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Sample records for fluorescence correlation spectroscopic

  1. Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopic Study of Fluorophore-Labeled Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Krishanu; Zhang, Jian; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the use of fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy (FLCS) to study the metal-fluorophore interactions in solution at single fluorophore level. A single-stranded oligonucleotide was chemically bound to a 50 nm diameter single silver particle and a Cy5-labeled complementary single-stranded oligonucleotide was hybridized with the silver particle-bound oligonucleotide. The distance between the fluorophore and silver particle was maintained by a rigid hybridized DNA duplex of 8 nm in length. The single Cy5-DNA-Ag-particles showed more than 10-fold increase in fluorescence intensity, 5-fold decrease in emission lifetimes as compared with Cy5-DNA free molecules in the absence of metal. The decrease of lifetime for the Cy5-DNA-Ag-particle allowed us to resolve the correlation functions of the two species based on the intensity decays. The increased brightness of Cy5-DNA-Ag-particle as compared to free Cy5-DNA resulted in an increased contribution of Cy5-DNA-Ag to the correlation function of the mixture. These results show that the effects of metal particles on fluorophores can be used to detect the small fractional populations of the metal-bound species in the presence of a larger number of less bright species. Our results also suggest that these bright fluorophores conjugated to silver particles could be used as the fluorescent probes for clinical detection in the biological samples with the high background. PMID:18771274

  2. Compact fluorescence spectroscopic tool for cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Valerie; Hamdan, Khaled; Hewett, Jacqueline; Makaryceva, Juljia; Tait, Iain; Cuschieri, Alfred; Padgett, Miles J.

    2002-05-01

    We describe a compact fluorescence spectroscopic tool for in vivo point monitoring of aminolaevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence and autofluorescence, as a non-invasive method of differentiating normal and cancerous tissue. This instrument incorporates a 405nm diode laser with a shutter to prevent exposure of tissue to harmful light doses and reduce photobleaching, a bifurcated optical fibre to allow illumination of tissue and collection of fluorescence with a single fibre, a compact grating spectrometer for collection of spectra and a PC for system control. We present spectra obtained using this system both during routine gastro-intestinal (GI) endoscopy for cancer detection and during photodynamic therapy (PDT) of anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) for monitoring of treatment progress. These results illustrate the potential of the system to be used for fluorescence monitoring in a variety of clinical applications.

  3. A new strategy to prepare giant vesicles from surface active ionic liquids (SAILs): a study of protein dynamics in a crowded environment using a fluorescence correlation spectroscopic technique.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Chiranjib; Roy, Arpita; Kundu, Niloy; Banik, Debasis; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2016-06-01

    A simple procedure for the preparation of giant vesicles using surface active ionic liquids (SAILs) has been provided in this paper. SAILs, used to form vesicles, were synthesized by replacing the cationic part of Aerosol OT (AOT) with cations having alkyl chains of different lengths (ammonium and imidazolium cations). The number of carbons in the alkyl chains of the cations was varied from eight to sixteen. From the observed results, the formation of giant vesicles is found to be dependent on the alkyl chain length as well as the organic moieties of the respective cations. These giant vesicles were characterized using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). The conformational dynamics of bovine serum albumin (BSA) inside these giant vesicles was determined using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to get an idea about the protein dynamics in a constrained environment. The interaction of the giant vesicles with the protein was confirmed by the change in the diffusion coefficient and the conformational fluctuation time. PMID:27173474

  4. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies of DNA dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Scalettar, B.A.

    1987-04-01

    Random solvent induced motions of DNA are manifest as nanosecond torsional oscillations of the helix backbone, nanosecond through millisecond bending deformations and overall rotational and translational diffusion of the polymer. Fluorescence spectroscopy is used to study this spectrum of DNA motions while ethidium monoazide was covalently bounded. The steady state fluorescence depolarization data indicate that the covalent monoazide/DNA complex exhibits internal motions characterized by an average angular amplitude of 26 degrees confirming reports of fast torsional oscillations in noncovalent ethidium bromide/DNA systems. Data obtained by use of a new polarized photobleaching recovery technique (FPR) reflect both the rotational dynamics of the polymer and the reversible photochemistry of the dye. To isolate the reorientational motion of the DNA, the FPR experiments were ran in two modes that differ only in the polarization of the bleaching light. A quotient function constructed from the data obtained in these two modes monitors only the rotational component of the FPR recovery. In specific applications those bending deformations of long DNA molecules that have characteristic relaxation times on the order of 100 microseconds have been resolved. A fluorescence correlation technique that relates fluctuations in particle number to center-of-mass motion was used to measure translational diffusion on coefficients of the plasmid PBR322 and a short oligomeric DNA. A theory that describes angular correlation in systems exhibiting cyclic, biologically directed reorientation and random Brownian rotation is developed.

  5. Correlative Fluorescence and Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schirra, Randall T.; Zhang, Peijun

    2014-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy (CFEM) is a multimodal technique that combines dynamic and localization information from fluorescence methods with ultrastructural data from electron microscopy, to give new information about how cellular components change relative to the spatiotemporal dynamics within their environment. In this review, we will discuss some of the basic techniques and tools of the trade for utilizing this attractive research method, which is becoming a very powerful tool for biology labs. The information obtained from correlative methods has proven to be invaluable in creating consensus between the two types of microscopy, extending the capability of each, and cutting the time and expense associate with using each method separately for comparative analysis. The realization of the advantages of these methods in cell biology have led to rapid improvement in the protocols and have ushered in a new generation of instruments to reach the next level of correlation – integration. PMID:25271959

  6. Supercritical Angle Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ries, Jonas; Ruckstuhl, Thomas; Verdes, Dorinel; Schwille, Petra

    2008-01-01

    We explore the potential of a supercritical angle (SA) objective for fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). This novel microscope objective combines tight focusing by an aspheric lens with strong axial confinement of supercritical angle fluorescence collection by a parabolic mirror lens, resulting in a small detection volume. The tiny axial extent of the detection volume features an excellent surface sensitivity, as is demonstrated by diffusion measurements in model membranes with an excess of free dye in solution. All SA-FCS measurements are directly compared to standard confocal FCS, demonstrating a clear advantage of SA-FCS, especially for diffusion measurements in membranes. We present an extensive theoretical framework that allows for accurate and quantitative evaluation of the SA-FCS correlation curves. PMID:17827221

  7. Single-particle spectroscopic measurements of fluorescent graphene quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qinfeng; Zhou, Qi; Hua, Zheng; Xue, Qi; Zhang, Chunfeng; Wang, Xiaoyong; Pan, Dengyu; Xiao, Min

    2013-12-23

    We have performed the first single-particle spectroscopic measurements on individual graphene quantum dots (GQDs) and revealed several intriguing fluorescent phenomena that are otherwise hidden in the optical studies of ensemble GQDs. First, despite noticeable differences in the size and the number of layers from particle to particle, all of the GQDs studied possess almost the same spectral lineshapes and peak positions. Second, GQDs with more layers are normally brighter emitters but are associated with shorter fluorescent lifetimes. Third, the fluorescent spectrum of GQDs was red-shifted upon being aged in air, possibly due to the water desorption effect. Finally, the missing emission of single photons and stable fluorescence without any intermittent behavior were observed from individual GQDs. PMID:24251867

  8. Detection of Hg2+ in water environment by fluorescence spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Zhang, Jinsong; Hu, Hong; Wan, Ruyi; Yao, Youwei

    2015-08-01

    Inorganic mercury (Hg2+) produces toxic effects even at very low concentration. High sensitive fluorescent probes for Hg2+ detection has been researched and synthesized. A fluorescence detection system is built for Hg2+ detection in water environment with fluorescent probes as the detection reagent. Fiber coupled LED with high brightness is developed and used as excitation light source. And the optimized excitation wavelength is about 520 nm. The measurements of fluorescence spectra is obtained by means of optical fiber spectroscopic techniques. Fluorescence detection experiments are carried out for a range of different concentrations of Hg2+ in aqueous solutions. The center wavelength of the fluorescence spectra is about 580 nm which is unchanged in the experiments. Relationship between Hg2+ concentrations and the fluorescence intensity is studied. A positive correlation exists between the intensity of fluorescence spectrum and the concentrations of Hg2+. The fluorescence intensity grows with increasing the concentration of Hg2+ for the same excitation light. When the concentration of Hg2+ is high enough, the fluorescence intensity increases slowly. And a numerical model is built for the concentration calculating. The detection limit is 0.005 μmol/L in the experiments. The Hg2+ detection system reported has many advantages such as small size, rapid response, high-sensitivity, and can be used for on-site testing of the water quality.

  9. Multiphoton excitation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of fluorescent DNA base analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katilius, Evaldas; Woodbury, Neal W.

    2004-06-01

    Two- and three-photon excitation was used to investigate the properties of two fluorescent DNA base analogs: 2-aminopurine and 6-methylisoxanthopterin. 2-aminopurine is a widely used fluorescent analog of the DNA base adenine. Three-photon excitation of 2-aminopurine is achievable by using intense femtosecond laser pulses in 850-950 nm spectral region. Interestingly, the three-photon excitation spectrum is blue-shifted relative to the three-times-wavelength single-photon excitation spectrum. The maximum of the absorbance band in the UV is at 305 nm, while the three-photon excitation spectrum has a maximum at around 880 nm. Fluorescence correlation measurements were attempted to evaluate the feasibility of using three-photon excitation of 2-aminopurine for DNA-protein interaction studies. However, due to relatively small three-photon absorption cross-section, a good signal-to-noise fluorescence correlation curves take very long time to obtain. Fluorescence properties of 6-methylisoxanthopterin, the fluorescent analog of guanine, were investigated using two-photon excitation. This molecule has the lowest energy absorption band centered around 350 nm, thus, two-photon excitation is attainable using 700 to 760 nm output of Ti-sapphire laser. The excitation spectrum of this molecule in the infrared well matches the doubled-wavelength single-photon excitation spectrum in the UV. The high fluorescence quantum yield of 6-methylisoxanthopterin allows efficient fluorescence correlation measurements and makes this molecule a very good candidate for using in in vitro DNA-protein interaction studies.

  10. Multipoint fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with total internal reflection fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed

    Ohsugi, Yu; Kinjo, Masataka

    2009-01-01

    We report simultaneous determination of diffusion coefficients at different points of a cell membrane using a multipoint fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) system. A system carrying seven detection areas in the evanescent field is achieved by using seven optical fibers on the image plane in the detection port of an objective-type total internal reflection FCS (TIR-FCS) system. Fluctuation of fluorescence intensity is monitored and evaluated using seven photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and a newly constructed multichannel correlator. We demonstrate simultaneous-multipoint FCS, with a 3-mus time resolution, to investigate heterogeneous structures such as cell membranes and membrane-binding molecular dynamics near glass surfaces in live cells. PMID:19256718

  11. Fluorescence Spectroscopic Properties of Normal and Abnormal Biomedical Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Asima

    Steady state and time-resolved optical spectroscopy and native fluorescence is used to study the physical and optical properties occurring in diseased and non-diseased biological human tissue, in particular, cancer of the human breast, artery and the dynamics of a photosensitizer useful in photodynamic therapy. The main focus of the research is on the optical properties of cancer and atherosclerotic tissues as compared to their normal counterparts using the different luminescence based spectroscopic techniques such as steady state fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, excitation spectroscopy and phosphorescence. The excitation and steady-state spectroscopic fluorescence using visible excitation wavelength displays a difference between normal and malignant tissues. This difference is attributed to absorption of the emission by hemoglobin in normal tissues. This method using 488nm fails to distinguish neoplastic tissue such as benign tissues and tumors from malignant tumors. The time-resolved fluorescence at visible, near -uv and uv excitation wavelengths display non-exponential profiles which are significantly different for malignant tumors as compared to non-malignant tissues only with uv excitation. The differences observed with visible and near-uv excitation wavelengths are not as significant. The non-exponential profiles are interpreted as due to a combination of fluorophores along with the action of non-radiative processes. Low temperature luminescence studies confirm the occurrence of non-radiative decay processes while temporal studies of various relevant biomolecules indicate the probable fluorophores responsible for the observed signal in tissues. Phosphorescence from human tissues have been observed for the first time and lifetimes of a few hundred nanoseconds are measured for malignant and benign tissues. Time-resolved fluorescence studies of normal artery and atherosclerotic plaque have shown that a combination of two excitation wavelengths can

  12. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy: The Case of Subdiffusion

    PubMed Central

    Lubelski, Ariel; Klafter, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The theory of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy is revisited here for the case of subdiffusing molecules. Subdiffusion is assumed to stem from a continuous-time random walk process with a fat-tailed distribution of waiting times and can therefore be formulated in terms of a fractional diffusion equation (FDE). The FDE plays the central role in developing the fluorescence correlation spectroscopy expressions, analogous to the role played by the simple diffusion equation for regular systems. Due to the nonstationary nature of the continuous-time random walk/FDE, some interesting properties emerge that are amenable to experimental verification and may help in discriminating among subdiffusion mechanisms. In particular, the current approach predicts 1), a strong dependence of correlation functions on the initial time (aging); 2), sensitivity of correlation functions to the averaging procedure, ensemble versus time averaging (ergodicity breaking); and 3), that the basic mean-squared displacement observable depends on how the mean is taken. PMID:19289033

  13. Spectroscopic Analysis of Today's Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluhar, Edward

    2012-03-01

    In today's consumer market, there are many different light bulbs that claim to produce `natural' light. In my research, I both quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed this claim. First, utilizing a spectroscope, I compared the spectra emitted by different brands and types of compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs to the spectra emitted by the Sun. Once the bulbs were quantitatively analyzed, I proceeded to qualitatively analyze them by exposing subjects to the different bulbs. The subjects were asked to rate the quality of color in different pictures illuminated by each type of CFL. From these tests, I was able to determine the ``best'' CFL bulbs, and conclude whether the health risks associated with CFL bulbs outweigh the cost savings, longevity of the bulbs, and/or quality of light benefits.

  14. Fluorescent-Spectroscopic Research of in Vivo Tissues Pathological Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraev, K. M.; Ashurbekov, N. A.; Medzhidov, R. T.

    The steady-state spectra of autofluorescence and the reflection coefficient on the excitation wavelength of some stomach tissues in vivo with various pathological conditions (surface gastritis, displasia, cancer) are measured under excitation by the nitrogen laser irradiation (λex=337.1 nm). The contour expansion of obtained fluorescence spectra into contributions of components is conducted by the Gaussian-Lorentzian curves method. It is shown that at least 7 groups of fluorophores forming a total luminescence spectrum can be distinguished during the development of displasia and tumor processes. The correlation of intensities of flavins and NAD(P)·H fluorescence is determined and the degree of respiratory activity of cells for the functional condition considered is estimated. The evaluations of the fluorescence quantum yield of the tissue's researched are given.

  15. Correlations of experimental isotope shifts with spectroscopic and mass observables

    SciTech Connect

    Cakirli, R. B.; Casten, R. F.; Blaum, K.

    2010-12-15

    Experimental differential observables relating to mean square charge radii, spectroscopic, and mass observables of even-even nuclei are presented for different regions in the nuclear chart. They exhibit remarkable correlations, not heretofore recognized, that provide a new perspective on structural evolution, especially in exotic nuclei. This can also be a guide for future measurements of charge radii, spectroscopic observables, and masses, as well as for future theoretical approaches.

  16. Position-Sensitive Scanning Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Joseph P.; Chen, Yan; Müller, Joachim D.

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) uses a stationary laser beam to illuminate a small sample volume and analyze the temporal behavior of the fluorescence fluctuations within the stationary observation volume. In contrast, scanning FCS (SFCS) collects the fluorescence signal from a moving observation volume by scanning the laser beam. The fluctuations now contain both temporal and spatial information about the sample. To access the spatial information we synchronize scanning and data acquisition. Synchronization allows us to evaluate correlations for every position along the scanned trajectory. We use a circular scan trajectory in this study. Because the scan radius is constant, the phase angle is sufficient to characterize the position of the beam. We introduce position-sensitive SFCS (PSFCS), where correlations are calculated as a function of lag time and phase. We present the theory of PSFCS and derive expressions for diffusion, diffusion in the presence of flow, and for immobilization. To test PSFCS we compare experimental data with theory. We determine the direction and speed of a flowing dye solution and the position of an immobilized particle. To demonstrate the feasibility of the technique for applications in living cells we present data of enhanced green fluorescent protein measured in the nucleus of COS cells. PMID:15894645

  17. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopic study of solvatochromic curcumin dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Digambara; Barakat, Christelle

    2011-09-01

    Curcumin, the main yellow bioactive component of turmeric, has recently acquired attention by chemists due its wide range of potential biological applications as an antioxidant, an anti-inflammatory, and an anti-carcinogenic agent. This molecule fluoresces weakly and poorly soluble in water. In this detailed study of curcumin in thirteen different solvents, both the absorption and fluorescence spectra of curcumin was found to be broad, however, a narrower and simple synchronous fluorescence spectrum of curcumin was obtained at Δ λ = 10-20 nm. Lippert-Mataga plot of curcumin in different solvents illustrated two sets of linearity which is consistent with the plot of Stokes' shift vs. the ET30. When Stokes's shift in wavenumber scale was replaced by synchronous fluorescence maximum in nanometer scale, the solvent polarity dependency measured by λSFSmax vs. Lippert-Mataga plot or ET30 values offered similar trends as measured via Stokes' shift for protic and aprotic solvents for curcumin. Better linear correlation of λSFSmax vs. π* scale of solvent polarity was found compared to λabsmax or λemmax or Stokes' shift measurements. In Stokes' shift measurement both absorption/excitation as well as emission (fluorescence) spectra are required to compute the Stokes' shift in wavenumber scale, but measurement could be done in a very fast and simple way by taking a single scan of SFS avoiding calculation and obtain information about polarity of the solvent. Curcumin decay properties in all the solvents could be fitted well to a double-exponential decay function.

  18. In Vivo Fluorescence Correlation and Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mütze, Jörg; Ohrt, Thomas; Petrášek, Zdeněk; Schwille, Petra

    In this manuscript, we describe the application of Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS), Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy (FCCS), and scanning FCS (sFCS) to two in vivo systems. In the first part, we describe the application of two-photon standard and scanning FCS in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. The differentiation of a single fertilized egg into a complex organism in C. elegans is regulated by a number of protein-dependent processes. The oocyte divides asymmetrically into two daughter cells of different developmental fate. Two of the involved proteins, PAR-2 and NMY-2, are studied. The second investigated system is the mechanism of RNA interference in human cells. An EGFP based cell line that allows to study the dynamics and localization of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) with FCS in vivo is created, which has so far been inaccessible with other experimental methods. Furthermore, Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy is employed to highlight the asymmetric incorporation of labeled siRNAs into RISC.

  19. Dual-wavelength excitation to reduce background fluorescence for fluorescence spectroscopic quantitation of erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin-IX and protoporphyrin-IX from whole blood and oral mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Georg; Vogeser, Michael; Holdt, Lesca M.; Homann, Christian; Großmann, Michael; Stepp, Herbert; Gruber, Christian; Erdogan, Ilknur; Hasmüller, Stephan; Hasbargen, Uwe; Brittenham, Gary M.

    2014-02-01

    Erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin-IX (ZnPP) and protoporphyrin-IX (PPIX) accumulate in a variety of disorders that restrict or disrupt the biosynthesis of heme, including iron deficiency and various porphyrias. We describe a reagent-free spectroscopic method based on dual-wavelength excitation that can measure simultaneously both ZnPP and PPIX fluorescence from unwashed whole blood while virtually eliminating background fluorescence. We further aim to quantify ZnPP and PPIX non-invasively from the intact oral mucosa using dual-wavelength excitation to reduce the strong tissue background fluorescence while retaining the faint porphyrin fluorescence signal originating from erythrocytes. Fluorescence spectroscopic measurements were made on 35 diluted EDTA blood samples using a custom front-face fluorometer. The difference spectrum between fluorescence at 425 nm and 407 nm excitation effectively eliminated background autofluorescence while retaining the characteristic porphyrin peaks. These peaks were evaluated quantitatively and the results compared to a reference HPLC-kit method. A modified instrument using a single 1000 μm fiber for light delivery and detection was used to record fluorescence spectra from oral mucosa. For blood measurements, the ZnPP and PPIX fluorescence intensities from the difference spectra correlated well with the reference method (ZnPP: Spearman's rho rs = 0.943, p < 0.0001; PPIX: rs = 0.959, p < 0.0001). In difference spectra from oral mucosa, background fluorescence was reduced significantly, while porphyrin signals remained observable. The dual-wavelength excitation method evaluates quantitatively the ZnPP/heme and PPIX/heme ratios from unwashed whole blood, simplifying clinical laboratory measurements. The difference technique reduces the background fluorescence from measurements on oral mucosa, allowing for future non-invasive quantitation of erythrocyte ZnPP and PPIX.

  20. Strengths and Weaknesses of Recently Engineered Red Fluorescent Proteins Evaluated in Live Cells Using Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Amanda P.; Baird, Michelle A.; Davidson, Michael W.; Day, Richard N.

    2013-01-01

    The scientific community is still looking for a bright, stable red fluorescent protein (FP) as functional as the current best derivatives of green fluorescent protein (GFP). The red FPs exploit the reduced background of cells imaged in the red region of the visible spectrum, but photophysical short comings have limited their use for some spectroscopic approaches. Introduced nearly a decade ago, mCherry remains the most often used red FP for fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and other single molecule techniques, despite the advent of many newer red FPs. All red FPs suffer from complex photophysics involving reversible conversions to a dark state (flickering), a property that results in fairly low red FP quantum yields and potential interference with spectroscopic analyses including FCS. The current report describes assays developed to determine the best working conditions for, and to uncover the shortcoming of, four recently engineered red FPs for use in FCS and other diffusion and spectroscopic studies. All five red FPs assayed had potential shortcomings leading to the conclusion that the current best red FP for FCS is still mCherry. The assays developed here aim to enable the rapid evaluation of new red FPs and their smooth adaptation to live cell spectroscopic microscopy and nanoscopy. PMID:24129172

  1. Two-Photon Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Fischer, David G.

    2002-01-01

    We will describe a two-photon microscope currently under development at the NASA Glenn Research Center. It is composed of a Coherent Mira 900 tunable, pulsed Titanium:Sapphire laser system, an Olympus Fluoview 300 confocal scanning head, and a Leica DM IRE inverted microscope. It will be used in conjunction with a technique known as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to study intracellular protein dynamics. We will briefly explain the advantages of the two-photon system over a conventional confocal microscope, and provide some preliminary experimental results.

  2. Tubulin equilibrium unfolding followed by time-resolved fluorescence and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Susana A.; Brunet, Juan E.; Jameson, David M.; Lagos, Rosalba; Monasterio, Octavio

    2004-01-01

    The pathway for the in vitro equilibrium unfolding of the tubulin heterodimer by guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) has been studied using several spectroscopic techniques, specifically circular dichroism (CD), two-photon Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS), and time-resolved fluorescence, including lifetime and dynamic polarization. The results show that tubulin unfolding is characterized by distinct processes that occur in different GdmCl concentration ranges. From 0 to 0.5 M GdmCl, a slight alteration of the tubulin heterodimer occurs, as evidenced by a small, but reproducible increase in the rotational correlation time of the protein and a sharp decrease in the secondary structure monitored by CD. In the range 0.5–1.5 M GdmCl, significant decreases in the steady-state anisotropy and average lifetime of the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence occur, as well as a decrease in the rotational correlation time, from 48 to 26 nsec. In the same GdmCl range, the number of protein molecules (labeled with Alexa 488), as determined by two-photon FCS measurements, increases by a factor of two, indicating dissociation of the tubulin dimer into monomers. From 1.5 to 4 M GdmCl, these monomers unfold, as evidenced by the continual decrease in the tryptophan steady-state anisotropy, average lifetime, and rotational correlation time, concomitant with secondary structural changes. These results help to elucidate the unfolding pathway of the tubulin heterodimer and demonstrate the value of FCS measurements in studies on oligomeric protein systems. PMID:14691224

  3. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic study of flavin fluorescence in purified enzymes of bioluminescent bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrova, Elena; Kudryasheva, N.; Cheng, K.

    2006-10-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence intensity and anisotropy decay measurements have been used to study the environment and rotational mobility of endogenous flavin in two purified enzymes of bioluminescent bacteria, Luciferase from Photobacterium leiognathi and NAD(P)H:FMN-oxidoreductase from Vibrio fischeri. We compared the time-resolved fluorescence parameters, intensity decay lifetimes, rotational correlation times, and their fractional contribution, of the endogeneous flavin fluorescence in each of the two enzymes in the presence or absence of quinones of different structures and redox potentials. The endogeneous flavin exhibited multi-exponential decay characteristics as compared to a single decay lifetime of around 5 ns for free flavin, suggesting a complex and heterogeneous environment of flavin bound to the enzyme. In addition, a significant increase in the rotational correlation time and a certain degree of ordering of the molecule were observed for endogenous flavin when compared to a single and fast rotational correlation time of 150 ps of free flavin. Quinone significantly altered both the lifetime and rotational characteristics of endogenous flavin suggesting specific interactions of quinones to the endogeneous flavin in the bacterial enzyme.

  4. Single molecule spectroscopic characterization of a far-red fluorescent protein (HcRed) from the Anthozoa coral Heteractis crispa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotlet, Mircea; Habuchi, Satoshi; Whitier, Jennifer E.; Werner, James H.; De Schryver, Frans C.; Hofkens, Johan; Goodwin, Peter M.

    2006-02-01

    We report on the photophysical properties of a far-red intrinsic fluorescent protein by means of single molecule and ensemble spectroscopic methods. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria is a popular fluorescent marker with genetically encoded fluorescence and which can be fused to any biological structure without affecting its function. GFP and its variants provide emission colors from blue to yellowish green. Red intrinsic fluorescent proteins from Anthozoa species represent a recent addition to the emission color palette provided by GFPs. Red intrinsic fluorescent markers are on high demand in protein-protein interaction studies based on fluorescence-resonance energy transfer or in multicolor tracking studies or in cellular investigations where autofluorescence possesses a problem. Here we address the photophysical properties of a far-red fluorescent protein (HcRed), a mutant engineered from a chromoprotein cloned from the sea anemone Heteractis crispa, by using a combination of ensemble and single molecule spectroscopic methods. We show evidence for the presence of HcRed protein as an oligomer and for incomplete maturation of its chromophore. Incomplete maturation results in the presence of an immature (yellow) species absorbing/fluorescing at 490/530-nm. This yellow chromophore is involved in a fast resonance-energy transfer with the mature (purple) chromophore. The mature chromophore of HcRed is found to adopt two conformations, a Transoriented form absorbing and 565-nm and non-fluorescent in solution and a Cis-oriented form absorbing at 590-nm and emitting at 645-nm. These two forms co-exist in solution in thermal equilibrium. Excitation-power dependence fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of HcRed shows evidence for singlet-triplet transitions in the microseconds time scale and for cis-trans isomerization occurring in a time scale of tens of microseconds. Single molecule fluorescence data recorded from immobilized HcRed proteins, all

  5. Synthesis, spectroscopic characteristic of novel fluorescent dyes of pyrazoline compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hai-Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Xiao; Shi, Jing-Jing; Chen, Gang; Xu, Xiao-Ping; Ji, Shun-Jun

    Four novel fluorescence dyes of the pyrazoline were synthesized and fully characterized by means of 1H, 13C NMR, and HRMS. The optical, electrochemical properties were also investigated. Solvent effect on the fluorescence characteristics of the four compounds indicates that the emission wavelength was red-shifted with the increase of solvent polarity. As we expected, the results indicated that these compounds exhibited high quantum yields. Quantum chemical calculations were used to obtain optimized ground-state geometry, spatial distributions of the HOMO, LUMO levels of the compounds.

  6. Spectroscopic properties and laser induced fluorescence determination of some endocrine disrupting compounds.

    PubMed

    Benmansour, Badr; Stephan, Ludovic; Cabon, Jean-Yves; Deschamps, Laure; Giamarchi, Philippe

    2011-05-01

    This work presents spectroscopic properties of some Endocrine Disrupting Compounds (EDCs), frequently found in food and in natural water. Studied molecules belong to the groups of phenolic and phthalate EDCs. In a first part, we have examined their absorption and fluorescence properties. Fluorescence emission wavelengths are about 300 nm for phenolic compounds and 360 nm for phtalate compounds; main excitation wavelengths being comprised between 210 nm and 230 nm. Fluorescence lifetimes measured are short (about 4 ns) and the fluorescence quantum yield has been determined. In a second part, to avoid the time consuming solvent extraction step, an analytical application to evaluate the performance of a direct analysis by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of ECDs traces in tap water and in raw water is presented. Good detection limits have been obtained, i.e.: 0.35 µg.L(-1) of chlorophenol in tap water, which are always lower than the reported Predictive Non Efficient Concentration (PNEC). PMID:20084436

  7. Fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of salivary metabolites of oral cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yuvaraj, Manoharan; Udayakumar, Kanniyappan; Jayanth, Vadivel; Prakasa Rao, Aruna; Bharanidharan, Ganesan; Koteeswaran, Dornadula; Munusamy, Balu David; Murali Krishna, Chilakapati; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2014-01-01

    A pilot study has been carried out using human saliva in differentiating the normal subjects from that of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients, using the autofluorescence spectroscopy at 405nm excitation. A markable difference in the spectral signatures between the saliva of normal subjects and that of oral cancer patients has been noticed. The possible reasons for the altered spectral signature may be due to the presence of endogenous porphyrin, NAD(P)H and FAD in the exfoliated cells from saliva. The elevated level of porphyrin in saliva of OSCC patients may be attributed to the disturbances in the amino acid degradation pathway and heme biosynthetic pathway, during the transformation of normal into malignant cells. The integrated area under the curve of fluorescence emission spectrum at 405nm excitation and also fluorescence excitation spectrum for 625nm emission were compared for the saliva of normal and oral cancer patients. The area under the curve for the emission spectrum provides 85.7% sensitivity and 93.3% specificity, where as the fluorescence excitation spectrum discriminates the same with 84.1% sensitivity and 93.2% specificity. PMID:24333763

  8. Fluorescence spectroscopic study on the interaction of resveratrol with lipoxygenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, María del Carmen; Duque, Antonio Luis; Macías, Pedro

    2010-09-01

    The interaction of lipoxygenase with (E)-resveratrol was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy. The data obtained revealed that the quenching of intrinsic fluorescence of lipoxygenase is produced by the formation of a complex lipoxygenase-(E)-resveratrol. From the value obtained for the binding constant, according to the Stern-Volmer modified equation, was deduced the existence of static quenching mechanism and, as consequence, the existence of a strong interaction between (E)-resveratrol and lipoxygenase. The values obtained for the thermodynamic parameter Δ H (-3.58 kJ mol -1) and Δ S (87.97 J mol -1K -1) suggested the participation of hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds in the stabilization of the complex ligand-protein. From the static quenching we determined that only exist one independent binding site. Based on the Förster energy transfer theory, the distance between the acceptor ((E)-resveratrol) and the donor (Trp residues of lipoxygenase) was calculated to be 3.42 nm. Finally, based on the information obtained from the evaluation of synchronous and three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy, we deduced that the interaction of (E)-resveratrol with lipoxygenase produces micro-environmental and conformational alterations of protein in the binding region.

  9. Correlating the chemical and spectroscopic characteristics of natural organic matter with the photodegradation of sulfamerazine.

    PubMed

    Batista, Ana Paula S; Teixeira, Antonio Carlos S C; Cooper, William J; Cottrell, Barbara A

    2016-04-15

    The role of aquatic natural organic matter (NOM) in the removal of contaminants of emerging concern has been widely studied. Sulfamerazine (SMR), a sulfonamide antibiotic detected in aquatic environments, is implicated in environmental toxicity and may contribute to the resistance of bacteria to antibiotics. In aquatic systems sulfonamides may undergo direct photodegradation, and, indirect photodegradation through the generation of reactive species. Because some forms of NOM inhibit the photodegradation there is an increasing interest in correlating the spectroscopic parameters of NOM as potential indicators of its degradation in natural waters. Under the conditions used in this study, SMR hydrolysis was shown to be negligible; however, direct photolysis is a significant in most of the solutions studied. Photodegradation was investigated using standard solutions of NOM: Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM), Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA), Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA), and Aldrich humic acid (AHA). The steady-state concentrations and formation rates of the reactive species and the SMR degradation rate constants (k1) were correlated with NOM spectroscopic parameters determined using UV-vis absorption, excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR). SMR degradation rate constants (k1) were correlated with steady-state concentrations of NOM triplet-excited state ([(3)NOM(∗)]ss) and the corresponding formation rates ((3)NOM*) for SRNOM, SRHA, and AHA. The efficiency of SMR degradation was highest in AHA solution and was inhibited in solutions of SRFA. The steady-state concentrations of singlet oxygen ([(1)O2]ss) and the SMR degradation rate constants with singlet oxygen (k1O2) were linearly correlated with the total fluorescence and inversely correlated with the carbohydrate/protein content ((1)H NMR) for all forms of NOM. The total fluorescence and EEMs Peak A were confirmed as indicators

  10. Chromatographic and fluorescence spectroscopic studies of individual 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene--deoxyribonucleoside adducts

    SciTech Connect

    Moschel, R.C.; Pigott, M.A.; Costantino, N.; Dipple, A.

    1983-09-01

    Compared with standard Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography, a newly developed high pressure liquid chromatographic separation of hydrocarbon deoxyribonucleoside adducts derived from the DNA of mouse embryo cell cultures exposed to 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) provides markedly superior resolution. Once resolved, the fluorescence spectroscopic properties of the three major DMBA--DNA adducts indicate that the fluorescence exhibited by adducts derived from a bay region syn dihydrodiol epoxide of DMBA differs subtly from that exhibited by adducts derived from the isomeric anti dihydrodiol epoxide.

  11. Identification of organic materials in historic oil paintings using correlated extractionless surface-enhanced Raman scattering and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Lindsay H; Dinehart, Stephen A; Svoboda, Shelley A; Wustholz, Kristin L

    2011-06-01

    A novel spectroscopic approach, correlated surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and fluorescence microscopy, is used to identify organic materials in two 18th century oil paintings. The vibrational fingerprint of analyte molecules is revealed using SERS, and corresponding fluorescence measurements provide a probe of local environment as well as an inherent capability to verify material identification. Correlated SERS and fluorescence measurements are performed directly on single pigment particles obtained from historic oil paintings with Ag colloids as the enhancing substrate. We demonstrate the first extractionless nonhydrolysis SERS study of oil paint as well as the potential of correlated SERS and fluorescence microscopy studies for the simultaneous identification of organic colorants and binding media in historic oil paintings. PMID:21524143

  12. New fluorescence reactions in DNA cytochemistry. 2. Microscopic and spectroscopic studies on fluorescent aluminum complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Del Castillo, P.; Llorente, A.R.; Gomez, A.; Gosalvez, J.; Goyanes, V.J.; Stockert, J.C. )

    1990-02-01

    Metal-dye complexes are widely applied in light microscopic techniques for chromatin staining (e.g., hematoxylin and carmine), but fluorescent complexes between phosphate-binding cations and suitable ligands have been little used. Preformed and postformed Al complexes with different anionic dyes induced strong and selective fluorescence reactions in nuclei from chicken blood smears, frozen sections, paraffin-embedded sections and Epon-embedded sections of mouse and rat tissues, mitotic chromosomes, meiotic chromosomes and kinetoplasts of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes. The DNA-dependent fluorescence of these structures showed a very low fading rate. The emission colors were related to the ligand. The most suitable compounds for forming fluorescent Al chelates were 8-hydroxyquinoline, morin, nuclear fast red and purpurin. Staining with diluted carmine solutions and InCl3 mordanting, followed by 8-hydroxyquinoline, also induced chromatin fluorescence. After treating isolated mouse chromosomes with the preformed complex Al-nuclear fast red, x-ray microanalysis indicated a P:Al:dye binding ratio of about 40:15:1. The selectivity, stability and easy formation of these fluorescent Al complexes are obvious advantages for their use as new cytochemical probes in cytologic studies.

  13. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy: inception, biophysical experimentations, and prospectus.

