Science.gov

Sample records for fluorescence depolarization measurements

  1. Fluorescence depolarization measurements on oriented membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Adler, M; Tritton, T R

    1988-01-01

    We describe the theory and experimental application of fluorescence depolarization measurements on small molecules bound to oriented phospholipid bilayers. The results yield insight into both the orientation and the rotational motion of fluorophores in a membrane environment. To accomplish this the angular distribution of polarized fluorescence intensities is measured on a membrane preparation consisting of stacked phospholipid bilayers oriented in a known coordinate system. Considerably more information is available from this data than in comparable solution phase measurements. Three parameters are derived from the data: the rate of rotational diffusion and the second and fourth degree order parameters. These latter two parameters provide an assessment of the average distribution of fluorophore orientation in the membrane bilayer. The data have been carefully examined for systematic experimental artifacts and new protocols are presented which help to eliminate errors that have not been amply treated in the past. We present data for two types of fluorescent molecules: (a) conventional membrane probes like diphenylhexatriene, perylene and anthroyloxy fatty acids; and (b) the anticancer agent adriamycin and several congeneric anthracycline antibiotics. The results show that the hydrocarbon core of membranes is more rigid than previously thought, particularly above the thermal phase transition temperature. We also show that the orientation of small molecules is sensitive to both the phospholipid composition and to the interaction of specific functional groups with the lipid bilayer. The results are discussed in terms of energetic models describing the general patterns for the binding of small molecules to biological membranes. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:3165033

  2. Identifiability analysis of rotational diffusion tensor and electronic transition moments measured in time-resolved fluorescence depolarization experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Szubiakowski, Jacek P.

    2014-06-14

    The subject of this paper is studies of the deterministic identifiability of molecular parameters, such as rotational diffusion tensor components and orientation of electronic transition moments, resulting from the time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy experiment. In the most general case considered, a pair of perpendicularly polarized emissions enables the unique determination of all the rotational diffusion tensor's principal components. The influence of the tensor's symmetry and the associated degeneration of its eigenvalues on the identifiability of the electronic transitions moments is systematically investigated. The analysis reveals that independently of the rotational diffusion tensor's symmetry, the transition moments involved in photoselection and emission processes cannot be uniquely identified without a priori information about their mutual orientation or their orientation with respect to the principal axes of the tensor. Moreover, it is shown that increasing the symmetry of the rotational diffusion tensor deteriorates the degree of the transition moments identifiability. To obtain these results analytically, a novel approach to solve bilinear system of equations for Markov parameters is applied. The effect of the additional information, obtained from fluorescence measurements for different molecular mobilities, to improve the identifiability at various levels of analysis is shown. The effectiveness and reliability of the target analysis method for experimental determination of the molecular parameters is also discussed.

  3. Analyzing fluorophore electronic structure and depolarization by fluorescence polarizing angle spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Taotao; Chen, Siying Zhang, Yinchao; Chen, He; Guo, Pan

    2014-07-21

    In this Letter, a method, based on stokes parameters, is developed to observe the angular displacement between the excitation and emission moments. Experiments demonstrate that when combined with degree of polarization spectrums, we can acquire the depolarization caused by angular displacement or energy migration. The method presented in this Letter can be easily realized with the existing fluorescence measuring system and may potentially make it convenient to study the fluorophore electronic structure or the mechanism of fluorescence anisotropy.

  4. Effect of multiple scattering on depolarization measurements with spaceborne lidars.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, Susanne; Reichardt, Jens

    2003-06-20

    An analytical model based on the integration of the scattering-angle and light-path manifold has been developed to quantify the effect of multiple scattering on cirrus measurements obtained with elastic polarization lidars from space. Light scattering by molecules and by a horizontally homogeneous cloud is taken into account. Lidar parameter, including laser beam divergence, can be freely chosen. Up to 3 orders of scattering are calculated. Furthermore, an inversion technique for the retrieval of cloud extinction profiles from measurements with elastic-backscatter lidars is proposed that explicitly takes multiple scattering into account. It is found that for typical lidar system parameters such as those of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) instrument multiple scattering does not significantly affect depolarization-ratio measurements in cirrus clouds with small to moderate optical depths. For all simulated clouds, the absolute value of the difference between measured and single-scattering volume depolarization ratio is < 0.006. The particle depolarization ratio can be calculated from the measured volume depolarization ratio and the retrieved backscatter ratio without degradation of accuracy; thus characterization of the various cirrus categories in terms of the particle depolarization ratio and retrieval of cloud microphysical properties is feasible from space. The results of this study apply to polar stratospheric clouds as well. PMID:12833968

  5. Depolarization Measurements with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eloranta, E. W.; Piironen, P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes modifications to the University of Wisconsin High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) which permit very precise depolarization measurements in addition to optical depth, backscatter cross section, and extinction cross section measurements. Because HSRL separates the lidar return into aerosol and molecular contributions, they can be measured separately.

  6. Far wing depolarization of light - Generalized absorption profiles. [in laser fluorescence spectroscopy of Sr vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomann, P.; Burnett, K.; Cooper, J.

    1981-01-01

    An absorption (and/or emission) event which takes place during a strong collision is called a 'correlated event'. It is discussed how correlated events affect the far red wing depolarization of fluorescence. Attention is given to an atomic vapor which is irradiated by linearly polarized light of a frequency on the red side of the resonance line. Two limiting cases are considered, corresponding to excitation in the impact region and in the quasi-static wing. In the quasi-static wing, absorption of a photon followed by fluorescence (rather than Rayleigh scattering), occurs mostly during a collision. Correlated events dominate the scattering process. Expressions derived for the polarization of the fluorescent light are applied to far red wing depolarization. It is found that the polarization of the fluorescent light does not go to zero in the far wing, but depends crucially on the detailed nature of the anisotropy in the long-range part of the interatomic potential.

  7. A Critique of Asphaltene Fluorescence Decay and Depolarization-Based Claims about Molecular Weight and Molecular Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Strausz,O.; Safarik, I.; Lown, E.; Morales-Izquierdo, A.

    2008-01-01

    Relying on experimental and theoretical data available from the literature, it is shown that the conclusions derived from measurements of fluorescence decay and depolarization kinetic times as reported in a series of papers over the past decade are egregiously wrong. To start with, the decay time measurements were done with inappropriate instrumentation which resulted in misleading results. Misinterpretation of the results led to the mistaken conclusion that bichromophoric type molecules are absent from petroleum asphaltene and therefore the architecture of the asphaltene molecule features a single condensed cyclic core spiked with some alkyl chains, in spite of irrefutable chemical evidence to the contrary. It was further concluded that if the asphaltene core is a single condensed ring, then the fluorescence depolarization with rotational correlation time method is applicable for the molecular weight determination of asphaltene. This is definitely not so, since, regardless of any other considerations, asphaltene is a mixture of a plethora of different, unknown components, with unknown concentrations along with innumerable different, unknown and some known chromophores portraying widely different absorption coefficients, fluorescence quantum yields, and kinetic decay times. Consequently, asphaltene fluorescence is a highly complex function of the above attributes and as such it is a totally unsuitable property for its molecular weight determination. The injection of an incorrect, single condensed ring core architecture for asphaltene has caused some confusion in asphaltene chemistry that has now hopefully been settled.

  8. Fluorescence depolarization of rhodamine 6G in glycerol: a photon-counting test of three-dimensional excitation transport theory

    SciTech Connect

    Anfinrud, P.A.; Hart, D.E.; Hedstrom, J.F.; Struve, W.S.

    1986-05-22

    Time-correlated photon counting has been used to measure fluorescence concentration depolarization for rhodamine 6G in glycerol. The excitation transport theory developed by Gochanour, Andersen, and Fayer yields good approximations to the experimental decay profiles over the concentration range 1.7 x 10/sup -4/ to 2.4 x 10/sup -3/ M. Although the differences between optimized theoretical and experimental profiles are fractionally small, they are readily characterized under present counting statistics. They prove to be dominated by experimental artifacts, arising from excitation trapping by rhodamine 6G aggregates and from self-absorption in solution cells thicker than approx. 10 ..mu..m.

  9. Experimental verification of depolarization effects in bioelectrical impedance measurement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Lv, Xinqiang; Du, Meng

    2014-01-01

    The electrode polarization effects on bioelectrical impedance measurement at low-frequency cannot be ignored. In this paper, the bioelectrical data of mice livers are measured to specify the polarization effects on the bio-impedance measurement data. We firstly introduce the measurement system and methodology. Using the depolarization method, the corrected results are obtained. Besides, the specific effects of electrode polarization on bio-impedance measurement results are investigated using comparative analysis of the previous and posterior correction results from dielectric spectroscopy, Cole-Cole plot, conductivity and spectroscopy of dissipation tangent. Experimental results show that electrode polarization has a significant influence on the characteristic parameters of mouse liver tissues. To be specific, we see a low-frequency limit resistance R0 increase by 19.29%, a reactance peak XP increase by 8.50%, a low-frequency limit conductivity Kl decrease by 17.65% and a dissipation peak tangent decrease by 160%. PMID:25227082

  10. Suppression of Rayleigh scattering noise in sodium laser guide stars by hyperfine depolarization of fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Guillet de Chatellus, Hugues; Moldovan, Ioana; Fesquet, Vincent; Pique, Jean-Paul

    2006-11-27

    We propose what we believe is a novel method for enabling the complete suppression of noise due to Rayleigh scattering in sodium laser guide star systems by means of selective discrimination between Rayleigh and fluorescence signals based on polarization properties. We show that, contrary to the nearly 100% polarized Rayleigh scattering, fluorescence from the D(2) sodium line is strongly depolarized under excitation by a modeless laser. This offers the possibility of completely cancelling the effects of the Rayleigh scattering background while preserving the fluorescence signal to about 40% of its maximal value, leading to an improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio by several orders of magnitude. Both theoretical and experimental data confirm this new proposal. PMID:19529568

  11. Fluorescence depolarization studies of sol-gel-derived glasses using a rigidochromic probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKiernan, John; Zink, Jeffrey I.; Dunn, Bruce S.

    1992-12-01

    The rigidochromic molecule rhenium(I)chlorotricarbonyl-2,2'-bipyridine was used in fluorescence depolarization experiments to probe the gelation, aging, and drying of silica and aluminosilicate sol-gel derived materials. These studies indicate that the local environment of the probe is fluid until well after gelation has occurred. Aluminosilicate gels show an increase in local viscosity after gelation while silica gels show no increase until the drying stage is begun. These results are compared to previous studies in which the shift of the emission band was used to indicate the rigidity in the local environment of the probe.

  12. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Depolarization Study Of Lamellar To Inverted Cylindrical Micellar Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kwan H.

    1989-05-01

    The orientational order and rotational dynamics of 2-(3-(diphenyl-hexatrienyl) propanoy11-3-palmitoyl-L-a-phosphatidylcholine (DPH-PC) embedded in dioleoplphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) were studied by time-resolved fluorescence depolarization technique. Upon increasing the temperature, the wobbling diffusion constant D⊥ of DPH-PC was found to decrease at the lamellar (Lα) to inverted cylindrical (HII) phase transition (12°C). The calculated ratio of order parameter in the La phase to that in the HII phase was close to the theoretical value of 2.0 as predicted from the change in packing symmetry. The effects of butylated hydroxytoluene, cholesterol and phosphatidylchollne on this phase transition were also examined.

  13. Probing the structure and dynamics of a DNA hairpin by ultrafast quenching and fluorescence depolarization.

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, O F; van Stokkum, I H; Gobets, B; van Grondelle, R; van Amerongen, H

    2001-01-01

    DNA hairpins have been investigated in which individual adenines were replaced by their fluorescent analog 2-aminopurine (2AP). The temperature dependence of the time evolution of polarized emission spectra was monitored with picosecond time resolution. Four isotropic decay components for each oligonucleotide indicated the coexistence of at least four conformations. The fluorescence for three of these was significantly quenched, which is explained by hole transfer from 2AP to guanine(s). An approximately 8-ps component is ascribed to direct hole transfer, the approximately 50-ps and approximately 500-ps components are ascribed to structural reorganization, preceding hole transfer. At room temperature, a fraction remains unquenched on a 10-ns timescale, in contrast to higher temperatures, where the flexibility increases. Besides quenching due to base stacking, a second quenching process was needed to describe the data. Evidence for both intrastrand and interstrand hole transfer was found. The extracted probability for stacking between neighboring bases in double-stranded regions was estimated to be approximately 75% at room temperature and approximately 25% at 80 degrees C, demonstrating structural disorder of the DNA. Fluorescence depolarization revealed both local dynamics of the DNA and overall dynamics of the entire oligonucleotide. Upon raising the temperature, the C-N terminus of the hairpin appears to melt first; the rest of the hairpin denatures above the average melting temperature. PMID:11463652

  14. Assessment of aerosol's mass concentrations from measured linear particle depolarization ratio (vertically resolved) and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemuc, A.; Vasilescu, J.; Talianu, C.; Belegante, L.; Nicolae, D.

    2013-11-01

    Multi-wavelength depolarization Raman lidar measurements from Magurele, Romania are used in this study along with simulated mass-extinction efficiencies to calculate the mass concentration profiles of different atmospheric components, due to their different depolarization contribution to the 532 nm backscatter coefficient. Linear particle depolarization ratio (δpart) was computed using the relative amplification factor and the system-dependent molecular depolarization. The low depolarizing component was considered as urban/smoke, with a mean δpart of 3%, while for the high depolarizing component (mineral dust) a mean δpart of 35% was assumed. For this study 11 months of lidar measurements were analysed. Two study cases are presented in details: one for a typical Saharan dust aerosol intrusion, 10 June 2012 and one for 12 July 2012 when a lofted layer consisting of biomass burning smoke extended from 3 to 4.5 km height. Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds software package (OPAC) classification and conversion factors were used to calculate mass concentrations. We found that calibrated depolarization measurements are critical in distinguishing between smoke-reach aerosol during the winter and dust-reach aerosol during the summer, as well as between elevated aerosol layers having different origins. Good agreement was found between lidar retrievals and DREAM- Dust REgional Atmospheric Model forecasts in cases of Saharan dust. Our method was also compared against LIRIC (The Lidar/Radiometer Inversion Code) and very small differences were observed.

  15. Assessment of aerosol's mass concentrations from measured linear particle depolarization ratio (vertically resolved) and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemuc, A.; Vasilescu, J.; Talianu, C.; Belegante, L.; Nicolae, D.

    2013-06-01

    Multiwavelength depolarization Raman lidar measurements from Magurele, Romania are used in this study along with simulated mass-extinction efficiencies to calculate the mass concentrations profiles of different atmospheric components, due to their different depolarization contribution to the 532 nm backscatter coefficient. Linear particle depolarization ratio (δpart) was computed using the relative amplification factor and the system-dependent molecular depolarization. The low depolarizing component was considered as urban/smoke, with a mean δpart of 3%, while for the high depolarizing component (mineral dust) a mean δpart of 35% was assumed. For this study 11 months of lidar measurements were analyzed. Two study cases are presented in details: one for a typical Saharan dust aerosol intrusion, 10 June 2012 and one for 12 July 2012 when a lofted layer consisting of biomass burning smoke extended from 3 to 4.5 km height. Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds software package (OPAC) classification and conversion factors were used to calculate mass concentrations. We found that calibrated depolarization measurements are critical to distinguish between smoke-reach aerosol during the winter and dust-reach aerosol during the summer, as well as between elevated aerosol layers having different origins. Good agreement was found between lidar retrievals and DREAM- Dust REgional Atmospheric Model forecasts in cases of Saharan dust. Our method was also compared against LIRIC (The Lidar/Radiometer Inversion Code) and very small differences were observed.

  16. Aerosol Properties over Southeastern China from Multi-Wavelength Raman and Depolarization Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heese, Birgit; Althausen, Dietrich; Baars, Holger; Bohlmann, Stephanie; Deng, Ruru

    2016-06-01

    A dataset of particle optical properties of highly polluted urban aerosol over the Pearl River Delta, Guangzhou, China is presented. The data were derived from multi-wavelengths Raman and depolarization lidar PollyXT and AERONET sun photometer measurements. The measurement campaign was conducted from Nov 2011 to June 2012. High aerosol optical depth was observed in the polluted atmosphere over this megacity, with a mean value of 0.54 ± 0.33 and a peak value of even 1.9. For the particle characterization the lidar ratio and the linear particle depolarization ratio, both at 532 nm, were used. The mean values of these properties are 48.0 sr ± 10.7 sr for the lidar ratio and 4%+-4% for the particle depolarization ratio, which means most depolarization measurements stayed below 10%. So far, most of these results indicate urban pollution particles mixed with particles arisen from biomass and industrial burning.

  17. Excimer fluorescence compared to depolarization in the flow cytometric characterization of lateral membrane mobility in platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothe, Gregor; Schaefer, Buerk; Wimmer, Martin S.; Schmitz, Gerd

    1998-04-01

    An altered cellular membrane fluidity secondary to changes of cholesterol metabolism is a potentially important mechanism in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Especially in blood platelets an increased sensitivity for stimulation dependent aggregation which is a risk factor for thrombosis has been experimentally linked to disorders of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. The goal of this study was the development of a flow cytometric assay for the direct analysis of cellular membrane microviscosity in correlation to activation associated phenotypic changes of platelets in vitro. The analysis of fluorescence polarization following the staining of hydrophobic lipid regions of cell membranes with the fluorescent dye 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) is a well established method for the analysis of membrane fluidity. The extent of fluorescence anisotropy dependent on the rotational mobility of this fluorochrome is indirectly proportional to the microviscosity of the stained membrane subcompartment. In this study, an alternative and more simple method based on the diffusion dependent excimer formation of pyrenedecanoic acid (PDA) (J. Immunol. Methods 96:225-31, 1987) was characterized in comparison to the DPH method as a reference. Human platelets showed a rapid uptake of both DPH and PDA resulting in the staining primarily of the plasma membrane after up to 30 min of incubation. Staining analyzed at 351 nm excitation resulted in a saturation of the depolarization coefficient of DPH at 20 (mu) M but an increase of the excimer to monomer ratio of PDA with increasing dye concentration. A 'membrane fluidity coefficient' which saturated at 5 (mu) M PDA was calculated as the excimer fluorescence divided through the square of monomer fluorescence thereby correcting for the influence of dye concentration on excimer formation. The temperature dependent changes of membrane viscosity were further used as a model for the comparison of both methods. Cells analyzed at temperatures

  18. Three-Signal Method for Accurate Measurements of Depolarization Ratio with Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, Jens; Baumgart, Rudolf; McGee, Thomsa J.

    2003-01-01

    A method is presented that permits the determination of atmospheric depolarization-ratio profiles from three elastic-backscatter lidar signals with different sensitivity to the state of polarization of the backscattered light. The three-signal method is insensitive to experimental errors and does not require calibration of the measurement, which could cause large systematic uncertainties of the results, as is the case in the lidar technique conventionally used for the observation of depolarization ratios.

  19. Light depolarization measurements in malaria: A new job for an old friend.

    PubMed

    Rebelo, Maria; Tempera, Carolina; Bispo, Claudia; Andrade, Claudia; Gardner, Rui; Shapiro, Howard M; Hänscheid, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    The use of flow cytometry in malaria research has increased over the last decade. Most approaches use nucleic acid stains to detect parasite DNA and RNA and require complex multi-color, multi-parameter analysis to reliably detect infected red blood cells (iRBCs). We recently described a novel and simpler approach to parasite detection based on flow cytometric measurement of scattered light depolarization caused by hemozoin (Hz), a pigment formed by parasite digestion of hemoglobin in iRBCs. Depolarization measurement by flow cytometry was described in 1987; however, patent issues restricted its use to a single manufacturer's hematology analyzers until 2009. Although we recently demonstrated that depolarization measurement of Hz, easily implemented on a bench top flow cytometer (Cyflow), provided useful information for malaria work, doubts regarding its application and utility remain in both the flow cytometry and malaria communities, at least in part because instrument manufacturers do not offer the option of measuring depolarized scatter. Under such circumstances, providing other researchers with guidance as to how to do this seemed to offer the most expeditious way to resolve the issue. We accordingly examined how several commercially available flow cytometers (CyFlow SL, MoFLo, Attune and Accuri C6) could be modified to detect depolarization due to the presence of free Hz on solution, or of Hz in leukocytes or erythrocytes from rodent or human blood. All were readily adapted, with substantially equivalent results obtained with lasers emitting over a wide wavelength range. Other instruments now available may also be modifiable for Hz measurement. Cytometric detection of Hz using depolarization is useful to study different aspects of malaria. Adding additional parameters, such as DNA content and base composition and RNA content, can demonstrably provide improved accuracy and sensitivity of parasite detection and characterization, allowing malaria researchers and

  20. Conductivity Variation Observed by Polarization and Depolarization Current Measurements of High-Voltage Equipment Insulation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamail, Nor Akmal Mohd; Piah, Mohamed Afendi Mohamed; Muhamad, Nor Asiah

    2012-09-01

    Nondestructive and time domain dielectric measurement techniques such as polarization and depolarization current (PDC) measurements have recently been widely used as a potential tool for determining high-voltage insulation conditions by analyzing the insulation conductivity. The variation in the conductivity of an insulator was found to depend on several parameters: the difference between the polarization and depolarization currents, geometric capacitance, and the relative permittivity of the insulation material. In this paper the conductivities of different types of oil-paper insulation material are presented. The insulation conductivities of several types of electrical apparatus were simulated using MATLAB. Conductivity insulation was found to be high at high polarizations and at the lowest depolarization current. It was also found to increase with increasing relative permittivity as well as with decreasing geometric capacitance of the insulating material.

  1. Arctic polar stratospheric cloud measurements by means of a four wavelength depolarization lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanutti, L.; Castagnoli, F.; Delguasta, M.; Flesia, C.; Godin, S.; Kolenda, J.; Kneipp, H.; Kyro, Esko; Matthey, R.; Morandi, M.

    1994-01-01

    A four wavelength depolarization backscattering lidar has been operated during the European Arctic Stratospheric Ozone Experiment (EASOE) in Sodankyl, in the Finnish Arctic. The lidar performed measurements during the months of December 1991, January, February and March 1992. The Finnish Meteorological Institute during the same period launched regularly three Radiosondes per day, and three Ozone sondes per week. Both Mt. Pinatubo aerosols and Polar Stratospheric Clouds were measured. The use of four wavelengths, respectively at 355 nm, 532 nm , 750 nm, and 850 nm permits an inversion of the lidar data to determine aerosol particle size. The depolarization technique permits the identification of Polar Stratospheric Clouds. Frequent correlation between Ozone minima and peaks in the Mt. Pinatubo aerosol maxima were detected. Measurements were carried out both within and outside the Polar Vortex.

  2. Measurement of the depolarization ratio of Rayleigh scattering at absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglister, J.; Steinberg, I. Z.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the depolarization ratio ρv of light scattered by the pigments lycopene and β-carotene at the red part of their absorption bands yielded values which are very close to the theoretical value 1/3 of a fully anisotropic molecular polarizability, i.e., that due to an electric dipole moment. Measurements of ρv at the blue edge of the visible absorption band of pinacyanol chloride yielded a value of 0.75 at 472.2 nm, which is the maximum value that a depolarization ratio can assume, and is attained if the average molecular polarizability is zero. This is possible only if the diagonalized polarizability tensor has at least one negative element to counterbalance the positive ones. A negative refractive index at the blue edge of the absorption band is thus experimentally demonstrated.

  3. Practical depolarization-ratio-based inversion procedure: lidar measurements of the Eyjafjallajökull ash cloud over the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Donovan, David Patrick; Apituley, Arnoud

    2013-04-10

    In this paper we present a technique for estimating optical backscatter and extinction profiles using lidar, which exploits the difference between the observed linear volume depolarization ratio at 355 nm and the corresponding expected aerosol-only depolarization ratio. The technique is specific to situations where a single strongly depolarizing species is present and the associated linear particulate depolarization ratio may be presumed to be known to within a reasonable degree of accuracy (on the order of 10%). The basic principle of the technique is extended to deal with situations where a depolarizing fraction is mixed with nondepolarizing aerosol. In general, since the relative depolarization interchannel calibration is much more stable than the absolute system calibration, the depolarization-based technique is easier to implement than conventional techniques that require a profile-by-profile calibration or, equivalently, an identification of aerosol-free altitude intervals. This in particular allows for unattended data analysis and makes the technique well-suited to be part of a broader (volcanic ash) surveillance system. The technique is demonstrated by applying it to the analysis of aerosol layers resulting from the 2010 eruptions of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland. The measurements were made at the Cabauw remote-sensing site in the central Netherlands. By comparing the results of the depolarization-based inversion with a more conventional manual inversion procedure as well as Raman lidar results, it is demonstrated that the technique can be successfully applied to the particular case of 355 nm depolarization lidar volcanic ash soundings, including cases in which the ash is mixed with nondepolarizing aerosol. PMID:23670771

  4. Impacts of depolarization calibration methods on cloud phase interpretation at Eureka during 2013 and 2014 CRL lidar measurement campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, E. M.; Perro, C. W.; Gamage, S. M.; Hopper, J.; Sica, R. J.; Duck, T.; Walker, K. A.; Drummond, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    The radiative behaviour of clouds is dependent on cloud particle phase. Water droplets can exist in temperatures well below 0° C for extended periods. Lidar depolarization measurements allow liquid and solid states to be differentiated in individual clouds at high spatial-temporal resolution. The 2012, 2013 and 2014 Canadian Arctic ACE Validation Campaigns in Eureka, Nunavut, Canada (80°N, 86°W) provided an opportunity to make extensive depolarization measurements using the CANDAC Rayleigh-Mie-Raman Lidar (CRL) in the troposphere.To date, most calibration methods in the literature are applicable to lidars which do not have non-ideal polarizing optics upstream of the polarizing analyzers in the receiver. We demonstrate a more complete matrix algebra calibration of the CRL to take the extra optics from six upstream lidar channels into account.Differences in depolarization parameter from 2013 and 2014 measurements show the advantage of the more extensive calibration for this lidar compared to the simpler traditional approach. The largest differences are found for depolarization parameter values around d = 0.50 (corresponding to δ = 0.33). Depolarization ratio values of δ = 0.2 to 0.3 are generally taken to be the cutoff between interpretations of ice (higher δ) or water (lower δ), and many CRL measurements lie in this particularly diagnostic range. An uncertainty analysis becomes important when extending the depolarization parameters to interpretation of the clouds in the atmosphere above Eureka.

  5. Depolarization Ratio of Clouds Measured by Multiple-Field of view Multiple Scattering Polarization Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Hajime; Sato, Kaori; Makino, Toshiyuki; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Jin, Yoshitaka; Shimizu, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    We have developed the Multiple Field of view Multiple Scattering Polarization Lidar (MFMSPL) system for the study of optically thick low-level clouds. It has 8 telescopes; 4 telescopes for parallel channels and another 4 for perpendicular channels. The MFMSPL is the first lidar system that can measure depolarization ratio for optically thick clouds where multiple scattering is dominant. Field of view of each channel was 10mrad and was mounted with different angles ranging from 0 mrad (vertical) to 30mrad. And footprint size from the total FOV was achieved to be close to that of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) lidar at the altitude of 1km in order to reproduce similar degree of multiple scattering effects as observed from space. The MFMSPL has started observations since June 2014 and has been continuously operated at National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) in Tsukuba, Japan. Observations proved expected performance such that measured depolarization ratio was comparable to the one observed by CALIPSO lidar.

  6. Measurement of the Loss and Depolarization Probability of UCN on Beryllium and Diamond Like Carbon Films

    PubMed Central

    Brys, Tomas; Daum, Manfred; Fierlinger, Peter; Geltenbort, Peter; Gupta, Mukul; Henneck, Reinhold; Heule, Stefan; Kirch, Klaus; Lasakov, Mikhail; Mammei, Russel; Makela, Mark; Pichlmaier, Axel; Serebrov, Anatoli; Straumann, Ulrich; Vogelaar, Robert B.; Wermelinger, Cedric; Young, Albert

    2005-01-01

    Currently several institutes worldwide are working on the development of a new generation of ultracold neutron (UCN) sources. In parallel with source development, new materials for guiding and storage of UCN are developed. Currently the best results have been achieved using 58Ni, Be, solid O2 and low temperature Fomblin oil (LTF). All of these materials have their shortcomings like cost, toxicity or difficulty of use. A novel very promising material is diamond like carbon (DLC). Several techniques exist to coat surfaces, and industrial applications (e.g., for extremely hard surfaces) are already wide spread. Preliminary investigations using neutron reflectometry at PSI and Los Alamos yielded a critical velocity for DLC of about 7 m/s thus comparable to Beryllium. A low upper limit of depolarization probability for stored polarized UCN has been measured at the PF2 facility of the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) by North Carolina State University (NCSU), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI), thus making it also a good material for storage and guidance of polarized UCN. Still missing is the loss probability per bounce. We will be able to extract this number and a more stringent value for the depolarization from our experiment thus proving the suitability of DLC as a wall material for a wide range of UCN applications. PMID:27308136

  7. Concept Design of a Multiwavelength Aerosol Lidar System With Mitigated Diattenuation Effects and Depolarization-Measurement Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comerón, Adolfo; Sicard, Michaël; Vidal, Eric; Barragán, Rubén; Muñoz, Constantino; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Tiana-Alsina, Jordi; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; García-Vizcaíno, David

    2016-06-01

    It is known that the retrieval of aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients from lidar data acquired through so-called total-power channels - intended to measure the backscattered power irrespective of the polarization - can be adversely affected by varying depolarization effects produced by the aerosol under measurement. This effect can be particularly noticeable in advanced multiwavelength systems, where different wavelengths are separated using a system of dichroic beam splitters, because in general the reflection and transmission coefficients of the beam splitters will be different for fields with polarization parallel or perpendicular to the incidence plane. Here we propose a setup for multiwavelength aerosol lidars alleviating diattenuation effects due to changing depolarization conditions while allowing measure linear depolarization.

  8. Measurement of the Linear Depolarization Ratio of Aged Dust at Three Wavelengths (355, 532 and 1064 nm) Simultaneously over Barbados

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haarig, Moritz; Althausen, Dietrich; Ansmann, Albert; Klepel, André; Baars, Holger; Engelmann, Ronny; Groß, Silke; Freudenthaler, Volker

    2016-06-01

    A ground-based polarization Raman lidar is presented, that is able to measure the depolarization ratio at three wavelengths (355, 532 and 1064 nm) simultaneously. This new feature is implemented for the first time in a Raman lidar. It provides a full dataset of 3 backscatter coefficients, two extinction coefficients and 3 depolarization ratios (3+2+3 lidar system). To ensure the data quality, it has been compared to the well characterized two-wavelength polarization lidar POLIS. Measurements of long-range transported dust have been performed in the framework of the Saharan Aerosol Long-Range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE) in the Caribbean.

  9. FLUORESCENCE DEPOLARIZATION STUDIES OF RED CELL MEMBRANE FLUIDITY. THE EFFECT OF EXPOSURE TO 1.0-GHZ MICROWAVE RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The internal viscosity of human red blood cell membranes was investigated during exposure to continuous wave 1.0-GHz microwave radiation using fluorescence measurements of a lipid seeking molecular probe, diphenylhexatriene. Samples were exposed in a Crowford cell arranged so tha...

  10. Passive fluorescence measurements during SIFLEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moya, I.; Ounis, A.; Louis, J.; Evain, S.; Ducruet, J.-M.

    The goal of the participation of the LURE team to the SIFLEX campaign was %to provide clear evidence of quantitative absolute measurements of natural fluorescence andfluorescence flux evaluation by passive methods in the Fraunhofer lines. More specifically, to quantify the fluorescence flux in A and B absorption bands of atmospheric oxygen. The measurements have been focus on: Testing specific passive fluorescence instrumentation recently developed at LURE for assessing the sun induced fluorescence radiance from vegetation. Investigating diurnal and seasonal change of fluorescence and its behaviour with respect to plant condition, pigment content, global radiation amount and its correlation against accumulated biomass during growing period, Cross-correlate the fluorescence signal with hyperspectral reflectance and thermal IR radiance. A special attention has been paid to diurnal cycle and seasonal variations. Comparing fluorescence fluxes with CO2 fluxes measured by the already existing gas exchange equipment of the site. Instrumentation PMFD (Passive Multiwavelength Fluorescence Detector) was the main instrument used to asses fluorescence fluxes. The instrument was based on the Fraunhofer line principle, applied in the atmospheric oxygen A and B bands (760nm and 687nm, respectively). The output parameters were two stationary fluorescence flux at 687nm and 760nm and the NDVI (NDVI = (R760-R687) / (R760+R687)) index. Two additional channels of the instrument are devoted to measure reflectance variations at 531nm and 570 nm in order to calculate the PRI (PRI = (R531-R570) / (R531+R570)) index. This instrument was installed on the main tower, 10 m above the crown of the trees and maintained in the same viewing direction during the campaign (towards the north direction). The zenith angle was set to about 50-65 degrees. The footprint of the instrument contained the crowns of several trees. BD was a second passive detector operating solely in the atmospheric oxygen A

  11. Order and dynamics in the lamellar L alpha and in the hexagonal HII phase. Dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine studied with angle-resolved fluorescence depolarization.

