Science.gov

Sample records for fluorescence in situ hybridization

  1. Autofluorescence correction for fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Szoelloesi, J.; Balazs, M.; Waldman, F.C.

    1995-08-01

    Optimal sensitivity of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) requires bright signals and low background fluorescence. Use of locus-specific probes is especially dependent on high sensitivity. Some tissue preparations show high autofluorescence, masking small or dim signals. We have developed a new method for subtracting autofluorescence from digital images on a pixel-by-pixel basis. It is based on the observation that fluorescent labels for FISH have narrower excitation and emission spectra than the chemical components responsible for autofluorescence. Our new approach uses calculation of the ratio of autofluorescence between multiple color images for correction of autofluorescence in each individual image. By subtracting autofluorescence components, we were able to enhance centromeric signals and make previously indistiguishable cosmid signals clearly visible. This image-processing approach to autofluorescence correction may widen the applicability of gene-specific probes in FISH analysis of tumor material. 15 refs., 3 fig., 1 tab.

  2. Molecular cytogenetics using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.W.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Lucas, J.; Pinkel, D.; Weier, H-U.; Yu, Loh-Chung.

    1990-12-07

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome-specific probes enables several new areas of cytogenetic investigation by allowing visual determination of the presence and normality of specific genetic sequences in single metaphase or interphase cells. in this approach, termed molecular cytogenetics, the genetic loci to be analyzed are made microscopically visible in single cells using in situ hybridization with nucleic acid probes specific to these loci. To accomplish this, the DNA in the target cells is made single stranded by thermal denaturation and incubated with single-stranded, chemically modified probe under conditions where the probe will anneal only with DNA sequences to which it has high DNA sequence homology. The bound probe is then made visible by treatment with a fluorescent reagent such as fluorescein that binds to the chemical modification carried by the probe. The DNA to which the probe does not bind is made visible by staining with a dye such as propidium iodide that fluoresces at a wavelength different from that of the reagent used for probe visualization. We show in this report that probes are now available that make this technique useful for biological dosimetry, prenatal diagnosis and cancer biology. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Reutilization of previously hybridized slides for fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, L.; DeVries, S.; Waldman, F.M.

    1995-12-01

    Application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to clinical material is sometimes limited by sample size. In addition, heterogeneity among slides prepared from a single sample may lead to variation in FISH analyses. Reutilization of material for repeated FISH analyses would help to alleviate these problems. We have developed a simple procedure for repeated FISH analyses with directly conjugated probes. Previously hybridized probes are removed by incubation in denaturing solution, and slides can then be rehybridized without residual signals remaining. Several cycles of this procedure allow a full complement of chromosomal loci to be analyzed on the same population of cells. Advantages of this protocol include gaining more cytogenetic information from small samples and eliminating the problem of intratumorvariability. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  4. FISH-ing for Genes: Modeling Fluorescence "in situ" Hybridization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton Buck

    2006-01-01

    Teaching methods of genetic analysis such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can be an important part of instructional units in biology, microbiology, and biotechnology. Experience, however, indicates that these topics are difficult for many students. The authors of this article describe how they created an activity that effectively…

  5. Supernumerary ring chromosome 17 identified by fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Fagan, K.; Edwards, M.

    1997-04-14

    We present a patient with multiple anomalies and severe developmental delay. A small supernumerary ring chromosome was found in 40% of her lymphocyte cells at birth. The origin of the marker chromosome could not be determined by GTG banding, but fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) later identified the marker as deriving from chromosome 17. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization in Suspension by Imaging Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Orla; Wallace, Paul K; Minderman, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of imaging flow cytometry (IFC) has brought novel applications exploiting its advantages over conventional flow cytometry and microscopy. One of the new applications is fluorescence in situ hybridization in suspension (FISH-IS). Conventional FISH is a slide-based approach in which the spotlike imagery resulting from hybridization with fluorescently tagged probes is evaluated by fluorescence microscopy. The FISH-IS approach evaluated by IFC enables the evaluation of tens to hundreds of thousands of cells in suspension and the analysis can be automated and standardized diminishing operator bias from the analysis. The high cell number throughput of FISH-IS improves the detection of rare events compared to conventional FISH. The applicability of FISH-IS is currently limited to detection of abnormal quantitative differences of hybridization targets such as occur in numerical chromosome abnormalities, deletions and amplifications.Here, we describe a protocol for FISH-IS using chromosome enumeration probes as an example. PMID:27460240

  7. RNA Imaging with Multiplexed Error Robust Fluorescence in situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Jeffrey R.; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of both the copy number and spatial distribution of large fractions of the transcriptome in single-cells could revolutionize our understanding of a variety of cellular and tissue behaviors in both healthy and diseased states. Single-molecule Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (smFISH)—an approach where individual RNAs are labeled with fluorescent probes and imaged in their native cellular and tissue context—provides both the copy number and spatial context of RNAs but has been limited in the number of RNA species that can be measured simultaneously. Here we describe Multiplexed Error Robust Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (MERFISH), a massively parallelized form of smFISH that can image and identify hundreds to thousands of different RNA species simultaneously with high accuracy in individual cells in their native spatial context. We provide detailed protocols on all aspects of MERFISH, including probe design, data collection, and data analysis to allow interested laboratories to perform MERFISH measurements themselves. PMID:27241748

  8. Telomere analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Hultdin, M; Grönlund, E; Norrback, K; Eriksson-Lindström, E; Just, T; Roos, G

    1998-01-01

    Determination of telomere length is traditionally performed by Southern blotting and densitometry, giving a mean telomere restriction fragment (TRF) value for the total cell population studied. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of telomere repeats has been used to calculate telomere length, a method called quantitative (Q)-FISH. We here present a quantitative flow cytometric approach, Q-FISHFCM, for evaluation of telomere length distribution in individual cells based on in situ hybridization using a fluorescein-labeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) (CCCTAA)3probe and DNA staining with propidium iodide. A simple and rapid protocol with results within 30 h was developed giving high reproducibility. One important feature of the protocol was the use of an internal cell line control, giving an automatic compensation for potential differences in the hybridization steps. This protocol was tested successfully on cell lines and clinical samples from bone marrow, blood, lymph nodes and tonsils. A significant correlation was found between Southern blotting and Q-FISHFCMtelomere length values ( P = 0.002). The mean sub-telomeric DNA length of the tested cell lines and clinical samples was estimated to be 3.2 kbp. With the Q-FISHFCMmethod the fluorescence signal could be determined in different cell cycle phases, indicating that in human cells the vast majority of telomeric DNA is replicated early in S phase. PMID:9685479

  9. 10p Duplication characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Wiktor, A.; Feldman, G.L.; Van Dyke, D.L.; Kratkoczki, P.; Ditmars, D.M. Jr.

    1994-09-01

    We describe a patient with severe failure to thrive, mild-moderate developmental delay, cleft lip and palate, and other anomalies. Routine cytogenetic analysis documented a de novo chromosome rearrangement involving chromosome 4, but the origin of the derived material was unknown. Using chromosome specific painting probes, the karyotype was defined as 46,XY,der(4)t(4;10)(q35;p11.23). Characterization of the dup(10p) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis provides another example of the usefulness of this technology in identifying small deletions, duplications, or supernumerary marker chromosomes. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1993-03-04

    Genetic mapping is approached using the techniques of high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This technology and the results of its application are designed to rapidly generate whole genome as tool box of expressed sequence to speed the identification of human disease genes. The results of this study are intended to dovetail with and to link the results of existing technologies for creating backbone YAC and genetic maps. In the first eight months, this approach generated 60--80% of the expressed sequence map, the remainder expected to be derived through more long-term, labor-intensive, regional chromosomal gene searches or sequencing. The laboratory has made significant progress in the set-up phase, in mapping fetal and adult brain and other cDNAs, in testing a model system for directly linking genetic and physical maps using FISH with small fragments, in setting up a database, and in establishing the validity and throughput of the system.

  11. Pallister-Killian syndrome detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.G.; Dev, V.G.

    1995-07-03

    The Pallister-Killian syndrome is a rare cytogenetic condition first described in 1977 by Pallister et al. in 3 adults; the first affected child was reported in 1981. This syndrome (also known as Pallister mosaic aneuploidy syndrome or isochromosome 12p mosaicism) is characterized by postnatal growth retardation, seizures, hypotonia, deafness, profound mental retardation, minimal speech development, and a distinctive facial appearance (high prominent forehead, ocular hypertelorism, sparse anterior scalp hair, prominent lower lip, large ears with thick protruding lobules, cupid-bow shaped upper lip, and a long philtrum). A chromosome 12 abnormality (tetrasomy 12p) has been reported in skin biopsies from these patients but this chromosome anomaly is usually not found (or in only a small proportion, e.g., <0.5%, of blood cells) in peripheral blood. We report on an additional patient with Pallister-Killian syndrome confirmed with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using an alpha satellite DNA probe for chromosome 12. This report further illustrates the application of FISH in identifying the source of chromosomal markers of unknown origin in infants with multiple congenital anomalies specifically before the natural history of a condition allows for definitive diagnosis based on clinical findings. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Detection of dengue group viruses by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) represent a global challenge in public health. It is estimated that 50 to 100 million infections occur each year causing approximately 20,000 deaths that are usually linked to severe cases like DHF and dengue shock syndrome. The causative agent of DF is dengue virus (genus Flavivirus) that comprises four distinct serotypes (DENV-1 to DENV-4). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has been used successfully to detect pathogenic agents, but has not been implemented in detecting DENV. To improve our understanding of DENV infection and dissemination in host tissues, we designed specific probes to detect DENV in FISH assays. Methods Oligonucleotide probes were designed to hybridize with RNA from the broadest range of DENV isolates belonging to the four serotypes, but not to the closest Flavivirus genomes. Three probes that fit the criteria defined for FISH experiments were selected, targeting both coding and non-coding regions of the DENV genome. These probes were tested in FISH assays against the dengue vector Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae). The FISH experiments were led in vitro using the C6/36 cell line, and in vivo against dissected salivary glands, with epifluorescence and confocal microscopy. Results The three 60-nt oligonucleotides probes DENV-Probe A, B and C cover a broad range of DENV isolates from the four serotypes. When the three probes were used together, specific fluorescent signals were observed in C6/36 infected with each DENV serotypes. No signal was detected in either cells infected with close Flavivirus members West Nile virus or yellow fever virus. The same protocol was used on salivary glands of Ae. albopictus fed with a DENV-2 infectious blood-meal which showed positive signals in the lateral lobes of infected samples, with no significant signal in uninfected mosquitoes. Conclusion Based on the FISH technique, we propose a way to design and use oligonucleotide probes to

  13. Bacterial colonization of enamel in situ investigated using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Al-Ahmad, Ali; Follo, Marie; Selzer, Ann-Carina; Hellwig, Elmar; Hannig, Matthias; Hannig, Christian

    2009-10-01

    Oral biofilms are one of the greatest challenges in dental research. The present study aimed to investigate initial bacterial colonization of enamel surfaces in situ using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) over a 12 h period. For this purpose, bovine enamel slabs were fixed on buccal sites of individual splints worn by six subjects for 2, 6 and 12 h to allow biofilm formation. Specimens were processed for FISH and evaluated with confocal laser-scanning microscopy, using probes for eubacteria, Streptococcus species, Veillonella species, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Actinomyces naeslundii. The number of adherent bacteria increased with time and all tested bacterial species were detected in the biofilm formed in situ. The general percentage composition of the eubacteria did not change over the investigated period, but the number of streptococci, the most frequently detected species, increased significantly with time (2 h: 17.7+/-13.8 %; 6 h: 20.0+/-16.6 %; 12 h: 24.7+/-16.1 %). However, < or =1 % of the surface was covered with bacteria after 12 h of biofilm formation in situ. In conclusion, FISH is an appropriate method for quantifying initial biofilm formation in situ, and the proportion of streptococci increases during the first 12 h of bacterial adherence. PMID:19528150

  14. Role of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in sequencing the tomato genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chromosomes at various stages of the cell cycle can be used for localization of DNA probes via Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). While mitotic metaphase chromosomes are demonstrably too short and compact for this purpose, long pachytene chromosomes are ideal. BACs that hybridize to euchrom...

  15. The Application of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization in Different Ploidy Levels Cross-Breeding of Lily

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Wang, Jingmao; Zhang, Yiying; Zhang, Yue; Xu, Shunchao; Lu, Yingmin

    2015-01-01

    21 crossing were conducted between Asiatic Lily with different ploidy levels, the results showed that the interploidy hybridization between diploid and tetraploid lilies was not as successful as intraploidy hybridization. Regardless of male sterility, triploid lilies could be used as female parents in the hybridization which the progenies were aneuploidy. 3x×4x crosses could be cultured more successfully than 3x×2x crosses. 45S rDNA was mapped on the chromosomes of seven Lilium species and their progenies using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH revealed six to sixteen 45S rDNA gene loci, and normally the sites were not in pairs. The asymmetry indexes of LA (Longiflorum hybrids × Asiatic hybrids) hybrids was higher than Asiatic hybrids, the evolution degree was LA hybrids > Asiatic hybrids. 45S rDNA distributed variably on chromosome 1-10 and 12 among Asiatic hybrids. Chromosome 1 had invariable sites of 45S rDNA in all Asiatic hybrids, which could be considered as the characteristic of Asiatic hybrids. LA hybrid ‘Freya’ had two sites of 45S rDNA on one homologous chromosome 5, and also it could be found in the progenies. The karyotype and fluorescence in situ hybridization with 45S rDNA as probe were applied to identify the different genotypes of 9 hybrids. Typical chromosomes with parental signal sites could be observed in all the genotypes of hybrids, it was confirmed that all the hybrids were true. PMID:26010356

  16. Detection of resistance to macrolides in thermotolerant campylobacter species by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Haas, Michaela; Essig, Andreas; Bartelt, Edda; Poppert, Sven

    2008-11-01

    The resistance of enteritis-causing Campylobacter strains to erythromycin is an emerging problem. We therefore evaluated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the rapid detection of resistance using 74 campylobacter isolates. FISH showed specificity and sensitivity of 100% for the detection of high-level resistance. PMID:18753354

  17. Evolution of Chromosome 6 of Solanum Species Revealed by Comparative Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization Mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative genome mapping is an important tool in evolutionary research. Here we demonstrate a comparative fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping strategy. A set of 13 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones derived from potato chromosome 6 was used for FISH mapping in seven differen...

  18. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and spectral imaging of coral-associated bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Ainsworth, T D; Fine, M; Blackall, L L; Hoegh-Guldberg, O

    2006-04-01

    Microbial communities play important roles in the functioning of coral reef communities. However, extensive autofluorescence of coral tissues and endosymbionts limits the application of standard fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques for the identification of the coral-associated bacterial communities. This study overcomes these limitations by combining FISH and spectral imaging. PMID:16598010

  19. De Novo nonreciprocal translocation 1;8 confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, J.E.; Stout, C.; Palmer, S.M.

    1995-07-17

    Constitutional nonreciprocal translocations are extremely rare, and even their existence is controversial. We report on a newborn infant with a de novo nonreciprocal translocation between chromosomes 1 and 8 resulting in 1q42.3 deletion syndrome. Fluorescent in situ hybridization with whole chromosome paints confirmed the conventional cytogenetic diagnosis. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. 21 CFR 866.4700 - Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems. 866.4700 Section 866.4700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES...

  1. 21 CFR 866.4700 - Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems. 866.4700 Section 866.4700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES...

  2. 21 CFR 866.4700 - Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems. 866.4700 Section 866.4700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES...

  3. 21 CFR 866.4700 - Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems. 866.4700 Section 866.4700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES...

  4. 21 CFR 866.4700 - Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems. 866.4700 Section 866.4700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES...

  5. Painting of parental chromatin in Beta hybrids by multi-colour fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Desel, Christine; Jansen, Rita; Dedong, Gue; Schmidt, Thomas

    2002-02-01

    Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) is a relatively young crop and has a narrow gene pool. In order to introduce genetic variability into the crop, interspecific hybrids, selected from crosses with wild beets of the sections Corollinae and Procumbentes, have been generated. The introgressed B. procumbens chromatin carries resistance genes to beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii Schm. These lines are important for breeding of nematode-resistant sugar beet, while Corollinae species are potential donors of tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses such as drought or saline soils. We have used in situ hybridization of genomic DNA to discriminate the parental chromosomes in these interspecific hybrids. Suppression of cross-hybridization by blocking DNA was not necessary indicating that the investigated Beta genomes contain sufficient species-specific DNA enabling the unequivocal determination of the genomic composition of the hybrids. Interspecific hybrid lines with an additional chromosome (2n = 18 + 1), chromosome fragment (2n = 18 + fragment) or translocation of B. procumbens (2n = 18) were analysed by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) at mitosis and meiosis. Species-specific satellites and ribosomal genes used in combination with genomic DNA or in rehybridization experiments served as landmark probes for chromosome identification in hybrid genomes. The detection of a B. procumbens translocation of approx. I Mbp demonstrated the sensitivity and resolution of GISH and showed that this approach is a powerful method in genome analysis projects of the genus Beta. PMID:12099348

  6. Detection of viral RNA by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Vyboh, Kishanda; Ajamian, Lara; Mouland, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    localization using a method like this, abundant information has been gained on both viral and cellular RNA trafficking events. For instance, HIV-1 produces RNA in the nucleus of infected cells but the RNA is only translated in the cytoplasm. When one key viral protein is missing (Rev), FISH of the viral RNA has revealed that the block to viral replication is due to the retention of the HIV-1 genomic RNA in the nucleus. Here, we present the method for visual analysis of viral genomic RNA in situ. The method makes use of a labelled RNA probe. This probe is designed to be complementary to the viral genomic RNA. During the in vitro synthesis of the antisense RNA probe, the ribonucleotide that is modified with digoxigenin (DIG) is included in an in vitro transcription reaction. Once the probe has hybridized to the target mRNA in cells, subsequent antibody labelling steps (Figure 1) will reveal the localization of the mRNA as well as proteins of interest when performing FISH/IF. PMID:22588480

  7. Identification of mosaicism in Prader-Willi syndrome using fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Mowery-Rushton, P.A.; Surti, U.; Hanchett, J.M.

    1996-12-30

    We report on our findings of 4 patients with mosaicism for a deletion of chromosome 15, most commonly associated with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). We examined a series of typical and atypical PWS patients in order to identify cytogenetically undetected deletions, using fluorescence in situ hybridization. In 4 of the patients analyzed we detected a deletion in 14-60% of peripheral blood leukocytes, using four commercially available probes. Our results indicate that mosaicism may play a role in the etiology of some PWS cases. These findings may be especially useful in patients who display discrepancies between clinical phenotype and established diagnostic criteria. Methylation and microsatellite polymorphism analyses of 2 patients with low-level mosaicism failed to identify the deletion. We propose that fluorescence in situ hybridization is the most effective method for detecting somatic mosaicism, since a large number of cells can be individually examined for the presence or absence of a specific deletion. 47 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Painting of Parental Chromatin in Beta Hybrids by Multi‐colour Fluorescent in situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    DESEL, CHRISTINE; JANSEN, RITA; DEDONG, GUE; SCHMIDT, THOMAS

    2002-01-01

    Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) is a relatively young crop and has a narrow gene pool. In order to introduce genetic variability into the crop, interspecific hybrids, selected from crosses with wild beets of the sections Corollinae and Procumbentes, have been generated. The introgressed B. procumbens chromatin carries resistance genes to beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii Schm. These lines are important for breeding of nematode‐resistant sugar beet, while Corollinae species are potential donors of tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses such as drought or saline soils. We have used in situ hybridization of genomic DNA to discriminate the parental chromosomes in these interspecific hybrids. Suppression of cross‐hybridization by blocking DNA was not necessary indicating that the investigated Beta genomes contain sufficient species‐specific DNA enabling the unequivocal determination of the genomic composition of the hybrids. Interspecific hybrid lines with an additional chromosome (2n = 18 + 1), chromosome fragment (2n = 18 + fragment) or translocation of B. procumbens (2n = 18) were analysed by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) at mitosis and meiosis. Species‐specific satellites and ribosomal genes used in combination with genomic DNA or in rehybridization experiments served as landmark probes for chromosome identification in hybrid genomes. The detection of a B. procumbens translocation of approx. 1 Mbp demonstrated the sensitivity and resolution of GISH and showed that this approach is a powerful method in genome analysis projects of the genus Beta. PMID:12099348

  9. Tyramide Signal Amplification: Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Identifying Homoeologous Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Fominaya, Araceli; Loarce, Yolanda; González, Juan M; Ferrer, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Tyramide signal amplification (TSA) fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has been shown as a valuable molecular tool for visualizing specific amplified DNA sequences in chromosome preparations. This chapter describes how to perform TSA-FISH, paying special interest to its two critical steps: probe generation and metaphase plate generation. The potential of physically mapping 12S-globulin sequences by TSA-FISH as a means of identifying homeology among chromosome regions of Avena species was tested and is discussed. PMID:27511165

  10. Mapping of a rat multidrug resistance gene by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, N.C.; Silverman, J.A.; Thorgeirsson, S.S. )

    1993-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding the rat mdr1b (Pgy2) gene was recently isolated and characterized. This gene has a high degree of sequence identity with other Pgy genes, particularly the mouse Pgy2 gene. By means of in situ fluorescence hybridization, the rat Pgy gene was localized on chromosome 4 band q12. This regional mapping will facilitate the identification of synteny groups on rat, mouse, and human genomes and chromosomal rearrangements during mammalian evolution. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization to Detect Transgene Integration into Plant Genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzacher, Trude

    Fluorescent chromosome analysis technologies have advanced our understanding of genome organization during the last 30 years and have enabled the investigation of DNA organization and structure as well as the evolution of chromosomes. Fluorescent chromosome staining allows even small chromosomes to be visualized, characterized by their composition and morphology, and counted. Aneuploidies and polyploidies can be established for species, breeding lines, and individuals, including changes occurring during hybridization or tissue culture and transformation protocols. Fluorescent in situ hybridization correlates molecular information of a DNA sequence with its physical location on chromosomes and genomes. It thus allows determination of the physical position of sequences and often is the only means to determine the abundance and distribution of DNA sequences that are difficult to map with any other molecular method or would require segregation analysis, in particular multicopy or repetitive DNA. Equally, it is often the best way to establish the incorporation of transgenes, their numbers, and physical organization along chromosomes. This chapter presents protocols for probe and chromosome preparation, fluorescent in situ hybridization, chromosome staining, and the analysis of results.

  12. [Use of photo-anchoring of DNA probes for fluorescent in situ hybridization].

    PubMed

    Nasedkina, T V; Mal'kov, R B; Fedorova, L I; Godovikova, T S; Kolpashchikov, D M; Poletaev, A I

    1998-01-01

    A possibility was investigated to use photo-crosslinking DNA probes for fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). DNA probes were modified by incorporating photonucleotides in these, containing a photoreactive group (tetrafluorobenzazid) and capable of making covalent bonds with the examined DNA, when irradiated in 300-330 nm region. The photonucleotide was incorporated into the probe either by nick-translation, or upon elongation of the hybridized probe by the Kljonow fragment. It has been shown that the DNA probe, cross-linking to a chromosome as a result of covalent bonds, is not removed from the place of hybridization under consequent denaturating washing, which makes it possible to carry out the following DNA hybridization with selective conservation of signals obtained due to previous hybridization. This peculiarity of photo-linking DNA probes makes it possible to use them for the two-step DNA hybridization. To demonstrate this, preparations of human chromosomes were investigated. On the first step, chromosomal DNA was hybridized by means of DNA probe having nucleotide sequences of centromeric regions of chromosomes 13 and 21, the probe being linked to chromosomal DNA by the photonucleotide. Following the denaturation treatment of the preparation, and after the second chromosomal DNA hybridization with cosmid DNA, containing chromosome 13 DNA nucleotide sequence, the signal in chromosome 13 centromeric region was retained to serve a marker of this chromosome, thus fascilitating its easier identification following the hybridization of its DNA with cosmic DNA. The denaturation stability of photo-crosslinking probes opens some new possibilities in technology of DNA in situ hybridization. PMID:9821246

  13. Identification of two Skeletonema costatum-like diatoms by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baoyu; Chen, Guofu; Wang, Guangce; Lu, Douding

    2010-03-01

    A harmful algae bloom (HAB) is a dense aggregation of algae in a marine or aquatic environment that can result in significant environmental problems. To forecast the occurrence of HAB, development of a rapid and precise detection method is urgently required. In this study, two Skeletonema costatum-like diatoms (SK-1 and SK-2), were identified morphologically under a light microscope, and detected using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Strain SK-1 was isolated from a frequently HAB affected area of the East China Sea, and strain SK-2 from an aquatic farm in Qingdao, China. Fluorescent DNA probes were designed that were complementary to the ITS sequence (including 5.8S rDNA) of strain SK-1. After hybridization, strong green fluorescence was observed in cells of strain SK-1 under an epifluorescence microscope; however, no such fluorescence was observed with strain SK-2, which indicates that probes hybridized only the DNA of the target strain, SK-1, in species-specific manner, and that the two strains do not belong to a same species. This finding was confirmed by ITS sequence analysis. The FISH technique used in this study was sensitive, simple, and rapid, and is a promising tool for detecting target HAB species in natural environments.

  14. Catalyzed Reported Deposition-Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Protocol To Evaluate Phagotrophy in Mixotrophic Protists

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Sánchez, Juan M.; Felip, Marisol; Casamayor, Emilio O.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a catalyzed reported deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) protocol particularly suited to assess the phagotrophy of mixotrophic protists on prokaryotes, since it maintains cell and plastid integrity, avoids cell loss and egestion of prey, and allows visualization of labeled prey against plastid autofluorescence. This protocol, which includes steps such as Lugol's-formaldehyde-thiosulfate fixation, agarose cell attachment, cell wall permeabilization with lysozyme plus achromopeptidase, and signal amplification with Alexa-Fluor 488, allowed us to detect almost 100% of planktonic prokaryotes (Bacteria and Archaea) and, for the first time, to show archaeal cells ingested by mixotrophic protists. PMID:16269774

  15. Single-mRNA counting using fluorescent in situ hybridization in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Trcek, Tatjana; Chao, Jeffrey A; Larson, Daniel R; Park, Hye Yoon; Zenklusen, Daniel; Shenoy, Shailesh M; Singer, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) allows the quantification of single mRNAs in budding yeast using fluorescently labeled single-stranded DNA probes, a wide-field epifluorescence microscope and a spot-detection algorithm. Fixed yeast cells are attached to coverslips and hybridized with a mixture of FISH probes, each conjugated to several fluorescent dyes. Images of cells are acquired in 3D and maximally projected for single-molecule analysis. Diffraction-limited labeled mRNAs are observed as bright fluorescent spots and can be quantified using a spot-detection algorithm. FISH preserves the spatial distribution of cellular RNA distribution within the cell and the stochastic fluctuations in individual cells that can lead to phenotypic differences within a clonal population. This information, however, is lost if the RNA content is measured on a population of cells by using reverse transcriptase PCR, microarrays or high-throughput sequencing. The FISH procedure and image acquisition described here can be completed in 3 d. PMID:22301778

  16. Multiplexed miRNA Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Renwick, Neil; Cekan, Pavol; Bognanni, Claudia; Tuschl, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Multiplexed miRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (miRNA FISH) is an advanced method for visualizing differentially expressed miRNAs, together with other reference RNAs, in archival tissues. Some miRNAs are excellent disease biomarkers due to their abundance and cell-type specificity. However, these short RNA molecules are difficult to visualize due to loss by diffusion, probe mishybridization, and signal detection and signal amplification issues. Here, we describe a reliable and adjustable method for visualizing and normalizing miRNA signals in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections. PMID:25218385

  17. Rapid detection of chromosome aneuploidies in uncultured amniocytes by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Katherine; Landes, Greg; Shook, Donna; Harvey, Robert; Lopez, Linda; Locke, Pat; Lerner, Terry; Osathanondh, Rapin; Leverone, Benjamin; Houseal, Timothy; Pavelka, Karen; Dackowski, William

    1992-01-01

    Herein we report the results of the first major prospective study directly comparing aneuploidy detection by fluorescence in situ hybridization of interphase nuclei with the results obtained by cytogenetic analysis. We constructed probes derived from specific subregions of human chromosomes 21, 18, 13, X, and Y that give a single copy–like signal when used in conjunction with suppression hybridization. A total of 526 independent amniotic fluid samples were analyzed in a blind fashion. All five probes were analyzed on 117 samples, while subsets of these five probes were used on the remaining samples (because of insufficient sample size), for a total of over 900 autosomal hybridization reactions and over 400 sex chromosome hybridization reactions. In this blind series, 21 of 21 abnormal samples were correctly identified. The remaining samples were correctly classified as disomic for these five chromosomes. The combination of chromosome-specific probe sets composed primarily of cosmid contigs and optimized hybridization/detection allowed accurate chromosome enumeration in uncultured human amniotic fluid cells, consistent with the results obtained by traditional cytogenetic analysis. Imagesp[60]-aFigure 1 PMID:1609805

  18. Simultaneous specific in planta visualization of root-colonizing fungi using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Vági, Pál; Knapp, Dániel G; Kósa, Annamária; Seress, Diána; Horváth, Áron N; Kovács, Gábor M

    2014-05-01

    In planta detection of mutualistic, endophytic, and pathogenic fungi commonly colonizing roots and other plant organs is not a routine task. We aimed to use fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for simultaneous specific detection of different fungi colonizing the same tissue. We have adapted ribosomal RNA (rRNA) FISH for visualization of common mycorrhizal (arbuscular- and ectomycorrhiza) and endophytic fungi within roots of different plant species. Beside general probes, we designed and used specific ones hybridizing to the large subunit of rRNA with fluorescent dyes chosen to avoid or reduce the interference with the autofluorescence of plant tissues. We report here an optimized efficient protocol of rRNA FISH and the use of both epifluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy for simultaneous specific differential detection of those fungi colonizing the same root. The method could be applied for the characterization of other plant-fungal interactions, too. In planta FISH with specific probes labeled with appropriate fluorescent dyes could be used not only in basic research but to detect plant colonizing pathogenic fungi in their latent life-period. PMID:24221902

  19. c-myc copy number gains in bladder cancer detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, G.; Carroll, P.; Moch, H.; Kallioniemi, A.; Kerschmann, R.; Narayan, P.; Mihatsch, M. J.; Waldman, F. M.

    1995-01-01

    Amplification and overexpression of c-myc have been suggested as prognostic markers in human cancer. To assess the role of c-myc gene copy number alterations in bladder cancer, 87 bladder tumors were examined for c-myc aberrations by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Dual labeling hybridization with a repetitive pericentromeric probe specific for chromosome 8 and a probe for the c-myc locus (at 8q24) was performed to analyze c-myc copy number in relation to chromosome 8 copy number on a cell by cell basis. A clear-cut c-myc amplification (up to 40 to 150 copies per cell) was found in 3 tumors. There was a low level c-myc copy number increase in 32 of the remaining 84 tumors. There was no association of low level c-myc copy number increase with c-myc protein overexpression. This suggests that a c-myc gene copy number gain as detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization does not necessarily reflect a disturbed c-myc gene function but may indicate a structural chromosome 8 abnormality including gain of distal 8q. The strong association of low level c-myc (8q) gains with tumor grade (P < 0.0001), stage (P < 0.0001), chromosome polysomy (P < 0.0001), p53 protein expression (P = 0.0019), p53 deletion (P = 0.0403), and tumor cell proliferation (Ki67 labeling index; P = 0.0021) is consistent with a role of chromosome 8 alterations in bladder cancer progression. Images Figure 1 PMID:7747807

  20. Confocal Raman microscopy and fluorescent in situ hybridization - A complementary approach for biofilm analysis.

    PubMed

    Kniggendorf, Ann-Kathrin; Nogueira, Regina; Kelb, Christian; Schadzek, Patrik; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Ngezahayo, Anaclet; Roth, Bernhard

    2016-10-01

    We combine confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) of wet samples with subsequent Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) without significant limitations to either technique for analyzing the same sample of a microbial community on a cell-to-cell basis. This combination of techniques allows a much deeper, more complete understanding of complex environmental samples than provided by either technique alone. The minimalistic approach is based on laboratory glassware with micro-engravings for reproducible localization of the sample at cell scale combined with a fixation and de- and rehydration protocol for the respective techniques. As proof of concept, we analyzed a floc of nitrifying activated sludge, demonstrating that the sample can be tracked with cell-scale precision over different measurements and instruments. The collected information includes the microbial content, spatial shape, variant chemical compositions of the floc matrix and the mineral microparticles embedded within. In addition, the direct comparison of CRM and FISH revealed a difference in reported cell size due to the different cell components targeted by the respective technique. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a direct cell-to-cell comparison of confocal Raman microscopy and Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis performed on the same sample. An adaptation of the method to include native samples as a starting point is planned for the near future. The micro-engraving approach itself also opens up the possibility of combining other, functionally incompatible techniques as required for further in-depth investigations of low-volume samples. PMID:27423128

  1. Detection of a complex translocation using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, B.A.; Abuelo, D.N.; Mark, H.F.

    1994-09-01

    The use of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) allowed the detection of a complex 3-way translocation in a patient with multiple congenital malformations and mental retardation. The patient was a 10-year-old girl with mental retardation, seizures, repaired cleft palate, esotropia, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, upward slanting palpebral fissures, single transverse palmar crease, brachydactyly, hypoplastic nails, ectrodactyly between the third and fourth right toes, and hypoplasia of the left third toe. Chromosome analysis performed at birth was reported as normal. We performed high resolution banding analysis which revealed an apparently balanced translocation between chromosomes 2 and 9. However, because of her multiple abnormalities, further studies were ordered. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using chromosome painting probes revealed a karyotype of 46,XX,t(2;8;9) (2pter{yields}q31::8q21.2{yields}8qter; 8pter{yields}q21.2::2q31{yields}q34::9q34{yields}qter; 9pter{yields}q34::2q34{yields}qter). The 3-way translocation appears to be de novo, as neither parent is a translocation carrier. This case illustrates the importance of using FISH to further investigate cases of apparently balanced translocations in the presence of phenotypic abnormalities and/or mental retardation.

  2. Protecting Quantum Dot Fluorescence from Quenching to Achieve a Reliable Automated Multiplex Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjun; Hubbard, Antony; Pang, Lizhen; Parkinson, Leslie Baca; Brunhoeber, Patrick; Wang, Yixin; Tang, Lei

    2015-09-01

    Quantum dots (QD) are novel inorganic fluorochromes that are ultra-bright, photo-stable, and available in multiple, highly-resolvable colors. QDs represent an ideal detection material for in situ hybridization (ISH) because they may provide unprecedented resolution and strong signal intensities that are not attainable with traditional fluorophores. Unfortunately, lack of reliability has been an impediment to widespread adoption of QD-based fluorescence in situ hybridization (QD FISH) technology. By optimizing QD-to-target accessibility, we have developed a QD FISH staining procedure that dramatically improves the reliability of an automated ERG/PTEN QD FISH assay (91% 1st pass rate). Here, we report improvements to the assay that protects QD fluorescence from quenching due to trace amounts of heavy metals and minimizes QD background signals. When using this method, highly-consistent staining was observed with the ERG/PTEN QD FISH assay in prostate tissue. Successful staining of several other clinically-relevant genetic markers was also possible. We further demonstrated improved reliability for determining HER2 gene status in breast cancer, identifying anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene break-apart in non-small cell lung cancer, and detecting human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. The enhanced QD FISH assay allows for examining complicated genetic aberrances without use of enzymatic amplification. Our optimized methods now demonstrate reliability sufficient for QD FISH technology to be a diagnostic tool in a clinical setting. PMID:26485928

  3. Gene numerical imbalances in cytological specimens based on fluorescence/chromogenic in situ hybridization analysis.

    PubMed

    Tsiambas, E; Karameris, A; Lygeros, M; Athanasiou, A E; Salemis, N S; Gourgiotis, S; Ragkos, V; Metaxas, G E; Vilaras, G; Patsouris, E

    2012-01-01

    Design and development of novel targeted therapeutic strategies is an innovation in handling patients with solid malignancies including breast, colon, lung, head & neck or even pancreatic and hepatocellular carcinoma. For a long time, immunohistocytochemistry (IHC/ICC) has been performed as a routine method in almost all labs for evaluating protein expression. Modern molecular approaches show that identification of specific structural and numerical imbalances regarding genes involved in signal transduction pathways provide important data to the oncologists. Alterations in molecules such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), HER2/neu, PTEN or Topoisomerase IIa affect the response rates to specific chemotherapeutic agents modifying also patients' prognostic rates. In situ hybridization (ISH) techniques based on fluorescence and chromogenic variants (FISH/CISH) or silver in situ hybridization (SISH) are applicable in both tissue and cell substrates. Concerning cytological specimens, FISH/CISH analysis appears to be a fast and very accurate method in estimating gene/chromosome ratios. In this paper, we sought to evaluate the usefulness of FISH/ CISH analysis in cytological specimens, describing also the advantages and disadvantages of these methods from the technical point of view. PMID:23033306

  4. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses of human oocytes in trisomy 18 and 21

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, E.Y.; Chen, Y.J.; Gartler, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    The commonly accepted view of synapsis is that only 2 homologues can synapse at any one site and that this restriction applies to polyploids as well. However, triple synapsis has been observed is some triploid plants and in triploid chicken. In humans, triple synapsis of the long arm of chromosome 21 was detected in sperm of a trisomic 21 individual. More recently, studies of oocytes from trisomic 21 and 18 fetuses also indicated extensive triple synapsis along the entire length of the chromosomes. To further investigate this question, we undertook an evaluation of trivalent synapsis in fetal oocytes from 2 trisomic 21 and 2 trisomic 18 fetuses using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome probes. Oocytes were hybridized with whole chromosome probes obtained from ONCOR, Inc. after fixation with methanol and acetic acid. Slides were scored for the distribution of prophase stages, hybridization efficiency, and hybridization characteristics of chromosomes 18 and 21 in the trisomic 18 and 21 fetuses respectively. Fifty-eight per cent (379/650) of pachytenes analyzed for chromosome 18 contained a conspicous trivalent and 319 (48%) of these nuclei contained a single, thick, continuous fluorescent signal consistent with complete triple synapsis along the entire length of all 3 chromosomes. Sixteen per cent (104/650) of pachytene contained 2 signals consistent with a bivalent and a univalent, and 9 cells contained 3 thin signals consistent with asynapsis of all 3 chromosomes. The remaining 158 pachytenes had unusual pairing configurations that we could not classify, but they most likely represent trivalents with partial pairing between different homologues. In the 2 trisomic 21 fetuses, the majority (143/232) of pachytenes also contained one signal while only 52 cells contained a bivalent and univalent. Five cells contained 3 separate signals. These results confirm the existence of triple synapsis in human meiosis.

  5. Application of locked nucleic acid-based probes in fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Fontenete, Sílvia; Carvalho, Daniel; Guimarães, Nuno; Madureira, Pedro; Figueiredo, Céu; Wengel, Jesper; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) employing nucleic acid mimics as probes is becoming an emerging molecular tool in the microbiology area for the detection and visualization of microorganisms. However, the impact that locked nucleic acid (LNA) and 2'-O-methyl (2'-OMe) RNA modifications have on the probe that is targeting microorganisms is unknown. In this study, the melting and hybridization efficiency properties of 18 different probes in regards to their use in FISH for the detection of the 16S rRNA of Helicobacter pylori were compared. For the same sequence and target, probe length and the type of nucleic acid mimics used as mixmers in LNA-based probes strongly influence the efficiency of detection. LNA probes with 10 to 15 mers showed the highest efficiency. Additionally, the combination of 2'-OMe RNA with LNA allowed an increase on the fluorescence intensities of the probes. Overall, these results have significant implications for the design and applications of LNA probes for the detection of microorganisms. PMID:26969040

  6. Chromosome-Specific DNA Repeats: Rapid Identification in Silico and Validation Using Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Joanne H.; Zeng, Hui; Lemke, Kalistyn H.; Polyzos, Aris A.; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Lawin-O’Brien, Anna R.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; O’Brien, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome enumeration in interphase and metaphase cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an established procedure for the rapid and accurate cytogenetic analysis of cell nuclei and polar bodies, the unambiguous gender determination, as well as the definition of tumor-specific signatures. Present bottlenecks in the procedure are a limited number of commercial, non-isotopically labeled probes that can be combined in multiplex FISH assays and the relatively high price and effort to develop additional probes. We describe a streamlined approach for rapid probe definition, synthesis and validation, which is based on the analysis of publicly available DNA sequence information, also known as “database mining”. Examples of probe preparation for the human gonosomes and chromosome 16 as a selected autosome outline the probe selection strategy, define a timeline for expedited probe production and compare this novel selection strategy to more conventional probe cloning protocols. PMID:23344021

  7. Prediction of melting temperatures in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedures using thermodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Fontenete, Sílvia; Guimarães, Nuno; Wengel, Jesper; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe

    2016-06-01

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA hybridization, i.e. the process of self-assembly of one, two or more complementary nucleic acid strands, has been studied for many years. The appearance of the nearest-neighbor model led to several theoretical and experimental papers on DNA thermodynamics that provide reasonably accurate thermodynamic information on nucleic acid duplexes and allow estimation of the melting temperature. Because there are no thermodynamic models specifically developed to predict the hybridization temperature of a probe used in a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure, the melting temperature is used as a reference, together with corrections for certain compounds that are used during FISH. However, the quantitative relation between melting and experimental FISH temperatures is poorly described. In this review, various models used to predict the melting temperature for rRNA targets, for DNA oligonucleotides and for nucleic acid mimics (chemically modified oligonucleotides), will be addressed in detail, together with a critical assessment of how this information should be used in FISH. PMID:25586037

  8. Fluorescent in situ hybridization in routinely processed bone marrow aspirate clot and core biopsy sections.

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, R. N.; Mark, H. F.; Medeiros, L. J.

    1994-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a technique which complements conventional cytogenetic banding analysis by allowing the evaluation of cells in interphase as well as metaphase. This technique has been used to study air-dried peripheral blood and bone marrow aspirate smears. We have applied the FISH technique to study routinely processed sections of bone marrow aspirate clot and decalcified core biopsy specimens, fixed in either formalin or B5 and embedded in paraffin. We evaluated 28 specimens (8 aspirate clot and 20 core biopsy sections) for chromosome 8 copy number, studied previously by conventional cytogenetics, and found the following distribution: 15 with disomy, 11 with trisomy, and 2 with tetrasomy. Using a chromosome 8 alpha-satellite probe, we detected fluorescent hybridization signals in 18 of 28 specimens (64%); 6 of 8 (75%) aspirate clot sections, and 12 of 20 (60%) core biopsy sections. Ten of 13 (77%) B5-fixed and 8 of 15 (53%) formalin-fixed specimens had hybridizing signals. Specimen age was a significant factor; 10 of 11 (91%) specimens processed within the last 6 months showed signals, in contrast with 8 of 17 (47%) specimens older than 6 months. In the positive specimens, 200 cells were analyzed in areas where individual cells could be identified. In the disomic specimens, two signals per cell were seen in 34 to 66% of the cells. Rare cells (0-2%) with three signals were detected. In the trisomic specimens, three signals per cell were seen in 19 to 46% of the cells. In the tetrasomic specimens, four signals per cell were seen in 15 to 25% of the cells. We conclude that the FISH technique may be useful in the detection of numerical chromosomal abnormalities such as trisomy and tetrasomy 8 in routinely processed bone marrow aspirate clot and decalcified core biopsy sections. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7992836

  9. Novel fluorescence in situ hybridization approaches in solid tumors. Characterization of frozen specimens, touch preparations, and cytological preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, S.; Renshaw, A.; Cibas, E. S.; Hudson, T. J.; Fletcher, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization has emerged as an extremely important tool for detection and characterization of nonrandom chromosome aberrations in cancer. Fluorescence in situ hybridization assays have been very reliable in cytogenetic tumor preparations, but have been more unpredictable in archival, paraffin-embedded specimens. We describe novel approaches for detection of chromosome aberrations in frozen tumor specimens, touch preparations, and cytological preparations. These approaches are both simple and reproducible, with minimal case-to-case variation in hybridization efficiency or hybridization signal quality. We demonstrate potential applications of these novel approaches by evaluating: 1) significance of normal karyotypes in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors; 2) p15/p16 copy number in prostate cancer; and 3) clonal chromosome 3p deletion in cytological preparations of pleural fluid from patients with mesothelioma. Images Figure 1 PMID:7573365

  10. Identification of supernumerary ring chromosome 1 mosaicism using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Tuck-Muller, C.M.; Wertelecki, W.

    1995-03-27

    We report on a 15-year-old black boy with severe mental retardation, multiple congenital anomalies, and a supernumerary ring chromosome mosaicism. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with a chromosome 1 painting probe (pBS1) identified the ring as derived from chromosome 1. The karyotype was 46,XY/47,XY,+r(1)(p13q23). A review showed 8 reports of ring chromosome 1. In 5 cases, the patients had a non-supernumerary ring chromosome 1 resulting in partial monosomies of the short and/or long arm of chromosome 1. In 3 cases, the presence of a supernumerary ring resulted in partial trisomy of different segments of chromosome 1. In one of these cases of the supernumerary ring was composed primarily of the centromere and the heterochromatic region of chromosome 1, resulting in normal phenotype. Our patient represents the third report of a supernumerary ring chromosome 1 resulting in abnormal phenotype. 28 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Enumeration of methanogens with a focus on fluorescence in situ hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Dagar, Sumit Singh; Mohanty, Ashok Kumar; Sirohi, Sunil Kumar; Puniya, Monica; Kuhad, Ramesh C.; Sangu, K. P. S.; Griffith, Gareth Wyn; Puniya, Anil Kumar

    2011-06-01

    Methanogens, the members of domain Archaea are potent contributors in global warming. Being confined to the strict anaerobic environment, their direct cultivation as pure culture is quite difficult. Therefore, a range of culture-independent methods have been developed to investigate their numbers, substrate uptake patterns, and identification in complex microbial communities. Unlike other approaches, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is not only used for faster quantification and accurate identification but also to reveal the physiological properties and spatiotemporal dynamics of methanogens in their natural environment. Aside from the methodological aspects and application of FISH, this review also focuses on culture-dependent and -independent techniques employed in enumerating methanogens along with associated problems. In addition, the combination of FISH with micro-autoradiography that could also be an important tool in investigating the activities of methanogens is also discussed.

  12. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) as a tool for visualization and enumeration of Campylobacter in broiler ceca

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food-borne human pathogens are typically detected and enumerated by either cultural methods or PCR-based approaches. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) is a standard microscopy tool for microbial ecology but has not been widely used for food safety applications despite important advantages o...

  13. Chromosome translocations measured by fluorescence in-situ hybridization: A promising biomarker

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.

    1995-10-01

    A biomarker for exposure and risk assessment would be most useful if it employs an endpoint that is highly quantitative, is stable with time, and is relevant to human risk. Recent advances in chromosome staining using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) facilitate fast and reliable measurement of reciprocal translocations, a kind of DNA damage linked to both prior exposure and risk. In contrast to other biomarkers available, the frequency of reciprocal translocations in individuals exposed to whole-body radiation is stable with time post exposure, has a rather small inter-individual variability, and can be measured accurately at the low levels. Here, the authors discuss results from their studies demonstrating that chromosome painting can be used to reconstruct radiation dose for workers exposed within the dose limits, for individuals exposed a long time ago, and even for those who have been diagnosed with leukemia but not yet undergone therapy.

  14. Blue Nevus-Like Metastasis of a Cutaneous Melanoma Identified by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Campa, Molly; Patel, Mahir; Aubert, Pamela; Hosler, Gregory; Witheiler, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    A blue nevus-like melanoma is a rare melanoma variant arising from or histologically similar to a blue nevus. It can be challenging to distinguish a cellular blue nevus from a blue nevus-like melanoma, particularly in cases of blue nevus-like melanoma lacking a transition from a clearly benign component. We present a case of a 78-year-old man who refused treatment for a previously existing melanoma and subsequently developed a gray nodule near the site of the previous melanoma. After fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed copy number gains in RREB1, this was diagnosed as a blue nevus-like metastatic melanoma. Blue nevus-like metastatic melanoma is most commonly seen near the site of the primary cutaneous melanoma. This entity should be considered in a patient with a history of melanoma and a new blue nevus-like lesion. PMID:27097332

  15. Acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma: an immunohistochemical and fluorescence in situ hybridization study.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Naoto; Yamashita, Motoki; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki; Hes, Ondrej; Michal, Michal; Lee, Gang-Hong

    2011-12-01

    Acquired cystic disease (ACD)-associated renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been recently identified. However, there are only a few genetic studies to date. In this article, we performed an immunohistochemical and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) study for six cases including one case with sarcomatoid change. As a result, we observed frequent immunohistochemical expression of AMACR. FISH of chromosome 3 showed trisomy for three cases, monosomy for two cases, and disomy for one case. Additionally, FISH of chromosome 16 showed trisomy for three cases, monosomy for two cases, and both trisomy and monosomy for one case. Furthermore, both the carcinomatous area and the sarcomatoid area of one ACD-associated RCC with sarcomatoid change revealed monosomy of chromosomes 3, 9, and 16 but showed disomy of chromosome 14. In conclusion, the numerical abnormalities of chromosomes 3 and 16, irrespective of gain or loss, may be characteristic of ACD-associated RCC. PMID:22179186

  16. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping of single copy genes on Trichomonas vaginalis chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Zubáčová, Zuzana; Krylov, Vladimír; Tachezy, Jan

    2011-04-01

    The highly repetitive nature of the Trichomonas vaginalis genome and massive expansion of various gene families has caused difficulties in genome assembly and has hampered genome mapping. Here, we adapted fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for T. vaginalis, which is sensitive enough to detect single copy genes on metaphase chromosomes. Sensitivity of conventional FISH, which did not allow single copy gene detection in T. vaginalis, was increased by means of tyramide signal amplification. Two selected single copy genes, coding for serine palmitoyltransferase and tryptophanase, were mapped to chromosome I and II, respectively, and thus could be used as chromosome markers. This established protocol provides an amenable tool for the physical mapping of the T. vaginalis genome and other essential applications, such as development of genetic markers for T. vaginalis genotyping. PMID:21195113

  17. The design of a microscopic system for typical fluorescent in-situ hybridization applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Dingrong; Xie, Shaochuan

    2013-12-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a modern molecular biology technique used for the detection of genetic abnormalities in terms of the number and structure of chromosomes and genes. The FISH technique is typically employed for prenatal diagnosis of congenital dementia in the Obstetrics and Genecology department. It is also routinely used to pick up qualifying breast cancer patients that are known to be highly curable by the prescription of Her2 targeted therapy. During the microscopic observation phase, the technician needs to count typically green probe dots and red probe dots contained in a single nucleus and calculate their ratio. This procedure need to be done to over hundreds of nuclei. Successful implementation of FISH tests critically depends on a suitable fluorescent microscope which is primarily imported from overseas due to the complexity of such a system beyond the maturity of the domestic optoelectrical industry. In this paper, the typical requirements of a fluorescent microscope that is suitable for FISH applications are first reviewed. The focus of this paper is on the system design and computational methods of an automatic florescent microscopy with high magnification APO objectives, a fast spinning automatic filter wheel, an automatic shutter, a cooled CCD camera used as a photo-detector, and a software platform for image acquisition, registration, pseudo-color generation, multi-channel fusing and multi-focus fusion. Preliminary results from FISH experiments indicate that this system satisfies routine FISH microscopic observation tasks.

  18. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for the identification of Treponema pallidum in tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Petrich, Annett; Rojas, Pablo; Schulze, Julia; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Giacani, Lorenzo; Schneider, Thomas; Hertel, Moritz; Kikhney, Judith; Moter, Annette

    2015-10-01

    Syphilis is often called the great imitator because of its frequent atypical clinical manifestations that make the disease difficult to recognize. Because Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the infectious agent of syphilis, is yet uncultivated in vitro, diagnosis is usually made using serology; however, in cases where serology is inconclusive or in patients with immunosuppression where these tests may be difficult to interpret, the availability of a molecular tool for direct diagnosis may be of pivotal importance. Here we present a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay that simultaneously identifies and analyzes spatial distribution of T. pallidum in histological tissue sections. For this assay the species-specific FISH probe TPALL targeting the 16S rRNA of T. pallidum was designed in silico and evaluated using T. pallidum infected rabbit testicular tissue and a panel of non-syphilis spirochetes as positive and negative controls, respectively, before application to samples from four syphilis-patients. In a HIV positive patient, FISH showed the presence of T. pallidum in inguinal lymph node tissue. In a patient not suspected to suffer from syphilis but underwent surgery for phimosis, numerous T. pallidum cells were found in preputial tissue. In two cases with oral involvement, FISH was able to differentiate T. pallidum from oral treponemes and showed infection of the oral mucosa and tonsils, respectively. The TPALL FISH probe is now readily available for in situ identification of T. pallidum in selected clinical samples as well as T. pallidum research applications and animal models. PMID:26365167

  19. In situ detection of freshwater fungi in an alpine stream by new taxon-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Baschien, Christiane; Manz, Werner; Neu, Thomas R; Marvanová, Ludmila; Szewzyk, Ulrich

    2008-10-01

    New rRNA-targeting oligonucleotide probes permitted the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) identification of freshwater fungi in an Austrian second-order alpine stream. Based on computer-assisted comparative sequence analysis, nine taxon-specific probes were designed and evaluated by whole-fungus hybridizations. Oligonucleotide probe MY1574, specific for a wide range of Eumycota, and the genus (Tetracladium)-specific probe TCLAD1395, as well as the species-specific probes ALacumi1698 (Alatospora acuminata), TRIang322 (Tricladium angulatum), and Alongi340 (Anguillospora longissima), are targeted against 18S rRNA, whereas probes TmarchB10, TmarchC1_1, TmarchC1_2, and AlongiB16 are targeted against the 28S rRNA of Tetracladium marchalianum and Anguillospora longissima, respectively. After 2 weeks and 3 months of exposure of polyethylene slides in the stream, attached germinating conidia and growing hyphae of freshwater fungi were accessible for FISH. Growing hyphae and germinating conidia on leaves and in membrane cages were also visualized by the new FISH probes. PMID:18776035

  20. Partial trisomy 13q identified by sequential fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal Rao, V.V.N.; Carpenter, N.J.; Gucsavas, M.

    1995-07-31

    We report on a 19-month-old boy with partial trisomy 13q resulting from a probable balanced translocation involving chromosomes 1 and 13. The infant presented with omphalocele, malrotation, microcephaly with overriding skull bones, micrognathia, apparently low-set ears, rocker-bottom feet, and congenital heart disease, findings suggestive of trisomy 13. Karyotypic studies from peripheral blood lymphocytes documented an unbalanced karyotype 46,XY,-1,+der. The mother`s chromosomes were normal, and the father was not available. Conventional cytogenetic techniques were unable to identify the extra material on the terminal 1q. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on the GTL-banded metaphases, the extra material on 1q was identified as the terminal long arm of 13, thus resulting in partial trisomy 13 (q32-qter). 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Development of single-cell array for large-scale DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingru; Kirkland, Brett; Shirley, James; Wang, Zhibin; Zhang, Peipei; Stembridge, Jacquelyn; Wong, Wilson; Takebayashi, Shin-ichiro; Gilbert, David M.; Lenhert, Steven

    2013-01-01

    DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful cytogenetic assay, but conventional sample-preparation methods for FISH do not support large-scale high-throughput data acquisition and analysis, which are potentially useful for several biomedical applications. To address this limitation, we have developed a novel FISH sample-preparation method based on generating a centimetre-sized cell array, in which all cells are precisely positioned and separated from their neighbours. This method is simple and easy and capable of patterning nonadherent human cells. We have successfully performed DNA FISH on the single-cell arrays, which facilitate analysis of FISH results with the FISH-FINDER computer program. PMID:23370691

  2. High-resolution telomere fluorescence in situ hybridization reveals intriguing anomalies in germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Shekhani, Mohammed Talha; Barber, John R; Bezerra, Stephania M; Heaphy, Christopher M; Gonzalez Roibon, Nilda Diana; Taheri, Diana; Reis, Leonardo O; Guner, Gunes; Joshu, Corinne E; Netto, George J; Meeker, Alan K

    2016-08-01

    Testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) is the most common malignancy of young men. Most patients are completely cured, which distinguishes these from most other malignancies. Orchiectomy specimens (n=76) were evaluated using high-resolution (single-cell discriminative) telomere-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with simultaneous Oct4 immunofluorescence to describe telomere length phenotype in TGCT neoplastic cells. For the first time, the TGCT precursor lesion, germ cell neoplasia in situ (GCNIS) is also evaluated in depth. The intensity of the signals from cancerous cells was compared to the same patient's reference cells-namely, healthy germ cells (defined as "medium" length) and interstitial/somatic cells (defined as "short" telomere length). We observed short telomeres in most GCNIS and pure seminomas (P=.006 and P=.0005, respectively). In contrast, nonseminomas displayed longer telomeres. Lesion-specific telomere lengths were documented in mixed tumor cases. Embryonal carcinoma (EC) demonstrated the longest telomeres. A fraction of EC displays the telomerase-independent alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) phenotype (24% of cases). Loss of ATRX or DAXX nuclear expression was strongly associated with ALT; however, nuclear expression of both proteins was retained in half of ALT-positive ECs. The particular distribution of telomere lengths among TGCT and GCNIS precursors implicate telomeres anomalies in pathogenesis. These results may advise management decisions as well. PMID:27085557

  3. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization Allows Rapid Identification of Microorganisms in Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Volkhard A. J.; Trebesius, Karlheinz; Autenrieth, Ingo B.

    2000-01-01

    Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with rRNA-targeted fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes, pathogens were rapidly detected and identified in positive blood culture bottles without cultivation and biotyping. In this study, 115 blood cultures with a positive growth index as determined by a continuous-reading automated blood culture system were examined by both conventional laboratory methods and FISH. For this purpose, oligonucleotide probes that allowed identification of approximately 95% of those pathogens typically associated with bacteremia were produced. The sensitivity and specificity of these probes were 100%. From all 115 blood cultures, microorganisms were grown after 1 day and identification to the family, genus, or species level was achieved after 1 to 3 days while 111 samples (96.5%) were similarly identified by FISH within 2.5 h. Staphylococci were identified in 62 of 62 samples, streptococci and enterococci were identified in 19 of 20 samples, gram-negative rods were identified in 28 of 30 samples, and fungi were identified in two of two samples. Thus, FISH is an appropriate method for identification of pathogens grown in blood cultures from septicemic patients. PMID:10655393

  4. Chromosomal loci of 50 human keratinocyte cDNAs assigned by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Morishima, Yohich; Ariyama, Takeshi; Yamanishi, Kiyofumi

    1995-07-20

    The chromosomal loci of expressed genes provide useful information for a candidate gene approach to the genes responsible for genetic diseases. A large set of randomly isolated cDNAs catalogued by partial sequencing can serve as a resource for accessing and isolating these disease genes. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we examined the chromosomal loci of 217 human keratinocyte-derived cDNAs, with independent novel sequence tags at the 3{prime} end region. Among them, we determined the loci of 50 cDNAs. Single-pass sequencing of these from the 5{prime} ends indicated that 39 cDNAs still can be produced for new genes. These cDNAs with identified chromosomal loci are powerful tools that can be used to help elucidate the genes responsible for hereditary skin disorders. 42 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Determination of the ruminant origin of bone particles using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Lecrenier, M C; Ledoux, Q; Berben, G; Fumière, O; Saegerman, C; Baeten, V; Veys, P

    2014-01-01

    Molecular biology techniques such as PCR constitute powerful tools for the determination of the taxonomic origin of bones. DNA degradation and contamination by exogenous DNA, however, jeopardise bone identification. Despite the vast array of techniques used to decontaminate bone fragments, the isolation and determination of bone DNA content are still problematic. Within the framework of the eradication of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (including BSE, commonly known as "mad cow disease"), a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) protocol was developed. Results from the described study showed that this method can be applied directly to bones without a demineralisation step and that it allows the identification of bovine and ruminant bones even after severe processing. The results also showed that the method is independent of exogenous contamination and that it is therefore entirely appropriate for this application. PMID:25034259

  6. Three dimensional dual labelled DNA fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis in fixed tissue sections

    PubMed Central

    Kernohan, Kristin D.; Bérubé, Nathalie G.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging studies demonstrate that three-dimensional organization of chromatin in the nucleus plays a vital role in regulating the genome. DNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a common molecular technique used to visualize the location of DNA sequences. The vast majority of DNA FISH studies are conducted on cultured cells due to the technical difficulties encountered using fixed tissue sections. However, the use of cultured cells poses important limitations that could yield misleading results, making in vivo analysis a far superior approach. Here we present a protocol for multiplexed three dimensional DNA FISH in mouse brain sections, which is also applicable to other tissues. Paraffin-embedded tissues could be used but the embedding and preparation of the samples is time-consuming and often associated with poor antigenicity. To overcome this problem we:•developed a FISH technique using fixed, frozen cryosections;•provide specific instructions for tissue processing for proper fixation and freezing, including equilibration in sucrose gradients to maintain proper cellular structure;•include optimized permeabilization and washing steps to achieve specific signal and to limit background fluorescence in tissue sections. PMID:26150931

  7. X chromosome aneuploidy in infertile women: Analysis by interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.A.; Moix, I.; Mermillod, B.

    1994-09-01

    Up to 1 in 3 couples have a problem of infertility at some time in their lives. Sex chromosome anomalies are found in 5-10% of couples, with mosaic aneuploidy being a common finding in primary infertility. Recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA), in contrast, is frequently associated with autosomal structural anomalies. We hypothesized that low-level mosaic X chromosome aneuploidy was associated with primary infertility but not with RSA. Three groups were studied: women from couples with primary infertillity (n=26); women with three or more spontaneous abortions (n=22); and age-matched normally fertile women (at least two pregnancies; n=28). Interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to determine X chromosome ploidy in 100 nuclei per patient, using a contig of three cosmids from MAO locus (kindly donated by W. Berger, Nijmegen). A control probe (chr. 15 centromere) was simultaneously hybridized, and only nuclei containing two control signals were scored for the X chromosome. The mean numbers of nuclei with two X chromosome signals were the same in all groups (Welch equality of means test: p>0.97). However, there is a significant difference between the variances of the primary infertile and RSA groups (Levene`s test: p=0.025 after Bonferrone correction for multiple testing). This provides preliminary support for the hypothesis of an association between primary infertility and low-level mosaic X chromosome aneuploidy.

  8. Development of a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique for visualizing CGMMV in plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Shargil, D; Zemach, H; Belausov, E; Lachman, O; Kamenetsky, R; Dombrovsky, A

    2015-10-01

    Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV), which belongs to the genus Tobamovirus, is a major pathogen of cucurbit crops grown indoors and in open fields. Currently, immunology (e.g., ELISA) and molecular amplification techniques (e.g., RT-PCR) are employed extensively for virus detection in plant tissues and commercial seed lots diagnostics. In this study, a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, using oligonucleotides whose 5'-terminals were labeled with red cyanine 3 (Cy3) or green fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), was developed for the visualization of the pathogen in situ. This simple and reliable method allows detection and localization of CGMMV in the vegetative and reproductive tissues of cucumber and melon. When this technique was applied in male flowers, anther tissues were found to be infected; whereas the pollen grains were found to be virus-free. These results have meaningful epidemiological implications for the management of CGMMV, particularly with regard to virus transfer via seed and the role of insects as CGMMV vectors. PMID:26231788

  9. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) assessment of chromosome copy number in sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Sheu, M.; Sigman, M.; Mark, H.F.L.

    1994-09-01

    Approximately 15% of all recognized pregnancies end in spontaneous abortions. The overall frequency of chromosome abnormalities in spontaneous abortions is approximately 50%. Thus aneuploidy is a significant cause of fetal wastage. In addition, structural and numerical abnormalities of chromosomes can also lead to birth defects, developmental delay, mental retardation and infertility. Conventional cytogenetic analysis via GTG- and other banding techniques is a powerful tool in the elucidation of the nature of chromosomal abnormalities. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) enables detection of numerical chromosomal abnormalities, especially trisomies, in intact cells. Using FISH and commercially available biotin-labeled probes, we have initiated a prospective study to assess specific chromosome copy number of preparations of unstained smears from men referred for a male infertility evaluation as well as smears from normal control males chosen randomly from the sample of sperm donors. A total of approximately 19,000 sperm nuclei have been examined thus far. Of those suitable for analysis, 7382 (38.75%) were normal possessing one copy of chromosome 8, 155 (0.81%) were disomic, and 15 (0.079%) had more than two copies of chromosome 8. Comparisons with data available in the literature will be discussed. Work is ongoing to increase the efficiency of hybridization using both reported and previously untried pretreatment and fixation protocols. We have also initiated studies using multicolor FISH with various chromosome enumeration probes. The assay described here is a potentially powerful tool for detecting rare events such as spontaneous germ cell aneuploidy, aneuploidy detected in semen from men with carcinoma in situ of the testis and aneuploidy induced by potential environmental genotoxicants. It can also be utilized for segregation analysis and for correlating chromosome copy number with germ cell morphology.

  10. RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF CANDIDA ALBICANS DIRECTLY FROM YEAST POSITIVE BLOOD CULTURE BOTTLES BY FLUORESCENCE IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION USING PNA PROBES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for identification of Candida albicans directly from yeast-positive blood culture bottles is described. The test (C. albicans PNA FISH) is based on a fluorescein-labeled PNA probe targeting C. albicans 26...

  11. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for rapid identification of Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Alcaligenes faecalis recovered from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Wellinghausen, Nele; Wirths, Beate; Poppert, Sven

    2006-09-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is frequently isolated from the respiratory secretions of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, but identification with biochemical tests is unreliable. We describe fluorescence in situ hybridization assays for the rapid identification of Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Alcaligenes faecalis. Both assays showed high sensitivities and high specificities with a collection of 155 nonfermenters from CF patients. PMID:16954289

  12. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of hindgut bacteria associated with the development of equine laminitis.

