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Sample records for fluorescence in situ hybridization

  1. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization on Rice Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yafei; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has become one of the most important technologies applied in plant molecular cytogenetic research. FISH technique has been not only well applied in physical mapping and genomic studies, but also served as an indispensable tool in tracing the individual chromosome during cell division. This chapter provides protocols for basic FISH analysis using rice as a model, which can also be adapted to other model plant species. PMID:26659957

  2. Autofluorescence correction for fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Szoelloesi, J.; Balazs, M.; Waldman, F.C.

    1995-08-01

    Optimal sensitivity of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) requires bright signals and low background fluorescence. Use of locus-specific probes is especially dependent on high sensitivity. Some tissue preparations show high autofluorescence, masking small or dim signals. We have developed a new method for subtracting autofluorescence from digital images on a pixel-by-pixel basis. It is based on the observation that fluorescent labels for FISH have narrower excitation and emission spectra than the chemical components responsible for autofluorescence. Our new approach uses calculation of the ratio of autofluorescence between multiple color images for correction of autofluorescence in each individual image. By subtracting autofluorescence components, we were able to enhance centromeric signals and make previously indistiguishable cosmid signals clearly visible. This image-processing approach to autofluorescence correction may widen the applicability of gene-specific probes in FISH analysis of tumor material. 15 refs., 3 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Molecular cytogenetics using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.W.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Lucas, J.; Pinkel, D.; Weier, H-U.; Yu, Loh-Chung.

    1990-12-07

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome-specific probes enables several new areas of cytogenetic investigation by allowing visual determination of the presence and normality of specific genetic sequences in single metaphase or interphase cells. in this approach, termed molecular cytogenetics, the genetic loci to be analyzed are made microscopically visible in single cells using in situ hybridization with nucleic acid probes specific to these loci. To accomplish this, the DNA in the target cells is made single stranded by thermal denaturation and incubated with single-stranded, chemically modified probe under conditions where the probe will anneal only with DNA sequences to which it has high DNA sequence homology. The bound probe is then made visible by treatment with a fluorescent reagent such as fluorescein that binds to the chemical modification carried by the probe. The DNA to which the probe does not bind is made visible by staining with a dye such as propidium iodide that fluoresces at a wavelength different from that of the reagent used for probe visualization. We show in this report that probes are now available that make this technique useful for biological dosimetry, prenatal diagnosis and cancer biology. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  4. New approaches to fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Sabita K; Demetrick, Douglas J

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a nonisotopic labeling and detection method that provides a direct way to determine the relative location or copy number of specific DNA sequences in nuclei or chromosomes. With recent advancements, this technique has found increased application in a number of research areas, including cytogenetics, prenatal diagnosis, cancer research and diagnosis, nuclear organization, gene loss and/or amplification, and gene mapping. The availability of different types of probe and the increasing number of FISH techniques has made it a widespread and diversely applied technology. Multicolor karyotyping by multicolor FISH and spectral karyotyping interphase FISH and comparative genomic hybridization allow genetic analysis of previously intractable targets. We present a brief overview of FISH technology and describe in detail methods of probe labeling and detection for different types of tissue sample, including microdissected nuclei from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections. PMID:16719359

  5. Fluorescent in situ hybridization protocols in Drosophila embryos and tissues.

    PubMed

    Lcuyer, Eric; Parthasarathy, Neela; Krause, Henry M

    2008-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization is the standard method for visualizing the spatial distribution of RNA. Although traditional histochemical RNA detection methods suffered from limitations in resolution or sensitivity, the recent development of peroxidase-mediated tyramide signal amplification provides strikingly enhanced sensitivity and subcellular resolution. In this chapter, we describe optimized fluorescent in situ hybridization protocols for Drosophila embryos and tissues utilizing tyramide signal amplification, either for single genes or in a high-throughput format, which greatly increases the sensitivity, consistency, economy, and throughput of the procedure. We also describe variations of the method for RNA-RNA and RNA-protein codetection. PMID:18641955

  6. FISH-ing for Genes: Modeling Fluorescence "in situ" Hybridization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton Buck

    2006-01-01

    Teaching methods of genetic analysis such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can be an important part of instructional units in biology, microbiology, and biotechnology. Experience, however, indicates that these topics are difficult for many students. The authors of this article describe how they created an activity that effectively

  7. Supernumerary ring chromosome 17 identified by fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Fagan, K.; Edwards, M.

    1997-04-14

    We present a patient with multiple anomalies and severe developmental delay. A small supernumerary ring chromosome was found in 40% of her lymphocyte cells at birth. The origin of the marker chromosome could not be determined by GTG banding, but fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) later identified the marker as deriving from chromosome 17. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. FISH-ing for Genes: Modeling Fluorescence "in situ" Hybridization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton Buck

    2006-01-01

    Teaching methods of genetic analysis such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can be an important part of instructional units in biology, microbiology, and biotechnology. Experience, however, indicates that these topics are difficult for many students. The authors of this article describe how they created an activity that effectively…

  9. Microscopic detection of yeasts using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Inácio, João; da Luz Martins, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has been widely used for the detection and identification of microorganisms in their natural environments. In this chapter we describe the use of a simple FISH-based protocol to detect and identify clinically relevant yeast species in culture and biological samples using Cryptococcus neoformans as a model. After fixation of cells with paraformaldehyde, the same are embedded in hybridization buffer containing specific fluorochrome-labeled oligonucleotide probes. After incubation and a subsequent washing step for removing unbound probes, samples are analyzed by epifluorescence microscopy. PMID:23296886

  10. Telomere analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Hultdin, M; Grönlund, E; Norrback, K; Eriksson-Lindström, E; Just, T; Roos, G

    1998-01-01

    Determination of telomere length is traditionally performed by Southern blotting and densitometry, giving a mean telomere restriction fragment (TRF) value for the total cell population studied. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of telomere repeats has been used to calculate telomere length, a method called quantitative (Q)-FISH. We here present a quantitative flow cytometric approach, Q-FISHFCM, for evaluation of telomere length distribution in individual cells based on in situ hybridization using a fluorescein-labeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) (CCCTAA)3probe and DNA staining with propidium iodide. A simple and rapid protocol with results within 30 h was developed giving high reproducibility. One important feature of the protocol was the use of an internal cell line control, giving an automatic compensation for potential differences in the hybridization steps. This protocol was tested successfully on cell lines and clinical samples from bone marrow, blood, lymph nodes and tonsils. A significant correlation was found between Southern blotting and Q-FISHFCMtelomere length values ( P = 0.002). The mean sub-telomeric DNA length of the tested cell lines and clinical samples was estimated to be 3.2 kbp. With the Q-FISHFCMmethod the fluorescence signal could be determined in different cell cycle phases, indicating that in human cells the vast majority of telomeric DNA is replicated early in S phase. PMID:9685479

  11. Detection of DNA damage by comet fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Schlörmann, Wiebke; Glei, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Comet fluorescence in situ hybridization (Comet-FISH) is a useful method to detect overall and region-specific DNA damage in individual cells. Two well-established methods are combined, the Comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The Comet assay is the method of choice for the detection of DNA damage. With the alkaline version the influence of specific substances such as water pollutants or ingredients of food on individual cells can be easily measured. The Comet assay involves the embedding of cells in agarose on microscopic slides, lysis of cells, and separation of DNA via electrophoresis. Damaged DNA migrates from the nucleus (head of the comet) forming a tail. The percentage of DNA in the tail correlates with the degree of DNA strand breaks (DNA damage). The combination of FISH with the Comet assay uses labeled probes which hybridize specifically to selected DNA sequences. This allows the detection of specific DNA damage or repair capacity in single cells. Here we present exemplarily the Comet-FISH method by detection of DNA damage using hydrogen peroxide as a genotoxic model substrate. PMID:22941598

  12. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for direct visualization of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Moter, A; Göbel, U B

    2000-07-01

    As a technique allowing simultaneous visualization, identification, enumeration and localization of individual microbial cells, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is useful for many applications in all fields of microbiology. FISH not only allows the detection of culturable microorganisms, but also of yet-to-be cultured (so-called unculturable) organisms, and can therefore help in understanding complex microbial communities. In this review, methodological aspects, as well as problems and pitfalls of FISH are discussed in an examination of past, present and future applications. PMID:10991623

  13. 10p Duplication characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Wiktor, A.; Feldman, G.L.; Van Dyke, D.L.; Kratkoczki, P.; Ditmars, D.M. Jr.

    1994-09-01

    We describe a patient with severe failure to thrive, mild-moderate developmental delay, cleft lip and palate, and other anomalies. Routine cytogenetic analysis documented a de novo chromosome rearrangement involving chromosome 4, but the origin of the derived material was unknown. Using chromosome specific painting probes, the karyotype was defined as 46,XY,der(4)t(4;10)(q35;p11.23). Characterization of the dup(10p) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis provides another example of the usefulness of this technology in identifying small deletions, duplications, or supernumerary marker chromosomes. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Analysis of DNA replication by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Boggs, B A; Chinault, A C

    1997-11-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has been shown to discriminate between unreplicated and replicated regions of the genome in interphase nuclei, based on the number of specific fluorescent signals that can be detected. By examining the replication status of hybridizing sequences in large numbers of individual cells from an asynchronously growing population, it is possible to deduce a relative order of replication of different sequences. The availability of well-mapped genomic probes and the ability to compare results from different cell lines make this a convenient approach with which to map domains of replication timing control at any chromosomal position and to relate this to various patterns of gene expression. Since there appear to be important but poorly understood correlations among replication timing, chromatin structure, and transcriptional competence in mammalian cells, this provides a valuable approach to understanding these interrelationships at the molecular level. The procedures for using FISH to examine replication timing in mammalian nuclei are described here in detail, and the advantages and limitations of the approach are discussed. Some other strategies for using high-resolution FISH on chromatin fibers to examine replication properties of specific sequences in situ are also described. PMID:9441852

  15. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1993-03-04

    Genetic mapping is approached using the techniques of high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This technology and the results of its application are designed to rapidly generate whole genome as tool box of expressed sequence to speed the identification of human disease genes. The results of this study are intended to dovetail with and to link the results of existing technologies for creating backbone YAC and genetic maps. In the first eight months, this approach generated 60--80% of the expressed sequence map, the remainder expected to be derived through more long-term, labor-intensive, regional chromosomal gene searches or sequencing. The laboratory has made significant progress in the set-up phase, in mapping fetal and adult brain and other cDNAs, in testing a model system for directly linking genetic and physical maps using FISH with small fragments, in setting up a database, and in establishing the validity and throughput of the system.

  16. Fluorescent in situ hybridization on comets: FISH comet.

    PubMed

    Shaposhnikov, Sergey; El Yamani, Naouale; Collins, Andrew R

    2015-01-01

    The DNA in eukaryotic cells is organized into loop domains that represent basic structural and functional units of chromatin packaging. The comet assay, a sensitive method for monitoring DNA damage and repair, involves electrophoresis of nucleoids comprising supercoiled DNA attached to the nuclear matrix. Breaks in the DNA relax the supercoiling and allow DNA loops to expand, and on electrophoresis to move towards the anode, giving the appearance of a comet tail. We use fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to investigate the structure of the chromatin within comet preparations and to study specific DNA sequences within comets. In this chapter we describe our FISH comets protocols, deal with some technical questions and outline the theory. FISH with comets should be useful to researchers interested in the structural organization of DNA and chromatin, the localization of DNA damage, and the kinetics of repair of damage. PMID:25827891

  17. Sexing of Dog Sperm by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    OI, Maya; YAMADA, Keisuke; HAYAKAWA, Hiroyuki; SUZUKI, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Effective preselection of sex has been accomplished in several species of livestock and also in humans using the flow cytometric sperm sorting method. A guaranteed high sorting accuracy is a key prerequisite for the widespread use of sperm sexing. The standard validation method is flow cytometric remeasurement of the DNA content of the sexed sperm. Since this method relies on the same instrument that produced the original sperm separation, it is not truly independent. Therefore, to be able to specifically produce either male or female offspring in the dog, we developed a method of direct visualization of sex chromosomes in a single sperm using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as a validation method. Denaturation of canine spermatozoa by immersion in 1 M NaOH for 4 min yielded consistent hybridization results with over 97% hybridization efficiency and a good preservation of sperm morphology. There was no significant difference between the theoretical ratio (50:50) and the observed ratio of X- and Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa in any of the three dogs. In addition, the mean purities of flow-sorted sex chromosomes in spermatozoa of the three dogs were 90.8% for the X chromosome fraction and 89.6% for the Y chromosome fraction. This sorting was evaluated by using the dual color FISH protocol. Therefore, our results demonstrated that the FISH protocol worked reliably for both unsorted and sexed sperm samples. PMID:23059640

  18. Sexing of dog sperm by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Oi, Maya; Yamada, Keisuke; Hayakawa, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Effective preselection of sex has been accomplished in several species of livestock and also in humans using the flow cytometric sperm sorting method. A guaranteed high sorting accuracy is a key prerequisite for the widespread use of sperm sexing. The standard validation method is flow cytometric remeasurement of the DNA content of the sexed sperm. Since this method relies on the same instrument that produced the original sperm separation, it is not truly independent. Therefore, to be able to specifically produce either male or female offspring in the dog, we developed a method of direct visualization of sex chromosomes in a single sperm using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as a validation method. Denaturation of canine spermatozoa by immersion in 1 M NaOH for 4 min yielded consistent hybridization results with over 97% hybridization efficiency and a good preservation of sperm morphology. There was no significant difference between the theoretical ratio (50:50) and the observed ratio of X- and Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa in any of the three dogs. In addition, the mean purities of flow-sorted sex chromosomes in spermatozoa of the three dogs were 90.8% for the X chromosome fraction and 89.6% for the Y chromosome fraction. This sorting was evaluated by using the dual color FISH protocol. Therefore, our results demonstrated that the FISH protocol worked reliably for both unsorted and sexed sperm samples. PMID:23059640

  19. Pallister-Killian syndrome detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.G.; Dev, V.G.

    1995-07-03

    The Pallister-Killian syndrome is a rare cytogenetic condition first described in 1977 by Pallister et al. in 3 adults; the first affected child was reported in 1981. This syndrome (also known as Pallister mosaic aneuploidy syndrome or isochromosome 12p mosaicism) is characterized by postnatal growth retardation, seizures, hypotonia, deafness, profound mental retardation, minimal speech development, and a distinctive facial appearance (high prominent forehead, ocular hypertelorism, sparse anterior scalp hair, prominent lower lip, large ears with thick protruding lobules, cupid-bow shaped upper lip, and a long philtrum). A chromosome 12 abnormality (tetrasomy 12p) has been reported in skin biopsies from these patients but this chromosome anomaly is usually not found (or in only a small proportion, e.g., <0.5%, of blood cells) in peripheral blood. We report on an additional patient with Pallister-Killian syndrome confirmed with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using an alpha satellite DNA probe for chromosome 12. This report further illustrates the application of FISH in identifying the source of chromosomal markers of unknown origin in infants with multiple congenital anomalies specifically before the natural history of a condition allows for definitive diagnosis based on clinical findings. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Multiplex-fluorescence in situ hybridization for chromosome karyotyping.

    PubMed

    Geigl, Jochen B; Uhrig, Sabine; Speicher, Michael R

    2006-01-01

    Multiplex-fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) was initially developed to stain human chromosomes--the 22 autosomes and X and Y sex chromosomes--with uniquely distinctive colors to facilitate karyotyping. The characteristic spectral signatures of all different combinations of fluorochromes are determined by multichannel image-analysis methods. Advantages of M-FISH include rapid analysis of metaphase spreads, even in complex cases with multiple chromosomal rearrangements, and identification of marker chromosomes. The M-FISH technology has been extended to other species, such as the mouse. Furthermore, in addition to painting probes, the method has been used with a variety of region-specific probes. M-FISH has even recently been used for 3D studies to analyze the distribution of human chromosomes in intact and preserved interphase nuclei. Hence, M-FISH has evolved into an essential tool for both clinical diagnostics and basic research. In this protocol, we describe how to use M-FISH to karyotype chromosomes, a procedure that takes approximately 14 d if new M-FISH probes have to be generated and 3 d if the M-FISH probes are ready to use. PMID:17406400

  1. Characterization of Robertsonian translocations by using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, D.J.; Schwartz, S. )

    1992-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization with five biotin-labeled probes (three alphoid probes, a probe specific for beta-satellite sequences in all acrocentric chromosomes, and an rDNA probe) was used to characterize 30 different Robertsonian translocations, including three t(13;13); one t(15;15), four t(21;21), three t(13;14), two t(13;15), two (13;21), two t(13;22), one t(14;15), eight t(14;21), two t(14;22), two t(21;22). Of 8 de novo homologous translocations, only one t(13;13) chromosome was interpreted as dicentric, while 19 of 22 nonhomologous Robertsonian translocations were dicentric. The three monocentric nonhomologous translocations included both of the t(13;21) and one t(21;22). Two of 26 translocations studied using the beta-satellite probe showed a positive signal, while rDNA was undetectable in 10 cases studied. These results indicate that most homologous Robertsonian translocations appear monocentric, while the bulk of nonhomologous translocations show two alphoid signals. A majority of the breakpoints localized using this analysis seem to be distal to the centromere and just proximal to the beta-satellite and nuclear-organizing regions.

  2. Detection of dengue group viruses by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) represent a global challenge in public health. It is estimated that 50 to 100 million infections occur each year causing approximately 20,000 deaths that are usually linked to severe cases like DHF and dengue shock syndrome. The causative agent of DF is dengue virus (genus Flavivirus) that comprises four distinct serotypes (DENV-1 to DENV-4). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has been used successfully to detect pathogenic agents, but has not been implemented in detecting DENV. To improve our understanding of DENV infection and dissemination in host tissues, we designed specific probes to detect DENV in FISH assays. Methods Oligonucleotide probes were designed to hybridize with RNA from the broadest range of DENV isolates belonging to the four serotypes, but not to the closest Flavivirus genomes. Three probes that fit the criteria defined for FISH experiments were selected, targeting both coding and non-coding regions of the DENV genome. These probes were tested in FISH assays against the dengue vector Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae). The FISH experiments were led in vitro using the C6/36 cell line, and in vivo against dissected salivary glands, with epifluorescence and confocal microscopy. Results The three 60-nt oligonucleotides probes DENV-Probe A, B and C cover a broad range of DENV isolates from the four serotypes. When the three probes were used together, specific fluorescent signals were observed in C6/36 infected with each DENV serotypes. No signal was detected in either cells infected with close Flavivirus members West Nile virus or yellow fever virus. The same protocol was used on salivary glands of Ae. albopictus fed with a DENV-2 infectious blood-meal which showed positive signals in the lateral lobes of infected samples, with no significant signal in uninfected mosquitoes. Conclusion Based on the FISH technique, we propose a way to design and use oligonucleotide probes to detect arboviruses. Results showed that this method was successfully implemented to specifically detect DENV in a mosquito cell line, as well as in mosquito salivary glands for the DENV-2 serotype. In addition, we emphasize that FISH could be an alternative method to detect arboviruses in host tissues, also offering to circumvent the discontinuity of antibodies used in immunofluorescent assays. PMID:23110979

  3. Chromosome replicating timing combined with fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Smith, Leslie; Thayer, Mathew

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian DNA replication initiates at multiple sites along chromosomes at different times during S phase, following a temporal replication program. The specification of replication timing is thought to be a dynamic process regulated by tissue-specific and developmental cues that are responsive to epigenetic modifications. However, the mechanisms regulating where and when DNA replication initiates along chromosomes remains poorly understood. Homologous chromosomes usually replicate synchronously, however there are notable exceptions to this rule. For example, in female mammalian cells one of the two X chromosomes becomes late replicating through a process known as X inactivation(1). Along with this delay in replication timing, estimated to be 2-3 hr, the majority of genes become transcriptionally silenced on one X chromosome. In addition, a discrete cis-acting locus, known as the X inactivation center, regulates this X inactivation process, including the induction of delayed replication timing on the entire inactive X chromosome. In addition, certain chromosome rearrangements found in cancer cells and in cells exposed to ionizing radiation display a significant delay in replication timing of >3 hours that affects the entire chromosome(2,3). Recent work from our lab indicates that disruption of discrete cis-acting autosomal loci result in an extremely late replicating phenotype that affects the entire chromosome(4). Additional 'chromosome engineering' studies indicate that certain chromosome rearrangements affecting many different chromosomes result in this abnormal replication-timing phenotype, suggesting that all mammalian chromosomes contain discrete cis-acting loci that control proper replication timing of individual chromosomes(5). Here, we present a method for the quantitative analysis of chromosome replication timing combined with fluorescent in situ hybridization. This method allows for a direct comparison of replication timing between homologous chromosomes within the same cell, and was adapted from(6). In addition, this method allows for the unambiguous identification of chromosomal rearrangements that correlate with changes in replication timing that affect the entire chromosome. This method has advantages over recently developed high throughput micro-array or sequencing protocols that cannot distinguish between homologous alleles present on rearranged and un-rearranged chromosomes. In addition, because the method described here evaluates single cells, it can detect changes in chromosome replication timing on chromosomal rearrangements that are present in only a fraction of the cells in a population. PMID:23271586

  4. Fluorescent in situ hybridization on mitotic chromosomes of mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Timoshevskiy, Vladimir A; Sharma, Atashi; Sharakhov, Igor V; Sharakhova, Maria V

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a technique routinely used by many laboratories to determine the chromosomal position of DNA and RNA probes. One important application of this method is the development of high-quality physical maps useful for improving the genome assemblies for various organisms. The natural banding pattern of polytene and mitotic chromosomes provides guidance for the precise ordering and orientation of the genomic supercontigs. Among the three mosquito genera, namely Anopheles, Aedes, and Culex, a well-established chromosome-based mapping technique has been developed only for Anopheles, whose members possess readable polytene chromosomes. As a result of genome mapping efforts, 88% of the An. gambiae genome has been placed to precise chromosome positions. Two other mosquito genera, Aedes and Culex, have poorly polytenized chromosomes because of significant overrepresentation of transposable elements in their genomes. Only 31 and 9% of the genomic supercontings have been assigned without order or orientation to chromosomes of Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus, respectively. Mitotic chromosome preparation for these two species had previously been limited to brain ganglia and cell lines. However, chromosome slides prepared from the brain ganglia of mosquitoes usually contain low numbers of metaphase plates. Also, although a FISH technique has been developed for mitotic chromosomes from a cell line of Ae. aegypti, the accumulation of multiple chromosomal rearrangements in cell line chromosomes makes them useless for genome mapping. Here we describe a simple, robust technique for obtaining high-quality mitotic chromosome preparations from imaginal discs (IDs) of 4th instar larvae which can be used for all three genera of mosquitoes. A standard FISH protocol is optimized for using BAC clones of genomic DNA as a probe on mitotic chromosomes of Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus, and for utilizing an intergenic spacer (IGS) region of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) as a probe on An. gambiae chromosomes. In addition to physical mapping, the developed technique can be applied to population cytogenetics and chromosome taxonomy/systematics of mosquitoes and other insect groups. PMID:23007640

  5. Role of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in sequencing the tomato genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chromosomes at various stages of the cell cycle can be used for localization of DNA probes via Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). While mitotic metaphase chromosomes are demonstrably too short and compact for this purpose, long pachytene chromosomes are ideal. BACs that hybridize to euchrom...

  6. Assignment of the human GL12 gene to 2q14 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Naomichi; Fujimoto, Masahiro; Kato, Rumiko; Niikawa, Norio; Fujimoto, Masahiro; Kato, Rumiko; Niikawa, Norio

    1996-08-15

    This report describes the localization of the human GLI2 gene to human chromosome 2q14 using fluorescence in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction of somatic cell hybrids. GLI2 is part of a gene family which encodes proteins with five zinc-finger repeat motifs. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Image analysis of cells stained by fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Tanke, H.J.; Raap, A.K.; Wiegant, J.; Vrolijk, J. )

    1993-01-01

    Specific nucleic acid sequences of about 1 kb can be detected on a routine basis using FISH methods. This is achieved by indirect techniques and conventional microscopy, or with fluorescent probes (direct methods) and integrating detection devices (e.g. CCD cameras). Labeling of probes with defined ratios of two or three fluorophores allows localization of multiple targets, especially when the signals are quantified by image analysis. This requires fluoroescence microscopes equipped with multi band pass filters and computer controlled filter wheels for sequential recording of red, green and blue images using a B/W CCD camera, and correction of occurring image shifts. This combined approach was applied to localize and map genes on chromosomes. In case of nuclei with long extentions of almost linear DNA molecules, (so-called halo preparations), single hybridization sides could be shown.

  8. Fluorescent in situ hybridization in plant polytene chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Guerra, M

    2001-01-01

    Polytene chromosomes are found in specialized tissues, with high metabolic activity, of a few angiosperm genera. They differ from Diptera polytenics in several aspects, mainly because their chromatids on each chromosome are not tightly paired, nor are they so highly endoreplicated as those of Diptera. In situ hybridization with isotopic and non-isotopic probes has been successfully used in plant polytene chromosomes, mainly in Phaseolus coccineus and Vigna unguiculata, where they have been best investigated. The results reported for mitotic and polytene chromosomes of these species, and a few others, are compared aiming to ascertain the efficiency and limitations of FISH in plant polytenics. In general, polytene chromosomes either from embryo suspensor cells of P. coccineus or from anther tapetal cells of V. unguiculata proved to be quite a suitable system for localizing DNA sequences by FISH. The partially unsynapsed chromatids, typically found in plant polytenics, seem to be the most important hindrance for a precise chromosome mapping. On the other hand, the interphase polytene nucleus is a valuable system for localizing FISH signals since they conserve a spatial organization similar to that of mitotic interphase and produce much amplified signals. PMID:11741150

  9. The Application of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization in Different Ploidy Levels Cross-Breeding of Lily

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Wang, Jingmao; Zhang, Yiying; Zhang, Yue; Xu, Shunchao; Lu, Yingmin

    2015-01-01

    21 crossing were conducted between Asiatic Lily with different ploidy levels, the results showed that the interploidy hybridization between diploid and tetraploid lilies was not as successful as intraploidy hybridization. Regardless of male sterility, triploid lilies could be used as female parents in the hybridization which the progenies were aneuploidy. 3x×4x crosses could be cultured more successfully than 3x×2x crosses. 45S rDNA was mapped on the chromosomes of seven Lilium species and their progenies using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH revealed six to sixteen 45S rDNA gene loci, and normally the sites were not in pairs. The asymmetry indexes of LA (Longiflorum hybrids × Asiatic hybrids) hybrids was higher than Asiatic hybrids, the evolution degree was LA hybrids > Asiatic hybrids. 45S rDNA distributed variably on chromosome 1-10 and 12 among Asiatic hybrids. Chromosome 1 had invariable sites of 45S rDNA in all Asiatic hybrids, which could be considered as the characteristic of Asiatic hybrids. LA hybrid ‘Freya’ had two sites of 45S rDNA on one homologous chromosome 5, and also it could be found in the progenies. The karyotype and fluorescence in situ hybridization with 45S rDNA as probe were applied to identify the different genotypes of 9 hybrids. Typical chromosomes with parental signal sites could be observed in all the genotypes of hybrids, it was confirmed that all the hybrids were true. PMID:26010356

  10. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for identification of microorganisms in acute chorioamnionitis.

    PubMed

    Schmiedel, D; Kikhney, J; Masseck, J; Rojas Mencias, P D; Schulze, J; Petrich, A; Thomas, A; Henrich, W; Moter, A

    2014-09-01

    The relevance of microorganisms in preterm birth is still under discussion. Using a diagnostic fluorescence in situ hybridization probe panel, we visualized Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus mitis group in two cases of acute chorioamnionitis. This technique provides spatial resolution and quantity of bacteria, clarifying the epidemiology and pathogenic pathways of acute chorioamnionitis. PMID:24382010

  11. Subsurface methanogenic activity in the Iberian Pyrite Belt detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oggerin, M.; Escudero, C.; Rodriguez, N.; Amils, R.

    2014-04-01

    The IPBSL is a drilling project designed to investigate the subsurface geomicrobiology of the Iberian Pyrite Belt (Southwestern, Spain), a geological and mineralogical terrestrial analogue of Mars. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARDFISH) has been used to detect the presence of methanogenic archaea in samples from uncontaminated cores of the IPBSL.

  12. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF SPERM-DERIVED CHROMATIN IN ZYGOTES DETERMINED BY FLUORESCENCE IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to determine the spatial distribution of chromatin in zygote pronuclei. ybrid system involving golden hamster eggs and individual human sperm permitted use of DNA probes specific for the entire human chromosome 4, for the heterochromati...

  13. Evolution of Chromosome 6 of Solanum Species Revealed by Comparative Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization Mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative genome mapping is an important tool in evolutionary research. Here we demonstrate a comparative fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping strategy. A set of 13 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones derived from potato chromosome 6 was used for FISH mapping in seven differen...

  14. Assignment of the REST gene to 4q12 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, J.M.; Powers, J.; Tischler, A.S.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the localization of the REST (RE1-silencing transcription factor) gene to human chromosome 14q12 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. This gene plays a role in the regulation of certain genes exclusively in neurons. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Isolation and fluorescence in situ hybridization mapping of 60 cosmid clones on human chromosome 18

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, Hitoshi; Sakai, Masako; Inaba, Rie; Imamura, Takashi )

    1994-02-01

    The authors have mapped 60 new cosmids on the short and long arms of chromosome 18 either by R- or by DAPI-banding and simultaneous fluorescence in situ hybridization. These markers were isolated from hybrid MS126-21 made from a human-rodent hybrid cell line that retained human chromosome 18. Twenty-two of the cosmid probes map on the short arm, and 31 probes cluster in the distal half of the long arm between bands 18q21.1 and 18q23, while 7 other probes are mapped more proximal to the centromere around bands 18q1.1-q12.3. The technique of fluorescence in situ hybridization has proven to be a very efficient methodology for gene mapping. These 60 probes will be useful in the elucidation of genetic alterations associated with diseases such as tetrasomy 18p syndrome, 18q- syndromes, and colorectal cancer. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  16. De Novo nonreciprocal translocation 1;8 confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, J.E.; Stout, C.; Palmer, S.M.

    1995-07-17

    Constitutional nonreciprocal translocations are extremely rare, and even their existence is controversial. We report on a newborn infant with a de novo nonreciprocal translocation between chromosomes 1 and 8 resulting in 1q42.3 deletion syndrome. Fluorescent in situ hybridization with whole chromosome paints confirmed the conventional cytogenetic diagnosis. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and spectral imaging of coral-associated bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Ainsworth, T D; Fine, M; Blackall, L L; Hoegh-Guldberg, O

    2006-04-01

    Microbial communities play important roles in the functioning of coral reef communities. However, extensive autofluorescence of coral tissues and endosymbionts limits the application of standard fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques for the identification of the coral-associated bacterial communities. This study overcomes these limitations by combining FISH and spectral imaging. PMID:16598010

  18. 21 CFR 866.4700 - Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... systems. (a) Identification. An automated FISH enumeration system is a device that consists of an automated scanning microscope, image analysis system, and customized software applications for FISH assays... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization...

  19. 21 CFR 866.4700 - Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... systems. (a) Identification. An automated FISH enumeration system is a device that consists of an automated scanning microscope, image analysis system, and customized software applications for FISH assays... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization...

  20. 21 CFR 866.4700 - Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... systems. (a) Identification. An automated FISH enumeration system is a device that consists of an automated scanning microscope, image analysis system, and customized software applications for FISH assays... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization...

  1. 21 CFR 866.4700 - Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... systems. (a) Identification. An automated FISH enumeration system is a device that consists of an automated scanning microscope, image analysis system, and customized software applications for FISH assays... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization...

  2. Mapping pachytene chromosomes of coffee using a modified protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Iacia, Ana Amélia Sanchez; Pinto-Maglio, Cecília A. F.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is the most direct method for physically mapping DNA sequences on chromosomes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization mapping of meiotic chromosomes during the pachytene stage is an important tool in plant cytogenetics, because it provides high-resolution measurements of physical distances. Fluorescence in situ hybridization mapping of coffee pachytene chromosomes offers significant advantages compared with FISH mapping of somatic chromosomes, because pachytene chromosomes are 30 times longer and provide additional cytological markers. However, the application of this technique to pachytene chromosomes has been complicated by problems in making preparations of meiotic chromosomes and by difficulties in the application of standard FISH protocols. We have been able to overcome most of these obstacles in applying the FISH technique to the pachytene chromosomes of coffee plants. Digesting the external callose layer surrounding the pollen mother cells (PMCs) in conjunction with other procedures permitted suitable pachytene chromosomes to be obtained by increasing cell permeability, which allowed the probe sequences to enter the cells. For the first time, hybridization signals were registered on coffee pachytene chromosomes using the FISH technique with a repetitive sequence as a probe. We obtained slides on which 80 % of the PMCs had hybridization signals, resulting in FISH labelling with high efficiency. The procedure does not seem to be dependent on the genotype, because hybridization signals were detected in genetically different coffee plants. These findings enhance the possibilities for high-resolution physical mapping of coffee chromosomes. PMID:24244840

  3. Identification of mosaicism in Prader-Willi syndrome using fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Mowery-Rushton, P.A.; Surti, U.; Hanchett, J.M.

    1996-12-30

    We report on our findings of 4 patients with mosaicism for a deletion of chromosome 15, most commonly associated with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). We examined a series of typical and atypical PWS patients in order to identify cytogenetically undetected deletions, using fluorescence in situ hybridization. In 4 of the patients analyzed we detected a deletion in 14-60% of peripheral blood leukocytes, using four commercially available probes. Our results indicate that mosaicism may play a role in the etiology of some PWS cases. These findings may be especially useful in patients who display discrepancies between clinical phenotype and established diagnostic criteria. Methylation and microsatellite polymorphism analyses of 2 patients with low-level mosaicism failed to identify the deletion. We propose that fluorescence in situ hybridization is the most effective method for detecting somatic mosaicism, since a large number of cells can be individually examined for the presence or absence of a specific deletion. 47 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Fluorescent in situ hybridization for evaluation of Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Wenger, S.L.; Cummins, J.H.

    1995-07-17

    We have found fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) results more reliavle than high resolution chromosome analysis for the diagnosis of Prader-Willi (PWS) or Angelman syndromes (AS). Specifically, we have found success in the detection of 15q11q13 deletions among 55 cases. Our study suggests that FISH analysis using PWS/AS probes can facilitate diagnostic evaluation of these cases for deletions. 2 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Mapping of a rat multidrug resistance gene by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, N.C.; Silverman, J.A.; Thorgeirsson, S.S. )

    1993-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding the rat mdr1b (Pgy2) gene was recently isolated and characterized. This gene has a high degree of sequence identity with other Pgy genes, particularly the mouse Pgy2 gene. By means of in situ fluorescence hybridization, the rat Pgy gene was localized on chromosome 4 band q12. This regional mapping will facilitate the identification of synteny groups on rat, mouse, and human genomes and chromosomal rearrangements during mammalian evolution. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization to Detect Transgene Integration into Plant Genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzacher, Trude

    Fluorescent chromosome analysis technologies have advanced our understanding of genome organization during the last 30 years and have enabled the investigation of DNA organization and structure as well as the evolution of chromosomes. Fluorescent chromosome staining allows even small chromosomes to be visualized, characterized by their composition and morphology, and counted. Aneuploidies and polyploidies can be established for species, breeding lines, and individuals, including changes occurring during hybridization or tissue culture and transformation protocols. Fluorescent in situ hybridization correlates molecular information of a DNA sequence with its physical location on chromosomes and genomes. It thus allows determination of the physical position of sequences and often is the only means to determine the abundance and distribution of DNA sequences that are difficult to map with any other molecular method or would require segregation analysis, in particular multicopy or repetitive DNA. Equally, it is often the best way to establish the incorporation of transgenes, their numbers, and physical organization along chromosomes. This chapter presents protocols for probe and chromosome preparation, fluorescent in situ hybridization, chromosome staining, and the analysis of results.

  7. Microbial Community Composition of Wadden Sea Sediments as Revealed by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Llobet-Brossa, Enric; Rossell-Mora, Ramon; Amann, Rudolf

    1998-01-01

    The microbial community composition of Wadden Sea sediments of the German North Sea coast was investigated by in situ hybridization with group-specific fluorescently labeled, rRNA-targeted oligonucleotides. A large fraction (up to 73%) of the DAPI (4?,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole)-stained cells hybridized with the bacterial probes. Nearly 45% of the total cells could be further identified as belonging to known phyla. Members of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium cluster were most abundant in all layers, followed by the sulfate-reducing bacteria. PMID:9647850

  8. Technical review: In situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Ellen

    2014-08-01

    In situ hybridization is a technique that is used to detect nucleotide sequences in cells, tissue sections, and even whole tissue. This method is based on the complementary binding of a nucleotide probe to a specific target sequence of DNA or RNA. These probes can be labeled with either radio-, fluorescent-, or antigen-labeled bases. Depending on the probe used, autoradiography, fluorescence microscopy, or immunohistochemistry, respectively, are used for visualization. In situ hybridization is extensively used in research, as well as clinical applications, especially for diagnostic purposes. This review discusses the basic technique of in situ hybridization. The standard in situ hybridization process is reviewed, and different types of in situ hybridization, their applications, and advantages and disadvantages are discussed. PMID:24810158

  9. Detection of sex chromosome aneuploidy in dog spermatozoa by triple color fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Komaki, Haruna; Oi, Maya; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    With the development of a direct visualization of sex chromosome in a single sperm by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, the frequency of aberration (aneuploidy) in spermatozoa in several mammals has been investigated. However, there is no report in the incidence of X-Y aneuploidy in the sperm population of dogs. Therefore, in this study, the aneuploidy in dog spermatozoa was examined by multicolor FISH using specific molecular probes for canine sex chromosomes and autosome. Semen from eight male Labrador retrievers was used as specimen. For decondensation of sperm nuclei, the specimen was treated with 1 M NaOH for 4 minutes at room temperature. Probes for chromosomes X, Y, and 1, labeled with SpectrumGreen, Cy3 and Cy5, respectively, were hybridized with decondensed spermatozoa. Fluorescence in situ hybridization signals in sperm heads were clearly detected in each specimen, regardless of the sperm donor. The FISH signal of at least one of the three probes was detected in all sperm heads examined. There was no significant difference between the theoretical ratio (50:50) and the observed ratio of X and Y chromosomes in spermatozoa of all the eight dogs. Mean percentage of sex chromosome aneuploidy was 0.127% (ranged between 0% and 0.316%). This percentage of canine sex chromosome aneuploidy was lower than the one reported in cattle, horses, river buffalo, and goats sperm, but higher than that observed in mice and sheep. PMID:24962971

  10. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on single cells. (Sex determination and chromosome rearrangements).

    PubMed

    Scriven, Paul N; Ogilvie, Caroline Mackie

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is the technique of choice for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) selection of female embryos in families with X-linked disease, for which there is no mutation-specific test. FISH with target-specific DNA probes is also the primary technique used for PGD detection of chromosome imbalance associated with Robertsonian translocations, reciprocal translocations, inversions, and other chromosome rearrangements, because the DNA probes, labeled with different fluorochromes or haptens, detect the copy number of their target loci. The methods described outline strategies for PGD for sex determination and chromosome rearrangements. These methods are assessment of reproductive risks, the selection of suitable probes for interphase FISH, spreading techniques for blastomere nuclei, and in situ hybridization and signal scoring using directly labeled and indirectly labeled probes. PMID:17876073

  11. Identification of two Skeletonema costatum-like diatoms by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baoyu; Chen, Guofu; Wang, Guangce; Lu, Douding

    2010-03-01

    A harmful algae bloom (HAB) is a dense aggregation of algae in a marine or aquatic environment that can result in significant environmental problems. To forecast the occurrence of HAB, development of a rapid and precise detection method is urgently required. In this study, two Skeletonema costatum-like diatoms (SK-1 and SK-2), were identified morphologically under a light microscope, and detected using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Strain SK-1 was isolated from a frequently HAB affected area of the East China Sea, and strain SK-2 from an aquatic farm in Qingdao, China. Fluorescent DNA probes were designed that were complementary to the ITS sequence (including 5.8S rDNA) of strain SK-1. After hybridization, strong green fluorescence was observed in cells of strain SK-1 under an epifluorescence microscope; however, no such fluorescence was observed with strain SK-2, which indicates that probes hybridized only the DNA of the target strain, SK-1, in species-specific manner, and that the two strains do not belong to a same species. This finding was confirmed by ITS sequence analysis. The FISH technique used in this study was sensitive, simple, and rapid, and is a promising tool for detecting target HAB species in natural environments.

  12. Evaluation of TET2 deletions in myeloid disorders: a fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of 109 cases.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Mirjam; Psaraki, Anna; Mastrodemou, Semeli; Pyrovolaki, Katerina; Mavroudi, Irene; Kalpadakis, Christina; Papadaki, Helen A

    2011-03-01

    Alterations of the ten-eleven translocation-2 (TET2) gene have been recently identified in patients with myeloid malignancies using molecular, comparative genomic hybridization and single nucleotide polymorphism array techniques. We have performed TET2 fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis in a cohort of patients with myeloid disorders including myeloid malignancies and chronic idiopathic neutropenia, aiming to determine the usefulness of the technique in the identification of TET2 gene alterations. A TET2 deletion was found in one patient with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia suggesting that fluorescence in situ hybridization may have a role in identification of TET2 deletions, at least in this group of patients. PMID:21087791

  13. Catalyzed Reported Deposition-Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Protocol To Evaluate Phagotrophy in Mixotrophic Protists

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Sánchez, Juan M.; Felip, Marisol; Casamayor, Emilio O.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a catalyzed reported deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) protocol particularly suited to assess the phagotrophy of mixotrophic protists on prokaryotes, since it maintains cell and plastid integrity, avoids cell loss and egestion of prey, and allows visualization of labeled prey against plastid autofluorescence. This protocol, which includes steps such as Lugol's-formaldehyde-thiosulfate fixation, agarose cell attachment, cell wall permeabilization with lysozyme plus achromopeptidase, and signal amplification with Alexa-Fluor 488, allowed us to detect almost 100% of planktonic prokaryotes (Bacteria and Archaea) and, for the first time, to show archaeal cells ingested by mixotrophic protists. PMID:16269774

  14. Two-color fluorescent in situ hybridization using chromogenic substrates in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Jennifer A; Zhao, Emma J; Kofron, Matthew J; Sumanas, Saulius

    2014-11-01

    Two-color fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a widely used technique for comparing relative gene expression patterns. Current two-color FISH protocols are not ideal for detecting weakly expressed transcripts or monitoring signal strength and background levels during the course of the reaction. Here we describe an improved FISH protocol using the conventional highly sensitive chromogenic substrates nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT)/5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate (BCIP) and Vector Red in zebrafish embryos. This protocol substantially improves on existing FISH techniques by combining the advantages of long reactivity of alkaline phosphatase, chromogenic monitoring of both developing reactions, and the ability to perform subsequent high-resolution fluorescent imaging. Although tested in zebrafish, a similar approach is expected to be applicable to ISH in any model organism. PMID:25391914

  15. Multiplexed miRNA Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Renwick, Neil; Cekan, Pavol; Bognanni, Claudia; Tuschl, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Multiplexed miRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (miRNA FISH) is an advanced method for visualizing differentially expressed miRNAs, together with other reference RNAs, in archival tissues. Some miRNAs are excellent disease biomarkers due to their abundance and cell-type specificity. However, these short RNA molecules are difficult to visualize due to loss by diffusion, probe mishybridization, and signal detection and signal amplification issues. Here, we describe a reliable and adjustable method for visualizing and normalizing miRNA signals in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections. PMID:25218385

  16. Mismatch discrimination in fluorescent in situ hybridization using different types of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Fontenete, Silvia; Silvia, Fontenete; Barros, Joana; Joana, Barros; Madureira, Pedro; Pedro, Madureira; Figueiredo, Céu; Céu, Figueiredo; Wengel, Jesper; Jesper, Wengel; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe; Filipe, Azevedo Nuno

    2015-05-01

    In the past few years, several researchers have focused their attention on nucleic acid mimics due to the increasing necessity of developing a more robust recognition of DNA or RNA sequences. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an example of a method where the use of these novel nucleic acid monomers might be crucial to the success of the analysis. To achieve the expected accuracy in detection, FISH probes should have high binding affinity towards their complementary strands and discriminate effectively the noncomplementary strands. In this study, we investigate the effect of different chemical modifications in fluorescent probes on their ability to successfully detect the complementary target and discriminate the mismatched base pairs by FISH. To our knowledge, this paper presents the first study where this analysis is performed with different types of FISH probes directly in biological targets, Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter acinonychis. This is also the first study where unlocked nucleic acids (UNA) were used as chemistry modification in oligonucleotides for FISH methodologies. The effectiveness in detecting the specific target and in mismatch discrimination appears to be improved using locked nucleic acids (LNA)/2'-O-methyl RNA (2'OMe) or peptide nucleic acid (PNA) in comparison to LNA/DNA, LNA/UNA, or DNA probes. Further, the use of LNA modifications together with 2'OMe monomers allowed the use of shorter fluorescent probes and increased the range of hybridization temperatures at which FISH would work. PMID:25840566

  17. Simultaneous specific in planta visualization of root-colonizing fungi using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Vági, Pál; Knapp, Dániel G; Kósa, Annamária; Seress, Diána; Horváth, Áron N; Kovács, Gábor M

    2014-05-01

    In planta detection of mutualistic, endophytic, and pathogenic fungi commonly colonizing roots and other plant organs is not a routine task. We aimed to use fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for simultaneous specific detection of different fungi colonizing the same tissue. We have adapted ribosomal RNA (rRNA) FISH for visualization of common mycorrhizal (arbuscular- and ectomycorrhiza) and endophytic fungi within roots of different plant species. Beside general probes, we designed and used specific ones hybridizing to the large subunit of rRNA with fluorescent dyes chosen to avoid or reduce the interference with the autofluorescence of plant tissues. We report here an optimized efficient protocol of rRNA FISH and the use of both epifluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy for simultaneous specific differential detection of those fungi colonizing the same root. The method could be applied for the characterization of other plant-fungal interactions, too. In planta FISH with specific probes labeled with appropriate fluorescent dyes could be used not only in basic research but to detect plant colonizing pathogenic fungi in their latent life-period. PMID:24221902

  18. Fluorescence in situ hybridization evaluation of chromosome deletion patterns in prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, S. F.; Xiao, S.; Renshaw, A. A.; Loughlin, K. R.; Hudson, T. J.; Fletcher, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    Various nonrandom chromosomal aberrations have been identified in prostate carcinoma. These aberrations include deletions of several chromosome regions, particularly the chromosome 8 short arm. Large-scale numerical aberrations, reflected in aberrant DNA ploidy, are also found in a minority of cases. However, it is unclear whether prostate carcinomas contain aberrations of certain chromosome regions that are deleted frequently in other common types of cancer. In this study, we performed dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization on intact nuclei from touch preparations of 16 prostate cancers. Chromosome copy number was determined using pericentromeric probes, whereas potential chromosome arm deletions were evaluated using yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) and P1 probes. Two YAC probes targeted chromosome 8 short arm regions known to be deleted frequently in prostate cancer. Other YACs and P1s were for chromosome regions, including 1p22, 3p14, 6q21, 9p21, and 22q12, that are deletion targets in a variety of cancers although not extensively studied in prostate cancer. Hybridization efficiencies and signal intensities were excellent for both repeat sequence (alpha-satellite) and single, copy (YAC and P1) fluorescence in situ hybridization probes. Of 16 prostate cancers, 11 had clonal aberrations of 1 or more of the 13 chromosome regions evaluated, and 10 cases (62.5%) had 8p deletions, including 4 cases with 8p deletion in virtually all cells and aneuploidy in only a subset of those deleted cells. Deletions at 3p14, 6q21, and 22q12 were identified in 2, 1, and 1 case, respectively, and each of those cases had a similarly sized cell population with 8p deletion. These studies confirm 8p deletion in the majority of prostate carcinomas. 8p deletions appear to be early events in prostate tumorigenesis, often antedating aneuploidy. Fluorescence in situ hybridization strategies incorporating pericentromeric and single-copy regional chromosome probes offer a powerful and efficient means for determining frequency and progression of oncogenetic events in prostate cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:8909246

  19. Fluorescence in situ hybridization applications for super-resolution 3D structured illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Markaki, Yolanda; Smeets, Daniel; Cremer, Marion; Schermelleh, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization on three-dimensionally preserved cells (3D-FISH) is an efficient tool to analyze the subcellular localization and spatial arrangement of targeted DNA sequences and RNA transcripts at the single cell level. 3D reconstructions from serial optical sections obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) have long been considered the gold standard for 3D-FISH analyses. Recent super-resolution techniques circumvent the diffraction-limit of optical resolution and have defined a new state-of-the-art in bioimaging. Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) represents one of these technologies. Notably, 3D-SIM renders an eightfold improved volumetric resolution over conventional imaging, and allows the simultaneous visualization of differently labeled target structures. These features make this approach highly attractive for the analysis of spatial relations and substructures of nuclear targets that escape detection by conventional light microscopy. Here, we focus on the application of 3D-SIM for the visualization of subnuclear 3D-FISH preparations. In comparison with conventional fluorescence microscopy, the quality of 3D-SIM data is dependent to a much greater extent on the optimal sample preparation, labeling and acquisition conditions. We describe typical problems encountered with super-resolution imaging of in situ hybridizations in mammalian tissue culture cells and provide optimized DNA-/(RNA)-FISH protocols including combinations with immunofluorescence staining (Immuno-FISH) and DNA replication labeling using click chemistry. PMID:23086869

  20. Analysis of HER2 Gene Amplification Using an Automated Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization Signal Enumeration System

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Rachel; Almanaseer, Imad; Gonzalez, Miguel; Caglar, Derin; Knudson, Ryan A.; Ketterling, Rhett P.; Schrock, Daniel S.; Seemayer, Thomas A.; Bridge, Julia A.

    2007-01-01

    The HER2 gene, amplified in 10 to 35% of invasive human breast carcinomas, has prognostic and therapeutic implications. Fluorescent in situ hybridization is one method currently used for assessing HER2 status, but fluorescent in situ hybridization involves the time-consuming step of manual signal enumeration. To address this issue, Vysis has developed an automated signal enumeration system, Vysis AutoVysion. A multicenter, blinded study was conducted on 39 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded invasive breast carcinoma specimens, including 20 HER2 nonamplified and 19 HER2 amplified (weakly to highly amplified), provided in duplicate to each study site for analysis. Calculation of the HER2/CEP17 ratio and the hands-on time of both manual and automated enumeration approaches were compared. Overall agreement of HER2 classification results (positive and negative) was 92.5% (196 of 212). The Vysis AutoVysion System requires manual enumeration for cases with scanner results within the ratio range of 1.5 to 3.0. When the data in this range are excluded, the agreement between manual and scanner results is 98.8% (169 of 171). The average Vysis AutoVysion System hands-on time per slide was 4.59 versus 7.47 minutes for manual signal enumeration (savings of 2.88 minutes/slide). These data suggest that the Vysis AutoVysion System can correctly classify specimens and may increase the overall efficiency of HER2 testing. PMID:17384205

  1. Detection of a complex translocation using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, B.A.; Abuelo, D.N.; Mark, H.F.

    1994-09-01

    The use of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) allowed the detection of a complex 3-way translocation in a patient with multiple congenital malformations and mental retardation. The patient was a 10-year-old girl with mental retardation, seizures, repaired cleft palate, esotropia, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, upward slanting palpebral fissures, single transverse palmar crease, brachydactyly, hypoplastic nails, ectrodactyly between the third and fourth right toes, and hypoplasia of the left third toe. Chromosome analysis performed at birth was reported as normal. We performed high resolution banding analysis which revealed an apparently balanced translocation between chromosomes 2 and 9. However, because of her multiple abnormalities, further studies were ordered. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using chromosome painting probes revealed a karyotype of 46,XX,t(2;8;9) (2pter{yields}q31::8q21.2{yields}8qter; 8pter{yields}q21.2::2q31{yields}q34::9q34{yields}qter; 9pter{yields}q34::2q34{yields}qter). The 3-way translocation appears to be de novo, as neither parent is a translocation carrier. This case illustrates the importance of using FISH to further investigate cases of apparently balanced translocations in the presence of phenotypic abnormalities and/or mental retardation.

  2. Protecting Quantum Dot Fluorescence from Quenching to Achieve a Reliable Automated Multiplex Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjun; Hubbard, Antony; Pang, Lizhen; Parkinson, Leslie Baca; Brunhoeber, Patrick; Wang, Yixin; Tang, Lei

    2015-09-01

    Quantum dots (QD) are novel inorganic fluorochromes that are ultra-bright, photo-stable, and available in multiple, highly-resolvable colors. QDs represent an ideal detection material for in situ hybridization (ISH) because they may provide unprecedented resolution and strong signal intensities that are not attainable with traditional fluorophores. Unfortunately, lack of reliability has been an impediment to widespread adoption of QD-based fluorescence in situ hybridization (QD FISH) technology. By optimizing QD-to-target accessibility, we have developed a QD FISH staining procedure that dramatically improves the reliability of an automated ERG/PTEN QD FISH assay (91% 1st pass rate). Here, we report improvements to the assay that protects QD fluorescence from quenching due to trace amounts of heavy metals and minimizes QD background signals. When using this method, highly-consistent staining was observed with the ERG/PTEN QD FISH assay in prostate tissue. Successful staining of several other clinically-relevant genetic markers was also possible. We further demonstrated improved reliability for determining HER2 gene status in breast cancer, identifying anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene break-apart in non-small cell lung cancer, and detecting human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. The enhanced QD FISH assay allows for examining complicated genetic aberrances without use of enzymatic amplification. Our optimized methods now demonstrate reliability sufficient for QD FISH technology to be a diagnostic tool in a clinical setting. PMID:26485928

  3. Whole-slide imaging is a robust alternative to traditional fluorescent microscopy for fluorescence in situ hybridization imaging using break-apart DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Camille; Gurin, Maxime; Frenois, Franois-Xavier; Thuries, Valrie; Jalabert, Laurence; Brousset, Pierre; Valmary-Degano, Sverine

    2013-08-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization is an indispensable technique used in routine pathology and for theranostic purposes. Because fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques require sophisticated microscopic workstations and long procedures of image acquisition with sometimes subjective and poorly reproducible results, we decided to test a whole-slide imaging system as an alternative approach. In this study, we used the latest generation of Pannoramic 250 Flash digital microscopes (P250 Flash digital microscopes; 3DHISTECH, Budapest, Hungary) to digitize fluorescence in situ hybridization slides of diffuse large B cells lymphoma cases for detecting MYC rearrangement. The P250 Flash digital microscope was found to be precise with better definition of split signals in cells containing MYC rearrangement with fewer truncated signals as compared to traditional fluorescence microscopy. This digital technique is easier thanks to the preview function, which allows almost immediate identification of the tumor area, and the panning and zooming functionalities as well as a shorter acquisition time. Moreover, fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses using the digital technique appeared to be more reproducible between pathologists. Finally, the digital technique also allowed prolonged conservation of photos. In conclusion, whole-slide imaging technologies represent rapid, robust, and highly sensitive methods for interpreting fluorescence in situ hybridization slides with break-apart probes. In addition, these techniques offer an easier way to interpret the signals and allow definitive storage of the images for pathology expert networks or e-learning databases. PMID:23517924

  4. PNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for rapid microbiology and cytogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Stender, Henrik; Williams, Brett; Coull, James

    2014-01-01

    Hybridization-based assays for the detection of nucleic acids including in situ hybridization are increasingly being utilized in a wide variety of disciplines such as cytogenetics, microbiology, and histology. Generally in situ hybridization assays utilize either cloned genomic probes for the detection of DNA sequences or oligonucleotide probes for the detection of DNA or RNA sequences. Alternately, PNA probes are increasingly being utilized in a variety of in situ hybridization assays. The neutral backbone of the PNA molecule allows for the PNA probes to bind to DNA or RNA under low ionic strength conditions that will either disfavor reannealing of complimentary genomic sequences or are denaturing for RNA secondary structure but are favorable for PNA/DNA or PNA/RNA hybridization. For in situ hybridization assays these unique properties of PNA probes offer significant advantages that allow for the development of fast, simple, and robust assays (Figs. 14.1 and 14.2). PMID:24297359

  5. Quantitative Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization of Microbial Communities in the Rumens of Cattle Fed Different Diets▿

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yunhong; He, Maolong; McAlister, Tim; Seviour, Robert; Forster, Robert

    2010-01-01

    At present there is little quantitative information on the identity and composition of bacterial populations in the rumen microbial community. Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization using newly designed oligonucleotide probes was applied to identify the microbial populations in liquid and solid fractions of rumen digesta from cows fed barley silage or grass hay diets with or without flaxseed. Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria were abundant in both fractions, constituting 31.8 to 87.3% of the total cell numbers. They belong mainly to the order Bacteroidales (0.1 to 19.2%), hybridizing with probe BAC1080; the families Lachnospiraceae (9.3 to 25.5%) and Ruminococcaceae (5.5 to 23.8%), hybridizing with LAC435 and RUM831, respectively; and the classes Deltaproteobacteria (5.8 to 28.3%) and Gammaproteobacteria (1.2 to 8.2%). All were more abundant in the rumen communities of cows fed diets containing silage (75.2 to 87.3%) than in those of cows fed diets containing hay (31.8 to 49.5%). The addition of flaxseed reduced their abundance in the rumens of cows fed silage-based diets (to 45.2 to 58.7%) but did not change markedly their abundance in the rumens of cows fed hay-based diets (31.8 to 49.5%). Fibrolytic species, including Fibrobacter succinogenes and Ruminococcus spp., and archaeal methanogens accounted for only a small proportion (0.4 to 2.1% and 0.2 to 0.6%, respectively) of total cell numbers. Depending on diet, between 37.0 and 91.6% of microbial cells specifically hybridized with the probes used in this study, allowing them to be identified in situ. The identities of other microbial populations (8.4 to 63.0%) remain unknown. PMID:20802069

  6. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses of human oocytes in trisomy 18 and 21

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, E.Y.; Chen, Y.J.; Gartler, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    The commonly accepted view of synapsis is that only 2 homologues can synapse at any one site and that this restriction applies to polyploids as well. However, triple synapsis has been observed is some triploid plants and in triploid chicken. In humans, triple synapsis of the long arm of chromosome 21 was detected in sperm of a trisomic 21 individual. More recently, studies of oocytes from trisomic 21 and 18 fetuses also indicated extensive triple synapsis along the entire length of the chromosomes. To further investigate this question, we undertook an evaluation of trivalent synapsis in fetal oocytes from 2 trisomic 21 and 2 trisomic 18 fetuses using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome probes. Oocytes were hybridized with whole chromosome probes obtained from ONCOR, Inc. after fixation with methanol and acetic acid. Slides were scored for the distribution of prophase stages, hybridization efficiency, and hybridization characteristics of chromosomes 18 and 21 in the trisomic 18 and 21 fetuses respectively. Fifty-eight per cent (379/650) of pachytenes analyzed for chromosome 18 contained a conspicous trivalent and 319 (48%) of these nuclei contained a single, thick, continuous fluorescent signal consistent with complete triple synapsis along the entire length of all 3 chromosomes. Sixteen per cent (104/650) of pachytene contained 2 signals consistent with a bivalent and a univalent, and 9 cells contained 3 thin signals consistent with asynapsis of all 3 chromosomes. The remaining 158 pachytenes had unusual pairing configurations that we could not classify, but they most likely represent trivalents with partial pairing between different homologues. In the 2 trisomic 21 fetuses, the majority (143/232) of pachytenes also contained one signal while only 52 cells contained a bivalent and univalent. Five cells contained 3 separate signals. These results confirm the existence of triple synapsis in human meiosis.

  7. Recent advances in rice genome and chromosome structure research by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    PubMed Central

    Ohmido, Nobuko; Fukui, Kiichi; Kinoshita, Toshiro

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an effective method for the physical mapping of genes and repetitive DNA sequences on chromosomes. Physical mapping of unique nucleotide sequences on specific rice chromosome regions was performed using a combination of chromosome identification and highly sensitive FISH. Increases in the detection sensitivity of smaller DNA sequences and improvements in spatial resolution have ushered in a new phase in FISH technology. Thus, it is now possible to perform in situ hybridization on somatic chromosomes, pachytene chromosomes, and even on extended DNA fibers (EDFs). Pachytene-FISH allows the integration of genetic linkage maps and quantitative chromosome maps. Visualization methods using FISH can reveal the spatial organization of the centromere, heterochromatin/euchromatin, and the terminal structures of rice chromosomes. Furthermore, EDF-FISH and the DNA combing technique can resolve a spatial distance of 1 kb between adjacent DNA sequences, and the detection of even a 300-bp target is now feasible. The copy numbers of various repetitive sequences and the sizes of various DNA molecules were quantitatively measured using the molecular combing technique. This review describes the significance of these advances in molecular cytology in rice and discusses future applications in plant studies using visualization techniques. PMID:20154468

  8. Fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques for the rapid detection of genetic prognostic factors in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, C P F; Bown, N P; McGuckin, A G; Lunec, J; Malcolm, A J; Pearson, A D J; Sheer, D

    2000-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the commonest extracranial solid tumour in children. There are a number of molecular genetic features known which are of prognostic importance and which are used to direct therapy. Identification and targeting of high-risk individuals with intensive therapeutic regimens may allow an improvement in survival rates. The most powerful biological parameters associated with prognosis in this malignancy are chromosomal changes, especially MYCN amplification, deletion of chromosome 1p and aneuploidy. Rapid characterization of these aberrations at the time of diagnosis is paramount if stratification according to risk group is to be achieved. This paper describes the rapid detection of del(1p), MYCN amplification and trisomy using interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization on imprints from fresh tumour biopsies. The results are related to those obtained by standard molecular methods and karyotyping. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10883666

  9. Chromosome-Specific DNA Repeats: Rapid Identification in Silico and Validation Using Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Joanne H.; Zeng, Hui; Lemke, Kalistyn H.; Polyzos, Aris A.; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Lawin-O’Brien, Anna R.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; O’Brien, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome enumeration in interphase and metaphase cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an established procedure for the rapid and accurate cytogenetic analysis of cell nuclei and polar bodies, the unambiguous gender determination, as well as the definition of tumor-specific signatures. Present bottlenecks in the procedure are a limited number of commercial, non-isotopically labeled probes that can be combined in multiplex FISH assays and the relatively high price and effort to develop additional probes. We describe a streamlined approach for rapid probe definition, synthesis and validation, which is based on the analysis of publicly available DNA sequence information, also known as “database mining”. Examples of probe preparation for the human gonosomes and chromosome 16 as a selected autosome outline the probe selection strategy, define a timeline for expedited probe production and compare this novel selection strategy to more conventional probe cloning protocols. PMID:23344021

  10. Chromosome orientation fluorescence in situ hybridization (CO-FISH) to study sister chromatid segregation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Falconer, Ester; Chavez, Elizabeth; Henderson, Alexander; Lansdorp, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Previously, assays for sister chromatid segregation patterns relied on incorporation of BrdU and indirect methods to infer segregation patterns after two cell divisions. Here we describe a method to differentially label sister chromatids of murine cells and directly assay sister chromatid segregation patterns following one cell division in vitro and in vivo by adaptation of the well-established CO-FISH (chromosome orientation fluorescent in situ hybridization) technique. 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) is incorporated into newly-formed DNA strands, followed by photolysis and exonuclease digestion to create single-stranded sister chromatids containing parental template DNA only. Such single-stranded sister chromatids are differentially labeled using unidirectional probes to major satellite sequences coupled to fluorescent markers. Differentially-labeled sister chromatids in post-mitotic cells are visualized using fluorescence microscopy and sister chromatid segregation patterns can be directly assayed after one cell division. This procedure requires four days for in vivo mouse tissues, and two days for in vitro cultured cells. PMID:20595964

  11. Prediction of melting temperatures in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedures using thermodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Fontenete, Sílvia; Guimarães, Nuno; Wengel, Jesper; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe

    2016-06-01

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA hybridization, i.e. the process of self-assembly of one, two or more complementary nucleic acid strands, has been studied for many years. The appearance of the nearest-neighbor model led to several theoretical and experimental papers on DNA thermodynamics that provide reasonably accurate thermodynamic information on nucleic acid duplexes and allow estimation of the melting temperature. Because there are no thermodynamic models specifically developed to predict the hybridization temperature of a probe used in a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure, the melting temperature is used as a reference, together with corrections for certain compounds that are used during FISH. However, the quantitative relation between melting and experimental FISH temperatures is poorly described. In this review, various models used to predict the melting temperature for rRNA targets, for DNA oligonucleotides and for nucleic acid mimics (chemically modified oligonucleotides), will be addressed in detail, together with a critical assessment of how this information should be used in FISH. PMID:25586037

  12. Methods for meiotic chromosome preparation, immunofluorescence, and fluorescence in situ hybridization in Daphnia pulex.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Dai; Eads, Brian D; Zolan, Miriam E

    2009-01-01

    The genus Daphnia has an intriguing reproductive mode of cyclical parthenogenesis. This reproductive mode has been studied for centuries, but cytogenetic information is lacking due to technical limitations of classical methods. We have developed methods for the preparation and examination of meiotic chromosomes of Daphnia pulex from oocytes and spermatocytes. Oocyte chromosome preparations are obtained by isolating individual oocytes after the release of yolk granules from the ovary using pressure and capillary action. Spermatocyte chromosomes are prepared using a conventional squash method. Cryosectioning is an easy and fast way to prepare sections. We also illustrate the application of immunofluorescence staining against alpha tubulin, as well as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using the intergenic spacer of ribosomal DNA or single-copy cosmid clones. PMID:19685328

  13. Detection of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans in acid mine drainage environments using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, K K; Leduc, L G; Ferroni, G D

    2005-04-01

    An important microorganism of acid mine drainage (AMD) and bioleaching environments is Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans which oxidizes ferrous iron and generates ferric iron, an oxidant. Most investigations to understand microbial aspects of sulfide mineral dissolution have focused on understanding physiological, metabolic, and genetic characteristics of A. ferrooxidans. In this study, a 16S rRNA oligonucleotide probe designated S-S-T.ferr-0584-a-A-18, and labeled at the 5'-end with indocarbocyanine dye (CY3), was used in a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure on pure cultures of nine isolates of A. ferrooxidans. These isolates were recovered from acid mine drainage and mining environments. The probe was also used to detect cells of A. ferrooxidans, recovered from AMD samples, growing on FeTSB and FeSo solid media in a FISH procedure. In addition, the presence of cells of A. ferrooxidans in an environmental water sample from an AMD site in Copper Cliff, Ontario, Canada was analyzed using the FISH technique. Probe specificity was first confirmed with A. ferrooxidans ATCC 19859 (positive control) and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans ATCC 19377, Acidiphilium acidophilum ATCC 27807, and Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 8014 (negative controls). Positive and negative control cells were also used to determine optimal stringency conditions for hybridizations with the probe. Cells of the nine isolates of A. ferrooxidans stained positive, although the fluorescent signal varied in intensity from isolate to isolate. Colonies of A. ferrooxidans from the environmental water sample of the AMD site were recovered only on FeTSB solid medium after 22 days of incubation. The probe was able to detect cells of A. ferrooxidans in a FISH procedure. However, no cells of A. ferrooxidans were detected in the AMD water sample without cultivation. Thus, probe S-S-T.ferr-0584-a-A-18 hybridized effectively with cells of A. ferrooxidans recovered from pure cultures but failed to directly detect cells of A. ferrooxidans in the AMD site. PMID:15676194

  14. Comparative aneugenicity of doxorubicin and its derivative idarubicin using fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques.

    PubMed

    Attia, Sabry M

    2011-10-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate and compare the aneugenicity of idarubicin and doxorubicin, topoisomerase-targeting anticancer anthracyclines, using fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques. It was found that idarubicin and doxorubicin treatment (12 mg/kg) induced sperm meiotic delay of 24h. To determine the frequencies of disomic and diploid sperm, groups of 5 male Swiss albino mice were treated with 3, 6 and 12 mg/kg idarubicin or doxorubicin. Significant increases in the frequencies of disomic and diploid sperm were caused by treatment with all doses of idarubicin and the two highest doses of doxorubicin compared with the controls. Moreover, both compounds significantly increased the frequency of diploid sperm, indicating that complete meiotic arrest occurred. The observation that XX- and YY-sperm significantly prevailed XY-sperm indicates missegregation during the second meiotic division. The results suggest also that earlier prophase stages contribute relatively less to idarubicin and doxorubicin-induced aneuploidy. Effects of the same doses were investigated by the bone-marrow micronucleus test. Significant increases in the frequencies of micronuclei were found after treatment with all doses of both compounds. The responses were also directly correlated with bone marrow suppression. Idarubicin was more toxic than doxorubicin. Exposure to 12 mg/kg of idarubicin and doxorubicin yielded 3.82 and 2.64% micronuclei, respectively, and of these an average of 58.3 and 62.8%, respectively, showed centromeric signals, indicating their formation by whole chromosomes and reflecting the aneugenic activity of both compounds. Correspondingly, about 41.7 and 37.2% of the induced micronuclei, respectively, were centromere-negative, demonstrating that both compounds not only induce chromosome loss but also DNA strand breaks. Based on our data, aneuploidy assays such as sperm-fluorescence in situ hybridization assay and micronucleus test complemented by fluorescence in situ hybridization with centromeric DNA probes have been to some extent validated to be recommended for the assessment of aneuploidogenic effects of chemicals. PMID:21856314

  15. Identification of supernumerary ring chromosome 1 mosaicism using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Tuck-Muller, C.M.; Wertelecki, W.