    PubMed Central

    van Langen, H; Schrama, C A; van Ginkel, G; Ranke, G; Levine, Y K

    1989-01-01

    Fluorescence depolarization techniques are used to determine the molecular order and reorientational dynamics of the probe molecule TMA-DPH embedded in the lamellar L alpha and the hexagonal HII phases of lipid/water mixtures. The thermotropically induced L alpha----HII phase transition of the lipid DOPE is used to obtain macroscopically aligned samples in the hexagonal HII phase at 45 degrees C from samples prepared in the lamellar L alpha phase at 7 degrees C. The interpretation of angle-resolved fluorescence depolarization experiments on these phases, within the framework of the rotational diffusion model, yields the order parameters (P2) and (P4), and the diffusion constants for the reorientational motions. The reorientational motion rates of the TMA-DPH molecules in the hexagonal HII phase are comparable with those in the lamellar L alpha phase. Furthermore, the lateral diffusion of the probe molecule on the surface of the lipid/water cylinder in the hexagonal phase is found to be considerably slower than the reorientational motion. PMID:2720082

  12. Extracting the depolarization coefficient DNN from data measured with a full acceptance detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauenstein, F.; Clement, H.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Eyrich, W.; Gillitzer, A.; Grzonka, D.; Jowzaee, S.; Ritman, J.; Roderburg, E.; Röder, M.; Wintz, P.

    2016-05-01

    The spin transfer from vertically polarized beam protons to Λ or Σ hyperons of the associated strangeness production p → p →pK+ Λ and p → p →pK0Σ+ is described with the depolarization coefficient DNN. As the polarization of the hyperons is determined by their weak decays, detectors, which have a large acceptance for the decay particles, are needed. In this paper a formula is derived, which describes the depolarization coefficient DNN by count rates of a 4π detector. It is shown that formulas, which are given in publications for detectors with restricted acceptance, are specific cases of this formula for a 4π detector.

  13. Studying Photosynthesis by Measuring Fluorescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Jose Francisco; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an easy experiment to study the absorption and action spectrum of photosynthesis, as well as the inhibition by heat, high light intensity and the presence of the herbicide 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) on the photosynthetic process. The method involves measuring the chlorophyll fluorescence emitted by intact…

  14. Lidar depolarization measurements of ice-precipitating liquid cloud layers during the 2012 Canadian Arctic ACE Validation Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, E. M.; Perro, C. W.; Nott, G. J.; Hopper, J.; Duck, T. J.; Sica, R. J.; Drummond, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    There is still great uncertainty in the relative abundance of liquid and solid particles in polar clouds, particularly in winter. Measurements of these quantities are important for the correct estimate of the local radiation budget. Depolarization measurements by the CANDAC Rayleigh-Mie-Raman Lidar (CRL) at Eureka, Nunavut, Canada (80°N, 86°W) are improving our understanding in this area. The 2012 Canadian Arctic ACE Validation Campaign provided an opportunity to run the CRL depolarization channel nearly continuously (both day and night) throughout the polar sunrise season, measuring cloud particle phase with 7.5 m resolution in altitude and 1-minute time resolution in the troposphere. More than 10 co-located instruments, and additional detection channels of the CRL itself, make for a data set which is well-supported for intercomparison analyses. The CRL is a versatile instrument with eight detection channels, capable of measuring 532 nm (visible) and 355 nm (ultraviolet) elastic and nitrogen Raman backscatter, aerosol extinction, water vapour mixing ratio, tropospheric temperature profiles, as well as particulate properties including density and colour ratio. The 532 nm depolarization channel measures the extent to which the polarization state of the lidar beam is changed by scattering interactions with cloud particles in the sky, providing the ability to discern between ice crystals and liquid water droplets in polar clouds. This paper will focus on such measurements of early springtime clouds over Eureka. A nearly-continuous time series of depolarization was collected from late February through early April 2012 and provides a detailed case study of several distinct cloud features. Particular attention is paid to thin ice clouds of several varieties (both precipitating and non-precipitating, as well as some possible examples of mixed-phase clouds) and to ice-precipitating liquid cloud layers, examined in the context of local meteorological measurements. The

  15. Ice crystal habits from cloud chamber studies obtained by in-line holographic microscopy related to depolarization measurements.

    PubMed

    Amsler, Peter; Stetzer, Olaf; Schnaiter, Martin; Hesse, Evelyn; Benz, Stefan; Moehler, Ottmar; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2009-10-20

    We investigate hydrometeor habits at the AIDA chamber with a newly developed in-line holographic microscope HOLographic Imager for Microscopic Objects (HOLIMO). Sizes and habits of ice crystals and droplets in a mixed-phase cloud experiment are related to relative humidity with respect to ice (RH(ice)), temperature (T), and experiment time. This experiment is initiated with supercooled water drops. As a result, ice crystals within a maximum particle diameter size range of 2 to 118 microm (average size of 19 microm) are detected and 63% of them reveal regular habits. The observed particle habits match those predicted for a given RH(ice) and T. Two different growth modes emerge from this cloud. The first one appears during water injection and reveals mainly optical particle sizes in the range of 5 to 250 microm. The second mode grows to sizes of 5 to 63 microm, just after the particles of the first one fall out. It is found that an increasing aspect ratio chi of maximum length over thickness from 2 to 20 as obtained by HOLIMO corresponds to a decreasing linear depolarization ratio from 0.1 to 0.04, as independently obtained by depolarization measurements. PMID:19844319

  16. Depolarization ratio and attenuated backscatter for nine cloud types: analyses based on collocated CALIPSO lidar and MODIS measurements.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyoun-Myoung; Yang, Ping; Kattawar, George W; Nasiri, Shaima L; Hu, Yongxiang; Minnis, Patrick; Trepte, Charles; Winker, David

    2008-03-17

    This paper reports on the relationship between lidar backscatter and the corresponding depolarization ratio for nine types of cloud systems. The data used in this study are the lidar returns measured by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aboard the Cloud- Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite and the collocated cloud products derived from the observations made by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard Aqua satellite. Specifically, the operational MODIS cloud optical thickness and cloud-top pressure products are used to classify cloud types on the basis of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud classification scheme. While the CALIPSO observations provide information for up to 10 cloud layers, in the present study only the uppermost clouds are considered. The layer-averaged attenuated backscatter (gamma') and layer-averaged depolarization ratio (delta) from the CALIPSO measurements show both water- and ice-phase features for global cirrus, cirrostratus, and deep convective cloud classes. Furthermore, we screen both the MODIS and CALIPSO data to eliminate cases in which CALIPSO detected two- or multi-layered clouds. It is shown that low gamma' values corresponding to uppermost thin clouds are largely eliminated in the CALIPSO delta-gamma' relationship for single-layered clouds. For mid-latitude and polar regions corresponding, respectively, to latitude belts 30 degrees -60 degrees and 60 degrees -90 degrees in both the hemispheres, a mixture of water and ice is also observed in the case of the altostratus class. MODIS cloud phase flags are also used to screen ice clouds. The resultant water clouds flagged by the MODIS algorithm show only water phase feature in the delta-gamma' relation observed by CALIOP; however, in the case of the ice clouds flagged by the MODIS algorithm, the co-existence of ice- and water-phase clouds is still observed in

  17. Efficient Chlorophyll Fluorescence Measurements of Sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As with many crops, chlorophyll fluorescence emission is a promising tool for measuring responses of sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) to biotic and abiotic stresses. Chlorophyll fluorescence can be easily measured using portable fluorometers. However, several factors should be considered in order to op...

  18. Depolarized FRET (depolFRET) on the cell surface: FRET control by photoselection.

    PubMed

    Bene, László; Gogolák, Péter; Ungvári, Tamás; Bagdány, Miklós; Nagy, István; Damjanovich, László

    2016-02-01

    Sensitivity of FRET in hetero- and homo-FRET systems on the photoselected orientation distribution of donors has been proven by using polarized and depolarized light for excitation. FRET as well as donor and acceptor anisotropies have been simultaneously measured in a dual emission-polarization scheme realized in a conventional flow cytometer by using single laser excitation and applying fluorophore-conjugated mAbs against the MHCI and MHCII cell surface receptors. Depolarization of the originally polarized light have been achieved by using crystal depolarizers based on Cornu's principle, a quarter-wave plate for circular polarization, and a parallel beam splitter acting as a diagonal-polarizer for dual-polarization excitation. Simultaneous analysis of intensity-based FRET efficiency and acceptor depolarization equivocally report that depolarization of light may increase FRET in an amount depending on the acceptor-to-donor concentration ratio. Acceptor depolarization turned to be more sensitive to FRET than donor hyper-polarization and even than intensity-based FRET efficiency. It can be used as a sensitive tool for monitoring changes in the dynamics of the donor-acceptor pairs. The basic observations of FRET enhancement and increased acceptor depolarization obtained for hetero-FRET are paralleled by analog observations of homo-FRET enhancements under depolarized excitation. In terms of the orientation factor for FRET, the FRET enhancements on depolarization in the condition of the macroscopically isotropic orientation distributions such as those of the cell surface bound fluorophores report on the presence of local orientation mismatches of the donor and acceptor preventing the optimal FRET in the polarized case, which may be eliminated by the excitation depolarization. A theory of fluorescence anisotropy for depolarized excitation is also presented. PMID:26657258

  19. Mesosphere light scattering depolarization during the Perseids activity epoch by wide-angle polarization camera measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugolnikov, Oleg S.; Maslov, Igor A.

    2014-03-01

    The paper describes the study of scattered radiation field in the mesosphere basing on wide-angle polarization camera (WAPC) measurements of the twilight sky background and single scattering separation procedure. Mid-August observations in 2012 and 2013 show the decrease of single scattering polarization value probably related with Perseids meteor dust moderation in the upper mesosphere. Effect correlates with activity of tiny fraction of Perseids shower. Polarization and temperature analysis allows estimating the altitude of dust layer and character polarization of dust scattering.

  20. Fluorescence lifetime measurements in flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisker, Wolfgang; Klocke, Axel

    1997-05-01

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements provide insights int eh dynamic and structural properties of dyes and their micro- environment. The implementation of fluorescence lifetime measurements in flow cytometric systems allows to monitor large cell and particle populations with high statistical significance. In our system, a modulated laser beam is used for excitation and the phase shift of the fluorescence signal recorded with a fast computer controlled digital oscilloscope is processed digitally to determine the phase shift with respect to a reference beam by fast fourier transform. Total fluorescence intensity as well as other parameters can be determined simultaneously from the same fluorescence signal. We use the epi-illumination design to allow the use of high numerical apertures to collect as much light as possible to ensure detection of even weak fluorescence. Data storage and processing is done comparable to slit-scan flow cytometric data using data analysis system. The results are stored, displayed, combined with other parameters and analyzed as normal listmode data. In our report we discuss carefully the signal to noise ratio for analog and digital processed lifetime signals to evaluate the theoretical minimum fluorescence intensity for lifetime measurements. Applications to be presented include DNA staining, parameters of cell functions as well as different applications in non-mammalian cells such as algae.

  1. Fluorescence lifetime measurements in heterogeneous scattering medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Goro; Awasthi, Kamlesh; Furukawa, Daisuke

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescence lifetime in heterogeneous multiple light scattering systems is analyzed by an algorithm without solving the diffusion or radiative transfer equations. The algorithm assumes that the optical properties of medium are constant in the excitation and emission wavelength regions. If the assumption is correct and the fluorophore is a single species, the fluorescence lifetime can be determined by a set of measurements of temporal point-spread function of the excitation light and fluorescence at two different concentrations of the fluorophore. This method is not dependent on the heterogeneity of the optical properties of the medium as well as the geometry of the excitation-detection on an arbitrary shape of the sample. The algorithm was validated by an indocyanine green fluorescence in phantom measurements and demonstrated by an in vivo measurement.

  2. Depolarization of cell membrane is associated with an increase in ciliary beat frequency (CBF).

    PubMed

    Mao, H; Wong, L B

    1995-10-24

    We hypothesize that activation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors depolarizes the cell membrane of the mammalian ciliated cells which in turn causes an increase of CBF. To test this hypothesis, a di-8-ANEPPS fluorescence photon counting and nonstationary heterodyne laser light scattering system was developed to measure cell membrane potential (psi) and CBF in cultured ovine tracheal ciliated cells simultaneously. Carbachol dose dependently depolarized the cell membrane with a corresponding stimulation of CBF. The carbachol induced depolarization of cell membrane and increases of CBF were inhibited by prior application of either atropine or verapamil or amiloride. These novel data suggest that depolarization of the cell membrane and the corresponding stimulation of CBF caused by the activation of muscarinic receptors of the mammalian ciliated cells are dependent on the influx of either extracellular Ca2+ or Na+. PMID:7488025

  3. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements under shock compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jue; Bassett, Will; Banishev, Alexandr; Dlott, Dana

    2015-06-01

    Fluorescence anisotropy measurements, where the parallel and perpendicular polarized emissions from probe molecules are acquired simultaneously, provide direct measurement of molecular rotational dynamics. In our experiments, the fluorescence from rhodamine 6G dye in various materials under GPa shocks produced by laser-driven flyer plates is collected, separated into two orthogonally-polarized beams using a Wollaston prism and detected with a streak camera. In liquids, the molecular rotations result from rotational diffusion and in solids from shear flow. The rotation rates can be used to determine the viscosity of the shocked medium.

  4. Precise Measurement of the Absolute Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ave, M.; Bohacova, M.; Daumiller, K.; Di Carlo, P.; di Giulio, C.; San Luis, P. Facal; Gonzales, D.; Hojvat, C.; Hörandel, J. R.; Hrabovsky, M.; Iarlori, M.; Keilhauer, B.; Klages, H.; Kleifges, M.; Kuehn, F.; Monasor, M.; Nozka, L.; Palatka, M.; Petrera, S.; Privitera, P.; Ridky, J.; Rizi, V.; D'Orfeuil, B. Rouille; Salamida, F.; Schovanek, P.; Smida, R.; Spinka, H.; Ulrich, A.; Verzi, V.; Williams, C.

    2011-09-01

    We present preliminary results of the absolute yield of fluorescence emission in atmospheric gases. Measurements were performed at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility with a variety of beam particles and gases. Absolute calibration of the fluorescence yield to 5% level was achieved by comparison with two known light sources--the Cherenkov light emitted by the beam particles, and a calibrated nitrogen laser. The uncertainty of the energy scale of current Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays experiments will be significantly improved by the AIRFLY measurement.

  5. Fundus depolarization imaging with GDx VCC scanning laser polarimeter and depolarization characteristics of normal eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qienyuan; Leder, Henry A.; Lo, Barrick P.; Reed, Geradus C.; Knighton, Robert W.; Cousins, Scott W.

    2009-02-01

    GDx VCC is a confocal scanning laser polarimeter (SLP) developed to assess the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) of the eye based on measurement of the phase retardation in the backscattered light from the fundus. In addition to the phase retardation measurement, a depolarization measurement is readily available from the same image series. We hypothesize that the depolarized light in the GDx signal consists of backscattering from the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the RPE-Bruch's membrane junction, and further, that subRPE deposits contribute to the depolarized backscattered light in proportion to their thickness. Therefore, a quantitative macular depolarization map will provide information about both spatial distribution and heterogeneity of the RPE structure and deposit thickness. Ultimately we predict that depolarization mapping will significantly increase the positive predictive power to identify early dry AMD eyes. In this paper, depolarization measurements in normal eyes and age related changes are reported. Data collection was performed at the Duke University Eye Center. A commercial GDx VCC system was modified with a central fixation target and, instead of depolarized light intensity images, normalized depolarization images were derived and saved in the database. Macular depolarization was observed to increase with age in normal eyes at a rate of 0.27%/yr.

  6. Measurement of fluorescent white effects and whiteness.

    PubMed

    Anders, G

    1975-01-01

    This report surveys the literature and describes various techniques of whiteness measurement and evaluation in current use. Measuring techniques are described for dealing separately with the effects obtained by bleaching, blueing and fluorescent whitening, and an example is given of the direct quantitative estimation of a fluorescent whitening agents (FWAs) on a substrate by measuring reflectance in the ultraviolet region. Another chapter deals with the colorimetric estimation of the whiteness and the shade of a fluorescent white using modern apparatus in conjunction with a programmable minicomputer. A new simple and universally applicab,e formula was worked out: W=D-Y+P-x+Q-y+C which has been successfully used in routine tests and which for the first time gives different weight to whiteness values corresponding to all shade preferences existing in theory. Each user can match the formula to his own preference by appropriate adjustment of the D, P, Q andC values. Y,x and y are the customary colorimetric values as standardized by the CIE (Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage). It was also found that with another formula the shades of fluorescent whitening effects (green to red tints) may be defined in a simple way. PMID:1064551

  7. Plant stress detection by remote measurement of fluorescence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McFarlane, J. C.; Watson, Robert D.; Theisen, Arnold F.; Jackson, R. D.; Ehrler, W. L.; Pinter, P. J., Jr.; Idso, S. B.; Reginato, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence of mature lemon trees was measured with a Fraunhofer line discriminator (FLD). An increase in fluorescence was correlated with plant water stress as measured by stomatal resistance and twig water potential.

  8. Laser-excited fluorescence for measuring atmospheric pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.

    1975-01-01

    System measures amount of given pollutant at specific location. Infrared laser aimed at location has wavelength that will cause molecules of pollutant to fluoresce. Detector separates fluorescence from other radiation and measures its intensity to indicate concentration of pollutant.

  9. Measurement of Rydberg positronium fluorescence lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deller, A.; Alonso, A. M.; Cooper, B. S.; Hogan, S. D.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2016-06-01

    We report measurements of the fluorescence lifetimes of positronium (Ps) atoms with principal quantum numbers n =10 -19 . Ps atoms in Rydberg-Stark states were produced via a two-color two-step 1 3S→2 3P→n 3S/n measured time-of-flight distributions were used to determine the mean lifetimes of the Rydberg levels, yielding values ranging from 3 μ s to 26 μ s . Our data are in accord with the expected radiative lifetimes of Rydberg-Stark states of Ps.

  10. Connection of Jones and Mueller Tensors in Second Harmonic Generation and Multi-Photon Fluorescence Measurements.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Garth J

    2016-04-01

    Despite the rapidly growing use of second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy, opportunities for relating polarization-dependent measurements back to local structure and molecular orientation are often confounded by losses in polarization purity. In this work, connections linking Mueller tensor and Jones tensor descriptions of polarization-dependent SHG and TPEF are shown to substantially simplify partially depolarized microscopy measurements. These connections were facilitated by the derivation of several new tensor identity relations, based on generalization of established transformations of matrices and vectors. Methods are described for integrating local-frame symmetry and azimuthal rotation angle for simplifying the Mueller tensor. Through simple expressions bridging the Mueller and Jones formalisms, mathematical models for partial depolarization can greatly simplify interpretation of SHG and TPEF measurements to reconstruct the more general Mueller tensors using the much more concise Jones descriptions for the purely polarized components. Integrating the Mueller architecture allows polarization-dependent SHG and TPEF measurements to be connected back to a relatively small set of free parameters related to local structure and orientation. PMID:26918624

  11. Ice clouds and Asian dust studied with lidar measurements of particle extinction-to-backscatter ratio, particle depolarization, and water-vapor mixing ratio over Tsukuba.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Tetsu; Nagai, Tomohiro; Nakazato, Masahisa; Mano, Yuzo; Matsumura, Takatsugu

    2003-12-20

    The tropospheric particle extinction-to-backscatter ratio, the depolarization ratio, and the water-vapor mixing ratio were measured by use of a Raman lidar and a polarization lidar during the Asian dust seasons in 2001 and 2002 in Tsukuba, Japan. The apparent (not corrected for multiple-scattering effects) extinction-to-backscatter ratios (Sp) showed a dependence on the relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) obtained from the lidar-derived water-vapor mixing ratio and radiosonde-derived temperature; they were mostly higher than 30 sr in dry air (RHice < 50%), whereas they were mostly lower than 30 sr in ice-supersaturated air (RHice > or = 100%), where the apparent extinction coefficients were larger than 0.036 km(-1). Both regions showed mean particle depolarization ratios of 20%-22%. Comparisons with theoretical calculations and the previous experiments suggest that the observed dependence of Sp on RHice is attributed to the difference in the predominant particles: nonspherical aerosols (mainly the Asian dust) in dry air and cloud particles in ice-supersaturated air. PMID:14717284

  12. Shape-induced Gravitational Sorting of Saharan Dust During Transatlantic Voyage: Evidence from CALIOP Lidar Depolarization Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander; Kostinski, Alexander B.; Varnai, Tamas

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by the physical picture of shape-dependent air resistance and, consequently, shape-induced differential sedimentation of dust particles, we searched for and found evidence of dust particle asphericity affecting the evolution and distribution of dust-scattered light depolarization ratio (delta). Specifically, we examined a large data set of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observations of Saharan dust from June to August 2007. Observing along a typical transatlantic dust track, we find that (1) median delta is uniformly distributed between 2 and 5?km altitudes as the elevated dust leaves the west coast of Africa, thereby indicating uniformly random mixing of particle shapes with height; (2) vertical homogeneity of median delta breaks down during the westward transport: between 2 and 5?km delta increases with altitude and this increase becomes more pronounced with westward progress; (3) delta tends to increase at higher altitude (greater than 4?km) and decrease at lower altitude (less than 4?km) during the westward transport. All these features are captured qualitatively by a minimal model (two shapes only), suggesting that shape-induced differential settling and consequent sorting indeed contribute significantly to the observed temporal evolution and vertical stratification of dust properties. By implicating particle shape as a likely cause of gravitational sorting, these results will affect the estimates of radiative transfer through Saharan dust layers.

  13. Integrating fluorescence and interactance measurements to improve apple maturity assessment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fluorescence and interactance are promising techniques for measuring fruit quality and condition. Our previous research showed that a hyperspectral imaging technique integrating fluorescence and reflectance could improve predictions of selected quality parameters compared to single sensing technique...

  14. Comparison of Sum Absolute QRST Integral, and Temporal Variability in Depolarization and Repolarization, Measured by Dynamic Vectorcardiography Approach, in Healthy Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Tereshchenko, Larisa G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently we showed the predictive value of sum absolute QRST integral (SAI QRST) and repolarization lability for risk stratification of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in heart failure patients. The goal of this study was to compare SAI QRST and metrics of depolarization and repolarization variability in healthy men and women. Methods Orthogonal ECGs were recorded at rest for 10 minutes in 160 healthy men and women (mean age 39.6±14.6, 80 men). Mean spatial TT′ angle, and normalized variances of T loop area, of spatial T vector amplitude, of QT interval and Tpeak-Tend area were measured for assessment of repolarization lability. Normalized variances of spatial QRS vector and QRS loop area characterized variability of depolarization. In addition, variability indices (VI) were calculated to adjust for normalized heart rate variance. SAI QRST was measured as the averaged arithmetic sum of areas under the QRST curve. Results Men were characterized by shorter QTc (430.3±21.7 vs. 444.7±22.2 ms; P<0.0001) and larger SAI QRST (282.1±66.7 vs.204.9±58.5 mV*ms; P<0.0001). Repolarization lability negatively correlated with spatial T vector amplitude. Adjusted by normalized heart rate variance, QT variability index was significantly higher in women than in men (−1.54±0.38 vs. −1.70±0.33; P = 0.017). However, in multivariate logistic regression after adjustment for body surface area, QTc, and spatial T vector amplitude, healthy men had 1.5–3 fold higher probability of having larger repolarization lability, as compared to healthy women (T vector amplitude variability index odds ratio 3.88(95%CI 1.4–11.1; P = 0.012). Conclusions Healthy men more likely than women have larger repolarization lability. PMID:23451181

  15. An optical microsensor to measure fluorescent light intensity in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Beyenal, Haluk; Yakymyshyn, Chris; Hyungnak, Jeon; Davis, Catherine C; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2004-09-01

    We have developed an optical microsensor to quantify fluorescent light intensity distribution in biofilms. The optical system consisted of a beam splitter, light couplers, filters and a spectrophotometer able to accept the fiberoptic cable to measure fluorescent light intensity. The emitted light, fluorescence from the biofilm, was collected at the tip of the optical microsensor and was transferred to a spectrophotometer via a fiberoptic cable. The total fluorescent light intensity was evaluated from the emission spectrum by numerical integration. The newly developed fiberoptic microsensor was tested using a Staphylococcus aureus strain producing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) grown as biofilm. We used a 405-nm violet laser diode for excitation, and measured the emission intensity between 480 nm and 540 nm. The optical microsensor that quantifies fluorescent light intensity is a promising tool in biofilm research which often requires detection and quantification of fluorescent light intensity distribution generated by various fluorescent proteins. PMID:15279941

  16. Fluorescent nanosensors for intracellular measurements: synthesis, characterization, calibration, and measurement

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Arpan S.; Chauhan, Veeren M.; Johnston, Angus P. R.; Esler, Tim; Aylott, Jonathan W.

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of intracellular acidification is important for understanding fundamental biological pathways as well as developing effective therapeutic strategies. Fluorescent pH nanosensors are an enabling technology for real-time monitoring of intracellular acidification. The physicochemical characteristics of nanosensors can be engineered to target specific cellular compartments and respond to external stimuli. Therefore, nanosensors represent a versatile approach for probing biological pathways inside cells. The fundamental components of nanosensors comprise a pH-sensitive fluorophore (signal transducer) and a pH-insensitive reference fluorophore (internal standard) immobilized in an inert non-toxic matrix. The inert matrix prevents interference of cellular components with the sensing elements as well as minimizing potentially harmful effects of some fluorophores on cell function. Fluorescent nanosensors are synthesized using standard laboratory equipment and are detectable by non-invasive widely accessible imaging techniques. The outcomes of studies employing this technology are dependent on reliable methodology for performing measurements. In particular, special consideration must be given to conditions for sensor calibration, uptake conditions and parameters for image analysis. We describe procedures for: (1) synthesis and characterization of polyacrylamide and silica based nanosensors, (2) nanosensor calibration and (3) performing measurements using fluorescence microscopy. PMID:24474936

  17. Apparatus for eliminating background interference in fluorescence measurements

    DOEpatents

    Martin, John C.; Jett, James H.

    1986-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for eliminating background interference during fluorescence measurements in a multiple laser flow cytometer. A biological particle stained with fluorescent dyes is excited by a laser. A fluorescence detector detects the fluorescence. The particle scatters light and a gate signal is generated and delayed until the biological particle reaches the next laser. The delayed signal turns on this next laser, which excites a different stained component of the same biological particle.

  18. Apparatus for eliminating background interference in fluorescence measurements

    DOEpatents

    Martin, J.C.; Jett, J.H.

    1984-01-06

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for eliminating background interference during fluorescence measurements in a multiple laser flow cytometer. A biological particle stained with fluorescent dyes is excited by a laser. A fluorescence detector detects the fluorescence. The particle scatters light and a gate signal is generated and delayed until the biological particle reaches the next laser. The delayed signal turns on this next laser which excites a different stained component of the same biological particle.

  19. Apparatus for eliminating background interference in fluorescence measurements

    DOEpatents

    Martin, J.C.; Jett, J.H.

    1986-03-04

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for eliminating background interference during fluorescence measurements in a multiple laser flow cytometer. A biological particle stained with fluorescent dyes is excited by a laser. A fluorescence detector detects the fluorescence. The particle scatters light and a gate signal is generated and delayed until the biological particle reaches the next laser. The delayed signal turns on this next laser, which excites a different stained component of the same biological particle. 8 figs.

  20. Dissolved-oxygen quenching of in-situ fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudyk, Wayne; Tonaszuck, David; Pohlig, Kenneth

    1993-04-01

    In-situ fluorescence measurements of aromatic organic ground water contaminants do not always agree with gas chromatographic methods. Dissolved oxygen quenching of fluorescence may be an interferant in field measurements. Two standard fluorescent aromatics, quinine sulfate and naphthalene, were evaluated in this study. Over the range of dissolved oxygen concentrations expected to be encountered in the field, no effects of oxygen quenching on fluorescence of these compounds was observed. Quenching of quinine sulfate fluorescence by sodium chloride was observed using this system. Sodium chloride quenching was shown to follow the Stern-Volmer relation.

  1. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOEpatents

    Deka, C.; Steinkamp, J.A.

    1999-06-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements are disclosed for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated CW laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes. 12 figs.

  2. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOEpatents

    Deka, Chiranjit; Steinkamp, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated cw laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes.

  3. Suitability of fluorescence measurements to quantify sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Barton, Larry L; Carpenter, Claire M

    2013-06-01

    Fluorescence activity has been used to identify Desulfovibrio and has been termed the 'desulfoviridin test'. This fluorescence is attributed to the prosthetic group of bisulfite reductase, a key enzyme in dissimilatory sulfate reduction. We have pursued the use of fluorescence measurements to quantify sulfate-reducing bacteria. Cells of D. desulfuricans and D. gigas were treated with NaOH and produced two fluorescence spectra: one with maximum fluorescence with an excitation at 395 nm and an emission at 605 nm and another with an excitation at 320 nm and emission at 360 nm. Using the fluorescence with excitation at 395 nm and emission at 605 nm, we explored a series of parameters to measure Desulfovibrio in pure cultures and environmental samples. Fluorescence measurements are reliable provided the cells are treated with 1.75 N NaOH and the chromophore released from the cells is not exposed to strong light intensity, and is not exposed to temperatures greater than 20 °C, and measurements are done within a few minutes of extraction. Bleaching of fluorescence was attributed to metal ions in solution which was not observed until metal concentrations reached 1.5mM. We propose that D. desulfuricans is appropriate as the reference organism for measurement of sulfate-reducing bacteria by fluorescence and by using fluorescence intensity, 10(5) cells/ml can be readily detected in environmental samples. PMID:23566827

  4. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    PubMed

    George Abraham, Bobin; Sarkisyan, Karen S; Mishin, Alexander S; Santala, Ville; Tkachenko, Nikolai V; Karp, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM). PMID:26237400

  5. Models of fluorescence and photosynthesis for interpreting measurements of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    van der Tol, C; Berry, J A; Campbell, P K E; Rascher, U

    2014-01-01

    We have extended a conventional photosynthesis model to simulate field and laboratory measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence at the leaf scale. The fluorescence paramaterization is based on a close nonlinear relationship between the relative light saturation of photosynthesis and nonradiative energy dissipation in plants of different species. This relationship diverged only among examined data sets under stressed (strongly light saturated) conditions, possibly caused by differences in xanthophyll pigment concentrations. The relationship was quantified after analyzing data sets of pulse amplitude modulated measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence and gas exchange of leaves of different species exposed to different levels of light, CO2, temperature, nitrogen fertilization treatments, and drought. We used this relationship in a photosynthesis model. The coupled model enabled us to quantify the relationships between steady state chlorophyll fluorescence yield, electron transport rate, and photosynthesis in leaves under different environmental conditions. Key Points Light saturation of photosynthesis determines quenching of leaf fluorescence We incorporated steady state leaf fluorescence in a photosynthesis model PMID:27398266

  6. Photon-counting technique for rapid fluorescence-decay measurement.

    PubMed

    Pack, S D; Renfro, M W; King, G B; Laurendeau, N M

    1998-08-01

    We report on a novel laser-induced fluorescence triple-integration method (LIFTIME) that is capable of making rapid, continuous fluorescence lifetime measurements by a unique photon-counting technique. The LIFTIME has been convolved with picosecond time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence, which employs a high-repetition-rate mode-locked laser, permitting the eventual monitoring of instantaneous species concentrations in turbulent flames. We verify the technique by application of the LIFTIME to two known fluorescence media, diphenyloxazole (PPO) and quinine sulfate monohydrate (QSM). PPO has a fluorescence lifetime of 1.28 ns, whereas QSM has a fluorescence lifetime that can be varied from 1.0 to 3.0 ns. From these liquid samples we demonstrate that fluorescence lifetime can currently be monitored at a sampling rate of up to 500 Hz with less than 10% uncertainty (1 sigma) . PMID:18087478

  7. Optical and microphysical characterization of aerosol layers over South Africa by means of multi-wavelength depolarization and Raman lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakaki, Elina; van Zyl, Pieter G.; Müller, Detlef; Balis, Dimitris; Komppula, Mika

    2016-07-01

    Optical and microphysical properties of different aerosol types over South Africa measured with a multi-wavelength polarization Raman lidar are presented. This study could assist in bridging existing gaps relating to aerosol properties over South Africa, since limited long-term data of this type are available for this region. The observations were performed under the framework of the EUCAARI campaign in Elandsfontein. The multi-wavelength PollyXT Raman lidar system was used to determine vertical profiles of the aerosol optical properties, i.e. extinction and backscatter coefficients, Ångström exponents, lidar ratio and depolarization ratio. The mean microphysical aerosol properties, i.e. effective radius and single-scattering albedo, were retrieved with an advanced inversion algorithm. Clear differences were observed for the intensive optical properties of atmospheric layers of biomass burning and urban/industrial aerosols. Our results reveal a wide range of optical and microphysical parameters for biomass burning aerosols. This indicates probable mixing of biomass burning aerosols with desert dust particles, as well as the possible continuous influence of urban/industrial aerosol load in the region. The lidar ratio at 355 nm, the lidar ratio at 532 nm, the linear particle depolarization ratio at 355 nm and the extinction-related Ångström exponent from 355 to 532 nm were 52 ± 7 sr, 41 ± 13 sr, 0.9 ± 0.4 % and 2.3 ± 0.5, respectively, for urban/industrial aerosols, while these values were 92 ± 10 sr, 75 ± 14 sr, 3.2 ± 1.3 % and 1.7 ± 0.3, respectively, for biomass burning aerosol layers. Biomass burning particles are larger and slightly less absorbing compared to urban/industrial aerosols. The particle effective radius were found to be 0.10 ± 0.03, 0.17 ± 0.04 and 0.13 ± 0.03 µm for urban/industrial, biomass burning, and mixed aerosols, respectively, while the single-scattering albedo at 532 nm was 0.87 ± 0.06, 0.90 ± 0.06, and 0.88 ± 0.07 (at 532

  8. Optical and microphysical characterization of aerosol layers over South Africa by means of multi-wavelength depolarization and Raman lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakaki, E.; van Zyl, P. G.; Müller, D.; Balis, D.; Komppula, M.

