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Sample records for fluid therapy stroke

  1. Cell therapy for stroke.

    PubMed

    Savitz, Sean I; Dinsmore, Jonathan H; Wechsler, Lawrence R; Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Caplan, Louis R

    2004-10-01

    Increasing experimental evidence suggests that cell transplantation can enhance recovery from stroke in animal models of focal cerebral ischemia. Clinical trials have been investigating the effects of a human immortalized neuronal cell line and porcine fetal neurons in stroke victims with persistent and stable deficits. Preclinical studies are focusing on the effects of human stem cells from various sources including brain, bone marrow, umbilical cord, and adipose tissue. This review presents an overview of preclinical and clinical studies on cell therapy for stroke. We emphasize the current, limited knowledge about the biology of implant sources and discuss special conditions in stroke that will impact the potential success of neurotransplantation in clinical trials. PMID:15717044

  2. Evolution of Volume and Signal Intensity on Fluid-attenuated Inversion Recovery MR Images after Endovascular Stroke Therapy.

    PubMed

    Federau, Christian; Mlynash, Michael; Christensen, Soren; Zaharchuk, Greg; Cha, Brannon; Lansberg, Maarten G; Wintermark, Max; Albers, Gregory W

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To analyze both volume and signal evolution on magnetic resonance (MR) fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images between the images after endovascular therapy and day 5 (which was the prespecified end point for infarct volume in the Diffusion and Perfusion Imaging Evaluation for Understanding Stroke Evolution [DEFUSE 2] trial) in a subset of patients enrolled in the DEFUSE 2 study. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the local ethics committee at all participating sites. Informed written consent was obtained from all patients. In this post hoc analysis of the DEFUSE 2 study, 35 patients with FLAIR images acquired both after endovascular therapy (median time after symptom onset, 12 hours) and at day 5 were identified. Patients were separated into two groups based on the degree of reperfusion achieved on time to maximum greater than 6-second perfusion imaging (≥90% vs <90%). After coregistration and signal normalization, lesion volumes and signal intensity were assessed by using FLAIR imaging for the initial lesion (ie, visible after endovascular therapy) and the recruited lesion (the additional lesion visible on day 5, but not visible after endovascular therapy). Statistical significance was assessed by using Wilcoxon signed-rank, Mann-Whitney U, and Fisher exact tests. Results All 35 patients had FLAIR lesion growth between the after-revascularization examination and day 5. Median lesion growth was significantly larger in patients with <90% reperfusion (27.85 mL) compared with ≥90% (8.12 mL; P = .003). In the initial lesion, normalized signal did not change between after endovascular therapy (median, 1.60) and day 5 (median, 1.58) in the ≥90% reperfusion group (P = .97), but increased in the <90% reperfusion group (from 1.60 to 1.73; P = .01). In the recruited lesion, median normalized signal increased significantly in both groups between after endovascular therapy and day 5 (after endovascular therapy, from 1.19 to 1.56, P

  3. [Therapy of acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Sobesky, J

    2009-11-01

    New diagnostic and therapeutic developments have led to an innovative approach to stroke therapy. The slogan "time is brain" emphasizes that stroke is a medical emergency comparable to myocardial infarction. The stroke unit conception is an evidence based therapy for all stroke patients and improves outcome significantly. The monitoring of vital signs and the management of stroke specific complications are highly effective. Early secondary prophylaxis reduces the risk of recurrence. The effect of CT based thrombolysis within the time window of 4,5 h has been substantiated by current data. Stroke MRI holds the promise for an improved therapy by patient stratification and by opening the time window. Interventional recanalisation, vascular interventions and hemicraniectomy complement the therapeutic options in the acute phase of stroke. PMID:19838656

  4. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... to a hospital quickly to begin treatment. Acute stroke therapies try to stop a stroke while it is ... rehabilitation helps individuals overcome disabilities that result from stroke damage. Drug therapy with blood thinners is the most common treatment ...

  5. Alternative therapies for stroke treatment in Asia.

    PubMed

    Pandian, Jeyaraj Durai; Liu, Ming; Misbach, Jusuf; Venketasubramanian, N

    2011-12-01

    Patients seek alternative therapies for stroke in Asia due to dissatisfaction with poststroke recovery. Most alternative therapies are of unproven benefit in rehabilitation. Well-conducted trials are needed to better define the role of alternative therapies in the process of poststroke recovery; the CHInese Medicine Neuroaid Efficacy on Stroke recovery is ongoing. However, further studies, better health education and rehabilitation services and centers are also required. PMID:22111799

  6. Fluid therapy in calves.

    PubMed

    Smith, Geof W; Berchtold, Joachim

    2014-07-01

    Early and aggressive fluid therapy is critical in correcting the metabolic complications associated with calf diarrhea. Oral electrolyte therapy can be used with success in calves, but careful consideration should be given to the type of oral electrolyte used. Electrolyte solutions with high osmolalities can significantly slow abomasal emptying and can be a risk factor for abomasal bloat in calves. Milk should not be withheld from calves with diarrhea for more than 12 to 24 hours. Hypertonic saline and hypertonic sodium bicarbonate can be used effectively for intravenous fluid therapy on farms when intravenous catheterization is not possible. PMID:24980729

  7. Dimethylarginine levels in cerebrospinal fluid of hyperacute ischemic stroke patients are associated with stroke severity.

    PubMed

    Brouns, Raf; Marescau, Bart; Possemiers, Ilse; Sheorajpanday, Rishi; De Deyn, Peter P

    2009-09-01

    We hypothesise that asymmetric and symmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, SDMA) are released in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) due to ischemia-induced proteolysis and that CSF dimethylarginines are related to stroke severity. ADMA and SDMA were measured in CSF of 88 patients with ischemic stroke or TIA within 24 h after stroke onset (mean 8.6 h) and in 24 controls. Stroke severity was assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score at admission. Outcome was evaluated by institutionalization due to stroke and the modified Rankin scale. Dimethylarginine levels were higher in patients with stroke than in TIA patients, who had higher levels than controls and correlated with the NIHSS. Logistic regression analysis confirmed that dimethylarginines were independently associated with stroke severity. The SDMA/ADMA ratio did not differ significantly between controls and stroke patients. CSF dimethylarginine levels are increased in hyperacute ischemic stroke and are associated with stroke severity. PMID:19296217

  8. Stem cell therapy in ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Vivek; Ritchie, Michael M.; Stone, Laura L.; Low, Walter C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Cell-based therapies are being investigated as an adjunct to IV thrombolysis or mechanical thrombectomy in ischemic stroke. This review summarizes the potential applications as well as challenges of intravascular cell delivery in ischemic stroke. Method: We conducted a search of Medline as well as the clinicaltrials.gov Web site for all ongoing human clinical studies using stem cells in ischemic stroke patients. Result: The pros and cons of the various donor cell types and routes of cell delivery, including intravascular delivery, in ischemic stroke are discussed. In addition, the potential challenges in translation from bench to bedside, the optimal techniques for intravascular cell delivery, and an updated comprehensive list of ongoing clinical trials in ischemic stroke are highlighted. Conclusions: Stem cells have shown a promising role in ischemic stroke, in preclinical studies as well as initial pilot studies. Further studies are needed to assess intravascular cell therapy as a potential adjunct to thrombolysis or mechanical thrombectomy in ischemic stroke. PMID:23008400

  9. Antithrombotic and Thrombolytic Therapy for Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lansberg, Maarten G.; O’Donnell, Martin J.; Khatri, Pooja; Lang, Eddy S.; Nguyen-Huynh, Mai N.; Schwartz, Neil E.; Sonnenberg, Frank A.; Schulman, Sam; Vandvik, Per Olav; Spencer, Frederick A.; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Guyatt, Gordon H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This article provides recommendations on the use of antithrombotic therapy in patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Methods: We generated treatment recommendations (Grade 1) and suggestions (Grade 2) based on high (A), moderate (B), and low (C) quality evidence. Results: In patients with acute ischemic stroke, we recommend IV recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA) if treatment can be initiated within 3 h (Grade 1A) or 4.5 h (Grade 2C) of symptom onset; we suggest intraarterial r-tPA in patients ineligible for IV tPA if treatment can be initiated within 6 h (Grade 2C); we suggest against the use of mechanical thrombectomy (Grade 2C) although carefully selected patients may choose this intervention; and we recommend early aspirin therapy at a dose of 160 to 325 mg (Grade 1A). In patients with acute stroke and restricted mobility, we suggest the use of prophylactic-dose heparin or intermittent pneumatic compression devices (Grade 2B) and suggest against the use of elastic compression stockings (Grade 2B). In patients with a history of noncardioembolic ischemic stroke or TIA, we recommend long-term treatment with aspirin (75-100 mg once daily), clopidogrel (75 mg once daily), aspirin/extended release dipyridamole (25 mg/200 mg bid), or cilostazol (100 mg bid) over no antiplatelet therapy (Grade 1A), oral anticoagulants (Grade 1B), the combination of clopidogrel plus aspirin (Grade 1B), or triflusal (Grade 2B). Of the recommended antiplatelet regimens, we suggest clopidogrel or aspirin/extended-release dipyridamole over aspirin (Grade 2B) or cilostazol (Grade 2C). In patients with a history of stroke or TIA and atrial fibrillation we recommend oral anticoagulation over no antithrombotic therapy, aspirin, and combination therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel (Grade 1B). Conclusions: These recommendations can help clinicians make evidence-based treatment decisions with their patients who have had strokes. PMID:22315273

  10. Post-stroke depression therapy: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Turner, Alyna; Dean, Olivia; Sureda, Antoni; Mohammad, Seyed

    2014-01-01

    Post-stroke depression is an important psychological consequence of ischemic stroke, and affects around one third of stroke patients at any time post-stroke. It has a negative impact on patient morbidity and mortality, and as such development of effective post-stroke recognition and treatment strategies are very important. There are several therapeutic strategies for post-stroke depression, including both pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches. In this review, we present evidence regarding the underlying biology of post-stroke depression, commonalities between post-stroke depression and Major Depressive Disorder and explore several treatment approaches, including antidepressant therapy, psychotherapy, surgical therapy, electroconvulsive therapy, acupuncture, music therapy and natural products. Further experimental and clinical studies are required, particularly in emerging fields such as the role of nutraceuticals in the treatment of stroke. PMID:24852795

  11. Occupational Therapy Interventions for Adults With Stroke.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Dawn; Gillen, Glen; Arbesman, Marian; Lieberman, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Evidence Connection articles provide a clinical application of systematic reviews developed in conjunction with the American Occupational Therapy Association's (AOTA's) Evidence-Based Practice project. The clinical condition discussed in this inaugural Evidence Connection article is adults with stroke. Findings from the systematic reviews on this topic were published in the January/February 2015 issue of the American Journal of Occupational Therapy and in AOTA's Occupational Therapy Practice Guidelines for Adults With Stroke (Wolf & Nilsen, 2015). Each article in this series will summarize the evidence from the published reviews on a given topic and presents an application of the evidence to a related clinical case. Evidence Connection articles illustrate how the research evidence from the reviews can be used to inform and guide clinical decision making. PMID:26356668

  12. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kwakkel, Gert; Veerbeek, Janne M.; van Wegen, Erwin E.H.; Wolf, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) was developed to overcome upper limb impairments after stroke and is the most investigated intervention for treating stroke patients in the previous decades. This review describes the current evidence regarding: original CIMT and modified versions of CIMT (mCIMT). Meta-analysis showed strong evidence favoring both types of CIMT in terms of motor function, arm-hand activities and self-reported arm-hand functioning in daily life, immediately after treatment and at long-term follow-up, whereas no evidence was found for constraining alone (Forced Use (FU) therapy). No evidence was found that type of CIMT, intensity of practice or timing did affect outcome. Although the underlying mechanism that drive (m)CIMT is still poorly understood, recent kinematic conducted studies suggests that improvements introduced by original CIMT or mCIMT are mainly based on adaptation by learning to optimize the use of intact end-effectors by selecting patients with some voluntary motor control of wrist and finger extensors post stroke. PMID:25772900

  13. Literature and art therapy in post-stroke psychological disorders.

    PubMed

    Eum, Yeongcheol; Yim, Jongeun

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of morbidity and long-term disability worldwide, and post-stroke depression (PSD) is a common and serious psychiatric complication of stroke. PSD makes patients have more severe deficits in activities of daily living, a worse functional outcome, more severe cognitive deficits and increased mortality as compared to stroke patients without depression. Therefore, to reduce or prevent mental problems of stroke patients, psychological treatment should be recommended. Literature and art therapy are highly effective psychological treatment for stroke patients. Literature therapy divided into poetry and story therapy is an assistive tool that treats neurosis as well as emotional or behavioral disorders. Poetry can add impression to the lethargic life of a patient with PSD, thereby acting as a natural treatment. Story therapy can change the gloomy psychological state of patients into a bright and healthy story, and therefore can help stroke patients to overcome their emotional disabilities. Art therapy is one form of psychological therapy that can treat depression and anxiety in stroke patients. Stroke patients can express their internal conflicts, emotions, and psychological status through art works or processes and it would be a healing process of mental problems. Music therapy can relieve the suppressed emotions of patients and add vitality to the body, while giving them the energy to share their feelings with others. In conclusion, literature and art therapy can identify the emotional status of patients and serve as a useful auxiliary tool to help stroke patients in their rehabilitation process. PMID:25744067

  14. Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy and Risk of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Carcaillon, Laure; Plu-Bureau, Geneviève; Oger, Emmanuel; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale; Elbaz, Alexis; Scarabin, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— The benefit/risk analysis of hormone therapy in postmenopausal women is not straightforward and depends on cardiovascular disease. Evidence supports the safety of transdermal estrogens and the importance of progestogens for thrombotic risk. However, the differential association of oral and transdermal estrogens with stroke remains poorly investigated. Furthermore, there are no data regarding the impact of progestogens. Methods— We set up a nested case–control study of ischemic stroke (IS) within all French women aged 51 to 62 years between 2009 and 2011 without personal history of cardiovascular disease or contraindication to hormone therapy. Participants were identified using the French National Health Insurance database, which includes complete drug claims for the past 3 years and French National hospital data. We identified 3144 hospitalized IS cases who were matched for age and zip code to 12 158 controls. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Results— Compared with nonusers, the adjusted ORs of IS were1.58 (95% CI, 1.01–2.49) in oral estrogen users and 0.83 (0.56–1.24) in transdermal estrogens users (P<0.01). There was no association of IS with use of progesterone (OR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.49–1.26), pregnanes (OR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.60–1.67), and nortestosterones (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 0.62–2.58), whereas norpregnanes increased IS risk (OR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.05–4.81). Conclusions— Both route of estrogen administration and progestogens were important determinants of IS. Our findings suggest that transdermal estrogens might be the safest option for short-term hormone therapy use. PMID:27256671

  15. Patient's Guide to Antithrombotic Therapy in Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... have had ischemic strokes. 5. How important is aspirin for a new stroke? ! Aspirin is a drug that “thins” the blood by ... cases, it is recommended that patients start taking aspirin within 48 hours of an ischemic stroke. While ...

  16. Non-pharmaceutical therapies for stroke: Mechanisms and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fan; Qi, Zhifeng; Luo, Yuming; Hinchliffe, Taylor; Ding, Guanghong; Xia, Ying; Ji, Xunming

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is deemed a worldwide leading cause of neurological disability and death, however, there is currently no promising pharmacotherapy for acute ischemic stroke aside from intravenous or intra-arterial thrombolysis. Yet because of the narrow therapeutic time window involved, thrombolytic application is very restricted in clinical settings. Accumulating data suggest that non-pharmaceutical therapies for stroke might provide new opportunities for stroke treatment. Here we review recent research progress in the mechanisms and clinical implications of non-pharmaceutical therapies, mainly including neuroprotective approaches such as hypothermia, ischemic/hypoxic conditioning, acupuncture, medical gases, transcranial laser therapy, etc. In addition, we briefly summarize mechanical endovascular recanalization devices and recovery devices for the treatment of the chronic phase of stroke and discuss the relative merits of these devices. PMID:24407111

  17. Therapeutic outcomes of transplantation of amniotic fluid-derived stem cells in experimental ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tajiri, Naoki; Acosta, Sandra; Portillo-Gonzales, Gabriel S.; Aguirre, Daniela; Reyes, Stephanny; Lozano, Diego; Pabon, Mibel; Dela Peña, Ike; Ji, Xunming; Yasuhara, Takao; Date, Isao; Solomita, Marianna A.; Antonucci, Ivana; Stuppia, Liborio; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating preclinical evidence suggests the use of amnion as a source of stem cells for investigations of basic science concepts related to developmental cell biology, but also for stem cells’ therapeutic applications in treating human disorders. We previously reported isolation of viable rat amniotic fluid-derived stem (AFS) cells. Subsequently, we recently reported the therapeutic benefits of intravenous transplantation of AFS cells in a rodent model of ischemic stroke. Parallel lines of investigations have provided safety and efficacy of stem cell therapy for treating stroke and other neurological disorders. This review article highlights the need for investigations of mechanisms underlying AFS cells’ therapeutic benefits and discusses lab-to-clinic translational gating items in an effort to optimize the clinical application of the cell transplantation for stroke. PMID:25165432

  18. Biomarkers and predictors of restorative therapy effects after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Erin; Cramer, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    Many restorative therapies that promote brain repair are under development. Stroke is very heterogeneous, highlighting the need to identify target populations and to understand inter-subject differences in treatment response. Several neuroimaging measures have shown promise as biomarkers and predictors, including measures of structure and function, in gray matter and white matter. Choice of biomarker and predictor can vary with the content of therapy and with the population under study, for example, contralesional hemisphere measures may be of particular importance in patients with more severe injury. Studies of training effects in healthy subjects provide insights useful to brain repair. Limitations of published studies include a focus on chronic stroke, however the brain is most galvanized to respond to restorative therapies in the early days post-stroke. Multimodal approaches might be the most robust approach for stratifying patients and so for optimizing prescription of restorative therapies after stroke. PMID:23299824

  19. Ischemic stroke related to an amniotic fluid embolism during labor.

    PubMed

    Woo, Yeon-Sun; Hong, Soon-Cheol; Park, Seong-Mi; Cho, Kyung-Hee

    2015-04-01

    We report a young woman who survived multiple cerebral infarctions related to an amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) during labor. To our knowledge, an embolic stroke due to the coexistence of an AFE and patent foramen ovale (PFO) has not been reported. We describe the patient's clinical and radiological features and discuss the stroke mechanism in relation to our AFE hypothesis. A 32-year-old woman presented to the emergency room after experiencing convulsions during labor (blood pressure, 64/28mmHg; oxygen saturation, 67%). She was in a stupor, and her response to painful stimuli on the right side was weaker than on the left side. Acute stroke was considered as a possible cause. Additionally, an AFE was suspected due to cardiopulmonary arrest during labor. Brain MRI revealed multiple territory embolic infarctions. The transcranial Doppler with bubble study demonstrated a right-to-left shunt during the Valsalva maneuver. A transesophageal echocardiogram revealed a PFO with a right-to-left shunt. The elevated intrathoracic pressure during labor may have caused blood to flow backward through the heart, shunting blood from the right side to the left through the PFO. In cases such as this, an amniotic fluid embolus may travel directly from the venous to the arterial circulation via the PFO, leading to multiple cerebral infarctions. PMID:25709056

  20. A large stroke magnetic fluid deformable mirror for focus control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Ling-kun; Wu, Zhi-zheng; Huang, Ming-shuang; Kong, Xiang-hui

    2016-03-01

    A liquid deformable mirror, which can provide a large stroke deflection more than 100 μm, is proposed for focus control. The deformable mirror utilizes the concept of magnetic fluid deformation shaped with electromagnetic fields to achieve concave or convex surface and to change the optical focus depth of the mirrors. The free surface of the magnetic fluid is coated with a thin layer of metal-liquid-like film (MELLF) prepared from densely packed silver nanoparticles to enhance the reflectance of the deformable mirror. The experimental results on the fabricated prototype magnetic fluid deformable mirror (MFDM) show that the desired concave/convex surface shape can be controlled precisely with a closed-loop adaptive optical system.

  1. A content analysis of stroke physical therapy intervention using stroke physiotherapy intervention recording tool.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyuk-Shin; Cha, Hyun-Gyu

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Physical therapy for recovery of function in people with stroke is known to be effective, but which type of physical therapy intervention is most effective is uncertain because a concrete and detailed record of interventions is done. This study aimed to record, analyze, and describe the content of physical therapy interventions for recovery of function after stroke using stroke physiotherapy intervention recording tool (SPIRIT). [Subjects and Methods] A convenience sample of 23 physical therapists from a rehabilitation hospital in Chung-nam recorded the interventions for 73 patients with stroke who were treated for 30 minutes in 670 treatment sessions. Treatment session contents were recorded using SPIRIT. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the interventions accurately and to investigate the differences according to time since stroke. [Results] Facilitation techniques were the most frequently used interventions (n=1,342, 35.1%), followed by practice (n=1,056, 27.6%), and exercise (n=748, 19.6%) in the physical therapists' clinical practice. [Conclusion] This pattern shows that physical therapists were focused on functional activity. Organizing or teaching patient activities for independent practice interventions (n=286, 7.5%) were used to encourage patient activity and independence outside the treatment sessions. Interventions according to time since stroke were not significantly different. PMID:27313368

  2. A content analysis of stroke physical therapy intervention using stroke physiotherapy intervention recording tool

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyuk-shin; Cha, Hyun-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Physical therapy for recovery of function in people with stroke is known to be effective, but which type of physical therapy intervention is most effective is uncertain because a concrete and detailed record of interventions is done. This study aimed to record, analyze, and describe the content of physical therapy interventions for recovery of function after stroke using stroke physiotherapy intervention recording tool (SPIRIT). [Subjects and Methods] A convenience sample of 23 physical therapists from a rehabilitation hospital in Chung-nam recorded the interventions for 73 patients with stroke who were treated for 30 minutes in 670 treatment sessions. Treatment session contents were recorded using SPIRIT. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the interventions accurately and to investigate the differences according to time since stroke. [Results] Facilitation techniques were the most frequently used interventions (n=1,342, 35.1%), followed by practice (n=1,056, 27.6%), and exercise (n=748, 19.6%) in the physical therapists’ clinical practice. [Conclusion] This pattern shows that physical therapists were focused on functional activity. Organizing or teaching patient activities for independent practice interventions (n=286, 7.5%) were used to encourage patient activity and independence outside the treatment sessions. Interventions according to time since stroke were not significantly different. PMID:27313368

  3. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stay Connected Home » Stroke Heath and Aging Stroke What Is a Stroke? Stroke Is an Emergency. ... IGNORE THE SIGNS OF STROKE! What Is a Stroke? A stroke happens when something changes how blood ...

  4. Effects of Music Therapy on Mood in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Soo; Choi, Jung Hwa; Im, Sang-Hee; Jung, Kang Jae; Cha, Young A; Jung, Chul Oh; Yoon, Yeo Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of music therapy on depressive mood and anxiety in post-stroke patients and evaluate satisfaction levels of patients and caregivers. Materials and Methods Eighteen post-stroke patients, within six months of onset and mini mental status examination score of over 20, participated in this study. Patients were divided into music and control groups. The experimental group participated in the music therapy program for four weeks. Psychological status was evaluated with the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) before and after music therapy. Satisfaction with music therapy was evaluated by a questionnaire. Results BAI and BDI scores showed a greater decrease in the music group than the control group after music therapy, but only the decrease of BDI scores were statistically significant (p=0.048). Music therapy satisfaction in patients and caregivers was affirmative. Conclusion Music therapy has a positive effect on mood in post-stroke patients and may be beneficial for mood improvement with stroke. These results are encouraging, but further studies are needed in this field. PMID:22028163

  5. Stroke-like Migraine Attacks after Radiation Therapy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qian; Yang, Li; Tan, Li-Ming; Qin, Li-Xia; Wang, Chun-Yu; Zhang, Hai-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the clinical presentation, pathogenesis, neuroimaging, treatment, and outcome of stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome, and to propose diagnostic criteria for this disorder. Data Sources: We searched the PubMed database for articles in English published from 1995 to 2015 using the terms of “stroke-like AND migraine AND radiation.” Reference lists of the identified articles and reviews were used to retrieve additional articles. Study Selection: Data and articles related to late-onset effects of cerebral radiation were selected and reviewed. Results: SMART is a rare condition that involves complex migraines with focal neurologic deficits following cranial irradiation for central nervous system malignancies. The recovery, which ranges from hours to days to weeks, can be partial or complete. We propose the following diagnostic criteria for SMART: (1) Remote history of therapeutic external beam cranial irradiation for malignancy; (2) prolonged, reversible clinical manifestations mostly years after irradiation, which may include migraine, seizures, hemiparesis, hemisensory deficits, visuospatial defect, aphasia, confusion and so on; (3) reversible, transient, unilateral cortical gadolinium enhancement correlative abnormal T2 and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery signal of the affected cerebral region; (4) eventual complete or partial recovery, the length of duration of recovery ranging from hours to days to weeks; (5) no evidence of residual or recurrent tumor; (6) not attributable to another disease. To date, no specific treatment has been identified for this syndrome. Conclusions: SMART is an extremely rare delayed complication of brain irradiation. However, improvements in cancer survival rates have resulted in a rise in its frequency. Hence, awareness and recognition of the syndrome is important to make a rapid diagnosis and avoid aggressive interventions such as brain biopsy and cerebral angiography. PMID

  6. Long-term Effectiveness of Intensive Therapy in Chronic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaotian; Guarino, Peter; Lo, Albert C; Peduzzi, Peter; Wininger, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Background While recent clinical trials involving robot-assisted therapy have failed to show clinically significant improvement versus conventional therapy, it is possible that a broader strategy of intensive therapy-to include robot-assisted rehabilitation-may yield clinically meaningful outcomes. Objective To test the immediate and sustained effects of intensive therapy (robot-assisted therapy plus intensive conventional therapy) on outcomes in a chronic stroke population. Methods A multivariate mixed-effects model adjusted for important covariates was established to measure the effect of intensive therapy versus usual care. A total of 127 chronic stroke patients from 4 Veterans Affairs medical centers were randomized to either robot-assisted therapy (n = 49), intensive comparison therapy (n = 50), or usual care (n = 28), in the VA-ROBOTICS randomized clinical trial. Patients were at least 6 months poststroke, of moderate-to-severe upper limb impairment. The primary outcome measure was the Fugl-Meyer Assessment at 12 and 36 weeks. Results There was significant benefit of intensive therapy over usual care on the Fugl-Meyer Assessment at 12 weeks with a mean difference of 4.0 points (95% CI = 1.3-6.7); P = .005; however, by 36 weeks, the benefit was attenuated (mean difference 3.4; 95% CI = -0.02 to 6.9; P = .05). Subgroup analyses showed significant interactions between treatment and age, treatment and time since stroke. Conclusions Motor benefits from intensive therapy compared with usual care were observed at 12 and 36 weeks posttherapy; however, this difference was attenuated at 36 weeks. Subgroups analysis showed that younger age, and a shorter time since stroke were associated with greater immediate and long-term improvement of motor function. PMID:26450442

  7. Progress in sensorimotor rehabilitative physical therapy programs for stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Ching; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2014-08-16

    Impaired motor and functional activity following stroke often has negative impacts on the patient, the family and society. The available rehabilitation programs for stroke patients are reviewed. Conventional rehabilitation strategies (Bobath, Brunnstrom, proprioception neuromuscular facilitation, motor relearning and function-based principles) are the mainstream tactics in clinical practices. Numerous advanced strategies for sensory-motor functional enhancement, including electrical stimulation, electromyographic biofeedback, constraint-induced movement therapy, robotics-aided systems, virtual reality, intermittent compression, partial body weight supported treadmill training and thermal stimulation, are being developed and incorporated into conventional rehabilitation programs. The concept of combining valuable rehabilitative procedures into "a training package", based on the patient's functional status during different recovery phases after stroke is proposed. Integrated sensorimotor rehabilitation programs with appropriate temporal arrangements might provide great functional benefits for stroke patients. PMID:25133141

  8. Progress in sensorimotor rehabilitative physical therapy programs for stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia-Ching; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2014-01-01

    Impaired motor and functional activity following stroke often has negative impacts on the patient, the family and society. The available rehabilitation programs for stroke patients are reviewed. Conventional rehabilitation strategies (Bobath, Brunnstrom, proprioception neuromuscular facilitation, motor relearning and function-based principles) are the mainstream tactics in clinical practices. Numerous advanced strategies for sensory-motor functional enhancement, including electrical stimulation, electromyographic biofeedback, constraint-induced movement therapy, robotics-aided systems, virtual reality, intermittent compression, partial body weight supported treadmill training and thermal stimulation, are being developed and incorporated into conventional rehabilitation programs. The concept of combining valuable rehabilitative procedures into “a training package”, based on the patient’s functional status during different recovery phases after stroke is proposed. Integrated sensorimotor rehabilitation programs with appropriate temporal arrangements might provide great functional benefits for stroke patients. PMID:25133141

  9. Anatomy of Stroke Injury Predicts Gains from Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Jeff D.; Le, Vu; Der-Yeghiaian, Lucy; See, Jill; Newton, Jennifer M.; Ward, Nick S.; Cramer, Steven C.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Many therapies are emerging that aim to improve motor function in people with stroke. Identifying key biological substrates needed for treatment gains would help to predict treatment effects, and to maximize treatment impact. The current study addressed the hypothesis that behavioral gains from therapy targeting distal upper extremity are predicted by the structural integrity of key motor system white matter tracts. Methods Twenty three subjects with chronic left-sided stroke underwent robotic therapy targeting the distal right upper extremity. MRI was obtained at baseline and used to outline the infarct. For each subject, the degree to which stroke injured each of four descending white matter tracts (from primary motor cortex, supplementary motor area, dorsal premotor cortex, and ventral premotor cortex, respectively) was determined. Correlations between tract-specific injury and behavioral gains from therapy were then examined. Results Numerous examples were found whereby tract-specific injury predicted treatment gains. The strongest correlations related to stroke injury to tracts descending from primary motor cortex and dorsal premotor cortex. Infarct volume and baseline behavior were weak predictors of treatment gains. Conclusions Extent of injury to specific motor tracts predicts behavioral gains from treatment in subjects with chronic stroke. This supports a role for these tracts in mediating treatment effects, and reinforces the importance of lesion location in stroke. Tract-specific injury was stronger than infarct volume or baseline clinical status at predicting gains, identifies subjects with sufficient biological substrate to improve from therapy, and so might be useful as an entry criterion in repair-based trials. PMID:21164128

  10. Update on Antithrombotic Therapy for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Opinion statement Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia in the elderly, affecting 1 in 20 adults over the age of 70 years. Stroke is a major yet highly preventable complication of AF, and the strokes related to AF often are disabling and fatal. Warfarin is the treatment of choice in high-risk patients with AF, and its superior efficacy over aspirin for preventing stroke in these patients is widely recognized. However, several eligible patients with AF are not being treated with warfarin or are being treated inadequately, largely because of concerns regarding the attendant strict monitoring, drug interactions, and risk of major bleeding. As such, alternative antithrombotic therapies that can rival or exceed the efficacy of warfarin, yet compare favorably with its administration and side effect profile, are being sought. One such strategy, the use of a combination antiplatelet regimen, for stroke prevention in high-risk patients with nonvalvular AF was investigated recently in two clinical trials. This article reviews the role of combination antiplatelet regimens in stroke prevention for patients with AF. Other therapies discussed include oral anticoagulation, single antiplatelet therapies, oral anticoagulation plus antiplatelet treatment, direct thrombin inhibitors, and factor Xa inhibitors. PMID:20461116

  11. Intra-Arterial Treatment Methods in Acute Stroke Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thanh N.; Babikian, Viken L.; Romero, Rafael; Pikula, Aleksandra; Kase, Carlos S.; Jovin, Tudor G.; Norbash, Alexander M.

    2011-01-01

    Acute revascularization is associated with improved outcomes in ischemic stroke patients. It is unclear which method of intra-arterial intervention, if any, is ideal. Promising approaches in acute stroke treatment are likely a combination of intravenous and endovascular revascularization efforts, combining early treatment initiation with direct clot manipulation and/or PTA/stenting. In this review, we will discuss available thrombolytic therapies and endovascular recanalization techniques, beginning with chemical thrombolytic agents, followed by mechanical devices, and a review of ongoing trials. Further randomized studies comparing medical therapy, intravenous and endovascular treatments are essential, and their implementation will require the wide support and enthusiasm from the neurologic, neuroradiologic, and neurosurgical stroke communities. PMID:21516256

  12. Antiplatelet therapy to prevent recurrent stroke: Three good options.

    PubMed

    Mansoor, Atizazul H; Mujtaba, Mohammad T; Silver, Brian

    2013-12-01

    Drugs that prevent platelets from sticking together-ie, aspirin, dipyridamole, and clopidogrel-are an important part of therapy to prevent recurrence of ischemic stroke of atherosclerotic origin. We discuss current indications for these drugs and review the evidence behind our current use of aspirin, dipyridamole, and clopidogrel. PMID:24307163

  13. Alpha 1-Antitrypsin Therapy Mitigated Ischemic Stroke Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Moldthan, Huong L.; Hirko, Aaron C.; Thinschmidt, Jeffrey S.; Grant, Maria; Li, Zhimin; Peris, Joanna; Lu, Yuanqing; Elshikha, Ahmed; King, Michael A.; Hughes, Jeffrey A.; Song, Sihong

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the only effective therapy for acute ischemic stroke is the thrombolytic agent recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. α1-Antitrypsin, an endogenous inhibitor of serine proteinases and a primary acute phase protein with potent anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, antimicrobial and cytoprotective activities, could be beneficial in stroke.. The goal of this study was to test whether α1-antitrypsin could improve ischemic stroke outcome in an established rat model. Middle cerebral artery occlusion was induced in male rats via intracranial microinjection of endothelin-1. Five to ten minutes following stroke induction rats received either intracranial or intravenous delivery of human α1-antitrypsin. Cylinder and vibrissae tests were used to evaluate sensorimotor function before and 72 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Infarct volumes were examined via either 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride assay or magnetic resonance imaging 72 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Despite equivalent initial strokes, at 72 hours the infarct volumes of the human α1-antitrypsin treatment groups (local and systemic injection) were statistically significantly reduced by 83% and 63% (p<0.0001 and p < 0.05 respectively) compared with control rats. Human α1-antitrypsin significantly limited sensory motor systems deficits. Human α1-antitrypsin could be a potential novel therapeutic drug for the protection against neurodegeneration following ischemic stroke, but more studies are needed to investigate the protective mechanisms and efficacy in other animal models. PMID:24582784

  14. New evidence for therapies in stroke rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Bruce H.; Dorsch, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Neurologic rehabilitation aims to reduce impairments and disabilities so that persons with serious stroke can return to participation in usual self-care and daily activities as independently as feasible. New strategies to enhance recovery draw from a growing understanding of how types of training, progressive task-related practice of skills, exercise for strengthening and fitness, neurostimulation, and drug and biological manipulations can induce adaptations at multiple levels of the nervous system. Recent clinical trials provide evidence for a range of new interventions to manage walking, reach and grasp, aphasia, visual field loss, and hemi-inattention. PMID:23591673

  15. Guiding principles of fluid and volume therapy.

    PubMed

    Aditianingsih, Dita; George, Yohanes W H

    2014-09-01

    Fluid therapy is a core concept in the management of perioperative and critically ill patients for maintenance of intravascular volume and organ perfusion. Recent evidence regarding the vascular barrier and its role in terms of vascular leakage has led to a new concept for fluid administration. The choice of fluid used should be based on the fluid composition and the underlying pathophysiology of the patient. Avoidance of both hypo- and hypervolaemia is essential when treating circulatory failure. In daily practice, the assessment of individual thresholds in order to optimize cardiac preload and avoid hypovolaemia or deleterious fluid overload remains a challenge. Liberal versus restrictive fluid management has been challenged by recent evidence, and the ideal approach appears to be goal-directed fluid therapy. PMID:25208960

  16. Middle cerebral artery territory infarct due to Cryptococcus infectionstitle: an uncommon indication for cerebrospinal fluid analysis in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Cachia, David; Singh, Charanjeet; Tetzlaff, Michael T; Penas-Prado, Marta

    2015-08-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is the most common manifestation of cryptococcosis and is caused by the encapsulated yeast organism Cryptococcus neoformans. It occurs most commonly in patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity such as in HIV infection; patients with hematological malignancies; patients post solid-organ transplantation; on chronic steroids or immunosuppressants. Clinically, stroke can arise as a complication of cryptococcal meningitis. While cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination is usually not indicated for evaluation of stroke patients, demonstration of cryptococcal yeast forms in CSF is valuable in guiding appropriate therapy in arterial stroke caused by Cryptococci. Herein, we describe the CSF and radiologic correlation in a female patient who presented with disseminated cryptococcosis, cryptococcal meninigitis and a middle cerebral artery infarct. PMID:25352313

  17. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zheng; Tong, Wesley C.; Lu, Xiao-Xin; Peng, Hui-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Stroke, also known as cerebrovascular disease, is a common and serious neurological disease, which is also the fourth leading cause of death in the United States so far. Hyperbaric medicine, as an emerging interdisciplinary subject, has been applied in the treatment of cerebral vascular diseases since the 1960s. Now it is widely used to treat a variety of clinical disorders, especially hypoxia-induced disorders. However, owing to the complex mechanisms of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment, the therapeutic time window and the undefined dose as well as some common clinical side effects (such as middle ear barotrauma), the widespread promotion and application of HBO was hindered, slowing down the hyperbaric medicine development. In August 2013, the US Food and Drug Administration declared artery occlusion as one of the 13 specific indications for HBO therapy. This provides opportunities, to some extent, for the further development of hyperbaric medicine. Currently, the mechanisms of HBO therapy for ischemic stroke are still not very clear. This review focuses on the potential mechanisms of HBO therapy in acute ischemic stroke as well as the time window. PMID:25337089

  18. Fluid Therapy and Outcome: Balance Is Best

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Sara J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: The use of intravenous fluids is routine in patients undergoing surgery or critical illness; however, controversy still exists regarding optimum fluid therapy. Recent literature has examined the effects of different types, doses, and timing of intravenous fluid therapy. Each of these factors may influence patient outcomes. Crystalloids consist of isotonic saline or balanced electrolyte solutions and widely distribute across extracellular fluid compartments, whereas colloids contain high-molecular-weight molecules suspended in crystalloid carrier solution and do not freely distribute across the extracellular fluid compartments. Colloids vary in composition and associated potential adverse effects. Recent evidence has highlighted safety and ethical concerns regarding the use of colloid solutions in critically ill patients, particularly the use of synthetic starch solutions. which have been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Crystalloid solutions with a chloride-rich composition (e.g., isotonic saline) have been associated with metabolic acidosis, hyperchloremia, increased incidence of acute kidney injury, and increased requirement for renal replacement therapy. An optimum dose of intravenous fluids remains controversial with no definitive evidence to support restrictive versus liberal approaches. Further high-quality trials are needed to elucidate the optimum fluid therapy for patients, but currently a balanced approach to type, dose, and timing of fluids is recommended. PMID:24779116

  19. Mirror therapy enhances upper extremity motor recovery in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Mirela Cristina, Luca; Matei, Daniela; Ignat, Bogdan; Popescu, Cristian Dinu

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of mirror therapy program in addition with physical therapy methods on upper limb recovery in patients with subacute ischemic stroke. 15 subjects followed a comprehensive rehabilitative treatment, 8 subjects received only control therapy (CT) and 7 subjects received mirror therapy (MT) for 30 min every day, five times a week, for 6 weeks in addition to the conventional therapy. Brunnstrom stages, Fugl-Meyer Assessment (upper extremity), the Ashworth Scale, and Bhakta Test (finger flexion scale) were used to assess changes in upper limb motor recovery and motor function after intervention. After 6 weeks of treatment, patients in both groups showed significant improvements in the variables measured. Patients who received MT showed greater improvements compared to the CT group. The MT treatment results included: improvement of motor functions, manual skills and activities of daily living. The best results were obtained when the treatment was started soon after the stroke. MT is an easy and low-cost method to improve motor recovery of the upper limb. PMID:25850528

  20. Virtual immersion for post-stroke hand rehabilitation therapy.

    PubMed

    Tsoupikova, Daria; Stoykov, Nikolay S; Corrigan, Molly; Thielbar, Kelly; Vick, Randy; Li, Yu; Triandafilou, Kristen; Preuss, Fabian; Kamper, Derek

    2015-02-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of serious, long-term disability in the United States. Impairment of upper extremity function is a common outcome following stroke, often to the detriment of lifestyle and employment opportunities. While the upper extremity is a natural target for therapy, treatment may be hampered by limitations in baseline capability as lack of success may discourage arm and hand use. We developeda virtual reality (VR) system in order to encourage repetitive task practice. This system combined an assistive glove with a novel VR environment. A set of exercises for this system was developed to encourage specific movements. Six stroke survivors with chronic upper extremity hemiparesis volunteered to participate in a pilot study in which they completed 18 one-hour training sessions with the VR system. Performance with the system was recorded across the 18 training sessions. Clinical evaluations of motor control were conducted at three time points: prior to initiation of training, following the end of training, and 1 month later. Subjects displayed significant improvement on performance of the virtual tasks over the course of the training, although for the clinical outcome measures only lateral pinch showed significant improvement. Future expansion to multi-user virtual environments may extend the benefits of this system for stroke survivors with hemiparesis by furthering engagement in the rehabilitation exercises. PMID:25558845

  1. New pathways for evaluating potential acute stroke therapies.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Marc; Cheung, Kenneth; Howard, George; Warach, Steven

    2006-05-01

    Pharmacological therapy for acute ischemic stroke remains limited to one successful, approved treatment: tissue plasminogen activator within 3 h of stroke onset. Many neuroprotective drugs and a few other thrombolytics were evaluated in clinical trials, but none demonstrated unequivocal success and were approved by regulatory agencies. The development paradigm for such therapies needs to provide convincing evidence of efficacy and safety to obtain approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA modernization act of 1997 stated that such evidence could be derived from one large phase III trial with a clinical endpoint and supportive evidence. Drugs being developed for acute ischemic stroke can potentially be approved under this act by coupling a major phase III trial with supportive evidence provided by a phase IIB trial demonstrating an effect on a relevant biomarker such as magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography assessment of ischemic lesion growth. Statistical approaches have been developed to optimize the design of such an imaging-based phase IIB study, for example approaches that modify randomization probabilities to assign larger proportions of patients to the 'winning' strategy (i.e. 'pick the winner' strategies) with an interim assessment to reduce the sample size requirement. Demonstrating a treatment effect on a relevant imaging-based biomarker should provide supportive evidence for a new drug application, if a subsequent phase III trial with a clinical outcome demonstrates a significant treatment effect. PMID:18706045

  2. Biomaterial Applications in Cell-Based Therapy in Experimental Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Boisserand, Ligia S. B.; Kodama, Tomonobu; Papassin, Jérémie; Auzely, Rachel; Moisan, Anaïck; Rome, Claire; Detante, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is an important health issue corresponding to the second cause of mortality and first cause of severe disability with no effective treatments after the first hours of onset. Regenerative approaches such as cell therapy provide an increase in endogenous brain structural plasticity but they are not enough to promote a complete recovery. Tissue engineering has recently aroused a major interesting development of biomaterials for use into the central nervous system. Many biomaterials have been engineered based on natural compounds, synthetic compounds, or a mix of both with the aim of providing polymers with specific properties. The mechanical properties of biomaterials can be exquisitely regulated forming polymers with different stiffness, modifiable physical state that polymerizes in situ, or small particles encapsulating cells or growth factors. The choice of biomaterial compounds should be adapted for the different applications, structure target, and delay of administration. Biocompatibilities with embedded cells and with the host tissue and biodegradation rate must be considerate. In this paper, we review the different applications of biomaterials combined with cell therapy in ischemic stroke and we explore specific features such as choice of biomaterial compounds and physical and mechanical properties concerning the recent studies in experimental stroke. PMID:27274738

  3. Fatal heat stroke associated with topiramate therapy.

    PubMed

    Borron, Stephen W; Woolard, Robert; Watts, Susan

    2013-12-01

    A 40-year-old man with diabetes and seizure disorder was found at home unresponsive and "very hot to touch" by his father 40 minutes before emergency medical services arrival. His usual medications included topiramate, divalproex sodium, and rosiglitazone/metformin. Paramedics administered oxygen, intravenous fluids, and naloxone. They did not witness or report seizure activity. Upon emergency department arrival, the patient was unresponsive (Glasgow Coma Scale 3), hypotensive (94/50 mm Hg), and tachypneic (32 breaths per minute), with a heart rate of 60 beats per minute and elevated rectal temperature peaking at 43.2°C. His skin was hot and dry, without rash; physical examination was otherwise normal. Laboratory studies revealed severe metabolic acidosis with acute renal failure and rhabdomyolysis. In spite of sedation, intubation, and aggressive cooling measures, the patient had cardiac arrest and died approximately 2 hours after arrival. Serum topiramate and valproate concentrations were within therapeutic ranges at 8.8 μg/mL (therapeutic 2-12) and 97 μg/mL (therapeutic 50-100), respectively. PMID:23993866

  4. Numerical investigation of fluid-particle interactions for embolic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Debanjan; Padilla, Jose; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2016-04-01

    Roughly one-third of all strokes are caused by an embolus traveling to a cerebral artery and blocking blood flow in the brain. The objective of this study is to gain a detailed understanding of the dynamics of embolic particles within arteries. Patient computed tomography image is used to construct a three-dimensional model of the carotid bifurcation. An idealized carotid bifurcation model of same vessel diameters was also constructed for comparison. Blood flow velocities and embolic particle trajectories are resolved using a coupled Euler-Lagrange approach. Blood is modeled as a Newtonian fluid, discretized using the finite volume method, with physiologically appropriate inflow and outflow boundary conditions. The embolus trajectory is modeled using Lagrangian particle equations accounting for embolus interaction with blood as well as vessel wall. Both one- and two-way fluid-particle coupling are considered, the latter being implemented using momentum sources augmented to the discretized flow equations. It was observed that for small-to-moderate particle sizes (relative to vessel diameters), the estimated particle distribution ratio—with and without the inclusion of two-way fluid-particle momentum exchange—were found to be similar. The maximum observed differences in distribution ratio with and without the coupling were found to be higher for the idealized bifurcation model. Additionally, the distribution was found to be reasonably matching the volumetric flow distribution for the idealized model, while a notable deviation from volumetric flow was observed in the anatomical model. It was also observed from an analysis of particle path lines that particle interaction with helical flow, characteristic of anatomical vasculature models, could play a prominent role in transport of embolic particle. The results indicate therefore that flow helicity could be an important hemodynamic indicator for analysis of embolus particle transport. Additionally, in the presence

  5. Effect of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy and Mirror Therapy for Patients With Subacute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jin A; Koo, Bon Il; Shin, Myung Jun; Shin, Yong Beom; Ko, Hyun-Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) and combined mirror therapy for inpatient rehabilitation of the patients with subacute stroke. Methods Twenty-six patients with subacute stroke were enrolled and randomly divided into three groups: CIMT combined with mirror therapy group, CIMT only group, and control group. Two weeks of CIMT for 6 hours a day with or without mirror therapy for 30 minutes a day were performed under supervision. All groups received conventional occupational therapy for 40 minutes a day for the same period. The CIMT only group and control group also received additional self-exercise to substitute for mirror therapy. The box and block test, 9-hole Pegboard test, grip strength, Brunnstrom stage, Wolf motor function test, Fugl-Meyer assessment, and the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index were performed prior to and two weeks after the treatment. Results After two weeks of treatment, the CIMT groups with and without mirror therapy showed higher improvement (p<0.05) than the control group, in most of functional assessments for hemiplegic upper extremity. The CIMT combined with mirror therapy group showed higher improvement than CIMT only group in box and block test, 9-hole Pegboard test, and grip strength, which represent fine motor functions of the upper extremity. Conclusion The short-term CIMT combined with mirror therapy group showed more improvement compared to CIMT only group and control group, in the fine motor functions of hemiplegic upper extremity for the patients with subacute stroke. PMID:25229024

  6. Two young stroke patients associated with regular intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Yumiko; Hayashi, Takeshi; Deguchi, Kentaro; Sato, Kota; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Yamashita, Toru; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Takao, Yoshiki; Morio, Tomohiro; Abe, Koji

    2016-02-15

    We recently experienced 2 young adult patients who developed ischemic stroke after regular intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy for agammaglobulinemia with diagnosis of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) in their childhood. Patient 1 was 26-year-old woman, who developed Wallenberg's syndrome 6 days after the last IVIg therapy, but had no further stroke recurrence with cilostazol later. Patient 2 was 37-year-old man, who developed recurrent cerebral infarction in the territory of bilateral lenticulostriate branches like branch atheromatous disease (BAD) several days after the IVIg therapy. However, he had no further stroke recurrence after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) therapy for his lymphoproliferative disorder. It was suggested that IVIg therapy was associated to these different types of ischemic stroke in our 2 young adult patients with minimal vascular risk factors. Although IVIg therapy is widely used as a relatively safe medication for immunodeficiency disorders or autoimmune diseases, we need to pay more attention to stroke occurrence with regular IVIg therapy. PMID:26810508

  7. Models to Tailor Brain Stimulation Therapies in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Plow, E. B.; Sankarasubramanian, V.; Cunningham, D. A.; Potter-Baker, K.; Varnerin, N.; Cohen, L. G.; Sterr, A.; Conforto, A. B.; Machado, A. G.

    2016-01-01

    A great challenge facing stroke rehabilitation is the lack of information on how to derive targeted therapies. As such, techniques once considered promising, such as brain stimulation, have demonstrated mixed efficacy across heterogeneous samples in clinical studies. Here, we explain reasons, citing its one-type-suits-all approach as the primary cause of variable efficacy. We present evidence supporting the role of alternate substrates, which can be targeted instead in patients with greater damage and deficit. Building on this groundwork, this review will also discuss different frameworks on how to tailor brain stimulation therapies. To the best of our knowledge, our report is the first instance that enumerates and compares across theoretical models from upper limb recovery and conditions like aphasia and depression. Here, we explain how different models capture heterogeneity across patients and how they can be used to predict which patients would best respond to what treatments to develop targeted, individualized brain stimulation therapies. Our intent is to weigh pros and cons of testing each type of model so brain stimulation is successfully tailored to maximize upper limb recovery in stroke. PMID:27006833

  8. Performance-based testing in mild stroke: identification of unmet opportunity for occupational therapy.

    PubMed

    Morrison, M Tracy; Edwards, Dorothy F; Giles, Gordon Muir

    2015-01-01

    Age at first stroke is decreasing, and most strokes are mild to moderate in severity. Executive function (EF) deficits are increasingly recognized in the stroke population, but occupational therapists have not altered their evaluation methods to fully accommodate changing patient needs. We present a hierarchical performance-based testing (PBT) pathway using data to illustrate how PBT could identify patients with mild stroke-related EF deficits in need of occupational therapy intervention. Data suggest that a substantial number of patients with EF deficits after mild stroke could benefit from occupational therapy services. PMID:25553755

  9. A numerical investigation into the effects of fluid rheology and stroke kinematics on swimming alga cells in complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuanbin; Guy, Robert; Thomases, Becca

    2015-11-01

    It is observed in experiments that when the fluid viscosity or elasticity is changed, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exhibits changes in both flagellar kinematics and the swimming speed. In order to understand the effects of rheology on both gait and swimming performance, we develop a computational model of the swimmer. We use flagellar strokes fit from experimental data to set up a constrained system, determining the forces on the swimmer and its swimming velocity. Our approach to simulating the swimming behavior demonstrates low computational costs even in three dimensions. In our simulations, stroke patterns and fluid rheologies are changed separately, so that we can dissect the contributions of stroke kinematics of the alga and the fluid environment, which can not be achieved with experiments.

  10. Pharmacological hypothermia: a potential for future stroke therapy?

    PubMed

    Liu, Kaiyin; Khan, Hajra; Geng, Xiaokun; Zhang, Jun; Ding, Yuchuan

    2016-06-01

    Mild physical hypothermia after stroke has been associated with positive outcomes. Despite the well-studied beneficial effects of hypothermia in the treatment of stroke, lack of precise temperature control, intolerance for the patient, and immunosuppression are some of the reasons which limit its clinical translation. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia has been explored as a possible treatment option following stroke in animal models. Currently, there are eight classes of pharmacological agents/agonists with hypothermic effects affecting a multitude of systems including cannabinoid, opioid, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), neurotensin, thyroxine derivatives, dopamine, gas, and adenosine derivatives. Interestingly, drugs in the TRPV1, neurotensin, and thyroxine families have been shown to have effects in thermoregulatory control in decreasing the compensatory hypothermic response during cooling. This review will briefly present drugs in the eight classes by summarizing their proposed mechanisms of action as well as side effects. Reported thermoregulatory effects of the drugs will also be presented. This review offers the opinion that these agents may be useful in combination therapies with physical hypothermia to achieve faster and more stable temperature control in hypothermia. PMID:27320243

  11. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... the blockages that lead to ischemic strokes. A hemorrhagic stroke occurs if an artery in the brain leaks ... risms) are examples of conditions that can cause hemorrhagic strokes. (Aneurysms are balloon-like bulges in an artery ...

  12. Basic rules of parenteral fluid therapy.

    PubMed

    Oh, M S; Kim, H-J

    2002-01-01

    The following basic rules of parenteral fluid therapy are formulated with the aim of alleviating concern and confusion about i.v. fluid orders that are experienced by most physicians: Don't be generous with fluid; in determining the water intake, one must know the usual water output through the kidney, skin and lung; one must know the quantities of the electrolytes and nutrients that are being given, and know the initial volume of distribution (usually the ECF); one must know the aim of fluid therapy; one must not give and remove the same substance at the same time; one must be aware that hypertonic saline contains less water for a given amount of Na than isotonic saline; one must be familiar with different i.v. solutions and i.v. additives; one must be aware that the kidney does not manufacture water or electrolytes except for bicarbonate; for short-term fluid therapy, divalent ions (Ca, Mg, and P) do not need replacement; one should think about COP-wedge gradient in determining the type of fluid to be given. PMID:12401938

  13. POTENTIAL FUTURE NEUROPROTECTIVE THERAPIES FOR NEURODEGENERATIVE DISORDERS AND STROKE

    PubMed Central

    Tarawneh, Rawan; Galvin, James E.

    2009-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms underlying neuronal loss and neurodegeneration have been an area of interest in the last decade. Although neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD) and Huntington’s disease (HD) each have distinct clinical symptoms and pathologies, they all share common mechanisms such as protein aggregation, oxidative injury, inflammation, apoptosis and mitochondrial injury that contribute to neuronal loss. Although cerebrovascular disease is due to etiologies quite different from the neurodegenerative disorders, many of the same common disease mechanisms come into play following a stroke. Novel therapies that target each of these mechanisms may be effective in decreasing the risk of disease, abating symptoms or slowing down their progression. While most of these therapies are experimental, and require further investigation, a few seem to offer promise in the near future. PMID:20176298

  14. General anesthesia in horses on fluid and electrolyte therapy.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Lindsey B C; Wendt-Hornickle, Erin

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to update the community of veterinarians performing general anesthesia in horses on fluid therapy. The rationale behind intraoperative fluid therapy, fluid dynamics, and various fluid options (crystalloids, hypertonic saline, colloids) is discussed. Additionally, electrolytes (calcium, potassium, and sodium) are included in the discussion in relation to general anesthesia and intraoperative fluid management. PMID:23498051

  15. Quality of Life after Intra-arterial Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Melissa M.; Wilder, Michael; McFadden, Molly; Majersik, Jennifer J.

    2014-01-01

    Few data exist about health-related quality of life outcomes after intra-arterial therapy for acute ischemic stroke. We assessed stroke-specific quality of life in stroke survivors after intra-arterial therapy. Consecutive patients undergoing intra-arterial therapy for acute ischemic stroke from 2005-2010 were retrospectively identified via an institutional database. Stroke-specific quality of life (using the Stroke-Specific Quality of Life Score) and disability status (modified Rankin Scale) were prospectively assessed via mailed questionnaire. We analyzed quality of life scores by domain and summary score, with a summary score of ≥ 4 defined as a good outcome. Analysis of variance was used to model the effect of final recanalization status, stroke severity, and modified Rankin Scale on total quality of life score. ANOVA and Pearson's correlations were used to test the association between stroke severity/modified Rankin Scale and quality of life/time since stroke respectively. Of ninety-nine acute ischemic stroke patients, 61 responded yielding: 11 interim deaths, 7 incomplete surveys, and 43 complete surveys for analysis. Among responding survivors, overall quality of life score was 3.9 (SD 0.7); 77% of these reported good quality of life. Scores were higher in recanalized patients in 11 of 12 domains, but was significant only for mood. Although modified Rankin Scale was associated with stroke severity, quality of life was independent of both. Seventy-seven percent of acute ischemic stroke survivors who received intra-arterial therapy reported good quality of life. Furthermore, these data suggest that stroke-specific quality of life is an independent outcome from stroke severity and disability status. PMID:24813258

  16. Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy improves dysphagia after brainstem stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chun-hong; Bian, Jin-ling; Meng, Zhi-hong; Meng, Li-na; Ren, Xue-song; Wang, Zhi-lin; Guo, Xiao-yan; Shi, Xue-min

    2016-01-01

    Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy has been shown to effectively treat dysphagia after stroke-based pseudobulbar paralysis. We presumed that this therapy would be effective for dysphagia after bulbar paralysis in patients with brainstem infarction. Sixty-four patients with dysphagia following brainstem infarction were recruited and divided into a medulla oblongata infarction group (n = 22), a midbrain and pons infarction group (n = 16), and a multiple cerebral infarction group (n = 26) according to their magnetic resonance imaging results. All patients received Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture for 28 days. The main acupoints were Neiguan (PC6), Renzhong (DU26), Sanyinjiao (SP6), Fengchi (GB20), Wangu (GB12), and Yifeng (SJ17). Furthermore, the posterior pharyngeal wall was pricked. Before and after treatment, patient swallowing functions were evaluated with the Kubota Water Test, Fujishima Ichiro Rating Scale, and the Standard Swallowing Assessment. The Barthel Index was also used to evaluate their quality of life. Results showed that after 28 days of treatment, scores on the Kubota Water Test and Standard Swallowing Assessment had decreased, but scores on the Fujishima Ichiro Rating Scale and Barthel Index had increased in each group. The total efficacy rate was 92.2% after treatment, and was most obvious in patients with medulla oblongata infarction (95.9%). These findings suggest that Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy can repair the connection of upper motor neurons to the medulla oblongata motor nucleus, promote the recovery of brainstem infarction, and improve patient's swallowing ability and quality of life. PMID:27073382

  17. Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy improves dysphagia after brainstem stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Hong; Bian, Jin-Ling; Meng, Zhi-Hong; Meng, Li-Na; Ren, Xue-Song; Wang, Zhi-Lin; Guo, Xiao-Yan; Shi, Xue-Min

    2016-02-01

    Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy has been shown to effectively treat dysphagia after stroke-based pseudobulbar paralysis. We presumed that this therapy would be effective for dysphagia after bulbar paralysis in patients with brainstem infarction. Sixty-four patients with dysphagia following brainstem infarction were recruited and divided into a medulla oblongata infarction group (n = 22), a midbrain and pons infarction group (n = 16), and a multiple cerebral infarction group (n = 26) according to their magnetic resonance imaging results. All patients received Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture for 28 days. The main acupoints were Neiguan (PC6), Renzhong (DU26), Sanyinjiao (SP6), Fengchi (GB20), Wangu (GB12), and Yifeng (SJ17). Furthermore, the posterior pharyngeal wall was pricked. Before and after treatment, patient swallowing functions were evaluated with the Kubota Water Test, Fujishima Ichiro Rating Scale, and the Standard Swallowing Assessment. The Barthel Index was also used to evaluate their quality of life. Results showed that after 28 days of treatment, scores on the Kubota Water Test and Standard Swallowing Assessment had decreased, but scores on the Fujishima Ichiro Rating Scale and Barthel Index had increased in each group. The total efficacy rate was 92.2% after treatment, and was most obvious in patients with medulla oblongata infarction (95.9%). These findings suggest that Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy can repair the connection of upper motor neurons to the medulla oblongata motor nucleus, promote the recovery of brainstem infarction, and improve patient's swallowing ability and quality of life. PMID:27073382

  18. A Comparison of Aphasia Therapy Outcomes before and after a Very Early Rehabilitation Programme Following Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godecke, Erin; Ciccone, Natalie A.; Granger, Andrew S.; Rai, Tapan; West, Deborah; Cream, Angela; Cartwright, Jade; Hankey, Graeme J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Very early aphasia rehabilitation studies have shown mixed results. Differences in therapy intensity and therapy type contribute significantly to the equivocal results. Aims: To compare a standardized, prescribed very early aphasia therapy regimen with a historical usual care control group at therapy completion (4-5 weeks post-stroke)…

  19. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds ... blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused ...

  20. Constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenqing; Wang, Aihui; Yu, Limin; Han, Xuesong; Jiang, Guiyun; Weng, Changshui; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2012-01-01

    Stroke patients with hemiplegia exhibit flexor spasms in the upper limb and extensor spasms in the lower limb, and their movement patterns vary greatly. Constraint-induced movement therapy is an upper limb rehabilitation technique used in stroke patients with hemiplegia; however, studies of lower extremity rehabilitation are scarce. In this study, stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia underwent conventional Bobath therapy for 4 weeks as baseline treatment, followed by constraint-induced movement therapy for an additional 4 weeks. The 10-m maximum walking speed and Berg balance scale scores significantly improved following treatment, and lower extremity motor function also improved. The results of functional MRI showed that constraint-induced movement therapy alleviates the reduction in cerebral functional activation in patients, which indicates activation of functional brain regions and a significant increase in cerebral blood perfusion. These results demonstrate that constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia. PMID:25337108

  1. Constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenqing; Wang, Aihui; Yu, Limin; Han, Xuesong; Jiang, Guiyun; Weng, Changshui; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2012-11-15

    Stroke patients with hemiplegia exhibit flexor spasms in the upper limb and extensor spasms in the lower limb, and their movement patterns vary greatly. Constraint-induced movement therapy is an upper limb rehabilitation technique used in stroke patients with hemiplegia; however, studies of lower extremity rehabilitation are scarce. In this study, stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia underwent conventional Bobath therapy for 4 weeks as baseline treatment, followed by constraint-induced movement therapy for an additional 4 weeks. The 10-m maximum walking speed and Berg balance scale scores significantly improved following treatment, and lower extremity motor function also improved. The results of functional MRI showed that constraint-induced movement therapy alleviates the reduction in cerebral functional activation in patients, which indicates activation of functional brain regions and a significant increase in cerebral blood perfusion. These results demonstrate that constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia. PMID:25337108

  2. Therapy Effects of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells on Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xinchun; Hu, Jinxia; Cui, Guiyun

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the second most common cause of death and major cause of disability worldwide. Recently, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have been shown to improve functional outcome after stroke. In this review, we will focus on the protective effects of BMSCs on ischemic brain and the relative molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of BMSCs on stroke. PMID:27069533

  3. Evaluation of Gene Therapy as an Intervention Strategy to Treat Brain Injury from Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Amanda J.; Housley, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, with a lack of treatments available to prevent cell death, regenerate damaged cells and pathways, or promote neurogenesis. The extended period of hours to weeks over which tissue damage continues to occur makes this disorder a candidate for gene therapy. This review highlights the development of gene therapy in the area of stroke, with the evolution of viral administration, in experimental stroke models, from pre-injury to clinically relevant timeframes of hours to days post-stroke. The putative therapeutic proteins being examined include anti-apoptotic, pro-survival, anti-inflammatory, and guidance proteins, targeting multiple pathways within the complex pathology, with promising results. The balance of findings from animal models suggests that gene therapy provides a viable translational platform for treatment of ischemic brain injury arising from stroke. PMID:27252622

  4. Pharmacological therapy of acute ischaemic stroke: Achievements and problems.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Antonio; Ferrari, Federica; Villa, Roberto F

    2015-09-01

    Acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Its incidence and prevalence increase considerably with age and numbers will grow with an ageing population. Consequently, the impact of AIS on costs is soaring. AIS is caused by the abrupt occlusion of an intracranial vessel resulting in reduced blood flow to the brain region supplied. The ischaemic core (which is irreversibly lesioned) is surrounded by the penumbra region with less severe flow reduction, lower functional impairment and potential recovery. Therefore, the fundamental treatment of AIS relies on prompt recanalisation and reperfusion of the threatened, but potentially salvageable, ischaemic penumbra. With this aim, intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) remains the current strategy. However, thrombolysis is underused, owing to various exclusion criteria that limit the number of treated patients. Other thrombolytics are under investigation. Endovascular therapy with mechanical recanalisation devices is also increasingly applied, though definite evidence of its benefit is lacking. Moreover, hypertension and hyperglycaemia are acute complications to be treated in AIS. This review analyses the current status, the problems, the perspectives and the cost-effectiveness of the pharmacological therapy for AIS. PMID:26079382

  5. Review of current and emerging therapies in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Novakovic, R; Toth, G; Purdy, P D

    2009-07-01

    The statistics for stroke in the USA reads like a familiar ad slogan cited in most papers pertaining to acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the USA. While stroke ranks third among all causes of death, behind diseases of the heart and cancer, it is the leading cause of serious long-term disability in the USA.(1) Approximately 795 000 people, 87% of whom are ischemic, suffer from stroke each year in the USA.(2) That means that on average, every 40 seconds someone within the USA develops a stroke. For 2009 the combined direct and indirect cost of stroke, from hospitalization and rehabilitation to institutionalization, is estimated at $68.9 billion within the USA.(2). PMID:21994100

  6. Art Therapy Outcomes in the Rehabilitation Treatment of a Stroke Patient: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sun-Hyun; Kim, Min-Young; Lee, Jae-Hyuk; Chun, Sae-il

    2008-01-01

    This case report discusses the potential for art therapy to aid in the recovery of early-chronic stroke patients. The patient was diagnosed with having a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a cerebral aneurysm rupture 1 year prior to hospitalization. Therapies used as part of the patient's treatment included 10 weeks of art therapy conducted twice a…

  7. Efficacy of Two Different Types of Speech Therapy for Aphasic Stroke Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prins, R. S.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Compared the effectiveness of two speech therapy programs for patients with stroke-induced aphasia. Neither a systematic therapy program for auditory communication disorders nor a conventional stimulation therapy program had any clear effect on the patients' language recovery, especially when contrasted against the progress of patients receiving…

  8. The Mechanism of and Preventive Therapy for Stroke in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Roh, Seung-Young

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a major cardiac cause of stroke, and a pathogenesis involving thrombus formation in patients with atrial fibrillation is well established. A strategy for rhythm control that involves catheter ablation and anticoagulation therapy is evolving. A strategy for rhythm control that restores and maintains sinus rhythm should reduce the risk of ischemic stroke that is associated with atrial fibrillation; however, this is yet to be proven in large-scale randomized controlled trials. This paper reviews the emerging role of rhythm control therapy for atrial fibrillation to prevent stroke. PMID:27283277

  9. Clinical Trials of Adult Stem Cell Therapy in Patients with Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is considered a potential regenerative strategy for patients with neurologic deficits. Studies involving animal models of ischemic stroke have shown that stem cells transplanted into the brain can lead to functional improvement. With current advances in the understanding regarding the effects of introducing stem cells and their mechanisms of action, several clinical trials of stem cell therapy have been conducted in patients with stroke since 2005, including studies using mesenchymal stem cells, bone marrow mononuclear cells, and neural stem/progenitor cells. In addition, several clinical trials of the use of adult stem cells to treat ischemic stroke are ongoing. This review presents the status of our understanding of adult stem cells and results from clinical trials, and introduces ongoing clinical studies of adult stem cell therapy in the field of stroke. PMID:26610894

  10. Stroke Volume Variation for Prediction of Fluid Responsiveness in Patients Undergoing Gastrointestinal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng; Lin, Fu-qing; Fu, Shu-kun; Chen, Guo-qiang; Yang, Xiao-hu; Zhu, Chun-yan; Zhang, Li-jun; Li, Quan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Stroke volume variation (SVV) has been shown to be a reliable predictor of fluid responsiveness. However, the predictive role of SVV measured by FloTrac/Vigileo system in prediction of fluid responsiveness was unproven in patients undergoing ventilation with low tidal volume. Methods: Fifty patients undergoing elective gastrointestinal surgery were randomly divided into two groups: Group C [n1=20, tidal volume (Vt) = 8 ml/kg, frequency (F) = 12/min] and Group L [n2=30, Vt= 6 ml/kg, F=16/min]. After anesthesia induction, 6% hydroxyethyl starch130/0.4 solution (7 ml/kg) was intravenously transfused. Besides standard haemodynamic monitoring, SVV, cardiac output, cardiac index (CI), stroke volume (SV), stroke volume index (SVI), systemic vascular resistance (SVR) and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) were determined with the FloTrac/Vigileo system before and after fluid loading. Results: After fluid loading, the MAP, CVP, SVI and CI increased significantly, whereas the SVV and SVR decreased markedly in both groups. SVI was significantly correlated to the SVV, CVP but not the HR, MAP and SVR. SVI was significantly correlated to the SVV before fluid loading (Group C: r = 0.909; Group L: r = 0.758) but not the HR, MAP, CVP and SVR before fluid loading. The largest area under the ROC curve (AUC) was found for SVV (Group C, 0.852; Group L, 0.814), and the AUC for other preloading indices in two groups ranged from 0.324 to 0.460. Conclusion: SVV measured by FloTrac/Vigileo system can predict fluid responsiveness in patients undergoing ventilation with low tidal volumes during gastrointestinal surgery. PMID:23329886

  11. The effects of combined hyperbaric oxygen therapy on patients with post-stroke depression

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dong; Shan, Jin; Ze, Yu; Xiao-yan, Zeng; Xiao-hua, Hu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To observe the effect of combined hyperbaric oxygen therapy on patients with post-stroke depression. [Subjects] Ninety patients with post-stroke depression were randomly divided into 3 groups: fluoxetine treatment group (n = 30), hyperbaric oxygen therapy group (n = 30), and hyperbaric oxygen combined treatment group (n = 30). [Methods] Fluoxetine treatment group received anti-depression drugs (fluoxetine, 20 mg/day), hyperbaric oxygen therapy group received hyperbaric oxygen (once a day, 5 days/week), hyperbaric oxygen combined treatment group received fluoxetine and hyperbaric oxygen treatments as described above. All patients received routine rehabilitation therapy. Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), and Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS) scores were evaluated before and at the end of 4th week. The total effective rate of depression release between the 3 groups was also compared at the end of study. [Results] The end scores of HAMD and SSS in the 3 groups were significantly lower than those before treatment. The total effective rate of combined hyperbaric oxygen therapy group after treatment was higher than the other two groups. [Conclusions] Combined hyperbaric oxygen therapy plays an important role in the treatment of patients with post-stroke depression. The total effective rate of combined hyperbaric oxygen therapy was higher than other routine anti post-stroke depression treatments. PMID:26157204

  12. Enhanced physical therapy for arm function after stroke: a one year follow up study.

    PubMed Central

    Sunderland, A; Fletcher, D; Bradley, L; Tinson, D; Hewer, R L; Wade, D T

    1994-01-01

    Ninety seven patients with stroke who had participated in a randomised trial of conventional physical therapy nu an enhanced therapy for arm function were followed up at one year. Despite the emphasis of the enhanced therapy approach on continued use of the arm in everyday life, the advantage seen for some patients with enhanced therapy at six months after stroke had diminished to a non-significant trend by one year. This was due to some late improvement in the conventional therapy group whereas the enhanced therapy group remained static or fell back slightly. It is recommended that trials should be conducted comparing very intensive therapy for the arm with controls without treatment. This would provide a model of the effects of therapy on intrinsic neural recovery that would be relevant to all areas of neurological rehabilitation. PMID:8021679

  13. The Role of Astrocytes in Mediating Exogenous Cell-Based Restorative Therapy for Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Liu, Zhongwu; Xin, Hongqi; Chopp, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes have not been a major therapeutic target for the treatment of stroke, with most research emphasis on the neuron. Given the essential role that astrocytes play in maintaining physiological function of the central nervous system and the very rapid and sensitive reaction astrocytes have in response to cerebral injury or ischemic insult, we propose to replace the neurocentric view for treatment with a more nuanced astrocytic centered approach. In addition, after decades of effort in attempting to develop neuroprotective therapies, which target reduction of the ischemic lesion, there are no effective clinical treatments for stroke, aside from thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator, which is used in a small minority of patients. A more promising therapeutic approach, which may affect nearly all stroke patients, may be in promoting endogenous restorative mechanisms, which enhance neurological recovery. A focus of efforts in stimulating recovery post stroke is the use of exogenously administered cells. The present review focuses on the role of the astrocyte in mediating the brain network, brain plasticity, and neurological recovery post stroke. As a model to describe the interaction of a restorative cell-based therapy with astrocytes, which drives recovery from stroke, we specifically highlight the subacute treatment of stroke with multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell therapy. PMID:24272702

  14. Outcomes associated with stroke volume variation versus central venous pressure guided fluid replacements during major abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Lakshmi; Rajan, Sunil; Baalachandran, Ramasubramanian

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: There is limited data on the impact of perioperative fluid therapy guided by dynamic preload variables like stroke volume variation (SVV) on outcomes after abdominal surgery. We studied the effect of SVV guided versus central venous pressure (CVP) guided perioperative fluid administration on outcomes after major abdominal surgery. Material and Methods: Sixty patients undergoing major abdominal surgeries were randomized into two equal groups in this prospective single blind randomized study. In the standard care group, the CVP was maintained at 10-12 mmHg while in the intervention group a SVV of 10% was achieved by the administration of fluids. The primary end-points were the length of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and hospital stay. The secondary end points were intraoperative lactate, intravenous fluid use, requirement for inotropes, postoperative ventilation and return of bowel function. Results: The ICU stay was significantly shorter in the intervention group as compared to the control group (2.9 ± 1.15 vs. 5.4 ± 2.71 days). The length of hospital stay was also shorter in the intervention group, (9.9 ± 2.68 vs. 11.96 ± 5.15 days) though not statistically significant. The use of intraoperative fluids was significantly lower in the intervention group than the control group (7721.5 ± 4138.9 vs. 9216.33 ± 2821.38 ml). Other secondary outcomes were comparable between the two groups. Conclusion: Implementation of fluid replacement guided by a dynamic preload variable (SVV) versus conventional static variables (CVP) is associated with lesser postoperative ICU stay and reduced fluid requirements in major abdominal surgery.

