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Sample records for fluorescent dye staining

  1. Rapid staining of proteins on polyacrylamide gels and nitrocellulose membranes using a mixture of fluorescent dyes.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, G; Kumar, T K; Pandian, S T; Yu, C

    2000-11-20

    The present work describes a novel, fluorescence-based method for staining proteins on SDS-PAGE and membrane(s). In this method, proteins are stained using a mixed-dye (sulfo-rhodamine B and 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonic acid (NH(4)(+))) solution. The mixed-dye staining protocol can detect proteins up to a concentration of 15 ng. This method is generally applicable to all proteins and is more sensitive than the conventional Coomassie blue method. The staining method is rapid and efficient. Staining-destaining of proteins using the mixed-dye protocol takes less than half an hour. Another interesting feature of the staining protocol described here is the applicability to the staining of proteins on nitrocellulose membranes. PMID:11086192

  2. Fluorescent staining of gels.

    PubMed

    Buxbaum, Engelbert

    2012-01-01

    Certain transition metal complexes show intensive fluorescence when bound to proteins. They can be used to stain gels after electrophoresis with a sensitivity approaching that of silver staining, but in a much simpler and more reproducible procedure. Stains can be prepared easily and at a fraction of the cost of commercially available reagents.Hydrophobic dyes can be used to stain gels without fixing; they do not interfere with later blotting or electro-elution. PMID:22585519

  3. Ex Vivo Sentinel Node Mapping in Colon Cancer Combining Blue Dye Staining and Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Schaafsma, Boudewijn E.; Verbeek, Floris P.R.; van der Vorst, Joost R.; Hutteman, Merlijn; Kuppen, Peter J.K.; Frangioni, John V.; van de Velde, Cornelis J.H.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.

    2013-01-01

    Background The sentinel lymph node procedure has been proposed to improve nodal staging in colon cancer patients. The aim of this study was to assess the added value of near-infrared fluorescence imaging to conventional blue dye staining for ex vivo sentinel lymph node mapping. Materials and Methods Twenty-two consecutive patients undergoing surgery for colon cancer were included. After tumor resection, a premixed cocktail of the near-infrared lymphatic tracer HSA800 and blue dye was submucosally injected around the tumor for detection of sentinel lymph nodes. The Mini-FLARE imaging system was used for fluorescence imaging. Results In 95% of the patients, at least one sentinel lymph node was identified. Overall, a total of 77 sentinel lymph nodes were identified, of which 77 were fluorescent (100%) and 70 (91%) were blue. Sentinel lymph nodes that were located deeper in the mesenteric fat could easily be located by NIR fluorescence. In 4 out of 5 patients with lymph node metastases, tumor cells were present in at least 1 of the sentinel lymph nodes. Conclusions This study shows the successful use and added value of the near-infrared fluorescence tracer HSA800 to conventional blue dye for the ex vivo sentinel lymph node procedure in colon cancer. PMID:23391167

  4. Detection of glycoproteins in polyacrylamide gels using Pro-Q Emerald 300 dye, a fluorescent periodate Schiff-base stain.

    PubMed

    Mehta-D'souza, Padmaja

    2012-01-01

    Pro-Q Emerald 300 glycoprotein stain generates a bright-green fluorescent signal upon reacting with periodic acid-oxidized carbohydrate groups on proteins. With this dye, it is possible to detect proteins directly in the gel without the need to transfer them to a membrane. This dye is more sensitive than the standard periodic acid Schiff's base which uses acidic fuchsin dye. PMID:22585521

  5. A Novel Staining Protocol for Multiparameter Assessment of Cell Heterogeneity in Phormidium Populations (Cyanobacteria) Employing Fluorescent Dyes

    PubMed Central

    Tashyreva, Daria; Elster, Josef; Billi, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial populations display high heterogeneity in viability and physiological activity at the single-cell level, especially under stressful conditions. We demonstrate a novel staining protocol for multiparameter assessment of individual cells in physiologically heterogeneous populations of cyanobacteria. The protocol employs fluorescent probes, i.e., redox dye 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride, ‘dead cell’ nucleic acid stain SYTOX Green, and DNA-specific fluorochrome 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, combined with microscopy image analysis. Our method allows simultaneous estimates of cellular respiration activity, membrane and nucleoid integrity, and allows the detection of photosynthetic pigments fluorescence along with morphological observations. The staining protocol has been adjusted for, both, laboratory and natural populations of the genus Phormidium (Oscillatoriales), and tested on 4 field-collected samples and 12 laboratory strains of cyanobacteria. Based on the mentioned cellular functions we suggest classification of cells in cyanobacterial populations into four categories: (i) active and intact; (ii) injured but active; (iii) metabolically inactive but intact; (iv) inactive and injured, or dead. PMID:23437052

  6. Candida, fluorescent stain (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    This microscopic film shows a fluorescent stain of Candida. Candida is a yeast (fungus) that causes mild disease, but in immunocompromised individuals it may cause life-threatening illness. (Image ...

  7. Methods of staining and visualization of sphingolipid enriched and non-enriched plasma membrane regions of Arabidopsis thaliana with fluorescent dyes and lipid analogues

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sterols and Sphingolipids form lipid clusters in the plasma membranes of cell types throughout the animal and plant kingdoms. These lipid domains provide a medium for protein signaling complexes at the plasma membrane and are also observed to be principal regions of membrane contact at the inception of infection. We visualized different specific fluorescent lipophilic stains of the both sphingolipid enriched and non-sphingolipid enriched regions in the plasma membranes of live protoplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Lipid staining protocols for several fluorescent lipid analogues in plants are presented. The most emphasis was placed on successful protocols for the single and dual staining of sphingolipid enriched regions and exclusion of sphingolipid enriched regions on the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts. A secondary focus was placed to ensure that these staining protocols presented still maintain cell viability. Furthermore, the protocols were successfully tested with the spectrally sensitive dye Laurdan. Conclusion Almost all existing staining procedures of the plasma membrane with fluorescent lipid analogues are specified for animal cells and tissues. In order to develop lipid staining protocols for plants, procedures were established with critical steps for the plasma membrane staining of Arabidopsis leaf tissue and protoplasts. The success of the plasma membrane staining protocols was additionally verified by measurements of lipid dynamics by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique and by the observation of new phenomena such as time dependent lipid polarization events in living protoplasts, for which a putative physiological relevance is suggested. PMID:22867517

  8. A simple, rapid and low-cost staining method for gel-electrophoresis separated phosphoproteins via the fluorescent purpurin dye.

    PubMed

    Cong, Weitao; Shen, Jiayi; Xuan, Yuanhu; Zhu, Xinliang; Ni, Maowei; Zhu, Zhongxin; Hong, Guoying; Lu, Xianghong; Jin, Litai

    2014-12-01

    A novel fluorescence detection method for phosphoproteins in 1-D and 2-D SDS-PAGE by using purpurin is developed in this study. Phosphoproteins as low as 4-8 ng could be specifically detected by purpurin within 60 min, and the detection limit is similar to or better than that of Pro-Q Diamond staining. Only 2 steps (staining and destaining) are needed for purpurin staining without requiring excessive fixing and washing steps, and for single use, $0.8 is enough for purpurin staining. By comprehensively comparing with Pro-Q Diamond staining, it is concluded that purpurin staining is a simple, rapid and low-cost staining method for a broad application to the research of phosphoproteins. PMID:25325196

  9. Exploring the dynamics of fluorescence staining of bacteria with cyanine dyes for the development of kinetic assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Marlon Sheldon

    Bacterial infections continue to be one of the major health risks in the United States. The common occurrence of such infection is one of the major contributors to the high cost of health care and significant patient mortality. The work presented in this thesis describes spectroscopic studies that will contribute to the development of a fluorescent assay that may allow the rapid identification of bacterial species. Herein, the optical interactions between six bacterial species and a series of thiacyanine dyes are investigated. The interactions between the dyes and the bacterial species are hypothesized to be species-specific. For this thesis, two Gram-negative strains, Escherichia coli (E. coli) TOP10 and Enterobacter aerogenes; two Gram-positive bacterial strains, Bacillus sphaericus and Bacillus subtilis; and two Bacillus endospores, B. globigii and B. thuringiensis, were used to test the proposed hypothesis. A series of three thiacyanine dyes---3,3'-diethylthiacyanine iodide (THIA), 3,3'-diethylthiacarbocyanine iodide (THC) and thiazole orange (THO)---were used as fluorescent probes. The basis of our spectroscopic study was to explore the bacterium-induced interactions of the bacterial cells with the individual thiacyanine dyes or with a mixture of the three dyes. Steady-state absorption spectroscopy revealed that the different bacterial species altered the absorption properties of the dyes. Mixed-dye solutions gave unique absorption patterns for each bacteria tested, with competitive binding observed between the bacteria and spectrophotometric probes (thiacyanine dyes). Emission spectroscopy recorded changes in the emission spectra of THIA following the introduction of bacterial cells. Experimental results revealed that the emission enhancement of the dyes resulted from increases in the emission quantum yield of the thiacyanine dyes upon binding to the bacteria cellular components. The recorded emission enhancement data were fitted to an exponential (mono-exponential or bi-exponential) function, and time constants were extracted by regressing on the experimental data. The addition of the TWEEN surfactants decreased the rate at which the dyes interacted with the bacterial cells, which typically resulted in larger time constants derived from an exponential fit. ANOVA analysis of the time constants confirmed that the values of the time constants clustered in a narrow range and were independent of dye concentration and weakly dependent on cell density.

  10. Chromosome characterization using single fluorescent dye

    DOEpatents

    Crissman, Harry A. (Los Alamos, NM); Hirons, Gregory T. (Irvine, CA)

    1995-01-01

    Chromosomes are characterized by fluorescent emissions from a single fluorescent dye that is excited over two different wavelengths. A mixture containing chromosomes is stained with a single dye selected from the group consisting of TOTO and YOYO and the stained chromosomes are placed in a flow cytometer. The fluorescent dye is excited sequentially by a first light having a wavelength in the ultraviolet range to excite the TOTO or YOYO to fluoresce at a first intensity and by a second light having a wavelength effective to excite the TOTO or YOYO dye to fluoresce at a second intensity. Specific chromosomes may be identified and sorted by intensity relationships between the first and second fluorescence emissions.

  11. Lipophilic Dye Staining of Cryptococcus neoformans Extracellular Vesicles and Capsule?

    PubMed Central

    Nicola, Andr Moraes; Frases, Susana; Casadevall, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an encapsulated yeast that causes systemic mycosis in immunosuppressed individuals. Recent studies have determined that this fungus produces vesicles that are released to the extracellular environment both in vivo and in vitro. These vesicles contain assorted cargo that includes several molecules associated with virulence and implicated in host-pathogen interactions, such as capsular polysaccharides, laccase, urease, and other proteins. To date, visualization of extracellular vesicles has relied on transmission electron microscopy, a time-consuming technique. In this work we report the use of fluorescent membrane tracers to stain lipophilic structures in cryptococcal culture supernatants and capsules. Two dialkylcarbocyanine probes with different spectral characteristics were used to visualize purified vesicles by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Dual staining of vesicles with dialkylcarbocyanine and RNA-selective nucleic acid dyes suggested that a fraction of the vesicle population carried RNA. Use of these dyes to stain whole cells, however, was hampered by their possible direct binding to capsular polysaccharide. A fluorescent phospholipid was used as additional membrane tracer to stain whole cells, revealing punctate structures on the edge of the capsule which are consistent with vesicular trafficking. Lipophilic dyes provide new tools for the study of fungal extracellular vesicles and their content. The finding of hydrophobic regions in the capsule of C. neoformans adds to the growing evidence for a structurally complex structure composed of polysaccharide and nonpolysaccharide components. PMID:19465562

  12. 21 CFR 864.1850 - Dye and chemical solution stains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dye and chemical solution stains. 864.1850 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Biological Stains § 864.1850 Dye and chemical solution stains. (a) Identification. Dye and chemical solution stains for medical purposes are mixtures...

  13. 21 CFR 864.1850 - Dye and chemical solution stains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dye and chemical solution stains. 864.1850 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Biological Stains § 864.1850 Dye and chemical solution stains. (a) Identification. Dye and chemical solution stains for medical purposes are mixtures...

  14. 21 CFR 864.1850 - Dye and chemical solution stains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dye and chemical solution stains. 864.1850 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Biological Stains § 864.1850 Dye and chemical solution stains. (a) Identification. Dye and chemical solution stains for medical purposes are mixtures...

  15. 21 CFR 864.1850 - Dye and chemical solution stains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dye and chemical solution stains. 864.1850 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Biological Stains § 864.1850 Dye and chemical solution stains. (a) Identification. Dye and chemical solution stains for medical purposes are mixtures...

  16. 21 CFR 864.1850 - Dye and chemical solution stains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dye and chemical solution stains. 864.1850 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Biological Stains § 864.1850 Dye and chemical solution stains. (a) Identification. Dye and chemical solution stains for medical purposes are mixtures...

  17. Fiberized fluorescent dye microtubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladev, Veselin; Eftimov, Tinko

    2013-03-01

    In the present work we study the effect of the length of fluorescent dye-filled micro-capillaries on the fluorescence spectra. Two types of micro-capillaries have been studied: a 100 ?m inner diameter fused silica capillary with a transparent coating and one of the holes of a fiber optic glass ferrule with 125 ?m inner diameter. The tubes were filled with solutions of Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethanol and then in glycerin. Experimental data show that the maximum fluorescence and the largest spectral widths are observed for a sample length of about 0.25 mm for the used concentration. This results show that miniature tunable fiberized dye lasers can be developed using available standard micro-and fibre-optic components.

  18. Improving acid-fast fluorescent staining for the detection of mycobacteria using a new nucleic acid staining approach.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Gavin J; Shapiro, Howard M; Lenaerts, Anne J

    2014-09-01

    Acid fast staining of sputum smears by microscopy remains the prevalent method for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The sensitivity of microscopy using acid fast stains requires 10(4) bacilli per ml of sputum. Although fluorescent acid fast stains, such as Auramine-O, show improved sensitivity, almost half of culture-positive TB cases are currently estimated to remain smear-negative. These current diagnosis problems provide impetus for improving staining procedures. We evaluated a novel fluorescent acid-fast staining approach using the nucleic acid-binding dye SYBR(®) Gold on mycobacterial in vitro cultures. The SYBR(®) Gold stain detected 99% of MTB in both actively replicating aerobic and non-replicating hypoxic cultures. Transmission light microscopy with Ziehl-Neelsen fuchsin, and fluorescence microscopy with Auramine-O or Auramine-rhodamine detected only 54%-86% of MTB bacilli. SYBR(®) Gold fluoresces more intensely than Auramine-O, and is highly resistant to fading. The signal to noise ratio is exceptionally high due to a >1000-fold enhanced fluorescence after binding to DNA/RNA, thereby reducing most background fluorescence. Although cost and stability of the dye may perhaps limit its clinical use at this time, these results warrant further research into more nucleic acid dye variants. In the meantime, SYBR(®) Gold staining shows great promise for use in numerous research applications. PMID:25130623

  19. A New Organic Dye-Based Staining for The Detection of Plant DNA in Agarose Gels.

    PubMed

    Sönmezoğlu, Özlem Ateş; Özkay, Kerime

    2015-01-01

    Ethidium bromide (EtBr) is used to stain DNA in agarose gel electrophoresis, but this dye is mutagenic and carcinogenic. We investigated N-719, which is a visible, reliable and organic Ruthenium-based dye, and five fluorescent alternatives for staining plant DNA. For prestaining and poststaining, N-719, GelRed, and SYBR Safe stained both DNA and PCR product bands as clearly as EtBr. SYBR Green I, methylene blue, and crystal violet were effective for poststaining only. The organic dye N-719 stained DNA bands as sensitively and as clearly as EtBr. Consequently, organic dyes can be used as alternatives to EtBr in plant biotechnology studies. PMID:26158569

  20. Hydroxyethyl lactamide, a dye solvent useful in vital staining.

    PubMed

    Risso-Dominguez, C J

    1976-03-01

    In a search for new vital stains to reveal the microanatomy of nudibranch mollusks, the slow or very low solubility of many dyes in sea water posed a serious problem. Preliminary dissolution in tap water proved impractical. Hydroxyethyl lactamide, an odorless liquid and dye solvent was found ideal since it permits immediate attainment of saturated solutions of dyes in sea water. Since hydroxyethyl lactamide passed the severe "eolid nudibranch test" and has been found nonirritating for the very sensitive rhinophorial structures, and furthermore since it has been used by the pharmaceutical industry as a vehicle in antibiotic preparations, it appears to be an ideal universal dye solvent for general use in vital staining. It has been used extensively in unpublished research by the writer on vital staining of nudibranchs. It has a low order of physiological activity and can be regarded an essentially inert when used in vital staining. PMID:59418

  1. An innovative brilliant blue FCF method for fluorescent staining of fungi and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chau, H W; Goh, Y K; Si, B C; Vujanovic, Vladimir

    2011-08-01

    Most natural and synthetic dyes currently used for microbial fluorescent staining are toxic or carcinogenic and are harmful to animals, humans and the environment. A food dye for microbial staining, brilliant blue FCF, was used as an alternative to lactofuchsin and lactophenol blue. Brilliant blue FCF shows pronounced microbial cell fluorescence staining of an array of pathogenic/toxigenic (Fusarium granunearum 3- and 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol chemotypes, and Escherichia coli O157:H7) and beneficial fungi and bacteria (Trichoderma harzianum and Bacillus subtilis). Brilliant blue FCF has no toxic effects on the microbes tested and is inexpensive. PMID:20560873

  2. Stain and dye stability over a 30-year period: a comparison of certified dye powders by the Biological Stain Commission.

    PubMed

    Penney, D P; Frank, M; Fagan, C; Willis, C

    2009-02-01

    The Biological Stain Commission (BSC) Assay Laboratory has received numerous inquiries during the past several years regarding the long-term stability of stain and dye powders, particularly since packaging requirements call for expiration dates on reagents. We have conducted a study to examine the long-term stability of selected dye powders. We used the standard procedures of the BSC for testing biological stains for certification to give an indication of the long-term chemical stability as well as staining performance of the dye powders. An earlier study by Emmel and Stotz examined the stability of various dye powders after a five-year storage period. The present study is a follow-up project covering the same dyes after storage for 30 years. The dye samples chosen for the study are the same samples used in the five-year storage period study and give comparative results for all three time periods. The results of this study affirm the generally held speculation that dye powders are stable for many years and thus have a substantial shelf-life. PMID:19096966

  3. The Color of Lactotroph Secretory Granules Stained with FM1-43 Depends on Dye Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Joseph M.; Betz, William J.

    2008-01-01

    When pituitary lactotroph granules undergo exocytosis in the presence of FM1-43, their cores absorb dye and fluoresce brightly. We report that different granules fluoresce with different colors, despite being stained with a single fluorescent dye; emission spectra from individual granules show up to a 25 nm difference between the greenest and reddest granules. We found a correlation between granule color and average fluorescence intensity, suggesting that granule color depends upon dye concentration. We confirmed this in two ways: by increasing FM dye concentration in granules, which red shifted granule color, and by partially photobleaching the FM dye in granules, which green shifted granule color. Increasing stimulation intensity (by increasing KCl concentration) increased the proportion of red granules, indicating that granules exocytosing during intense stimulation bound more dye. This, perhaps, reflects differences in granule core maturation and condensation in which mature granules with condensed cores bind more FM dye but require more intense stimulation to be released. Concentration-dependent color shifts of FM dyes may be useful for monitoring aggregation processes occurring on a size scale smaller than the optical limit. PMID:18065476

  4. Real-time histological imaging of kidneys stained with food dyes using multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Yasuaki; Kimura, Kazushi; Wang, Shujie; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Mizoguchi, Akira

    2015-10-01

    We have developed a real-time imaging technique for diagnosis of kidney diseases which is composed of two steps, staining renal cells safely with food dyes and optical sectioning of living renal tissue to obtain histological images by multiphoton microscopy (MPM). Here, we demonstrated that the MPM imaging with food dyes, including erythrosine and indigo carmine, could be used as fluorescent agents to visualize renal functions and structures such as glomerular bloodstreams, glomerular filtration, and morphology of glomeruli and renal tubules. We also showed that the kidneys of IgA nephropathy model-mice stained with the food dyes presented histopathological characteristics different from those observed in normal kidneys. The use of the food dyes enhances the quality of tissue images obtained by MPM and offers the potential to contribute to a clinical real-time diagnosis of kidney diseases. PMID:26260138

  5. Fluorescent staining of protein in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels by salicylaldehyde azine.

    PubMed

    Ni, Mao-Wei; Ye, Wei-Jian; Cong, Wei-Tao; Hong, Guo-Ying; Zhu, Zhong-Xin; Duan, Yuan-Meng; Zhou, Xuan; Jin, Li-Tai

    2013-12-01

    As a non-covalent fluorescence probe, in this study, salicylaldehyde azine (SA) was introduced as a sensitive fluorescence-based dye for detecting proteins both in 1-D and 2-D polyacrylamide electrophoresis gels. Down to 0.2 ng of single protein band could be detected within 1 h, which similars to that of glutaraldehyde (GA)-silver stain, but approximately four times higher than that of SYPRO Ruby fluorescent stain. Furthermore, comparative analysis of the MS compatibility of SA stain with SYPRO Ruby stain indicated that SA stain is compatible with the downstream of protein identification by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Additionally, the probable mechanism of the SA stain was investigated by molecular docking. The results demonstrated that the interaction between SA and protein was mainly contributed by hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic forces. PMID:24105885

  6. Sizing of single fluorescently stained DNA fragments by scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Laib, Stephan; Rankl, Michael; Ruckstuhl, Thomas; Seeger, Stefan

    2003-01-01

    We describe an approach to determine DNA fragment sizes based on the fluorescence detection of single adsorbed fragments on specifically coated glass cover slips. The brightness of single fragments stained with the DNA bisintercalation dye TOTO-1 is determined by scanning the surface with a confocal microscope. The brightness of adsorbed fragments is found to be proportional to the fragment length. The method needs only minute amount of DNA, beyond inexpensive and easily available surface coatings, like poly-l-lysine, 3-aminoproyltriethoxysilane and polyornithine, are utilizable. We performed DNA-sizing of fragment lengths between 2 and 14 kb. Further, we resolved the size distribution before and after an enzymatic restriction digest. At this a separation of buffers or enzymes was unnecessary. DNA sizes were determined within an uncertainty of 714%. The proposed method is straightforward and can be applied to standardized microtiter plates. PMID:14602931

  7. Investigating Fluorescence Dyes in Fluorescence-Assisted Screenings

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Joo-Eun; Lim, Jaehong; Hyun, Hoon; Oon, Jessica; Ong, Yong Siang; Massif, Cedrik; Chang, Young-Tae; Choi, Hak Soo; Lee, Su Seong

    2014-01-01

    Screening of bead-based peptide libraries against fluorescence-labeled target proteins was found significantly influenced by the dye characteristics. Commercially available red fluorescence dyes with net negative charges adversely showed strong interactions with library beads. The introduction of zwitterionic dyes significantly reduced the unwanted interactions, which sheds light upon using the right fluorescence probe for acquisition of reliable results in various fluorescence-assisted applications. PMID:25340456

  8. Image analysis of dye stained patterns in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogner, Christina; Trancn y Widemann, Baltasar; Lange, Holger

    2013-04-01

    Quality of surface water and groundwater is directly affected by flow processes in the unsaturated zone. In general, it is difficult to measure or model water flow. Indeed, parametrization of hydrological models is problematic and often no unique solution exists. To visualise flow patterns in soils directly dye tracer studies can be done. These experiments provide images of stained soil profiles and their evaluation demands knowledge in hydrology as well as in image analysis and statistics. First, these photographs are converted to binary images classifying the pixels in dye stained and non-stained ones. Then, some feature extraction is necessary to discern relevant hydrological information. In our study we propose to use several index functions to extract different (ideally complementary) features. We associate each image row with a feature vector (i.e. a certain number of image function values) and use these features to cluster the image rows to identify similar image areas. Because images of stained profiles might have different reasonable clusterings, we calculate multiple consensus clusterings. An expert can explore these different solutions and base his/her interpretation of predominant flow mechanisms on quantitative (objective) criteria. The complete workflow from reading-in binary images to final clusterings has been implemented in the free R system, a language and environment for statistical computing. The calculation of image indices is part of our own package Indigo, manipulation of binary images, clustering and visualization of results are done using either build-in facilities in R, additional R packages or the LATEX system.

  9. Evaluation of optimal DNA staining for triggering by scanning fluorescence microscopy (SFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittag, Anja; Marecka, Monika; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Malkusch, Wolf; Bocsi, Jzsef; Trnok, Attila

    2009-02-01

    In imaging and flow cytometry, DNA staining is a common trigger signal for cell identification. Selection of the proper DNA dye is restricted by the hardware configuration of the instrument. The Zeiss Imaging Solutions GmbH (Mnchen, Germany) introduced a new automated scanning fluorescence microscope - SFM (Axio Imager.Z1) which combines fluorescence imaging with cytometric parameters measurement. The aim of the study was to select optimal DNA dyes as trigger signal in leukocyte detection and subsequent cytometric analysis of double-labeled leukocytes by SFM. Seven DNA dyes (DAPI, Hoechst 33258, Hoechst 33342, POPO-3, PI, 7-AAD, and TOPRO-3) were tested and found to be suitable for the implemented filtersets (fs) of the SFM (fs: 49, fs: 44, fs: 20). EDTA blood was stained after erythrocyte lysis with DNA dye. Cells were transferred on microscopic slides and embedded in fluorescent mounting medium. Quality of DNA fluorescence signal as well as spillover signals were analyzed by SFM. CD45-APC and CD3-PE as well as CD4-FITC and CD8-APC were selected for immunophenotyping and used in combination with Hoechst. Within the tested DNA dyes DAPI showed relatively low spillover and the best CV value. Due to the low spillover of UV DNA dyes a triple staining of Hoechst and APC and PE (or APC and FITC, respectively) could be analyzed without difficulty. These results were confirmed by FCM measurements. DNA fluorescence is applicable for identifying and triggering leukocytes in SFM analyses. Although some DNA dyes exhibit strong spillover in other fluorescence channels, it was possible to immunophenotype leukocytes. DAPI seems to be best suitable for use in the SFM system and will be used in protocol setups as primary parameter.

  10. Dimeric fluorescent energy transfer dyes comprising asymmetric cyanine azole-indolenine chromophores

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, Alexander N. (Orinda, CA); Benson, Scott C. (Albany, CA)

    1996-01-01

    Novel fluorescent DNA-staining dyes are provided combining asymmetric cyanine azole-indolenine dyes, which provide for strong DNA affinity, large Stokes shifts and emission in the red region of the spectrum. The dyes find particular application in gel electrophoresis and for labels which may be bound to a variety of compositions in a variety of contexts.

  11. Reactive Fluorescent Dyes For Urethane Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Paul B.; Cuddihy, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    Molecules of fluorescent dyes chemically bound in urethane conformal-coating materials to enable nondestructive detection of flaws in coats through inspection under ultraviolet light, according to proposal. Dye-bonding technique prevents outgassing of dyes, making coating materials suitable for use where flaw-free coats must be assured in instrumentation or other applications in which contamination by outgassing must be minimized.

  12. Facile method to stain the bacterial cell surface for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gunsolus, Ian L.; Hu, Dehong; Mihai, Cosmin; Lohse, Samuel E.; Lee, Chang-soo; Torelli, Marco D.; Hamers, Robert J.; Murhpy, Catherine J.; Orr, Galya

    2015-01-01

    A method to fluorescently stain the surfaces of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial cells compatible with super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is presented. This method utilizes a commercially-available fluorescent probe to label primary amines at the surface of the cell. We demonstrate eficient staining of two bacterial strains, the Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis 168. Using structured illumination microscopy and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, which require high quantum yield or specialized dyes, we show that this staining method may be used to resolve the bacterial cell surface with sub-diffraction-limited resolution. We further use this method to identify localization patterns of nanomaterials, specifically cadmium selenide quantum dots, following interaction with bacterial cells. PMID:24816810

  13. Facile method to stain the bacterial cell surface for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gunsolus, Ian L.; Hu, Dehong; Mihai, Cosmin; Lohse, Samuel E.; Lee, Chang-Soo; Torelli, Marco; Hamers, Robert J.; Murphy, Catherine; Orr, Galya; Haynes, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    A method to fluorescently stain the surfaces of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial cells compatible with super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is presented. This method utilizes a commercially-available fluorescent probe to label primary amines at the surface of the cell. We demonstrate efficient staining of two bacterial strains, the Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis 168. Using structured illumination microscopy and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, which require high quantum yield or specialized dyes, we show that this staining method may be used to resolve the bacterial cell surface with sub-diffraction-limited resolution. We further use this method to identify localization patterns of nanomaterials, specifically cadmium selenide quantum dots, following interaction with bacterial cells.

  14. Improved Charge-Transfer Fluorescent Dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Improved charge-transfer fluorescent dyes have been developed for use as molecular probes. These dyes are based on benzofuran nuclei with attached phenyl groups substituted with, variously, electron donors, electron acceptors, or combinations of donors and acceptors. Optionally, these dyes could be incorporated as parts of polymer backbones or as pendant groups or attached to certain surfaces via self-assembly-based methods. These dyes exhibit high fluorescence quantum yields -- ranging from 0.2 to 0.98, depending upon solvents and chemical structures. The wavelengths, quantum yields, intensities, and lifetimes of the fluorescence emitted by these dyes vary with (and, hence, can be used as indicators of) the polarities of solvents in which they are dissolved: In solvents of increasing polarity, fluorescence spectra shift to longer wavelengths, fluorescence quantum yields decrease, and fluorescence lifetimes increase. The wavelengths, quantum yields, intensities, and lifetimes are also expected to be sensitive to viscosities and/or glass-transition temperatures. Some chemical species -- especially amines, amino acids, and metal ions -- quench the fluorescence of these dyes, with consequent reductions in intensities, quantum yields, and lifetimes. As a result, the dyes can be used to detect these species. Another useful characteristic of these dyes is a capability for both two-photon and one-photon absorption. Typically, these dyes absorb single photons in the ultraviolet region of the spectrum (wavelengths < 400 nm) and emit photons in the long-wavelength ultraviolet, visible, and, when dissolved in some solvents, near-infrared regions. In addition, these dyes can be excited by two-photon absorption at near-infrared wavelengths (600 to 800 nm) to produce fluorescence spectra identical to those obtained in response to excitation by single photons at half the corresponding wavelengths (300 to 400 nm). While many prior fluorescent dyes exhibit high quantum yields, solvent-polarity- dependent fluorescence behavior, susceptibility to quenching by certain chemical species, and/or two-photon fluorescence, none of them has the combination of all of these attributes. Because the present dyes do have all of these attributes, they have potential utility as molecular probes in a variety of applications. Examples include (1) monitoring curing and deterioration of polymers; (2) monitoring protein expression; (3) high-throughput screening of drugs; (4) monitoring such chemical species as glucose, amines, amino acids, and metal ions; and (5) photodynamic therapy of cancers and other diseases.

  15. Assessment of fluorescein-based fluorescent dyes for tracing Neotyphodium endophytes in planta.

    PubMed

    Card, Stuart D; Tapper, Brian A; Lloyd-West, Catherine; Wright, Kathryn M

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent dyes were assessed for their ability to stain viable hyphae of the fungi Neotyphodium lolii and N. coenophialum, symbiotic endophytes of the Pooideae grasses Lolium perenne and Festuca arundinacea, respectively. The fluorescein-based fluorophores; fluorescein diacetate (FDA), 5(6)-carboxy-fluorescein diacetate (CFDA), 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate (CMFDA) and the chitin-binding stain, Calcofluor while M2R, were assessed for staining of endophyte hyphae in vitro from axenic fungal cultures and in planta, including epidermal leaf sheath peels, nodes, ovaries, embryos and meristems. CMFDA produced the greatest intensity of staining of fungal hyphae and gave excellent contrast in planta compared to the plant cells. Compared to the other dyes, CMFDA was also the least affected by photo bleaching and continued to fluoresce up to 2 h after initial excitation. None of the fluorescent dyes stained fungal hyphae in seed. PMID:22802389

  16. Advantages of preelectrophoretic conjugation of polypeptides with fluorescent dyes.

    PubMed

    Strottmann, J M; Robinson, J B; Stellwagen, E

    1983-07-15

    A rapid simple procedure is described for the conjugation of proteins, glycoproteins, and peptides with the fluorescent dye fluorescein isothiocyanate during the time required to polymerize a polyacrylamide gel. Such conjugation does not perturb the electrophoretic mobility of the polypeptides in detergent containing gels. The location of polypeptide . dye conjugate is evident by inspection immediately upon removal of a gel from an electrophoresis cabinet avoiding the time required for postelectrophoretic staining and destaining procedures. The sensitivity of detection of polypeptide . fluorescein conjugates is at least equivalent to that obtained using Coomassie blue. PMID:6414333

  17. Contact urticaria caused by a fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Keiji; Sugiura, Mariko; Sasaki, Kazumi; Mori, Ayumi

    2010-08-01

    A 28-year-old man developed urticaria while he was working in the garage. We suspected contact urticaria, which can be caused by some products used in his field, and we carried out a prick test using his work gloves and shoes. His gloves were orange and black in colour, his shoes were black and white in colour, and the materials they were made of were unknown. The results of the prick test using the gloves and shoes were positive. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was applied, and a fluorescent dye was found to be present in his gloves and shoes. The results of a prick test using the fluorescent dye were positive. His urticaria improved after he stopped using these gloves and shoes. This was a rare case of contact urticaria caused by a fluorescent dye in clothing. PMID:20695863

  18. Influence of some aldehyde blocking agents on staining of depurinized DNA with cationic dyes.

    PubMed

    Erenpreisa, J; Freivalds, T

    1979-01-01

    Rat liver, spleen and Walker carcinosarcoma imprints were subjected to depurinizing Feulgen hydrolysis and then treated with blocking agents of aldehyde groups. Such blockators as sodium bisulfite and hydroxylamine which multiplay additionally anionic groups in DNA and intensify the reactions with cationic dyes, ensuring anisotropic staining. Hydrazine lowers the binding of carionic dyes to DNA, instead phenylhydrazine, completely blocks both aldehyde and phosphate groups. When the imprints were treated with 2.4-dinitrophenylhydrazine, aldehyde and phosphate groups of apurinic acid were blocked, and DNA staining by cationic dyes occurred only on account of nitrogroups of the blocking agents which have been used. The staining reaction of cationic dyes after the use of anionogenic blocking agents of aldehyde groups is prospective not only for revealing DNA but also for several other compounds with natural or potential aldo- and ketogroups. However the reaction with phenylhydrazine can serve as a staining without removal of DNA prior to staining as an optional procedure. PMID:86483

  19. Facial nerve identification with fluorescent dye in rats.

    PubMed

    Melo, Giulianno Molina de; Cervantes, Onivaldo; Covolan, Luciene; Baptista, Heloisa Allegro; Ferreira, Elenn Soares; Abrahao, Marcio

    2016-02-01

    PURPOSE The parotidectomy technique still has an elevated paresis and paralysis index, lowering patient life's quality. The correct identification of the facial nerve can prevent nerve damage. Fluorescent dye identifies nerves in experimental studies but only few articles focused its use on facial nerve study in parotidectomies. We aimed to stain the rat facial nerve with fluorescent dye to facilitate visualization and dissection in order to prevent injuries. METHODS Forty adult male Wistar rats were submitted to facial injection of saline solution (Gsf-control group, 10) or fluorescent dye solution (Gdye group, 30) followed by parotidectomy preserving the facial nerve, measuring the time for localization and facility of localization (LocTime and LFN). Nerve function was assessed using the Vibrissae Movements (PMV) and Eyelid Closure Motion (PFP) scores. RESULTS Nerve localization was faster in Gdye group, with 83% Easy LFN rate. The Gdye group presented with low nerve injury degree and better PMV and PFP scores, with high sensitivity and accuracy. CONCLUSIONS This experimental method of facial nerve fluorescence was effective for intraoperative nerve visualization, identification and preservation. The technique may be used in future facial nerve studies, translated to humans, contributing to the optimization of parotid surgery in the near future. PMID:26959618

  20. Visible fluorescent detection of proteins in polyacrylamide gels without staining.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Carol L; Yang, Jing; Turner, Raymond J; Edwards, Robert A

    2004-03-01

    2,2,2-Trichloroethanol (TCE) incorporated into polyacrylamide gels before polymerization provides fluorescent visible detection of proteins in less than 5min of total processing time. The tryptophans in proteins undergo an ultraviolet light-induced reaction with trihalocompounds to produce fluorescence in the visible range so that the protein bands can be visualized on a 300-nm transilluminator. In a previous study trichloroacetic acid or chloroform was used to stain polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) gels for protein visualization. This study shows that placing TCE in the gel before electrophoresis can eliminate the staining step. The gel is removed from the electrophoresis apparatus and placed on a transilluminator and then the protein bands develop their fluorescence in less than 5min. In addition to being rapid this visualization method provides detection of 0.2microg of typical globular proteins, which for some proteins is slightly more sensitive than the standard Coomassie brilliant blue (CBB) method. Integral membrane proteins, which do not stain well with CBB, are visualized well with the TCE in-gel method. After TCE in-gel visualization the same gel can then be CBB stained, allowing for complementary detection of proteins. In addition, visualization with TCE in the gel is compatible with two-dimensional PAGE, native PAGE, Western blotting, and autoradiography. PMID:14769330

  1. Fluorescent indicator dyes for calcium ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsien, Roger Y. (Inventor); Grynkiewicz, Grzegorz (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The present invention discloses a new class of highly fluorescent indicator dyes that are specific for calcium ions. The new fluorescent indicator dyes combine a stilbene-type fluorophore with a tetracarboxylate parent Ca.sup.2+ chelating compound having the octacoordinate pattern of liganding groups characteristic of EGTA and BAPTA. Preferred forms contain extra heterocyclic bridges to reinforce the ethylenic bond of the stilbene and to reduce hydrophobicity. Compared to their widely used predecessor, quin2, the new dyes offer up to thirty-fold brighter fluorescence, major changes in wavelength (not just intensity) upon Ca.sup.2+ binding, slightly lower affinities for Ca.sup.2+, slightly longer wavelengths of excitation, and considerably improved selectivity for Ca.sup.2+ over other divalent cations. These properties, particularly the wavelength sensitivity to Ca.sup.2+, make the dyes useful indicators for many intracellular applications, especially in single cells, adherent cell layers, or bulk tissues. The present invention also discloses an improved method for synthesizing alpha-acyloxyalkyl bromides wherein the bromides so synthesized are free of contaminating bis(1-bromoalkyl)ether. The improved method is exemplified herein in the synthesis of acetoxymethyl bromide, a compound useful in preparing the acetoxymethyl esters disclosed herein as novel Ca.sup.2+ specific fluorescent indicators.

  2. Dye-sensitized solar cells consisting of dye-bilayer structure stained with two dyes for harvesting light of wide range of wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inakazu, Fumi; Noma, Yusuke; Ogomi, Yuhei; Hayase, Shuzi

    2008-09-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) containing dye-bilayer structure of black dye and NK3705 (3-carboxymethyl-5-[3-(4-sulfobutyl)-2(3H)-bezothiazolylidene]-2-thioxo-4-thiazolidinone, sodium salt) in one TiO2 layer (2-TiO-BD-NK) are reported. The 2-TiO-BD-NK structure was fabricated by staining one TiO2 layer with these two dyes, step by step, under a pressurized CO2 condition. The dye-bilayer structure was observed by using a confocal laser scanning microscope. The short circuit current (Jsc) and the incident photon to current efficiency of the cell (DSC-2-TiO-BD-NK) was almost the sum of those of DSC stained with black dye only (DSC-1-TiO-BD) and DSC stained with NK3705 only (DSC-1-TiO-NK).

  3. Storable, thermally activated, near-infrared chemiluminescent dyes and dye-stained microparticles for optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumes, Jeffrey M.; Gassensmith, Jeremiah J.; Giblin, Jay; Lee, Jung-Jae; White, Alexander G.; Culligan, William J.; Leevy, W. Matthew; Kuno, Masaru; Smith, Bradley D.

    2010-12-01

    Imaging techniques are a vital part of clinical diagnostics, biomedical research and nanotechnology. Optical molecular imaging makes use of relatively harmless, low-energy light and technically straightforward instrumentation. Self-illuminating, chemiluminescent systems are particularly attractive because they have inherently high signal contrast due to the lack of background emission. Currently, chemiluminescence imaging involves short-lived molecular species that are not stored but are instead generated in situ, and they typically emit visible light, which does not penetrate far through heterogeneous biological media. Here, we describe a new paradigm for optical molecular imaging using squaraine rotaxane endoperoxides, interlocked fluorescent and chemiluminescent dye molecules that have a squaraine chromophore encapsulated inside a macrocycle endoperoxide. Squaraine rotaxane endoperoxides can be stored indefinitely at temperatures below -20 C, but upon warming to body temperature they undergo a unimolecular chemical reaction and emit near-infrared light that can pass through a living mouse.

  4. Spiculogenesis in the siliceous sponge Lubomirskia baicalensis studied with fluorescent staining.

    PubMed

    Annenkov, Vadim V; Danilovtseva, Elena N

    2016-04-01

    Siliceous sponges are the most primitive multicellular animals whose skeleton consists of spicules - needle-like constructions from silicon dioxide surrounding organic axial filaments. Mechanisms of spicule formation have been intensively studied due to the high ecological importance of sponges and their interest to materials science. Light and electron microscopy are not appropriate enough to display the process from silicon-enriched cells to mature spicules because of composite structure of the sponge tissues. In this article, spiculogenesis in the siliceous sponge has been studied for the first time with the use of fluorescent microscopy. Fluorescent vital dye NBD-N2 was applied to stain growing siliceous structures in the sponge and primmorph cell system. The main stages of spicule growth in the fresh-water sponge Lubomirskia baicalensis (Pallas, 1773) were visualized: silicon accumulation in sclerocytes; formation of an organic filament protruding from the cell; further elongation of the filament and growth of the spicule in a spindle-like form with enlargement in the center; merger with new sclerocytes and formation of the mature spicule. Fluorescent microscopy combined with SEM allows us to overcome the virtual differentiation between intra- and extracellular mechanisms of spicule growth. The growing spicule can capture silicic acid from the extracellular space and merge with new silicon-enriched cells. Visualization of the growing spicules with the fluorescent dye allows us to monitor sponge viability in ecological or toxicological experiments and to apply genomic, proteomic and biochemical techniques. PMID:26821342

  5. Brain morphology imaging by 3D microscopy and fluorescent Nissl staining.

    PubMed

    Lazutkin, A A; Komissarova, N V; Toptunov, D M; Anokhin, K V

    2013-07-01

    Modern optical methods (multiphoton and light-sheet fluorescent microscopy) allow 3D imaging of large specimens of the brain with cell resolution. It is therefore essential to refer the resultant 3D pictures of expression of transgene, protein, and other markers in the brain to the corresponding structures in the atlas. This implies counterstaining of specimens with morphological dyes. However, there are no methods for contrasting large samples of the brain without their preliminary slicing. We have developed a method for fluorescent Nissl staining of whole brain samples. 3D reconstructions of specimens of the hippocampus, olfactory bulbs, and cortex were created. The method can be used for morphological control and evaluation of the effects of various factors on the brain using 3D microscopy technique. PMID:24137612

  6. An easy method for cutting and fluorescent staining of thin roots

    PubMed Central

    Zelko, Ivan; Lux, Alexander; Sterckeman, Thibault; Martinka, Michal; Kollárová, Karin; Lišková, Desana

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Cutting plant material is essential for observing internal structures and may be difficult for various reasons. Most fixation agents such as aldehydes, as well as embedding resins, do not allow subsequent use of fluorescent staining and make material too soft to make good-quality hand-sections. Moreover, cutting thin roots can be very difficult and time consuming. A new, fast and effective method to provide good-quality sections and fluorescent staining of fresh or fixed root samples, including those of very thin roots (such as Arabidopsis or Noccaea), is described here. Methods To overcome the above-mentioned difficulties the following procedure is proposed: fixation in methanol (when fresh material cannot be used) followed by en bloc staining with toluidine blue, embedding in 6 % agarose, preparation of free-hand sections of embedded material, staining with fluorescent dye, and observation in a microscope under UV light. Key Results Despite eventual slight deformation of primary cell walls (depending on the species and root developmental stage), this method allows effective observation of different structures such as ontogenetic changes of cells along the root axis, e.g. development of xylem elements, deposition of Casparian bands and suberin lamellae in endodermis or exodermis or peri-endodermal thickenings in Noccaea roots. Conclusions This method provides good-quality sections and allows relatively rapid detection of cell-wall modifications. Also important is the possibility of using this method for free-hand cutting of extremely thin roots such as those of Arabidopsis. PMID:22419758

  7. Facile and eco-friendly synthesis of green fluorescent carbon nanodots for applications in bioimaging, patterning and staining.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lihong; Li, Yanyan; Li, Xiaofeng; Wen, Xiangping; Zhang, Guomei; Yang, Jun; Dong, Chuan; Shuang, Shaomin

    2015-04-28

    We report a facile and eco-friendly strategy for the fabrication of green fluorescent carbon nanodots (CDs), and demonstrate their applications for bio-imaging, patterning, and staining. A one-pot hydrothermal method using various plant petals yields bright green-emitting CDs, providing an easy way for the production of green fluorescent CDs without the need for a tedious synthetic methodology or the use of toxic/expensive solvents and starting materials. The as-prepared CDs show small size distribution and excellent dispersibility. Their strong green fluorescence is observed when the excitation wavelength is between 430 nm and 490 nm. Moreover, they exhibit high tolerance to various external conditions, such as pH values, external cations, and continuous excitation. Due to minimum toxicity as well as good photoluminescence properties, these CDs can be applied to in vitro and in vivo imaging, patterning, and staining. According to confocal fluorescence imaging of human uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma cells, CDs penetrate into the cell and enter the cytoplasm and the nucleus. More strikingly, carp is directly fed with CDs for in vivo imaging and shows bright green fluorescence at an excitation wavelength of 470 nm. In addition, the obtained CDs are used as fluorescent inks for drawing luminescence patterns. Finally, we also apply the CDs as a fluorescent dye. Interestingly, the absorbent filter paper with staining emits dramatic fluorescence under 470 nm excitation. PMID:25826612

  8. Organic Solvent-Free Fluorescence Confocal Imaging of Living Cells Using Pure Nanocrystal Forms of Fluorescent Dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Koichi; Kasai, Hitoshi; Masuhara, Akito; Oikawa, Hidetoshi; Nakanishi, Hachiro

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we describe an organic solvent-free method for the in vitro fluorescence confocal imaging of living cells using nanocrystals of the hydrophobic fluorescent dyes 3,3'-dioctadecyloxacarbocyanine perchlorate (DiO) and perylene, which we obtained separately using the reprecipitation method. Confocal microscopy imaging revealed that cancer cells took up the dye with high avidity. Under similar treatment conditions, the dyes in their nanocrystal forms or as dimethylsulfoxide solutions provided comparable in vitro fluorescence imaging of cells through confocal microscopy. This nanocrystal formulation approach to in vitro bioimaging in cultures eliminates the need for external solubilizing agents (i.e., organic solvent, surfactant), which usually exhibit cytotoxicity. Our developed technique also allowed the double-staining imaging of cancer cells using DiO and perylene nanocrystals.

  9. Evaluation of a fluorescent lectin-based staining technique for some acidophilic mining bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Fife, D.J.; Bruhn, D.F.; Miller, K.S.; Stoner, D.L.

    2000-05-01

    A fluorescence-labeled wheat germ agglutinin staining technique was modified and found to be effective for staining gram-positive, acidophilic mining bacteria. Bacteria identified by others as being gram positive through 16S rRNA sequence analyses, yet clustering near the divergence of that group, stained weakly. Gram-negative bacteria did not stain. Background staining of environmental samples was negligible, and pyrite and soil particles in the samples did not interfere with the staining procedure.

  10. Brazilwood, sappanwood, brazilin and the red dye brazilein: from textile dyeing and folk medicine to biological staining and musical instruments.

    PubMed

    Dapson, R W; Bain, C L

    2015-01-01

    Brazilin is a nearly colorless dye precursor obtained from the heartwood of several species of trees including brazilwood from Brazil, sappanwood from Asia and the Pacific islands, and to a minor extent from two other species in Central America, northern South America and the Caribbean islands. Its use as a dyeing agent and medicinal in Asia was recorded in the 2(nd) century BC, but was little known in Europe until the 12(th) century AD. Asian supplies were replaced in the 16(th) century AD after the Portuguese discovered vast quantities of trees in what is now Brazil. Overexploitation decimated the brazilwood population to the extent that it never fully recovered. Extensive environmental efforts currently are underway to re-create a viable, sustainable population. Brazilin is structurally similar to the better known hematoxylin, thus is readily oxidized to a colored dye, brazilein, which behaves like hematein. Attachment of the dye to fabric is by hydrogen bonding or in conjunction with certain metallic mordants by coordinative bonding. For histology, most staining procedures involve aluminum (brazalum) for staining nuclei. In addition to textile dyeing and histological staining, brazilin and brazilein have been and still are used extensively in Asian folk medicine to treat a wide variety of disorders. Recent pharmacological studies for the most part have established a scientific basis for these uses and in many cases have elucidated the biochemical pathways involved. The principal use of brazilwood today is for the manufacture of bows for violins and other stringed musical instruments. The dye and other physical properties of the wood combine to produce bows of unsurpassed tonal quality. PMID:25893688

  11. Uniform silica nanoparticles encapsulating two-photon absorbing fluorescent dye

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Weibing; Liu Chang; Wang Mingliang; Huang Wei; Zhou Shengrui; Jiang Wei; Sun Yueming; Cui Yiping; Xu Chunxinag

    2009-04-15

    We have prepared uniform silica nanoparticles (NPs) doped with a two-photon absorbing zwitterionic hemicyanine dye by reverse microemulsion method. Obvious solvatochromism on the absorption spectra of dye-doped NPs indicates that solvents can partly penetrate into the silica matrix and then affect the ground and excited state of dye molecules. For dye-doped NP suspensions, both one-photon and two-photon excited fluorescence are much stronger and recorded at shorter wavelength compared to those of free dye solutions with comparative overall dye concentration. This behavior is possibly attributed to the restricted twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT), which reduces fluorescence quenching when dye molecules are trapped in the silica matrix. Images from two-photon laser scanning fluorescence microscopy demonstrate that the dye-doped silica NPs can be actively uptaken by Hela cells with low cytotoxicity. - Graphical abstract: Water-soluble silica NPs doped with a two-photon absorbing zwitterionic hemicyanine dye were prepared. They were found of enhanced one-photon and two-photon excited fluorescence compared to free dye solutions. Images from two-photon laser scanning fluorescence microscopy demonstrate that the dye-doped silica NPs can be actively uptaken by Hela cells.

  12. A Method for the Direct Identification of Differentiating Muscle Cells by a Fluorescent Mitochondrial Dye

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Tetsuaki; McDermott, John C.; Gramolini, Anthony O.

    2011-01-01

    Identification of differentiating muscle cells generally requires fixation, antibodies directed against muscle specific proteins, and lengthy staining processes or, alternatively, transfection of muscle specific reporter genes driving GFP expression. In this study, we examined the possibility of using the robust mitochondrial network seen in maturing muscle cells as a marker of cellular differentiation. The mitochondrial fluorescent tracking dye, MitoTracker, which is a cell-permeable, low toxicity, fluorescent dye, allowed us to distinguish and track living differentiating muscle cells visually by epi-fluorescence microscopy. MitoTracker staining provides a robust and simple detection strategy for living differentiating cells in culture without the need for fixation or biochemical processing. PMID:22174849

  13. Detection of Acid Fast Bacilli in Saliva using Papanicolaou Stain Induced Fluorescence Method Versus Fluorochrome Staining: An Evaluative Study

    PubMed Central

    (Munot), Priya P Lunawat; Mhapuskar, Amit A; Ganvir, S M; Hazarey, Vinay K; Mhapuskar, Madhavi A; Kulkarni, Dinraj

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fifty years after effective chemotherapy, tuberculosis (TB) still remains leading infectious cause of adult mortality. The aim of present study was to evaluate diagnostic utility of papanicolaou (Pap) stain induced fluorescence microscopic examination of salivary smears in the diagnosis of pulmonary TB. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional study of 100 individuals clinically suspected of suffering from active pulmonary TB. Control group 50 individuals are suffering from any pulmonary disease other than TB such as pneumonia or bronchiogenic carcinoma. Fluorescence microscopic examination of two salivary smears stained by Pap stain and auramine-rhodamine (A-R) stain respectively for each patient. ZiehlNeelsen stained sputum smear examined under the light microscope for each patient. Culture was done in all the patients for microbiological confirmation. McNemar's Chi-square analysis, Kappa test, and Z-test. Results: The sensitivities of the three staining methods using culture as a reference method were 93.02%, 88.37% and 87.20% for Pap, A-R and ZiehlNeelson respectively. Conclusion: Pap-induced fluorescence of salivary smears is a safe, reliable and rapid method, which can prove as a valuable diagnostic tool for diagnosis of TB. PMID:26229384

  14. Apoptotic cell nuclei favour aggregation and fluorescence quenching of DNA dyes.

    PubMed

    Erenpreisa, J; Freivalds, T; Roach, H; Alston, R

    1997-07-01

    Apoptotic cell nuclei are known to stain hyperchromatically with absorption dyes and dimly with many DNA fluorochromes. We hypothesised that both optical phenomena have the same cause--the ability of apoptotic chromatin to aggregate cationic dyes. This hypothesis was tested using prednisolone-primed rat thymus, which is known to contain apoptotic cells. The apoptotic cells were classified as early and late, based on their morphology, in thin and semithin sections and in thymus imprints on slides. Direct reaction for DNA strand breaks (TUNEL) indicated the presence of breaks in both categories of cells, with more intense labelling in late apoptosis. The chromatin ultrastructure of early apoptotic cells initially retained the supranucleosomal order of packaging which characterises control cells, whereas the dense chromatin of late apoptotic cells possessed the degraded structure. Absorption spectra of the toluidine blue-stained early apoptotic cell chromatin revealed a metachromatic shift, indicating a change of DNA conformation and polymerisation of the dye. When the staining was performed by acridine orange (preceded by a short acid treatment), a paradoxical several-fold increase of fluorescence intensity at a several-fold dilution of the dye was found. The simultaneous reduction of the ratio of red to green components of fluorescence confirmed that the concentration-dependent fluorescence quenching was due to aggregation of the dye. The results suggest that the enhanced affinity of the chromatin of early apoptotic cells for cationic dyes is associated with conformational relaxation rather than degradation of DNA. In late apoptotic cells, the very dense packaging of degraded DNA promotes further aggregation of dyes. The results suggest alternative methods for detection and discrimination of early and late apoptotic cells. PMID:9377226

  15. Continuous gamma irradiation effects on acrylic staining treated with basic dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rawi, Anis M.; Al-Harithy, Rafila S.; Muslih, Raad M.

    Gamma photons were used as a tool to enhance colours producing of the acrylic fibres used in the manufacture of textile in Iraq. Acrylic fibres and basic dyes were irradiated at doses up to 5 Mrad. Different fascinating colours were obtained after the dyeing process. Colours were found to depend on the total dose absorbed. Developed colours are stable against decolorization and their staining are comparable to that of the normal non-irradiated material. Computer Nova 3 fortran was used to differentiate between the obtained colours. Further physical and chemical studies are still under investigation in order to view the nature of changes that took place during radiolysis.

  16. Apparatus for fixing, staining, and rinsing of tissue cultures for fluorescent-antibody testing.

    PubMed

    Poole, G M

    1972-08-01

    A staining tray and tray-housing container have been developed to facilitate fluorescent-antibody staining of tissue cultures on cover slips, which allows fixing, staining, and rinsing with a minimum of handling. Breakage and loss of cells were negligible. PMID:16349928

  17. [Staining for Helicobacter pylori on gastric mucosa with dye from red cabbage during endoscopy].

    PubMed

    Kimura, S; Arakawa, T; Kobayashi, K

    1993-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori has a high urease activity and produces ammonia from urea, resulting in elevation of mucosal pH. Based on this characteristics of H. pylori, we have developed a method for staining H. pylori under endoscopy using dye from red cabbage (San-red RC, San-Ei Chemical Ind., Osaka), a pH indicator, safe for clinical use. After administration of a proton-pump inhibitor and an H2-receptor antagonist, the dye solution, mixed with 2% urea, was sprayed over the mucosa by endoscope. Change in color of the dye was found in some areas infected with H. pylori. The change in color reflects urease activity or amount of ammonia. This method may be useful to find the distribution of H. pylori in the mucosa and to examine the H. pylori-infected mucosa pathophysiologically. PMID:8283630

  18. Facile and eco-friendly synthesis of green fluorescent carbon nanodots for applications in bioimaging, patterning and staining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lihong; Li, Yanyan; Li, Xiaofeng; Wen, Xiangping; Zhang, Guomei; Yang, Jun; Dong, Chuan; Shuang, Shaomin

    2015-04-01

    We report a facile and eco-friendly strategy for the fabrication of green fluorescent carbon nanodots (CDs), and demonstrate their applications for bio-imaging, patterning, and staining. A one-pot hydrothermal method using various plant petals yields bright green-emitting CDs, providing an easy way for the production of green fluorescent CDs without the need for a tedious synthetic methodology or the use of toxic/expensive solvents and starting materials. The as-prepared CDs show small size distribution and excellent dispersibility. Their strong green fluorescence is observed when the excitation wavelength is between 430 nm and 490 nm. Moreover, they exhibit high tolerance to various external conditions, such as pH values, external cations, and continuous excitation. Due to minimum toxicity as well as good photoluminescence properties, these CDs can be applied to in vitro and in vivo imaging, patterning, and staining. According to confocal fluorescence imaging of human uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma cells, CDs penetrate into the cell and enter the cytoplasm and the nucleus. More strikingly, carp is directly fed with CDs for in vivo imaging and shows bright green fluorescence at an excitation wavelength of 470 nm. In addition, the obtained CDs are used as fluorescent inks for drawing luminescence patterns. Finally, we also apply the CDs as a fluorescent dye. Interestingly, the absorbent filter paper with staining emits dramatic fluorescence under 470 nm excitation.We report a facile and eco-friendly strategy for the fabrication of green fluorescent carbon nanodots (CDs), and demonstrate their applications for bio-imaging, patterning, and staining. A one-pot hydrothermal method using various plant petals yields bright green-emitting CDs, providing an easy way for the production of green fluorescent CDs without the need for a tedious synthetic methodology or the use of toxic/expensive solvents and starting materials. The as-prepared CDs show small size distribution and excellent dispersibility. Their strong green fluorescence is observed when the excitation wavelength is between 430 nm and 490 nm. Moreover, they exhibit high tolerance to various external conditions, such as pH values, external cations, and continuous excitation. Due to minimum toxicity as well as good photoluminescence properties, these CDs can be applied to in vitro and in vivo imaging, patterning, and staining. According to confocal fluorescence imaging of human uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma cells, CDs penetrate into the cell and enter the cytoplasm and the nucleus. More strikingly, carp is directly fed with CDs for in vivo imaging and shows bright green fluorescence at an excitation wavelength of 470 nm. In addition, the obtained CDs are used as fluorescent inks for drawing luminescence patterns. Finally, we also apply the CDs as a fluorescent dye. Interestingly, the absorbent filter paper with staining emits dramatic fluorescence under 470 nm excitation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00783f

  19. Protein stains and applications.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Ranjini K; Balasubramaniyan, Natarajan; Sundaram, Pazhani

    2012-01-01

    Staining of proteins separated on gels provides the basis for determination of the critical properties of these biopolymers, such as their molecular weight and/or charge. Detection of proteins on gels and blots require stains. These stains vary in sensitivity, ease of use, color, stability, versatility, and specificity. This review discusses different stains and applications with details on how to use the advantages and disadvantages of each stain. It also compiles some important points to be considered in imaging and evaluation. Commonly used colorimetric and fluorescent dyes for general protein staining, and posttranslational modification-specific detection methods are also discussed. PMID:22585510

  20. Specific DNA duplex formation at an artificial lipid bilayer: fluorescence microscopy after Sybr Green I staining

    PubMed Central

    Werz, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Summary The article describes the immobilization of different probe oligonucleotides (4, 7, 10) carrying each a racemic mixture of 2,3-bis(hexadecyloxy)propan-1-ol (1a) at the 5-terminus on a stable artificial lipid bilayer composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). The bilayer separates two compartments (cis/trans channel) of an optical transparent microfluidic sample carrier with perfusion capabilities. Injection of unlabeled target DNA sequences (6, 8, or 9), differing in sequence and length, leads in the case of complementarity to the formation of stable DNA duplexes at the bilayer surface. This could be verified by Sybr Green I double strand staining, followed by incubation periods and thorough perfusions, and was visualized by single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy. The different bilayer-immobilized complexes consisting of various DNA duplexes and the fluorescent dye were studied with respect to the kinetics of their formation as well as to their stability against perfusion. PMID:25298798

  1. NIR fluorescent dyes: versatile vehicles for marker and probe applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patonay, Gabor; Chapman, Gala; Beckford, Garfield; Henary, Maged

    2013-02-01

    The use of the NIR spectral region (650-900 nm) is advantageous due to the inherently lower background interference and the high molar absorptivities of NIR chromophores. Near-Infrared (NIR) dyes are increasingly used in the biological and medical field. The binding characteristics of NIR dyes to biomolecules are possibly controlled by several factors, including hydrophobicity, size and charge just to mention a few parameters. Binding characteristics of symmetric carbocyanines and found that the hydrophobic nature of the NIR dye is only partially responsible for the binding strength. Upon binding to biomolecules significant fluorescence enhancement can be observed for symmetrical carbocyanines. This fluorescence amplification facilitates the detection of the NIR dye and enhances its utility as NIR reporter. This manuscript discusses some probe and marker applications of such NIR fluorescent dyes. One application discussed here is the use of NIR dyes as markers. For labeling applications the fluorescence intensity of the NIR fluorescent label can significantly be increased by enclosing several dye molecules in nanoparticles. To decrease self quenching dyes that have relatively large Stokes' shift needs to be used. This is achieved by substituting meso position halogens with amino moiety. This substitution can also serve as a linker to covalently attach the dye molecule to the nanoparticle backbone. We report here on the preparation of NIR fluorescent silica nanoparticles. Silica nanoparticles that are modified with aminoreactive moieties can be used as bright fluorescent labels in bioanalytical applications. A new bioanalytical technique to detect and monitor the catalytic activity of the sulfur assimilating enzyme using NIR dyes is reported as well. In this spectroscopic bioanalytical assay a family of Fischer based n-butyl sulfonate substituted dyes that exhibit distinct variation in absorbance and fluorescence properties and strong binding to serum albumin as its sulfonic acid moiety is modified to less water soluble moiety was identified. In polar solvents, these water soluble compounds are strongly fluorescent, however form the less soluble aggregated species with virtual loss of fluorescence when the sulfonate groups are cleaved by enzymatic activity to form the corresponding straight chain alkyl aldehyde derivatives. To achieve this conversion in vitro photo-reduced riboflavin mononucleotide (FMN) with a glucose/ glucose-oxygenase oxygen scavenging system was utilized. The reduced FMN serves as a key substrate in the enzymatic desulfonation. Once the FMNH2 was produced the desulfonation reaction was characterized by using Laser Induced Fluorescence Capillary Zone Electropheresis (LIF-CZE). This method can be utilized as an assay to detect the enzyme activity in vitro with the possibilities of in vivo applications.