    2015-12-01

    Optical and microphysical properties of different aerosol types over South Africa measured with a multi-wavelength polarization Raman lidar are presented. This study could assist in bridging existing gaps relating to aerosol properties over South Africa, since limited long-term data of this type is available for this region. The observations were performed under the framework of the EUCAARI campaign in Elandsfontein. The multi-wavelength PollyXT Raman lidar system was used to determine vertical profiles of the aerosol optical properties, i.e. extinction and backscatter coefficients, Ångström exponents, lidar ratio and depolarization ratio. The mean microphysical aerosol proper ties, i.e. effective radius and single scattering, albedo were retrieved with an advanced inversion algorithm. Clear differences were observed for the intensive optical properties of atmospheric layers of biomass burning and urban/industrial aerosols. Our results reveal a wide range of optical and microphysical parameters for biomass burning aerosols. This indicates probable mixing of biomass burning aerosols with desert dust particles, as well as the possible continuous influence of urban/industrial aerosol load in the region. The lidar ratio at 355 nm, the linear particle depolarization ratio at 355 nm and the extinction-related Ångström exponent from 355 to 532 nm were 52 ± 7 sr; 0.9 ± 0.4 % and 2.3 ± 0.5, respectively for urban/industrial aerosols, while these values were 92 ± 10 sr; 3.2 ± 1.3 %; 2.0 ± 0.4 respectively for biomass burning aerosols layers. Biomass burning particles are larger and slightly less absorbing compared to urban/industrial aerosols. The particle effective radius were found to be 0.10 ± 0.03, 0.17 ± 0.04 and 0.13 ± 0.03 μm for urban/industrial, biomass burning, and mixed biomass burning and desert dust aerosols, respectively, while the single scattering albedo at 532 nm were 0.87 ± 0.06, 0.90 ± 0.06, and 0.88 ± 0.07 (at 532 nm), respectively for

  9. Molecular anisotropy effects in carbon K-edge scattering: depolarized diffuse scattering and optical anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Kevin H.

    2014-07-14

    Some polymer properties, such as conductivity, are very sensitive to short- and intermediate-range orientational and positional ordering of anisotropic molecular functional groups, and yet means to characterize orientational order in disordered systems are very limited. We demonstrate that resonant scattering at the carbon K-edge is uniquely sensitive to short-range orientation correlations in polymers through depolarized scattering at high momentum transfers, using atactic polystyrene as a well-characterized test system. Depolarized scattering is found to coexist with unpolarized fluorescence, and to exhibit pronounced anisotropy. We also quantify the spatially averaged optical anisotropy from low-angle reflectivity measurements, finding anisotropy consistent with prior visible, x-ray absorption, and theoretical studies. The average anisotropy is much smaller than that in the depolarized scattering and the two have different character. Both measurements exhibit clear spectral signatures from the phenyl rings and the polyethylene-like backbone. Discussion focuses on analysis considerations and prospects for using this depolarized scattering for studies of disorder in soft condensed matter.

  10. SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF CIRCULAR DICHROISM AND FLUORESCENCE POLARIZATION ANISOTROPY.

    SciTech Connect

    SUTHERLAND,J.C.

    2002-01-19

    Circular dichroism and fluorescence polarization anisotropy are important tools for characterizing biomolecular systems. Both are used extensively in kinetic experiments involving stopped- or continuous flow systems as well as titrations and steady-state spectroscopy. This paper presents the theory for determining circular dichroism and fluorescence polarization anisotropy simultaneously, thus insuring the two parameters are recorded under exactly the same conditions and at exactly the same time in kinetic experiments. The approach to measuring circular dichroism is that used in almost all conventional dichrographs. Two arrangements for measuring fluorescence polarization anisotropy are described. One uses a single fluorescence detector and signal processing with a lock-in amplifier that is similar to the measurement of circular dichroism. The second approach uses classic ''T'' format detection optics, and thus can be used with conventional photon-counting detection electronics. Simple extensions permit the simultaneous measurement of the absorption and excitation intensity corrected fluorescence intensity.

  11. Membrane depolarization in PC-12 cells during hypoxia is regulated by an O2-sensitive K+ current.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W H; Conforti, L; Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Millhorn, D E

    1996-08-01

    The effects of hypoxia on K+ current (IK), resting membrane potential, and cytosolic free Ca2+ in rat pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cells were studied. Whole cell voltage- and current-clamp experiments were performed to measure IK and membrane potential, respectively. Cytosolic free Ca2+ level was measured using the Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent dye fura 2. Depolarizing voltage steps to +50 mV from a holding potential of -90 mV elicited a slowly inactivating, tetraethylammonium chloride-sensitive, and Ca(2+)-insensitive IK that was reversibly inhibited by reduced O2 tension. Graded reduction in PO2 (from 150 to 0 mmHg) induced a graded inhibition of O2-sensitive IK [IK(O2)] up to 46% at 0 mmHg. Moreover, hypoxia induced a 19-mV membrane depolarization and a twofold increase in cytosolic free Ca2+. In Ca(2+)-free condition, inhibition of IK(O2) induced an 8-mV depolarization, suggesting that inhibition of IK(O2) was responsible for initiating depolarization. The effect of reduced PO2 on the current-voltage relationship showed a reduction of outward current and a 14-mV shift in the reversal potential comparable with the amount of depolarization measured in current clamp experiments. Neither Ca(2+)-activated IK nor inwardly rectifying IK are responsible for the hypoxia-induced depolarization. In conclusion, PC-12 cells express an IK(O2), inhibition of which leads to membrane depolarization and increased intracellular Ca2+, making the PC-12 clonal cell line a useful model for studying the molecular and biophysical mechanisms that mediate O2 chemosensitivity. PMID:8770007

  12. Intracellular distribution of fluorescent copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes measured with fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hickey, James L; James, Janine L; Henderson, Clare A; Price, Katherine A; Mot, Alexandra I; Buncic, Gojko; Crouch, Peter J; White, Jonathan M; White, Anthony R; Smith, Trevor A; Donnelly, Paul S

    2015-10-01

    The intracellular distribution of fluorescently labeled copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes was investigated in M17 neuroblastoma cells and primary cortical neurons with a view to providing insights into the neuroprotective activity of a copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex known as Cu(II)(atsm). Time-resolved fluorescence measurements allowed the identification of the Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes as well as the free ligand inside the cells by virtue of the distinct fluorescence lifetime of each species. Confocal fluorescent microscopy of cells treated with the fluorescent copper(II)bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex revealed significant fluorescence associated with cytoplasmic puncta that were identified to be lysosomes in primary cortical neurons and both lipid droplets and lysosomes in M17 neuroblastoma cells. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that the fluorescence signal emanating from the lipid droplets could be attributed to the copper(II) complex but also that some degree of loss of the metal ion led to diffuse cytosolic fluorescence that could be attributed to the metal-free ligand. The accumulation of the copper(II) complex in lipid droplets could be relevant to the neuroprotective activity of Cu(II)(atsm) in models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease. PMID:26397162

  13. Measuring initiator caspase activation by bimolecular fluorescence complementation.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Melissa J; Bouchier-Hayes, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Initiator caspases, including caspase-2, -8, and -9, are activated by the proximity-driven dimerization that occurs after their recruitment to activation platforms. Here we describe the use of caspase bimolecular fluorescence complementation (caspase BiFC) to measure this induced proximity. BiFC assays rely on the use of a split fluorescent protein to identify protein-protein interactions in cells. When fused to interacting proteins, the fragments of the split fluorescent protein (which do not fluoresce on their own) can associate and fluoresce. In this protocol, we use the fluorescent protein Venus, a brighter and more photostable variant of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), to detect the induced proximity of caspase-2. Plasmids encoding two fusion products (caspase-2 fused to either the amino- or carboxy-terminal halves of Venus) are transfected into cells. The cells are then treated with an activating (death) stimulus. The induced proximity (and subsequent activation) of caspase-2 in the cells is visualized as Venus fluorescence. The proportion of Venus-positive cells at a single time point can be determined using fluorescence microscopy. Alternatively, the increase in fluorescence intensity over time can be evaluated by time-lapse confocal microscopy. The caspase BiFC strategy described here should also work for other initiator caspases, such as caspase-8 or -9, as long as the correct controls are used. PMID:25561623

  14. Laser-fluorescence measurement of marine algae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.

    1980-01-01

    Progress in remote sensing of algae by laser-induced fluorescence is subject of comprehensive report. Existing single-wavelength and four-wavelength systems are reviewed, and new expression for power received by airborne sensor is derived. Result differs by as much as factor of 10 from those previously reported. Detailed error analysis evluates factors affecting accuracy of laser-fluorosensor systems.

  15. Measurement of Fluorescence Spectra from Ambient Aerosol Particles Using Laser-induced Fluorescence Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketani, F.; Kanaya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Moteki, N.; Takegawa, N.

    2011-12-01

    To obtain the information of composition of organic aerosol particles in atmosphere, we developed an instrument using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. To measure the fluorescence from a particle, we employed two lasers. Scattering light signal derived from a single particle upon crossing the 635nm-CW laser triggers the 266nm-pulsed laser to excite the particle. Fluorescence from the particle in the wavelength range 300-600nm is spectrally dispersed by a grating spectrometer and then detected by a 32-Ch photo-multiplier tube(PMT). The aerosol stream is surrounded by a coaxial sheath air flow and delivered to the optical chamber at atmospheric pressure. Using PSL particles with known sizes, we made a calibration curve to estimate particle size from scattering light intensity. With the current setup of the instrument we are able to detect both scattering and fluorescence from particles whose diameters are larger than 0.5um. Our system was able to differentiate particles composed of mono-aromatic species (e.g. Tryptophan) from those of Riboflavin, by their different fluorescence wavelengths. Also, measurements of fluorescence spectra of ambient particles were demonstrated in our campus in Yokosuka city, facing Tokyo bay in Japan. We obtained several types of florescence spectra in the 8 hours. Classification of the measured fluorescence spectra will be discussed in the presentation.

  16. Double-excitation fluorescence spectral imaging: eliminating tissue auto-fluorescence from in vivo PPIX measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torosean, Sason; Flynn, Brendan; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Davis, Scott C.; Gunn, Jason; Axelsson, Johan; Pogue, Brian W.

    2012-02-01

    An ultrasound coupled handheld-probe-based optical fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) system has been in development for the purpose of quantifying the production of Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) in aminolevulinic acid treated (ALA), Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC) in vivo. The design couples fiber-based spectral sampling of PPIX fluorescence emission with a high frequency ultrasound imaging system, allowing regionally localized fluorescence intensities to be quantified [1]. The optical data are obtained by sequential excitation of the tissue with a 633nm laser, at four source locations and five parallel detections at each of the five interspersed detection locations. This method of acquisition permits fluorescence detection for both superficial and deep locations in ultrasound field. The optical boundary data, tissue layers segmented from ultrasound image and diffusion theory are used to estimate the fluorescence in tissue layers. To improve the recovery of the fluorescence signal of PPIX, eliminating tissue autofluorescence is of great importance. Here the approach was to utilize measurements which straddled the steep Qband excitation peak of PPIX, via the integration of an additional laser source, exciting at 637 nm; a wavelength with a 2 fold lower PPIX excitation value than 633nm.The auto-fluorescence spectrum acquired from the 637 nm laser is then used to spectrally decouple the fluorescence data and produce an accurate fluorescence emission signal, because the two wavelengths have very similar auto-fluorescence but substantially different PPIX excitation levels. The accuracy of this method, using a single source detector pair setup, is verified through animal tumor model experiments, and the result is compared to different methods of fluorescence signal recovery.

  17. System and method for measuring fluorescence of a sample

    DOEpatents

    Riot, Vincent J

    2015-03-24

    The present disclosure provides a system and a method for measuring fluorescence of a sample. The sample may be a polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) array, a loop-mediated-isothermal amplification array, etc. LEDs are used to excite the sample, and a photodiode is used to collect the sample's fluorescence. An electronic offset signal is used to reduce the effects of background fluorescence and the noises from the measurement system. An integrator integrates the difference between the output of the photodiode and the electronic offset signal over a given period of time. The resulting integral is then converted into digital domain for further processing and storage.

  18. Models of fluorescence and photosynthesis for interpreting measurements of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tol, C.; Berry, J. A.; Campbell, P. K. E.; Rascher, U.

    2014-12-01

    We have extended a conventional photosynthesis model to simulate field and laboratory measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence at the leaf scale. The fluorescence paramaterization is based on a close nonlinear relationship between the relative light saturation of photosynthesis and nonradiative energy dissipation in plants of different species. This relationship diverged only among examined data sets under stressed (strongly light saturated) conditions, possibly caused by differences in xanthophyll pigment concentrations. The relationship was quantified after analyzing data sets of pulse amplitude modulated measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence and gas exchange of leaves of different species exposed to different levels of light, CO2, temperature, nitrogen fertilization treatments, and drought. We used this relationship in a photosynthesis model. The coupled model enabled us to quantify the relationships between steady state chlorophyll fluorescence yield, electron transport rate, and photosynthesis in leaves under different environmental conditions.

  19. Fluorescence cross section measurements of biological agent simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.R.

    1996-11-01

    Fluorescence is a powerful technique that has potential uses in detection and characterization of biological aerosols both in the battlefield and in civilian environments. Fluorescence techniques can be used with ultraviolet (UV) light detection and ranging (LIDAR) equipment to detect biological aerosol clouds at a distance, to provide early warning of a biological attack, and to track an potentially noxious cloud. Fluorescence can also be used for detection in a point sensor to monitor biological materials and to distinguish agents from benign aerosols. This work is part of a continuing program by the Army`s Chemical and Biological Defense Command to characterized the optical properties of biological agents. Reported here are ultraviolet fluorescence measurements of Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus Globigii aerosols suspended in an electrodynamic particle trap. Fluorescence spectra of a common atmospheric aerosol, pine pollen, are also presented.

  20. Laser-saturated fluorescence measurements in laminar sooting diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Changlie

    1993-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical is known to be one of the most important intermediate species in the combustion processes. The hydroxyl radical has also been considered a dominant oxidizer of soot particles in flames. In this investigation the hydroxyl concentration profiles in sooting diffusion flames were measured by the laser-saturated fluorescence (LSF) method. The temperature distributions in the flames were measured by the two-line LSF technique and by thermocouple. In the sooting region the OH fluorescence was too weak to make accurate temperature measurements. The hydroxyl fluorescence profiles for all four flames presented herein show that the OH fluorescence intensities peaked near the flame front. The OH fluorescence intensity dropped sharply toward the dark region of the flame and continued declining to the sooting region. The OH fluorescence profiles also indicate that the OH fluorescence decreased with increasing height in the flames for all flames investigated. Varying the oxidizer composition resulted in a corresponding variation in the maximum OH concentration and the flame temperature. Furthermore, it appears that the maximum OH concentration for each flame increased with increasing flame temperature.

  1. Fluorescence lifetime as a new parameter in analytical cytology measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkamp, John A.; Deka, Chiranjit; Lehnert, Bruce E.; Crissman, Harry A.

    1996-05-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to quantify fluorescence decay lifetimes on fluorochrome-labeled cells/particles. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and frequency-domain fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved lifetime measurements, while preserving conventional FCM capabilities. Cells are analyzed as they intersect a high-frequency, intensity-modulated (sine wave) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence signals are processed by conventional and phase-sensitive signal detection electronics and displayed as frequency distribution histograms. In this study we describe results of fluorescence intensity and lifetime measurements on fluorescently labeled particles, cells, and chromosomes. Examples of measurements on intrinsic cellular autofluorescence, cells labeled with immunofluorescence markers for cell- surface antigens, mitochondria stains, and on cellular DNA and protein binding fluorochromes will be presented to illustrate unique differences in measured lifetimes and changes caused by fluorescence quenching. This innovative technology will be used to probe fluorochrome/molecular interactions in the microenvironment of cells/chromosomes as a new parameter and thus expand the researchers' understanding of biochemical processes and structural features at the cellular and molecular level.

  2. Measurement of Sun Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence Using Hyperspectral Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irteza, S. M.; Nichol, J. E.

    2016-06-01

    Solar Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence (SIF), can be used as an indicator of stress in vegetation. Several scientific approaches have been made and there is considerable evidence that steady state Chlorophyll fluorescence is an accurate indicator of plant stress hence a reliable tool to monitor vegetation health status. Retrieval of Chlorophyll fluorescence provides an insight into photochemical and carbon sequestration processes within vegetation. Detection of Chlorophyll fluorescence has been well understood in the laboratory and field measurement. Fluorescence retrieval methods were applied in and around the atmospheric absorption bands 02B (Red wavelength) approximately 690 nm and 02A (Far red wavelengths) 740 nm. Hyperion satellite images were acquired for the years 2012 to 2015 in different seasons. Atmospheric corrections were applied using the 6S Model. The Fraunhofer Line Discrimanator (FLD) method was applied for retrieval of SIF from the Hyperion images by measuring the signal around the absorption bands in both vegetated and non vegetated land cover types. Absorption values were extracted in all the selected bands and the fluorescence signal was detected. The relationships between NDVI and Fluorescence derived from the satellite images are investigated to understand vegetation response within the absorption bands.

  3. Measuring and Sorting Cell Populations Expressing Isospectral Fluorescent Proteins with Different Fluorescence Lifetimes

    PubMed Central

    Naivar, Mark; Houston, Jessica P.; Brent, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Study of signal transduction in live cells benefits from the ability to visualize and quantify light emitted by fluorescent proteins (XFPs) fused to different signaling proteins. However, because cell signaling proteins are often present in small numbers, and because the XFPs themselves are poor fluorophores, the amount of emitted light, and the observable signal in these studies, is often small. An XFP's fluorescence lifetime contains additional information about the immediate environment of the fluorophore that can augment the information from its weak light signal. Here, we constructed and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae variants of Teal Fluorescent Protein (TFP) and Citrine that were isospectral but had shorter fluorescence lifetimes, ∼1.5 ns vs ∼3 ns. We modified microscopic and flow cytometric instruments to measure fluorescence lifetimes in live cells. We developed digital hardware and a measure of lifetime called a “pseudophasor” that we could compute quickly enough to permit sorting by lifetime in flow. We used these abilities to sort mixtures of cells expressing TFP and the short-lifetime TFP variant into subpopulations that were respectively 97% and 94% pure. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using information about fluorescence lifetime to help quantify cell signaling in living cells at the high throughput provided by flow cytometry. Moreover, it demonstrates the feasibility of isolating and recovering subpopulations of cells with different XFP lifetimes for subsequent experimentation. PMID:25302964

  4. Protein rotational motion in solution measured by polarized fluorescence depletion.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, T M; Barisas, B G

    1986-01-01

    A microscope-based system is described for directly measuring protein rotational motion in viscous environments such as cell membranes by polarized fluorescence depletion (PFD). Proteins labeled with fluorophores having a high quantum yield for triplet formation, such as eosin isothiocyanate (EITC), are examined anaerobically in a fluorescence microscope. An acousto-optic modulator generates a several-microsecond pulse of linearly polarized light which produces an orientationally-asymmetric depletion of ground state fluorescence in the sample. When the sample is then probed with light polarized parallel to the excitation pulse, fluorescence recovers over 0-1,000 microseconds as the sum of two exponentials. One exponential corresponds to triplet decay and the other to the rotational relaxation. An exciting pulse perpendicular to the probe beam is then applied. Fluorescence recovery following this pulse is the difference of the same two exponentials. Equations for fluorescence recovery kinetics to be expected in various experimentally significant cases are derived. Least-squares analysis using these equations then permits the triplet lifetime and rotational correlation time to be determined directly from PFD data. Instrumentation for PFD measurements is discussed that permits photobleaching recovery measurements of lateral diffusion coefficients using the same microscope system. With this apparatus, both rotational and translational diffusion coefficients (Dr, Dt) were measured for EITC-labeled bovine serum albumin in glycerol solutions. Values obtained for Dr and Dt are discussed in light of both the PFD models and the experimental system. PMID:3730506

  5. Depolarization artifacts in dual rotating-compensator Mueller matrix ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiqi; Zhang, Chuanwei; Jiang, Hao; Chen, Xiuguo; Liu, Shiyuan

    2016-05-01

    Noticeable depolarization effects are observed in the measurement of the air using an in-house developed dual rotating-compensator Mueller matrix ellipsometer. We demonstrate that these depolarization effects are essentially artifacts and mainly induced when the compensator with wavelength-dependent optical properties is integrated with the finite bandwidth detector. We define a general formula to represent the actual Mueller matrix of the compensator by taking into account the depolarization artifacts. After incorporating this formula into the system model, a correction method is further proposed, and consequently, improved accuracy can be achieved in the Mueller matrix measurement.

  6. Depolarization of mitochondria in neurons promotes activation of nitric oxide synthase and generation of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Katakam, Prasad V G; Dutta, Somhrita; Sure, Venkata N; Grovenburg, Samuel M; Gordon, Angellica O; Peterson, Nicholas R; Rutkai, Ibolya; Busija, David W

    2016-05-01

    The diverse signaling events following mitochondrial depolarization in neurons are not clear. We examined for the first time the effects of mitochondrial depolarization on mitochondrial function, intracellular calcium, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activation, and nitric oxide (NO) production in cultured neurons and perivascular nerves. Cultured rat primary cortical neurons were studied on 7-10 days in vitro, and endothelium-denuded cerebral arteries of adult Sprague-Dawley rats were studied ex vivo. Diazoxide and BMS-191095 (BMS), activators of mitochondrial KATP channels, depolarized mitochondria in cultured neurons and increased cytosolic calcium levels. However, the mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate was unaffected by mitochondrial depolarization. In addition, diazoxide and BMS not only increased the nNOS phosphorylation at positive regulatory serine 1417 but also decreased nNOS phosphorylation at negative regulatory serine 847. Furthermore, diazoxide and BMS increased NO production in cultured neurons measured with both fluorescence microscopy and electron spin resonance spectroscopy, which was sensitive to inhibition by the selective nNOS inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI). Diazoxide also protected cultured neurons against oxygen-glucose deprivation, which was blocked by NOS inhibition and rescued by NO donors. Finally, BMS induced vasodilation of endothelium denuded, freshly isolated cerebral arteries that was diminished by 7-NI and tetrodotoxin. Thus pharmacological depolarization of mitochondria promotes activation of nNOS leading to generation of NO in cultured neurons and endothelium-denuded arteries. Mitochondrial-induced NO production leads to increased cellular resistance to lethal stress by cultured neurons and to vasodilation of denuded cerebral arteries. PMID:26945078

  7. Inelastic spin depolarization spectroscopy in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Appelbaum, Ian

    2013-07-01

    In ballistic injection spin transport devices, a tunnel junction emitter bias voltage determines the energy at which spin-polarized hot electrons cross a Schottky barrier into the conduction band of a semiconductor collector. Fast energy relaxation via phonon emission restores equilibrium for subsequent transport at the band edge. Through an analysis incorporating voltage-dependent measurement of magnetocurrent polarization in silicon spin transport devices along with magnetic-tunnel- and spin-valve-transistor configurations, the contribution to total spin depolarization caused by this inelastic scattering in the presence of spin-orbit interaction is quantified. From the shape of this spectroscopy, it is found that all measured spin depolarization can be accounted for solely by considering spin relaxation during bulk transport in quasi-equilibrium near the conduction band edge; the relaxation of initial spin state is irrelevant to the spin-dependent device characteristics.

  8. Fluorescent-Antibody Measurement Of Cancer-Cell Urokinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1993-01-01

    Combination of laboratory techniques provides measurements of amounts of urokinase in and between normal and cancer cells. Includes use of fluorescent antibodies specific against different forms of urokinase-type plasminogen activator, (uPA), fluorescence microscopy, quantitative analysis of images of sections of tumor tissue, and flow cytometry of different uPA's and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) found in suspended-tumor-cell preparations. Measurements provide statistical method for indicating or predicting metastatic potentials of some invasive tumors. Assessments of metastatic potentials based on such measurements used in determining appropriate follow-up procedures after surgical removal of tumors.

  9. Breast cancer: in vitro measurements of native fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, Wolfgang; Bohle, Rainer M.; Dreyer, Thomas; Haas, Sabine; Wallenfels, Heike; Schwemmle, Konrad; Schill, Wolf-Bernhard

    1996-12-01

    Unfixed, HE stained cryosections of breast tissue obtained from 67 patients during surgery were illuminated with 395 - 440 nm and their fluorescence response as well as the 2- dimensional fluorophore distribution were measured. The histological evaluation of the same cryosection, illuminated as usual with a transmitted light obtained from a halogen lamp, revealed 9 patients with healthy tissue, 11 with benign epithelial hyperplasia, 4 with ductal carcinoma in situ, 35 with invasive ductal carcinoma, 7 with invasive lobular carcinoma, and one with invasive tubular carcinoma. A comparison between the fluorescence and the HE images shows that both match very nicely and that the fluorescence images are also characteristic for the different pathological condition of the biopsy sample. Moreover, benign tumors e.g. fibroadenomas, exhibit a fluorescence response different from cancer and healthy tissue.

  10. Measuring and interpreting X-ray fluorescence from planetary surfaces.

    PubMed

    Owens, Alan; Beckhoff, Burkhard; Fraser, George; Kolbe, Michael; Krumrey, Michael; Mantero, Alfonso; Mantler, Michael; Peacock, Anthony; Pia, Maria-Grazia; Pullan, Derek; Schneider, Uwe G; Ulm, Gerhard

    2008-11-15

    As part of a comprehensive study of X-ray emission from planetary surfaces and in particular the planet Mercury, we have measured fluorescent radiation from a number of planetary analog rock samples using monochromatized synchrotron radiation provided by the BESSY II electron storage ring. The experiments were carried out using a purpose built X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer chamber developed by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany's national metrology institute. The XRF instrumentation is absolutely calibrated and allows for reference-free quantitation of rock sample composition, taking into account secondary photon- and electron-induced enhancement effects. The fluorescence data, in turn, have been used to validate a planetary fluorescence simulation tool based on the GEANT4 transport code. This simulation can be used as a mission analysis tool to predict the time-dependent orbital XRF spectral distributions from planetary surfaces throughout the mapping phase. PMID:18855420

  11. Single-particle spectroscopic measurements of fluorescent graphene quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qinfeng; Zhou, Qi; Hua, Zheng; Xue, Qi; Zhang, Chunfeng; Wang, Xiaoyong; Pan, Dengyu; Xiao, Min

    2013-12-23

    We have performed the first single-particle spectroscopic measurements on individual graphene quantum dots (GQDs) and revealed several intriguing fluorescent phenomena that are otherwise hidden in the optical studies of ensemble GQDs. First, despite noticeable differences in the size and the number of layers from particle to particle, all of the GQDs studied possess almost the same spectral lineshapes and peak positions. Second, GQDs with more layers are normally brighter emitters but are associated with shorter fluorescent lifetimes. Third, the fluorescent spectrum of GQDs was red-shifted upon being aged in air, possibly due to the water desorption effect. Finally, the missing emission of single photons and stable fluorescence without any intermittent behavior were observed from individual GQDs. PMID:24251867

  12. Marine fluorescence from high spectrally resolved satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolanin, Aleksandra; Dinter, Tilman; Rozanov, Vladimir; Noël, Stefan; Vountas, Marco; Burrows, John P.; Bracher, Astrid

    2014-05-01

    When chlorophyll molecules absorb light, most of this energy is transformed into chemical energy in a process of photosynthesis. However, a fraction of the energy absorbed is reemitted as fluorescence. As a result of its relationship to photosynthetic e?ciency, information about chlorophyll fluorescence can be used to assess the physiological state of phytoplankton (Falkowski and Kolber,1995). In-situ measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence are widespread in physiological and ecophysiological studies. When retrieved from space, chlorophyll fluorescence can improve our knowledge of global biogeochemical cycles and phytoplankton productivity (Behrenfeld et al., 2009; Huot et al., 2013) by providing high coverage and periodicity. So far, the only satellite retrieval of sun-induced marine fluorescence, Fluorescence Line Height (FLH), was designed for MODIS (Abbott and Letelier, 1999), and later also applied to the similar sensor MERIS (Gower et al., 2004). However, it could so far not be evaluated on global scale. Here, we present a different approach to observe marine chlorophyll fluorescence, based on the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique (Perner and Platt, 1979) applied to the hyperspectral data from Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2). Since fluorescence, as a trans-spectral process, leads to the shift of the wavelength of the radiation, it can be observed in the filling-in of Fraunhofer lines. In our retrieval, we evaluate the filling-in of the Zeeman triplet Fraunhofer line FeI at 684.3 nm, which is located very close to the emission peak of marine fluorescence (~685 nm). In order to conduct the chlorophyll fluorescence retrieval with the DOAS method, we calculated the reference spectra for chlorophyll fluorescence, based on simulations performed with the coupled ocean-atmosphere radiative transfer model SCIATRAN (Rozanov et al., 2014

  13. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of boronate derivatives to determine glucose concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Gable, J H

    2000-06-01

    A novel investigation into the fluorescence lifetimes of molecules, both established and newly designed, was performed. These molecules are the basis of a continuous, minimally invasive, glucose sensor based on fluorescence lifetime measurements. This sensor, if coupled with an automated insulin delivery device, would effectively create an artificial pancreas allowing for the constant monitoring and control of glucose levels in a person with diabetes. The proposed sensor includes a fluorescent molecule that changes its' fluorescence properties upon binding selectively and reversibly to glucose. One possible sensor molecule is N-methyl-N-(9-methylene anthryl)-2-methylenephenylboronic acid (AB). The fluorescence intensity of AB was shown to change in response to changing glucose concentrations. (James, 1994) James proposed that when glucose binds to AB the fluorescence intensity increases due to an enhancement of the N{yields}B dative bond which prevents photoinduced electron transfer (PET). PET from the amine (N) to the fluorophore (anthracene) quenches the fluorescence. The dative bond between the boron and the amine can prevent PET by involving the lone pair of electrons on the amine in interactions with the boron rather than allowing them to be transferred to the fluorophore. Results of this research show the average fluorescence lifetime of AB also changes with glucose concentration. It is proposed that fluorescence is due to two components: (1) AB with an enhanced N{yields}B interaction, and no PET, and (2) AB with a weak N{yields}B interaction, resulting in fluorescence quenching by PET. Lifetime measurements of AB as a function of both the pH of the solvent and glucose concentration in the solution were made to characterize this two component system and investigate the nature of the N{yields}B bond. Measurements of molecules similar to AB were also performed in order to isolate behavior of specific AB constituents. These molecules are 9-(Methylaminomethyl

  14. Biochip Image Grid Normalization Absolute Signal Fluorescence Measurement Using

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-04-17

    This software was developed to measure absolute fluorescent intensities of gel pads on a microchip in units defined by a standard fluorescent slide. It can accomodate varying measurement conditions (e.g. exposure time, sensitivity of detector, resolution of detector, etc.) as well as fluorescent microscopes with non-uniform sensitivity across their field of view allowing the user to compare measurements done on different detectors with varying exposure times, sensitivities, and resolutions. The software is designed both tomore » operate Roper Scientific, Inc. cameras and to use image files produced by the program supplied with that equipment for its calculations. the intensity of the gel pad signal is computed so as to reduce background influence.« less

  15. Fluorescence molecular tomographic image reconstruction based on reduced measurement data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Wei; Wang, Jiajun; Feng, David Dagan; Fang, Erxi

    2015-07-01

    The analysis of fluorescence molecular tomography is important for medical diagnosis and treatment. Although the quality of reconstructed results can be improved with the increasing number of measurement data, the scale of the matrices involved in the reconstruction of fluorescence molecular tomography will also become larger, which may slow down the reconstruction process. A new method is proposed where measurement data are reduced according to the rows of the Jacobian matrix and the projection residual error. To further accelerate the reconstruction process, the global inverse problem is solved with level-by-level Schur complement decomposition. Simulation results demonstrate that the speed of the reconstruction process can be improved with the proposed algorithm.