  15. Pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation to predict fluid responsiveness in patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Mi; Choi, Soo Joo; Kim, Myung Hee; Park, Mi Hye; Heo, Burn Young

    2013-01-01

    Background During carotid endarterectomy (CEA), hemodynamic stability and adequate fluid management are crucial to prevent perioperative cerebral stroke, myocardial infarction and hyperperfusion syndrome. Both pulse pressure variation (PPV) and stroke volume variation (SVV), dynamic preload indices derived from the arterial waveform, are increasingly advocated as predictors of fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of PPV and SVV for predicting fluid responsiveness in patients undergoing CEA. Methods Twenty seven patients undergoing CEA were enrolled in this study. PPV, SVV and cardiac output (CO) were measured before and after fluid loading of 500 ml of hydroxyethyl starch solution. Fluid responsiveness was defined as an increase in CO ≥ 15%. The ability of PPV and SVV to predict fluid responsiveness was assessed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results Both PPV and SVV measured before fluid loading are associated with changes in CO caused by fluid expansion. The ROC analysis showed that PPV and SVV predicted response to volume loading (area under the ROC curve = 0.854 and 0.841, respectively, P < 0.05). A PPV ≥ 9.5% identified responders (Rs) with a sensitivity of 71.4% and a specificity of 90.9%, and a SVV ≥ 7.5% identified Rs with a sensitivity of 92.9% and a specificity of 63.6%. Conclusions Both PPV and SVV values before volume loading are associated with increased CO in response to volume expansion. Therefore, PPV and SVV are useful predictors of fluid responsiveness in patients undergoing CEA. PMID:24101958

  16. A randomised controlled trial evaluating family mediated exercise (FAME) therapy following stroke

    PubMed Central

    Galvin, Rose; Cusack, Tara; Stokes, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Background Stroke is a leading cause of disability among adults worldwide. Evidence suggests that increased duration of exercise therapy following stroke has a positive impact on functional outcome following stroke. The main objective of this randomised controlled trial is to evaluate the impact of additional family assisted exercise therapy in people with acute stroke. Methods/Design A prospective multi-centre single blind randomised controlled trial will be conducted. Forty patients with acute stroke will be randomised into either an experimental or control group. The experimental group will receive routine therapy and additional lower limb exercise therapy in the form of family assisted exercises. The control group will receive routine therapy with no additional formal input from their family members. Participants will be assessed at baseline, post intervention and followed up at three months using a series of standardised outcome measures. A secondary aim of the project is to evaluate the impact of the family mediated exercise programme on the person with stroke and the individual(s) assisting in the delivery of exercises using a qualitative methodology. The study has gained ethical approval from the Research Ethics Committees of each of the clinical sites involved in the study. Discussion This study will evaluate a structured programme of exercises that can be delivered to people with stroke by their 'family members/friends'. Given that the progressive increase in the population of older people is likely to lead to an increased prevalence of stroke in the future, it is important to reduce the burden of this illness on the individual, the family and society. Family mediated exercises can maximise the carry over outside formal physiotherapy sessions, giving patients the opportunity for informal practice. Trial Registration The protocol for this study is registered with the US NIH Clinical trials registry (NCT00666744) PMID:18570643

  17. Method for the evidence-based reviews on occupational therapy and stroke.

    PubMed

    Arbesman, Marian; Lieberman, Deborah; Berlanstein, Debra R

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based reviews of the literature relevant to adults with stroke are important to the practice of occupational therapy. We describe the four questions that served as the focus for the evidence-based reviews of the effectiveness of occupational therapy interventions for adults with stroke. The questions include occupation- and activity-based interventions to improve occupational performance and social participation after stroke, as well as interventions for motor, cognitive, and psychological and emotional impairments after stroke. We include the background for the reviews; the process followed for addressing each question, including search terms and search strategy; the databases searched; and the methods used to summarize and critically appraise the literature. The final number of articles included in each evidence-based review; a summary of the themes of the results; the strengths and limitations of the findings; and implications for practice, education, and research are presented. PMID:25553741

  18. Estrogen therapy increases BDNF expression and improves post-stroke depression in ovariectomy-treated rats

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qiaoer; Cheng, Yifan; Jin, Kunlin; Cheng, Jianhua; Lin, Yuanshao; Lin, Zhenzhen; Wang, Liuqing; Shao, Bei

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of exogenous estrogen on post-stroke depression. Rats were exposed to chronic mild stress following middle cerebral artery occlusion. The occurrence of post-stroke depression was evaluated according to the changes in preference for sucrose and performance in a forced swimming test. Estrogen therapy significantly improved these neurological symptoms, indicating that estrogen is effective in treating post-stroke depression. Increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression was reported in the hippocampus of rats that had been treated with estrogen for two weeks, suggesting that BDNF expression may be an important contributor to the improvement of post-stroke depression that is observed following estrogen therapy. PMID:27602095

  19. Context-sensitive fluid therapy in critical illness.

    PubMed

    Tatara, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    Microcirculatory alterations are frequently observed in critically ill patients undergoing major surgery and those who suffer from trauma or sepsis. Despite the need for adequate fluid administration to restore microcirculation, there is no consensus regarding optimal fluid therapy for these patients. The recent recognition of the importance of the endothelial glycocalyx layer in capillary fluid and solute exchange has largely changed our views on fluid therapy in critical illness. Given that disease status largely differs among critically ill patients, fluid therapy must not be considered generally, but rather tailored to the clinical condition of each patient. This review outlines the current understanding of context-sensitive volume expansion by fluid solutions and considers its clinical implications for critically ill patients. The modulation of capillary hydrostatic pressure through the appropriate use of vasopressors may increase the effectiveness of fluid infusion and thereby reduce detrimental effects resulting from excessive fluid administration. PMID:26985394

  20. Use of Oral Anticoagulation Therapy in Atrial Fibrillation after Stroke: Results from a Nationwide Registry

    PubMed Central

    Jespersen, Stine Funder; Christensen, Louisa M.; Christensen, Anders; Christensen, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Background. The knowledge is still sparse about patient related factors, influencing oral anticoagulation therapy (OAC) rates, in stroke patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Aims. To assess the use of OAC in ischemic stroke patients diagnosed with AF and to identify patient related factors influencing the initiation of OAC. Methods. In the nationwide Danish Stroke Registry we identified 55,551 patients admitted with acute ischemic stroke from 2003 to 2011. Frequency analysis was used to assess the use of OAC in patients with AF, and logistic regression was used to determine independent predictors of OAC. Results. 17.1% (n = 9,482) of ischemic stroke patients had AF. OAC prescription rates were increasing, and in 2011 46.6% were prescribed OAC, 42.5% had a contraindication, and 3.7% were not prescribed OAC without a stated contraindication. Younger age, less severe stroke, and male gender were positive predictors of OAC, while excessive alcohol consumption, smoking, and institutionalization were negative predictors of OAC (P values < 0.05). Conclusions. Advanced age, severe stroke, female gender, institutionalization, smoking, and excessive alcohol consumption were associated with lower OAC rates. Contraindications were generally present in patients not in therapy, and the assumed underuse of OAC may be overestimated. PMID:24349774

  1. Dodecafluoropentane Emulsion Extends Window for tPA Therapy in a Rabbit Stroke Model

    PubMed Central

    Brown, A. T.; Lowery, J. D.; Arthur, M. C.; Roberson, P. K.; Skinner, R. D.

    2016-01-01

    Dodecafluoropentane emulsion (DDFPe) nanodroplets are exceptional oxygen transporters and can protect ischemic brain in stroke models 24 h without reperfusion. Current stroke therapy usually fails to reach patients because of delays following stroke onset. We tested using DDFPe to extend the time window for tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Longer treatment windows will allow more patients more complete stroke recovery. We test DDFPe to safely extend the time window for tPA thrombolysis to 9 h after stroke. With IACUC approval, randomized New Zealand white rabbits (3.4–4.7 kg, n=30) received angiography and 4-mm blood clot in the internal carotid artery for flow-directed middle cerebral artery occlusion. Seven failed and were discarded. Groups were IV tPA (n=11), DDFPe + tPA (n=7), and no therapy controls (n=5). DDFPe (0.3 ml/kg, 2 % emulsion) IV dosing began at 1 h and continued at 90 min intervals for 6 doses in one test group; the other received saline injections. Both got standard IV tPA (0.9 mg/kg) therapy starting 9 h post stroke. At 24 h, neurological assessment scores (NAS, 0–18) were determined. Following brain removal percent stroke volume (%SV) was measured. Outcomes were compared with Kruskal-Wallis analysis. For NAS, DDFPe + tPA was improved overall, p=0.0015, and vs. tPA alone, p=0.0052. For %SV, DDFPe + tPA was improved overall, p=0.0003 and vs. tPA alone, p=0.0018. NAS controls and tPA alone were not different but %SV was, p=0.0078. With delayed reperfusion, DDFPe + tPAwas more effective than tPA alone in preserving functioning brain after stroke. DDFPe significantly extends the time window for tPA therapy. PMID:26055229

  2. The use of alternative therapies in the Saskatchewan stroke rehabilitation population

    PubMed Central

    Blackmer, Jeff; Jefromova, Ludmilla

    2002-01-01

    Background Many patients use alternative therapies. The purpose of this study was to determine the percentage of stroke rehabilitation patients in Saskatchewan using alternative therapies, whether patients found these therapies effective in alleviating stroke-related symptoms, how often those patients who used alternative therapies discuss this fact with their primary care doctor and the main reason why patients might not do so. Methods Telephone questionnaire surveys were conducted with 117 patients who had suffered a stroke and undergone inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation at Saskatoon City Hospital. Results The study revealed that 26.5% of 117 stroke rehabilitation patients visited alternative practitioners at least once or used some form of unconventional therapy. Only 16.1% of patients found that alternative therapy made them feel much better. Of those who used alternative therapy, 61.3% did not discuss this fact with their primary physician. Many of the respondents (47.3%) who did not inform their physician stated that they did not see the necessity of talking about these treatments and 21.1% did not discuss the issue with their physician because they felt that he or she might disapprove of alternative therapies. Conclusion A relatively small percentage of stroke patients found alternative therapies beneficial. Doctors should be aware that a significant number of patients will try alternative treatment without discussion with their primary care physician or specialist. The current study suggests that after completing routine questioning, doctors should also ask their patients about their use of alternative therapies and, when appropriate, review issues of safety and efficacy. PMID:12095423

  3. The complexities of designing therapy for Māori living with stroke-related communication disorders.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Karen M

    2016-01-01

    Stroke-related communication disorders can have a substantial impact on Māori whānau (extended family). Timely and appropriate speech-language therapy is required, but there are many challenges in providing this. In this article we discuss the need for a kaupapa Māori approach to speech-language therapy that is designed by Māori for Māori, and undertaken in a Māori way. We report the results of a literature review that revealed a small but significant body of literature describing Māori experiences of stroke, aphasia and speech-language therapy, and evidence that a Māori-specific therapy programme can improve outcomes for people with stroke. We then consider the social and political context that impacts the design and delivery of such an approach. Informed by the literature, we propose a hierarchy of skill and resource acquisition for speech-language therapists, in which they learn why to be culturally safe, how to be culturally safe, and how to interact before creating resources to build relationships, resources for education and for therapy. The creation of a kaupapa Māori speech-language therapy approach should bring together people with stroke, whānau members and service providers to create therapy that crosses sectors and disciplines and acknowledges the wider social and political context. PMID:27355171

  4. Controversies in fluid therapy: Type, dose and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    McDermid, Robert C; Raghunathan, Karthik; Romanovsky, Adam; Shaw, Andrew D; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2014-01-01

    Fluid therapy is perhaps the most common intervention received by acutely ill hospitalized patients; however, a number of critical questions on the efficacy and safety of the type and dose remain. In this review, recent insights derived from randomized trials in terms of fluid type, dose and toxicity are discussed. We contend that the prescription of fluid therapy is context-specific and that any fluid can be harmful if administered inappropriately. When contrasting ‘‘crystalloid vs colloid’’, differences in efficacy are modest but differences in safety are significant. Differences in chloride load and strong ion difference across solutions appear to be clinically important. Phases of fluid therapy in acutely ill patients are recognized, including acute resuscitation, maintaining homeostasis, and recovery phases. Quantitative toxicity (fluid overload) is associated with adverse outcomes and can be mitigated when fluid therapy based on functional hemodynamic parameters that predict volume responsiveness and minimization of non-essential fluid. Qualitative toxicity (fluid type), in particular for iatrogenic acute kidney injury and metabolic acidosis, remain a concern for synthetic colloids and isotonic saline, respectively. Physiologically balanced crystalloids may be the ‘‘default’’ fluid for acutely ill patients and the role for colloids, in particular hydroxyethyl starch, is increasingly unclear. We contend the prescription of fluid therapy is analogous to the prescription of any drug used in critically ill patients. PMID:24834399

  5. Effect of stem cell-based therapy for ischemic stroke treatment: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Duan, Feng; Wang, Ming-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Peng; Ma, Li-Zhi

    2016-07-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and long-term disability worldwide. Cell-based therapies improve neural functional recovery in pre-clinical studies, but clinical results require evaluation. We aimed to assess the effects of mesenchymal stem cells on ischemic stroke treatment. We searched the PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases until July 2015 and selected the controlled trials using mesenchymal stem cells for ischemic stroke treatment compared with cell-free treatment. We assessed the results by meta-analysis using the error matrix approach, and we assessed the association of mesenchymal stem cell counts with treatment effect by dose-response meta-analysis. Seven trials were included. Manhattan plots revealed no obvious advantage of the application of stem cells to treat ischemic stroke. For the comprehensive evaluation index, stem cell treatment did not significantly reduce the mortality of ischemic stroke patients (relative risk (RR) 0.59, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.29-1.19; ln(RR) 0.54, 95% CI -0.18 to 1.25, p=0.141). The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale was also not significantly improved by stem cell treatment (standardized mean difference (SMD) 0.94, 95% CI -0.13 to 2.01, p=0.072). The European Stroke Scale was significantly improved using the stem cell treatment (SMD 1.15, 95% CI 0.37-1.92). The dose-response meta-analysis did not reveal a significant linear regression relationship between the number of stem cells and therapeutic effect, except regarding the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale index. In conclusion, our assessments indicated no significant difference between stem cell and cell-free treatments. Further research is needed to discover more effective stem cell-based therapies for ischemic stroke treatment. PMID:27131124

  6. Association Between Ischemic Stroke and Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Low, Audrey S. L.; Lunt, Mark; Mercer, Louise K.; Watson, Kath D.; Dixon, William G.; Symmons, Deborah P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at an increased risk of ischemic stroke. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) may influence risk and mortality after ischemic stroke by reducing inflammation. This study was undertaken to examine the association of TNFi with the risk of incident ischemic stroke and with 30‐day and 1‐year mortality after ischemic stroke. Methods Patients with RA starting therapy with TNFi and a biologics‐naive comparator group treated with synthetic disease‐modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) only were recruited to the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register for Rheumatoid Arthritis from 2001 to 2009. Patients were followed up via clinical and patient questionnaires as well as the national death register. Incident strokes were classified as ischemic if brain imaging reports suggested ischemia or if ischemic stroke was reported as the underlying cause of death on a death certificate. Patients with a previous stroke were excluded. Risk of ischemic stroke was compared between patients receiving synthetic DMARDs only and those ever‐exposed to TNFi using a Cox proportional hazards regression model adjusted for potential confounders. Mortality after ischemic stroke was compared between synthetic DMARD–treated patients and TNFi‐treated patients using logistic regression, adjusted for age and sex. Results To April 2010, 127 verified incident ischemic strokes (21 in 3,271 synthetic DMARD–treated patients and 106 in 11,642 TNFi‐treated patients) occurred during 11,973 and 61,226 person‐years of observation, respectively (incidence rate 175 versus 173 per 100,000 person‐years). After adjustment for confounders, there was no association between ever‐exposure to TNFi and ischemic stroke (hazard ratio 0.99 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.54–1.81]). Mortality 30 days or 1 year after ischemic stroke was not associated with concurrent TNFi exposure (odds ratio 0.18 [95% CI 0.03–1.21] and 0.60 [95

  7. Effects of early intervention of swallowing therapy on recovery from dysphagia following stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiyari, Jalal; Sarraf, Payam; Nakhostin-Ansari, Noureddin; Tafakhori, Abbas; Logemann, Jeri; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat; Harirchian, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dysphagia is common after stroke. The onset time of swallowing rehabilitation following stroke has an important role in the recovery of dysphagia and preventing of its complications, but it was either highly variable or was not stated in previous trials. The aim of this study was investigation effects of onset time of swallowing therapy on recovery from dysphagia following stroke. Methods: Sixty dysphagia patients due to stroke range of age 60-74 (67.1 ± 3.8), participated in this randomized clinical trial study. The patients allocated in Early, Medium and Late groups, on the base of initiation of swallowing therapy after the stroke. After basic clinical and video fluoroscopic swallowing study assessments, traditional swallowing therapy was initiated 3 times per week for 3 months. The outcome measures were North-Western dysphagia patient check sheet, functional oral intake scale, video fluoroscopy, and frequency of pneumonia. Statistical analysis was done by repeated measure ANOVA, Bonferroni and χ2 tests. Results: Three groups of patients in terms of demographic and clinical characteristics were similar in the pre-treatment P > 0.050. Onset time of swallowing therapy after stroke was effective on swallowing recovery on the main outcome variables. So that in first group patients, recovery was rather than other groups P < 0.050. Furthermore, the frequency of pneumonia in the early group was less than other groups and in the early group no patients experienced pneumonia P = 0.002. Conclusion: Our data suggested that early interventions for dysphagia in stroke have an important role in recovery from dysphagia and prevention of complications like aspiration pneumonia. PMID:26622975

  8. Cerebrospinal Fluid HIV Escape from Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Francesca; Gisslen, Magnus; Cinque, Paola; Price, Richard W

    2015-06-01

    CNS infection is a nearly constant facet of systemic CNS infection and is generally well controlled by suppressive systemic antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, there are instances when HIV can be detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) despite suppression of plasma viruses below the clinical limits of measurement. We review three types of CSF viral escape: asymptomatic, neuro-symptomatic, and secondary. The first, asymptomatic CSF escape, is seemingly benign and characterized by lack of discernable neurological deterioration or subsequent CNS disease progression. Neuro-symptomatic CSF escape is an uncommon, but important, entity characterized by new or progressive CNS disease that is critical to recognize clinically because of its management implications. Finally, secondary CSF escape, which may be even more uncommon, is defined by an increase of CSF HIV replication in association with a concomitant non-HIV infection, as a consequence of the local inflammatory response. Understanding these CSF escape settings not only is important for clinical diagnosis and management but also may provide insight into the CNS HIV reservoir. PMID:25860317

  9. Incidence, Causative Mechanisms, and Anatomic Localization of Stroke in Pituitary Adenoma Patients Treated With Postoperative Radiation Therapy Versus Surgery Alone

    SciTech Connect

    Sattler, Margriet G.A.; Vroomen, Patrick C.; Sluiter, Wim J.; Schers, Henk J.; Berg, Gerrit van den; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Bergh, Alphons C.M. van den; Beek, André P. van

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To assess and compare the incidence of stroke and stroke subtype in pituitary adenoma patients treated with postoperative radiation therapy (RT) and surgery alone. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 462 pituitary adenoma patients treated between 1959 and 2008 at the University Medical Center Groningen in The Netherlands was studied. Radiation therapy was administered in 236 patients. The TOAST (Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) and the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification methods were used to determine causative mechanism and anatomic localization of stroke. Stroke incidences in patients treated with RT were compared with that observed after surgery alone. Risk factors for stroke incidence were studied by log–rank test, without and with stratification for other significant risk factors. In addition, the stroke incidence was compared with the incidence rate in the general Dutch population. Results: Thirteen RT patients were diagnosed with stroke, compared with 12 surgery-alone patients. The relative risk (RR) for stroke in patients treated with postoperative RT was not significantly different compared with surgery-alone patients (univariate RR 0.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.28-1.35, P=.23). Stroke risk factors were coronary or peripheral artery disease (univariate and multivariate RR 10.4, 95% CI 4.7-22.8, P<.001) and hypertension (univariate RR 3.9, 95% CI 1.6-9.8, P=.002). There was no difference in TOAST and Oxfordshire classification of stroke. In this pituitary adenoma cohort 25 strokes were observed, compared with 16.91 expected (standard incidence ratio 1.48, 95% CI 1.00-1.96, P=.049). Conclusions: In pituitary adenoma patients, an increased incidence of stroke was observed compared with the general population. However, postoperative RT was not associated with an increased incidence of stroke or differences in causative mechanism or anatomic localization of stroke compared with surgery alone. The primary stroke risk

  10. Effects of upper limb robot-assisted therapy in the rehabilitation of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Doo Han; Kim, Se Yun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of upper limb robot-assisted therapy in the rehabilitation of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen stroke patients with no visual or cognitive problems were enrolled. All subjects received robot-assisted therapy and comprehensive rehabilitation therapy for 30 minutes each. The experimental group received a conventional therapy and an additional half hour per weekday of robot therapy. The patients participated in a total of 20 sessions, each lasting 60 minutes (conventional therapy 30 min, robot-assisted therapy 30 min), which were held 5 days a week for 4 weeks. [Result] The patients showed a significant difference in smoothness and reach error of the point to point test, circle size and independence of the circle in the circle test, and hold deviation of the playback static test between before and after the intervention. On the other hand, no significant difference was observed in the displacement of the round dynamic test. The patients also showed significant improvement in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Modified Barthel Index after the intervention. [Conclusion] These kinematic factors can provide good information when analyzing the upper limb function of stroke patients in robot-assisted therapy. Nevertheless, further research on technology-based kinematic information will be necessary. PMID:25931706

  11. Building a "brain attack" team to administer thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hill, M D; Barber, P A; Demchuk, A M; Sevick, R J; Newcommon, N J; Green, T; Buchan, A M

    2000-01-01

    Before tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) was licensed for use in Canada, in February 1999, the Calgary Regional Stroke Program spearheaded the development and organization of local resources to use thrombolytic therapy in patients who had experienced acute ischemic stroke. In 1996 special permission was obtained from the Calgary Regional Health Authority to use intravenously administered tPA for acute ischemic stroke, and ethical and scientific review boards approved the protocols. After 3 years our efforts have resulted in improved patient outcomes, shorter times from symptom onset to treatment and acceptable adverse event rates. Areas for continued improvement include the door-to-needle time and broader education of the public about the symptoms of acute ischemic stroke. PMID:10862236

  12. Combining Dopaminergic Facilitation with Robot-Assisted Upper Limb Therapy in Stroke Survivors: A Focused Review.

    PubMed

    Tran, Duc A; Pajaro-Blazquez, Marta; Daneault, Jean-Francois; Gallegos, Jaime G; Pons, Jose; Fregni, Felipe; Bonato, Paolo; Zafonte, Ross

    2016-06-01

    Despite aggressive conventional therapy, lasting hemiplegia persists in a large percentage of stroke survivors. The aim of this article is to critically review the rationale behind targeting multiple sites along the motor learning network by combining robotic therapy with pharmacotherapy and virtual reality-based reward learning to alleviate upper extremity impairment in stroke survivors. Methods for personalizing pharmacologic facilitation to each individual's unique biology are also reviewed. At the molecular level, treatment with levodopa was shown to induce long-term potentiation-like and practice-dependent plasticity. Clinically, trials combining conventional therapy with levodopa in stroke survivors yielded statistically significant but clinically unconvincing outcomes because of limited personalization, standardization, and reproducibility. Robotic therapy can induce neuroplasticity by delivering intensive, reproducible, and functionally meaningful interventions that are objective enough for the rigors of research. Robotic therapy also provides an apt platform for virtual reality, which boosts learning by engaging reward circuits. The future of stroke rehabilitation should target distinct molecular, synaptic, and cortical sites through personalized multimodal treatments to maximize motor recovery. PMID:26829074

  13. Combining Dopaminergic Facilitation with Robot-Assisted Upper Limb Therapy in Stroke Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Duc A.; Pajaro-Blazquez, Marta; Daneault, Jean-Francois; Gallegos, Jaime G.; Pons, Jose; Fregni, Felipe; Bonato, Paolo; Zafonte, Ross

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite aggressive conventional therapy, lasting hemiplegia persists in a large percentage of stroke survivors. The aim of this article is to critically review the rationale behind targeting multiple sites along the motor learning network by combining robotic therapy with pharmacotherapy and virtual reality–based reward learning to alleviate upper extremity impairment in stroke survivors. Methods for personalizing pharmacologic facilitation to each individual’s unique biology are also reviewed. At the molecular level, treatment with levodopa was shown to induce long-term potentiation-like and practice-dependent plasticity. Clinically, trials combining conventional therapy with levodopa in stroke survivors yielded statistically significant but clinically unconvincing outcomes because of limited personalization, standardization, and reproducibility. Robotic therapy can induce neuroplasticity by delivering intensive, reproducible, and functionally meaningful interventions that are objective enough for the rigors of research. Robotic therapy also provides an apt platform for virtual reality, which boosts learning by engaging reward circuits. The future of stroke rehabilitation should target distinct molecular, synaptic, and cortical sites through personalized multimodal treatments to maximize motor recovery. PMID:26829074

  14. Gesture Therapy: A Vision-Based System for Arm Rehabilitation after Stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sucar, L. Enrique; Azcárate, Gildardo; Leder, Ron S.; Reinkensmeyer, David; Hernández, Jorge; Sanchez, Israel; Saucedo, Pedro

    Each year millions of people in the world survive a stroke, in the U.S. alone the figure is over 600,000 people per year. Movement impairments after stroke are typically treated with intensive, hands-on physical and occupational therapy for several weeks after the initial injury. However, due to economic pressures, stroke patients are receiving less therapy and going home sooner, so the potential benefit of the therapy is not completely realized. Thus, it is important to develop rehabilitation technology that allows individuals who had suffered a stroke to practice intensive movement training without the expense of an always-present therapist. Current solutions are too expensive, as they require a robotic system for rehabilitation. We have developed a low-cost, computer vision system that allows individuals with stroke to practice arm movement exercises at home or at the clinic, with periodic interactions with a therapist. The system integrates a web based virtual environment for facilitating repetitive movement training, with state-of-the art computer vision algorithms that track the hand of a patient and obtain its 3-D coordinates, using two inexpensive cameras and a conventional personal computer. An initial prototype of the system has been evaluated in a pilot clinical study with promising results.

  15. METHODOLOGY OF THE FIELD ADMINISTRATION OF STROKE THERAPY - MAGNESIUM (FAST-MAG) PHASE 3 TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Saver, Jeffrey L.; Starkman, Sidney; Eckstein, Marc; Stratton, Samuel; Pratt, Frank; Hamilton, Scott; Conwit, Robin; Liebeskind, David S.; Sung, Gene; Sanossian, Nerses

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Prehospital initiation by paramedics may enable delivery of neuroprotective therapies to stroke patients in the hyperacute period when they are most effective in preclinical studies. Magnesium is neuroprotective in experimental stroke models and has been shown to be safe with signals of potential efficacy when started early after onset of human cerebral ischemia. Aims 1) To demonstrate that paramedic initiation of the neuroprotective agent magnesium sulfate in the field is an efficacious and safe treatment for acute stroke; 2) To demonstrate that field enrollment of acute stroke patients is a practical and feasible strategy for phase 3 stroke trials, permitting enrollment of greater numbers of patients in hyperacute time windows. Design Multicenter, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, pivotal clinical trial. Study Procedures The study is enrolling 1700 patients (850 in each arm) with likely acute stroke, including both cerebral infarction and intracerebral hemorrhage patients. Inclusion criteria are: 1) likely stroke as identified by the modified Los Angeles Prehospital Stroke Screen (mLAPSS), 2) age 40–95, 3) symptom onset within 2 hours of treatment initiation, and 4) deficit present ≥ 15 minutes. Paramedics administer a loading dose of magnesium sulfate (Mg) or matched placebo in the field, 4 grams over 15 minutes. In the Emergency Department, a maintenance infusion follows, 16 grams Mg or matched placebo over 24 hours. Outcomes The primary endpoint is the modified Rankin Scale measure of global disability, assessed using the Rankin Focused Assessment, 90 days after treatment. Secondary efficacy endpoints include the NIHSS (neurologic deficit), Barthel Index (activities of daily living), and the Stroke Impact Scale (quality of life). PMID:24444116

  16. Healthy Living after Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Stroke Weight Training After Stroke Tips for Improving Fine Motor Skills Functional Tone Management Arm Training Program Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy Emotional & Behavioral Challenges Self-Esteem after Stroke Post-Stroke Mood Disorders One-side ...

  17. Early and intermediate prognosis of intravenous thrombolytic therapy in acute ischemic stroke subtypes according to the causative classification of stroke system

    PubMed Central

    Pashapour, Ali; Atalu, Abolfazl; Farhoudi, Mehdi; Taheraghdam, Ali-Akbar; Sadeghi Hokmabadi, Elyar; Sharifipour, Ehsan; NajafiNeshli, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Intravenous thrombolytic therapy has established acceptable results in treating ischemic stroke. However, there is little information on treatment outcome especially in different subtypes. The aim of current study was to evaluate early and intermediate prognosis in intravenous thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke subtypes. Methodology: Forty eligible patients (57.5% male with mean age of 63.18±13.49 years) with definite ischemic stroke who were admitted to emergency department of Imam Reza University Hospital, in the first 180 minutes after occurrence received recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. All investigation findings were recorded and stroke subtypes were determined according to the Causative Classification of Stroke System. Stroke severity forms including modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores were recorded for all patients in first, seven and 90 days after stroke and disease outcome was evaluated. Results: The etiology of stroke was large artery atherosclerosis in 20%, cardio-aortic embolism in 45%, small artery occlusion in 17.5% and undetermined causes in 17.5%. NIHSS and mRS scores were significantly improved during time (P < 0.001 in both cases). Three months mortality rate was 25%. Among the etiologies, patients with small artery occlusion and then cardio-aortic embolism had lower NIHSS score at arrival (P = 0.04). Caplan-meier analysis showed that age, sex and symptom to needle time could predict disease outcome. Conclusion: Intravenous thrombolytic therapy is accompanied by good early and intermediate outcome in most patients with ischemic stroke. Small artery occlusion subtype had less disease severity and higher improvement. PMID:24353536

  18. Review of technology development and clinical trials of transcranial laser therapy for acute ischemic stroke treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanzaro, Brian E.; Streeter, Jackson; de Taboada, Luis

    2010-02-01

    Stroke is the one of the leading causes of mortality in the United States, claiming 600,000 lives each year. Evidence suggests that near infrared (NIR) illumination has a beneficial effect on a variety of cells when these cells are exposed to adverse conditions. Among these conditions is the hypoxic state produced by acute ischemic stroke (AIS). To demonstrate the impact NIR Transcranial Laser Therapy (TLT) has on AIS in humans, a series of double blind, placebo controlled clinical trials were designed using the NeuroThera(R) System (NTS). The NTS was designed and developed to treat subjects non-invasively using 808 nm NIR illumination. TLT, as it applies to stroke therapy, and the NTS will be described. The results of the two clinical trials: NeuroThera(R) Safety and Efficacy Trial 1 (NEST-1) and NeuroThera(R) Safety and Efficacy Trial 2 (NEST-2) will be reviewed and discussed.

  19. Interactive visuo-motor therapy system for stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Eng, Kynan; Siekierka, Ewa; Pyk, Pawel; Chevrier, Edith; Hauser, Yves; Cameirao, Monica; Holper, Lisa; Hägni, Karin; Zimmerli, Lukas; Duff, Armin; Schuster, Corina; Bassetti, Claudio; Verschure, Paul; Kiper, Daniel

    2007-09-01

    We present a virtual reality (VR)-based motor neurorehabilitation system for stroke patients with upper limb paresis. It is based on two hypotheses: (1) observed actions correlated with self-generated or intended actions engage cortical motor observation, planning and execution areas ("mirror neurons"); (2) activation in damaged parts of motor cortex can be enhanced by viewing mirrored movements of non-paretic limbs. We postulate that our approach, applied during the acute post-stroke phase, facilitates motor re-learning and improves functional recovery. The patient controls a first-person view of virtual arms in tasks varying from simple (hitting objects) to complex (grasping and moving objects). The therapist adjusts weighting factors in the non-paretic limb to move the paretic virtual limb, thereby stimulating the mirror neuron system and optimizing patient motivation through graded task success. We present the system's neuroscientific background, technical details and preliminary results. PMID:17687578

  20. Robotic Technologies and Rehabilitation: New Tools for Stroke Patients' Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Patrizia; Morone, Giovanni; Rosati, Giulio; Masiero, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The role of robotics in poststroke patients' rehabilitation has been investigated intensively. This paper presents the state-of-the-art and the possible future role of robotics in poststroke rehabilitation, for both upper and lower limbs. Materials and Methods. We performed a comprehensive search of PubMed, Cochrane, and PeDRO databases using as keywords “robot AND stroke AND rehabilitation.” Results and Discussion. In upper limb robotic rehabilitation, training seems to improve arm function in activities of daily living. In addition, electromechanical gait training after stroke seems to be effective. It is still unclear whether robot-assisted arm training may improve muscle strength, and which electromechanical gait-training device may be the most effective for walking training implementation. Conclusions. In the field of robotic technologies for stroke patients' rehabilitation we identified currently relevant growing points and areas timely for developing research. Among the growing points there is the development of new easily transportable, wearable devices that could improve rehabilitation also after discharge, in an outpatient or home-based setting. For developing research, efforts are being made to establish the ideal type of treatment, the length and amount of training protocol, and the patient's characteristics to be successfully enrolled to this treatment. PMID:24350244

  1. Dysphagia Therapy in Stroke: A Survey of Speech and Language Ttherapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, S. K.; Wellwood, I.; Smith, C. H.; Newham, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dysphagia is common after stroke, leading to adverse outcome. There is a paucity of high-quality evidence for dysphagia therapy, thus making it difficult to determine the best approaches to treatment. Clinical decisions are often based on usual practice, however no formal method of monitoring practice patterns exists. Aims: To…

  2. Logistical and financial obstacles for endovascular therapy of acute stroke implementation.

    PubMed

    Schellinger, Peter D; Köhrmann, Martin; Nogueira, Raul G

    2016-07-01

    After publication of the recent positive randomized clinical endovascular trials, several questions and obstacles for wide spread implementation remain. We address specific issues namely efficacy, safety, logistics, timing, sedation, numbers, imaging, manpower, centers, geographics, and economical aspects of endovascular therapy. As we move forward, a high degree of collaboration will be crucial to implement a therapy with established overwhelming treatment efficacy for severe acute stroke patients. PMID:27016510

  3. Antiplatelet therapy for secondary prevention of noncardioembolic ischemic stroke: a critical review.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Martin J; Hankey, Graeme J; Eikelboom, John W

    2008-05-01

    For patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack caused by atherothromboembolism, immediate and long-term aspirin reduces the relative risk of recurrent stroke, MI, and death attributable to vascular causes. Oral anticoagulation is not more effective than aspirin. Long-term clopidogrel reduces the relative risk of stroke, MI, or vascular death by about 9% (0.3% to 16.5%) compared with aspirin. Any long-term benefits of clopidogrel combined with aspirin, compared with aspirin or clopidogrel alone, appear to be offset by increased major bleeding. The combination of aspirin and extended-release dipyridamole reduces the relative odds of stroke, MI, or vascular death by about 18% (odds ratio 0.82, 0.74 to 0.91) compared with aspirin alone without causing more bleeding. Cilostazole reduces the risk of stroke, MI, or vascular death by 39% compared to placebo. A large clinical trial comparing clopidogrel with the combination of aspirin and dipyridamole, in >20 000 patients with recent (<120 days) atherothrombotic ischemic stroke, is expected to report in 2008. Emerging antiplatelet therapies presently being evaluated for secondary prevention of atherothromboembolism include other P(2)Y(12) ADP receptor antagonists (prasugrel, cangrelor, AZD 6140), thromboxane receptor antagonists (eg, S18886 - terutroban), and thrombin receptor (PAR-1) antagonists (eg, SCH530348). PMID:18369175

  4. Warfarin versus aspirin: using CHADS2 to guide therapy for stroke prevention in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hopps, Sarah; Marcy, Todd R

    2009-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) results in nearly a quarter of the strokes suffered in patients 80 to 89 years of age. Aspirin and warfarin are primary choices for preventing these ischemic strokes. CHADS2 (Congestive heart failure, Hypertention, Age, Diabetes, Stroke) is a validated assessment tool for cardioembolic stroke in AF. Ischemic stroke rates increase from 1.9 to 18.2 events per 100 patient-years with CHADS2 scores of 0 and 6, respectively. Warfarin is more effective than aspirin at preventing stroke in AF, but is associated with more hemorrhagic events. The American College of Chest Physicians recommends the use of warfarin in patients with a CHADS2 score of 2 or higher and suggests warfarin be used in patients with a score of 1. We recommend a patient-specific approach to therapy in which warfarin is offered to patients with a CHADS2 score of 1 or higher unless the patient is at high risk for a hemorrhagic event or cannot attain regular warfarin monitoring. PMID:20092222

  5. Effects of Art Therapy Using Color on Purpose in Life in Patients with Stroke and Their Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Kyoung

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Patients with stroke suffer from physical disabilities, followed by mental instability. Their caregivers also suffer from mental instability. The present study attempted to address the degree and the change of the level of Purpose in Life (PIL) in patients with stroke and caregivers by applying art therapy using colors. Materials and Methods Twenty-eight stroke patients with a good functional recovery or a moderate disability and their 28 caregivers were selected and evaluated. The period of the study between the stroke and color therapy was more than 6 months. Patients and caregivers were divided into the color therapy (28) and control groups (28). A questionnaire, which measures the level of PIL was conducted separately for patients and caregivers prior to the first session of color therapy (2 hours per week, total 16 sessions). The final examination was performed 5 months after the last color therapy session. Results There was significant difference between before and after color therapy when the level of PIL was measured both in patients and caregivers (p<0.01). These were the same between the color therapy group, compared with the control group (p<0.01). As color therapy progressed to the late phase, patients and caregivers applied increasing number of colors and color intensity. Conclusion These results prove that color therapy will improve PIL of the patients with post-stroke disability and caregivers. Furthermore, color therapy would be a useful adjuvant for improving the quality of life of the patients with stroke and their caregivers. PMID:23225793

  6. Movement therapy induced neural reorganization and motor recovery in stroke: a review.

    PubMed

    Arya, Kamal Narayan; Pandian, Shanta; Verma, Rajesh; Garg, R K

    2011-10-01

    This paper is a review conducted to provide an overview of accumulated evidence on contemporary rehabilitation methods for stroke survivors. Loss of functional movement is a common consequence of stroke for which a wide range of interventions has been developed. Traditional therapeutic approaches have shown limited results for motor deficits as well as lack evidence for their effectiveness. Stroke rehabilitation is now based on the evidence of neuroplasticity, which is responsible for recovery following stroke. The neuroplastic changes in the structure and function of relevant brain areas are induced primarily by specific rehabilitation methods. The therapeutic method which induces neuroplastic changes, leads to greater motor and functional recovery than traditional methods. Further, the recovery is permanent in nature. During the last decade various novel stroke rehabilitative methods for motor recovery have been developed. This review focuses on the methods that have evidence of associated cortical level reorganization, namely task-specific training, constraint-induced movement therapy, robotic training, mental imaging, and virtual training. All of these methods utilize principles of motor learning. The findings from this review demonstrated convincing evidence both at the neural and functional level in response to such therapies. The main aim of the review was to determine the evidence for these methods and their application into clinical practice. PMID:21943628

  7. Use of virtual reality to promote hand therapy post-stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoupikova, Daria; Stoykov, Nikolay; Vick, Randy; Li, Yu; Kamper, Derek; Listenberger, Molly

    2013-03-01

    A novel artistic virtual reality (VR) environment was developed and tested for use as a rehabilitation protocol for post-stroke hand rehabilitation therapy. The system was developed by an interdisciplinary team of engineers, art therapists, occupational therapists, and VR artists to improve patients' motivation and engagement. Specific exercises were developed to explicitly promote the practice of therapeutic tasks requiring hand and arm coordination for upper extremity rehabilitation. Here we describe system design, development, and user testing for efficiency, subject's satisfaction and clinical feasibility. We report results of the completed qualitative, pre-clinical pilot study of the system effectiveness for therapy. Fourteen stroke survivors with chronic hemiparesis participated in a single training session within the environment to gauge user response to the protocol through a custom survey. Results indicate that users found the system comfortable, enjoyable, tiring; instructions clear, and reported a high level of satisfaction with the VR environment and rehabilitation task variety and difficulty. Most patients reported very positive impressions of the VR environment and rated it highly, appreciating its engagement and motivation. We are currently conducting a longitudinal intervention study over 6 weeks in stroke survivors with chronic hemiparesis. Initial results following use of the system on the first subjects demonstrate that the system is operational and can facilitate therapy for post stroke patients with upper extremity impairment.

  8. Multimedia-Based Therapy Model for Non-Pharmacological Stroke with Decrease Impaired Muscle Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajar Puji Sejati, Rr; Muhimmah, Izzati; Mahtarami, Affan

    2016-01-01

    Stroke patients who experience a decrease in muscle strength need to do exercises so that they can increase their muscle strength. In order to enable the patient does exercise independently the multimedia-based stroke therapy model is needed. These exercises can be done independently, with supervision of the family member at home. So, we develop prototype of the multimedia-based therapy for the family member so that they can assist patients performing exercises without attending therapy session in hospital. This model was built according to the advices from physiotherapist and a medical rehabilitation doctor. This model has been evaluated through focused group discussion by physiotherapists. And they gave positive responses to this proposed model.

  9. Meta-Analysis of Local Endovascular Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Sean A; Baerlocher, Mark O; Baerlocher, Felix; Socko, Daniel; Sacks, David; Nikolic, Boris; Wojak, Joan C; Haskal, Ziv J

    2016-03-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to assess randomized controlled trials comparing local endovascular therapy (with and without intravenous thrombolysis) versus standard care (intravenous thrombolysis alone when appropriate) for acute ischemic stroke. Local endovascular therapy showed a significant improvement in functional independence versus standard care (odds ratio, 1.779; 95% confidence interval, 1.262-2.507; P < .001). This benefit strengthened further on subgroup analyses of trials in which a majority of cases used stent retrievers, trials with intravenous thrombolysis use in both arms when appropriate, and trials that required preprocedural imaging of all patients. There were no significant differences between arms in terms of mortality, hemicraniectomy, intracranial hemorrhage, and cerebral edema rates (P > .05). In conclusion, in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, local endovascular therapy leads to improved functional independence compared with standard care. PMID:26803573

  10. Modified constraint-induced movement therapy for clients with chronic stroke: interrupted time series (ITS) design

    PubMed Central

    Park, JuHyung; Lee, NaYun; Cho, YongHo; Yang, YeongAe

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact that modified constraint-induced movement therapy has on upper extremity function and the daily life of chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Modified constraint-induced movement therapy was conduct for 2 stroke patients with hemiplegia. It was performed 5 days a week for 2 weeks, and the participants performed their daily living activities wearing mittens for 6 hours a day, including the 2 hours of the therapy program. The assessment was conducted 5 times in 3 weeks before and after intervention. The upper extremity function was measured using the box and block test and a dynamometer, and performance daily of living activities was assessed using the modified Barthel index. The results were analyzed using a scatterplot and linear regression. [Results] All the upper extremity functions of the participants all improved after the modified constraint-induced movement therapy. Performance of daily living activities by participant 1 showed no change, but the results of participant 2 had improved after the intervention. [Conclusion] Through the results of this research, it was identified that modified constraint-induced movement therapy is effective at improving the upper extremity functions and the performance of daily living activities of chronic stroke patients. PMID:25931770

  11. Different immunological mechanisms govern protection from experimental stroke in young and older mice with recombinant TCR ligand therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dotson, Abby L.; Zhu, Wenbin; Libal, Nicole; Alkayed, Nabil J.; Offner, Halina

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States. The lack of clinical success in stroke therapies can be attributed, in part, to inadequate basic research on aging rodents. The current study demonstrates that recombinant TCR ligand therapy uses different immunological mechanisms to protect young and older mice from experimental stroke. In young mice, RTL1000 therapy inhibited splenocyte efflux while reducing frequency of T cells and macrophages in the spleen. Older mice treated with RTL1000 exhibited a significant reduction in inflammatory cells in the brain and inhibition of splenic atrophy. Our data suggest age specific differences in immune response to stroke that allow unique targeting of stroke immunotherapies. PMID:25309326

  12. Noninvasive ventilatory correction as an adjunct to an experimental systemic reperfusion therapy in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Barlinn, Kristian; Balucani, Clotilde; Palazzo, Paola; Zhao, Limin; Sisson, April; Alexandrov, Andrei V

    2010-01-01

    Background. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common condition in patients with acute ischemic stroke and associated with early clinical deterioration and poor functional outcome. However, noninvasive ventilatory correction is hardly considered as a complementary treatment option during the treatment phase of acute ischemic stroke. Summary of Case. A 55-year-old woman with an acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion received intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and enrolled into a thrombolytic research study. During tPA infusion, she became drowsy, developed apnea episodes, desaturated and neurologically deteriorated without recanalization, re-occlusion or intracerebral hemorrhage. Urgent noninvasive ventilatory correction with biphasic positive airway pressure (BiPAP) reversed neurological fluctuation. Her MCA completely recanalized 24 hours later. Conclusions. Noninvasive ventilatory correction should be considered more aggressively as a complementary treatment option in selected acute stroke patients. Early initiation of BiPAP can stabilize cerebral hemodynamics and may unmask the true potential of other therapies. PMID:21052540

  13. Treating anxiety after stroke using cognitive-behaviour therapy: Two cases

    PubMed Central

    Kneebone, Ian I.; Jeffries, Fiona W.

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are common after stroke. However, information on how to treat them with psychotherapy in this population is highly limited. Modified cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) has the potential to assist. Two cases of individuals treated with modified CBT for anxiety after stroke are presented. The modification was required in light of deficits in executive and memory function in one individual and in the context of communication difficulties in the other. The anxiety symptoms were treated over seven and nine sessions, respectively. Both participants improved following the intervention, and these improvements were maintained at 3 month follow-ups. Further case-series and randomised controlled designs are required to support and develop modified CBT for those with anxiety after stroke. PMID:23889561

  14. Stroke in atrial fibrillation: update on pathophysiology, new antithrombotic therapies, and evolution of procedures and devices.

    PubMed

    Savelieva, Irina; Bajpai, Abhay; Camm, A John

    2007-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is said to be an epidemic, affecting 1%-1.5% of the population in the developed world. The clinical significance of AF lies predominantly in a 5-fold increased risk of stroke. Strokes associated with AF are usually more severe and confer increased risk of morbidity, mortality, and poor functional outcome. Despite the advent of promising experimental therapies for selected patients with acute stroke, pharmacological primary prevention remains the best approach to reducing the burden of stroke. New antithrombotic drugs include both parenteral agents (e.g. a long-acting factor Xa inhibitor idraparinux) and oral anticoagulants, such as oral factor Xa inhibitors and direct oral thrombin inhibitors (ximelagatran, dabigatran). Ximelagatran had shown significant potential as a possible replacement to warfarin therapy, but has been withdrawn because of potential liver toxicity. Its congener dabigatran appears to have a better safety profile and has recently entered a phase III randomized clinical trial in AF. Oral factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban, YM150) inhibit factor Xa directly, without antithrombin III mediation, and may prove to be more potent and safe. Selective inhibitors of specific coagulation factors involved in the initiation and propagation of the coagulation cascade (factor IXa, factor VIIa, circulating tissue factor) are at an early stage of development. Additional new agents with hypothetical, although not yet proven, anticoagulation benefits include nematode anticoagulant peptide (NAPc2), protein C derivatives, and soluble thrombomodulin. A battery of novel mechanical approaches for the prevention of cardioembolic stroke has recently been evaluated, including various models of percutaneous left atrial appendage occluders which block the connection between the left atrium and the left atrial appendage, minimally invasive surgical isolation of the left atrial appendage, and implantation of the carotid filtering devices which

  15. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy for Rehabilitation of Arm Dysfunction After Stroke in Adults

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The purpose of this evidence-based analysis is to determine the effectiveness and cost of CIMT for persons with arm dysfunction after a stroke. Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population A stroke is a sudden loss of brain function caused by the interruption of blood flow to the brain (ischemic stroke) or the rupture of blood vessels in the brain (hemorrhagic stroke). A stroke can affect any number of areas including the ability to move, see, remember, speak, reason, and read and write. Stroke is the leading cause of adult neurological disability in Canada; 300,000 people or 1% of the population live with its effects. Up to 85% of persons experiencing a complete stroke have residual arm dysfunction which will interfere with their ability to live independently. Rehabilitation interventions are the cornerstone of care and recovery after a stroke. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy Constraint-Induced Movement (CIMT) is a behavioural approach to neurorehabilitation based on the principle of ‘learned non-use’. The term is derived from studies in nonhuman primates in which somatosensory deafferentation of a single forelimb was performed and after which the animal then failed to use that limb. This failure to use the limb was deemed ‘learned non-use’. The major components of CIMT include: i) intense repetitive task-oriented training of the impaired limb ii) immobilization of the unimpaired arm, and iii) shaping. With regard to the first component, persons may train the affected arm for several hours a day for up to 10-15 consecutive days. With immobilization, the unaffected arm may be restrained for up to 90% of waking hours. And finally, with shaping, the difficulty of the training tasks is progressively increased as performance improves and encouraging feedback is provided immediately when small gains are achieved. Research Question What is the effectiveness and cost of CIMT compared with physiotherapy and/or occupational therapy

  16. Targeting Microglial Activation in Stroke Therapy: Pharmacological Tools and Gender Effects

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y.; Won, S.J.; Xu, Y.; Swanson, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is caused by critical reductions in blood flow to brain or spinal cord. Microglia are the resident immune cells of the central nervous system, and they respond to stroke by assuming an activated phenotype that releases cytotoxic cytokines, reactive oxygen species, proteases, and other factors. This acute, innate immune response may be teleologically adapted to limit infection, but in stroke this response can exacerbate injury by further damaging or killing nearby neurons and other cell types, and by recruiting infiltration of circulating cytotoxic immune cells. The microglial response requires hours to days to fully develop, and this time interval presents a clinically accessible time window for initiating therapy. Because of redundancy in cytotoxic microglial responses, the most effective therapeutic approach may be to target the global gene expression changes involved in microglial activation. Several classes of drugs can do this, including histone deacetylase inhibitors, minocycline and other PARP inhibitors, corticosteroids, and inhibitors of TNFα and scavenger receptor signaling. Here we review the pre-clinical studies in which these drugs have been used to suppress microglial activation after stroke. We also review recent advances in the understanding of sex differences in the CNS inflammatory response, as these differences are likely to influence the efficacy of drugs targeting post-stroke brain inflammation. PMID:24372213

  17. Cell based therapies for ischemic stroke: From basic science to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinfeng; Ye, Ruidong; Yan, Tao; Yu, Shan Ping; Wei, Ling; Xu, Gelin; Fan, Xinying; Jiang, Yongjun; Stetler, R. Anne; Liu, George; Chen, Jieli

    2014-01-01

    Cell therapy is emerging as a viable therapy to restore neurological function after stroke. Many types of stem/progenitor cells from different sources have been explored for their feasibility and efficacy for the treatment of stroke. Transplanted cells not only have the potential to replace the lost circuitry, but also produce growth and trophic factors, or stimulate the release of such factors from host brain cells, thereby enhancing endogenous brain repair processes. Although stem/progenitor cells have shown a promising role in ischemic stroke in experimental studies as well as initial clinical pilot studies, cellular therapy is still at an early stage in humans. Many critical issues need to be addressed including the therapeutic time window, cell type selection, delivery route, and in vivo monitoring of their migration pattern. This review attempts to provide a comprehensive synopsis of preclinical evidence and clinical experience of various donor cell types, their restorative mechanisms, delivery routes, imaging strategies, future prospects and challenges for translating cell therapies as a neurorestorative regimen in clinical applications. PMID:24333397

  18. A Novel Cell Therapy Method for Recovering after Brain Stroke in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Seyed Mojtaba; Farahmandnia, Mohammad; Kazemi, Sepehr; Shakibajahromi, Benafshe; Sarvestani, Fatemeh Sabet; Khodabande, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Background Nowadays, stroke leads to a significant part of the adult mortality and morbidity and also it could result in some neurological deficits in the patients’ lives. Cell therapy has opened a new approach to treat the brain ischemia and reduce its terrible effects on the patients’ lives. There are several articles which show that the cell therapy could be beneficial for treating brain stroke. In this study, we have planned to present a new cell therapy method for stroke by administration of Mesenchymal stem cells and differentiated neural stem cells without astrocytes. Method and Materials The Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from tibia and femur of a 250~300 g rat and they were cultured in DMEM/F12, 10% fetal bovine serum, 1% Pen/Strep. Neural stem cells were isolated from 14 days rat embryo ganglion eminence and were cultured in NSA media containing Neurobasal, 2% B27, bFGF 10 ng/ml and EGF 20 ng/ml after 5 days they formed some neurospheres. The isolated neural stem cells were differentiated to neural lineages by adding 5% fetal bovine serum to their culture media. After 48 hours the astrocytes were depleted by using MACS kit. Results The group that received Mesenchymal stem cells systemically and differentiated neural stem cells without astrocytes had the best neurological outcomes and the least infarct volume and apoptosis. It could be understood that this cell therapy method might cause almost full recovery after brain stoke. Conclusion Using combination cell therapy with Mesenchymal stem cells and differentiated neural stem cells with removed astrocyte could provide a novel method for curing brain stroke. PMID:26634067

  19. Sonification of Arm Movements in Stroke Rehabilitation – A Novel Approach in Neurologic Music Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Daniel S.; Rohde, Sönke; Nikmaram, Nikou; Brückner, Hans-Peter; Großbach, Michael; Rollnik, Jens D.; Altenmüller, Eckart O.

    2016-01-01

    Gross motor impairments are common after stroke, but efficient and motivating therapies for these impairments are scarce. We present an innovative musical sonification therapy, especially designed to retrain patients’ gross motor functions. Sonification should motivate patients and provide additional sensory input informing about relative limb position. Twenty-five stroke patients were included in a clinical pre–post study and took part in the sonification training. The patients’ upper extremity functions, their psychological states, and their arm movement smoothness were assessed pre and post training. Patients were randomly assigned to either of two groups. Both groups received an average of 10 days (M = 9.88; SD = 2.03; 30 min/day) of musical sonification therapy [music group (MG)] or a sham sonification movement training [control group (CG)], respectively. The only difference between the two protocols was that in the CG no sound was played back during training. In the beginning, patients explored the acoustic effects of their arm movements in space. At the end of the training, the patients played simple melodies by coordinated arm movements. The 15 patients in the MG showed significantly reduced joint pain (F = 19.96, p < 0.001) in the Fugl–Meyer assessment after training. They also reported a trend to have improved hand function in the stroke impact scale as compared to the CG. Movement smoothness at day 1, day 5, and the last day of the intervention was compared in MG patients and found to be significantly better after the therapy. Taken together, musical sonification may be a promising therapy for motor impairments after stroke, but further research is required since estimated effect sizes point to moderate treatment outcomes. PMID:27445970

  20. Sonification of Arm Movements in Stroke Rehabilitation - A Novel Approach in Neurologic Music Therapy.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Daniel S; Rohde, Sönke; Nikmaram, Nikou; Brückner, Hans-Peter; Großbach, Michael; Rollnik, Jens D; Altenmüller, Eckart O

    2016-01-01

    Gross motor impairments are common after stroke, but efficient and motivating therapies for these impairments are scarce. We present an innovative musical sonification therapy, especially designed to retrain patients' gross motor functions. Sonification should motivate patients and provide additional sensory input informing about relative limb position. Twenty-five stroke patients were included in a clinical pre-post study and took part in the sonification training. The patients' upper extremity functions, their psychological states, and their arm movement smoothness were assessed pre and post training. Patients were randomly assigned to either of two groups. Both groups received an average of 10 days (M = 9.88; SD = 2.03; 30 min/day) of musical sonification therapy [music group (MG)] or a sham sonification movement training [control group (CG)], respectively. The only difference between the two protocols was that in the CG no sound was played back during training. In the beginning, patients explored the acoustic effects of their arm movements in space. At the end of the training, the patients played simple melodies by coordinated arm movements. The 15 patients in the MG showed significantly reduced joint pain (F = 19.96, p < 0.001) in the Fugl-Meyer assessment after training. They also reported a trend to have improved hand function in the stroke impact scale as compared to the CG. Movement smoothness at day 1, day 5, and the last day of the intervention was compared in MG patients and found to be significantly better after the therapy. Taken together, musical sonification may be a promising therapy for motor impairments after stroke, but further research is required since estimated effect sizes point to moderate treatment outcomes. PMID:27445970

  1. The Dark Side of the Force – Constraints and Complications of Cell Therapies for Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Boltze, Johannes; Arnold, Antje; Walczak, Piotr; Jolkkonen, Jukka; Cui, Lili; Wagner, Daniel-Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapies are increasingly recognized as a promising option to augment the limited therapeutic arsenal available to fight ischemic stroke. During the last two decades, cumulating preclinical evidence has indicated a substantial efficacy for most cell treatment paradigms and first clinical trials are currently underway to assess safety and feasibility in patients. However, the strong and still unmet demand for novel stroke treatment options and exciting findings reported from experimental studies may have drawn our attention away from potential side effects related to cell therapies and the ways by which they are commonly applied. This review summarizes common and less frequent adverse events that have been discovered in preclinical and clinical investigations assessing cell therapies for stroke. Such adverse events range from immunological and neoplastic complications over seizures to cell clotting and cell-induced embolism. It also describes potential complications of clinically applicable administration procedures, detrimental interactions between therapeutic cells, and the pathophysiological environment that they are placed into, as well as problems related to cell manufacturing. Virtually each therapeutic intervention comes at a certain risk for complications. Side effects do therefore not generally compromise the value of cell treatments for stroke, but underestimating such complications might severely limit therapeutic safety and efficacy of cell treatment protocols currently under development. On the other hand, a better understanding will provide opportunities to further improve existing therapeutic strategies and might help to define those circumstances, under which an optimal effect can be realized. Hence, the review eventually discusses strategies and recommendations allowing us to prevent or at least balance potential complications in order to ensure the maximum therapeutic benefit at minimum risk for stroke patients. PMID:26257702

  2. Unusual case of recurrent SMART (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Ramnath Santosh; Sreedher, Gayathri; Malhotra, Konark; Guduru, Zain; Agarwal, Deeksha; Flaherty, Mary; Leichliter, Timothy; Rana, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome is a rare delayed complication of cerebral radiation therapy. A 53-year-old female initially presented with headache, confusion and left homonymous hemianopia. Her medical history was notable for cerebellar hemangioblastoma, which was treated with radiation in 1987. Her initial brain MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) revealed cortical enhancement in the right temporo-parieto-occipital region. She improved spontaneously in 2 weeks and follow-up scan at 4 weeks revealed no residual enhancement or encephalomalacia. She presented 6 weeks later with aphasia. Her MRI brain revealed similar contrast-enhancing cortical lesion but on the left side. Repeat CSF studies was again negative other than elevated protein. She was treated conservatively and recovered completely within a week. Before diagnosing SMART syndrome, it is important to rule out tumor recurrence, encephalitis, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and stroke. Typically the condition is self-limiting, and gradually resolves. PMID:27570398

  3. Plasticity in the motor system related to therapy-induced improvement of movement after stroke.

    PubMed

    Kopp, B; Kunkel, A; Mühlnickel, W; Villringer, K; Taub, E; Flor, H

    1999-03-17

    Neuroplasticity might play a beneficial role in the recovery of function after stroke but empirical evidence for this is lacking thus far. Constraint-induced (CI) therapy was used to increase the use of a paretic upper extremity in four hemiparetic stroke patients. Dipole modeling of steady-state movement-related cortical potentials was applied before and after training and 3 months later. The source locations associated with affected hand movement were unusual at follow-up because activation of the ipsilateral hemisphere was found in the absence of mirror movements of the unaffected hand. This long-term change may be considered as an initial demonstration of large-scale neuroplasticity associated with increased use of the paretic limb after application of CI therapy. PMID:10208552

  4. The influence of statin therapy on platelet activity markers in hyperlipidemic patients after ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chmielewski, Henryk; Kaczorowska, Beata; Przybyła, Monika; Baj, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) has been reported to increase platelet activation. Reducing the level of LDL-C with statins induces important pleiotropic effects such as platelet inhibition. This association between platelet activity and statin therapy may be clinically important in reducing the risk of ischemic stroke. We investigated the effect of simvastatin therapy on platelet activation markers (platelet CD62P, sP-selectin, and platelet-derived microparticles (PDMPs)) in hyperlipidemic patients after ischemic stroke. Material and methods The study group consisted of 21 hyperlipidemic patients after ischemic stroke confirmed by CT, and 20 healthy subjects served as controls. We assessed the CD62P expression on resting and thrombin-activated blood platelets. CD62P and PDMPs were analyzed by the use of monoclonal antibodies anti-CD61 and anti-CD62 on a flow cytometer. The level of sP-selectin in serum was measured by the ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) method. All markers were re-analyzed after 6 months of treatment with simvastatin (20 mg/day). Results Hyperlipidemic patients presented a significantly higher percentage of CD62+ platelets and higher reactivity to thrombin compared to control subjects. After simvastatin therapy hyperlipidemic patients showed a reduction of the percentage of resting CD62P(+) platelets (p = 0.005) and a reduction of expression and percentage of CD62P(+) platelets after activation by thrombin (median p < 0.05; percentage: p = 0.001). A decrease of sP-selectin levels (p = 0.001) and percentage of PDMPs (p < 0.05) in this group was also observed. Conclusions HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor therapy in stroke patients with hyperlipidemia may be useful not only due to the lipid-lowering effect but also because of a significant role in reduction of platelet activation and reactivity. PMID:25861297

  5. A comparison between reported therapy staffing levels and the department of health therapy staffing guidelines for stroke rehabilitation: a national survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study compared reported staffing levels for stroke care within UK in-patient stroke units to stroke strategy staffing guidelines published by the UK Department of Health and the Royal College of Physicians. The purpose was to explore the extent to which stroke teams are meeting recommended staffing levels. Method The data analyzed in this report consisted of the detailed therapist staffing levels reported in the demographic section of our national survey to determine upper limb treatment in stroke units (the ATRAS survey). A contact list of stroke practitioners was therefore compiled primarily in collaboration with the 28 National Stroke Improvement Networks. Geographic representation of the network areas was obtained by applying the straight-forward systematic sampling method and the Nth name selection technique to each Network list. In total 192 surveys were emailed to stroke care providers around England. This included multiple contacts within stroke teams (e.g. a stroke consultant and a stroke co-coordinator) to increase awareness of the survey. Results A total of 53 surveys were returned from stroke teams and represented 20 of the 28 network areas providing 71% national coverage. To compare reported staffing levels to suggested DoH guidelines, analysis was conducted on 19 of the 37 inpatient hospital care units that had no missing data for staff numbers, unit bed numbers, number of stroke patients treated per annum, average unit length-of-stay, and average unit occupancy rates. Only 42% of units analyzed reached the DoH guideline for physiotherapy and fewer than 16% of the units reached the guideline for speech & language therapy. By contrast, 84% of units surveyed reached the staffing guideline for occupational therapy. However, a post-hoc analysis highlights this as an irregularity in the DoH guidelines, revealing that all therapies are challenged to provide the recommended therapy time. Conclusions Most in-patient stroke units are operating

  6. Constraint-induced movement therapy enhanced neurogenesis and behavioral recovery after stroke in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chuansheng; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Shanshan; Nie, Yingxue

    2009-08-01

    Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) has been extensively used for stroke rehabilitation. CIMT encourages use of the impaired limb along with restraint of the ipsilesional limb in daily life, and may promote behavioral recovery and induce structural changes in brain after stroke. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CIMT enhances neurogenesis in rat brain after stroke that was generated by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Adult rats were divided into sham group, ischemia group and ischemia treated with CIMT group. Rats of CIMT group were treated with a plaster cast to restrain the healthy forelimb for 14 days beginning 1 week after ischemia. The proliferation of neuronal cells labeled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and behavioral recovery were analyzed at day 29 after ischemia. We also measured the tissue level of stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) by ELISA. SDF-1 might be involved in the regulation of neurogenesis following stroke. In the subventricular zone of the animals treated with CIMT, there was a significant increase in the number of BrdU-positive cells (135 +/- 18, P < 0.05), compared with ischemia group (87 +/- 12) or sham group (18 +/- 3.6). Likewise, in the dentate gyrus, animals treated with CIMT showed a significant increase in BrdU-positive cells (296 +/- 26, P < 0.05) compared with ischemia group (225 +/- 18) or sham group (162 +/- 11). CIMT treatment after stroke significantly improved behavioral performances and increased the SDF-1 protein levels in the cortex and dentate gyrus. In conclusion, CIMT treatment enhances neurogenesis and functional recovery after stroke. PMID:19638734

  7. Primed Physical Therapy Enhances Recovery of Upper Limb Function in Chronic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Ackerley, Suzanne J; Byblow, Winston D; Barber, P Alan; MacDonald, Hayley; McIntyre-Robinson, Andrew; Stinear, Cathy M

    2016-05-01

    Background Recovery of upper limb function is important for regaining independence after stroke.Objective To test the effects of priming upper limb physical therapy with intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS), a form of noninvasive brain stimulation.Methods Eighteen adults with first-ever chronic monohemispheric subcortical stroke participated in this randomized, controlled, triple-blinded trial. Intervention consisted of priming with real or sham iTBS to the ipsilesional primary motor cortex immediately before 45 minutes of upper limb physical therapy, daily for 10 days. Changes in upper limb function (Action Research Arm Test [ARAT]), upper limb impairment (Fugl-Meyer Scale), and corticomotor excitability, were assessed before, during, and immediately, 1 month and 3 months after the intervention. Functional magnetic resonance images were acquired before and at one month after the intervention.Results Improvements in ARAT were observed after the intervention period when therapy was primed with real iTBS, but not sham, and were maintained at 1 month. These improvements were not apparent halfway through the intervention, indicating a dose effect. Improvements in ARAT at 1 month were related to balancing of corticomotor excitability and an increase in ipsilesional premotor cortex activation during paretic hand grip.Conclusions Two weeks of iTBS-primed therapy improves upper limb function at the chronic stage of stroke, for at least 1 month postintervention, whereas therapy alone may not be sufficient to alter function. This indicates a potential role for iTBS as an adjuvant to therapy delivered at the chronic stage. PMID:26180053

  8. Flexibility, stroke, and dimensionless parameters: the importance of telling the whole story for swimming micro-organisms in complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomases, Becca; Guy, Robert

    2015-11-01

    The question of how fluid elasticity affects the swimming performance of micro-organisms is complicated and has been the subject of many recent experimental and theoretical studies. The Deborah number, De = λω , is typically used to characterize the strength of the fluid elasticity in these studies, and for swimmers is expressed as the product of the elastic relaxation time and the frequency of the swimmer stroke. In simulations of undulatory flexible swimmers in an Oldroyd-B-type fluid, we find that varying the frequency of the stroke and varying the relaxation time separately results in a significantly different dependence of swimming speed for the same De . Thus the elastic effects on swimming cannot be characterized by a single dimensionless number. The Weissenberg number, defined as the product of elastic relaxation time and characteristic strain rate (Wi = λγ˙), is another dimensionless parameter useful for describing complex fluids. For a fixed swimmer frequency, varying the relaxation time will also vary the Weissenberg number. We conjecture that the different behavior is a consequence of a Weissenberg-number transition in the fluid, which additionally depends on the amplitude of the swimmer stroke.