  2. High efficiency dye laser with low fluorescence yield pyrromethene dyes: experimental and theoretical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagtap, K. K.; Maity, D. K.; Ray, A. K.; Dasgupta, K.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2011-06-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical study of the photo-physical, laser properties and molecular structures of three relatively recent Pyrromethene (PM) class dyes, PM597, PM580 and PM567, have been carried out. Laser characteristics of these three PM dyes were compared with three other widely used Rhodamine (RH) class dyes, RH6G, RHB and KRS, using a narrow-band dye laser setup, transversely pumped by the second harmonic (532 nm) of a Q-switched Nd-YAG laser. In addition to generating comparative data of these dyes for optimal use in dye lasers, we observed that unlike the RH dyes, the PM dyes show high efficiencies and wide tunability, despite the low fluorescence yield and high rate of non-radiative decay. Particularly, PM597 dye, in spite of a very low quantum yield of fluorescence (?=0.42), high non-radiative decay rate, and a large distortion from planarity in its excited state, when used in a laser cavity it exhibited similar laser efficiency and a beneficially wider tuning curve in comparison to other two PM dyes. Theoretical studies were carried out applying density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory (DFT/TDDFT) to obtain new information on ground and the first excited state geometrical parameters of the PM dyes. Good correlation between calculated molecular properties and experimental results was observed for the evolution of the longest wavelength absorption maximum.

  3. A Versatile Cell Death Screening Assay Using Dye-Stained Cells and Multivariate Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Collins, Tony J; Ylanko, Jarkko; Geng, Fei; Andrews, David W

    2015-11-01

    A novel dye-based method for measuring cell death in image-based screens is presented. Unlike conventional high- and medium-throughput cell death assays that measure only one form of cell death accurately, using multivariate analysis of micrographs of cells stained with the inexpensive mix, red dye nonyl acridine orange, and a nuclear stain, it was possible to quantify cell death induced by a variety of different agonists even without a positive control. Surprisingly, using a single known cytotoxic agent as a positive control for training a multivariate classifier allowed accurate quantification of cytotoxicity for mechanistically unrelated compounds enabling generation of dose-response curves. Comparison with low throughput biochemical methods suggested that cell death was accurately distinguished from cell stress induced by low concentrations of the bioactive compounds Tunicamycin and Brefeldin A. High-throughput image-based format analyses of more than 300 kinase inhibitors correctly identified 11 as cytotoxic with only 1 false positive. The simplicity and robustness of this dye-based assay makes it particularly suited to live cell screening for toxic compounds. PMID:26422066

  4. A Versatile Cell Death Screening Assay Using Dye-Stained Cells and Multivariate Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Tony J.; Ylanko, Jarkko; Geng, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A novel dye-based method for measuring cell death in image-based screens is presented. Unlike conventional high- and medium-throughput cell death assays that measure only one form of cell death accurately, using multivariate analysis of micrographs of cells stained with the inexpensive mix, red dye nonyl acridine orange, and a nuclear stain, it was possible to quantify cell death induced by a variety of different agonists even without a positive control. Surprisingly, using a single known cytotoxic agent as a positive control for training a multivariate classifier allowed accurate quantification of cytotoxicity for mechanistically unrelated compounds enabling generation of dose–response curves. Comparison with low throughput biochemical methods suggested that cell death was accurately distinguished from cell stress induced by low concentrations of the bioactive compounds Tunicamycin and Brefeldin A. High-throughput image-based format analyses of more than 300 kinase inhibitors correctly identified 11 as cytotoxic with only 1 false positive. The simplicity and robustness of this dye-based assay makes it particularly suited to live cell screening for toxic compounds. PMID:26422066

  5. Argon-pumped tunable dye laser for port-wine stains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teillac-Hamel, Dominique; de Prost, Yves

    1994-12-01

    We have been using a continuous dye laser (coherent medical) for more than two years. The wavelength is 585 nm, the power 1.8 W and the fluence 16 - 18 J/cm2. We have treated 364 patients with port-wine stains and 15 children with ulcerated hemangiomas. The results were analyzed using a computer program developed by a team in Lille. The most frequent color was pale pink, followed by deep pink, red and purple. The mean number of laser sessions was 2.3.

  6. Histochemical fluorescent staining of Sendai virus-infected cells with a novel sialidase substrate.

    PubMed

    Takano, Maiko; Takahashi, Tadanobu; Agarikuchi, Takashi; Kurebayashi, Yuuki; Minami, Akira; Otsubo, Tadamune; Ikeda, Kiyoshi; Kanazawa, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Takashi

    2014-09-01

    Sialidases, enzymes that remove terminal sialic acid residues, are pivotal in various biological processes such as malignancy and infection with pathogens. For histochemical staining of sialidase activity, we have developed a new synthetic sialidase substrate, sialic acid-conjugated fluorescent benzothiazolylphenol derivative (BTP3-Neu5Ac), for rapid, sensitive, and specific fluorescent staining of sialidase activity. Here, we showed the usefulness of BTP3-Neu5Ac for histochemical fluorescent staining of cells infected with Sendai virus (SV), which possesses sialidase activity. BTP3-Neu5Ac also visualised SV-infected regions of lung sections from SV-infected mice. We succeeded in histochemical fluorescent staining of SV both in vitro and in vivo. SV has been utilised in many virological and biotechnological studies such as developments of an oncolytic virus, a gene therapy vector, and a vaccine candidate. BTP3-Neu5Ac should contribute to rapid progress of such studies and researches on viral sialidase. PMID:25090482

  7. Multimodal fluorescence microscopy of prion strain specific PrP deposits stained by thiophene-based amyloid ligands.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Karin; Simon, Rozalyn; Sjlander, Daniel; Sigurdson, Christina J; Hammarstrm, Per; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2014-01-01

    The disease-associated prion protein (PrP) forms aggregates which vary in structural conformation yet share an identical primary sequence. These variations in PrP conformation are believed to manifest in prion strains exhibiting distinctly different periods of disease incubation as well as regionally specific aggregate deposition within the brain. The anionic luminescent conjugated polythiophene (LCP), polythiophene acetic acid (PTAA) has previously been used to distinguish PrP deposits associated with distinct mouse adapted strains via distinct fluorescence emission profiles from the dye. Here, we employed PTAA and 3 structurally related chemically defined luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs) to stain brain tissue sections from mice inoculated with 2 distinct prion strains. Our results showed that in addition to emission spectra, excitation, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) can fruitfully be assessed for optical distinction of PrP deposits associated with distinct prion strains. Our findings support the theory that alterations in LCP/LCO fluorescence are due to distinct conformational restriction of the thiophene backbone upon interaction with PrP aggregates associated with distinct prion strains. We foresee that LCP and LCO staining in combination with multimodal fluorescence microscopy might aid in detecting structural differences among discrete protein aggregates and in linking protein conformational features with disease phenotypes for a variety of neurodegenerative proteinopathies. PMID:25495506

  8. Multimodal fluorescence microscopy of prion strain specific PrP deposits stained by thiophene-based amyloid ligands

    PubMed Central

    Magnusson, Karin; Simon, Rozalyn; Sjlander, Daniel; Sigurdson, Christina J; Hammarstrm, Per; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2014-01-01

    The disease-associated prion protein (PrP) forms aggregates which vary in structural conformation yet share an identical primary sequence. These variations in PrP conformation are believed to manifest in prion strains exhibiting distinctly different periods of disease incubation as well as regionally specific aggregate deposition within the brain. The anionic luminescent conjugated polythiophene (LCP), polythiophene acetic acid (PTAA) has previously been used to distinguish PrP deposits associated with distinct mouse adapted strains via distinct fluorescence emission profiles from the dye. Here, we employed PTAA and 3 structurally related chemically defined luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs) to stain brain tissue sections from mice inoculated with 2 distinct prion strains. Our results showed that in addition to emission spectra, excitation, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) can fruitfully be assessed for optical distinction of PrP deposits associated with distinct prion strains. Our findings support the theory that alterations in LCP/LCO fluorescence are due to distinct conformational restriction of the thiophene backbone upon interaction with PrP aggregates associated with distinct prion strains. We foresee that LCP and LCO staining in combination with multimodal fluorescence microscopy might aid in detecting structural differences among discrete protein aggregates and in linking protein conformational features with disease phenotypes for a variety of neurodegenerative proteinopathies. PMID:25495506

  9. Staining of keratin and keratohyalin with the reactive dye levafix red violet E-2BL.

    PubMed

    Waldrop, F S; Puchtler, H; Akamatsu, Y

    1976-07-01

    Demonstration of keratin in Zenker-fixed skin and in tissues stored in formalin can be difficult because such material is unsuitable for histochemical studies. A reactive dye, Levafix red violet E-2BL, proved useful for demonstration of keratohyalin and some types of keratin. Formalin-, Zenker- and methacarn-fixed sections were pretreated with alkaline alcohol, stained one hour at 60 C in an aqueous solution containing 0.25% Levafix red violet E-2BL plus 0.25% NaCl, rinsed in buffer solution pH 9, dehydrated and mounted. Keratohyalin granules and stratum corneum were colored red violet; hair and tonofibrils remained unstained. In sections prestained with Mayer's acid hemalum, keratohyalin was dark blue. Sulfonated monoazo dyes without reactive groups colored no tissue structures under the conditions of this technic; apparently, Levafix red violet E-2BL is bound via its reactive group. Polarization microscopic studies suggest binding of Levafix red violet E-2BL by an amorphous matrix of keratin. Correlations with chemical data indicate that the staining patterns parallel the distribution of proteins formed in the stratum granulosum. PMID:60802

  10. Highly sensitive and simple fluorescence staining of proteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide-based gels by using hydrophobic tail-mediated enhancement of fluorescein luminescence.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chulhun; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kang, Donghoon; Jung, Duk Young; Suh, Myungkoo

    2003-10-01

    Fluorescein has an extremely low luminescence intensity in acidic aqueous media. However, when it was bound to proteins, subsequent increase of luminescence intensity took place. Furthermore, when a hydrophobic tail, such as aliphatic hydrocarbons, was introduced to fluorescein, more dramatic increase of luminescence intensity was observed upon binding to proteins. In the present study, by utilizing this luminescence enhancement, three hydrophobic fluorescein dyes (5-dodecanoyl amino fluorescein, 5-hexadecanoyl amino fluorescein, and 5-octadecanoyl amino fluorescein) were examined as noncovalent fluorescent stains of protein bands in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Effective incorporation of the dyes to proteins in gels was accomplished either simply by adding dyes at the protein fixation step, or by treating gels with a staining solution after the fixation. The sensitivity of this staining method using the fluorescein derivatives was approximately 1 ng/band for most proteins. For some cases, protein bands containing as low as 0.1 ng were successfully visualized. In addition, the detection sensitivity showed much less protein-to-protein variation than silver staining. This new staining method was also successfully applied to two-dimensional electrophoresis of rat brain proteins. Its overall sensitivity was comparable to that of silver staining. PMID:14595675

  11. Dimeric fluorescent energy transfer dyes comprising asymmetric cyanine azole-indolenine chromophores

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, Alexander N. (Orinda, CA); Benson, Scott C. (Oakland, CA)

    1998-01-01

    Novel fluorescent heterodimeric DNA-staining energy transfer dyes are provided combining asymmetric cyanine azole-indolenine dyes, which provide for strong DNA affinity, large Stokes shifts and emission in the red region of the spectrum. The dyes find particular application in gel electrophoresis and for labels which may be bound to a variety of compositions in a variety of contexts. Kits and individual compounds are provided, where the kits find use for simultaneous detection of a variety of moieties, particularly using a single narrow wavelength irradiation source. The individual compounds are characterized by high donor quenching and high affinity to dsDNA as a result of optimizing the length of the linking group separating the two chromophores.

  12. Visualization of mouse embryo angiogenesis by fluorescence-based staining.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Antonyak, Marc; Peng, Xu

    2012-01-01

    The establishment of a blood vessel network is fundamental to embryonic development and plays a critical role in many diseases including coronary heart disease and cancer. Vascular endothelial cells are central players in blood vessel formation and line the inside of the entire blood vessel system. PECAM-1 is expressed in all types of endothelial cells and is therefore a useful marker for the detection of blood vessels. In this manuscript, we describe PECAM-1 staining in whole-mount and sectioned tissues in mouse embryos. PMID:22222523

  13. Estimation of Fluorescent Dye Amount in Tracer Dye Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekkan, Emrah; Balkan, Erman; Balkan, Emir

    2015-04-01

    Karstic groundwater is more influenced by human than the groundwater that disperse in pores. On the other hand karstic groundwater resources, in addition to providing agricultural needs, livestock breeding, drinking and domestic water in most of the months of the year, they also supply drinking water to the wild life at high altitudes. Therefore sustainability and hydrogeological investigation of karstic resources is critical. Tracing techniques are widely used in hydrologic and hydrogeologic studies to determine water storage, flow rate, direction and protection area of groundwater resources. Karanfil Mountain (2800 m), located in Adana, Turkey, is one of the karstic recharge areas of the natural springs spread around its periphery. During explorations of the caves of Karanfil mountain, a 600 m deep cave was found by the Turkish and Polish cavers. At the bottom of the cave there is an underground river with a flow rate of approximately 0.5 m3/s during August 2014. The main spring is located 8 km far from the cave's entrance and its mean flow rate changes between 3.4 m3/s and 0.21 m3/s in March and September respectively according to a flowrate observation station of Directorate of Water Works of Turkey. As such frequent storms, snowmelt and normal seasonal variations in rainfall have a significant and rapid effect on the volume of this main spring resource. The objective of our research is to determine and estimate dye amount before its application on the field inspired from the previously literature on the subject. This estimation is intended to provide a preliminary application of a tracer test of a karstic system. In this study dye injection, inlet point will be an underground river located inside the cave and the observation station will be the spring that is approximately 8 km far from the cave entrance. On the other hand there is 600 meter elevation difference between cave entrance and outlet spring. In this test Rodamin-WT will be used as tracer and the appropriate amount of tracers was found according to the flowrate of the spring. The amount of dye is very important for the consistency of the results and the applicability of the tests. For example if the amount of tracer that is estimated is found to be inadequate, any field readings and data could be lost. Most importantly tracer dye is costly and hard to prepare, transport and will follow a torturous path through the cave to the underground river.

  14. Nonlinear emission of quinolizinium-based dyes with application in fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Marcelo, Gema; Pinto, Sandra; Caeque, Tatiana; Mariz, Ins F A; Cuadro, Ana M; Vaquero, Juan J; Martinho, Jos M G; Maas, Ermelinda M S

    2015-03-19

    Charged molecules based on the quinolizinum cation have potential applications as labels in fluorescence imaging in biological media under nonlinear excitation. A systematic study of the linear and nonlinear photophysics of derivatives of the quinolizinum cation substituted by either dimethylaniline or methoxyphenyl electron donors is performed. The effects of donor strength, conjugation length, and symmetry in the two-photon emission efficiency are analyzed in detail. The best performing nonlinear fluorophore, with two-photon absorption cross sections of 1140 GM and an emission quantum yield of 0.22, is characterized by a symmetric D-?-A(+)-?-D architecture based on the methoxyphenyl substituent. Application of this molecule as a fluorescent marker in optical microscopy of living cells revealed that, under favorable conditions, the fluorophore can be localized in the cytoplasmatic compartment of the cell, staining vesicular shape organelles. At higher dye concentrations and longer staining times, the fluorophore can also penetrate into the nucleus. The nonlinearly excited fluorescence lifetime imaging shows that the fluorophore lifetime is sensitive to its location in the different cell compartments. Using fluorescence lifetime microscopy, a multicolor map of the cell is drafted with a single dye. PMID:25135761

  15. Fluorescence imaging of dendritic spines of Golgi-Cox-stained neurons using brightening background.

    PubMed

    Ai, Min; Xiong, Hanqing; Yang, Tao; Shang, Zhenhua; Chen, Muqing; Liu, Xiuli; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel fluorescence imaging approach to imaging nonfluorescence-labeled biological tissue samples. The method was demonstrated by imaging neurons in Golgi-Cox-stained and epoxy-resin-embedded samples through the excitation of the background fluorescence of the specimens. The dark neurons stood out clearly against background fluorescence in the images, enabling the tracing of a single dendritic spine using both confocal and wide-field fluorescence microscopy. The results suggest that the reported fluorescence imaging method would provide an effective alternative solution to image nonfluorescence-labeled samples, and it allows tracing the dendritic spine structure of neurons. PMID:25585023

  16. A comparison of the iodine and fluorescent antibody methods for staining trachoma inclusions in the conjunctiva*

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, J.; Collier, L. H.; Sowa, Shiona

    1971-01-01

    In terms of the rate of positive diagnoses the indirect fluorescent antibody (FA) test was rather more effective than iodine for demonstrating trachoma (TRIC) inclusions in conjunctival scrapings, but the degree of advantage was not statistically significant. In duplicate scrapings stained at random by one or the other method, FA staining yielded the higher inclusion count significantly more often than did iodine. Some inclusions that failed to stain with FA were found on subsequent staining with Giemsa. A method is described for improving the post-FA Giemsa staining of conjunctival smears stored at subzero temperatures. Given adequate facilities, the FA stain is preferable to iodine for demonstrating TRIC inclusions in the conjunctiva; but the iodine method, properly used, holds advantages for field use. ImagesPlate 1Plate 1Plate 1Plate 1 PMID:4109203

  17. Development of Highly Fluorescent Materials Based on Thiophenylimidazole Dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santos, Javier; Bu, Xiu R.; Mintz, Eric A.; Meador, Michael A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Organic fluorescent materials are expected to find many potential applications in optical devices and photo-functionalized materials. Although many investigations have been focused on heterocyclic compounds such as coumarins, bipyridines, rhodamines, and pyrrole derivatives, little is known for fluorescent imidazole materials. We discovered that one particular class of imidazole derivatives is highly fluorescent. A series of monomeric and polymeric based fluorescent dyes were prepared containing a thiophene unit at the second position of the imidazole ring. Dependence of fluorescence efficiency on parameters such as solvent polarity and substituent groups has been investigated. It was found that a formyl group at the 2-position of the thiophene ring dramatically enhance fluorescence properties. Ion recognition probes indicated their potential as sensor materials. These fluorophores have flexibility for introduction of versatile substituent groups that could improve the fluorescence efficiency and sensor properties.

  18. Optimization strategies for a fluorescent dye with bimodal excitation spectra: application to semiautomated proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, Wayne F.; Berggren, Kiera N.; Lopez, Mary F.

    2001-04-01

    Facilities engaged in proteome analysis differ significantly in the degree that they implement automated systems for high-throughput protein characterization. Though automated workstation environments are becoming more routine in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical sectors of industry, university-based laboratories often perform these tasks manually, submitting protein spots excised from polyacrylamide gels to institutional core facilities for identification. For broad compatibility with imaging platforms, an optimized fluorescent dye developed for proteomics applications should be designed taking into account that laser scanners use visible light excitation and that charge-coupled device camera systems and gas discharge transilluminators rely upon UV excitation. The luminescent ruthenium metal complex, SYPRO Ruby protein gel stain, is compatible with a variety of excitation sources since it displays intense UV (280 nm) and visible (470 nm) absorption maxima. Localization is achieved by noncovalent, electrostatic and hydrophobic binding of dye to proteins, with signal being detected at 610 nm. Since proteins are not covalently modified by the dye, compatibility with downstream microchemical characterization techniques such as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry is assured. Protocols have been devised for optimizing fluorophore intensity. SYPRO Ruby dye outperforms alternatives such as silver staining in terms of quantitative capabilities, compatibility with mass spectrometry and ease of integration into automated work environments.

  19. Early detection of breast cancer: a molecular optical imaging approach using novel estrogen conjugate fluorescent dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Shubhadeep; Jose, Iven

    2011-02-01

    Estrogen induced proliferation of mutant cells is widely understood to be the one of major risk determining factor in the development of breast cancer. Hence determination of the Estrogen Receptor[ER] status is of paramount importance if cancer pathogenesis is to be detected and rectified at an early stage. Near Infrared Fluorescence [NIRf] Molecular Optical Imaging is emerging as a powerful tool to monitor bio-molecular changes in living subjects. We discuss pre-clinical results in our efforts to develop an optical imaging diagnostic modality for the early detection of breast cancer. We have successfully carried out the synthesis and characterization of a novel target-specific NIRf dye conjugate aimed at measuring Estrogen Receptor[ER] status. The conjugate was synthesized by ester formation between 17-β estradiol and a hydrophilic derivative of Indocyanine Green (ICG) cyanine dye, bis-1,1-(4-sulfobutyl) indotricarbocyanine-5-carboxylic acid, sodium salt. In-vitro studies regarding specific binding and endocytocis of the dye performed on ER+ve [MCF-7] and control [MDA-MB-231] adenocarcinoma breast cancer cell lines clearly indicated nuclear localization of the dye for MCF-7 as compared to plasma level staining for MDA-MB-231. Furthermore, MCF-7 cells showed ~4.5-fold increase in fluorescence signal intensity compared to MDA-MB-231. A 3-D mesh model mimicking the human breast placed in a parallel-plate DOT Scanner is created to examine the in-vivo efficacy of the dye before proceeding with clinical trials. Photon migration and florescence flux intensity is modeled using the finite-element method with the coefficients (quantum yield, molar extinction co-efficient etc.) pertaining to the dye as obtained from photo-physical and in-vitro studies. We conclude by stating that this lipophilic dye can be potentially used as a target specific exogenous contrast agent in molecular optical imaging for early detection of breast cancer.

  20. Update on flashlamp pumped pulsed dye laser treatment for port wine stains (capillary malformation) patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Yen-Chang; Chang, Cheng-Jen

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims: Currently, the method of choice for the treatment of port-wine stains is laser photocoagulation. Because of evolving treatment options, it is no longer enough for port-wine stains merely to be lightened through laser treatment. The best course of management consists of the most appropriate laser that will produce the most complete clearing of a lesion in the fewest treatment sessions with the least morbidity. The goal is generally accomplished with the use of yellow-light lasers. Materials (Subjects) and Methods: Absorption of laser energy by melanin causes localized heating in the epidermis, which may, if not controlled, produce permanent complications such as hypertrophic scarring or dyspigmentation. Refinements of the results can be achieved by using the flashlamp-pumped pulsed dye laser (FLPDL) in conjunction with the cryogen spray cooling (CSC) system. In our related studies, the infrared thermal image instrument is used for doctors in determining the optimum laser light dosage and preventing the side effects caused by FLPDL. Topic application of angiogenesis inhibitor (Imiquimod) in conjunction with pulsed dye laser treatment for the PWS patients has been assessed for improvement of FLPDL treatment. Results: We present the clinical effect of FLPDL, and the efficacy and safety of cooled laser treatment of PWS birthmarks. Our clinical outcome in the laser treatment of patients with PWS has been achieved to maximize thermal impact on targeted vessels, while minimizing adverse complications. Conclusions: CSC in conjunction with FLPDL can improve the treatment of PWS. The infrared image instrument is helpful for doctors in determining the optimum laser light dosage. Topic application of angiogenesis inhibitor (Imiquimod) in conjunction with laser treatment for the PWS patients is promising in the near future. PMID:24155536

  1. Image analysis of cells stained by fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Tanke, H.J.; Raap, A.K.; Wiegant, J.; Vrolijk, J. )

    1993-01-01

    Specific nucleic acid sequences of about 1 kb can be detected on a routine basis using FISH methods. This is achieved by indirect techniques and conventional microscopy, or with fluorescent probes (direct methods) and integrating detection devices (e.g. CCD cameras). Labeling of probes with defined ratios of two or three fluorophores allows localization of multiple targets, especially when the signals are quantified by image analysis. This requires fluoroescence microscopes equipped with multi band pass filters and computer controlled filter wheels for sequential recording of red, green and blue images using a B/W CCD camera, and correction of occurring image shifts. This combined approach was applied to localize and map genes on chromosomes. In case of nuclei with long extentions of almost linear DNA molecules, (so-called halo preparations), single hybridization sides could be shown.

  2. Use of reflectance spectrophotometry to predict the response of port wine stains to pulsed dye laser.

    PubMed

    Halachmi, Shlomit; Azaria, Ron; Inbar, Roy; Ad-El, Dean; Lapidoth, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Reflectance spectroscopy can be used to quantitate subtle differences in color. We applied a portable reflectance spectrometer to determine its utility in the evaluation of pulsed dye laser treatment of port wine stains (PWS) and in prediction of clinical outcome, in a prospective study. Forty-eight patients with PWS underwent one to nine pulsed dye laser treatments. Patient age and skin color as well as PWS surface area, anatomic location, and color were recorded. Pretreatment spectrophotometric measurements were performed. The subjective clinical results of treatment and the quantitative spectrophotometry results were evaluated by two independent teams, and the findings were correlated. The impact of the clinical characteristics on the response to treatment was assessed as well. Patients with excellent to good clinical results of laser treatments had pretreatment spectrophotometric measurements which differed by more than 10%, whereas patients with fair to poor results had spectrophotometric measurements with a difference of of less than 10%. The correlation between the spectrophotometric results and the clinical outcome was 73% (p < 0.01). The impact of the other clinical variables on outcome agreed with the findings in the literature. Spectrophotometry has a higher correlation with clinical outcome and a better predictive value than other nonmeasurable, nonquantitative, dependent variables. PMID:23609559

  3. Fluorescent Staining of Tea Pathogenic Fungi in Tea Leaves Using Fluorescein-labeled Lectin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kengo; Yoshida, Katsuyuki; Sonoda, Ryoichi

    Fluorochrome-labeled lectin, fluorescein conjugated wheat germ agglutinin (F-WGA) was applied to stain tea pathogenic fungi in tea leaf tissue. Infected leaves were fixed and decolorized with a mixture of ethanol and acetic acid, and cleared with 10% KOH for whole mount before staining with F-WGA. Hyphae of Pestalotiopsis longiseta, Pseudocercospora ocellata, Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum theae-sinensis fluoresced brightly in whole mount and sectioned samples of infected leaf tissue. In browned tissue, hyphae did not fluoresce frequently in whole mount sample. Autofluorescence of leaf tissue was strong in browned tissue of sections, it was removed by 10% KOH treatment before staining. Penetration hyphae of C. theae-sinensis in cell wall of trichome and hyphae in basal part of trichome did not fluoresced frequently. In whole mount samples of tea leaf infected with Exobasidium vexans and E. reticulatum, hymenia appeared on leaf surface fluoresced, but hyphae in leaf tissue did not fluoresce. In sectioned samples, hyphae fluoresced brightly when sections were treated with 10% KOH before staining.

  4. Approximate analytic solutions for the optical pumping of fluorescent dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.

    1978-01-01

    A general technique for solving a system of rate equations describing the interaction of an electromagnetic field and a molecular system is presented. The method is used to obtain approximate time-dependent solutions for the upper-level population of fluorescent dyes in the presence of a pump field.

  5. Disposable nitrate-selective optical sensor based on fluorescent dye

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple, disposable thin-film optical nitrate sensor was developed. The sensor was fabricated by applying a nitrate-selective polymer membrane on the surface of a thin polyester film. The membrane was composed of polyvinylchloride (PVC), plasticizer, fluorescent dye, and nitrate-selective ionophore...

  6. Phosphoprotein staining for sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis using fluorescent reagent morin hydrate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Hwang, Sun-Young; Cong, Wei-Tao; Jin, Li-Tai; Choi, Jung-Kap

    2013-04-01

    A fluorescence-based stain with 3,5,7,2',4'-pentahydroxyflavone (morin hydrate, MH) was designed to stain phosphoproteins in one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Al(3+) was applied as a "fixed bridge," providing an efficient energy transfer channel between phosphoprotein and MH, to produce a strong fluorescent complex for the determination of phosphoprotein. As little as 62.5ng of ?-casein (7 or 8 phosphates) and ?-casein (5 phosphates), 125ng of ovalbumin (2 phosphates), and ?-casein (1 phosphate) could be visualized with a wide linear dynamic range. In comparison with conventional methods, MH stain is a time-saving method that takes just 90min. It also has good compatibility with routine protein stainings such as Coomassie Brilliant Blue R (CBBR) and SYPRO Ruby for total protein analysis. PMID:23274386

  7. Superior optical nonlinearity of an exceptional fluorescent stilbene dye

    SciTech Connect

    He, Tingchao; Sreejith, Sivaramapanicker; Zhao, Yanli; Gao, Yang; Grimsdale, Andrew C.; Lin, Xiaodong E-mail: hdsun@ntu.edu.sg; Sun, Handong E-mail: hdsun@ntu.edu.sg

    2015-03-16

    Strong multiphoton absorption and harmonic generation in organic fluorescent chromophores are, respectively, significant in many fields of research. However, most of fluorescent chromophores fall short of the full potential due to the absence of the combination of such different nonlinear upconversion behaviors. Here, we demonstrate that an exceptional fluorescent stilbene dye could exhibit efficient two- and three-photon absorption under the excitation of femtosecond pulses in solution phase. Benefiting from its biocompatibility and strong excited state absorption behavior, in vitro two-photon bioimaging and superior optical limiting have been exploited, respectively. Simultaneously, the chromophore could generate efficient three-photon excited fluorescence and third-harmonic generation (THG) when dispersed into PMMA film, circumventing the limitations of classical fluorescent chromophores. Such chromophore may find application in the production of coherent light sources of higher photon energy. Moreover, the combination of three-photon excited fluorescence and THG can be used in tandem to provide complementary information in biomedical studies.

  8. Bright and photostable cyanine-styryl chromophores with green and red fluorescence colour for DNA staining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohländer, Peggy R.; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim

    2015-12-01

    The synthesis and optical characterisation of a series of green- and red-emitting cyanine and cyanine-styryl dyes is presented that were developed based on the cyanine-indole-quinolinium and based on the thiazole red type structure. For the green emitting fluorophores the quinolinium part was replaced by a pyridinium group. The bridge to the indole group was attached either to the 2-position or to the 4-position of the pyridinium moiety. For the red-emitting dyes the connection to the indole moiety is at the 4-position of the quinolinium part. In each set of dyes a methyl group at the indole-NH and/or a phenyl group at the 2-position of the indole part were introduced to tune the optical properties and photostability. Additionally, two dyes were modified with a cyano group to tune the photophysical properties and to enhance the photostabilities. The developed dyes show good photostabilities and bright green or red fluorescence intensities in the presence of DNA. Thus, these dyes represent important and promising candidates for fluorescent molecular imaging of nucleic acids inside living cells.

  9. Neoplasm diagnostics based on fluorescence of polymethine dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samtsov, Michael P.; Voropay, Eugene S.; Chalov, Vadim N.; Zhavrid, Edvard A.

    2002-05-01

    Investigated polymethine dye TICS has near IR bands of fluorescence and absorption within the transparency region of biological tissues. It can be detected up to 1.5 cm from the surface of the skin. The intensity of a fluorescence signal of TICS is linear for doses up to 2 mg/kg in both tumor and muscle tissue. The ratio of an intensity of light induced fluorescence in tumor tissue to one in muscle tissue is up to 3.6 for rapidly growing tumors. The retention time of TICS is 7 days in all tissues. TICS can be used in the detection of tumor boundaries and tumor internal structure.

  10. Inhibition of beta-amyloid aggregation by fluorescent dye labels

    SciTech Connect

    Amaro, Mariana; Wellbrock, Thorben; Birch, David J. S.; Rolinski, Olaf J.

    2014-02-10

    The fluorescence decay of beta-amyloid's (Aβ) intrinsic fluorophore tyrosine has been used for sensing the oligomer formation of dye-labelled Aβ monomers and the results compared with previously studied oligomerization of the non-labelled Aβ peptides. It has been demonstrated that two different sized, covalently bound probes 7-diethylaminocoumarin-3-carbonyl and Hilyte Fluor 488 (HLF), alter the rate and character of oligomerization to different extents. The ability of HLF to inhibit formation of highly ordered structures containing beta-sheets was also shown. The implications of our findings for using fluorescence methods in amyloidosis research are discussed and the advantages of this auto-fluorescence approach highlighted.

  11. Array-based sensing of purine derivatives with fluorescent dyes.

    PubMed

    Kstereli, Ziya; Severin, Kay

    2015-09-21

    Natural and synthetic purine derivatives such as caffeine, theophylline, 6-mercaptopurine and 8-chlorotheophylline are important drugs. Due to the structural similarity of these compounds, it is intrinsically difficult to prepare chemosensors for their selective optical detection. Here, we describe a sensor array which can be used to differentiate pharmacologically important purine derivatives with good accuracy. The array is composed of four polysufonated fluorescent dyes, all of which can bind purines via?-stacking interactions. The complexation of the analytes results in partial quenching of the fluorescence. The fluorescence response of the four dyes provides a characteristic signal pattern, enabling the identification of thirteen purine derivatives at low millimolar concentration. Furthermore, it is possible to use the array for obtaining information about the quantity and purity of purine samples. PMID:26223489

  12. Fluorescence properties of dye doped mesoporous silica

    SciTech Connect

    Carbonaro, Carlo M. Corpino, Riccardo Ricci, Pier Carlo Chiriu, Daniele; Cannas, Carla

    2014-10-21

    In this paper we present a review of the main results we obtained studying the emission properties of organic-inorganic hybrids obtained combining mesoporous silica and Xantene dyes, in particular the standard reference Rhodamine 6G. The purpose of the review is to show the possibility to efficiently 'dope' the transparent inorganic porous matrix to obtain promising systems for photonic and biomedical applications. The strategies to solve the concentration effect and the leaching phenomenon are discussed within the framework of the single exciton theory.

  13. Fluorescence of Alexa Fluor Dye Tracks Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Lindhoud, Simon; Westphal, Adrie H.; Visser, Antonie J. W. G.; Borst, Jan Willem; van Mierlo, Carlo P. M.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is an important tool for the characterization of protein folding. Often, a protein is labeled with appropriate fluorescent donor and acceptor probes and folding-induced changes in Frster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) are monitored. However, conformational changes of the protein potentially affect fluorescence properties of both probes, thereby profoundly complicating interpretation of FRET data. In this study, we assess the effects protein folding has on fluorescence properties of Alexa Fluor 488 (A488), which is commonly used as FRET donor. Here, A488 is covalently attached to Cys69 of apoflavodoxin from Azotobacter vinelandii. Although coupling of A488 slightly destabilizes apoflavodoxin, the three-state folding of this protein, which involves a molten globule intermediate, is unaffected. Upon folding of apoflavodoxin, fluorescence emission intensity of A488 changes significantly. To illuminate the molecular sources of this alteration, we applied steady state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. The results obtained show that tryptophans cause folding-induced changes in quenching of Alexa dye. Compared to unfolded protein, static quenching of A488 is increased in the molten globule. Upon populating the native state both static and dynamic quenching of A488 decrease considerably. We show that fluorescence quenching of Alexa Fluor dyes is a sensitive reporter of conformational changes during protein folding. PMID:23056480

  14. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer enhanced luminescence (FRETEL) of Quantum Dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leif, R. C.; Becker, M. C.; Bromm, A., Jr.; Vallarino, L. M.; Yang, S.

    2006-02-01

    Methods for increasing the luminescence intensity of lanthanide macrocycles, Quantum Dyes (R), by the Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Enhanced Luminescence (FRETEL) effect in the solid state have been developed. A homogeneous solution containing the europium or terbium Quantum Dye and an excess of selected energy transfer species is evaporated to dryness, resulting in a thin film that surrounds and embeds the Quantum Dye or its conjugates. Under these conditions, in the presence of the gadolinium-thenoyltrifluoroacetonate complex as the energy transfer species, the luminescence of the europium Quantum Dye increased approximately 6-fold upon drying. However, the presence of a nonemitting lanthanide such as gadolinium is not always required for this effect. In studies employing the 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylate ion as the energy transfer species, where both the terbium and the europium Quantum Dyes could be simultaneously excited at 280 nm, the presence of gadolinium actually decreased the luminescence compared to that obtained with the 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylate alone. The simplest explanation for the FRETEL effect is that fluorescence resonance energy transfer occurs between the photo-trapping energy transfer species, either unbound or complexed with the nonluminescent gadolinium ion. The energy being finally transferred to the luminescent lanthanide ion complexes with consequent increase in emission intensity. This new method for the enhancement of luminescence intensity in the solid state has the significant advantage of eliminating the need for the previously required aqueous emulsion, which was difficult to make and transport.

  15. Ethidium bromide: a fast fluorescent staining procedure for the detection of symbiotic partnership of flagellates and prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, J; König, H

    1999-03-01

    The hindgut of 'lower' termites harbors a dense population of flagellates and bacteria. The flagellates possess ecto- and endosymbiotic prokaryotes. Most of them are hardly visible in the phase contrast microscope. Staining with the DNA-intercalating agent ethidium bromide visualizes the nuclei of the flagellates as well as the ecto- and endosymbiotic bacteria as red objects. Furthermore, it is possible to distinguish between endosymbiotic methanogens and other bacteria. Following UV excitation, the blue-green autofluorescence of the methanogenic bacteria eclipses the red fluorescence light of the intercalated ethidium bromide. The dye facilitates the observation of symbiotic bacteria and helps identify the number, shape, localization, and dividing status of the nuclei. Thus, it is a powerful tool for the examination of microorganisms in complex habitats, which are rich in strongly autofluorescent material, like wood. PMID:10192044

  16. Asymmetric distyrylpyridinium dyes as red-emitting fluorescent probes for quadruplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao; Choi, Bina; Largy, Eric; Guillot, Rgis; Granzhan, Anton; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule

    2013-01-21

    The interactions of three cationic distyryl dyes, namely 2,4-bis(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-1-methylpyridinium (1a), its derivative with a quaternary aminoalkyl chain (1b), and the symmetric 2,6-bis(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-1-methylpyridinium (2a), with several quadruplex and duplex nucleic acids were studied with the aim to establish the influence of the geometry of the dyes on their DNA-binding and DNA-probing properties. The results from spectrofluorimetric titrations and thermal denaturation experiments provide evidence that asymmetric (2,4-disubstituted) dyes 1a and 1b bind to quadruplex DNA structures with a near-micromolar affinity and a fair selectivity with respect to double-stranded (ds) DNA [K(a)(G4)/K(a)(ds)=2.5-8.4]. At the same time, the fluorescence of both dyes is selectively increased in the presence of quadruplex DNAs (more than 80-100-fold in the case of human telomeric quadruplex), even in the presence of an excess of competing double-stranded DNA. This optical selectivity allows these dyes to be used as quadruplex-DNA-selective probes in solution and stains in polyacrylamide gels. In contrast, the symmetric analogue 2a displays a strong binding preference for double-stranded DNA [K(a) (ds)/K(a) (G4)=40-100), presumably due to binding in the minor groove. In addition, 2a is not able to discriminate between quadruplex and duplex DNA, as its fluorescence is increased equally well (20-50-fold) in the presence of both structures. This study emphasizes and rationalizes the strong impact of subtle structural variations on both DNA-recognition properties and fluorimetric response of organic dyes. PMID:23292703

  17. A blue fluorescent labeling technique utilizing micro- and nanoparticles for tracking in LIVE/DEAD® stained pathogenic biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus and Burkholderia cepacia

    PubMed Central

    Klinger-Strobel, Mareike; Ernst, Julia; Lautenschläger, Christian; Pletz, Mathias W; Fischer, Dagmar; Makarewicz, Oliwia

    2016-01-01

    Strategies that target and treat biofilms are widely applied to bacterial cultures using popular live/dead staining techniques with mostly red or green fluorescent markers (eg, with SYTO® 9, propidium iodide, fluorescein). Therefore, visualizing drugs or micro- and nanoparticulate delivery systems to analyze their distribution and effects in biofilms requires a third fluorescent dye that does not interfere with the properties of the live/dead markers. The present study establishes and evaluates a model for tracking polymeric particles in fluorescently stained biological material. To this end, poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-based micro- and nanoparticles were used as well-established model systems, which, because of their favorable safety profiles, are expected to play important future roles with regard to drug delivery via inhalation. PLGA was covalently and stably labeled with 7-amino-4-methyl-3-coumarinylacetic acid (AMCA), after which blue fluorescent poly(ethylene glycol)-block-PLGA (PEG-PLGA) particles were prepared using a mixture of fluorescent AMCA-PLGA and PEG-PLGA. Because chitosan is known to reduce negative surface charge, blue fluorescent PEG-PLGA-particles with chitosan were also prepared. These micro- and nanoparticles were physicochemically characterized and could be clearly distinguished from live/dead stained bacteria in biofilms using confocal laser scanning microscopy. PMID:26917959

  18. Sensitive Immunofluorescent Staining of Cells via Generation of Fluorescent Nanoscale Polymer Films in Response to Biorecognition

    PubMed Central

    Avens, Heather J.; Berron, Brad J.; May, Allison M.; Voigt, Katerina R.; Seedorf, Gregory J.; Balasubramaniam, Vivek; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2011-01-01

    Immunofluorescent staining is central to nearly all cell-based research, yet only a few fluorescent signal amplification approaches for cell staining exist, each with distinct limitations. Here, the authors present a novel, fluorescent polymerization-based amplification (FPBA) method that is shown to enable similar signal intensities as the highly sensitive, enzyme-based tyramide signal amplification (TSA) approach. Being non-enzymatic, FPBA is not expected to suffer from nonspecific staining of endogenous enzymes, as occurs with enzyme-based approaches. FPBA employs probes labeled with photopolymerization initiators, which lead to the controlled formation of fluorescent polymer films only at targeted biorecognition sites. Nuclear pore complex proteins (NPCs; in membranes), vimentin (in filaments), and von Willebrand factor (in granules) were all successfully immunostained by FPBA. Also, FPBA was demonstrated to be capable of multicolor immunostaining of multiple antigens. To assess relative sensitivity, decreasing concentrations of anti-NPC antibody were used, indicating that both FPBA and TSA stained NPC down to a 1:100,000 dilution. Nonspecific, cytoplasmic signal resulting from NPC staining was found to be reduced up to 5.5-fold in FPBA as compared to TSA, demonstrating better signal localization with FPBA. FPBA’s unique approach affords a combination of preferred attributes, including high sensitivity and specificity not otherwise available with current techniques. PMID:21339175

  19. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia diagnosed by non-induced sputum stained with a direct fluorescent antibody.

    PubMed

    Rafanan, A L; Klevjer-Anderson, P; Metersky, M L

    1998-01-01

    Non-induced expectorated sputum (NIS) stained with tinctorial stains is not considered useful in the diagnosis of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP). The diagnostic yield of NIS was evaluated in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, when stained with a more sensitive direct fluorescent antibody for PCP-direct fluorescent antibody (PC-DFA). A retrospective analysis was carried out on fifty-five HIV-infected patients with PCP, who had NIS submitted for staining with PC-DFA. Thirty had positive NIS with PC-DFA and all had clinical courses consistent with PCP. Twenty-five had negative NIS with PC-DFA and were diagnosed as having PCP, by autopsy (n = 2), by a positive bronchoalveolar lavage (n = 10), or by having a clinical course consistent with PCP (n = 13). Thus, the sensitivity of NIS stained with PC-DFA was 55 percent (30/55). This is within the range reported in the literature for induced sputum for the diagnosis of PCP. Non-induced sputum stained with PC-DFA can be useful for the diagnosis of PCP in HIV-infected patients. PMID:9558448

  20. Fluorescent labeling of dendritic spines in cell cultures with the carbocyanine dye “DiI”

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Connie; Trzcinski, Olivia; Doering, Laurie C.

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing cell morphology is a key component to understand neuronal function. Several staining techniques have been developed to facilitate the morphological analysis of neurons, including the use of fluorescent markers, such as DiI (1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate). DiI is a carbocyanine membrane dye that exhibits enhanced fluorescence upon insertion of its lipophilic hydrocarbon chains into the lipid membrane of cells. The high photostability and prominent fluorescence of the dye serves as an effective means of illuminating cellular architecture in individual neurons, including detailed dendritic arborizations and spines in cell culture and tissue sections. Here, we specifically optimized a simple and reliable method to fluorescently label and visualize dissociated hippocampal neurons using DiI and high-resolution confocal microscopic imaging. With high efficacy, this method accurately labels neuronal and synaptic morphology to permit quantitative analysis of dendritic spines. Accurate imaging techniques of these fine neuronal specializations are vital to the study of their morphology and can help delineate structure-function relationships in the central nervous system. PMID:24847216

  1. Influence of selected fluorescent dyes on small aquatic organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowiński, Paweł; Chrzanowski, Marcin

    2011-02-01

    Rhodamine B and Rhodamine WT are fluorescent dyes commonly used as tracers in hydrological investigations. Since introducing intensely red substances into rivers raises understandable doubts of ecological nature, the authors aimed at examining the influence of these dyes on small water fauna using bioindication methods. Quantitative results, calculated with the use of Bliss-Weber probit statistical method, were achieved by means of standardized ecotoxicological tests containing ready-to-hatch resting forms of fairy shrimp (Thamnocephalus platyurus). Qualitative studies included observation of water flea crustacean (Daphnia magna) and horned planorbis snail (Planorbis corneus), both typically present in rivers and representative for temperate climate, as well as guppy fish (Poecilla reticulata), paramecium protozoan (Paramaecium caudatum) and the above-mentioned fairy shrimp. The investigation revealed that both dyes in concentrations used for hydrological purposes are low enough to exert almost no toxic impact on water fauna considered.

  2. Rapid image-based cytometry for comparison of fluorescent viability staining methods.

    PubMed

    Chan, Leo L; Wilkinson, Alisha R; Paradis, Benjamin D; Lai, Ning

    2012-09-01

    The ability to accurately measure cell viability is important for any cell-based research. Traditionally, viability measurements have been performed using trypan blue exclusion method on hemacytometer, which allowed researchers to visually distinguish viable from nonviable cells. However, the trypan blue method is often limited to only cell lines or primary cells that have been rigorously purified. In the recent years, small desktop image-based cell counters have been developed for rapid cell concentration and viability measurement due to advances in imaging and optics technologies as well as novel fluorescent stains. In this work, we employed the Cellometer image-based cytometer to demonstrate the ability to simplify viability detection compared to the current methods. We compared various fluorescence viability detection methods using single- or dual-staining technique. Single-staining method using nucleic acid stains including ethidium bromide, propidium iodide, 7AAD, DAPI, Sytox Green and Sytox Red, and enzymatic stains including CFDA and Calcein AM were performed. All stains produced comparable results to trypan blue exclusion method for cell line samples. Dual-staining method using AO/PI, CFDA/PI, Calcein AM/PI and Hoechst 33342/PI that enumerates viable and non-viable cells was tested on primary cell samples with high debris contents. This method allowed exclusion of cellular debris and non-nucleated cells from analysis, which can eliminate the need to perform purification step during sample preparation, and improves the efficiency of viability detection method. Overall, these image-based fluorescent cell counters can simplify assay procedures as well as capture images for visual confirmation. PMID:22718197

  3. Assessment of gamete quality for the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) by use of fluorescent dyes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paniagua-Chavez, C. G.; Jenkins, J.; Segovia, M.; Tiersch, T.R.

    2006-01-01

    Evaluation of sperm motility is the single most widely used parameter to determine semen quality in mammals and aquatic species. While a good indicator for fresh sperm viability, post-thaw motility is not always effective at predicting fertilizing ability. Techniques using fluorescent dyes can assess functionality of mammalian sperm, but have not been widely applied in aquatic organisms. The eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica is an important mollusk in the United States, and cryopreservation protocols have been developed to preserve sperm and larvae to assist research and hatchery production. In this study, protocols were developed to assess sperm cell membrane integrity and mitochondrial function by flow cytometry and to assess viability of eggs by fluorescence microscopy. The fluorescent dyes SYBR 14 and propidium iodide (PI) (to assess membrane integrity) and rhodamine 123 (R123) (to assess mitochondrial membrane potential) were used to evaluate the quality of thawed oyster sperm previously cryopreserved with different cryoprotectant and thawing treatments. Membrane integrity results were correlated with motility of thawed sperm and mitochondrial membrane potential with fertilizing ability. Fluorescein diacetate (FDA) was used to assess cytotoxicity of cryoprotectant solutions and post-thaw damage to oyster eggs. The results indicated that membrane integrity (P = 0.004) and thawing treatments (P = 0.04), and mitochondrial membrane potential (P = 0.0015) were correlated with motility. Fertilizing ability was correlated with cryoprotectant treatments (P = 0.0258) and with mitochondrial membrane potential (P = 0.001). The dye FDA was useful in indicating structural integrity of fresh and thawed eggs. Exposure of eggs, without freezing, to dimethyl sulfoxide yielded higher percentages of stained eggs and fertilization rate than did exposure to propylene glycol (P = 0.002). Thawed eggs were not stained with FDA (<1%) and larvae were not produced. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Two-photon fluorescence and fluorescence imaging of two styryl heterocyclic dyes combined with DNA.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chao; Liu, Shu-Yao; Zhang, Xian; Liu, Ying-Kai; Qiao, Cong-de; Liu, Zhao-E

    2016-03-01

    Two new styryl heterocyclic two-photon (TP) materials, 4-[4-(N-methyl)styrene]-imidazo [4,5-f][1,10] phenanthroline-benzene iodated salt (probe-1) and 4,4- [4-(N-methyl)styrene] -benzene iodated salt (probe-2) were successfully synthesized and studied as potential fluorescent probes of DNA detection. The linear and nonlinear photophysical properties of two compounds in different solvents were investigated. The absorption, one- and two-photon fluorescent spectra of the free dye and dye-DNA complex were also examined to evaluate their photophysical properties. The binding constants of dye-DNA were obtained according to Scatchard equation with good values. The results showed that two probes could be used as fluorescent DNA probes by two-photon excitation, and TP fluorescent properties of probe-1 are superior to that of probe-2. The fluorescent method date indicated that the mechanisms of dye-DNA complex interaction may be groove binding for probe-1 and electrostatic interaction for probe-2, respectively. The MTT assay experiments showed two probes are low toxicity. Moreover, the TP fluorescence imaging of DNA detection in living cells at 800nm indicated that the ability to locate in cell nuclei of probe-1 is better than that of probe-2. PMID:26629954

  5. Two-photon fluorescence and fluorescence imaging of two styryl heterocyclic dyes combined with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chao; Liu, Shu-yao; Zhang, Xian; Liu, Ying-kai; Qiao, Cong-de; Liu, Zhao-e.

    2016-03-01

    Two new styryl heterocyclic two-photon (TP) materials, 4-[4-(N-methyl)styrene]-imidazo [4,5-f][1,10] phenanthroline-benzene iodated salt (probe-1) and 4,4- [4-(N-methyl)styrene] -benzene iodated salt (probe-2) were successfully synthesized and studied as potential fluorescent probes of DNA detection. The linear and nonlinear photophysical properties of two compounds in different solvents were investigated. The absorption, one- and two-photon fluorescent spectra of the free dye and dye-DNA complex were also examined to evaluate their photophysical properties. The binding constants of dye-DNA were obtained according to Scatchard equation with good values. The results showed that two probes could be used as fluorescent DNA probes by two-photon excitation, and TP fluorescent properties of probe-1 are superior to that of probe-2. The fluorescent method date indicated that the mechanisms of dye-DNA complex interaction may be groove binding for probe-1 and electrostatic interaction for probe-2, respectively. The MTT assay experiments showed two probes are low toxicity. Moreover, the TP fluorescence imaging of DNA detection in living cells at 800 nm indicated that the ability to locate in cell nuclei of probe-1 is better than that of probe-2.

  6. Anatomical differences in response to treatment of port-wine stains by the pulsed dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renfro, Lisa; Geronemus, Roy G.

    1992-06-01

    Two-hundred and fifty-seven patients (136 adults and 121 children) with port-wine stains of the head and neck were treated with the flashlamp-pumped pulsed dye laser. The head and neck was subdivided into 8 anatomical regions (forehead/temple, periorbital, medial cheek, nose, upper cutaneous lip, lateral cheek, chin and neck) which were independently evaluated for response. Response to treatment was found to be associated with the anatomical location of the lesion; in both adults and children the mid-facial region (medial cheek, nose and upper cutaneous lip) responded less favorably to treatment than the other regions of the head and neck (periorbital, forehead/temple, lateral cheek, neck and chin). In adults and children, mean percent lesional lightening of the mid-facial regions was 70.7% compared to 82.3% of the other regions of the head and neck with an estimated difference of 11.6% (95% confidence interval: 8.7% - 14.6%). The mean number of treatments for adults was 3.7, while this number in children was 3.9. All side effects were transient, and included cutaneous depressions, hypopigmentation and hyperpigmentation.

  7. Particle Image Velocimetry Applications Using Fluorescent Dye-Doped Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosky, Brian J.; Maisto, Pietro; Lowe, K. Todd; Andre, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.; Tiemsin, Patsy I.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Polystyrene latex sphere particles are widely used to seed flows for velocimetry techniques such as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). These particles may be doped with fluorescent dyes such that signals spectrally shifted from the incident laser wavelength may be detected via Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). An attractive application of the LIF signal is achieving velocimetry in the presence of strong interference from laser scatter, opening up new research possibilities very near solid surfaces or at liquid/gas interfaces. Additionally, LIF signals can be used to tag different fluid streams to study mixing. While fluorescence-based PIV has been performed by many researchers for particles dispersed in water flows, the current work is among the first in applying the technique to micron-scale particles dispersed in a gas. A key requirement for such an application is addressing potential health hazards from fluorescent dyes; successful doping of Kiton Red 620 (KR620) has enabled the use of this relatively safe dye for fluorescence PIV for the first time. In this paper, basic applications proving the concept of PIV using the LIF signal from KR620-doped particles are exhibited for a free jet and a twophase flow apparatus. Results indicate that while the fluorescence PIV techniques are roughly 2 orders of magnitude weaker than Mie scattering, they provide a viable method for obtaining data in flow regions previously inaccessible via standard PIV. These techniques have the potential to also complement Mie scattering signals, for example in multi-stream and/or multi-phase experiments.

  8. Several hemicyanine dyes as fluorescence chemosensors for cyanide anions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Muhan; Wang, Kangnan; Guan, Ruifang; Liu, Zhiqiang; Cao, Duxia; Wu, Qianqian; Shan, Yanyan; Xu, Yongxiao

    2016-05-01

    Four hemicyanine dyes as chemosensors for cyanide anions were synthesized easily. Their photophysical properties and recognition properties for cyanide anions were investigated. The results indicate that all the dyes can recognize cyanide anions with obvious color, absorption and fluorescence change. The recognition mechanism analysis basing on in situ (1)H NMR and Job plot data indicates that to the compounds with hydroxyl group, the recognition mechanism is intramolecular hydrogen bonding interaction. However, to the compounds without hydroxyl group, cyanide anion is bonded to carbon-carbon double bond in conjugated bridge and induces N(+)CH3 to neutral NCH3. Fluorescence of the compounds is almost quenched upon the addition of cyanide anions. PMID:26921604

  9. Fluorescence dye tagging scheme for mercury quantification and speciation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Hong; Catterall, Hannah

    2015-09-22

    A fluorescent dye or fluorophore capable of forming complexes with mercury comprises 6,8-difluoro-7-hydroxy-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carboxylate amide, wherein the amide is formed by reacting the succinimidyl ester (Pacific Blue.TM.) with an amino acid containing a thiol group, such as cysteine or glutathione. Mercury complexes of the fluorophore fluoresce when excited by a UV or violet laser diode, and the detected intensity can be calibrated to quantify the concentration of mercury in a sample reacted with the fluorophore.

  10. Fluorescence lifetime imaging with near-infrared dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Wolfgang; Shcheslavskiy, Vladislav

    2013-02-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) dyes are used as fluorescence markers in small-animal imaging and in diffuse optical tomography of the human brain. In these applications it is important to know whether the dyes bind to proteins or other tissue constituents, and whether their fluorescence lifetimes depend on the targets they are bound to. Unfortunately, neither the lasers nor the detectors of commonly used confocal and multiphoton laser scanning microscopes allow for excitation and detection of NIR fluorescence. We therefore upgraded existing confocal TCSPC FLIM systems with NIR lasers and NIR sensitive detectors. In multiphoton systems we used the Ti:Sa laser as a one-photon excitation source in combination with an NIR-sensitive detector in the confocal beam path. We tested a number of NIR dyes in biological tissue. Some of them showed clear lifetime changes depending on the tissue structures they are bound to. We therefore believe that NIR FLIM can deliver supplementary information on the tissue constitution and on local biochemical parameters.