    1995-03-27

    We report on a 15-year-old black boy with severe mental retardation, multiple congenital anomalies, and a supernumerary ring chromosome mosaicism. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with a chromosome 1 painting probe (pBS1) identified the ring as derived from chromosome 1. The karyotype was 46,XY/47,XY,+r(1)(p13q23). A review showed 8 reports of ring chromosome 1. In 5 cases, the patients had a non-supernumerary ring chromosome 1 resulting in partial monosomies of the short and/or long arm of chromosome 1. In 3 cases, the presence of a supernumerary ring resulted in partial trisomy of different segments of chromosome 1. In one of these cases of the supernumerary ring was composed primarily of the centromere and the heterochromatic region of chromosome 1, resulting in normal phenotype. Our patient represents the third report of a supernumerary ring chromosome 1 resulting in abnormal phenotype. 28 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. A New Multicolor Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Probe Set Directed Against Human Heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Bucksch, Maria; Ziegler, Monika; Kosayakova, Nadezda; Mulatinho, Milene V.; Llerena, Juan C.; Morlot, Susanne; Fischer, Wolfgang; Polityko, Anna D.; Kulpanovich, Anna I.; Petersen, Michael B.; Belitz, Britta; Trifonov, Vladimir; Weise, Anja; Hamid, Ahmed B.

    2012-01-01

    A new multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) probe set is presented, and its possible applications are highlighted in 25 clinical cases. The so-called heterochromatin-M-FISH (HCM-FISH) probe set enables a one-step characterization of the large heterochromatic regions within the human genome. HCM-FISH closes a gap in the now available mFISH probe sets, as those do not normally cover the acrocentric short arms; the large pericentric regions of chromosomes 1, 9, and 16; as well as the band Yq12. Still, these regions can be involved in different kinds of chromosomal rearrangements such as translocations, insertions, inversions, amplifications, and marker chromosome formations. Here, examples are given for all these kinds of chromosomal aberrations, detected as constitutional rearrangements in clinical cases. Application perspectives of the probe set in tumors as well as in evolutionary cytogenetic studies are given. PMID:22511603

  17. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) as a tool for visualization and enumeration of Campylobacter in broiler ceca

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food-borne human pathogens are typically detected and enumerated by either cultural methods or PCR-based approaches. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) is a standard microscopy tool for microbial ecology but has not been widely used for food safety applications despite important advantages o...

  18. Same-day prenatal diagnosis of common chromosomal aneuploidies using microfluidics-fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Ho, Sherry S Y; Chua, Cuiwen; Gole, Leena; Biswas, Arijit; Koay, Evelyn; Choolani, Mahesh

    2012-04-01

    Rapid molecular prenatal diagnostic methods, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), quantitative fluorescence-PCR, and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, can detect common fetal aneuploidies within 24 to 48 h. However, specific diagnosis or aneuploidy exclusion should be ideally available within the same day as fetal sampling to alleviate parental anxiety. Microfluidic technologies integrate different steps into a microchip, saving time and costs. We have developed a cost-effective, same-day prenatal diagnostic FISH assay using microfluidics. Amniotic fluids (1-4 mL from 40 pregnant women at 15-22 weeks of gestation) were fixed with Carnoy's before loading into the microchannels of a microfluidic FISH-integrated nanostructured device. The glass slides were coated with nanostructured titanium dioxide to facilitate cell adhesion. Pretreatment and hybridization were performed within the microchannels. Fifty nuclei were counted by two independent analysts, and all results were validated with their respective karyotypes. Of the 40 samples, we found three cases of fetal aneuploidies (trisomies 13, 18, and 21), whereas the remaining 37 cases were normal. Results were concordant with their karyotypes and ready to be released within 3 h of sample receipt. Microfluidic FISH, using 20-fold less than the recommended amount of probe, is a cost-effective method to diagnose common fetal aneuploidies within the same day of fetal sampling. PMID:22467162

  19. Chromosome translocations measured by fluorescence in-situ hybridization: A promising biomarker

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.

    1995-10-01

    A biomarker for exposure and risk assessment would be most useful if it employs an endpoint that is highly quantitative, is stable with time, and is relevant to human risk. Recent advances in chromosome staining using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) facilitate fast and reliable measurement of reciprocal translocations, a kind of DNA damage linked to both prior exposure and risk. In contrast to other biomarkers available, the frequency of reciprocal translocations in individuals exposed to whole-body radiation is stable with time post exposure, has a rather small inter-individual variability, and can be measured accurately at the low levels. Here, the authors discuss results from their studies demonstrating that chromosome painting can be used to reconstruct radiation dose for workers exposed within the dose limits, for individuals exposed a long time ago, and even for those who have been diagnosed with leukemia but not yet undergone therapy.

  20. Acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma: an immunohistochemical and fluorescence in situ hybridization study.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Naoto; Yamashita, Motoki; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki; Hes, Ondrej; Michal, Michal; Lee, Gang-Hong

    2011-12-01

    Acquired cystic disease (ACD)-associated renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been recently identified. However, there are only a few genetic studies to date. In this article, we performed an immunohistochemical and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) study for six cases including one case with sarcomatoid change. As a result, we observed frequent immunohistochemical expression of AMACR. FISH of chromosome 3 showed trisomy for three cases, monosomy for two cases, and disomy for one case. Additionally, FISH of chromosome 16 showed trisomy for three cases, monosomy for two cases, and both trisomy and monosomy for one case. Furthermore, both the carcinomatous area and the sarcomatoid area of one ACD-associated RCC with sarcomatoid change revealed monosomy of chromosomes 3, 9, and 16 but showed disomy of chromosome 14. In conclusion, the numerical abnormalities of chromosomes 3 and 16, irrespective of gain or loss, may be characteristic of ACD-associated RCC. PMID:22179186

  1. Nasopharyngeal hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma with EWSR1 rearrangements diagnosed by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Atsushi; Tagami, Yohei; Takasawa, Akira; Sugita, Shintaro; Kuramoto, Rinnosuke; Imai, Suguru; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Iizuka, Keiji

    2015-10-01

    Hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma (HCCC) is a rare, low-grade salivary gland neoplasm with a predilection for the palate and tongue. A 63-year-old woman presented a 14×14×17-mm mass at the roof of the nasopharynx. Endoscopic resection was performed via a transnasal approach. Histopathological findings of the salivary gland tumor indicated hyalinization of the stroma and neoplastic cells with clear cytoplasm without mucin. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis revealed that the tumor cells were positive for EWSR1 rearrangement. We finally diagnosed this case as HCCC of the nasopharynx. EWSR1 rearrangements are non-existent in other salivary gland tumors with clear cell change; thus, the identification of this rearrangement was very useful in accurately diagnosing HCCC. PMID:25805066

  2. The design of a microscopic system for typical fluorescent in-situ hybridization applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Dingrong; Xie, Shaochuan

    2013-12-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a modern molecular biology technique used for the detection of genetic abnormalities in terms of the number and structure of chromosomes and genes. The FISH technique is typically employed for prenatal diagnosis of congenital dementia in the Obstetrics and Genecology department. It is also routinely used to pick up qualifying breast cancer patients that are known to be highly curable by the prescription of Her2 targeted therapy. During the microscopic observation phase, the technician needs to count typically green probe dots and red probe dots contained in a single nucleus and calculate their ratio. This procedure need to be done to over hundreds of nuclei. Successful implementation of FISH tests critically depends on a suitable fluorescent microscope which is primarily imported from overseas due to the complexity of such a system beyond the maturity of the domestic optoelectrical industry. In this paper, the typical requirements of a fluorescent microscope that is suitable for FISH applications are first reviewed. The focus of this paper is on the system design and computational methods of an automatic florescent microscopy with high magnification APO objectives, a fast spinning automatic filter wheel, an automatic shutter, a cooled CCD camera used as a photo-detector, and a software platform for image acquisition, registration, pseudo-color generation, multi-channel fusing and multi-focus fusion. Preliminary results from FISH experiments indicate that this system satisfies routine FISH microscopic observation tasks.

  3. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for the identification of Treponema pallidum in tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Petrich, Annett; Rojas, Pablo; Schulze, Julia; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Giacani, Lorenzo; Schneider, Thomas; Hertel, Moritz; Kikhney, Judith; Moter, Annette

    2015-10-01

    Syphilis is often called the great imitator because of its frequent atypical clinical manifestations that make the disease difficult to recognize. Because Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the infectious agent of syphilis, is yet uncultivated in vitro, diagnosis is usually made using serology; however, in cases where serology is inconclusive or in patients with immunosuppression where these tests may be difficult to interpret, the availability of a molecular tool for direct diagnosis may be of pivotal importance. Here we present a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay that simultaneously identifies and analyzes spatial distribution of T. pallidum in histological tissue sections. For this assay the species-specific FISH probe TPALL targeting the 16S rRNA of T. pallidum was designed in silico and evaluated using T. pallidum infected rabbit testicular tissue and a panel of non-syphilis spirochetes as positive and negative controls, respectively, before application to samples from four syphilis-patients. In a HIV positive patient, FISH showed the presence of T. pallidum in inguinal lymph node tissue. In a patient not suspected to suffer from syphilis but underwent surgery for phimosis, numerous T. pallidum cells were found in preputial tissue. In two cases with oral involvement, FISH was able to differentiate T. pallidum from oral treponemes and showed infection of the oral mucosa and tonsils, respectively. The TPALL FISH probe is now readily available for in situ identification of T. pallidum in selected clinical samples as well as T. pallidum research applications and animal models. PMID:26365167

  4. Development of single-cell array for large-scale DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingru; Kirkland, Brett; Shirley, James; Wang, Zhibin; Zhang, Peipei; Stembridge, Jacquelyn; Wong, Wilson; Takebayashi, Shin-ichiro; Gilbert, David M.; Lenhert, Steven

    2013-01-01

    DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful cytogenetic assay, but conventional sample-preparation methods for FISH do not support large-scale high-throughput data acquisition and analysis, which are potentially useful for several biomedical applications. To address this limitation, we have developed a novel FISH sample-preparation method based on generating a centimetre-sized cell array, in which all cells are precisely positioned and separated from their neighbours. This method is simple and easy and capable of patterning nonadherent human cells. We have successfully performed DNA FISH on the single-cell arrays, which facilitate analysis of FISH results with the FISH-FINDER computer program. PMID:23370691

  5. Partial trisomy 13q identified by sequential fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal Rao, V.V.N.; Carpenter, N.J.; Gucsavas, M.

    1995-07-31

    We report on a 19-month-old boy with partial trisomy 13q resulting from a probable balanced translocation involving chromosomes 1 and 13. The infant presented with omphalocele, malrotation, microcephaly with overriding skull bones, micrognathia, apparently low-set ears, rocker-bottom feet, and congenital heart disease, findings suggestive of trisomy 13. Karyotypic studies from peripheral blood lymphocytes documented an unbalanced karyotype 46,XY,-1,+der. The mother`s chromosomes were normal, and the father was not available. Conventional cytogenetic techniques were unable to identify the extra material on the terminal 1q. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on the GTL-banded metaphases, the extra material on 1q was identified as the terminal long arm of 13, thus resulting in partial trisomy 13 (q32-qter). 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. In Situ Detection of Freshwater Fungi in an Alpine Stream by New Taxon-Specific Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Probes▿

    PubMed Central

    Baschien, Christiane; Manz, Werner; Neu, Thomas R.; Marvanová, Ludmila; Szewzyk, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    New rRNA-targeting oligonucleotide probes permitted the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) identification of freshwater fungi in an Austrian second-order alpine stream. Based on computer-assisted comparative sequence analysis, nine taxon-specific probes were designed and evaluated by whole-fungus hybridizations. Oligonucleotide probe MY1574, specific for a wide range of Eumycota, and the genus (Tetracladium)-specific probe TCLAD1395, as well as the species-specific probes ALacumi1698 (Alatospora acuminata), TRIang322 (Tricladium angulatum), and Alongi340 (Anguillospora longissima), are targeted against 18S rRNA, whereas probes TmarchB10, TmarchC1_1, TmarchC1_2, and AlongiB16 are targeted against the 28S rRNA of Tetracladium marchalianum and Anguillospora longissima, respectively. After 2 weeks and 3 months of exposure of polyethylene slides in the stream, attached germinating conidia and growing hyphae of freshwater fungi were accessible for FISH. Growing hyphae and germinating conidia on leaves and in membrane cages were also visualized by the new FISH probes. PMID:18776035

  7. In situ detection of freshwater fungi in an alpine stream by new taxon-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Baschien, Christiane; Manz, Werner; Neu, Thomas R; Marvanová, Ludmila; Szewzyk, Ulrich

    2008-10-01

    New rRNA-targeting oligonucleotide probes permitted the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) identification of freshwater fungi in an Austrian second-order alpine stream. Based on computer-assisted comparative sequence analysis, nine taxon-specific probes were designed and evaluated by whole-fungus hybridizations. Oligonucleotide probe MY1574, specific for a wide range of Eumycota, and the genus (Tetracladium)-specific probe TCLAD1395, as well as the species-specific probes ALacumi1698 (Alatospora acuminata), TRIang322 (Tricladium angulatum), and Alongi340 (Anguillospora longissima), are targeted against 18S rRNA, whereas probes TmarchB10, TmarchC1_1, TmarchC1_2, and AlongiB16 are targeted against the 28S rRNA of Tetracladium marchalianum and Anguillospora longissima, respectively. After 2 weeks and 3 months of exposure of polyethylene slides in the stream, attached germinating conidia and growing hyphae of freshwater fungi were accessible for FISH. Growing hyphae and germinating conidia on leaves and in membrane cages were also visualized by the new FISH probes. PMID:18776035

  8. Use of fluorescence in situ hybridization for retrospective detection of aneuploidy in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Lee, W; Han, K; Drut, R M; Harris, C P; Meisner, L F

    1993-07-01

    In malignancies with a low mitotic index such as multiple myeloma (MM), conventional cytogenetic studies may not be informative. This study's purpose was to assess specific numerical chromosomal aberrations in non-dividing MM cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of DNA chromosome probes on bone marrow smears. Old air-dried bone marrow smears from 18 MM patients were probed with alpha satellite DNA sequences for chromosomes 7, X, and Y, and a whole painting probe for chromosome 11. Plasma cells were identified by their morphologic characteristics so that counts of fluorescent signals in the nuclei of MM cells could be differentiated from those of normal marrow cells. Numerical chromosome aberrations were found in 66.7% of the cases (12 of 18), including 5 cases of trisomy 7, 2 cases of tetraploidy, 2 cases of monosomy X in females, 2 cases of disomy X in males, and 1 case of nullisomy Y. In addition, 2 of the 7 cases probed with chromosome 11 paint demonstrated 3 signals in about 15% of the cells. This study illustrates the advantages of FISH for interphase analysis of chromosome aberrations in slowly dividing cells, as well as the ability to use old slides for retrospective studies. PMID:7687866

  9. Chromosomal loci of 50 human keratinocyte cDNAs assigned by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Morishima, Yohich; Ariyama, Takeshi; Yamanishi, Kiyofumi

    1995-07-20

    The chromosomal loci of expressed genes provide useful information for a candidate gene approach to the genes responsible for genetic diseases. A large set of randomly isolated cDNAs catalogued by partial sequencing can serve as a resource for accessing and isolating these disease genes. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we examined the chromosomal loci of 217 human keratinocyte-derived cDNAs, with independent novel sequence tags at the 3{prime} end region. Among them, we determined the loci of 50 cDNAs. Single-pass sequencing of these from the 5{prime} ends indicated that 39 cDNAs still can be produced for new genes. These cDNAs with identified chromosomal loci are powerful tools that can be used to help elucidate the genes responsible for hereditary skin disorders. 42 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Determination of the ruminant origin of bone particles using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Lecrenier, M C; Ledoux, Q; Berben, G; Fumière, O; Saegerman, C; Baeten, V; Veys, P

    2014-01-01

    Molecular biology techniques such as PCR constitute powerful tools for the determination of the taxonomic origin of bones. DNA degradation and contamination by exogenous DNA, however, jeopardise bone identification. Despite the vast array of techniques used to decontaminate bone fragments, the isolation and determination of bone DNA content are still problematic. Within the framework of the eradication of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (including BSE, commonly known as "mad cow disease"), a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) protocol was developed. Results from the described study showed that this method can be applied directly to bones without a demineralisation step and that it allows the identification of bovine and ruminant bones even after severe processing. The results also showed that the method is independent of exogenous contamination and that it is therefore entirely appropriate for this application. PMID:25034259

  11. Determination of the ruminant origin of bone particles using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    PubMed Central

    Lecrenier, M. C.; Ledoux, Q.; Berben, G.; Fumière, O.; Saegerman, C.; Baeten, V.; Veys, P.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular biology techniques such as PCR constitute powerful tools for the determination of the taxonomic origin of bones. DNA degradation and contamination by exogenous DNA, however, jeopardise bone identification. Despite the vast array of techniques used to decontaminate bone fragments, the isolation and determination of bone DNA content are still problematic. Within the framework of the eradication of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (including BSE, commonly known as “mad cow disease”), a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) protocol was developed. Results from the described study showed that this method can be applied directly to bones without a demineralisation step and that it allows the identification of bovine and ruminant bones even after severe processing. The results also showed that the method is independent of exogenous contamination and that it is therefore entirely appropriate for this application. PMID:25034259

  12. Genotyping the factor VIII intron 22 inversion locus using fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Campbell R; McDonald, Margaret A; George, Peter M; Smith, Mark P; Morris, Christine M

    2011-02-15

    The factor VIII intron 22 inversion is the most common cause of hemophilia A, accounting for approximately 40% of all severe cases of the disease. Southern hybridization and multiplex long distance PCR are the most commonly used techniques to detect the inversion in a diagnostic setting, although both have significant limitations. Here we describe our experience establishing a multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) based assay as an alternative to existing methods for genetic diagnosis of the inversion. Our assay was designed to apply three differentially labelled BAC DNA probes that when hybridized to interphase nuclei would exhibit signal patterns that are consistent with the normal or the inversion locus. When the FISH assay was applied to five normal and five inversion male samples, the correct genotype was assignable with p<0.001 for all samples. When applied to carrier female samples the assay could not assign a genotype to all female samples, probably due to a lower proportion of informative nuclei in female samples caused by the added complexity of a second X chromosome. Despite this complication, these pilot findings show that the assay performs favourably compared to the commonly used methods. PMID:21212008

  13. Three dimensional dual labelled DNA fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis in fixed tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Kernohan, Kristin D; Brub, Nathalie G

    2014-01-01

    Emerging studies demonstrate that three-dimensional organization of chromatin in the nucleus plays a vital role in regulating the genome. DNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a common molecular technique used to visualize the location of DNA sequences. The vast majority of DNA FISH studies are conducted on cultured cells due to the technical difficulties encountered using fixed tissue sections. However, the use of cultured cells poses important limitations that could yield misleading results, making in vivo analysis a far superior approach. Here we present a protocol for multiplexed three dimensional DNA FISH in mouse brain sections, which is also applicable to other tissues. Paraffin-embedded tissues could be used but the embedding and preparation of the samples is time-consuming and often associated with poor antigenicity. To overcome this problem we:developed a FISH technique using fixed, frozen cryosections;provide specific instructions for tissue processing for proper fixation and freezing, including equilibration in sucrose gradients to maintain proper cellular structure;include optimized permeabilization and washing steps to achieve specific signal and to limit background fluorescence in tissue sections. PMID:26150931

  14. X chromosome aneuploidy in infertile women: Analysis by interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.A.; Moix, I.; Mermillod, B.

    1994-09-01

    Up to 1 in 3 couples have a problem of infertility at some time in their lives. Sex chromosome anomalies are found in 5-10% of couples, with mosaic aneuploidy being a common finding in primary infertility. Recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA), in contrast, is frequently associated with autosomal structural anomalies. We hypothesized that low-level mosaic X chromosome aneuploidy was associated with primary infertility but not with RSA. Three groups were studied: women from couples with primary infertillity (n=26); women with three or more spontaneous abortions (n=22); and age-matched normally fertile women (at least two pregnancies; n=28). Interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to determine X chromosome ploidy in 100 nuclei per patient, using a contig of three cosmids from MAO locus (kindly donated by W. Berger, Nijmegen). A control probe (chr. 15 centromere) was simultaneously hybridized, and only nuclei containing two control signals were scored for the X chromosome. The mean numbers of nuclei with two X chromosome signals were the same in all groups (Welch equality of means test: p>0.97). However, there is a significant difference between the variances of the primary infertile and RSA groups (Levene`s test: p=0.025 after Bonferrone correction for multiple testing). This provides preliminary support for the hypothesis of an association between primary infertility and low-level mosaic X chromosome aneuploidy.

  15. Development of a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique for visualizing CGMMV in plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Shargil, D; Zemach, H; Belausov, E; Lachman, O; Kamenetsky, R; Dombrovsky, A

    2015-10-01

    Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV), which belongs to the genus Tobamovirus, is a major pathogen of cucurbit crops grown indoors and in open fields. Currently, immunology (e.g., ELISA) and molecular amplification techniques (e.g., RT-PCR) are employed extensively for virus detection in plant tissues and commercial seed lots diagnostics. In this study, a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, using oligonucleotides whose 5'-terminals were labeled with red cyanine 3 (Cy3) or green fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), was developed for the visualization of the pathogen in situ. This simple and reliable method allows detection and localization of CGMMV in the vegetative and reproductive tissues of cucumber and melon. When this technique was applied in male flowers, anther tissues were found to be infected; whereas the pollen grains were found to be virus-free. These results have meaningful epidemiological implications for the management of CGMMV, particularly with regard to virus transfer via seed and the role of insects as CGMMV vectors. PMID:26231788

  16. Simple method for fluorescence DNA in situ hybridization to squashed chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Larracuente, Amanda M; Ferree, Patrick M

    2015-01-01

    DNA in situ hybridization (DNA ISH) is a commonly used method for mapping sequences to specific chromosome regions. This approach is particularly effective at mapping highly repetitive sequences to heterochromatic regions, where computational approaches face prohibitive challenges. Here we describe a streamlined protocol for DNA ISH that circumvents formamide washes that are standard steps in other DNA ISH protocols. Our protocol is optimized for hybridization with short single strand DNA probes that carry fluorescent dyes, which effectively mark repetitive DNA sequences within heterochromatic chromosomal regions across a number of different insect tissue types. However, applications may be extended to use with larger probes and visualization of single copy (non-repetitive) DNA sequences. We demonstrate this method by mapping several different repetitive sequences to squashed chromosomes from Drosophila melanogaster neural cells and Nasonia vitripennis spermatocytes. We show hybridization patterns for both small, commercially synthesized probes and for a larger probe for comparison. This procedure uses simple laboratory supplies and reagents, and is ideal for investigators who have little experience with performing DNA ISH. PMID:25591075

  17. Simple Method for Fluorescence DNA In Situ Hybridization to Squashed Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Larracuente, Amanda M.; Ferree, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    DNA in situ hybridization (DNA ISH) is a commonly used method for mapping sequences to specific chromosome regions. This approach is particularly effective at mapping highly repetitive sequences to heterochromatic regions, where computational approaches face prohibitive challenges. Here we describe a streamlined protocol for DNA ISH that circumvents formamide washes that are standard steps in other DNA ISH protocols. Our protocol is optimized for hybridization with short single strand DNA probes that carry fluorescent dyes, which effectively mark repetitive DNA sequences within heterochromatic chromosomal regions across a number of different insect tissue types. However, applications may be extended to use with larger probes and visualization of single copy (non-repetitive) DNA sequences. We demonstrate this method by mapping several different repetitive sequences to squashed chromosomes from Drosophila melanogaster neural cells and Nasonia vitripennis spermatocytes. We show hybridization patterns for both small, commercially synthesized probes and for a larger probe for comparison. This procedure uses simple laboratory supplies and reagents, and is ideal for investigators who have little experience with performing DNA ISH. PMID:25591075

  18. Investigation of telomere length dynamics in induced pluripotent stem cells using quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Terai, Masanori; Izumiyama-Shimomura, Naotaka; Aida, Junko; Ishikawa, Naoshi; Kuroiwa, Mie; Poon, Steven S S; Arai, Tomio; Toyoda, Masashi; Akutsu, Hidenori; Umezawa, Akihiro; Nakamura, Ken-Ichi; Takubo, Kaiyo

    2013-12-01

    Here we attempted to clarify telomere metabolism in parental cells and their derived clonal human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) at different passages using quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (Q-FISH). Our methodology involved estimation of the individual telomere lengths of chromosomal arms in individual cells within each clone in relation to telomere fluorescence units (TFUs) determined by Q-FISH. TFUs were very variable within the same metaphase spread and within the same cell. TFUs of the established iPSCs derived from human amnion (hAM933 iPSCs), expressed as mean values of the median TFUs of 20 karyotypes, were significantly longer than those of the parental cells, although the telomere extension rates varied quite significantly among the clones. Twenty metaphase spreads from hAM933 iPSCs demonstrated no chromosomal instability. The iPSCs established from fetal lung fibroblasts (MRC-5) did not exhibit telomere shortening and chromosomal instability as the number of passages increased. However, the telomeres of other iPSCs derived from MRC-5 became shorter as the number of passages increased, and one (5%) of 20 metaphase spreads showed chromosomal abnormalities including X trisomy at an early stage and all 20 showed abnormalities including X and 12 trisomies at the late stage. PMID:23928219

  19. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) assessment of chromosome copy number in sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Sheu, M.; Sigman, M.; Mark, H.F.L.

    1994-09-01

    Approximately 15% of all recognized pregnancies end in spontaneous abortions. The overall frequency of chromosome abnormalities in spontaneous abortions is approximately 50%. Thus aneuploidy is a significant cause of fetal wastage. In addition, structural and numerical abnormalities of chromosomes can also lead to birth defects, developmental delay, mental retardation and infertility. Conventional cytogenetic analysis via GTG- and other banding techniques is a powerful tool in the elucidation of the nature of chromosomal abnormalities. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) enables detection of numerical chromosomal abnormalities, especially trisomies, in intact cells. Using FISH and commercially available biotin-labeled probes, we have initiated a prospective study to assess specific chromosome copy number of preparations of unstained smears from men referred for a male infertility evaluation as well as smears from normal control males chosen randomly from the sample of sperm donors. A total of approximately 19,000 sperm nuclei have been examined thus far. Of those suitable for analysis, 7382 (38.75%) were normal possessing one copy of chromosome 8, 155 (0.81%) were disomic, and 15 (0.079%) had more than two copies of chromosome 8. Comparisons with data available in the literature will be discussed. Work is ongoing to increase the efficiency of hybridization using both reported and previously untried pretreatment and fixation protocols. We have also initiated studies using multicolor FISH with various chromosome enumeration probes. The assay described here is a potentially powerful tool for detecting rare events such as spontaneous germ cell aneuploidy, aneuploidy detected in semen from men with carcinoma in situ of the testis and aneuploidy induced by potential environmental genotoxicants. It can also be utilized for segregation analysis and for correlating chromosome copy number with germ cell morphology.

  20. FISHIS: Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization in Suspension and Chromosome Flow Sorting Made Easy

    PubMed Central

    Giorgi, Debora; Farina, Anna; Grosso, Valentina; Gennaro, Andrea; Ceoloni, Carla; Lucretti, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The large size and complex polyploid nature of many genomes has often hampered genomics development, as is the case for several plants of high agronomic value. Isolating single chromosomes or chromosome arms via flow sorting offers a clue to resolve such complexity by focusing sequencing to a discrete and self-consistent part of the whole genome. The occurrence of sufficient differences in the size and or base-pair composition of the individual chromosomes, which is uncommon in plants, is critical for the success of flow sorting. We overcome this limitation by developing a robust method for labeling isolated chromosomes, named Fluorescent In situ Hybridization In suspension (FISHIS). FISHIS employs fluorescently labeled synthetic repetitive DNA probes, which are hybridized, in a wash-less procedure, to chromosomes in suspension following DNA alkaline denaturation. All typical A, B and D genomes of wheat, as well as individual chromosomes from pasta (T. durum L.) and bread (T. aestivum L.) wheat, were flow-sorted, after FISHIS, at high purity. For the first time in eukaryotes, each individual chromosome of a diploid organism, Dasypyrum villosum (L.) Candargy, was flow-sorted regardless of its size or base-pair related content. FISHIS-based chromosome sorting is a powerful and innovative flow cytogenetic tool which can develop new genomic resources from each plant species, where microsatellite DNA probes are available and high quality chromosome suspensions could be produced. The joining of FISHIS labeling and flow sorting with the Next Generation Sequencing methodology will enforce genomics for more species, and by this mightier chromosome approach it will be possible to increase our knowledge about structure, evolution and function of plant genome to be used for crop improvement. It is also anticipated that this technique could contribute to analyze and sort animal chromosomes with peculiar cytogenetic abnormalities, such as copy number variations or cytogenetic aberrations. PMID:23469124

  1. RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF CANDIDA ALBICANS DIRECTLY FROM YEAST POSITIVE BLOOD CULTURE BOTTLES BY FLUORESCENCE IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION USING PNA PROBES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for identification of Candida albicans directly from yeast-positive blood culture bottles is described. The test (C. albicans PNA FISH) is based on a fluorescein-labeled PNA probe targeting C. albicans 26...

  2. DNA Mimics for the Rapid Identification of Microorganisms by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH)

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueira, Laura; Azevedo, Nuno F.; Almeida, Carina; Jardim, Tatiana; Keevil, Charles William; Vieira, Maria J.

    2008-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a well-established technique that is used for a variety of purposes, ranging from pathogen detection in clinical diagnostics to the determination of chromosomal stability in stem cell research. The key step of FISH involves the detection of a nucleic acid region and as such, DNA molecules have typically been used to probe for the sequences of interest. However, since the turn of the century, an increasing number of laboratories have started to move on to the more robust DNA mimics methods, most notably peptide and locked nucleic acids (PNA and LNA). In this review, we will cover the state-of-the-art of the different DNA mimics in regard to their application as efficient markers for the presence of individual microbial cells, and consider their potential advantages and pitfalls. Available PNA probes are then reassessed in terms of sensitivity and specificity using rRNA databases. In addition, we also attempt to predict the applicability of DNA mimics in well-known techniques attempting to detect in situ low number of copies of specific nucleic acid sequences such as catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD) and recognition of individual genes (RING) FISH. PMID:19325728

  3. Increase in Fluorescence Intensity of 16S rRNA In Situ Hybridization in Natural Samples Treated with Chloramphenicol

    PubMed Central

    Ouverney, C. C.; Fuhrman, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    Despite the numerous advantages of fluorescent in situ hybridization for the identification of single prokaryotic cells with 16S rRNA probes, use of the technique with natural samples, especially those from the marine environment, is still problematic. The low percentage of fluorescently labeled cells constitutes the primary problem for in situ hybridization of natural samples, probably due to low cellular rRNA content. This study represents an attempt to improve detection of marine prokaryotes by increasing cellular rRNA content without changing the species composition. Cells from three California coastal sites were treated with chloramphenicol, an inhibitor of protein synthesis and rRNA degradation, at 100 (mu)g/ml and then were probed with a "universal" 16S rRNA fluorescent probe and viewed by image-intensified video microscopy. Counts of fluorescent cells increased from ca. 75% for untreated samples to ca. 93 to 99% for chloramphenicol-treated samples, compared to counts produced by DAPI (4(prm1),6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining, after at least 45 min of exposure to the drug (these percentages include autofluorescent cells, which averaged 6%). This suggests that most cells in these samples were active. We hypothesize that the low fluorescent-cell counts previously reported were probably often due to the fluorescence intensity of labeled cells being below the detection level rather than to high levels of dead cells in marine environments. This method may aid in the characterization of bacterioplankton with fluorescent probes. PMID:16535648

  4. Increase in Fluorescence Intensity of 16S rRNA In Situ Hybridization in Natural Samples Treated with Chloramphenicol.

    PubMed

    Ouverney, C C; Fuhrman, J A

    1997-07-01

    Despite the numerous advantages of fluorescent in situ hybridization for the identification of single prokaryotic cells with 16S rRNA probes, use of the technique with natural samples, especially those from the marine environment, is still problematic. The low percentage of fluorescently labeled cells constitutes the primary problem for in situ hybridization of natural samples, probably due to low cellular rRNA content. This study represents an attempt to improve detection of marine prokaryotes by increasing cellular rRNA content without changing the species composition. Cells from three California coastal sites were treated with chloramphenicol, an inhibitor of protein synthesis and rRNA degradation, at 100 (mu)g/ml and then were probed with a "universal" 16S rRNA fluorescent probe and viewed by image-intensified video microscopy. Counts of fluorescent cells increased from ca. 75% for untreated samples to ca. 93 to 99% for chloramphenicol-treated samples, compared to counts produced by DAPI (4(prm1),6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining, after at least 45 min of exposure to the drug (these percentages include autofluorescent cells, which averaged 6%). This suggests that most cells in these samples were active. We hypothesize that the low fluorescent-cell counts previously reported were probably often due to the fluorescence intensity of labeled cells being below the detection level rather than to high levels of dead cells in marine environments. This method may aid in the characterization of bacterioplankton with fluorescent probes. PMID:16535648

  5. Fluorescence in situ hybridization in combination with the comet assay and micronucleus test in genetic toxicology

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Comet assay and micronucleus (MN) test are widely applied in genotoxicity testing and biomonitoring. While comet assay permits to measure direct DNA-strand breaking capacity of a tested agent MN test allows estimating the induced amount of chromosome and/or genome mutations. The potential of these two methods can be enhanced by the combination with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques. FISH plus comet assay allows the recognition of targets of DNA damage and repairing directly. FISH combined with MN test is able to characterize the occurrence of different chromosomes in MN and to identify potential chromosomal targets of mutagenic substances. Thus, combination of FISH with the comet assay or MN test proved to be promising techniques for evaluation of the distribution of DNA and chromosome damage in the entire genome of individual cells. FISH technique also permits to study comet and MN formation, necessary for correct application of these methods. This paper reviews the relevant literature on advantages and limitations of Comet-FISH and MN-FISH assays application in genetic toxicology. PMID:20840797

  6. Analysis of DNA damage and repair by comet fluorescence in situ hybridization (Comet-FISH).

    PubMed

    Glei, Michael; Schlörmann, Wiebke

    2014-01-01

    A useful tool in the detection of overall and region-specific DNA damage is the Comet-FISH technique. This method combines two well-established methods, the Comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis), which makes it possible to detect and quantify DNA damage at the single cell level, and FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization), a technique that allows the specific detection of selected DNA sequences. The influence of specific substances such as water pollutants or food ingredients on individual cells can be measured with the alkaline version of the Comet assay, which involves the embedding of cells in agarose on microscopic slides, lysis of cells, and separation of DNA via electrophoresis. In damaged cells a "comet tail" is formed by fractured DNA migrating from the nucleus (head of the comet) in the electric field.The damaged DNA (DNA strand breaks) correlates with the percentage of DNA in the tail. In combination with the FISH method, DNA damage or repair capacity in single cells can be measured using labelled probes, which hybridize to specific DNA sequences of interest. This protocol exemplarily provides a description of the Comet-FISH technique for the detection of DNA damage using hydrogen peroxide as a genotoxic model substance. PMID:24162978

  7. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of synaptic proteins imaged with super-resolution STED microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, William I; Rhse, Heiko; Rizzoli, Silvio O; Opazo, Felipe

    2014-07-01

    Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is still a developing field. One of the limitations has been that standard labeling assays, which had been developed for conventional imaging, must be adjusted and optimized for each super-resolution method. These methods are more sensitive to noise, and require more intense labeling than conventional microscopy, which is not always trivial to achieve. Here, we describe the use of stimulation-emission depletion (STED) microscopy to locate messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in single neurons with high spatial precision. We address several technical difficulties we encountered in using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for STED imaging. We optimized the experimental protocol to detect mRNAs and proteins simultaneously, by performing FISH and immunostaining on the same samples. We tested our imaging approach in primary hippocampal neurons, studying the mRNAs of three important presynaptic proteins (synaptobrevin, synaptotagmin, and synaptophysin). Our approach allowed us to relate changes in mRNA levels and localization to neuronal physiology, under different activity regimes and also during neuronal development. We conclude that FISH can be performed efficiently using super-resolution techniques. This should contribute significantly to the clarification of the molecular mechanisms that govern mRNA distribution and dynamics within cells. PMID:24723361

  8. Micro fluorescence in situ hybridization (μFISH) for spatially multiplexed analysis of a cell monolayer.

    PubMed

    Huber, D; Autebert, J; Kaigala, G V

    2016-04-01

    We here present a micrometer-scale implementation of fluorescence in situ hybridization that we term μFISH. This μFISH implementation makes use of a non-contact scanning probe technology, namely, a microfluidic probe (MFP) that hydrodynamically shapes nanoliter volumes of liquid on a surface with micrometer resolution. By confining FISH probes at the tip of this microfabricated scanning probe, we locally exposed approximately 1000 selected MCF-7 cells of a monolayer to perform incubation of probes - the rate-limiting step in conventional FISH. This method is compatible with the standard workflow of conventional FISH, allows re-budgeting of the sample for various tests, and results in a ~ 15-fold reduction in probe consumption. The continuous flow of probes and shaping liquid on these selected cells resulted in a 120-fold reduction of the hybridization time compared with the standard protocol (3 min vs. 6 h) and efficient rinsing, thereby shortening the total FISH assay time for centromeric probes. We further demonstrated spatially multiplexed μFISH, enabling the use of spectrally equivalent probes for detailed and real-time analysis of a cell monolayer, which paves the way towards rapid and automated multiplexed FISH on standard cytological supports. PMID:27138995

  9. Mapping of 13 horse genes by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) and somatic cell hybrid analysis.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, G; Breen, M; Godard, S; Bowling, A; Murray, J; Scavone, M; Skow, L; Sandberg, K; Guérin, G; Binns, M; Ellegren, H

    2001-01-01

    We report fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) and somatic cell hybrid mapping data for 13 different horse genes (ANP, CD2, CLU, CRISP3, CYP17, FGG, IL1RN, IL10, MMP13, PRM1, PTGS2, TNFA and TP53). Primers for PCR amplification of intronic or untranslated regions were designed from horse-specific DNA or mRNA sequences in GenBank. Two different horse bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries were screened with PCR for clones containing these 13 Type I loci, nine of which were found in the libraries. BAC clones were used as probes in dual colour FISH to confirm their precise chromosomal origin. The remaining four genes were mapped in a somatic cell hybrid panel. All chromosomal assignments except one were in agreement with human-horse ZOO-FISH data and revealed new and more detailed information on the equine comparative map. CLU was mapped by synteny to ECA2 while human-horse ZOO-FISH data predicted that CLU would be located on ECA9. The assignment of IL1RN permitted analysis of gene order conservation between HSA2 and ECA15, which identified that an event of inversion had occurred during the evolution of these two homologous chromosomes. PMID:11272792

  10. Development of a PNA Probe for Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Detection of Prorocentrum donghaiense

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guofu; Zhang, Chunyu; Zhang, Baoyu; Wang, Guangce; Lu, Douding; Xu, Zhong; Yan, Peishen

    2011-01-01

    Prorocentrum donghaiense is a common but dominant harmful algal bloom (HAB) species, which is widely distributed along the China Sea coast. Development of methods for rapid and precise identification and quantification is prerequisite for early-stage warning and monitoring of blooms due to P. donghaiense. In this study, sequences representing the partial large subunit rDNA (D1D2), small subunit rDNA and internal transcribed spacer region (ITS-1, 5.8S rDNA and ITS-2) of P. donghaiense were firstly obtained, and then seven candidate DNA probes were designed for performing fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) tests on P. donghaiense. Based on the fluorescent intensity of P. donghaiense cells labeled by the DNA probes, the probe DP0443A displayed the best hybridization performance. Therefore, a PNA probe (PP0443A) analogous to DP0443A was used in the further study. The cells labeled with the PNA probe displayed more intensive green fluorescence than that labeled with its DNA analog. The PNA probe was used to hybridize with thirteen microalgae belonging to five families, i.e., Dinophyceae, Prymnesiophyceae, Raphidophyceae, Chlorophyceae and Bacillariophyceae, and showed no visible cross-reaction. Finally, FISH with the probes PP0443A and DP0443A and light microscopy (LM) analysis aiming at enumerating P. donghaiense cells were performed on the field samples. Statistical comparisons of the cell densities (cells/L) of P. donghaiense in the natural samples determined by FISH and LM were performed using one-way ANOVA and Duncan's multiple comparisons of the means. The P. donghaiense cell densities determined by LM and the PNA probe are remarkably higher than (p<0.05) that determined by the DNA probe, while no significant difference is observed between LM and the PNA probe. All results suggest that the PNA probe is more sensitive that its DNA analog, and therefore is promising for the monitoring of harmful algal blooms of P. donghaiense in the future. PMID:22022408

  11. Identification of pathogens in mastitis milk samples with fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Gey, Annerose; Werckenthin, Christiane; Poppert, Sven; Straubinger, Reinhard K

    2013-05-01

    Traditionally, the bacteriological examination of mastitis milk samples is performed by culture followed by biochemical tests on the cultured bacteria to allow identification of the causative pathogen. Depending on the species involved, this classic identification is time-consuming compared to other techniques such as fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), a culture-independent method that utilizes oligonucleotides (labeled with a fluorophore) that are specific to a string of target DNA/RNA. In the current study, the applicability of FISH was evaluated for the detection of mastitis pathogens directly in milk samples. To remove interfering lipids and proteins from mastitis milk samples prior to FISH, a previously published enzymatic treatment with savinase was evaluated. FISH was performed using oligonucleotides specific for Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus uberis, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Escherichia coli, and Trueperella (Arcanobacterium) pyogenes. The enzymatic pretreatment and the sensitivity of FISH were evaluated using spiked whole milk samples and mastitis milk samples with bacterial loads of less than 10(3) up to 10(8) colony-forming units (CFU)/ml. Bacteria were reliably detected in milk samples with bacterial numbers of 10(6) CFU/ml or higher. However, bacteria present in numbers below 10(6) CFU/ml were not detectable in all cases. The ability of FISH to identify mastitis-causing pathogens directly in milk samples, and therefore earlier than classical culture methods, can supplement the classic diagnostic procedures for mastitis milk samples. PMID:23632662

  12. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) Assays for Diagnosing Malaria in Endemic Areas

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jyotsna; Mark, Olivia; Weltman, Helena; Barcelo, Nicolas; Lo, Wai; Wronska, Danuta; Kakkilaya, Srinivas; Rao, Aravinda; Bhat, Shalia T.; Sinha, Ruchi; Omar, Sabah; Moro, Manuel; Gilman, Robert H.; Harris, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a responsible for approximately 600 thousand deaths worldwide every year. Appropriate and timely treatment of malaria can prevent deaths but is dependent on accurate and rapid diagnosis of the infection. Currently, microscopic examination of the Giemsa stained blood smears is the method of choice for diagnosing malaria. Although it has limited sensitivity and specificity in field conditions, it still remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of malaria. Here, we report the development of a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) based method for detecting malaria infection in blood smears and describe the use of an LED light source that makes the method suitable for use in resource-limited malaria endemic countries. The Plasmodium Genus (P-Genus) FISH assay has a Plasmodium genus specific probe that detects all five species of Plasmodium known to cause the disease in humans. The P. falciparum (PF) FISH assay and P. vivax (PV) FISH assay detect and differentiate between P. falciparum and P. vivax respectively from other Plasmodium species. The FISH assays are more sensitive than Giemsa. The sensitivities of P-Genus, PF and PV FISH assays were found to be 98.2%, 94.5% and 98.3%, respectively compared to 89.9%, 83.3% and 87.9% for the detection of Plasmodium, P. falciparum and P. vivax by Giemsa staining respectively. PMID:26333092

  13. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) Assays for Diagnosing Malaria in Endemic Areas.

    PubMed

    Shah, Jyotsna; Mark, Olivia; Weltman, Helena; Barcelo, Nicolas; Lo, Wai; Wronska, Danuta; Kakkilaya, Srinivas; Rao, Aravinda; Bhat, Shalia T; Sinha, Ruchi; Omar, Sabah; O'bare, Peter; Moro, Manuel; Gilman, Robert H; Harris, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a responsible for approximately 600 thousand deaths worldwide every year. Appropriate and timely treatment of malaria can prevent deaths but is dependent on accurate and rapid diagnosis of the infection. Currently, microscopic examination of the Giemsa stained blood smears is the method of choice for diagnosing malaria. Although it has limited sensitivity and specificity in field conditions, it still remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of malaria. Here, we report the development of a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) based method for detecting malaria infection in blood smears and describe the use of an LED light source that makes the method suitable for use in resource-limited malaria endemic countries. The Plasmodium Genus (P-Genus) FISH assay has a Plasmodium genus specific probe that detects all five species of Plasmodium known to cause the disease in humans. The P. falciparum (PF) FISH assay and P. vivax (PV) FISH assay detect and differentiate between P. falciparum and P. vivax respectively from other Plasmodium species. The FISH assays are more sensitive than Giemsa. The sensitivities of P-Genus, PF and PV FISH assays were found to be 98.2%, 94.5% and 98.3%, respectively compared to 89.9%, 83.3% and 87.9% for the detection of Plasmodium, P. falciparum and P. vivax by Giemsa staining respectively. PMID:26333092

  14. MiL-FISH: Multilabeled Oligonucleotides for Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Improve Visualization of Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kleiner, Manuel; Wetzel, Silke; Liebeke, Manuel; Dubilier, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has become a vital tool for environmental and medical microbiology and is commonly used for the identification, localization, and isolation of defined microbial taxa. However, fluorescence signal strength is often a limiting factor for targeting all members in a microbial community. Here, we present the application of a multilabeled FISH approach (MiL-FISH) that (i) enables the simultaneous targeting of up to seven microbial groups using combinatorial labeling of a single oligonucleotide probe, (ii) is applicable for the isolation of unfixed environmental microorganisms via fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), and (iii) improves signal and imaging quality of tissue sections in acrylic resin for precise localization of individual microbial cells. We show the ability of MiL-FISH to distinguish between seven microbial groups using a mock community of marine organisms and its applicability for the localization of bacteria associated with animal tissue and their isolation from host tissues using FACS. To further increase the number of potential target organisms, a streamlined combinatorial labeling and spectral imaging-FISH (CLASI-FISH) concept with MiL-FISH probes is presented here. Through the combination of increased probe signal, the possibility of targeting hard-to-detect taxa and isolating these from an environmental sample, the identification and precise localization of microbiota in host tissues, and the simultaneous multilabeling of up to seven microbial groups, we show here that MiL-FISH is a multifaceted alternative to standard monolabeled FISH that can be used for a wide range of biological and medical applications. PMID:26475101

  15. Comparative gene mapping in cattle, Indian muntjac, and Chinese muntjac by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Murmann, Andrea E; Mincheva, Antoaneta; Scheuermann, Markus O; Gautier, Mathieu; Yang, Fentang; Buitkamp, Johannes; Strissel, Pamela L; Strick, Reiner; Rowley, Janet D; Lichter, Peter

    2008-11-01

    The Indian muntjac (Muntiacus muntjak vaginalis) has a karyotype of 2n = 6 in the female and 2n = 7 in the male. The karyotypic evolution of Indian muntjac via extensive tandem fusions and several centric fusions are well documented by molecular cytogenetic studies mainly utilizing chromosome paints. To achieve higher resolution mapping, a set of 42 different genomic clones coding for 37 genes and the nucleolar organizer region were used to examine homologies between the cattle (2n = 60), human (2n = 46), Indian muntjac (2n = 6/7) and Chinese muntjac (2n = 46) karyotypes. These genomic clones were mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Localization of genes on all three pairs of M. m. vaginalis chromosomes and on the acrocentric chromosomes of M. reevesi allowed not only the analysis of the evolution of syntenic regions within the muntjac genus but also allowed a broader comparison of synteny with more distantly related species, such as cattle and human, to shed more light onto the evolving genome organization. PMID:18283540

  16. Molecular characterization of the breakpoints in rob(13q14q) by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Han, J.Y.; Shaffer, L.G.; Choo, K.H.A.

    1994-09-01

    Robertsonian translocations are the most common rearrangements in humans with rob(13q14q) contributing to the majority of all ascertained rearrangements. Studying the sequences around the breakpoint regions of Robertsonian translocations may enable us to understand the underlying mechanisms of translocation formation and the molecular organization of the centromeric and pericentromeric regions of the acrocentric chromosomes. We have characterized 17 rob(13q14q), including 6 de novo rearrangements, 5 maternally and 3 paternally inherited rearrangements, and 3 of undetermined origin, by dual color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and 6 molecular probes which are specific for the repetitive sequences in the centromeric and short arm regions of acrocentric chromosomes. The centromeric alpha satellite DNA probes D21Z1/D13Z1 and D14Z1/D22Z1 showed all rob(13q14q) chromosomes to be dicentric. The rDNA probe did not hybridize to the 17 translocations studied. The pTRS-47 satellite III DNA probe specific for chromosomes 14 and 22 indicated the retention of pTRS-47 sequences around the breakpoints in all cases studied. However, pTRS-63 satellite III probe specific for chromosome 14 did not show any signals on the translocation chromosomes. In 16 of 17 translocations, strong hybridization signals were detected with pTRI-6 satellite I DNA probe specific for chromosome 13. All parental chromosomes 13 and 14 for 6 de novo rob(13q14q), including one whose pTRI-6 sequence was lost, showed strong hybridization signals with pTRS-47 and pTRS-63, and pTRI-6 probes, respectively. These results demonstrate that the breakpoints fall between the pTRS-47 and pTRS-63 sequences in the p11 region of chromosome 14 and between the pTRI-6 and rDNA sequences within the p11 region of chromosome 13 further narrowing the region containing the rob(13q14q) breakpoints.

  17. Ecophysiological Analysis of Microorganisms in Complex Microbial Systems by Combination of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization with Extracellular Staining Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Kragelund, Caroline; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    Ecophysiological analysis and functions of single cells in complex microbial systems can be examined by simple combinations of Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for identification with various staining techniques targeting functional phenotypes. In this chapter, we describe methods and protocols optimized for the study of extracellular enzymes, surface hydrophobicity and specific surface structures. Although primarily applied to the study of microbes in wastewater treatment (activated sludge and biofilms), the methods may also be used with minor modifications in several other ecosystems.

  18. Rapid and accurate diagnosis of human intestinal spirochetosis by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Schmiedel, Dinah; Epple, Hans-Jörg; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Ignatius, Ralf; Wagner, Jutta; Hammer, Bettina; Petrich, Annett; Stein, Harald; Göbel, Ulf B; Schneider, Thomas; Moter, Annette

    2009-05-01

    Human intestinal spirochetosis (HIS) is associated with overgrowth of the large intestine by spirochetes of the genus Brachyspira. The microbiological diagnosis of HIS is hampered by the fastidious nature and slow growth of Brachyspira spp. In clinical practice, HIS is diagnosed histopathologically, and a significant portion of cases may be missed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a molecular method that allows the visualization and identification of single bacteria within tissue sections. In this study, we analyzed intestinal biopsy samples from five patients with possible HIS. All specimens yielded positive results by histopathological techniques. PCR amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene were performed. Sequences of two isolates clustered in the group of Brachyspira aalborgi, whereas in three cases, the sequences were highly similar to that of Brachyspira pilosicoli. Three phylotypes showed mismatches at distinct nucleotide positions with Brachyspira sp. sequences published previously. In addition, culture for Brachyspira was successful in three cases. On the basis of these data, we designed and evaluated a Brachyspira genus-specific 16S rRNA-directed FISH probe that detects all of the Brachyspira spp. published to date. FISH of biopsy samples resulted in strong, unequivocal signals of brush-like formations at the crypt surfaces. This technique allowed simultaneous visualization of single spirochetes and their identification as Brachyspira spp. In conclusion, FISH provides a fast and accurate technique for the visualization and identification of intestinal spirochetes in tissue sections. It therefore represents a valuable tool for routine diagnosis of HIS. PMID:19279178

  19. Bacterioplankton Compositions of Lakes and Oceans: a First Comparison Based on Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Fuchs, Bernhard M.; Amann, Rudolf

    1999-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes was used to investigate the phylogenetic composition of bacterioplankton communities in several freshwater and marine samples. An average of about 50% of the cells were detected by probes for the domains Bacteria and Archaea, and of these, about half could be identified at the subdomain level with a set of group-specific probes. Beta subclass proteobacteria constituted a dominant fraction in freshwater systems, accounting for 16% (range, 3 to 32%) of the cells, although they were essentially absent in the marine samples examined. Members of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium cluster were the most abundant group detected in the marine systems, accounting for 18% (range, 2 to 72%) of the 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) counts, and they were also important in freshwater systems (7%, range 0 to 18%). Furthermore, members of the alpha and gamma subclasses of Proteobacteria as well as members of the Planctomycetales were detected in both freshwater and marine water in abundances <7%. PMID:10427073

  20. Clinical Follow-up of Atypical Spitzoid Tumors Analyzed by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Egnatios, Genevieve L; Ferringer, Tammie C

    2016-04-01

    Many neoplasms with spitzoid features remain enigmatic, especially those with intermediate grade features or "atypical spitzoid tumors" (ASTs). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has emerged as a complementary technique to conventional microscopy, with certain chromosomal patterns conveying diagnostic information. In this study, we examined 36 ASTs analyzed by FISH for specific abnormalities in chromosomes 6, 9, and 11. Aberrations were detected in 11 cases, 7 of which met FISH criteria for spitzoid melanoma. These had homozygous deletion of 9p21, partial deletion of 11q13, gain of 6p25, and gain of 11q13. All 3 patients with positive sentinel lymph nodes, including one with progression beyond the sentinel lymph node, had homozygous deletion of chromosome 9p21, but there were no deaths in an average of 28 months of follow-up of these cases. Other aberrations in the chromosomal pattern of ASTs were heterozygous deletion of 9p21, partial deletion of 6p23, and tetraploidy. We found that ASTs, including those eventually diagnosed as spitzoid melanoma, had a more indolent course in our cohort than conventional malignant melanoma. Moreover, the addition of FISH results led to a more definitive diagnosis in 7 cases, 4 of which had abnormalities on FISH consistent with spitzoid melanoma. PMID:26999339

  1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization to improve the diagnosis of endocarditis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mallmann, C; Siemoneit, S; Schmiedel, D; Petrich, A; Gescher, D M; Halle, E; Musci, M; Hetzer, R; Göbel, U B; Moter, A

    2010-06-01

    Infective endocarditis is a rare but life-threatening disease associated with high mortality. Early diagnosis of the causative microorganism is critical to patient outcome. However, conventional diagnostic methods are often unsatisfactory in achieving this goal. As a proof of concept, we applied fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for detection and identification of bacteria in histological sections of heart valves. Biopsy specimens from 54 suspected endocarditis patients were obtained during valve surgery and analysed via FISH. Specimens were screened with a probe panel that identifies the most common bacteria implicated in endocarditis. Results were compared with those of culture-based diagnostics and clinical data. Discrepant results were subjected to comparative sequence analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes. FISH detected bacteria in 26 of the 54 heart valves. FISH allowed successful diagnosis of infective endocarditis in five of 13 blood culture-negative cases and in 11 of 37 valve culture-negative cases, showing the bacteria within their histological context. This technique allows the simultaneous detection and identification of microorganisms at the species or genus level directly from heart valves and might be a valuable tool for diagnosis of endocarditis. PMID:19694763

  2. Potential clinical impact of three-dimensional visualization for fluorescent in situ hybridization image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Li, Shibo; Bin, Zheng; Zhang, Roy; Li, Yuhua; Tian, Huimin; Chen, Wei; Liu, Hong

    2012-05-01

    Chromosomal translocation is strong indication of cancers. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) can effectively detect this translocation and achieve high accuracy in disease diagnosis and prognosis assessment. For this purpose, whole chromosome paint probes are utilized to image the configuration of DNA fragments. Although two-dimensional (2-D) microscopic images are typically used in FISH signal analysis, we present a case where the translocation occurs in the depth direction where two probed FISH signals are overlapped in the projected image plane. Thus, the translocation cannot be identified. However, when imaging the whole specimen with a confocal microscope at 27 focal planes with 0.5-μm step interval, the translocation can be clearly identified due to the free rotation capability by the three-dimensional (3-D) visualization. Such a translocation detection error of using 2-D images might be critical in detecting and diagnosing early or subtle disease cases where detecting a small number of abnormal cells can make diagnostic difference. Hence, the underlying implication of this report suggests that utilizing 3-D visualization may improve the overall accuracy of FISH analysis for some clinical cases. However, the clinical efficiency and cost of using 3-D versus 2-D imaging methods are also to be assessed carefully.

  3. A new approach to screen transgenic offspring using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Swiger, R.R.; Tucker, J.D.; Heddle, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    In order to identify the presence of vector, specifically Lacl or LacZ, in putative transgenic mice rapidly and reliably, we developed a new method which utilizes fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Transgenic mouse models are being used with increasing frequency for mutational and toxicological studies. By applying our method, an investigator can reliably determine the presence and the number of integration sites of a transgenic vector in numerous samples with less effort compared to conventional methods. This approach involves gazing a tail with a scalpel to obtain a blood smear on a microscope slide. After fixing the slide in 3:1 methanol: acetic acid, typical FISH analysis using biotinylated lambda DNA as the probe in performed. Our method eliminates the need for DNA extraction, blotting, and PCR, and yields results from a large number of individually identifiable cells from each animal. This assay is more accurate, reliable and easier to perform than conventional schemes presently used for screening transgenic animals. A particular advantage of this assay is the ability to discriminate between animals that are heterozygous and homozygous, something that eludes the PCR-based methods and Southern blotting. We have successfully analyzed over 95 samples with this method. Based on these results, we believe our system is more sensitive and accurate than conventional means of screening.

  4. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of human sperm – diagnostics, indications, and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Ranjith; Besada, Stefan; Lamb, Dolores J.

    2015-01-01

    Male factor infertility is a relatively common condition, affecting at least 6% of men of reproductive age. Typically men with unknown genetic abnormalities resort to using assisted reproductive technologies (ART) to achieve their reproductive goals. Infertile men who father biological children using ART could have a higher incidence of aneuploidy, which is a deviation from the normal haploid or diploid chromosomal state. Aneuploidy can be evaluated using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), a cytogenetic assay that gives an estimate of the frequencies of chromosomal abnormalities. The chromosomes that are generally analyzed in FISH are associated with aneuploidies that are compatible with life, that is, chr.13, 18, 21, X, and Y. The technique is indicated for a variety of reasons, but most importantly in the following: 1) men who despite normal semen parameters suffer recurrent pregnancy loss and 2) men with normal semen parameters, undergoing IVF, but still experiencing recurrent implantation failure. It may be used as a screening tool to help in reproductive and genetic counseling of affected couples, or those who have previously experienced failure of ART. A qualitative analysis of FISH study results allows them to make informed reproductive choices. Given its increasing clinical use in various infertility diagnoses and the development of novel adjunct technologies, one can expect much progress in the areas of preimplantation genetic screening, diagnostics, and therapeutics. PMID:25439797

  5. Estimate of true incomplete exchanges using fluorescence in situ hybridization with telomere probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the frequency of true incomplete exchanges in radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Human lymphocytes were exposed to 2 Gy and 5 Gy of gamma-rays. Chromosome aberrations were studied using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with whole chromosome-specific probes, together with human telomere probes. Chromosomes 2 and 4 were chosen in the present study. RESULTS: The percentage of incomplete exchanges was 27% when telomere signals were not considered. After excluding false incomplete exchanges identified by the telomere signals, the percentage of incomplete exchanges decreased to 11%. Since telomere signals appear on about 82% of the telomeres, the percentage of true incomplete exchanges should be even lower and was estimated to be 3%. This percentage was similar for chromosomes 2 and 4 and for doses of both 2 Gy and 5 Gy. CONCLUSIONS: The percentage of true incomplete exchanges is significantly lower in gamma-irradiated human lymphocytes than the frequencies reported in the literature.

  6. Interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization signal detection by computing intensity variance along the optical axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Zheng, Bin; Ren, Liqiang; Liu, Hong

    2014-02-01

    Fluorescence in situ Hybridization technology is a commonly used tool to detect chromosome aberrations, which are often pathologically significant. Since manual FISH analysis is a tedious and time-consuming procedure, reliable and robust automated image acquisition and analysis are in demand. Under high magnification objective lenses such as 60x and 100x, the depth of field will often be too small and the FISH probes may not always lie in the same focal plane. A statistical variance based automated FISH analysis method is developed in order to address this problem. On a stack of slices at consecutive image planes with a step size d, the statistical variance alone the z-axis is calculated to form a 2-D matrix. Since pixels shift dramatically to high intensity at FISH probe location, the probes will manifest high peak values in the matrix. A computer-aided detection scheme based on top-hat transform is applied to the matrix to detect FISH probe signals. This study demonstrates a simple and robust method for FISH probe detection as well as a way of 2- D representation of 3-D data.

  7. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of the DiGeorge syndrome region using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, E.A. Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London ); Halford, S.; Wadey, R.; Scambler, P.J. ); Baldini, A. )

    1993-08-01

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is a developmental defect characterized by cardiac defects, facial dysmorphism, and mental retardation. Several studies have described a critical region for DGS at 22q11, within which the majority of DGS patients have deletions. The authors have isolated nine cosmid and three YAC clones using previously described and newly isolated probes that have been shown to be deleted in many DGS patients. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization and digital imaging, they have mapped and ordered these clones relative to the breakpoints of two balanced translocations at 22q11 (one in a DGS patient and one in the unaffected parent of a DGS child). The data indicate that the breakpoint in the unaffected individual distally limits the DGS critical region (defined as the smallest region of overlap), while proximally the region is limited by repeat-rich DNA. The critical region includes the balanced translocation breakpoint of the DGS patient that presumably disrupts the gene causing this syndrome.

  8. Cytogenetic analysis using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to evaluate occupational exposure to carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Sram, Radim J; Beskid, Olena; Binkova, Blanka; Rossner, Pavel; Smerhovsky, Zdenek

    2004-04-01

    Chromosomal aberrations determined by conventional method or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with whole chromosome painting are used as biomarkers of effect. Groups occupationally exposed to 1,3-butadiene (BD), acrylonitrile, ethyl benzene and benzene in petrochemical industry, and carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (c-PAHs) from ambient air were followed by conventional method and FISH painting for chromosomes # 1 and # 4, in total 383 subjects, including controls. No effect was observed by either method with exposure to 1,3-butadiene < 1mg/m(3) and acrylonitrile < 0.3mg/m(3). Ethyl benzene and benzene exposure significantly increased chromosomal aberrations by both methods, which decreased after the implementation of preventive measures. The genomic frequency of translocations by FISH calculated as FG/100 was significantly increased in city policemen versus control group exposed to c-PAHs from ambient air (1.72+/-1.57 versus 1.25+/-1.11, P<0.05). The method of FISH with whole chromosome painting seems to be more sensitive to detect chromosomal injury by occupational exposure to carcinogens than conventional method. PMID:15093279

  9. Does polyomavirus infection interfere with bladder cancer fluorescence in situ hybridization?

    PubMed

    Hossain, Deloar; Hull, David; Kalantarpour, Fatemeh; Maitlen, Rebecca; Qian, Junqi; Bostwick, David G

    2014-03-01

    Urine cytology is a proven and widely used screening tool for the detection of urothelial carcinoma. However, morphologic features of polyomavirus infected cells, characterized by nuclear inclusions (decoy cells) are a known source of diagnostic confusion with malignancy. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is now routinely used to support the cytological diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma and monitor for recurrence. We sought to determine whether polyomavirus infection could result in positive FISH results (aneuploidy). This study deals with retrospective study of 100 polyomavirus-infected urine samples from patients with no history of urothelial carcinoma or organ transplantation. All cases were stained with Papanicolaou and acid hematoxylin stain. One slide from each sample was de-stained and FISH was performed using chromosome enumeration probes 3, 7, 17, and locus-specific probe 9p21. Adequate cells for FISH analysis (25 cells) were present in 81 cases; 19 cases were insufficient due to loss of cells during de-staining and FISH preparation process. All polyomavirus-infected cells (decoy cells) exhibited a normal chromosome pattern. Four cases were FISH positive, but there were no positive decoy cells. Decoy cells did not exhibit aneuploidy by FISH. The presence of decoy cells does not exclude the possibility of concurrent urothelial carcinoma. Acid hematoxylin stain appeared to supplement the Papanicolou stain in identifying and confirming the presence of polyomavirus infection. PMID:24006232

  10. Spatial genome organization: contrasting views from chromosome conformation capture and fluorescence in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Iain; Berlivet, Soizik; Eskeland, Ragnhild; Boyle, Shelagh; Illingworth, Robert S.; Paquette, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Although important for gene regulation, most studies of genome organization use either fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) or chromosome conformation capture (3C) methods. FISH directly visualizes the spatial relationship of sequences but is usually applied to a few loci at a time. The frequency at which sequences are ligated together by formaldehyde cross-linking can be measured genome-wide by 3C methods, with higher frequencies thought to reflect shorter distances. FISH and 3C should therefore give the same views of genome organization, but this has not been tested extensively. We investigated the murine HoxD locus with 3C carbon copy (5C) and FISH in different developmental and activity states and in the presence or absence of epigenetic regulators. We identified situations in which the two data sets are concordant but found other conditions under which chromatin topographies extrapolated from 5C or FISH data are not compatible. We suggest that products captured by 3C do not always reflect spatial proximity, with ligation occurring between sequences located hundreds of nanometers apart, influenced by nuclear environment and chromatin composition. We conclude that results obtained at high resolution with either 3C methods or FISH alone must be interpreted with caution and that views about genome organization should be validated by independent methods. PMID:25512564

  11. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis by a new multiplex peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization method

    PubMed Central

    Machado, António; Castro, Joana; Cereija, Tatiana; Almeida, Carina

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is one of most common vaginal infections. However, its diagnosis by classical methods reveals low specificity. Our goal was to evaluate the accuracy diagnosis of 150 vaginal samples with research gold standard methods and our Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probes by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) methodology. Also, we described the first PNA-FISH methodology for BV diagnosis, which provides results in approximately 3 h. The results showed a sensitivity of 84.6% (95% confidence interval (CI), from 64.3 to 95.0%) and a specificity of 97.6% (95% CI [92.6–99.4%]), demonstrating the higher specificity of the PNA-FISH method and showing false positive results in BV diagnosis commonly obtained by the classical methods. This methodology combines the specificity of PNA probes for Lactobacillus species and G. vaginalis visualization and the calculation of the microscopic field by Nugent score, allowing a trustful evaluation of the bacteria present in vaginal microflora and avoiding the occurrence of misleading diagnostics. Therefore, the PNA-FISH methodology represents a valuable alternative for BV diagnosis. PMID:25737820

  12. Microfluidic fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry (µFlowFISH)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Meagher, Robert J.; Light, Yooli Kim; Yilmaz, Suzan; Chakraborty, Romy; Arkin, Adam P.; Hazen, Terry C.; Singh, Anup K.

    2011-01-01

    We describe an integrated microfluidic device (µFlowFISH) capable of performing 16S rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) followed by flow cytometric detection for identifying bacteria in natural microbial communities. The device was used for detection of species involved in bioremediation of Cr(VI) and other metals in groundwater samples from a highly-contaminated environmental site (Hanford, WA, USA). The µFlowFISH seamlessly integrates two components: a hybridization chamber formed between two photopolymerized membranes, where cells and probes are electrophoretically loaded, incubated and washed; and a downstream cross structure for electrokinetically focusing cells into a single-file flow for flow cytometry analysis. The device is capable of analyzing a wide variety of bacteria including aerobic, facultative and anaerobic bacteria and was initially tested and validated using cultured microbes, including Escherichia coli, as well as two strains isolated from Hanford site: Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain RCH1, and Pseudomonas sp. strain RCH2 that are involved in Cr(VI) reduction and immobilization. Combined labeling and detection efficiencies of 74–97% were observed in experiments with simple mixtures of cultured cells confirmed specific labeling. Results obtained were in excellent agreement with those obtained by conventional flow cytometry confirming the accuracy of µFlowFISH. Finally, the device was used for analyzing water samples collected on different dates from the Hanford Site. We were able to monitor the numbers of Pseudomonas sp. with only 100–200 cells loaded into the microchip. The µFlowFISH approach provides an automated platform for quantitative detection of microbial cells from complex samples, and is ideally suited for analysis of precious samples with low cell numbers such as those found at extreme environmental niches, bioremediation sites, and the human microbiome. PMID:21755095

  13. The Bin1 gene localizes to human chromosome 2q14 by PCR analysis of somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Negorev, D.; Simon, D.; Riethman, H.