    PubMed

    Webb, W W

    2001-08-20

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy examines the chemical and the photophysical dynamics of dilute molecular solutions by measurement of the dynamic optical fluctuations of the fluorescence of a few molecules, even averaging less than one molecule at a time, in open focal volumes that are usually less than a femtoliter (<10(-18) m(3)). It applies the same principles of statistical thermodynamics as does quasi-elastic light scattering. Molecular interactions, conformational changes, chemical reactions, and photophysical dynamics that are not ordinarily detectable by quasi-elastic light scattering can be analyzed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in cases in which molecular fluorescence changes in the dynamic range 10(-7)-10(2) s. PMID:18360431

  14. Tracking-FCS: Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of individual particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, Andrew J.; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2005-10-01

    We exploit recent advances in single-particle tracking to perform fluorescence correlation spectroscopy on individual fluorescent particles, in contrast to traditional methods that build up statistics over a sequence of many measurements. By rapidly scanning the focus of an excitation laser in a circular pattern, demodulating the measured fluorescence, and feeding these results back to a piezoelectric translation stage, we track the Brownian motion of fluorescent polymer microspheres in aqueous solution in the plane transverse to the laser axis. We discuss the estimation of particle diffusion statistics from closed-loop position measurements, and we present a generalized theory of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for the case that the motion of a single fluorescent particle is actively tracked by a time-dependent laser intensity. We model the motion of a tracked particle using Ornstein-Uhlenbeck statistics, using a general theory that contains a umber of existing results as specific cases. We find good agreement between our theory and experimental results, and discuss possible future applications of these techniques to passive, single-shot, single-molecule fluorescence measurements with many orders of magnitude in time resolution.

  15. Intramolecular Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy in a Feedback Tracking Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHale, Kevin; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2010-07-01

    We derive the statistics of the signals generated by shape fluctuations of large molecules studied by feedback tracking microscopy. We account for the influence of intramolecular dynamics on the response of the tracking system, and derive a general expression for the fluorescence autocorrelation function that applies when those dynamics are linear. We show that tracking provides enhanced sensitivity to translational diffusion, molecular size, heterogeneity and long time-scale decays in comparison to traditional fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. We demonstrate our approach by using a three-dimensional tracking microscope to study genomic $\\lambda$-phage DNA molecules with various fluorescence label configurations.

  16. 25 ns software correlator for photon and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magatti, Davide; Ferri, Fabio

    2003-02-01

    A 25 ns time resolution, multi-tau software correlator developed in LABVIEW based on the use of a standard photon counting unit, a fast timer/counter board (6602-PCI National Instrument) and a personal computer (PC) (1.5 GHz Pentium 4) is presented and quantitatively discussed. The correlator works by processing the stream of incoming data in parallel according to two different algorithms: For large lag times (τ⩾100 μs), a classical time-mode (TM) scheme, based on the measure of the number of pulses per time interval, is used; differently, for τ⩽100 μs a photon-mode (PM) scheme is adopted and the time sequence of the arrival times of the photon pulses is measured. By combining the two methods, we developed a system capable of working out correlation functions on line, in full real time for the TM correlator and partially in batch processing for the PM correlator. For the latter one, the duty cycle depends on the count rate of the incoming pulses, being ˜100% for count rates ⩽3×104 Hz, ˜15% at 105 Hz, and ˜1% at 106 Hz. For limitations imposed by the fairly small first-in, first-out (FIFO) buffer available on the counter board, the maximum count rate permissible for a proper functioning of the PM correlator is limited to ˜105 Hz. However, this limit can be removed by using a board with a deeper FIFO. Similarly, the 25 ns time resolution is only limited by maximum clock frequency available on the 6602-PCI and can be easily improved by using a faster clock. When tested on dilute solutions of calibrated latex spheres, the overall performances of the correlator appear to be comparable with those of commercial hardware correlators, but with several nontrivial advantages related to its flexibility, low cost, and easy adaptability to future developments of PC and data acquisition technology.

  17. Nonlinear Spectroscopic Theory of Displaced Harmonic Oscillators with Differing Curvatures: A Correlation Function Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidler, Andrew F.; Engel, Gregory S.

    2013-10-01

    We present a theory for a bath model in which we approximate the adiabatic nuclear potential surfaces on the ground and excited electronic states by displaced harmonic oscillators that differ in curvature. Calculations of the linear and third-order optical response functions employ an effective short-time approximation coupled with the cumulant expansion. In general, all orders of correlation contribute to the optical response, indicating that the solvation process cannot be described as Gaussian within the model. Calculations of the linear absorption and fluorescence spectra resulting from the theory reveal a stronger temperature dependence of the Stokes shift along with a general asymmetry between absorption and fluorescence line shapes, resulting purely from the difference in the phonon side band. We discuss strategies for controlling spectral tuning and energy-transfer dynamics through the manipulation of the excited-state and ground-state curvature. Calculations of the nonlinear response also provide insights into the dynamics of the system-bath interactions and reveal that multidimensional spectroscopies are sensitive to a difference in curvature between the ground- and excited-state adiabatic surfaces. This extension allows for the elucidation of short-time dynamics of dephasing that are accessible in nonlinear spectroscopic methods.

  18. A single-photon fluorescence and multi-photon spectroscopic study of atherosclerotic lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael S. D.; Ko, Alex C. T.; Ridsdale, Andrew; Schattka, Bernie; Pegoraro, Adrian; Hewko, Mark D.; Shiomi, Masashi; Stolow, Albert; Sowa, Michael G.

    2009-06-01

    In this study we compare the single-photon autofluorescence and multi-photon emission spectra obtained from the luminal surface of healthy segments of artery with segments where there are early atherosclerotic lesions. Arterial tissue was harvested from atherosclerosis-prone WHHL-MI rabbits (Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbit-myocardial infarction), an animal model which mimics spontaneous myocardial infarction in humans. Single photon fluorescence emission spectra of samples were acquired using a simple spectrofluorometer set-up with 400 nm excitation. Samples were also investigated using a home built multi-photon microscope based on a Ti:sapphire femto-second oscillator. The excitation wavelength was set at 800 nm with a ~100 femto-second pulse width. Epi-multi-photon spectroscopic signals were collected through a fibre-optics coupled spectrometer. While the single-photon fluorescence spectra of atherosclerotic lesions show minimal spectroscopic difference from those of healthy arterial tissue, the multi-photon spectra collected from atherosclerotic lesions show marked changes in the relative intensity of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) signals when compared with those from healthy arterial tissue. The observed sharp increase of the relative SHG signal intensity in a plaque is in agreement with the known pathology of early lesions which have increased collagen content.

  19. Infrared and fluorescence spectroscopic studies of a phospholipid bilayer supported by a soft cationic hydrogel scaffold.

    PubMed

    Grossutti, Michael; Seenath, Ryan; Noël, John A; Lipkowski, Jacek

    2016-07-01

    Polarized attenuated total reflection (ATR-IR) spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy techniques were used to characterize a 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) membrane supported on porous, cationic hydrogel beads. Fluorescence microscopy images showed that the DPhPC coated the external surface of the hydrogel scaffold. In addition, a fluorescence assay of the emission intensity of the Tb(3+)/dipicolinic acid complex demonstrated that the DPhPC coating acted as a barrier to Tb(3+) efflux from the scaffolded vesicle and successfully sealed the porous hydrogel bead. Fluorescence quenching and ATR-IR spectroscopic measurements revealed that the lipid coating has a bilayer structure. The phytanoyl chains were found to exhibit significant trans-gauche isomerization, characteristic of the fluid liquid phase. However, no lipid lateral mobility was observed by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) measurements. The phosphocholine headgroup was found to be well hydrated and oriented such that the cationic choline group tucked in behind the anionic phosphate group, consistent with an electrostatic attraction between the cationic scaffold and zwitterionic lipid. The absence of lipid lateral mobility may be due to the strength of this attraction. PMID:27064742

  20. Fluorescence quenching of quantum dots by gold nanoparticles: a potential long range spectroscopic ruler.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Anirban; Zhou, Yadong; Zou, Shengli; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan

    2014-09-10

    The dependence of quantum dot (QD) fluorescence emission on the proximity of 30 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was studied with controlled interparticle distances ranging from 15 to 70 nm. This was achieved by coassembling DNA-conjugated QDs and AuNPs in a 1:1 ratio at precise positions on a triangular-shaped DNA origami platform. A profound, long-range quenching of the photoluminescence intensity of the QDs was observed. A combination of static and time-resolved fluorescence measurements suggests that the quenching is due to an increase in the nonradiative decay rate of QD emission. Unlike FRET, the energy transfer is inversely proportional to the 2.7th power of the distance between nanoparticles with half quenching at ∼28 nm. This long-range quenching phenomena may be useful for developing extended spectroscopic rulers in the future. PMID:25084363

  1. Quantum-chemical investigations of spectroscopic properties of a fluorescence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titova, T. Yu.; Morozova, Yu. P.; Zharkova, O. M.; Artyukhov, V. Ya.; Korolev, B. V.

    2012-09-01

    The prodan molecule (6-propionyl-2-dimethylamino naphthalene) - fluorescence probe - is investigated by quantum-chemical methods of intermediate neglect of differential overlap (INDO) and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP). The dipole moments of the ground and excited states, the nature and position of energy levels, the centers of specific solvation, the rate constants of photoprocesses, and the fluorescence quantum yield are estimated. To elucidate the role of the dimethylamino group in the formation of bands and spectral characteristics, the molecule only with the propionyl group (pron) is investigated. The long-wavelength absorption bands of prodan and pron molecules are interpreted. The results obtained for the prodan molecule by the INDO method with original spectroscopic parameterization are compared with the literature data obtained by the DFT/CIS, ZINDO/S, and AM1/CISD methods.

  2. Fluorescence, spectroscopic and NLO properties of green tea extract in deoxyribonucleic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Ana-Maria; Rau, Ileana; Kajzar, Francois; Meghea, Aurelia

    2013-11-01

    Natural, purely biological deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-green tea extract (GTE) complexes at different concentrations were prepared and characterized for their spectroscopic, fluorescent, linear and nonlinear optical properties. The complexes can be processed into good optical quality thin films by solution casting. They fluoresce when excited in UV absorption band, with a significantly larger quantum yield for the DNA-GTE complex than for a pure GTE solution. The thin film refractive indices were determined by Fabry-Perot (FP) interference patterns. The third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of thin films were determined by the optical third-harmonic generation technique at 1064.2 nm fundamental wavelength. The phase of THG susceptibility was determined from the concentration variation of THG susceptibility. It reveals presence of a two-photon resonance with a band lying in the optical gap.

  3. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic study of crude petroleum oils: influence of chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Alan G

    2004-05-01

    The fluorescence of crude petroleum oils is sensitive to changes in chemical composition and many different fluorescence methods have been used to characterize crude oils. The use of fluorescence lifetimes to quantitatively characterize oil composition has practical advantages over steady-state measurements, but there have been comparatively few studies in which the lifetime behavior is correlated with gross chemical compositional data. In this study, the fluorescence lifetimes for a series of 23 crude petroleum oils with American Petroleum Institute (API) gravities of between 10 and 50 were measured at several emission wavelengths (450-785 nm) using a 380 nm light emitting diode (LED) excitation source. It was found that the intensity average fluorescence lifetime (tau) at any emission wave-length does not correlate well with either API gravity or aromatic concentration. However, it was found that tau is strongly negatively correlated with both the polar and sulfur concentrations and positively correlated with the corrected alkane concentration. This indicates that the fluorescence behavior of crude petroleum oils is governed primarily by the concentration of quenching species. All the strong lifetime-concentration correlations are nonlinear and show a high degree of scatter, especially for medium to light oils with API gravities of between 25 and 40. The degree of scatter is greatest for oils where the concentrations (wt %) of the polar fraction is approximately 10 +/- 4%, the asphaltene component is approximately 1 +/- 0.5%, and sulfur is 0.5 +/- 0.4%. This large degree of scatter precludes the use of average fluorescence lifetime data obtained with 380 nm excitation for the accurate prediction of the common chemical compositional parameters of crude petroleum oils. PMID:15165340

  4. Quantitative confocal fluorescence microscopy of dynamic processes by multifocal fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krmpot, Aleksandar J.; Nikolić, Stanko N.; Vitali, Marco; Papadopoulos, Dimitrios K.; Oasa, Sho; Thyberg, Per; Tisa, Simone; Kinjo, Masataka; Nilsson, Lennart; Gehring, Walter J.; Terenius, Lars; Rigler, Rudolf; Vukojevic, Vladana

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging without scanning is developed for the study of fast dynamical processes. The method relies on the use of massively parallel Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (mpFCS). Simultaneous excitation of fluorescent molecules across the specimen is achieved by passing a single laser beam through a Diffractive Optical Element (DOE) to generate a quadratic illumination matrix of 32×32 light sources. Fluorescence from 1024 illuminated spots is detected in a confocal arrangement by a matching matrix detector consisting of the same number of single-photon avalanche photodiodes (SPADs). Software was developed for data acquisition and fast autoand cross-correlation analysis by parallel signal processing using a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU). Instrumental performance was assessed using a conventional single-beam FCS instrument as a reference. Versatility of the approach for application in biomedical research was evaluated using ex vivo salivary glands from Drosophila third instar larvae expressing a fluorescently-tagged transcription factor Sex Combs Reduced (Scr) and live PC12 cells stably expressing the fluorescently tagged mu-opioid receptor (MOPeGFP). We show that quantitative mapping of local concentration and mobility of transcription factor molecules across the specimen can be achieved using this approach, which paves the way for future quantitative characterization of dynamical reaction-diffusion landscapes across live cells/tissue with a submillisecond temporal resolution (presently 21 μs/frame) and single-molecule sensitivity.

  5. Correlated quadratures of resonance fluorescence and the generalized uncertainty relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnoldus, Henk F.; George, Thomas F.; Gross, Rolf W. F.

    1994-01-01

    Resonance fluorescence from a two-state atom has been predicted to exhibit quadrature squeezing below the Heisenberg uncertainty limit, provided that the optical parameters (Rabi frequency, detuning, laser linewidth, etc.) are chosen carefully. When the correlation between two quadratures of the radiation field does not vanish, however, the Heisenberg limit for quantum fluctuations might be an unrealistic lower bound. A generalized uncertainty relation, due to Schroedinger, takes into account the possible correlation between the quadrature components of the radiation, and it suggests a modified definition of squeezing. We show that the coherence between the two levels of a laser-driven atom is responsible for the correlation between the quadrature components of the emitted fluorescence, and that the Schrodinger uncertainty limit increases monotonically with the coherence. On the other hand, the fluctuations in the quadrature field diminish with an increasing coherence, and can disappear completely when the coherence reaches 1/2, provided that certain phase relations hold.

  6. Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy (FLCS): Concepts, Applications and Outlook

    PubMed Central

    Kapusta, Peter; Macháň, Radek; Benda, Aleš; Hof, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy (FLCS) is a variant of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), which uses differences in fluorescence intensity decays to separate contributions of different fluorophore populations to FCS signal. Besides which, FLCS is a powerful tool to improve quality of FCS data by removing noise and distortion caused by scattered excitation light, detector thermal noise and detector after pulsing. We are providing an overview of, to our knowledge, all published applications of FLCS. Although these are not numerous so far, they illustrate possibilities for the technique and the research topics in which FLCS has the potential to become widespread. Furthermore, we are addressing some questions which may be asked by a beginner user of FLCS. The last part of the text reviews other techniques closely related to FLCS. The generalization of the idea of FLCS paves the way for further promising application of the principle of statistical filtering of signals. Specifically, the idea of fluorescence spectral correlation spectroscopy is here outlined. PMID:23202928

  7. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy: Diagnostics for sparse molecules

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Sudipta; Haupts, Ulrich; Webb, Watt W.

    1997-01-01

    The robust glow of molecular fluorescence renders even sparse molecules detectable and susceptible to analysis for concentration, mobility, chemistry, and photophysics. Correlation spectroscopy, a statistical-physics-based tool, gleans quantitative information from the spontaneously fluctuating fluorescence signals obtained from small molecular ensembles. This analytical power is available for studying molecules present at minuscule concentrations in liquid solutions (less than one nanomolar), or even on the surfaces of living cells at less than one macromolecule per square micrometer. Indeed, routines are becoming common to detect, locate, and examine individual molecules under favorable conditions. PMID:9342306

  8. Electrostatic Interactions of Fluorescent Molecules with Dielectric Interfaces Studied by Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Hans; Hassler, Kai; Chmyrov, Andriy; Widengren, Jerker

    2010-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions between dielectric surfaces and different fluorophores used in ultrasensitive fluorescence microscopy are investigated using objective-based Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (TIR-FCS). The interfacial dynamics of cationic rhodamine 123 and rhodamine 6G, anionic/dianionic fluorescein, zwitterionic rhodamine 110 and neutral ATTO 488 are monitored at various ionic strengths at physiological pH. As analyzed by means of the amplitude and time-evolution of the autocorrelation function, the fluorescent molecules experience electrostatic attraction or repulsion at the glass surface depending on their charges. Influences of the electrostatic interactions are also monitored through the triplet-state population and triplet relaxation time, including the amount of detected fluorescence or the count-rate-per-molecule parameter. These TIR-FCS results provide an increased understanding of how fluorophores are influenced by the microenvironment of a glass surface, and show a promising approach for characterizing electrostatic interactions at interfaces. PMID:20386645

  9. Simultaneous Surface-Near and Solution Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Winterflood, Christian M; Seeger, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    We report the first simultaneous measurement of surface-confined and solution fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). We use an optical configuration for tightly focused excitation and separate detection of light emitted below (undercritical angle fluorescence, UAF) and above (supercritical angle fluorescence, SAF) the critical angle of total internal reflection of the coverslip/sample interface. This creates two laterally coincident detection volumes which differ in their axial extent. While detection of far-field UAF emission producesa standard confocal volume, near-field-mediated SAF produces a highly surface-confined detection volume at the coverslip/sample interface which extends only ~200 nm into the sample. A characterization of the two detection volumes by FCS of free diffusion is presented and compared with analytical models and simulations. The presented FCS technique allows to determine bulk solution concentrations and surface-near concentrations at the same time. PMID:27001472

  10. Simultaneous Correlative Scanning Electron and High-NA Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liv, Nalan; Zonnevylle, A. Christiaan; Narvaez, Angela C.; Effting, Andries P. J.; Voorneveld, Philip W.; Lucas, Miriam S.; Hardwick, James C.; Wepf, Roger A.; Kruit, Pieter; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.

    2013-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is a unique method for investigating biological structure-function relations. With CLEM protein distributions visualized in fluorescence can be mapped onto the cellular ultrastructure measured with electron microscopy. Widespread application of correlative microscopy is hampered by elaborate experimental procedures related foremost to retrieving regions of interest in both modalities and/or compromises in integrated approaches. We present a novel approach to correlative microscopy, in which a high numerical aperture epi-fluorescence microscope and a scanning electron microscope illuminate the same area of a sample at the same time. This removes the need for retrieval of regions of interest leading to a drastic reduction of inspection times and the possibility for quantitative investigations of large areas and datasets with correlative microscopy. We demonstrate Simultaneous CLEM (SCLEM) analyzing cell-cell connections and membrane protrusions in whole uncoated colon adenocarcinoma cell line cells stained for actin and cortactin with AlexaFluor488. SCLEM imaging of coverglass-mounted tissue sections with both electron-dense and fluorescence staining is also shown. PMID:23409024

  11. Two-dimensional fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy. 2. Application.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kunihiko; Tahara, Tahei

    2013-10-01

    In the preceding article, we introduced the theoretical framework of two-dimensional fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy (2D FLCS). In this article, we report the experimental implementation of 2D FLCS. In this method, two-dimensional emission-delay correlation maps are constructed from the photon data obtained with the time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC), and then they are converted to 2D lifetime correlation maps by the inverse Laplace transform. We develop a numerical method to realize reliable transformation, employing the maximum entropy method (MEM). We apply the developed actual 2D FLCS to two real systems, a dye mixture and a DNA hairpin. For the dye mixture, we show that 2D FLCS is experimentally feasible and that it can identify different species in an inhomogeneous sample without any prior knowledge. The application to the DNA hairpin demonstrates that 2D FLCS can disclose microsecond spontaneous dynamics of biological molecules in a visually comprehensible manner, through identifying species as unique lifetime distributions. A FRET pair is attached to the both ends of the DNA hairpin, and the different structures of the DNA hairpin are distinguished as different fluorescence lifetimes in 2D FLCS. By constructing the 2D correlation maps of the fluorescence lifetime of the FRET donor, the equilibrium dynamics between the open and the closed forms of the DNA hairpin is clearly observed as the appearance of the cross peaks between the corresponding fluorescence lifetimes. This equilibrium dynamics of the DNA hairpin is clearly separated from the acceptor-missing DNA that appears as an isolated diagonal peak in the 2D maps. The present study clearly shows that newly developed 2D FLCS can disclose spontaneous structural dynamics of biological molecules with microsecond time resolution. PMID:23977902

  12. Principles and applications of fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beranová, Lenka; Humpolícková, Jana; Hof, Martin

    2009-05-01

    Two fluorescence spectroscopy concepts, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) are employed in fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy (FLCS) - a relatively new technique with several experimental benefits. In FLCS experiments, pulsed excitation is used and data are stored in a special time-tagged time-resolved mode. Mathematical treatment of TCSPC decay patterns of distinct fluorophores and their mixture enables to calculate autocorrelation functions of each of the fluorophores and thus their diffusion properties and concentrations can be determined separately. Moreover, crosscorrelation of the two signals can be performed and information on interaction of the species can be obtained. This technique is particularly helpful for distinguishing different states of the same fluorophore in different microenvironments. The first application of that concept represents the simultaneous determination of two-dimensional diffusion in planar lipid layers and three-dimensional vesicle diffusion in bulk above the lipid layers. The lifetime in both investigated systems differed because the lifetime of the dye is considerably quenched in the layer near the light-absorbing surface. This concept was also used in other applications: a) investigation of a conformational change of a labeled protein, b) detection of small amounts of labeled oligonucleotides bound to metal particles or c) elucidation of the compaction mechanism of different sized labeled DNA molecules. Moreover, it was demonstrated that FLCS can help to overcome some FCS experimental drawbacks.

  13. Spectroscopic OCT by Grating-Based Temporal Correlation Coupled to Optical Spectral Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Froehly, L.; Ouadour, M.; Furfaro, L.; Sandoz, P.; Leproux, P.; Huss, G.; Couderc, V.

    2008-01-01

    Spectroscopic optical coherence tomography (spectroscopic OCT) is an echographic-like optical method for biomedical functional imaging. Current spectroscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) methods rely on a posteriori numerical calculation. We present an alternative for optically accessing the spectroscopic information in OCT, that is, without postprocessing, by using a grating-based correlation and a wavelength demultiplexing system. Spectrally resolved A-scan is directly recorded on the image sensor. Due to the grating-based system, no correlation scan is necessary. The signal is registered in the wavelength-depth plane on a 2D camera that provides a large number of resolved points. In the frame of this paper, we present the principle of the system as well as demonstration results. Advantages and drawback of this system compared to others are discussed. PMID:18385813

  14. A cryogenic fluorescence spectroscopic study of uranyl carbonate, phosphate, and oxyhydroxide minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.; Liu, Chongxuan; Gassman, Paul L.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Clark, Sue B.

    2008-11-03

    In this work we have applied liquid-helium temperature (LHeT) time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLIF) to characterize a series of natural and synthetic minerals of uranium carbonate, phosphate and oxyhydroxides including rutherfordine, zellerite, liebigite, phosphuranylite, meta-autunite, meta-torbernite, uranyl phosphate, sodium-uranyl-phosphate, bequerelite, clarkeite, curite, schoepite and compregnacite, and compared their spectral characteristics among these minerals as well as our previously published data on uranyl silicates. For the carbonate minerals, the fluorescence spectra depend on the stoichiometry of the mineral. For the phosphate minerals the fluorescence spectra closely resemble each other despite the differences in their composition and structure. For all uranium oxyhydroxides, the fluorescence spectra are largely red-shifted as compared with those of the uranium carbonates and phosphates and their vibronic bands are broadened and less resolved. The much enhanced spectra resolution at LHeT allows more accurate calculation of the O=U=O symmetrical stretch frequency, ν1, corresponding to the average spacing of the vibronic peaks of the fluorescence spectra and the spectral origin as reflected by the position of the first vibronic band. It was found that both the average ν1 and λ1 values correlate well with the average basicity of the inorganic anion.

  15. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy: Statistical analysis and biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffarian, Saveez

    2002-01-01

    The experimental design and realization of an apparatus which can be used both for single molecule fluorescence detection and also fluorescence correlation and cross correlation spectroscopy is presented. A thorough statistical analysis of the fluorescence correlation functions including the analysis of bias and errors based on analytical derivations has been carried out. Using the methods developed here, the mechanism of binding and cleavage site recognition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) for their substrates has been studied. We demonstrate that two of the MMP family members, Collagenase (MMP-1) and Gelatinase A (MMP-2) exhibit diffusion along their substrates, the importance of this diffusion process and its biological implications are discussed. We show through truncation mutants that the hemopexin domain of the MMP-2 plays and important role in the substrate diffusion of this enzyme. Single molecule diffusion of the collagenase MMP-1 has been observed on collagen fibrils and shown to be biased. The discovered biased diffusion would make the MMP-1 molecule an active motor, thus making it the first active motor that is not coupled to ATP hydrolysis. The possible sources of energy for this enzyme and their implications are discussed. We propose that a possible source of energy for the enzyme can be in the rearrangement of the structure of collagen fibrils. In a separate application, using the methods developed here, we have observed an intermediate in the intestinal fatty acid binding protein folding process through the changes in its hydrodynamic radius also the fluctuations in the structure of the IFABP in solution were measured using FCS.

  16. Stochastic fractal behavior in concentration fluctuation and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Gary M.; Bassingthwaighte, James B.

    2010-01-01

    Fluctuations in the concentration of Brownian particles in one and two dimensions, or any reasonable measurement of the concentration such as in fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, is shown to be a stochastic fractal with a long tail. Being singular at ω = 0, the power spectrum of the fluctuation S(ω) ~ ω −1/2 for diffusion in one dimension, ~ log ω in two dimensions, but non-singular in three dimensions. This discovery provides one simple physical mechanism for possible long-memory fractal behavior, and its implications to various biological processes are discussed. PMID:10457592

  17. In vivo spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography imaging of a far red fluorescent protein expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mengyang; Schmitner, Nicole; Sandrian, Michelle G.; Zabihian, Behrooz; Hermann, Boris; Salvenmoser, Willi; Meyer, Dirk; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescent proteins brought a revolution in life sciences and biological research in that they make a powerful tool for researchers to study not only the structural and morphological information, but also dynamic and functional information in living cells and organisms. While green fluorescent proteins (GFP) have become a common labeling tool, red-shifted or even near infrared fluorescent proteins are becoming the research focus due to the fact that longer excitation wavelengths are more suitable for deep tissue imaging. In this study, E2-Crimson, a far red fluorescent protein whose excitation wavelength is 611 nm, was genetically expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish. Using spectroscopic all optical detection photoacoustic tomography, we mapped the distribution of E2-Crimson in 3D after imaging the transgenic zebrafish in vivo using two different wavelengths. With complementary morphological information provided by imaging the same fish using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system, the E2-Crimson distribution acquired from spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography was confirmed in 2D by epifluorescence microscopy and in 3D by histology. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time a far red fluorescent protein is imaged in vivo by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Due to the regeneration feature of zebrafish pancreas, this work preludes the longitudinal studies of animal models of diseases such as pancreatitis by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Since the effective penetration depth of photoacoustic tomography is beyond the transport mean free path length, other E2-Crimson labeled inner organs will also be able to be studied dynamically using spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography.

  18. Diffusion, transport, and cell membrane organization investigated by imaging fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Jagadish; Manna, Manoj; Guo, Lin; Kraut, Rachel; Wohland, Thorsten

    2009-11-01

    Cell membrane organization is dynamic and is assumed to have different characteristic length scales. These length scales, which are influenced by lipid and protein composition as well as by the cytoskeleton, can range from below the optical resolution limit (as with rafts or microdomains) to far above the resolution limit (as with capping phenomena or the formation of lipid "platforms"). The measurement of these membrane features poses a significant problem because membrane dynamics are on the millisecond timescale and are thus beyond the time resolution of conventional imaging approaches. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), a widely used spectroscopic technique to measure membrane dynamics, has the required time resolution but lacks imaging capabilities. A promising solution is the recently introduced method known as imaging total internal reflection (ITIR)-FCS, which can probe diffusion phenomena in lipid membranes with good temporal and spatial resolution. In this work, we extend ITIR-FCS to perform ITIR fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (ITIR-FCCS) between pixel areas of arbitrary shape and derive a generalized expression that is applicable to active transport and diffusion. ITIR-FCCS is applied to model systems exhibiting diffusion, active transport, or a combination of the two. To demonstrate its applicability to live cells, we observe the diffusion of a marker, the sphingolipid-binding domain (SBD) derived from the amyloid peptide Abeta, on live neuroblastoma cells. We investigate the organization and dynamics of SBD-bound lipid microdomains under the conditions of cholesterol removal and cytoskeleton disruption. PMID:19883607

  19. First fluorescence spectroscopic investigation of Am(III) complexation with an organic carboxylic ligand, pyromellitic acid.

    PubMed

    Barkleit, Astrid; Geipel, Gerhard; Acker, Margret; Taut, Steffen; Bernhard, Gert

    2011-01-01

    For the first time Am(III) complexation with a small organic ligand could be identified and characterized with time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) at room temperature and trace metal concentration. With pyromellitic acid (1,2,4,5-benzene-tetracarboxylic acid, BTC) as ligand spectroscopic characteristics for the Am-BTC complex system were determined at pH 5.0, an ionic strength of 0.1 M (NaClO4) and room temperature. The fluorescence lifetimes were determined to be 23.2±2.2 ns for Am3+(aq) and 27.2±1.2 ns for the Am-BTC 1:1 complex; the emission maximum for the 5D1-(7)F1 transition is 691 nm for both species. The complex stability constant for the Am-BTC 1:1 complex was calculated to be logβ110=5.42±0.16. PMID:20943431

  20. Live-cell multiphoton fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with an improved large Stokes shift fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yinghua; Meurer, Matthias; Raghavan, Sarada; Rebane, Aleksander; Lindquist, Jake R.; Santos, Sofia; Kats, Ilia; Davidson, Michael W.; Mazitschek, Ralph; Hughes, Thomas E.; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Knop, Michael; Shah, Jagesh V.

    2015-01-01

    We report an improved variant of mKeima, a monomeric long Stokes shift red fluorescent protein, hmKeima8.5. The increased intracellular brightness and large Stokes shift (∼180 nm) make it an excellent partner with teal fluorescent protein (mTFP1) for multiphoton, multicolor applications. Excitation of this pair by a single multiphoton excitation wavelength (MPE, 850 nm) yields well-separable emission peaks (∼120-nm separation). Using this pair, we measure homo- and hetero-oligomerization interactions in living cells via multiphoton excitation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (MPE-FCS). Using tandem dimer proteins and small-molecule inducible dimerization domains, we demonstrate robust and quantitative detection of intracellular protein–protein interactions. We also use MPE-FCCS to detect drug–protein interactions in the intracellular environment using a Coumarin 343 (C343)-conjugated drug and hmKeima8.5 as a fluorescence pair. The mTFP1/hmKeima8.5 and C343/hmKeima8.5 combinations, together with our calibration constructs, provide a practical and broadly applicable toolbox for the investigation of molecular interactions in the cytoplasm of living cells. PMID:25877871

  1. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies of tyrosine environment and ligand binding of plant calmodulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanyal, Gautam; Thompson, Faith; Puett, David

    1990-05-01

    Recent studies in our laboratories have focused on using tyrosine (Tyr) fluorescence of calmodulin (CaM) and tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence of CaM-bound peptdies as intrinsic probes of structure and interactions of this Ca2+ regulatory protein. Plant CaM contains a single Tyr (Tyr.-l38) and vertebrate CaM contains two (Tyr-99 and Tyr-.l38). Neither protein contains Trp. The fluorescence properties of Tyr-138 of wheat-germ CaM is sensitive to conformational changes induced by perturbations such as Ca2+ ligation or depletion, and pH changes. Effects of these perturbations on quantum yield, lifetime and dynamic quenching of Tyr-l38 fluorescence are reported. We have also studied binding of amphiphilic peptides to wheat-germ CaM. A comparison of wheat CaM induced changes in the fluorescence properties of a single Trp of these peptides with those induced by bovine testes CaM indicate general similarities of the peptide binding surfaces of plant and mammalian CaMs. Frequency domain measurements of decay of intensity and anisotropy have suggested some orientational freedom and local motion of the Trp residue of CaM-bound peptide, independent of the overall protein motion, even when the Trp is expected to be buried in the doubly apolar protein-peptide interface. Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous calcium binding protein which is believed to regulate several different enzymes in diverse cells (Klee et al., 1982). Much of the structural work to date has been carried out on mammalian CaM. However, CaM has also been isolated from plant and invertebrate sources, and a high degree of sequence homology with vertebrate CaM has been found. The amino acid sequence of wheat germ CaM shows eleven substitutions, two insertions and one deletion compared with the 148.-residue bovine brain CaM (Toda et al., 1985). Specific differences with mammalian CaM at two sites make plant CaM attractive for fluorescence spectroscopic studies. These are: (1) The presence of a single tyrosine residue (Tyr

  2. Remote excitation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy using silver nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Liang; Yuan, Haifeng; Lu, Gang; Hofkens, Johan; Roeffaers, Maarten; Uji-i, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), a powerful tool to resolve local properties, dynamical process of molecules, rotational and translational diffusion motions, relies on the fluctuations of florescence observables in the observation volume. In the case of rare transition events or small dynamical fluctuations, FCS requires few molecules or even single molecules in the observation volume at a time to minimize the background signals. Metal nanoparticle which possess unique localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) have been used to reduce the observation volume down to sub-diffraction limited scale while maintain at high analyst concentration up to tens of micromolar. Nevertheless, the applications of functionalized nanoparticles in living cell are limited due to the continuous diffusion after cell uptake, which makes it difficult to target the region of interests in the cell. In this work, we demonstrate the use of silver nanowires for remote excitation FCS on fluorescent molecules in solution. By using propagation surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) which supported by the silver nanowire to excite the fluorescence, both illumination and observation volume can be reduced simultaneously. In such a way, less perturbation is induced to the target region, and this will broaden the application scope of silver nanowire as tip in single cell endoscopy.

  3. Searching for spectroscopic signatures of density wave correlations in cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Rui-Hua

    2015-03-01

    Recent developments in the research on high-temperature cuprate superconductors highlight the relevance of some density wave correlations to the superconductivity and its normal state in this generic class of materials. Depending on specific cuprate systems, these density wave correlations can have diverse manifestations in different (charge, spin, pairing) sectors and likely break (time reversal, space inversion, point group, gauge) symmetries in addition to the lattice translation. A unified understanding of their microscopic nature hinges on further characterizations using direct (imaging scattering) probes for these correlations themselves, as well as indirect probes for their interplay with other degrees of freedom in the system. ARPES can provide information about a density wave order through probing modifications in the electron structure it induces, while other spectroscopy techniques can shed unique lights on the broken symmetry aspect of the order. In this talk, I will review the density-wave signatures that have been or yet to be found in ARPES mainly in terms of the spectral weight, energy gap, and renormalized band dispersions. These experimental observations/proposals, coupled with simple theoretical modeling, promise new insights into the (wavevector, order parameter, form factor) characters of associated density wave correlations. Time permitting, I will introduce a novel x-ray spectroscopy technique that can detect broken time-reversal versus space-inversion symmetry of an electronic order in a way complementary to the polar Kerr effect.