  11. Determination of collagen content within picrosirius red stained paraffin-embedded tissue sections using fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Benjamin; Siebert, Hanna; Hofmann, Ulrich; Frantz, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Picrosirius red (PSR) staining is a commonly used histological technique to visualize collagen in paraffin-embedded tissue sections. PSR stained collagen appears red in light microscopy. However it is largely unknown that PSR stained collagen also shows a red fluorescence, whereas live cells have a distinct green autofluorescence. Both emission patterns can be detected using standard filter sets as found in conventional fluorescence microscopes. Here we used digital image addition and subtraction to determine the relative area of the pure collagen and live cell content in heart tissue in a semi-automated process using standard software. This procedure, which considers empty spaces (holes) within the section, can be easily adapted to quantify the collagen and live cell areas in healthy or fibrotic tissues as aorta, lung, kidney or liver by semi-automated planimetry exemplified herein for infarcted heart tissue obtained from the mouse myocardial infarction model. Use of conventional PSR stained paraffin-embedded tissue sections for fluorescence analysis. PSR and autofluorescence images are used to calculate area of collagen and area of live cells in the tissue; empty spaces (holes) in tissue are considered. High throughput analysis of collagen and live cell content in tissue for statistical purposes. PMID:26150980

  12. Determination of collagen content within picrosirius red stained paraffin-embedded tissue sections using fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Benjamin; Siebert, Hanna; Hofmann, Ulrich; Frantz, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Picrosirius red (PSR) staining is a commonly used histological technique to visualize collagen in paraffin-embedded tissue sections. PSR stained collagen appears red in light microscopy. However it is largely unknown that PSR stained collagen also shows a red fluorescence, whereas live cells have a distinct green autofluorescence. Both emission patterns can be detected using standard filter sets as found in conventional fluorescence microscopes. Here we used digital image addition and subtraction to determine the relative area of the pure collagen and live cell content in heart tissue in a semi-automated process using standard software. This procedure, which considers empty spaces (holes) within the section, can be easily adapted to quantify the collagen and live cell areas in healthy or fibrotic tissues as aorta, lung, kidney or liver by semi-automated planimetry exemplified herein for infarcted heart tissue obtained from the mouse myocardial infarction model. Use of conventional PSR stained paraffin-embedded tissue sections for fluorescence analysis.PSR and autofluorescence images are used to calculate area of collagen and area of live cells in the tissue; empty spaces (holes) in tissue are considered.High throughput analysis of collagen and live cell content in tissue for statistical purposes. PMID:26150980

  13. DNA fluorescent stain accumulates in the Golgi but not in the kinetosomes of amitochondriate protists.

    PubMed

    Dolan, M F

    2000-03-01

    Hindgut symbiotic trichomonads (uninucleate Caduceia versatilis, and multinucleate Stephanonympha sp. and Snyderella tabogae) from the dry-wood-eating termite Cryptotermes cavifrons (Kalotermitidae) accumulate DAPI (4,6diamidino-2-phenylindole) in the membranous sacs of the Golgi complex. This form of Golgi complex, typical of protists in the class Parabasalia, is called a parabasal body. Trichomonads contain organellar systems, mastigonts, that consist of four undulipodia (e.g. eukaryotic flagella and cilia), axostylar microtubules, a parabasal body and other structures. These cells bear from one (in the case of Caduceia) to hundreds (in the case of Snyderella) of mastigonts. These features are characteristic of their protist class (Parabasalia). The nuclei of all three species stained with DNA-specific stains: DAPI, SYTOX, acridine orange, propidium iodide, ethidium bromide and Feulgen, at optimal concentrations, but kinetosomes failed to stain at all. The nuclei, parabasal bodies and symbiotic bacteria (but no microtubular structures) fluoresced in glutaraldehyde-fixed cells stained with 1.45 microM DAPI. Parabasal bodies of Snyderella and Caduceia treated to remove lipids with Triton X-100, or treated with 5% trichloroacetic acid, lacked DAPI-fluorescence. I conclude that DNA, present as expected in nuclei and bacterial symbionts, is absent from and not associated with calonymphid kinetosomes. The reason for DNA-RNA stain accumulation in the Golgi cistemae is not clear. PMID:10963333

  14. Influence of pulsewidth on the efficiency of pulsed dye laser (PDL) treatment of port-wine stains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strempel, Hartmut; Klein, Guy

    1996-12-01

    In order to destroy selectively cutaneous vessels with a dye laser, the exposition time has to be shorter than the thermal relaxation time of the target tissue. Within this frame of time longer pulses are found to be more efficient in bleaching portwine stains than shorter ones. Two pulses of different length but with identical power density are compared in their therapeutical efficiency by means of reflectometry. There were no relevant differences neither in terms of lightness, redness nor in yellowness. If the increment and the irradiance is the same, a pulse stretching form 200 microsecond(s) to 260 microsecond(s) does not influence decisively the therapeutical effect in portwine stains.

  15. Deterministically Polarized Fluorescence from Single Dye Molecules Aligned in Liquid Crystal Host

    SciTech Connect

    Lukishova, S.G.; Schmid, A.W.; Knox, R.; Freivald, P.; Boyd, R. W.; Stroud, Jr., C. R.; Marshall, K.L.

    2005-09-30

    We demonstrated for the first time to our konwledge deterministically polarized fluorescence from single dye molecules. Planar aligned nematic liquid crystal hosts provide deterministic alignment of single dye molecules in a preferred direction.

  16. Topography and Response Timing of Intact Cerebellum Stained With Absorbance Voltage-Sensitive Dye

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Michael E.; Ariel, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Physiological activity of the turtle cerebellar cortex (Cb), maintained in vitro, was recorded during microstimulation of inferior olive (IO). Previous single-electrode responses to such stimulation showed similar latencies across a limited region of Cb, yet those recordings lacked spatial and temporal resolution and the recording depth was variable. The topography and timing of those responses were reexamined using photodiode optical recordings. Because turtle Cb is thin and unfoliated, its entire surface can be stained by a voltage-sensitive dye and transilluminated to measure changes in its local absorbance. Microstimulation of the IO evoked widespread depolarization from the rostral to the caudal edge of the contralateral Cb. The time course of responses measured at a single photodiode matched that of single-microelectrode responses in the corresponding Cb locus. The largest and most readily evoked response was a sagittal band centered about 0.7 mm from the midline. Focal white-matter (WM) microstimulation on the ventricular surface also activated sagittal bands, whereas stimulation of adjacent granule cells evoked a radial patch of activation. In contrast, molecular-layer (ML) microstimulation evoked transverse beams of activation, centered on the rostrocaudal stimulus position, which traveled bidirectionally across the midline to the lateral edges of the Cb. A timing analysis demonstrated that both IO and WM microstimulation evoked responses with a nearly simultaneous onset along a sagittal band, whereas ML microstimulation evoked a slowly propagating wave traveling about 25 cm/s. The response similarity to IO and WM microstimulation suggests that the responses to WM microstimulation are dominated by activation of its climbing fibers. The Cb's role in the generation of precise motor control may result from these temporal and topographic differences in orthogonally oriented pathways. Optical recordings of the turtle's thin flat Cb can provide insights into that role. PMID:19004999

  17. Choroidal angiography with indocyanine green dye: absorption and fluorescence techniques.

    PubMed

    Panzardi, G; Donati, M C; Longobardi, G; Poggi, P

    1992-01-01

    The results of choroidal indocyanine green (I.C.G.) angiography by the absorption and fluorescence techniques are compared. Both techniques were done using the same apparatus, a modified fundus camera, an image intensifier coupled to a solid-state video camera and a U Matic video recorder. Both were performed with the same dye dilution in the same patients, at a 24-hour interval. The light source was the unmodified 50 Watt halogen light bulb of the fundus camera. The angiograms obtained by the absorption and the fluorescence techniques refer to the same chorioretinal area and the same angiographic phase. Comparison of all the angiograms shows that I.C.G. fluorescence angiography provides a better resolution of choroidal vascular details than the absorption technique. PMID:1498571

  18. Treatment of Port-Wine Stains with Flash Lamp Pumped Pulsed Dye Laser on Indian Skin: A Six Year Study

    PubMed Central

    Thajudheen, Chandroth Ponnambath; Jyothy, Kannangath; Priyadarshini, Arul

    2014-01-01

    Context: Port-wine stain (PWS) is one of the commonly encountered congenital cutaneous vascular lesions, with an equal sex distribution. Pulsed dye lasers (PDL) have revolutionized the treatment of both congential and acquired cutaneous vascular lesions. The pulsed dye lasers owing to its superior efficacy and safety profile have become the gold standard for the management of port-wine stains. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy and side effects of pulsed dye laser for the management of Port-wine stain on Indian skin. Materials and Methods: Seventy five patients of Fitzpatrick skin types IV&V with PWS underwent multiple treatments with PDL (V beam-Candela) over a period of six years at monthly intervals. Laser parameters were wavelength 595nm, spot sizes 7-10mm, fluence 6-12 j/cm2, pulse duration 0.45-10ms, along with cryogen cooling. Serial photographs were taken before and after every session. Clinical improvement scores of comparable photographs using a quartile grading (o=<20%, 1=21-40%, 2=41-60%, 3=61-80%, 4=>80%) were judged independently by two dermatologists after the series of treatment. Minimum number of treatments was 6 and maximum 17. They were followed up at six monthly intervals to observe re darkening of PWS. Results: No patient showed total clearance.Grade3 improvement was observed in 70 % of children and 50% of adults after 8-10 sessions. Children showed better and faster response than adults. Thirty percent of patients developed post inflammatory hyper pigmentation which resolved over a period of six to eight weeks. Two patients had superficial scarring due to stacking of pulses. None of the patients showed re darkening of PWS till now. Conclusion: Pulsed dye laser is an effective and safe treatment for port-wine stain in Indian skin. PMID:24761097

  19. Improved Dye Stability in Single-Molecule Fluorescence Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeverra Aitken, Colin; Marshall, R. Andrew; Pugi, Joseph D.

    Complex biological systems challenge existing single-molecule methods. In particular, dye stability limits observation time in singlemolecule fluorescence applications. Current approaches to improving dye performance involve the addition of enzymatic oxygen scavenging systems and small molecule additives. We present an enzymatic oxygen scavenging system that improves dye stability in single-molecule experiments. Compared to the currently-employed glucose-oxidase/catalase system, the protocatechuate-3,4-dioxygenase system achieves lower dissolved oxygen concentration and stabilizes single Cy3, Cy5, and Alexa488 fluorophores. Moreover, this system possesses none of the limitations associated with the glucose oxidase/catalase system. We also tested the effects of small molecule additives in this system. Biological reducing agents significantly destabilize the Cy5 fluorophore as a function of reducing potential. In contrast, anti-oxidants stabilize the Cy3 and Alexa488 fluorophores. We recommend use of the protocatechuate-3,4,-dioxygenase system with antioxidant additives, and in the absence of biological reducing agents. This system should have wide application to single-molecule fluorescence experiments.

  20. Emission Lifetimes of a Fluorescent Dye under Shock Compression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-long; Bassett, Will P; Christensen, James M; Dlott, Dana D

    2015-11-01

    The emission lifetimes of rhodamine 6G (R6G) were measured under shock compression to 9.1 GPa, with the dual intents of better understanding molecular photophysics in extreme environments and assessing the usefulness of fluorescence lifetime microscopy to measure spatially dependent pressure distributions in shocked microstructured media. R6G was studied as free dye dissolved in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), or dye encapsulated in silica microparticles suspended in PMMA. Thin layers of these materials in impedance-matched geometries were subjected to planar single-stage shocks created by laser-driven flyer plates. A synchronized femtosecond laser excited the dye at selected times relative to flyer plate arrival and the emission lifetimes were measured with a streak camera. Lifetimes decreased when shocks arrived. The lifetime decrease was attributed to a shock-induced enhancement of R6G nonradiative relaxation. At least part of the relaxation involved shock-enhanced intersystem crossing. For free dye in PMMA, the lifetime decrease during the shock was shown to be a linear function of shock pressure from 0 to 9 GPa, with a slope of -0.22 nsGPa(-1). The linear relationship makes it simple to convert lifetimes into pressures. Lifetime measurements in shocked microenvironments may be better than emission intensity measurements, because lifetimes are sensitive to the surrounding environment, but insensitive to intensity variations associated with the motion and optical properties of a dynamically changing structure. PMID:26469397

  1. Coomassie Blue as a Near-infrared Fluorescent Stain: A Systematic Comparison With Sypro Ruby for In-gel Protein Detection*

    PubMed Central

    Butt, R. Hussain; Coorssen, Jens R.

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative proteome analyses suggest that the well-established stain colloidal Coomassie Blue, when used as an infrared dye, may provide sensitive, post-electrophoretic in-gel protein detection that can rival even Sypro Ruby. Considering the central role of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in top-down proteomic analyses, a more cost effective alternative such as Coomassie Blue could prove an important tool in ongoing refinements of this important analytical technique. To date, no systematic characterization of Coomassie Blue infrared fluorescence detection relative to detection with SR has been reported. Here, seven commercial Coomassie stain reagents and seven stain formulations described in the literature were systematically compared. The selectivity, threshold sensitivity, inter-protein variability, and linear-dynamic range of Coomassie Blue infrared fluorescence detection were assessed in parallel with Sypro Ruby. Notably, several of the Coomassie stain formulations provided infrared fluorescence detection sensitivity to <1 ng of protein in-gel, slightly exceeding the performance of Sypro Ruby. The linear dynamic range of Coomassie Blue infrared fluorescence detection was found to significantly exceed that of Sypro Ruby. However, in two-dimensional gel analyses, because of a blunted fluorescence response, Sypro Ruby was able to detect a few additional protein spots, amounting to 0.6% of the detected proteome. Thus, although both detection methods have their advantages and disadvantages, differences between the two appear to be small. Coomassie Blue infrared fluorescence detection is thus a viable alternative for gel-based proteomics, offering detection comparable to Sypro Ruby, and more reliable quantitative assessments, but at a fraction of the cost. PMID:24043422

  2. Laser velocimetry with fluorescent dye-doped polystyrene microspheres.

    PubMed

    Lowe, K Todd; Maisto, Pietro; Byun, Gwibo; Simpson, Roger L; Verkamp, Max; Danehy, Paul M; Tiemsin, Pacita I; Wohl, Christopher J

    2013-04-15

    Simultaneous Mie scattering and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) signals are obtained from individual polystyrene latex microspheres dispersed in an air flow. Microspheres less than 1 ?m mean diameter were doped with two organic fluorescent dyes, Rhodamine B (RhB) and dichlorofluorescein (DCF), intended either to provide improved particle-based flow velocimetry in the vicinity of surfaces or to provide scalar flow information (e.g., marking one of two fluid streams). Both dyes exhibit measureable fluorescence signals that are on the order of 10(-3) to 10(-4) times weaker than the simultaneously measured Mie signals. It is determined that at the conditions measured, 95.5% of RhB LIF signals and 32.2% of DCF signals provide valid laser-Doppler velocimetry measurements compared with the Mie scattering validation rate with 6.5 W of 532 nm excitation, while RhB excited with 1.0 W incident laser power still exhibits 95.4% valid velocimetry signals from the LIF channel. The results suggest that the method is applicable to wind tunnel measurements near walls where laser flare can be a limiting factor and monodisperse particles are essential. PMID:23595429

  3. Microarray Analysis of Port Wine Stains Before and After Pulsed Dye Laser Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Laquer, Vivian T.; Hevezi, Peter A.; Albrecht, Huguette; Chen, Tina S.; Zlotnik, Albert; Kelly, Kristen M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Neither the pathogenesis of port wine stain (PWS) birthmarks nor tissue effects of pulsed dye laser (PDL) treatment of these lesions is fully understood. There are few published reports utilizing gene expression analysis in human PWS skin. We aim to compare gene expression in PWS before and after PDL, using DNA microarrays that represent most, if not all, human genes to obtain comprehensive molecular profiles of PWS lesions and PDL-associated tissue effects. Materials and Methods Five human subjects had PDL treatment of their PWS. One week later, three biopsies were taken from each subject: normal skin (N); untreated PWS (PWS); PWS post-PDL (PWS + PDL). Samples included two lower extremity lesions, two facial lesions, and one facial nodule. High-quality total RNA isolated from skin biopsies was processed and applied to Affymetrix Human gene 1.0ST microarrays for gene expression analysis. We performed a 16 pair-wise comparison identifying either up- or down-regulated genes between N versus PWS and PWS versus PWS + PDL for four of the donor samples. The PWS nodule (nPWS) was analyzed separately. Results There was significant variation in gene expression profiles between individuals. By doing pair-wise comparisons between samples taken from the same donor, we were able to identify genes that may participate in the formation of PWS lesions and PDL tissue effects. Genes associated with immune, epidermal, and lipid metabolism were up-regulated in PWS skin. The nPWS exhibited more profound differences in gene expression than the rest of the samples, with significant differential expression of genes associated with angiogenesis, tumorigenesis, and inflammation. Conclusion In summary, gene expression profiles from N, PWS, and PWS + PDL demonstrated significant variation within samples from the same donor and between donors. By doing pair-wise comparisons between samples taken from the same donor and comparing these results between donors, we were able to identify genes that may participate in formation of PWS and PDL effects. Our preliminary results indicate changes in gene expression of angiogenesis-related genes, suggesting that dysregulation of angiogenic signals and/or components may contribute to PWS pathology. PMID:23440713

  4. Renal biopsy frozen section: a fluorescent study of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections.

    PubMed

    Bonsib, S M; Reznicek, M J

    1990-03-01

    When frozen sections of kidney are stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and viewed by standard fluorescence microscopy, crisp detail of nephron and vascular basement membranes is revealed. We studied by H&E fluorescence, control kidneys, and 85 renal biopsies which span a broad range of renal disease. We found that H&E fluorescence provides useful initial orientation by revealing the presence of cortex or medulla and number of glomeruli and vessels. It also reveals major structural alterations of nephron and vascular basement membranes (sclerosis, disruption, atrophy) and heavy deposition of abnormal material (fibrin, immune deposits, paraprotein). When coupled with direct immunofluorescence, a much greater understanding of the disease process is possible, prior to review of permanent sections. PMID:1691496

  5. Exploration of the two-photon excitation spectrum of fluorescent dyes at wavelengths below the range of the Ti:Sapphire laser

    PubMed Central

    Trgrdh, J; Robb, G; Amor, R; Amos, WB; Dempster, J; McConnell, G

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the wavelength dependence of the two-photon excitation efficiency for a number of common UV excitable fluorescent dyes; the nuclear stains DAPI, Hoechst and SYTOX Green, chitin- and cellulose-staining dye Calcofluor White and Alexa Fluor 350, in the visible and near-infrared wavelength range (540800 nm). For several of the dyes, we observe a substantial increase in the fluorescence emission intensity for shorter excitation wavelengths than the 680 nm which is the shortest wavelength usually available for two-photon microscopy. We also find that although the rate of photo-bleaching increases at shorter wavelengths, it is still possible to acquire many images with higher fluorescence intensity. This is particularly useful for applications where the aim is to image the structure, rather than monitoring changes in emission intensity over extended periods of time. We measure the excitation spectrum when the dyes are used to stain biological specimens to get a more accurate representation of the spectrum of the dye in a cell environment as compared to solution-based measurements. PMID:25946127

  6. Exploration of the two-photon excitation spectrum of fluorescent dyes at wavelengths below the range of the Ti:Sapphire laser.

    PubMed

    Trgrdh, J; Robb, G; Amor, R; Amos, W B; Dempster, J; McConnell, G

    2015-09-01

    We have studied the wavelength dependence of the two-photon excitation efficiency for a number of common UV excitable fluorescent dyes; the nuclear stains DAPI, Hoechst and SYTOX Green, chitin- and cellulose-staining dye Calcofluor White and Alexa Fluor 350, in the visible and near-infrared wavelength range (540-800 nm). For several of the dyes, we observe a substantial increase in the fluorescence emission intensity for shorter excitation wavelengths than the 680 nm which is the shortest wavelength usually available for two-photon microscopy. We also find that although the rate of photo-bleaching increases at shorter wavelengths, it is still possible to acquire many images with higher fluorescence intensity. This is particularly useful for applications where the aim is to image the structure, rather than monitoring changes in emission intensity over extended periods of time. We measure the excitation spectrum when the dyes are used to stain biological specimens to get a more accurate representation of the spectrum of the dye in a cell environment as compared to solution-based measurements. PMID:25946127

  7. Interaction of fluorescent dyes with DNA and spermine using fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gracie, K; Smith, W E; Yip, P; Sutter, J U; Birch, D J S; Graham, D; Faulds, K

    2014-08-01

    Oligonucleotides labelled with fluorescent dyes are widely used as probes for the identification of DNA sequences in detection methods using optical spectroscopies such as fluorescence and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Spermine is widely used in surface enhanced based assays as a charge reduction and aggregating agent as it interacts strongly with the phosphate backbone and has shown to enhance the signal of a labelled oligonucleotide. The fluorescence intensity of two commonly used labels, FAM and TAMRA, were compared when spermine was added under different experimental conditions. There was a marked difference upon conjugating the free dye to an oligonucleotide, when FAM was conjugated to an oligonucleotide there was around a six fold decrease in emission, compared to a six fold increase when TAMRA was conjugated to an oligonucleotide. Dye labelled single and double stranded DNA also behaved differently with double stranded DNA labelled with FAM being a much more efficient emitter in the mid pH range, however TAMRA becomes increasingly less efficient as the pH rises. Upon addition of the base spermine, signal enhancement from the FAM labelled oligonucleotide is observed. Increasing probe concentrations of TAMRA oligonucleotide above 0.5 μM led to signal reduction most likely through quenching, either by an interaction with guanine, or through self-quenching. By using different bases for comparison, spermine and triethylamine (TEA), different affects were observed in the measured fluorescence signals. When TEA was added to FAM, a reduction in the pH dependence of fluorescence was observed, which may be useful for mid pH range assays. With the drive to increase information content and decrease time and complexity of DNA assays it is likely that more assays will be carried out in complex media such as extracted DNA fragments and PCR product. This model study indicates that dye DNA and dye spermine interactions are dye specific and that extreme care with conditions is necessary particularly if it is intended to determine the concentrations of multiple analytes using probes labelled with different dyes. PMID:24915043

  8. An improved method for collecting and staining microorganisms for enumeration by fluorescence light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Williamson, F A; Palframan, K R

    1989-06-01

    A rapid, robust method for the enumeration of total and viable microorganisms is described. A method using specific stains for viable and total cells and fluorescence light microscopy on membrane filters had been previously developed, but was suboptimal in that some non-specific staining of the filters occurred and the filters were not flat enough for automatic image analysis methods to be employed, because not all cells in a field of view were in focus simultaneously. A new membrane filter has recently become available: the Anopore membrane was described by the manufacturers as having a number of properties which would overcome these limitations. These include inorganic construction (giving resistance to solvents), high porosity (giving high flow rates), low surface adsorption (giving low background staining) and inherent hydrophilicity (simplifying wetting with aqueous solutions). Anopore membrane filters were found to produce very high contrast images of bacteria stained with ethidium bromide. Even with a relatively low power (magnification = 40) dry objective, these images could be easily thresholded for image analysis using only grey-level information. The methods developed here are considered to be a suitable basis for a fully automated procedure for the enumeration of total microbial populations. PMID:2475635

  9. pH-Sensitive Fluorescent Dyes: Are They Really pH-Sensitive in Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Xiang; Wang, Zhe; Yue, Xuyi; Ma, Ying; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    Chemically synthesized near-infrared (NIR) aza-BODIPY dyes displayed OFF/ON fluorescence at acidic pH (pKa = 6.2-6.6) through the suppression of photoinduced electron transfer (PET) and/or internal charge transfer (ICT) process. The apparent pKas of the dyes were shifted well above physiological pH in hydrophobic microenvironment, which led to turned-on fluorescence in micelles and liposomes at neutral and basic pH. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) also activated the fluorescence, though to a much less extent. When these small molecular dyes entered cells, instead of being fluorescent only in acidic organelles, the whole cytoplasm exhibited fluorescence, with signal/background ratio as high as ?10 in no-wash live cell imaging. The dye 1 labeled cells remained highly fluorescent even after 3 days. Moreover, slight variations of the dye structure resulted in significantly different intracellular fluorescence behaviors, possibly due to their different cellular uptake and intracellular activation capabilities. After separation of cellular components, the fraction of plasma membrane and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) showed the highest fluorescence, further confirming the fluorescence activation by membrane structures. The fluorescence intensity of these dyes at different intracellular pH (6.80 and 8.00) did not differ significantly, indicating that intracellular pH did not play a critical role. Altogether, we showed here for the first time that the fluorescence of pH-sensitive aza-BODIPY dyes were switched intracellularly not by acidic pH, but by intracellular membranes (and proteins as well). The excellent membrane permeability, ultra high fluorescence contrast ratio, persistent fluorescent signal, and minimum biological interference of dye 1 make it an ideal choice for live cell imaging and in vivo cell tracking. These findings also imply that the intracellular fluorescent properties of pH-sensitive dyes should be carefully examined before used as pH indicators. PMID:23464828

  10. Dye-enhanced reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy as an optical pathology tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroslavsky, Anna N.; Salomatina, Elena; Novak, John; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Castano, Ana; Hamblin, Michael

    2006-02-01

    Early detection and precise excision of neoplasms are imperative requirements for successful cancer treatment. In this study we evaluated the use of dye-enhanced confocal microscopy as an optical pathology tool in the ex vivo trial with fresh thick non-melanoma skin cancer excisions and in vivo trial with B16F10 melanoma cancer in mice. For the experiments the tumors were rapidly stained using aqueous solutions of either toluidine blue or methylene blue and imaged using multimodal confocal microscope. Reflectance images were acquired at the wavelengths of 630nm and 650 nm. Fluorescence was excited at 630 nm and 650 nm. Fluorescence emission was registered in the range between 680 nm and 710 nm. The images were compared to the corresponding en face frozen H&E sections. The results of the study indicate confocal images of stained cancerous tissue closely resemble corresponding H&E sections both in vivo and in vitro. This remarkable similarity enables interpretation of confocal images in a manner similar to that of histopathology. The developed technique may provide an efficient real-time optical tool for detecting skin pathology.

  11. Synthesis and biological assay of GSH functionalized fluorescent quantum dots for staining Hydra vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Tortiglione, Claudia; Quarta, Alessandra; Tino, Angela; Manna, Liberato; Cingolani, Roberto; Pellegrino, Teresa

    2007-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have been used extensively as fluorescent markers in several studies on living cells. Here, we report the synthesis of conjugates based on glutathione (GSH) and QDs (GSH-QDs) and we prove how these functionalized fluorescent probes can be used for staining a freshwater invertebrate called Hydra vulgaris. GSH is known to promote Hydra feeding response by inducing mouth opening. We demonstrate that GSH-QDs as well are able to elicit biological activity in such an animal, which results in the fluorescent staining of Hydra. GSH-QDs, once they reach the gastric region, are internalized by endodermal cells. The efficiency of GSH-QD internalization increases significantly when nanoparticles are coadministrated with free GSH. We also compared the behavior of bare QDs to that of GSH-QDs both in the presence and in the absence of free GSH. The conclusions from these series of experiments point to the presence of GSH binding proteins in the endodermal cell layer and uncover a novel role played by glutathione in this organism. PMID:17441682

  12. Selection of hybrid hybridomas by flow cytometry using a new combination of fluorescent vital stains.

    PubMed

    Shi, T; Eaton, A M; Ring, D B

    1991-08-01

    A new combination of fluorescent dyes (rhodamine 123 and hydroethidine) was used to internally label hybridoma fusion partners. Murine hybridoma 520C9 (recognizing human c-erbB-2) was labeled with hydroethidine. Murine hybridoma 3G8 (recognizing human Fc gamma receptor III) was labeled with rhodamine 123, and verapamil was used to block rhodamine efflux via P-glycoprotein. Viability assays showed little cytotoxicity from these dyes at the concentrations used. The labeled cells were fused with polyethylene glycol, sorted for dual fluorescence on an Epics V cell sorter, and cloned. Hybrid hybridomas producing bispecific antibodies were selected for ability to promote lysis of SK-Br-3 breast cancer cells by human mononuclear cells. Several positive clones were obtained and shown to have a double content of DNA. Bispecific antibody produced by subclone 2B1 was purified by anion exchange chromatography and shown to bind both tumor cells and Fc gamma R III bearing cells. Using two parameter flow cytometric analysis, we were able to measure a 'bridging' effect of this bispecific antibody, which caused formation of complexes between PMNs and SK-Br-3 cells. Either parental antibody could compete with bispecific antibody to block such complexing. This fusion method provides several advantages over other techniques presently used (speed, convenience, low toxicity and automatic exclusion of dead cells) and can be applied to produce other hybrid hybridomas. PMID:1715368

  13. Direct confocal acquisition of fluorescence from X-gal staining on thick tissue sections

    PubMed Central

    Levitsky, Konstantin L.; Toledo-Aral, Juan Jos; Lpez-Barneo, Jos; Villadiego, Javier

    2013-01-01

    X-gal staining is a common procedure used in the histochemical monitoring of gene expression by light microscopy. However, this procedure does not permit the direct confocal acquisition of images, thus preventing the identification of labelled cells on the depth (Z) axis of tissue sections and leading sometimes to erroneous conclusions in co-localization and gene expression studies. Here we report a technique, based on X-gal fluorescence emission and mathematically-based optical correction, to obtain high quality fluorescence confocal images. This method, combined with immunofluorescence, makes it possible to unequivocally identify X-gal-labelled cells in tissue sections, emerging as a valuable tool in gene expression and cell tracing analysis. PMID:24121824

  14. Clinical approved fluorescent dyes coupled to endomicroscopy for in vivo diagnostic of peritoneal carcinomatosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaci, Muriel; Dartigues, Peggy; Soufan, Ranya; De Leeuw, Frederic; Fabre, Monique; Laplace-Builhé, Corinne

    2015-03-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis is metastatic stage aggravating digestive, gynecological or bladder cancer dissemination and the preoperative evaluation of lesions remains difficult. There is therefore a need for minimal invasive innovative techniques to establish a precise preoperative assessment of cancer peritoneal cavity. Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) provides dynamic images of the microarchitecture of tissues during an endoscopy. The PERSEE project proposes new developments in robotics and pCLE for the exploration of the peritoneal cavity during laparoscopy. Two fluorescent dyes, Patent blue V and Indocyanine green have been evaluated on human ex vivo samples to improve the contrast of pCLE images. For a future implementation in clinical study, two topically staining protocols operable in vivo have been validated on 70 specimens from 25 patients with a peritoneal carcinomatosis. The specimens were then imaged by pCLE with an optical probe designed for the application. A histo-morphological correlative study was performed on 350 pCLE images and 70 standard histological preparations. All images were interpreted in a random way by two pathologists. Differential histological diagnostics such as normal peritoneum or pseudomyxoma could be recognized on fluorescence images. The statistical analysis of the correlative study is underway. These dyes already approved for human use are interesting for pCLE imaging because some micromorphological criteria look like to conventional histology and are readable by pathologist. Thus pCLE images using both dyes do not require a specific semiology unlike to what is described in the literature, for pCLE associated with fluorescein for the in vivo imaging of pancreatic cysts.

  15. Sensitive silver staining of protein in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels using an azo dye, calconcarboxylic acid, as a silver-ion sensitizer.

    PubMed

    Jin, Li-Tai; Hwang, Sun-Young; Yoo, Gyurng-Soo; Choi, Jung-Kap

    2004-08-01

    A highly sensitive silver staining method for detecting proteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was developed. It is based on the silver nitrate staining method but also employs an azo dye, calconcarboxylic acid (NN), as a silver-ion sensitizer. It increases silver binding on protein bands or spots by the formation of a silver-dye complex and also increases the reducing power of silver ions to metallic silver by NN itself with formaldehyde. After a 2 h gel fixing step, the protocol including sensitization, silver-ion impregnation, and reduction steps can be completed in 1 h. The sensitivity is superior to that of silver stain with glutardialdehyde as a silver-ion sensitizer. The detection limit of NN-silver stain is 0.05-0.2 ng protein. Considering the high sensitivity without using glutardialdehyde, the NN-silver stain would be useful for routine silver staining of proteins. PMID:15300767

  16. Staining diatoms with rhodamine dyes: control of emission colour in photonic biocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Kucki, Melanie; Fuhrmann-Lieker, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The incorporation of rhodamine dyes in the cell wall of diatoms Coscinodiscus granii and Coscinodiscus wailesii for the production of luminescent hybrid nanostructures is investigated. By systematic variation of the substitution pattern of the rhodamine core, we found that carbonic acids are considerably better suited than esters because of their physiological compatibility. The amino substitution pattern that controls the optical properties of the chromophore has no critical influence on dye uptake and incorporation, thus a variety of biocomposites with different emission maxima can be prepared. Applications in biomineralization studies as well as in materials science are envisioned. PMID:21865248

  17. A new probe using hybrid virus-dye nanoparticles for near-infrared fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Changfeng; Barnhill, Hannah; Liang, Xiaoping; Wang, Qian; Jiang, Huabei

    2005-11-01

    A fluorescent probe based on bionanoparticle cowpea mosaic virus has been developed for near-infrared fluorescence tomography. A unique advantage of this probe is that over 30 dye molecules can be loaded onto each viral nanoparticle with an average diameter of 30 nm, making high local dye concentration (∼1.8 mM) possible without significant fluorescence quenching. This ability of high loading of local dye concentration would increase the signal-to-noise ratio considerably, thus sensitivity for detection. We demonstrate successful tomographic fluorescence imaging of a target containing the virus-dye nanoparticles embedded in a tissue-like phantom. Tomographic fluorescence data were obtained through a multi-channel frequency-domain system and the spatial maps of fluorescence quantum yield were recovered with a finite-element-based reconstruction algorithm.

  18. Neural projections in planarian brain revealed by fluorescent dye tracing.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Keiji; Takeuchi, Kosei; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2005-05-01

    The planarian brain has an inverted-U shaped structure with functional regionalization. To investigate how each region in the brain connects to each other, we traced neural projections by microinjection of fluorescence dye tracers. We found that external light and olfactory/taste signals received in the head region are conveyed in the main lobes (sponge region) of the brain. Chemosensory neurons distributed in the lateral branches project to the peripheral region of the sponge and visual neurons project to the medial region of the sponge. Parts of the sensory neurons project directly to the corresponding sensory neurons on the opposite side of the brain. However, all of the dye labeled brain neurons in the left and right lobes connect to each other via commissural neurons in the central region of the sponge. In addition to these observations, we detected regional differences in the planarian visual neurons. Posterior visual neurons have ipsilateral projection, but anterior visual neurons project to the contralateral side of the brain. A pair of longitudinal ventral nerve cords (VNC) connect to the brain on the ventral side, suggesting that they transmit signals which are integrated and processed in the brain. We also detected the direct connection of neurons in the brain and those of the pharynx, even though most pharynx neurons connect to VNC neurons. Here, we report for the first time on neural connections in the planarian central nervous system after overcoming technical difficulties specific to flatworms. PMID:15930826

  19. Modelling of microcracks image treated with fluorescent dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebov, Victor; Lashmanov, Oleg U.

    2015-06-01

    The main reasons of catastrophes and accidents are high level of wear of equipment and violation of the production technology. The methods of nondestructive testing are designed to find out defects timely and to prevent break down of aggregates. These methods allow determining compliance of object parameters with technical requirements without destroying it. This work will discuss dye penetrant inspection or liquid penetrant inspection (DPI or LPI) methods and computer model of microcracks image treated with fluorescent dye. Usually cracks on image look like broken extended lines with small width (about 1 to 10 pixels) and ragged edges. The used method of inspection allows to detect microcracks with depth about 10 or more micrometers. During the work the mathematical model of image of randomly located microcracks treated with fluorescent dye was created in MATLAB environment. Background noises and distortions introduced by the optical systems are considered in the model. The factors that have influence on the image are listed below: 1. Background noise. Background noise is caused by the bright light from external sources and it reduces contrast on the objects edges. 2. Noises on the image sensor. Digital noise manifests itself in the form of randomly located points that are differing in their brightness and color. 3. Distortions caused by aberrations of optical system. After passing through the real optical system the homocentricity of the bundle of rays is violated or homocentricity remains but rays intersect at the point that doesn't coincide with the point of the ideal image. The stronger the influence of the above-listed factors, the worse the image quality and therefore the analysis of the image for control of the item finds difficulty. The mathematical model is created using the following algorithm: at the beginning the number of cracks that will be modeled is entered from keyboard. Then the point with random position is choosing on the matrix whose size is 1024x1024 pixels (result image size). This random pixel and two adjacent points are painted with random brightness, the points, located at the edges have lower brightness than the central pixel. The width of the paintbrush is 3 pixels. Further one of the eight possible directions is chosen and the painting continues in this direction. The number of `steps' is also entered at the beginning of the program. This method of cracks simulating is based on theory A.N. Galybin and A.V. Dyskin, which describe cracks propagation as random walk process. These operations are repeated as many times as many cracks it's necessary to simulate. After that background noises and Gaussian blur (for simulating bad focusing of optical system) are applied.

  20. Identification Of Natural Dyes On Archaeological Textile Objects Using Laser Induced Fluorescent Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Eltokhy, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-22

    This study aims to evaluate the use of Laser Fluorescent as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. In this study wool textile samples were dyed with 10 natural dyes such as cochineal, cutch, henna, indigo, Lac, madder, safflower, saffron, sumac and turmeric. These dyes common present on archaeological textile objects to be used as standard dyed textile samples. These selected natural dyes will be used as known references that can be used a guide to identify unknown archaeological dyes. The dyed textile samples were investigated with laser radiation in different wavelengths to detect the best wavelengths for identification each dye. This study confirms that Laser Florescent is very useful and a rapid technique can be used as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. The results obtained with this study can be a guide for all conservators in identification of natural organic dyes on archaeological textile objects.

  1. Identification Of Natural Dyes On Archaeological Textile Objects Using Laser Induced Fluorescent Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Eltokhy, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the use of Laser Fluorescent as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. In this study wool textile samples were dyed with 10 natural dyes such as cochineal, cutch, henna, indigo, Lac, madder, safflower, saffron, sumac and turmeric. These dyes common present on archaeological textile objects to be used as standard dyed textile samples. These selected natural dyes will be used as known references that can be used a guide to identify unknown archaeological dyes. The dyed textile samples were investigated with laser radiation in different wavelengths to detect the best wavelengths for identification each dye. This study confirms that Laser Florescent is very useful and a rapid technique can be used as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. The results obtained with this study can be a guide for all conservators in identification of natural organic dyes on archaeological textile objects.

  2. Estrogen receptor-targeted optical imaging of breast cancer cells with near-infrared fluorescent dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Iven; Deodhar, Kodand; Chiplunkar, Shuba V.; Patkar, Meena

    2010-02-01

    Molecular imaging provides the in vivo characterization of cellular molecular events involved in normal and pathologic processes. With the advent of optical molecular imaging, specific molecules, proteins and genes may be tagged with a luminescent reporter and visualized in small animals. This powerful new tool has pushed in vivo optical imaging to the forefront as it allows for direct determination of drug bio-distribution and uptake kinetics as well as an indicator of biochemical activity and drug efficacy. Although optical imaging encompasses diverse techniques and makes use of various wavelengths of light, a great deal of excitement in molecular research lies in the use of tomographic and fluorescence techniques to image living tissues with near-infrared (NIR) light. Nonionizing, noninvasive near-infrared optical imaging has great potential to become promising alternative for breast cancer detection. Fluorescence spectroscopy studies of human tissue suggest that a variety of lesions show distinct fluorescence spectra compared to those of normal tissue. It has also been shown that exogenous dyes exhibit selective uptake in neoplastic lesions and may offer the best contrast for optical imaging. Use of exogenous agents would provide fluorescent markers, which could serve to detect embedded tumors in the breast. In particular, the ability to monitor the fluorescent yield and lifetime may also enable biochemical specificity if the fluorophore is sensitive to a specific metabolite, such as oxygen. As a first step, we have synthesized and characterized one such NIR fluorescent dye conjugate, which could potentially be used to detect estrogen receptors (ER)[2] . The conjugate was synthesized by ester formation between 17-? estradiol and a hydrophilic derivative of indocyanine green (ICG) cyanine dye, bis-1, 1-(4-sulfobutyl) indotricarbocyanine-5- carboxylic acid, sodium salt. The ester formed was found to have an extra binding ability with the receptor cites as compared to ICG, which was established by the partition coefficient studies. The replacement of the sodium ion in the ester by a larger glucosammonium ion was found to enhance the hydrophilicity and reduce the toxic effect on the cell lines. The excitation and emission peaks for the conjugate were recorded in the NIR region as 750nm and 788nm respectively. The ester was found nontoxic on adenocarcinoma breast cancer cell lines MCF-7/MDA-MB-231. Specific binding and endocytosis of the estrogen-labeled conjugate was studied on the MCF-7 (ER positive) and MDA-MB-231 (ER negative). Conjugate staining of MCF-7 cells showed ~ 4-fold increase in signal intensity compared to MDA-MB- 231. Further, estrogen molecules were found to be specifically localized to the nuclear region of MCF-7 cells, whereas MDA-MB-231 showed plasma membrane staining. This technique offers the potential of noninvasive detection of hormone receptor status in breast cancer cells and would help in decreasing the load of unnecessary biopsies. Here, we have reported the progress made in the development of a novel NIR external contrast agent and the work is in progress to use this conjugate for the molecular based, diagnostic imaging of breast cancer.

  3. Infiltration pattern in a regolith-fractured bedrock profile: field observation of a dye stain pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae Gon; Lee, Gyoo Ho; Lee, Jin-Soo; Chon, Chul-Min; Kim, Tack Hyun; Ha, Kyoochul

    2006-02-01

    We examined the infiltration pattern of water in a regolith-bedrock profile consisting of two overburdens (OB1 and OB2), a buried rice paddy soil (PS), two texturally distinctive weathered materials (WM1 and WM2) and a fractured sedimentary rock (BR), using a Brilliant Blue FCF dye tracer. A black-coloured coating in conducting fractures in WM1, WM2 and BR was analysed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The dye tracer penetrated to greater than 2 m depth in the profile. The macropore flow and saturated interflow were the major infiltration patterns in the profile. Macropore flow and saturated interflow were observed along fractures in WM1, WM2 and BR and at the dipping interfaces of PS-WM1, PS-WM2 and PS-BR respectively. Heterogeneous matrix flow occurred in upper overburden (OB1) and PS. Compared with OB1, the coarser textured OB2 acted as a physical barrier for vertical flow of water. The PS with low bulk density and many fine roots was another major conducting route of water in the profile. Manganese oxide and iron oxide were positively identified in the black coating material and had low crystallinity and high surface area, indicating their high reactivity with conducting contaminants.

  4. Cytofluorometric detection of rodent malaria parasites using red-excited fluorescent dyes.

    PubMed

    Gerena, Y; Gonzalez-Pons, M; Serrano, A E

    2011-11-01

    Flow cytometry is a potentially efficient approach for the quantification of parasitemias in experimental malaria infections and drug susceptibility assays using rodent malaria models such as Plasmodium berghei. In this study, we used two red DNA-binding fluorochromes, rhodamine 800 (R800) and LD700, to measure parasitemia levels in whole blood samples from mice infected with P. berghei. Blood samples were treated with RNAse A to eliminate RNA-derived signals. Propidium iodide, which stains both DNA and RNA, was used as a positive control. The parasitemia levels determined by R800 and LD700 were comparable to those calculated by microscopic analysis of blood smears and flow cytometry using Hoechst 33258. RNAse treatment did not affect these measurements. We also used R800 or LD700 to quantify parasitemias in mice infected with a GFP-expressing P. berghei line to correlate the parasitemia levels determined by DNA staining versus parasite numbers using GFP fluorescence as a surrogate measurement. A positive correlation was found between levels determined by flow cytometry using these dyes and those measured by GFP expression. Similar results were obtained when parasitemias determined by flow cytometry were compared to those determined by conventional microscopy. The limit of detection of infected red blood cells using R800 or LD700 staining was 0.1% and 0.15%, respectively. This study demonstrates that red laser-based flow cytometry using R800 or LD700 can be used for effective quantification of parasitemia levels in Plasmodium infected red blood cells. Furthermore, this method has the advantage that it does not require RNAse pretreatment and allows for a greater amount of cells to be analyzed for parasite burden than otherwise measured by conventional microscopy. 2011 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:22015734

  5. Local delivery of fluorescent dye for fiber-optics confocal microscopy of the living heart

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao; Kaza, Aditya K.; Hitchcock, Robert W.; Sachse, Frank B.

    2014-01-01

    Fiber-optics confocal microscopy (FCM) is an emerging imaging technology with various applications in basic research and clinical diagnosis. FCM allows for real-time in situ microscopy of tissue at sub-cellular scale. Recently FCM has been investigated for cardiac imaging, in particular, for discrimination of cardiac tissue during pediatric open-heart surgery. FCM relies on fluorescent dyes. The current clinical approach of dye delivery is based on systemic injection, which is associated with high dye consumption, and adverse clinical events. In this study, we investigated approaches for local dye delivery during FCM imaging based on dye carriers attached to the imaging probe. Using three-dimensional confocal microscopy, automated bench tests, and FCM imaging we quantitatively characterized dye release of carriers composed of open-pore foam only and foam loaded with agarose hydrogel. In addition, we compared local dye delivery with a model of systemic dye delivery in the isolated perfused rodent heart. We measured the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of images acquired in various regions of the heart. Our evaluations showed that foam-agarose dye carriers exhibited a prolonged dye release vs. foam-only carriers. Foam-agarose dye carriers allowed reliable imaging of 59 lines, which is comparable to 48 min of continuous dye release. Our study in the living heart revealed that the SNR of FCM images using local and systemic dye delivery is not different. However, we observed differences in the imaged tissue microstructure with the two approaches. Structural features characteristic of microvasculature were solely observed for systemic dye delivery. Our findings suggest that local dye delivery approach for FCM imaging constitutes an important alternative to systemic dye delivery. We suggest that the approach for local dye delivery will facilitate clinical translation of FCM, for instance, for FCM imaging during pediatric heart surgery. PMID:25309455

  6. Homogeneous plate based antibody internalization assay using pH sensor fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Nath, Nidhi; Godat, Becky; Zimprich, Chad; Dwight, Stephen J; Corona, Cesear; McDougall, Mark; Urh, Marjeta

    2016-04-01

    Receptor-mediated antibody internalization is a key mechanism underlying several anti-cancer antibody therapeutics. Delivering highly toxic drugs to cancer cells, as in the case of antibody drug conjugates (ADCs), efficient removal of surface receptors from cancer cells and changing the pharmacokinetics profile of the antibody drugs are some of key ways that internalization impacts the therapeutic efficacy of the antibodies. Over the years, several techniques have been used to study antibody internalization including radiolabels, fluorescent microscopy, flow cytometry and cellular toxicity assays. While these methods allow analysis of internalization, they have limitations including a multistep process and limited throughput and are generally endpoint assays. Here, we present a new homogeneous method that enables time and concentration dependent measurements of antibody internalization. The method uses a new hydrophilic and bright pH sensor dye (pHAb dye), which is not fluorescent at neutral pH but becomes highly fluorescent at acidic pH. For receptor mediated antibody internalization studies, antibodies against receptors are conjugated with the pHAb dye and incubated with the cells expressing the receptors. Upon binding to the receptor, the dyes conjugated to the antibody are not fluorescent because of the neutral pH of the media, but upon internalization and trafficking into endosomal and lysosomal vesicles the pH drops and dyes become fluorescent. The enabling attributes of the pHAb dyes are the hydrophilic nature to minimize antibody aggregation and bright fluorescence at acidic pH which allows development of simple plate based assays using a fluorescent reader. Using two different therapeutic antibodies - Trastuzumab (anti-HER2) and Cetuximab (anti-EGFR) - we show labeling with pHAb dye using amine and thiol chemistries and impact of chemistry and dye to antibody ration on internalization. We finally present two new approaches using the pHAb dye, which will be beneficial for screening a large number of antibody samples during early monoclonal development phase. PMID:26851520

  7. Method and apparatus for staining immobilized nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Foote, Robert S.; Jacobson, Stephen C.

    2000-01-01

    A method for staining immobilized nucleic acids includes the steps of affixing DNA probes to a solid substrate, moving target DNA material into proximity with the DNA probes, whereby the target DNA hybridized with specific ones of the DNA probes, and moving a fluorescent dye into proximity with the hybridized target DNA, whereby the fluorescent dye binds to the hybridized DNA to enable subsequent detection of fluorescence.

  8. Argon-pumped tunable dye laser therapy for facial port-wine stain hemangiomas in adults--a new technique using small spot size and minimal power

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibner, A.; Wheeland, R.G.

    1989-03-01

    A low power, argon-pumped tunable dye laser was used to deliver yellow light of 577 nm. Individual blood vessels within port-wine stain hemangiomas were treated with a 0.1-mm beam of light using 8 X magnification. This technique permits excellent resolution of facial and nuchal port-wine stain hemangiomas in adults without the adverse complications of textural change, permanent pigmentation abnormality, or hypertrophic scarring.

  9. Label-free continuous enzyme assays with macrocycle-fluorescent dye complexes.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Andreas; Bakirci, Hseyin; Nau, Werner M

    2007-08-01

    We introduce a new economic, convenient and general assay principle based on the reversible interaction of water-soluble macrocycles and fluorescent dyes. We show that amino acid decarboxylase activity can be continuously monitored by measuring changes in fluorescence, which result from the competition of the enzymatic product and the dye for forming a complex with a cucurbituril or calixarene macrocycle. The new assay provides a complementary method to the use of antibodies, radioactive markers and labeled substrates. PMID:17603491

  10. Spectral Fluorescence Properties of an Anionic Oxacarbocyanine Dye in Complexes with Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronkin, P. G.; Tatikolov, A. S.

    2015-07-01

    The spectral fluorescence properties of the anionic oxacarbocyanine dye 3,3'-di-(γ-sulfopropyl)-5,5'-diphenyl-9-ethyloxacarbocyanine betaine (OCC) were studied in solutions and in complexes with human serum albumin (HSA). Interaction with HSA leads to a significant increase in the fluorescence of the dye. We studied quenching of the fluorescence of OCC in a complex with HSA by ibuprofen and warfarin. Data on quenching of fluorescence by ibuprofen indicate binding of the dye to binding site II of subdomain IIIA in the HSA molecule. Synchronous fluorescence spectra of human serum albumin in the presence of OCC showed that complexation with OCC does not lead to appreciable rearrangement of the protein molecule at the binding site.

  11. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence study on dyes used in DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Kaisyang; Force, R.K. )

    1993-01-01

    Research on the time-resolved fluorescence of fluorescein isothiocyanate, NBD, tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate, and Texas Red - the dyes used for fluorescence-based DNA sequencing - is described. Mean fluorescence lifetiems in both aqueous buffer solution and 5.3%T, 4.8%C polyacrylamide gel were determined as a function of excitation wave-lengths at 337, 470, and 550 nm and were found to be 3.5, 1.1, 2.5, and 4.3 ns; the detection limits are 10, 200, 200 and 200 amol for FITC, NBD, TEMR, and T. Red, respectively. Comparisons of fluorescence parameters between the conjugated dyes and the free dyes are also reported. Results on the optimization of the excitation source wavelengths to improve sensitivity and reduce background scattering in polyacrylamide gel are also reported. Time-resolved fluorescence was successfully applied to resolve spectral overlapping of emissions in both solution and in polyacrylamide gel. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Enhanced fluorescence from dye molecules by Au nanoparticles on asymmetric double-stranded DNA and mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J. H.; Liu, L. Z.; Zhu, X. B.; Wu, X. L.; Chu, Paul K.

    2014-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles (NPs) prepared on asymmetric DNA double helical structures show some twinning structures and sharp corners because of the low processing temperature. The distance between individual NPs varies between 2 and 4 nm, and these NPs form clusters with a size of 40 nm. The DNA structures also provide docking sites for the fluorescent dye. The dependence of the fluorescence enhancement on the distance between the NPs and dye molecules is investigated. The maximum enhancement factor is 5.8 when the distance between the dye and Au NP surface is 3.4 nm and the results are consistent with theoretical simulation.

  13. On the circular polarization of fluorescence from dyes dissolved in chiral nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Monika; Chambers, Martin; Grell, Martin

    2001-10-01

    The sense of circular polarization of the fluorescence from dyes dissolved in chiral nematic liquid crystals (CNLCs) with a photonic stopband overlapping the dye emission (`resonance regime') displays a peculiar reversal as a function of wavelength, which so far is not satisfactorily explained. We systematically study this phenomenon and show that theories based on the guest/host alignment of the fluorescent dye in the CNLC matrix are not adequate in the resonance regime. We instead propose a consistent explanation of sign reversal based on the description of CNLCs as one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystals.

  14. Imaging system for morphometric assessment of absorption or fluorescence in stained cells.

    PubMed

    Jaggi, B; Poon, S S; MacAulay, C; Palcic, B

    1988-11-01

    An image acquisition and processing system has been developed for quantitative microscopy of absorption or fluorescence in stained cells. Three different light transducers are used in the system to exploit the best characteristics of these sensors for different biological measurements. A digital scanner, in the form of a linear array charge-coupled device (CCD), acquires data with high spatial and photometric resolution. A color (RGB) camera is employed when spectral information is required for the segmentation of cellular subcomponents. An image-intensified charged-injection device (CID) camera provides for very low light intensity measurements, primarily for fluorescence-labeled cells. Properties of these transducers, such as contrast transfer function, linearity, and photo-response nonuniformity, have been measured. Two dedicated image processing units were incorporated into the system. The front-end processor, based on a digital signal processor, provides functions such as object detection, raw image calibration, compression, artifact removal, and filtering. The second image processor is associated with the frame memory and includes a histogram processor, a dedicated arithmetic logic unit for image processing functions, and a graphics module for one-bit overlay functions. An interactive program was developed to acquire cell images and to experiment with a range of segmentation algorithms, feature extractions, and other image processing functions. The results of any image operation are displayed on the video monitor. Once a desired processing sequence is determined, the sequence may be stored to become part of a command library and can be executed thereafter as a single instruction. PMID:3208622

  15. A double fluorescence staining protocol to determine the cross-sectional area of myofibers using image analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Fassel, T. A.; Schultz, E.; Greaser, M. L.; Cassens, R. G.

    1996-01-01

    A double fluorescence staining protocol was developed to facilitate computer based image analysis. Myofibers from experimentally treated (irradiated) and control growing turkey skeletal muscle were labeled with the anti-myosin antibody MF-20 and detected using fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC). Extracellular material was stained with concanavalin A (ConA)-Texas red. The cross-sectional area of the myofibers was determined by calculating the number of pixels (0.83 mu m(2)) overlying each myofiber after subtracting the ConA-Texas red image from the MF-20-FITC image for each region of interest. As expected, myofibers in the irradiated muscle were smaller (P < 0.05) than those in the non-irradiated muscle. This double fluorescence staining protocol combined with image analysis is accurate and less labor-intensive than classical procedures for determining the cross-sectional area of myofibers.

  16. Time-resolved fluorescence polarization spectroscopy of visible and near infrared dyes in picosecond dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) dyes absorb and emit light within the range from 700 to 900 nm have several benefits in biological studies for one- and/or two-photon excitation for deeper penetration of tissues. These molecules undergo vibrational and rotational motion in the relaxation of the excited electronic states, Due to the less than ideal anisotropy behavior of NIR dyes stemming from the fluorophores elongated structures and short fluorescence lifetime in picosecond range, no significant efforts have been made to recognize the theory of these dyes in time-resolved polarization dynamics. In this study, the depolarization of the fluorescence due to emission from rotational deactivation in solution will be measured with the excitation of a linearly polarized femtosecond laser pulse and a streak camera. The theory, experiment and application of the ultrafast fluorescence polarization dynamics and anisotropy are illustrated with examples of two of the most important medical based dyes. One is NIR dye, namely Indocyanine Green (ICG) and is compared with Fluorescein which is in visible range with much longer lifetime. A set of first-order linear differential equations was developed to model fluorescence polarization dynamics of NIR dye in picosecond range. Using this model, the important parameters of ultrafast polarization spectroscopy were identified: risetime, initial time, fluorescence lifetime, and rotation times.

  17. Far-Red Emitting Fluorescent Dyes for Optical Nanoscopy: Fluorinated Silicon-Rhodamines (SiRF Dyes) and Phosphorylated Oxazines.

    PubMed

    Kolmakov, Kirill; Hebisch, Elke; Wolfram, Thomas; Nordwig, Lars A; Wurm, Christian A; Ta, Haisen; Westphal, Volker; Belov, Vladimir N; Hell, Stefan W

    2015-09-14

    Far-red emitting fluorescent dyes for optical microscopy, stimulated emission depletion (STED), and ground-state depletion (GSDIM) super-resolution microscopy are presented. Fluorinated silicon-rhodamines (SiRF dyes) and phosphorylated oxazines have absorption and emission maxima at about λ≈660 and 680 nm, respectively, possess high photostability, and large fluorescence quantum yields in water. A high-yielding synthetic path to introduce three aromatic fluorine atoms and unconventional conjugation/solubilization spacers into the scaffold of a silicon-rhodamine is described. The bathochromic shift in SiRF dyes is achieved without additional fused rings or double bonds. As a result, the molecular size and molecular mass stay quite small (<600 Da). The use of the λ=800 nm STED beam instead of the commonly used one at λ=750-775 nm provides excellent imaging performance and suppresses re-excitation of SiRF and the oxazine dyes. The photophysical properties and immunofluorescence imaging performance of these new far-red emitting dyes (photobleaching, optical resolution, and switch-off behavior) are discussed in detail and compared with those of some well-established fluorophores with similar spectral properties. PMID:26272226

  18. Comparative analysis of heterochromatin distribution in wild and cultivated Abelmoschus species based on fluorescent staining methods.

    PubMed

    Merita, Keisham; Kattukunnel, Joseph John; Yadav, Shrirang Ramchandra; Bhat, Kangila Venkataramana; Rao, Satyawada Rama

    2015-03-01

    A comparative analysis of fluorochrome-binding pattern in nine taxa of Abelmoschus had shown that the type, amount and distribution pattern of heterochromatin were characteristic for each taxa. The fluorescent chromosome-binding sites obtained by chromomycin A3 (CMA) and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining in all the nine species showed constitutive heterochromatin CMA(+), DAPI(+) and CMA(+)/DAPI(+). Large amount of heterozygosity was observed with regard to heterochromatin distribution pattern in all the taxa studied. The CMA(+)-binding sites are comparatively less than DAPI(+)-binding sites which is clearly evident as AT-rich regions are more than GC-rich regions in all the nine taxa analysed in Abelmoschus. These CMA(+) and DAPI(+)-binding sites apparently rise with the increased in chromosome numbers of the different species. This pattern of heterochromatin heterogeneity seems to be a general characteristic feature. Therefore, the differential pattern of distribution of GC- and AT-rich sequences might have played an important role in diversification of the genus Abelmoschus. Polyploidy is an important factor in the evolution of Abelmoschus and the sole reason for range in chromosome numbers in this genus. It may be noted that, though often, but not always, the increase of DNA is caused by an increase in the amount of heterochromatin, i.e. increase of non-coding sections indicating restructuring of the heterochromatin. Thus, cumulative small and direct numerical changes might have played a role in the speciation of Abelmoschus. PMID:25300590

  19. A sensitive method for confocal fluorescence microscopic visualization of starch granules in iodine stained samples.

    PubMed

    Ovecka, Miroslav; Bahaji, Abdellatif; Muoz, Francisco Jos; Almagro, Goizeder; Ezquer, Ignacio; Baroja-Fernndez, Edurne; Li, Jun; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2012-09-01

    Synthesized by glycogen synthase and starch synthases (SS) using ADP-glucose as the sugar donor molecule, glycogen and starch accumulate as predominant storage carbohydrates in most bacteria and plants, respectively. We have recently shown that the so-called "starch-less" Arabidopsis thaliana adg1-1 and aps1 mutants impaired in ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase do indeed accumulate low starch content in normal growth conditions, and relatively high starch content when plants were cultured in the presence of microbial volatiles. Our results were strongly supported by data obtained using a highly sensitive method for confocal fluorescence microscopic visualization of iodine stained starch granules. Using Arabidopsis leaves from WT plants, aps1 plants, ss3/ss4 plants lacking both class III and class IV SS, gbss plants lacking the granule-bound SS, and sus1/sus2/sus3/sus4 plants lacking four genes that code for proteins with sucrose synthase activity, in this work we precisely describe the method for preparation of plant samples for starch microscopic examination. Furthermore, we show that this method can be used to visualize glycogen in bacteria, and pure starch granules, amylose and amylopectin. PMID:22899048

  20. Non-invasive Photoacoustic and Fluorescence Sentinel Lymph Node Identification using Dye-loaded Perfluorocarbon Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Akers, Walter J.; Kim, Chulhong; Berezin, Mikhail; Guo, Kevin; Fuhrhop, Ralph; Lanza, Gregory M.; Fischer, Georg M.; Daltrozzo, Ewald; Zumbusch, Andreas; Cai, Xin; Wang, Lihong V.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    The contrast mechanisms used for photoacoustic tomography (PAT) and fluorescence imaging differ in subtle but significant ways. Design of contrast agents for each or both modalities requires an understanding of the spectral characteristics as well as intra- and intermolecular interactions that occur during formulation. We found that fluorescence quenching that occurs in the formulation of near infrared (NIR) fluorescent dyes in nanoparticles results in enhanced contrast for PAT. The ability of the new PAT method to utilize strongly absorbing chromophores for signal generation allowed us to convert a highly fluorescent dye into an exceptionally high PA contrast material. Spectroscopic characterization of the developed NIR dye-loaded perfluorocarbon-based nanoparticles for combined fluorescence and PA imaging revealed distinct dye-dependent photophysical behavior. We demonstrate that the enhanced contrast allows detection of regional lymph nodes of rats in vivo with time-domain optical and photoacoustic imaging methods. The results further show that the use of fluorescence lifetime (FLT) imaging, which is less dependent on fluorescence intensity, provides a strategic approach to bridge the disparate contrast reporting mechanisms of fluorescence and PA imaging methods. PMID:21171567

  1. [Staining of microsporidian spores with diamidine phenylindole].

    PubMed

    Tokarev, Iu S; Malysh, Iu M; Zakharova, Iu A; Muntianu, N V; Toderash, I K; Frolov, A N

    2012-01-01

    A number of microscopic techniques and dyes are available to diagnose microsporidian infections in invertebrate and vertebrate hosts. Among these, DNA-specific fluorochrome DAPI is widely used to stain DNA in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, alone or in combination with other histochemical or fluorescent dyes. Moreover, this dye also binds to membraneous structures and protein complexes. In our studies, DAPI was used to stain spores of microsporidia infecting orthopteran, coleopteran, dipteran and lepidopteran insect hosts. DAPI staining of diplokarya helped to discriminate the Nosema-like microsporidian spores from spore-shaped bodies lacking this characteristic staining. It was found, moreover, that non-DNA staining occurred in many cases and other components of the spores were stained: the exospore, the cytoplasm, the extruded polar filament and the polaroplast. Staining of these structures was feeble as compared to DNA and in most cases did not interfere with nuclear apparatus staining. Feebly stained cytoplasm and exospore clearly indicated unstained zone of endospore, making it easier to diagnose both mono- and diplokaryotic spores. Staining of extruded polar filament allowed to demonstrate viability and to observe some stages of extrusion process of microsporidian spores. PMID:22834351

  2. Selective nonspecific solvation under dielectric saturation and fluorescence spectra of dye solutions in binary solvents.