    1996-04-15

    This report describes the localization of the box-dependent myc-interacting protein-1 (Bin1) gene to human chromosome 2q14 using fluorescence in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction. Loss of Bin1 expression is commonly found in human carcinomas. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Discrimination of bacteriophage infected cells using locked nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization (LNA-FISH).

    PubMed

    Vilas Boas, Diana; Almeida, Carina; Sillankorva, Sanna; Nicolau, Ana; Azeredo, Joana; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2016-02-01

    Bacteriophage-host interaction studies in biofilm structures are still challenging due to the technical limitations of traditional methods. The aim of this study was to provide a direct fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method based on locked nucleic acid (LNA) probes, which targets the phage replication phase, allowing the study of population dynamics during infection. Bacteriophages specific for two biofilm-forming bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter, were selected. Four LNA probes were designed and optimized for phage-specific detection and for bacterial counterstaining. To validate the method, LNA-FISH counts were compared with the traditional plaque forming unit (PFU) technique. To visualize the progression of phage infection within a biofilm, colony-biofilms were formed and infected with bacteriophages. A good correlation (r = 0.707) was observed between LNA-FISH and PFU techniques. In biofilm structures, LNA-FISH provided a good discrimination of the infected cells and also allowed the assessment of the spatial distribution of infected and non-infected populations. PMID:26813295

  15. Comparative cytogenetic characterization of primary canine melanocytic lesions using array CGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Poorman, Kelsey; Borst, Luke; Moroff, Scott; Roy, Siddharth; Labelle, Philippe; Motsinger-Reif, Alison; Breen, Matthew

    2015-06-01

    Melanocytic lesions originating from the oral mucosa or cutaneous epithelium are common in the general dog population, with up to 100,000 diagnoses each year in the USA. Oral melanoma is the most frequent canine neoplasm of the oral cavity, exhibiting a highly aggressive course. Cutaneous melanocytomas occur frequently, but rarely develop into a malignant form. Despite the differential prognosis, it has been assumed that subtypes of melanocytic lesions represent the same disease. To address the relative paucity of information about their genomic status, molecular cytogenetic analysis was performed on the three recognized subtypes of canine melanocytic lesions. Using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis, highly aberrant distinct copy number status across the tumor genome for both of the malignant melanoma subtypes was revealed. The most frequent aberrations included gain of dog chromosome (CFA) 13 and 17 and loss of CFA 22. Melanocytomas possessed fewer genome wide aberrations, yet showed a recurrent gain of CFA 20q15.3-17. A distinctive copy number profile, evident only in oral melanomas, displayed a sigmoidal pattern of copy number loss followed immediately by a gain, around CFA 30q14. Moreover, when assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), copy number aberrations of targeted genes, such as gain of c-MYC (80% of cases) and loss of CDKN2A (68% of cases), were observed. This study suggests that in concordance with what is known for human melanomas, canine melanomas of the oral mucosa and cutaneous epithelium are discrete and initiated by different molecular pathways. PMID:25511566

  16. Fifty probands with extra structurally abnormal chromosomes characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, E.; Telenius, H.; Nordenskjoeld, M.

    1995-01-02

    Extra structurally abnormal chromosomes (ESACs) are small supernumerary chromosomes often associated with developmental abnormalities and malformations. We present 50 probands with ESACs characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization using centromere-specific probes and chromosome-specific libraries. ESAC-specific libraries were constructed by flow sorting and subsequent amplification by DOP-PCR. Using such ESAC-specific libraries we were able to outline the chromosome regions involved. Twenty-three of the 50 ESACs were inverted duplications of chromosome 15 (inv dup(15)), including patients with normal phenotypes and others with similar clinical symptoms. These 2 groups differed in size and shape of the inv dup(15). Patients with a large inv dup(15), which included the Prader-Willi region, had a high risk of abnormality, whereas patients with a small inv dup(15), not including the Prader-Willi region, were normal. ESACs derived from chromosomes 13 or 21 appeared to have a low risk of abnormality, while one out of 3 patients with an ESAC derived from chromosome 14 had discrete symptoms. One out of 3 patients with an ESAC derived from chromosome 22 had severe anomalies, corresponding to some of the manifestations of the cat eye syndrome. Small extra ring chromosomes of autosomal origin and ESACs identified as i(12p) or i(18p) were all associated with a high risk of abnormality. 42 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Analysis of replication timing properties of human X-chromosomal loci by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Boggs, B A; Chinault, A C

    1994-01-01

    We have used fluorescence in situ hybridization on interphase nuclei of normal female cells to compare the replication timing patterns of genes on the human X chromosome that are known to escape X inactivation with those that are inactivated. By this procedure it was possible not only to determine the relative time of replication of the earlier-replicating allele for different loci but also to estimate the degree of asynchrony of replication of the two alleles for each individual locus. Loci such as HPRT and FRAXA, which are normally inactivated, displayed a high degree of replication asynchrony, whereas loci that are not inactivated (ZFX and RPS4X) were found to replicate very synchronously. Interestingly, examination of XIST, which is expressed only from the inactive X chromosome, by this procedure revealed that it also replicated asynchronously, with the expressed copy apparently replicating first. Therefore, by examining different loci from the X chromosome it was determined that there is a strict correlation between the expression and relative time of replication of individual genes. Images PMID:8016119

  18. Simultaneous determination of bacterial viability and identity in biofilms using ethidium monoazide and fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Regan, J M; Oldenburg, P S; Park, H D; Harrington, G W; Noguera, D R

    2003-01-01

    A protocol for simultaneously interrogating bacterial viability and identity using in situ, culture-independent methods is described. Viability is assayed using ethidium monoazide (EMA) staining of cells with compromised membranes, and identity is determined using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Experiments with planktonic cultures were used to demonstrate the compatibility of EMA staining and FISH after covalently bonding EMA to nucleic acids by photoreaction. Applications to biofilm samples showed that diffusion limitations in the biofilm matrix were not problematic and that effective discrimination of viable target cells within a mixed microbial community was possible. PMID:12701916

  19. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Analysis of Atypical Melanocytic Proliferations and Melanoma in Young Patients

    PubMed Central

    DeMarchis, Emilia H; Swetter, Susan M; Jennings, Charay D; Kim, Jinah

    2014-01-01

    Morphologic heterogeneity among melanocytic proliferations is a common challenge in the diagnosis of melanoma. In particular, atypical melanocytic lesions in children, adolescents, and young adults may be difficult to classify because of significant morphologic overlap with melanoma. Recently a four-probe fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) protocol to detect chromosomal abnormalities in chromosomes 6 and 11 has shown promise for improving the classification of melanocytic lesions. We sought to determine the correlation between FISH results, morphology, and clinical outcomes in a series of challenging melanocytic proliferations in young patients. We retrospectively performed the standard four-probe FISH analysis on 21 melanocytic neoplasms from 21 patients younger than 25 years of age (range 5–25 years, mean 14.6 years) from Stanford University Medical Center who were prospectively followed for a median of 51 months (range 1–136 months). The study cohort included patients with 5 confirmed melanomas, 2 melanocytic tumors of uncertain malignant potential (MelTUMPs), 10 morphologically challenging atypical Spitz tumors (ASTs), and 4 typical Spitz nevi. FISH detected chromosomal aberrations in all five melanomas and in one MelTUMP, in which the patient developed subsequent lymph node and distant metastasis. All 10 ASTs, 4 Spitz nevi, and 1 of 2 MelTUMPs were negative for significant gains or losses in chromosomes 6 and 11q. Our findings demonstrated a strong correlation between positive FISH results and the histomorphologic impression of melanoma. This finding was also true for the MelTUMP with poor clinical outcome. Therefore FISH may serve as a helpful adjunct in the classification of controversial melanocytic tumors in young patients. PMID:24924836

  20. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of atypical melanocytic proliferations and melanoma in young patients.

    PubMed

    DeMarchis, Emilia H; Swetter, Susan M; Jennings, Charay D; Kim, Jinah

    2014-01-01

    Morphologic heterogeneity among melanocytic proliferations is a common challenge in the diagnosis of melanoma. In particular, atypical melanocytic lesions in children, adolescents, and young adults may be difficult to classify because of significant morphologic overlap with melanoma. Recently a four-probe fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) protocol to detect chromosomal abnormalities in chromosomes 6 and 11 has shown promise for improving the classification of melanocytic lesions. We sought to determine the correlation between FISH results, morphology, and clinical outcomes in a series of challenging melanocytic proliferations in young patients. We retrospectively performed the standard four-probe FISH analysis on 21 melanocytic neoplasms from 21 patients younger than 25 years of age (range 5-25 years, mean 14.6 years) from Stanford University Medical Center who were prospectively followed for a median of 51 months (range 1-136 months). The study cohort included patients with 5 confirmed melanomas, 2 melanocytic tumors of uncertain malignant potential (MelTUMPs), 10 morphologically challenging atypical Spitz tumors (ASTs), and 4 typical Spitz nevi. FISH detected chromosomal aberrations in all five melanomas and in one MelTUMP, in which the patient developed subsequent lymph node and distant metastasis. All 10 ASTs, 4 Spitz nevi, and 1 of 2 MelTUMPs were negative for significant gains or losses in chromosomes 6 and 11q. Our findings demonstrated a strong correlation between positive FISH results and the histomorphologic impression of melanoma. This finding was also true for the MelTUMP with poor clinical outcome. Therefore FISH may serve as a helpful adjunct in the classification of controversial melanocytic tumors in young patients. PMID:24924836

  1. Automated analysis of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) labeled genetic biomarkers in assisting cervical cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingwei; Zheng, Bin; Zhang, Roy R; Li, Shibo; Chen, Xiaodong; Mulvihill, John J; Lu, Xianglan; Pang, Hui; Liu, Hong

    2010-06-01

    The numerical and/or structural deviation of some chromosomes (i.e., monosomy and _polysomy of chromosomes 3 and X) are routinely used as positive genetic biomarkers to diagnose cervical cancer and predict the disease progression. Among the available diagnostic methods to analyze the aneusomy of chromosomes 3 and X, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technology has demonstrated significant advantages in assisting clinicians to more accurately detect and diagnose cervical carcinoma at an early stage, in particular for the women at a high risk for progression of low-grade and high-grade squamous intra-epithelium lesions (LSIL and HSIL). In order to increase the diagnostic accuracy, consistency, and efficiency from that of manual FISH analysis, this study aims to develop and test an automated FISH analysis method that includes a two-stage scheme. In the first stage, an interactive multiple-threshold algorithm is utilized to segment potential interphase nuclei candidates distributed in different intensity levels and a rule-based classifier is implemented to identify analyzable interphase cells. In the second stage, FISH labeled biomarker spots of chromosomes 3 and X are segmented by a top-hat transform. The independent FISH spots are then detected by a knowledge-based classifier, which enables recognition of the splitting and stringy FISH signals. Finally, the ratio of abnormal interphase cells with numerical changes of chromosomes 3 and X is calculated to detect positive cases. The experimental results of four test cases showed high agreement of FISH analysis results between the automated scheme and the cytogeneticist's analysis including 92.7% to 98.7% agreement in cell segmentation and 4.4% to 11.0% difference in cell classification. This preliminary study demonstrates the feasibility of potentially applying the automatic FISH analysis method to expedite the screening and detecting cervical cancer at an early stage. PMID:20441233

  2. Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization Detects Increased Sperm Aneuploidy in Men with Recurrent Pregnancy Loss

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Ranjith; Scovell, Jason M.; Kovac, Jason R.; Cook, Peter J.; Lamb, Dolores J.; Lipshultz, Larry I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate, in men presenting with recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL), the prevalence of sperm autosome and sex chromosome aneuploidy. Design Retrospective Study. Setting Male infertility clinic at a tertiary referral center. Patients 140 men with recurrent pregnancy loss provided semen samples and five normozoospermic controls provided 140 semen samples for comparison. RPL, documented in the female partners, was defined as a prior miscarriage and/or recurrent IVF/ICSI failure. Interventions Fluorescent In situ hybridization (FISH) was used to detect numerical abnormalities in sex chromosomes (X,Y) and autosomes (13, 18, 21) in ejaculated sperm. Main Outcome Measures Sperm aneuploidy in men with RPL and normozoospermic controls. Results Men with RPL had a greater percentage of sperm aneuploidy within the sex chromosomes, chromosomes 18 and 13/21 (1.04% vs. 0.38%; 0.18% vs. 0.03%; 0.26% vs. 0.08%). In total, 40% of men with normal sperm density and motility had abnormal sperm aneuploidy in the all the chromosomes analyzed. Men with abnormal sperm density and motility had a higher proportion of sperm sex chromosome aneuploidy than men with normal density/motility (62% vs. 45%). Men with normal strict morphology (>4%) had lower rates of sex chromosome and sperm aneuploidy than men with abnormal strict morphology (28% vs. 57%). There was no association between sperm DNA fragmentation and sperm aneuploidy. Conclusions Men with RPL have increased sperm aneuploidy compared to controls. A total of 40% of men with RPL and normal sperm density/motility had abnormal sperm aneuploidy. Men with oligoasthenozoospermia and abnormal strict morphology had greater percentage of sperm aneuploidy compared to men with normal semen parameters. PMID:25707335

  3. The role of fluorescence in situ hybridization and gene expression profiling in myeloma risk stratification.

    PubMed

    Hose, Dirk; Seckinger, Anja; Jauch, Anna; Rme, Thierry; Moreaux, Jrme; Bertsch, Uta; Neben, Kai; Klein, Bernard; Goldschmidt, Hartmut

    2011-12-01

    Multiple myeloma patients' survival under treatment varies from a few months to more than 15 years. Clinical prognostic factors, especially beta2-microglobulin (B2M) and the international staging system (ISS), allow risk assessment to a certain extent, but do not identify patients at very high risk. As malignant plasma cells are characterized by a variety of chromosomal aberrations and changes in gene expression, a molecular characterization ofCD138-purified myeloma cells by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (iFISH) and gene expression profiling (GEP) can be used for improved risk assessment, iFISH allows a risk stratification with presence of a translocation t(4;14) and/or deletion of 17p13 being the best documented adverse prognostic factors. A deletion of 13q14 is no longer considered to define adverse risk. Patients harbouring a t(4;14) seems to benefit from a bortezomib- or lenalidomide containing regimen, whereas patients with deletion 17p13 seem only to benefit from a high dose therapy approach using long term bortezomib (in induction and maintenance) and autologous tandem-transplantation as used in the GMMG-HD4 trial, or the total therapy 3 concept. Gene expression profiling allows the assessment of high risk scores (IFM, UAMS), remaining prognostic despite treatment with novel agents, and prognostic surrogates of biological factors (e.g. proliferation) and (prognostic) target gene expression (e.g. Aurora-kinase A). Thus, assessment of B2M and ISS-stage, iFISH, and GEP is considered extended routine diagnostics in therapy requiring multiple myeloma patients for risk assessment and, even now, to a certain extent selection of treatment. PMID:22352188

  4. Six antimicrobial peptide genes of the cathelicidin family map to bovine chromosome 22q24 by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Castiglioni, B; Scocchi, M; Zanetti, M; Ferretti, L

    1996-01-01

    Six phage clones containing gene members of the family of antimicrobial peptides named cathelicidins, were mapped to bovine chromosome 22q24, by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization. The mapping data suggest the clustering of cathelicidins into a CATHL@ locus, in a similar manner as for beta-defensins, another family of antimicrobial peptides, defining the locus DEFB@ mapped to 27q13-->q14. PMID:9067433

  5. Localization of the human OB gene (OBS) to chromosome 7q32 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Geffroy, S.; Duban, B.; Martinville, B. de

    1995-08-10

    An important gene involved in the pathogenesis of obesity is the product of the human homologue of the murine obese gene (gene symbol OBS). Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), we have localized the human OB gene to human chromosome 7, specifically to region 7q32.1. The FISH data of human OBS provide a gene-associated marker for genetic mapping. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Assignment of the developmentally regulated gene NEDD1 to human chromosome 12q22 by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Takai, S; Yoshida, Y; Noda, M; Yamada, K; Kumar, S

    1995-01-01

    The developmentally regulated mouse gene Nedd 1 encodes a protein showing similarities with the beta-subunit of heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins and has growth suppressing activity when overexpressed in various cultured cell types. We have mapped the human homolog (NEDD1) of the mouse gene to chromosome 12q22 by fluorescence in situ hybridization using R-banded human (pro)metaphase chromosomes. PMID:7814034

  7. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) maps chromosomal homologies between the dusky titi and squirrel monkey.

    PubMed

    Stanyon, R; Consigliere, S; Müller, S; Morescalchi, A; Neusser, M; Wienberg, J

    2000-02-01

    The Platyrrhini are one of the most karyologically derived groups of primates and the evolution of their karyotypes is far from understood. The identification of the origin and direction of chromosome rearrangements will contribute to a better understanding of New World monkey phylogeny, taxonomy, and evolution. We mapped homology and identified translocations in the chromosomes of the dusky titi monkey (Callicebus moloch, 2n = 50) and the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus, 2n = 44) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of human chromosome paints. The hybridization results established chromosomal homologies between these New World primates, humans, other primates, and more distantly related mammalian species and show that both species have highly rearranged karyotypes. The total number of hybridization signals was 37 in C. moloch and 40 in S. sciureus, which is in the range of most comparisons of human chromosomes with phylogenetically more distant species outside of the primate order. Parsimony analyses of outgroup painting patterns allowed us to propose an ancestral karyotype for New World monkeys consisting of 2n = 56 with homologs to the following human chromosomes or chromosome segments: 1b; 1c; 2a; 2b; 3a; 3b; 3/21; 4; 5; 6; 7; 8a; 8/18; 9; 10a; 10/16; 11; 12; 13; 14/15; 15a; 16a; 17; 19; 20; 22; X; Y. Associations 8/18 and 10/16 are derived ancestral associations for all Platyrrhini. A 2/16 association found in S. sciureus and C. moloch was also seen in Ateles geoffroyi and Cebus capucinus; a 5/7 association in S. sciureus was present in A. geoffroyi, C. capucinus, and Alouatta belzebul. Other associations seen in the dusky titi monkey or the squirrel monkey are probably automorphisms. Comparison with chromosome phylogenies based on R-banding [Dutrillaux et al., 1986] showed that there were many errors in assigning homology with human chromosomes. The chromosomal phylogeny of New World monkeys based on banding patterns is in need of revision using modern molecular methods. PMID:10676707

  8. Simple Adhesive-Tape-Based Sampling of Tomato Surfaces Combined with Rapid Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Salmonella Detection▿

    PubMed Central

    Bisha, Bledar; Brehm-Stecher, Byron F.

    2009-01-01

    A simple adhesive-tape-based method for sampling of tomato surfaces was combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization for rapid culture-independent detection of Salmonella strains. Tapes could also be placed face-down on selective agar for on-tape enrichment of captured Salmonella cells. Overlay of cell-charged tapes with small volumes of liquid enrichment media enabled subsequent detection of tape-captured Salmonella via flow cytometry. PMID:19124588

  9. Identification of Dekkera bruxellensis (Brettanomyces) from Wine by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes

    PubMed Central

    Stender, Henrik; Kurtzman, Cletus; Hyldig-Nielsen, Jens J.; Sørensen, Ditte; Broomer, Adam; Oliveira, Kenneth; Perry-O'Keefe, Heather; Sage, Andrew; Young, Barbara; Coull, James

    2001-01-01

    A new fluorescence in situ hybridization method using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for identification of Brettanomyces is described. The test is based on fluorescein-labeled PNA probes targeting a species-specific sequence of the rRNA of Dekkera bruxellensis. The PNA probes were applied to smears of colonies, and results were interpreted by fluorescence microscopy. The results obtained from testing 127 different yeast strains, including 78 Brettanomyces isolates from wine, show that the spoilage organism Brettanomyces belongs to the species D. bruxellensis and that the new method is able to identify Brettanomyces (D. bruxellensis) with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. PMID:11157265

  10. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Melanoma Diagnosis: A Review and a Reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Gerardo; De Vanna, Anna Chiara

    2016-04-01

    Although conventional histopathological examination is the undisputable mainstay for the diagnosis of melanocytic skin neoplasms, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has the potential to provide important information to morphologically challenging cases. The standard melanoma FISH test targeting RREB1 (6p25), MYB (6q23), CCND1 (11q13), and centromere 6 is an effective compromise between cost, technical complexity, and sensitivity. The authors use the standard FISH-positivity as a tie-breaker for challenging melanocytic neoplasms mainly in a non-Spitzoid morphologic context because the currently available test leaves several unresolved issues: namely, a relatively low diagnostic accuracy in morphologically ambiguous melanocytic neoplasms; a relatively low sensitivity and specificity in Spitzoid neoplasms; and the occurrence of false positives due to tetraploidy in Spitz nevi and in nevi with an atypical epithelioid component. Under investigation is currently a new melanoma probe cocktail targeting RREB1 (6p25), C-MYC (8q24), CDKN2A (9p21), and CCND1 (11q13). However, CDKN2A is a significant parameter only if lost in homozygosis, and this complicates the interpretation of the results. Furthermore, the new melanoma probe cocktail has been tested on cases of atypical Spitzoid proliferations with fatal outcomes which at present are too few to allow definite conclusions. The authors propose the implementation of a FISH algorithm (standard 4-probe test followed by either C-MYC or CDKN2A/centromere 9) to assist the histopathological diagnosis and minimize the technical problems. Nevertheless, because the diagnostic accuracy of the FISH technique is far from being absolute, the overall clinicopathological context must always guide the decision-making process about the management of morphobiologically ambiguous melanocytic proliferations. PMID:26999337

  11. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for detecting urothelial carcinoma: A clinicopathological study

    PubMed Central

    Caraway, Nancy P.; Khanna, Abha; Fernandez, Ricardo L.; Payne, Linda; Bassett, Roland L.; Zhang, Hua-Zhong; Kamat, Ashish; Katz, Ruth L.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Because urothelial carcinoma (UC) is associated with a significant high risk of recurrence and progression, patients with UC require long-term surveillance. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has been shown to be more sensitive than cytology in the detection of UC. This study evaluated the use of FISH for detecting UC. METHODS We used a pathology database to identify patients who had urine cytology and FISH performed at our institution between 2004 and 2006. Urinary specimens were analyzed using UroVysion FISH probes for abnormalities in centromeric chromosomes 3, 7 and 17 and locus specific 9p21. FISH results were correlated with cytologic findings and a minimal clinical follow-up of 24 months. RESULTS We identified 1006 consecutive urinary specimens from 600 patients (448 men and 152 women) who were monitored for recurrent UC (915 specimens) or evaluated for urinary symptoms (91 specimens). On FISH analysis, 669 specimens were negative for UC and 272 specimens were positive for UC. Sixty-five (6%) specimens were insufficient for FISH analysis. The sensitivity and specificity of FISH for UC were 58% and 66%, respectively, and 59% and 63% when FISH and cytology results were combined. Factors contributing to decreased FISH sensitivity included the paucity or absence of tumor cells, low-grade tumors, degenerated cells, method of specimen collection, type of specimen, and obscuring inflammatory cells or lubricant. CONCLUSIONS We found UroVysion FISH had good sensitivity and specificity for detecting UC in urinary specimens. It is important to correlate the FISH results with the cytologic findings. PMID:20665656

  12. Adjunct prenatal testing: patient decisions regarding ethnic carrier screening and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Erica L; Ormond, Kelly E

    2004-02-01

    Little has been reported regarding how women make decisions about genetic carrier screening for Ashkenazi Jewish genetic disease and cystic fibrosis (CF), and for fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) during pregnancy. Thirty-seven women who underwent genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis were interviewed about their prenatal decision making. Respondents were largely Caucasian (95%), and undergoing prenatal diagnosis because of maternal age (78%). Sixty-three percent of those who reported having genetic carrier screening correctly defined it; 83% felt positively about it. Primary reasons reported for electing screening were: to get information, to be prepared, perception of risk, wanting peace of mind and percieved inability to care for an affected child. Women who declined screening felt they had very little or no risk, and some were deterred by cost. Ninety-five percent of respondents elected to have FISH; most were motivated by its speed in providing information and peace of mind or by timing of when the procedure was performed. Those who declined FISH reported being less concerned about having an affected child, receiving bad news, or waiting 2 weeks for results and slightly less affected by their "feelings toward medical testing" or physician's suggestion. These findings suggest decision-making factors differ between those electing and declining adjunct prenatal testing and increased knowledge about these factors may impact the way in which these services are offered by health care professionals. Prospective research with a larger population will be useful in further delineating the factors that influence prenatal decisions about adjunct testing measures. PMID:19731471

  13. Fluorescence in situ hybridization improves the detection of monosomy 7 in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Flactif, M; Lai, J L; Preudhomme, C; Fenaux, P

    1994-06-01

    We performed conventional cytogenetic (CC) and interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis with an alpha satellite chromosome 7 specific DNA centromeric probe (p alpha 7t1) on bone marrow material prepared for CC in 11 controls and 80 cases of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In controls, a mean of 4.3 +/- 1% of the 700 cells examined showed only one FISH signal for chromosome 7, and the finding of > 6.3% (mean +2 standard deviations) of cells with one FISH signal was considered to indicate the presence of a clone with -7. By CC, clonal -7 was found in 11 patients, whereas two patients had -7 in only one mitose (non-clonal -7). In eight of the 11 cases of clonal -7 by CC, interphase FISH confirmed -7. In the remaining three patients, 5.1%, 6.3% and 18.4% respectively of the cells had one signal. Those three patients had, in addition to -7 by CC, a marker chromosome which was shown to be constituted of chromosome 7 pericentromeric material by FISH analysis on metaphase spreads (metaphase FISH). Of the two patients with non-clonal -7 by CC, one had a -7 clone by interphase FISH whereas the other patient had normal FISH results. Five of the 67 patients with no -7 mitose by CC had clonal -7 by interphase FISH, with one chromosome 7 signal in 14.4 to 39% of the cells examined. At least three mitoses with -7 were found in two of them by metaphase FISH. Three of the five patients were reexamined 12 to 17 months later: CC and metaphase FISH found no -7, whereas interphase FISH still showed a -7 clone. Three of the patients with clonal -7 by CC and by FISH were reexamined in complete hematological remission after intensive therapy. CC found no -7 and interphase FISH was normal in all three patients. Our findings suggest that interphase FISH may improve the detection of -7 in MDS. Conventional cytogenetics should still be performed in parallel to FISH, however, because of possible false negative FISH results when a pericentromeric chromosome 7 marker is present in patients with -7. Larger numbers of cases with minor -7 clones, detectable by FISH only, and longer follow-up in those cases will be necessary to determine the significance of this finding, the evolution of this minor clone, and the outcome of the patients. PMID:8207974

  14. Cytogenetic abnormality in patients with multiple myeloma analyzed by fluorescent in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ying; Chen, Wenming; Chen, Shilun; Huang, Zhongxia

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) data and the association with clinical characteristics, therapy response, and survival time in patients with multiple myeloma. Method We performed a retrospective review of patients with multiple myeloma from November 2010 to April 2014. Results Cytogenetic abnormalities by FISH were detectable in 66% of patients. One cytogenetic abnormality, two cytogenetic abnormalities, and complex abnormalities were detectable in 21.2%, 51.5%, and 27.3% of cases, respectively. 1q21 amplification, t(4p16.3/14q32), and 17p deletion were observed in 69.7%, 30.3%, and 21.2% of cases, respectively. Total response rates (complete response [CR] + near CR + partial response) were 93.8% and 82.1%, respectively, in cytogenetic normality group and abnormality group. CR rates were 50% and 32.1%, respectively. Median overall survival (OS) time was 51 months and 24 months, respectively, in cytogenetic normality group and abnormality group (P<0.05). Median OS time was not significantly different between 1q21 amplification group and no 1q21 amplification group in patients with FISH abnormalities (P>0.05). Median OS time was not significantly different between t(4;14) group and no t(4;14) group in patients with FISH abnormalities (P>0.05). Seven patients of 17p deletion died in 2 years. Conclusion Multiple myeloma is characterized by a high occurrence of chromosomal aberrations. 1q21 amplification and t(4;14) are the most common abnormalities. Multiple cytogenetic abnormalities are frequently observed in the same one patient. The total response rate, CR rate, and OS time are worse in cytogenetic abnormal patients compared with cytogenetic normal patients. Patients with 17p deletion have a very poor prognosis. Future goals of therapy will be to achieve minimal residual disease, biomarkers, and genomic data, which might provide a better estimate of the depth of response to therapy and OS. PMID:27042105

  15. Direct visualization of the novel pathogen, Spiroplasma eriocheiris, in the freshwater crayfish Procambarus clarkii (Girard) using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Ding, Z F; Xia, S Y; Xue, H; Tang, J Q; Ren, Q; Gu, W; Meng, Q G; Wang, W

    2015-09-01

    Spiroplasma eriocheiris is the first spiroplasma strain known to be pathogenic to freshwater crustaceans. It has caused considerable economic losses both in the freshwater crayfish Procambarus clarkii (Girard) and in some other crustaceans. The monitoring of the pathogen in crustacean populations and study of its behaviour in the laboratory require the development of reliable diagnostic tools. In this article, we improved microscopic identification of S. eriocheiris by combining in situ hybridization with specific fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes. The established fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) allowed simultaneous visualization, identification and localization of S. eriocheiris in the tissues of diseased crayfish P. clarkii and exhibited low background autofluorescence and ideal signal-to-noise ratio. With the advantages of better tissue penetration, potentially more specific and stable, we designed three species-specific oligonucleotide probes utilizing the sequences of 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions (ISRs) of S. eriocheiris. Positive hybridization signals were visualized in haemocytes and connective tissues of hepatopancreas, cardiac muscle and gill from diseased crayfish. This unique distribution pattern matched the pathological changes when diagnosed by H&E staining and indicated that S. eriocheiris probably spread throughout the tissues in P. clarkii by hemokinesis. This assay will facilitate our understanding of the pathogenesis of S. eriocheiris and enhance the early diagnosis of the novel pathogen. PMID:25167936

  16. Differentiation of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis by fluorescent in situ hybridization with peptide nucleic acid probes.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, K; Haase, G; Kurtzman, C; Hyldig-Nielsen, J J; Stender, H

    2001-11-01

    The recent discovery of Candida dubliniensis as a separate species that traditionally has been identified as Candida albicans has led to the development of a variety of biochemical and molecular methods for the differentiation of these two pathogenic yeasts. rRNA sequences are well-established phylogenetic markers, and probes targeting species-specific rRNA sequences have been used in diagnostic assays for the detection and identification of microorganisms. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a DNA mimic with improved hybridization characteristics, and the neutral backbone of PNA probes offers significant advantages in whole-cell in situ hybridization assays. In this study, we developed PNA probes targeting the rRNAs of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis and applied them to a fluorescence in situ hybridization method (PNA FISH) for differentiation between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. Liquid cultures were smeared onto microscope slides, heat fixed, and then hybridized for 30 min. Unhybridized PNA probe was removed by washing, and smears were examined by fluorescence microscopy. Evaluation of the PNA FISH method using smears of 79 C. dubliniensis and 70 C. albicans strains showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for both PNA probes. We concluded that PNA FISH is a powerful tool for the differentiation of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. PMID:11682542

  17. Fluorescence in situ hybridization shows spatial distribution of as yet uncultured treponemes in biopsies from digital dermatitis lesions.

    PubMed

    Moter, A; Leist, G; Rudolph, R; Schrank, K; Choi, B K; Wagner, M; Göbel, U B

    1998-09-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed on sections of plastic-embedded tissue using 16S rRNA-directed oligonucleotide probes to visualize uncultured treponemes in skin biopsies of cows with digital dermatitis. Plastic as embedding material allowed sectioning of hard and soft tissue with a defined thickness, avoiding the risk of dragging bacteria into the tissue while sectioning. furthermore, it provided a good signal-to-noise ratio. Using this method the spatial distribution of three different bacterial phylotypes was visualized simultaneously within the tissue. Whereas debris covering the ulcers contained a mixture of different micro-organisms, a layering of certain treponemal phylotypes was observed deeper in the epidermis. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and subsequent three-dimensional reconstruction of series of optical sections confirmed that the treponemes migrated intercellularly around the cells, most of them directed towards the dermis. In situ hybridization on tissue embedded in plastic proved to be a useful method to study mixed bacterial infections since it combines excellent histological conservation of tissue with identification of bacterial species by simultaneous use of probes labelled with different fluorescent dyes. This technique may have implications for in situ detection, identification and localization of microorganisms in veterinary as well as in human medicine. PMID:9782493

  18. Preparation of cells from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue for use in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments.

    PubMed

    Weremowicz, Stanislawa; Schofield, Deborah E

    2007-01-01

    Numerical and structural chromosome abnormalities can be accurately detected in cells from archived tissues using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This unit describes two common approaches to performing FISH in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. The first approach utilizes 4 to 6 microm tissue sections in cases for which preserving tissue morphology is necessary, and the second involves extraction of intact nuclei from 50 microm tissue sections. To interpret FISH results using 4 to 6 microm sections, an adequate number of nuclei must be evaluated to perform statistical analysis. Evaluation of 30 to 50 nuclei from the single cell suspension generally gives an interpretable result. PMID:18428417

  19. Enumeration of Respiring Pseudomonas spp. in Milk within 6 Hours by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization following Formazan Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Kitaguchi, Akiko; Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Nasu, Masao

    2005-01-01

    Respiring Pseudomonas spp. in milk were quantified within 6 h by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with vital staining. FISH with an oligonucleotide probe based on 16S rRNA sequences was used for the specific detection of Pseudomonas spp. at the single cell level. 5-Cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) was used to estimate bacterial respiratory activity. The numbers of respiring Pseudomonas cells as determined by FISH with CTC staining (CTC-FISH) were almost the same or higher than the numbers of CFU as determined by the conventional culture method. PMID:15870367

  20. Chromosomal aberrations by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)--Biomarker of exposure to carcinogenic PAHs.

    PubMed

    Beskid, Olena; Binkova, Blanka; Dusek, Zdik; Rössner, Pavel; Solansky, Ivo; Kalina, Ivan; Zidzik, Jozef; Popov, Todor A; Farmer, Peter B; Sram, Radim J

    2007-07-01

    The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with whole chromosome painting for chromosomes #1 and #4 was used to study the impact of air pollution containing higher concentrations of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (c-PAHs) in three European cities, Prague (Czech Republic), Kosice (Slovakia) and Sofia (Bulgaria). In each site were followed an exposed group, who were police officers or bus drivers who work usually through busy streets for at least 8h, and a reference group, who spent more than 90% of their daily time indoors. In Prague, a significant increase was observed in percentage of aberrant cells (% AB.C.) in the police officers compared to the reference group (0.33+/-0.25 versus 0.24+/-0.18, p<0.05). In Kosice, the exposed group differed from reference in the endpoints F(G)/100 1.52+/-1.18 versus 1.12+/-1.30, p<0.05; % AB.C. 0.30+/-0.19 versus 0.21+/-0.20, p<0.05; t/1000 3.91+/-3.18 versus 2.84+/-3.10, p<0.05. In Sofia were followed two exposed groups: police officers and bus drivers. All FISH endpoints were significantly higher in police officers compared to reference group (F(G)/100 1.60+/-0.99 versus 0.82+/-0.79, p<0.01; % AB.C. 0.25+/-0.14 versus 0.13+/-0.13, p<0.01; t/1000 4.19+/-2.65 versus 2.13+/-2.05, p<0.05; rcp 1.46+/-1.07 versus 0.70+/-0.76, p<0.05). In bus drivers compared to reference there was an increase in % AB.C. (0.25+/-0.18 versus 0.13+/-0.13, p<0.05). This is the first study when FISH method was used to analyze the impact of environmental air pollution. According to the original hypothesis it is expected that the most important group of chemicals responsible for the biological activity of air pollution represent c-PAHs. PMID:17412370

  1. Whole-mount fluorescent in situ hybridization staining of the colonial tunicate Botryllus schlosseri

    PubMed Central

    Langenbacher, Adam D.; Rodriguez, Delany; Di Maio, Alessandro; De Tomaso, Anthony W.

    2014-01-01

    Botryllus schlosseri is a colonial ascidian with characteristics that make it an attractive model for studying immunology, stem cell biology, evolutionary biology, and regeneration. Transcriptome sequencing and the recent completion of a draft genome sequence for B. schlosseri have revealed a large number of genes, both with and without vertebrate homologs, but analyzing the spatial and temporal expression of these genes in situ has remained a challenge. Here we report a robust protocol for in situ hybridization that enables the simultaneous detection of multiple transcripts in whole adult B. schlosseri using Tyramide Signal Amplification in conjunction with digoxigenin- and dinitrophenol-labeled RNA probes. Using this protocol we have identified a number of genes that can serve as markers for developing and mature structures in B. schlosseri, permitting analysis of phenotypes induced in loss-of-function experiments. PMID:25179474

  2. Breakpoints in Robertsonian translocations are localized to satellite III DNA by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Gravholt, C.H.; Friedrich, U.; Caprani, M.; Jorgensen, A.L. )

    1992-12-01

    The authors characterized 21 t(13;14) and 3 t(14;21) Robertsonian translocations for the presence of DNA derived from the short arms of the translocated acrocentric chromosomes and identified their centromeres. Nineteen of these 24 translocation carriers were unrelated. Using centromeric [alpha]-repeat DNA as chromosome-specific probe, they found by in situ hybridization that all 24 translocation chromosomes were dicentric. The chromatin between the two centromeres did not stain with silver, and no hybridization signal was detected with probes for rDNA or [beta]-satellite DNA that flank the distal and proximal ends of the rDNA region on the short arm of the acrocentrics. By contrast, all 24 translocation chromosomes gave a distinct hybridization signal when satellite III DNA was used as probe. This result strongly suggests that the chromosomal rearrangements leading to Robertsonian translocations occur preferentially in satellite III DNA. The authors hypothesize that guanine-rich satellite III repeats may promote chromosomal recombination by formation of tetraplex structures. The findings localize satellite III DNA to the short arm of the acrocentric chromosomes distal to centromeric [alpha]-repeat DNA and proximal to [beta]-satellite DNA. 32 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. High resolution multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization using cyanine and fluorescein dyes: rapid chromosome identification by directly fluorescently labeled alphoid DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Yurov, Y B; Soloviev, I V; Vorsanova, S G; Marcais, B; Roizes, G; Lewis, R

    1996-03-01

    We tested DNA probes directly labeled by fluorescently labeled nucleotides (Cy3-dCTP, Cy5-dCTP, FluorX-dCTP) for high resolution uni- and multicolor detection of human chromosomes and analysis of centromeric DNA organization by in situ hybridization. Alpha-satellite DNA probes specific to chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4 + 9, 5 + 19, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13 + 21, 14 + 22, 15, 16, 17, 18, 20, 22, X and Y were suitable for the accurate identification of human chromosomes in metaphase and interphase cells. Cy3-labeled probes had several advantages: (1) a high level of fluorescence (5-10 times more compared with fluorescein-labeled probes); (2) a low level of fluorescence in solution, allowing the detection of target chromosomes in situ during hybridization without the washing of slides; and (3) high resistance to photobleaching during prolonged (1-2 h) exposure to strong light, thus allowing the use of a high energy mercury lamp or a long integration time during image acquisition in digital imaging microscopy for the determination of weak signals. For di- and multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), we successfully used different combinations of directly fluorophorated probes with preservation of images by conventional microscopy or by digital imaging microscopy. FluorX and Cy3 dyes allowed the use of cosmid probes for mapping in a one-step hybridization experiment. Cyanine-labeled fluorophorated DNA probes offer additional possibilities for rapid chromosome detection during a simple 15-min FISH procedure, and can be recommended for basic research and clinical studies, utilizing FISH. PMID:8786090

  4. Scanning Near-field Optical/Atomic Force Microscopy detection of fluorescence in situ hybridization signals beyond the optical limit.

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Daisuke; Shichiri, Motoharu; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Yoshino, Tomoyuki; Hagiwara, Shoji; Ohtani, Toshio

    2003-10-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is widely used in molecular biological study. However, high-resolution analysis of fluorescent signals is theoretically limited by the 300-nm resolution optical limit of light microscopy. As an alternative to detection by light microscopy, we used Scanning Near-field Optical/Atomic Force Microscopy (SNOM/AFM), which can simultaneously obtain topographic and fluorescent images with nanometer-scale resolution. In this study, we demonstrated high-resolution SNOM/AFM imaging of barley chromosome (Hordeum vulgare, cv. Minorimugi) FISH signals using telomeric DNA probes. Besides detecting the granular structures on chromosomes in a topographic image, we clearly detected fluorescent signals in telomeric regions with low-magnification imaging. The high-resolution analysis suggested that one of the telomeric signals could be observed by expanded imaging as two fluorescent regions separated by approximately 250 nm. This result indicated that the fluorescent signals beyond the optical limit were detected with higher resolution scanning by SNOM/AFM. PMID:14499624

  5. Combined interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization elucidates the genetic heterogeneity of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Gorello, Paolo; La Starza, Roberta; Varasano, Emanuela; Chiaretti, Sabina; Elia, Loredana; Pierini, Valentina; Barba, Gianluca; Brandimarte, Lucia; Crescenzi, Barbara; Vitale, Antonella; Messina, Monica; Grammatico, Sara; Mancini, Marco; Matteucci, Caterina; Bardi, Antonella; Guarini, Anna; Martelli, Massimo Fabrizio; Fo, Robin; Mecucci, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Background Molecular lesions in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias affect regulators of cell cycle, proliferation, differentiation, survival and apoptosis in multi-step pathogenic pathways. Full genetic characterization is needed to identify events concurring in the development of these leukemias. Design and Methods We designed a combined interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization strategy to study 25 oncogenes/tumor suppressor genes in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias and applied it in 23 adult patients for whom immunophenotyping, karyotyping, molecular studies, and gene expression profiling data were available. The results were confirmed and integrated with those of multiplex-polymerase chain reaction analysis and gene expression profiling in another 129 adults with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias. Results The combined hybridization was abnormal in 21/23 patients (91%), and revealed multiple genomic changes in 13 (56%). It found abnormalities known to be associated with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, i.e. CDKN2A-B/9p21 and GRIK2/6q16 deletions, TCR and TLX3 rearrangements, SIL-TAL1, CALM-AF10, MLL-translocations, del(17)(q12)/NF1 and other cryptic genomic imbalances, i.e. 9q34, 11p, 12p, and 17q11 duplication, del(5)(q35), del(7)(q34), del(9)(q34), del(12)(p13), and del(14)(q11). It revealed new cytogenetic mechanisms for TCRB-driven oncogene activation and C-MYB duplication. In two cases with cryptic del(9)(q34), fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction detected the TAF_INUP214 fusion and gene expression profiling identified a signature characterized by HOXA and NUP214 upregulation and TAF_I, FNBP1, C9orf78, and USP20 down-regulation. Multiplex-polymerase chain reaction analysis and gene expression profiling of 129 further cases found five additional cases of TAF_I-NUP214-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Conclusions Our combined interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization strategy greatly improved the detection of genetic abnormalities in adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias. It identified new tumor suppressor genes/oncogenes involved in leukemogenesis and highlighted concurrent involvement of genes. The estimated incidence of TAF_I-NUP214, a new recurrent fusion in adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, was 4.6% (7/152). PMID:20065082

  6. Improved signal recognition for interphase fluorescent in-situ hybridization using a non-ionic detergent (NP-40) pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, H.M.; Day-Salvatore, D.L.; Sciorra, L.J.

    1994-09-01

    We have reported that the non-ionic detergent ethylphenolpoly (ethyleneglycolether)x known as Noniet-P40 (Shell International Petroleum) can gently disrupt cell membranes, resulting in cells with varying degrees of free chromatin release. The extent of this phenomena is dependent upon the concentration of NP-40 and the detergent`s exposure time to the cells. Treated cells can range from halos of DNA around the cells to fully extended free chromatin configurations. We have demonstrated that these treated cells are excellent targets for many different fluorescently labelled probes used for in situ hybridization studies. Recently, we have compared NP-40 harvested lymphocytes with normally harvested cells to see if we could improve upon the number of cells showing discreet signals in interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization. Preliminary work has shown that using a trisomy 21 cell line, one can get a statistically significant improvement with NP-40 pretreatment cells over control levels, in the number of cells having three discreet signals in interphase {open_quotes}FISH{close_quotes}. Such a pretreatment is simple to perform and may be of value when the number of cells available for analysis is low, as in the search for fetal cells from maternal circulation.

  7. Fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques (FISH) to detect changes in CYP19a gene expression of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    SciTech Connect

    Park, June-Woo; Tompsett, Amber; Zhang, Xiaowei; Newsted, John L.; Jones, Paul D.; Au, Doris; Kong, Richard; Wu, Rudolf S.S.; Giesy, John P. Hecker, Markus

    2008-10-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a sensitive in situ hybridization methodology using fluorescence-labeled riboprobes (FISH) that allows for the evaluation of gene expression profiles simultaneously in multiple target tissues of whole fish sections of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). To date FISH methods have been limited in their application due to autofluorescence of tissues, fixatives or other components of the hybridization procedure. An optimized FISH method, based on confocal fluorescence microscopy was developed to reduce the autofluorescence signal. Because of its tissue- and gender-specific expression and relevance in studies of endocrine disruption, gonadal aromatase (CYP19a) was used as a model gene. The in situ hybridization (ISH) system was validated in a test exposure with the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole. The optimized FISH method revealed tissue-specific expression of the CYP19a gene. Furthermore, the assay could differentiate the abundance of CYP19a mRNA among cell types. Expression of CYP19a was primarily associated with early stage oocytes, and expression gradually decreased with increasing maturation. No expression of CYP19a mRNA was observed in other tissues such as brain, liver, or testes. Fadrozole (100 {mu}g/L) caused up-regulation of CYP19a expression, a trend that was confirmed by RT-PCR analysis on excised tissues. In a combination approach with gonad histology, it could be shown that the increase in CYP19a expression as measured by RT-PCR on a whole tissue basis was due to a combination of both increases in numbers of CYP19a-containing cells and an increase in the amount of CYP19a mRNA present in the cells.

  8. Rapid identification of the animal pathogens Streptococcus uberis and Arcanobacterium pyogenes by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Werckenthin, Christiane; Gey, Annerose; Straubinger, Reinhard K; Poppert, Sven

    2012-05-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has been reported to be an easy and rapid identification method for many human pathogens, but applications for common veterinary pathogens are lacking. Gene probes for FISH of the animal pathogens Streptococcus uberis and Arcanobacterium pyogenes were designed to provide probes for a specific identification of these bacteria from cultures. Specific FISH probes for these species have so far not been published. Both probes recognized all isolates of the target species correctly. With the S. uberis probe SUB 196 no false-positive results were obtained for reference strains as well as for clinical isolates. Probe APYO 183 for A. pyogenes produced false-positive reactions with so far rarely described Arcanobacterium species from animals at standard hybridization conditions. In order to avoid any incorrect classifications of microorganisms as A. pyogenes, two non-labelled competitor probes were designed and successfully evaluated. PMID:22033042

  9. Direct fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes using quantum dot-platinum labeled DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Gyoyeon; Lee, Hansol; Lee, Jiyeon

    2015-11-13

    The telomere shortening in chromosomes implies the senescence, apoptosis, or oncogenic transformation of cells. Since detecting telomeres in aging and diseases like cancer, is important, the direct detection of telomeres has been a very useful biomarker. We propose a telomere detection method using a newly synthesized quantum dot (QD) based probe with oligonucleotide conjugation and direct fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). QD-oligonucleotides were prepared with metal coordination bonding based on platinum-guanine binding reported in our previous work. The QD-oligonucleotide conjugation method has an advantage where any sequence containing guanine at the end can be easily bound to the starting QD-Pt conjugate. A synthesized telomeric oligonucleotide was bound to the QD-Pt conjugate successfully and this probe hybridized specifically on the telomere of fabricated MV-4-11 and MOLT-4 chromosomes. Additionally, the QD-telomeric oligonucleotide probe successfully detected the telomeres on the CGH metaphase slide. Due to the excellent photostability and high quantum yield of QDs, the QD-oligonucleotide probe has high fluorescence intensity when compared to the organic dye-oligonucleotide probe. Our QD-oligonucleotide probe, conjugation method of this QD probe, and hybridization protocol with the chromosomes can be a useful tool for chromosome painting and FISH. PMID:26449454

  10. Fluorescence in situ hybridizations (FISH) for the localization of viruses and endosymbiotic bacteria in plant and insect tissues.

    PubMed

    Kliot, Adi; Kontsedalov, Svetlana; Lebedev, Galina; Brumin, Marina; Cathrin, Pakkianathan Britto; Marubayashi, Julio Massaharu; Skaljac, Marisa; Belausov, Eduard; Czosnek, Henryk; Ghanim, Murad

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a name given to a variety of techniques commonly used for visualizing gene transcripts in eukaryotic cells and can be further modified to visualize other components in the cell such as infection with viruses and bacteria. Spatial localization and visualization of viruses and bacteria during the infection process is an essential step that complements expression profiling experiments such as microarrays and RNAseq in response to different stimuli. Understanding the spatiotemporal infections with these agents complements biological experiments aimed at understanding their interaction with cellular components. Several techniques for visualizing viruses and bacteria such as reporter gene systems or immunohistochemical methods are time-consuming, and some are limited to work with model organisms and involve complex methodologies. FISH that targets RNA or DNA species in the cell is a relatively easy and fast method for studying spatiotemporal localization of genes and for diagnostic purposes. This method can be robust and relatively easy to implement when the protocols employ short hybridizing, commercially-purchased probes, which are not expensive. This is particularly robust when sample preparation, fixation, hybridization, and microscopic visualization do not involve complex steps. Here we describe a protocol for localization of bacteria and viruses in insect and plant tissues. The method is based on simple preparation, fixation, and hybridization of insect whole mounts and dissected organs or hand-made plant sections, with 20 base pairs short DNA probes conjugated to fluorescent dyes on their 5' or 3' ends. This protocol has been successfully applied to a number of insect and plant tissues, and can be used to analyze expression of mRNAs or other RNA or DNA species in the cell. PMID:24637389

  11. Fluorescent whole-mount RNA in situ hybridization (F-WISH) in plant germ cells and the fertilized ovule.

    PubMed

    Bleckmann, Andrea; Dresselhaus, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    First evidence on gene function and regulation is provided by the cellular expression pattern in complex tissues. However, to understand the activity of a specific gene, it is essential to analyze the regulatory network, which controls the spatio-temporal translation pattern during the entire life span of the transcribed mRNA. To explore mechanisms which control mRNA abundance and localization in space and time, it is necessary to visualize mRNAs quantitatively with a subcellular resolution, without sectioning the tissues. We have adapted and optimized a protocol for colorimetric whole-mount RNA in situ hybridization (WISH) using egg cell-specific digoxigenin (DIG) labeled probes (Hejátko et al., 2006) [1] on ovules and early seeds of Arabidopsis. Furthermore, we established a fluorescent whole-mount RNA in situ hybridization (F-WISH) protocol, which allows mRNA visualization on a subcellular level. The polar localized mRNA of SBT4.13, encoding a subtilase, was identified using this protocol. Both methods are described and discussed in detail. Additionally a (F)-WISH flow-chart is provided along with a troubleshooting table. PMID:26521978

  12. Detection of aneuploidy in sperm of an ataxia telangiectasia patient using three-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, X.R.; Baulch, J.E.; Arnheim, N.

    1994-09-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is an inherited, recessive, cancer-prone disorder. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with DNA probes specific for three chromosomes was applied to sperm of an A-T patient to determine if there may be an increased germinal risk for aneuploidy. Air-dried sperm smears were treated with proteinase K and were decondensed with DTT and LIS. The slides were then hybridized with fluorescently labeled repetitive DNA probes specific for chromosomes X, Y and 8, and a total of 11,825 sperm cells were scored. The ratio of sperm bearing X-8 and Y-8 was 1:1, as predicted. The frequencies of hyperhaploidy were 3.9, 1.0, 17.6 and 7.8 per 10,000 cells for categories X-X-8, Y-Y-8, X-Y-8 and 8-8-(X or Y), respectively, In addition, the frequency of diploidy (X-Y-8-8) was 18.6 and auto-diploidies (X-X-8-8 and Y-Y-8-8) were 1.0 and 2.0, respectively. These frequencies were not significantly different when compared with levels in healthy men (p > 0.1). Our finding suggests that chromosome X, Y and 8 aneuploidies are not elevated in the sperm of A-T patients, but studies with additional patients and chromosomes are needed.

  13. Preparation of Cells from Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissue for Use in Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) Experiments.

    PubMed

    Weremowicz, Stanislawa

    2015-01-01

    Numerical and structural chromosome abnormalities can be accurately detected in cells from archived tissues using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This unit describes two common approaches to performing FISH in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. The first approach utilizes 4 to 6 μm tissue sections in cases for which preserving tissue morphology is necessary, and the second involves extraction of intact nuclei from 50-μm tissue sections. To interpret FISH results using 4 to 6 μm sections, an adequate number of nuclei must be evaluated to perform statistical analysis. Evaluation of 30 to 50 nuclei from the single-cell suspension generally gives an interpretable result. PMID:25599671

  14. Specific Detection of Arcobacter and Campylobacter Strains in Water and Sewage by PCR and Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Yolanda; Botella, Salut; Alonso, José Luis; Ferrús, María A.; Hernández, Manuel; Hernández, Javier

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate PCR and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques for detecting Arcobacter and Campylobacter strains in river water and wastewater samples. Both 16S and 23S rRNA sequence data were used to design specific primers and oligonucleotide probes for PCR and FISH analyses, respectively. In order to assess the suitability of the methods, the assays were performed on naturally and artificially contaminated samples and compared with the isolation of cells on selective media. The detection range of PCR and FISH assays varied between 1 cell/ml (after enrichment) to 103 cells/ml (without enrichment). According to our results, both rRNA-based techniques have the potential to be used as quick and sensitive methods for detection of campylobacters in environmental samples. PMID:12571045

  15. Diagnostics of common microdeletion syndromes using fluorescence in situ hybridization: Single center experience in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Kurtovic-Kozaric, Amina; Mehinovic, Lejla; Stomornjak-Vukadin, Meliha; Kurtovic-Basic, Ilvana; Catibusic, Feriha; Kozaric, Mirza; Dinarevic, Senka Mesihovic; Hasanhodzic, Mensuda; Sumanovic-Glamuzina, Darinka

    2016-01-01

    Microdeletion syndromes are caused by chromosomal deletions of less than 5 megabases which can be detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We evaluated the most commonly detected microdeletions for the period from June 01, 2008 to June 01, 2015 in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, including DiGeorge, Prader-Willi/Angelman, Wolf-Hirschhorn, and Williams syndromes. We report 4 patients with DiGeorge syndromes, 4 patients with Prader-Willi/Angelman, 4 patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, and 3 patients with Williams syndrome in the analyzed 7 year period. Based on the positive FISH results for each syndrome, the incidence was calculated for the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. These are the first reported frequencies of the microdeletion syndromes in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. PMID:26937776

  16. Identification and characterization of marker chromosomes, de novo rearrangements and microdeletions in 100 cases with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.M.; Liu, Y.; Papenhausen, P.R.

    1994-09-01

    Results of molecular cytogenetic analysis are presented for 100 cases in which fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used as an adjunct to standard cytogenetics. Commercially available centromeric, telomeric, chromosome painting and unique sequence probes were used. Cases were from a 12-month period (June 1993-May 1994) and included examples of sex chromosome abnormalities (8), duplications (5), de novo translocations (6), satellited (12) and non-satellited (7) markers, and microdeletion syndromes (62). Satellited marker chromosomes were evaluated using a combination of DAPI/Distamycin A staining, hybridization with a classical satellite probe for chromosome 15 and hybridization with alpha-satellite probes for chromosomes 13, 14, 21 and 22. Markers positive for the chromosome 15 probe were further evaluated using unique sequence probes for the Prader-Willi/Angelman region. Microdeletion analysis was performed for Prader-Willi/Angelman (49) and DiGeorge/VCF (13) syndromes. Seven cases evaluated for Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome demonstrated evidence of a deletion within this region. Uniparental disomy analysis was available in cases where a deletion was not detected by FISH, yet follow-up was clinically indicated. Two cases evaluated for DiGeorge/VCF syndrome demonstrated molecular evidence of a deletion. Included in our analysis is an example of familial DiGeorge syndrome.

  17. Visualization and quantification of archaeal and bacterial metabolically active cells in soil using fluorescence in situ hybridization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Mikhail; Manucharova, Natalia; Stepanov, Alexey

    2015-04-01

    The method of in situ hybridization using fluorescent labeled 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes (FISH - fluorescence in situ hybridization) combines identification and quantification of groups of microorganisms at different phylogenetic levels, from domain to species. The FISH method enables to study the soil microbial community in situ, avoiding plating on nutrient media, and allows to identify and quantify living, metabolically active cells of Bacteria and Archaea. The full procedure consists of the following steps: desorption of the cells from the soil particles, fixation of cells, coating a fixed sample on the glass slide, hybridization with the specific probes and, finally, microscopic observation and cell counting. For the FISH analysis of Bacteria and Archaea, the paraformaldehyde-fixed samples were hybridized with Cy3-labeled Archaea-specific probe(Arc915) and 6-carboxyfluorescein (FAM)-labeled Bacteria-specific probe(EUB338). When a molecular probe is incorporated into a cell, it can hybridize solely with a complementary rRNA sequence. The hybridization can be visualized under the fluorescent microscope and counted. The application of FISH will be demonstrated by the abundance of metabolically active cells of Archaea and Bacteria depending on soil properties, depth and land use. The research was carried out at field and natural ecosystems of European part of Russia. Samples were collected within the soil profiles (3-6 horizons) of Chernozem and Kastanozem with distinct land use. Quantification of metabolically active cells in virgin and arable Chernozem revealed that the abundance of Archaea in topsoil of virgin Chernozem was doubled as compared with arable soil, but it leveled off in the deeper horizons. Plowing of Chernozem decreased an amount of archaeal and bacterial active cells simultaneously, however, Bacteria were more resistant to agrogenic impact than Archaea. In Kastanozem, a significant change in the abundance of metabolically active cells due to plowing was detected only within 40 cm soil layer, and this effect disappeared in lower horizons. The abundance of Archaea was higher in the upper horizons of arable soil as compared to virgin. Conversely, the abundance of Bacteria in the upper layers of arable Kastanozem decreased versus virgin soil. A relationship between soil organic carbon and the amount of soil metabolically active Bacteria and Archaea cells revealed that distribution of both Bacteria and Archaea throughout the soil profile was governed mostly by the organic matter content. Thus, the organic matter was a main factor of declining the Bacteria:Archaea ratio with the soil depth (from 7.1 to 4.2 for virgin soil and from 5 to 3.9 for arable soil). As a result, Archaea out-compete Bacteria under conditions of reduced energy supply. Thus, the FISH method combines classical microscopic and modern phylogenetic microbiological approaches and can be considered as an effective tool for ecological, diagnostic and environmental research in microbiology.

  18. Directly incorporating fluorochromes into DNA probes by PCR increases the efficience of fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmer, Joy

    1996-05-01

    The object of this study was to produce a directly labeled whole chromosome probe in a Degenerative Oligonucleotide Primed-Polymerase Chain Reaction (DOP-PCR) that will identify chromosome breaks, deletions, inversions and translocations caused by radiation damage. In this study we amplified flow sorted chromosome 19 using DOP-PCR. The product was then subjected to a secondary DOP PCR amplification, After the secondary amplification the DOP-PCR product was directly labeled in a tertiary PCR reaction with rhodamine conjugated with dUTP (FluoroRed) to produce a DNA fluorescent probe. The probe was then hybridized to human metaphase lymphocytes on slides, washed and counterstained with 4{prime},6-diamino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). The signal of the FluoroRed probe was then compared to a signal of a probe labeled with biotin and stained with avidin fluorescein isothio cynate (FITC) and anti-avidin FITC. The results show that the probe labeled with FluoroRed gave signals as bright as the probe with biotin labeling. The FluoroRed probe had less noise than the biotin labeled probe. Therefore, a directly labeled probe has been successfully produced in a DOP-PCR reaction. In future a probe labeled with FluoroRed will be produced instead of a probe labeled with biotin to increase efficiency.

  19. Rapid prenatal diagnosis of chromosomal aneuploidies by fluorescence in situ hybridization: Clinical experience with 4,500 specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, B.E.; Gersen, S.L.; Carelli, M.P.; McGuire, N.M.; Dackowski, W.R.; Klinger, K.W. ); Weinstein, M. ); Sandlin, C. ); Klinger, K.W. )

    1993-05-01

    Detection of chromosome aneuploidies in uncultured amniocytes is possible using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The authors herein describe the results of the first clinical program which utilized FISH for the rapid detection of chromosome aneuploidies in uncultured amniocytes. FISH was performed on physician request, as an adjunct to cytogenetics in 4,500 patients. Region-specific DNA probes to chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X, and Y were used to determine ploidy by analysis of signal number in hybridized nuclei. A sample was considered to be euploid when all autosomal probes generated two hybridization signals and when a normal sex chromosome pattern was observed in greater than or equal to 80% of hybridized nuclei. A sample was considered to be aneuploid when greater than or equal to 70% of hybridized nuclei displayed the same abnormal hybridization pattern for a specific probe. Of the attempted analyses, 90.2% met these criteria and were reported as informative to referring physicians within 2 d of receipt. Based on these reporting parameters, the overall detection rate for aneuploidies was 73.3% (107/146), with an accuracy of informative results for aneuploidies of 93.9% (107/114). Compared to cytogenetics, the accuracy of all informative FISH results, euploid and aneuploid, was 99.8%, and the specificity was 99.9%. In those pregnancies where fetal abnormalities had been observed by ultrasound, referring physicians requested FISH plus cytogenetics at a significantly higher rate than they requested cytogenetics alone. The current prenatal FISH protocol is not designed to detect all chromosome abnormalities and should only be utilized as an adjunctive test to cytogenetics. This experience demonstrates that FISH can provide a rapid and accurate clinical method for prenatal identification of chromosome aneuploidies. 40 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.,

  20. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Progress report, April 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1993-03-04

    Genetic mapping is approached using the techniques of high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This technology and the results of its application are designed to rapidly generate whole genome as tool box of expressed sequence to speed the identification of human disease genes. The results of this study are intended to dovetail with and to link the results of existing technologies for creating backbone YAC and genetic maps. In the first eight months, this approach generated 60--80% of the expressed sequence map, the remainder expected to be derived through more long-term, labor-intensive, regional chromosomal gene searches or sequencing. The laboratory has made significant progress in the set-up phase, in mapping fetal and adult brain and other cDNAs, in testing a model system for directly linking genetic and physical maps using FISH with small fragments, in setting up a database, and in establishing the validity and throughput of the system.

  1. Cellular localization of oriC during the cell cycle of Escherichia coli as analyzed by fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Roos, M; van Geel, A B; Aarsman, M E; Veuskens, J T; Woldringh, C L; Nanninga, N

    1999-01-01

    The origin of replication of Escherichia coli, oriC, has been labeled by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The E. coli K12 strain was grown under steady state conditions with a doubling time of 79 min at 28 degrees C. Under these growth conditions DNA replication starts in the previous cell cycle at -33 min. At birth cells possess two origins which are visible as two separated foci in fully labeled cells. The number of foci increased with cell length. The distance of foci from the nearest cell pole has been measured in various length classes. The data suggest: i) that the two most outwardly located foci keep a constant distance to the cell pole and they therefore move apart gradually in line with cell elongation; and ii) that at the initiation of DNA replication the labeled origins occur near the center of prospective daughter cells. PMID:10572291

  2. A view on Bartonella quintana endocarditis--confirming the molecular diagnosis by specific fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Gescher, Dorothee Maria; Mallmann, Christian; Kovacevic, Dragoljub; Schmiedel, Dinah; Borges, Adrian C; Schweickert, Birgitta; Göbel, Ulf B; Moter, Annette

    2008-01-01

    Culture-negative endocarditis is a frequent problem in cardiology, especially if caused by fastidious organisms. Among these, the diagnostic tools for the detection of Bartonella quintana are still unsatisfactory. In a culture-negative case of suspected endocarditis undergoing aortic valve replacement, polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene indicated B. quintana infection. To develop a new diagnostic tool, independent from culture and amplification techniques, we designed and optimized an oligonucleotide fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probe specific for B. quintana and suitable for FISH. FISH succeeded in simultaneous visualization and identification of vital microorganisms directly within the aortic valve tissue and in fast and univocal diagnosis of B. quintana endocarditis. PMID:17889492

  3. Localization of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus in dissected organs of its psyllid vector Diaphorina citri using fluorescent in situ hybridization and quantitative PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vector interactions of huanglongbing (HLB) disease with its psyllid vectors, particularly at the organ and cellular levels, are poorly understood. We used fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) for the localization of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), associat...

  4. Design and application of two oligonucleotide probes for the identification of Geodermatophilaceae strains using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Urzì, Clara; La Cono, Violetta; Stackebrandt, Erko

    2004-07-01

    Bacteria of the family of Geodermatophilaceae are actively involved in the decay processes [Urzì, C. and Realini, M. (1998) Int Biodeterior Biodegrad 42: 45-54; Urzì, C., Salamone, P., Schumann, P., and Stackebrandt, E. (2000) Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 50: 529-536] of stone monuments. Characterization of isolates includes phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genetic analysis often requiring long-term procedures. The use of specific probes for members of Geodermatophilaceae family could be useful for the easy detection of those strains colonizing rock surfaces and involved in the biodeterioration. Two 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were designed for the specific detection of members of the family Geodermatophilaceae using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH); one probe specific for members of the two genera Geodermatophilus/Blastococcus and the second for members of the genus Modestobacter. PMID:15186346

  5. Genotype-phenotype correlation in satellited 1p chromosome: Importance of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) applications

    SciTech Connect

    Habibian, R.; Hajianpour, M.J.; Hajianpour, A.K.

    1994-09-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to delineate the structural rearrangement of two satellited 1p chromosomes identified in a prenatal and in a postnatal case. Prenatal case: chromosome analysis of amniotic cells on a 37-year-old G2, PO, SAb1 woman, referred for advanced maternal age, revealed a 46,XX,1ps karyotype. Parental chromosome analyses showed that the satellited chromosome was paternal in origin. The satellited 1p did not stain with NOR and DA-DAPI. FISH using a probe specific for the rDNA, 18S and 28S genes also showed no hybridization to the satellited 1p. Using two different probes specific for 1p36.3 showed hybridization to both chromosomes 1p. This indicated that the terminal band was most likely present in the fetus and chromosomally balanced like the father. The pregnancy was continued and a phenotypically normal female was born. Postnatal case: Chromosome analysis of peripheral lymphocytes was performed on a 3 1/2-year old female with multiple congenital anomalies including growth retardation, developmental delay, upslanted palpebral fissures, thick eyebrows, esotropia, seizures, and mental retardation. She was born to a 14-year old, G1, PO mother, after a full-term pregnancy, by cesarian-section due to breech presentation. Her one-year-old brother is reportedly in good health. Chromosome analysis revealed a de novo 46,XX,lps. NOR and DA-DAPI stains were positive indicating the satellites are most likely chromosome 15 in origin. FISH using the rDNA probes also showed a hybridization to the 1ps. The two 1p36.3 probes showed only one signal to the normal chromosome 1, indicating a deletion which resulted in monosomy of 1p36.3. The clinical features of the child correlates with published cases of the terminal deletions of 1p.

  6. Karyotype characterization of the lake sturgeon, Acipenser fulvescens (Rafinesque 1817) by chromosome banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Francesco; Bruch, Ronald M; Binkowski, Fred P; Lanfredi, Massimo; Chicca, Milvia; Beltrami, Nicola; Congiu, Leonardo

    2004-08-01

    A karyotype analysis using several staining techniques was carried out on the North American lake sturgeon, Acipenser fulvescens. The chromosome number was found to be 2n = 262 +/- 6. A representative karyotype of 264 chromosomes was composed of 134 meta- and submetacentrics, 70 telo- and acrocentrics, and 60 microchromosomes. The constitutive heterochromatin, revealed by C banding, was localized in various positions on several chromosomes, including microchromosomes. The signals of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with a HindIII satellite DNA probe were visible as centromeric heterochromatin blocks on 48 chromosomes. The telomeric repeat (TTAGGG)n detected by FISH was localized at both ends of all chromosomes and two chromosomes were entirely marked. Fluorescent staining with GC-specific chromomycin A3 showed recognizable fluorescent regions, whereas a more uniform base composition was revealed by the AT-specific 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). After silver staining, the active nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) were detected on 12 chromosomes. FISH with the 5S probe showed four signals on four small chromosomes. Our data suggest that A. fulvescens is a tetraploid species. PMID:15284879

  7. Technical Note: Determination of the metabolically active fraction of benthic foraminifera by means of Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrelli, C.; Sabbatini, A.; Luna, G. M.; Nardelli, M. P.; Sbaffi, T.; Morigi, C.; Danovaro, R.; Negri, A.