  4. Vectorized data acquisition and fast triple-correlation integrals for Fluorescence Triple Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ridgeway, William K; Millar, David P; Williamson, James R

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) is widely used to quantitate reaction rates and concentrations of molecules in vitro and in vivo. We recently reported Fluorescence Triple Correlation Spectroscopy (F3CS), which correlates three signals together instead of two. F3CS can analyze the stoichiometries of complex mixtures and detect irreversible processes by identifying time-reversal asymmetries. Here we report the computational developments that were required for the realization of F3CS and present the results as the Triple Correlation Toolbox suite of programs. Triple Correlation Toolbox is a complete data analysis pipeline capable of acquiring, correlating and fitting large data sets. Each segment of the pipeline handles error estimates for accurate error-weighted global fitting. Data acquisition was accelerated with a combination of off-the-shelf counter-timer chips and vectorized operations on 128-bit registers. This allows desktop computers with inexpensive data acquisition cards to acquire hours of multiple-channel data with sub-microsecond time resolution. Off-line correlation integrals were implemented as a two delay time multiple-tau scheme that scales efficiently with multiple processors and provides an unprecedented view of linked dynamics. Global fitting routines are provided to fit FCS and F3CS data to models containing up to ten species. Triple Correlation Toolbox is a complete package that enables F3CS to be performed on existing microscopes. PMID:23525193

  5. Nucleoplasmic viscosity of living cells investigated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Lifang; Xing, Da; Chen, Tongshen; Pei, Yihui

    2007-11-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a new kind of real-time, high-speed and single-molecule technique. It is used to detect the kinetic characteristics of fluorescent dye such as diffusion coefficient in the aqueous solution. Combined with confocal microscope optics, it has been now widely applied in cell biological research. Through a time correlation analysis of spontaneous intensity fluctuations, this technique with EGFP as a probe is capable of determining viscosity of fluids according to Stokes-Einstein equation. Nucleoplasmic viscosity is an important physical parameter to quantify the rheological characteristics of the nucleoplasm. Investigation on nucleoplasmic viscosity plays an important role in further understanding intranuclear environment. In this paper, FCS is introduced to noninvasively investigate nucleoplasmic viscosity of living cells. The results show that nucleoplasmic viscosity of lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cells is 2.55+/-0.61 cP and nucleoplasmic viscosity is larger than cytoplasmic viscosity at 37 °C (pH 7.4). In addition, significant changes in nucleoplasmic viscosity are detected by FCS when cells are exposed to hyper or hypotonic medium. Our study suggests that FCS can be used to detect the kinetic characteristics of biomolecules in living cells and thus helps to investigate the dynamic changes of the microenvironment in the cell.

  6. Preliminary investigation of intrinsic UV fluorescence spectroscopic changes associated with proteolytic digestion of bovine articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, William; Padilla-Martinez, Juan-Pablo; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Franco, Walfre

    2016-03-01

    Degradation and destruction of articular cartilage is the etiology of osteoarthritis (OA), an entity second only to cardiovascular disease as a cause of disability in the United States. Joint mechanics and cartilage biochemistry are believed to play a role in OA; an optical tool to detect structural and chemical changes in articular cartilage might offer benefit for its early detection and treatment. The objective of the present study was to identify the spectral changes in intrinsic ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence of cartilage that occur after proteolytic digestion of cartilage. Bovine articular cartilage samples were incubated in varying concentrations of collagenase ranging from 10ug/mL up to 5mg/mL for 18 hours at 37°C, a model of OA. Pre- and post-incubation measurements were taken of the UV excitation-emission spectrum of each cartilage sample. Mechanical tests were performed to determine the pre- and post-digestion force/displacement ratio associated with indentation of each sample. Spectral changes in intrinsic cartilage fluorescence and stiffness of the cartilage were associated with proteolytic digestion. In particular, changes in the relative intensity of fluorescence peaks associated with pentosidine crosslinks (330 nm excitation, 390 nm emission) and tryptophan (290 nm excitation, 340 nm emission) were found to correlate with different degrees of cartilage digestion and cartilage stiffness. In principle, it may be possible to use UV fluorescence spectral data for early detection of damage to articular cartilage, and as a surrogate measure for cartilage stiffness.

  7. Immunoglobulin surface-binding kinetics studied by total internal reflection with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, N L; Axelrod, D

    1983-01-01

    An experimental application of total internal reflection with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (TIR/FCS) is presented. TIR/FCS is a new technique for measuring the binding and unbinding rates and surface diffusion coefficient of fluorescent-labeled solute molecules in equilibrium at a surface. A laser beam totally internally reflects at the solid-liquid interface, selectively exciting surface-adsorbed molecules. Fluorescence collected by a microscope from a small, well-defined surface area approximately 5 micron2 spontaneously fluctuates as solute molecules randomly bind to, unbind from, and/or diffuse along the surface in chemical equilibrium. The fluorescence is detected by a photomultiplier and autocorrelated on-line by a minicomputer. The shape of the autocorrelation function depends on the bulk and surface diffusion coefficients, the binding rate constants, and the shape of the illuminated and observed region. The normalized amplitude of the autocorrelation function depends on the average number of molecules bound within the observed area. TIR/FCS requires no spectroscopic or thermodynamic change between dissociated and complexed states and no extrinsic perturbation from equilibrium. Using TIR/FCS, we determine that rhodamine-labeled immunoglobulin and insulin each nonspecifically adsorb to serum albumin-coated fused silica with both reversible and irreversible components. The characteristic time of the most rapidly reversible component measured is approximately 5 ms and is limited by the rate of bulk diffusion. Rhodamine-labeled bivalent antibodies to dinitrophenyl (DNP) bind to DNP-coated fused silica virtually irreversibly. Univalent Fab fragments of these same antibodies appear to specifically bind to DNP-coated fused silica, accompanied by a large amount of nonspecific binding. TIR/FCS is shown to be a feasible technique for measuring absorption/desorption kinetic rates at equilibrium. In suitable systems where nonspecific binding is low, TIR

  8. A spectroscopic fingerprint of electron correlation in high temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gweon, Gey-Hong; Matsuyama, Kazue; Gu, G.-D.; Schneeloch, J.; Zhong, R. D.; Liu, T. S.

    2014-03-01

    The so-called ``strange metal phase'' of high temperature (high Tc) superconductors remains at the heart of the high Tc mystery. Better experimental data and insightful theoretical work would improve our understanding of this enigmatic phase. In particular, the recent advance in angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES), incorporating low photon energies (~ 7 eV), has given a much more refined view of the many body interaction in these materials. Here, we report a new ARPES feature of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ that we demonstrate to have the key ability to distinguish between different classes of theories of the normal state. This feature-the anomaly in the nodal many body density of states (nMBDOS)-is clearly observed in the low energy ARPES data, but also observed in more conventional high energy ARPES data, when a sufficient temperature range is covered. We show that key characteristics of this anomaly are explained by a strong electron correlation model; the electron-hole asymmetry and the momentum dependent self energy emerge as key required ingredients. In particular, we find that, among many theories available for comparison, the phenomenological extremely correlated Fermi liquid (ECFL) model scores the best in terms of explaining the new anomaly feature.

  9. Dynamic and unique nucleolar microenvironment revealed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Hweon; Han, Sung-Sik; Sako, Yasushi; Pack, Chan-Gi

    2015-03-01

    Organization and functions of the nucleolus is maintained by mobilities and interactions of nucleolar factors. Because the nucleolus is a densely packed structure, molecular crowding effects determined by the molecular concentrations and mobilities in the nucleolus should also be important for regulating nucleolar organization and functions. However, such molecular property of nucleolar organization is not fully understood. To understand the biophysical property of nucleolar organization, the diffusional behaviors of inert green fluorescent protein (GFP) oligomers with or without nuclear localization signals (NLSs) were analyzed under various conditions by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Our result demonstrates that the mobility of GFPs inside the nucleolus and the nucleoplasm can be represented by single free diffusion under normal conditions, even though the mobility in the nucleolus is considerably slower than that in the chromatin region. Moreover, the free diffusion of GFPs is found to be significantly size- and NLS-dependent only in the nucleolus. Interestingly, the mobility in the nucleolus is highly sensitive to ATP depletion, as well as actinomycin D (ActD) treatment. In contrast, the ultra-structure of the nucleolus was not significantly changed by ATP depletion but was changed by ActD treatment. These results suggest that the nucleolus behaves similarly to an open aqueous-phase medium with an increased molecular crowding effect that depends on both energy and transcription. PMID:25404711

  10. Continuous fluorescence microphotolysis and correlation spectroscopy using 4Pi microscopy.

    PubMed

    Arkhipov, Anton; Hüve, Jana; Kahms, Martin; Peters, Reiner; Schulten, Klaus

    2007-12-01

    Continuous fluorescence microphotolysis (CFM) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) permit measurement of molecular mobility and association reactions in single living cells. CFM and FCS complement each other ideally and can be realized using identical equipment. So far, the spatial resolution of CFM and FCS was restricted by the resolution of the light microscope to the micrometer scale. However, cellular functions generally occur on the nanometer scale. Here, we develop the theoretical and computational framework for CFM and FCS experiments using 4Pi microscopy, which features an axial resolution of approximately 100 nm. The framework, taking the actual 4Pi point spread function of the instrument into account, was validated by measurements on model systems, employing 4Pi conditions or normal confocal conditions together with either single- or two-photon excitation. In all cases experimental data could be well fitted by computed curves for expected diffusion coefficients, even when the signal/noise ratio was small due to the small number of fluorophores involved. PMID:17704168

  11. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in biology, chemistry, and medicine.

    PubMed

    Perevoshchikova, I V; Kotova, E A; Antonenko, Y N

    2011-05-01

    This review describes the method of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and its applications. FCS is used for investigating processes associated with changes in the mobility of molecules and complexes and allows researchers to study aggregation of particles, binding of fluorescent molecules with supramolecular complexes, lipid vesicles, etc. The size of objects under study varies from a few angstroms for dye molecules to hundreds of nanometers for nanoparticles. The described applications of FCS comprise various fields from simple chemical systems of solution/micelle to sophisticated regulations on the level of living cells. Both the methodical bases and the theoretical principles of FCS are simple and available. The present review is concentrated preferentially on FCS applications for studies on artificial and natural membranes. At present, in contrast to the related approach of dynamic light scattering, FCS is poorly known in Russia, although it is widely employed in laboratories of other countries. The goal of this review is to promote the development of FCS in Russia so that this technique could occupy the position it deserves in modern Russian science. PMID:21639831

  12. Spectroscopic Evidence of Anthropogenic Compounds Extraction from Polymers by Fluorescent Dissolved Organic Matter in Natural Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, M.; Trojzuck, A.; Voss, D.; Gassmann, S.; Zielinski, O.

    2016-04-01

    FDOM is one of the most important carriers of anthropogenic compounds in natural waters. It can combine with environmental contaminants and polymers to form diverse chemical structures. To this end, here a microfluidic chip was designed for the analysis of these changes in fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) fingerprints due to thermal treatment and varying time intervals of exposure. Excitation Emission Matrix Spectroscopy (EEMS) approach was utilized to detect and identify the inherent compounds in sampled FDOM. Strong direct correlations were founded, Spearman rank correlation values (ρ = 0.85 at α = 0.1, n = 4) and linear correlation R2 = 0.8359 were noted between thermal treatment pattern 2 and fluorescence intensity of samples. Materials, acrylic based glue and cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) polymer, used to design the microfluidic sensor were determined to possess unique spectral features in the ultraviolet to green spectrum using EEMS. The study therefore provides an insight on methods to identify contaminants in natural waters. This underlines the potential of optical sensors providing measurements at fast intervals, enabling environmental monitoring.

  13. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy at Micromolar Concentrations without Optical Nanoconfinement

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, Ted A.; Ly, Sonny; Bourguet, Feliza; Fischer, Nicholas O.; Coleman, Matthew A.

    2014-08-14

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is an important technique for studying biochemical interactions dynamically that may be used in vitro and in cell-based studies. It is generally claimed that FCS may only be used at nM concentrations. We show that this general consensus is incorrect and that the limitation to nM concentrations is not fundamental but due to detector limits as well as laser fluctuations. With a high count rate detector system and applying laser fluctuation corrections, we demonstrate FCS measurements up to 38 μM with the same signal-to-noise as at lower concentrations. Optical nanoconfinement approaches previously used to increase the concentration range of FCS are not necessary, and further increases above 38 μM may be expected using detectors and detector arrays with higher saturation rates and better laser fluctuation corrections. This approach greatly widens the possibilities of dynamic measurements of biochemical interactions using FCS at physiological concentrations.

  14. Shedding light on azopolymer brush dynamics by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kollarigowda, R H; De Santo, I; Rianna, C; Fedele, C; Manikas, A C; Cavalli, S; Netti, P A

    2016-09-14

    Understanding the response to illumination at a molecular level as well as characterising polymer brush dynamics are key features that guide the engineering of new light-stimuli responsive materials. Here, we report on the use of a confocal microscopy technique that was exploited to discern how a single molecular event such as the photoinduced isomerisation of azobenzene can affect an entire polymeric material at a macroscopic level leading to photodriven mass-migration. For this reason, a set of polymer brushes, containing azobenzene (Disperse Red 1, DR) on the side chains of poly(methacrylic acid), was synthesised and the influence of DR on the polymer brush dynamics was investigated for the first time by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS). Briefly, two dynamics were observed, a short one coming from the isomerisation of DR and a long one related to the brush main chain. Interestingly, photoinduced polymer aggregation in the confocal volume was observed. PMID:27491890

  15. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy evidence for structural heterogeneity in ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J C; Baker, G. A.; Hillesheim, P. C.; Dai, S.; Shaw, R. W.; Mahurin, S., M.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we provide new experimental evidence for chain length-dependent self-aggregation in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). In studying a homologous series of N-alkyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide, [C{sub n}MPy][Tf{sub 2}N] RTILs of varying alkyl chain length (n = 3, 4, 6, 8, and 10), biphasic rhodamine 6G solute diffusion dynamics were observed; both the fast and slow diffusion coefficients decreased with increasing alkyl chain length, with the relative contribution from slower diffusion increasing for longer-chain [C{sub n}MPy][Tf{sub 2}N]. We propose that the biphasic diffusion dynamics originate from self-aggregation of the nonpolar alkyl chains in the cationic [CnMPy]{sup +}.

  16. Interpretation of fluorescence correlation spectra of biopolymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Phillies, George D J

    2016-05-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is regularly used to study diffusion in non-dilute "crowded" biopolymer solutions, including the interior of living cells. For fluorophores in dilute solution, the relationship between the FCS spectrum G(t) and the diffusion coefficient D is well-established. However, the dilute-solution relationship between G(t) and D has sometimes been used to interpret FCS spectra of fluorophores in non-dilute solutions. Unfortunately, the relationship used to interpret FCS spectra in dilute solutions relies on an assumption that is not always correct in non-dilute solutions. This paper obtains the correct form for interpreting FCS spectra of non-dilute solutions, writing G(t) in terms of the statistical properties of the fluorophore motions. Approaches for applying this form are discussed. PMID:26756528

  17. High-speed low-cost correlator for single molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hsu-Yang; Lin, Hsin-Yu; White, Jonathon D.; Fann, Wunshain

    2009-02-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) has been extensively applied to study the kinetics and photophysics of molecules as well as interactions between molecules by extracting information from the fluctuation of signals. In particular, single molecule applications of FCS promise the greatest amounts of information. Ideally, one would like to carry out FCS in real-time; however, due to the time-consuming nature of the correlation process, performing the correlation in real-time is totally nontrivial. Generally an expensive hardware correlator or a TCSPC board is required for this purpose. Recently highly-efficient algorithms based on multi-tau method have been proposed to build up a software correlator. In this work, we set forth an innovative algorithm capable of realizing the real-time correlation, without turning to the multi-tau method. This algorithm takes advantage of the low count rate generally existing in the FCS experiments, directly using the time interval between each photon its adjacent photon to efficiently update the correlation function. Based on this efficiency, it is possible to build a low-cost software correlator with just an ordinary counter board. We practically demonstrate the feasibility by setting up this correlator to measure the diffusion motion of rhodamine 6G in water using FCS. The algorithm was validated by duplicating the signal from the photon detector and sending it to both the ordinary counter board with our software correlator and a commercial correlator simultaneously. The perfect coincidence of the correlation curves from these two correlators and the real-time display of the correlation function indicate the validity and practicability of our approach.

  18. Fluorescent-spectroscopic and imaging methods of investigations for diagnostics of head and neck tumors and control of PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edinak, N. E.; Chental, Victor V.; Komov, D.; Vaculovskaya, E.; Tabolinovskaya, T. D.; Abdullin, N. A.; Pustynsky, I.; Chatikhin, V.; Loschenov, Victor B.; Meerovich, Gennady A.; Stratonnikov, A. A.; Linkov, Kirill G.; Agafonov, Vladimir I.; Zuravleva, V.; Lukjanets, E.

    1996-01-01

    Methodics of PDT control and fluorescent-spectroscopic diagnostic of head and neck tumors and mammary gland cancer (nodular) with the use of Kr, He-Ne and semiconductor lasers and photosensitizer (PS) -- Al phtalocyanin (Photosense) are discussed. The results show that applied diagnostic methods permit us not only to identify the topology and malignancy of a tumor but also to correct PDT process directly during irradiation.

  19. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and Nonlinear Stochastic Reaction-Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Del Razo, Mauricio; Pan, Wenxiao; Qian, Hong; Lin, Guang

    2014-05-30

    The currently existing theory of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is based on the linear fluctuation theory originally developed by Einstein, Onsager, Lax, and others as a phenomenological approach to equilibrium fluctuations in bulk solutions. For mesoscopic reaction-diffusion systems with nonlinear chemical reactions among a small number of molecules, a situation often encountered in single-cell biochemistry, it is expected that FCS time correlation functions of a reaction-diffusion system can deviate from the classic results of Elson and Magde [Biopolymers (1974) 13:1-27]. We first discuss this nonlinear effect for reaction systems without diffusion. For nonlinear stochastic reaction-diffusion systems there are no closed solutions; therefore, stochastic Monte-Carlo simulations are carried out. We show that the deviation is small for a simple bimolecular reaction; the most significant deviations occur when the number of molecules is small and of the same order. Extending Delbrück-Gillespie’s theory for stochastic nonlinear reactions with rapidly stirring to reaction-diffusion systems provides a mesoscopic model for chemical and biochemical reactions at nanometric and mesoscopic level such as a single biological cell.

  20. [Intermolecular Interactions between Cytisine and Bovine Serum Albumin A Synchronous Fluorescence Spectroscopic Analysis and Molecular Docking Research].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-hang; Han, Zhong-bao; Ma, Jia-ze; He, Yan; Liu, Li-yan; Xin, Shi-gang; Yu, Zhan

    2016-03-01

    Cytisine (Cy) is one of the alkaloids that exist naturally in the plant genera Laburnum of the family Fabaceae. With strong bioactivities, Cy is commercialized for smoking cessation for years. In this work, the study of intermolecular interactions between Cy and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was performed by applying fluorescence spectroscopic methods under simulated physiological conditions. The mechanism of fluorescence quenching of BSA by Cy was also studied. Parameters such as bathing temperature, time and solution pH were investigated to optimize the fluorescence quenching. The binding type, binding ratio and binding constant between BSA and Cy were calculated by using the Stem-Volmer equation. Experimental results indicated that Cy can quench the fluorescent emission of BSA statically by forming a 1 : 1 type non-covalent complex and the binding constant is 5.6 x 10(3) L x mol(-1). Synchronous fluorescence spectral research shows Cy may affect the fluorescence emission of Trp residues of BSA. Furthermore, molecular docking is utilized to model the complex and probe the plausible quenching mechanism. It can be noted that the hydrogen bindings and hydrophobic interactions between Cy and BSA change the micro-environment of Trp213, which leads to the fluorescence quenching of BSA. PMID:27400521

  1. Correlation Between Bulk Material Defects and Spectroscopic Response in Cadmium Zinc Telluride Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Bradford H.; Stahle, C. M.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Parsons, A. M.; Tueller, J.; VanSant, J. T.; Munoz, B. F.; Snodgrass, S. J.; Mullinix, R. E.

    1999-01-01

    One of the critical challenges for large area cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) detector arrays is obtaining material capable of uniform imaging and spectroscopic response. Two complementary nondestructive techniques for characterizing bulk CdZnTe have been developed to identify material with a uniform response. The first technique, infrared transmission imaging, allows for rapid visualization of bulk defects. The second technique, x-ray spectral mapping, provides a map of the material spectroscopic response when it is configured as a planar detector. The two techniques have been used to develop a correlation between bulk defect type and detector performance. The correlation allows for the use of infrared imaging to rapidly develop wafer mining maps. The mining of material free of detrimental defects has the potential to dramatically increase the yield and quality of large area CdZnTe detector arrays.

  2. Spectroscopic and nonlinear optical properties of new chalcone fluorescent probes for bioimaging applications: a theoretical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Przemysław; Pietrzak, Marek; Janek, Tomasz; Jędrzejewska, Beata; Cysewski, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the newly synthesized non-centrosymmetric, 4-dimethylamino-3'-isothiocyanatochalcone (PKA) compound was presented. This compound belongs to the chalcone group, and its main purpose is to be used in biomedical imaging as a fluorescence dye. For this reason, the linear and nonlinear properties in solvents of different polarity were thoroughly studied. In accordance with the requirements for a fluorochrome, the PKA compound is characterized by strong absorption, large Stokes' shifts, relatively high fluorescence quantum yields and high nonlinear optical response. Moreover, the isothiocyanate reactive probe was conjugated with Concanavalin A. Conventional fluorescence microscopy imaging of Candida albicans cells incubated with the PKA-Concanavalin A, is presented. The results of this study show that the novel conjugate PKA-Concanavalin A could be a promising new probe for cellular labelling in biological and biomedical research. Graphical abstract Spectroscopic behavior of the PKA dye. PMID:27168200

  3. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy at Micromolar Concentrations without Optical Nanoconfinement

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Laurence, Ted A.; Ly, Sonny; Bourguet, Feliza; Fischer, Nicholas O.; Coleman, Matthew A.

    2014-08-14

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is an important technique for studying biochemical interactions dynamically that may be used in vitro and in cell-based studies. It is generally claimed that FCS may only be used at nM concentrations. We show that this general consensus is incorrect and that the limitation to nM concentrations is not fundamental but due to detector limits as well as laser fluctuations. With a high count rate detector system and applying laser fluctuation corrections, we demonstrate FCS measurements up to 38 μM with the same signal-to-noise as at lower concentrations. Optical nanoconfinement approaches previously used to increase themore » concentration range of FCS are not necessary, and further increases above 38 μM may be expected using detectors and detector arrays with higher saturation rates and better laser fluctuation corrections. This approach greatly widens the possibilities of dynamic measurements of biochemical interactions using FCS at physiological concentrations.« less

  4. Inference of protein diffusion probed via fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekouras, Konstantinos

    2015-03-01

    Fluctuations are an inherent part of single molecule or few particle biophysical data sets. Traditionally, ``noise'' fluctuations have been viewed as a nuisance, to be eliminated or minimized. Here we look on how statistical inference methods - that take explicit advantage of fluctuations - have allowed us to draw an unexpected picture of single molecule diffusional dynamics. Our focus is on the diffusion of proteins probed using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). First, we discuss how - in collaboration with the Bustamante and Marqusee labs at UC Berkeley - we determined using FCS data that individual enzymes are perturbed by self-generated catalytic heat (Riedel et al, Nature, 2014). Using the tools of inference, we found how distributions of enzyme diffusion coefficients shift in the presence of substrate revealing that enzymes performing highly exothermic reactions dissipate heat by transiently accelerating their center of mass following a catalytic reaction. Next, when molecules diffuse in the cell nucleus they often appear to diffuse anomalously. We analyze FCS data - in collaboration with Rich Day at the IU Med School - to propose a simple model for transcription factor binding-unbinding in the nucleus to show that it may give rise to apparent anomalous diffusion. Here inference methods extract entire binding affinity distributions for the diffusing transcription factors, allowing us to precisely characterize their interactions with different components of the nuclear environment. From this analysis, we draw key mechanistic insight that goes beyond what is possible by simply fitting data to ``anomalous diffusion'' models.

  5. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Evidence for Structural Heterogeneity in Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jianchang; Baker, Gary A; Hillesheim, Patrick C; Dai, Sheng; Shaw, Robert W; Mahurin, Shannon Mark

    2011-01-01

    Self-aggregation in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) has been a subject of intense interest in recent years. In this work, we provide new experimental evidence for chain length-dependent self-aggregation in RTILs using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). In studying a homologous series of N-alkyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide, [CnMPy][Tf2N] RTILs of varying alkyl chain length (n = 3, 4, 6, 8, and 10), biphasic rhodamine 6G solute diffusion dynamics were observed; both the fast and slow diffusion coefficients decrease with increasing alkyl chain length, with the relative contribution from slower diffusion increasing for longer-chained [CnMPy][Tf2N]. We propose that the biphasic diffusion dynamics originate from self-aggregation of the nonpolar alkyl chains in the cationic [CnMPy]+. The presence of this local liquid structuring provides important insight into the behavior of RTILs relevant to their application in photovoltaics, fuel cells, and batteries.

  6. Fixation-resistant photoactivatable fluorescent proteins for correlative light and electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Paez Segala, Maria G.; Sun, Mei G.; Shtengel, Gleb; Viswanathan, Sarada; Baird, Michelle A.; Macklin, John J.; Patel, Ronak; Allen, John R.; Howe, Elizabeth S.; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Hess, Harald F.; Davidson, Michael W.; Wang, Yalin; Looger, Loren L.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins facilitate a variety of imaging paradigms in live and fixed samples. However, they cease to function following heavy fixation, hindering advanced applications such as correlative light and electron microscopy. Here we report engineered variants of the photoconvertible Eos fluorescent protein that function normally in heavily fixed (0.5–1% OsO4), plastic resin-embedded samples, enabling correlative super-resolution fluorescence imaging and high-quality electron microscopy. PMID:25581799

  7. Analyses of the Dynamic Properties of Nuclear Lamins by Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) and Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS).

    PubMed

    Takeshi, Shimi; Pack, Chan-Gi; Goldman, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    The major structural components of the nuclear lamina are the A- and B-type nuclear lamin proteins which are also present in the nucleoplasm. Studies of molecular movements of the lamins in both the lamina and nucleoplasm of living cell nuclei have provided insights into their roles in maintaining nuclear architecture. In this chapter, we present protocols for quantitatively measuring the mobilities of lamin proteins by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) in mammalian cell nuclei. PMID:27147036

  8. Multiple-perturbation two-dimensional (2D) correlation analysis for spectroscopic imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinzawa, Hideyuki; Hashimoto, Kosuke; Sato, Hidetoshi; Kanematsu, Wataru; Noda, Isao

    2014-07-01

    A series of data analysis techniques, including multiple-perturbation two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy and kernel analysis, were used to demonstrate how these techniques can sort out convoluted information content underlying spectroscopic imaging data. A set of Raman spectra of polymer blends consisting of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) were collected under varying spatial coordinates and subjected to multiple-perturbation 2D correlation analysis and kernel analysis by using the coordinates as perturbation variables. Cross-peaks appearing in asynchronous correlation spectra indicated that the change in the spectral intensity of the free Cdbnd O band of the PMMA band occurs before that of the Cdbnd O⋯Hsbnd O band arising from the molecular interaction between PMMA and PEG. Kernel matrices, generated by carrying out 2D correlation analysis on principal component analysis (PCA) score images, revealed subtle but important discrepancy between the patterns of the images, providing additional interpretation to the PCA in an intuitively understandable manner. Consequently, the results provided apparent spectroscopic evidence that PMMA and PEG in the blends are partially miscible at the molecular level, allowing the PMMAs to respond to the perturbations in different manner.

  9. [Vermicomposting of different organic materials and three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of their dissolved organic matter].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Wang, Dong-sheng; Liu, Man-qiang; Hu, Feng; Li, Hui-xin; Huang, Zhong-yang; Chang, Yi-jun; Jiao, Jia-guo

    2015-10-01

    In this experiment, different proportions of the cattle manure, tea-leaf, herb and mushroom residues, were used as food for earthworm (Eisenia fetida) to study the growth of the earth-worm. Then the characteristics and transformation of nutrient content and three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence (3DEEM) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) during vermistabilization were investigated by means of chemical and spectroscopic methods. The result showed that the mixture of different ratios of cattle manure with herb residue, and cattle manure with tea-leaf were conducive to the growth of earthworm, while the materials compounded with mushroom residue inhibited the growth of earthworm. With the increasing time of verimcomposting, the pH in vermicompost tended to be circumneutral and weakly acidic, and there were increases in electrical conductivity, and the contents of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, available nitrogen, and available phosphorus, while the total potassium and available potassium increased first and then decreased, and the organic matter content decreased. 3DEEM and fluorescence regional integration results indicated that, the fluorescence of protein-like fluorescence peaks declined significantly, while the intensity of humic-like fluorescence peak increased significantly in DOM. Vermicomposting process might change the compositions of DOM with elevated concentrations of humic acid and fulvic acid in the organics. In all, this study suggested the suitability of 3DEEM for monitoring the organics transformation and assessing the maturity in the vermicomposting. PMID:26995929

  10. Characterization of humic acids by two-dimensional correlation fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, K.; Xing, Shaoyong; Gong, Yongkuan; Miyajima, Toru

    2008-07-01

    We have investigated interaction between humic acids and heavy metal ions by fluorescence spectroscopy. The humic acids examined are Aldrich humic acid (AHA) and Dando humic acid (DHA), and heavy metal ions are Cu 2+ and Pb 2+. The binding constants between the humic acids and the heavy metal ions are obtained by a conventional fluorescence quenching technique. The two prominent bands in the fluorescence spectra of the humic acids give different binding constants, implying that the two bands are originated from different fluorescent species in the matrices of the humic acids. This was confirmed by two-dimensional correlation analysis based on the quenching perturbation on the fluorescence spectra. Two prominent cross peaks corresponding to the two fluorescence bands are obtained in the asynchronous maps, indicating that the two fluorescence bands belong to different species. The order of the response of the two fluorescence bands to the quenching perturbation is also elucidated based on Noda's rule.

  11. Single gold nanoparticles to enhance the detection of single fluorescent molecules at micromolar concentration using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punj, Deep; Rigneault, Hervé; Wenger, Jérôme

    2014-05-01

    Single nanoparticles made of noble metals are strongly appealing to develop practical applications to detect fluorescent molecules in solution. Here, we detail the use of a single gold nanoparticle of 100 nm diameter to enhance the detection of single Alex Fluor 647 fluorescent molecules at high concentrations of several micromolar. We discuss the implementation of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and provide a new method to reliably extract the enhanced fluorescence signal stemming from the nanoparticle near-field from the background generated in the confocal volume. The applicability of our method is checked by reporting the invariance of the single molecule results as function of the molecular concentration, and the experimental data is found in good agreement with numerical simulations.

  12. Hybrid plasmonic platforms based on silica-encapsulated gold nanorods as effective spectroscopic enhancers for Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabudean, A. M.; Biro, D.; Astilean, S.

    2012-12-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nano-tags are of increasing interest in biomedical research as viable alternatives to bio-imaging techniques based on semiconductor quantum dots or fluorescent molecules. In this work, we fabricate silica-coated gold nanorods (AuNRs) encoded with two molecular labels to operate as highly effective spectroscopic nano-tags in near-infrared SERS (NIR-SERS) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering combined with metal-enhanced fluorescence (SERRS-MEF), respectively. Specifically, a non-fluorescent molecule with strong affinity for a gold surface (para-aminothiophenol, p-ATP) and a common dye (Nile Blue, NB) with lower affinity have been successfully tested as NIR-SERS nano-tags under laser excitation at 785 nm. Moreover, as a result of designing AuNRs with a plasmon resonance band overlapping the electronic absorption band of the encoded NB molecule, a dual SERRS and MEF performance has been devised under resonant excitation at 633 nm. We explain this result by considering a partial desorption of NB molecules from the metal surface and their trapping into the silica shell at favorable distances to avoid quenching and enhance the fluorescence signal. Finally, we prove that the silica shell prevents the desorption or chemical transformation of p-ATP into p,p‧-dimercaptoazobenzene species, as previously noticed, thus providing a highly stable SERRS signal, which is crucial for imaging applications.

  13. Hybrid plasmonic platforms based on silica-encapsulated gold nanorods as effective spectroscopic enhancers for Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gabudean, A M; Biro, D; Astilean, S

    2012-12-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nano-tags are of increasing interest in biomedical research as viable alternatives to bio-imaging techniques based on semiconductor quantum dots or fluorescent molecules. In this work, we fabricate silica-coated gold nanorods (AuNRs) encoded with two molecular labels to operate as highly effective spectroscopic nano-tags in near-infrared SERS (NIR-SERS) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering combined with metal-enhanced fluorescence (SERRS-MEF), respectively. Specifically, a non-fluorescent molecule with strong affinity for a gold surface (para-aminothiophenol, p-ATP) and a common dye (Nile Blue, NB) with lower affinity have been successfully tested as NIR-SERS nano-tags under laser excitation at 785 nm. Moreover, as a result of designing AuNRs with a plasmon resonance band overlapping the electronic absorption band of the encoded NB molecule, a dual SERRS and MEF performance has been devised under resonant excitation at 633 nm. We explain this result by considering a partial desorption of NB molecules from the metal surface and their trapping into the silica shell at favorable distances to avoid quenching and enhance the fluorescence signal. Finally, we prove that the silica shell prevents the desorption or chemical transformation of p-ATP into p,p'-dimercaptoazobenzene species, as previously noticed, thus providing a highly stable SERRS signal, which is crucial for imaging applications. PMID:23138835

  14. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies of (acetamide + sodium/potassium thiocyanates) molten mixtures: composition and temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Guchhait, Biswajit; Gazi, Harun Al Rasid; Kashyap, Hemant K; Biswas, Ranjit

    2010-04-22

    Steady state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic techniques have been used to explore the Stokes' shift dynamics and rotational relaxation of a dipolar solute probe in molten mixtures of acetamide (CH(3)CONH(2)) with sodium and potassium thiocyanates (Na /KSCN) at T approximately 318 K and several other higher temperatures. The dipolar solute probe employed for this study is coumarin 153 (C153). Six different fractions (f) of KSCN of the following ternary mixture composition, 0.75 CH(3)CONH(2) + 0.25[(1 - f)NaSCN + fKSCN], have been considered. The estimated experimental dynamic Stokes' shift for these systems ranges between 1800 and 2200 cm(-1) (+/-250 cm(-1)), which is similar to what has been observed with the same solute probe in several imidazolium cation based room temperature ionic liquids (RTIL) and in pure amide solvents. Interestingly, this range of estimated Stokes' shift, even though not corresponding to the megavalue of static dielectric constant reported in the literature for a binary mixture of molten CH(3)CONH(2) and NaSCN, exhibits a nonmonotonic KSCN concentration dependence. The magnitudes of the dynamic Stokes' shift detected in the present experiments are significantly less than the estimated ones, as nearly 40-60% of the total shift is missed due to the limited time resolution employed (full-width at half-maximum of the instrument response function approximately 70 ps). The solvation response function, constructed from the detected shifts in these systems, exhibits triexponential decay with the fastest time constant (tau(1)) in the 10-20 ps range, which might be much shorter if measured with a better time resolution. The second time constant (tau(2)) lies in the 70-100 ps range, and the third one (tau(3)) ranges between 300 and 800 ps. Both these time constants (tau(2) and tau(3)) show alkali metal ion concentration dependence and exhibit viscosity decoupling at higher viscosity in the NaSCN-enriched region. Time dependent rotational

  15. INVESTIGATION OF SATURATED LASER FLUORESCENCE AND CARS SPECTROSCOPIC TECHNIQUES FOR COMBUSTION DIAGNOSTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of comparisons of saturated laser-excited molecular fluorescence measurements of CH and CN in atmospheric pressure acetylene flames with absorption measurements of these flame radicals. It was found possible to saturate the fluorescence intensity of both ...

  16. A 32-channel photon counting module with embedded auto/cross-correlators for real-time parallel fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, S.; Labanca, I.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M.