    PubMed

    Bakhshiev, N G; Kiselev, M B

    1991-09-01

    The influence of selective nonspecific solvation on the fluorescence spectra of three substitutedN-methylphthalimides in a binary solvent system consisting of a nonpolar (n-heptane) and a polar (pyridine) component has been studied under conditions close to dielectric saturation. The substantially nonlinearity of the effect is confirmation that the spectral shifts of fluorescence bands depend on the number of polar solvent molecules involved in solvating the dye molecule. The measured fluorescence spectral shifts determined by substituting one nonpolar solvent molecula with a polar one in the proximity of the dye molecule agree quantitatively with the forecasts of the previously proposed semiempirical theory which describes this nonlinear solvation phenomenon. PMID:24242995

  3. ADSORPTION AND FLUORESCENCE OF FAT-SOLUBLE FLUORESCENT DYES ON CLASS I AND CLASS III SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    PubMed Central

    Lycette, R. M.; Hedrick, L. R.

    1963-01-01

    Lycette, R. M. (Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago) and L. R. Hedrick. Adsorption and fluorescence of fat-soluble fluorescent dyes on class I and class III Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Bacteriol. 85:16. 1963.Class III cells of the brewery yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae flocculate, but class I cells do not, when cultured in an organic YM medium. Class III cells adsorb the fat-soluble stilbyl-triazole fluorescent dye (STC) more readily and produce more fluorescence than do class I cells. This suggests that cells of the class III yeasts have more lipids or more phospholipids on their surface than do cells of class I yeasts. Fluorescence of STC in the absence of cells is pH-independent, but adsorption of the compound on the surface of cells, with the associated fluorescence, is pH-dependent. As the pH level was decreased within the range of pH 9 to 0, and as the temperature was elevated within the range of 0 to 40 C, there was an increase in adsorption and a corresponding increase in fluorescence. Maximal adsorption was attained in less than 15 min when the cells and dye were shaken at 26 C. Cells of class III adsorbed 2.5 ?g of STC per 3.25 mg (dry wt) of cells. The kinetics of adsorption follow the Langmuir monomolecular model. PMID:13931901

  4. Use of fluorescent NIR dyes in silica nanoparticles and as enzyme substrates in bioanalytical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patonay, Gabor; Chapman, Gala; Beckford, Garfield; Henary, Maged; Ellis, Holly

    2014-03-01

    Near-Infrared (NIR) absorbing carbocyanine dyes have been increasingly used in analytical, biological and medical fields as they can be useful for developing bioanalytical and biomedical methods. The utilization of the NIR spectral region (650-900 nm) is advantageous and is due to the inherently lower background interference and the high molar absorptivities of NIR chromophores. NIR dyes typically have relatively lower fluorescent quantum yield as compared to visible fluorophores, but much higher molar absorptivities which more than compensates for the lower quantum yields regarding detection limits. Fluorescence intensity of NIR dyes significantly increases by enclosing several dye molecules in silica nanoparticles. Self quenching may become a problem for carbocyanines at such high concentrations that may be present in the silica nanoparticles. Dyes that have large Stokes' shift can significantly decrease this problem. Increased Stokes' shift for carbocyanines dyes can be achieved by substituting meso position halogens with a linker containing aliphatic or aromatic amino moiety which also serves as a covalent linker for attaching the dye molecule to the nanoparticle backbone. The primary applications of these particles are for bright fluorescent labels to be used in bioanalytical applications such as immunochemistry, flow cytometry, etc. This work also discusses the use of NIR dyes as enzyme substrates. NIR dyes can be used as enzyme substrates and hence for characterization of enzyme activity. The well characterized alkenesulfonate monooxygenase enzyme was chosen for these studies. Carbocyanines containing alkylsulfonate moieties do not exhibit significant fluorescence change upon binding to biomolecules however otherwise identical NIR dye analogs that contain alkylaldehyde moiety at the same position do exhibit changes which can be utilized for characterization of alkenesulfonate monooxygenase enzyme activity using near infrared dyes as substrates. In this study a new class of sulfonated penta- and heptamethine dyes were used as substrates in vitro utilizing a photo-reduced riboflavin mononucleotide (FMN) with a glucose/ glucose-oxygenase oxygen scavenging system. Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) detected CZE was utilized to detect the sulfonated and de-sulfonated carbocyanines. The lower fluorescence quantum yield of the less water soluble alkylaldehyde analogs was detected and enzyme activity was characterized.

  5. Staining proteins in gels.

    PubMed

    Sasse, Joachim; Gallagher, Sean R

    2004-02-01

    This unit describes protocols for detecting protein in a gel by either Coomassie blue, silver or fluorescent staining. Alternate rapid staining procedures are provided for each method and a support protocol describes how to photograph stained gels. Fluorescent staining (e.g., with SYPRO Orange or Red) is described as a popular alternative to traditional staining procedures, mainly because it is more sensitive than Coomassie staining, and often as sensitive as silver staining. Staining of proteins in SDS-polyacrylamide gels is described, and an alternate protocol details variations in the procedure for proteins in nondenaturing gels. A final support protocol describes the photography of fluorescently stained proteins. PMID:18432935

  6. Fluorescence of Dyes in Solutions with High Absorbance. Inner Filter Effect Correction

    PubMed Central

    Fonin, Alexander V.; Sulatskaya, Anna I.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence is a proven tool in all fields of knowledge, including biology and medicine. A significant obstacle in its use is the nonlinearity of the dependence of the fluorescence intensity on fluorophore concentration that is caused by the so-called primary inner filter effect. The existing methods for correcting the fluorescence intensity are hard to implement in practice; thus, it is generally considered best to use dilute solutions. We showed that correction must be performed always. Furthermore, high-concentration solutions (high absorbance) are inherent condition in studying of the photophysical properties of fluorescent dyes and the functionally significant interactions of biological macromolecules. We proposed an easy to use method to correct the experimentally recorded total fluorescence intensity and showed that informative component of fluorescence intensity numerically equals to the product of the absorbance and the fluorescence quantum yield of the object. It is shown that if dye molecules do not interact with each other and there is no reabsorption (as for NATA) and spectrofluorimeter provides the proportionality of the detected fluorescence intensity to the part of the absorbed light (that is possible for spectrofluorimeter with horizontal slits) then the dependence of experimentally detected total fluorescence intensity of the dye on its absorbance coincides with the calculated dependence and the correction factor for eliminating the primary inner filter effect can be calculated on the basis of solution absorbance. It was experimentally shown for NATA fluorescence in the wide range of absorbance (at least up to 60). For ATTO-425, which fluorescence and absorption spectra overlap, the elimination of the primary and secondary filter effects and additional spectral analysis allow to conclude that the most probable reason of the deviation of experimentally detected fluorescence intensity dependence on solution absorbance from the calculated dependence is the dye molecules self-quenching, which accompanies resonance radiationless excitation energy transfer. PMID:25072376

  7. Staining proteins in gels.

    PubMed

    Sasse, Joachim; Gallagher, Sean R

    2009-01-01

    This unit describes protocols for detecting protein in a gel by Coomassie blue, silver, or fluorescent staining. As a general protein stain, Coomassie is easier and more rapid; however, fluorescent and silver staining methods are considerably more sensitive and thus can be used to detect smaller amounts of protein. Fluorescent staining is a popular alternative to traditional staining procedures, mainly because it is more sensitive than Coomassie staining, and often as sensitive as silver staining. Alternate protocols describe rapid Coomassie and silver staining methods, as well as fluorescent stains that are specific for phosphoproteins and glycoproteins. Staining of proteins in SDS-polyacrylamide gels is described; variations for fluorescent staining of proteins in nondenaturing gels are also included. Support protocols describe photography of stained proteins. PMID:19170026

  8. Fluorescent lifetime of near infrared dyes for structural analysis of serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, Mikhail Y.; Lee, Hyeran; Akers, Walter; Nikiforovich, Gregory; Achilefu, Samuel

    2008-02-01

    Structural alteration of serum albumin, the major extracellular multifunctional protein in mammals, has been linked to a number of diseases. Herein we present a method based on fluorescence lifetime analysis of near-infrared (NIR) probes bound to albumin to interrogate its structural state without prior isolation of the protein. Molecular modeling study revealed that albumin binds polymethine dyes via two binding sites with different sizes and polarities. As a result, a NIR molecular probe typically exhibits two distinct lifetimes with corresponding fractional contributions. The distribution of fractional contributions along with individual fluorescence lifetimes represents unique parameters for characterizing albumin architecture. To evaluate the effect of size and polarity of binding sites on fluorescence lifetime we studied NIR probes in solutions with different viscosity and polarity. We established that viscosity has negligible effect on polymethine dyes lifetime while the change in polarity has a profound impact. We also established a correlation between fluorescence lifetime and solvent polarity function for a number of NIR dyes for quantitative description of binding sites polarity. After screening a library of dyes, we identified a probe with optimal fluorescence lifetime properties to assess structure-related differences of albumins. The results show that changes in the lifetime of NIR dyes reflect the perturbation of albumin's tertiary structures. Because of the reduced absorption of light by blood in the NIR region, the method developed can be used to determine structural changes of albumins in whole blood.

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells: isolation, characterisation and in vivo fluorescent dye tracking.

    PubMed

    Weir, Christopher; Morel-Kopp, Marie-Christine; Gill, Anthony; Tinworth, Kellie; Ladd, Leigh; Hunyor, Stephen N; Ward, Christopher

    2008-10-01

    Cell therapies have been used to regenerate the heart by direct myocardial delivery, by coronary infusion and by surface attached scaffolds. Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) with capacity to differentiate into cardiomyocytes and other cell lines have been predominantly trialled in rodents. However, large animal models are increasingly needed to translate basic research into new, safe regenerative therapies. Understanding the mode of action of cell therapies in the mammalian heart has been limited by cell tracking capability. This study examined the ability to track the fate of allogeneic MSC in sheep using various fluorescent dyes. MSC isolated from sheep bone marrow were grown in culture following extraction and flow cytometric characterisation. After labelling with fluorescent tracking dyes (e.g. CFSE and DiI) cells were tested for in vitro and in vivo signal up to six weeks. Labelling effect on cell division and differentiation was studied. Several dyes lost fluorescence and slowed cell division. However, the thiol reactive dye CM-DiI showed detectable in vivo fluorescence in labelled MSC six weeks after injection into sheep skeletal muscle and two weeks after implantation of an MSC coated biomaterial scaffold. CM-DiI labelled MSC differentiated in vitro showed label retention over four weeks. The fluorescent membrane dye CM-DiI tracks implanted sheep MSC and provides an alternative to traditional cell markers such as gene modified GFP. PMID:18396458

  10. Photostabilizing effects of lidocaine and tris(8-hydroxy-quinoline) aluminum on organic fluorescent dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisk, Wade N.

    2003-07-01

    The photostabilization efficacy of lidocaine and tris(8-hydroxy-quinoline) aluminum (Alq3) was determined for methanol solutions of the fluorescent laser dyes 1,3,5,7,8-pentamethyl-2,6-diethylpyrromethene-difluoroborate complex (PM-567) and rhodamine 590 (R590) by evaluation with the , rose bengal (RB). The photostability was measured by noting the decrease in fluorescence with accumulated 532 nm Nd:YAG laser pulses. Rose bengal demonstrated dramatic photostability enhancement upon lidocaine or Alq3 addition; whereas nominal photostability enhancement was observed for PM-567 and R590 upon lidocaine or Alq3 addition. A geminate dye-singlet oxygen complex is proposed to explain the disparity in dye photostability enhancement between rose bengal and the laser dyes.

  11. Rapid Macrocycle Threading by a Fluorescent Dye-Polymer Conjugate in Water with Nanomolar Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Evan M.; Liu, Wenqi; Spence, Graeme T.; Shaw, Scott K.; Davis, Anthony P.; Destecroix, Harry; Smith, Bradley D.

    2015-01-01

    A macrocyclic tetralactam host is threaded by a highly fluorescent squaraine dye that is flanked by two polyethyleneglycol (PEG) chains with nanomolar dissociation constants in water. Furthermore, the rates of bimolecular association are very fast with kon ~106107 M?1s?1. The association is effective under cell culture conditions and produces large changes in dye optical properties including turn-on near-infrared fluorescence that can be imaged using cell microscopy. Association constants in water are ~1000 times higher than in organic solvents and strongly enthalpically favored at 27 C. The threading rate is hardly affected by the length of the PEG chains that flank the squaraine dye. For example, macrocyle threading by a dye conjugate with two appended PEG2000 chains is only three times slower than threading by a conjugate with triethyleneglycol chains that are twenty times shorter. The results are a promising advance towards synthetic mimics of streptavidin/biotin. PMID:26106948

  12. Photophysics of Laser Dye-Doped Polymer Membranes for Laser-Induced Fluorescence Photogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorrington, Adrian A.; Jones, Thomas W.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2004-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence target generation in dye-doped polymer films has recently been introduced as a promising alternative to more traditional photogrammetric targeting techniques for surface profiling of highly transparent or reflective membrane structures. We investigate the photophysics of these dye-doped polymers to help determine their long-term durability and suitability for laser-induced fluorescence photogrammetric targeting. These investigations included experimental analysis of the fluorescence emission pattern, spectral content, temporal lifetime, linearity, and half-life. Results are presented that reveal an emission pattern wider than normal Lambertian diffuse surface scatter, a fluorescence time constant of 6.6 ns, a pump saturation level of approximately 20 micro J/mm(exp 2), and a useful lifetime of more than 300,000 measurements. Furthermore, two demonstrations of photogrammetric measurements by laser-induced fluorescence targeting are presented, showing agreement between photogrammetric and physically measured dimensions within the measurement scatter of 100 micron.

  13. Diketopyrrolopyrrole: brilliant red pigment dye-based fluorescent probes and their applications.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Matinder; Choi, Dong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    The development of fluorescent probes for the detection of biologically relevant species is a burgeoning topic in the field of supramolecular chemistry. A number of available dyes such as rhodamine, coumarin, fluorescein, and cyanine have been employed in the design and synthesis of new fluorescent probes. However, diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) and its derivatives have a distinguished role in supramolecular chemistry for the design of fluorescent dyes. DPP dyes offer distinctive advantages relative to other organic dyes, including high fluorescence quantum yields and good light and thermal stability. Significant advancements have been made in the development of new fluorescent probes based on DPP in recent years as a result of tireless research efforts by the chemistry scientific community. In this tutorial review, we highlight the recent progress in the development of DPP-based fluorescent probes for the period spanning 2009 to the present time and the applications of these probes to recognition of biologically relevant species including anions, cations, reactive oxygen species, thiols, gases and other miscellaneous applications. This review is targeted toward providing the readers with deeper understanding for the future design of DPP-based fluorogenic probes for chemical and biological applications. PMID:25186723

  14. Determination of torasemide by fluorescence quenching method with some dihalogenated fluorescein dyes as probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhiping; Liu, Shaopu; Liu, Zhongfang; Li, Yuanfang; Hu, Xiaoli; Tian, Jing

    2013-10-01

    A novel fluorescence quenching method for the determination of torasemide (TOR) with some dihalogenated fluorescein dyes as fluorescence probes was developed. In acidulous medium, TOR could interact with some dihalogenated fluorescein dyes such as dichlorofluorescein (DCF), dibromofluorescein (DBF) and diiodofluorescein (DIF) to form binary complexes, which could lead to fluorescence quenching of above dihalogenated fluorescein dyes. The maximum fluorescence emission wavelengths were located at 532 nm (TOR-DCF), 535 nm (TOR-DBF) and 554 nm (TOR-DIF). The relative fluorescence intensities (ΔF = F0 - F) were proportional to the concentration of TOR in certain ranges. The detection limits were 4.8 ng mL-1 for TOR-DCF system, 9.8 ng mL-1 for TOR-DBF system and 35.1 ng mL-1 for TOR-DIF system. The optimum reaction conditions, influencing factors were studied; and the effect of coexisting substances was investigated owing to the highest sensitivity of TOR-DCF system. In addition, the reaction mechanism, composition and structure of the complex were discussed by quantum chemical calculation and Job's method. The fluorescence quenching of dihalogenated fluorescein dyes by TOR was a static quenching process judging from the effect of temperature and the Stern-Volmer plots. The method was satisfactorily applied to the determination of TOR in tablets and human urine samples.

  15. Sensitive Structural Control of Macrocycle Threading by a Fluorescent Squaraine Dye Flanked by Polymer Chains

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenqi; Peck, Evan M.; Hendzel, Kevin D.; Smith, Bradley D.

    2015-01-01

    A macrocyclic tetralactam is threaded by a complementary squaraine dye that is flanked by two polyethylene glycol chains to produce a pseudorotaxane complex with favorable near-infrared fluorescence properties. The association thermodynamics and kinetics were measured for a homologous series of squaraines with different N-alkyl substituents at both ends of the dye. The results show that subtle changes in substituent steric size have profound effects on threading kinetics without greatly altering the very high association constant. PMID:26452041

  16. Improved conditions for periodate/Schiff's base-based fluorescent staining of glycoproteins with dansylhydrazine in SDS-PAGE.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan; Hong, Guo-Ying; Huang, Bin-Bin; Duan, Yuan-Meng; Shen, Jia-Yi; Ni, Mao-Wei; Cong, Wei-Tao; Jin, Li-Tai

    2014-05-01

    An improved periodate/Schiff's base based fluorescent stain with dansylhydrazine (DH) for glycoproteins in 1D and 2D SDS-PAGE was described. Down to 4-8ng of glycoproteins can be selectively detected within 2h, which is approximately 16-fold higher than that of original protocol, but similar to that of Pro-Q Emerald 488 stain (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, USA). Furthermore, subsequent study of deglycosylation, glycoprotein affinity isolation, and LC-MS/MS analysis were performed to confirm the specificity of the improved method. As a result, improved DH stain may provide a new choice for selective, economic, MS compatible, and convenient visualization of gel-separated glycoproteins. PMID:24591039

  17. Combined immunofluorescence-DNA-fluorescence staining technique for enumeration of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans in a population of acidophilic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Muyzer, G.; De Bruyn, A.; Schmedding, D.J.M.; Bos, P.; Westbroek, P.; Kuenen, G.J.

    1987-04-01

    An antiserum raised against whole cells of Thiobacillus ferroxidans was allowed to react with a variety of acidophilic and nonacidophilic bacteria in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and an indirect immunofluorescence assay. Both experiments demonstrated that the antiserum was specific at the species level. This preparation was used to evaluate the role of T. ferroooxidans in the microbial desulfurization process. Leaching experiments were performed, and the numbers of T. ferrooxidans cells and other bacteria were estimated by using a combined immunofluorescence-DNA-fluorescence staining technique that was adapted for this purpose. Nonsterile coal samples inoculated with T. ferrooxidans yielded high concentrations of soluble iron after 16 days. After this period, however, T. ferrooxidans cells could no longer be detected by the immunofluorescence assay, whereas the DNA-fluorescence staining procedure demonstrated a large number of microorganisms on the coal particles. These results indicate that T. ferrooxidans is removed by competition with different acidophilic microorganisms that were originally present on the coal.

  18. Dye distance mapping using waveguide evanescent field fluorescence microscopy and its application to cell biology.

    PubMed

    Fleissner, Frederik; Morawitz, Michael; Dixon, S Jeffrey; Langbein, Uwe; Mittler, Silvia

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have measured the distance between cells and the substratum at sites of adhesion via the emission of a fluorescent dye and waveguide methods. Here, we demonstrate a novel approach to measure the position of fluorescent dyes above a waveguide surface in the 10-200 nm distance range throughout an entire area, yielding a 2D dye distance map or a 3D contour plot. The dye is located in a multilayered Langmuir Blodgett (LB) film or in the plasma membrane of a cell. Waveguide evanescent field fluorescence (WEFF) images obtained using two different waveguide modes are employed allowing, with a simple mathematical approach, the calculation of dye distance maps. Ultra-thin steps made using LB technology, adhesion distances and the bending of the plasma membrane between focal adhesions of osteoblastic cells are shown as examples. The errors are discussed. False color representation of a dye distance map with four osteoblasts. The inset represents an overexposed WEFF image of the same field of view. PMID:25401699

  19. Selection of fluorescent DNA dyes for real-time LAMP with portable and simple optics.

    PubMed

    Seyrig, Gregoire; Stedtfeld, Robert D; Tourlousse, Dieter M; Ahmad, Farhan; Towery, Keara; Cupples, Alison M; Tiedje, James M; Hashsham, Syed A

    2015-12-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is increasingly used for point-of-care nucleic acid based diagnostics. LAMP can be monitored in real-time by measuring the increase in fluorescence of DNA binding dyes. However, there is little information comparing the effect of various fluorescent dyes on signal to noise ratio (SNR) or threshold time (Tt). This information is critical for implementation with field deployable diagnostic tools that require small, low power consumption, robust, and inexpensive optical components with reagent saving low volume reactions. In this study, SNR and Tt during real-time LAMP was evaluated with eleven fluorescent dyes. Of all dyes tested, SYTO-82, SYTO-84, and SYTOX Orange resulted in the shortest Tt, and SYTO-81 had the widest range of working concentrations. The optimized protocol detected 10 genome copies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in less than 10min, 10 copies of Giardia intestinalis in ~20min, and 10 copies of Staphylococcus aureus or Salmonella enterica in less than 15min. Results demonstrate that reaction efficiency depends on both dye type and concentration and the selected polymerase. The optimized protocol was evaluated in the Gene-Z device, a hand-held battery operated platform characterized via simple and low cost optics, and a multiple assay microfluidic chip with micron volume reaction wells. Compared to the more conventional intercalating dye (SYBR Green), reliable amplification was only observed in the Gene-Z when using higher concentrations of SYTO-81. PMID:26554941

  20. New epifluorescence microscope providing pairs of specific fluorescence images of double-stained cells for simultaneous visual perception and for quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiden, Thomas; Tribukait, Bernhard

    1996-05-01

    A new epi-fluorescence microscope for analysis of cells stained with two fluorochromes which can be spectrally isolated is described. The system makes it possible to perform independent and specific spectral selection of each dye (e.g. DAPI and CY3) while perceiving the two specific images simultaneously by eye. The optics uses splitting of the primary excitation and emission light beams, independent modification of the separated beams, and their reunification. Modifications in the separated beams comprise: (1) isolation of specific wavelengths (365 nm and 546 nm in the excitation light path, 435 - 500 nm and 590 - 750 nm in the emission light beams), (2) wavelength switching without image displacement and blur by means of a light chopper alternating between ultraviolet-excitation/blue-detection and green-excitation/red-detection at frequencies of up to 140 Hz for observation by eye without image flicker, and (3) the possible separate positioning of lenses for compensation of chromatic aberrations. The system demonstrates a good transmission of the chosen wavelengths. A high specificity of double fluorescence analysis with minimal effects of spectral overlap was attained with good temporal resolution. It has been shown that it is feasible to obtain separate chromatic compensations for the use of a microscope objective in spectral regions outside the range for which the objective is corrected. Quantitative and independent measurements of the two fluorescence images by a CCD camera synchronized with the light chopper are feasible. In conclusion, this imaging system is outlined for highly specific visual analysis and exact quantitative measurement of double fluorescence labeled specimens in cytology and histology.

  1. Testing the Fraunhofer line discriminator by sensing fluorescent dye

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoertz, G. E.

    1969-01-01

    The experimental Fraunhofer Line Discriminator (FLD) has detected increments of Rhodamine WT dye as small as 1 ppb in 1/2 meter depths. It can be inferred that increments considerably smaller than 1 ppb will be detectable in depths considerably greater than 1/2 meter. Turbidity of the water drastically reduces luminescence or even completely blocks the transmission of detectable luminescence to the FLD. Attenuation of light within the water by turbidity and by the dye itself are the major factors to be considered in interpreting FLD records and in relating luminescence coefficient to dye concentration. An airborne test in an H-19 helicopter established feasibility of operating the FLD from the aircraft power supply, and established that the rotor blades do not visibly affect the monitoring of incident solar radiation.

  2. Highly sensitive fluorescent stain for detecting lipopolysaccharides in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Zhou, Ayi; Cai, Wanhui; Yu, Dongdong; Zhu, Zhongxin; Jiang, Chengxi; Jin, Litai

    2015-08-01

    A sensitive and simple technique was developed for the visualization of gel-separated lipopolysaccharides by using a hydrazide derivative, UGF202. As low as 0.5-1 ng total LPS could be detected by UGF202 stain, which is 2- and 16-fold more sensitive than that of the commonly used Pro-Q Emerald 300 and Keenan et al. developed silver stain, respectively. The results indicated that UGF202 stain could be a good choice for LPS determination in polyacrylamide gels. PMID:25930092

  3. Photosensitive Fluorescent Dye Contributes to Phototoxicity and Inflammatory Responses of Dye-doped Silica NPs in Cells and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Ye, Yan; Zhou, Xikun; Chen, Jiao; Jin, Yuihui; Hanson, Aaron; Zhao, Julia Xiaojun; Wu, Min

    2014-01-01

    Dye-doped fluorescent silica nanoparticles provide highly intense and photostable fluorescence signals. However, some dopant dye molecules are photosensitive. A widely-used photosensitive fluorescent dopant, RuBpy, was chosen to systematically investigate the phototoxicity of the dye-doped silica nanoparticles (NPs). We investigated cell viability, DNA damage, and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) levels in alveolar macrophages using the dye-doped NPs with or without irradiation. Our results showed that the RuBpy-doped silica NPs could induce significant amount of ROS, DNA damage, apoptosis and impaired proliferation in MH-S cells. In vivo studies in mice showed that RuBpy-doped silica NPs induced significant inflammatory cytokine production and lowered expression in signaling proteins such as ERK1/2 and NF-?B as well as increased lung injury determined by myeloperoxidase and lipid peroxidation. Strikingly, we also found that both RuBpy alone and NPs induced systemic signaling activation in the kidney compared to the liver and lung where showed highly selective signaling patterns, which is more pronounced than RuBpy-doped silica NPs. Moreover, we discovered a critical biomarker (e.g., HMGB1) for silica NPs-induced stress and toxicity and demonstrated differentially-regulated response patterns in various organs. Our results indicate for the first time that the RuBpy-doped silica NPs may impose less inflammatory responses but stronger thermotherapeutic effects on target cells in animals than naked NPs in a time- and dose-dependent manner. PMID:24578727

  4. DBD dyes as fluorescence lifetime probes to study conformational changes in proteins.

    PubMed

    Wawrzinek, Robert; Ziomkowska, Joanna; Heuveling, Johanna; Mertens, Monique; Herrmann, Andreas; Schneider, Erwin; Wessig, Pablo

    2013-12-16

    Previously, [1,3]dioxolo[4,5-f][1,3]benzodioxole (DBD)-based fluorophores used as highly sensitive fluorescence lifetime probes reporting on their microenvironmental polarity have been described. Now, a new generation of DBD dyes has been developed. Although they are still sensitive to polarity, in contrast to the former DBD dyes, they have extraordinary spectroscopic properties even in aqueous surroundings. They are characterized by long fluorescence lifetimes (10-20 ns), large Stokes shifts (?100 nm), high photostabilities, and high quantum yields (>0.56). Here, the spectroscopic properties and synthesis of functionalized derivatives for labeling biological targets are described. Furthermore, thio-reactive maleimido derivatives of both DBD generations show strong intramolecular fluorescence quenching. This mechanism has been investigated and is found to undergo a photoelectron transfer (PET) process. After reaction with a thiol group, this fluorescence quenching is prevented, indicating successful bonding. Being sensitive to their environmental polarity, these compounds have been used as powerful fluorescence lifetime probes for the investigation of conformational changes in the maltose ATP-binding cassette transporter through fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy. The differing tendencies of the fluorescence lifetime change for both DBD dye generations promote their combination as a powerful toolkit for studying microenvironments in proteins. PMID:24214850

  5. Fluorescence switch of dye-infiltrated SiO2 inverse opal based on acid-base vapors or light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. Q.; Wang, J. X.; Shang, Y. L.; Song, Y. L.; Jiang, L.

    2011-03-01

    The acid-base vapors/light double responsive dye-infiltrated SiO2 inverse opal photonic crystals (PCs) were fabricated by sacrificial template method and a subsequent infiltration of spiropyran derivative dye molecules. The fluorescence of ring-open dye molecules infiltrated in PCs can be switched on/off based on different fluorescence properties of spiropyran dye under stimuli of acid-base vapors or light, when PCs with suitable stopband were selected. The fluorescence switch behavior based on PCs has potential applications in data storage, color displays, chemical and biological sensors.

  6. Proteinase assay by capillary electrophoresis employing fluorescence-quenched protein-dye conjugates.

    PubMed

    Welder, Frank; McCorquodale, Elizabeth Moody; Colyer, Christa L

    2002-06-01

    Determination of proteinases--enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of peptide bonds--is often difficult due to the presence of interferences in complex biological media and limited sample size. Capillary electrophoresis (CE), with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) can serve as a useful tool for such determinations. LIF detection offers the advantages of increased sensitivity and increased selectivity. However, direct LIF detection requires the proteinase analyte to be fluorescently derivatized prior to analysis. A viable alternative is offered by the present work, in which protein substrates are first labeled with BODIPY dye, a relatively pH-insensitive, high-fluorescence quantum yield dye. Upon binding of some 4-10 molecules of dye to a single protein, the dye is effectively fluorescence-quenched. Digestion of the BODIPY--labeled and quenched protein by an unlabeled enzyme yields smaller peptide fragments in which the fluorescence of associated BODIPY tags is restored. We will present how the fragmentation pattern of BODIPY-labeled casein changes as a function of incubation time with trypsin, as well as the effect of varying concentrations of trypsin on the BODIPY-casein digest. PMID:12179975

  7. Polarization and Symmetry of Electronic Transitions in Long Fluorescence Lifetime Triangulenium Dyes

    PubMed Central

    Thyrhaug, Erling; Srensen, Thomas Just; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Laursen, Bo W.

    2013-01-01

    To fully exploit the capabilities of fluorescence probes in modern experiments, where advanced instrumentation is used to probe complex environments, other photophysical properties than emission color and emission intensity are monitored. Each dye property can be addressed individually as well as collectively to provide in-depth information unavailable from the standard intensity measurements. Dyes with long emission lifetimes and strongly polarized transitions enable the monitoring of lifetime changes as well as emission polarization (or anisotropy). Thus experiments can be designed to follow slow dynamics. In this article the UV and visible electronic transitions of a series of red emitting dyes based on the triangulenium motif are investigated. We resolve overlapping features in the spectra and assign transition moment of the molecular axes. The result is the complete Jablonski diagram for the UV and visible spectral region. The symmetries of the studied dyes are shown to have a large influence on the optical response and they are clearly separated into two groups of symmetry by their photophysical properties. The C2v symmetric dyes: azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA+) and diazaoxatriangulenium (DAOTA+) have high emission anisotropies, fluorescence lifetimes around 20 ns, and fluorescence quantum yields of ~50%. The trioxatriangulenium (TOTA+) and triazatriangulenium (TATA+) dyesnominally of D3h symmetryhave fluorescence lifetimes around 10 ns lifetimes and fluorescence quantum yields of 10-15%. However, the D3h-symmetry is shown to be lowered to a point group, where the axes transform uniquely such that the degeneracy of the E-states is lifted. PMID:23391292

  8. Microplate fluorescence assay for the quantification of double stranded DNA using SYBR Green I dye.

    PubMed

    Leggate, Johanna; Allain, Ray; Isaac, Leah; Blais, Burton W

    2006-10-01

    A high-throughput, 96-well microplate fluorescence assay (MFA) was developed for DNA quantification using the double-stranded DNA-binding dye SYBR Green I. Samples mixed with SYBR Green I in the wells of a microtiter plate produced fluorescence in proportion with DNA concentration which was measured using a fluorescence plate reader. The performance characteristics of the assay were compared with spectrophotometric quantification based on ultraviolet absorption and the Hoefer DyNA Quant assay utilizing the fluorescent dye, Hoechst 33258. The MFA accurately quantified different types of DNA over a broad linear dynamic range of concentrations (0.25-2,500 pg/microl), and was not affected by a variety of contaminants in the assay mixture. PMID:16937249

  9. Experimental and theoretical studies of the optimisation of fluorescence from near-infrared dye-doped silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nooney, Robert I; McCahey, Ciara M N; Stranik, Ondrej; Le Guevel, Xavier; McDonagh, Colette; MacCraith, Brian D

    2009-02-01

    There is substantial interest in the development of near-infrared dye-doped nanoparticles (NPs) for a range of applications including immunocytochemistry, immunosorbent assays, flow cytometry, and DNA/protein microarray analysis. The main motivation for this work is the significant increase in NP fluorescence that may be obtained compared with a single dye label, for example Cy5. Dye-doped NPs were synthesised and a reduction in fluorescence as a function of dye concentration was correlated with the occurrence of homo-Frster resonance energy transfer (HFRET) in the NP. Using standard analytical expressions describing HFRET, we modelled the fluorescence of NPs as a function of dye loading. The results confirmed the occurrence of HFRET which arises from the small Stokes shift of near-infrared dyes and provided a simple method for predicting the optimum dye loading in NPs for maximum fluorescence. We used the inverse micelle method to prepare monodispersed silica NPs. The NPs were characterised using dynamic light scattering, UV spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The quantum efficiency of the dye inside the NPs, as a function of dye loading, was also determined. The fluorescent NPs were measured to be approximately 165 times brighter than the free dye, at an optimal loading of 2% (w/w). These experimental results were in good agreement with model predictions. PMID:18846367

  10. Suitability of Mixing Fluorescent Dye in Adulticides and its Impact on Droplet Characteristics and Pesticide Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Muhammad; Waits, Christy

    2015-12-01

    Fluorescent dyes are commonly used to help visualize insecticidal droplets or to trace movement of insecticides; however, the effect these dyes have on the insecticide's efficacy and droplet characteristics is unknown. This study evaluated the effects of mixing Uvitex OB fluorescent dye with 5 adulticides on their efficacy in a wind tunnel. Efficacy was determined via droplet size characteristics, spray flux (active ingredient [AI] deposition), and female adult Aedes aegypti mortality. Fyfanon ULV, Anvil 10+10, Duet, Aqualuer 20-20, and Zenivex E20, diluted with corn oil, were tested with and without the dye at maximum, minimum, and half-minimum label rates. Adulticide droplet size was not affected by the addition of dye to any of the 5 pesticides tested. Mosquito mortality was strongly correlated with AI deposition for all pesticides except Duet. There was no difference among correlation coefficients of the 5 pesticides and between coefficients of any pesticide pairs, indicating that all correlations were similar. The addition of dye slightly but nonsignificantly and nonconsistently affected mortality. It was found that the source of this variability was due to large variation in mortality among different replicates of the same treatment. PMID:26675457

  11. Improvements in laser flare removal for particle image velocimetry using fluorescent dye-doped particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosky, B. J.; Lowe, K. T.; Danehy, P. M.; Wohl, C. J.; Tiemsin, P. I.

    2015-11-01

    Laser flare, or scattering of laser light from a surface, can often be a major issue in particle image velocimetry (PIV) involving solid boundaries in the flow or a gas-liquid interface. The use of fluorescent light from dye-doped particles has been demonstrated in water applications, but reproducing the technique in an airflow is more difficult due to particle size constraints and safety concerns. The following work presents fluorescent Kiton Red 620 (KR620)-doped polystyrene latex microspheres as a solution to this issue. The particles are small and narrowly distributed, with a mean diameter of 0.87 μ \\text{m} and diameter distribution standard deviation of 0.30 μ \\text{m} . Furthermore, the KR620 dye exhibits much lower toxicity than other common fluorescent dyes, and would be safe to use in large flow facilities. The fluorescent signal from the particles is measured on average to be 320  ±  10 times weaker than the Mie scattering signal from the particles. This reduction in signal is counterbalanced by greatly enhanced contrast via optical rejection of the incident laser wavelength. Fluorescent PIV with these particles is shown to eliminate laser flare near surfaces, allowing for velocity measurements as close as 100 μ \\text{m} to the surface. In one case, fluorescent PIV led to velocity vector validation rates more than 20 times that of the Mie scattering results in the boundary layer region of an angled surface.

  12. Fluorescence enhancement monitoring of pyrromethene laser dyes by metallic Ag nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sakr, Mahmoud E M; Abou Kana, Maram T H; Abdel Fattah, Gamal

    2014-11-01

    Fluorescence enhancement monitoring of pyrromethene laser dyes using their complexation with Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) was studied. The size of the prepared Ag NPs was determined by transmission electron spectroscopy and UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy. Mie theory was also used to confirm the size of NPs theoretically. The effect of different nanoparticle concentrations on the optical properties of 1 10(-4) M PM dyes shows that 40%of Ag NPs concentration (40%C Ag NPs) in complex is the optimum concentration. Also, the effects of different concentrations of PM dyes in a complex was measured. Emission enhancement factors were calculated for all samples. Fluorescence enhancement efficiencies depended on the input pumping energy of a Nd-YAG laser (wavelength 532 nm and 8 ns pulse duration) were reported and showed the lowest energy (28 and 32 mJ) in the case of PM567 and PM597, respectively. PMID:24652745

  13. Investigation of Fluorescence Characteristic in Transversely Excited Dye and Nanoparticle-Doped PMMA Fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NG, C. S.; Yap, S. S.; Chin, O. H.; Wong, H. Y.; Tou, T. Y.

    2011-03-01

    A simple extruder was used to fabricate poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) fibers with optimum diameter 0.5 mm from the modified, low-softening (50-60 C) PMMA that was prepared using the reactive polymerization. The laser dye Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles of nominal diameter 30nm were added to the monomer MMA prior to the polymerization process, hence producing a random media. The nanoparticle embedded dye-doped PMMA fibers were transversely excited by TEA Nitrogen (N2) laser for fluorescence studies. It was observed that ZnO nanoparticles embedded in the dye-doped PMMA fibre significantly improved the fluorescence characteristic.

  14. Fingerprint visualization enhancement by deposition of columnar thin films and fluorescent dye treatment.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Jhuma; Ramakrishna, S A; Mekkaoui Alaoui, I

    2013-05-10

    Enhanced visualization of latent fingerprints on two non-porous surfaces, smooth glass slides and highly reflecting rough aluminum sheets, is obtained by depositing columnar thin films (CTFs) of calcium fluoride (CaF2) and silica (SiO2) by physical vapor deposition at large oblique angles. Due to the vapor flux getting shadowed by the physical residues in the fingerprints, the CTFs are deposited only on the upraised ridges, resulting in highly enhancing the visibility of the fingerprint. The visualization of these fingerprints with deposited CTFs is further enhanced by subsequently treating them with a fluorescent dye and fluorescence imaging. A specific amino-acid reagent (1,2-indanedione) and non-specific laser dye (Rhodamine 6G), both allowed enhanced visualization of the CTFs grown on the fingerprints, due to the localization and entrenchment of the dye within the CTF regions. PMID:23597736

  15. On the nature of Romanowsky-Giemsa staining and the Romanowsky-Giemsa effect. I. Model experiments on the specificity of azure B-eosin Y stain as compared with other thiazine dye-eosin Y combinations.

    PubMed

    Wittekind, D H; Gehring, T

    1985-03-01

    After incorporation into a polyacrylamide matrix, the biopolymers DNA, RNA, heparin, hyaluronic acid, collagen and the synthetic polymers poly(U) and poly(A, U) were stained with the pure thiazine dyes, Methylene Blue, the Azures and Thionin alone and combined with Eosin Y. Satisfactory spectrophotometric agreement was obtained between the staining reactions of the biopolymers in the artificial matrix and those in their natural surroundings. This was especially true with respect to the specificity of the Azure B-Eosin Y dye-pair, which is based on the generation, on suitable substrates, of a purple colour, the Romanowsky-Giemsa effect (RGE), with an absorbance maximum near 550 nm. In the model experiments, DNA, heparin, hyaluronic acid and collagen were found to be RGE-positive and poly(U), poly(A, U) and RNA RGE-negative. A theory of RGE is proposed which complies with the new and earlier observations: after saturation of available anionic binding sites and aggregate formation by Azure B, electron donor acceptor complexes are formed between Eosin Y and Azure B via hydrogen-bridge formation of the aminosubstituent proton of Azure B and between Eosin Y and the biopolymer surface. Charge-transfer complex formation may also account for the qualitative identity of Azure B-Eosin Y and Azure A-Eosin Y spectra of substrates, which are coloured purple. Quantitatively, Azure A-Eosin Y is less efficient in giving RGE. The generation of RGE is time-dependent. Equilibrium staining is attained after about 120 h. The implications of the results for the biological application of Romanowsky-Giemsa staining are discussed briefly. PMID:2411682

  16. Physical markers for landmarking fluorescently stained gels that facilitate automated spot-picking.

    PubMed

    Fehring, V; Wandschneider, S; Lhr, M

    2001-08-01

    The quantitative comparison of spot patterns relies heavily on protein stains that do provide an appropriate dynamic range. Unfortunately most spot picking robot devices are still limited to nonfluorescent protein stains and the appropriate equipment is still quite expensive. These problems are solved by the application of a newly developed "GelMarker" that combines a spot picking robot device and a UV scanner. The "GelMarkers" are detectable in both the visible and UV range of light and permit the comparison of gel pictures taken by such different devices. The application of these "GelMarkers" together with the transformation of spot coordinates by using a "spot matching" procedure allows the automated excision of selected protein spots. The obtained picking accuracies are as good as those obtainable from visible stained gels due to the shape stability of the gels even over a longer time period. PMID:11565786

  17. Highly fluorescent water-soluble polyglycerol-dendronized perylene bisimide dyes.

    PubMed

    Heek, Timm; Fasting, Carlo; Rest, Christina; Zhang, Xin; Wrthner, Frank; Haag, Rainer

    2010-03-21

    Water-soluble perylene tetracarboxylic acid bisimides (PBIs) with terminally linked polyglycerol dendrons of four different generations have been synthesized. These PBI dyes reveal a strong dendritic effect, enabling outstanding fluorescence quantum yields in water up to almost 100% for the highest dendron generation. PMID:20198241

  18. Development of Thermally Stable and Highly Fluorescent IR Dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bu, Xiu R.

    2004-01-01

    Fluorophores are the core component in various optical applications such as sensors and probes. Fluorphores with low-energy or long wavelength emission, in particular, in NIR region, possess advantages of low interference and high sensitivity. In this study, we has explored several classes of imidazole-based compounds for NIR fluorescent properties and concluded: (1) thiazole-based imidazole compounds are fluorescent; (2) emission energy is tunable by additional donor groups; (3) they also possess impressive two- photon absorption properties; and (4) fluorescence emission can be induced by two- photon input. This report summarizes (1) synthesis of new series of fluorophore; (2) impact of electron-withdrawing groups on fluorescent property; (3) unique property of two-photon absorption; and (4) on-going development.

  19. Use of Tunable, Pulsed Dye Laser for Quantitative Fluorescence in Syphilis Serology (FTA-ABS Test)

    PubMed Central

    Kasatiya, S. S.; Lambert, N. G.; Laurence, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    A pulsed dye laser was used as an excitation source in a fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-ABS) test. A high precision in quantitative fluorescence was obtained with this high-power excitation source coupled to an electronic detection system and a storage oscilloscope by standardization of fluorescence evaluation and through elimination of human error. One 0.4-?s pulse exposure was sufficient to record fluorescence intensity data on the oscilloscope. Absence of fading of fluorescence after repeated excitation permitted multiple readings of the same microscope field. Almost 100% reproducible results were obtained for the FTA-ABS test with 40 samples. Electronic detection of fluorescence and the high sensitivity obtained with laser excitation raise doubts about the relative value of quantitative immunofluorescence in the FTA-ABS test. PMID:4598221

  20. Ion-enhanced fluorescence staining of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels using bis(8-p-toluidino-1-naphthalenesulfonate).

    PubMed

    Horowitz, P M; Bowman, S

    1987-09-01

    A method for the sensitive fluorescent staining of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gels that extends the applicability and sensitivity of existing procedures has been developed. SDS-protein complexes are able to bind the noncovalent hydrophobic probe, bis(8-p-toluidino-1-naphthalenesulfonate) (bisANS) with an increase in quantum yield that is considerably larger than that observed with the commonly used monomeric form, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (1,8-ANS). The quantum yield of bisANS bound to the SDS-protein complex is greatly enhanced by incubation with one of a number of cations including potassium and barium. The use of bisANS with metal ion enhancements provides a method for staining SDS gels that can be more sensitive than commonly used methods based on the binding of Coomassie blue, and provides a simple and rapid method for the detection and quantitation of proteins. The use of metal ion enhancements also greatly increases the sensitivity of staining methods based on the use of 1,8-ANS. The present method is much more sensitive than previous noncovalent, flourescent, postelectrophoresis stains, but it retains their considerable advantages of speed, simplicity, and the ability to perform secondary procedures on the separated materials. PMID:3425913

  1. Interactions of dissolved humic substances with oppositely charged fluorescent dyes for tracer techniques.

    PubMed

    Hafuka, Akira; Ding, Qing; Yamamura, Hiroshi; Yamada, Koji; Satoh, Hisashi

    2015-11-15

    To investigate interactions between oppositely charged fluorescent dyes and dissolved humic substances, fluorescence quenching of fluorescein and rhodamine 6G with dissolved humic substances was performed. Binding coefficients were obtained by the Stern-Volmer equation. The fluorescence of rhodamine 6G was largely quenched by the addition of humic acid and a non-linear Stern-Volmer plot was obtained. This strong quenching may be caused by the electrostatic interaction between cationic rhodamine 6G and humic acid and strengthened by the hydrophobic repulsion. In contrast, the quenching and interactive effects of dissolved humic substances for fluorescein were relatively weak. PMID:26318652

  2. Multifunctional particles: Magnetic nanocrystals and gold nanorods coated with fluorescent dye-doped silica shells

    SciTech Connect

    Heitsch, Andrew T.; Smith, Danielle K.; Patel, Reken N.; Ress, David; Korgel, Brian A.

    2008-07-15

    Multifunctional colloidal core-shell nanoparticles of magnetic nanocrystals (of iron oxide or FePt) or gold nanorods encapsulated in silica shells doped with the fluorescent dye, Tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)dichlororuthenium(II) hexahydrate (Rubpy) were synthesized. The as-prepared magnetic nanocrystals are initially hydrophobic and were coated with silica using a microemulsion approach, while the as-prepared gold nanorods are hydrophilic and were coated with silica using a Stoeber type of process. Each approach yielded monodisperse nanoparticles with uniform fluorescent dye-doped silica shells. These colloidal heterostructures have the potential to be used as dual-purpose tags-exhibiting a fluorescent signal that could be combined with either dark-field optical contrast (in the case of the gold nanorods), or enhanced contrast in magnetic resonance images (in the case of magnetic nanocrystal cores). The optical and magnetic properties of the fluorescent silica-coated gold nanorods and magnetic nanocrystals are reported. - Graphical abstract: Colloidal gold nanorods and iron platinum and iron oxide nanocrystals were encapsulated with fluorescent dye-doped silica shells using a generic coating strategy. These heterostructures are promising contrast agents for dual-mode medical imaging. Their optical and magnetic properties were studied and are reported here.

  3. Photonic effects on the fluorescence lifetimes of dyes in thin PVA layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prangsma, Jord C.; Molenaar, Robert; Subramaniam, Vinod; Blum, Christian

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we investigate the expected change in fluorescent decay rate when a fluorophore in aqueous solution is moved to a thin spin-coated layer of poly(vinyl alcohol). We take into account the local field effect due to the change in the refractive index of the medium around the fluorophore and the photonic effect due to the layers. The obtained results are compared with experimental results for the organic dye Atto565 and the fluorescent protein mCherry. We find that the effects for the organic dye can be well described with the model, for the fluorescent protein (FP) the model is less accurate. We discuss the possible explanations for this.

  4. Miniaturized side-viewing imaging probe for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM): validation with fluorescence dyes, tissue structural proteins and tissue specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elson, D. S.; Jo, J. A.; Marcu, L.

    2007-05-01

    We report a side viewing fibre-based endoscope that is compatible with intravascular imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). The instrument has been validated through testing with fluorescent dyes and collagen and elastin powders using the Laguerre expansion deconvolution technique to calculate the fluorescence lifetimes. The instrument has also been tested on freshly excised unstained animal vascular tissues.

  5. Miniaturized side-viewing imaging probe for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM): validation with fluorescence dyes, tissue structural proteins and tissue specimens

    PubMed Central

    Elson, D S; Jo, J A

    2007-01-01

    We report a side viewing fibre-based endoscope that is compatible with intravascular imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). The instrument has been validated through testing with fluorescent dyes and collagen and elastin powders using the Laguerre expansion deconvolution technique to calculate the fluorescence lifetimes. The instrument has also been tested on freshly excised unstained animal vascular tissues. PMID:19503759

  6. Fluorescence intensity and anisotropy decays of the DNA stain Hoechst 33342 resulting from one-photon and two-photon excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryczynski, Ignacy; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    1994-08-01

    We studied the steady state and time-resolved fluorescence spectral properties of the DNA stain Hoechst 33342 for one-photon (OPE) and two-photon (TPE) excitation. Hoechst 33342 was found to display a large cross-section for two-photon excitation within the fundamental wavelength range of pyridine 2 and rhodamine 6G dye lasers, 690 to 770 nm and 560 to 630 nm, respectively. The time-resolved measurements show that intensity decays are similar for one- and two-photon excitation. The anisotropy decay measurements of bis-benzimide, 2,5'-bi-1H-benzimidazole, 2'-(4- ethoxphenyl)-5-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl) (HOECHST 33342) in ethanol revealed the same correlation times for two-photon excitation as observed for one-photon excitation. However, the zero-time anisotropies recovered from anisotropy decay measurements are 1.4-fold higher for two-photon excitation than for one-photon excitation. The anisotropy spectra of Hoechst 33342 was examined in glycerol at -20 degree(s)C, revealing limiting values close to the theoretical limits for one-photon (0.4) and two-photon (0.57) excitation. The steady-state anisotropy for one-photon excitation decreases in the shorter wavelength region (R6G dye laser, 280 to 315 nm), but the two-photon anisotropy for 560 to 630 nm excitation remains as high as in the long- wavelength region (690 to 770 nm). This result suggests that one- photon absorption is due to two electronic transitions, but only one transition contributes to the two-photon absorption over the wavelength range from 580 to 770 nm.

  7. Demonstration of Actinomyces and Arachnia species in cervicovaginal smears by direct staining with species-specific fluorescent-antibody conjugate.

    PubMed Central

    Pine, L; Malcolm, G B; Curtis, E M; Brown, J M

    1981-01-01

    For direct observation of microaerophilic actinomycetes by fluorescent antibody, a procedure was developed in which pepsin treatment and rhodamine conjugate of normal serum were used to reduce nonspecific staining in cervicovaginal smears. Actinomyces israelii, Actinomyces naeslundii, and Arachnia propionica were observed in cervicovaginal smears from women who did use and who did not use an intrauterine contraceptive device. A. israelii was found more commonly in women with an intrauterine contraceptive device, but no evidence was obtained that the use of an intrauterine contraceptive device influenced the presence of either A. propionica or A. naeslundii. PMID:6161943

  8. New fluoranthene FLUN-550 as a fluorescent probe for selective staining and quantification of intracellular lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Goel, Atul; Sharma, Ashutosh; Kathuria, Manoj; Bhattacharjee, Arindam; Verma, Ashwni; Mishra, Prabhat R; Nazir, Aamir; Mitra, Kalyan

    2014-02-01

    A new class of live cell permeant, nontoxic fluoranthene-based fluorescent probe (FLUN-550) having a high Stokes shift in aqueous medium has been discovered. It showed selective staining of lipid droplets (LDs, dynamic cytoplasmic organelles) at a low concentration without background noise in in vitro live cell imaging of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, J774 macrophages, MCF7 breast cancer cells, and single-celled, parasitic protozoa Leishmania donovani promastigotes and in vivo nonparasitic soil nematode C. elegans. PMID:24410145

  9. Plasmonic properties and enhanced fluorescence of gold and dye-doped silica nanoparticle aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Nathaniel Scott

    The development of metal-enhanced fluorescence has prompted a great interest in augmenting the photophysical properties of fluorescent molecules with noble metal nanostructures. Our research efforts, outlined in this dissertation, focus on augmenting properties of fluorophores by conjugation with gold nanostructures. The project goals are split into two separate efforts; the enhancement in brightness of fluorophores and long distance non-radiative energy transfer between fluorophores. We believe that interacting dye-doped silica nanoparticles with gold nanoparticles can facilitate both of these phenomena. Our primary research interest is focused on optimizing brightness, as this goal should open a path to studying the second goal of non-radiative energy transfer. The two major challenges to this are constructing suitable nanomaterials and functionalizing them to promote plasmonically active complexes. The synthesis of dye-doped layered silica nanoparticles allows for control over the discrete location of the dye and a substrate that can be surface functionalized. Controlling the exact location of the dye is important to create a silica spacer, which promotes productive interactions with metal nanostructures. Furthermore, the synthesis of silica nanoparticles allows for various fluorophores to be studied in similar environments (removing solvent and other chemo-sensitive issues). Functionalizing the surface of silica nanoparticles allows control over the degree of silica and gold nanoparticle aggregation in solution. Heteroaggregation in solution is useful for producing well-aggregated clusters of many gold around a single silica nanoparticle. The dye-doped surface functionalized silica nanoparticles can than be mixed efficiently with gold nanomaterials. Aggregating multiple gold nanospheres around a single dye-doped silica nanoparticle can dramatically increase the fluorescent brightness of the sample via metal-enhanced fluorescence due to increase plasmonic scattering. Our aim is to promote heteroaggregation with functionalized silica nanoparticles while minimizing homoaggregation of silica-silica or gold-gold species. Reproducible production of multiple gold nanospheres about a dye-doped silica nanoparticle should lead to dramatic fluorescence brightness enhancements in solution. Gold nanorods can potentially be used to establish radiationless energy transfer between hetero dye-doped silica nanoparticles via gold nanorod plasmon mediated FRET by aggregating two different dye-doped silica nanoparticles preferentially at opposite ends of the nanorod. End-cap binding is accomplished by tuning the strength of gold binding ligands that functionalize the surface of the silica nanoparticles. The gold nanorod can then theoretically serve as a waveguide by employing the longitudinal plasmon as a non-radiative energy transfer agent between the two different fluorophores, giving rise to a new ultrafast signaling paradigm. Heteroaggregation of dye-doped silica nanoparticles and gold nanorods can be potentially employed to as nano waveguides. Construction and aggregation of functionalized silica and gold nano-materials provides an opportunity to advance the field of fluorescence. The synthesis of gold nano-particles allows control over their size and shape, which give rise to useful optical and electronic properties. Silica nanoparticles provide a framework allowing control over a requisite distance for increasing beneficial and deceasing non-radiative dye-metal interactions as well fluorophore protection. Our aim is to take advantage of fine-tuned synthetic control of functionalized nanomaterials to realize the great potential of solution based metal-enhanced fluorescence for future applications.

  10. Self-assembled hydrophobin for producing water-soluble and membrane permeable fluorescent dye

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kunpeng; Xiao, Yunjie; Wang, Yanyan; Feng, Yaqing; Chen, Cheng; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Qian; Meng, Shuxian; Wang, Zefang; Yang, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Low water solubility and poor membrane permeability are major disadvantages that compromise applications of most fluorescent dyes. To resolve these problems, herein, using Boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) as a model fluorescent dye, for the first time, we provide a new strategy for the rapid and efficient production of a water-soluble and membrane-permeable dye by mixing with an amphiphilic protein named hydrophobin. Data shows BODIPY could be effectively solubilized and dispersed in 200 μg/mL hydrophobin by simple mixing and sonication. Subsequent experiments indicated that hydrophobin self-assembled into a protein film on the surface of BODIPY forming stable hydrophobin-BODIPY complexes with a size range of 10–30 nm. Furthermore, we demonstrated hydrophobin-functionalized BODIPY are toxicity free to cells. The hydrophobin-BODIPY complex could pass through both the cell plasma membrane and nuclear membrane efficiently. Our work opens a novel route to modify and functionalize fluorescent dyes and may be developed as a general strategy for broadening their applications. PMID:26976627

  11. Self-assembled hydrophobin for producing water-soluble and membrane permeable fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kunpeng; Xiao, Yunjie; Wang, Yanyan; Feng, Yaqing; Chen, Cheng; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Qian; Meng, Shuxian; Wang, Zefang; Yang, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Low water solubility and poor membrane permeability are major disadvantages that compromise applications of most fluorescent dyes. To resolve these problems, herein, using Boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) as a model fluorescent dye, for the first time, we provide a new strategy for the rapid and efficient production of a water-soluble and membrane-permeable dye by mixing with an amphiphilic protein named hydrophobin. Data shows BODIPY could be effectively solubilized and dispersed in 200 μg/mL hydrophobin by simple mixing and sonication. Subsequent experiments indicated that hydrophobin self-assembled into a protein film on the surface of BODIPY forming stable hydrophobin-BODIPY complexes with a size range of 10-30 nm. Furthermore, we demonstrated hydrophobin-functionalized BODIPY are toxicity free to cells. The hydrophobin-BODIPY complex could pass through both the cell plasma membrane and nuclear membrane efficiently. Our work opens a novel route to modify and functionalize fluorescent dyes and may be developed as a general strategy for broadening their applications. PMID:26976627

  12. A new polymerizable fluorescent PET chemosensor of fluoride (F-) based on naphthalimide-thiourea dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaei, Parvaneh; Rouhani, Shohre; Gharanjig, Kamaladin; Ghasemi, Jahanbakhsh

    2012-05-01

    A novel N-allyl-4-amino-substituted 1,8-naphthalimide dye, containing thiourea functional group with intense yellow-green fluorescence was successfully synthesized. Copolymerization was done with styrene. The photophysical characteristics of dye and its copolymer in solution and solid film were investigated in the presence of halide ions. The results reveal that the fluorescence emissions of the monomer dye and also its polymer were 'switched off' in the presence of fluoride ions. The dye showed spectral shifts and intensity changes in the presence of more fluoride ions which lead to detect certain fluoride concentrations of 10-150 mM at visible wavelengths. By adding the fluoride ions, green-yellow to purple color changes occurs and the green fluorescence emission quenches, all of which easily observed by naked eyes. These phenomena are essential for producing a dual responsive chemosensor for fluoride ions. The polymeric sensor, in the film state exhibited a fast response to the fluoride ions.

  13. Using Fluorescent Dyes to Demonstrate Solution-Mixing Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shmaefsky, Brian; Shmaefsky, Mary Jo

    1994-01-01

    Describes a demonstration using a variety of clear solutions in which the instructor asks students whether the solutions appear homogeneous or inadequately mixed. The solutions are then induced to fluoresce with ultraviolet light to provide visible evidence of homogeneity or nonhomogeneity. (PR)

  14. Evaluation of Fungal Burden in Experimental Paracoccidioidomycosis by Using the Fluorescent Dye Blankophor

    PubMed Central

    Nishikaku, Angela Satie; Burger, Eva

    2003-01-01

    The fungal load in organs and blood of susceptible and resistant mice infected with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis was quantitated by using the optical brightener Blankophor and compared with CFU counts. Fluorescent staining of fungal cells proved to be a quick and easy procedure, suitable for evaluation of paracoccidioidomycotic infection. PMID:12843109

  15. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopic study of solvatochromic curcumin dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Digambara; Barakat, Christelle

    2011-09-01

    Curcumin, the main yellow bioactive component of turmeric, has recently acquired attention by chemists due its wide range of potential biological applications as an antioxidant, an anti-inflammatory, and an anti-carcinogenic agent. This molecule fluoresces weakly and poorly soluble in water. In this detailed study of curcumin in thirteen different solvents, both the absorption and fluorescence spectra of curcumin was found to be broad, however, a narrower and simple synchronous fluorescence spectrum of curcumin was obtained at Δ λ = 10-20 nm. Lippert-Mataga plot of curcumin in different solvents illustrated two sets of linearity which is consistent with the plot of Stokes' shift vs. the ET30. When Stokes's shift in wavenumber scale was replaced by synchronous fluorescence maximum in nanometer scale, the solvent polarity dependency measured by λSFSmax vs. Lippert-Mataga plot or ET30 values offered similar trends as measured via Stokes' shift for protic and aprotic solvents for curcumin. Better linear correlation of λSFSmax vs. π* scale of solvent polarity was found compared to λabsmax or λemmax or Stokes' shift measurements. In Stokes' shift measurement both absorption/excitation as well as emission (fluorescence) spectra are required to compute the Stokes' shift in wavenumber scale, but measurement could be done in a very fast and simple way by taking a single scan of SFS avoiding calculation and obtain information about polarity of the solvent. Curcumin decay properties in all the solvents could be fitted well to a double-exponential decay function.