  16. Mercury mass measurement in fluorescent lamps via neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viererbl, L.; Vinš, M.; Lahodová, Z.; Fuksa, A.; Kučera, J.; Koleška, M.; Voljanskij, A.

    2015-11-01

    Mercury is an essential component of fluorescent lamps. Not all fluorescent lamps are recycled, resulting in contamination of the environment with toxic mercury, making measurement of the mercury mass used in fluorescent lamps important. Mercury mass measurement of lamps via instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) was tested under various conditions in the LVR-15 research reactor. Fluorescent lamps were irradiated in different positions in vertical irradiation channels and a horizontal channel in neutron fields with total fluence rates from 3×108 cm-2 s-1 to 1014 cm-2 s-1. The 202Hg(n,γ)203Hg nuclear reaction was used for mercury mass evaluation. Activities of 203Hg and others induced radionuclides were measured via gamma spectrometry with an HPGe detector at various times after irradiation. Standards containing an Hg2Cl2 compound were used to determine mercury mass. Problems arise from the presence of elements with a large effective cross section in luminescent material (europium, antimony and gadolinium) and glass (boron). The paper describes optimization of the NAA procedure in the LVR-15 research reactor with particular attention to influence of neutron self-absorption in fluorescent lamps.

  17. Measurements of extrinsic fluorescence in Intralipid and polystyrene microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Du Le, Vinh Nguyen; Nie, Zhaojun; Hayward, Joseph E.; Farrell, Thomas J.; Fang, Qiyin

    2014-01-01

    The fluorescence of Intralipid and polystyrene microspheres with sphere diameter of 1 µm at a representative lipid and microsphere concentration for simulation of mucosal tissue scattering has not been a subject of extensive experimental study. In order to elucidate the quantitative relationship between lipid and microsphere concentration and the respective fluorescent intensity, the extrinsic fluorescence spectra between 360 nm and 650 nm (step size of 5 nm) were measured at different lipid concentrations (from 0.25% to 5%) and different microsphere concentrations (0.00364, 0.0073, 0.0131 spheres per cubic micrometer) using laser excitation at 355 nm with pulse energy of 2.8 µJ. Current findings indicated that Intralipid has a broadband emission between 360 and 650 nm with a primary peak at 500 nm and a secondary peak at 450 nm while polystyrene microspheres have a single peak at 500 nm. In addition, for similar scattering properties the fluorescence of Intralipid solutions is approximately three-fold stronger than that of the microsphere solutions. Furthermore, Intralipid phantoms with lipid concentrations ~2% (simulating the bottom layer of mucosa) produce up to seven times stronger fluorescent emission than phantoms with lipid concentration ~0.25% (simulating the top layer of mucosa). The fluoresence decays of Intralipid and microsphere solutions were also recorded for estimation of fluorescence lifetime. PMID:25136497

  18. Ultracold neutron depolarization in magnetic bottles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steyerl, A.; Kaufman, C.; Müller, G.; Malik, S. S.; Desai, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    We analyze the depolarization of ultracold neutrons confined in a magnetic field configuration similar to those used in existing or proposed magnetogravitational storage experiments aiming at a precise measurement of the neutron lifetime. We use an extension of the semiclassical Majorana approach as well as an approximate quantum mechanical analysis, both pioneered by Walstrom [Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A10.1016/j.nima.2008.11.010 599, 82 (2009)]. In contrast with this previous work we do not restrict the analysis to purely vertical modes of neutron motion. The lateral motion is shown to cause the predominant depolarization loss in a magnetic storage trap. The system studied also allowed us to estimate the depolarization loss suffered by ultracold neutrons totally reflected on a nonmagnetic mirror immersed in a magnetic field. This problem is of preeminent importance in polarized neutron decay studies such as the measurement of the asymmetry parameter A using ultracold neutrons, and it may limit the efficiency of ultracold neutron polarizers based on passage through a high magnetic field.

  19. Fluorescence Rise Time Measurements for High Temperature Fluorescence-Based Thermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, S.W.

    2005-03-24

    Certain ceramic-like phosphor materials exhibit bright fluorescence with a pronounced temperature dependence over a range which spans the cryogenic to 1700 C, depending on the specific phosphor. To measure temperature, a surface, for instance a turbine blade, is coated with the material. An optical system, sometimes including optical fibers, conveys stimulating light and collects the emission for analysis. Either emission intensity or decay time may indicate temperature. Previously fielded tests have involved surfaces such as blades, vanes, pistons, in-take valves, sheets of galvanneal steel, etc. The fluorescent coatings may be applied to small parts via sputtering methods or to large areas by mixture with inorganic binders. Presented here are results characterizing fluorescence rise times as a means of determining temperature from ambient to 700 C for Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu.

  20. Velocity measurements by laser resonance fluorescence. [single atom diffusional motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    She, C. Y.; Fairbank, W. M., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The photonburst correlation method was used to detect single atoms in a buffer gas. Real time flow velocity measurements with laser induced resonance fluorescence from single or multiple atoms was demonstrated and this method was investigated as a tool for wind tunnel flow measurement. Investigations show that single atoms and their real time diffusional motion on a buffer gas can be measured by resonance fluorescence. By averaging over many atoms, flow velocities up to 88 m/s were measured in a time of 0.5 sec. It is expected that higher flow speeds can be measured and that the measurement time can be reduced by a factor of 10 or more by careful experimental design. The method is clearly not ready for incorporation in high speed wind tunnels because it is not yet known whether the stray light level will be higher or lower, and it is not known what detection efficiency can be obtained in a wind tunnel situation.

  1. Compton effect thermally activated depolarization dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Moran, Paul R.

    1978-01-01

    A dosimetry technique for high-energy gamma radiation or X-radiation employs the Compton effect in conjunction with radiation-induced thermally activated depolarization phenomena. A dielectric material is disposed between two electrodes which are electrically short circuited to produce a dosimeter which is then exposed to the gamma or X radiation. The gamma or X-radiation impinging on the dosimeter interacts with the dielectric material directly or with the metal composing the electrode to produce Compton electrons which are emitted preferentially in the direction in which the radiation was traveling. A portion of these electrons becomes trapped in the dielectric material, consequently inducing a stable electrical polarization in the dielectric material. Subsequent heating of the exposed dosimeter to the point of onset of ionic conductivity with the electrodes still shorted through an ammeter causes the dielectric material to depolarize, and the depolarization signal so emitted can be measured and is proportional to the dose of radiation received by the dosimeter.

  2. Kr II laser-induced fluorescence for measuring plasma acceleration.

    PubMed

    Hargus, W A; Azarnia, G M; Nakles, M R

    2012-10-01

    We present the application of laser-induced fluorescence of singly ionized krypton as a diagnostic technique for quantifying the electrostatic acceleration within the discharge of a laboratory cross-field plasma accelerator also known as a Hall effect thruster, which has heritage as spacecraft propulsion. The 728.98 nm Kr II transition from the metastable 5d(4)D(7/2) to the 5p(4)P(5/2)(∘) state was used for the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence within the plasma discharge. From these measurements, it is possible to measure velocity as krypton ions are accelerated from near rest to approximately 21 km/s (190 eV). Ion temperature and the ion velocity distributions may also be extracted from the fluorescence data since available hyperfine splitting data allow for the Kr II 5d(4)D(7/2)-5p(4)P(5/2)(∘) transition lineshape to be modeled. From the analysis, the fluorescence lineshape appears to be a reasonable estimate for the relatively broad ion velocity distributions. However, due to an apparent overlap of the ion creation and acceleration regions within the discharge, the distributed velocity distributions increase ion temperature determination uncertainty significantly. Using the most probable ion velocity as a representative, or characteristic, measure of the ion acceleration, overall propellant energy deposition, and effective electric fields may be calculated. With this diagnostic technique, it is possible to nonintrusively characterize the ion acceleration both within the discharge and in the plume. PMID:23126755

  3. Raman/Rayleigh/fluorescence lidar for atmosphere measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Shunsheng; Zheng, Wengang; Li, Hongjun; Yang, Guotao

    1998-08-01

    A Raman/Rayleigh/Fluorescence Lidar established in the Wuhan Institute of Physics & Mathematics, China for the measurements of the atmosphere is described, and the preliminary observation results for the lower, upper atmosphere and the sodium layer over Wuhan, China obtained by this lidar are presented in this paper.

  4. Photoinhibition of Photosystems I and II Using Chlorophyll Fluorescence Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quiles, Maria Jose

    2005-01-01

    In this study the photoinhibition of photosystems (PS) I and II caused by exposure to high intensity light in oat ("Avena sativa," var Prevision) is measured by the emission of chlorophyll fluorescence in intact leaves adapted to darkness. The maximal quantum yield of PS II was lower in plants grown under high light intensity than in plants grown…

  5. Temperature Dependent Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements in a Phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nettles, Charles J.; Smith, R. Seth; Heath, Jonathan J.

    2012-03-01

    This poster will describe an undergraduate senior research project involving fluorescence lifetime measurements in a LaSO4:Eu phosphor compound. Specifically, this project seeks to determine the temperature dependence of the lifetime. The temperature of the phosphor will be varied using a heater block with temperature control. The phosphor will be excited with the 337 nm output of a Nitrogen Laser. An Oriel Monochromator will be used to disperse the fluorescence, and the lifetime for a particular wavelength will be determined from a photomultiplier tube signal. At the time of the presentation, this project will be nearing completion; and I will discuss my progress, successes, and challenges.

  6. Correlation of Daptomycin Bactericidal Activity and Membrane Depolarization in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Jared A.; Perlmutter, Nancy G.; Shapiro, Howard M.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to further elucidate the role of membrane potential in the mechanism of action of daptomycin, a novel lipopeptide antibiotic. Membrane depolarization was measured by both fluorimetric and flow cytometric assays. Adding daptomycin (5 μg/ml) to Staphylococcus aureus gradually dissipated membrane potential. In both assays, cell viability was reduced by >99% and membrane potential was reduced by >90% within 30 min of adding daptomycin. Cell viability decreased in parallel with changes in membrane potential, demonstrating a temporal correlation between bactericidal activity and membrane depolarization. Decreases in viability and potential also showed a dose-dependent correlation. Depolarization is indicative of ion movement across the cytoplasmic membrane. Fluorescent probes were used to demonstrate Ca2+-dependent, daptomycin-triggered potassium release from S. aureus. Potassium release was also correlated with bactericidal activity. This study demonstrates a clear correlation between dissipation of membrane potential and the bactericidal activity of daptomycin. A multistep model for daptomycin's mechanism of action is proposed. PMID:12878516

  7. Laboratory investigations of mineral dust near-backscattering depolarization ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvinen, E.; Kemppinen, O.; Nousiainen, T.; Kociok, T.; Möhler, O.; Leisner, T.; Schnaiter, M.

    2016-07-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest to derive the fractions of fine- and coarse-mode dust particles from polarization lidar measurements. For this, assumptions of the backscattering properties of the complex dust particles have to be made either by using empirical data or particle models. Laboratory measurements of dust backscattering properties are important to validate the assumptions made in the lidar retrievals and to estimate their uncertainties. Here, we present laboratory measurements of linear and circular near-backscattering (178°) depolarization ratios of over 200 dust samples measured at 488 and 552 nm wavelengths. The measured linear depolarization ratios ranged from 0.03 to 0.36 and were strongly dependent on the particle size. The strongest size-dependence was observed for fine-mode particles as their depolarization ratios increased almost linearly with particle median diameter from 0.03 to 0.3, whereas the coarse-mode particle depolarization values stayed rather constant with a mean linear depolarization ratio of 0.27. The depolarization ratios were found to be insensitive to the dust source region or thin coating of the particles or to changes in relative humidity. We compared the measurements with results of three different scattering models. With certain assumptions for model particle shape, all the models were capable of correctly describing the size-dependence of the measured dust particle, albeit the model particles significantly differed in composition, shape and degree of complexity. Our results show potential for distinguishing the dust fine- and coarse-mode distributions based on their depolarization properties and, thus, can serve the lidar community as an empirical reference.

  8. Diffusion measurement of fluorescence-labeled amphiphilic molecules with a standard fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, C; Merkel, R; Tampé, R

    1997-01-01

    The lateral diffusion of fluorescence-labeled amphiphilic tracer molecules dissolved within a two-dimensional matrix of lipids was measured by continuous illumination of an elongated rectangular region. The resulting spatial concentration profile of unbleached tracer molecules was observed with a standard epifluorescence microscope and analyzed with digital image-processing techniques. These concentration profiles are governed by the mobility of the tracers, their rate of photolysis, and the geometry of the illuminated area. For the case of a long and narrow illuminated stripe, a mathematical analysis of the process is given. After prolonged exposure, the concentration profile can be approximated by a simple analytical function. This fact was used to measure the quotient of the rate of photolysis, and the diffusion constant of the fluorescent probe. With an additional measurement of the rate of photolysis, the mobility of the tracer was determined. As prototype experiments we studied the temperature dependence of the lateral diffusion of N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-dipalmitoylphosphatidyl++ + ethanolamine in glass-supported bilayers of L-alpha-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine. Because of its simple experimental setup, this technique represents a very useful method of determining the lateral diffusion of fluorescence-labeled membrane molecules. Images FIGURE 5 PMID:9083674

  9. Measuring Exocytosis Rate Using Corrected Fluorescence Recovery After Photoconversion.

    PubMed

    Luo, Nan; Yan, An; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2016-05-01

    Exocytosis plays crucial roles in regulating the distribution and function of plasma membrane (PM) and extracellular matrix proteins. However, measuring the exocytosis rate of a specific protein by conventional methods is very difficult because of exocytosis-independent trafficking such as endocytosis, which also affects membrane protein distribution. Here, we describe a novel method, corrected fluorescence recovery after photoconversion, in which exocytosis-dependent and -independent trafficking events are measured simultaneously to accurately determine exocytosis rate. In this method, the protein-of-interest is tagged with Dendra2, a green-to-red photoconvertible fluorescent protein. Following the photoconversion of PM-localized Dendra2, both the recovery of the green signal and the changes in the photoconverted red signal are measured, and the rate of exocytosis is calculated from the changing rates of these two signals. PMID:26822068

  10. Polarization-independent electro-optic depolarizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heismann, F.; Tokuda, K. L.

    1995-05-01

    We demonstrate a compact electro-optic polarization scrambler that depolarizes arbitrarily polarized light with less than 2.5% residual degree of polarization and variable depolarization times in the microsecond to millisecond range. The integrated-optic depolarizer is fabricated on lithium niobate and operates with a single-mode waveguide designed for a 1.5- mu m wavelength. The scrambler introduces negligible intensity modulation of less than 1.6% in the depolarized output light.

  11. Measurements of Solar Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence at 685 nm by Airborne Plant Fluorescence Sensor (APFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, F.; Yee, J. H.; Boldt, J.; Cook, W. B.; Corp, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    Solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) by terrestrial vegetation is linked closely to photosynthetic efficiency that can be exploited to monitor the plant health status and to assess the terrestrial carbon budget from space. The weak, broad continuum ChlF signal can be detected from the fill-in of strong O2 absorption lines or solar Fraunhofer lines in the reflected spectral radiation. The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) Airborne Plant Fluorescence Sensor (APFS) is a triple etalon Fabry-Perot interferometer designed and optimized specifically for the ChlF sensing from an airborne platform using this line fill-in technique. In this paper, we will present the results of APFS ChlF measurements obtained from a NASA Langley King Air during two airborne campaigns (12/12 in 2014 and 5/20 in 2015) over various land, river, and vegetated targets in Virginia during stressed and growth seasons.

  12. Measurements of Fluorescent Bioaerosol Particles in the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perring, A. E.; Emerson, J. B.; Fierer, N.; Schwarz, J. P.; Fahey, D. W.

    2013-12-01

    Bioaerosols are of atmospheric interest due to their potential importance as cloud condensation and heterogeneous ice nuclei and because they represent a sizeable fraction of coarse mode aerosol in some locations. Relatively little data exists, however, regarding diurnal, seasonal and annual cycles of bioaerosols and the meteorological processes that control them. Newly developed real-time instrumentation allows for sensitive, high time resolution detection of fluorescent bioaerosols and is uniquely suited to address key uncertainties in the sources, distributions and behavior of these particles in the atmosphere. Here we present observations of ambient fluorescent biological aerosol made on the Front Range of Colorado using a custom-modified Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS) during the summer and fall of 2013. The summertime measurements were made from the roof of the NOAA ESRL David Skaggs Research Center in Boulder and the fall measurements were made both at the surface and aloft at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory Tall Tower. We examine diurnal variations in loading and size distribution of fluorescent bioaerosol at the two locations. We also investigate the relationship between meteorological events and fluorescent bioaerosol. For example, we observe higher concentrations and markedly different number distributions associated with precipitation events. Simultaneous filter samples were collected for DNA sequencing and flow cytometry. To our knowledge this represents the first such comparison for the WIBS under ambient conditions and the microbial identification accomplished with the filters adds significantly to the analysis. This data set will provide useful insight into the sources, loadings and properties of fluorescent bioaerosol and the local and regional processes that drive them.

  13. Blind deconvolution estimation of fluorescence measurements through quadratic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Delgado, Daniel U.; Gutierrez-Navarro, Omar; Arce-Santana, Edgar R.; Skala, Melissa C.; Walsh, Alex J.; Jo, Javier A.

    2015-07-01

    Time-deconvolution of the instrument response from fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data is usually necessary for accurate fluorescence lifetime estimation. In many applications, however, the instrument response is not available. In such cases, a blind deconvolution approach is required. An iterative methodology is proposed to address the blind deconvolution problem departing from a dataset of FLIM measurements. A linear combination of a base conformed by Laguerre functions models the fluorescence impulse response of the sample at each spatial point in our formulation. Our blind deconvolution estimation (BDE) algorithm is formulated as a quadratic approximation problem, where the decision variables are the samples of the instrument response and the scaling coefficients of the basis functions. In the approximation cost function, there is a bilinear dependence on the decision variables. Hence, due to the nonlinear nature of the estimation process, an alternating least-squares scheme iteratively solves the approximation problem. Our proposal searches for the samples of the instrument response with a global perspective, and the scaling coefficients of the basis functions locally at each spatial point. First, the iterative methodology relies on a least-squares solution for the instrument response, and quadratic programming for the scaling coefficients applied just to a subset of the measured fluorescence decays to initially estimate the instrument response to speed up the convergence. After convergence, the final stage computes the fluorescence impulse response at all spatial points. A comprehensive validation stage considers synthetic and experimental FLIM datasets of ex vivo atherosclerotic plaques and human breast cancer cell samples that highlight the advantages of the proposed BDE algorithm under different noise and initial conditions in the iterative scheme and parameters of the proposal.

  14. Uncertainty analysis of planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavoularis, Stavros; Vanderwel, Christina

    2014-11-01

    We present a thorough analysis of the uncertainty of the planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) method. We consider the measurement of concentration maps in cross-sections parallel to and normal to the axis of a slender plume containing Rhodamine 6G as a passive scalar tracer and transported by a turbulent shear flow. In particular, we identify two previously unexplored sources of error contributed by non-uniformity of the concentration across the laser sheet and by secondary fluorescence. We propose new methods to evaluate and correct for these sources of error and demonstrate that the corrected concentration measurements accurately determined the injected dye mass flow rate of the plume in the far field. Supported by NSERC.

  15. Measurement of Nanoparticle Magnetic Hyperthermia Using Fluorescent Microthermal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaowan; van Keuren, Edward

    Nanoparticle magnetic hyperthermia uses the application of an AC magnetic field to ferromagnetic nanoparticles to elevate the temperature of cancer cells. The principle of hyperthermia as a true cell-specific therapy is that tumor cells are more sensitive to high temperature, so it is of great importance to control the locality and magnitude of the temperature differences. One technique to measure temperature variations on microscopic length scales is fluorescent microthermal imaging (FMI). Since it is the local temperature that is measured in FMI, effects such as heating due to nearby field coils can be accounted for. A dye, the rare earth chelate europium thenoyltrifluoroacetonate (Eu:TTA), with a strong temperature-dependent fluorescence emission has been incorporated into magnetic nanoparticles dispersed in a polymer films. FMI experiments were carried out on these samples under an applied high frequency magnetic field. Preliminary results show that FMI is a promising technique for characterizing the local generation of heat in nanoparticle magnetic hyperthermia.

  16. Kr II laser-induced fluorescence for measuring plasma acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hargus, W. A. Jr.

    2012-10-15

    We present the application of laser-induced fluorescence of singly ionized krypton as a diagnostic technique for quantifying the electrostatic acceleration within the discharge of a laboratory cross-field plasma accelerator also known as a Hall effect thruster, which has heritage as spacecraft propulsion. The 728.98 nm Kr II transition from the metastable 5d{sup 4}D{sub 7/2} to the 5p{sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup Ring-Operator} state was used for the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence within the plasma discharge. From these measurements, it is possible to measure velocity as krypton ions are accelerated from near rest to approximately 21 km/s (190 eV). Ion temperature and the ion velocity distributions may also be extracted from the fluorescence data since available hyperfine splitting data allow for the Kr II 5d{sup 4}D{sub 7/2}-5p{sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup Ring-Operator} transition lineshape to be modeled. From the analysis, the fluorescence lineshape appears to be a reasonable estimate for the relatively broad ion velocity distributions. However, due to an apparent overlap of the ion creation and acceleration regions within the discharge, the distributed velocity distributions increase ion temperature determination uncertainty significantly. Using the most probable ion velocity as a representative, or characteristic, measure of the ion acceleration, overall propellant energy deposition, and effective electric fields may be calculated. With this diagnostic technique, it is possible to nonintrusively characterize the ion acceleration both within the discharge and in the plume.

  17. Near-infrared spark source excitation for fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, D. J. S.; Hungerford, G.; Imhof, R. E.

    1991-10-01

    We have extended the range of excitation wavelengths from spark sources used in single photon timing fluorometry into the near infrared by means of the all-metal coaxial flashlamp filled with an argon-hydrogen gas mixture. At 750 nm this mixture gives ˜15 times the intensity available from pure hydrogen for a comparable pulse duration. Measurements are demonstrated by using the laser dye IR-140 in acetone, for which a fluorescence lifetime of 1.20 ns is recorded.

  18. Solvent-induced multicolour fluorescence of amino-substituted 2,3-naphthalimides studied by fluorescence and transient absorption measurements.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Mayu; Namba, Misa; Yamaji, Minoru; Okamoto, Hideki

    2016-07-01

    A series of amino-2,3-naphthalimide derivatives having the amino functionality at 1-, 5- and 6-positions (, and , respectively) were prepared, and their photophysical properties were systematically investigated based on the measurements of steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectra, fluorescence lifetimes as well as transient absorption spectra. The s efficiently fluoresced in solution, and the emission spectra appreciably shifted depending on the solvent polarity. displayed only a slight fluorescence red-shift upon increasing the solvent polarity. In contrast, and showed marked positive solvatofluorochromism with large Stokes shifts displaying multicolour fluorescence; the fluorescence colours of and varied from violet-blue in hexane to orange-red in methanol. and , thus, serve as micro-environment responding fluorophores. In methanol, the intensity of the fluorescence emission band of and significantly reduced. Based on the fluorescence quantum yields and lifetimes, and transient absorption measurements, it has been revealed that internal conversion from the S1 state of s to the ground state was accelerated by the protic medium, resulting in a reduction in their fluorescence efficiency, while intersystem crossing from the S1 state to a triplet state was not responsible for the decrease of fluorescence intensity. PMID:27251860

  19. Analysis of Antimicrobial-Triggered Membrane Depolarization Using Voltage Sensitive Dyes

    PubMed Central

    te Winkel, J. Derk; Gray, Declan A.; Seistrup, Kenneth H.; Hamoen, Leendert W.; Strahl, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial cytoplasmic membrane is a major inhibitory target for antimicrobial compounds. Commonly, although not exclusively, these compounds unfold their antimicrobial activity by disrupting the essential barrier function of the cell membrane. As a consequence, membrane permeability assays are central for mode of action studies analysing membrane-targeting antimicrobial compounds. The most frequently used in vivo methods detect changes in membrane permeability by following internalization of normally membrane impermeable and relatively large fluorescent dyes. Unfortunately, these assays are not sensitive to changes in membrane ion permeability which are sufficient to inhibit and kill bacteria by membrane depolarization. In this manuscript, we provide experimental advice how membrane potential, and its changes triggered by membrane-targeting antimicrobials can be accurately assessed in vivo. Optimized protocols are provided for both qualitative and quantitative kinetic measurements of membrane potential. At last, single cell analyses using voltage-sensitive dyes in combination with fluorescence microscopy are introduced and discussed. PMID:27148531

  20. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordine, P. C.; Schiffman, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence techniques were developed for the containerless study of high temperature processes, material properties, levitation, and heating techniques for containerless earth-based experimentation. Experiments were performed in which fluorescence of atomic aluminum, mercury, or tungsten were studied. These experiments include measurements of: (1) Al atom evaporation from CW CO2 laser heated and aerodynamically levitated sapphire and alumina spheres, and self-supported sapphire filaments, (2) Al atom reaction with ambient oxygen in the wake of a levitated specimen, (3) Hg atom concentrations in the wake of levitated alumina and sapphire spheres, relative to the ambient Hg atom concentration, (4) Hg atom concentrations in supersonic levitation jets, and (5) metastable, electronically excited W atom concentrations produced by evaporation of an electrically heated tungsten filament.

  1. Bloodstain age analysis: toward solid state fluorescent lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kevin; Zhegalova, Natalia; Achilefu, Samuel; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2013-03-01

    One of the most pressing unsolved challenges in forensic science is the determination of time since deposition (TSD) of bloodstains at crime scenes. Despite a number of high profile cases over the past couple hundred years involving controversy over TSD methods, no reliable quantitative method has been established. We present here an approach that has yet to be explored by forensic scientist: measuring the fluorescence lifetime of solid-state blood. Such a method would allow for on-site measurements of bloodstains utilizing the appropriate device, and would allow for rapid results returned in real-time to investigators.

  2. Laser-induced fluorescence measurement of combustion chemistry intermediates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosley, David R.

    1986-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) can measure the trace (often free radical) species encountered as intermediates in combustion chemistry; OH, CS, NH, NS, and NCO are typical of the species detected in flames by LIF. Attention is given to illustrative experiments designed to accumulate a quantitative data base for LIF detection in low pressure flow systems and flames, as well as to flame measurements conducted with a view to the detection of new chemical intermediaries that may deepen insight into the chemistry of combustion.

  3. Characterization of natural and irradiated nails by means of the depolarization metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenkov, Sergey; Priezzhev, Alexander; Oberemok, Yevgen; Sholom, Sergey; Kolomiets, Ivan; Chunikhina, Kateryna

    2016-07-01

    Mueller polarimetry is applied to study the samples of nails: natural (or reference) and irradiated to 2 Gy ionizing radiation dose. We measure the whole Mueller matrices of the samples as a function of the scattering angle at a wavelength of 632.8 nm. We apply depolarization analysis to measured Mueller matrices by calculating the depolarization metrics [depolarization index, Q(M)-metric, first and second Lorenz indices, Cloude and Lorenz entropy] to quantify separability of the different samples of nails under study based on differences in their Mueller matrix. The results show that nail samples strongly depolarize the output light in backscattering, and irradiation in all cases results in increasing of depolarization. Most sensitive among depolarization metrics are the Lorenz entropy and Q(M)-metric.

  4. Characterization of natural and irradiated nails by means of the depolarization metrics.

    PubMed

    Savenkov, Sergey; Priezzhev, Alexander; Oberemok, Yevgen; Sholom, Sergey; Kolomiets, Ivan; Chunikhina, Kateryna

    2016-07-01

    Mueller polarimetry is applied to study the samples of nails: natural (or reference) and irradiated to 2 Gy ionizing radiation dose. We measure the whole Mueller matrices of the samples as a function of the scattering angle at a wavelength of 632.8 nm. We apply depolarization analysis to measured Mueller matrices by calculating the depolarization metrics [depolarization index, Q(M)-metric, first and second Lorenz indices, Cloude and Lorenz entropy] to quantify separability of the different samples of nails under study based on differences in their Mueller matrix. The results show that nail samples strongly depolarize the output light in backscattering, and irradiation in all cases results in increasing of depolarization. Most sensitive among depolarization metrics are the Lorenz entropy and Q(M)-metric. PMID:26927390

  5. Measurement of cation movement in primary cultures using fluorescent dyes.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, I J

    2001-05-01

    Ca(2+), Na(+), K(+), and Mg(2+) have a central role in neuronal excitability. The concentration of these cations in the cytoplasm of neurons (generically termed [ion(+)]i) provides a marker of the excitation state of the neurons, and may also illuminate the activity of specific signaling mechanisms that involve Ca(2+)- or Mg(2+)-activated enzymes. The measurement of [ion(+)]i in cultured neurons is achieved with the use of an ion-sensitive fluorescent dye in combination with equipment designed to quantitatively measure fluorescence. Specificity is obtained by choosing dyes with the appropriate selectivity for the ion of interest. Measurements of steady state ion concentrations can be made, as well as measurements of the net difference between ion movement into the cytoplasm (in response to a stimulus) and the physiological buffering of that ion. The procedures in this unit for loading and recording from dyes are broadly similar for each ion when ratiometric dyes are used as described, and can readily be modified for use with single-wavelength dyes. Support protocols are provided for calibration of individual dyes, which can be more problematic. PMID:18428522

  6. Geometry of generalized depolarizing channels

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, Christian K.

    2009-10-15

    A generalized depolarizing channel acts on an N-dimensional quantum system to compress the 'Bloch ball' in N{sup 2}-1 directions; it has a corresponding compression vector. We investigate the geometry of these compression vectors and prove a conjecture of Dixit and Sudarshan [Phys. Rev. A 78, 032308 (2008)], namely, that when N=2{sup d} (i.e., the system consists of d qubits), and we work in the Pauli basis then the set of all compression vectors forms a simplex. We extend this result by investigating the geometry in other bases; in particular we find precisely when the set of all compression vectors forms a simplex.

  7. A depolarization and attenuation experiment using the CTS satellite. Volume 1: Experiment description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bostian, C. W.; Holt, S. B., Jr.; Kauffman, S. R.; Manus, E. A.; Marshall, R. E.; Stutzman, W. L.; Wiley, P. H.

    1976-01-01

    An experiment for measuring precipitation attenuation and depolarization on the Communications Technology Satellite (CTS) 11.7 GHz downlink is described. Attenuation and depolarization of the signal received from the spacecraft is monitored on a 24 hour basis. Data is correlated with ground weather conditions. Theoretical models for millimeter wave propagation through rain are refined for maximum agreement with observed data. Techniques are developed for predicting and mimimizing the effects of rain scatter and depolarization on future satellite communication systems.