    PubMed

    Milinovich, Gabriel J; Trott, Darren J; Burrell, Paul C; Croser, Emma L; Al Jassim, Rafat A M; Morton, John M; van Eps, Andrew W; Pollitt, Christopher C

    2007-08-01

    Carbohydrate-induced laminitis in horses is characterized by marked changes in the composition of the hindgut microbiota, from a predominantly Gram-negative population to one dominated by Gram-positive bacteria. The objective of this study was to monitor changes in the relative abundance of selected hindgut bacteria that have previously been implicated in the pathophysiology of equine laminitis using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Caecal cannulae were surgically implanted in five Standardbred horses and laminitis induced by oral administration of a bolus dose of oligofructose. Caecal fluid and faecal specimens were collected over a 48 h period at 2 to 4 h intervals post-oligofructose administration and subjected to FISH using probes specific for nine bacterial groups to determine changes in their relative abundance compared with total bacteria hybridizing to the generic EUBMIX probe. Additionally, hoof biopsies were taken over the course of the experiment at 6 h intervals and evaluated for histopathological changes consistent with laminitis, allowing changes in hindgut microbiota to be correlated with the onset of lesions in the foot. Of the microorganisms specifically targeted, streptococci of the Streptococcus bovis/equinus complex were the only bacteria that consistently proliferated in both caecal fluid and faeces immediately before the onset of histological signs of laminitis. Furthermore, lactobacilli, Enterobacteriaceae, Allisonella histaminiformans, enterococci, Bacteroides fragilis, Mitsuokella jalaludinii and Clostridium difficile did not establish significant populations in the hindgut before the onset of equine laminitis. PMID:17635552

  13. Calibration of interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization cutoff by mathematical models.

    PubMed

    Du, Qinghua; Li, Qingshan; Sun, Daochun; Chen, Xiaoyan; Yu, Bizhen; Ying, Yi

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) continues to play an important role in clinical investigations. Laboratories may create their own cutoff, a percentage of positive nuclei to determine whether a specimen is positive or negative, to eliminate false positives that are created by signal overlap in most cases. In some cases, it is difficult to determine the cutoff value because of differences in both the area of nuclei and the number of signals. To address these problems, we established two mathematical models using probability theory. To verify these two models, normal disomy cells from healthy individuals were used to simulate cells with different numbers of signals by hybridization with different probes. We used an X/Y probe to obtain the average distance between two signals and the probability of signal overlap in different nuclei area. Frequencies of all signal patterns were scored and compared with theoretical frequencies, and models were assessed using a goodness of fit test. We used five BCR/ABL1-positive samples, 20 BCR/ABL1-negative samples and two samples with ambiguous results to verify the cutoff calibrated by these two models. The models were in agreement with experimental results. The dynamic cutoff can classify cases in routine analysis correctly, and it can also correct for influences from nuclei area and the number of signals in some ambiguous cases. The probability models can be used to assess the effect of signal overlap and calibrate the cutoff. © 2015 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:26580488

  14. Fluorescence in situ hybridization in combination with the comet assay and micronucleus test in genetic toxicology

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Comet assay and micronucleus (MN) test are widely applied in genotoxicity testing and biomonitoring. While comet assay permits to measure direct DNA-strand breaking capacity of a tested agent MN test allows estimating the induced amount of chromosome and/or genome mutations. The potential of these two methods can be enhanced by the combination with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques. FISH plus comet assay allows the recognition of targets of DNA damage and repairing directly. FISH combined with MN test is able to characterize the occurrence of different chromosomes in MN and to identify potential chromosomal targets of mutagenic substances. Thus, combination of FISH with the comet assay or MN test proved to be promising techniques for evaluation of the distribution of DNA and chromosome damage in the entire genome of individual cells. FISH technique also permits to study comet and MN formation, necessary for correct application of these methods. This paper reviews the relevant literature on advantages and limitations of Comet-FISH and MN-FISH assays application in genetic toxicology. PMID:20840797

  15. Micro fluorescence in situ hybridization (μFISH) for spatially multiplexed analysis of a cell monolayer.

    PubMed

    Huber, D; Autebert, J; Kaigala, G V

    2016-04-01

    We here present a micrometer-scale implementation of fluorescence in situ hybridization that we term μFISH. This μFISH implementation makes use of a non-contact scanning probe technology, namely, a microfluidic probe (MFP) that hydrodynamically shapes nanoliter volumes of liquid on a surface with micrometer resolution. By confining FISH probes at the tip of this microfabricated scanning probe, we locally exposed approximately 1000 selected MCF-7 cells of a monolayer to perform incubation of probes - the rate-limiting step in conventional FISH. This method is compatible with the standard workflow of conventional FISH, allows re-budgeting of the sample for various tests, and results in a ~ 15-fold reduction in probe consumption. The continuous flow of probes and shaping liquid on these selected cells resulted in a 120-fold reduction of the hybridization time compared with the standard protocol (3 min vs. 6 h) and efficient rinsing, thereby shortening the total FISH assay time for centromeric probes. We further demonstrated spatially multiplexed μFISH, enabling the use of spectrally equivalent probes for detailed and real-time analysis of a cell monolayer, which paves the way towards rapid and automated multiplexed FISH on standard cytological supports. PMID:27138995

  16. In situ hybridization of phytoplankton using fluorescently labeled rRNA probes.

    PubMed

    Groben, René; Medlin, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Phytoplankton are one of the major components of ecosystem processes and play an important role in many biogeochemical cycles in the marine and freshwater environment. Despite their importance, many microalgae are poorly described and little is known of broad spatial and temporal scale trends in their abundance and distribution. Reasons for this are that microalgae are often small, lack distinct morphological features, and are unculturable, which make analyses difficult. It is now possible by using molecular biological techniques to advance our knowledge of aquatic biodiversity and to understand how biodiversity supports ecosystem structure, dynamics, and resilience. We present in this chapter a brief review of the progress that has been made in analyzing microalgae from populations to the species level. The described methods range from DNA fingerprinting techniques, such as random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), and simple sequence repeats (SSRs), to microsatellites, which are used in population studies, to sequence analysis, which help to reconstruct the evolutionary history of organisms and to examine relationships at various taxonomic levels. Special emphasis is given to the application of molecular probes for the identification and characterization of microalgal taxa. The fast and secure identification of phytoplankton, especially of toxic species, is important from an ecological and economical point of view and whole-cell hybridization with specific fluorochrome-labeled probes followed by fluorescence microscopy or flow cytometry offers a fast method for this purpose. In this context, we present a detailed protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) probes that can be applied to many algal cell types and discuss practical considerations of its use. PMID:15865974

  17. Multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization and comparative genomic hybridization reveal molecular events in lung adenocarcinomas and squamous cell lung carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hua; Gao, Wen; Wu, Yu-jie; Qiu, Hai-rong; Shu, Yong-qian

    2009-07-01

    We have used the molecular cytogenetic techniques of multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to analyze two established lung cancer cell lines (A549, H520), 80 primary lung adenocarcinoma samples and 80 squamous cell lung carcinoma samples in order to identify common chromosomal aberrations. M-FISH revealed numerous complex chromosomal rearrangements. Chromosomes 5, 6, 11, 12, and 17 were most frequently involved in interchromosomal translocations. CGH revealed regions on 1q, 2p, 3q, 5p, 5q, 7p, 8q, 11q, 12q, 14q, 16p, 17p, 19q, 20q, 21q and 22q to be commonly over-represented and regions on 2q, 3p, 4p, 5q, 7q, 8p, 9p, 13q, 14q, and 17p to be under-represented. In lung adenocarcinomas the most common gains were found in 16p13 (50%); while in squamous cell lung carcinomas the common gains were found in 17q21 (45%) and these alterations were observed to be associated with their specific pathological subtype. In conclusion, the present study contributes to the molecular biological characterization in lung adenocarcinomas and squamous cell lung carcinomas and through evaluation of molecular events to the recently emergent focus on novel markers for lung cancer treatment. PMID:18848758

  18. Development of a PNA Probe for Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Detection of Prorocentrum donghaiense

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guofu; Zhang, Chunyu; Zhang, Baoyu; Wang, Guangce; Lu, Douding; Xu, Zhong; Yan, Peishen

    2011-01-01

    Prorocentrum donghaiense is a common but dominant harmful algal bloom (HAB) species, which is widely distributed along the China Sea coast. Development of methods for rapid and precise identification and quantification is prerequisite for early-stage warning and monitoring of blooms due to P. donghaiense. In this study, sequences representing the partial large subunit rDNA (D1–D2), small subunit rDNA and internal transcribed spacer region (ITS-1, 5.8S rDNA and ITS-2) of P. donghaiense were firstly obtained, and then seven candidate DNA probes were designed for performing fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) tests on P. donghaiense. Based on the fluorescent intensity of P. donghaiense cells labeled by the DNA probes, the probe DP0443A displayed the best hybridization performance. Therefore, a PNA probe (PP0443A) analogous to DP0443A was used in the further study. The cells labeled with the PNA probe displayed more intensive green fluorescence than that labeled with its DNA analog. The PNA probe was used to hybridize with thirteen microalgae belonging to five families, i.e., Dinophyceae, Prymnesiophyceae, Raphidophyceae, Chlorophyceae and Bacillariophyceae, and showed no visible cross-reaction. Finally, FISH with the probes PP0443A and DP0443A and light microscopy (LM) analysis aiming at enumerating P. donghaiense cells were performed on the field samples. Statistical comparisons of the cell densities (cells/L) of P. donghaiense in the natural samples determined by FISH and LM were performed using one-way ANOVA and Duncan's multiple comparisons of the means. The P. donghaiense cell densities determined by LM and the PNA probe are remarkably higher than (p<0.05) that determined by the DNA probe, while no significant difference is observed between LM and the PNA probe. All results suggest that the PNA probe is more sensitive that its DNA analog, and therefore is promising for the monitoring of harmful algal blooms of P. donghaiense in the future. PMID:22022408

  19. Identification of pathogens in mastitis milk samples with fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Gey, Annerose; Werckenthin, Christiane; Poppert, Sven; Straubinger, Reinhard K

    2013-05-01

    Traditionally, the bacteriological examination of mastitis milk samples is performed by culture followed by biochemical tests on the cultured bacteria to allow identification of the causative pathogen. Depending on the species involved, this classic identification is time-consuming compared to other techniques such as fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), a culture-independent method that utilizes oligonucleotides (labeled with a fluorophore) that are specific to a string of target DNA/RNA. In the current study, the applicability of FISH was evaluated for the detection of mastitis pathogens directly in milk samples. To remove interfering lipids and proteins from mastitis milk samples prior to FISH, a previously published enzymatic treatment with savinase was evaluated. FISH was performed using oligonucleotides specific for Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus uberis, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Escherichia coli, and Trueperella (Arcanobacterium) pyogenes. The enzymatic pretreatment and the sensitivity of FISH were evaluated using spiked whole milk samples and mastitis milk samples with bacterial loads of less than 10(3) up to 10(8) colony-forming units (CFU)/ml. Bacteria were reliably detected in milk samples with bacterial numbers of 10(6) CFU/ml or higher. However, bacteria present in numbers below 10(6) CFU/ml were not detectable in all cases. The ability of FISH to identify mastitis-causing pathogens directly in milk samples, and therefore earlier than classical culture methods, can supplement the classic diagnostic procedures for mastitis milk samples. PMID:23632662

  20. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) Assays for Diagnosing Malaria in Endemic Areas

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jyotsna; Mark, Olivia; Weltman, Helena; Barcelo, Nicolas; Lo, Wai; Wronska, Danuta; Kakkilaya, Srinivas; Rao, Aravinda; Bhat, Shalia T.; Sinha, Ruchi; Omar, Sabah; Moro, Manuel; Gilman, Robert H.; Harris, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a responsible for approximately 600 thousand deaths worldwide every year. Appropriate and timely treatment of malaria can prevent deaths but is dependent on accurate and rapid diagnosis of the infection. Currently, microscopic examination of the Giemsa stained blood smears is the method of choice for diagnosing malaria. Although it has limited sensitivity and specificity in field conditions, it still remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of malaria. Here, we report the development of a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) based method for detecting malaria infection in blood smears and describe the use of an LED light source that makes the method suitable for use in resource-limited malaria endemic countries. The Plasmodium Genus (P-Genus) FISH assay has a Plasmodium genus specific probe that detects all five species of Plasmodium known to cause the disease in humans. The P. falciparum (PF) FISH assay and P. vivax (PV) FISH assay detect and differentiate between P. falciparum and P. vivax respectively from other Plasmodium species. The FISH assays are more sensitive than Giemsa. The sensitivities of P-Genus, PF and PV FISH assays were found to be 98.2%, 94.5% and 98.3%, respectively compared to 89.9%, 83.3% and 87.9% for the detection of Plasmodium, P. falciparum and P. vivax by Giemsa staining respectively. PMID:26333092

  1. MiL-FISH: Multilabeled Oligonucleotides for Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Improve Visualization of Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kleiner, Manuel; Wetzel, Silke; Liebeke, Manuel; Dubilier, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has become a vital tool for environmental and medical microbiology and is commonly used for the identification, localization, and isolation of defined microbial taxa. However, fluorescence signal strength is often a limiting factor for targeting all members in a microbial community. Here, we present the application of a multilabeled FISH approach (MiL-FISH) that (i) enables the simultaneous targeting of up to seven microbial groups using combinatorial labeling of a single oligonucleotide probe, (ii) is applicable for the isolation of unfixed environmental microorganisms via fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), and (iii) improves signal and imaging quality of tissue sections in acrylic resin for precise localization of individual microbial cells. We show the ability of MiL-FISH to distinguish between seven microbial groups using a mock community of marine organisms and its applicability for the localization of bacteria associated with animal tissue and their isolation from host tissues using FACS. To further increase the number of potential target organisms, a streamlined combinatorial labeling and spectral imaging-FISH (CLASI-FISH) concept with MiL-FISH probes is presented here. Through the combination of increased probe signal, the possibility of targeting hard-to-detect taxa and isolating these from an environmental sample, the identification and precise localization of microbiota in host tissues, and the simultaneous multilabeling of up to seven microbial groups, we show here that MiL-FISH is a multifaceted alternative to standard monolabeled FISH that can be used for a wide range of biological and medical applications. PMID:26475101

  2. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) of microorganisms in hydrocarbon contaminated aquifer sediment samples.

    PubMed

    Tischer, Karolin; Zeder, Michael; Klug, Rebecca; Pernthaler, Jakob; Schattenhofer, Martha; Harms, Hauke; Wendeberg, Annelie

    2012-12-01

    Groundwater ecosystems are the most important sources of drinking water worldwide but they are threatened by contamination and overexploitation. Petroleum spills account for the most common source of contamination and the high carbon load results in anoxia and steep geochemical gradients. Microbes play a major role in the transformation of petroleum hydrocarbons into less toxic substances. To investigate microbial populations at the single cell level, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is now a well-established technique. Recently, however, catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH has been introduced for the detection of microbes from oligotrophic environments. Nevertheless, petroleum contaminated aquifers present a worst case scenario for FISH techniques due to the combination of high background fluorescence of hydrocarbons and the presence of small microbial cells caused by the low turnover rates characteristic of groundwater ecosystems. It is therefore not surprising that studies of microorganisms from such sites are mostly based on cultivation techniques, fingerprinting, and amplicon sequencing. However, to reveal the population dynamics and interspecies relationships of the key participants of contaminant degradation, FISH is an indispensable tool. In this study, a protocol for FISH was developed in combination with cell quantification using an automated counting microscope. The protocol includes the separation and purification of microbial cells from sediment particles, cell permeabilization and, finally, CARD-FISH in a microwave oven. As a proof of principle, the distribution of Archaea and Bacteria was shown in 60 sediment samples taken across the contaminant plume of an aquifer (Leuna, Germany), which has been heavily contaminated with several ten-thousand tonnes of petroleum hydrocarbons since World War II. PMID:22425347

  3. Application of flow cytometry and fluorescent in situ hybridization for assessment of exposures to airborne bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Lange, J L; Thorne, P S; Lynch, N

    1997-01-01

    Current limitations in the methodology for enumeration and identification of airborne bacteria compromise the precision and accuracy of bioaerosol exposure assessment. In this study, flow cytometry and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were evaluated for the assessment of exposures to airborne bacteria. Laboratory-generated two-component bioaerosols in exposures chambers and complex native bioaerosols in swine barns were sampled with two types of liquid impingers (all-glass impinger-30 and May 3-stage impinger). Aliquots of collection media were processed and enumerated by a standard culture technique, microscopy, or flow cytometry after nucleic acid staining with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and identified taxonomically by FISH. DAPI-labeled impinger samples yielded comparable estimates of bioaerosol concentrations when enumerated by microscopy or flow cytometry. The standard culture method underestimated bioaerosol concentrations by 2 orders of magnitude when compared to microscopy or flow cytometry. In the FISH method, aliquots of collection media were incubated with a probe universally complementary to eubacteria, a probe specific for several Pseudomonas species, and a probe complementary to eubacteria for detection of nonspecific binding. With these probes, FISH allowed quantitative identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli bioaerosols in the exposure chamber without measurable nonspecific binding. Impinger samples from the swine barn demonstrated the efficacy of the FISH method for the identification of eubacteria in a complex organic dust. This work demonstrates the potential of emerging molecular techniques to complement traditional methods of bioaerosol exposure assessment. PMID:9097451

  4. Visualizing the Spatial Relationship of the Genome with the Nuclear Envelope Using Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Clements, Craig S; Bikkul, Ural; Ahmed, Mai Hassan; Foster, Helen A; Godwin, Lauren S; Bridger, Joanna M

    2016-01-01

    The genome has a special relationship with the nuclear envelope in cells. Much of the genome is anchored at the nuclear periphery, tethered by chromatin binding proteins such nuclear lamins and other integral membrane proteins. Even though there are global assays such as DAM-ID or ChIP to assess what parts of the genome are associated with the nuclear envelope, it is also essential to be able to visualize regions of the genome in order to reveal their individual relationships with nuclear structures in single cells. This is executed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in 2-dimensional flattened nuclei (2D-FISH) or 3-dimensionally preserved cells (3D-FISH) in combination with indirect immunofluorescence to reveal structural proteins. This chapter explains the protocols for 2D- and 3D-FISH in combination with indirect immunofluorescence and discusses options for image capture and analysis. Due to the nuclear envelope proteins being part of the non-extractable nucleoskeleton, we also describe how to prepare DNA halos through salt extraction and how they can be used to study genome behavior and association when combined with 2D-FISH. PMID:27147055

  5. Potential clinical impact of three-dimensional visualization for fluorescent in situ hybridization image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Li, Shibo; Bin, Zheng; Zhang, Roy; Li, Yuhua; Tian, Huimin; Chen, Wei; Liu, Hong

    2012-05-01

    Chromosomal translocation is strong indication of cancers. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) can effectively detect this translocation and achieve high accuracy in disease diagnosis and prognosis assessment. For this purpose, whole chromosome paint probes are utilized to image the configuration of DNA fragments. Although two-dimensional (2-D) microscopic images are typically used in FISH signal analysis, we present a case where the translocation occurs in the depth direction where two probed FISH signals are overlapped in the projected image plane. Thus, the translocation cannot be identified. However, when imaging the whole specimen with a confocal microscope at 27 focal planes with 0.5-μm step interval, the translocation can be clearly identified due to the free rotation capability by the three-dimensional (3-D) visualization. Such a translocation detection error of using 2-D images might be critical in detecting and diagnosing early or subtle disease cases where detecting a small number of abnormal cells can make diagnostic difference. Hence, the underlying implication of this report suggests that utilizing 3-D visualization may improve the overall accuracy of FISH analysis for some clinical cases. However, the clinical efficiency and cost of using 3-D versus 2-D imaging methods are also to be assessed carefully.

  6. Interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization signal detection by computing intensity variance along the optical axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Zheng, Bin; Ren, Liqiang; Liu, Hong

    2014-02-01

    Fluorescence in situ Hybridization technology is a commonly used tool to detect chromosome aberrations, which are often pathologically significant. Since manual FISH analysis is a tedious and time-consuming procedure, reliable and robust automated image acquisition and analysis are in demand. Under high magnification objective lenses such as 60x and 100x, the depth of field will often be too small and the FISH probes may not always lie in the same focal plane. A statistical variance based automated FISH analysis method is developed in order to address this problem. On a stack of slices at consecutive image planes with a step size d, the statistical variance alone the z-axis is calculated to form a 2-D matrix. Since pixels shift dramatically to high intensity at FISH probe location, the probes will manifest high peak values in the matrix. A computer-aided detection scheme based on top-hat transform is applied to the matrix to detect FISH probe signals. This study demonstrates a simple and robust method for FISH probe detection as well as a way of 2- D representation of 3-D data.

  7. Estimate of true incomplete exchanges using fluorescence in situ hybridization with telomere probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the frequency of true incomplete exchanges in radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Human lymphocytes were exposed to 2 Gy and 5 Gy of gamma-rays. Chromosome aberrations were studied using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with whole chromosome-specific probes, together with human telomere probes. Chromosomes 2 and 4 were chosen in the present study. RESULTS: The percentage of incomplete exchanges was 27% when telomere signals were not considered. After excluding false incomplete exchanges identified by the telomere signals, the percentage of incomplete exchanges decreased to 11%. Since telomere signals appear on about 82% of the telomeres, the percentage of true incomplete exchanges should be even lower and was estimated to be 3%. This percentage was similar for chromosomes 2 and 4 and for doses of both 2 Gy and 5 Gy. CONCLUSIONS: The percentage of true incomplete exchanges is significantly lower in gamma-irradiated human lymphocytes than the frequencies reported in the literature.

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of multiprobe fluorescence in situ hybridization data from tumor cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Russell

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Development and progression of solid tumors can be attributed to a process of mutations, which typically includes changes in the number of copies of genes or genomic regions. Although comparisons of cells within single tumors show extensive heterogeneity, recurring features of their evolutionary process may be discerned by comparing multiple regions or cells of a tumor. A useful source of data for studying likely progression of individual tumors is fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), which allows one to count copy numbers of several genes in hundreds of single cells. Novel algorithms for interpreting such data phylogenetically are needed, however, to reconstruct likely evolutionary trajectories from states of single cells and facilitate analysis of tumor evolution. Results: In this article, we develop phylogenetic methods to infer likely models of tumor progression using FISH copy number data and apply them to a study of FISH data from two cancer types. Statistical analyses of topological characteristics of the tree-based model provide insights into likely tumor progression pathways consistent with the prior literature. Furthermore, tree statistics from the resulting phylogenies can be used as features for prediction methods. This results in improved accuracy, relative to unstructured gene copy number data, at predicting tumor state and future metastasis. Availability: Source code for software that does FISH tree building (FISHtrees) and the data on cervical and breast cancer examined here are available at ftp://ftp.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pub/FISHtrees. Contact: sachowdh@andrew.cmu.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23812984

  9. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis by a new multiplex peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization method

    PubMed Central

    Machado, António; Castro, Joana; Cereija, Tatiana; Almeida, Carina

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is one of most common vaginal infections. However, its diagnosis by classical methods reveals low specificity. Our goal was to evaluate the accuracy diagnosis of 150 vaginal samples with research gold standard methods and our Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probes by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) methodology. Also, we described the first PNA-FISH methodology for BV diagnosis, which provides results in approximately 3 h. The results showed a sensitivity of 84.6% (95% confidence interval (CI), from 64.3 to 95.0%) and a specificity of 97.6% (95% CI [92.6–99.4%]), demonstrating the higher specificity of the PNA-FISH method and showing false positive results in BV diagnosis commonly obtained by the classical methods. This methodology combines the specificity of PNA probes for Lactobacillus species and G. vaginalis visualization and the calculation of the microscopic field by Nugent score, allowing a trustful evaluation of the bacteria present in vaginal microflora and avoiding the occurrence of misleading diagnostics. Therefore, the PNA-FISH methodology represents a valuable alternative for BV diagnosis. PMID:25737820

  10. Does polyomavirus infection interfere with bladder cancer fluorescence in situ hybridization?

    PubMed

    Hossain, Deloar; Hull, David; Kalantarpour, Fatemeh; Maitlen, Rebecca; Qian, Junqi; Bostwick, David G

    2014-03-01

    Urine cytology is a proven and widely used screening tool for the detection of urothelial carcinoma. However, morphologic features of polyomavirus infected cells, characterized by nuclear inclusions (decoy cells) are a known source of diagnostic confusion with malignancy. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is now routinely used to support the cytological diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma and monitor for recurrence. We sought to determine whether polyomavirus infection could result in positive FISH results (aneuploidy). This study deals with retrospective study of 100 polyomavirus-infected urine samples from patients with no history of urothelial carcinoma or organ transplantation. All cases were stained with Papanicolaou and acid hematoxylin stain. One slide from each sample was de-stained and FISH was performed using chromosome enumeration probes 3, 7, 17, and locus-specific probe 9p21. Adequate cells for FISH analysis (25 cells) were present in 81 cases; 19 cases were insufficient due to loss of cells during de-staining and FISH preparation process. All polyomavirus-infected cells (decoy cells) exhibited a normal chromosome pattern. Four cases were FISH positive, but there were no positive decoy cells. Decoy cells did not exhibit aneuploidy by FISH. The presence of decoy cells does not exclude the possibility of concurrent urothelial carcinoma. Acid hematoxylin stain appeared to supplement the Papanicolou stain in identifying and confirming the presence of polyomavirus infection. PMID:24006232

  11. Spatial genome organization: contrasting views from chromosome conformation capture and fluorescence in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Iain; Berlivet, Soizik; Eskeland, Ragnhild; Boyle, Shelagh; Illingworth, Robert S.; Paquette, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Although important for gene regulation, most studies of genome organization use either fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) or chromosome conformation capture (3C) methods. FISH directly visualizes the spatial relationship of sequences but is usually applied to a few loci at a time. The frequency at which sequences are ligated together by formaldehyde cross-linking can be measured genome-wide by 3C methods, with higher frequencies thought to reflect shorter distances. FISH and 3C should therefore give the same views of genome organization, but this has not been tested extensively. We investigated the murine HoxD locus with 3C carbon copy (5C) and FISH in different developmental and activity states and in the presence or absence of epigenetic regulators. We identified situations in which the two data sets are concordant but found other conditions under which chromatin topographies extrapolated from 5C or FISH data are not compatible. We suggest that products captured by 3C do not always reflect spatial proximity, with ligation occurring between sequences located hundreds of nanometers apart, influenced by nuclear environment and chromatin composition. We conclude that results obtained at high resolution with either 3C methods or FISH alone must be interpreted with caution and that views about genome organization should be validated by independent methods. PMID:25512564

  12. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis by a new multiplex peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization method.

    PubMed

    Machado, António; Castro, Joana; Cereija, Tatiana; Almeida, Carina; Cerca, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is one of most common vaginal infections. However, its diagnosis by classical methods reveals low specificity. Our goal was to evaluate the accuracy diagnosis of 150 vaginal samples with research gold standard methods and our Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probes by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) methodology. Also, we described the first PNA-FISH methodology for BV diagnosis, which provides results in approximately 3 h. The results showed a sensitivity of 84.6% (95% confidence interval (CI), from 64.3 to 95.0%) and a specificity of 97.6% (95% CI [92.6-99.4%]), demonstrating the higher specificity of the PNA-FISH method and showing false positive results in BV diagnosis commonly obtained by the classical methods. This methodology combines the specificity of PNA probes for Lactobacillus species and G. vaginalis visualization and the calculation of the microscopic field by Nugent score, allowing a trustful evaluation of the bacteria present in vaginal microflora and avoiding the occurrence of misleading diagnostics. Therefore, the PNA-FISH methodology represents a valuable alternative for BV diagnosis. PMID:25737820

  13. Microfluidic fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry (µFlowFISH)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Meagher, Robert J.; Light, Yooli Kim; Yilmaz, Suzan; Chakraborty, Romy; Arkin, Adam P.; Hazen, Terry C.; Singh, Anup K.

    2011-01-01

    We describe an integrated microfluidic device (µFlowFISH) capable of performing 16S rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) followed by flow cytometric detection for identifying bacteria in natural microbial communities. The device was used for detection of species involved in bioremediation of Cr(VI) and other metals in groundwater samples from a highly-contaminated environmental site (Hanford, WA, USA). The µFlowFISH seamlessly integrates two components: a hybridization chamber formed between two photopolymerized membranes, where cells and probes are electrophoretically loaded, incubated and washed; and a downstream cross structure for electrokinetically focusing cells into a single-file flow for flow cytometry analysis. The device is capable of analyzing a wide variety of bacteria including aerobic, facultative and anaerobic bacteria and was initially tested and validated using cultured microbes, including Escherichia coli, as well as two strains isolated from Hanford site: Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain RCH1, and Pseudomonas sp. strain RCH2 that are involved in Cr(VI) reduction and immobilization. Combined labeling and detection efficiencies of 74–97% were observed in experiments with simple mixtures of cultured cells confirmed specific labeling. Results obtained were in excellent agreement with those obtained by conventional flow cytometry confirming the accuracy of µFlowFISH. Finally, the device was used for analyzing water samples collected on different dates from the Hanford Site. We were able to monitor the numbers of Pseudomonas sp. with only 100–200 cells loaded into the microchip. The µFlowFISH approach provides an automated platform for quantitative detection of microbial cells from complex samples, and is ideally suited for analysis of precious samples with low cell numbers such as those found at extreme environmental niches, bioremediation sites, and the human microbiome. PMID:21755095

  14. Comparative cytogenetic characterization of primary canine melanocytic lesions using array CGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Poorman, Kelsey; Borst, Luke; Moroff, Scott; Roy, Siddharth; Labelle, Philippe; Motsinger-Reif, Alison; Breen, Matthew

    2015-06-01

    Melanocytic lesions originating from the oral mucosa or cutaneous epithelium are common in the general dog population, with up to 100,000 diagnoses each year in the USA. Oral melanoma is the most frequent canine neoplasm of the oral cavity, exhibiting a highly aggressive course. Cutaneous melanocytomas occur frequently, but rarely develop into a malignant form. Despite the differential prognosis, it has been assumed that subtypes of melanocytic lesions represent the same disease. To address the relative paucity of information about their genomic status, molecular cytogenetic analysis was performed on the three recognized subtypes of canine melanocytic lesions. Using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis, highly aberrant distinct copy number status across the tumor genome for both of the malignant melanoma subtypes was revealed. The most frequent aberrations included gain of dog chromosome (CFA) 13 and 17 and loss of CFA 22. Melanocytomas possessed fewer genome wide aberrations, yet showed a recurrent gain of CFA 20q15.3-17. A distinctive copy number profile, evident only in oral melanomas, displayed a sigmoidal pattern of copy number loss followed immediately by a gain, around CFA 30q14. Moreover, when assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), copy number aberrations of targeted genes, such as gain of c-MYC (80 % of cases) and loss of CDKN2A (68 % of cases), were observed. This study suggests that in concordance with what is known for human melanomas, canine melanomas of the oral mucosa and cutaneous epithelium are discrete and initiated by different molecular pathways. PMID:25511566

  15. Fifty probands with extra structurally abnormal chromosomes characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, E.; Telenius, H.; Nordenskjoeld, M.

    1995-01-02

    Extra structurally abnormal chromosomes (ESACs) are small supernumerary chromosomes often associated with developmental abnormalities and malformations. We present 50 probands with ESACs characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization using centromere-specific probes and chromosome-specific libraries. ESAC-specific libraries were constructed by flow sorting and subsequent amplification by DOP-PCR. Using such ESAC-specific libraries we were able to outline the chromosome regions involved. Twenty-three of the 50 ESACs were inverted duplications of chromosome 15 (inv dup(15)), including patients with normal phenotypes and others with similar clinical symptoms. These 2 groups differed in size and shape of the inv dup(15). Patients with a large inv dup(15), which included the Prader-Willi region, had a high risk of abnormality, whereas patients with a small inv dup(15), not including the Prader-Willi region, were normal. ESACs derived from chromosomes 13 or 21 appeared to have a low risk of abnormality, while one out of 3 patients with an ESAC derived from chromosome 14 had discrete symptoms. One out of 3 patients with an ESAC derived from chromosome 22 had severe anomalies, corresponding to some of the manifestations of the cat eye syndrome. Small extra ring chromosomes of autosomal origin and ESACs identified as i(12p) or i(18p) were all associated with a high risk of abnormality. 42 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Metallographic in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Powell, Richard D; Pettay, James D; Powell, William C; Roche, Patrick C; Grogan, Thomas M; Hainfeld, James F; Tubbs, Raymond R

    2007-08-01

    Metallographic methods, in which a target is visualized using a probe or antibody that deposits metal selectively at its binding site, offers many advantages for bright-field in situ hybridization (ISH) detection as well as for other labeling and detection methods. Autometallographically enhanced gold labeling procedures have demonstrated higher sensitivity than conventional enzyme chromogens. Enzyme metallography, a novel procedure in which an enzymatic probe is used to deposit metal directly from solution, has been used to develop bright-field ISH methods for HER2 gene determination in breast cancer and other biopsy specimens. It provides the highest level of sensitivity and resolution, both for visualizing endogenous gene copies in nonamplified tissues and for resolving multiple gene copies to allow copy enumeration in amplified tissues without the need for oil immersion or fluorescence optics. An automated enzyme metallography procedure, silver ISH, has been developed for use in slide-staining instruments. Metallographic staining also provides excellent results for immunohistochemistry and may be combined with other staining procedures for the simultaneous detection of more than one gene or combinations of genes and proteins. PMID:17640553

  17. An extended fluorescence in situ hybridization approach for the cytogenetic study of cholangiocarcinoma on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography brushing cytology preparations.

    PubMed

    Vasilieva, Larisa E; Papadhimitriou, Stefanos I; Alexopoulou, Alexandra; Pavlidis, Dimitris; Kostopoulos, Ioannis; Georgiakaki, Maria; Xinopoulos, Dimitrios; Romanos, Andreas; Dourakis, Spyridon P

    2013-10-01

    The cytological diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma has been significantly aided by applying a 4-probe fluorescence in situ hybridization system on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography brushing smears, aiming mainly at the detection of hyperdiploidy. However, this approach adds little to our understanding of the genetic background of the disease. With the prospect of obtaining additional data on chromosomal aberrations, we have extended the fluorescence in situ hybridization study, with the application of 4 independent 2-probe systems in 35 patients with documented cholangiocarcinoma. Fluorescence in situ hybridization assays were performed on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography brushing smears, with probes for the 7q31, 11q13 (CCND1), 17p53 (TP53), and 9p21 (INK4 locus) bands, together with the respective centromeric probe. Hyperdiploidy, involving at least 2 of the 4 chromosomes targeted, was found in 31 patients. 17p13 deletion was detected in 3, and 9p21 deletion, in 5 of the hyperdiploid cases, with the 2 aberrations concurrent in 1. CCND1 amplification was found in 1 case as the sole abnormality and in another together with hyperdiploidy, but in apparently unrelated clones. This work indicates that interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization is a practical and useful tool for the cytogenetic study of cholangiocarcinoma on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography brushing smears, which is often the only available tissue specimen of the tumor. Apart from hyperdiploidy, it provides additional data on the genetic profile of cholangiocarcinoma, especially regarding structural chromosomal aberrations and clonal diversity. This line of investigation may prove useful in the delineation of oncogenesis and the interpretation of the diverse clinical features of the disease. PMID:23845469

  18. ERBB2 amplification in breast cancer analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Kallioniemi, O P; Kallioniemi, A; Kurisu, W; Thor, A; Chen, L C; Smith, H S; Waldman, F M; Pinkel, D; Gray, J W

    1992-01-01

    We illustrate the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for analysis of ERBB2 oncogene copy number, the level of amplification (here defined as the ratio of ERBB2 copy number to copy number of chromosome 17 centromeres), and the distribution of amplified genes in breast cancer cell lines and uncultured primary breast carcinomas. The relative ERBB2 copy number determined by FISH in 10 breast cancer cell lines correlated strongly with Southern blot results (r = 0.98) when probes for an identical reference locus were used in the two methods. Metaphase analysis of cell lines showed that amplified ERBB2 copies always occurred in intrachromosomal clusters but that the number and chromosomal location of these clusters varied among the cell lines. In interphase nuclei of primary tumors showing ERBB2 amplification (10/44), ERBB2 copies were seen as one to four clusters, also suggesting intrachromosomal localization. Regardless of the average level of amplification, all these tumors contained highly amplified cell subpopulations with at least 25, and sometimes more than 100, ERBB2 copies per cell. Tumors that did not show amplification by FISH (34/44) had an average of one to five ERBB2 copies scattered randomly in the nuclei and completely lacked cells with high copy levels. FISH results on primary tumors were concordant with slot blot results on amplification and with immunohistochemical detection of overexpression. Quantitative analysis of ERBB2 amplification by FISH may improve prognostic assessments based on the pattern of amplification and detection of heavily amplified tumor cell subpopulations. Images PMID:1351679

  19. Visualization of the mycelia of wood-rotting fungi by fluorescence in situ hybridization using a peptide nucleic acid probe.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Yuji; Nakaba, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Hiroshi; Funada, Ryo; Yoshida, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    White rot fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and brown rot fungus, Postia placenta, grown on agar plates, were visualized by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe. Mycelia grown on wood chips were also clearly detected by PNA-FISH following blocking treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the visualization of fungi in wood by FISH. PMID:23391931

  20. Localization of the human OB gene (OBS) to chromosome 7q32 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Geffroy, S.; Duban, B.; Martinville, B. de

    1995-08-10

    An important gene involved in the pathogenesis of obesity is the product of the human homologue of the murine obese gene (gene symbol OBS). Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), we have localized the human OB gene to human chromosome 7, specifically to region 7q32.1. The FISH data of human OBS provide a gene-associated marker for genetic mapping. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization investigation of potentially pathogenic bacteria involved in neonatal porcine diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neonatal diarrhea is a multifactorial condition commonly present on pig farms and leads to economic losses due to increased morbidity and mortality of piglets. Immature immune system and lack of fully established microbiota at birth predispose neonatal piglets to infection with enteric pathogens. The microorganisms that for decades have been associated with enteritis and diarrhea in suckling piglets are: rotavirus A, coronavirus, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), Clostridium perfringens type C, Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia spp., Cystoisospora suis and Strongyloides ransomi. However, in recent years, the pig industry has experienced an increased number of neonatal diarrhea cases in which the above mentioned pathogens are no longer detected. Potentially pathogenic bacteria have recently received focus in the research on the possible etiology of neonatal diarrhea not caused by common pathogens. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the role of E. coli, Enterococcus spp., C. perfringens and C. difficile in the pathogenesis of neonatal porcine diarrhea with no established casual agents. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with oligonucleotide probes was applied on the fixed intestinal tissue samples from 51 diarrheic and 50 non-diarrheic piglets collected from four Danish farms during outbreaks of neonatal diarrhea not caused by well-known enteric pathogens. Furthermore, an association between the presence of these bacteria and histological lesions was evaluated. Results The prevalence of fluorescence signals specific for E. coli, C. perfringens and C. difficile was similar in both groups of piglets. However, Enterococcus spp. was primarily detected in the diarrheic piglets. Furthermore, adherent bacteria were detected in 37 % diarrheic and 14 % non-diarrheic piglets. These bacteria were identified as E. coli and Enterococcus spp. and their presence in the intestinal mucosa was associated with histopathological changes. Conclusions The

  2. Simple Adhesive-Tape-Based Sampling of Tomato Surfaces Combined with Rapid Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Salmonella Detection▿

    PubMed Central

    Bisha, Bledar; Brehm-Stecher, Byron F.

    2009-01-01

    A simple adhesive-tape-based method for sampling of tomato surfaces was combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization for rapid culture-independent detection of Salmonella strains. Tapes could also be placed face-down on selective agar for on-tape enrichment of captured Salmonella cells. Overlay of cell-charged tapes with small volumes of liquid enrichment media enabled subsequent detection of tape-captured Salmonella via flow cytometry. PMID:19124588

  3. Multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to analyze multispecies oral biofilms.

    PubMed

    Karygianni, Lamprini; Hellwig, Elmar; Al-Ahmad, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) constitutes a favorable microbiological method for the analysis of spatial distribution of highly variable phenotypes found in multispecies oral biofilms. The combined use of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) produces high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) images of individual bacteria in their natural environment. Here, we describe the application of M-FISH on early (Streptococcus spp., Actinomyces naeslundii) and late colonizers (Fusobacterium nucleatum, Veillonella spp.) of in situ-formed oral biofilms, the acquisition of CLSM images, as well as the qualitative and quantitative analysis of these digitally obtained and processed images. PMID:24664826

  4. Observation and Quantification of Telomere and Repetitive Sequences Using Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) with PNA Probes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Seo, Beomseok; Lee, Junho

    2016-01-01

    Telomere is a ribonucleoprotein structure that protects chromosomal ends from aberrant fusion and degradation. Telomere length is maintained by telomerase or an alternative pathway, known as alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT)(1). Recently, C. elegans has emerged as a multicellular model organism for the study of telomere and ALT(2). Visualization of repetitive sequences in the genome is critical in understanding the biology of telomeres. While telomere length can be measured by telomere restriction fragment assay or quantitative PCR, these methods only provide the averaged telomere length. On the contrary, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can provide the information of the individual telomeres in cells. Here, we provide protocols and representative results of the method to determine telomere length of C. elegans by fluorescent in situ hybridization. This method provides a simple, but powerful, in situ procedure that does not cause noticeable damage to morphology. By using fluorescently labeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) and digoxigenin-dUTP-labeled probe, we were able to visualize two different repetitive sequences: telomere repeats and template of ALT (TALT) in C. elegans embryos and gonads. PMID:27583462

  5. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis is a helpful test for the diagnosis of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans.

    PubMed

    Karanian, Marie; Pérot, Gaëlle; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Chibon, Frédéric; Pedeutour, Florence; Neuville, Agnès

    2015-02-01

    Cytogenetically, most dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans are characterized by chromosomal rearrangements resulting in the collagen type-1 alpha 1 (COL1A1)-platelet-derived growth factor β (PDGFB) fusion gene. This abnormality can be detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis in routine practice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the FISH analysis in the diagnosis of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans. A FISH analysis was prospectively and systematically performed on a series of 448 consecutive tumor specimens. All cases were reviewed by two independent pathologists and classified in three categories according to the probability of a DFSP diagnosis before molecular analyses. Cases were classified as certain when dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans was the only possible diagnosis. Those cases for which dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans remained the first diagnosis, but other differential diagnosis existed, were regarded as probable. When dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans was considered a differential diagnosis, they were labeled as possible. The final diagnosis was supported by clinicopathological findings and results of FISH analyses. Immunohistochemical analysis of CD34 was systematically performed, and additional markers when necessary. The cases (n=37) with a non-interpretable FISH were excluded. For the 185 certain tumors specimens: 178 (96%) FISH analyses showed a PDGFB/COL1A1 rearrangement, 7 (4%) were negative. For the 114 probable tumors specimens: 104 (91%) FISH analyses were positive and 10 (9%) were negative leading to a new diagnosis in 8 cases. For the 112 possible cases: 91 (81%) FISH analyses were negative and 21 (19%) were positive. Of the 21 cases, initial diagnoses included unclassified sarcoma, myxofibrosarcoma, dermatofibroma, reactive lesion, solitary fibrous tumor, perineurioma, benign nerve sheath tumor, and undifferentiated spindle cell tumor without malignant evidence. FISH analysis has been helpful for confirming the

  6. Identification of triclosan-degrading bacteria using stable isotope probing, fluorescence in situ hybridization and microautoradiography.

    PubMed

    Lolas, Ihab Bishara; Chen, Xijuan; Bester, Kai; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund

    2012-11-01

    Triclosan is considered a ubiquitous pollutant and can be detected in a wide range of environmental samples. Triclosan removal by wastewater treatment plants has been largely attributed to biodegradation processes; however, very little is known about the micro-organisms involved. In this study, DNA-based stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP) combined with microautoradiography-fluorescence in situ hybridization (MAR-FISH) was applied to identify active triclosan degraders in an enrichment culture inoculated with activated sludge. Clone library sequences of 16S rRNA genes derived from the heavy DNA fractions of enrichment culture incubated with (13)C-labelled triclosan showed a predominant enrichment of a single bacterial clade most closely related to the betaproteobacterial genus Methylobacillus. To verify that members of the genus Methylobacillus were actively utilizing triclosan, a specific probe targeting the Methylobacillus group was designed and applied to the enrichment culture incubated with (14)C-labelled triclosan for MAR-FISH. The MAR-FISH results confirmed a positive uptake of carbon from (14)C-labelled triclosan by the Methylobacillus. The high representation of Methylobacillus in the (13)C-labelled DNA clone library and its observed utilization of (14)C-labelled triclosan by MAR-FISH reveal that these micro-organisms are the primary consumers of triclosan in the enrichment culture. The results from this study show that the combination of SIP and MAR-FISH can shed light on the networks of uncultured micro-organisms involved in degradation of organic micro-pollutants. PMID:22956759

  7. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Melanoma Diagnosis: A Review and a Reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Gerardo; De Vanna, Anna Chiara

    2016-04-01

    Although conventional histopathological examination is the undisputable mainstay for the diagnosis of melanocytic skin neoplasms, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has the potential to provide important information to morphologically challenging cases. The standard melanoma FISH test targeting RREB1 (6p25), MYB (6q23), CCND1 (11q13), and centromere 6 is an effective compromise between cost, technical complexity, and sensitivity. The authors use the standard FISH-positivity as a tie-breaker for challenging melanocytic neoplasms mainly in a non-Spitzoid morphologic context because the currently available test leaves several unresolved issues: namely, a relatively low diagnostic accuracy in morphologically ambiguous melanocytic neoplasms; a relatively low sensitivity and specificity in Spitzoid neoplasms; and the occurrence of false positives due to tetraploidy in Spitz nevi and in nevi with an atypical epithelioid component. Under investigation is currently a new melanoma probe cocktail targeting RREB1 (6p25), C-MYC (8q24), CDKN2A (9p21), and CCND1 (11q13). However, CDKN2A is a significant parameter only if lost in homozygosis, and this complicates the interpretation of the results. Furthermore, the new melanoma probe cocktail has been tested on cases of atypical Spitzoid proliferations with fatal outcomes which at present are too few to allow definite conclusions. The authors propose the implementation of a FISH algorithm (standard 4-probe test followed by either C-MYC or CDKN2A/centromere 9) to assist the histopathological diagnosis and minimize the technical problems. Nevertheless, because the diagnostic accuracy of the FISH technique is far from being absolute, the overall clinicopathological context must always guide the decision-making process about the management of morphobiologically ambiguous melanocytic proliferations. PMID:26999337

  8. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization: A New Tool for the Direct Identification and Detection of F. psychrophilum

    PubMed Central

    Strepparava, Nicole; Wahli, Thomas; Segner, Helmut; Polli, Bruno; Petrini, Orlando

    2012-01-01

    F. psychrophilum is the causative agent of Bacterial Cold Water Disease (BCW) and Rainbow Trout Fry Syndrome (RTFS). To date, diagnosis relies mainly on direct microscopy or cultural methods. Direct microscopy is fast but not very reliable, whereas cultural methods are reliable but time-consuming and labor-intensive. So far fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) has not been used in the diagnosis of flavobacteriosis but it has the potential to rapidly and specifically detect F. psychrophilum in infected tissues. Outbreaks in fish farms, caused by pathogenic strains of Flavobacterium species, are increasingly frequent and there is a need for reliable and cost-effective techniques to rapidly diagnose flavobacterioses. This study is aimed at developing a FISH that could be used for the diagnosis of F. psychrophilum infections in fish. We constructed a generic probe for the genus Flavobacterium (“Pan-Flavo”) and two specific probes targeting F. psychrophilum based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. We tested their specificity and sensitivity on pure cultures of different Flavobacterium and other aquatic bacterial species. After assessing their sensitivity and specificity, we established their limit of detection and tested the probes on infected fresh tissues (spleen and skin) and on paraffin-embedded tissues. The results showed high sensitivity and specificity of the probes (100% and 91% for the Pan-Flavo probe and 100% and 97% for the F. psychrophilum probe, respectively). FISH was able to detect F. psychrophilum in infected fish tissues, thus the findings from this study indicate this technique is suitable as a fast and reliable method for the detection of Flavobacterium spp. and F. psychrophilum. PMID:23152887

  9. Cytogenetic abnormality in patients with multiple myeloma analyzed by fluorescent in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ying; Chen, Wenming; Chen, Shilun; Huang, Zhongxia

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) data and the association with clinical characteristics, therapy response, and survival time in patients with multiple myeloma. Method We performed a retrospective review of patients with multiple myeloma from November 2010 to April 2014. Results Cytogenetic abnormalities by FISH were detectable in 66% of patients. One cytogenetic abnormality, two cytogenetic abnormalities, and complex abnormalities were detectable in 21.2%, 51.5%, and 27.3% of cases, respectively. 1q21 amplification, t(4p16.3/14q32), and 17p deletion were observed in 69.7%, 30.3%, and 21.2% of cases, respectively. Total response rates (complete response [CR] + near CR + partial response) were 93.8% and 82.1%, respectively, in cytogenetic normality group and abnormality group. CR rates were 50% and 32.1%, respectively. Median overall survival (OS) time was 51 months and 24 months, respectively, in cytogenetic normality group and abnormality group (P<0.05). Median OS time was not significantly different between 1q21 amplification group and no 1q21 amplification group in patients with FISH abnormalities (P>0.05). Median OS time was not significantly different between t(4;14) group and no t(4;14) group in patients with FISH abnormalities (P>0.05). Seven patients of 17p deletion died in 2 years. Conclusion Multiple myeloma is characterized by a high occurrence of chromosomal aberrations. 1q21 amplification and t(4;14) are the most common abnormalities. Multiple cytogenetic abnormalities are frequently observed in the same one patient. The total response rate, CR rate, and OS time are worse in cytogenetic abnormal patients compared with cytogenetic normal patients. Patients with 17p deletion have a very poor prognosis. Future goals of therapy will be to achieve minimal residual disease, biomarkers, and genomic data, which might provide a better estimate of the depth of response to therapy and OS. PMID:27042105

  10. Direct visualization of the novel pathogen, Spiroplasma eriocheiris, in the freshwater crayfish Procambarus clarkii (Girard) using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Ding, Z F; Xia, S Y; Xue, H; Tang, J Q; Ren, Q; Gu, W; Meng, Q G; Wang, W

    2015-09-01

    Spiroplasma eriocheiris is the first spiroplasma strain known to be pathogenic to freshwater crustaceans. It has caused considerable economic losses both in the freshwater crayfish Procambarus clarkii (Girard) and in some other crustaceans. The monitoring of the pathogen in crustacean populations and study of its behaviour in the laboratory require the development of reliable diagnostic tools. In this article, we improved microscopic identification of S. eriocheiris by combining in situ hybridization with specific fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes. The established fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) allowed simultaneous visualization, identification and localization of S. eriocheiris in the tissues of diseased crayfish P. clarkii and exhibited low background autofluorescence and ideal signal-to-noise ratio. With the advantages of better tissue penetration, potentially more specific and stable, we designed three species-specific oligonucleotide probes utilizing the sequences of 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions (ISRs) of S. eriocheiris. Positive hybridization signals were visualized in haemocytes and connective tissues of hepatopancreas, cardiac muscle and gill from diseased crayfish. This unique distribution pattern matched the pathological changes when diagnosed by H&E staining and indicated that S. eriocheiris probably spread throughout the tissues in P. clarkii by hemokinesis. This assay will facilitate our understanding of the pathogenesis of S. eriocheiris and enhance the early diagnosis of the novel pathogen. PMID:25167936

  11. [A Case of Xp.11.2 Traslocational Renal Cell Carcinoma Diagnosed by Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (FISH)].

    PubMed

    Iinuma, Koji; Kojima, Keitaro; Okamoto, Kiyohisa; Yuhara, Kazuya

    2016-08-01

    A 72-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with complaints of macro-hematuria. The radiographic evaluation including computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suggested it to be renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in her right kidney. She underwent laparoscopic nephrectomy. We diagnosed her with renal cell carcinoma associated with Xp11.2 translocation/TFE3 gene fusion, based on pathological findings and break apart of transcription factor E3 (TFE3)by fluorescence in situ hybridization. She was free of recurrence at 8 months postoperatively. PMID:27624107

  12. Efficiency of fluorescence in situ hybridization for bacterial cell identification in temporary river sediments with contrasting water content.

    PubMed

    Fazi, Stefano; Amalfitano, Stefano; Pizzetti, Ilaria; Pernthaler, Jakob

    2007-09-01

    We studied the efficiency of two hybridization techniques for the analysis of benthic bacterial community composition under varying sediment water content. Microcosms were set up with sediments from four European temporary rivers. Wet sediments were dried, and dry sediments were artificially rewetted. The percentage of bacterial cells detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization with fluorescently monolabeled probes (FISH) significantly increased from dry to wet sediments, showing a positive correlation with the community activity measured via incorporation of (3)H leucine. FISH and signal amplification by catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD-FISH) could significantly better detect cells with low activity in dried sediments. Through the application of an optimized cell permeabilization protocol, the percentage of hybridized cells by CARD-FISH showed comparable values in dry and wet conditions. This approach was unrelated to (3)H leucine incorporation rates. Moreover, the optimized protocol allowed a significantly better visualization of Gram-positive Actinobacteria in the studied samples. CARD-FISH is, therefore, proposed as an effective technique to compare bacterial communities residing in sediments with contrasting water content, irrespective of differences in the activity state of target cells. Considering the increasing frequencies of flood and drought cycles in European temporary rivers, our approach may help to better understand the dynamics of microbial communities in such systems. PMID:17452089

  13. QUANTITATIVE IMAGING AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF FLUORESCENCE IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION (FISH) OF AUREOBASIDIUM PULLULANS. (R823845)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Image and multifactorial statistical analyses were used to evaluate the intensity of fluorescence signal from cells of three strains of A. pullulans and one strain of Rhodosporidium toruloides, as an outgroup, hybridized with either a universal o...

  14. Improved signal recognition for interphase fluorescent in-situ hybridization using a non-ionic detergent (NP-40) pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, H.M.; Day-Salvatore, D.L.; Sciorra, L.J.

    1994-09-01

    We have reported that the non-ionic detergent ethylphenolpoly (ethyleneglycolether)x known as Noniet-P40 (Shell International Petroleum) can gently disrupt cell membranes, resulting in cells with varying degrees of free chromatin release. The extent of this phenomena is dependent upon the concentration of NP-40 and the detergent`s exposure time to the cells. Treated cells can range from halos of DNA around the cells to fully extended free chromatin configurations. We have demonstrated that these treated cells are excellent targets for many different fluorescently labelled probes used for in situ hybridization studies. Recently, we have compared NP-40 harvested lymphocytes with normally harvested cells to see if we could improve upon the number of cells showing discreet signals in interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization. Preliminary work has shown that using a trisomy 21 cell line, one can get a statistically significant improvement with NP-40 pretreatment cells over control levels, in the number of cells having three discreet signals in interphase {open_quotes}FISH{close_quotes}. Such a pretreatment is simple to perform and may be of value when the number of cells available for analysis is low, as in the search for fetal cells from maternal circulation.

  15. Fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques (FISH) to detect changes in CYP19a gene expression of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    SciTech Connect

    Park, June-Woo; Tompsett, Amber; Zhang, Xiaowei; Newsted, John L.; Jones, Paul D.; Au, Doris; Kong, Richard; Wu, Rudolf S.S.; Giesy, John P. Hecker, Markus

    2008-10-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a sensitive in situ hybridization methodology using fluorescence-labeled riboprobes (FISH) that allows for the evaluation of gene expression profiles simultaneously in multiple target tissues of whole fish sections of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). To date FISH methods have been limited in their application due to autofluorescence of tissues, fixatives or other components of the hybridization procedure. An optimized FISH method, based on confocal fluorescence microscopy was developed to reduce the autofluorescence signal. Because of its tissue- and gender-specific expression and relevance in studies of endocrine disruption, gonadal aromatase (CYP19a) was used as a model gene. The in situ hybridization (ISH) system was validated in a test exposure with the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole. The optimized FISH method revealed tissue-specific expression of the CYP19a gene. Furthermore, the assay could differentiate the abundance of CYP19a mRNA among cell types. Expression of CYP19a was primarily associated with early stage oocytes, and expression gradually decreased with increasing maturation. No expression of CYP19a mRNA was observed in other tissues such as brain, liver, or testes. Fadrozole (100 {mu}g/L) caused up-regulation of CYP19a expression, a trend that was confirmed by RT-PCR analysis on excised tissues. In a combination approach with gonad histology, it could be shown that the increase in CYP19a expression as measured by RT-PCR on a whole tissue basis was due to a combination of both increases in numbers of CYP19a-containing cells and an increase in the amount of CYP19a mRNA present in the cells.

  16. The human tissue transglutaminase gene maps on chromosome 20q12 by in situ fluorescence hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, V.; Davies, P.J.A. ); Baldini, A. )

    1994-03-15

    A cDNA encoding for the human tissue transglutaminase gene has been used to identify the chromosomal localization of the corresponding structural gene. The precise chromosomal and subregional localizations have been established by using in situ fluorescence mapping with a recombinant [lambda]-Zap phage containing the full cDNA coding sequence. The study showed that the human tissue transglutaminase gene is localized on chromosome 20 and, more precisely, within the band 20q12. To date, this is the third member of the transglutaminase gene family to be mapped. Human factor XIIIa (plasma transglutaminase), human keratinocyte transglutaminase (type I), and human tissue transglutaminase (type II) genes, although codifying for homologous enzymes, are localized on three different chromosomes. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Thick-section fluorescence in situ hybridization on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded archival tissue provides a histogenetic profile.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, C. T.; LeBoit, P. E.; Nederlof, P. M.; Gray, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization has become a major tool for analysis of gene and chromosome copy number in normal and malignant tissue. The technique has been applied widely to fresh tissue and dispersed formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded archival tissue, but its use on sections of archival tissue has largely been limited to sections < 6 mu thick. This does not provide intact, uncut nuclei for accurate analysis of gene or chromosome copy number. We report here a method of hybridization to sections > 20 microns thick that overcomes these difficulties. Key developments were the use of DNA probes directly labeled with fluorochromes and optical sectioning using laser-scanning confocal microscopy. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8311111

  18. Towards a cellular multi-parameter analysis platform: fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on microhole-array chips.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Christian M; Moosdijk, Stefan V D; Thielecke, Hagen; Velten, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Highly-sensitive analysis systems based on cellular multi-parameter are needed in the diagnostics. Therefore we improved our previously developed chip platform for another additional analysis method, the fluorescence in situ hybridization. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a technique used in the diagnostics to determine the localization and the presence or absence of specific DNA sequence. To improve this labor- and cost-intensive method, we reduced the assay consumption by a factor of 5 compared to the standard protocol. Microhole chips were used for making the cells well addressable. The chips were fabricated by semiconductor technology on the basis of a Silicon wafer with a thin deposited silicon nitride layer (Si(3)N(4)). Human retina pigment epithelia (ARPE-19) cells were arrayed on 5-μm holes of a 35 × 35 microhole-array by a gently negative differential pressure of around 5 mbar. After 3 hours of incubation the cells were attached to the chip and the FISH protocol was applied to the positioned cells. A LabView software was developed to simplify the analysis. The software automatically counts the number of dots (positive labeled chromosome regions) as well as the distance between adjacent dots. Our developed platform reduces the assay consumption and the labor time. Furthermore, during the 3 hours of incubation non-invasive or minimal-invasive methods like Raman- and impedance-spectroscopy can be applied. PMID:22256298

  19. Direct fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes using quantum dot-platinum labeled DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Gyoyeon; Lee, Hansol; Lee, Jiyeon

    2015-11-13

    The telomere shortening in chromosomes implies the senescence, apoptosis, or oncogenic transformation of cells. Since detecting telomeres in aging and diseases like cancer, is important, the direct detection of telomeres has been a very useful biomarker. We propose a telomere detection method using a newly synthesized quantum dot (QD) based probe with oligonucleotide conjugation and direct fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). QD-oligonucleotides were prepared with metal coordination bonding based on platinum-guanine binding reported in our previous work. The QD-oligonucleotide conjugation method has an advantage where any sequence containing guanine at the end can be easily bound to the starting QD-Pt conjugate. A synthesized telomeric oligonucleotide was bound to the QD-Pt conjugate successfully and this probe hybridized specifically on the telomere of fabricated MV-4-11 and MOLT-4 chromosomes. Additionally, the QD-telomeric oligonucleotide probe successfully detected the telomeres on the CGH metaphase slide. Due to the excellent photostability and high quantum yield of QDs, the QD-oligonucleotide probe has high fluorescence intensity when compared to the organic dye-oligonucleotide probe. Our QD-oligonucleotide probe, conjugation method of this QD probe, and hybridization protocol with the chromosomes can be a useful tool for chromosome painting and FISH. PMID:26449454

  20. Fluorescence in situ hybridizations (FISH) for the localization of viruses and endosymbiotic bacteria in plant and insect tissues.

    PubMed

    Kliot, Adi; Kontsedalov, Svetlana; Lebedev, Galina; Brumin, Marina; Cathrin, Pakkianathan Britto; Marubayashi, Julio Massaharu; Skaljac, Marisa; Belausov, Eduard; Czosnek, Henryk; Ghanim, Murad

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a name given to a variety of techniques commonly used for visualizing gene transcripts in eukaryotic cells and can be further modified to visualize other components in the cell such as infection with viruses and bacteria. Spatial localization and visualization of viruses and bacteria during the infection process is an essential step that complements expression profiling experiments such as microarrays and RNAseq in response to different stimuli. Understanding the spatiotemporal infections with these agents complements biological experiments aimed at understanding their interaction with cellular components. Several techniques for visualizing viruses and bacteria such as reporter gene systems or immunohistochemical methods are time-consuming, and some are limited to work with model organisms and involve complex methodologies. FISH that targets RNA or DNA species in the cell is a relatively easy and fast method for studying spatiotemporal localization of genes and for diagnostic purposes. This method can be robust and relatively easy to implement when the protocols employ short hybridizing, commercially-purchased probes, which are not expensive. This is particularly robust when sample preparation, fixation, hybridization, and microscopic visualization do not involve complex steps. Here we describe a protocol for localization of bacteria and viruses in insect and plant tissues. The method is based on simple preparation, fixation, and hybridization of insect whole mounts and dissected organs or hand-made plant sections, with 20 base pairs short DNA probes conjugated to fluorescent dyes on their 5' or 3' ends. This protocol has been successfully applied to a number of insect and plant tissues, and can be used to analyze expression of mRNAs or other RNA or DNA species in the cell. PMID:24637389

  1. Detection of aneuploidy in sperm of an ataxia telangiectasia patient using three-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, X.R.; Baulch, J.E.; Arnheim, N.

    1994-09-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is an inherited, recessive, cancer-prone disorder. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with DNA probes specific for three chromosomes was applied to sperm of an A-T patient to determine if there may be an increased germinal risk for aneuploidy. Air-dried sperm smears were treated with proteinase K and were decondensed with DTT and LIS. The slides were then hybridized with fluorescently labeled repetitive DNA probes specific for chromosomes X, Y and 8, and a total of 11,825 sperm cells were scored. The ratio of sperm bearing X-8 and Y-8 was 1:1, as predicted. The frequencies of hyperhaploidy were 3.9, 1.0, 17.6 and 7.8 per 10,000 cells for categories X-X-8, Y-Y-8, X-Y-8 and 8-8-(X or Y), respectively, In addition, the frequency of diploidy (X-Y-8-8) was 18.6 and auto-diploidies (X-X-8-8 and Y-Y-8-8) were 1.0 and 2.0, respectively. These frequencies were not significantly different when compared with levels in healthy men (p > 0.1). Our finding suggests that chromosome X, Y and 8 aneuploidies are not elevated in the sperm of A-T patients, but studies with additional patients and chromosomes are needed.

  2. Diagnostics of common microdeletion syndromes using fluorescence in situ hybridization: single center experience in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Kurtovic-Kozaric, Amina; Mehinovic, Lejla; Stomornjak-Vukadin, Meliha; Kurtovic-Basic, Ilvana; Catibusic, Feriha; Kozaric, Mirza; Mesihovic-Dinarevic, Senka; Hasanhodzic, Mensuda; Glamuzina, Darinka

    2016-01-01

    Microdeletion syndromes are caused by chromosomal deletions of less than 5 megabases which can be detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We evaluated the most commonly detected microdeletions for the period from June 01, 2008 to June 01, 2015 in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, including DiGeorge, Prader-Willi/Angelman, Wolf-Hirschhorn, and Williams syndromes. We report 4 patients with DiGeorge syndromes, 4 patients with Prader-Willi/Angelman, 4 patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, and 3 patients with Williams syndrome in the analyzed 7 year period. Based on the positive FISH results for each syndrome, the incidence was calculated for the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. These are the first reported frequencies of the microdeletion syndromes in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. PMID:26937776

  3. Diagnostics of common microdeletion syndromes using fluorescence in situ hybridization: Single center experience in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Kurtovic-Kozaric, Amina; Mehinovic, Lejla; Stomornjak-Vukadin, Meliha; Kurtovic-Basic, Ilvana; Catibusic, Feriha; Kozaric, Mirza; Dinarevic, Senka Mesihovic; Hasanhodzic, Mensuda; Sumanovic-Glamuzina, Darinka

    2016-01-01

    Microdeletion syndromes are caused by chromosomal deletions of less than 5 megabases which can be detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We evaluated the most commonly detected microdeletions for the period from June 01, 2008 to June 01, 2015 in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, including DiGeorge, Prader-Willi/Angelman, Wolf-Hirschhorn, and Williams syndromes. We report 4 patients with DiGeorge syndromes, 4 patients with Prader-Willi/Angelman, 4 patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, and 3 patients with Williams syndrome in the analyzed 7 year period. Based on the positive FISH results for each syndrome, the incidence was calculated for the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. These are the first reported frequencies of the microdeletion syndromes in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. PMID:26937776

  4. Use of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Rapid Identification of Staphylococci in Blood Culture Samples Collected in a Portuguese Hospital ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Ana; Inácio, João; Melo-Cristino, José; Couto, Isabel

    2008-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used for the direct identification of staphylococci in blood cultures collected at a Portuguese hospital where staphylococci account for up to 35% of clinically relevant blood cultures. The assay was able to detect the presence/absence of staphylococci and distinguish Staphylococcus aureus from coagulase-negative staphylococci in 4.5 h. PMID:18562589

  5. Identification and characterization of marker chromosomes, de novo rearrangements and microdeletions in 100 cases with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.M.; Liu, Y.; Papenhausen, P.R.

    1994-09-01

    Results of molecular cytogenetic analysis are presented for 100 cases in which fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used as an adjunct to standard cytogenetics. Commercially available centromeric, telomeric, chromosome painting and unique sequence probes were used. Cases were from a 12-month period (June 1993-May 1994) and included examples of sex chromosome abnormalities (8), duplications (5), de novo translocations (6), satellited (12) and non-satellited (7) markers, and microdeletion syndromes (62). Satellited marker chromosomes were evaluated using a combination of DAPI/Distamycin A staining, hybridization with a classical satellite probe for chromosome 15 and hybridization with alpha-satellite probes for chromosomes 13, 14, 21 and 22. Markers positive for the chromosome 15 probe were further evaluated using unique sequence probes for the Prader-Willi/Angelman region. Microdeletion analysis was performed for Prader-Willi/Angelman (49) and DiGeorge/VCF (13) syndromes. Seven cases evaluated for Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome demonstrated evidence of a deletion within this region. Uniparental disomy analysis was available in cases where a deletion was not detected by FISH, yet follow-up was clinically indicated. Two cases evaluated for DiGeorge/VCF syndrome demonstrated molecular evidence of a deletion. Included in our analysis is an example of familial DiGeorge syndrome.

  6. Rapid sex determination on buccal smears using DNA probes and fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Giraldez, R.A.; Harris, C.

    1994-09-01

    Hybridization of dual-labeled DNA probes for the repetitive sequences on the X and Y chromosomes allows a fast, non-invasive, more reliable method for sex determination that current cytogenetic Barr body and Y chromatin assays. Scrapes of squamous epithelial cells were collected from the oral cavity of 14 subjects (5{male}, 9{female}) and smeared onto silanized slides. The smears were allowed to air dry. Samples were blinded and then fixed in 50% methanol/50% glacial acetic acid for 10 minutes, and allowed to dry. The slides were incubated in a pretreatment solution containing 30% sodium bisulfite at 45{degrees}C for 10 minutes. They were rinsed in 2XSSC pH 7.0 and then dehydrated through a series of 70%, 85%, and 100% ethanols at room temperature and allowed to air dry. A probe mixture (30 {mu}L containing 10 ng/{mu}L biotin-labeled DXZ1 and digoxigenin-labeled DYZ1/DYZ3 in 70% Formamide/2XSSC) was aliquoted onto each slide, coverslipped, and sealed with rubber cement. Probe and target DNA were simultaneously denatured at 72{degrees}C on a slide warmer for 6 minutes. Probe was allowed to hybridize overnight in a humidified chamber at 37{degrees}C. Slides were postwashed at 72{degrees}C in 0.5xSSC pH 7.0 for 5 minutes, then soaked at room temperature 1XPBD for 2 minutes, and detected with rhodamine/anti-digoxigenin-FITC/avidin for 15 minutes at 37{degrees}C. Slides were soaked 3X in 1XPBD and then counterstained with 15 {mu}L 0.05 {mu}g/mL DAP1/Antifade. 200 nuclei were scored for the presence of one green (X), two green (XX), one green and one red (XY), or a single red (Y) signal, using a fluorescent microscope equipped with a triple band pass filter. Greater than 90% of the hybridized nuclei from each of the 14 cases studied conformed to the sex chromosome pattern. The modal number in 9 cases showed two green signals (XX), and a green and a red signal (XY) in the other 5 cases; this was in complete agreement with the cytogenetic results.