    2011-08-01

    Benthic foraminifera are an important component of the marine biota, but protocols for investigating their viability and metabolism are still extremely limited. Classical studies on benthic foraminifera have been based on direct counting under light microscopy. Typically, these organisms are stained with Rose Bengal, which binds proteins and other macromolecules, but does not allow discrimination between viable and recently dead organisms. The fluorescent in situ hybridization technique (FISH) represents a new and useful approach to identify living cells possessing an active metabolism. Our work is the first test of the suitability of the FISH technique, based on fluorescent probes targeting the 18S rRNA, to detect live benthic foraminifera. The protocol was applied on Ammonia group and Miliolids, as well as on agglutinated polythalamous (i.e., Leptohalysis scottii and Eggerella scabra) and soft-shelled monothalamous (i.e., Psammophaga sp. and saccamminid morphotypes) taxa. The results from FISH analyses were compared with those obtained, on the same specimens assayed with FISH, from microscopic analysis of the cytoplasm colour, presence of pigments and pseudopodial activity. Our results indicate that FISH targets only metabolically active foraminifera, and allows discerning from low to high cellular activity, validating the hypothesis that the intensity of the fluorescent signal emitted by the probe is dependent upon the physiological status of cells. These findings support the usefulness of this molecular approach as a key tool for obtaining information on the physiology of living foraminifera, both in field and experimental settings.

  8. Direct fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in Escherichia coli with a target-specific quantum dot-based molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sheng-Mei; Tian, Zhi-Quan; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Huang, Bi-Hai; Jiang, Peng; Xie, Zhi-Xiong; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2010-10-15

    Quantum dots (QDs) are inorganic fluorescent nanocrystals with excellent properties such as tunable emission spectra and photo-bleaching resistance compared with organic dyes, which make them appropriate for applications in molecular beacons. In this work, quantum dot-based molecular beacons (QD-based MBs) were fabricated to specifically detect ?-lactamase genes located in pUC18 which were responsible for antibiotic resistance in bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) DH5?. QD-based MBs were constructed by conjugating mercaptoacetic acid-quantum dots (MAA-QDs) with black hole quencher 2 (BHQ2) labeled thiol DNA vial metal-thiol bonds. Two types of molecular beacons, double-strands beacons and hairpin beacons, were observed in product characterization by gel electrophoresis. Using QD-based MBs, one-step FISH in tiny bacteria DH5? was realized for the first time. QD-based MBs retained their bioactivity when hybridizing with complementary target DNA, which showed excellent advantages of eliminating background noise caused by adsorption of non-specific bioprobes and achieving clearer focus of genes in plasmids pUC18, and capability of bacterial cell penetration and signal specificity in one-step in situ hybridization. PMID:20729070

  9. Use of Hybridization Chain Reaction-Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization To Track Gene Expression by Both Partners during Initiation of Symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Nikolakakis, K; Lehnert, E; McFall-Ngai, M J; Ruby, E G

    2015-07-01

    The establishment of a productive symbiosis between Euprymna scolopes, the Hawaiian bobtail squid, and its luminous bacterial symbiont, Vibrio fischeri, is mediated by transcriptional changes in both partners. A key challenge to unraveling the steps required to successfully initiate this and many other symbiotic associations is characterization of the timing and location of these changes. We report on the adaptation of hybridization chain reaction-fluorescent in situ hybridization (HCR-FISH) to simultaneously probe the spatiotemporal regulation of targeted genes in both E. scolopes and V. fischeri. This method revealed localized, transcriptionally coregulated epithelial cells within the light organ that responded directly to the presence of bacterial cells while, at the same time, provided a sensitive means to directly show regulated gene expression within the symbiont population. Thus, HCR-FISH provides a new approach for characterizing habitat transition in bacteria and for discovering host tissue responses to colonization. PMID:25956763

  10. Chromosomal mapping of tandem repeats in the Yesso Scallop, Patinopecten yessoensis (Jay, 1857), utilizing fluorescence in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuan; Yang, Zujing; Liao, Huan; Zhang, Zhengrui; Huang, Xiaoting; Bao, Zhenmin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Construction of cytogenetic maps can provide important information for chromosome identification, chromosome evolution and genomic research. However, it hasn’t been conducted in many scallop species yet. In the present study, we attempted to map 12 fosmid clones containing tandem repeats by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in the Yesso scallop Patinopecten yessoensis (Jay, 1857). The results showed 6 fosmid clones were successfully mapped and distributed in 6 different pairs of chromosomes. Three clones were respectively assigned to a pair of metacentric chromosomes, a pair of submetacentric chromosomes and a pair of telocentric chromosomes and the remaining 3 clones showed their loci on three different pairs of subtelocentric chromosomes by co-hybridization. In summary, totally 8 pairs of chromosomes of the Yesso scallop were identified by 6 fosmid clones and two rDNA probes. Furthermore, 6 tandem repeats of 5 clones were sequenced and could be developed as chromosome specific markers for the Yesso scallop. The successful localization of fosmid clones will undoubtedly facilitate the integration of linkage groups with cytogenetic map and genomic research for the Yesso scallop. PMID:27186345

  11. Cytogenetic follow-up by karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization: implications for monitoring patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and deletion 5q treated with lenalidomide

    PubMed Central

    Göhring, Gudrun; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Büsche, Guntram; Hofmann, Winfried; Kreipe, Hans Heinrich; Fenaux, Pierre; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Schlegelberger, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    In patients with low and intermediate risk myelodysplastic syndrome and deletion 5q (del(5q)) treated with lenalidomide, monitoring of cytogenetic response is mandatory, since patients without cytogenetic response have a significantly increased risk of progression. Therefore, we have reviewed cytogenetic data of 302 patients. Patients were analyzed by karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization. In 85 patients, del(5q) was only detected by karyotyping. In 8 patients undergoing karyotypic evolution, the del(5q) and additional chromosomal aberrations were only detected by karyotyping. In 3 patients, del(5q) was only detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization, but not by karyotyping due to a low number of metaphases. Karyotyping was significantly more sensitive than fluorescence in situ hybridization in detecting the del(5q) clone. In conclusion, to optimize therapy control of myelodysplastic syndrome patients with del(5q) treated with lenalidomide and to identify cytogenetic non-response or progression as early as possible, fluorescence in situ hybridization alone is inadequate for evaluation. Karyotyping must be performed to optimally evaluate response. (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01099267 and NCT00179621) PMID:21109690

  12. Localization of the human kinesin light chain gene (KNS2) to chromosome 14q32.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Goedert, M.; Marsh, S.; Carter, N.

    1996-02-15

    This article reports on the localization of human kinesin light chain gene (KNS2) to human chromosome 14q32.3 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Further studies will need to be conducted to see whether mutations in the KNS2 gene are associated with hereditary diseases. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Assignment of the gastric inhibitory polypeptide receptor gene (GIPR) to chromosome bands 19q13.2-q13.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, M.; Fernald, A.A.; Bell, G.I.; Le Beau, M.M.

    1995-08-10

    The gastric inhibitory polypeptide receptor gene (GIPR) was localized, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), to human chromosome bands 19q13.2-q13.3. Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is a potent stimulator of insulin secretion and mutations in the GIPR gene may be related to non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). 13 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Multicenter Evaluation of a Candida albicans Peptide Nucleic Acid Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization Probe for Characterization of Yeast Isolates from Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, D. A.; Joyce, M. J.; Hall, L. S.; Reller, L. B.; Roberts, G. D.; Hall, G. S.; Alexander, B. D.; Procop, G. W.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated aliquots from 244 clinical blood culture bottles that demonstrated yeasts on Gram stain using a Candida albicans peptide nucleic acid (PNA) fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probe. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the C. albicans PNA FISH test in this study were 99%, 100%, 100%, and 99.3%, respectively. PMID:15956416

  15. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for direct visualization of bacteria in periapical lesions of asymptomatic root-filled teeth.

    PubMed

    Sunde, Pia T; Olsen, Ingar; Göbel, Ulf B; Theegarten, Dirk; Winter, Sascha; Debelian, Gilberto J; Tronstad, Leif; Moter, Annette

    2003-05-01

    Whether micro-organisms can live in periapical endodontic lesions of asymptomatic teeth is under debate. The aim of the present study was to visualize and identify micro-organisms within periapical lesions directly, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in combination with epifluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Thirty-nine periapical lesions were surgically removed, fixed, embedded in cold polymerizing resin and sectioned. The probe EUB 338, specific for the domain Bacteria, was used together with a number of species-specific 16S rRNA-directed oligonucleotide probes to identify bacteria. To control non-specific binding of EUB 338, probe NON 338 was used. Alternatively, DAPI (4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining was applied to record prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA in the specimens. Hybridization with NON 338 gave no signals despite background fluorescence of the tissue. The eubacterial probe showed bacteria of different morphotypes in 50 % of the lesions. Rods, spirochaetes and cocci were spread out in areas of the tissue while other parts seemed bacteria-free. Bacteria were also seen to co-aggregate inside the tissue, forming microcolonies. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythensis and treponemes of phylogenetic Group I were detected with specific probes. In addition, colonies with Streptococcus spp. were seen in some lesions. A number of morphotypes occurred that could not be identified with the specific probes used, indicating the presence of additional bacterial species. CLSM confirmed that bacteria were located in different layers of the tissue. Accordingly, the FISH technique demonstrated mixed consortia of bacteria consisting of rods, spirochaetes and cocci in asymptomatic periapical lesions of root-filled teeth. PMID:12724371

  16. Reliability of aneuploidy estimates in human sperm: Results of fluorescence in situ hybridization studies using two different scoring criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H. |; Rademaker, A.

    1994-09-01

    Aneuploidy estimates for individual chromosomes in human sperm have varied more than 10-fold in different laboratories using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These laboratories use different scoring criteria in the assessment of a disomic sperm. In order to determine reliable estimates of aneuploidy, we have investigated whether scoring criteria affect the aneuploidy frequency in human sperm. Aneuploidy estimates for chromosomes 1(pUC1.77), 12(pBR12), X(XC) and Y(DYZ3Z) were obtained in human sperm from five donors using multicolor FISH analysis to provide an internal control to differentiate between nullisomy and lack of hybridization and between disomy and diploidy. Disomy frequencies were obtained by scoring a minimum of 10,000 sperm for each chromosome probe per donor. This analysis was replicated for two scoring criteria: one scoring criterion used one-half a signal domain as the minimum distance between two signals to be counted as two and thus disomic; the other scoring criterion set one signal domain as the minimum distance between two signals. A total of 120,870 sperm were assessed using one half domain as the scoring criterion and 113,478 were scored using one domain as the criterion. The mean percent disomy for chromosomes 1, 12, X, Y and XY was .18, .16, .15, .19, .25 respectively using the one-half domain criterion and .08, .17, .07, .12, .16 respectively using the one domain criterion. The percent disomy decreased significantly with use of one domain as the minimum distance for signal separation for all chromosomes except chromosome number 12. These lower disomy frequencies correlated well with frequencies derived from human sperm karyotypes analyzed in our laboratory. This suggests that the fluorescent signals for chromosomes 1, X and Y split into more than one domain in decondensed interphase sperm and use of the one-half domain criterion leads to an overestimate of aneuploidy frequencies.

  17. Midkine gene (MDK), a gene for prenatal differentiation and neuroregulation, maps to band 11p11. 2 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Kaname, Tadashi; Uehara, Kazuyoshi; Muramatsu, Taskashi ); Kuwano, Akira; Murano, Ichiro; Kajii, Tadashi )

    1993-08-01

    Midkine (MDK) is a retinoic acid-responsive gene concerned with prenatal development and neurite growth. The authors mapped the gene to band p11.2 of chromosome 11 through fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis and using a 4.5-kb fragment of its human genomic DNA. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Chromosomal localization of the human natural killer cell class I receptor family genes to 19q13.4 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Suto, Yumiko; Maenaka, Katsumi; yabe, Toshio

    1996-07-01

    This report describes the localization of the human natural killer cell I receptor family genes to human chromosome 19q13.4 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. These genes mediate the inhibition of the cytotoxicity of subsets of natural killer cells. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Localization of the DCTN1 gene encoding p150{sup Glued} to human chromosome 2p13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Holzbaur, E.L.F.; Tokito, M.K.

    1996-02-01

    This report discusses the genetic mapping of the DCTN1 gene to human chromosome 2p13 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. This gene encodes the largest polypeptide of the dynactin complex, which is one of two microtubule-based biological motor protein complexes. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Determination of the metabolically active fraction of benthic foraminifera by means of Fluorescent in situ Hybridization (FISH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrelli, C.; Sabbatini, A.; Luna, G. M.; Morigi, C.; Danovaro, R.; Negri, A.

    2010-10-01

    Benthic foraminifera are an important component of the marine living biota, but protocols for investigating their viability and metabolism are still extremely limited. Classical studies on benthic foraminifera have been based on direct counting under light microscopy. Typically these organisms are stained with Rose Bengal, which binds proteins and other macromolecules, but this approach does not allow discriminating between viable and recently dead organisms. The fluorescent in situ hybridization technique (FISH) represents a potentially useful approach identifying living cells with active metabolism cells. In this work, we tested for the first time the suitability of the FISH technique based on fluorescent probes targeting the 18S rRNA, to detect these live benthic protists. The protocol was applied on the genus Ammonia, on the Miliolidae group and an attempt was made also with agglutinated species (i.e., Leptohalysis scottii and Eggerella scabra). In addition microscopic analysis of the cytoplasm colour, presence of pigments and, sometimes, those of pseudopodial activity where conducted. The results of the present study indicate that FISH targeted only live and metabolically active foraminifera. These results allowed to identify as "live", cells improperly classified as "dead" by means of the classical technique (Type I error) and vice versa to identify as dead the foraminifera without rRNA, but stained using Rose Bengal (Type II error). In addition, the comparative FISH analysis of starved and actively growing cells demonstrated that individuals with active metabolism were stained more intensively than starved cells. This finding supports the hypothesis that the physiological status of cells can be directly related with the intensity of the fluorescent signal emitted by the fluorescent probe. We conclude that the use of molecular approaches could represent a key tool for acquiring crucial information on living foraminifera specimens and for investigating their ecological role in marine sediments.

  1. Development of a flow-fluorescence in situ hybridization protocol for the analysis of microbial communities in anaerobic fermentation liquor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The production of bio-methane from renewable raw material is of high interest because of the increasing scarcity of fossil fuels. The process of biomethanation is based on the inter- and intraspecific metabolic activity of a highly diverse and dynamic microbial community. The community structure of the microbial biocenosis varies between different biogas reactors and the knowledge about these microbial communities is still fragmentary. However, up to now no approaches are available allowing a fast and reliable access to the microbial community structure. Hence, the aim of this study was to originate a Flow-FISH protocol, namely a combination of flow cytometry and fluorescence in situ hybridization, for the analysis of the metabolically active microorganisms in biogas reactor samples. With respect to the heterogenic texture of biogas reactor samples and to collect all cells including those of cell aggregates and biofilms the development of a preceding purification procedure was indispensable. Results Six different purification procedures with in total 29 modifications were tested. The optimized purification procedure combines the use of the detergent sodium hexametaphosphate with ultrasonic treatment and a final filtration step. By this treatment, the detachment of microbial cells from particles as well as the disbandment of cell aggregates was obtained at minimized cell loss. A Flow-FISH protocol was developed avoiding dehydration and minimizing centrifugation steps. In the exemplary application of this protocol on pure cultures as well as biogas reactor samples high hybridization rates were achieved for commonly established domain specific oligonucleotide probes enabling the specific detection of metabolically active bacteria and archaea. Cross hybridization and autofluorescence effects could be excluded by the use of a nonsense probe and negative controls, respectively. Conclusions The approach described in this study enables for the first time the analysis of the metabolically active fraction of the microbial communities within biogas reactors by Flow-FISH. PMID:24304697

  2. Triplex in-situ hybridization

    DOEpatents

    Fresco, Jacques R.; Johnson, Marion D.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are methods for detecting in situ the presence of a target sequence in a substantially double-stranded nucleic acid segment, which comprises: a) contacting in situ under conditions suitable for hybridization a substantially double-stranded nucleic acid segment with a detectable third strand, said third strand being capable of hybridizing to at least a portion of the target sequence to form a triple-stranded structure, if said target sequence is present; and b) detecting whether hybridization between the third strand and the target sequence has occured.

  3. Detection of the AML translocation (8;21) by two-color fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Sacchi, N.; Magnani, I.; Kearney, L.

    1994-09-01

    In the translocation (8;21)(q22;q22) associated with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), part of the long arm of chromosome 8 is reciprocally translocated onto chromosome 21. At the molecular level the translocation results in the fusion of the 5{prime} region of the AML1 gene on chromosome 21 and almost the entire CDR gene (also ETO or MTG8) on chromosome 8. To detection the translocation at the single cell level, we used two probes, a cosmid clone containing the first five exons of AML1 and a P1 clone containing the entire CDR gene. Hybridization of the two probes to the distal and proximal sides of the translocation breakpoint was expected to highlight the derivative 8q-chromosome in an interphase cell. To demonstrate the ability to identify the translocation in interphase cells using two-color FISH, these two probes were hybridized simultaneously to a cell line containing the 8;21 translocation, Kasumi-1. Each probe was detected with a different color so that their relationship in the sample could be determined within the same interphase cell. Simultaneous hybridization of the CDR and AML1 probes to interphase Kasumi-1 cells resulted in one orange and one green hybridization signal randomly located in the cell, from the hybridization to the normal 8 and 21 chromosomes, and one orange-green pair of signals from the close hybridization of the two probes to the fusion gene on the derivative 8q-chromosome, indicating the translocation. The translocation was identified by an abnormal pairing of the two differently colored signals in the same interphase cell. This technique allows for the detection of the translocation in all cells, not just those arrested in metaphase, and also permits the analysis of a small number of cells. Therefore, useful information can still be obtained from samples not suited for RT-PCR analysis and conventional cytogenetic techniques.

  4. Detection of sex chromosomal aneuploidies X-X, Y-Y, and X-Y in human sperm using two-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Robbins, W.A. |; Pinkel, D.; Weier, H.U.; Mehraein, Y. |

    1994-10-15

    Sex chromosome aneuploidy is the most common numerical chromosomal abnormality in humans at birth and a substantial portion of these abnormalities involve paternal chromosomes. An efficient method is presented for using air-dried smears of human semen to detect the number of X and Y chromosomes in sperm chromatin using two-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization. Air-dried semen smears were pre-treated with dithiothreitol and 3,4-diiodosalicylate salt to decondense the sperm chromatin and then were hybridized with repetitive sequence DNA probes that had been generated by PCR and differentially labeled. Hybridizations with X and Y specific probes showed the expected ratio of 50%X:50%Y bearing sperm. Sperm carrying extra fluorescence domains representing disomy for the X or Y chromosomes occurred at frequencies of {approximately} 4 per 10,000 sperm each. Cells carrying both X and Y fluorescence domains occurred at a frequency of {approximately} 6/10,000. Thus, the overall frequency of sperm that carried an extra sex chromosome was 1.4/1,000. The frequencies of sperm carrying sex chromosome aneuploidies determined by hybridization did not differ statistically from those reported from the same laboratory using the human-sperm/hamster-egg cytogenetic technique. Multi-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization to sperm is a promising method for assessing sex-ratio alterations in human semen and for determining the fraction of sperm carrying sex or other chromosome aneuploidies which may be transmissible to offspring. 44 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  5. Combination of Adhesive-tape-based Sampling and Fluorescence in situ Hybridization for Rapid Detection of Salmonella on Fresh Produce

    PubMed Central

    Bisha, Bledar; Brehm-Stecher, Byron F.

    2010-01-01

    This protocol describes a simple approach for adhesive-tape-based sampling of tomato and other fresh produce surfaces, followed by on-tape fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for rapid culture-independent detection of Salmonella spp. Cell-charged tapes can also be placed face-down on selective agar for solid-phase enrichment prior to detection. Alternatively, low-volume liquid enrichments (liquid surface miniculture) can be performed on the surface of the tape in non-selective broth, followed by FISH and analysis via flow cytometry. To begin, sterile adhesive tape is brought into contact with fresh produce, gentle pressure is applied, and the tape is removed, physically extracting microbes present on these surfaces. Tapes are mounted sticky-side up onto glass microscope slides and the sampled cells are fixed with 10% formalin (30 min) and dehydrated using a graded ethanol series (50, 80, and 95%; 3 min each concentration). Next, cell-charged tapes are spotted with buffer containing a Salmonella-targeted DNA probe cocktail and hybridized for 15 - 30 min at 55°C, followed by a brief rinse in a washing buffer to remove unbound probe. Adherent, FISH-labeled cells are then counterstained with the DNA dye 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and results are viewed using fluorescence microscopy. For solid-phase enrichment, cell-charged tapes are placed face-down on a suitable selective agar surface and incubated to allow in situ growth of Salmonella microcolonies, followed by FISH and microscopy as described above. For liquid surface miniculture, cell-charged tapes are placed sticky side up and a silicone perfusion chamber is applied so that the tape and microscope slide form the bottom of a water-tight chamber into which a small volume (≤ 500 μL) of Trypticase Soy Broth (TSB) is introduced. The inlet ports are sealed and the chambers are incubated at 35 - 37°C, allowing growth-based amplification of tape-extracted microbes. Following incubation, inlet ports are unsealed, cells are detached and mixed with vigorous back and forth pipetting, harvested via centrifugation and fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin. Finally, samples are hybridized and examined via flow cytometry to reveal the presence of Salmonella spp. As described here, our "tape-FISH" approach can provide simple and rapid sampling and detection of Salmonella on tomato surfaces. We have also used this approach for sampling other types of fresh produce, including spinach and jalapeño peppers. PMID:21048665

  6. Combination of adhesive-tape-based sampling and fluorescence in situ hybridization for rapid detection of Salmonella on fresh produce.

    PubMed

    Bisha, Bledar; Brehm-Stecher, Byron F

    2010-01-01

    This protocol describes a simple approach for adhesive-tape-based sampling of tomato and other fresh produce surfaces, followed by on-tape fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for rapid culture-independent detection of Salmonella spp. Cell-charged tapes can also be placed face-down on selective agar for solid-phase enrichment prior to detection. Alternatively, low-volume liquid enrichments (liquid surface miniculture) can be performed on the surface of the tape in non-selective broth, followed by FISH and analysis via flow cytometry. To begin, sterile adhesive tape is brought into contact with fresh produce, gentle pressure is applied, and the tape is removed, physically extracting microbes present on these surfaces. Tapes are mounted sticky-side up onto glass microscope slides and the sampled cells are fixed with 10% formalin (30 min) and dehydrated using a graded ethanol series (50, 80, and 95%; 3 min each concentration). Next, cell-charged tapes are spotted with buffer containing a Salmonella-targeted DNA probe cocktail and hybridized for 15 - 30 min at 55°C, followed by a brief rinse in a washing buffer to remove unbound probe. Adherent, FISH-labeled cells are then counterstained with the DNA dye 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and results are viewed using fluorescence microscopy. For solid-phase enrichment, cell-charged tapes are placed face-down on a suitable selective agar surface and incubated to allow in situ growth of Salmonella microcolonies, followed by FISH and microscopy as described above. For liquid surface miniculture, cell-charged tapes are placed sticky side up and a silicone perfusion chamber is applied so that the tape and microscope slide form the bottom of a water-tight chamber into which a small volume (≤ 500 μL) of Trypticase Soy Broth (TSB) is introduced. The inlet ports are sealed and the chambers are incubated at 35 - 37°C, allowing growth-based amplification of tape-extracted microbes. Following incubation, inlet ports are unsealed, cells are detached and mixed with vigorous back and forth pipetting, harvested via centrifugation and fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin. Finally, samples are hybridized and examined via flow cytometry to reveal the presence of Salmonella spp. As described here, our "tape-FISH" approach can provide simple and rapid sampling and detection of Salmonella on tomato surfaces. We have also used this approach for sampling other types of fresh produce, including spinach and jalapeño peppers. PMID:21048665

  7. Aneuploidy detection for chromosomes 1, X and Y by fluorescence in situ hybridization in human sperm from oligoasthenoteratozoospermic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, M.G.; Zackowski, J.L.; Acosta, A.A.

    1994-09-01

    Oligoasthenoteratozoospermic males (n=15) were investigated for infertility as compared with proven fertile donors. The oligoasthenoteratozoospermic population showed a mean sperm concentration of 9.7 x 10{sup 6}/ml (Range 4.2-19.7), mean motility of 38.5% (Range 10.6-76.8) and morphology (measured by the percentage of normal forms evaluated by strict criteria) with a mean of 3.49% (Range 1.5-5.0). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using satellite DNA probes specific for chromosomes 1 (puc 1.77), X (alpha satellite), and Y (satellite-III at Yqh) was performed on human interphase sperm nuclei. DNA probes were either directly labelled with rhodamine-dUTP, FITC-dUTP, or biotinylated by nick translation. Hybridization and signal detection were done by routine laboratory protocols. Microscopic analysis was performed using a cooled CCD camera attached to an epi-fluorescent microscope. After hybridization, fertile donors yielded a frequency of 0.96% (n=12) nullisomic, 98.5% (n=1231) monosomic and 0.96% (n=12) disomic for chromosome 1, whereas oligoasthenoteratozoospermic males yielded a frequency of 16% (n=600) nullisomic, 74.5% (n=2792) monosomic and 9.9% (n=370) disomic. In addition, fertile donors yielded a frequency of 45.7% (n=633) monosomic and 0.7% (n=11) disomic for chromosome X, whereas oligoasthenoteratozoospermic males yielded a frequency of 38.7% (n=760) monosomic and 0.8% (n=13) disomic. Chromosome Y frequencies for fertile donors showed 44.6% (n=614) monosomic and 0.6% (n=2) disomic, whereas oligoasthenoteratozoospermic males yielded a frequency of 33.2% (n=701) monosomic and 0.8% (n=15) disomic. This suggests that the frequency of nullisomy for chromosome 1 is significantly higher (p<0.001) in sperm from oligoasthenoteratozoospermic makes versus sperm from our fertile donors. We conclude that FISH is a powerful tool to determine the frequency of aneuploidy in sperm from oligoasthenoteratozoospermic patients.

  8. Feasibility of using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to detect early gene changes in sputum cells from uranium miners

    SciTech Connect

    Neft, R.E.; Rogers, J.L.; Belinsky, S.A.

    1995-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that combined exposure to radon progeny and tobacco smoke produce a greater than additive or synergistic increase in lung cancer risk. Lung cancer results from multiple genetic changes over a long period of time. An early change that occurs in lung cancer is trisomy 7 which is found in 50% of non-small cell lung cancer and in the far margins of resected lung tumors. The 80% mortality associated with lung cancer is in part related to the high proportion of patients who present with an advanced, unresectable tumor. Therefore, early detection of patients at risk for tumor development is critical to improve treatment of this disease. Currently, it is difficult to detect lung cancer early while it is still amendable by surgery. Saccomanno, G. has shown that premalignant cytologic changes in sputum cells collected from uranium miners can be detected by a skilled, highly trained cytopathologist. A more objective alternative for identifying premalignant cells in sputum may be to determine whether an early genetic change such as trisomy 7 is present in these cells. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can be used to identify cells with trisomy 7. The results of this investigation indicate that FISH may prove to be an accurate, efficient method to test at-risk individuals for genetic alterations in bronchial epithelial cells from sputum.

  9. Paternal-age effects on sperm aneuploidy investigated in mice and humans by three-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Lowe, X.; Holland, N.T.

    1994-09-01

    We conducted a cross-species comparison of the effects of paternal age on sperm aneuploidy in mice and humans. A new murine assay was developed to detect sperm hyperhaploidy and polyploidy for chromosomes X, Y, and 8 using fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific DNA probes, to serve as a direct corollate to the three-chromosome method developed early for human sperm. Sperm aneuploidy was evaluated in eight male B6C3F1 male mice (aged 22.5-30.5 mo) and compared to young controls (2.4 mo). The aged group showed significant ({approximately}2.0-fold) increases in hyperhaploidies involving chromosomes X, Y and 8, with the greatest effects seen in the oldest animals. Sperm aneuploidy was also evaluated in two groups of healthy men who differed in mean age [46.8{plus_minus}3.1 (n=4) vs. 28.5{plus_minus}5.0 (n=10) yrs], using the three-chromosome method. The older group showed a statistically significant increase in hyperhaploid sperm for both sex chromosomes. Additional controlled human studies are planned. Taken together, the murine and human data are consistent with a positive effect of paternal age on sperm aneuploidy. In both species, the strongest age effect was observed for hyperhaploidies of chromosome Y. Future studies are needed to investigate the shape of the age-effect curve and to evaluate chromosomal differences, especially for humans in their late reproductive years.

  10. An approach for quantitative assessment of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) signals for applied human molecular cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Iourov, Ivan Y; Soloviev, Ilia V; Vorsanova, Svetlana G; Monakhov, Viktor V; Yurov, Yuri B

    2005-03-01

    A number of applied molecular cytogenetic studies require the quantitative assessment of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) signals (for example, interphase FISH analysis of aneuploidy by chromosome enumeration DNA probes; analysis of somatic pairing of homologous chromosomes in interphase nuclei; identification of chromosomal heteromorphism after FISH with satellite DNA probes for differentiation of parental origin of homologous chromosome, etc.). We have performed a pilot study to develop a simple technique for quantitative assessment of FISH signals by means of the digital capturing of microscopic images and the intensity measuring of hybridization signals using Scion Image software, commonly used for quantification of electrophoresis gels. We have tested this approach by quantitative analysis of FISH signals after application of chromosome-specific DNA probes for aneuploidy scoring in interphase nuclei in cells of different human tissues. This approach allowed us to exclude or confirm a low-level mosaic form of aneuploidy by quantification of FISH signals (for example, discrimination of pseudo-monosomy and artifact signals due to over-position of hybridization signals). Quantification of FISH signals was also used for analysis of somatic pairing of homologous chromosomes in nuclei of postmortem brain tissues after FISH with "classical" satellite DNA probes for chromosomes 1, 9, and 16. This approach has shown a relatively high efficiency for the quantitative registration of chromosomal heteromorphism due to variations of centromeric alphoid DNA in homologous parental chromosomes. We propose this approach to be efficient and to be considered as a useful tool in addition to visual FISH signal analysis for applied molecular cytogenetic studies. PMID:15750029

  11. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of TP53 for the detection of chromosome 17 abnormalities in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Castro, Judit; Marco-Betés, Víctor; Gómez-Arbonés, Xavier; García-Cerecedo, Tomás; López, Ricard; Talavera, Elisabeth; Fernández-Ruiz, Sara; Ademà, Vera; Marugan, Isabel; Luño, Elisa; Sanzo, Carmen; Vallespí, Teresa; Arenillas, Leonor; Marco Buades, Josefa; Batlle, Ana; Buño, Ismael; Martín Ramos, María Luisa; Blázquez Rios, Beatriz; Collado Nieto, Rosa; Vargas, Ma Teresa; González Martínez, Teresa; Sanz, Guillermo; Solé, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    Conventional G-banding cytogenetics (CC) detects chromosome 17 (chr17) abnormalities in 2% of patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We used CC and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) (LSI p53/17p13.1) to assess deletion of 17p in 531 patients with de novo MDS from the Spanish Group of Hematological Cytogenetics. FISH detected - 17 or 17p abnormalities in 13 cases (2.6%) in whom no 17p abnormalities were revealed by CC: 0.9% of patients with a normal karyotype, 0% in non-informative cytogenetics, 50% of patients with a chr17 abnormality without loss of 17p and 4.7% of cases with an abnormal karyotype not involving chr17. Our results suggest that applying FISH of 17p13 to identify the number of copies of the TP53 gene could be beneficial in patients with a complex karyotype. We recommend using FISH of 17p13 in young patients with a normal karyotype or non-informative cytogenetics, and always in isolated del(17p). PMID:25754580

  12. Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification Versus Multiprobe Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization To Detect Genomic Aberrations in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Al Zaabi, Eiman A.; Fernandez, Louis A.; Sadek, Irene A.; Riddell, D. Christie; Greer, Wenda L.

    2010-01-01

    Cytogenetic abnormalities play a major role in the prognosis of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Several methods have emerged to try to best identify these abnormalities. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to determine the frequency of cytogenetic changes in our CLL patient population. We also evaluated the effectiveness of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) in detecting these abnormalities. Sixty-two B-CLL patients and 20 healthy controls were enrolled, and FISH and MLPA analyses were performed on peripheral blood samples. Using FISH, genomic aberrations were found in 73% of patients and presented as follows: single 13q14.3 deletion (60%), trisomy 12 (7%), ATM deletion (6%), 17p13.1 deletion (2%). MLPA analyses done on 61/62 patients showed sensitivity and specificity values of 90% and 100% respectively. MLPA revealed several additional copy number changes, the most common being 19p13 (LDLR and CDKN2D). Moreover, the cost for MLPA analysis, including technical time and reagents, is 86% less than FISH. In conclusion, cytogenetic abnormalities are a common finding in CLL patients, and MLPA is a reliable approach that is more cost effective and faster than FISH. Despite MLPA limitations of sensitivity, it can be used as a first-line screen and complementary test to FISH analysis. PMID:20093390

  13. Microbial populations identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization in a constructed wetland treating acid coal mine drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Nicomrat, D.; Dick, W.A.; Tuovinen, O.H.

    2006-07-15

    Microorganisms are an integral part of the biogeochemical processes in wetlands, yet microbial communities in sediments within constructed wetlands receiving acid mine drainage (AMD) are only poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to characterize the microbial diversity and abundance in a wetland receiving AMD using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. Seasonal samples of oxic surface sediments, comprised of Fe(III) precipitates, were collected from two treatment cells of the constructed wetland system. The pH of the bulk samples ranged between pH 2.1 and 3.9. Viable counts of acidophilic Fe and S oxidizers and heterotrophs were determined with a most probable number (MPN) method. The MPN counts were only a fraction of the corresponding FISH counts. The sediment samples contained microorganisms in the Bacteria (including the subgroups of acidophilic Fe- and S-oxidizing bacteria and Acidiphilium spp.) and Eukarya domains. Archaea were present in the sediment surface samples at < 0.01% of the total microbial community. The most numerous bacterial species in this wetland system was Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, comprising up to 37% of the bacterial population. Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans was also abundant.

  14. Monitoring of chimerism using fluorescence in situ hybridization in a child with severe combined immune deficiency following bone marrow transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Wenger, S.L.; Chen, X.O.; Katz, A.J. |

    1994-09-01

    A boy with severe combined immunodeficiency received a bone marrow transplant from his sister when he was approximately 3 years of age. His peripheral blood karyotype at age 3 and 4 years was 46,XX (20 cells analyzed). Because of a decline in antibody production at 19 years of age, the patient`s peripheral blood was analyzed again for suspected chimerism. His karyotype in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated culture was 46,XX in 49 cells and 46,XY in one cell. Both metaphase and interphase cells were examined for sex chromosome constitution using X and Y dual-color alpha-satellite probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH results for metaphase cells showed 1/50 XY cells, but 38% of interphase cells showed the presence of both X and Y centromere. Pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-stimulated cultures grew poorly and were therefore analyzed using FISH only: 81% of interphase cells were 46,XX. The discrepancy between metaphase and interphase in the PHA-stimulated cultures most likely represents a failure of this boy`s own XY T-cells to be stimulated.

  15. Microbial populations identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization in a constructed wetland treating acid coal mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Nicomrat, Duongruitai; Dick, Warren A; Tuovinen, Olli H

    2006-01-01

    Microorganisms are an integral part of the biogeochemical processes in wetlands, yet microbial communities in sediments within constructed wetlands receiving acid mine drainage (AMD) are only poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to characterize the microbial diversity and abundance in a wetland receiving AMD using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. Seasonal samples of oxic surface sediments, comprised of Fe(III) precipitates, were collected from two treatment cells of the constructed wetland system. The pH of the bulk samples ranged between pH 2.1 and 3.9. Viable counts of acidophilic Fe and S oxidizers and heterotrophs were determined with a most probable number (MPN) method. The MPN counts were only a fraction of the corresponding FISH counts. The sediment samples contained microorganisms in the Bacteria (including the subgroups of acidophilic Fe- and S-oxidizing bacteria and Acidiphilium spp.) and Eukarya domains. Archaea were present in the sediment surface samples at < 0.01% of the total microbial community. The most numerous bacterial species in this wetland system was Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, comprising up to 37% of the bacterial population. Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans was also abundant. Heterotrophs in the Acidiphilium genus totaled 20% of the bacterial population. Leptospirillum ferrooxidans was below the level of detection in the bacterial community. The results from the FISH technique from this field study are consistent with results from other experiments involving enumeration by most probable number, dot-blot hybridization, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analyses and with the geochemistry of the site. PMID:16825452

  16. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using non-commercial probes in the diagnosis of clinically suspected microdeletion syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Halder, Ashutosh; Jain, Manish; Chaudhary, Isha; Gupta, Neerja; Kabra, Madhulika

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Microdeletion syndromes are characterized by small (<5 Mb) chromosomal deletions in which one or more genes are involved. These are frequently associated with multiple congenital anomalies. The phenotype is the result of haploinsufficiency of genes in the critical interval. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique is commonly used for precise genetic diagnosis of microdeletion syndromes. This study was conducted to assess the role of FISH in the diagnosis of suspected microdeletion syndrome. Methods: FISH was carried out on 301 clinically suspected microdeletion syndrome cases for the confirmation of clinical diagnosis using non-commercial probes. Of these, 177 cases were referred for 22q11.2 microdeletion, 42 cases were referred for William syndrome, 38 cases were referred for Prader Willi/Angelman and 44 cases were referred for other suspected microdeletion syndromes. Results: FISH was confirmatory in 23 cases only (7.6%). There were 17 cases of 22q11.2 microdeletion, four cases of Prader Willi syndrome and two cases of William syndrome. Interpretation & conclusion: We conclude that FISH should not be the method of choice for clinically suspected microdeletion syndromes. We propose to follow strict clinical criteria for FISH testing or preferably to follow better methods (genotype first approach). Whole genome screening may be used as first line of test and FISH may be used for confirmation of screening result, screening of family members and prenatal diagnosis. PMID:24056568

  17. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization, Immunohistochemistry, and Next-Generation Sequencing for Detection of EML4-ALK Rearrangement in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pekar-Zlotin, Marina; Hirsch, Fred R.; Soussan-Gutman, Lior; Ilouze, Maya; Dvir, Addie; Boyle, Theresa; Wynes, Murry; Miller, Vincent A.; Lipson, Doron; Palmer, Gary A.; Ali, Siraj M.; Dekel, Shlomi; Brenner, Ronen; Bunn, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved method for detecting EML4-ALK rearrangement is fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH); however, data supporting the use of immunohistochemistry (IHC) for that purpose are accumulating. Previous studies that compared FISH and IHC considered FISH the gold standard, but none compared data with the results of next-generation sequencing (NGS) analysis. Materials and Methods. We studied FISH and IHC (D5F3 antibody) systematically for EML4-ALK rearrangement in 51 lung adenocarcinoma patients, followed by NGS in case of discordance. Results. Of 51 patients, 4 were positive with FISH (7.8%), and 8 were positive with IHC (15.7%). Three were positive with both. NGS confirmed that four of the five patients who were positive with IHC and negative with FISH were positive for ALK. Two were treated by crizotinib, with progression-free survival of 18 and 6 months. Considering NGS as the most accurate test, the sensitivity and specificity were 42.9% and 97.7%, respectively, for FISH and 100% and 97.7%, respectively, for IHC. Conclusion. The FISH-based method of detecting EML4-ALK rearrangement in lung cancer may miss a significant number of patients who could benefit from targeted ALK therapy. Screening for EML4-ALK rearrangement by IHC should be strongly considered, and NGS is recommended in borderline cases. Two patients who were negative with FISH and positive with IHC were treated with crizotinib and responded to therapy. PMID:25721120

  18. Quantitative Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Analysis of Microbial Consortia from a Biogenic Gas Field in Alaska's Cook Inlet Basin

    PubMed Central

    Strąpoć, Dariusz; Huizinga, Brad; Lidstrom, Ulrika; Ashby, Matt; Macalady, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Filter-collected production water samples from a methane-rich gas field in the Cook Inlet basin of Alaska were investigated using whole-cell rRNA-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and 16S rRNA tag pyrosequencing. Both techniques were consistent in determining the microbial community composition, including the archaeal or bacterial dominance of samples. The archaeal community is dominated by the obligate methylotrophic methanogen genus Methanolobus as well as the nutritional generalist methanogen genus Methanosarcina, which is capable of utilizing acetate, CO2, and methyl-bearing compounds. The most-abundant bacterial groups are Firmicutes, notably of the Acetobacterium genus, and Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides species (CFBs) affiliated with the order Bacteroidales. We observed spatial variation among samples in both the percentage of members of Archaea compared to that of members of Bacteria and the dominant members of the bacterial community, differences which could not be explained with the available geochemical data. Based upon the microbial community composition and the isotopic signature of methane associated with the Cook Inlet basin site, we propose a simplified reaction network beginning with the breakdown of coal macromolecules, followed by fermentation and methylotrophic and acetoclastic methane production. PMID:22427501

  19. Grazing of a Tetrahymena sp. on Adhered Bacteria in Percolated Columns Monitored by In Situ Hybridization with Fluorescent Oligonucleotide Probes

    PubMed Central

    Eisenmann, Heinrich; Harms, Hauke; Meckenstock, Rainer; Meyer, Elisabeth I.; Zehnder, Alexander J. B.

    1998-01-01

    Predation of attached Pseudomonas putida mt2 by the small ciliate Tetrahymena sp. was investigated with a percolated column system. Grazing rates were examined under static and dynamic conditions and were compared to grazing rates in batch systems containing suspended prey. The prey densities were 2 × 108 bacteria per ml of pore space and 2 × 108 bacteria per ml of suspension, respectively. Postingestion in situ hybridization of bacteria with fluorescent oligonucleotide probes was used to quantify ingestion. During 30 min, a grazing rate of 1,382 ± 1,029 bacteria individual−1 h−1 was obtained with suspended prey; this was twice the grazing rate observed with attached bacteria under static conditions. Continuous percolation at a flow rate of 73 cm h−1 further decreased the grazing rate to about 25% of the grazing rate observed with suspended prey. A considerable proportion of the protozoans fed on neither suspended bacteria nor attached bacteria. The transport of ciliates through the columns was monitored at the same time that predation was monitored. Less than 20% of the protozoans passed through the columns without being retained. Most of these organisms ingested no bacteria, whereas the retained protozoans grazed more efficiently. Retardation of ciliate transport was greater in columns containing attached bacteria than in bacterium-free columns. We propose that the correlation between grazing activity and retardation of transport is a consequence of the interaction between active predators and attached bacteria. PMID:9546161

  20. Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of microbial consortia from a biogenic gas field in Alaska's Cook Inlet basin.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Katherine S; Strąpoć, Dariusz; Huizinga, Brad; Lidstrom, Ulrika; Ashby, Matt; Macalady, Jennifer L

    2012-05-01

    Filter-collected production water samples from a methane-rich gas field in the Cook Inlet basin of Alaska were investigated using whole-cell rRNA-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and 16S rRNA tag pyrosequencing. Both techniques were consistent in determining the microbial community composition, including the archaeal or bacterial dominance of samples. The archaeal community is dominated by the obligate methylotrophic methanogen genus Methanolobus as well as the nutritional generalist methanogen genus Methanosarcina, which is capable of utilizing acetate, CO(2), and methyl-bearing compounds. The most-abundant bacterial groups are Firmicutes, notably of the Acetobacterium genus, and Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides species (CFBs) affiliated with the order Bacteroidales. We observed spatial variation among samples in both the percentage of members of Archaea compared to that of members of Bacteria and the dominant members of the bacterial community, differences which could not be explained with the available geochemical data. Based upon the microbial community composition and the isotopic signature of methane associated with the Cook Inlet basin site, we propose a simplified reaction network beginning with the breakdown of coal macromolecules, followed by fermentation and methylotrophic and acetoclastic methane production. PMID:22427501

  1. Analysis of methanogenic activity in a thermophilic-dry anaerobic reactor: Use of fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Montero, B.

    2009-03-15

    Methanogenic activity in a thermophilic-dry anaerobic reactor was determined by comparing the amount of methane generated for each of the organic loading rates with the size of the total and specific methanogenic population, as determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization. A high correlation was evident between the total methanogenic activity and retention time [-0.6988Ln(x) + 2.667] (R{sup 2} 0.8866). The total methanogenic activity increased from 0.04 x 10{sup -8} mLCH{sub 4} cell{sup -1}day{sup -1} to 0.38 x 10{sup -8} mLCH{sub 4} cell{sup -1}day{sup -1} while the retention time decreased, augmenting the organic loading rates. The specific methanogenic activities of H{sub 2}-utilizing methanogens and acetate-utilizing methanogens increased until they stabilised at 0.64 x 10{sup -8} mLCH{sub 4} cell{sup -1}day{sup -1} and 0.33 x 10{sup -8} mLCH{sub 4} cell{sup -1}day{sup -1}, respectively. The methanogenic activity of H{sub 2}-utilizing methanogens was higher than acetate-utilizing methanogens, indicating that maintaining a low partial pressure of hydrogen does not inhibit the acetoclastic methanogenesis or the anaerobic process.

  2. Fully Automated Fluorescent in situ Hybridization (FISH) Staining and Digital Analysis of HER2 in Breast Cancer: A Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    van der Logt, Elise M. J.; Kuperus, Deborah A. J.; van Setten, Jan W.; van den Heuvel, Marius C.; Boers, James. E.; Schuuring, Ed; Kibbelaar, Robby E.

    2015-01-01

    HER2 assessment is routinely used to select patients with invasive breast cancer that might benefit from HER2-targeted therapy. The aim of this study was to validate a fully automated in situ hybridization (ISH) procedure that combines the automated Leica HER2 fluorescent ISH system for Bond with supervised automated analysis with the Visia imaging D-Sight digital imaging platform. HER2 assessment was performed on 328 formalin-fixed/paraffin-embedded invasive breast cancer tumors on tissue microarrays (TMA) and 100 (50 selected IHC 2+ and 50 random IHC scores) full-sized slides of resections/biopsies obtained for diagnostic purposes previously. For digital analysis slides were pre-screened at 20x and 100x magnification for all fluorescent signals and supervised-automated scoring was performed on at least two pictures (in total at least 20 nuclei were counted) with the D-Sight HER2 FISH analysis module by two observers independently. Results were compared to data obtained previously with the manual Abbott FISH test. The overall agreement with Abbott FISH data among TMA samples and 50 selected IHC 2+ cases was 98.8% (? = 0.94) and 93.8% (? = 0.88), respectively. The results of 50 additionally tested unselected IHC cases were concordant with previously obtained IHC and/or FISH data. The combination of the Leica FISH system with the D-Sight digital imaging platform is a feasible method for HER2 assessment in routine clinical practice for patients with invasive breast cancer. PMID:25844540

  3. Fully automated fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) staining and digital analysis of HER2 in breast cancer: a validation study.

    PubMed

    van der Logt, Elise M J; Kuperus, Deborah A J; van Setten, Jan W; van den Heuvel, Marius C; Boers, James E; Schuuring, Ed; Kibbelaar, Robby E

    2015-01-01

    HER2 assessment is routinely used to select patients with invasive breast cancer that might benefit from HER2-targeted therapy. The aim of this study was to validate a fully automated in situ hybridization (ISH) procedure that combines the automated Leica HER2 fluorescent ISH system for Bond with supervised automated analysis with the Visia imaging D-Sight digital imaging platform. HER2 assessment was performed on 328 formalin-fixed/paraffin-embedded invasive breast cancer tumors on tissue microarrays (TMA) and 100 (50 selected IHC 2+ and 50 random IHC scores) full-sized slides of resections/biopsies obtained for diagnostic purposes previously. For digital analysis slides were pre-screened at 20x and 100x magnification for all fluorescent signals and supervised-automated scoring was performed on at least two pictures (in total at least 20 nuclei were counted) with the D-Sight HER2 FISH analysis module by two observers independently. Results were compared to data obtained previously with the manual Abbott FISH test. The overall agreement with Abbott FISH data among TMA samples and 50 selected IHC 2+ cases was 98.8% (κ = 0.94) and 93.8% (κ = 0.88), respectively. The results of 50 additionally tested unselected IHC cases were concordant with previously obtained IHC and/or FISH data. The combination of the Leica FISH system with the D-Sight digital imaging platform is a feasible method for HER2 assessment in routine clinical practice for patients with invasive breast cancer. PMID:25844540

  4. Detection of aneuploid human sperm by fluorescence in situ hybridization: Evidence for a donor difference in frequency of sperm disomic for chromosomes 1 and Y

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, W.A. Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA ); Segraves, R.; Pinkel, D. ); Wyrobek, A.J. )

    1993-04-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization with repetitive-sequence DNA probes was used to detect human sperm disomic for chromosomes 1 and Y in three healthy men. Data on these same men had been obtained previously, using the human-sperm/hamster-egg cytogenetic technique, providing a cytogenetic reference for validating sperm hybridization measurements. Air-dried smears were prepared from semen samples and treated with DTT and lithium diiodosalicylate to expand sperm chromatin. Hybridization with fluorescently tagged DNA probes for chromosomes 1 (pUC177) or Y (pY3.4) yielded average frequencies of sperm with two fluorescent domains of 14.2[+-]2.4/10,000 and 5.6[+-]1.6/10,000 sperm, respectively. These frequencies did not differ statistically from frequencies of hyperploidy observed for these chromosomes with the hamster technique. In addition, frequencies of disomic sperm from one donor were elevated [approximately]2.5-fold above those of other donors, for both chromosomes 1 (P = .045) and Y (P = .01), consistent with a trend found with the hamster technique. The authors conclude that fluorescence in situ hybridization to sperm chromosomes provides a valid and promising measure of the frequency of disomic human sperm. 43 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  5. A fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) microfluidic platform for detection of HER2 amplification in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kao, Kai-Jie; Tai, Chien-Hsuan; Chang, Wen-Hsin; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Chen, Tse-Ching; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2015-07-15

    Over-expression/amplification of human epidermal growth factor receptors 2 (HER2) is a verified therapeutic biomarker for breast and gastric cancers. HER2 is also served as prognostic biomarker for gastric cancer because HER2 over-expression is associated with a 5-10% increase in cancer related death of gastric cancer. Cancer patients exhibiting HER2 over-expression can significantly improve their overall survival rates by taking the targeting drug Herceptin, which directly targets HER2. However, Herceptin has limited functions toward patients without HER2 over-expression and therefore it needs a highly specific and accurate detection method for diagnosis of HER2 over-expression. Currently, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique is routinely employed to detect HER2 amplification. However, it is a labor-intensive, time-consuming hybridization process and is relatively costly. Furthermore, well-trained personnel are required to operate the delicate and complicate process. More importantly, it may take 1-2 days for well-trained personnel to perform a whole FISH assay. Given these limitations, we developed a new, integrated microfluidic FISH system capable of automating the entire FISH protocol which could be performed within a shorter period of time when compared to traditional methods. The microfluidic FISH chip consisted of a microfluidic control module for transportation of small amounts of fluids and a hybridization module to perform the hybridization of DNA probes and cells/tissue samples. With this approach, the new microfluidic chip was capable of performing the whole FISH assay within 20h. Four cell lines, two for non-HER2 amplification and two for HER2 amplification, and two clinical tissue samples, one for non-HER2 amplification and another for HER2 amplification, were used for verifications of the developed chip. Experimental data showed that there was no significant difference between the benchtop protocol and the chip-based protocol. Furthermore, the reagent consumption was greatly reduced (∼70% reduction). Especially, only 2-μl usage for FISH deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probe was used, which is five-fold reduction when compared with the traditional method. It is the first time that the entire FISH assay could be automated on a single chip by using tissue samples. The microfluidic system developed herein is therefore promising for rapid, automatic diagnosis of HER2-related diseases by detecting the HER2 gene with minimal consumption of samples and reagents and has a great potential for future pharmacogenetic diagnostics and therapy. PMID:25770459

  6. Cytogenetic analysis of human oocytes and isolated polar bodies by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Freidine, M.; Dyban, A.; Cieslak, J.

    1994-09-01

    Three hundred eighty six human oocytes that had remained unfertilized 1-2 days after insemination, 78 isolated 1st polar bodies (PB) and 26 isolated 2nd PB were fixed and analyzed by FISH technique with probes which hybridized specifically to definite regions of X chromosome, autosomes 18 and 13/21. In 133 secondary oocytes it was possible to count accurately the number of signals specific for X and 18 chromosomes in MII and in the corresponding 1st PB. In two cases, three X chromatids in MII and one X chromatid in the 1st PB were found. In one oocyte the 1st PB was without chromosome 18 and an extra 18 chromosome was located in MII. In two oocytes, extra chromatids 18 segregated to MII and in the 1st PB, only one chromatid was left. FISH analysis was informative in eleven isolated 1st PB which contained a normal number of X and 18 chromosomes. Hybridization was also informative for chromosomes X and 18 in 26 isolated 2nd PB and revealed one case of extra X and one case of extra 18. From 39 isolated 1st PB which were successfully hybridized with a probe for chromosome 13/21, six were abnormal. In four of them one signal was missing and in two, an extra signal was present. The efficiency of FISH strongly depended on the quality and age of chromosomal preparations, the structure of chromatin, the age of PB and oocytes, the DNA probes used. Directly labelled alpha-satellite probes to the centromeric region of chromosomes X and 18 were much more reliable than probes for chromosomes 13/21.

  7. Counting and Size Classification of Active Soil Bacteria by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization with an rRNA Oligonucleotide Probe

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Henrik; Hansen, Michael; Sørensen, Jan

    1999-01-01

    A fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique based on binding of a rhodamine-labelled oligonucleotide probe to 16S rRNA was used to estimate the numbers of ribosome-rich bacteria in soil samples. Such bacteria, which have high cellular rRNA contents, were assumed to be active (and growing) in the soil. Hybridization to an rRNA probe, EUB338, for the domain Bacteria was performed with a soil slurry, and this was followed by collection of the bacteria by membrane filtration (pore size, 0.2 μm). A nonsense probe, NONEUB338 (which has a nucleotide sequence complementary to the nucleotide sequence of probe EUB338), was used as a control for nonspecific staining. Counting and size classification into groups of small, medium, and large bacteria were performed by fluorescence microscopy. To compensate for a difference in the relative staining intensities of the probes and for binding by the rhodamine part of the probe, control experiments in which excess unlabelled probe was added were performed. This resulted in lower counts with EUB338 but not with NONEUB338, indicating that nonspecific staining was due to binding of rhodamine to the bacteria. A value of 4.8 × 108 active bacteria per g of dry soil was obtained for bulk soil incubated for 2 days with 0.3% glucose. In comparison, a value of 3.8 × 108 active bacteria per g of dry soil was obtained for soil which had been air dried and subsequently rewetted. In both soils, the majority (68 to 77%) of actively growing bacteria were members of the smallest size class (cell width, 0.25 to 0.5 μm), but the active (and growing) bacteria still represented only approximately 5% of the total bacterial population determined by DAPI (4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining. The FISH technique in which slurry hybridization is used holds great promise for use with phylogenetic probes and for automatic counting of soil bacteria. PMID:10103277

  8. Comparative cytogenetics of six Indo-Pacific moray eels (Anguilliformes: Muraenidae) by chromosomal banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Coluccia, E; Deidda, F; Cannas, R; Lobina, C; Cuccu, D; Deiana, A M; Salvadori, S

    2015-09-01

    A comparative cytogenetic analysis, using both conventional staining techniques and fluorescence in situ hybridization, of six Indo-Pacific moray eels from three different genera (Gymnothorax fimbriatus, Gymnothorax flavimarginatus, Gymnothorax javanicus, Gymnothorax undulatus, Echidna nebulosa and Gymnomuraena zebra), was carried out to investigate the chromosomal differentiation in the family Muraenidae. Four species displayed a diploid chromosome number 2n = 42, which is common among the Muraenidae. Two other species, G. javanicus and G. flavimarginatus, were characterized by different chromosome numbers (2n = 40 and 2n = 36). For most species, a large amount of constitutive heterochromatin was detected in the chromosomes, with species-specific C-banding patterns that enabled pairing of the homologous chromosomes. In all species, the major ribosomal genes were localized in the guanine-cytosine-rich region of one chromosome pair, but in different chromosomal locations. The (TTAGGG)n telomeric sequences were mapped onto chromosomal ends in all muraenid species studied. The comparison of the results derived from this study with those available in the literature confirms a substantial conservation of the diploid chromosome number in the Muraenidae and supports the hypothesis that rearrangements have occurred that have diversified their karyotypes. Furthermore, the finding of two species with different diploid chromosome numbers suggests that additional chromosomal rearrangements, such as Robertsonian fusions, have occurred in the karyotype evolution of the Muraenidae. PMID:26242690

  9. Cytogenetic, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and genomic array characterization of chronic myeloid leukemia with cryptic BCR-ABL1 fusions.

    PubMed

    Shao, Lina; Miller, Sue; Keller-Ramey, Jennifer; Zhang, Yang; Roulston, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is characterized by the breakpoint cluster region (BCR)-Abelson murine leukemia (ABL1) fusion gene. In approximately 1% of CML cases, the Philadelphia chromosome associated with the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene is not present, and the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene is generated by cryptic insertion or sequential translocations. In this study, we describe the cytogenetic and molecular features of five CML patients with cryptic BCR-ABL1 fusion genes using karyotype, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and whole genome single nucleotide polymorphism array techniques. Two cases of CML in the chronic phase (CP) had a normal karyotype, and three cases of CML in the blast phase (BP) had an abnormal karyotype with neither a typical nor variant t(9;22). By BCR-ABL1 metaphase FISH analysis, we found that fusion signals were localized on chromosomes 9 (3 cases), 22 (1 case), and both 9 and 22 (1 case). In two cases of CML-BP, duplication of the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene occurred as a result of mitotic recombination between homologous chromosomes. Copy number losses involving the IKZF1 gene were observed in two patients with CML-BP. This study demonstrates for the first time the acquisition of additional BCR-ABL1 fusion genes through mitotic recombination in CML with cryptic BCR-ABL1. PMID:26186983

  10. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Progress report, April 1--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1993-12-31

    The ultimate goal of this proposal is to create a cDNA map of the human genome. Mapping is approached using the techniques of high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This technology and the results of its application are designed to rapidly generate whole genome as tool box of expressed sequence to speed the identification of human disease genes. The results of this study are intended to dovetail with and to link the results of existing technologies for creating backbone YAC and genetic maps. In the first eight months, this approach will generate 60--80% of the expressed sequence map, the remainder expected to be derived through more long-term, labor-intensive, regional chromosomal gene searches or sequencing. The laboratory has made significant progress in the set-up phase, in mapping fetal and adult brain and other cDNAs, in testing a model system for directly linking genetic and physical maps using FISH with small fragments, in setting up a database, and in establishing the validity and throughput of the system.

  11. TERT and AURKA gene copy number gains enhance the detection of acral lentiginous melanomas by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Alba; Puig-Butillé, Joan Anton; Valera, Alexandra; Muñoz, Concha; Costa, Dolors; Garcia-Herrera, Adriana; Carrera, Cristina; Sole, Francesc; Malvehy, Josep; Puig, Susana; Alos, Llucia

    2014-03-01

    The study of specific chromosomal loci through fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is useful in differential diagnosis of melanocytic tumors. However, sensitivity rates vary, probably because of molecular heterogeneity. Acral lentiginous melanomas are characterized by copy number gains of small genomic regions, including CCND1, TERT, and AURKA. In a series of 58 acral melanocytic lesions, we explored the value of a four-color FISH probe, used in addition to determining MYC gene status, and assessed the potential diagnostic usefulness of newly developed probes targeting TERT and AURKA. Moreover, we tested CCND1, TERT, and AURKA protein expression by immunohistochemistry. The four-color FISH probe detected 85.3% of melanomas and 29.4% of TERT and AURKA copy number gains. Sensitivity was 97% (confidence interval 95%, 82.9% to 99.8%) for the combined results of all probes. No MYC copy number gains were detected. No nevi showed aberrations. Immunohistochemistry revealed a higher percentage of cells positive for CCND1, TERT, and AURKA protein in melanomas than in nevi (P ≤ 0.001). A significant correlation between gene copy number gain and protein expression was found for CCND1 (P = 0.015). Our results indicate that addition of specific FISH probes to the current probe could improve sensitivity for the diagnosis of acral melanomas. Further studies in larger numbers of cases are needed to validate these results. PMID:24374110

  12. Rapid molecular cytogenetic analysis of X-chromosomal microdeletions: Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for complex glycerol kinase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, K.C.; Lindsay, E.A.; McCabe, E.R.B.

    1995-07-17

    Diagnosis of X-chromosomal microdeletions has relied upon the traditional methods of Southern blotting and DNA amplification, with carrier identification requiring time-consuming and unreliable dosage calculations. In this report, we describe rapid molecular cytogenetic identification of deleted DNA in affected males with the Xp21 contiguous gene syndrome (complex glycerol kinase deficiency, CGKD) and female carriers for this disorder. CGKD deletions involve the genes for glycerol kinase, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and/or adrenal hypoplasia congenita. We report an improved method for diagnosis of deletions in individuals with CGKD and for identification of female carriers within their families using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a cosmid marker (cosmid 35) within the glycerol kinase gene. When used in combination with an Xq control probe, affected males demonstrate a single signal from the control probe, while female carriers demonstrate a normal chromosome with two signals, as well as a deleted chromosome with a single signal from the control probe. FISH analysis for CGKD provides the advantages of speed and accuracy for evaluation of submicroscopic X-chromosome deletions, particularly in identification of female carriers. In addition to improving carrier evaluation, FISH will make prenatal diagnosis of CGKD more readily available. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction as a diagnostic aid for synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Shipley, J.; Crew, J.; Birdsall, S.; Gill, S.; Clark, J.; Fisher, C.; Kelsey, A.; Nojima, T.; Sonobe, H.; Cooper, C.; Gusterson, B.

    1996-01-01

    Identification of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) that is associated with a high proportion of synovial sarcoma can be a useful diagnostic aid. The translocation results in fusion of the SYT gene on chromosome 18 to either the SSX1 or the SSX2 gene, two homologous genes within Xp11.2. Two-color interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction were assessed as approaches to identify the rearrangement in well characterized cases. The presence of the translocation, and the specific chromosome X gene disrupted, were inferred from the configuration of signals from chromosome-specific centromere probes, paints, and markers flanking each gene in preparations of interphase nuclei. Rearrangement was found in two cell lines and eight of nine tumor samples, including analysis of five touch imprints. This was consistent with cytogenetic data in four cases and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis using primers known to amplify both SYT-SSX1 and SYT-SSX2 transcripts. The transcripts were distinguished by restriction with LspI and SmaI. Contrary to previous suggestions, there was no obvious correlation between histological subtype and involvement of the SSX1 or SSX2 gene. These approaches could also be applied to the identification of tumor-free margins and metastatic disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8579118

  14. Application of rRNA probes and fluorescence in situ hybridization for rapid detection of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xianghai; Yu, Rencheng; Zhou, Mingjiang; Yu, Zhigang

    2012-03-01

    The dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum is often associated with harmful algal blooms (HABs). This species consists of many strains that differ in their ability to produce toxins but have similar morphology, making identification difficult. In this study, species-specific rRNA probes were designed for whole-cell fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to distinguish A. minutum from two phylogenetic clades. We acquired the complete SSU to LSU rDNA sequences (GenBank accession numbers JF906989-JF906999) of 11 Alexandrium strains and used these to design rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes. Three ribotype-specific probes, M-GC-1, M-PC-2, and M-PC-3, were designed. The former is specific for the GC clade ("Global clade") of A. minutum, the majority of which have been found non-toxic, and the latter two are specific for the PSP (paralytic shellfish poisoning)-producing PC clade ("Pacific clade"). The specificity of these three probes was confirmed by FISH. All cells in observed fields of view were fluorescently labeled when probes and target species were incubated under optimized FISH conditions. However, the accessibility of rRNA molecules in ribosomes varied among the probe binding positions. Thus, there was variation in the distribution of positive signals in labeled cells within nucleolus and cytosol (M-GC-1, M-PC-3), or just nucleolus (M-PC-2). Our results provide a methodological basis for studying the biogeography and population dynamics of A. minutum, and providing an early warning of toxic HABs.

  15. Discriminating Multi-Species Populations in Biofilms with Peptide Nucleic Acid Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (PNA FISH)

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Carina; Azevedo, Nuno F.; Santos, Sílvio; Keevil, Charles W.; Vieira, Maria J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Our current understanding of biofilms indicates that these structures are typically composed of many different microbial species. However, the lack of reliable techniques for the discrimination of each population has meant that studies focusing on multi-species biofilms are scarce and typically generate qualitative rather than quantitative data. Methodology/Principal Findings We employ peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) methods to quantify and visualize mixed biofilm populations. As a case study, we present the characterization of Salmonella enterica/Listeria monocytogenes/Escherichia coli single, dual and tri-species biofilms in seven different support materials. Ex-situ, we were able to monitor quantitatively the populations of ∼56 mixed species biofilms up to 48 h, regardless of the support material. In situ, a correct quantification remained more elusive, but a qualitative understanding of biofilm structure and composition is clearly possible by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) at least up to 192 h. Combining the data obtained from PNA FISH/CLSM with data from other established techniques and from calculated microbial parameters, we were able to develop a model for this tri-species biofilm. The higher growth rate and exopolymer production ability of E. coli probably led this microorganism to outcompete the other two [average cell numbers (cells/cm2) for 48 h biofilm: E. coli 2,1×108 (±2,4×107); L. monocytogenes 6,8×107 (±9,4×106); and S. enterica 1,4×106 (±4,1×105)]. This overgrowth was confirmed by CSLM, with two well-defined layers being easily identified: the top one with E. coli, and the bottom one with mixed regions of L. monocytogenes and S. enterica. Significance While PNA FISH has been described previously for the qualitative study of biofilm populations, the present investigation demonstrates that it can also be used for the accurate quantification and spatial distribution of species in polymicrobial communities. Thus, it facilitates the understanding of interspecies interactions and how these are affected by changes in the surrounding environment. PMID:21479268

  16. Characterization of an unbalanced de novo rearrangement by microsatellite polymorphism typing and by fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J.; Gordon, P.L.; Wilroy, R.S. Jr.

    1995-05-08

    Unbalanced de novo rearrangements, difficult to characterize by conventional cytogenetic techniques, may be elucidated by molecular approaches. By dinucleotide repeat polymorphism typing and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), we have defined the composition of an unbalanced de novo translocation (46,XX,15p+) in a child with multiple congenital anomalies. Use of a microsatellite repeat D5S208 (localized to 5p15) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis confirmed that the extra segment originated from the short arm of chromosome 5. Amplification of the patient`s DNA with primers for dinucleotide repeats D5S350 and D5S118 showed that the entire 5p (from 5pter to 5q11) was present in 3 copies. FISH confirmed the trisomic status of 5p, and further revealed the presence of centromeres of both chromosomes 5 and 15 on the rearranged chromosome thus delineating its dicentric nature. This information allowed us to redefine the de novo rearrangement in this patient as 46,XX,dic der(15)t(5;15)(q11;p11). 19 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and high resolution karyotype analysis reveal a novel inversion duplication of 10q

    SciTech Connect

    Czarnecki, P.; Dyke, D.L. Van; Dowling, P.K.

    1994-09-01

    A white male born with dysmorphic features, including upslanting palpebral fissures, bilateral simian creases, posteriorly rotated ears, bitemporal narrowing, frontal bossing, camptodactyly and head circumference and weight less than the 5th percentile was found to have a de novo add(10)(q26.1). High resolution karyotype analysis revealed a novel chromosomal abnormality: 46,XY,inv dup(10)(q26.3-q25.1). Fluorescent in situ hybridization using a chromosome 10-specific painting probe (Oncor, Inc.) confirmed that the extra material was derived from chromosome 10. Duplication of 10q24 or 10q25 is associated with characteristic craniofacial malformations, minor malformations of the hands and feet, major malformations of the heart, skeleton, and kidneys and severe mental retardation. Our patient, currently 7 months old, has many of the skeletal and craniofacial manifestations of other patients, but is developmentally normal at this early age. This is the first FISH confirmation of a 10q duplication and demonstrates the utility of this technology in addition to karyotype analysis. Molecular studies to determine the parental origin and extent of the duplication are in progress, since the apparent lack of developmental delay was unexpected. Identification of the origin of duplicated material will help assist in genetic counseling by further delineating new genetic syndromes.