    2014-10-15

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a well-established technique to study binding interactions or the diffusion of fluorescently labeled biomolecules in vitro and in vivo. Fast FCS experiments require parallel data acquisition and analysis which can be achieved by exploiting a multi-channel Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) array and a corresponding multi-input correlator. This paper reports a 32-channel FPGA based correlator able to perform 32 auto/cross-correlations simultaneously over a lag-time ranging from 10 ns up to 150 ms. The correlator is included in a 32 × 1 SPAD array module, providing a compact and flexible instrument for high throughput FCS experiments. However, some inherent features of SPAD arrays, namely afterpulsing and optical crosstalk effects, may introduce distortions in the measurement of auto- and cross-correlation functions. We investigated these limitations to assess their impact on the module and evaluate possible workarounds.

  17. A 32-channel photon counting module with embedded auto/cross-correlators for real-time parallel fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gong, S.; Labanca, I.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a well-established technique to study binding interactions or the diffusion of fluorescently labeled biomolecules in vitro and in vivo. Fast FCS experiments require parallel data acquisition and analysis which can be achieved by exploiting a multi-channel Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) array and a corresponding multi-input correlator. This paper reports a 32-channel FPGA based correlator able to perform 32 auto/cross-correlations simultaneously over a lag-time ranging from 10 ns up to 150 ms. The correlator is included in a 32 × 1 SPAD array module, providing a compact and flexible instrument for high throughput FCS experiments. However, some inherent features of SPAD arrays, namely afterpulsing and optical crosstalk effects, may introduce distortions in the measurement of auto- and cross-correlation functions. We investigated these limitations to assess their impact on the module and evaluate possible workarounds. PMID:25362365

  18. Spectroscopic Ellipsometry and Fluorescence Study of Thermochromism in an Ultrathin Poly(diacetylene) Film: Reversibility and Transition Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    CARPICK,R.W.; MAYER,THOMAS M.; SASAKI,DARRYL Y.; BURNS,ALAN R.

    2000-01-18

    We have investigated the thermochromic transition of an ultrathin poly(diacetylene) film. The Langmuir film is composed of three layers of polymerized 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid [CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}C{triple_bond}CC{triple_bond}C(CH{sub 2}){sub 8}COOH] (poly-PCDA) organized into crystalline domains on a silicon substrate. Spectroscopic ellipsometry and fluorescence intensity measurements are obtained with in-situ temperature control. Poly-PCDA films exhibit a reversible thermal transition between the initial blue form and an intermediate ''purple'' form that exists only at elevated temperature (between 303-333 K), followed by an irreversible transition to the red form after annealing above 320 K. We propose that the purple form is thermally distorted blue poly-PCDA, and may represent a transitional configuration in the irreversible conversion to red. This hypothesis is supported by the appearance of unique features in the absorption spectra for each form as derived from the ellipsometry measurements. Significant fluorescence emission occurs only with the red form, and is reduced at elevated temperatures while the absorption remains unchanged. Reduced emission is likely related to thermal fluctuations of the hydrocarbon side chains. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements of the irreversible transition have been performed. Using a first-order kinetic analysis of these measurements we deduce an energy barrier of 17.6 {+-} 1.1 kcal mol{sup -1} between the blue and red forms.

  19. Stochastic Micro-Pattern for Automated Correlative Fluorescence - Scanning Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Begemann, Isabell; Viplav, Abhiyan; Rasch, Christiane; Galic, Milos

    2015-01-01

    Studies of cellular surface features gain from correlative approaches, where live cell information acquired by fluorescence light microscopy is complemented by ultrastructural information from scanning electron micrographs. Current approaches to spatially align fluorescence images with scanning electron micrographs are technically challenging and often cost or time-intensive. Relying exclusively on open-source software and equipment available in a standard lab, we have developed a method for rapid, software-assisted alignment of fluorescence images with the corresponding scanning electron micrographs via a stochastic gold micro-pattern. Here, we provide detailed instructions for micro-pattern production and image processing, troubleshooting for critical intermediate steps, and examples of membrane ultra-structures aligned with the fluorescence signal of proteins enriched at such sites. Together, the presented method for correlative fluorescence – scanning electron microscopy is versatile, robust and easily integrated into existing workflows, permitting image alignment with accuracy comparable to existing approaches with negligible investment of time or capital. PMID:26647824

  20. Stochastic Micro-Pattern for Automated Correlative Fluorescence - Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Begemann, Isabell; Viplav, Abhiyan; Rasch, Christiane; Galic, Milos

    2015-01-01

    Studies of cellular surface features gain from correlative approaches, where live cell information acquired by fluorescence light microscopy is complemented by ultrastructural information from scanning electron micrographs. Current approaches to spatially align fluorescence images with scanning electron micrographs are technically challenging and often cost or time-intensive. Relying exclusively on open-source software and equipment available in a standard lab, we have developed a method for rapid, software-assisted alignment of fluorescence images with the corresponding scanning electron micrographs via a stochastic gold micro-pattern. Here, we provide detailed instructions for micro-pattern production and image processing, troubleshooting for critical intermediate steps, and examples of membrane ultra-structures aligned with the fluorescence signal of proteins enriched at such sites. Together, the presented method for correlative fluorescence - scanning electron microscopy is versatile, robust and easily integrated into existing workflows, permitting image alignment with accuracy comparable to existing approaches with negligible investment of time or capital. PMID:26647824

  1. Spectroscopic study one thiosemicarbazone derivative with ctDNA using ethidium bromide as a fluorescence probe.

    PubMed

    Geng, Shaoguang; Wu, Qing; Shi, Lei; Cui, Fengling

    2013-09-01

    In this study, a thiosemicarbazone derivative (E)-2-((1,4-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone-2-yl)methylene)-N-(4-fluorophenyl)hydrazinecarbothioamide (DAFPT) was synthesized, and the interaction of DAFPT with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) was explored using ethidium bromide (EB) as a fluorescence probe. The binding mode between DAFPT and ctDNA was investigated by UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular docking. The fluorescence quenching mechanism of EB-ctDNA by DAFPT might be a combined quenching type. Thermodynamic parameters showed that the reaction was spontaneous. According to ionic strength, fluorescence polarization and melting temperature (T(m)) curve results, DAFPT-ctDNA interaction was groove binding. The molecular modeling results indicated that DAFPT could slide into the A-T rich region of ctDNA. PMID:23769721

  2. Availability of fluorescence spectroscopic in the accompaniment of formation of corneal cross-linking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, M. M.; Kurachi, C.; Bagnato, V. S.; Faria e Sousa, S. J.; Ventura, L.

    2010-02-01

    The corneal cross-linking is a method that associates riboflavin and ultraviolet light to induce a larger mechanical resistance at cornea. This method has been used for the treatment of Keratoconus. Since cross-linking is recent as treatment, there is a need to verify the effectiveness of the method. Therefore, the viability of the fluorescence spectroscopy technique to follow the cross-linking formation at cornea was studied. Corneas were divided in two measuring procedures: M1 (cornea + riboflavin), and M2 (cornea + riboflavina + light irradiation, 365nm). For fluorescence measurements, a spectrofluorimeter was used, where several wavelengths were selected (between 320nm and 370nm) for cornea excitation. Several fluorescence spectra were collected, at 10 min-interval, during 60 min. Spectra allowed one to observe two very well defined bands of fluorescence: the first one at 400nm (collagen), and the second one at 520nm (riboflavin). After spectra analyses, a decrease of collagen fluorescence was observed for both groups. For riboflavin, on the other hand, there was a fluorescence increase for M1, and a decrease for M2. Thus, it is possible to conclude that it this technique is sensitive for the detection of tissue structural changes during cross-linking treatment, encouraging subsequent studies on quantification of cross-linking promotion in tissue.

  3. Optical caries diagnostics: comparison of laser spectroscopic PNC method with method of laser integral fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masychev, Victor I.

    2000-11-01

    In this research we present the results of approbation of two methods of optical caries diagnostics: PNC-spectral diagnostics and caries detection by laser integral fluorescence. The research was conducted in a dental clinic. PNC-method analyses parameters of probing laser radiation and PNC-spectrums of stimulated secondary radiations: backscattering and endogenous fluorescence of caries-involved bacterias. He-Ne-laser ((lambda) =632,8 nm, 1-2mW) was used as a source of probing (stimulated) radiation. For registration of signals, received from intact and pathological teeth PDA-detector was applied. PNC-spectrums were processed by special algorithms, and were displayed on PC monitor. The method of laser integral fluorescence was used for comparison. In this case integral power of fluorescence of human teeth was measured. As a source of probing (stimulated) radiation diode lasers ((lambda) =655 nm, 0.1 mW and 630nm, 1mW) and He-Ne laser were applied. For registration of signals Si-photodetector was used. Integral power was shown in a digital indicator. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods are described in this research. It is disclosed that the method of laser integral power of fluorescence has the following characteristics: simplicity of construction and schema-technical decisions. However the method of PNC-spectral diagnostics are characterized by considerably more sensitivity in diagnostics of initial caries and capability to differentiate pathologies of various stages (for example, calculus/initial caries). Estimation of spectral characteristics of PNC-signals allows eliminating a number of drawbacks, which are character for detection by method of laser integral fluorescence (for instance, detection of fluorescent fillings, plagues, calculus, discolorations generally, amalgam, gold fillings as if it were caries.

  4. Comparison of laser spectroscopic PNC method with laser integral fluorescence in optical caries diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masychev, Victor I.

    2001-05-01

    In this research we represent the results of approbation of two methods of optical caries diagnostics: PNC-spectral diagnostics and caries detection by laser integral fluorescence. The research was conducted in a dental clinic. PNC-method analyzes parameters of probing laser radiation and PNC-spectrums of stimulated secondary radiations: backscattering and endogenous fluorescence of caries- involved bacteria. Ia-Ne laser ((lambda) equals632.8 nm, 1-2 mW) was used as a source of probing (stimulated) radiation. For registration of signals, received from intact and pathological teeth PDA-detector was applied. PNC-spectrums were processed by special algorithms, and were displayed on PC monitor. The method of laser integral fluorescence was used for comparison. In this case integral power of fluorescence of human teeth was measured. As a source of probing (stimulated) radiation diode lasers ((lambda) equals655 nm, 0.1 mW and 630 nm, 1 mW) and Ia-Na laser were applied. For registration of signals Si-photodetector was used. Integral power was shown in a digital indicator. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods are described in this research. It is disclosed that the method of laser integral power of fluorescence has the following characteristics: simplicity of construction and schema-technical decisions. However the method of PNC-spectral diagnostics are characterized by considerably more sensitivity in diagnostics of initial caries and capability to differentiate pathologies of various stages (for example, calculus/initial caries). Estimation of spectral characteristics of PNC-signals allows eliminating a number of drawbacks, which are character for detection by method of laser integral fluorescence (for instance, detection of fluorescent fillings, plagues, calculus, discolorations generally, amalgam, gold fillings as if it were caries).

  5. Single-molecule spectroscopic study of enhanced intrinsic phycoerythrin fluorescence on silver nanostructured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ray, Krishanu; Chowdhury, Mustafa H; Lakowicz, Joseph R

    2008-09-15

    In this paper, we report on steady-state and time-resolved single-molecule fluorescence measurements performed on a phycobiliprotein, R-phycoerythrin (RPE), assembled on silver nanostructures. Single-molecule measurements clearly show that RPE molecules display a 10-fold increase in fluorescence intensity, with a 7-fold decrease in lifetime when they are assembled on silver nanostructured surfaces, as compared to control glass slides. The emission spectrum of individual RPE molecules also displays a significant fluorescence enhancement on silver nanostructures as compared to glass. From intensity and lifetime histograms, it is clear that the intensities as well as lifetimes of individual RPE molecules on silver nanostructures are more heterogeneously distributed than that on glass. This single-molecule study provides further insight on the heterogeneity in the fluorescence intensity and lifetimes of the RPE molecules on both glass and SiFs surfaces, which is otherwise not possible to observe using ensemble measurements. Finite-difference time-domain calculations have been performed to study the enhanced near-fields induced around silver nanoparticles by a radiating excited-state fluorophore, and the effect of such enhanced fields on the fluorescence enhancement observed is discussed. PMID:18690697

  6. Spectroscopic ellipsometry and fluorescence study of thermochromism in an ultrathin poly(diacetylene) film: Reversibility and transition kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Carpick, R.W.; Mayer, T.M.; Sasaki, D.Y.; Burns, A.R.

    2000-05-16

    The authors have investigated the thermochromic transition of an ultrathin poly(diacetylene)film. The Langmuir film is composed of three layers of polymerized 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid [Ch{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}C{triple_bond}CC{triple_bond}C(CH{sub 2}){sub 8}COOH] (poly-PCDA) organized into crystalline domains on a silicon substrate. Spectroscopic ellipsometry and fluorescence intensity measurements are obtained with in situ temperature control. Poly-PCDA films exhibit a reversible thermal transition between the initial blue form and an intermediate purple form that exists only at elevated temperature (between 303 and 333 K), followed by an irreversible transition to the red form after annealing above 320 K. The authors propose that the purple form is thermally distorted blue poly-PCDA and may represent a transitional configuration in the irreversible conversion to red. This hypothesis is supported by the appearance of unique features in the absorption spectra for each form as derived from the ellipsometry measurements. Significant fluorescence emission occurs only with the red form and is reduced at elevated temperatures while the absorption remains unchanged. Reduced emission is likely related to thermal fluctuations of the hydrocarbon side chains. Time-resolved fluorescence is likely related to thermal fluctuations of the hydrocarbon side chains. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements of the irreversible transition have been performed. Using a first-order kinetic analysis of these measurements, the authors deduce an energy barrier of 17.6 {+-} 1.1 kcal mol{sup {minus}1} between the blue and red forms.

  7. High-precision correlative fluorescence and electron cryo microscopy using two independent alignment markers☆

    PubMed Central

    Schellenberger, Pascale; Kaufmann, Rainer; Siebert, C. Alistair; Hagen, Christoph; Wodrich, Harald; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an emerging technique which combines functional information provided by fluorescence microscopy (FM) with the high-resolution structural information of electron microscopy (EM). So far, correlative cryo microscopy of frozen-hydrated samples has not reached better than micrometre range accuracy. Here, a method is presented that enables the correlation between fluorescently tagged proteins and electron cryo tomography (cryoET) data with nanometre range precision. Specifically, thin areas of vitrified whole cells are examined by correlative fluorescence cryo microscopy (cryoFM) and cryoET. Novel aspects of the presented cryoCLEM workflow not only include the implementation of two independent electron dense fluorescent markers to improve the precision of the alignment, but also the ability of obtaining an estimate of the correlation accuracy for each individual object of interest. The correlative workflow from plunge-freezing to cryoET is detailed step-by-step for the example of locating fluorescence-labelled adenovirus particles trafficking inside a cell. PMID:24262358

  8. High-precision correlative fluorescence and electron cryo microscopy using two independent alignment markers.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, Pascale; Kaufmann, Rainer; Siebert, C Alistair; Hagen, Christoph; Wodrich, Harald; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-08-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an emerging technique which combines functional information provided by fluorescence microscopy (FM) with the high-resolution structural information of electron microscopy (EM). So far, correlative cryo microscopy of frozen-hydrated samples has not reached better than micrometre range accuracy. Here, a method is presented that enables the correlation between fluorescently tagged proteins and electron cryo tomography (cryoET) data with nanometre range precision. Specifically, thin areas of vitrified whole cells are examined by correlative fluorescence cryo microscopy (cryoFM) and cryoET. Novel aspects of the presented cryoCLEM workflow not only include the implementation of two independent electron dense fluorescent markers to improve the precision of the alignment, but also the ability of obtaining an estimate of the correlation accuracy for each individual object of interest. The correlative workflow from plunge-freezing to cryoET is detailed step-by-step for the example of locating fluorescence-labelled adenovirus particles trafficking inside a cell. PMID:24262358

  9. Spectroscopic and computational study of a naphthalene derivative as colorimetric and fluorescent sensor for bioactive anions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Darshna; Sahoo, Suban K; Bera, Rati Kanta; Kamal, Raj

    2013-05-01

    The anion recognition property of a naphthalene based receptor (L) was investigated by naked-eye, UV-Vis, fluorescence, (1)H NMR and computational methods. The receptor L showed fluoride selective naked-eye detectable colorimetric and UV-Vis spectral changes over other tested anions due to the formation of hydrogen bonding complex in 1:1 stoichiometry and/or deprotonation between fluoride and the receptor. Interestingly, the fluorescence of L was quenched by fluoride but enhanced by acetate. PMID:23456416

  10. Steady state fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of normal and diabetic urine at selective excitation wavelength 280 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesavan, Anjana; Pachaiappan, Rekha; Aruna, Prakasa Rao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2016-03-01

    Urine is considered diagnostically important for tits native fluorophores and they vary in their distribution, concentration and physiochemical properties, depending upon the metabolic condition of the subject. In this study, we have made an attempt, to characterize the urine of normal subject and diabetic patients under medication by native fluorescence spectroscopy at 280 nm excitation. Further, the fluorescence data were analyzed employing the multivariate statistical method linear discriminant analysis (LDA) using leave one out cross validation method. The results were promising in discriminating diabetic urine from that of normal urine. This study in future may be extended to check the feasibility in ruling out the coexisting disorders such as cancer.

  11. Nonlinear Theory of Anomalous Diffusion and Application to Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, Jean Pierre; Lutsko, James F.

    2015-12-01

    The nonlinear theory of anomalous diffusion is based on particle interactions giving an explicit microscopic description of diffusive processes leading to sub-, normal, or super-diffusion as a result of competitive effects between attractive and repulsive interactions. We present the explicit analytical solution to the nonlinear diffusion equation which we then use to compute the correlation function which is experimentally measured by correlation spectroscopy. The theoretical results are applicable in particular to the analysis of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of marked molecules in biological systems. More specifically we consider the cases of fluorescently labeled lipids in the plasma membrane and of fluorescent apoferritin (a spherically shaped oligomer) in a crowded dextran solution and we find that the nonlinear correlation spectra reproduce very well the experimental data indicating sub-diffusive molecular motion.

  12. Two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with high count rates and low background using dielectric microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Aouani, Heykel; Schön, Peter; Brasselet, Sophie; Rigneault, Hervé; Wenger, Jérôme

    2010-01-01

    Two-photon excitation fluorescence is a powerful technique commonly used for biological imaging. However, the low absorption cross section of this non-linear process is a critical issue for performing biomolecular spectroscopy at the single molecule level. Enhancing the two-photon fluorescence signal would greatly improve the effectiveness of this technique, yet current methods struggle with medium enhancement factors and/or high background noise. Here, we show that the two-photon fluorescence signal from single Alexa Fluor 488 molecules can be enhanced up to 10 times by using a 3 µm diameter latex sphere while adding almost no photoluminescence background. We report a full characterization of the two-photon fluorescence enhancement by a single microsphere using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. This opens new routes to enhance non-linear optical signals and extend biophotonic applications. PMID:21258531

  13. Spectroscopic parameters of the cuticle and ethanol extracts of the fluorescent cave isopod Mesoniscus graniger (Isopoda, Oniscidea)

    PubMed Central

    Giurginca, Andrei; Šustr, Vladimír; Tajovský, Karel; Giurginca, Maria; Matei, Iulia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The body surface of the terrestrial isopod Mesoniscus graniger (Frivaldsky, 1863) showed blue autofluorescence under UV light (330–385 nm), using epifluorescence microscopy and also in living individuals under a UV lamp with excitation light of 365 nm. Some morphological cuticular structures expressed a more intense autofluorescence than other body parts. For this reason, only the cuticle was analyzed. The parameters of autofluorescence were investigated using spectroscopic methods (molecular spectroscopy in infrared, ultraviolet-visible, fluorescence, and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy) in samples of two subspecies of Mesoniscus graniger preserved in ethanol. Samples excited by UV light (from 350 to 380 nm) emitted blue light of wavelengths 419, 420, 441, 470 and 505 nm (solid phase) and 420, 435 and 463 (ethanol extract). The results showed that the autofluorescence observed from living individuals may be due to some β-carboline or coumarin derivatives, some crosslinking structures, dityrosine, or due to other compounds showing similar excitation-emission characteristics. PMID:26261444

  14. Multiplex immunoassay using fluorescent-surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic dots for the detection of bronchioalveolar stem cells in murine lung.

    PubMed

    Woo, Min-Ah; Lee, Sang-Myung; Kim, Gunsung; Baek, JongHo; Noh, Mi Suk; Kim, Ji Eun; Park, Sung Jin; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Park, Se-Chang; Seo, Yeong Tai; Kim, Yong-Kwon; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Jeong, Dae Hong; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2009-02-01

    Immunoassays using nanomaterials have been rapidly developed for the analysis of multiple biomolecules. Highly sensitive and biocompatible surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy-active nanomaterials have been used for biomolecule analysis by many research groups in order to overcome intrinsic problems of conventional immunoassays. We used fluorescent surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic dots (F-SERS dots) to detect biomolecules in this study. The F-SERS dots are composed of silver nanoparticle-embedded silica nanospheres, organic Raman tagging materials, and fluorescent dyes. The F-SERS dots demonstrated highly sensitive, selective, and multifunctional characteristics for multiplex targeting, tracking, and imaging of cellular and molecular events in the living organism. We successfully applied F-SERS dots for the detection of three cellular proteins, including CD34, Sca-1, and SP-C. These proteins are simultaneously expressed in bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs) in the murine lung. We analyzed the relative expression ratios of each protein in BASCs since external standards were used to evaluate SERS intensity in tissue. Quantitative comparisons of multiple protein expression in tissue were first attempted using SERS-encoded nanoprobes. Our results suggested that immunoassays using F-SERS dots offered significant increases in sensitivity and selectivity. Such immunoassays may serve as the primary next-generation labeling technologies for the simultaneous analysis of multiple biomolecules. PMID:19117480

  15. Spectroscopical study of bacteriopurpurinimide-naphthalimide conjugates for fluorescent diagnostics and photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Panchenko, Pavel A; Sergeeva, Antonina N; Fedorova, Olga A; Fedorov, Yuri V; Reshetnikov, Roman I; Schelkunova, Anastasiya E; Grin, Mikhail A; Mironov, Andrey F; Jonusauskas, Gediminas

    2014-04-01

    Two novel bis(chromophoric) dyads ABPI-NI1 and ABPI-NI2 containing 1,8-naphthalimide and bacteriopurpurinimide units linked by p-phenylene-methylene (ABPI-NI1) and pentamethylene (ABPI-NI2) spacers were prepared to test their ability to be used in the design of effective agents for both photodynamic therapy (PDT) and fluorescent tumor imaging. Photophysical studies revealed that the emission from the naphthalimide chromophore in both conjugates was partially quenched due to resonance energy transfer between the photoactive components. Compound ABPI-NI2 with more sterically flexible oligomethylene group demonstrated higher fluorescence intensity as compared with that for ABPI-NI1. PMID:24727406

  16. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic investigation of cationic polymer/DNA complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrea, Cosimo; Bassi, Andrea; Taroni, Paola; Pezzoli, Daniele; Volonterio, Alessandro; Candiani, Gabriele

    2011-07-01

    Since DNA is not internalized efficiently by cells, the success of gene therapy depends on the availability of carriers to efficiently deliver genetic material into target cells. Gene delivery vectors can be broadly categorized into viral and non-viral ones. Non-viral gene delivery systems are represented by cationic lipids and polymers rely on the basics of supramolecular chemistry termed "self-assembling": at physiological pH, they are cations and spontaneously form lipoplexes (for lipids) and polyplexes (for polymers) complexing nucleic acids. In this scenario, cationic polymers are commonly used as non-viral vehicles. Their effectiveness is strongly related to key parameters including DNA binding ability and stability in different environments. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of SYBR Green I (DNA dye) was carried out to characterize cationic polymer/DNA complex (polyplex) formation dispersed in aqueous solution. Both fluorescence amplitude and lifetime proved to be very sensitive to the polymer/DNA ratio (N/P ratio, +/-).

  17. Steady state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of normal and cancerous urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasekaran, Ramu; Aruna, Prakasa Rao; Balu David, Munusamy; Koteeswaran, Dornadula; Muthuvelu, Kulandaivel; Rai, R.; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2013-03-01

    Urine is one of the diagnostically important bio fluids, as it has many metabolites and some of them are native fluorophores. There may be a variation in the distribution and the physiochemical properties of the fluorophores during any metabolic change and pathologic conditions. Native fluorescence spectroscopy has been considered as a promising tool to characterize the fluorophores present in the urine. In this study, we aimed at characterizing the urine of both normal and patients with confirmed cancer using steady state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy at 280 nm and 350 nm excitation. It is observed that the metabolites indoxyl sulphate and neopterin and its derivatives are responsible for altered spectral signatures at 280 nm, and 350 nm excitation. The overall spectral data were subjected to Principal Component Analysis and the resultant components were used as input in the linear discriminant analysis. As a total, 84% and 81.8% of samples were correctly classified at 280 nm and 350 nm respectively.

  18. Spectroscopic evidence of xanthine compounds fluorescence quenching effect on water-soluble porphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena

    2015-02-01

    The formation of π-stacked complexes between water-soluble porphyrins: 4,4‧,4″,4″‧-(21H,23H-porphine-5,10,15,20-tetrayl)tetrakis-(benzoic acid) (H2TCPP), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)-21H,23H-porphine (H2TPPS4), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(trimethylammonio)phenyl]-21H,23H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate (H2TTMePP), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)-21H,23H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate (H2TMePyP), the Cu(II) complexes of H2TTMePP and H2TMePyP, as well as chlorophyll a with xanthine, theophylline (1,3-dimethylxanthine) and theobromine (3,7-dimethylxanthine) has been studied analysing their absorption and steady-state fluorescence spectra in aqueous (or acetone in case of chlorophyll a) solution. During titration by the compounds from xanthine group the bathochromic effect in the porphyrin absorption spectra as well as the hypochromicity of the porphyrin Soret maximum can be noticed. The fluorescence quenching effect observed during interactions in the systems examined suggests the process of static quenching. The association and fluorescence quenching constants are of the order of magnitude of 103 - 102 mol-1. The results obtained show that xanthine and its derivatives can quench the fluorescence of the porphyrins according to the number of methyl groups in the molecule of quencher.

  19. Encapsulation of serotonin in β-cyclodextrin nano-cavities: Fluorescence spectroscopic and molecular modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Sudip; Chakraborty, Sandipan; Sengupta, Pradeep K.

    2010-06-01

    Serotonin is a physiologically important biogenic amine, deficiency of which leads to mental disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, infantile autism, and depression. Both β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and its chemically substituted synthetic varieties (often possessing enhanced aqueous solubility and improved drug complexing abilities) are finding wide applications as drug delivery vehicles. Here we have studied the encapsulation of serotonin in β-CD and succinyl-2-hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin (SHP-β-CD) by exploiting the intrinsic serotonin fluorescence. Enhanced fluorescence emission intensity (which increases by ˜18% and 34% in β-CD and SHPβ-CD respectively) and anisotropy ( r) ( r = 0.075 and 0.1 in β-CD and SHPβ-CD respectively) are observed in presence of the cyclodextrins. From the fluorescence data host-guest interaction with 1:1 stoichiometry is evident, the association constants ( K) being 126.06 M -1 and 461.62 M -1 for β-CD and SHPβ-CD respectively. Additionally, molecular docking and semiempirical calculations have been carried out which provide, for the first time, detailed insights regarding the encapsulation process. In particular, it is evident that the indole ring is inserted within the β-CD cavity with the aliphatic amine side chain protruding towards the primary rim of the β-CD cavity. Docking calculations reveal that hydrogen bonding interactions are involved in the formation of the inclusion complex. Semiempirical calculations indicate that formation of the 1:1 inclusion complex is energetically favorable which is consistent with the fluorescence data.

  20. Identification of hematic cells by spectroscopic analysis of the intrinsic fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monici, Monica; Agati, Giovanni; Fusi, Franco; Bernabei, Pietro A.; Caporale, Roberto; Ferrini, Pierluigi R.; Croce, Anna C.; Bottiroli, Giovanni F.; Cioncolini, Stefano; Innocenti, Alberto; Pratesi, Riccardo

    1994-12-01

    The determination of blood cell composition has been a valuable tool in diagnoses. In particular, both total and differential counts are considered the basic parameters that characterize the leukocyte population. Since 100 years ago, manual techniques were introduced that allow a morphological examination of blood smears. At present, the automated analysis has been proved to be particularly difficult to standardize. In fact, the identification and count of the five leukocyte populations are not completely solved problems in routine methods for hematological analysis. Optoelectronics could have a decisive role in the development of new techniques that can ensure characteristics of automation, reliability, accuracy and rapidity of execution. Fluorescence spectroscopy techniques could represent a valid approach. Recently, the evaluation of tissue and cell autofluorescence has been applied to the diagnosis of solid tissue neoplasies. In this work, we have considered the possibility to develop a reliable method of leukocyte analysis based on their intrinsic fluorescence emission properties. The study has been performed by applying both spectrofluorometric techniques to enriched suspensions of cells and microspectrofluorometric techniques to single leukocytes. The results obtained have shown the possibility to recognize some cell populations on the grounds of the intrinsic fluorescence characteristics.

  1. Spectroscopic insights on imidazole substituted phthalocyanine photosensitizers: fluorescence properties, triplet state and singlet oxygen generation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian-Fu; Lin, Yong; Guo, Wenfeng; Zhu, Jingzhong

    2014-12-10

    Imidazole substituted metal phthalocyanine (Pc) complexes were synthesized. UV-vis absorption, steady state and time-resolved fluorescence, as well as laser flash photolysis were used to measure the photophysical and photosensitizing properties. All the imidazole-phthalocyanine conjugates show high ΦT (quantum yield of excited triplet formation), high ΦΔ (singlet oxygen formation yield, >0.50) and good fluorescence properties (quantum yield Φf>0.20 and lifetime τf>3.0 ns). Compared to the unsubstituted Pc, both α- and β-imidazole substitutions result in the remarkable decrease in Φf and τf, but the α-substitution is stronger. The imidazole substitution, on the other hand, causes the increase of ΦT, τT, and ΦΔ values. Magnesium phthalocyanine (MgPc) is more susceptible to the substitution than zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc). The mechanism responsible for the result is suggested based on the involvement of intramolecular photoinduced electron transfer. The high ΦΔ and appropriate fluorescence properties make the Pcs good candidate for PDT photosensitizers. PMID:24997445

  2. Spectroscopic insights on imidazole substituted phthalocyanine photosensitizers: Fluorescence properties, triplet state and singlet oxygen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xian-Fu; Lin, Yong; Guo, Wenfeng; Zhu, Jingzhong

    2014-12-01

    Imidazole substituted metal phthalocyanine (Pc) complexes were synthesized. UV-vis absorption, steady state and time-resolved fluorescence, as well as laser flash photolysis were used to measure the photophysical and photosensitizing properties. All the imidazole-phthalocyanine conjugates show high ΦT (quantum yield of excited triplet formation), high ΦΔ (singlet oxygen formation yield, >0.50) and good fluorescence properties (quantum yield Φf > 0.20 and lifetime τf > 3.0 ns). Compared to the unsubstituted Pc, both α- and β-imidazole substitutions result in the remarkable decrease in Φf and τf, but the α-substitution is stronger. The imidazole substitution, on the other hand, causes the increase of ΦT, τT, and ΦΔ values. Magnesium phthalocyanine (MgPc) is more susceptible to the substitution than zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc). The mechanism responsible for the result is suggested based on the involvement of intramolecular photoinduced electron transfer. The high ΦΔ and appropriate fluorescence properties make the Pcs good candidate for PDT photosensitizers.

  3. Near-Field Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy on Planar Membranes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The organization and dynamics of plasma membrane components at the nanometer scale are essential for biological functions such as transmembrane signaling and endocytosis. Planarized nanoscale apertures in a metallic film are demonstrated as a means of confining the excitation light for multicolor fluorescence spectroscopy to a 55 ± 10 nm beam waist. This technique provides simultaneous two-color, subdiffraction-limited fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy on planar membranes. The fabrication and implementation of this technique are demonstrated for both model membranes and live cells. Membrane-bound proteins were observed to cluster upon the addition of a multivalent cross-linker: On supported lipid bilayers, clusters of cholera toxin subunit B were formed upon cross-linking by an antibody specific for this protein; on living cells, immunoglobulin E bound to its receptor (FcεRI) on the plasma membranes of RBL mast cells was observed to form clusters upon exposure to a trivalent antigen. The formation of membrane clusters was quantified via fluorescence intensity vs time and changes in the temporal auto- and cross-correlations above a single nanoscale aperture. The illumination profile from a single aperture is analyzed experimentally and computationally with a rim-dominated illumination profile, yielding no change in the autocorrelation dwell time with changes in aperture diameter from 60 to 250 nm. This near-field fluorescence cross-correlation methodology provides access to nanoscale details of dynamic membrane interactions and motivates further development of near-field optical methods. PMID:25004429

  4. A quantitative study of the intracellular dynamics of fluorescently labelled glyco-gold nanoparticles via fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Murray, Richard A; Qiu, Yuan; Chiodo, Fabrizio; Marradi, Marco; Penadés, Soledad; Moya, Sergio E

    2014-07-01

    The dynamic behaviour of gold nanoparticles functionalised with glucose (Glc-Au NPs) has been studied here by means of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Meaningful data on the state of aggregation and dynamics of Glc-Au NPs fluorescently-labelled with HiLyte Fluor647 (Glc-Au-Hi NPs) in the intracellular environment were obtained. Moreover, the work presented here shows that FCS can be used to visualise the presence of single NPs or NP aggregates following uptake and to estimate, locally, NP concentrations within the cell. FCS measurements become possible after applying a "prebleaching" methodology, when the immobile NP fraction has been effectively removed and thus significant FCS data has been recorded. In this study, Glc-Au-Hi NPs have been incubated with HepG2 cells and their diffusion time in the intracellular environment has been measured and compared with their diffusion value in water and cell media. PMID:24639360

  5. Insights into accelerated liposomal release of topotecan in plasma monitored by a non-invasive fluorescence spectroscopic method

    PubMed Central

    Fugit, Kyle D.; Jyoti, Amar; Upreti, Meenakshi; Anderson, Bradley D.

    2014-01-01

    A non-invasive fluorescence method was developed to monitor liposomal release kinetics of the anticancer agent topotecan (TPT) in physiological fluids and subsequently used to explore the cause of accelerated release in plasma. Analyses of fluorescence excitation spectra confirmed that unencapsulated TPT exhibits a red shift in its spectrum as pH is increased. This property was used to monitor TPT release from actively loaded liposomal formulations having a low intravesicular pH. Mathematical release models were developed to extract reliable rate constants for TPT release in aqueous solutions monitored by fluorescence and release kinetics obtained by HPLC. Using the fluorescence method, accelerated TPT release was observed in plasma as previously reported in the literature. Simulations to estimate the intravesicular pH were conducted to demonstrate that accelerated release correlated with alterations in the low intravesicular pH. This was attributed to the presence of ammonia in plasma samples rather than proteins and other plasma components generally believed to alter release kinetics in physiological samples. These findings shed light on the critical role that ammonia may play in contributing to the preclinical/clinical variability and performance seen with actively-loaded liposomal formulations of TPT and other weakly-basic anticancer agents. PMID:25456833

  6. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis by evaluation of normalized variances of fluorescence time correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziekan, Thomas; Weissbach, Carmen; Voigt, Jan; Ebert, Bernd; MacDonald, Rainer; Bahner, Malte L.; Mahler, Marianne; Schirner, Michael; Berliner, Michael; Berliner, Birgitt; Osel, Jens; Osel, Ilka

    2011-07-01

    Fluorescence imaging using the dye indocyanine green as a contrast agent was investigated in a prospective clinical study for the detection of rheumatoid arthritis. Normalized variances of correlated time series of fluorescence intensities describing the bolus kinetics of the contrast agent in certain regions of interest were analyzed to differentiate healthy from inflamed finger joints. These values are determined using a robust, parameter-free algorithm. We found that the normalized variance of correlation functions improves the differentiation between healthy joints of volunteers and joints with rheumatoid arthritis of patients by about 10% compared to, e.g., ratios of areas under the curves of raw data.