  7. Visualization and quantification of archaeal and bacterial metabolically active cells in soil using fluorescence in situ hybridization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Mikhail; Manucharova, Natalia; Stepanov, Alexey

    2015-04-01

    The method of in situ hybridization using fluorescent labeled 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes (FISH - fluorescence in situ hybridization) combines identification and quantification of groups of microorganisms at different phylogenetic levels, from domain to species. The FISH method enables to study the soil microbial community in situ, avoiding plating on nutrient media, and allows to identify and quantify living, metabolically active cells of Bacteria and Archaea. The full procedure consists of the following steps: desorption of the cells from the soil particles, fixation of cells, coating a fixed sample on the glass slide, hybridization with the specific probes and, finally, microscopic observation and cell counting. For the FISH analysis of Bacteria and Archaea, the paraformaldehyde-fixed samples were hybridized with Cy3-labeled Archaea-specific probe(Arc915) and 6-carboxyfluorescein (FAM)-labeled Bacteria-specific probe(EUB338). When a molecular probe is incorporated into a cell, it can hybridize solely with a complementary rRNA sequence. The hybridization can be visualized under the fluorescent microscope and counted. The application of FISH will be demonstrated by the abundance of metabolically active cells of Archaea and Bacteria depending on soil properties, depth and land use. The research was carried out at field and natural ecosystems of European part of Russia. Samples were collected within the soil profiles (3-6 horizons) of Chernozem and Kastanozem with distinct land use. Quantification of metabolically active cells in virgin and arable Chernozem revealed that the abundance of Archaea in topsoil of virgin Chernozem was doubled as compared with arable soil, but it leveled off in the deeper horizons. Plowing of Chernozem decreased an amount of archaeal and bacterial active cells simultaneously, however, Bacteria were more resistant to agrogenic impact than Archaea. In Kastanozem, a significant change in the abundance of metabolically active

  8. Directly incorporating fluorochromes into DNA probes by PCR increases the efficience of fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmer, Joy

    1996-05-01

    The object of this study was to produce a directly labeled whole chromosome probe in a Degenerative Oligonucleotide Primed-Polymerase Chain Reaction (DOP-PCR) that will identify chromosome breaks, deletions, inversions and translocations caused by radiation damage. In this study we amplified flow sorted chromosome 19 using DOP-PCR. The product was then subjected to a secondary DOP PCR amplification, After the secondary amplification the DOP-PCR product was directly labeled in a tertiary PCR reaction with rhodamine conjugated with dUTP (FluoroRed) to produce a DNA fluorescent probe. The probe was then hybridized to human metaphase lymphocytes on slides, washed and counterstained with 4{prime},6-diamino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). The signal of the FluoroRed probe was then compared to a signal of a probe labeled with biotin and stained with avidin fluorescein isothio cynate (FITC) and anti-avidin FITC. The results show that the probe labeled with FluoroRed gave signals as bright as the probe with biotin labeling. The FluoroRed probe had less noise than the biotin labeled probe. Therefore, a directly labeled probe has been successfully produced in a DOP-PCR reaction. In future a probe labeled with FluoroRed will be produced instead of a probe labeled with biotin to increase efficiency.

  9. Rapid prenatal diagnosis of chromosomal aneuploidies by fluorescence in situ hybridization: Clinical experience with 4,500 specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, B.E.; Gersen, S.L.; Carelli, M.P.; McGuire, N.M.; Dackowski, W.R.; Klinger, K.W. ); Weinstein, M. ); Sandlin, C. ); Klinger, K.W. )

    1993-05-01

    Detection of chromosome aneuploidies in uncultured amniocytes is possible using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The authors herein describe the results of the first clinical program which utilized FISH for the rapid detection of chromosome aneuploidies in uncultured amniocytes. FISH was performed on physician request, as an adjunct to cytogenetics in 4,500 patients. Region-specific DNA probes to chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X, and Y were used to determine ploidy by analysis of signal number in hybridized nuclei. A sample was considered to be euploid when all autosomal probes generated two hybridization signals and when a normal sex chromosome pattern was observed in greater than or equal to 80% of hybridized nuclei. A sample was considered to be aneuploid when greater than or equal to 70% of hybridized nuclei displayed the same abnormal hybridization pattern for a specific probe. Of the attempted analyses, 90.2% met these criteria and were reported as informative to referring physicians within 2 d of receipt. Based on these reporting parameters, the overall detection rate for aneuploidies was 73.3% (107/146), with an accuracy of informative results for aneuploidies of 93.9% (107/114). Compared to cytogenetics, the accuracy of all informative FISH results, euploid and aneuploid, was 99.8%, and the specificity was 99.9%. In those pregnancies where fetal abnormalities had been observed by ultrasound, referring physicians requested FISH plus cytogenetics at a significantly higher rate than they requested cytogenetics alone. The current prenatal FISH protocol is not designed to detect all chromosome abnormalities and should only be utilized as an adjunctive test to cytogenetics. This experience demonstrates that FISH can provide a rapid and accurate clinical method for prenatal identification of chromosome aneuploidies. 40 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.,

  10. Rapid prenatal diagnosis of chromosomal aneuploidies by fluorescence in situ hybridization: clinical experience with 4,500 specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, B E; Gersen, S L; Carelli, M P; McGuire, N M; Dackowski, W R; Weinstein, M; Sandlin, C; Warren, R; Klinger, K W

    1993-01-01

    Detection of chromosome aneuploidies in uncultured amniocytes is possible using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We herein describe the results of the first clinical program which utilized FISH for the rapid detection of chromosome aneuploidies in uncultured amniocytes. FISH was performed on physician request, as an adjunct to cytogenetics in 4,500 patients. Region-specific DNA probes to chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X, and Y were used to determine ploidy by analysis of signal number in hybridized nuclei. A sample was considered to be euploid when all autosomal probes generated two hybridization signals and when a normal sex chromosome pattern was observed in greater than or equal to 80% of hybridized nuclei. A sample was considered to be aneuploid when greater than or equal to 70% of hybridized nuclei displayed the same abnormal hybridization pattern for a specific probe. Of the attempted analyses, 90.2% met these criteria and were reported as informative to referring physicians within 2 d of receipt. Based on these reporting parameters, the overall detection rate for aneuploidies was 73.3% (107/146), with an accuracy of informative results for aneuploidies of 93.9% (107/114). Compared to cytogenetics, the accuracy of all informative FISH results, euploid and aneuploid, was 99.8%, and the specificity was 99.9%. In those pregnancies where fetal abnormalities had been observed by ultrasound, referring physicians requested FISH plus cytogenetics at a significantly higher rate than they requested cytogenetics alone. The current prenatal FISH protocol is not designed to detect all chromosome abnormalities and should only be utilized as an adjunctive test to cytogenetics. This experience demonstrates that FISH can provide a rapid and accurate clinical method for prenatal identification of chromosome aneuploidies. PMID:8488836

  11. Determination of HER2 amplification in primary breast cancer using dual-colour chromogenic in situ hybridization is comparable to fluorescence in situ hybridization: a European multicentre study involving 168 specimens

    PubMed Central

    García-Caballero, Tomás; Grabau, Dorthe; Green, Andrew R; Gregory, John; Schad, Arno; Kohlwes, Elke; Ellis, Ian O; Watts, Sarah; Mollerup, Jens

    2010-01-01

    García-Caballero T, Grabau D, Green A R, Gregory J, Schad A, Kohlwes E, Ellis I O, Watts S & Mollerup J (2010) Histopathology56, 472–480 Determination of HER2 amplification in primary breast cancer using dual-colour chromogenic in situ hybridization is comparable to fluorescence in situ hybridization: a European multicentre study involving 168 specimens Aims: Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can be used to reveal several genomic imbalances relevant to proper cancer diagnosis and to the correct treatment regime. However, FISH requires expensive and advanced fluorescence microscopes in addition to expertise in fluorescence microscopy. To determine whether a newly developed dual-colour chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) method is a suitable alternative to FISH, we analysed the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 gene (HER2) amplification level of 168 breast cancer specimens using dual-colour CISH and FISH and compared the results. Methods and results: We found 100% agreement between HER2 status determined by FISH and dual-colour CISH. Furthermore, we observed that the time used to score slides was significantly reduced by 28% in dual-colour CISH compared with the FISH protocol. Concordance between HER2 protein status and dual-colour CISH or FISH was equally good with an overall agreement of 96.8%. Correlation between the HER2/centromere 17 gene ratios obtained with dual-colour CISH and FISH was highly significant with an overall correlation coefficient (ρ) of 0.96. Conclusions: We conclude that dual-colour CISH and bright field microscopy are excellent alternatives to FISH when analysing the HER2 status of primary breast cancer. PMID:20459554

  12. Visualization of sporopollenin-containing pathogenic green micro-alga Prototheca wickerhamii by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Ueno, Ryohei

    2009-04-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using taxon-specific, rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes is one of the most powerful tools for the rapid identification of harmful microorganisms. However, eukaryotic algal cells do not always allow FISH probes to permeate over their cell walls. Members of the pathogenic micro-algal genus Prototheca are characterized by their distinctive cell-wall component, sporopollenin, an extremely tough biopolymer that resists acid and alkaline hydrolysis, enzyme attack, and acetolysis. To our knowledge, there has been no report of the successful permeation by the oligonucleotide probes over the cell walls of unicellular green micro-algae, which contain sporopollenin. The DNA probes passed through the cell wall of Prototheca wickerhamii after treating the algal cells with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Most cells in the middle logarithmic growth phase culture fluoresced when hybridized with the rRNA-targeted universal probe for eukaryotes, though individual cells included in this culture differed in the level of cell-wall vulnerability to attack by the polysaccharide-degrading enzyme, thus reflecting the different stages of the life cycle. This is the first report regarding the visualization of sporopollenin-containing, green micro-algal cells by FISH. PMID:19396247

  13. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Progress report, April 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1993-03-04

    Genetic mapping is approached using the techniques of high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This technology and the results of its application are designed to rapidly generate whole genome as tool box of expressed sequence to speed the identification of human disease genes. The results of this study are intended to dovetail with and to link the results of existing technologies for creating backbone YAC and genetic maps. In the first eight months, this approach generated 60--80% of the expressed sequence map, the remainder expected to be derived through more long-term, labor-intensive, regional chromosomal gene searches or sequencing. The laboratory has made significant progress in the set-up phase, in mapping fetal and adult brain and other cDNAs, in testing a model system for directly linking genetic and physical maps using FISH with small fragments, in setting up a database, and in establishing the validity and throughput of the system.

  14. Design and application of two oligonucleotide probes for the identification of Geodermatophilaceae strains using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Urzì, Clara; La Cono, Violetta; Stackebrandt, Erko

    2004-07-01

    Bacteria of the family of Geodermatophilaceae are actively involved in the decay processes [Urzì, C. and Realini, M. (1998) Int Biodeterior Biodegrad 42: 45-54; Urzì, C., Salamone, P., Schumann, P., and Stackebrandt, E. (2000) Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 50: 529-536] of stone monuments. Characterization of isolates includes phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genetic analysis often requiring long-term procedures. The use of specific probes for members of Geodermatophilaceae family could be useful for the easy detection of those strains colonizing rock surfaces and involved in the biodeterioration. Two 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were designed for the specific detection of members of the family Geodermatophilaceae using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH); one probe specific for members of the two genera Geodermatophilus/Blastococcus and the second for members of the genus Modestobacter. PMID:15186346

  15. Chromosome analysis of nuclear power plant workers using fluorescence in situ hybridization and Giemsa assay

    PubMed Central

    Hristova, Rositsa; Hadjidekova, Valeria; Grigorova, Mira; Nikolova, Teodora; Bulanova, Minka; Popova, Ljubomira; Staynova, Albena; Benova, Donka

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation in vivo in exposed Bulgarian nuclear power plant workers by using classical cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic analyses of peripheral lymphocytes. Chromosome analysis using fluorescence in situ hybrydization (FISH) and Giemsa techniques was undertaken on 63 workers and 45 administrative staff controls from the Bulgarian Nuclear Power Plant. Using the Giemsa method, the frequencies of cells studied with chromosome aberrations, dicentrics plus rings and chromosome fragments in the radiation workers were significantly higher compared with the control group (P = 0.044, P = 0.014, and P = 0.033, respectively). A significant association between frequencies of dicentrics plus rings and accumulated doses was registered (P < 0.01). In the present study, a FISH cocktail of whole chromosome paints for chromosomes 1, 4 and 11 was used. A significant association between frequency of translocations and accumulated doses was also observed (P < 0.001). Within the control group, a correlation was found between age and the spontaneous frequency of translocations. No correlation was found between smoking status and frequency of translocations. When compared with the control group, workers with accumulated doses up to 100 mSv showed no increase in genome translocation frequency, whereas workers with accumulated doses from 101 to 200 mSv showed a statistically significant doubling of genome translocation frequency (P = 0.009). Thus, in cases of chronic exposure and for purposes of retrospective dosimetry, the genome frequency of translocations is a more useful marker for evaluation of genotoxic effects than dicentric frequency. PMID:23536543

  16. Chromosome analysis of nuclear power plant workers using fluorescence in situ hybridization and Giemsa assay.

    PubMed

    Hristova, Rositsa; Hadjidekova, Valeria; Grigorova, Mira; Nikolova, Teodora; Bulanova, Minka; Popova, Ljubomira; Staynova, Albena; Benova, Donka

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation in vivo in exposed Bulgarian nuclear power plant workers by using classical cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic analyses of peripheral lymphocytes. Chromosome analysis using fluorescence in situ hybrydization (FISH) and Giemsa techniques was undertaken on 63 workers and 45 administrative staff controls from the Bulgarian Nuclear Power Plant. Using the Giemsa method, the frequencies of cells studied with chromosome aberrations, dicentrics plus rings and chromosome fragments in the radiation workers were significantly higher compared with the control group (P = 0.044, P = 0.014, and P = 0.033, respectively). A significant association between frequencies of dicentrics plus rings and accumulated doses was registered (P < 0.01). In the present study, a FISH cocktail of whole chromosome paints for chromosomes 1, 4 and 11 was used. A significant association between frequency of translocations and accumulated doses was also observed (P < 0.001). Within the control group, a correlation was found between age and the spontaneous frequency of translocations. No correlation was found between smoking status and frequency of translocations. When compared with the control group, workers with accumulated doses up to 100 mSv showed no increase in genome translocation frequency, whereas workers with accumulated doses from 101 to 200 mSv showed a statistically significant doubling of genome translocation frequency (P = 0.009). Thus, in cases of chronic exposure and for purposes of retrospective dosimetry, the genome frequency of translocations is a more useful marker for evaluation of genotoxic effects than dicentric frequency. PMID:23536543

  17. Technical Note: Determination of the metabolically active fraction of benthic foraminifera by means of Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrelli, C.; Sabbatini, A.; Luna, G. M.; Nardelli, M. P.; Sbaffi, T.; Morigi, C.; Danovaro, R.; Negri, A.

    2011-08-01

    Benthic foraminifera are an important component of the marine biota, but protocols for investigating their viability and metabolism are still extremely limited. Classical studies on benthic foraminifera have been based on direct counting under light microscopy. Typically, these organisms are stained with Rose Bengal, which binds proteins and other macromolecules, but does not allow discrimination between viable and recently dead organisms. The fluorescent in situ hybridization technique (FISH) represents a new and useful approach to identify living cells possessing an active metabolism. Our work is the first test of the suitability of the FISH technique, based on fluorescent probes targeting the 18S rRNA, to detect live benthic foraminifera. The protocol was applied on Ammonia group and Miliolids, as well as on agglutinated polythalamous (i.e., Leptohalysis scottii and Eggerella scabra) and soft-shelled monothalamous (i.e., Psammophaga sp. and saccamminid morphotypes) taxa. The results from FISH analyses were compared with those obtained, on the same specimens assayed with FISH, from microscopic analysis of the cytoplasm colour, presence of pigments and pseudopodial activity. Our results indicate that FISH targets only metabolically active foraminifera, and allows discerning from low to high cellular activity, validating the hypothesis that the intensity of the fluorescent signal emitted by the probe is dependent upon the physiological status of cells. These findings support the usefulness of this molecular approach as a key tool for obtaining information on the physiology of living foraminifera, both in field and experimental settings.

  18. Chromosomal mapping of tandem repeats in the Yesso Scallop, Patinopecten yessoensis (Jay, 1857), utilizing fluorescence in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuan; Yang, Zujing; Liao, Huan; Zhang, Zhengrui; Huang, Xiaoting; Bao, Zhenmin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Construction of cytogenetic maps can provide important information for chromosome identification, chromosome evolution and genomic research. However, it hasn’t been conducted in many scallop species yet. In the present study, we attempted to map 12 fosmid clones containing tandem repeats by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in the Yesso scallop Patinopecten yessoensis (Jay, 1857). The results showed 6 fosmid clones were successfully mapped and distributed in 6 different pairs of chromosomes. Three clones were respectively assigned to a pair of metacentric chromosomes, a pair of submetacentric chromosomes and a pair of telocentric chromosomes and the remaining 3 clones showed their loci on three different pairs of subtelocentric chromosomes by co-hybridization. In summary, totally 8 pairs of chromosomes of the Yesso scallop were identified by 6 fosmid clones and two rDNA probes. Furthermore, 6 tandem repeats of 5 clones were sequenced and could be developed as chromosome specific markers for the Yesso scallop. The successful localization of fosmid clones will undoubtedly facilitate the integration of linkage groups with cytogenetic map and genomic research for the Yesso scallop. PMID:27186345

  19. Automated detection and analysis of fluorescent in situ hybridization spots depicted in digital microscopic images of Pap-smear specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingwei; Zheng, Bin; Li, Shibo; Zhang, Roy; Mulvihill, John J.; Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong

    2009-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technology has been widely recognized as a promising molecular and biomedical optical imaging tool to screen and diagnose cervical cancer. However, manual FISH analysis is time-consuming and may introduce large inter-reader variability. In this study, a computerized scheme is developed and tested. It automatically detects and analyzes FISH spots depicted on microscopic fluorescence images. The scheme includes two stages: (1) a feature-based classification rule to detect useful interphase cells, and (2) a knowledge-based expert classifier to identify splitting FISH spots and improve the accuracy of counting independent FISH spots. The scheme then classifies detected analyzable cells as normal or abnormal. In this study, 150 FISH images were acquired from Pap-smear specimens and examined by both an experienced cytogeneticist and the scheme. The results showed that (1) the agreement between the cytogeneticist and the scheme was 96.9% in classifying between analyzable and unanalyzable cells (Kappa=0.917), and (2) agreements in detecting normal and abnormal cells based on FISH spots were 90.5% and 95.8% with Kappa=0.867. This study demonstrated the feasibility of automated FISH analysis, which may potentially improve detection efficiency and produce more accurate and consistent results than manual FISH analysis.

  20. Use of Hybridization Chain Reaction-Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization To Track Gene Expression by Both Partners during Initiation of Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Nikolakakis, K.; Lehnert, E.

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of a productive symbiosis between Euprymna scolopes, the Hawaiian bobtail squid, and its luminous bacterial symbiont, Vibrio fischeri, is mediated by transcriptional changes in both partners. A key challenge to unraveling the steps required to successfully initiate this and many other symbiotic associations is characterization of the timing and location of these changes. We report on the adaptation of hybridization chain reaction-fluorescent in situ hybridization (HCR-FISH) to simultaneously probe the spatiotemporal regulation of targeted genes in both E. scolopes and V. fischeri. This method revealed localized, transcriptionally coregulated epithelial cells within the light organ that responded directly to the presence of bacterial cells while, at the same time, provided a sensitive means to directly show regulated gene expression within the symbiont population. Thus, HCR-FISH provides a new approach for characterizing habitat transition in bacteria and for discovering host tissue responses to colonization. PMID:25956763

  1. Automated fluorescent in situ hybridization for the specific detection and quantification of oral streptococci in dental plaque.

    PubMed

    Thurnheer, T; Gmür, R; Giertsen, E; Guggenheim, B

    2001-02-01

    Our aim was to develop a rapid fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) assay for the identification of different oral groups of streptococci in dental plaque and to combine it with digital image analysis for the automated enumeration of target cells. Cy3-labeled oligonucleotide probes specific for 16S rRNA gene sequences of the anginosus, mitis, mutans, and salivarius groups of streptococci were hybridized under stringent conditions with bacterial cultures or supragingival plaque samples that had been permeabilized with lysozyme. Probe specificity was determined with strains from 30 different species, mainly of oral origin. Results showed that probes ANG541, MIT447, SSP001, and SAL090 with specificity for the anginosus, mitis, mutans, and salivarius groups, respectively, the pan-reactive streptococcal probe STR405, the S. mutans specific probe MUT590, and the S. sobrinus specific probe SOB174 were well-suited for the identification of cultured streptococci. Probes STR405, MIT447 and SSP001 were then successfully applied to enumerate automatically bacteria of the recognized taxa in 144 supragingival plaque samples. On the average, total streptococci accounted for 8.2%, streptococci of the mitis and mutans groups for 3.9 and 1.7%, respectively, of the plaques. The combined application of FISH and automated image analysis provides an objective time-saving alternative to culture or PCR for the enumeration of selected oral streptococci in dental plaque. PMID:11166098

  2. Establishment of a human malignant fibrous histiocytoma cell line, COMA. Characterization By conventional cytogenetics, comparative genomic hybridization, and multiplex fluorescence In situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Mairal, A; Chibon, F; Rousselet, A; Couturier, J; Terrier, P; Aurias, A

    2000-09-01

    The human COMA cell line has been established from a storiform pleomorphic malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH). As expected for this tumor type, a very complex karyotype was observed after R-banding analysis. An extensive analysis by 24-color painting, comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed. Twelve complex marker chromosomes recurrently observed were clearly identified; among them, three were systematically present in all analyzed metaphases. Amplifications detected by CGH were refined by FISH with probes specific for various candidate loci. A significant aneuploidy and numerous micronuclei were observed, which could be related to the anomalies of centriole numbers detected in a proportion of cells. Such an analysis, performed on a series of MFH cell lines, would allow the delineation of the genomic alterations specific for the oncogenesis or progression of this complex tumor type or both. PMID:11063793

  3. Assignment of the gastric inhibitory polypeptide receptor gene (GIPR) to chromosome bands 19q13.2-q13.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, M.; Fernald, A.A.; Bell, G.I.; Le Beau, M.M.

    1995-08-10

    The gastric inhibitory polypeptide receptor gene (GIPR) was localized, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), to human chromosome bands 19q13.2-q13.3. Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is a potent stimulator of insulin secretion and mutations in the GIPR gene may be related to non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). 13 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Localization of the human kinesin light chain gene (KNS2) to chromosome 14q32.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Goedert, M.; Marsh, S.; Carter, N.

    1996-02-15

    This article reports on the localization of human kinesin light chain gene (KNS2) to human chromosome 14q32.3 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Further studies will need to be conducted to see whether mutations in the KNS2 gene are associated with hereditary diseases. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Reliability of aneuploidy estimates in human sperm: Results of fluorescence in situ hybridization studies using two different scoring criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H. |; Rademaker, A.

    1994-09-01

    Aneuploidy estimates for individual chromosomes in human sperm have varied more than 10-fold in different laboratories using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These laboratories use different scoring criteria in the assessment of a disomic sperm. In order to determine reliable estimates of aneuploidy, we have investigated whether scoring criteria affect the aneuploidy frequency in human sperm. Aneuploidy estimates for chromosomes 1(pUC1.77), 12(pBR12), X(XC) and Y(DYZ3Z) were obtained in human sperm from five donors using multicolor FISH analysis to provide an internal control to differentiate between nullisomy and lack of hybridization and between disomy and diploidy. Disomy frequencies were obtained by scoring a minimum of 10,000 sperm for each chromosome probe per donor. This analysis was replicated for two scoring criteria: one scoring criterion used one-half a signal domain as the minimum distance between two signals to be counted as two and thus disomic; the other scoring criterion set one signal domain as the minimum distance between two signals. A total of 120,870 sperm were assessed using one half domain as the scoring criterion and 113,478 were scored using one domain as the criterion. The mean percent disomy for chromosomes 1, 12, X, Y and XY was .18, .16, .15, .19, .25 respectively using the one-half domain criterion and .08, .17, .07, .12, .16 respectively using the one domain criterion. The percent disomy decreased significantly with use of one domain as the minimum distance for signal separation for all chromosomes except chromosome number 12. These lower disomy frequencies correlated well with frequencies derived from human sperm karyotypes analyzed in our laboratory. This suggests that the fluorescent signals for chromosomes 1, X and Y split into more than one domain in decondensed interphase sperm and use of the one-half domain criterion leads to an overestimate of aneuploidy frequencies.

  6. Assignment of the human FKBP12-rapamycin-associated protein (FRAP) gene to chromosome 1p36 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, P.A.; Rosen, C.A.; Carter, K.C.

    1996-04-15

    This report describes the localization of the human FKBP12-rapamycin-associated protein (FRAP) gene to human chromosome 1p36 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. This protein is the binding site for rapamycin and FK506, two potent immunosuppressive drugs. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Localization of the DCTN1 gene encoding p150{sup Glued} to human chromosome 2p13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Holzbaur, E.L.F.; Tokito, M.K.

    1996-02-01

    This report discusses the genetic mapping of the DCTN1 gene to human chromosome 2p13 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. This gene encodes the largest polypeptide of the dynactin complex, which is one of two microtubule-based biological motor protein complexes. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Chromosomal localization of the human natural killer cell class I receptor family genes to 19q13.4 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Suto, Yumiko; Maenaka, Katsumi; yabe, Toshio

    1996-07-01

    This report describes the localization of the human natural killer cell I receptor family genes to human chromosome 19q13.4 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. These genes mediate the inhibition of the cytotoxicity of subsets of natural killer cells. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Determination of the metabolically active fraction of benthic foraminifera by means of Fluorescent in situ Hybridization (FISH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrelli, C.; Sabbatini, A.; Luna, G. M.; Morigi, C.; Danovaro, R.; Negri, A.

    2010-10-01

    Benthic foraminifera are an important component of the marine living biota, but protocols for investigating their viability and metabolism are still extremely limited. Classical studies on benthic foraminifera have been based on direct counting under light microscopy. Typically these organisms are stained with Rose Bengal, which binds proteins and other macromolecules, but this approach does not allow discriminating between viable and recently dead organisms. The fluorescent in situ hybridization technique (FISH) represents a potentially useful approach identifying living cells with active metabolism cells. In this work, we tested for the first time the suitability of the FISH technique based on fluorescent probes targeting the 18S rRNA, to detect these live benthic protists. The protocol was applied on the genus Ammonia, on the Miliolidae group and an attempt was made also with agglutinated species (i.e., Leptohalysis scottii and Eggerella scabra). In addition microscopic analysis of the cytoplasm colour, presence of pigments and, sometimes, those of pseudopodial activity where conducted. The results of the present study indicate that FISH targeted only live and metabolically active foraminifera. These results allowed to identify as "live", cells improperly classified as "dead" by means of the classical technique (Type I error) and vice versa to identify as dead the foraminifera without rRNA, but stained using Rose Bengal (Type II error). In addition, the comparative FISH analysis of starved and actively growing cells demonstrated that individuals with active metabolism were stained more intensively than starved cells. This finding supports the hypothesis that the physiological status of cells can be directly related with the intensity of the fluorescent signal emitted by the fluorescent probe. We conclude that the use of molecular approaches could represent a key tool for acquiring crucial information on living foraminifera specimens and for investigating their

  10. Development of a flow-fluorescence in situ hybridization protocol for the analysis of microbial communities in anaerobic fermentation liquor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The production of bio-methane from renewable raw material is of high interest because of the increasing scarcity of fossil fuels. The process of biomethanation is based on the inter- and intraspecific metabolic activity of a highly diverse and dynamic microbial community. The community structure of the microbial biocenosis varies between different biogas reactors and the knowledge about these microbial communities is still fragmentary. However, up to now no approaches are available allowing a fast and reliable access to the microbial community structure. Hence, the aim of this study was to originate a Flow-FISH protocol, namely a combination of flow cytometry and fluorescence in situ hybridization, for the analysis of the metabolically active microorganisms in biogas reactor samples. With respect to the heterogenic texture of biogas reactor samples and to collect all cells including those of cell aggregates and biofilms the development of a preceding purification procedure was indispensable. Results Six different purification procedures with in total 29 modifications were tested. The optimized purification procedure combines the use of the detergent sodium hexametaphosphate with ultrasonic treatment and a final filtration step. By this treatment, the detachment of microbial cells from particles as well as the disbandment of cell aggregates was obtained at minimized cell loss. A Flow-FISH protocol was developed avoiding dehydration and minimizing centrifugation steps. In the exemplary application of this protocol on pure cultures as well as biogas reactor samples high hybridization rates were achieved for commonly established domain specific oligonucleotide probes enabling the specific detection of metabolically active bacteria and archaea. Cross hybridization and autofluorescence effects could be excluded by the use of a nonsense probe and negative controls, respectively. Conclusions The approach described in this study enables for the first time the

  11. Triplex in-situ hybridization

    DOEpatents

    Fresco, Jacques R.; Johnson, Marion D.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are methods for detecting in situ the presence of a target sequence in a substantially double-stranded nucleic acid segment, which comprises: a) contacting in situ under conditions suitable for hybridization a substantially double-stranded nucleic acid segment with a detectable third strand, said third strand being capable of hybridizing to at least a portion of the target sequence to form a triple-stranded structure, if said target sequence is present; and b) detecting whether hybridization between the third strand and the target sequence has occured.

  12. Detection of sex chromosomal aneuploidies X-X, Y-Y, and X-Y in human sperm using two-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Robbins, W.A. |; Pinkel, D.; Weier, H.U.; Mehraein, Y. |

    1994-10-15

    Sex chromosome aneuploidy is the most common numerical chromosomal abnormality in humans at birth and a substantial portion of these abnormalities involve paternal chromosomes. An efficient method is presented for using air-dried smears of human semen to detect the number of X and Y chromosomes in sperm chromatin using two-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization. Air-dried semen smears were pre-treated with dithiothreitol and 3,4-diiodosalicylate salt to decondense the sperm chromatin and then were hybridized with repetitive sequence DNA probes that had been generated by PCR and differentially labeled. Hybridizations with X and Y specific probes showed the expected ratio of 50%X:50%Y bearing sperm. Sperm carrying extra fluorescence domains representing disomy for the X or Y chromosomes occurred at frequencies of {approximately} 4 per 10,000 sperm each. Cells carrying both X and Y fluorescence domains occurred at a frequency of {approximately} 6/10,000. Thus, the overall frequency of sperm that carried an extra sex chromosome was 1.4/1,000. The frequencies of sperm carrying sex chromosome aneuploidies determined by hybridization did not differ statistically from those reported from the same laboratory using the human-sperm/hamster-egg cytogenetic technique. Multi-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization to sperm is a promising method for assessing sex-ratio alterations in human semen and for determining the fraction of sperm carrying sex or other chromosome aneuploidies which may be transmissible to offspring. 44 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  13. Combination of Adhesive-tape-based Sampling and Fluorescence in situ Hybridization for Rapid Detection of Salmonella on Fresh Produce

    PubMed Central

    Bisha, Bledar; Brehm-Stecher, Byron F.

    2010-01-01

    This protocol describes a simple approach for adhesive-tape-based sampling of tomato and other fresh produce surfaces, followed by on-tape fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for rapid culture-independent detection of Salmonella spp. Cell-charged tapes can also be placed face-down on selective agar for solid-phase enrichment prior to detection. Alternatively, low-volume liquid enrichments (liquid surface miniculture) can be performed on the surface of the tape in non-selective broth, followed by FISH and analysis via flow cytometry. To begin, sterile adhesive tape is brought into contact with fresh produce, gentle pressure is applied, and the tape is removed, physically extracting microbes present on these surfaces. Tapes are mounted sticky-side up onto glass microscope slides and the sampled cells are fixed with 10% formalin (30 min) and dehydrated using a graded ethanol series (50, 80, and 95%; 3 min each concentration). Next, cell-charged tapes are spotted with buffer containing a Salmonella-targeted DNA probe cocktail and hybridized for 15 - 30 min at 55°C, followed by a brief rinse in a washing buffer to remove unbound probe. Adherent, FISH-labeled cells are then counterstained with the DNA dye 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and results are viewed using fluorescence microscopy. For solid-phase enrichment, cell-charged tapes are placed face-down on a suitable selective agar surface and incubated to allow in situ growth of Salmonella microcolonies, followed by FISH and microscopy as described above. For liquid surface miniculture, cell-charged tapes are placed sticky side up and a silicone perfusion chamber is applied so that the tape and microscope slide form the bottom of a water-tight chamber into which a small volume (≤ 500 μL) of Trypticase Soy Broth (TSB) is introduced. The inlet ports are sealed and the chambers are incubated at 35 - 37°C, allowing growth-based amplification of tape-extracted microbes. Following incubation, inlet ports

  14. Combination of adhesive-tape-based sampling and fluorescence in situ hybridization for rapid detection of Salmonella on fresh produce.

    PubMed

    Bisha, Bledar; Brehm-Stecher, Byron F

    2010-01-01

    This protocol describes a simple approach for adhesive-tape-based sampling of tomato and other fresh produce surfaces, followed by on-tape fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for rapid culture-independent detection of Salmonella spp. Cell-charged tapes can also be placed face-down on selective agar for solid-phase enrichment prior to detection. Alternatively, low-volume liquid enrichments (liquid surface miniculture) can be performed on the surface of the tape in non-selective broth, followed by FISH and analysis via flow cytometry. To begin, sterile adhesive tape is brought into contact with fresh produce, gentle pressure is applied, and the tape is removed, physically extracting microbes present on these surfaces. Tapes are mounted sticky-side up onto glass microscope slides and the sampled cells are fixed with 10% formalin (30 min) and dehydrated using a graded ethanol series (50, 80, and 95%; 3 min each concentration). Next, cell-charged tapes are spotted with buffer containing a Salmonella-targeted DNA probe cocktail and hybridized for 15 - 30 min at 55°C, followed by a brief rinse in a washing buffer to remove unbound probe. Adherent, FISH-labeled cells are then counterstained with the DNA dye 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and results are viewed using fluorescence microscopy. For solid-phase enrichment, cell-charged tapes are placed face-down on a suitable selective agar surface and incubated to allow in situ growth of Salmonella microcolonies, followed by FISH and microscopy as described above. For liquid surface miniculture, cell-charged tapes are placed sticky side up and a silicone perfusion chamber is applied so that the tape and microscope slide form the bottom of a water-tight chamber into which a small volume (≤ 500 μL) of Trypticase Soy Broth (TSB) is introduced. The inlet ports are sealed and the chambers are incubated at 35 - 37°C, allowing growth-based amplification of tape-extracted microbes. Following incubation, inlet ports

  15. Visualization and enumeration of marine planktonic archaea and bacteria by using polyribonucleotide probes and fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    DeLong, E F; Taylor, L T; Marsh, T L; Preston, C M

    1999-12-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using rRNA-specific oligonucleotide probes has emerged as a popular technique for identifying individual microbial cells. In natural samples, however, the signal derived from fluor-labeled oligonucleotide probes often is undetectable above background fluorescence in many cells. To circumvent this difficulty, we applied fluorochrome-labeled polyribonucleotide probes to identify and enumerate marine planktonic archaea and bacteria. The approach greatly enhanced the sensitivity and applicability of FISH with seawater samples, allowing confident identification and enumeration of planktonic cells to ocean depths of 3,400 m. Quantitative whole-cell hybridization experiments using these probes accounted for 90 to 100% of the total 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)-stained cells in most samples. As predicted in a previous study (R. Massana, A. E. Murray, C. M. Preston, and E. F. DeLong, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63:50-56, 1997), group I and II marine archaea predominate in different zones in the water column, with maximal cell densities of 10(5)/ml. The high cell densities of archaea, extending from surface waters to abyssal depths, suggest that they represent a large and significant fraction of the total picoplankton biomass in coastal ocean waters. The data also show that the vast majority of planktonic prokaryotes contain significant numbers of ribosomes, rendering them easily detectable with polyribonucleotide probes. These results imply that the majority of planktonic cells visualized by DAPI do not represent lysed cells or "ghosts," as was suggested in a previous report. PMID:10584017

  16. Assignment of the human aggrecan gene (AGC1) to 15q26 using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.; Chen, X.N.; Doege, K.; Grover, J.; Roughley, P.J.

    1993-05-01

    The large aggregating proteoglycan aggrecan is a major structural component of the extracellular matrix of articular cartilage. Recent cDNA cloning of the human aggrecan gene (AGC1) reveals a core protein of at least 2316 amino acids characterized by several distinct structural domains. Two globular domains, termed G1 and G2, are present at the amino terminus of the molecule and a third, termed G3, is present at the carboxy terminus. The G1 domain is homologous in structure to the cartilage link protein and accounts for the aggregating potential of aggrecan through its ability to interact with hyaluronic acid. The aggrecan gene is known to consist of 15 exons, with each exon encoding a distinct functional region of the mature protein. However, while the link protein gene is known to reside on chromosome 5 in the human, the location of the aggrecan gene is currently undetermined in any species. The probe (pAGG2) for the aggrecan gene was mapped on chromosome band 15q26, most likely in the subregion of 15q26.1, using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Clear signals were noted on both chromatids of chromosome band 15q26 in over 80% of the 300 metaphase cells examined in three independent experiments using pAGG2. No other sites of hybridization were noted on both chromatids of any other chromosome band. The precise band location was identified by using chromsomes of about 650 bands and employing fluorescence reverse banding with chromomycin A3 and distamycin. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Specific sorting of single bacterial cells with microfabricated fluorescence-activated cell sorting and tyramide signal amplification fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun H; Cho, Sung H; Chiang, Hsin-I; Tsai, Frank; Zhang, Kun; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2011-10-01

    When attempting to probe the genetic makeup of diverse bacterial communities that elude cell culturing, researchers face two primary challenges: isolation of rare bacteria from microbial samples and removal of contaminating cell-free DNA. We report a compact, low-cost, and high-performance microfabricated fluorescence-activated cell sorting (μFACS) technology in combination with a tyramide signal amplification fluorescence in situ hybridization (TSA-FISH) to address these two challenges. The TSA-FISH protocol that was adapted for flow cytometry yields a 10-30-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity over standard FISH methods. The μFACS technology, capable of enhancing its sensitivity by ~18 dB through signal processing, was able to enrich TSA-FISH-labeled E. coli cells by 223-fold. The μFACS technology was also used to remove contaminating cell-free DNA. After two rounds of sorting on E. coli mixed with λ-phage DNA (10 ng/μL), we demonstrated over 100,000-fold reduction in λ-DNA concentration. The integrated μFACS and TSA-FISH technologies provide a highly effective and low-cost solution for research on the genomic complexity of bacteria as well as single-cell genomic analysis of other sample types. PMID:21809842

  18. Aneuploidy detection for chromosomes 1, X and Y by fluorescence in situ hybridization in human sperm from oligoasthenoteratozoospermic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, M.G.; Zackowski, J.L.; Acosta, A.A.

    1994-09-01

    Oligoasthenoteratozoospermic males (n=15) were investigated for infertility as compared with proven fertile donors. The oligoasthenoteratozoospermic population showed a mean sperm concentration of 9.7 x 10{sup 6}/ml (Range 4.2-19.7), mean motility of 38.5% (Range 10.6-76.8) and morphology (measured by the percentage of normal forms evaluated by strict criteria) with a mean of 3.49% (Range 1.5-5.0). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using satellite DNA probes specific for chromosomes 1 (puc 1.77), X (alpha satellite), and Y (satellite-III at Yqh) was performed on human interphase sperm nuclei. DNA probes were either directly labelled with rhodamine-dUTP, FITC-dUTP, or biotinylated by nick translation. Hybridization and signal detection were done by routine laboratory protocols. Microscopic analysis was performed using a cooled CCD camera attached to an epi-fluorescent microscope. After hybridization, fertile donors yielded a frequency of 0.96% (n=12) nullisomic, 98.5% (n=1231) monosomic and 0.96% (n=12) disomic for chromosome 1, whereas oligoasthenoteratozoospermic males yielded a frequency of 16% (n=600) nullisomic, 74.5% (n=2792) monosomic and 9.9% (n=370) disomic. In addition, fertile donors yielded a frequency of 45.7% (n=633) monosomic and 0.7% (n=11) disomic for chromosome X, whereas oligoasthenoteratozoospermic males yielded a frequency of 38.7% (n=760) monosomic and 0.8% (n=13) disomic. Chromosome Y frequencies for fertile donors showed 44.6% (n=614) monosomic and 0.6% (n=2) disomic, whereas oligoasthenoteratozoospermic males yielded a frequency of 33.2% (n=701) monosomic and 0.8% (n=15) disomic. This suggests that the frequency of nullisomy for chromosome 1 is significantly higher (p<0.001) in sperm from oligoasthenoteratozoospermic makes versus sperm from our fertile donors. We conclude that FISH is a powerful tool to determine the frequency of aneuploidy in sperm from oligoasthenoteratozoospermic patients.

  19. Feasibility of using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to detect early gene changes in sputum cells from uranium miners

    SciTech Connect

    Neft, R.E.; Rogers, J.L.; Belinsky, S.A.

    1995-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that combined exposure to radon progeny and tobacco smoke produce a greater than additive or synergistic increase in lung cancer risk. Lung cancer results from multiple genetic changes over a long period of time. An early change that occurs in lung cancer is trisomy 7 which is found in 50% of non-small cell lung cancer and in the far margins of resected lung tumors. The 80% mortality associated with lung cancer is in part related to the high proportion of patients who present with an advanced, unresectable tumor. Therefore, early detection of patients at risk for tumor development is critical to improve treatment of this disease. Currently, it is difficult to detect lung cancer early while it is still amendable by surgery. Saccomanno, G. has shown that premalignant cytologic changes in sputum cells collected from uranium miners can be detected by a skilled, highly trained cytopathologist. A more objective alternative for identifying premalignant cells in sputum may be to determine whether an early genetic change such as trisomy 7 is present in these cells. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can be used to identify cells with trisomy 7. The results of this investigation indicate that FISH may prove to be an accurate, efficient method to test at-risk individuals for genetic alterations in bronchial epithelial cells from sputum.

  20. Paternal-age effects on sperm aneuploidy investigated in mice and humans by three-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Lowe, X.; Holland, N.T.

    1994-09-01

    We conducted a cross-species comparison of the effects of paternal age on sperm aneuploidy in mice and humans. A new murine assay was developed to detect sperm hyperhaploidy and polyploidy for chromosomes X, Y, and 8 using fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific DNA probes, to serve as a direct corollate to the three-chromosome method developed early for human sperm. Sperm aneuploidy was evaluated in eight male B6C3F1 male mice (aged 22.5-30.5 mo) and compared to young controls (2.4 mo). The aged group showed significant ({approximately}2.0-fold) increases in hyperhaploidies involving chromosomes X, Y and 8, with the greatest effects seen in the oldest animals. Sperm aneuploidy was also evaluated in two groups of healthy men who differed in mean age [46.8{plus_minus}3.1 (n=4) vs. 28.5{plus_minus}5.0 (n=10) yrs], using the three-chromosome method. The older group showed a statistically significant increase in hyperhaploid sperm for both sex chromosomes. Additional controlled human studies are planned. Taken together, the murine and human data are consistent with a positive effect of paternal age on sperm aneuploidy. In both species, the strongest age effect was observed for hyperhaploidies of chromosome Y. Future studies are needed to investigate the shape of the age-effect curve and to evaluate chromosomal differences, especially for humans in their late reproductive years.

  1. Identification of Fetal Inflammatory Cells in Eosinophilic/T-cell Chorionic Vasculitis Using Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Katzman, Philip J; Li, LiQiong; Wang, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic/T-cell chorionic vasculitis (ETCV) is an inflammatory lesion of placental fetal vessels. In contrast to acute chorionic vasculitis, inflammation in ETCV is seen in chorionic vessel walls opposite the amnionic surface. It is not known whether inflammation in ETCV consists of maternal cells from the intervillous space or fetal cells migrating from the vessel. We used fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to differentiate fetal versus maternal cells in ETCV. Placentas with ETCV, previously identified for a published study, were used. Infant sex in each case was identified using the electronic medical record. For male infants, 3-μm sections were cut from archived tissue blocks from placentas involving ETCV and stained with fluorescent X- and Y-chromosome centromeric probes. A consecutive hematoxylin/eosin-stained section was used for correlation. FISH analysis was performed on 400 interphase nuclei at the site of ETCV to determine the proportion of XX, XY, X, and Y cells. Of 31 ETCV cases, 20 were female and 10 were male (1 sex not recorded). Six of 10 cases with male infants had recuts with visible ETCV. In these 6 cases the average percentages (ranges) of XY cells, X-only cells, and Y-only cells in the region of inflammation were 81 (70-90), 11 (6-17), and 8 (2-14), respectively. There was a 2:1 female:male infant ratio in ETCV. Similar to acute chorionic vasculitis, the inflammation in ETCV is of fetal origin. It is still unknown, however, whether the stimulus for ETCV is of fetal or maternal origin. PMID:25756311

  2. Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification Versus Multiprobe Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization To Detect Genomic Aberrations in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Al Zaabi, Eiman A.; Fernandez, Louis A.; Sadek, Irene A.; Riddell, D. Christie; Greer, Wenda L.

    2010-01-01

    Cytogenetic abnormalities play a major role in the prognosis of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Several methods have emerged to try to best identify these abnormalities. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to determine the frequency of cytogenetic changes in our CLL patient population. We also evaluated the effectiveness of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) in detecting these abnormalities. Sixty-two B-CLL patients and 20 healthy controls were enrolled, and FISH and MLPA analyses were performed on peripheral blood samples. Using FISH, genomic aberrations were found in 73% of patients and presented as follows: single 13q14.3 deletion (60%), trisomy 12 (7%), ATM deletion (6%), 17p13.1 deletion (2%). MLPA analyses done on 61/62 patients showed sensitivity and specificity values of 90% and 100% respectively. MLPA revealed several additional copy number changes, the most common being 19p13 (LDLR and CDKN2D). Moreover, the cost for MLPA analysis, including technical time and reagents, is 86% less than FISH. In conclusion, cytogenetic abnormalities are a common finding in CLL patients, and MLPA is a reliable approach that is more cost effective and faster than FISH. Despite MLPA limitations of sensitivity, it can be used as a first-line screen and complementary test to FISH analysis. PMID:20093390

  3. Microbial populations identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization in a constructed wetland treating acid coal mine drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Nicomrat, D.; Dick, W.A.; Tuovinen, O.H.

    2006-07-15

    Microorganisms are an integral part of the biogeochemical processes in wetlands, yet microbial communities in sediments within constructed wetlands receiving acid mine drainage (AMD) are only poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to characterize the microbial diversity and abundance in a wetland receiving AMD using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. Seasonal samples of oxic surface sediments, comprised of Fe(III) precipitates, were collected from two treatment cells of the constructed wetland system. The pH of the bulk samples ranged between pH 2.1 and 3.9. Viable counts of acidophilic Fe and S oxidizers and heterotrophs were determined with a most probable number (MPN) method. The MPN counts were only a fraction of the corresponding FISH counts. The sediment samples contained microorganisms in the Bacteria (including the subgroups of acidophilic Fe- and S-oxidizing bacteria and Acidiphilium spp.) and Eukarya domains. Archaea were present in the sediment surface samples at < 0.01% of the total microbial community. The most numerous bacterial species in this wetland system was Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, comprising up to 37% of the bacterial population. Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans was also abundant.

  4. Monitoring of chimerism using fluorescence in situ hybridization in a child with severe combined immune deficiency following bone marrow transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Wenger, S.L.; Chen, X.O.; Katz, A.J. |

    1994-09-01

    A boy with severe combined immunodeficiency received a bone marrow transplant from his sister when he was approximately 3 years of age. His peripheral blood karyotype at age 3 and 4 years was 46,XX (20 cells analyzed). Because of a decline in antibody production at 19 years of age, the patient`s peripheral blood was analyzed again for suspected chimerism. His karyotype in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated culture was 46,XX in 49 cells and 46,XY in one cell. Both metaphase and interphase cells were examined for sex chromosome constitution using X and Y dual-color alpha-satellite probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH results for metaphase cells showed 1/50 XY cells, but 38% of interphase cells showed the presence of both X and Y centromere. Pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-stimulated cultures grew poorly and were therefore analyzed using FISH only: 81% of interphase cells were 46,XX. The discrepancy between metaphase and interphase in the PHA-stimulated cultures most likely represents a failure of this boy`s own XY T-cells to be stimulated.

  5. Telomeric IGH Losses Detectable by Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Reflect Somatic VH Recombination Events

    PubMed Central

    Wlodarska, Iwona; Matthews, Christine; Veyt, Ellen; Pospisilova, Helena; Catherwood, Mark A.; Poulsen, Tim S.; Vanhentenrijk, Vera; Ibbotson, Rachel; Vandenberghe, Peter; Morris, T.C.M. “Curly”; Alexander, H. Denis

    2007-01-01

    Routine interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) with LSI IGH/CCND1 assay, applied to differentiate CLL from leukemic mantle cell lymphoma, identified a subset of cases (42/174) with translocation-like IGH signal pattern. To unravel the underlying 14q32/IGH aberrations, 14 of these cases were subjected to cytogenetic, detailed FISH, and VH mutation analyses. FISH identified cryptic losses of various portions of the IGHV region in all 14 cases. Fine mapping of these VH deletions revealed a strict correlation between their distal border and localization of the used VH gene, suggesting that they are not oncogenic but reflect physiological events accompanying somatic V-D-J assembly. This hypothesis was further supported by FISH analysis of 20 CLL and hairy cell leukemia cases with the known VH usage showing a constant loss of sequences proximal to the used gene, identification of VH deletions in normal B cells, and their exclusive demonstration in B cell malignancies, but not of T cell and myeloid linage. Given that these cryptic physiological VH losses in B cells may seriously complicate analysis of B cell leukemia/lymphoma and lead to false conclusions, FISH users should take them into consideration when interpreting IGH aberrations in these malignancies. PMID:17251335

  6. Microbial populations identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization in a constructed wetland treating acid coal mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Nicomrat, Duongruitai; Dick, Warren A; Tuovinen, Olli H

    2006-01-01

    Microorganisms are an integral part of the biogeochemical processes in wetlands, yet microbial communities in sediments within constructed wetlands receiving acid mine drainage (AMD) are only poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to characterize the microbial diversity and abundance in a wetland receiving AMD using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. Seasonal samples of oxic surface sediments, comprised of Fe(III) precipitates, were collected from two treatment cells of the constructed wetland system. The pH of the bulk samples ranged between pH 2.1 and 3.9. Viable counts of acidophilic Fe and S oxidizers and heterotrophs were determined with a most probable number (MPN) method. The MPN counts were only a fraction of the corresponding FISH counts. The sediment samples contained microorganisms in the Bacteria (including the subgroups of acidophilic Fe- and S-oxidizing bacteria and Acidiphilium spp.) and Eukarya domains. Archaea were present in the sediment surface samples at < 0.01% of the total microbial community. The most numerous bacterial species in this wetland system was Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, comprising up to 37% of the bacterial population. Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans was also abundant. Heterotrophs in the Acidiphilium genus totaled 20% of the bacterial population. Leptospirillum ferrooxidans was below the level of detection in the bacterial community. The results from the FISH technique from this field study are consistent with results from other experiments involving enumeration by most probable number, dot-blot hybridization, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analyses and with the geochemistry of the site. PMID:16825452

  7. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using non-commercial probes in the diagnosis of clinically suspected microdeletion syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Halder, Ashutosh; Jain, Manish; Chaudhary, Isha; Gupta, Neerja; Kabra, Madhulika

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Microdeletion syndromes are characterized by small (<5 Mb) chromosomal deletions in which one or more genes are involved. These are frequently associated with multiple congenital anomalies. The phenotype is the result of haploinsufficiency of genes in the critical interval. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique is commonly used for precise genetic diagnosis of microdeletion syndromes. This study was conducted to assess the role of FISH in the diagnosis of suspected microdeletion syndrome. Methods: FISH was carried out on 301 clinically suspected microdeletion syndrome cases for the confirmation of clinical diagnosis using non-commercial probes. Of these, 177 cases were referred for 22q11.2 microdeletion, 42 cases were referred for William syndrome, 38 cases were referred for Prader Willi/Angelman and 44 cases were referred for other suspected microdeletion syndromes. Results: FISH was confirmatory in 23 cases only (7.6%). There were 17 cases of 22q11.2 microdeletion, four cases of Prader Willi syndrome and two cases of William syndrome. Interpretation & conclusion: We conclude that FISH should not be the method of choice for clinically suspected microdeletion syndromes. We propose to follow strict clinical criteria for FISH testing or preferably to follow better methods (genotype first approach). Whole genome screening may be used as first line of test and FISH may be used for confirmation of screening result, screening of family members and prenatal diagnosis. PMID:24056568

  8. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization, Immunohistochemistry, and Next-Generation Sequencing for Detection of EML4-ALK Rearrangement in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pekar-Zlotin, Marina; Hirsch, Fred R.; Soussan-Gutman, Lior; Ilouze, Maya; Dvir, Addie; Boyle, Theresa; Wynes, Murry; Miller, Vincent A.; Lipson, Doron; Palmer, Gary A.; Ali, Siraj M.; Dekel, Shlomi; Brenner, Ronen; Bunn, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved method for detecting EML4-ALK rearrangement is fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH); however, data supporting the use of immunohistochemistry (IHC) for that purpose are accumulating. Previous studies that compared FISH and IHC considered FISH the gold standard, but none compared data with the results of next-generation sequencing (NGS) analysis. Materials and Methods. We studied FISH and IHC (D5F3 antibody) systematically for EML4-ALK rearrangement in 51 lung adenocarcinoma patients, followed by NGS in case of discordance. Results. Of 51 patients, 4 were positive with FISH (7.8%), and 8 were positive with IHC (15.7%). Three were positive with both. NGS confirmed that four of the five patients who were positive with IHC and negative with FISH were positive for ALK. Two were treated by crizotinib, with progression-free survival of 18 and 6 months. Considering NGS as the most accurate test, the sensitivity and specificity were 42.9% and 97.7%, respectively, for FISH and 100% and 97.7%, respectively, for IHC. Conclusion. The FISH-based method of detecting EML4-ALK rearrangement in lung cancer may miss a significant number of patients who could benefit from targeted ALK therapy. Screening for EML4-ALK rearrangement by IHC should be strongly considered, and NGS is recommended in borderline cases. Two patients who were negative with FISH and positive with IHC were treated with crizotinib and responded to therapy. PMID:25721120

  9. Vidas UP-enzyme-linked fluorescent immunoassay based on recombinant phage protein and fluorescence in situ hybridization as alternative methods for detection of Salmonella enterica serovars in meat.

    PubMed

    Zadernowska, Anna; Chajęcka-Wierzchowska, Wioleta; Kłębukowska, Lucyna

    2014-09-01

    Several methods for the rapid and specific detection of Salmonella spp. in meat have been described. This study was conducted to evaluate the capability of the VIDAS(®) UP (SPT [Salmonella Phage Technology]), an enzyme-linked fluorescent immunoassay method, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to complement the International Organization for Standardization Method 6579 (ISO) in detecting Salmonella spp. from beef, pork, and poultry meat samples. The meat was inoculated with a mixture of Salmonella spp. on three levels of contamination. It was also checked that the tests did not produce cross-reactions with other Enterobacteriaceae rods. On the basis of the results, the relative specificity, relative accordance, and relative sensitivity of the method were determined. In meat samples, Vidas UP and FISH detection results were in substantial agreement with ISO, with relative specificity, accordance, and sensitivity rates of 90%, 96.3%, and 100%, respectively, for Vidas UP and 100%, 100%, and 99.4%, respectively, for FISH. This is the first report on the evaluation of both Vidas UP and FISH compared to ISO for the rapid detection of Salmonella enterica serovars in meat. PMID:24971928

  10. Quick Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization Protocol for Xist RNA Combined with Immunofluorescence of Histone Modification in X-chromosome Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Norishige; Ogawa, Akiyo; Ogawa, Yuya

    2014-01-01

    Combining RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with immunofluorescence (immuno-FISH) creates a technique that can be employed at the single cell level to detect the spatial dynamics of RNA localization with simultaneous insight into the localization of proteins, epigenetic modifications and other details which can be highlighted by immunofluorescence. X-chromosome inactivation is a paradigm for long non-coding RNA (lncRNA)-mediated gene silencing. X-inactive specific transcript (Xist) lncRNA accumulation (called an Xist cloud) on one of the two X-chromosomes in mammalian females is a critical step to initiate X-chromosome inactivation. Xist RNA directly or indirectly interacts with various chromatin-modifying enzymes and introduces distinct epigenetic landscapes to the inactive X-chromosome (Xi). One known epigenetic hallmark of the Xi is the Histone H3 trimethyl-lysine 27 (H3K27me3) modification. Here, we describe a simple and quick immuno-FISH protocol for detecting Xist RNA using RNA FISH with multiple oligonucleotide probes coupled with immunofluorescence of H3K27me3 to examine the localization of Xist RNA and associated epigenetic modifications. Using oligonucleotide probes results in a shorter incubation time and more sensitive detection of Xist RNA compared to in vitro transcribed RNA probes (riboprobes). This protocol provides a powerful tool for understanding the dynamics of lncRNAs and its associated epigenetic modification, chromatin structure, nuclear organization and transcriptional regulation. PMID:25489864

  11. Quantitative Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Analysis of Microbial Consortia from a Biogenic Gas Field in Alaska's Cook Inlet Basin

    PubMed Central

    Strąpoć, Dariusz; Huizinga, Brad; Lidstrom, Ulrika; Ashby, Matt; Macalady, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Filter-collected production water samples from a methane-rich gas field in the Cook Inlet basin of Alaska were investigated using whole-cell rRNA-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and 16S rRNA tag pyrosequencing. Both techniques were consistent in determining the microbial community composition, including the archaeal or bacterial dominance of samples. The archaeal community is dominated by the obligate methylotrophic methanogen genus Methanolobus as well as the nutritional generalist methanogen genus Methanosarcina, which is capable of utilizing acetate, CO2, and methyl-bearing compounds. The most-abundant bacterial groups are Firmicutes, notably of the Acetobacterium genus, and Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides species (CFBs) affiliated with the order Bacteroidales. We observed spatial variation among samples in both the percentage of members of Archaea compared to that of members of Bacteria and the dominant members of the bacterial community, differences which could not be explained with the available geochemical data. Based upon the microbial community composition and the isotopic signature of methane associated with the Cook Inlet basin site, we propose a simplified reaction network beginning with the breakdown of coal macromolecules, followed by fermentation and methylotrophic and acetoclastic methane production. PMID:22427501

  12. Automated segmentation and analysis of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) signals in interphase nuclei of pap-smear specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingwei; Zheng, Bin; Li, Shibo; Zhang, Roy R.; Li, Yuhua; Mulvihill, John J.; Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong

    2009-02-01

    Interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technology is a potential and promising molecular imaging tool, which can be applied to screen and detect cervical cancer. However, manual FISH detection method is a subjective, tedious, and time-consuming process that results in a large inter-reader variability and possible detection error (in particular for heterogeneous cases). Automatic FISH image analysis aims to potentially improve detection efficiency and also produce more accurate and consistent results. In this preliminary study, a new computerized scheme is developed to automatically segment analyzable interaphase cells and detect FISH signals using digital fluorescence microscopic images acquired from Pap-smear specimens. First, due to the large intensity variations of the acquired interphase cells and overlapping cells, an iterative (multiple) threshold method and a feature-based classifier are applied to detect and segment all potentially analyzable interphase nuclei depicted on a single image frame. Second, a region labeling algorithm followed up a knowledge-based classifier is implemented to identify splitting and diffused FISH signals. Finally, each detected analyzable cell is classified as normal or abnormal based on the automatically counted number of FISH signals. To test the performance of this scheme, an image dataset involving 250 Pap-smear FISH image frames was collected and used in this study. The overall accuracy rate for segmenting analyzable interphase nuclei is 86.6% (360/424). The sensitivity and specificity for classifying abnormal and normal cells are 88.5% and 86.6%, respectively. The overall cell classification agreement rate between our scheme and a cytogeneticist is 86.6%. The testing results demonstrate the feasibility of applying this automated scheme in FISH image analysis.

  13. Detection of aneuploid human sperm by fluorescence in situ hybridization: Evidence for a donor difference in frequency of sperm disomic for chromosomes 1 and Y

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, W.A. Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA ); Segraves, R.; Pinkel, D. ); Wyrobek, A.J. )

    1993-04-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization with repetitive-sequence DNA probes was used to detect human sperm disomic for chromosomes 1 and Y in three healthy men. Data on these same men had been obtained previously, using the human-sperm/hamster-egg cytogenetic technique, providing a cytogenetic reference for validating sperm hybridization measurements. Air-dried smears were prepared from semen samples and treated with DTT and lithium diiodosalicylate to expand sperm chromatin. Hybridization with fluorescently tagged DNA probes for chromosomes 1 (pUC177) or Y (pY3.4) yielded average frequencies of sperm with two fluorescent domains of 14.2[+-]2.4/10,000 and 5.6[+-]1.6/10,000 sperm, respectively. These frequencies did not differ statistically from frequencies of hyperploidy observed for these chromosomes with the hamster technique. In addition, frequencies of disomic sperm from one donor were elevated [approximately]2.5-fold above those of other donors, for both chromosomes 1 (P = .045) and Y (P = .01), consistent with a trend found with the hamster technique. The authors conclude that fluorescence in situ hybridization to sperm chromosomes provides a valid and promising measure of the frequency of disomic human sperm. 43 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  14. Identification of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) chromosomes using a fluorescence in situ hybridization system reveals multiple hybridization events during tetraploid peanut formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Laining; Yang, Xiaoyu; Tian, Li; Chen, Lei; Yu, Weichang

    2016-09-01

    The cultivated peanut Arachis hypogaea (AABB) is thought to have originated from the hybridization of Arachis duranensis (AA) and Arachis ipaënsis (BB) followed by spontaneous chromosome doubling. In this study, we cloned and analyzed chromosome markers from cultivated peanut and its wild relatives. A fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based karyotyping cocktail was developed with which to study the karyotypes and chromosome evolution of peanut and its wild relatives. Karyotypes were constructed in cultivated peanut and its two putative progenitors using our FISH-based karyotyping system. Comparative karyotyping analysis revealed that chromosome organization was highly conserved in cultivated peanut and its two putative progenitors, especially in the B genome chromosomes. However, variations existed between A. duranensis and the A genome chromosomes in cultivated peanut, especially for the distribution of the interstitial telomere repeats (ITRs). A search of additional A. duranensis varieties from different geographic regions revealed both numeric and positional variations of ITRs, which were similar to the variations in tetraploid peanut varieties. The results provide evidence for the origin of cultivated peanut from the two diploid ancestors, and also suggest that multiple hybridization events of A. ipaënsis with different varieties of A. duranensis may have occurred during the origination of peanut. PMID:27176118

  15. Comparative cytogenetics of six Indo-Pacific moray eels (Anguilliformes: Muraenidae) by chromosomal banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Coluccia, E; Deidda, F; Cannas, R; Lobina, C; Cuccu, D; Deiana, A M; Salvadori, S

    2015-09-01

    A comparative cytogenetic analysis, using both conventional staining techniques and fluorescence in situ hybridization, of six Indo-Pacific moray eels from three different genera (Gymnothorax fimbriatus, Gymnothorax flavimarginatus, Gymnothorax javanicus, Gymnothorax undulatus, Echidna nebulosa and Gymnomuraena zebra), was carried out to investigate the chromosomal differentiation in the family Muraenidae. Four species displayed a diploid chromosome number 2n = 42, which is common among the Muraenidae. Two other species, G. javanicus and G. flavimarginatus, were characterized by different chromosome numbers (2n = 40 and 2n = 36). For most species, a large amount of constitutive heterochromatin was detected in the chromosomes, with species-specific C-banding patterns that enabled pairing of the homologous chromosomes. In all species, the major ribosomal genes were localized in the guanine-cytosine-rich region of one chromosome pair, but in different chromosomal locations. The (TTAGGG)n telomeric sequences were mapped onto chromosomal ends in all muraenid species studied. The comparison of the results derived from this study with those available in the literature confirms a substantial conservation of the diploid chromosome number in the Muraenidae and supports the hypothesis that rearrangements have occurred that have diversified their karyotypes. Furthermore, the finding of two species with different diploid chromosome numbers suggests that additional chromosomal rearrangements, such as Robertsonian fusions, have occurred in the karyotype evolution of the Muraenidae. PMID:26242690

  16. Rapid identification of Acinetobacter spp. by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) from colony and blood culture material

    PubMed Central

    Essig, A.; Hagen, R. M.; Riecker, M.; Jerke, K.; Ellison, D.; Poppert, S.

    2011-01-01

    Multi-drug-resistant strains of the Acinetobacter baumannii complex cause nosocomial infections. Rapid identification of Acinetobacter spp. is desirable in order to facilitate therapeutic or hygiene decisions. We evaluated a newly designed DNA probe that can be used under standard conditions in both a microwave oven and a slide chamber for the rapid identification of Acinetobacter spp. by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Using FISH, the new probe correctly identified 81/81 Acinetobacter spp. isolates and excluded 109/109 tested non-target organisms from agar culture. Furthermore, the new probe correctly identified 7/7 Acinetobacter spp. in 214 blood cultures determined to contain Gram-negative bacteria by Gram staining. Using either the microwave oven or slide chamber technique, the new probe was able to identify Acinetobacter spp. in 100% of the samples tested. FISH used in conjunction with our newly designed probe provides an easy, cheap, precise, and rapid method for the preliminary identification of Acinetobacter spp., especially in laboratories where more sophisticated methods like matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) are not available. PMID:24516735

  17. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Progress report, April 1--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1993-12-31

    The ultimate goal of this proposal is to create a cDNA map of the human genome. Mapping is approached using the techniques of high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This technology and the results of its application are designed to rapidly generate whole genome as tool box of expressed sequence to speed the identification of human disease genes. The results of this study are intended to dovetail with and to link the results of existing technologies for creating backbone YAC and genetic maps. In the first eight months, this approach will generate 60--80% of the expressed sequence map, the remainder expected to be derived through more long-term, labor-intensive, regional chromosomal gene searches or sequencing. The laboratory has made significant progress in the set-up phase, in mapping fetal and adult brain and other cDNAs, in testing a model system for directly linking genetic and physical maps using FISH with small fragments, in setting up a database, and in establishing the validity and throughput of the system.

  18. Rapid molecular cytogenetic analysis of X-chromosomal microdeletions: Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for complex glycerol kinase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, K.C.; Lindsay, E.A.; McCabe, E.R.B.

    1995-07-17

    Diagnosis of X-chromosomal microdeletions has relied upon the traditional methods of Southern blotting and DNA amplification, with carrier identification requiring time-consuming and unreliable dosage calculations. In this report, we describe rapid molecular cytogenetic identification of deleted DNA in affected males with the Xp21 contiguous gene syndrome (complex glycerol kinase deficiency, CGKD) and female carriers for this disorder. CGKD deletions involve the genes for glycerol kinase, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and/or adrenal hypoplasia congenita. We report an improved method for diagnosis of deletions in individuals with CGKD and for identification of female carriers within their families using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a cosmid marker (cosmid 35) within the glycerol kinase gene. When used in combination with an Xq control probe, affected males demonstrate a single signal from the control probe, while female carriers demonstrate a normal chromosome with two signals, as well as a deleted chromosome with a single signal from the control probe. FISH analysis for CGKD provides the advantages of speed and accuracy for evaluation of submicroscopic X-chromosome deletions, particularly in identification of female carriers. In addition to improving carrier evaluation, FISH will make prenatal diagnosis of CGKD more readily available. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction as a diagnostic aid for synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Shipley, J.; Crew, J.; Birdsall, S.; Gill, S.; Clark, J.; Fisher, C.; Kelsey, A.; Nojima, T.; Sonobe, H.; Cooper, C.; Gusterson, B.