  18. Oligonucleotide Array-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization Approach in Hematologic Malignancies With Normal/Failed Conventional Cytogenetics and Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Spina, Paolo; Coro, Ilaria; De Donno, Alessia; Vidali, Matteo; Morani, Federica; Cavaliere, Cristina; Galetto, Alessandra S; Kerim, Simonetta; Valente, Guido

    2016-02-01

    Oligonucleotide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (oaCGH) was used to investigate 60 cases of hematologic malignancies, mainly acute myeloid leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes, in order to evaluate its sensitivity and specificity and to search for genomic alterations undetected by previous investigation with conventional cytogenetics (CC) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). On the basis of CC and FISH results, we subdivided the series into group A (36 cases with a normal karyotype after CC and/or FISH testing) and group B (24 cases with anomalies detected by CC and/or FISH). oaCGH did not show alterations in 21 cases of the group A (58.3%); in the remaining 15 cases (41.7%), it detected 19 new abnormalities (14 amplifications and 5 deletions). In the group B, oaCGH confirmed 32/55 aneuploidies detected by FISH (58.1%). The sensitivity increased at 27/33 confirmed aneuploidies (81.8%) by placing as a cutoff a mosaic of 50%. Moreover, in the cases of this group oaCGH revealed 36 new alterations (15 amplifications and 21 deletions). From these results it is possible to assess a strong overlap between results obtained by FISH and oaCGH. However, oaCGH is a reliable alternative where CC and FISH are not feasible and is able to identify new alterations unexplored by FISH. PMID:25710586

  19. Validation of break-apart and fusion MYC probes using a digital fluorescence in situ hybridization capture and imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Michael; Rowe, Leslie; Clement, Parker W.; Miles, Rodney R.; Salama, Mohamed E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Detection of MYC translocations using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is important in the evaluation of lymphomas, in particular, Burkitt lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Our aim was to validate a digital FISH capture and imaging system for the detection of MYC 8q24 translocations using LSI-MYC (a break-apart probe) and MYC 8;14 translocation using IGH-MYC (a fusion probe). Materials and Methods: LSI-MYC probe was evaluated using tissue sections from 35 patients. IGH-MYC probe was evaluated using tissue sections from forty patients. Sections were processed for FISH and analyzed using traditional methods. FISH slides were then analyzed using the GenASIs capture and analysis system. Results: Results for LSI-MYC had a high degree of correlation between traditional method of FISH analysis and digital FISH analysis. Results for IGH-MYC had a 100% concordance between traditional method of FISH analysis and digital FISH analysis. Conclusion: Annotated whole slide images of H and E and FISH sections can be digitally aligned, so that areas of tumor within a section can be matched and evaluated with a greater degree of accuracy. Images can be archived permanently, providing a means for examining the results retrospectively. Digital FISH imaging of the MYC translocations provides a better diagnostic tool compared to traditional methods for evaluating lymphomas.

  20. Use of microautoradiography combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization to determine dimethylsulfoniopropionate incorporation by marine bacterioplankton taxa.

    PubMed

    Vila, Maria; Simó, Rafel; Kiene, Ronald P; Pinhassi, Jarone; González, José M; Moran, Mary Ann; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    2004-08-01

    The fraction of planktonic heterotrophic bacteria capable of incorporating dissolved dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and leucine was determined at two coastal sites by microautoradioagraphy (AU). In Gulf of Mexico seawater microcosm experiments, the proportion of prokaryotes that incorporated sulfur from [(35)S]DMSP ranged between 27 and 51% of 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)-positive cells, similar to or slightly lower than the proportion incorporating [(3)H]leucine. In the northwest Mediterranean coast, the proportion of cells incorporating sulfur from [(35)S]DMSP increased from 5 to 42% from January to March, coinciding with the development of a phytoplankton bloom. At the same time, the proportion of cells incorporating [(3)H]leucine increased from 21 to 40%. The combination of AU and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed that the Roseobacter clade (alpha-proteobacteria) accounted for 13 to 43% of the microorganisms incorporating [(35)S]DMSP at both sampling sites. Significant uptake of sulfur from DMSP was also found among members of the gamma-proteobacteria and Cytophaga-Flavobacterium groups. Roseobacter and gamma-proteobacteria exhibited the highest percentage of DAPI-positive cells incorporating (35)S from DMSP (around 50%). Altogether, the application of AU with [(35)S]DMSP combined with FISH indicated that utilization of S from DMSP is a widespread feature among active marine bacteria, comparable to leucine utilization. These results point toward DMSP as an important substrate for a broad and diverse fraction of marine bacterioplankton. PMID:15294798

  1. Combining fluorescent in situ hybridization with the comet assay for targeted examination of DNA damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Shaposhnikov, Sergey; Thomsen, Preben D; Collins, Andrew R

    2011-01-01

    The comet assay is a simple and sensitive method for measuring DNA damage. Cells are embedded in agarose on a microscope slide, lysed, and electrophoresed; the presence of strand breaks allows the DNA to migrate, giving the appearance of a comet tail, the percentage of DNA in the tail reflecting the break frequency. Lesion-specific endonucleases extend the usefulness of the method to investigate different kinds of damage. DNA repair can be studied by treating cells with damaging agent and monitoring the damage remaining at intervals during incubation. An important feature of the assay is that damage is detected at the level of individual cells. By combining the comet assay with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), using labeled probes to particular DNA sequences, we can examine DNA damage and repair at the level of single genes or DNA sequences. Here we provide protocols for the comet assay and the FISH modification, answer some technical questions, and give examples of applications of the technique. PMID:21057925

  2. The Dohner fluorescence in situ hybridization prognostic classification of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL): the CLL Research Consortium experience.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, Daniel L; Werner, Lillian; Rassenti, Laura Z; Neuberg, Donna; Ghia, Emanuella; Heerema, Nyla A; Dal Cin, Paola; Dell Aquila, Marie; Sreekantaiah, Chandrika; Greaves, Andrew W; Kipps, Thomas J; Kay, Neil E

    2016-04-01

    This study revisited the Dohner prognostic hierarchy in a cohort of 1585 well-documented patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. The duration of both time to first treatment (TTFT) and overall survival (OS) were significantly longer than observed previously, and this is at least partly due to improved therapeutic options. Deletion 13q remains the most favourable prognostic group with median TTFT and OS from fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) testing of 72 months and >12 years, respectively. Deletion 11q had the poorest median TTFT (22 months) and 17p deletion the poorest median OS (5 years). The percentages of abnormal nuclei were significantly associated with differential TTFT for the trisomy 12, 13q and 17p deletion cohorts but not for the 11q deletion cohort. From the date of the first FISH study, patients with >85% 13q deletion nuclei had a notably shorter TTFT (24 months). Patients with ≤20% 17p deletion nuclei had longer median TTFT and OS from the date of the first FISH study (44 months and 11 years), and were more likely to be IGHV mutated. PMID:26848054

  3. Automation of ALK gene rearrangement testing with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH): a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Zwaenepoel, Karen; Merkle, Dennis; Cabillic, Florian; Berg, Erica; Belaud-Rotureau, Marc-Antoine; Grazioli, Vittorio; Herelle, Olga; Hummel, Michael; Le Calve, Michele; Lenze, Dido; Mende, Stefanie; Pauwels, Patrick; Quilichini, Benoit; Repetti, Elena

    2015-02-01

    In the past several years we have observed a significant increase in our understanding of molecular mechanisms that drive lung cancer. Specifically in the non-small cell lung cancer sub-types, ALK gene rearrangements represent a sub-group of tumors that are targetable by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor Crizotinib, resulting in significant reductions in tumor burden. Phase II and III clinical trials were performed using an ALK break-apart FISH probe kit, making FISH the gold standard for identifying ALK rearrangements in patients. FISH is often considered a labor and cost intensive molecular technique, and in this study we aimed to demonstrate feasibility for automation of ALK FISH testing, to improve laboratory workflow and ease of testing. This involved automation of the pre-treatment steps of the ALK assay using various protocols on the VP 2000 instrument, and facilitating automated scanning of the fluorescent FISH specimens for simplified enumeration on various backend scanning and analysis systems. The results indicated that ALK FISH can be automated. Significantly, both the Ikoniscope and BioView system of automated FISH scanning and analysis systems provided a robust analysis algorithm to define ALK rearrangements. In addition, the BioView system facilitated consultation of difficult cases via the internet. PMID:25576649

  4. 6q deletion detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization using bacterial artificial chromosome in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dalsass, Alessia; Mestichelli, Francesca; Ruggieri, Miriana; Gaspari, Paola; Pezzoni, Valerio; Vagnoni, Davide; Angelini, Mario; Angelini, Stefano; Bigazzi, Catia; Falcioni, Sadia; Troiani, Emanuela; Alesiani, Francesco; Catarini, Massimo; Attolico, Immacolata; Scortechini, Ilaria; Discepoli, Giancarlo; Galieni, Piero

    2013-07-01

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 6 are known to occur at relatively low frequency (3-6%) in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and they are more frequently observed in 6q21. Few data have been reported regarding other bands on 6q involved by cytogenetic alterations in CLL. The cytogenetic study was performed in nuclei and metaphases obtained after stimulation with a combination of CpG-oligonucleotide DSP30 and interleukin-2. Four bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones mapping regions in bands 6q16, 6q23, 6q25, 6q27 were used as probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization in 107 CLL cases in order to analyze the occurrence and localization of 6q aberrations. We identified 11 cases (10.2%) with 6q deletion of 107 patients studied with CLL. The trends of survival curves and the treatment-free intervals (TFI) of patients with deletion suggest a better outcome than the other cytogenetic risk groups. We observed two subgroups with 6q deletion as the sole anomaly: two cases with 6q16 deletion, and three cases with 6q25.2-27 deletion. There were differences of age, stage, and TFI between both subgroups. By using BAC probes, we observed that 6q deletion has a higher frequency in CLL and is linked with a good prognosis. In addition, it was observed that the deletion in 6q16 appears to be the most frequent and, if present as the only abnormality, it could be associated with a most widespread disease. PMID:23560441

  5. Fluorescence in situ hybridization as an ancillary tool in the diagnosis of ambiguous melanocytic neoplasms: a review of 804 cases.

    PubMed

    North, Jeffrey P; Garrido, Maria C; Kolaitis, Nicholas A; LeBoit, Philip E; McCalmont, Timothy H; Bastian, Boris C

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the utility of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as an ancillary method in the diagnostic workup of histopathologically ambiguous melanocytic neoplasms. A combination of probes targeting 3 loci on chromosome 6 and 1 on 11q has been reported to distinguish unequivocal melanomas and nevi with a sensitivity and specificity of 87% and 96%, respectively. However, information on how FISH should be integrated into routine clinical testing is limited. We report our experience of FISH testing of 804 ambiguous melanocytic lesions performed as part of routine workup at University of California, San Francisco. The main category (47% of all cases) for which FISH testing was requested was Spitz tumors. Other categories included the distinction of possible melanoma from combined nevi (9%), acral or mucosal nevi (9%), Clark/dysplastic nevi (7%), and blue or deep penetrating nevi (6%) and to assess the possibility of nevoid melanoma (4%). Of the ambiguous tumors successfully tested, 88% received a more definitive benign or malignant final diagnosis. Of the 630 cases that tested negative by FISH, the final diagnosis was benign in 489 (78%) cases, ambiguous in 91 cases (14%), and malignant in 50 cases (8%). A positive FISH result was observed in 124 cases, with a final diagnosis of melanoma in 117 (94%). One (1%) FISH-positive case had an equivocal final diagnosis, and 6 (5%) were interpreted, despite the positive FISH result, as melanocytic nevi. We conclude that FISH testing can help reduce the number of equivocal diagnoses in ambiguous melanocytic neoplasms, in particular if FISH testing is positive, and discuss the challenges and limitations of FISH in clinical practice. PMID:24618603

  6. FISH in chips: turning microfluidic fluorescence in situ hybridization into a quantitative and clinically reliable molecular diagnosis tool.

    PubMed

    Perez-Toralla, Karla; Mottet, Guillaume; Guneri, Ezgi Tulukcuoglu; Champ, Jrme; Bidard, Franois-Clment; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Klijanienko, Jerzy; Draskovic, Irena; Malaquin, Laurent; Viovy, Jean-Louis; Descroix, Stphanie

    2015-02-01

    Microfluidic systems bear promise to provide new powerful tools for the molecular characterization of cancer cells, in particular for the routine detection of multiple cancer biomarkers using a minute amount of the sample. However, taking miniaturized cell-based assays into the clinics requires the implementation and validation of complex biological protocols on chip, as well as the development of disposable microdevices produced at a low cost. Based on a recently developed microfluidic chip made of Cyclic Olefin Copolymer for cell immobilization with minimal dead volume and controlled shear stress, we developed a protocol performed entirely in the liquid phase, allowing the immobilization and fixation of cells and their quantitative characterization by fluorescence in situ hybridization. We demonstrated first in cell lines and then in two clinical case studies the potential of this method to perform quantitative copy number measurement and clinical scoring of the amplification of the ERBB2 gene, a decisive biomarker for the prescription of HER2+ related targeted therapies. This validation was performed in a blind protocol in two clinical case studies, in reference to the gold standard and clinically used method based on glass slides. We obtained a comparable reproducibility and a minor difference in apparent amplification, which can be corrected by internal calibration. The method thus reaches the standard of robustness needed for clinical use. The protocol can be fully automated, and its consumption of samples and DNA probes is reduced as compared to glass slide protocols by a factor of at least 10. The total duration of the assay is divided by two. PMID:25474258

  7. Assessment of chromosomal abnormalities in sperm of infertile men using sperm karyotyping and multicolour fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Moosani, N.; Martin, R.H.

    1994-09-01

    Individuals with male factor infertility resulting from idiopathic oligo-, astheno- or teratozoospermia are frequently offered IVF in an attempt to increase their chances of having a child. A concern remains whether these infertile males have an elevated risk of transmitting chromosomal abnormalities to their offspring. Sperm chromosomal complements from these men were assayed using the human sperm/hamster oocyte fusion system and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on sperm nuclei. For each of 5 infertile patients, 100 sperm karyotypes were analyzed and multicolour FISH analysis was performed on a minimum of 10,000 sperm nuclei for each chromosome-specific DNA probe for chromosomes 1 (pUC1.77), 12 (D12Z3), X (XC) and Y (DYZ3). As a group, the infertile patients showed increased frequencies of both numerical ({chi}{sup 2}=17.26, {proportional_to} <0.001) and total abnormalities ({chi}{sup 2}=7.78, {proportional_to} <0.01) relative to control donors when assessed by sperm karyotypes. Analysis of sperm nuclei by FISH indicated a significant increase in the frequency of disomy for chromosome 1 in three of the five patients as compared to control donors ({chi}{sup 2}>8.35, {proportional_to} <0.005). In addition, the frequency of XY disomy was significantly higher in four of the five patients studied by FISH ({chi}{sup 2}>10.58, {proportional_to}<0.005), suggesting that mis-segregation caused by the failure of the XY bivalent to pair may play a role in idiopathic male infertility.

  8. Analysis of fluorescent in situ hybridization images with a digitizer board

    SciTech Connect

    Engh, G.J. van den; Trask, B.J.; Esposito, R. Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1993-01-01

    The authors have developed a rapid method for mapping unique DNA sequences along chromosomes (van den Engh et al., Science, 1992, in press). The map is constructed from distance measurements between pairs of cosmid probes that have been hybridized to interphase nuclei. These physical distance measurements are related to the genomic distance by a random walk model. In order to obtain accurate genomic distance estimates from this statistical approach, large numbers of interphase nuclei need to be evaluated. They have developed a method that achieves thousand of interphase distance measurements per day. The microscope slides are photographed. The photographs are projected onto a wall-mounted digitizer board. A simple computer program collects the data from the board, operates the slide projector, plots the distance profiles and generates a map from the data. The approach compares favorably to image analysis with computer controlled digital cameras. A slide projector carrousel loaded with 100 transparencies is equivalent to 3.6 Mbyte random access memory. The carrousel contains color images of 1,000 nuclei that can be analyzed in less than two hours.

  9. Multicenter Evaluation of a New Shortened Peptide Nucleic Acid Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Procedure for Species Identification of Select Gram-Negative Bacilli from Blood Cultures▿

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Margie; Marlowe, Elizabeth; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Salimnia, Hossein; Novak-Weekley, Susan; Wu, Fann; Crystal, Benjamin S.

    2010-01-01

    A shortened protocol for two peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) assays for the detection of Gram-negative bacilli from positive blood cultures was evaluated in a multicenter trial. There was 100% concordance between the two protocols for each assay (368 of 368 and 370 of 370 results) and 99.7% (367 of 368 and 369 of 370 results) agreement with routine laboratory techniques. PMID:20357212

  10. Localization of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase gene (INDO) to chromosome 8p12-->p11 by fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Najfeld, V; Menninger, J; Muhleman, D; Comings, D E; Gupta, S L

    1993-01-01

    Indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase are two enzymes that degrade tryptophan to N-formylkynurenine. The gene (TDO2) for tryptophane 2,3-dioxygenase has been localized to 4q31-->32. We now report localization of INDO (the gene encoding indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase) by fluorescent in situ hybridization to 8p12-->p11. PMID:8404046

  11. The mouse Mcmd gene for DNA replication protein P1MCM3 maps to bands A3-A5 on chromosome 1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Ikuya; Kimura, Hiroshi; Takagi, Nobuo

    1996-03-05

    This report describes the localization of the mouse Mcmd gene for DNA replication to mouse chromosome 1, bands A3-A5 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. This finding supports the recent mapping of the human MCM3 gene to human chromosome 6p12, which shows synteny with mouse chromosome 1. The mouse Mcmd gene encodes the protein P1MCM3 which is essential for DNA replication. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Fluorescence In situ Hybridization Study Shows Association of PTEN Deletion with ERG Rearrangement during Prostate Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bo; Mehra, Rohit; Lonigro, Robert J.; Wang, Lei; Suleman, Khalid; Menon, Anjana; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Tomlins, Scott A.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Shah, Rajal B.

    2009-01-01

    The link between ERG rearrangement and PTEN deletion is unclear in prostate cancer progression. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we systematically validated the frequency and distribution of ERG and PTEN aberrations in a cohort of 73 benign prostate tissues, 59 high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) foci, 281 localized prostate cancer and 47 androgen-independent metastatic prostate cancer patients. Overall, ERG rearrangement was present in 15% (5/33) of HGPIN, 45% (121/267) of localized cancers and 35% (15/43) of metastases. By contrast, PTEN deletion was identified in 9% (3/33) of HGPIN, 17% (42/251) of localized cancers and 54% (22/41) of metastases, of which 0%, 40% (17/42) and 45% (10/22) were homozygous, respectively. Concomitance of ERG rearrangement and PTEN deletion was observed in a subset of HGPIN. Significantly, association between PTEN deletion and ERG rearrangement was present both in localized cancers (p=0.0008) and metastases (p=0.02). Further, immunohistochemistry revealed significant correlation of decreased PTEN protein expression with PTEN genomic deletion both in localized and metastatic cancer. Of note, ERG aberration, but not PTEN deletion, was consistently identical both in localized cancer and adjacent HGPIN. Similarly, whereas all metastases (41/41, 100%) shared the same ERG status across multiple sites from the same patient, 5% (2/41) of cases showed discordance for PTEN deletion status across multiple sites. Collectively, our data support PTEN deletion as a late genetic event in human prostate cancer, presumably a “second hit” after ERG rearrangement. PTEN deletion and ERG rearrangement may cooperate, but contribute at different stages, in prostate cancer progression. PMID:19407851

  13. Preparations of meiotic pachytene chromosomes and extended DNA fibers from cotton suitable for fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Peng, Renhai; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Fang; Ling, Jian; Wang, Chunying; Li, Shaohui; Zhang, Xiangdi; Wang, Yuhong; Wang, Kunbo

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has become one of the most important techniques applied in plant molecular cytogenetics. However, the application of this technique in cotton has lagged behind because of difficulties in chromosome preparation. The focus of this article was FISH performed not only on cotton pachytene chromosomes, but also on cotton extended DNA fibers. The cotton pollen mother cells (PMCs) instead of buds or anthers were directly digested in enzyme to completely breakdown the cell wall. Before the routine acetic acid treatment, PMCs were incubated in acetic acid and enzyme mixture to remove the cytoplasm and clear the background. The method of ice-cold Carnoy's solution spreading chromosome was adopted instead of nitrogen removed method to avoid chromosomes losing and fully stretch chromosome. With the above-improved steps, the high-quality well-differentiated pachytene chromosomes with clear background were obtained. FISH results demonstrated that a mature protocol of cotton pachytene chromosomes preparation was presented. Intact and no debris cotton nuclei were obtained by chopping from etiolation cotyledons instead of the conventional liquid nitrogen grinding method. After incubating the nuclei with nucleus lysis buffer on slide, the parallel and clear background DNA fibers were acquired along the slide. This method overcomes the twist, accumulation and fracture of DNA fibers compared with other methods. The entire process of DNA fibers preparation requires only 30 min, in contrast, it takes 3 h with routine nitrogen grinding method. The poisonous mercaptoethanol in nucleus lysis buffer is replaced by nonpoisonous dithiothreitol. PVP40 in nucleus isolation buffer is used to prevent oxidation. The probability of success in isolating nuclei for DNA fiber preparation is almost 100% tested with this method in cotton. So a rapid, safe, and efficient method for the preparation of cotton extended DNA fibers suitable for FISH was established. PMID:22442728

  14. Preparations of Meiotic Pachytene Chromosomes and Extended DNA Fibers from Cotton Suitable for Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Ling, Jian; Wang, Chunying; Li, Shaohui; Zhang, Xiangdi; Wang, Yuhong; Wang, Kunbo

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has become one of the most important techniques applied in plant molecular cytogenetics. However, the application of this technique in cotton has lagged behind because of difficulties in chromosome preparation. The focus of this article was FISH performed not only on cotton pachytene chromosomes, but also on cotton extended DNA fibers. The cotton pollen mother cells (PMCs) instead of buds or anthers were directly digested in enzyme to completely breakdown the cell wall. Before the routine acetic acid treatment, PMCs were incubated in acetic acid and enzyme mixture to remove the cytoplasm and clear the background. The method of ice-cold Carnoy's solution spreading chromosome was adopted instead of nitrogen removed method to avoid chromosomes losing and fully stretch chromosome. With the above-improved steps, the high-quality well-differentiated pachytene chromosomes with clear background were obtained. FISH results demonstrated that a mature protocol of cotton pachytene chromosomes preparation was presented. Intact and no debris cotton nuclei were obtained by chopping from etiolation cotyledons instead of the conventional liquid nitrogen grinding method. After incubating the nuclei with nucleus lysis buffer on slide, the parallel and clear background DNA fibers were acquired along the slide. This method overcomes the twist, accumulation and fracture of DNA fibers compared with other methods. The entire process of DNA fibers preparation requires only 30 min, in contrast, it takes 3 h with routine nitrogen grinding method. The poisonous mercaptoethanol in nucleus lysis buffer is replaced by nonpoisonous dithiothreitol. PVP40 in nucleus isolation buffer is used to prevent oxidation. The probability of success in isolating nuclei for DNA fiber preparation is almost 100% tested with this method in cotton. So a rapid, safe, and efficient method for the preparation of cotton extended DNA fibers suitable for FISH was established. PMID:22442728

  15. Assignment of the human homologue of the drosophila cut homeobox gene (CUTL1) to band 7q22 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Lemieux, N.; Zhang, X.X.; Dufort, D.

    1994-11-01

    Three cDNA probes that were used for the mapping. The regions covered by these probes comprise nucleotides 2492 to 5374 for probe 1, 2492 to 3936 for probe 2, and 3936 to 5374 for probe 3. The chromosomal localization of the CUTL1 gene was determined by FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization). Probes were labeled by nick-translation using biotin-11-dUTP. After hybridization, slides were rinsed once with 2 x SSC. Probes were visualized by an indirect immunofluorescence system without any amplification.

  16. Fluorescence in situ Hybridization method using Peptide Nucleic Acid probes for rapid detection of Lactobacillus and Gardnerella spp.

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common vaginal infection occurring in women of reproductive age. It is widely accepted that the microbial switch from normal microflora to BV is characterized by a decrease in vaginal colonization by Lactobacillus species together with an increase of Gardnerella vaginalis and other anaerobes. Our goal was to develop and optimize a novel Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) Fluorescence in situ Hybridization assay (PNA FISH) for the detection of Lactobacillus spp. and G. vaginalis in mixed samples. Results Therefore, we evaluated and validated two specific PNA probes by using 36 representative Lactobacillus strains, 22 representative G. vaginalis strains and 27 other taxonomically related or pathogenic bacterial strains commonly found in vaginal samples. The probes were also tested at different concentrations of G. vaginalis and Lactobacillus species in vitro, in the presence of a HeLa cell line. Specificity and sensitivity of the PNA probes were found to be 98.0% (95% confidence interval (CI), from 87.8 to 99.9%) and 100% (95% CI, from 88.0 to 100.0%), for Lactobacillus spp.; and 100% (95% CI, from 92.8 to 100%) and 100% (95% CI, from 81.5 to 100.0%) for G. vaginalis. Moreover, the probes were evaluated in mixed samples mimicking women with BV or normal vaginal microflora, demonstrating efficiency and applicability of our PNA FISH. Conclusions This quick method accurately detects Lactobacillus spp. and G. vaginalis species in mixed samples, thus enabling efficient evaluation of the two bacterial groups, most frequently encountered in the vagina. PMID:23586331

  17. Renal cell carcinoma with mixed features of papillary and clear cell cytomorphology: a fluorescent in situ hybridization study.

    PubMed

    Mai, Kien T; Faraji, Hamidreza; Desantis, Darren; Robertson, Susan J; Belanger, Eric C; Levac, Joelle

    2010-01-01

    We performed fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to investigate the numeric change of chromosomes 7, 17, and Y and loss of chromosome 3p in "papillary renal cell carcinomas (RCC) with extensive clear cell changes (CCC)." Consecutive cases of RCC over a 12-year period were reviewed to identify "papillary RCC with extensive CCC." Immunostaining for cytokeratin 7 and alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR) and FISH for chromosomes 7, 17, Y, and 3p were applied. Of the total of 521 RCC retrieved, there were 49 RCC with papillary architecture and clear cell areas that could be divided into: Group 1 (12 cases), typical clear cell RCC with focal areas of papillary formation; Group 2 (28 cases), focal typical papillary RCC having papillary architecture with extensive CCC; and Group 3 (nine cases), RCC with an admixture of eosinophilic/clear cytoplasm and solid/papillary architecture. Group 1 showed negative immunoreactivity for CK7 and AMACR and absence of numeric chromosomal gain or loss of chromosomes 7/17 and Y. Groups 2 and 3 showed variable reactivity for CK7 and AMACR. Tumors in group 2 and five in group 3 showed trisomies of chromosomes 7 and/or 17 with or without loss of chromosome Y. Loss of small arm 3p was observed in groups 1 and 3 but not in group 2 tumors. In conclusion, papillary RCC may show phenotypical CCC mimicking clear cell RCC. In a small number of cases with mixed histopathological features, FISH is helpful in subtyping RCC. PMID:20033232

  18. Localization of single- and low-copy sequences on tomato synaptonemal complex spreads using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, D G; Lapitan, N L; Stack, S M

    1999-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful means by which single- and low-copy DNA sequences can be localized on chromosomes. Compared to the mitotic metaphase chromosomes that are normally used in FISH, synaptonemal complex (SC) spreads (hypotonically spread pachytene chromosomes) have several advantages. SC spreads (1) are comparatively free of debris that can interfere with probe penetration, (2) have relatively decondensed chromatin that is highly accessible to probes, and (3) are about ten times longer than their metaphase counterparts, which permits FISH mapping at higher resolution. To investigate the use of plant SC spreads as substrates for single-copy FISH, we probed spreads of tomato SCs with two single-copy sequences and one low-copy sequence (ca. 14 kb each) that are associated with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers on SC 11. Individual SCs were identified on the basis of relative length, arm ratio, and differential staining patterns after combined propidium iodide (PI) and 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. In this first report of single-copy FISH to SC spreads, the probe sequences were unambiguously mapped on the long arm of tomato SC 11. Coupled with data from earlier studies, we determined the distance in micrometers, the number of base pairs, and the rates of crossing over between these three FISH markers. We also observed that the order of two of the FISH markers is reversed in relation to their order on the molecular linkage map. SC-FISH mapping permits superimposition of markers from molecular linkage maps directly on pachytene chromosomes and thereby contributes to our understanding of the relationship between chromosome structure, gene activity, and recombination. PMID:10224272

  19. Molecular diagnosis of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans: a comparison between reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence in situ hybridization methodologies.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Rocío; Llombart, Beatriz; M Pujol, Ramon; Fernández-Serra, Antonio; Sanmartín, Onofre; Toll, Agustí; Rubio, Luis; Segura, Sonia; Barranco, Carlos; Serra-Guillén, Carlos; Yébenes, Mireia; Salido, Marta; Traves, Víctor; Monteagudo, Carlos; Sáez, Empar; Hernández, Teresa; de Álava, Enrique; Llombart-Bosch, Antonio; Solé, Francesc; Guillén, Carlos; Espinet, Blanca; López-Guerrero, Jose A

    2011-07-01

    Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is characterized by the presence of the t(17;22)(q22;q13) that leads to the fusion of the COL1A1 and PDGFB genes. This translocation can be detected by multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques. We have evaluated the usefulness of a dual color dual fusion FISH probe strategy for COL1A1/PDGFB detection in a series of 103 archival DFSPs and compared the obtained results with RT-PCR analyses. FISH and RT-PCR were carried out on paraffin embedded tissue samples. Regarding the RT-PCR approach, all COL1A1 exons and exon 2 of PDGFB were evaluated. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were assessed considering the histological diagnosis as the gold standard. We also analyzed the relationship between the genetic findings and the clinicopathological variables of the tumors. The COL1A1/PDGFB translocation was detected in 93% of DFSP. Both techniques showed a similar specificity (100%), but FISH was more sensitive than RT-PCR (90% vs. 72%). Regarding, clinicopathological features, a higher percentage of positive cells detected by FISH was significantly associated with the fibrosarcomatous DFSP variant (P < 0.001). Interestingly, all CD34 negative DFSP (n = 5) were positive for COL1A1/PDGFB translocation by both techniques. In conclusion, the majority of DFSP harbor the COL1A1/PDGFB translocation and FISH technique should be recommended as a routine diagnostic tool, especially in cases showing unusual histopathological subtypes and/or immunohistochemical features. PMID:21484928

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF SEX CHROMOSOME MOLECULAR MARKERS USING RAPDS AND FLUORESCENT IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION IN RAINBOW TROUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this work is to identify molecular markers associated with the sex chromosomes in rainbow trout to study the mode of sex determination mechanisms in this species. Using the RAPD assay and bulked segregant analysis, two markers were identified that generated polymorphi...

  1. [Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) in the diagnosis of acute childhood lymphatic leukemia (ALL)].

    PubMed

    Zemanov, Z; Michalov, K; Brezinov, J; Sindelrov, L; Kurkov, S; Smsek, P; Zuna, J; Trka, J; Star, J

    2001-08-30

    Classical cytogenetic analysis plays an important role in the diagnosis, classification, therapy monitoring and prognosis of patients with leukemia. Many recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities with major prognostic values have been described in childhood ALL. Hyperdiploidy and/or t(12;21) are associated with good prognosis, whereas t(9;22) and/or rearrangements of MLL gene correlate with poor outcome and therefore early detection of these abnormalities is very important. FISH can overcome some limitations of conventional cytogenetic and molecular-genetic analyses and due to high sensitivity specific chromosomal aberrations in mitoses and/or interphase nuclei can be detected. In the Center of Oncocytogenetics of the 3rd Medical Department for assessment of hyperdiploidy and structural rearrangements we use double-color FISH with centromeric and/or locus-specific probes and complex aberrations are ascertained by whole chromosome painting probes and multicolor FISH. Among 275 children with ALL examined during the last 8 years by different FISH methods we found seven patients with translocation t(9;22) and 14 patients with MLL rearrangements in bone marrow cells. Since 1988 we focus on detection of hyperdiploidy and/or t(12;21). High hyperdiploidy was found in 35 children, 10 of them had further complex rearrangements. Translocation t(12;21) was proved in 37 patients and complex rearrangements were found in 22 of them. FISH, cytogenetic and molecular-genetic analyses become obligatory for the first diagnostic examination as well as for monitoring of treatment effect in children with ALL. PMID:11702476

  2. Spot counting on fluorescence in situ hybridization in suspension images using Gaussian mixture model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sijia; Sa, Ruhan; Maguire, Orla; Minderman, Hans; Chaudhary, Vipin

    2015-03-01

    Cytogenetic abnormalities are important diagnostic and prognostic criteria for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A flow cytometry-based imaging approach for FISH in suspension (FISH-IS) was established that enables the automated analysis of several log-magnitude higher number of cells compared to the microscopy-based approaches. The rotational positioning can occur leading to discordance between spot count. As a solution of counting error from overlapping spots, in this study, a Gaussian Mixture Model based classification method is proposed. The Akaike information criterion (AIC) and Bayesian information criterion (BIC) of GMM are used as global image features of this classification method. Via Random Forest classifier, the result shows that the proposed method is able to detect closely overlapping spots which cannot be separated by existing image segmentation based spot detection methods. The experiment results show that by the proposed method we can obtain a significant improvement in spot counting accuracy.

  3. Trisomy 10p resulting from an inv dup of 10p defined by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, S.J.; Easterling, T.R.; Leppig, K.A.

    1994-09-01

    De novo cases of trisomy for the entire short arm of chromosome 10 are infrequently reported and are most commonly the result of translocation of 10p to an acrocentric chromosome. Most reported cases of trisomy 10p are not trisomy for the complete short arm of chromosome 10, but are duplication, deficiency syndromes that result from either inheritance of an unbalanced translocation from a parent possessing a balanced reciprocal translocation, or from a recombinant chromosome derived from a parental pericentric inversion of chromosome 10. Here, we report a case of a de novo trisomy 10p that resulted from an inverted duplication of the entire short arm of chromosome 10. A 42 year old G7,P5,SAB1 woman was referred for amniocentesis because of advanced maternal age. Ultrasound examination at 17 weeks demonstrated a fetus of normal size with no apparent anatomic abnormalities. Cytogenetic evaluation demonstrated one homologue of chromosome 10 had a tandem inverted duplication of the short arm. The fetal karyotype was interpreted to be 46,XX,inv dup (10) (peter-cen::cen-p15::q11-pter). Parental karyotype are normal. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a chromosome 10 paint, chromosome 10 centromere, and all telomere probe, confirmed the inverted duplication involved the entire short arm of chromosome 10. Termination of pregnancy was performed at 20 weeks gestation. Autopsy revealed multiple anomalies including low-set posteriorly rotated ears, cleft of the soft palate, ocular hypertelorism, small upturned nose, agenesis of the gallbladder, sacral hemivertebrae, and abnormal flexion of the thumbs. The fetal karyotype was confirmed by cytogenetic analysis in lung and kidney. This is the second reported case of a de novo tandem duplication of 10p of which we are aware, and the first using FISH technology to characterize the abnormality.

  4. Localization of a candidate colon tumor-suppressor gene (DRA) to 7q22-q31. 1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, T.; Testa, J.R. ); Papas, T.S.; Schweinfest, C. )

    1994-03-01

    The authors have previously reported that the DRA gene is located on chromosome 7. This assignment was based on Southern blot hybridization of a DRA cDNA to genomic DNA from rodent-human somatic cell hybrids. In this report, they localize the DRA gene to chromosome band 7q22-q31.1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a full-length (2.9 kb) cDNA as probe. Metaphase spreads from normal human lymphocytes were prepared according to the method of Fan et al. The cDNA clone 611C was labeled with biotin-11-dUTP using a nick-translation kit (Oncor) followed by purification on a Sephadex G50-fine column. FISH and detection of immunofluorescence were performed according to the technique of Pinkel et al. with minor modifications. The chromosome preparations were stained with both diamidino-2-phenylindole and propidium iodide (Oncor) and observed with a Zeiss Axiophot fluorescence microscope. Hybridization was detected on chromosome 7 in 22 of 47 spreads examined. Of 89 fluorescent signals on all chromosomes, 44 (49%) were located on 7q. All signals on chromosome 7 appeared to be located at 7q22-q31.1. Hybridization is in the vicinity of the met protooncogene locus at 7q31.

  5. 21 CFR 866.4700 - Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... automated scanning microscope, image analysis system, and customized software applications for FISH assays. This device is intended for in vitro diagnostic use with FISH assays as an aid in the...

  6. Fluorescence in situ hybridization-based karyotyping of soybean translocation lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is a major crop species and a target of a substantial investment of genomic and genetic studies; yet, in contrast to other plant species, relatively few chromosomal aberrations have been identified and characterized in soybean. This is due in part to the difficulty ...

  7. Combined Fluorescent-Chromogenic In Situ Hybridization for Identification and Laser Microdissection of Interphase Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Nerea; Zabala, Amaia; Royo, Félix; García-Orad, África; Zugaza, José L.; Parada, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome territories constitute the most conspicuous feature of nuclear architecture, and they exhibit non-random distribution patterns in the interphase nucleus. We observed that in cell nuclei from humans with Down Syndrome two chromosomes 21 frequently localize proximal to one another and distant from the third chromosome. To systematically investigate whether the proximally positioned chromosomes were always the same in all cells, we developed an approach consisting of sequential FISH and CISH combined with laser-microdissection of chromosomes from the interphase nucleus and followed by subsequent chromosome identification by microsatellite allele genotyping. This approach identified proximally positioned chromosomes from cultured cells, and the analysis showed that the identity of the chromosomes proximally positioned varies. However, the data suggest that there may be a tendency of the same chromosomes to be positioned close to each other in the interphase nucleus of trisomic cells. The protocol described here represents a powerful new method for genome analysis. PMID:23565206

  8. Rapid method for measuring clastogenic fingerprints using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.

    2000-01-01

    A method is provided for determining a clastogenic signature of a sample of chromosomes by quantifying a frequency of a first type of chromosome aberration present in the sample; quantifying a frequency of a second, different type of chromosome aberration present in the sample; and comparing the frequency of the first type of chromosome aberration to the frequency of the second type of chromosome aberration. A method is also provided for using that clastogenic signature to identify a clastogenic agent or dosage to which the cells were exposed.

  9. Diagnosis of a constitutional five-chromosome rearrangement by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Tsien, F.; Shapira, E.; Carvalho, T.

    1994-09-01

    Complex chromosomal rearrangements are structural rearrangements involving at least three chromosomes and three or more chromosome breakpoints. Such karyotypes are often acquired during cancer multi-step development and in chromosome instability syndromes. However, extremely rare constitutional forms have been reported, most of which are incompatible with life. We present a 2-year-old female with de novo complex rearrangement consisting of five chromosomes and nine breakpoints. Clinical evaluation at two years of age revealed a weight of 5 kg, length of 66 cm, and had circumference of 38 cm, all below the 5th percentile, microcephaly, trigonocephaly, epicanthal folds, inguinal hernia, left clubfoot, hypertonicity, and developmental delay. The neurological examination revealed chorea-acanthocytosis and psychomotor delay. Cultured lymphocytes and fibroblasts revealed a karyotype consisting of five derivative chromosomes. The metaphases were further analyzed by FISH using chromosome-specific libraries and telomeric probes in order to delineate the composition of the rearranged chromosomes; FISH results demonstrated a karyotype of: 46,XX,1pter{r_arrow}1q25::1q42.1{r_arrow}1qter, 2pter{r_arrow}q32.3::1q32.3{r_arrow}2q41::2q37.3{r_arrow}2qter, 7qter{r_arrow}7q21.2::6q22.3{r_arrow}6qter::1q31{r_arrow}1q32.3::6p23{r_arrow}6q22.3, 7pter{r_arrow}7q21.1::6p23{r_arrow}6pter, 2q33{r_arrow}2q37, 1::9p21{r_arrow}9qter. This analysis demonstrates the usefulness of FISH in characterizing complex chromosome rearrangements otherwise difficult to correctly interpret using classical cytogenetics alone.

  10. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and spectral imaging analysisof human oocytes and first polar bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.; Weier, Jingly F.; Oter Renom, Maria; Zheng,Xuezhong; Colls, Pere; Nureddin, Aida; Pham, Chau D.; Chu, Lisa W.; Racowsky, Catherine; Munne, Santiago

    2004-10-06

    We investigated the frequencies of abnormalities involving either chromosome 1, 16, 18 or 21 in failed-fertilized human oocytes.While abnormalities involving chromosome 16 showed an age-dependant increase, results for the other chromosomes did not show statistically significant differences between the three age groups <35 yrs, 35-39 yrs, and >39 yrs. The scoring of four chromosomes is likely to underestimate the true rate of aneuploid cells. Thus, for a pilot study investigating a more comprehensive analysis of oocytes and their corresponding first polar bodies (1PBs), we developed a novel 8-probe chromosome enumeration scheme using FISH and SIm.

  11. Partial trisomy 11q involving chromosome 1 detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    McCorquodale, M.; Bereziouk, O.; McCorquodale, D.J.

    1994-09-01

    Partial trisomy 11q was detected in an infant delivered 3-4 weeks prematurely. The phenotype included slanted palpebral fissures, high arched palate, developmental delay, microcephaly, and cardiac defects, all of which occur in the majority of cases with this syndrome. Other features included a column-shaped skull, preauricular pit, single palmar crease, short, broad great toes, flat occiput, unilateral kidney agenesis, and strabismus. Chromosomes obtained from peripheral blood cells revealed the presence of extra material on the long arm of chromosome 1. The G-banding pattern of this extra material indicated that it might be derived from chromosome 1 or 11. Chromosomal {open_quotes}paints{close_quotes} showed that it was not chromosome 1 material, but was chromosome 11 material extending from band q21 to qter. Partial trisomy 11q arising from translocation of the 11q material to chromosome 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 13, 17, 21, 22, and X has been reported previously, whereas translocation to chromosome 1 has not. The chromosome to which the 11q material is translocated does not alter the most frequent features of the partial trisomy 11q syndrome, but may influence other less common features.

  12. Interphase study by fluorescence in situ hybridization of spermatozoa of a paracentric inversion heterozygote

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, J.K.; Best, R.G.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies of peripheral lymphocytes were initiated on a couple with a history of three spontaneous 1st trimester losses and oligospermia. The results revealed the woman to have a normal female karyotype. The man had a karyotype of 46,XY,inv(2)(q14.2q24.3). Interphase sperm studies were offered as an attempt to quantify the relative proportion of sperm with acentric and dicentric chromosome No. 2 in response to the couple`s concern that chromosomally unbalanced sperm resulting from recombination of the inversion was the primary cause of pregnancy losses. Slides were prepared and processed as previously described. A two-color probe cocktail consisting of a biotinylated {alpha}-satellite probe for No. 2 and a digoxigenin-labeled probe for {alpha}-satellite No. 17 as an internal control was employed. Among 496 cells with a single signal for chromosome No. 17, we observed 2 with no signal for chromsome No. 2, 492 with a single signal for No. 2, and 2 cells with 2 signals for No. 2. These findings indicate that the proportion of unbalanced recombinant sperm is probably under 1%, and that other factors are likely to be involved in the etiology of this couple`s pregnancy losses.

  13. Identification of a ring chromosome as a ring 8 using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) in a child with multiple congenital anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.G.; Roback, E.W.; Allen, G.A.

    1995-07-03

    We read with interest the report by Melnyk and Dewald of a small supernumerary ring chromosome 8 identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in a child with developmental delay and minor anomalies. Although ring chromosomes resulting in loss of parts of chromosome 8 have been reported, Melnyk and Dewald reported the first small ring chromosome 8 diagnosed by FISH. Previously nonsatellited markers derived from chromosomes 1, 3, 6, 9, 11, 13-16, 18, 20, 21, and X have been identified using FISH. Their study illustrated the value of FISH techniques in identifying the chromosomal source of markers or rings.

  14. Use of Combined Microautoradiography and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization To Determine Carbon Metabolism in Mixed Natural Communities of Uncultured Bacteria from the Genus Achromatium

    PubMed Central

    Gray, N. D.; Howarth, R.; Pickup, R. W.; Jones, J. Gwyn; Head, I. M.

    2000-01-01

    Combined microautoradiography and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to investigate carbon metabolism in uncultured bacteria from the genus Achromatium. All of the Achromatium species identified in a freshwater sediment from Rydal Water, Cumbria, United Kingdom, which were distinguishable only by FISH, assimilated both [14C]bicarbonate and [14C]acetate. This extends previous findings that Achromatium spp. present at another location could only utilize organic carbon sources. Achromatium spp., therefore, probably exhibit a range of physiologies, i.e., facultative chemolithoautotrophy, mixotrophy, and chemoorganoheterotrophy, similar to other large sulfur bacteria (e.g., Beggiatoa spp.). PMID:11010908

  15. Warthin-like Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma: A Combined Study of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization and Whole-slide Imaging.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Kenichiro; Ito, Yohei; Masaki, Ayako; Fujii, Kana; Beppu, Shintaro; Sakakibara, Takeo; Takino, Hisashi; Takase, Hiroshi; Ijichi, Kei; Shimozato, Kazuo; Inagaki, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    There has been some debate as to whether a subset of metaplastic Warthin tumors (mWTs) harbor the mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC)-associated CRTC1-MAML2 fusion. We analyzed 15 tumors originally diagnosed as mWT (mWT-like tumors), 2 of which had concurrent MECs. We looked for the CRTC1/3-MAML2 fusion transcripts and performed immunohistochemistry for p63 and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the MAML2 split. To localize MAML2 split-positive cells at the cellular level, whole tumor tissue sections were digitalized (whole-slide imaging [WSI]). The CRTC1-MAML2, but not CRTC3-MAML2 was detected in 5/15 mWT-like tumors. FISH-WSI results showed that all epithelial cells harbored the MAML2 split in fusion-positive mWT-like tumors and were totally negative in fusion-negative mWT-like tumors. A review of the hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides showed that morphology of the "metaplastic" epithelium was virtually indistinguishable between fusion-positive and fusion-negative tumors. However, oncocytic bilayered tumor epithelium, characteristic to typical WT, was always found somewhere in the fusion-negative tumors but not in the fusion-positive tumors. This distinguishing histologic finding enabled 5 pathologists to easily differentiate the 2 tumor groups with 100% accuracy. The age and sex distribution of fusion-positive mWT-like tumor cases was similar to that of fusion-positive MEC cases and significantly different from those of fusion-negative mWT-like tumor and typical WT cases. In addition, only fusion-positive mWT-like tumors possessed concurrent low-grade MECs. In conclusion, a subset of mWT-like tumors were positive for the CRTC1-MAML2 fusion and had many features that are more in accord with MEC than with WT. The term Warthin-like MEC should be considered for fusion-positive mWT-like tumors. PMID:26457352

  16. Novel karyotype in the Ullrich-Turner syndrome - 45,X/46,X,r(X)/46,X,dic(X) - investigated with fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Robson, L.; Jackson, J.; Cowell, C.; Sillence, D.; Smith, A.

    1994-04-15

    A 10-year-old girl with Ullrich-Turner syndrome was found to have the novel karyotype 45,X/46,X,r(X)(p11q11)/46,X,dic(X)(p11). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with the {alpha} satellite X centromere probe established the origin of the small ring chromosome. Scanning a large number of cells by interphase FISH showed that the dicentric (X) was the least prevalent cell line. The common breakpoint of Xp11 suggests a sequence of errors as the mechanism whereby these 3 distinct cell lines have arisen. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Assessment of retrospective dose estimation, with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), of six victims previously exposed to accidental ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing-Jie; Lu, Xue; Zhao, Xiao-Tao; Feng, Jiang-Bin; Lü, Yu-Min; Jiang, En-Hai; Zhang, Shu-Lan; Chen, De-Qing; Jia, Ting-Zhen; Liang, Li

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the use of the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) translocation assay for retrospective dose estimation of acute accidental exposure to radiation in the past. Reciprocal translocation analysis by FISH with three whole-chromosome probes was performed on normal peripheral blood samples. Samples were irradiated with 0-5Gy (60)Co γ-rays in vitro, and dose-effect curves were established. FISH-based translocation analyses for six accident victims were then performed, and biological doses were estimated retrospectively by comparison with the dose-effect curves. Reconstructed doses by FISH were compared with estimated doses obtained by analysis of di-centrics performed soon after exposure, or with dose estimates from tooth-enamel electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) data obtained at the same time as the FISH analysis. Follow-up FISH analyses for an adolescent victim were performed. Results showed that dose-effect curves established in the present study follow a linear-quadratic model, regardless of the background translocation frequency. Estimated doses according to two dose-effect curves for all six victims were similar. FISH dose estimations of three adult victims exposed to accidental radiation less than a decade prior to analysis (3, 6, or 7 years ago) were consistent with those estimated with tooth-enamel EPR measurements or analyses of di-centrics. Estimated doses of two other adult victims exposed to radiation over a decade prior to analysis (16 or 33 years ago) were underestimated and two to three times lower than the values obtained from analysis of di-centrics or tooth-enamel EPR. Follow-up analyses of the adolescent victim showed that doses estimated by FISH analysis decrease rapidly over time. Therefore, the accuracy of dose estimates by FISH is acceptable only when analysis is performed less than 7 years after exposure. Measurements carried out more than a decade after exposure through FISH analysis resulted in underestimation of the biological doses compared with values obtained through analysis of di-centrics and tooth-enamel EPR. PMID:24246721

  18. 3p22.1 and 10q22.3 Deletions Detected by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH)

    PubMed Central

    Yendamuri, Sai; Vaporciyan, Ara A.; Zaidi, Tanweer; Feng, Lei; Fernandez, Ricardo; Bekele, Nebiyou B.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Jiang, Feng; Mehran, Reza J.; Rice, David C.; Spitz, Margaret R.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Walsh, Garrett L.; Roth, Jack A.; Katz, Ruth L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Our objective was to study the feasibility of detecting chromosomal deletions at 3p22.1 and 10q22.3 by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and to examine their distribution in different areas of the airway in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Methods Brush biopsies from the mainstem bronchus on the normal side contralateral to the tumor (NBB) and mainstem bronchus on the tumor side (TBB) were obtained from 122 patients who underwent surgical resection. Touch preparations from the tumor (TTP), normal lung parenchyma, and bronchi adjacent to the tumor were also obtained. Two FISH assays using probes complementary to 3p22.1 and 10q22.3 were used to detect deletions. Results NBB showed a relatively low deletion rate of 3p22.1 and 10q22.3 compared with TTP (p < 0.0001). TBB showed a significantly higher rate of deletions compared with NBB but lower than TTP from the tumor (p < 0.05) for both 3p22.1 and 10q22.3. A significantly higher deletion rate was seen at TTP compared with normal lung parenchyma at both the 3p22.1 and 10 q22.3 (p < 0.0001). Correlations were seen between the deletion rates of TTP and TBB at 3p22.1 (ρ = 0.61, p < 0.0001) and between TTP and bronchi adjacent to the tumor at 10q22.3 (ρ = 0.64, p < 0.0001). Conclusion Deletions of the 3p22.1 and 10q22.3 regions can be reliably detected by FISH. As one progresses from the contralateral normal bronchus to the bronchus on the side of tumor and the tumor itself, the percentage of chromosomal deletions increases in a statistically significant fashion. This suggests that, FISH analysis of bronchoscopic brushes may be useful for identifying patients at high risk for developing non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:18758299

  19. Chromosome in situ hybridization on formalin-fixed mammary tissue using non-isotopic, non-fluorescent probes: technical considerations and biological implications.

    PubMed

    Dhingra, K; Sahin, A; Supak, J; Kim, S Y; Hortobagyi, G; Hittelman, W N

    1992-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization techniques have provided an important tool for interphase cytogenetic studies of human neoplasms. However, these techniques are difficult to use on formalin-fixed archival tissue sections. We describe here a non-fluorescent, non-isotopic in situ hybridization (ISH) approach that is easily applicable to paraffin-embedded breast tissue sections. The technical steps that must be monitored and individualized to optimize signal generation and detection are discussed. This ISH technique has several advantages over fluorescent detection methods. The signal obtained can be viewed using an ordinary light microscope and does not fade with time. More importantly, the signal is observed and analyzed in the context of tissue morphology. The technique permits detection of numerical chromosomal abnormalities not only in malignant but also in apparently normal and potentially premalignant mammary tissue. This may allow identification of focal genetic abnormalities as well as field-defects and enable analysis of their evolution during the multistep transformation to mammary neoplasm. This technique is also suitable for analysis of tumor heterogeneity and the correlation of numerical chromosomal aberrations with histologic, immunocytochemical, and clinical features of breast tumors. PMID:1463859

  20. Delineation by fluorescence in situ hybridization of a single hemizygous chromosomal region associated with aposporous embryo sac formation in Pennisetum squamulatum and Cenchrus ciliaris.

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Shailendra; Chen, Zhenbang; Conner, Joann A; Akiyama, Yukio; Hanna, Wayne W; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2003-01-01

    Apomixis is a means of asexual reproduction by which plants produce embryos without meiosis and fertilization; thus the embryo is of clonal, maternal origin. We previously reported molecular markers showing no recombination with the trait for aposporous embryo sac development in Pennisetum squamulatum and Cenchrus ciliaris, and the collective single-dose alleles defined an apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to confirm that the ASGR is a hemizygous genomic region and to determine its chromosomal position with respect to rDNA loci and centromere repeats. We also documented chromosome transmission from P. squamulatum in several backcrosses (BCs) with P. glaucum using genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). One to three complete P. squamulatum chromosomes were detected in BC(6), but only one of the three hybridized with the ASGR-linked markers. In P. squamulatum and in all BCs examined, the apospory-linked markers were located in the distal region of the short arm of a single chromosome. All alien chromosomes behaved as univalents during meiosis and segregated randomly in BC(3) and later BC generations, but presence of the ASGR-carrier chromosome alone was sufficient to confer apospory. FISH results support our hypotheses that hemizygosity, proximity to centromeric sequences, and chromosome structure may all play a role in low recombination in the ASGR. PMID:12663545

  1. A high-resolution cytogenetic map of human chromosome 5: Localization of 206 new cosmid markers by direct R-banding fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Ei-Ichi; Hitomi, Akitsu ); Nakamura, Yusuke )

    1993-07-01

    The authors have constructed a high-resolution cytogenetic map of human chromosome 5 with 206 new cosmid clones by direct R-banding fluorescence in situ hybridization. The fluorescent signals of 206 clones were evenly distributed throughout chromosome 5, although they were sublocalized preferentially to R-positive bands. This high-resolution cytogenetic map with an average distance of nearly 1 Mb will serve as an important resource for construction of a genetic linkage map, which is essential for positional cloning of responsible genes. Moreover, these mapping data provide many useful landmarks for the construction of contig maps of chromosome 5, as required in the Human Genome Project. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Double and triple in situ hybridization for coexpression studies: combined fluorescent and chromogenic detection of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and serotonin receptor subtype mRNAs expressed at different abundance levels.

    PubMed

    Bonn, Maria; Schmitt, Angelika; Asan, Esther

    2012-01-01

    Multiple fluorescence in situ hybridization is the method of choice for studies aimed at determining simultaneous production of signal transduction molecules and neuromodulators in neurons. In our analyses of the monoamine receptor mRNA expression of peptidergic neurons in the rat telencephalon, double tyramide-signal-amplified fluorescence in situ hybridization delivered satisfactory results for coexpression analysis of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and serotonin receptor 2C (5-HT2C) mRNA, a receptor subtype expressed at high-to-moderate abundance in the regions analyzed. However, expression of 5-HT1A mRNA, which is expressed at comparatively low abundance in many telencephalic areas, could not be unequivocally identified in NPY mRNA-reactive neurons due to high background and poor signal-to-noise ratio in fluorescent receptor mRNA detections. Parallel chromogenic in situ hybridization provided clear labeling for 5-HT1A mRNA and additionally offered the possibility to monitor the chromogen deposition at regular time intervals to determine the optimal signal-to-noise ratio. We first developed a double labeling protocol combining fluorescence and chromogenic in situ hybridization and subsequently expanded this variation to combine double fluorescence and chromogenic in situ hybridization for triple labelings. With this method, we documented expression of 5-HT2C and/or 5-HT1A in subpopulations of telencephalic NPY-producing neurons. The method developed in the present study appears suitable for conventional light and fluorescence microscopy, combines advantages of fluorescence and chromogenic in situ hybridization protocols and thus provides a reliable non-radioactive alternative to previously published multiple labeling methods for coexpression analyses in which one mRNA species requires highly sensitive detection. PMID:22075564

  3. Quantitative fluorescent in-situ hybridization: a hypothesized competition mode between two dominant bacteria groups in hydrogen-producing anaerobic sludge processes.

    PubMed

    Huang, C-L; Chen, C-C; Lin, C-Y; Liu, W-T

    2009-01-01

    Two hydrogen-producing continuous flow stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) fed respectively with glucose and sucrose were investigated by polymerase chain reaction-denatured gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH). The substrate was fed in a continuous mode decreased from hydraulic retention time (HRT) 10 hours to 6, 5, 4, 3, and 2 hours. Quantitative fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) observations further demonstrated that two morphotypes of bacteria dominated both microbial communities. One was long rod bacteria which can be targeted either by Chis150 probe designed to hybridize the gram positive low G + C bacteria or the specific oligonucleotide probe Lg10-6. The probe Lg10-6, affiliated with Clostridium pasteurianum, was designed and then checked with other reference organisms. The other type, unknown group, which cannot be detected by Chis150 was curved rod bacteria. Notably, the population ratios of the two predominant groups reflected the different operational performance of the two reactors, such as hydrogen producing rates, substrate turnover rates and metabolites compositions. Therefore, a competition mode of the two dominant bacteria groups was hypothesized. In the study, 16S rRNA-based gene library of hydrogen-producing microbial communities was established. The efficiency of hydrogen yields was correlated with substrates (glucose or sucrose), HRT, metabolites compositions (acetate, propionate, butyrate and ethanol), thermal pre-treatment (seed biomass was heated at 100 degrees C for 45 minutes), and microbial communities in the bioreactor, not sludge sources (municipal sewage sludge, alcohol-processing sludge, or bean-processing sludge). The designed specific oligonucleotide probe Lg10-6 also provides us a useful and fast molecular tool to screen hydrogen-producing microbial communities in the future research. PMID:19474483

  4. Multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization with centromeric DNA probes as a new approach to distinguish chromosome breakage from aneuploidy in interphase cells and micronuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Eastmond, D.A.; Rupa, D.S.; Chen, H.W.; Hasegawa, L.

    1993-12-31

    Chromosomal abnormalities are believed to contribute significantly to human reproductive failure, carcinogenesis and other pathophysiological conditions. For example, approximately 15% of recognized pregnancies terminate in spontaneous abortion, and of these approximately 30% have been shown to be chromosomally abnormal. The contribution of chromosomal abnormalities to early embryonic and fetal death appears to decrease with gestational age, suggesting that as many as 67% of the aborted embryos in early embryonic deaths are chromosomally abnormal. Furthermore, clinically significant chromosomal abnormalities can also be found to be present in approximately 0.58 to 0.67% of live births. These figures indicate that within a given year, hundreds of thousands of chromosomally abnormal babies will be born throughout the world and additional millions of chromosomally abnormal embryos will have been spontaneously aborted. For the past several years, our research has focused on utilizing new molecular cytogenetic techniques to develop assays for detecting aneuploidy-inducing agents in mammalian cells. One approach that we have sucessfully employed involves the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific DNA probes to determine the number of copies of a representative chromosome present within the nucleus following chemical exposure. DNA sequences (probes) which hybridize to blocks of repetitive centromeric DNA on specific chromosomes have been developed for most of the human chromosomes. In situ hybridization with these probes results in the staining of a compact chromosomal region which can be easily detected in interphase nuclei. The presence of 3 (or more) hybridization domains in an interphase nucleus indicates the presence of three centromeric regions and has been presumed to indicate that three copies of the entire chromosome were present in the nucleus.

  5. In situ preparation and fluorescence quenching properties of polythiophene/ZnO nanocrystals hybrids through atom-transfer radical polymerization and hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiaoming; Zhang, Lin; Chen, Yiwang; Li, Fan; Zhou, Weihua

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, a new approach for in situ preparing nanocomposites of conjugated polymers (CPs) and semiconductor nanocrystals was developed. Polythiophene grafted poly(zinc methacrylate) (PTh-g-PZMA) copolymer was synthesized by atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of zinc methacrylate (ZMA) initiated from the macroinitiator poly(2,5-(3-(bromoisopropyl-carbonyl-oxymethylene) thiophene)) (PTh-Br) with pendant initiator groups. Subsequently, the polythiophene grafted poly(methacrylate)/ZnO (PTh-g-PMA/ZnO) hybrid heterojunction nanocomposites were successfully prepared by in situ hydrolysis of PTh-g-PZMA casting films in alkaline aqueous solution. The structures of PTh-Br, PTh-g-PZMA and PTh-g-PMA/ZnO were confirmed by the proton nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1H NMR) spectra, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphologies of PTh-g-PMA/ZnO films prepared for different hydrolysis time were observed in the cross-sections by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The SEM images revealed that ZnO nanocrystals were uniformly dispersed in polymers without any aggregation and the appearances of ZnO nanocrystals changed from nanoparticles to nanorods with the hydrolysis treatment time increasing. The optical properties of these nanocomposites were studied by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. UV-vis absorption spectroscopy showed that the adsorption band of PTh-g-PMA/ZnO hybrids was broader than that of PTh-Br, implying that the existence of ZnO nanocrystals increased the optical absorption region of hybrids. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the hybrids showed that fluorescence quenching occurred in PTh-g-PMA/ZnO blends and a maximum of 85% of the fluorescence intensity quenched in the PTh-g-PMA/ZnO obtained from treatment in NaOH aqueous solution for 2 h, which revealed the existence of photo-induced charge transfer between the polythiophene chains and ZnO. These results indicated that the hybrid heterojunction nanocomposites could be promising candidates for photovoltaic applications.

  6. Comparative mapping of DNA probes derived from the V{sub k} immunoglobulin gene regions on human and great ape chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, N.; Wienberg, J.; Ermert, K.

    1995-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of cosmid clones of human V{sub K} gene regions to human and primate chromosomes contributed to the dating of chromosome reorganizations in evolution. A clone from the K locus at 2p11-p12 (cos 106) hybridized to the assumed homologous chromosome bands in the chimpanzees Pan troglodytes (PTR) and P. paniscus (PPA), the Gorilla gorilla (GGO), and the orangutan Pongo Pygmaeus (PPY). Human and both chimpanzees differed from gorilla and orangutan by the mapping of cos 170, a clone derived from chromosome 2cen-q11.2; the transposition of this orphon to the other side of the centromere can, therefore, be dated after the human/chimpanzee and gorilla divergence. Hybridization to homologous bands was also found with a cosmid clone containing a V{sub K}I orphon located on chromosome 1 (cos 115, main signal at 1q31-q32), although the probe is not fully unique. Also, a clone derived from the orphon V{sub K} region on chromosome 22q11 (cos 121) hybridized to the homologous bands in the great apes. This indicates that the orphons on human chromosomes 1 and 22 had been translocated early in primate evolution. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Identification of the origin of marker chromosomes by two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction in azoospermic patients.

    PubMed

    Wei, C L; Cheng, J L; Yang, W C; Li, L Y; Cheng, H C; Fu, J J

    2015-01-01

    Y chromosomal microdeletions at the azoospermia factor locus and chromosome abnormalities have been implicated as the major causes of idiopathic male infertility. A marker chromosome is a structurally abnormal chromosome in which no part can be identified by cytogenetics. In this study, to identify the origin of the marker chromosomes and to perform a genetic diagnosis of patients with azoospermia, two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques were carried out. The marker chromosomes for the two patients with azoospermia originated in the Y chromosome; it was ascertained that the karyotype of both patients was 46,X, ish del(Y)(q11)(DYZ3+, DXZ1-). The combination of two-color FISH and PCR techniques is an important method for the identification of the origin of marker chromosomes. Thus, genetic counseling and a clear genetic diagnosis of patients with azoospermia before intracytoplasmic sperm injection or other clinical managements are important. PMID:26600507

  8. Detection and quantification of Epstein-Barr virus EBER1 in EBV-infected cells by fluorescent in situ hybridization and flow cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowe, R. P.; Cubbage, M. L.; Sams, C. F.; Pierson, D. L.; Barrett, A. D.

    1998-01-01

    A rapid and highly sensitive fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) assay was developed to detect Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-infected cells in peripheral blood. Multiple fluorescein-labeled antisense oligonucleotide probes were designed to hybridize to the EBER1 transcript, which is highly expressed in latently infected cells. After a rapid (30 min) hybridization, the cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. EBER1 was detected in several positive control cell lines that have variable numbers of EBV genome copies. No EBER1 was detected in two known EBV-negative cell lines. Northern blot analyses confirmed the presence and quantity of EBER1 transcripts in each cell line. This method was used to quantify the number of EBV-infected cells in peripheral blood from a patient with chronic mononucleosis. These results indicate that EBV-infected cells can be detected at the single cell level, and that this assay can be used to quantify the number of EBV-infected cells in clinical samples.

  9. Clinical and cytogenetic findings in seven cases of inverted duplication of 8p with evidence of a telomeric deletion using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Wen-Jun; Callif-Daley, F.; Zapata, M.C.; Miller, M.E.

    1995-09-11

    We report on the clinical and cytogenetic findings in 7 cases of inverted duplication of region 8p11.2-p23. The phenotype of inv dup (8p) compiled from this series and the literature (N = 29) consists of severe mental retardation (100%), minor facial alterations (97%), agenesis of the corpus callosum (80%), hypotonia (66%), orthopedic abnormalities (58%), scoliosis/kyphosis (40%), and congenital heart defect (26%). A telomeric deletion of region 8p23.3-pter was confirmed in 3 of our cases studied using fluorescent in situ hybridization with a telomeric probe for 8p. Thus, these karyotypes are inv dup del(8) (qter{r_arrow} p23.1::p23.1{r_arrow}p11.2:). Our findings suggest that most cases of inv dup(8p) probably have a telomeric deletion. 20 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Differentiation of Methanosaeta concilii and Methanocarcina barkeri in anaerobic mesophilic granular sludge by fluorescent in situ hybridization and confocal scanning laser microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rocheleau, S.; Greer, C.W.; Cantin, C.; Laramee, L.; Guiot, S.R.; Lawrence, J.R.

    1999-05-01

    Oligonucleotide probes, designed from genes coding for 16S rRNA, were developed to differentiate Methanosaeta concilii, Methanosarcina barkeri, and mesophilic methanogens. All M. concilii oligonucleotide probes (designated MS1, MS2, and MS5) hybridized specifically with the target DNA, but MS5 was the most specific M. concilii oligonucleotide probe. Methanosarcina barkeri oligonucleotide probes (designated MB1, MB3, and MB4) hybridized with different Methanosarcina species. The MB4 probe specifically detected Methanosarcina barkeri, and the MB3 probe detected the presence of al mesophilic Methanosarcina species. These new oligonucleotide probes facilitated the identification, localization, and quantification of the specific relative abundance of M. concilii and Methanosarcina barkeri, which play important roles in methanogenesis. The combined use of fluorescent in situ hybridization with confocal scanning laser microscopy demonstrated that anaerobic granule topography depends on granule origin and feeding. Protein-fed granules showed no layered structure with a random distribution of M. concilii. In contrast, a layered structure developed in methanol-enriched granules, where M. barkeri growth was induced in an outer layer. This outer layer was followed by a layer composed of M. concilii, with an inner core of M. concilii and other bacteria.

  11. Considerations in the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and confocal laser scanning microscopy to characterize rumen methanogens and define their spatial distributions.

    PubMed

    Valle, Edith R; Henderson, Gemma; Janssen, Peter H; Cox, Faith; Alexander, Trevor W; McAllister, Tim A

    2015-06-01

    In this study, methanogen-specific coenzyme F420 autofluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to identify rumen methanogens and define their spatial distribution in free-living, biofilm-, and protozoa-associated microenvironments. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with temperature-controlled hybridization was used in an attempt to describe methanogen diversity. A heat pretreatment (65 °C, 1 h) was found to be a noninvasive method to increase probe access to methanogen RNA targets. Despite efforts to optimize FISH, 16S rRNA methanogen-specific probes, including Arch915, bound to some cells that lacked F420, possibly identifying uncharacterized Methanomassiliicoccales or reflecting nonspecific binding to other members of the rumen bacterial community. A probe targeting RNA from the methanogenesis-specific methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcr) gene was shown to detect cultured Methanosarcina cells with signal intensities comparable to those of 16S rRNA probes. However, the probe failed to hybridize with the majority of F420-emitting rumen methanogens, possibly because of differences in cell wall permeability among methanogen species. Methanogens were shown to integrate into microbial biofilms and to exist as ecto- and endosymbionts with rumen protozoa. Characterizing rumen methanogens and defining their spatial distribution may provide insight into mitigation strategies for ruminal methanogenesis. PMID:25924182

  12. Use of fluorescence in situ hybridization (fish) to study chromosomal damage induced by radiation and bromodeoxyuridine in human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wilt, S.R.; Burgess, A.C.; Lawrence, T.S.