  7. A low cost time-resolved Raman spectroscopic sensing system enabling fluorescence rejection.

    PubMed

    Sinfield, Joseph V; Colic, Oliver; Fagerman, Daniel; Monwuba, Chike

    2010-02-01

    This paper describes a novel, compact, fiber-coupled, time-resolved Raman spectroscopy system that takes advantage of recent developments in diode laser and data acquisition technology to exploit the natural temporal separation between Raman and fluorescence phenomena and thereby limits the influence of fluorescence on Raman observations. The unit has been designed to be particularly low cost and is intended to provide the foundation for a wide range of in-line or fieldable sensing devices that can enhance the potential and affordability of in situ chemical analyses. The system operating principles, design, and performance are discussed along with its advantages and tradeoffs relative to traditional continuous wave (CW) Raman techniques. The system relies on a 6.4 kHz repetition rate 900 ps pulsed diode laser operating in the visible wavelength range (532 nm) to enhance the quality of Raman observations relative to CW and infrared systems, particularly for analytes examined in the presence of fluorophores. Time-resolved photon counting, achieved through a combination of off-the-shelf and custom hardware and software, limits the influence of fluorescence on Raman observations under pulsed excitation. The paper presents examples of the quality of Raman signatures that can be obtained with the system for a variety of compounds such as trichloroethylene, benzene, an aqueous nitrate solution, and olive oil. Further, the paper demonstrates an approximately 15-fold improvement in signal-to-noise ratio when comparing long- and short-gated time-resolved photon counting acquisition scenarios for a neat benzene sample doped with rhodamine 6G at a concentration of 1 x 10(-4) M. The system's versatility and effectiveness in the assessment of complex mixtures representative of industrial or field settings is demonstrated through analysis of a gasoline sample. Additional discussion outlines how efficient signal averaging over extended observation periods can enable low

  8. Synthesis and spectroscopic study of highly fluorescent β-enaminone based boron complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumbhar, Haribhau S.; Gadilohar, Balu L.; Shankarling, Ganapati S.

    2015-07-01

    The newly synthesized 1, 1, 2-trimethyl-1H benzo[e]indoline based β-enaminone boron complexes exhibited the intense fluorescence (Fmax = 522-547 nm) in solution as well as in solid state (Fmax = 570-586 nm). These complexes exhibited large stoke shift, excellent thermal and photo stability when compared to the boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) colorants. Optimized geometry and orbital distribution in ground states were computed by employing density functional theory (DFT). The cyclic voltammetry study revealed the better electron transport ability of these molecules than current electroluminescent materials like tris(8-hydroxyquinoli-nato)-aluminium (Alq3) and BODIPY, which can find application in electroluminescent devices.

  9. Spectroscopic and fluorescence studies on Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes with NO donor fluorescence dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; El-Metwaly, Nashwa M.

    2011-10-01

    The reactions of the two common dyes [2TMPACT and 4PENI] with Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) ions were done. All the isolated complexes have been characterized by physicochemical and spectroscopic techniques. The IR data reflect the bidentate mode of 2TMPACT towards the mononuclear complex [Mn(II)] even its tetradentate in binuclear complexes [Co(II) and Cu(II)]. However, the bidentate mode is the only behavior of 4PENI ligand towards each metal ion in its mononuclear complexes. The UV-vis spectral analysis beside the magnetic moment measurements are proposed different geometries concerning each metal ions with the two ligands under investigation, as the Mn(II)-2TMPACT complex is an octahedral but Mn(II)-4PENI is a tetrahedral geometry. All the synthesized compounds are thermogravimetrically investigated. The proposed thermal decomposition was discussed for each compound with each step as well as, the kinetic parameters were calculated for all preferrible decomposition steps. The mass spectroscopy tool was used to emphasis on the suitable molecular formula proposed and the fragmentation patterns were displayed. The fluorescence properties of the synthesized ligands and their complexes were studied in DMSO at room temperature.

  10. Spectroscopic and fluorescence studies on Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes with NO donor fluorescence dyes.

    PubMed

    Refat, Moamen S; el-Metwaly, Nashwa M

    2011-10-15

    The reactions of the two common dyes [2TMPACT and 4PENI] with Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) ions were done. All the isolated complexes have been characterized by physicochemical and spectroscopic techniques. The IR data reflect the bidentate mode of 2TMPACT towards the mononuclear complex [Mn(II)] even its tetradentate in binuclear complexes [Co(II) and Cu(II)]. However, the bidentate mode is the only behavior of 4PENI ligand towards each metal ion in its mononuclear complexes. The UV-vis spectral analysis beside the magnetic moment measurements are proposed different geometries concerning each metal ions with the two ligands under investigation, as the Mn(II)-2TMPACT complex is an octahedral but Mn(II)-4PENI is a tetrahedral geometry. All the synthesized compounds are thermogravimetrically investigated. The proposed thermal decomposition was discussed for each compound with each step as well as, the kinetic parameters were calculated for all preferrible decomposition steps. The mass spectroscopy tool was used to emphasis on the suitable molecular formula proposed and the fragmentation patterns were displayed. The fluorescence properties of the synthesized ligands and their complexes were studied in DMSO at room temperature. PMID:21763185

  11. Correlative in-resin super-resolution and electron microscopy using standard fluorescent proteins

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Errin; Seiradake, Elena; Jones, E. Yvonne; Davis, Ilan; Grünewald, Kay; Kaufmann, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a method for correlative in-resin super-resolution fluorescence and electron microscopy (EM) of biological structures in mammalian culture cells. Cryo-fixed resin embedded samples offer superior structural preservation, performing in-resin super-resolution, however, remains a challenge. We identified key aspects of the sample preparation procedure of high pressure freezing, freeze substitution and resin embedding that are critical for preserving fluorescence and photo-switching of standard fluorescent proteins, such as mGFP, mVenus and mRuby2. This enabled us to combine single molecule localization microscopy with transmission electron microscopy imaging of standard fluorescent proteins in cryo-fixed resin embedded cells. We achieved a structural resolution of 40–50 nm (~17 nm average single molecule localization accuracy) in the fluorescence images without the use of chemical fixation or special fluorophores. Using this approach enabled the correlation of fluorescently labeled structures to the ultrastructure in the same cell at the nanometer level and superior structural preservation. PMID:25823571

  12. Evaluation of transformer insulating oil quality using NIR, fluorescence, and NMR spectroscopic data fusion.

    PubMed

    Godinho, Mariana S; Blanco, Marcos R; Gambarra Neto, Francisco F; Lião, Luciano M; Sena, Marcelo M; Tauler, Romà; de Oliveira, Anselmo E

    2014-11-01

    Power transformers are essential components in electrical energy distribution. One of their most important parts is the insulation system, consisting of Kraft paper immersed in insulating oil. Interfacial tension and color are major parameters used for assessing oil quality and the system׳s degradation. This work proposes the use of near infrared (NIR), molecular fluorescence, and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy methods combined with chemometric multivariate calibration methods (Partial Least Squares - PLS) to predict interfacial tension and color in insulating mineral oil samples. Interfacial tension and color were also determined using tensiometry and colorimetry as standard reference methods, respectively. The best PLS model was obtained when NIR, fluorescence, and NMR data were combined (data fusion), demonstrating synergy among them. An optimal PLS model was calculated using the selected group of variables according to their importance on PLS projections (VIP). The root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) values of 2.9 mN m(-1) and 0.3 were estimated for interfacial tension and color, respectively. Mean relative standard deviations of 1.5% for interfacial tension and 6% for color were registered, meeting quality control requirements set by electrical energy companies. The methods proposed in this work are rapid and simple, showing great advantages over traditional approaches, which are slow and environmentally unfriendly due to chemical waste generation. PMID:25127577

  13. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of fluorescent 4-aminoantipyrine analogues: Molecular docking and in vitro cytotoxicity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premnath, D.; Mosae Selvakumar, P.; Ravichandiran, P.; Tamil Selvan, G.; Indiraleka, M.; Jannet Vennila, J.

    2016-01-01

    Two substituted aromatic carbonyl compounds (compounds 1 and 2) of 4-aminoantipyrine were synthesized by condensation of fluorine substituted benzoyl chlorides and 4-aminoantipyrine. The structures of synthesized derivatives were established on the basis of UV-Vis, IR, and Mass, 1H, 13C NMR and Fluorescence spectroscopy. Both compounds showed significant fluorescence emission and two broad emission bands were observed in the region at 340 nm and 450 nm on excitation at 280 nm. Theoretically to prove that the molecule has anticancer activity against cervical cancer cells, the compounds were analyzed for molecular docking interactions with HPV16-E7 target protein by Glide protocol. Furthermore, 4-aminoantipyrine derivatives were evaluated for their in vitro cytotoxic activity against human cervical cancer cells (SiHa) by MTT assay. Compound 1 showed two fold higher activity (IC50 = 0.912 μM) over compound 2, and its activity was similar to that of Pazopanib, suggesting that although the two compounds were chemically very similar the difference in substituent on the phenyl moiety caused changes in properties.

  14. Vibrational nano-spectroscopic imaging correlating structure with intermolecular coupling and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Benjamin; Muller, Eric A.; Hinrichs, Karsten; Raschke, Markus B.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly, the function of biomembranes and the performance of organic solar cells rely on nanoscale molecular interactions. Understanding and control of such materials have been impeded by difficulties in imaging their properties with the desired nanometre spatial resolution, attomolar sensitivity and intermolecular spectroscopic specificity. Here we implement vibrational scattering-scanning near-field optical microscopy with high spectral precision to investigate the structure–function relationship in nano-phase separated block copolymers. A vibrational resonance is used as a sensitive reporter of the local chemical environment and we image, with few nanometre spatial resolution and 0.2 cm−1 spectral precision, solvatochromic Stark shifts and line broadening correlated with molecular-scale morphologies. We discriminate local variations in electric fields between nano-domains with quantitative agreement with dielectric continuum models. This ability to directly resolve nanoscale morphology and associated intermolecular interactions can form a basis for the systematic control of functionality in multicomponent soft matter systems. PMID:24721995

  15. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy: Ultrasensitive detection in clear and turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahari, Abdel Kader

    In this work, I describe the development of a simple, inexpensive, and powerful alternative technique to detect and analyze, without enrichment, extremely low concentrations of cells, bacteria, viruses, and protein aggregates in turbid fluids for clinical and biotechnological applications. The anticipated applications of this technique are many. They range from the determination of the somatic cell count in milk for the dairy industry, to the enumeration and characterization of microorganisms in environmental microbiology and the food industry, and to the fast and ultrasensitive detection of protein aggregates for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases in clinical medicine. A prototype instrument has been built and allowed the detection and quantification of particles down to a few per milliliter in short scanning times. It consists of a small microscope that has a horizontal geometry and a mechanical instrument that holds a cylindrical cuvette (1 cm in diameter) with two motors that provide a rotational and a slower vertical inversion motions. The illumination focus is centered about 200 mum from the wall of the cuvette inside the sample. The total volume that is explored is large (˜1ml/min for bright particles). The data is analyzed with a correlation filter program based on particle passage pattern recognition. I will also describe further work on improving the sensitivity of the technique, expanding it for multiple-species discrimination and enumeration, and testing the prototype device in actual clinical and biotechnological applications. The main clinical application of this project seeks to establish conditions and use this new technique to quantify and size-analyze oligomeric complexes of the Alzheimer's disease beta-peptide in cerebrospinal fluid and other body fluids as a molecular biomarker for persons at risk of Alzheimer's disease dementia. The technology could potentially be extended to the diagnosis and therapeutic

  16. Precise quantification of cellular uptake of cell-penetrating peptides using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rezgui, Rachid; Blumer, Katy; Yeoh-Tan, Gilbert; Trexler, Adam J; Magzoub, Mazin

    2016-07-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have emerged as a potentially powerful tool for drug delivery due to their ability to efficiently transport a whole host of biologically active cargoes into cells. Although concerted efforts have shed some light on the cellular internalization pathways of CPPs, quantification of CPP uptake has proved problematic. Here we describe an experimental approach that combines two powerful biophysical techniques, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), to directly, accurately and precisely measure the cellular uptake of fluorescently-labeled molecules. This rapid and technically simple approach is highly versatile and can readily be applied to characterize all major CPP properties that normally require multiple assays, including amount taken up by cells (in moles/cell), uptake efficiency, internalization pathways, intracellular distribution, intracellular degradation and toxicity threshold. The FACS-FCS approach provides a means for quantifying any intracellular biochemical entity, whether expressed in the cell or introduced exogenously and transported across the plasma membrane. PMID:27033412

  17. Synthesis and spectroscopic study of highly fluorescent β-enaminone based boron complexes.

    PubMed

    Kumbhar, Haribhau S; Gadilohar, Balu L; Shankarling, Ganapati S

    2015-07-01

    The newly synthesized 1, 1, 2-trimethyl-1H benzo[e]indoline based β-enaminone boron complexes exhibited the intense fluorescence (Fmax=522-547 nm) in solution as well as in solid state (F max=570-586 nm). These complexes exhibited large stoke shift, excellent thermal and photo stability when compared to the boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) colorants. Optimized geometry and orbital distribution in ground states were computed by employing density functional theory (DFT). The cyclic voltammetry study revealed the better electron transport ability of these molecules than current electroluminescent materials like tris(8-hydroxyquinoli-nato)-aluminium (Alq3) and BODIPY, which can find application in electroluminescent devices. PMID:25813165

  18. Noninvasive fluorescence and Raman spectroscopic analysis of laser welded aorta and skin tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Alvin; Gayen, Tapan K.; Minko, Glenn; Alimova, Alexandra; Savage, Howard E.; McCormick, Steven A.; Alfano, Robert R.

    2002-05-01

    Laser tissue welding involves the denaturing and partial renaturing of collagen and elastin. Tissues welded with NIR lasers tuned to the 1455 nm water absorption band have demonstrated high tensile strength with minimal collateral damage. To better understand the welding process, welded tissue samples were investigated using fluorescence imaging and Raman spectroscopy. As part of this study, human aorta, and porcine aorta and skin, specimens were investigated. Emission and excitation/emission wavelengths corresponding to tryptophan and collagen emission and slightly weaker emission for wavelengths corresponding to elastin emission. The inner surface an cross-section images of the aortic specimens exhibited a very high degree of uniformity with no indication of the presence of a weld. The Raman spectra from the aortic specimens at the weld site and a few mm away form the weld were very similar. This work indicates the emission and Raman properties of the collagen helix after welding are very similar to native collagen tissue.

  19. Correlated fluorescence and 3D electron microscopy with high sensitivity and spatial precision

    PubMed Central

    Kukulski, Wanda; Schorb, Martin; Welsch, Sonja; Picco, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Correlative electron and fluorescence microscopy has the potential to elucidate the ultrastructural details of dynamic and rare cellular events, but has been limited by low precision and sensitivity. Here we present a method for direct mapping of signals originating from ∼20 fluorescent protein molecules to 3D electron tomograms with a precision of less than 100 nm. We demonstrate that this method can be used to identify individual HIV particles bound to mammalian cell surfaces. We also apply the method to image microtubule end structures bound to mal3p in fission yeast, and demonstrate that growing microtubule plus-ends are flared in vivo. We localize Rvs167 to endocytic sites in budding yeast, and show that scission takes place halfway through a 10-s time period during which amphiphysins are bound to the vesicle neck. This new technique opens the door for direct correlation of fluorescence and electron microscopy to visualize cellular processes at the ultrastructural scale. PMID:21200030

  20. CFHTLenS and RCSLenS: Testing Photometric Redshift Distributions Using Angular Cross-Correlations with Spectroscopic Galaxy Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, A.; Heymans, C.; Blake, C.; Hildebrandt, H.; Duncan, C. A. J.; Erben, T.; Nakajima, R.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Viola, M.

    2016-09-01

    We determine the accuracy of galaxy redshift distributions as estimated from photometric redshift probability distributions p(z). Our method utilises measurements of the angular cross-correlation between photometric galaxies and an overlapping sample of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts. We describe the redshift leakage from a galaxy photometric redshift bin j into a spectroscopic redshift bin i using the sum of the p(z) for the galaxies residing in bin j. We can then predict the angular cross-correlation between photometric and spectroscopic galaxies due to intrinsic galaxy clustering when i ≠ j as a function of the measured angular cross-correlation when i = j. We also account for enhanced clustering arising from lensing magnification using a halo model. The comparison of this prediction with the measured signal provides a consistency check on the validity of using the summed p(z) to determine galaxy redshift distributions in cosmological analyses, as advocated by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). We present an analysis of the photometric redshifts measured by CFHTLenS, which overlaps the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We also analyse the Red-sequence Cluster Lensing Survey (RCSLenS), which overlaps both BOSS and the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We find that the summed p(z) from both surveys are generally biased with respect to the true underlying distributions. If unaccounted for, this bias would lead to errors in cosmological parameter estimation from CFHTLenS by less than ˜4%. For photometric redshift bins which spatially overlap in 3-D with our spectroscopic sample, we determine redshift bias corrections which can be used in future cosmological analyses that rely on accurate galaxy redshift distributions.

  1. Fluorescent Ag nanoclusters prepared in aqueous poly(acrylic acid-co-maleic acid) solutions: a spectroscopic study of their excited state dynamics, size and local environment.

    PubMed

    Dandapat, Manika; Mandal, Debabrata

    2016-01-28

    Stable, fluorescent Ag nanoclusters were prepared in aqueous solutions of Na(+) salt of the carboxylate-rich polymer poly(acrylic acid-co-maleic acid) under brief spells of UV irradiation. The nanoclusters were nearly spherical, with diameters within 1.90 ± 0.50 nm, but displayed a prominent red edge excitation shift (REES) of fluorescence upon exciting within the visible absorption band, indicating heterogeneity of energy level distributions. Spectroscopic studies revealed that irrespective of whether the nanoclusters are excited in their UV or visible absorption bands, their fluorescence always ensues from the same manifold of emissive states, with a broad range of fluorescence lifetimes from ∼150 fs to 1 ns. PMID:26700465

  2. Binding-induced fluorescence of serotonin transporter ligands: A spectroscopic and structural study of 4-(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)-1-methylpyridinium (APP(+)) and APP(+) analogues.

    PubMed

    Wilson, James N; Ladefoged, Lucy Kate; Babinchak, W Michael; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2014-04-16

    The binding-induced fluorescence of 4-(4-(dimethylamino)-phenyl)-1-methylpyridinium (APP(+)) and two new serotonin transporter (SERT)-binding fluorescent analogues, 1-butyl-4-[4-(1-dimethylamino)phenyl]-pyridinium bromide (BPP(+)) and 1-methyl-4-[4-(1-piperidinyl)phenyl]-pyridinium (PPP(+)), has been investigated. Optical spectroscopy reveals that these probes are highly sensitive to their chemical microenvironment, responding to variations in polarity with changes in transition energies and responding to changes in viscosity or rotational freedom with emission enhancements. Molecular docking calculations reveal that the probes are able to access the nonpolar and conformationally restrictive binding pocket of SERT. As a result, the probes exhibit previously not identified binding-induced turn-on emission that is spectroscopically distinct from dyes that have accumulated intracellularly. Thus, binding and transport dynamics of SERT ligands can be resolved both spatially and spectroscopically. PMID:24460204

  3. Binding-Induced Fluorescence of Serotonin Transporter Ligands: A Spectroscopic and Structural Study of 4-(4-(Dimethylamino)phenyl)-1-methylpyridinium (APP+) and APP+ Analogues

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The binding-induced fluorescence of 4-(4-(dimethylamino)-phenyl)-1-methylpyridinium (APP+) and two new serotonin transporter (SERT)-binding fluorescent analogues, 1-butyl-4-[4-(1-dimethylamino)phenyl]-pyridinium bromide (BPP+) and 1-methyl-4-[4-(1-piperidinyl)phenyl]-pyridinium (PPP+), has been investigated. Optical spectroscopy reveals that these probes are highly sensitive to their chemical microenvironment, responding to variations in polarity with changes in transition energies and responding to changes in viscosity or rotational freedom with emission enhancements. Molecular docking calculations reveal that the probes are able to access the nonpolar and conformationally restrictive binding pocket of SERT. As a result, the probes exhibit previously not identified binding-induced turn-on emission that is spectroscopically distinct from dyes that have accumulated intracellularly. Thus, binding and transport dynamics of SERT ligands can be resolved both spatially and spectroscopically. PMID:24460204

  4. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of DMBA-TPA-induced squamous cell carcinoma in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diagaradjane, Parmeswaran; Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Yu, Jie; Wong, Michael S.; Anvari, Bahman

    2006-01-01

    While initially confined to the epidermis, squamous cell carcinoma can eventually penetrate into the underlying tissue if not diagnosed early and treated. The noninvasive early detection of the carcinoma is important to achieve a complete treatment of the disease. Of the various non-invasive optical techniques, the synchronous fluorescence (SF) technique is considered to provide a simplified spectral profile with more sharp spectral signatures of the endogenous fluorophores in complex systems. The potential use of the SF technique in the characterization of the sequential tissue transformation in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (DMBA-TPA)-induced mouse skin tumor model in conjunction with simple statistical analysis is explored. The SF spectra show distinct differences during the earlier weeks of the tumor-induction period. Intensity ratio variables are calculated and used in three discriminant analyses. All the discriminant analyses show better classification results with accuracy greater than 80%. From the observed differences in the spectral characteristics and the ratio variables that resulted in better classification between groups, it is concluded that tryptophan, collagen, and NADH are the key fluorophores that undergo changes during tissue transformation process and hence they can be targeted as tumor markers to diagnose normal from abnormal tissues using the SF technique.

  5. Biodistribution, pharmacokinetic, and in-vivo fluorescence spectroscopic studies of photosensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moan, Johan; Peng, Qian; Iani, Vladimir; Ma, Li Wei; Horobin, Richard W.; Berg, Kristian; Kongshaug, Magne; Nesland, Jahn M.

    1996-01-01

    Some key data concerning the pharmacokinetics of PCT photosensitizers are reviewed. The following topics are discussed: The binding of photosensitizers to serum proteins, and the significance of LDL binding for tumor localization, the distribution of sensitizers among different tissue compartments and the significance of extracellular proteins and other stromal elements, such as macrophages, low tumor pH, leaky vasculature and poor lymphatic drainage for tumor selectivity of drugs, the retention and excretion of sensitizers, and intracellular pharmacokinetics. Furthermore, the usefulness of fluorescence measurements in the study of sensitizer pharmacokinetics is briefly discussed. A key observation is that 1O2 has a short radius of action. Since practically all PCT sensitizers act via the 1O2 pathway, only targets with significant sensitizer concentrations can be damaged. A given number of 1O2 entities generated in different organelles (mitochondria, lysosomes, plasma membrane, etc.) may lead to widely different effects with respect to cell inactivation. Similarly, sensitizers localizing in different compartments of tissues may have different photosensitizing efficiencies even under conditions of a similar 1O2 yield.

  6. Fluorescence Spectroscopic Studies on the Complexation of Antidiabetic Drugs with Glycosylated Serum Albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seedher, N.; Kanojia, M.

    2013-11-01

    Glycosylation decreases the association constant values and hence the binding affinity of human serum albumin (HSA) for the antidiabetic drugs under study. The percentage of HAS-bound drug at physiological temperature was only about 21-38 % as compared to 46-74 % for non-glycosylated HSA. Thus the percentage of free drug available for an antihyperglycemic effect was about double (62-79 %) compared to the values for non-glycosylated HSA. Much higher free drug concentrations available for pharmacological effect can lead to the risk of hypoglycemia. Hydrophobic interactions were predominantly involved in the binding. In the binding of gliclazide, hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions were involved. Site specificity for glycosylated HSA was the same as that for non-glycosylated HSA; gliclazide and repaglinide bind only at site II whereas glimepiride and glipizide bind at both sites I and II. Glycosylation, however, caused conformational changes in albumin, and the binding region within site II was different for glycosylated and non-glycosylated albumin. Stern-Volmer analysis also indicated the conformational changes in albumin as a result of glycosylation and showed that the dynamic quenching mechanism was valid for fluorescence of both glycosylated and non-glycosylated HSA.

  7. BH2 revisited: New, extensive measurements of laser-induced fluorescence transitions and ab initio calculations of near-spectroscopic accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunahori, Fumie X.; Gharaibeh, Mohammed; Clouthier, Dennis J.; Tarroni, Riccardo

    2015-05-01

    The spectroscopy of gas phase BH2 has not been explored experimentally since the pioneering study of Herzberg and Johns in 1967. In the present work, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of the A ˜ 2 B 1 ( Π u ) - X ˜ 2A1 band system of 11BH2, 10BH2, 11BD2, and 10BD2 have been observed for the first time. The free radicals were "synthesized" by an electric discharge through a precursor mixture of 0.5% diborane (B2H6 or B2D6) in high pressure argon at the exit of a pulsed valve. A total of 67 LIF bands have been measured and rotationally analyzed, 62 of them previously unobserved. These include transitions to a wide variety of excited state bending levels, to several stretch-bend combination levels, and to three ground state levels which gain intensity through Renner-Teller coupling to nearby excited state levels. As an aid to vibronic assignment of the spectra, very high level hybrid ab initio potential energy surfaces were built starting from the coupled cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples (CCSD(T))/aug-cc-pV5Z level of theory for this seven-electron system. In an effort to obtain the highest possible accuracy, the potentials were corrected for core correlation, extrapolation to the complete basis set limit, electron correlation beyond CCSD(T), and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer effects. The spin-rovibronic states of the various isotopologues of BH2 were calculated for energies up to 22 000 cm-1 above the X ˜ (000) level without any empirical adjustment of the potentials or fitting to experimental data. The agreement with the new LIF data is excellent, approaching near-spectroscopic accuracy (a few cm-1) and has allowed us to understand the complicated spin-rovibronic energy level structure even in the region of strong Renner-Teller resonances.

  8. BH2 revisited: New, extensive measurements of laser-induced fluorescence transitions and ab initio calculations of near-spectroscopic accuracy.

    PubMed

    Sunahori, Fumie X; Gharaibeh, Mohammed; Clouthier, Dennis J; Tarroni, Riccardo

    2015-05-01

    The spectroscopy of gas phase BH2 has not been explored experimentally since the pioneering study of Herzberg and Johns in 1967. In the present work, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of the Ã(2)B1(Πu)-X̃ (2)A1 band system of (11)BH2, (10)BH2, (11)BD2, and (10)BD2 have been observed for the first time. The free radicals were "synthesized" by an electric discharge through a precursor mixture of 0.5% diborane (B2H6 or B2D6) in high pressure argon at the exit of a pulsed valve. A total of 67 LIF bands have been measured and rotationally analyzed, 62 of them previously unobserved. These include transitions to a wide variety of excited state bending levels, to several stretch-bend combination levels, and to three ground state levels which gain intensity through Renner-Teller coupling to nearby excited state levels. As an aid to vibronic assignment of the spectra, very high level hybrid ab initio potential energy surfaces were built starting from the coupled cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples (CCSD(T))/aug-cc-pV5Z level of theory for this seven-electron system. In an effort to obtain the highest possible accuracy, the potentials were corrected for core correlation, extrapolation to the complete basis set limit, electron correlation beyond CCSD(T), and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer effects. The spin-rovibronic states of the various isotopologues of BH2 were calculated for energies up to 22 000 cm(-1) above the X̃ (000) level without any empirical adjustment of the potentials or fitting to experimental data. The agreement with the new LIF data is excellent, approaching near-spectroscopic accuracy (a few cm(-1)) and has allowed us to understand the complicated spin-rovibronic energy level structure even in the region of strong Renner-Teller resonances. PMID:25956095

  9. Diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging correlates with final pathological response in breast cancer neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cerussi, Albert E.; Tanamai, Vaya W.; Hsiang, David; Butler, John; Mehta, Rita S.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    Diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI) non-invasively and quantitatively measures tissue haemoglobin, water and lipid. Pilot studies in small groups of patients demonstrate that DOSI may be useful for longitudinal monitoring and predicting breast cancer neoadjuvant chemotherapy pathological response. This study evaluates the performance of a bedside DOSI platform in 34 breast cancer patients followed for several months. DOSI optical endpoints obtained at multiple timepoints are compared with final pathological response. Thirty-six stage II/III breast cancers (34 patients) were measured in vivo with DOSI prior to, in the middle of and after the completion of pre-surgical neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Cancer therapies ranged from standard anthracyclines to targeted therapies. Changes in DOSI-measured parameters at each timepoint were compared against final surgical pathology. Absolute changes in the tumour-to-normal (T/N) ratio of tissue deoxyhaemoglobin concentration (ctHHb) and relative changes in the T/N ratio of a tissue optical index (TOI) were most sensitive and correlate to pathological response. Changes in ctHHb and TOI were significantly different between tumours that achieved pathological complete response (pCR) versus non-pCR. By therapy midpoint, mean TOI-T/N changes were 47±8 versus 20±5 per cent for pCR versus non-pCR subjects, respectively (Z=0.011). Changes in ctHHb and TOI scaled significantly with the degree of pathological response (non-, partial and complete). DOSI measurements of TOI separated pCR from non-pCR by therapy midpoint regardless of drug or dosing strategy. This approach is well suited to monitoring breast tumour response and may provide feedback for optimizing therapeutic outcomes and minimizing side-effects. PMID:22006904

  10. Cy3 in AOT reverse micelles II. Probing intermicellar interactions using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    McPhee, Jeffrey T; Scott, Eric; Levinger, Nancy E; Van Orden, Alan

    2011-08-11

    Cyanine-3 (Cy3) fluorescent dye molecules confined in sodium di-2-ethylhexyl sulfosuccinate (AOT) reverse micelles were examined using dynamic light scattering and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to probe the kinetics of Cy3 dye and reverse micelle aggregation. This study explored a range of reverse micelle sizes, defined as w(0) = [H(2)O]/[AOT], in which the occupation number ranged from one Cy3 molecule per ∼10(5) to ∼10(6) reverse micelles. These measurements reveal that in the smallest reverse micelle, w(0) = 1, the Cy3 molecules aggregate to form H-aggregate dimers, and the Cy3 dimerization is accompanied by the formation of a transient dimer between reverse micelles. Transient reverse micelle dimer particles are only observed in the small fraction of Cy3-labeled reverse micelles probed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and are not observed in the bulk solution probed by dynamic light scattering. Furthermore, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy makes it possible to probe the size and shape of these dimers, revealing prolate ellipsoid-shaped particles with twice the volume and surface area of a single reverse micelle. PMID:21761943

  11. Polarization-dependent fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for studying structural properties of proteins in living cell

    PubMed Central

    Oura, Makoto; Yamamoto, Johtaro; Ishikawa, Hideto; Mikuni, Shintaro; Fukushima, Ryousuke; Kinjo, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Rotational diffusion measurement is predicted as an important method in cell biology because the rotational properties directly reflect molecular interactions and environment in the cell. To prove this concept, polarization-dependent fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (pol-FCS) measurements of purified fluorescent proteins were conducted in viscous solution. With the comparison between the translational and rotational diffusion coefficients obtained from pol-FCS measurements, the hydrodynamic radius of an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was estimated as a control measurement. The orientation of oligomer EGFP in living cells was also estimated by pol-FCS and compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The results of this pol-FCS experiment indicate that this method allows an estimation of the molecular orientation using the characteristics of rotational diffusion. Further, it can be applied to analyze the degree of molecular orientation and multimerization or detection of tiny aggregation of aggregate-prone proteins. PMID:27489044

  12. Multifocal multiphoton excitation and time correlated single photon counting detection for 3-D fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Dunsby, C; De Beule, P A A; Owen, D M; Anand, U; Lanigan, P M P; Benninger, R K P; Davis, D M; Neil, M A A; Anand, P; Benham, C; Naylor, A; French, P M W

    2007-10-01

    We report a multifocal multiphoton time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) microscope system that uses a 16 channel multi-anode PMT detector. Multiphoton excitation minimizes out-of-focus photobleaching, multifocal excitation reduces non-linear in-plane photobleaching effects and TCSPC electronics provide photon-efficient detection of the fluorescence decay profile. TCSPC detection is less prone to bleaching- and movement-induced artefacts compared to wide-field time-gated or frequency-domain FLIM. This microscope is therefore capable of acquiring 3-D FLIM images at significantly increased speeds compared to single beam multiphoton microscopy and we demonstrate this with live cells expressing a GFP tagged protein. We also apply this system to time-lapse FLIM of NAD(P)H autofluorescence in single live cells and report measurements on the change in the fluorescence decay profile following the application of a known metabolic inhibitor. PMID:19550524

  13. CINCH (confocal incoherent correlation holography) super resolution fluorescence microscopy based upon FINCH (Fresnel incoherent correlation holography)

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Nisan; Storrie, Brian; Bruce, Marc

    2016-01-01

    FINCH holographic fluorescence microscopy creates high resolution super-resolved images with enhanced depth of focus. The simple addition of a real-time Nipkow disk confocal image scanner in a conjugate plane of this incoherent holographic system is shown to reduce the depth of focus, and the combination of both techniques provides a simple way to enhance the axial resolution of FINCH in a combined method called “CINCH”. An important feature of the combined system allows for the simultaneous real-time image capture of widefield and holographic images or confocal and confocal holographic images for ready comparison of each method on the exact same field of view. Additional GPU based complex deconvolution processing of the images further enhances resolution. PMID:26839443

  14. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip window surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria. PMID:25358460

  15. Correlative electron and fluorescence microscopy of magnetotactic bacteria in liquid: toward in vivo imaging.

    PubMed

    Woehl, Taylor J; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip window surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria. PMID:25358460

  16. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-10-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip window surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria.

  17. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-10-31

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip window surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria.

  18. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-10-31

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip windowmore » surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria.« less

  19. Determination of Dynamics of Plant Plasma Membrane Proteins with Fluorescence Recovery and Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Laňková, Martina; Humpolíčková, Jana; Vosolsobě, Stanislav; Cit, Zdeněk; Lacek, Jozef; Čovan, Martin; Čovanová, Milada; Hof, Martin; Petrášek, Jan

    2016-04-01

    A number of fluorescence microscopy techniques are described to study dynamics of fluorescently labeled proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and whole organelles. However, for studies of plant plasma membrane (PM) proteins, the number of these techniques is still limited because of the high complexity of processes that determine the dynamics of PM proteins and the existence of cell wall. Here, we report on the usage of raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) for studies of integral PM proteins in suspension-cultured tobacco cells and show its potential in comparison with the more widely used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching method. For RICS, a set of microscopy images is obtained by single-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Fluorescence fluctuations are subsequently correlated between individual pixels and the information on protein mobility are extracted using a model that considers processes generating the fluctuations such as diffusion and chemical binding reactions. As we show here using an example of two integral PM transporters of the plant hormone auxin, RICS uncovered their distinct short-distance lateral mobility within the PM that is dependent on cytoskeleton and sterol composition of the PM. RICS, which is routinely accessible on modern CLSM instruments, thus represents a valuable approach for studies of dynamics of PM proteins in plants. PMID:27041337

  20. Spectroscopic studies of the internal modes of aminoaromatics by fluorescence excitation and dispersed emission in supersonic jet

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, S.

    1992-01-01

    A systematic study for the NH[sub 2] inversional mode in aniline and para substituted anilines has been performed using the techniques of fluorescence excitation and dispersed emission in supersonic jet. The transitions of the nitrogen inversion mode in aniline and para substituted anilines have been assigned in both the fluorescence excitation and dispersed emission spectra, which are strongly supported by the evidence of a large deuterium shift, the presence of a strong hot band, and the intense second overtone transition of the amino inversion in the excitation spectra of all the aniline molecules. The potential surface of each aniline has been fit using the observed inversional levels in both the ground and excited states. The molecular structure of each aniline has been investigated based on the experimental results. The NH[sub 2] torsional transition is assigned in the excitation spectrum of each aniline molecule for the first time. The absence of a torsional hot band and no observable tunneling splitting in the NH[sub 2] torsional mode indicates that the NH[sub 2] torsion mode in the anilines must have a very high first quanta in the ground state. The mechanism of I[sup 2][sub 0] and T[sup 2][sub 0] splittings in the excitation spectrum of p-toluidine has been explained by using molecular symmetry. The splittings are caused by the torsion-torsion coupling between the NH[sub 2] and CH[sub 3] groups. The structure of p-amino-p[prime]-methyl-trans-stilbene (PPTS) has been studied by spectroscopic methods and X-ray diffraction. The nearly planar geometry of the proton donor in the PPTS crystal dimer provides important evidence that the structure of gas phase PPTS is planar in the ground state. The absence of the hot band and I[sup 2][sub 0] in the excitation spectrum of PPTS indicates that the potential surface of PPTS must be a single well in both states, which is consistent with the X-ray result.