  8. Measuring Phagosome pH by Ratiometric Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Paula; Guido, Daniele; Demaurex, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Phagocytosis is a fundamental process through which innate immune cells engulf bacteria, apoptotic cells or other foreign particles in order to kill or neutralize the ingested material, or to present it as antigens and initiate adaptive immune responses. The pH of phagosomes is a critical parameter regulating fission or fusion with endomembranes and activation of proteolytic enzymes, events that allow the phagocytic vacuole to mature into a degradative organelle. In addition, translocation of H(+) is required for the production of high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are essential for efficient killing and signaling to other host tissues. Many intracellular pathogens subvert phagocytic killing by limiting phagosomal acidification, highlighting the importance of pH in phagosome biology. Here we describe a ratiometric method for measuring phagosomal pH in neutrophils using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled zymosan as phagocytic targets, and live-cell imaging. The assay is based on the fluorescence properties of FITC, which is quenched by acidic pH when excited at 490 nm but not when excited at 440 nm, allowing quantification of a pH-dependent ratio, rather than absolute fluorescence, of a single dye. A detailed protocol for performing in situ dye calibration and conversion of ratio to real pH values is also provided. Single-dye ratiometric methods are generally considered superior to single wavelength or dual-dye pseudo-ratiometric protocols, as they are less sensitive to perturbations such as bleaching, focus changes, laser variations, and uneven labeling, which distort the measured signal. This method can be easily modified to measure pH in other phagocytic cell types, and zymosan can be replaced by any other amine-containing particle, from inert beads to living microorganisms. Finally, this method can be adapted to make use of other fluorescent probes sensitive to different pH ranges or other phagosomal activities, making it a generalized

  9. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiffman, R. A.; Walker, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques for containerless study of high temperature processes and material properties was studied. Gas jet and electromagnetic levitation and electromagnetic and laser heating techniques are used with LIF in earth-based containerless high temperature experiments. Included are the development of an apparatus and its use in the studies of (1) chemical reactions on Al2O3, molybdenum, tungsten and LaB6 specimens, (2) methods for noncontact specimen temperature measurement, (3) levitation jet properties and (4) radiative lifetime and collisional energy transfer rates for electronically excited atoms.

  10. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The use of laser induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques for containerless study of high temperature processes and material properties is studied. Gas jet and electromagnetic levitation and electromagnetic and laser heating techniques are used with LIF in Earth-based containerless high temperature experiments. The work to date includes development of an apparatus and its use in studies of chemical reactions on Al2O3, molybdenum, and tungsten specimens, novel methods for noncontact specimen temperature measurement, and levitation jet properties. Brief summaries of these studies are given. The apparatus is described and detailed results for the current reporting period are presented.

  11. Assessment of Vegetation Stress Using Reflectance or Fluorescence Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, P. K. E.; Middleton, E. M.; McMurtrey, J. E.; Corp, L. A.; Chappelle, E. W.

    2007-01-01

    Current methods for large-scale vegetation monitoring rely on multispectral remote sensing, which has serious limitation for the detection of vegetation stress. To contribute to the establishment of a generalized spectral approach for vegetation stress detection, this study compares the ability of high-spectral resolution reflectance (R) and fluorescence (F) foliar measurements to detect vegetation changes associated with common environmental factors affecting plant growth and productivity. To obtain a spectral dataset from a broad range of species and stress conditions, plant material from three experiments was examined, including (i) corn, nitrogen (N) deficiency/excess; (ii) soybean, elevated carbon dioxide, and ozone levels; and (iii) red maple, augmented ultraviolet irradiation. Fluorescence and R spectra (400-800 nm) were measured on the same foliar samples in conjunction with photosynthetic pigments, carbon, and N content For separation of a wide range of treatment levels, hyperspectral (5-10 nm) R indices were superior compared with F or broadband R indices, with the derivative parameters optimal results. For the detection of changes in vegetation physiology, hyperspectral indices can provide a significant improvement over broadband indices. The relationship of treatment levels to R was linear, whereas that to F was curvilinear. Using reflectance measurements, it was not possible to identify the unstressed vegetation condition, which was accomplished in all three experiments using F indices. Large-scale monitoring of vegetation condition and the detection of vegetation stress could be improved by using hyperspectral R and F information, a possible strategy for future remote sensing missions.

  12. Probing intrinsic anisotropies of fluorescence: Mueller matrix approach.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sudipta; Soni, Jalpa; Chandel, Shubham; Kumar, Uday; Ghosh, Nirmalya

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate that information on “intrinsic” anisotropies of fluorescence originating from preferential orientation/organization of fluorophore molecules can be probed using a Mueller matrix of fluorescence. For this purpose, we have developed a simplified model to decouple and separately quantify the depolarization property and the intrinsic anisotropy properties of fluorescence from the experimentally measured fluorescence Mueller matrix. Unlike the traditionally defined fluorescence anisotropy parameter, the Mueller matrix-derived fluorescence polarization metrics, namely, fluorescence diattenuation and polarizance parameters, exclusively deal with the intrinsic anisotropies of fluorescence. The utility of these newly derived fluorescence polarimetry parameters is demonstrated on model systems exhibiting multiple polarimetry effects, and an interesting example is illustrated on biomedically important fluorophores, collagen. PMID:26301796

  13. Strain measurements in thermally grown alumina scales using ruby fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Veal, B.W.; Natesan, K.; Koshelev, I.; Grimsditch, M.; Renusch, D. Hou, P.Y.

    1996-12-31

    We have measured strains in alumina scales thermally grown on Fe-Cr- Al alloys by exploiting the strain dependence of the ruby luminescence line. Measurements were done on Fe-5Cr-28Al and Fe-18Cr-10Al (at.%, bal. Fe) oxidized between 300-1300 C with periodic cycling to room temperature. Significantly different levels of strain buildup were observed in scales on these alloys. Results on similar alloys containing a dilute reactive element (Zr or Hf) are also presented. We observe that scales on alloys containing a reactive element (RE) can support higher strains than scales on RE-free alloys. With the luminescence technique, strain relief associated with spallation thresholds is readily observed. In early stage oxidation, the evolution of transition phases is monitored using Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies. The fluorescence technique also provides a sensitive probe of early stage formation of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. It appears that, in presence of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} or Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, the {alpha}-alumina phase can form at anomalously low temperatures.

  14. Rapid measurements of intracellular calcium using a fluorescence plate reader.

    PubMed

    Lin, K; Sadée, W; Quillan, J M

    1999-02-01

    Intracellular calcium is a universal second messenger that can serve as a broad-based measure of receptor activity. Recent developments in multi-well plate fluorescence readers facilitate measurement of intracellular free-calcium levels and reduce reliance on slower, more cumbersome or expensive data collection methods. In this report, we describe a rapid and sensitive method to assay intracellular calcium ions in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells from multi-well plates using a fluorometer equipped with on-line injectors. We examine the compatibility of visible-light excitable dyes Calcium Green-1 and Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1. Using this assay, we were able to detect and quantify activity from muscarinic and beta-adrenergic receptors endogenous to HEK293 cells and detect calcium signals generated by activation of Gi-coupled recombinant mu-opioid and dopamine D2L receptors, and the Gs-coupled melanocortin subtype 4 (MC4) receptor. Fluorescence signals, stable in HEK293 cells, required the use of Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1 and an inhibitor of organic anion transport in CHO cells. Under appropriate conditions, both cell types can be used to collect complete concentration-response data for a variety of receptors (including a recombinant muscarinic M1 receptor expressed in CHO cells) from a single plate of dye-loaded cells. PMID:10023544

  15. Radiometric calibration to consider in quantitative clinical fluorescence imaging measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litorja, M.; Urbas, A.; Zong, Y.

    2015-03-01

    The fluorescent light detected by a clinical imager is assumed to be proportional only to the amount of fluorescent substance present in the sample and the level of excitation. Unfortunately, there are many factors that can add or subtract to the light signal directly attributable to the desired fluorescence emission, especially with fluorescence from inside the body imaged remotely. The quantification of fluorescence emission is feasible by calibrating the imager using international system of units (SI)-traceable physical and material calibration artifacts such that the detector's digital numbers (DN) can be converted to radiometric units. Here we discuss three calibration methods for quantitative clinical fluorescence imaging systems.

  16. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordine, Paul C.; Shiffman, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    Containerless high temperature processing and material property measurements are discussed. Researchers developed methods for non-contact suspension, heating, and property measurement for materials at temperatures up to 3,680K, the melting point of tungsten. New, scientifically interesting results were obtained in Earth-based research. These results and the demonstration of new methods and techniques form a basis for further advances under the low gravity environment of space where containerless conditions are more easily achieved. Containerless high temperature material property investigations that have been completed in this and our earlier projects include measurements of fluorine LaB sub 6 reaction kinetics at 1,000 to 1,500K; optical property measurements on sapphire (Al2O3) at temperatures up to the melting point (2,327K); and vapor pressure measurements for LaB sub 6 at 2,000 to 2,500K, for molybdenum up to 2,890K and for tungsten up to 3,680K. Gas jet levitation which is applicable to any solid material, and electromagnetic levitation of electrical conductors were used to suspend the materials of interest. Non-contact heating and property measurements were achieved by optical techniques, i.e., laser heating, laser induced fluorescence measurements of vapor concentrations, and optical pyrometry for specimen temperatures.

  17. Neutron depolarization study of phase transformations in steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, N. H.; Te Velthuis, S. G. E.; Rekveldt, M. Th.; Sietsma, J.; van der Zwaag, S.

    1999-06-01

    Three-dimensional neutron depolarization experiments have been performed in order to study the phase transformations from austenite (γ-Fe) into ferrite (α-Fe) and cementite (Fe 3C) in two medium-carbon steel samples with different carbon concentrations. The rotation of the neutron polarization vector during transmission through the sample is a direct measure for the ferromagnetic ferrite fraction. The degree of depolarization is related to the magnetic correlation length, which gives an indication of the characteristic length scales of the microstructure.

  18. Fluorescent measurements of Zn2+ on a smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Arafat; Ast, Sandra; Canning, John; Cook, Kevin; Rutledge, Peter J.; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2015-07-01

    Using a smartphone-based portable spectrofluorimeter, measurement of metal ion concentration in water is reported. A UV LED (λex ~ 370 nm), which is powered by the internal source of the smartphone was implemented to function as the excitation source. The emission peak of the UV LED overlaps well with the absorption peak of the Zn2+-responsive molecular probe 6-(1,4,8,11-cyclam-1-yl)ethyl-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)2-ethyl-naphthalimide fluoro-ionophore (λabs ~ 358 nm). The fluorescence emission of this dye at λem ~ 458 nm is enhanced upon coordination of Zn2+. A customized Android application digitally processes the image from a nano-imprinted polymer diffraction grating and analyses the spectral changes. Zn2+ concentration in water samples were measured with a detection limit of δ ~ 5 μM.

  19. Multiparameter single-molecule fluorescence measurements of DNA intercalating fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Benjamin P.; Enderlein, Jorg; Woodbury, Neal W. T.

    2003-06-01

    Experiments using single-molecules of TOTO-1 intercalated into dsDNA were performed to investigate the DNA sequence dependence on the fluorescence detectable with single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. Previous work has shown that there is a difference in the fluorescence lifetime when TOTO-1 is intercalated in poly-AT DNA or in poly-GC DNA. The fluorescence detected from single-molecules in this work for poly-GC and poly-AT DNA showed fluorescence lifetimes of 2.1 and 1.8 nsec, respectively. Analysis of the fluorescence intensity detected from single-molecules of TOTO-1 was performed by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy. TOTO-1 is shown to spend large amounts of time in dark states. These dark states reduce the detectable fluorescence intensity to approximately 10 photons per millisecond on average.

  20. Limitation of fluorescence spectrophotometry in the measurement of naphthenic acids in oil sands process water.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weibing; Ewanchuk, Andrea; Perez-Estrada, Leonidas; Sego, Dave; Ulrich, Ania

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence spectrophotometry has been proposed as a quick screening technique for the measurement of naphthenic acids (NAs). To evaluate the feasibility of this application, the fluorescence emission spectra of NAs extracted from three oil sands process water sources were compared with that of commercial NAs. The NAs resulting from the bitumen extraction process cannot be differentiated because of the similarity of the fluorescence spectra. Separation of the fluorescent species in NAs using high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detector proved unsuccessful. The acidic fraction of NAs is fluorescent but the basic fraction of NAs is not fluorescent, implying that aromatic acids in NAs give rise to the fluorescent signals. The concentrations of NAs in oil sands process water were measured by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), fluorescence spectrophotometry and ultra high performance liquid chromatography-time of flight/mass spectrometry (UPLC-TOF/MS). Commercial Merichem and Kodak NAs are the best standards to use when measuring NAs concentration with FTIR and fluorescence spectrophotometry. In addition, the NAs concentrations measured by fluorescence spectrophotometry are about 30 times higher than those measured by FTIR and UPLC-TOF/MS. The findings in this study underscore the limitation of fluorescence spectrophotometry in the measurement of NAs. PMID:23379948

  1. Prolonged irradiation of enhanced cyan fluorescent protein or Cerulean can invalidate Forster resonance energy transfer measurements.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Birgit; Zimmer, Thomas; Klöcker, Nikolaj; Kelbauskas, Laimonas; König, Karsten; Benndorf, Klaus; Biskup, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Since its discovery, green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its variants have proven to be a good and convenient fluorescent label for proteins: GFP and other visible fluorescent proteins (VFPs) can be fused selectively to the protein of interest by simple cloning techniques and develop fluorescence without additional cofactors. Among the steadily growing collection of VFPs, several pairs can be chosen that can serve as donor and acceptor fluorophores in Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments. Among them, the cyan fluorescent proteins (ECFP/Cerulean) and the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) are most commonly used. We show that ECFP and Cerulean have some disadvantages despite their common use: Upon irradiation with light intensities that are commonly used for intensity- and lifetime-based FRET measurements, both the fluorescence intensity and the fluorescence lifetime of ECFP and Cerulean decrease. This can hamper both intensity- and lifetime-based FRET measurements and emphasizes the need for control measurements to exclude these artifacts. PMID:18601529

  2. Localization of subsurface fluorescent lesions using surface spectral measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolste, Kolbein

    Localization of Subsurface Fluorescent Lesions using Surface Spectral Measurements Sponsored by the National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland Kolbein Kolste, Ph.D. Keith Paulsen In neurosurgical tumor resection, maximizing extent of resection plays a major role in the care of cancer patients. To date, ALA is being researched as a technique to guide tumor resection by inducing the accumulation of the endogenous fluorophore PpIX. Most research has focused on the use of blue light excitation of PpIX to visual the tumor. However, due to the high attenuation of blue light by in vivo chromophores, such as oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin, the source of collected fluorescence emissions is confined to the top layer of cells, and the signal is subject to masking by blood on the surface of the surgical field of view. This issue is particularly a problem at the end of the resection, when the surgeon is evaluating the margin for remaining tumor, but the blue-signal is insensitive to residual tumor that may be located several millimeters beneath the surface. PpIX has an absorption band in the near infrared (NIR), where the absorption due to blood is orders of magnitude lower, enabling the excitation of a fluorophore at depth. In this work, we created a hyperspectral imaging system that attaches to a neurosurgical microscope and is capable of detecting PpIX fluorescence that has been excited at 635 nm. We utilize a dual-waveband technique from the hyperspectral to estimate depth of fluorescence origin and characterize the inherent limitations of the estimated depth. One of the major benefits of this technique is that the estimation is independent of the concentration and size of the fluorophore. This is first demonstrated in phantom studies, where the depths of multiple separate inclusions at various depths are accurately estimated. The technique is verified in animal tumor models and translated into the clinical theater, with pilot data showing the first estimation of depth of

  3. Quantitative fluorescent speckle microscopy (QFSM) to measure actin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Michelle C; Besson, Sebastien; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2012-10-01

    Quantitative fluorescent speckle microscopy (QFSM) is a live-cell imaging method to analyze the dynamics of macromolecular assemblies with high spatial and temporal resolution. Its greatest successes were in the analysis of actin filament and adhesion dynamics in the context of cell migration and microtubule dynamics in interphase and the meiotic/mitotic spindle. Here, focus is on the former application to illustrate the procedures of FSM imaging and the computational image processing that extracts quantitative information from these experiments. QFSM is advantageous over other methods because it measures the movement and turnover kinetics of the actin filament (F-actin) network in living cells across the entire field of view. Experiments begin with the microinjection of fluorophore-labeled actin into cells, which generate a low ratio of fluorescently labeled to endogenously unlabeled actin monomers. Spinning disk confocal or wide-field imaging then visualizes fluorophore clusters (two to eight actin monomers) within the assembled F-actin network as speckles. QFSM software identifies and computationally tracks and utilizes the location, appearance, and disappearance of speckles to derive network flows and maps of the rate of filament assembly and disassembly. PMID:23042526

  4. An advanced fluorescence LIDAR system for the acquisition of interleaved active (LIF) and passive (SIF) fluorescence measurements on vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondi, Valentina; Palombi, Lorenzo; Di Ninni, Paola

    2015-10-01

    Fluorescence is regarded as a valuable tool to investigate the eco-physiological status of vegetation. Chlorophyll a, which emits a typical fluorescence in the red/far-red region of the e.m. spectrum, plays a key role in the photosynthetic process and its fluorescence is considered an effective proxy of photosynthetic activity of plants. Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) has been studied for several decades both at leaf- and canopy-level by means of optical fibers-coupled instrumentation and fluorescence LIDAR systems. On the other hand, Solar-Induced Fluorescence (SIF) has been the object of several scientific studies quite recently, with the aim to investigate the feasibility of measuring the fluorescence of vegetation using passive spectroradiometers in view of global scale monitoring from satellite platforms. This paper presents the main technical features and preliminary tests of a fluorescence LIDAR, recently upgraded to acquire maps of interleaved LIF and SIF measurements at canopy level. In-house developed electronics and software permits the acquisition of interleaved LIF and SIF spectra by switching on/off the laser, the selection of the suitable grating, the setting of the integration time and the synchronization of the Intensified CCD (ICCD) gate opening time. For each pixel of the map, a fluorescence dataset can be acquired containing a LIF spectrum - from 570 nm to 830 nm with a spectral resolution of 0.5 nm - and radiance spectra from 685.53 nm to 690.30 nm with subnanometric spectral resolution containing the molecular oxygen O2-B telluric absorption band. The latter can be exploited for polynomial regression data fit and SIF retrieval.

  5. Measuring Agarwood Formation Ratio Quantitatively by Fluorescence Spectral Imaging Technique.

    PubMed

    Huang, Botao; Nguyen, Duykien; Liu, Tianyi; Jiang, Kaibin; Tan, Jinfen; Liu, Chunxin; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Shaowei

    2015-01-01

    Agarwood is a kind of important and precious traditional Chinese medicine. With the decreasing of natural agarwood, artificial cultivation has become more and more important in recent years. Quantifying the formation of agarwood is an essential work which could provide information for guiding cultivation and controlling quality. But people only can judge the amount of agarwood qualitatively by experience before. Fluorescence multispectral imaging method is presented to measure the agarwood quantitatively in this paper. A spectral cube from 450 nm to 800 nm was captured under the 365 nm excitation sources. The nonagarwood, agarwood, and rotten wood in the same sample were distinguished based on analyzing the spectral cube. Then the area ratio of agarwood to the whole sample was worked out, which is the quantitative information of agarwood area percentage. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the formation of agarwood was quantified accurately and nondestructively. PMID:26089935

  6. Fluorescent Measurement of Synaptic Activity Using SynaptopHluorin in Isolated Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongmei; Park, Han-A; Jonas, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    This protocol comprises the entire process of fluorescent measurement of vesicle recycling using the probe SynaptopHluorin, a pH-dependent GFP variant whose fluorescence increases at the synapse upon vesicle release due to fluorescence quenching in acidic vesicles. This technique provides a genetic tool to monitor synaptic vesicle recycling in real time in cultured hippocampal neurons.

  7. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of the cylindrical Hall thruster plume

    SciTech Connect

    Spektor, R.; Diamant, K. D.; Beiting, E. J.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2010-09-15

    An investigation of a fully cylindrical Hall thruster was performed using laser induced fluorescence (LIF) to measure ion velocity profiles in the plume. The measurements confirm a previously reported 9% increase in the exhaust energy when the cathode keeper draws an excess current (overrun mode). Furthermore, the velocity directions in the plume remain relatively unchanged for the cusped and direct magnetic field configuration in both overrun and nonoverrun modes. Previously reported plume narrowing in the overrun mode was confirmed and found to be due to the shift of the acceleration and ionization regions toward the anode. The electric field inferred from the LIF measurements allowed calculation of the electron ExB drift. Close to the centerline of the thruster, electrons drift azimuthally with velocity decreasing away from the centerline, thus creating shear. This shear can be a source of plasma instabilities and influence electron transport. Further away from the centerline, electrons drift in the opposite direction with their velocity increasing with increasing radius. In that region, electrons rotate without shear.

  8. Measurement uncertainty in Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floor, G. H.; Queralt, I.; Hidalgo, M.; Marguí, E.

    2015-09-01

    Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry is a multi-elemental technique using micro-volumes of sample. This work assessed the components contributing to the combined uncertainty budget associated with TXRF measurements using Cu and Fe concentrations in different spiked and natural water samples as an example. The results showed that an uncertainty estimation based solely on the count statistics of the analyte is not a realistic estimation of the overall uncertainty, since the depositional repeatability and the relative sensitivity between the analyte and the internal standard are important contributions to the uncertainty budget. The uncertainty on the instrumental repeatability and sensitivity factor could be estimated and as such, potentially relatively straightforward implemented in the TXRF instrument software. However, the depositional repeatability varied significantly from sample to sample and between elemental ratios and the controlling factors are not well understood. By a lack of theoretical prediction of the depositional repeatability, the uncertainty budget can be based on repeat measurements using different reflectors. A simple approach to estimate the uncertainty was presented. The measurement procedure implemented and the uncertainty estimation processes developed were validated from the agreement with results obtained by inductively coupled plasma - optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and/or reference/calculated values.

  9. Azadioxatriangulenium: exploring the effect of a 20 ns fluorescence lifetime in fluorescence anisotropy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogh, Sidsel A.; Bora, Ilkay; Rosenberg, Martin; Thyrhaug, Erling; Laursen, Bo W.; Just Sørensen, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Azaoxatriangulenium (ADOTA) has been shown to be highly emissive despite a moderate molar absorption coefficient of the primary electronic transition. As a result, the fluorescence lifetime is ~20 ns, longer than all commonly used red fluorescent organic probes. The electronic transitions in ADOTA are highly polarised (r 0  =  0.38), which in combination with the long fluorescence lifetime extents the size-range of biomolecular weights that can be detected in fluorescence polarisation-based experiments. Here, the rotational dynamics of bovine serum albumin (BSA) are monitored with three different ADOTA derivatives, differing only in constitution of the reactive linker. A detailed study of the degree of labelling, the steady-state anisotropy, and the time-resolved anisotropy of the three different ADOTA-BSA conjugates are reported. The fluorescence quantum yields (ϕ fl) of the free dyes in PBS solution are determined to be ~55%, which is reduced to ~20% in the ADOTA-BSA conjugates. Despite the reduction in ϕ fl, a ~20 ns intensity averaged lifetime is maintained, allowing for the rotational dynamics of BSA to be monitored for up to 100 ns. Thus, ADOTA can be used in fluorescence polarisation assays to fill the gap between commonly used organic dyes and the long luminescence lifetime transition metal complexes. This allows for efficient steady-state fluorescence polarisation assays for detecting binding of analytes with molecular weights of up to 100 kDa.

  10. Characterization and measurement results of fluorescence in absorption optical filter glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichel, S.; Biertümpfel, R.; Engel, A.

    2015-09-01

    Optical filter glasses (absorption filters) are for example used for spectroscopy. The filter glass absorbs the unwanted light and has a nearly angle independent spectral characteristic. The absorbed light can lead to (self-) fluorescence, i. e. the filter glass itself re-emits fluorescence light at a different wavelength - compared to the incident (excitation) light. This fluorescence light can disturb the measurement signal. In order to obtain an optimized optical design the fluorescence properties of the glasses must be known. By knowing fluorescence properties one can design a system with a good signal-to-noise ratio. We will present our measurement set-up for fluorescence measurements of optical filter glass. This set-up was used to obtain fluorescence measurement results for different optical filter glasses. For the first time we present results on the fluorescence level for different optical filter glasses. In addition the effect of excitation wavelength on the fluorescence level will be studied. Besides other factors, fluorescence depends on impurities of the raw material of the glass melt. Due to small fluctuations of the raw material used for the glass production the fluorescence of the same filter glass type can fluctuate from melt-to-melt. Thus, results from different melts will be shown for the same filter glass type.

  11. Electron beam fluorescence measurements in the Boeing hypersonic shock tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Linwood L.; Williams, W. Dan; Powell, H. M.

    1992-01-01

    The Calspan electron beam fluorescence (EBF) measurement system is described along with the results of measurements made in hypersonic flow. Numerous self-emitting metallic species were identified, many of which may be associated with an aging/erosion process within the B30HST. Because there were only 16 tunnel runs, it was only possible to obtain spectral measurements over a limited range of wavelengths and time sampling periods. Many spectral features of the flow remain uninvestigated. Because flow self-emission is important to all optical diagnostic techniques, it is recommended that additional spectral studies by performed. The three electron beam-excited species that were identified are nitrogen, helium, and nitric oxide. The high metallic radiation background interfered with attempts to obtain the time-wise variation of N2 density and He radiation with the optical fiber/PMT channels. In the case of the N2 density measurements the result of interference was increased uncertainty. Unfortunately, the interference caused the time-wise He measurements to fail completely. It is recommended that the electron beam be modulated to provide discrimination against the background radiation in future N2 density measurements. Careful data reduction produced useful measurements of N2 vibrational temperature, even though the high background from metallic species significantly increased measurement uncertainty. Perhaps the recommended additional spectral studies would reveal N2(+) First Negative System band-pair regions having less background. Detection of the He arrival was easily accomplished with the spectrometer/array detector system. Because of this, it is recommended that this means of detecting He arrival be used in the future. With proper calibrations of the system an He number density could be obtained. Although the flow conditions were out of limits for the run in which the NO spectrum was recorded, the usefulness of the NO spectrum for determination of free

  12. Phytoplankton photocompensation from space-based fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, J. Ruairidh; Goodwin, Deborah S.

    2010-03-01

    Recent satellite-derived observations linked global scale phytoplankton fluorescence variability with iron stress and hinted at photophysiological responses associated with changing light levels. These photocompensation reactions, the sum of photoacclimation and photoadaptation, were examined with climatological data for the Gulf of Maine. Significant seasonal variability was observed in the fluorescence quantum yield that was unrelated to patterns of biomass. Up to 89% of the variability in the fluorescence quantum yield was explained by a physiology-based photocompensation model. Spatial variability in seasonal patterns was associated with differing hydrodynamic regimes. This variability in the quantum yield demonstrates that satellite-based fluorescence is inappropriate for phytoplankton biomass determinations. More importantly, the work presented here provides the modeling foundation for fluorescence-based investigations of temporal and spatial variability in phytoplankton physiology associated with growth irradiance. These space-based physiological observations have the potential to decrease uncertainties in future ocean color derived primary productivity estimates.

  13. Ice depolarization on low-angle 2 GHz satellite downlinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Bostian, C. W.; Tsolakis, A.; Pratt, T.

    1984-01-01

    The impact of ice depolarization on the statistical performance of satellite downlinks were investigated. Propagation data recorded during 1979 and 1980 to see what impact of ice depolarization on link performance were analyzed. The effects on the cross polarization discrimination (XPD) statistics amounted to at most a 2 to 4 dB reduction in the XPD values which rain would have produced for a given percentage of time. Ice depolarization had no effect on the statistics of XPD values below the 0.01% level. Most of the severe ice depolarization events were associated with drops in barometric pressure and the passage of intense cold fronts through our area. Ice contents as the product of three individually undetermined quantities were defined: ice particle density, ice cloud thickness, and the average volume of the ice crystals. It is indicated that populations of ice particle with ice contents on the order of 0.002 m4/m3 are probably responsible for the lower values of measured XPD.

  14. Time-resolved spectroscopy of charge-transfer fluorescent molecules in polymer matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstraat, Johannes W.; Verhey, H. J.; Verhoeven, Jan W.; Kuemke, M.; McGown, Linda B.; Novikov, Eugene G.; van Hoek, Arie; Visser, Antonie J. W. G.

    1996-03-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence measurements have been carried out on charge-transfer fluorescent molecules incorporated in polymeric lattices, consisting of polystyrene cores and polyglycidylmethacrylate shells, and in polymethylmethacrylate thin films. New approaches to the analysis of fluorescence lifetime data obtained for molecules in polymer matrices had to be applied, since conventional analysis methods appeared not suitable for such strongly heterogeneous systems. The polymer lattices could be characterized by application of phase- resolved fluorescence lifetime measurements followed by maximum-entropy methods for data analysis. The thin films were studied using time-correlated single photon counting fluorescence lifetime measurements and data analysis with a home-built program based on stretched exponential decays. Interactions of the fluorescent guest molecules could be established by combined fluorescence lifetime and depolarization measurements. Suggestions for further improvements in fluorescence lifetime methods for characterization of polymeric materials have been made.

  15. Laser-induced fluorescence, dispersed fluorescence and lifetime measurements of jet-cooled chloro-substituted benzyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamatani, Satoshi; Tsuji, Kazuhide; Kawai, Akio; Shibuya, Kazuhiko

    2002-07-01

    We measured the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and dispersed fluorescence (DF) spectra of jet-cooled α-, o- and m-chlorobenzyl radicals after they were generated by the 193 nm photolysis of the corresponding parent molecules. The vibronically resolved spectra were obtained to analyze their D1-D0 transitions. The fluorescence lifetimes of α-, o-, m- and p-chlorobenzyls in the zeroth vibrational levels of the D1 states were measured to estimate the oscillator strengths of a series of benzyl derivatives. It was found that the α-substitution is inefficient to break the `accidental forbiddenness' of the D1-D0 transition of benzyl, while the ring-substitution enhances the oscillator strength by 50%.

  16. Fluorescence measurements of the thermal control experiments coatings on LDEF S0069 and A0114

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwiener, J. M.; Mell, R. J.; Peters, P. N.; Gregory, J. C.; Wilkes, D. R.; Miller, E. R.

    1993-01-01

    Fluorescence measurements were made on the thermal control coatings from the Long Duration Experiment Facility (LDEF) S0069, Thermal Control Surfaces Experiment (TCSE); and the A0114, Interaction of Atomic Oxygen with Material Surfaces in Low Earth orbit. Fluorescence was observed in two types of thermal control coatings and is attributed to pigments or binders. In addition, fluorescence measurement on the silver Teflon from the front cover of TCSE led to confirmation of damage (cracking) to the metal layers during application.

  17. In situ Measurements of Phytoplankton Fluorescence Using Low Cost Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Leeuw, Thomas; Boss, Emmanuel S.; Wright, Dana L.

    2013-01-01

    Chlorophyll a fluorometry has long been used as a method to study phytoplankton in the ocean. In situ fluorometry is used frequently in oceanography to provide depth-resolved estimates of phytoplankton biomass. However, the high price of commercially manufactured in situ fluorometers has made them unavailable to some individuals and institutions. Presented here is an investigation into building an in situ fluorometer using low cost electronics. The goal was to construct an easily reproducible in situ fluorometer from simple and widely available electronic components. The simplicity and modest cost of the sensor makes it valuable to students and professionals alike. Open source sharing of architecture and software will allow students to reconstruct and customize the sensor on a small budget. Research applications that require numerous in situ fluorometers or expendable fluorometers can also benefit from this study. The sensor costs US$150.00 and can be constructed with little to no previous experience. The sensor uses a blue LED to excite chlorophyll a and measures fluorescence using a silicon photodiode. The sensor is controlled by an Arduino microcontroller that also serves as a data logger. PMID:23783738

  18. Quantum dots fluorescence quantum yield measured by Thermal Lens Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Estupiñán-López, Carlos; Dominguez, Christian Tolentino; Cabral Filho, Paulo E; Fontes, Adriana; de Araujo, Renato E

    2014-01-01

    An essential parameter to evaluate the light emission properties of fluorophores is the fluorescence quantum yield, which quantify the conversion efficiency of absorbed photons to emitted photons. We detail here an alternative nonfluorescent method to determine the absolute fluorescence quantum yield of quantum dots (QDs). The method is based in the so-called Thermal Lens Spectroscopy (TLS) technique, which consists on the evaluation of refractive index gradient thermally induced in the fluorescent material by the absorption of light. Aqueous dispersion carboxyl-coated cadmium telluride (CdTe) QDs samples were used to demonstrate the Thermal Lens Spectroscopy technical procedure. PMID:25103802

  19. Aberrations of a horizontal-vertical depolarizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, Stephen C.; Chipman, Russell A.; Hillman, Lloyd W.