    1996-01-01

    Identification of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) that is associated with a high proportion of synovial sarcoma can be a useful diagnostic aid. The translocation results in fusion of the SYT gene on chromosome 18 to either the SSX1 or the SSX2 gene, two homologous genes within Xp11.2. Two-color interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction were assessed as approaches to identify the rearrangement in well characterized cases. The presence of the translocation, and the specific chromosome X gene disrupted, were inferred from the configuration of signals from chromosome-specific centromere probes, paints, and markers flanking each gene in preparations of interphase nuclei. Rearrangement was found in two cell lines and eight of nine tumor samples, including analysis of five touch imprints. This was consistent with cytogenetic data in four cases and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis using primers known to amplify both SYT-SSX1 and SYT-SSX2 transcripts. The transcripts were distinguished by restriction with LspI and SmaI. Contrary to previous suggestions, there was no obvious correlation between histological subtype and involvement of the SSX1 or SSX2 gene. These approaches could also be applied to the identification of tumor-free margins and metastatic disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8579118

  20. Application of rRNA probes and fluorescence in situ hybridization for rapid detection of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xianghai; Yu, Rencheng; Zhou, Mingjiang; Yu, Zhigang

    2012-03-01

    The dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum is often associated with harmful algal blooms (HABs). This species consists of many strains that differ in their ability to produce toxins but have similar morphology, making identification difficult. In this study, species-specific rRNA probes were designed for whole-cell fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to distinguish A. minutum from two phylogenetic clades. We acquired the complete SSU to LSU rDNA sequences (GenBank accession numbers JF906989-JF906999) of 11 Alexandrium strains and used these to design rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes. Three ribotype-specific probes, M-GC-1, M-PC-2, and M-PC-3, were designed. The former is specific for the GC clade ("Global clade") of A. minutum, the majority of which have been found non-toxic, and the latter two are specific for the PSP (paralytic shellfish poisoning)-producing PC clade ("Pacific clade"). The specificity of these three probes was confirmed by FISH. All cells in observed fields of view were fluorescently labeled when probes and target species were incubated under optimized FISH conditions. However, the accessibility of rRNA molecules in ribosomes varied among the probe binding positions. Thus, there was variation in the distribution of positive signals in labeled cells within nucleolus and cytosol (M-GC-1, M-PC-3), or just nucleolus (M-PC-2). Our results provide a methodological basis for studying the biogeography and population dynamics of A. minutum, and providing an early warning of toxic HABs.

  1. Discriminating Multi-Species Populations in Biofilms with Peptide Nucleic Acid Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (PNA FISH)

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Carina; Azevedo, Nuno F.; Santos, Sílvio; Keevil, Charles W.; Vieira, Maria J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Our current understanding of biofilms indicates that these structures are typically composed of many different microbial species. However, the lack of reliable techniques for the discrimination of each population has meant that studies focusing on multi-species biofilms are scarce and typically generate qualitative rather than quantitative data. Methodology/Principal Findings We employ peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) methods to quantify and visualize mixed biofilm populations. As a case study, we present the characterization of Salmonella enterica/Listeria monocytogenes/Escherichia coli single, dual and tri-species biofilms in seven different support materials. Ex-situ, we were able to monitor quantitatively the populations of ∼56 mixed species biofilms up to 48 h, regardless of the support material. In situ, a correct quantification remained more elusive, but a qualitative understanding of biofilm structure and composition is clearly possible by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) at least up to 192 h. Combining the data obtained from PNA FISH/CLSM with data from other established techniques and from calculated microbial parameters, we were able to develop a model for this tri-species biofilm. The higher growth rate and exopolymer production ability of E. coli probably led this microorganism to outcompete the other two [average cell numbers (cells/cm2) for 48 h biofilm: E. coli 2,1×108 (±2,4×107); L. monocytogenes 6,8×107 (±9,4×106); and S. enterica 1,4×106 (±4,1×105)]. This overgrowth was confirmed by CSLM, with two well-defined layers being easily identified: the top one with E. coli, and the bottom one with mixed regions of L. monocytogenes and S. enterica. Significance While PNA FISH has been described previously for the qualitative study of biofilm populations, the present investigation demonstrates that it can also be used for the accurate quantification and spatial distribution of species in

  2. Evaluation of fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect encapsulated Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 spores released from poly(methylmethacrylate).

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Bidyut R; La Duc, Myron T

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 spores originally isolated from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory spacecraft assembly facility clean room are extremely resistant to UV radiation, H(2)O(2), desiccation, chemical disinfection and starvation compared to spores of other Bacillus species. The resistance of B. pumilus SAFR-032 spores to standard industrial clean room sterilization practices is not only a major concern for medical, pharmaceutical and food industries, but also a threat to the extraterrestrial environment during search for life via spacecraft. The objective of the present study was to investigate the potential of Alexa-FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization with Alexa Fluor® 488 labeled oligonucleotide) method as a molecular diagnostic tool for enumeration of multiple sterilant-resistant B. pumilus SAFR-032 spores artificially encapsulated in, and released via organic solvent from, a model polymeric material: poly(methylmethacrylate) (Lucite, Plexiglas). Plexiglas is used extensively in various aerospace applications and in medical, pharmaceutical and food industries. Alexa-FISH signals were not detected from spores via standard methods for vegetative bacterial cells. Optimization of a spore permeabilization protocol capitalizing on the synergistic action of proteinase-K, lysozyme, mutanolysin and Triton X-100 facilitated efficient spore detection by Alexa-FISH microscopy. Neither of the Alexa-probes tested gave rise to considerable levels of Lucite- or solvent-associated background autofluorescence, demonstrating the immense potential of Alexa-FISH for rapid quantification of encapsulated B. pumilus SAFR-032 spores released from poly(methylmethacrylate). PMID:22145981

  3. Validation of break-apart and fusion MYC probes using a digital fluorescence in situ hybridization capture and imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Michael; Rowe, Leslie; Clement, Parker W.; Miles, Rodney R.; Salama, Mohamed E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Detection of MYC translocations using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is important in the evaluation of lymphomas, in particular, Burkitt lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Our aim was to validate a digital FISH capture and imaging system for the detection of MYC 8q24 translocations using LSI-MYC (a break-apart probe) and MYC 8;14 translocation using IGH-MYC (a fusion probe). Materials and Methods: LSI-MYC probe was evaluated using tissue sections from 35 patients. IGH-MYC probe was evaluated using tissue sections from forty patients. Sections were processed for FISH and analyzed using traditional methods. FISH slides were then analyzed using the GenASIs capture and analysis system. Results: Results for LSI-MYC had a high degree of correlation between traditional method of FISH analysis and digital FISH analysis. Results for IGH-MYC had a 100% concordance between traditional method of FISH analysis and digital FISH analysis. Conclusion: Annotated whole slide images of H and E and FISH sections can be digitally aligned, so that areas of tumor within a section can be matched and evaluated with a greater degree of accuracy. Images can be archived permanently, providing a means for examining the results retrospectively. Digital FISH imaging of the MYC translocations provides a better diagnostic tool compared to traditional methods for evaluating lymphomas. PMID:27217970

  4. The Dohner fluorescence in situ hybridization prognostic classification of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL): the CLL Research Consortium experience

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyke, Daniel L.; Werner, Lillian; Rassenti, Laura Z.; Neuberg, Donna; Ghia, Emanuella; Heerema, Nyla A.; Cin, Paola Dal; Aquila, Marie Dell; Sreekantaiah, Chandrika; Greaves, Andrew W.; Kipps, Thomas J.; Kay, Neil E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary This study revisited the Dohner prognostic hierarchy in a cohort of 1585 well-documented patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. The duration of both time to first treatment (TTFT) and overall survival (OS) were significantly longer than observed previously, and this is at least partly due to improved therapeutic options. Deletion 13q remains the most favourable prognostic group with median TTFT and OS from fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) testing of 72 months and >12 years, respectively. Deletion 11q had the poorest median TTFT (22 months) and 17p deletion the poorest median OS (5 years). The percentages of abnormal nuclei were significantly associated with differential TTFT for the trisomy 12, 13q and 17p deletion cohorts but not for the 11q deletion cohort. From the date of the first FISH study, patients with >85% 13q deletion nuclei had a notably shorter TTFT (24 months). Patients with ≤20% 17p deletion nuclei had longer median TTFT and OS from the date of the first FISH study (44 months and 11 years), and were more likely to be IGHV mutated. PMID:26848054

  5. Tubular and endothelial chimerism in renal allografts using fluorescence and chromogenic in situ hybridization (FISH, CISH) technology.

    PubMed

    Varga, Zsuzsanna; Gaspert, Ariana; Behnke, Silvia; von Teichman, Adriana; Fritzsche, Florian; Fehr, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    The role of endothelial and tubular chimerism in renal allograft adaptation and rejection varies in different studies. We addressed the correlation between different clinico-pathological settings and sex-chromosomal endothelial and/or tubular chimerism in renal allografts. We examined the presence or absence of the X and Y chromosomes by fluorescence and chromogenic in situ hybridization (FISH, CISH) methodology on paraffin embedded kidney biopsies in 16 gender mismatched renal transplants (1 to 12 years post-transplantation). Twelve patients were male, four female. Four groups were selected: (i) Vascular calcineurin inhibitor toxicity without rejection; (ii) T-cell mediated vascular rejection; (iii) antibody mediated rejection; and (iv) C4d-positivity in AB0-incompatible transplants with or without rejection. Twelve non-transplant kidney biopsies (8 female, 4 male) were used as controls. Tubular chimerism was detected more frequently (69%) than endothelial chimerism (12%) in renal transplants. One of 12 control patients had tubular and endothelial chimeric cells (8%). The Y chromosome occurred in 8/12 male recipients (67%) in tubular epithelial cells and in 5/12 male recipients (42%) in endothelial cells. Double X chromosomes were detected in 3/4 female recipients in tubular epithelium. Tubular chimerism occurred more often with endothelial chimerism and capillaritis without correlation with other parameters, such as rejection. Combined Y chromosomal tubular and lymphatic endothelial chimerism correlated with T-cell mediated vascular rejection in two out of three patients (66%). Combined Y chromosomal tubular and peritubular capillary chimerism correlated with antibody mediated C4d+ rejection in one out of two patients (50%). Tubular and/or endothelial chimerism occur frequently in gender mismatched renal allografts and, when combined, this is associated with T-cell mediated rejection. PMID:22449229

  6. Automation of ALK gene rearrangement testing with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH): a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Zwaenepoel, Karen; Merkle, Dennis; Cabillic, Florian; Berg, Erica; Belaud-Rotureau, Marc-Antoine; Grazioli, Vittorio; Herelle, Olga; Hummel, Michael; Le Calve, Michele; Lenze, Dido; Mende, Stefanie; Pauwels, Patrick; Quilichini, Benoit; Repetti, Elena

    2015-02-01

    In the past several years we have observed a significant increase in our understanding of molecular mechanisms that drive lung cancer. Specifically in the non-small cell lung cancer sub-types, ALK gene rearrangements represent a sub-group of tumors that are targetable by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor Crizotinib, resulting in significant reductions in tumor burden. Phase II and III clinical trials were performed using an ALK break-apart FISH probe kit, making FISH the gold standard for identifying ALK rearrangements in patients. FISH is often considered a labor and cost intensive molecular technique, and in this study we aimed to demonstrate feasibility for automation of ALK FISH testing, to improve laboratory workflow and ease of testing. This involved automation of the pre-treatment steps of the ALK assay using various protocols on the VP 2000 instrument, and facilitating automated scanning of the fluorescent FISH specimens for simplified enumeration on various backend scanning and analysis systems. The results indicated that ALK FISH can be automated. Significantly, both the Ikoniscope and BioView system of automated FISH scanning and analysis systems provided a robust analysis algorithm to define ALK rearrangements. In addition, the BioView system facilitated consultation of difficult cases via the internet. PMID:25576649

  7. FISH in chips: turning microfluidic fluorescence in situ hybridization into a quantitative and clinically reliable molecular diagnosis tool.

    PubMed

    Perez-Toralla, Karla; Mottet, Guillaume; Guneri, Ezgi Tulukcuoglu; Champ, Jérôme; Bidard, François-Clément; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Klijanienko, Jerzy; Draskovic, Irena; Malaquin, Laurent; Viovy, Jean-Louis; Descroix, Stéphanie

    2015-02-01

    Microfluidic systems bear promise to provide new powerful tools for the molecular characterization of cancer cells, in particular for the routine detection of multiple cancer biomarkers using a minute amount of the sample. However, taking miniaturized cell-based assays into the clinics requires the implementation and validation of complex biological protocols on chip, as well as the development of disposable microdevices produced at a low cost. Based on a recently developed microfluidic chip made of Cyclic Olefin Copolymer for cell immobilization with minimal dead volume and controlled shear stress, we developed a protocol performed entirely in the liquid phase, allowing the immobilization and fixation of cells and their quantitative characterization by fluorescence in situ hybridization. We demonstrated first in cell lines and then in two clinical case studies the potential of this method to perform quantitative copy number measurement and clinical scoring of the amplification of the ERBB2 gene, a decisive biomarker for the prescription of HER2+ related targeted therapies. This validation was performed in a blind protocol in two clinical case studies, in reference to the gold standard and clinically used method based on glass slides. We obtained a comparable reproducibility and a minor difference in apparent amplification, which can be corrected by internal calibration. The method thus reaches the standard of robustness needed for clinical use. The protocol can be fully automated, and its consumption of samples and DNA probes is reduced as compared to glass slide protocols by a factor of at least 10. The total duration of the assay is divided by two. PMID:25474258

  8. microFIND(®) approach to fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Zanardi, Andrea; Barborini, Emanuele; Carbone, Roberta

    2013-01-01

    FISH technology has gained increasing attention in the management of cancer disease, either for predictive or prognostic indications. Molecular cytogenetics has greatly improved diagnostic capability of classical cytogenetics analysis of metaphase-based chromosome for the identification of genetic aberrations. The availability of a large number of fluorescent probes, each specific for different genetic lesions, together with a robust protocol for interphase FISH, provide the pathologist with the essential tools for an accurate evaluation of patient's disease. Hemato-oncological and many of the solid tumors have been comprehensively characterized by peculiar genetic defects and are now routinely evaluated by interphase FISH. Despite the reliability of the method, which has undergone only minor changes since the 1970s, FISH assay is still hampered by reagents cost, preventing its adoption in large-scale oncological screening. In this chapter we describe a major improvement of interphase FISH assay for cytological samples through the description of the miniaturized device microFIND(®) that offers, besides reduction of cost per assay, a completely novel vision to the FISH technology, thanks to the perspective of full automation of FISH assay using a dedicated robotic platform for microFIND(®) handling, (not presently described in the chapter). PMID:23329459

  9. Assessment of chromosomal abnormalities in sperm of infertile men using sperm karyotyping and multicolour fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Moosani, N.; Martin, R.H.

    1994-09-01

    Individuals with male factor infertility resulting from idiopathic oligo-, astheno- or teratozoospermia are frequently offered IVF in an attempt to increase their chances of having a child. A concern remains whether these infertile males have an elevated risk of transmitting chromosomal abnormalities to their offspring. Sperm chromosomal complements from these men were assayed using the human sperm/hamster oocyte fusion system and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on sperm nuclei. For each of 5 infertile patients, 100 sperm karyotypes were analyzed and multicolour FISH analysis was performed on a minimum of 10,000 sperm nuclei for each chromosome-specific DNA probe for chromosomes 1 (pUC1.77), 12 (D12Z3), X (XC) and Y (DYZ3). As a group, the infertile patients showed increased frequencies of both numerical ({chi}{sup 2}=17.26, {proportional_to} <0.001) and total abnormalities ({chi}{sup 2}=7.78, {proportional_to} <0.01) relative to control donors when assessed by sperm karyotypes. Analysis of sperm nuclei by FISH indicated a significant increase in the frequency of disomy for chromosome 1 in three of the five patients as compared to control donors ({chi}{sup 2}>8.35, {proportional_to} <0.005). In addition, the frequency of XY disomy was significantly higher in four of the five patients studied by FISH ({chi}{sup 2}>10.58, {proportional_to}<0.005), suggesting that mis-segregation caused by the failure of the XY bivalent to pair may play a role in idiopathic male infertility.

  10. Preparations of meiotic pachytene chromosomes and extended DNA fibers from cotton suitable for fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Peng, Renhai; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Fang; Ling, Jian; Wang, Chunying; Li, Shaohui; Zhang, Xiangdi; Wang, Yuhong; Wang, Kunbo

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has become one of the most important techniques applied in plant molecular cytogenetics. However, the application of this technique in cotton has lagged behind because of difficulties in chromosome preparation. The focus of this article was FISH performed not only on cotton pachytene chromosomes, but also on cotton extended DNA fibers. The cotton pollen mother cells (PMCs) instead of buds or anthers were directly digested in enzyme to completely breakdown the cell wall. Before the routine acetic acid treatment, PMCs were incubated in acetic acid and enzyme mixture to remove the cytoplasm and clear the background. The method of ice-cold Carnoy's solution spreading chromosome was adopted instead of nitrogen removed method to avoid chromosomes losing and fully stretch chromosome. With the above-improved steps, the high-quality well-differentiated pachytene chromosomes with clear background were obtained. FISH results demonstrated that a mature protocol of cotton pachytene chromosomes preparation was presented. Intact and no debris cotton nuclei were obtained by chopping from etiolation cotyledons instead of the conventional liquid nitrogen grinding method. After incubating the nuclei with nucleus lysis buffer on slide, the parallel and clear background DNA fibers were acquired along the slide. This method overcomes the twist, accumulation and fracture of DNA fibers compared with other methods. The entire process of DNA fibers preparation requires only 30 min, in contrast, it takes 3 h with routine nitrogen grinding method. The poisonous mercaptoethanol in nucleus lysis buffer is replaced by nonpoisonous dithiothreitol. PVP40 in nucleus isolation buffer is used to prevent oxidation. The probability of success in isolating nuclei for DNA fiber preparation is almost 100% tested with this method in cotton. So a rapid, safe, and efficient method for the preparation of cotton extended DNA fibers suitable for FISH was established

  11. Preparations of Meiotic Pachytene Chromosomes and Extended DNA Fibers from Cotton Suitable for Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Ling, Jian; Wang, Chunying; Li, Shaohui; Zhang, Xiangdi; Wang, Yuhong; Wang, Kunbo

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has become one of the most important techniques applied in plant molecular cytogenetics. However, the application of this technique in cotton has lagged behind because of difficulties in chromosome preparation. The focus of this article was FISH performed not only on cotton pachytene chromosomes, but also on cotton extended DNA fibers. The cotton pollen mother cells (PMCs) instead of buds or anthers were directly digested in enzyme to completely breakdown the cell wall. Before the routine acetic acid treatment, PMCs were incubated in acetic acid and enzyme mixture to remove the cytoplasm and clear the background. The method of ice-cold Carnoy's solution spreading chromosome was adopted instead of nitrogen removed method to avoid chromosomes losing and fully stretch chromosome. With the above-improved steps, the high-quality well-differentiated pachytene chromosomes with clear background were obtained. FISH results demonstrated that a mature protocol of cotton pachytene chromosomes preparation was presented. Intact and no debris cotton nuclei were obtained by chopping from etiolation cotyledons instead of the conventional liquid nitrogen grinding method. After incubating the nuclei with nucleus lysis buffer on slide, the parallel and clear background DNA fibers were acquired along the slide. This method overcomes the twist, accumulation and fracture of DNA fibers compared with other methods. The entire process of DNA fibers preparation requires only 30 min, in contrast, it takes 3 h with routine nitrogen grinding method. The poisonous mercaptoethanol in nucleus lysis buffer is replaced by nonpoisonous dithiothreitol. PVP40 in nucleus isolation buffer is used to prevent oxidation. The probability of success in isolating nuclei for DNA fiber preparation is almost 100% tested with this method in cotton. So a rapid, safe, and efficient method for the preparation of cotton extended DNA fibers suitable for FISH was established

  12. Fluorescence in situ Hybridization method using Peptide Nucleic Acid probes for rapid detection of Lactobacillus and Gardnerella spp.

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common vaginal infection occurring in women of reproductive age. It is widely accepted that the microbial switch from normal microflora to BV is characterized by a decrease in vaginal colonization by Lactobacillus species together with an increase of Gardnerella vaginalis and other anaerobes. Our goal was to develop and optimize a novel Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) Fluorescence in situ Hybridization assay (PNA FISH) for the detection of Lactobacillus spp. and G. vaginalis in mixed samples. Results Therefore, we evaluated and validated two specific PNA probes by using 36 representative Lactobacillus strains, 22 representative G. vaginalis strains and 27 other taxonomically related or pathogenic bacterial strains commonly found in vaginal samples. The probes were also tested at different concentrations of G. vaginalis and Lactobacillus species in vitro, in the presence of a HeLa cell line. Specificity and sensitivity of the PNA probes were found to be 98.0% (95% confidence interval (CI), from 87.8 to 99.9%) and 100% (95% CI, from 88.0 to 100.0%), for Lactobacillus spp.; and 100% (95% CI, from 92.8 to 100%) and 100% (95% CI, from 81.5 to 100.0%) for G. vaginalis. Moreover, the probes were evaluated in mixed samples mimicking women with BV or normal vaginal microflora, demonstrating efficiency and applicability of our PNA FISH. Conclusions This quick method accurately detects Lactobacillus spp. and G. vaginalis species in mixed samples, thus enabling efficient evaluation of the two bacterial groups, most frequently encountered in the vagina. PMID:23586331

  13. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for identification of Tritrichomonas foetus in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded histological specimens of intestinal trichomoniasis.

    PubMed

    Gookin, J L; Stone, M R; Yaeger, M J; Meyerholz, D K; Moisan, Peter

    2010-08-27

    In the present study a highly species-specific oligonucleotide sequence of Tritrichomonas foetus 18S rRNA was used to design an antisense probe for identification of T. foetus in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded histological specimens by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Using archival histological specimens from several species with light microscopic evidence of intestinal trichomoniasis, and under optimized hybridization conditions, the probe positively identified trichomonads in colonic specimens from piglets and a kitten with PCR-confirmed T. foetus infection. Neither positive hybridization of the probe or PCR amplification of T. foetus DNA was observed in histological specimens from hamster (Tritrichomonas muris), turkey, nor mouse (Entamoeba muris) intestinal protozoal infections. Sequence-specific binding of the probe was further verified by successfully out-competing the hybridization with 10 x molar excess unlabeled probe and failure of a labeled sense probe to hybridize. The FISH assay described here enables simultaneous location and molecular identification of T. foetus in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded histological specimens of intestinal trichomoniasis. The methods employed are likely to also be applicable to probes designed for specific recognition of other trichomonad species, especially in mammalian tissue where red blood cell auto-fluorescence can be easily differentiated from the hybridization signal of trichomonads. PMID:20447769

  14. Effect of chromosome size on aberration levels caused by gamma radiation as detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Pandita, T K; Gregoire, V; Dhingra, K; Hittelman, W N

    1994-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful technique for detecting genomic alterations at the chromosome level. To study the effect of chromosome size on aberration formation, we used FISH to detect initial damage in individual prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC) of gamma-irradiated G0 human cells. A linear dose response for breaks and a nonlinear dose response for exchanges was obtained using a chromosome 1-specific probe. FISH detected more chromosome 1 breaks than expected from DNA based extrapolation of Giemsa stained PCC preparations. The discrepancy in the number of breaks detected by the two techniques raised questions as to whether Giemsa staining and FISH differ in their sensitivities for detecting breaks, or is chromosome 1 uniquely sensitive to gamma-radiation. To address the question of technique sensitivity, we determined total chromosome damage by FISH using a total genomic painting probe; the results obtained from Giemsa-staining and FISH were nearly identical. To determine if chromosome 1 was uniquely sensitive, we selected four different sized chromosomes for paint probes and scored them for gamma-ray induced aberrations. In these studies the number of chromosome breaks per unit DNA increased linearly with an increase in the DNA content of the chromosomes. However, the number of exchanges per unit of DNA did not increase with an increase in chromosome size. This suggests that chromosome size may influence the levels of aberrations observed. Extrapolation from measurements of a single chromosome's damage to the whole genome requires that the relative DNA content of the measured chromosome be considered. PMID:8039428

  15. Localization of single- and low-copy sequences on tomato synaptonemal complex spreads using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, D G; Lapitan, N L; Stack, S M

    1999-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful means by which single- and low-copy DNA sequences can be localized on chromosomes. Compared to the mitotic metaphase chromosomes that are normally used in FISH, synaptonemal complex (SC) spreads (hypotonically spread pachytene chromosomes) have several advantages. SC spreads (1) are comparatively free of debris that can interfere with probe penetration, (2) have relatively decondensed chromatin that is highly accessible to probes, and (3) are about ten times longer than their metaphase counterparts, which permits FISH mapping at higher resolution. To investigate the use of plant SC spreads as substrates for single-copy FISH, we probed spreads of tomato SCs with two single-copy sequences and one low-copy sequence (ca. 14 kb each) that are associated with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers on SC 11. Individual SCs were identified on the basis of relative length, arm ratio, and differential staining patterns after combined propidium iodide (PI) and 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. In this first report of single-copy FISH to SC spreads, the probe sequences were unambiguously mapped on the long arm of tomato SC 11. Coupled with data from earlier studies, we determined the distance in micrometers, the number of base pairs, and the rates of crossing over between these three FISH markers. We also observed that the order of two of the FISH markers is reversed in relation to their order on the molecular linkage map. SC-FISH mapping permits superimposition of markers from molecular linkage maps directly on pachytene chromosomes and thereby contributes to our understanding of the relationship between chromosome structure, gene activity, and recombination. PMID:10224272

  16. Comparison of ribosomal DNA sites in Lolium species by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Thomas, H M; Harper, J A; Meredith, M R; Morgan, W G; Thomas, I D; Timms, E; King, I P

    1996-11-01

    The position of the 18S-5.8S-26S and 5S rRNA genes have been physically mapped on the chromosomes of seven Lolium taxa. 18S-5.8S-26S sites were seen on two pairs of chromosomes in the inbreeding taxa. In the outbreeding taxa six sites were found in the L. multiflorum, seven in L. perenne and nine in L. rigidum var. rigidum. Two 5S sites were found in each of the taxa. In the inbreeders, the 5S sites were found adjacent to the 18S-5.8S-26S sites on chromosome 2. In L. multifiorum and L.perenne the 5S sites were on the short arm of chromosome 3. However, in L. rigidum var. rigidum the 5S rDNA site was found in either of the two positions. PMID:8939359

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF SEX CHROMOSOME MOLECULAR MARKERS USING RAPDS AND FLUORESCENT IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION IN RAINBOW TROUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this work is to identify molecular markers associated with the sex chromosomes in rainbow trout to study the mode of sex determination mechanisms in this species. Using the RAPD assay and bulked segregant analysis, two markers were identified that generated polymorphi...

  18. Spot counting on fluorescence in situ hybridization in suspension images using Gaussian mixture model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sijia; Sa, Ruhan; Maguire, Orla; Minderman, Hans; Chaudhary, Vipin

    2015-03-01

    Cytogenetic abnormalities are important diagnostic and prognostic criteria for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A flow cytometry-based imaging approach for FISH in suspension (FISH-IS) was established that enables the automated analysis of several log-magnitude higher number of cells compared to the microscopy-based approaches. The rotational positioning can occur leading to discordance between spot count. As a solution of counting error from overlapping spots, in this study, a Gaussian Mixture Model based classification method is proposed. The Akaike information criterion (AIC) and Bayesian information criterion (BIC) of GMM are used as global image features of this classification method. Via Random Forest classifier, the result shows that the proposed method is able to detect closely overlapping spots which cannot be separated by existing image segmentation based spot detection methods. The experiment results show that by the proposed method we can obtain a significant improvement in spot counting accuracy.

  19. Occurrence of Bifidobacterium in the intestine of newborns by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Bezirtzoglou, E; Maipa, V; Chotoura, N; Apazidou, E; Tsiotsias, A; Voidarou, C; Kostakis, D; Alexopoulos, A

    2006-11-01

    Colonization by Bifidobacterium occurs generally within 4 days of life. The new method FISH has been applied for molecular detection of Bifidobacteria. The study was carried out on 26 healthy newborns delivered by vaginal delivery. Breast-fed infants harbor a gastrointestinal flora characterized by an increased concentration of Bifidobacterium cells (by a factor of 1.75). In artificial alimentation, some infants either did not harbor any Bifidobacterium or showed lower numbers of Bifidobacterium. Moreover, male newborns show higher numbers of Bifidobacterium, but in both sexes the predominance of Bifidobacterium is evident after maternal alimentation. PMID:17034855

  20. Trisomy 10p resulting from an inv dup of 10p defined by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, S.J.; Easterling, T.R.; Leppig, K.A.

    1994-09-01

    De novo cases of trisomy for the entire short arm of chromosome 10 are infrequently reported and are most commonly the result of translocation of 10p to an acrocentric chromosome. Most reported cases of trisomy 10p are not trisomy for the complete short arm of chromosome 10, but are duplication, deficiency syndromes that result from either inheritance of an unbalanced translocation from a parent possessing a balanced reciprocal translocation, or from a recombinant chromosome derived from a parental pericentric inversion of chromosome 10. Here, we report a case of a de novo trisomy 10p that resulted from an inverted duplication of the entire short arm of chromosome 10. A 42 year old G7,P5,SAB1 woman was referred for amniocentesis because of advanced maternal age. Ultrasound examination at 17 weeks demonstrated a fetus of normal size with no apparent anatomic abnormalities. Cytogenetic evaluation demonstrated one homologue of chromosome 10 had a tandem inverted duplication of the short arm. The fetal karyotype was interpreted to be 46,XX,inv dup (10) (peter-cen::cen-p15::q11-pter). Parental karyotype are normal. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a chromosome 10 paint, chromosome 10 centromere, and all telomere probe, confirmed the inverted duplication involved the entire short arm of chromosome 10. Termination of pregnancy was performed at 20 weeks gestation. Autopsy revealed multiple anomalies including low-set posteriorly rotated ears, cleft of the soft palate, ocular hypertelorism, small upturned nose, agenesis of the gallbladder, sacral hemivertebrae, and abnormal flexion of the thumbs. The fetal karyotype was confirmed by cytogenetic analysis in lung and kidney. This is the second reported case of a de novo tandem duplication of 10p of which we are aware, and the first using FISH technology to characterize the abnormality.

  1. Asymmetric Aneuploidy in Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Detected by In Situ Karyotyping and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization: Suggestions for Reference Values for Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seon Young; Im, Kyongok; Park, Si Nae; Kwon, Jiseok; Kim, Jung-Ah; Choi, Qute; Hwang, Sang Mee; Han, Sung-Hee; Kwon, Sunghoon; Oh, Il-Hoan

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetic testing is important to ensure patient safety before therapeutic application of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). However, the standardized methods and criteria for the screening of chromosomal abnormalities of MSCs have not yet been determined. We investigated the frequency of cytogenetic aberrations in MSCs using G-banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and suggest reference values for aneuploidy in MSCs. Cytogenetic analysis was performed on 103 consecutive cultures from 68 MSCs (25 adipose-origin, 20 bone marrow-origin, 18 cord blood-origin, and 5 neural stem cells; 8 from adipose tissue of patients with breast cancer and 60 from healthy donors). We compared the MSC aneuploidy patterns with those of hematological malignancies and benign hematological diseases. Interphase FISH showed variable aneuploid clone proportions (1%–20%) in 68 MSCs. The aneuploidy patterns were asymmetric, and aneuploidy of chromosomes 16, 17, 18, and X occurred most frequently. Clones with polysomy were significantly more abundant than those with monosomy. The cutoff value of maximum polysomy rates (upper 95th percentile value) was 13.0%. By G-banding, 5 of the 61 MSCs presented clonal chromosomal aberrations. Aneuploidy was asymmetric in the malignant hematological diseases, while it was symmetric in the benign hematological diseases. We suggest an aneuploidy cutoff value of 13%, and FISH for aneuploidy of chromosomes 16, 17, 18, and X would be informative to evaluate the genetic stability of MSCs. Although it is unclear whether the aneuploid clones might represent the senescent cell population or transformed cells, more attention should be focused on the safety of MSCs, and G-banding combined with FISH should be performed. PMID:25019198

  2. Oral biofilm analysis of palatal expanders by fluorescence in-situ hybridization and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Klug, Barbara; Rodler, Claudia; Koller, Martin; Wimmer, Gernot; Kessler, Harald H; Grube, Martin; Santigli, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) of natural heterogeneous biofilm is today facilitated by a comprehensive range of staining techniques, one of them being fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We performed a pilot study in which oral biofilm samples collected from fixed orthodontic appliances (palatal expanders) were stained by FISH, the objective being to assess the three-dimensional organization of natural biofilm and plaque accumulation. FISH creates an opportunity to stain cells in their native biofilm environment by the use of fluorescently labeled 16S rRNA-targeting probes. Compared to alternative techniques like immunofluorescent labeling, this is an inexpensive, precise and straightforward labeling technique to investigate different bacterial groups in mixed biofilm consortia. General probes were used that bind to Eubacteria (EUB338 + EUB338II + EUB338III; hereafter EUBmix), Firmicutes (LGC354 A-C; hereafter LGCmix), and Bacteroidetes (Bac303). In addition, specific probes binding to Streptococcus mutans (MUT590) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (POGI) were used. The extreme hardness of the surface materials involved (stainless steel and acrylic resin) compelled us to find new ways of preparing the biofilm. As these surface materials could not be readily cut with a cryotome, various sampling methods were explored to obtain intact oral biofilm. The most workable of these approaches is presented in this communication. Small flakes of the biofilm-carrying acrylic resin were scraped off with a sterile scalpel, taking care not to damage the biofilm structure. Forceps were used to collect biofilm from the steel surfaces. Once collected, the samples were fixed and placed directly on polysine coated glass slides. FISH was performed directly on these slides with the probes mentioned above. Various FISH protocols were combined and modified to create a new protocol that was easy to handle. Subsequently the samples were analyzed by confocal laser scanning

  3. Localization of a candidate colon tumor-suppressor gene (DRA) to 7q22-q31. 1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, T.; Testa, J.R. ); Papas, T.S.; Schweinfest, C. )

    1994-03-01

    The authors have previously reported that the DRA gene is located on chromosome 7. This assignment was based on Southern blot hybridization of a DRA cDNA to genomic DNA from rodent-human somatic cell hybrids. In this report, they localize the DRA gene to chromosome band 7q22-q31.1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a full-length (2.9 kb) cDNA as probe. Metaphase spreads from normal human lymphocytes were prepared according to the method of Fan et al. The cDNA clone 611C was labeled with biotin-11-dUTP using a nick-translation kit (Oncor) followed by purification on a Sephadex G50-fine column. FISH and detection of immunofluorescence were performed according to the technique of Pinkel et al. with minor modifications. The chromosome preparations were stained with both diamidino-2-phenylindole and propidium iodide (Oncor) and observed with a Zeiss Axiophot fluorescence microscope. Hybridization was detected on chromosome 7 in 22 of 47 spreads examined. Of 89 fluorescent signals on all chromosomes, 44 (49%) were located on 7q. All signals on chromosome 7 appeared to be located at 7q22-q31.1. Hybridization is in the vicinity of the met protooncogene locus at 7q31.

  4. Quantitative real-time PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization approaches for enumerating Brevundimonas diminuta in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Donofrio, Robert S; Bestervelt, Lorelle L; Saha, Ratul; Bagley, Susan T

    2010-09-01

    Brevundimonas diminuta is a small Gram-negative bacterium used for validation of membranes and filters used in the pharmaceutical and drinking water treatment industries. Current assays are time consuming, nonselective, and may be subject to interference by competing indigenous microorganisms. The focus of this study is to develop rapid and specific enumeration methodologies for B. diminuta. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assays were developed based on the gyrB (1,166 bp) and rpoD (829 bp) gene sequences of B. diminuta ATCC 19146. Species-specific primers and probes were designed, and a 100-200 bp segment of each gene was targeted in the qPCR studies. For both the qPCR and FISH assays, an internal 25 bp sequence was selected for use as a TaqMan probe (labeled with 6-FAM and a Black Hole Quencher). Probe specificity studies, conducted against Gram-negative and Gram-positive reference strains as well as environmental strains, revealed high specificity of the primer/probe pairs to B. diminuta. Sensitivities of the qPCR reactions using purified genomic DNA from B. diminuta were determined to be 0.89 pg for rpoD and 8.9 pg for gyrB. The feasibility of using whole-cell B. diminuta suspensions directly with the rpoD qPCR protocol was also evaluated. The greatest sensitivity observed for B. diminuta was 1 x 10(3) colony forming units (CFU) per mL when tryptic soy broth was used as the growth medium. When compared with direct microscopic enumeration using a 5' 6-FAM FISH probe, traditional plating methods showed significant underestimation of B. diminuta concentration (P = 0.01) when this organism was cultivated in saline lactose broth. The results of this investigation demonstrate that qPCR and FISH are effective methods for rapid (<4 h) enumeration of B. diminuta and may be viable alternatives to plating when validating drinking water filtration systems. PMID:20495940

  5. Rapid method for measuring clastogenic fingerprints using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.

    2000-01-01

    A method is provided for determining a clastogenic signature of a sample of chromosomes by quantifying a frequency of a first type of chromosome aberration present in the sample; quantifying a frequency of a second, different type of chromosome aberration present in the sample; and comparing the frequency of the first type of chromosome aberration to the frequency of the second type of chromosome aberration. A method is also provided for using that clastogenic signature to identify a clastogenic agent or dosage to which the cells were exposed.

  6. Identification of Prader-Willi Syndrome mosaicism by fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Mowery-Rushton, P.A.; Surti, U.; Hanchett, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) is a microdeletion syndrome involving an interstitial deletion of region q11-q13 on the paternal chromosome 15. We report 2 cases of PWS that were analyzed using FISH and were found to be mosaic for a normal cell line and a deleted cell line. Case 1 was diagnosed as an atypical PWS who was cytogenetically normal. She is a 38 y.o. white female displaying some but not all of the features of PWS. Case 2 is a 23 y.o. white male with a classical deletion of chromosome 15q11-q13. He displays very typical features of PWS. He was also noted to be albino. FISH analysis was performed on PHA stimulated lymphocytes. We examined four loci: D15S11, SNRPN, D15S10, and GABRB3. The number of cells examined for each locus ranged from 46 to 75. Case 1 was deleted at 3 of the 4 loci (D15S11, SNRPN and GABRB3) in 30% of her cells. The D15S10 locus was not deleted. This may account for the atypical features displayed by this patient. It also suggests that this chromosome is rearranged resulting in the retention of the interstitial locus. The exact nature of the rearrangement needs to be determined. Case 2 was deleted at all four loci in 60% of the cells analyzed. This result was unexpected because his deletion was identified cytogenetically, but mosaicism was not detected. These are the first reported cases of mosaic PWS diagnosed using FISH. The use of cytogenetics alone requires high resolution banding to accurately identify the deletion. This makes the detection of small deletions in every cell difficult and the determination of mosaicism almost impossible. Our results suggest that mosaicism may be occurring more frequently than previously thought and may account for some of the atypical cases. Studies are in progress to determine the effect of mosaicism on methylation at genes located within this region which are imprinted and are thought to be involved in the etiology of Prader-Willi Syndroms.

  7. Diagnosis of a constitutional five-chromosome rearrangement by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Tsien, F.; Shapira, E.; Carvalho, T.

    1994-09-01

    Complex chromosomal rearrangements are structural rearrangements involving at least three chromosomes and three or more chromosome breakpoints. Such karyotypes are often acquired during cancer multi-step development and in chromosome instability syndromes. However, extremely rare constitutional forms have been reported, most of which are incompatible with life. We present a 2-year-old female with de novo complex rearrangement consisting of five chromosomes and nine breakpoints. Clinical evaluation at two years of age revealed a weight of 5 kg, length of 66 cm, and had circumference of 38 cm, all below the 5th percentile, microcephaly, trigonocephaly, epicanthal folds, inguinal hernia, left clubfoot, hypertonicity, and developmental delay. The neurological examination revealed chorea-acanthocytosis and psychomotor delay. Cultured lymphocytes and fibroblasts revealed a karyotype consisting of five derivative chromosomes. The metaphases were further analyzed by FISH using chromosome-specific libraries and telomeric probes in order to delineate the composition of the rearranged chromosomes; FISH results demonstrated a karyotype of: 46,XX,1pter{r_arrow}1q25::1q42.1{r_arrow}1qter, 2pter{r_arrow}q32.3::1q32.3{r_arrow}2q41::2q37.3{r_arrow}2qter, 7qter{r_arrow}7q21.2::6q22.3{r_arrow}6qter::1q31{r_arrow}1q32.3::6p23{r_arrow}6q22.3, 7pter{r_arrow}7q21.1::6p23{r_arrow}6pter, 2q33{r_arrow}2q37, 1::9p21{r_arrow}9qter. This analysis demonstrates the usefulness of FISH in characterizing complex chromosome rearrangements otherwise difficult to correctly interpret using classical cytogenetics alone.

  8. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and spectral imaging analysisof human oocytes and first polar bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.; Weier, Jingly F.; Oter Renom, Maria; Zheng,Xuezhong; Colls, Pere; Nureddin, Aida; Pham, Chau D.; Chu, Lisa W.; Racowsky, Catherine; Munne, Santiago

    2004-10-06

    We investigated the frequencies of abnormalities involving either chromosome 1, 16, 18 or 21 in failed-fertilized human oocytes.While abnormalities involving chromosome 16 showed an age-dependant increase, results for the other chromosomes did not show statistically significant differences between the three age groups <35 yrs, 35-39 yrs, and >39 yrs. The scoring of four chromosomes is likely to underestimate the true rate of aneuploid cells. Thus, for a pilot study investigating a more comprehensive analysis of oocytes and their corresponding first polar bodies (1PBs), we developed a novel 8-probe chromosome enumeration scheme using FISH and SIm.

  9. Partial trisomy 11q involving chromosome 1 detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    McCorquodale, M.; Bereziouk, O.; McCorquodale, D.J.

    1994-09-01

    Partial trisomy 11q was detected in an infant delivered 3-4 weeks prematurely. The phenotype included slanted palpebral fissures, high arched palate, developmental delay, microcephaly, and cardiac defects, all of which occur in the majority of cases with this syndrome. Other features included a column-shaped skull, preauricular pit, single palmar crease, short, broad great toes, flat occiput, unilateral kidney agenesis, and strabismus. Chromosomes obtained from peripheral blood cells revealed the presence of extra material on the long arm of chromosome 1. The G-banding pattern of this extra material indicated that it might be derived from chromosome 1 or 11. Chromosomal {open_quotes}paints{close_quotes} showed that it was not chromosome 1 material, but was chromosome 11 material extending from band q21 to qter. Partial trisomy 11q arising from translocation of the 11q material to chromosome 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 13, 17, 21, 22, and X has been reported previously, whereas translocation to chromosome 1 has not. The chromosome to which the 11q material is translocated does not alter the most frequent features of the partial trisomy 11q syndrome, but may influence other less common features.

  10. Interphase study by fluorescence in situ hybridization of spermatozoa of a paracentric inversion heterozygote

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, J.K.; Best, R.G.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies of peripheral lymphocytes were initiated on a couple with a history of three spontaneous 1st trimester losses and oligospermia. The results revealed the woman to have a normal female karyotype. The man had a karyotype of 46,XY,inv(2)(q14.2q24.3). Interphase sperm studies were offered as an attempt to quantify the relative proportion of sperm with acentric and dicentric chromosome No. 2 in response to the couple`s concern that chromosomally unbalanced sperm resulting from recombination of the inversion was the primary cause of pregnancy losses. Slides were prepared and processed as previously described. A two-color probe cocktail consisting of a biotinylated {alpha}-satellite probe for No. 2 and a digoxigenin-labeled probe for {alpha}-satellite No. 17 as an internal control was employed. Among 496 cells with a single signal for chromosome No. 17, we observed 2 with no signal for chromsome No. 2, 492 with a single signal for No. 2, and 2 cells with 2 signals for No. 2. These findings indicate that the proportion of unbalanced recombinant sperm is probably under 1%, and that other factors are likely to be involved in the etiology of this couple`s pregnancy losses.

  11. Identification of a ring chromosome as a ring 8 using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) in a child with multiple congenital anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.G.; Roback, E.W.; Allen, G.A.

    1995-07-03

    We read with interest the report by Melnyk and Dewald of a small supernumerary ring chromosome 8 identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in a child with developmental delay and minor anomalies. Although ring chromosomes resulting in loss of parts of chromosome 8 have been reported, Melnyk and Dewald reported the first small ring chromosome 8 diagnosed by FISH. Previously nonsatellited markers derived from chromosomes 1, 3, 6, 9, 11, 13-16, 18, 20, 21, and X have been identified using FISH. Their study illustrated the value of FISH techniques in identifying the chromosomal source of markers or rings.

  12. Electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence in situ hybridization-based investigations of individual doses for persons living at Metlino in the upper reaches of the Techa River.

    PubMed

    Degteva, Marina O; Anspaugh, Lynn R; Akleyev, Alexander V; Jacob, Peter; Ivanov, Denis V; Wieser, Albrecht; Vorobiova, Marina I; Shishkina, Elena A; Shved, Valentina A; Vozilova, Alexandra; Bayankin, Sergey N; Napier, Bruce A

    2005-02-01

    Waterborne releases to the Techa River from the Mayak Production Association in Russia during 1949-1956 resulted in significant doses to persons living downstream; the most contaminated village was Metlino, about 7 km from the site of release. Internal and external doses have been estimated for these residents using the Techa River Dosimetry System-2000 (TRDS-2000); the primary purpose is to support epidemiological studies of the members of the Extended Techa River Cohort. Efforts to validate the calculations of external and internal dose are considered essential. One validation study of the TRDS-2000 system has been performed by the comparison of calculated doses to quartz from bricks in old buildings at Metlino with those measured by luminescence dosimetry. Two additional methods of validation considered here are electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements of teeth and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) measurements of chromosome translocations in circulating lymphocytes. For electron paramagnetic resonance, 36 measurements on 26 teeth from 16 donors from Metlino were made at the GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health (16 measurements) and the Institute of Metal Physics (20 measurements); the correlation among measurements made at the two laboratories has been found to be 0.99. Background measurements were also made on 218 teeth (63 molars, 128 premolars, and 27 incisors). Fluorescence in situ hybridization measurements were made for 31 residents of Metlino. These measurements were handicapped by the analysis of a limited number of cells; for several individuals no stable translocations were observed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization measurements were also made for 39 individuals believed to be unexposed. The EPR- and FISH-based estimates agreed well for permanent residents of Metlino: 0.67 +/- 0.21 Gy and 0.48 +/- 0.18 Gy (mean +/- standard error of the mean), respectively. Results of the two experimental methods also agreed well

  13. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization-Based Investigations of Individual Doses for Persons Living at Metlino in the Upper Reaches of the Techa River

    SciTech Connect

    Degteva, M. O.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Akleyev, A V.; Jacob, Peter; Ivanov, Denis V.; Wieser, Albrecht; Vorobiova, M I.; Shishkina, Elena A.; Shved, Valentina A.; Vozilova, Alexandra; Bayankin, Sergey N.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2005-02-01

    Waterborne releases to the Techa River from the Mayak Production Association in Russia during 1949-1956 resulted in significant doses to persons living downstream; the most contaminated village was Metlino, about 7 km from the site of release. Internal and external doses have been estimated for these residents using the Techa River Dosimetry System-2000 (TRDS-2000); the primary purpose is to support epidemiological studies of the members of the Extended Techa River Cohort. Efforts to validate the calculations of external and internal dose are considered essential. One validation study of the TRDS-2000 system has been performed by the comparison of calculated doses to quartz from bricks in old buildings at Metlino with those measured by luminescence dosimetry. Two additional methods of validation considered here are electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements of teeth and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) measurements of chromosome translocations in circulating lymphocytes. For electron paramagnetic resonance, 36 measurements on 26 teeth from 16 donors from Metlino were made at the GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health (16 measurements) and the Institute of Metal Physics (20 measurements); the correlation among measurements made at the two laboratories has been found to be 0.99. Background measurements were also made on 218 teeth (63 molars, 128 premolars, and 27 incisors). Fluorescence in situ hybridization measurements were made for 31 residents of Metlino. These measurements were handicapped by the analysis of a limited number of cells; for several individuals no stable translocations were observed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization measurements were also made for 39 individuals believed to be unexposed. The EPR- and FISH-based estimates agreed well for permanent residents of Metlino: 0.67 +/- 0.21 Gy and 0.48 +/- 0.18 Gy (mean +/- standard error of the mean), respectively. Results of the two experimental methods also agreed well

  14. A molecular cytogenetic map of sorghum chromosome 1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with mapped bacterial artificial chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Islam-Faridi, M N; Childs, K L; Klein, P E; Hodnett, G; Menz, M A; Klein, R R; Rooney, W L; Mullet, J E; Stelly, D M; Price, H J

    2002-01-01

    We used structural genomic resources for Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench to target and develop multiple molecular cytogenetic probes that would provide extensive coverage for a specific chromosome of sorghum. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones containing molecular markers mapped across sorghum linkage group A were labeled as probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Signals from single-, dual-, and multiprobe BAC-FISH to spreads of mitotic chromosomes and pachytene bivalents were associated with the largest sorghum chromosome, which bears the nucleolus organizing region (NOR). The order of individual BAC-FISH loci along the chromosome was fully concordant to that of marker loci along the linkage map. In addition, the order of several tightly linked molecular markers was clarified by FISH analysis. The FISH results indicate that markers from the linkage map positions 0.0-81.8 cM reside in the short arm of chromosome 1 whereas markers from 81.8-242.9 cM are located in the long arm of chromosome 1. The centromere and NOR were located in a large heterochromatic region that spans approximately 60% of chromosome 1. In contrast, this region represents only 0.7% of the total genetic map distance of this chromosome. Variation in recombination frequency among euchromatic chromosomal regions also was apparent. The integrated data underscore the value of cytological data, because minor errors and uncertainties in linkage maps can involve huge physical regions. The successful development of multiprobe FISH cocktails suggests that it is feasible to develop chromosome-specific "paints" from genomic resources rather than flow sorting or microdissection and that when applied to pachytene chromatin, such cocktails provide an especially powerful framework for mapping. Such a molecular cytogenetic infrastructure would be inherently cross-linked with other genomic tools and thereby establish a cytogenomics system with extensive utility in development and application

  15. Warthin-like Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma: A Combined Study of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization and Whole-slide Imaging.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Kenichiro; Ito, Yohei; Masaki, Ayako; Fujii, Kana; Beppu, Shintaro; Sakakibara, Takeo; Takino, Hisashi; Takase, Hiroshi; Ijichi, Kei; Shimozato, Kazuo; Inagaki, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    There has been some debate as to whether a subset of metaplastic Warthin tumors (mWTs) harbor the mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC)-associated CRTC1-MAML2 fusion. We analyzed 15 tumors originally diagnosed as mWT (mWT-like tumors), 2 of which had concurrent MECs. We looked for the CRTC1/3-MAML2 fusion transcripts and performed immunohistochemistry for p63 and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the MAML2 split. To localize MAML2 split-positive cells at the cellular level, whole tumor tissue sections were digitalized (whole-slide imaging [WSI]). The CRTC1-MAML2, but not CRTC3-MAML2 was detected in 5/15 mWT-like tumors. FISH-WSI results showed that all epithelial cells harbored the MAML2 split in fusion-positive mWT-like tumors and were totally negative in fusion-negative mWT-like tumors. A review of the hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides showed that morphology of the "metaplastic" epithelium was virtually indistinguishable between fusion-positive and fusion-negative tumors. However, oncocytic bilayered tumor epithelium, characteristic to typical WT, was always found somewhere in the fusion-negative tumors but not in the fusion-positive tumors. This distinguishing histologic finding enabled 5 pathologists to easily differentiate the 2 tumor groups with 100% accuracy. The age and sex distribution of fusion-positive mWT-like tumor cases was similar to that of fusion-positive MEC cases and significantly different from those of fusion-negative mWT-like tumor and typical WT cases. In addition, only fusion-positive mWT-like tumors possessed concurrent low-grade MECs. In conclusion, a subset of mWT-like tumors were positive for the CRTC1-MAML2 fusion and had many features that are more in accord with MEC than with WT. The term Warthin-like MEC should be considered for fusion-positive mWT-like tumors. PMID:26457352

  16. Novel karyotype in the Ullrich-Turner syndrome - 45,X/46,X,r(X)/46,X,dic(X) - investigated with fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Robson, L.; Jackson, J.; Cowell, C.; Sillence, D.; Smith, A.

    1994-04-15

    A 10-year-old girl with Ullrich-Turner syndrome was found to have the novel karyotype 45,X/46,X,r(X)(p11q11)/46,X,dic(X)(p11). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with the {alpha} satellite X centromere probe established the origin of the small ring chromosome. Scanning a large number of cells by interphase FISH showed that the dicentric (X) was the least prevalent cell line. The common breakpoint of Xp11 suggests a sequence of errors as the mechanism whereby these 3 distinct cell lines have arisen. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Assessment of retrospective dose estimation, with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), of six victims previously exposed to accidental ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing-Jie; Lu, Xue; Zhao, Xiao-Tao; Feng, Jiang-Bin; Lü, Yu-Min; Jiang, En-Hai; Zhang, Shu-Lan; Chen, De-Qing; Jia, Ting-Zhen; Liang, Li

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the use of the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) translocation assay for retrospective dose estimation of acute accidental exposure to radiation in the past. Reciprocal translocation analysis by FISH with three whole-chromosome probes was performed on normal peripheral blood samples. Samples were irradiated with 0-5Gy (60)Co γ-rays in vitro, and dose-effect curves were established. FISH-based translocation analyses for six accident victims were then performed, and biological doses were estimated retrospectively by comparison with the dose-effect curves. Reconstructed doses by FISH were compared with estimated doses obtained by analysis of di-centrics performed soon after exposure, or with dose estimates from tooth-enamel electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) data obtained at the same time as the FISH analysis. Follow-up FISH analyses for an adolescent victim were performed. Results showed that dose-effect curves established in the present study follow a linear-quadratic model, regardless of the background translocation frequency. Estimated doses according to two dose-effect curves for all six victims were similar. FISH dose estimations of three adult victims exposed to accidental radiation less than a decade prior to analysis (3, 6, or 7 years ago) were consistent with those estimated with tooth-enamel EPR measurements or analyses of di-centrics. Estimated doses of two other adult victims exposed to radiation over a decade prior to analysis (16 or 33 years ago) were underestimated and two to three times lower than the values obtained from analysis of di-centrics or tooth-enamel EPR. Follow-up analyses of the adolescent victim showed that doses estimated by FISH analysis decrease rapidly over time. Therefore, the accuracy of dose estimates by FISH is acceptable only when analysis is performed less than 7 years after exposure. Measurements carried out more than a decade after exposure through FISH analysis resulted in

  18. Fluorescent nanodiamond and lanthanide labelled in situ hybridization for the identification of RNA transcripts in fixed and CLARITY-cleared central nervous system tissues (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Lindsay M.; Staikopoulos, Vicky; Cordina, Nicole M.; Sayyadi, Nima; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Packer, Nicolle H.

    2016-03-01

    Despite significant advancement in the methodology used to conjugate, incorporate and visualize fluorescent molecules at the cellular and tissue levels, biomedical imaging predominantly relies on the limitations of established fluorescent molecules such as fluorescein, cyanine and AlexaFluor dyes or genetic incorporation of fluorescent proteins by viral or other means. These fluorescent dyes and conjugates are highly susceptible to photobleaching and compete with cellular autofluorescence, making biomedical imaging unreliable, difficult and time consuming in many cases. In addition, some proteins have low copy numbers and/or poor antibody recognition, further making detection and imaging difficult. We are developing better methods for imaging central nervous system neuroinflammatory markers using targeted mRNA transcripts labelled with fluorescent nanodiamonds or lanthanide chelates. These tags have increased signal and photostability and can also discriminate against tissue/cell autofluorescence. Brains and spinal cords from BALB/c mice with a chronic constriction model of neuropathic pain (neuroinflammation group) or that have undergone sham surgeries (control group) were collected. A subset of brains and spinal cords were perfused and fixed with paraformaldehyde (n=3 sham and n=3 pain groups) prior to sectioning and in situ hybridization using nanodiamond or lanthanide chelate conjugated complementary RNA probes. Another subset of brains and spinal cords from the same cohort of animals were perfused and processed for CLARITY hydrogel based clearing prior to in situ hybridization with the same probes. We will present our findings on the photostability, sensitivity and discrimination from background tissue autofluorescence of our novel RNA probes, compared to traditional fluorophore tags.

  19. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Rapid Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Potable-Water Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Lehtola, Markku J.; Torvinen, Eila; Miettinen, Ilkka T.; Keevil, C. William

    2006-01-01

    Here, we present for the first time a high-affinity peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligonucleotide sequence for detecting Mycobacterium avium bacteria, including the opportunistically pathogenic subspecies M. avium subsp. avium, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and M. avium subsp. silvaticum, by the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method. There is evidence that M. avium subsp. avium especially is able to survive and grow in drinking-water biofilms and possibly transmit via drinking water. The designed PNA probe (MAV148) specificity was tested with several bacterial species, including other mycobacteria and mycolic acid-containing bacteria. From the range of bacterial strains tested, only M. avium subsp. avium and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains were hybridized. The PNA FISH method was applied successfully to detect M. avium subsp. avium spiked in water samples and biofilm established within a Propella biofilm reactor fed with potable water from a distribution supply. PMID:16391126

  20. Development of automated brightfield double In Situ hybridization (BDISH) application for HER2 gene and chromosome 17 centromere (CEN 17) for breast carcinomas and an assay performance comparison to manual dual color HER2 fluorescence In Situ hybridization (FISH)

    PubMed Central

    Nitta, Hiroaki; Hauss-Wegrzyniak, Beatrice; Lehrkamp, Megan; Murillo, Adrian E; Gaire, Fabien; Farrell, Michael; Walk, Eric; Penault-Llorca, Frederique; Kurosumi, Masafumi; Dietel, Manfred; Wang, Lin; Loftus, Margaret; Pettay, James; Tubbs, Raymond R; Grogan, Thomas M

    2008-01-01

    Background Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a quantitative assay for selecting breast cancer patients for trastuzumab therapy. However, current HER2 FISH procedures are labor intensive, manual methods that require skilled technologists and specialized fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, FISH slides cannot be archived for long term storage and review. Our objective was to develop an automated brightfield double in situ hybridization (BDISH) application for HER2 gene and chromosome 17 centromere (CEN 17) and test the assay performance with dual color HER2 FISH evaluated breast carcinomas. Methods The BDISH assay was developed with the nick translated dinitrophenyl (DNP)-labeled HER2 DNA probe and DNP-labeled CEN 17 oligoprobe on the Ventana BenchMark® XT slide processing system. Detection of HER2 and CEN 17 signals was accomplished with the silver acetate, hydroquinone, and H2O2 reaction with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and the fast red and naphthol phosphate reaction with alkaline phosphatise (AP), respectively. The BDISH specificity was optimized with formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded xenograft tumors, MCF7 (non-amplified HER2 gene) and BT-474 (amplified HER2 gene). Then, the BDISH performance was evaluated with 94 routinely processed breast cancer tissues. Interpretation of HER2 and CEN 17 BDISH slides was conducted by 4 observers using a conventional brightfield microscope without oil immersion objectives. Results Sequential hybridization and signal detection for HER2 and CEN 17 ISH demonstrated both DNA targets in the same cells. HER2 signals were visualized as discrete black metallic silver dots while CEN 17 signals were detected as slightly larger red dots. Our study demonstrated a high consensus concordance between HER2 FISH and BDISH results of clinical breast carcinoma cases based on the historical scoring method (98.9%, Simple Kappa = 0.9736, 95% CI = 0.9222 – 1.0000) and the ASCO

  1. The analysis of ALK gene rearrangement by fluorescence in situ hybridization in non-small cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, Paweł Adam; Ramlau, Rodryg Adam; Szumiło, Justyna; Kozielski, Jerzy; Kalinka-Warzocha, Ewa; Bryl, Maciej; Knopik-Dąbrowicz, Alina; Spychalski, Łukasz; Szczęsna, Aleksandra; Rydzik, Ewelina; Milanowski, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Introduction ALK gene rearrangement is observed in a small subset (3–7%) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. The efficacy of crizotinib was shown in lung cancer patients harbouring ALK rearrangement. Nowadays, the analysis of ALK gene rearrangement is added to molecular examination of predictive factors. Aim of the study The frequency of ALK gene rearrangement as well as the type of its irregularity was analysed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) in tissue samples from NSCLC patients. Material and methods The ALK gene rearrangement was analysed in 71 samples including 53 histological and 18 cytological samples. The analysis could be performed in 56 cases (78.87%), significantly more frequently in histological than in cytological materials. The encountered problem with ALK rearrangement diagnosis resulted from the scarcity of tumour cells in cytological samples, high background fluorescence noises and fragmentation of cell nuclei. Results The normal ALK copy number without gene rearrangement was observed in 26 (36.62%) patients ALK gene polysomy without gene rearrangement was observed in 25 (35.21%) samples while in 3 (4.23%) samples ALK gene amplification was found. ALK gene rearrangement was observed in 2 (2.82%) samples from males, while in the first case the rearrangement coexisted with ALK amplification. In the second case, signet-ring tumour cells were found during histopathological examination and this patient was successfully treated with crizotinib with partial remission lasting 16 months. Conclusions FISH is a useful technique for ALK gene rearrangement analysis which allows us to specify the type of gene irregularities. ALK gene examination could be performed in histological as well as cytological (cellblocks) samples, but obtaining a reliable result in cytological samples depends on the cellularity of examined materials. PMID:24592134

  2. Bacterioplankton community structure in a maritime antarctic oligotrophic lake during a period of holomixis, as determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Pearce, D A

    2003-07-01

    The bacterioplankton community structure in Moss Lake, a maritime Antarctic oligotrophic lake, was determined with vertical depth in the water column, during the ice-free period on Signy Island in the South Orkney Islands. Bacterioplankton community structure was determined using a combination of direct counting of 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) stained cells, PCR amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragments, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and in situ hybridization with group-specific, fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probes. Using PCR amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragments and DGGE, the bacterioplankton community composition was shown to be constant with vertical depth in the water column. Specific bacterioplankton species identified through cloning and sequencing the DGGE products obtained were Flavobacterium xinjiangensis (a Flavobacterium), Leptothrix discophora (a beta-Proteobacterium), and a number of uncultured groups: two beta-Proteobacteria, an unclassified Proteobacterium, three sequences from Actinobacteria, and a Cyanobacterium. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), however, demonstrated that there were minor but significant fluctuations in different groups of bacteria with vertical depth in the water column. It showed that the beta-Proteobacteria accounted for between 26.4 and 71.5%, the alpha-Proteobacteria 2.3-10.6%, the gamma-Proteobacteria 0-29.6%, and the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium group 1.8-23.5% of cells hybridizing to a universal probe. This study reports the first description of the community structure of an oligotrophic Antarctic freshwater lake as determined by PCR-dependent and PCR-independent molecular techniques. It also suggests that the bacterioplankton community of Moss Lake contains classes of bacteria known to be important in freshwater systems elsewhere in the world. PMID:12739078

  3. Improved permeabilization protocols for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of mycolic-acid-containing bacteria found in foams.

    PubMed

    Carr, Emma L; Eales, Kathryn; Soddell, Jacques; Seviour, Robert J

    2005-04-01

    Formation of thick, stable foams and scums on activated sludge wastewater treatment plants is a worldwide problem, and to better understand what causes this foam and to cure it, there is a need to identify and quantify the bacteria present there. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) overcomes the difficulties experienced with microscopic methods of identification for the mycolic-acid-containing actinomycetes (the mycolata), which are present in foams, where many share the morphotype of right-angled branching filaments. However, the presence of hydrophobic mycolic acids in their cell wall makes this group of bacteria particularly difficult to permeabilise, which greatly reduces the usefulness of FISH. While several permeabilisation treatments have been described, none appear to adequately permeabilise all genera of the mycolata. In this study several protocols for permeabilisation were assessed with both pure cultures of selected genera of the mycolata and foam samples. Combining mild acid hydrolysis with enzyme treatments (either mutanolysin/lysozyme or lipase/proteinase K) was found to be the most effective method, although other evidence presented here suggests that negative FISH results can not always be explained in terms of cell permeability to the probes. PMID:15676195

  4. Multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization with centromeric DNA probes as a new approach to distinguish chromosome breakage from aneuploidy in interphase cells and micronuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Eastmond, D.A.; Rupa, D.S.; Chen, H.W.; Hasegawa, L.

    1993-12-31

    Chromosomal abnormalities are believed to contribute significantly to human reproductive failure, carcinogenesis and other pathophysiological conditions. For example, approximately 15% of recognized pregnancies terminate in spontaneous abortion, and of these approximately 30% have been shown to be chromosomally abnormal. The contribution of chromosomal abnormalities to early embryonic and fetal death appears to decrease with gestational age, suggesting that as many as 67% of the aborted embryos in early embryonic deaths are chromosomally abnormal. Furthermore, clinically significant chromosomal abnormalities can also be found to be present in approximately 0.58 to 0.67% of live births. These figures indicate that within a given year, hundreds of thousands of chromosomally abnormal babies will be born throughout the world and additional millions of chromosomally abnormal embryos will have been spontaneously aborted. For the past several years, our research has focused on utilizing new molecular cytogenetic techniques to develop assays for detecting aneuploidy-inducing agents in mammalian cells. One approach that we have sucessfully employed involves the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific DNA probes to determine the number of copies of a representative chromosome present within the nucleus following chemical exposure. DNA sequences (probes) which hybridize to blocks of repetitive centromeric DNA on specific chromosomes have been developed for most of the human chromosomes. In situ hybridization with these probes results in the staining of a compact chromosomal region which can be easily detected in interphase nuclei. The presence of 3 (or more) hybridization domains in an interphase nucleus indicates the presence of three centromeric regions and has been presumed to indicate that three copies of the entire chromosome were present in the nucleus.

  5. Speckle-type POZ (pox virus and zinc finger protein) protein gene deletion in ovarian cancer: Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of a tissue microarray

    PubMed Central

    HU, XIAOYU; YANG, ZHU; ZENG, MANMAN; LIU, YI; YANG, XIAOTAO; LI, YANAN; LI, XU; YU, QIUBO

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the status of speckle-type POZ (pox virus and zinc finger protein) protein (SPOP) gene located on chromosome 17q21 in ovarian cancer (OC). The present study evaluated a tissue microarray, which contained 90 samples of ovarian cancer and 10 samples of normal ovarian tissue, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH is a method where a SPOP-specific DNA red fluorescence probe was used for the experimental group and a centromere-specific DNA green fluorescence probe for chromosome 17 was used for the control group. The present study demonstrated that a deletion of the SPOP gene was observed in 52.27% (46/88) of the ovarian cancer tissues, but was not identified in normal ovarian tissues. Simultaneously, monosomy 17 was frequently identified in the ovarian cancer tissues, but not in the normal ovarian tissues. Furthermore, the present data revealed that the ovarian cancer histological subtype and grade were significantly associated with a deletion of the SPOP gene, which was assessed by the appearance of monosomy 17 in the ovarian cancer samples; the deletion of the SPOP gene was observed in a large proportion of serous epithelial ovarian cancer (41/61; 67.21%), particularly in grade 3 (31/37; 83.78%). In conclusion, deletion of the SPOP gene on chromosome 17 in ovarian cancer samples, which results from monosomy 17, indicates that the SPOP gene may serve as a tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancer. PMID:27347196

  6. Comparative mapping of DNA probes derived from the V{sub k} immunoglobulin gene regions on human and great ape chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, N.; Wienberg, J.; Ermert, K.