  9. Goal-directed therapy in intraoperative fluid and hemodynamic management

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Maria Cristina; Moore, Peter G.; Liu, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Intraoperative fluid management is pivotal to the outcome and success of surgery, especially in high-risk procedures. Empirical formula and invasive static monitoring have been traditionally used to guide intraoperative fluid management and assess volume status. With the awareness of the potential complications of invasive procedures and the poor reliability of these methods as indicators of volume status, we present a case scenario of a patient who underwent major abdominal surgery as an example to discuss how the use of minimally invasive dynamic monitoring may guide intraoperative fluid therapy. PMID:24086168

  10. Fluid Therapy: Double-Edged Sword during Critical Care?

    PubMed Central

    Benes, Jan; Kirov, Mikhail; Kuzkov, Vsevolod; Lainscak, Mitja; Molnar, Zsolt; Voga, Gorazd; Monnet, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Fluid therapy is still the mainstay of acute care in patients with shock or cardiovascular compromise. However, our understanding of the critically ill pathophysiology has evolved significantly in recent years. The revelation of the glycocalyx layer and subsequent research has redefined the basics of fluids behavior in the circulation. Using less invasive hemodynamic monitoring tools enables us to assess the cardiovascular function in a dynamic perspective. This allows pinpointing even distinct changes induced by treatment, by postural changes, or by interorgan interactions in real time and enables individualized patient management. Regarding fluids as drugs of any other kind led to the need for precise indication, way of administration, and also assessment of side effects. We possess now the evidence that patient centered outcomes may be altered when incorrect time, dose, or type of fluids are administered. In this review, three major features of fluid therapy are discussed: the prediction of fluid responsiveness, potential harms induced by overzealous fluid administration, and finally the problem of protocol-led treatments and their timing. PMID:26798642

  11. Controversies and future perspectives of antiplatelet therapy in secondary stroke prevention

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Ralph; Diener, Hans-Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Antiplatelet agents are a cornerstone in the treatment of acute arterial thrombotic events and in the prevention of thrombus formation. However, existing antiplatelet agents (mainly aspirin, the combination of aspirin and dipyridamole and clopidogrel) reduce the risk of vascular events only by about one quarter compared with placebo. As a consequence, more efficacious antiplatelet therapies with a reduced bleeding risk are needed. We give an overview of several new antiplatelet agents that are currently investigated in secondary stroke prevention: adenosine 5′-diphosphonate receptor antagonists, cilostazol, sarpogrelate, terutroban and SCH 530348. There are unique features in secondary stroke prevention that have to be taken into account: ischaemic stroke is a heterogeneous disease caused by multiple aetiologies and the blood–brain barrier is disturbed after stroke which may result in a higher intracerebral bleeding risk. Several small randomized trials indicated that the combination of aspirin and clopidogrel might be superior to antiplatelet monotherapy in the acute and early post-ischaemic phase. There is an ongoing debate about antiplatelet resistance. Decreasing response to aspirin is correlated independently with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. However, there is still no evidence from randomized trials linking aspirin resistance and recurrent ischaemic events. Similarly, randomized trials have not demonstrated a clinical significantly decreased antiplatelet effect by the concomitant use of clopidogrel and proton pump inhibitors. Nevertheless, a routine use of this drug combination is not recommended. PMID:20738445

  12. Grasps Recognition and Evaluation of Stroke Patients for Supporting Rehabilitation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sale, Patrizio; Nijenhuis, Sharon; Prange, Gerdienke; Amirabdollahian, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Stroke survivors often suffer impairments on their wrist and hand. Robot-mediated rehabilitation techniques have been proposed as a way to enhance conventional therapy, based on intensive repeated movements. Amongst the set of activities of daily living, grasping is one of the most recurrent. Our aim is to incorporate the detection of grasps in the machine-mediated rehabilitation framework so that they can be incorporated into interactive therapeutic games. In this study, we developed and tested a method based on support vector machines for recognizing various grasp postures wearing a passive exoskeleton for hand and wrist rehabilitation after stroke. The experiment was conducted with ten healthy subjects and eight stroke patients performing the grasping gestures. The method was tested in terms of accuracy and robustness with respect to intersubjects' variability and differences between different grasps. Our results show reliable recognition while also indicating that the recognition accuracy can be used to assess the patients' ability to consistently repeat the gestures. Additionally, a grasp quality measure was proposed to measure the capabilities of the stroke patients to perform grasp postures in a similar way than healthy people. These two measures can be potentially used as complementary measures to other upper limb motion tests. PMID:25258709

  13. [Hereditary thrombophilia with ischemiC stroke and sinus thrombosis. Diagnosis, therapy and meta-analysis].

    PubMed

    Weih, M; Junge-Hülsing, J; Mehraein, S; Ziemer, S; Einhäupl, K M

    2000-12-01

    Hereditary thrombophilias are a heterogenous group of genetic coagulation disorders which, particularly in combination with acquired prothrombotic factors, induce a predisposition to thrombosis. After characterization of frequent thrombophilic syndromes like factor V-Leiden or the prothrombin 20210GA mutation, a number of case-control studies screened for the prevalence of these mutations in ischemic stroke and cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT). Our meta-analysis shows that factor V-Leiden and prothrombin are frequent and significantly associated with CVT (16.4% vs. 4.9% or 4.3, P < 0.001, and 12.1% vs. 1.9% or 5.8, P < 0.001). In ischemic stroke, only factor V-Leiden and not prothrombin is a weak but significant risk factor (5.9% vs. 2.6% or 1.6, P < 0.001, and 4.1% vs. 3.3% or 1.4, P = 0.1). The C677T homozygous point mutation in the MTHFR, a homocysteine-degrading enzyme, was also associated with arterial stroke (16% vs. 15% or 1.5, P < 0.001). For CVT, sufficient data are lacking. We therefore recommend screening for thrombophilia in CVT. In ischemic stroke, atrial premature complex (APC) resistance should be considered. As long as controlled studies are lacking, individual anticoagulant therapy must take hereditary and precipitating factors into account to assess potential thrombotic risk. PMID:11139989

  14. Exploring Erythropoietin and G-CSF Combination Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yoon-Kyum; Cho, Sung-Rae

    2016-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) are known to have neuroprotective actions. Based on previous reports showing the synergistic effects of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy in experimental models, we investigated the safety of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy in patients with chronic stroke. In a pilot study, 3 patients were treated with EPO and G-CSF for 5 consecutive days, with follow-up on day 30. In an exploratory double-blind study, 6 patients were allocated to treatment with either EPO+G-CSF or placebo. Treatment was applied once a day for 5 days per month over 3 months. Participants were followed up for 6 months. To substantiate safety, vital signs, adverse events, and hematological values were measured on days 0, 5, and 30 in each cycle and on day 180. Functional outcomes were determined on day 0 and 180. In the laboratory measurements, EPO+G-CSF combination therapy significantly elevated erythropoietin, CD34⁺ hematopoietic stem cells, white blood cells, and neutrophils on day 5 of each cycle. There were no observations of serious adverse events. In the functional outcomes, the grip power of the dominant hand was increased in the EPO+G-CSF treatment group. In conclusion, this exploratory study suggests a novel strategy of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy for stroke patients. PMID:27043535

  15. Current Trends in Robot-Assisted Upper-Limb Stroke Rehabilitation: Promoting Patient Engagement in Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Amy A.; French, James A.; Pehlivan, Ali Utku

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of long-term disability today; therefore, many research efforts are focused on designing maximally effective and efficient treatment methods. In particular, robotic stroke rehabilitation has received significant attention for upper-limb therapy due to its ability to provide high-intensity repetitive movement therapy with less effort than would be required for traditional methods. Recent research has focused on increasing patient engagement in therapy, which has been shown to be important for inducing neural plasticity to facilitate recovery. Robotic therapy devices enable unique methods for promoting patient engagement by providing assistance only as needed and by detecting patient movement intent to drive to the device. Use of these methods has demonstrated improvements in functional outcomes, but careful comparisons between methods remain to be done. Future work should include controlled clinical trials and comparisons of effectiveness of different methods for patients with different abilities and needs in order to inform future development of patient-specific therapeutic protocols. PMID:26005600

  16. Exploring Erythropoietin and G-CSF Combination Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Yoon-Kyum; Cho, Sung-Rae

    2016-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) are known to have neuroprotective actions. Based on previous reports showing the synergistic effects of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy in experimental models, we investigated the safety of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy in patients with chronic stroke. In a pilot study, 3 patients were treated with EPO and G-CSF for 5 consecutive days, with follow-up on day 30. In an exploratory double-blind study, 6 patients were allocated to treatment with either EPO+G-CSF or placebo. Treatment was applied once a day for 5 days per month over 3 months. Participants were followed up for 6 months. To substantiate safety, vital signs, adverse events, and hematological values were measured on days 0, 5, and 30 in each cycle and on day 180. Functional outcomes were determined on day 0 and 180. In the laboratory measurements, EPO+G-CSF combination therapy significantly elevated erythropoietin, CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells, white blood cells, and neutrophils on day 5 of each cycle. There were no observations of serious adverse events. In the functional outcomes, the grip power of the dominant hand was increased in the EPO+G-CSF treatment group. In conclusion, this exploratory study suggests a novel strategy of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy for stroke patients. PMID:27043535

  17. Music-supported motor training after stroke reveals no superiority of synchronization in group therapy

    PubMed Central

    Van Vugt, Floris T.; Ritter, Juliane; Rollnik, Jens D.; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    Background: Music-supported therapy has been shown to be an effective tool for rehabilitation of motor deficits after stroke. A unique feature of music performance is that it is inherently social: music can be played together in synchrony. Aim: The present study explored the potential of synchronized music playing during therapy, asking whether synchronized playing could improve fine motor rehabilitation and mood. Method: Twenty-eight patients in neurological early rehabilitation after stroke with no substantial previous musical training were included. Patients learned to play simple finger exercises and familiar children's songs on the piano for 10 sessions of half an hour. Patients first received three individual therapy sessions and then continued in pairs. The patient pairs were divided into two groups. Patients in one group played synchronously (together group) whereas the patients in the other group played one after the other (in-turn group). To assess fine motor skill recovery the patients performed standard clinical tests such as the nine-hole-pegboard test (9HPT) and index finger-tapping speed and regularity, and metronome-paced finger tapping. Patients' mood was established using the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Results: Both groups showed improvements in fine motor control. In metronome-paced finger tapping, patients in both groups improved significantly. Mood tests revealed reductions in depression and fatigue in both groups. During therapy, patients in the in-turn group rated their partner as more sympathetic than the together-group in a visual-analog scale. Conclusions: Our results suggest that music-supported stroke rehabilitation can improve fine motor control and mood not only individually but also in patient pairs. Patients who were playing in turn rather than simultaneously tended to reveal greater improvement in fine motor skill. We speculate that patients in the former group may benefit from the opportunity to learn from observation. PMID

  18. The effects of very early mirror therapy on functional improvement of the upper extremity in acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Yeldan, Ipek; Huseyınsınoglu, Burcu Ersoz; Akıncı, Buket; Tarakcı, Ela; Baybas, Sevim; Ozdıncler, Arzu Razak

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a very early mirror therapy program on functional improvement of the upper extremity in acute stroke patients. [Subjects] Eight stroke patients who were treated in an acute neurology unit were included in the study. [Methods] The patients were assigned alternatively to either the mirror therapy group receiving mirror therapy and neurodevelopmental treatment or the neurodevelopmental treatment only group. The primary outcome measures were the upper extremity motor subscale of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Motricity Index upper extremity score, and the Stroke Upper Limb Capacity Scale. Somatosensory assessment with the Ayres Southern California Sensory Integration Test, and the Barthel Index were used as secondary outcome measures. [Results] No statistically significant improvements were found for any measures in either group after the treatment. In terms of minimally clinically important differences, there were improvements in Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Barthel Index in both mirror therapy and neurodevelopmental treatment groups. [Conclusion] The results of this pilot study revealed that very early mirror therapy has no additional effect on functional improvement of upper extremity function in acute stroke patients. Multicenter trials are needed to determine the results of early application of mirror therapy in stroke rehabilitation. PMID:26696729

  19. The effects of very early mirror therapy on functional improvement of the upper extremity in acute stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yeldan, Ipek; Huseyınsınoglu, Burcu Ersoz; Akıncı, Buket; Tarakcı, Ela; Baybas, Sevim; Ozdıncler, Arzu Razak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a very early mirror therapy program on functional improvement of the upper extremity in acute stroke patients. [Subjects] Eight stroke patients who were treated in an acute neurology unit were included in the study. [Methods] The patients were assigned alternatively to either the mirror therapy group receiving mirror therapy and neurodevelopmental treatment or the neurodevelopmental treatment only group. The primary outcome measures were the upper extremity motor subscale of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Motricity Index upper extremity score, and the Stroke Upper Limb Capacity Scale. Somatosensory assessment with the Ayres Southern California Sensory Integration Test, and the Barthel Index were used as secondary outcome measures. [Results] No statistically significant improvements were found for any measures in either group after the treatment. In terms of minimally clinically important differences, there were improvements in Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Barthel Index in both mirror therapy and neurodevelopmental treatment groups. [Conclusion] The results of this pilot study revealed that very early mirror therapy has no additional effect on functional improvement of upper extremity function in acute stroke patients. Multicenter trials are needed to determine the results of early application of mirror therapy in stroke rehabilitation. PMID:26696729

  20. Stroke and Bleeding Risk Associated With Antithrombotic Therapy for Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    An, JaeJin; Niu, Fang; Lang, Daniel T; Jazdzewski, Kristin P; Le, Paul T; Rashid, Nazia; Meissner, Brian; Mendes, Robert; Dills, Diana G; Aranda, Gustavus; Bruno, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Background The quality of antithrombotic therapy for patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation during routine medical care is often suboptimal. Evidence linking stroke and bleeding risk with antithrombotic treatment is limited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the associations between antithrombotic treatment episodes and outcomes. Methods and Results A retrospective longitudinal observational cohort study was conducted using patients newly diagnosed with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation with 1 or more stroke risk factors (CHADS2 ≥1) in Kaiser Permanente Southern California between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2011. A total of 1782 stroke and systemic embolism (SE) and 3528 major bleed events were identified from 23 297 patients during the 60 021 person-years of follow-up. The lowest stroke/SE rates and major bleed rates were observed in warfarin time in therapeutic range (TTR) ≥55% episodes (stroke/SE: 0.87 [0.71 to 1.04]; major bleed: 4.91 [4.53 to 5.28] per 100 person-years), which was similar to the bleed rate in aspirin episodes (4.95 [4.58 to 5.32] per 100 person-years). The warfarin TTR ≥55% episodes were associated with a 77% lower risk of stroke/SE (relative risk=0.23 [0.18 to 0.28]) compared to never on therapy; and the warfarin TTR <55% and on-aspirin episodes were associated with a 20% lower and with a 26% lower risk of stroke/SE compared to never on therapy, respectively. The warfarin TTR <55% episodes were associated with nearly double the risk of a major bleed compared to never on therapy (relative risk=1.93 [1.74 to 2.14]). Conclusions Continuation of antithrombotic therapy as well as maintaining an adequate level of TTR is beneficial to prevent strokes while minimizing bleeding events. PMID:26187996

  1. Occupational therapy for patients with problems in personal activities of daily living after stroke: systematic review of randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Avril; Leonardi-Bee, Jo; Gladman, J R F; Donkervoort, Mireille; Edmans, Judi; Gilbertson, Louise; Jongbloed, Lyn; Logan, Pip; Sackley, Catherine; Walker, Marion; Langhorne, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine whether occupational therapy focused specifically on personal activities of daily living improves recovery for patients after stroke. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources The Cochrane stroke group trials register, the Cochrane central register of controlled trials, Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsycLIT, AMED, Wilson Social Sciences Abstracts, Science Citation Index, Social Science Citation, Arts and Humanities Citation Index, Dissertations Abstracts register, Occupational Therapy Research Index, scanning reference lists, personal communication with authors, and hand searching. Review methods Trials were included if they evaluated the effect of occupational therapy focused on practice of personal activities of daily living or where performance in such activities was the target of the occupational therapy intervention in a stroke population. Original data were sought from trialists. Two reviewers independently reviewed each trial for methodological quality. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results Nine randomised controlled trials including 1258 participants met the inclusion criteria. Occupational therapy delivered to patients after stroke and targeted towards personal activities of daily living increased performance scores (standardised mean difference 0.18, 95% confidence interval 0.04 to 0.32, P=0.01) and reduced the risk of poor outcome (death, deterioration or dependency in personal activities of daily living) (odds ratio 0.67, 95% confidence interval 0.51 to 0.87, P=0.003). For every 100 people who received occupational therapy focused on personal activities of daily living, 11 (95% confidence interval 7 to 30) would be spared a poor outcome. Conclusions Occupational therapy focused on improving personal activities of daily living after stroke can improve performance and reduce the risk of deterioration in these abilities. Focused occupational therapy should be available to everyone who has had a stroke. PMID

  2. Monitoring functional arm movement for home-based therapy after stroke.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, R; Reinkensmeyer, D; Shah, P; Liu, J; Rao, S; Smith, R; Cramer, S; Rahman, T; Bobrow, J

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a means for individuals with stroke to practice arm movement therapy at home with remote monitoring. We previously developed a Web-based system for repetitive movement training (Java Therapy). This paper describes a new input device for the system that measures and assists in naturalistic arm movement, as well as software enhancements. The new input device is an instrumented, adult-sized version of Wilmington robotic exoskeleton (WREX), which is a five degrees-of-freedom orthosis that counterbalances the weight of the arm using elastic bands. To test the ability of the new device (Training-WREX or "T-WREX") to measure and assist in functional arm movements, we measured five chronic stroke subjects' movement ability while wearing the orthosis without gravity balance compared to wearing the orthosis with gravity balance. T-WREX's gravity balance function improved a clinical measure of arm movement (Fugl-Meyer Score), range of motion of reaching movements, and accuracy of drawing movements. Coupled with an enhanced version of Java Therapy, T-WREX will thus provide a means to assist functional arm movement training at home, either over the Web in real-time, or stand-alone with periodic communication with a remote site. PMID:17271381

  3. Factors influencing nonadministration of thrombolytic therapy in early arrival strokes in a university hospital in Hyderabad, India

    PubMed Central

    Pidaparthi, Lalitha; Kotha, Anitha; Aleti, Venkat Reddy; Kohat, Abhijeet Kumar; Kandadai, Mridula R.; Turaga, Suryaprabha; Shaik, Jabeen A.; Alladi, Suvarna; Kanikannan, Meena A.; Rupam, Borgohain; Kaul, Subhash

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is a well-known fact that very few patients of stroke arrive at the hospital within the window period of thrombolysis. Even among those who do, not all receive thrombolytic therapy. Objective: The objectives of this study were to determine the proportion of early arrival ischemic strokes (within 6 h of stroke onset) in our hospital and to evaluate the causes of nonadministration of intravenous and/or intraarterial thrombolysis in them. Materials and Methods: Data of all early arrival acute stroke patients between January 2010 and January 2015 were included. Factors determining nonadministration of intravenous and/or intraarterial thrombolysis in early arrival strokes were analyzed. Results: Out of 2,593 stroke patients, only 145 (5.6%) patients presented within 6 h of stroke onset and among them 118 (81.4%) patients had ischemic stroke and 27 (18.6%) patients had hemorrhagic stroke. A total of 89/118 (75.4%) patients were thrombolyzed. The reasons for nonadministration of thrombolysis in the remaining 29 patients were analyzed, which included unavoidable factors in 8/29 patients [massive infarct (N = 4), hemorrhagic infarct (N = 1), gastrointestinal bleed (N = 1), oral anticoagulant usage with prolonged international normalized ratio (INR) (N = 1), and recent cataract surgery (N = 1)]. Avoidable factors were found for 21/29 patients, include nonaffordability (N = 7), fear of bleed (N = 4), rapidly improving symptoms (N = 4), mild stroke (N = 2), delayed neurologist referral within the hospital (N = 2), and logistic difficulty in organizing endovascular treatment (N = 2). Conclusion: One-fourth of early ischemic stroke patients in our study were not thrombolyzed even though they arrived within the window period. The majority of the reasons for nonadministration of thrombolysis were potentially preventable, such as nonaffordability, intrahospital delay, and nonavailability of newer endovascular interventions. PMID:27570387

  4. The effects of mirror therapy on arm and hand function in subacute stroke in patients.

    PubMed

    Radajewska, Alina; Opara, Józef A; Kucio, Cezary; Błaszczyszyn, Monika; Mehlich, Krzysztof; Szczygiel, Jarosław

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of mirror therapy on arm and hand function in subacute stroke in patients. The study included 60 hemiparetic right-handed patients after ischemic stroke 8-10 weeks after onset. They underwent stationary comprehensive rehabilitation in the rehabilitation centre. They were divided into two randomly assigned groups: mirror (n=30) and control (n=30). For both groups, two subgroups were created: one that included patients with right arm paresis (n=15) and the other that included patients with left arm paresis (n=15). The mirror group received an additional intervention: training with a mirror for 5 days/week, 2 sessions/day, for 21 days. Each single session lasted for 15 min. The control group (n=30) underwent a conventional rehabilitation program without mirror therapy. To evaluate self-care in performing activities of daily living, the Functional Index 'Repty' was used. To evaluate hand and arm function, the Frenchay Arm Test and the Motor Status Score were used. Measurements were performed twice: before and after 21 days of applied rehabilitation. No significant improvement in hand and arm function in both subgroups in Frenchay Arm Test and Motor Status Score scales was observed. However, there was a significant improvement in self-care of activities of daily living in the right arm paresis subgroup in the mirror group measured using the Functional Index 'Repty'. Mirror therapy improves self-care of activities of daily living for patients with right arm paresis after stroke. PMID:23528388

  5. Noninvasive cerebral oximetry during endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Hametner, Christian; Stanarcevic, Predrag; Stampfl, Sibylle; Rohde, Stefan; Veltkamp, Roland; Bösel, Julian

    2015-11-01

    Implementing endovascular stroke care often impedes neurologic assessment in patients who need sedation or general anesthesia. Cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) may help physicians monitor cerebral tissue viability, but data in hyperacute stroke patients receiving endovascular treatment are sparse. In this observational study, the NIRS index regional oxygen saturation (rSO2) was measured noninvasively before, during, and after endovascular therapy via bilateral forehead NIRS optodes. During the study period, 63 patients were monitored with NIRS; 43 qualified for analysis. Before recanalization, 10 distinct rSO2 decreases occurred in 11 patients with respect to time to intubation. During recanalization, two kinds of unilateral rSO2 changes occurred in the affected hemisphere: small peaks throughout the treatment (n=14, 32.6%) and sustained increases immediately after recanalization (n=2, 4.7%). Lower area under the curve 10% below baseline was associated with better reperfusion status (thrombolysis in cerebral infarction ≥ 2b, P=0.009). At the end of the intervention, lower interhemispheric rSO2 difference predicted death within 90 days (P=0.037). After the intervention, higher rSO2 variability predicted poor outcome (modified Rankin scale > 3, P=0.032). Our findings suggest that bi-channel rSO2-NIRS has potential for guiding neuroanesthesia and predicting outcome. To better monitor local revascularization, an improved stroke-specific set-up in future studies is necessary. PMID:26243709

  6. Multijoint arm stiffness during movements following stroke: implications for robot therapy

    PubMed Central

    Piovesan, D.; Casadio, M.; Mussa-Ivaldi, F. A.; Morasso, P.G

    2015-01-01

    Impaired arm movements in stroke appear as a set of stereotypical kinematic patterns, characterized by abnormal joint coupling, which have a direct consequence on arm mechanics and can be quantified by the net arm stiffness at the hand. The current available measures of arm stiffness during functional tasks have limited clinical use, since they require several repetitions of the same test movement in many directions. Such procedure is difficult to obtain in stroke survivors who have lower fatigue threshold and increased variability compared to unimpaired individuals. The present study proposes a novel, fast quantitative measure of arm stiffness during movements by means of a Time-Frequency technique and the use of a reassigned spectrogram, applied on a trial-by-trial basis with a single perturbation. We tested the technique feasibility during robot mediated therapy, where a robot helped stroke survivors to regain arm mobility by providing assistive forces during a hitting task to 13 targets covering the entire reachable workspace. The endpoint stiffness of the paretic arm was estimated at the end of each hitting movements by suddenly switching of the assistive forces and observing the ensuing recoil movements. In addition, we considered how assistive forces influence stiffness. This method will provide therapists with improved tools to target the treatment to the individual’s specific impairment and to verify the effects of the proposed exercises. PMID:22275576

  7. Role of imaging in current acute ischemic stroke workflow for endovascular therapy.

    PubMed

    Menon, Bijoy K; Campbell, Bruce C V; Levi, Christopher; Goyal, Mayank

    2015-06-01

    Ischemic stroke is caused by a thrombus that blocks an intracranial artery. Brain tissue beyond the blocked artery survives for a variable period of time because of blood and nutrients received through tiny vessels called collaterals. Imaging the brain and the vasculature that supplies it is therefore a vital first step in treating patients with acute ischemic stroke. In this review, we focus on current evidence for imaging selection of patients for endovascular therapy in the context of the recently positive clinical trials, such as Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands (MR CLEAN), Endovascular Treatment for Small Core and Anterior Circulation Proximal Occlusion With Emphasis on Minimizing Computed Tomography to Recanalization Times (ESCAPE), Solitaire With the Intention for Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment (SWIFT PRIME), and Extending the Time for Thrombolysis in Emergency Neurological Deficits-Intra-Arterial (EXTEND-IA). We discuss evidence for and use of the various imaging paradigms available. We discuss how to set up quick and efficient imaging protocols for patient selection and address common concerns about the use of imaging, including time spent, contrast, radiation, and other advantages and disadvantages. Finally, we briefly comment on how imaging can integrate itself within various health systems of care in the future, thereby potentially improving patient outcomes further. PMID:25944319

  8. The Fluid Mechanics of Cancer and Its Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koumoutsakos, Petros; Pivkin, Igor; Milde, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Fluid mechanics is involved in the growth, progression, metastasis, and therapy of cancer. Blood vessels transport oxygen and nutrients to cancerous tissues, provide a route for metastasizing cancer cells to distant organs, and deliver drugs to tumors. The irregular and leaky tumor vasculature is responsible for increased interstitial pressure in the tumor microenvironment, whereas multiscale flow-structure interaction processes control tumor growth, metastasis, and nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery. We outline these flow-mediated processes, along with related experimental and computational methods for the diagnosis, predictive modeling, and therapy of cancer.

  9. Robotic therapy for chronic stroke: general recovery of impairment or improved task-specific skill?

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, Jeff; Harran, Michelle; Kane, Leslie; Berard, Jessica; Huang, Sylvia; Ryan, Sophia L.; Mazzoni, Pietro; Krakauer, John W.; Huang, Vincent S.

    2015-01-01

    There is a great need to develop new approaches for rehabilitation of the upper limb after stroke. Robotic therapy is a promising form of neurorehabilitation that can be delivered in higher doses than conventional therapy. Here we sought to determine whether the reported effects of robotic therapy, which have been based on clinical measures of impairment and function, are accompanied by improved motor control. Patients with chronic hemiparesis were trained for 3 wk, 3 days a week, with titrated assistive robotic therapy in two and three dimensions. Motor control improvements (i.e., skill) in both arms were assessed with a separate untrained visually guided reaching task. We devised a novel PCA-based analysis of arm trajectories that is sensitive to changes in the quality of entire movement trajectories without needing to prespecify particular kinematic features. Robotic therapy led to skill improvements in the contralesional arm. These changes were not accompanied by changes in clinical measures of impairment or function. There are two possible interpretations of these results. One is that robotic therapy only leads to small task-specific improvements in motor control via normal skill-learning mechanisms. The other is that kinematic assays are more sensitive than clinical measures to a small general improvement in motor control. PMID:26180120

  10. Safety and feasibility of intravenous thrombolytic therapy in Iranian patients with acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Aghaei, Mahboubeh; Motamed, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background Thrombolytic therapy is the only approved treatment for acute cerebral ischemia. The hemorrhagictransformation is the greatest complication of this treatment, which may occur after recanalization of occludedartery. The aim of this study was to determine factors associated with clinical improvement and worseningin patients with acute ischemic stroke treated with intravenous thrombolysis. Methods Thirty seven patients who were treated with intravenous thrombolysis between August 2010 andAugust 2012 who had the inclusion criteria were studied. In this prospective study, all of the admitted patients instroke unit, monitored for at least 48 hours. We registered all patients’ information in a stroke data registry andfollowed them for at least 6 months. Results Thirty seven patients with acute ischemic stroke who treated with recombinant tissue plasminogenactivator (r-TPA) were studied. There were hemorrhagic transformations in 9 (24%) patients. Seven of them(18%) revealed intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH) within the control brain CT after 24 hours without any deteriorationof neurologic symptoms (asymptomatic ICH). Although outcomes of patients with symptomatic post r-TPA hemorrhages were worse than non-hemorrhagic post r-TPA patients, there were no significant differencesbetween asymptomatic post r-TPA hemorrhages and non-hemorrhagic post r-TPA patients, according to theNational Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at admission (p = 0.2), after 24 hours (p= 0.07) and after 7days (p= 0.06) post treatment. Conclusion If the r-TPA protocol is followed carefully, the risk of symptomatic hemorrhage is low (about7%). Taking r-TPA was feasible and safe in our study population; thus, it can be applied for other Iranian patients. PMID:24791120

  11. Critical early thrombolytic and endovascular reperfusion therapy for acute ischemic stroke victims: a call for adjunct neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Lapchak, Paul A

    2015-10-01

    Today, there is an enormous amount of excitement in the field of stroke victim care due to the recent success of MR. CLEAN, SWIFT PRIME, ESCAPE, EXTEND-IA, and REVASCAT endovascular trials. Successful intravenous (IV) recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) clinical trials [i.e., National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) rt-PA trial, Third European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study (ECASSIII), and Third International Stroke study (IST-3)] also need to be emphasized. In the recent endovascular and thrombolytic trials, there is statistically significant improvement using both the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and the modified Rankin Score (mRS) scale, but neither approach promotes complete recovery in patients enrolled within any particular NIHSS or mRS score tier. Absolute improvement (mRS 0-2 at 90 days) with endovascular therapy is 13.5-31 %, whereas thrombolytics alone also significantly improve patient functional independence, but to a lesser degree (NINDS rt-PA trial 13 %). This article has 3 main goals: (1) first to emphasize the utility and cost-effectiveness of rt-PA to treat stroke; (2) second to review the recent endovascular trials with respect to efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness as a stroke treatment; and (3) to further consider and evaluate strategies to develop novel neuroprotective drugs. A thesis will be put forth so that future stroke trials and therapy development can optimally promote recovery so that stroke victims can return to "normal" life. PMID:26314402

  12. Intravenous Fluid Therapy in Traumatic Brain Injury and Decompressive Craniectomy

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Castellar-Leones, Sandra Milena; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The patient with head trauma is a challenge for the emergency physician and for the neurosurgeon. Currently traumatic brain injury constitutes a public health problem. Knowledge of the various supportive therapeutic strategies in the pre-hospital and pre-operative stages is essential for optimal care. The immediate rapid infusion of large volumes of crystalloids to restore blood volume and blood pressure is now the standard treatment of patients with combined traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS). The fluid in patients with brain trauma and especially in patients with brain injur y is a critical issue. In this context we present a review of the literature about the history, physiology of current fluid preparations, and a discussion regarding the use of fluid therapy in traumatic brain injury and decompressive craniectomy. PMID:27162857

  13. Recent Progress in Endothelial Progenitor Cell Culture Systems: Potential for Stroke Therapy

    PubMed Central

    TAKIZAWA, Shunya; NAGATA, Eiichiro; NAKAYAMA, Taira; MASUDA, Haruchika; ASAHARA, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) participate in endothelial repair and angiogenesis due to their abilities to differentiate into endothelial cells and to secrete protective cytokines and growth factors. Consequently, there is considerable interest in cell therapy with EPCs isolated from peripheral blood to treat various ischemic injuries. Quality and quantity-controlled culture systems to obtain mononuclear cells enriched in EPCs with well-defined angiogenic and anti-inflammatory phenotypes have recently been developed, and increasing evidence from animal models and clinical trials supports the idea that transplantation of EPCs contributes to the regenerative process in ischemic organs and is effective for the therapy of ischemic cerebral injury. Here, we briefly describe the general characteristics of EPCs, and we review recent developments in culture systems and applications of EPCs and EPC-enriched cell populations to treat ischemic stroke. PMID:27041632

  14. Sequential Therapy with Minocycline and Candesartan Improves Long Term Recovery after Experimental Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Sahar; Ishrat, Tauheed; Fouda, Abdelrahman Y.; Patel, Ami; Pillai, Bindu; Fagan, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Minocycline and candesartan have both shown promise as candidate therapeutics in ischemic stroke, with multiple, and somewhat contrasting, molecular mechanisms. Minocycline is an anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-apoptotic agent and a known inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Yet, minocycline exerts antiangiogenic effects both in vivo and in vitro. Candesartan promotes angiogenesis and activates MMPs. Aligning these therapies with the dynamic processes of injury and repair after ischemia is likely to improve success of treatment. Objective In this study, we hypothesize that opposing actions of minocycline and candesartan on angiogenesis, when administered simultaneously, will reduce the benefit of candesartan treatment. Therefore, we propose a sequential combination treatment regimen to yield a better outcome and preserve the proangiogenic potential of candesartan. Methods In vitro angiogenesis was assessed using human brain endothelial cells. In vivo, Wistar rats subjected to 90-minute middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) were randomized into 4 groups: saline, candesartan, minocycline and sequential combination of minocycline and candesartan. Neurobehavioral tests were performed 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after stroke. Brain tissue was collected on day 14 for assessment of infarct size and vascular density. Results Minocycline, when added simultaneously, decreased the proangiogenic effect of candesartan treatment in vitro. Sequential treatment, however, preserved the proangiogenic potential of candesartan both in vivo and in vitro, improved neurobehavioral outcome and reduced infarct size. Conclusion Sequential combination therapy with minocycline and candesartan improves long term recovery and maintains candesartan’s proangiogenic potential. PMID:26004281

  15. The effects of mirror therapy with tasks on upper extremity function and self-care in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Youngju; Chang, Moonyoung; Kim, Kyeong-Mi; An, Duk-Hyun

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of mirror therapy with tasks on upper extremity unction and self-care in stroke patients. [Subjects] Thirty participants were randomly assigned to either an experimental group (n=15) or a control group (n=15). [Methods] Subjects in the experimental group received mirror therapy with tasks, and those in the control group received a sham therapy; both therapies were administered, five times per week for six weeks. The main outcome measures were the Manual Function Test for the paralyzed upper limb and the Functional Independence Measure for self-care performance. [Results] The experimental group had more significant gains in change scores compared with the control group after the intervention. [Conclusion] We consider mirror therapy with tasks to be an effective form of intervention for upper extremity function and self-care in stroke patients. PMID:26157249

  16. Differential patterns of cortical reorganization following constraint-induced movement therapy during early and late period after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sawaki, Lumy; Butler, Andrew J.; Leng, Xiaoyan; Wassenaar, Peter A.; Mohammad, Yousef; Blanton, Sarah; Sathian, K.; Nichols-Larsen, Deborah S.; Wolf, Steven L.; Good, David C.; Wittenberg, George F.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) leads to improvement in upper extremity movement and cortical reorganization after stroke. Direct comparison of the differential degree of cortical reorganization according to chronicity in stroke subjects receiving CIMT has not been performed and was the purpose of this study. We hypothesized that a higher degree of cortical reorganization would occur in the early (less than 9 months post-stroke) compared to the late group (more than 12 months post-stroke). METHODS 17 early and 9 late subjects were enrolled. Each subject was evaluated using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) and received CIMT for 2 weeks. RESULTS The early group showed greater improvement in WMFT compared with the late group. TMS motor maps showed persistent enlargement in both groups. The map shifted posteriorly in the late stroke group. CONCLUSION CIMT appears to lead to greater improvement in motor function in early phase after stroke. Greater cortical reorganization associated with shift in map position occurred in late group. SIGNIFICANCE The contrast between larger functional gains in the early group vs larger map expansion in the late group may indicate that cortical reorganization depends upon different neural substrates in the late stroke group. PMID:25227542

  17. Effects of mirror therapy combined with motor tasks on upper extremity function and activities daily living of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Lee, Sukmin; Kim, Donghoon; Lee, Kyoungbo; Kim, Youlim

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of mirror therapy combined with exercise tasks on the function of the upper limbs and activities of daily living. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five stroke patients who were receiving physical therapy at K Hospital in Gyeonggi-do, South Korea, were classified into a mirror therapy group (n=12) and a conventional therapy group (n=13). The therapies were applied for 30 minutes per day, five times per week, for a total of four weeks. Upper limb function was measured with the Action Research Arm test, the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, and the Box and Block test, and activities of daily living were measured with the Functional Independence Measure. A paired test was performed to compare the intragroup differences between before training and after four weeks of therapy, and an independent t-test was performed to compare the differences between the two groups before and after four weeks of therapy. [Results] In the intragroup comparison, both groups showed significant differences between measurements taken before and after four weeks of therapy. In the intergroup comparison, the mirror therapy group showed significant improvements compared with the conventional therapy group, both in upper limb function and activities of daily living. [Conclusion] The findings of this study demonstrated that mirror therapy is more effective than conventional therapy for the training of stroke patients to improve their upper limb function and activities of daily living. PMID:27065534

  18. Effects of mirror therapy combined with motor tasks on upper extremity function and activities daily living of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Lee, Sukmin; Kim, Donghoon; Lee, Kyoungbo; Kim, Youlim

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of mirror therapy combined with exercise tasks on the function of the upper limbs and activities of daily living. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five stroke patients who were receiving physical therapy at K Hospital in Gyeonggi-do, South Korea, were classified into a mirror therapy group (n=12) and a conventional therapy group (n=13). The therapies were applied for 30 minutes per day, five times per week, for a total of four weeks. Upper limb function was measured with the Action Research Arm test, the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, and the Box and Block test, and activities of daily living were measured with the Functional Independence Measure. A paired test was performed to compare the intragroup differences between before training and after four weeks of therapy, and an independent t-test was performed to compare the differences between the two groups before and after four weeks of therapy. [Results] In the intragroup comparison, both groups showed significant differences between measurements taken before and after four weeks of therapy. In the intergroup comparison, the mirror therapy group showed significant improvements compared with the conventional therapy group, both in upper limb function and activities of daily living. [Conclusion] The findings of this study demonstrated that mirror therapy is more effective than conventional therapy for the training of stroke patients to improve their upper limb function and activities of daily living. PMID:27065534

  19. Machine-based, self-guided home therapy for individuals with severe arm impairment after stroke: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Zondervan, DK; Augsburger, R; Bodenhoefer, B; Friedman, N; Reinkensmeyer, DJ; Cramer, SC

    2015-01-01

    Background Few therapeutic options exist for the millions of persons living with severe arm impairment after stroke to increase their dose of arm rehabilitation. This study compared self-guided, high-repetition home therapy with a mechanical device (the Resonating Arm Exerciser - RAE) to conventional therapy in patients with chronic stroke, and explored RAE use for patients with subacute stroke. Methods Sixteen participants with severe upper extremity impairment (mean Fugl-Meyer (FM) score = 21.4 ± 8.8 out of 66) > 6 months post stroke were randomized to three-weeks of exercise with RAE or conventional exercises. Primary outcome measure was FM score one month post-therapy. Secondary outcome measures included MAL, Visual Analog Pain scale, and Ashworth spasticity scale. After a one-month break, individuals in the conventional group also received a three-week course of RAE therapy. Results The change in FM score was significant in both the RAE and conventional groups after training (2.6 ± 1.4 and 3.4 ± 2.4, p = 0.008 and 0.016, respectively). These improvements were not significant at one-month. Exercise with RAE led to significantly greater improvements in distal FM score than conventional therapy at the one-month follow-up (p = 0.02). In a separate cohort of patients with subacute stroke, RAE was found feasible for exercise. Discussion In subjects with severe arm impairment after chronic stroke, home-based training with RAE was feasible and significantly reduced impairment without increasing pain or spasticity. Gains with RAE were comparable to those found with conventional training, and also included distal arm improvement. PMID:25273359

  20. Fluid therapy for septic shock resuscitation: which fluid should be used?

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Rocha, Leonardo Lima; Pessoa, Camila Menezes Souza; Silva, Eliézer; de Assuncao, Murillo Santucci Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Early resuscitation of septic shock patients reduces the sepsis-related morbidity and mortality. The main goals of septic shock resuscitation include volemic expansion, maintenance of adequate tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery, guided by central venous pressure, mean arterial pressure, mixed or central venous oxygen saturation and arterial lactate levels. An aggressive fluid resuscitation, possibly in association with vasopressors, inotropes and red blood cell concentrate transfusion may be necessary to achieve those hemodynamic goals. Nonetheless, even though fluid administration is one of the most common interventions offered to critically ill patients, the most appropriate type of fluid to be used remains controversial. According to recently published clinical trials, crystalloid solutions seem to be the most appropriate type of fluids for initial resuscitation of septic shock patients. Balanced crystalloids have theoretical advantages over the classic solutions, but there is not enough evidence to indicate it as first-line treatment. Additionally, when large amounts of fluids are necessary to restore the hemodynamic stability, albumin solutions may be a safe and effective alternative. Hydroxyethyl starches solutions must be avoided in septic patients due to the increased risk of acute renal failure, increased need for renal replacement therapy and increased mortality. Our objective was to present a narrative review of the literature regarding the major types of fluids and their main drawbacks in the initial resuscitation of the septic shock patients. PMID:26313437

  1. An exploration of EEG features during recovery following stroke – implications for BCI-mediated neurorehabilitation therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI) can potentially be used to aid in the recovery of lost motor control in a limb following stroke. BCIs are typically used by subjects with no damage to the brain therefore relatively little is known about the technical requirements for the design of a rehabilitative BCI for stroke. Methods 32-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded during a finger-tapping task from 10 healthy subjects for one session and 5 stroke patients for two sessions approximately 6 months apart. An off-line BCI design based on Filter Bank Common Spatial Patterns (FBCSP) was implemented to test and compare the efficacy and accuracy of training a rehabilitative BCI with both stroke-affected and healthy data. Results Stroke-affected EEG datasets have lower 10-fold cross validation results than healthy EEG datasets. When training a BCI with healthy EEG, average classification accuracy of stroke-affected EEG is lower than the average for healthy EEG. Classification accuracy of the late session stroke EEG is improved by training the BCI on the corresponding early stroke EEG dataset. Conclusions This exploratory study illustrates that stroke and the accompanying neuroplastic changes associated with the recovery process can cause significant inter-subject changes in the EEG features suitable for mapping as part of a neurofeedback therapy, even when individuals have scored largely similar with conventional behavioural measures. It appears such measures can mask this individual variability in cortical reorganization. Consequently we believe motor retraining BCI should initially be tailored to individual patients. PMID:24468185

  2. Physical Therapy for an Adult with Chronic Stroke after Botulinum Toxin Injection for Spasticity: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Chetan P.; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: In this case report, we describe the type and duration of a physical therapy and botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) intervention directed at lower limb spasticity and the gait and balance improvement in a patient post-stroke. Treatment of focal spasticity with BoNTA intramuscular injections combined with physical therapy is recommended by rehabilitation experts. However, the optimal type and duration of physical therapy intervention to optimize any functional gains that follow chemodenervation induced by BoNTA has not been established. Method: One individual with chronic stroke who received BoNTA injections for upper and lower extremity spasticity was included. Physical therapy intervention consisted of 45- to 60-min sessions twice weekly for 12 weeks, based on the Bobath–neurodevelopmental therapy approach, and an activity-based home program. Results: After BoNTA injections and physical therapy, the patient made clinically significant improvements in balance and gait speed and became more independent with his ambulation. Conclusions: This case report demonstrates that physical therapy after BoNTA injections can result in significant functional improvements for individuals with spasticity after chronic stroke that may not be possible with BoNTA injections alone. PMID:25931655

  3. A rational approach to fluid therapy in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Marik, P; Bellomo, R

    2016-03-01

    Aggressive fluid resuscitation to achieve a central venous pressure (CVP) greater than 8 mm Hg has been promoted as the standard of care, in the management of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. However recent clinical trials have demonstrated that this approach does not improve the outcome of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. Pathophysiologically, sepsis is characterized by vasoplegia with loss of arterial tone, venodilation with sequestration of blood in the unstressed blood compartment and changes in ventricular function with reduced compliance and reduced preload responsiveness. These data suggest that sepsis is primarily not a volume-depleted state and recent evidence demonstrates that most septic patients are poorly responsive to fluids. Furthermore, almost all of the administered fluid is sequestered in the tissues, resulting in severe oedema in vital organs and, thereby, increasing the risk of organ dysfunction. These data suggest that a physiologic, haemodynamically guided conservative approach to fluid therapy in patients with sepsis would be prudent and would likely reduce the morbidity and improve the outcome of this disease. PMID:26507493

  4. Automated stroke volume and pulse pressure variations predict fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients with obstructive jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Feng; Wang, Peng; Pei, Shujun; Mi, Weidong; Fu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives: Stroke volume variation (SVV) and the pulse pressure variation (PPV) have been found to be effective in prediction fluid responsiveness especially in high risk operations. The objective of this study is to validate the ability of SVV obtained by FloTrac/Vigileo system and PPV obtained by IntelliVue MP System to predict fluid responsiveness in patients with obstructive jaundice during mechanical ventilation. Methods: Twentyfive patients with obstructive jaundice (mean serum total bilirubin 175.0 ± 120.8 μmol/L), who accepted volume expansion and were hemodynamically stable after induction of anesthesia, were included in the study. SVV and PPV were recorded simultaneously before and after an intravascular volume expansion. Patients with a stroke volume index (SVI) increase of more than 10% after volume expansion were considered as responders. Results: The agreement (mean bias ± SD) between SVV and PPV was -0.2% ± 1.56%. Before volume expansion, SVV and PPV were significantly higher in responders compared to non-responders (P<0.001, P<0.001). Significant correlation was observed between the baseline value of SVV and PPV and the percent change in SVI after fluid expansion (r=0.654, P<0.001; r=0.592, P=0.002). Area under the receiver operating characteristic curves of SVV (0.955) and PPV (0.875) were comparable (P=0.09). The optimal threshold values in predicting fluid responsiveness were 10% for SVV and 8% for PPV. Conclusion: In conclusion, SVV obtained by FloTrac/Vigileo system and PPV obtained by IntelliVue MP System was able to predict fluid responsiveness in patients with obstructive jaundice. PMID:26884998

  5. Economic Aspects of a Therapy and Support Service for People with Long-Term Stroke and Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Gaag, Anna; Brooks, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Background: This paper considers some economic aspects of a therapy and support service for people with stroke and aphasia. This material was part of a broader evaluation of the service, which is reported elsewhere (van der Gaag et al. 2005, van der Gaag and Mowles 2005). Aims: The purpose of this part of the study was to investigate the…

  6. Inadvertent recovery in communication deficits following the upper limb mirror therapy in stroke: A case report.

    PubMed

    Arya, Kamal Narayan; Pandian, Shanta

    2014-10-01

    Broca's aphasia is the most challenging communication deficit in stroke. Left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), a key region of the mirror-neuron system, gets lesioned in Broca's aphasia. Mirror therapy (MT), a form of action-observation, may trigger the mirror neurons. The aim of this study was to report a case of poststroke subject with Broca's aphasia, who exhibited an inadvertent and significant improvement in speech after MT for the paretic upper limb. The 20-month old stroke patient underwent MT through goal-directed tasks. He received a total absence of spontaneous speech, writing, and naming. After 45 sessions of task-based MT for the upper limb, he showed tremendous recovery in expressive communication. He had fluent and comprehensive communication; however, with a low pitch and minor pronunciation errors. He showed a substantial change (from 18/100 to 79/100) on the Communicative Effective Index, particularly, on items such as expressing emotions, one-to-one conversation, naming, and spontaneous conversation. PMID:25440208

  7. Potential determinants of efficacy of mirror therapy in stroke patients – A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti, Maddalena; Morkisch, Nadine; Fritzsch, Claire; Mehnert, Jan; Steinbrink, Jens; Niedeggen, Michael; Dohle, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Mirror therapy (MT) was found to improve motor function after stroke. However, there is high variability between patients regarding motor recovery. Objectives: The following pilot study was designed to identify potential factors determining this variability between patients with severe upper limb paresis, receiving MT. Methods: Eleven sub-acute stroke patients with severe upper limb paresis participated, receiving in-patient rehabilitation. After a set of pre-assessments (including measurement of brain activity at the primary motor cortex and precuneus during the mirror illusion, using near-infrared spectroscopy as described previously), four weeks of MT were applied, followed by a set of post-assessments. Discriminant group analysis for MT responders and non-responders was performed. Results: Six out of eleven patients were defined as responders and five as non-responders on the basis of their functional motor improvement. The initial motor function and the activity shift in both precunei (mirror index) were found to discriminate significantly between responders and non-responders. Conclusions: In line with earlier results, initial motor function was confirmed as crucial determinant of motor recovery. Additionally, activity response to the mirror illusion in both precunei was found to be a candidate for determination of the efficacy of MT. PMID:26409402

  8. An Economic Analysis of Robot-Assisted Therapy for Long-Term Upper-Limb Impairment After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Todd H.; Lo, Albert C.; Peduzzi, Peter; Bravata, Dawn M.; Huang, Grant D.; Krebs, Hermano I.; Ringer, Robert J.; Federman, Daniel G.; Richards, Lorie G.; Haselkorn, Jodie K.; Wittenberg, George F.; Volpe, Bruce T.; Bever, Christopher T.; Duncan, Pamela W.; Siroka, Andrew; Guarino, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Stroke is a leading cause of disability. Rehabilitation robotics have been developed to aid in recovery after a stroke. This study determined the additional cost of robot-assisted therapy and tested its cost-effectiveness. Methods We estimated the intervention costs and tracked participants' healthcare costs. We collected quality of life using the Stroke Impact Scale and the Health Utilities Index. We analyzed the cost data at 36 weeks postrandomization using multivariate regression models controlling for site, presence of a prior stroke, and Veterans Affairs costs in the year before randomization. Results A total of 127 participants were randomized to usual care plus robot therapy (n=49), usual care plus intensive comparison therapy (n=50), or usual care alone (n=28). The average cost of delivering robot therapy and intensive comparison therapy was $5152 and $7382, respectively (P<0.001), and both were significantly more expensive than usual care alone (no additional intervention costs). At 36 weeks postrandomization, the total costs were comparable for the 3 groups ($17 831 for robot therapy, $19 746 for intensive comparison therapy, and $19 098 for usual care). Changes in quality of life were modest and not statistically different. Conclusions The added cost of delivering robot or intensive comparison therapy was recuperated by lower healthcare use costs compared with those in the usual care group. However, uncertainty remains about the cost-effectiveness of robotic-assisted rehabilitation compared with traditional rehabilitation. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00372411. PMID:21757677

  9. Therapeutic synergism in the treatment of post-stroke arm paresis utilizing botulinum toxin, robotic therapy, and constraint-induced movement therapy.

    PubMed

    Takebayashi, Takashi; Amano, Satoru; Hanada, Keisuke; Umeji, Atsushi; Takahashi, Kayoko; Koyama, Tetsuo; Domen, Kazuhisa

    2014-11-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BtxA) injection, constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT), and robotic therapy (RT) each represent promising approaches to enhance arm motor recovery after stroke. To provide more effective treatment for a 50-year-old man with severe left spastic hemiparesis, we attempted to facilitate CIMT with adaptive approaches to extend the wrist and fingers using RT for 10 consecutive weeks after BtxA injection. This combined treatment resulted in substantial improvements in arm function and the amount of arm use in activities of daily living, and may be effective for stroke patients with severe arm paresis. However, we were unable to sufficiently prove the efficacy of combined treatment based only on a single case. To fully elucidate the efficacy of the combined approach for patients with severe hemiparesis after stroke, future studies of a larger number of patients are needed. PMID:24880058

  10. Transcranial Near-Infrared Laser Therapy for Stroke: How to Recover from Futility in the NEST-3 Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Lapchak, Paul A; Boitano, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    Development of drugs and devices for the treatment of stroke is not exempt from current translational research standards, which include Stroke Treatment Academic Industry Roundtable (STAIR) criteria and RIGOR guidelines. Near-infrared laser therapy (NILT) was developed to treat stroke in an era when STAIR criteria were not adhered to, thus NILT was not optimized in multiple species, nor was it optimized for efficacy across barriers in translational animal models before proceeding to expensive and extensive clinical trials. Moreover, the majority of rodent studies did not adhere to RIGOR guidelines. This ultimately led to failure in the NeuroThera Effectiveness and Safety Trial-3. Because NILT remains a promising therapeutic approach to treat stroke, we designed a systematic study to determine laser light penetration profiles across the skull of four different species with increasing skull thickness: mouse, rat, rabbit, and human.Our study demonstrates that NILT differentially penetrates the skulls. There is especially extensive attenuation of light energy penetration across the human calvaria, compared with animal skulls, which suggests that the power density setting used in stroke clinical trials may not have optimally stimulated neuroprotection and repair pathways. The results of our study suggest that NILT cannot be sufficiently optimized in "small" animals and directly translated to humans because of significant variances of skull thickness and penetration characteristics across species. NILT neuroprotection should be further studied using a research design that endeavors to incorporate human skull characteristics (thickness) into the development plan to increase the probability of success in stroke victims. PMID:26463915

  11. Developing movement therapy application with Microsoft Kinect control for supporting stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Mintal, Flavian A; Szucs, Veronika; Sik-Lanyi, Cecília

    2015-01-01

    The topic of this article and work was to create an application for movement therapy, which can help the rehabilitation of stroke patients. The application makes it possible to make unique exercises for different patients, adapting to the special personal needs. The developed real time gesture analyzing algorithm works in the background of the application, which has not yet spread on the field of medical devices. I deal with one part of this wide field in my dissertation, with the rehabilitation gesture analyzing. The data received from the Kinect sensor is processed by a location based gesture analyzing algorithm, and the results show that the software is suitable for the improvement of the rehabilitation process. It was a key aspect to create a simple interface. I achieved this with the use of the C# language and WPF technology. PMID:26294562

  12. Intensive therapy induces contralateral white matter changes in chronic stroke patients with Broca's aphasia.

    PubMed

    Wan, Catherine Y; Zheng, Xin; Marchina, Sarah; Norton, Andrea; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2014-09-01

    Using a pre-post design, eleven chronic stroke patients with large left hemisphere lesions and nonfluent aphasia underwent diffusion tensor imaging and language testing before and after receiving 15 weeks of an intensive intonation-based speech therapy. This treated patient group was compared to an untreated patient group (n=9) scanned twice over a similar time period. Our results showed that the treated group, but not the untreated group, had reductions in fractional anisotropy in the white matter underlying the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG, pars opercularis and pars triangularis), the right posterior superior temporal gyrus, and the right posterior cingulum. Furthermore, we found that greater improvements in speech production were associated with greater reductions in FA in the right IFG (pars opercularis). Thus, our findings showed that an intensive rehabilitation program for patients with nonfluent aphasia led to structural changes in the right hemisphere, which correlated with improvements in speech production. PMID:25041868

  13. Procedural Predictors of Outcome in Patients Undergoing Endovascular Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Ansaar T. Jhadhav, Yahodeep; Domico, Jennifer; Hobbs, Gerald R.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To identify factors impacting outcome in patients undergoing interventions for acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of patients undergoing endovascular therapy for AIS secondary during a 30 month period. Outcome was based on modified Rankin score at 3- to 6-month follow-up. Recanalization was defined as Thrombolysis in myocardial infarction score 2 to 3. Collaterals were graded based on pial circulation from the anterior cerebral artery either from an ipsilateral injection in cases of middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion or contralateral injection for internal carotid artery terminus (ICA) occlusion as follows: no collaterals (grade 0), some collaterals with retrograde opacification of the distal MCA territory (grade 1), and good collaterals with filling of the proximal MCA (M2) branches or retrograde opacification up to the occlusion site (grade 2). Occlusion site was divided into group 1 (ICA), group 2 (MCA with or without contiguous M2 involvement), and group 3 (isolated M2 or M3 branch occlusion). Results: A total of 89 patients were studied. Median age and National Institutes of health stroke scale (NIHSS) score was 71 and 15 years, respectively. Favorable outcome was seen in 49.4% of patients and mortality in 25.8% of patients. Younger age (P = 0.006), lower baseline NIHSS score (P = 0.001), successful recanalization (P < 0.0001), collateral support (P = 0.0008), distal occlusion (P = 0.001), and shorter procedure duration (P = 0.01) were associated with a favorable outcome. Factors affecting successful recanalization included younger age (P = 0.01), lower baseline NIHSS score (P = 0.05), collateral support (P = 0.01), and shorter procedure duration (P = 0.03). An ICA terminus occlusion (P < 0.0001), lack of collaterals (P = 0.0003), and unsuccessful recanalization (P = 0.005) were significantly associated with mortality. Conclusion: Angiographic findings and preprocedure variables can help

  14. CT Perfusion ASPECTS in the Evaluation of Acute Ischemic Stroke: Thrombolytic Therapy Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Sillanpaa, Niko; Saarinen, Jukka T.; Rusanen, Harri; Hakomaki, Jari; Lahteela, Arto; Numminen, Heikki; Elovaara, Irina; Dastidar, Prasun; Soimakallio, Seppo

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Advances in the management of acute ischemic stroke and medical imaging are creating pressure to replace the rigid one-third middle cerebral artery (MCA) and non-contrast-enhanced CT (NCCT) Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) thresholds used for the selection of patients eligible for intravenous thrombolytic therapy. The identification of potentially salvageable ischemic brain tissue lies at the core of this issue. In this study, the role of CT perfusion ASPECTS in the detection of reversible ischemia was analyzed. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the clinical and imaging data of 92 consecutive patients who received intravenous thrombolytic therapy for acute (duration <3 h) ischemic stroke. Most of the patients underwent admission multimodal CT, and all patients had follow-up NCCT at 24 h. ASPECTS was assigned to all modalities and correlated with clinical and imaging parameters. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to determine optimal thresholds for different parameters to predict clinical outcome. Results A perfusion defect could be detected in 50% of the patients. ASPECTS correlated inversely with the clinical outcome in the following order: follow-up NCCT > cerebral blood volume (CBV) > mean transit time (MTT) > admission NCCT. The follow-up NCCT and the CBV displayed a statistically significant difference from the admission NCCT, while the MTT did not reach statistical significance. The threshold that best differentiated between good and bad clinical outcome on admission was CBV ASPECTS ≥7. In patients with CT perfusion ASPECTS mismatch, MTT and CBV ASPECTS essentially provided the lower and upper limits for the follow-up NCCT ASPECTS, thus defining the spectrum of possible outcomes. Furthermore, CT perfusion ASPECTS mismatch strongly correlated (r = 0.83) with the mismatch between the tissue at risk and the final infarct, i.e. the amount of salvaged tissue. This finding suggests

  15. Wrist rehabilitation in chronic stroke patients by means of adaptive, progressive robot-aided therapy.

    PubMed

    Squeri, V; Masia, L; Giannoni, P; Sandini, G; Morasso, P

    2014-03-01

    Despite distal arm impairment after brain injury is an extremely disabling consequence of neurological damage, most studies on robotic therapy are mainly focused on recovery of proximal upper limb motor functions, routing the major efforts in rehabilitation to shoulder and elbow joints. In the present study we developed a novel therapeutic protocol aimed at restoring wrist functionality in chronic stroke patients. A haptic three DoFs (degrees of freedom) robot has been used to quantify motor impairment and assist wrist and forearm articular movements: flexion/extension (FE), abduction/adduction (AA), pronation/supination (PS). This preliminary study involved nine stroke patients, from a mild to severe level of impairment. Therapy consisted in ten 1-hour sessions over a period of five weeks. The novelty of the approach was the adaptive control scheme which trained wrist movements with slow oscillatory patterns of small amplitude and progressively increasing bias, in order to maximize the recovery of the active range of motion. The primary outcome was a change in the active RoM (range of motion) for each DoF and a change of motor function, as measured by the Fugl-Meyer assessment of arm physical performance after stroke (FMA). The secondary outcome was the score on the Wolf Motor Function Test (WOLF). The FMA score reported a significant improvement (average of 9.33±1.89 points), revealing a reduction of the upper extremity motor impairment over the sessions; moreover, a detailed component analysis of the score hinted at some degree of motor recovery transfer from the distal, trained parts of the arm to the proximal untrained parts. WOLF showed an improvement of 8.31±2.77 points, highlighting an increase in functional capability for the whole arm. The active RoM displayed a remarkable improvement. Moreover, a three-months follow up assessment reported long lasting benefits in both distal and proximal arm functionalities. The experimental results of th- s

  16. Effects of mental practice embedded in daily therapy compared to therapy as usual in adult stroke patients in Dutch nursing homes: design of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Susy M; Beurskens, Anna J; van Kroonenburgh, Susanne M; Demarteau, Jeroen; Schols, Jos M; Wade, Derick T

    2007-01-01

    Background Mental practice as an additional cognitive therapy is getting increased attention in stroke rehabilitation. A systematic review shows some evidence that several techniques in which movements are rehearsed mentally might be effective but not enough to be certain. This trial investigates whether mental practice can contribute to a quicker and/or better recovery of stroke in two Dutch nursing homes. The objective is to investigate the therapeutic potential of mental practice embedded in daily therapy to improve individually chosen daily activities of adult stroke patients compared to therapy as usual. In addition, we will investigate prognostic variables and feasibility (process evaluation). Methods A randomised, controlled, observer masked prospective trial will be conducted with adult stroke patients in the (sub)acute phase of stroke recovery. Over a six weeks intervention period the control group will receive multi professional therapy as usual. Patients in the experimental group will be instructed how to perform mental practice, and will receive care as usual in which mental practice is embedded in physical, occupation and speech therapy sessions. Outcome will be assessed at six weeks and six months. The primary outcome measure is the patient-perceived effect on performance of daily activities as assessed by an 11-point Likert Scale. Secondary outcomes are: Motricity Index, Nine Hole Peg Test, Barthel Index, Timed up and Go, 10 metres walking test, Rivermead Mobility Index. A sample size of the patients group and all therapists will be interviewed on their opinion of the experimental program to assess feasibility. All patients are asked to keep a log to determine unguided training intensity. Discussion Advantages and disadvantages of several aspects of the chosen design are discussed. Trial registration ISRCTN27582267 PMID:17937798

  17. Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review of Neural Stem Cells therapy for experimental ischemia stroke in preclinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lukui; Zhang, Guilong; Gu, Yuchun; Guo, Xiaoyuan

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the preclinical studies using NSCs transplantation therapy for experimental ischemic stroke, and determine the effect size of NSCs therapy and the correlations between different clinical measures. We firstly searched literatures to identify studies of NSCs therapy in animal cerebral ischemia models, and then calculated the quality score of studies, assessed the effect size of NSCs therapy relative to behavioral and histologic endpoints by meta-analysis. A total of 37 studies and 54 independent treated interventions were used for systematic review and meta-analysis. The median quality score was 5 of 10. 36 studies (53 intervention arms) reported functional outcome, 22 studies (34 intervention arms) reported structural outcome. After adjusted by subgroup and sensitivity analysis, the mean effect sizes were improved by 1.35 for mNSS, 1.84 for rotarod test, 0.61 for cylinder test, and 0.84 for infarct volume. Furthermore, effect size had a certain interaction with clinical variables, for example early NSCs therapy etc. In this preclinical studies, we demonstrated that transplanted NSCs significantly improved outcomes (both functional and structural outcome) in ischemic stroke. It is suggested that future preclinical animal model studies of stroke should improve study quality validity and reduce potentially confounded publication bias. PMID:27554433

  18. Perturbation of Brain Oscillations after Ischemic Stroke: A Potential Biomarker for Post-Stroke Function and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rabiller, Gratianne; He, Ji-Wei; Nishijima, Yasuo; Wong, Aaron; Liu, Jialing

    2015-01-01

    Brain waves resonate from the generators of electrical current and propagate across brain regions with oscillation frequencies ranging from 0.05 to 500 Hz. The commonly observed oscillatory waves recorded by an electroencephalogram (EEG) in normal adult humans can be grouped into five main categories according to the frequency and amplitude, namely δ (1–4 Hz, 20–200 μV), θ (4–8 Hz, 10 μV), α (8–12 Hz, 20–200 μV), β (12–30 Hz, 5–10 μV), and γ (30–80 Hz, low amplitude). Emerging evidence from experimental and human studies suggests that groups of function and behavior seem to be specifically associated with the presence of each oscillation band, although the complex relationship between oscillation frequency and function, as well as the interaction between brain oscillations, are far from clear. Changes of brain oscillation patterns have long been implicated in the diseases of the central nervous system including ischemic stroke, in which the reduction of cerebral blood flow as well as the progression of tissue damage have direct spatiotemporal effects on the power of several oscillatory bands and their interactions. This review summarizes the current knowledge in behavior and function associated with each brain oscillation, and also in the specific changes in brain electrical activities that correspond to the molecular events and functional alterations observed after experimental and human stroke. We provide the basis of the generations of brain oscillations and potential cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying stroke-induced perturbation. We will also discuss the implications of using brain oscillation patterns as biomarkers for the prediction of stroke outcome and therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26516838

  19. Perturbation of Brain Oscillations after Ischemic Stroke: A Potential Biomarker for Post-Stroke Function and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Rabiller, Gratianne; He, Ji-Wei; Nishijima, Yasuo; Wong, Aaron; Liu, Jialing

    2015-01-01

    Brain waves resonate from the generators of electrical current and propagate across brain regions with oscillation frequencies ranging from 0.05 to 500 Hz. The commonly observed oscillatory waves recorded by an electroencephalogram (EEG) in normal adult humans can be grouped into five main categories according to the frequency and amplitude, namely δ (1-4 Hz, 20-200 μV), θ (4-8 Hz, 10 μV), α (8-12 Hz, 20-200 μV), β (12-30 Hz, 5-10 μV), and γ (30-80 Hz, low amplitude). Emerging evidence from experimental and human studies suggests that groups of function and behavior seem to be specifically associated with the presence of each oscillation band, although the complex relationship between oscillation frequency and function, as well as the interaction between brain oscillations, are far from clear. Changes of brain oscillation patterns have long been implicated in the diseases of the central nervous system including ischemic stroke, in which the reduction of cerebral blood flow as well as the progression of tissue damage have direct spatiotemporal effects on the power of several oscillatory bands and their interactions. This review summarizes the current knowledge in behavior and function associated with each brain oscillation, and also in the specific changes in brain electrical activities that correspond to the molecular events and functional alterations observed after experimental and human stroke. We provide the basis of the generations of brain oscillations and potential cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying stroke-induced perturbation. We will also discuss the implications of using brain oscillation patterns as biomarkers for the prediction of stroke outcome and therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26516838

  20. Doses to Carotid Arteries After Modern Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma: Is Stroke Still a Late Effect of Treatment?

    SciTech Connect

    Maraldo, Maja V.; Brodin, Patrick; Aznar, Marianne C.; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Petersen, Peter M.; Specht, Lena

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors are at an increased risk of stroke because of carotid artery irradiation. However, for early-stage HL involved node radiation therapy (INRT) reduces the volume of normal tissue exposed to high doses. Here, we evaluate 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and proton therapy (PT) delivered as INRT along with the extensive mantle field (MF) by comparing doses to the carotid arteries and corresponding risk estimates. Methods and Materials: We included a cohort of 46 supradiaphragmatic stage I-II classical HL patients. All patients were initially treated with chemotherapy and INRT delivered as 3D-CRT (30 Gy). For each patient, we simulated MF (36 Gy) and INRT plans using VMAT and PT (30 Gy). Linear dose-response curves for the 20-, 25-, and 30-year risk of stroke were derived from published HL data. Risks of stroke with each technique were calculated for all patients. Statistical analyses were performed with repeated measures analysis of variance. Results: The mean doses to the right and left common carotid artery were significantly lower with modern treatment compared with MF, with substantial patient variability. The estimated excess risk of stroke after 20, 25, and 30 years was 0.6%, 0.86%, and 1.3% for 3D-CRT; 0.67%, 0.96%, and 1.47% for VMAT; 0.61%, 0.96%, and 1.33% for PT; and 1.3%, 1.72%, and 2.61% for MF. Conclusions: INRT reduces the dose delivered to the carotid arteries and corresponding estimated risk of stroke for HL survivors. Even for the subset of patients with lymphoma close to the carotid arteries, the estimated risk is low.

  1. The effect of mirror therapy on upper-extremity function and activities of daily living in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Young; Chang, Moonyoung; Kim, Kyeong-Mi; Kim, Hee-Jung

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of mirror therapy on upper-extremity function and activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen subjects were each assigned to a mirror therapy group and a sham therapy group. The Fugl-Meyer Motor Function Assessment and the Box and Block Test were performed to compare paretic upper-extremity function and hand coordination abilities. The functional independence measurement was conducted to compare abilities to perform activities of daily living. [Results] Paretic upper-extremity function and hand coordination abilities were significantly different between the mirror therapy and sham therapy groups. Intervention in the mirror therapy group was more effective than in the sham therapy group for improving the ability to perform activities of daily living. Self-care showed statistically significant differences between the two groups. [Conclusion] Mirror therapy is effective in improving paretic upper-extremity function and activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients. PMID:26180297

  2. [Efficacy and safety of the combined therapy with citicholine and actovegin in the acute period of ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Shamalov, N A; Stakhovskaia, L V; Shetova, I M; Efremova, N M; Anisimov, K V

    2010-01-01

    One hundred and four patients with acute carotid ischemic stroke were included in the study. Patients were divided into 4 groups. Patients of control group (group 1) were treated with equal basic and reperfusional therapy without any cytoprotectors. Patients of the 2nd group received citicholine in dose 1000 mg per day. Patients of the 3rd group were treated with 250 ml actovegin per day. The NIH stroke scale, the modified Rankin scale and the Barthel index were used to assess neurological status dynamics. The significant decrease of neurological deficit and improvement of functional recovery were seen in patients treated both with citicholine and actovegin (p < 0.005) to the 30th day compared to the control group. There was a trend towards the decrease of brain infarction volume within 5 days after stroke in patients of the 4th group. No side-effects of citicholine and actovegin were found. PMID:21462435

  3. Adapting the Home After a Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis ... PROFILE→ Credits This section was developed by the Internet Stroke Center and the Program in Occupational Therapy ...