  1. Echo Planar Correlated Spectroscopic Imaging (EP-COSI): Implementation and Pilot Evaluation in Human Calf in Vivo#

    PubMed Central

    Lipnick, Scott; Verma, Gaurav; Ramadan, Saadallah; Furuyama, Jon; Thomas, M. Albert

    2010-01-01

    Exploiting the speed benefits of echo-planar imaging (EPI), the echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI) sequence facilitates recording of one spectral and two to three spatial dimensions faster than the conventional MR Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI). A novel four dimensional (4D) echo-planar correlated spectroscopic imaging (EP-COSI) was implemented on a whole body 3T MRI scanner combining two spectral with two spatial encodings. Similar to EPSI, the EP-COSI sequence used a bipolar spatial read-out train facilitating simultaneous spatial and spectral encoding, and the conventional phase and spectral encodings for the other spatial and indirect spectral dimensions, respectively. Multiple 2D correlated spectroscopy (COSY) spectra were recorded over the spatially resolved volume of interest (VOI) localized by a train of three slice-selective radio-frequency (RF) pulses (90°-180°-90°). After the initial optimization using phantom solutions, the EP-COSI data were recorded in the lower leg of eight healthy volunteers including one endurance trained volunteer. Pilot results showed acceptable spatial and spectral quality achievable using the EP-COSI sequence. There was a detectable separation of cross peaks arising from the skeletal muscle intramyocellular lipids (IMCL) and extramyocellular lipids (EMCL) saturated and unsaturated pools. Residual dipolar interaction between the N-methylene and N-methyl protons of creatine/phosphocreatine (Cr/PCr) was also observed in the tibialis anterior region. PMID:20574964

  2. Probe diffusion in polymer solutions and hydrogels using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelman-Ribeiro, Ariel; Boukari, Hacene; Horkay, Ferenc; Nossal, Ralph

    2006-03-01

    We apply fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to measure the diffusion of small fluorescent probes (TAMRA, Mw = 430 Da; dextran, Mw = 10 kDa) in poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) solutions and hydrogels. PVA is a linear, neutral, biocompatible polymer, whose hydrogels have many biotechnology applications, such as drug-delivery devices and tissue scaffolds. The FCS measurements indicate that the probe diffusion decreases when the polymer solution is cross-linked. Further, the more the polymer chains are cross-linked, the slower the particles diffuse. These results suggest that the cross-link density, which is often ignored in the analysis of probe diffusion data in gels, must be taken into account. Remarkably, we find that the apparent diffusion time and the elastic modulus of the gels show a linear correlation.

  3. Spot Variation Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Allows for Superresolution Chronoscopy of Confinement Times in Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ruprecht, Verena; Wieser, Stefan; Marguet, Didier; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2011-01-01

    Resolving the dynamical interplay of proteins and lipids in the live-cell plasma membrane represents a central goal in current cell biology. Superresolution concepts have introduced a means of capturing spatial heterogeneity at a nanoscopic length scale. Similar concepts for detecting dynamical transitions (superresolution chronoscopy) are still lacking. Here, we show that recently introduced spot-variation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy allows for sensing transient confinement times of membrane constituents at dramatically improved resolution. Using standard diffraction-limited optics, spot-variation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy captures signatures of single retardation events far below the transit time of the tracer through the focal spot. We provide an analytical description of special cases of transient binding of a tracer to pointlike traps, or association of a tracer with nanodomains. The influence of trap mobility and the underlying binding kinetics are quantified. Experimental approaches are suggested that allow for gaining quantitative mechanistic insights into the interaction processes of membrane constituents. PMID:21641330

  4. TOTAL INTERNAL REFLECTION WITH FLUORESCENCE CORRELATION SPECTROSCOPY: APPLICATIONS TO SUBSTRATE-SUPPORTED PLANAR MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Nancy L.; Wang, Xiang; Navaratnarajah, Punya

    2009-01-01

    In this review paper, the conceptual basis and experimental design of total internal reflection with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (TIR-FCS) is described. The few applications to date of TIR-FCS to supported membranes are discussed, in addition to a variety of applications not directly involving supported membranes. Methods related, but not technically equivalent, to TIR-FCS are also summarized. Future directions for TIR-FCS are outlined. PMID:19269331

  5. Fluorescence lifetime measurement via a radionuclide-scintillation light source and analog cross correlation.

    PubMed

    Burden, D L; Hobbs, S E; Hieftje, G M

    1997-05-15

    beta-Emitting 90Sr is used with a plastic scintillator to produce excitation-light pulses for fluorescence lifetime analysis. This light source is less expensive, more compact, and much more reliable than traditionally employed excitation sources such as lasers or pulsed flash lamps. The pulse train from this light source varies randomly in amplitude and time. Cross-correlation signal analysis is ideal for such a source because, unlike other time domain techniques, cross correlation takes complete advantage of its random nature. Here we report on the construction of an instrument and the methods employed to make fluorescence lifetime measurements via the new source and an analog correlation processor. Although the light intensity of the scintillator-based excitation source is comparatively low, an adequate signal level can be generated. The fluorescence lifetimes of three fluorophores are measured with a 1-mCi radionuclide to demonstrate a lifetime range from less than 1.5 to 28 ns. Long-lifetime measurements require an extra calibration step in order to compensate for delay cable energy loss. The light collection efficiency of the current instrument was found to be undesirably low; improvements in the instrument optics are suggested that will increase the collection efficiency and enhance the detection capability. PMID:9164162

  6. Precise intensity correlation measurement for atomic resonance fluorescence from optical molasses.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Kazuyuki; Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Matsumoto, Hisatoshi; Torii, Yoshio; Kuga, Takahiro

    2010-03-29

    We measured the intensity correlation of true thermal light scattered from cold atoms in an optical molasses. Using a single-mode fiber as a transverse mode filter, measurement with maximally high spatial coherence was realized, allowing us to observe ideal photon bunching with unprecedented precision. The measured intensity correlation functions showed a definite bimodal structure with fast damped oscillation from the maximum value of 2.02(3) and slow monotonic decay toward unity. The oscillation can be understood as an interference between elastic and inelastic scattering fields in resonance fluorescence. PMID:20389684

  7. Unraveling transcription factor interactions with heterochromatin protein 1 using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Amanda P.; Hays, Nicole M.; Day, Richard N.

    2013-02-01

    The epigenetic control of heterochromatin deposition is achieved through a network of protein interactions mediated by the heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1). In earlier studies, we showed that the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα), a transcription factor that controls cell differentiation, localizes to heterochromatin, and interacts with HP1α. Here, deletion and mutagenesis are combined with live-cell imaging approaches to characterize these protein interactions. The results demonstrate that the basic region and leucine zipper (BZip) domain of C/EBPα is sufficient for the interaction with HP1α in regions of heterochromatin. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and cross-correlation (FCS and FCCS) revealed very different diffusion profiles for HP1α and the BZip protein, and co-expression studies indicated that the mobile fractions of these nuclear proteins diffuse independently of one another. The steady-state interactions of these proteins in regions of heterochromatin were monitored using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). A point mutation in HP1α, W174A, which disrupts the interactions with proteins containing the common PxVxL motif did not affect the interaction with the BZip protein. In contrast, the HP1α W41A mutation, which prevents binding to methylated histones, exhibited greatly reduced FRET efficiency when compared to the wild type HP1α or HP1αW174A. The functional significance of these interactions is discussed.

  8. Quantitative Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Reveals a 1000-Fold Increase in Lifetime of Protein Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dianwen; Lans, Hannes; Vermeulen, Wim; Lenferink, Aufried; Otto, Cees

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated dilute protein solutions with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and have observed that a rapid loss of proteins occurs from solution. It is commonly assumed that such a loss is the result of protein adsorption to interfaces. A protocol was developed in which this mode of protein loss can be prevented. However, FCS on fluorescent protein (enhanced green fluorescent protein, mCherry, and mStrawberry) solutions enclosed by adsorption-protected interfaces still reveals a decrease of the fluorescent protein concentration, while the diffusion time is stable over long periods of time. We interpret this decay as a loss of protein functionality, probably caused by denaturation of the fluorescent proteins. We show that the typical lifetime of protein functionality in highly dilute, approximately single molecule per femtoliter solutions can be extended more than 1000-fold (typically from a few hours to >40 days) by adding compounds with surfactant behavior. No direct interactions between the surfactant and the fluorescent proteins were observed from the diffusion time measured by FCS. A critical surfactant concentration of more than 23 μM was required to achieve the desired protein stabilization for Triton X-100. The surfactant does not interfere with DNA-protein binding, because similar observations were made using DNA-cutting restriction enzymes. We associate the occurrence of denaturation of proteins with the activity of water at the water-protein interface, which was recently proposed in terms of the “water attack model”. Our observations suggest that soluble biomolecules can extend an influence over much larger distances than suggested by their actual volume. PMID:18586843

  9. Tumor redox metabolism correlation with the expression level of red fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Shuang; Wang, Anle; Lin, Qiaoya; Zhang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    The redox metabolism is variable and complicated with the progress of tumor development. Whether the tumor redox state will affect the exogenous gene expression or not, are still not clear now . To investigate the relationship between tumor endogenous redox state and the exogenous gene expression level, a far red fluorescent protein fRFP was used to monitor tumor cells proliferation and as an exogenous protein expression in tumors. NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) and Fp (flavin protein) are two important coenzymes in the mitochondria respiratory chain, which can be as a standard representation for redox metabolism state. Three tumor subcutaneous models (melanoma, human pancreatic carcinoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma) were used to observe their redox state and protein expression by our home-made redox scanner. The results showed that the distribution of fRFP fluorescent protein expression in the inner tumor regions are heterogeneous, and the fluorescent intensity of fRFP and the fluorescent intensity of NADH have high correlation. In addition, we also found the linear coefficient in three tumors are different, the value of coefficient is (R2 = 0.966 and R2 = 0.943) in melanoma, (R2 = 0.701 and R2 = 0.942) in human pancreatic carcinoma, and (R2 = 0.994) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, respectively. From these results, we consider that the exogenous protein expression of fRFP in tumor had some relationship with the tumor redox state of NADH.

  10. Evaluation of sensitivity of fluorescence-based asbestos detection by correlative microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takenori; Alexandrov, Maxym; Nishimura, Tomoki; Minakawa, Kenji; Hirota, Ryuichi; Sekiguchi, Kiyoshi; Kohyama, Norihiko; Kuroda, Akio

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy (FM) has recently been applied to the detection of airborne asbestos fibers that can cause asbestosis, mesothelioma and lung cancer. In our previous studies, we discovered that the E. coli protein DksA specifically binds to the most commonly used type of asbestos, chrysotile. We also demonstrated that fluorescent-labeled DksA enabled far more specific and sensitive detection of airborne asbestos fibers than conventional phase contrast microscopy (PCM). However, the actual diameter of the thinnest asbestos fibers visualized under the FM platform was unclear, as their dimensions were below the resolution of optical microscopy. Here, we used correlative microscopy (scanning electron microscopy [SEM] in combination with FM) to measure the actual diameters of asbestos fibers visualized under the FM platform with fluorescent-labeled DksA as a probe. Our analysis revealed that FM offers sufficient sensitivity to detect chrysotile fibrils as thin as 30-35 nm. We therefore conclude that as an analytical method, FM has the potential to detect all countable asbestos fibers in air samples, thus approaching the sensitivity of SEM. By visualizing thin asbestos fibers at approximately tenfold lower magnifications, FM enables markedly more rapid counting of fibers than SEM. Thus, fluorescence microscopy represents an advanced analytical tool for asbestos detection and monitoring. PMID:21932006

  11. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy to Study Diffusion of Polymer Chains within Layered Hydrogen-Bonded Polymer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pristinski, Denis; Kharlampieva, Evguenia; Sukhishvili, Svetlana

    2002-03-01

    Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) has been used to probe molecular motions within polymer multilayers formed by hydrogen-bonding sequential self-assembly. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules were end-labeled with the fluorescent tags, and self-assembled with polymethacrylic acid (PMAA) using layer-by-layer deposition. We have found that molecules included in the top adsorbed layer have significant mobility at the millisecond time scale, probably due to translational diffusion. However, their dynamics deviate from classical Brownian motion with a single diffusion time. Possible reasons for the deviation are discussed. We found that motions were significantly slowed with increasing depth within the PEG/PMAA multilayer. This phenomena occured in a narrow pH range around 4.0 in which intermolecular interactions were relatively weak.

  12. Measurement of the temperature-dependent diffusion properties of nanoparticles by using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Chanbae; Lee, Jaeran; Kang, Manil; Kim, Sok Won

    2014-10-01

    Changes in the diffusion properties of three kinds of fluorescent particles, Alexa Fluor 647, Q-dots (quantum dots), and beads, with temperature were investigated with a home-built fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) system based on a confocal microscope. In all samples, as the temperature was increased, the diffusion times were reduced, indicating an increase in the diffusion coefficient. In particular, of all the particles, Alexa Fluor 647 having the smallest size of ˜1 nm, showed a hydrodynamic radius that increased with increasing temperature of the solvent. However, for the Q-dots and beads with larger sizes, the hydrodynamic radius of the particles was inversely proportional to the temperature. These results show that diffusion coefficient obtained by changing the temperature has an influence on the hydrodynamic radius of the particles.

  13. What information is contained in the fluorescence correlation spectroscopy curves, and where

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadem, S. M. J.; Hille, C.; Löhmannsröben, H.-G.; Sokolov, I. M.

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the application of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) for characterization of anomalous diffusion of tracer particles in crowded environments. While the fact of anomaly may be detected by the standard fitting procedure, the value of the exponent α of anomalous diffusion may be not reproduced correctly for non-Gaussian anomalous diffusion processes. The important information is however contained in the asymptotic behavior of the fluorescence autocorrelation function at long and at short times. Thus, analysis of the short-time behavior gives reliable values of α and of lower moments of the distribution of particles' displacement, which allows us to confirm or reject its Gaussian nature. The method proposed was tested on the FCS data obtained in artificial crowded fluids and in living cells.

  14. Highly Sensitive Determination of Hydrogen Peroxide and Glucose by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Watabe, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuki; Morikawa, Mika; Okada, Ryuichi; Miura, Toshiaki; Ito, Etsuro

    2011-01-01

    Background Because H2O2 is generated by various oxidase-catalyzed reactions, a highly sensitive determination method of H2O2 is applicable to measurements of low levels of various oxidases and their substrates such as glucose, lactate, glutamate, urate, xanthine, choline, cholesterol and NADPH. We propose herein a new, highly sensitive method for the measurement of H2O2 and glucose using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Methodology/Principal Findings FCS has the advantage of allowing us to determine the number of fluorescent molecules. FCS measures the fluctuations in fluorescence intensity caused by fluorescent probe movement in a small light cavity with a defined volume generated by confocal illumination. We thus developed a highly sensitive determination system of H2O2 by FCS, where horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzes the formation of a covalent bond between fluorescent molecules and proteins in the presence of H2O2. Our developed system gave a linear calibration curve for H2O2 in the range of 28 to 300 nM with the detection limit of 8 nM. In addition, by coupling with glucose oxidase (GOD)-catalyzed reaction, the method allows to measure glucose in the range of 80 nM to 1.5 µM with detection limit of 24 nM. The method was applicable to the assay of glucose in blood plasma. The mean concentration of glucose in normal human blood plasma was determined to be 4.9 mM. Conclusions/Significance In comparison with commercial available methods, the detection limit and the minimum value of determination for glucose are at least 2 orders of magnitude more sensitive in our system. Such a highly sensitive method leads the fact that only a very small amount of plasma (20 nL) is needed for the determination of glucose concentration in blood plasma. PMID:21850246

  15. Studies on the structure of actin gels using time correlation spectroscopy of fluorescent beads.

    PubMed Central

    Qian, H; Elson, E L; Frieden, C

    1992-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) has been used to measure the diffusion of fluorescently labeled beads in solutions of polymerized actin or buffer. The results, obtained at actin concentrations of 1 mg/ml, show that small beads (0.09 micron in diameter) diffuse nearly as rapidly in the actin gel as in buffer, whereas the largest beads tested (0.5 micron in diameter) are immobilized. Measured autocorrelation times for motions of beads with intermediate sizes show that the diffusion is retarded (relative to buffer) and that the time behavior cannot be represented as a single diffusive process. In addition to the retarded diffusion observed over distances > 1 micron, 0.23-micron beads also show a faster motion over smaller distances. Based on the measured rate of this faster motion, we estimate that the beads may be constrained within a cage approximately 0.67 micron on a side, equal to a filament length of approximately 250 subunits. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements made in the same small spot (radius of 1.4 microns) of the gel vary over time. From the variations of both the autocorrelation functions and the mean fluorescence, we conclude that, corresponding to a spatial scale of 1.4 microns, the actin gel is a dynamic structure with slow rearrangement of the gel occurring over periods of 20-50 s at 21-22 degrees C. This rearrangement may result from local reorganization of the actin matrix. Data for the retardation of beads by the actin gel are consistent with a detailed theory of the diffusion of particles through solutions of rigid rods that have longitudinal diffusion coefficients much less than that of the particles (Ogston, A. G., B. N. Preston, and J. D. Wells. 1973. Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A. 333:297-316). PMID:1420920

  16. BH{sub 2} revisited: New, extensive measurements of laser-induced fluorescence transitions and ab initio calculations of near-spectroscopic accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Sunahori, Fumie X.; Gharaibeh, Mohammed; Clouthier, Dennis J.; Tarroni, Riccardo

    2015-05-07

    The spectroscopy of gas phase BH{sub 2} has not been explored experimentally since the pioneering study of Herzberg and Johns in 1967. In the present work, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of the A{sup ~} {sup 2}B{sub 1}(Π{sub u})−X{sup ~2}A{sub 1} band system of {sup 11}BH{sub 2}, {sup 10}BH{sub 2}, {sup 11}BD{sub 2}, and {sup 10}BD{sub 2} have been observed for the first time. The free radicals were “synthesized” by an electric discharge through a precursor mixture of 0.5% diborane (B{sub 2}H{sub 6} or B{sub 2}D{sub 6}) in high pressure argon at the exit of a pulsed valve. A total of 67 LIF bands have been measured and rotationally analyzed, 62 of them previously unobserved. These include transitions to a wide variety of excited state bending levels, to several stretch-bend combination levels, and to three ground state levels which gain intensity through Renner-Teller coupling to nearby excited state levels. As an aid to vibronic assignment of the spectra, very high level hybrid ab initio potential energy surfaces were built starting from the coupled cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples (CCSD(T))/aug-cc-pV5Z level of theory for this seven-electron system. In an effort to obtain the highest possible accuracy, the potentials were corrected for core correlation, extrapolation to the complete basis set limit, electron correlation beyond CCSD(T), and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer effects. The spin-rovibronic states of the various isotopologues of BH{sub 2} were calculated for energies up to 22 000 cm{sup −1} above the X{sup ~} (000) level without any empirical adjustment of the potentials or fitting to experimental data. The agreement with the new LIF data is excellent, approaching near-spectroscopic accuracy (a few cm{sup −1}) and has allowed us to understand the complicated spin-rovibronic energy level structure even in the region of strong Renner-Teller resonances.

  17. On the pH-responsive, charge-selective, polymer-brush-mediated transport probed by traditional and scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Daniels, C R; Tauzin, L J; Foster, E; Advincula, R C; Landes, C F

    2013-04-25

    The complete and reversible charge-selective sequestration of fluorophores by a weak polyelectrolyte brush, poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethylmethacrylate) (PDMAEMA) was demonstrated using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The chemistry and thickness of the weak polyelectrolyte PDMAEMA was tuned reversibly between neutral and cationic polymer forms. Thus, by switching the pH successively, the brush architecture was tuned to selectively trap and release anionic dye probes while continuously excluding cationic molecules. In addition, line-scan FCS was implemented and applied for the first time to a synthetic polymer system and used to identify a new, slower diffusion time on the order of seconds for the sequestered anionic probe under acidic conditions. These results, which quantify the selective sequestration properties of the PDMAEMA brush, are important because they enable a better understanding of transport in polymers and establish a spectroscopic means of evaluating materials with proposed applications in separations science, charge storage/release, and environmental remediation. PMID:23092304

  18. On the pH Responsive, Charge Selective, Polymer Brush-Mediated Transport Probed by Traditional and Scanning Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, C. R.; Tauzin, L. J.; Foster, E.; Advincula, R. C.; Landes, C. F.

    2013-01-01

    The complete and reversible charge-selective sequestration of fluorophores by a weak polyelectrolyte brush, poly(2-(dimethylamino) ethyl-methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) was demonstrated using Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS). The chemistry and thickness of the weak polyelectrolyte PDMAEMA was tuned reversibly between neutral and cationic polymer forms. Thus, by switching the pH successively, the brush architecture was tuned to selectively trap and release anionic dye probes, while continuously excluding cationic molecules. In addition, line-scan FCS was implemented and applied for the first time to a synthetic polymer system, and used to identify a new, slower diffusion time on the order of seconds for the sequestered anionic probe under acidic conditions. These results, which quantify the selective sequestration properties of the PDMAEMA brush, are important because they enable a better understanding of transport in polymers, and establish a spectroscopic means of evaluating materials with proposed applications in separations science, charge storage/release and environmental remediation. PMID:23092304

  19. A pilot validation of multi-echo based echo-planar correlated spectroscopic imaging in human calf muscles.

    PubMed

    Furuyama, Jon K; Nagarajan, Rajakumar; Roberts, Christian K; Lee, Cathy C; Hahn, Theodore J; Thomas, M Albert

    2014-10-01

    A current limitation of MR spectroscopic imaging of multiple skeletal muscles is prolonged scan duration. A significant reduction in the total scan duration using the echo-planar correlated spectroscopic imaging (EP-COSI) sequence was accomplished using two bipolar readout trains with different phase-encoded echoes for one of two spatial dimensions within a single repetition time (TR). The second bipolar readout was used for spatially encoding the outer k-space, whereas the first readout was used for the central k-space only. The performance of this novel sequence, called multi-echo based echo-planar correlated spectroscopic imaging (ME-EPCOSI), was demonstrated by localizing specific key features in calf muscles and bone marrow of 11 healthy volunteers and five subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2D). A 3 T MRI-MRS scanner equipped with a transmit-receive extremity coil was used. Localization of the ME-EPCOSI sequence was in good agreement with the earlier single-readout based EP-COSI sequence and the required scan time was reduced by a factor of two. In agreement with an earlier report using single-voxel based 2D MRS, significantly increased unsaturated pools of intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) and extramyocellular lipid (EMCL) and decreased IMCL and EMCL unsaturation indices (UIs) were observed in the soleus and tibialis anterior muscle regions of subjects with T2D compared with healthy controls. In addition, significantly decreased choline content was observed in the soleus of T2D subjects compared with healthy controls. Multi-voxel characterization of IMCL and EMCL ratios and UI in the calf muscle may be useful for the non-invasive assessment of altered lipid metabolism in the pathophysiology of T2D. PMID:25132520

  20. Infrared Spectroscopic Evidences of Strong Electronic Correlations in (Sr1-xLax)3Ir2O7.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Gihyeon; Song, S J; Hogan, T; Wilson, S D; Moon, S J

    2016-01-01

    We report on infrared spectroscopic studies of the electronic response of the (Sr1-xLax)3Ir2O7 system. Our experiments revealed hallmarks of strong electronic correlations in the evolution of the electronic response across the filling-controlled insulator-metal transition. We observed a collapse of the Jeff = 1/2 Mott gap accompanying the transfer of the spectral weight from the high-energy region to the gap region with electron doping. The intraband conductivity at the metallic side of the transition was found to consist of coherent Drude-like and incoherent responses. The sum rule and the extended Drude model analyses further indicated a large mass enhancement. Our results demonstrate a critical role of the electronic correlations in the charge dynamics of the (Sr1-xLax)3Ir2O7 system. PMID:27599573

  1. Infrared Spectroscopic Evidences of Strong Electronic Correlations in (Sr1−xLax)3Ir2O7

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Gihyeon; Song, S. J.; Hogan, T.; Wilson, S. D.; Moon, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    We report on infrared spectroscopic studies of the electronic response of the (Sr1−xLax)3Ir2O7 system. Our experiments revealed hallmarks of strong electronic correlations in the evolution of the electronic response across the filling-controlled insulator-metal transition. We observed a collapse of the Jeff = 1/2 Mott gap accompanying the transfer of the spectral weight from the high-energy region to the gap region with electron doping. The intraband conductivity at the metallic side of the transition was found to consist of coherent Drude-like and incoherent responses. The sum rule and the extended Drude model analyses further indicated a large mass enhancement. Our results demonstrate a critical role of the electronic correlations in the charge dynamics of the (Sr1−xLax)3Ir2O7 system. PMID:27599573

  2. On the measurement of particle number and mobility in nonideal solutions by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Abney, J R; Scalettar, B A; Hackenbrock, C R

    1990-01-01

    Interparticle interactions are incorporated into the theoretical description of the initial amplitude, G(0), of the normalized fluorescence correlation spectroscopy autocorrelation function. Measurements of particle number, aggregate size, and interaction-dependent diffusion are then analyzed in the context of this generalized theory. It is shown that the neglect of interactions can introduce order-of-magnitude errors into estimates of particle number and aggregate size. It is also shown that measurement of G(0) provides an essentially unique method for testing the validity of theories of interaction-dependent membrane protein diffusion. PMID:2383634

  3. Effect of different agents onto multidrug resistant cells revealed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, C.; Roche, Y.; Jaffiol, R.; Millot, J.-M.; Millot, C.; Plain, J.; Deturche, R.; Jeannesson, P.; Manfait, M.; Royer, P.

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), which is a sensitive and non invasive technique, has been used to characterize the plasma membrane fluidity and heterogeneity of multidrug resistant living cells. At the single cell level, the effects of different membrane agents present in the extra-cellular medium have been analyzed. Firstly, we reveal a modification of plasma membrane microviscosity according to the addition of a fluidity modulator, benzyl alcohol. In the other hand, revertant such as verapamil and cyclosporin-A appears to act more specifically on the slow diffusion sites as microdomains.

  4. Recent Developments in Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy for Diffusion Measurements in Planar Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Macháň, Radek; Hof, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a single molecule technique used mainly for determination of mobility and local concentration of molecules. This review describes the specific problems of FCS in planar systems and reviews the state of the art experimental approaches such as 2-focus, Z-scan or scanning FCS, which overcome most of the artefacts and limitations of standard FCS. We focus on diffusion measurements of lipids and proteins in planar lipid membranes and review the contributions of FCS to elucidating membrane dynamics and the factors influencing it, such as membrane composition, ionic strength, presence of membrane proteins or frictional coupling with solid support. PMID:20386647

  5. Characterization of simian virus 40 on its infectious entry pathway in cells using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bernacchi, S; Mueller, G; Langowski, J; Waldeck, W

    2004-11-01

    SV40 (simian virus 40) is a double-stranded DNA virus and is strongly oncogenic in experimental animals. SV40 enters cells by atypical endocytosis mediated by caveolae, transporting the virus to its usual destination, namely the endoplasmic reticulum. The cellular mechanisms of capsid disassembly (uncoating) and deliverance of the viral genome into the cellular nucleus remain unknown. Here, we study (i) the formation of caveolae after viral infection and the diffusion of caveosome vesicles in the cytoplasm and (ii) the capsid disassembly and the mobility of the viral genome on its way to the nucleus, using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. To follow the viral genome and capsids separately, the histone components of SV40 minichromosomes were labelled with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein and the capsid was labelled with a fluorescent red dye, Alexa568. We characterized the diffusion of caveosomes, the capsid disassembly process in the cytoplasm and the mobility of the viral genome in the nucleus, using two kinds of permissive cells. PMID:15494004

  6. Confined diffusion in tubular structures analyzed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy on a mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etienne, Emilien; Lenne, Pierre-François; Sturgis, James N.; Rigneault, Hervé

    2006-06-01

    In fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) analysis it is generally assumed that molecular species diffuse freely in volumes much larger than the three-dimensional FCS observation volume. However, this standard assumption is not valid in many measurement conditions, particularly in tubular structures with diameters in the micrometer range, such as those found in living cells (organelles, dendrites) and microfluidic devices (capillaries, reaction chambers). As a result the measured autocorrelation functions (ACFs) deviate from those predicted for free diffusion, and this can shift the measured diffusion coefficient by as much as ~50% when the tube diameter is comparable with the axial extension of the FCS observation volume. We show that the range of validity of the FCS measurements can be drastically improved if the tubular structures are located in the close vicinity of a mirror on which FCS is performed. In this case a new fluctuation time in the ACF, arising from the diffusion of fluorescent probes in optical fringes, permits measurement of the real diffusion coefficient within the tubular structure without assumptions about either the confined geometry or the FCS observation volume geometry. We show that such a measurement can be done when the tubular structure contains at least one pair of dark and bright fringes resulting from interference between the incoming and the reflected excitation beams on the mirror surface. Measurement of the diffusion coefficient of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and IscS-EGFP in the cytoplasm of living Escherichia coli illustrates the capabilities of the technique.

  7. The initial step of DNA hairpin folding: a kinetic analysis using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiho; Doose, Sören; Neuweiler, Hannes; Sauer, Markus

    2006-01-01

    Conformational fluctuations of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) oligonucleotides were studied in aqueous solution by monitoring contact-induced fluorescence quenching of the oxazine fluorophore MR121 by intrinsic guanosine residues (dG). We applied fluorescence correlation spectroscopy as well as steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy to analyze kinetics of DNA hairpin folding. We first characterized the reporter system by investigating bimolecular quenching interactions between MR121 and guanosine monophosphate in aqueous solution estimating rate constants, efficiency and stability for formation of quenched complexes. We then studied the kinetics of complex formation between MR121 and dG residues site-specifically incorporated in DNA hairpins. To uncover the initial steps of DNA hairpin folding we investigated complex formation in ssDNA carrying one or two complementary base pairs (dC–dG pairs) that could hybridize to form a short stem. Our data show that incorporation of a single dC–dG pair leads to non-exponential decays for opening and closing kinetics and reduces rate constants by one to two orders of magnitude. We found positive activation enthalpies independent of the number of dC–dG pairs. These results imply that the rate limiting step of DNA hairpin folding is not determined by loop dynamics, or by mismatches in the stem, but rather by interactions between stem and loop nucleotides. PMID:16687657

  8. Confined diffusion in tubular structures analyzed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy on a mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Etienne, Emilien; Lenne, Pierre-Francois; Sturgis, James N.; Rigneault, Herve

    2006-06-20

    In fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) analysis it is generally assumed that molecular species diffuse freely in volumes much larger than the three-dimensional FCS observation volume. However, this standard assumption is not valid in many measurement conditions, particularly in tubular structures with diameters in the micrometer range, such as those found in living cells (organelles, dendrites) and microfluidic devices (capillaries,reaction chambers). As a result the measured autocorrelation functions (ACFs) deviate from those predicted for free diffusion, and this can shift the measured diffusion coefficient by as much as {approx}50% when the tube diameter is comparable with the axial extension of the FCS observation volume. We show that the range of validity of the FCS measurements can be drastically improved if the tubular structures are located in the close vicinity of a mirror on which FCS is performed. In this case a new fluctuation time in the ACF, arising from the diffusion of fluorescent probes in optical fringes,permits measurement of the real diffusion coefficient within the tubular structure without assumptions about either the confined geometry orthe FCS observation volume geometry. We show that such a measurement can be done when the tubular structure contains at least one pair of dark and bright fringes resulting from interference between the incoming and the reflected excitation beams on the mirror surface. Measurement of the diffusion coefficient of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and IscS-EGFP in the cytoplasm of living Escherichiacoli illustrates the capabilities of the technique.

  9. Studies on the formation and stability of triplex DNA using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongyan; Huang, Xiangyi; Ren, Jicun

    2016-05-01

    Triplex DNA has become one of the most useful recognition motifs in the design of new molecular biology tools, therapeutic agents and sophisticated DNA-based nanomaterials because of its direct recognition of natural double-stranded DNA. In this paper, we developed a sensitive and microscale method to study the formation and stability characterization of triplex DNA using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The principle of this method is mainly based on the excellent capacity of FCS for sensitively distinguishing between free single-strand DNA (ssDNA) fluorescent probes and fluorescent probe-double-strand DNA (dsDNA) hybridized complexes. First, we systematically investigated the experimental conditions of triplex DNA formation. Then, we evaluated the equilibrium association constants (Ka ) under different ssDNA probe lengths, composition and pH. Finally, we used FCS to measure the hybridization fraction of a 20-mer perfectly matched ssDNA probe and three single-base mismatched ssDNA probes with 146-mer dsDNA. Our data illustrated that FCS is a useful tool for the direct determination of the thermodynamic parameters of triplex DNA formation and discrimination of a single-base mismatch of triplex DNA without denaturation. Compared with current methods, our method is characterized by high sensitivity, good universality and small sample and reagent requirements. More importantly, our method has the potential to become a platform for triplex DNA research in vitro. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26377428

  10. Probing the photoluminescence properties of gold nanoclusters by fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, C. T. Lin, T. N.; Shen, J. L.; Lin, C. A.; Chang, W. H.; Cheng, H. W.; Tang, J.

    2013-12-21

    Gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) have attracted much attention for promising applications in biological imaging owing to their tiny sizes and biocompatibility. So far, most efforts have been focused on the strategies for fabricating high-quality Au NCs and then characterized by conventional ensemble measurement. Here, a fusion single-molecule technique combining fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and time-correlated single-photon counting can be successfully applied to probe the photoluminescence (PL) properties for sparse Au NCs. In this case, the triplet-state dynamics and diffusion process can be observed simultaneously and the relevant time constants can be derived. This work provides a complementary insight into the PL mechanism at the molecular levels for Au NCs in solution.

  11. Velocity of movement of actin filaments in in vitro motility assay. Measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Borejdo, J; Burlacu, S

    1992-01-01

    We have measured the velocity of actin filaments in in vitro motility assay by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. In this method, one measures fluctuations in the number of filaments in an open sample volume. The number of filaments was calculated from measurements of fluorescence of rhodamine-phalloidin bound to F-actin. Sample volume was defined by a diaphragm placed in front of the photomultiplier. Fluctuations arise when actin filaments enter and leave the sample volume due to translations driven by mechanochemical interactions with myosin heads which are immobilized on a glass surface. The average velocity of the translation of filaments determined by the correlation method, (Vc), was equal to the diameter of the diaphragm divided by the half-time of the relaxation of fluctuations. The average number of moving filaments determined by correlation method, (Nc), was inversely proportional to the relative fluctuations. By the fluctuation method it was possible to determine the average velocity of over 800 moving filaments in less than 4 min. There was good agreement between (Vc) and (Nc) and the average velocity and the average number of moving filaments determined manually. To be able to apply correlation measurements to an experimental problem, neither (Vc) nor (Nc) must depend on the position of observation of filaments. We first confirmed that this was indeed the case. We then applied the method to investigate the dependence of motility on the ATPase activity of myosin heads. ATPase activity was varied by mixing intact heads with heads which were labeled with different thiol reagents. It was found that the motion was drastically influenced by the reagent used for modification. When the reagent was N-ethyl-maleimide, 1.5% modification was sufficient to completely inhibit the motion. When the reagent was 5-iodoacetamidofluorescein, motion declined hyperbolically with the fraction of modified heads. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 11 PMID:1534696

  12. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to measure the metabolism of high-density lipoprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deitrick, Russell; Gibson, Emily; Razzaghi, Hamid

    2009-10-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL), referred to as the ``good cholesterol'', carries free cholesterol to the liver to be filtered from the bloodstream and is important to our understanding of atherosclerosis. HDL is metabolized in part by the enzyme Endothelial Lipase (EL). With this project we will use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to study the metabolism of HDL by EL comparing wild type with different genetic mutations. FCS is an advanced microscopy technique in which we record fluctuations in the fluorescence of dye-labeled molecules (in this case, HDL labeled with Nile Red) as they freely diffuse through a small focal volume. This data can be analyzed mathematically using the cross-correlation function, from which we can ultimately ascertain much information. In our case, we are interested in the diffusion coefficient which, via the Stokes-Einstein relation for a sphere, we can determine the size of HDL as it undergoes the process of metabolism. Preliminary results seem to indicate that the metabolic process occurs very quickly, that the final size of HDL depends primarily on the concentration of EL, and that the wild and mutant variants of EL have a similar effectiveness. In following experiments, we hope to investigate these relationships further.