  16. pI-Control in Comparative Fluorescence Gel Electrophoresis (CoFGE) using amphoteric azo dyes

    PubMed Central

    Hanneken, Marina; Šlais, Karel; König, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Amphoteric azo dyes were used for internal control of pI values in Comparative two-dimensional Fluorescence Gel Electrophoresis (CoFGE) [1]. The 2D-gel images of separated Escherichia coli proteins as well as those of colored amphoteric dyes separated by isoelectric focussing are presented. The latter were used to correct for variation in the first electrophoretic dimension and further improve protein coordinate assignment in 2D-gel electrophoresis. Data tables are supplied to demonstrate pI-value calibration and the effect on the assignment of protein spot coordinates. PMID:26217748

  17. pI-Control in Comparative Fluorescence Gel Electrophoresis (CoFGE) using amphoteric azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Hanneken, Marina; Šlais, Karel; König, Simone

    2015-06-01

    Amphoteric azo dyes were used for internal control of pI values in Comparative two-dimensional Fluorescence Gel Electrophoresis (CoFGE) [1]. The 2D-gel images of separated Escherichia coli proteins as well as those of colored amphoteric dyes separated by isoelectric focussing are presented. The latter were used to correct for variation in the first electrophoretic dimension and further improve protein coordinate assignment in 2D-gel electrophoresis. Data tables are supplied to demonstrate pI-value calibration and the effect on the assignment of protein spot coordinates. PMID:26217748

  18. Selective fluorescence functionalization of dye-doped polymerized structures fabricated by direct laser writing (DLW) lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Miguel, Gustavo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Duocastella, Martí; Diaspro, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    The continuous development of the vast arsenal of fabrication techniques is a pivotal factor in the breakthrough of nanotechnology. Although the broad interest is generally focused on the reduction of the dimensions of the fabricated structures, localized functionalization of the nanomaterials emerges as a key factor closely linked to their potential applications. In particular, fabrication of spatially selective fluorescence nanostructures is highly demanded in nanophotonics, as for example in three-dimensional (3D) optical data storage (ODS), where massive storage capacity and fast writing-reading processes are promised. We have developed an innovative method to control the location and intensity of the fluorescence signal in dye-doped photopolymerized structures fabricated with Direct Laser Writing (DLW) lithography. Well-defined fluorescent pixels (area = 0.24 μm2) were written inside a polymer matrix with the help of a femtosecond pulsed laser (multiphoton absorption) via a thermally-induced di-aggregation of a fluorescent dye. Moreover, we have accomplished a fine control of the fluorescence intensity which can increase the storage capacity of ODS systems fabricated with this approach.The continuous development of the vast arsenal of fabrication techniques is a pivotal factor in the breakthrough of nanotechnology. Although the broad interest is generally focused on the reduction of the dimensions of the fabricated structures, localized functionalization of the nanomaterials emerges as a key factor closely linked to their potential applications. In particular, fabrication of spatially selective fluorescence nanostructures is highly demanded in nanophotonics, as for example in three-dimensional (3D) optical data storage (ODS), where massive storage capacity and fast writing-reading processes are promised. We have developed an innovative method to control the location and intensity of the fluorescence signal in dye-doped photopolymerized structures fabricated with Direct Laser Writing (DLW) lithography. Well-defined fluorescent pixels (area = 0.24 μm2) were written inside a polymer matrix with the help of a femtosecond pulsed laser (multiphoton absorption) via a thermally-induced di-aggregation of a fluorescent dye. Moreover, we have accomplished a fine control of the fluorescence intensity which can increase the storage capacity of ODS systems fabricated with this approach. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06071k

  19. Benchtop Antigen Detection Technique using Nanofiltration and Fluorescent Dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Varaljay, Vanessa

    2009-01-01

    The designed benchtop technique is primed to detect bacteria and viruses from antigenic surface marker proteins in solutions, initially water. This inclusive bio-immunoassay uniquely combines nanofiltration and near infrared (NIR) dyes conjugated to antibodies to isolate and distinguish microbial antigens, using laser excitation and spectrometric analysis. The project goals include detecting microorganisms aboard the International Space Station, space shuttle, Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), and human habitats on future Moon and Mars missions, ensuring astronaut safety. The technique is intended to improve and advance water contamination testing both commercially and environmentally as well. Lastly, this streamlined technique poses to greatly simplify and expedite testing of pathogens in complex matrices, such as blood, in hospital and laboratory clinics.

  20. Localized surface plasmon-influenced fluorescence decay in dye-doped metallo-dielectric opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, Dipak; Vijaya, R.

    2016-01-01

    Well-ordered opaline photonic crystals are grown by inward growing self-assembly method from Rhodamine B dye-doped polystyrene colloids. Subsequent to self-assembly, the crystals are infiltrated with gold nanoparticles of 40 nm diameter. Measurements of the stopband features and photoluminescence intensity from these crystals are supplemented by fluorescence decay time analysis. The fluorescence decay times from the dye-doped photonic crystals before and after the infiltration are dramatically different from each other. A lowered fluorescence decay time was observed for the case of gold infiltrated crystal along with an enhanced emission intensity. Double-exponential decay nature of the fluorescence from the dye-doped crystal gets converted into single-exponential decay upon the infiltration of gold nanoparticles due to the resonant radiative process resulting from the overlap of the surface plasmon resonance with the emission spectrum. The influence of localized surface plasmon due to gold nanoparticles on the increase in emission intensity and decrease in decay time of the emitters is established.

  1. Stability of fluorescent labels in PLGA polymeric nanoparticles: Quantum dots versus organic dyes.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Mottaleb, Mona M A; Beduneau, Arnaud; Pellequer, Yann; Lamprecht, Alf

    2015-10-15

    Polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) are currently being investigated for various therapeutic, diagnostic and drug delivery applications. The study of their interactions and fate in biological systems is frequently performed via their fluorescent labeling and following them using fluorescent microscopy. Quantum dots are proposed as stable fluorescent label and compared to other organic dyes (Nile red and DiI) in terms of their entrapment, diffusion in different aqueous or lipophilic media and photostability. In vitro transfer to hydrophilic PBS solution showed that after 8h, 4.2±2.2, 15.5±2.0 and 0.9±0.02% was released from the QDs, NR and DiI nanoparticles, respectively. However, higher diffusion rates were observed in the lipophilic medium chain triglyceride and artificial sebum for all the dyes used. Fluorescent intensity of the three different markers was found to be stable over a period of 24h. Continuous illumination with laser beam using a confocal laser scanning microscopy indicated the superior stability of quantum dots compared to the other organic dyes. Skin permeation experiments have shown that QDs were the most representative marker for the polymeric nanoparticles skin penetration. PMID:26307264

  2. Sentinel lymph nodes detection with an imaging system using Patent Blue V dye as fluorescent tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellier, F.; Steibel, J.; Chabrier, R.; Rodier, J. F.; Pourroy, G.; Poulet, P.

    2013-03-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy is the gold standard to detect metastatic invasion from primary breast cancer. This method can help patients avoid full axillary chain dissection, thereby decreasing the risk of morbidity. We propose an alternative to the traditional isotopic method, to detect and map the sentinel lymph nodes. Indeed, Patent Blue V is the most widely used dye in clinical routine for the visual detection of sentinel lymph nodes. A Recent study has shown the possibility of increasing the fluorescence quantum yield of Patent Blue V, when it is bound to human serum albumin. In this study we present a preclinical fluorescence imaging system to detect sentinel lymph nodes labeled with this fluorescent tracer. The setup is composed of a black and white CCD camera and two laser sources. One excitation source with a laser emitting at 635 nm and a second laser at 785 nm to illuminate the region of interest. The prototype is operated via a laptop. Preliminary experiments permitted to determine the device sensitivity in the ?mol.L-1 range as regards the detection of PBV fluorescence signals. We also present a preclinical evaluation performed on Lewis rats, during which the fluorescence imaging setup detected the accumulation and fixation of the fluorescent dye on different nodes through the skin.

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Far-Red/NIR-Fluorescent BODIPY Dyes, Solid-State Fluorescence, and Application as Fluorescent Tags Attached to Carbon Nano-onions.

    PubMed

    Bartelmess, Juergen; Baldrighi, Michele; Nardone, Valentina; Parisini, Emilio; Buck, David; Echegoyen, Luis; Giordani, Silvia

    2015-06-26

    A series of ?-extended distyryl-substituted boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) derivatives with intense far-red/near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence was synthesized and characterized, with a view to enhance the dye's performance for fluorescence labeling. An enhanced brightness was achieved by the introduction of two methyl substituents in the meso positions on the phenyl group of the BODIPY molecule; these substituents resulted in increased structural rigidity. Solid-state fluorescence was observed for one of the distyryl-substituted BODIPY derivatives. The introduction of a terminal bromo substituent allows for the subsequent immobilization of the BODIPY fluorophore on the surface of carbon nano-onions (CNOs), which leads to potential imaging agents for biological and biomedical applications. The far-red/NIR-fluorescent CNO nanoparticles were characterized by absorption, fluorescence, and Raman spectroscopies, as well as by thermogravimetric analysis, dynamic light scattering, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and confocal microscopy. PMID:26015289

  4. Temporal fluctuations of fluorescence resonance energy transfer between two dyes conjugated to a single protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Taekjip; Ting, Alice Y.; Liang, Joy; Chemla, Daniel S.; Schultz, Peter G.; Weiss, Shimon; Deniz, Ashok A.

    1999-08-01

    Biological molecules together with available labeling chemistries provide an ideal setting to investigate the interaction between two closely spaced dye molecules. The photo-excitation of a donor molecule can be non-radiatively transferred to a near-by acceptor molecule via the induced-dipole-induced-dipole interaction in a distance-dependent manner. In this work, we further elaborate on single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements between two dye molecules attached to a single protein - staphylococcal nuclease molecules [T. Ha, A.Y. Ting, J. Liang, W.B. Caldwell, A.A. Deniz, D.S. Chemla, P.G. Schultz, S. Weiss, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 96 (1999) 893-898]. Temporal fluctuations in the energy transfer signal include: (1) reversible transitions to dark states; (2) irreversible photodestruction; (3) intersystem crossing to and from the triplet state; (4) spectral fluctuations; (5) rotational dynamics of the dyes; and (6) distance changes between the two dyes. To extract biologically relevant information from such measurements, an experimental strategy and data analysis schemes are developed. First, abrupt photophysical events, such as (1)-(3) are identified and removed from the data. The remaining slow, gradual fluctuations in the energy transfer signal are due to spectral shifts, rotational dynamics and distance changes of the dyes. Direct measurements of each dye's spectral fluctuation and rotational dynamics indicate that these, by themselves, cannot fully account for the observed energy transfer fluctuations. It is therefore concluded that inter-dye distance changes must be present as well. The distance and orientational dynamics are shown to be dependent on the binding of the active-site inhibitor (deoxythymidine diphosphate) to the protein. The inhibitor most probably affects the protein's stability and the dye-protein interaction, possibly by amplifying the motion of the linker arm between the fluorophore and the protein.

  5. Enhancement of the fluorescence of triphenylmethane dyes caused by their interaction with nanoparticles from β-diketonate complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sveshnikova, E. B.; Ermolaev, V. L.

    2014-08-01

    We have studied the absorption and fluorescence spectra of Malachite Green and Crystal Violet in aqueous and alcoholic-aqueous solutions in which nanoparticles from Ln(III) and Sc(III) diketonates are formed at concentrations of complexes in a solution of 5-30 μM. We have shown that, if the concentrations of the dyes in the solution are lower than 0.5 μM, dye molecules are incorporated completely into nanoparticles or are precipitated onto their surface. The fluorescence intensity of these incorporated and adsorbed Malachite Green and Crystal Violet molecules increases by several orders of magnitude compared to the solution, which takes place because of a sharp increase in the fluorescence quantum yields of these dyes and at the expense of the sensitization of their fluorescence upon energy transfer from β-diketonate complexes entering into the composition of nanoparticles. We have shown that, if there is no concentration quenching, the values of the fluorescence quantum yield of the Crystal Violet dye incorporated into nanoparticles and adsorbed on their surface vary from 0.06 to 0.13, i.e., are close to the fluorescence quantum yield of this dye in solid solutions of sucrose acetate at room temperature. The independence of the fluorescence quantum yield of Crystal Violet on the morphology of nanoparticles testifies to a high binding constant of complexes and the dye. The considerable fluorescence quantum yields of triphenylmethane dyes in nanoparticles and sensitization of their fluorescence by nanoparticle-forming complexes make it possible to determine the concentration of these dyes in aqueous solutions by the luminescent method in the range of up to 1 nM.

  6. Hierarchical growth of fluorescent dye aggregates in water by fusion of segmented nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Grl, Daniel; Stepanenko, Vladimir; Wrthner, Frank

    2014-01-27

    Dye aggregates are becoming increasingly attractive for diverse applications, in particular as organic electronic and sensor materials. However, the growth processes of such aggregates from molecular to small assemblies up to nanostructures is still not properly understood, limiting the design of materials' functional properties. Here we elucidate the supramolecular growth process for an outstanding class of functional dyes, perylene bisimides (PBIs), by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our studies reveal a sequential growth of amphiphilic PBI dyes from nanorods into nanoribbons in water by fusion and fission processes. More intriguingly, the fluorescence observed for higher hierarchical order nanoribbons was enhanced relative to that of nanorods. Our results provide insight into the relationship between molecular, morphological, and functional properties of self-assembled organic materials. PMID:24352910

  7. Targeting tumor hypoxia: a third generation 2-nitroimidazole-indocyanine dye-conjugate with improved fluorescent yield.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feifei; Zanganeh, Saeid; Mohammad, Innus; Dietz, Christopher; Abuteen, Akram; Smith, Michael B; Zhu, Quing

    2015-12-14

    Tumor hypoxia is associated with the rapid proliferation and growth of malignant tumors, and the ability to detect tumor hypoxia is important for predicting tumor response to anti-cancer treatments. We have developed a class of dye-conjugates that are related to indocyanine green (ICG, ) to target tumor hypoxia, based on in vivo infrared fluorescence imaging using nitroimidazole moieties linked to indocyanine fluorescent dyes. We previously reported that linking 2-nitroimidazole to an indocyanine dicarboxylic acid dye derivative () using an ethanolamine linker (ethanolamine-2-nitroimidazole-ICG, ), led to a dye-conjugate that gave promising results for targeting cancer hypoxia in vivo. Structural modification of the dye conjugate replaced the ethanolamine unit with a piperazineacetyl unit and led a second generation dye conjugate, piperzine-2-nitroimidazole-ICG (). This second generation dye-conjugate showed improved targeting of tumor hypoxia when compared with . Based on the hypothesis that molecules with more planar and rigid structures have a higher fluorescence yield, as they could release less absorbed energy through molecular vibration or collision, we have developed a new 2-nitroimidazole ICG conjugate, , with two carbon atoms less in the polyene linker. Dye-conjugate was prepared from our new dye (), and coupled to 2-nitroimidazole using a piperazine linker to produce this third-generation dye-conjugate. Spectral measurements showed that the absorption/emission wavelengths of 657/670 were shifted ?100 nm from the second-generation hypoxia dye of 755/780 nm. Its fluorescence quantum yield was measured to be 0.467, which is about 5 times higher than that of (0.083). In vivo experiments were conducted with balb/c mice and showed more than twice the average in vivo fluorescence intensity in the tumor beyond two hours post retro-orbital injection as compared with . These initial results suggest that may significantly improve in vivo tumor hypoxia targeting. PMID:26403518

  8. Critical tonicity determination of sperm using fluorescent staining and flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Noiles, E.E.; Ruffing, N.A.; Kleinhans, F.W.; Mark, L.A.; Watson, P.F.; Critser, J.K. ); Horstman, L. . School of Veterinary Medicine); Mazur, P. )

    1990-01-01

    The use of cryopreserved, rather than fresh, mammalian semen for artificial insemination confers several important medical and/or economic advantages. However, current methods for cryopreservation of both human and bovine spermatozoa result in approximately only a 50% survival rate with thawing, obviously reducing the fertilizing capacity of the semen. A primary consideration during the cooling process is to avoid intracellular ice crystal formation with its lethal consequences to the cell. Current techniques achieve this by controlling the cooling rate. Computation of the time necessary for this dehydration, and hence, the cooling rate, is dependent upon knowledge of the water permeability coefficient (L{sub {rho}}) and its activation energy. The fluorophore, 6-carboxyfluoroscein diacetate (CFDA), which is nonfluorescent, readily crosses the intact plasma membrane. Intracellular esterases hydrolyze CFDA to 6-carboxyfluoroscein, a fluorescent, membrane-impermeable fluorophore. Consequently, spermatozoa with intact plasma membranes fluoresce bright green (Garner et. al., 1986), but those with disrupted membranes do not. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to use loss of CFDA fluorescence to determine the osmolality at which 50% of the spermatozoa will swell and lyse (critical tonicity, CT). These data will then be used to determine the L{sub {rho}} and its activation energy for sperm, thus increasing the knowledge available in cellular cryopreservation. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Measurement of atmospheric OH by titration of near-IR fluorescent dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betterton, Eric A.; Gast, Karl

    1994-01-01

    Recent research has shown that certain polymethine dyes can be detected at ultratrace levels (greater than or equal to 6x10(exp -14) M) in solution by fluorimetry. These detection limits are possible because of the inherent sensitivity of fluorescence techniques, because the dyes fluoresce in the near infrared region where background interference is negligible, and because powerful infrared diode lasers are now available to improve the signal to noise ratio. Other work has shown that the hydroxyl radical destroys the ability of polymethine dyes to fluoresce. These observations form the basis for a new hydroxyl radical detector that is essentially a fluorometric titrator. Theoretically, the detector should show an acceptable sensitivity and response time. Assuming that the atmospheric HO concentration is about 10(exp -11) moles m(exp -3) (i.e. 10(exp 6) molecules cm(exp -3)), then 10 L of air 'titrated' with 20 mL of 10(exp -11) M dye solution (an easily detected concentration) should result in a drop in the fluorescent signal of 50 percent - a readily detectable change. At a flow rate of 3 L min(exp -1) the sampling time would be 3 minutes. The biggest potential problem is selectivity: other oxidants may also cause the fluorescence signal to be lost. The chemistry of polymethine dyes has not been studied in detail and so no quantitative data are available. However, a survey of the literature suggests that in general HO should react up to six orders of magnitude faster than HO2 and other radicals such as RO2 and RO. It should also react much more rapidly than H2O2 and O3. Thus it may be possible to discriminate kinetically against potential interfering substances. It was shown in the laboratory that 10(exp -4) M H2O2 has little effect on the absorption spectrum of the dye IR125 over a period of hours but that the band at 780 nm is slowly lost in water over a period of days even under argon in the dark. By contrast, DMSO solutions of IR125 are stable.

  10. DO-sensing based on enhancement of cladding fluorescence in dye-doped plastic fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnoi, Gargi; Morisawa, Masayuki; Muto, Shinzo

    1998-09-01

    A new technique for the optical sensing of dissolved oxygen (DO) is proposed here. It is based on the enhancement in fluorescence yield of TPP dye at (lambda) equals 656 nm, when excited by He-Cd blue laser of (lambda) equals 441 nm in the presence of dissolved oxygen. The sensor head was fabricated by cladding the ARTON fiber core with the poly-4-methyl-1- pentene polymer matrix suitably doped with Tetraphenylporphine dye. This sensor head, when placed in a test chamber and end-pumped by He-Cd laser, generates the intense fluorescence at 656 nm. Its intensity was noticed to increase with increasing the amount of DO. A theoretical model of the sensor response was designed and is also discussed.

  11. Phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence properties of fluorone dyes in bio-related films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penzkofer, ?.; Tyagi, A.; Slyusareva, E.; Sizykh, A.

    2010-12-01

    The phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence behaviour of the fluorone dyes disodium fluorescein (FL, uranine), 4,5-dibromofluorescein (DBF), eosin Y (EO), erythrosine B (ER), and rose bengal (RB) in bio-films of gelatine, starch, and chitosan at room temperature is studied. Phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence quantum yields and lifetimes were measured. The singlet-triplet dynamics is described and applied to the fluorone dyes for parameter extraction. For uranine films at room temperature no phosphorescence could be resolved. The efficiency of singlet-triplet intersystem crossing increased in the order ? ISC(DBF) < ? ISC(EO) < ? ISC(ER) < ? ISC(RB) due to the heavy atom effect on spin-orbit coupling. The phosphorescence quantum yields increased in the order ? P(DBF) < ? P(EO) < ? P(RB) < ? P(ER). The phosphorescence lifetimes followed the order ? P(DBF) > ? P(EO) > ? P(ER) > ? P(RB).

  12. Organic dye penetration quantification into a dental composite resin cured by LED system using fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizarelli, Rosane de Fátima Zanirato; Silva, Maciel E., Jr.; Lins, Emery C. C. C.; Costa, Mardoqueu M.; Pelino, José Eduardo P.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2007-02-01

    A major characteristic of LEDs systems is the lower heat emission related with the kind of light generation and spectral emission band. Material temperature during photoactivation can promote different photocuring performance. Organic dye penetration could be a trace to identify the efficacy of photocured composite resin. A new method using fluorescent spectroscopy through digital image evaluation was developed in this study. In order to understand if there is a real influence of material temperature during the photoactivation procedure of a dental restorative material, a hybrid composite resin (Z250, 3M-Espe, USA) and 3 light sources, halogen lamp (510 mW/cm2) and two LED systems 470+/-10nm (345 and 1000 mW/cm2) under different temperatures and intensities were used. One thousand and five hundred samples under different associations between light sources and temperatures (0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 °C were tested and immediately kept in 6G rodamin dye solution. Dye penetration was evaluated through fluorescent spectroscopy recorded by digital image data. Pixels in gray scale showed the percentage penetration of organic dye into the composite resin mass. Time and temperature were statistically significant (p<0.05) through the ANOVA statistical test. The lowest penetration value was with 60 seconds and 25 °C. Time and temperature are important factors to promote a homogeneous structure polymerized composite resin more than the light source type, halogen or LEDs system.

  13. An assessment of the potential adverse properties of fluorescent tracer dyes used for groundwater tracing.

    PubMed

    Field, M S; Wilhelm, R G; Quinlan, J F; Aley, T J

    1995-10-01

    The potential ecotoxicity of fluorescent dyes used in tracing, and their possible effects on human health, were evaluated by reviewing available toxicological information for 12 dyes - fluorescein, Lissamine Flavine FF, Rhodamine WT, Rhodamine B, Sulpho Rhodamine G, Sulpho Rhodamine B, eosin, pyranine, Phorwite BBH Pure, Tinopal 5BM GX, Tinopal CBS-X, and Diphenyl Brilliant Flavine 7GFF - and a dye-intermediate, amino G acid. This evaluation used available toxicological information, test data on analogous substances, and mathematical expressions for biological activity. Based on set criteria for human health and acute ecotoxicity, the evaluation indicated that these tracers have low to moderate levels of concern. The use of these tracers for the study of groundwater flow is appropriate if consideration is given to the overall human health and environmental effects. Their use in the environment requires tracer concentrations not exceeding 1-2 mg 1(-1) persisting for a period in excess of 24 h in the groundwater at the point of groundwater withdrawal or discharge. A simple calculated potential dose was used in a comparison of the estimated acute toxicity of Rhodamine WT in rats to the known acute oral toxic dose in humans for several known acutely toxic chemicals. This comparison showed that none of the fluorescent dyes evaluated would present an acutely toxic threat at or substantially above the recommended 2 mg 1(-1) concentration. PMID:24197914

  14. Dye-Specific Wavelength Offsets to Resolve Spectrally Overlapping and Co-Localized Two-Photon Induced Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Almlie, C Kyle; Hsiao, Austen; Burrows, Sean M

    2016-01-19

    The fundamentally important fluorescent imaging has one major limitation, resolution of over three dyes. This limitation is in part due to the overlap of the broad emission profile of each of the emitters used in fluorescence detection. The overlapping emission contaminates each emitter's detection channel, referred to as cross-talk. To reduce fluorescence cross-talk for two photon applications, we present an innovative Two-Photon-Dye-Specific Excitation-Emission Offset (TP-DSO) method. TP-DSO selectively detects each dye by synchronously scanning the excitation and emission wavelengths at defined wavelength offsets. This technique advances multicolor analysis significantly by resolving dyes with highly overlapping spectral profiles. We identified three benefits: reduced excitation spectral bandwidth, reduced emission cross-talk between colocalized emitters with closely overlapping fluorescence, and validated use of thin-film variable optical emission filters for tuning the bandwidth and center wavelength. TP-DSO will advance multicolor analysis for many applications. PMID:26695340

  15. Fluorescence quenching and photocatalytic degradation of textile dyeing waste water by silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavitha, S. R.; Umadevi, M.; Janani, S. R.; Balakrishnan, T.; Ramanibai, R.

    2014-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) of different sizes have been prepared by chemical reduction method and characterized using UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Fluorescence spectral analysis showed that the quenching of fluorescence of textile dyeing waste water (TDW) has been found to decrease with decrease in the size of the Ag NPs. Experimental results show that the silver nanoparticles can quench the fluorescence emission of adsorbed TDW effectively. The fluorescence interaction between Ag NPs (acceptor) and TDW (donor) confirms the Frster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) mechanism. Long range dipole-dipole interaction between the excited donor and ground state acceptor molecules is the dominant mechanism responsible for the energy transfer. Furthermore, photocatalytic degradation of TDW was measured spectrophotometrically by using silver as nanocatalyst under UV light illumination. The kinetic study revealed that synthesized Ag NPs was found to be effective in degrading TDW.

  16. Fluorescence quenching and photocatalytic degradation of textile dyeing waste water by silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, S R; Umadevi, M; Janani, S R; Balakrishnan, T; Ramanibai, R

    2014-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) of different sizes have been prepared by chemical reduction method and characterized using UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Fluorescence spectral analysis showed that the quenching of fluorescence of textile dyeing waste water (TDW) has been found to decrease with decrease in the size of the Ag NPs. Experimental results show that the silver nanoparticles can quench the fluorescence emission of adsorbed TDW effectively. The fluorescence interaction between Ag NPs (acceptor) and TDW (donor) confirms the Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) mechanism. Long range dipole-dipole interaction between the excited donor and ground state acceptor molecules is the dominant mechanism responsible for the energy transfer. Furthermore, photocatalytic degradation of TDW was measured spectrophotometrically by using silver as nanocatalyst under UV light illumination. The kinetic study revealed that synthesized Ag NPs was found to be effective in degrading TDW. PMID:24632164

  17. Near-Infrared Emitting Squaraine Dyes with High 2PA Cross Sections for Multiphoton Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Hyo-Yang; Yao, Sheng; Wang, Xuhua; Belfield, Kevin D.

    2012-01-01

    Designed to achieve high two-photon absorptivity, new near infrared (NIR) emitting squaraine dyes, (E)-2-(1-(2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl)-5-(3,4,5-trimethoxystyryl)-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-4-(1-(2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl)-5-(3,4,5-trimethoxystyryl)-2H-pyrrolium-2-ylidene)-3-oxocyclobut-1-enolate (1) and (Z)-2-(4-(dibutylamino)-2-hydroxyphenyl)-4-(4-(dibutyliminio)-2-hydroxycyclohexa-2,5-dienylidene)-3-oxocyclobut-1-enolate (2) were synthesized and characterized. Their linear photophysical properties were investigated via UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy in various solvents, while their nonlinear photophysical properties were investigated using a combination of two-photon induced fluorescence and open aperture z-scan methods. Squaraine 1 exhibited a high two-photon absorption (2PA) cross section (δ2PA), ~ 20,000 GM at 800 nm, and high photostability with the photochemical decomposition quantum yield one order of magnitude lower than Cy 5, a commercially available pentamethine cyanine NIR dye. The cytotoxicity of the squaraine dyes were evaluated in HCT 116 and COS 7 cell lines to assess the potential of these probes for biomedical imaging. The viability of both cell lines was maintained above 80% at dye concentrations up to 30 μM, indicating good biocompatibility of the probes. Finally, one-photon fluorescence microscopy (1PFM) and two-photon fluorescence microscopy (2PFM) imaging was accomplished after incubation of micelle-encapsulated squaraine probes with HCT 116 and COS 7 cells, demonstrating their potential in 2PFM bioimaging. PMID:22591003

  18. Design and Synthesis of Efficient Fluorescent Dyes for Incorporation into DNA Backbone and Biomolecule Detection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Li, Alexander D. Q.

    2008-01-01

    We report here the design and synthesis of a series of ?-conjugated fluorescent dyes with D-A-D (D: donor; A: Acceptor), D-?-D, A-?-A, and D-?-A for applications as the signaling motif in biological-synthetic hybrid foldamers for DNA detection. Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons (HWE) reaction and Knoevenagel condensation were demonstrated as the optimum ways for construction of long ?-conjugated systems. Such rod-like chromophores have distinct advantages, as their fluorescence properties are not quenched by the presence of DNA. To be incorporated into the backbone of DNA, the chromophores need to be reasonably soluble in organic solvent for solid-phase synthesis, and therefore a strategy of using flexible tetra(ethylene glycol) (TEG) linkers at either end of these rod-like dyes were developed. The presence of TEG facilitates the protection of the chain-growing hydroxyl group with DMTrCl (dimethoxy trityl chloride) as well as the activation of the coupling step with phosphoramidite chemistry on an automated DNA synthesizer. To form fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) pairs, six synthetic chromophores with blue to red fluorescence have been developed and those with orthogonal fluorescent emission were chosen for incorporation into DNA-chromophore hybrid foldamers. PMID:17508711

  19. Selective fluorescence functionalization of dye-doped polymerized structures fabricated by direct laser writing (DLW) lithography.

    PubMed

    de Miguel, Gustavo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Duocastella, Mart; Diaspro, Alberto

    2015-12-21

    The continuous development of the vast arsenal of fabrication techniques is a pivotal factor in the breakthrough of nanotechnology. Although the broad interest is generally focused on the reduction of the dimensions of the fabricated structures, localized functionalization of the nanomaterials emerges as a key factor closely linked to their potential applications. In particular, fabrication of spatially selective fluorescence nanostructures is highly demanded in nanophotonics, as for example in three-dimensional (3D) optical data storage (ODS), where massive storage capacity and fast writing-reading processes are promised. We have developed an innovative method to control the location and intensity of the fluorescence signal in dye-doped photopolymerized structures fabricated with Direct Laser Writing (DLW) lithography. Well-defined fluorescent pixels (area = 0.24 ?m(2)) were written inside a polymer matrix with the help of a femtosecond pulsed laser (multiphoton absorption) via a thermally-induced di-aggregation of a fluorescent dye. Moreover, we have accomplished a fine control of the fluorescence intensity which can increase the storage capacity of ODS systems fabricated with this approach. PMID:26572098

  20. Staining proteins in gels.

    PubMed

    Sasse, Joachim; Gallagher, Sean R

    2003-08-01

    This unit describes protocols for detecting protein in a gel by either Coomassie blue staining or silver staining. The former is easier and more rapid; however, silver staining methods are considerably more sensitive and thus can be used to detect smaller amounts of protein. Alternate rapid staining procedures are provided for each method and a support protocol describes how to photograph stained gels. Fluorescent staining is a popular alternative to traditional staining procedures, mainly because it is more sensitive than Coomassie staining, and often as sensitive as silver staining. Staining of proteins in SDS-polyacrylamide gels is described, and an alternate protocol details variations in the procedure for proteins in nondenaturing gels. A final support protocol describes the photography of fluorescently stained proteins. PMID:18265316

  1. Cyclopenta[b]naphthalene cyanoacrylate dyes: Synthesis and evaluation as fluorescent molecular rotors

    PubMed Central

    Kocsis, Laura S.; Elbel, Kristyna M.; Hardigree, Billie A.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the design, synthesis and fluorescent profile of a family of environment-sensitive dyes in which a dimethylamino (donor) group is conjugated to a cyanoacrylate (acceptor) unit via a cyclopenta[b]naphthalene ring system. This assembly satisfies the typical D-π-A motif of a fluorescent molecular rotor and exhibits solvatochromic and viscosity-sensitive fluorescence emission. The central naphthalene ring system of these dyes was synthesized via a novel intramolecular dehydrogenative dehydro-Diels-Alder (IDDDA) reaction that permits incorporation of the donor and acceptor groups in variable positions around the aromatic core. A bathochromic shift of excitation and emission peaks was observed with increasing solvent polarity but the dyes exhibited a complex emission pattern with a second red emission band when dissolved in nonpolar solvents. Consistent with other known molecular rotors, the emission intensity increased with increasing viscosity. Interestingly, closer spatial proximity between the donor and the acceptor groups led to decreased viscosity sensitivity combined with an increased quantum yield. This observation indicates that structural hindrance of intramolecular rotation dominates when the donor and acceptor groups are in close proximity. The examined compounds give insight into how excited state intramolecular rotation can be influenced by both the solvent and the chemical structure. PMID:25614187

  2. OH detection by near-infrared fluorescence quenching of a polymethine dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gast, Karl Frederick

    The development and investigation of a new technique for measuring tropospheric concentrations of hydroxyl radicals (OH) is presented. The technique is based on the near-infrared fluorescence of IR125 which is quenched upon reaction with OH. IR125, is shown to react with OH, and be sufficiently less reactive with other tropospheric oxidants that when exposed to tropospheric air samples, changes in the dye fluorescence are related to the ambient OH concentration. A near-infrared fluorimeter was constructed to determine IR125 concentrations. Detection of 10-12 M IR125 in solution was obtained. This sensitivity allows observation of changes in IR125 concentrations due to reaction with typical tropospheric OH concentrations. Changes in the fluorescence of IR125 when sampling the ambient air using dye impregnated quartz wool cartridges were shown to follow predicted OH concentrations for the observed environmental conditions. Photodecomposition by sunlight and reaction with other, longer lived, oxidants were accounted for in determining the IR125 response to OH. An OH source of known concentration to calibrate the IR125 response based on the photolysis of HONO or H2O2 was constructed. A photochemical computer model developed and used to determine the steady-state OH concentrations was validated by the successful prediction of concentrations of some cogenerated compounds. This OH source was not compatible with the sampling technique using dye impregnated quartz wool cartridges, because of the overwhelming interference caused by suspected heterogeneous reactions of the precursors. Absolute calibration remains to be completed.

  3. Pyrazole-substituted Near-infrared Cyanine Dyes Exhibit pH-dependent Fluorescence Lifetime Properties

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeran; Berezin, Mikhail Y.; Tang, Rui; Zhegalova, Natalia; Achilefu, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Near-infrared heptamethine cyanine dye is functionalized with pyrazole derivatives at the meso-position to induce pH-dependent photophysical properties. The presence of pyrazole unsubstituted at 1-position is essential to induce pH-dependent fluorescence intensity and lifetime changes of these dyes. Replacement of meso-chloro group of cyanine dye IR820 with 1N-unsubstituted pyrazole resulted in the pH-dependent fluorescence lifetime changes from 0.93 ns in neutral media to 1.27 ns in acidic media in DMSO. Time resolved emission spectra (TRES) revealed that at lower pH, the pyrazole consists of fluorophores with two distinct lifetimes, which corresponds to pH sensitive and non-pH sensitive species. In contrast, 1N-substituted pyrazoles do not exhibit pH response, suggesting excited state electron transfer as the mechanism of pH-dependent fluorescence lifetime sensitivity for this class of compounds. PMID:23094959

  4. Boron difluoride complexes of 2‧-hydroxychalcones and curcuminoids as fluorescent dyes for photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Aléo, Anthony; Felouat, Abdellah; Fages, Frédéric

    2015-03-01

    The field of fluorescent boron complexes has witnessed tremendous developments in recent years. In that context, we have investigated two series of boron difluoride complexes based on 2‧-hydroxychalcone and curcuminoid ligands that represent naturally occurring pigment structures. The dyes display significantly large Stokes shift values, indicating that an ICT state is involved as lower-energy state in the singlet manifold. Remarkably they are also fluorescent in the solid-state, with emission wavelengths usually in the visible and mainly in the near infrared (NIR). It is especially intriguing that those dyes experience strong π-interactions in the crystal phase. We have observed that the formation of those highly stacked structures was not detrimental to solid-state emission and could even be exploited for the generation of efficient NIR emitters. For example, the boron complexes of curcuminoid ligands can be used to generate NIR fluorescent organic nanoparticles with large cross sections for two-photon absorption. The design of organic dyes displaying NIR emission in solution or in the solid-state remains challenging for applications in bioimaging and organic photonics. Invited talk at the 7th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology IWAMSN2014, 2-6 November, 2014, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  5. Development of an image processing support system based on fluorescent dye to prevent elderly people with dementia from wandering.

    PubMed

    Nishigaki, Yutaka; Tanaka, Kentaro; Kim, Juhyon; Nakajima, Kazuki

    2013-01-01

    The wandering of elderly people with dementia is a significant behavioral problem and is a heavy burden on caregivers in residential and nursing homes. Thus, warning systems have been developed to prevent elderly people with dementia from leaving the premises. Some of these systems use radio waves. However, systems based on radio waves present several practical problems. For instance, the transmitter must be carried and may become lost; in addition, the battery of the transmitter must be changed. To solve these problems, we developed a support system that prevents elderly people with dementia from wandering. The system employs image processing technology based on fluorescent dye. The composition of the support system can be described as follows: fluorescent dye is painted in a simple shape on the clothes of an elderly person. The fluorescent color becomes visible by irradiation with a long wavelength of ultraviolet light. In the present paper, the relationship between the color of the dye and the cloth was investigated. A 3D video camera was used to acquire a 3D image and detect the simple shape. As a preliminary experiment, 3 colors (red, green and blue) of fluorescent dye were applied to cloths of 9 different colors. All fluorescent colors were detected on 6 of the cloths, but red and blue dye could not be detected on the other 3 cloths. In contrast, green dye was detectable on all 9 of the cloths. Additionally, we determined whether green dye could be detected in an actual environment. A rectangular shaped patch of green fluorescent dye was painted on the shoulder area of a subject, from the scapula to the clavicle. As a result, the green dye was detected on all 9 different colored cloths. PMID:24111431

  6. Staining proteins in gels.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Sean; Chakavarti, Deb

    2008-01-01

    Following separation by electrophoretic methods, proteins in a gel can be detected by several staining methods. This unit describes protocols for detecting proteins by four popular methods. Coomassie blue staining is an easy and rapid method. Silver staining, while more time consuming, is considerably more sensitive and can thus be used to detect smaller amounts of protein. Fluorescent staining is a popular alternative to traditional staining procedures, mainly because it is more sensitive than Coomassie staining, and is often as sensitive as silver staining. Staining of proteins with SYPRO Orange and SYPRO Ruby are also demonstrated here. PMID:19066521

  7. The study of polyplex formation and stability by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of SYBR Green I-stained DNA.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Cosimo; Pezzoli, Daniele; Malloggi, Chiara; Candeo, Alessia; Capelli, Giulio; Bassi, Andrea; Volonterio, Alessandro; Taroni, Paola; Candiani, Gabriele

    2014-12-01

    Polyplexes are nanoparticles formed by the self-assembly of DNA/RNA and cationic polymers specifically designed to deliver exogenous genetic material to cells by a process called transfection. There is a general consensus that a subtle balance between sufficient extracellular protection and intracellular release of nucleic acids is a key factor for successful gene delivery. Therefore, there is a strong need to develop suitable tools and techniques for enabling the monitoring of the stability of polyplexes in the biological environment they face during transfection. In this work we propose time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with SYBR Green I-DNA dye as a reliable tool for the in-depth characterization of the DNA/vector complexation state. As a proof of concept, we provide essential information on the assembly and disassembly of complexes formed between DNA and each of three cationic polymers, namely a novel promising chitosan-graft-branched polyethylenimine copolymer (Chi-g-bPEI), one of its building block 2 kDa bPEI and the gold standard transfectant 25 kDa bPEI. Our results highlight the higher information content provided by the time-resolved studies of SYBR Green I/DNA, as compared to conventional steady state measurements of ethidium bromide/DNA that enabled us to draw relationships among fluorescence lifetime, polyplex structural changes and transfection efficiency. PMID:25308511

  8. Same day sputum smear microscopy for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis: Ziehl-Neelsen versus fluorescent staining

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, T. Jaya; Selvaraj, R.; Sharma, Y. V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sputum smear microscopy is the main tool for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Limited sensitivity of smear microscopy and patient dropouts (PDs) are the important obstacles of national TB control programs. Objectives: (1) To assess the diagnostic utility of the same day (SS2) approach (2) To compare the smear results of the spot morning (SM) and the SS2 approaches. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in the Department of Microbiology, GSL Medical College, Rajahmundry, Andhra Pradesh, India from January 2011 to February 2015. Three sputum samples were collected [spot (S), second spot (S2) 1 h after S, and morning sample (M)] from the volunteers. The sputum smears were stained by Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN), modified ZN (MZN), and fluorescent staining (FS) techniques and the results were pooled and compared under SM and SS2 approaches. Results: Of the 3,186 study participants, sputum smear positivity (SSP) for SM approach was 9.6% and 10.8% and for SS2 approach, it was 9.4% and 10.6%, respectively, with ZN and FS and the results were statistically insignificant (Mann-Whitney U test, P > 0.05). Conclusion: Technically SSP was similar for both the approaches and no improvement was observed with the SS2 approach. Hence, there is an urgent need to improve SSP. PMID:26985410

  9. Quantification of AAV particle titers by infrared fluorescence scanning of coomassie-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Kohlbrenner, Erik; Henckaerts, Els; Rapti, Kleopatra; Gordon, Ronald E; Linden, R Michael; Hajjar, Roger J; Weber, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors have gained increasing attention as gene delivery vehicles in basic and preclinical studies as well as in human gene therapy trials. Especially for the latter two-for both safety and therapeutic efficacy reasons-a detailed characterization of all relevant parameters of the vector preparation is essential. Two important parameters that are routinely used to analyze recombinant AAV vectors are (1) the titer of viral particles containing a (recombinant) viral genome and (2) the purity of the vector preparation, most commonly assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) followed by silver staining. An important, third parameter, the titer of total viral particles, that is, the combined titer of both genome-containing and empty viral capsids, is rarely determined. Here, we describe a simple and inexpensive method that allows the simultaneous assessment of both vector purity and the determination of the total viral particle titer. This method, which was validated by comparison with established methods to determine viral particle titers, is based on the fact that Coomassie Brilliant Blue, when bound to proteins, fluoresces in the infrared spectrum. Viral samples are separated by SDS-PAGE followed by Coomassie Brilliant Blue staining and gel analysis with an infrared laser-scanning device. In combination with a protein standard, our method allows the rapid and accurate determination of viral particle titers simultaneously with the assessment of vector purity. PMID:22816378

  10. Blood analyte sensing using fluorescent dye-loaded red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Sarah C.; Shao, Xiaole; Cooley, Nicholas; Milanick, Mark A.; Glass, Timothy E.; Meissner, Kenith E.

    2014-02-01

    Measurement of blood analytes provides crucial information about a patient's health. Some such analytes, such as glucose in the case of diabetes, require long-term or near-continuous monitoring for proper disease management. However, current monitoring techniques are far from ideal: multiple-per-day finger stick tests are inconvenient and painful for the patient; implantable sensors have short functional life spans (i.e., 3-7 days). Due to analyte transporters on red blood cell (RBC) membranes that equilibrate intracellular and extracellular analyte levels, RBCs serve as an attractive alternative for encapsulating analyte sensors. Once reintroduced to the blood stream, the functionalized RBCs may continue to live for the remainder of their life span (120 days for humans). They are biodegradable and biocompatible, thereby eliminating the immune system response common for many implanted devices. The proposed sensing system utilizes the ability of the RBCs to swell in response to a decrease in the osmolarity of the extracellular solution. Just before lysis, they develop small pores on the scale of tens of nanometers. While at low temperature, analyte-sensitive dyes in the extracellular solution diffuse into the perforated RBCs and become entrapped upon restoration of temperature and osmolarity. Since the fluorescent signal from the entrapped dye reports on changes in the analyte level of the extracellular solution via the RBC transporters, interactions between the RBCs and the dye are critical to the efficacy of this technique. In this work, we study the use of a near infrared pH sensitive dye encapsulated within RBCs and assess the ability to measure dye fluorescence in vivo.

  11. Self-quenching DNA probes based on aggregation of fluorescent dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Gabriela; Muller, Matthias; Hafner, Bernhard; Habl, Gregor; Nolte, Oliver; Marme, Nicole; Knemeyer, Jens-Peter

    2005-04-01

    Here we present a novel class of self-quenching, double-labeled DNA probes based on the formation of non fluorescent H-type dye dimers. We therefore investigated the aggregation behavior of the red-absorbing oxazine derivative MR121 and found a dimerization constant of about 3000 M-1. This dye was successfully used to develop hairpin-structured as well as linear self-quenching DNA probes that report the presence of the target DNA by an increase of the fluorescence intensity by a factor of 3 to 12. Generally fluorescence quenching of the hairpin-structure probes is more efficient compared to the linear probes, whereas the kinetic of the fluorescence increase is significantly slower. The new probes were used for the identification of different mycobacteria and their antibiotic resistant species. As a test system a probe for the identification of a DNA sequence specific for the Mycobacterium xenopi was synthesized differing from the sequence of the Mycobacterium fortuitum by 6 nucleotides. Furthermore we developed a method for the discrimination between the sequences of the wild type and an antibiotic resistant species of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Both sequences differ by just 2 nucleotides and were detected specifically by the use of competing olignonucleotides.

  12. Detection of acid moisture in photovoltaic modules using a dual wavelength pH-sensitive fluorescent dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaka, Takashi; Iwami, Kentaro; Taguchi, Atsushi; Umeda, Norihiro; Masuda, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    The formation of acetic acid via the penetration of moisture into ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) in photovoltaic (PV) modules is cited as the main reason for PV modules degradation. Currently, there is no effective method for detecting acetic moisture in PV modules. We proposed a simple method for detecting acid moisture in PV modules using a dual-wavelength pH-sensitive dye that measures pH by the ratio of the intensities of two peaks in the fluorescence spectra of the dye. We detected the pH change caused by acetic acid with the change in the intensity ratio of the fluorescence spectra of the dried dye. Furthermore, we observed that the dry fluorescent dye is heat resistant to withstand the lamination process for the manufacturing of PV modules, and has good long-term durability.

  13. Fluorescence upconversion properties of a class of improved pyridinium dyes induced by two-photon absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guibao; Hu, Dawei; Zhao, Xian; Shao, Zongshu; Liu, Huijun; Tian, Yupeng

    2007-06-01

    We report the fluorescence upconversion properties of a class of improved pyridinium toluene- p-sulfonates having donor- ?-acceptor (D- ?-A) structure under two-photon excitation at 1064 nm. The experimental results show that both the two-photon excited (TPE) fluorescence lifetime and the two-photon pumped (TPP) energy upconversion efficiency were increased with the enhancement of electron-donating capability of the donor in the molecule. It is also indicated that an overlong alkyl group tends to result in a weakened molecular conjugation, leading to a decreased two-photon absorption (TPA) cross section. By choosing the donor, we can obtain a longest fluorescence lifetime of 837 ps, a highest energy upconversion efficiency of 6.1%, and a maximum TPA cross-section of 8.7410 -48 cm 4 s/photon in these dyes.

  14. Use of fluorescent dyes and spectrofluorometry to observe evidence of vesicant toxicity in human epidermal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mershon, M.M.; Rhoads, L.S.; Van Buskirk, R.G.

    1993-05-13

    Normal human epidermal keratinocyes (NHEK) show multiple dose-related biochemical ranges at 3 hours after in vitro exposure to a vesicant compound, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) CEES in ethanol was diluted to 0.8, 8.0 and 80 mM concentrations in cell culture medium over confluent NHEK on gel-coated membranes of Millipore Millicells or in NHEK suspensions. A site-specific fluorescent dye was incubated with each NHEK layer for 1 hr prior to comparisons of normal and challenged NHEK within a Cytofluor 2300 spectrofluorometer. Reduced fluorescence from loss of all dye probes indicated severe membrane damage with 80 mM CEES in medium. Intracellular increases in Ca++, evidence of altered mitochondrial activity, and decreases in pH, glutathione levels and lysosomal integrity, were observed with 0.8 and 8.0 mM CEES in the culture medium. Control studies performed with Testskin and another human epidermal model suggest that dermal substitutes and transportation stresses can influence results with the dye probe/Cytofluor 2300 method. However, the feasibility of using the described methods to observe vesicant biochemical effects, screen antivesicants and perform other toxicological studies with NHEK models is supported by the results of the preliminary studies.

  15. Development of a Wavelength-Shifting Fluorescent Module for the Adenosine Aptamer Using Photostable Cyanine Dyes

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Heidi-Kristin; Bohlnder, Peggy R; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim

    2015-01-01

    DNA-based aptamers are commonly used recognition elements in biosensors for a range of target molecules. Here, the development of a wavelength-shifting optical module for a DNA-based adenosine-binding aptamer is described. It applies the combination of two photostable cyanine-styryl dyes as covalent modifications. This energy-transfer pair is postsynthetically attached to oligonucleotides via a copper(I)-catalyzed azidealkyne cycloaddition by two structurally different approaches: 1)?as nucleotide modifications at the 2?-position of uridines and 2)?as nucleotide substitutions using (S)-amino-1,2-propanediol as acyclic linker between the phosphodiester bridges. Both dyes exhibit a remarkable photostability. A library of DNA aptamers consisting of different combinations of the two dyes in diagonal orientations were evaluated by their emission color contrast as readout. Further optimization led to aptasensors with improved fluorescent readout as compared with previously reported aptasensors. This approach described is synthetically facile using simple propargylated phosphoramidites as DNA building blocks. As such, this approach could be applied for other dyes and other chemical/biological applications. PMID:25969803

  16. Magneto-fluorescent hybrid of dye and SPION with ordered and radially distributed porous structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Madhulekha; Deb, Pritam

    2014-04-01

    We have reported the development of a silica based magneto-fluorescent hybrid of a newly synthesized dye and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with ordered and radially distributed porous structure. The dye is synthesized by a novel yet simple synthetic approach based on Michael addition between dimer of glutaraldehyde and oleylamine molecule. The surfactant used for phase transformation of the dye from organic to aqueous phase, also acts as a structure directing agent for the porous structure evolution of the hybrid with radial distribution. The evolution of the radially distributed pores in the hybrids can be attributed to the formation of rod-like micelles containing nanoparticles, for concentration of micelles greater than critical micelle concentration. A novel water extraction method is applied to remove the surfactants resulting in the characteristic porous structure of the hybrid. Adsorption isotherm analysis confirms the porous nature of the hybrids with pore diameter ?2.4 nm. A distinct modification in optical and magnetic property is observed due to interaction of the dye and SPION within the silica matrix. The integration of multiple structural components in the so developed hybrid nanosystem results into a potential agent for multifunctional biomedical application.

  17. Fluorescent Sensing of Chlorophenols in Water Using an Azo Dye Modified β-Cyclodextrin Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Ncube, Phendukani; Krause, Rui W.; Mamba, Bhekie B.

    2011-01-01

    A water soluble azo dye modified β-cyclodextrin polymer 4 was synthesized and used as a chemosensor for the detection of chlorinated phenols, model chlorinated by-products (CBPs) of water treatment for drinking purposes. The characterization of the intermediates and the azo dye modified β-CD polymer was done by UV/Vis Spectrophotometry, FT-IR and 1H-NMR spectroscopies. The chlorophenols were capable of quenching the fluorescence of the polymer. The polymer showed greater sensitivity towards 2,4-dichlorophenol, with a sensitivity factor of 0.35 compared to 0.05 and 0.12 for phenol and 4-chlorophenol, respectively. The stability constants (Ks) of the pollutants were also determined by the Benesi-Hildebrand method to be 2.104 × 103 M−1 for 2,4-dichlorophenol and 1.120 × 102 M−1 for 4-chlorophenol. PMID:22163864

  18. Fluorescent stilbazolium dyes as probes of the norepinephrine transporter: structural insights into substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Wilson, James N; Brown, Adrienne S; Babinchak, W Michael; Ridge, Clark D; Walls, Jamie D

    2012-11-21

    We report the synthesis, binding kinetics, optical spectroscopy and predicted binding modes of a series of sterically demanding, fluorescent norepinephrine transporter (NET) ligands. A series of bulky stilbazolium dyes, including six newly synthesized compounds, were evaluated to determine the effect of extending the molecular probes' 'heads' or 'tails'. Taking advantage of the dyes' characteristic 'turn-on' emission, the kinetic binding parameters, k(on) and k(off) were determined revealing that extension of the molecules' tails is well tolerated while expansion of the head is not. Additionally, a 'headfirst' orientation appears to be preferred over a 'tail-first' binding pose. Further details of the possible binding modes were obtained from the emission spectra of the bound probes. A small range of interplanar twist angles, approximately 35 to 60, is predicted to produce the observed emission. Docking experiments and molecular modelling support the kinetic and spectroscopic data providing structural insights into substrate binding. PMID:23032519

  19. Stable biocompatible cross-linked fluorescent polymeric nanoparticles based on AIE dye and itaconic anhydride.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyin; Zhang, Xiqi; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Yang, Bin; Wei, Yen

    2014-09-01

    Self-assembly of polymeric materials to form nanoparticles is a particularly promising strategy for various biomedical applications, however, these self-assembling systems often encounter the critical micelle concentration (CMC) issue, as the nanoparticles is usually unstable at low concentration. Therefore, stable cross-linked fluorescent polymeric nanoparticles (FPNs) were covalently constructed from an aggregation induced emission (AIE) dye, itaconic anhydride, poly(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ether methacylate and polyethylenimine. These obtained PhE-ITA-20%(80%) FPNs were fully characterized by a series of techniques including (1)H NMR spectra, UV-vis absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra, FT-IR spectra, transmission electron microscopy, gel permeation chromatography, and dynamic light scattering. Such FPNs emitted intense fluorescence due to the introduction of aggregation induced emission dye. More importantly, the FPNs were found extremely stable in physiological solution even below the CMC owing to their cross-linked architectures. Biocompatibility evaluation and cell uptake behavior of the FPNs were further investigated to explore their potential biomedical applications, the demonstrated excellent biocompatibility made them promising for cell imaging. PMID:24973146

  20. Photophysical parameters and fluorescence quenching of 7-diethylaminocoumarin (DEAC) laser dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Mossalamy, E. H.; Obaid, A. Y.; El-Daly, S. A.

    2011-10-01

    The optical properties including electronic absorption spectrum, emission spectrum, fluorescence quantum yield, and dipole moment of electronic transition of 7-diethylaminocoumarin (DEAC) laser dye have been measured in different solvents. Both electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra are red shifted as the polarity of the medium increases, indicating that the dipole moment of molecule increases on excitation. The fluorescence quantum yield of DEAC decreases as the polarity of solvent increases, a result of the role of solvent polarity in stabilization of the twisting of the intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) in excited state, which is a non-emissive state, as well as hydrogen bonding with the hetero-atom of dye. The emission spectrum of DEAC has also been measured in cationic (CTAC) and anionic (SDS) micelles, the intensity increases as the concentration of surfactant increases, and an abrupt change in emission intensity is observed at critical micelle concentration (CMC) of surfactant. 210 -3 mol dm -3 of DEAC gives laser emission in the blue region on pumping with nitrogen laser ( ?ex=337.1 nm). The laser parameters such as tuning range, gain coefficient ( ?), emission cross section ( ?e), and half-life energy have been calculated in different solvents, namely acetone, dioxane , ethanol, and dimethyforamide (DMF). The photoreactivity of DEAC has been studied in CCl 4 at a wavelength of 366 nm. The values of photochemical yield ( ?c) and rate constant ( k) are determined. The interaction of organic acceptors such as picric acid (PA), tetracyanoethylene (TCNE), and 7,7,8,8-tetracynoquinonedimethane (TCNQ) with DEAC is also studied using fluorescence measurements in acetonitrile (CH 3CN); from fluorescence quenching study we assume the possible electron transfer from excited donor DEAC to organic acceptor forming non-emissive exciplex.

  1. Nonlinear multicontrast microscopy of hematoxylin-and-eosin-stained histological sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuer, Adam; Tokarz, Danielle; Prent, Nicole; Cisek, Richard; Alami, Jennifer; Dumont, Daniel J.; Bakueva, Ludmila; Rowlands, John; Barzda, Virginijus

    2010-03-01

    Imaging hematoxylin-and-eosin-stained cancerous histological sections with multicontrast nonlinear excitation fluorescence, second- and third-harmonic generation (THG) microscopy reveals cellular structures with extremely high image contrast. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy together with second hyperpolarizability measurements of the dyes shows that strong THG appears due to neutral hemalum aggregation and is subsequently enhanced by interaction with eosin. Additionally, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy reveals eosin fluorescence quenching by hemalums, showing better suitability of only eosin staining for fluorescence microscopy. Multicontrast nonlinear microscopy has the potential to differentiate between cancerous and healthy tissue at a single cell level.

  2. How Long Will I Be Blue? Prolonged Skin Staining Following Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy Using Intradermal Patent Blue Dye

    PubMed Central

    Gumus, Metehan; Gumus, Hatice; Jones, Sue E; Jones, Peter A; Sever, Ali R; Weeks, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Blue dye used for sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in breast cancer patients may cause prolonged skin discoloration at the site of injection. The aim of this study was to assess the duration of such skin discoloration. Patients and Methods 236 consecutive patients who had undergone breast conserving surgery and SLNB for breast cancer were reviewed prospectively from January 2007 to December 2009. Results Of the 236 patients, 2 had undergone bilateral surgery, and 41 had been examined in consecutive yearly reviews. Blue discoloration remained visible at the injection site after 12, 24, and > 36 months in 36.5, 23.6, and 8.6% of the patients, respectively. Conclusion The use of patent blue for identification of the sentinel lymph node in patients undergoing breast cancer surgery may result in prolonged discoloration of the skin at the injection site. PMID:24415970

  3. Fluorescence quenching of dyes by tryptophan: interactions at atomic detail from combination of experiment and computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Vaiana, Andrea C; Neuweiler, Hannes; Schulz, Andreas; Wolfrum, Jrgen; Sauer, Markus; Smith, Jeremy C

    2003-11-26

    Fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation are combined to characterize the interaction of two organic fluorescent dyes, rhodamine 6G (R6G) and an oxazine derivative (MR121), with the amino acid tryptophan in aqueous solution. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching experiments reveal the formation of essentially nonfluorescent ground-state dye/Trp complexes. The MD simulations are used to elucidate the molecular interaction geometries involved. The MD-derived probability distribution of the distance r between the centers of geometry of the dye and quencher ring systems, P(r), extends to higher distances for R6G than for MR121 due to population in the R6G/Trp system of fluorescent interaction geometries between Trp and the phenyl ring and ester group of the dye. The consequence of this is the experimental finding that under the conditions used in the simulations about 25% of the R6G dye is fluorescent in comparison with 10% of the MR121. Combining the above findings allows determination of the "quenching distance", r, above which no quenching occurs. r is found to be very similar (approximately 5.5 A) for both dye/Trp systems, corresponding to close to van der Waals contact. Both experimental dynamic Stern-Volmer analysis and the MD trajectories demonstrate that the main determinant of the fluorescence intensity is static quenching. The approach presented is likely to be useful in the structural interpretation of data obtained from fluorescent conjugates commonly used for monitoring the binding and dynamics of biomolecular systems. PMID:14624606

  4. Synthesis of New Styrylquinoline Cellular Dyes, Fluorescent Properties, Cellular Localization and Cytotoxic Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Dulski, Mateusz; Mrozek-Wilczkiewicz, Anna; Cieslik, Wioleta; Spaczyńska, Ewelina; Bartczak, Piotr; Ratuszna, Alicja; Polanski, Jaroslaw; Musiol, Robert

    2015-01-01

    New styrylquinoline derivatives with their photophysical constants are described. The synthesis was achieved via Sonogashira coupling using the newly developed heterogeneous nano-Pd/Cu catalyst system, which provides an efficient synthesis of high purity products. The compounds were tested in preliminary fluorescent microscopy studies to in order to identify their preferable cellular localization, which appeared to be in the lipid cellular organelles. The spectroscopic properties of the compounds were measured and theoretical TD-DFT calculations were performed. A biological analysis of the quinolines that were tested consisted of cytotoxicity assays against normal human fibroblasts and colon adenocarcinoma cells. All of the compounds that were studied appeared to be safe and indifferent to cells in a high concentration range. The presented results suggest that the quinoline compounds that were investigated in this study may be valuable structures for development as fluorescent dyes that could have biological applications. PMID:26114446

  5. High-Throughput Isolation of Giant Viruses in Liquid Medium Using Automated Flow Cytometry and Fluorescence Staining.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Jacques Y B; Robert, Stephane; Reteno, Dorine G; Andreani, Julien; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The isolation of giant viruses using amoeba co-culture is tedious and fastidious. Recently, the procedure was successfully associated with a method that detects amoebal lysis on agar plates. However, the procedure remains time-consuming and is limited to protozoa growing on agar. We present here advances for the isolation of giant viruses. A high-throughput automated method based on flow cytometry and fluorescent staining was used to detect the presence of giant viruses in liquid medium. Development was carried out with the Acanthamoeba polyphaga strain widely used in past and current co-culture experiments. The proof of concept was validated with virus suspensions: artificially contaminated samples but also environmental samples from which viruses were previously isolated. After validating the technique, and fortuitously isolating a new Mimivirus, we automated the technique on 96-well plates and tested it on clinical and environmental samples using other protozoa. This allowed us to detect more than 10 strains of previously known species of giant viruses and seven new strains of a new virus lineage. This automated high-throughput method demonstrated significant time saving, and higher sensitivity than older techniques. It thus creates the means to isolate giant viruses at high speed. PMID:26858703

  6. High-Throughput Isolation of Giant Viruses in Liquid Medium Using Automated Flow Cytometry and Fluorescence Staining

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Jacques Y. B.; Robert, Stephane; Reteno, Dorine G.; Andreani, Julien; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The isolation of giant viruses using amoeba co-culture is tedious and fastidious. Recently, the procedure was successfully associated with a method that detects amoebal lysis on agar plates. However, the procedure remains time-consuming and is limited to protozoa growing on agar. We present here advances for the isolation of giant viruses. A high-throughput automated method based on flow cytometry and fluorescent staining was used to detect the presence of giant viruses in liquid medium. Development was carried out with the Acanthamoeba polyphaga strain widely used in past and current co-culture experiments. The proof of concept was validated with virus suspensions: artificially contaminated samples but also environmental samples from which viruses were previously isolated. After validating the technique, and fortuitously isolating a new Mimivirus, we automated the technique on 96-well plates and tested it on clinical and environmental samples using other protozoa. This allowed us to detect more than 10 strains of previously known species of giant viruses and seven new strains of a new virus lineage. This automated high-throughput method demonstrated significant time saving, and higher sensitivity than older techniques. It thus creates the means to isolate giant viruses at high speed. PMID:26858703

  7. Detection of microlesions induced by heavy ions using liposomes filled with fluorescent dye

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koniarek, J. P.; Thomas, J. L.; Vazquez, M.