  4. Pediatric CI therapy for stroke-induced hemiparesis in young children.

    PubMed

    Taub, Edward; Griffin, Angi; Nick, Jennifer; Gammons, Kristin; Uswatte, Gitendra; Law, Charles R

    2007-01-01

    In this laboratory we have developed a set of techniques that randomized controlled studies and a multisite randomized controlled trial have shown can substantially reduce the motor deficit of adult patients with mild to severe chronic strokes. Equivalent results have been obtained with adult patients after traumatic brain injury and brain resection. The basic technique, termed Constraint-Induced Movement therapy or CI therapy was derived directly from basic research with monkeys with mature motor systems and with monkeys given surgical intervention either on their day of birth or prenatally by intrauterine surgical procedures. We report here the results of two randomized controlled trials of CI therapy with young children with asymmetric upper extremity motor deficits of varied etiologies from 8 months to 8 years of age in one study and with children with hemiparesis consequent to prenatal, perinatal, or early antenatal stroke from 2 to 6 years old in a second study. The procedures used with children are very similar to those used with adults and diverge simply to make the basic techniques age-appropriate. All forms of CI therapy for the upper extremity to date involve 3 main elements: (1) intensive training of the more affected extremity, (2) prolonged restraint of the less affected extremity, (3) a 'transfer package' of techniques to induce transfer of therapeutic gains achieved in the laboratory to the life situation. The results in children with cerebral palsy are considerably better than those obtained in adults. Marked changes were observed in the quality of movement in the laboratory scored by masked observers from videotape; actual amount of use of the more affected arm in the life situation; active range of motion; and emergence of new classes of behaviour never performed before, such as in individual cases, fine thumb-forefinger grasp, supination, and use of the more affected extremity in crawling with palmar placement and rhythmic alteration. In the

  5. Retrosternal mass: An interesting allergic reaction to intravenous thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Motamed, Mohammad Reza; Aghaei, Mahboubeh; Badi, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is an important cause of disability and death worldwide, with the majority of strokes occurring in older people. Thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-TPA) is the approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke. A major concern of physicians, who treat acute ischemic stroke with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-TPA,) is the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. However, other adverse reactions, including anaphylaxis and angioedema, can also occur. Here we report an interesting soft tissue reaction to intravenous r-TPA in an 80 year-old male who was treated for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:24250917

  6. Retrosternal mass: An interesting allergic reaction to intravenous thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Mehrpour, Masoud; Motamed, Mohammad Reza; Aghaei, Mahboubeh; Badi, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is an important cause of disability and death worldwide, with the majority of strokes occurring in older people. Thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-TPA) is the approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke. A major concern of physicians, who treat acute ischemic stroke with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-TPA,) is the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. However, other adverse reactions, including anaphylaxis and angioedema, can also occur. Here we report an interesting soft tissue reaction to intravenous r-TPA in an 80 year-old male who was treated for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:24250917

  7. Post-Stroke Walking Behaviors Consistent with Altered Ground Reaction Force Direction Control Advise New Approaches to Research and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Wendy L; Gruben, Kreg G

    2016-02-01

    Recovery of walking after stroke requires an understanding of how motor control deficits lead to gait impairment. Traditional therapy focuses on removing specific observable gait behaviors that deviate from unimpaired walking; however, those behaviors may be effective compensations for underlying problematic motor control deficits rather than direct effects of the stroke. Neurological deficits caused by stroke are not well understood, and thus, efficient interventions for gait rehabilitation likely remain unrealized. Our laboratory has previously characterized a post-stroke control deficit that yields a specific difference in direction of the ground reaction force (F, limb endpoint force) exerted with the hemiplegic limb of study participants pushing on both stationary and moving pedals while seated. That task was not dependent on F to retain upright posture, and thus, the task did not constrain F direction. Rather, the F direction was the product of neural preference. It is not known if this specific muscle coordination deficit causes the observed walking deviations, but if present during walking, the deficit would prevent upright posture unless counteracted by compensatory behaviors. Compensations are presented that mechanically counteract the F misdirection to allow upright posture. Those compensations are similar to behaviors observed in stroke patients. Based on that alignment between predictions of this theory and clinical observations, we theorize that post-stroke gait results from the attempt to compensate for the underlying F misdirection deficit. Limb endpoint force direction has been shown to be trainable in the paretic upper limb, making it a feasible goal in the lower limb. If this F misdirection theory is valid, these ideas have tremendous promise for advancing the field of post-stroke gait rehabilitation. PMID:26639659

  8. Laser therapy of painful shoulder and shoulder-hand syndrome in treatment of patients after the stroke.

    PubMed

    Karabegović, Azra; Kapidzić-Duraković, Suada; Ljuca, Farid

    2009-02-01

    The common complication after stroke is pain and dysfunction of shoulder of paralyzed arm, as well as the swelling of the hand. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of LASER therapy and to correlate with electrotherapy (TENS, stabile galvanization) in subjects after stroke. We analyzed 70 subjects after stroke with pain in shoulder and oedema of paralyzed hand. The examinees were divided in two groups of 35, and they were treated in the Clinic for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in Tuzla during 2006 and 2007. Experimental group (EG) had a treatment with LASER, while the control group (CG) was treated with electrotherapy. Both groups had kinesis therapy and ice massage. All patients were examined on the admission and discharge by using the VAS, DASH, Barthel index and FIM. The pain intensity in shoulder was significantly reduced in EG (p<0,0001), swelling is lowered in EG (p=0,01). Barthel index in both groups was significant higher (p<0,01). DASH was significantly improved after LASER therapy in EG (p<0,01). EG had higher level of independency (p<0,01). LASER therapy used on EG shows significantly better results in reducing pain, swelling, disability and improvement of independency. PMID:19284397

  9. Constraint-Induced Aphasia Therapy for Treatment of Chronic Post-Stroke Aphasia: A Randomized, Blinded, Controlled Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Szaflarski, Jerzy P.; Ball, Angel L.; Vannest, Jennifer; Dietz, Aimee R.; Allendorfer, Jane B.; Martin, Amber N.; Hart, Kimberly; Lindsell, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have documented the possibility of treatment-induced improvements in language functions 12 months or longer after stroke. The purpose of the current study was to provide a preliminary estimate of efficacy of constraint-induced aphasia therapy (CIAT) when compared to no-intervention in patients with chronic (>1 year) post-stroke aphasia in order to provide the data needed to design an appropriately powered trial. Material/Methods This was a randomized, controlled, single-blinded, pilot trial. We identified 32 patients with chronic post-stroke aphasia. Of these, 27 were offered participation, and 24 were randomized (CONSORT diagram): 14 to CIAT and to 10 to no-intervention. CIAT groups received up to 4 hours/day of intervention for 10 consecutive business days (40 hours of therapy). Outcomes were assessed within 1 week of intervention and at 1 and 12 weeks after intervention and included several linguistic measures and a measure of overall subjective communication abilities (mini-Communicative Abilities Log (mini-CAL)). To maintain blinding, clinicians treating patients (CIAT group) did not communicate with other team members and the testing team members were blinded to treatment group assignment. Results Overall, the results of this pilot trial support the results of previous observational studies that CIAT may lead to improvements in linguistic abilities. At 12 weeks, the treatment group reported better subjective communication abilities (mini-CAL) than the no-intervention group (p=0.019). Other measures trended towards better performance in the CIAT group. Conclusions In this randomized, controlled, and blinded pilot study, intensive language therapy (CIAT) led to an improvement in subjective language abilities. The effects demonstrated allow the design of a definitive trial of CIAT in patients with a variety of post-stroke aphasia types. In addition, our experiences have identified important considerations for designing subsequent trial

  10. Plasticity in the sensorimotor cortex induced by Music-supported therapy in stroke patients: a TMS study

    PubMed Central

    Grau-Sánchez, Jennifer; Amengual, Julià L.; Rojo, Nuria; Veciana de las Heras, Misericordia; Montero, Jordi; Rubio, Francisco; Altenmüller, Eckart; Münte, Thomas F.; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Playing a musical instrument demands the engagement of different neural systems. Recent studies about the musician's brain and musical training highlight that this activity requires the close interaction between motor and somatosensory systems. Moreover, neuroplastic changes have been reported in motor-related areas after short and long-term musical training. Because of its capacity to promote neuroplastic changes, music has been used in the context of stroke neurorehabilitation. The majority of patients suffering from a stroke have motor impairments, preventing them to live independently. Thus, there is an increasing demand for effective restorative interventions for neurological deficits. Music-supported Therapy (MST) has been recently developed to restore motor deficits. We report data of a selected sample of stroke patients who have been enrolled in a MST program (1 month intense music learning). Prior to and after the therapy, patients were evaluated with different behavioral motor tests. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) was applied to evaluate changes in the sensorimotor representations underlying the motor gains observed. Several parameters of excitability of the motor cortex were assessed as well as the cortical somatotopic representation of a muscle in the affected hand. Our results revealed that participants obtained significant motor improvements in the paretic hand and those changes were accompanied by changes in the excitability of the motor cortex. Thus, MST leads to neuroplastic changes in the motor cortex of stroke patients which may explain its efficacy. PMID:24027507

  11. Plasticity in the sensorimotor cortex induced by Music-supported therapy in stroke patients: a TMS study.

    PubMed

    Grau-Sánchez, Jennifer; Amengual, Julià L; Rojo, Nuria; Veciana de Las Heras, Misericordia; Montero, Jordi; Rubio, Francisco; Altenmüller, Eckart; Münte, Thomas F; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Playing a musical instrument demands the engagement of different neural systems. Recent studies about the musician's brain and musical training highlight that this activity requires the close interaction between motor and somatosensory systems. Moreover, neuroplastic changes have been reported in motor-related areas after short and long-term musical training. Because of its capacity to promote neuroplastic changes, music has been used in the context of stroke neurorehabilitation. The majority of patients suffering from a stroke have motor impairments, preventing them to live independently. Thus, there is an increasing demand for effective restorative interventions for neurological deficits. Music-supported Therapy (MST) has been recently developed to restore motor deficits. We report data of a selected sample of stroke patients who have been enrolled in a MST program (1 month intense music learning). Prior to and after the therapy, patients were evaluated with different behavioral motor tests. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) was applied to evaluate changes in the sensorimotor representations underlying the motor gains observed. Several parameters of excitability of the motor cortex were assessed as well as the cortical somatotopic representation of a muscle in the affected hand. Our results revealed that participants obtained significant motor improvements in the paretic hand and those changes were accompanied by changes in the excitability of the motor cortex. Thus, MST leads to neuroplastic changes in the motor cortex of stroke patients which may explain its efficacy. PMID:24027507

  12. Concise review: Preclinical studies on human cell-based therapy in rodent ischemic stroke models: where are we now after a decade?

    PubMed

    Leong, Wai Khay; Lewis, Martin D; Koblar, Simon A

    2013-06-01

    Stroke, a debilitating brain insult, afflicts millions of individuals globally each year. In the last decade, researchers have investigated cell-based therapy as an alternative strategy to improve neurological outcome following stroke. This concise review critically examines preclinical reports using human adult and fetal stem/progenitor cells in rodent models of ischemic stroke. As we enter the second decade of study, we should aim to optimize our collective likelihood to translational success for stroke victims worldwide. We advocate international consensus recommendations be developed for future preclinical research. PMID:23390084

  13. Virtual Reality Therapy for Adults Post-Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Exploring Virtual Environments and Commercial Games in Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lohse, Keith R.; Hilderman, Courtney G. E.; Cheung, Katharine L.; Tatla, Sandy; Van der Loos, H. F. Machiel

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this analysis was to systematically review the evidence for virtual reality (VR) therapy in an adult post-stroke population in both custom built virtual environments (VE) and commercially available gaming systems (CG). Methods MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, ERIC, PSYCInfo, DARE, PEDro, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were systematically searched from the earliest available date until April 4, 2013. Controlled trials that compared VR to conventional therapy were included. Population criteria included adults (>18) post-stroke, excluding children, cerebral palsy, and other neurological disorders. Included studies were reported in English. Quality of studies was assessed with the Physiotherapy Evidence Database Scale (PEDro). Results Twenty-six studies met the inclusion criteria. For body function outcomes, there was a significant benefit of VR therapy compared to conventional therapy controls, G = 0.48, 95% CI = [0.27, 0.70], and no significant difference between VE and CG interventions (P = 0.38). For activity outcomes, there was a significant benefit of VR therapy, G = 0.58, 95% CI = [0.32, 0.85], and no significant difference between VE and CG interventions (P = 0.66). For participation outcomes, the overall effect size was G = 0.56, 95% CI = [0.02, 1.10]. All participation outcomes came from VE studies. Discussion VR rehabilitation moderately improves outcomes compared to conventional therapy in adults post-stroke. Current CG interventions have been too few and too small to assess potential benefits of CG. Future research in this area should aim to clearly define conventional therapy, report on participation measures, consider motivational components of therapy, and investigate commercially available systems in larger RCTs. Trial Registration Prospero CRD42013004338 PMID:24681826

  14. A Descriptive Study of the Fluid Intake, Hydration, and Health Status of Rehabilitation Inpatients without Dysphagia Following Stroke.

    PubMed

    Murray, Jo; Doeltgen, Sebastian; Miller, Michelle; Scholten, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Adequate hydration is important for all people, particularly when hospitalized with illness. Individuals with dysphagia following stroke are considered to be at risk of inadequate fluid intake and, therefore, dehydration, but there is little information about the fluid intake or hydration of individuals without dysphagia poststroke. This cohort study measured the average beverage intake, calculated the urea/creatinine ratio as a measure of hydration, and documented specific health outcomes of 86 people without dysphagia poststroke who were inpatients in rehabilitation centers. Participants drank on average 1504 ml per day (SD 359 ml), which typically represented 67% of their estimated daily requirement. Approximately 44% of the participants in the sample were dehydrated based on a blood urea nitrogen/creatinine ratio >20:1. Sixteen percent of participants were diagnosed with one or more of the health outcomes of dehydration/hypernatremia, urinary tract infection, or constipation. A greater level of dependence was associated with poorer beverage intake and higher risk of an adverse health outcome. Those in the older/elderly age range (particularly older women) and those with poor mobility were most at risk of poor hydration. This study highlights that patients in rehabilitation facilities poststroke, even without dysphagia, may be at risk of suboptimal fluid intake and hydration. PMID:26267442

  15. Update of the Korean Clinical Practice Guidelines for Endovascular Recanalization Therapy in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Ko, Sang-Bae; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Jung, Cheolkyu; Park, Sukh Que; Kim, Byung Moon; Chang, Chul-Hoon; Bae, Hee-Joon; Heo, Ji Hoe; Oh, Chang Wan; Lee, Byung-Chul; Kim, Bum-Tae; Kim, Bum-soo; Chung, Chin-Sang; Yoon, Byung-Woo; Rha, Joung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Patients with severe stroke due to acute large cerebral artery occlusion are likely to be severely disabled or dead without timely reperfusion. Previously, intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-TPA) within 4.5 hours after stroke onset was the only proven therapy, but IV-TPA alone does not sufficiently improve the outcome of patients with acute large artery occlusion. With the introduction of the advanced endovascular therapy, which enables more fast and more successful recanalization, recent randomized trials consecutively and consistently demonstrated the benefit of endovascular recanalization therapy (ERT) when added to IV-TPA. Accordingly, to update the recommendations, we assembled members of the writing committee appointed by the Korean Stroke Society, the Korean Society of Interventional Neuroradiology, and the Society of Korean Endovascular Neurosurgeons. Reviewing the evidences that have been accumulated, the writing members revised recommendations, for which formal consensus was achieved by convening a panel composed of 34 experts from the participating academic societies. The current guideline provides the evidence-based recommendations for ERT in patients with acute large cerebral artery occlusion regarding patient selection, treatment modalities, neuroimaging evaluation, and system organization. PMID:26846761

  16. Update of the Korean Clinical Practice Guidelines for Endovascular Recanalization Therapy in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Ko, Sang-Bae; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Jung, Cheolkyu; Park, Sukh Que; Kim, Byung Moon; Chang, Chul-Hoon; Bae, Hee-Joon; Heo, Ji Hoe; Oh, Chang Wan; Lee, Byung-Chul; Kim, Bum-Tae; Kim, Bum-Soo; Chung, Chin-Sang; Yoon, Byung-Woo; Rha, Joung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Patients with severe stroke due to acute large cerebral artery occlusion are likely to be severely disabled or dead without timely reperfusion. Previously, intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-TPA) within 4.5 hours after stroke onset was the only proven therapy, but IV-TPA alone does not sufficiently improve the outcome of patients with acute large artery occlusion. With the introduction of the advanced endovascular therapy, which enables more fast and more successful recanalization, recent randomized trials consecutively and consistently demonstrated the benefit of endovascular recanalization therapy (ERT) when added to IV-TPA. Accordingly, to update the recommendations, we assembled members of the writing committee appointed by the Korean Stroke Society, the Korean Society of Interventional Neuroradiology, and the Society of Korean Endovascular Neurosurgeons. Reviewing the evidences that have been accumulated, the writing members revised recommendations, for which formal consensus was achieved by convening a panel composed of 34 experts from the participating academic societies. The current guideline provides the evidence-based recommendations for ERT in patients with acute large cerebral artery occlusion regarding patient selection, treatment modalities, neuroimaging evaluation, and system organization. PMID:26846761

  17. Original Research: Sickle cell anemia and pediatric strokes: Computational fluid dynamics analysis in the middle cerebral artery.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Christian P; Veneziani, Alessandro; Ware, Russell E; Platt, Manu O

    2016-04-01

    Children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) have a high incidence of strokes, and transcranial Doppler (TCD) identifies at-risk patients by measuring blood velocities in large intracerebral arteries; time-averaged mean velocities greater than 200 cm/s confer high stroke risk and warrant therapeutic intervention with blood transfusions. Our objective was to use computational fluid dynamics to alter fluid and artery wall properties, to simulate scenarios causative of significantly elevated arterial blood velocities. Two-dimensional simulations were created and increasing percent stenoses were created in silico, with their locations varied among middle cerebral artery (MCA), internal carotid artery (ICA), and anterior cerebral artery (ACA). Stenoses placed in the MCA, ICA, or ACA generated local increases in velocity, but not sufficient to reach magnitudes > 200 cm/s, even up to 75% stenosis. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the MCA, ICA, and ACA from children with SCA were generated from magnetic resonance angiograms. Using finite element method, blood flow was simulated with realistic velocity waveforms to the ICA inlet. Three-dimensional reconstructions revealed an uneven, internal arterial wall surface in children with SCA and higher mean velocities in the MCA up to 145 cm/s compared to non-SCA reconstructions. There were also greater areas of flow recirculation and larger regions of low wall shear stress. Taken together, these bumps on the internal wall of the cerebral arteries could create local flow disturbances that, in aggregate, could elevate blood velocities in SCA. Identifying cellular causes of these microstructures as adhered blood cells or luminal narrowing due to endothelial hyperplasia induced by disturbed flow would provide new targets to treat children with SCA. The preliminary qualitative results provided here point out the critical role of 3D reconstruction of patient-specific vascular geometries and provide qualitative insight to complex

  18. The DRESS trial: a feasibility randomized controlled trial of a neuropsychological approach to dressing therapy for stroke inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Sunderland, Alan; Fletcher-Smith, Joanna; Drummond, Avril; Logan, Pip; Edmans, Judi A; Garvey, Katherine; Dineen, Robert A; Ince, Paul; Horne, Jane; Fisher, Rebecca J; Taylor, Jenny L

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate two approaches to treating patients with persistent dressing problems and cognitive difficulties following stroke. Design: Pilot randomized controlled trial. Setting: Inpatient stroke rehabilitation service. Subjects: Seventy consecutive stroke patients with persistent dressing problems and accompanying cognitive difficulties at two weeks after their stroke. Interventions: Patients were randomly allocated to six weeks of either a systematic neuropsychological approach, based on analysis of dressing problems and further cognitive testing, or to the control group who received conventional (functional) dressing practice. Both groups received treatment three times a week in accordance with two separately prepared manuals. Main measures: Nottingham Stroke Dressing Assessment (NSDA), Line Cancellation, 10-hole peg transfer test, Object Decision, Gesture Imitation. Patients were assessed at six weeks after randomization by an independent assessor masked to group allocation. Results: Both neuropsychological and functional groups improved performance on the NSDA over the treatment period (31% and 22%, respectively) but there was no significant difference between groups at six weeks. However, the neuropsychological group showed a significantly greater improvement on a line cancellation test of visual neglect (t(62) = 2.1, P < 0.05) and a planned subanalysis for those with right hemisphere damage showed a trend towards better dressing outcome (P = 0.07, one-tailed). Conclusions: Results demonstrate the potential benefits of a systematic neuropsychological approach to dressing therapy, particularly for patients with right hemisphere damage. This study suggests the need for a phase III study evaluating the efficacy of a systematic neuropsychological approach in treating dressing difficulties, targeting patients with right hemisphere stroke and visuospatial impairments. PMID:22180445

  19. Cerebral Hyperperfusion in a Child with Stroke-Like Migraine Attacks after Radiation Therapy Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ardicli, Didem; Gocmen, Rahsan; Oguz, Kader K; Varan, Ali; Yalnizoglu, Dilek

    2016-08-01

    Stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome is a rare complication of cranial radiotherapy characterized by migraine-like headache and transient neurological deficits with typical gyriform enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Potential underlying mechanisms are endothelial damage or dysfunction, vascular instability, vasospasm and, neuronal dysfunction.We report an 11-year-old girl with a primary diagnosis of medulloblastoma presented with acute-onset severe headache and left-sided weakness, 20 months after completing cranial radiotherapy. MRI demonstrated unilateral cortical swelling and concomitant leptomeningeal, gyral contrast enhancement, and MR perfusion imaging showed increased cortical perfusion in the right temporo-parieto-occipital region. Her symptoms resolved spontaneously over several days.SMART syndrome appears to be a reversible, long-term complication of cranial radiotherapy. So far, a limited number of pediatric patients with SMART syndrome have been reported. Prompt recognition of clinical signs and radiological imaging of SMART syndrome may help prevent unnecessary interventions and initiate appropriate diagnostic workup and management. PMID:27104483

  20. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module III. Shock and Fluid Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on shock and fluid therapy is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Six units of study are presented: (1) body fluids, electrolytes and their effect on the body, and the general principles of fluid and acid base balances; (2) characteristics of…

  1. Why do patients with stroke not receive the recommended amount of active therapy (ReAcT)? Study protocol for a multisite case study investigation

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, David J; Tyson, Sarah; Rodgers, Helen; Drummond, Avril; Palmer, Rebecca; Prescott, Matthew; Tyrrell, Pippa; Burton, Louisa; Grenfell, Katie; Brkic, Lianne; Forster, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Increased frequency and intensity of inpatient therapy contributes to improved outcomes for stroke survivors. Differences exist in the amount of therapy provided internationally. In England, Wales and Northern Ireland it is recommended that a minimum of 45 min of each active therapy should be provided at least 5 days a week provided the therapy is appropriate and that the patient can tolerate this. Sentinel Stroke National Audit Programme (2014) data demonstrate this standard is not being achieved for most patients. No research been undertaken to explore how therapists in England manage their practice to meet time-specific therapy recommendations. The ReAcT study aims to develop an in-depth understanding of stroke therapy provision, including how the guideline of 45 min a day of each relevant therapy, is interpreted and implemented by therapists, and how it is experienced by stroke-survivors and their families. Methods and analysis A multisite ethnographic case study design in a minimum of six stroke units will include modified process mapping, observations of service organisation, therapy delivery and documentary analysis. Semistructured interviews with therapists and service managers (n=90), and with patients and informal carers (n=60 pairs) will be conducted. Data will be analysed using the Framework approach. Ethics and dissemination The study received a favourable ethical opinion via the National Research Ethics Service (reference number: 14/NW/0266). Participants will provide written informed consent or, where stroke-survivors lack capacity, a consultee declaration will be sought. ReAcT is designed to generate insights into the organisational, professional, social, practical and patient-related factors acting as facilitators or barriers to providing the recommended amount of therapy. Provisional recommendations will be debated in consensus meetings with stakeholders who have not participated in ReAcT case studies or interviews. Final

  2. Acute Endovascular Reperfusion Therapy in Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Osanai, Toshiya; Pasupuleti, Vinay; Deshpande, Abhishek; Thota, Priyaleela; Roman, Yuani; Hernandez, Adrian V.; Uchino, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Background Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke have had inconsistent results. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of endovascular therapy in published RCTs. Methods We performed a systematic review of RCTs of endovascular therapy with thrombolytic or mechanical reperfusion compared with interventions without endovascular therapy. Primary outcome was the frequency of good functional outcome (modified Rankin scale (mRS) of 0-2 at 90 days) and secondary outcomes were mortality at 90 days and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH). Random-effects meta-analysis was performed and the Cochrane risk of bias assessment was used to evaluate quality of evidence. Results Ten studies involving 1,612 subjects were included. Endovascular therapy was not significantly associated with good functional outcome (Relative Risk [RR] =1.17; 95% CI, 0.97 to 1.42; p=0.10 and Absolute Risk Difference [ARD] =7%; 95%CI -0.1% to 14%; p=0.05); heterogeneity was moderate among studies (I2=30%). Mortality was unchanged with endovascular therapy (RR=0.92; 95 % CI, 0.75 to 1.13; p=0.45) and there was no difference in sICH (RR=1.20; 95 % CI, 0.79 to 1.82; p=0.39). The quality of evidence was low for all outcomes and the recommendation is weak for the use of endovascular therapy as per GRADE methodology. Conclusions Intra-arterial therapy did not show significant increase in good outcomes and no changes in either mortality or sICH in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We need further RCTs with better design and quality to evaluate the true efficacy of endovascular therapy. PMID:25915905

  3. Stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Langhorne, Peter; Bernhardt, Julie; Kwakkel, Gert

    2011-05-14

    Stroke is a common, serious, and disabling global health-care problem, and rehabilitation is a major part of patient care. There is evidence to support rehabilitation in well coordinated multidisciplinary stroke units or through provision of early supported provision of discharge teams. Potentially beneficial treatment options for motor recovery of the arm include constraint-induced movement therapy and robotics. Promising interventions that could be beneficial to improve aspects of gait include fitness training, high-intensity therapy, and repetitive-task training. Repetitive-task training might also improve transfer functions. Occupational therapy can improve activities of daily living; however, information about the clinical effect of various strategies of cognitive rehabilitation and strategies for aphasia and dysarthria is scarce. Several large trials of rehabilitation practice and of novel therapies (eg, stem-cell therapy, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, virtual reality, robotic therapies, and drug augmentation) are underway to inform future practice. PMID:21571152

  4. Effectiveness of mirror therapy on lower extremity motor recovery, balance and mobility in patients with acute stroke: A randomized sham-controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Uthra; babu, S. Karthik; Kumar, K. Vijay; Suresh, B. V.; Misri, Z. K.; Chakrapani, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of mirror therapy on lower extremity motor recovery, balance and mobility in patients with acute stroke. Design: A randomized, sham-controlled, assessor blinded, pilot trial. Setting: Inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit. Subjects: First time onset of stroke with mean post-stroke duration of 6.41 days, able to respond to verbal instructions, and Brunnstrom recovery stage 2 and above were enrolled. Intervention: Mirror therapy group performed 30 minutes of functional synergy movements of non-paretic lower extremity, whereas control group underwent sham therapy with similar duration. In addition, both groups were administered with conventional stroke rehabilitation regime. Altogether 90 minutes therapy session per day, six days a week, for two weeks duration was administered to both groups. Outcome Measures: Lower extremity motor subscale of Fugl Meyer Assessment (FMA), Brunnel Balance Assessment (BBA) and Functional Ambulation Categories (FAC). Results: Amongst the 22 patients included, equal number of patients participated in mirror group (N = 11) and control group (N = 11). Baseline variables were similar in both groups, except for Brunnstrom recovery stage. There was no statistical difference between groups, except for FAC. (FMA: P = 0.894; BBA: P = 0.358; FAC: P = 0.02). Significance was set at P < 0.05. Conclusion: Administration of mirror therapy early after stroke is not superior to conventional treatment in improving lower limb motor recovery and balance, except for improvement in mobility. PMID:24339596

  5. Detecting nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and anticoagulant therapy in cardioembolic ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Min, Jiangyong; Farooq, Muhammad Umar

    2016-08-01

    Nonvalvular Atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia associated with an increase in risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. Strokes related to AF are associated with higher mortality, greater disability, longer hospital stays, and lower chance of being discharged home. The present review will focus on the current status of detecting NVAF and stroke prevention when there is AF. The CHA2DS2-VASc risk stratification scheme is discussed for the identification of patients who are at risk for thromboembolic stroke related to NVAF. Patient with a CHA2DS2-VASc score of 2 or greater are candidates for warfarin or a novel oral anticoagulant, irrespective of whether the strategy is for rate or rhythm control. Finally, guidelines and landmark clinical trials in NVAF patients with primary or secondary stroke prevention are discussed. PMID:27263867

  6. Mirror therapy combined with biofeedback functional electrical stimulation for motor recovery of upper extremities after stroke: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Hee; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of mirror therapy in combination with biofeedback functional electrical stimulation (BF-FES) on motor recovery of the upper extremities after stroke. Twenty-nine patients who suffered a stroke > 6 months prior participated in this study and were randomly allocated to three groups. The BF-FES + mirror therapy and FES + mirror therapy groups practiced training for 5 × 30 min sessions over a 4-week period. The control group received a conventional physical therapy program. The following clinical tools were used to assess motor recovery of the upper extremities: electrical muscle tester, electrogoniometer, dual-inclinometer, electrodynamometer, the Box and Block Test (BBT) and Jabsen Taylor Hand Function Test (JHFT), the Functional Independence Measure, the Modified Ashworth Scale, and the Stroke Specific Quality of Life (SSQOL) assessment. The BF-FES + mirror therapy group showed significant improvement in wrist extension as revealed by the Manual Muscle Test and Range of Motion (p < 0.05). The BF-FES + mirror therapy group showed significant improvement in the BBT, JTHT, and SSQOL compared with the FES + mirror therapy group and control group (p < 0.05). We found that BF-FES + mirror therapy induced motor recovery and improved quality of life. These results suggest that mirror therapy, in combination with BF-FES, is feasible and effective for motor recovery of the upper extremities after stroke. PMID:25367222

  7. Susceptibility weighted imaging of stroke brain in response to normobaric oxygen (NBO) therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Iris Y.; Igarashi, Takahiro; Guo, Yingkun; Sun, Phillip Z.

    2015-03-01

    The neuroprotective effect of oxygen leads to recent interest in normobaric oxygen (NBO) therapy after acute ischemic stroke. However, the mechanism remains unclear and inconsistent outcomes were reported in human studies. Because NBO aims to improve brain tissue oxygenation by enhancing oxygen delivery to ischemic tissue, monitoring the oxygenation level changes in response to NBO becomes necessary to elucidate the mechanism and to assess the efficacy. Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) which provides a new MRI contrast by combining the magnitude and phase images is fit for purpose. SWI is sensitive to deoxyhemoglobin level changes and thus can be used to evaluate the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen. In this study, SWI was used for in vivo monitoring of oxygenation changes in a rat model of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) before, during and after 30 min of NBO treatment. Regions of interest in ischemic core, penumbra and contralateral normal area were generated based on diffusionweighted imaging and perfusion imaging. Significant differences in SWI indicating different oxygenation levels were generally found: contralateral normal > penumbra > ischemic core. Ischemic core showed insignificant increase in oxygenation during NBO and returned to pre-treatment level after termination of NBO. Meanwhile, the oxygenation levels slightly increased in contralateral normal and penumbra regions during NBO and significantly decreased to a level lower than pre-treatment after termination of NBO, indicating secondary metabolic disruption upon the termination of transient metabolic support from oxygen. Further investigation of NBO effect combined with reperfusion is necessary while SWI can be used to detect hemorrhagic transformation after reperfusion.

  8. Effect of collateral blood flow on patients undergoing endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Michael P.; Lansberg, Maarten G.; Mlynash, Michael; Olivot, Jean-Marc; Straka, Matus; Kemp, Stephanie; McTaggart, Ryan; Inoue, Manabu; Zaharchuk, Greg; Bammer, Roland; Albers, Gregory W.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Our aim was to determine the relationships between angiographic collaterals and diffusion/perfusion findings, subsequent infarct growth, and clinical outcome in patients undergoing endovascular therapy for ischemic stroke. Methods Sixty patients with a TICI score of 0, 1 and ICA/M1 occlusion at baseline were evaluated. A blinded reader assigned a collateral score using a prior 5 point scale, from 0 (no collateral flow) to 4 (complete/rapid collaterals to entire ischemic territory). Analysis was dichotomized to poor flow (0–2) versus good flow (3–4). Collateral score was correlated with baseline NIHSS, DWI volume, PWI volume (Tmax ≥ 6 sec), TICI reperfusion, infarct growth and mRS at day 90. Results Collateral score correlated with baseline NIHSS (p=0.002) and Tmax ≥ 6 sec volume (p=0.009). 29% of patients with poor collateral flow had TICI 2B-3 reperfusion versus 65.5% with good flow, p=0.009. Patients with poor collaterals who reperfused (TICI 2B-3) were more likely to have a good functional outcome (mRS 0–2 at 90 days) than patients who did not reperfuse, OR 12 (95% CI, 1.6–98). There was no difference in the rate of good functional outcome following reperfusion in the patients with poor collaterals versus good collaterals (p= 1.0). Patients with poor reperfusion (TICI 0–2a) showed a trend toward greater infarct growth if they had poor collaterals vs. good collaterals, p=0.06. Conclusion Collaterals correlate with baseline NIHSS, PWI volume, and good reperfusion. However, Target Mismatch patients who reperfuse, appear to have favorable outcomes at a similar rate, irrespective of the collateral score. PMID:24569816

  9. Extended-Release Niacin Therapy and Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease: AIM HIGH Trial

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Koon K.; Goldstein, Larry B.; Chaitman, Bernard R.; Grant, Shannon; Weintraub, William S.; Anderson, David C.; Sila, Cathy A.; Cruz-Flores, Salvador; Padley, Robert J.; Kostuk, William J.; Boden, William E.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose In AIM-HIGH addition of extended-release niacin (ERN) to simvastatin in participants with established CV disease, low HDL-C and high triglycerides, there was no incremental benefit despite increases in HDL-C, preliminary analysis based on incomplete endpoint adjudication suggested increased ischemic stroke risk among participants randomized to ERN. Methods This final analysis was conducted after complete AIM HIGH event ascertainment to further explore potential relationship between niacin therapy and ischemic stroke risk. Results There was no group difference in trial primary composite endpoint at a mean 36-month follow-up among 3,414 patients (85% male; mean age: 64±9 years) randomized to simvastatin plus ERN (1,500–2,000mg/day) versus simvastatin plus matching placebo. In the intention to treat analysis, there were 50 fatal or non-fatal ischemic strokes, 18 (1.06%) in placebo arm versus 32 (1.86%) in ERN arm: age-adjusted hazard ratio, HR 1.78 (95% CI 1.00–3.17, p=0.050). Multivariate analysis showed independent associations between ischemic stroke risk and age > 65 years (HR 3.58, 95% CI 1.82–7.05, p=0.0002), history of stroke/TIA/carotid disease (HR 2.18, 95% CI 1.23–3.88, p=0.0079), elevated baseline Lp(a) (HR 2.80, 95%CI 1.25 – 6.27, middle vs. lowest tertiles, HR 2.31, 95% CI 1.002 – 5.30 highest vs lowest tertiles, overall p=0.042), but a non-significant association with ERN (HR 1.74 95% CI .97–3.11, p=0.063). Conclusions Although there were numerically more ischemic strokes with addition of ERN to simvastatin that reached nominal significance, number was small and multivariable analysis accounting for known risk factors did not support a significant association between niacin and ischemic stroke risk. Clinical Trial Registration AIM-HIGH ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00120289 PMID:23881958

  10. Changes in functional connectivity correlate with behavioral gains in stroke patients after therapy using a brain-computer interface device.

    PubMed

    Young, Brittany Mei; Nigogosyan, Zack; Remsik, Alexander; Walton, Léo M; Song, Jie; Nair, Veena A; Grogan, Scott W; Tyler, Mitchell E; Edwards, Dorothy Farrar; Caldera, Kristin; Sattin, Justin A; Williams, Justin C; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) technology is being incorporated into new stroke rehabilitation devices, but little is known about brain changes associated with its use. We collected anatomical and functional MRI of nine stroke patients with persistent upper extremity motor impairment before, during, and after therapy using a BCI system. Subjects were asked to perform finger tapping of the impaired hand during fMRI. Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), 9-Hole Peg Test (9-HPT), and Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) domains of Hand Function (HF) and Activities of Daily Living (ADL) were also assessed. Group-level analyses examined changes in whole-brain task-based functional connectivity (FC) to seed regions in the motor network observed during and after BCI therapy. Whole-brain FC analyses seeded in each thalamus showed FC increases from baseline at mid-therapy and post-therapy (p < 0.05). Changes in FC between seeds at both the network and the connection levels were examined for correlations with changes in behavioral measures. Average motor network FC was increased post-therapy, and changes in average network FC correlated (p < 0.05) with changes in performance on ARAT (R (2) = 0.21), 9-HPT (R (2) = 0.41), SIS HF (R (2) = 0.27), and SIS ADL (R (2) = 0.40). Multiple individual connections within the motor network were found to correlate in change from baseline with changes in behavioral measures. Many of these connections involved the thalamus, with change in each of four behavioral measures significantly correlating with change from baseline FC of at least one thalamic connection. These preliminary results show changes in FC that occur with the administration of rehabilitative therapy using a BCI system. The correlations noted between changes in FC measures and changes in behavioral outcomes indicate that both adaptive and maladaptive changes in FC may develop with this therapy and also suggest a brain-behavior relationship that may be stimulated by the neuromodulatory

  11. Changes in functional connectivity correlate with behavioral gains in stroke patients after therapy using a brain-computer interface device

    PubMed Central

    Young, Brittany Mei; Nigogosyan, Zack; Remsik, Alexander; Walton, Léo M.; Song, Jie; Nair, Veena A.; Grogan, Scott W.; Tyler, Mitchell E.; Edwards, Dorothy Farrar; Caldera, Kristin; Sattin, Justin A.; Williams, Justin C.; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) technology is being incorporated into new stroke rehabilitation devices, but little is known about brain changes associated with its use. We collected anatomical and functional MRI of nine stroke patients with persistent upper extremity motor impairment before, during, and after therapy using a BCI system. Subjects were asked to perform finger tapping of the impaired hand during fMRI. Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), 9-Hole Peg Test (9-HPT), and Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) domains of Hand Function (HF) and Activities of Daily Living (ADL) were also assessed. Group-level analyses examined changes in whole-brain task-based functional connectivity (FC) to seed regions in the motor network observed during and after BCI therapy. Whole-brain FC analyses seeded in each thalamus showed FC increases from baseline at mid-therapy and post-therapy (p < 0.05). Changes in FC between seeds at both the network and the connection levels were examined for correlations with changes in behavioral measures. Average motor network FC was increased post-therapy, and changes in average network FC correlated (p < 0.05) with changes in performance on ARAT (R2 = 0.21), 9-HPT (R2 = 0.41), SIS HF (R2 = 0.27), and SIS ADL (R2 = 0.40). Multiple individual connections within the motor network were found to correlate in change from baseline with changes in behavioral measures. Many of these connections involved the thalamus, with change in each of four behavioral measures significantly correlating with change from baseline FC of at least one thalamic connection. These preliminary results show changes in FC that occur with the administration of rehabilitative therapy using a BCI system. The correlations noted between changes in FC measures and changes in behavioral outcomes indicate that both adaptive and maladaptive changes in FC may develop with this therapy and also suggest a brain-behavior relationship that may be stimulated by the neuromodulatory component of BCI

  12. Stroke volume changes induced by a recruitment maneuver predict fluid responsiveness in patients with protective ventilation in the operating theater.

    PubMed

    De Broca, Bruno; Garnier, Jeremie; Fischer, Marc-Olivier; Archange, Thomas; Marc, Julien; Abou-Arab, Osama; Dupont, Hervé; Lorne, Emmanuel; Guinot, Pierre-Grégoire

    2016-07-01

    During abdominal surgery, the use of protective ventilation with a low tidal volume, positive expiratory pressure (PEEP) and recruitment maneuvers (RMs) may limit the applicability of dynamic preload indices. The objective of the present study was to establish whether or not the variation in stroke volume (SV) during an RM could predict fluid responsiveness.We prospectively included patients receiving protective ventilation (tidal volume: 6 mL kg, PEEP: 5-7 cmH2O; RMs). Hemodynamic variables, such as heart rate, arterial pressure, SV, cardiac output (CO), respiratory variation in SV (ΔrespSV) and pulse pressure (ΔrespPP), and the variation in SV (ΔrecSV) as well as pulse pressure (ΔrecPP) during an RM were measured at baseline, at the end of the RM, and after fluid expansion. Responders were defined as patients with an SV increase of at least 15% after infusion of 500 mL of crystalloid solution.Thirty-seven (62%) of the 60 included patients were responders. Responders and nonresponders differed significantly in terms of the median ΔrecSV (26% [19-37] vs 10% [4-12], respectively; P < 0.0001). A ΔrecSV value more than 16% predicted fluid responsiveness with an area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AU) of 0.95 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.91-0.99; P < 0.0001) and a narrow gray zone between 15% and 17%. The area under the curve values for ΔrecPP and ΔrespSV were, respectively, 0.81 (95%CI: 0.7-0.91; P = 0.0001) and 0.80 (95%CI: 0.70-0.94; P < 0.0001). ΔrespPP did not predict fluid responsiveness.During abdominal surgery with protective ventilation, a ΔrecSV value more than 16% accurately predicted fluid responsiveness and had a narrow gray zone (between 15% and 17%). ΔrecPP and ΔrespSV (but not ΔrespPP) were also predictive. PMID:27428237

  13. Stroke volume changes induced by a recruitment maneuver predict fluid responsiveness in patients with protective ventilation in the operating theater

    PubMed Central

    De Broca, Bruno; Garnier, Jeremie; Fischer, Marc-Olivier; Archange, Thomas; Marc, Julien; Abou-Arab, Osama; Dupont, Hervé; Lorne, Emmanuel; Guinot, Pierre-grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Abstract During abdominal surgery, the use of protective ventilation with a low tidal volume, positive expiratory pressure (PEEP) and recruitment maneuvers (RMs) may limit the applicability of dynamic preload indices. The objective of the present study was to establish whether or not the variation in stroke volume (SV) during an RM could predict fluid responsiveness. We prospectively included patients receiving protective ventilation (tidal volume: 6 mL kg−1, PEEP: 5–7 cmH2O; RMs). Hemodynamic variables, such as heart rate, arterial pressure, SV, cardiac output (CO), respiratory variation in SV (ΔrespSV) and pulse pressure (ΔrespPP), and the variation in SV (ΔrecSV) as well as pulse pressure (ΔrecPP) during an RM were measured at baseline, at the end of the RM, and after fluid expansion. Responders were defined as patients with an SV increase of at least 15% after infusion of 500 mL of crystalloid solution. Thirty-seven (62%) of the 60 included patients were responders. Responders and nonresponders differed significantly in terms of the median ΔrecSV (26% [19–37] vs 10% [4–12], respectively; P < 0.0001). A ΔrecSV value more than 16% predicted fluid responsiveness with an area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AU) of 0.95 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.91–0.99; P < 0.0001) and a narrow gray zone between 15% and 17%. The area under the curve values for ΔrecPP and ΔrespSV were, respectively, 0.81 (95%CI: 0.7–0.91; P = 0.0001) and 0.80 (95%CI: 0.70–0.94; P < 0.0001). ΔrespPP did not predict fluid responsiveness. During abdominal surgery with protective ventilation, a ΔrecSV value more than 16% accurately predicted fluid responsiveness and had a narrow gray zone (between 15% and 17%). ΔrecPP and ΔrespSV (but not ΔrespPP) were also predictive. PMID:27428237

  14. Self-regulated magnetic fluid hyperthermia: A potential cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagaria, Hitesh Ghanshyam

    An emerging cancer therapy, self-regulated magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH), is the motivation for this work. In this therapy, cancer is annihilated by heating the tumor to desired therapeutic temperatures (˜45°C) by using magnetic nanoparticles of controlled Curie temperatures (Tc). This work was aimed at preparing and characterizing FePt, NiPd and NiPt nanoparticles for self-regulated MFH because their Tc could be tuned by changing their composition. Based on the excellent colloidal stability, size tunability and toxicity considerations, FePt was an obvious choice for self-regulated MFH. The 3.2 nm Fe61Pt39 particles displayed a Tc of 151°C, which is well below the Tc of bulk Fe61Pt39 (˜327°C). To reach the desired Tc of 45°C the composition of iron needs to be increased. However, a major obstacle was the formation of iron oxide shells with increase in iron composition of the particles. A recent finding that the composition of individual FePt particles deviated significantly from the average value encouraged us to study the mechanism of formation of FePt particles. Our analysis showed that early in the reaction the particles were Pt-rich and as the reaction proceeded the Fe content increased. It was found that the wide distribution in the composition of individual particles started early in the synthesis, suggesting that the compositional variability may be attributed to the Pt nuclei. The synthesized FePt particles are unsuitable for biological applications because of their hydrophobic surface. Hence, their surface was modified by ligand exchange with mercapto alkanoic acids. After ligand exchange, stable FePt dispersions could be formed in alkaline water. The study revealed that both the carboxylate and thiol groups were required to form stable FePt dispersions. In addition, 15 nm gold particles were successfully conjugated to genetically modified adenoviruses that selectively bind to cancer tumors. We also modeled the thermal transport in tissues during

  15. New Electrical Stimulation Therapy Can Help Stroke Patients Move Paralyzed Hand

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stroke Patients Move Paralyzed Hand With help of sensor-laden glove, good hand used to regain some ... Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland. A sensor-laden glove worn on the patient's good hand ...

  16. Current issues and considerations about the central role of rehabilitation therapies in the functional recovery of neurological impairments after stroke in adults

    PubMed Central

    Moraru, E; Onose, G

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Well-organized acute and intermediate rehabilitation after stroke can provide patients with the best functional results. Several studies led to major changes in recommendations concerning remobilization therapies following stroke. Controlled studies including early mobilization in stands and training with partial body weight support on treadmills and "gait training" systems showed superior results compared to traditional treatment strategies. In case of spasticity and equinovarus and stiff knee pattern following stroke, botulinum neurotoxin A injections and/or casting enable the achievement of adequate alignment of the ankle for stance phase and allow the improvement of joint mobility during swing phase when restricted. PMID:25408756

  17. Hemorrhagic Stroke in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hillis M.D., Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke accounts for approximately half of stroke in childhood. Unlike arterial ischemic stroke, there are no consensus guidelines to assist in the evaluation and treatment of these children. We review the literature on the evaluation, treatment, etiology and neurologic outcome of hemorrhagic stroke in children. Important differences between pediatric and adult hemorrhage are highlighted, as treatment guidelines for adults may not be applicable in all cases. Needed future research and potential therapies are also discussed. PMID:17275656

  18. Ascites fluid in severe acute pancreatitis: from pathophysiology to therapy.

    PubMed

    Dugernier, T; Laterre, P F; Reynaert, M S

    2000-01-01

    acute pancreatitis. The rationale behind this procedure was the washout of potential toxic mediators from the peritoneal cavity before they gain access to the systemic circulation. Contrary to animal and uncontrolled human data no prospective randomized study could ever demonstrated a significant effect of peritoneal lavage neither in the prevention and control of remote organ failures or in early mortality and ultimate survival after severe acute pancreatitis in humans. Differences between experimentally-induced pancreatitis, difference in the timing of the initiation of lavage and a type II error in controlled human studies may account for the discrepancy in the outcome between these studies. Anyway, this disparity should raise the question as whether the peritoneal cavity acts simply as a reservoir or as a route of transfer of toxic mediators to the systemic circulation. Although data are scarce, conflicting and limited to animal experiments and to a few molecules, peripancreatic veins and lymphatics seem to be the major routes of transfer whereas transperitoneal absorption is trivial. Nevertheless early peritoneal aspiration of ascitic fluid in acute pancreatitis and measurement of trypsinogen activation peptides may be used as a means of severity assessment and identification of pancreatic necrosis. This implies that even if not taking part actively in the emergence of remote organ failures ascitic fluid may reflect the peripancreatic necrotizing process. So careful comparative analysis of peritoneal exudate, plasma and lymph with regards to putative mediators of local and remote injury may provide essential pathophysiological clues. At the time of trials of antimediator therapy early in the attack this kind of insight is essential. PMID:11189983

  19. Real-time stroke volume measurements for the optimization of cardiac resynchronization therapy parameters

    PubMed Central

    Dizon, José M.; Quinn, T. Alexander; Cabreriza, Santos E.; Wang, Daniel; Spotnitz, Henry M.; Hickey, Kathleen; Garan, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    Aims We investigated the utility of real-time stroke volume (SV) monitoring via the arterial pulse power technique to optimize cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) parameters at implant and prospectively evaluated the clinical and echocardiographic results. Methods and results Fifteen patients with ischaemic or non-ischaemic dilated cardiomyopathy, sinus rhythm, Class III congestive heart failure, and QRS >150 ms underwent baseline 2D echocardiogram (echo), 6 min walk distance, and quality of life (QOL) questionnaire  within 1 week of implant. Following implant, 0.3 mmol lithium chloride was injected to calibrate SV via dilution curve. Atrioventricular (AV) delay (90, 120, 200 ms, baseline: atrial pacing only) and V-V delay (−80 to 80 ms in 20 ms increments) were varied every 60 s. The radial artery pulse power autocorrelation method (PulseCO algorithm, LiDCO, Ltd.) was used to monitor SV on a beat-to-beat basis (LiDCO, Ltd.). Optimal parameters were programmed and echo, 6 min walk, and QOL were repeated at 6–8 weeks post-implant. Nine patients had >5% increase in SV after optimization (Group A). Six patients had <5% improvement in SV (Group B). Compared with Group B, Group A had significant improvements in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (11.0 ± 8.5 vs. 0.8 ± 2.0%) and decrease in left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (LVEDD) (−0.6 ± 0.4 vs. −0.2 ± 0.2 cm) and 6 min walk (346 ± 226 vs. 32 ±271 ft, P ≤ 0.05). Group A patients also tended to have greater improvement in the septal-to-posterior wall motion delay on M-mode echo (P = 0.07). Conclusion Real-time SV measurements can be used to optimize CRT at the time of implant. Improvement in SV correlates with improvement in LVEF, LVEDD, and 6 min walk, and improvement in echocardiographic dyssynchrony. PMID:20525728

  20. Multipotent bone marrow stromal cell therapy promotes endogenous cell proliferation following ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Pirzad Jahromi, Gila; Shabanzadeh Pirsaraei, Alireza; Sadr, Seyed Shahabeddin; Kaka, Golamreza; Jafari, Mahvash; Seidi, Sadegh; Charish, Jason

    2015-11-01

    Despite extensive research over the years, there still exists some debate as to what constitutes the optimal therapeutic strategy to promote recovery following stroke. Due to the complexity of injured brain pathophysiology, treatment approaches should ideally address numerous factors, ultimately aiming to promote tissue protection, axonal regrowth and functional recovery. This study extends the understanding of the effects of bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) treatment following experimentally induced ischemic stroke in rats. Focal ischemic brain injury was experimentally induced in rats by placing a preformed clot into the middle cerebral artery. Animals were injected intravenously with BMSCs at 24 h after stroke and were killed 7 days post injury. When administered BMSCs following stroke, the neurological outcome was significantly improved relative to controls. There was an increase in the number of BMSCs labelled with BrdU present in the injured hemisphere of the brain compared to the non-injured side. Furthermore, administration of BMSCs also led to increases in astrocytosis, vascularization and endogenous proliferation. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms of action of BMSC treatment and further argue for the therapeutic potential of BMSCs as an effective treatment following cerebral stroke. PMID:26218989

  1. Prolonged Field Care Working Group Fluid Therapy Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Baker, Benjamin L; Powell, Doug; Riesberg, Jamie; Keenan, Sean

    2016-01-01

    The Prolonged Field Care Working Group concurs that fresh whole blood (FWB) is the fluid of choice for patients in hemorrhagic shock, and the capability to transfuse FWB should be a basic skill set for Special Operations Forces (SOF) Medics. Prolonged field care (PFC) must also address resuscitative and maintenance fluid requirements in nonhemorrhagic conditions. PMID:27045508

  2. A Simulation for Teaching the Basic and Clinical Science of Fluid Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawson, Richard E.; Dispensa, Marilyn E.; Goldstein, Richard E.; Nicholson, Kimberley W.; Vidal, Noni Korf

    2009-01-01

    The course "Management of Fluid and Electrolyte Disorders" is an applied physiology course taught using lectures and paper-based cases. The course approaches fluid therapy from both basic science and clinical perspectives. While paper cases provide a basis for application of basic science concepts, they lack key components of genuine clinical…

  3. Neurorestoration after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Tej D.; Veeravagu, Anand; Steinberg, Gary K.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advancements in stem cell biology and neuromodulation have ushered in a battery of new neurorestorative therapies for ischemic stroke. While the understanding of stroke pathophysiology has matured, the ability to restore patients’ quality of life remains inadequate. New therapeutic approaches, including cell transplantation and neurostimulation, focus on reestablishing the circuits disrupted by ischemia through multidimensional mechanisms to improve neuroplasticity and remodeling. The authors provide a broad overview of stroke pathophysiology and existing therapies to highlight the scientifc and clinical implications of neurorestorative therapies for stroke. PMID:27132523

  4. Neurorestoration after stroke.

    PubMed

    Azad, Tej D; Veeravagu, Anand; Steinberg, Gary K

    2016-05-01

    Recent advancements in stem cell biology and neuromodulation have ushered in a battery of new neurorestorative therapies for ischemic stroke. While the understanding of stroke pathophysiology has matured, the ability to restore patients' quality of life remains inadequate. New therapeutic approaches, including cell transplantation and neurostimulation, focus on reestablishing the circuits disrupted by ischemia through multidimensional mechanisms to improve neuroplasticity and remodeling. The authors provide a broad overview of stroke pathophysiology and existing therapies to highlight the scientific and clinical implications of neurorestorative therapies for stroke. PMID:27132523

  5. Effect of whole-body vibration exercise in a sitting position prior to therapy on muscle tone and upper extremity function in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Boo, Jung-A; Moon, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Sun-Min; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Park, Si-Eun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of whole-body vibration exercise in a sitting position prior to therapy in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fourteen chronic stroke patients were included in this study. Prior to occupational therapy, whole-body exercise was performed for 10 minutes, 5 times per week, for a total of 8 weeks. Muscle tone and upper extremity function were measured. The Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) was used to measure muscle tone, and the Manual Function Test (MFT) and Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale (FugM) were used to measure upper extremity function. [Results] MAS score was significantly decreased, and MFT and FugM were significantly increased. [Conclusion] These results indicate that whole-body vibration exercise in a sitting position prior to therapy had a positive effect on muscle tone, and upper extremity function in stroke patients. PMID:27065354

  6. Effect of whole-body vibration exercise in a sitting position prior to therapy on muscle tone and upper extremity function in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Boo, Jung-A; Moon, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Sun-Min; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Park, Si-Eun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of whole-body vibration exercise in a sitting position prior to therapy in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fourteen chronic stroke patients were included in this study. Prior to occupational therapy, whole-body exercise was performed for 10 minutes, 5 times per week, for a total of 8 weeks. Muscle tone and upper extremity function were measured. The Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) was used to measure muscle tone, and the Manual Function Test (MFT) and Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale (FugM) were used to measure upper extremity function. [Results] MAS score was significantly decreased, and MFT and FugM were significantly increased. [Conclusion] These results indicate that whole-body vibration exercise in a sitting position prior to therapy had a positive effect on muscle tone, and upper extremity function in stroke patients. PMID:27065354

  7. An investigation of fluid flow during induction stroke of a water analog model of an IC engine using an innovative optical velocimetry concept: LIPA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stier, Bernd; Falco, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Optical measurements on an axisymmetrical quartz component engine research model were made to evaluate the flow field encountered during induction. The measurement technique is LIPA (Laser Induced Photochemical Anemometry), a non-intrusive velocimetry concept that provides an investigator of fluid flow with a tool to attain planar information about three-dimensional velocity and vorticity vectors in a single measurement step. The goal of this investigation is to further develop this measurement technique and apply it to study the induction stroke of a water analog model of a four-stroke internal combustion engine. The research conducted in the water analog model is a fundamental scientific inquiry into the flow fields that develop in the induction stroke of an engine at idling engine speeds. As this is the first investigation of its kind using LIPA technique, our goal has been to quantify, in a preliminary manner, the flow field features that develop during the intake stroke. In the process a more comprehensive understanding of the flow field features was developed, and tied to the quantification. The study evaluated the flow field of the intake stroke by estimating fields of velocity and vorticity. On the basis of these data, information about fluid dynamics during induction at engine speeds of 10, 20, and 30 RPM (corresponding to 170, 340, and 510 RPM respectively, when air is the flowing medium) for three different valve lifts was obtained. The overall development of the flow field, its energy content (kinetic, fluctuation) for the different settings of the engine parameters, vorticity information, and cyclic variations have been quantified. These have been discussed in terms of mixing performance.

  8. Neurorestorative Therapy of Stroke in Type two Diabetes Rats Treated with Human Umbilical Cord Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Tao; Venkat, Poornima; Chopp, Michael; Zacharek, Alex; Ning, Ruizhuo; Cui, Yisheng; Roberts, Cynthia; Kuzmin-Nichols, Nicole; Sanberg, Cyndy Davis; Chen, Jieli

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Diabetes mellitus is a high risk factor for ischemic stroke. Diabetic stroke patients suffer worse outcomes, poor long term recovery, risk of recurrent strokes and extensive vascular damage. We investigated the neurorestorative effects and the underlying mechanisms of stroke treatment with human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBCs) in Type two diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rats. Methods Adult male T2DM rats were subjected to 2 h of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). Three days after MCAo, rats were treated via tail-vein injection with: 1) phosphate-buffered-saline (PBS); 2) HUCBCs (5×106); n=10/group. Results HUCBC stroke treatment initiated 3 days after MCAo in T2DM rats did not significantly decrease blood-brain-barrier (BBB) leakage (p=0.1) and lesion volume (p=0.078), but significantly improved long term functional outcome and decreased brain hemorrhage (p<0.05) when compared to the PBS-treated T2DM-MCAo control group. HUCBC treatment significantly promoted white matter (WM) remodeling as indicated by increased expression of Bielschowsky silver (axons marker), Luxol fast blue (myelin marker), SMI-31 (neurofilament) and Synaptophysin in the ischemic border zone (IBZ). HUCBC promoted vascular remodeling, and significantly increased arterial and vascular density. HUCBC treatment of stroke in T2DM rats significantly increased M2 macrophage polarization (increased M2 macrophage CD163, CD 206; decreased M1 macrophage ED1 and iNOS expression) in the ischemic brain compared to PBS-treated T2DM-MCAo controls (p<0.05). HUCBC also significantly decreased pro-inflammatory factors i.e., matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) and toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression in the ischemic brain. Conclusion HUCBC treatment initiated 3 days after stroke significantly increased WM and vascular remodeling in the ischemic brain as well as decreased neuroinflammatory factor expression in the ischemic brain in T2DM

  9. Endovascular therapy including thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke: A systematic review and meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Zhao, Dong Fang; Phan, Steven; Huo, Ya Ruth; Mobbs, Ralph J; Rao, Prashanth J; Mortimer, Alex M

    2016-07-01

    One of the primary strategies for the management of acute ischemic stroke is intravenous (IV) thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). Over the past decade, endovascular therapies such as the use of stent retrievers to perform mechanical thrombectomy have been found to improve functional outcomes compared to t-PA alone. We aimed to reassess the functional outcomes and complications of IV thrombolysis with and without endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke using conventional meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis. Pooled relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for the effect of IV thrombolysis with and without endovascular therapy on functional outcome, mortality and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (SICH). Trial sequential analysis was done to strengthen the meta-analysis. We analyzed six randomized controlled trials involving 1943 patients. Patients who received IV thrombolysis with endovascular treatment showed significantly higher rates of excellent functional outcomes (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] 0-1) (RR, 1.75 [95% CI, 1.29-2.39]) compared to those who received IV thrombolysis alone. A similar association was seen for good functional outcomes (mRS 0-2) (RR, 1.56 [95% CI, 1.24-1.96]). Trial sequential analysis demonstrated endovascular treatment increased the RR of a good functional outcome by at least 30% compared to IV thrombolysis alone. There was no significant difference in all-cause mortality for mechanical thrombectomy compared to IV thrombolysis alone or the incidence of SICH at 3month follow-up. Endovascular treatment is more likely to result in a better functional outcome for patients compared to IV thrombolysis alone for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:26947342

  10. Changes in Upper-Extremity Functional Capacity and Daily Performance During Outpatient Occupational Therapy for People With Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Doman, Caitlin A.; Waddell, Kimberly J.; Bailey, Ryan R.; Moore, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study explored how upper-extremity (UE) functional capacity and daily performance change during the course of outpatient rehabilitation in people with stroke. METHOD. Fifteen participants receiving outpatient occupational therapy services for UE paresis poststroke were enrolled. UE motor capacity was measured with the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), and UE performance was measured using bilateral, wrist-worn accelerometers. Measurements were taken at or near the start of therapy, at every 10th visit or every 30 days throughout the duration of services, and at discharge. RESULTS. Three patterns were observed: (1) increase in ARAT scores and more normalized accelerometry profiles, (2) increase in ARAT scores but no change in accelerometry profiles, and (3) no change in ARAT scores or in accelerometry profiles. CONCLUSION. UE performance in daily life was highly variable, with inconsistencies between change in UE capacity and change in UE performance. UE capacity and performance are important constructs to assess separately during rehabilitation. PMID:27089298

  11. The Factors Associated with Good Responses to Speech Therapy Combined with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Post-stroke Aphasic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Il-Young; Lim, Jong Youb; Kang, Eun Kyoung; Sohn, Hae Min

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine factors associated with good responses to speech therapy combined with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in aphasic patients after stroke. Method The language function was evaluated using Korean version of Western aphasia battery (K-WAB) before and after speech therapy with tDCS in 37 stroke patients. Patients received speech therapy for 30 minutes over 2 to 3 weeks (10 sessions) while the cathodal tDCS was performed to the Brodmann area 45 with 1 mA for 20 minutes. We compared the improvement of aphasia quotient % (AQ%) between two evaluation times according to age, sex, days after onset, stroke type, aphasia type, brain lesion confirmed by magnetic resonance image and initial severity of aphasia. The factors related with good responses were also checked. Results AQ% improved from pre- to post-therapy (14.94±6.73%, p<0.001). AQ% improvement was greater in patients with less severe, fluent type of aphasia who received treatment before 30 days since stroke was developed (p<0.05). The adjusted logistic regression model revealed that patients with hemorrhagic stroke were more likely to achieve good responses (odds ratio=4.897, p<0.05) relative to infarction. Initial severity over 10% in AQ% was also found to be significantly associated with good improvement (odds ratio=8.618, p<0.05). Conclusion Speech therapy with tDCS was established as a treatment tool for aphasic patients after stroke. Lower initial severity was associated with good responses. PMID:22506160

  12. A physiological approach to fluid and electrolyte therapy in the horse.

    PubMed

    Rose, R J

    1981-01-01

    In this article a physiological approach to fluid therapy is discussed, commencing with examination of fluid distribution in the normal horse. The functions of individual plasma electrolyte concentrations are considered and practical causes of acid-base disturbances discussed. When fluid administration is necessary, selection of the route for fluid administration as well as the type of fluid are important considerations and these must be adjusted to the needs of the individual case. Balanced polyionic solutions appear to be most suitable for general use because normal saline can produce hypokalaemia and metabolic acidosis. The use of bicarbonate is indicated mainly where there has been alkali loss (eg, diarrhoea) or severe acidosis associated with increased lactate production. Plasma volume expanders, such as dextran or gelatin polymers, can be considered where a rapid and prolonged restoration of blood volume is required. Fluids should be warmed to body temperature before administration and flow rates up to 6 to 8 litres/h may be safely used. A plan for fluid therapy involves the estimation of existing fluids, as an average horse will require almost 84,000 kJ continuing losses should be estimated and corrected. Maintenance of calorific requirements is difficult using intravenous fluids, as an average horse will require almost 84,000 kJ (20,000 kcal) per day. Lipid emulsions provide up to 8370 kJ/litre but their expense precludes the use of large volumes. PMID:7016529

  13. Robot-assisted upper-limb therapy in acute rehabilitation setting following stroke: Department of Veterans Affairs multisite clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Burgar, Charles G; Lum, Peter S; Scremin, A M Erika; Garber, Susan L; Van der Loos, H F Machiel; Kenney, Deborah; Shor, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    This randomized, controlled, multisite Department of Veterans Affairs clinical trial assessed robot-assisted (RA) upper-limb therapy with the Mirror Image Movement Enabler (MIME) in the acute stroke rehabilitation setting. Hemiparetic subjects (n = 54) received RA therapy using MIME for either up to 15 hours (low-dose) or 30 hours (high-dose) or received up to 15 hours of additional conventional therapy in addition to usual care (control). The primary outcome measure was the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA). The secondary outcome measures were the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Wolf Motor Function Test, Motor Power, and Ashworth scores at intake, discharge, and 6-month follow-up. Mean duration of study treatment was 8.6, 15.8, and 9.4 hours for the low-dose, high-dose, and control groups, respectively. Gains in the primary outcome measure were not significantly different between groups at follow-up. Significant correlations were found at discharge between FMA gains and the dose and intensity of RA. Intensity also correlated with FMA gain at 6 months. The high-dose group had greater FIM gains than controls at discharge and greater tone but no difference in FIM changes compared with low-dose subjects at 6 months. As used during acute rehabilitation, motor-control changes at follow-up were no less with MIME than with additional conventional therapy. Intensity of training with MIME was positively correlated with motor-control gains. PMID:21674393

  14. Fate of graft cells: what should be clarified for development of mesenchymal stem cell therapy for ischemic stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Ikegame, Yuka; Yamashita, Kentaro; Nakashima, Shigeru; Nomura, Yuichi; Yonezawa, Shingo; Asano, Yoshitaka; Shinoda, Jun; Hara, Hideaki; Iwama, Toru

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are believed to be promising for cell administration therapy after ischemic stroke. Because of their advantageous characteristics, such as ability of differentiation into neurovascular lineages, avoidance of immunological problems, and abundance of graft cells in mesodermal tissues, studies regarding MSC therapy have increased recently. However, several controversies are yet to be resolved before a worldwide consensus regarding a standard protocol is obtained. In particular, the neuroprotective effects, the rate of cell migration to the lesion, and differentiation direction differ depending on preclinical observations. Analyses of these differences and application of recent developments in stem cell biology or engineering in imaging modality may contribute to identification of criteria for optimal stem cell therapy in which reliable protocols, which control cell quality and include safe administration procedures, are defined for each recovery phase after cerebral ischemia. In this mini review, we examine controversies regarding the fate of grafts and the prospects for advanced therapy that could be obtained through recent developments in stem cell research as direct conversion to neural cells. PMID:25374506

  15. Genetic Stroke Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Kevin M.; Meschia, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This review describes the clinical and radiographic features, genetic determinants, and treatment options for the most well-characterized monogenic disorders associated with stroke. Recent Findings: Stroke is a phenotype of many clinically important inherited disorders. Recognition of the clinical manifestations of genetic disorders associated with stroke is important for accurate diagnosis and prognosis. Genetic studies have led to the discovery of specific mutations associated with the clinical phenotypes of many inherited stroke syndromes. Summary: Several inherited causes of stroke have established and effective therapies, further underscoring the importance of timely diagnosis. PMID:24699489

  16. Effects of goal-directed fluid therapy with different lactated Ringer's: hydroxyethyl starch ratios in hemorrhagic shock dogs.

    PubMed

    Tao, J P; Huang, Q Q; Huang, H Q; Yang, J J; Shi, M; Zhou, Y; Wan, L J; Zhou, C; Ou, Y J; Tong, Y Y; Yang, D G; Si, Y Y

    2015-01-01

    The effects of goal-directed fluid therapy, with lactated Ringer's (LR) and 6% hydroxyethyl starch (HES) solution, on hemorrhagic shock dogs are unknown. We aimed to determine the optimal LR: HES ratio for the resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock dogs. Hemorrhagic shock was induced in 40 ventilated dogs by drawing an estimated 60% blood volume. The animals were randomly divided into five groups (N = 8) according to the LR: HES ratio of the resuscitation fluid (3:1, 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3), and were then resuscitated for 24 h to reach the stroke volume variation (SVV) and hemoglobin (Hb) goals by fluid infusion and autologous blood perfusion. The extravascular lung water index (EVLWI), pH, partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), base excess (BE), sodium, chloride, Hb and creatinine clearance (Clearcrea) were checked after 24 h (R24). The EVLWI of the 3:1 group at R24 were higher than that of the 1:3 group and the baseline value (P < 0.05), whereas the PaO2 was lower (P < 0.05). In contrast to the 3:1 group at R24 and baseline, plasma chloride and sodium in the 1:3 and 1:2 groups increased; however, pH, BE, and Clearcrea decreased (P < 0.05). No significant differences were found in the 1:1 and 2:1 groups at R24 compared with baseline (P > 0.05). Resuscitation with LR and HES at 2:1 and 1:1 ratios are superior in maintaining the acid-base, electrolyte, and lung water balances as well as renal function in hemorrhagic shock dogs than at ratios of 3:l, 1:2, and1:3. PMID:26125873

  17. Neuronal repair. Asynchronous therapy restores motor control by rewiring of the rat corticospinal tract after stroke.