  13. The performance of 2D array detectors for light sheet based fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anand Pratap; Krieger, Jan Wolfgang; Buchholz, Jan; Charbon, Edoardo; Langowski, Jörg; Wohland, Thorsten

    2013-04-01

    Single plane illumination microscopy based fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (SPIM-FCS) is a new method for imaging FCS in 3D samples, providing diffusion coefficients, transport, flow velocities and concentrations in an imaging mode. SPIM-FCS records correlation functions over a whole plane in a sample, which requires array detectors for recording the fluorescence signal. Several types of image sensors are suitable for FCS. They differ in properties such as effective area per pixel, quantum efficiency, noise level and read-out speed. Here we compare the performance of several low light array detectors based on three different technologies: (1) Single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) arrays, (2) passive-pixel electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) and (3) active-pixel scientific-grade complementary metal oxide semiconductor cameras (sCMOS). We discuss the influence of the detector characteristics on the effective FCS observation volume, and demonstrate that light sheet based SPIM-FCS provides absolute diffusion coefficients. This is verified by parallel measurements with confocal FCS, single particle tracking (SPT), and the determination of concentration gradients in space and time. While EMCCD cameras have a temporal resolution in the millisecond range, sCMOS cameras and SPAD arrays can extend the time resolution of SPIM-FCS down to 10 μs or lower. PMID:23571955

  14. Photon and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and light scattering of eye-lens proteins at moderate concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Andries, C; Guedens, W; Clauwaert, J; Geerts, H

    1983-01-01

    The bovine eye-lens protein, alpha L-crystallin, has been studied with photon correlation spectroscopy to obtain the mutual diffusion coefficient, Dm, with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to determine the tracer diffusion coefficient, DT, and with light scattering to get the isothermal osmotic compressibility (delta pi/delta c) P,T. The concentration dependence of Dm, DT, and (delta pi/delta c) P,T up to a volume fraction phi of the protein of 2.5 x 10(-2) has been interpreted on the basis of four different interaction potentials: (a) an extended hard-sphere potential; (b) a shielded Coulomb potential; (c) a shielded Coulomb interaction where the effect of counterions is included; (d) a simple mixed potential. The three parameters Dm, DT, and (delta pi/delta c) P,T have also been combined in the generalized Stokes-Einstein equation, Dm = [(delta pi/delta c)P,T . (1--phi) . (DT)]/(kappa B . T). Our results indicate that, in the case that photon correlation spectroscopy gives the mutual diffusion coefficient Dm, the applicability of the Stokes-Einstein equation can be questioned; or that, when one assumes the Stokes-Einstein equation to be valid, there is significant discrepancy between the result of photon correlation spectroscopy and Dm. PMID:6626672

  15. The Effect of a Fluorophore Photo-Physics on the Lipid Vesicle Diffusion Coefficient Studied by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Drabik, Dominik; Przybyło, Magda; Sikorski, Aleksander; Langner, Marek

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) is a technique, which allows determination of the diffusion coefficient and concentration of fluorescent objects suspended in the solution. The measured parameter is the fluctuation of the fluorescence signal emitted by diffusing molecules. When 100 nm DOPC vesicles labeled with various fluorescent dyes (Fluorescein-PE, NBD-PE, Atto488 DOPE or βBodipy FL) were measured, different values of diffusion coefficients have been obtained. These diffusion coefficients were different from the expected values measured using the dynamic light scattering method (DLS). The FCS was initially developed for solutions containing small fluorescent molecules therefore the observed inconsistency may result from the nature of vesicle suspension itself. The duration of the fluorescence signal may depend on the following factors: the exposure time of the labeled object to the excitation beam, the photo-physical properties (e.g., stability) of a fluorophore, the theoretical model used for the calculations of the diffusion coefficient and optical properties of the vesicle suspension. The diffusion coefficients determined for differently labeled liposomes show that its dependence on vesicle size and quantity of fluorescent probed used for labeling was significant demonstrating that the fluorescence properties of the fluorophore itself (bleaching and/or blinking) were critical factors for a correct outcome of FCS experiment. The new, based on combined FCS and DLS measurements, method for the determination of the focal volume prove itself to be useful for the evaluation of a fluorescence dye with respect to its applicability for FCS experiment. PMID:26695945

  16. Photon Antibunching in Complex Intermolecular Fluorescence Quenching Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Arjun; Enderlein, Jörg; Kumbhakar, Manoj

    2016-08-18

    We present a novel fluorescence spectroscopic method, which combines fluorescence antibunching, time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC), and steady-state emission spectroscopy, to study chemical reactions at the single molecule level. We exemplify our method on investigating intermolecular fluorescence quenching of Rhodamine110 by aniline. We demonstrate that the combination of measurements of fluorescence antibunching, fluorescence lifetime, and fluorescence steady state intensity, captures the full picture of the complex quenching kinetics, which involves static and dynamics quenching, and which cannot be seen by steady-state or lifetime measurements alone. PMID:27468007

  17. Dynamic imaging by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy identifies diverse populations of polyglutamine oligomers formed in vivo.

    PubMed

    Beam, Monica; Silva, M Catarina; Morimoto, Richard I

    2012-07-27

    Protein misfolding and aggregation are exacerbated by aging and diseases of protein conformation including neurodegeneration, metabolic diseases, and cancer. In the cellular environment, aggregates can exist as discrete entities, or heterogeneous complexes of diverse solubility and conformational state. In this study, we have examined the in vivo dynamics of aggregation using imaging methods including fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), to monitor the diverse biophysical states of expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) proteins expressed in Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that monomers, oligomers and aggregates co-exist at different concentrations in young and aged animals expressing different polyQ-lengths. During aging, when aggregation and toxicity are exacerbated, FCS-based burst analysis and purified single molecule FCS detected a populational shift toward an increase in the frequency of brighter and larger oligomeric species. Regardless of age or polyQ-length, oligomers were maintained in a heterogeneous distribution that spans multiple orders of magnitude in brightness. We employed genetic suppressors that prevent polyQ aggregation and observed a reduction in visible immobile species with the persistence of heterogeneous oligomers, yet our analysis did not detect the appearance of any discrete oligomeric states associated with toxicity. These studies reveal that the reversible transition from monomers to immobile aggregates is not represented by discrete oligomeric states, but rather suggests that the process of aggregation involves a more complex pattern of molecular interactions of diverse intermediate species that can appear in vivo and contribute to aggregate formation and toxicity. PMID:22669943

  18. THE USE OF FLUORESCENCE CORRELATION SPECTROSCOPY TO PROBE CHROMATIN IN THE CELL NUCLEUS

    SciTech Connect

    Sorscher, Stanley M.; Bartholemew, James C.; Klein, Melvin P.

    1980-03-01

    All systems in thermodynamic equilibrium are subject to spontaneous fluctuations from equilibrium. For very small systems, the fluctuations can be made apparent, and can be used to study the behavior of the system without introducing any external perturbations. The mean squared amplitude of these fluctuations contains information about the absolute size of the system. The characteristic time of the fluctuation autocorrelation function contains kinetic information. In the experiments reported here, these concepts are applied to the binding equilibrium between ethidium bromide and DNA, a system where the fluorescence properties of the dye greatly enhance the effect of spontaneous fluctuations in the binding equilibrium. Preliminary experiments employ well characterized DNA preparations, including calf thymus DNA, SV40 DNA, and calf thymus nucleohistone particles. Additional measurements are described which have been made in small regions of individual nuclei, isolated from green monkey kidney cells, observing as few as 5000 dye molecules. The data indicate that the strength of dye binding increases in nuclei isolated from cells which have been stimulated to enter the cell growth cycle. The viscosity of nuclear material is inferred to be between one and two orders of magnitude greater than that of water, and decreases as the cells leave the resting state, and enter the cell growth cycle. Washing the nuclei also lowers the viscosity. These experiments demonstrate that fluorescence correlation spectroscopy can provide information at the subnuclear level that is otherwise unavailable.

  19. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy to Monitor Kai Protein-based Circadian Oscillations in Real Time*

    PubMed Central

    Goda, Kazuhito; Ito, Hiroshi; Kondo, Takao; Oyama, Tokitaka

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic protein-protein interactions play an essential role in cellular regulatory systems. The cyanobacterial circadian clock is an oscillatory system that can be reconstituted in vitro by mixing ATP and three clock proteins: KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC. Association and dissociation of KaiB from KaiC-containing complexes are critical to circadian phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of KaiC. We developed an automated and noninvasive method to monitor dynamic complex formation in real time using confocal fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and uniformly labeled KaiB as a probe. A nanomolar concentration of the labeled KaiB for FCS measurement did not interfere with the oscillatory system but behaved similarly to the wild-type one during the measurement period (>5 days). The fluorescent probe was stable against repeated laser exposure. As an application, we show that this detection system allowed analysis of the dynamics of both long term circadian oscillations and short term responses to temperature changes (∼10 min) in the same sample. This suggested that a phase shift of the clock with a high temperature pulse occurred just after the stimulus through dissociation of KaiB from the KaiC complex. This monitoring method should improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying this cellular circadian oscillator and provide a means to assess dynamic protein interactions in biological systems characterized by rates similar to those observed with the Kai proteins. PMID:22157012

  20. Heterogeneity in binary mixtures of dimethyl sulfoxide and glycerol: fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chattoraj, Shyamtanu; Chowdhury, Rajdeep; Ghosh, Shirsendu; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2013-06-01

    Diffusion of four coumarin dyes in a binary mixture of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and glycerol is studied using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The coumarin dyes are C151, C152, C480, and C481. In pure DMSO, all the four dyes exhibit a very narrow (almost uni-modal) distribution of diffusion coefficient (Dt). In contrast, in the binary mixtures all of them display a bimodal distribution of Dt with broadly two components. One of the components of D(t) corresponds to the bulk viscosity. The other one is similar to that in pure DMSO. This clearly indicates the presence of two distinctly different nano-domains inside the binary mixture. In the first, the micro-environment of the solute consists of both DMSO and glycerol approximately at the bulk composition. The other corresponds to a situation where the first layer of the solute consists of DMSO only. The burst integrated fluorescence lifetime (BIFL) analysis also indicates presence of two micro-environments one of which resembles DMSO. The relative contribution of the DMSO-like environment obtained from the BIFL analysis is much larger than that obtained from FCS measurements. It is proposed that BIFL corresponds to an instantaneous environment in a small region (a few nm) around the probe. FCS, on the contrary, describes the long time trajectory of the probes in a region of dimension ~200 nm. The results are explained in terms of the theory of binary mixtures and recent simulations of binary mixtures containing DMSO. PMID:23758388

  1. Heterogeneity in binary mixtures of dimethyl sulfoxide and glycerol: Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattoraj, Shyamtanu; Chowdhury, Rajdeep; Ghosh, Shirsendu; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2013-06-01

    Diffusion of four coumarin dyes in a binary mixture of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and glycerol is studied using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The coumarin dyes are C151, C152, C480, and C481. In pure DMSO, all the four dyes exhibit a very narrow (almost uni-modal) distribution of diffusion coefficient (Dt). In contrast, in the binary mixtures all of them display a bimodal distribution of Dt with broadly two components. One of the components of Dt corresponds to the bulk viscosity. The other one is similar to that in pure DMSO. This clearly indicates the presence of two distinctly different nano-domains inside the binary mixture. In the first, the micro-environment of the solute consists of both DMSO and glycerol approximately at the bulk composition. The other corresponds to a situation where the first layer of the solute consists of DMSO only. The burst integrated fluorescence lifetime (BIFL) analysis also indicates presence of two micro-environments one of which resembles DMSO. The relative contribution of the DMSO-like environment obtained from the BIFL analysis is much larger than that obtained from FCS measurements. It is proposed that BIFL corresponds to an instantaneous environment in a small region (a few nm) around the probe. FCS, on the contrary, describes the long time trajectory of the probes in a region of dimension ˜200 nm. The results are explained in terms of the theory of binary mixtures and recent simulations of binary mixtures containing DMSO.

  2. Dynamics of water-in-oil nanoemulsions revealed by fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Orte, Angel; Ruedas-Rama, Maria J; Paredes, Jose M; Crovetto, Luis; Alvarez-Pez, Jose M

    2011-11-01

    The size, diffusional properties, and dynamics of reverse water-in-oil nanoemulsions, or reverse micelles (RMs), have been widely investigated because of interest in this system as a model for biological compartmentalization. Here, we have employed fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy (FLCS) to reveal the dynamics and sizes of aerosol-OT (AOT)/isooctane RMs using a fluorescent xanthene derivative called Tokyo Green II (TG-II). The dye undergoes a partition and a shift in its tautomeric equilibrium such that the TG-II anion remains in the inner micellar aqueous core, and the neutral quinoid form lies in the interfacial region. By applying FLCS, we specifically obtained the lifetime filtered autocorrelation curves of the anionic TG-II, which shows a characteristic lifetime of approximately 4 ns. Analysis of the FLCS curves provides the diffusion coefficient and hydrodynamic radius of the RMs as well as micelle dynamics in the same experiment. The FLCS curves show dynamics in the microsecond time range, which represents an interconversion rate that changes the distribution of the TG-II neutral and anionic forms in the hydrophobic interface and the water core. PMID:21913723

  3. Guided fluorescence diagnosis of childhood caries: preliminary measures correlate with depth of carious decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoshchuk, Mari-Alina; Zhang, Liang; Dickinson, Brian A.; Ridge, Jeremy S.; Kim, Amy S.; Baltuck, Camille T.; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Berg, Joel H.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2014-02-01

    The current rise in childhood caries worldwide has increased the demand for portable technologies that can quickly and accurately detect and diagnose early stage carious lesions. These lesions, if identified at an early stage, can be reversed with remineralization treatments, education, and improvements in home care. A multi-modal optical prototype for detecting and diagnosing occlusal caries demineralization in vivo has been developed and pilot tested. The device uses a 405-nm laser as a scanned illumination source to obtain high resolution and high surface contrast reflectance images, which allows the user to quickly image and screen for any signs of demineralized enamel. When a suspicious region is located, the device can be switched to perform dual laser fluorescence spectroscopy using 405-nm and 532-nm laser excitations. These spectra are used to compute an auto-fluorescence (AF) ratio of the suspicious region and the percent difference of AF ratios from a healthy region of the same tooth. The device was tested on 7 children's teeth in vivo with clinically diagnosed carious lesions. Lesion depth was then visually estimated from the video image using the 405-nm scanned light source, and within a month the maximum drill depth was assessed by a clinician. The researcher and clinicians were masked from previous measurements in a blinded study protocol. Preliminary results show that the ratiometric percent difference measurement of the AF spectrum of the tooth correlates with the severity of the demineralization as assessed by the clinician after drilling.

  4. Fluorescence detection of single molecules using pulsed near-field optical excitation and time correlated photon counting

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, W.P.; Goodwin, P.M.; Martin, J.C.; Keller, R.A.

    1994-03-01

    Pulsed excitation, time correlated single photon counting and time gated detection are used in near-field optical microscopy to enhance fluorescence images and measure the fluorescence lifetimes of single molecules of Rhodamine 6G on silica surfaces. Time gated detection is used to reject prompt scattered background and to improve the image signal to noise ratio. The excited state lifetime of a single Rhodamine 6G molecule is found to depend on the position of the near-field probe. We attribute the lifetime variations to spontaneous emission rate alterations by the fluorescence reflected from and quenching by the aluminum coated probe.

  5. Global correlations between electromagnetic and spectroscopic properties of collective 21+ and 22+ states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Z. Z.; Lei, Y.; Pittel, S.

    2016-08-01

    By using the general triaxial rotor model (TRM) and the phonon-configuration mixing scheme within an anharmonic-vibrator (AHV) framework, a series of global correlations between electromagnetic properties of nuclear 21+ and 22+ states are analytically established. The correlations from both models can roughly describe the experimental data involving quadrupole collectivity with few exceptions. Furthermore, there seems to be a robust orthogonal transformation between the AHV and the TRM bases for realistic nuclear systems, suggesting that the two models may in fact be describing the collective features of nuclear low-lying states in similar model spaces.

  6. Study of mechanical properties of DNA in E. coli cells by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafle, Rudra; Liebeskind, Molly; Meiners, Jens-Christian

    Mechanical quantities like the elasticity of cells are conventionally measured by directly probing them mechanically. Measurements of these quantities for subcellular structures in living cells are almost impossible this way. We use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to measure such mechanical quantities in chromosomal DNA in E. coli cells. We present methods to address complexities of live-cell FCS such as photobleaching, and calculate the viscoelastic moduli from the FCS data. We compare the measured viscoelastic moduli of live cells with those that are ATP-depleted to stop all molecular motor action and find substantial differences. Active processes are stopped in ATP-depleted cells and hence the bacterial DNA appears to become stiffer and the surrounding intracellular medium more viscous. We also compare our results with the FCS data obtained from the lambda DNA solution in various concentrations to mimic the cellular environment.

  7. Correlation of hemodynamic and fluorescence signals under resting state conditions in mice's barrel field cortex.

    PubMed

    Bélanger, Samuel; de Souza, Bruno Oliveira Ferreira; Casanova, Christian; Lesage, Frédéric

    2016-03-11

    Both neurons and astrocytes are known to affect local vascular response in the brain following neuronal activity. In order to differentiate the contributions of each cell type to the hemodynamic response during stimulation and resting state, intrinsic optical signal (IOI) was recorded synchronized with fluorescence imaging of calcium concentration sensitive dye Oregon Green BAPTA-1 AM. By changing the stimulation parameters (frequency and duration), it was possible to individually promote neuronal and glial responses and to compare them to levels of oxy (HbO), deoxy (HbR) and total (HbT) hemoglobin concentrations. Finally, resting state recordings were done to investigate the possible correlation between hemoglobin fluctuation and calcium transients, based on different frequency bands associated either with neuronal or glial activity. PMID:26850574

  8. Enumerating virus-like particles in an optically concentrated suspension by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yi; Cheng, Xuanhong; Daniel Ou-Yang, H.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is one of the most sensitive methods for enumerating low concentration nanoparticles in a suspension. However, biological nanoparticles such as viruses often exist at a concentration much lower than the FCS detection limit. While optically generated trapping potentials are shown to effectively enhance the concentration of nanoparticles, feasibility of FCS for enumerating field-enriched nanoparticles requires understanding of the nanoparticle behavior in the external field. This paper reports an experimental study that combines optical trapping and FCS to examine existing theoretical predictions of particle concentration. Colloidal suspensions of polystyrene (PS) nanospheres and HIV-1 virus-like particles are used as model systems. Optical trapping energies and statistical analysis are used to discuss the applicability of FCS for enumerating nanoparticles in a potential well produced by a force field. PMID:24049685

  9. Photosystem II antenna phosphorylation-dependent protein diffusion determined by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Masakazu; Pack, Chan-Gi; Takenaka, Yoshiko; Sako, Yasushi; Nakano, Akihiko

    2013-01-01

    Flexibility of chloroplast thylakoid membrane proteins is essential for plant fitness and survival under fluctuating light environments. Phosphorylation of light-harvesting antenna complex II (LHCII) is known to induce dynamic protein reorganization that fine-tunes the rate of energy conversion in each photosystem. However, molecular details of how LHCII phosphorylation causes light energy redistribution throughout thylakoid membranes still remain unclear. By using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we here determined the LHCII phosphorylation-dependent protein diffusion in thylakoid membranes isolated from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. As compared to the LHCII dephosphorylation-induced condition, the diffusion coefficient of LHCII increased nearly twofold under the LHCII phosphorylation-induced condition. We also verified the results by using the LHCII phosphorylation-deficient mutant. Our observation suggests that LHCII phosphorylation-dependent protein reorganization occurs along with the changes in the rate of protein diffusion, which would have an important role in mediating light energy redistribution throughout thylakoid membranes. PMID:24088948

  10. Correlative super-resolution fluorescence and electron microscopy of the nuclear pore complex with molecular resolution.

    PubMed

    Löschberger, Anna; Franke, Christian; Krohne, Georg; van de Linde, Sebastian; Sauer, Markus

    2014-10-15

    Here, we combine super-resolution fluorescence localization microscopy with scanning electron microscopy to map the position of proteins of nuclear pore complexes in isolated Xenopus laevis oocyte nuclear envelopes with molecular resolution in both imaging modes. We use the periodic molecular structure of the nuclear pore complex to superimpose direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy images with a precision of <20 nm on electron micrographs. The correlative images demonstrate quantitative molecular labeling and localization of nuclear pore complex proteins by standard immunocytochemistry with primary and secondary antibodies and reveal that the nuclear pore complex is composed of eight gp210 (also known as NUP210) protein homodimers. In addition, we find subpopulations of nuclear pore complexes with ninefold symmetry, which are found occasionally among the more typical eightfold symmetrical structures. PMID:25146397

  11. Simultaneous Characterization of Lateral Lipid and Prothrombin Diffusion Coefficients by Z-Scan Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Štefl, Martin; Kułakowska, Anna; Hof, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Abstract A new (to our knowledge) robust approach for the determination of lateral diffusion coefficients of weakly bound proteins is applied for the phosphatidylserine specific membrane interaction of bovine prothrombin. It is shown that z-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in combination with pulsed interleaved dual excitation allows simultaneous monitoring of the lateral diffusion of labeled protein and phospholipids. Moreover, from the dependencies of the particle numbers on the axial sample positions at different protein concentrations phosphatidylserine-dependent equilibrium dissociation constants are derived confirming literature values. Increasing the amount of membrane-bound prothrombin retards the lateral protein and lipid diffusion, indicating coupling of both processes. The lateral diffusion coefficients of labeled lipids are considerably larger than the simultaneously determined lateral diffusion coefficients of prothrombin, which contradicts findings reported for the isolated N-terminus of prothrombin. PMID:19651025

  12. Cellular response to heat shock studied by multiconfocal fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kloster-Landsberg, Meike; Herbomel, Gaëtan; Wang, Irène; Derouard, Jacques; Vourc'h, Claire; Usson, Yves; Souchier, Catherine; Delon, Antoine

    2012-09-19

    Heat shock triggers a transient and ubiquitous response, the function of which is to protect cells against stress-induced damage. The heat-shock response is controlled by a key transcription factor known as heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). We have developed a multiconfocal fluorescence correlation spectroscopy setup to measure the dynamics of HSF1 during the course of the heat-shock response. The system combines a spatial light modulator, to address several points of interest, and an electron-multiplying charge-coupled camera for fast multiconfocal recording of the photon streams. Autocorrelation curves with a temporal resolution of 14 μs were analyzed before and after heat shock on eGFP and HSF1-eGFP-expressing cells. Evaluation of the dynamic parameters of a diffusion-and-binding model showed a slower HSF1 diffusion after heat shock. It is also observed that the dissociation rate decreases after heat shock, whereas the association rate is not affected. In addition, thanks to the multiconfocal fluorescence correlation spectroscopy system, up to five spots could be simultaneously located in each cell nucleus. This made it possible to quantify the intracellular variability of the diffusion constant of HSF1, which is higher than that of inert eGFP molecules and increases after heat shock. This finding is consistent with the fact that heat-shock response is associated with an increase of HSF1 interactions with DNA and cannot be explained even partially by heat-induced modifications of nuclear organization. PMID:22995483

  13. Correlative VIS-fluorescence and soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Christoph; Guttmann, Peter; Klupp, Barbara; Werner, Stephan; Rehbein, Stefan; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Schneider, Gerd; Grünewald, Kay

    2012-02-01

    Soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of vitreous samples is becoming a valuable tool in structural cell biology. Within the 'water-window' wavelength region (2.34-4.37nm), it provides absorption contrast images with high signal to noise ratio and resolution of a few tens of nanometer. Soft X-rays with wavelengths close to the K-absorption edge of oxygen penetrate biological samples with thicknesses in the micrometer range. Here, we report on the application of a recently established extension of the transmission soft X-ray cryo-microscope (HZB TXM) at the beamline U41-XM of the BESSY II electron storage ring by an in-column epi-fluorescence and reflected light cryo-microscope. We demonstrate the new capability for correlative fluorescence and soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of this instrument along a typical life science experimental approach - the correlation of a fluorophore-tagged protein (pUL34-GFP of pseudorabies virus, PrV, the nuclear membrane-anchored component of the nuclear egress complex of the Herpesviridae which interacts with viral pUL31) in PrV pUL34-GFP/pUL31 coexpressing mammalian cells, with virus-induced vesicular structures in the nucleus, expanding the nucleoplasmic reticulum. Taken together, our results demonstrate new possibilities to study the role of specific proteins in substructures of adherent cells, especially of the nucleus in toto, accessible to electron microscopy in thinned samples only. PMID:22210307

  14. Ultrasensitive detection of genetically modified plants by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junfeng; Xing, Da; Chen, Tongsheng; Liu, Jinfeng

    2006-09-01

    In this study, a novel method for the direct detection of GMP without amplified by the general method of PCR is firstly presented and proved by experiments. In our method, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, cleaving nucleic acid by restriction endonuclease and two nucleic acid probe hybridization techniques are combined to distinguish the caulifiower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and determine whether samples contain genetically modified components. The detection principle is as follows: firstly two restriction endonucleases FOKI and BsrDlare used to cleave the genomic DNA and the 169bp fragments of CaMV 35S promoter are retrieved; secondly, two nucleic acid probes labeled by Rhodamine Green and y5 dyes respectively hybridize with cleaved 169bp fragments of CaMV 35S promoter; thirdly, the hybridization products simultaneously with two dye-labeled probes are detected by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy and GMP is distinguished. As the detection and analysis by FCS can be performed at the level of single molecule, there is no need for any type of amplification. Genetically modified tobaccos are measured by this method. The results indicate this method can detect CaMV 35S promoter of GMP exactly and the sensitivity can be down to 3.47X10 -10M. Because no any type of amplification is involved, this method can avoid the non-specffic amplification and false-positive problems of PCR, Due to its high-sensitivity, simplicity, reliability and little need for sample amounts, this method promises to be a highly effective detection method for GMP.

  15. Correlative VIS-fluorescence and soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of adherent cells

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Christoph; Guttmann, Peter; Klupp, Barbara; Werner, Stephan; Rehbein, Stefan; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.; Schneider, Gerd; Grünewald, Kay

    2012-01-01

    Soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of vitreous samples is becoming a valuable tool in structural cell biology. Within the ‘water-window’ wavelength region (2.34–4.37 nm), it provides absorption contrast images with high signal to noise ratio and resolution of a few tens of nanometer. Soft X-rays with wavelengths close to the K-absorption edge of oxygen penetrate biological samples with thicknesses in the micrometer range. Here, we report on the application of a recently established extension of the transmission soft X-ray cryo-microscope (HZB TXM) at the beamline U41-XM of the BESSY II electron storage ring by an in-column epi-fluorescence and reflected light cryo-microscope. We demonstrate the new capability for correlative fluorescence and soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of this instrument along a typical life science experimental approach – the correlation of a fluorophore-tagged protein (pUL34-GFP of pseudorabies virus, PrV, the nuclear membrane-anchored component of the nuclear egress complex of the Herpesviridae which interacts with viral pUL31) in PrV pUL34-GFP/pUL31 coexpressing mammalian cells, with virus-induced vesicular structures in the nucleus, expanding the nucleoplasmic reticulum. Taken together, our results demonstrate new possibilities to study the role of specific proteins in substructures of adherent cells, especially of the nucleus in toto, accessible to electron microscopy in thinned samples only. PMID:22210307

  16. Diffusion Tensor Analysis by Two-Dimensional Pair Correlation of Fluorescence Fluctuations in Cells.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo, Carmine; Cardarelli, Francesco; Di Luca, Mariagrazia; Beltram, Fabio; Gratton, Enrico

    2016-08-23

    In a living cell, the movement of biomolecules is highly regulated by the cellular organization into subcompartments that impose barriers to diffusion, can locally break the spatial isotropy, and ultimately guide these molecules to their targets. Despite the pivotal role of these processes, experimental tools to fully probe the complex connectivity (and accessibility) of the cell interior with adequate spatiotemporal resolution are still lacking. Here, we show how the heterogeneity of molecular dynamics and the location of barriers to molecular motion can be mapped in live cells by exploiting a two-dimensional (2D) extension of the pair correlation function (pCF) analysis. Starting from a time series of images collected for the same field of view, the resulting 2D pCF is calculated in the proximity of each point for each time delay and allows us to probe the spatial distribution of the molecules that started from a given pixel. This 2D pCF yields an accurate description of the preferential diffusive routes. Furthermore, we combine this analysis with the image-derived mean-square displacement approach and gain information on the average nanoscopic molecular displacements in different directions. Through these quantities, we build a fluorescence-fluctuation-based diffusion tensor that contains information on speed and directionality of the local dynamical processes. Contrary to classical fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and related methods, this combined approach can distinguish between isotropic and anisotropic local diffusion. We argue that the measurement of this iMSD tensor will contribute to advance our understanding of the role played by the intracellular environment in the regulation of molecular diffusion at the nanoscale. PMID:27558727

  17. Correlative imaging of live biological cells with a soft x-ray microscope and a fluorescence microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kado, M.; Kishimoto, M.; Tamotsu, S.; Yasuda, K.; Aoyama, M.; Tone, S.; Shinohara, K.

    2016-01-01

    A laser-plasma soft X-ray microscope which is a combination of a highly intense laser-plasma soft X-ray source and a contact microscopy has been developed. We have proposed a correlative imaging method with the laser-plasma soft X-ray microscope and a fluorescence microscope to observe the same biological cells with the both microscopes at the same time. Live hydrated biological cells and cellular organelles have been observed with the correlative imaging method. Using the information of the cellular organelles obtained with the fluorescence microscope, inner structures obtained with the soft X-ray microscope are identified. Since the spatial resolution of the soft X-ray microscope is much higher than that of the fluorescence microscope, fine structures of the cellular organelles of the live biological cells have been visualized with the correlative imaging.

  18. Spectroscopic Analysis of Red Fluorescent Proteins and Development of a Microfluidic Cell Sorter for the Generation of Improved Variants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubbeck, Jennifer L.

    The discovery of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) launched the development of a wide variety of fluorescent protein (FP) mutants whose spectral and photophysical diversity revolutionized in vivo imaging. The excitation and emission spectra of red fluorescent proteins (RFPs), in particular, have been ideally tuned to a window optically favorable for in vivo work. However, their quantum yields, photostabilities and fluorescence intermittency properties require improvement if they are to be broadly employed for low-copy or single-molecule measurements. Attempts to engineer improved RFPs often result in optimization of one photophysical property at the expense of others. We developed a microfluidic-based cytometer for screening HeLa cell-based genetic RFP-libraries simultaneously on the basis of fluorescence lifetime (a proxy for quantum yield), photostability, and brightness. Ten 532 nm excitation beams interrogate each cell in flow. The first is electro-optically modulated (30 MHz) to enable lifetime measurement with phase fluorimetry. The remaining beams act as a pulse sequence for isolating the irreversible photobleaching time constant. Optical-force switching is employed to sort cells based on any combination of the photophysical parameters. Screening with this instrument enables identification of regions of the structure that synergistically affect quantum yield and photostability and the sorting capability provides a new tool for accelerating the development of next generation RFPs.

  19. Single-Particle Spectroscopic Study on Fluorescence Enhancement by Plasmon Coupled Gold Nanorod Dimers Assembled on DNA Origami.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Taishi; Gao, Nengyue; Li, Shuang; Lang, Matthew J; Xu, Qing-Hua

    2015-06-01

    Metal-enhanced fluorescence has attracted much attention due to its scientific importance and lots of potential applications. Plasmon coupled metal nanoparticles have been demonstrated to further improve the enhancement effects. Conventional studies of metal-enhanced fluorescence on the bulk systems are complicated by the ensemble average effects over many critical factors with large variations. Here, fluorescence enhancement of ATTO-655 by a plasmon coupled gold nanorod dimer fixed on a DNA origami nanobreadboard was studied on the single-particle level. A series of gold nanorod dimers with linear orientation and different gap distances ranging from 6.1 to 26.0 nm were investigated to explore the plasmon coupling effect on fluorescence enhancement. The results show that the dimer with the smallest gap (6.1 nm) gives the highest enhancement (470-fold), and the enhancement gradually decreases as the gap distance increases and eventually approaches that from a monomer (120-fold). This trend is consistent with the numerical calculation results. This study indicates that plasmon coupling in gold nanorod dimers offers further increased excitation efficiency to achieve large fluorescence enhancement. PMID:26266500

  20. Position-dependent correlation function from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 10 CMASS sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chi-Ting; Wagner, Christian; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Schmidt, Fabian; Komatsu, Eiichiro

    2015-09-01

    We report on the first measurement of the three-point function with the position-dependent correlation function from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Data Release 10 CMASS sample. This new observable measures the correlation between two-point functions of galaxy pairs within different subvolumes, hat xi(ř,řL), where řL is the location of a subvolume, and the corresponding mean overdensities, bar delta(řL). This correlation, which we call the "integrated three-point function", iζ(r)≡langlehat xi(ř,řL)bar delta(řL)rangle, measures a three-point function of two short- and one long-wavelength modes, and is generated by nonlinear gravitational evolution and possibly also by the physics of inflation. The iζ(r) measured from the BOSS data lies within the scatter of those from the mock galaxy catalogs in redshift space, yielding a ten-percent-level determination of the amplitude of iζ(r). The tree-level perturbation theory in redshift space predicts how this amplitude depends on the linear and quadratic nonlinear galaxy bias parameters (b1 and b2), as well as on the amplitude and linear growth rate of matter fluctuations (σ8 and f). Combining iζ(r) with the constraints on b1σ8 and fσ8 from the global two-point correlation function and that on σ8 from the weak lensing signal of BOSS galaxies, we measure b2=0.41±0.41 (68% C.L.) assuming standard perturbation theory at the tree level and the local bias model.

  1. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopic studies of segmental mobility in aequorin and a green fluorescent protein from Aequorea forskalea

    SciTech Connect

    Nageswara Rao, B.D.; Kemple, M.D.; Prendergast, F.G.

    1980-10-01

    Aequorin is a protein of low molecular weight (20,000) isolated from the jellyfish Aequorea forskalea which emits blue light upon the binding of Ca/sup 2 +/ ions. This bioluminescence requires neither exogenous oxygen nor any other cofactors. The light emission occurs from an excited state of a chromophore (an imidazolopyrazinone) which is tightly and noncovalently bound to the protein. Apparently the binding of Ca/sup 2 +/ by the protein induces changes in the protein conformation which allow oxygen, already bound or otherwise held by the protein, to react with and therein oxidize the chromophore. The resulting discharged protein remains intact, with the Ca/sup 2 +/ and the chromophore still bound, but is incapable of further luminescence. The fluorescence spectrum of this discharged protein and the bioluminescence spectrum of the original charged aequorin are identical. A green fluorescent protein (GFP) of approx. 30,000 mol wt isolated from the same organism, functions in vivo as an acceptor of energy from aequorin and subsequently emits green light. We are applying proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy to examine structural details of, and fluctuations associated with the luminescent reaction of aequorin and the in vivo energy transfer from aequorin to the GFP.