    2004-01-01

    In cells irradiation by heavy ions has been hypothesized to produce microlesions, regions of local damage. In cell membranes this damage is thought to manifest itself in the form of holes. The primary evidence for microlesions comes from morphological studies of cell membranes, but this evidence is still controversial, especially since holes also have been observed in membranes of normal, nonirradiated, cells. However, it is possible that damage not associated with histologically discernable disruptions may still occur. In order to resolve this issue, we developed a system for detecting microlesions based on liposomes filled with fluorescent dye. We hypothesized that if microlesions form in these liposomes as the result of irradiation, then the entrapped dye will leak out into the surrounding medium in a measurable way. Polypropylene vials containing suspensions of vesicles composed of either dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine, or a combination of egg phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol were irradiated at the Brookhaven National Laboratory using 56Fe ions at 1 GeV/amu. In several cases we obtained a significant loss of the entrapped dye above the background level. Our results suggest that holes may form in liposomes as the result of heavy ion irradiation, and that these holes are large enough to allow leakage of cell internal contents that are at least as large as a 1 nm diameter calcein molecule. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Energy transfer processes in dye-doped nanostructures yield cooperative and versatile fluorescent probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genovese, Damiano; Rampazzo, Enrico; Bonacchi, Sara; Montalti, Marco; Zaccheroni, Nelsi; Prodi, Luca

    2014-02-01

    Fast and efficient energy transfer among dyes confined in nanocontainers provides the basis of outstanding functionalities in new-generation luminescent probes. This feature article provides an overview of recent research achievements on luminescent Pluronic-Silica NanoParticles (PluS NPs), a class of extremely monodisperse core-shell nanoparticles whose design can be easily tuned to match specific needs for diverse applications based on luminescence, and that have already been successfully tested in in vivo imaging. An outline of their outstanding properties, such as tuneability, bright and photoswitchable fluorescence and electrochemiluminescence, will be supported by a critical discussion of our recent works in this field. Furthermore, novel data and simulations will be presented to (i) thoroughly examine common issues arising from the inclusion of multiple dyes in a small silica core, and (ii) show the emergence of a cooperative behaviour among embedded dyes. Such cooperative behaviour provides a handle for fine control of brightness, emission colour and self-quenching phenomena in PluS NPs, leading to significantly enhanced signal to noise ratios.

  9. Fluorescent viability stains to probe the metabolic status of aflatoxigenic fungus in dual culture of Aspergillus flavus and Pichia anomala

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The metabolic activity of aflatoxigenic fungus, Aspergillus flavus co-cultured with a biocontrol yeast, Pichia anomala was examined using several vital stains. Both the FUN-1 stain and the combined use of DiBAC4(5) with CDFA-AM stains demonstrated that P. anomala inactivated the ATP generating syst...

  10. Fluorescence microscopy is superior to polarized microscopy for detecting amyloid deposits in Congo red-stained trephine bone marrow biopsy specimens.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Alan; Sadimin, Evita; Richardson, Maurice; Goodell, Lauri; Fyfe, Billie

    2012-10-01

    The classic gold standard for detecting amyloid deposits is Congo red-stained bright field and polarized microscopy (CRPM). A prior study showed that Congo red fluorescence (CRF) microscopy had increased sensitivity compared with traditional CRPM when analyzing fat pad specimens. The purpose of the current study was to determine the sensitivity of CRF for evaluating Congo red-stained bone marrow biopsy specimens, and to compare these results with those of CRPM. We compared the CRPM and the CRF analyses of 33 trephine bone marrow biopsy specimens with clinical or morphologic suspicion of amyloid deposits. These results were verified against immunohistochemical staining with anti-amyloid P antibody. CRF achieved 100% sensitivity, and CRPM achieved 75% sensitivity. Both groups showed 100% specificity compared with amyloid P immunohistochemical staining. The results show that CRF is a sensitive method to analyze trephine bone marrow biopsy specimens for amyloid deposits. PMID:23010714

  11. Fluorescent staining of glycoproteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels by 4H-[1]-benzopyrano[4,3-b]thiophene-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhongxin; Zhou, Xuan; Wang, Yang; Chi, Lisha; Ruan, Dandan; Xuan, Yuanhu; Cong, Weitao; Jin, Litai

    2014-06-01

    A fluorescent detection method for glycoproteins in SDS-PAGE by using 4H-[1]-benzopyrano[4,3-b]thiophene-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide (BH) was developed in this study. As low as 4-8 ng glycoproteins (transferrin, ?1-acid glycoprotein) could be specifically detected by the BH staining method, which is twofold more sensitive than that of the most commonly used Pro-Q Emerald 488 glycoprotein stain. Furthermore, the specificity of the newly developed stain for glycoproteins was demonstrated by 1-D and 2-D SDS-PAGE, deglycosylation, glycoprotein affinity enrichment and LC-MS/MS, respectively. According to the results, it is concluded that BH stain may provide new choices for convenient, sensitive, specific and economic visualization of gel-separated glycoproteins. PMID:24712021

  12. On the incorporation of Rhodamine B and 2?,7?-dichlorofluorescein dyes in silica: Synthesis of fluorescent nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Elis C. C.; de Carvalho, Idalina M. M.; Digenes, Izaura C. N.; de Sousa, Eduardo H. S.; Longhinotti, Elisane

    2014-05-01

    The present paper reports the incorporation of 2?,7?-dichlorofluorescein (DCF) and Rhodamine B (RhB) dyes in silica nanoparticles by using the Stber's method with some modifications. Based on infrared and electronic spectroscopies, these dyes were successfully incorporated resulting in fluorescent nanomaterials of an average size of 80 nm. A composite fluorescent nanomaterial containing both dyes was also synthesized and showed the occurrence of Frster resonant energy transfer process (FRET) with the average distance between the donor (DCF) and acceptor (RhB) of 3.6 nm. Furthermore, these fluorescent nanoparticles were modified with folic acid producing nanomaterials whose Zeta potential values were in the range of -2 to -13 mV. These values are consistent with the low dispersivity observed by TEM micrographs. Altogether, these suitable properties can lead to the development of nanomaterials for cancer bioimaging and drug release.

  13. Dye analysis of Shosoin textiles using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence and ultraviolet-visible reflectance spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Rikiya; Tanaka, Yoko; Ogata, Atsuhiko; Naruse, Masakazu

    2009-07-15

    The dyes of 8th century textiles, treasured for more than 1250 years in the Shosoin treasure repository in Japan, were analyzed by nondestructive methods, i.e., excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) reflectance spectrometry, in combination with natural dye references extracted from plants, which have been widely used from ancient times. In this analysis, five dyes were found in the following objects: embroidered shoes dedicated to Great Buddha of the Todaiji temple by the empress of that time, the cloth lining for a case holding a mirror belonging to the emperor of that time, two rolls of yellow and light green plain-weave silks, and a sleeveless coat used for a musical in a Buddhist ceremony in 752 A.D. EEM fluorescence spectrometry distinguished kihada yellow (Amur cork tree), kariyasu yellow (eulalia), and akane red (Japanese madder). UV-vis spectrometry also distinguished kariyasu yellow, ai blue (knotweed), akane red, and shikon purple (murasaki); the characteristic peaks of these dyes were detected by a second derivatization. The results show that although the dyes used easily degrade with age, EEM fluorescence and UV-vis reflectance spectrometry are useful for distinguishing dyes used in the Shosoin textiles, which had been stored for more than 1250 years. PMID:19507884

  14. Computational and Experimental Characterization of a Fluorescent Dye for Detection of Potassium Ion Concentration

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The fluorescence of the SKC-513 ((E)-N-(9-(4-(1,4,7,10,13-pentaoxa-16-azacyclooctadecan-16-yl)phenyl)-6-(butyl(3-sulfopropyl)amino)-3H-xanthen-3-ylidene)-N-(3-sulfopropyl)butan-1-aminium) dye is shown experimentally to have high sensitivity to binding of the K+ ion. Computations are used to explore the potential origins of this sensitivity and to make some suggestions regarding structural improvements. In the absence of K+, excitation is to two nearly degenerate states, a neutral (N) excited state with a high oscillator strength, and a charge-transfer (CT) state with a lower oscillator strength. Binding of K+ destabilizes the CT state, raising its energy far above the N state. The increase in fluorescence quantum yield upon binding of K+ is attributed to the increased energy of the CT state suppressing a nonradiative pathway mediated by the CT state. The near degeneracy of the N and CT excited states can be understood by considering SKC-513 as a reduced symmetry version of a parent molecule with 3-fold symmetry. Computations show that acceptordonor substituents can be used to alter the relative energies of the N and CT state, whereas a methylene spacer between the heterocycle and phenylene groups can be used to increase the coupling between these states. These modifications provide synthetic handles with which to optimize the dye for K+ detection. PMID:25216181

  15. Computational and experimental characterization of a fluorescent dye for detection of potassium ion concentration.

    PubMed

    Tanha, Matteus; Chakraborty, Subhasish K; Gabris, Beth; Waggoner, Alan S; Salama, Guy; Yaron, David

    2014-10-23

    The fluorescence of the SKC-513 ((E)-N-(9-(4-(1,4,7,10,13-pentaoxa-16-azacyclooctadecan-16-yl)phenyl)-6-(butyl(3-sulfopropyl)amino)-3H-xanthen-3-ylidene)-N-(3-sulfopropyl)butan-1-aminium) dye is shown experimentally to have high sensitivity to binding of the K(+) ion. Computations are used to explore the potential origins of this sensitivity and to make some suggestions regarding structural improvements. In the absence of K(+), excitation is to two nearly degenerate states, a neutral (N) excited state with a high oscillator strength, and a charge-transfer (CT) state with a lower oscillator strength. Binding of K(+) destabilizes the CT state, raising its energy far above the N state. The increase in fluorescence quantum yield upon binding of K(+) is attributed to the increased energy of the CT state suppressing a nonradiative pathway mediated by the CT state. The near degeneracy of the N and CT excited states can be understood by considering SKC-513 as a reduced symmetry version of a parent molecule with 3-fold symmetry. Computations show that acceptor-donor substituents can be used to alter the relative energies of the N and CT state, whereas a methylene spacer between the heterocycle and phenylene groups can be used to increase the coupling between these states. These modifications provide synthetic handles with which to optimize the dye for K(+) detection. PMID:25216181

  16. UV laser interaction with a fluorescent dye solution studied using pulsed digital holography.

    PubMed

    Amer, Eynas; Gren, Per; Sjdahl, Mikael

    2013-10-21

    A frequency tripled Q-switched Nd-YAG laser (wavelength 355 nm, pulse duration 12 ns) has been used to pump Coumarin 153 dye solved in ethanol. Simultaneously, a frequency doubled pulse (532 nm) from the same laser is used to probe the solvent perpendicularly resulting in a gain through stimulated laser induced fluorescence (LIF) emission. The resulting gain of the probe beam is recorded using digital holography by blending it with a reference beam on the detector. Two digital holograms without and with the pump beam were recorded. Intensity maps were calculated from the recorded digital holograms and used to calculate the gain of the probe beam due to the stimulated LIF. In addition numerical data of the local temperature rise was calculated from the corresponding phase maps using Radon inversion. It was concluded that about 15% of the pump beam energy is transferred to the dye solution as heat while the rest is consumed in the radiative process. The results show that pulsed digital holography is a promising technique for quantitative study of fluorescent species. PMID:24150372

  17. Gram stain

    MedlinePLUS

    A Gram stain is a test used to identify bacteria. It is one of the most common ways to quickly diagnose ... Urethral discharge Gram stain; Feces Gram stain; Stool Gram stain; Joint fluid Gram stain; Pericardial fluid Gram stain; Gram stain of urethral discharge; ...

  18. Excitation efficiency of a side-pumped fiberized fluorescent dye microcapillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladev, Veselin; Eftimov, Tinko; Nedev, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    In the present work we study the dependence of fluorescence spectra for different pump source characteristics on the length of a micro-capillary filled with a fluorescent dye solution. A standard fiber-optic glass ferrule with two parallel 125 μm inner diameter holes serving as capillary structures has been studied. One of the holes of the ferrule was filled with a solution of Rhodamine 6G in glycerin, while in the second hole an angle-polished single-mode pump optical fiber was placed. Experiments with pump fibers polished at 20°, 25°, 30°, 35°, 40° and 45° with a reflective aluminium coating have been conducted. The analysis of the experimental data shows differences in the behavior of the fluorescent spectra at different polished angles. Theoretical calculations for pump ray trajectories as well as overall power transmission for pump fibers polished at different angles have been made. The results show that the proposed construction could be used in optofluidic chemical and biosensors, microfluidic lasers or as a compact fluorescent source compatible with fiber-optic components.

  19. Apparatus for eliminating background interference in fluorescence measurements

    DOEpatents

    Martin, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Jett, James H. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1986-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for eliminating background interference during fluorescence measurements in a multiple laser flow cytometer. A biological particle stained with fluorescent dyes is excited by a laser. A fluorescence detector detects the fluorescence. The particle scatters light and a gate signal is generated and delayed until the biological particle reaches the next laser. The delayed signal turns on this next laser, which excites a different stained component of the same biological particle.

  20. Apparatus for eliminating background interference in fluorescence measurements

    DOEpatents

    Martin, J.C.; Jett, J.H.

    1986-03-04

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for eliminating background interference during fluorescence measurements in a multiple laser flow cytometer. A biological particle stained with fluorescent dyes is excited by a laser. A fluorescence detector detects the fluorescence. The particle scatters light and a gate signal is generated and delayed until the biological particle reaches the next laser. The delayed signal turns on this next laser, which excites a different stained component of the same biological particle. 8 figs.

  1. Apparatus for eliminating background interference in fluorescence measurements

    DOEpatents

    Martin, J.C.; Jett, J.H.

    1984-01-06

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for eliminating background interference during fluorescence measurements in a multiple laser flow cytometer. A biological particle stained with fluorescent dyes is excited by a laser. A fluorescence detector detects the fluorescence. The particle scatters light and a gate signal is generated and delayed until the biological particle reaches the next laser. The delayed signal turns on this next laser which excites a different stained component of the same biological particle.

  2. CGE-laser induced fluorescence of double-stranded DNA fragments using GelGreen dye.

    PubMed

    Valds, Alberto; Garca-Caas, Virginia; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2013-06-01

    Nowadays, new solutions focused on the replacement of reagents hazardous to human health are highly demanded in laboratories and Green Chemistry. In the present work, GelGreen, a new nonhazardous DNA staining reagent, has been assayed for the first time to analyze double-stranded DNA by CGE with LIF detection. The effect of GelGreen concentration on S/N ratio and migration time of a wide concentration range of standard DNA mixtures was evaluated. Under optimum GelGreen concentration in the sieving buffer efficient and sensitive separations of DNA fragments with sizes from 100-500 base pairs (bp) were obtained. A comparison in terms of resolution, time of analysis, LOD, LOQ, reproducibility, sizing performance, and cost of analysis was established between two optimized CGE-LIF protocols for DNA analysis, one based on the dye YOPRO-1 (typically used for CGE-LIF of DNA fragments) and another one using the new GelGreen. Analyses using YOPRO-1 were faster than those using GelGreen (ca. 31 min versus 34 min for the analysis of 100-500 bp DNA fragments). On the other side, sensitivity using GelGreen was twofold higher than that using YOPRO-1. The cost of analysis was significantly cheaper (ninefold) using GelGreen than with YOPRO-1. The resolution values and sizing performance were not significantly different between the two dyes (e.g. both dyes allowed the separation of fragments differing in only 2 bp in the 100-200 bp range). The usefulness of the separation method using GelGreen is demonstrated by the characterization of different amplicons obtained by PCR. PMID:23417332

  3. Evaluation of slide based cytometry (SBC) for concentration measurements of fluorescent dyes in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Marecka, Monika; Mller, Hans-Willy; Bocsi, Jzsef; Trnok, Attila

    2009-02-01

    Flow cytometers (FCM) are built for particle measurements. In principle, concentration measurement of a homogeneous solution is not possible with FCM due to the lack of a trigger signal. In contrast to FCM slide based cytometry systems could act as tools for the measurement of concentrations using volume defined cell counting chambers. These chambers enable to analyze a well defined volume. Sensovation AG (Stockach, Germany) introduced an automated imaging system that combines imaging with cytometric features analysis. Aim of this study was to apply this imaging system to quantify the fluorescent molecule concentrations. The Lumisens (Sensovation AG) slide-based technology based on fluorescence digital imaging microscopy was used. The instrument is equipped with an inverted microscope, blue and red LEDs, double band-pass filters and a high-resolution cooled 16-bit digital camera. The instrument was focussed on the bottom of 400?m deep 6 chamber slides (IBIDI GmbH, Martinsried, Germany) or flat bottom 96 well plates (Greiner Bio One GmbH, Frickenhausen, Germany). Fluorescent solutions were imaged under 90% pixel saturation in a broad concentration range (FITC: 0.0002-250 ?g/ml, methylene blue (MethB): 0.0002-250 ?g/ml). Exposition times were recorded. Images were analysed by the iCys (CompuCyte Corp., Cambridge, MA, USA) image analysis software with the phantom contour function. Relative fluorescence intensities were calculated from mean fluorescence intensities per phantom contours divided by the exposition time. Solution concentrations could be distinguished over a broad dynamic range of 3.5 to 5.5 decades log (range FITC: 0.0002-31.25?g/ml, MethB: 0.0076-31.25?g/ml) with a good linear relationship between dye concentration and relative fluorescence intensity. The minimal number of fluorescent molecules per pixel as determined by the mean fluorescence intensity and the molecular weight of the fluorochrome were about 800 molecules FITC and ~2.000 MethB. The novel slide-based imaging system is suitable for detection of fluorescence differences over a broad range of concentrations. This approach may lead to novel assays for measuring concentration differences in cell free solutions and cell cultures e.g. in secretion assays.

  4. Ratiometric Optical Temperature Sensor Using Two Fluorescent Dyes Dissolved in an Ionic Liquid Encapsulated by Parylene Film

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Tetsuo; Aoki, Hironori; Binh-Khiem, Nguyen; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2013-01-01

    A temperature sensor that uses temperature-sensitive fluorescent dyes is developed. The droplet sensor has a diameter of 40 μm and uses 1 g/L of Rhodamine B (RhB) and 0.5 g/L of Rhodamine 110 (Rh110), which are fluorescent dyes that are dissolved in an ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethyl sulfate) to function as temperature indicators. This ionic liquid is encapsulated using vacuum Parylene film deposition (which is known as the Parylene-on-liquid-deposition (PoLD) method). The droplet is sealed by the chemically stable and impermeable Parylene film, which prevents the dye from interacting with the molecules in the solution and keeps the volume and concentration of the fluorescent material fixed. The two fluorescent dyes enable the temperature to be measured ratiometrically such that the droplet sensor can be used in various applications, such as the wireless temperature measurement of microregions. The sensor can measure the temperature of such microregions with an accuracy of 1.9 °C, a precision of 3.7 °C, and a fluorescence intensity change sensitivity of 1.0%/K. The sensor can measure temperatures at different sensor depths in water, ranging from 0 to 850 μm. The droplet sensor is fabricated using microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technology and is highly applicable to lab-on-a-chip devices. PMID:23535716

  5. Ratiometric optical temperature sensor using two fluorescent dyes dissolved in an ionic liquid encapsulated by Parylene film.

    PubMed

    Kan, Tetsuo; Aoki, Hironori; Binh-Khiem, Nguyen; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2013-01-01

    A temperature sensor that uses temperature-sensitive fluorescent dyes is developed. The droplet sensor has a diameter of 40 m and uses 1 g/L of Rhodamine B (RhB) and 0.5 g/L of Rhodamine 110 (Rh110), which are fluorescent dyes that are dissolved in an ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethyl sulfate) to function as temperature indicators. This ionic liquid is encapsulated using vacuum Parylene film deposition (which is known as the Parylene-on-liquid-deposition (PoLD) method). The droplet is sealed by the chemically stable and impermeable Parylene film, which prevents the dye from interacting with the molecules in the solution and keeps the volume and concentration of the fluorescent material fixed. The two fluorescent dyes enable the temperature to be measured ratiometrically such that the droplet sensor can be used in various applications, such as the wireless temperature measurement of microregions. The sensor can measure the temperature of such microregions with an accuracy of 1.9 C, a precision of 3.7 C, and a fluorescence intensity change sensitivity of 1.0%/K. The sensor can measure temperatures at different sensor depths in water, ranging from 0 to 850 m. The droplet sensor is fabricated using microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technology and is highly applicable to lab-on-a-chip devices. PMID:23535716

  6. Design of a fluorescent DNA IMPLICATION logic gate and detection of Ag+ and cysteine with triphenylmethane dye/G-quadruplex complexes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jun-Hong; Kong, De-Ming; Shen, Han-Xi

    2010-10-15

    This paper describes the construction of a DNA IMPLICATION logic gate based on triphenylmethane (TPM) dye/G-quadruplex complexes, using Ag+ and cysteine (Cys) as the two inputs, and fluorescence intensity of the TPM dye as the output signal. Free triphenylmethane (TPM) dyes emit inherently low fluorescence signal, the formation of TPM dye/G-quadruplex complexes yielded greatly enhanced fluorescence signals from the dye, and the output signal of the gate was 1. The addition of Cys had no effect on the fluorescence signal, again yielding an output of 1. However, the addition of Ag+ instead of Cys greatly disrupted the G-quadruplex structure, causing a decrease in the fluorescence of the dye, and yielding an output signal of 0. The addition of Cys into the Ag+-quenched fluorescence system led to the release of Ag+ from G-quadruplex-forming DNAs, resulting in the reformation of G-quadruplex structures and the recovery of TMP dye fluorescence, the output signal of 1 was obtained again. Compared with previously published DNA logic gates, the gate operation described here was rapid and reversible, with a reliable, nondestructive readout and excellent digital behavior. In addition, the modulation of TPM dye/G-quadruplex complex fluorescence by Ag+ and Cys could be used to develop a simple, fast, label-free and highly specific homogenous sensing methods for Ag+ and Cys. PMID:20829021

  7. Membrane filtration-fluorescent antibody staining procedure for detecting and quantifying Renibacterium salmoninarum in coelomic fluid of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, D.G.; Barila, T.Y.

    1988-01-01

    e developed a rapid method for detecting and quantifying the pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum in coelomic fluid of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) by concentrating the bacteria on 0.2-μm polycarbonate filters and staining them with specific fluorescein-labeled antibody. Centrifugation of samples and resuspension of the sedimented material in phosphate-buffered saline containing Triton X-100 increased the ease of filtration. Background fluorescence was reduced by counterstaining filters with Eriochrome black T. Postfiltration staining, rinsing, and counterstaining were done in the syringe-mounted filter holders, reducing handling of the filters and possible loss of bacteria. The number of bacteria detected by the filtration – fluorescent antibody technique in a broth culture of R. salmoninarum ranged from 6.7 × 107to7.6 × 107/mL and was slightly higher than that determined by plate count (9.6 × 106/mL). Increasing the sample dilution or decreasing the number of microscope fields examined generally increased the variability of filter counts of R. salmoninarum. Using the filtration – fluorescent antibody technique, we detected the bacterium in the coelomic fluid of 85% of spawning female spring chinook salmon sampled from a hatchery population. Membrane Filtration – Fluorescent Antibody Staining Procedure for Detecting and Quantifying Renibacterium salmoninarum in Coelomic Fluid of Chinook Salmon (oncorhynchus tshawytscha) (PDF Download Available). 

  8. Cell type related differences in staining with pentameric thiophene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Cie?lar-Pobuda, Artur; Bck, Marcus; Magnusson, Karin; Jain, Mayur V; Rafat, Mehrdad; Ghavami, Saeid; Nilsson, K Peter R; ?os, Marek J

    2014-07-01

    Fluorescent compounds capable of staining cells selectively without affecting their viability are gaining importance in biology and medicine. Recently, a new family of optical dyes, denoted luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs), has emerged as an interesting class of highly emissive molecules for studying various biological phenomena. Properly functionalized LCOs have been utilized for selective identification of disease-associated protein aggregates and for selective detection of distinct cells. Herein, we present data on differential staining of various cell types, including cancer cells. The differential staining observed with newly developed pentameric LCOs is attributed to distinct side chain functionalities along the thiophene backbone. Employing flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy we examined a library of LCOs for stainability of a variety of cell lines. Among tested dyes we found promising candidates that showed strong or moderate capability to stain cells to different extent, depending on target cells. Hence, LCOs with diverse imidazole motifs along the thiophene backbone were identified as an interesting class of agents for staining of cancer cells, whereas LCOs with other amino acid side chains along the backbone showed a complete lack of staining for the cells included in the study. Furthermore, for p-HTMI,a LCO functionalized with methylated imidazole moieties, the staining was dependent on the p53 status of the cells, indicating that the molecular target for the dye is a cellular component regulated by p53. We foresee that functionalized LCOs will serve as a new class of optical ligands for fluorescent classification of cells and expand the toolbox of reagents for fluorescent live imaging of different cells. PMID:24500794

  9. Amyloid Histology Stain for Rapid Bacterial Endospore Imaging ?

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Bing; Upadhyayula, Srigokul; Nuez, Vicente; Landsman, Pavel; Lam, Samuel; Malik, Harbani; Gupta, Sharad; Sarshar, Mohammad; Hu, Jingqiu; Anvari, Bahman; Jones, Guilford; Vullev, Valentine I.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial endospores are some of the most resilient forms of life known to us, with their persistent survival capability resulting from a complex and effective structural organization. The outer membrane of endospores is surrounded by the densely packed endospore coat and exosporium, containing amyloid or amyloid-like proteins. In fact, it is the impenetrable composition of the endospore coat and the exosporium that makes staining methodologies for endospore detection complex and challenging. Therefore, a plausible strategy for facile and expedient staining would be to target components of the protective surface layers of the endospores. Instead of targeting endogenous markers encapsulated in the spores, here we demonstrated staining of these dormant life entities that targets the amyloid domains, i.e., the very surface components that make the coats of these species impenetrable. Using an amyloid staining dye, thioflavin T (ThT), we examined this strategy. A short incubation of bacillus endospore suspensions with ThT, under ambient conditions, resulted in (i) an enhancement of the fluorescence of ThT and (ii) the accumulation of ThT in the endospores, affording fluorescence images with excellent contrast ratios. Fluorescence images revealed that ThT tends to accumulate in the surface regions of the endospores. The observed fluorescence enhancement and dye accumulation, coupled with the sensitivity of emission techniques, provide an effective and rapid means of staining endospores without the inconvenience of pre- or posttreatment of samples. PMID:21653779

  10. Amyloid histology stain for rapid bacterial endospore imaging.

    PubMed

    Xia, Bing; Upadhyayula, Srigokul; Nuez, Vicente; Landsman, Pavel; Lam, Samuel; Malik, Harbani; Gupta, Sharad; Sarshar, Mohammad; Hu, Jingqiu; Anvari, Bahman; Jones, Guilford; Vullev, Valentine I

    2011-08-01

    Bacterial endospores are some of the most resilient forms of life known to us, with their persistent survival capability resulting from a complex and effective structural organization. The outer membrane of endospores is surrounded by the densely packed endospore coat and exosporium, containing amyloid or amyloid-like proteins. In fact, it is the impenetrable composition of the endospore coat and the exosporium that makes staining methodologies for endospore detection complex and challenging. Therefore, a plausible strategy for facile and expedient staining would be to target components of the protective surface layers of the endospores. Instead of targeting endogenous markers encapsulated in the spores, here we demonstrated staining of these dormant life entities that targets the amyloid domains, i.e., the very surface components that make the coats of these species impenetrable. Using an amyloid staining dye, thioflavin T (ThT), we examined this strategy. A short incubation of bacillus endospore suspensions with ThT, under ambient conditions, resulted in (i) an enhancement of the fluorescence of ThT and (ii) the accumulation of ThT in the endospores, affording fluorescence images with excellent contrast ratios. Fluorescence images revealed that ThT tends to accumulate in the surface regions of the endospores. The observed fluorescence enhancement and dye accumulation, coupled with the sensitivity of emission techniques, provide an effective and rapid means of staining endospores without the inconvenience of pre- or posttreatment of samples. PMID:21653779

  11. Fluorescent nanomicelles for selective detection of Sudan dye in Pluronic F127 aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xinliang; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Hui; Wang, Xiaohui; Huang, Fei

    2014-04-01

    Novel self-assembled water-soluble nanomicelles that contain fluorescent conjugated polymers (poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO) or poly[2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene)-alt-4,4'-phenylether] (PF-PE)) have been obtained and used as the highly sensitive/selective platform for Sudan dye detection. The Fluorescent nanomicelles exhibited a highly selective fluorescence quenching by the prohibited food additive Sudan I, while not for the natural pigments: Capsanthin and Beta-carotene, due to the more suitable matching of the LUMOs (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital) of the conjugated polymers with that of Sudan I molecules. The Stern-Volmer constants (K(SV)) of PF-PE/F127 and PFO/F127 for Sudan I were 1,040,480 and 665,000 M(-1), respectively, which were more than 100 times higher than those of the same conjugated polymers in the orgainc solvents. The significantly enhanced sensitivity was due to the collective effect of the F127 micelles to both chromophore and analyte, through which the fluorophone-analyte binding interaction is significantly strengthened and efficient photoinduced charge transfer occurs. The as-proposed materials and approach may be potentially applied in the real-time food safety screening. PMID:24625370

  12. Optical tweezers and non-ratiometric fluorescent-dye-based studies of respiration in sperm mitochondria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Timothy; Shi, Linda Z.; Zhu, Qingyuan; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Berns, Michael W.

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how the mitochondrial membrane potential affects sperm motility using laser tweezers and a non-ratiometric fluorescent probe, DiOC6(3). A 1064 nm Nd:YVO4 continuous wave laser was used to trap motile sperm at a power of 450 mW in the trap spot. Using customized tracking software, the curvilinear velocity (VCL) and the escape force from the laser tweezers were measured. Human (Homo sapiens), dog (Canis lupis familiaris) and drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) sperm were treated with DiOC6(3) to measure the membrane potential in the mitochondria-rich sperm midpieces. Sperm from all three species exhibited an increase in fluorescence when treated with the DiOC6(3). When a cyanide inhibitor (CCCP) of aerobic respiration was applied, sperm of all three species exhibited a reduction in fluorescence to pre-dye levels. With respect to VCL and escape force, the CCCP had no effect on dog or human sperm, suggesting a major reliance upon anaerobic respiration (glycolysis) for ATP in these two species. Based on the preliminary study on drill sperm, CCCP caused a drop in the VCL, suggesting potential reliance on both glycolysis and aerobic respiration for motility. The results demonstrate that optical trapping in combination with DiOC6(3) is an effective way to study sperm motility and energetics.

  13. Signal Decomposition of Transmembrane Voltage-Sensitive Dye Fluorescence Using a Multiresolution Wavelet Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Asfour, Huda; Swift, Luther M.; Sarvazyan, Narine; Doroslova?ki, Milo; Kay, Matthew W.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging of transmembrane voltage-sensitive dyes is used to study electrical activation in cardiac tissue. However, the fluorescence signals, typically, have low SNRs and may be contaminated with motion artifact. In this report, we introduce a new processing approach for fluoresced transmembrane potentials (fTmps) that is based upon a discrete wavelet transform. We show how fTmp signals can be decomposed and reconstructed to form three subsignals that contain signal noise (noise signal), the early depolarization phase of the action potential (rTmp signal), and motion artifact (rMA signal). A coiflet4 wavelet is used for fTmp decomposition and reconstruction of these subsignals. Results using fTmp signals that are contaminated with motion artifact indicate that the approach is a useful processing step to remove baseline drift, reduce noise, and reveal wavefronts. It streamlines the preprocessing of fTmps for the subsequent measurement of activation times and conduction velocities. It is a promising approach for studying wavefronts without aggressive mechanical tissue constraint or electromechanical uncoupling agents and is, useful for single-camera systems that do not provide for ratiometric imaging. PMID:21511560

  14. Synthesis and characterization of monodisperse, mesoporous, and magnetic sub-micron particles doped with a near-infrared fluorescent dye

    SciTech Connect

    Le Guevel, Xavier; Nooney, Robert; McDonagh, Colette; MacCraith, Brian D.

    2011-06-15

    Recently, multifunctional silica nanoparticles have been investigated extensively for their potential use in biomedical applications. We have prepared sub-micron monodisperse and stable multifunctional mesoporous silica particles with a high level of magnetization and fluorescence in the near infrared region using an one-pot synthesis technique. Commercial magnetite nanocrystals and a conjugated-NIR-dye were incorporated inside the particles during the silica condensation reaction. The particles were then coated with polyethyleneglycol to stop aggregation. X-ray diffraction, N{sub 2} adsorption analysis, TEM, fluorescence and absorbance measurements were used to structurally characterize the particles. These mesoporous silica spheres have a large surface area (1978 m{sup 2}/g) with 3.40 nm pore diameter and a high fluorescence in the near infrared region at {lambda}=700 nm. To explore the potential of these particles for drug delivery applications, the pore accessibility to hydrophobic drugs was simulated by successfully trapping a hydrophobic ruthenium dye complex inside the particle with an estimated concentration of 3 wt%. Fluorescence imaging confirmed the presence of both NIR dye and the post-grafted ruthenium dye complex inside the particles. These particles moved at approximately 150 {mu}m/s under the influence of a magnetic field, hence demonstrating the multifunctionality and potential for biomedical applications in targeting and imaging. - Graphical Abstract: Hydrophobic fluorescent Ruthenium complex has been loaded into the mesopores as a surrogate drug to simulate drug delivery and to enhance the multifunctionality of the magnetic NIR emitting particles. Highlights: > Monodisperse magnetic mesoporous silica particles emitting in the near infrared region are obtained in one-pot synthesis. > We prove the capacity of such particles to uptake hydrophobic dye to mimic drug loading. > Loaded fluorescent particles can be moved under a magnetic field in a microfluidic device.

  15. Manipulating Nanoscale Features on the Surface of Dye-Loaded Microbubbles to Increase their Ultrasound-Modulated Fluorescence Output

    PubMed Central

    Ibsen, Stuart D.; Benchimol, Michael J.; Hsu, Mark J.; Esener, Sadik C.

    2014-01-01

    The nanoscale surface features of lipid-coated microbubbles can dramatically affect how the lipids interact with one another as the microbubble diameter expands and contracts under the influence of ultrasound. During microbubble manufacturing, the different lipid shell species naturally partition forming concentrated lipid islands. In this study the dynamics of how these nanoscale islands accommodate the expansion of the microbubbles are monitored by measuring the fluorescence intensity changes that occur as self-quenching lipophilic dye molecules embedded in the lipid layer change their distance from one another. It was found that when the dye molecules were concentrated in islands, less than 5% of the microbubbles displayed measurable fluorescence intensity modulation indicating the islands were not able to expand sufficiently for the dye molecules to separate from one another. When the microbubbles were heated and cooled rapidly through the lipid transition temperature the islands were melted creating an even distribution of dye about the surface. This resulted in over 50% of the microbubbles displaying the fluorescence-modulated signal indicating that the dye molecules could now separate sufficiently to change their self-quenching efficiency. The separation of the surface lipids in these different formations has significant implications for microbubble development as ultrasound and optical contrast agents. PMID:24839198

  16. Characterization of the vitreous body of the human eye using a cyanine dye as a spectral and fluorescent probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panova, Ina G.; Tatikolov, Alexander S.

    2009-02-01

    We used one of cyanine dyes as a spectral and fluorescent probe in the study of the composition of the extracellular matrix of the human eye (its vitreous body). Owing to the unique ability of the dye to bind to collagens and human serum albumin, we revealed the simultaneous presence of both types of biomacromolecules in the vitreous body. The formation of the dye complex with human serum albumin leads to appearance of a long-wavelength absorption band (~612 nm) and a steep rise of fluorescence, whereas in the presence of collagens the dye forms J-aggregates with a longer-wavelength absorption band (640-660 nm) and moderate fluorescence. In this work we studied the composition of the human fetus vitreous body and its dynamics from 9 to 31 gestation weeks. On the basis of the data obtained by this method, we may assume that albumin, being a carrier protein, probably provides the vitreous body and surrounding tissues with necessary growth factors, hormones, lipids, vitamins, and some other biomolecules. The data show that the dye is promising not only for study of albumin functions in eye development, but also for characterization of some eye diseases and for analysis of other extracellular media.

  17. Fluorescence-based sensing of glucose using engineered glucose/galactose-binding protein: A comparison of fluorescence resonance energy transfer and environmentally sensitive dye labelling strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Faaizah; Gnudi, Luigi; Pickup, John C.

    2008-01-04

    Fluorescence-based glucose sensors using glucose-binding protein (GBP) as the receptor have employed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and environmentally sensitive dyes, but with widely varying sensitivity. We therefore compared signal changes in (a) a FRET system constructed by transglutaminase-mediated N-terminal attachment of Alexa Fluor 488/555 as donor and QSY 7 as acceptor at Cys 152 or 182 mutations with (b) GBP labelled with the environmentally sensitive dye badan at C152 or 182. Both FRET systems had a small maximal fluorescence change at saturating glucose (7% and 16%), badan attached at C152 was associated with a 300% maximal fluorescence increase with glucose, though with badan at C182 there was no change. We conclude that glucose sensing based on GBP and FRET does not produce a larger enough signal change for clinical use; both the nature of the environmentally sensitive dye and its site of conjugation seem important for maximum signal change; badan-GBP152C has a large glucose-induced fluorescence change, suitable for development as a glucose sensor.

  18. AIRBORNE LIDAR MONITORING OF FLUORESCENT DYE PARTICLES AS A TRACER TO CHARACTERIZE TRANSPORT AND DISPERSION: A FEASIBILITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of using airborne lidar to observe the three-dimensional distribution of fluorescent dye particle (FDP) tracers in long-range atmospheric transport and dispersion studies has been successfully demonstrated in field experiments conducted in the North East U.S. duri...

  19. Single-lane single-fluor sequencing using dideoxy-labeled, heavy-atom-modified near-IR fluorescent dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Daryl C.; Flanagan, James H., Jr.; Legendre, Benjamin L., Jr.; Hammer, Robert P.; Soper, Steven A.

    1995-04-01

    Using a near-IR (NIR) fluorescence detection system and labels synthesized in our laboratories, electropherograms of oligonucleotides separated by capillary gel electrophoresis and detected using NIR fluorescence will be presented. The sequence of nucleotide bases was determined using a single-lane, single-dye technique. The molar concentrations of the ddNTP's used during extension reactions were varied in order to achieve a ratio of 4:2:1:0 (A:C:G:T) which allowed the identification of each terminal base via fluorescence intensity measurements. Sequencing ladders were prepared from the template, M13mp18, using standard Sanger dideoxy chain termination techniques, the modified T7 DNA polymerase, and a NIR-labeled M13 primer. The data indicated reliable sequence determination up to 300 bases with a base-calling accuracy of 90%. In order to eliminate the need for dye-labeled primers and the T7 DNA polymerase enzyme, we have developed a sequencing strategy which utilizes dye-labeled dideoxy nucleotides in a single-lane, single-fluor approach. Base-calling is accomplished by measuring the fluorescence lifetime of intramolecular heavy-atom modified dyes.

  20. Static and dynamic model fluorescence quenching of laser dye by carbon tetrachloride in binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadadevarmath, J. S.; Malimath, G. H.; Melavanki, R. M.; Patil, N. R.

    2014-01-01

    The fluorescence quenching of laser dye namely 4,4?-Bis (2-butyloctyl-oxy)-p-quaterphenyl [BIBUQ] by carbon tetrachloride has been studied in different solvent mixtures of 1-4 dioxane (DN) and acetonitrile (AN) at room temperature. The quenching is found to be appreciable and a positive deviation from linearity was observed in the Stern-Volmer plot in all the solvent mixtures. Various parameters for the quenching process have been determined by sphere of action static quenching model and finite sink approximation model. The magnitudes of these rate parameters indicate that positive deviation in the Stern-Volmer (S-V) plot is both due to static and dynamic processes.

  1. Conformational dependence of energy transfer rate between photochromic molecule and fluorescent dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokojima, Satoshi; Ryuo, Koutaro; Tachikawa, Masanori; Kobayashi, Takao; Kanda, Katsuya; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu; Fukaminato, Tuyoshi; Irie, Masahiro

    2007-12-01

    The dependence of the energy transfer rate from the fluorescent dye, bis(phenylethynyl)anthracene, to the diarylethene derivative on the dihedral angle around the adamantyl spacer, which is used in the single-molecule photoswitching experiment based on the photochromism [T. Fukaminato, T. Sasaki, T. Kawai, N. Tamai, M. Irie, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 126 (2004) 14843], is examined using the ab initio calculations. For the interpretation of the single-molecule photoswitching experiment, most desirable condition is that the on/off of the florescence is directly due to the photochromic reaction, but not others. One of the undesirable factors is the dependence of the energy transfer rate on the dihedral angle around spacer. The computational results show that the energy transfer rate depends little on the dihedral angle.

  2. Direct measurement of efflux in Pseudomonas aeruginosa using an environment-sensitive fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Ramkumar; Erwin, Alice L

    2015-01-01

    Resistance-Nodulation-Division (RND) family pumps AcrB and MexB are the major efflux routes in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa respectively. Fluorescent environment-sensitive dyes provide a means to study efflux pump function in live bacterial cells in real-time. Recently, we demonstrated the utility of this approach using the dye Nile Red to quantify AcrB-mediated efflux and measured the ability of antibiotics and other efflux pump substrates to compete with efflux of Nile Red, independent of antibacterial activity. Here, we extend this method to P. aeruginosa and describe a novel application that permits the comparison and rank-ordering of bacterial strains by their inherent efflux potential. We show that glucose and l-malate re-energize Nile Red efflux in P. aeruginosa, and we highlight differences in the glucose dependence and kinetics of efflux between P. aeruginosa and E. coli. We quantify the differences in efflux among a set of P. aeruginosa laboratory strains, which include PAO1, the hyper-sensitive strain ATCC 35151 and its parent, ATCC 12055. Efflux of Nile Red in P. aeruginosa is mediated by MexAB-OprM and is slower than in E. coli. In conclusion, we describe an efflux measurement tool for use in antibacterial drug discovery and basic research on P. aeruginosa efflux pumps. PMID:26117599

  3. Monitoring Changes in Membrane Polarity, Membrane Integrity, and Intracellular Ion Concentrations in Streptococcus pneumoniae Using Fluorescent Dyes

    PubMed Central

    Roche-Hkansson, Hazeline; Hkansson, Anders P.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane depolarization and ion fluxes are events that have been studied extensively in biological systems due to their ability to profoundly impact cellular functions, including energetics and signal transductions. While both fluorescent and electrophysiological methods, including electrode usage and patch-clamping, have been well developed for measuring these events in eukaryotic cells, methodology for measuring similar events in microorganisms have proven more challenging to develop given their small size in combination with the more complex outer surface of bacteria shielding the membrane. During our studies of death-initiation in Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus), we wanted to elucidate the role of membrane events, including changes in polarity, integrity, and intracellular ion concentrations. Searching the literature, we found that very few studies exist. Other investigators had monitored radioisotope uptake or equilibrium to measure ion fluxes and membrane potential and a limited number of studies, mostly in Gram-negative organisms, had seen some success using carbocyanine or oxonol fluorescent dyes to measure membrane potential, or loading bacteria with cell-permeant acetoxymethyl (AM) ester versions of ion-sensitive fluorescent indicator dyes. We therefore established and optimized protocols for measuring membrane potential, rupture, and ion-transport in the Gram-positive organism S. pneumoniae. We developed protocols using the bis-oxonol dye DiBAC4(3) and the cell-impermeant dye propidium iodide to measure membrane depolarization and rupture, respectively, as well as methods to optimally load the pneumococci with the AM esters of the ratiometric dyes Fura-2, PBFI, and BCECF to detect changes in intracellular concentrations of Ca2+, K+, and H+, respectively, using a fluorescence-detection plate reader. These protocols are the first of their kind for the pneumococcus and the majority of these dyes have not been used in any other bacterial species. Though our protocols have been optimized for S. pneumoniae, we believe these approaches should form an excellent starting-point for similar studies in other bacterial species. PMID:24637356

  4. Time-resolved fluorescence for breast cancer detection using an octreotate-indocyanine green derivative dye conjugate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordillo, Laura A.; Das, B. B.; Pu, Yang; Liang, Kexian; Milione, Giovanni; Sordillo, Peter P.; Achilefu, Sam; Alfano, R. R.

    2013-03-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence was used to investigate malignant and normal adjacent breast tissues stained with a conjugate of indocyanine green and octreotate. A marked increase in fluorescence lifetime intensity was seen in the breast cancer sample compared to the normal sample. The fluorescent lifetimes were also investigated and showed similar fluorescence decay curves in stained malignant and normal breast tissue. These results confirm that somatostatin receptors occur on human breast carcinomas, suggest that the presence of somatostatin receptors should be investigated as a marker of breast cancer aggressiveness, and suggest that this conjugate might be used to detect the presence of residual breast cancer after surgery, allowing better assessment of tumor margins and reducing the need for second or repeat biopsies in selected patients. These results may also provide clues for designing future treatment options for breast cancer patients.

  5. Fluorescence enhancement of dyes embedded in nanoparticles of Lu, Eu, Al, and Sc diketonates of different composition and concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, L. Yu.; Sveshnikova, E. B.; Ermolaev, V. L.

    2014-12-01

    We have studied the effect of central ions (Lu(III), Eu(III), Sc(III), and Al(III)), organic ligands (2-naphthoyltrifluoroacetone (NTA) and p-phenylbenzoyltrifluoroacetone (PhBTA)), and their concentration in a water-alcohol solution on the fluorescence of ?-diketonate complexes formed and nanoparticles (NPs) generated by the self-assembly of these complexes. The fluorescence quenching of ligands of the complexes of nanoparticles because of the introduction of molecules of dyes, such as Nile Blue (NB), Lissamine Rhodamine RB-200 (RB), and Crystal Violet (CV), in these nanoparticles is investigated, and the NP-sensitization of the fluorescence of these dyes is explored. The dependence of the intensity of the NP-sensitized fluorescence of NB on its concentration in nanoparticles consisting of complexes that differ in composition and concentration is studied. By analyzing this dependence for the nanoparticles consisting of Sc(NTA)3, the size of the studied nanoparticles is evaluated. It is shown that the nature of this dependence is determined by a competition of two processes: the migration of the excitation energy over complexes to dyes and the migration of the excitation energy of dyes to impurities or dimer of dyes. The size of nanoparticles is compared to the estimated values of the exciton diffusion length and the critical radius of energy transfer from complexes to NB. An energy transfer of close to 100% from the nanoparticles formed of 10 ?M of Sc(NTA)3 to 50 nM of NB molecules embedded therein is observed. The introduction of NB molecules into nanoparticles leads to a 200-fold increase in fluorescence intensity compared to their direct excitation in solution.

  6. Substituent and Solvent Effects on Excited State Charge Transfer Behavior of Highly Fluorescent Dyes Containing Thiophenylimidazole-Based Aldehydes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santos, Javier; Bu, Xiu R.; Mintz, Eric A.

    2001-01-01

    The excited state charge transfer for a series of highly fluorescent dyes containing thiophenylimidazole moiety was investigated. These systems follow the Twisted Intramolecular Charge Transfer (TICT) model. Dual fluorescence was observed for each substituted dye. X-ray structures analysis reveals a twisted ground state geometry for the donor substituted aryl on the 4 and 5 position at the imidazole ring. The excited state charge transfer was modeled by a linear solvation energy relationship using Taft's pi and Dimroth's E(sub T)(30) as solvent parameters. There is linear relation between the energy of the fluorescence transition and solvent polarity. The degree of stabilization of the excited state charge transfer was found to be consistent with the intramolecular molecular charge transfer. Excited dipole moment was studied by utilizing the solvatochromic shift method.

  7. Visual fluorescence detection of H2O2 and glucose based on "molecular beacon"-hosted Hoechst dyes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ling-Fei; Li, Yan-Yun; Zhang, Min; Shi, Guoyue

    2015-05-21

    In this work, a label-free molecular beacon (MB)-like biosensor is designed for the determination of H2O2 and glucose based on the fluorescence regulation of Hoechst dyes hosted by the designed AT-rich single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), in which Hg(2+) and cysteine (Cys) act as activators. The designed AT-rich ssDNA (ATprobe) can be directed to form a hairpin with an Hg(2+)-induced T-Hg(2+)-T complex, which provides a medium for enhancing the fluorescence of Hoechst dyes significantly. On the other hand, Cys can effectively grab Hg(2+) from the T-Hg(2+)-T complex by thiol-Hg(2+) interactions, destructing the hairpin and then switching the Hoechst dyes to the fluorescence "off" state. Combined with these properties, we have demonstrated its application for label-free fluorescence "turn on" detection of H2O2. The sensing mechanism is based on the specific reaction between H2O2 and Cys catalyzed by I(-), the resulting disulfide reverses the Cys-mediated fluorescence decrease of the MB-hosted Hoechst dyes. The approach achieves a low detection limit of 0.1 μM for H2O2. Moreover, this method is further applied to the noninvasive detection of glucose in artificial saliva and urine samples, combining with glucose oxidase (GOx) for the oxidation of glucose and formation of H2O2. Compared to traditional methods, the proposed design is cost-effective, simple to prepare and manipulate without fluorescence labeling or chemical modification. PMID:25868604

  8. Fluorescent dye-labelled polymer synthesis by nitroxide mediated radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollr, Jozef; Chmela, tefan; Hr?kov, Ľudmila; Hrdlovi?, Pavol

    2012-07-01

    New applications of polymers at advanced technologies demand increased requirements on their properties. These properties are influenced by molecular as well as supramolecular structure. Controlled radical polymerization mediated by stable nitroxides (NMP) or substituted alkoxyamines offers simple method for preparation of polymers with programmable structure of macromolecules which possess remarkable better physical as well as chemical properties. They can be used as a macro initiators for the synthesis of block copolymers. At the present time it has been generally accepted that the extent of "livingness" is high for all conversions [1-4]. To verify this statement a series of fluorescent dye-labelled regulators has been synthesized, spectrally characterized and used as the mediators of styrene and n-butyl acrylate polymerization. Direct quantification of dormant species concentration (extent of livingness) and calculation of molar mass of marked polymers was performed by absorption and/or emission spectroscopy. Controlled radical polymerization mediated by stable nitroxides bearing fluorescence mark represents unconventional approach for monitoring and evaluation of mechanism and kinetics of polymerization process. Results indicate that the extent of livingness is strongly influenced by conversion as well as mediator concentration. There is a clear tendency toward to decreasing amount of dormant species with increasing monomer conversion. Moreover, lower mediator concentration decreases livingness of polymerization process.

  9. A Three-Component Assembly Promoted by Boronic Acids Delivers a Modular Fluorophore Platform (BASHY Dyes).

    PubMed

    Santos, Fbio M F; Rosa, Joo N; Candeias, Nuno R; Carvalho, Ctia Parente; Matos, Ana I; Ventura, Ana E; Florindo, Helena F; Silva, Liana C; Pischel, Uwe; Gois, Pedro M P

    2016-01-01

    The modular assembly of boronic acids with Schiff-base ligands enabled the construction of innovative fluorescent dyes [boronic acid salicylidenehydrazone (BASHY)] with suitable structural and photophysical properties for live cell bioimaging applications. This reaction enabled the straightforward synthesis (yields up to 99?%) of structurally diverse and photostable dyes that exhibit a polarity-sensitive green-to-yellow emission with high quantum yields of up to 0.6 in nonpolar environments. These dyes displayed a high brightness (up to 54?000?m(-1) ?cm(-1) ). The promising structural and fluorescence properties of BASHY dyes fostered the preparation of non-cytotoxic, stable, and highly fluorescent poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles that were effectively internalized by dendritic cells. The dyes were also shown to selectively stain lipid droplets in HeLa cells, without inducing any appreciable cytotoxicity or competing plasma membrane labeling; this confirmed their potential as fluorescent stains. PMID:26691630

  10. Determination of the Frster distance in polymer films by fluorescence decay for donor dyes with a nonexponential decay profile.

    PubMed

    Felorzabihi, Neda; Froimowicz, Pablo; Haley, Jeffrey C; Bardajee, Ghasem Rezanejad; Li, Binxin; Bovero, Enrico; van Veggel, Frank C J M; Winnik, Mitchell A

    2009-02-26

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments were carried out on three pairs of donor-acceptor dyes in polymer films in which the donor dyes had absorption maxima in the range of 350-450 nm. Two of the donors, a coumarin dye and a naphthalimide dye covalently bound to polystyrene, gave nonexponential decays in the absence of acceptors. The decay profiles could be fitted to a stretched exponential form with a beta value on the order of 0.9. We developed equations for analyzing donor fluorescence intensity decay profiles for donor-acceptor mixtures in rigid matrices for the case of donors showing relatively small deviations from exponentiality. To test these equations, we calculate values of the Frster radius (R0(FR)) from the decay profile data and compare these values to the Frster radius R0(SO) determined by the traditional spectral overlap method. Agreement between these values validates the methodology developed here for the use of such donor dyes in FRET studies of more complex polymer systems. PMID:19182945

  11. Fluorescent dyes with large Stokes shifts for super-resolution optical microscopy of biological objects: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sednev, Maksim V.; Belov, Vladimir N.; Hell, Stefan W.

    2015-12-01

    The review deals with commercially available organic dyes possessing large Stokes shifts and their applications as fluorescent labels in optical microscopy based on stimulated emission depletion (STED). STED microscopy breaks Abbe’s diffraction barrier and provides optical resolution beyond the diffraction limit. STED microscopy is non-invasive and requires photostable fluorescent markers attached to biomolecules or other objects of interest. Up to now, in most biology-related STED experiments, bright and photoresistant dyes with small Stokes shifts of 20–40 nm were used. The rapid progress in STED microscopy showed that organic fluorophores possessing large Stokes shifts are indispensable in multi-color super-resolution techniques. The ultimate result of the imaging relies on the optimal combination of a dye, the bio-conjugation procedure and the performance of the optical microscope. Modern bioconjugation methods, basics of STED microscopy, as well as structures and spectral properties of the presently available fluorescent markers are reviewed and discussed. In particular, the spectral properties of the commercial dyes are tabulated and correlated with the available depletion wavelengths found in STED microscopes produced by LEICA Microsytems, Abberior Instruments and Picoquant GmbH.

  12. Stain-less staining for computed histopathology

    PubMed Central

    Mayerich, David; Walsh, Michael J.; Kadjacsy-Balla, Andre; Ray, Partha S.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Dyes such as hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and immunohistochemical stains have been increasingly used to visualize tissue composition in research and clinical practice. We present an alternative approach to obtain the same information using stain-free chemical imaging. Relying on Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging and computation, stainless computed histopathology can enable a rapid, digital, quantitative and non-perturbing visualization of morphology and multiple molecular epitopes simultaneously in a variety of research and clinical pathology applications. PMID:26029735

  13. Protein Stains to Detect Antigen on Membranes.

    PubMed

    Dsouza, Anil; Scofield, R Hal

    2015-01-01

    Western blotting (protein blotting/electroblotting) is the gold standard in the analysis of complex protein mixtures. Electroblotting drives protein molecules from a polyacrylamide (or less commonly, of an agarose) gel to the surface of a binding membrane, thereby facilitating an increased availability of the sites with affinity for both general and specific protein reagents. The analysis of these complex protein mixtures is achieved by the detection of specific protein bands on a membrane, which in turn is made possible by the visualization of protein bands either by chemical staining or by reaction with an antibody of a conjugated ligand. Chemical methods employ staining with organic dyes, metal chelates, autoradiography, fluorescent dyes, complexing with silver, or prelabeling with fluorophores. All of these methods have differing sensitivities and quantitative determinations vary significantly. This review will describe the various protein staining methods applied to membranes after western blotting. "Detection" precedes and is a prerequisite to obtaining qualitative and quantitative data on the proteins in a sample, as much as to comparing the protein composition of different samples. "Detection" is often synonymous to staining, i.e., the reversible or irreversible binding by the proteins of a colored organic or inorganic chemical. PMID:26139252

  14. Fluorescent viability stains to probe the metabolic status of aflatoxigenic fungus in dual culture of Aspergillus flavus and Pichia anomala.

    PubMed

    Hua, Sui Sheng T; Brandl, Maria T; Hernlem, Bradley; Eng, Jeffrey G; Sarreal, Siov Bouy L

    2011-02-01

    The metabolic activity of the aflatoxigenic fungus, Aspergillus flavus co-cultured with the biocontrol yeast, Pichia anomala was examined using several viability stains. Both the FUN-1 stain and the combined use of DiBAC(4)(5) with CDFA-AM stains were applied in this study. The results suggest that the ATP-generating system in A. flavus was inactivated as the ratio of yeasts to fungi increased in the dual culture. A decrease in hyphal membrane potential and esterase activity was substantiated by the combined stains of DiBAC(4)(5) and CDFA-AM. Reduced metabolic function in conjunction with cell wall damage of A. flavus hindered the growth and biomass production of this fungus. Viability stains such as FUN-1 and DiBAC(4)(5) with CDFA-AM may assist in elucidating the biocontrol mechanism by allowing for the visualization of the antagonistic effect of yeast species on target fungi in situ, as well as for screening potent biocontrol yeast agents against fungal pathogens. PMID:20680685

  15. Accurate Diffusion Coefficients of Organosoluble Reference Dyes in Organic Media Measured by Dual-Focus Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Karel; Prior, Mira; Pacheco, Victor; Willbold, Dieter; Mllen, Klaus; Enderlein, Jrg; Hofkens, Johan; Gregor, Ingo

    2015-07-28

    Dual-focus fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (2fFCS) is a versatile method to determine accurate diffusion coefficients of fluorescent species in an absolute, reference-free manner. Whereas (either classical or dual-focus) FCS has been employed primarily in the life sciences and thus in aqueous environments, it is increasingly being used in materials chemistry, as well. These measurements are often performed in nonaqueous media such as organic solvents. However, the diffusion coefficients of reference dyes in organic solvents are not readily available. For this reason we determined the translational diffusion coefficients of several commercially available organosoluble fluorescent dyes by means of 2fFCS. The selected dyes and organic solvents span the visible spectrum and a broad range of refractive indices, respectively. The diffusion coefficients can be used as absolute reference values for the calibration of experimental FCS setups, allowing quantitative measurements to be performed. We show that reliable information about the hydrodynamic dimensions of the fluorescent species (including noncommercial compounds) within organic media can be extracted from the 2fFCS data. PMID:26144863

  16. Fluorescence dye adsorption assay to quantify carboxyl groups on the surface of poly(methyl methacrylate) microbeads.