    1992-01-01

    Ray-trace equations for uniaxial birefringent materials are used here to derive third-order estimates for aberrations that are produced in imaging through uniaxial plates and horizontal-vertical (HV) depolarizers. An HV depolarizer is a spatial pseudodepolarizer; it converts a uniform input polarization state into a continuum of spatially varying polarization states in an output beam. An HV depolarizer consists of two birefringent wedges whose crystal axes are crossed at 90 deg. The interface between the wedges is included, which leads to a spatially varying retardance that provides the spatial pseudodepolarization. In HV depolarizers, spherical aberration, astigmatism, and image doubling are the principal aberrations for on-axis objects. Only spherical aberration occurs in isotropic plates, while the presence of birefringent wedges introduces astigmatism and image doubling. It is shown that image separation is proportional to the magnitude of the retardance variation.

  20. Naphthalene laser-induced fluorescence measurements at low temperature and pressure.

    PubMed

    Combs, Christopher S; Clemens, Noel T

    2016-05-01

    Few studies on naphthalene vapor fluorescence have been conducted at low temperature and pressure conditions. The current study focuses on conducting measurements of naphthalene quenching and absorption cross section in a temperature- and pressure-regulated test cell with 266 nm laser excitation. The test-cell measurements were of the naphthalene-fluorescence lifetime and integrated fluorescence signal over the temperature range of 100 to 525 K and pressure range of 1 to 40 kPa in air. These data enabled the calculation of naphthalene-fluorescence quantum yield and absorption cross section over the range of temperatures and pressures tested, which were then fit to simple functional forms for future use in the calibration of naphthalene laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements. Furthermore, the variation of naphthalene-fluorescence signal with respect to temperature was investigated for four different excitation wavelengths, demonstrating that a two-line naphthalene LIF thermometry technique may be feasible. PMID:27140385

  1. Lidar ratio and depolarization ratio for cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Nai; Chiang, Chih-Wei; Nee, Jan-Bai

    2002-10-20

    We report on studies of the lidar and the depolarization ratios for cirrus clouds. The optical depth and effective lidar ratio are derived from the transmission of clouds, which is determined by comparing the backscattering signals at the cloud base and cloud top. The lidar signals were fitted to a background atmospheric density profile outside the cloud region to warrant the linear response of the return signals with the scattering media. An average lidar ratio, 29 +/- 12 sr, has been found for all clouds measured in 1999 and 2000. The height and temperature dependences ofthe lidar ratio, the optical depth, and the depolarization ratio were investigated and compared with results of LITE and PROBE. Cirrus clouds detected near the tropopause are usually optically thin and mostly subvisual. Clouds with the largest optical depths were found near 12 km with a temperature of approximately -55 degrees C. The multiple-scattering effect is considered for clouds with high optical depths, and this effect lowers the lidar ratios compared with a single-scattering condition. Lidar ratios are in the 20-40 range for clouds at heights of 12.5-15 km and are smaller than approximately 30 in height above 15 km. Clouds are usually optically thin for temperatures below approximately -65 degrees C, and in this region the optical depth tends to decrease with height. The depolarization ratio is found to increase with a height at 11-15 km and smaller than 0.3 above 16 km. The variation in the depolarization ratio with the lidar ratio was also reported. The lidar and depolarization ratios were discussed in terms of the types of hexagonal ice crystals. PMID:12396200

  2. [Study on fluorescence measurement system of wastewater treatment process].

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Jun-Bo; Li, Zhan-Feng; Deng, Hu

    2011-06-01

    The present paper, focusing on the relationship between the fluorescence characteristics of fluorescent substances produced by the anaerobic reactors in process of the wastewater treatment status, aims to build an online detection platform of anaerobic wastewater treatment process for the wastewater treatment process parameter control, to provide effective, credible and stable technical basis, and to a certain extent can improve the efficiency of wastewater treatment. The results showed that it is feasible for this system to use fluorescence spectroscopy of wastewater treatment anaerobic reactor during the test; compared with the conventional detection method, it has simple structure, high sensitivity, and less time-consuming advantages; for other fluorescent substances in waste water treatment, it has broad application prospects. PMID:21847935

  3. Atmospheric Depolarization Lidar Experimental Receiver: A Space Shuttle Hitchhiker Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Matthew J.; Scott, V. Stanley; Spinhirne, James D.

    1998-01-01

    Development work is underway at the Goddard Space Flight Center to construct a depolarization measuring atmospheric lidar receiver. The Atmospheric Lidar (AL) is tentatively scheduled to fly on the Space Shuttle in a late-1999 time frame. The AL will fly in conjunction with the Shuttle Laser Altimeter (SLA) and the Infrared Spectral Imaging Radiometer (ISIR) to provide a comprehensive package of atmospheric aerosol and cloud information. The AL operates in conjunction with the SLA laser transmitter and measures profiles of atmospheric backscatter at 532 nm. The receiver system discriminates between the parallel and perpendicular polarizations of the backscattered signal, thus providing depolarization ratios for scattering from clouds. The lidar receiver also provides cloud height and thickness measurements to complement the brightness temperature measurements generated by the ISIR thermal imager. The function of the AL is twofold. The primary function is to provide range-resolved measurements of atmospheric aerosol backscatter and depolarization ratio at 532 nm with 75 m vertical resolution. The scientific purpose of these measurements is to determine composition of clouds based on the depolarization ratio (i.e cloud content is water or ice), to determine cloud height and thickness, and to gain further understanding of the global distribution of aerosols. This information, when coupled with the cloud brightness measured by the ISIR thermal imager will provide a significant amount of information on cloud composition and radiative effects, particularly for cirrus and sub-visual cirrus clouds. A secondary function of the AL is to serve as an in-space test bed for lidar technology advancements, including a fully fiber-coupled receiver and photon counting from space. In addition, the data obtained by the AL will be used to develop software for the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) flight mission.

  4. Color measurements on prints containing fluorescent whitening agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Mattias; Norberg, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Papers with a slightly blue shade are, at least among a majority of observers being perceived as whiter than papers having a more neutral color1. Therefore, practically all commercially available printing papers contain bluish dyes and fluorescent whitening agents (FWA) to give the paper a whiter appearance. Furthermore, in the paper industry, the most frequently used measure for paper whiteness is the CIE-whiteness. The CIE Whiteness formula, does in turn, also favor slightly bluish papers. Excessive examples of high CIE-whiteness values can be observed in the office-paper segment where a high CIE-whiteness value is an important sales argument. As an effect of the FWA, spectrophotometer measurements of optical properties such as paper whiteness are sensitive to the ultraviolet (UV) content of the light source used in the instrument. To address this, the standard spectrophotometers used in the paper industry are equipped with an adjustable filter for calibrating the UV-content of the illumination. In the paper industry, spectrophotometers with d/0 measurement geometry and a light source of type C are used. The graphical arts industry on the other hand, typically measures with spectrophotometers having 45/0 geometry and a light source of type A. Moreover, these instruments have only limited possibilities to adjust the UV-content by the use of different weighting filters. The standard for color measurements in the paper industry governs that measurements should be carried out using D65 standard illumination and the 10 ° standard observer. The corresponding standard for the graphic arts industry specify D50 standard illumination and the 2 ° standard observer. In both cases, the standard illuminants are simulated from the original light source by spectral weighting functions. However, the activation of FWA, which will impact the measured spectral reflectance, depends on the actual UV-content of the illumination used. Therefore, comparisons between measurements on

  5. Determination of biological activity from fluorescence-lifetime measurements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudek, F.; Baselt, T.; Lempe, B.; Taudt, C.; Hartmann, P.

    2015-03-01

    The importance of fluorescence lifetime measurement as an optical analysis tool is growing. Many applications already exist in order to determine the fluorescence lifetime, but the majority of these require the addition of fluorescence-active substances to enable measurements. Every usage of such foreign materials has an associated risk. This paper investigates the use of auto-fluorescing substances in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) as a risk free alternative to fluorescence-active substance enabled measurements. The experimental setup uses a nitrogen laser with a pulse length of 350 ps and a wavelength of 337 nm. The excited sample emits light due to fluorescence of NADH/NADPH and collagen. A fast photodiode collects the light at the output of an appropriate high-pass edge-filter at 400 nm. Fluorescence lifetimes can be determined from the decay of the measurement signals, which in turn characterizes the individual materials and their surrounding environment. Information about the quantity of the fluorescence active substances can also be measured based on the received signal intensity. The correlation between the fluorescence lifetime and the metabolic state of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated and is presented here.

  6. Analysis of laser-induced-fluorescence carbon monoxide measurements in turbulent nonpremixed flames.

    PubMed

    Mokhov, A V; Levinsky, H B; van der Meij, C E; Jacobs, R A

    1995-10-20

    The influence of fluctuating concentrations and temperature on the laser-induced-fluorescence (LIF) measurement of CO in turbulent flames is described, under conditions in which the fluorescence and the temperature are measured independently. The analysis shows that correlations between CO concentration and temperature can bias the averaged mole fraction extracted from LIF measurements. The magnitude of the bias can exceed the order of the average CO mole fraction. Further, LIF measurements of CO concentrations in a turbulent, nonpremixed, natural gas flame are described. The averaged CO mole fractions are derived from the fluorescence measurements by the use of flame temperatures independently measured by coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. Analysis of the fluctuations in measured temperature and fluorescence indicates that temperature and CO concentrations in flame regions with intensive mixing are indeed correlated. In the flame regions where burnout of CO has ceased, the LIF measurements of the CO mole fraction correspond to the probe measurements in exhaust. PMID:21060569

  7. Measuring thermodynamic details of DNA hybridization using fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    You, Yong; Tataurov, Andrey V; Owczarzy, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Modern real-time PCR systems make it easy to monitor fluorescence while temperature is varied for hundreds of samples in parallel, permitting high-throughput studies. We employed such system to investigate melting transitions of ordered nucleic acid structures into disordered random coils. Fluorescent dye and quencher were attached to oligonucleotides in such a way that changes of fluorescence intensity with temperature indicated progression of denaturation. When fluorescence melting data were compared with traditional ultraviolet optical experiments, commonly used dye/quencher combinations, like fluorescein and tetramethylrhodamine, showed substantial discrepancies. We have therefore screened 22 commercially available fluorophores and quenchers for their ability to reliably report annealing and melting transitions. Dependence of fluorescence on temperature and pH was also investigated. The optimal performance was observed using Texas Red or ROX dyes with Iowa Black RQ or Black Hole quenchers. These labels did not alter two-state nature of duplex melting process and provided accurate melting temperatures, free energies, enthalpies, and entropies. We also suggest a new strategy for determination of DNA duplex thermodynamics where concentration of a dye-labeled strand is kept constant and its complementary strand modified with a quencher is added at increasing excess. These methodological improvements will help build predictive models of nucleic acid hybridization. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 95: 472–486, 2011. PMID:21384337

  8. Frequency domain fluorescence lifetime microwell-plate platform for respirometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatni, M. R.; Yale, G.; Van Ryckeghem, A.; Porterfield, D. M.

    2010-04-01

    Traditionally micro-well plate based platforms used in biology utilize fluorescence intensity based methods to measure processes of biological relevance. However, fluorescence intensity measurements suffer from calibration drift due to a variety of factors. Photobleaching and self-quenching of the fluorescent dyes cause the intensity signal to drop over the lifetime of sensor immobilized inside the well. Variation in turbidity of the sample during the course of the measurement affects the measured fluorescence intensity. In comparison, fluorescence lifetime measurements are not significantly affected by these factors because fluorescence lifetime is a physico-chemical property of the fluorescent dye. Reliable and inexpensive frequency domain fluorescence lifetime instrumentation platforms are possible because the greater tolerance for optical alignment, and because they can be performed using inexpensive light sources such as LEDs. In this paper we report the development of a frequency domain fluorescence lifetime well-plate platform utilizing an oxygen sensitive transition-metal ligand complex fluorophore with a lifetime in the microsecond range. The fluorescence lifetime dye is incorporated in a polymer matrix and immobilized on the base of micro-well of a 60 well micro-well plate. Respiration measurements are performed in both aqueous and non-aqueous environment. Respirometry measurements were recorded from single Daphnia magna egg in hard water. Daphnia is an aquatic organism, important in environmental toxicology as a standard bioassay and early warning indicator for water quality monitoring. Also respirometry measurements were recorded from Tribolium castaneum eggs, which are common pests in the processed flour industry. These eggs were subjected to mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibitor such as potassium cyanide (KCN) and its effects on egg respiration were measured in real-time.

  9. Suppression of Ultracold Neutron Depolarization on Material Surfaces with Magnetic Holding Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Raymond

    2009-05-01

    The depolarization of Ultracold Neutrons(UCN) was measured within 1-m long, 2 3/4" diameter electropolished copper, diamondlike carbon-coated copper, and stainless steel guide tubes as a function of magnetic holding field. The UCN were trapped between a 6 Tesla solenoidal magnetic field and a 3/8" copper aperture. A series of Helmholtz coils produced a magnetic field over the length of the test guide of either 10 or 250 Gauss. The surface depolarization was observed to be suppressed at the higher holding field on the measured copper guides. These measurements will aid in the determination of the upper limit of depolarization of UCN in the UCN beta asymmetry measurement at LANL (UCNA) and in understanding the mechanisms for depolarization in non-magnetic guides.

  10. Depolarization of Cellular Resting Membrane Potential Promotes Neonatal Cardiomyocyte Proliferation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Jen-Yu; Williams, Corin; Levin, Michael; Black, Lauren Deems

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes (CMs) undergo a rapid transition from hyperplastic to hypertrophic growth soon after birth, which is a major challenge to the development of engineered cardiac tissue for pediatric patients. Resting membrane potential (Vmem) has been shown to play an important role in cell differentiation and proliferation during development. We hypothesized that depolarization of neonatal CMs would stimulate or maintain CM proliferation in vitro. To test our hypothesis, we isolated postnatal day 3 neonatal rat CMs and subjected them to sustained depolarization via the addition of potassium gluconate or Ouabain to the culture medium. Cell density and CM percentage measurements demonstrated an increase in mitotic CMs along with a ~2 fold increase in CM numbers with depolarization. In addition, depolarization led to an increase in cells in G2 and S phase, indicating increased proliferation, as measured by flow cytometry. Surprisingly depolarization of Vmem with either treatment led to inhibition of proliferation in cardiac fibroblasts. This effect is abrogated when the study was carried out on postnatal day 7 neonatal CMs, which are less proliferative, indicating that the likely mechanism of depolarization is the maintenance of the proliferating CM population. In summary, our findings suggest that depolarization maintains postnatal CM proliferation and may be a novel approach to encourage growth of engineered tissue and cardiac regeneration in pediatric patients. PMID:25295125

  11. Measurement of protein-like fluorescence in river and waste water using a handheld spectrophotometer.

    PubMed

    Baker, Andy; Ward, David; Lieten, Shakti H; Periera, Ryan; Simpson, Ellie C; Slater, Malcolm

    2004-07-01

    Protein-like fluorescence intensity in rivers increases with increasing anthropogenic DOM inputs from sewerage and farm wastes. Here, a portable luminescence spectrophotometer was used to investigate if this technology could be used to provide both field scientists with a rapid pollution monitoring tool and process control engineers with a portable waste water monitoring device, through the measurement of river and waste water tryptophan-like fluorescence from a range of rivers in NE England and from effluents from within two waste water treatment plants. The portable spectrophotometer determined that waste waters and sewerage effluents had the highest tryptophan-like fluorescence intensity, urban streams had an intermediate tryptophan-like fluorescence intensity, and the upstream river samples of good water quality the lowest tryptophan-like fluorescence intensity. Replicate samples demonstrated that fluorescence intensity is reproducible to +/- 20% for low fluorescence, 'clean' river water samples and +/- 5% for urban water and waste waters. Correlations between fluorescence measured by the portable spectrophotometer with a conventional bench machine were 0.91; (Spearman's rho, n = 143), demonstrating that the portable spectrophotometer does correlate with tryptophan-like fluorescence intensity measured using the bench spectrophotometer. PMID:15223288

  12. Longitudinal polarization periodicity of unpolarized light passing through a double wedge depolarizer.

    PubMed

    de Sande, Juan Carlos G; Santarsiero, Massimo; Piquero, Gemma; Gori, Franco

    2012-12-01

    The polarization characteristics of unpolarized light passing through a double wedge depolarizer are studied. It is found that the degree of polarization of the radiation propagating after the depolarizer is uniform across transverse planes after the depolarizer, but it changes from one plane to another in a periodic way giving, at different distances, unpolarized, partially polarized, or even perfectly polarized light. An experiment is performed to confirm this result. Measured values of the Stokes parameters and of the degree of polarization are in complete agreement with the theoretical predictions. PMID:23262685

  13. Photonic reagents for concentration measurement of flu-orescent proteins with overlapping spectra.

    PubMed

    Goun, Alexei; Bondar, Denys I; Er, Ali O; Quine, Zachary; Rabitz, Herschel A

    2016-01-01

    By exploiting photonic reagents (i.e., coherent control by shaped laser pulses), we employ Optimal Dynamic Discrimination (ODD) as a novel means for quantitatively characterizing mixtures of fluorescent proteins with a large spectral overlap. To illustrate ODD, we simultaneously measured concentrations of in vitro mixtures of Enhanced Blue Fluorescent Protein (EBFP) and Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP). Building on this foundational study, the ultimate goal is to exploit the capabilities of ODD for parallel monitoring of genetic and protein circuits by suppressing the spectral cross-talk among multiple fluorescent reporters. PMID:27181496

  14. Photonic reagents for concentration measurement of flu-orescent proteins with overlapping spectra

    PubMed Central

    Goun, Alexei; Bondar, Denys I.; Er, Ali O.; Quine, Zachary; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2016-01-01

    By exploiting photonic reagents (i.e., coherent control by shaped laser pulses), we employ Optimal Dynamic Discrimination (ODD) as a novel means for quantitatively characterizing mixtures of fluorescent proteins with a large spectral overlap. To illustrate ODD, we simultaneously measured concentrations of in vitro mixtures of Enhanced Blue Fluorescent Protein (EBFP) and Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP). Building on this foundational study, the ultimate goal is to exploit the capabilities of ODD for parallel monitoring of genetic and protein circuits by suppressing the spectral cross-talk among multiple fluorescent reporters. PMID:27181496

  15. Measurement of the fluorescence lifetime in scattering media by frequency-domain photon migration.

    PubMed

    Mayer, R H; Reynolds, J S; Sevick-Muraca, E M

    1999-08-01

    A method is presented to determine fluorescence decay lifetimes within tissuelike scattering media. Fluorescence lifetimes are determined for micromolar concentrations of the dyes 3,3'-Diethylthiatricarbocyanine Iodide and Indocyanine Green by frequency-domain investigations of light propagating in turbid media. Dual-wavelength photon-migration measurements that use intensity-modulated sources at excitation and emission wavelengths of the fluorophores provide optical parameters of the media as well as fluorescence properties of the dyes. The deduction of fluorescence lifetimes requires no calibration with reference fluorophores, and the results are shown to be independent of dye concentration. PMID:18323983

  16. Photonic reagents for concentration measurement of flu-orescent proteins with overlapping spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goun, Alexei; Bondar, Denys I.; Er, Ali O.; Quine, Zachary; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2016-05-01

    By exploiting photonic reagents (i.e., coherent control by shaped laser pulses), we employ Optimal Dynamic Discrimination (ODD) as a novel means for quantitatively characterizing mixtures of fluorescent proteins with a large spectral overlap. To illustrate ODD, we simultaneously measured concentrations of in vitro mixtures of Enhanced Blue Fluorescent Protein (EBFP) and Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP). Building on this foundational study, the ultimate goal is to exploit the capabilities of ODD for parallel monitoring of genetic and protein circuits by suppressing the spectral cross-talk among multiple fluorescent reporters.

  17. Intestine pH measurements using fluorescence imaging: an in-vivo preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marechal, Xavier-Marie; Mordon, Serge R.; Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Begu, Sylvie; Mathieu, D.; Buys, Bruno; Dhelin, Guy; Lesage, Jean C.; Neviere, Remi; Chopin, Claude

    1999-02-01

    Measurement of gastrointestinal intramucosal pH has been recognized as an important factor in the detection of hypoxia-induced dysfunctions. However, current pH measurement techniques are limited in terms of time and spatial resolution. A major advance in accurate pH measurement was the development of the ratiometric fluorescent indicator dye, 2',7'-bis(carboxyethyl)-4,5- carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). This study aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of fluorescence imaging technique to measure in vivo the pH of intestine. The intestine was inserted in an optical chamber placed under a microscope. Animals were injected i.v. with the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye BCECF. Fluorescence was visualized by illuminating the intestine alternately at 490 and 470 nm. The emitted fluorescence was directed to an intensified camera. The ratio of emitted fluorescence at excitation wavelengths of 490 and 470 nm was measured, corrected and converted to pH by constructing a calibration curve. The pH controls were performed with a pH microelectrode correlated with venous blood gas sampling. We concluded that accurate pH measurements of rat intestine can be obtained by fluorescence imaging using BCECF. This technology could be easily adapted for endoscopic pH measurement.

  18. Droplet temperature measurement based on 2-color laser-induced exciplex fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuyin; Zhang, Gaoming; Xu, Min; Wang, Jianxin

    2013-08-01

    Measurements of liquid phase temperature distributions in liquid-vapor co-existing conditions (such as in evaporating sprays) are important to understand the physics of droplet evaporation. The techniques based on laser-induced fluorescence are not suitable for evaporating case since both liquid and vapor phases emit fluorescence with the same wavelength. In this study, the fluorescence from liquid and vapor phases was separated by use of laser-induced exciplex fluorescence (LIEF) technique. Two fluorescence bands from the liquid phase fluorescence spectra were detected simultaneously, and their intensity ratio was correlated to the liquid phase temperature. For the LIEF imaging system, FB-DEMA- n-hexane was selected as it was a typical LIEF system for the vapor concentration diagnostic, and thus easily to be extended to a simultaneous diagnostic on the vapor concentration and the droplet temperature. The fluorescence spectra were obtained in the temperature range from 303 to 423 K. The effects of liquid temperature, liquid pressure, dopant concentration and laser energy on the temperature measurement were investigated. The results show a good linear relationship between the fluorescence ratio and the temperature function. Increasing the dopant concentration can raise the signal-to-noise ratio but deteriorate temperature sensitivity. The optimal range of the dopant concentration was found between 0.1 % and 0.5 %. After calibration, the technique was applied to a monosized droplet stream, and the measurement results demonstrated excellent measurement accuracy with error below 1 % in the range of 303-423 K.

  19. Relative entropy convergence for depolarizing channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Hermes, Alexander; Stilck França, Daniel; Wolf, Michael M.

    2016-02-01

    We study the convergence of states under continuous-time depolarizing channels with full rank fixed points in terms of the relative entropy. The optimal exponent of an upper bound on the relative entropy in this case is given by the log-Sobolev-1 constant. Our main result is the computation of this constant. As an application, we use the log-Sobolev-1 constant of the depolarizing channels to improve the concavity inequality of the von Neumann entropy. This result is compared to similar bounds obtained recently by Kim and we show a version of Pinsker's inequality, which is optimal and tight if we fix the second argument of the relative entropy. Finally, we consider the log-Sobolev-1 constant of tensor-powers of the completely depolarizing channel and use a quantum version of Shearer's inequality to prove a uniform lower bound.

  20. Localization of nerve depolarization with magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Odderson, I R; Halar, E M

    1992-06-01

    The specific location on the magnetic stimulation (MS) coil that may correspond to the area of nerve depolarization has not been determined. In order to localize such an area, MS with 9-cm and 5-cm diameter coils was compared with conventional percutaneous electric stimulation (ES). On the 9-cm coil the distribution of points of nerve depolarization corresponded to that quarter of the coil which was placed over and parallel to the median nerve, whereas on the 5-cm coil, this area also extended outside the coil. The points of median nerve depolarization with MS were distributed over a distance of 7 cm on the stimulator head and was nearly identical for the 2 coil sizes at the wrist and elbow. Ulnar nerve costimulation was less frequent with the smaller coil at the wrist. A calculated reference point on the coil is suggested for more accurate NCV determinations. PMID:1508235

  1. Zinc depolarized electrochemical CO2 concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, R. R.; Marshall, R. D.; Schubert, F. H.

    1975-01-01

    Two zinc depolarized electrochemical carbon dioxide concentrator concepts were analytically and experimentally evaluated for portable life support system carbon dioxide (CO2) removal application. The first concept, referred to as the zinc hydrogen generator electrochemical depolarized CO2 concentrator, uses a ZHG to generate hydrogen for direct use in an EDC. The second concept, referred to as the zinc/electrochemical depolarized concentrator, uses a standard EDC cell construction modified for use with the Zn anode. The Zn anode is consumed and subsequently regenerated, thereby eliminating the need to supply H2 to the EDC for the CO2 removal process. The evaluation was based primarily on an analytical evaluation of the two ZnDCs at projected end item performance and hardware design levels. Both ZnDC concepts for PLSS CO2 removal application were found to be noncompetitive in both total equivalent launch weight and individual extravehicular activity mission volume when compared to other candidate regenerable PLSS CO2 scrubbers.

  2. Capturing Depolarization Information in GPS Reflections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Kenneth C.

    2000-01-01

    The state of the surface of the ocean has a prominent effect on the depolarization of the circularly polarized emissions of the GPS satellites. The system designers election to capture the important information carries with it the need to implement the data extraction in a cost efficient manner. Antenna components, and associated networks for deriving depolarization information are described. For typical sea states the polarization characteristics of the reflected GPS signal vary rapidly with time so various methods for recording the changes are discussed.

  3. Temperature dependent steady state and picosecond kinetic fluorescence measurements of a photosystem I preparation from spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Mukerji, I.; Sauer, K.

    1988-08-01

    The fluorescence properties of a photosystem I (PSI) preparation from spinach containing approximately 200 chlorophyll (Chl) per reaction center were investigated. The preparation, characterized both spectroscopically and biochemically, contained the peripheral light harvesting antenna associated with PSI. In this study steady state fluorescence measurements were performed as a function of temperature. An emission maximum at 690 nm and a long wavelength shoulder from 710 to 740 nm were observed. The fluorescence yield at 690 nm is temperature independent, while the yield of the long wavelength shoulder increases dramatically with decreasing temperature. Additionally, kinetic measurements using the technique of single photon counting were done at room temperature and 77K. At 295K a four component fit was needed to describe the fluorescence decay; whereas at 77K, an additional 40-50 ps rise component indicative of fluorescence induction was necessary. 28 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Red and far red Sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence as a measure of plant photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossini, M.; Nedbal, L.; Guanter, L.; Ač, A.; Alonso, L.; Burkart, A.; Cogliati, S.; Colombo, R.; Damm, A.; Drusch, M.; Hanus, J.; Janoutova, R.; Julitta, T.; Kokkalis, P.; Moreno, J.; Novotny, J.; Panigada, C.; Pinto, F.; Schickling, A.; Schüttemeyer, D.; Zemek, F.; Rascher, U.

    2015-03-01

    Remote estimation of Sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence emitted by terrestrial vegetation can provide an unparalleled opportunity to track spatiotemporal variations of photosynthetic efficiency. Here we provide the first direct experimental evidence that the two peaks of the chlorophyll fluorescence spectrum can be accurately mapped from high-resolution radiance spectra and that the signal is linked to variations in actual photosynthetic efficiency. Red and far red fluorescence measured using a novel airborne imaging spectrometer over a grass carpet treated with an herbicide known to inhibit photosynthesis was significantly higher than the corresponding signal from an equivalent untreated grass carpet. The reflectance signal of the two grass carpets was indistinguishable, confirming that the fast dynamic changes in fluorescence emission were related to variations in the functional status of actual photosynthesis induced by herbicide application. Our results from a controlled experiment at the local scale illustrate the potential for the global mapping of terrestrial photosynthesis through space-borne measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence.

  5. Measurements of the Ultraviolet Fluorescence Cross Sections and Spectra of Bacillus Anthracis Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.R.

    1998-09-01

    Measurements of the ultraviolet autofluorescence spectra and absolute cross sections of the Bacillus anthracis (Ba) simulants Bacillus globigii (Bg), Bacillus megaterium (Bm), Bacillus subtilis (Bs), and Bacillus cereus (Bc) were measured. Fluorescence spectra and cross sections of pine pollen (Pina echinata) were measured for comparison. Both dried vegetative cells and spores separated from the sporulated vegetative material were studied. The spectra were obtained by suspending a small number (<10) of particles in air in our Single Particle Spectroscopy Apparatus (SPSA), illuminating the particles with light from a spectrally filtered arc lamp, and measuring the fluorescence spectra of the particles. The illumination was 280 nm (20 nm FWHM) and the fluorescence spectra was measured between 300 and 450 nm. The fluorescence cross section of vegetative Bg peaks at 320 nm with a maximum cross section of 5 X 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle while the Bg spore fluorescence peaks at 310 nm with peak fluorescence of 8 X 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle. Pine pollen particles showed a higher fluorescence peaking at 355 nm with a cross section of 1.7 X 10{sup -13} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle. Integrated cross sections ranged from 3.0 X 10{sup -13} for the Bg spores through 2.25 X 10{sup -12} (cm{sup 2}/sr-particle) for the vegetative cells.

  6. 5-Aminolevulinic Acid-Induced Protoporphyrin IX Fluorescence in Meningioma: Qualitative and Quantitative Measurements In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Valdes, Pablo A.; Bekelis, Kimon; Harris, Brent T.; Wilson, Brian C.; Leblond, Frederic; Kim, Anthony; Simmons, Nathan E.; Erkmen, Kadir; Paulsen, Keith D.; Roberts, David W.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The use of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence has shown promise as a surgical adjunct for maximizing the extent of surgical resection in gliomas. To date, the clinical utility of 5-ALA in meningiomas is not fully understood, with most descriptive studies using qualitative approaches to 5-ALA-PpIX. OBJECTIVE To assess the diagnostic performance of 5-ALA-PpIX fluorescence during surgical resection of meningioma. METHODS ALA was administered to 15 patients with meningioma undergoing PpIX fluorescence-guided surgery at our institution. At various points during the procedure, the surgeon performed qualitative, visual assessments of fluorescence by using the surgical microscope, followed by a quantitative fluorescence measurement by using an intra-operative probe. Specimens were collected at each point for subsequent neuropathological analysis. Clustered data analysis of variance was used to ascertain a difference between groups, and receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed to assess diagnostic capabilities. RESULTS Red-pink fluorescence was observed in 80% (12/15) of patients, with visible fluorescence generally demonstrating a strong, homogenous character. Quantitative fluorescence measured diagnostically significant PpIX concentrations (CPpIx) in both visibly and nonvisibly fluorescent tissues, with significantly higher CPpIx in both visibly fluorescent (P < .001) and tumor tissue (P = .002). Receiver operating characteristic analyses also showed diagnostic accuracies up to 90% for differentiating tumor from normal dura. CONCLUSION ALA-induced PpIX fluorescence guidance is a potential and promising adjunct in accurately detecting neoplastic tissue during meningioma resective surgery. These results suggest a broader reach for PpIX as a biomarker for meningiomas than was previously noted in the literature. PMID:23887194

  7. Direct determination of fluorescent whitening agents by absorption measurement in situ on thin layer chromatograms.

    PubMed

    Theidel, H

    1975-01-01

    The measuring technique for the chromatogram spectrophotometer (Zeiss) to determine the reflectance curves, the analysis according to the Kubelka-Munck function, and the basic outlines of the quantitative determination of stilbene fluorescent whitening agents (FWAs) are explained. PMID:1064527

  8. A unified planar measurement technique for compressible flows using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1992-01-01

    A unified laser-induced fluorescence technique for conducting planar measurements of temperature, pressure and velocity in nonreacting, highly compressible flows has been developed, validated and demonstrated. Planar fluorescence from iodine, seeded into air, was induced by an argon-ion laser and collected using a liquid-nitrogen cooled CCD camera. In the measurement technique, temperature is determined from the fluorescence induced with the laser operated broad band. Pressure and velocity are determined from the shape and position of the fluorescence excitation spectrum which is measured with the laser operated narrow band. The measurement approach described herein provides a means of obtaining accurate, spatially-complete maps of the primary flow field parameters in a wide variety of cold supersonic and transonic flows.