  2. A CRITICAL STUDY ON THE INTERACTIONS OF HESPERITIN WITH HUMAN HEMOGLOBIN: FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPIC AND MOLECULAR MODELING APPROACH

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sandipan; Chaudhuri, Sudip; Pahari, Biswapathik; Taylor, Jasmine; Sengupta, Pradeep K.; Sengupta, Bidisha

    2012-01-01

    Hesperitin, a ubiquitous bioactive flavonoid abundant in citrus fruits is known to possess antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic, hypolipidemic, vasoprotective and other important therapeutic properties. Here we have explored the interactions of hesperitin with normal human hemoglobin (HbA), using steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, far UV circular dicroism (CD) spectroscopy, combined with molecular modeling computations. Specific interaction of the flavonoid with HbA is confirmed from flavonoid-induced static quenching which is evident from steady state fluorescence as well as lifetime data. Both temperature dependent fluorescence measurements and molecular docking studies reveal that apart from hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions, electrostatic interactions also play crucial role in hesperitin-HbA interactions. Furthermore, electrostatic surface potential calculations indicate that the hesperitin binding site in HbA is intensely positive due to the presence of several lysine and histidine residues. PMID:22543928

  3. Spectroscopic orbits of two short-period early-type binaries using two-dimensional cross-correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, J. F.; Lapasset, E.

    2003-06-01

    We apply the two-dimensional cross-correlation technique TODCOR to derive spectroscopic orbits for the two B-type double-lined spectroscopic binaries HD 66066A and HD 315031, previously mentioned as blue straggler candidates of the open clusters NGC 2516 and NGC 6530, respectively. Reliable radial velocities for both components are measured even for orbital phases for which the separation between the spectral lines are about 0.5 times the quadratic sum of the full-width at half-maximum of the lines. Both binaries have circular orbits and the orbital periods are 1.67 and 1.38 days for HD 66066A and HD 315031, respectively. We calculate minimum masses with errors of 3-5% and obtain the projected radii from the line widths. We derive absolute stellar parameters which are consistent with the age and distance of the clusters. Both binary systems are formed by main-sequence stars and it is expected that they will experience mass-transfer between their components before the end of the core H-burning stage. HD 315031 is likely a triple system as suggested by the variation of the center-of-mass velocity. The observations presented here were obtained at the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO), which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina (CONICET) and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan.

  4. Ultraviolet emission and excitation fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of DMBA-treated Swiss Albino mice skin carcinogenesis for measuring tissue transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aruna, Prakasa R.; Hemamalini, Srinivasan; Ebenezar, Jeyasingh; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2002-05-01

    The ultraviolet fluorescence emission spectra of skin tissues under different pathological conditions were measured at 280nm excitation. At this excitation wavelength, the normal skin showed a primary peak emission at 352nm and this primary peak emission from neoplastic skin shows a blue shift with respect to normal tissue. This blue shift increases as the stage of abnormality increases and it is maximum (19nm) for well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. This alteration is further confirmed from fluorescence excitation spectra of the tissues for 340nm emission. The study concludes that the change in the emission of tryptophan around 340nm may be due to partial unfolding of protein.

  5. Lightweight Raman spectroscope using time-correlated photon-counting detection

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Zhaokai; Petrov, Georgi I.; Cheng, Shuna; Jo, Javier A.; Lehmann, Kevin K.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is an important tool in understanding chemical components of various materials. However, the excessive weight and energy consumption of a conventional CCD-based Raman spectrometer forbids its applications under extreme conditions, including unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAVs) and Mars/Moon rovers. In this article, we present a highly sensitive, shot-noise–limited, and ruggedized Raman signal acquisition using a time-correlated photon-counting system. Compared with conventional Raman spectrometers, over 95% weight, 65% energy consumption, and 70% cost could be removed through this design. This technique allows space- and UAV-based Raman spectrometers to robustly perform hyperspectral Raman acquisitions without excessive energy consumption. PMID:26392538

  6. Lightweight Raman spectroscope using time-correlated photon-counting detection.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhaokai; Petrov, Georgi I; Cheng, Shuna; Jo, Javier A; Lehmann, Kevin K; Yakovlev, Vladislav V; Scully, Marlan O

    2015-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy is an important tool in understanding chemical components of various materials. However, the excessive weight and energy consumption of a conventional CCD-based Raman spectrometer forbids its applications under extreme conditions, including unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAVs) and Mars/Moon rovers. In this article, we present a highly sensitive, shot-noise-limited, and ruggedized Raman signal acquisition using a time-correlated photon-counting system. Compared with conventional Raman spectrometers, over 95% weight, 65% energy consumption, and 70% cost could be removed through this design. This technique allows space- and UAV-based Raman spectrometers to robustly perform hyperspectral Raman acquisitions without excessive energy consumption. PMID:26392538

  7. Fluorescence Spectroscopic Investigation of Tillage, Cropping Management, and Nitrogen Application Effects on Stable and Water-Extractable Organic Matter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic matter (OM) controls many important soil ecosystem processes. Stable (humic and fulvic) and water-extractable OM was obtained from soils in a nine-year tillage, cropping management, and nitrogen application study and characterized for its composition using multi-dimensional fluorescence spec...

  8. Correlation of photobleaching, oxidation and metal induced fluorescence quenching of DNA-templated silver nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Kiyoshi; Maclean, James L.; Liu, Biwu; Jiang, Hui; Liu, Juewen

    2013-03-01

    Few-atom noble metal nanoclusters have attracted a lot of interest due to their potential applications in biosensor development, imaging and catalysis. DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) are of particular interest as different emission colors can be obtained by changing the DNA sequence. A popular analytical application is fluorescence quenching by Hg2+, where d10-d10 metallophilic interaction has often been proposed for associating Hg2+ with nanoclusters. However, it cannot explain the lack of response to other d10 ions such as Zn2+ and Cd2+. In our effort to elucidate the quenching mechanism, we studied a total of eight AgNCs prepared by different hairpin DNA sequences; they showed different sensitivity to Hg2+, and DNA with a larger cytosine loop size produced more sensitive AgNCs. In all the cases, samples strongly quenched by Hg2+ were also more easily photobleached. Light of shorter wavelengths bleached AgNCs more potently, and photobleached samples can be recovered by NaBH4. Strong fluorescence quenching was also observed with high redox potential metal ions such as Ag+, Au3+, Cu2+ and Hg2+, but not with low redox potential ions. Such metal induced quenching cannot be recovered by NaBH4. Electronic absorption and mass spectrometry studies offered further insights into the oxidation reaction. Our results correlate many important experimental observations and will fuel the further growth of this field.Few-atom noble metal nanoclusters have attracted a lot of interest due to their potential applications in biosensor development, imaging and catalysis. DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) are of particular interest as different emission colors can be obtained by changing the DNA sequence. A popular analytical application is fluorescence quenching by Hg2+, where d10-d10 metallophilic interaction has often been proposed for associating Hg2+ with nanoclusters. However, it cannot explain the lack of response to other d10 ions such as Zn2+ and Cd2+. In

  9. Studies of cytochrome c-551 unfolding using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and other biophysical techniques.

    PubMed

    Sil, Pallabi; Paul, Simanta Sarani; Silvio, Eva Di; Travaglini-Allocatelli, Carlo; Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda

    2016-09-21

    In this paper, we have studied the equilibrium unfolding transitions of cytochrome c from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (cytc551), a small bacterial protein. Similar to eukaryotic cytochrome c, cytc551 folds sequentially, although significant differences exist in the order of folding units (foldons). There are two regions of cytc551 (N-terminal helix with residue number 3 to 10 and the loop 2 region containing residues 34 to 45), in which no foldon unit could be assigned. In addition, the helix containing the Cys-X-X-Cys-His motif, adjacent to the N-terminal helix (residue number 3 to 10), shows unexplained ultra-fast collapse. To obtain further insights, we have studied cytc551 site-directed mutants using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and molecular dynamics simulation. We have found out that cytc551 unfolds through the formation of a fluorescently dark intermediate state and the amplitude of the dark component depends on the position of labeling. We have utilized this position dependence to propose a shape change model during the unfolding of cytc551. The present results show that the N-terminal helix remains in a collapsed position even in the completely unfolded state and this helix may act as a rigid support to guide the folding of its adjacent helix. This rigid support may be responsible for the ultra-fast collapse of the adjacent helix region, which occurs during the initial events of folding. The present results also show that the C-terminal end of loop 2 traverses a large distance during unfolding compared to the N-terminal end, which justifies the observed flexibility of the loop 2 region. PMID:27538920

  10. Imaging fluorescence correlation spectroscopy studies of dye diffusion in self-assembled organic nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Nagasaka, Shinobu; Kameta, Naohiro; Masuda, Mitsutoshi; Ito, Takashi; Higgins, Daniel A

    2016-06-22

    The rate and mechanism of diffusion by anionic sulforhodamine B (SRB) dye molecules within organic nanotubes self-assembled from bolaamphiphile surfactants were investigated by imaging fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (imaging-FCS). The inner and outer surfaces of the nanotubes are terminated with amine and glucose groups, respectively; the former allow for pH-dependent manipulation of nanotube surface charge while the latter enhance their biocompatibility. Wide-field fluorescence video microscopy was used to locate and image dye-doped nanotubes dispersed on a glass surface. Imaging-FCS was then used to spatially resolve the SRB transport dynamics. Mobilization of the dye molecules was achieved by immersion of the nanotubes in buffer solution. Experiments were performed in pH 6.4, 7.4 and 8.4 buffers, at ionic strengths ranging from 1.73 mM to 520 mM. The results show that coulombic interactions between cationic ammonium ions on the inner nanotube surface and the anionic SRB molecules play a critical role in governing mass transport of the dye. The apparent dye diffusion coefficient, D, was found to generally increase with increasing ionic strength and with increasing pH. The D values obtained were found to be invariant along the nanotube length. Mass transport of the SRB molecules within the nanotubes is concluded to occur by a desorption-mediated Fickian diffusion mechanism in which dye motion is slowed by its coulombic interactions with the inner surfaces of the nanotubes. The results of these studies afford information essential to the use of organic nanotubes in controlled drug release applications. PMID:27271313

  11. Molecular dynamics of tryptophan in ribonuclease-T1. II. Correlations with fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Axelsen, P H; Prendergast, F G

    1989-07-01

    The interactions of tryptophan-59 (TRP-59) and its protein environment in ribonuclease-T1 (RNAse-T1) were examined in a 50-ps molecular dynamics simulation. The simulation used was previously shown to demonstrate a fluorescence anisotropy decay that closely agreed with the experimentally determined limiting anisotropy for RNAse-T1 (Axelsen, P. H., C. Haydock, and F. G. Prendergast. 1988. Biophys. J. 54:249-258). Further characterization of TRP-59 side chain dynamics and its protein environment has now been completed and correlated to other photophysical properties of this protein. Angular fluctuations of the side chain occur at rates of 1-10 cycles/ps and are limited to +/- 0.3 radians in all directions. Side chain motions are primarily limited by nonpolar collisions, although most side chain atoms have some collisional contact with polar atoms in the adjacent protein matrix or water. The steric relationship between PRO-39 and TRP-59 changes abruptly at 16 ps into the simulation. Two types of interaction with water are observed. First, a structural water appears to H-bond with the greater than N-H group of TRP-59. Second, water frequently contacts the six-atom ring. The electrostatic field experienced by the TRP-59 rings appears to be relatively constant and featureless regardless of ring orientation. We make the following interferences from our data: The fluorescent emission of TRP-59 may be red-shifted relative to TRP in nonpolar solvents either as a result of specific interactions with the structural water or relaxations of proximal bulk water and polar protein moieties. The quenching efficiency of polar interactions with TRP-59 must be extremely low given their frequency and the high quantum yield of RNAse-T1. This low efficiency may be due to restricted and unfavorable interaction geometries. PRO-39 is located near two titratable HIS residues in RNAse-T1 and may be involved in pH-dependent fluorescence phenomena by virtue of a metastable interaction with TRP

  12. Dynamics of ANS binding to tuna apomyoglobin measured with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bismuto, E; Gratton, E; Lamb, D C

    2001-12-01

    The dynamics of the binding reaction of ANS to native and partly folded (molten globule) tuna and horse apomyoglobins has been investigated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and frequency domain fluorometry. The reaction rate has been measured as a function of apomyoglobin and ANS concentrations, pH, and temperature. Examination of the autocorrelation functions shows that the reaction rate is fast enough to be observed in tuna apomyoglobin, whereas the reaction rate in horse apomyoglobin is on the same time scale as diffusion through the volume or longer. Specifically, for tuna apomyoglobin at pH 7 and room temperature the on rate is 2200 microM(-1) s(-1) and the off rate is 5900 s(-1), in comparison with k(on) = 640 microM(-1) s(-1) and k(off) = 560 s(-1) for horse myoglobin as measured previously. The independence of the reaction rate from the ANS concentration indicates that the reaction rate is dominated by the off rate. The temperature dependence of the on-rate shows that this rate is diffusion limited. The temperature dependence of the off rates analyzed by Arrhenius and Ferry models indicates that the off rate depends on the dynamics of the protein. The differences between horse and tuna apomyoglobins in the ANS binding rate can be explained in terms of the three-dimensional apoprotein structures obtained by energy minimization after heme removal starting from crystallographic coordinates. The comparison of the calculated apomyoglobin surfaces shows a 15% smaller cavity for tuna apomyoglobin. Furthermore, a negative charge (D44) is present in the heme cavity of tuna apomyoglobin that could decrease the strength of ANS binding. At pH 5 the fluorescence lifetime distribution of ANS-apomyoglobin is bimodal, suggesting the presence of an additional binding site in the protein. The binding rates determined by FCS under these conditions show that the protein is either in the open configuration or is more flexible, making it much easier to bind. At pH 3, the

  13. UV-Vis, fluorescence and NMR spectroscopic investigations on inclusion properties of a designed tetrahomocalix[8]arene with fullerenes C 60 and C 70 in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, Amal; Bhatt, Suchitra; Nayak, Sandip K.; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Bhattacharya, Sumanta

    2011-12-01

    The present article reports the spectroscopic investigations on non-covalent interaction of fullerenes C 60 and C 70 with a macrocyclic receptor molecule, namely, 1,3,5,7-tetrahomo- p- tert-butylcalix[8]arene ( 1) in toluene. Jobs method of continuous variation reveals 1:1 stoichiometry for the fullerene complexes of 1. The most fascinating feature of the present study is that 1 binds selectively C 60 compared to C 70 as obtained from binding constant ( K) data of C 60- 1 ( KC60- 1) and C 70- 1 ( KC70- 1) complexes which are enumerated to be 265,000 dm 3 mol -1 and 63,430 dm 3 mol -1, respectively, and selectivity in binding ( KC60- 1/K C70- 1) is estimated to be 4.18 as obtained from UV-Vis study. Steady state fluorescence studies reveal quenching of fluorescence of 1 in presence of fullerenes and the K value of the C 60- 1 and C 70- 1 complexes are estimated to be 80,760 and 68,780 dm 3 mol -1, respectively, with selectivity in binding (K C60- 1/K C70- 1) ˜1.18. 1H NMR analysis provides very good support in favor of strong binding between C 60 and 1. The high value of K value for C 60- 1 complex indicates that 1 forms an inclusion complex with C 60.

  14. Ultra-narrow spectroscopic cells in atomic spectroscopy: reflection, transmission, fluorescence, and nonadiabatic transitions at the walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazgalev, A.; Sarkisyan, D.; Cartaleva, S.; Przhibelskii, S.; Vartanyan, T.

    2014-11-01

    Ultra-narrow cells with the thicknesses in the range from several wavelengths to the small fractions of the wavelength brought a number of new opportunities for atomic spectroscopy. Depending on the cell thickness, spectral lines recorded in ultra-narrow cells are either Doppler-free or Doppler-broadened. With careful selection of the cell thickness hyperfine structure may be easily resolved without resorting on the multibeam nonlinear optical techniques. Moreover, frequent collisions with the walls leads to the important modifications of velocity selective optical pumping resonances. Finally, ultra-narrow cells provide with the unique opportunity to study collisions of the excited atoms with the solid surfaces. In this contribution several examples of the use of the ultra-narrow spectroscopic cells filled with the alkali atomic vapour is presented. First, we discuss general aspects of the transient polarisation that defines all peculiarities of an ultra-narrow cell as a spectroscopic tool. Second, we demonstrate the resolution of the magnetic sublevels in the transition from Zeeman to Paschen-Back regime in the Cs hyperfine structure. Third, new aspects of velocity selective optical pumping resonances in reflection and transmission of resonant radiation by the 6 wavelengths thick cell filled with Cs are discussed. Forth, the experimental evidences of the nonadiabatic transitions between excited states of Rb atoms in the course of collisions with the sapphire surface are presented.

  15. Adhesion of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to Goethite: A Two-Dimensional Correlation Spectroscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wei; Wang, Hongbo; Jing, Chuanyong

    2016-04-19

    Bacterial adhesion to mineral surfaces is an important but underappreciated process. To decipher the molecular level process and mechanism, the adhesion of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells to goethite was investigated using flow-cell attenuated total reflectance (ATR) Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy coupled with two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) analysis. The FTIR results indicate that bacterial phosphate-moieties play an important role in the formation of mono- and bidentate inner-sphere complexes, whereas carboxylic groups on cell surface only have a minor contribution to its adhesion. The 2D-COS analysis in short-term (0-120 min) and long-term (2-18 h) stages reveal that the adhesion process was in the following sequence: change in H-bonds of proteins on cell surfaces > formation of monodentate inner-sphere surface complexes > formation of outer-sphere surface complexes > transformation of protein secondary structure on cell surfaces > formation of additional bridging bidentate surface complexes. In addition, the adhesion of MR-1 cells on goethite was pH dependent due to pH impacts on the cell structure and the interface charge. The in situ ATR-FTIR integrated with 2D-COS analysis highlights its great potential in exploring complex surface reactions with microbes involved. These results improve our understanding of microbe-mineral interactions at the molecular level and have significant implications for a series of biogeochemical processes. PMID:27029565

  16. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction between anthragallol and DNA using of ethidium bromide as a fluorescence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yan; Li, Junsheng; Huang, Guoxia; Yan, Liujuan; Dong, Zhen

    2015-04-01

    The interaction of DNA with anthragallol (Ant) was investigated using ethidium bromide (EB) as a fluorescence probe, and the binding mechanism of Ant with DNA was researched via viscosity measurements. The results indicate that there is a complex of Ant and DNA, as confirmed by Ultraviolet visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-vis), Fluorescent and Resonance Light Scattering spectrum (RLS) and viscosity measurements. Ant molecules could intercalate with the base pairs of DNA as evidenced by the hyperchromic effect of absorption spectra, the relative viscosity of DNA and significant increases in the melting temperature. The binding constants of Ant and DNA were obtained by the fluorescence quenching technique. Furthermore, the binding mechanisms of the reaction of Ant with DNA were also investigated. The RLS assay successfully evaluated the saturated value and measured the potential toxicity of Ant. Adriamycin, chrysophanol, rhein, and alizarin can be used as references to build a method based on the mechanism of interactions with DNA and the DNA-saturation binding value to rapidly evaluate the potential toxicity of Ant.

  17. Time-resolved spectroscopic study of photofragment fluorescence in methane/air mixtures and its diagnostic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Malin; Borggren, Jesper; Aldén, Marcus; Bood, Joakim

    2015-09-01

    In this work 80-picosecond laser pulses of 266-nm wavelength with intensities up to (2.0 ± 0.5) × 1011 W/cm2 were used for fragmentation of methane/air gas mixtures at ambient pressure and temperature. Emission spectra are, for the first time, studied with ultrahigh temporal resolution using a streak camera. Fluorescence spectra from CH(A2Δ-X2Π, B2Σ--X2Π, C2Σ+-X2Π), CN(B2Σ+-X2Σ+, Δ v = 0 and Δ v = ±1), NH(A3Π--X3Σ-), OH(A2Σ+-X2Π) and N2 +(B2Σu + X2Σg + were recorded and analyzed. By fitting simulated spectra to high-resolution experimental spectra, rotational and vibrational temperatures are estimated, showing that CH(C), CN(B), NH(A), and OH(A) are formed in highly excited vibrational and rotational states. The fluorescence signal dependencies on laser intensity and CH4/air equivalence ratio were investigated as well as the fluorescence lifetimes. All fragments observed are formed within 200 ps after the arrival of the laser pulse and their fluorescence lifetimes are shorter than 1 ns, except for CN(B-X) Δ v = 0 whose lifetime is 2.0 ns. The CN(B-X) Δ v = 0 fluorescence was studied temporally under high spectral resolution, and it was found that the vibrational levels are not populated simultaneously, but with a rate that decreases with increasing vibrational quantum number. This observation indicates that the rate of the chemical reaction that forms the CN(B) fragments is decreasing with increasing vibrational state of the product. The results provide vital information for the application of laser diagnostic techniques based on strong UV excitation, as they show that such methods might not be entirely non-intrusive and suffering from spectral interferences, unless the laser intensity is kept sufficiently low. Finally, equivalence ratios were determined from "unknown" spectra using multivariate analysis, showing a good agreement with theoretical compositions with an error of 4 %. The method is expected to be a useful diagnostic tool for

  18. Interplay of electron correlations and localization in disordered β-tantalum films: Evidence from dc transport and spectroscopic ellipsometry study

    SciTech Connect

    Kovaleva, N. N.; Chvostova, D.; Dejneka, A.; Bagdinov, A. V.; Petrova, M. G.; Demikhov, E. I.; Pudonin, F. A.

    2015-02-02

    We report the dc transport (5 K ≲ T ≲ 380 K) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (0.8 eV ≤ hν ≤ 8.5 eV, T ≃ 300 K) study of β-Ta films prepared by rf sputtering deposition as a function of their thickness in the range 2.5 nm ≲ d ≲ 200 nm. The dc transport of the β-Ta films with a thickness d ≳ 25 nm is characterized by negative temperature coefficient of resistivity (TCR) caused by localization effects peculiar of highly disordered metals. Their dielectric function spectra display non-metallic-like behavior due to the presence of the pronounced band at 2 eV. We found that with increasing TCR absolute value, specifying elevated degree disorder, the optical spectral weight (SW) of free charge carriers decreases. The associated SW is recovered in the range of Mott-Hubbard transitions, indicating the mechanism of localization enhancement by electronic correlations in disordered metals.

  19. Characterization of Diblock Copolymer Order-Order Transitions in Semidilute Aqueous Solution Using Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Christopher G; Lovett, Joseph R; Madsen, Jeppe; Armes, Steven P; Geoghegan, Mark

    2015-09-01

    The temperature and pH-dependent diffusion of poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)-block-poly(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate) nanoparticles prepared via polymerization-induced self-assembly in water is characterized using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Lowering the solution temperature or raising the solution pH induces a worm-to-sphere transition and hence an increase in diffusion coefficient by a factor of between four and eight. FCS enables morphological transitions to be monitored at relatively high copolymer concentrations (10% w/w) compared to those required for dynamic light scattering (0.1% w/w). This is important because such transitions are reversible at the former concentration, whereas they are irreversible at the latter. Furthermore, the FCS data suggest that the thermal transition takes place over a very narrow temperature range (less than 2 °C). These results demonstrate the application of FCS to characterize order-order transitions, as opposed to order-disorder transitions. PMID:26096738

  20. Effects of multiple scattering on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements of particles moving within optically dense media.

    PubMed

    Zustiak, Silviya; Riley, Jason; Boukari, Hacène; Gandjbakhche, Amir; Nossal, Ralph

    2012-12-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is increasingly being used to assess the movement of particles diffusing in complex, optically dense surroundings, in which case measurement conditions may complicate data interpretation. It is considered how a single-photon FCS measurement can be affected if the sample properties result in scattering of the incident light. FCS autocorrelation functions of Atto 488 dye molecules diffusing in solutions of polystyrene beads are measured, which acted as scatterers. Data indicated that a scattering-linked increase in the illuminated volume, as much as two fold, resulted in minimal increase in diffusivity. To analyze the illuminated beam profile, Monte-Carlo simulations were employed, which indicated a larger broadening of the beam along the axial than the radial directions, and a reduction of the incident intensity at the focal point. The broadening of the volume in the axial direction has only negligible effect on the measured diffusion time, since intensity fluctuations due to diffusion events in the radial direction are dominant in FCS measurements. Collectively, results indicate that multiple scattering does not result in FCS measurement artifacts and thus, when sufficient signal intensity is attainable, single-photon FCS can be a useful technique for measuring probe diffusivity in optically dense media. PMID:23208294

  1. Tracking transcription factor mobility and interaction in Arabidopsis roots with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Clark, Natalie M; Hinde, Elizabeth; Winter, Cara M; Fisher, Adam P; Crosti, Giuseppe; Blilou, Ikram; Gratton, Enrico; Benfey, Philip N; Sozzani, Rosangela

    2016-01-01

    To understand complex regulatory processes in multicellular organisms, it is critical to be able to quantitatively analyze protein movement and protein-protein interactions in time and space. During Arabidopsis development, the intercellular movement of SHORTROOT (SHR) and subsequent interaction with its downstream target SCARECROW (SCR) control root patterning and cell fate specification. However, quantitative information about the spatio-temporal dynamics of SHR movement and SHR-SCR interaction is currently unavailable. Here, we quantify parameters including SHR mobility, oligomeric state, and association with SCR using a combination of Fluorescent Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) techniques. We then incorporate these parameters into a mathematical model of SHR and SCR, which shows that SHR reaches a steady state in minutes, while SCR and the SHR-SCR complex reach a steady-state between 18 and 24 hr. Our model reveals the timing of SHR and SCR dynamics and allows us to understand how protein movement and protein-protein stoichiometry contribute to development. PMID:27288545

  2. Effects of multiple scattering on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements of particles moving within optically dense media

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Jason; Boukari, Hacène; Gandjbakhche, Amir; Nossal, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is increasingly being used to assess the movement of particles diffusing in complex, optically dense surroundings, in which case measurement conditions may complicate data interpretation. It is considered how a single-photon FCS measurement can be affected if the sample properties result in scattering of the incident light. FCS autocorrelation functions of Atto 488 dye molecules diffusing in solutions of polystyrene beads are measured, which acted as scatterers. Data indicated that a scattering-linked increase in the illuminated volume, as much as two fold, resulted in minimal increase in diffusivity. To analyze the illuminated beam profile, Monte-Carlo simulations were employed, which indicated a larger broadening of the beam along the axial than the radial directions, and a reduction of the incident intensity at the focal point. The broadening of the volume in the axial direction has only negligible effect on the measured diffusion time, since intensity fluctuations due to diffusion events in the radial direction are dominant in FCS measurements. Collectively, results indicate that multiple scattering does not result in FCS measurement artifacts and thus, when sufficient signal intensity is attainable, single-photon FCS can be a useful technique for measuring probe diffusivity in optically dense media. PMID:23208294

  3. Phospholipid Diffusion Coefficients of Cushioned Model Membranes determined via Z-Scan Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Sarah M.; Allgeyer, Edward S.; Fick, Jörg; Prudovsky, Igor; Mason, Michael D.; Neivandt, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Model cellular membranes enable the study of biological processes in a controlled environment and reduce the traditional challenges associated with live or fixed cell studies. However, model membrane systems based on the air/water or oil/solution interface do not allow for incorporation of transmembrane proteins, or for the study of protein transport mechanisms. Conversely, a phospholipid bilayer deposited via the Langmuir-Blodgett/Langmuir Schaefer method on a hydrogel layer is potentially an effective mimic of the cross-section of a biological membrane, and facilitates both protein incorporation and transport studies. Prior to application, however, such membranes must be fully characterized, particularly with respect to the phospholipid bilayer phase transition temperature. Here we present a detailed characterization of the phase transition temperature of the inner and outer leaflets of a chitosan supported model membrane system. Specifically, the lateral diffusion coefficient of each individual leaflet has been determined as a function of temperature. Measurements were performed utilizing z-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), a technique that yields calibration-free diffusion information. Analysis via the method of Wawrezinieck and coworkers, revealed that phospholipid diffusion changes from raft-like to free diffusion as the temperature is increased; an insight into the dynamic behavior of hydrogel supported membranes not previously reported. PMID:23705855

  4. Tracking transcription factor mobility and interaction in Arabidopsis roots with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Natalie M; Hinde, Elizabeth; Winter, Cara M; Fisher, Adam P; Crosti, Giuseppe; Blilou, Ikram; Gratton, Enrico; Benfey, Philip N; Sozzani, Rosangela

    2016-01-01

    To understand complex regulatory processes in multicellular organisms, it is critical to be able to quantitatively analyze protein movement and protein-protein interactions in time and space. During Arabidopsis development, the intercellular movement of SHORTROOT (SHR) and subsequent interaction with its downstream target SCARECROW (SCR) control root patterning and cell fate specification. However, quantitative information about the spatio-temporal dynamics of SHR movement and SHR-SCR interaction is currently unavailable. Here, we quantify parameters including SHR mobility, oligomeric state, and association with SCR using a combination of Fluorescent Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) techniques. We then incorporate these parameters into a mathematical model of SHR and SCR, which shows that SHR reaches a steady state in minutes, while SCR and the SHR-SCR complex reach a steady-state between 18 and 24 hr. Our model reveals the timing of SHR and SCR dynamics and allows us to understand how protein movement and protein-protein stoichiometry contribute to development. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14770.001 PMID:27288545

  5. Mapping Liquid-liquid protein phase separation using ultra-fast-scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ming-Tzo; Elbaum-Garfinkle, Shana; Arnold, Craig B.; Priestley, Rodney D.; Brangwynne, Clifford P.

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are an understudied class of proteins that play important roles in a wide variety of biological processes in cells. We've previously shown that the C. elegans IDP LAF-1 phase separates into P granule-like droplets in vitro. However, the physics of the condensed phase remains poorly understood. Here, we use a novel technique, ultra-fast-scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, to study the nano-scale rheological properties of LAF-1 droplets. Ultra-fast-scanning FCS uses a tunable acoustic gradient index of refraction (TAG) lens with an oil immersion objective to control axial movement of the focal point over a length of several micrometers at frequencies of 70kHz. Using ultra-fast-scanning FCS allows for the accurate determination of molecular concentrations and their diffusion coefficient, when the particle is passing through an excitation volume. Our work reveals an asymmetric LAF-1 phase diagram, and demonstrates that LAF-1 droplets are purely viscous phases which are highly tunable by salt concentration.

  6. A Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Study of the Cryoprotective Mechanism of Glucose on Hemocyanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauger, Eric J.

    Cryopreservation is the method of preserving biomaterials by cooling and storing them at very low temperatures. In order to prevent the damaging effects of cooling, cryoprotectants are used to inhibit ice formation. Common cryoprotectants used today include ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, dimethyl sulfoxide, glycerol, and sugars. However, the mechanism responsible for the effectiveness of these cryoprotectants is poorly understood on the molecular level. The water replacement model predicts that water molecules around the surfaces of proteins are replaced with sugar molecules, forming a protective layer against the denaturing ice formation. Under this scheme, one would expect an increase in the hydrodynamic radius with increasing sugar concentration. In order to test this hypothesis, two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) was used to measure the hydrodynamic radius of hemocyanin (Hc), an oxygen-carrying protein found in arthropods, in glucose solutions up to 20wt%. FCS found that the hydrodynamic radius was invariant with increasing glucose concentration. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) results verified the hydrodynamic radius of hemocyanin in the absence of glucose. Although this invariant trend seems to indicate that the water replacement hypothesis is invalid the expected glucose layer around the Hc is smaller than the error in the hydrodynamic radius measurements for FCS. The expected change in the hydrodynamic radius with an additional layer of glucose is 1nm, however, the FCS standard error is +/-3.61nm. Therefore, the water replacement model cannot be confirmed nor refuted as a possible explanation for the cryoprotective effects of glucose on Hc.

  7. Photolithography and Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy used to examine the rates of exchange in reverse micelle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Zach; Mawson, Cara; Johnson, Kyron; Kessler, Sarah; Rebecca, Anne; Wolf, Nathan; Lim, Michael; Nucci, Nathaniel

    Reverse micelles are molecular complexes that encapsulate a nanoscale pool of water in a surfactant shell dissolved in non-polar solvent. These complexes have a wide range of applications, and in all cases, the degree to which reverse micelles (RM) exchange their contents is relevant for their use. Despite its importance, this aspect of RM behavior is poorly understood. Photolithography is employed here to create micro and nano scale fluidic systems in which mixing rates can be precisely measured using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Micro-channel patterns are etched using reactive ion etching process into a layer of silicon dioxide on crystalline silicon substrates. Solutions containing mixtures of reverse micelles, proteins, and fluorophores are placed into reservoirs in the patterns, while diffusion and exchange between RMs is monitored using a FCS system built from a modified confocal Raman spectrometer. Using this approach, the diffusion and exchange rates for RM systems are measured as a function of the components of the RM mixture. Funding provided by Rowan University.

  8. Investigating axial diffusion in cylindrical pores using confocal single-particle fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang; Neupane, Bhanu; Li, Peiyuan; Su, Wei; Wang, Gufeng

    2016-08-01

    We explored the feasibility of using confocal fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to study small nanoparticle diffusion in hundred-nanometer-sized cylindrical pores. By modeling single particle diffusion in tube-like confined three-dimensional space aligned parallel to the confocal optical axis, we showed that two diffusion dynamics can be observed in both original intensity traces and the autocorrelation functions (ACFs): the confined two-dimensional lateral diffusion and the unconfined one-dimensional (1D) axial diffusion. The separation of the axial and confined lateral diffusion dynamics provides an opportunity to study diffusions in different dimensions separately. We further experimentally studied 45 nm carboxylated polystyrene particles diffusing in 300 nm alumina pores. The experimental data showed consistency with the simulation. To extract the accurate axial diffusion coefficient, we found that a 1D diffusion model with a Lorentzian axial collection profile needs to be used to analyze the experimental ACFs. The diffusion of the 45 nm nanoparticles in polyethyleneglycol-passivated 300 nm pores slowed down by a factor of ∼2, which can be satisfactorily explained by hydrodynamic frictions. PMID:27196052

  9. Heat shock-induced interactions among nuclear HSFs detected by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, Chan-Gi; Ahn, Sang-Gun

    2015-07-31

    The cellular response to stress is primarily controlled in cells via transcriptional activation by heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). HSF1 is well-known to form homotrimers for activation upon heat shock and subsequently bind to target DNAs, such as heat-shock elements, by forming stress granules. A previous study demonstrated that nuclear HSF1 and HSF2 molecules in live cells interacted with target DNAs on the stress granules. However, the process underlying the binding interactions of HSF family in cells upon heat shock remains unclear. This study demonstrate for the first time that the interaction kinetics among nuclear HSF1, HSF2, and HSF4 upon heat shock can be detected directly in live cells using dual color fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS). FCCS analyses indicated that the binding between HSFs was dramatically changed by heat shock. Interestingly, the recovery kinetics of interaction between HSF1 molecules after heat shock could be represented by changes in the relative interaction amplitude and mobility. - Highlights: • The binding interactions among nuclear HSFs were successfully detected. • The binding kinetics between HSF1s during recovery was quantified. • HSF2 and HSF4 strongly formed hetero-complex, even before heat shock. • Nuclear HSF2 and HSF4 bound to HSF1 only after heat shock.

  10. Correlation of NADH fluorescence lifetime and oxidative phosphorylation metabolism in the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Han-Wen; Yu, Jia-Sin; Hsu, Shu-Han; Wei, Yau-Huei; Lee, Oscar K.; Dong, Chen-Yuan; Wang, Hsing-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence lifetime has been broadly used as a metabolic indicator for stem cell imaging. However, the direct relationship between NADH fluorescence lifetime and metabolic pathway and activity remains to be clarified. In this study, we measured the NADH fluorescence lifetime of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) as well as the metabolic indictors, such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) level, oxygen consumption, and lactate release, up to 4 weeks under normal osteogenic differentiation and oxidative phosphorylation-attenuated/inhibited differentiation by oligomycin A (OA) treatment. NADH fluorescence lifetime was positively correlated with oxygen consumption and ATP level during energy transformation from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation. Under OA treatment, oxidative phosphorylation was attenuated/inhibited (i.e., oxygen consumption remained the same as controls or lower), cells showed attenuated differentiation under glycolysis, and NADH fluorescence lifetime change was not detected. Increased expression of the overall complex proteins was observed in addition to Complex I. We suggested special caution needs to be exercised while interpreting NADH fluorescence lifetime signal in terms of stem cell differentiation.