    PubMed

    Wahl, A S; Omlor, W; Rubio, J C; Chen, J L; Zheng, H; Schröter, A; Gullo, M; Weinmann, O; Kobayashi, K; Helmchen, F; Ommer, B; Schwab, M E

    2014-06-13

    The brain exhibits limited capacity for spontaneous restoration of lost motor functions after stroke. Rehabilitation is the prevailing clinical approach to augment functional recovery, but the scientific basis is poorly understood. Here, we show nearly full recovery of skilled forelimb functions in rats with large strokes when a growth-promoting immunotherapy against a neurite growth-inhibitory protein was applied to boost the sprouting of new fibers, before stabilizing the newly formed circuits by intensive training. In contrast, early high-intensity training during the growth phase destroyed the effect and led to aberrant fiber patterns. Pharmacogenetic experiments identified a subset of corticospinal fibers originating in the intact half of the forebrain, side-switching in the spinal cord to newly innervate the impaired limb and restore skilled motor function. PMID:24926013

  18. Effect of mirror therapy with tDCS on functional recovery of the upper extremity of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyuk-Shin; Cha, Hyun-gyu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effect of mirror therapy (MT) with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on the recovery of the upper extremity function of chronic stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-seven patients at least 6 months after stroke onset were divided randomly into an experimental group (14 patients) and a control group (13 patients). [Methods] All subjects received tDCS for 20 min followed by a 5 min rest. Then the experimental group received MT while the control group conducted the same exercises as the experimental group using a mirror that did not show the non-paretic upper extremity. The groups performed the same exercises for 20 min. All subjects received this intervention for 45-min three times a week for 6 weeks. [Results] After the intervention, the experimental group showed significant improvements in the box and block test (BBT), grip strength, and the Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA), and a significant decrease in the Jebsen-Taylor test. The control group showed a significant increase in grip strength after the intervention, and a significant decrease in the Jebsen-Taylor test. Comparison of the result after the intervention revealed that the experimental group showed more significant increases in the BBT and grip strength than the control group. [Conclusion] These results show that MT with tDCS has a positive effect on the functional recovery of the upper extremity of stroke patients, through activating motor regions in the brain, and thus plays an important role in recovery of neuroplasticity. PMID:25995552

  19. Effect of mirror therapy with tDCS on functional recovery of the upper extremity of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyuk-Shin; Cha, Hyun-Gyu

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effect of mirror therapy (MT) with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on the recovery of the upper extremity function of chronic stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-seven patients at least 6 months after stroke onset were divided randomly into an experimental group (14 patients) and a control group (13 patients). [Methods] All subjects received tDCS for 20 min followed by a 5 min rest. Then the experimental group received MT while the control group conducted the same exercises as the experimental group using a mirror that did not show the non-paretic upper extremity. The groups performed the same exercises for 20 min. All subjects received this intervention for 45-min three times a week for 6 weeks. [Results] After the intervention, the experimental group showed significant improvements in the box and block test (BBT), grip strength, and the Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA), and a significant decrease in the Jebsen-Taylor test. The control group showed a significant increase in grip strength after the intervention, and a significant decrease in the Jebsen-Taylor test. Comparison of the result after the intervention revealed that the experimental group showed more significant increases in the BBT and grip strength than the control group. [Conclusion] These results show that MT with tDCS has a positive effect on the functional recovery of the upper extremity of stroke patients, through activating motor regions in the brain, and thus plays an important role in recovery of neuroplasticity. PMID:25995552

  20. Prothrombotic risk factors and antithrombotic therapy in children with ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Askar, Gamal A.; Abu Faddan, Naglaa H.; Kamal, Taghreed M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Congenital and acquired prothrombotic disorders have been highlighted in a recent series of cerebrovascular stroke (CVS), with a controversial role in pathogenesis. The aim is to study some prothrombotic risk factors [activated protein C (APC) resistance, von Willebrand factor (vWF), anticardiolpin (ACL) antibodies and plasma homocysteine] in children with ischemic stroke, and to evaluate the role of aspirin and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) in its management in relation to outcome. Methods: A total of 37 cases aged from 1 month to 15 years ( mean ± standard deviation 26.2 ± 35.7 months), diagnosed as ischemic stroke (>24 hours) were recruited. Complete blood count, prothrombin time and concentration, partial thromboplastin time, serum electrolytes, random blood sugar, C-reactive protein, electrocardiogram and echocardiography were done. Levels of APC resistance, vWF, ACL antibodies [immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin M (IgM)] and plasma homocysteine were estimated. A total of 25 cases received aspirin 3–5 mg /kg/d and 12 patients received LMWH as initial dose at 75 international units (IU)/kg subcutaneously (SC) then 10–25 IU/kg/day for 15 days in a nonrandomized fashion. Results: The levels of APC resistance, vWF, ACL antibodies (IgG and IgM) and plasma homocysteine were significantly higher in stroke cases than in controls. There was no significant difference between cases treated with aspirin and those with LMWH in all prothrombotic factors. Significant positive correlations were found between vWF and ACL antibodies (IgG and IgM) levels before treatment. Significant decrease in cognitive function was detected between cases treated with LMWH and those treated with aspirin. Conclusion: Ischemic CVS in children is multifactorial. Thrombophilia testing should be performed in any child with CVS. Early use of aspirin improves the prognosis and has less effect on cognitive function. PMID:25922619

  1. An Update on Translating Stem Cell Therapy for Stroke from Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Dailey, Travis; Metcalf, Christopher; Mosley, Yusef I.; Sullivan, Robert; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Tajiri, Naoki; Pabon, Mibel; Acosta, Sandra; Kaneko, Yuji; van Loveren, Harry; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2013-01-01

    With a constellation of stem cell sources available, researchers hope to utilize their potential for cellular repair as a therapeutic target for disease. However, many lab-to-clinic translational considerations must be given in determining their efficacy, variables such as the host response, effects on native tissue, and potential for generating tumors. This review will discuss the current knowledge of stem cell research in neurological disease, mainly stroke, with a focus on the benefits, limitations, and clinical potential. PMID:25177494

  2. An occupational therapy intervention for residents with stroke related disabilities in UK care homes (OTCH): cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sackley, Catherine M; Walker, Marion F; Burton, Christopher R; Watkins, Caroline L; Mant, Jonathan; Roalfe, Andrea K; Wheatley, Keith; Sheehan, Bart; Sharp, Leslie; Stant, Katie E; Fletcher-Smith, Joanna; Steel, Kerry; Wilde, Kate; Irvine, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy of an established programme of occupational therapy in maintaining functional activity and reducing further health risks from inactivity in care home residents living with stroke sequelae. Design Pragmatic, parallel group, cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting 228 care homes (>10 beds each), both with and without the provision of nursing care, local to 11 trial administrative centres across the United Kingdom. Participants 1042 care home residents with a history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack, including those with language and cognitive impairments, not receiving end of life care. 114 homes (n=568 residents, 64% from homes providing nursing care) were allocated to the intervention arm and 114 homes (n=474 residents, 65% from homes providing nursing care) to standard care (control arm). Participating care homes were randomised between May 2010 and March 2012. Intervention Targeted three month programme of occupational therapy, delivered by qualified occupational therapists and assistants, involving patient centred goal setting, education of care home staff, and adaptations to the environment. Main outcome measures Primary outcome at the participant level: scores on the Barthel index of activities of daily living at three months post-randomisation. Secondary outcome measures at the participant level: Barthel index scores at six and 12 months post-randomisation, and scores on the Rivermead mobility index, geriatric depression scale-15, and EuroQol EQ-5D-3L questionnaire, at all time points. Results 64% of the participants were women and 93% were white, with a mean age of 82.9 years. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups for all measures, personal characteristics, and diagnostic tests. Overall, 2538 occupational therapy visits were made to 498 participants in the intervention arm (mean 5.1 visits per participant). No adverse events attributable to the intervention were recorded. 162 (11%) died

  3. Action observation therapy in the subacute phase promotes dexterity recovery in right-hemisphere stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Sale, Patrizio; Ceravolo, Maria Gabriella; Franceschini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The clinical impact of action observation (AO) on upper limb functional recovery in subacute stroke patients is recent evidence. We sought to test the hypothesis that training everyday life activities through AO coupled with task execution might activate the left hemisphere different from the right one. Sixty-seven first-ever ischemic stroke subjects were randomly assigned to receive upper limb training coupled with AO tasks or standard rehabilitation. The groups were matched by age and gender, Bamford category, and interval from stroke and lesion side. Fugl-Meyer (FM) and Box and Block Test (BBT) were used to measure hand function recovery at the end (T1) and 4-5 months after the treatment (T2). At T1, FM was increased by 31% (± 26%), of maximum achievable recovery, whereas BBT was increased by 17% (± 18%); at T2, FM had reached 43% (± 45%) of maximum recovery, while BBT had reached 25% (± 22%). Combining the effects of treatment to those of lesion side revealed significantly higher gains, in both FM and BBT scores, in left hemiparetic subjects when exposed to AO as compared to standard rehabilitation alone (P < .01). The findings lead to recommend the use of AO in addition to motor training in left hemiparetic patients. PMID:24967372

  4. Evidence-Based Systematic Review: Effects of Intensity of Treatment and Constraint-Induced Language Therapy for Individuals with Stroke-Induced Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherney, Leora R.; Patterson, Janet P.; Raymer, Anastasia; Frymark, Tobi; Schooling, Tracy

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This systematic review summarizes evidence for intensity of treatment and constraint-induced language therapy (CILT) on measures of language impairment and communication activity/participation in individuals with stroke-induced aphasia. Method: A systematic search of the aphasia literature using 15 electronic databases (e.g., PubMed,…

  5. Treatment of dysphasia with rTMS and language therapy after childhood stroke: Multimodal imaging of plastic change.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Helen L; Jadavji, Zeanna; Mineyko, Aleksandra; Damji, Omar; Hodge, Jacquie; Saunders, Jenny; Hererro, Mia; Nowak, Michele; Patzelt, Rebecca; Mazur-Mosiewicz, Anya; MacMaster, Frank P; Kirton, Adam

    2016-08-01

    Expressive dysphasia accompanies left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG/Broca) injury. Recovery may relate to interhemispheric balance with homologous, contralesional IFG but is unexplored in children. We evaluated effects of inhibitory rTMS to contralesional IFG combined with intensive speech therapy (SLT). A 15year-old, right-handed male incurred a left middle cerebral artery stroke. After 30months, severe non-fluent dysphasia impacted quality of life. Language networks, neuronal metabolism and white matter pathways were explored using MRI. Language function was measured longitudinally. An intensive SLT program was combined with contralesional inhibitory rTMS of right pars triangularis. Procedures were well tolerated. Language function improved persisting to four months. Post-treatment fMRI demonstrated increased left perilesional IFG activations and connectivity at rest. Bilateral changes in inositol and glutamate metabolism were observed. Contralesional, inhibitory rTMS appears safe in childhood stroke-induced dysphasia. We observed clinically significant improvements after SLT coupled with rTMS. Advanced neuroimaging can evaluate intervention-induced plasticity. PMID:27262774

  6. Perioperative nutritional support and fluid therapy in patients with liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yongliang; Tan, Haidong

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of liver dysfunction and malnutrition is common among patients with obstructive jaundice or cirrhosis, the poor nutrition status in patients with indications for hepatic resection increases the risk of postoperative complications and/or mortality. Hepatic surgery significantly affects body’s metabolism and environment. Therefore, it is very important for patients with liver diseases undergoing hepatic surgery to receive essential nutritional support and fluid therapy during perioperative period. There are several principles in nutritional support and fluid therapy that surgeons need to pay attention to, for example, time, nutritional approach, fluid volume, choice of fat emulsions and amino acids. Some issues, such as albumin and plasma application, choice of crystalloid and colloid, liver protective therapy, also need further attention. PMID:25019075

  7. Physical therapy applications of MR fluids and intelligent control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shufang; Lu, Ke-Qian; Sun, J. Q.; Rudolph, Katherine

    2005-05-01

    Resistance exercise has been widely reported to have positive rehabilitation effects for patients with neuromuscular and orthopaedic conditions. This paper presents an optimal design of magneto-rheological fluid dampers for variable resistance exercise devices. Adaptive controls for regulating the resistive force or torque of the device as well as the joint motion are presented. The device provides both isometric and isokinetic strength training for various human joints.

  8. Various Cell Populations Within the Mononuclear Fraction of Bone Marrow Contribute to the Beneficial Effects of Autologous Bone Marrow Cell Therapy in a Rodent Stroke Model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing; Parsha, Kaushik; Schaar, Krystal; Xi, XiaoPei; Aronowski, Jaroslaw; Savitz, Sean I

    2016-08-01

    Cell-based therapies including bone-marrow derived mononuclear cells (MNCs) are now widely being studied because of their pleotropic effects and promising results to improve recovery after stroke in animal models. Unlike other types of cell therapies, MNCs is a mixture of lymphoid, myeloid, erythroid, and stem cell populations. Which cell population(s) accounts for the beneficial effects of MNCs in stroke recovery is unclear. In this paper, we employed a mouse stroke model with middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo), and used positively and negatively sorted autologous MNCs by MACs to determine which fractions of the MNCs contribute to their beneficial effects. We evaluated the benefits of neurofunctional recovery produced by individual cell lineages within MNCs in a long-term observation study up to 28 days after stroke. Mortality and modulation of inflammation were also compared among different sub-populations. We further studied the impact of neurotoxicity posed by activated microglia in the presence of different cell lineages within MNCs. We concluded that myeloid cell lineage and stem cell/progenitors appeared to be important components within MNCs that contribute to improved outcomes after stroke. PMID:26997513

  9. Angiographic outcome of endovascular stroke therapy correlated with MR findings, infarct growth, and clinical outcome in the DEFUSE 2 trial

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Michael P.; Lansberg, Maarten G.; Mlynash, Michael; Kemp, Stephanie; McTaggart, Ryan A.; Zaharchuk, Greg; Bammer, Roland; Albers, Gregory W.

    2015-01-01

    Background DEFUSE 2 demonstrated that patients with magnetic resonance imaging mismatch had a favorable clinical response to tissue reperfusion assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. This study reports the endovascular results and correlates angiographic reperfusion with clinical and imaging outcomes. Methods Prospectively enrolled ischemic stroke patients underwent baseline magnetic resonance imaging and started endovascular therapy within 12 h of onset. Patients were classified as either target mismatch or no target mismatch using magnetic resonance imaging. The pre- and postprocedure angiogram was evaluated to determine thrombolysis in cerebral infarction scores. Favorable clinical response was determined at day 30, and good functional outcome was defined as a modified Rankin Scale 0–2 at day 90. Results One-hundred patients had attempted endovascular treatment. At procedure end, 23% were thrombolysis in cerebral infarction 0–1, 31% thrombolysis in cerebral infarction 2A, 28% thrombolysis in cerebral infarction 2B, and 18% thrombolysis in cerebral infarction 3. More favorable thrombolysis in cerebral infarction-reperfusion scores were associated with greater magnetic resonance imaging reperfusion (P < 0·001). thrombolysis in cerebral infarction scores correlated with 30-day favorable clinical response (P = 0·041) and 90-day modified Rankin Scale 0–2 (P = 0·008). These correlations were significant for target mismatch patients at 30 days (P = 0·034) and 90 days (P = 0·003). Infarct growth was strongly associated with poorer thrombolysis in cerebral infarction scores in target mismatch patients (P < 0·001). Patients with thrombolysis in cerebral infarctionnfarction 2A reperfusion had less magnetic resonance imaging reperfusion (P = 0·004) and poorer clinical outcome at 90 days (P = 0·01) compared with thrombolysis in cerebral infarction 2B-3 patients. Conclusion Thrombolysis in cerebral infarction reperfusion following endovascular therapy for

  10. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell therapy in ischemic stroke: mechanisms of action and treatment optimization strategies.

    PubMed

    Li, Guihong; Yu, Fengbo; Lei, Ting; Gao, Haijun; Li, Peiwen; Sun, Yuxue; Huang, Haiyan; Mu, Qingchun

    2016-06-01

    Animal and clinical studies have confirmed the therapeutic effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cerebral ischemia, but their mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. Here, we summarize the transplantation approaches, directional migration, differentiation, replacement, neural circuit reconstruction, angiogenesis, neurotrophic factor secretion, apoptosis, immunomodulation, multiple mechanisms of action, and optimization strategies for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of ischemic stroke. We also explore the safety of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation and conclude that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an important direction for future treatment of cerebral ischemia. Determining the optimal timing and dose for the transplantation are important directions for future research. PMID:27482235

  11. Final Results of Cilostazol-Aspirin Therapy against Recurrent Stroke with Intracranial Artery Stenosis (CATHARSIS)

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Toi, Sono; Ezura, Masayuki; Okada, Yasushi; Takagi, Makoto; Nagai, Yoji; Matsubara, Yoshihiro; Minematsu, Kazuo; Suzuki, Norihiro; Tanahashi, Norio; Taki, Waro; Nagata, Izumi; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the effect of cilostazol plus aspirin versus aspirin alone on the progression of intracranial arterial stenosis (IAS), and to compare ischemic and hemorrhagic events in patients with symptomatic IAS, an investigator-driven, nationwide multicenter cooperative randomized controlled trial (CATHARSIS; ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier 00333164) was conducted. Methods 165 noncardioembolic ischemic stroke patients with >50% stenosis in the responsible intracranial artery after 2 weeks to 6 months from the onset were randomly allocated to receive either cilostazol 200 mg/day plus aspirin 100 mg/day (n = 83, CA group) or aspirin 100 mg/day alone (n = 82, A group). The primary endpoint was the progression of IAS on magnetic resonance angiography at 2 years after randomization. Secondary endpoints were any vascular events, any cause of death, serious adverse events, new silent brain infarcts, and worsening of the modified Rankin Scale score. Results Progression of IAS was observed in 9.6% of the CA group patients and in 5.6% of the A group patients, with no significant intergroup difference (p = 0.53). The incidence of the secondary endpoints tended to be lower in the CA group compared with the A group, although the differences were not significant. By using exploratory logistic regression analysis adjusted for patient background characteristics, it was shown that the risk for certain combinations of secondary endpoints was lower in the CA group than in the A group [all vascular events and silent brain infarcts: odds ratio (OR) = 0.37, p = 0.04; stroke and silent brain infarcts: OR = 0.34, p = 0.04; all vascular events, worsening of modified Rankin Scale scores and silent brain infracts: OR = 0.41, p = 0.03]. Major hemorrhage was observed in 4 patients of the CA group and in 3 of the A group. Conclusion Progression of IAS during the 2-year observation period appears to be less frequent than previously reported in stroke patients on antiplatelet agents after

  12. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell therapy in ischemic stroke: mechanisms of action and treatment optimization strategies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guihong; Yu, Fengbo; Lei, Ting; Gao, Haijun; Li, Peiwen; Sun, Yuxue; Huang, Haiyan; Mu, Qingchun

    2016-01-01

    Animal and clinical studies have confirmed the therapeutic effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cerebral ischemia, but their mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. Here, we summarize the transplantation approaches, directional migration, differentiation, replacement, neural circuit reconstruction, angiogenesis, neurotrophic factor secretion, apoptosis, immunomodulation, multiple mechanisms of action, and optimization strategies for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of ischemic stroke. We also explore the safety of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation and conclude that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an important direction for future treatment of cerebral ischemia. Determining the optimal timing and dose for the transplantation are important directions for future research. PMID:27482235

  13. Dose and type of crystalloid fluid therapy in adult hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective In this narrative review, an overview is given of the pros and cons of various crystalloid fluids used for infusion during initial resuscitation or maintenance phases in adult hospitalized patients. Special emphasis is given on dose, composition of fluids, presence of buffers (in balanced solutions) and electrolytes, according to recent literature. We also review the use of hypertonic solutions. Methods We extracted relevant clinical literature in English specifically examining patient-oriented outcomes related to fluid volume and type. Results A restrictive fluid therapy prevents complications seen with liberal, large-volume therapy, even though restrictive fluid loading with crystalloids may not demonstrate large hemodynamic effects in surgical or septic patients. Hypertonic solutions may serve the purpose of small volume resuscitation but carry the disadvantage of hypernatremia. Hypotonic solutions are contraindicated in (impending) cerebral edema, whereas hypertonic solutions are probably more helpful in ameliorating than in preventing this condition and improving outcome. Balanced solutions offer a better approach for plasma composition than unbalanced ones, and the evidence for benefits in patient morbidity and mortality is increasing, particularly by helping to prevent acute kidney injury. Conclusions Isotonic and hypertonic crystalloid fluids are the fluids of choice for resuscitation from hypovolemia and shock. The evidence that balanced solutions are superior to unbalanced ones is increasing. Hypertonic saline is effective in mannitol-refractory intracranial hypertension, whereas hypotonic solutions are contraindicated in this condition. PMID:24472418

  14. Pediatric Diabetic Ketoacidosis, Fluid Therapy and Cerebral Injury: The Design of a Factorial Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Nicole S.; Ghetti, Simona; Casper, T. Charles; Dean, J. Michael; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Treatment protocols for pediatric diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) vary considerably among centers in the United States and worldwide. The optimal protocol for intravenous fluid administration is an area of particular controversy, mainly in regard to possible associations between rates of intravenous fluid infusion and the development of cerebral edema, the most common and most feared complication of DKA in children. Theoretical concerns about associations between osmotic fluid shifts and cerebral edema have prompted recommendations for conservative fluid infusion during DKA. However, recent data suggest that cerebral hypoperfusion may play a role in cerebral injury associated with DKA. Currently there are no existing data from prospective clinical trials to determine the optimal fluid treatment protocol for pediatric DKA. The Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network FLUID (Fluid Therapies Under Investigation in DKA) Study is the first prospective randomized trial to evaluate fluid regimens for pediatric DKA. This 13-center nationwide factorial-design study will evaluate the effects of rehydration rate and fluid sodium content on neurological status during DKA treatment, the frequency of clinically-overt CE, and long-term neurocognitive outcomes following DKA. PMID:23490311

  15. Quantitative measurements of relative fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) signal intensities in acute stroke for the prediction of time from symptom onset

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bastian; Brinkmann, Mathias; Forkert, Nils D; Treszl, Andras; Ebinger, Martin; Köhrmann, Martin; Wu, Ona; Kang, Dong-Wha; Liebeskind, David S; Tourdias, Thomas; Singer, Oliver C; Christensen, Soren; Luby, Marie; Warach, Steven; Fiehler, Jens; Fiebach, Jochen B; Gerloff, Christian; Thomalla, Götz

    2013-01-01

    In acute stroke magnetic resonance imaging, a ‘mismatch' between visibility of an ischemic lesion on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and missing corresponding parenchymal hyperintensities on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) data sets was shown to identify patients with time from symptom onset ≤4.5 hours with high specificity. However, moderate sensitivity and suboptimal interpreter agreement are limitations of a visual rating of FLAIR lesion visibility. We tested refined image analysis methods in patients included in the previously published PREFLAIR study using refined visual analysis and quantitative measurements of relative FLAIR signal intensity (rSI) from a three-dimensional, segmented stroke lesion volume. A total of 399 patients were included. The rSI of FLAIR lesions showed a moderate correlation with time from symptom onset (r=0.382, P<0.001). A FLAIR rSI threshold of <1.0721 predicted symptom onset ≤4.5 hours with slightly increased specificity (0.85 versus 0.78) but also slightly decreased sensitivity (0.47 versus 0.58) as compared with visual analysis. Refined visual analysis differentiating between ‘subtle' and ‘obvious' FLAIR hyperintensities and classification and regression tree algorithms combining information from visual and quantitative analysis also did not improve diagnostic accuracy. Our results raise doubts whether the prediction of stroke onset time by visual image judgment can be improved by quantitative rSI measurements. PMID:23047272

  16. Early detection of hand movements from electroencephalograms for stroke therapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidharan, A.; Chae, J.; Taylor, D. M.

    2011-08-01

    Movement-assist devices such as neuromuscular stimulation systems can be used to generate movements in people with chronic hand paralysis due to stroke. If detectable, motor planning activity in the cortex could be used in real time to trigger a movement-assist device and restore a person's ability to perform many of the activities of daily living. Additionally, re-coupling motor planning in the cortex with assisted movement generation in the periphery may provide an even greater benefit—strengthening relevant synaptic connections over time to promote natural motor recovery. This study examined the potential for using electroencephalograms (EEGs) as a means of rapidly detecting the intent to open the hand during movement planning in individuals with moderate chronic hand paralysis following a subcortical ischemic stroke. On average, attempts to open the hand could be detected from EEGs approximately 100-500 ms prior to the first signs of movement onset. This earlier detection would minimize device activation delays and allow for tighter coupling between initial formation of the motor plan in the cortex and augmentation of that plan in the periphery by a movement-assist device. This tight temporal coupling may be important or even essential for strengthening synaptic connections and enhancing natural motor recovery.

  17. Multiple Coaxial Catheter System for Reliable Access in Interventional Stroke Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kulcsar, Zsolt Yilmaz, Hasan; Bonvin, Christophe; Lovblad, Karl O.; Ruefenacht, Daniel A.

    2010-12-15

    In some patients with acute cerebral vessel occlusion, navigating mechanical thrombectomy systems is difficult due to tortuous anatomy of the aortic arch, carotid arteries, or vertebral arteries. Our purpose was to describe a multiple coaxial catheter system used for mechanical revascularization that helps navigation and manipulations in tortuous vessels. A triple or quadruple coaxial catheter system was built in 28 consecutive cases presenting with acute ischemic stroke. All cases were treated by mechanical thrombectomy with the Penumbra System. In cases of unsuccessful thrombo-aspiration, additional thrombolysis or angioplasty with stent placement was used for improving recanalization. The catheter system consisted of an outermost 8-Fr and an intermediate 6-Fr guiding catheter, containing the inner Penumbra reperfusion catheters. The largest, 4.1-Fr, reperfusion catheter was navigated over a Prowler Select Plus microcatheter. The catheter system provided access to reach the cerebral lesions and provided stability for the mechanically demanding manipulations of thromboaspiration and stent navigation in all cases. Apart from their mechanical role, the specific parts of the system could also provide access to different types of interventions, like carotid stenting through the 8-Fr guiding catheter and intracranial stenting and thrombolysis through the Prowler Select Plus microcatheter. In this series, there were no complications related to the catheter system. In conclusion, building up a triple or quadruple coaxial system proved to be safe and efficient in our experience for the mechanical thrombectomy treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

  18. Early detection and efficient therapy of cardiac angiosarcoma due to routine transesophageal echocardiography after cerebrovascular stroke

    PubMed Central

    Vogelgesang, Dirk; Dahm, Johannes B; Großmann, Holm; Hippe, Andre; Hummel, Astrid; Lotze, Christian; Vogelgesang, Silke

    2008-01-01

    Primary malignant cardiac tumors (cardiac angiosarcomas) are exceedingly rare. Since there are initially nonspecific or missing symptoms, these tumors are usually diagnosed only in an advanced, often incurable stage, after the large tumor mass elicits hemodynamic obstructive symptoms. A 59-year-old female presented with symptoms of cerebral ischemia. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed changes suggestive of stroke. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed an inhomogeneous, medium-echogenic, floating mass at the roof of the left atrium near the mouth of the right upper pulmonary vein, indicative of a thrombus. At surgery, a solitary tumor was completely enucleated. Histologically, cardiac angiosarcoma was diagnosed. The patient received adjuvant chemotherapy and was free of symptoms and recurrence of disease at 14 months follow-up. Due to the fortuitous appearance of clinical signs indicative of stroke, cardiac angiosarcoma was diagnosed and effectively treated at an early, nonmetastatic, and therefore potentially curable stage. Although cardiac angiosarcoma is a rare disease, it should be taken into consideration as a potential cause of cerebral embolic disease. PMID:19066013

  19. Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Human Reticulocyte 12/15-Lipoxygenase as Anti-Stroke Therapies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A key challenge facing drug discovery today is variability of the drug target between species, such as with 12/15-lipoxygenase (12/15-LOX), which contributes to ischemic brain injury, but its human and rodent isozymes have different inhibitor specificities. In the current work, we have utilized a quantitative high-throughput (qHTS) screen to identify compound 1 (ML351), a novel chemotype for 12/15-LOX inhibition that has nanomolar potency (IC50 = 200 nM) against human 12/15-LOX and is protective against oxidative glutamate toxicity in mouse neuronal HT22 cells. In addition, it exhibited greater than 250-fold selectivity versus related LOX isozymes, was a mixed inhibitor, and did not reduce the active-site ferric ion. Lastly, 1 significantly reduced infarct size following permanent focal ischemia in a mouse model of ischemic stroke. As such, this represents the first report of a selective inhibitor of human 12/15-LOX with demonstrated in vivo activity in proof-of-concept mouse models of stroke. PMID:24684213

  20. Extravascular Lung Water Does Not Increase in Hypovolemic Patients after a Fluid-Loading Protocol Guided by the Stroke Volume Variation

    PubMed Central

    Ferrando, Carlos; Aguilar, Gerardo; Belda, F. Javier

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Circulatory failure secondary to hypovolemia is a common situation in critical care patients. Volume replacement is the first option for the treatment of hypovolemia. A possible complication of volume loading is pulmonary edema, quantified at the bedside by the measurement of extravascular lung water index (ELWI). ELWI predicts progression to acute lung injury (ALI) in patients with risk factors for developing it. The aim of this study was to assess whether fluid loading guided by the stroke volume variation (SVV), in patients presumed to be hypovolemic, increased ELWI or not. Methods. Prospective study of 17 consecutive postoperative, fully mechanically ventilated patients diagnosed with circulatory failure secondary to presumed hypovolemia were included. Cardiac index (CI), ELWI, SVV, and global end-diastolic volume index (GEDI) were determined using the transpulmonary thermodilution technique during the first 12 hours after fluid loading. Volume replacement was done with a strict hemodynamic protocol. Results. Fluid loading produced a significant increase in CI and a decrease in SVV. ELWI did not increase. No correlation was found between the amount of fluids administered and the change in ELWI. Conclusion. Fluid loading guided by SVV in hypovolemic and fully mechanically ventilated patients in sinus rhythm does not increase ELWI. PMID:23091710

  1. Multimodal Approaches for Regenerative Stroke Therapies: Combination of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor with Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells is Not Superior to G-CSF Alone

    PubMed Central

    Balseanu, Adrian Tudor; Buga, Ana-Maria; Catalin, Bogdan; Wagner, Daniel-Christoph; Boltze, Johannes; Zagrean, Ana-Maria; Reymann, Klaus; Schaebitz, Wolf; Popa-Wagner, Aurel

    2014-01-01

    Attractive therapeutic strategies to enhance post-stroke recovery of aged brains include methods of cellular therapy that can enhance the endogenous restorative mechanisms of the injured brain. Since stroke afflicts mostly the elderly, it is highly desirable to test the efficacy of cell therapy in the microenvironment of aged brains that is generally refractory to regeneration. In particular, stem cells from the bone marrow allow an autologous transplantation approach that can be translated in the near future to the clinical practice. Such a bone marrow-derived therapy includes the grafting of stem cells as well as the delayed induction of endogenous stem cell mobilization and homing by the stem cell mobilizer granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). We tested the hypothesis that grafting of bone marrow-derived pre-differentiated mesenchymal cells (BM-MSCs) in G-CSF-treated animals improves the long-term functional outcome in aged rodents. To this end, G-CSF alone (50 μg/kg) or in combination with a single dose (106 cells) of rat BM MSCs was administered intravenously to Sprague-Dawley rats at 6 h after transient occlusion (90 min) of the middle cerebral artery. Infarct volume was measured by magnetic resonance imaging at 3 and 48 days post-stroke and additionally by immunhistochemistry at day 56. Functional recovery was tested during the entire post-stroke survival period of 56 days. Daily treatment for post-stroke aged rats with G-CSF led to a robust and consistent improvement of neurological function after 28 days. The combination therapy also led to robust angiogenesis in the formerly infarct core and beyond in the “islet of regeneration.” However, G-CSF + BM MSCs may not impact at all on the spatial reference-memory task or infarct volume and therefore did not further improve the post-stroke recovery. We suggest that in a real clinical practice involving older post-stroke patients, successful regenerative therapies would have to be

  2. A randomised controlled trial of antiplatelet therapy in combination with Rt-PA thrombolysis in ischemic stroke: rationale and design of the ARTIS-Trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Thrombolysis with intravenous rt-PA is currently the only approved acute therapy for ischemic stroke. Re-occlusion after initial recanalization occurs in up to 34% in patients treated with rt-PA, probably caused by platelet activation. In acute myocardial infarction, the combination of thrombolysis and antiplatelet therapy leads to a greater reduction of mortality compared to thrombolysis alone. In patients with acute ischemic stroke, several studies showed that patients already on antiplatelet treatment prior to thrombolysis had an equal or even better outcome compared to patients without prior antiplatelet treatment, despite an increased risk of intracerebral bleeding. Based on the fear of intracerebral haemorrhage, current international guidelines recommend postponing antiplatelet therapy until 24 hours after thrombolysis. Remarkably, prior use of antiplatelet therapy is not a contra-indication for thrombolysis. We hypothesize that antiplatelet therapy in combination with rt-PA thrombolysis will improve outcome by enhancing fibrinolysis and preventing re-occlusion. Methods/Design ARTIS is a randomised multi-center controlled trial with blind endpoint assessment. Our objective is to investigate whether immediate addition of aspirin to rt-PA thrombolysis improves functional outcome in ischemic stroke. Patients with acute ischemic stroke eligible for rt-PA thrombolysis are randomised to receive 300 mg aspirin within 1.5 hours after start of thrombolysis or standard care, consisting of antiplatelet therapy after 24 hours. Primary outcome is poor functional health at 3 months follow-up (modified Rankin Scale 3 - 6). Discussion This is the first clinical trial investigating the combination of rt-PA and acute aspirin by means of a simple and cheap adjustment of current antiplatelet regimen. We expect the net benefit of improved functional outcome will overcome the possible slightly increased risk of intracerebral haemorrhage. Trial registration The

  3. Quality-of-Life Change Associated With Robotic-Assisted Therapy to Improve Hand Motor Function in Patients With Subacute Stroke: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rebecca; Butler, Andrew J.; Wolf, Steven L.; Alberts, Jay L.

    2010-01-01

    Background At 6 months poststroke, most patients cannot incorporate their affected hand into daily activities, which in turn is likely to reduce their perceived quality of life. Objective This preliminary study explored change in patient-reported, health-related quality of life associated with robotic-assisted therapy combined with reduced therapist-supervised training. Design and Setting A single-blind, multi-site, randomized clinical trial was conducted. Participants Seventeen individuals who were 3 to 9 months poststroke participated. Intervention Sixty hours of therapist-supervised repetitive task practice (RTP) was compared with 30 hours of RTP combined with 30 hours of robotic-assisted therapy. Measurements Participants completed the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) at baseline, immediately postintervention, and 2 months postintervention. Change in SIS score domains was assessed in a mixed model analysis. Results The combined therapy group had a greater increase in rating of mood from preintervention to postintervention, and the RTP-only group had a greater increase in rating of social participation from preintervention to follow-up. Both groups had statistically significant improvement in activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living scores from preintervention to postintervention. Both groups reported significant improvement in hand function postintervention and at follow-up, and the magnitude of these changes suggested clinical significance. The combined therapy group had significant improvements in stroke recovery rating postintervention and at follow-up, which appeared clinically significant; this also was true for stroke recovery rating from preintervention to follow-up in the RTP-only group. Limitations Outcomes of 30 hours of RTP in the absence of robotic-assisted therapy remain unknown. Conclusion Robotic-assisted therapy may be an effective alternative or adjunct to the delivery of intensive task practice interventions to enhance

  4. Pediatric Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis ... UT Southwestern Medical Center. Copyright © 1997-2016 - The Internet Stroke Center. All rights reserved. The information contained ...

  5. Ischemic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Ischemic stroke is the most common type. It is usually ... are at risk for having a more serious stroke. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness ...

  6. Development of an accurate fluid management system for a pediatric continuous renal replacement therapy device

    PubMed Central

    SANTHANAKRISHNAN, ARVIND; NESTLE, TRENT T.; MOORE, BRIAN L.; YOGANATHAN, AJIT P.; PADEN, MATTHEW L.

    2013-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is common in critically ill children and renal replacement therapies provide a life saving therapy to a subset of these children. However, there is no Food and Drug Administration approved device to provide pediatric continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Consequently, clinicians adapt approved adult CRRT devices for use in children due to lack of safer alternatives. Complications occur using adult CRRT devices in children due to inaccurate fluid balance (FB) between the volumes of ultrafiltrate (UF) removed and replacement fluid (RF) delivered. We demonstrate the design and validation of a pediatric fluid management system for obtaining accurate instantaneous and cumulative FB. Fluid transport was achieved via multiple novel pulsatile diaphragm pumps. The conservation of volume principle leveraging the physical property of fluid incompressibility along with mechanical coupling via a crankshaft was used for FB. Accuracy testing was conducted in vitro for 8-hour long continuous operation of the coupled UF and RF pumps. The mean cumulative FB error was <1% across filtration flows from 300 mL/hour to 3000 mL/hour. This approach of FB control in a pediatric specific CRRT device would represent a significant accuracy improvement over currently used clinical implementations. PMID:23644618

  7. Development of an accurate fluid management system for a pediatric continuous renal replacement therapy device.

    PubMed

    Santhanakrishnan, Arvind; Nestle, Trent T; Moore, Brian L; Yoganathan, Ajit P; Paden, Matthew L

    2013-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is common in critically ill children, and renal replacement therapies provide a life-saving therapy to a subset of these children. However, there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved device to provide pediatric continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Consequently, clinicians adapt approved adult CRRT devices for use in children because of lack of safer alternatives. Complications occur using adult CRRT devices in children because of inaccurate fluid balance (FB) between the volumes of ultrafiltrate (UF) removed and replacement fluid (RF) delivered. We demonstrate the design and validation of a pediatric fluid management system for obtaining accurate instantaneous and cumulative FB. Fluid transport was achieved via multiple novel pulsatile diaphragm pumps. The conservation of volume principle leveraging the physical property of fluid incompressibility along with mechanical coupling via a crankshaft was used for FB. Accuracy testing was conducted in vitro for 8 hour long continuous operation of the coupled UF and RF pumps. The mean cumulative FB error was <1% across filtration flows from 300 to 3000 ml/hour. This approach of FB control in a pediatric-specific CRRT device would represent a significant accuracy improvement over currently used clinical implementations. PMID:23644618

  8. The ability of stroke volume variation measured by a noninvasive cardiac output monitor to predict fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated children.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yeon; Kim, Ji Young; Choi, Chang Hyu; Kim, Hong Soon; Lee, Kyung Cheon; Kwak, Hyun Jeong

    2014-02-01

    Continuous noninvasive cardiac output monitoring (NICOM) is a clinically useful tool in the pediatric setting. This study compared the ability of stroke volume variation (SVV) measured by NICOM with that of respiratory variations in the velocity of aortic blood flow (△Vpeak) and central venous pressure (CVP) to predict of fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated children after ventricular septal defect repair. The study investigated 26 mechanically ventilated children after the completion of surgery. At 30 min after their arrival in an intensive care unit, a colloid solution of 10 ml/kg was administrated for volume expansion. Hemodynamic variables, including CVP, stroke volume, and △Vpeak in addition to cardiac output and SVV in NICOM were measured before and 10 min after volume expansion. The patients with a stroke volume increase of more than 15 % after volume expansion were defined as responders. The 26 patients in the study consisted of 13 responders and 13 nonresponders. Before volume expansion, △Vpeak and SVV were higher in the responders (both p values <0.001). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves of △Vpeak, SVV, and CVP were respectively 0.956 (95 % CI 0.885-1.00), 0.888 (95 % CI 0.764-1.00), and 0.331 (95 % CI 0.123-0.540). This study showed that SVV by NICOM and △Vpeak by echocardiography, but not CVP, reliably predicted fluid responsiveness during mechanical ventilation after ventricular septal defect repair in children. PMID:23963186

  9. Determinants of Concurrent Motor and Language Recovery during Intensive Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients: Four Single-Case Studies

    PubMed Central

    Primaßin, Annika; Scholtes, Nina; Heim, Stefan; Huber, Walter; Neuschäfer, Martina; Binkofski, Ferdinand; Werner, Cornelius J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite intensive research on mechanisms of recovery of function after stroke, surprisingly little is known about determinants of concurrent recovery of language and motor functions in single patients. The alternative hypotheses are that the two functions might either “fight for resources” or use the same mechanisms in the recovery process. Here, we present follow-up data of four exemplary patients with different base levels of motor and language abilities. We assessed functional scales and performed exact lesion analysis to examine the connection between lesion parameters and recovery potential in each domain. Results confirm that preservation of the corticospinal tracts (CSTs) is a neural predictor for good motor recovery while preservation of the arcuate fasciculus (AF) is important for a good language recovery. However, results further indicate that even patients with large lesions in CST, AF, and superior longitudinal fasciculus, respectively, are able to recover their motor/language abilities during intensive therapy. We further found some indicators of a facilitating interaction between motor and language recovery. Patients with positive improvement of motor skills after therapy also improved in language skills, while the patients with no motor improvements were not able to gain any language recovery. PMID:26500606

  10. Comparing Two Computational Mechanisms for Explaining Functional Recovery in Robot-Therapy of Stroke Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Piovesan, Davide; Casadio, Maura; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A.; Morasso, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we discuss two possible strategies of movement control that can be used by stroke survivors during rehabilitation robotics training. To perform a reaching task in a minimally assistive force field, subjects either can move following the trajectory provided by the assistive force or they can use an internal representation of a minimum jerk trajectory from their starting position to the target. We used the stiffness and damping values directly estimated from the experimental data to simulate the trajectories that result by taking into account both hypotheses. The comparison of the simulated results with the data collected on four hemiparetic subjects supports the hypothesis that the central nervous system (CNS) is still able to correctly plan the movement, although a normal execution is impaired. PMID:26180655

  11. Methodology of the Field Administration of Stroke Therapy – Magnesium (FAST-MAG) phase 3 trial: Part 2 – prehospital study methods

    PubMed Central

    Saver, Jeffrey L.; Starkman, Sidney; Eckstein, Marc; Stratton, Samuel; Pratt, Frank; Hamilton, Scott; Conwit, Robin; Liebeskind, David S.; Sung, Gene; Sanossian, Nerses

    2016-01-01

    Rationale In acute stroke, the volume of salvageable brain tissue is maximal at onset and declines rapidly with time. Prehospital start of clinical trial interventions would enable delivery of neuroprotective agents, such as magnesium sulfate, to stroke patients in the hyperacute period when they are potentially most effective. Aims A broad aim of the FAST-MAG study is to develop and validate techniques to perform pivotal trials of neuroprotective therapies for acute stroke in the prehospital setting. In tandem with an accompanying general trial design article, this manuscript provides a detailed overview of several novel prehospital study methods employed in the NIH FAST-MAG Trial. Design Multicenter, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, pivotal clinical trial. Special Prehospital Procedures Distinctive prehospital methods deployed in FAST-MAG include: identifying likely stroke patients using the Los Angeles Prehospital Stroke Screen; eliciting explicit informed consent from patients or on scene legally authorized representatives via cellphone discussion with off-scene physicians; paramedic rating of pretreatment stroke severity using the Los Angeles Motor Scale; assigning patients to a study arm using blinded, pre-encounter randomization; facilitating continuity of study infusion from the field to the ED by stocking ambulances with study kits including both field and hospital doses; and electronic fax consent signature documentation by geographically separated subjects and enrolling physicians. Discussion The suite of prehospital trial methods developed for the FAST-MAG Trial enable enrollment of patients in very early time windows, including the hyperacute, ‘golden hour’ period immediately after stroke onset. PMID:24444117

  12. Risk of Stroke in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention versus Optimal Medical Therapy: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Taglieri, Nevio; Bacchi Reggiani, Maria Letizia; Ghetti, Gabriele; Saia, Francesco; Dall’Ara, Gianni; Gallo, Pamela; Moretti, Carolina; Palmerini, Tullio; Marrozzini, Cinzia; Marzocchi, Antonio; Rapezzi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Background Stroke is a rare but serious adverse event associated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, the relative risk of stroke between stable patients undergoing a direct PCI strategy and those undergoing an initial optimal medical therapy (OMT) strategy has not been established yet. This study sought to investigate if, in patients with stable coronary artery disease (SCAD), an initial strategy PCI is associated with a higher risk of stroke than a strategy based on OMT alone. Methods We performed a meta-analysis of 6 contemporary randomized control trials in which 5673 patients with SCAD were randomized to initial PCI or OMT. Only trials with stent utilization more than 50% were included. Study endpoint was the rate of stroke during follow up. Results Mean age of patients ranged from 60 to 65 years and stent utilization ranged from 72% to 100%. Rate of stroke was 2.0% at a weighted mean follow up of 55.3 months. On pooled analysis, the risk of stroke was similar between patients undergoing a PCI plus OMT and those receiving only OMT (2.2% vs. 1.8%, OR on fixed effect = 1.24 95%CI: 0.85–1.79). There was no heterogeneity among the studies (I2 = 0.0%, P = 0.15). On sensitivity analysis after removing each individual study the pooled effect estimate remains unchanged. Conclusions In patients with SCAD an initial strategy based on a direct PCI is not associated with an increased risk of stroke during long-term follow up compared to an initial strategy based on OMT alone. PMID:27391212

  13. Lower Intraprocedural Systolic Blood Pressure Predicts Good Outcome in Patients Undergoing Endovascular Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    John, Seby; Hazaa, Walaa; Uchino, Ken; Toth, Gabor; Bain, Mark; Thebo, Umera; Hussain, Muhammad S.

    2016-01-01

    Background It is unknown if intraprocedural blood pressure (BP) influences clinical outcomes and what BP parameter best predicts outcomes in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients who undergo intra-arterial therapy (IAT) for emergent large vessel occlusion. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 147 patients who underwent IAT for anterior circulation AIS from January 2008 to December 2012 at our institution. Baseline demographics, stroke treatment variables, and detailed intraprocedural hemodynamic variables were collected. Results The entire cohort consisted of 81 (55%) females with a mean age of 66.9 ± 15.6 years and a median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score of 16 (IQR 11-21). Thirty-six (24.5%) patients died during hospitalization, 25 (17%) achieved a 30-day modified Rankin Scale score of 0-2, and 24 (16.3%) suffered symptomatic parenchymal hematoma type 1/2 hemorrhage. Patients who achieved a good outcome had a significantly lower admission NIHSS score, a higher baseline CT ASPECTS score, and a lower rate of ICA terminus occlusions. Successful recanalization was more frequent in the good-outcome group, while symptomatic hemorrhages occurred only in poor-outcome patients. The first systolic BP (SBP; 146.5 ± 0.2 vs. 157.7 ± 25.6 mm Hg, p = 0.042), first mean arterial pressure (MAP; 98.1 ± 20.8 vs. 109.7 ± 20.3 mm Hg, p = 0.024), maximum SBP (164.6 ± 27.6 vs. 180.9 ± 18.3 mm Hg, p = 0.0003), and maximum MAP (125.5 ± 18.6 vs. 138.5 ± 24.6 mm Hg, p = 0.0309) were all significantly lower in patients who achieved good outcomes. A lower maximum intraprocedural SBP was an independent predictor of good outcome (adjusted OR 0.929, 95% CI 0.886-0.963, p = 0.0005). Initial NIHSS score was the only other independent predictor of a good outcome. Conclusion Lower intraprocedural SBP was associated with good outcome in patients undergoing IAT for AIS, and maximum SBP was an independent predictor of good outcome. SBP may be the optimal hemodynamic

  14. Electroencephalographic markers of robot-aided therapy in stroke patients for the evaluation of upper limb rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Sale, Patrizio; Infarinato, Francesco; Del Percio, Claudio; Lizio, Roberta; Babiloni, Claudio; Foti, Calogero; Franceschini, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of permanent disability in developed countries; its effects may include sensory, motor, and cognitive impairment as well as a reduced ability to perform self-care and participate in social and community activities. A number of studies have shown that the use of robotic systems in upper limb motor rehabilitation programs provides safe and intensive treatment to patients with motor impairments because of a neurological injury. Furthermore, robot-aided therapy was shown to be well accepted and tolerated by all patients; however, it is not known whether a specific robot-aided rehabilitation can induce beneficial cortical plasticity in stroke patients. Here, we present a procedure to study neural underpinning of robot-aided upper limb rehabilitation in stroke patients. Neurophysiological recordings use the following: (a) 10-20 system electroencephalographic (EEG) electrode montage; (b) bipolar vertical and horizontal electrooculographies; and (c) bipolar electromyography from the operating upper limb. Behavior monitoring includes the following: (a) clinical data and (b) kinematic and dynamic of the operant upper limb movements. Experimental conditions include the following: (a) resting state eyes closed and eyes open, and (b) robotic rehabilitation task (maximum 80 s each block to reach 4-min EEG data; interblock pause of 1 min). The data collection is performed before and after a program of 30 daily rehabilitation sessions. EEG markers include the following: (a) EEG power density in the eyes-closed condition; (b) reactivity of EEG power density to eyes opening; and (c) reactivity of EEG power density to robotic rehabilitation task. The above procedure was tested on a subacute patient (29 poststroke days) and on a chronic patient (21 poststroke months). After the rehabilitation program, we observed (a) improved clinical condition; (b) improved performance during the robotic task; (c) reduced delta rhythms (1-4 Hz) and increased alpha

  15. Reducing Door‐to‐Puncture Times for Intra‐Arterial Stroke Therapy: A Pilot Quality Improvement Project

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Brijesh P.; Leslie‐Mazwi, Thabele M.; Chandra, Ronil V.; Bell, Donnie L.; Sun, Chung‐Huan J.; Hirsch, Joshua A.; Rabinov, James D.; Rost, Natalia S.; Schwamm, Lee H.; Goldstein, Joshua N.; Levine, Wilton C.; Gupta, Rishi; Yoo, Albert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Delays to intra‐arterial therapy (IAT) lead to worse outcomes in stroke patients with proximal occlusions. Little is known regarding the magnitude of, and reasons for, these delays. In a pilot quality improvement (QI) project, we sought to examine and improve our door‐puncture times. Methods and Results For anterior‐circulation stroke patients who underwent IAT, we retrospectively calculated in‐hospital time delays associated with various phases from patient arrival to groin puncture. We formulated and then implemented a process change targeted to the phase with the greatest delay. We examined the impact on time to treatment by comparing the pre‐ and post‐QI cohorts. One hundred forty‐six patients (93 pre‐ vs. 51 post‐QI) were analyzed. In the pre‐QI cohort (ie, sequential process), the greatest delay occurred from imaging to the neurointerventional (NI) suite (“picture‐suite”: median, 62 minutes; interquartile range [IQR], 40 to 82). A QI measure was instituted so that the NI team and anesthesiologist were assembled and the suite set up in parallel with completion of imaging and decision making. The post‐QI (ie, parallel process) median picture‐to‐suite time was 29 minutes (IQR, 21 to 41; P<0.0001). There was a 36‐minute reduction in median door‐to‐puncture time (143 vs. 107 minutes; P<0.0001). Parallel workflow and presentation during work hours were independent predictors of shorter door‐puncture times. Conclusions In‐hospital delays are a major obstacle to timely IAT. A simple approach for achieving substantial time savings is to mobilize the NI and anesthesia teams during patient evaluation and treatment decision making. This parallel workflow resulted in a >30‐minute (25%) reduction in median door‐to‐puncture times. PMID:25389281

  16. Risk of First and Recurrent Stroke in Childhood Cancer Survivors Treated With Cranial and Cervical Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Sabine; Sear, Katherine; Hills, Nancy K.; Chettout, Nassim; Afghani, Shervin; Gastelum, Erica; Haas-Kogan, Daphne; Fullerton, Heather J.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To assess, in a retrospective cohort study, rates and predictors of first and recurrent stroke in patients treated with cranial irradiation (CRT) and/or cervical irradiation at ≤18 years of age. Methods and Materials: We performed chart abstraction (n=383) and phone interviews (n=104) to measure first and recurrent stroke in 383 patients who received CRT and/or cervical radiation at a single institution between 1980 and 2009. Stroke was defined as a physician diagnosis and symptoms consistent with stroke. Incidence of first stroke was number of first strokes per person-years of observation after radiation. We used survival analysis techniques to determine cumulative incidence of first and recurrent stroke. Results: Among 325 subjects with sufficient follow-up data, we identified 19 first strokes (13 ischemic, 4 hemorrhagic, 2 unknown subtype) occurring at a median age of 24 years (interquartile range 17-33 years) in patients treated with CRT. Imaging was reviewed when available (n=13), and the stroke was confirmed in 12. Overall rate of first stroke was 625 (95% confidence interval [CI] 378-977) per 100,000 person-years. The cumulative incidence of first stroke was 2% (95% CI 0.01%-5.3%) at 5 years and 4% (95% CI 2.0%-8.4%) at 10 years after irradiation. With each 100-cGy increase in the radiation dose, the stroke hazard increased by 5% (hazard ratio 1.05; 95% CI 1.01-1.09; P=.02). We identified 6 recurrent strokes; 5 had available imaging that confirmed the stroke. Median time to recurrence was 15 months (interquartile range 6 months-3.2 years) after first stroke. The cumulative incidence of recurrent stroke was 38% (95% CI 17%-69%) at 5 years and 59% (95% CI 27%-92%) at 10 years after first stroke. Conclusion: Cranial irradiation puts childhood cancer survivors at high risk of both first and recurrent stroke. Stroke prevention strategies for these survivors are needed.

  17. Combined therapy with COX-2 inhibitor and 20-HETE inhibitor reduces colon tumor growth and the adverse effects of ischemic stroke associated with COX-2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Hoda, Md Nasrul; Zheng, Xuan; Li, Weiguo; Luo, Pengcheng; Maddipati, Krishna Rao; Seki, Tsugio; Ergul, Adviye; Wang, Mong-Heng

    2014-09-15

    20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), Cyp4a-derived eicosanoid, is a lipid mediator that promotes tumor growth, as well as causing detrimental effects in cerebral circulation. We determined whether concurrent inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 20-HETE affects colon tumor growth and ischemic stroke outcomes. The expression of Cyp4a and COXs and production of 20-HETE and PGE2 were determined in murine colon carcinoma (MC38) cells. We then examined the effects of combined treatment with rofecoxib, a potent COX-2 inhibitor, and HET0016, a potent Cyp4a inhibitor, on the growth and proliferation of MC38 cells. Subsequently, we tested the effects of HET0016 plus rofecoxib in MC38 tumor and ischemic stroke models. Cyp4a and COXs are highly expressed in MC38 cells. Respectively, HET0016 and rofecoxib inhibited 20-HETE and PGE2 formation in MC38 cells. Moreover, rofecoxib combined with HET0016 had greater inhibitory effects on the growth and proliferation of MC38 cells than did rofecoxib alone. Importantly, rofecoxib combined with HET0016 provided greater inhibition on tumor growth than did rofecoxib alone in MC38 tumor-bearing mice. Prolonged treatment with rofecoxib selectively induced circulating 20-HETE levels and caused cerebrovascular damage after ischemic stroke, whereas therapy with rofecoxib and HET0016 attenuated 20-HETE levels and reduced rofecoxib-induced cerebrovascular damage and stroke outcomes during anti-tumor therapy. Thus these results demonstrate that combination therapy with rofecoxib and HET0016 provides a new treatment of colon tumor, which can not only enhance the anti-tumor efficacy of rofecoxib, but also reduce rofecoxib-induced cerebrovascular damage and stroke outcomes. PMID:24990856

  18. Increased perfusion in motor areas after constraint-induced movement therapy in chronic stroke: a single-photon emission computerized tomography study.

    PubMed

    Könönen, Mervi; Kuikka, Jyrki T; Husso-Saastamoinen, Minna; Vanninen, Esko; Vanninen, Ritva; Soimakallio, Seppo; Mervaala, Esa; Sivenius, Juhani; Pitkänen, Kauko; Tarkka, Ina M

    2005-12-01

    Hemiparesis is the most common deficit after cerebral stroke. Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) is a new neurorehabilitation method that emphasizes task-relevant repetitive training for the stroke hand. Twelve chronic stroke patients were studied with single-photon emission computerized tomography at rest before and after the two-week CIMT period. Increased perfusion was found in motor control related areas. The specific areas with an increase in perfusion in the affected hemisphere were in the precentral gyrus, premotor cortex (Brodmann's area 6 (BA6)), frontal cortex, and superior frontal gyrus (BA10). In the nonaffected hemisphere, perfusion was increased in the superior frontal gyrus (BA6) and cingulate gyrus (BA31). In the cerebellum increased perfusion was seen bilaterally. The brain areas with increased perfusion receive and integrate the information from different sensory systems and plan the movement execution. Regional cerebral perfusion decreased in the lingual gyrus (BA18) in the affected hemisphere. In the nonaffected frontal cortex, two areas with decreased perfusion were found in the middle frontal gyrus (BA8/10). Also, the fusiform gyrus (BA20) and inferior temporal gyrus (BA37) in the nonaffected hemisphere showed decreased perfusion. Intensive movement therapy appears to change local cerebral perfusion in areas known to participate in movement planning and execution. These changes might be a sign of active reorganization processes after CIMT in the chronic state of stroke. PMID:15931162

  19. [Stroke from the Perspective of Neurologists (Part 2): Update in the Acute Therapy].

    PubMed

    Schur, Patrick; Luft, Andreas

    2016-05-11

    In the last praxis edition (9/2016) the article with the title “Neues in der Akutdiagnostik” reported about the relevant factors for the extension of thrombolytic procedures despite the usual inclusion criteria of thrombolysis. The rapid clinical and imaging identification of patients who benefit from endovascular therapy based on the “target mismatch” is an other key factor in the race against time. In addition the advantages of new mechanical devices allow to remove a thrombus quickly, completely and especially with better outcome. The recently published randomized controlled studies MR-CLEAN, EXTEND-IA, ESCAPE, SWIFT-PRIME and REVASCAT showed significant benefits of intra-arterial thrombolysis in patients with large artery occlusions. The following article discusses the state-of-the-art of the basic therapy and the major pathways of acute therapy. PMID:27167477

  20. Stroke and atrial fibrillation: risks, prevention and therapy in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Raffaeli, S; Paciaroni, E

    1995-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) represents a high risk of systemic embolism, particularly of stroke (S). This is true not only when AF is associated with an organic cardiopathy, but also in the so-called nonvalvular AF (NVAF). Not all cases of AF are of the same S-risk; such risk is higher for rheumatic AF and lower for NVAF. Therefore, a risk stratification is important in order to decide long-term antithrombotic prophylaxis. Five major trials have recently examined the thromboembolic prophylaxis in this group of patients. These randomised prospective open studies showed a significant reduction of S and systematic embolism in patients receiving low dose of warfarin (W), even in the elderly, as compared to placebo, and the incidence of hemorrhagic complications was also very low. Significant benefits of aspirin (ASA) were observed only in one trial in patients, except those older than 75 years. In a double blind, randomised trial indobufene was found effective resulting in 67% reduction of S and systematic embolism in patients with various cardiac diseases in AF or sinus rhythm. Consequently, a reasonable policy would be to treat patients with NVAF (also old ones) with anticoagulants unless contraindications or lone atrial fibrillations are present; in the latter cases ASA and indobufene should be considered. In the secondary prevention of ischemic S, W has given good results, whereas ASA and indobufene seem to be promising. PMID:15374252

  1. Study of the Efficacy, Safety and Tolerability of Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin vs. Unfractionated Heparin as Bridging Therapy in Patients with Embolic Stroke due to Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Feiz, Farnia; Sedghi, Reyhane; Salehi, Alireza; Hatam, Nahid; Bahmei, Jamshid; Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation with adjusted dose warfarin is a well-accepted treatment for the prevention of recurrent stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. Meanwhile, using bridging therapy with heparin or heparinoids before warfarin for initiation of anticoagulation is a matter of debate. We compared safety, efficacy, and tolerability of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) and unfractionated heparin (UFH) as a bridging method in patients with recent ischemic stroke due to atrial fibrillation. Method This study was a randomized single-blind controlled trial in patients with acute ischemic stroke due to atrial fibrillation who were eligible for receiving warfarin and were randomly treated with 60 milligrams (mg) of LMWH (enoxaparin) subcutaneously every 12 h, or 1000 units/h of continuous intravenous heparin. The primary efficacy endpoints were recurrence of new ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction and/or death. The primary safety endpoint was central nervous system and/or systemic bleeding. Results Seventy-four subjects were recruited. Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics of two groups were matched. Composite endpoint outcome of new ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, and/or death in follow-up period was seen in 10 subjects (27.03%) in UFH group and in four subjects (10.81%) in LMWH group (p value: 0.136). All hemorrhages and symptomatic central nervous system (CNS) hemorrhages in follow-up period were in 7 (18.9%) and 4 (10.8%) patients in UFH group, in 5 (13.5%), and 3 (8.1%) patients in LMWH group (p values: 0.754 and 0.751), respectively. Drop out and major adverse-effects such as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and drug hypersensitivity were not seen in any patient. Conclusion Enoxaparin can be a safe and efficient alternative for UFH as bridging therapy. PMID:27403222

  2. Bilateral brain reorganization with memantine and constraint-induced aphasia therapy in chronic post-stroke aphasia: An ERP study.

    PubMed

    Barbancho, Miguel A; Berthier, Marcelo L; Navas-Sánchez, Patricia; Dávila, Guadalupe; Green-Heredia, Cristina; García-Alberca, José M; Ruiz-Cruces, Rafael; López-González, Manuel V; Dawid-Milner, Marc S; Pulvermüller, Friedemann; Lara, J Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Changes in ERP (P100 and N400) and root mean square (RMS) were obtained during a silent reading task in 28 patients with chronic post-stroke aphasia in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of both memantine and constraint-induced aphasia therapy (CIAT). Participants received memantine/placebo alone (weeks 0-16), followed by drug treatment combined with CIAT (weeks 16-18), and then memantine/placebo alone (weeks 18-20). ERP/RMS values (week 16) decreased more in the memantine group than in the placebo group. During CIAT application (weeks 16-18), improvements in aphasia severity and ERP/RMS values were amplified by memantine and changes remained stable thereafter (weeks 18-20). Changes in ERP/RMS occurred in left and right hemispheres and correlated with gains in language performance. No changes in ERP/RMS were found in a healthy group in two separated evaluations. Our results show that aphasia recovery induced by both memantine alone and in combination with CIAT is indexed by bilateral cortical potentials. PMID:25932618

  3. Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging for assessing evolution of ischemic penumbra: a key translational medicine strategy to manage the risk of developing novel therapies for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Chavez, Juan C; Zaleska, Margaret M; Wang, Xinkang; Wood, Andrew; Hurko, Orest; Pangalos, Menelas N; Feuerstein, Giora Z

    2009-01-01

    The implicit aim of neuroprotection is to rescue neurons within distressed but still viable tissue, thereby promoting functional recovery upon neuronal salvage. The clinical failure of this approach suggests that previous efforts to develop stroke therapies lacked means to predict success or futility in pre-clinical and early clinical studies. A key translational medicine strategy that can improve predictability relies on imaging methodologies to map the spatiotemporal evolution of the ischemic penumbra. This could serve as a biomarker indicative of neuroprotective potential and could increase likelihood of success in clinical studies by allowing selection of patients who are most likely to respond to therapy. PMID:18766199

  4. The utility of cognitive behavioural therapy on chronic haemodialysis patients' fluid intake: a preliminary examination.

    PubMed

    Sagawa, M; Oka, M; Chaboyer, W

    2003-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) on chronic haemodialysis (HD) patients' ability to achieve fluid intake related behavioural objectives. This one group before and after quasi-experiment consisted of a four-week base-line phase, a six-week intervention phase and a four-week follow-up phase. Interventions included self-contract, reinforcement and self-monitoring. Participants were 10 Japanese HD outpatients. The average achievement of the fluid intake objective in the intervention phase was 65%. Fifty percent of participants achieved their objectives at least 3/4 of the time without individualised reinforcement. CBT was effective in helping patients change their fluid intake behaviours. PMID:12667513

  5. Safety and efficacy of intensive vs. guideline antiplatelet therapy in high‐risk patients with recent ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack: rationale and design of the Triple Antiplatelets for Reducing Dependency after Ischaemic Stroke (TARDIS) trial (ISRCTN47823388)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Rationale The risk of recurrence following a stroke or transient ischemic attack is high, especially immediately after the event. Hypothesis Because two antiplatelet agents are superior to one in patients with non‐cardioembolic events, more intensive treatment might be even more effective. Sample size estimates The sample size of 4100 patients will allow a shift to less recurrence, and less severe recurrence, to be detected (odds ratio 0·68) with 90% power at 5% significance. Methods and design Triple Antiplatelets for Reducing Dependency after Ischaemic Stroke (ISRCTN47823388) is comparing the safety and efficacy of intensive (combined aspirin, clopidogrel, and dipyridamole) vs. guideline antiplatelet therapy, both given for one‐month. This international collaborative parallel‐group prospective randomized open‐label blinded‐end‐point phase III trial plans to recruit 4100 patients with acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. Randomization and data collection are performed over a secure Internet site with real‐time data validation and concealment of allocation. Outcomes, serious adverse events, and neuroimaging are adjudicated centrally with blinding to treatment allocation. Study outcome The primary outcome is stroke recurrence and its severity (‘ordinal recurrence’ based on modified Rankin Scale) at 90 days, with masked assessment centrally by telephone. Secondary outcomes include vascular events, functional measures (disability, mood, cognition, quality of life), and safety (bleeding, death, serious adverse events). Discussion The trial has recruited more than 50% of its target sample size (latest number: 2399) and is running in 104 sites in 4 countries. One‐third of patients presented with a transient ischemic attack. PMID:26079743

  6. Ischemic Stroke during Pregnancy and Puerperium

    PubMed Central

    Del Zotto, Elisabetta; Giossi, Alessia; Volonghi, Irene; Costa, Paolo; Padovani, Alessandro; Pezzini, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Ischemic stroke during pregnancy and puerperium represents a rare occurrence but it could be a serious and stressful event for mothers, infants, and also families. Whenever it does occur, many concerns arise about the safety of the mother and the fetus in relation to common diagnostic tests and therapies leading to a more conservative approach. The physiological adaptations in the cardiovascular system and in the coagulability that accompany the pregnant state, which are more significant around delivery and in the postpartum period, likely contribute to increasing the risk of an ischemic stroke. Most of the causes of an ischemic stroke in the young may also occur in pregnant patients. Despite this, there are specific conditions related to pregnancy which may be considered when assessing this particular group of patients such as pre-eclampsia-eclampsia, choriocarcinoma, peripartum cardiomiopathy, amniotic fluid embolization, and postpartum cerebral angiopathy. This article will consider several questions related to pregnancy-associated ischemic stroke, dwelling on epidemiological and specific etiological aspects, diagnostic issue concerning the use of neuroimaging, and the related potential risks to the embryo and fetus. Therapeutic issues surrounding the use of anticoagulant and antiplatelets agents will be discussed along with the few available reports regarding the use of thrombolytic therapy during pregnancy. PMID:21331336

  7. Constraint-induced movement therapy as a rehabilitation intervention for upper extremity in stroke patients: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Etoom, Mohammad; Hawamdeh, Mohannad; Hawamdeh, Ziad; Alwardat, Mohammad; Giordani, Laura; Bacciu, Serenella; Scarpini, Claudia; Foti, Calogero

    2016-09-01

    Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) is a neurorehabilitation technique designed to improve upper extremity motor functions after stroke. This review aimed to investigate evidence of the effect of CIMT on upper extremity in stroke patients and to identify optimal methods to apply CIMT. Four databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINHAL, and PEDro) and reference lists of relevant articles and reviews were searched. Randomized clinical trials that studied the effect of CIMT on upper extremity outcomes in stroke patients compared with other rehabilitative techniques, usual care, or no intervention were included. Methodological quality was assessed using the PEDro score. The following data were extracted for each trial: patients' characteristics, sample size, eligibility criteria, protocols of CIMT and control groups, outcome measurements, and the PEDro score. A total of 38 trials were identified according to the inclusion criteria. The trials included were heterogeneous in CIMT protocols, time since stroke, and duration and frequency of treatment. The pooled meta-analysis of 36 trials found a heterogeneous significant effect of CIMT on upper extremity. There was no significant effect of CIMT at different durations of follow-up. The majority of included articles did not fulfill powered sample size and quality criteria. The effect of CIMT changed in terms of sample size and quality features of the articles included. These meta-analysis findings indicate that evidence for the superiority of CIMT in comparison with other rehabilitative interventions is weak. Information on the optimal dose of CIMT and optimal time to start CIMT is still limited. PMID:27123790

  8. Ischemic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

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  9. Stroke Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke can cause lasting brain damage. People who survive a stroke need to relearn skills they lose because of ... damage. Rehabilitation can help them relearn those skills. Stroke can cause five types of disabilities: Paralysis or ...

  10. Hemorrhagic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Hemorrhagic stroke is the less common type. It happens when ... an artery wall that breaks open. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, ...