  9. INTER-LABORATORY STUDY OF CELLULAR FLUORESCENCE INTENSITY MEASUREMENTS WITH FLUORESCEIN-LABELED MICROBEAD STANDARDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine the precision of cellular fluorescence intensity (FI) measurements derived from labeled microbead standards, FI results were compared from 43 different flow cytometers in 34 laboratories. ll laboratories analyzed prepared aliquots of fluoresceinated calf thymocyte nu...

  10. Intrinsic photosensitizer fluorescence measured using multi-diameter single-fiber spectroscopy in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen-van Zaane, Floor; Gamm, Ute A.; van Driel, Pieter B. A. A.; Snoeks, Thomas J.; de Bruijn, Henriette S.; van der Ploeg-van den Heuvel, Angelique; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Löwik, Clemens W.; Amelink, Arjen; Robinson, Dominic J.

    2014-01-01

    Quantification of fluorescence in vivo is complicated by the influence of tissue optical properties on the collected fluorescence signal. When tissue optical properties in the measurement volume are quantified, one can obtain the intrinsic fluorescence, which equals the product of fluorophore absorption coefficient and quantum yield. We applied this method to in vivo single-fiber fluorescence spectroscopy measurements on mouse tongue, skin, liver, and oral squamous cell carcinoma, where we detected intrinsic fluorescence spectra of the photosensitizers chlorin e6 and Bremachlorin at t=[3,4.5,6,24,48] h incubation time. We observed a tissue-dependent maximum of 35% variation in the total correction factor over the visible wavelength range. Significant differences in spectral shape over time between sensitizers were observed. Although the wavelength position of the fluorescence intensity maximum for ce6 shifted to the red, Bremachlorin showed a blue shift. Furthermore, the Bremachlorin peak appeared to be broader than the ce6 fluorescence peak. Intrinsic fluorescence intensity, which can be related to photosensitizer concentration, was decreasing for all time points but showed significantly more Bremachlorin present compared to ce6 at long incubation times. Results from this study can be used to define an optimal treatment protocol for Bremachlorin-based photodynamic therapy.

  11. Measurement of the Fluorescence Quantum Yield Using a Spectrometer With an Integrating Sphere Detector.

    PubMed

    Gaigalas, Adolfas K; Wang, Lili

    2008-01-01

    A method is proposed for measuring the fluorescence quantum yield (QY) using a commercial spectrophotometer with a 150 mm integrating sphere (IS) detector. The IS detector is equipped with an internal cuvette holder so that absorbance measurements can be performed with the cuvette inside the IS. In addition, the spectrophotometer has a cuvette holder outside the IS for performing conventional absorbance measurements. It is shown that the fluorescence quantum yield can be obtained from a combination of absorbance measurements of the buffer and the analyte solution inside and outside the IS detector. Due to the simultaneous detection of incident and fluorescent photons, the absorbance measurements inside the IS need to be adjusted for the wavelength dependence of the photomultiplier detector and the wavelength dependence of the IS magnification factor. An estimate of the fluorescence emission spectrum is needed for proper application of the wavelength-dependent adjustments. Results are presented for fluorescein, quinine sulfate, myoglobin, rhodamine B and erythrosin B. The QY of fluorescein in 0.1 mol/L NaOH was determined as 0.90±0.02 where the uncertainty is equal to the standard deviation of three independent measurements. The method provides a convenient and rapid estimate of the fluorescence quantum yield. Refinements of the measurement model and the characteristics of the IS detector can in principle yield an accurate value of the absolute fluorescence quantum yield. PMID:27096110

  12. Optical fiber sensor system for oil contamination measurement based on 3D fluorescence spectrum parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Liping; Shi, Jinshan

    2000-10-01

    In recent years oil contamination in water is more serious and destroys the mode of life and relation to water body environments. Excitation fluorescence method is one of the main approaches to monitor oil contamination on line. But average intensity of oil fluorescence only indicates its density, not indicates the type of contamination oil. Two-dimensional fluorescence spectrum is more difficult to determine the kind of oil, because the different oil has fluorescence spectrum overlapping to a great extent. In this paper, the 3D fluorescence spectrum parameterization is introduced. It can extract several characteristic parameters to measure the kid of oil to be measured. A prototype of optical fiber 3D fluorescence spectrum meter we developed carries out the identification of different oil types, such as crude oil, diesel oil and kerosene. The experiment arrangement conceived to measure pulse xenon lamp induced of oil component in water. The experiment results state clearly that the 3D fluorescence spectrum parameterization and software are successful to measure oil density and identify the type of oil in situ.

  13. A bio-aerosol detection technique based on tryptophan intrinsic fluorescence measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Shuyao; Zhang, Pei; Zhu, Linglin; Zhao, Yongkai; Huang, Huijie

    2011-12-01

    Based on the measurement of intrinsic fluorescence, a set of bio-aerosol including virus aerosols detection instrument is developed, with which a method of calibration is proposed using tryptophan as the target. The experimental results show a good linear relationship between the fluorescence voltage of the instrument and the concentration of the tryptophan aerosol. An excellent correlation (R2>=0.99) with the sensitivity of 4000PPL is obtained. The research demonstrates the reliability of the bio-aerosol detection by measuring the content of tryptophan. Further more the feasibility of prejudgment to the species of bio-aerosol particles with the multi-channel fluorescence detection technology is discussed.

  14. A double filtering method for measuring the translational velocity of fluorescently stained cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yasokawa, Toshiki; Ishimaru, Ichirou; Kuriyama, Shigeki; Masaki, Tsutomu; Takegawa, Kaoru; Tanaka, Naotaka

    2007-09-24

    The authors propose a double filtering method to measure translational velocity for tracking fluorescently stained cells. This method employs two diffraction gratings installed in the infinity space through which the parallel pencil beam of the fluorescence passes. With this method, the change in light intensity whose period is proportional to the translational velocity of the sample can be obtained at the imaging surface. By using a sample that has a random distribution of fluorescence intensity, the authors verified that translational velocity measurements could be achieved using the proposed method.

  15. On the Uncertainty in Single Molecule Fluorescent Lifetime and Energy Emission Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Emery N.; Zhang, Zhenhua; McCollom, Alex D.

    1996-01-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting has recently been combined with mode-locked picosecond pulsed excitation to measure the fluorescent lifetimes and energy emissions of single molecules in a flow stream. Maximum likelihood (ML) and least squares methods agree and are optimal when the number of detected photons is large, however, in single molecule fluorescence experiments the number of detected photons can be less than 20, 67 percent of those can be noise, and the detection time is restricted to 10 nanoseconds. Under the assumption that the photon signal and background noise are two independent inhomogeneous Poisson processes, we derive the exact joint arrival time probability density of the photons collected in a single counting experiment performed in the presence of background noise. The model obviates the need to bin experimental data for analysis, and makes it possible to analyze formally the effect of background noise on the photon detection experiment using both ML or Bayesian methods. For both methods we derive the joint and marginal probability densities of the fluorescent lifetime and fluorescent emission. The ML and Bayesian methods are compared in an analysis of simulated single molecule fluorescence experiments of Rhodamine 110 using different combinations of expected background noise and expected fluorescence emission. While both the ML or Bayesian procedures perform well for analyzing fluorescence emissions, the Bayesian methods provide more realistic measures of uncertainty in the fluorescent lifetimes. The Bayesian methods would be especially useful for measuring uncertainty in fluorescent lifetime estimates in current single molecule flow stream experiments where the expected fluorescence emission is low. Both the ML and Bayesian algorithms can be automated for applications in molecular biology.

  16. On the uncertainty in single molecule fluorescent lifetime and energy emission measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Emery N.; Zhang, Zhenhua; Mccollom, Alex D.

    1995-01-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting has recently been combined with mode-locked picosecond pulsed excitation to measure the fluorescent lifetimes and energy emissions of single molecules in a flow stream. Maximum likelihood (ML) and least square methods agree and are optimal when the number of detected photons is large however, in single molecule fluorescence experiments the number of detected photons can be less than 20, 67% of those can be noise and the detection time is restricted to 10 nanoseconds. Under the assumption that the photon signal and background noise are two independent inhomogeneous poisson processes, we derive the exact joint arrival time probably density of the photons collected in a single counting experiment performed in the presence of background noise. The model obviates the need to bin experimental data for analysis, and makes it possible to analyze formally the effect of background noise on the photon detection experiment using both ML or Bayesian methods. For both methods we derive the joint and marginal probability densities of the fluorescent lifetime and fluorescent emission. the ML and Bayesian methods are compared in an analysis of simulated single molecule fluorescence experiments of Rhodamine 110 using different combinations of expected background nose and expected fluorescence emission. While both the ML or Bayesian procedures perform well for analyzing fluorescence emissions, the Bayesian methods provide more realistic measures of uncertainty in the fluorescent lifetimes. The Bayesian methods would be especially useful for measuring uncertainty in fluorescent lifetime estimates in current single molecule flow stream experiments where the expected fluorescence emission is low. Both the ML and Bayesian algorithms can be automated for applications in molecular biology.

  17. Confidence intervals for concentration and brightness from fluorescence fluctuation measurements.

    PubMed

    Pryse, Kenneth M; Rong, Xi; Whisler, Jordan A; McConnaughey, William B; Jiang, Yan-Fei; Melnykov, Artem V; Elson, Elliot L; Genin, Guy M

    2012-09-01

    The theory of photon count histogram (PCH) analysis describes the distribution of fluorescence fluctuation amplitudes due to populations of fluorophores diffusing through a focused laser beam and provides a rigorous framework through which the brightnesses and concentrations of the fluorophores can be determined. In practice, however, the brightnesses and concentrations of only a few components can be identified. Brightnesses and concentrations are determined by a nonlinear least-squares fit of a theoretical model to the experimental PCH derived from a record of fluorescence intensity fluctuations. The χ(2) hypersurface in the neighborhood of the optimum parameter set can have varying degrees of curvature, due to the intrinsic curvature of the model, the specific parameter values of the system under study, and the relative noise in the data. Because of this varying curvature, parameters estimated from the least-squares analysis have varying degrees of uncertainty associated with them. There are several methods for assigning confidence intervals to the parameters, but these methods have different efficacies for PCH data. Here, we evaluate several approaches to confidence interval estimation for PCH data, including asymptotic standard error, likelihood joint-confidence region, likelihood confidence intervals, skew-corrected and accelerated bootstrap (BCa), and Monte Carlo residual resampling methods. We study these with a model two-dimensional membrane system for simplicity, but the principles are applicable as well to fluorophores diffusing in three-dimensional solution. Using simulated fluorescence fluctuation data, we find the BCa method to be particularly well-suited for estimating confidence intervals in PCH analysis, and several other methods to be less so. Using the BCa method and additional simulated fluctuation data, we find that confidence intervals can be reduced dramatically for a specific non-Gaussian beam profile. PMID:23009839

  18. Thermally induced depolarization in terbium gallium garnet ceramics rod with natural convection cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slezak, Ondrej; Yasuhara, Ryo; Lucianetti, Antonio; Vojna, David; Mocek, Tomas

    2015-06-01

    Thermal birefringence-induced depolarization in terbium gallium garnet (TGG) ceramic rods has been numerically evaluated for the geometry and heating conditions in a previous experiment. In this model, the spatially resolved heat transfer coefficient corresponding to natural convection cooling and the offset of the beam from the rotational axis of the rod have been incorporated and the realistic beam profile used in the experiment has been considered. A resulting beam depolarization ratio of 4.3 × 10-4 has been calculated for an input power of 117 W. The results were found to be in good agreement with the measured values. Furthermore, a parametric study of the depolarization ratio for higher input powers has been performed leading to a depolarization ratio of 3.3 × 10-2 for 1 kW input power.

  19. A research on measuring and analyzing the optical properties of fluorescent whitening agent in soybean milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xingyue; Zhao, Zhimin; Zhang, Lin; Qian, Kun; Wang, Lexin; Lan, Xiufeng

    2015-03-01

    A research on measuring and analyzing the fluorescence spectra of fluorescent whitening agent in soybean milk was explained in this paper. At the temperature of 30 °C, linear relationship was found good between fluorescence intensity and concentration of fluorescent whitening agent in the range of 0.015-0.25 mg/mL when the emission wavelength was 437 nm and excitation wavelength was 347 nm. Modeling analysis showed that the correlation coefficient was 0.996, the relative standard deviation (RSD) ranged from 0.45% to 0.73% and the recovery of standard addition ranged from 96.80% to 102.67%, which testified the validity of the method. This research provided a new way for detecting the unedible fluorescent whitening agent content in food production.

  20. Detecting and Quantifying Biomolecular Interactions of a Dendritic Polyglycerol Sulfate Nanoparticle Using Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    PubMed

    Boreham, Alexander; Pikkemaat, Jens; Volz, Pierre; Brodwolf, Robert; Kuehne, Christian; Licha, Kai; Haag, Rainer; Dernedde, Jens; Alexiev, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Interactions of nanoparticles with biomaterials determine the biological activity that is key for the physiological response. Dendritic polyglycerol sulfates (dPGS) were found recently to act as an inhibitor of inflammation by blocking selectins. Systemic application of dPGS would present this nanoparticle to various biological molecules that rapidly adsorb to the nanoparticle surface or lead to adsorption of the nanoparticle to cellular structures such as lipid membranes. In the past, fluorescence lifetime measurements of fluorescently tagged nanoparticles at a molecular and cellular/tissue level have been proven to reveal valuable information on the local nanoparticle environment via characteristic fluorescent lifetime signatures of the nanoparticle bound dye. Here, we established fluorescence lifetime measurements as a tool to determine the binding affinity to fluorescently tagged dPGS (dPGS-ICC; ICC: indocarbocyanine). The binding to a cell adhesion molecule (L-selectin) and a human complement protein (C1q) to dPGS-ICC was evaluated by the concentration dependent change in the unique fluorescence lifetime signature of dPGS-ICC. The apparent binding affinity was found to be in the nanomolar range for both proteins (L-selectin: 87 ± 4 nM and C1q: 42 ± 12 nM). Furthermore, the effect of human serum on the unique fluorescence lifetime signature of dPGS-ICC was measured and found to be different from the interactions with the two proteins and lipid membranes. A comparison between the unique lifetime signatures of dPGS-ICC in different biological environments shows that fluorescence lifetime measurements of unique dPGS-ICC fluorescence lifetime signatures are a versatile tool to probe the microenvironment of dPGS in cells and tissue. PMID:26712722

  1. A novel pretreatment method of three-dimensional fluorescence data for quantitative measurement of component contents in mixture.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Wang, Yu-Tian; Liu, Xiao-Fei

    2015-04-01

    Three-dimensional fluorescence technique is commonly used for the determination of component contents in the mixture. Fluorescence intensity data are used directly in the fluorescent spectrum data processing method. The relationship between fluorescence intensity values and concentrations is linear. Random noise is inevitable in the process of measuring due to fluorescence spectrometer. The measurement accuracy is reduced due to the existence of noise. To reduce random noise and improve the measurement sensitivity, a novel pretreatment method of three-dimensional fluorescence data is proposed. The method is based on Quasi-Monte-Carlo integral. Due to the increased slope of fluorescence intensity data during the integral, the measurement sensitivity is improved. At the same time, the sum of different exponentials of fluorescence intensity at the points reduces the random noise, so the measurement sensitivity is improved more. The recovery rates of the mixture mixed by gasoline, kerosene and diesel oil are calculated to validate the effectiveness of the method. PMID:25638431

  2. Accurate modeling of fluorescence line narrowing difference spectra: Direct measurement of the single-site fluorescence spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reppert, Mike; Naibo, Virginia; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2010-07-01

    Accurate lineshape functions for modeling fluorescence line narrowing (FLN) difference spectra (ΔFLN spectra) in the low-fluence limit are derived and examined in terms of the physical interpretation of various contributions, including photoproduct absorption and emission. While in agreement with the earlier results of Jaaniso [Proc. Est. Acad. Sci., Phys., Math. 34, 277 (1985)] and Fünfschilling et al. [J. Lumin. 36, 85 (1986)], the derived formulas differ substantially from functions used recently [e.g., M. Rätsep et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 479, 140 (2009)] to model ΔFLN spectra. In contrast to traditional FLN spectra, it is demonstrated that for most physically reasonable parameters, the ΔFLN spectrum reduces simply to the single-site fluorescence lineshape function. These results imply that direct measurement of a bulk-averaged single-site fluorescence lineshape function can be accomplished with no complicated extraction process or knowledge of any additional parameters such as site distribution function shape and width. We argue that previous analysis of ΔFLN spectra obtained for many photosynthetic complexes led to strong artificial lowering of apparent electron-phonon coupling strength, especially on the high-energy side of the pigment site distribution function.

  3. DAPI-fluorescent fading: a problem in microscopy or a way to measure nuclear DNA content?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian; Álvarez-Borrego, Josué; Kober, V.; del Río-Portilla, Miguel Á.

    2006-01-01

    In observation by confocal or conventional fluorescence microscopy, the retardation of the lost in fluorescence, from highest signal of fluorescence to lowest intensity are important factors in order to obtain accurate images. This problem is very common in fluorochromes for nuclear DNA and especially for DAPI stain. The fluorescence of DAPI is rapidly lost when it is exposure to excitation by ultra violet (UV) light, and especially under optimal condition of observation. Although the fading process could be retardate by using of mounting medium with antifading solutions, the photochemical process underlying the fluorescence decay has not yet been fully explained. In addiction, neither relationship has been tested between the fluorescence fading and nuclear DNA content. However, the capacity of the DNA to absorb UV light is knows. In order to test this relationship we measured by means of image analysis the fluorescence intensity in several nuclei types during a fading period. The analysis was performed by an algorithm specifically built in MATLAB software. The relationship between nuclear DNA content and DAPI-fluorescence fading was found equal to 99%. This study demonstrates the feasibility for estimates genome size by quantification of fluorescence fading. In this context, the present method allows to measure nuclear DNA content in several medical applications (cancer, HIV, organ transplants, etc). Nowadays, for measuring DNA content, flow cytometry is widely used; however, with the flow cytometry method it is not possible to select a specific group of cells, such as from a specific region of a tumor. Moreover, the using of image analysis allows automatizing diagnostics procedures.

  4. Standard reference for instrument response function in fluorescence lifetime measurements in visible and near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chib, Rahul; Shah, Sunil; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Fudala, Rafal; Borejdo, Julian; Zelent, Bogumil; Corradini, Maria G.; Ludescher, Richard D.; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2016-02-01

    Allura red (AR) fluorophore, a common dye in the food industry, displays a broad emission spectrum in water (visible-to-near infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum) and has a remarkably short fluorescence lifetime of about 10 ps. This short lifetime does not depend on the emission (observation) wavelength. We examined time responses of AR fluorescence across emission wavelengths from 550 nm to 750 nm and found that it is an ideal candidate for impulse response functions in fluorescence lifetime measurements.

  5. Precise measurement of the absolute fluorescence yield of the 337 nm band in atmospheric gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ave, M.; Bohacova, M.; Curry, E.; Di Carlo, P.; Di Giulio, C.; Facal San Luis, P.; Gonzales, D.; Hojvat, C.; Hörandel, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Iarlori, M.; Keilhauer, B.; Klages, H.; Kleifges, M.; Kuehn, F.; Li, S.; Monasor, M.; Nozka, L.; Palatka, M.; Petrera, S.; Privitera, P.; Ridky, J.; Rizi, V.; Rouille D'Orfeuil, B.; Salamida, F.; Schovanek, P.; Smida, R.; Spinka, H.; Ulrich, A.; Verzi, V.; Williams, C.

    2013-02-01

    A measurement of the absolute fluorescence yield of the 337 nm nitrogen band, relevant to ultra-high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) detectors, is reported. Two independent calibrations of the fluorescence emission induced by a 120 GeV proton beam were employed: Cherenkov light from the beam particle and calibrated light from a nitrogen laser. The fluorescence yield in air at a pressure of 1013 hPa and temperature of 293 K was found to be Y337=5.61±0.06stat±0.22syst photons/MeV. When compared to the fluorescence yield currently used by UHECR experiments, this measurement improves the uncertainty by a factor of three, and has a significant impact on the determination of the energy scale of the cosmic ray spectrum.

  6. Ultrafast solvent dynamics: Connection between time resolved fluorescence and optical Kerr measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Minhaeng; Rosenthal, Sandra J.; Scherer, Norbert F.; Ziegler, Lawrence D.; Fleming, Graham R.

    1992-04-01

    The vibrational characteristics of liquid dynamics are used to describe the ultrafast relaxations observed in time-dependent fluorescence Stokes shift [J. Chem. Phys. 95, 4715 (1991)] and heterodyne detected optical Kerr effect measurements on acetonitrile, via a Brownian oscillator model. Introducing a frequency distribution of vibrational modes makes it possible to compare the two experiments. The ultrafast decays observed in the fluorescence Stokes shift and optical Kerr signals are produced by destructive superposition of the high frequency, underdamped modes.

  7. Simultaneous measurement of Raman scattering and laser-induced OH fluorescence in nonpremixed turbulent jet flames.

    PubMed

    Barlow, R S; Dibble, R W; Lucht, R P

    1989-03-01

    Spontaneous Raman scattering and laser-induced fluorescence are combined to perform simultaneous point measurements of major species concentrations, temperature, and hydroxyl radical concentration in turbulent nonpremixed flames. The Raman-scattering data for major species concentrations and temperature characterize the instantaneous, local, collisional quenching environment of the OH molecule. Collisional quenching corrections are applied for each laser shot so that absolute hydroxyl concentrations are obtained in turbulent flames using linear laser-induced fluorescence. PMID:19749889

  8. On-line measurement of lignin in wood pulp by color shift of fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Jeffers, Larry A.; Malito, Michael L.

    1996-01-01

    Lignin concentrations from wood pulp samples are measured by applying an excitation light at a selected wavelength to the samples in order to cause the lignin to emit fluorescence. A spectral distribution of the fluorescence emission is then determined. The lignin concentration is then calculated based on the spectral distribution signal. The spectral distribution is quantified by either a wavelength centroid method or a band ratio method.

  9. On-line measurement of lignin in wood pulp by color shift of fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Jeffers, L.A.; Malito, M.L.

    1996-01-23

    Lignin concentrations from wood pulp samples are measured by applying an excitation light at a selected wavelength to the samples in order to cause the lignin to emit fluorescence. A spectral distribution of the fluorescence emission is then determined. The lignin concentration is then calculated based on the spectral distribution signal. The spectral distribution is quantified by either a wavelength centroid method or a band ratio method. 6 figs.

  10. Quenching-independent measurement of species concentrations in flames by laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, J.T.; Carter, C.D.; Laurendeau, N.M.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes work accomplished in the last two years on measurement of species concentrations in flames via laser-induced fluorescence. During this period, we have published absolute number densities of atomic hydrogen in subatmospheric, premixed C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/O{sub 2}/Ar flames at equivalence ratios of 1.0 and 1.7 via two-photon excited fluorescence. This work has led to the development of a new single-laser, two-step fluorescence method for the detection of atomic hydrogen in flames. Using photoionization controlled-loss spectroscopy (PICLS), we have verified the T{sup {minus}1/2} dependence of quenching on temperature for atomic hydrogen, in agreement with kinetic theory. Previous work on pyrometry using laser-saturated fluorescence (LSF) and the anomalous fluorescence from pyrene has evolved into publication of a major review paper on temperature measurements by light-scattering methods. Finally, we have demonstrated the feasibility of quantitative LSF measurements of NO concentration by obtaining relative saturation curves and NO fluorescence profiles. 25 refs.

  11. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging of Nile red for measurements of intracellular polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, James A.; Chung, Pei-Hua; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Spectrally resolved confocal microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging have been used to measure the polarity of lipid-rich regions in living HeLa cells stained with Nile red. The emission peak from the solvatochromic dye in lipid droplets is at a shorter wavelength than other, more polar, stained internal membranes, and this is indicative of a low polarity environment. We estimate that the dielectric constant, ɛ, is around 5 in lipid droplets and 25<ɛ<40 in other lipid-rich regions. Our spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data show that intracellular Nile red exhibits complex, multiexponential fluorescence decays due to emission from a short lifetime locally excited state and a longer lifetime intramolecular charge transfer state. We measure an increase in the average fluorescence lifetime of the dye with increasing emission wavelength, as shown using phasor plots of the FLIM data. We also show using these phasor plots that the shortest lifetime decay components arise from lipid droplets. Thus, fluorescence lifetime is a viable contrast parameter for distinguishing lipid droplets from other stained lipid-rich regions. Finally, we discuss the FLIM of Nile red as a method for simultaneously mapping both polarity and relative viscosity based on fluorescence lifetime measurements.

  12. Laser Induced Fluorescence For Measurement Of Lignin Concentrations In Pulping Liquors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, J. J.; Semerjian, H. G.; Biasca, K. L.; Attala, R.

    1988-11-01

    Laser excited fluorescence of pulping liquors was investigated for use in the pulp and paper industry for process measurement and control applications. Liquors from both mill and laboratory cooks were studied. A Nd-YAG pumped dye laser was used to generate the excitation wavelength of 280 nm; measurements were also performed using a commercially available fluorometer. Measurements on mill pulping liquors gave strong signals and showed changes in the fluorescence intensity during the cook. Absorption spectra of diluted mill liquor samples showed large changes during the cook. Samples from well controlled and characterized laboratory cooks showed fluorescence to be linear with concentration over two decades with an upper limit of approximately 1000 ppm dissolved lignin. At the end of these cooks a possible chemical change was indicated by an increase in the observed fluorescence intensity. Results indicate that lignin concentrations in pulping liquors can be accurately determined with fluorescence in the linear optical region over a greater dynamic range than absorption spectroscopy. Laser induced fluorescence may also provide an indication of chemical changes occurring in the lignin structure during a cook.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF EVALUATION OF A QUANTITATIVE VIDEO-FLUORESCENCE IMAGING SYSTEM AND FLUORESCENT TRACER FOR MEASURING TRANSFER OF PESTICIDE RESIDUES FROM SURFACES TO HANDS WITH REPEATED CONTACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A video imaging system and the associated quantification methods have been developed for measurement of the transfers of a fluorescent tracer from surfaces to hands. The highly fluorescent compound riboflavin (Vitamin B2), which is also water soluble and non-toxic, was chosen as...

  14. Validation of fluorescent-labeled microspheres for measurement of relative blood flow in severely injured lungs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubler, M.; Souders, J. E.; Shade, E. D.; Hlastala, M. P.; Polissar, N. L.; Glenny, R. W.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to validate a nonradioactive method for relative blood flow measurements in severely injured lungs that avoids labor-intensive tissue processing. The use of fluorescent-labeled microspheres was compared with the standard radiolabeled-microsphere method. In seven sheep, lung injury was established by using oleic acid. Five pairs of radio- and fluorescent-labeled microspheres were injected before and after established lung injury. Across all animals, 175 pieces were selected randomly. The radioactivity of each piece was determined by using a scintillation counter. The fluorescent dye was extracted from each piece with a solvent without digestion or filtering. The fluorescence was determined with an automated fluorescent spectrophotometer. Perfusion was calculated for each piece from both the radioactivity and fluorescence and volume normalized. Correlations between flow determined by the two methods were in the range from 0.987 +/- 0.007 (SD) to 0.991 +/- 0.002 (SD) after 9 days of soaking. Thus the fluorescent microsphere technique is a valuable tool for investigating regional perfusion in severely injured lungs and can replace radioactivity.

  15. Measuring diffusion coefficients via two-photon fluorescence recovery after photobleaching.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kelley D; Brown, Edward B

    2010-01-01

    Multi-fluorescence recovery after photobleaching is a microscopy technique used to measure the diffusion coefficient (or analogous transport parameters) of macromolecules, and can be applied to both in vitro and in vivo biological systems. Multi-fluorescence recovery after photobleaching is performed by photobleaching a region of interest within a fluorescent sample using an intense laser flash, then attenuating the beam and monitoring the fluorescence as still-fluorescent molecules from outside the region of interest diffuse in to replace the photobleached molecules. We will begin our demonstration by aligning the laser beam through the Pockels Cell (laser modulator) and along the optical path through the laser scan box and objective lens to the sample. For simplicity, we will use a sample of aqueous fluorescent dye. We will then determine the proper experimental parameters for our sample including, monitor and bleaching powers, bleach duration, bin widths (for photon counting), and fluorescence recovery time. Next, we will describe the procedure for taking recovery curves, a process that can be largely automated via LabVIEW (National Instruments, Austin, TX) for enhanced throughput. Finally, the diffusion coefficient is determined by fitting the recovery data to the appropriate mathematical model using a least-squares fitting algorithm, readily programmable using software such as MATLAB (The Mathworks, Natick, MA). PMID:20190730

  16. Simultaneous measurement of NK cell cytotoxicity against two target cell lines labelled with fluorescent lanthanide chelates.

    PubMed

    Lövgren, J; Blomberg, K

    1994-07-12

    We describe a cytotoxicity assay which permits the simultaneous measurement of natural killer cell activity against two different cell lines. The target cell lines are labelled either with a fluorescent europium chelate or with a fluorescent terbium chelate and cell death is quantified by measuring the chelate release. K-562, Molt4 and Daudi cell lines have been used as targets. The release of the two chelates from the target cells can be detected with the help of time resolved fluorometry. As the measurements are made after background fluorescence has decayed no additional steps are needed to correct for the background from the medium. The assay procedure used for measurement of cytotoxicity against two target cell lines is very similar to the widely used 51Cr release assay. PMID:8034979

  17. Portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometer for coating thickness measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Carapelle, Alain; Fleury-Frenette, Karl; Collette, Jean-Paul; Garnir, Henri-Pierre; Harlet, Philippe

    2007-12-15

    A handheld x-ray spectrometer has been realized and tested. The purpose of the device is to measure the thickness of coated samples in the range of 1-1500 nm in an industrial environment. Accuracy of {approx}3% has been achieved in this range with a measurement time of 1 min. Automated software has been implemented to allow utilization by a nonspecialist operator. An automated calibration procedure, based on measurements of reference samples, is used.

  18. Confocal zero-angle dynamic depolarized light scattering.

    PubMed

    Potenza, M A C; Sanvito, T; Alaimo, M D; Degiorgio, V; Giglio, M

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel Dynamic Depolarized Scattering method based on a tight confocal, zero scattering angle, heterodyne scheme. The method is highly immune from parasitic multiple-scattering contributions, so that it can operate with non-index-matched samples presenting large turbidity. It provides measurements of both rotational and translational diffusion coefficients, the latter via number fluctuation spectroscopy. In addition, the amplitude ratio between the two baselines for the fast rotational mode and the slow translational mode can be used to determine the particles intrinsic birefringence. PMID:20087622

  19. Understanding the contributions of NADH and collagen to cervical tissue fluorescence spectra: modeling, measurements, and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drezek, Rebekah A.; Sokolov, Konstantin V.; Utzinger, Urs; Boiko, Iouri; Malpica, Anais; Follen, Michele; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca R.

    2001-10-01

    Objective: At 380 nm excitation, cervical tissue fluorescence spectra demonstrate characteristic changes with both patient age and the presence of dysplasia. A Monte Carlo model was developed in order to quantitatively examine how intrinsic NADH and collagen fluorescence, in combination with tissue scattering and absorption properties, yield measured tissue spectra. Methods: Excitation-emission matrices were measured for live cervical cells and collagen gel phantoms. Fluorescence microscopy of fresh tissue sections was performed to obtain the location and density of fluorophores as a function of patient age and the presence of dysplasia. A Monte Carlo model was developed which incorporated measurements of fluorophore line shapes and spatial distributions. Results: Modeled spectra were consistent with clinical measurements and indicate that an increase in NADH fluorescence and decrease in collagen fluorescence create clinically observed differences between normal and dysplastic tissue spectra. Model predictions were most sensitive to patient age and epithelial thickness. Conclusions: Monte Carlo techniques provide an important means to investigate the combined contributions of multiple fluorophores to measured emission spectra. The approach will prove increasingly valuable as a more sophisticated understanding of in vivo optical properties is developed.