    PubMed

    Rdiger, Stefan; Ruhland, Mirko; Schmidt, Carsten; Schrder, Christian; Grossmann, Kai; Bhm, Alexander; Nitschke, Jrg; Berger, Ingo; Schimke, Ingolf; Schierack, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Microbead-based assays have evolved into powerful tools for the multiplex detection of biomolecules. Analytes are captured by DNA or protein capture molecules which are coupled on microbead surfaces. A homogeneous carboxylation of microbeads is essential for the optimal and reproducible coupling of capture molecules and thus a prerequisite for an optimal multiplex microbead-based assay performance. We developed a simple fluorescence dye adsorption assay for the description of microbead carboxylation and for the prediction of coupling successes of capture molecules. Using the fluorescence dye SYTO-62 it is possible to quantify the degree of carboxylation of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microbeads within 1 h in a multiplex format by fluorescence microscopy or flow cytometry. Compared to conventional bulk assays which only provide an average degree of carboxylation the main advantage of the SYTO-62 assay is the single microbead analysis and therefore the description of the qualitative distribution of carboxylation in microbead populations. The SYTO-62 assay is sensitive enough to even determine weak carboxylation. Also, the quality of microbeads can be evaluated. To our knowledge this is the first report which applies a reversible noncovalent fluorescent dye adsorption assay to quantify the degree of carboxylation on surfaces. PMID:21413805

  17. Treatment of port wine stains with pulsed dye laser: a retrospective study of 848 cases in Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wenhao; Wang, Jinliang; Lin, Yan; Geng, Jianhui; Wang, Haixia; Gong, Yueqin; Liu, Huaxu; Zhang, Furen

    2014-01-01

    Background Currently, 595 nm pulsed dye laser (PDL) therapy is offered as one of the effective treatments of port wine stains (PWSs). However, the efficacy of PDL differs in different populations. Objective The purpose of the study was to investigate the efficacy, and related factors, of 595 nm PDL in the treatment of PWSs in Chinese patients with skin type III to IV. Methods A total of 848 cases that were treated with PDL were enrolled and analyzed in this study. An independent dermatologist evaluated these lesions according to the before and after photographs. Results The response rate (RR) of all the 848 PWS patients was 69.9%, within which the cure rate was 6.3%. The patients aged ≤1 year had the highest RR (93.9%), whereas those treated after age 50 reacted the worst (RR =25%). We analyzed the anatomical distribution of the lesion and found that the temporal region had the highest lesion clearance (RR =75.3%), while the extremities had the lowest clearance (RR =44.5%). Compared with the patients whose lesion size was larger than 80 cm2, the patients with small lesion size, of 0–20 cm2, had better clinical effect (RR =73.8% vs 53.2%). The reactions of the patients with hyperplastic lesion were worse than those with red patches (RR =36.4% vs 71.7%). As well, increasing treatment numbers could achieve higher clearance rates (P=0.005). Conclusion The PDL had a relatively high RR but a low clearance rate in Chinese patients with PWS, although the earlier the intervention, the better was the efficacy. The response of PDL was, not only related to the anatomical area, but also, to the lesion size, type of lesion (ie, the presence of existing hyperplastic lesions), and the number of treatment, all of which are essential for the evaluation of therapeutic effect and acquisition of patients consent before treatment. PMID:25548515

  18. Oxidative synthesis of highly fluorescent boron/nitrogen co-doped carbon nanodots enabling detection of photosensitizer and carcinogenic dye.

    PubMed

    Jahan, Shanaz; Mansoor, Farrukh; Naz, Shagufta; Lei, Jianping; Kanwal, Shamsa

    2013-11-01

    Current research efforts have demonstrated the facile hydrothermal oxidative synthetic route to develop highly fluorescent boron/nitrogen co-doped carbon nanodots (CNDs). During this process, N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)glycine served as a source of N doping and a carbon precursor as well, while boric acid H3BO3 is used as an oxidizing agent in the N2 environment. Surface passivation through ultrasonic treatment of CNDs was performed to induce modifications by using various surface passivating agents. Polyethyleneimine (PEI) remarkably enhanced the fluorescence performance and monodispersity of polymerized carbon nanodots (P-CNDs) in aqueous phase with an enhanced quantum yield of 23.71%, along with an increase in size from ~3 nm to ~200 nm. For characterization of CNDs and P-CNDs, UV, infrared, photoluminescence, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectra, and atomic force microscopy techniques were utilized. Application potentials of synthesized P-CNDs were developed via introduction of protoporphyrin (PPD, a photosensitizer) which has great doping affinity with polymer PEI to switch-off the fluorescence of P-CNDs, leading to the production of dye-doped nanoprobes. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was also observed during dye-doping, and PPD was detected with a limit of detection (LOD, 3σ) of 15 pM. The fluorescence recovery of this switched-off nanoprobe was made possible by using Sudan red III (carcinogenic dye), which was oxidized by PPD doped in P-CNDs. Sudan red III was detected in the concentration range of 9.9 pM-0.37 nM. Meanwhile, it was also confirmed that the dye-doped nanoprobe is highly selective and exceptionally sensitive to detect this carcinogenic agent in commercial products with a LOD (3σ) of 90 fM. PMID:24083490

  19. Preferential Attachment of Specific Fluorescent Dyes and Dye Labeled DNA Sequences in a Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Multiplex.

    PubMed

    Gracie, Kirsten; Moores, Matthew; Smith, W Ewen; Harding, Kerry; Girolami, Mark; Graham, Duncan; Faulds, Karen

    2016-01-19

    A significant advantage of using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for DNA detection is the capability to detect multiple analytes simultaneously within the one sample. However, as the analytes approach the metallic surface required for SERS, they become more concentrated and previous studies have suggested that different dye labels will have different affinities for the metal surface. Here, the interaction of single stranded DNA labeled with either fluorescein (FAM) or tetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA) with a metal surface, using spermine induced aggregated silver nanoparticles as the SERS substrate, is investigated by analyzing the labels separately and in mixtures. Comparison studies were also undertaken using the dyes in their free isothiocyanate forms, fluorescein isothiocyanate (F-ITC) and tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate (TR-ITC). When the two dyes are premixed prior to the addition of nanoparticles, TAMRA exerts a strong masking effect over FAM due to a stronger affinity for the metal surface. When parameters such as order of analyte addition, analysis time, and analyte concentration are investigated, the masking effect of TAMRA is still observed but the extent changes depending on the experimental parameters. By using bootstrap estimation of changes in SERS peak intensity, a greater insight has been achieved into the surface affinity of the two dyes as well as how they interact with each other. It has been shown that the order of addition of the analytes is important and that specific dye related interactions occur, which could greatly affect the observed SERS spectra. SERS has been used successfully for the simultaneous detection of several analytes; however, this work has highlighted the significant factors that must be taken into consideration when planning a multiple analyte assay. PMID:26698880

  20. Isolation of full-size mRNA from ethanol-fixed cells after cellular immunofluorescence staining and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS).

    PubMed

    Esser, C; Gttlinger, C; Kremer, J; Hundeiker, C; Radbruch, A

    1995-12-01

    Preparation of intact, full-size RNA from tissues or cells requires stringent precautions against ubiquitous and rather stable RNases. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) usually aims at the isolation of cells according to cell surface markers on living cells, from which RNA can be obtained by standard protocols. The separation of cells according to intracellular immunofluorescence markers, such as intranuclear, intracytoplasmic, or secreted molecules, requires permeation of the cell membrane for the staining antibodies, which is usually achieved by fixation. However, commonly used fixatives such as ethanol, methanol, or formaldehyde do not inactivate RNases completely, thereby hampering the analysis of complete RNA molecules from fixed cells. We report isolation of intact, full-size RNA suitable for Northern blotting from cells that were fixed by 95% ethanol/5% acetic acid containing RNase inhibitors, stained intracellularly, and sorted by FACS. PMID:8608737

  1. Studies of the photophysics of highly fluorescent Red Mega 480 laser dye in solutions: Steady state spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangod, V. B.; Mastiholi, B. M.; Raikar, Prasad; Kulkarni, S. G.; Raikar, U. S.

    2015-09-01

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of highly fluorescent industrially useful medium sized Red Mega 480 dye have been studied in various solvents at 298 K. The solute photophysical behavior depends strongly on the solute-solvent interactions. In order to understand the effect of inter molecular interactions on spectral behaviors of the dye in different solvents extent of this behavior can be analyzed by linear solvation energy relationships. In addition, ground and excited state dipole moments were evaluated by various methods. It is observed that excited state dipole moment (?e) is larger than the ground state (?g), absorption spectra show a bathochromic shift with increasing polarity indicating that transition involved is ? ? ?? and Onsager cavity radius is determined by atomic increment method.

  2. Red/blue spectral shifts of laser-induced fluorescence emission due to different nanoparticle suspensions in various dye solutions.

    PubMed

    Bavali, A; Parvin, P; Mortazavi, S Z; Mohammadian, M; Mousavi Pour, M R

    2014-08-20

    Red/blue shifts of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) are investigated using several guest dielectric nanoscatterers, such as TiO2, ZnO, Al2O3, and SiO2, in the host Rd6G, RdB, Coumarin 4, and Coumarin 7 ethanolic solutions. A couple of inflection points are identified varying nanoparticle (NP) density into dye solutions based on LIF spectroscopy. The inflection of the spectral shift exhibits that the suspension of NPs in dye solutions significantly involves a couple of competitive chemical and optical mechanisms during photon traveling in scattering media regarding ballistic and diffusive transport. It is shown that the low, medium, and high NP additives in fluorescent suspension induce blue, red, and blue spectral shifts, respectively. PMID:25321111

  3. Studies of the photophysics of highly fluorescent Red Mega 480 laser dye in solutions: Steady state spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tangod, V B; Mastiholi, B M; Raikar, Prasad; Kulkarni, S G; Raikar, U S

    2015-09-01

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of highly fluorescent industrially useful medium sized Red Mega 480 dye have been studied in various solvents at 298 K. The solute photophysical behavior depends strongly on the solute-solvent interactions. In order to understand the effect of inter molecular interactions on spectral behaviors of the dye in different solvents extent of this behavior can be analyzed by linear solvation energy relationships. In addition, ground and excited state dipole moments were evaluated by various methods. It is observed that excited state dipole moment (?e) is larger than the ground state (?g), absorption spectra show a bathochromic shift with increasing polarity indicating that transition involved is ???(?) and Onsager cavity radius is determined by atomic increment method. PMID:25875032

  4. Dependence of Purcell effect on fluorescence wavelength in dye molecules on metaldielectric multilayer hyperbolic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurumachi, Noriaki; Izawa, Hayato; Tomioka, Ryo; Sakata, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Shimokawa, Fusao; Nakanishi, Shunsuke

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the enhancement of spontaneous emission, i.e., broadband Purcell effect, has been achieved using hyperbolic metamaterials. Hyperbolic metamaterials, which can be realized using a metaldielectric multilayer structure, have an extremely large optical anisotropy of permittivity in both the parallel and perpendicular directions to the propagation of light, especially when the signs of permittivities in both directions differ. In this study, we investigated the conditions for realizing the broadband Purcell effect using dye molecules with different fluorescence wavelengths. Our fabricated metaldielectric multilayer structure exhibited hyperbolic dispersion at wavelengths beyond 500 nm. In the case of coumarin 500 whose fluorescence peak is located at 500 nm, no broadband Purcell effect was observed. However, in the case of pyridine 1 whose fluorescence peak is located at 650 nm, we observed the successfull fluorescence lifetime shortening, i.e., the broadband Purcell effect.

  5. Selective staining by 4', 6-diamidine-2-phenylindole of nanogram quantities of DNA in the presence of RNA on gels.

    PubMed

    Kapu?ci?ski, J; Yanagi, K

    1979-08-10

    4', 6-Diamidine-2-phenylindole.2HCl (DAPI) forms fluorescent complexes with double-stranded (ds) DNA but not with ds RNA as shown by fluorescence titration. The widely used dye ethidium bromide (EB) forms fluorescent complexes with both types of nucleic acids. Also, in contrast to EB, DAPI forms much weaker fluorescent complexes with single-stranded DNA than with ds DNA. These observations were utilized to develop staining procedures for the selective visualization of ds DNA on gels. The use of DAPI in addition to EB for staining makes possible the localization of ds DNA and other species of nucleic acids on a single gel. PMID:493114

  6. Fluorescence Quenching of (Dimethylamino)naphthalene Dyes Badan and Prodan by Tryptophan in Cytochromes P450 and Micelles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence of 2-(N,N-dimethylamino)-6-propionylnaphthalene dyes Badan and Prodan is quenched by tryptophan in Brij 58 micelles as well as in two cytochrome P450 proteins (CYP102, CYP119) with Badan covalently attached to a cysteine residue. Formation of nonemissive complexes between a dye molecule and tryptophan accounts for about 76% of the fluorescence intensity quenching in micelles, the rest is due to diffusive encounters. In the absence of tryptophan, fluorescence of Badan-labeled cytochromes decays with triexponential kinetics characterized by lifetimes of about 100 ps, 700800 ps, and 3 ns. Site mutation of a histidine residue in the vicinity of the Badan label by tryptophan results in shortening of all three decay lifetimes. The relative amplitude of the fastest component increases at the expense of the two slower ones. The average quenching rate constants are 4.5 108 s1 (CYP102) and 3.7 108 s1 (CYP119), at 288 K. Cyclic voltammetry of Prodan in MeCN shows a reversible reduction peak at ?1.85 V vs NHE that becomes chemically irreversible and shifts positively upon addition of water. A quasireversible reduction at ?0.88 V was observed in an aqueous buffer (pH 7.3). The excited-state reduction potential of Prodan (and Badan) is estimated to vary from about +0.6 V (vs NHE) in polar aprotic media (MeCN) to approximately +1.6 V in water. Tryptophan quenching of Badan/Prodan fluorescence in CYPs and Brij 58 micelles is exergonic by ?0.5 V and involves tryptophan oxidation by excited Badan/Prodan, coupled with a fast reaction between the reduced dye and water. Photoreduction is a new quenching mechanism for 2-(N,N-dimethylamino)-6-propionylnaphthalene dyes that are often used as solvatochromic polarity probes, FRET donors and acceptors, as well as reporters of solvation dynamics. PMID:25079965

  7. Quirks of dye nomenclature. 5. Rhodamines.

    PubMed

    Cooksey, C J

    2016-01-01

    Rhodamines were first produced in the late 19(th) century, when they constituted a new class of synthetic dyes. These compounds since have been used to color many things including cosmetics, inks, textiles, and in some countries, food products. Certain rhodamine dyes also have been used to stain biological specimens and currently are widely used as fluorescent probes for mitochondria in living cells. The early history and current biological applications are sketched briefly and an account of the ambiguities, complications and confusions concerning dye identification and nomenclature are discussed. PMID:26529223

  8. Charge-recombination fluorescence from push-pull electronic systems constructed around amino-substituted styryl-BODIPY dyes.

    PubMed

    Nano, Adela; Ziessel, Raymond; Stachelek, Patrycya; Harriman, Anthony

    2013-09-27

    A small series of donor-acceptor molecular dyads has been synthesized and fully characterized. In each case, the acceptor is a dicyanovinyl unit and the donor is a boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dye equipped with a single styryl arm bearing a terminal amino group. In the absence of the acceptor, the BODIPY-based dyes are strongly fluorescent in the far-red region and the relaxed excited-singlet states possess significant charge-transfer character. As such, the emission maxima depend on both the solvent polarity and temperature. With the corresponding push-pull molecules, there is a low-energy charge-transfer state that can be observed by both absorption and emission spectroscopy. Here, charge-recombination fluorescence is weak and decays over a few hundred picoseconds or so to recover the ground state. Overall, these results permit evaluation of the factors affecting the probability of charge-recombination fluorescence in push-pull dyes. The photophysical studies are supported by cyclic voltammetry and DFT calculations. PMID:24038505

  9. Volume labeling with Alexa Fluor dyes and surface functionalization of highly sensitive fluorescent silica (SiO2) nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Foster, Carmen M.; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L.; Mortensen, Ninell P.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Gu, Baohua; Retterer, Scott T.

    2013-10-01

    A new synthesis approach is described that allows the direct incorporation of fluorescent labels into the volume or body of SiO2 nanoparticles. In this process, fluorescent Alexa Fluor dyes with different emission wavelengths were covalently incorporated into the SiO2 nanoparticles during their formation by the hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane. The dye molecules were homogeneously distributed throughout the SiO2 nanoparticles. The quantum yields of the Alexa Fluor volume-labeled SiO2 nanoparticles were much higher than nanoparticles labeled using conventional organic dyes. The size of the resulting nanoparticles was controlled using microemulsion reaction media with sizes in the range of 20-100 nm and a polydispersity of <15%. In comparison with conventional surface tagged particles created by post-synthesis modification, this process maintains the physical and surface chemical properties that have the most pronounced effect on colloidal stability and interactions with their surroundings. These volume-labeled nanoparticles have proven to be extremely robust, showing excellent signal strength, negligible photobleaching, and minimal loss of functional organic components. The native or ``free'' surface of the volume-labeled particles can be altered to achieve a specific surface functionality without altering fluorescence. Their utility was demonstrated for visualizing the association of surface-modified fluorescent particles with cultured macrophages. Differences in particle agglomeration and cell association were clearly associated with differences in observed nanoparticle toxicity. The capacity to maintain particle fluorescence while making significant changes to surface chemistry makes these particles extremely versatile and useful for studies of particle agglomeration, uptake, and transport in environmental and biological systems.A new synthesis approach is described that allows the direct incorporation of fluorescent labels into the volume or body of SiO2 nanoparticles. In this process, fluorescent Alexa Fluor dyes with different emission wavelengths were covalently incorporated into the SiO2 nanoparticles during their formation by the hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane. The dye molecules were homogeneously distributed throughout the SiO2 nanoparticles. The quantum yields of the Alexa Fluor volume-labeled SiO2 nanoparticles were much higher than nanoparticles labeled using conventional organic dyes. The size of the resulting nanoparticles was controlled using microemulsion reaction media with sizes in the range of 20-100 nm and a polydispersity of <15%. In comparison with conventional surface tagged particles created by post-synthesis modification, this process maintains the physical and surface chemical properties that have the most pronounced effect on colloidal stability and interactions with their surroundings. These volume-labeled nanoparticles have proven to be extremely robust, showing excellent signal strength, negligible photobleaching, and minimal loss of functional organic components. The native or ``free'' surface of the volume-labeled particles can be altered to achieve a specific surface functionality without altering fluorescence. Their utility was demonstrated for visualizing the association of surface-modified fluorescent particles with cultured macrophages. Differences in particle agglomeration and cell association were clearly associated with differences in observed nanoparticle toxicity. The capacity to maintain particle fluorescence while making significant changes to surface chemistry makes these particles extremely versatile and useful for studies of particle agglomeration, uptake, and transport in environmental and biological systems. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Cell culture preparation for dose/response imaging experiments. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02639f

  10. A Three‐Component Assembly Promoted by Boronic Acids Delivers a Modular Fluorophore Platform (BASHY Dyes)†

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Fábio M. F.; Rosa, João N.; Candeias, Nuno R.; Carvalho, Cátia Parente; Matos, Ana I.; Ventura, Ana E.; Florindo, Helena F.; Silva, Liana C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The modular assembly of boronic acids with Schiff‐base ligands enabled the construction of innovative fluorescent dyes [boronic acid salicylidenehydrazone (BASHY)] with suitable structural and photophysical properties for live cell bioimaging applications. This reaction enabled the straightforward synthesis (yields up to 99 %) of structurally diverse and photostable dyes that exhibit a polarity‐sensitive green‐to‐yellow emission with high quantum yields of up to 0.6 in nonpolar environments. These dyes displayed a high brightness (up to 54 000 m −1 cm−1). The promising structural and fluorescence properties of BASHY dyes fostered the preparation of non‐cytotoxic, stable, and highly fluorescent poly(lactide‐co‐glycolide) nanoparticles that were effectively internalized by dendritic cells. The dyes were also shown to selectively stain lipid droplets in HeLa cells, without inducing any appreciable cytotoxicity or competing plasma membrane labeling; this confirmed their potential as fluorescent stains. PMID:26691630

  11. Volume Labeling with Alexa-Fluor Dyes and Surface Functionalization of Highly Sensitive Fluorescent SiO2 Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Foster, Carmen M; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Nallathamby, Prakash D; Mortensen, Ninell P; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Gu, Baohua; Retterer, Scott T; Gu, Baohua

    2013-01-01

    A new synthesis approach is described that allows the direct incorporation of fluorescent labels into the volume or body of SiO2 nanoparticles. In this process, fluorescent Alexa Fluor dyes with different emission wavelengths were covalently incorporated into the SiO2 nanoparticles during their formation by the hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane. The dye molecules were homogeneously distributed throughout the SiO2 nanoparticles. The quantum yields of the Alexa Fluor volume-labeled SiO2 nanoparticles were much higher than nanoparticles labeled using conventional organic dyes. The size of the resulting nanoparticles was controlled using microemulsion reaction media with sizes in the range of 20-100 nm and a polydispersity of <15%. In comparison with conventional surface tagged particles created by post-synthesis modification, this process maintains the physical and surface chemical properties that have the most pronounced effect on colloidal stability and interactions with their surroundings. These volume-labeled nanoparticles have proven to be extremely robust, showing excellent signal strength, negligible photobleaching, and minimal loss of functional organic components. The native or free surface of the volume-labeled particles can be altered to achieve a specific surface functionality without altering fluorescence. Their utility was demonstrated for visualizing the association of surface modified fluorescent particles with cultured macrophages. Differences in particle agglomeration and cell association were clearly associated with differences in observed nanoparticle toxicity. The capacity to maintain particle fluorescence while making significant changes to surface chemistry makes these particles extremely versatile and useful for studies of particle agglomeration, uptake, and transport in environmental and biological systems.

  12. Fluorescence imaging method for in vivo pH monitoring during liposomes uptake in rat liver using a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Begu, S; Mordon, S; Desmettre, T; Devoisselle, J M

    2005-01-01

    Liposomes are known to be taken up by the liver cells after intravenous injection. Among the few techniques available to follow this process in vivo are perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and scintigraphy. The study of the intracellular pathways and liposomal localization in the different liver cells requires sacrifice of the animals, cells separation, and electronic microscopy. In the acidic intracellular compartments, the in situ rate of release of liposomes remains poorly understood. We present a new method to follow the in situ and in vivo uptake of liposomes using a fluorescent pH-sensitive probe 5,6-carboxyfluorescein (5,6-CF). 5,6-CF is encapsulated in liposomes at high concentration (100 mM) to quench its fluorescence. After laparotomy, liposomes are injected into the penile vein of Wistar rats. Fluorescence images of the liver and the skin are recorded during 90 min and the fluorescence intensity ratio is calculated. Ratio kinetics show different profiles depending on the liposomal formulation. The calculated intracellular liver pH values are, respectively, 4.5 to 5.0 and 6.0 to 6.5 for DSPC/chol and DMPC liposomes. After sacrifice and flush with a cold saline solution, the pH of the intracellular site of the liver (ex vivo) is found to be 4.5 to 5.0. This value can be explained by an uptake of liposomes by the liver cells and subsequent localization into the acidic compartment. An intracellular event such as dye release of a drug carrier (liposomes loaded with a fluorescent dye) can be monitored by pH fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy in vivo and in situ. PMID:15910082

  13. Fluorescent porous film modified polymer optical fiber via "click" chemistry: stable dye dispersion and trace explosive detection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiajun; Lv, Ling; Zou, Gang; Zhang, Qijin

    2015-01-14

    In this paper, we report a facile strategy to fabricate fluorescent porous thin film on the surface of U-bent poly(methyl methacrylate) optical fiber (U-bent POF) in situ via "click" polymerization for vapor phase sensing of explosives. Upon irradiation of evanescent UV light transmitting within the fiber under ambient condition, a porous film (POSS-thiol cross-linking film, PTCF) is synthesized on the side surface of the fiber by a thiol-ene "click" reaction of vinyl-functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS-V8) and alkane dithiols. When vinyl-functionalized porphyrin, containing four allyl substituents at the periphery, is added into precursors for the polymerization, fluorescence porphyrin can be covalently bonded into the cross-linked network of PTCF. This "fastened" way reduces the aggregation-induced fluorescence self-quenching of porphyrin and enhances the physicochemical stability of the porous film on the surface of U-bent POF. Fluorescent signals of the PTCF/U-bent POF probe made by this method exhibit high fluorescence quenching toward trace TNT and DNT vapor and the highest fluorescence quenching efficiency is observed for 1, 6-hexanedimercaptan-based film. In addition, because of the presence of POSS-V8 with multi cross-linkable groups, PTCF exhibits well-organized pore network and stable dye dispersion, which not only causes fast and sensitive fluorescence quenching against vapors of nitroaromatic compounds, but also provides a repeatability of the probing performance. PMID:25487515

  14. In Situ Immune Infrared Fluorescent Staining for Detection and Quantification of Bluetongue Virus in Cullicoides Insect Cell Culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is transmitted to sheep, cattle and other ruminants by Culicoides spp. of biting midges. Cell lines have been developed from C. sonorensis; however, techniques for directly detecting and quantifying virus in these insect cells are lacking. In situ immune infrared fluorescent s...

  15. Measurement of Bluetongue Virus Binding to a Mammalian Cell Surface Receptor by an In Situ Immune Fluorescent Staining Technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A quantifiable in situ immune fluorescent assay (IFA) was developed to measure bluetongue virus (BTV) binding to mammalian cells. The utility of the assay was demonstrated with both Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and bovine pulmonary artery endothelial (CPAE) cells. Since heparin sulfate (HS) has been ...

  16. Comparing the efficacy of routine H&E staining and cytokeratin immunohistochemical staining in detection of micro-metastasis on serial sections of dye-mapped sentinel lymph nodes in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sanei, Mohammad Hossein; Tabatabie, Seid Abbas; Hashemi, Seid Mozafar; Cherei, Ali; Mahzouni, Parvin; Sanei, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Background: The significance of techniques used for detecting micro-metastasis (MM) or isolated tumor cells (ITCs) is a controversial issue among investigators. We evaluated the different techniques used on sentinel lymph node (SLN) to detect MM/ITCs. Materials and Methods: Ninety-one SLNs of 15 patients underwent serial section with 100 μm interval. In each level, two sections were prepared. One section was stained with H&E and another with anti-cytokeratin antibody (immunohistochemistry). Then the sections were evaluated for detecting MM/ITCs. Results were analyzed by chi-square test. Results: 1656 sections of 91 SLNs of 15 patients were evaluated by a pathologist; MM was found in 1 and ITCs in 1 case. Overall, 2 out of 15 cases (13.3% of the patients) showed MM/ITCs by IHC staining. So, serial section along with using IHC was superior than serial section and routine H&E staining. But it did not affect the 5-year survival of the patients (P = 0.47). Conclusion: Using the combined techniques of serial section and IHC staining could up-stage 13.3% of colon cancer patients who were lymph node negative. In other studies with different combination of serial section, IHC staining, and PCR, investigators were able to find MM/ITCs in 3-39% of the cases. In our study, although serial section and IHC staining could up-stage 13.3% of patients, it could not affect the 5-year survival of the patients.

  17. A high-sensitive and non-radioisotopic fluorescence dye method for evaluating bacterial adhesion to denture materials.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Yoko; Washio, Jumpei; Sasaki, Keiichi; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Oral bacteria adhered to dental material surfaces are known to cause various oral diseases. This study aimed to develop a highsensitive and non-radioisotopic fluorescence dye method for quantification of oral bacteria (Streptococcus, Actinomyces and Veillonella) adhered to denture material surfaces. The amount of adhered bacteria was estimated from the fluorescence intensity derived from resazurin, which is reduced by bacterial metabolic reactions. The addition of bacterial metabolic substrates (glucose for Streptococcus and Actinomyces and sodium lactate for Veillonella) to the reaction mixture increased the fluorescence intensity by 2.3-110 times, subsequently improved the sensitivity. Furthermore, an experimental device having silicon wells containing test material was carefully designed for accurate quantification of bacteria adhered to test materials. The improved resazurin method using a new experimental device successfully enabled the quantification of bacterial adhesion to polymethyl methacrylate and other three conventional denture materials. PMID:23903640

  18. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of the crucian carp, Carassius carassius (Linnaeus, 1758) (Teleostei, Cyprinidae), using chromosome staining and fluorescence in situ hybridisation with rDNA probes

    PubMed Central

    Spoz, Aneta; Boron, Alicja; Porycka, Katarzyna; Karolewska, Monika; Ito, Daisuke; Abe, Syuiti; Kirtiklis, Lech; Juchno, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The crucian carp Carassius carassius (Linnaeus, 1758) is a species with restricted and decreasing distribution in Europe. Six males and six females of the species from the Baltic Sea basin in Poland were examined to show sequentially CMA3/AgNO3 staining pattern, DAPI staining, and, for the first time in literature, molecular cytogenetic analysis using double-colour fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with 28S and 5S rDNA probes. The karyotype consisted of 20 m, 36 sm and 44 sta chromosomes, NF=156. The AgNO3 stained NORs were most frequently located terminally in the short arms of two sm and two sta elements, and CMA3-positive sites were also observed suggesting abundant GC-rich repetitive DNA in the regions. Other CMA3-positive sites in the short arms of six to ten sm and sta chromosomes were detected. The results based on 28S rDNA FISH confirmed the location of rDNA sites. DAPI-negative staining of NORs suggested the scarcity of AT-rich DNA in the regions. FISH with 5S rDNA probe revealed 8–14 loci (ten and 12 in respectively 49 and 29% of metaphases). They were located in two sm and eight to ten sta chromosomes and six of them were larger than others. Simultaneously, mapping of the two rDNA families on the chromosomes of C. carassius revealed that both 28S and 5S rDNA probes were located in different chromosomes. Molecular cytogenetic data of C. carassius presented here for the first time give an important insight into the structure of chromosomes of this polyploid and declining species and may be useful in its systematics. PMID:25349674

  19. Pitfalls of DNA Quantification Using DNA-Binding Fluorescent Dyes and Suggested Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Hiromi; Einaga, Naoki; Esumi, Mariko

    2016-01-01

    The Qubit fluorometer is a DNA quantification device based on the fluorescence intensity of fluorescent dye binding to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Qubit is generally considered useful for checking DNA quality before next-generation sequencing because it measures intact dsDNA. To examine the most accurate and suitable methods for quantifying DNA for quality assessment, we compared three quantification methods: NanoDrop, which measures UV absorbance; Qubit; and quantitative PCR (qPCR), which measures the abundance of a target gene. For the comparison, we used three types of DNA: 1) DNA extracted from fresh frozen liver tissues (Frozen-DNA); 2) DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded liver tissues comparable to those used for Frozen-DNA (FFPE-DNA); and 3) DNA extracted from the remaining fractions after RNA extraction with Trizol reagent (Trizol-DNA). These DNAs were serially diluted with distilled water and measured using three quantification methods. For Frozen-DNA, the Qubit values were not proportional to the dilution ratio, in contrast with the NanoDrop and qPCR values. This non-proportional decrease in Qubit values was dependent on a lower salt concentration, and over 1 mM NaCl in the DNA solution was required for the Qubit measurement. For FFPE-DNA, the Qubit values were proportional to the dilution ratio and were lower than the NanoDrop values. However, electrophoresis revealed that qPCR reflected the degree of DNA fragmentation more accurately than Qubit. Thus, qPCR is superior to Qubit for checking the quality of FFPE-DNA. For Trizol-DNA, the Qubit values were proportional to the dilution ratio and were consistently lower than the NanoDrop values, similar to FFPE-DNA. However, the qPCR values were higher than the NanoDrop values. Electrophoresis with SYBR Green I and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) quantification demonstrated that Trizol-DNA consisted mostly of non-fragmented ssDNA. Therefore, Qubit is not always the most accurate method for quantifying DNA available for PCR. PMID:26937682

  20. Solvent influence on absorption and fluorescence spectra of merocyanine dyes: a theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraldi, I.; Brancolini, G.; Momicchioli, F.; Ponterini, G.; Vanossi, D.

    2003-03-01

    The solvaton-CS INDO model, previously successfully used to describe the solvatochromic properties of merocyanines, has been extended to the study of the solvent influence on the fluorescence spectra (fluorosolvatochromism) of these dyes. A ketocyanine (M1) and a stilbazolium betaine (M2) were chosen as representatives of positively and negatively solvatochromic behaviours, respectively. The gap of experimental knowledge concerning the emission properties of M2 was filled by a spectrofluorometric analysis in a set of solvents covering a large range of the ET(30) scale. Solvato- and fluorosolvatochromism were described by calculating the S 0(eq.)?S 1(Franck-Condon) and S 1(eq.)?S 0(Franck-Condon) transition energies as a function of a polarity factor related to the static dielectric constant of the solvent, and ranging from 0 to 1. The absorbing S 0(eq.) and emitting S 1(eq.) units (solute molecule + solvent cage) were approximated using the S 0 and S 1 geometries of the unsolvated molecule and the respective charge distributions fitted to the current value of k( ?). The calculation results fully confirm that S 0 and S 1 states of merocyanines can be viewed as a mixture of a neutral and a zwitterionic structure whose composition is controlled by the solvent polarity. The plots of the calculated spectral data (absorption and emission maxima and corresponding Stokes shifts) vs k( ?) are in fairly good agreement with those of the experimental data over almost the entire range of the normalized ETN values, thus showing that specific solvent interactions are at least partly simulated within the solvaton-CS INDO scheme. The methodological prerequisites for a correct prediction of solvatochromic shifts are recalled with reference to previous conflicting theoretical interpretations.

  1. In vivo fluorescence imaging of lysosomes: a potential technique to follow dye accumulation in the context of PDT?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Mordon, Serge R.; Soulie-Begu, Sylvie

    1995-03-01

    Lysosomes and intracellular acidic compartments seem to play an important role in the context of PDT. Some photosensitizers are localized in the lysosomes of tumor-associated macrophages. Liposomes, which are lysosomotropic drug carriers, are used to deliver photosensitizers in tumors. Liposomes are taken up by the liver cells after intravenous injection. Intracellular pathway and liposomes localization in the different liver cells require sacrifice of the animals, cell separation, and observation by electronic microscopy. Little is known about liposomes kinetic uptake by the acidic intracellular compartments in vivo. We propose in this study a new method to follow liposomes uptake in the liver in vivo using a fluorescent pH-sensitive probe. We have already demonstrated the ability of fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging using a pH-dependent probe to monitor pH in living tissues. As pH of lysosome is very low, the kinetic of liposome uptake in this intracellular acidic compartment is followed by monitoring the pH of the whole liver in vivo and ex vivo. Liposomes-encapsulated carboxyfluorescein are prepared by the sonication procedure. Carboxyfluorescein is used at high concentration (100 mM) in order to quench its fluorescence. Liposomes are injected to Wistar rats into the peinil vein. After laparotomy, fluorescence spectra and images are recorded during two hours. Results show a rapid fluorescence increase followed by a slow phase of fluorescence decrease. pH decreases from physiological value to 6.0. After sacrifice and flush with cold saline solution, pH of liver ex vivo is found to be 5.0 - 5.5. These data show a rapid clearance of released dye and an uptake of liposomes by the liver cells and, as liposomes penetrate in the acidic compartment, dye is released from liposomes and is delivered in lysosomes leading to the decrease of pH.

  2. Estimation of presynaptic calcium currents and endogenous calcium buffers at the frog neuromuscular junction with two different calcium fluorescent dyes

    PubMed Central

    Samigullin, Dmitry; Fatikhov, Nijaz; Khaziev, Eduard; Skorinkin, Andrey; Nikolsky, Eugeny; Bukharaeva, Ellya

    2015-01-01

    At the frog neuromuscular junction, under physiological conditions, the direct measurement of calcium currents and of the concentration of intracellular calcium bufferswhich determine the kinetics of calcium concentration and neurotransmitter release from the nerve terminalhas hitherto been technically impossible. With the aim of quantifying both Ca2+ currents and the intracellular calcium buffers, we measured fluorescence signals from nerve terminals loaded with the low-affinity calcium dye Magnesium Green or the high-affinity dye Oregon Green BAPTA-1, simultaneously with microelectrode recordings of nerve-action potentials and end-plate currents. The action-potential-induced fluorescence signals in the nerve terminals developed much more slowly than the postsynaptic response. To clarify the reasons for this observation and to define a spatiotemporal profile of intracellular calcium and of the concentration of mobile and fixed calcium buffers, mathematical modeling was employed. The best approximations of the experimental calcium transients for both calcium dyes were obtained when the calcium current had an amplitude of 1.6 0.08 pA and a half-decay time of 1.2 0.06 ms, and when the concentrations of mobile and fixed calcium buffers were 250 13 ?M and 8 0.4 mM, respectively. High concentrations of endogenous buffers define the time course of calcium transients after an action potential in the axoplasm, and may modify synaptic plasticity. PMID:25709579

  3. Migration and penetration of a fluorescent textile dye into the skin--in vivo versus in vitro methods.

    PubMed

    Meinke, Martina; Abdollahnia, Mandana; Ghr, Frank; Platzek, Thomas; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Jrgen

    2009-09-01

    The amount of textile dye migration from the textile and penetration into the skin is relevant when assessing the risk of textile dyes. In this paper, in vivo methods were developed using a harmless textile dye with a strong fluorescence and were then compared with in vitro methods. For the in vivo method, the textile was applied to the lower back of six volunteers wearing the textile 12 h and to the lower back of 12 volunteers during 30 min active sport. The maximum skin absorption of 55 +/- 17 ng/cm(2) was obtained in the group engaged in sports. The in vitro methods, which involved the application of the textile to the pig ear skin, was shown to yield similar results to the 12 h in vivo group (31.2 +/- 9.6 ng/cm(2) vs 27 +/- 14 ng/cm(2)). The migration of the textiles into artificial sweat resulted in approximately 20 microg/cm(2). The disadvantage of such textile extract applications on pig ear skin is discussed. It could be demonstrated that the absorption of the dye is strongly correlated to the amount of sweat, whereas the contact time was less important. PMID:19397699

  4. Studies on the two-photon pumped upconverted fluorescence and superradiance of a new organic dye material in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guangyong; Wang, Dong; Yang, Shengjun; Xu, Xinguang; Ren, Yan; Shao, Zongshu; Jiang, Minhua; Tian, Yupeng; Hao, Fuying; Li, Shengli

    2002-10-01

    The linear and nonlinear optical properties of a new organic dye, trans-4-p-(N-ethyl-N-ethylamino)-styryl-N-methyl-pyridinium tris(thiocyanato) cadmates (II), are reported in this paper. When pumped with a picosecond laser at the wavelength range of 850-1200 nm, intense upconversion fluorescence can be obtained. The upconversion efficiencies at different pump energies were measured when pumped with a 1064-nm laser beam from a mode-locked Nd:YAG laser. The highest upconversion efficiencies were measured to be 5.8% and 7.6% in dimethyl formamide (DMF) and methanol. The lifetime of the dye in DMF was measured to be 75 ps. The strongest nonlinear absorption was at the wavelength of 940 nm, and the highest upconversion efficiency was at the wavelength of 1030 nm. The difference of the two wavelengths was caused by excited state absorption in the dye at wavelengths shorter than 1000 nm. The dye solution in DMF and methanol show a clear optical power limiting effect.

  5. Studies on the two-photon pumped upconverted fluorescence and superradiance of a new organic dye material in solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangyong; Wang, Dong; Yang, Shengjun; Xu, Xinguang; Ren, Yan; Shao, Zongshu; Jiang, Minhua; Tian, Yupeng; Hao, Fuying; Li, Shengli; Shi, Pengfei

    2002-10-20

    The linear and nonlinear optical properties of a new organic dye, trans-4-[p-(N-ethyl-N-ethylamino)-styryl]-N-methyl-pyridinium tris(thiocyanato) cadmates (II), are reported in this paper. When pumped with a picosecond laser at the wavelength range of 850-1200 nm, intense upconversion fluorescence can be obtained. The upconversion efficiencies at different pump energies were measured when pumped with a 1064-nm laser beam from a mode-locked Nd:YAG laser. The highest upconversion efficiencies were measured to be 5.8% and 7.6% in dimethyl formamide (DMF) and methanol. The lifetime of the dye in DMF was measured to be 75 ps. The strongest nonlinear absorption was at the wavelength of 940 nm, and the highest upconversion efficiency was at the wavelength of 1030 nm. The difference of the two wavelengths was caused by excited state absorption in the dye at wavelengths shorter than 1000 nm. The dye solution in DMF and methanol show a clear optical power limiting effect. PMID:12396187

  6. One- and two-photon time-resolved fluorescence of visible and near-infrared dyes in scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, R.; Altucci, C.; Velotta, R.; Gaeta, G. M.; Lepore, M.

    2009-02-01

    Visible and near-infrared dyes are largely used in diagnostics and sensing. For this reason, it is very important to study their time-resolved fluorescence in presence or in absence of proper scattering medium in order to simulate the optical characteristics of biological tissues. Moreover, if one- or two-photon excitation processes are available also visible dyes will be employed taking advantages from using exciting sources in the diagnostic window (red and near IR) of the electromagnetic spectrum, where the photons are rarely absorbed and more often scattered. Visible and near IR fluorescent samples (Indocyanine Green and Rhodamine 6G) in absence and in presence of scattering agents (different Intralipid concentrations) and one- and two- photon time-resolved experiments have been performed. As expected, the presence of scattering agents modified time-resolved spectra and the related lifetime components. The experimental results have been used to preliminarly test different theoretical approaches describing the propagation of fluorescence signals in scattering media.

  7. The mitochondrial fluorescent dye rhodamine 123 is a high-affinity substrate for organic cation transporters (OCTs) 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Jouan, Elodie; Le Vee, Marc; Denizot, Claire; Da Violante, Georges; Fardel, Olivier

    2014-02-01

    Rhodamine 123 is a fluorescent cationic dye commonly used as a mitochondrial probe and known or suspected to be transported by certain drug membrane transporters. The present study was designed to characterize the putative interactions of rhodamine 123 with human organic cation transporter (OCT) 1 and OCT2. Intracellular uptake of the dye was demonstrated to be enhanced in both hOCT1- and hOCT2-overexpressing HEK293 cells when compared with control HEK293 cells. This increase of rhodamine 123 influxes was found to be a saturable carrier-mediated process, with low K(m) values (K(m) = 0.54 ?m and K(m) = 0.61 ?m for transport of the dye in hOCT1- and hOCT2-positive HEK293 cells, respectively). Known inhibitors of hOCT1 and hOCT2 activities such as verapamil, amitriptyline, prazosin, and quinine were next demonstrated to decrease rhodamine 123 accumulation in hOCT1- and hOCT2-overexpressing HEK293 cells. In addition, the dye was found to inhibit hOCT1- and hOCT2-mediated uptake of tetraethylammonium (TEA), a model substrate for both hOCT1 and hOCT2; rhodamine 123 appeared nevertheless to be a more potent inhibitor of hOCT1-mediated TEA transport (IC?? = 0.37 ?m) than of that mediated by hOCT2 (IC?? = 61.5 ?m). Taken together, these data demonstrate that rhodamine 123 is a high-affinity substrate for both hOCT1 and hOCT2. This dye may be therefore useful for fluorimetrically investigating cellular hOCT1 or hOCT2 activity, knowing, however, that other factors potentially contributing to cellular accumulation of rhodamine 123, including mitochondrial membrane potential or expression of the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein, have also to be considered. PMID:22913740

  8. Two-dimensional, computer-controlled film scanner: quantitation of fluorescence from ethidium bromide-stained DNA gels

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J.C.; Monteleone, D.C.; Trunk, J.; Ciarrocchi, G.

    1984-01-01

    A two-dimensional scanner based on a digital plotter is described. The device is used to analyze photographic negatives of ethidium bromide-stained DNA-agarose gels. Scanning is controlled by and photometric data transferred to a computer for processing, storage, display, and analysis such as integration of the areas under bands and determination of the mean distances of migration of polydisperse samples. An integral light source and detector module designed for reading optical bar-codes is mounted in place of the pen of the plotter. Spatial resolution and reproducibility are about 0.2 and 0.005 mm, respectively. Photometric precision as good as one part per thousand is achieved by sinusoidal modulation of the intensity of the light source and synchronous, phase-sensitive detection of the signal from the detector by a lock-in amplifier. No part of the sensor assembly touches the surface of the negative. In contrast to a densitometer, the computer transforms photometric data to values directly proportional to the amount of DNA at given points on the original gel. The ability to move the sensor in two dimensions over the negative allows for the integration across the width of a lane correctly allowing for the nonuniform distribution of the DNA.

  9. Organic solar cells with a multicharge separation structure consisting of a thin rubrene fluorescent dye for open circuit voltage enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jiang; Yu, Junsheng; Wang, Wan; Jiang, Yadong

    2011-01-01

    Organic solar cells were fabricated by inserting a thin rubrene fluorescent dye between pentacene and fullerene heterojunction with a multicharge separation (MCS) structure, which was adopted to inherently further improve maximum open circuit voltage and power conversion efficiency. The morphology of organic films showed that a more surface roughness of pentacene film could be beneficial for an effective MCS interface, exciton dissociation, and charge carrier transportation. Moreover, a slight improvement of short-circuit current density when adding a 1 or 2 nm rubrene layer was also analyzed in detail based on external quantum efficiency spectra and optical transfer matrix theory.

  10. Fully Automated Fluorescent in situ Hybridization (FISH) Staining and Digital Analysis of HER2 in Breast Cancer: A Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    van der Logt, Elise M. J.; Kuperus, Deborah A. J.; van Setten, Jan W.; van den Heuvel, Marius C.; Boers, James. E.; Schuuring, Ed; Kibbelaar, Robby E.

    2015-01-01

    HER2 assessment is routinely used to select patients with invasive breast cancer that might benefit from HER2-targeted therapy. The aim of this study was to validate a fully automated in situ hybridization (ISH) procedure that combines the automated Leica HER2 fluorescent ISH system for Bond with supervised automated analysis with the Visia imaging D-Sight digital imaging platform. HER2 assessment was performed on 328 formalin-fixed/paraffin-embedded invasive breast cancer tumors on tissue microarrays (TMA) and 100 (50 selected IHC 2+ and 50 random IHC scores) full-sized slides of resections/biopsies obtained for diagnostic purposes previously. For digital analysis slides were pre-screened at 20x and 100x magnification for all fluorescent signals and supervised-automated scoring was performed on at least two pictures (in total at least 20 nuclei were counted) with the D-Sight HER2 FISH analysis module by two observers independently. Results were compared to data obtained previously with the manual Abbott FISH test. The overall agreement with Abbott FISH data among TMA samples and 50 selected IHC 2+ cases was 98.8% (? = 0.94) and 93.8% (? = 0.88), respectively. The results of 50 additionally tested unselected IHC cases were concordant with previously obtained IHC and/or FISH data. The combination of the Leica FISH system with the D-Sight digital imaging platform is a feasible method for HER2 assessment in routine clinical practice for patients with invasive breast cancer. PMID:25844540

  11. Fluorescent multiple staining and CASA system to assess boar sperm viability and membranes integrity in short and long-term extenders

    PubMed Central

    Lange-Consiglio, A.; Meucci, A.; Cremonesi, F.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect on boar spermatozoa quality of in vitro storage in short and long-term extenders by fluorescent multiple staining (FMS) and computer assisted semen analyzer (CASA). Fresh ejaculates from three healthy, sexually mature boars were diluted with equal volumes of six short-term or three long-term commercial extenders and stored at 19°C for 6 days (short-term) or 12 days (long-term). The integrity of spermatozoa membranes was analyzed by FMS using propidium iodide, 5,5’,6,6’-tetrachloro-1,1’,3,3’ tetraethylbenzimidazolyl-carbocyanine iodide (JC-1) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated peanut agglutinin (PNA). The results obtained from this staining were compared with spermatozoa motility assessed by CASA. Our study showed that the number of viable spermatozoa with non-reacted acrosomes and intact mitochondria was positively correlated with the rate of motile spermatozoa (r2>0.9) irrespective of the extender used. In all extenders the number of motile spermatozoa significantly decreased as preservation period increased (P<0.05). FMS test is a potent indicator of sperm motility because it analyses mitochondrial integrity independently from observable alterations in motility. The best performing extenders were BTS for short-term storage and TRI-x-Cell for long-term storage. PMID:26623308

  12. Interactions of L-Arg with calf thymus DNA using neutral red dye as a fluorescence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jing; Liu, Rutao; Gao, Canzhu

    2012-11-01

    The interaction between L-Arg and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) in sodium acetate-acetic acid buffer (pH = 4) was investigated with the use of neutral red (NR) dye as a spectral probe coupled with UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy technique. The UV absorption spectroscopy indicated that L-Arg interacted with ctDNA via electrostatic force and the fluorescence enhancing of the DNA-NR system verified the electrostatic interaction. In addition, detectable changes in the CD spectrum of ctDNA in the presence of L-Arg indicated conformational changes in the DNA double helix after interaction with the drug. Docking studies were found to corroborate the experimental results. All these results prove that this drug interacts with ctDNA via an electrostatic binding mode.

  13. Monitoring of the prostate tumour cells redox state and real-time proliferation by novel biophysical techniques and fluorescent staining.

    PubMed

    Masarik, Michal; Gumulec, Jaromir; Hlavna, Marian; Sztalmachova, Marketa; Babula, Petr; Raudenska, Martina; Pavkova-Goldbergova, Monika; Cernei, Natalia; Sochor, Jiri; Zitka, Ondrej; Ruttkay-Nedecky, Branislav; Krizkova, Sona; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2012-06-01

    The present paper is focused on zinc(ii) treatment effects on prostatic cell lines PC-3 (tumour) and PNT1A (non-tumour). Oxidative status of cells was monitored by evaluation of expression of metallothionein (MT) isoforms 1A and 2A at the mRNA and protein level, glutathione (oxidised and reduced), and intracellular zinc(ii) after exposition to zinc(ii) treatment at concentrations of 0-150 μM using electrochemical methods, western blotting and fluorescent microscopy. A novel real-time impedance-based growth monitoring system was compared with widely used end-point MTT assay. Impedance-based IC(50) for zinc(ii) is 55.5 and 150.8 μM for PC-3 and PNT1A, respectively. MTT-determined IC(50) are >1.3-fold higher. Impedance-based viability correlates with viable count (r > 0.92; p < 0.03), not with MTT. Two-fold lower intracellular zinc(ii) in the tumour PC-3 cell line was found. After zinc(ii) treatment >2.6-fold increase of intracellular zinc(ii) was observed in non-tumour PNT1A and in tumour PC-3 cells. In PC-3 cells, free and bound zinc(ii) levels were enhanced more markedly as compared to PNT1A. PNT1A produced 4.2-fold less MT compared to PC3. PNT1A cells showed a 4.8-fold increase trend (r = 0.94; p = 0.005); PC-3 did show a significant trend at MT1 and MT2 protein levels (r = 0.93; p = 0.02) with nearly ten-fold increase after 100 μM zinc(ii) treatment. In terms of redox state, PNT1A had a predominance of reduced GSH forms (GSH : GSSG ratio > 1), when exposed to zinc(ii) compared to PC3, where predominance of oxidised forms remains at all concentrations. IC(50) differs significantly when determined by MTT and real-time impedance-based assays due to dependence of impedance on cell morphology and adhesion. When real-time growth monitoring, precise electrochemical methods and fluorescent microscopy are performed together, accurate information for metal fluxes, their buffering by thiol compounds and monitoring of the redox state become a powerful tool for understanding the role of oxidative stress in carcinogenesis. PMID:22592803

  14. Perylene Diimide Based Fluorescent Dyes for Selective Sensing of Nitroaromatic Compounds: Selective Sensing in Aqueous Medium Across Wide pH Range.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, P S; Pitchaimani, J; Madhu, Vedichi; Anthony, Savarimuthu Philip

    2016-03-01

    Water soluble perylenediimide based fluorophore salt, N,N'-bis(ethelenetrimethyl ammoniumiodide)-perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylicbisimide (PDI-1), has been used for selective fluorescence sensing of picric acid (PA) and 4-nitroaniline (4-NA) in organic as well as aqueous medium across wide pH range (1.0 to 10.0). PDI-1 showed strong fluorescence in dimethylformamide (DMF) (Φf = 0.26 (DMF) and moderate fluorescence in water. Addition of picric acid (PA) and 4-nitroaniline (4-NA) into PDI-1 in DMF/aqueous solution selectively quenches the fluorescence. The concentration dependent studies showed decrease of fluorescence linearly with increase of PA and 4-NA concentration. The interference studies demonstrate high selectivity for PA and 4-NA. Interestingly, PDI-1 showed selective fluorescence sensing of PA and 4-NA across wide pH range (1.0 to 10.0). Selective fluorescence sensing of PA and 4-NA has also been observed with trifluoroacetate (PDI-2), sulfate (PDI-3) salt of PDI-1 as well as octyl chain substituted PDI (PDI-4) without amine functionality. These studies suggest that PA and 4-NA might be having preferential interaction with PDI aromatic core and quenches the fluorescence. Thus PDI based dyes have been used for selective fluorescent sensing of explosive NACs for the first time to the best our knowledge. Graphical Abstract Selective fluorescent sensing of picric acid and 4-nitroaniline nitroaromatic compounds by perylene diimide fluorescent dyes. PMID:26585348

  15. Electron transfer dynamics of dye-55026 J-aggregate to AgBr grains studied by ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shaopeng; Fan, Guozhi; Cao, Ning; Li, Xiaowei; Fu, Guangsheng

    2006-02-01

    Direct detection of the dynamics of photo-induced electrons in AgBr photographic system sensitized by dye-55026 was performed using picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The dependence of the electron transfer rate on different conditions and microcosmic mechanism of electron transfer were analyzed. The experiment setup in our work was a system of high-speed streak photography (Streak Cameras) with a time-resolution of 5 ps. With stead spectroscopy, the peak of absorption and fluorescence of J-aggregation on AgBr grains both have a red shift contrast to monomer. On the same time the absorption spectrum band of J-aggregation becomes narrow. The fluorescence decay curves of J-aggregation on both the cubic and tabular AgBr grains (T-grains) were gained with different dye concentrations. These curves are fitted well by a sum of double exponential functions, which includes a fast and a slow component. Because of large amplitudes (68-99% for T-grains and 68-80% for cubic grains) of the fast decay (2.4-12.1ps for T-grains and 4.1-5.8ps for cubic grains) and the estimated quantum yield of the electron injection, this fast decay should be mainly attributable to the electron transfer from excited J-aggregation to conduction band of AgBr. At low concentration (<4.51mmol/molAg), the fluorescence decay lifetime for T-grains is longer than that for cubic grains. As the increase of the concentration, it will become more rapidly for T-grains than that for cubic grains.

  16. DNA complexes with dyes designed for energy transfer as fluorescent markers

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, A.N.; Benson, S.C.

    1995-03-28

    Heteromultimeric fluorophores are provided for binding to DNA, which allow for the detection of DNA in electrical separations and preparation of probes having high-fluorescent efficiencies and large Stokes shifts. In addition, by appropriate choice of fluorescent molecules, one can use a single narrow wavelength band excitation light source, while obtaining fluorescent emissions having sufficient separation to be readily discriminated. 4 figures.

  17. DNA complexes with dyes designed for energy transfer as fluorescent markers

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, Alexander M.; Benson, Scott C.

    1999-01-01

    Heteromultimeric fluorophores are provided for binding to DNA, which allow for the detection of DNA in electrical separations and preparation of probes having high-fluorescent efficiencies and large Stokes shifts. In addition, by appropriate choice of fluorescent molecules, one can use a single narrow wavelength band excitation light source, while obtaining fluorescent emissions having sufficient separation to be readily discriminated.

  18. DNA complexes with dyes designed for energy transfer as fluorescent markers

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, Alexander M.; Benson, Scott C.

    1998-01-01

    Heteromultimeric fluorophores are provided for binding to DNA, which allow for the detection of DNA in electrical separations and preparation of probes having high-fluorescent efficiencies and large Stokes shifts. In addition, by appropriate choice of fluorescent molecules, one can use a single narrow wavelength band excitation light source, while obtaining fluorescent emissions having sufficient separation to be readily discriminated.

  19. DNA complexes with dyes designed for energy transfer as fluorescent markers

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Benson, Scott C.

    1995-01-01

    Heteromultimeric fluorophores are provided for binding to DNA, which allow for the detection of DNA in electrical separations and preparation of probes having high-fluorescent efficiencies and large Stokes shifts. In addition, by appropriate choice of fluorescent molecules, one can use a single narrow wavelength band excitation light source, while obtaining fluorescent emissions having sufficient separation to be readily discriminated.

  20. DNA complexes with dyes designed for energy transfer as fluorescent markers

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, A.N.; Benson, S.C.

    1997-07-08

    Heteromultimeric fluorophores are provided for binding to DNA, which allow for the detection of DNA in electrical separations and preparation of probes having high-fluorescent efficiencies and large Stokes shifts. In addition, by appropriate choice of fluorescent molecules, one can use a single narrow wavelength band excitation light source, while obtaining fluorescent emissions having sufficient separation to be readily discriminated. 4 figs.

  1. DNA complexes with dyes designed for energy transfer as fluorescent markers

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, A.M.; Benson, S.C.

    1998-06-16

    Heteromultimeric fluorophores are provided for binding to DNA, which allow for the detection of DNA in electrical separations and preparation of probes having high-fluorescent efficiencies and large Stokes shifts. In addition, by appropriate choice of fluorescent molecules, one can use a single narrow wavelength band excitation light source, while obtaining fluorescent emissions having sufficient separation to be readily discriminated. 4 figs.

  2. DNA complexes with dyes designed for energy transfer as fluorescent markers

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Benson, Scott C.

    1997-01-01

    Heteromultimeric fluorophores are provided for binding to DNA, which allow for the detection of DNA in electrical separations and preparation of probes having high-fluorescent efficiencies and large Stokes shifts. In addition, by appropriate choice of fluorescent molecules, one can use a single narrow wavelength band excitation light source, while obtaining fluorescent emissions having sufficient separation to be readily discriminated.

  3. Rational design of a new fluorescent 'ON/OFF' xanthene dye for phosphate detection in live cells.

    PubMed

    Martnez-Peragn, A; Miguel, D; Orte, A; Mota, A J; Ruedas-Rama, M J; Justicia, J; Alvarez-Pez, J M; Cuerva, J M; Crovetto, L

    2014-09-01

    A new fluorescein derivative with ON/OFF features, 9-[1-(4-tert-butyl-2-methoxyphenyl)]-6-hydroxy-3H-xanthen-3-one (Granada Green, GG), was designed and synthesised. The new dye has spectral characteristics similar to those of other xanthenic derivatives but shows a higher pK(a) value for the equilibrium between its neutral and anionic forms. In addition, GG undergoes the same phosphate-mediated excited state proton transfer (ESPT) reaction as other xanthenic derivatives, giving rise to fluorescence decay traces that are dependent on both the phosphate concentration and pH of the medium. The phosphate-mediated ESPT reaction was employed to detect changes in the phosphate concentrations in live, permeabilised MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts at pH 7.35. Its high pK(a) value indicates that this new dye is more sensitive as an intracellular phosphate sensor than other previously tested dyes, as experimentally demonstrated by its ability to detect a wider range of phosphate concentrations in biomimetic media and by the increased ratio of the phosphate concentration/decay time. PMID:25017473

  4. Spectroscopic and electrochemical behavior of newly synthesized high fluorescent symmetric 4'-nitrophenyl-3,4,9,10-perylenebisdiimide-azo hybrid dyes.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Aamer; Shabir, Ghulam; Mahar, Jamaluddin; Irfan, Madiha

    2015-12-01

    The investigation has been made in the synthesis of azo hybrid rylene dyes. The hybridization of perylene bis-diimide with phenolic azo-dyes was carried out by the nucleophilic substitution (SNAr) reaction of tetrachloroperylene-3,4,9,10-bisdiimide 3 with phenolic azo-dyes 4a-g in basic medium. The hybrid dyes exhibited two absorption maxima ?max in the range 300-350, 426-438 nm in ethanol due to presence of azo linkage and highly conjugated framework of ? bonds. Fluorescence spectra of these dyes in water showed sharp emission peaks with small bandwidths in the range 490-495 nm, and fluorescence quantum yield was 0.71-0.83 in comparison with standard reference fluorescein. The structures of perylene-azo dyes were elucidated by FTIR and NMR spectroscopy. Luminescence was determined by LS-100 meter which was found to be excellent in limits 0.208-0.239 cd/m(2). Cyclic voltammetric studies were made by Electrochemical Analyzer CH1830C which showed the oxidation chemical potential of these hybrid dyes. PMID:26125985

  5. Nano-confined squaraine dye assemblies: new photoacoustic and near-infrared fluorescence dual-modular imaging probes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Di; Zhao, Ying-Xi; Qiao, Zeng-Ying; Mayerhffer, Ulrich; Spenst, Peter; Li, Xiao-Jun; Wrthner, Frank; Wang, Hao

    2014-11-19

    For the purpose of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence and photoacoustic (PA) tomography dual-modular imaging, self-assembly of squaraine (SQ) dyes is constructed in the hydrophobic phospholipid bilayers of liposomes (SQ?L) with variable mixing ratios of SQ and phospholipids from 1:500 to 1:10 (w/w). When doping minimal amounts of SQ, molecularly dispersed SQ in bilayers shows remarkable fluorescence. Interesting, the PA signal is enhanced with increase of SQ in the nanoconfined bilayer region, which is attributed to the formation of SQ-based H-aggregates and enhanced thermal conversion efficiency (?). SQ?L shows satisfactory chemical and thermal stabilities and photobleaching resistance. SQ?L is well-distributed in the cytoplasm of MCF-7 cells and its fluorescence signal remains for 7 days without dramatic quenching owing to the good stability of SQ?L. Furthermore, SQ?L is subjected to in vivo NIR fluorescence imaging to evaluate the whole-body biodistribution in organ level. Particularly, PA imaging with deeper tissue penetration capability is utilized to investigate the heterogeneous distribution SQ?L inside solid tumor. The majority of SQ?L are enriched in the area where the blood vessels are generated, implying that the liposomal nanocarriers exhibit lower tumor tissue penetration capability after the vascular leakage. This result is validated by histological examination of tumor tissue in parallel. PMID:25370305

  6. A Phosphole Oxide Based Fluorescent Dye with Exceptional Resistance to Photobleaching: A Practical Tool for Continuous Imaging in STED Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenguang; Fukazawa, Aiko; Taki, Masayasu; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Yamaguchi, Shigehiro

    2015-12-01

    The development of stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy represented a major breakthrough in cellular and molecular biology. However, the intense laser beams required for both excitation and STED usually provoke rapid photobleaching of fluorescent molecular probes, which significantly limits the performance and practical utility of STED microscopy. We herein developed a photoresistant fluorescent dye C-Naphox as a practical tool for STED imaging. With excitation using either a ?=405?or 488?nm laser in protic solvents, C-Naphox exhibited an intense red/orange fluorescence (quantum yield ?F >0.7) with a large Stokes shift (circa 5900?cm(-1) ). Even after irradiation with a Xe?lamp (300?W, ?ex =460?nm, full width at half maximum (FWHM)=11?nm) for 12?hours, 99.5?% of C-Naphox remained intact. The high photoresistance of C-Naphox allowed repeated STED imaging of HeLa cells. Even after recording 50 STED?images, 83?% of the initial fluorescence intensity persisted. PMID:26493944

  7. Flow cytometric detection of micronuclei by combined staining of DNA and membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Wessels, J.M.; Nuesse, M.