    1994-11-15

    Although the thymidine analog radiation sensitizer bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) increases radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations, it is not known whether these aberrations are uniformly distributed among chromosomes. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we carried out a study to test the hypothesis that BrdUrd-induced radiosensitization may be mediated by nonuniform chromsomal damage. Log phase HT29 human colon cancer cells were exposed to 10 {mu}M BrdUrd (or media alone) for one cell cycle, and the G1 cells were separated by centrifugal elutriation. Half of the control and BrdUrd samples were irradiated with 8 Gy. Cells were then incubated for 24-28 h, and metaphase spreads were prepared. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed using paint probes for chromosomes 1 and 4. We found that radiation induced 0.20 aberrations per chromosome in chromosome 4. Based on the ratio of the relative lengths of chromosome 1-4(1.34), it was predicted that chromosome 1 would have {approx}0.26 aberrations per chromosome. However, we observed 0.39 aberrations per chromosome 1, which was significantly greater than the predicted (p<0.001 by chi-square). Incubation with BrdUrd prior to irradiation significantly increased the aberrations found in chromosome 1 (by a factor of 1.4) and chromosome 4 (by a factor of 1.9) compared to radiation alone (p<0.001 for both chromosome 1 and 4). This study demonstrates that individual chromosomes in human colon cancer cells show significantly different rates of aberration after irradiation. Furthermore, the BrdUrd-mediated increase in radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations may not be uniform among chromosomes. 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Mapping of the human thromboxane synthase gene (TBXAS1) to chromosome 7q34-q35 by two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, M.B.; Baek, Seung Joon; Purtell, D.C.; Schwartz, S. ); Shen, Rong Fong Maryland Biotechnology Institute, Baltimore, MD )

    1993-06-01

    Thromboxane synthase (TS) catalyzes the conversion of the prostaglandin endoperoxide into thromboxane A[sub 2] (TxA[sub 2]), a potent vasoconstrictor and inducer of platelet aggregation. In concert with prostacyclin, TxA[sub 2] plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of hemostasis. Deficiency of platelet TS activity has been shown to result in bleeding disorders. The potent effect of TxA[sub 2] on platelet function and vascular activity suggests a possible involvement of TS in normal and pathophysiological conditions such as cardiovascular disease. To aid in establishing the correlation of TS to disease states, the authors localized the human TS gene (TBXAS1) to chromosome 7q34-q35 using dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Fluorescence in situ hybridization mapping of 25 markers on distal human chromosome 2q surrounding the human Waardenburg syndrome, type I (WS1) locus (PAX3 gene)

    SciTech Connect

    Lu-Kuo, J.; Ward, D.C. ); Spritz, R.A. )

    1993-04-01

    A total of 25 DNA markers located on the long arm of human chromosome 2 have been mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization. This region includes the locus for Waardenburg syndrome, type I (WS1), recently found to result, at least in some cases, from mutations of the PAX3 gene. The authors have established that the chromosomal location of the PAX3 gene is within band 2q36. They also show that three markers in the distal 2q region, including the PAX3 gene, are deleted in a patient with phenotypic features of WS1 associated with a de novo deletion (2)(q35q36.2). The improved physical map of this region should facilitate linkage mapping and positional cloning of loci on distal 2q. 46 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Mosaic vs. nonmosaic trisomy 9: Report of a liveborn infant evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Cantu, E.S.; Eicher, D.J.; Shashidhar Pai, G.; Donahue, C.J.; Harley, R.A.

    1996-04-24

    We report on a newborn infant with multiple congenital anomalies and apparent nonmosaic trisomy 9 in the blood (by conventional cytogenetic studies) who died shortly after birth. Clinical observations at birth and autopsy are compared with phenotypes of mosaic and nonmosaic trisomy 9 cases reported previously. Unlike the initial cytogenetic analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies of metaphase and interphase blood cells and skin fibroblasts detected the presence of euploid and trisomy 9 cells. These results suggest that earlier reports of trisomy 9, which relied on conventional chromosome analysis of a few metaphase cells and/or only one tissue type, may not have excluded mosaicism, and that trisomy 9 may be viable only in the mosaic state. 39 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of the interactions between honeybee larvae and Paenibacillus larvae, the causative agent of American foulbrood of honeybees (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Yue, Dominique; Nordhoff, Marcel; Wieler, Lothar H; Genersch, Elke

    2008-06-01

    American foulbrood (AFB) is a bacterial disease of honeybee larvae caused by the spore-forming bacterium Paenibacillus larvae. Although AFB and its aetiological agent are described now for more than a century, the general and molecular pathogenesis of this notifiable disease is poorly understood. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) performed with P. larvae-specific, 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes to analyse the early steps in the pathogenesis of American foulbrood. The following chain of events could be demonstrated: (i) the spores germinate in the midgut lumen, (ii) the vegetative bacteria massively proliferate within the midgut before, and (iii) they start to locally breach the epithelium and invade the haemocoel. The paracellular route was shown to be the main mechanism for invasion contrasting earlier hypotheses of phagocytosis of P. larvae. Invasion coincided with the death of the host implicating that the penetration of the midgut epithelium is a critical step determining the time of death. PMID:18331334

  17. Cross-Species Bacterial Artificial Chromosome–Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization Painting of the Tomato and Potato Chromosome 6 Reveals Undescribed Chromosomal Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaomin; Szinay, Dóra; Lang, Chunting; Ramanna, Munikote S.; van der Vossen, Edwin A. G.; Datema, Erwin; Lankhorst, René Klein; de Boer, Jan; Peters, Sander A.; Bachem, Christian; Stiekema, Willem; Visser, Richard G. F.; de Jong, Hans; Bai, Yuling

    2008-01-01

    Ongoing genomics projects of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and potato (S. tuberosum) are providing unique tools for comparative mapping studies in Solanaceae. At the chromosomal level, bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) can be positioned on pachytene complements by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on homeologous chromosomes of related species. Here we present results of such a cross-species multicolor cytogenetic mapping of tomato BACs on potato chromosomes 6 and vice versa. The experiments were performed under low hybridization stringency, while blocking with Cot-100 was essential in suppressing excessive hybridization of repeat signals in both within-species FISH and cross-species FISH of tomato BACs. In the short arm we detected a large paracentric inversion that covers the whole euchromatin part with breakpoints close to the telomeric heterochromatin and at the border of the short arm pericentromere. The long arm BACs revealed no deviation in the colinearity between tomato and potato. Further comparison between tomato cultivars Cherry VFNT and Heinz 1706 revealed colinearity of the tested tomato BACs, whereas one of the six potato clones (RH98-856-18) showed minor putative rearrangements within the inversion. Our results present cross-species multicolor BAC–FISH as a unique tool for comparative genetic studies across Solanum species. PMID:18791231

  18. Reliable protocols for whole-mount fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum: a comprehensive survey and analysis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chen-yo; Cook, Charles E; Lin, Gee-way; Huang, Ting-Yu; Chang, Chun-che

    2014-06-01

    RNA in situ hybridization (ISH), including chromogenic ISH (CISH) and fluorescent ISH (FISH), has become a powerful tool for revealing the spatial distribution of gene transcripts in model organisms. Previously, we developed a robust protocol for whole-mount RNA CISH in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, an emerging insect genomic model. In order to improve the resolving capacity of gene detection, we comprehensively surveyed current protocols of whole-mount RNA-FISH and developed protocols that allow, using confocal microscopy, clearer visualization of target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) - including those subcellularly localized and those with spatially overlapping expression. We find that Fast dye-based substrate fluorescence (SF), tyramide signal amplification (TSA), and TSA Plus all enable identifying gene expression thanks to multiplex amplification of fluorescent signals. By contrast, methods of direct fluorescence (DF) do not allow visualizing signals. Detection of a single gene target was achieved with SF and TSA Plus for most mRNAs, whereas TSA only allowed visualization of abundant transcripts such as Apvas1 and Appiwi2 in the germ cells. For detection of multiple gene targets using double FISH, we recommend: (i) TSA/TSA, rather than TSA Plus/TSA Plus for colocalized mRNAs abundantly expressed in germ cells, as proteinase K treatment can be omitted; and (ii) SF/TSA Plus for other gene targets such as Apen1 and Apen2 as inactivation of enzyme conjugates is not required. SF/SF is not ideal for double FISH experiments due to signal blurring. Based on these new conditions for RNA-FISH, we have obtained a better understanding of germline specification and embryonic segmentation in the pea aphid. We anticipate that the RNA-FISH protocols for the pea aphid may also be used for other aphids and possibly other insect species, thus expanding the range of species from which useful insights into development and evolution may be obtained. PMID:24850784

  19. Visual demonstration of the organization of the human complement C4 and 21-hydroxylase genes by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Suto, Yumiko; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Watanabe, Yoshihisa; Hirai, Momoki

    1996-04-15

    We analyzed the gene organization in the complement component C4 and 21-hydroxylase (21OH) gene region of the human major histocompatibility complex using visual mapping of stretched DNA by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Normally, this region contains a duplicated 21OH-C4 gene unit are known to occur frequently. Biotin-labeled cDNA of the C4 gene and digoxigenin-labeled cDNA of the 21OH gene were hybridized to decondensed nuclei of peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from individuals with various 21OH-C4 haplotypes. Hybridization signals of the C4 and 21OH probes were detected with fluorescein isothiocyanate (green) and rhodamine (red), respectively. Two linear green and red signal clusters were observed in each nucleus showing the normal haplotype. Gene duplication and deletion were visualized as addition and deletion of the signal cluster, respectively. The DNA types of the 21OH-C4 region determined by FISH were concordant with the results previously obtained by conventional molecular studies. Our high-resolution FISH technique is found to be useful for screening gene duplications and deletions. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Cytochrome P4502E (CYP2E) in brain: constitutive expression, induction by ethanol and localization by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Upadhya, S C; Tirumalai, P S; Boyd, M R; Mori, T; Ravindranath, V

    2000-01-01

    Cytochrome P4502E (P4502E), the major ethanol-inducible P450 metabolizes ethanol to acetaldehyde and bioactivates procarcinogens to ultimate carcinogens. Metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde in the brain could be deleterious since it can react with cytoskeletal proteins, forming adducts. In the present study, rats were administered ethanol chronically to evaluate its effect on chlorzoxazone hydroxylation in rat brain regions. Chlorzoxazone hydroxylation in brains from the treated rats was induced in hippocampus and cortex, downregulated in brainstem, and unchanged in cerebellum, striatum, and thalamus. The presence of functionally active P4502E was also seen in human brain regions obtained at autopsy from traffic accident victims. Northern blot analysis of rat and human brain poly(A)(+) RNA hybridized with cDNA to rat CYP2E1 revealed the constitutive presence of a corresponding transcript in rat and human brain. Localization of CYP2E by fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated the constitutive expression of CYP2E preferentially in the neuronal cells in rat and human brain. CYP2E expression was seen in neurons within the cerebral cortex, Purkinje and granule cell layers of cerebellum, granule cell layer of dentate gyrus, and pyramidal neurons of CA1, CA2, and CA3 subfields of hippocampus in both rat and human brain. The present studies demonstrate constitutive expression of P4502E1 in brain, its differential induction in rat brain regions by chronic ethanol treatment, and its topographic distribution in rat and human brain. PMID:10620320

  1. Stellaris(®) RNA Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for the Simultaneous Detection of Immature and Mature Long Noncoding RNAs in Adherent Cells.

    PubMed

    Orjalo, Arturo V; Johansson, Hans E

    2016-01-01

    RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), long an indispensable tool for the detection and localization of RNA, is becoming an increasingly important complement to other gene expression analysis methods. Especially important for long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), RNA FISH adds the ability to distinguish between primary and mature lncRNA transcripts and thus to segregate the site of synthesis from the site of action.We detail a streamlined RNA FISH protocol for the simultaneous imaging of multiple primary and mature mRNA and lncRNA gene products and RNA variants in fixed mammalian cells. The technique makes use of fluorescently pre-labeled, short DNA oligonucleotides (circa 20 nucleotides in length), pooled into sets of up to 48 individual probes. The overall binding of multiple oligonucleotides to the same RNA target results in fluorescent signals that reveal clusters of RNAs or single RNA molecules as punctate spots without the need for enzymatic signal amplification. Visualization of these punctate signals, through the use of wide-field fluorescence microscopy, enables the counting of single transcripts down to one copy per cell. Additionally, by using probe sets with spectrally distinct fluorophores, multiplex analysis of gene-specific RNAs, or RNA variants, can be achieved. The presented examples illustrate how this method can add temporospatial information between the transcription event and both the location and the endurance of the mature lncRNA. We also briefly discuss post-processing of images and spot counting to demonstrate the capabilities of this method for the statistical analysis of RNA molecules per cell. This information can be utilized to determine both overall gene expression levels and cell-to-cell gene expression variation. PMID:26721487

  2. Numerical and Structural Genomic Aberrations Are Reliably Detectable in Tissue Microarrays of Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tumor Samples by Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Heike; Bausinger, Julia; Staiger, Annette M.; Sohn, Maximilian; Schmelter, Christopher; Gruber, Kim; Kalla, Claudia; Ott, M. Michaela; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German

    2014-01-01

    Few data are available regarding the reliability of fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH), especially for chromosomal deletions, in high-throughput settings using tissue microarrays (TMAs). We performed a comprehensive FISH study for the detection of chromosomal translocations and deletions in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor specimens arranged in TMA format. We analyzed 46 B-cell lymphoma (B-NHL) specimens with known karyotypes for translocations of IGH-, BCL2-, BCL6- and MYC-genes. Locus-specific DNA probes were used for the detection of deletions in chromosome bands 6q21 and 9p21 in 62 follicular lymphomas (FL) and six malignant mesothelioma (MM) samples, respectively. To test for aberrant signals generated by truncation of nuclei following sectioning of FFPE tissue samples, cell line dilutions with 9p21-deletions were embedded into paraffin blocks. The overall TMA hybridization efficiency was 94%. FISH results regarding translocations matched karyotyping data in 93%. As for chromosomal deletions, sectioning artefacts occurred in 17% to 25% of cells, suggesting that the proportion of cells showing deletions should exceed 25% to be reliably detectable. In conclusion, FISH represents a robust tool for the detection of structural as well as numerical aberrations in FFPE tissue samples in a TMA-based high-throughput setting, when rigorous cut-off values and appropriate controls are maintained, and, of note, was superior to quantitative PCR approaches. PMID:24733537

  3. Fluorescent in situ hybridization shows DIPLOSPOROUS located on one of the NOR chromosomes in apomictic dandelions (Taraxacum) in the absence of a large hemizygous chromosomal region.

    PubMed

    Vašut, Radim J; Vijverberg, Kitty; van Dijk, Peter J; de Jong, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Apomixis in dandelions (Taraxacum: Asteraceae) is encoded by two unlinked dominant loci and a third yet undefined genetic factor: diplosporous omission of meiosis (DIPLOSPOROUS, DIP), parthenogenetic embryo development (PARTHENOGENESIS, PAR), and autonomous endosperm formation, respectively. In this study, we determined the chromosomal position of the DIP locus in Taraxacum by using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) that genetically map within 1.2-0.2 cM of DIP. The BACs showed dispersed fluorescent signals, except for S4-BAC 83 that displayed strong unique signals as well. Under stringent blocking of repeats by C0t-DNA fragments, only a few fluorescent foci restricted to defined chromosome regions remained, including one on the nucleolus organizer region (NOR) chromosomes that contains the 45S rDNAs. FISH with S4-BAC 83 alone and optimal blocking showed discrete foci in the middle of the long arm of one of the NOR chromosomes only in triploid and tetraploid diplosporous dandelions, while signals in sexual diploids were lacking. This agrees with the genetic model of a single dose, dominant DIP allele, absent in sexuals. The length of the DIP region is estimated to cover a region of 1-10 Mb. FISH in various accessions of Taraxacum and the apomictic sister species Chondrilla juncea, confirmed the chromosomal position of DIP within Taraxacum but not outside the genus. Our results endorse that, compared to other model apomictic species, expressing either diplospory or apospory, the genome of Taraxacum shows a more similar and less diverged chromosome structure at the DIP locus. The different levels of allele sequence divergence at apomeiosis loci may reflect different terms of asexual reproduction. The association of apomeiosis loci with repetitiveness, dispersed repeats, and retrotransposons commonly observed in apomictic species may imply a functional role of these shared features in apomictic reproduction, as is discussed. PMID:25760668

  4. Groping for quantitative digital 3-D image analysis: an approach to quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization in thick tissue sections of prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rodenacker, K; Aubele, M; Hutzler, P; Adiga, P S

    1997-01-01

    In molecular pathology numerical chromosome aberrations have been found to be decisive for the prognosis of malignancy in tumours. The existence of such aberrations can be detected by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The gain or loss of certain base sequences in the desoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) can be estimated by counting the number of FISH signals per cell nucleus. The quantitative evaluation of such events is a necessary condition for a prospective use in diagnostic pathology. To avoid occlusions of signals, the cell nucleus has to be analyzed in three dimensions. Confocal laser scanning microscopy is the means to obtain series of optical thin sections from fluorescence stained or marked material to fulfill the conditions mentioned above. A graphical user interface (GUI) to a software package for display, inspection, count and (semi-)automatic analysis of 3-D images for pathologists is outlined including the underlying methods of 3-D image interaction and segmentation developed. The preparative methods are briefly described. Main emphasis is given to the methodical questions of computer-aided analysis of large 3-D image data sets for pathologists. Several automated analysis steps can be performed for segmentation and succeeding quantification. However tumour material is in contrast to isolated or cultured cells even for visual inspection, a difficult material. For the present a fully automated digital image analysis of 3-D data is not in sight. A semi-automatic segmentation method is thus presented here. PMID:9373710

  5. Arm-specific telomere dynamics of each individual chromosome in induced pluripotent stem cells revealed by quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Terai, Masanori; Izumiyama-Shimomura, Naotaka; Aida, Junko; Ishikawa, Naoshi; Kuroiwa, Mie; Arai, Tomio; Toyoda, Masashi; Nakamura, Ken-ichi; Takubo, Kaiyo

    2014-12-01

    We have reported that telomere fluorescence units (TFUs) of established induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from human amnion (hAM933) and fetal lung fibroblasts (MRC-5) were significantly longer than those of the parental cells, and that the telomere extension rates varied quite significantly among clones without chromosomal instability, although the telomeres of other iPSCs derived from MRC-5 became shorter as the number of passages increased along with chromosomal abnormalities from an early stage. In the present study we attempted to clarify telomere dynamics in each individual chromosomal arm of parental cells and their derived clonal human iPSCs at different numbers of passages using quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (Q-FISH). Although no speci?c arm of any particular chromosome appeared to be consistently shorter or longer than most of the other chromosomes in any of the cell strains, telomere elongation in each chromosome of an iPSC appeared to be random and stochastic. However, in terms of the whole genome of any specific cell, the telomeres showed overall elongation associated with iPSC generation. We have thus demonstrated the specific telomere dynamics of each individual chromosomal arm in iPSCs derived from parental cells, and in the parental cells themselves, using Q-FISH. PMID:25217290

  6. Detection of the Genome and Transcripts of a Persistent DNA Virus in Neuronal Tissues by Fluorescent In situ Hybridization Combined with Immunostaining

    PubMed Central

    Catez, Frédéric; Rousseau, Antoine; Labetoulle, Marc; Lomonte, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Single cell codetection of a gene, its RNA product and cellular regulatory proteins is critical to study gene expression regulation. This is a challenge in the field of virology; in particular for nuclear-replicating persistent DNA viruses that involve animal models for their study. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) establishes a life-long latent infection in peripheral neurons. Latent virus serves as reservoir, from which it reactivates and induces a new herpetic episode. The cell biology of HSV-1 latency remains poorly understood, in part due to the lack of methods to detect HSV-1 genomes in situ in animal models. We describe a DNA-fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) approach efficiently detecting low-copy viral genomes within sections of neuronal tissues from infected animal models. The method relies on heat-based antigen unmasking, and directly labeled home-made DNA probes, or commercially available probes. We developed a triple staining approach, combining DNA-FISH with RNA-FISH and immunofluorescence, using peroxidase based signal amplification to accommodate each staining requirement. A major improvement is the ability to obtain, within 10 µm tissue sections, low-background signals that can be imaged at high resolution by confocal microscopy and wide-field conventional epifluorescence. Additionally, the triple staining worked with a wide range of antibodies directed against cellular and viral proteins. The complete protocol takes 2.5 days to accommodate antibody and probe penetration within the tissue. PMID:24514006

  7. Evaluation of Peptide Nucleic Acid-Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Identification of Clinically Relevant Mycobacteria in Clinical Specimens and Tissue Sections

    PubMed Central

    Lefmann, Michael; Schweickert, Birgitta; Buchholz, Petra; Göbel, Ulf B.; Ulrichs, Timo; Seiler, Peter; Theegarten, Dirk; Moter, Annette

    2006-01-01

    With fluorescently labeled PNA (peptide nucleic acid) probes targeting 16S rRNA, we established a 3-h fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure for specific visualization of members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, M. leprae, M. avium, and M. kansasii. Probe specificity was tested against a panel of 25 Mycobacterium spp. and 10 gram-positive organisms. After validation, probes were used to identify 52 mycobacterial culture isolates. Results were compared to conventional genotypic identification with amplification-based methods. All isolates (M. tuberculosis complex, n = 24; M. avium, n = 7; M. kansasii, n = 1) were correctly identified by FISH. In addition, the technique was used successfully for visualization of mycobacteria in biopsies from infected humans or animals. In conclusion, PNA-FISH is a fast and accurate tool for species-specific identification of culture-grown mycobacteria and for direct visualization of these organisms in tissue sections. It may be used successfully for both research and clinical microbiology. PMID:17021106

  8. Evaluation of peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization for identification of clinically relevant mycobacteria in clinical specimens and tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Lefmann, Michael; Schweickert, Birgitta; Buchholz, Petra; Göbel, Ulf B; Ulrichs, Timo; Seiler, Peter; Theegarten, Dirk; Moter, Annette

    2006-10-01

    With fluorescently labeled PNA (peptide nucleic acid) probes targeting 16S rRNA, we established a 3-h fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure for specific visualization of members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, M. leprae, M. avium, and M. kansasii. Probe specificity was tested against a panel of 25 Mycobacterium spp. and 10 gram-positive organisms. After validation, probes were used to identify 52 mycobacterial culture isolates. Results were compared to conventional genotypic identification with amplification-based methods. All isolates (M. tuberculosis complex, n = 24; M. avium, n = 7; M. kansasii, n = 1) were correctly identified by FISH. In addition, the technique was used successfully for visualization of mycobacteria in biopsies from infected humans or animals. In conclusion, PNA-FISH is a fast and accurate tool for species-specific identification of culture-grown mycobacteria and for direct visualization of these organisms in tissue sections. It may be used successfully for both research and clinical microbiology. PMID:17021106

  9. Mapping of low-frequency chimeric yeast artificial chromosome libraries from human chromosomes 16 and 21 by fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Marrone, B.L.; Campbell, E.W.; Anzick, S.L.; Shera, K.; Campbell, M.; Yoshida, T.M.; McCormick, M.K.; Deaven, L. )

    1994-05-01

    Yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones from low-frequency chimeric libraries of human chromosomes 16 and 21 were mapped onto human diploid fibroblast metaphase chromosomes using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and digital imaging microscopy. YACs mapped onto chromosome 21 were selected to provide subregional location and ordering of known and unknown markers on the long arm of chromosome 21, particularly in the Down syndrome region (q22). YACs mapped onto chromosome 16 were selected to overlap regions spanning chromosome 16 cosmid maps. YAC clones were indirectly labeled with fluorescein, and the total DNA of the chromosome was counterstained with propidium iodide. A single image containing both the FISH signal and the whole chromosome was acquired for each chromosome of interest containing the fluorescent probe signal in a metaphase spread. From the digitized image, the fluorescence intensity profile through the long axis of the chromosome gave the total chromosome length and the probe position. The map position of the probe was expressed as the fractional length (FL) of the total chromosome relative to the end of the short arm (Flpter). From each clone hybridized, 20-40 chromosome images were analyzed. Thirty-eight YACs were mapped onto chromosome 16, and their FLs were distributed along the short and long arms. On chromosome 21, 47 YACs were mapped, including 12 containing known markers. To confirm the order of a dense population of YACs within the Down syndrome region, a two-color mapping strategy was used in which an anonymous YAC was located relative to one or two known markers on the metaphase chromosome. The chromosome FL maps have a 1- to 2-Mb resolution, and the FL measurement of each probe has a typical standard error of 0.5-1 Mb. 14 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Simultaneous 16S and 18S rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on LR White sections demonstrated in Vestimentifera (Siboglinidae) tubeworms

    PubMed Central

    Schimak, Mario P.; Toenshoff, Elena R.; Bright, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Traditional morphological identification of invertebrate marine species is limited in early life history stages for many taxa. In this study, we demonstrate, by example of Vestimentiferan tubeworms (Siboglinidae, Polychaeta), that the simultaneous fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of both eukaryotic host and bacterial symbiont cells is possible on a single semi-thin (1 μm) section. This allows the identification of host specimens to species level as well as offering visualization of bacteria distributed within the host tissue. Previously published 18S rRNA host-specific oligonucleotide probes for Riftia pachyptila, Tevnia jerichonana and a newly designed Oasisia alvinae probe, as well as a 16S rRNA probe targeting symbionts found in all host species, were applied. A number of standard fixation and hybridization parameters were tested and optimized for the best possible signal intensity and cellular resolution. Ethanol conserved samples embedded in LR White low viscosity resin yielded the best results with regard to both signal intensity and resolution. We show that extended storage times of specimens does not affect the quality of signals attained by FISH and use our protocol to identify morphologically unidentifiable tubeworm individuals from a small data set, conforming to previous findings in succession studies of the Siboglinidae family. PMID:21507466

  11. Re-appraisal of the phylogeny and fluorescence in situ hybridization probes for the analysis of the Competibacteraceae in wastewater treatment systems.

    PubMed

    McIlroy, Simon J; Nittami, Tadashi; Kanai, Eri; Fukuda, Junji; Saunders, Aaron M; Nielsen, Per Halkjaer

    2015-04-01

    Members of the family Competibacteraceae are common in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) designed for enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) and are putatively deleterious to the process of P removal. Their ability to accumulate large amounts of polyhydroxyalkanoates is also suggested to be of potential commercial interest for bioplastic production. In this study we have updated the 16S rRNA-based phylogeny of the Competibacter and the Plasticicumulans lineages. The former is delineated by 13 clades including two described genera; 'Ca. Competibacter' and 'Ca. Contendobacter'. The oligonucleotide probes used for detection of the family by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were re-evaluated and designed for coverage of these clades. Surveys of full-scale WWTPs based on 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and FISH analysis indicate that a number of member clades always coexist, with their relative abundances varying substantially between and temporally within plants. The hypothesis that these differences are based on niche partitioning is supported by marked phenotypic differences between clades. An in-depth understanding of the ecology of the family requires further studies of the metabolism of individual clades in situ. The proposed phylogeny and FISH probes will provide the foundation for such studies. PMID:25224028

  12. Rapid detection of rRNA group I pseudomonads in contaminated metalworking fluids and biofilm formation by fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Saha, Ratul; Donofrio, Robert S; Goeres, Darla M; Bagley, Susan T

    2012-05-01

    Metalworking fluids (MWFs), used in different machining operations, are highly prone to microbial degradation. Microbial communities present in MWFs lead to biofilm formation in the MWF systems, which act as a continuous source of contamination. Species of rRNA group I Pseudomonas dominate in contaminated MWFs. However, their actual distribution is typically underestimated when using standard culturing techniques as most fail to grow on the commonly used Pseudomonas Isolation Agar. To overcome this, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to study their abundance along with biofilm formation by two species recovered from MWFs, Pseudomonas fluorescens MWF-1 and the newly described Pseudomonas oleovorans subsp. lubricantis. Based on 16S rRNA sequences, a unique fluorescent molecular probe (Pseudo120) was designed targeting a conserved signature sequence common to all rRNA group I Pseudomonas. The specificity of the probe was evaluated using hybridization experiments with whole cells of different Pseudomonas species. The probe's sensitivity was determined to be 10(3) cells/ml. It successfully detected and enumerated the abundance and distribution of Pseudomonas indicating levels between 3.2 (± 1.1) × 10(6) and 5.0 (± 2.3) × 10(6) cells/ml in four different industrial MWF samples collected from three different locations. Biofilm formation was visualized under stagnant conditions using high and low concentrations of cells for both P. fluorescens MWF-1 and P. oleovorans subsp. lubricantis stained with methylene blue and Pseudo120. On the basis of these observations, this molecular probe can be successfully be used in the management of MWF systems to monitor the levels and biofilm formation of rRNA group I pseudomonads. PMID:22042232

  13. Whole-mount in situ hybridization using DIG-labeled probes in planarian.

    PubMed

    Rybak-Wolf, Agnieszka; Solana, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    In recent years freshwater flatworms (planarian) have become a powerful model for studies of regeneration and stem cell biology. Whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) are key and most commonly used techniques to determine and visualize gene expression patterns in planaria. Here, we present the established version of whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH) and whole-mount fluorescence in situ hybridization (WFISH) protocol optimized over the last years by several labs from the rapidly growing planaria field and give an overview of recently introduced modifications which can be critical in the study of low abundant transcripts. PMID:25218375

  14. mRNA-targeted Fluorescent in Situ Hybridization (FISH) of Gram-negative Bacteria Without Template Amplification or Tyramide Signal Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, James R.; Culley, David E.; Chrisler, William B.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2007-12-01

    Technologies are needed to study gene expression at the level of individual cells within a population or microbial community. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) supplies high-resolution spatial information and has been widely applied to study microbial communities at the rRNA level. While mRNA-targeted FISH has been popular for studying gene expression in eukaryotic cells, very little success has been achieved with prokaryotes. At present, detection of specific mRNAs in individual prokaryotic cells requires the use of in situ-RT-PCR or tyramide signal amplification (TSA). In this study we used DNA oligonucleotide probes labeled with a single near-infrared dye in FISH assays to detect multicopy plasmid-based and endogenous mRNA molecules in Escherichia coli and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We took advantage of the fact there is much less background signal produced by biological materials and support matrices in the near-infrared spectrum and thus long camera exposure times could be used. In addition, we demonstrate that a combination of probes targeting both rRNA and mRNA could be successfully employed within the same FISH assay. These results, as well as ongoing R&D improvements in NIR and infrared dyes, indicate the FISH approach we demonstrated could be applied in certain environmental settings to monitor gene expression in mixed populations.

  15. Monitoring of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Hanseniaspora uvarum, and Starmerella bacillaris (synonym Candida zemplinina) populations during alcoholic fermentation by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxiao; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Mas, Albert

    2014-11-17

    Various molecular approaches have been applied as culture-independent techniques to monitor wine fermentations over the last decade. Among them, those based on RNA detection have been widely used for yeast cell detection, assuming that RNA only exists in live cells. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) targeting intracellular rRNA is considered a promising technique for the investigation of wine ecology. For the present study, we applied the FISH technique in combination with epifluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry to directly quantify populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Hanseniaspora uvarum, and Starmerella bacillaris during alcoholic fermentations. A new specific probe that hybridizes with eight species of Hanseniaspora genus and a second probe specific for Starm. bacillaris were designed, and the conditions for their application to pure cultures, mixed cultures, and wine samples were optimized. Single and mixed fermentations were performed with natural, concentrated must at two different temperatures, 15 °C and 25 °C. The population dynamics revealed that the Sacch. cerevisiae population increased to 10(7)-10(8)cells/ml during all fermentations, whereas H. uvarum and Starm. bacillaris tended to increase in single fermentations but remained at levels similar to their inoculations at 10(6)cells/ml in mixed fermentations. Temperature mainly affected the fermentation duration (slower at the lower temperature) but did not affect the population sizes of the different species. The use of these probes in natural wine fermentations has been validated. PMID:25218463

  16. Validation of a new catalysed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization probe for the accurate quantification of marine Bacteroidetes populations.

    PubMed

    Acinas, Silvia G; Ferrera, Isabel; Sarmento, Hugo; Díez-Vives, Cristina; Forn, Irene; Ruiz-González, Clara; Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M; Salazar, Guillem; Gasol, Josep M

    2015-10-01

    Catalysed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) is a powerful approach to quantify bacterial taxa. In this study, we compare the performance of the widely used Bacteroidetes CF319a probe with the new CF968 probe. In silico analyses and tests with isolates demonstrate that CF319a hybridizes with non-Bacteroidetes sequences from the Rhodobacteraceae and Alteromonadaceae families. We test the probes' accuracy in 37 globally distributed marine samples and over two consecutive years at the Blanes Bay Microbial Observatory (NW Mediterranean). We also compared the CARD-FISH data with the Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from 27 marine metagenomes from the TARA Oceans expedition. We find no significant differences in abundances between both approaches, although CF319a targeted some unspecific sequences and both probes displayed different abundances of specific Bacteroidetes phylotypes. Our results demonstrate that quantitative estimations by using both probes are significantly different in certain oceanographic regions (Mediterranean Sea, Red Sea and Arabian Sea) and that CF968 shows seasonality within marine Bacteroidetes, notably large differences between summer and winter that is overlooked by CF319a. We propose CF968 as an alternative to CF319a for targeting the whole Bacteroidetes phylum since it has better coverage, greater specificity and overall better quantifies marine Bacteroidetes. PMID:24890225

  17. Simultaneous Quantification of Active Carbon- and Nitrogen-Fixing Communities and Estimation of Fixation Rates Using Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization and Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Alicia K.; Raes, Eric J.; Waite, Anya M.; Quigg, Antonietta

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the interconnectivity of oceanic carbon and nitrogen cycles, specifically carbon and nitrogen fixation, is essential in elucidating the fate and distribution of carbon in the ocean. Traditional techniques measure either organism abundance or biochemical rates. As such, measurements are performed on separate samples and on different time scales. Here, we developed a method to simultaneously quantify organisms while estimating rates of fixation across time and space for both carbon and nitrogen. Tyramide signal amplification fluorescence in situ hybridization (TSA-FISH) of mRNA for functionally specific oligonucleotide probes for rbcL (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase; carbon fixation) and nifH (nitrogenase; nitrogen fixation) was combined with flow cytometry to measure abundance and estimate activity. Cultured samples representing a diversity of phytoplankton (cyanobacteria, coccolithophores, chlorophytes, diatoms, and dinoflagellates), as well as environmental samples from the open ocean (Gulf of Mexico, USA, and southeastern Indian Ocean, Australia) and an estuary (Galveston Bay, Texas, USA), were successfully hybridized. Strong correlations between positively tagged community abundance and 14C/15N measurements are presented. We propose that these methods can be used to estimate carbon and nitrogen fixation in environmental communities. The utilization of mRNA TSA-FISH to detect multiple active microbial functions within the same sample will offer increased understanding of important biogeochemical cycles in the ocean. PMID:25172848

  18. Simultaneous quantification of active carbon- and nitrogen-fixing communities and estimation of fixation rates using fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    McInnes, Allison S; Shepard, Alicia K; Raes, Eric J; Waite, Anya M; Quigg, Antonietta

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the interconnectivity of oceanic carbon and nitrogen cycles, specifically carbon and nitrogen fixation, is essential in elucidating the fate and distribution of carbon in the ocean. Traditional techniques measure either organism abundance or biochemical rates. As such, measurements are performed on separate samples and on different time scales. Here, we developed a method to simultaneously quantify organisms while estimating rates of fixation across time and space for both carbon and nitrogen. Tyramide signal amplification fluorescence in situ hybridization (TSA-FISH) of mRNA for functionally specific oligonucleotide probes for rbcL (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase; carbon fixation) and nifH (nitrogenase; nitrogen fixation) was combined with flow cytometry to measure abundance and estimate activity. Cultured samples representing a diversity of phytoplankton (cyanobacteria, coccolithophores, chlorophytes, diatoms, and dinoflagellates), as well as environmental samples from the open ocean (Gulf of Mexico, USA, and southeastern Indian Ocean, Australia) and an estuary (Galveston Bay, Texas, USA), were successfully hybridized. Strong correlations between positively tagged community abundance and (14)C/(15)N measurements are presented. We propose that these methods can be used to estimate carbon and nitrogen fixation in environmental communities. The utilization of mRNA TSA-FISH to detect multiple active microbial functions within the same sample will offer increased understanding of important biogeochemical cycles in the ocean. PMID:25172848

  19. Localization of Ruminal Cellulolytic Bacteria on Plant Fibrous Materials as Determined by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization and Real-Time PCR▿

    PubMed Central

    Shinkai, Takumi; Kobayashi, Yasuo

    2007-01-01

    To visualize and localize specific bacteria associated with plant materials, a new fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) protocol was established. By using this protocol, we successfully minimized the autofluorescence of orchard grass hay and detected rumen bacteria attached to the hay under a fluorescence microscope. Real-time PCR assays were also employed to quantitatively monitor the representative fibrolytic species Fibrobacter succinogenes and Ruminococcus flavefaciens and also total bacteria attached to the hay. F. succinogenes was found firmly attached to not only the cut edges but also undamaged inner surfaces of the hay. Cells of phylogenetic group 1 of F. succinogenes were detected on many stem and leaf sheath fragments of the hay, even on fragments on which few other bacteria were seen. Cells of phylogenetic group 2 of F. succinogenes were often detected on hay fragments coexisting with many other bacteria. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene copy number analysis, the numbers of bacteria attached to the leaf sheaths were higher than those attached to the stems (P < 0.05). In addition, R. flavefaciens had a greater tendency than F. succinogenes to be found on the leaf sheath (P < 0.01) with formation of many pits. F. succinogenes, particularly phylogenetic group 1, is suggested to possibly play an important role in fiber digestion, because it is clearly detectable by FISH and is the bacterium with the largest population size in the less easily degradable hay stem. PMID:17209077

  20. Assignment of the human diacylglycerol kinase gene (DAGK) to 12q13.3 using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, T.C.; Zhou, J.; Champagne, C.

    1994-07-01

    A 1-kb cDNA probe specific for the human DAGK gene was prepared by polymerase chain reaction and used to assign it to human chromosome 12 using a human x hamster somatic cell hybrid mapping panel. To determine the chromosomal sublocalization of DAGK, used the 1-kg DAGK cDNA probe to isolate a DAGK-specific phage clone from a human chromosome 12 library by Southern blot techniques. This clone (phEDCDAGK) contained a 17-kb human genomic insert in the phage Charon 40 that hybridized to the 1-kb DAGK cDNA previously characterized.

  1. A physical map of 15 loci on human chromosome 5q23-q33 by two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Saltman, D.L.; Dolganov, G.M. ); Warrington, J.A.; Wasmuth, J.J. ); Lovett, M. )

    1993-06-01

    The q23-q33 region of human chromosome 5 encodes a large number of growth factors, growth factor receptors, and hormone/neurotransmitter receptors. This is also the general region into which several disease genes have been mapped, including diastrophic dysplasia, Treacher Collins syndrome, hereditary startle disease, the myeloid disorders that are associated with the 5q-syndrome, autosomal-dominant forms of hereditary deafness, and limb girdle muscular dystrophy. The authors have developed a framework physical map of this region using cosmid clones isolated from the Los Alamos arrayed chromosome 5-specific library. Entry points into this library included 14 probes to genes within this interval and one anonymous polymorphic marker locus. A physical map has been constructed using fluorescence in situ hybridization of these cosmids on metaphase and interphase chromosomes, and this is in good agreement with the radiation hybrid map of the region. The derived order of loci across the region is cen-IL4-IL5-IRF1-IL3-IL9-EGR1-CD14-FGFA-GRL-D5S207-ADRB2-SPARC-RPS14-CSF1R-ADRA1, and the total distance spanned by these loci is approximately 15 Mb. The framework map, genomic clones, and contig expansion within 5q23-q33 should provide valuable resources for the eventual isolation of the clinically relevant loci that reside in this region. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Gene protein detection platform--a comparison of a new human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 assay with conventional immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization platforms.

    PubMed

    Stålhammar, Gustav; Farrajota, Pedro; Olsson, Ann; Silva, Cristina; Hartman, Johan; Elmberger, Göran

    2015-08-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) are widely used semiquantitative assays for selecting breast cancer patients for HER2 antibody therapy. However, both techniques have been shown to have disadvantages. Our aim was to test a recent automated technique of combined IHC and brightfield dual in situ hybridization-gene protein detection platform (GPDP)-in breast cancer HER2 protein, gene, and chromosome 17 centromere status evaluations, comparing the results in accordance to the American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists recommendations for HER2 testing in breast cancer from both 2007 and 2013. The GPDP technique performance was evaluated on 52 consecutive whole slide invasive breast cancer cases with HER2 IHC 2/3+ scoring results. Applying in turns the American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists recommendations for HER2 testing in breast cancer from 2007 and 2013 to both FISH and GPDP DISH assays, the HER2 gene amplification results showed 100% concordance among amplified/nonamplified cases, but there was a shift in 4 cases toward positive from equivocal results and toward equivocal from negative results. This might be related to the emphasis on the average HER2 copy number in the 2013 criteria. HER2 expression by IVD market IHC kit (Pathway®) has a strong correlation with GPDP HER2 protein, including a full concordance for all cases scored as 3+ and a reduction from 2+ to 1+ in 7 cases corresponding to nonamplified cases. Gene protein detection platform HER2 protein "solo" could have spared the need for 7 FISH studies. In addition, the platform offered advantages on interpretation reassurance including selecting areas for counting gene signals paralleled with protein IHC expression, on heterogeneity detection, interpretation time, technical time, and tissue expense. PMID:25921313

  3. High-resolution cytogenetic mapping of 342 new cosmid markers including 43 RFLP markers on human chromosome 17 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Inazawa, Johji; Ariyama, Takeshi; Abe, Tatsuo ); Saito, Hiroko; Nakamura, Yusuke )

    1993-07-01

    The authors have constructed a high-resolution cytogenetic map of human chromosome 17 with 342 cosmid markers, each newly isolated from a cosmid library constructed from a human-mouse hybrid cell line containing a single human chromosome 17. Direct mapping on R- and/or G-banded (pro)metaphase chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization localized these markers throughout the chromosome, although density was highest in the R-band-dominant regions of 17p13, 17p11.2, 17q11.2-q12, 17q21.3, 17q23, and 17q25. By screening some of the cosmid clones, they identified 71 polymorphic systems with 43 markers; 11 of these are VNTRs. As the high-resolution cytogenetic map contains a large number of markers, it can provide useful landmarks for a contig map of chromosome 17. Furthermore, the map will contribute to positional cloning of aberrant genes responsible for inherited diseases such as Miller-Dieker syndrome (MDS), Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), and familial early-onset breast cancer, as well as putative tumor suppressor genes on this chromosome. 47 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Fluorescence in situ hybridization as an adjunct tool in the diagnosis of primary and metastatic renal cell carcinoma in fine needle aspiration specimens.

    PubMed

    Kos, Zuzana; Williams, Phillip A; Belanger, Eric C; Mai, Kien T

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the role of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in the diagnosis of primary renal neoplasms and lesions suspicious for metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Consecutive fine-needle aspiration biopsies (FNAB) of 39 renal masses and 41 metastatic tumours suspicious for renal cell origin were assessed with an immunohistochemical panel for CK7, RCC antigen, CD10, AMACR, PAX8, vimentin, and CD117. In addition, FISH was performed using probes for chromosomes 1p, 3p, 7, 17, X, and Y. A total of 31 of 39 primary renal masses and 33 of 41 metastatic tumors suspicious for renal origin demonstrated typical cytological and immunohistochemical (IHC) features of subtypes of renal neoplasms (40 clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC), 20 papillary RCC, and 4 renal oncocytomas). FISH analysis of 15 randomly selected cases each of primary and metastatic lesions revealed chromosomal abnormalities consistent with the diagnosis in 73% of these cases. Of 8 primary renal masses demonstrating atypical microscopic features and noncontributory IHC profiles, FISH was helpful in subtyping 5 (62%) of these lesions (2 clear cell RCC, 1 solid variant of oncocytic papillary RCC, 1 mixed clear cell and papillary RCC, and 1 chromophobe RCC with papillary architecture). Of 8 metastatic tumors clinically suspicious for renal cell origin and supportive, but nondiagnostic IHC, FISH revealed supportive chromosomal changes in 6 (75%) cases. In conclusion FISH analysis on FNAB material, even with limited tissue, may be contributory to the diagnosis and subtyping of RCC in diagnostically challenging biopsies. PMID:24692327

  5. Agreement between amoA Gene-Specific Quantitative PCR and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization in the Measurement of Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria in Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Lunn, M.; Davenport, R. J.; Swan, D. L.; Read, L. F.; Brown, M. R.; Morais, C.; Curtis, T. P.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial abundance is central to most investigations in microbial ecology, and its accurate measurement is a challenging task that has been significantly facilitated by the advent of molecular techniques over the last 20 years. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is considered the gold standard of quantification techniques; however, it is expensive and offers low sample throughput, both of which limit its wider application. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) is an alternative that offers significantly higher throughput, and it is used extensively in molecular biology. The accuracy of qPCR can be compromised by biases in the DNA extraction and amplification steps. In this study, we compared the accuracy of these two established quantification techniques to measure the abundance of a key functional group in biological wastewater treatment systems, the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), in samples from a time-series experiment monitoring a set of laboratory-scale reactors and a full-scale plant. For the qPCR analysis, we tested two different sets of AOB-specific primers, one targeting the 16SrRNA gene and one targeting the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene. We found that there was a positive linear logarithmic relationship between FISH and the amoA gene-specific qPCR, where the data obtained from both techniques was equivalent at the order of magnitude level. The 16S rRNA gene-specific qPCR assay consistently underestimated AOB numbers. PMID:25002435

  6. Visualization of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on whole-body sections of Ixodes ricinus ticks and gerbil skin biopsies.

    PubMed

    Hammer, B; Moter, A; Kahl, O; Alberti, G; Göbel, U B

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this study was to visualize borreliae directly in whole-body sections of Ixodes ricinus by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Borrelia afzelii mono-infected or Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (ss)/B. afzelii double-infected nymphs were fixed, embedded in cold polymerizing resin and sectioned. The same sample processing was applied to skin biopsies taken from a Mongolian gerbil after an infectious tick-bite. FISH was carried out using 16S-rRNA-directed, fluorescence-labelled oligonucleotide probes specific for the genus Borrelia and specific within the group of Lyme borreliosis-associated genospecies B. afzelii, B. burgdorferi ss, Borrelia garinii and Borrelia valaisiana. Sensitivity and specificity of the newly designed probes were evaluated using PCR, dot-blot hybridizations and FISH. Despite significant autofluorescence of certain tick tissues (which allowed good histological orientation within the sections), borreliae showing the typical spirochaetal morphotype were clearly visible in five out of six putatively infected ticks. These findings were confirmed by electron microscopy of ticks from the same infected batch as used for FISH. Attempts to produce ticks infected by two different Borrelia genospecies were not successful. FISH on whole-body sections of resin-embedded ticks offers the possibility of visualizing and identifying borreliae within tick tissues. This technique has great potential for the investigation of the transmission of bacteria or other micro-organisms by arthropod vectors. Furthermore, clear visualization of single spirochaetes distributed along subcutaneous fat cell membranes in gerbil skin biopsies suggests that FISH might also be suitable for the detection of borreliae in clinical tissue specimens. PMID:11390674

  7. Automated design of probes for rRNA-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization reveals the advantages of using dual probes for accurate identification.

    PubMed

    Wright, Erik S; Yilmaz, L Safak; Corcoran, Andrew M; Ökten, Hatice E; Noguera, Daniel R

    2014-08-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a common technique for identifying cells in their natural environment and is often used to complement next-generation sequencing approaches as an integral part of the full-cycle rRNA approach. A major challenge in FISH is the design of oligonucleotide probes with high sensitivity and specificity to their target group. The rapidly expanding number of rRNA sequences has increased awareness of the number of potential nontargets for every FISH probe, making the design of new FISH probes challenging using traditional methods. In this study, we conducted a systematic analysis of published probes that revealed that many have insufficient coverage or specificity for their intended target group. Therefore, we developed an improved thermodynamic model of FISH that can be applied at any taxonomic level, used the model to systematically design probes for all recognized genera of bacteria and archaea, and identified potential cross-hybridizations for the selected probes. This analysis resulted in high-specificity probes for 35.6% of the genera when a single probe was used in the absence of competitor probes and for 60.9% when up to two competitor probes were used. Requiring the hybridization of two independent probes for positive identification further increased specificity. In this case, we could design highly specific probe sets for up to 68.5% of the genera without the use of competitor probes and 87.7% when up to two competitor probes were used. The probes designed in this study, as well as tools for designing new probes, are available online (http://DECIPHER.cee.wisc.edu). PMID:24928876

  8. Amplification of the c-erbB-2 (HER-2/neu) gene in gastric cancer cells. Detection by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, T.; Kobayashi, M.; Mai, M.; Suzuki, T.; Ooi, A.

    1997-01-01

    Amplification of the c-erbB-2 gene was examined in 120 gastric adenocarcinomas by dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using probes for centromere 17 and the 17q11.2-12. The results were compared with Southern blot analysis and immunohistochemistry of c-erbB-2 overexpression. FISH was successful in 105 tumors, and the amplification was found in 19 tumors. FISH on 17 tumors revealed high-level amplification; in 15, the predominant cancer populations had amplified c-erbB-2 gene with the signals forming one or two clusters, indicating that the amplified gene was present in homogeneously staining regions. In two tumors, most cancer cells had multiple scattered c-erbB-2 signals, indicating that the amplicon was within double-minute chromosomes. The other two tumors had a few additional copies of the c-erbB-2 gene. Seventeen tumors had increased numbers of the gene probably due to polysomy 17, and sixty-nine tumors had no aberrations of chromosome 17. Immunohistochemically, distinct membrane staining was found only in the 17 tumors with the high-level amplification. It is concluded that, in gastric adenocarcinomas, high-level amplification produces the c-erbB-2 gene principally in homogeneously staining region form and occasionally in double-minute form and is thought to control the over-expression of the protein in the cytoplasmic membrane. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9284825

  9. Identification of Treponema pedis as the predominant Treponema species in porcine skin ulcers by fluorescence in situ hybridization and high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Frida; Klitgaard, Kirstine; Jensen, Tim Kåre

    2014-06-25

    Skin lesions often seen in pig production are of great animal welfare concern. To study the potential role of Treponema bacteria in porcine skin ulcers, we investigated the presence and distribution of these organisms in decubital shoulder ulcers (n=51) and ear necroses (n=54) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and high-throughput sequencing. In addition, two cases of facial ulcers and five cases of other skin ulcers were included in the study. Samples from all 112 skin lesions and intact skin from pigs without skin ulcers (n=14) were screened by FISH. Three different oligonucleotide probes targeting 16S rRNA were used, specific for domain bacterium, Treponema spp. and species T. pedis. Screening showed that two cases each of facial and other ulcers, 35 (69%) of shoulder ulcers and 32 (59%) of ear necroses were positive for Treponema spp. T. pedis was the unequivocally, predominant species typically constituting more than 90% of the treponemes in a lesion, assessed visually by microscopy. Altogether, T. pedis was demonstrated in 69 of the 71 Treponema spp. positive lesions. We conclude that Treponema spp. are frequently present and abundant in various skin ulcers of pigs. The results from this study point toward an important role of T. pedis as a secondary bacterial infection in porcine skin ulcers, especially in severe and chronic lesions. PMID:24725449

  10. Clonal evolution in chronic lymphocytic leukemia detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization and conventional cytogenetics after stimulation with CpG oligonucleotides and interleukin-2: a prospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Brejcha, Martin; Stoklasová, Martina; Brychtová, Yvona; Panovská, Anna; Štěpanovská, Kristina; Vaňková, Gabriela; Plevová, Karla; Oltová, Alexandra; Horká, Kateřina; Pospíšilová, Šárka; Mayer, Jiří; Doubek, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients may acquire new chromosome abnormalities during the course of their disease. Clonal evolution (CE) has been detected by conventional chromosome banding (CBA), several groups also confirmed CE with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). At present, there are minimal prospective data on CE frequency determined using a combination of both methods. Therefore, the aim of our study was to prospectively assess CE frequency using a combination of FISH and CBA after stimulation with CpG oligonucleotides and interleukin-2. Between 2008 and 2012, we enrolled 140 patients with previously untreated CLL in a prospective trial evaluating CE using FISH and CBA after stimulation. Patients provided baseline and regular follow-up peripheral blood samples for testing. There was a median of 3 cytogenetic examinations (using both methods) per patient. CE was detected in 15.7% (22/140) of patients using FISH, in 28.6% (40/140) using CBA, and in 34.3% (48/140) of patients by combining both methods. Poor-prognosis CE (new deletion 17p, new deletion 11q or new complex karyotype) was detected in 15% (21/140) of patients and was significantly associated with previous CLL treatment (p=0.013). CBA provides more complex information about cytogenetic abnormalities in CLL patients than FISH and confirms that many patients can acquire new abnormalities during the course of their disease in a relatively short time period. PMID:24246692

  11. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Is Necessary to Detect an Association Between Chromosome Aberrations and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Exposure In Utero and Reveals Nonrandom Chromosome Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Bocskay, Kirsti A.; Orjuela, Manuela A.; Tang, Deliang; Liu, Xinhua; Warburton, Dorothy; Perera, Frederica P.

    2011-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations are associated with environmental exposures in infants and children. Recently we reported that prenatal exposure to airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was significantly (P < 0.01) associated with stable aberration frequencies in cord blood from a subset of 60 newborns from the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health Prospective Cohort Study (Bocskay K et al. [2005]: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 14:506–511). To determine whether the environmental exposures may be targeting specific chromosomes and to compare various methods for measuring chromosome aberrations, we further evaluated this same subset of subjects composed of African-American and Dominican nonsmoking mother–newborn pairs residing in low-income neighborhoods of New York City, and exposed to varying levels of airborne PAHs. Chromosome aberrations were measured in cord blood lymphocytes, both by whole chromosome probe (WCP) fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and traditional Giemsa-staining. Prenatal exposures were assessed by personal air monitoring. Breaks in chromosomes 1–6, as detected by WCP FISH, were nonrandomly distributed, underscoring the importance of appropriate chromosome probe selection to capture cytogenetic damage in response to exposure. FISH for stable aberrations was found to be a more sensitive method for detecting aberration frequencies associated with environmental exposures, when compared with FISH for unstable aberrations or Giemsa-staining for aberrations. Together, these results suggest that PAHs may be targeting specific chromosomes and highlight the importance of using the more sensitive detection methods to assess risk in populations with low levels of exposure. PMID:17253628

  12. Anatomic site-specific patterns of gene copy number gains in skin, mucosal, and uveal melanomas detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Glatz-Krieger, Katharina; Pache, Mona; Tapia, Coya; Fuchs, Alain; Savic, Spasenija; Glatz, Dieter; Mihatsch, Michael; Meyer, Peter

    2006-09-01

    To assess the differences between melanomas of different location and different etiology, 372 malignant melanomas were brought in a tissue microarray format. The collection included 23 acral and 118 non-acral skin melanomas, 9 mucosal melanomas, 100 uveal melanomas, and 122 melanoma metastases. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to assess copy number changes of the cyclin D1 (CCND1), MDM2, c-myc (MYC), and HER2 genes. FISH analysis revealed distinct differences between melanomas from different locations. CCND1 amplifications were detected in skin melanomas from sites with chronic sun exposure (6 of 32 cases), acral melanomas (4 of 17 cases), and mucosal melanomas (one of ten cases) but not in uveal melanomas. High-level MDM2 amplifications were exclusively present in acral melanomas (2 of 19 cases). MYC copy number gains were detected in 32 of 71 uveal melanomas, five of eight mucosal melanomas, and 6 of 67 melanomas from sites with intermittent sun exposure but not in acral melanomas nor melanomas from sites with chronic sun exposure. Alterations of the MYC gene were associated with advanced tumor stage. There were no high-level HER2 amplifications. Site-specific genetic and epigenetic features may impact the response of melanomas to various anti-cancer drugs and should be considered in future studies on the molecular pathogenesis of malignant melanomas. PMID:16523260

  13. Combining fluorescent in situ hybridization data with ISS staging improves risk assessment in myeloma: an International Myeloma Working Group collaborative project

    PubMed Central

    Avet-Loiseau, H; Durie, BGM; Cavo, M; Attal, M; Gutierrez, N; Haessler, J; Goldschmidt, H; Hajek, R; Lee, JH; Sezer, O; Barlogie, B; Crowley, J; Fonseca, R; Testoni, N; Ross, F; Rajkumar, SV; Sonneveld, P; Lahuerta, J; Moreau, P; Morgan, G

    2014-01-01

    The combination of serum β2-microglobulin and albumin levels has been shown to be highly prognostic in myeloma as the International Staging System (ISS). The aim of this study was to assess the independent contributions of ISS stage and cytogenetic abnormalities in predicting outcomes. A retrospective analysis of international studies looking at both ISS and cytogenetic abnormalities was performed in order to assess the potential role of combining ISS stage and cytogenetics to predict survival. This international effort used the International Myeloma Working Group database of 12 137 patients treated worldwide for myeloma at diagnosis, of whom 2309 had cytogenetic studies and 5387 had analyses by fluorescent in situ hybridization (iFISH). Comprehensive analyses used 2642 patients with sufficient iFISH data available. Using the comprehensive iFISH data, combining both t(4;14) and deletion (17p), along with ISS stage, significantly improved the prognostic assessment in terms of progression-free survival and overall survival. The additional impact of patient age and use of high-dose therapy was also demonstrated. In conclusion, the combination of iFISH data with ISS staging significantly improves risk assessment in myeloma. PMID:23032723

  14. Effects of compost on colonization of roots of plants grown in metalliferous mine tailings, as examined by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Sadie L; Maier, Raina M

    2009-02-01

    The relationship between compost amendment, plant biomass produced, and bacterial root colonization as measured by fluorescence in situ hybridization was examined following plant growth in mine tailings. Mine tailings can remain devoid of vegetation for decades after deposition due to a combination of factors that include heavy metal toxicity, low pH, poor substrate structure and water-holding capacity, and a severely impacted heterotrophic microbial community. Research has shown that plant establishment, a desired remedial objective to reduce eolian and water erosion of such tailings, is enhanced by organic matter amendment and is correlated with significant increases in rhizosphere populations of neutrophilic heterotrophic bacteria. Results show that for the acidic metalliferous tailings tested in this study, compost amendment was associated with significantly increased bacterial colonization of roots and increased production of plant biomass. In contrast, for a Vinton control soil, increased compost had no effect on root colonization and resulted only in increased plant biomass at high levels of compost amendment. These data suggest that the positive association between compost amendment and root colonization is important in the stressed mine tailings environment where root colonization may enhance both microbial and plant survival and growth. PMID:19047384

  15. Detection of numerical and structural alterations and fusion of chromosomes 16 and 1 in low-grade papillary breast carcinoma by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, H.; Takarabe, T.; Susumu, N.; Inazawa, J.; Okada, S.; Hirohashi, S.

    1997-01-01

    Intracystic papillary breast tumors, including intraductal papilloma and low-grade intracystic papillary carcinoma, constitute a group for which differential diagnosis is frequently difficult. We examined the status of chromosomes 16 and 1 by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses and the DNA ploidy patterns by flow cytometry in 26 intracystic papillary tumors. Alterations of chromosomes 16 and 1 were detected by FISH in 93 and 85%, respectively, of 14 low-grade papillary carcinomas, and the latter alterations always concurred with the former. Two-color FISH using probes for the D1Z1 (1q12) and D16Z2 (16cen) loci or the D1Z1 and D16Z3 (16q11) loci showed that fusion of chromosomes 16 and 1, mostly with breakpoints distal to 16q11.2 and proximal to 1q12, occurred in 77% of the papillary carcinomas. DNA aneuploidy was detected in 6% of these carcinomas. No papilloma showed these chromosome alterations or DNA aneuploidy. Chromosome 16 and 1 fusions appeared to occur frequently in diploid breast carcinomas and to be involved in the acquisition of a malignant phenotype by duct epithelial cells. We suggest that two-color FISH methods for detecting 1;16 fusions might be applicable as supportive methods for the differential diagnosis of intracystic papillary breast tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9327736

  16. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH)-Based Karyotyping Reveals Rapid Evolution of Centromeric and Subtelomeric Repeats in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Radke, Brittany; Findley, Seth; Abernathy, Brian; Vallejos, C. Eduardo; Jackson, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based karyotyping is a powerful cytogenetics tool to study chromosome organization, behavior, and chromosome evolution. Here, we developed a FISH-based karyotyping system using a probe mixture comprised of centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats, 5S rDNA, and chromosome-specific BAC clones in common bean, which enables one to unambiguously distinguish all 11 chromosome pairs. Furthermore, we applied the karyotyping system to several wild relatives and landraces of common bean from two distinct gene pools, as well as other related Phaseolus species, to investigate repeat evolution in the genus Phaseolus. Comparison of karyotype maps within common bean indicates that chromosomal distribution of the centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats is stable, whereas the copy number of the repeats was variable, indicating rapid amplification/reduction of the repeats in specific genomic regions. In Phaseolus species that diverged approximately 2–4 million yr ago, copy numbers of centromeric repeats were largely reduced or diverged, and chromosomal distributions have changed, suggesting rapid evolution of centromeric repeats. We also detected variation in the distribution pattern of subtelomeric repeats in Phaseolus species. The FISH-based karyotyping system revealed that satellite repeats are actively and rapidly evolving, forming genomic features unique to individual common bean accessions and Phaseolus species. PMID:26865698

  17. In Silico and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Mapping Reveals Collinearity between the Pennisetum squamulatum Apomixis Carrier-Chromosome and Chromosome 2 of Sorghum and Foxtail Millet.

    PubMed

    Sapkota, Sirjan; Conner, Joann A; Hanna, Wayne W; Simon, Bindu; Fengler, Kevin; Deschamps, Stéphane; Cigan, Mark; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Apomixis, or clonal propagation through seed, is a trait identified within multiple species of the grass family (Poaceae). The genetic locus controlling apomixis in Pennisetum squamulatum (syn Cenchrus squamulatus) and Cenchrus ciliaris (syn Pennisetum ciliare, buffelgrass) is the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR). Previously, the ASGR was shown to be highly conserved but inverted in marker order between P. squamulatum and C. ciliaris based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and varied in both karyotype and position of the ASGR on the ASGR-carrier chromosome among other apomictic Cenchrus/Pennisetum species. Using in silico transcript mapping and verification of physical positions of some of the transcripts via FISH, we discovered that the ASGR-carrier chromosome from P. squamulatum is collinear with chromosome 2 of foxtail millet and sorghum outside of the ASGR. The in silico ordering of the ASGR-carrier chromosome markers, previously unmapped in P. squamulatum, allowed for the identification of a backcross line with structural changes to the P. squamulatum ASGR-carrier chromosome derived from gamma irradiated pollen. PMID:27031857

  18. In Silico and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Mapping Reveals Collinearity between the Pennisetum squamulatum Apomixis Carrier-Chromosome and Chromosome 2 of Sorghum and Foxtail Millet

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Sirjan; Conner, Joann A.; Hanna, Wayne W.; Simon, Bindu; Fengler, Kevin; Deschamps, Stéphane; Cigan, Mark; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Apomixis, or clonal propagation through seed, is a trait identified within multiple species of the grass family (Poaceae). The genetic locus controlling apomixis in Pennisetum squamulatum (syn Cenchrus squamulatus) and Cenchrus ciliaris (syn Pennisetum ciliare, buffelgrass) is the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR). Previously, the ASGR was shown to be highly conserved but inverted in marker order between P. squamulatum and C. ciliaris based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and varied in both karyotype and position of the ASGR on the ASGR-carrier chromosome among other apomictic Cenchrus/Pennisetum species. Using in silico transcript mapping and verification of physical positions of some of the transcripts via FISH, we discovered that the ASGR-carrier chromosome from P. squamulatum is collinear with chromosome 2 of foxtail millet and sorghum outside of the ASGR. The in silico ordering of the ASGR-carrier chromosome markers, previously unmapped in P. squamulatum, allowed for the identification of a backcross line with structural changes to the P. squamulatum ASGR-carrier chromosome derived from gamma irradiated pollen. PMID:27031857

  19. The origin of in situ hybridization - A personal history.

    PubMed

    Gall, Joseph G

    2016-04-01

    In situ hybridization is the technique by which specific RNA or DNA molecules are detected in cytological preparations. Basically it involves formation of a hybrid molecule between an endogenous single-stranded RNA or DNA in the cell and a complementary single-stranded RNA or DNA probe. In its original form the probe was labeled with (3)H and the hybrid was detected by autoradiography. The first successful experiments in 1968 involved detection of the highly amplified ribosomal DNA in oocytes of the frog Xenopus, followed soon after by the reiterated "satellite DNA" in mouse and Drosophila chromosomes. Fluorescent probes were developed about ten years later. PMID:26655524

  20. High prognostic value of minimal residual disease detected by flow-cytometry-enhanced fluorescence in situ hybridization in core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML).

    PubMed

    Wang, Libing; Gao, Lei; Xu, Sheng; Gong, Shenglan; Liu, Min; Qiu, Huiying; Xu, Xiaoqian; Ni, Xiong; Chen, Li; Lu, Shuqing; Chen, Jie; Song, Xianmin; Zhang, Weiping; Yang, Jianmin; Hu, Xiaoxia; Wang, Jianmin

    2014-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is generally regarded as a disorder of stem cells, known as leukemic initiating cells (LICs), which initiate the disease and contribute to relapses. Although the phenotype of these cells remains unclear in most patients, they are enriched within the CD34(+)CD38(-) population. In core-binding factor (CBF) AML, the cytogenetic abnormalities also exist in LIC. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic power of minimal residual disease (MRD) measured by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in CD34(+)CD38(-) cells sorted by flow cytometry at different periods during therapy. Thirty-six patients under 65 years of age with de novo CBF-AML treated with intensive chemotherapy were retrospectively included in this study. Correlations with relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival were evaluated with univariate and multivariate analyses. FISH efficiently identified LICs in the CD34(+)CD38(-) population. The presence of FISH(+)CD34(+)CD38(-) cells before consolidation was negatively associated with cumulative incidence of relapse (64 vs 18 %, P = .012), which showed prognostic value for RFS (12 vs 68 %, P = .008) and OS (11 vs 75 %, P = .0005), and retained prognostic significance for RFS in multivariate analysis. The detection of FISH(+)CD34(+)CD38(-) cells before consolidation therapy significantly correlated with long-term survival. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-FISH could be potentially adopted as a MRD monitor approach in clinical practice to identify CBF-AML patients at risk of treatment failure during therapy. PMID:24844781

  1. Detection of microRNAs in frozen tissue sections by fluorescence in situ hybridization using locked nucleic acid probes and tyramide signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Silahtaroglu, Asli N; Nolting, Dorrit; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Berezikov, Eugene; Møller, Morten; Tommerup, Niels; Kauppinen, Sakari

    2007-01-01

    The ability to determine spatial and temporal microRNA (miRNA) accumulation at the tissue, cell and subcellular levels is essential for understanding the biological roles of miRNAs and miRNA-associated gene regulatory networks. This protocol describes a method for fast and effective detection of miRNAs in frozen tissue sections using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The method combines the unique miRNA recognition properties of locked nucleic acid (LNA)-modified oligonucleotide probes with FISH using the tyramide signal amplification (TSA) technology. Although both approaches have previously been shown to increase detection sensitivity in FISH, combining these techniques into one protocol significantly decreases the time needed for miRNA detection in cryosections, while simultaneously retaining high detection sensitivity. Starting with fixation of the tissue sections, this miRNA FISH protocol can be completed within approximately 6 h and allows miRNA detection in a wide variety of animal tissue cryosections as well as in human tumor biopsies at high cellular resolution. PMID:17947994

  2. Multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization and cross species color banding of a case of chronic myeloid leukemia in blastic crisis with a complex Philadelphia translocation.