    1995-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of cosmid clones of human V{sub K} gene regions to human and primate chromosomes contributed to the dating of chromosome reorganizations in evolution. A clone from the K locus at 2p11-p12 (cos 106) hybridized to the assumed homologous chromosome bands in the chimpanzees Pan troglodytes (PTR) and P. paniscus (PPA), the Gorilla gorilla (GGO), and the orangutan Pongo Pygmaeus (PPY). Human and both chimpanzees differed from gorilla and orangutan by the mapping of cos 170, a clone derived from chromosome 2cen-q11.2; the transposition of this orphon to the other side of the centromere can, therefore, be dated after the human/chimpanzee and gorilla divergence. Hybridization to homologous bands was also found with a cosmid clone containing a V{sub K}I orphon located on chromosome 1 (cos 115, main signal at 1q31-q32), although the probe is not fully unique. Also, a clone derived from the orphon V{sub K} region on chromosome 22q11 (cos 121) hybridized to the homologous bands in the great apes. This indicates that the orphons on human chromosomes 1 and 22 had been translocated early in primate evolution. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Use of the Verrucomicrobia-Specific Probe EUB338-III and Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization for Detection of “Candidatus Xiphinematobacter” Cells in Nematode Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Vandekerckhove, Tom T. M.; Coomans, August; Cornelis, Karen; Baert, Philippe; Gillis, Monique

    2002-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization with a 16S rRNA probe specific for Verrucomicrobia was used to (i) confirm the division-level identity of and (ii) study the behavior of the obligate intracellular verrucomicrobium “Candidatus Xiphinematobacter” in its nematode hosts. Endosymbionts in the egg move to the pole where the gut primordium arises; hence, they populate the intestinal epithelia of juvenile worms. During the host's molt to adult female, the endosymbionts concentrate around the developing ovaries to occupy the ovarian wall. Some bacteria are enclosed in the ripening oocytes for vertical transmission. Verrucomicrobia in males stay outside the testes because the tiny spermatozoids are not suitable for transmission of cytoplasmic bacteria. PMID:12039775

  8. Combined DNA-RNA Fluorescent In situ Hybridization (FISH) to Study X Chromosome Inactivation in Differentiated Female Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Tahsin Stefan; Gribnau, Joost

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a molecular technique which enables the detection of nucleic acids in cells. DNA FISH is often used in cytogenetics and cancer diagnostics, and can detect aberrations of the genome, which often has important clinical implications. RNA FISH can be used to detect RNA molecules in cells and has provided important insights in regulation of gene expression. Combining DNA and RNA FISH within the same cell is technically challenging, as conditions suitable for DNA FISH might be too harsh for fragile, single stranded RNA molecules. We here present an easily applicable protocol which enables the combined, simultaneous detection of Xist RNA and DNA encoded by the X chromosomes. This combined DNA-RNA FISH protocol can likely be applied to other systems where both RNA and DNA need to be detected. PMID:24961515

  9. Detection of WWE2-related Lentisphaerae by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization in landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Limam, Rim Driss; Bouchez, Théodore; Chouari, Rakia; Li, Tianlun; Barkallah, Insaf; Landoulsi, Ahmed; Sghir, Abdelghani

    2010-10-01

    We collected samples of anaerobic landfill leachate from municipal solid waste landfill (Vert-le-Grand, France) and constructed 16S rRNA clone libraries using primers targeting Planctomycetes and relatives (Pla46F and 1390R). Analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences resulted in the abundant representation of WWE2-related Lentisphaerae, members of the phylum Lentisphaerae, in the clone library (98% of the retrieved sequences). Although the sequences that are phylogenetically affiliated with the cultured isolate Victivallis vadensis were identified (WWE2 subgroup II), the majority of the sequences were affiliated with an uncultured Lentisphaerae lineage (WWE2 subgroup I). We designed oligonucleotides probes targeting the specific 16S rRNA gene regions of those 2 subgroups. Fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed the abundance of the uncultivated WWE2 subgroup I in our leachate samples. PMID:20962908

  10. Detection and quantification of Epstein-Barr virus EBER1 in EBV-infected cells by fluorescent in situ hybridization and flow cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowe, R. P.; Cubbage, M. L.; Sams, C. F.; Pierson, D. L.; Barrett, A. D.

    1998-01-01

    A rapid and highly sensitive fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) assay was developed to detect Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-infected cells in peripheral blood. Multiple fluorescein-labeled antisense oligonucleotide probes were designed to hybridize to the EBER1 transcript, which is highly expressed in latently infected cells. After a rapid (30 min) hybridization, the cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. EBER1 was detected in several positive control cell lines that have variable numbers of EBV genome copies. No EBER1 was detected in two known EBV-negative cell lines. Northern blot analyses confirmed the presence and quantity of EBER1 transcripts in each cell line. This method was used to quantify the number of EBV-infected cells in peripheral blood from a patient with chronic mononucleosis. These results indicate that EBV-infected cells can be detected at the single cell level, and that this assay can be used to quantify the number of EBV-infected cells in clinical samples.

  11. Clinical and cytogenetic findings in seven cases of inverted duplication of 8p with evidence of a telomeric deletion using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Wen-Jun; Callif-Daley, F.; Zapata, M.C.; Miller, M.E.

    1995-09-11

    We report on the clinical and cytogenetic findings in 7 cases of inverted duplication of region 8p11.2-p23. The phenotype of inv dup (8p) compiled from this series and the literature (N = 29) consists of severe mental retardation (100%), minor facial alterations (97%), agenesis of the corpus callosum (80%), hypotonia (66%), orthopedic abnormalities (58%), scoliosis/kyphosis (40%), and congenital heart defect (26%). A telomeric deletion of region 8p23.3-pter was confirmed in 3 of our cases studied using fluorescent in situ hybridization with a telomeric probe for 8p. Thus, these karyotypes are inv dup del(8) (qter{r_arrow} p23.1::p23.1{r_arrow}p11.2:). Our findings suggest that most cases of inv dup(8p) probably have a telomeric deletion. 20 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Considerations in the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and confocal laser scanning microscopy to characterize rumen methanogens and define their spatial distributions.

    PubMed

    Valle, Edith R; Henderson, Gemma; Janssen, Peter H; Cox, Faith; Alexander, Trevor W; McAllister, Tim A

    2015-06-01

    In this study, methanogen-specific coenzyme F420 autofluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to identify rumen methanogens and define their spatial distribution in free-living, biofilm-, and protozoa-associated microenvironments. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with temperature-controlled hybridization was used in an attempt to describe methanogen diversity. A heat pretreatment (65 °C, 1 h) was found to be a noninvasive method to increase probe access to methanogen RNA targets. Despite efforts to optimize FISH, 16S rRNA methanogen-specific probes, including Arch915, bound to some cells that lacked F420, possibly identifying uncharacterized Methanomassiliicoccales or reflecting nonspecific binding to other members of the rumen bacterial community. A probe targeting RNA from the methanogenesis-specific methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcr) gene was shown to detect cultured Methanosarcina cells with signal intensities comparable to those of 16S rRNA probes. However, the probe failed to hybridize with the majority of F420-emitting rumen methanogens, possibly because of differences in cell wall permeability among methanogen species. Methanogens were shown to integrate into microbial biofilms and to exist as ecto- and endosymbionts with rumen protozoa. Characterizing rumen methanogens and defining their spatial distribution may provide insight into mitigation strategies for ruminal methanogenesis. PMID:25924182

  13. Differentiation of Methanosaeta concilii and Methanocarcina barkeri in anaerobic mesophilic granular sludge by fluorescent in situ hybridization and confocal scanning laser microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rocheleau, S.; Greer, C.W.; Cantin, C.; Laramee, L.; Guiot, S.R.; Lawrence, J.R.

    1999-05-01

    Oligonucleotide probes, designed from genes coding for 16S rRNA, were developed to differentiate Methanosaeta concilii, Methanosarcina barkeri, and mesophilic methanogens. All M. concilii oligonucleotide probes (designated MS1, MS2, and MS5) hybridized specifically with the target DNA, but MS5 was the most specific M. concilii oligonucleotide probe. Methanosarcina barkeri oligonucleotide probes (designated MB1, MB3, and MB4) hybridized with different Methanosarcina species. The MB4 probe specifically detected Methanosarcina barkeri, and the MB3 probe detected the presence of al mesophilic Methanosarcina species. These new oligonucleotide probes facilitated the identification, localization, and quantification of the specific relative abundance of M. concilii and Methanosarcina barkeri, which play important roles in methanogenesis. The combined use of fluorescent in situ hybridization with confocal scanning laser microscopy demonstrated that anaerobic granule topography depends on granule origin and feeding. Protein-fed granules showed no layered structure with a random distribution of M. concilii. In contrast, a layered structure developed in methanol-enriched granules, where M. barkeri growth was induced in an outer layer. This outer layer was followed by a layer composed of M. concilii, with an inner core of M. concilii and other bacteria.

  14. Use of fluorescence in situ hybridization (fish) to study chromosomal damage induced by radiation and bromodeoxyuridine in human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wilt, S.R.; Burgess, A.C.; Lawrence, T.S.

    1994-11-15

    Although the thymidine analog radiation sensitizer bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) increases radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations, it is not known whether these aberrations are uniformly distributed among chromosomes. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we carried out a study to test the hypothesis that BrdUrd-induced radiosensitization may be mediated by nonuniform chromsomal damage. Log phase HT29 human colon cancer cells were exposed to 10 {mu}M BrdUrd (or media alone) for one cell cycle, and the G1 cells were separated by centrifugal elutriation. Half of the control and BrdUrd samples were irradiated with 8 Gy. Cells were then incubated for 24-28 h, and metaphase spreads were prepared. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed using paint probes for chromosomes 1 and 4. We found that radiation induced 0.20 aberrations per chromosome in chromosome 4. Based on the ratio of the relative lengths of chromosome 1-4(1.34), it was predicted that chromosome 1 would have {approx}0.26 aberrations per chromosome. However, we observed 0.39 aberrations per chromosome 1, which was significantly greater than the predicted (p<0.001 by chi-square). Incubation with BrdUrd prior to irradiation significantly increased the aberrations found in chromosome 1 (by a factor of 1.4) and chromosome 4 (by a factor of 1.9) compared to radiation alone (p<0.001 for both chromosome 1 and 4). This study demonstrates that individual chromosomes in human colon cancer cells show significantly different rates of aberration after irradiation. Furthermore, the BrdUrd-mediated increase in radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations may not be uniform among chromosomes. 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. High-resolution mapping of YACs and the single-copy gene Hs1(pro-1) on Beta vulgaris chromosomes by multi-colour fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Desel, C; Jung, C; Cai, D; Kleine, M; Schmidt, T

    2001-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful approach for physical mapping of DNA sequences along plant chromosomes. Nematode-resistant sugar beets (Beta vulgaris) carrying a Beta procumbens translocation were investigated by FISH with two differentially labelled YACs originating from the translocation. At mitotic metaphases, the translocation was identified with both YACs in the terminal region on a pair of chromosomes. Meiotic chromosomes, representing a far more extended hybridization target, were used to determine the orientation of YACs with respect to chromosomal domains in combination with chromosomal landmark probes for telomeres and centromeres. The in situ detection of plant single-copy sequences is technically difficult, and the wild beet translocation was used to explore the potential resolution of the FISH approach and to introduce the chromosomal mapping of single-copy genes into genome analysis of Beta species. An internal fragment of the nematode resistance gene Hs1(pro-1), 684 bp long, was detected on both chromatids of different Beta chromosomes and represents one of the shortest unique DNA sequences localized on mitotic plant chromosomes so far. Comparative chromosomal mapping of the 684 bp Hs1(pro-1) probe in the translocation line, a monosomic addition line and in B. procumbens revealed the origin of the wild beet translocation leading to nematode-resistant sugar beets. PMID:11247602

  16. Fluorescence in situ hybridization mapping of the mouse platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM1) to mouse chromosome 6, region F3-G1

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yong; Muller, W.A.

    1996-10-15

    Human platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM1), an important member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily, is widely distributed on cells of the vascular system and mediates cellular interactions through both homophilic and heterophilic adhesive mechanisms. The function of PECAM1 in vitro has begun to be understood, but its function in vivo is yet to be established. To study the function of PECAM1 in vivo, its mouse counterpart was identified and its cDNA gene isolated and characterized. In this study, the mouse chromosomal localization was determined for the mouse gene encoding Pecam. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to map the Pecam gene on mouse chromosome 6, region F3-G1. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Mosaic vs. nonmosaic trisomy 9: Report of a liveborn infant evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Cantu, E.S.; Eicher, D.J.; Shashidhar Pai, G.; Donahue, C.J.; Harley, R.A.

    1996-04-24

    We report on a newborn infant with multiple congenital anomalies and apparent nonmosaic trisomy 9 in the blood (by conventional cytogenetic studies) who died shortly after birth. Clinical observations at birth and autopsy are compared with phenotypes of mosaic and nonmosaic trisomy 9 cases reported previously. Unlike the initial cytogenetic analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies of metaphase and interphase blood cells and skin fibroblasts detected the presence of euploid and trisomy 9 cells. These results suggest that earlier reports of trisomy 9, which relied on conventional chromosome analysis of a few metaphase cells and/or only one tissue type, may not have excluded mosaicism, and that trisomy 9 may be viable only in the mosaic state. 39 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of the interactions between honeybee larvae and Paenibacillus larvae, the causative agent of American foulbrood of honeybees (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Yue, Dominique; Nordhoff, Marcel; Wieler, Lothar H; Genersch, Elke

    2008-06-01

    American foulbrood (AFB) is a bacterial disease of honeybee larvae caused by the spore-forming bacterium Paenibacillus larvae. Although AFB and its aetiological agent are described now for more than a century, the general and molecular pathogenesis of this notifiable disease is poorly understood. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) performed with P. larvae-specific, 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes to analyse the early steps in the pathogenesis of American foulbrood. The following chain of events could be demonstrated: (i) the spores germinate in the midgut lumen, (ii) the vegetative bacteria massively proliferate within the midgut before, and (iii) they start to locally breach the epithelium and invade the haemocoel. The paracellular route was shown to be the main mechanism for invasion contrasting earlier hypotheses of phagocytosis of P. larvae. Invasion coincided with the death of the host implicating that the penetration of the midgut epithelium is a critical step determining the time of death. PMID:18331334

  19. Microfluidic-Based Amplification-Free Bacterial DNA Detection by Dielectrophoretic Concentration and Fluorescent Resonance Energy Transfer Assisted in Situ Hybridization (FRET-ISH) †,‡

    PubMed Central

    Packard, Michelle M.; Shusteff, Maxim; Alocilja, Evangelyn C.

    2012-01-01

    Although real-time PCR (RT-PCR) has become a diagnostic standard for rapid identification of bacterial species, typical methods remain time-intensive due to sample preparation and amplification cycle times. The assay described in this work incorporates on-chip dielectrophoretic capture and concentration of bacterial cells, thermal lysis, cell permeabilization, and nucleic acid denaturation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer assisted in situ hybridization (FRET-ISH) species identification. Combining these techniques leverages the benefits of all of them, allowing identification to be accomplished completely on chip less than thirty minutes after receipt of sample, compared to multiple hours required by traditional RT-PCR and its requisite sample preparation. PMID:25586031

  20. 5-bp Classical Satellite DNA Loci from Chromosome-1 Instability in Cervical Neoplasia Detected by DNA Breakage Detection/Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (DBD-FISH)

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I.; Ortíz-Hernández, Brenda L.; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I.; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Fernández, José Luis; López-Fernández, Carmen; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the association between the progressive stages of cervical neoplasia and DNA damage in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 in cervical epithelium and in peripheral blood lymphocytes using DNA breakage detection/fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH). A hospital-based unmatched case-control study was conducted in 2011 with a sample of 30 women grouped according to disease stage and selected according to histological diagnosis; 10 with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LG-SIL), 10 with high-grade SIL (HG-SIL), and 10 with no cervical lesions, from the Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad of The Mexican Social Security Institute, IMSS, Mexico. Specific chromosome damage levels in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 were evaluated in cervical epithelium and peripheral blood lymphocytes using the DBD-FISH technique. Whole-genome DNA hybridization was used as a reference for the level of damage. Results of Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant increase according to neoplastic development in both tissues. The instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 was evidenced using chromosome-orientation FISH. In conclusion, we suggest that the progression to malignant transformation involves an increase in the instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1. PMID:23429197

  1. Fluorescent in situ hybridization shows DIPLOSPOROUS located on one of the NOR chromosomes in apomictic dandelions (Taraxacum) in the absence of a large hemizygous chromosomal region.

    PubMed

    Vašut, Radim J; Vijverberg, Kitty; van Dijk, Peter J; de Jong, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Apomixis in dandelions (Taraxacum: Asteraceae) is encoded by two unlinked dominant loci and a third yet undefined genetic factor: diplosporous omission of meiosis (DIPLOSPOROUS, DIP), parthenogenetic embryo development (PARTHENOGENESIS, PAR), and autonomous endosperm formation, respectively. In this study, we determined the chromosomal position of the DIP locus in Taraxacum by using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) that genetically map within 1.2-0.2 cM of DIP. The BACs showed dispersed fluorescent signals, except for S4-BAC 83 that displayed strong unique signals as well. Under stringent blocking of repeats by C0t-DNA fragments, only a few fluorescent foci restricted to defined chromosome regions remained, including one on the nucleolus organizer region (NOR) chromosomes that contains the 45S rDNAs. FISH with S4-BAC 83 alone and optimal blocking showed discrete foci in the middle of the long arm of one of the NOR chromosomes only in triploid and tetraploid diplosporous dandelions, while signals in sexual diploids were lacking. This agrees with the genetic model of a single dose, dominant DIP allele, absent in sexuals. The length of the DIP region is estimated to cover a region of 1-10 Mb. FISH in various accessions of Taraxacum and the apomictic sister species Chondrilla juncea, confirmed the chromosomal position of DIP within Taraxacum but not outside the genus. Our results endorse that, compared to other model apomictic species, expressing either diplospory or apospory, the genome of Taraxacum shows a more similar and less diverged chromosome structure at the DIP locus. The different levels of allele sequence divergence at apomeiosis loci may reflect different terms of asexual reproduction. The association of apomeiosis loci with repetitiveness, dispersed repeats, and retrotransposons commonly observed in apomictic species may imply a functional role of these shared features in apomictic reproduction, as is

  2. Detection of the Genome and Transcripts of a Persistent DNA Virus in Neuronal Tissues by Fluorescent In situ Hybridization Combined with Immunostaining

    PubMed Central

    Catez, Frédéric; Rousseau, Antoine; Labetoulle, Marc; Lomonte, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Single cell codetection of a gene, its RNA product and cellular regulatory proteins is critical to study gene expression regulation. This is a challenge in the field of virology; in particular for nuclear-replicating persistent DNA viruses that involve animal models for their study. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) establishes a life-long latent infection in peripheral neurons. Latent virus serves as reservoir, from which it reactivates and induces a new herpetic episode. The cell biology of HSV-1 latency remains poorly understood, in part due to the lack of methods to detect HSV-1 genomes in situ in animal models. We describe a DNA-fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) approach efficiently detecting low-copy viral genomes within sections of neuronal tissues from infected animal models. The method relies on heat-based antigen unmasking, and directly labeled home-made DNA probes, or commercially available probes. We developed a triple staining approach, combining DNA-FISH with RNA-FISH and immunofluorescence, using peroxidase based signal amplification to accommodate each staining requirement. A major improvement is the ability to obtain, within 10 µm tissue sections, low-background signals that can be imaged at high resolution by confocal microscopy and wide-field conventional epifluorescence. Additionally, the triple staining worked with a wide range of antibodies directed against cellular and viral proteins. The complete protocol takes 2.5 days to accommodate antibody and probe penetration within the tissue. PMID:24514006

  3. Re-appraisal of the phylogeny and fluorescence in situ hybridization probes for the analysis of the Competibacteraceae in wastewater treatment systems.

    PubMed

    McIlroy, Simon J; Nittami, Tadashi; Kanai, Eri; Fukuda, Junji; Saunders, Aaron M; Nielsen, Per Halkjaer

    2015-04-01

    Members of the family Competibacteraceae are common in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) designed for enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) and are putatively deleterious to the process of P removal. Their ability to accumulate large amounts of polyhydroxyalkanoates is also suggested to be of potential commercial interest for bioplastic production. In this study we have updated the 16S rRNA-based phylogeny of the Competibacter and the Plasticicumulans lineages. The former is delineated by 13 clades including two described genera; 'Ca. Competibacter' and 'Ca. Contendobacter'. The oligonucleotide probes used for detection of the family by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were re-evaluated and designed for coverage of these clades. Surveys of full-scale WWTPs based on 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and FISH analysis indicate that a number of member clades always coexist, with their relative abundances varying substantially between and temporally within plants. The hypothesis that these differences are based on niche partitioning is supported by marked phenotypic differences between clades. An in-depth understanding of the ecology of the family requires further studies of the metabolism of individual clades in situ. The proposed phylogeny and FISH probes will provide the foundation for such studies. PMID:25224028

  4. Mapping of low-frequency chimeric yeast artificial chromosome libraries from human chromosomes 16 and 21 by fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Marrone, B.L.; Campbell, E.W.; Anzick, S.L.; Shera, K.; Campbell, M.; Yoshida, T.M.; McCormick, M.K.; Deaven, L. )

    1994-05-01

    Yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones from low-frequency chimeric libraries of human chromosomes 16 and 21 were mapped onto human diploid fibroblast metaphase chromosomes using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and digital imaging microscopy. YACs mapped onto chromosome 21 were selected to provide subregional location and ordering of known and unknown markers on the long arm of chromosome 21, particularly in the Down syndrome region (q22). YACs mapped onto chromosome 16 were selected to overlap regions spanning chromosome 16 cosmid maps. YAC clones were indirectly labeled with fluorescein, and the total DNA of the chromosome was counterstained with propidium iodide. A single image containing both the FISH signal and the whole chromosome was acquired for each chromosome of interest containing the fluorescent probe signal in a metaphase spread. From the digitized image, the fluorescence intensity profile through the long axis of the chromosome gave the total chromosome length and the probe position. The map position of the probe was expressed as the fractional length (FL) of the total chromosome relative to the end of the short arm (Flpter). From each clone hybridized, 20-40 chromosome images were analyzed. Thirty-eight YACs were mapped onto chromosome 16, and their FLs were distributed along the short and long arms. On chromosome 21, 47 YACs were mapped, including 12 containing known markers. To confirm the order of a dense population of YACs within the Down syndrome region, a two-color mapping strategy was used in which an anonymous YAC was located relative to one or two known markers on the metaphase chromosome. The chromosome FL maps have a 1- to 2-Mb resolution, and the FL measurement of each probe has a typical standard error of 0.5-1 Mb. 14 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Chromosomal mapping of the gene (INPP5A) encoding the 43-kDa membrane-associated inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase to 10q26.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, C.A.; Speed, C.J.; Nicholl, J.; Sutherland, G.R.

    1996-01-01

    This report discusses the localization of a membrane-associated inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase gene to human chromosome 10q26.3 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. This 43-kDa 5-phosphatase does not map to the same location as any other 5-phosphatase enzymes. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Rapid detection of rRNA group I pseudomonads in contaminated metalworking fluids and biofilm formation by fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Saha, Ratul; Donofrio, Robert S; Goeres, Darla M; Bagley, Susan T

    2012-05-01

    Metalworking fluids (MWFs), used in different machining operations, are highly prone to microbial degradation. Microbial communities present in MWFs lead to biofilm formation in the MWF systems, which act as a continuous source of contamination. Species of rRNA group I Pseudomonas dominate in contaminated MWFs. However, their actual distribution is typically underestimated when using standard culturing techniques as most fail to grow on the commonly used Pseudomonas Isolation Agar. To overcome this, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to study their abundance along with biofilm formation by two species recovered from MWFs, Pseudomonas fluorescens MWF-1 and the newly described Pseudomonas oleovorans subsp. lubricantis. Based on 16S rRNA sequences, a unique fluorescent molecular probe (Pseudo120) was designed targeting a conserved signature sequence common to all rRNA group I Pseudomonas. The specificity of the probe was evaluated using hybridization experiments with whole cells of different Pseudomonas species. The probe's sensitivity was determined to be 10(3) cells/ml. It successfully detected and enumerated the abundance and distribution of Pseudomonas indicating levels between 3.2 (± 1.1) × 10(6) and 5.0 (± 2.3) × 10(6) cells/ml in four different industrial MWF samples collected from three different locations. Biofilm formation was visualized under stagnant conditions using high and low concentrations of cells for both P. fluorescens MWF-1 and P. oleovorans subsp. lubricantis stained with methylene blue and Pseudo120. On the basis of these observations, this molecular probe can be successfully be used in the management of MWF systems to monitor the levels and biofilm formation of rRNA group I pseudomonads. PMID:22042232

  7. Fluorescent in situ hybridization for the localization of viruses, bacteria and other microorganisms in insect and plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Kliot, Adi; Ghanim, Murad

    2016-04-01

    Methods for the localization of cellular components such as nucleic acids, proteins, cellular vesicles and more, and the localization of microorganisms including viruses, bacteria and fungi have become an important part of any research program in biological sciences that enable the visualization of these components in fixed and live tissues without the need for complex processing steps. The rapid development of microscopy tools and technologies as well as related fluorescent markers and fluorophores for many cellular components, and the ability to design DNA and RNA sequence-based molecular probes and antibodies which can be visualized fluorescently, have rapidly advanced this field. This review will focus on some of the localizations methods which have been used in plants and insect pests in agriculture, and other microorganisms, which are rapidly advancing the research in agriculture-related fields. PMID:26678796

  8. mRNA-targeted Fluorescent in Situ Hybridization (FISH) of Gram-negative Bacteria Without Template Amplification or Tyramide Signal Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, James R.; Culley, David E.; Chrisler, William B.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2007-12-01

    Technologies are needed to study gene expression at the level of individual cells within a population or microbial community. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) supplies high-resolution spatial information and has been widely applied to study microbial communities at the rRNA level. While mRNA-targeted FISH has been popular for studying gene expression in eukaryotic cells, very little success has been achieved with prokaryotes. At present, detection of specific mRNAs in individual prokaryotic cells requires the use of in situ-RT-PCR or tyramide signal amplification (TSA). In this study we used DNA oligonucleotide probes labeled with a single near-infrared dye in FISH assays to detect multicopy plasmid-based and endogenous mRNA molecules in Escherichia coli and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We took advantage of the fact there is much less background signal produced by biological materials and support matrices in the near-infrared spectrum and thus long camera exposure times could be used. In addition, we demonstrate that a combination of probes targeting both rRNA and mRNA could be successfully employed within the same FISH assay. These results, as well as ongoing R&D improvements in NIR and infrared dyes, indicate the FISH approach we demonstrated could be applied in certain environmental settings to monitor gene expression in mixed populations.

  9. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and qPCR to detect Merkel cell polyomavirus physical status and load in Merkel cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Haugg, Anke M; Rennspiess, Dorit; zur Hausen, Axel; Speel, Ernst-Jan M; Cathomas, Gieri; Becker, Jürgen C; Schrama, David

    2014-12-15

    The Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is detected in 80% of Merkel cell carcinomas (MCC). Clonal integration and tumor-specific mutations in the large T antigen are strong arguments that MCPyV is a human tumor virus. However, the relationship between viral presence and cancer induction remains discussed controversially. Since almost all studies on virus prevalence are based on PCR techniques, we performed MCPyV fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on MCC to gain information about the quality of the viral presence on the single cell level. MCPyV-FISH was performed on tissue microarrays containing 62 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue samples including all tumor grades of 42 patients. The hybridization patterns were correlated to the qPCR data determined on corresponding whole tissue sections. Indeed, MCPyV-FISH and qPCR data were highly correlated, i.e. 83% for FISH-positive and 93% for FISH-negative cores. Accordingly, the mean of the qPCR values of all MCPyV-positive cores differed significantly from the mean of the negative cores (p = 0.0076). Importantly, two hybridization patterns were definable in the MCPyV-FISH: a punctate pattern (85%) indicating viral integration, which correlated with a moderate viral abundance and a combination of the punctate with a diffuse pattern (15%), suggesting a possible coexistence of integrated and episomal virus which was associated with very high viral load and VP1 expression. Thus, MCPyV-FISH adds important information on the single cell level within the histomorphological context and could therefore be an important tool to further elucidate MCPyV related carcinogenesis. PMID:24771111

  10. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of 16S rRNA gene clones (Clone-FISH) for probe validation and screening of clone libraries.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Andreas; Fuchs, Bernhard M; Nielsen, Jeppe L; Tonolla, Mauro; Stahl, David A

    2002-11-01

    A method is presented for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of 16S rRNA gene clones targeting in vivo transcribed plasmid inserts (Clone-FISH). Several different cloning approaches and treatments to generate target-rRNA in the clones were compared. Highest signal intensities of Clone-FISH were obtained using plasmids with a T7 RNA polymerase promoter and host cells with an IPTG-inducible T7 RNA polymerase. Combined IPTG-induction and chloramphenicol treatment of those clones resulted in FISH signals up to 2.8-fold higher than signals of FISH with probe EUB338 to cells of Escherichia coli. Probe dissociation curves for three oligonucleotide probes were compared for reference cells containing native (FISH) or cloned (Clone-FISH) target sequences. Melting behaviour and calculated T(d) values were virtually identical for clones and cells, providing a format to use 16S rRNA gene clones instead of pure cultures for probe validation and optimization of hybridization conditions. The optimized Clone-FISH protocol was also used to screen an environmental clone library for insert sequences of interest. In this application format, 13 out of 82 clones examined were identified to contain sulphate-reducing bacterial rRNA genes. In summary, Clone-FISH is a simple and fast technique, compatible with a wide variety of cloning vectors and hosts, that should have general utility for probe validation and screening of clone libraries. PMID:12460279

  11. Validation of a new catalysed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization probe for the accurate quantification of marine Bacteroidetes populations.

    PubMed

    Acinas, Silvia G; Ferrera, Isabel; Sarmento, Hugo; Díez-Vives, Cristina; Forn, Irene; Ruiz-González, Clara; Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M; Salazar, Guillem; Gasol, Josep M

    2015-10-01

    Catalysed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) is a powerful approach to quantify bacterial taxa. In this study, we compare the performance of the widely used Bacteroidetes CF319a probe with the new CF968 probe. In silico analyses and tests with isolates demonstrate that CF319a hybridizes with non-Bacteroidetes sequences from the Rhodobacteraceae and Alteromonadaceae families. We test the probes' accuracy in 37 globally distributed marine samples and over two consecutive years at the Blanes Bay Microbial Observatory (NW Mediterranean). We also compared the CARD-FISH data with the Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from 27 marine metagenomes from the TARA Oceans expedition. We find no significant differences in abundances between both approaches, although CF319a targeted some unspecific sequences and both probes displayed different abundances of specific Bacteroidetes phylotypes. Our results demonstrate that quantitative estimations by using both probes are significantly different in certain oceanographic regions (Mediterranean Sea, Red Sea and Arabian Sea) and that CF968 shows seasonality within marine Bacteroidetes, notably large differences between summer and winter that is overlooked by CF319a. We propose CF968 as an alternative to CF319a for targeting the whole Bacteroidetes phylum since it has better coverage, greater specificity and overall better quantifies marine Bacteroidetes. PMID:24890225

  12. Simultaneous Quantification of Active Carbon- and Nitrogen-Fixing Communities and Estimation of Fixation Rates Using Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization and Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Alicia K.; Raes, Eric J.; Waite, Anya M.; Quigg, Antonietta

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the interconnectivity of oceanic carbon and nitrogen cycles, specifically carbon and nitrogen fixation, is essential in elucidating the fate and distribution of carbon in the ocean. Traditional techniques measure either organism abundance or biochemical rates. As such, measurements are performed on separate samples and on different time scales. Here, we developed a method to simultaneously quantify organisms while estimating rates of fixation across time and space for both carbon and nitrogen. Tyramide signal amplification fluorescence in situ hybridization (TSA-FISH) of mRNA for functionally specific oligonucleotide probes for rbcL (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase; carbon fixation) and nifH (nitrogenase; nitrogen fixation) was combined with flow cytometry to measure abundance and estimate activity. Cultured samples representing a diversity of phytoplankton (cyanobacteria, coccolithophores, chlorophytes, diatoms, and dinoflagellates), as well as environmental samples from the open ocean (Gulf of Mexico, USA, and southeastern Indian Ocean, Australia) and an estuary (Galveston Bay, Texas, USA), were successfully hybridized. Strong correlations between positively tagged community abundance and 14C/15N measurements are presented. We propose that these methods can be used to estimate carbon and nitrogen fixation in environmental communities. The utilization of mRNA TSA-FISH to detect multiple active microbial functions within the same sample will offer increased understanding of important biogeochemical cycles in the ocean. PMID:25172848

  13. Assignment of the human diacylglycerol kinase gene (DAGK) to 12q13.3 using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, T.C.; Zhou, J.; Champagne, C.

    1994-07-01

    A 1-kb cDNA probe specific for the human DAGK gene was prepared by polymerase chain reaction and used to assign it to human chromosome 12 using a human x hamster somatic cell hybrid mapping panel. To determine the chromosomal sublocalization of DAGK, used the 1-kg DAGK cDNA probe to isolate a DAGK-specific phage clone from a human chromosome 12 library by Southern blot techniques. This clone (phEDCDAGK) contained a 17-kb human genomic insert in the phage Charon 40 that hybridized to the 1-kb DAGK cDNA previously characterized.

  14. A physical map of 15 loci on human chromosome 5q23-q33 by two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Saltman, D.L.; Dolganov, G.M. ); Warrington, J.A.; Wasmuth, J.J. ); Lovett, M. )

    1993-06-01

    The q23-q33 region of human chromosome 5 encodes a large number of growth factors, growth factor receptors, and hormone/neurotransmitter receptors. This is also the general region into which several disease genes have been mapped, including diastrophic dysplasia, Treacher Collins syndrome, hereditary startle disease, the myeloid disorders that are associated with the 5q-syndrome, autosomal-dominant forms of hereditary deafness, and limb girdle muscular dystrophy. The authors have developed a framework physical map of this region using cosmid clones isolated from the Los Alamos arrayed chromosome 5-specific library. Entry points into this library included 14 probes to genes within this interval and one anonymous polymorphic marker locus. A physical map has been constructed using fluorescence in situ hybridization of these cosmids on metaphase and interphase chromosomes, and this is in good agreement with the radiation hybrid map of the region. The derived order of loci across the region is cen-IL4-IL5-IRF1-IL3-IL9-EGR1-CD14-FGFA-GRL-D5S207-ADRB2-SPARC-RPS14-CSF1R-ADRA1, and the total distance spanned by these loci is approximately 15 Mb. The framework map, genomic clones, and contig expansion within 5q23-q33 should provide valuable resources for the eventual isolation of the clinically relevant loci that reside in this region. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Gene protein detection platform--a comparison of a new human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 assay with conventional immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization platforms.

    PubMed

    Stålhammar, Gustav; Farrajota, Pedro; Olsson, Ann; Silva, Cristina; Hartman, Johan; Elmberger, Göran

    2015-08-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) are widely used semiquantitative assays for selecting breast cancer patients for HER2 antibody therapy. However, both techniques have been shown to have disadvantages. Our aim was to test a recent automated technique of combined IHC and brightfield dual in situ hybridization-gene protein detection platform (GPDP)-in breast cancer HER2 protein, gene, and chromosome 17 centromere status evaluations, comparing the results in accordance to the American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists recommendations for HER2 testing in breast cancer from both 2007 and 2013. The GPDP technique performance was evaluated on 52 consecutive whole slide invasive breast cancer cases with HER2 IHC 2/3+ scoring results. Applying in turns the American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists recommendations for HER2 testing in breast cancer from 2007 and 2013 to both FISH and GPDP DISH assays, the HER2 gene amplification results showed 100% concordance among amplified/nonamplified cases, but there was a shift in 4 cases toward positive from equivocal results and toward equivocal from negative results. This might be related to the emphasis on the average HER2 copy number in the 2013 criteria. HER2 expression by IVD market IHC kit (Pathway®) has a strong correlation with GPDP HER2 protein, including a full concordance for all cases scored as 3+ and a reduction from 2+ to 1+ in 7 cases corresponding to nonamplified cases. Gene protein detection platform HER2 protein "solo" could have spared the need for 7 FISH studies. In addition, the platform offered advantages on interpretation reassurance including selecting areas for counting gene signals paralleled with protein IHC expression, on heterogeneity detection, interpretation time, technical time, and tissue expense. PMID:25921313

  16. Fluorescence in situ hybridization as an adjunct tool in the diagnosis of primary and metastatic renal cell carcinoma in fine needle aspiration specimens.

    PubMed

    Kos, Zuzana; Williams, Phillip A; Belanger, Eric C; Mai, Kien T

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the role of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in the diagnosis of primary renal neoplasms and lesions suspicious for metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Consecutive fine-needle aspiration biopsies (FNAB) of 39 renal masses and 41 metastatic tumours suspicious for renal cell origin were assessed with an immunohistochemical panel for CK7, RCC antigen, CD10, AMACR, PAX8, vimentin, and CD117. In addition, FISH was performed using probes for chromosomes 1p, 3p, 7, 17, X, and Y. A total of 31 of 39 primary renal masses and 33 of 41 metastatic tumors suspicious for renal origin demonstrated typical cytological and immunohistochemical (IHC) features of subtypes of renal neoplasms (40 clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC), 20 papillary RCC, and 4 renal oncocytomas). FISH analysis of 15 randomly selected cases each of primary and metastatic lesions revealed chromosomal abnormalities consistent with the diagnosis in 73% of these cases. Of 8 primary renal masses demonstrating atypical microscopic features and noncontributory IHC profiles, FISH was helpful in subtyping 5 (62%) of these lesions (2 clear cell RCC, 1 solid variant of oncocytic papillary RCC, 1 mixed clear cell and papillary RCC, and 1 chromophobe RCC with papillary architecture). Of 8 metastatic tumors clinically suspicious for renal cell origin and supportive, but nondiagnostic IHC, FISH revealed supportive chromosomal changes in 6 (75%) cases. In conclusion FISH analysis on FNAB material, even with limited tissue, may be contributory to the diagnosis and subtyping of RCC in diagnostically challenging biopsies. PMID:24692327

  17. Clinical role and importance of fluorescence in situ hybridization method in diagnosis of H pylori infection and determination of clarithromycin resistance in H pylori eradication therapy.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ozlem; Demiray, Ebru

    2007-02-01

    H pylori is etiologically associated with gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Eradicating H pylori may convert rapidly the outcome of related diseases with the use of more accurate diagnostic molecular tests. Indeed some of the tests cannot give the evidence of current infection; H pylori can be detected by noninvasive and invasive methods, the latter requiring an endoscopy. Eradication failure is a big problem in H pylori infection. Recently, clarithromycin resistance in H pylori strains is increasing and eradication therapy of this bacterium is becoming more difficult. Molecular methods have frequently been applied besides phenotypic methods for susceptibility testing to detect clarithromycin resistance due to mutations in the 2143 and 2144 positions of 23S rRNA gene. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method on paraffin embedded tissue is a rapid, accurate and cost-effective method for the detection of H pylori infection and to determine clarithromycin resistance within three hours according to the gold standards as a non-culture method. This method can also be applied to fresh biopsy samples and the isolated colonies from a culture of H pylori, detecting both the culturable bacillary forms and the coccoid forms of H pylori, besides the paraffin embedded tissue sections. This technique is helpful for determining the bacterial density and the results of treatment where clarithromycin has been widely used in populations to increase the efficacy of the treatment and to clarify the treatment failure in vitro. PMID:17278188

  18. Homoeologous chromosome pairing in the distant hybrid Alstroemeria aurea x A. inodora and the genome composition of its backcross derivatives determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization with species-specific probes.

    PubMed

    Kamstra, S A; Ramanna, M S; de Jeu, M J; Kuipers, A G; Jacobsen, E

    1999-01-01

    A distant hybrid between two diploid species (2n = 2x = 16), Alstroemeria aurea and A. inodora, was investigated for homoeologous chromosome pairing, crossability with A. inodora and chromosome transmission to its BC1 offspring. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with two species-specific probes, A001-I (A. aurea specific) and D32-13 (A. inodora specific), was used to analyse chromosome pairing in the hybrid and the genome constitution of its BC1 progeny plants. High frequencies of associated chromosomes were observed in both genotypes of the F1 hybrid, A1P2-2 and A1P4. In the former, both univalents and bivalents were found at metaphase I, whereas the latter plant also showed tri- and quadrivalents. Based on the hybridization sites of DNA probes on the chromosomes of both parental species, it was established that hybrid A1P4 contains a reciprocal translocation between the short arm of chromosome 1 and the long arm of chromosome 8 of A. inodora. Despite regular homoeologous chromosome pairing in 30% of the pollen mother cells, both hybrids were highly sterile. They were backcrossed reciprocally with one of the parental species, A. inodora. Two days after pollination, embryo rescue was applied and, eventually, six BC1 progeny plants were obtained. Among these, two were aneuploids (2n = 2x + 1 = 17) and four were triploids (2n = 3x = 24). The aneuploid plants had originated when the interspecific hybrid was used as a female parent, indicating that n eggs were functional in the hybrid. In addition, 2n gametes were also functional in the hybrid, resulting in the four triploid BC1 plants. Of these four plants, three had received 2n pollen grains from the hybrid and one a 2n egg. Using FISH, homoeologous crossing over between the chromosomes of the two parental species in the hybrid was clearly detected in all BC1 plants. The relevance of these results for the process of introgression and the origin of n and 2n gametes are discussed. PMID:10087627

  19. The genes for the {alpha}-type HC3 (PMSA2) and {beta}-type HC5 (PMSB1) subunits of human proteasomes map to chromosomes 6q27 and 7p12-p13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, Katsuzumi; Nogami, Masahiro; Taguchi, Hiroshi

    1995-05-20

    The authors have determined the locations of the genes for the two subunits, HC3 and HC5, by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Chromosome spreads were obtained from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated blood lymphocytes of a healthy donor after thymidine synchronization and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation by the method of Takahashi et al. Genomic DNA fragments of HC3 (4.3 kb, including exons 3, 4, and 5) and HC5 (7.5 kb including exons 1 and 2) (11) were labeled with biotin-16-dUTP by nick-translation. In situ hybridization was performed according to Lichter et al. in the presence of COT-1 DNA as a competitor. Hybridized probe was detected with FITC-conjugated avidin without further signal amplification. Comparison of the fluorescence signals and the banding patterns of the chromosomes indicated that the HC3 and HC5 genes were located on chromosome band 6q27 and 7p12-p13, respectively.

  20. Automated design of probes for rRNA-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization reveals the advantages of using dual probes for accurate identification.

    PubMed

    Wright, Erik S; Yilmaz, L Safak; Corcoran, Andrew M; Ökten, Hatice E; Noguera, Daniel R

    2014-08-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a common technique for identifying cells in their natural environment and is often used to complement next-generation sequencing approaches as an integral part of the full-cycle rRNA approach. A major challenge in FISH is the design of oligonucleotide probes with high sensitivity and specificity to their target group. The rapidly expanding number of rRNA sequences has increased awareness of the number of potential nontargets for every FISH probe, making the design of new FISH probes challenging using traditional methods. In this study, we conducted a systematic analysis of published probes that revealed that many have insufficient coverage or specificity for their intended target group. Therefore, we developed an improved thermodynamic model of FISH that can be applied at any taxonomic level, used the model to systematically design probes for all recognized genera of bacteria and archaea, and identified potential cross-hybridizations for the selected probes. This analysis resulted in high-specificity probes for 35.6% of the genera when a single probe was used in the absence of competitor probes and for 60.9% when up to two competitor probes were used. Requiring the hybridization of two independent probes for positive identification further increased specificity. In this case, we could design highly specific probe sets for up to 68.5% of the genera without the use of competitor probes and 87.7% when up to two competitor probes were used. The probes designed in this study, as well as tools for designing new probes, are available online (http://DECIPHER.cee.wisc.edu). PMID:24928876

  1. Clonal evolution in chronic lymphocytic leukemia detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization and conventional cytogenetics after stimulation with CpG oligonucleotides and interleukin-2: a prospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Brejcha, Martin; Stoklasová, Martina; Brychtová, Yvona; Panovská, Anna; Štěpanovská, Kristina; Vaňková, Gabriela; Plevová, Karla; Oltová, Alexandra; Horká, Kateřina; Pospíšilová, Šárka; Mayer, Jiří; Doubek, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients may acquire new chromosome abnormalities during the course of their disease. Clonal evolution (CE) has been detected by conventional chromosome banding (CBA), several groups also confirmed CE with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). At present, there are minimal prospective data on CE frequency determined using a combination of both methods. Therefore, the aim of our study was to prospectively assess CE frequency using a combination of FISH and CBA after stimulation with CpG oligonucleotides and interleukin-2. Between 2008 and 2012, we enrolled 140 patients with previously untreated CLL in a prospective trial evaluating CE using FISH and CBA after stimulation. Patients provided baseline and regular follow-up peripheral blood samples for testing. There was a median of 3 cytogenetic examinations (using both methods) per patient. CE was detected in 15.7% (22/140) of patients using FISH, in 28.6% (40/140) using CBA, and in 34.3% (48/140) of patients by combining both methods. Poor-prognosis CE (new deletion 17p, new deletion 11q or new complex karyotype) was detected in 15% (21/140) of patients and was significantly associated with previous CLL treatment (p=0.013). CBA provides more complex information about cytogenetic abnormalities in CLL patients than FISH and confirms that many patients can acquire new abnormalities during the course of their disease in a relatively short time period. PMID:24246692

  2. In Silico and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Mapping Reveals Collinearity between the Pennisetum squamulatum Apomixis Carrier-Chromosome and Chromosome 2 of Sorghum and Foxtail Millet.

    PubMed

    Sapkota, Sirjan; Conner, Joann A; Hanna, Wayne W; Simon, Bindu; Fengler, Kevin; Deschamps, Stéphane; Cigan, Mark; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Apomixis, or clonal propagation through seed, is a trait identified within multiple species of the grass family (Poaceae). The genetic locus controlling apomixis in Pennisetum squamulatum (syn Cenchrus squamulatus) and Cenchrus ciliaris (syn Pennisetum ciliare, buffelgrass) is the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR). Previously, the ASGR was shown to be highly conserved but inverted in marker order between P. squamulatum and C. ciliaris based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and varied in both karyotype and position of the ASGR on the ASGR-carrier chromosome among other apomictic Cenchrus/Pennisetum species. Using in silico transcript mapping and verification of physical positions of some of the transcripts via FISH, we discovered that the ASGR-carrier chromosome from P. squamulatum is collinear with chromosome 2 of foxtail millet and sorghum outside of the ASGR. The in silico ordering of the ASGR-carrier chromosome markers, previously unmapped in P. squamulatum, allowed for the identification of a backcross line with structural changes to the P. squamulatum ASGR-carrier chromosome derived from gamma irradiated pollen. PMID:27031857

  3. In Silico and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Mapping Reveals Collinearity between the Pennisetum squamulatum Apomixis Carrier-Chromosome and Chromosome 2 of Sorghum and Foxtail Millet

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Sirjan; Conner, Joann A.; Hanna, Wayne W.; Simon, Bindu; Fengler, Kevin; Deschamps, Stéphane; Cigan, Mark; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Apomixis, or clonal propagation through seed, is a trait identified within multiple species of the grass family (Poaceae). The genetic locus controlling apomixis in Pennisetum squamulatum (syn Cenchrus squamulatus) and Cenchrus ciliaris (syn Pennisetum ciliare, buffelgrass) is the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR). Previously, the ASGR was shown to be highly conserved but inverted in marker order between P. squamulatum and C. ciliaris based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and varied in both karyotype and position of the ASGR on the ASGR-carrier chromosome among other apomictic Cenchrus/Pennisetum species. Using in silico transcript mapping and verification of physical positions of some of the transcripts via FISH, we discovered that the ASGR-carrier chromosome from P. squamulatum is collinear with chromosome 2 of foxtail millet and sorghum outside of the ASGR. The in silico ordering of the ASGR-carrier chromosome markers, previously unmapped in P. squamulatum, allowed for the identification of a backcross line with structural changes to the P. squamulatum ASGR-carrier chromosome derived from gamma irradiated pollen. PMID:27031857

  4. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH)-Based Karyotyping Reveals Rapid Evolution of Centromeric and Subtelomeric Repeats in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and Relatives.

    PubMed

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Radke, Brittany; Findley, Seth; Abernathy, Brian; Vallejos, C Eduardo; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based karyotyping is a powerful cytogenetics tool to study chromosome organization, behavior, and chromosome evolution. Here, we developed a FISH-based karyotyping system using a probe mixture comprised of centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats, 5S rDNA, and chromosome-specific BAC clones in common bean, which enables one to unambiguously distinguish all 11 chromosome pairs. Furthermore, we applied the karyotyping system to several wild relatives and landraces of common bean from two distinct gene pools, as well as other related Phaseolus species, to investigate repeat evolution in the genus Phaseolus Comparison of karyotype maps within common bean indicates that chromosomal distribution of the centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats is stable, whereas the copy number of the repeats was variable, indicating rapid amplification/reduction of the repeats in specific genomic regions. In Phaseolus species that diverged approximately 2-4 million yr ago, copy numbers of centromeric repeats were largely reduced or diverged, and chromosomal distributions have changed, suggesting rapid evolution of centromeric repeats. We also detected variation in the distribution pattern of subtelomeric repeats in Phaseolus species. The FISH-based karyotyping system revealed that satellite repeats are actively and rapidly evolving, forming genomic features unique to individual common bean accessions and Phaseolus species. PMID:26865698

  5. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH)-Based Karyotyping Reveals Rapid Evolution of Centromeric and Subtelomeric Repeats in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Radke, Brittany; Findley, Seth; Abernathy, Brian; Vallejos, C. Eduardo; Jackson, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based karyotyping is a powerful cytogenetics tool to study chromosome organization, behavior, and chromosome evolution. Here, we developed a FISH-based karyotyping system using a probe mixture comprised of centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats, 5S rDNA, and chromosome-specific BAC clones in common bean, which enables one to unambiguously distinguish all 11 chromosome pairs. Furthermore, we applied the karyotyping system to several wild relatives and landraces of common bean from two distinct gene pools, as well as other related Phaseolus species, to investigate repeat evolution in the genus Phaseolus. Comparison of karyotype maps within common bean indicates that chromosomal distribution of the centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats is stable, whereas the copy number of the repeats was variable, indicating rapid amplification/reduction of the repeats in specific genomic regions. In Phaseolus species that diverged approximately 2–4 million yr ago, copy numbers of centromeric repeats were largely reduced or diverged, and chromosomal distributions have changed, suggesting rapid evolution of centromeric repeats. We also detected variation in the distribution pattern of subtelomeric repeats in Phaseolus species. The FISH-based karyotyping system revealed that satellite repeats are actively and rapidly evolving, forming genomic features unique to individual common bean accessions and Phaseolus species. PMID:26865698

  6. Comparison of chromosomal aberrations detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization with clinical parameters, DNA ploidy and Ki 67 expression in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Y.; Igawa, M.; Shiina, H.; Shigeno, K.; Yokogi, H.; Urakami, S.; Yoneda, T.; Maruyama, R.

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the significance of chromosomal aberrations in renal cell carcinoma, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to determine its prevalence and correlation with clinical parameters of malignancy. In addition, correlation of chromosomal aberration with Ki 67 expression was analysed. We performed FISH with chromosome-specific DNA probes, and the signal number of pericentromeric sequences on chromosomes 3, 7, 9 and 17 was detected within interphase nuclei in touch preparations from tumour specimen. The incidence of loss of chromosome 3 was significantly higher than those of chromosomes 7, 9 and 17 (P < 0.001, P = 0.03 and P < 0.001 respectively). Hyperdiploid aberration of chromosomes 3 and 17 was significantly correlated with tumour stage (P = 0.03, P = 0.02 respectively), whereas hyperdiploid aberration of chromosome 9 was associated with nuclear grade (P = 0.04). Disomy of chromosome 7 was correlated with venous involvement (P = 0.04). Ki 67 expression was significantly associated with hyperdiploid aberration of chromosome 17 (P = 0.01), but not with aberration of chromosome 3. There was a significant relationship between hyperdiploid aberration of chromosome 7 and Ki 67 expression (P = 0.01). In conclusions, gain of chromosome 17 may reflect tumour development, and aberration of chromosome 7 may affect metastatic potential of malignancy, whereas loss of chromosome 3 may be associated with early stage of tumour development in renal cell carcinoma. PMID:9667682

  7. Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in ataxia telangiectasia cells: high frequency of deletions and misrejoining detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, Tetsuya; Ito, Hisao; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu; Uno, Takashi; Isobe, Kouichi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the hyper-radiosensitivity of AT cells were investigated by analyzing chromosome aberrations in the G(2) and M phases of the cell cycle using a combination of chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome painting probes. Confluent cultures of normal fibroblast cells (AG1522) and fibroblast cells derived from an individual with AT (GM02052) were exposed to gamma rays and allowed to repair at 37 degrees C for 24 h. At doses that resulted in 10% survival, GM02052 cells were approximately five times more sensitive to gamma rays than AG1522 cells. For a given dose, GM02052 cells contained a much higher frequency of deletions and misrejoining than AG1522 cells. For both cell types, a good correlation was found between the percentage of aberrant cells and cell survival. The average number of color junctions, which represent the frequency of chromosome misrejoining, was also found to correlate well with survival. However, in a similar surviving population of GM02052 and AG1522 cells, induced by 1 Gy and 6 Gy, respectively, AG1522 cells contained four times more color junctions and half as many deletions as GM02052 cells. These results indicate that both repair deficiency and misrepair may be involved in the hyper-radiosensitivity of AT cells.

  8. Molecular Cytogenetic Analysis of JAZF1, PHF1, and YWHAE in Endometrial Stromal Tumors: Discovery of Genetic Complexity by Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Jennelle C; Bedroske, Patrick P; Pearce, Kathryn E; Sukov, William R

    2016-07-01

    Diagnosis of endometrial stromal tumors (ESTs) can be challenging, particularly endometrial stromal sarcomas (ESSs) because of variable histologic appearance, long latency to recurrence, frequent metastases with unknown primary, and overlap with endometrial stromal nodules and undifferentiated uterine sarcomas. To enhance EST diagnosis, a break-apart strategy fluorescence in situ hybridization panel to detect JAZF1, PHF1, and YWHAE rearrangements was applied to a cohort of primary or metastatic endometrial stromal nodules, ESSs, or undifferentiated uterine sarcomas (36 cases for JAZF1, 24 of which were also assessed for PHF1 and YWHAE), 24 myometrium/endometrium controls, and 37 non-ESTs in the differential diagnosis. JAZF1 was the most frequently altered gene and occurred in all EST types, JAZF1 and/or PHF1 were mutually exclusive from YWHAE involvement, and uterine and extrauterine ESTs have a shared pathogenesis. We further defined frequency of these rearrangements and provided a resource demonstrating the signal complexity that can manifest when evaluating JAZF1. Rearrangement of JAZF1 occurred in 47% of ESTs, most (70%) of which had atypical patterns representing multiple structural alterations and/or more than one clone. YWHAE and PHF1 rearrangements each occurred in 8% of ESTs. An exceptional case was an ESS without JAZF1 or MEAF6 disruption that further disputes correlation of PHF1 involvement with the sex cord-like variant. These results expand our understanding of the genetic heterogeneity that defines ESTs. PMID:27154512

  9. Parental exposure to environmental concentrations of diuron leads to aneuploidy in embryos of the Pacific oyster, as evidenced by fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Barranger, Audrey; Benabdelmouna, Abdellah; Dégremont, Lionel; Burgeot, Thierry; Akcha, Farida

    2015-02-01

    Changes in normal chromosome numbers (i.e. aneuploidy) due to abnormal chromosome segregation may arise either spontaneously or as a result of chemical/radiation exposure, particularly during cell division. Coastal ecosystems are continuously subjected to various contaminants originating from urban, industrial and agricultural activities. Genotoxicity is common to several families of major environmental pollutants, including pesticides, which therefore represent a potential important environmental hazard for marine organisms. A previous study demonstrated the vertical transmission of DNA damage by subjecting oyster genitors to short-term exposure to the herbicide diuron at environmental concentrations during gametogenesis. In this paper, Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to further characterize diuron-induced DNA damage at the chromosomal level. rDNA genes (5S and 18-5.8-28S), previously mapped onto Crassostrea gigas chromosomes 4, 5 and 10, were used as probes on the interphase nuclei of embryo preparations. Our results conclusively show higher aneuploidy (hypo- or hyperdiploidy) level in embryos from diuron-exposed genitors, with damage to the three studied chromosomal regions. This study suggests that sexually developing oysters are vulnerable to diuron exposure, incurring a negative impact on reproductive success and oyster recruitment. PMID:25498420

  10. High-Resolution Single-Copy Gene Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization and Its Use in the Construction of a Cytogenetic Map of Maize Chromosome 9[W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chung-Ju Rachel; Harper, Lisa; Cande, W. Zacheus

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution cytogenetic maps provide important biological information on genome organization and function, as they correlate genetic distance with cytological structures, and are an invaluable complement to physical sequence data. The most direct way to generate a cytogenetic map is to localize genetically mapped genes onto chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Detection of single-copy genes on plant chromosomes has been difficult. In this study, we developed a squash FISH procedure allowing successful detection of single-copy genes on maize (Zea mays) pachytene chromosomes. Using this method, the shortest probe that can be detected is 3.1 kb, and two sequences separated by ∼100 kb can be resolved. To show the robust nature of this protocol, we localized nine genetically mapped single-copy genes on chromosome 9 in one FISH experiment. Integration of existing information from genetic maps and the BAC contig-based physical map with the cytological structure of chromosome 9 provides a comprehensive cross-referenced cytogenetic map and shows the dramatic reduction of recombination in the pericentromeric heterochromatic region. To establish a feasible mapping system for maize, we also developed a probe cocktail for unambiguous identification of the 10 maize pachytene chromosomes. These results provide a starting point toward constructing a high-resolution integrated cytogenetic map of maize. PMID:16461583

  11. Evaluation of HER2 Gene Status in Breast Cancer Samples with Indeterminate Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization by Quantitative Real-Time PCR.

    PubMed

    Koudelakova, Vladimira; Berkovcova, Jitka; Trojanec, Radek; Vrbkova, Jana; Radova, Lenka; Ehrmann, Jiri; Kolar, Zdenek; Melichar, Bohuslav; Hajduch, Marian

    2015-07-01

    Administration of drugs targeting HER2 (official symbol ERBB2) is an important component of therapy for breast cancer patients with HER2 amplification/overexpression as determined by in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). In approximately 5% of breast cancers, ISH assays fail. In these cases, HER2 protein expression is evaluated by IHC alone that may yield false negatives/positives for poor-quality samples. Therefore, we developed a method that was based on quantitative real-time PCR applicable for DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples. Its limit of detection was determined with breast cancer cell lines and validated with 223 breast cancer patient samples. On the basis of comparisons with fluorescent ISH (FISH) and IHC data, the sensitivity of the new method was 94.2% and 95.1%, its specificity was 100% and 99.1%, and overall concordance between results obtained with the quantitative real-time PCR method and FISH/IHC was 97.6% for both methods. The quantitative real-time PCR method was then used to evaluate the HER2 status of 198 of 3696 breast cancer tissues that yielded indeterminate FISH results. The HER2 copy number was successfully determined in 69.2% of these indeterminate samples. Thus, the DNA-based technique appears to be a specific, sensitive method for determining HER2 copy numbers when the FISH assay fails, which may complement IHC tests. PMID:25956448

  12. Mapping the Distribution of Cysts from the Toxic Dinoflagellate Cochlodinium polykrikoides in Bloom-Prone Estuaries by a Novel Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Assay

    PubMed Central

    Hattenrath-Lehmann, Theresa K.; Zhen, Yu; Wallace, Ryan B.

    2015-01-01

    Cochlodinium polykrikoides is a cosmopolitan dinoflagellate that is notorious for causing fish-killing harmful algal blooms (HABs) across North America and Asia. While recent laboratory and ecosystem studies have definitively demonstrated that Cochlodinium forms resting cysts that may play a key role in the dynamics of its HABs, uncertainties regarding cyst morphology and detection have prohibited even a rudimentary understanding of the distribution of C. polykrikoides cysts in coastal ecosystems. Here, we report on the development of a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay using oligonucleotide probes specific for the large subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of C. polykrikoides. The LSU rDNA-targeted FISH assay was used with epifluorescence microscopy and was iteratively refined to maximize the fluorescent reaction with C. polykrikoides and minimize cross-reactivity. The final LSU rDNA-targeted FISH assay was found to quantitatively recover cysts made by North American isolates of C. polykrikoides but not cysts formed by other common cyst-forming dinoflagellates. The method was then applied to identify and map C. polykrikoides cysts across bloom-prone estuaries. Annual cyst and vegetative cell surveys revealed that elevated densities of C. polykrikoides cysts (>100 cm−3) during the spring of a given year were spatially consistent with regions of dense blooms the prior summer. The identity of cysts in sediments was confirmed via independent amplification of C. polykrikoides rDNA. This study mapped C. polykrikoides cysts in a natural marine setting and indicates that the excystment of cysts formed by this harmful alga may play a key role in the development of HABs of this species. PMID:26637596

  13. Mapping the Distribution of Cysts from the Toxic Dinoflagellate Cochlodinium polykrikoides in Bloom-Prone Estuaries by a Novel Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Assay.

    PubMed

    Hattenrath-Lehmann, Theresa K; Zhen, Yu; Wallace, Ryan B; Tang, Ying-Zhong; Gobler, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Cochlodinium polykrikoides is a cosmopolitan dinoflagellate that is notorious for causing fish-killing harmful algal blooms (HABs) across North America and Asia. While recent laboratory and ecosystem studies have definitively demonstrated that Cochlodinium forms resting cysts that may play a key role in the dynamics of its HABs, uncertainties regarding cyst morphology and detection have prohibited even a rudimentary understanding of the distribution of C. polykrikoides cysts in coastal ecosystems. Here, we report on the development of a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay using oligonucleotide probes specific for the large subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of C. polykrikoides. The LSU rDNA-targeted FISH assay was used with epifluorescence microscopy and was iteratively refined to maximize the fluorescent reaction with C. polykrikoides and minimize cross-reactivity. The final LSU rDNA-targeted FISH assay was found to quantitatively recover cysts made by North American isolates of C. polykrikoides but not cysts formed by other common cyst-forming dinoflagellates. The method was then applied to identify and map C. polykrikoides cysts across bloom-prone estuaries. Annual cyst and vegetative cell surveys revealed that elevated densities of C. polykrikoides cysts (>100 cm(-3)) during the spring of a given year were spatially consistent with regions of dense blooms the prior summer. The identity of cysts in sediments was confirmed via independent amplification of C. polykrikoides rDNA. This study mapped C. polykrikoides cysts in a natural marine setting and indicates that the excystment of cysts formed by this harmful alga may play a key role in the development of HABs of this species. PMID:26637596

  14. Human carbonyl reductase (CBR) localized to band 21q22. 1 by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization displays gene dosage effects in trisomy 21 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lemieux, N. ); Malfoy, B. ); Forrest, G.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Human carbonyl reductase (CBR) belongs to a group of NADPH-dependent enzymes called aldo-keto reductases. The enzyme can function as an aldo-keto reductase or as a quinone reductase with potential for modulating quinone-mediated oxygen free radicals. The CBR gene was mapped by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization to band 21q22.12, very close to the SOD1 locus at position 2lq22.11. CBR displayed gene dosage effects in trisomy 21 human lymphoblasts at the DNA and mRNA levels. Lymphoblasts with increasing chromosome 21 ploidy also showed increased aldo-keto reductase activity and increased quinone reductase activity. Both aldo-keto reductase activity and quinone reductase activity have been shown to be associated with carbonyl reductase. The location of CBR near SOD1 and the increased enzyme activity and potential for free radical modulation in trisomy 21 cells implicate CBR as a candidate for contributing to the pathology of certain diseases such as Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease. 28 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Detection of clarithromycin-resistant Helicobacter pylori in frozen gastric biopsies from pediatric patients by a commercially available fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Vega, Alba E; Alarcón, Teresa; Domingo, Diego; López-Brea, Manuel

    2007-12-01

    Clarithromycin resistance is an important factor of eradication failure. A commercially available fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) kit (creaFAST) was used to detect H. pylori infection and the resistance to clarithromycin in frozen biopsies. A total of 33 biopsies, H. pylori culture-positive, obtained from pediatric patients were retrospectively studied. Clarithromycin resistance was compared with MICs detected by E-test from H. pylori clinical isolates. All culture-positive biopsies were positive by FISH. Detection of clarithromycin resistance showed sensitivity of 90%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100%, and negative predictive value of 86.7% compared with results obtained by E-test. Discrepant results were 2 biopsies, clarithromycin-susceptible by FISH but intermediate by E-test. In conclusion, FISH technology is a rapid, easy-to-implement, and reliable cultivation-independent method for routine application; however, when frozen biopsies are studied, some modification of the recommended procedure should be used to obtain better results. PMID:17878066

  16. Tracking and quantification of nitrifying bacteria in biofilm and mixed liquor of a partial nitrification MBBR pilot plant using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Abzazou, Tarik; Araujo, Rosa M; Auset, María; Salvadó, Humbert

    2016-01-15

    A moving bead biofilm reactor (MBBR) pilot plant was implemented as a partial nitrification process for pre-treatment of ammonium-rich liquors (676 ± 195 mg L(-1)), and studied for 479 days under variations in hydraulic retention time. The main purpose of this work, was the study of dynamics abundance of total bacteria and single-cells nitrifying bacteria belonging to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in biofilms and mixed liquor of the plant. The microbial monitoring was successfully achieved using fluorescence in situ hybridization combined with flocs disaggregation protocol as a useful microbial monitoring tool. A partial nitrification process with a N-NH4(+) removal rate of about 38.6 ± 14.8% was successfully achieved at 211 days after start-up, with a clear dominance of AOB, which accounted for 11.3 ± 17.0% of total bacterial cells compared with only 2.1 ± 4.0% of NOB. The effluent obtained was subsequently supplied to an Anammox reactor for complete ammonium treatment. PMID:26473713

  17. Aneuploidy in 165,330 human sperm; results of two- and three-colour fluorescence in situ hybridization for chromosomes 1, 12, 15, 18, X, and Y

    SciTech Connect

    Spriggs, E.L.; Martin, R.H. |

    1994-09-01

    To understand the mechanisms that affect aneuploidy, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), using chromosome-specific centromeric probes, was employed to screen a large population of human sperm for numerical errors. To determine the true rate of disomy for chromosomes 1, 12, 15, 18, two-color FISH was performed, and for the gonosomes, three-color FISH. The use of multiple, differently-colored probes allows one to distingish a true disomic sperm from a diploid cell. For each centromeric probe, a minimum of 10,000 sperm nuclei for each of five donors was scored, giving a total count of 165,330 sperm nuclei. The incidence of disomic sperm for the sex chromosomes was significantly increased as compared to the frequency for the autosomes ({chi}{sup 2}=232.3, p<0.001), confirming the results observed in studies of sperm karyotypes and spontaneous abortions. The disomy frequencies for autosomes 1, 12, 15, and 18 were found to be uniform. Inter-donor heterogeneity for disomy frequencies was found to exist for the sex chromosomes and for chromosomes 1 and 15, suggesting significant variation among normal men.