  11. Inflammatory Disequilibrium in Stroke.

    PubMed

    Petrovic-Djergovic, Danica; Goonewardena, Sascha N; Pinsky, David J

    2016-06-24

    Over the past several decades, there have been substantial advances in our knowledge of the pathophysiology of stroke. Understanding the benefits of timely reperfusion has led to the development of thrombolytic therapy as the cornerstone of current management of ischemic stroke, but there remains much to be learned about mechanisms of neuronal ischemic and reperfusion injury and associated inflammation. For ischemic stroke, novel therapeutic targets have continued to remain elusive. When considering modern molecular biological techniques, advanced translational stroke models, and clinical studies, a consistent pattern emerges, implicating perturbation of the immune equilibrium by stroke in both central nervous system injury and repair responses. Stroke triggers activation of the neuroimmune axis, comprised of multiple cellular constituents of the immune system resident within the parenchyma of the brain, leptomeninges, and vascular beds, as well as through secretion of biological response modifiers and recruitment of immune effector cells. This neuroimmune activation can directly impact the initiation, propagation, and resolution phases of ischemic brain injury. To leverage a potential opportunity to modulate local and systemic immune responses to favorably affect the stroke disease curve, it is necessary to expand our mechanistic understanding of the neuroimmune axis in ischemic stroke. This review explores the frontiers of current knowledge of innate and adaptive immune responses in the brain and how these responses together shape the course of ischemic stroke. PMID:27340273

  12. Phytochemicals in Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joonki; Fann, David Yang-Wei; Seet, Raymond Chee Seong; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Mattson, Mark P; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2016-09-01

    Stroke is the second foremost cause of mortality worldwide and a major cause of long-term disability. Due to changes in lifestyle and an aging population, the incidence of stroke continues to increase and stroke mortality predicted to exceed 12 % by the year 2030. However, the development of pharmacological treatments for stroke has failed to progress much in over 20 years since the introduction of the thrombolytic drug, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. These alarming circumstances caused many research groups to search for alternative treatments in the form of neuroprotectants. Here, we consider the potential use of phytochemicals in the treatment of stroke. Their historical use in traditional medicine and their excellent safety profile make phytochemicals attractive for the development of therapeutics in human diseases. Emerging findings suggest that some phytochemicals have the ability to target multiple pathophysiological processes involved in stroke including oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, epidemiological studies suggest that the consumption of plant sources rich in phytochemicals may reduce stroke risk, and so reinforce the possibility of developing preventative or neuroprotectant therapies for stroke. In this review, we describe results of preclinical studies that demonstrate beneficial effects of phytochemicals in experimental models relevant to stroke pathogenesis, and we consider their possible mechanisms of action. PMID:27193940

  13. The effects of game-based virtual reality movement therapy plus mental practice on upper extremity function in chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Hyuck; Park, Ji-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of game-based virtual reality movement therapy plus mental practice on upper extremity function in chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis. [Subjects] The subjects were chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis. [Methods] Thirty subjects were randomly assigned to either the control group or experimental group. All subjects received 20 sessions (5 days in a week) of virtual reality movement therapy using the Nintendo Wii. In addition to Wii-based virtual reality movement therapy, experimental group subjects performed mental practice consisting of 5 minutes of relaxation, Wii games imagination, and normalization phases before the beginning of Wii games. To compare the two groups, the upper extremity subtest of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Box and Block Test, and quality of movement subscale of the Motor Activity Log were performed. [Results] Both groups showed statistically significant improvement in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Box and Block Test, and quality of the movement subscale of Motor Activity Log after the interventions. Also, there were significant differences in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Box and Block Test, and quality of movement subscale of the Motor Activity Log between the two groups. [Conclusion] Game-based virtual reality movement therapy alone may be helpful to improve functional recovery of the upper extremity, but the addition of MP produces a lager improvement. PMID:27134363

  14. The effects of game-based virtual reality movement therapy plus mental practice on upper extremity function in chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Hyuck; Park, Ji-Hyuk

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of game-based virtual reality movement therapy plus mental practice on upper extremity function in chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis. [Subjects] The subjects were chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis. [Methods] Thirty subjects were randomly assigned to either the control group or experimental group. All subjects received 20 sessions (5 days in a week) of virtual reality movement therapy using the Nintendo Wii. In addition to Wii-based virtual reality movement therapy, experimental group subjects performed mental practice consisting of 5 minutes of relaxation, Wii games imagination, and normalization phases before the beginning of Wii games. To compare the two groups, the upper extremity subtest of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Box and Block Test, and quality of movement subscale of the Motor Activity Log were performed. [Results] Both groups showed statistically significant improvement in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Box and Block Test, and quality of the movement subscale of Motor Activity Log after the interventions. Also, there were significant differences in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Box and Block Test, and quality of movement subscale of the Motor Activity Log between the two groups. [Conclusion] Game-based virtual reality movement therapy alone may be helpful to improve functional recovery of the upper extremity, but the addition of MP produces a lager improvement. PMID:27134363

  15. Viscosity and non-Newtonian features of thickened fluids used for dysphagia therapy.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Mark; Hanson, Ben; Smith, Christina

    2010-08-01

    Thickening agents based primarily on granulated maize starch are widely used in the care of patients with swallowing difficulties, increasing viscosity of consumed fluids. This slows bolus flow during swallowing, allowing airway protection to be more properly engaged. Thickened fluids have been shown to exhibit time-varying behavior and are non-Newtonian, complicating assessment of fluid thickness, potentially compromising efficacy of therapy. This work aimed to quantify the flow properties of fluids produced with commercial thickeners at shear rates representative of slow tipping in a beaker to fast swallowing. Results were presented as indices calculated using a power-law model representing apparent viscosity (consistency index) and non-Newtonian nature of flow (flow behavior index). Immediately following mixing, 3 fluid thicknesses showed distinct consistency indices and decreasing flow behavior index with increasing thickener concentration. An increase in consistency index over 30 min was observed, but only for samples that were repeatedly sheared during acquisition. Three-hour measurements showed changes in consistency index across fluids with the largest being a 25% rise from initial value. This may have implications for efficacy of treatment, as fluids are not always consumed immediately upon mixing. Flow behavior indices were comparable across thickeners exhibiting similar rises over time. The indices were a more complete method of quantifying flow properties compared with single viscosity measurements, allowing an increased depth of analysis. The non-Newtonian nature of fluids perhaps renders them particularly suitable for use as dysphagia therapies, and such analysis may allow the possibility of altering these properties to optimize therapeutic efficacy to be explored. Practical Application: Effective treatment of swallowing disorders relies upon the appropriate choice and subsequent reproduction of drinks thickened to one of a number of predetermined

  16. Exosomes/miRNAs as mediating cell-based therapy of stroke

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Hongqi; Li, Yi; Chopp, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Cell-based therapy, e.g., multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) treatment, shows promise for the treatment of various diseases. The strong paracrine capacity of these cells and not their differentiation capacity, is the principal mechanism of therapeutic action. MSCs robustly release exosomes, membrane vesicles (~30–100 nm) originally derived in endosomes as intraluminal vesicles, which contain various molecular constituents including proteins and RNAs from maternal cells. Contained among these constituents, are small non-coding RNA molecules, microRNAs (miRNAs), which play a key role in mediating biological function due to their prominent role in gene regulation. The release as well as the content of the MSC generated exosomes are modified by environmental conditions. Via exosomes, MSCs transfer their therapeutic factors, especially miRNAs, to recipient cells, and therein alter gene expression and thereby promote therapeutic response. The present review focuses on the paracrine mechanism of MSC exosomes, and the regulation and transfer of exosome content, especially the packaging and transfer of miRNAs which enhance tissue repair and functional recovery. Perspectives on the developing role of MSC mediated transfer of exosomes as a therapeutic approach will also be discussed. PMID:25426026

  17. Underlying neural mechanisms of mirror therapy: Implications for motor rehabilitation in stroke.

    PubMed

    Arya, Kamal Narayan

    2016-01-01

    Mirror therapy (MT) is a valuable method for enhancing motor recovery in poststroke hemiparesis. The technique utilizes the mirror-illusion created by the movement of sound limb that is perceived as the paretic limb. MT is a simple and economical technique than can stimulate the brain noninvasively. The intervention unquestionably has neural foundation. But the underlying neural mechanisms inducing motor recovery are still unclear. In this review, the neural-modulation due to MT has been explored. Multiple areas of the brain such as the occipital lobe, dorsal frontal area and corpus callosum are involved during the simple MT regime. Bilateral premotor cortex, primary motor cortex, primary somatosensory cortex, and cerebellum also get reorganized to enhance the function of the damaged brain. The motor areas of the lesioned hemisphere receive visuo-motor processing information through the parieto-occipital lobe. The damaged motor cortex responds variably to the MT and may augment true motor recovery. Mirror neurons may also play a possible role in the cortico-stimulatory mechanisms occurring due to the MT. PMID:26754990

  18. Measuring MERCI: exploring data mining techniques for examining the neurologic outcomes of stroke patients undergoing endo-vascular therapy at Erlanger Southeast Stroke Center.

    PubMed

    McNabb, Matthew; Cao, Yu; Devlin, Thomas; Baxter, Blaise; Thornton, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical Embolus Removal in Cerebral Ischemia (MERCI) has been supported by medical trials as an improved method of treating ischemic stroke past the safe window of time for administering clot-busting drugs, and was released for medical use in 2004. The importance of analyzing real-world data collected from MERCI clinical trials is key to providing insights on the effectiveness of MERCI. Most of the existing data analysis on MERCI results has thus far employed conventional statistical analysis techniques. To the best of our knowledge, advanced data analytics and data mining techniques have not yet been systematically applied. To address the issue in this thesis, we conduct a comprehensive study on employing state of the art machine learning algorithms to generate prediction criteria for the outcome of MERCI patients. Specifically, we investigate the issue of how to choose the most significant attributes of a data set with limited instance examples. We propose a few search algorithms to identify the significant attributes, followed by a thorough performance analysis for each algorithm. Finally, we apply our proposed approach to the real-world, de-identified patient data provided by Erlanger Southeast Regional Stroke Center, Chattanooga, TN. Our experimental results have demonstrated that our proposed approach performs well. PMID:23366978

  19. Functional Improvement After 4-Week Rehabilitation Therapy and Effects of Attention Deficit in Brain Tumor Patients: Comparison With Subacute Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Han, Eun Young; Kim, Bo Ryun; Kim, Ha Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To confirm functional improvement in brain tumor patients after 4-week conventional rehabilitation therapy, to compare the cognitive impairment of brain tumor patients with subacute stroke patients using computerized neuropsychological testing, and to determine the effects on functional outcomes of daily activity. Methods From April 2008 to December 2012, 55 patients (29 brain tumor patients and 26 subacute stroke patients) were enrolled. All patients were assessed with a computerized neuropsychological test at baseline. Motricity Index, Korean version of Mini Mental Status Examination, and Korean version of Modified Barthel Index scores were assessed at the beginning and end of 4-week rehabilitation. Conventional rehabilitation therapy was applied to both groups for 4 weeks. Results Functional outcomes of all patients in both groups significantly improved after 4-week rehabilitation therapy. In brain tumor patients, the initial Motricity Index, cognitive dysfunction, and visual continuous performance test correction numbers were strong predictors of initial daily activity function (R2=0.778, p<0.01). The final Motricity Index and word-black test were strong predictors of final daily activity function (R2=0.630, p<0.01). In patients with subacute stroke, the initial Motricity index was an independent predictor of initial daily activity function (R2=0.245, p=0.007). The initial daily activity function and color of color word test were strong predictors of final daily activity function (R2=0.745, p<0.01). Conclusion Conventional rehabilitation therapy induced functional improvement in brain tumor patients. Objective evaluation of cognitive function and comprehensive rehabilitation including focused cognitive training should be performed in brain tumor patients for improving their daily activity function. PMID:26361592

  20. Effect of Radial Shock Wave Therapy on Spasticity of the Upper Limb in Patients With Chronic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tsung-Ying; Chang, Chih-Ya; Chou, Yu-Ching; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Chu, Heng-Yi; Chiang, Shang-Lin; Chang, Shin-Tsu; Wu, Yung-Tsan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recently, studies have reported that extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is a safe, noninvasive, alternative treatment for spasticity. However, the effect of ESWT on spasticity cannot be determined, because most studies to date have enrolled small patient numbers and have lacked placebo-controlled groups and/or long-term follow-up. In addition, whether varying the number of ESWT sessions would affect the duration of the therapeutic effect has not been investigated in a single study. Hence, we performed a prospective, randomized, single blind, placebo-controlled study to investigate the long-term effect of radial ESWT (rESWT) in patients with poststroke spasticity and surveyed the outcome of functional activity. Sixty patients were randomized into 3 groups. Group A patients received 1 session of rESWT per week for 3 consecutive weeks; group B patients received a single session of rESWT; group C patients received one session of sham rESWT per week for 3 consecutive weeks. The primary outcome was Modified Ashworth Scale of hand and wrist, whereas the secondary outcomes were Fugl-Meyer Assessment of hand function and wrist control. Evaluations were performed before the first rESWT treatment and immediately 1, 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks after the last session of rESWT. Compared to the control group, the significant reduction in spasticity of hand and wrist lasted at least 16 and 8 weeks in group A and B, respectively. Three sessions of rESWT had a longer-lasting effect than one session. Furthermore, the reduction in spasticity after 3 sessions of rESWT may be beneficial for hand function and wrist control and the effect was maintained for 16 and 12 weeks, respectively. rESWT may be valuable in decreasing spasticity of the hand and wrist with accompanying enhancement of wrist control and hand function in chronic stroke patients. PMID:27149465

  1. Plasma and cerebrosponal fluid amino acid levels in diabetic ketoacidosis before and after corrective therapy.

    PubMed

    Aoki, T T; Assal J-P; Manzano, F M; Kozak, G P; Cahill, G F

    1975-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of insulin-saline-bicarbonate therapy on amino acid metabolism in diabetic ketoacidosis, arterial and venous blood samples as well as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were obtained from six patients before and after initiation of corrective therapy. Levels of CSF glutamine were decreased while alanine alpha-amino-n-butyrate, valine, isoleucine and leucine were increased significantly compared to a control group composed of six normal, postabsorptive adults free of any neurologic disease. Following therapy, CSF levels of alanine, alpha-amino-n-butyrate, valine, isoleucine, and leucine declined while glutamine levels did not change. Admission arterial plasma levels of the glycogenic amino acids were lower than normal while the branched-chain amino acids were elevated. Plasma alanine and glutamine arterio-venous (A-V) differences across forearm tissue were larger. After four hours of corrective therapy, arterial plasma levels of most of the amino acids had declined sharply and A-V differences for glutamine and alanine were markedly reduced (p smaller than.025 and p smaller than.01, paired t, respectively). Coincident with the decrease in A-V amino acid differences, plasma glucagon and free fatty acid levels declined significantly. These data suggest that the effect exerted by insulin-saline-bicarbonate therapy on amino acid metabolism is manifested by diminished A-V plasma alanine and glutamine differences across forearm tissue. Thus, the role played by the splanchnic bed both before and following corrective measures may be secondary to substrate availability. PMID:805076

  2. What Are Some Common Outcomes of Stroke and Some Common Treatments for These Outcomes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Other FAQs within the Stroke topic. [top] Rehabilitation Stroke is the leading cause of serious adult ... functions damaged by the stroke. These therapies include: Physical therapy A physical therapist uses training and exercises to ...

  3. Effects of iodinated contrast on various magnetic resonance imaging sequences and field strength: Implications for characterization of hemorrhagic transformation in acute stroke therapy

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Humberto; Lemen, Lisa; Samaratunga, Ranasinghage; Nguyen, Peter; Tomsick, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the effects of iodinated contrast material (ICM) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) comparing different sequences and magnetic fields, with emphasis to similarities/differences with well-known signal characteristics of hemorrhage in the brain. METHODS: Aliquots of iopamidol and iodixanol mixed with normal saline were scanned at 1.5T and 3T. Signal intensity (SI) was measured using similar spin-echo (SE)-T1, SE-T2, gradient-echo (GRE) and fluid-attenuation-inversion-recovery (FLAIR) sequences at both magnets. Contrast to noise ratio (CNR) (SI contrast-SI saline/SD noise) for each aliquot were calculated and Kruskall-wallis test and graphic analysis was used to compare different pulse sequences and ICMs. RESULTS: Both ICM showed increased SI on SE-T1 and decreased SI on SE-T2, GRE and FLAIR at both 1.5T and 3T, as the concentration was increased. By CNR measurements, SE-T2 had the greatest conspicuity at 3T with undiluted iopamidol (92.6 ± 0.3, P < 0.00) followed by iodixanol (77.5 ± 0.9, P < 0.00) as compared with other sequences (CNR range: 15-40). While SE-T2 had greatest conspicuity at 1.5T with iopamidol (49.3 ± 1, P < 0.01), SE-T1 showed similar or slightly better conspicuity (20.8 ± 4) than SE-T2 with iodixanol (23 ± 1.7). In all cases, hypo-intensity on GRE was less conspicuous than on SE-T2. CONCLUSION: Iodixanol and iopamidol shorten T1 and T2 relaxation times at both 1.5T and 3T. Hypo-intensity due to shortened T2 relaxation time is significantly more conspicuous than signal changes on T1-WI, FLAIR or GRE. Variations in signal conspicuity according to pulse sequence and to type of ICM are exaggerated at 3T. We postulate T2 hypointensity with less GRE conspicuity differentiates ICM from hemorrhage; given the well-known GRE hypointensity of hemorrhage. Described signal changes may be relevant in the setting of recent intra-arterial or intravenous ICM administration in translational research and/or human stroke therapy. PMID

  4. Connector Mechanism Has Smaller Stroke

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, M. Bruce

    1992-01-01

    System for connecting electrical and/or fluid lines includes mechanism reducing length of stroke necessary to make or break connections. Feature enables connection and disconnection in confined space, and compensates for misalignment between connectors. Connector in active member moves upward at twice the speed of downward stroke of passive member. Stroke amplified within connector system. Applications include connections between modular electronic units, coupled vehicles, and hydraulic systems.

  5. Choice of Fluid Therapy in the Initial Management of Sepsis, Severe Sepsis, and Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ronald; Holcomb, John B

    2016-07-01

    Sepsis results in disruption of the endothelial glycocalyx layer and damage to the microvasculature, resulting in interstitial accumulation of fluid and subsequently edema. Fluid resuscitation is a mainstay in the initial treatment of sepsis, but the choice of fluid is unclear. The ideal resuscitative fluid is one that restores intravascular volume while minimizing edema; unfortunately, edema and edema-related complications are common consequences of current resuscitation strategies. Crystalloids are recommended as first-line therapy, but the type of crystalloid is not specified. There is increasing evidence that normal saline is associated with increased mortality and kidney injury; balanced crystalloids may be a safer alternative. Albumin is similar to crystalloids in terms of outcomes in the septic population but is costlier. Hydroxyethyl starches appear to increase mortality and kidney injury in the critically ill and are no longer indicated in these patients. In the trauma population, the shift to plasma-based resuscitation with decreased use of crystalloid and colloid in the treatment of hemorrhagic shock has led to decreased inflammatory and edema-mediated complications. Studies are needed to determine if these benefits also occur with a similar resuscitation strategy in the setting of sepsis. PMID:26844975

  6. The comparison of stroke volume variation with central venous pressure in predicting fluid responsiveness in septic patients with acute circulatory failure

    PubMed Central

    Angappan, Santhalakshmi; Parida, Satyen; Vasudevan, Arumugam; Badhe, Ashok Shankar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The present study was designed to investigate the efficacy of stroke volume variation (SVV) in predicting fluid responsiveness and compare it to traditional measures of volume status assessment like central venous pressure (CVP). Methods: Forty-five mechanically ventilated patients in sepsis with acute circulatory failure. Patients were not included when they had atrial fibrillation, other severe arrhythmias, permanent pacemaker, or needed mechanical cardiac support. Furthermore, excluded were patients with hypoxemia and a CVP >12. Patients received volume expansion in the form of 500 ml of 6% hydroxyethyl starch. Results: The volume expansion-induced increase in  cardiac index (CI) was >15% in 29 patients (labeled responders) and <15% in 16 patients (labeled nonresponders). Before volume expansion, SVV was higher in responders than in nonresponders. Receiver operating characteristic curves analysis showed that SVV was a more accurate indicator of fluid responsiveness than CVP. Before volume expansion, an SVV value of 13% allowed discrimination between responders and nonresponders with a sensitivity of 78% and a specificity of 89%. Volume expansion-induced changes in CI weakly and positively correlated with SVV before volume expansion. Volume expansion decreased SVV from 18.86 ± 4.35 to 7.57 ± 1.80 and volume expansion-induced changes in SVV moderately correlated with volume expansion-induced changes in CI. Conclusions: When predicting fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients in septic shock, SVV is more effective than CVP. Nevertheless, the overall correlation of baseline SVV with increases in CI remains poor. Trends in SVV, as reflected by decreases with volume replacement, seem to correlate much better with increases in CI. PMID:26180432

  7. Intravenous thrombolysis or endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke associated with cervical internal carotid artery occlusion: the ICARO-3 study.

    PubMed

    Paciaroni, Maurizio; Inzitari, Domenico; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Caso, Valeria; Balucani, Clotilde; Grotta, James C; Sarraj, Amrou; Sung-Il, Sohn; Chamorro, Angel; Urra, Xabier; Leys, Didier; Henon, Hilde; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Dequatre, Nelly; Aguettaz, Pierre; Alberti, Andrea; Venti, Michele; Acciarresi, Monica; D'Amore, Cataldo; Zini, Andrea; Vallone, Stefano; Dell'Acqua, Maria Luisa; Menetti, Federico; Nencini, Patrizia; Mangiafico, Salvatore; Barlinn, Kristian; Kepplinger, Jessica; Bodechtel, Ulf; Gerber, Johannes; Bovi, Paolo; Cappellari, Manuel; Linfante, Italo; Dabus, Guilherme; Marcheselli, Simona; Pezzini, Alessandro; Padovani, Alessandro; Alexandrov, Andrei V; Shahripour, Reza Bavarsad; Sessa, Maria; Giacalone, Giacomo; Silvestrelli, Giorgio; Lanari, Alessia; Ciccone, Alfonso; De Vito, Alessandro; Azzini, Cristiano; Saletti, Andrea; Fainardi, Enrico; Orlandi, Giovanni; Chiti, Alberto; Gialdini, Gino; Silvestrini, Mauro; Ferrarese, Carlo; Beretta, Simone; Tassi, Rossana; Martini, Giuseppe; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Vasdekis, Spyros N; Consoli, Domenico; Baldi, Antonio; D'Anna, Sebastiano; Luda, Emilio; Varbella, Ferdinando; Galletti, Giampiero; Invernizzi, Paolo; Donati, Edoardo; De Lodovici, Maria Luisa; Bono, Giorgio; Corea, Francesco; Sette, Massimo Del; Monaco, Serena; Riva, Maurizio; Tassinari, Tiziana; Scoditti, Umberto; Toni, Danilo

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the ICARO-3 study was to evaluate whether intra-arterial treatment, compared to intravenous thrombolysis, increases the rate of favourable functional outcome at 3 months in acute ischemic stroke and extracranial ICA occlusion. ICARO-3 was a non-randomized therapeutic trial that performed a non-blind assessment of outcomes using retrospective data collected prospectively from 37 centres in 7 countries. Patients treated with endovascular treatment within 6 h from stroke onset (cases) were matched with patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis within 4.5 h from symptom onset (controls). Patients receiving either intravenous or endovascular therapy were included among the cases. The efficacy outcome was disability at 90 days assessed by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS), dichotomized as favourable (score of 0-2) or unfavourable (score of 3-6). Safety outcomes were death and any intracranial bleeding. Included in the analysis were 324 cases and 324 controls: 105 cases (32.4 %) had a favourable outcome as compared with 89 controls (27.4 %) [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.25, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.88-1.79, p = 0.1]. In the adjusted analysis, treatment with intra-arterial procedures was significantly associated with a reduction of mortality (OR 0.61, 95 % CI 0.40-0.93, p = 0.022). The rates of patients with severe disability or death (mRS 5-6) were similar in cases and controls (30.5 versus 32.4 %, p = 0.67). For the ordinal analysis, adjusted for age, sex, NIHSS, presence of diabetes mellitus and atrial fibrillation, the common odds ratio was 1.15 (95 % IC 0.86-1.54), p = 0.33. There were more cases of intracranial bleeding (37.0 versus 17.3 %, p = 0.0001) in the intra-arterial procedure group than in the intravenous group. After the exclusion of the 135 cases treated with the combination of I.V. thrombolysis and I.A. procedures, 67/189 of those treated with I.A. procedures (35.3 %) had a favourable outcome, compared to 89/324 of

  8. A Comparative Analysis of 2D and 3D Tasks for Virtual Reality Therapies Based on Robotic-Assisted Neurorehabilitation for Post-stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Lledó, Luis D; Díez, Jorge A; Bertomeu-Motos, Arturo; Ezquerro, Santiago; Badesa, Francisco J; Sabater-Navarro, José M; García-Aracil, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    Post-stroke neurorehabilitation based on virtual therapies are performed completing repetitive exercises shown in visual electronic devices, whose content represents imaginary or daily life tasks. Currently, there are two ways of visualization of these task. 3D virtual environments are used to get a three dimensional space that represents the real world with a high level of detail, whose realism is determinated by the resolucion and fidelity of the objects of the task. Furthermore, 2D virtual environments are used to represent the tasks with a low degree of realism using techniques of bidimensional graphics. However, the type of visualization can influence the quality of perception of the task, affecting the patient's sensorimotor performance. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate if there were differences in patterns of kinematic movements when post-stroke patients performed a reach task viewing a virtual therapeutic game with two different type of visualization of virtual environment: 2D and 3D. Nine post-stroke patients have participated in the study receiving a virtual therapy assisted by PUPArm rehabilitation robot. Horizontal movements of the upper limb were performed to complete the aim of the tasks, which consist in reaching peripheral or perspective targets depending on the virtual environment shown. Various parameter types such as the maximum speed, reaction time, path length, or initial movement are analyzed from the data acquired objectively by the robotic device to evaluate the influence of the task visualization. At the end of the study, a usability survey was provided to each patient to analysis his/her satisfaction level. For all patients, the movement trajectories were enhanced when they completed the therapy. This fact suggests that patient's motor recovery was increased. Despite of the similarity in majority of the kinematic parameters, differences in reaction time and path length were higher using the 3D task. Regarding the success rates

  9. A Comparative Analysis of 2D and 3D Tasks for Virtual Reality Therapies Based on Robotic-Assisted Neurorehabilitation for Post-stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lledó, Luis D.; Díez, Jorge A.; Bertomeu-Motos, Arturo; Ezquerro, Santiago; Badesa, Francisco J.; Sabater-Navarro, José M.; García-Aracil, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    Post-stroke neurorehabilitation based on virtual therapies are performed completing repetitive exercises shown in visual electronic devices, whose content represents imaginary or daily life tasks. Currently, there are two ways of visualization of these task. 3D virtual environments are used to get a three dimensional space that represents the real world with a high level of detail, whose realism is determinated by the resolucion and fidelity of the objects of the task. Furthermore, 2D virtual environments are used to represent the tasks with a low degree of realism using techniques of bidimensional graphics. However, the type of visualization can influence the quality of perception of the task, affecting the patient's sensorimotor performance. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate if there were differences in patterns of kinematic movements when post-stroke patients performed a reach task viewing a virtual therapeutic game with two different type of visualization of virtual environment: 2D and 3D. Nine post-stroke patients have participated in the study receiving a virtual therapy assisted by PUPArm rehabilitation robot. Horizontal movements of the upper limb were performed to complete the aim of the tasks, which consist in reaching peripheral or perspective targets depending on the virtual environment shown. Various parameter types such as the maximum speed, reaction time, path length, or initial movement are analyzed from the data acquired objectively by the robotic device to evaluate the influence of the task visualization. At the end of the study, a usability survey was provided to each patient to analysis his/her satisfaction level. For all patients, the movement trajectories were enhanced when they completed the therapy. This fact suggests that patient's motor recovery was increased. Despite of the similarity in majority of the kinematic parameters, differences in reaction time and path length were higher using the 3D task. Regarding the success rates

  10. Rationale and design of Short-Term EXenatide therapy in Acute ischaemic Stroke (STEXAS): a randomised, open-label, parallel-group study

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Rachel T; Hocking, Samantha L; Priglinger, Miriam; Day, Susan; Herkes, Geoffrey K; Krause, Martin; Fulcher, Gregory R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Both hyperglycaemia and hypoglycaemia in acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) are associated with increased infarct size and worse functional outcomes. Thus, therapies that can maintain normoglycaemia during stroke are clinically important. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogues, including exenatide, are routinely used in the treatment of hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes, but data on the usefulness of this class of agents in the management of elevated glucose levels in AIS are limited. Owing to their glucose-dependent mechanism of action, GLP-1 analogues are associated with a low risk of hypoglycaemia, which may give them an advantage over intensive insulin therapy in the acute management of hyperglycaemia in this setting. Methods and analysis The Short-Term EXenatide therapy in Acute ischaemic Stroke study is a randomised, open-label, parallel-group pilot study designed to investigate the efficacy of exenatide at lowering blood glucose levels in patients with hyperglycaemia with AIS. A total of 30 patients presenting with AIS and blood glucose levels >10 mmol/L will be randomised to receive the standard therapy (intravenous insulin) or intravenous exenatide for up to 72 h. Outcomes including blood glucose levels within the target range (5–10 mmol/L), the incidence of hypoglycaemia and the feasibility of administering intravenous exenatide in this patient population will be assessed. A follow-up visit at 3 months will facilitate evaluation of neurological outcomes post-stroke. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by the local Institutional Review Board (Northern Sydney Local Health District Human Research Ethics Committee). The study results will be communicated via presentations at scientific conferences and through publication in peer-reviewed journals. Conclusions As GLP-1 analogues require elevated glucose levels to exert their insulin potentiating activity, the use of exenatide in the management of hyperglycaemia in AIS may

  11. A clinical decision aid for the selection of antithrombotic therapy for the prevention of stroke due to atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    LaHaye, Stephen Andrew; Gibbens, Sabra Lynn; Ball, David Gerald Andrew; Day, Andrew George; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Skanes, Allan Cameron

    2012-01-01

    Aims The availability of new antithrombotic agents, each with a unique efficacy and bleeding profile, has introduced a considerable amount of clinical uncertainty with physicians. We have developed a clinical decision aid in order to assist clinicians in determining an optimal antithrombotic regime for the prevention of stroke in patients who are newly diagnosed with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Methods and results The CHA2DS2-VASc and HAS-BLED scoring systems were used to assess patients’ baseline risks of stroke and major bleeding, respectively. The relative risks of stroke and major bleeding for each antithrombotic agent were then used to identify the agent associated with the lowest net risk. Individual patient factors such as the treatment threshold, bleeding ratio, and cost threshold modified the recommendations in order to generate a final recommendation. By considering both patient factors and clinical research concurrently, this clinical decision aid is able to provide specific advice to clinicians regarding an optimal stroke prevention strategy. The resulting treatment recommendation tables are consistent with the recommendations of the European Society of Cardiology and Canadian Cardiovascular Society Guidelines, which can be incorporated into either a paper-based or electronic format to allow clinicians to have decision support at the point of care. Conclusion The use of a clinical decision aid that considers both patient factors and evidence-based medicine will serve to bridge the knowledge gap and provide practical guidance to clinicians in the prevention of stroke due to atrial fibrillation. PMID:22752615

  12. Home-based neurologic music therapy for upper limb rehabilitation with stroke patients at community rehabilitation stage—a feasibility study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Street, Alexander J.; Magee, Wendy L.; Odell-Miller, Helen; Bateman, Andrew; Fachner, Jorg C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Impairment of upper limb function following stroke is more common than lower limb impairment and is also more resistant to treatment. Several lab-based studies with stroke patients have produced statistically significant gains in upper limb function when using musical instrument playing and techniques where rhythm acts as an external time-keeper for the priming and timing of upper limb movements. Methods: For this feasibility study a small sample size of 14 participants (3–60 months post stroke) has been determined through clinical discussion between the researcher and study host in order to test for management, feasibility and effects, before planning a larger trial determined through power analysis. A cross-over design with five repeated measures will be used, whereby participants will be randomized into either a treatment (n = 7) or wait list control (n = 7) group. Intervention will take place twice weekly over 6 weeks. The ARAT and 9HPT will be used to measure for quantitative gains in arm function and finger dexterity, pre/post treatment interviews will serve to investigate treatment compliance and tolerance. A lab based EEG case comparison study will be undertaken to explore audio-motor coupling, brain connectivity and neural reorganization with this intervention, as evidenced in similar studies. Discussion: Before evaluating the effectiveness of a home-based intervention in a larger scale study, it is important to assess whether implementation of the trial methodology is feasible. This study investigates the feasibility, efficacy and patient experience of a music therapy treatment protocol comprising a chart of 12 different instrumental exercises and variations, which aims at promoting measurable changes in upper limb function in hemiparetic stroke patients. The study proposes to examine several new aspects including home-based treatment and dosage, and will provide data on recruitment, adherence and variability of outcomes. PMID:26441586

  13. A report of heat stroke in two Nigerian siblings.

    PubMed

    Asani, M; Kabir, H; Adamu, H

    2015-01-01

    Infants and children are at higher risk of heat stroke for several reasons. We report these cases to highlight the danger of leaving children unsupervised in vehicles, aid prompt diagnosis, and management of heat stroke. Two Nigerian siblings aged ranges 5 and 3 years old, were trapped inside an unlocked vehicle and subsequently developed heat stroke. Both children presented with hyperthermia, severe dehydration, convulsions, and loss of consciousness. One of them also had hematuria. They were treated by spraying water onto their bodies to bring down the temperature, intravenous fluid resuscitation, oxygen therapy, and anticonvulsants. Both eventually recovered and were discharged with no obvious neurologic sequalae, but are being followed-up. PMID:25511359

  14. [Cerebellar stroke].

    PubMed

    Paradowski, Michał; Zimny, Anna; Paradowski, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar stroke belongs to a group of rare diseases of vascular origin. Cerebellum, supplied by three pairs of arteries (AICA, PICA, SCA) with many anastomoses between them is less susceptible for a stroke, especially ischemic one. Diagnosis of the stroke in this region is harder due to lower sensibility of commonly used CT of the head in case of stroke suspicion. The authors highlight clinical symptoms distinguishing between vascular territories or topographical locations of the stroke, diagnostic procedures, classical and surgical treatment, the most common misdiagnoses are also mentioned. The authors suggest a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm development, including rtPA treatment criteria for ischemic cerebellar stroke. PMID:26181157

  15. Cerebrospinal Fluid Culture Positivity and Clinical Outcomes After Amphotericin-Based Induction Therapy for Cryptococcal Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Rolfes, Melissa A; Rhein, Joshua; Schutz, Charlotte; Taseera, Kabanda; Nabeta, Henry W; Huppler Hullsiek, Kathy; Akampuira, Andrew; Rajasingham, Radha; Musubire, Abdu; Williams, Darlisha A; Thienemann, Friedrich; Bohjanen, Paul R; Muzoora, Conrad; Meintjes, Graeme; Meya, David B; Boulware, David R

    2015-12-01

    Background.  Amphotericin-based combination antifungal therapy reduces mortality from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated cryptococcal meningitis. However, 40%-50% of individuals have positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fungal cultures at completion of 2 weeks of amphotericin induction therapy. Residual CSF culture positivity has historically been associated with poor clinical outcomes. We investigated whether persistent CSF fungemia was associated with detrimental clinical outcomes in a contemporary African cohort. Methods.  Human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals with cryptococcal meningitis in Uganda and South Africa received amphotericin (0.7-1.0 mg/kg per day) plus fluconazole (800 mg/day) for 2 weeks, followed by "enhanced consolidation" therapy with fluconazole 800 mg/day for at least 3 weeks or until cultures were sterile, and then 400 mg/day for 8 weeks. Participants were randomized to receive antiretroviral therapy (ART) either 1-2 or 5 weeks after diagnosis and observed for 6 months. Survivors were classified as having sterile or nonsterile CSF based on 2-week CSF cultures. Mortality, immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), and culture-positive relapse were compared in those with sterile or nonsterile CSF using Cox regression. Results.  Of 132 participants surviving 2 weeks, 57% had sterile CSF at 2 weeks, 23 died within 5 weeks, and 40 died within 6 months. Culture positivity was not significantly associated with mortality (adjusted 6-month hazard ratio, 1.2; 95% confidence interval, 0.6-2.3; P = .28). Incidence of IRIS or relapse was also not significantly related to culture positivity. Conclusions.  Among patients, all treated with enhanced consolidation antifungal therapy and ART, residual cryptococcal culture positivity was not found to be associated with poor clinical outcomes. PMID:26716103

  16. Cerebrospinal Fluid Culture Positivity and Clinical Outcomes After Amphotericin-Based Induction Therapy for Cryptococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Rolfes, Melissa A.; Rhein, Joshua; Schutz, Charlotte; Taseera, Kabanda; Nabeta, Henry W.; Huppler Hullsiek, Kathy; Akampuira, Andrew; Rajasingham, Radha; Musubire, Abdu; Williams, Darlisha A.; Thienemann, Friedrich; Bohjanen, Paul R.; Muzoora, Conrad; Meintjes, Graeme; Meya, David B.; Boulware, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Amphotericin-based combination antifungal therapy reduces mortality from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated cryptococcal meningitis. However, 40%–50% of individuals have positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fungal cultures at completion of 2 weeks of amphotericin induction therapy. Residual CSF culture positivity has historically been associated with poor clinical outcomes. We investigated whether persistent CSF fungemia was associated with detrimental clinical outcomes in a contemporary African cohort. Methods. Human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals with cryptococcal meningitis in Uganda and South Africa received amphotericin (0.7–1.0 mg/kg per day) plus fluconazole (800 mg/day) for 2 weeks, followed by “enhanced consolidation” therapy with fluconazole 800 mg/day for at least 3 weeks or until cultures were sterile, and then 400 mg/day for 8 weeks. Participants were randomized to receive antiretroviral therapy (ART) either 1–2 or 5 weeks after diagnosis and observed for 6 months. Survivors were classified as having sterile or nonsterile CSF based on 2-week CSF cultures. Mortality, immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), and culture-positive relapse were compared in those with sterile or nonsterile CSF using Cox regression. Results. Of 132 participants surviving 2 weeks, 57% had sterile CSF at 2 weeks, 23 died within 5 weeks, and 40 died within 6 months. Culture positivity was not significantly associated with mortality (adjusted 6-month hazard ratio, 1.2; 95% confidence interval, 0.6–2.3; P = .28). Incidence of IRIS or relapse was also not significantly related to culture positivity. Conclusions. Among patients, all treated with enhanced consolidation antifungal therapy and ART, residual cryptococcal culture positivity was not found to be associated with poor clinical outcomes. PMID:26716103

  17. To compare the effectiveness of constraint induced movement therapy versus motor relearning programme to improve motor function of hemiplegic upper extremity after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Batool, Sana; Soomro, Nabila; Amjad, Fareeha; Fauz, Rabia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of constraint induced movement therapy versus motor relearning programme to improve motor function of hemiplegic upper extremity after stroke. Method: A sample of 42 patients was recruited from the Physiotherapy Department of IPM&R and Neurology OPD of Civil Hospital Karachi through non probability purposive sampling technique. Twenty one patients were placed to each experimental and control groups. Experimental group was treated with Constraint Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT) and control group was treated with motor relearning programme (MRP) for three consecutive weeks. Pre and post treatment measurements were determined by upper arm section of Motor Assessment Scale (MAS) and Self Care item of Functional Independence Measure (FIM) Scale. Results: Intra group analysis showed statistically significant results (p-value<0.05) in all items of MAS in both groups. However, advanced hand activities item of MAS in MRP group showed insignificant result (p-value=0.059). Self-care items of FIM Scale also showed significant result (p-value< 0.05) in both groups except dressing upper body item (p-value=0.059) in CIMT group and grooming and dressing upper body items (p-value=0.059 & 0.063) in MRP group showed insignificant p-values. Conclusion: CIMT group showed more significant improvement in motor function and self-care performance of hemiplegic upper extremity as compared to MRP group in patients with sub-acute stroke assessed by the MAS and FIM scales. Thus CIMT is proved to be more statistically significant and clinically effective intervention in comparison to motor relearning programme among the patients aged between 35-60 years. Further studies are needed to evaluate CIMT effects in acute and chronic post stroke population. PMID:26649007

  18. A comparison of intravenous and subcutaneous hydration in elderly acute stroke patients.

    PubMed Central

    Challiner, Y. C.; Jarrett, D.; Hayward, M. J.; al-Jubouri, M. A.; Julious, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of subcutaneous and intravenous fluid therapy in hydrating, elderly acute stroke patients. Thirty-four such patients, needing parenteral fluids because of impaired consciousness or dysphagia, were randomly allocated to receive either subcutaneous or intravenous fluids (2 litres of dextrose-saline/24 hours). Serum osmolality was measured before starting fluid therapy (Day 1) and on Days 2 and 3. An analysis of covariance of the osmolalities showed no statistical difference between the two groups (P = 0.12). The total cost of cannulae used over the 3 days for the subcutaneous route was approximately a third of that for the intravenous route. Complication rates were similar for the two groups. The results suggest that subcutaneous fluid therapy is an effective alternative to the intravenous route. PMID:8183752

  19. Stroke: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Albertson, Megan; Sharma, Jitendra

    2014-11-01

    Cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs) are the leading cause of disability and the fourth leading cause of death in the U.S. The WHO defines stroke as "rapidly developing clinical signs of focal disturbance of cerebral function lasting more than 24 hours with no apparent cause other than of vascular origin." Strokes are subdivided into two major classifications: ischemic (80-87 percent) andhemorrhagic (13-20 percent). Ischemic strokes occur from thrombi, emboli, or global hypoperfusion. Hemorrhagic strokes are either parenchymal (10 percent of all strokes) or subarachnoid (3 percent of all strokes). There are a variety of recognized risk factors for stroke which include: age, race, family history, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, cardiac arrhythmias, prosthetic valves, hyperlipidemia, cigarette smoking, and others (drugs or hormones). The initial assessment of a patient suspected of stroke should be done quickly enough to ensure maximal reperfusion of brain tissue. The steps to achieve this goal are: 1) exclude an intracranial hemorrhage, 2) assess for contraindications to thrombolytics, 3) characterize the infarct. The workup for a patient should first include a history (especially the time when neurologic symptoms began), a physical exam (including the NIHSS), and imaging studies (to rule out hemorrhagic components). In addition, several lab studies can also be obtained including: PT/INR, glucose, complete blood count, metabolic panel, creatine kinase, ECG, echocardiogram, lipid panel, carotid Doppler, MRA or CTA. Acute management of a stroke is primarily focused on stabilizing the patient and allowing as much reperfusion as possible for at-risk brain tissue. Stroke management in the acute setting includes: use of thrombolytics if indicated, and re-assessment to monitor progression. Several trials have been completed in pursuit of safety and effectiveness of intra-arterial stroke therapy for patients outside the recommended thrombolytic time window

  20. Stroke: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Albertson, Megan; Sharma, Jitendra

    2014-11-01

    Cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs) are the leading cause of disability and the fourth leading cause of death in the U.S. The WHO defines stroke as "rapidly developing clinical signs of focal disturbance of cerebral function lasting more than 24 hours with no apparent cause other than of vascular origin." Strokes are subdivided into two major classifications: ischemic (80-87 percent) andhemorrhagic (13-20 percent). Ischemic strokes occur from thrombi, emboli, or global hypoperfusion. Hemorrhagic strokes are either parenchymal (10 percent of all strokes) or subarachnoid (3 percent of all strokes). There are a variety of recognized risk factors for stroke which include: age, race, family history, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, cardiac arrhythmias, prosthetic valves, hyperlipidemia, cigarette smoking, and others (drugs or hormones). The initial assessment of a patient suspected of stroke should be done quickly enough to ensure maximal reperfusion of brain tissue. The steps to achieve this goal are: 1) exclude an intracranial hemorrhage, 2) assess for contraindications to thrombolytics, 3) characterize the infarct. The workup for a patient should first include a history (especially the time when neurologic symptoms began), a physical exam (including the NIHSS), and imaging studies (to rule out hemorrhagic components). In addition, several lab studies can also be obtained including: PT/INR, glucose, complete blood count, metabolic panel, creatine kinase, ECG, echocardiogram, lipid panel, carotid Doppler, MRA or CTA. Acute management of a stroke is primarily focused on stabilizing the patient and allowing as much reperfusion as possible for at-risk brain tissue. Stroke management in the acute setting includes: use of thrombolytics if indicated, and re-assessment to monitor progression. Several trials have been completed in pursuit of safety and effectiveness of intra-arterial stroke therapy for patients outside the recommended thrombolytic time window

  1. Preventing stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partially-hydrogenated or hydrogenated fats Medical problems may lead to stroke Control your cholesterol and diabetes with ... increase the chance of blood clots, which can lead to stroke. Clots are more likely in women ...

  2. Stroke - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100218.htm Stroke - series—Part 1 To use the sharing features ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Ischemic Stroke A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  3. Stroke Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... relearn skills they lose because of the damage. Rehabilitation can help them relearn those skills. Stroke can ... Problems with thinking and memory Emotional disturbances Stroke rehabilitation involves many kinds of health professionals. The goal ...

  4. Stroke Stories

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Stroke Rehabilitation Stroke Stories Past Issues / Spring 2013 Table of ... she has returned to an active life after rehabilitation. Tedy Bruschi: The New England Patriots linebacker was ...

  5. Know Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Know Stroke Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... D. Director, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Photo courtesy of NIH/NINDS Welcome to this ...

  6. Pediatric Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Goun; Lim, Byung Chan

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric stroke is relatively rare but may lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Along with the advance of brain imaging technology and clinical awareness, diagnosis of pediatric stroke is increasing wordwide. Pediatric stroke differs from adults in variable risk factor/etiologies, diverse and nonspecific clinical presentation depending on ages. This review will be discussed pediatric stroke focusing on their clinical presentations, diagnosis and etiologies/risk factors. PMID:26180605

  7. Effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT 808 nm) on lower limb spastic muscle activity in chronic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    das Neves, Marcele Florêncio; Dos Reis, Mariana César Ribeiro; de Andrade, Eliana Aparecida Fonseca; Lima, Fernanda Pupio Silva; Nicolau, Renata Amadei; Arisawa, Emília Ângela Loschiavo; Andrade, Adriano Oliveira; Lima, Mário Oliveira

    2016-09-01

    A cerebrovascular accident (CVA) may affect basic motor functions, including spasticity that may be present in the upper extremity and/or the lower extremity, post-stroke. Spasticity causes pain, muscle force reduction, and decreases the time to onset of muscle fatigue. Several therapeutic resources have been employed to treat CVA to promote functional recovery. The clinical use of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) for rehabilitation of muscular disorders has provided better muscle responses. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the application of LLLT in spastic muscles in patients with spasticity post-CVA. A double-blind clinical trial was conducted with 15 volunteer stroke patients who presented with post-stroke spasticity. Both males and females were treated; the average age was 51.5 ± 11.8 years old; the participants entered the study ranging from 11 to 48 months post-stroke onset. The patients participated in three consecutive phases (control, placebo, and real LLLT), in which all tests of isometric endurance of their hemiparetic lower limb were performed. LLLT (diode laser, 100 mW 808 nm, beam spot area 0.0314 cm(2), 127.39 J/cm(2)/point, 40 s) was applied before isometric endurance. After the real LLLT intervention, we observed significant reduction in the visual analogue scale for pain intensity (p = 0.0038), increased time to onset of muscle fatigue (p = 0.0063), and increased torque peak (p = 0.0076), but no significant change in the root mean square (RMS) value (electric signal in the motor unit during contraction, as obtained with surface electromyography). Our results suggest that the application of LLLT may contribute to increased recruitment of muscle fibers and, hence, to increase the onset time of the spastic muscle fatigue, reducing pain intensity in stroke patients with spasticity, as has been observed in healthy subjects and athletes. PMID:27299571

  8. Ischemic Strokes (Clots)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quiz 5 Things to Know About Stroke Ischemic Strokes (Clots) Updated:Jul 12,2016 Ischemic stroke accounts ... strokes. Read more about silent strokes . TIA and Stroke: Medical Emergencies When someone has shown symptoms of ...

  9. Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants and Antiplatelet Therapy for Stroke Prevention in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shashi; Danik, Stephan B; Altman, Robert K; Barrett, Conor D; Lip, Gregory Y H; Chatterjee, Saurav; Roubin, Gary S; Natale, Andrea; Danik, Jacqueline S

    2016-01-01

    Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are frequently used to prevent stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. These patients are often also on aspirin or other antiplatelet agents. It is possible that treatment with both NOACs and aspirin or other antiplatelet drug may be effective in decreasing stroke, but data are sparse regarding the efficacy and safety of using both agents for stroke prevention. To address these issues, data were pooled from the 4 recent randomized, controlled trials of NOACs: apixaban, rivaroxaban, dabigatran, and edoxaban, which included 42,411 patients; 14,148 (33.4%) were also on aspirin or other antiplatelet drug. The number of thromboembolic events among participants on NOAC and aspirin/antiplatelet was compared with the number of events in patients on NOAC alone. Bleeding rates were also compared between those on NOAC + aspirin/antiplatelet and on NOAC alone. These results were compared with thromboembolic and bleeding events in the warfarin + aspirin/antiplatelet versus warfarin alone. No greater risk for thromboembolism was seen in patients on NOACs compared with patients on both NOACs and aspirin/antiplatelet drug. In this nonrandomized comparison, there was initially a signal toward higher thromboembolic rates among NOAC users also on aspirin/antiplatelet drugs (relative risk, 1.16; 95% confidence intervals, 1.05, 1.29) when compared with NOAC alone. This likely reflected the higher CHADS2 scores of those on aspirin/antiplatelet drugs. When the analysis was limited to studies that included aspirin rather than other antiplatelet drugs, no difference was seen for thromboembolic rates comparing dual therapy to NOAC alone (relative risk, 1.02; 95% confidence intervals, 0.90, 1.15). Higher rates of bleeding were seen with aspirin/antiplatelet drug in conjunction with NOAC. In this meta-analysis and nonrandomized comparison of aspirin/antiplatelet users and nonusers also on anticoagulation, there was no additional

  10. Recovery of Dysphagia in Lateral Medullary Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Hitesh; Banerjee, Alakananda

    2014-01-01

    Lateral medullary stroke is typically associated with increased likelihood of occurrence of dysphagia and exhibits the most severe and persistent form. Worldwide little research exists on dysphagia in brainstem stroke. An estimated 15% of all patients admitted to stroke rehabilitation units experience a brainstem stroke out of which about 47% suffer from dysphagia. In India, a study showed that 22.3% of posterior circulation stroke patients develop dysphagia. Dearth of literature on dysphagia and its outcome in brainstem stroke particularly lateral medullary stroke motivated the author to present an actual case study of a patient who had dysphagia following a lateral medullary infarct. This paper documents the severity and management approach of dysphagia in brainstem stroke, with traditional dysphagia therapy and VitalStim therapy. Despite being diagnosed with a severe form of dysphagia followed by late treatment intervention, the patient had complete recovery of the swallowing function. PMID:25045555

  11. MRI-based Selection for Intra-arterial Stroke Therapy: Value of Pre-treatment DWI Lesion Volume in Selecting Acute Stroke Patients Who Will Benefit from Early Recanalization

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Albert J.; Verduzco, Luis A.; Schaefer, Pamela W.; Hirsch, Joshua A.; Rabinov, James D.; González, R. Gilberto

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Recent studies demonstrate that an acute diffusion weighted imaging(DWI) lesion volume >70cm3 predicts poor outcome in stroke patients. We sought to determine if this threshold could identify patients treated with intra-arterial therapy(IAT) who would do poorly despite reperfusion. In patients with initial infarcts <70cm3, we sought to determine what effect recanalization and time to recanalization had on infarct growth and functional outcome. Methods We retrospectively studied 34 consecutive anterior circulation stroke patients who underwent pre-treatment DWI and perfusion weighted imaging(PWI) and subsequent IAT. Recanalization success and time to recanalization were recorded. Initial DWI and MTT lesion and final infarct volumes were determined. Patients were stratified based on initial infarct volume, recanalization status and time to recanalization. Statistical tests were performed to assess differences in clinical and imaging outcomes. Good clinical outcome was defined as a 3-month mRS≤2. Results Among patients with initial infarcts >70cm3, all had poor outcomes despite a 50% recanalization rate, with mean infarct growth of 114cm3. These patients also had the largest MTT volumes(p<0.04). Patients with initial infarct volumes <70cm3 who recanalized early had the best clinical outcomes(p<0.008) with a 64% rate of mRS≤2 and the least infarct growth(p<0.03), with mean growth of 18cm3. Conclusion This study supports the use of an acute DWI lesion volume threshold as an imaging selection criterion for IAT. It also confirms the importance of early reperfusion in selected patients. PMID:19359641

  12. Aptamer conjugated paclitaxel and magnetic fluid loaded fluorescently tagged PLGA nanoparticles for targeted cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravind, Athulya; Nair, Remya; Raveendran, Sreejith; Veeranarayanan, Srivani; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Fukuda, Takahiro; Hasumura, Takahashi; Morimoto, Hisao; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Sakthi Kumar, D.

    2013-10-01

    Controlled and targeted drug delivery is an essential criterion in cancer therapy to reduce the side effects caused by non-specific drug release and toxicity. Targeted chemotherapy, sustained drug release and optical imaging have been achieved using a multifunctional nanocarrier constructed from poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles (PLGA NPs), an anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX), a fluorescent dye Nile red (NR), magnetic fluid (MF) and aptamers (Apt, AS1411, anti-nucleolin aptamer). The magnetic fluid and paclitaxel loaded fluorescently labeled PLGA NPs (MF-PTX-NR-PLGA NPs) were synthesized by a single-emulsion technique/solvent evaporation method using a chemical cross linker bis (sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate (BS3) to enable binding of aptamer on to the surface of the nanoparticles. Targeting aptamers were then introduced to the particles through the reaction with the cross linker to target the nucleolin receptors over expressed on the cancer cell surface. Specific binding and uptake of the aptamer conjugated magnetic fluid loaded fluorescently tagged PLGA NPs (Apt-MF-NR-PLGA NPs) to the target cancer cells induced by aptamers was observed using confocal microscopy. Cytotoxicity assay conducted in two cell lines (L929 and MCF-7) confirmed that targeted MCF-7 cancer cells were killed while control cells were unharmed. In addition, aptamer mediated delivery resulting in enhanced binding and uptake to the target cancer cells exhibited increased therapeutic effect of the drug. Moreover, these aptamer conjugated magnetic polymer vehicles apart from actively transporting drugs into specifically targeted tumor regions can also be used to induce hyperthermia or for facilitating magnetic guiding of particles to the tumor regions.

  13. Effect of small group treatment of the modified constraint induced movement therapy for clients with chronic stroke in a community setting.

    PubMed

    Leung, Daniel P K; Ng, Adelina K Y; Fong, Kenneth N K

    2009-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of the group treatment component of the modified constraint induced movement therapy (mCIMT) protocol for clients with chronic stroke in a community setting. A within-subjects longitudinal study was conducted to which eight participants with chronic stroke being treated in a community setting in Hong Kong were recruited. Ten 3-h group sessions were conducted on two occasions within a four-week period, with four participants per group. Participants' less-affected hands were restrained in a mitt, with a target of wearing it for 4h per weekday. Laboratory based tests and the Motor Activity Log (MAL) were used repeatedly to measure participants' hemiparetic upper extremity functions and the use of the limb in real-life on four measurement occasions: at baseline (four weeks before training), pre-test (one day before training), post-test (one day after training), and follow-up (four weeks after training). The Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed participants' baselines were stable four weeks before the intervention. The Friedman test found significant differences between pre-test, post-test and follow-up in the Box and Block Test (BBT), the total score, grasp and pinch subscores of the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), and the Hong Kong Version of the Functional Test for the Hemiplegic Upper Extremity (FTHUE-HK), the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT), and the MAL. All these gains were maintained during the 1-month follow-up. The small group treatment component of the mCIMT was found to be effective, feasible, and capable of improving both motor performance and functional use of the affected upper extremity for patients with chronic stroke in a community setting. PMID:19837473

  14. Spontaneous Splenic Rupture Following Intravenous Thrombolysis with Alteplase Applied as Stroke Therapy – Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Aleksic-Shihabi, Anka; Jadrijevic, Eni; Milekic, Nina; Bulicic, Ana Repic; Titlic, Marina; Suljic, Enra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Stroke is a medical emergency in neurology, and is one of the leading causes of death nowadays. At a recent time, a therapeutic method used in adequate conditions is thrombolysis, a treatment of an emerging clot in the brain vascular system by alteplase. The application of alteplase also has a high risk of life threatening conditions. Case report: This is a brief report of a case with thrombolysis complication which manifested as a spleen rupture. PMID:26980937

  15. Brain Stimulation Therapy for Central Post-Stroke Pain from a Perspective of Interhemispheric Neural Network Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Takashi; Inoue, Tooru

    2016-01-01

    Central post-stroke pain (CPSP) is a debilitating, severe disorder affecting patient quality of life. Since CPSP is refractory to medication, various treatment modalities have been tried with marginal results. Following the first report of epidural motor cortex (M1) stimulation (MCS) for CPSP, many researchers have investigated the mechanisms of electrical stimulation of the M1. CPSP is currently considered to be a maladapted network reorganization problem following stroke, and recent studies have revealed that the activities of the impaired hemisphere after stroke may be inhibited by the contralesional hemisphere. Even though this interhemispheric inhibition (IHI) theory was originally proposed to explain the motor recovery process in stroke patients, we considered that IHI may also contribute to the CPSP mechanism. Based on the IHI theory and the fact that electrical stimulation of the M1 suppresses CPSP, we hypothesized that the inhibitory signals from the contralesional hemisphere may suppress the activities of the M1 in the ipsilesional hemisphere, and therefore pain suppression mechanisms may be malfunctioning in CPSP patients. In this context, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) was considered to be a reasonable procedure to address the interhemispheric imbalance, as the bilateral M1 can be simultaneously stimulated using an anode (excitatory) and cathode (inhibitory). In this article, we review the potential mechanisms and propose a new model of CPSP. We also report two cases where CPSP was addressed with tDCS, discuss the potential roles of tDCS in the treatment of CPSP, and make recommendations for future studies. PMID:27148019

  16. Similar Effects of Two Modified Constraint-Induced Therapy Protocols on Motor Impairment, Motor Function and Quality of Life in Patients with Chronic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Wilma Costa; Conforto, Adriana B.; Orsini, Marco; Stern, Annette; André, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Modified constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) protocols show motor function and real-world arm use improvement. Meanwhile it usually requires constant supervision by physiotherapists and is therefore more expensive than customary care. This study compared the preliminary efficacy of two modified CIMT protocols. A two-group randomized controlled trial with pre and post treatment measures and six months follow-up was conducted. Nineteen patients with chronic stroke received 10 treatment sessions distributed three to four times a week over 22 days. CIMT3h_direct group received 3 hours of CIMT supervised by a therapist (n=10) while CIMT1.5h_direct group had 1.5 hours of supervised CIMT+1.5 hours home exercises supervised by a caregiver (n=9). Outcome measures were the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, the Motor Activity Log, and the Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale. The modified CIMT protocols were feasible and well tolerated. Improvements in motor function, real-world arm use and quality of life did not differ significantly between treated groups receiving either 3 or 1.5 hours mCIMT supervised by a therapist. PMID:26294941

  17. Acute care in stroke: the importance of early intervention to achieve better brain protection.

    PubMed

    Díez-Tejedor, E; Fuentes, B

    2004-01-01

    It is known that 'time is brain', and only early therapies in acute stroke have been effective, like thrombolysis within the first 3 h, and useful neuroprotective drugs are searched for that probably would be effective only with their very early administration. General care (respiratory and cardiac care, fluid and metabolic management, especially blood glucose and blood pressure control, early treatment of hyperthermia, and prevention and treatment of neurological and systemic complications) in acute stroke patients is essential and must already start in the prehospital setting and continue at the patient's arrival to hospital in the emergency room and in the stroke unit. A review of published studies analyzing the influence of general care on stroke outcome and the personal experience from observational studies was performed. Glucose levels >8 mmol/l have been found to be predictive of a poor prognosis after correcting for age, stroke severity, and stroke subtype. Although a clinical trial of glucose-insulin-potassium infusions is ongoing, increased plasma glucose levels should be treated. Moreover, insulin therapy in critically ill patients, including stroke patients, is safe and determines lower mortality and complication rates. Both high and low blood pressure levels have been related to a poor prognosis in acute stroke, although the target levels have not been defined yet in clinical trials. The body temperature has been shown to have a negative effect on stroke outcome, and its control and early treatment of hyperthermia are important. Hypoxemia also worsens the stroke prognosis, and oxygen therapy in case of <92% O(2) saturation is recommended. Besides, blood pressure stabilization avoiding falls of the diastolic pressure and the lowering of glycemia and temperature have been related to a better prognosis in stroke units patients, and homeostasis maintenance is associated with a better outcome. General care has become an emergent and first-line brain

  18. The ‘pit-crew’ model for improving door-to-needle times in endovascular stroke therapy: a Six-Sigma project

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Ansaar T; Smith, Matthew S; Boo, SoHyun; Tarabishy, Abdul R; Hobbs, Gerald R; Carpenter, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    Background Delays in delivering endovascular stroke therapy adversely affect outcomes. Time-sensitive treatments such as stroke interventions benefit from methodically developed protocols. Clearly defined roles in these protocols allow for parallel processing of tasks, resulting in consistent delivery of care. Objective To present the outcomes of a quality-improvement (QI) process directed at reducing stroke treatment times in a tertiary level academic medical center. Methods A Six-Sigma-based QI process was developed over a 3-month period. After an initial analysis, procedures were implemented and fine-tuned to identify and address rate-limiting steps in the endovascular care pathway. Prospectively recorded treatment times were then compared in two groups of patients who were treated ‘before’ (n=64) or ‘after’ (n=30) the QI process. Three time intervals were measured: emergency room (ER) to arrival for CT scan (ER–CT), CT scan to interventional laboratory arrival (CT–Lab), and interventional laboratory arrival to groin puncture (Lab–puncture). Results The ER–CT time was 40 (±29) min in the ‘before’ and 26 (±15) min in the ‘after’ group (p=0.008). The CT–Lab time was 87 (±47) min in the ‘before’ and 51 (±33) min in the ‘after’ group (p=0.0002). The Lab–puncture time was 24 (±11) min in the ‘before’ and 15 (±4) min in the ‘after’ group (p<0.0001). The overall ER–arrival to groin-puncture time was reduced from 2 h, 31 min (±51) min in the ‘before’ to 1 h, 33 min (±37) min in the ‘after’ group, (p<0.0001). The improved times were seen for both working hours and off-hours interventions. Conclusions A protocol-driven process can significantly improve efficiency of care in time-sensitive stroke interventions. PMID:26863106

  19. Oral fluid therapy: sodium and potassium content and osmolality of some commercial "clear" soups, juices and beverages.

    PubMed Central

    Wendland, B E; Arbus, G S

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of nearly 90 commercial "clear" fluids, including soups, juices, fruit-flavoured drinks and ices, carbonated beverages and gelatins, showed a range of 0.1 to 251 mmol of sodium and 0.0 to 65 mmol of potassium per litre; the osmolality ranged from 246 to more than 2000 mOsm/kg of water. Knowledge of these values is useful in the home or hospital management of patients for whom control of fluid and electrolyte intake is indicated. The results of the analyses are presented in tabular form for use by physicians and nutritionists when counselling patients to ingest clear-type fluids for various illnesses. Examples are given using these data to show how clear-fluid therapy can be tailored in one such illness--gastroenteritis (infectious diarrhea). PMID:497946

  20. Comparing uni-modal and multi-modal therapies for improving writing in acquired dysgraphia after stroke.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Lindsey; Sage, Karen; Conroy, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Writing therapy studies have been predominantly uni-modal in nature; i.e., their central therapy task has typically been either writing to dictation or copying and recalling words. There has not yet been a study that has compared the effects of a uni-modal to a multi-modal writing therapy in terms of improvements to spelling accuracy. A multiple-case study with eight participants aimed to compare the effects of a uni-modal and a multi-modal therapy on the spelling accuracy of treated and untreated target words at immediate and follow-up assessment points. A cross-over design was used and within each therapy a matched set of words was targeted. These words and a matched control set were assessed before as well as immediately after each therapy and six weeks following therapy. The two approaches did not differ in their effects on spelling accuracy of treated or untreated items or degree of maintenance. All participants made significant improvements on treated and control items; however, not all improvements were maintained at follow-up. The findings suggested that multi-modal therapy did not have an advantage over uni-modal therapy for the participants in this study. Performance differences were instead driven by participant variables. PMID:25854414

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in acute ischemic stroke treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bum Joon; Kang, Hyun Goo; Kim, Hye-Jin; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Kim, Na Young; Warach, Steven; Kang, Dong-Wha

    2014-09-01

    Although intravenous administration of tissue plasminogen activator is the only proven treatment after acute ischemic stroke, there is always a concern of hemorrhagic risk after thrombolysis. Therefore, selection of patients with potential benefits in overcoming potential harms of thrombolysis is of great importance. Despite the practical issues in using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for acute stroke treatment, multimodal MRI can provide useful information for accurate diagnosis of stroke, evaluation of the risks and benefits of thrombolysis, and prediction of outcomes. For example, the high sensitivity and specificity of diffusion-weighted image (DWI) can help distinguish acute ischemic stroke from stroke-mimics. Additionally, the lesion mismatch between perfusion-weighted image (PWI) and DWI is thought to represent potential salvageable tissue by reperfusion therapy. However, the optimal threshold to discriminate between benign oligemic areas and the penumbra is still debatable. Signal changes of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery image within DWI lesions may be a surrogate marker for ischemic lesion age and might indicate risks of hemorrhage after thrombolysis. Clot sign on gradient echo image may reflect the nature of clot, and their location, length and morphology may provide predictive information on recanalization by reperfusion therapy. However, previous clinical trials which solely or mainly relied on perfusion-diffusion mismatch for patient selection, failed to show benefits of MRI-based thrombolysis. Therefore, understanding the clinical implication of various useful MRI findings and comprehensively incorporating those variables into therapeutic decision-making may be a more reasonable approach for expanding the indication of acute stroke thrombolysis. PMID:25328872

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Ischemic Stroke Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bum Joon; Kang, Hyun Goo; Kim, Hye-Jin; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Kim, Na Young; Warach, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Although intravenous administration of tissue plasminogen activator is the only proven treatment after acute ischemic stroke, there is always a concern of hemorrhagic risk after thrombolysis. Therefore, selection of patients with potential benefits in overcoming potential harms of thrombolysis is of great importance. Despite the practical issues in using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for acute stroke treatment, multimodal MRI can provide useful information for accurate diagnosis of stroke, evaluation of the risks and benefits of thrombolysis, and prediction of outcomes. For example, the high sensitivity and specificity of diffusion-weighted image (DWI) can help distinguish acute ischemic stroke from stroke-mimics. Additionally, the lesion mismatch between perfusion-weighted image (PWI) and DWI is thought to represent potential salvageable tissue by reperfusion therapy. However, the optimal threshold to discriminate between benign oligemic areas and the penumbra is still debatable. Signal changes of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery image within DWI lesions may be a surrogate marker for ischemic lesion age and might indicate risks of hemorrhage after thrombolysis. Clot sign on gradient echo image may reflect the nature of clot, and their location, length and morphology may provide predictive information on recanalization by reperfusion therapy. However, previous clinical trials which solely or mainly relied on perfusion-diffusion mismatch for patient selection, failed to show benefits of MRI-based thrombolysis. Therefore, understanding the clinical implication of various useful MRI findings and comprehensively incorporating those variables into therapeutic decision-making may be a more reasonable approach for expanding the indication of acute stroke thrombolysis. PMID:25328872

  3. Human amniotic fluid stem cell injection therapy for urethral sphincter regeneration in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Stem cell injection therapies have been proposed to overcome the limited efficacy and adverse reactions of bulking agents. However, most have significant limitations, including painful procurement, requirement for anesthesia, donor site infection and a frequently low cell yield. Recently, human amniotic fluid stem cells (hAFSCs) have been proposed as an ideal cell therapy source. In this study, we investigated whether periurethral injection of hAFSCs can restore urethral sphincter competency in a mouse model. Methods Amniotic fluids were collected and harvested cells were analyzed for stem cell characteristics and in vitro myogenic differentiation potency. Mice underwent bilateral pudendal nerve transection to generate a stress urinary incontinence (SUI) model and received either periurethral injection of hAFSCs, periurethral injection of Plasma-Lyte (control group), or underwent a sham (normal control group). For in vivo cell tracking, cells were labeled with silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles containing rhodamine B isothiocyanate (MNPs@SiO2 (RITC)) and were injected into the urethral sphincter region (n = 9). Signals were detected by optical imaging. Leak point pressure and closing pressure were recorded serially after injection. Tumorigenicity of hAFSCs was evaluated by implanting hAFSCs into the subcapsular space of the kidney, followed two weeks later by retrieval and histologic analysis. Results Flow activated cell sorting showed that hAFSCs expressed mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) markers, but no hematopoietic stem cell markers. Induction of myogenic differentiation in the hAFSCs resulted in expression of PAX7 and MYOD at Day 3, and DYSTROPHIN at Day 7. The nanoparticle-labeled hAFSCs could be tracked in vivo with optical imaging for up to 10 days after injection. Four weeks after injection, the mean LPP and CP were significantly increased in the hAFSC-injected group compared with the control group. Nerve regeneration and neuromuscular junction

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid asparagine depletion during pegylated asparaginase therapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Louise T; Nersting, Jacob; Raja, Raheel A; Frandsen, Thomas L; Rosthøj, Steen; Schrøder, Henrik; Albertsen, Birgitte K

    2014-07-01

    L-asparaginase is an important drug in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) asparagine depletion is considered a marker of asparaginase effect in the central nervous system (CNS) and may play a role in CNS-directed anti-leukaemia therapy. The objective of this study was to describe CSF asparagine depletion during 30 weeks of pegylated asparaginase therapy, 1000 iu/m(2) i.m. every second week, and to correlate CSF asparagine concentration with serum L-asparaginase enzyme activity. Danish children (1-17 years) with ALL, treated according to the Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology ALL2008 protocol, standard and intermediate risk, were included. CSF samples were obtained throughout L-asparaginase treatment at every scheduled lumbar puncture. A total of 128 samples from 31 patients were available for analysis. Median CSF asparagine concentration decreased from a pre-treatment level of 5·3 μmol/l to median levels ≤1·5 μmol/l. However, only 4/31 patients (five samples) had CSF asparagine concentrations below the limit of detection (0·1 μmol/l). In 11 patients, 24 paired same day serum and CSF samples were obtained. A decrease in CSF asparagine corresponded to serum enzyme activities above 50 iu/l. Higher serum enzyme activities were not followed by more extensive depletion. In conclusion, pegylated asparaginase 1000 iu/m(2) i.m. every second week effectively reduced CSF asparagine levels. PMID:24702187

  5. Secondary stroke prevention: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Esenwa, Charles; Gutierrez, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the USA and a major cause of mortality worldwide. One out of four strokes is recurrent. Secondary stroke prevention starts with deciphering the most likely stroke mechanism. In general, one of the main goals in stroke reduction is to control vascular risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and smoking cessation. Changes in lifestyle like a healthy diet and aerobic exercise are also recommended strategies. In the case of cardioembolism due to atrial fibrillation, mechanical valves, or cardiac thrombus, anticoagulation is the mainstay of therapy. The role of anticoagulation is less evident in the case of bioprosthetic valves, patent foramen ovale, and dilated cardiomyopathy with low ejection fraction. Strokes due to larger artery atherosclerosis account for approximately a third of all strokes. In the case of symptomatic extracranial carotid stenosis, surgical intervention as close as possible in time to the index event seems highly beneficial. In the case of intracranial large artery atherosclerosis, the best medical therapy consists of antiplatelets, high-dose statins, aggressive controls of vascular risk factors, and lifestyle modifications, with no role for intracranial arterial stenting or angioplasty. For patients with small artery occlusion (ie, lacunar stroke), the therapy is similar to that used in patients with intracranial large artery atherosclerosis. Despite the constant new evidence on how to best treat patients who have suffered a stroke, the risk of stroke recurrence remains unacceptably high, thus evidencing the need for novel therapies. PMID:26300647

  6. Secondary stroke prevention: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Esenwa, Charles; Gutierrez, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the USA and a major cause of mortality worldwide. One out of four strokes is recurrent. Secondary stroke prevention starts with deciphering the most likely stroke mechanism. In general, one of the main goals in stroke reduction is to control vascular risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and smoking cessation. Changes in lifestyle like a healthy diet and aerobic exercise are also recommended strategies. In the case of cardioembolism due to atrial fibrillation, mechanical valves, or cardiac thrombus, anticoagulation is the mainstay of therapy. The role of anticoagulation is less evident in the case of bioprosthetic valves, patent foramen ovale, and dilated cardiomyopathy with low ejection fraction. Strokes due to larger artery atherosclerosis account for approximately a third of all strokes. In the case of symptomatic extracranial carotid stenosis, surgical intervention as close as possible in time to the index event seems highly beneficial. In the case of intracranial large artery atherosclerosis, the best medical therapy consists of antiplatelets, high-dose statins, aggressive controls of vascular risk factors, and lifestyle modifications, with no role for intracranial arterial stenting or angioplasty. For patients with small artery occlusion (ie, lacunar stroke), the therapy is similar to that used in patients with intracranial large artery atherosclerosis. Despite the constant new evidence on how to best treat patients who have suffered a stroke, the risk of stroke recurrence remains unacceptably high, thus evidencing the need for novel therapies. PMID:26300647

  7. Stroke Warning Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Advocate Stroke Warning Signs Quiz Stroke Warning Signs and Symptoms THINK YOU ARE HAVING A STROKE? ... Learn more stroke signs and symptoms >>>> Stroke Warning Signs Hip-Hop F.A.S.T. Video Updated Guidelines ...