    PubMed

    Harrison, C J; Gibbons, B; Yang, F; Butler, T; Cheung, K L; Kearney, L; Dirscherl, L; Bray-Ward, P; Gregson, M; Ferguson-Smith, M

    2000-01-15

    Exciting new techniques in molecular cytogenetics--namely, spectral karyotyping, multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH), and cross species color banding--have been recently developed. An increasing number of reports demonstrate the success of these procedures in providing additional cytogenetic information--identifying marker chromosomes and revealing the presence of previously undetected chromosomal changes. However, these procedures have their limitations, and their absolute sensitivity in the accurate identification of subtle chromosomal abnormalities remains to be established. M-FISH and color banding have been applied to a case of chronic myeloid leukemia with a complex Philadelphia translocation involving chromosomes 9, 17, and 22, which had initially been identified from G-banded chromosome analysis. The abnormalities were confirmed by chromosome "painting" and specific probes. Although M-FISH and color banding revealed no additional cryptic chromosomal changes, this study has clearly demonstrated the success of these multiple color FISH approaches in the accurate characterization of a complex rearrangement with subtle abnormalities. PMID:10640141

  3. Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in ataxia telangiectasia cells: high frequency of deletions and misrejoining detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, Tetsuya; Ito, Hisao; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu; Uno, Takashi; Isobe, Kouichi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the hyper-radiosensitivity of AT cells were investigated by analyzing chromosome aberrations in the G(2) and M phases of the cell cycle using a combination of chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome painting probes. Confluent cultures of normal fibroblast cells (AG1522) and fibroblast cells derived from an individual with AT (GM02052) were exposed to gamma rays and allowed to repair at 37 degrees C for 24 h. At doses that resulted in 10% survival, GM02052 cells were approximately five times more sensitive to gamma rays than AG1522 cells. For a given dose, GM02052 cells contained a much higher frequency of deletions and misrejoining than AG1522 cells. For both cell types, a good correlation was found between the percentage of aberrant cells and cell survival. The average number of color junctions, which represent the frequency of chromosome misrejoining, was also found to correlate well with survival. However, in a similar surviving population of GM02052 and AG1522 cells, induced by 1 Gy and 6 Gy, respectively, AG1522 cells contained four times more color junctions and half as many deletions as GM02052 cells. These results indicate that both repair deficiency and misrepair may be involved in the hyper-radiosensitivity of AT cells.

  4. Parental exposure to environmental concentrations of diuron leads to aneuploidy in embryos of the Pacific oyster, as evidenced by fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Barranger, Audrey; Benabdelmouna, Abdellah; Dégremont, Lionel; Burgeot, Thierry; Akcha, Farida

    2015-02-01

    Changes in normal chromosome numbers (i.e. aneuploidy) due to abnormal chromosome segregation may arise either spontaneously or as a result of chemical/radiation exposure, particularly during cell division. Coastal ecosystems are continuously subjected to various contaminants originating from urban, industrial and agricultural activities. Genotoxicity is common to several families of major environmental pollutants, including pesticides, which therefore represent a potential important environmental hazard for marine organisms. A previous study demonstrated the vertical transmission of DNA damage by subjecting oyster genitors to short-term exposure to the herbicide diuron at environmental concentrations during gametogenesis. In this paper, Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to further characterize diuron-induced DNA damage at the chromosomal level. rDNA genes (5S and 18-5.8-28S), previously mapped onto Crassostrea gigas chromosomes 4, 5 and 10, were used as probes on the interphase nuclei of embryo preparations. Our results conclusively show higher aneuploidy (hypo- or hyperdiploidy) level in embryos from diuron-exposed genitors, with damage to the three studied chromosomal regions. This study suggests that sexually developing oysters are vulnerable to diuron exposure, incurring a negative impact on reproductive success and oyster recruitment. PMID:25498420

  5. Evaluation of HER2 Gene Status in Breast Cancer Samples with Indeterminate Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization by Quantitative Real-Time PCR.

    PubMed

    Koudelakova, Vladimira; Berkovcova, Jitka; Trojanec, Radek; Vrbkova, Jana; Radova, Lenka; Ehrmann, Jiri; Kolar, Zdenek; Melichar, Bohuslav; Hajduch, Marian

    2015-07-01

    Administration of drugs targeting HER2 (official symbol ERBB2) is an important component of therapy for breast cancer patients with HER2 amplification/overexpression as determined by in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). In approximately 5% of breast cancers, ISH assays fail. In these cases, HER2 protein expression is evaluated by IHC alone that may yield false negatives/positives for poor-quality samples. Therefore, we developed a method that was based on quantitative real-time PCR applicable for DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples. Its limit of detection was determined with breast cancer cell lines and validated with 223 breast cancer patient samples. On the basis of comparisons with fluorescent ISH (FISH) and IHC data, the sensitivity of the new method was 94.2% and 95.1%, its specificity was 100% and 99.1%, and overall concordance between results obtained with the quantitative real-time PCR method and FISH/IHC was 97.6% for both methods. The quantitative real-time PCR method was then used to evaluate the HER2 status of 198 of 3696 breast cancer tissues that yielded indeterminate FISH results. The HER2 copy number was successfully determined in 69.2% of these indeterminate samples. Thus, the DNA-based technique appears to be a specific, sensitive method for determining HER2 copy numbers when the FISH assay fails, which may complement IHC tests. PMID:25956448

  6. Mapping the Distribution of Cysts from the Toxic Dinoflagellate Cochlodinium polykrikoides in Bloom-Prone Estuaries by a Novel Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Assay.

    PubMed

    Hattenrath-Lehmann, Theresa K; Zhen, Yu; Wallace, Ryan B; Tang, Ying-Zhong; Gobler, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Cochlodinium polykrikoides is a cosmopolitan dinoflagellate that is notorious for causing fish-killing harmful algal blooms (HABs) across North America and Asia. While recent laboratory and ecosystem studies have definitively demonstrated that Cochlodinium forms resting cysts that may play a key role in the dynamics of its HABs, uncertainties regarding cyst morphology and detection have prohibited even a rudimentary understanding of the distribution of C. polykrikoides cysts in coastal ecosystems. Here, we report on the development of a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay using oligonucleotide probes specific for the large subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of C. polykrikoides. The LSU rDNA-targeted FISH assay was used with epifluorescence microscopy and was iteratively refined to maximize the fluorescent reaction with C. polykrikoides and minimize cross-reactivity. The final LSU rDNA-targeted FISH assay was found to quantitatively recover cysts made by North American isolates of C. polykrikoides but not cysts formed by other common cyst-forming dinoflagellates. The method was then applied to identify and map C. polykrikoides cysts across bloom-prone estuaries. Annual cyst and vegetative cell surveys revealed that elevated densities of C. polykrikoides cysts (>100 cm(-3)) during the spring of a given year were spatially consistent with regions of dense blooms the prior summer. The identity of cysts in sediments was confirmed via independent amplification of C. polykrikoides rDNA. This study mapped C. polykrikoides cysts in a natural marine setting and indicates that the excystment of cysts formed by this harmful alga may play a key role in the development of HABs of this species. PMID:26637596

  7. Tracking and quantification of nitrifying bacteria in biofilm and mixed liquor of a partial nitrification MBBR pilot plant using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Abzazou, Tarik; Araujo, Rosa M; Auset, María; Salvadó, Humbert

    2016-01-15

    A moving bead biofilm reactor (MBBR) pilot plant was implemented as a partial nitrification process for pre-treatment of ammonium-rich liquors (676 ± 195 mg L(-1)), and studied for 479 days under variations in hydraulic retention time. The main purpose of this work, was the study of dynamics abundance of total bacteria and single-cells nitrifying bacteria belonging to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in biofilms and mixed liquor of the plant. The microbial monitoring was successfully achieved using fluorescence in situ hybridization combined with flocs disaggregation protocol as a useful microbial monitoring tool. A partial nitrification process with a N-NH4(+) removal rate of about 38.6 ± 14.8% was successfully achieved at 211 days after start-up, with a clear dominance of AOB, which accounted for 11.3 ± 17.0% of total bacterial cells compared with only 2.1 ± 4.0% of NOB. The effluent obtained was subsequently supplied to an Anammox reactor for complete ammonium treatment. PMID:26473713

  8. HER2 amplification in gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma: correlation of two antibodies using gastric cancer scoring criteria, H score, and digital image analysis with fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Radu, Oana M; Foxwell, Tyler; Cieply, Kathleen; Navina, Sarah; Dacic, Sanja; Nason, Katie S; Davison, Jon M

    2012-04-01

    We assessed 103 resected gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas for HER2 amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and 2 commercial immunohistochemical assays. Of 103, 30 (29%) were FISH-amplified. Both immunohistochemical assays had greater than 95% concordance with FISH. However, as a screening test for FISH amplification, the Ventana Medical Systems (Tucson, AZ) 4B5 antibody demonstrated superior sensitivity (87%) compared with the DAKO (Carpinteria, CA) A0485 (70%). Of the cases, 28 were immunohistochemically 3+ or immunohistochemically 2+/FISH-amplified with the 4B5 assay compared with only 22 cases with the A0485 assay, representing a large potential difference in patient eligibility for anti-HER2 therapy. Cases with low-level FISH amplification (HER2/CEP17, 2.2-4.0) express lower levels of HER2 protein compared with cases with high-level amplification (HER2/CEP17, ?4.0), raising the possibility of a differential response to anti-HER2 therapy. The H score and digital image analysis may have a limited role in improving HER2 test performance. PMID:22431535

  9. Human carbonyl reductase (CBR) localized to band 21q22. 1 by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization displays gene dosage effects in trisomy 21 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lemieux, N. ); Malfoy, B. ); Forrest, G.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Human carbonyl reductase (CBR) belongs to a group of NADPH-dependent enzymes called aldo-keto reductases. The enzyme can function as an aldo-keto reductase or as a quinone reductase with potential for modulating quinone-mediated oxygen free radicals. The CBR gene was mapped by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization to band 21q22.12, very close to the SOD1 locus at position 2lq22.11. CBR displayed gene dosage effects in trisomy 21 human lymphoblasts at the DNA and mRNA levels. Lymphoblasts with increasing chromosome 21 ploidy also showed increased aldo-keto reductase activity and increased quinone reductase activity. Both aldo-keto reductase activity and quinone reductase activity have been shown to be associated with carbonyl reductase. The location of CBR near SOD1 and the increased enzyme activity and potential for free radical modulation in trisomy 21 cells implicate CBR as a candidate for contributing to the pathology of certain diseases such as Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease. 28 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  10. Aneuploidy in 165,330 human sperm; results of two- and three-colour fluorescence in situ hybridization for chromosomes 1, 12, 15, 18, X, and Y

    SciTech Connect

    Spriggs, E.L.; Martin, R.H. |

    1994-09-01

    To understand the mechanisms that affect aneuploidy, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), using chromosome-specific centromeric probes, was employed to screen a large population of human sperm for numerical errors. To determine the true rate of disomy for chromosomes 1, 12, 15, 18, two-color FISH was performed, and for the gonosomes, three-color FISH. The use of multiple, differently-colored probes allows one to distingish a true disomic sperm from a diploid cell. For each centromeric probe, a minimum of 10,000 sperm nuclei for each of five donors was scored, giving a total count of 165,330 sperm nuclei. The incidence of disomic sperm for the sex chromosomes was significantly increased as compared to the frequency for the autosomes ({chi}{sup 2}=232.3, p<0.001), confirming the results observed in studies of sperm karyotypes and spontaneous abortions. The disomy frequencies for autosomes 1, 12, 15, and 18 were found to be uniform. Inter-donor heterogeneity for disomy frequencies was found to exist for the sex chromosomes and for chromosomes 1 and 15, suggesting significant variation among normal men.

  11. Vertical distribution of Archaea and Bacteria in a meromictic lake as determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Lentini, Valeria; Gugliandolo, Concetta; Maugeri, Teresa L

    2012-01-01

    The prokaryotic cells distribution in the water column of the coastal saline meromictic Lake Faro (Messina, Italy) was investigated by microscopic counting techniques. Water samples were collected at a central station from the surface to the bottom, when waters were characterized by a marked stratification. A "red-water" layer, caused by a dense growth of photosynthetic sulfur bacteria, was present at a depth of 15 m, defining a transition area between oxic (mixolimnion) and anoxic (monimolimnion) layers. Fluorescently labeled 16S rRNA oligonucleotide, group-specific probes were used to determine the abundance of Bacteria and Archaea, and their subgroups, Green Sulfur Bacteria (GSB), Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB), Cyanobacteria and Chromatium okenii, and Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota, as key elements of the microbial community. Bacteria decreased from surface to bottom, while Archaea increased with depth and reached the maximum value at 30 m, where they outnumbered the Bacteria. Bacteria and picophytoplankton prevailed in the mixolimnion. At the chemocline high numbers of prokaryotic cells were present, mainly represented by Cyanobacteria, Chromatium okenii and Euryarchaeota. GSB, SRB, and Crenarchaeota prevailed below the chemocline. Although Archaea constitute a minor fraction of microbial community, they could represent active contributors to the meromictic Lake Faro ecosystem. PMID:22006072

  12. Genetically Abnormal Circulating Cells in Lung Cancer Patients: An Antigen Independent Fluorescence in-situ Hybridization Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Ruth L.; He, Weigong; Khanna, Abha; Fernandez, Ricardo L.; Zaidi, Tanweer M.; Krebs, Matthew; Caraway, Nancy P.; Zhang, Hua-Zhong; Jiang, Feng; Spitz, Margaret R.; Blowers, David P.; Jimenez, Carlos A.; Mehran, Reza J.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Roth, Jack; Morris, Jeffrey S.; Etzel, Carol; El-Zein, Randa

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We performed a study to determine if a fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH)-based assay using isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with DNA probes targeting specific sites on chromosomes known to have abnormalities in Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) cases could detect circulating genetically abnormal cells (CACs). Experimental Design We evaluated 59 NSCLC cases with stage I through IV disease and 24 controls. PBMCs and matched tumors were hybridized with 2 two-color (3p22.1/CEP3 and 10q22.3 [SP-A]/CEP10) and 2 four-color (CEP3, CEP7, CEP17, and 9p21.3 [URO]) and (EGFR, c-MYC, 6p11-q11, and 5p15.2 [LAV]) FISH probes. Percentages of cytogenetically abnormal cells (CACs) in peripheral blood and in matched tumor specimens were quantified using an automated fluorescent scanner. Numbers of CACs were calculated based on the percentage of CACs (defined as PBMCs with genetic abnormalities) per mL of blood and expressed per microliter of blood. Results Patients with NSCLC had significantly higher numbers of CACs than did controls. Mean number of CACs ranged from 7.23±1.32/μl for deletions of 10q22.3/CEP10 to 45.52±7.49/μl for deletions of 3p22.1/CEP3. Numbers of CACs with deletions of 3p22.1, 10q22.3, and 9p21.3, and gains of URO, increased significantly from early to advanced stage of disease. Conclusions We have developed a sensitive and quantitative antigen-independent FISH-based test for detecting CACs in peripheral blood of patients with NSCLC which showed a significant correlation with the presence of cancer. If this pilot study can be validated in a larger study, CACs may have a role in the management of patients with NSCLC. PMID:20651054

  13. Characterization of Brazilian accessions of wild Arachis species of section Arachis (Fabaceae) using heterochromatin detection and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Custódio, Adriana Regina; Seijo, Guillermo; Valls, José Francisco Montenegro

    2013-09-01

    The cytogenetic characterization of Arachis species is useful for assessing the genomes present in this genus, for establishing the relationship among their representatives and for understanding the variability in the available germplasm. In this study, we used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to examine the distribution patterns of heterochromatin and rDNA genes in 12 Brazilian accessions of five species of the taxonomic section Arachis. The heterochromatic pattern varied considerably among the species: complements with centromeric bands in all of the chromosomes (A. hoehnei) and complements completely devoid of heterochromatin (A. gregoryi, A. magna) were observed. The number of 45S rDNA loci ranged from two (A. gregoryi) to eight (A. glandulifera), while the number of 5S rDNA loci was more conserved and varied from two (in most species) to four (A. hoehnei). In some species one pair of 5S rDNA loci was observed adjacent to 45S rDNA loci. The chromosomal markers revealed polymorphism in the three species with more than one accession (A. gregoryi, A. magna and A. valida) that were tested. The previous genome assignment for each of the species studied was confirmed, except for A. hoehnei. The intraspecific variability observed here suggests that an exhaustive cytogenetic and taxonomic analysis is still needed for some Arachis species. PMID:24130444

  14. Food selection by bacterivorous protists: insight from the analysis of the food vacuole content by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Jezbera, Jan; Hornák, Karel; Simek, Karel

    2005-05-01

    A modified fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method was used to analyze bacterial prey composition in protistan food vacuoles in both laboratory and natural populations. Under laboratory conditions, we exposed two bacterial strains (affiliated with beta- and gamma-Proteobacteria -- Aeromonas hydrophila and Pseudomonas fluorescens, respectively) to grazing by three protists: the flagellates Bodo saltans and Goniomonas sp., and the ciliate Cyclidium glaucoma. Both flagellate species preferably ingested A. hydrophila over P. fluorescens, while C. glaucoma showed no clear preferences. Differences were found in the digestion of bacterial prey with B. saltans digesting significantly faster P. fluorescens compared to two other protists. The field study was conducted in a reservoir as part of a larger experiment. We monitored changes in the bacterial prey composition available compared to the bacteria ingested in flagellate food vacuoles. Bacteria detected by probe HGC69a (Actinobacteria) and R-BT065 were negatively selected by flagellates. Bacteria detected by probe CF319a were initially positively selected but along with a temporal shift in bacterial cell size, this trend changed to negative selection during the experiment. Overall, our analysis of protistan food vacuole content indicated marked effects of flagellate prey selectivity on bacterioplankton community composition. PMID:16329920

  15. Improved fluorescent in situ hybridization method for detection of bacteria from activated sludge and river water by using DNA molecular beacons and flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Lenaerts, Jeremy; Lappin-Scott, Hilary M; Porter, Jonathan

    2007-03-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) remains a key technique in microbial ecology. Molecular beacons (MBs) are self-reporting probes that have potential advantages over linear probes for FISH. MB-FISH strategies have been described using both DNA-based and peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-based approaches. Although recent reports have suggested that PNA MBs are superior, DNA MBs have some advantages, most notably cost. The data presented here demonstrate that DNA MBs are suitable for at least some FISH applications in complex samples, providing superior discriminatory power compared to that of corresponding linear DNA-FISH probes. The use of DNA MBs for flow cytometric detection of Pseudomonas putida resulted in approximately double the signal-to-noise ratio of standard linear DNA probes when using laboratory-grown cultures and yielded improved discrimination of target cells in spiked environmental samples, without a need for separate washing steps. DNA MBs were also effective for the detection and cell sorting of both spiked and indigenous P. putida from activated sludge and river water samples. The use of DNA MB-FISH presents another increase in sensitivity, allowing the detection of bacteria in environmental samples without the expense of PNA MBs or multilaser flow cytometry. PMID:17277208

  16. Zoo-fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of human and Indian muntjac karyotypes (Muntiacus muntjak vaginalis) reveals satellite DNA clusters at the margins of conserved syntenic segments.

    PubMed

    Frönicke, L; Scherthan, H

    1997-06-01

    Zoo-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with human whole chromosome-specific paint probes revealed extensive homoeologies between Indian muntjac (2n=6, 7 female, male) and human karyotypes (2n=46). Forty-two conserved syntenic segments, corresponding to all human chromosomes except the Y chromosome, produced a near-complete coverage of the muntjac complement and revealed margins of interspecific segmental homoeology. To test the hypothesis that interstitial satellite DNA loci, illuminated by a Chinese muntjac C5-satellite probe in Indian muntjac chromosome arms, mark ancestral fusion points (Lin CC, Sasi R, Fan YS, Chen Z-Q (1991) New evidence for tandem chromosome fusions in the karyotypic evolution of the Asian muntjacs. Chromosoma 101: 19-24), we combined Zoo-FISH with C5 satellite mapping. Twenty-six interstitial satellite DNA loci were detected in the haploid Indian muntjac genome and were found to co-localize with the margins of conserved human/Indian muntjac syntenic segments. These results were confirmed by two-colour FISH and are in accordance with the tandem fusion hypothesis for Indian muntjac chromosomes. Furthermore, conserved syntenic segment combinations detected in pig, cattle and Indian muntjac Zoo-FISH maps reveal ancestral artiodactyl chromosomes. PMID:9244453

  17. From Environmental Sequences to Morphology: Observation and Characterisation of a Paulinellid Testate Amoeba (Micropyxidiella edaphonis gen. nov. sp. nov. Euglyphida, Paulinellidae) from Soil using Fluorescent in situ Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tarnawski, Sonia-Estelle; Lara, Enrique

    2015-05-01

    High microbial diversity is revealed by environmental DNA surveys. However, nothing is known about the morphology and function of these potentially new organisms. In the course of an environmental soil diversity study, we found for the first time environmental sequences that reveal the presence of Paulinellidae (a mostly marine and marginally freshwater family of euglyphid testate amoebae) in samples of forest litter from different geographic origins. The new sequences form a basal, robust clade in the family. We used fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to detect the organisms from which these sequences derived. We isolated the cells and documented them with light and scanning electron microscopy. Based on these observations, we described these organisms as Micropyxidiella edaphonis gen. nov. sp. nov. The organisms were very small testate amoebae (generally less than 10μm) with an irregular proteinaceous test. This suggests an unknown diversity in testate amoebae, and calls for extending this type of investigations to other protist groups which are known only as environmental DNA sequences. PMID:25935762

  18. International, collaborative assessment of 146,000 prenatal karyotypes: expected limitations if only chromosome-specific probes and fluorescent in-situ hybridization are used.

    PubMed

    Evans, M I; Henry, G P; Miller, W A; Bui, T H; Snidjers, R J; Wapner, R J; Miny, P; Johnson, M P; Peakman, D; Johnson, A; Nicolaides, K; Holzgreve, W; Ebrahim, S A; Babu, R; Jackson, L

    1999-05-01

    The development of chromosome-specific probes (CSP) and fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) has allowed for very rapid identification of selected numerical abnormalities. We attempt here to determine, in principle, what percentage of abnormalities would be detectable if only CSP-FISH were performed without karyotype for prenatal diagnosis. A total of 146 128 consecutive karyotypes for prenatal diagnosis from eight centres in four countries for 5 years were compared with predicted detection if probes for chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X and Y were used, and assuming 100% detection efficiency. A total of 4163 abnormalities (2.85%) were found including 2889 (69. 4%) (trisomy 21, trisomy 18, trisomy 13, numerical sex chromosome abnormalities, and triploidies) which were considered detectable by FISH. Of these, 1274 were mosaics, translocations, deletions, inversions, rings, and markers which would not be considered detectable. CSP-FISH is a useful adjunct to karyotype for high risk situations, and may be appropriate in low risk screening, but should not be seen as a replacement for karyotype as too many structural chromosome abnormalities will be missed. PMID:10325263

  19. Clonal profiling of mixed lobular and ductal carcinoma revealed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tajiri, Ryosuke; Inokuchi, Masafumi; Sawada-Kitamura, Seiko; Kawashima, Hiroko; Nakamura, Ritsuko; Oyama, Takeru; Dobashi, Yoh; Ooi, Akishi

    2014-05-01

    A needle biopsy of a mass in the right breast of a 36-year-old woman revealed invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), and approximately 20% of cancer cells showed unequivocal membranous staining with the HercepTest. After systemic therapy with trastuzumab and paclitaxel followed by FEC (fluorouracil + epirubicin + cyclophosphamide), a right mastectomy was performed. By histological and immunohistochemical examinations, the resected tumor consisted mainly of E-cadherin-negative invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC), and the rest was ERBB2-positive IDC; thus, the diagnosis was mixed ductal and lobular carcinoma. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses revealed that ILC and IDC shared high-level amplification of CCND1 in homogeneously staining regions (HSR) and that IDC had an additional HSR-type amplicon of ERBB2. These findings strongly indicate that IDC and ILC had a common precursor cell with CCND1 amplification. Review of the biopsy specimen with FISH showed IDC with gene amplifications of CCND1 and ERBB2 as a minor component, IDC without amplification of CCND1 or ERBB2 as a major component, and a minute portion of ILC with CCND1 amplification. We speculate that chemotherapy and trastuzumab caused a marked reduction in IDC; however, ILC with CCND1 amplification was resistant to chemotherapy and grew. PMID:24888777

  20. The human ovarian teratocarcinoma cell line PA-1 demonstrates a single translocation: analysis with fluorescence in situ hybridization, spectral karyotyping, and bacterial artificial chromosome microarray.

    PubMed

    Sarraf, Shireen; Tejada, Raphael; Abawi, Massih; Oberst, Michael; Dennis, Tom; Simon, Kelly Claire; Blancato, Jan

    2005-08-01

    Cell lines derived from tumors contain numerous chromosomal aberrations and are the focus of study in tumor evolution. The ovarian teratocarcinoma cell line PA-1 demonstrates a single chromosomal aberration: a reciprocal t(15;20)(p11.2;q11.2). A complete molecular genetic analysis was undertaken to characterize this cell line. The PA-1 cell line was studied with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), spectral karyotyping (SKY), bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) microarray, and Western blotting. Amplification of 20q is frequently implicated in both breast and ovarian cancer; this region contains a number of oncogenes including MDM2, ZNF217, and the ovarian tumor marker WFDC2 (alias HE4). FISH revealed gene amplification of AIB1 (now known as NCOA3) but not STK15 (now known as AURKA). Immunoblot analysis demonstrated 3.6-fold overexpression of the AIB1 protein product, but no elevation of the STK15. BAC cancer gene microarray analysis showed gene amplification of > or =1.20 for five oncogenes. The presence of a consistent single change in PA-1, the t(15;20)(p11.2;q11.2), suggests that the aberration is significant with respect to the transformation status of the cell line. This translocation appears to cause overexpression of AIB1 (and perhaps other proteins), which may provide an immortalizing effect on this cell line. PMID:16080959

  1. Application of ELN cosmid probes using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) towards a clinical diagnostic test for Williams syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Lowery, M.; Brothman, L.; Leonard, C.

    1994-09-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is characterized by mental deficiency, gregarious personalities, dysmorphic facies, supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS), and idiopathic infantile hypercalcemia. Expression of the phenotype is variable. Deletions including an elastin allele (ELN) are thought to be the basis of the connective tissue and vascular abnormalities in WS patients. Patients with WS are hemizygous for ELN, exhibiting a submicroscopic deletion at 7q11.23 detected by FISH. To substantiate the hemizygosity hypothesis and define molecular cytogenetics in patients with familial and sporadic WS, a series of 71 patients were evaluated. EBV-transformed lymphocytes from 48 selected patients were cultured and harvested according to cytogenetic protocol. Cosmids containing ELN were biotinylated and hybridized to metaphase cells by routine procedures. In addition, an alpha-satellite probe for chromosome 7 was included in hybridizations as an internal control. Thirty-one of these 48 patients (65%) showed a deletion in one ELN allele by FISH. Negative patients were shown to be non-affected family members or patients in the {open_quotes}uncertain{close_quotes} category (expressing some, but not all features characteristic of WS). The FISH data were consistent with molecular analyses of ELN deletions. Twenty-three additional patients were referred to confirm or rule out a diagnosis of WS. Nine patients (39%) showed a deletion of ELN by FISH. Correlations between phenotype and FISH results are in progress. These results suggest that a rapid, accurate diagnostic technique for WS using FISH can be implemented in the cytogenetics laboratory as a routine clinical service. Identification of the deletion in patients suspected of having WS will facilitate classification of these patients and improve clinical management.

  2. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with specific oligonucleotide rRNA probes distinguishes the sibling species Stylonychia lemnae and Stylonychia mytilus (Ciliophora, Spirotrichea).

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stephanie L; Bernhard, Detlef; Schlegel, Martin; Fried, Johannes

    2006-02-01

    Based on morphological and morphogenetic characters alone, the sibling species Stylonychia lemnae and Stylonychia mytilus, members of the Stylonychia mytilus complex, can hardly be distinguished. However, biochemical investigations of the isoenzyme pattern of different enzymes showed a distinct differentiation between these two species. In the last few years, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques have become a suitable and reliable tool for identification and differentiation of closely related species of protozoa, such as ciliates. To distinguish the sibling species, a set of specific oligonucleotide probes were developed. In the present study, the SSU rDNA of 7 clones of Stylonychia lemnae and 13 clones of Stylonychia mytilus, isolated from different geographic regions, were sequenced. Comparing all SSU rDNA sequences of both species, only one single difference within the whole gene was detected. Based on this difference, a set of two oligonucleotide probes, targeting the SSU rRNA of each species (Stylonychia mytilus and Stylonychia lemnae) was designed. These probes were successfully tested by applying the FISH techniques on preserved cells of different clones of both species. PMID:16427805

  3. Assignment of the human prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) gene to 1q25 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, A.; Squire, J.A.; Goldberg, H.; Skorecki, K.

    1994-10-01

    A major mechanism for the regulation of prostaglandin synthesis occurs at the level of cyclooxygenase, also known as prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase (PTGS). Two isoforms of PTGS have been identified: PTGS1, encoded by a 2.8-kb mRNA and a mitogen-inducible form, PTGS2, encoded by a 4.5-kb mRNA. We report here the assignment of the human PTGS2 gene to chromosome 1q25 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We note with interest the physical proximity of the PTGS2 gene to that of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), which we have previously mapped to chromosome 1q24-q25. In contrast, the PTGS1 gene has been mapped to chromosome 9. Since cPLA2 and PTGS2 are key enzymes in the synthesis of prostaglandins and thromboxane, the possible implication of this proximity could mean that polymorphic markers already determined for the cPLA2 gene may also prove to be useful as markers for the PTGS2 gene as well. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Let them fly or light them up: matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Schweickert, Birgitta; Moter, Annette; Lefmann, Michael; Göbel, Ulf B

    2004-01-01

    This review focuses on clinical bacteriology and by and large does not cover the detection of fungi, viruses or parasites. It discusses two completely different but complementary approaches that may either supplement or replace classic culture-based bacteriology. The latter view may appear provocative in the light of the actual market penetration of molecular genetic testing in clinical bacteriology. Despite its elegance, high specificity and sensitivity, molecular genetic diagnostics has not yet reached the majority of clinical laboratories. The reasons for this are manifold: Many microbiologists and medical technologists are more familiar with classical microbiological methods than with molecular biology techniques. Culture-based methods still represent the work horse of everyday routine. The number of available FDA-approved molecular genetic tests is limited and external quality control is still under development. Finally, it appears difficult to incorporate genetic testing in the routine laboratory setting due to the limited number of samples received or the lack of appropriate resources. However, financial and time constraints, particularly in hospitals as a consequence of budget cuts and reduced length of stay, lead to a demand for significantly shorter turnaround times that cannot be met by culture-dependent diagnosis. As a consequence, smaller laboratories that do not have the technical and personal equipment required for molecular genetic amplification techniques may adopt alternative methods such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) that combines easy-to-perform molecular hybridization with microscopy, a technique familiar to every microbiologist. FISH is hence one of the technologies presented here. For large hospital or reference laboratories with a high sample volume requiring massive parallel high-throughput testing we discuss matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) of nucleic acids, a technology that has evolved from the post-genome sequencing era, for high-throughput sequence variation analysis (1, 2). PMID:15638841

  5. Optimization of peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) for the detection of bacteria: The effect of pH, dextran sulfate and probe concentration.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Rui; Santos, Rita S; Madureira, Pedro; Almeida, Carina; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2016-05-20

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a molecular technique widely used for the detection and characterization of microbial populations. FISH is affected by a wide variety of abiotic and biotic variables and the way they interact with each other. This is translated into a wide variability of FISH procedures found in the literature. The aim of this work is to systematically study the effects of pH, dextran sulfate and probe concentration in the FISH protocol, using a general peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe for the Eubacteria domain. For this, response surface methodology was used to optimize these 3 PNA-FISH parameters for Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens) and Gram-positive species (Listeria innocua, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Bacillus cereus). The obtained results show that a probe concentration higher than 300nM is favorable for both groups. Interestingly, a clear distinction between the two groups regarding the optimal pH and dextran sulfate concentration was found: a high pH (approx. 10), combined with lower dextran sulfate concentration (approx. 2% [w/v]) for Gram-negative species and near-neutral pH (approx. 8), together with higher dextran sulfate concentrations (approx. 10% [w/v]) for Gram-positive species. This behavior seems to result from an interplay between pH and dextran sulfate and their ability to influence probe concentration and diffusion towards the rRNA target. This study shows that, for an optimum hybridization protocol, dextran sulfate and pH should be adjusted according to the target bacteria. PMID:27021959

  6. Nucleic acid in-situ hybridization detection of infectious agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Curtis T.

    2000-04-01

    Limitations of traditional culture methods and newer polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for detection and speciation of infectious agents demonstrate the need for more rapid and better diagnostics. Nucleic acid hybridization is a detection technology that has gained wide acceptance in cancer and prenatal cytogenetics. Using a modification of the nucleic acid hybridization technique known as fluorescence in-situ hybridization, infectious agents can be detected in a variety of specimens with high sensitivity and specificity. The specimens derive from all types of human and animal sources including body fluids, tissue aspirates and biopsy material. Nucleic acid hybridization can be performed in less than one hour. The result can be interpreted either using traditional fluorescence microscopy or automated platforms such as micro arrays. This paper demonstrates proof of concept for nucleic acid hybridization detection of different infectious agents. Interpretation within a cytologic and histologic context is possible with fluorescence microscopic analysis, thereby providing confirmatory evidence of hybridization. With careful probe selection, nucleic acid hybridization promises to be a highly sensitive and specific practical diagnostic alternative to culture, traditional staining methods, immunohistochemistry and complicated nucleic acid amplification tests.

  7. High concordance between HercepTest immunohistochemistry and ERBB2 fluorescence in situ hybridization before and after implementation of American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathology 2007 guidelines.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Lluri, Maria E; Moatamed, Neda A; Hong, Elizabeth; Apple, Sophia K

    2012-10-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, ERBB2) is an important critical predictive marker in patients with invasive breast cancer. It is thus imperative to ensure accuracy and precision in HER2 and ERBB2 testing. In 2007, the American Society of Clinical Oncology and College of American Pathologists (ASCO/CAP) proposed new guidelines for immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in-situ hybridization scoring in an effort to improve accuracy and utility of these companion diagnostic tests. The goal of the 2007 guidelines was to improve concordance rates between the diagnostic tests and decrease the number of inconclusive cases. This study examines the impact in concordance rates and number of inconclusive cases based on the recent change in guidelines in a large study cohort. HER2 immunohistochemistry and ERBB2 fluorescence in-situ hybridization were performed on all specimens from our facility from years 2003 through 2010 (n=1437). Cases from 2003-2007 (n=1016) were scored using Food and Drug Administration guidelines, with immunohistochemical 3+ cases staining >10% of tumor cells and fluorescence in-situ hybridization amplification cutoff value of 2.0. The 2007 guidelines were implemented and scored accordingly for cases from 2008-2010 (n=421), with immunohistochemical 3+ cases staining >30% of tumor cells and fluorescence in-situ hybridization amplification cutoff value of 2.2. We compared concordance rates before and after 2007 guidelines. For the 2003-2007 study population, the concordance rate between the assays was 97.6% with a corresponding kappa coefficient (k) of 0.90. For the 2008-2010 study population, concordance rate was 97.6% with a corresponding k of 0.89. There was no significant difference in number of inconclusive rates before and after 2007 guidelines. In our study, implementation of the new ASCO/CAP 2007 HER2 guidelines did not show a significant difference in concordance rates and did not decrease the number of inconclusive cases. PMID:22699517

  8. Gene fusion detection in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded benign fibrous histiocytomas using fluorescence in situ hybridization and RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Walther, Charles; Hofvander, Jakob; Nilsson, Jenny; Magnusson, Linda; Domanski, Henryk A; Gisselsson, David; Tayebwa, Johnbosco; Doyle, Leona A; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Mertens, Fredrik

    2015-09-01

    Benign fibrous histiocytomas (FH) can be subdivided into several morphological and clinical subgroups. Recently, gene fusions involving either one of two protein kinase C genes (PRKCB and PRKCD) or the ALK gene were described in FH. We here wanted to evaluate the frequency of PRKCB and PRKCD gene fusions in FH. Using interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization on sections from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumors, 36 cases could be analyzed. PRKCB or PRKCD rearrangements were seen in five tumors: 1/7 regular, 0/3 aneurysmal, 0/6 cellular, 2/7 epithelioid, 0/1 atypical, 2/10 deep, and 0/2 metastatic lesions. We also evaluated the status of the ALK gene in selected cases, finding rearrangements in 3/7 epithelioid and 0/1 atypical lesions. To assess the gene fusion status of FH further, deep sequencing of RNA (RNA-Seq) was performed on FFPE tissue from eight cases with unknown gene fusion status, as well as on two FH and six soft tissue sarcomas with known gene fusions; of the latter eight positive controls, the expected fusion transcript was found in all but one, while 2/8 FH with unknown genetic status showed fusion transcripts, including a novel KIRREL/PRKCA chimera. Thus, also a third member of the PRKC family is involved in FH tumorigenesis. We conclude that gene fusions involving PRKC genes occur in several morphological (regular, cellular, aneurysmal, epithelioid) and clinical (cutaneous, deep) subsets of FH, but they seem to account for only a minority of the cases. In epithelioid lesions, however, rearrangements of PRKC or ALK were seen, as mutually exclusive events, in the majority (5/7) of cases. Finally, the study also shows that RNA-Seq is a promising tool for identifying gene fusions in FFPE tissues. PMID:26121314

  9. Survival rate of wine-related yeasts during alcoholic fermentation assessed by direct live/dead staining combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Branco, Patrícia; Monteiro, Margarida; Moura, Patrícia; Albergaria, Helena

    2012-08-01

    Real-time detection of microorganisms involved in complex microbial process, such as wine fermentations, and evaluation of their physiological state is crucial to predict whether or not those microbial species will be able to impact the final product. In the present work we used a direct live/dead staining (LDS) procedure combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to simultaneously assess the identity and viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc) and Hanseniaspora guilliermondii (Hg) during fermentations performed with single and mixed cultures. The population evolution of both yeasts was determined by plating and by LDS combined with species-specific FISH-probes labeled with Fluorescein. Since the FISH method involves the permeabilization of the cell membrane prior to hybridization and that it may influence the free diffusion of PI in and out of the cells, we optimized the concentration of this dye (0.5 μg of PI per 10(6) cells) for minimal diffusion (less than 2%). Fluorescent cells were enumerated by hemocytometry and flow cytometry. Results showed that the survival rate of Sc during mixed cultures was high throughout the entire process (60% of viable cells at the 9th day), while Hg began to die off at the 2nd day, exhibited 98% of dead cells at the 3rd day (45 g/l of ethanol) and became completely unculturable at the 4th day. However, under single culture fermentation the survival rate and culturability of Hg decreased at a much slower pace, exhibiting at the 7th day (67 g/l of ethanol) 8.7×10(4) CFU/ml and 85% of dead cells. Thus, our work demonstrated that the LDS-FISH method is able to simultaneously assess the viability and identity of these wine-related yeast species during alcoholic fermentation in a fast and reliable way. In order to validate PI-staining as a viability marker during alcoholic fermentation, we evaluated the effect of ethanol on the membrane permeability of Sc and Hg cells, as well as their capacity to recover membrane integrity after being exposed to different levels of ethanol (1%, 6%, 10%, 12% v/v). Results showed that while Sc cells were able to recover membrane integrity after ethanol exposure, Hg cells were not. However, under alcoholic fermentation Sc cells didn't recover membrane integrity after the mid-term (4-5 days) of alcoholic fermentation. PMID:22819715

  10. Visualization of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' cells in the vascular bundle of citrus seed coats with fluorescence in situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hilf, Mark E; Sims, Kenneth R; Folimonova, Svetlana Y; Achor, Diann S

    2013-06-01

    'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' is the bacterium implicated as a causal agent of the economically damaging disease of citrus called huanglongbing (HLB). Vertical transmission of the organism through seed to the seedling has not been demonstrated. Previous studies using real-time polymerase chain reaction assays indicated abundant bacterial 16S rRNA sequences in seed coats of citrus seed but the presence of intact bacterial cells was not demonstrated. We used microscopy to verify that intact bacterial cells were present in citrus seed coats. Bacterial cells with the morphology and physical dimensions appropriate for 'Ca. L. asiaticus' were seen in phloem sieve elements in the vascular bundle of grapefruit seed coats using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses utilizing probes complementary to the 'Ca. L. asiaticus' 16S rRNA gene revealed bacterial cells in the vascular tissue of intact seed coats of grapefruit and pummelo and in fragmented vascular bundles excised from grapefruit seed coats. The physical measurements and the morphology of individual bacterial cells were consistent with those ascribed in the literature to 'Ca. L. asiaticus'. No bacterial cells were observed in preparations of seed from fruit from noninfected trees. A small library of clones amplified from seed coats from a noninfected tree using degenerate primers targeting prokaryote 16S rRNA gene sequences contained no 'Ca. L. asiaticus' sequences, whereas 95% of the sequences in a similar library from DNA from seed coats from an infected tree were identified as 'Ca. L. asiaticus', providing molecular genetic corroboration that the bacterial cells observed by TEM and FISH in seed coats from infected trees were 'Ca. L. asiaticus'. PMID:23676087

  11. Sensitive detection of numerical and structural aberrations of chromosome 1 in neuroblastoma by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization. Comparison with restriction fragment length polymorphism and conventional cytogenetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Combaret, V; Turc-Carel, C; Thiesse, P; Rebillard, A C; Frappaz, D; Haus, O; Philip, T; Favrot, M C

    1995-04-10

    Chromosome I abnormalities are indicators of prognosis in neuroblastoma (NB) but are not yet routinely exploited because conventional methods are technically demanding. We evaluated the pertinence of interphase cytogenetics fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the analysis of chromosome I in NB, compared with conventional methods. Deletion of Ip was detected in 8 of 9 cell lines analyzed by both FISH and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), but was evidenced in only 2 cases by conventional cytogenetics, painting analysis being required to reveal the other cases. The chromosome I number evaluated by FISH reflected the total chromosome modal number obtained by cytogenetics. Twenty-eight specimens obtained from ultrasound-guided punctures, surgical biopsies of the primary tumor and bone-marrow aspirates were studied by FISH on frozen cytocentrifuged smears; 12 had a chromosome I trisomy and 16 a disomy. Requirements for a reliable control analysis of Ip deletion by RFLP were met in only 23 cases. The retention of 2 alleles was observed in 15 cases and Ip deletion in 7, by both techniques. In one case, an interstitial deletion of Ip was evidenced only by RFLP, and one of 5 cases analyzed only by FISH had a Ip deletion. Although FISH might be improved by using additional probes, it presents major advantages for routine exploitation. Determining Ip deletion in individual cells makes it possible to analyze small and heterogeneous tumoral specimens; the technique requires only a few hours and can easily be standardized in non-specialized laboratories. The number of chromosome I homologues per cell might serve as a rapid screening for ploidy. PMID:7705946

  12. Specific Detection and Prevalence of Helicobacter heilmannii-Like Organisms in the Human Gastric Mucosa by Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization and Partial 16S Ribosomal DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Trebesius, K.; Adler, K.; Vieth, M.; Stolte, M.; Haas, R.

    2001-01-01

    Gastric infection with Helicobacter heilmannii (previously known as Gastrospirillum hominis) is invariably linked with the presence of chronic gastritis and the risk of developing low-grade mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma in humans. In contrast to Helicobacter pylori, various H. heilmannii species colonize the stomachs of domestic animals, which might be a reservoir for transmission to humans (zoonosis). To identify the number and prevalence of different H. heilmanni types in humans, we analyzed 89 gastric biopsy samples histologically identified as H. heilmannii positive by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Of these gastric specimens, 84 (94.4%) contained a single H. heilmannii type. In five samples, however, two different H. heilmannii types were detected. The most prevalent species in monoinfected samples is H. heilmannii type 1, found in 78.5% (66 of 84) of the specimens, followed by a novel H. heilmannii-like organism (HHLO), HHLO type 4, identified in 9.6% (8 of 84) of tissue sections. H. heilmannii type 2 and a further HHLO type not described before, type 3, were found in 8.3% (7 of 84) and 1.2% (1 of 84) of the monoinfected samples, respectively. Additionally, HHLO type 5 with a 16S ribosomal DNA sequence identical to that of Helicobacter salomonis was found with a prevalence of 2.4% (2 of 89). Thirteen of these biopsy samples were also investigated by a PCR approach developed for this study that allows a Helicobacter-specific amplification of a variable portion of the 16S rRNA gene and subsequent sequencing. In total, five different types of HHLOs could be identified within these samples. We conclude that humans can be infected by at least five different HHLO types, which presumably have their origin in animal species like dogs, cats, and pigs. PMID:11283079

  13. The human gene for xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group G (XPG) maps to 13q33 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Samec, S.; Corlet, J.; Scherly, D.; Clarkson, S.G. ); Jones, T.A.; Sheer, D. ); Wood, R.D. )

    1994-05-01

    Recently, a human cDNA was isolated that restores normal levels of UV resistance and DNA repair synthesis when expressed in vivo in a lymphoblastoid cell line representing XP group G. The XP-G complementing gene (XPG) generates an mRNA of [approximately]4 kb and encodes a protein (XPGC) with homology to the RAD2 DNA repair protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One hundred twenty nanograms of labeled probe was mixed with 2 [mu]g of human C[sub 0]t-1 DNA as a competitor for repetitive elements. Denaturation, dehydration, hybridization, and washing were performed as described. Probe detection was achieved by incubating metaphase spreads sequentially with 2 [mu]g/ml avidin-Texas Red, 5 [mu]g/ml biotinylated goat anti-avidin antibody, and 2 [mu]g/ml avidin-Texas Red. R-banding was revealed after incubation with fluorescein-labeled anti-BrdU mouse monoclonal antibody. Chromosomes were counter-stained with 0.06 [mu]g/ml DAPI in Citifluor. Analysis of 40 metaphase spreads showed paired signals on both copies of chromosome 13 at band 13q33. No other paired signals were seen consistently on any other chromosome. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  14. [Evaluation of peptide nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) method in the identifi cation of Candida species isolated from blood cultures].

    PubMed

    Aydemir, Gonca; Koç, Ayşe Nedret; Atalay, Mustafa Altay

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, increased number of patients who are hospitalized in intensive care units, received immunosuppressive therapy and treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics that can lead an increase in the incidence of systemic candidiasis. In these patients, the most common clinical manifestation is candidemia. Since the identification of Candida species isolated from blood cultures is time consuming by conventional (morphological and biochemical) methods, rapid, reliable and accurate methods are needed. For this purpose novel systems have been developed to identify the agent directly. The aim of this study was to evaluate the peptide nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) method for the identification of Candida species by comparing with the conventional methods. A total of 50 patients who were admitted to Erciyes University Medical Faculty Hospital clinics and followed with prediagnosis of systemic fungal infections whose blood cultures were positive for the yeasts between July 2011 and July 2012 were included in the study. The conventional identification of Candida isolates was performed by considering macroscopic and microscopic morphology, germ tube test, cycloheximide sensitivity, urease activity and carbohydrate assimilation patterns with API 20C AUX (bioMerieux, France) test. PNA FISH method was conducted by the use of a commercial kit namely Yeast Traffic Light® PNA FISH (AdvanDx, USA). According to morphological and biochemical characteristics (conventional methods), 19 (38%) out of 50 Candida isolates were identified as C.albicans, 12 (24%) as C.glabrata, five (10%) as C.parapsilosis, five (10%) as C.kefyr, four (8%) as C.krusei, two (4%) as C.guilliermondii, two (4%) as C.tropicalis and one (2%) as C.lusitaniae. On the other hand, 24 (48%) of the isolates were identified as C.albicans/C.parapsilosis (with green fluorescence), 16 (32%) as C.glabrata/C.krusei (with red fluorescence) and one (%2) as C.tropicalis (with yellow fluorescence) properly, however one C.tropicalis strain was misidentified as C.albicans by PNA FISH method. Other eight (16%) strains which were not presented in the evaluation panel of PNA FISH kit (5 C.kefyr, 2 C.guillermondii and 1 C.lusitaniae), gave no fluorescence and determined as other Candida spp. According to this, when the species that could be detected with the kit (C.albicans, C.parapsilosis, C.glabrata, C.krusei and C.tropicalis) were considered, the concordance rate with the conventional methods was determined as 97.6% (41/42) and the total evaluation rate for all the species was 84% (41/50). In conclusion, the most frequent isolated species from blood cultures in our hospital was C.albicans, followed by C.glabrata and C.parapsilosis. Since PNA FISH testing is a practical, reliable and rapid (resulted in 90 minutes) method for the identification of Candida strains at species level isolated from blood cultures, it was thought to be useful in routine laboratories. However, further comparative studies are required with large number of strains with the consideration of cost-effectiveness. PMID:27175502

  15. Gene amplification of ESR1 in breast cancers--fact or fiction? A fluorescence in situ hybridization and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification study.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Akishi; Inokuchi, Masafumi; Harada, Shinichi; Inazawa, Johji; Tajiri, Ryousuke; Kitamura, Seiko Sawada-; Ikeda, Hiroko; Kawashima, Hiroko; Dobashi, Yoh

    2012-05-01

    Oestrogen receptor-alpha (ERα), encoded by the ESR1 gene located on 6q25, is a nuclear transcription factor. Since it was reported in 2007 that more than 20% of breast cancers show ESR1 gene amplification, there has been considerable controversy about its frequency and clinical significance. We set out to assess the frequency and levels of ESR1 amplification in breast cancers. In a total of 106 breast needle biopsy specimens examined by immunohistochemistry, 78 tumours contained more than 10% ERα-positive cancer cells. In fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis with an ESR1-specific probe, variously extended ESR1 signals were found in ERα-expressing cells. Some of these were indistinguishable from large clustered signals generally accepted to mean high-level gene amplification in homogeneously staining regions (HSRs), and could be considered to represent gene amplification. However, with RNase treatment, the 'HSR-like' signals changed to small compact signals, and are thus thought to represent concentrated RNA. FISH using two differently labelled probes corresponding to the non-overlapping 5'- and 3'-end portions of the ESR1 gene on touch smears showed a preserved spatial relationship of the 3' to 5' sequence of ESR1, therefore strongly suggesting that the RNA consisted of primary transcripts. Using touch smears obtained from 51 fresh tumours, precise enumeration of ESR1 signals with a correction by the number of centromere 6 on FISH after RNase A treatment revealed that three tumours (5.9%) had tumour cells with one to three additional copies of ESR1 as predominant subpopulations. This infrequent and low level of gene amplification of ESR1 was also detected as a 'gain' of the gene by analysis with multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). The consistent results from immunohistochemistry, FISH, and MLPA in the present study settle the long-standing debate concerning gene amplification of ESR1 in breast carcinoma. PMID:22170254

  16. Subtyping of renal cortical neoplasms in fine needle aspiration biopsies using a decision tree based on genomic alterations detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Gowrishankar, Banumathy; Cahill, Lynnette; Arndt, Alexandra E; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Lin, Oscar; Chadalavada, Kalyani; Chaganti, Seeta; Nanjangud, Gouri J; Murty, Vundavalli V; Chaganti, Raju S K; Reuter, Victor E; Houldsworth, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To improve the overall accuracy of diagnosis in needle biopsies of renal masses, especially small renal masses (SRMs), using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and to develop a renal cortical neoplasm classification decision tree based on genomic alterations detected by FISH. Patients and Methods Ex vivo fine needle aspiration biopsies of 122 resected renal cortical neoplasms were subjected to FISH using a series of seven-probe sets to assess gain or loss of 10 chromosomes and rearrangement of the 11q13 locus. Using specimen (nephrectomy)-histology as the ‘gold standard’, a genomic aberration-based decision tree was generated to classify specimens. The diagnostic potential of the decision tree was assessed by comparing the FISH-based classification and biopsy histology with specimen histology. Results Of the 114 biopsies diagnostic by either method, a higher diagnostic yield was achieved by FISH (92 and 96%) than histology alone (82 and 84%) in the 65 biopsies from SRMs (<4 cm) and 49 from larger masses, respectively. An optimized decision tree was constructed based on aberrations detected in eight chromosomes, by which the maximum concordance of classification achieved by FISH was 79%, irrespective of mass size. In SRMs, the overall sensitivity of diagnosis by FISH compared with histopathology was higher for benign oncocytoma, was similar for the chromophobe renal cell carcinoma subtype, and was lower for clear-cell and papillary subtypes. The diagnostic accuracy of classification of needle biopsy specimens (from SRMs) increased from 80% obtained by histology alone to 94% when combining histology and FISH. Conclusion The present study suggests that a novel FISH assay developed by us has a role to play in assisting in the yield and accuracy of diagnosis of renal cortical neoplasms in needle biopsies in particular, and can help guide the clinical management of patients with SRMs that were non-diagnostic by histology. PMID:24467611

  17. Detection of Y chromosome sequences in a 45,X/46,XXq - patient by Southern blot analysis of PCR-amplified DNA and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Kocova, M.; Siegel, S.F.; Wenger, S.L.

    1995-02-13

    In some cases of gonadal dysgenesis, cytogenetic analysis seems to be discordant with the phenotype of the patients. We have applied techniques such as Southern blot analysis and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to resolve the phenotype/genotype discrepancy in a patient with ambiguous genitalia in whom the peripheral blood karotype was 45,X. Gonadectomy at age 7 months showed the gonadal tissue to be prepubertal testis on the left side and a streak gonad on the right. The karyotype obtained from the left gonad was 45,X/46,XXq- and that from the right gonad was 45,X. Three different techniques, PCR amplification, FISH, and chromosome painting for X and Y chromosomes, confirmed the presence of Y chromosome sequences. Five different tissues were evaluated. The highest percentage of Y chromosome positive cells were detected in the left gonad, followed by the peripheral blood lymphocytes, skin fibroblasts, and buccal mucosa. No Y chromosomal material could be identified in the right gonad. Since the Xq- chromosome is present in the left gonad (testis), it is likely that the Xq- contains Y chromosomal material. Sophisticated analysis in this patient showed that she has at least 2 cell lines, one of which contains Y chromosomal material. These techniques elucidated the molecular basis of the genital ambiguity for this patient. When Y chromosome sequences are present in patients with Ullrich-Turner syndrome or gonadal dysgenesis, the risk for gonadal malignancy is significantly increased. Hence, molecular diagnostic methods to ascertain for the presence of Y chromosome sequences may expedite the evaluation of patients with the ambiguous genitalia. 21 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Validation of a Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Method Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Detection of Helicobacter pylori Clarithromycin Resistance in Gastric Biopsy Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueira, Laura; Fernandes, Ricardo M.; Ferreira, Rui M.; Oleastro, Mónica; Carneiro, Fátima; Brandão, Catarina; Pimentel-Nunes, Pedro; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Figueiredo, Céu; Keevil, Charles W.; Vieira, Maria J.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we evaluated a previously established peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) method as a new diagnostic test for Helicobacter pylori clarithromycin resistance detection in paraffin-embedded gastric biopsy specimens. Both a retrospective study and a prospective cohort study were conducted to evaluate the specificity and sensitivity of a PNA-FISH method to determine H. pylori clarithromycin resistance. In the retrospective study (n = 30 patients), full agreement between PNA-FISH and PCR-sequencing was observed. Compared to the reference method (culture followed by Etest), the specificity and sensitivity of PNA-FISH were 90.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 57.1% to 99.5%) and 84.2% (95% CI, 59.5% to 95.8%), respectively. In the prospective cohort (n = 93 patients), 21 cases were positive by culture. For the patients harboring clarithromycin-resistant H. pylori, the method showed sensitivity of 80.0% (95% CI, 29.9% to 98.9%) and specificity of 93.8% (95% CI, 67.7% to 99.7%). These values likely represent underestimations, as some of the discrepant results corresponded to patients infected by more than one strain. PNA-FISH appears to be a simple, quick, and accurate method for detecting H. pylori clarithromycin resistance in paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens. It is also the only one of the methods assessed here that allows direct and specific visualization of this microorganism within the biopsy specimens, a characteristic that allowed the observation that cells of different H. pylori strains can subsist in very close proximity in the stomach. PMID:23596234

  19. Large-scale polymorphism near the ends of several human chromosomes analyzed by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Trask, B.J.; Friedman, C.; Giorgi, D.

    1994-09-01

    We have discovered a large DNA segment that is polymorphically present at the ends of several human chromosomes. The segment, f7501, was originally derived form a human chromosome 19-specific cosmid library. FISH was used to determine the cosmid`s chromosomal distribution on 44 unrelated humans and several closely related primates. The human subjects represent a diversity of reproductively isolated ethnic populations. FISH analysis revealed that sequences highly homologous to the cosmid`s insert are present on both homologs at 3q, 15q,. and 19p in almost all individuals (88, 85, and 87 of 88 homologs, respectively). Other chromosomes sites were labeled much more rarely in the sampled individuals. For example, 56 of the 88 analyzed chromosomes 11 were labeled (18+/+, 6-/-, and 20+/- individuals). In contrast, 2q was labeled on only 1/88 sampled chromosomes. The termini of 2q, 5q, 6p, 6q, 7p, 8p, 9p, 9q, 11p, 12q, 16p, 19q, and 20q and an interstitial site at 2q13-14 were labeled in at least one individual of the set. EcoR1-fragments derived from the cosmid showed the same hybridization pattern as the entire cosmid, indicating that at least 40 kbp is shared by these chromosome ends. Ethnic differences in the allele frequency of these polymorphic variants was observed. For example, signals were observed on 8/10 and 7/10 of the chromosomes 7p and 16q, respectively, derived form Biakan Pygmies, but these sites were infrequently labeled in non-Pygmy human populations (2/68, respectively). This region has undergone significant changes in chromosome location during human evolution. Strong signal was seen on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosome 3, which is homologous to human chromosome 4, a chromosome unlabeled in any of the humans we have analyzed.

  20. A novel four-color fluorescence in situ hybridization assay for the detection of TMPRSS2 and ERG rearrangements in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiaoyu; Randhawa, Grace; Friedman, Cynthia; O'Hara-Larrivee, Siobhan; Kroeger, Kathleen; Dumpit, Ruth; True, Larry; Vakar-Lopez, Funda; Porter, Christopher; Vessella, Robert; Nelson, Peter; Fang, Min

    2013-01-01

    Since the identification of the TMPRSS2-ERG rearrangement as the most common fusion event in prostate cancer, various methods have been developed to detect this rearrangement and to study its prognostic significance. We report a novel four-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay that detects not only the typical TMPRSS2-ERG fusion but also alternative rearrangements of the TMPRSS2 or ERG gene. We validated this assay on fresh, frozen, or formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded prostate cancer specimens, including cell lines, primary prostate cancer tissues, xenograft tissues derived from metastatic prostate cancer, and metastatic tissues from castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients. When compared with either reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction or the Gen-Probe method as the technical reference, analysis using the four-color FISH assay demonstrated an analytical sensitivity of 94.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.80-0.99) and specificity of 100% (95% CI 0.89-1.00) for detecting the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion. The TMPRSS2-ERG fusion was detected in 41% and 43% of primary prostate cancer (n = 59) and CRPC tumors (n = 82), respectively. Rearrangements other than the typical TMPRSS2-ERG fusion were confirmed by karyotype analysis and found in 7% of primary cancer and 13% of CRPC tumors. Successful karyotype analyses are reported for the first time on four of the xenograft samples, complementing the FISH results. Analysis using the four-color FISH assay provides sensitive detection of TMPRSS2 and ERG gene rearrangements in prostate cancer. PMID:23352841

  1. Evidence for cytogenetic and fluorescence in situ hybridization risk stratification of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma in the era of novel therapie.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Prashant; Fonseca, Rafael; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Sinha, Shirshendu; Gertz, Morie A; Stewart, A Keith; Bergsagel, P Leif; Lacy, Martha Q; Dingli, David D; Ketterling, Rhett P; Buadi, Francis; Kyle, Robert A; Witzig, Thomas E; Greipp, Philip R; Dispenzieri, Angela; Kumar, Shaji

    2010-06-01

    Overall survival (OS) has improved with increasing use of novel agents in multiple myeloma (MM). However, the disease course remains highly variable, and the heterogeneity largely reflects different genetic abnormalities. We studied the impact of the Mayo risk-stratification model of MM on patient outcome in the era of novel therapies, evaluating each individual component of the model-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), conventional cytogenetics (CG), and the plasma cell labeling index-that segregates patients into high- and standard-risk categories. This report consists of 290 patients with newly diagnosed MM, predominantly treated with novel agents, who were risk-stratified at diagnosis and were followed up for OS. Of these patients, 81% had received primarily thalidomide (n=50), lenalidomide (n=199), or bortezomib (n=79) as frontline or salvage therapies. Our retrospective analysis validates the currently proposed Mayo risk-stratification model (median OS, 37 months vs not reached for high- and standard-risk patients, respectively; P=.003). Although the FISH or CG test identifies a high-risk cohort with hazard ratios of 2.1 (P=.006) and 2.5 (P=.006), respectively, the plasma cell labeling index cutoff of 3% fails to independently prognosticate patient risk (hazard ratio, 1.4; P=.41). In those stratified as standard-risk by one of the 2 tests (FISH or CG), the other test appears to be of additional prognostic significance. This study validates the high-risk features defined by FISH and CG in the Mayo risk-stratification model for patients with MM predominantly treated with novel therapies based on immunomodulatory agents. PMID:20511484

  2. Identification of a microdeletion at 7q21.3 with fluorescence in situ hybridization in a patient with split hand/split foot (ectrodactyly)

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, L.; Massa, H.; Disteche, C.

    1994-09-01

    Split hand/split foot (SHSF), often referred to as ectrodactyly or lobster claw deformity, is a human developmental disorder characterized by a deep median cleft of the hands and feet, missing digits, and fusion of remaining digits. This anomaly can be seen alone, frequently autosomal dominant, or in association with other abnormalities. One locus for this defect has been localized to chromosome 7q21.3-q22.1. We report a patient with SHSF plus mental retardation, short stature and dysmorphic features who was found to have a microdeletion at this locus detected only with the aid of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). T.H. is a 7 y.o. male who was referred for evaluation of foot anomalies and mild mental retardation. History was remarkable for growth retardation of postnatal onset and hypotonia. Renal ultrasound and audiology evaluation were normal. Physical exam revealed dysplastic ears, micrognathia, long philtrum, high narrow palate, and malformations of the feet consistent with SHSF. Family history was negative for limb abnormalities and mental retardation. A number of patients with SHSF and other anomalies have been found to have deletions involving chromosome 7q21-q22; therefore, high resolution chromosome analysis was performed in T.H. but was inconclusive. Cosmids and yeast artificial chromosomes which we had previously mapped to the SHSF critical region were used as FISH probes and a microdeletion was detected. We were thus able to determine the etiology of this child`s abnormalities and provide accurate genetic counseling, which would not have been possible with standard cytogenetic techniques. This technique also allowed us to further refine the SHSF critical region. This case illustrates the utility of FISH for the rapid identification of suspect microdeletions in SHSF. This approach should also be useful as an expeditious way of defining the critical regions for the location of genes which give rise to other developmental malformations.

  3. Male infertility and copy number variants (CNVs) in the dog: a two-pronged approach using Computer Assisted Sperm Analysis (CASA) and Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Infertility affects ~10-15% of couples trying to have children, in which the rate of male fertility problems is approximately at 30-50%. Copy number variations (CNVs) are DNA sequences greater than or equal to 1 kb in length sharing a high level of similarity, and present at a variable number of copies in the genome; in our study, we used the canine species as an animal model to detect CNVs responsible for male infertility. We aim to identify CNVs associated with male infertility in the dog genome with a two-pronged approach: we performed a sperm analysis using the CASA system and a cytogenetic-targeted analysis on genes involved in male gonad development and spermatogenesis with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), using dog-specific clones. This analysis was carried out to evaluate possible correlations between CNVs on targeted genes and spermatogenesis impairments or infertility factors. Results We identified two genomic regions hybridized by BACs CH82-321J09 and CH82-509B23 showing duplication patterns in all samples except for an azoospermic dog. These two regions harbor two important genes for spermatogenesis: DNM2 and TEKT1. The genomic region encompassed by the BAC clone CH82-324I01 showed a single-copy pattern in all samples except for one dog, assessed with low-quality sperm, displaying a marked duplication pattern. This genomic region harbors SOX8, a key gene for testis development. Conclusion We present the first study involving functional and genetic analyses in male infertility. We set up an extremely reliable analysis on dog sperm cells with a highly consistent statistical significance, and we succeeded in conducting FISH experiments on sperm cells using BAC clones as probes. We found copy number differences in infertile compared with fertile dogs for genomic regions encompassing TEKT1, DNM2, and SOX8, suggesting those genes could have a role if deleted or duplicated with respect to the reference copy number in fertility biology. This method is of particular interest in the dog due to the recognized role of this species as an animal model for the study of human genetic diseases and could be useful for other species of economic interest and for endangered animal species. PMID:24373333

  4. The use of peroxidase-mediated deposition of biotin-tyramide in combination with time-resolved fluorescence imaging of europium chelate label in immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    de Haas, R R; Verwoerd, N P; van der Corput, M P; van Gijlswijk, R P; Siitari, H; Tanke, H J

    1996-10-01

    The application of europium chelates as delayed fluorescent labels in FISH and immunocytochemistry is hampered by their relatively low quantum yield. To increase the intensity of the delayed fluorescence, we have used a recently introduced peroxidase-mediated amplification system. This system results in a large accumulation of biotin-tyramide, which is detected using streptavidin-europium chelate as label. Optimal staining conditions were evaluated for the immunocytochemical detection of vimentin in cryosections of rat liver, for DNA in situ hybridization (alphoid type probes and 40-KB cosmid probes), and for RNA in situ hybridization (detection of 28S ribosomal RNA, human elongation factor mRNA, and luciferase mRNA). Using a time-resolved fluorescence microscope, intense europium fluorescence was obtained in all these applications when the tyramide amplification system was applied. The signals were strong enough to be observed by eye using the microscope in the time-delayed mode. The routine application of this technique for localization and quantization of antigens or nucleic acid sequences in tissue exhibiting strong autofluorescence is discussed. PMID:8813073

  5. Localization of the ribonuclease L inhibitor gene (RNS4I), a new member of the interferon-regulated 2-5A pathway, to 4q31 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Diriong, S.; Taviaux, S.; Salehzada, T. Bisbal, C.; Martinand, C.

    1996-03-05

    This report describes the localization of the the ribonuclease L inhibitor gene (RNS4I) to human chromosome 4q31 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. This gene is a new member of the interferon-regulated pathway which plays a major role in the antiviral and antiproliferative activities and results in the stability of cells. Genetic mapping revealed three hybridization peaks on human chromosomes 4, 1 and 7; the hypothesis is that RNS4I maps to chromosome 4q31 and the genes on 1q25 and 7p15-p21 are pseudogenes. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Rat karyotyping by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH): Localization of oncogene c-raf to 4q42, retinoblastoma antioncogene to 15q12, and mitochondrial D-loop-like sequences to the Y chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Zullo, S.; Upender, M.