  18. Vertical distribution of Archaea and Bacteria in a meromictic lake as determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Lentini, Valeria; Gugliandolo, Concetta; Maugeri, Teresa L

    2012-01-01

    The prokaryotic cells distribution in the water column of the coastal saline meromictic Lake Faro (Messina, Italy) was investigated by microscopic counting techniques. Water samples were collected at a central station from the surface to the bottom, when waters were characterized by a marked stratification. A "red-water" layer, caused by a dense growth of photosynthetic sulfur bacteria, was present at a depth of 15 m, defining a transition area between oxic (mixolimnion) and anoxic (monimolimnion) layers. Fluorescently labeled 16S rRNA oligonucleotide, group-specific probes were used to determine the abundance of Bacteria and Archaea, and their subgroups, Green Sulfur Bacteria (GSB), Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB), Cyanobacteria and Chromatium okenii, and Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota, as key elements of the microbial community. Bacteria decreased from surface to bottom, while Archaea increased with depth and reached the maximum value at 30 m, where they outnumbered the Bacteria. Bacteria and picophytoplankton prevailed in the mixolimnion. At the chemocline high numbers of prokaryotic cells were present, mainly represented by Cyanobacteria, Chromatium okenii and Euryarchaeota. GSB, SRB, and Crenarchaeota prevailed below the chemocline. Although Archaea constitute a minor fraction of microbial community, they could represent active contributors to the meromictic Lake Faro ecosystem. PMID:22006072

  19. Food selection by bacterivorous protists: insight from the analysis of the food vacuole content by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Jezbera, Jan; Hornák, Karel; Simek, Karel

    2005-05-01

    A modified fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method was used to analyze bacterial prey composition in protistan food vacuoles in both laboratory and natural populations. Under laboratory conditions, we exposed two bacterial strains (affiliated with beta- and gamma-Proteobacteria -- Aeromonas hydrophila and Pseudomonas fluorescens, respectively) to grazing by three protists: the flagellates Bodo saltans and Goniomonas sp., and the ciliate Cyclidium glaucoma. Both flagellate species preferably ingested A. hydrophila over P. fluorescens, while C. glaucoma showed no clear preferences. Differences were found in the digestion of bacterial prey with B. saltans digesting significantly faster P. fluorescens compared to two other protists. The field study was conducted in a reservoir as part of a larger experiment. We monitored changes in the bacterial prey composition available compared to the bacteria ingested in flagellate food vacuoles. Bacteria detected by probe HGC69a (Actinobacteria) and R-BT065 were negatively selected by flagellates. Bacteria detected by probe CF319a were initially positively selected but along with a temporal shift in bacterial cell size, this trend changed to negative selection during the experiment. Overall, our analysis of protistan food vacuole content indicated marked effects of flagellate prey selectivity on bacterioplankton community composition. PMID:16329920

  20. Comparison of high resolution chromosome banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the laboratory evaluation of Prader-Willi syndrome and Angelman syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Delach, J.A.; Rosengren, S.S.; Kaplan, L.; Greenstein, R.M.; Cassidy, S.B.; Benn, P.A.

    1994-08-01

    The development of probes containing segments of DNA from chromosome region 15q11-q13 provides the opportunity to confirm the diagnosis of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We have evaluated FISH studies and high resolution chromosome banding studies in 14 patients referred to confirm or rule out AS. In four patients (three from the PWS category and 1 from the AS group) chromosome analysis suggested that a deletion was present but FISH failed to confirm the finding. In one AS group patient, FISH identified a deletion not detectable by high resolution banding. Review of the clinical findings in the discrepant cases suggested that FISH results were correct and high resolution findings were erroneous. Studies with a chromosome 15 alpha satellite probe (D15Z) on both normal and abnormal individuals suggested that incorrect interpretation of chromosome banding may occasionally be attributable to alpha satellite polymorphism but other variation of 15q11-q13 chromosome bands also contributes to misinterpretation. We conclude that patients who have been reported to have a cytogenetic deletion of 15q11-q13 and who have clinical findings inconsistent with PWS and AS should be re-evaluated by molecular genetic techniques. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Mapping of the Gene for the Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase, hTERT, to Chromosome 5p15.33 by Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization1

    PubMed Central

    Bryce, Lisa A; Morrison, Norma; Hoare, Stacey F; Muir, Sharon; Keith, W Nicol

    2000-01-01

    Abstract Telomerase, the enzyme that maintains the ends of chromosomes, is absent from the majority of somatic cells but is present and active in most tumours. The gene for the reverse transcriptase component of telomerase (hTERT) has recently been identified. A cDNA clone of this gene was used as a probe to identify three genomic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones, one of which was used as a probe to map hTERT by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to chromosome 5p15.33. This BAC probe was further used to look at copy number of the hTERT region in immortal cell lines. We found that 10/15 immortal cell lines had a modal copy number of 3 or more per cell, with one cell line (CaSki) having a modal copy number of 11. This suggests that increases in copy number of the hTERT gene region do occur, and may well be one route to upregulating telomerase levels in tumour cells. 5p15 gains and amplifications have been documented for various tumour types, including non-small cell lung carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck, and uterine cervix cancer, making hTERT a potential target. PMID:10935505

  2. The human ovarian teratocarcinoma cell line PA-1 demonstrates a single translocation: analysis with fluorescence in situ hybridization, spectral karyotyping, and bacterial artificial chromosome microarray.

    PubMed

    Sarraf, Shireen; Tejada, Raphael; Abawi, Massih; Oberst, Michael; Dennis, Tom; Simon, Kelly Claire; Blancato, Jan

    2005-08-01

    Cell lines derived from tumors contain numerous chromosomal aberrations and are the focus of study in tumor evolution. The ovarian teratocarcinoma cell line PA-1 demonstrates a single chromosomal aberration: a reciprocal t(15;20)(p11.2;q11.2). A complete molecular genetic analysis was undertaken to characterize this cell line. The PA-1 cell line was studied with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), spectral karyotyping (SKY), bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) microarray, and Western blotting. Amplification of 20q is frequently implicated in both breast and ovarian cancer; this region contains a number of oncogenes including MDM2, ZNF217, and the ovarian tumor marker WFDC2 (alias HE4). FISH revealed gene amplification of AIB1 (now known as NCOA3) but not STK15 (now known as AURKA). Immunoblot analysis demonstrated 3.6-fold overexpression of the AIB1 protein product, but no elevation of the STK15. BAC cancer gene microarray analysis showed gene amplification of > or =1.20 for five oncogenes. The presence of a consistent single change in PA-1, the t(15;20)(p11.2;q11.2), suggests that the aberration is significant with respect to the transformation status of the cell line. This translocation appears to cause overexpression of AIB1 (and perhaps other proteins), which may provide an immortalizing effect on this cell line. PMID:16080959

  3. Assignment of the human prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) gene to 1q25 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, A.; Squire, J.A.; Goldberg, H.; Skorecki, K.

    1994-10-01

    A major mechanism for the regulation of prostaglandin synthesis occurs at the level of cyclooxygenase, also known as prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase (PTGS). Two isoforms of PTGS have been identified: PTGS1, encoded by a 2.8-kb mRNA and a mitogen-inducible form, PTGS2, encoded by a 4.5-kb mRNA. We report here the assignment of the human PTGS2 gene to chromosome 1q25 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We note with interest the physical proximity of the PTGS2 gene to that of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), which we have previously mapped to chromosome 1q24-q25. In contrast, the PTGS1 gene has been mapped to chromosome 9. Since cPLA2 and PTGS2 are key enzymes in the synthesis of prostaglandins and thromboxane, the possible implication of this proximity could mean that polymorphic markers already determined for the cPLA2 gene may also prove to be useful as markers for the PTGS2 gene as well. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Efficiency of sex pre-selection of spermatozoa by albumin separation method evaluated by double-labelled fluorescence in-situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Chen, M J; Guu, H F; Ho, E S

    1997-09-01

    To evaluate the separation efficiency of Ericsson's two- and three-layer albumin separation methods, semen samples from 21 healthy males were studied. Seven patients already had two or more sons, another seven had two or more daughters and the other seven had primary infertility due to female factors. The semen samples were divided into three aliquots: one remained unprocessed initially, the other two aliquots went through two- and three-layer albumin separation methods respectively. All samples were then stained with X-Y double staining probes. In each group, four or five samples were processed at room temperature, and two or three at body temperature (37 degrees C). The labelling efficiency of X-Y double staining probe was over 99%. The X:Y sperm ratios were even in the original samples. The ratios of the X and Y spermatozoa were altered slightly but significantly after the two-layer (P < or = 0.05) or the three-layer (P < or = 0.005) separation. The alterations occurred only at room temperature. The X spermatozoa increased and the Y spermatozoa decreased, both to a small degree of difference (1.4-3.5%). Double fluorescence in-situ hybridization analysis therefore showed that albumin separation methods do not enrich Y spermatozoa. PMID:9363707

  5. Let them fly or light them up: matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Schweickert, Birgitta; Moter, Annette; Lefmann, Michael; Göbel, Ulf B

    2004-01-01

    This review focuses on clinical bacteriology and by and large does not cover the detection of fungi, viruses or parasites. It discusses two completely different but complementary approaches that may either supplement or replace classic culture-based bacteriology. The latter view may appear provocative in the light of the actual market penetration of molecular genetic testing in clinical bacteriology. Despite its elegance, high specificity and sensitivity, molecular genetic diagnostics has not yet reached the majority of clinical laboratories. The reasons for this are manifold: Many microbiologists and medical technologists are more familiar with classical microbiological methods than with molecular biology techniques. Culture-based methods still represent the work horse of everyday routine. The number of available FDA-approved molecular genetic tests is limited and external quality control is still under development. Finally, it appears difficult to incorporate genetic testing in the routine laboratory setting due to the limited number of samples received or the lack of appropriate resources. However, financial and time constraints, particularly in hospitals as a consequence of budget cuts and reduced length of stay, lead to a demand for significantly shorter turnaround times that cannot be met by culture-dependent diagnosis. As a consequence, smaller laboratories that do not have the technical and personal equipment required for molecular genetic amplification techniques may adopt alternative methods such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) that combines easy-to-perform molecular hybridization with microscopy, a technique familiar to every microbiologist. FISH is hence one of the technologies presented here. For large hospital or reference laboratories with a high sample volume requiring massive parallel high-throughput testing we discuss matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) of nucleic acids, a

  6. 3D-catFISH: a system for automated quantitative three-dimensional compartmental analysis of temporal gene transcription activity imaged by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Monica K; Lin, Gang; Olson, Kathy; Vazdarjanova, Almira; Burke, Sara N; McNaughton, Bruce L; Worley, Paul F; Guzowski, John F; Roysam, Badrinath; Barnes, Carol A

    2004-10-15

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of neural activity-regulated, immediate-early gene (IEG) expression provides a method of functional brain imaging with cellular resolution. This enables the identification, in one brain, of which specific principal neurons were active during each of two distinct behavioral epochs. The unprecedented potential of this differential method for large-scale analysis of functional neural circuits is limited, however, by the time-intensive nature of manual image analysis. A comprehensive software tool for processing three-dimensional, multi-spectral confocal image stacks is described which supports the automation of this analysis. Nuclei counterstained with conventional DNA dyes and FISH signals indicating the sub-cellular distribution of specific, IEG RNA species are imaged using different spectral channels. The DNA channel data are segmented into individual nuclei by a three-dimensional multi-step algorithm that corrects for depth-dependent attenuation, non-isotropic voxels, and imaging noise. Intra-nuclear and cytoplasmic FISH signals are associated spatially with the nuclear segmentation results to generate a detailed tabular/database and graphic representation. Here we present a comprehensive validation of data generated by the automated software against manual quantification by human experts on hippocampal and parietal cortical regions (96.5% concordance with multi-expert consensus). The high degree of reliability and accuracy suggests that the software will generalize well to multiple brain areas and eventually to large-scale brain analysis. PMID:15351517

  7. Dual-Color Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Reveals an Association of Chromosome 8q22 but Not 8p21 Imbalance with High Grade Invasive Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Logan C.; McDonald, Margaret; Wells, J. Elisabeth; Harris, Gavin C.; Robinson, Bridget A.; Morris, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported molecular karyotype analysis of invasive breast tumour core needle biopsies by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) (Walker et al, Genes Chromosomes Cancer, 2008 May;47(5):405-17). That study identified frequently recurring gains and losses involving chromosome bands 8q22 and 8p21, respectively. Moreover, these data highlighted an association between 8q22 gain and typically aggressive grade 3 tumors. Here we validate and extend our previous investigations through FISH analysis of tumor touch imprints prepared from excised breast tumor specimens. Compared to post-surgical tumor excisions, core needle biopsies are known to be histologically less precise when predicting tumor grade. Therefore investigating these chromosomal aberrations in tumor samples that offer more reliable pathological assessment is likely to give a better overall indication of association. A series of 60 breast tumors were screened for genomic copy number changes at 8q22 and 8p21 by dual-color FISH. Results confirm previous findings that 8p loss (39%) and 8q gain (74%) occur frequently in invasive breast cancer. Both absolute quantification of 8q22 gain across the sample cohort, and a separate relative assessment by 8q22:8p21 copy number ratio, showed that the incidence of 8q22 gain significantly increased with grade (p = 0.004, absolute and p = 0.02, relative). In contrast, no association was found between 8p21 loss and tumor grade. These findings support the notion that 8q22 is a region of interest for invasive breast cancer pathogenesis, potentially harboring one or more genes that, when amplified, precipitate the molecular events that define high tumor grade. PMID:23936250

  8. Optimization of peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) for the detection of bacteria: The effect of pH, dextran sulfate and probe concentration.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Rui; Santos, Rita S; Madureira, Pedro; Almeida, Carina; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2016-05-20

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a molecular technique widely used for the detection and characterization of microbial populations. FISH is affected by a wide variety of abiotic and biotic variables and the way they interact with each other. This is translated into a wide variability of FISH procedures found in the literature. The aim of this work is to systematically study the effects of pH, dextran sulfate and probe concentration in the FISH protocol, using a general peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe for the Eubacteria domain. For this, response surface methodology was used to optimize these 3 PNA-FISH parameters for Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens) and Gram-positive species (Listeria innocua, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Bacillus cereus). The obtained results show that a probe concentration higher than 300nM is favorable for both groups. Interestingly, a clear distinction between the two groups regarding the optimal pH and dextran sulfate concentration was found: a high pH (approx. 10), combined with lower dextran sulfate concentration (approx. 2% [w/v]) for Gram-negative species and near-neutral pH (approx. 8), together with higher dextran sulfate concentrations (approx. 10% [w/v]) for Gram-positive species. This behavior seems to result from an interplay between pH and dextran sulfate and their ability to influence probe concentration and diffusion towards the rRNA target. This study shows that, for an optimum hybridization protocol, dextran sulfate and pH should be adjusted according to the target bacteria. PMID:27021959

  9. Nucleic acid in-situ hybridization detection of infectious agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Curtis T.

    2000-04-01

    Limitations of traditional culture methods and newer polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for detection and speciation of infectious agents demonstrate the need for more rapid and better diagnostics. Nucleic acid hybridization is a detection technology that has gained wide acceptance in cancer and prenatal cytogenetics. Using a modification of the nucleic acid hybridization technique known as fluorescence in-situ hybridization, infectious agents can be detected in a variety of specimens with high sensitivity and specificity. The specimens derive from all types of human and animal sources including body fluids, tissue aspirates and biopsy material. Nucleic acid hybridization can be performed in less than one hour. The result can be interpreted either using traditional fluorescence microscopy or automated platforms such as micro arrays. This paper demonstrates proof of concept for nucleic acid hybridization detection of different infectious agents. Interpretation within a cytologic and histologic context is possible with fluorescence microscopic analysis, thereby providing confirmatory evidence of hybridization. With careful probe selection, nucleic acid hybridization promises to be a highly sensitive and specific practical diagnostic alternative to culture, traditional staining methods, immunohistochemistry and complicated nucleic acid amplification tests.

  10. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of the ALK gene in 2,045 non-small cell lung cancer patients from North-Western Spain (Galicia)

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Ares, María; Cameselle-Teijeiro, José M.; Vázquez-Estévez, Sergio; Lázaro-Quintela, Martín; Vázquez-Boquete, Ángel; Afonso-Afonso, Francisco J.; Casal-Rubio, Joaquín; González-Piñeiro, Ana L.; Rico-Rodríguez, Yolanda; Fírvida-Pérez, José L.; Ruíz-Bañobre, Juan; Couso, Elena; Santomé, Lucía; Pérez-Becerra, Raquel; García-Campelo, Rosario; Amenedo, Margarita; Azpitarte-Raposeiras, Cristina; Antúnez, José; Abdulkader, Ihab

    2016-01-01

    Identification of anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements is a standard diagnostic test in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The current study describes the experience of ALK rearrangement detection of a referral center in the public health care system of Galicia in North-Western Spain. The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) patterns of the ALK gene and the clinical and pathological features of these patients are reported. This study is also of interest for comparative purposes due to the relative geographical isolation of the area, which could have contributed to particular genetic features. A total of 2,045 tissue samples from NSCLC patients were collected between October 2010 and July 2015 and tested for ALK rearrangements by FISH. Examination of 1,686 paraffin-embedded tissue specimens and 395 cytological samples (306 cell block preparations and 53 cytological smears) was conducted, and any associations between the FISH results and clinicopathological features were assessed. The rate of successful evaluation was marginally higher in tissue samples than in cytological samples (92.9% vs. 84.1%); this difference was not significant. ALK rearrangements were identified in 82 patients(4%): 65 (79.3%) in tissue specimens, 15 (18.3%) in cell block samples and 2 (2.4%) in cytological smears. This genetic translocation appeared to be associated with a non-smoking history, younger age, female gender, stage IV and adenocarcinoma histological type. The findings demonstrate that ALK evaluation by FISH is feasible in tissue and cytological samples. The clinical and pathological features of the ALK-positive series of patients are similar to those previously reported in the literature. PMID:27446444

  11. Gene fusion detection in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded benign fibrous histiocytomas using fluorescence in situ hybridization and RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Walther, Charles; Hofvander, Jakob; Nilsson, Jenny; Magnusson, Linda; Domanski, Henryk A; Gisselsson, David; Tayebwa, Johnbosco; Doyle, Leona A; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Mertens, Fredrik

    2015-09-01

    Benign fibrous histiocytomas (FH) can be subdivided into several morphological and clinical subgroups. Recently, gene fusions involving either one of two protein kinase C genes (PRKCB and PRKCD) or the ALK gene were described in FH. We here wanted to evaluate the frequency of PRKCB and PRKCD gene fusions in FH. Using interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization on sections from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumors, 36 cases could be analyzed. PRKCB or PRKCD rearrangements were seen in five tumors: 1/7 regular, 0/3 aneurysmal, 0/6 cellular, 2/7 epithelioid, 0/1 atypical, 2/10 deep, and 0/2 metastatic lesions. We also evaluated the status of the ALK gene in selected cases, finding rearrangements in 3/7 epithelioid and 0/1 atypical lesions. To assess the gene fusion status of FH further, deep sequencing of RNA (RNA-Seq) was performed on FFPE tissue from eight cases with unknown gene fusion status, as well as on two FH and six soft tissue sarcomas with known gene fusions; of the latter eight positive controls, the expected fusion transcript was found in all but one, while 2/8 FH with unknown genetic status showed fusion transcripts, including a novel KIRREL/PRKCA chimera. Thus, also a third member of the PRKC family is involved in FH tumorigenesis. We conclude that gene fusions involving PRKC genes occur in several morphological (regular, cellular, aneurysmal, epithelioid) and clinical (cutaneous, deep) subsets of FH, but they seem to account for only a minority of the cases. In epithelioid lesions, however, rearrangements of PRKC or ALK were seen, as mutually exclusive events, in the majority (5/7) of cases. Finally, the study also shows that RNA-Seq is a promising tool for identifying gene fusions in FFPE tissues. PMID:26121314

  12. Mapping of human chromosome Xq28 by two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization of DNA sequences to interphase cell nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Trask, B J; Massa, H; Kenwrick, S; Gitschier, J

    1991-01-01

    We have used the proximity of probe hybridization sites in interphase chromatin to derive the order of DNA sequences in a 2-3-Mbp region of human chromosome Xq28. The map generated bridges the results of genetic and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis mapping to produce a more complete map of Xq28 than possible with either of these other techniques alone. Two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to detect the positions of two or more probes in G1 male interphase nuclei. We show that cosmids that are 50 kbp to 2-3 Mbp apart can be ordered rapidly with two alternative approaches: (1) by comparing the average measured distance between two probes and (2) simply by scoring the order of red and green fluorescent dots after detection of three or more probes with two fluorochromes. The validity of these approaches is demonstrated using five cosmids from a region spanning approximately 800 kbp that includes the factor VIII (F8), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), and color-vision pigment (CV) genes. The cosmid map derived from interphase mapping is consistent with the map determined by restriction-fragment analysis. The two interphase mapping approaches were then used (1) to orient the F8/CV cluster relative to two markers, c1A1 and st14c, which we show by metaphase mapping to be proximal to the F8/CV cluster, (2) to position st14c (DXS52) between c1A1 and F8, and (3) to orient the CV gene cluster relative to G6PD by using two CV-flanking cosmids, 18b41 and fr7. The probe order in Xq28 derived from interphase proximity is cen-c1A1-st14c-5'F8 (p624-p542-p625)-G6PD-18b41-3' green-green-red-fr7-tel. We also show that, to determine their order by using metaphase chromosomes, sequences must be at least 1 Mbp apart, an order of magnitude greater than required in interphase chromatin. The data show that FISH mapping is a simple way to order sequences separated by greater than or equal to 50 kbp for the construction of long-range maps of mammalian genomes

  13. Sequence of human hexokinase III cDNA and assignment of the human hexokinase III gene (HK3) to chromosome band 5q35.2 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Furuta, Hiroto; Le Beau, M.M.; Fernald, A.A.

    1996-08-15

    Complementary DNA clones encoding human hexokinase III were isolated from a liver cDNA library. There was 84.7% identity between the amino acid sequences of human and rat hexokinase III. RNA blotting showed the presence of hexokinase III mRNA in liver and lung. Fluorescence in situ hybridization localized the human hexokinase III gene (HK3) to chromosome 5, band q35.2. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Definition of a fluorescence in-situ hybridization score identifies high- and low-level FGFR1 amplification types in squamous cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Heukamp, Lukas C; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine; Riesner, Katharina; Schmitz, Katja; Binot, Elke; Paggen, Ellen; Albus, Kerstin; Schulte, Wolfgang; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Schlesinger, Andreas; Ansén, Sascha; Engel-Riedel, Walburga; Brockmann, Michael; Serke, Monika; Gerigk, Ulrich; Huss, Sebastian; Göke, Friederike; Perner, Sven; Hekmat, Khosro; Frank, Konrad F; Reiser, Marcel; Schnell, Roland; Bos, Marc; Mattonet, Christian; Sos, Martin; Stoelben, Erich; Wolf, Jürgen; Zander, Thomas; Buettner, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported fibroblast growth factor receptor-type 1 (FGFR1) amplification to be associated with therapeutically tractable FGFR1 dependency in squamous cell lung cancer. This makes FGFR1 a novel target for directed therapy in these tumors. To reproducibly identify patients for clinical studies, we developed a standardized reading and evaluation strategy for FGFR1 fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) and propose evaluation criteria, describe different patterns of low- and high-level amplifications and report on the prevalence of FGFR1 amplifications in pulmonary carcinomas. A total of 420 lung cancer patients including 307 squamous carcinomas, 100 adenocarcinomas of the lung and 13 carcinomas of other types were analyzed for FGFR1 amplification using a dual color FISH. We found heterogeneous and different patterns of gene copy numbers. FGFR1 amplifications were observed in 20% of pulmonary squamous carcinomas but not in adenocarcinomas. High-level amplification (as defined by an FGFR1/centromer 8 (CEN8) ratio ≥2.0, or average number of FGFR1 signals per tumor cell nucleus ≥6, or the percentage of tumor cells containing ≥15 FGFR1 signals or large clusters ≥10%) was detected at a frequency of 16% and low-level amplification (as defined by ≥5 FGFR1 signals in ≥50% of tumor cells) at a frequency of 4%. We conclude that FGFR1 amplification is one of the most frequent therapeutically tractable genetic lesions in pulmonary carcinomas. Standardized reporting of FGFR1 amplification in squamous carcinomas of the lung will become increasingly important to correlate therapeutic responses with FGFR1 inhibitors in clinical studies. Thus, our reading and evaluation strategy might serve as a basis for identifying patients for ongoing and upcoming clinical trials. PMID:22684217

  15. The human gene for xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group G (XPG) maps to 13q33 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Samec, S.; Corlet, J.; Scherly, D.; Clarkson, S.G. ); Jones, T.A.; Sheer, D. ); Wood, R.D. )

    1994-05-01

    Recently, a human cDNA was isolated that restores normal levels of UV resistance and DNA repair synthesis when expressed in vivo in a lymphoblastoid cell line representing XP group G. The XP-G complementing gene (XPG) generates an mRNA of [approximately]4 kb and encodes a protein (XPGC) with homology to the RAD2 DNA repair protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One hundred twenty nanograms of labeled probe was mixed with 2 [mu]g of human C[sub 0]t-1 DNA as a competitor for repetitive elements. Denaturation, dehydration, hybridization, and washing were performed as described. Probe detection was achieved by incubating metaphase spreads sequentially with 2 [mu]g/ml avidin-Texas Red, 5 [mu]g/ml biotinylated goat anti-avidin antibody, and 2 [mu]g/ml avidin-Texas Red. R-banding was revealed after incubation with fluorescein-labeled anti-BrdU mouse monoclonal antibody. Chromosomes were counter-stained with 0.06 [mu]g/ml DAPI in Citifluor. Analysis of 40 metaphase spreads showed paired signals on both copies of chromosome 13 at band 13q33. No other paired signals were seen consistently on any other chromosome. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  16. [Evaluation of peptide nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) method in the identifi cation of Candida species isolated from blood cultures].

    PubMed

    Aydemir, Gonca; Koç, Ayşe Nedret; Atalay, Mustafa Altay

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, increased number of patients who are hospitalized in intensive care units, received immunosuppressive therapy and treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics that can lead an increase in the incidence of systemic candidiasis. In these patients, the most common clinical manifestation is candidemia. Since the identification of Candida species isolated from blood cultures is time consuming by conventional (morphological and biochemical) methods, rapid, reliable and accurate methods are needed. For this purpose novel systems have been developed to identify the agent directly. The aim of this study was to evaluate the peptide nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) method for the identification of Candida species by comparing with the conventional methods. A total of 50 patients who were admitted to Erciyes University Medical Faculty Hospital clinics and followed with prediagnosis of systemic fungal infections whose blood cultures were positive for the yeasts between July 2011 and July 2012 were included in the study. The conventional identification of Candida isolates was performed by considering macroscopic and microscopic morphology, germ tube test, cycloheximide sensitivity, urease activity and carbohydrate assimilation patterns with API 20C AUX (bioMerieux, France) test. PNA FISH method was conducted by the use of a commercial kit namely Yeast Traffic Light(®) PNA FISH (AdvanDx, USA). According to morphological and biochemical characteristics (conventional methods), 19 (38%) out of 50 Candida isolates were identified as C.albicans, 12 (24%) as C.glabrata, five (10%) as C.parapsilosis, five (10%) as C.kefyr, four (8%) as C.krusei, two (4%) as C.guilliermondii, two (4%) as C.tropicalis and one (2%) as C.lusitaniae. On the other hand, 24 (48%) of the isolates were identified as C.albicans/C.parapsilosis (with green fluorescence), 16 (32%) as C.glabrata/C.krusei (with red fluorescence) and one (%2) as C.tropicalis (with yellow

  17. Cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic findings in 43 aneurysmal bone cysts: aberrations of 17p mapped to 17p13.2 by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Althof, Pamela A; Ohmori, Kazuo; Zhou, Ming; Bailey, Jacqueline M; Bridge, R Stuart; Nelson, Marilu; Neff, James R; Bridge, Julia A

    2004-05-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst is a benign, cystic lesion of bone composed of blood-filled spaces separated by fibrous septa. Relatively few cases of aneurysmal bone cyst have been cytogenetically characterized, yet abnormalities of the short arm of chromosome 17 appear to be recurrent. In this study, conventional cytogenetic analysis of 43 aneurysmal bone cyst specimens from 38 patients over a 12-year period revealed clonal chromosomal abnormalities in 12 specimens. Karyotypic anomalies of 17p, including a complex translocation and inversion, were identified in eight of these 12 specimens. In an effort to further define the aberrant 17p breakpoint, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses were performed using a series of probe combinations spanning a 5.1 Mb region between the TP53 (17p13.1) and Miller-Dieker lissencephaly syndrome (17p13.3) gene loci. These studies revealed the critical breakpoint locus at 17p13.2, flanked proximally by an RP11-46I8, RP11-333E1, and RP11-457I18 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) probe cocktail and distally by an RP11-198F11 and RP11-115H24 BAC and RP5-1050D4 P1 artificial chromosome (PAC) probe cocktail. Overall, abnormalities of the 17p13.2 locus were identified by metaphase and/or interphase cell FISH analysis in 22 of 35 (63%) aneurysmal bone cyst specimens examined including 26 karyotypically normal specimens. These cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic findings expand our knowledge of chromosomal alterations in aneurysmal bone cyst, further localize the critically involved 17p breakpoint, and provide an alternative approach (ie FISH) for detecting 17p abnormalities in nondividing cells of aneurysmal bone cysts. The latter could potentially be utilized as an adjunct in diagnostically challenging cases. PMID:15044915

  18. Chromosomal gains and genomic loss of p53 and p16 genes in Barrett's esophagus detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization of cytology specimens.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, Mona; Skacel, Marek; Gramlich, Terry L; Brainard, Jennifer A; Rice, Thomas W; Goldblum, John R; Connor, Jason T; Casey, Graham; Legator, Mona S; Tubbs, Raymond R; Falk, Gary W

    2004-05-01

    Endoscopic brush cytology is a promising surveillance technique for Barrett's esophagus. Ancillary markers are sought to increase the sensitivity of cytology and allow identification of patients at increased risk for disease progression. To determine if there are specific genetic changes in Barrett's esophagus with associated high-grade dysplasia/intramucosal adenocarcinoma compared to those without dysplasia, we performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on cytologic specimens using probes to chromosomes and genomic regions previously described as altered in this disease. We studied archival brush cytology slides from 40 Barrett's esophagus patients: 21 with biopsy-proven high-grade dysplasia/carcinoma and 19 with no dysplasia and a minimum 5 years of negative follow-up. Centromeric enumeration probes (CEP) for chromosomes 6, 7, 11, and 12, and locus-specific probes (LSI) for 9p21 (p16 gene), and 17p13.1 (p53 gene) loci along with their corresponding CEP (9 and 17, respectively) were used in this study. A positive FISH result was defined as the presence of cells with >2 CEP signals or with a loss of the LSI signals relative to their corresponding CEP. p53 locus loss and/or aneusomy of chromosomes 6, 7, 11, and 12 abnormalities could be detected by FISH in routinely processed endoscopic brush cytology specimens from 95% of biopsy-positive cases with a specificity of 100%. Interestingly, all five cases with cytologic changes classified as indefinite for dysplasia from patients with a positive biopsy showed changes by FISH. Loss of the p16 locus was seen commonly in patients both with and without dysplasia/carcinoma. Selected biomarkers from this study merit further investigation to determine their potential to detect genetic changes in patients with Barrett's esophagus prior to the development of high-grade dysplasia. PMID:15017433

  19. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Method Using a Peptide Nucleic Acid Probe for Identification of Salmonella spp. in a Broad Spectrum of Samples ▿

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, C.; Azevedo, N. F.; Fernandes, R. M.; Keevil, C. W.; Vieira, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    A fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method for the rapid detection of Salmonella spp. using a novel peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe was developed. The probe theoretical specificity and sensitivity were both 100%. The PNA-FISH method was optimized, and laboratory testing on representative strains from the Salmonella genus subspecies and several related bacterial species confirmed the predicted theoretical values of specificity and sensitivity. The PNA-FISH method has been successfully adapted to detect cells in suspension and is hence able to be employed for the detection of this bacterium in blood, feces, water, and powdered infant formula (PIF). The blood and PIF samples were artificially contaminated with decreasing pathogen concentrations. After the use of an enrichment step, the PNA-FISH method was able to detect 1 CFU per 10 ml of blood (5 × 109 ± 5 × 108 CFU/ml after an overnight enrichment step) and also 1 CFU per 10 g of PIF (2 × 107 ± 5 × 106 CFU/ml after an 8-h enrichment step). The feces and water samples were also enriched according to the corresponding International Organization for Standardization methods, and results showed that the PNA-FISH method was able to detect Salmonella immediately after the first enrichment step was conducted. Moreover, the probe was able to discriminate the bacterium in a mixed microbial population in feces and water by counter-staining with 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). This new method is applicable to a broad spectrum of samples and takes less than 20 h to obtain a diagnosis, except for PIF samples, where the analysis takes less than 12 h. This procedure may be used for food processing and municipal water control and also in clinical settings, representing an improved alternative to culture-based techniques and to the existing Salmonella PNA probe, Sal23S10, which presents a lower specificity. PMID:20453122

  20. Next-Generation Sequencing and Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization Have Comparable Performance Characteristics in the Analysis of Pancreaticobiliary Brushings for Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Jonathan C; Zheng, Zongli; McDonald, Thomas; Le, Long P; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Borger, Darrell; Batten, Julie; Vernovsky, Kathy; Sweeney, Brenda; Arpin, Ronald N; Brugge, William R; Forcione, David G; Pitman, Martha B; Iafrate, A John

    2016-01-01

    Cytological evaluation of pancreatic or biliary duct brushings is a specific, but insensitive, test for malignancy. We compared adjunctive molecular testing with next-generation sequencing (NGS) relative to fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for detection of high-risk neoplasia or malignancy. Bile duct brushings from 81 specimens were subjected to cytological analysis, FISH using the UroVysion probe set, and targeted NGS. Specimens were placed into negative/atypical (negative) or suspicious/positive (positive) categories depending on cytology and negative or positive categories on the basis of FISH and NGS results. Performance characteristics for each diagnostic modality were calculated on the basis of clinicopathologic follow-up and compared in a receiver operating characteristic analysis. There were 33 high-risk neoplasia/malignant strictures (41%) and 48 benign (59%). NGS revealed driver mutations in 24 cases (30%), including KRAS (21 of 24 cases), TP53 (14 of 24 cases), SMAD4 (6 of 24 cases), and CDKN2A (4 of 24 cases). Cytology had a sensitivity of 67% (95% CI, 48%-82%) and a specificity of 98% (95% CI, 89%-100%). When added to cytology, NGS increased the sensitivity to 85% (95% CI, 68%-95%), leading to a significant increase in the area under the curve in a receiver operating characteristic analysis (P = 0.03). FISH increased the sensitivity to 76% (95% CI, 58%-89%), without significantly increasing the area under the curve. These results suggest that ancillary NGS testing offers advantages over FISH, although studies with larger cohorts are needed to verify these findings. PMID:26596524

  1. Large-scale polymorphism near the ends of several human chromosomes analyzed by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Trask, B.J.; Friedman, C.; Giorgi, D.

    1994-09-01

    We have discovered a large DNA segment that is polymorphically present at the ends of several human chromosomes. The segment, f7501, was originally derived form a human chromosome 19-specific cosmid library. FISH was used to determine the cosmid`s chromosomal distribution on 44 unrelated humans and several closely related primates. The human subjects represent a diversity of reproductively isolated ethnic populations. FISH analysis revealed that sequences highly homologous to the cosmid`s insert are present on both homologs at 3q, 15q,. and 19p in almost all individuals (88, 85, and 87 of 88 homologs, respectively). Other chromosomes sites were labeled much more rarely in the sampled individuals. For example, 56 of the 88 analyzed chromosomes 11 were labeled (18+/+, 6-/-, and 20+/- individuals). In contrast, 2q was labeled on only 1/88 sampled chromosomes. The termini of 2q, 5q, 6p, 6q, 7p, 8p, 9p, 9q, 11p, 12q, 16p, 19q, and 20q and an interstitial site at 2q13-14 were labeled in at least one individual of the set. EcoR1-fragments derived from the cosmid showed the same hybridization pattern as the entire cosmid, indicating that at least 40 kbp is shared by these chromosome ends. Ethnic differences in the allele frequency of these polymorphic variants was observed. For example, signals were observed on 8/10 and 7/10 of the chromosomes 7p and 16q, respectively, derived form Biakan Pygmies, but these sites were infrequently labeled in non-Pygmy human populations (2/68, respectively). This region has undergone significant changes in chromosome location during human evolution. Strong signal was seen on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosome 3, which is homologous to human chromosome 4, a chromosome unlabeled in any of the humans we have analyzed.

  2. Quantitative Use of Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization To Examine Relationships between Mycolic Acid-Containing Actinomycetes and Foaming in Activated Sludge Plants

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Russell J.; Curtis, Thomas P.; Goodfellow, Michael; Stainsby, Fiona M.; Bingley, Marc

    2000-01-01

    The formation of viscous foams on aeration basins and secondary clarifiers of activated sludge plants is a common and widespread problem. Foam formation is often attributed to the presence of mycolic acid-containing actinomycetes (mycolata). In order to examine the relationship between the number of mycolata and foam, we developed a group-specific probe targeting the 16S rRNA of the mycolata, a protocol to permeabilize mycolata, and a statistically robust quantification method. Statistical analyses showed that a lipase-based permeabilization method was quantitatively superior to previously described methods (P << 0.05). When mixed liquor and foam samples were examined, most of the mycolata present were rods or cocci, although filamentous mycolata were also observed. A nested analysis of variance showed that virtually all of the measured variance occurred between fields of view and not between samples. On this basis we determined that as few as five fields of view could be used to give a statistically meaningful sample. Quantitative fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to examine the relationship between foaming and the concentration of mycolata in a 20-m3 completely mixed activated sludge plant. Foaming occurred when the number of mycolata exceeded a certain threshold value. Baffling of the plant affected foaming without affecting the number of mycolata. We tentatively estimated that the threshold foaming concentration of mycolata was about 2 × 106 cells ml−1 or 4 × 1012 cells m−2. We concluded that quantitative use of FISH is feasible and that quantification is a prerequisite for rational investigation of foaming in activated sludge. PMID:10698786

  3. Identification of a microdeletion at 7q21.3 with fluorescence in situ hybridization in a patient with split hand/split foot (ectrodactyly)

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, L.; Massa, H.; Disteche, C.

    1994-09-01

    Split hand/split foot (SHSF), often referred to as ectrodactyly or lobster claw deformity, is a human developmental disorder characterized by a deep median cleft of the hands and feet, missing digits, and fusion of remaining digits. This anomaly can be seen alone, frequently autosomal dominant, or in association with other abnormalities. One locus for this defect has been localized to chromosome 7q21.3-q22.1. We report a patient with SHSF plus mental retardation, short stature and dysmorphic features who was found to have a microdeletion at this locus detected only with the aid of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). T.H. is a 7 y.o. male who was referred for evaluation of foot anomalies and mild mental retardation. History was remarkable for growth retardation of postnatal onset and hypotonia. Renal ultrasound and audiology evaluation were normal. Physical exam revealed dysplastic ears, micrognathia, long philtrum, high narrow palate, and malformations of the feet consistent with SHSF. Family history was negative for limb abnormalities and mental retardation. A number of patients with SHSF and other anomalies have been found to have deletions involving chromosome 7q21-q22; therefore, high resolution chromosome analysis was performed in T.H. but was inconclusive. Cosmids and yeast artificial chromosomes which we had previously mapped to the SHSF critical region were used as FISH probes and a microdeletion was detected. We were thus able to determine the etiology of this child`s abnormalities and provide accurate genetic counseling, which would not have been possible with standard cytogenetic techniques. This technique also allowed us to further refine the SHSF critical region. This case illustrates the utility of FISH for the rapid identification of suspect microdeletions in SHSF. This approach should also be useful as an expeditious way of defining the critical regions for the location of genes which give rise to other developmental malformations.

  4. Development of Five Dual-Color, Double-Fusion Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization Assays for the Detection of Common MLL Translocation Partners

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Jeannette G.; Sukov, William R.; Knudson, Ryan A.; Nguyen, Lai P.; Williamson, Cynthia; Sinnwell, Jason P.; Ketterling, Rhett P.

    2010-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements involving the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene at 11q23 are frequent in adult and childhood acute leukemia and have been associated with an unfavorable prognosis. Recent evidence suggests that MLL gene partners may influence prognosis. Five translocations account for ∼80% of MLL rearrangements: t(4;11)(q21;q23), AFF1/MLL; t(6;11)(q27;q23), MLLT4/MLL; t(9;11)(p22;q23), MLLT3/MLL; t(11;19)(q23;p13.1), MLL/ELL; and t(11;19)(q23;p13.3), MLL/MLLT1. We have designed dual-color, double-fusion fluorescence in situ hybridization (D-FISH) probe sets to identify these translocations. A blinded study was performed for each probe set using 25 normal bone marrow samples, 25 t(4;11), 20 t(6;11), 20 t(9;11), 18 t(11;19p13.1), and 20 t(11;19p13.3) leukemia specimens as defined by chromosome analysis. The findings demonstrated abnormal D-FISH results for 24 of 25 AFF1/MLL, 19 of 20 MLLT4/MLL, all 20 MLLT3/MLL, all 18 MLL/ELL, and all 20 MLL/MLLT1 samples, confirming the efficacy of these D-FISH assays in detecting these common MLL/partner translocations. Our D-FISH assays were more accurate than chromosome analysis at distinguishing disruption of 19p13.1/ELL from that of 19p13.3/MLLT1. We also demonstrated a statistically significant increase in complex/unbalanced MLL/partner translocations occurring in pediatric patients versus adult patients (P = 0.02). A normal cutoff of 0.6% was established, suggesting an application for these assays in minimal residual disease detection and disease monitoring. PMID:20539022

  5. Detection of Escherichia coli O157 by Peptide Nucleic Acid Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (PNA-FISH) and Comparison to a Standard Culture Method

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, C.; Sousa, J. M.; Rocha, R.; Cerqueira, L.; Fanning, S.; Azevedo, N. F.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the emergence of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections, E. coli serotype O157 is still the most commonly identified STEC in the world. It causes high morbidity and mortality and has been responsible for a number of outbreaks in many parts of the world. Various methods have been developed to detect this particular serotype, but standard bacteriological methods remain the gold standard. Here, we propose a new peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) method for the rapid detection of E. coli O157. Testing on 54 representative strains showed that the PNA probe is highly sensitive and specific to E. coli O157. The method then was optimized for detection in food samples. Ground beef and unpasteurized milk samples were artificially contaminated with E. coli O157 concentrations ranging from 1 × 10−2 to 1 × 102 CFU per 25 g or ml of food. Samples were then preenriched and analyzed by both the traditional bacteriological method (ISO 16654:2001) and PNA-FISH. The PNA-FISH method performed well in both types of food matrices with a detection limit of 1 CFU/25 g or ml of food samples. Tests on 60 food samples have shown a specificity value of 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 82.83 to 100), a sensitivity of 97.22% (95% CI, 83.79 to 99.85%), and an accuracy of 98.33% (CI 95%, 83.41 to 99.91%). Results indicate that PNA-FISH performed as well as the traditional culture methods and can reduce the diagnosis time to 1 day. PMID:23934486

  6. Studies on karyotype evolution in higher primates in relation to human chromosome 14 and 9 by comparative mapping of immunoglobulin C epsilon genes with fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, H

    1999-01-01

    Karyotypic homologies in relation to human chromosome 14 and 9 were studied through comparative mapping of the immunoglobulin C epsilon genes in higher primates by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. The C epsilon genes will be suitable probes for the analysis of evolutionary rearrangements due to that the multiple recombinational events such as gene duplications and deletions have occurred repeatedly in the immunoglobulin CH gene family (IGH@) during the course of primate evolution. IGH@ locating on the terminal region of human chromosome 14 (HSA14), at band HSA14q32.33, has generated multiple pseudogenes and among subclasses of IGH@ the C epsilon genes have shown most dynamic changes with generating both truncated type (C epsilon 2) and processed type (C epsilon 3) pseudogenes. In this study, chromosomal homologies and rearrangements on HSA14 (C epsilon 1) and HSA9 (C epsilon 3) in relation to the evolutionary genesis of their primate homologous chromosomes in speciation were investigated by comparative mapping with FISH and chromosome painting (ZOO-FISH) techniques. Comparative mapping of the C epsilon 1 gene at HSA14q32.33 was carried out in seven species of nonhuman primates: common chimpanzee (PTR), pygmy chimpanzee (PPA), gorilla (GGO), orangutan (PPY), white-handed gibbon (HLA), agile gibbon (HAG), and Japanese macaque (MFU). The C epsilon 1 gene was assigned to the telomeric region of HSA14 homologues in each species, namely, PTR15q32, PPA15q32, GGO18q16, PPY15q32, HLA17qter, HAG17qter, and MFU7q29, respectively. These results suggested that HSA14 has high degree of syntenic organization with its primate homologues confirmed by ZOO-FISH. Concerning HSA9, comparative mapping of the C epsilon 3 gene at HSA9p24.2-->p24.1 was performed. The mapped positions indicated the HSA9 homologous regions detected by ZOO-FISH in each species, namely, PTR11q34, PPA11q34, GGO13q22, PPY13q16, HLA8qter, HAG8qter, and MFU14q22, respectively, suggesting that

  7. Longitudinal investigation of the faecal microbiota of healthy full-term infants using fluorescence in situ hybridization and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Roger, Laure C; McCartney, Anne L

    2010-11-01

    From birth onwards, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of infants progressively acquires a complex range of micro-organisms. It is thought that by 2 years of age the GI microbial population has stabilized. Within the developmental period of the infant GI microbiota, weaning is considered to be most critical, as the infant switches from a milk-based diet (breast and/or formula) to a variety of food components. Longitudinal analysis of the biological succession of the infant GI/faecal microbiota is lacking. In this study, faecal samples were obtained regularly from 14 infants from 1 month to 18 months of age. Seven of the infants (including a set of twins) were exclusively breast-fed and seven were exclusively formula-fed prior to weaning, with 175 and 154 faecal samples, respectively, obtained from each group. Diversity and dynamics of the infant faecal microbiota were analysed by using fluorescence in situ hybridization and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Overall, the data demonstrated large inter- and intra-individual differences in the faecal microbiological profiles during the study period. However, the infant faecal microbiota merged with time towards a climax community within and between feeding groups. Data from the twins showed the highest degree of similarity both quantitatively and qualitatively. Inter-individual variation was evident within the infant faecal microbiota and its development, even within exclusively formula-fed infants receiving the same diet. These data can be of help to future clinical trials (e.g. targeted weaning products) to organize protocols and obtain a more accurate outline of the changes and dynamics of the infant GI microbiota. PMID:20829292

  8. High resolution chromosome analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization in patients referred for Prader-Willi or Angelman syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-08

    Laboratory testing is helpful in the evaluation of patients suspected to have either Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) or Angelman syndrome (AS) because most of the patients have recognizable cytogenetic deletions of 15q11q13. Maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15, identified by molecular genetic techniques, is found in about 20 to 25% of PWS patients. Paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15 is seen in 2 to 3% of AS patients. Thus, PWS and AS represent the first examples in humans of genetic imprinting or the differential expression of genetic information depending on the parental origin. Herein, I report our experience with FISH and high resolution chromosome analysis in patients referred to confirm or rule out PWS or AS. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  9. Karyotype analysis and visualization of 45S rRNA genes using fluorescence in situ hybridization in aroids (Araceae)

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, Prabhu Shankar; Van Laere, Katrijn; Eeckhaut, Tom; Van Huylenbroeck, Johan; Van Bockstaele, Erik; Khrustaleva, Ludmila

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Karyotype analysis and FISH mapping using 45S rDNA sequences on 6 economically important plant species Anthurium andraeanum Linden ex André, 1877, Monstera deliciosa Liebmann, 1849, Philodendron scandens Koch & Sello, 1853, Spathiphyllum wallisii Regel, 1877, Syngonium auritum (Linnaeus, 1759) Schott, 1829 and Zantedeschia elliottiana (Knight, 1890) Engler, 1915 within the monocotyledonous family Araceae (aroids) were performed. Chromosome numbers varied between 2n=2x=24 and 2n=2x=60 and the chromosome length varied between 15.77 µm and 1.87 µm. No correlation between chromosome numbers and genome sizes was observed for the studied genera. The chromosome formulas contained only metacentric and submetacentric chromosomes, except for Philodendron scandens in which also telocentric and subtelocentric chromosomes were observed. The highest degree of compaction was calculated for Spathiphyllum wallisii (66.49Mbp/µm). B-chromosome-like structures were observed in Anthurium andraeanum. Their measured size was 1.87 times smaller than the length of the shortest chromosome. After FISH experiments, two 45S rDNA sites were observed in 5 genera. Only in Zantedeschia elliottiana, 4 sites were seen. Our results showed clear cytogenetic differences among genera within Araceae, and are the first molecular cytogenetics report for these genera. These chromosome data and molecular cytogenetic information are useful in aroid breeding programmes, systematics and evolutionary studies. PMID:26140158

  10. Genomic In Situ Hybridization (GISH) as a Tool to Identify Chromosomes of Parental Species in Sunflower Interspecific Hybrids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interspecific hybridization has been widely used to transfer genes from wild species into cultivated sunflower. Fluorescent genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) has been used to identify alien chromosomes or segments in other crops, but an equivalent technique for sunflower is lacking. The objective...

  11. X-Y aneuploidy rate in sperm of two "minor" breeds of cattle (Bos taurus) by using dual color fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Pauciullo, A; Nicodemo, D; Peretti, V; Marino, G; Iannuzzi, A; Cosenza, G; Di Meo, G P; Ramunno, L; Iannuzzi, L; Rubes, J; Di Berardino, D

    2012-08-01

    The present study reports on the frequency of X-Y aneuploidy in the sperm population of two minor cattle breeds reared in Italy, namely Modicana and Agerolese, which are listed in the "Anagraphic Register of autochthonous cattle populations with limited distribution". More than 50 000 sperm nuclei from 11 subjects (5 and 6, respectively for each breed) have been analyzed by the fluorescent in situ hybridization with the Xcen and Y-chromosome specific painting probes. The fraction of X- and Y-bearing sperm was close to the 1:1 ratio in the Modicana breed, whereas in the Agerolese the Y-fraction was significantly higher (P < 0.002) compared to the X-counterpart. The mean rates of X-Y aneuploidy were 0.510 and 0.466%, respectively, in the two breeds; no significant differences were found among individual bulls within each breed. Average frequencies of disomic and diploid sperm were 0.425 and 0.085% in the former and 0.380 and 0.086% in the latter. In both breeds, (a) disomy was significantly more frequent than diploidy (P < 0.01), (b) YY disomy was significantly (P < 0.001) more frequent than XY or XX; (c) MI errors (XY disomy) were significantly (P < 0.01) less represented than MII (XX + YY disomy). Compared to the dairy (Italian Friesian and Brown) and meat (Podolian and Maremmana) breeds previously analyzed, the "minor" breeds investigated in the present study showed a significantly (P < 0.002) higher rate of X-Y aneuploidy (0.486 vs. 0.159 and 0.190%, respectively). Considering all the breeds analyzed -so far- and assuming no significant interchromosomal effect, the baseline level of aneuploidy in the sperm population of the species Bos taurus was estimated as 5.19%. Establishing the baseline level of aneuploidy in the sperm population of the various livestock species/breeds engaged in animal production could reveal useful for monitoring future trends of their reproductive health, especially in relation to management errors and/or environmental hazards. PMID

  12. DNA/DNA in situ hybridization with enzyme linked probes

    SciTech Connect

    Grillo, S.; Mosher, M.; Charles, P.; Henry, S.; Taub, F.

    1987-05-01

    A non-radioactive in situ nucleic acid hybridization method which requires no antibodies, haptens, avidin or biotin intermediateries is presented. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeled nucleic acid probes are hybridized in situ for 2 hours or less, followed by brief washing of hybridized cells and the direct detection of in situ hybrids with diaminobenzidine (DAB). Application of this method to the detection of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in human cells is shown.

  13. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization-Based Investigations of Individual Doses for Persons Living at Metlino in the Upper Reaches of the Techa River

    SciTech Connect

    Degteva, M. O.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Akleyev, A. V.; Jacob, Peter; Ivanov, Denis V.; Wieser, Albrecht; Vorobiova, M. I.; Shishkina, Elena A.; Shved, Valentina A.; Vozilova, Alexandra; Bayankin, Sergey N.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2005-02-01

    Waterborne releases from the Mayak Production Association in Russia during 1949–1956 resulted in significant doses to persons living downstream; the most contaminated village was Metlino about 7 km downstream. Internal and external doses have been estimated for these residents using the Techa River Dosimetry System–2000; the primary purpose is to support epidemiological studies of the members of the Extended Techa River Cohort (ETRC). Efforts to validate the calculations of external and internal dose are considered essential. Two methods used for the validation of external dose are electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements of teeth and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) measurements of chromosome translocations in circulating lymphocytes. For EPR, 36 measurements on 26 teeth from 16 donors from Metlino were made at the GSF (16 measurements) and the IMP (20 measurements); the correlation between measurements made at the two laboratories has been found to be 0.99. Background measurements were also made on 218 teeth (63 molars, 128 premolars, and 27 incisors). FISH measurements were made for 31 residents of Metlino at the GSF. These measurements were handicapped by the analysis of a limited number of cells; for several individuals no stable translocations were observed. FISH measurements were also made for 39 individuals believed to be unexposed. The majority of EPR-measurement results fell within the range of 70 to 2700 mGy (including background). The results of FISH-based measurements fell within the range of nondetectable to 2 Gy (background subtracted). The results of individual measurements using EPR and FISH methods were generally consistent with each other and with results of other assays, including thermoluminescent measurements of quartz extracted from bricks taken from old buildings. Results were also consistent with those estimated with the TRDS-2000. Thus, the limited sets of data currently available tend to validate the present

  14. Deletion of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N (SNRPN) in Prader-Willi syndrome detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization: Two sibs with the typical phenotype without a cytogenetic deletion in chromosome 15q

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Kibe, Tetsuya; Wada, Yoshiro

    1996-04-24

    The small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N (SNRPN) gene is regarded as one of the candidates for Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). We describe two sibs with typical PWS presenting deletion of SNRPN detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Neither a cytogenetically detectable 15q12 deletion nor a deletion for the D15S11, D15S10, and GABRB3 cosmid probes were found in either patient. This implies a smaller deletion limited to the PWS critical region. FISH with a SNRPN probe will permit analysis of PWS patients with limited deletions not detectable with other probes. 22 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Cytomolecular characterization of rRNA gene sequences among Citrullus species and subspecies using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In previous studies, many DNA markers showed strong preferential (non-Mendelian) segregation in F2 and BC1 genetic populations derived from crosses between wild type watermelon [C. lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. et Nakai subsp. lanatus var. citroides (Bailey) Mansf. ex Greb.] (CLC) and watermelon cultivar...

  16. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Final progress report, April 1, 1994--July 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1997-12-31

    The ultimate goal of this research is to generate and apply novel technologies to speed completion and integration of the human genome map and sequence with biomedical problems. To do this, techniques were developed and genome-wide resources generated. This includes a genome-wide Mapped and Integrated BAC/PAC Resource that has been used for gene finding, map completion and anchoring, breakpoint definition and sequencing. In the last period of the grant, the Human Mapped BAC/PAC Resource was also applied to determine regions of human variation and to develop a novel paradigm of primate evolution through to humans. Further, in order to more rapidly evaluate animal models of human disease, a BAC Map of the mouse was generated in collaboration with the MTI Genome Center, Dr. Bruce Birren.

  17. Phenotypic consequences of a mosaic marker chromosome identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as being derived from chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, J.H.; Zhou, X.; Pletcher, B.A.

    1994-09-01

    De novo marker chromosomes are detected in 1 in 2500 amniotic fluid samples and are associated with a 10-15% risk for phenotypic abnormality. FISH can be utilized as a research tool to identify the origins of marker chromosomes. The phenotypic consequences of a marker chromosome derived from the short arm of chromosome 16 are described. A 26-year-old woman underwent amniocentesis at 28 weeks gestation because of a prenatally diagnosed tetralogy of Fallot. Follow-up ultrasounds also showed ventriculomegaly and cleft lip and palate. 32 of 45 cells had the karyotype 47,XY,+mar; the remaining cells were 46,XY. The de novo marker chromosome was C-band positive and non-satellited and failed to stain with distamycin A/DAPI. At birth the ultrasound findings were confirmed and dysmorphic features and cryptorchidism were noted. Although a newborn blood sample contained only normal cells, mosaicism was confirmed in 2 skin biopsies. FISH using whole-chromosome painting and alpha-satellite DNA probes showed that the marker chromosome had originated from chromosome 16. As proximal 16q is distamycin A/DAPI positive, the marker is apparently derived from proximal 16p. At 15 months of age, this child is hypotonic, globally delayed and is gavage-fed. His physical examination is significant for microbrachycephaly, a round face, sparse scalp hair, ocular hypertelorism, exotropia, a flat, wide nasal bridge and tip, mild micrognathia, and tapered fingers with lymphedema of hands and feet. Inguinal hernias have been repaired. His features are consistent with those described for patients trisomic for most or all of the short arm of chromosome 16. Marker chromosomes derived from the short arm of chromosome 16 appear to have phenotypic consequences. As the origin of more marker chromosomes are identified using FISH, their karyotype/phenotype correlations will become more apparent, which will permit more accurate genetic counseling.

  18. Zebrafish Whole-Mount In Situ Hybridization Followed by Sectioning.

    PubMed

    Doganli, Canan; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin

    2016-01-01

    In situ hybridization is a powerful technique used for locating specific nucleic acid targets within morphologically preserved tissues and cell preparations. A labeled RNA or DNA probe hybridizes to its complementary mRNA or DNA sequence within a sample. Here, we describe RNA in situ hybridization protocol for whole-mount zebrafish embryos. PMID:26695046

  19. Inter-observer reproducibility of HER2 immunohistochemical assessment and concordance with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH): pathologist assessment compared to quantitative image analysis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In breast cancer patients, HER2 overexpression is routinely assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and equivocal cases are subject to fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Our study compares HER2 scoring by histopathologists with automated quantitation of staining, and determines the concordance of IHC scores with FISH results. Methods A tissue microarray was constructed from 1,212 invasive breast carcinoma cases with linked treatment and outcome information. IHC slides were semi-quantitatively scored by two independent pathologists on a range of 0 to 3+, and also analyzed with an Ariol automated system by two operators. 616 cases were scorable by both IHC and FISH. Results Using data from unequivocal positive (3+) or negative (0, 1+) results, both visual and automated scores were highly consistent: there was excellent concordance between two pathologists (kappa = 1.000, 95% CI: 1-1), between two machines (kappa = 1.000, 95% CI: 1-1), and between both visual and both machine scores (kappa = 0.898, 95% CI: 0.775–0.979). Two pathologists successfully distinguished negative, positive and equivocal cases (kappa = 0.929, 95% CI: 0.909–0.946), with excellent agreement with machine 1 scores (kappa = 0.835, 95% CI: 0.806–0.862; kappa = 0.837, 95% CI: 0.81–0.862), and good agreement with machine 2 scores (kappa = 0.698, 95% CI: 0.6723–0.723; kappa = 0.709, 95% CI: 0.684–0.732), whereas the two machines showed good agreement (kappa = 0.806, 95% CI: 0.785–0.826). When comparing categorized IHC scores and FISH results, the agreement was excellent for visual 1 (kappa = 0.814, 95% CI: 0.768–0.856), good for visual 2 (kappa = 0.763, 95% CI: 0.712–0.81) and machine 1 (kappa = 0.665, 95% CI: 0.609–0.718), and moderate for machine 2 (kappa = 0.535, 95% CI: 0.485–0.584). Conclusion A fully automated image analysis system run by an experienced operator can provide results consistent with visual HER2 scoring. Further development of such systems will

  20. In situ identification of bacteria in drinking water and adjoining biofilms by hybridization with 16S and 23S rRNA-directed fluorescent oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed Central

    Manz, W; Szewzyk, U; Ericsson, P; Amann, R; Schleifer, K H; Stenström, T A

    1993-01-01

    Free-water-phase and surface-associated microorganisms from drinking water were detected and roughly identified by hybridization with fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide probes complementary to regions of 16S and 23S rRNA characteristic for the domains Bacteria, Archaea, and Eucarya and the beta and gamma subclasses of Proteobacteria. Samples of glass-attached biofilms and plankton were taken from a Robbins device installed in a water distribution system. More than 70% of the surface-associated cells and less than 40% of the planktonic cells visualized by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining bound detectable amounts of rRNA-targeted probes. These findings are an indication for higher average rRNA content and consequently higher physiological activity of the attached microbial cells compared with the free-living cells. All detectable cells hybridized with the bacterial probe, whereas no Archaea and no Eucarya cells could be detected. Simultaneous hybridization with probes specific for the beta and gamma subclasses of Proteobacteria revealed that microcolonies already consisted of mixed populations in early stages with fewer than 50 cells. These observations provide further evidence that the coexistence and interaction of bacteria in drinking water biofilms may be an integral part of their growth and survival strategies. Images PMID:8357261

  1. Novel, rapid DNA-based on-chip bacterial identification system combining dielectrophoresis and amplification-free fluorescent resonance energy transfer assisted in-situ hybridization (FRET-ISH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packard, Michelle M.; Shusteff, Maxim; Alocilja, Evangelyn

    2011-10-01

    Although real-time PCR (RT-PCR) has become a diagnostic standard for rapid identification of bacterial species, typical methods remain time-intensive due to sample preparation and amplification cycle times. The assay described in this work incorporates on-chip dielectrophoretic capture and concentration of bacterial cells, thermal lysis, cell permeabilization, and nucleic acid denaturation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer assisted in-situ hybridization (FRET-ISH) species identification. Identification is achieved completely on chip in less than thirty minutes from receipt of sample compared to multiple hours required by traditional RT-PCR and its requisite sample preparation.

  2. Assignment of the tyrosinase-related protein-2 gene (TYRP2) to human chromosome 13q31-q32 by fluorescence in situ hybridization: Extended synteny with mouse chromosome 14

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, R.A. ); Baker, E.; Sutherland, G.R. )

    1994-05-01

    A recombinant human genomic liver DNA [lambda]-phage library was screened with the insert of the pHuTRP-2 cDNA clone to isolate a series of bacteriophage with inserts spanning the human TYRP2 gene. One of the [lambda]-phage clones ([lambda]HuT-YRP2-7) containing a 2-kb HindIII fragment with the 5[prime] exon sequence of the cDNA as determined by sequence analysis was used for the gene localization study. DNA prepared from the phage by Qiagen chromatography was nick-translated with biotin-14-dATP and hybridized in situ at a final concentration of 5 ng/[mu]l to metaphases from two normal males. The fluorescence in situ hybridization method was modified from that previously described in that chromosomes were stained before analysis with both propidium iodide as counterstain and DAPI for chromosome identification. Twenty metaphases from the first normal male were examined for fluorescent signal. All of these metaphases showed signal on one or both chromatids of chromosome 13 in the region 13q31-q33; 88% of this signal was at the interface of bands 13q31-q32. There was a total of four nonspecific background dots observed in these 20 metaphases. A similar result was obtained from hybridization of the probe to 20 metaphases from the second normal male (data not shown). This region has also been shown to contain the propionyl coenzyme A carboxylase [alpha]-chain gene by in situ hybridization. The localization of the TYRP2 locus to human chromosome 13q31-q32 extends the syntenic region of chromosome 13 with mouse chromosome 14. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  3. FLUORESCENT IN SITU DETECTION OF ENCEPHALITOZOON HELLEM SPORES WITH A 6-CARBOXYFLUORESCEIN-LABELED RNA-TARGETED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fluorescent in situ hybridization assay has been developed for the detection of the human-pathogenic microsporidian, Encephalitozoon hellem, in water samples using epifluorescence microscopy. The assay employs a 19-nucleotide species-specific 6-carboxyfluorescein-labeled oligo...

  4. Dissolved-oxygen quenching of in-situ fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudyk, Wayne; Tonaszuck, David; Pohlig, Kenneth

    1993-04-01

    In-situ fluorescence measurements of aromatic organic ground water contaminants do not always agree with gas chromatographic methods. Dissolved oxygen quenching of fluorescence may be an interferant in field measurements. Two standard fluorescent aromatics, quinine sulfate and naphthalene, were evaluated in this study. Over the range of dissolved oxygen concentrations expected to be encountered in the field, no effects of oxygen quenching on fluorescence of these compounds was observed. Quenching of quinine sulfate fluorescence by sodium chloride was observed using this system. Sodium chloride quenching was shown to follow the Stern-Volmer relation.

  5. In situ hybridization in the plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana.

    PubMed

    Garcês, Helena; Sinha, Neelima

    2009-10-01

    Here we describe in detail the detection of gene expression in plant tissues of Kalanchoë daigremontiana by in situ hybridization analyses. Included are methods for making RNA transcript probes, probe-tissue hybridization, and detection of antisense RNA probes. The in situ hybridization technique is used to determine which cells or group of cells in particular tissue(s) express a gene of interest. PMID:20147047

  6. Detection of {open_quotes}cryptic{close_quotes}karyotypic rearrangements in closely related primate species by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using human subtelomeric DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblom, J.J.; Trask, B.J.; Friedman, C.

    1994-09-01

    Specific human subtelomeric DNA probes were used to reveal cryptic chromosomal rearrangements that cannot be detected by conventional high resolution cytogenetic techniques, or by chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization using whole chromosome paint analysis. Two cosmids containing different subtelomeric DNA sequences were derived from human chromosome 19 and designated as 7501 and 16432. Cosmid 7501 was hybridized to chromosomes from humans, chimpanzee, gorilla and orangutan. In humans, 7501 consistently labeled chromosomes 3q, 15q, and 19p. Additional chromosomes were labeled in different individuals, indicating a polymorphic distribution of this sequence in the human genome. In contrast, 7501 consistently and strongly labeled only the q arm terminus of chromosome 3 in both chimp and gorilla. The identification of the chromosome was made by two-color FISH analysis using human chromosome 4-specific paint and homologous to human chromosome 4. None of the human subjects showed labeling of chromosome 4 with 7501. This finding suggests that in the course of human evolution, subsequent to the divergence of humans and African apes, a cryptic translocation occurred between the ancestral human chromosome 4 and one or more of the other human chromosomes that now contain this DNA segment. In orangutan, 7501 labeled a single acrocentric chromosome pair, a distinctly different chromosome than that labeled in chimp and gorilla. Comparison of chromosome sites labeled with cosmid 16432 showed the distribution of signals on chromosome 1q arm is the same for humans and chimp, but different in the gorilla. Humans and chimps show distinct labeling on sites 1q terminus and 1q41-42. In gorilla, there is instead a large cluster of intense signal near the terminus of 1q that clearly does not extend all the way to the terminus. A paracentric inversion or an unequal cross-over event may account for the observed difference between these species.

  7. Localization of the human transaldolase gene (TALDO) to chromosome 1p33-p34.1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization and PCR analysis of somatic cell hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Kusuda, Jun; Hashimoto, Katusyuki; Hirai, Momoki

    1997-03-01

    Transaldolase catalyzes the transfer of a C3 fragment corresponding to dihydroxyacetone from sedoheptulose 7-phosphate to glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, forming erythrose 4-phosphate and fructose 6-phosphate in the pentose phosphate pathway. The pathway provides mainly D-ribose 5-phosphate for nucleic acid synthesis and NADPH for lipid biosynthesis. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  8. The oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) localizes to human chromosome 3p25 by fluorescence in situ hybridization and PCR analysis of somatic cell hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, C.F. Jr.; Clancy, T.E.; Quan, R.