  20. Quantitative correlation between light depolarization and transport albedo of various porcine tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alali, Sanaz; Ahmad, Manzoor; Kim, Anthony; Vurgun, Nasit; Wood, Michael F. G.; Vitkin, I. Alex

    2012-04-01

    We present a quantitative study of depolarization in biological tissues and correlate it with measured optical properties (reduced scattering and absorption coefficients). Polarized light imaging was used to examine optically thick samples of both isotropic (liver, kidney cortex, and brain) and anisotropic (cardiac muscle, loin muscle, and tendon) pig tissues in transmission and reflection geometries. Depolarization (total, linear, and circular), as derived from polar decomposition of the measured tissue Mueller matrix, was shown to be related to the measured optical properties. We observed that depolarization increases with the transport albedo for isotropic and anisotropic tissues, independent of measurement geometry. For anisotropic tissues, depolarization was higher compared to isotropic tissues of similar transport albedo, indicating birefringence-caused depolarization effects. For tissues with large transport albedos (greater than ~0.97), backscattering geometry was preferred over transmission due to its greater retention of light polarization; this was not the case for tissues with lower transport albedo. Preferential preservation of linearly polarized light over circularly polarized light was seen in all tissue types and all measurement geometries, implying the dominance of Rayleigh-like scattering. The tabulated polarization properties of different tissue types and their links to bulk optical properties should prove useful in future polarimetric tissue characterization and imaging studies.

  1. Measurement of Pressure Dependent Fluorescence Yield of Air: Calibration Factor for UHECR Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Belz, J.W.; Burt, G.W.; Cao, Z.; Chang, F.Y.; Chen, C.C.; Chen, C.W.; Chen, P.; Field, C.; Findlay, J.; Huntemeyer, Petra; Huang, M.A.; Hwang, W.-Y.P.; Iverson, R.; Jones, B.F.; Jui, C.C.H.; Kirn, M.; Lin, G.-L.; Loh, E.C.; Maestas, M.M.; Manago, N.; Martens, K.; /Montana U. /Utah U. /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2005-07-06

    In a test experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, the fluorescence yield of 28.5 GeV electrons in air and nitrogen was measured. The measured photon yields between 300 and 400 nm at 1 atm and 29 C are Y(760 Torr){sup air} = 4.42 {+-} 0.73 and Y(760 Torr){sup N{sub 2}} = 29.2 {+-} 4.8 photons per electron per meter. Assuming that the fluorescence yield is proportional to the energy deposition of a charged particle traveling through air, good agreement with measurements at lower particle energies is observed.

  2. Role of membrane depolarization and extracellular calcium in increased complement receptor expression during neutrophil (PMN) activation

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, M.; Wetzler, E.; Birx, D.L.

    1986-03-05

    During PMN activation the surface expression of receptors (R) for C3b and C3bi increases rapidly. This is necessary for optimal cell adhesion, migration, and phagocytosis. Following stimulation with fMLP or LTB-4, the increased expression of C3bR depends only on the Ca/sup + +/ released from intracellular stores and is not inhibited by 5mM EDTA, while the increase in C3biR also requires extracellular Ca/sup + +/. CR expression also increases when the PMN are depolarized with 140 mM K/sup +/, but with this stimulus, EDTA inhibits C3bR by 67% and C3biR 100%, suggesting that intracellular Ca/sup + +/ stores may not be released. Pertussis toxin caused dose-dependent inhibition of both CR responses to fMLP and also inhibited the increases in both CR induced by K/sup +/. Membrane depolarization (monitored by di-O-C5 fluorescence) due to fMLP was similarly inhibited by toxin but the depolarization due to K/sup +/ was not. The dose of phorbol myristate acetate that maximally increased CR expression, 0.1 ng/ml, did not depolarize the membrane. These results suggest that membrane depolarization is neither necessary nor sufficient for increased CR expression. A Ca/sup + +/ and GTP binding protein-dependent enzyme such as phospholipase C is necessary to the amplify initial signals generated either by release of Ca/sup + +/ stores or by opening voltage dependent Ca/sup + +/ channels following membrane depolarization.

  3. Laser measurement of the spectral extinction coefficients of fluorescent, highly absorbing liquids. [crude petroleum oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.

    1982-01-01

    A conceptual method is developed to deduce rapidly the spectral extinction coefficient of fluorescent, highly absorbing liquids, such as crude or refined petroleum oils. The technique offers the advantage of only requiring one laser wavelength and a single experimental assembly and execution for any specific fluorescent liquid. The liquid is inserted into an extremely thin wedge-shaped cavity for stimulation by a laser from one side and flurescence measurement on the other side by a monochromator system. For each arbitrarily selected extinction wavelength, the wedge is driven slowly to increasing thicknesses until the fluorescence extinguishes. The fluorescence as a function of wedge thickness permits a determination of the extinction coefficient using an included theoretical model. When the monochromator is set to the laser emission wavelength, the extinction coefficient is determined using the usual on-wavelength signal extinction procedure.

  4. Aerosol-fluorescence spectrum analyzer: real-time measurement of emission spectra of airborne biological particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Steven C.; Pinnick, Ronald G.; Nachman, Paul; Chen, Gang; Chang, Richard K.; Mayo, Michael W.; Fernandez, Gilbert L.

    1995-10-01

    We have assembled an aerosol-fluorescence spectrum analyzer (AFS), which can measure the fluorescence spectra and elastic scattering of airborne particles as they flow through a laser beam. The aerosols traverse a scattering cell where they are illuminated with intense (50 kW/cm 2) light inside the cavity of an argon-ion laser operating at 488 nm. This AFS can obtain fluorescence spectra of individual dye-doped polystyrene microspheres as small as 0.5 mu m in diameter. The spectra obtained from microspheres doped with pink and green-yellow dyes are clearly different. We have also detected the fluorescence spectra of airborne particles (although not single particles) made from various

  5. Fluorescence Spectrum and Decay Measurement for Hsil VS Normal Cytology Differentiation in Liquid Pap Smear Supernatant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitkuviene, A.; Gegzna, V.; Juodkazis, S.; Jursenas, S.; Miasojedovas, S.; Kurtinaitiene, R.; Rimiene, J.; Vaitkus, J.

    2009-06-01

    Cervical smear material contains endo and exocervical cells, mucus and inflammative, immune cells in cases of pathology. Just not destroyed keratinocytes lay on the glass for microscopy. Liquid cytology supernatant apart other diagnostics could be used for photodiagnostic. The spectroscopic parameters suitable for Normal and HSIL cytology groups supernatant differentiation are demonstrated. The dried liquid PAP supernatant fractions—sediment and liquid were investigated. Excitation and emission matrices (EEM), supernatant fluorescence decay measured under 280 nm diode short pulse excitation and fluorescence spectroscopy by excitation with 355 nm laser light were analyzed. The differences between Normal and HSIL groups were statistically proven in the certain spectral regions. Fluorescence decay peculiarities show spectral regions consisting of few fluorophores. Obtained results on fluorescence differences in Normal and HSIL groups' supernatant shows the potency of photodiagnosis application in cervical screening.

  6. Simultaneous Measurement of Oscillations in Oxygen Evolution and Chlorophyll a Fluorescence in Leaf Pieces 1

    PubMed Central

    Walker, David A.; Sivak, Mirta N.; Prinsley, Roslyn T.; Cheesbrough, John K.

    1983-01-01

    In spinach (Spinacia oleracea) and barley (Hordeum vulgare) leaves, chlorophyll a fluorescence and O2 evolution have been measured simultaneously following re-illumination after a dark interval or when steady state photosynthesis has been perturbed by changes in the gas phase. In high CO2 concentrations, both O2 and fluorescence can display marked dampening oscillations that are antiparallel but slightly out of phase (a rise or fall in fluorescence anticipating a corresponding fall or rise in O2 by about 10 to 15 seconds). Infrared gas analysis measurements showed that CO2 uptake behaved like O2 evolution both in the period of oscillation (about 1 minute) and in its relation to fluorescence. In the steady state, oscillations were initiated by increases in CO2 or by increases or decreases in O2. Oscillations in O2 or CO2 did not occur without associated oscillations in fluorescence and the latter were a sensitive indicator of the former. The relationship between such oscillations in photosynthetic carbon assimilation and chlorophyl a fluorescence is discussed in the context of the effect of ATP or NADPH consumption on known quenching mechanisms. PMID:16663255

  7. Simultaneous measurement of oscillations in oxygen evolution and chlorophyll a fluorescence in leaf pieces.

    PubMed

    Walker, D A; Sivak, M N; Prinsley, R T; Cheesbrough, J K

    1983-11-01

    In spinach (Spinacia oleracea) and barley (Hordeum vulgare) leaves, chlorophyll a fluorescence and O(2) evolution have been measured simultaneously following re-illumination after a dark interval or when steady state photosynthesis has been perturbed by changes in the gas phase. In high CO(2) concentrations, both O(2) and fluorescence can display marked dampening oscillations that are antiparallel but slightly out of phase (a rise or fall in fluorescence anticipating a corresponding fall or rise in O(2) by about 10 to 15 seconds). Infrared gas analysis measurements showed that CO(2) uptake behaved like O(2) evolution both in the period of oscillation (about 1 minute) and in its relation to fluorescence. In the steady state, oscillations were initiated by increases in CO(2) or by increases or decreases in O(2). Oscillations in O(2) or CO(2) did not occur without associated oscillations in fluorescence and the latter were a sensitive indicator of the former. The relationship between such oscillations in photosynthetic carbon assimilation and chlorophyl a fluorescence is discussed in the context of the effect of ATP or NADPH consumption on known quenching mechanisms. PMID:16663255

  8. Fluorescent Mueller matrix analysis of a highly scattering turbid media

    SciTech Connect

    Satapathi, Soumitra; Soni, Jalpa; Ghosh, Nirmalya

    2014-03-31

    We report the fluorescent Mueller matrix analysis of a highly scattering, inhomogeneous, and low quantum yield polymeric nanoparticle system. Both the ground and the excited state anisotropy of this turbid system were measured. The excited state anisotropy was found to be higher than ground state anisotropy by inverse polar decomposition analysis. The depolarization coefficients of these polythiophene nanoparticles were experimentally determined by recording Mueller matrices from this complex random medium. This approach provides an alternative method of determining optical characteristics of low quantum efficiency turbid system like fluorescently leveled tissue phantom.

  9. Laser-induced fluorescence measurement of the dynamics of a pulsed planar sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Goeckner, M.J.; Malik, S.M. ); Conrad, J.R. ); Breun, R.A. )

    1994-04-01

    Using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) the ion density near the edge of an expanding plasma sheath has been measured. These measurements utilized a transition of N[sup +][sub 2] [the P12 component of the [ital X] [sup 2][Sigma][sup +][sub [ital g

  10. Fluorescence spectroscopy: a rapid, noninvasive method for measurement of skin surface thickness of topical agents.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, L E; Diffey, B L

    1997-01-01

    We report the quantification of skin surface thickness of topical agents by in vivo fluorescence spectroscopy, and demonstrate its potential uses for assessment of application technique and substantivity. A series of studies were performed on forearm skin of eight normal subjects using three creams which have intrinsic fluorescence: a sunscreen (Neutrogena SPF15 waterproof cream), an antiseptic (Hewlett's cream) and a steroid (Trimovate (clobetasone butyrate) cream). Initially, the dose-response relationship was established for each agent by applying a series of five doses (0.5-8 microliters/cm2) and measuring cream fluorescence using appropriate excitation and emission wavelengths. Next, the influence of application technique was examined by comparing light application of cream with firm rubbing. Substantivity of the three creams was assessed on dry skin by taking fluorescence measurements over 8 h. Finally, water resistance of 2 microliters/cm2 of sunscreen and antiseptic cream were compared by measuring fluorescence after each of four water immersions. The fluorescence intensity was strongly correlated with the logarithm of surface density. r = 1.0, 0.92 and 0.98 for sunscreen, antiseptic and steroid creams, respectively, allowing derivation of a simple expression for equivalent thickness. Surface thickness of each cream was lower following firm rubbing compared with light application (P < 0.01). The rate constants for reduction of surface density of the three creams with time on dry skin were not significantly different. However, on washed skin, the rate constant was higher for Hewlett's than Neutrogena cream (0.503 and 0.243 h. respectively, P = 0.02), with a higher rate for each cream on wet compared with dry skin (P < 0.001). Hence, fluorescence spectroscopy is a simple, rapid method for measurement of cream thickness in vivo. The many potential applications in dermatology include quantitative assessment of application technique and substantivity of topical

  11. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy of Bicyclo[1.1.1]pentane/Tolane-Based Molecular Rods Included in Tris(o-phenylenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazene (TPP)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We examine the fluorescence anisotropy of rod-shaped guests held inside the channels of tris(o-phenylenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazene (TPP) host nanocrystals, characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and solid state NMR spectroscopy. We address two issues: (i) are light polarization measurements on an aqueous colloidal solution of TPP nanocrystals meaningful, or is depolarization by scattering excessive? (ii) Can measurements of the rotational mobility of the included guests be performed at low enough loading levels to suppress depolarization by intercrystallite energy transfer? We find that meaningful measurements are possible and demonstrate that the long axis of molecular rods included in TPP channels performs negligible vibrational motion. PMID:25937858

  12. Measurement of diffusion of fluorescent compounds and autofluorescence in skin in vivo using a confocal instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttenschoen, K. K.; Sutton, E. E.; Daly, D.; Girkin, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    Using compact and affordable instrumentation based upon fluorescent confocal imaging we have tracked the movement of autofluorescent compounds through skin in near real time with high temporal and spatial resolution and sensitivity. The ability to measure the diffusion of compounds through skin with such resolution plays an important role for applications such as monitoring the penetration of pharmaceuticals applied to skin and assessing the integrity of the skin barrier. Several measurement methods exist, but they suffer from a number of problems such as being slow, expensive, non-portable and lacking sensitivity. To address these issues, we adapted a technique that we previously developed for tracking fluorescent compounds in the eye to measure the autofluorescence and the diffusion of externally applied fluorescent compounds in skin in vivo. Results are presented that show the change in autofluorescence of the volar forearm over the course of a week. We furthermore demonstrate the ability of the instrument to measure the diffusion speed and depth of externally applied fluorescent compounds both in healthy skin and after the skin barrier function has been perturbed. The instrument is currently being developed further for increased sensitivity and multi-wavelength excitation. We believe that the presented instrument is suitable for a large number of applications in fields such as assessment of damage to the skin barrier, development of topical and systemic medication and tracking the diffusion of fluorescent compounds through skin constructs as well as monitoring effects of skin products and general consumer products which may come into contact with the skin.

  13. Quantitative fluorescence measurements of the OH radical in high pressure methane flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battles, B. E.; Hanson, R. K.

    1992-01-01

    A method for quantifying laser-induced fluorescence signals from the OH radical in high-pressure flames is presented. The fluorescence signal per unit OH mole fraction is modeled as a function of temperature, pressure, and overall flame stoichiometry. Known values of the collisional quenching cross sections as a function of temperature are used to model the electronic quench rate. The reverse A - X (1.0) Q15 transition is used with broadband collection to measure single-point fluorescence produced by a pulsed Nd:YAG-pumped, frequency-doubled dye laser. Laser absorption and thermocouples are used to measure absolute OH concentration and temperature, respectively, which are used to confirm the validity of the model. Measurements are made in CH4/O2/N2 flames up to 10 atm.

  14. Stochastic path integral approach to continuous quadrature measurement of a single fluorescing qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Andrew N.; Chantasri, Areeya; Huard, Benjamin

    I will present a theory of continuous quantum measurement for a superconducting qubit undergoing fluorescent energy relaxation. The fluorescence of the qubit is detected via a phase-preserving heterodyne measurement, giving the cavity mode quadrature signals as two continuous qubit readout results. By using the stochastic path integral approach to the measurement physics, we obtain the most likely fluorescence paths between chosen boundary conditions on the state, and compute approximate correlation functions between all stochastic variables via diagrammatic perturbation theory. Of particular interest are most-likely paths describing increasing energy during the florescence. Comparison to Monte Carlo numerical simulation and experiment will be discussed. This work was supported by US Army Research Office Grants No. W911NF-09-0-01417 and No. W911NF-15-1-0496, by NSF Grant DMR-1506081, by John Templeton Foundation Grant ID 58558, and by the DPSTT Project Thailand.

  15. Fluorescence Quantum Yield Measurements of Fluorescent Proteins: A Laboratory Experiment for a Biochemistry or Molecular Biophysics Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Kathryn P.; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts…

  16. Ischemia-induced spreading depolarization in the retina.

    PubMed

    Srienc, Anja I; Biesecker, Kyle R; Shimoda, Angela M; Kur, Joanna; Newman, Eric A

    2016-09-01

    Cortical spreading depolarization is a metabolically costly phenomenon that affects the brain in both health and disease. Following severe stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, or traumatic brain injury, cortical spreading depolarization exacerbates tissue damage and enlarges infarct volumes. It is not known, however, whether spreading depolarization also occurs in the retina in vivo. We report now that spreading depolarization episodes are generated in the in vivo rat retina following retinal vessel occlusion produced by photothrombosis. The properties of retinal spreading depolarization are similar to those of cortical spreading depolarization. Retinal spreading depolarization waves propagate at a velocity of 3.0 ± 0.1 mm/min and are associated with a negative shift in direct current potential, a transient cessation of neuronal spiking, arteriole constriction, and a decrease in tissue O2 tension. The frequency of retinal spreading depolarization generation in vivo is reduced by administration of the NMDA antagonist MK-801 and the 5-HT(1D) agonist sumatriptan. Branch retinal vein occlusion is a leading cause of vision loss from vascular disease. Our results suggest that retinal spreading depolarization could contribute to retinal damage in acute retinal ischemia and demonstrate that pharmacological agents can reduce retinal spreading depolarization frequency after retinal vessel occlusion. Blocking retinal spreading depolarization generation may represent a therapeutic strategy for preserving vision in branch retinal vein occlusion patients. PMID:27389181

  17. Calibration of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors and the effect on measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gookin, Ben

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is a high-energy cosmic ray observatory located in Malargue, Mendoza, Argentina. It is used to probe the highest energy particles in the Universe, with energies greater than 1018 eV, which strike the Earth constantly. The observatory uses two techniques to observe the air shower initiated by a cosmic ray: a surface detector composed of an array of more than 1600 water Cherenkov tanks covering 3000 km2, and 27 nitrogen fluorescence telescopes overlooking this array. The Cherenkov detectors run all the time and therefore have high statistics on the air showers. The fluorescence detectors run only on clear moonless nights, but observe the longitudinal development of the air shower and make a calorimetric measure of its energy. The energy measurement from the the fluorescence detectors is used to cross calibrate the surface detectors, and makes the measurements made by the Auger Observatory surface detector highly model-independent. The calibration of the fluorescence detectors is then of the utmost importance to the measurements of the Observatory. Described here are the methods of the absolute and multi-wavelength calibration of the fluorescence detectors, and improvements in each leading to a reduction in calibration uncertainties to 4% and 3.5%, respectively. Also presented here are the effects of introducing a new, and more detailed, multi-wavelength calibration on the fluorescence detector energy estimation and the depth of the air shower maximum measurement, leading to a change of 1+-0.03% in the absolute energy scale at 1018 eV, and a negligible change in the measurement on shower maximum.

  18. Fast repetition rate (FRR) fluorometer and method for measuring fluorescence and photosynthetic parameters

    DOEpatents

    Kolber, Z.; Falkowski, P.

    1995-06-20

    A fast repetition rate fluorometer device and method for measuring in vivo fluorescence of phytoplankton or higher plants chlorophyll and photosynthetic parameters of phytoplankton or higher plants is revealed. The phytoplankton or higher plants are illuminated with a series of fast repetition rate excitation flashes effective to bring about and measure resultant changes in fluorescence yield of their Photosystem II. The series of fast repetition rate excitation flashes has a predetermined energy per flash and a rate greater than 10,000 Hz. Also, disclosed is a flasher circuit for producing the series of fast repetition rate flashes. 14 figs.

  19. Planar temperature measurement in compressible flows using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1991-01-01

    A laser-induced iodine fluorescence technique that is suitable for the planar measurement of temperature in cold nonreacting compressible air flows is investigated analytically and demonstrated in a known flow field. The technique is based on the temperature dependence of the broadband fluorescence from iodine excited by the 514-nm line of an argon-ion laser. Temperatures ranging from 165 to 245 K were measured in the calibration flow field. This technique makes complete, spatially resolved surveys of temperature practical in highly three-dimensional, low-temperature compressible flows.

  20. Measurement of partial L fluorescence yields of bismuth using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Ménesguen, Yves; Boyer, Bruno; Rodrigues, Matias; Lépy, Marie-Christine

    2016-03-01

    Tunable monochromatic photon radiation was used to measure transmission of a bismuth target in the energy range from 7keV to 20keV. Partial L fluorescence yields of bismuth were obtained by combining measurement of the fluorescence induced by photoionization of the bismuth target and X-rays from the radioactive decay of (210)Pb. Several photon energies have been used to successively ionize the L subshells, which allowed detailed analysis of the rearrangement spectra and determination of the X-ray relative intensities of the L1, L2 and L3 series. PMID:26651165

  1. Fast repetition rate (FRR) fluorometer and method for measuring fluorescence and photosynthetic parameters

    DOEpatents

    Kolber, Zbigniew; Falkowski, Paul

    1995-06-20

    A fast repetition rate fluorometer device and method for measuring in vivo fluorescence of phytoplankton or higher plants chlorophyll and photosynthetic parameters of phytoplankton or higher plants by illuminating the phytoplankton or higher plants with a series of fast repetition rate excitation flashes effective to bring about and measure resultant changes in fluorescence yield of their Photosystem II. The series of fast repetition rate excitation flashes has a predetermined energy per flash and a rate greater than 10,000 Hz. Also, disclosed is a flasher circuit for producing the series of fast repetition rate flashes.

  2. Individual variability analysis of fluorescence parameters measured in skin with different levels of nutritive blood flow.

    PubMed

    Dunaev, Andrey V; Dremin, Victor V; Zherebtsov, Evgeny A; Rafailov, Ilya E; Litvinova, Karina S; Palmer, Scott G; Stewart, Neil A; Sokolovski, Sergei G; Rafailov, Edik U

    2015-06-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy has recently become more common in clinical medicine. However, there are still many unresolved issues related to the methodology and implementation of instruments with this technology. In this study, we aimed to assess individual variability of fluorescence parameters of endogenous markers (NADH, FAD, etc.) measured by fluorescent spectroscopy (FS) in situ and to analyse the factors that lead to a significant scatter of results. Most studied fluorophores have an acceptable scatter of values (mostly up to 30%) for diagnostic purposes. Here we provide evidence that the level of blood volume in tissue impacts FS data with a significant inverse correlation. The distribution function of the fluorescence intensity and the fluorescent contrast coefficient values are a function of the normal distribution for most of the studied fluorophores and the redox ratio. The effects of various physiological (different content of skin melanin) and technical (characteristics of optical filters) factors on the measurement results were additionally studied. The data on the variability of the measurement results in FS should be considered when interpreting the diagnostic parameters, as well as when developing new algorithms for data processing and FS devices. PMID:25922293

  3. Noninvasive measurement of pharmacokinetics by near-infrared fluorescence imaging in the eye of mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobosz, Michael; Strobel, Steffen; Stubenrauch, Kay-Gunnar; Osl, Franz; Scheuer, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: For generating preclinical pharmacokinetics (PKs) of compounds, blood is drawn at different time points and levels are quantified by different analytical methods. In order to receive statistically meaningful data, 3 to 5 animals are used for each time point to get serum peak-level and half-life of the compound. Both characteristics are determined by data interpolation, which may influence the accuracy of these values. We provide a method that allows continuous monitoring of blood levels noninvasively by measuring the fluorescence intensity of labeled compounds in the eye and other body regions of anesthetized mice. Procedures: The method evaluation was performed with four different fluorescent compounds: (i) indocyanine green, a nontargeting dye; (ii) OsteoSense750, a bone targeting agent; (iii) tumor targeting Trastuzumab-Alexa750; and (iv) its F(-alxea750 fragment. The latter was used for a direct comparison between fluorescence imaging and classical blood analysis using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: We found an excellent correlation between blood levels measured by noninvasive eye imaging with the results generated by classical methods. A strong correlation between eye imaging and ELISA was demonstrated for the F( fragment. Whole body imaging revealed a compound accumulation in the expected regions (e.g., liver, bone). Conclusions: The combination of eye and whole body fluorescence imaging enables the simultaneous measurement of blood PKs and biodistribution of fluorescent-labeled compounds.

  4. Laser induced fluorescence measurements and modeling of nitric oxide in high-pressure premixed flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reisel, John R.; Laurendeau, Normand M.

    1994-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has been applied to the quantitative measurement of nitric oxide (NO) in premixed, laminar, high-pressure flames. Their chemistry was also studied using three current kinetics schemes to determine the predictive capabilities of each mechanism with respect to NO concentrations. The flames studied were low-temperature (1600 less than T less than 1850K) C2H6/O2/N2 and C2H6/O2/N2 flames, and high temperature (2100 less than T less than 2300K) C2H6/O2/N2 flames. Laser-saturated fluorescence (LSF) was initially used to measure the NO concentrations. However, while the excitation transition was well saturated at atmospheric pressure, the fluorescence behavior was basically linear with respect to laser power at pressures above 6 atm. Measurements and calculations demonstrated that the fluorescence quenching rate variation is negligible for LIF measurements of NO at a given pressure. Therefore, linear LIF was used to perform quantitative measurements of NO concentration in these high-pressure flames. The transportability of a calibration factor from one set of flame conditions to another also was investigated by considering changes in the absorption and quenching environment for different flame conditions. The feasibility of performing LIF measurements of (NO) in turbulent flames was studied; the single-shot detection limit was determined to be 2 ppm.

  5. Retrievals of Aerosol and Cloud Particle Microphysics Using Polarization and Depolarization Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The recent availability of theoretical techniques for computing single and multiple scattering of light by realistic polydispersions of spherical and nonspherical particles and the strong dependence of the Stokes scattering matrix on particle size, shape, and refractive index make polarization and depolarization measurements a powerful particle characterization tool. In this presentation I will describe recent applications of photopolarimetric and lidar depolarization measurements to remote sensing characterization of tropospheric aerosols, polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), and contrails. The talk will include (1) a short theoretical overview of the effects of particle microphysics on particle single-scattering characteristics; (2) the use of multi-angle multi-spectral photopolarimetry to retrieve the optical thickness, size distribution, refractive index, and number concentration of tropospheric aerosols over the ocean surface; and (3) the application of the T-matrix method to constraining the PSC and contrail particle microphysics using multi-spectral measurements of lidar backscatter and depolarization.

  6. A portable time-domain LED fluorimeter for nanosecond fluorescence lifetime measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongtao; Salthouse, Christopher D.; Qi, Ying; Mountziaris, T. J.

    2014-05-15

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements are becoming increasingly important in chemical and biological research. Time-domain lifetime measurements offer fluorescence multiplexing and improved handling of interferers compared with the frequency-domain technique. In this paper, an all solid-state, filterless, and highly portable light-emitting-diode based time-domain fluorimeter (LED TDF) is reported for the measurement of nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes. LED based excitation provides more wavelengths options compared to laser diode based excitation, but the excitation is less effective due to the uncollimated beam, less optical power, and longer latency in state transition. Pulse triggering and pre-bias techniques were implemented in our LED TDF to improve the peak optical power to over 100 mW. The proposed pulsing circuit achieved an excitation light fall time of less than 2 ns. Electrical resetting technique realized a time-gated photo-detector to remove the interference of the excitation light with fluorescence. These techniques allow the LED fluorimeter to accurately measure the fluorescence lifetime of fluorescein down to concentration of 0.5 μM. In addition, all filters required in traditional instruments are eliminated for the non-attenuated excitation/emission light power. These achievements make the reported device attractive to biochemical laboratories seeking for highly portable lifetime detection devices for developing sensors based on fluorescence lifetime changes. The device was initially validated by measuring the lifetimes of three commercial fluorophores and comparing them with reported lifetime data. It was subsequently used to characterize a ZnSe quantum dot based DNA sensor.

  7. Algal fluorescence: impact and potential for retrieval from measurements of the underwater degree of polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, S.; Tonizzo, A.; Ibrahim, A.; Gilerson, A.; Gross, B.; Moshary, F.

    2012-09-01

    Algorithms for retrieving inherent optical properties (IOPs) in coastal waters from remote sensing of water leaving reflectance spectra, are increasingly focused on red and near infrared (NIR) spectral bands, since the simple blue - green ratio approaches, valid in open oceans, fail when in coastal waters with strongly scattering inorganic particles and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM). NIR spectra can however be significantly impacted by overlapping chlorophyll a fluorescence, and considerable progress has been made to quantify its contribution, and hence achieve more accurate [Chl] retrievals. Recently we have been studying multiangular hyperspectral polarization characteristics of underwater scattered light, using our recently developed Stokes vector polarimeter to fully measure Stokes parameters. From these studies, information on IOPs, in particular the characteristics of non - algal particles (NAP), which are the primary source of underwater polarized elastic scattering, can be obtained. Multiangular hyperspectral polarization measurements, combined with those of IOPs collected in eutrophic waters of Chesapeake/Virginia and New York Harbor/Hudson River areas, showed that chlorophyll a fluorescence markedly impacts (reduces) the underwater degree of polarization (DOP) in the 650 - 700 nm spectral region. By noting the unpolarized nature of algal fluorescence and the partially polarized properties of elastic scattering, we are able to separate the chlorophyll a fluorescence signal from the total reflectance. The analysis is based on comparisons of experimental measurements with vector/scalar radiative transfer computations using measured IOPs as inputs. Relationships between change in observed DOP and fluorescence contributions are examined, and the possibility of using DOP measurements for underwater fluorescence retrieval is evaluated for different scattering geometries.

  8. Fluorescent triplet probes for measuring the rotational diffusion of membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, P; Garland, P B

    1982-01-01

    We have previously described a method for measuring the rotational diffusion of membrane proteins by using fluorescent triplet probes [Johnson & Garland (1981) FEBS Lett. 135, 252-256]. We now describe the criteria by which the suitability of such probes may be judged. In general, the greatest sensitivity is achievable with probes where the ratio of the quantum yields for prompt fluorescene (phi f) and triplet formation (phi t) are high, as with Rhodamine (phi f/phi t congruent to 10(3)). However, considerations of heat generation at the sample membrane, of time resolution of fast rotations and of irreversible bleaching of the fluorescent probe also apply. The immediate environment of a probe molecule at a membrane protein must also be important in determining the performance of a given probe. Nevertheless, we describe guidelines for evaluating the likely usefulness of fluorescent triplet probes in measurements of membrane protein rotation. PMID:7103944

  9. Composition measurement of bicomponent droplets using laser-induced fluorescence of acetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqua, C.; Depredurand, V.; Castanet, G.; Wolff, M.; Lemoine, F.

    2007-12-01

    Commercial fuels are complex mixtures, the evaporation of which remains particularly difficult to model. Experimental characterization of the differential vaporization of the components is a problem that is seldom addressed. In this paper, the evaporation of binary droplets made of ethyl-alcohol and acetone is investigated using a technique of measurement of the droplet composition developed in purpose. This technique exploits the laser induced fluorescence of acetone which acts as a fluorescent tracer as well as the more volatile component of the fuel associated with an accurate measurement of the droplet diameter by forward scattering interferometry. A model of the fluorescence intensity of the binary mixture, taking into account the absorption of the acetone molecules, is proposed and validated. The sensitivity of the technique is discussed. Finally, the reliability of the technique is demonstrated on binary combusting droplets in linear stream.

  10. Dualex: A New Instrument for Field Measurements of Epidermal Ultraviolet Absorbance by Chlorophyll Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulas, Yves; Cerovic, Zoran G.; Cartelat, Aurélie; Moya, Ismaël

    2004-08-01

    Dualex (dual excitation) is a field-portable instrument, hereby described, for the assessment of polyphenolic compounds in leaves from the measurement of UV absorbance of the leaf epidermis by double excitation of chlorophyll fluorescence. The instrument takes advantage of a feedback loop that equalizes the fluorescence level induced by a reference red light to the UV-light-induced fluorescence level. This allows quick measurement from attached leaves even under field conditions. The use of light-emitting diodes and of a leaf-clip configuration makes Dualex a user-friendly instrument with potential applications in ecophysiological research, light climate analysis, agriculture, forestry, horticulture, pest management, selection of medicinal plants, and wherever accumulation of leaf polyphenolics is involved in plant responses to the environment.