    1995-02-10

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has been used to karyotype the rat genome with long interspersed repetitive elements (LINEs). Two-color FISH experiments were used to localize the rat c-raf oncogene to 4q42 and the rat retinoblastoma anti-oncogene to 15q12. In addition, sequences similar to the rat mitochondrial origin of replication (D-loop-like sequences) have been found to be concentrated among repetitive element sequences on the Y chromosome. This report extends hybridization-based karyotype technology to the rat, thus facilitating the application of FISH to rat gene mapping. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Comparative study between quantitative digital image analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization of breast cancer equivocal human epidermal growth factor receptors 2 score 2+ cases

    PubMed Central

    Ayad, Essam; Mansy, Mina; Elwi, Dalal; Salem, Mostafa; Salama, Mohamed; Kayser, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Background: Optimization of workflow for breast cancer samples with equivocal human epidermal growth factor receptors 2 (HER2)/neu score 2+ results in routine practice, remains to be a central focus of the on-going efforts to assess HER2 status. According to the College of American Pathologists/American Society of Clinical Oncology guidelines equivocal HER2/neu score 2+ cases are subject for further testing, usually by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) investigations. It still remains on open question, whether quantitative digital image analysis of HER2 immunohistochemistry (IHC) stained slides can assist in further refining the HER2 score 2+. Aim of this Work: To assess utility of quantitative digital analysis of IHC stained slides and compare its performance to FISH in cases of breast cancer with equivocal HER2 score 2+. Materials and Methods: Fifteen specimens (previously diagnosed as breast cancer and was evaluated as HER 2- score 2+) represented the study population. Contemporary new cuts were prepared for re-evaluation of HER2 immunohistochemical studies and FISH examination. All the cases were digitally scanned by iScan (Produced by BioImagene [Now Roche-Ventana]). The IHC signals of HER2 were measured using an automated image analyzing system (MECES, www.Diagnomx.eu/meces). Finally, a comparative study was done between the results of the FISH and the quantitative analysis of the virtual slides. Results: Three out of the 15 cases with equivocal HER2 score 2+, turned out to be positive (3+) by quantitative digital analysis, and 12 were found to be negative in FISH too. Two of these three positive cases proved to be positive with FISH, and only one was negative. Conclusions: Quantitative digital analysis is highly sensitive and relatively specific when compared to FISH in detecting HER2/neu overexpression. Therefore, it represents a potential reliable substitute for FISH in breast cancer cases, which desire further refinement of equivocal IHC results. PMID:26110098

  8. Studies on karyotype evolution in higher primates in relation to human chromosome 14 and 9 by comparative mapping of immunoglobulin C epsilon genes with fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, H

    1999-01-01

    Karyotypic homologies in relation to human chromosome 14 and 9 were studied through comparative mapping of the immunoglobulin C epsilon genes in higher primates by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. The C epsilon genes will be suitable probes for the analysis of evolutionary rearrangements due to that the multiple recombinational events such as gene duplications and deletions have occurred repeatedly in the immunoglobulin CH gene family (IGH@) during the course of primate evolution. IGH@ locating on the terminal region of human chromosome 14 (HSA14), at band HSA14q32.33, has generated multiple pseudogenes and among subclasses of IGH@ the C epsilon genes have shown most dynamic changes with generating both truncated type (C epsilon 2) and processed type (C epsilon 3) pseudogenes. In this study, chromosomal homologies and rearrangements on HSA14 (C epsilon 1) and HSA9 (C epsilon 3) in relation to the evolutionary genesis of their primate homologous chromosomes in speciation were investigated by comparative mapping with FISH and chromosome painting (ZOO-FISH) techniques. Comparative mapping of the C epsilon 1 gene at HSA14q32.33 was carried out in seven species of nonhuman primates: common chimpanzee (PTR), pygmy chimpanzee (PPA), gorilla (GGO), orangutan (PPY), white-handed gibbon (HLA), agile gibbon (HAG), and Japanese macaque (MFU). The C epsilon 1 gene was assigned to the telomeric region of HSA14 homologues in each species, namely, PTR15q32, PPA15q32, GGO18q16, PPY15q32, HLA17qter, HAG17qter, and MFU7q29, respectively. These results suggested that HSA14 has high degree of syntenic organization with its primate homologues confirmed by ZOO-FISH. Concerning HSA9, comparative mapping of the C epsilon 3 gene at HSA9p24.2-->p24.1 was performed. The mapped positions indicated the HSA9 homologous regions detected by ZOO-FISH in each species, namely, PTR11q34, PPA11q34, GGO13q22, PPY13q16, HLA8qter, HAG8qter, and MFU14q22, respectively, suggesting that several dynamic chromosomal rearrangements including at least twice pericentric inversions have occurred during the course of hominoid evolution. The comparison of syntenic groups and painting results has provided a hypothesis of the evolutionary genesis of HSA9 and its homologues with defined breakpoints on the present chromosomes. Likewise, studies on karyotype evolution will be promoted by combining comparative mapping with ZOO-FISH that can more clearly define the chromosomal rearrangements among species. PMID:10859938

  9. Detection of two different mRNAs in a single section by dual in situ hybridization: a comparison between colorimetric and fluorescent detection.

    PubMed

    Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; Aymerich, Mara S; Castle, Mara M; Prez-Manso, Mnica; Tun, Teresa; Erro, Elena; Lanciego, Jos L

    2007-05-15

    We have compared the performance of two methods designed to simultaneously detect two different mRNAs within a single brain section by dual ISH. Specific mRNA riboprobes labeled with biotin and digoxigenin were simultaneously hybridized and visualized using either brightfield or fluorescence microscopy. For brightfield visualization, the biotin-labeled riboprobe was detected with a peroxidase chromogen, whereas, an alkaline phosphatase substrate was used for the detection of the digoxigenin-labeled riboprobe. Dual fluorescent ISH involved the detection of the biotin-labeled riboprobe with an Alexa((R))488-conjugated streptavidin followed by the visualization of the digoxigenin-labeled riboprobe with the red fluorescent substrate HNPP. The dual ISH protocols presented here offer sensitive methods to detect the expression of two mRNAs of interest, with both colorimetric and fluorescent ISH each having its strengths and limitations. For example, dual colorimetric ISH has proven to be particularly useful to study the distribution of two mRNAs in different brain nuclei, whereas, dual fluorescent ISH has provided better results when studying the co-localization of two different mRNAs in single neurons. The comprehensive step-by-step procedure is presented, together with a troubleshooting section in which the advantages and limitations of these procedures are reviewed in depth. Moreover, alternative protocols for dual ISH were also compared to those presented here. PMID:17306886

  10. Differences in the gut bacterial flora of healthy and milk-hypersensitive adults, as measured by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Apostolou, E; Pelto, L; Kirjavainen, P V; Isolauri, E; Salminen, S J; Gibson, G R

    2001-04-01

    We enumerated the predominant gut genera from fecal samples of nine healthy and eight milk-hypersensitive adults both before and after 4 weeks Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) supplementation. The anaerobic intestinal microflora of milk-hypersensitive adults was found to resemble that of healthy adults. LGG-consumption resulted in a significant increase in the number of bifidobacteria in healthy but not in milk-hypersensitive subjects, as well as a general increase in bacterial numbers in all other bacterial genera tested in both groups. In conclusion, the composition of the gut microbiota in milk-hypersensitive adults appears to be normal. LGG may have potential in reinforcing the endogenous flora. PMID:11335141

  11. Multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization with peptide nucleic acid probes for enumeration of specific chromosomes in human cells.

    PubMed

    Taneja, K L; Chavez, E A; Coull, J; Lansdorp, P M

    2001-01-01

    In previous studies, we showed that peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes have significant advantages over conventional synthetic RNA or DNA probes in FISH procedures for detecting telomeric and trinucleotide repeat sequences. Here, we report that directly labeled PNA probes recognizing chromosome-specific repeat sequences are also powerful tools for detecting and enumerating specific chromosomes in interphase and metaphase cells. This is illustrated by multicolor FISH experiments with cells from normal individuals and patients with numerical sex chromosome aberrations. PMID:11107176

  12. High resolution chromosome analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization in patients referred for Prader-Willi or Angelman syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-08

    Laboratory testing is helpful in the evaluation of patients suspected to have either Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) or Angelman syndrome (AS) because most of the patients have recognizable cytogenetic deletions of 15q11q13. Maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15, identified by molecular genetic techniques, is found in about 20 to 25% of PWS patients. Paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15 is seen in 2 to 3% of AS patients. Thus, PWS and AS represent the first examples in humans of genetic imprinting or the differential expression of genetic information depending on the parental origin. Herein, I report our experience with FISH and high resolution chromosome analysis in patients referred to confirm or rule out PWS or AS. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Karyotype analysis and visualization of 45S rRNA genes using fluorescence in situ hybridization in aroids (Araceae)

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, Prabhu Shankar; Van Laere, Katrijn; Eeckhaut, Tom; Van Huylenbroeck, Johan; Van Bockstaele, Erik; Khrustaleva, Ludmila

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Karyotype analysis and FISH mapping using 45S rDNA sequences on 6 economically important plant species Anthurium andraeanum Linden ex André, 1877, Monstera deliciosa Liebmann, 1849, Philodendron scandens Koch & Sello, 1853, Spathiphyllum wallisii Regel, 1877, Syngonium auritum (Linnaeus, 1759) Schott, 1829 and Zantedeschia elliottiana (Knight, 1890) Engler, 1915 within the monocotyledonous family Araceae (aroids) were performed. Chromosome numbers varied between 2n=2x=24 and 2n=2x=60 and the chromosome length varied between 15.77 µm and 1.87 µm. No correlation between chromosome numbers and genome sizes was observed for the studied genera. The chromosome formulas contained only metacentric and submetacentric chromosomes, except for Philodendron scandens in which also telocentric and subtelocentric chromosomes were observed. The highest degree of compaction was calculated for Spathiphyllum wallisii (66.49Mbp/µm). B-chromosome-like structures were observed in Anthurium andraeanum. Their measured size was 1.87 times smaller than the length of the shortest chromosome. After FISH experiments, two 45S rDNA sites were observed in 5 genera. Only in Zantedeschia elliottiana, 4 sites were seen. Our results showed clear cytogenetic differences among genera within Araceae, and are the first molecular cytogenetics report for these genera. These chromosome data and molecular cytogenetic information are useful in aroid breeding programmes, systematics and evolutionary studies. PMID:26140158

  14. Localization of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus associated with citrus huanglongbing disease, in its pysllid vector using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) bacterium has been strongly associated with huanglongbing (HLB), or citrus greening, which is currently the most devastating citrus disease worldwide. HLB is transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri in a persistent manner but its interac...

  15. Comparison of immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assessment for Her-2 status in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Weiguo; Ou, Minglin; Chen, Jiejing; Wan, Youhua; Peng, Hongbo; Qi, Minfang; Huang, He; Dai, Yong

    2009-01-01

    Background The concordance rate between IHC and FISH according to clinical performance is still controversial. We report a prospective study to reflect the concordance between IHC and FISH in Guilin city, People's Republic of China. Methods Fifty cases of invasive ductal carcinoma of breast tested by IHC and scored as 0, 1+, 2+ and 3+ by pathologists were further analyzed by FISH using a commercially available double-color probe, and the FISH findings were compared with IHC test results. Results A total concordance of 82.0% was observed with a Kappa coefficient of 0.640 (P < 0.001). A high discordance was observed in 30.0% of the patients with IHC 2+, 7.1% in IHC 3+, 19.2% overall in IHC 0 and 1+. Conclusion The IHC can be used firstly to screen the HER-2 status, and FISH can be used as a supplementary role to IHC and 2+ and some negative cases. And only those cases with Her-2 status of IHC 3+ or FISH positive should be treated with Herceptin. PMID:19895711

  16. Genomic In Situ Hybridization (GISH) as a Tool to Identify Chromosomes of Parental Species in Sunflower Interspecific Hybrids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interspecific hybridization has been widely used to transfer genes from wild species into cultivated sunflower. Fluorescent genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) has been used to identify alien chromosomes or segments in other crops, but an equivalent technique for sunflower is lacking. The objective...

  17. Localization of the gene for DNA polymerase [epsilon] (POLE) to human chromosome 12q24. 3 and rat chromosome 12 by somatic cell hybrid panels and fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Szpirer, J.; Riviere, M.; Szpirer, C. ); Pedeutour, F.; Turc-Carel, C. ); Kesti, T.; Syvaeoja, J.E. )

    1994-03-15

    DNA polymerase [epsilon] [DNA pol [epsilon] (EC 2.7.7.7)] is one of the four nuclear DNA polymerases in eukaryotic cells. The mammalian enzyme is involved in DNA repair and possibly also in replication of chromosomal DNA. The gene encoding pol [epsilon] (POLE) was assigned to human and rat chromosomes 12 by Southern blot analysis of genomic dNA from mouse-human and mouse-rat somatic cell hybrid panels using human cDNA probe. The human gene was then regionally localized to band 12q24.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization of metaphase spreads of chromosomes from human lymphocytes using genomic DNA probe. POLE is closely linked to HNF1A, a gene encoding a liver-enriched transcription factor, HNF1[alpha]. The two genes thus define a new synteny group retained on human and rat chromosomes 12. Another gene mapping to the same or close-by region as human POLE is a gene for the inherited disorder tuberous sclerosis 3, TSC3. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Polysomy of chromosome 17 in breast cancer tumors showing an overexpression of ERBB2: a study of 175 cases using fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Salido, Marta; Tusquets, Ignasi; Corominas, Josep M; Suarez, Marta; Espinet, Blanca; Corzo, Cristina; Bellet, Meritxell; Fabregat, Xavier; Serrano, Sergi; Solé, Francesc

    2005-01-01

    Introduction One of the most common genetic aberrations associated with breast cancer is the amplification and overexpression of the ERBB2 proto-oncogene located at chromosome 17, bands q12-21. The amplification/overexpression occurs in 25 to 30% of all breast cancers. In breast cancer, aneusomy of chromosome 17, either monosomy or polysomy, is frequently observed by conventional cytogenetics and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The aim of this study was to discover whether or not numerical aberrations on chromosome 17 have a correlation to the amplification or overexpression of the ERBB2 gene and to analyze their clinical implications in subgroups showing 2+ or 3+ positive scores by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Methods We used FISH on a series of 175 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded breast carcinomas to detect ERBB2 amplification, using a dual-probe system for the simultaneous enumeration of the ERBB2 gene and the centromeric region of chromosome 17, as well as using IHC to detect overexpression. We analyzed clinical and pathological variables in a subgroup of patients with 2+ and 3+ IHC scores (147 patients), to describe any differences in clinicopathological characteristics between polysomic and non-polysomic cases with the use of the χ2 test. Results We found 13% of cases presenting polysomy, and three cases presented monosomy 17 (2%). According to the status of the ERBB2 gene, instances of polysomy 17 were more frequently observed in non-amplified cases than in FISH-amplified cases, suggesting that the mechanism for ERBB2 amplification is independent of polysomy 17. Polysomy 17 was detected in patients with 2+ and 3+ IHC scores. We found that nodal involvement was more frequent in polysomic than in non-polysomic cases (P = 0.046). Conclusions The determination of the copy number of chromosome 17 should be incorporated into the assesment of ERBB2 status. It might also be helpful to differentiate a subgroup of breast cancer patients with polysomy of chromosome 17 and overexpression of ERBB2 protein that probably have genetic and clinical differences. PMID:15743507

  19. DNA/DNA in situ hybridization with enzyme linked probes

    SciTech Connect

    Grillo, S.; Mosher, M.; Charles, P.; Henry, S.; Taub, F.

    1987-05-01

    A non-radioactive in situ nucleic acid hybridization method which requires no antibodies, haptens, avidin or biotin intermediateries is presented. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeled nucleic acid probes are hybridized in situ for 2 hours or less, followed by brief washing of hybridized cells and the direct detection of in situ hybrids with diaminobenzidine (DAB). Application of this method to the detection of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in human cells is shown.

  20. HER-2/neu in breast cancer: interobserver variability and performance of immunohistochemistry with 4 antibodies compared with fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Thomson, T A; Hayes, M M; Spinelli, J J; Hilland, E; Sawrenko, C; Phillips, D; Dupuis, B; Parker, R L

    2001-11-01

    The immunohistochemistry (IHC) performance of 4 anti-HER-2/neu antibodies was compared with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of HER-2/neu gene expression in breast cancer patients considered for Herceptin (Trastuzumab) therapy. Interobserver variability in IHC interpretation was measured. Formalin-fixed tissue was received from 24 provincial hospital laboratories. The following anti-Her-2 antibodies were used: DAKO A0485 (polyclonal), Novacastra CB11 (monoclonal), Zymed TAB250 (monoclonal), and DAKO HercepTest (polyclonal). Additional sections were analyzed by FISH (Vysis). Three pathologists blinded to FISH results independently interpreted invasive tumor cell membranous staining on a scale of 0 to +3. The HER-2/neu gene was considered amplified when the FISH signal ratio of HER-2/CEP-17 was > or =2.0. Blocks from all hospitals and of all ages were suitable for IHC and FISH analysis. No interlaboratory analysis variability was noted. The interobserver agreement (kappa) for stain intensity for each antibody was good for 0 and +3 but poor for +1 and +2. Reasonable concordance between IHC and FISH was found with three of the four antibodies. TAB250 was the most sensitive antibody. For the three pathologists, the IHC sensitivities and specificities compared with FISH using 0/+1 as negative and +2/+3 as positive were as follows: A0485, 63-84/95-98; CB11, 63-66/97-98; TAB-250, 82-100/94-95; HercepTest, 59-77/91-93. The positive and negative predictive values varied by stain intensity. Stain scores of 0 and +3 were highly predictive of gene status. Stain scores of +1 and +2 were not sufficiently predictive to classify cases as amplified versus nonamplified. IHC is a reasonable first test to assess HER-2/neu status in patients with breast cancer. For most cases, DAKO A0485, TAB250, and HercepTest adequately predicted gene status. In cases with stain intensity of +1 or +2, the interobserver agreement is poor, and the predictive value is unsatisfactory for clinical use. Additional testing, preferably with FISH, is recommended. PMID:11706067

  1. Cytomolecular characterization of rRNA gene sequences among Citrullus species and subspecies using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In previous studies, many DNA markers showed strong preferential (non-Mendelian) segregation in F2 and BC1 genetic populations derived from crosses between wild type watermelon [C. lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. et Nakai subsp. lanatus var. citroides (Bailey) Mansf. ex Greb.] (CLC) and watermelon cultivar...

  2. Localization of the human zipper protein kinase gene (ZPK) to chromosome 12q13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization and somatic cell hybrid analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, U.R.; Nycum, L.; Slavc, I.

    1995-01-20

    Human teratocarcinoma cells, NTera-2 (NT2), have the phenotypic properties of primitive neuroectodermal cells. Treatment of NT2 cells with retinoic acid and antimitotic drugs results in pure cultures of irreversibly postmitotic, fully differentiated NT2-N neurons. Using subtractive hybridization and employing PCR to amplify the subtractive cDNAs (specific to NT2 or NT2-N cells) with degenerate oligonucleotide primers to the catalytic domains of protein kinases, we have identified several apparently new genes. We have recently described the molecular cloning of one novel putative protein kinase gene, ZPK. The ZPK gene encodes a putative serine/threonine protein kinase of 859 amino acids with a leucine-zipper domain. The gene is expressed in fetal and adult brain, as well as adult kidney, skeletal muscle, and lung. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Final progress report, April 1, 1994--July 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1997-12-31

    The ultimate goal of this research is to generate and apply novel technologies to speed completion and integration of the human genome map and sequence with biomedical problems. To do this, techniques were developed and genome-wide resources generated. This includes a genome-wide Mapped and Integrated BAC/PAC Resource that has been used for gene finding, map completion and anchoring, breakpoint definition and sequencing. In the last period of the grant, the Human Mapped BAC/PAC Resource was also applied to determine regions of human variation and to develop a novel paradigm of primate evolution through to humans. Further, in order to more rapidly evaluate animal models of human disease, a BAC Map of the mouse was generated in collaboration with the MTI Genome Center, Dr. Bruce Birren.

  4. Phenotypic consequences of a mosaic marker chromosome identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as being derived from chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, J.H.; Zhou, X.; Pletcher, B.A.

    1994-09-01

    De novo marker chromosomes are detected in 1 in 2500 amniotic fluid samples and are associated with a 10-15% risk for phenotypic abnormality. FISH can be utilized as a research tool to identify the origins of marker chromosomes. The phenotypic consequences of a marker chromosome derived from the short arm of chromosome 16 are described. A 26-year-old woman underwent amniocentesis at 28 weeks gestation because of a prenatally diagnosed tetralogy of Fallot. Follow-up ultrasounds also showed ventriculomegaly and cleft lip and palate. 32 of 45 cells had the karyotype 47,XY,+mar; the remaining cells were 46,XY. The de novo marker chromosome was C-band positive and non-satellited and failed to stain with distamycin A/DAPI. At birth the ultrasound findings were confirmed and dysmorphic features and cryptorchidism were noted. Although a newborn blood sample contained only normal cells, mosaicism was confirmed in 2 skin biopsies. FISH using whole-chromosome painting and alpha-satellite DNA probes showed that the marker chromosome had originated from chromosome 16. As proximal 16q is distamycin A/DAPI positive, the marker is apparently derived from proximal 16p. At 15 months of age, this child is hypotonic, globally delayed and is gavage-fed. His physical examination is significant for microbrachycephaly, a round face, sparse scalp hair, ocular hypertelorism, exotropia, a flat, wide nasal bridge and tip, mild micrognathia, and tapered fingers with lymphedema of hands and feet. Inguinal hernias have been repaired. His features are consistent with those described for patients trisomic for most or all of the short arm of chromosome 16. Marker chromosomes derived from the short arm of chromosome 16 appear to have phenotypic consequences. As the origin of more marker chromosomes are identified using FISH, their karyotype/phenotype correlations will become more apparent, which will permit more accurate genetic counseling.

  5. Clear-cell and papillary carcinoma of the kidney: an analysis of chromosome 3, 7, and 17 abnormalities by microsatellite amplification, cytogenetics, and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hughson, M D; Dickman, K; Bigler, S A; Meloni, A M; Sandberg, A A

    1998-10-15

    Clear-cell and papillary renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) have specific genetic changes that allow them to be classified on the basis of histopathology and on the basis of cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings. Clear-cell carcinomas are characterized by a deletion of gene sequences on the short arm of chromosome 3 (3p). Papillary RCCs do not have 3p deletions but have an increase in chromosomal number that usually includes trisomies of chromosomes 7 and 17. This study was undertaken to determine whether PCR-amplified DNA microsatellites can be used to detect numerical abnormalities of chromosomes 7 and 17 and whether the numerical abnormalities and 3p deletions that are detected by microsatellite analysis can be correlated with histopathologic tumor types. A series of histologically unambiguous RCCs consisting of three papillary and ten clear-cell RCCs were studied by cytogenetics and by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome 7 and 17 centromeric probes. Microsatellites on the long and short arms of chromosomes 3, 7, and 17 were amplified in paired normal tissue and tumor samples, and the reaction products were analyzed for differences between the normal and the tumor allele ratios. Clear-cell carcinomas showed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of 3p but not 3q alleles in eight of ten cases. LOH of 3p and 3q was seen in one case of papillary RCC that cytogenetically had two normal chromosomes 3. This indicated a nondisjunction duplication that could be confused with monosomy 3 if only microsatellite studies were performed. Differences in microsatellite allele ratios between normal tissue and tumor correlated with the presence of trisomy 7 that was identified in clear-cell and papillary RCCs by cytogenetics and by FISH. Microsatellite analysis did not detect numerical chromosome 17 abnormalities in the papillary RCCs but did show an abnormality in one clear-cell carcinoma that was markedly aneusomic for chromosomes 7 and 17 by FISH. In this collection of cases, microsatellite amplification genetically distinguished only clear-cell RCCs showing 3p but not 3q LOH as a separate class of tumors. The method detected abnormalities in chromosome number that were found in both clear-cell and papillary RCCs. PMID:9797772

  6. Zebrafish Whole-Mount In Situ Hybridization Followed by Sectioning.

    PubMed

    Doganli, Canan; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin

    2016-01-01

    In situ hybridization is a powerful technique used for locating specific nucleic acid targets within morphologically preserved tissues and cell preparations. A labeled RNA or DNA probe hybridizes to its complementary mRNA or DNA sequence within a sample. Here, we describe RNA in situ hybridization protocol for whole-mount zebrafish embryos. PMID:26695046

  7. Inter-observer reproducibility of HER2 immunohistochemical assessment and concordance with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH): pathologist assessment compared to quantitative image analysis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In breast cancer patients, HER2 overexpression is routinely assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and equivocal cases are subject to fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Our study compares HER2 scoring by histopathologists with automated quantitation of staining, and determines the concordance of IHC scores with FISH results. Methods A tissue microarray was constructed from 1,212 invasive breast carcinoma cases with linked treatment and outcome information. IHC slides were semi-quantitatively scored by two independent pathologists on a range of 0 to 3+, and also analyzed with an Ariol automated system by two operators. 616 cases were scorable by both IHC and FISH. Results Using data from unequivocal positive (3+) or negative (0, 1+) results, both visual and automated scores were highly consistent: there was excellent concordance between two pathologists (kappa = 1.000, 95% CI: 1-1), between two machines (kappa = 1.000, 95% CI: 1-1), and between both visual and both machine scores (kappa = 0.898, 95% CI: 0.775–0.979). Two pathologists successfully distinguished negative, positive and equivocal cases (kappa = 0.929, 95% CI: 0.909–0.946), with excellent agreement with machine 1 scores (kappa = 0.835, 95% CI: 0.806–0.862; kappa = 0.837, 95% CI: 0.81–0.862), and good agreement with machine 2 scores (kappa = 0.698, 95% CI: 0.6723–0.723; kappa = 0.709, 95% CI: 0.684–0.732), whereas the two machines showed good agreement (kappa = 0.806, 95% CI: 0.785–0.826). When comparing categorized IHC scores and FISH results, the agreement was excellent for visual 1 (kappa = 0.814, 95% CI: 0.768–0.856), good for visual 2 (kappa = 0.763, 95% CI: 0.712–0.81) and machine 1 (kappa = 0.665, 95% CI: 0.609–0.718), and moderate for machine 2 (kappa = 0.535, 95% CI: 0.485–0.584). Conclusion A fully automated image analysis system run by an experienced operator can provide results consistent with visual HER2 scoring. Further development of such systems will likely improve the accuracy of detection and categorization of membranous staining, making this technique suitable for use in quality assurance programs and eventually in clinical practice. PMID:19476653

  8. Direct detection of Legionella species from bronchoalveolar lavage and open lung biopsy specimens: comparison of LightCycler PCR, in situ hybridization, direct fluorescence antigen detection, and culture.

    PubMed

    Hayden, R T; Uhl, J R; Qian, X; Hopkins, M K; Aubry, M C; Limper, A H; Lloyd, R V; Cockerill, F R

    2001-07-01

    We developed a rapid thermocycling, real-time detection (also known as real-time PCR) method for the detection of Legionella species directly from clinical specimens. This method uses the LightCycler (Roche Molecular Biochemicals, Indianapolis, Ind.) and requires approximately 1 to 2 h to perform. Both a Legionella genus PCR assay and Legionella pneumophila species-specific PCR assay were designed. A total of 43 archived specimens from 35 patients were evaluated, including 19 bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens and 24 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded open lung biopsy specimens. Twenty-five of the specimens were culture-positive for Legionella (9 BAL specimens and 16 tissue specimens). BAL specimens were tested by LightCycler PCR (LC-PCR) methods and by a direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) assay, which detects L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 6 and several other Legionella species. Tissue sections were tested by the two LC-PCR methods, by DFA, by an in situ hybridization (ISH) assay, specifically designed to detect L. pneumophila, and by Warthin-Starry (WS) staining. The results were compared to the "gold standard" method of bacterial culture. With BAL specimens the following assays yielded the indicated sensitivities and specificities, respectively: Legionella genus detection by Legionella genus LC-PCR, 100 and 100%; Legionella genus detection by DFA assay, 33 and 100%; and L. pneumophila detection by L. pneumophila species-specific LC-PCR, 100 and 100%. With open lung biopsy specimens the following assays yielded the indicated sensitivities and specificities, respectively: Legionella genus detection by LC-PCR 68.8 and 100%; Legionella genus detection by DFA assay, 44 and 100%; Legionella genus detection by WS staining, 63 and 100%; L. pneumophila species-specific detection by LC-PCR, 17 and 100%; and L. pneumophila species-specific detection by ISH, 100 and 100%. The analytical sensitivity of both LC-PCR assays was <10 CFU/reaction. LC-PCR is a reliable method for the direct detection of Legionella species from BAL specimens. The Legionella genus LC-PCR assay could be performed initially; if positive, L. pneumophila species-specific LC-PCR could then be performed (if species differentiation is desired). The speed with which the LC-PCR procedure can be performed offers significant advantages over both culture-based methods and conventional PCR techniques. In contrast, for the methods evaluated, culture was the best for detecting multiple Legionella species in lung tissue. WS staining, Legionella genus LC-PCR, and L. pneumophila species-specific ISH were useful as rapid tests with lung tissue. PMID:11427579

  9. High-efficiency single-cell entrapment and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis using a poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic device integrated with a black poly(ethylene terephthalate) micromesh.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Tadashi; Hosokawa, Masahito; Arakaki, Atsushi; Taguchi, Tomoyuki; Mori, Tetsushi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Takeyama, Haruko

    2008-07-01

    Here, we report a high-efficiency single-cell entrapment system with a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic device integrated with a micromesh, and its application to single-cell fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. A micromesh comprising of 10 x 10 microcavities was fabricated on a black poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrate by laser ablation. The cavity was approximately 2 microm in diameter. Mammalian cells were driven and trapped onto the microcavities by applying negative pressure. Trapped cells were uniformly arrayed on the micromesh, enabling high-throughput microscopic analysis. Furthermore, we developed a method of PDMS surface modification by using air plasma and the copolymer Pluronic F-127 to prevent nonspecific adsorption on the PDMS microchannel. This method decreased the nonspecific adsorption of cells onto the microchannel to less than 1%. When cells were introduced into the microfluidic device integrated with the black PET micromesh, approximately 70-80% of the introduced cells were successfully trapped. Moreover, for mRNA expression analysis, on-chip fluorescence in situ hybridization (e.g., membrane permeabilization, hybridization, washing) can be performed in a microfluidic assay on an integrated device. This microfluidic device has been employed for the detection of beta-actin mRNA expression in individual Raji cells. Differences in the levels of beta-actin mRNA expression were observed in serum-supplied or serum-starved cell populations. PMID:18537270

  10. Quantitative Assessment of Picoeukaryotes in the Natural Environment by Using Taxon-Specific Oligonucleotide Probes in Association with Tyramide Signal Amplification-Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization and Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Biegala, Isabelle C.; Not, Fabrice; Vaulot, Daniel; Simon, Nathalie

    2003-01-01

    Picoeukaryotes (cells of <3 μm in diameter) contribute significantly to marine plankton biomass and productivity, and recently molecular studies have brought to light their wide diversity. Among the methods that have been used so far to quantify aquatic microorganisms, fluorescence in situ hybridization of oligonucleotide probes combined with flow cytometry offers the advantages of both high resolution for taxonomic identification and automated cell counting. However, cell losses, cell clumps, and low signal-to-background ratio have often been mentioned as major problems for routine application of this combination of techniques. We developed a new protocol associating tyramide signal amplification-fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry, which allows the detection of picoeukaryotes in cultures during both the exponential and stationary phases. The use of surfactant and sonication proved to be essential for the detection and quantification of picoeukaryotes from the natural environment, with as little as a few tenths of a milliliter of 3-μm-pore-size prefiltered sea water. The routine application of the technique was tested along a coastal transect off Brittany (France), where the different groups of picoeukaryotes were investigated using already published specific probes and a newly designed probe that targets the order Mamiellales (Prasinophyceae, Chlorophyta). Among the picoeukaryotes, Mamiellales outnumbered by 1 order of magnitude both the cyanobacteria and the non-Chlorophyta, which were represented mainly by the Pelagophyceae class. Picoeukaryote abundance increased from open toward more estuarine water, probably following changes in water temperature and stability. PMID:12957941

  11. Assignment of the tyrosinase-related protein-2 gene (TYRP2) to human chromosome 13q31-q32 by fluorescence in situ hybridization: Extended synteny with mouse chromosome 14

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, R.A. ); Baker, E.; Sutherland, G.R. )

    1994-05-01

    A recombinant human genomic liver DNA [lambda]-phage library was screened with the insert of the pHuTRP-2 cDNA clone to isolate a series of bacteriophage with inserts spanning the human TYRP2 gene. One of the [lambda]-phage clones ([lambda]HuT-YRP2-7) containing a 2-kb HindIII fragment with the 5[prime] exon sequence of the cDNA as determined by sequence analysis was used for the gene localization study. DNA prepared from the phage by Qiagen chromatography was nick-translated with biotin-14-dATP and hybridized in situ at a final concentration of 5 ng/[mu]l to metaphases from two normal males. The fluorescence in situ hybridization method was modified from that previously described in that chromosomes were stained before analysis with both propidium iodide as counterstain and DAPI for chromosome identification. Twenty metaphases from the first normal male were examined for fluorescent signal. All of these metaphases showed signal on one or both chromatids of chromosome 13 in the region 13q31-q33; 88% of this signal was at the interface of bands 13q31-q32. There was a total of four nonspecific background dots observed in these 20 metaphases. A similar result was obtained from hybridization of the probe to 20 metaphases from the second normal male (data not shown). This region has also been shown to contain the propionyl coenzyme A carboxylase [alpha]-chain gene by in situ hybridization. The localization of the TYRP2 locus to human chromosome 13q31-q32 extends the syntenic region of chromosome 13 with mouse chromosome 14. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  12. FLUORESCENT IN SITU DETECTION OF ENCEPHALITOZOON HELLEM SPORES WITH A 6-CARBOXYFLUORESCEIN-LABELED RNA-TARGETED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fluorescent in situ hybridization assay has been developed for the detection of the human-pathogenic microsporidian, Encephalitozoon hellem, in water samples using epifluorescence microscopy. The assay employs a 19-nucleotide species-specific 6-carboxyfluorescein-labeled oligo...

  13. Detection of in-situ hybridization to human metaphase chromosomes by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Naoaki; Ishikawa, Mitsuru

    2000-04-01

    Detection of in situ hybridization to human metaphase chromosomes provides important information about gene mappings and about analysis of chromosomal disorders. We applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to the detection of in situ hybridization to get better resolution as compared to light microscopy. Chromosomes were spread over a glass substrate and hybridized with DNA probes labeled with biotin or digoxigenin. The hybridized probes were reacted with streptavidin or anti-digoxigenin antibody, both of which were conjugated with 5-nm gold colloidal particles. We missed direct detection of the conjugated gold colloidal particles by micro-meter scale AFM scanning , but obtained clear topographic difference between the site of hybridization and the chromosome arm with the help of silver enhancement. We thus clearly detected the in situ hybridization using chromosome painting probes, alpha satellite probes, and locus specific gene probes by AFM. The in situ hybridization to DNA fiber was also detected by AFM. The detection of in situ hybridization by AFM has advantages over fluorescence in situ hybridization: no reduction of signal intensity under light irradiation. Application of AFM to the detection of in situ hybridization will be a useful method to analyze chromosomes.

  14. In situ hybridization in the plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana.

    PubMed

    Garcês, Helena; Sinha, Neelima

    2009-10-01

    Here we describe in detail the detection of gene expression in plant tissues of Kalanchoë daigremontiana by in situ hybridization analyses. Included are methods for making RNA transcript probes, probe-tissue hybridization, and detection of antisense RNA probes. The in situ hybridization technique is used to determine which cells or group of cells in particular tissue(s) express a gene of interest. PMID:20147047

  15. Do recorded doses overestimate true doses received by Chernobyl cleanup workers? Results of cytogenetic analyses of Estonian workers by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Littlefield, L G; McFee, A F; Salomaa, S I; Tucker, J D; Inskip, P D; Sayer, A M; Lindholm, C; Mäkinen, S; Mustonen, R; Sorensen, K; Tekkel, M; Veidebaum, T; Auvinen, A; Boice, J D

    1998-08-01

    Studies of workers who were sent to Chernobyl after the 1986 reactor accident are being conducted to provide a better understanding of the effects of chronic low-dose radiation exposures. A crucial component to these investigations is an accurate assessment of the radiation doses received during the cleanup activities. To provide information on biological measurements of dose, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole-chromosome painting probes has been applied to quantify stable chromosome aberrations (translocations and insertions) among a defined cohort of 4,833 cleanup workers from Estonia. Cytogenetic analysis of 48-h lymphocyte cultures from 118 Estonian cleanup workers (10.3 cGy mean recorded dose; 25 cGy maximum), 29 Estonian population controls and 21 American controls was conducted by three laboratories. More than 258,000 painted metaphases were evaluated. Overall, we observed lower translocation frequencies than has been reported in previous studies using FISH among Chernobyl cleanup workers. In our data, a clear association with increased levels of translocations was seen with increasing age at blood drawing. There was no correlation, however, between aberration frequency and recorded measurements of physical dose or any category of potential high-dose and high-dose-rate exposure such as being sent to Chernobyl in 1986, working on the roof near the damaged nuclear reactor, working in special zones or having multiple tours. In fact, the translocation frequency was lower among the exposed workers than the controls, though not significantly so. To estimate the level of effect that would have been expected in a population of men having an average dose of approximately 10 cGy, blood from six donors was exposed to low-LET radiation, and more than 32,000 metaphases were scored to estimate dose-response coefficients for radiation-induced translocations in chromosome pairs 1, 2 and 4. Based on these results, we estimate that had this group of 118 men received an average whole-body dose of 10-11 cGy, as chronic or acute exposures, an increase in the mean frequency of chromosome translocations of more than 40-65% would have been observed in their lymphocytes compared to findings in nonirradiated controls. In spite of evaluating more than a quarter of a million metaphases, we were unable to detect any increase in the mean, median or range in chromosome aberrations in lymphocyte cultures from a group of Estonian men who took part in the cleanup of the Chernobyl nuclear power site and those who did not. We conclude that it is likely that recorded doses for these cleanup workers overestimate their average bone marrow doses, perhaps substantially. These results are consistent with several negative studies of cancer incidence in Chernobyl cleanup workers and, if borne out, suggest that future studies may not be sufficiently powerful to detect increases in leukemia or cancer, much less distinguish differences between the effects of chronic compared to brief radiation exposures. PMID:9692369

  16. Detection of {open_quotes}cryptic{close_quotes}karyotypic rearrangements in closely related primate species by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using human subtelomeric DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblom, J.J.; Trask, B.J.; Friedman, C.

    1994-09-01

    Specific human subtelomeric DNA probes were used to reveal cryptic chromosomal rearrangements that cannot be detected by conventional high resolution cytogenetic techniques, or by chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization using whole chromosome paint analysis. Two cosmids containing different subtelomeric DNA sequences were derived from human chromosome 19 and designated as 7501 and 16432. Cosmid 7501 was hybridized to chromosomes from humans, chimpanzee, gorilla and orangutan. In humans, 7501 consistently labeled chromosomes 3q, 15q, and 19p. Additional chromosomes were labeled in different individuals, indicating a polymorphic distribution of this sequence in the human genome. In contrast, 7501 consistently and strongly labeled only the q arm terminus of chromosome 3 in both chimp and gorilla. The identification of the chromosome was made by two-color FISH analysis using human chromosome 4-specific paint and homologous to human chromosome 4. None of the human subjects showed labeling of chromosome 4 with 7501. This finding suggests that in the course of human evolution, subsequent to the divergence of humans and African apes, a cryptic translocation occurred between the ancestral human chromosome 4 and one or more of the other human chromosomes that now contain this DNA segment. In orangutan, 7501 labeled a single acrocentric chromosome pair, a distinctly different chromosome than that labeled in chimp and gorilla. Comparison of chromosome sites labeled with cosmid 16432 showed the distribution of signals on chromosome 1q arm is the same for humans and chimp, but different in the gorilla. Humans and chimps show distinct labeling on sites 1q terminus and 1q41-42. In gorilla, there is instead a large cluster of intense signal near the terminus of 1q that clearly does not extend all the way to the terminus. A paracentric inversion or an unequal cross-over event may account for the observed difference between these species.

  17. In situ hybridization and immunostaining of Xenopus brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai-li; Wang, Xiu-mei; Li, Zi-long; He, Rong-qiao; Liu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic expression pattern analysis provides the primary information of gene function. Differences of the RNA and/or protein location will provide valuable information for gene expression regulation. Generally, in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) are two main techniques to visualize the locations of gene transcripts and protein products in situ, respectively. Here we describe the protocol for the whole brain dissection, the in situ hybridization and immunostaining of the developing Xenopus brain sections. Additionally, we point out the modification of in situ hybridization for microRNA expression detection. PMID:24048931

  18. The oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) localizes to human chromosome 3p25 by fluorescence in situ hybridization and PCR analysis of somatic cell hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, C.F. Jr.; Clancy, T.E.; Quan, R.

    1995-04-10

    The human oxytocin receptor regulates parturition and myometrial contractility, breast milk let-down, and reproductive behaviors in the mammalian central nervous system. Kimura et al. recently identified a human oxytocin receptor cDNA by means of expression cloning from a human myometrial cDNA library. To elucidate further the molecular mechanisms that regulate oxytocin receptor gene expression and to define the expected Mendelian inheritance of possible human disease states, we must determine the number of genes, their localization, and their organization and structure. We summarize below our data indicating that the human oxytocin receptor gene is localized to 3p25 and exists as a single copy in the haploid genome. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  19. In situ DNA-hybridization chain reaction (HCR): a facilitated in situ HCR system for the detection of environmental microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Kawakami, Shuji; Hatamoto, Masashi; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Masanobu; Araki, Nobuo; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Kubota, Kengo

    2015-07-01

    In situ detection of microorganisms by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful tool for environmental microbiology, but analyses can be hampered by low rRNA content in target organisms, especially in oligotrophic environments. Here, we present a non-enzymatic, hybridization chain reaction (HCR)-based signal amplified in situ whole-cell detection technique (in situ DNA-HCR). The components of the amplification buffer were optimized to polymerize DNA amplifier probes for in situ DNA-HCR. In situ hybridization of initiator probes followed by signal amplification via HCR produced bright signals with high specificity and probe permeation into cells. The detection rates for Bacteria in a seawater sample and Archaea in anaerobic sludge samples were comparable with or greater than those obtained by catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH or standard FISH. Detection of multiple organisms (Bacteria, Archaea and Methanosaetaceae) in an anaerobic sludge sample was achieved by simultaneous in situ DNA-HCR. In summary, in situ DNA-HCR is a simple and easy technique for detecting single microbial cells and enhancing understanding of the ecology and behaviour of environmental microorganisms in situ. PMID:25523128

  20. Fluorescent and chromogenic in situ hybridization of CEN17q as a potent useful diagnostic marker for Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome-associated chromophobe renal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kato, Ikuma; Iribe, Yasuhiro; Nagashima, Yoji; Kuroda, Naoto; Tanaka, Reiko; Nakatani, Yukio; Hasumi, Hisashi; Yao, Masahiro; Furuya, Mitsuko

    2016-06-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD) is a familial disorder associated with a germline mutation of FLCN that is a tumor suppressor gene. Patients with BHD have high risks for developing multiple renal cell carcinomas (RCCs). The frequent histological types are hybrid oncocytic/chromophobe tumors (HOCTs) and chromophobe RCCs. The morphology of HOCTs could alert pathologists to the possibility of BHD. On the other hand, chromophobe RCCs occurring in BHD patients demonstrate positive immunostaining for cytokeratin-7, CD82, and Ksp-cadherin similar to their sporadic counterparts. Highly reliable markers for BHD-associated chromophobe RCCs have not been identified. In the present study, we analyzed the state of chromosome 17 in 18 renal tumors composed of 8 chromophobe RCCs, 7 HOCTs, and 3 papillary RCCs obtained from BHD patients using fluorescent and chromogenic in situ hybridization probes for the centromeric region of chromosome 17 long arm. All chromophobe RCCs and HOCTs were disomic except for 1 chromophobe RCC that showed monosomy. On the other hand, 12 of 14 sporadic chromophobe RCCs were monosomic (P = .0008). The state of chromosomes 2 and 6 were also statistically different (P = .0074 and P = .0007, respectively). Three BHD-associated papillary RCCs demonstrated either trisomy (n = 2) or disomy (n = 1). Three of 5 sporadic papillary RCCs showed trisomy. The results indicate that fluorescent and chromogenic in situ hybridization of the centromeric region of chromosome 17 long arm should be a potent useful marker for chromophobe RCCs in patients who have not been diagnosed with BHD and thereby help to determine whether the cases should be considered for genetic testing. PMID:26980015

  1. A fluorescence in situ hybridization map of human chromosome 21 consisting of 30 genetic and physical markers on the chromosome: Localization of 137 additional YAC and cosmid clones with respect to this map

    SciTech Connect

    Gingrich, J.C.; Shadravan, F.; Lowry, S.R. )

    1993-07-01

    A fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) map of human chromosome 21 was compiled using yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) DNA probes that encode 28 markers physically and/or genetically mapped on the chromosome. Probes that recognize the centromere and rDNA repeat sequences in the p arm were also placed as reference markers on the FISH map. For each probe, the location of the fluorescence hybridization signal was measured on metaphase chromosomes with respect to fractional chromosome length (FL) from p-ter. The location of the markers was established with a standard error of [+-]1.9 Mb using from 9 to 63 FL measurements for each probe. The relative order and separation of the markers as determined by FISH are shown to correspond well to those of other maps of the chromosome. Fifty-one additional YAC and 86 cosmid clones were also localized by FISH with respect to the 30 markers on the chromosome. The cosmids, chosen at random from a flow-sorted chromosome 21 cosmid library, show some biases in chromosome distribution. 42 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Specific detection and localization of microsporidian parasites in invertebrate hosts by using in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Dubuffet, Aurore; Smith, Judith E; Solter, Leellen; Perotti, M Alejandra; Braig, Henk R; Dunn, Alison M

    2013-01-01

    We designed fluorescence in situ hybridization probes for two distinct microsporidian clades and demonstrated their application in detecting, respectively, Nosema/Vairimorpha and Dictyoceola species. We used them to study the vertical transmission of two microsporidia infecting the amphipod Gammarus duebeni. PMID:23087031

  3. Specific Detection and Localization of Microsporidian Parasites in Invertebrate Hosts by Using In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Judith E.; Solter, Leellen; Perotti, M. Alejandra; Braig, Henk R.; Dunn, Alison M.

    2013-01-01

    We designed fluorescence in situ hybridization probes for two distinct microsporidian clades and demonstrated their application in detecting, respectively, Nosema/Vairimorpha and Dictyoceola species. We used them to study the vertical transmission of two microsporidia infecting the amphipod Gammarus duebeni. PMID:23087031

  4. [Development of a Dual Detection Method with Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization and Immunostaining on Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Sections--Molecular Pathological Detection Techniques and Their Applications to Pathological Diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has recently become important for pathological diagnosis. However, its practical applications is not widespread because FISH protocol with FFPE specimens is complicated. We report a dual detection method by overlapping FISH with fluorescent immunostaining on FFPE sections. This method is characterized by changing buffers for heat treatment without proteolytic enzyme treatment. Subsequent proteolytic enzyme treatment can be omitted using an antigen activation solution, pH9 (Nichirei Corporation), for heat treatment. After the pretreatment, dual detection was achieved by DNA FISH following RNA FISH and fluorescent immunostaining. This protocol visualized gene abnormalities and protein overexpression on the same sections. Of note, in poorly differentiated tumors containing both normal and tumor cells, the tumor cells were clearly identified on the sections, and FISH signals could be counted in these cells. In addition, HER2 mRNA overexpression and gene amplification were simultaneously detected in HER2-positive gastric cancer. Thus, this method should be widely applicable in clinical settings. PMID:26548243

  5. Chromosomal localization of the genes encoding the kinetochore proteins CENPE and DENPF to human chromosomes 4q24{r_arrow}q25 and 1q32{r_arrow}q41, respectively, by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Testa, J.R.; Zhou, J.Y.; Bell, D.W.; Yen, T.J.

    1994-10-01

    CENPE and CENPF are human kinetochore proteins of 312 and {approximately}400 kDa, respectively. As part of an effort to characterize the functions of these two proteins, we have used their respective cDNAs to map their human chromosomal locations by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The gene that encodes CENPE, a kinetochore-associated motor protein that is postulated to segregate chromosomes during mitosis, maps to chromosome 4q24{r_arrow}q25. The CENPF gene, which encodes a structural protein of the kinetochore, maps to chromosome 1q32{r_arrow}q41 within close proximity to the genetic locus that is linked to Van der Woude syndrome. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Advantages of peptide nucleic acid oligonucleotides for sensitive site directed 16S rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) detection of Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter lari.

    PubMed

    Lehtola, Markku J; Loades, Christopher J; Keevil, C William

    2005-08-01

    Traditionally fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has been performed with labeled DNA oligonucleotide probes. Here we present for the first time a high affinity peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligonucleotide sequence for detecting thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. using FISH. Thermotolerant Campylobacter spp, including the species Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari, are important food and water borne pathogens. The designed PNA probe (CJE195) bound with higher affinity to a previously reported low affinity site on the 16S rRNA than the corresponding DNA probe. PNA also overcame the problem of the lack of affinity due to the location of the binding site and the variation of the target sequence within species. The PNA probe specificity was tested with several bacterial species, including other Campylobacter spp. and their close relatives. All tested C. coli, C. jejuni and C. lari strains were hybridized successfully. Aging of the Campylobacter cultures caused the formation of coccoid forms, which did not hybridize as well as bacteria in the active growth phase, indicating that the probe could be used to assess the physiological status of targeted cells. The PNA FISH methodology detected C. coli by membrane filtration method from C. coli spiked drinking water samples. PMID:16009278

  7. Comparison of conventional culture method and fluorescent in situ hybridization technique for detection of Listeria spp. in ground beef, turkey, and chicken breast fillets in İzmir, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Baysal, Ayse Handan

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of Listeria species in refrigerated fresh chicken breast fillet, turkey breast fillet, and ground beef was evaluated, comparing the conventional culture method and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH uses hybridization of a nucleic acid sequence target of a microorganism with a specific DNA probe labeled with a fluorochrome and imaging by a fluorescence microscope. First, Listeria was inoculated in chicken breast fillet, turkey breast fillet, or ground beef, and the applicability of the FISH method was evaluated. Second, Listeria was detected in fresh chicken breast fillet, turkey breast fillet, and ground beef by culture and FISH methods. Listeria was isolated from 27 (37.4%) of 216 samples by the standard culture method, whereas FISH detected 25 (24.7%) preenriched samples. Of these isolates, 17 (63%) were L. innocua, 6 (22%) L. welshimeri, and 4 (14.8%) L. seeligeri. Overall, the prevalences of Listeria spp. found with the conventional culture method in chicken breast fillet, turkey breast fillet, and ground beef were 9.7, 6.9, and 20.8%, whereas with the FISH technique these values were 11.1, 6.9, and 16.7%, respectively. The molecular FISH technique appears to be a cheap, sensitive, and time-efficient procedure that could be used for routine detection of Listeria spp. in meat. This study showed that retail raw meats are potentially contaminated with Listeria spp. and are, thus, vehicles for transmitting diseases caused by foodborne pathogens, underlining the need for increased precautions, such as implementation of hazard analysis and critical control points and consumer food safety education. PMID:25474046

  8. Comparative fluorescence in situ hybridization mapping of a 431-kb Arabidopsis thaliana bacterial artificial chromosome contig reveals the role of chromosomal duplications in the expansion of the Brassica rapa genome.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, S A; Cheng, Z; Wang, M L; Goodman, H M; Jiang, J

    2000-01-01

    Comparative genome studies are important contributors to our understanding of genome evolution. Most comparative genome studies in plants have been based on genetic mapping of homologous DNA loci in different genomes. Large-scale comparative physical mapping has been hindered by the lack of efficient and affordable techniques. We report here the adaptation of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques for comparative physical mapping between Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa. A set of six bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) representing a 431-kb contiguous region of chromosome 2 of A. thaliana was mapped on both chromosomes and DNA fibers of B. rapa. This DNA fragment has a single location in the A. thaliana genome, but hybridized to four to six B. rapa chromosomes, indicating multiple duplications in the B. rapa genome. The sizes of the fiber-FISH signals from the same BACs were not longer in B. rapa than those in A. thaliana, suggesting that this genomic region is duplicated but not expanded in the B. rapa genome. The comparative fiber-FISH mapping results support that chromosomal duplications, rather than regional expansion due to accumulation of repetitive sequences in the intergenic regions, played the major role in the evolution of the B. rapa genome. PMID:11014828

  9. Characterization of the temporal persistence of chromosomal abnormalities in the semen of Hodkin`s disease patients after treatment with NOVP chemotherapy using multi-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Cassel, M.J.; Robbins, W.A.; Wyrobek, A.J.; Meistrich, M.L.

    1994-12-31

    Three-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was applied to sperm of men with Hodgkin`s disease to measure the persistence of chromosomally abnormal sperm within the time interval of 3 to 33 months after the end of treatment. NOVP chemotherapy includes the agents novantrone, oncovin, vinblastine, and prednisone, two of which are spindle poisons expected to induce aneuploidy. Semen samples were evaluated for the frequencies of fluorescence phenotypes representing hyperhaploidy, hypohaploidy, and genomic duplications using DNA probes specific for repetitive sequences on chromosomes X,Y, and 8. Using this procedure, NOVP was previously shown to induce chromosomally abnormal sperm in treated patients. In a longitudinal assessment of 11 semen samples from 2 men, frequencies of abnormal sperm appeared to return to pre-treatment levels at {approximately}6 months after the end of treatment and remained at these levels up to 33 months after the end of treatment. However, pre-treatment frequencies of chromosomally abnormal cells in Hodgkin`s patients were elevated above those found in normal healthy men. Additional patients are being evaluated to determine how long after therapy Hodgkin`s disease patients remain at increased risk for producing chromosomally abnormal sperm.

  10. Human very-low-density lipoprotein receptor complementary DNA and deduced amino acid sequence and localization of its Gene (VLDLR) to chromosome band 9p24 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, K.; Tzung, K.W.; Sullivan, M.; Lindsay, E.; Baldini, A.; Chan, L. )

    1994-03-15

    A complementary DNA for the very-low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) that codes for a protein of 873 amino acids was cloned from a human heart cDNA library. The mature protein of 846 amino acids, preceded by a 27-residue signal peptide, shares 97% amino acid sequence identity with the rabbit VLDLR. Like the low-density lipoprotein receptor, the VLDLR contains five different domains, all of which are highly conserved between human and rabbit. A tetrapeptide NPVY that potentially serves as a signal for clustering of the CLDLR on coated pits is present in the cytoplasmic domain, which is 100% conserved between human and rabbit. The authors localized the VLDLR gene to chromosome 9p24 by fluorescence in situ hybridization using the cloned cDNA as hybridization probe. The high amino acid sequence homology of the VLDLR between two mammalian species suggests that the receptor plays a fundamental role in lipoprotein metabolism and that energy metabolism mediated by triglyceride utilization may be an evolutionarily highly conserved mechanism. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Electron Microscopy of Living Cells During in Situ Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liv, Nalan; van Oosten Slingeland, Daan S B; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Kruit, Pieter; Piston, David W; Hoogenboom, Jacob P

    2016-01-26

    We present an approach toward dynamic nanoimaging: live fluorescence of cells encapsulated in a bionanoreactor is complemented with in situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on an integrated microscope. This allows us to take SEM snapshots on-demand, that is, at a specific location in time, at a desired region of interest, guided by the dynamic fluorescence imaging. We show that this approach enables direct visualization, with EM resolution, of the distribution of bioconjugated quantum dots on cellular extensions during uptake and internalization. PMID:26580231

  12. Small RNA Detection by in Situ Hybridization Methods.

    PubMed

    Urbanek, Martyna O; Nawrocka, Anna U; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J

    2015-01-01

    Small noncoding RNAs perform multiple regulatory functions in cells, and their exogenous mimics are widely used in research and experimental therapies to interfere with target gene expression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are the most thoroughly investigated representatives of the small RNA family, which includes short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), PIWI-associated RNA (piRNAs), and others. Numerous methods have been adopted for the detection and characterization of small RNAs, which is challenging due to their short length and low level of expression. These include molecular biology methods such as real-time RT-PCR, northern blotting, hybridization to microarrays, cloning and sequencing, as well as single cell miRNA detection by microscopy with in situ hybridization (ISH). In this review, we focus on the ISH method, including its fluorescent version (FISH), and we present recent methodological advances that facilitated its successful adaptation for small RNA detection. We discuss relevant technical aspects as well as the advantages and limitations of ISH. We also refer to numerous applications of small RNA ISH in basic research and molecular diagnostics. PMID:26068454

  13. Small RNA Detection by in Situ Hybridization Methods

    PubMed Central

    Urbanek, Martyna O.; Nawrocka, Anna U.; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J.

    2015-01-01

    Small noncoding RNAs perform multiple regulatory functions in cells, and their exogenous mimics are widely used in research and experimental therapies to interfere with target gene expression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are the most thoroughly investigated representatives of the small RNA family, which includes short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), PIWI-associated RNA (piRNAs), and others. Numerous methods have been adopted for the detection and characterization of small RNAs, which is challenging due to their short length and low level of expression. These include molecular biology methods such as real-time RT-PCR, northern blotting, hybridization to microarrays, cloning and sequencing, as well as single cell miRNA detection by microscopy with in situ hybridization (ISH). In this review, we focus on the ISH method, including its fluorescent version (FISH), and we present recent methodological advances that facilitated its successful adaptation for small RNA detection. We discuss relevant technical aspects as well as the advantages and limitations of ISH. We also refer to numerous applications of small RNA ISH in basic research and molecular diagnostics. PMID:26068454

  14. Standardized fluorescence in situ hybridization testing based on an appropriate panel of probes more effectively identifies common cytogenetic abnormalities in myelodysplastic syndromes than conventional cytogenetic analysis: a multicenter prospective study of 2302 patients in China.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yue-Yun; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Li, Juan; Zou, Ping; Xu, Ze-Feng; Sun, Hui; Shao, Zong-Hong; Zhou, Dao-Bin; Chen, Fang-Ping; Liu, Zhuo-Gang; Zhu, Huan-Ling; Wu, De-Pei; Wang, Chun; Zhang, Yin; Li, Yan; Hou, Ming; Du, Xin; Wang, Xin; Li, Wei; Lai, Yong-Rong; Zhou, Jin; Zhou, Yu-Hong; Fang, Mei-Yun; Qiu, Lin; Wang, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Guang-Sen; Jiang, Ming; Liang, Ying-Min; Zhang, Lian-Sheng; Chen, Xie-Qun; Bai, Hai; Lin, Jin-Ying

    2015-05-01

    In an attempt to establish the advantages of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies over conventional cytogenetic (CC) analysis, a total of 2302 de novo MDS patients from 31 Chinese institutions were prospectively selected in the present study for both CC and standardized FISH analysis for +8, -7/7q-, -5/5q-, 20q- and-Y chromosomal abnormalities. CC analysis was successful in 94.0% of the patients; of these patients, 35.9% of the cases were abnormal. FISH analysis was successful in all 2302 patients and detected at least one type of common cytogenetic abnormality in 42.7% of the cases. The incidences of +8, -7/7q-, -5/5q-, 20q- and-Y chromosomal abnormalities by FISH were 4.1% to 8.7% higher than those by CC. FISH identified abnormalities in 23.6% of the patients exhibiting normal CC results and revealed that 20.7% of the patients with adequate normal metaphases (≥20) had abnormal clones. FISH identified cytogenetic abnormalities in 50.4% of the patients with failed CC analysis. In summary, our multicenter studies emphasised and confirmed the importance of applying standardized FISH testing based on an appropriate panel of probes to detect common cytogenetic abnormalities in Chinese de novo MDS patients, particularly those with normal or failed CC results. PMID:25823643

  15. Genomic affinities in Turnera (subseries Turnera, Turneraceae) inferred by in situ hybridization techniques.

    PubMed

    López, Alicia; Fernández, Aveliano; Poggio, Lidia

    2010-08-01

    Subseries Turnera comprises a polyploid complex with ploidy levels ranging from diploid (2n = 2x = 10) to octoploid (2n = 8x = 40). The use of fluorescent in situ hybridization greatly improved the knowledge of the karyotypes of Turnera species by detecting and mapping rDNA sites. Interspecific variability in the number of sites was detected, but not in correlation with the ploidy level. A chromosome pair with a strong hybridization signal was always visible and this signal corresponded to the secondary constriction detectable by conventional techniques. Genomic in situ hybridization experiments combined with information on meiotic pairing in species and interspecific hybrids revealed that homologies detected by molecular analysis are greater than those detected by chromosome pairing. This suggests that the formation of the allopolyploids could involve species more closely related than previously assumed. Despite the molecular affinity among the genomes, the meiotic pairing is probably controlled by specific genes that restrict homeologous pairing in polyploids. PMID:20725146

  16. Interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization deletion analysis of the 9p21 region and prognosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL): results from a prospective analysis of 519 Nordic patients treated according to the NOPHO-ALL 2000 protocol.

    PubMed

    Kuchinskaya, Ekaterina; Heyman, Mats; Nordgren, Ann; Söderhäll, Stefan; Forestier, Erik; Wehner, Peder; Vettenranta, Kim; Jonsson, Olafur; Wesenberg, Finn; Sahlén, Sigrid; Nordenskjöld, Magnus; Blennow, Elisabeth

    2011-03-01

    Interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was applied on diagnostic BM smears from 519 children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in order to establish the frequency and prognostic importance of 9p21 deletion in children enrolled in the Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (NOPHO) - 2000 treatment protocol. Among the patients, 452 were diagnosed with B-cell precursor (BCP)-ALL and 66 with T-ALL. A higher incidence of 9p21 deletions was found in T-ALL (38%) compared to BCP-ALL (15·7%). Homozygous deletions were found in 19·7% of T-ALL and 4·0% of BCP-ALL; hemizygous deletions were found in 18·2% and 11·7% respectively. In our series, 9p21 deletions were detected in all age groups with a steady rise in the frequency with age. There was no significant difference in outcome between cases with or without 9p21 deletion or between cases with hemi- or homozygous deletions of 9p21. In conclusion, in this large series of childhood ALL deletion of 9p21 was not associated with worse prognosis. However, interphase FISH deletion analysis of 9p21 could be used as a first step to detect unfavourable subtle cytogenetic aberrations such as the dic(9;20) rearrangement. PMID:21241277

  17. The prognostic value of cytology and fluorescence in situ hybridization in the follow-up of nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer after intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy.

    PubMed

    Savic, Spasenija; Zlobec, Inti; Thalmann, George N; Engeler, Daniel; Schmauss, Martina; Lehmann, Kurt; Mattarelli, Gianfranco; Eichenberger, Tobias; Dalquen, Peter; Spieler, Peter; Schoenegg, René; Gasser, Thomas C; Sulser, Tullio; Forster, Thomas; Zellweger, Tobias; Casella, Roberto; Bubendorf, Lukas

    2009-06-15

    Molecular markers reliably predicting failure or success of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in the treatment of nonmuscle-invasive urothelial bladder cancer (NMIBC) are lacking. The aim of our study was to evaluate the value of cytology and chromosomal aberrations detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in predicting failure to BCG therapy. Sixty-eight patients with NMIBC were prospectively recruited. Bladder washings collected before and after BCG instillation were analyzed by conventional cytology and by multitarget FISH assay (UroVysion, Abbott/Vysis, Des Plaines, IL) for aberrations of chromosomes 3, 7, 17 and 9p21. Persistent and recurrent bladder cancers were defined as positive events during follow-up. Twenty-six of 68 (38%) NMIBC failed to BCG. Both positive post-BCG cytology and positive post-BCG FISH were significantly associated with failure of BCG (hazard ratio (HR)= 5.1 and HR= 5.6, respectively; p < 0.001 each) when compared to those with negative results. In the subgroup of nondefinitive cytology (all except those with unequivocally positive cytology), FISH was superior to cytology as a marker of relapse (HR= 6.2 and 1.4, respectively). Cytology and FISH in post-BCG bladder washings are highly interrelated and a positive result predicts failure to BCG therapy in patients with NMIBC equally well. FISH is most useful in the diagnostically less certain cytology categories but does not provide additional information in clearly malignant cytology. PMID:19230026

  18. Loss of chromosome 17 regions in early-stage prostate tumors detected by quantitative PCR and single-copy fluorescence in situ hybridization: Involvement of the BRCA-1 locus?

    SciTech Connect

    Brothman, A.R.; Steele, M.; Williams, B.J.

    1994-09-01

    Prostate cancer is the leading male malignancy in the U.S., yet no consistent cellular defect has been associated with the disease. Loss of whole chromosome 17 has been observed in primary prostate tumors by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). A small subset of late-stage tumors showed abnormalities in the p53 gene on 17p, but no loss of heterozygosity (LOH) has been observed on the long arm of 17 in prostate cancer. An increased incidence of prostate cancers in families with linkage to the familial breast-ovarian cancer predisposition gene, BRCA-1, indicates that this locus, which maps to 17q, may also be involved in prostate cancers. We studied 23 early-stage primary prostate tumors, obtained from radical prostatectomies, for LOH at five initial sites on chromosome 17 using highly informative microsatellite markers and quantitative analysis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product. Six of the 23 specimens (26%) showed tumor-specific LOH on chromosome 17. Two specimens showed interstitial loss near the BRCA-1 region on 17q. We confirmed these losses by single copy FISH on fixed cell suspensions from the primary tumors using selected P1 probes flanking the markers. Our findings suggest that genes on proximal 17q may play a pivotal role in the development of at least a subset of prostate tumors.

  19. Experimental design and quality assurance: in situ fluorescence instrumentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conmy, Robyn N.; Del Castillo, Carlos E.; Downing, Bryan D.; Chen, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Both instrument design and capabilities of fluorescence spectroscopy have greatly advanced over the last several decades. Advancements include solid-state excitation sources, integration of fiber optic technology, highly sensitive multichannel detectors, rapid-scan monochromators, sensitive spectral correction techniques, and improve data manipulation software (Christian et al., 1981, Lochmuller and Saavedra, 1986; Cabniss and Shuman, 1987; Lakowicz, 2006; Hudson et al., 2007). The cumulative effect of these improvements have pushed the limits and expanded the application of fluorescence techniques to numerous scientific research fields. One of the more powerful advancements is the ability to obtain in situ fluorescence measurements of natural waters (Moore, 1994). The development of submersible fluorescence instruments has been made possible by component miniaturization and power reduction including advances in light sources technologies (light-emitting diodes, xenon lamps, ultraviolet [UV] lasers) and the compatible integration of new optical instruments with various sampling platforms (Twardowski et at., 2005 and references therein). The development of robust field sensors skirt the need for cumbersome and or time-consuming filtration techniques, the potential artifacts associated with sample storage, and coarse sampling designs by increasing spatiotemporal resolution (Chen, 1999; Robinson and Glenn, 1999). The ability to obtain rapid, high-quality, highly sensitive measurements over steep gradients has revolutionized investigations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) optical properties, thereby enabling researchers to address novel biogeochemical questions regarding colored or chromophoric DOM (CDOM). This chapter is dedicated to the origin, design, calibration, and use of in situ field fluorometers. It will serve as a review of considerations to be accounted for during the operation of fluorescence field sensors and call attention to areas of concern when making this type of measurement. Attention is also given to ways in which in-water fluorescence measurements have revolutionized biogeochemical studies of CDOM and how those measurements can be used in conjunction with remotely sense satellite data to understand better the biogeochemistry of DOM in aquatic environments.

  20. Overexpression and gene amplification of both ERBB2 and EGFR in an esophageal squamous cell carcinoma revealed by fluorescence in situ hybridization, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Takeru; Okamoto, Koichi; Nakamura, Ritsuko; Tajiri, Ryosuke; Ikeda, Hiroko; Ninomiya, Itasu; Ooi, Akishi

    2015-11-01

    EGFR and ERBB2 belong to the EGFR gene family. In esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), amplification of EGFR or ERBB2 is usually mutually exclusive. EGFR amplification occurs in approximately 15% of SCCs, ERBB2 occurs in less than 5%. Here, we report the co-amplification of EGFR and ERBB2 in an ulcerative and infiltrating-type SCC that measured approximately 4.2 × 2.7 × 1.2 cm with a superficial lesion occurring in the thoracic esophagus of a 72-year-old man. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification using representative tumor sections showed gain of CCND1 and coincident amplification of ERBB2 or EGFR or neither. Immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that the tumor comprised three cancer-cell populations: well-differentiated SCC with high-level ERBB2 amplification and ERBB2 overexpression, more infiltrative poorly-differentiated SCC with high-level EGFR amplification and EGFR overexpression, and poorly-differentiated SCC lacking any ERBB2 or EGFR abnormality. These three populations each had low-level CCND1 amplification and nuclear cyclin D1 overexpression. This histological topology and gene amplification combinations suggested that genetic instability first produced CCND1 amplification, and then ERBB2 or EGFR gene amplification occurred. It is further speculated that during cancer progression and clonal selection indecisive predominance of either clone caused the rare co-amplification of ERBB2 and EGFR in a single chimeric tumor. PMID:26314265

  1. GeneCARD-FISH: detection of tceA and vcrA reductive dehalogenase genes in Dehalococcoides mccartyi by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Matturro, B; Rossetti, S

    2015-03-01

    Due to the direct involvement in the biodegradation of chlorinated solvents, reductive dehalogenase genes (RDase) are considered biomarkers of the metabolic potential of different strains of Dehalococcoides mccartyi (Dhc). This is known to be the only microbe able to completely reduce toxic chlorinated solvents to harmless ethene. In the last years, several Molecular Biological Tools (MBTs) have been developed to optimize the detectability of Dhc cells and/or the RDase genes, with particular attention to the most important indicators of ethene formation, namely tceA and vcrA genes. Despite qPCR has been indicated as the MBT of choice, the use of CARD-FISH recently demonstrated to provide a more accurate quantification of Dhc cells in a wide concentration range, overcoming the drawbacks of loosing nucleic acids during the preparation of the sample associated with qPCR. CARD-FISH assays usually target 16S rRNA and up to date no protocol able to discriminate different Dhc strains by detecting RDase genes has been developed. This study reports the first evidence of in situ detection of tceA and vcrA genes into Dhc cells by applying a new procedure named geneCARD-FISH. Dhc strains carrying tceA and vcrA genes were identified and quantified in a PCE-to-ethene dechlorinating microbial enrichment and overall they represented 58.63%±2.45% and 40.46%±1.86% of the total Dhc cells, respectively. These values were markedly higher than those obtained by qPCR, which strongly underestimated the actual concentration of vcrA gene (0.08%±0.01% of Dhc 16S rRNA gene copies). The assay was successfully applied also for the analysis of environmental samples and remarkably strengthens the biomonitoring activities at field scale by providing the specific in situ discrimination of Dhc cells carrying the key-RDase genes. PMID:25595619

  2. Combined immunophenotyping and f