    1995-04-10

    The human oxytocin receptor regulates parturition and myometrial contractility, breast milk let-down, and reproductive behaviors in the mammalian central nervous system. Kimura et al. recently identified a human oxytocin receptor cDNA by means of expression cloning from a human myometrial cDNA library. To elucidate further the molecular mechanisms that regulate oxytocin receptor gene expression and to define the expected Mendelian inheritance of possible human disease states, we must determine the number of genes, their localization, and their organization and structure. We summarize below our data indicating that the human oxytocin receptor gene is localized to 3p25 and exists as a single copy in the haploid genome. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Fluorescent and chromogenic in situ hybridization of CEN17q as a potent useful diagnostic marker for Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome-associated chromophobe renal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kato, Ikuma; Iribe, Yasuhiro; Nagashima, Yoji; Kuroda, Naoto; Tanaka, Reiko; Nakatani, Yukio; Hasumi, Hisashi; Yao, Masahiro; Furuya, Mitsuko

    2016-06-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD) is a familial disorder associated with a germline mutation of FLCN that is a tumor suppressor gene. Patients with BHD have high risks for developing multiple renal cell carcinomas (RCCs). The frequent histological types are hybrid oncocytic/chromophobe tumors (HOCTs) and chromophobe RCCs. The morphology of HOCTs could alert pathologists to the possibility of BHD. On the other hand, chromophobe RCCs occurring in BHD patients demonstrate positive immunostaining for cytokeratin-7, CD82, and Ksp-cadherin similar to their sporadic counterparts. Highly reliable markers for BHD-associated chromophobe RCCs have not been identified. In the present study, we analyzed the state of chromosome 17 in 18 renal tumors composed of 8 chromophobe RCCs, 7 HOCTs, and 3 papillary RCCs obtained from BHD patients using fluorescent and chromogenic in situ hybridization probes for the centromeric region of chromosome 17 long arm. All chromophobe RCCs and HOCTs were disomic except for 1 chromophobe RCC that showed monosomy. On the other hand, 12 of 14 sporadic chromophobe RCCs were monosomic (P = .0008). The state of chromosomes 2 and 6 were also statistically different (P = .0074 and P = .0007, respectively). Three BHD-associated papillary RCCs demonstrated either trisomy (n = 2) or disomy (n = 1). Three of 5 sporadic papillary RCCs showed trisomy. The results indicate that fluorescent and chromogenic in situ hybridization of the centromeric region of chromosome 17 long arm should be a potent useful marker for chromophobe RCCs in patients who have not been diagnosed with BHD and thereby help to determine whether the cases should be considered for genetic testing. PMID:26980015

  10. Community Analysis of Biofilters Using Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Including a New Probe for the Xanthomonas Branch of the Class Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Udo; Naismith, Michèle M.; Altendorf, Karlheinz; Lipski, André

    1999-01-01

    Domain-, class-, and subclass-specific rRNA-targeted probes were applied to investigate the microbial communities of three industrial and three laboratory-scale biofilters. The set of probes also included a new probe (named XAN818) specific for the Xanthomonas branch of the class Proteobacteria; this probe is described in this study. The members of the Xanthomonas branch do not hybridize with previously developed rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes for the α-, β-, and γ-Proteobacteria. Bacteria of the Xanthomonas branch accounted for up to 4.5% of total direct counts obtained with 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole. In biofilter samples, the relative abundance of these bacteria was similar to that of the γ-Proteobacteria. Actinobacteria (gram-positive bacteria with a high G+C DNA content) and α-Proteobacteria were the most dominant groups. Detection rates obtained with probe EUB338 varied between about 40 and 70%. For samples with high contents of gram-positive bacteria, these percentages were substantially improved when the calculations were corrected for the reduced permeability of gram-positive bacteria when formaldehyde was used as a fixative. The set of applied bacterial class- and subclass-specific probes yielded, on average, 58.5% (± a standard deviation of 23.0%) of the corrected eubacterial detection rates, thus indicating the necessity of additional probes for studies of biofilter communities. The Xanthomonas-specific probe presented here may serve as an efficient tool for identifying potential phytopathogens. In situ hybridization proved to be a practical tool for microbiological studies of biofiltration systems. PMID:10427047

  11. Specific Detection and Localization of Microsporidian Parasites in Invertebrate Hosts by Using In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Judith E.; Solter, Leellen; Perotti, M. Alejandra; Braig, Henk R.; Dunn, Alison M.

    2013-01-01

    We designed fluorescence in situ hybridization probes for two distinct microsporidian clades and demonstrated their application in detecting, respectively, Nosema/Vairimorpha and Dictyoceola species. We used them to study the vertical transmission of two microsporidia infecting the amphipod Gammarus duebeni. PMID:23087031

  12. [Development of a Dual Detection Method with Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization and Immunostaining on Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Sections--Molecular Pathological Detection Techniques and Their Applications to Pathological Diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has recently become important for pathological diagnosis. However, its practical applications is not widespread because FISH protocol with FFPE specimens is complicated. We report a dual detection method by overlapping FISH with fluorescent immunostaining on FFPE sections. This method is characterized by changing buffers for heat treatment without proteolytic enzyme treatment. Subsequent proteolytic enzyme treatment can be omitted using an antigen activation solution, pH9 (Nichirei Corporation), for heat treatment. After the pretreatment, dual detection was achieved by DNA FISH following RNA FISH and fluorescent immunostaining. This protocol visualized gene abnormalities and protein overexpression on the same sections. Of note, in poorly differentiated tumors containing both normal and tumor cells, the tumor cells were clearly identified on the sections, and FISH signals could be counted in these cells. In addition, HER2 mRNA overexpression and gene amplification were simultaneously detected in HER2-positive gastric cancer. Thus, this method should be widely applicable in clinical settings. PMID:26548243

  13. Linking Microbial Phylogeny to Metabolic Activity at the Single-Cell Level by Using Enhanced Element Labeling-Catalyzed Reporter Deposition Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (EL-FISH) and NanoSIMS▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Sebastian; Lösekann, Tina; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Weber, Peter K.; Ng, Wing-On; Stevenson, Bradley S.; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Relman, David A.; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2008-01-01

    To examine phylogenetic identity and metabolic activity of individual cells in complex microbial communities, we developed a method which combines rRNA-based in situ hybridization with stable isotope imaging based on nanometer-scale secondary-ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). Fluorine or bromine atoms were introduced into cells via 16S rRNA-targeted probes, which enabled phylogenetic identification of individual cells by NanoSIMS imaging. To overcome the natural fluorine and bromine backgrounds, we modified the current catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique by using halogen-containing fluorescently labeled tyramides as substrates for the enzymatic tyramide deposition. Thereby, we obtained an enhanced element labeling of microbial cells by FISH (EL-FISH). The relative cellular abundance of fluorine or bromine after EL-FISH exceeded natural background concentrations by up to 180-fold and allowed us to distinguish target from non-target cells in NanoSIMS fluorine or bromine images. The method was optimized on single cells of axenic Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae cultures. EL-FISH/NanoSIMS was then applied to study interrelationships in a dual-species consortium consisting of a filamentous cyanobacterium and a heterotrophic alphaproteobacterium. We also evaluated the method on complex microbial aggregates obtained from human oral biofilms. In both samples, we found evidence for metabolic interactions by visualizing the fate of substrates labeled with 13C-carbon and 15N-nitrogen, while individual cells were identified simultaneously by halogen labeling via EL-FISH. Our novel approach will facilitate further studies of the ecophysiology of known and uncultured microorganisms in complex environments and communities. PMID:18359832

  14. In situ hybridization for detection of HIV RNA.

    PubMed

    Fox, C H; Cottler-Fox, M

    2001-05-01

    In HIV studies, in situ hybridization can be used for identifying virion RNA, mRNA being produced for virion packaging, and proviral DNA in the cytoplasm or integrated in the nucleus. This unit focuses primarily on identifying virion RNA, because this is the most sensitive means by which in situ hybridization can be employed to detect HIV expression. In situ hybridization, as developed for HIV RNA detection, involves several protocols: (1) preparation of a radioactive or nonradioactive RNA probe; (2) in situ hybridization of probe to cells and paraffin sections of tissue; (3) detection of radiolabeled probe by emulsion autoradiography; (4) development, staining, and mounting of slides; and finally (5) examination of slides by bright-field, dark-field, specular reflectance, or laser-scanning confocal microscopy. The protocols presented in this unit describe a setup involving up to 150 slides. PMID:18432712

  15. Chromosomal localization of the genes encoding the kinetochore proteins CENPE and DENPF to human chromosomes 4q24{r_arrow}q25 and 1q32{r_arrow}q41, respectively, by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Testa, J.R.; Zhou, J.Y.; Bell, D.W.; Yen, T.J.

    1994-10-01

    CENPE and CENPF are human kinetochore proteins of 312 and {approximately}400 kDa, respectively. As part of an effort to characterize the functions of these two proteins, we have used their respective cDNAs to map their human chromosomal locations by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The gene that encodes CENPE, a kinetochore-associated motor protein that is postulated to segregate chromosomes during mitosis, maps to chromosome 4q24{r_arrow}q25. The CENPF gene, which encodes a structural protein of the kinetochore, maps to chromosome 1q32{r_arrow}q41 within close proximity to the genetic locus that is linked to Van der Woude syndrome. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Comparison of conventional culture method and fluorescent in situ hybridization technique for detection of Listeria spp. in ground beef, turkey, and chicken breast fillets in İzmir, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Baysal, Ayse Handan

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of Listeria species in refrigerated fresh chicken breast fillet, turkey breast fillet, and ground beef was evaluated, comparing the conventional culture method and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH uses hybridization of a nucleic acid sequence target of a microorganism with a specific DNA probe labeled with a fluorochrome and imaging by a fluorescence microscope. First, Listeria was inoculated in chicken breast fillet, turkey breast fillet, or ground beef, and the applicability of the FISH method was evaluated. Second, Listeria was detected in fresh chicken breast fillet, turkey breast fillet, and ground beef by culture and FISH methods. Listeria was isolated from 27 (37.4%) of 216 samples by the standard culture method, whereas FISH detected 25 (24.7%) preenriched samples. Of these isolates, 17 (63%) were L. innocua, 6 (22%) L. welshimeri, and 4 (14.8%) L. seeligeri. Overall, the prevalences of Listeria spp. found with the conventional culture method in chicken breast fillet, turkey breast fillet, and ground beef were 9.7, 6.9, and 20.8%, whereas with the FISH technique these values were 11.1, 6.9, and 16.7%, respectively. The molecular FISH technique appears to be a cheap, sensitive, and time-efficient procedure that could be used for routine detection of Listeria spp. in meat. This study showed that retail raw meats are potentially contaminated with Listeria spp. and are, thus, vehicles for transmitting diseases caused by foodborne pathogens, underlining the need for increased precautions, such as implementation of hazard analysis and critical control points and consumer food safety education. PMID:25474046

  17. Comparative fluorescence in situ hybridization mapping of a 431-kb Arabidopsis thaliana bacterial artificial chromosome contig reveals the role of chromosomal duplications in the expansion of the Brassica rapa genome.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, S A; Cheng, Z; Wang, M L; Goodman, H M; Jiang, J

    2000-01-01

    Comparative genome studies are important contributors to our understanding of genome evolution. Most comparative genome studies in plants have been based on genetic mapping of homologous DNA loci in different genomes. Large-scale comparative physical mapping has been hindered by the lack of efficient and affordable techniques. We report here the adaptation of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques for comparative physical mapping between Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa. A set of six bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) representing a 431-kb contiguous region of chromosome 2 of A. thaliana was mapped on both chromosomes and DNA fibers of B. rapa. This DNA fragment has a single location in the A. thaliana genome, but hybridized to four to six B. rapa chromosomes, indicating multiple duplications in the B. rapa genome. The sizes of the fiber-FISH signals from the same BACs were not longer in B. rapa than those in A. thaliana, suggesting that this genomic region is duplicated but not expanded in the B. rapa genome. The comparative fiber-FISH mapping results support that chromosomal duplications, rather than regional expansion due to accumulation of repetitive sequences in the intergenic regions, played the major role in the evolution of the B. rapa genome. PMID:11014828

  18. Characterization of the temporal persistence of chromosomal abnormalities in the semen of Hodkin`s disease patients after treatment with NOVP chemotherapy using multi-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Cassel, M.J.; Robbins, W.A.; Wyrobek, A.J.; Meistrich, M.L.

    1994-12-31

    Three-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was applied to sperm of men with Hodgkin`s disease to measure the persistence of chromosomally abnormal sperm within the time interval of 3 to 33 months after the end of treatment. NOVP chemotherapy includes the agents novantrone, oncovin, vinblastine, and prednisone, two of which are spindle poisons expected to induce aneuploidy. Semen samples were evaluated for the frequencies of fluorescence phenotypes representing hyperhaploidy, hypohaploidy, and genomic duplications using DNA probes specific for repetitive sequences on chromosomes X,Y, and 8. Using this procedure, NOVP was previously shown to induce chromosomally abnormal sperm in treated patients. In a longitudinal assessment of 11 semen samples from 2 men, frequencies of abnormal sperm appeared to return to pre-treatment levels at {approximately}6 months after the end of treatment and remained at these levels up to 33 months after the end of treatment. However, pre-treatment frequencies of chromosomally abnormal cells in Hodgkin`s patients were elevated above those found in normal healthy men. Additional patients are being evaluated to determine how long after therapy Hodgkin`s disease patients remain at increased risk for producing chromosomally abnormal sperm.

  19. Small RNA Detection by in Situ Hybridization Methods

    PubMed Central

    Urbanek, Martyna O.; Nawrocka, Anna U.; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J.

    2015-01-01

    Small noncoding RNAs perform multiple regulatory functions in cells, and their exogenous mimics are widely used in research and experimental therapies to interfere with target gene expression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are the most thoroughly investigated representatives of the small RNA family, which includes short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), PIWI-associated RNA (piRNAs), and others. Numerous methods have been adopted for the detection and characterization of small RNAs, which is challenging due to their short length and low level of expression. These include molecular biology methods such as real-time RT-PCR, northern blotting, hybridization to microarrays, cloning and sequencing, as well as single cell miRNA detection by microscopy with in situ hybridization (ISH). In this review, we focus on the ISH method, including its fluorescent version (FISH), and we present recent methodological advances that facilitated its successful adaptation for small RNA detection. We discuss relevant technical aspects as well as the advantages and limitations of ISH. We also refer to numerous applications of small RNA ISH in basic research and molecular diagnostics. PMID:26068454

  20. Small RNA Detection by in Situ Hybridization Methods.

    PubMed

    Urbanek, Martyna O; Nawrocka, Anna U; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J

    2015-01-01

    Small noncoding RNAs perform multiple regulatory functions in cells, and their exogenous mimics are widely used in research and experimental therapies to interfere with target gene expression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are the most thoroughly investigated representatives of the small RNA family, which includes short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), PIWI-associated RNA (piRNAs), and others. Numerous methods have been adopted for the detection and characterization of small RNAs, which is challenging due to their short length and low level of expression. These include molecular biology methods such as real-time RT-PCR, northern blotting, hybridization to microarrays, cloning and sequencing, as well as single cell miRNA detection by microscopy with in situ hybridization (ISH). In this review, we focus on the ISH method, including its fluorescent version (FISH), and we present recent methodological advances that facilitated its successful adaptation for small RNA detection. We discuss relevant technical aspects as well as the advantages and limitations of ISH. We also refer to numerous applications of small RNA ISH in basic research and molecular diagnostics. PMID:26068454

  1. Emerging applications of the single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay. I. Management of invasive transitional cell human bladder carcinoma. II. Fluorescent in situ hybridization Comets for the identification of damaged and repaired DNA sequences in individual cells.

    PubMed

    McKelvey-Martin, V J; Ho, E T; McKeown, S R; Johnston, S R; McCarthy, P J; Rajab, N F; Downes, C S

    1998-01-01

    ABSTRACT I: Management of invasive transitional cell human bladder carcinoma. The two main treatment options for invasive transitional cell bladder carcinoma are radiotherapy or primary cystectomy with urinary diversion or bladder substitution. Approximately 50% of patients fail to respond to radiotherapy and such patients so treated are disadvantaged by the absence of predictive information regarding their radiosensitivity, since the tumour gains additional time for metastatic spread before cystectomy is performed. The SF2 clonogenic assay, which measures the surviving fraction of tumour cells after 2 Gy X-ray irradiation, is regarded as a good measure of radiosensitivity. However, the assay is time consuming and provides results for only approximately 70% of human tumours. In this paper three bladder transitional cell carcinoma cell lines (HT1376, UMUC-3 and RT112) were exposed to X-irradiation (0-10 Gy). We have compared the responses obtained using a clonogenic assay and a more clinically feasible alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay. A very good inverse correlation was obtained between cell survival (clonogenic assay) and mean tail moment (Comet assay) for the three cell lines, indicating that the Comet assay can be used to predict the radio-responsiveness of individual cell lines. The clinical usefulness of the assay for predicting response to radiotherapy in bladder cancer patients is currently being investigated. ABSTRACT II: Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) Comets for the identification of damaged and repaired DNA sequences in individual cells. In mammalian cells the extent of DNA damage is partly and the rate of DNA repair very considerably dependent on DNA position and transcription. This has been established by biochemical techniques which are labour intensive and require large numbers of cells. The Comet assay for overall DNA damage and repair is relatively simple and allows individual cells to be examined. Here we present a

  2. Green Fluorescent Protein as a Visual Marker in Somatic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    OLIVARES‐FUSTER, O.; PEÑA, L.; DURAN‐VILA, N.; NAVARRO, L.

    2002-01-01

    Using a transgenic citrus plant expressing Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) as a parent in somatic fusion experiments, we investigated the suitability of GFP as an in vivo marker to follow the processes of protoplast fusion, regeneration and selection of hybrid plants. A high level of GFP expression was detected in transgenic citrus protoplasts, hybrid callus, embryos and plants. It is demonstrated that GFP can be used for the continuous monitoring of the fusion process, localization of hybrid colonies and callus, and selection of somatic hybrid embryos and plants. PMID:12096810

  3. An increased frequency of 13q deletions detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization and its impact on survival in children and adolescents with Burkitt lymphoma: results from the Children's Oncology Group study CCG-5961

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Marilu; Perkins, Sherrie L.; Dave, Bhavana J.; Coccia, Peter F.; Bridge, Julia A.; Lyden, Elizabeth R.; Heerema, Nyla A.; Lones, Mark A.; Harrison, Lauren; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Sanger, Warren G.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Burkitt lymphoma (BL), an aggressive B-cell malignancy, is often curable with short intensive treatment regiments. Nearly all BLs contain rearrangements of the MYC/8q24 region; however, recent cytogenetic studies suggest that certain secondary chromosomal aberrations in BL correlate with an adverse prognosis. In this multi-center study, the frequency and impact on clinical outcome of del(13q) and +7 in addition to MYC rearrangements as detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in children and adolescents with intermediate and high-risk BL registered on Children's Cancer Group study CCG-5961 were investigated. Analysis with 13q14.3 and 13q34 loci specific probes demonstrated deletions of 13q in 38/90 (42%) cases. The loss of either 13q14.3 or 13q34 alone occurred in 14% and 8%, respectively, while 20% exhibited loss of both regions. Gain of chromosome 7 was observed in 7/68 (10%) cases and MYC rearrangements were detected in 84/90 (93%). Prognostic analysis controlling for known risk factors demonstrated that patients exhibiting loss of 13q, particularly 13q14.3, had a significant decrease in 5-year overall survival (77% vs. 95%, p=0.012). These observations indicate that del(13q) occurs in childhood BL at frequencies higher than previously detected by classical cytogenetics and underscores the importance of molecular cytogenetics in risk stratification. PMID:19895612

  4. Experimental design and quality assurance: in situ fluorescence instrumentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conmy, Robyn N.; Del Castillo, Carlos E.; Downing, Bryan D.; Chen, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Both instrument design and capabilities of fluorescence spectroscopy have greatly advanced over the last several decades. Advancements include solid-state excitation sources, integration of fiber optic technology, highly sensitive multichannel detectors, rapid-scan monochromators, sensitive spectral correction techniques, and improve data manipulation software (Christian et al., 1981, Lochmuller and Saavedra, 1986; Cabniss and Shuman, 1987; Lakowicz, 2006; Hudson et al., 2007). The cumulative effect of these improvements have pushed the limits and expanded the application of fluorescence techniques to numerous scientific research fields. One of the more powerful advancements is the ability to obtain in situ fluorescence measurements of natural waters (Moore, 1994). The development of submersible fluorescence instruments has been made possible by component miniaturization and power reduction including advances in light sources technologies (light-emitting diodes, xenon lamps, ultraviolet [UV] lasers) and the compatible integration of new optical instruments with various sampling platforms (Twardowski et at., 2005 and references therein). The development of robust field sensors skirt the need for cumbersome and or time-consuming filtration techniques, the potential artifacts associated with sample storage, and coarse sampling designs by increasing spatiotemporal resolution (Chen, 1999; Robinson and Glenn, 1999). The ability to obtain rapid, high-quality, highly sensitive measurements over steep gradients has revolutionized investigations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) optical properties, thereby enabling researchers to address novel biogeochemical questions regarding colored or chromophoric DOM (CDOM). This chapter is dedicated to the origin, design, calibration, and use of in situ field fluorometers. It will serve as a review of considerations to be accounted for during the operation of fluorescence field sensors and call attention to areas of concern when making

  5. A Novel Three-Colour Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization Approach for the Detection of t(7;12)(q36;p13) in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia Reveals New Cryptic Three Way Translocation t(7;12;16)

    PubMed Central

    Naiel, Abdulbasit; Vetter, Michael; Plekhanova, Olga; Fleischman, Elena; Sokova, Olga; Tsaur, Grigory; Harbott, Jochen; Tosi, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    The t(7;12)(q36;p13) translocation is a recurrent chromosome abnormality that involves the ETV6 gene on chromosome 12 and has been identified in 20–30% of infant patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). The detection of t(7;12) rearrangements relies on the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) because this translocation is hardly visible by chromosome banding methods. Furthermore, a fusion transcript HLXB9-ETV6 is found in approximately 50% of t(7;12) cases, making the reverse transcription PCR approach not an ideal screening method. Considering the report of few cases of variant translocations harbouring a cryptic t(7;12) rearrangement, we believe that the actual incidence of this abnormality is higher than reported to date. The clinical outcome of t(7;12) patients is believed to be poor, therefore an early and accurate diagnosis is important in the clinical management and treatment. In this study, we have designed and tested a novel three-colour FISH approach that enabled us not only to confirm the presence of the t(7;12) in a number of patients studied previously, but also to identify a cryptic t(7;12) as part of a complex rearrangement. This new approach has proven to be an efficient and reliable method to be used in the diagnostic setting. PMID:24216708

  6. Lifetime fluorescence spectroscopy for in situ investigation of osteogenic differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, Laura; Elbarbary, Amir; Zuk, Patricia; De Ugarte, Daniel A.; Benhaim, Prosper; Kurt, Hamza; Hedrick, Marc H.; Ashjian, Peter

    2003-07-01

    Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TR-LIFS) represents a potential tool for the in-situ characterization of bioengineered tissues. In this study, we evaluate the application of TR-LIFS to non-intrusive monitoring of matrix composition during osteogenetic differentiation. Human adipose-derived stem cells, harvested from 3 patients, were induced in osteogenic media for 3, 5, and 7 weeks. Samples were subsequently collected and probed for time-resolved fluorescence emission with a pulsed nitrogen laser. Fluorescence parameters, derived from both spectral- and time-domain, were used for sample characterization. The samples were further analyzed using Western blot analysis and computer-based densitometry. A significant change in the fluorescence parameters was detected for samples beyond 3 weeks of osteogenic differentiation. The spectroscopic observations: 1) show increase of collagen I when contrasted against the time-resolved fluorescence spectra of commercially available collagens; and 2) are in agreement with Western blot analysis that demonstrated significant increase in collagen I content between 3- vs. 5-weeks and 3- vs. 7-weeks and no changes for collagens III, IV, and V. Our results suggest that TR-LIFS can be used as a non-invasive means for the detection of specific collagens in maturing connective tissues.

  7. In situ Measurements of Phytoplankton Fluorescence Using Low Cost Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Leeuw, Thomas; Boss, Emmanuel S.; Wright, Dana L.

    2013-01-01

    Chlorophyll a fluorometry has long been used as a method to study phytoplankton in the ocean. In situ fluorometry is used frequently in oceanography to provide depth-resolved estimates of phytoplankton biomass. However, the high price of commercially manufactured in situ fluorometers has made them unavailable to some individuals and institutions. Presented here is an investigation into building an in situ fluorometer using low cost electronics. The goal was to construct an easily reproducible in situ fluorometer from simple and widely available electronic components. The simplicity and modest cost of the sensor makes it valuable to students and professionals alike. Open source sharing of architecture and software will allow students to reconstruct and customize the sensor on a small budget. Research applications that require numerous in situ fluorometers or expendable fluorometers can also benefit from this study. The sensor costs US$150.00 and can be constructed with little to no previous experience. The sensor uses a blue LED to excite chlorophyll a and measures fluorescence using a silicon photodiode. The sensor is controlled by an Arduino microcontroller that also serves as a data logger. PMID:23783738

  8. Molecular cytotaxonomy of primates by chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization.

    PubMed

    Wienberg, J; Jauch, A; Stanyon, R; Cremer, T

    1990-10-01

    A new strategy for analyzing chromosomal evolution in primates is presented using chromosomal in situ suppression (CISS) hybridization. Biotin-labeled DNA libraries from flow-sorted human chromosomes are hybridized to chromosome preparations of catarrhines, platyrrhines, and prosimians. By this approach rearrangements of chromosomes that occurred during hominoid evolution are visualized directly at the level of DNA sequences, even in primate species with pronounced chromosomal shuffles. PMID:2249853

  9. Establishment of stable synthetic mutualism without co-evolution between microalgae and bacteria demonstrated by mutual transfer of metabolites (NanoSIMS isotopic imaging) and persistent physical association (Fluorescent in situ hybridization)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    de-Bashan, Luz E.; Mayali, Xavier; Bebout, Brad M.; Weber, Peter K.; Detweiler, Angela M.; Hernandez, Juan- Pablo; Prufert-Bebout, Leslie; Bashan, Yoav

    2016-03-03

    The demonstration of a mutualistic interaction requires evidence of benefits for both partners as well as stability of the association over multiple generations. A synthetic mutualism between the freshwater microalga Chlorella sorokiniana and the soil-derived plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB) Azospirillum brasilense was created when both microorganisms were co-immobilized in alginate beads. Using stable isotope enrichment experiments followed by high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) imaging of single cells, we demonstrated transfer of carbon and nitrogen compounds between the two partners. Further, using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), mechanical disruption and scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrated the stability of their physicalmore » association for a period of 10 days after the aggregated cells were released from the beads. The bacteria significantly enhanced the growth of the microalgae while the microalgae supported growth of the bacteria in a medium where it could not otherwise grow. In conclusion, we propose that this microalga-bacterium association is a true synthetic mutualism independent of co-evolution. (155 words).« less

  10. Denaturation, renaturation, and loss of DNA during in situ hybridization procedures.

    PubMed

    Raap, A K; Marijnen, J G; Vrolijk, J; van der Ploeg, M

    1986-05-01

    With the aim of optimizing in situ hybridization methods, alkaline, acid, and thermal denaturation procedures have been studied for their ability to separate the DNA strands of nuclear DNA and for the DNA losses they induce. Isolated methanol/acetic acid-fixed mouse liver nuclei have been used as a biological object. The results, obtained with acridine orange staining and microfluorometry, show that all denaturations studied lead to almost complete strand separation. Quantitative DNA staining and cytometry indicated that with heat and alkaline denaturation about 40% of the DNA is lost. Acid denaturation led to about 20% DNA loss. For the alkaline denaturation, the DNA retention could be improved to a 20% DNA loss by adding 70% ethanol to the denaturation medium. During hybridization, another 20% DNA loss occurs. When denatured nuclei are brought under annealing conditions, a rapid renaturation of a considerable fraction of the remaining DNA occurs. The extent of renaturation was dependent on the type of denaturation used. For the ethanolic alkaline denaturation, it was estimated to be 35%. Quantitative nonautoradiographic in situ hybridization experiments with acetylaminofluorene-modified mouse satellite DNA showed that alkaline denaturation procedures are superior to the heat and acid denaturation. As proven by acridine orange fluorescence measurements, hybridization conditions can be designed that permit DNA.RNA hybridization under in situ DNA.DNA denaturing conditions. These conditions should be very useful, especially for in situ hybridization with single-stranded RNA probes. PMID:3709305

  11. In situ hybridization for metalloproteinases and their inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hurskainen, Tiina L; Apte, Suneel S

    2010-01-01

    In situ hybridization (ISH) is an invaluable tool in understanding tissue-specific gene expression and gene regulation within a spatial context and at a resolution that is not possible by any other method. In this chapter, we provide ISH methodology that has successfully been applied to the detection of metalloproteinases and their inhibitors. PMID:20135283

  12. Interstitial deletion of chromosome 1q [del(1)(q24q25.3)] identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization and gene dosage analysis of apolipoprotein A-II, coagulation factor V, and antithrombin III

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, Takako; Yamanouchi, Yasuko; Mori, Yosuke

    1997-01-20

    We report on a 12-month-old Japanese boy with an interstitial deletion of the long-arm of chromosome 1 and meningomyelocele, hydrocephalus, anal atresia, atrial septal defect, left renal agenesis, bilateral cryptorchidism, talipes equinovarus, low birth weight, growth/developmental retardation, and many minor anomalies. By conventional GTG-banding, his karyotype was first interpreted as 46,XY,de1(1)(q23q24), but it was corrected as 46,XY.ish del(1)(q24q25.3) by fluorescence in situ hybridization using 11 known cosmid clones as probes. His serum levels of apolipoprotein A-II (gene symbol: APOA2, previously assigned to 1q21-q23) and coagulation factor V (F5, 1q21-q25) were normal, while serum concentration and activity of antithrombin III (AT3, 1q23-q25.1) was low. The results indicated that localization of APOA2 and F5 are proximal to the deleted region and AT3 is located within the deletion extent in the patient. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Applications of Strand-Specific in situ Hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, E.H.; Meyne, J.; Bailey, S.M.; Quigley, D.; Smith, L.; Tennyson, R.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is used to determine the location of specific DNA sequences on chromosomes. It is an effective tool in genomic mapping and is finding increasing use in medical diagnosis. A ''strand-specific'' version of FISH has been developed in the Life Sciences Division of LANL. The new procedure, named CO-FISH, reveals not only location but also the 5'-to-3'direction of a target sequence, such as the sense strand of a gene. This project was designed to investigate applications of the new technique. Strand-specific FISH was found to be useful and informative for genomic mapping of repetitive DNA sequences. The method provide a valuable new tool for investigating the mechanisms of aneuploidy inducing agents and the cytogenetic phenomena called lateral asymmetry. Finally, using strand-specific FISH, the authors were able to detect certain types of chromosome aberrations (isochromosomes, inversions and Robertsonian translocations) that can be difficult to observe with standard techniques.

  14. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping of human chromosome 1: Cytogenetic band localization of 71 NotI linking clones on chromosome 1q25

    SciTech Connect

    Sumegi, J.; Talmadge, C.G.; Zhen, D.K.

    1994-09-01

    Seventy-one human chromosome 1q25-qter-specific lambda clones have been isolated from NotI-linking libraries which were constructed using DNA from MCH206.1 somatic cell hybrid cells. These cells contain chromosome 1q25 translocated to chromosome Xp22 as the only human chromosomes in a mouse background. The NotI-linking clones have been mapped to cytogenetic bands. The relative order of ten NotI clones in 1q32 and 1q41 and their relation to known chromosome 1 markers have been also determined. Portions of these ten NotI-linking clones were sequenced. Most of the NotI-linking clones were derived from CpG islands, which are often associated with genes. DNA sequence homologies were searched for these ten NotI-linking clones in sequences available in GeneBank. One of the NotI clones carries sequences identical to TGF-beta 2. The NotI-linking clones described here will be useful for constructing a long-range restriction map of chromosome 1q25-qter and may contribute to the cloning of disease genes.

  15. The fate of Helicobacter pylori phagocytized by Acanthamoeba polyphaga demonstrated by fluorescent in situ hybridization and quantitative polymerization chain reaction tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    Helicobacter pylori able to express green fluorescent protein, as well as an ATCC strain, and a clinical isolate of this pathogen were evaluated for their ability to survive predation by Acanthamoeba polyphaga. Ingestion was evaluated by microscopic observation of the GFP-H. pyl...

  16. Chromosome mapping of 18S rDNA and 5S rDNA by dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization in the half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis).

    PubMed

    Jiang, L; Jiang, J; Liu, J; Yuan, J; Chen, Y; Zhang, Q; Wang, X

    2014-01-01

    Half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis) is an important aquaculture flatfish in China. Cytogenetic analysis has revealed that its sex determination system is female heterogametic (ZZ/ZW). The W chromosome is morphologically larger and has been considered evolutionarily younger than any other chromosome in the set. However, the genetic origin and evolution process of this neo-chromosome remains unclear. In this study, 2 tandem arrays of rRNA genes were chosen to address this question. Both the major rDNA (18S rDNA) and the minor rDNA (5S rDNA) were located on the C. semilaevis chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Six 18S rDNA signals were observed on the centromeric regions of 3 pairs of autosomes in both males and females. In females, there was an additional 18S rDNA signal mapping to the telomeric region of the W chromosome long arm. With respect to the 5S rDNA, 12 signals were mapped to the centromeric regions of six pairs of autosomes. Two-color FISH further confirmed that the two pairs of the 5S rDNA signals were correspondingly located at the same positions of the same autosomes as those of the 18S rDNA signals. These results allowed us to speculate about the evolution process of the W chromosome. Chromosome fusions and repetitive sequence accumulations might have occurred in C. semilaevis. The synteny and non-synteny of C. semilaevis 18S rDNA and 5S rDNA might imply the original and evolutionary characteristics of this species. These findings will facilitate studies on karyotype evolution of the order Pleuronectiformes. PMID:25526196

  17. ENHANCING THE IN VITRO AND IN VIVO DETECTION OF ANEUPLOIDY BY FLUORESCENCE IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION WITH THE USE OF BROMODEOXYURIDINE AS A PROLIFERATION MARKER. (R826408)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  18. DETECTION OF HYPERDIPLOIDY IN RAT INTERPHASE HEPATOCYTES FOLLOWING TREATMENT IN VIVO WITH VINBLASTINE SULFATE USING FLUORESCENCE IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION (FISH). (R826408)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  19. Cellular identification of a novel uncultured marine stramenopile (MAST-12 Clade) small-subunit rRNA gene sequence from a norwegian estuary by use of fluorescence in situ hybridization-scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kolodziej, Karolina; Stoeck, Thorsten

    2007-04-01

    Revealing the cellular identity of organisms behind environmental eukaryote rRNA gene sequences is a major objective in microbial diversity research. We sampled an estuarine oxygen-depleted microbial mat in southwestern Norway and retrieved an 18S rRNA gene signature that branches in the MAST-12 clade, an environmental marine stramenopile clade. Detailed phylogenetic analyses revealed that MAST-12 branches among the heterotrophic stramenopiles as a sister of the free-living Bicosoecida and the parasitic genus Blastocystis. Specific sequence signatures confirmed a relationship to these two groups while excluding direct assignment. We designed a specific oligonucleotide probe for the target sequence and detected the corresponding organism in incubation samples using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Using the combined FISH-scanning electron microscopy approach (T. Stoeck, W. H. Fowle, and S. S. Epstein, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 69:6856-6863, 2003), we determined the morphotype of the target organism among the very diverse possible morphologies of the heterotrophic stramenopiles. The unpigmented cell is spherical and about 5 mum in diameter and possesses a short flagellum and a long flagellum, both emanating anteriorly. The long flagellum bears mastigonemes in a characteristic arrangement, and its length (30 mum) distinguishes the target organism from other recognized heterotrophic stramenopiles. The short flagellum is naked and often directed posteriorly. The organism possesses neither a lorica nor a stalk. The morphological characteristics that we discovered should help isolate a representative of a novel stramenopile group, possibly at a high taxonomic level, in order to study its ultrastructure, physiological capabilities, and ecological role in the environment. PMID:17293516

  20. Rapid Discrimination of Haemophilus influenzae, H. parainfluenzae, and H. haemolyticus by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) and Two Matrix-Assisted Laser-Desorption-Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Frickmann, Hagen; Christner, Martin; Donat, Martina; Berger, Anja; Essig, Andreas; Podbielski, Andreas; Hagen, Ralf Matthias; Poppert, Sven

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to considerable differences in pathogenicity, Haemophilus influenzae, H. parainfluenzae and H. haemolyticus have to be reliably discriminated in routine diagnostics. Retrospective analyses suggest frequent misidentifications of commensal H. haemolyticus as H. influenzae. In a multi-center approach, we assessed the suitability of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and matrix-assisted laser-desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) for the identification of H. influenzae, H. parainfluenzae and H. haemolyticus to species level. Methodology A strain collection of 84 Haemophilus spp. comprising 50 H. influenzae, 25 H. parainfluenzae, 7 H. haemolyticus, and 2 H. parahaemolyticus including 77 clinical isolates was analyzed by FISH with newly designed DNA probes, and two different MALDI-TOF-MS systems (Bruker, Shimadzu) with and without prior formic acid extraction. Principal Findings Among the 84 Haemophilus strains analyzed, FISH led to 71 correct results (85%), 13 uninterpretable results (15%), and no misidentifications. Shimadzu MALDI-TOF-MS resulted in 59 correct identifications (70%), 19 uninterpretable results (23%), and 6 misidentifications (7%), using colony material applied directly. Bruker MALDI-TOF-MS with prior formic acid extraction led to 74 correct results (88%), 4 uninterpretable results (5%) and 6 misidentifications (7%). The Bruker MALDI-TOF-MS misidentifications could be resolved by the addition of a suitable H. haemolyticus reference spectrum to the system's database. In conclusion, no analyzed diagnostic procedure was free of errors. Diagnostic results have to be interpreted carefully and alternative tests should be applied in case of ambiguous test results on isolates from seriously ill patients. PMID:23646201

  1. Nanogold In Situ Hybridization for Phylogenetic Identification in Geologic Samples Using Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, C.; Haymon, R.; Sievert, S.; Holden, P.

    2006-12-01

    Collecting phylogenetic information simultaneously with mineral textures and associations for geomicrobiological studies has always been a challenge. Recently a new type of nucleotide reporter system has been developed that utilizes small particles of nanogold (1.4 nm) covalently attached to oligonucelotide probes. Due to the small size and electron density of these nanogold reporter molecules, this in situ hybridization technique allows for the phylogenetic identification of microbial targets with a scanning electron microscope. Here we present new applications of the nanogold hybridization technique for pure cultures and natural microbial communities in a range of geologic samples including sand grains, basalt chips incubated on deep sea hydrothermal vents, and gypsum crusts sampled from a saline lake. While we do observe nonspecific binding of nanogold probes to minerals and organic compounds in geologic matrices, this can be distinguished from positive hybridization events with a spatial variety analysis. To assess the potential of nanogold hybridizations for quantitative assessments of microbial communities, fluorescent in situ hybridizations (FISH) were performed on all samples and compared to cell counts generated from nanogold hybridizations.

  2. DETECTION OF HYPERDIPLOIDY IN BLADDER EPITHELIAL CELLS OF RATS TREATED WITH ORTHO-PHENYLPHENOL USING FLUORESCENCE IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION. (R826408)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  3. Evaluation of hybridization efficiencies of centromeric probes for chromosomes X, Y, 18 and 13/21 on uncultured amniocytes by a `rapid one-step` fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Prashad, N.; Cubbage, M.; Weber, W.

    1994-09-01

    Aprogenex has developed a rapid one-step FISH assay, KaryoSite{trademark}, for the detection of chromosomes X, Y, 13, 18 and 21. The chromosome probes used are synthetic oligonucleotides with covalently attached chromosomes. In combination with a unique hybridization cocktail, these chromosomes are detected in a one-step hybridization. This method allows the detection of aneuploidy for these five chromosomes in uncultured amniocytes as well as metaphase chromosome preparations. Hybridization efficiency of dual probe combinations, X-Rhodamine plus Y-FITC and 18-FITC plus 13/21-Rhodamine, was determined on 50 amniocyte samples. Probes were added to the cells on slides and target cellular DNA was denatured at 90{degrees}C for 5 minutes followed by hybridization at 42{degrees}C for 30 minutes. Hybridization efficiency for SY probes was greater than 95% and for 18-13/21 probes was greater than 90%. Aneuploidy data from amniocyte samples will be presented. Aprogenex`s FISH technology is a reliable and rapid one-step method for prenatal diagnosis of aneuploidy for chromosome X, Y, 13, 18 and 21 in uncultured amniocytes.

  4. Apparent mosaicism for del(17)(p11.2) ruled out by fluorescence in situ hybridization in a Smith-Magenis syndrome patient

    SciTech Connect

    Juyal, R.C.; Shaffer, L.G.; Lupski, J.R.; Greenberg, F.; Baldini, A.; Patel, P.I.

    1995-11-20

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation syndrome typically associated with a deletion of band p11.2 of human chromosome 17. Finucane et al. reported a 14-year-old boy with mild physical and behavior manifestations of SMS. No evidence for deletion was initially evident in 20 peripheral blood lymphocytes examined at 850 band level of resolution. Examination of metaphase chromosomes of skin fibroblasts showed a deletion of 17p11.2 in 25/25 cells examined which was consistent with the patient`s clinical manifestations of SMS. Subsequent examination of 25 cells from peripheral blood cultures indicated that 11% of cells harbored a deletion at 17p11.2, thus suggesting a mosaicism for the deletion. A third study of 20 peripheral blood lymphocytes examined at 550-850 band length resolution in a different laboratory, indicated that 13 cells had no apparent deletion, 4 cells had an apparent deletion and 3 cells were questionable. 7 refs.

  5. International, collaborative assessment of limitations of chromosome-specific probes (CSP) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH): Analysis of expected detections in 73,000 prenatal cases

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.I.; Henry, G.P.; Miller, W.A.

    1994-09-01

    FISH and CSP have been proposed to reduce karyotyping need. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential efficacy of CSP-FISH using currently available probes (13, 18, 21, X, & Y) in large, prenatal diagnostic centers. Results (1990-1993) from 7 centers in 4 countries were divided by those expected to be detectable by currently available probes, and those which would be missed assuming 10% probe efficacy. 72,994 karyotypes included 699 trisomy 21`s, 352 trisomy 18`s, 136 trisomy 13`s, 358 sex chromosome aneuploidies, 70 triploidies, and 855 others (translocations, inversions, deletions, markers). Of 2,613 abnormalities, 1,745 would be detectable (66.8%). [Detroit 55.7%, Stockholm 68.3%, Boston 52.6%, Denver 61.3%, Muenster 77.0%, London 84.5%, Philadelphia 69.4%]. Centers with high proportions of referrals for ultrasound anomalies had the highest CSP-FISH positives secondary to increased T 18 & 13. We conclude: (1) 73,000 karyotypes show relatively consistent incidences of the common trisomies, sex chromosome abnormalities, and other chromosome abnormalities among the centers. (2) The proportion expected detectable by FISH-CSP technology varies from 52.6% to 84.5%, averaging 66.8%. (3) 1/3 of the karyotypic abnormalities would be missed, and therefore, replacement of complete karyotyping with FISH would have unacceptably high false-negative rates for routine evaluation. (4) FISH-CSP, while useful when positive for anomalies, is not sufficient when negative to obviate the need for a complete karyotype.

  6. Hybrid Propulsion In-Situ Resource Utilization Test Facility Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, Ashley A.; Gatto, Corinne; Nakazono, Barry; Grayson, Kristian; Vaughan, David

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid propulsion could be a potential game changing technology for several Mars applications, such as Mars Sample Return (MSR) and human exploration. A flexible hybrid test facility has been built at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to provide data relevant to the design of such systems. This paper presents the motivations for such a system and its design. The facility is capable of testing 5 cm diameter fuel grains with gaseous oxygen and Mars in situ propellant production simulating oxidizer (varying mixtures of GO2, CO2 and CO). All currently planned tests utilize paraffin based fuels; however, alternative hybrid fuels may be used in the future. Variable length to outer diameter (L/D) ratios may also be tested to give insight on potential packaging constraints. The goal of this research is to enable the inclusion of hybrid propulsion systems in future mission design studies by determining the empirical constants in the regression rate equation for paraffin-based fuels with space storable and/or in situ oxidizers and to investigate the effect of L/D on combustion efficiency. Test results will be reported separately.

  7. Enzymatic Permeabilization of the Thecate Dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum (Dinophyceae) Yields Detection of Intracellularly Associated Bacteria via Catalyzed Reporter Deposition-Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization▿

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Lucía; Marín, Irma

    2008-01-01

    The enzymatic permeabilization procedure described here allows the detection of intracellular bacteria in the thecate dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum by using catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization. The combined use of propidium iodide and calcofluor for confocal laser scanning microscopy, together with general and specific fluorescent bacterial probes, demonstrated the intracellular presence of bacteria, including members of the phylum Bacteroidetes. PMID:18263745

  8. Localization of the human prostate transglutaminase (Type IV) gene (TGM4) to chromosome 3p21.33-p22 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, V.; Grant, F.J.; Porta, R.

    1995-05-01

    Transglutaminases (EC 2.3.2.13) catalyze the post-translational modifications of proteins by the formation of{var_epsilon}({gamma}-glutamyl)lysine insopeptide bonds. The number of transglutaminases recently described in eukaryotic cells includes at least five distinct enzymes that have been localized both intracellularly (tissue transglutaminase, keratinocyte transglutaminase, hair follicle transglutaminase) and extracellularly (factor XIIIa and prostate transglutaminase). Although these enzymes share some common features, such as the amino acid sequence in the active site and a strict calcium dependence for their catalytic activity, many differences in the biochemical and immunological properties have been described among the different members of this family. These findings suggest that each molecular form of transglutaminase, catalyzing the cross-linking of specific substrate proteins in specific biological districts, plays a different role in various physiological processes (i.e., blood coagulation, keratinocyte terminal differentiation, cell differentiation, apoptosis, seminal fluid coagulation, and sperm immunogenicity suppression). 10 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Unravelling the Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Biofilm: A Multiplex Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Assay Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Liselotte; Jespers, Vicky; Dahchour, Nassira; Mwambarangwe, Lambert; Musengamana, Viateur; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Crucitti, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV), a condition defined by increased vaginal discharge without significant inflammation, is characterized by a change in the bacterial composition of the vagina. Lactobacillus spp., associated with a healthy vaginal microbiome, are outnumbered by BV-associated organisms. These bacteria could form a polymicrobial biofilm which allows them to persist in spite of antibiotic treatment. In this study, we examined the presence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae in vaginal biofilms using Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probes targeting these bacteria. For this purpose, we developed three new PNA probes for A. vaginae. The most specific A. vaginae probe, AtoITM1, was selected and then used in an assay with two existing probes, Gard162 and BacUni-1, to evaluate multiplex FISH on clinical samples. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) as the gold standard, we demonstrated a sensitivity of 66.7% (95% confidence interval: 54.5% - 77.1%) and a specificity of 89.4% (95% confidence interval: 76.1% - 96%) of the new AtoITM1 probe. FISH enabled us to show the presence of a polymicrobial biofilm in bacterial vaginosis, in which Atopobium vaginae is part of a Gardnerella vaginalis-dominated biofilm. We showed that the presence of this biofilm is associated with high bacterial loads of A. vaginae and G. vaginalis. PMID:26305575

  10. Unravelling the Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Biofilm: A Multiplex Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Assay Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Liselotte; Jespers, Vicky; Dahchour, Nassira; Mwambarangwe, Lambert; Musengamana, Viateur; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Crucitti, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV), a condition defined by increased vaginal discharge without significant inflammation, is characterized by a change in the bacterial composition of the vagina. Lactobacillus spp., associated with a healthy vaginal microbiome, are outnumbered by BV-associated organisms. These bacteria could form a polymicrobial biofilm which allows them to persist in spite of antibiotic treatment. In this study, we examined the presence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae in vaginal biofilms using Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probes targeting these bacteria. For this purpose, we developed three new PNA probes for A. vaginae. The most specific A. vaginae probe, AtoITM1, was selected and then used in an assay with two existing probes, Gard162 and BacUni-1, to evaluate multiplex FISH on clinical samples. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) as the gold standard, we demonstrated a sensitivity of 66.7% (95% confidence interval: 54.5% - 77.1%) and a specificity of 89.4% (95% confidence interval: 76.1% - 96%) of the new AtoITM1 probe. FISH enabled us to show the presence of a polymicrobial biofilm in bacterial vaginosis, in which Atopobium vaginae is part of a Gardnerella vaginalis-dominated biofilm. We showed that the presence of this biofilm is associated with high bacterial loads of A. vaginae and G. vaginalis. PMID:26305575

  11. Use of Stable-Isotope Probing, Full-Cycle rRNA Analysis, and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization-Microautoradiography To Study a Methanol-Fed Denitrifying Microbial Community

    PubMed Central

    Ginige, Maneesha P.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Daims, Holger; Wagner, Michael; Keller, Jürg; Blackall, Linda L.

    2004-01-01

    A denitrifying microbial consortium was enriched in an anoxically operated, methanol-fed sequencing batch reactor (SBR) fed with a mineral salts medium containing methanol as the sole carbon source and nitrate as the electron acceptor. The SBR was inoculated with sludge from a biological nutrient removal activated sludge plant exhibiting good denitrification. The SBR denitrification rate improved from less than 0.02 mg of NO3−-N mg of mixed-liquor volatile suspended solids (MLVSS)−1 h−1 to a steady-state value of 0.06 mg of NO3−-N mg of MLVSS−1 h−1 over a 7-month operational period. At this time, the enriched microbial community was subjected to stable-isotope probing (SIP) with [13C]methanol to biomark the DNA of the denitrifiers. The extracted [13C]DNA and [12C]DNA from the SIP experiment were separately subjected to full-cycle rRNA analysis. The dominant 16S rRNA gene phylotype (group A clones) in the [13C]DNA clone library was closely related to those of the obligate methylotrophs Methylobacillus and Methylophilus in the order Methylophilales of the Betaproteobacteria (96 to 97% sequence identities), while the most abundant clone groups in the [12C]DNA clone library mostly belonged to the family Saprospiraceae in the Bacteroidetes phylum. Oligonucleotide probes for use in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were designed to specifically target the group A clones and Methylophilales (probes DEN67 and MET1216, respectively) and the Saprospiraceae clones (probe SAP553). Application of these probes to the SBR biomass over the enrichment period demonstrated a strong correlation between the level of SBR denitrification and relative abundance of DEN67-targeted bacteria in the SBR community. By contrast, there was no correlation between the denitrification rate and the relative abundances of the well-known denitrifying genera Hyphomicrobium and Paracoccus or the Saprospiraceae clones visualized by FISH in the SBR biomass. FISH combined with

  12. EBER in situ hybridization for Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Lawrence M; Chen, Yuan-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr encoding region (EBER) in situ hybridization is the methodology of choice for the detection of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in tissue sections. Because of the large numbers of copies of EBERs present in latently infected cells, non-isotopic methods can be used. Positive studies show staining in the nuclei of the EBV-infected cells, accentuating the chromatin and often excluding the nucleolus. False-negative results are most often the result of RNA degradation in the tissues, a finding that may be detected through the use of a polyT probe as a control for RNA preservation. PMID:23666702

  13. Hybrid-type temperature sensor for in situ measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Iuchi, Tohru; Hiraka, Kensuke

    2006-11-15

    A hybrid-type surface temperature sensor combines the contact and noncontact methods, which allows us to overcome the shortcomings of both methods. The hybrid-type surface thermometer is composed mainly of two components: a metal film sheet that makes contact with an object and a radiometer that is used to detect the radiance of the rear surface of the metal film, which is actually a modified radiation thermometer. Temperature measurement using the hybrid-type thermometer with a several tens micrometer thick Hastelloy sheet, a highly heat and corrosion resistant alloy, is possible with a systematic error of -0.5 K and random errors of {+-}0.5 K, in the temperature range from 900 to 1000 K. This thermometer provides a useful means for calibration of in situ temperature measurement in various processes, especially in the silicon semiconductor industry. This article introduces the basic idea of the hybrid-type surface sensor, presents experimental results and discussions, and finally describes some applications.

  14. Enabling in situ thermometry using transmission nuclear resonance fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angell, Christopher T.

    2016-02-01

    Transmission nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) has been proposed for use as an assay and detection technique for nuclear security and safeguards applications because of its isotope-specific sensitivity and the penetrating capability of γ -rays. It can also be used for in situ thermometry because the absorbing resonance profile is sensitive to temperature. Using transmission NRF for thermometry could provide a new avenue for studying the ion temperature evolution of laser-induced plasmas using the upcoming ELI-NP facility. It could also be used for applications where thermometry would be otherwise infeasible, such as for determining the average fuel temperature of spent nuclear fuel, a step that would reduce the assay uncertainty using transmission NRF. In this paper, two different transmission NRF thermometry scenarios are presented and analyzed for sensitivity. This analysis demonstrated that thermometry using γ -rays is possible independent of γ -ray beam type and will be feasible with next-generation high-intensity γ -ray sources. Beyond thermometry, an application of temperature effects was found in the improvement of transmission NRF efficacy for assay and detection: using a cryogenic witness target will reduce the required measurement time by 40%.

  15. In situ growth of fluorescent silicon nanocrystals in a monolithic microcapsule as a photostable, versatile platform.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guixian; Huang, Yu; Bhave, Gauri; Wang, Yuzhen; Hu, Zhongbo; Liu, Xuewu

    2016-08-25

    A facile, one-step method was developed for the in situ formation of fluorescent silicon nanocrystals (SiNC) in a microspherical encapsulating matrix. The obtained SiNC encapsulated polymeric microcapsules (SiPM) possess uniform size (0.1-2.0 μm), strong fluorescence, and nanoporous structure. A unique two stage, time dependent reaction was developed, as the growth of SiNC was slower than the formation of polymeric microcapsules. The resulting SiPM with increasing reaction time exhibited two levels of stability, and correspondingly, the release of SiNC in aqueous media showed different behavior. With reaction time <1 h, the obtained low-density SiPM (LD-SiPM) as matrix microcapsules, would release encapsulated SiNC on demand. With >1 h reaction time, resulting high-density SiPM (HD-SiPM) became stable SiNC reservoirs. SiPM exhibit stable photoluminescence. The porous structure and fluorescence quenching effects make SiPM suitable for bioimaging, drug loading and sorption of heavy metals (Hg(2+) as shown) as an intrinsic indicator. SiPM were able to reduce metal ions, forming SiPM/metal oxide and SiPM/metal hybrids, and their applications in bio-sensing and catalysis were also demonstrated. PMID:27515701

  16. Quantitative analysis of chromosome in situ hybridization signal in paraffin-embedded tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Dhingra, K; Sneige, N; Pandita, T K; Johnston, D A; Lee, J S; Emami, K; Hortobagyi, G N; Hittelman, W N

    1994-06-01

    Interphase cytogenetic analysis using chromosome-specific probes is increasingly being used to detect chromosomal aberrations on paraffin-embedded tissue sections. However, quantitative analysis of the hybridization signal is confounded by the nuclear slicing that occurs during sectioning. To determine the sensitivity and accuracy of chromosome in situ hybridization for detecting numerical chromosomal aberrations on paraffin-embedded sections, in situ hybridization was performed on sections derived from mixtures of cell populations with known frequencies of numerical chromosomal aberrations and the Chromosome Index (CI) was calculated (i.e., total number of signal spots/number of nuclei counted) as a quantitative measure of chromosome copy number. The presence of 25% or more monosomic or tetrasomic cells in a given population was easily detected as a change in CI (P < 0.05). Lower degrees of polysomy could be detected as a small percentage of nuclear fragments with > 2 signal spots. The CI was not significantly influenced by a change in section thickness from 4 to 8 microM, by an increase in cell size from 478 to 986 microM3, or by the choice of detection method (fluorescence vs. conventional bright-field microscopy). Comparative analysis of touch preparations and tissue sections from the corresponding breast tumors showed that CI accurately reflects the average copy number of chromosomes in intact nuclei and may actually be superior to in situ hybridization on whole nuclei for the detection of numerical chromosomal changes in defined histologic areas. This method is thus a sensitive and accurate means of studying genetic changes in premalignant and malignant tissue, and of assessing the genetic changes associated with specific phenotypes. PMID:7924678

  17. Combined in situ Hybridization/Immunohistochemistry (ISH/IH) on Free-floating Vibratome Tissue Sections

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Manuel E.

    2016-01-01

    In situ hybridization and immunostaining are common techniques for localizing gene expression, the mRNA and protein respectively, within tissues. Both techniques can be applied to tissue sections to achieve similar goals, but in some cases, it is necessary to use them together. For example, complement C1q is a secreted protein complex that can target the innate immune response during inflammation. Complement has been found to be elevated early and before severe neurodegeneration in several disease models. Thus, complement may serve as an important marker for disease progression and may contribute to the pathology under certain conditions. Since complement is a secreted complex, immunostaining for C1q does not necessarily reveal where compliment is produced. In situ hybridization for complement components, C1q a, b, or c mRNA, is ideal to mark complement producing cells in tissue. In situ hybridization can be coupled with cell-type-specific immunostaining for accurate identification of the cell types involved. Protein localization and mRNA localization together can reveal details as to the relationship between complement producing and complement target cells within disease tissues. Here we outline the steps for combined in situ hybridization and immunostaining on the same tissue section. The protocol outlined here has been designed for detection of complement C1q in neurons and microglia in the mouse brain. Provided here are two approaches for combined ISH/IH. In the 1st example, in situ hybridization of C1q mRNA is performed together with fluorescent detection of Purkinje neuron cell bodies using Calbindin-D28K antibody. In the 2nd example, C1q mRNA in situ is performed together with 3,3’-diaminobenzidine (DAB) detection of microglia using CD68 antibody. Please note that modifications to the protocol may be needed for the use of distinct probes and antibodies, as well as alternate tissue-processing methods that are not specified herein. For appropriate examples

  18. The Use of Whole-Mount "in Situ" Hybridization to Illustrate Gene Expression Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Llamusí, Beatriz; Muñoz-Soriano, Verónica; Paricio, Nuria; Artero, Rubén

    2014-01-01

    "In situ" hybridization is a widely used technique for studying gene expression. Here, we describe two experiments addressed to postgraduate genetics students in which the effect of transcription factors on gene expression is analyzed in "Drosophila embryos of different genotypes by whole-mount in situ hybridization. In one of the…

  19. Le diagnostic anténatal de la trisomie 21 par l'hybridation in situ en fluorescence (FISH): à propos des premiers tests réalisés au Maroc

    PubMed Central

    Lamzouri, Afaf; Natiq, Abdelhafid; Tajir, Mariam; Sendid, Mohamed; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Le but de cette étude était de présenter les premiers résultats de diagnostic anténatal de la trisomie 21 par la technique d'hybridation in situ en fluorescence (FISH) au Maroc et discuter son intérêt dans le diagnostic rapide de cette aneuploïdie. Méthodes Ce travail a été réalisé chez 23 femmes avec des grossesses à haut risque de trisomie 21. La moyenne d’âge des gestantes étaient de 37,43 ans avec des extrêmes de 21 et 43 ans. Toutes étaient musulmanes mariées, mariage légitimé par la Charia, dont trois mariages consanguins, sauf une originaire de la République Démocratique du Congo qui était chrétienne et concubine. La majorité des femmes étaient fonctionnaires et avaient un niveau de scolarisation moyen à élevé. Toutes les patientes ont bénéficié d'une consultation de génétique médicale au cours de laquelle il leur a été donné des informations sur la technique, son intérêt et ses limites. Il s'agit de femmes enceintes qui avaient soit un âge maternel élevé ou des signes d'appel échographiques et/ ou biochimiques. Une des patientes était porteuse d'une translocation robertsonienne t(14;21) équilibrée. Une amniocentèse a été réalisée chez toutes les gestantes et aucun avortement n'a était induit par ce geste invasif. L’âge gestationnel moyen à la première consultation était de 14 semaines d'aménorrhée (SA) et à l'amniocentèse était de 16 SA et 5 jours. L'analyse FISH a été réalisée, après consentement des couples, sur des cellules non cultivées à partir des échantillons de liquides amniotiques, en utilisant des sondes spécifiques du chromosome 21. Résultats Parmi les 23 patientes qui ont bénéficiées d'un diagnostic anténatal de la trisomie 21 par la technique FISH, nous avons pu rassurer 21 d'entre elles, et nous avons détecté deux cas de trisomie 21 fœtal. Conclusion La technique FISH permet un diagnostic anténatal rapide, en moins de 48h, de la trisomie 21 sur

  20. Immuno-Electron Microscopy and Electron Microscopic In Situ Hybridization for Visualizing piRNA Biogenesis Bodies in Drosophila Ovaries.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Shinsuke; Murota, Yukiko; Nishimoto, Yoshinori; Yoshimura, Mana; Nagai, Toshihiro; Okano, Hideyuki; Siomi, Mikiko C

    2015-01-01

    Immuno-electron microscopy and electron microscopic in situ hybridization are powerful tools to identify the precise subcellular localization of specific proteins and RNAs at the ultramicroscopic level. Here we describe detailed procedures for how to detect the precise location of a specific target labeled with both fluorescence and gold particles. Although they have been developed for the analysis of Drosophila ovarian somatic cells, these techniques are suitable for a wide range of biological applications including human, primate, and rodent analysis. PMID:26324437

  1. Improved hybrid solar cells via in situ UV-polymerization.

    SciTech Connect

    Tepavcevic, S.; Darling, S. B.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Rajh, T.; Sibener, S. J.; Univ. of Chicago

    2009-08-03

    One approach for making inexpensive inorganic-organic hybrid photovoltaic (PV) cells is to fill highly ordered TiO{sub 2} nanotube (NT) arrays with solid organic hole conductors such as conjugated polymers. Here, a new in situ UV polymerization method for growing polythiophene (UV-PT) inside TiO{sub 2} NTs is presented and compared to the conventional approach of infiltrating NTs with pre-synthesized polymer. A nanotubular TiO{sub 2} substrate is immersed in a 2,5-diiodothiophene (DIT) monomer precursor solution and then irradiated with UV light. The selective UV photodissociation of the C-I bond produces monomer radicals with intact {pi}-ring structure that further produce longer oligothiophene/PT molecules. Complete photoluminescence quenching upon UV irradiation suggests coupling between radicals created from DIT and at the TiO{sub 2} surface via a charge transfer complex. Coupling with the TiO{sub 2} surface improves UV-PT crystallinity and {pi}-{pi} stacking; flat photocurrent values show that charge recombination during hole transport through the polymer is negligible. A non-ideal, backside-illuminated setup under illumination of 620-nm light yields a photocurrent density of {approx} 5 {micro}A cm{sup -2} - surprisingly much stronger than with comparable devices fabricated with polymer synthesized ex situ. Since in this backside architecture setup we illuminate the cell through the Ag top electrode, there is a possibility for Ag plasmon-enhanced solar energy conversion. By using this simple in situ UV polymerization method that couples the conjugated polymer to the TiO{sub 2} surface, the absorption of sunlight can be improved and the charge carrier mobility of the photoactive layer can be enhanced.

  2. Improved hybrid solar cells via in situ UV polymerization.

    PubMed

    Tepavcevic, Sanja; Darling, Seth B; Dimitrijevic, Nada M; Rajh, Tijana; Sibener, Steven J

    2009-08-01

    One approach for making inexpensive inorganic-organic hybrid photovoltaic (PV) cells is to fill highly ordered TiO(2) nanotube (NT) arrays with solid organic hole conductors such as conjugated polymers. Here, a new in situ UV polymerization method for growing polythiophene (UV-PT) inside TiO(2) NTs is presented and compared to the conventional approach of infiltrating NTs with pre-synthesized polymer. A nanotubular TiO(2) substrate is immersed in a 2,5-diiodothiophene (DIT) monomer precursor solution and then irradiated with UV light. The selective UV photodissociation of the C--I bond produces monomer radicals with intact pi-ring structure that further produce longer oligothiophene/PT molecules. Complete photoluminescence quenching upon UV irradiation suggests coupling between radicals created from DIT and at the TiO(2) surface via a charge transfer complex. Coupling with the TiO(2) surface improves UV-PT crystallinity and pi-pi stacking; flat photocurrent values show that charge recombination during hole transport through the polymer is negligible. A non-ideal, backside-illuminated setup under illumination of 620-nm light yields a photocurrent density of approximately 5 microA cm(2)-surprisingly much stronger than with comparable devices fabricated with polymer synthesized ex situ. Since in this backside architecture setup we illuminate the cell through the Ag top electrode, there is a possibility for Ag plasmon-enhanced solar energy conversion. By using this simple in situ UV polymerization method that couples the conjugated polymer to the TiO(2) surface, the absorption of sunlight can be improved and the charge carrier mobility of the photoactive layer can be enhanced. PMID:19367599

  3. Fluorescent labels for in situ wet chemistry experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kloepfer, J. A.; Nadeau, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    We evaluate a wide selection of dyes and suggest a panel that would be the most likely to succeed in a simple flight instrument with a single excitation laser. We also investigate fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots as additions to or replacements for these organic dyes.

  4. Fetal t(5p;21q) misdiagnosed as monosomy 21: A plea for in situ hybridization studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, P.; Uhrich, S.; Cheng, E.; Disteche, C.

    1994-10-01

    We report a case of 45,XY,-5,-21,+der (5)t(5;21) (p13 or p14;q11.2 or q21) that was prenatally misdiagnosed as complete monosomy 21 and terminated at 24 weeks of gestation. Subsequent fluorescence in situ hybridization studies with a chromosome 21 painting probe documented the cryptic unbalanced translocation. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. In situ hybridization of carbon nanotubes with bacterial cellulose for three-dimensional hybrid bioscaffolds.

    PubMed

    Park, Subeom; Park, Jooyeon; Jo, Insu; Cho, Sung-Pyo; Sung, Dongchul; Ryu, Seungmi; Park, Minsung; Min, Kyung-Ah; Kim, Jangho; Hong, Suklyun; Hong, Byung Hee; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2015-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great potential in biomedical fields. However, in vivo applications of CNTs for regenerative medicine have been hampered by difficulties associated with the fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds of CNTs due to CNTs' nano-scale nature. In this study, we devised a new method for biosynthesis of CNT-based 3D scaffold by in situ hybridizing CNTs with bacterial cellulose (BC), which has a structure ideal for tissue-engineering scaffolds. This was achieved simply by culturing Gluconacetobacter xylinus, BC-synthesizing bacteria, in medium containing CNTs. However, pristine CNTs aggregated in medium, which hampers homogeneous hybridization of CNTs with BC scaffolds, and the binding energy between hydrophobic pristine CNTs and hydrophilic BC was too small for the hybridization to occur. To overcome these problems, an amphiphilic comb-like polymer (APCLP) was adsorbed on CNTs. Unlike CNT-coated BC scaffolds (CNT-BC-Imm) formed by immersing 3D BC scaffolds in CNT solution, the APCLP-adsorbed CNT-BC hybrid scaffold (CNT-BC-Syn) showed homogeneously distributed CNTs throughout the 3D microporous structure of BC. Importantly, in contrast to CNT-BC-Imm scaffolds, CNT-BC-Syn scaffolds showed excellent osteoconductivity and osteoinductivity that led to high bone regeneration efficacy. This strategy may open a new avenue for development of 3D biofunctional scaffolds for regenerative medicine. PMID:25941786

  6. Immunocytochemical fluorescent in situ visualization of proteins in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Boutté, Yohann; Grebe, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of cellular and subcellular functions often relies on the ability to visualize proteins as close as possible to their endogenous locations. A number of immunocytochemical techniques have been developed to detect proteins in situ using specific antibodies raised against proteins of interest. Here, we describe in detail two protocols commonly, successfully employed in Arabidopsis research. The first allows for immunolocalization of proteins in whole-mount Arabidopsis roots without the need for physical sectioning. The second allows for immunolocalization of proteins on semi-thin microtome sections of wax-embedded swamples. This approach is particularly useful when sectioning of Arabidopsis roots or other thicker plant organs is required for immunolocalization. We provide step-by-step protocols with extensive troubleshooting for both the whole-mount and sectioning protocols. Furthermore, critical steps, advantages, and limitations of the two protocols described here are discussed. PMID:24057381

  7. Rapid in situ assessment of physiological activities in bacterial biofilms using fluorescent probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, F. P.; McFeters, G. A.

    1994-01-01

    Two rapid in situ enumeration methods using fluorescent probes were used to assess the physiological activities of Klebsiella pneumoniae biofilms on stainless steel. Fluorescent dyes, 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) and rhodamine 123 (Rh 123), were chosen to perform this study. CTC is a soluble redox indicator which can be reduced by respiring bacteria to fluorescent CTC-formazan crystals. Rh 123 is incorporated into bacteria with respect to cellular proton motive force. The intracellular accumulation of these fluorescent dyes can be determined using epifluorescence microscopy. The results obtained with these two fluorescent probes in situ were compared to the plate count (PC) and in situ direct viable count (DVC) methods. Viable cell densities within biofilms determined by the three in situ methods were comparable and always showed approximately 2-fold higher values than those obtained with the PC method. As an additional advantage, the results were observed after 2 h, which was shorter than the 4 h incubation time required for the DVC method and 24 h for colony formation. The results indicate that staining with CTC and Rh 123 provides rapid information regarding cell numbers and physiological activities of bacteria within biofilms.