  8. Standardized Electrolyte Supplementation and Fluid Management Improves Survival During Amphotericin Therapy for Cryptococcal Meningitis in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Bahr, Nathan C.; Rolfes, Melissa A.; Musubire, Abdu; Nabeta, Henry; Williams, Darlisha A.; Rhein, Joshua; Kambugu, Andrew; Meya, David B.; Boulware, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Background  Amphotericin B is the preferred treatment for cryptococcal meningitis, but it has cumulative severe side effects, including nephrotoxicity, hypokalemia, and hypomagnesemia. Amphotericin-induced severe hypokalemia may predispose the patient to cardiac arrhythmias and death, and there is very little data available regarding these toxicities in resource-limited settings. We hypothesized that standardized electrolyte management during amphotericin therapy is essential to minimize toxicity and optimize survival in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods  Human immunodeficiency virus-infected, antiretroviral therapy naive adults with cryptococcal meningitis were prospectively enrolled at Mulago Hospital in Kampala, Uganda in 3 sequential cohorts with amphotericin B deoxycholate induction treatment. Intravenous fluid use was intermittent in 2001–2002, and universal in 2006–2012. In 2001–2009, serum potassium (K+) was monitored on days 1, 7, and 14 of treatment with replacement (K+, Mg2+) per clinician discretion. In 2011–2012, K+ was measured on days 1, 5, and approximately every 48 hours thereafter with universal electrolyte (K+, Mg2+) supplementation and standardized replacement. Clinical outcomes were retrospectively compared between fluid and electrolyte management strategies. Results  With limited intravenous fluids, the 14-day survival was 49% in 2001–2002. With universal intravenous fluids, the 30-day survival improved to 62% in 2006–2010 (P = .003). In 2011–2012, with universal supplementation of fluids and electrolytes, 30-day cumulative survival improved to 78% (P = .021 vs 2006–2010 cohort). The cumulative incidence of severe hypokalemia (<2.5 mEq/L) decreased from 38% in 2010 to 8.5% in 2011–2012 with universal supplementation (P < .001). Conclusions  Improved survival was seen in a resource-limited setting with proactive fluid and electrolyte management (K+, Mg2+), as part of comprehensive amphotericin-based cryptococcal therapy

  9. Characteristics and expectations of fluid bolus therapy: a bi-national survey of acute care physicians.

    PubMed

    Glassford, N J; Jones, S L; Martensson, J; Eastwoods, G M; Bailey, M; Cross, A M; Taylor, D McD; Bellomo, R

    2015-11-01

    There is little consensus on the definition or optimal constituents of fluid bolus therapy (FBT), and there is uncertainty regarding its physiological effects. The aims of this study were to determine clinician-reported definitions of FBT and to explore the physiological responses clinicians expect from such FBT. In June and October 2014, intensive care and emergency physicians in Australia and New Zealand were asked to participate in an electronic questionnaire of the reported practice and expectations of FBT. Two hundred and fifty-one questionnaires were completed, 65.3% from intensivists. We identified the prototypical FBT given by intensivists is more than 250 ml of compound sodium lactate, saline or 4% albumin given in less than 30 minutes, while that given by emergency department physicians is a similar volume of saline delivered over a similar time frame. Intensive care and emergency physicians expected significantly different changes in mean arterial pressure (P=0.001) and heart rate (P=0.033) following FBT. Substantial variation was demonstrated in the magnitude of expected response within both specialties for each variable. Major variations exist in self-reported FBT practice, both within and between acute specialties, and wide variation can be demonstrated in the expected physiological responses to FBT. International explorations of practice and prospective quantification of the actual physiological response to FBT are warranted. PMID:26603800

  10. Whole body correction of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA by intracerebrospinal fluid gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Haurigot, Virginia; Marcó, Sara; Ribera, Albert; Garcia, Miguel; Ruzo, Albert; Villacampa, Pilar; Ayuso, Eduard; Añor, Sònia; Andaluz, Anna; Pineda, Mercedes; García-Fructuoso, Gemma; Molas, Maria; Maggioni, Luca; Muñoz, Sergio; Motas, Sandra; Ruberte, Jesús; Mingozzi, Federico; Pumarola, Martí; Bosch, Fatima

    2013-01-01

    For most lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) affecting the CNS, there is currently no cure. The BBB, which limits the bioavailability of drugs administered systemically, and the short half-life of lysosomal enzymes, hamper the development of effective therapies. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (MPS IIIA) is an autosomic recessive LSD caused by a deficiency in sulfamidase, a sulfatase involved in the stepwise degradation of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) heparan sulfate. Here, we demonstrate that intracerebrospinal fluid (intra-CSF) administration of serotype 9 adenoassociated viral vectors (AAV9s) encoding sulfamidase corrects both CNS and somatic pathology in MPS IIIA mice. Following vector administration, enzymatic activity increased throughout the brain and in serum, leading to whole body correction of GAG accumulation and lysosomal pathology, normalization of behavioral deficits, and prolonged survival. To test this strategy in a larger animal, we treated beagle dogs using intracisternal or intracerebroventricular delivery. Administration of sulfamidase-encoding AAV9 resulted in transgenic expression throughout the CNS and liver and increased sulfamidase activity in CSF. High-titer serum antibodies against AAV9 only partially blocked CSF-mediated gene transfer to the brains of dogs. Consistently, anti-AAV antibody titers were lower in CSF than in serum collected from healthy and MPS IIIA–affected children. These results support the clinical translation of this approach for the treatment of MPS IIIA and other LSDs with CNS involvement. PMID:23863627

  11. Whole body correction of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA by intracerebrospinal fluid gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Haurigot, Virginia; Marcó, Sara; Ribera, Albert; Garcia, Miguel; Ruzo, Albert; Villacampa, Pilar; Ayuso, Eduard; Añor, Sònia; Andaluz, Anna; Pineda, Mercedes; García-Fructuoso, Gemma; Molas, Maria; Maggioni, Luca; Muñoz, Sergio; Motas, Sandra; Ruberte, Jesús; Mingozzi, Federico; Pumarola, Martí; Bosch, Fatima

    2013-07-01

    For most lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) affecting the CNS, there is currently no cure. The BBB, which limits the bioavailability of drugs administered systemically, and the short half-life of lysosomal enzymes, hamper the development of effective therapies. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (MPS IIIA) is an autosomic recessive LSD caused by a deficiency in sulfamidase, a sulfatase involved in the stepwise degradation of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) heparan sulfate. Here, we demonstrate that intracerebrospinal fluid (intra-CSF) administration of serotype 9 adenoassociated viral vectors (AAV9s) encoding sulfamidase corrects both CNS and somatic pathology in MPS IIIA mice. Following vector administration, enzymatic activity increased throughout the brain and in serum, leading to whole body correction of GAG accumulation and lysosomal pathology, normalization of behavioral deficits, and prolonged survival. To test this strategy in a larger animal, we treated beagle dogs using intracisternal or intracerebroventricular delivery. Administration of sulfamidase-encoding AAV9 resulted in transgenic expression throughout the CNS and liver and increased sulfamidase activity in CSF. High-titer serum antibodies against AAV9 only partially blocked CSF-mediated gene transfer to the brains of dogs. Consistently, anti-AAV antibody titers were lower in CSF than in serum collected from healthy and MPS IIIA-affected children. These results support the clinical translation of this approach for the treatment of MPS IIIA and other LSDs with CNS involvement. PMID:23863627

  12. Biotherapies in stroke.

    PubMed

    Detante, O; Jaillard, A; Moisan, A; Barbieux, M; Favre, I M; Garambois, K; Hommel, M; Remy, C

    2014-12-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death worldwide and the most common cause of severe disability. Neuroprotection and repair mechanisms supporting endogenous brain plasticity are often insufficient to allow complete recovery. While numerous neuroprotective drugs trials have failed to demonstrate benefits for patients, they have provided interesting translational research lessons related to neurorestorative therapy mechanisms in stroke. Stroke damage is not limited to neurons but involve all brain cell type including the extracellular matrix in a "glio-neurovascular niche". Targeting a range of host brain cells, biotherapies such as growth factors and therapeutic cells, currently hold great promise as a regenerative medical strategy for stroke. These techniques can promote both neuroprotection and delayed neural repair through neuro-synaptogenesis, angiogenesis, oligodendrogliogenesis, axonal sprouting and immunomodulatory effects. Their complex mechanisms of action are interdependent and vary according to the particular growth factor or grafted cell type. For example, while "peripheral" stem or stromal cells can provide paracrine trophic support, neural stem/progenitor cells (NSC) or mature neurons can act as more direct neural replacements. With a wide therapeutic time window after stroke, biotherapies could be used to treat many patients. However, guidelines for selecting the optimal time window, and the best delivery routes and doses are still debated and the answers may depend on the chosen product and its expected mechanism including early neuroprotection, delayed neural repair, trophic systemic transient effects or graft survival and integration. Currently, the great variety of growth factors, cell sources and cell therapy products form a therapeutic arsenal that is available for stroke treatment. Their effective clinical use will require prior careful considerations regarding safety (e.g. tumorgenicity, immunogenicity), potential efficacy, cell

  13. Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Teri; Murphy, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Each year, more than 795,000 people in the United States suffer a stroke and by 2030, it is estimated that 4% of the U.S. population will have had a stroke. Home healthcare clinicians will be increasingly called upon to assist stroke survivors and their caregivers adjust to disability and assist the survivor during their reintegration into the community. Therapeutic modalities are changing with advanced technology. Great strides are being made in the treatment of acute stroke; particularly endovascular interventions. More patients are surviving the acute stroke event and therefore will need to learn how to live with various degrees of disability. It is important for home healthcare clinicians to understand the process from acute event to medical stabilization, and from rehabilitation to long-term adaptation. PMID:27145407

  14. [Drug rehabilitation in stroke patients].

    PubMed

    Skoromets, A A; Koval'chuk, V V

    2007-01-01

    An influence of different drugs on functional rehabilitation in post-stroke patients has been studied. We tested for efficacy medications with nootropic, metabolic and antioxidative activity as well as pathogenetic and symptomatic remedies for differential therapy of ischemic and haemorrhagic stroke (IS, HS). We analyzed 1920 stroke patients, including 1520 with IS and 400 with HS. The functional rehabilitation depending on different drugs was followed up 1 year after stroke using Barthel, Lindmark and Scandinavian scales for stroke. Moreover, we suggested a coefficient for calculating of drug efficacy. The results of the study revealed that the use of some traditional drugs was not well founded. The most efficient medications in the treatment of IS proved to be actovegin, instenon, berlition, rheopolyglucin and gliatilin. The beneficial effect on rehabilitation of patients with HS was found only for actovegin. PMID:18379517

  15. Efficacy of recombinant annexin 2 for fibrinolytic therapy in a rat embolic stroke model: A magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yoji; Ishii, Hideto; Hiraoka, Megumi; Miyasaka, Naoyuki; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Hajjar, Katherine A.; Nagaoka, Tsukasa; Duong, Timothy Q.; Ohno, Kikuo; Yoshida, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    Efficacy of recombinant annexin 2 (rAN II) in a rat model of embolic stroke was examined using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histology. The right middle cerebral artery of male Wistar rats was occluded by autologous clots under anesthesia. Four doses of rAN II (0.125, 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg, n = 10 for each group) or saline (1 ml/kg, n = 10) were administrated intravenously within 5 min before clot infusion. Serial changes in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and relative blood flow (CBF) were measured with the use of MRI in half of the animals in each group. The remaining half of the animals in each group was evaluated for hemorrhage and final infarct size by histology at 48 h after embolization. At 3 h after embolization, lesion volumes with ADC were abnormality and CBF in the peripheral lesion was improved in groups treated with 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg, but not 0.125 mg/kg, of rAN II in comparison with the saline-treated group (P < 0.05). Histological analyses were consistent with MRI findings. More importantly, no hemorrhagic transformation was documented in rats treated with 0.125 and 0.25 mg/kg of rAN II, whereas it was observed at higher doses. We concluded that rAN II at 0.25 mg/kg significantly reduced infarct size and improved CBF without hemorrhagic complications. rAN II is a novel compound that has the potential to be a promising fibrinolytic agent to treat embolic stroke. PMID:17651708

  16. Infected pancreatic necrosis and peripancreatic fluid collections: serendipitous response to antibiotics and medical therapy in three patients.

    PubMed

    Dubner, H; Steinberg, W; Hill, M; Bassi, C; Chardavoyne, R; Bank, S

    1996-04-01

    Three patients with clinical and radiologic evidence of pancreatic necrosis or peripancreatic fluid collections/inflammatory masses who were advised to have surgery on the basis of bacterial infection on skinny-needle aspiration of the pancreas but were deemed medically unstable or refused operative intervention were treated with intensive antibiotic therapy. All three patients survived the attack of acute pancreatitis with infection on medical therapy alone. This suggests that occasional patients with infected necrosis and/or peripancreatic collections/inflammatory masses may respond to antibiotics, especially those antibiotics that have recently been shown to have a high penetration into pancreatic tissue. PMID:8830338

  17. Functional Improvement after Photothrombotic Stroke in Rats Is Associated with Different Patterns of Dendritic Plasticity after G-CSF Treatment and G-CSF Treatment Combined with Concomitant or Sequential Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Leukel, Petra; Bauer, Henrike; Schäbitz, Wolf-Rüdiger; Sommer, Clemens J.; Minnerup, Jens

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment alone, or in combination with constraint movement therapy (CIMT) either sequentially or concomitantly, results in significantly improved sensorimotor recovery after photothrombotic stroke in rats in comparison to untreated control animals. CIMT alone did not result in any significant differences compared to the control group (Diederich et al., Stroke, 2012;43:185–192). Using a subset of rat brains from this former experiment the present study was designed to evaluate whether dendritic plasticity would parallel improved functional outcomes. Five treatment groups were analyzed (n = 6 each) (i) ischemic control (saline); (ii) CIMT (CIMT between post-stroke days 2 and 11); (iii) G-CSF (10 μg/kg G-CSF daily between post-stroke days 2 and 11); (iv) combined concurrent group (CIMT plus G-CSF) and (v) combined sequential group (CIMT between post-stroke days 2 and 11; 10 μg/kg G-CSF daily between post-stroke days 12 and 21, respectively). After impregnation of rat brains with a modified Golgi-Cox protocol layer V pyramidal neurons in the peri-infarct cortex as well as the corresponding contralateral cortex were analyzed. Surprisingly, animals with a similar degree of behavioral recovery exhibited quite different patterns of dendritic plasticity in both peri-lesional and contralesional areas. The cause for these patterns is not easily to explain but puts the simple assumption that increased dendritic complexity after stroke necessarily results in increased functional outcome into perspective. PMID:26752421

  18. Functional Improvement after Photothrombotic Stroke in Rats Is Associated with Different Patterns of Dendritic Plasticity after G-CSF Treatment and G-CSF Treatment Combined with Concomitant or Sequential Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Frauenknecht, Katrin; Diederich, Kai; Leukel, Petra; Bauer, Henrike; Schäbitz, Wolf-Rüdiger; Sommer, Clemens J; Minnerup, Jens

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment alone, or in combination with constraint movement therapy (CIMT) either sequentially or concomitantly, results in significantly improved sensorimotor recovery after photothrombotic stroke in rats in comparison to untreated control animals. CIMT alone did not result in any significant differences compared to the control group (Diederich et al., Stroke, 2012;43:185-192). Using a subset of rat brains from this former experiment the present study was designed to evaluate whether dendritic plasticity would parallel improved functional outcomes. Five treatment groups were analyzed (n = 6 each) (i) ischemic control (saline); (ii) CIMT (CIMT between post-stroke days 2 and 11); (iii) G-CSF (10 μg/kg G-CSF daily between post-stroke days 2 and 11); (iv) combined concurrent group (CIMT plus G-CSF) and (v) combined sequential group (CIMT between post-stroke days 2 and 11; 10 μg/kg G-CSF daily between post-stroke days 12 and 21, respectively). After impregnation of rat brains with a modified Golgi-Cox protocol layer V pyramidal neurons in the peri-infarct cortex as well as the corresponding contralateral cortex were analyzed. Surprisingly, animals with a similar degree of behavioral recovery exhibited quite different patterns of dendritic plasticity in both peri-lesional and contralesional areas. The cause for these patterns is not easily to explain but puts the simple assumption that increased dendritic complexity after stroke necessarily results in increased functional outcome into perspective. PMID:26752421

  19. Recanalization and Reperfusion Therapies of Acute Ischemic Stroke: What have We Learned, What are the Major Research Questions, and Where are We Headed?

    PubMed Central

    Gomis, Meritxell; Dávalos, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Two placebo-controlled trials have shown that early administration of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) after ischemic stroke improves outcomes up to 4.5 h after symptoms onset; however, six other trials contradict these results. We also know from analysis of the pooled data that benefits from treatment decrease as time from stroke onset to start of treatment increases. In addition to time, another important factor is patient selection through multimodal imaging, combining data from artery status, and salvageable tissue measures. Nonetheless, at the present time randomized controlled trials (RCTs) cannot demonstrate any beneficial outcomes for neuroimaging mismatch selection after 4.5 h from symptoms onset. By focusing on cases of large arterial occlusion, we know that recanalization is crucial, so endovascular treatment is an approach of interest. The use of intra-arterial thrombolysis was tested in two small RCTs that demonstrated clear benefits in terms of higher recanalization and also in clinical outcomes. But a new paradigm of stroke treatment may have begun with mechanical thrombectomy. In this field, Merci devices have been overtaken by fully deployed closed-cell self-expanding stents (stent-retrievers or “stent-trievers”). However, despite the high rate of recanalization achieved with stent-retrievers compared with other recanalization treatments, the use of these devices cannot clearly demonstrate better outcomes. Thus, futile recanalization occurs when successful recanalization fails to improve functional outcome. Recently, three RCTs, namely synthesis, IMS-III, and MR-rescue, have not been demonstrated any clear benefit for endovascular treatment. Most likely, these trials were not adequately designed to prove the superiority of endovascular treatment because they did not use optimal target populations, vascular status was not evaluated in all patients, relatively high rates of patients did not have enough mismatch

  20. Influences of hand dominance on the maintenance of benefits after home-based modified constraint-induced movement therapy in individuals with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Renata C. M.; Nascimento, Lucas R.; Michaelsen, Stella M.; Polese, Janaine C.; Pereira, Natália D.; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of hand dominance on the maintenance of gains after home-based modified constraint-induced movement therapy (mCIMT). Method: Aprevious randomized controlled trial was conducted to examine the addition of trunk restraint to the mCIMT. Twenty-two chronic stroke survivors with mild to moderate motor impairments received individual home-based mCIMT with or without trunk restraints, five times per week, three hours daily over two weeks. In this study, the participants were separated into dominant group, which had their paretic upper limb as dominant before the stroke (n=8), and non-dominant group (n=14) for analyses. The ability to perform unimanual tasks was measured by the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) and the Motor Activity Log (MAL), whereas the capacity to perform bimanual tasks was measured using the Bilateral Activity Assessment Scale (BAAS). Results: Analysis revealed significant positive effects on the MAL amount of use and quality of the movement scales, as well as on the BAAS scores after intervention, with no differences between groups. Both groups maintained the bimanual improvements during follow-ups (BAAS-seconds 0.1, 95% CI -10.0 to 10.0), however only the dominant group maintained the unilateral improvements (MAL-amount of use: 1.5, 95% CI 0.7 to 2.3; MAL-quality: 1.3, 95% CI 0.5 to 2.1). Conclusions: Upper limb dominance did not interfere with the acquisition of upper limb skills after mCIMT. However, the participants whose paretic upper limb was dominant demonstrated better abilities to maintain the unilateral gains. The bilateral improvements were maintained, regardless of upper limb dominance. PMID:25372006

  1. Goal-directed Fluid Therapy May Improve Hemodynamic Stability of Parturient with Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy Under Combined Spinal Epidural Anesthesia for Cesarean Delivery and the Well-being of Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wei; Duan, Qing-Fang; Fu, Wen-Ya; Chi, Xin-Zuo; Wang, Feng-Ying; Ma, Da-Qing; Wang, Tian-Long; Zhao, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypotension induced by combined spinal epidural anesthesia in parturient with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) can easily compromise blood supply to vital organs including uteroplacental perfusion and result in fetal distress. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the goal-directed fluid therapy (GDFT) with LiDCOrapid system can improve well-being of both HDP parturient and their babies. Methods: Fifty-two stable HDP parturient scheduled for elective cesarean delivery were recruited. After loading with 10 ml/kg lactated Ringer's solution (LR), parturient were randomized to the GDFT and control group. In the GDFT group, individualized fluid therapy was guided by increase in stroke volume (ΔSV) provided via LiDCOrapid system. The control group received the routine fluid therapy. The primary endpoints included maternal hypotension and the doses of vasopressors administered prior to fetal delivery. The secondary endpoints included umbilical blood gas abnormalities and neonatal adverse events. Results: The severity of HDP was similar between two groups. The total LR infusion (P < 0.01) and urine output (P < 0.05) were higher in the GDFT group than in the control group. Following twice fluid challenge tests, the systolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure, cardiac output and SV in the GDFT group were significantly higher, and the heart rate was lower than in the control group. The incidence of maternal hypotension and doses of phenylephrine used prior to fetal delivery were significantly higher in the control group than in the GDFT group (P < 0.01). There were no differences in the Apgar scores between two groups. In the control group, the mean values of pH in umbilical artery/vein were remarkably decreased (P < 0.05), and the incidences of neonatal hypercapnia and hypoxemia were statistically increased (P < 0.05) than in the GDFT group. Conclusions: Dynamic responsiveness guided fluid therapy with the LiDCOrapid system may provide

  2. Benchmarks for acute stroke care delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Ruth E.; Khan, Ferhana; Bayley, Mark T.; Asllani, Eriola; Lindsay, Patrice; Hill, Michael D.; O'Callaghan, Christina; Silver, Frank L.; Kapral, Moira K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Despite widespread interest in many jurisdictions in monitoring and improving the quality of stroke care delivery, benchmarks for most stroke performance indicators have not been established. The objective of this study was to develop data-derived benchmarks for acute stroke quality indicators. Design Nine key acute stroke quality indicators were selected from the Canadian Stroke Best Practice Performance Measures Manual. Participants A population-based retrospective sample of patients discharged from 142 hospitals in Ontario, Canada, between 1 April 2008 and 31 March 2009 (N = 3191) was used to calculate hospital rates of performance and benchmarks. Intervention The Achievable Benchmark of Care (ABC™) methodology was used to create benchmarks based on the performance of the upper 15% of patients in the top-performing hospitals. Main Outcome Measures Benchmarks were calculated for rates of neuroimaging, carotid imaging, stroke unit admission, dysphasia screening and administration of stroke-related medications. Results The following benchmarks were derived: neuroimaging within 24 h, 98%; admission to a stroke unit, 77%; thrombolysis among patients arriving within 2.5 h, 59%; carotid imaging, 93%; dysphagia screening, 88%; antithrombotic therapy, 98%; anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation, 94%; antihypertensive therapy, 92% and lipid-lowering therapy, 77%. ABC™ acute stroke care benchmarks achieve or exceed the consensus-based targets required by Accreditation Canada, with the exception of dysphagia screening. Conclusions Benchmarks for nine hospital-based acute stroke care quality indicators have been established. These can be used in the development of standards for quality improvement initiatives. PMID:24141011

  3. Heat stroke.

    PubMed

    Leon, Lisa R; Bouchama, Abderrezak

    2015-04-01

    Heat stroke is a life-threatening condition clinically diagnosed as a severe elevation in body temperature with central nervous system dysfunction that often includes combativeness, delirium, seizures, and coma. Classic heat stroke primarily occurs in immunocompromised individuals during annual heat waves. Exertional heat stroke is observed in young fit individuals performing strenuous physical activity in hot or temperature environments. Long-term consequences of heat stroke are thought to be due to a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. This article provides a comprehensive review of recent advances in the identification of risk factors that predispose to heat stroke, the role of endotoxin and cytokines in mediation of multi-organ damage, the incidence of hypothermia and fever during heat stroke recovery, clinical biomarkers of organ damage severity, and protective cooling strategies. Risk factors include environmental factors, medications, drug use, compromised health status, and genetic conditions. The role of endotoxin and cytokines is discussed in the framework of research conducted over 30 years ago that requires reassessment to more clearly identify the role of these factors in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. We challenge the notion that hypothalamic damage is responsible for thermoregulatory disturbances during heat stroke recovery and highlight recent advances in our understanding of the regulated nature of these responses. The need for more sensitive clinical biomarkers of organ damage is examined. Conventional and emerging cooling methods are discussed with reference to protection against peripheral organ damage and selective brain cooling. PMID:25880507

  4. Stroke Rehabilitation Using Virtual Environments.

    PubMed

    Fu, Michael J; Knutson, Jayme S; Chae, John

    2015-11-01

    This review covers the rationale, mechanisms, and availability of commercially available virtual environment-based interventions for stroke rehabilitation. It describes interventions for motor, speech, cognitive, and sensory dysfunction. Also discussed are the important features and mechanisms that allow virtual environments to facilitate motor relearning. A common challenge is the inability to translate success in small trials to efficacy in larger populations. The heterogeneity of stroke pathophysiology has been blamed, and experts advocate for the study of multimodal approaches. Therefore, this article also introduces a framework to help define new therapy combinations that may be necessary to address stroke heterogeneity. PMID:26522910

  5. Does cholesterol lowering prevent stroke?

    PubMed

    Henry, R Y; Kendall, M J

    1998-10-01

    The importance of lowering plasma cholesterol to reduce the incidence of coronary events is well established. However, in the prevention of stroke disease, control of hypertension has been the main aim of treatment and lipid lowering therapy has not hitherto been considered to be desirable or necessary. In this review, the evidence from large multicentre trials, imaging studies and meta-analyses is presented. It shows convincingly that HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (Statins) reduce stroke risk. PMID:9875681

  6. Collaborative overview of randomised trials of antiplatelet therapy--I: Prevention of death, myocardial infarction, and stroke by prolonged antiplatelet therapy in various categories of patients. Antiplatelet Trialists' Collaboration.

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the effects of "prolonged" antiplatelet therapy (that is, given for one month or more) on "vascular events" (non-fatal myocardial infarctions, non-fatal strokes, or vascular deaths) in various categories of patients. DESIGN--Overviews of 145 randomised trials of "prolonged" antiplatelet therapy versus control and 29 randomised comparisons between such antiplatelet regimens. SETTING--Randomised trials that could have been available by March 1990. SUBJECTS--Trials of antiplatelet therapy versus control included about 70,000 "high risk" patients (that is, with some vascular disease or other condition implying an increased risk of occlusive vascular disease) and 30,000 "low risk" subjects from the general population. Direct comparisons of different antiplatelet regimens involved about 10,000 high risk patients. RESULTS--In each of four main high risk categories of patients antiplatelet therapy was definitely protective. The percentages of patients suffering a vascular event among those allocated antiplatelet therapy versus appropriately adjusted control percentages (and mean scheduled treatment durations and net absolute benefits) were: (a) among about 20,000 patients with acute myocardial infarction, 10% antiplatelet therapy v 14% control (one month benefit about 40 vascular events avoided per 1000 patients treated (2P < 0.00001)); (b) among about 20,000 patients with a past history of myocardial infarction, 13% antiplatelet therapy v 17% control (two year benefit about 40/1000 (2P < 0.00001)); (c) among about 10,000 patients with a past history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack, 18% antiplatelet therapy v 22% control (three year benefit about 40/1000 (2P < 0.00001)); (d) among about 20,000 patients with some other relevant medical history (unstable angina, stable angina, vascular surgery, angioplasty, atrial fibrillation, valvular disease, peripheral vascular disease, etc), 9% v 14% in 4000 patients with unstable angina (six month

  7. Biochemical, histological and functional correction of mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB by intra-cerebrospinal fluid gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ribera, Albert; Haurigot, Virginia; Garcia, Miguel; Marcó, Sara; Motas, Sandra; Villacampa, Pilar; Maggioni, Luca; León, Xavier; Molas, Maria; Sánchez, Víctor; Muñoz, Sergio; Leborgne, Christian; Moll, Xavier; Pumarola, Martí; Mingozzi, Federico; Ruberte, Jesús; Añor, Sònia; Bosch, Fatima

    2015-04-01

    Gene therapy is an attractive tool for the treatment of monogenic disorders, in particular for lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) caused by deficiencies in secretable lysosomal enzymes in which neither full restoration of normal enzymatic activity nor transduction of all affected cells are necessary. However, some LSD such as Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIB (MPSIIIB) are challenging because the disease's main target organ is the brain and enzymes do not efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier even if present at very high concentration in circulation. To overcome these limitations, we delivered AAV9 vectors encoding for α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU) to the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) of MPSIIIB mice with the disease already detectable at biochemical, histological and functional level. Restoration of enzymatic activity in Central Nervous System (CNS) resulted in normalization of glycosaminoglycan content and lysosomal physiology, resolved neuroinflammation and restored the pattern of gene expression in brain similar to that of healthy animals. Additionally, transduction of the liver due to passage of vectors to the circulation led to whole-body disease correction. Treated animals also showed reversal of behavioural deficits and extended lifespan. Importantly, when the levels of enzymatic activity were monitored in the CSF of dogs following administration of canine NAGLU-coding vectors to animals that were either naïve or had pre-existing immunity against AAV9, similar levels of activity were achieved, suggesting that CNS efficacy would not be compromised in patients seropositive for AAV9. Our studies provide a strong rationale for the clinical development of this novel therapeutic approach as the treatment for MPSIIIB. PMID:25524704

  8. Stroke - risk factors

    MedlinePlus

    Preventing stroke; Stroke - prevention; CVA - prevention; TIA - prevention ... Biology; Council on Hypertension. Guidelines for the primary prevention of stroke: a statement for healthcare professionals from ...

  9. Stroke - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... People who have had a stroke may have speech or language problems. Here are some tips for your family and care givers: Keep distractions and noise down. Keep your voice lower. Move to a quieter room. DO NOT ...

  10. Preventing stroke

    MedlinePlus

    Stroke - prevention; CVA - prevention; cerebral vascular accident - prevention; TIA - prevention, transient ischemic attack - prevention ... Clinical Cardiology; Council on Functional Genomics and ... Council on Hypertension. Guidelines for the primary prevention ...

  11. After Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... much function as possible. Learn more about spasticity . Deep Venous Thrombosis – Deep venous thrombosis happens when a clot forms in ... from all RESCUE fact sheets. American Stroke Association Web: www.strokeassociation.org * Phone: 1-888-478-7653 ...

  12. Stroke Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... weakened blood vessels that also cause hemorrhagic stroke: aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Treatment differs depending on ... the leg or arm, then guided to the aneurysm or AVM ; it then deposits a mechanical agent, ...

  13. Menopause and Stroke: An Epidemiologic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lisabeth, Lynda; Bushnell, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Although women have a lower risk of stroke during middle age, the menopausal transition is a time when many women develop cardiovascular risk factors. In addition, during the 10 years after menopause, the risk of stroke roughly doubles in women. Endogenous estrogen levels decline by 60% during the menopausal transition, leading to a relative androgen excess, which could contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk factors in women. Earlier onset of menopause may influence the risk of stroke, but the data are not clear. Because of the stroke risk associated with hormone therapy, this is only indicated for treatment of vasomotor symptoms, but some formulations may be safe than others. More research is needed to understand which women are at greatest stroke risk during midlife and to determine the safest formulation, dose, and duration of hormone therapy that will treat vasomotor symptoms without increasing the risk for stroke. PMID:22172623

  14. Fifty years of stroke researches in India.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Tapas Kumar; Das, Shyamal Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the stroke incidence in India is much higher than Western industrialized countries. Large vessel intracranial atherosclerosis is the commonest cause of ischemic stroke in India. The common risk factors, that is, hypertension, diabetes, smoking, and dyslipidemia are quite prevalent and inadequately controlled; mainly because of poor public awareness and inadequate infrastructure. Only a small number of ischemic stroke cases are able to have the benefit of thrombolytic therapy. Benefits from stem cell therapy in established stroke cases are under evaluation. Presently, prevention of stroke is the best option considering the Indian scenario through control and/or avoiding risk factors of stroke. Interventional studies are an important need for this scenario. PMID:27011621

  15. Fifty years of stroke researches in India

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Tapas Kumar; Das, Shyamal Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the stroke incidence in India is much higher than Western industrialized countries. Large vessel intracranial atherosclerosis is the commonest cause of ischemic stroke in India. The common risk factors, that is, hypertension, diabetes, smoking, and dyslipidemia are quite prevalent and inadequately controlled; mainly because of poor public awareness and inadequate infrastructure. Only a small number of ischemic stroke cases are able to have the benefit of thrombolytic therapy. Benefits from stem cell therapy in established stroke cases are under evaluation. Presently, prevention of stroke is the best option considering the Indian scenario through control and/or avoiding risk factors of stroke. Interventional studies are an important need for this scenario. PMID:27011621

  16. Prehospital care of the acute stroke patient.

    PubMed

    Rajajee, Venkatakrishna; Saver, Jeffrey

    2005-06-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) is the first medical contact for most acute stroke patients, thereby playing a pivotal role in the identification and treatment of acute cerebrovascular brain injury. The benefit of thrombolysis and interventional therapies for acute ischemic stroke is highly time dependent, making rapid and effective EMS response of critical importance. In addition, the general public has suboptimal knowledge about stroke warning signs and the importance of activating the EMS system. In the past, the ability of EMS dispatchers to recognize stroke calls has been documented to be poor. Reliable stroke identification in the field enables appropriate treatment to be initiated in the field and potentially inappropriate treatment avoided; the receiving hospital to be prenotified of a stroke patient's imminent arrival, rapid transport to be initiated; and stroke patients to be diverted to stroke-capable receiving hospitals. In this article we discuss research studies and educational programs aimed at improving stroke recognition by EMS dispatchers, prehospital personnel, and emergency department (ED) physicians and how this has impacted stroke treatment. In addition public educational programs and importance of community awareness of stroke symptoms will be discussed. For example, general public's utilization of 911 system for stroke victims has been limited in the past. However, it has been repeatedly shown that utilization of the 911 system is associated with accelerated arrival times to the ED, crucial to timely treatment of stroke patients. Finally, improved stroke recognition in the field has led investigators to study in the field treatment of stroke patients with neuroprotective agents. The potential impact of this on future of stroke treatment will be discussed. PMID:16194754

  17. Vascular remodeling after ischemic stroke: mechanisms and therapeutic potentials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jialing; Wang, Yongting; Akamatsu, Yosuke; Lee, Chih Cheng; Stetler, R Anne; Lawton, Michael T.; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The brain vasculature has been increasingly recognized as a key player that directs brain development, regulates homeostasis, and contributes to pathological processes. Following ischemic stroke, the reduction of blood flow elicits a cascade of changes and leads to vascular remodeling. However, the temporal profile of vascular changes after stroke is not well understood. Growing evidence suggests that the early phase of cerebral blood volume (CBV) increase is likely due to the improvement in collateral flow, also known as arteriogenesis, whereas the late phase of CBV increase is attributed to the surge of angiogenesis. Arteriogenesis is triggered by shear fluid stress followed by activation of endothelium and inflammatory processes, while angiogenesis induces a number of pro-angiogenic factors and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). The status of collaterals in acute stroke has been shown to have several prognostic implications, while the causal relationship between angiogenesis and improved functional recovery has yet to be established in patients. A number of interventions aimed at enhancing cerebral blood flow including increasing collateral recruitment are under clinical investigation. Transplantation of EPCs to improve angiogenesis is also underway. Knowledge in the underlying physiological mechanisms for improved arteriogenesis and angiogenesis shall lead to more effective therapies for ischemic stroke. PMID:24291532

  18. Enhancing activities of daily living of chronic stroke patients in primary health care by modified constraint-induced movement therapy (HOMECIMT): study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stroke leads to constant rehabilitation needs even at the chronic stage. However, although many stroke patients receive physical or occupational therapy in primary health care, treatment prescriptions do not generally specify therapeutic goals; in particular, participation is not established as an explicit therapeutic goal in the ambulatory setting. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of a therapy regimen for chronic stroke patients (modified ‘constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) at home’) with impaired hand or arm function with regard to the prerequisites of participation in everyday activities: a sufficient arm and hand function. ‘CIMT at home’ will be compared with conventional physical and occupational therapy (‘therapy as usual’). Methods/design The study is a parallel cluster randomized controlled trial with therapy practices as clusters (n = 48). After written consent from the patients (n = 144), the therapists will be randomly assigned to treat either the intervention or the control group. Blinded external assessors will evaluate the patients using standardized outcome measures before and after the intervention, and six months later. The two coprimary endpoint assessments of arm and hand function as prerequisites for participation (defined as equal involvement in activities of daily living) are the motor activity log (quality of arm and hand use) and the Wolf motor function test (arm and hand function). These assessments are made four weeks post-treatment and relativized to baseline performance. Changes in primary outcomes will be analyzed with mixed models, which consider the hierarchical structure of the data and will be adjusted to the baseline measurements and sex. The primary analysis will be the comparison of the two randomized groups, with respect to the adjusted averages for each of the two coprimary endpoints. To keep an overall significance level of 5%, the two endpoints will be tested at the

  19. Effect of a provincial system of stroke care delivery on stroke care and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kapral, Moira K.; Fang, Jiming; Silver, Frank L.; Hall, Ruth; Stamplecoski, Melissa; O’Callaghan, Christina; Tu, Jack V.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Systems of stroke care delivery have been promoted as a means of improving the quality of stroke care, but little is known about their effectiveness. We assessed the effect of the Ontario Stroke System, a province-wide strategy of regionalized stroke care delivery, on stroke care and outcomes in Ontario, Canada. Methods: We used population-based provincial administrative databases to identify all emergency department visits and hospital admissions for acute stroke and transient ischemic attack from Jan. 1, 2001, to Dec. 31, 2010. Using piecewise regression analyses, we assessed the effect of the full implementation of the Ontario Stroke System in 2005 on the proportion of patients who received care at stroke centres, and on rates of discharge to long-term care facilities and 30-day mortality after stroke. Results: We included 243 287 visits by patients with acute stroke or transient ischemic attack. The full implementation of the Ontario Stroke System in 2005 was associated with an increase in rates of care at stroke centres (before implementation: 40.0%; after implementation: 46.5%), decreased rates of discharge to long-term care facilities (before implementation: 16.9%; after implementation: 14.8%) and decreased 30-day mortality for hemorrhagic (before implementation: 38.3%; after implementation: 34.4%) and ischemic stroke (before implementation: 16.3%; after implementation: 15.7%). The system’s implementation was also associated with marked increases in the proportion of patients who received neuroimaging, thrombolytic therapy, care in a stroke unit and antithrombotic therapy. Interpretation: The implementation of an organized system of stroke care delivery was associated with improved processes of care and outcomes after stroke. PMID:23713072

  20. The Prognostic Value of a Four-Dimensional CT Angiography-Based Collateral Grading Scale for Reperfusion Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Chen, Weili; Tang, Huan; Han, Quan; Yan, Shenqiang; Zhang, Xiaocheng; Chen, Qingmeng; Parsons, Mark; Wang, Shaoshi; Lou, Min

    2016-01-01

    Objective Leptomeningeal collaterals, which affects tissue fate, are still challenging to assess. Four-dimensional CT angiography (4D CTA) originated from CT perfusion (CTP) provides the possibility of non-invasive and time-resolved assessment of leptomeningeal collateral flow. We sought to develop a comprehensive rating system to integrate the speed and extent of collateral flow on 4D CTA, and investigate its prognostic value for reperfusion therapy in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients. Methods We retrospectively studied 80 patients with M1 ± internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion who had baseline CTP before intravenous thrombolysis. The velocity and extent of collaterals were evaluated by regional leptomeningeal collateral score on peak phase (rLMC-P) and temporally fused intensity projections (tMIP) (rLMC-M) on 4D CTA, respectively. The cutoffs of rLMC-P and rLMC-M score for predicting good outcome (mRS score ≤ 2) were integrated to develop the collateral grading scale (CGS) (rating from 0–2). Results The CGS score was correlated with 3-months mRS score (non-recanalizers: ρ = -0.495, p = 0.01; recanalizers: ρ = -0.671, p < 0.001). Patients with intermediate or good collaterals (CGS score of 1 and 2) who recanalized were more likely to have good outcome than those without recanalization (p = 0.038, p = 0.018), while there was no significant difference in outcome in patients with poor collaterals (CGS score of 0) stratified by recanalization (p = 0.227). Conclusions Identification of collaterals based on CGS may help to select good responders to reperfusion therapy in patients with large artery occlusion. PMID:27505435

  1. Effects of mild hypothermia therapy on the levels of glutathione in rabbit blood and cerebrospinal fluid after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Chen, Yueliang

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mild hypothermia therapy on oxidative stress injury of rabbit brain tissue after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Materials and Methods: Rabbit models of cardiac arrest were established. After the restoration of spontaneous circulation, 50 rabbits were randomly divided into normothermia and hypothermia groups. The following five time points were selected: before CPR, immediately after CPR, 2 hr after CPR (hypothermia group reached the target temperature), 14 hr after CPR (hypothermia group before rewarming), and 24 hr after CPR (hypothermia group recovered to normal temperature). Glutathione (GSH) concentrations in both the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of the normothermia and hypothermia groups were measured. Results: At 2, 14, and 24 hr after CPR, the GSH concentrations in both the blood and cerebrospinal fluid were significantly higher in the hypothermia group than in the nomorthermia group. Conclusion: Mild hypothermia therapy may increase GSH concentrations in rabbit blood and cerebrospinal fluid after CPR as well as promote the recovery of cerebral function. PMID:25810895

  2. The effects of a rhythm and music-based therapy program and therapeutic riding in late recovery phase following stroke: a study protocol for a three-armed randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Stroke represents one of the most costly and long-term disabling conditions in adulthood worldwide and there is a need to determine the effectiveness of rehabilitation programs in the late phase after stroke. Limited scientific support exists for training incorporating rhythm and music as well as therapeutic riding and well-designed trials to determine the effectiveness of these treatment modalities are warranted. Methods/Design A single blinded three-armed randomized controlled trial is described with the aim to evaluate whether it is possible to improve the overall health status and functioning of individuals in the late phase of stroke (1-5 years after stroke) through a rhythm and music-based therapy program or therapeutic riding. About 120 individuals will be consecutively and randomly allocated to one of three groups: (T1) rhythm and music-based therapy program; (T2) therapeutic riding; or (T3) control group receiving the T1 training program a year later. Evaluation is conducted prior to and after the 12-week long intervention as well as three and six months later. The evaluation comprises a comprehensive functional and cognitive assessment (both qualitative and quantitative), and questionnaires. Based on the International classification of functioning, disability, and health (ICF), the outcome measures are classified into six comprehensive domains, with participation as the primary outcome measure assessed by the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS, version 2.0.). The secondary outcome measures are grouped within the following domains: body function, activity, environmental factors and personal factors. Life satisfaction and health related quality of life constitute an additional domain. Current status A total of 84 participants were randomised and have completed the intervention. Recruitment proceeds and follow-up is on-going, trial results are expected in early 2014. Discussion This study will ascertain whether any of the two intervention programs can

  3. In-flight demonstration of the Space Station Freedom Health Maintenance Facility fluid therapy system (E300/E05)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Charles W.

    1993-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom (SSF) Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) will provide medical care for crew members for up to 10 days. An integral part of the required medical care consists of providing intravenous infusion of fluids, electrolyte solutions, and nutrients to sustain an ill or injured crew member. In terrestrial health care facilities, intravenous solutions are normally stored in large quantities. However, due to the station's weight and volume constraints, an adequate supply of the required solutions cannot be carried onboard SSF. By formulating medical fluids onboard from concentrates and station water as needed, the Fluid Therapy System (FTS) eliminates weight and volume concerns regarding intravenous fluids. The first full-system demonstration of FTS is continuous microgravity will be conducted in Spacelab-Japan (SL-J). The FTS evaluation consists of two functional objectives and an in-flight demonstration of intravenous administration of fluids. The first is to make and store sterile water and IV solutions onboard the spacecraft. If intravenous fluids are to be produced in SSF, successful sterilization of water and reconstituting of IV solutions must be achieved. The second objective is to repeat the verification of the FTS infusion pump, which had been performed in Spacelab Life Sciences - 1 (SLS-1). during SLS-1, the FTS IV pump was operated in continuous microgravity for the first time. The pump functioned successfully, and valuable knowledge on its performance in continuous microgravity was obtained. Finally, the technique of starting an IF in microgravity will be demonstrated. The IV technique requires modifications in microgravity, such as use of restraints for equipment and crew members involved.

  4. Fluid type and the use of renal replacement therapy in sepsis: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rochwerg, B; Alhazzani, W; Gibson, A; Ribic, C M; Sindi, A; Heels-Ansdell, D; Thabane, L; Fox-Robichaud, A; Mbuagbaw, L; Szczeklik, W; Alshamsi, F; Altayyar, S; Ip, W; Li, G; Wang, M; Włudarczyk, A; Zhou, Q; Annane, D; Cook, D J; Jaeschke, R; Guyatt, G H

    2015-09-01

    Fluid resuscitation, along with the early administration of antibiotics, is the cornerstone of treatment for patients with sepsis. However, whether differences in resuscitation fluids impact on the requirements for renal replacement therapy (RRT) remains unclear. To examine this issue, we performed a network meta-analysis (NMA), including direct and indirect comparisons, that addressed the effect of different resuscitation fluids on the use of RRT in patients with sepsis. The data sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, ACPJC, CINAHL and Cochrane Central Register were searched up to March 2014. Eligible studies included randomized trials reported in any language that enrolled adult patients with sepsis or septic shock and addressed the use of RRT associated with alternative resuscitation fluids. The risk of bias for individual studies and the overall certainty of the evidence were assessed. Ten studies (6664 patients) that included a total of nine direct comparisons were assessed. NMA at the four-node level showed that an increased risk of receiving RRT was associated with fluid resuscitation with starch versus crystalloid [odds ratio (OR) 1.39, 95% credibility interval (CrI) 1.17-1.66, high certainty]. The data suggested no difference between fluid resuscitation with albumin and crystalloid (OR 1.04, 95% CrI 0.78-1.38, moderate certainty) or starch (OR 0.74, 95% CrI 0.53-1.04, low certainty). NMA at the six-node level showed a decreased risk of receiving RRT with balanced crystalloid compared to heavy starch (OR 0.50, 95% CrI 0.34-0.74, moderate certainty) or light starch (OR 0.70, 95% CrI 0.49-0.99, high certainty). There was no significant difference between balanced crystalloid and saline (OR 0.85, 95% CrI 0.56-1.30, low certainty) or albumin (OR 0.82, 95% CrI 0.49-1.37, low certainty). Of note, these trials vary in terms of case mix, fluids evaluated, duration of fluid exposure and risk of bias. Imprecise estimates contributed to low confidence in most estimates of effect

  5. Stroke prevention: modifying risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Romero, José Rafael; Morris, Jane; Pikula, Aleksandra

    2009-01-01

    Risk factor modification remains as the principal aspect of care for stroke prevention. Understanding of risk factors has advanced and several options are now available to treat modifiable risk factors. However, effective treatment remains a challenging task in clinical practice. Prevention begins with awareness of risk factors by patients and clinicians. Risk factor assessment along with overall stroke risk estimation should be part of evaluation of patients with stroke, and used with careful clinical judgment. In this review we discuss the impact of modifiable traditional vascular risk factors on ischemic stroke, interventions for stroke prevention, and evidence for early treatment of risk factors where available as well as areas of research progress. Emphasis should be paid in education of patients, the community and medical personnel. Future research in the field of genetic determinants of vascular risk factors and stroke will increase our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of cerebrovascular disease and likely result in development of new therapies and individualized programs for stroke prevention. PMID:19124428

  6. Hip Hop Stroke: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial to Address Stroke Literacy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Olajide; Leighton-Herrmann, Ellyn; DeSorbo, Alexandra; Hecht, Mindy; Hedmann, Monique; Huq, Saima; Gerin, William; Chinchilli, Vernon; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Noble, James

    2015-01-01

    Objective Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death and the leading cause of serious long-term adult disability in the US. Acute stroke treatments with intravenous thrombolysis and endovascular therapy are proven to reduce disability, however a critical limitation on their effectiveness is the narrow time window for administration, which is 4.5 hours and 6 hours respectively from the onset of symptoms. Our overarching goal is to reduce pre-hospital delays to acute stroke treatments in economically disadvantaged minority communities where the greatest delays exist, using Hip Hop Stroke. Methods Hip Hop Stroke (HHS) is a school-based, child-mediated, culturally-tailored stroke communication multimedia intervention developed using validated models of behavior change and designed to improve stroke literacy (knowledge of stroke symptoms, the urgent need to call 911, and prevention measures) of 4th, 5th and 6th grade students and their parents residing in poor urban communities. Children in the intervention arm will receive the HHS intervention, while those in the attentional control arm will receive standardized nutrition education based on the USDA's MyPyramid program. Children will be trained and motivated to share stroke information with their parents or other adult caregiver. Both children and parents will complete a stroke knowledge assessment at baseline, immediately following the program, and at 3-months post-program. The primary outcome is the effect of the child mediation on parental stroke literacy. Conclusion Stroke literate children, a captive audience in school systems, may represent a viable channel for spreading stroke information into households of poor urban communities where mass media stroke campaigns have shown the lowest penetration. These children may also call 911 when witnessing a stroke in their homes or communities. The HHS program may highlight the potential role of children in the chain of stroke recovery as a strategy for reducing

  7. Recent trends in robot-assisted therapy environments to improve real-life functional performance after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Michelle J

    2006-01-01

    Upper and lower limb robotic tools for neuro-rehabilitation are effective in reducing motor impairment but they are limited in their ability to improve real world function. There is a need to improve functional outcomes after robot-assisted therapy. Improvements in the effectiveness of these environments may be achieved by incorporating into their design and control strategies important elements key to inducing motor learning and cerebral plasticity such as mass-practice, feedback, task-engagement, and complex problem solving. This special issue presents nine articles. Novel strategies covered in this issue encourage more natural movements through the use of virtual reality and real objects and faster motor learning through the use of error feedback to guide acquisition of natural movements that are salient to real activities. In addition, several articles describe novel systems and techniques that use of custom and commercial games combined with new low-cost robot systems and a humanoid robot to embody the " supervisory presence" of the therapy as possible solutions to exercise compliance in under-supervised environments such as the home. PMID:17176474

  8. Recent trends in robot-assisted therapy environments to improve real-life functional performance after stroke.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Michelle J

    2006-01-01

    Upper and lower limb robotic tools for neuro-rehabilitation are effective in reducing motor impairment but they are limited in their ability to improve real world function. There is a need to improve functional outcomes after robot-assisted therapy. Improvements in the effectiveness of these environments may be achieved by incorporating into their design and control strategies important elements key to inducing motor learning and cerebral plasticity such as mass-practice, feedback, task-engagement, and complex problem solving. This special issue presents nine articles. Novel strategies covered in this issue encourage more natural movements through the use of virtual reality and real objects and faster motor learning through the use of error feedback to guide acquisition of natural movements that are salient to real activities. In addition, several articles describe novel systems and techniques that use of custom and commercial games combined with new low-cost robot systems and a humanoid robot to embody the " supervisory presence" of the therapy as possible solutions to exercise compliance in under-supervised environments such as the home. PMID:17176474

  9. Intravenous Fluid Therapy Course for the Licensed Practical Nurse. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a 10-unit intravenous (IV) therapy course for licensed practical nurses. Units contain from one to nine lessons. The first unit provides an introduction and orientation to the course. Subsequent units concern documentation, anatomy and physiology as applied to IV therapy, fundamental aspects of fluid…

  10. Use of the robot assisted gait therapy in rehabilitation of patients with stroke and spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Sale, P; Franceschini, M; Waldner, A; Hesse, S

    2012-03-01

    Difficulty in walking is a major feature of neurological disease, and loss of mobility is the activity of daily living on which patients place the greatest value. The impact on patients is enormous, with negative ramifications on their participation in social, vocational, and recreational activities. In current clinical practice the gait restoration with robotic device is an integral part of rehabilitation program. Robot therapy involves the use of a robot exoskeleton device or end-effector device to help the patient retrain motor coordination by performing well-focused and carefully directed repetitive practice. The exoskeleton, as an assistive device, is also an external structural mechanism with joints and links corresponding to those of the human body. These robots use joint trajectories of the entire gait cycle and offer a uniform (more or less) stiff control along this trajectory. In this field the new powered exoskeleton ReWalk (Argo Medical Technologies Ltd) was developed to have an alternative mobility solution to the wheelchair and rehabilitation treatment for individuals with severe walking impairments, enabling them to stand, walk, ascend/descent stairs and more. The end-effector-based robot is a device with footplates placed on a double crank and rocker gear system. Alternatives to powered exoskeletons are devices that use movable footplates to which the patient's feet are attached. All devices include some form of body weight support. Prominent goals in the field include: developing implementable technologies that can be easily used by patients, therapists, and clinicians; enhancing the efficacy of clinician's therapies and increasing the ease of activities in the daily lives of patients. PMID:22543557

  11. Patent Foramen Ovale: Stroke and Device Closure.

    PubMed

    Suradi, Hussam S; Hijazi, Ziyad M

    2016-05-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a common finding in healthy adults and has long been implicated in cryptogenic stroke. The pathogenesis is hypothesized to be caused by microemboli gaining access into the systemic circulation via a PFO. Proposed treatment options include medical therapy and/or PFO closure. Despite numerous studies and several randomized trials, much debate persists regarding the efficacy of this approach in reducing the risk of recurrent stroke in cryptogenic stroke patients. This article reviews the association between PFO and cryptogenic stroke, as well as current evidence for PFO device closure. PMID:27150171

  12. Recognition and Management of Threatened Stroke

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, C. W.

    1983-01-01

    Completed stroke may often be prevented by early recognition and appropriate management of the stroke-threatened patient. About 80% of strokes are ischemic, the remainder hemorrhagic. Roughly half of ischemic strokes are heralded by transient ischemic attacks (TIA). The clinical picture of TIA depends upon which part of the brain is involved. The investigation of such patients is outlined, together with current approaches to medical and surgical therapy. Intracerebral hemorrhage rarely provides any advanced warning, but occasionally subarachnoid hemorrhage may be preceded by a warning leak, the clinical picture of which is described. PMID:21286581

  13. The Effect of Photodynamic Therapy and Diode Laser as Adjunctive Periodontal Therapy on the Inflammatory Mediators Levels in Gingival Crevicular Fluid and Clinical Periodontal Status

    PubMed Central

    Teymouri, Faraz; Farhad, Shirin Zahra; Golestaneh, Hedayatollah

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The presence of bacterial biofilms is the major cause of gingivitis and periodontitis, their mechanical removal is not often enough. Therefore, laser therapy and photodynamic therapy can be effective as adjunctive treatment. Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the impact of these treatments on the level of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), inflammatory mediators, and periodontal clinical status. Materials and Method In this clinical trial, three quadrants were studied in 12 patients with chronic periodontitis aged 30-60 years. The clinical parameters were recorded and GCF samples were taken. After the first phase of periodontal treatment, one of the three quadrants was determined as the control group, one was treated by diode laser, and one underwent photodynamic therapy. The clinical parameters were recorded 2 and 6 weeks later. The data were statistically analyzed by using Friedman, ANOVA, and LSD post-test. Results Significant reduction was observed over time in the level of Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Interleukin-17 (IL-17), clinical attachment loss, and pocket depth in the three treatment groups (p< 0.000). The three treatment methods significantly reduced the IL-1β and IL-17 at the baseline, up to 2 weeks, and 2-6 weeks (p< 0.05). Diode laser and photodynamic therapy significantly decreased the average bleeding on probing over time (p< 0.000 and p< 0.002, respectively). Conclusion Laser and photodynamic therapy reduced the inflammatory mediators (IL-1β and IL-17) and improved the clinical symptoms. PMID:27602399

  14. Haptic/Graphic Rehabilitation: Integrating a Robot into a Virtual Environment Library and Applying it to Stroke Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Ian; Patton, James; Listenberger, Molly; Case, Emily

    2011-01-01

    Recent research that tests interactive devices for prolonged therapy practice has revealed new prospects for robotics combined with graphical and other forms of biofeedback. Previous human-robot interactive systems have required different software commands to be implemented for each robot leading to unnecessary developmental overhead time each time a new system becomes available. For example, when a haptic/graphic virtual reality environment has been coded for one specific robot to provide haptic feedback, that specific robot would not be able to be traded for another robot without recoding the program. However, recent efforts in the open source community have proposed a wrapper class approach that can elicit nearly identical responses regardless of the robot used. The result can lead researchers across the globe to perform similar experiments using shared code. Therefore modular "switching out"of one robot for another would not affect development time. In this paper, we outline the successful creation and implementation of a wrapper class for one robot into the open-source H3DAPI, which integrates the software commands most commonly used by all robots. PMID:21847086

  15. Haptic/graphic rehabilitation: integrating a robot into a virtual environment library and applying it to stroke therapy.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Ian; Patton, James; Listenberger, Molly; Case, Emily

    2011-01-01

    Recent research that tests interactive devices for prolonged therapy practice has revealed new prospects for robotics combined with graphical and other forms of biofeedback. Previous human-robot interactive systems have required different software commands to be implemented for each robot leading to unnecessary developmental overhead time each time a new system becomes available. For example, when a haptic/graphic virtual reality environment has been coded for one specific robot to provide haptic feedback, that specific robot would not be able to be traded for another robot without recoding the program. However, recent efforts in the open source community have proposed a wrapper class approach that can elicit nearly identical responses regardless of the robot used. The result can lead researchers across the globe to perform similar experiments using shared code. Therefore modular "switching out"of one robot for another would not affect development time. In this paper, we outline the successful creation and implementation of a wrapper class for one robot into the open-source H3DAPI, which integrates the software commands most commonly used by all robots. PMID:21847086

  16. Stroke findings in the Women's Health Initiative.

    PubMed

    Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Kaplan, Robert C; Salazar, Christian R

    2014-11-01

    The Women's Health Initiative (WHI) clinical trials of estrogen with or without progestin versus placebo in 27,341 postmenopausal women are the largest randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trials to look at the effect of hormone therapy on the outcomes of stroke, dementia, and cognition. Data from a parallel prospective observational study of 93,676 women examine biomarkers and risk factors associated with stroke. We summarize the results of 29 published articles in the WHI with stroke or cognition as outcomes of interest. Estrogen alone or in combination with progestin resulted in approximately 50% excess risk of ischemic stroke and in a 76% excess risk of dementia in women 65 years or older. Other risk factors for stroke identified in the WHI were panic attacks, depression, use of antidepressants (particularly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for hemorrhagic but not ischemic stroke), high triglycerides, low walking speed, long sleep duration, certain inflammatory factors, and systolic blood pressure variability. Hormone therapy has adverse effects on the brain as manifested by higher risks of stroke and dementia. Additional risk factors for stroke identified in WHI should be followed up to determine if reversing them would result in lower stroke rates. PMID:25321421

  17. Continuing versus Stopping Prestroke Antihypertensive Therapy in Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Subgroup Analysis of the Efficacy of Nitric Oxide in Stroke Trial

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Kailash; Scutt, Polly; Woodhouse, Lisa; Adami, Alessandro; Becker, Jennifer L.; Cala, Lesley A.; Casado, Ana M.; Chen, Christopher; Dineen, Robert A.; Gommans, John; Koumellis, Panos; Christensen, Hanna; Collins, Ronan; Czlonkowska, Anna; Lees, Kennedy R.; Ntaios, George; Ozturk, Serefnur; Phillips, Stephen J.; Sprigg, Nikola; Szatmari, Szabolcs; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Bath, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose More than 50% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) are taking antihypertensive drugs before ictus. Although antihypertensive therapy should be given long term for secondary prevention, whether to continue or stop such treatment during the acute phase of ICH remains unclear, a question that was addressed in the Efficacy of Nitric Oxide in Stroke (ENOS) trial. Methods ENOS was an international multicenter, prospective, randomized, blinded endpoint trial. Among 629 patients with ICH and systolic blood pressure between 140 and 220 mmHg, 246 patients who were taking antihypertensive drugs were assigned to continue (n = 119) or to stop (n = 127) taking drugs temporarily for 7 days. The primary outcome was the modified Rankin Score at 90 days. Secondary outcomes included death, length of stay in hospital, discharge destination, activities of daily living, mood, cognition, and quality of life. Results Blood pressure level (baseline 171/92 mmHg) fell in both groups but was significantly lower at 7 days in those patients assigned to continue antihypertensive drugs (difference 9.4/3.5 mmHg, P < .01). At 90 days, the primary outcome did not differ between the groups; the adjusted common odds ratio (OR) for worse outcome with continue versus stop drugs was .92 (95% confidence interval, .45-1.89; P = .83). There was no difference between the treatment groups for any secondary outcome measure, or rates of death or serious adverse events. Conclusions Among patients with acute ICH, immediate continuation of antihypertensive drugs during the first week did not reduce death or major disability in comparison to stopping treatment temporarily. PMID:26853137

  18. Effect of Radial Shock Wave Therapy on Spasticity of the Upper Limb in Patients With Chronic Stroke: A Prospective, Randomized, Single Blind, Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Li, Tsung-Ying; Chang, Chih-Ya; Chou, Yu-Ching; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Chu, Heng-Yi; Chiang, Shang-Lin; Chang, Shin-Tsu; Wu, Yung-Tsan

    2016-05-01

    Recently, studies have reported that extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is a safe, noninvasive, alternative treatment for spasticity. However, the effect of ESWT on spasticity cannot be determined, because most studies to date have enrolled small patient numbers and have lacked placebo-controlled groups and/or long-term follow-up. In addition, whether varying the number of ESWT sessions would affect the duration of the therapeutic effect has not been investigated in a single study. Hence, we performed a prospective, randomized, single blind, placebo-controlled study to investigate the long-term effect of radial ESWT (rESWT) in patients with poststroke spasticity and surveyed the outcome of functional activity.Sixty patients were randomized into 3 groups. Group A patients received 1 session of rESWT per week for 3 consecutive weeks; group B patients received a single session of rESWT; group C patients received one session of sham rESWT per week for 3 consecutive weeks. The primary outcome was Modified Ashworth Scale of hand and wrist, whereas the secondary outcomes were Fugl-Meyer Assessment of hand function and wrist control. Evaluations were performed before the first rESWT treatment and immediately 1, 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks after the last session of rESWT.Compared to the control group, the significant reduction in spasticity of hand and wrist lasted at least 16 and 8 weeks in group A and B, respectively. Three sessions of rESWT had a longer-lasting effect than one session. Furthermore, the reduction in spasticity after 3 sessions of rESWT may be beneficial for hand function and wrist control and the effect was maintained for 16 and 12 weeks, respectively.rESWT may be valuable in decreasing spasticity of the hand and wrist with accompanying enhancement of wrist control and hand function in chronic stroke patients. PMID:27149465

  19. A comparative study of the effects of trunk exercise program in aquatic and land-based therapy on gait in hemiplegic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byoung-Sun; Noh, Ji-Woong; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Yang, Seung-Min; Lee, Won-Deok; Shin, Yong-Sub; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Park, Jaehong; Kim, Junghwan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of aquatic and land-based trunk exercise program on gait in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 28 hemiplegic stroke patients (20 males, 8 females). The subjects performed a trunk exercise program for a total of four weeks. [Results] Walking speed and cycle, stance phase and stride length of the affected side, and the symmetry index of the stance phase significantly improved after the aquatic and land-based trunk exercise program. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the aquatic and land-based trunk exercise program may help improve gait performance ability after stroke. PMID:27390444

  20. A comparative study of the effects of trunk exercise program in aquatic and land-based therapy on gait in hemiplegic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Byoung-Sun; Noh, Ji-Woong; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Yang, Seung-Min; Lee, Won-Deok; Shin, Yong-Sub; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Park, Jaehong; Kim, Junghwan

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of aquatic and land-based trunk exercise program on gait in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 28 hemiplegic stroke patients (20 males, 8 females). The subjects performed a trunk exercise program for a total of four weeks. [Results] Walking speed and cycle, stance phase and stride length of the affected side, and the symmetry index of the stance phase significantly improved after the aquatic and land-based trunk exercise program. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the aquatic and land-based trunk exercise program may help improve gait performance ability after stroke. PMID:27390444

  1. Burden of stroke in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Loo, Keat Wei; Gan, Siew Hua

    2013-02-01

    Based on disability-adjusted life-years, stroke is the second leading cause of death and among the top five diseases with the greatest burden. Although two community-based studies have been conducted to determine the prevalence of stroke in the Philippines, the incidence has not been nationally recorded to date. The prevalence ranged from 1·9% to 6·59%, and 'Wiihabilitation', a rehabilitation stroke therapy, is widely practiced. A clinical trial for stroke rehabilitation using the Chinese Medicine NeuroAid®, which consists of several herbs, is ongoing in many hospitals across the Philippines. Due to their ready availability, phytomedicines are widely used, especially in the rural areas, for the treatment of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hypercholesterolemia, which are predisposing factors for stroke in the Philippines. Due to the increasing number of stroke cases annually, the government of the Philippines should emphasize primary and secondary prevention strategies. PMID:22568853

  2. Upper Extremity Proprioception in Healthy Aging and Stroke Populations, and the Effects of Therapist- and Robot-Based Rehabilitation Therapies on Proprioceptive Function

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Charmayne Mary Lee; Tommasino, Paolo; Budhota, Aamani; Campolo, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    The world’s population is aging, with the number of people ages 65 or older expected to surpass 1.5 billion people, or 16% of the global total. As people age, there are notable declines in proprioception due to changes in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Moreover, the risk of stroke increases with age, with approximately two-thirds of stroke-related hospitalizations occurring in people over the age of 65. In this literature review, we first summarize behavioral studies investigating proprioceptive deficits in normally aging older adults and stroke patients, and discuss the differences in proprioceptive function between these populations. We then provide a state of the art review the literature regarding therapist- and robot-based rehabilitation of the upper extremity proprioceptive dysfunction in stroke populations and discuss avenues of future research. PMID:25784872

  3. Treating the acute stroke patient as an emergency: current practices and future opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Davis, S; Lees, K; Donnan, G

    2006-01-01

    Summary Developments in acute stroke therapy have followed advances in the understanding of the evolving pathophysiology in both ischaemic stroke and intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH). In ischaemic stroke, rapid reperfusion of the ischaemic penumbra with thrombolysis within 3 h of symptom onset is of proven benefit, but few patients currently receive therapy, mainly due to the short-time window and lack of stroke expertise. In ICH, a recent study indicated that a haemostatic agent can limit ongoing bleeding and improve outcomes when administered within 4 h of stroke onset. These advances in acute stroke therapy underlie the concept that ‘time is brain’ and that urgent intervention can limit cerebral damage. Neuroprotective therapy could offer the prospect of a greater proportion of stroke patients receiving treatment, potentially before imaging and even in the ambulance setting. Virtually all stroke patients would benefit from receiving multidisciplinary care in acute stroke units. PMID:16620351

  4. Quality Improvement in Acute Ischemic Stroke Care in Taiwan: The Breakthrough Collaborative in Stroke.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Fang-I; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chern, Chang-Ming; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Liao, Hsun-Hsiang; Chang, Hang; LaBresh, Kenneth A; Lin, Hung-Jung; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Lien, Li-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In the management of acute ischemic stroke, guideline adherence is often suboptimal, particularly for intravenous thrombolysis or anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation. We sought to improve stroke care quality via a collaborative model, the Breakthrough Series (BTS)-Stroke activity, in a nationwide, multi-center activity in Taiwan. A BTS Collaborative, a short-term learning system for a large number of multidisciplinary teams from hospitals, was applied to enhance acute ischemic stroke care quality. Twenty-four hospitals participated in and submitted data for this stroke quality improvement campaign in 2010-2011. Totally, 14 stroke quality measures, adopted from the Get With The Guideline (GWTG)-Stroke program, were used to evaluate the performance and outcome of the ischemic stroke patients. Data for a one-year period from 24 hospitals with 13,181 acute ischemic stroke patients were analyzed. In 14 hospitals, most stroke quality measures improved significantly during the BTS-activity compared with a pre-BTS-Stroke activity period (2006-08). The rate of intravenous thrombolysis increased from 1.2% to 4.6%, door-to-needle time ≤60 minutes improved from 7.1% to 50.8%, symptomatic hemorrhage after intravenous thrombolysis decreased from 11.0% to 5.6%, and anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation increased from 32.1% to 64.1%. The yearly composite measures of five stroke quality measures revealed significant improvements from 2006 to 2011 (75% to 86.3%, p<0.001). The quarterly composite measures also improved significantly during the BTS-Stroke activity. In conclusion, a BTS collaborative model is associated with improved guideline adherence for patients with acute ischemic stroke. GWTG-Stroke recommendations can be successfully applied in countries besides the United States. PMID:27487190

  5. Quality Improvement in Acute Ischemic Stroke Care in Taiwan: The Breakthrough Collaborative in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chern, Chang-Ming; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Liao, Hsun-Hsiang; Chang, Hang; LaBresh, Kenneth A.; Lin, Hung-Jung; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Lien, Li-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In the management of acute ischemic stroke, guideline adherence is often suboptimal, particularly for intravenous thrombolysis or anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation. We sought to improve stroke care quality via a collaborative model, the Breakthrough Series (BTS)-Stroke activity, in a nationwide, multi-center activity in Taiwan. A BTS Collaborative, a short-term learning system for a large number of multidisciplinary teams from hospitals, was applied to enhance acute ischemic stroke care quality. Twenty-four hospitals participated in and submitted data for this stroke quality improvement campaign in 2010–2011. Totally, 14 stroke quality measures, adopted from the Get With The Guideline (GWTG)-Stroke program, were used to evaluate the performance and outcome of the ischemic stroke patients. Data for a one-year period from 24 hospitals with 13,181 acute ischemic stroke patients were analyzed. In 14 hospitals, most stroke quality measures improved significantly during the BTS-activity compared with a pre-BTS-Stroke activity period (2006–08). The rate of intravenous thrombolysis increased from 1.2% to 4.6%, door-to-needle time ≤60 minutes improved from 7.1% to 50.8%, symptomatic hemorrhage after intravenous thrombolysis decreased from 11.0% to 5.6%, and anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation increased from 32.1% to 64.1%. The yearly composite measures of five stroke quality measures revealed significant improvements from 2006 to 2011 (75% to 86.3%, p<0.001). The quarterly composite measures also improved significantly during the BTS-Stroke activity. In conclusion, a BTS collaborative model is associated with improved guideline adherence for patients with acute ischemic stroke. GWTG-Stroke recommendations can be successfully applied in countries besides the United States. PMID:27487190

  6. Acute Stroke Care at Rural Hospitals in Idaho: Challenges in Expediting Stroke Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebhardt, James G.; Norris, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Thrombolytics are currently the most effective treatment for stroke. However, the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke criteria for initiation of thrombolytic therapy, most notably the 3-hour time limit from symptom onset, have proven challenging for many rural hospitals to achieve. Purpose: To provide a snapshot of…

  7. Incidence of ischemic stroke and systemic embolism in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, CHA2DS2-VASc score of ≤1 and without anticoagulant therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yin-Jian; Yuan, Jin-Qing; Fan, Chao-Mei; Pu, Jie-Lin; Fang, Pi-Hua; Ma, Jian; Guo, Xi-Ying; Li, Yi-Shi

    2016-07-01

    Data on the risk of ischemic stroke and systemic embolism (iSSE) events in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), a CHA2DS2-VASc score of ≤1, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and without anticoagulant therapy are still lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of iSSE events in these patients. We consecutively screened medical records of patients with HCM and NVAF referred to Fuwai Hospital between January 1994 and March 2014. The primary end point was iSSE events, defined as a composite of ischemic stroke and systemic embolism. Follow-up was carried out to ascertain end point status. Medical records of 522 patients with NVAF and HCM were screened. A total of 108 patients (20.7 %) with a CHA2DS2-VASc score of ≤1 and without anticoagulant therapy were enrolled and constituted our study population. After a median follow-up of 2.4 years (range 0.6-14.1 years; 376.2 patient-years), ischemic stroke occurred in 2 patients, resulting in death of 1 patient in the first year and paralysis of the other patient in the fourth year. No other iSSE events occurred. The incidence of iSSE was 0.9 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.0-5.0 %] in the first year, and 0.5 % per 100 patient-years (95 % CI 0.1-1.9 %). The risk of iSSE events seems low in patients with NVAF, a CHA2DS2-VASc score of ≤1, HCM, and without anticoagulant therapy. Multicenter studies with sizeable study populations are needed to validate the risk of iSSE events in these patients. PMID:26231425

  8. Emerging Treatments for Motor Rehabilitation After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Chandramouli; Khot, Sandeep P.

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous treatments are available to improve cerebral perfusion after acute stroke and prevent recurrent stroke, few rehabilitation treatments have been conclusively shown to improve neurologic recovery. The majority of stroke survivors with motor impairment do not recover to their functional baseline, and there remains a need for novel neurorehabilitation treatments to minimize long-term disability, maximize quality of life, and optimize psychosocial outcomes. In recent years, several novel therapies have emerged to restore motor function after stroke, and additional investigational treatments have also shown promise. Here, we familiarize the neurohospitalist with emerging treatments for poststroke motor rehabilitation. The rehabilitation treatments covered in this review will include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications, constraint-induced movement therapy, noninvasive brain stimulation, mirror therapy, and motor imagery or mental practice. PMID:25829989

  9. Using clinical and robotic assessment tools to examine the feasibility of pairing tDCS with upper extremity physical therapy in patients with stroke and TBI: a consideration-of-concept pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Addie; Fritz, Stacy L.; Liuzzo, Derek M.; Newman-Norlund, Roger; Herter, Troy M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may provide a safe, non-invasive technique for modulating neural excitability during neurorehabilitation. OBJECTIVE 1) Assess feasibility and potential effectiveness of tDCS as an adjunct to standard upper extremity (UE) physical therapy (PT) for motor impairments resulting from neurological insult. 2) Determine sustainability of improvements over a six month period. METHODS Five participants with chronic neurologic insult (stroke or traumatic brain injury > 6 months prior) completed 24 sessions (40 minutes, three times/week) of UE-PT combined with bihemispheric tDCS delivered at 1.5mA over the motor cortex during the first 15 minutes of each PT session. Outcomes were assessed using clinical (UE Fugl-Meyer, Purdue Pegboard, Box and Block, Stroke Impact Scale) and robotic (unimanual and bimanual motor control) measures. Change in scores and associated effects sizes from Pre-test to Post-test and a six month Follow-up were calculated for each participant and group as a whole. RESULTS Scores on UE Fugl-Meyer, Box and Block, Purdue Pegboard, Stroke Impact Scale, and robotic measures improved from Pre- to Post-test. Improvements on UE Fugl-Meyer, Box and Block, and robotic measures were largely sustained at six months. CONCLUSIONS Combining bihemispheric tDCS with UE-PT in individuals with neurological insult warrants further investigation. PMID:25323084

  10. National data on stroke outcomes in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kongbunkiat, Kannikar; Kasemsap, Narongrit; Thepsuthammarat, Kaewjai; Tiamkao, Somsak; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2015-03-01

    Stroke is a major public health problem worldwide. There are limited data on national stroke prevalence and outcomes after the beginning of the thrombolytic therapy era in Thailand. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and factors associated with mortality in stroke patients in Thailand using the national reimbursement databases. Clinical data retrieved included individuals under the universal coverage, social security, and civil servant benefit systems between 1 October 2009 and 30 September 2010. The stroke diagnosis code was based on the International Classification of Diseases 10th revision system including G45 (transient cerebral ischemic attacks and related syndromes), I61 (intracerebral hemorrhage), and I63 (cerebral infarction). The prevalence and stroke outcomes were calculated from these coded data. Factors associated with death were evaluated by multivariable logistic regression analysis. We found that the most frequent stroke subtype was cerebral infarction with a prevalence of 122 patients per 100,000 of population, an average length of hospital stay of 6.8 days, an average hospital charge of 20,740 baht (∼$USD 691), a mortality rate of 7%, and thrombolytic prescriptions of 1%. The significant factors associated with stroke mortality were septicemia, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, myocardial infarction, status epilepticus, and heart failure. In conclusion, the prevalence and outcomes of stroke in Thailand were comparable with other countries. The era of thrombolytic therapy has just begun in Thailand. PMID:25595959

  11. A Retrospective Cohort Study Comparing Stroke Recurrence Rate in Ischemic Stroke Patients With and Without Acupuncture Treatment.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chun-Chuan; Liao, Chien-Chang; Sun, Mao-Feng; Su, Yi-Chang; Wen, Chi-Pang; Morisky, Donald E; Sung, Fung-Chang; Hsu, Chung Y; Lin, Jaung-Geng

    2015-09-01

    Little was known about the effects of acupuncture on stroke recurrence. The aim of this study is to investigate whether ischemic stroke patients receiving acupuncture treatment have a decreased risk of stroke recurrence. A retrospective cohort study of 30,058 newly diagnosed cases of ischemic stroke in 2000 to 2004 was conducted based on the claims of Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The use of acupuncture treatment and stroke recurrence were identified during the follow-up period from 2000 to 2009. This study compared the risk of stroke recurrence between ischemic stroke cohorts with and without acupuncture treatment by calculating adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of acupuncture associated with stroke recurrence in the Cox proportional hazard model. The stroke recurrence rate per 1000 person-years decreased from 71.4 without to 69.9 with acupuncture treatment (P < 0.001). Acupuncture treatment was associated with reduced risk of stroke recurrence (HR 0.88; 95% CI 0.84-0.91). The acupuncture effect was noted in patients with or without medical treatment for stroke prevention but its impact decreased with aging of stroke patients. Compared with stroke patients without acupuncture treatment and medication therapy, the hazard ratios of stroke recurrence for those had medication therapy only, acupuncture only, and both were 0.42 (95% CI 0.38-0.46), 0.50 (95% CI 0.43-0.57), and 0.39 (95% CI 0.35-0.43), respectively. This study raises the possibility that acupuncture might be effective in lowering stroke recurrence rate even in those on medications for stroke prevention. Results suggest the need of prospective sham-controlled and randomized trials to establish the efficacy of acupuncture in preventing stroke. PMID:26426630

  12. A Retrospective Cohort Study Comparing Stroke Recurrence Rate in Ischemic Stroke Patients With and Without Acupuncture Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Chun-Chuan; Liao, Chien-Chang; Sun, Mao-Feng; Su, Yi-Chang; Wen, Chi-Pang; Morisky, Donald E.; Sung, Fung-Chang; Hsu, Chung Y.; Lin, Jaung-Geng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Little was known about the effects of acupuncture on stroke recurrence. The aim of this study is to investigate whether ischemic stroke patients receiving acupuncture treatment have a decreased risk of stroke recurrence. A retrospective cohort study of 30,058 newly diagnosed cases of ischemic stroke in 2000 to 2004 was conducted based on the claims of Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The use of acupuncture treatment and stroke recurrence were identified during the follow-up period from 2000 to 2009. This study compared the risk of stroke recurrence between ischemic stroke cohorts with and without acupuncture treatment by calculating adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of acupuncture associated with stroke recurrence in the Cox proportional hazard model. The stroke recurrence rate per 1000 person-years decreased from 71.4 without to 69.9 with acupuncture treatment (P < 0.001). Acupuncture treatment was associated with reduced risk of stroke recurrence (HR 0.88; 95% CI 0.84–0.91). The acupuncture effect was noted in patients with or without medical treatment for stroke prevention but its impact decreased with aging of stroke patients. Compared with stroke patients without acupuncture treatment and medication therapy, the hazard ratios of stroke recurrence for those had medication therapy only, acupuncture only, and both were 0.42 (95% CI 0.38–0.46), 0.50 (95% CI 0.43–0.57), and 0.39 (95% CI 0.35–0.43), respectively. This study raises the possibility that acupuncture might be effective in lowering stroke recurrence rate even in those on medications for stroke prevention. Results suggest the need of prospective sham-controlled and randomized trials to establish the efficacy of acupuncture in preventing stroke. PMID:26426630

  13. Depression after Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Library CARING FOR SOMEONE WITH EMOTIONAL & BEHAVIORAL NEEDS Depression After Stroke After a stroke, your loved one ... available! Almost half of all stroke survivors have depression. Depression is a normal response to the losses ...

  14. The "Know Stroke" Campaign

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section The "Know Stroke" Campaign Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents ... campaign for the U.S. Hispanic community. 1 Know Stroke A stroke occurs when the blood supply to ...

  15. Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More The Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia Click a letter below to get a ... dozens of cardiovascular terms from our Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia and get links to in-depth information. ...

  16. Atherosclerosis and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stroke When the Beat is Off - Atrial Fibrillation Atherosclerosis and Stroke How Cardiovascular & Stroke Risks Relate Problems ... of LDL cholesterol contribute to the development of atherosclerosis as the cholesterol is deposited in artery walls, ...

  17. Risk Factors in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Mustacchi, Piero

    1985-01-01

    In the United States, stroke accounts for 160,000 annual deaths; only 16% of the 1.8 million stroke survivors are fully independent. The incidence of stroke increases with age. Hemorrhagic strokes outnumber ischemic strokes before age 15. Japanese men in this country have a lower stroke mortality than their age peers in Japan. Excessive stroke mortality for US nonwhites may not be entirely due to the greater prevalence of hypertension among blacks. Hypertension emerges as the single most powerful and reversible risk factor in stroke and for survival after stroke. Impaired cardiac function is the second most important precursor of stroke. The recurrence of stroke in survivors is high. The frequency of completed stroke is high in persons with transient ischemic attacks, but not in those with asymptomatic carotid bruits. Other reversible risk factors are smoking, the use of oral contraceptives, alcoholic excess, a low level of physical activity, blood hyperviscosity and drug abuse. PMID:3898597

  18. The "Know Stroke" Campaign

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section The "Know Stroke" Campaign Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of ... the campaign for the U.S. Hispanic community. 1 Know Stroke A stroke occurs when the blood supply ...

  19. National Stroke Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Advocate Share Spread the Word Contact Us Contact Us 1-800-STROKES (787-6537) 9707 E. ... Stroke En Espanol Stroke Facts Come Back Strong Contact Us 1-800-787-6537 9707 E. Easter ...

  20. Two Kinds of Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section Two Kinds of Stroke Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... are often a warning sign for future strokes. Stroke Can Affect Anyone Award-winning actress Julie Harris ...

  1. Critical Care for Patients with Massive Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Younsuck; Choi, H. Alex; Lee, Kiwon

    2014-01-01

    Malignant cerebral edema following ischemic stroke is life threatening, as it can cause inadequate blood flow and perfusion leading to irreversible tissue hypoxia and metabolic crisis. Increased intracranial pressure and brain shift can cause herniation syndrome and finally brain death. Multiple randomized clinical trials have shown that preemptive decompressive hemicraniectomy effectively reduces mortality and morbidity in patients with malignant middle cerebral artery infarction. Another life-saving decompressive surgery is suboccipital craniectomy for patients with brainstem compression by edematous cerebellar infarction. In addition to decompressive surgery, cerebrospinal fluid drainage by ventriculostomy should be considered for patients with acute hydrocephalus following stroke. Medical treatment begins with sedation, analgesia, and general measures including ventilatory support, head elevation, maintaining a neutral neck position, and avoiding conditions associated with intracranial hypertension. Optimization of cerebral perfusion pressure and reduction of intracranial pressure should always be pursued simultaneously. Osmotherapy with mannitol is the standard treatment for intracranial hypertension, but hypertonic saline is also an effective alternative. Therapeutic hypothermia may also be considered for treatment of brain edema and intracranial hypertension, but its neuroprotective effects have not been demonstrated in stroke. Barbiturate coma therapy has been used to reduce metabolic demand, but has become less popular because of its systemic adverse effects. Furthermore, general medical care is critical because of the complex interactions between the brain and other organ systems. Some challenging aspects of critical care, including ventilator support, sedation and analgesia, and performing neurological examinations in the setting of a minimal stimulation protocol, are addressed in this review. PMID:25328873

  2. Risk stratification and stroke prevention therapy care gaps in Canadian atrial fibrillation patients (from the Co-ordinated National Network to Engage Physicians in the Care and Treatment of Patients With Atrial Fibrillation chart audit).

    PubMed

    Patel, Ashish D; Tan, Mary K; Angaran, Paul; Bell, Alan D; Berall, Murray; Bucci, Claudia; Demchuk, Andrew M; Essebag, Vidal; Goldin, Lianne; Green, Martin S; Gregoire, Jean C; Gross, Peter L; Heilbron, Brett; Lin, Peter J; Ramanathan, Krishnan; Skanes, Allan; Wheeler, Bruce H; Goodman, Shaun G

    2015-03-01

    The objectives of this national chart audit (January to June 2013) of 6,346 patients with atrial fibrillation (AF; ≥18 years without a significant heart valve disorder) from 647 primary care physicians were to (1) describe the frequency of stroke and bleed risk assessments in patients with nonvalvular AF by primary care physicians, including the accuracy of these assessments relative to established predictive indexes; (2) outline contemporary methods of anticoagulation used; and (3) report the time in the therapeutic range among patients prescribed warfarin. An annual stroke risk assessment was not undertaken in 15% and estimated without a formal risk tool in 33%; agreement with CHADS2 score estimation was seen in 87% of patients. Major bleeding risk assessment was not undertaken in 25% and estimated without a formal risk tool in 47%; agreement with HAS-BLED score estimation was observed in 64% with physician overestimation in 26% of patients. Antithrombotic therapy included warfarin (58%), dabigatran (22%), rivaroxaban (14%), and apixaban (<1%). Among warfarin-treated patients, the median international normalized ratio was 2.4 and time in therapeutic range (TTR) was 73%; however, the TTR was <50% in 845 (25%), 50% to 69% in 674 (20%), and ≥70% in 1,827 (55%) patients. In conclusion, we describe a contemporary real-world elderly population with AF at important risk for stroke. There is apparent overestimation of bleeding risk in many patients. Warfarin was the dominant stroke prevention treatment; however, the suggested TTR target was achieved in only 55% of these patients. PMID:25727083

  3. Niacin for stroke prevention: evidence and rationale.

    PubMed

    Keener, Adrienne; Sanossian, Nerses

    2008-01-01

    Low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are associated with increased atherothrombotic events, including stroke. Niacin is a safe and effective means of raising HDL, yet its role in stroke prevention is not well characterized. The purpose of the study is to determine the role of niacin in stroke prevention. A search of the PUBMED database using the keywords niacin, stroke, atherosclerosis, and/or carotid artery was undertaken to identify studies for review. National guidelines from the American Heart Association and National Cholesterol Education Program were reviewed. Treatment of low serum HDL (<40 mg/dL) is an identified goal of dyslipidemic therapy. Niacin is effective in raising HDL levels and reducing cardiovascular events in individuals with high vascular risk and can be used for treatment of stroke patients with low serum HDL. Niacin can be used safely in combination with statins, the first-line dyslipidemic treatment for secondary stroke risk reduction, with increased efficacy. Studies are needed to better define the role for niacin in secondary stroke prevention. Treatment of stroke patients with extended-release (ER) of niacin, alone or in combination with statins, should be considered in stroke patients with atherosclerotic mechanisms with low serum HDL-C levels. PMID:19040554

  4. The Importance of Considering Sex Differences in Translational Stroke Research.

    PubMed

    Ahnstedt, Hilda; McCullough, Louise D; Cipolla, Marilyn J

    2016-08-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death worldwide, and differences between men and women have been documented in incidence, prevalence, and outcome. Here, we reviewed the literature on sex differences in stroke severity, mortality, functional outcome, and response to therapies after ischemic stroke. Many of the sex differences in stroke severity and mortality are explained by differences in baseline demographics such as older age in women. However, women account for more stroke deaths, consistently suffer from worse stroke outcomes, and are more often institutionalized and permanently disabled than men. These sex differences in functional outcome are equalized after treatment with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and women may benefit more from treatment than men. However, this may depend on race, as African-American women have less of a response to tPA than other groups. Regarding endovascular treatments, the few existing studies that have investigated sex differences in stroke outcome point to equal benefit in both sexes; however, many clinical trials are relatively underpowered to detect sex differences. Further, we considered sex-specific effects in animal models of stroke and present recommendations for the performance of stroke studies in female animals. The male-biased use of research animals is distinguished from the clinical situation where there is a disproportionate and growing female stroke population. Stroke in women is greatly understudied, and including both sexes is especially important in both preclinical and clinical studies that evaluate potential stroke therapies. PMID:26830778

  5. Impact of Infection on Stroke Morbidity and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Chad M; Behrouz, Réza

    2016-09-01

    Each year, millions of persons worldwide are disabled by stroke. The burden of stroke is expected to increase as a consequence of growth in our elderly population. Outcome is dependent upon limitation of secondary medical processes in the acute setting that lead to deterioration and increased long-term disability. The prevalence of infection after stroke is greater that seen in other medical conditions with similar acuity and its impact upon morbidity and mortality is substantial. Physical impairment and immune modulation are chief determinants in rate of infection after stroke. Each of these factors has been a target for therapeutic intervention. Current best practices for acute stroke management implement strategies for prevention, prompt identification, and treatment of infection. Novel therapies are currently being explored which have the opportunity to greatly minimize infectious complications following stroke. Fever commonly accompanies infection and independently influences stroke outcome. Targeted temperature management provides an additional chance to improve stroke recovery. PMID:27485944

  6. Biodynamic Performance of Hyaluronic Acid versus Synovial fluid of the Knee for Osteoarthritic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Corvelli, Michael; Che, Bernadette; Saeui, Christopher; Singh, Anirudha; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural biomaterial present in healthy joints but depleted in osteoarthritis (OA), has been employed clinically to provide symptomatic relief of joint pain. Joint movement combined with a reduced joint lubrication in osteoarthritic knees can result in increased wear and tear, chondrocyte apoptosis, and inflammation, leading to cascading cartilage deterioration. Therefore, development of an appropriate cartilage model and evaluation for its friction properties with potential lubricants in different conditions is necessary, which can closely resemble a mechanically induced OA cartilage. Additionally, the comparison of different models with and without endogenous lubricating surface zone proteins, such as PRG4 promotes a well-rounded understanding of cartilage lubrication. In this study, we present our findings on the lubricating effects of HA on different articular cartilage model surfaces in comparison to synovial fluid, a physiological lubricating biomaterial. The mechanical testings data demonstrated that HA reduced average static and kinetic friction coefficient values of the cartilage samples by 75% and 70%, respectively. Furthermore, HA mimicked the friction characteristics of freshly harvested natural synovial fluid throughout all tested and modeled OA conditions with no statistically significant difference. These characteristics led us to exclusively identify HA as an effective boundary layer lubricant in the technology that we develop to treat OA [Singh et al. 2104]. PMID:25858258

  7. Multisensory Stimulation in Stroke Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Barbro Birgitta

    2012-01-01

    The brain has a large capacity for automatic simultaneous processing and integration of sensory information. Combining information from different sensory modalities facilitates our ability to detect, discriminate, and recognize sensory stimuli, and learning is often optimal in a multisensory environment. Currently used multisensory stimulation methods in stroke rehabilitation include motor imagery, action observation, training with a mirror or in a virtual environment, and various kinds of music therapy. Non-invasive brain stimulation has showed promising preliminary results in aphasia and neglect. Patient heterogeneity and the interaction of age, gender, genes, and environment are discussed. Randomized controlled longitudinal trials starting earlier post-stroke are needed. The advance in brain network science and neuroimaging enabling longitudinal studies of structural and functional networks are likely to have an important impact on patient selection for specific interventions in future stroke rehabilitation. It is proposed that we should pay more attention to age, gender, and laterality in clinical studies. PMID:22509159

  8. Wake-Up Stroke and Stroke of Unknown Onset: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Wouters, Anke; Lemmens, Robin; Dupont, Patrick; Thijs, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Patients, who wake up with an ischemic stroke, account for a large number of the total stroke population, due to circadian morning predominance of stroke. Currently, this subset of patients is excluded from revascularization-therapy since no exact time of onset is known. A large group of these patients might be eligible for therapy. In this review, we assessed the current literature about the hypothesis that wake-up-strokes occur just prior on awakening and if this subgroup differs in characteristics compared to the overall stroke population. We looked at the safety and efficacy of thrombolysis and interventional techniques in the group of patients with unknown stroke-onset. We performed a meta-analysis of the diagnostic accuracy of the diffusion-FLAIR mismatch in identifying stroke within 3 and 4.5 h. The different imaging-selection criteria that can be used to treat these patients are discussed. Additional research on imaging findings associated with recent stroke and penumbral imaging will eventually lead to a shift from a rigid time-frame based therapy to a tissue-based individualized treatment approach. PMID:25161646

  9. Endovascular Treatment of Acute Stroke with Major Vessel Occlusion before Approval of Mechanical Thrombectomy Devices in Japan: Japanese Registry of Neuroendovascular Therapy (JR-NET) and JR-NET 2

    PubMed Central

    HAYAKAWA, Mikito; YAMAGAMI, Hiroshi; SAKAI, Nobuyuki; MATSUMARU, Yuji; YOSHIMURA, Shinichi; TOYODA, Kazunori

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the general status and historical transition of endovascular therapy (EVT) of acute stroke with major vessel occlusion before approval of mechanical thrombectomy devices in Japan from January 2005 to December 2009. We extracted 1,409 acute ischemic stroke patients receiving EVT (513 women, 69.8 ± 11.8 years) from two nationwide registry studies, the Japanese Registry of Neuroendovascular Therapy (JR-NET) and JR-NET 2. The median baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score was 18, and 81.3% of the patients received EVT within 6 hours after symptom onset. The culprit occluded arteries were the internal carotid artery (ICA) in 21.2%, middle cerebral artery (MCA) in 53.0%, and basilar artery (BA) in 20.6%. Intravenous thrombolysis was administered to 6.7% of the patients, and EVT mainly consisted of intra-arterial thrombolysis and percutaneous balloon angioplasty/balloon clot disruption. The final recanalization rate was 82.5%, and the clinical outcome was favorable in 35.8% and fatal in 11.6% at 30 days after onset or at discharge. There was no significant change in neurological severity at baseline throughout the study period, but the onset-to-treatment time became longer and the proportion of ICA or BA occlusion increased annually. Although the final recanalization rate was similar throughout the study period, the incidence of a favorable outcome tended to decreased annually from 41.0% to 29.0%. These results could be considered as baseline data that can be used to validate the beneficial effects of novel EVT devices in Japan. PMID:24292608

  10. Stroke: morbidity, risk factors, and care in taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Fang-I; Chiou, Hung-Yi

    2014-05-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death and the most common cause of complex disability in Taiwan. The annual age-standardized mortality rate of stroke is steadily decreasing between 2001 and 2012. The average years of potential life lost before age 70 for stroke is 13.8 years, ranked the fifth in the cause of death. Its national impact is predicted to be greater accompany aging population. The most common type of stroke was ischemic stroke in Taiwan. Small vessel occlusion was the majority of ischemic strokes subtype. Age, gender, hypertension, diabetes hyperlipidemia, obesity, atrial fibrillation, and smoking were important contributory factors to stroke morbidity. The standard treatment for acute ischemic stroke in Taiwan is providing the intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) therapy for ischemic stroke patients within 3 hours of symptom onset. However, the rate of IV tPA therapy for patients with acute ischemic stroke is still low in Taiwan. Therefore, improving the public awareness of stroke warning signs and act on stroke and improving in-hospital critical pathway for thrombolysis would be the most important and urgent issues in Taiwan. To improve acute stroke care quality, a program of Breakthrough Series-Stroke activity was conducted from 2010 to 2011 and stroke centers were established in the medical centers. For the prevention of stroke, it was successful to increased annual smoke cessation rate through the 2009 Tobacco Hazards Prevention Act and decreased obesity rate through a nationwide weight-loss program conducted by Health Promotion Administration from 2011 to 2013 in Taiwan. PMID:24949310

  11. Large Animal Stroke Models vs. Rodent Stroke Models, Pros and Cons, and Combination?

    PubMed

    Cai, Bin; Wang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of serious long-term disability worldwide and the second leading cause of death in many countries. Long-time attempts to salvage dying neurons via various neuroprotective agents have failed in stroke translational research, owing in part to the huge gap between animal stroke models and stroke patients, which also suggests that rodent models have limited predictive value and that alternate large animal models are likely to become important in future translational research. The genetic background, physiological characteristics, behavioral characteristics, and brain structure of large animals, especially nonhuman primates, are analogous to humans, and resemble humans in stroke. Moreover, relatively new regional imaging techniques, measurements of regional cerebral blood flow, and sophisticated physiological monitoring can be more easily performed on the same animal at multiple time points. As a result, we can use large animal stroke models to decrease the gap and promote translation of basic science stroke research. At the same time, we should not neglect the disadvantages of the large animal stroke model such as the significant expense and ethical considerations, which can be overcome by rodent models. Rodents should be selected as stroke models for initial testing and primates or cats are desirable as a second species, which was recommended by the Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable (STAIR) group in 2009. PMID:26463926

  12. The NLRP3 inflammasome and stroke.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yeqing; Ding, Zhi-Hong; Zhan, Fa-Xian; Cai, Li; Yin, Xiaoxv; Ling, Jin-Lian; Ye, Jian-Jun; Hou, Shuang-Yi; Lu, Zuxun; Wang, Zhi-Hong; Liu, Jia-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Inflammasome pattern recognition receptors, which belong to the family of multi-meric proteins, play an important role in innate immunity, including NLRPs, NLRC, and NAIP. Among these receptors, NLRP3 (nucleotide-binding domain (NOD)-like receptor protein 3) inflammasome may activate the inflammation and participate in atherosclerosis, pathophysiology of myocardial infarction, resultin ischemia/reperfusion injury and stroke and other cardiovascular diseases. Effective regulation of NLRP3 may help prevent or even treat stroke. In recent years, the role of inflammation in stroke has attracted much attention, and the in-depth study of its mechanism of action is gradually clear. This mini-review focuses on the association of regulatory mechanisms of NLRP3 inflammasome with the development of stroke, which may supply some clues for future therapies and novel drug targets for stroke. PMID:26131053

  13. Neuroprotection in Stroke: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Arshad

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a devastating medical condition, killing millions of people each year and causing serious injury to many more. Despite advances in treatment, there is still little that can be done to prevent stroke-related brain damage. The concept of neuroprotection is a source of considerable interest in the search for novel therapies that have the potential to preserve brain tissue and improve overall outcome. Key points of intervention have been identified in many of the processes that are the source of damage to the brain after stroke, and numerous treatment strategies designed to exploit them have been developed. In this review, potential targets of neuroprotection in stroke are discussed, as well as the various treatments that have been targeted against them. In addition, a summary of recent progress in clinical trials of neuroprotective agents in stroke is provided. PMID:24579051

  14. Patent Foramen Ovale and Stroke.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yee-Ping; Homma, Shunichi

    2016-07-25

    A patent foramen ovale (PFO) is common and found in nearly 25% of healthy individuals. The majority of patients with PFO remain asymptomatic and they are not at increased risk for developing a stroke. The presence of PFO, however, has been found to be higher in patients with cryptogenic stroke, suggesting there may be a subset of patients with PFO who are indeed at risk for stroke. Paradoxical embolization of venous thrombi through the PFO, which then enter the arterial circulation, is hypothesized to account for this relationship. Although aerated-saline transesophageal echocardiography is the gold standard for diagnosis, aerated-saline transthoracic echocardiography and transcranial Doppler are often used as the initial diagnostic tests for detecting PFO. Patients with cryptogenic stroke and PFO are generally treated with antiplatelet therapy in the absence of another condition for which anticoagulation is necessary. Based on the findings of 3 large randomized clinical trials, current consensus guidelines do not recommend percutaneous closure, though this is an area of controversy. The following review discusses the relationship of PFO and cryptogenic stroke, focusing on the epidemiology, pathophysiological mechanisms, diagnostic tools, associated clinical/anatomic factors and treatment. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1665-1673). PMID:27334127

  15. The implementation of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator in acute ischaemic stroke--a scientific position statement from the National Stroke Foundation and the Stroke Society of Australasia.

    PubMed

    2009-05-01

    Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been licensed in Australia for thrombolysis in selected patients with acute ischaemic stroke since 2003. The use of tPA is low but is increasing across Australia and national audits indicate efficacy and safety outcomes equivalent to international benchmarks. Implementing tPA therapy in clinical practice is, however, challenging and requires a coordinated multidisciplinary approach to acute stroke care across prehospital, emergency department and inpatient care sectors. Stroke care units are an essential ingredient underpinning safe implementation of stroke thrombolysis. Support systems such as care pathways, therapy delivery protocols, and thrombolysis-experienced multidisciplinary care teams are also important enablers. Where delivery of stroke thrombolysis is being planned, health systems need to be re-configured to provide these important elements. This consensus statement provides a review of the evidence for, and implementation of, tPA in acute ischaemic stroke with specific reference to the Australian health-care system. PMID:19545242

  16. Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Nour, May; Scalzo, Fabien; Liebeskind, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Despite ongoing advances in stroke imaging and treatment, ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke continue to debilitate patients with devastating outcomes at both the personal and societal levels. While the ultimate goal of therapy in ischemic stroke is geared towards restoration of blood flow, even when mitigation of initial tissue hypoxia is successful, exacerbation of tissue injury may occur in the form of cell death, or alternatively, hemorrhagic transformation of reperfused tissue. Animal models have extensively demonstrated the concept of reperfusion injury at the molecular and cellular levels, yet no study has quantified this effect in stroke patients. These preclinical models have also demonstrated the success of a wide array of neuroprotective strategies at lessening the deleterious effects of reperfusion injury. Serial multimodal imaging may provide a framework for developing therapies for reperfusion injury. PMID:25187778

  17. [THE IMPORTANCE OF ANTICOAGULANT THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH ARTIAL FIBRILLATION IN STROKE PREVENTION--SUMMARY OF INTERNATIONAL DATA AND NOVEL THERAPEUTIC MODALITIES].

    PubMed

    Mirolovics, Ágnes; Papp, Csaba; Zsuga, Judit; Bereczki, Dániel

    2016-03-30

    The most common cardiogenic cause of ischaemic stroke is atrial fibrillation which increases the probability of stroke five-fold and doubles case fatality. Based on international data the incidence of atrial fibrillation is approx. 2% however this rapidly increases with age. The necessity of using oral anticoagulants in the prevention of non-valvular atrial fibrillation related stroke is decided based on estimated stroke risk. The CHADS2 and the more predictive CHA2DS2-VASc scales are used for this purpose while the bleeding risk of patients treated with anticoagulant may be estimated by the HAS-BLED scoring scale. For decades oral anticoagulation meant using vitamin-K antagonists. Based on international data we can see that rate of anticoagulation is unacceptably low, furthermore most of the anticoagulated patients aren't within the therapeutic range of INR (INR: 2-3). A lot of disadvantages of vitamin-K antagonists are known (e.g. food-drug interaction, need for regular coagulation monitoring, increased risk of bleeding), therefore compounds with new therapeutic target have been developed. The novel oral anticoagulants (NOAC) can be divided in two major subgroups: direct thrombin inhibitors (dabigatran etexilate) and Xa-factor inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban). These products are administered in fix doses, they less frequently interact with other medications or food, and regular coagulation monitoring is not needed when using these drugs. Moreover several studies have shown that they are at least as effective in the prevention of ischaemic stroke than the vitamin-K antagonists, with no more haemorrhagic complications. PMID:27188000

  18. A 2 × 2 factorial design for the combination therapy of minocycline and remote ischemic perconditioning: efficacy in a preclinical trial in murine thromboembolic stroke model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background After the failure of so many drugs and therapies for acute ischemic stroke, innovative approaches are needed to develop new treatments. One promising strategy is to test combinations of agents in the pre-hospital setting prior to the administration of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) and/ or the use of mechanical reperfusion devices in the hospital. Methods We performed a 2 × 2 factorial design preclinical trial where we tested minocycline (MINO), remote ischemic perconditioning (RIPerC) and their combination treatment in a thromboembolic clot model of stroke in mice, without IV-tPA or later treated with IV-tPA at 4 hours post-stroke. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), behavioral outcomes as neurological deficit score (NDS) and adhesive tape removal test, and infarct size measurement were performed at 48 hours post-stroke. Mice within the experimental sets were randomized for the different treatments, and all outcome measures were blinded. Results RIPerC significantly improved CBF as measured by LSCI in both with and without tPA treated mice (P < 0.001). MINO and RIPerC treatment were effective alone at reducing infarct size (p < 0.0001) and improving short-term functional outcomes (p < 0.001) in the tPA and non-tPA treated animals. The combination treatment of MINO and RIPerC significantly reduced the infarct size greater than either intervention alone (p < 0.05). There were trends in favor of improving functional outcomes after combination treatment of MINO and RIPerC; however combination treatment group was not significantly different than the individual treatments of MINO and RIPerC. There was no “statistical” interaction between minocycline and RIPerC treatments indicating that the effects of RIPerC and MINO were additive and not synergistic on the outcome measures. Conclusion In the future, combining these two safe and low cost interventions in the ambulance

  19. Fluid overload is associated with an increased risk for 90-day mortality in critically ill patients with renal replacement therapy: data from the prospective FINNAKI study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Positive fluid balance has been associated with an increased risk for mortality in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury with or without renal replacement therapy (RRT). Data on fluid accumulation prior to RRT initiation and mortality are limited. We aimed to study the association between fluid accumulation at RRT initiation and 90-day mortality. Methods We conducted a prospective, multicenter, observational cohort study in 17 Finnish intensive care units (ICUs) during a five-month period. We collected data on patient characteristics, RRT timing, and parameters at RRT initiation. We studied the association of parameters at RRT initiation, including fluid overload (defined as cumulative fluid accumulation > 10% of baseline weight) with 90-day mortality. Results We included 296 RRT-treated critically ill patients. Of 283 patients with complete data on fluid balance, 76 (26.9%) patients had fluid overload. The median (interquartile range) time from ICU admission to RRT initiation was 14 (3.3 to 41.5) hours. The 90-day mortality rate of the whole cohort was 116 of 296 (39.2%; 95% confidence interval 38.6 to 39.8%). The crude 90-day mortality of patients with or without fluid overload was 45 of 76 (59.2%) vs. 65 of 207 (31.4%), P < 0.001. In logistic regression, fluid overload was associated with an increased risk for 90-day mortality (odds ratio 2.6) after adjusting for disease severity, time of RRT initiation, initial RRT modality, and sepsis. Of the 168 survivors with data on RRT use at 90 days, 34 (18.9%, 95% CI 13.2 to 24.6%) were still dependent on RRT. Conclusions Patients with fluid overload at RRT initiation had twice as high crude 90-day mortality compared to those without. Fluid overload was associated with increased risk for 90-day mortality even after adjustments. PMID:23075459

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of stroke volume variation measured with uncalibrated arterial waveform analysis for the prediction of fluid responsiveness in patients with impaired left ventricular function: a prospective, observational study.

    PubMed

    Montenij, L J; Sonneveld, J P C; Nierich, A P; Buhre, W F; de Waal, E E C

    2016-08-01

    Uncalibrated arterial waveform analysis enables dynamic preload assessment in a minimally invasive fashion. Evidence about the validity of the technique in patients with impaired left ventricular function is scarce, while adequate cardiac preload assessment would be of great value in these patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of stroke volume variation (SVV) measured with the FloTrac/Vigileo™ system in patients with impaired left ventricular function. In this prospective, observational study, 22 patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction of 40 % or less undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting were included. Patients were considered fluid responsive if cardiac output increased with 15 % or more after volume loading (7 ml kg(-1) ideal body weight). The following variables were calculated: area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve, ideal cut-off value for SVV, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and overall accuracy. In addition, SVV cut-off points to obtain 90 % true positive and 90 % true negative predictions were determined. ROC analysis revealed an area under the curve of 0.70 [0.47; 0.92]. The ideal SVV cut-off value was 10 %, with a corresponding sensitivity and specificity of 56 and 69 % respectively. Overall accuracy was 64 %, positive and negative predictive values were 69 and 56 % respectively. SVV values to obtain more than 90 % true positive and negative predictions were 16 and 6 % respectively. The ability of uncalibrated arterial waveform analysis SVV to predict fluid responsiveness in patients with impaired LVF was low. PMID:26227160

  1. Cryptogenic Stroke: Making the Management Less Cryptic.

    PubMed

    Marks, Stephen J; Khera, Sahil

    2016-01-01

    Cryptogenic stroke (CS) accounts for 20% to 40% of ischemic strokes. CS is defined as a cortical infarct suggestive of an embolic stroke with no identifiable cardiac etiology, large vessel occlusive disease, or small vessel lacunar stroke. The likely etiologies for CS are patent foramen ovale (PFO) and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, which can be detected by transesophageal echocardiography and long-term cardiac rhythm monitoring. In a busy academic hospital, the stroke service is frequently asked to provide a rational approach to patients with such a presentation. The 2011 American Heart Association/American Stroke Association recommends that antiplatelet therapy is "reasonable" (Class IIa; Level of Evidence B) for patients with PFO and a clinical presentation of CS. Confounding PFO management is the lack of a controlled trial comparing anticoagulation with antiplatelet therapy in patients with CS, despite the belief that the primary mechanism of PFO-mediated stroke would be that it serves as a conduit for venous emboli. Data from 3 recent prospective PFO closure device trials further compound the management protocols for these patients. Also complicating the management of CS is increasing evidence that paroxysmal atrial fibrillation may be found as often as 30% with extensive monitoring and long-term follow-up of 36 months. Based on these recent developments, we summarize the factors that we deemed relevant in our approach to patients with CS. PMID:25867760

  2. Combination Protocol of Low-Frequency rTMS and Intensive Occupational Therapy for Post-stroke Upper Limb Hemiparesis: a 6-year Experience of More Than 1700 Japanese Patients.

    PubMed

    Kakuda, Wataru; Abo, Masahiro; Sasanuma, Jinichi; Shimizu, Masato; Okamoto, Takatsugu; Kimura, Chikou; Kakita, Kiyohito; Hara, Hiroyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Several years ago, we proposed a combination protocol of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and intensive occupational therapy (OT) for upper limb hemiparesis after stroke. Subsequently, the number of patients treated with the protocol has increased in Japan. We aimed to present the latest data on our proposed combination protocol for post-stroke upper limb hemiparesis as a result of a multi-institutional study. After confirming that a patient met the inclusion criteria for the protocol, they were scheduled to receive the 15-day inpatient protocol. In the protocol, two sessions of 20-min rTMS and 120-min occupational therapy were provided daily, except for Sundays and the days of admission/discharge. Motor function of the affected upper limb was evaluated by the Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA) and Wolf motor function test (WMFT) at admission/discharge and at 4 weeks after discharge if possible. A total of 1725 post-stroke patients were studied (mean age at admission 61.4 ± 13.0 years). The scheduled 15-day protocol was completed by all patients. At discharge, the increase in FMA score, shortening in performance time of WMFT, and increase in functional ability scale (FAS) score of WMFT were significant (FMA score 46.8 ± 12.2 to 50.9 ± 11.4 points, p < 0.001; performance time of WMFT 2.57 ± 1.32 to 2.21 ± 1.33, p < 0.001; FAS score of WMFT 47.4 ± 14. to 51.4 ± 14.3 points, p < 0.001). Our proposed combination protocol can be a potentially safe and useful therapeutic intervention for upper limb hemiparesis after stroke, although its efficacy should be confirmed in a randomized controlled study. PMID:26884316

  3. Mechanical Thrombectomy for Stroke After Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Márcio; Martins, Catarina; Koukoulis, Giovanna; Marques, Marta; Reis, João; Abecassis, Miguel

    2016-08-01

    Stroke after cardiac surgery remains a devastating complication and its treatment options are limited. Systemic fibrinolysis is a relative contraindication, because it raises the risk of systemic hemorrhage. Endovascular therapy, mechanical thrombectomy, and intra-arterial fibrinolysis have emerged as safer options. We present three patients who developed strokes following cardiac surgery who underwent successful mechanical thrombectomy and review the literature on this subject. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12776 (J Card Surg 2016;31:517-520). PMID:27282492

  4. The fluid dynamics of simultaneous irrigation with negative pressure wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kathryn E; Moquin, Kenneth J; Lavery, Lawrence A

    2016-08-01

    Saline irrigation has been shown to be both experimentally and clinically efficacious in decreasing bacterial contamination as well as decreasing infection rates. The dynamics of irrigation delivery fall into two primary categories: simultaneous and intermittent irrigation. An important component to irrigation therapy is distribution of irrigation solution to hard-to-reach areas of a wound bed, including undermining and fissure-like structures. Here we test the effectiveness of simultaneous irrigation to fill the irregular structures of a wound bed. In order to visualise the dynamic movement of irrigation solution, three-dimensional wound models were constructed using clear synthetic ballistic gel. Wounds with the aforementioned characteristics were carved into the ballistic gel with varying area, depth and volume. All three wounds were dressed as per manufacturer's instructions. Data demonstrate that simultaneous irrigation is effective in reaching all parts of a wound bed in wound models that have both undermining and tunnelling, and irrigation effectively saturates bridged wounds. Finally, this study shows that there is constant turnover of irrigation solution in the wound that is driven more by administration volume and less by flow rate. These data show that simultaneous irrigation is an effective technique for delivering irrigation solution to both simple and complex wounds. PMID:25968404

  5. Effect of perioperative crystalloid or colloid fluid therapy on hemorrhage, coagulation competence, and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Kirsten C.; Secher, Niels H.; Pedersen, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: A meta-analysis concerning perioperative coagulation competence, hemorrhage, and outcome was conducted including the use of hydroxyethyl starches (HESs), dextran, or albumin versus administration of a crystalloid as control to assess the efficacy and safety of colloids and crystalloids for fluid administration during major elective surgery. Surgery was restricted to cardiovascular and noncardiovascular surgery, and HESs were stratified to HES 130/0.4 and HES 200/0.5. Methods: We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science, EMBASE, conference proceedings, reference lists, and databases of ongoing trials. Results: Thirty one primary clinical randomized controlled trials included 2287 patients undergoing major surgery from January 2000 to August 2015. The perioperative changes in coagulation competence were measured by thromboelastography (TEG) maximum amplitude (MA) in 9 studies administering crystalloids versus HES and in 4 studies administering albumin versus HES. All studies but 1 disclosed increased reduction in TEG-MA following HES administration (P = 0.0001 and 0.0002). The total loss of blood was reported in 17 studies in which crystalloids were compared to HES and 12 studies reported increased blood loss after administration of HES (P < 0.003). When administering albumin versus HES, 6 studies reported reduced hemorrhage associated with albumin administration (P = 0.005). Reoperation was not significantly reduced by the use of crystalloids, but may be more frequent after HESs compared to albumin (P < 0.03). In this analysis, more patients admitted to administration of HESs were exposed to decrease coagulation competence, compared to perioperative crystalloids and albumin administration. Conclusion: This stratified meta-analysis showed that increased blood loss was found in noncardiovascular surgery among patients receiving HES compared with crystalloids, followed by a marked

  6. [Stroke - lifestyle and environment].

    PubMed

    Gerischer, L M; Flöel, A; Endres, M

    2015-08-01

    Lifestyle modifications and environmental factors are important for stroke prevention and rehabilitation after stroke. The individual stroke risk may be modified by factors like physical activity, body weight and nutrition, special dietary supplements such as vitamins, smoking, consumption of tea, coffee and alcohol, psychological factors and by keeping a pet. The focus of this article lies on measures for stroke prevention. For certain topics, it also comments on factors that are important during rehabilitation after stroke. PMID:26105161

  7. Stroke Epidemiology in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a major health burden in Thailand. It is the leading cause of death and long term disability in both men and women. Despite the improvement of healthcare system, the mortality rate of stroke is still increasing during the past 5 years. The incidence of stroke in Thailand is now being studied in a large population based cohort. The prevalence of stroke is estimated to be 1.88% among adults 45 years and older. Stroke is more prevalent in men than in women and the mean age of stroke onset is 65 years. Hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome, and atrial fibrillation are major risk factors of stroke in the Thai population. Evolution from predominantly rural to urbanized industrial communities result in the increasing prevalence of these risk factors. Similar to other parts of the world, ischemic stroke is the most common stroke type but the proportion of hemorrhagic stroke is higher when compared to Caucasian populations. Among patients with ischemic stroke, lacunar stroke is most common, accounting for almost half followed by atherosclerotic disease. Intracranial atherosclerosis is also prevalent in Thai population. For acute treatment, intravenous thrombolysis has been used in Thailand for over 20 years. Its cost is reimbursed by the national health care system but its use is still limited. With the introduction of the stroke fast track system, prompt stroke treatment across the country is warranted. Stroke unit is now the standard of care in large regional and provincial hospitals. PMID:24741559

  8. A review of the progression and future implications of brain-computer interface therapies for restoration of distal upper extremity motor function after stroke.

    PubMed

    Remsik, Alexander; Young, Brittany; Vermilyea, Rebecca; Kiekhoefer, Laura; Abrams, Jessica; Evander Elmore, Samantha; Schultz, Paige; Nair, Veena; Edwards, Dorothy; Williams, Justin; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2016-05-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of acquired disability resulting in distal upper extremity functional motor impairment. Stroke mortality rates continue to decline with advances in healthcare and medical technology. This has led to an increased demand for advanced, personalized rehabilitation. Survivors often experience some level of spontaneous recovery shortly after their stroke event, yet reach a functional plateau after which there is exiguous motor recovery. Nevertheless, studies have demonstrated the potential for recovery beyond this plateau. Non-traditional neurorehabilitation techniques, such as those incorporating the brain-computer interface (BCI), are being investigated for rehabilitation. BCIs may offer a gateway to the brain's plasticity and revolutionize how humans interact with the world. Non-invasive BCIs work by closing the proprioceptive feedback loop with real-time, multi-sensory feedback allowing for volitional modulation of brain signals to assist hand function. BCI technology potentially promotes neuroplasticity and Hebbian-based motor recovery by rewarding cortical activity associated with sensory-motor rhythms through use with a variety of self-guided and assistive modalities. PMID:27112213

  9. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors as a New Therapy for Ischemic Stroke and other Neurologic Diseases: Is there any Hope for a Better Outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Gągało, Iwona; Rusiecka, Izabela; Kocić, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in the treatment of malignancies has been already defined. Aberrant activation of tyrosine kinase signaling pathways has been causally linked not only to cancers but also to other non-oncological diseases. This review concentrates on the novel plausible usage of this group of drugs in neurological disorders, such as ischemic brain stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis. The drugs considered here are representatives of both receptor and non-receptor TKIs. Among them imatinib and masitinib have the broadest spectrum of therapeutic usage. Both drugs are effective in ischemic brain stroke and multiple sclerosis, but only imatinib produces a therapeutic effect in subarachnoid hemorrhage. Masitinib and dasatinib reduce the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. In the case of multiple sclerosis several TKIs are useful, including apart from imatinib and masitinib, also sunitinib, sorafenib, lestaurtinib. Furthermore, the possible molecular targets for the drugs are described in connection with the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in the diseases in question. The most frequent target for the TKIs is PDGFR which plays a pivotal role particularly in ischemic brain stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage. The collected data indicates that TKIs are very promising candidates for new therapeutic interventions in neurological diseases. PMID:26630962

  10. Atrial fibrillation and stroke: epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Reiffel, James A

    2014-04-01

    The statistics for AFib are impressive. (online video available at: http://education.amjmed.com/video.php?event_id=445&stage_id=5&vcs=1). The principal risk with AFib, stroke or thrombotic embolism, is increased 5-fold in some series; AFib accounts for ≥15% of all strokes in the United States, 36% of strokes for individuals aged >80, and up to 20% of cryptogenic strokes, which means >100,000-125,000 embolic strokes per year, of which >20% are fatal. Patients with ischemic stroke and AFib are significantly (P<.0005) more likely to be chronically disabled, bedridden, and to require constant nursing care, particularly older patients (≥85 years). Prevention of these thromboembolic outcomes requires prophylactic anticoagulation therapy. The "gold standard" for anticoagulation has been warfarin, despite its well-known side effects and adherence challenges for patients. The recent approvals of several new, novel oral anticoagulation (NOAC) agents, however, presents physicians with a benefit/risk profile that represents an important advance over warfarin prophylaxis. The principal risk with all oral anticoagulants is bleeding. An important misconception about warfarin is that if anticoagulated patients bleed, the risk can be quickly reversed, but most trial experience has found that warfarin reversal requires 24 hours to halve the INR value. Reversal of anticoagulation with the NOACs is unproven at present; possible approaches are presented in this review, but since the NOACs have both rapid onsets of action and short biologic half-lives, they do not present the same reversal challenges as warfarin. Finally, physicians must be aware of thromboembolic risk assessment. The principal risk assessment scores are CHADS2, updated with the more recent CHA2DS2-VASc to provide more accurate assessment of low-risk patients; this review concludes with a novel flow-chart showing physicians how the CHADS2/CHA2DS2-VASc scoring systems can be used. PMID:24655742

  11. The potential of mesenchymal stem cells derived from amniotic membrane and amniotic fluid for neuronal regenerative therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Lee, Kyung-Bon; Kim, Min Kyu

    2014-01-01

    The mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which are derived from the mesoderm, are considered as a readily available source for tissue engineering. They have multipotent differentiation capacity and can be differentiated into various cell types. Many studies have demonstrated that the MSCs identified from amniotic membrane (AM-MSCs) and amniotic fluid (AF-MSCs) are shows advantages for many reasons, including the possibility of noninvasive isolation, multipotency, self-renewal, low immunogenicity, anti-inflammatory and nontumorigenicity properties, and minimal ethical problem. The AF-MSCs and AM-MSCs may be appropriate sources of mesenchymal stem cells for regenerative medicine, as an alternative to embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Recently, regenerative treatments such as tissue engineering and cell transplantation have shown potential in clinical applications for degenerative diseases. Therefore, amnion and MSCs derived from amnion can be applied to cell therapy in neuro-degeneration diseases. In this review, we will describe the potential of AM-MSCs and AF-MSCs, with particular focus on cures for neuronal degenerative diseases. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(3): 135-140] PMID:24499672

  12. Management of depression in elderly stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Lökk, Johan; Delbari, Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    Poststroke depression (PSD) in elderly patients has been considered the most common neuropsychiatric consequence of stroke up to 6–24 months after stroke onset. When depression appears within days after stroke onset, it is likely to remit, whereas depression at 3 months is likely to be sustained for 1 year. One of the major problems posed by elderly stroke patients is how to identify and optimally manage PSD. This review provides insight to identification and management of depression in elderly stroke patients. Depression following stroke is less likely to include dysphoria and more likely characterized by vegetative signs and symptoms compared with other forms of late-life depression, and clinicians should rely more on nonsomatic symptoms rather than somatic symptoms. Evaluation and diagnosis of depression among elderly stroke patients are more complex due to vague symptoms of depression, overlapping signs and symptoms of stroke and depression, lack of properly trained health care personnel, and insufficient assessment tools for proper diagnosis. Major goals of treatment are to reduce depressive symptoms, improve mood and quality of life, and reduce the risk of medical complications including relapse. Antidepressants (ADs) are generally not indicated in mild forms because the balance of benefit and risk is not satisfactory in elderly stroke patients. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the first choice of PSD treatment in elderly patients due to their lower potential for drug interaction and side effects, which are more common with tricyclic ADs. Recently, stimulant medications have emerged as promising new therapeutic interventions for PSD and are now the subject of rigorous clinical trials. Cognitive behavioral therapy can also be useful, and electroconvulsive therapy is available for patients with severe refractory PSD. PMID:20856917

  13. Herpes simplex encephalitis initially presented with parietal cortex lesions mimicking acute ischemic stroke: A case report.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yoshine; Ishii, Nobuyuki; Sakai, Katsuya; Mochizuki, Hitoshi; Shiomi, Kazutaka; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2016-03-01

    A 73-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital due to a decreased conscious level and a high fever. Six days before her admission, she felt transient numbness in her right lower limb. Brain MRI taken by her local doctor revealed only right parietal cortex lesions. She was diagnosed with transient ischemic attack and started on anti-platelet therapy. One day before her admission, she became drowsy, and left-side weakness developed. She was admitted to a community hospital for treating stroke. On the next day, she was referred to our hospital because of a high fever. Our brain MRI showed new lesions in her right temporal lobe. She had no stroke risk factors, and embolic sources were not detected. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis detected herpes simplex virus DNA. She was diagnosed with herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). HSE is common encephalitis which develops fever, headache and alteration in mental status. It often involves temporal lobe, but extratemporal lesions alone are not uncommon. Diffusion-weighted images (DWI) of brain are of importance to differentiate HSE from stroke. When it is questionable to diagnose with stroke for patients with cerebral cortex lesions, they must be monitored with close observation. There is the possibility of initial presentation of HSE in that situation even if patients have no typical symptoms. PMID:26797480

  14. Airplane stroke syndrome.

    PubMed

    Humaidan, Hani; Yassi, Nawaf; Weir, Louise; Davis, Stephen M; Meretoja, Atte

    2016-07-01

    Only 37 cases of stroke during or soon after long-haul flights have been published to our knowledge. In this retrospective observational study, we searched the Royal Melbourne Hospital prospective stroke database and all discharge summaries from 1 September 2003 to 30 September 2014 for flight-related strokes, defined as patients presenting with stroke within 14days of air travel. We hypothesised that a patent foramen ovale (PFO) is an important, but not the only mechanism, of flight-related stroke. We describe the patient, stroke, and flight characteristics. Over the study period, 131 million passengers arrived at Melbourne airport. Our centre admitted 5727 stroke patients, of whom 42 (0.73%) had flight-related strokes. Flight-related stroke patients were younger (median age 65 versus 73, p<0.001), had similar stroke severity, and received intravenous thrombolysis more often than non-flight-related stroke patients. Seven patients had flight-related intracerebral haemorrhage. The aetiology of the ischaemic strokes was cardioembolic in 14/35 (40%), including seven patients with confirmed PFO, one with atrial septal defect, four with atrial fibrillation, one with endocarditis, and one with aortic arch atheroma. Paradoxical embolism was confirmed in six patients. Stroke related to air travel is a rare occurrence, less than one in a million. Although 20% of patients had a PFO, distribution of stroke aetiologies was diverse and was not limited to PFO and paradoxical embolism. PMID:26898578

  15. [Post-stroke apathy].

    PubMed

    López-Dóriga Bonnardeaux, Pedro; Andrino Díaz, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Apathy is a motivational disturbance that can be defined as a quantitative reduction of goal-directed behaviour. Patients present with loss of motivation, concern, interest, and emotional response, resulting in a loss of initiative, decreased interaction with their environment, and a reduced interest in social life. Apathy not only appears to be common in stroke patients, but it has also been related to a wide range of negative consequences for the patients and their caregivers, including poor functional recovery, loss of social independence, and caregiver distress. Clear definition and consensus diagnostic criteria for apathy are needed to accomplish an accurate assessment and an individualised treatment plan. Although there have been reports of successful behavioural therapy treatment of apathetic states, there is a paucity of controlled clinical trials on the efficacy of apathetic behaviours using pharmacotherapy. PMID:26522489

  16. Stroke volume optimization: the new hemodynamic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Alexander; Ahrens, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Critical care practices have evolved to rely more on physical assessments for monitoring cardiac output and evaluating fluid volume status because these assessments are less invasive and more convenient to use than is a pulmonary artery catheter. Despite this trend, level of consciousness, central venous pressure, urine output, heart rate, and blood pressure remain assessments that are slow to be changed, potentially misleading, and often manifested as late indications of decreased cardiac output. The hemodynamic optimization strategy called stroke volume optimization might provide a proactive guide for clinicians to optimize a patient's status before late indications of a worsening condition occur. The evidence supporting use of the stroke volume optimization algorithm to treat hypovolemia is increasing. Many of the cardiac output monitor technologies today measure stroke volume, as well as the parameters that comprise stroke volume: preload, afterload, and contractility. PMID:25639574

  17. Recent Endovascular Stroke Trials and Their Impact on Stroke Systems of Care.

    PubMed

    Mokin, Maxim; Snyder, Kenneth V; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Levy, Elad I; Hopkins, L Nelson

    2016-06-01

    Five recently published randomized trials of endovascular therapy versus medical management, including intravenous thrombolysis, demonstrated strong positive data in support of intra-arterial thrombectomy procedures. The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association released a focused update of the 2013 guidelines on the early management of acute ischemic strokes to specifically incorporate the findings of the 5 "positive" trials. In this review, we examine the key results of those trials and the principal changes in the updated guidelines. We discuss the ongoing and future changes in stroke systems of care, with an emphasis on the role of pre-hospital stroke triage, interhospital transfer, and the 2 main levels of stroke center certification (primary and comprehensive). PMID:27256836

  18. Novel Stroke Therapeutics: Unraveling Stroke Pathophysiology and Its Impact on Clinical Treatments

    PubMed Central

    George, Paul M.; Steinberg, Gary K.

    2016-01-01

    Stroke remains a leading cause of death and disability in the world. Over the past few decades our understanding of the pathophysiology of stroke has increased, but greater insight is required to advance the field of stroke recovery. Clinical treatments have improved in the acute time window, but long-term therapeutics remain limited. Complex neural circuits damaged by ischemia make restoration of function after stroke difficult. New therapeutic approaches, including cell transplantation or stimulation, focus on reestablishing these circuits through multiple mechanisms to improve circuit plasticity and remodeling. Other research targets intact networks to compensate for damaged regions. This review highlights several important mechanisms of stroke injury and describes emerging therapies aimed at improving clinical outcomes. PMID:26182415

  19. Questions and Answers about Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... 30 percent are permanently disabled. What is the cost of stroke for our nation? Stroke places a ... society in terms of mortality, morbidity and economic costs. The National Stroke Association estimates stroke costs the ...

  20. How a Stroke Is Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis ... UT Southwestern Medical Center. Copyright © 1997-2016 - The Internet Stroke Center. All rights reserved. The information contained ...

  1. Stem Cell Transplantation for Neuroprotection in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Dailey, Travis; Tajiri, Naoki; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies for stroke have expanded substantially over the last decade. The diversity of embryonic and adult tissue sources provides researchers with the ability to harvest an ample supply of stem cells. However, the optimal conditions of stem cell use are still being determined. Along this line of the need for optimization studies, we discuss studies that demonstrate effective dose, timing, and route of stem cells. We recognize that stem cell derivations also provide uniquely individual difficulties and limitations in their therapeutic applications. This review will outline the current knowledge, including benefits and challenges, of the many current sources of stem cells for stroke therapy. PMID:24147217

  2. White matter injury in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Liu, Gang; Hong, Dandan; Chen, Fenghua; Ji, Xunming; Cao, Guodong

    2016-06-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of disability and mortality worldwide. It is well known that ischemic stroke can cause gray matter injury. However, stroke also elicits profound white matter injury, a risk factor for higher stroke incidence and poor neurological outcomes. The majority of damage caused by stroke is located in subcortical regions and, remarkably, white matter occupies nearly half of the average infarct volume. Indeed, white matter is exquisitely vulnerable to ischemia and is often injured more severely than gray matter. Clinical symptoms related to white matter injury include cognitive dysfunction, emotional disorders, sensorimotor impairments, as well as urinary incontinence and pain, all of which are closely associated with destruction and remodeling of white matter connectivity. White matter injury can be noninvasively detected by MRI, which provides a three-dimensional assessment of its morphology, metabolism, and function. There is an urgent need for novel white matter therapies, as currently available strategies are limited to preclinical animal studies. Optimal protection against ischemic stroke will need to encompass the fortification of both gray and white matter. In this review, we discuss white matter injury after ischemic stroke, focusing on clinical features and tools, such as imaging, manifestation, and potential treatments. We also briefly discuss the pathophysiology of WMI and future research directions. PMID:27090751

  3. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Laurie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Gunga, H.; Johnston, S.; Westby, C.; Ribeiro, L.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mechanisms responsible for the ocular structural and functional changes that characterize the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (ICP) syndrome (VIIP) are unclear, but hypothesized to be secondary to the cephalad fluid shift experienced in spaceflight. This study will relate the fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight with VIIP symptoms. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, can be predicted preflight with acute hemodynamic manipulations, and also if lower body negative pressure (LBNP) can reverse the VIIP effects. METHODS: Physiologic variables will be examined pre-, in- and post-flight in 10 International Space Station crewmembers including: fluid compartmentalization (D2O and NaBr dilution); interstitial tissue thickness (ultrasound); vascular dimensions and dynamics (ultrasound and MRI (including cerebrospinal fluid pulsatility)); ocular measures (optical coherence tomography, intraocular pressure, ultrasound); and ICP measures (tympanic membrane displacement, otoacoustic emissions). Pre- and post-flight measures will be assessed while upright, supine and during 15 deg head-down tilt (HDT). In-flight measures will occur early and late during 6 or 12 month missions. LBNP will be evaluated as a countermeasure during HDT and during spaceflight. RESULTS: The first two crewmembers are in the preflight testing phase. Preliminary results characterize the acute fluid shifts experienced from upright, to supine and HDT postures (increased stroke volume, jugular dimensions and measures of ICP) which are reversed with 25 millimeters Hg LBNP. DISCUSSION: Initial results indicate that acute cephalad fluid shifts may be related to VIIP symptoms, but also may be reversible by LBNP. The effect of a chronic fluid shift has yet to be evaluated. Learning Objectives: Current spaceflight VIIP research is described

  4. Aspirator increases relief valve poppet stroke

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biddle, M. E.

    1967-01-01

    Addition of an aspirator to a relief valve increases the valve poppet stroke under dynamic flow conditions. The aspirator allows poppet inlet dynamic forces to overcome relief valve spring force. It reduces the fluid pressure in the skirt cavity by providing a low pressure sense probe.

  5. MR Perfusion Imaging in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Copen, William A.; Schaefer, Pamela W.; Wu, Ona

    2011-01-01

    MR perfusion imaging offers the potential for measuring brain perfusion in acute stroke patients, at a time when treatment decisions based upon these measurements may affect outcomes dramatically. Rapid advancements in both acute stroke therapy and perfusion imaging techniques have resulted in continuing redefinition of the role that perfusion imaging should play in patient management. This review first discusses the basic pathophysiology of acute stroke, with specific attention to alterations in the various perfusion-related parameters that can be studied by MR perfusion imaging. Although these parameters are sometimes treated as somewhat interchangeable, they reveal greatly different information about brain perfusion. Therefore, subsequent discussion of the utility of different kinds of perfusion images focuses on the differences between them, as well as important artifacts that can complicate their interpretation. Finally, research on the continually evolving role of MR perfusion imaging in acute stroke care is summarized. PMID:21640299

  6. Physiologic imaging in acute stroke: Patient selection

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Clinton D; Stephens, Marcus; Zuckerman, Scott L; Waitara, Magarya S; Morone, Peter J; Dewan, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of acute stroke is changing, as endovascular intervention becomes an important adjunct to tissue plasminogen activator. An increasing number of sophisticated physiologic imaging techniques have unique advantages and applications in the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment-decision making of acute ischemic stroke. In this review, we first highlight the strengths, weaknesses, and possible indications for various stroke imaging techniques. How acute imaging findings in each modality have been used to predict functional outcome is discussed. Furthermore, there is an increasing emphasis on using these state-of-the-art imaging modalities to offer maximal patient benefit through IV therapy, endovascular thrombolytics, and clot retrieval. We review the burgeoning literature in the determination of stroke treatment based on acute, physiologic imaging findings. PMID:26063695

  7. Genetics of stroke

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jin-min; Liu, Ai-jun; Su, Ding-feng

    2010-01-01

    Stroke is the second most common cause of death and the most common cause of disability in developed countries. Stroke is a multi-factorial disease caused by a combination of environmental and genetic factors. Numerous epidemiologic studies have documented a significant genetic component in the occurrence of strokes. Genes encoding products involved in lipid metabolism, thrombosis, and inflammation are believed to be potential genetic factors for stroke. Although a large group of candidate genes have been studied, most of the epidemiological results are conflicting. Studies of stroke as a monogenic disease have made huge progress, and animal models serve as an indispensable tool to dissect the complex genetics of stroke. In the present review, we provide insight into the role of in vivo stroke models for the study of stroke genetics. PMID:20729874

  8. Stroke (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a mix of cholesterol and other fatty stuff that sticks to the walls of blood vessels. ... major stroke can cause big problems with important stuff, like walking and talking. With a major stroke, ...

  9. Stroke Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... tells you to. Return to top Does taking birth control pills increase my risk for stroke? Taking birth ... your vagina Return to top Does using the birth control patch increase my risk for stroke? The patch ...

  10. Stroke: Hope through Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... substantially reduce costs of care. Stroke Hyperglycemia Insulin Network Effort Trial (SHINE) Nearly 40 percent of patients ... Stroke, contact the Institute's Brain Resources and Information Network (BRAIN) at: BRAIN P.O. Box 5801 Bethesda, ...

  11. Stroke Trials Registry

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Trials Registry Clinical Trials Interventions Conditions ... UT Southwestern Medical Center. Copyright © 1997-2011 - The Internet Stroke Center. All rights reserved. The information contained ...

  12. Two Kinds of Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Two Kinds of Stroke Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table ... minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ...

  13. Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find People About NINDS NINDS Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... done? Clinical Trials What is Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke? Atrial fibrillation (AF) describes the rapid, irregular beating ...

  14. Efficacy of complete decongestive therapy (CDT) on edematous rat limb after lymphadenectomy demonstrated by real time lymphatic fluid tracing.

    PubMed

    Takeno, Yukari; Arita, Hiromi; Fujimoto, Etsuko

    2013-12-01

    Although complete decongestive therapy (CDT) is considered to reduce the volume of lymphedema, there is no concrete evidence to sustain its efficacy. The purpose of the present study was to find new evidence of CDT based on visualizing the changes of lymph fluid accumulating in an edematous limb using indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescent lymphography in real time.Twelve lymphedema rats were divided randomly into two groups. On the first day, ICG was injected into an edematous limb of rats, and no-intervention and CDT was applied to groups 1 and 2, respectively, for two weeks. ICG lymphography and circumferential measurements were done every two days in each two-week observation. The results indicates that a fluorescent flow to the ipsilateral axillary fossa was identified in all rats. In addition, network-like and dermal backflow patterns were observed in the lower legs and thighs. While manual lymph drainage was applied in the CDT group, the flow moved more rapidly through this pathway than that in the no-intervention group. An area of high-intensity fluorescent signals concentrated around the injection sites diminished in the CDT group more than that in the no-intervention-group after two weeks. Circumferential lengths of the edematous limbs were longer than the non-edematous limbs in both groups 1 and 2 on the day of ICG injection. The no-intervention group 1 showed no significance differences during 14 days, whereas the CDT group 2 exhibited very significant differences. These results suggest that CDT has beneficial effects in lymphedema treatment. PMID:23795339

  15. Cost of post-stroke outpatient care in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Hejazi, Seyed Majid Akhavan; Mazlan, Mazlina; Abdullah, Saini Jeffery Freddy; Engkasan, Julia Patrick

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to investigate the direct cost of outpatient care for patients with stroke, as well as the relationship between the aforementioned cost and the sociodemographic and stroke characteristics of the patients. METHODS This was a cross-sectional study involving patients with first-ever stroke who were attending outpatient stroke rehabilitation, and their family members. Participants were interviewed using a structured questionnaire designed to obtain information regarding the cost of outpatient care. Stroke severity was measured using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale. RESULTS This study comprised 49 patients (28 men, 21 women) with a mean age of 60.2 (range 35–80) years. The mean total cost incurred was USD 547.10 (range USD 53.50–4,591.60), of which 36.6% was spent on attendant care, 25.5% on medical aids, 15.1% on travel expenses, 14.1% on medical fees and 8.5% on out-of-pocket expenses. Stroke severity, age > 70 years and haemorrhagic stroke were associated with increased cost. The mean cost of attending outpatient therapy per patient was USD 17.50 per session (range USD 6.60–30.60), with travelling expenses (41.8%) forming the bulk of the cost, followed by medical fees (38.1%) and out-of-pocket expenses (10.9%). Multiple regression analysis showed that stroke severity was the main determinant of post-stroke outpatient care cost (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION Post-stroke outpatient care costs are significantly influenced by stroke severity. The cost of attendant care was the main cost incurred during the first three months after hospital discharge, while travelling expenses was the main cost incurred when attending outpatient stroke rehabilitation therapy. PMID:25715857

  16. Newer Oral Anticoagulants: Stroke Prevention and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anand; Goddeau Jr, Richard P.; Henninger, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Warfarin is very effective in preventing stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, its use is limited due to fear of hemorrhagic complications, unpredictable anticoagulant effects related to multiple drug interactions and dietary restrictions, a narrow therapeutic window, frequent difficulty maintaining the anticoagulant effect within a narrow therapeutic window, and the need for inconvenient monitoring. Several newer oral anticoagulants have been approved for primary and secondary prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. These agents have several advantages relative to warfarin therapy. As a group, these direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC), which include the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran, and the factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban), are more effective than dose adjusted warfarin for prevention of all-cause stroke (including both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke), and have an overall more favorable safety profile. Nevertheless, an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding (with the exception of apixaban), increased risk for thrombotic complication with sudden discontinuation, and inability to accurately assess and reverse anticoagulant effect require consideration prior to therapy initiation, and pose a challenge for decision making in acute stroke therapy. PMID:27347226

  17. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Lauriie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Ribeiro, L.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Johnston, S.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2016-01-01

    ultrasound); (3) vascular dimensions by ultrasound (jugular veins, cerebral and carotid arteries, vertebral arteries and veins, portal vein); (4) vascular dynamics by MRI (head/neck blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid pulsatility); (5) ocular measures (optical coherence tomography, intraocular pressure, 2-dimensional ultrasound including optic nerve sheath diameter, globe flattening, and retina-choroid thickness, Doppler ultrasound of ophthalmic and retinal arteries, and veins); (6) cardiac variables by ultrasound (inferior vena cava, tricuspid flow and tissue Doppler, pulmonic valve, stroke volume, right heart dimensions and function, four-cham