  8. Hybrid assemblies of fluorescent nanocrystals and membrane proteins in liposomes.

    PubMed

    De Leo, Vincenzo; Catucci, Lucia; Falqui, Andrea; Marotta, Roberto; Striccoli, Marinella; Agostiano, Angela; Comparelli, Roberto; Milano, Francesco

    2014-02-18

    Because of the growing potential of nanoparticles in biological and medical applications, tuning and directing their properties toward a high compatibility with the aqueous biological milieu is of remarkable relevance. Moreover, the capability to combine nanocrystals (NCs) with biomolecules, such as proteins, offers great opportunities to design hybrid systems for both nanobiotechnology and biomedical technology. Here we report on the application of the micelle-to-vesicle transition (MVT) method for incorporation of hydrophobic, red-emitting CdSe@ZnS NCs into the bilayer of liposomes. This method enabled the construction of a novel hybrid proteo-NC-liposome containing, as model membrane protein, the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Electron microscopy confirmed the insertion of NCs within the lipid bilayer without significantly altering the structure of the unilamellar vesicles. The resulting aqueous NC-liposome suspensions showed low turbidity and kept unaltered the wavelengths of absorbance and emission peaks of the native NCs. A relative NC fluorescence quantum yield up to 8% was preserved after their incorporation in liposomes. Interestingly, in proteo-NC-liposomes, RC is not denatured by Cd-based NCs, retaining its structural and functional integrity as shown by absorption spectra and flash-induced charge recombination kinetics. The outlined strategy can be extended in principle to any suitably sized hydrophobic NC with similar surface chemistry and to any integral protein complex. Furthermore, the proposed approach could be used in nanomedicine for the realization of theranostic systems and provides new, interesting perspectives for understanding the interactions between integral membrane proteins and nanoparticles, i.e., in nanotoxicology studies. PMID:24460372

  9. Circovirus-infected geese studied by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Joan; Soike, D; Moffett, Deborah; Weston, J H; Todd, D

    2005-06-01

    It has now been established that circovirus infection is common in farmed geese, but little is known about the clinicopathological significance of such infections. Ten clinically diseased geese suspected of being infected by circovirus were studied by in situ hybridization using a goose circovirus DNA probe. Circovirus DNA was demonstrated in the bursa of Fabricius (BF), spleen, thymus, bone marrow, liver, kidney, lung and heart, indicating that infection can be multisystemic. In some birds, virus DNA was present in very large quantities, most notably in the BF, liver and small intestine. With the exception of BF and thymus, there were no histological findings that would have suggested the presence of such quantities of circovirus DNA. In view of the very large quantities of virus DNA labelling present in some tissues, and by analogy to porcine circovirus type 2 infection and psittacine beak and feather virus infections, which are known to cause severe disease, and which have similar virus distribution to that found in our geese, it seems probable that the circovirus was important in the disease manifestations shown by the infected geese. PMID:16191706

  10. Identification of canine glial cells by nonradioactive in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Graber, H U; Zurbriggen, A; Vandevelde, M

    1993-01-01

    Studies on the development of the canine central nervous system and on demyelinating diseases demand unequivocal identification of the glial cells. For that reason, nonradioactive in situ hybridization (ISH) was performed in primary dog brain cell cultures (DBCC) and in brain sections of neonatal dogs. Specific RNA probes were used to detect messenger RNA (mRNA) coding for proteolipid protein (PLP), myelin basic protein (MBP) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). PLP and MBP are markers for oligodendrocytes, GFAP for astrocytes. Oligodendrocytes positive for PLP and MBP mRNA were found in both DBCC and brain sections of neonatal dogs. Astrocytes expressing GFAP specific mRNA were detected in DBCC and in brain sections. These cells were evenly distributed in the white matter with additional accumulation in the membrana limitans gliae superficialis, around the ventricles and blood vessels. ISH clearly improves the study of oligodendrocytes in brain sections as, in contrast to the immunohistochemical methods, this technique allows to identify individual cells. PMID:8135072

  11. Regulatory pathway analysis by high-throughput in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Visel, Axel; Carson, James P.; Oldekamp, Judit; Warnecke, Marei; Jakubcakova, Vladimira; Zhou, Xunlei; Shaw, Chad; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo; Eichele, Gregor

    2007-10-01

    Automated in situ hybridization (ISH) permits construction of comprehensive atlases of gene expression patterns in mammals. When web-accessible, such atlases become searchable digital expression maps of individual genes and offer an entryway to elucidate genetic interactions and signaling pathways. An atlas housing ~1,000 spatial gene expression patterns of the mid-gestation mouse embryo was generated. Patterns were textually annotated using a controlled vocabulary comprising 90 anatomical features. Hierarchical clustering of annotations was carried out using distance scores calculated from the similarity between pairs of patterns across all anatomical structures. This ordered hundreds of complex expression patterns into a matrix that reflected the embryonic architecture and the relatedness of patterns of expression. Clustering yielded twelve distinct groups of expression pattern. Because of similarity of expression patterns within a group, members of this group may be components of regulatory cascades. We focused on one group, which is composed of 83 genes, including Pax6, an evolutionary conserved transcriptional master mediator of the development. Using functional studies, ISH on Pax6-deficient embryos and Pax6 binding site identification and validation by means of electromobility shift assays, we identified numerous genes that are transcriptionally regulated by Pax6. Hence cluster analysis of annotated gene expression patterns obtained by robotic ISH is an entryway for identification of components of signaling cascades in mammals.

  12. Next-Generation in Situ Hybridization Chain Reaction: Higher Gain, Lower Cost, Greater Durability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hybridization chain reaction (HCR) provides multiplexed, isothermal, enzyme-free, molecular signal amplification in diverse settings. Within intact vertebrate embryos, where signal-to-background is at a premium, HCR in situ amplification enables simultaneous mapping of multiple target mRNAs, addressing a longstanding challenge in the biological sciences. With this approach, RNA probes complementary to mRNA targets trigger chain reactions in which metastable fluorophore-labeled RNA hairpins self-assemble into tethered fluorescent amplification polymers. The properties of HCR lead to straightforward multiplexing, deep sample penetration, high signal-to-background, and sharp subcellular signal localization within fixed whole-mount zebrafish embryos, a standard model system for the study of vertebrate development. However, RNA reagents are expensive and vulnerable to enzymatic degradation. Moreover, the stringent hybridization conditions used to destabilize nonspecific hairpin binding also reduce the energetic driving force for HCR polymerization, creating a trade-off between minimization of background and maximization of signal. Here, we eliminate this trade-off by demonstrating that low background levels can be achieved using permissive in situ amplification conditions (0% formamide, room temperature) and engineer next-generation DNA HCR amplifiers that maximize the free energy benefit per polymerization step while preserving the kinetic trapping property that underlies conditional polymerization, dramatically increasing signal gain, reducing reagent cost, and improving reagent durability. PMID:24712299

  13. In situ ultraviolet fluorescence probe for detection of volatile organic hydrocarbons in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Morlock, C.R.

    1995-12-31

    The authors have developed a miniature ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence device for measuring volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in ground water. The device consists of a mercury vapor lamp, excitation filter, sample chamber, emission filter and a miniature photomultiplier tube. Filters are chosen for optimal fluorescence signals from BTEX compounds. The prototype device is a benchtop model where a water sample is introduced into a sample chamber. Fluorescence is measured for the water/contaminant mix. This is followed by an air purge of the water to eliminate all volatile compounds. A second fluorescence measurement is taken after the purge. Any detected fluorescent after the purge results from system noise or fluorescence of substances other than VOCs. By rationing the two fluorescence measurements the authors arrive at a number which is proportional to VOC concentration. The results indicated that the authors can detect BTEX compounds in the sub-ppm range. The authors are currently designing an instrument to be lowered into a bore hole for continuous depth profiling and in situ measurement. They believe that it will be possible to build a device suitable for installation within a cone penetrometer or other sounding device. The intended use of the instrument is for rapid in situ assessment of VOCs and for permanent installation in a well for long term monitoring. The cost of all components that are part of this device is less than $2000.

  14. In situ measurement of reactive neutral constituents in the thermosphere by atomic and molecular resonance fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    The Tethered Satellite System in combination with in situ atomic and molecular resonance fluorescence techniques can treat the problem of simultaneously determining the absolute density of atomic and molecular species known to control the photochemical structure of the upper atmosphere. Two familities of reactants which can be treated by these techniques are the nitrogen oxygen family and the hydrogen oxygen family.

  15. In situ identification of nocardioform actinomycetes in activated sludge using fluorescent rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Schuppler, M; Wagner, M; Schön, G; Göbel, U B

    1998-01-01

    Hitherto, few environmental samples have been investigated by a 'full cycle rRNA analysis'. Here the results of in situ hybridization experiments with specific rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes developed on the basis of new sequences derived from a previously described comparative 16S rRNA analysis of nocardioform actinomycetes in activated sludge are reported. Application of the specific probes enabled identification and discrimination of the distinct populations of nocardioform actinomycetes in activated sludge. One of the specific probes (DLP) detected rod-shaped bacteria which were found in 13 of the 16 investigated sludge samples from various wastewater treatment plants, suggesting their importance in the wastewater treatment process. Another probe (GLP2) hybridized with typically branched filaments of nocardioforms mainly found in samples from enhanced biological phosphorus removal plants, suggesting that these bacteria are involved in sludge foaming. The combination of in situ hybridization with fluorescently labelled rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes and confocal laser scanning microscopy improved the detection of nocardioform actinomycetes, which often showed only weak signals inside the activated-sludge flocs. PMID:9467916

  16. Analysis of chromosome segregation during mammalian meiosis using combined immunofluorescence and fluorescence in situ hubridization

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, P.A.; Embury, P.B.; Mroz, K.M.

    1994-09-01

    Meiotic non-disjunction is thought to occur in 10-20% of all human oocytes, making this the most common genetic abnormality in our species. Aberrant recombination has been implicated in the genesis of these errors; however, direct studies of the meiotic process have been hampered by the lack of material and appropriate technology. We have developed a technique for the evaluation of meiosis in intact mammalian oocytes that combines immunofluorescence and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This allows for simultaneous, 3-dimensional visualization of the meiotic spindle, the alignment of the chromosomes on the spindle, and the placement of specific chromosomes. We have used this technology to follow meiotic progression in oocytes from XO female mice to evaluate the behavior of an unsynapsed chromosome during mammalian meiosis. Perturbations in chromosome behavior are evident early in meiosis: during the formation of the first meiotic spindle, the univalent X chromosome is properly positioned. With the onset of anaphase, the single X chromosome most commonly segregates as an intact chromosome, although equational segregation of the X chromatids is seen in a significant minority (approximately 20%) of oocytes. These observations demonstrate that failure of pairing/recombination can result in segregation of sister chromatids at meiosis I. This has obvious implications for human non-disjunction, much of which is thought to be due to recombination deficiencies; accordingly, we are now extending our studies to include analyses of human oocytes.

  17. A capillary-based probe for in situ detection of enhanced fluorescence signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, F.; Xiao, R.; Zhu, A. N.; Shi, H. C.; Wang, S. Q.

    2013-07-01

    A simple, compact, and high sensitivity capillary-based probe for the in situ detection of fluorescence signals with high sensitivity is demonstrated. A home-made single-multi-mode fiber coupler that is coaxially aligned with the capillary-based probe provides for the transmission of excitation light and the collection and transmission of fluorescence. We propose a conceptually straightforward theoretical model to optimize the factors affecting the fluorescence-capture capability of the capillary-based probe. The fluorescence signal detected by fiber-optic spectroscopy non-linearly increases with the length of the capillary-based probe. In addition, the thicker the capillary tube wall is, the less the fluorescence signals determined are. The performance of the proposed probe is evaluated experimentally by measuring the fluorescence spectra of Cy5.5 dye and blue-green algae. The experimental results show that the proposed probe provides more than a ten-fold increase in fluorescence signal compared with direct measurements by a flat-tipped multi-mode fiber probe. The advantages of the capillary-based probe, which include its simple and compact structure, excellent light collection efficiency, requirement of small sample volume, and recoverability of samples, allow its wide application to in situ detection in the medical, forensic, biological, geological, and environmental fields with high sensitivity.

  18. A target-induced fluorescent nanoparticle for in situ monitoring of Zn(II).

    PubMed

    John, Carrie L; Huan, Yanfu; Wu, Xu; Jin, Yuhui; Pierce, David T; Zhao, Julia Xiaojun

    2013-09-01

    A target-induced fluorescent silica nanoparticle has been developed for the identification, enrichment and in situ determination of trace amounts of zinc(II). The nanoparticle combines the advantages of target-induced fluorescent compounds and the small size of the nanomaterial to produce a new, smarter nanosignaling material that is capable of selectively enriching a target and detecting a specific binding process in one step. As the target analyte, Zn(II), changes the fluorescence characteristics of the nanoparticle and effectively 'turns on' the fluorescence signal, no separation step is needed to confirm or quantify the binding process. The designed nanoparticle was characterized by several aspects prior to monitoring of Zn(II) in situ. The interferences from common metal ions were studied in detail. The photostability and reversibility of the sensing materials were investigated as well. The ability of this nanoparticle to detect the target Zn(II) provides a great advantage for in situ monitoring targets in biological samples under the fluorescence microscope. PMID:23799230

  19. In situ monitoring of ocean chlorophyll via laser-induced fluorescence backscattering through an optical fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Cowles, T.J.; Moum, J.N.; Desiderio, R.A.; Angel, S.M.

    1989-02-01

    The first seagoing test of a prototype laser/fiber-optic system for in situ detection of ocean chlorophyll fluorescence is described. Radiation at 488 nm originating from a shipboard argon laser was transmitted through 20 of 200-..mu..m core optical fiber to the distal tip mounted on the microstructure profiler, the Rapid Sampling Vertical Profiler. The backscattered fluorescence emission signal was collected through the same fiber and processed on board ship. A series of measurements indicated that (1) successful isolation of ship-induced vibrations could be achieved using our optical bench framework to maintain optical alignments; (2) ambient chlorophyll concentrations could be detected in situ; (3) a Raman scattering signal from water could also be detected and should provide an internal standard against which chlorophyll fluorescence may be calibrated.

  20. Quantifying the photothermal efficiency of gold nanoparticles using tryptophan as an in situ fluorescent thermometer.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Ming-Jui; Chu, Li-Kang

    2015-07-14

    The photothermal efficiencies, denoting the efficiency of transducing incident light to heat, of gold nanoparticles of different diameters (∅ = 22-86 nm) were quantified upon exposure at 532 nm. The fluorescence of tryptophan at 300-450 nm upon 280 nm excitation serves as an in situ fluorescent thermometer to illustrate the evolution of the average temperature change in the heating volume of the nanoparticle solution. The fluorescence intensity decreases as the temperature increases, having a linear gradient of 2.05% fluorescence decrease per degree Celsius increment from 20 to 45 °C. The presence of gold nanoparticles at the nM level does not perturb the temperature-dependent fluorescence of tryptophan in terms of fluorescence contour and temperature response. The heating volume was defined by overlapping the collimated 532 nm laser (∅ = 0.83 mm) for exciting the nanoparticles and the 280 nm continuous-wave beam (∅ = 0.81 mm) for exciting tryptophan in a 2 mm × 2 mm square tube, and the fluorescence was collected perpendicularly to the collinear alignment. This method has satisfactory reproducibility and a sufficient temperature detectivity of 0.2 °C. The profiles of the average temperature evolution of the mixtures containing nanoparticles and tryptophan were derived from the evolution of fluorescence and analyzed using collective energy balancing. The relative photothermal efficiencies for different sizes of gold nanoparticles with respect to the 22 nm nanoparticle agree with those predicted using Mie theory. The employment of tryptophan as a fluorescent thermometer not only provides an in situ tool to monitor the photothermal effect of nanostructures but is also applicable to thermal imaging in biological applications. PMID:26068797

  1. Understanding aquatic microbial processes using EEM's and in-situ fluorescence sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Bethany; Attridge, John; Rushworth, Cathy; Cox, Tim; Anesio, Alexandre; Reynolds, Darren

    2015-04-01

    The diverse origin of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in aquatic systems is well documented within the literature. Previous literature indicates that coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is, in part, transformed by aquatic microbial processes, and that dissolved organic material derived from a microbial origin exhibits tryptophan-like fluorescence. However, this phenomenon is not fully understood and very little data is available within the current literature. The overall aim of our work is to reveal the microbial-CDOM interactions that give rise to the observed tryptophan-like fluorescence. The work reported here investigates the microbial processes that occur within freshwater aquatic samples, as defined by the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) test, as a function of the T1 peak (λex/em 280/330-370 nm). A series of standard water samples were prepared using glucose, glutamic acid, BOD dilution water and a bacterial seed (Cole-Parmer BOD microbe capsules). Samples were spiked with CDOM (derived from an environmental water body) and subjected to time resolved BOD analysis and as excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy. All EEM spectral data was interrogated using parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) in an attempt to determine the presence and dominance (relative intensities) of the CDOM-related and T1-related fluorophores within the samples. In-situ fluorescence sensors (Chelsea Technologies Group Ltd.) were also used to monitor the T1 fluorescence peak (UviLux Tryptophan) and the CDOM fluorescence peak (UviLux CDOM) during experiments. Tryptophan-like fluorescence was observed (albeit transient) in both spiked and un-spiked standard water samples. By furthering our understanding of aquatic organic matter fluorescence, its origin, transformation, fate and interaction with aquatic microbiological processes, we aim to inform the design of a new generation in-situ fluorescence sensor for the monitoring of aquatic ecosystem health.

  2. In Situ Growth of In2S3 Nanorods in Poly(3-Hexylthiophene) Hybrid Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cota-Leal, M.; Sotelo-Lerma, M.; Corona-Corona, I.; Quevedo-Lopez, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    A novel and efficient gas-liquid method for the in situ synthesis of In2S3 nanorods in a poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) matrix is demonstrated. The method involves a self-contained reaction between Na2S and HCl that produces H2S, which reacts with a P3HT/InCl3 solution resulting in hybrid P3HT/In2S3 films. The Na2S solution is regenerated for further use. The method yielded results in In2S3 nanoparticles and nanorods in a P3HT matrix, as observed by transmission electron microscopy. The In2S3 nanorods are 3 nm wide and ~30 nm long. The size of the nanorods is dependent on the P3HT concentration. The band gap (E g) of the resulting In2S3/P3HT is in the range of 2.97-3.71 eV, as measured by UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) Charge transfer in the In2S3/P3HT was demonstrated by the presence of quenching in the fluorescence spectra of the composite. Chemical composition was investigated by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis, as well as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Both techniques demonstrated the formation of In2S3.

  3. In situ Synthesis of Fluorescent Gold Nanoclusters by Nontumorigenic Microglial Cells.

    PubMed

    West, Abby L; Schaeublin, Nicole M; Griep, Mark H; Maurer-Gardner, Elizabeth I; Cole, Daniel P; Fakner, Alexis M; Hussain, Saber M; Karna, Shashi P

    2016-08-24

    To date, the directed in situ synthesis of fluorescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) has only been demonstrated in cancerous cells, with the theorized synthesis mechanism prohibiting AuNC formation in nontumorigenic cell lines. This limitation hinders potential biostabilized AuNC-based technology in healthy cells involving both chemical and mechanical analysis, such as the direct sensing of protein function and the elucidation of local mechanical environments. Thus, new synthesis strategies are required to expand the application space of AuNCs beyond cancer-focused cellular studies. In this contribution, we have developed the methodology and demonstrated the direct in situ synthesis of AuNCs in the nontumorigenic neuronal microglial line, C8B4. The as-synthesized AuNCs form in situ and are stabilized by cellular proteins. The clusters exhibit bright green fluorescence and demonstrate low (<10%) toxicity. Interestingly, elevated ROS levels were not required for the in situ formation of AuNCs, although intracellular reductants such as glutamate were required for the synthesis of AuNCs in C8B4 cells. To our knowledge, this is the first-ever demonstration of AuNC synthesis in nontumorigenic cells and, as such, it considerably expands the application space of biostabilized fluorescent AuNCs. PMID:27328035

  4. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded nodal non-Hodgkin's lymphomas demonstrate the same chromosome changes as those found in frozen samples: a comparative study using interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Godon, Alban; Genevieve, Franck; Valo, Isabelle; Josselin, Nicolas; Talmant, Pascaline; Foussard, Charles; Avet-Loiseau, Herve; Ifrah, Nobert; Zandecki, Marc; Rousselet, Marie-Christine

    2004-06-01

    Cytogenetic studies in lymphomas classically require fresh or frozen tissue, whereas in many instances only paraffin-embedded biopsies are available. We applied an interphase FISH assay on nuclei extracted from thick paraffin sections to determine accuracy of molecular cytogenetics in such samples. Twenty-three lymphoma samples and 4 reactive lymph nodes were tested with various commercially available DNA probes, and hybridization patterns were compared with those obtained on frozen nuclei counterparts. Successful hybridization with all probes tested was observed for 23/27 (85%) paraffin-embedded tissues and for all (100%) frozen samples, and cut-off levels defining positivity were superimposable for both situations. Chromosome changes were detected in the same way, without any false-positive or false-negative cases. Hybridization signals observed on dewaxed samples were either those classically expected to define the relevant chromosome change or were atypical: all atypical changes could be demonstrated also into nuclei from the frozen counterpart. Moreover, all typical and atypical chromosome changes observed on frozen nuclei were also detected in paraffin-embedded tissues. Our study shows that our interphase FISH assay performed on paraffin-embedded samples is a valuable alternate to conventional methods to ascertain diagnosis of lymphomas as to include patients into therapeutic trials. PMID:15167011

  5. [Non-radioactive in situ hybridization of alpha-satellite sequences in cytogenetic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Perfumo, C; Arslanian, A; Zara, F; Piombo, G; Pierluigi, M

    1992-01-01

    Non isotopic in situ hybridization with alpha-satellite DNA probes in the cytogenetic diagnosis. Standard banding cytogenetic techniques do not always allow to define the structure and the origin of chromosome rearrangements involving the centromere region. Non-isotopic in situ hybridization of alphoid sequences has allowed to determine the origin of the centromeres in the metaphases of 5 patients referred to us for: 2 structural rearrangements involving chromosome 21, 2 structural rearrangements involving chromosome Y and 1 reciprocal translocation involving on chromosome 20 and one chromosome 15. PMID:1465321

  6. Portable fluorescence spectroscopy platform for Huanglongbing (HLB) citrus disease in situ detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mota, Alessandro D.; Rossi, Giuliano; de Castro, Guilherme Cunha; Ortega, Tiago A.; de Castro N., Jarbas C.

    2014-02-01

    In this work, the development of a portable fluorescence spectroscopy platform for Huanglongbing (HLB) citrus disease in situ detection is presented. The equipment consists of an excitation blue LED light source, a commercial miniature spectrometer and embedded software. Measurements of healthy, HLB-symptomatic and HLB-asymptomatic citrus leafs were performed. Leafs were excited with the blue LED and their fluorescence spectra collected. Embedded electronics and software were responsible for the spectrum processing and classification via partial least squares regression. Global success rates above 80% and 100% distinction of healthy and HLB-symptomatic leafs were obtained.

  7. Improved method of detecting the ERG gene rearrangement in prostate cancer using combined dual-color chromogenic and silver in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Braun, Martin; Stomper, Julia; Boehm, Diana; Vogel, Wenzel; Scheble, Veit J; Wernert, Nicolas; Shaikhibrahim, Zaki; Fend, Falko; Kristiansen, Glen; Perner, Sven

    2012-07-01

    The recently detected TMPRSS2-ERG fusion gene was revealed as a recurrent and prevalent prostate cancer (PCa)-specific event, potentially qualifying it for clinical use. To detect this alteration, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is the method of choice. However, FISH has some disadvantages for widespread adoption in clinical practice. Subsequently, chromogenic in situ hybridization, which uses organic chromogens, and enzymatic metallography silver in situ hybridization have emerged as promising bright-field alternatives. Compared with chromogenic in situ hybridization, silver in situ hybridization signals are very distinct and superior with regard to signal clarity and resolution, but the method excludes multicolor protocols. Based on the ERG break-apart FISH assay, we established a dual-color ERG break-apart assay using combined chromogenic in situ hybridization and silver in situ hybridization (CS-ISH) and compared these results with those obtained by FISH. We assessed 178 PCa and 10 benign specimens for their ERG rearrangement status by applying dual-color FISH and CS-ISH ERG break-apart assays to consecutive sections. We observed a highly significant concordance (97.7%) between FISH- and CS-ISH-based results (Pearson's correlation coefficient = 0.955, P < 0.001). Our findings demonstrate that the ERG rearrangement status can reliably be assessed by CS-ISH. Further, the CS-ISH technique combines the accuracy and precision of FISH with the ease of bright-field microscopy. This tool allows a much broader spectrum of applications in which to study the biological role and clinical use of ERG rearrangements in PCa. PMID:22642898

  8. Application of portable in situ UV fluorescence sensors in natural and engineered aquatic systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Bethany; Rushworth, Cathy; Atrridge, John

    2016-04-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) is ubiquitous throughout aquatic systems. This heterogeneous mixture of organic matter is central for aquatic ecosystems and, both local and global, biogeochemical cycling. Improvements in technology and data analysis has allowed for advances in the understanding and characterisation of aquatic organic matter. However, much of the technological expansions have focussed on benchtop instruments. In recent years, there has been interest in the continued development of portable in situ sensors for monitoring NOM characteristics within a wide range of applications, spanning both natural and engineered systems. The UviLux (Chelsea Technologies Group Ltd., UK) is an in situ portable UV fluorescence sensor that can be configured to monitor a range of NOM in aquatic systems, as well as anthropogenic inputs such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and optical brighteners. Here we will focus on the use of the Tryptophan and CDOM UviLux sensors across a variety of applications in both natural systems, such as rivers and leachate into groundwater, and engineered systems, including drinking water and waste water treatment. Recent work has focused on standardising the fluorescence output across the UviLux range of sensors, reporting data in quinine sulphate units (QSU), which enables the output from two different fluorometers to be directly compared both to each other, and to bench-top data. A key advantage of deploying multiple sensors is the ability to fingerprint the fluorescence, by providing, for example, a Tryptophan/CDOM ratio. From the data collected, the ratio of the different fluorescence regions has been shown to provide more robust in situ data and help identify true temporal variations and patterns across multiple applications and sampling locations.

  9. Progress in molecular diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth-disease type 1 (CMT 1, HMSN I) and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-detection of a potential genetic mosaicism

    SciTech Connect

    Bathke, K.; Liehr. T.; Ekici, A.

    1994-09-01

    We tested 20 CMT 1 patients characterized according to the criteria of the European CMT consortium by Southern hybridization of MspI restricted genomic DNA with probes pVAW409R1, pVAW412Hec and pEW401HE. In 11 of the 20 CMT 1 cases (55%), we observed a duplication in 17q11.2; one patient had a dinucleotide insertion in exon 6 of the PO-gene (5%). One HNPP case had a typical 17p11.2 deletion. Analysis of CA-repeats was performed with primers RM11GT and Mfd41; SSCP-analysis of the PO, PMP22 and Cx32-genes is in progress. FISH was carried out with probe pVAW409R1. 125 interphase nuclei were analyzed for each proband by counting the signals per nucleus. Normal cells show a characteristic distribution of signals: 1 signal in 5.9% of nuclei, 2 in 86.3% and 3 in 7.8%. A duplication is indicated by a shift to 3 signals in more than approximately 60% and 2 in less than 25% of the nuclei. In contrast, the 17p11.2 deletion of the HNPP patient shifts to 82.4% of nuclei with a single hybridization signal versus 14.4% with 2 signals. We detected one case with significantly abnormal distribution of interphase nuclei hybridization signals compared to cultures of normal cells and to those with 17p11.2 duplication or deletion: 3.2% nuclei revealed 1 signal, 48.0% two signals and 48.8% 3 signals, indicating a pathogenic but moderate dosis increase compared to the throughout duplicated cases. FISH with probe pVAW409R1 is a versatile tool to detect the HNPP deletion both in interphase nuclei and in metaphase chromosomes. In CMT 1 disease interphase nuclei are required for FISH analysis due to the small duplication of 1.5 Mbp. In contrast to Southern techniques, FISH is able to detect genetic mosaicism.

  10. Fluorescence in situ detection of human cutaneous melanoma: study of diagnostic parameters of the method.

    PubMed

    Chwirot, B W; Chwirot, S; Sypniewska, N; Michniewicz, Z; Redzinski, J; Kurzawski, G; Ruka, W

    2001-12-01

    Multicenter study of the diagnostic parameters was conducted by three groups in Poland to determine if in situ fluorescence detection of human cutaneous melanoma based on digital imaging of spectrally resolved autofluorescence can be used as a tool for a preliminary selection of patients at increased risk of the disease. Fluorescence examinations were performed for 7228 pigmented lesions in 4079 subjects. Histopathologic examinations showed 56 cases of melanoma. A sensitivity of fluorescence detection of melanoma was 82.7% in agreement with 82.5% found in earlier work. Using as a reference only the results of histopathologic examinations obtained for 568 cases we found a specificity of 59.9% and a positive predictive value of 17.5% (melanomas versus all pigmented lesions) or 24% (melanomas versus common and dysplastic naevi). The specificity and positive predictive value found in this work are significantly lower than reported earlier but still comparable with those reported for typical screening programs. In conclusion, the fluorescence method of in situ detection of melanoma can be used in screening large populations of patients for a selection of patients who should be examined by specialists. PMID:11886507

  11. Fluorescent In Situ Targeting Probes for Rapid Imaging of Ovarian-Cancer-Specific γ-Glutamyltranspeptidase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feiyi; Zhu, Ying; Zhou, Li; Pan, Liang; Cui, Zhifen; Fei, Qiang; Luo, Sihang; Pan, Dun; Huang, Qing; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Chunchang; Tian, He; Fan, Chunhai

    2015-06-15

    γ-Glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT) is a tumor biomarker that selectively catalyzes the cleavage of glutamate overexpressed on the plasma membrane of tumor cells. Here, we developed two novel fluorescent in situ targeting (FIST) probes that specifically target GGT in tumor cells, which comprise 1) a GGT-specific substrate unit (GSH), and 2) a boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) moiety for fluorescent signalling. In the presence of GGT, sulfur-substituted BODIPY was converted to amino-substituted BODIPY, resulting in dramatic fluorescence variations. By exploiting this enzyme-triggered photophysical property, we employed these FIST probes to monitor the GGT activity in living cells, which showed remarkable differentiation between ovarian cancer cells and normal cells. These probes represent two first-generation chemodosimeters featuring enzyme-mediated rapid, irreversible aromatic hydrocarbon transfer between the sulfur and nitrogen atoms accompanied by switching of photophysical properties. PMID:25940513

  12. Soil characterization by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence: sampling strategy for in situ analysis.

    PubMed

    Custo, Graciela; Boeykens, Susana; Dawidowski, L; Fox, L; Gómez, D; Luna, F; Vázquez, Cristina

    2005-07-01

    This work describes a sampling strategy that will allow the use of portable EDXRF (energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence) instruments for "in situ" soil analysis. The methodology covers a general approach to planning field investigations for any type of environmental studies and it was applied for a soil characterization study in the zone of Campana, Argentina, by evaluating data coming from an EDXRF spectrometer with a radioisotope excitation source. Simulating non-treated sampled as "in situ" samples and a soil characterization for Campana area was intended. "In situ" EDXRF methodology is a powerful analytical modality with the advantage of providing data immediately, allowing a fast general screening of the soil composition. PMID:16038489

  13. In Situ Biosynthesis of Fluorescent Platinum Nanoclusters: Toward Self-Bioimaging-Guided Cancer Theranostics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Donghua; Zhao, Chunqiu; Ye, Jing; Li, Qiwei; Liu, Xiaoli; Su, Meina; Jiang, Hui; Amatore, Christian; Selke, Matthias; Wang, Xuemei

    2015-08-19

    Among the noble-metal clusters, very few reports about platinum clusters were used as bioimaging probes of tumors except as a reducing catalyst. It is first established herein that the biocompatible platinum nanoclusters are spontaneously biosynthesized by cancerous cells (i.e., HepG2 (human hepatocarcinoma), A549 (lung cancer), and others) rather than noncancerous cells (i.e., L02 (human embryo liver cells)) when incubated with micromolar chloroplatinic acid solutions. These in situ biosynthesized platinum nanoclusters could be readily realized in a biological environment and emit a bright fluorescence at 460 nm, which could be further utilized to facilitate an excellent cancer-cell-killing efficiency when combined with porphyrin derivatives for photothermal treatment. This raises the possibility of providing a promising and precise bioimaging strategy for specific fluorescent self-biomarking of tumor locations and realizing fluorescence imaging-guided photothermal therapy of tumors. PMID:26227621

  14. A PDMS-Based Cylindrical Hybrid Lens for Enhanced Fluorescence Detection in Microfluidic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bor-Shyh; Yang, Yu-Ching; Ho, Chong-Yi; Yang, Han-Yu; Wang, Hsiang-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic systems based on fluorescence detection have been developed and applied for many biological and chemical applications. Because of the tiny amount of sample in the system; the induced fluorescence can be weak. Therefore, most microfluidic systems deploy multiple optical components or sophisticated equipment to enhance the efficiency of fluorescence detection. However, these strategies encounter common issues of complex manufacturing processes and high costs. In this study; a miniature, cylindrical and hybrid lens made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to improve the fluorescence detection in microfluidic systems is proposed. The hybrid lens integrates a laser focusing lens and a fluorescence collecting lens to achieve dual functions and simplify optical setup. Moreover, PDMS has advantages of low-cost and straightforward fabrication compared with conventional optical components. The performance of the proposed lens is first examined with two fluorescent dyes and the results show that the lens provides satisfactory enhancement for fluorescence detection of Rhodamine 6G and Nile Red. The overall increments in collected fluorescence signal and detection sensitivity are more than 220% of those without lens, and the detection limits of Rhodamine 6G and Nile red are lowered to 0.01 μg/mL and 0.05 μg/mL, respectively. The hybrid lens is further applied to the detection of Nile red-labeled Chlorella vulgaris cells and it increases both signal intensity and detection sensitivity by more than 520%. The proposed hybrid lens also dramatically reduces the variation in detected signal caused by the deviation in incident angle of excitation light. PMID:24531300

  15. Laser fluorescence quantification of remineralisation in situ of incipient enamel lesions: influence of fluoride supplements.

    PubMed

    al-Khateeb, S; Oliveby, A; de Josselin de Jong, E; Angmar-Månsson, B

    1997-01-01

    The aims of this study were to test the laser fluorescence method for quantification of remineralisation in situ of enamel with incipient lesions and to evaluate the enhancement of remineralisation by fluoride (F) supplements when a F dentifrice was used on a regular basis by healthy young subjects. Enamel samples were cut from extracted premolar teeth with the natural surface kept intact, and subjected to a pH-cycling system to produce subsurface demineralisation in vitro. The enamel blocks were then inserted into composite holders bonded to the buccal surfaces of both upper first molars of 12 panelists. Each panelist participated in 3 separate experiments in a randomised order; each lasted for 5 weeks with washout intervals of 2 weeks between experiments; experiment 1: F dentifrice (0.145% F as NaF) only; experiment 2: F dentrifice + F lozenges (0.25 mg F x 6/day); experiment 3: F dentifrice + F chewing-gum (0.25 mg F x 6/day). Fluorescence radiance was measured before, during, and after in vitro demineralisation, and once a week during the in situ experimental periods. The enamel samples were then sectioned and analysed with transverse microradiography (TMR). Anova and Pearson correlation coefficient were used for the statistical analysis. At the end of the 5-week in situ periods, fluorescence radiance had been regained to a level of 80-100% of the value before in vitro demineralisation, indicating remineralisation of the enamel samples. There were no differences in the fluorescence radiance gain between the 3 different F exposures. However, there was a statistically significant time trend (p < 0.001), and a highly significant linear dependence (p < 0.001) between the final measurements obtained with the laser fluorescence method (LAF) and the data obtained from TMR, r = 0.76. It was concluded that: (1) with the sensitive LAF method it was possible to register the small changes in the enamel week by week during in situ remineralisation: (2) when F dentrifice was

  16. FLUORESCENT IN SITU DETECTION OF ENCEPHALITOZOON HELLEM SPORES WITH A 6-CARBOXYFLUORESCEIN-LABELED RIBOSOMAL RNA-TARGETED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fluroescent in situ hybridization assay has been developed for the detection of the human-pathogenic microsporidian, Encephalitozoon hellem in water samples using epifluorescence microscopy. The assay employs a 19-nucleotide species-specific 6-carboxyfluorescein-labeled oligonu...

  17. Identification of a tumor marker chromosome by flow sorting, DNA amplification in vitro, and in situ hybridization of the amplified product

    SciTech Connect

    Boschman, G.; Rens, W.; Slater, R.; Aten, J. ); Buys, C.; Veen, A. van der; Osinga, J. )

    1993-01-01

    A method combining flow sorting and molecular cytogenetic techniques was used to identify an unknown marker chromosome in the bladder tumor cell line J82. The marker chromosome was isolated by dual parameter sorting after staining with Hoechst 33258 and chromomycin [Lambda]3. DNA amplification of 300 isolated chromosomes by polymerase chain reaction using the Alu-primer Bk33 and the Lines-primer LH5 was carried out. The DNA was labelled using Bio-11-dUTP and applied to human lymphocyte metaphase cells in a suppressive in situ hybridization procedure. Fluorescence was visible over chromosome 20 and over the distal one-half of 6p. Together the fluorescent regions accounted for only 60% of the marker length, indicating a possible duplication of chromosome 20 material. This was subsequently confirmed by applying bicolor in-situ hybridization using chromosome 6- and 20-specific DNA libraries to metaphase cells of the J82 culture.

  18. Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ

    DOEpatents

    Christian, Allen T.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Tucker, James D.

    2002-01-01

    Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ to increase the amount of DNA associated with a chromosome or chromosome region is described. The amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ provides for the synthesis of Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) painting probes from single dissected chromosome fragments, the production of cDNA libraries from low copy mRNAs and improved in Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) procedures.

  19. Coexistence of t(15;17) and t(15;16;17) detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization in a patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, RUI; KIM, YOUNG-MI; WANG, XIANFU; LI, YAN; PANG, HUI; LEE, JI-YUN; LI, SHIBO

    2014-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is characterized by the t(15;17)(q22;q21), which results in the fusion of the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) gene at 15q22 with the retinoic acid α-receptor (RARA) gene at 17q21. The current study presents the case of a 54-year-old female with APL carrying the atypical PML/RARA fusion signal due to a novel complex variant translocation t(15;16;17)(q22;q24;q21), as well as the classical PML/RARA fusion signal. Subsequent array comparative genomic hybridization revealed somatic, cryptic deletions on 3p25.3, 8q23.1 and 12p13.2-p13.1, and a duplication on 8q11.2; however, no genetic material loss or gain was observed in the breakpoint regions of chromosomes 15, 16 or 17. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the coexistence of two abnormal clones, one classical and one variant, presenting simultaneously in addition to cryptic chromosome segmental imbalances in an adult APL patient. PMID:25120648

  20. Fluorescent in situ sequencing (FISSEQ) of RNA for gene expression profiling in intact cells and tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Je Hyuk; Daugharthy, Evan R.; Scheiman, Jonathan; Kalhor, Reza; Ferrante, Thomas C.; Terry, Richard; Turczyk, Brian M.; Yang, Joyce L.; Lee, Ho Suk; Aach, John; Zhang, Kun; Church, George M.

    2014-01-01

    RNA sequencing measures the quantitative change in gene expression over the whole transcriptome, but it lacks spatial context. On the other hand, in situ hybridization provides the location of gene expression, but only for a small number of genes. Here we detail a protocol for genome-wide profiling of gene expression in situ in fixed cells and tissues, in which RNA is converted into cross-linked cDNA amplicons and sequenced manually on a confocal microscope. Unlike traditional RNA-seq our method enriches for context-specific transcripts over house-keeping and/or structural RNA, and it preserves the tissue architecture for RNA localization studies. Our protocol is written for researchers experienced in cell microscopy with minimal computing skills. Library construction and sequencing can be completed within 14 d, with image analysis requiring an additional 2 d. PMID:25675209

  1. In situ microbial detection in Mojave Desert soil using native fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Smith, H D; Duncan, A G; Neary, P L; Lloyd, C R; Anderson, A J; Sims, R C; McKay, C P

    2012-03-01

    We report on the use of a portable instrument for microbial detection in the Mojave Desert soil and the potential for its use on Mars. The instrument is based on native fluorescence and employs four excitation wavelengths combined with four emission wavelengths. A soil dilution series in which known numbers of Bacillus subtilis spores were added to soil was used to determine the sensitivity of the instrument. We found that the fluorescence of the biological and organic components of the desert soil samples studied can be as strong as the fluorescence of the mineral component of these soils. Using the calibration derived from B. subtilis spores, we estimated that microbial content at our primary sampling site was 10(7) bacteria per gram of soil, a level confirmed by phospholipid fatty acid analysis. At a nearby site, but in a slightly different geological setting, we tested the instrument's ability to map out microbial concentrations in situ. Over a ∼50 m diameter circle, soil microbial concentrations determined with the B. subtilis calibration indicate that the concentrations of microorganisms detected varies from 10(4) to 10(7) cells per gram of soil. We conclude that fluorescence is a promising method for detecting soil microbes in noncontact applications in extreme environments on Earth and may have applications on future missions to Mars. PMID:22352702

  2. Towards in situ fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy investigations of asphaltene precipitation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Franco, Juliana C; Gonçalves, Grasiele; Souza, Monique S; Rosa, Samantha B C; Thiegue, Larissa M; Atvars, Teresa D Z; Rosa, Paulo T V; Nome, René A

    2013-12-16

    We perform a spectroscopic analysis of asphaltene in solution and in crude oil with the goal of designing an optical probe of asphaltene precipitation inside high-pressure cells. Quantitative analysis of steady-state spectroscopic data is employed to identify fluorescence and Raman contributions to the observed signals. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy indicates that fluorescence lifetime can be used as a spectroscopic probe of asphaltene in crude oil. Quantitative confocal laser-scanning microscopy studies of asphaltene in n-heptane are used to calculate particle-size distributions as a function of time, both at the sample surface and asphaltene interior. The resulting precipitation kinetics is well described by stochastic numerical simulations of diffusion-limited aggregation. Based on these results, we present the design and construction of an apparatus to optically probe the in situ precipitation of asphaltene suitable for studies inside high pressure cells. Design considerations include the use of a spatial light modulator for aberration correction in microscopy measurements, together with the design of epi-fluorescence spectrometer, both fiber-based and for remote sensing fluorescence spectroscopy. PMID:24514660

  3. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry for the detection of porcine cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Maki; Shibahara, Tomoyuki; Miyazaki, Ayako; Tajima, Tomoko; Shimizu, Shinya; Kabali, Emmanuel; Takano, Yoshiyuki; Sasaki, Yosuke; Kubo, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    To establish in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry based-assays for the detection of porcine cytomegalovirus, routinely processed renal tissue sections from 34 diseased piglets suspected of having the infection were obtained and examined. Using hematoxylin and eosin, porcine cytomegalovirus inclusion bodies were found in the nucleus of renal epithelial cells and capillary endothelial cells in the renal medulla in 30 cases. Inclusion bodies corresponding to porcine cytomegalovirus mRNA after in situ hybridization or porcine cytomegalovirus antigens after immunohistochemistry were easily determined. The cells were characterized by cytomegaly and basophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies. Using in situ hybridization, porcine cytomegalovirus mRNA were clearly detected in the nucleus and cytoplasm of the cells in 28 of the 30 (93.3%) cases. Using immunohistochemistry, porcine cytomegalovirus antigens were clearly detected in the cytoplasm of the cells in 21 of the 30 (70.0%) cases. Higher specificities and increased intensity of staining was observed with minimal background using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry compared with hematoxylin and eosin. Thus, the two established methods are useful and helpful tools for detecting the presence of a porcine cytomegalovirus infection. PMID:22008295

  4. Detection of Legionella species in potting mixes using fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH).

    PubMed

    Whiley, Harriet; Taylor, Michael; Bentham, Richard

    2011-09-01

    This study used Fluorescent in situ Hybridisation (FISH) with rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes combined with scanning confocal laser microscopy to successfully detect Legionella spp. in commercially available potting mix. A range of techniques were explored to optimise the FISH method by reducing background fluorescence and preventing non-specific binding of probes. These techniques included the use of a blocking agent, UV light treatment, image subtraction of a nonsense probe and spectral unmixing of specific probes fluorescence and autofluorescence dependent on the specific emission spectra of probe fluorophores. Spectral unmixing was the best microscopy technique for reducing background fluorescence and non-specific binding of probes was not observed. The rapid turnaround time and increased sensitivity of the FISH provides as an alternative to traditional culture methods, which are tedious and often give varied results. FISH is also advantageous compared to PCR methods as it provides information on the structure of the microbial community the bacteria is situated in. This study demonstrates that FISH could provide an alternative method for Legionella detection and enumeration in environmental samples. PMID:21683098

  5. Thiazole Orange Dimers in DNA: Fluorescent Base Substitutions with Hybridization Readout.

    PubMed

    Berndl, Sina; Dimitrov, Stoichko D; Menacher, Florian; Fiebig, Torsten; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim

    2016-02-12

    By using (S)-2-amino-1,3-propanediol as a linker, thiazole orange (TO) was incorporated in a dimeric form into DNA. The green fluorescence (λ=530 nm) of the intrastrand TO dimer is quenched, whereas the interstrand TO dimer shows a characteristic redshifted orange emission (λ=585 nm). Steady-state optical spectroscopic methods reveal that the TO dimer fluorescence is independent of the sequential base contexts. Time-resolved pump-probe measurements and excitation spectra reveal the coexistence of conformations, including mainly stacked TO dimers and partially unstacked ones, which yield exciton and excimer contributions to the fluorescence, respectively. The helicity of the DNA framework distorts the excitonic coupling. In particular, the interstrand TO dimer could be regarded as an excitonically interacting base pair with fluorescence readout for DNA hybridization. Finally, the use of this fluorescent readout was representatively demonstrated in molecular beacons. PMID:26773846

  6. Quantitative in situ hybridization for the study of gene expression at the regional and cellular levels.

    PubMed

    Le Moine, Catherine

    2003-08-01

    Quantitative in situ hybridization allows measurement of mRNA level modifications in a variety of experimental conditions. This analysis may be performed both at the regional anatomical and cellular levels by densitometry, neuronal counting and silver grain measurements. PMID:18428577

  7. Demonstration of tissue-specific gene expression by in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Angerer, L.M.; Cox, K.H.; Angerer, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    In situ hybridization has emerged as a valuable tool for the identification of individual cells expressing specific genes. Recently, methods have become sufficiently sensitive to detect mRNAs present at the level of only a few molecules per cell. When mRNAs are expressed in only a small fraction of the cells in a mixed population, in situ hybridization may be the most sensitive nucleic acid hybridization technique available. The authors' laboratory has shown that antisense RNA probes offer a unique combination of advantages for detection of individual mRNAs by in situ hybridization. Most importantly, antisense probes provide a large increase in sensitivity due to the absence of competing probe self-reassociation. The high stability of RNA-RNA duplexes allows use of higher post hybridization wash temperatures to achieve a given fidelity of base pairing (stringency), which also reduced backgrounds. RNA transcripts can be synthesized from truncated templates such that they are essentially devoid of vector sequences. This sequence purity maximizes the signal to noise ratio since lower probe concentrations are required to saturate target RNAs.

  8. Delineation of HER2 Gene Status in Breast Carcinoma by Silver in Situ Hybridization is Reproducible among Laboratories and Pathologists

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Antonino; Botti, Gerardo; Gloghini, Annunziata; Simone, Gianni; Truini, Mauro; Curcio, Maria Pia; Gasparini, Patrizia; Mangia, Anita; Perin, Tiziana; Salvi, Sandra; Testi, Adele; Verderio, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    An automated enzyme metallographic silver in situ hybridization method (SISH) has been reported to successfully determine human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) gene amplification. We evaluated the staining and interpretative reproducibility of the HER2 SISH assay at five laboratories and compared SISH results with other in situ hybridization (ISH) methods. The HER2 gene status of 89 breast carcinomas was analyzed in parallel using manual dual-color fluorescence ISH, manual chromogenic ISH, and bright-field automated SISH. A total of 1098 SISH-stained slides were evaluated. For comparison, all specimens were stained by 4B5 immunohistochemistry for HER2 protein expression. Interpretation was performed by pathologists at five different laboratories using the algorithms provided by the manufacturers and the guidelines of American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists. Staining and interpretative reproducibility were measured through the computation of weighted kappa statistics. Following the optimization of SISH staining, 1077/1098 (98%) of slides were evaluable. Excellent reproducibility and efficacy of HER2 SISH staining, and interobserver interpretation (Kw = 0.91), were observed among five sites. For the 89 invasive breast cancer cases, the overall rate of concordance between consensus 4B5 and consensus SISH, fluorescence ISH, and chromogenic ISH was 96.6% (86/89), 97.8% (87/89), and 96.6% (86/89), respectively. Overall concordance between positive and negative SISH and fluorescence ISH results, as well as between individual and consensus positive and negative SISH results, was excellent (P < 0.001). PMID:18832456

  9. microRNA in situ hybridization for miR-211 detection as an ancillary test in melanoma diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Babapoor, Sankhiros; Horwich, Michael; Wu, Rong; Levinson, Shauna; Gandhi, Manoj; Makkar, Hanspaul; Kristjansson, Arni; Chang, Mary; Dadras, Soheil S

    2016-05-01

    Some melanocytic tumors can be histologically ambiguous causing diagnostic difficulty, which could lead to overtreatment of benign lesions with an unwarranted psychological distress or undertreatment of malignant cancers. Previously, we demonstrated that significantly decreased miR-211 expression in melanomas compared with melanocytic nevi could accurately discriminate malignant from benign tumors. Herein we show microRNA in situ hybridization for fluorescent detection of miR-211, suitable for paraffin-embedded tissues in 109 primary melanocytic tumors. miR-211 expression was significantly lower in melanomas vs nevi (P<0.0001), and receiver operating characteristic curve (area under the curve=0.862) accurately discriminated melanomas from nevi with 90% sensitivity and 86.2% specificity. Qualitatively, all dysplastic nevi expressed miR-211 at high (86%) and low (14%) levels, independent of the degree of nuclear atypia. All 35 melanocytic tumors with Spitz morphology expressed miR-211 independent of morphological classification, where clinical follow-up of these patients showed no recurrence at the site or metastasis in mean and median of 3 (ranging 2-5) years. Moreover, a decision tree learning analysis selected age and miR-211 miRNA in situ hybridization as the predictive variables for benign or malignant outcome in 88 patients correctly classified 92% (81 out of 88) of cases as proven by receiver operating characteristic curve (area under the curve=0.9029). These results support miR-211 as a leading miRNA candidate for melanoma diagnosis and miRNA in situ hybridization as a uniquely uncomplicated ancillary test. PMID:26916074

  10. Transformation and segregation of GFP fluorescence and glyphosate resistance in horseweed (Conyza canadensis) hybrids.

    PubMed

    Halfhill, Matthew D; Good, Laura L; Basu, Chhandak; Burris, Jason; Main, Christopher L; Mueller, Thomas C; Stewart, C Neal

    2007-03-01

    The goal of this research was to generate a breeding population of horseweed segregating for glyphosate resistance. In order to generate a marker to select between hybrids of glyphosate resistant (GR) and glyphosate susceptible (GS) horseweed, a GR horseweed accession from western Tennessee was transformed with a green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene. The GFP marker allowed for the simple and accurate determination of GR hybrid plants by visual observation. GR plants were shown to be transgenic via the green fluorescence under UV light, and resistant to glyphosate when sprayed with the field-use-rate 0.84 kg acid equivalent ha(-1) of glyphosate (i.e. Roundup) herbicide. An in vitro screen for glyphosate resistance in seedlings was developed, and a 5 microM glyphosate concentration was found to reduce dry weight in GS seedlings but not in GR seedlings. The GR plants containing GFP were then hand-crossed with GS plants from eastern Tennessee under greenhouse conditions, with GS plants acting as the pollen acceptor. Resulting seed was collected and germinated for GFP fluorescence screening. Seedlings that exhibited the transgenic GFP phenotype were selected as F(1) hybrids between GR and GS horseweed. Thirty GSxGR hybrids were produced on the basis of a green-fluorescent GFP phenotype of GR plants. GSxGFP/GR F(1) hybrids produced F(2) seeds, and F(2) plants were shown to segregate for GFP fluorescence and glyphosate resistance independently. Both traits segregated at a Mendelian 3:1 ratio, indicating a single gene is responsible for each phenotype. PMID:17024451

  11. Mapping of the gene encoding the melanocortin-1 ([alpha]-melanocyte stimulating hormone) receptor (MC1R) to human chromosome 16q24. 3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Gantz, I.; Yamada, Tadataka; Tashiro, Takao; Konda, Yoshitaka; Shimoto, Yoshimasa; Miwa, Hiroto; Trent, J.M. )

    1994-01-15

    [alpha]-Melanocyte stimulating hormone ([alpha]-MSH), a hormone originally named for its ability to regulate pigmentation of melanocytes, is a 13-amino-acid post-translational product of the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) gene. [alpha]-MSH and the other products of POMC processing, which share the core heptapeptide amino acid sequence Met-Glu (Gly)-His-Phe-Arg-Trp-Gly (Asp), the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), [beta]-MSH, and [gamma]-MSH, are collectively referred to as melanocortins. While best known for their effects on the melanocyte (pigmentation) and adrenal cortical cells (steroidogenesis), melanocortins have been postulated to function in diverse activities, including enhancement of learning and memory, control of the cardiovascular system, analgesia, thermoregulation, immunomodulation, parturition, and neurotrophism. To identify the chromosomal band encoding the human melanocortin-1 receptor gene, 1 [mu]g of an EMBL clone coding region of the human MC1R and approximately 15 kb of surrounding DNA was labeled with biotin and hybridized to human metaphase chromosomes as previously described. The results indicate that the human MC1R gene is localized to 16q24.3. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Fluorescence spectroscopy of collagen crosslinking: non-invasive and in situ evaluation of corneal stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Walfre; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Ruisheng; Kochevar, Irene E.

    2015-03-01

    Collagen is a long fibrous structural protein that imparts mechanical support, strength and elasticity to many tissues. The state of the tissue mechanical environment is related to tissue physiology, disease and function. In the cornea, the collagen network is responsible for its shape and clarity; disruption of this network results in degradation of visual acuity, for example in the keratoconus eye disease. The objective of the present study is to investigate the feasibility of using the endogenous fluorescence of collagen crosslinks to evaluate variations in the mechanical state of tissue, in particular, the stiffness of cornea in response to different degrees of photo-crosslinking or RGX treatment—a novel keratoconus treatment. After removing the epithelium, rabbit corneas were stained with Rose Bengal and then irradiated with a 532 nm solid-state laser. Analysis of the excitation spectra obtained by fluorescence spectroscopy shows a correlation between the fluorescence intensity at 370/460 nm excitation/emission wavelengths and the mechanical properties. In principle, it may be feasible to use the endogenous fluorescence of collagen crosslinks to evaluate the mechanical stiffness of cornea non-invasively and in situ.

  13. In-Situ Silver Acetylide Silver Nitrate Explosive Deposition Measurements Using X-Ray Fluorescence.

    SciTech Connect

    Covert, Timothy Todd

    2014-09-01

    The Light Initiated High Explosive facility utilized a spray deposited coating of silver acetylide - silver nitrate explosive to impart a mechanical shock into targets of interest. A diagnostic was required to measure the explosive deposition in - situ. An X - ray fluorescence spectrometer was deployed at the facility. A measurement methodology was developed to measure the explosive quantity with sufficient accuracy. Through the use of a tin reference material under the silver based explosive, a field calibration relationship has been developed with a standard deviation of 3.2 % . The effect of the inserted tin material into the experiment configuration has been explored.

  14. DNA hybridization in nanostructural molecular assemblies enables detection of gene mutations without a fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Tatsuo; Park, Lian-Chun; Shinohara, Toshimitsu; Goto, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a simple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) analysis utilizing DNA hybridization in nanostructural molecular assemblies. The novel technique enables the detection of a single-base mismatch in a DNA sequence without a fluorescent probe. This report describes for the first time that DNA hybridization occurs in the nanostructural molecular assemblies (termed reverse micelles) formed in an organic medium. The restricted nanospace in the reverse micelles amplifies the differences in the hybridization rate between mismatched and perfectly matched DNA probes. For a model system, we hybridized a 20-mer based on the p53 gene sequence to 20-mer complementary oligonucleotides with various types of mismatches. Without any DNA labeling or electrochemical apparatus, we successfully detected the various oligonucleotide mismatches by simply measuring the UV absorbance at 260 nm. PMID:14715007

  15. Automated brightfield break-apart in situ hybridization (ba-ISH) application: ALK and MALT1 genes as models.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Hiroaki; Zhang, Wenjun; Kelly, Brian D; Miller, Melanie; Pestic-Dragovich, Lidija; Bieniarz, Christopher; Vasicek, Thomas J; Marafioti, Teresa; Rimsza, Lisa; Grogan, Thomas M

    2010-12-01

    Cancer diagnosis can be a complex process, which takes consideration of histopathological, clinical, immunophenotypic, and genetic features. Since non-random chromosomal translocations are specifically involved in the development of various cancers, the detection of these gene aberrations becomes increasingly important. In recent years, break-apart (or split-signal) fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has emerged as an advantageous technique to detect gene translocations on tissue sections. However, FISH assays are technically challenging and require specialized fluorescence microscopes. Furthermore, the FISH signal is not stable for long term archiving due to photo bleaching. Our objective was to demonstrate the feasibility of brightfield break-apart in situ hybridization (ba-ISH) for anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue translocation protein 1 (MALT1) genes as models. ALK or MALT1 break-apart probes were labeled with digoxigenin (DIG) or 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP) on both sides of a known gene breakpoint region and the hybridization sites were visualized with the combination of alkaline phosphatase (AP)-based blue and red detection. Therefore, normal genes are detected as purple dots by mixing blue and red colors while translocated genes are detected as isolated blue or red dots. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tonsil was used as control for the co-localized 5' and 3' probes. Gene translocations of ALK or MALT1 were detected as separate blue and red dots on ALCL and MALT lymphoma cases. Thus, ISH analyses of gene translocations can be conducted with a regular light microscope and the long term archiving of break-apart ISH slides can be achieved. PMID:20621192

  16. Evolution in situ: hybrid origin and establishment of willows (Salix L.) on alpine glacier forefields

    PubMed Central

    Gramlich, S; Sagmeister, P; Dullinger, S; Hadacek, F; Hörandl, E

    2016-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to the evolutionary consequences of the colonizing dynamics and succession processes following glacier retreat. Here we studied hybrid populations that have recently formed and established on glacier forefields of the European Alps owing to secondary contact of a lowland colonizer with a subalpine species. We analyzed the composition of two hybrid populations between Salix purpurea and Salix helvetica with nine microsatellite markers by using Bayesian methods (structure and NewHybrids), and simulations. We also studied niche differentiation between the hybrids and the parental species based on indicator values, soil pH and water retention potential measurements. Allelic structure of hybrids confirms the assumed parentage and in situ origin of the crosses on two independent sites within the last decades. Both hybrid populations comprised F1 and later generation hybrids (F2 and backcrosses), confirming hybrid fertility. The parental species showed significant differences in niche characteristics for temperature, soil pH, nutrients and moisture. Remarkably, the hybrids exhibited a higher tolerance to cold temperatures, nutrient-poor and acidic soils than either parent. Our results show that willow hybrids originated after glacier retreat and have established persistent populations within a few decades. One factor contributing to hybrid establishment in sympatry with their parents is their ability to occupy more extreme niches than either parental species within a mosaic-like pattern of microhabitats on the forefield. Introgression and/or transgressive segregation may have resulted in novel genotypes that are able to expand the ecological spectrum of either parent. PMID:26980342

  17. Evolution in situ: hybrid origin and establishment of willows (Salix L.) on alpine glacier forefields.

    PubMed

    Gramlich, S; Sagmeister, P; Dullinger, S; Hadacek, F; Hörandl, E

    2016-06-01

    Little attention has been paid to the evolutionary consequences of the colonizing dynamics and succession processes following glacier retreat. Here we studied hybrid populations that have recently formed and established on glacier forefields of the European Alps owing to secondary contact of a lowland colonizer with a subalpine species. We analyzed the composition of two hybrid populations between Salix purpurea and Salix helvetica with nine microsatellite markers by using Bayesian methods (structure and NewHybrids), and simulations. We also studied niche differentiation between the hybrids and the parental species based on indicator values, soil pH and water retention potential measurements. Allelic structure of hybrids confirms the assumed parentage and in situ origin of the crosses on two independent sites within the last decades. Both hybrid populations comprised F1 and later generation hybrids (F2 and backcrosses), confirming hybrid fertility. The parental species showed significant differences in niche characteristics for temperature, soil pH, nutrients and moisture. Remarkably, the hybrids exhibited a higher tolerance to cold temperatures, nutrient-poor and acidic soils than either parent. Our results show that willow hybrids originated after glacier retreat and have established persistent populations within a few decades. One factor contributing to hybrid establishment in sympatry with their parents is their ability to occupy more extreme niches than either parental species within a mosaic-like pattern of microhabitats on the forefield. Introgression and/or transgressive segregation may have resulted in novel genotypes that are able to expand the ecological spectrum of either parent. PMID:26980342

  18. [Three cases of vulvar bowenoid papulosis: the localization of HPV DNA by in situ hybridization].

    PubMed

    Kioka, H; Nagai, N; Tanioka, Y; Fujii, T; Katsube, Y; Egawa, K; Fujiwara, A

    1989-09-01

    Cytological, histological, and molecular biological studies were conducted in 3 cases of vulvar Bowenoid papulosis, using biotinylated HPV DNA probes by in situ hybridization. 1) Cytological findings showed dyskaryotic cells that revealed hyperchromatism with a coarse granular pattern, and a high N/C ratio was observed among the dyskeratotic cells. 2) In 2 cases of Bowenoid papulosis lesions, HPV 16 DNA was detected in the nucleus of the dysplastic cells. 3) In one case of Bowenoid papulosis, a complicated carcinoma in situ of the uterine cervix was observed, and the HPV 16 DNA was found to be positive in both the vulva and cervix. PMID:2550688

  19. Spatial distribution of Escherichia coli in the mouse large intestine inferred from rRNA in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, L K; Lan, F; Kristensen, C S; Hobolth, P; Molin, S; Krogfelt, K A

    1994-01-01

    Fluorescent oligonucleotide probes targeting rRNA were used to develop an in situ hybridization technique by which the spatial distribution of Escherichia coli in the large intestines of streptomycin-treated mice was determined. Single E. coli cells were identified in thin frozen sections from the large intestines by the use of a probe specific for E. coli 23S rRNA. Furthermore, the total bacterial population was visualized with an rRNA probe targeting the domain Bacteria. By this technique, all E. coli cells were seen embedded in the mucosal material overlying the epithelial cells of the large intestine, and no direct attachment to the epithelium was observed. Images PMID:7927805

  20. Detection of alien chromatin conferring resistance to the beet cyst nematode (Heterodera schachtii Schm.) in cultivated beet (Beta vulgaris L.) using in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, T; Jung, C; Heslop-Harrison, J S; Kleine, M

    1997-05-01

    Chromatin originating from wild beets of the genus Beta, section Procumbentes, has been investigated in nematode-resistant hybrid-derived lines of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) by in situ hybridization using satellite, telomeric and ribosomal DNA repeats, a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) and total genomic DNA as probes. The allen chromosome was detected in three monosomic addition lines (2n = 18 + 1) by genomic in situ hybridization. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with a genome-specific satellite repeat and YAC DNA enabled the visualization of Procumbentes chromosomes, and in double-target hybridization it was shown that they do not carry 18S-5.8S-25S rRNA and 5S rRNA genes. The wild beet-specific satellite repeat and the telomere sequence from Arabidopsis thaliana were used to perform a structural analysis of the wild beet chromosome fragments of two resistant fragment addition lines. It was shown that one physical end of the chromosome fragments consists of telomeric repeats. Comparison of fragment sizes indicated that the small chromosome fragments harbouring the resistance gene most likely resulted from the loss of one wild beet chromosome arm and an internal deletion of the remaining arm. PMID:9246412

  1. In situ hybridization of oxytocin messenger RNA: macroscopic distribution and quantitation in rat hypothalamic cell groups

    SciTech Connect

    Burbach, J.P.; Voorhuis, T.A.; van Tol, H.H.; Ivell, R.

    1987-05-29

    Oxytocin mRNA was detected in the rat hypothalamus by in situ hybridization to a single stranded /sup 35/S-labelled DNA probe and the distribution of oxytocin mRNA-containing cell groups was studied at the macroscopic level. Specificity of hybridization was confirmed by comparison to vasopressin mRNA hybridization in parallel tissue sections. Cell groups containing oxytocin mRNA were confined to a set of hypothalamic cell groups, i.c. the supraoptic, paraventricular, anterior commissural nuclei, nucleus circularis and scattered hypothalamic islets. These cell groups displayed similar densities of autoradiographic signals indicating that the oxytocin gene is expressed at approximately the same average level at these various sites.

  2. Detection of Hepatitis B Virus DNA in Hepatocytes, Bile Duct Epithelium, and Vascular Elements by in situ Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Hubert E.; Stowring, Linda; Figus, Annalena; Montgomery, Carolyn K.; Haase, Ashley T.; Vyas, Girish N.

    1983-11-01

    A radiolabeled probe specific for hepatitis B virus (HBV) nucleotide sequences was hybridized in situ to liver tissue from three patients with chronic hepatitis B. The HBV genome was detected not only in infected hepatocytes but also in bile duct epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells. These findings extend the known host cell range for HBV, suggest new mechanisms of viral dissemination, and illustrate the usefulness of in situ hybridization in the study of pathogenesis of HBV infection.

  3. Dual colour fluorescence in situ hybridization to paraffin-embedded samples to deduce the presence of the der(X)t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) and involvement of either the SSX1 or SSX2 gene: a diagnostic and prognostic aid for synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y J; Birdsall, S; Summersgill, B; Smedley, D; Osin, P; Fisher, C; Shipley, J

    1999-03-01

    Identification of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) and the fusion gene products, SYT-SSX1 and SYT-SSX2, associated with a high proportion of synovial sarcomas, has been shown to be a useful diagnostic aid. This study demonstrates the application of dual colour fluorescence in situ hybridization to paraffin-embedded samples to deduce the presence of the derivative X chromosome and also the position of the breakpoint on chromosome X at either the SSX1 or the SSX2 gene. This used region specific markers from chromosomes X and 18 and an optimized protocol involving microwave exposure. Novel and rapid scoring criteria were validated which circumvented potential problems of nuclear truncation and defining cell boundaries. This involved blind analysis of two negative sarcoma samples and three synovial sarcomas in which corresponding frozen material had been previously shown to have the translocation involving different SSX genes. Six new cases diagnosed as synovial sarcoma were also analysed; two monophasic and two biphasic case were deduced to have a breakpoint in the SSX1 gene, one monophasic case an SSX2 breakpoint, and one case did not show rearrangement of the region. The ability to analyse formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples in this way has practical implications for aiding the diagnosis of difficult cases, recently ascribed prognostic relevance, and allows further retrospective studies to be carried out. The methodology is also applicable to the identification of other tumour specific translocations in paraffin-embedded material. PMID:10398111

  4. In situ hybridization for the study of gene expression in neuro-otologic research.

    PubMed

    Wackym, P A; Popper, P; Ward, P H; Micevych, P E

    1990-10-01

    In situ hybridization histochemistry technology was developed for future application to neuro-otologic research. This method allowed the detection of cellular mRNA in tissue sections from the temporal bone or brainstem after cRNA/mRNA hybridization. To produce specific cRNA, single-stranded 35S-labeled cRNA (complimentary to target mRNA) is transcribed from commercially available plasmid vectors. These vectors contain promotor sequences for specific synthesis of RNA, and polylinker regions that will accept cloned DNA inserts for virtually any target nucleic acid sequence of interest. The protocol used in this research was optimized