    1995-03-01

    A new staining method is presented for flow cytometric measurement of micronuclei (MN) in cell cultures and human lymphocytes using membrane-specific fluorescent dyes in addition to DNA staining. Several combinations of fluorescent membrane and DNA dyes were studied for a better discrimination of MN from debris in a suspension of nuclei and micronuclei. For staining of membranes, the lipophilic dyes 2-hydroxyethyl-7,12,17-tris(methoxyethyl)porphycene (HEPn) and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) were used in combination with ethidium bromide (EB), proflavine (PF), and Hoechst 33258 (HO). Due to their spectral properties, HO or EB combined with HEPn were not as suitable for the discrimination of MN from debris as was HEPn in combination with PF. With HEPn in combination with PF, however, additional noise was found at low fluorescence intensities, probably due to free fluorescent dye molecules in the solution. The optimal simultaneous staining of membranes and DNA was obtained using a combination of DPH and EB. The induction of MN in Chinese hamster and mouse NIH-3T3 cells by UV-B illumination was studied with this new staining technique. UV-B illumination (280-360 nm) induced MN in both cell lines. Chinese hamster cells were found to be more sensitive to these wavelengths. Illumination with wavelengths above 360 nm did not induce MN in either cell line. The results obtained from human lymphocytes using the combination of EB or DPH were comparable to the results obtained with the combination of EB and HO. 23 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Fluorescent Dye Encapsulated ZnO Particles with Cell-specific Toxicity for Potential use in Biomedical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hua; Wingett, Denise; Engelhard, Mark H.; Feris, Kevin; Reddy, K. M.; Turner, Paul; Layne, Janet; Hanley, Cory; Bell, Jason; Tenne, Dmitri; Wang, Chong M.; Punnoose, Alex

    2008-07-24

    Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-encapsulated core-shell particles with a nanoscale ZnO finishing layer have been synthesized for the first time as multifunctional “smart” nanostructures for particle tracking and cell imaging using the visible fluorescence emission of the dye or UV fluorescence emission of ZnO, and anti-cancer/antibacterial treatments using the selective toxicity of the nanoscale ZnO outer surface. The chemical phase composition, morphology, size, and the layered core-shell architecture of the particles were characterized using detailed transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV-vis-NIR spectrophotometry. Systematic XPS studies after removing nanometer thick layers confirmed the expected layered structure in the order ZnO-SiO2-APTMS-FITC proceeding from the surface to the core of the ~200 nm sized particles. Detailed investigation of the fluorescence properties of these hydrophilic particles in bio-compatible media using fluorescence spectroscopy, flow cytometry and fluorescence confocal microscopy demonstrated that the silica/ZnO outer layer offers considerable protection to the encapsulated dye molecules from photobleaching and quenching due to reactive species such as oxygen in the solvent. These particles showed promise toward cell imaging, for example when the bacterium Escherichia coli was used as a test system, the green fluorescence of the particles allowed confocal microscopy to image the cells. The FITC encapsulated ZnO (FITC-ZnO) particles demonstrated excellent selectivity in preferentially killing Jurkat cancer cells (18% cell viability) without any significant toxicity to normal primary immune cells (75% cell viability) at 60 μg/mL concentrations and inhibited the growth of both gram-positive and gram negative bacteria at concentrations ≥ 250-500 μg/mL (for Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, respectively). These results indicate that the novel FITC encapsulated multifunctional particles with nanoscale ZnO surface layer are smart nanostructures for particle tracking, cell imaging, antibacterial treatments and cancer therapy.

  9. In vivo tumor-targeted dual-modal fluorescence/CT imaging using a nanoprobe co-loaded with an aggregation-induced emission dye and gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jimei; Li, Chan; Zhang, Xu; Huo, Shuaidong; Jin, Shubin; An, Fei-Fei; Wang, Xiaodan; Xue, Xiangdong; Okeke, C I; Duan, Guiyun; Guo, Fengguang; Zhang, Xiaohong; Hao, Jifu; Wang, Paul C; Zhang, Jinchao; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2015-02-01

    As an intensely studied computed tomography (CT) contrast agent, gold nanoparticle has been suggested to be combined with fluorescence imaging modality to offset the low sensitivity of CT. However, the strong quenching of gold nanoparticle on fluorescent dyes requires complicated design and shielding to overcome. Herein, we report a unique nanoprobe (M-NPAPF-Au) co-loading an aggregation-induced emission (AIE) red dye and gold nanoparticles into DSPE-PEG(2000) micelles for dual-modal fluorescence/CT imaging. The nanoprobe was prepared based on a facile method of "one-pot ultrasonic emulsification". Surprisingly, in the micelles system, fluorescence dye (NPAPF) efficiently overcame the strong fluorescence quenching of shielding-free gold nanoparticles and retained the crucial AIE feature. In vivo studies demonstrated the nanoprobe had superior tumor-targeting ability, excellent fluorescence and CT imaging effects. The totality of present studies clearly indicates the significant potential application of M-NPAPF-Au as a dual-modal non-invasive fluorescence/X-ray CT nanoprobe for in vivo tumor-targeted imaging and diagnosis. PMID:25542798

  10. NaCl-aided Hoechst 33258 staining method for DNA quantification and its application.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, A; Araki, T; Fujimori, K; Yamada, M; Yamaguchi, H; Izumi, K; Matsumoto, K

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the effect of salt on the fluorescence staining procedure for quantification of the amount of DNA in cell nuclei in situ. For this, NaCl was added at various concentrations to the Hoechst 33258 fluorochrome (Hoe) medium for staining DNA. The fluorescence intensity of free DNA-Hoe solution was not changed by the addition of NaCl, but that of the nuclei-Hoe complex in situ increased 4-fold on increasing the NaCl concentration up to 1 M. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that histones H1, H2A, and H2B dissociated from cell nuclei in the presence of 1 M NaCl, resulting in increasing accessibility of DNA to the fluorochrome. The applicability of the NaCl-aided fluorescence staining method was evaluated by measuring the ploidy classes of various cells. The amount of DNA in spermatozoa is half that in 2 n hepatocytes, but by the conventional Hoe staining procedure the fluorescence intensity of spermatozoa is higher than that of 2 n hepatocytes, due to differences in accessibility of the dye to DNA. In contrast, by the NaCl-aided procedure, the fluorescence intensity of 2 n hepatocytes was twice that of spermatozoa. The effectiveness of the NaCl-aided Hoe staining method was checked using cultivated human gingival cells and hepatocytes of LEC rats with hereditary hepatitis. In all cases, reasonable proportionality between the fluorescence intensity and the amount of DNA was observed. PMID:2475469

  11. Improved diagnosis of Trichomonas vaginalis infection by PCR using vaginal swabs and urine specimens compared to diagnosis by wet mount microscopy, culture, and fluorescent staining.

    PubMed

    van Der Schee, C; van Belkum, A; Zwijgers, L; van Der Brugge, E; O'neill, E L; Luijendijk, A; van Rijsoort-Vos, T; van Der Meijden, W I; Verbrugh, H; Sluiters, H J

    1999-12-01

    Four vaginal cotton swab specimens were obtained from each of 804 women visiting the outpatient sexually transmitted disease clinic of the Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, for validation of various forms of Trichomonas vaginalis diagnostic procedures. One swab specimen was immediately examined by wet mount microscopy, a second swab was placed in Kupferberg's Trichosel medium for cultivation, and two swabs were placed in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), pH 7.2. The resulting PBS suspension was used for direct staining with acridine orange and fluorescence microscopy, inoculation of modified Diamond's culture medium, and a PCR specific for T. vaginalis. A total of 70 samples positive in one or more of the tests were identified: 31 (3.8%) infections were detected by wet mount microscopy, and 36 (4.4%) were identified by acridine orange staining, as opposed to 40 (4.9%) and 46 (5.7%) positives in modified Diamond's and Trichosel media, respectively. PCR was positive for 61 (7.5%) samples. Secondly, from each of 200 women were obtained a urine sample and a vaginal cotton swab specimen, and 200 urine samples were obtained from men. For the women, 15 (7.4%) of the samples showed a positive result for either the wet mount (n = 1), Trichosel culture (n = 6), PCR on the vaginal swab sample (n = 10), or PCR on the urine specimen (n = 11). Four men (2%) were diagnosed with a T. vaginalis infection. Thus, PCR appears to be the method of choice for the detection of genital infections with T. vaginalis. PMID:10565943

  12. Improved Diagnosis of Trichomonas vaginalis Infection by PCR Using Vaginal Swabs and Urine Specimens Compared to Diagnosis by Wet Mount Microscopy, Culture, and Fluorescent Staining

    PubMed Central

    van der Schee, Cindy; van Belkum, Alex; Zwijgers, Lisette; van der Brugge, Esther; O'neill, Errol L.; Luijendijk, Ad; van Rijsoort-Vos, Tineke; van der Meijden, Willem I.; Verbrugh, Henri; Sluiters, Hans J. F.

    1999-01-01

    Four vaginal cotton swab specimens were obtained from each of 804 women visiting the outpatient sexually transmitted disease clinic of the Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, for validation of various forms of Trichomonas vaginalis diagnostic procedures. One swab specimen was immediately examined by wet mount microscopy, a second swab was placed in Kupferberg's Trichosel medium for cultivation, and two swabs were placed in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), pH 7.2. The resulting PBS suspension was used for direct staining with acridine orange and fluorescence microscopy, inoculation of modified Diamond's culture medium, and a PCR specific for T. vaginalis. A total of 70 samples positive in one or more of the tests were identified: 31 (3.8%) infections were detected by wet mount microscopy, and 36 (4.4%) were identified by acridine orange staining, as opposed to 40 (4.9%) and 46 (5.7%) positives in modified Diamond's and Trichosel media, respectively. PCR was positive for 61 (7.5%) samples. Secondly, from each of 200 women were obtained a urine sample and a vaginal cotton swab specimen, and 200 urine samples were obtained from men. For the women, 15 (7.4%) of the samples showed a positive result for either the wet mount (n = 1), Trichosel culture (n = 6), PCR on the vaginal swab sample (n = 10), or PCR on the urine specimen (n = 11). Four men (2%) were diagnosed with a T. vaginalis infection. Thus, PCR appears to be the method of choice for the detection of genital infections with T. vaginalis. PMID:10565943

  13. Optical Properties of Fluorescent Mixtures: Comparing Quantum Dots to Organic Dyes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Benjamin M.; Morgan, Thomas T.; Ucak-Astarlioglu, Mine G.; Wlilliams, Mary Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The study describes and compares the size-dependent optical properties of organic dyes with those of semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs). The analysis shows that mixtures of QDs contain emission colors that are sum of the individual QD components.

  14. Mixed-Dye-Based Label-Free and Sensitive Dual Fluorescence for the Product Detection of Nucleic Acid Isothermal Multiple-Self-Matching-Initiated Amplification.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiong; Wu, Wenshuai; Zhu, Qiangyuan; Zhang, Tao; Jin, Wei; Mu, Ying

    2015-10-20

    Visual detections based on fluorescence and the color changes under natural light are two promising product detections for isothermal nucleic acid amplifications (INAAs) such as the isothermal multiple-self-matching-initiated amplification (IMSA) as point-of-care testing techniques. However, the currently used approaches have shortcomings in application. For the former, fluorescence changes recognized by naked eye may be indistinguishable because of single fluorescence emitted and strong background noise, which requires empirical preset of cutoff intensity values. For the latter, visual detection sensitivity under natural light is not comparable to that based on fluorescence. Herein, hydroxyl naphthol blue (HNB) and SYBR Green I (SG) were coupled to acquire a label-free dual fluorescence for the visual product detection of IMSA. The mixed-dye-loaded off-chip (tube-based) and on-chip (microfluidic chip-based) IMSAs for the detection of hepatitis B virus were conducted. The results demonstrated that this dual fluorescence could realize distinguishable fluorescent color changes to improve visual detection sensitivity and avoid the preset of cutoff values. Moreover, the mixed dye is stable when kept at room temperature and compatible with the IMSA's reagents without a contamination-prone step of opening tubes after amplification. Also, this coupled dye inherits the advantages of achieving color changes under natural light from HNB and real-time detection from SG. In conclusion, the mixed-dye-based dual fluorescence has a potential in the point-of-care testing application for realizing off-chip and on-chip product detection of IMSA, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), or other INAAs. PMID:26383158

  15. High resolution multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization using cyanine and fluorescein dyes: rapid chromosome identification by directly fluorescently labeled alphoid DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Yurov, Y B; Soloviev, I V; Vorsanova, S G; Marcais, B; Roizes, G; Lewis, R

    1996-03-01

    We tested DNA probes directly labeled by fluorescently labeled nucleotides (Cy3-dCTP, Cy5-dCTP, FluorX-dCTP) for high resolution uni- and multicolor detection of human chromosomes and analysis of centromeric DNA organization by in situ hybridization. Alpha-satellite DNA probes specific to chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4 + 9, 5 + 19, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13 + 21, 14 + 22, 15, 16, 17, 18, 20, 22, X and Y were suitable for the accurate identification of human chromosomes in metaphase and interphase cells. Cy3-labeled probes had several advantages: (1) a high level of fluorescence (5-10 times more compared with fluorescein-labeled probes); (2) a low level of fluorescence in solution, allowing the detection of target chromosomes in situ during hybridization without the washing of slides; and (3) high resistance to photobleaching during prolonged (1-2 h) exposure to strong light, thus allowing the use of a high energy mercury lamp or a long integration time during image acquisition in digital imaging microscopy for the determination of weak signals. For di- and multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), we successfully used different combinations of directly fluorophorated probes with preservation of images by conventional microscopy or by digital imaging microscopy. FluorX and Cy3 dyes allowed the use of cosmid probes for mapping in a one-step hybridization experiment. Cyanine-labeled fluorophorated DNA probes offer additional possibilities for rapid chromosome detection during a simple 15-min FISH procedure, and can be recommended for basic research and clinical studies, utilizing FISH. PMID:8786090

  16. Criteria for selecting fluorescent dye tracers for soil hydrological applications using Uranine as an example

    EPA Science Inventory

    Calibrating and verifying 2-D and 3-D vadose zone flow and transport models requires detailed information on water and solute redistribution. Among the different water flow and mass transfer determination methods, staining tracers have the best spatial resolution allowing visuali...

  17. Structure, Dynamic and Photophysical Properties of a Fluorescent Dye Incorporated in an Amorphous Hydrophobic Polymer Bundle

    PubMed Central

    De Mitri, N.; Monti, S.; Barone, V.

    2015-01-01

    The properties of a low molecular weight organic dye, namely 4-naphtoyloxy-1-methoxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine, covalently bound to an apolar polyolefin are investigated by means of a multi-level approach, combining classical molecular dynamics simulations, based on an purposely parameterized force fields, and quantum mechanical calculations, based on density functional theory (DFT) and its time-dependent extension (TD-DFT). The structure and dynamics of the dye in its embedding medium is analyzed and discussed in the light of the entangling effect of the surrounding polymer, also by comparing it to the results obtained for a different environment, i.e. toluene solution. The influence on photophysical properties of long lived cages, found in the polymeric embedding is eventually investigated in terms of slow and fast dye’s internal dynamics, by comparing computed IR and UV spectra with their experimental counterparts. PMID:24988373

  18. Development of a pH sensor based on a nanostructured filter adding pH-sensitive fluorescent dye for detecting acetic acid in photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaka, Takashi; Itayama, Tomohiro; Nagasaki, Hideaki; Iwami, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Chizuko; Hara, Yukiko; Masuda, Atsushi; Umeda, Norihiro

    2015-08-01

    Acetic acid formed via the hydrolysis of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) as an encapsulant in photovoltaic (PV) modules causes a decrease in the conversion efficiency of such modules by grid corrosion. Here, a nondestructive and simple optical method for evaluating the condition of PV modules is proposed. This method uses a dual-wavelength pH-sensitive fluorescent dye to detect acetic acid in PV modules using a change in pH. The change in pH induced by the formation of acetic acid is detected by the change in the ratio of the fluorescent intensities of two peaks of the dye. A pH-sensitive fluorescent dye showed sensitivity for small amounts of acetic acid such as that produced from EVA. Furthermore, a membrane filter dyed with a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye was confirmed to detect acetic acid in aged EVA after a damp-heat test (85 °C, 85%) for 5000 h in PV modules.

  19. Development of indirect competitive fluorescence immunoassay for 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether using DNA/dye conjugate as antibody multiple labels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An indirect competitive fluorescence immunoassay using DNA/dye conjugate as antibody multiple labels was developed on 96-well plates for the identification and quantification of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) in aqueous samples. A hapten, 2,4,2'-tribromodiphenyl ether-4-aldehyde was sy...

  20. Cell wall staining with Trypan blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells

    PubMed Central

    Liesche, Johannes; Marek, Magdalena; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Yeast cells are protected by a cell wall that plays an important role in the exchange of substances with the environment. The cell wall structure is dynamic and can adapt to different physiological states or environmental conditions. For the investigation of morphological changes, selective staining with fluorescent dyes is a valuable tool. Furthermore, cell wall staining is used to facilitate sub-cellular localization experiments with fluorescently-labeled proteins and the detection of yeast cells in non-fungal host tissues. Here, we report staining of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall with Trypan Blue, which emits strong red fluorescence upon binding to chitin and yeast glucan; thereby, it facilitates cell wall analysis by confocal and super-resolution microscopy. The staining pattern of Trypan Blue was similar to that of the widely used UV-excitable, blue fluorescent cell wall stain Calcofluor White. Trypan Blue staining facilitated quantification of cell size and cell wall volume when utilizing the optical sectioning capacity of a confocal microscope. This enabled the quantification of morphological changes during growth under anaerobic conditions and in the presence of chemicals, demonstrating the potential of this approach for morphological investigations or screening assays. PMID:25717323

  1. Exploring chip-capillary electrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence field-deployable platform flexibility: separations of fluorescent dyes by chip-based non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Nuchtavorn, Nantana; Smejkal, Petr; Breadmore, Michael C; Guijt, Rosanne M; Doble, Philip; Bek, Fritz; Foret, Frantisek; Suntornsuk, Leena; Macka, Mirek

    2013-04-19

    Microfluidic chip electrophoresis (chip-CE) is a separation method that is compatible with portable and on-site analysis, however, only few commercial chip-CE systems with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and light emitting diode (LED) fluorescence detection are available. They are established for several application tailored methods limited to specific biopolymers (DNA, RNA and proteins), and correspondingly the range of their applications has been limited. In this work we address the lack of commercially available research-type flexible chip-CE platforms by exploring the limits of using an application-tailored system equipped with chips and methods designed for DNA separations as a generic chip-CE platform - this is a very significant issue that has not been widely studied. In the investigated Agilent Bioanalyzer chip-CE system, the fixed components are the Agilent chips and the detection (LIF at 635 nm and LEDIF at 470 nm), while the chemistry (electrolyte) and the programming of all the high voltages are flexible. Using standard DNA chips, we show that a generic CE function of the system is easily possible and we demonstrate an extension of the applicability to non-aqueous CE (NACE). We studied the chip compatibility with organic solvents (i.e. MeOH, ACN, DMF and DMSO) and demonstrated the chip compatibility with DMSO as a non-volatile and non-hazardous solvent with satisfactory stability of migration times over 50h. The generic CE capability is illustrated with separations of fluorescent basic blue dyes methylene blue (MB), toluidine blue (TB), nile blue (NB) and brilliant cresyl blue (BC). Further, the effects of the composition of the background electrolyte (BGE) on the separation were studied, including the contents of water (0-30%) and buffer composition. In background electrolytes containing typically 80 mmol/L ammonium acetate and 870 mmol/L acetic acid in 100% DMSO baseline separation of the dyes were achieved in 40s. Linearity was documented in the range of 5-28 ?mol/L, 10-100 ?mol/L, 1.56-50 nmol/L and 5-75 nmol/L (r(2) values in the range 0.974-0.999), and limit of detection (LOD) values were 90 nmol/L, 1 ?mol/L 1.4 nmol/L, and 2 nmol/L for MB, TB, NB and BC, respectively. PMID:23510955

  2. Spicy SDS-PAGE gels: curcumin/turmeric as an environment-friendly protein stain.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Biji T; Dorri, Yaser; Scofield, R Hal

    2012-01-01

    Gel proteins are commonly stained with calorimetric/fluorescent dyes. Here, we demonstrate that heat-solubilized curcumin can serve as a nontoxic and environment-friendly fluorescent/colorimetric reversible protein stain. Curcumin, the yellow pigment found in the rhizomes of the perennial herb Curcuma longa (turmeric), is insoluble in aqueous solvents. However, heat (100°C) solubilization in water renders 1.5% of curcumin soluble. Curcumin solubilized by ethanol or alkali is ineffective in staining proteins. Heat solubilized curry spice turmeric stains proteins similarly. Staining is achieved in 30 min, with a sensitivity almost equaling that of Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB). Destaining is not required, and excess curcumin/turmeric can be discarded into the sink. Binding of proteins by silver inhibits curcumin binding, suggesting similarity of protein binding by silver and curcumin. It costs $1.5-2.0 to stain a mini-gel with curcumin, while turmeric costs less than 0.005 cent. CBB staining/destaining costs about 2 cents. However, CBB is toxic and its use necessitates specialized disposal efforts. Curcumin/turmeric, thus, can serve as an ideal nontoxic protein stain. PMID:22585522

  3. Spectral studies of multi-branched fluorescence dyes based on triphenylpyridine core.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Ying; Chen, Liang-Feng; Zhu, Xiu-Ling; Wang, Chao; Wan, Yu; Wu, Hui

    2014-01-01

    A series of novel triphenylpyridine-containing triphenylamine derivatives have been carefully designed and prepared in good yields using the stepwise route reactions. The relationship of photoluminescence property and structure of compounds 9-13 was systematically investigated via UV-vis, fluorescence, thermogravimetric and electrochemical analyzer. The highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital distributions of compounds 9-13 were calculated by density functional theory method. The high fluorescence quantum yields, desirable the highest occupied molecular orbital levels and high thermal stability of compounds 9-13 indicate that the linkage of triphenylpyridine and triphenylamine is an efficient means to enhance hole-transporting ability and fluorescent quantum yield. PMID:24287048

  4. Laser therapy in plastic surgery: decolorization in port wine stains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peszynski-Drews, Cezary; Wolf, Leszek

    1996-03-01

    For the first time laserotherapy is described as a method of port wine stain decolorization in plastic surgery. The authors present their 20-year experience in the treatment of port wine stains with the argon laser and dye laser.

  5. Application of a fluorescent dual stain to assess decontamination of tissue protein and prion amyloid from surgical stainless steel during simulated washer-disinfector cycles.

    PubMed

    Howlin, R P; Khammo, N; Secker, T; McDonnell, G; Keevil, C W

    2010-05-01

    Current World Health Organization guidelines pertaining to the reprocessing of surgical instruments in the face of potential iatrogenic transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (iCJD) are incompatible for the vast majority of devices. This has led to the advent of a range of new decontamination measures. Even without the implementation of these new procedures, the incidence of proven iCJD through surgery remains low. In this study, existing decontamination processes in sterile service departments have been evaluated using simulated washer-disinfector cycles on surgical grade stainless steel wires inoculated with ME7 scrapie homogenate. The consequence of varying the soil drying times and choice of cycle pre-treatment on prion removal were evaluated. Assessment of residual contamination at each cycle phase was carried out with the application of a sensitive fluorescent staining procedure to identify both total protein and prion-associated amyloid. The study confirmed that immediate reprocessing following contamination was beneficial during the pre-treatment phase with either an enzymatic or pre-soak wetting agent. Final total protein levels at the end of the cycles, were not significantly different from those where the soil was allowed to dry. In addition, cycles involving a pre-treatment with either an enzymatic cleaner or pre-soak, whether the soil was allowed to dry or not, showed complete removal of detectable prion amyloid. The results suggest that current decontamination procedures, combined with immediate processing of surgical instruments, have the potential to be highly effective alone at reducing the risk of surgical transmission of CJD. PMID:20303614

  6. Detection of Legionella species in reclaimed water and air with the EnviroAmp Legionella PCR kit and direct fluorescent antibody staining.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, C J; Bonilla, G F; Roll, B; Paszko-Kolva, C; Sangermano, L R; Fujioka, R S

    1995-01-01

    Reclaimed water is an important resource for areas with inadequate water supplies. However, there have been few studies on the variety of microorganisms found in this type of water, since typically reclaimed water is examined only for the presence of coliform bacteria. Many microorganisms, including the legionellae, are known to be more resistant to chlorine than are coliform bacteria. Previously, we detected > 10(3) Legionella cells per ml in primary and secondary sewage effluents and observed no significant reduction in population numbers throughout the treatment process. In this study, we detected Legionella spp. in chlorinated effluent by using an EnviroAmp Legionella PCR kit and direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) staining. However, we were not able to isolate Legionella spp. from either natural or seeded reclaimed water samples. This suggests that the Legionella spp. detected by the PCR and DFA methods may be injured or viable but nonculturable after exposure to the high residual chlorine levels typically found in this type of water source. The numbers of coliform bacteria were low (< 2 cells per 100 ml) in most reclaimed water samples and were not correlated with the presence or absence of Legionella spp. We also collected air samples from above a secondary aeration basin and analyzed them by using the PCR, DFA, and plate culture methods. Legionella spp. were detected in the air obtained from above the secondary basin with all three methods. We concluded that the PCR was superior to the culture and DFA methods for detecting Legionella spp. in environmental water samples. PMID:7574578

  7. Fluorescent Dye-doped Sol-gel Sensor for Highly Sensitive Carbon Dioxide Gas Detection below Atmospheric Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Dansby-Sparks, Royce N.; Jin, Jun; Mechery, Shelly J; Sampathkumaran, Uma; Owens, Thomas W; Yu, Bi Dan; Goswami, Kisholoy; Hong, Kunlun; Grant, Joseph; Xue, Ziling {nmn}

    2009-01-01

    Optical fluorescence sol-gel sensors have been developed for the detection of carbon dioxide gas in the 0.03?30% range with a detection limit of 0.008% (or 80 ppm) and a quantitation limit of 0.02% (or 200 ppm) CO{sub 2}. Sol?gels were spin-coated on glass slides to create an organically modified silica-doped matrix with the 1-hydroxypyrene-3,6,8-trisulfonate (HPTS) fluorescent indicator. The luminescence intensity of the HPTS indicator (513 nm) is quenched by CO{sub 2}, which protonates the anionic form of HPTS. An ion pair technique was used to incorporate the lipophilic dye into the hydrophilic sol?gel matrix. TiO{sub 2} particles (<5 {mu}m diameter) were added to induce Mie scattering and increase the incident light interaction with the sensing film, thus increasing the signal-to-noise ratio. Moisture-proof overcoatings have been used to maintain a constant level of water inside the sensor films. The optical sensors are inexpensive to prepare and can be easily coupled to fiber optics for remote sensing capabilities. A fiber-optic bundle was used for the gas detection and shown to work as part of a multianalyte platform for simultaneous detection of multiple analytes. The studies reported here resulted in the development of sol?gel optical fluorescent sensors for CO{sub 2} gas with sensitivity below that in the atmosphere (ca. 387 ppm). These sensors are a complementary approach to current FT-IR measurements for real-time carbon dioxide detection in environmental applications.

  8. Fluorescent-dye-doped sol-gel sensor for highly sensitive carbon dioxide gas detection below atmospheric concentrations.

    PubMed

    Dansby-Sparks, Royce N; Jin, Jun; Mechery, Shelly J; Sampathkumaran, Uma; Owen, Thomas William; Yu, Bi Dan; Goswami, Kisholoy; Hong, Kunlun; Grant, Joseph; Xue, Zi-Ling

    2010-01-15

    Optical fluorescence sol-gel sensors have been developed for the detection of carbon dioxide gas in the 0.03-30% range with a detection limit of 0.008% (or 80 ppm) and a quantitation limit of 0.02% (or 200 ppm) CO(2). Sol-gels were spin-coated on glass slides to create an organically modified silica-doped matrix with the 1-hydroxypyrene-3,6,8-trisulfonate (HPTS) fluorescent indicator. The luminescence intensity of the HPTS indicator (513 nm) is quenched by CO(2), which protonates the anionic form of HPTS. An ion pair technique was used to incorporate the lipophilic dye into the hydrophilic sol-gel matrix. TiO(2) particles (<5 microm diameter) were added to induce Mie scattering and increase the incident light interaction with the sensing film, thus increasing the signal-to-noise ratio. Moisture-proof overcoatings have been used to maintain a constant level of water inside the sensor films. The optical sensors are inexpensive to prepare and can be easily coupled to fiber optics for remote sensing capabilities. A fiber-optic bundle was used for the gas detection and shown to work as part of a multianalyte platform for simultaneous detection of multiple analytes. The studies reported here resulted in the development of sol-gel optical fluorescent sensors for CO(2) gas with sensitivity below that in the atmosphere (ca. 387 ppm). These sensors are a complementary approach to current FT-IR measurements for real-time carbon dioxide detection in environmental applications. PMID:20038093

  9. A Transient Diffusion Model Yields Unitary Gap Junctional Permeabilities from Images of Cell-to-Cell Fluorescent Dye Transfer Between Xenopus Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nitsche, Johannes M.; Chang, Hou-Chien; Weber, Paul A.; Nicholson, Bruce J.

    2004-01-01

    As ubiquitous conduits for intercellular transport and communication, gap junctional pores have been the subject of numerous investigations aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying permeability and selectivity. Dye transfer studies provide a broadly useful means of detecting coupling and assessing these properties. However, given evidence for selective permeability of gap junctions and some anomalous correlations between junctional electrical conductance and dye permeability by passive diffusion, the need exists to give such studies a more quantitative basis. This article develops a detailed diffusion model describing experiments (reported separately) involving transport of fluorescent dye from a “donor” region to an “acceptor” region within a pair of Xenopus oocytes coupled by gap junctions. Analysis of transport within a single oocyte is used to determine the diffusion and binding characteristics of the cellular cytoplasm. Subsequent double-cell calculations then yield the intercellular junction permeability, which is translated into a single-channel permeability using concomitant measurements of intercellular conductance, and known single-channel conductances of gap junctions made up of specific connexins, to count channels. The preceding strategy, combined with use of a graded size series of Alexa dyes, permits a determination of absolute values of gap junctional permeability as a function of dye size and connexin type. Interpretation of the results in terms of pore theory suggests significant levels of dye-pore affinity consistent with the expected order of magnitude of typical (e.g., van der Waals) intermolecular attractions. PMID:15041648

  10. High-precision recording of the action potential in isolated cardiomyocytes using the near-infrared fluorescent dye di-4-ANBDQBS

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, Kenneth W.; Steadman, Bruce W.; Rees, Tyler D.; Venable, Paul; Taylor, Tyson; Shibayama, Junko; Yan, Ping; Wuskell, Joseph P.; Loew, Leslie M.; Zaitsev, Alexey V.

    2010-01-01

    The use of voltage-sensitive fluorescent dyes (VSD) for noninvasive measurement of the action potential (AP) in isolated cells has been hindered by low-photon yield of the preparation, dye toxicity, and photodynamic damage. Here we used a new red-shifted VSD, di-4-ANBDQBS, and a fast electron-multiplied charge-coupled device camera for optical AP (OAP) recording in guinea pig cardiac myocytes. Loading di-4-ANBDQBS did not alter APs recorded with micropipette. With short laser exposures (just enough to record one OAP every 15 min), di-4-ANBDQBS yielded fluorescent signals with very high signal-to-background ratios (change in fluorescence on depolarization/fluorescence at resting potential: 19.2 4.1%) and signal-to-noise ratios (40 13.2). Quantum chemical calculations comparing the ANBDQ chromophore to the conventional ANEP chromophore showed that the higher wavelength and the greater voltage sensitivity of the former have the same electro-optical origin: a longer path for electron redistribution in the excited state. OAP closely tracked simultaneously recorded electrical APs, permitting measurement of AP duration within 1% error. Prolonged laser exposure caused progressive AP duration prolongation and instability. However, these effects were alleviated or abolished by reducing the dye concentration and by perfusion with antioxidants. Thus the presented technique provides a unique opportunity for noninvasive AP recording in single cardiomyocytes. PMID:20601458

  11. High-precision recording of the action potential in isolated cardiomyocytes using the near-infrared fluorescent dye di-4-ANBDQBS.

    PubMed

    Warren, Mark; Spitzer, Kenneth W; Steadman, Bruce W; Rees, Tyler D; Venable, Paul; Taylor, Tyson; Shibayama, Junko; Yan, Ping; Wuskell, Joseph P; Loew, Leslie M; Zaitsev, Alexey V

    2010-10-01

    The use of voltage-sensitive fluorescent dyes (VSD) for noninvasive measurement of the action potential (AP) in isolated cells has been hindered by low-photon yield of the preparation, dye toxicity, and photodynamic damage. Here we used a new red-shifted VSD, di-4-ANBDQBS, and a fast electron-multiplied charge-coupled device camera for optical AP (OAP) recording in guinea pig cardiac myocytes. Loading di-4-ANBDQBS did not alter APs recorded with micropipette. With short laser exposures (just enough to record one OAP every 1-5 min), di-4-ANBDQBS yielded fluorescent signals with very high signal-to-background ratios (change in fluorescence on depolarization/fluorescence at resting potential: 19.2 4.1%) and signal-to-noise ratios (40 13.2). Quantum chemical calculations comparing the ANBDQ chromophore to the conventional ANEP chromophore showed that the higher wavelength and the greater voltage sensitivity of the former have the same electro-optical origin: a longer path for electron redistribution in the excited state. OAP closely tracked simultaneously recorded electrical APs, permitting measurement of AP duration within 1% error. Prolonged laser exposure caused progressive AP duration prolongation and instability. However, these effects were alleviated or abolished by reducing the dye concentration and by perfusion with antioxidants. Thus the presented technique provides a unique opportunity for noninvasive AP recording in single cardiomyocytes. PMID:20601458

  12. “Turn-On” Protein Fluorescence: In Situ Formation of Cyanine Dyes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein reengineering of cellular retinoic acid binding protein II (CRABPII) has yielded a genetically addressable system, capable of binding a profluorophoric chromophore that results in fluorescent protein/chromophore complexes. These complexes exhibit far-red emission, with high quantum efficiencies and brightness and also exhibit excellent pH stability spanning the range of 2–11. In the course of this study, it became evident that single mutations of L121E and R59W were most effective in improving the fluorescent characteristics of CRABPII mutants as well as the kinetics of complex formation. The readily crystallizable nature of these proteins was invaluable to provide clues for the observed spectroscopic behavior that results from single mutation of key residues. PMID:25534273

  13. Semiconductor laser-induced fluorescence detection in capillary electrophoresis using a cyanine dye.

    PubMed

    Chen, F T; Tusak, A; Pentoney, S; Konrad, K; Lew, C; Koh, E; Sternberg, J

    1993-10-22

    Cy5, an activated carboxyl cyanine fluorophore, was characterized by capillary electrophoresis (CE) using a semiconductor laser at 652 nm to induce fluorescence. Hydrolysis of the activated Cy5 in the presence of ammonia results in the formation of a mono- and diamide and a dicarboxylic acid. A Cy5-labeled oligonucleotide M13 primer for DNA sequencing (M13mp18 template) was synthesized with a purity of better than 95%. The labeled primer was analyzed by liquid chromatography, using UV-visible detection, and by CE, monitored by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection. Analysis of the Cy5-labeled oligonucleotide primer by CE-LIF in a 9% polyacrylamide gel-filled capillary indicated the purity of the major Cy5-oligonucleotide primer was greater than 90%. The detection sensitivity for Cy5-based CE-LIF detection system with a 2.5-mW red semiconductor laser is about 10(-10) M. PMID:8287130

  14. Measurement method for photoluminescent quantum yields of fluorescent organic dyes in polymethyl methacrylate for luminescent solar concentrators.

    PubMed

    Wilson, L R; Richards, B S

    2009-01-10

    A method for measuring the photoluminescent quantum yields (PLQY) of luminescent organic dyes is presented. The self-absorption probability calculated at different dye concentrations is used to determine the absolute quantum yield from the observed values. The results for a range of commercially available dyes show high quantum yields, even at high concentrations, and an absence of quenching. The PLQY of several dye mixtures are also presented. The results indicate an absence of any reduction of PLQY in a dye mixture as compared with the individual PLQY of the dyes. PMID:19137031

  15. Sensing of transcription factor binding via cyanine dye pair fluorescence lifetime changes

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanov, Alexei; Metelev, Valeriy; Zhang, Surong; Kumar, Anand T.N.

    2013-01-01

    We designed and synthesized sensors for imaging transcription factor-DNA interactions using a complementary pair of 21-base pair long oligonucleotides (ODN) carrying two internucleoside phosphate-linked cyanine fluorophores that can either engage in Frster's resonance energy transfer (FRET) with fluorescence emission or assemble into a ground state quenched dimer with short fluorescence lifetimes (FL). Cyanine fluorophores were linked to ODNs within the NF-?B binding site. These sensors were tested in the presence of recombinant p50 and p65 NF-?B proteins or constitutively NF-?B activating HeLa cell lysates. By using a coherent light excitation source we followed changes in fluorescence lifetime of the donor (Cy5.5) at the donor's excitation and emission light wavelengths, as well as the acceptor (800CW or Cy7 cyanine fluorophores) in FRET mode. We observed increases of the donor lifetime in both emitting (0.08-0.15 ns) and non-emitting quenched (0.21 ns) sensors in response to protein binding. The measurements of lifetimes in FRET mode in quenched pair-carrying ODN duplex sensors showed significant differences in FL of the acceptor cyanine fluorophore between NF-?B -containing and NF-?B -free samples but not in control sensors with ODN sequences that have decreased binding affinity to NF-?B. We anticipate that the observed effects will be instrumental for developing sensors enabling non-invasive imaging in cells that undergo activation of NF-?B. PMID:22710322

  16. Immobilizing a Fluorescent Dye Offers Potential to Investigate the Glass/Resin Interface.

    PubMed

    Lenhart; van Zanten JH; Dunkers; Zimba; James; Pollack; Parnas

    2000-01-01

    Silane coupling agents are commonly applied to glass fibers to promote fiber/resin adhesion and enhance durability in composite parts. In this study, a coupling agent multilayer on glass was doped with trace levels of the dimethylaminonitrostilbene (DMANS) fluorophore. The fluorophore was immobilized on the glass surface by tethering the molecule to a triethoxy silane coupling agent, creating the DMANS/silane coupling agent molecule (DMSCA). DMSCA was then diluted with commonly used coupling agents and grafted to a glass microscope coverslip to create a model composite interface. A 53-nm blue shift in fluorescence from the immobilized DMSCA can be followed during cure of an epoxy resin overlayer, giving this technique potential to monitor the properties of the fiber/resin interface during composite processing. Contact angle measurements on these coupling agent layers were similar in the presence or absence of the DMSCA molecule, suggesting that trace levels of the fluorescent probe did not affect the structure of the layer. The immobilized DMSCA molecule behaved similarly to the DMANS precursor in solution. Both showed longer wavelength fluorescence in more polar environments. Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10623454

  17. Efficiency of staining hair with indocyanine green

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulyabina, Tatyana V.; Kochubey, Vyacheslav I.

    2005-06-01

    The efficiency of staining hair with indocyanine green (ICG) solution depending on type of hair, natural color, staining time and other parameters was investigated. Bonding ICG with hair material occurs due to interaction between ICG molecules and keratinocyte albumin. The penetration of ICG dye into hair meets with difficulties owing to surface protective layer.

  18. Spectroscopic and fluorescence studies on Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes with NO donor fluorescence dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; El-Metwaly, Nashwa M.

    2011-10-01

    The reactions of the two common dyes [2TMPACT and 4PENI] with Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) ions were done. All the isolated complexes have been characterized by physicochemical and spectroscopic techniques. The IR data reflect the bidentate mode of 2TMPACT towards the mononuclear complex [Mn(II)] even its tetradentate in binuclear complexes [Co(II) and Cu(II)]. However, the bidentate mode is the only behavior of 4PENI ligand towards each metal ion in its mononuclear complexes. The UV-vis spectral analysis beside the magnetic moment measurements are proposed different geometries concerning each metal ions with the two ligands under investigation, as the Mn(II)-2TMPACT complex is an octahedral but Mn(II)-4PENI is a tetrahedral geometry. All the synthesized compounds are thermogravimetrically investigated. The proposed thermal decomposition was discussed for each compound with each step as well as, the kinetic parameters were calculated for all preferrible decomposition steps. The mass spectroscopy tool was used to emphasis on the suitable molecular formula proposed and the fragmentation patterns were displayed. The fluorescence properties of the synthesized ligands and their complexes were studied in DMSO at room temperature.

  19. Spectroscopic and fluorescence studies on Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes with NO donor fluorescence dyes.

    PubMed

    Refat, Moamen S; el-Metwaly, Nashwa M

    2011-10-15

    The reactions of the two common dyes [2TMPACT and 4PENI] with Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) ions were done. All the isolated complexes have been characterized by physicochemical and spectroscopic techniques. The IR data reflect the bidentate mode of 2TMPACT towards the mononuclear complex [Mn(II)] even its tetradentate in binuclear complexes [Co(II) and Cu(II)]. However, the bidentate mode is the only behavior of 4PENI ligand towards each metal ion in its mononuclear complexes. The UV-vis spectral analysis beside the magnetic moment measurements are proposed different geometries concerning each metal ions with the two ligands under investigation, as the Mn(II)-2TMPACT complex is an octahedral but Mn(II)-4PENI is a tetrahedral geometry. All the synthesized compounds are thermogravimetrically investigated. The proposed thermal decomposition was discussed for each compound with each step as well as, the kinetic parameters were calculated for all preferrible decomposition steps. The mass spectroscopy tool was used to emphasis on the suitable molecular formula proposed and the fragmentation patterns were displayed. The fluorescence properties of the synthesized ligands and their complexes were studied in DMSO at room temperature. PMID:21763185

  20. Fluorescence Ratiometric Properties Induced by Nanoparticle Plasmonics and Nanoscale Dye Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale transport of merocyanine 540 within/near the plasmon field of gold nanoparticles was recognized as an effective inducer of single-excitation dual-emission ratiometric properties. With a high concentration of the signal transducer (ammonium), a 700% increase in fluorescence was observed at the new red-shifted emission maximum, compared to a nanoparticle free sensor membrane. A previously nonrecognized isosbestic point is demonstrated at 581.4 0.1?nm. The mechanism can be utilized for enhanced and simplified ratiometric optical chemical sensors and potentially for thin film engineering to make solar cells more effective and stable by a broader and more regulated absorption. PMID:23781159

  1. Spectral changes of the fluorescent acriflavine--(Feulgen) DNA dye complex at different temperatures: application of a new cryostat for measurements in reflected and transmitted light.

    PubMed

    Tiffe, H W; Matzke, K H; Thiessen, G

    1979-08-01

    The fluorometric behaviour of cellular objects is influenced during excitation by two nearly independent phenomena: (1) by the photochemical reaction of the DNA/AF dye complex, and (2) by the energy transfer among several DNA/AF dye complexes. Both processes show a distinct temperature-dependent behaviour and can therefore be characterized by the analysis of the fluorescence spectra at different temperatures. All microfluorometric measurements were performed with a self-constructed cooling device. The cryostat permits measurements of the cellular fluorescence within a range of temperatures between 4 K and 300 K. The cooling unit operates in accordance with the 'Continuous Flow Principle' and allows the application of objectives up to a numerical aperture of 0.6. PMID:480345

  2. In vivo tracking of bone marrow fibroblasts with fluorescent carbocyanine dye.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, A; Hannouche, D; Oudina, K; Bourguignon, M; Meunier, A; Sedel, L; Petite, H

    2001-09-01

    Recent advances in the field of tissue engineering have culminated in new tissue substitutes that combine a biomaterial and precursor cells. The effectiveness of these materials is generally assessed in animals, but few studies explore the fate of the transplanted cells in vivo, despite its paramount importance for understanding the function of the engineered tissues. Current methods that use reporter genes or chimeric animals are not always well suited to solving tissue-engineering problems. We therefore developed a new method for irreversible labeling of cells to track their fate in vivo. We used a fluorescent lipophilic probe, CM-Dil, that avidly binds to the cell membrane. Human bone marrow stromal fibroblasts could be labeled with 20 microM CM-Dil in 30 min. The CM-Dil was not cytotoxic and did not affect cell proliferation in vitro. Cells could be monitored for up to 30 days when placed in a coral scaffold and implanted intramuscularly or in a bony site. However, the fluorescence intensity decreased roughly in parallel with the number of cell divisions. This fact needs to be taken into account during the design and interpretation of experiments. We believe that this technique is also of interest for other cell types. PMID:11372053

  3. Label-free and sensitive fluorescence detection of nucleic acid, based on combination of a graphene oxid /SYBR green I dye platform and polymerase assisted signal amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiao; Xing, Da

    2012-12-01

    A new label-free isothermal fluorescence amplification detection for nucleic acid has been developed. In this paper, we first developed a novel sensitive and specific detection platform with an unmodified hairpin probe (HP) combination of the graphene oxid (GO)/ SYBR green I dye (SG), which was relied on the selective principle of adsorption and the high quenching efficiency of GO. Then for the application of this new strategy, we used Mirco RNA-21 (Mir-21) as the target to evaluate this working principle of our design. When the target was hybridizing with the HP and inducing its conformation of change, an efficient isothermal circular strand-displacement polymerization reaction was activating to assist the first signal amplification. In this format, the formed complex conformation of DNA would interact with its high affinity dye, then detached from the surface of GO after incubating with the platform of GO/intercalating dye. This reaction would accompany with obvious fluorescence recovery, and accomplish farther signal enhancement by a mass of intercalating dye inserting into the minor groove of the long duplex replication product. By taking advantage of the multiple amplification of signal, this method exerted substantial enhancement in sensitivity and could be used for rapid and selective detection of Mir-21 with attomole range. It is expected that this cost-effective GO based sensor might hold considerable potential to apply in bioanalysis studies.

  4. Complexation induced fluorescence and acid-base properties of dapoxyl dye with γ-cyclodextrin: a drug-binding application using displacement assays.

    PubMed

    Pal, Kaushik; Mallick, Suman; Koner, Apurba L

    2015-06-28

    Host-guest complexation of dapoxyl sodium sulphonate (DSS), an intramolecular charge transfer dye with water-soluble and non-toxic macrocycle γ-cyclodextrin (γ-CD), has been investigated in a wide pH range. Steady-state absorption, fluorescence and time-resolved fluorescence measurements confirm the positioning of DSS into the hydrophobic cavity of γ-CD. A large fluorescence enhancement ca. 30 times, due to 1 : 2 complex formation and host-assisted guest-protonation have been utilised for developing a method for the utilisation of CD based drug-delivery applications. A simple fluorescence-displacement based approach is implemented at physiological pH for the assessment of binding strength of pharmaceutically useful small drug molecules (ibuprofen, paracetamol, methyl salicylate, salicylic acid, aspirin, and piroxicam) and six important antibiotic drugs (resazurin, thiamphenicol, chloramphenicol, ampicillin, kanamycin, and sorbic acid) with γ-CD. PMID:26028009

  5. Integrating fluorescent dye flow-curve testing and acoustic Doppler velocimetry profiling for in situ hydraulic evaluation and improvement of clarifier performance.

    PubMed

    Tarud, F; Aybar, M; Pizarro, G; Cienfuegos, R; Pastén, P

    2010-08-01

    Enhancing the performance of clarifiers requires a thorough understanding of their hydraulics. Fluorescence spectroscopy and acoustic doppler velocimeter (ADV) profiling generally have been used separately to evaluate secondary settlers. We propose that simultaneous use of these techniques is needed to obtain a more reliable and useful evaluation. Experiments were performed on laboratory- and full-scale clarifiers. Factors affecting Fluorescein and Rhodamine 6G properties were identified. Underestimations up to 500% in fluorescence intensities may be derived from differential fluorescence quenching by oxygen. A careful control and interpretation of fluorescent dye experiments is needed to minimize artifacts in real settings. While flow-curve tests constructed under controlled conditions provided a more accurate overall quantitative estimation of the hydraulic performance, ADV velocity and turbulence profiling provided a detailed spatial understanding of flow patterns that was used to troubleshoot and fix the causes of hydraulic short-circuits. PMID:20853746

  6. NIR-Cyanine Dye Linker: a Promising Candidate for Isochronic Fluorescence Imaging in Molecular Cancer Diagnostics and Therapy Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Komljenovic, Dorde; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Ehemann, Volker; Pipkorn, Ruediger; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Debus, Jürgen; Braun, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Personalized anti-cancer medicine is boosted by the recent development of molecular diagnostics and molecularly targeted drugs requiring rapid and efficient ligation routes. Here, we present a novel approach to synthetize a conjugate able to act simultaneously as an imaging and as a chemotherapeutic agent by coupling functional peptides employing solid phase peptide synthesis technologies. Development and the first synthesis of a fluorescent dye with similarity in the polymethine part of the Cy7 molecule whose indolenine-N residues were substituted with a propylene linker are described. Methylating agent temozolomide is functionalized with a tetrazine as a diene component whereas Cy7-cell penetrating peptide conjugate acts as a dienophilic reaction partner for the inverse Diels-Alder click chemistry-mediated ligation route yielding a theranostic conjugate, 3-mercapto-propionic-cyclohexenyl-Cy7-bis-temozolomide-bromide-cell penetrating peptide. Synthesis route described here may facilitate targeted delivery of the therapeutic compound to achieve sufficient local concentrations at the target site or tissue. Its versatility allows a choice of adequate imaging tags applicable in e.g. PET, SPECT, CT, near-infrared imaging, and therapeutic substances including cytotoxic agents. Imaging tags and therapeutics may be simultaneously bound to the conjugate applying click chemistry. Theranostic compound presented here offers a solid basis for a further improvement of cancer management in a precise, patient-specific manner. PMID:26722379

  7. A method for the general identification of protein crystals in crystallization experiments using a noncovalent fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Groves, Matthew R; Mller, Ingrid B; Kreplin, Xandra; Mller-Dieckmann, Jochen

    2007-04-01

    A technique is described whereby the addition of low concentrations (millimolar to micromolar) of the fluorescent dye 1,8-ANS to the protein solution prior to crystallization results in crystallization experiments in which protein crystals are strongly contrasted above background artifacts when exposed to low-intensity UV radiation. As 1,8-ANS does not covalently modify the protein sample, no further handling or purification steps are necessary. The system has been tested on a wide variety of protein samples and it has been shown that the addition of 1,8-ANS has no discernible effect on the crystallization frequencies or crystallization conditions of these proteins. As 1,8-ANS interacts with a wide variety of proteins, this is proposed to be a general solution for the automated classification of protein crystallization images and the detection of protein crystals. The results also demonstrate the expected discrimination between salt and protein crystals, as well as allowing the straightforward identification of small crystals that grow in precipitate or under a protein skin. PMID:17372358

  8. Quantitative evaluation of in vivo vital-dye fluorescence endoscopic imaging for the detection of Barrett's-associated neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thekkek, Nadhi; Lee, Michelle H.; Polydorides, Alexandros D.; Rosen, Daniel G.; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2015-05-01

    Current imaging tools are associated with inconsistent sensitivity and specificity for detection of Barrett's-associated neoplasia. Optical imaging has shown promise in improving the classification of neoplasia in vivo. The goal of this pilot study was to evaluate whether in vivo vital dye fluorescence imaging (VFI) has the potential to improve the accuracy of early-detection of Barrett's-associated neoplasia. In vivo endoscopic VFI images were collected from 65 sites in 14 patients with confirmed Barrett's esophagus (BE), dysplasia, or esophageal adenocarcinoma using a modular video endoscope and a high-resolution microendoscope (HRME). Qualitative image features were compared to histology; VFI and HRME images show changes in glandular structure associated with neoplastic progression. Quantitative image features in VFI images were identified for objective image classification of metaplasia and neoplasia, and a diagnostic algorithm was developed using leave-one-out cross validation. Three image features extracted from VFI images were used to classify tissue as neoplastic or not with a sensitivity of 87.8% and a specificity of 77.6% (AUC=0.878). A multimodal approach incorporating VFI and HRME imaging can delineate epithelial changes present in Barrett's-associated neoplasia. Quantitative analysis of VFI images may provide a means for objective interpretation of BE during surveillance.

  9. NIR-Cyanine Dye Linker: a Promising Candidate for Isochronic Fluorescence Imaging in Molecular Cancer Diagnostics and Therapy Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Komljenovic, Dorde; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Ehemann, Volker; Pipkorn, Ruediger; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Debus, Jürgen; Braun, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Personalized anti-cancer medicine is boosted by the recent development of molecular diagnostics and molecularly targeted drugs requiring rapid and efficient ligation routes. Here, we present a novel approach to synthetize a conjugate able to act simultaneously as an imaging and as a chemotherapeutic agent by coupling functional peptides employing solid phase peptide synthesis technologies. Development and the first synthesis of a fluorescent dye with similarity in the polymethine part of the Cy7 molecule whose indolenine-N residues were substituted with a propylene linker are described. Methylating agent temozolomide is functionalized with a tetrazine as a diene component whereas Cy7-cell penetrating peptide conjugate acts as a dienophilic reaction partner for the inverse Diels-Alder click chemistry-mediated ligation route yielding a theranostic conjugate, 3-mercapto-propionic-cyclohexenyl-Cy7-bis-temozolomide-bromide-cell penetrating peptide. Synthesis route described here may facilitate targeted delivery of the therapeutic compound to achieve sufficient local concentrations at the target site or tissue. Its versatility allows a choice of adequate imaging tags applicable in e.g. PET, SPECT, CT, near-infrared imaging, and therapeutic substances including cytotoxic agents. Imaging tags and therapeutics may be simultaneously bound to the conjugate applying click chemistry. Theranostic compound presented here offers a solid basis for a further improvement of cancer management in a precise, patient-specific manner. PMID:26722379

  10. FM1-43 dye ultrastructural localization in and release from frog motor nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Henkel, A W; Lbke, J; Betz, W J

    1996-03-01

    Previous work has shown that the fluorescent styryl dye FM1-43 stains nerve terminals in an activity-dependent fashion. This dye appears to label the membranes of recycled synaptic vesicles by being trapped during endocytosis. Stained terminals can subsequently be destained by repeating nerve stimulation in the absence of dye; the destaining evidently reflects escape of dye into the bathing medium from membranes of exocytosing synaptic vesicles. In the present study we tested two key aspects of this interpretation of FM1-43 behavior, namely: (i) that the dye is localized in synaptic vesicles, and (ii) that it is actually released into the bathing medium during destaining. To accomplish this, we first photolyzed the internalized dye in the presence of diaminobenzidine. This created an electron-dense reaction product that could be visualized in the electron microscope. Reaction product was confined to synaptic vesicles, as predicted. Second, using spectrofluorometry, we quantified the release of dye liberated into the medium from tubocurarine-treated nerve-muscle preparations. Nerve stimulation increased the amount of FM1-43 released, and we estimate that normally a stained synaptic vesicle contains a few hundred molecules of the dye. The key to the successful detection of released FM1-43 was to add the micelle-forming detergent 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS), which increased FM1-43 quantum yield by more than two orders of magnitude. PMID:8700859

  11. Comparison of a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody conjugated with visible or near-infrared fluorescent dyes for imaging pancreatic cancer in orthotopic nude mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maawy, Ali A.; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Luiken, George A.; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a set of visible and near-infrared dyes conjugated to a tumor-specific chimeric antibody for high-resolution tumor imaging in orthotopic models of pancreatic cancer. BxPC-3 human pancreatic cancer was orthotopically implanted into pancreata of nude mice. Mice received a single intravenous injection of a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody conjugated to one of the following fluorophores: 488-nm group (Alexa Fluor 488 or DyLight 488); 550-nm group (Alexa Fluor 555 or DyLight 550); 650-nm group (Alexa Fluor 660 or DyLight 650), or the 750-nm group (Alexa Fluor 750 or DyLight 755). After 24 h, the Olympus OV100 small-animal imaging system was used for noninvasive and intravital fluorescence imaging of mice. Dyes were compared with respect to depth of imaging, resolution, tumor-to-background ratio (TBR), photobleaching, and hemoglobin quenching. The longer wavelength dyes had increased depth of penetration and ability to detect the smallest tumor deposits and provided the highest TBRs, resistance to hemoglobin quenching, and specificity. The shorter wavelength dyes were more photostable. This study showed unique advantages of each dye for specific cancer imaging in a clinically relevant orthotopic model.

  12. The use of vitamins as tracer dyes for laser-induced fluorescence in liquid flow applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zähringer, Katharina

    2014-04-01

    Tracers commonly used in experimental flow studies are mostly nocuous to the environment and human health. Particularly, in large flow installations, this can become a problem. In this study, a solution of this problem is presented, based on using water-soluble vitamins. Five of them are examined here for their applicability in flow studies. Vitamins B2 and B6 turned out to be the most promising candidates, and the dependency of their fluorescence intensity on parameters like concentration, laser energy, temperature, and pH are determined for two commonly used laser excitation wavelengths (532, 355 nm). Two examples of application in a static mixer and a spray flow are shown and demonstrate the applicability of the vitamin tracers.

  13. Isolation and Applications of Prostate Side Population Cells Based on Dye Cycle Violet Efflux

    PubMed Central

    Gangavarapu, Kalyan J.; Huss, Wendy J.

    2011-01-01

    This unit describes methods for the digestion of human prostate clinical specimens, dye cycle violet (DCV) staining procedure for the identification, isolation, and quantitation of radiolabeled dihydrotestosterone (DHT) retention of side population cells. The principle of the side population assay is based on differential efflux of DCV, a cell membrane permeable fluorescent dye, by cells with high ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter activity. Cells with high ABC transporter activity efflux DCV and fall in the lower left quadrant of a flow cytograph are designated as side population cells. This unit emphasizes tissue digestion, DCV staining, flow settings for sorting side population cells and quantitation of radiolabeled DHT retention. PMID:21400686

  14. Facile Synthesis of Gold Nanospheres Modified by Positively Charged Mesoporous Silica, Loaded with Near-Infrared Fluorescent Dye, for in Vivo X-ray Computed Tomography and Fluorescence Dual Mode Imaging.

    PubMed

    Song, Ji-Tao; Yang, Xiao-Quan; Zhang, Xiao-Shuai; Yan, Dong-Mei; Wang, Zhao-Yang; Zhao, Yuan-Di

    2015-08-12

    We developed a simple and efficient method to synthesize a novel probe for both computed tomography (CT) and fluorescence imaging. Gold nanospheres were coated with positively charged mesoporous silica (Au@mSiO2-TTA) using a one-pot method to cohydrolyze quaternary ammonium silane and tetraethyl orthosilicate. Subsequently, IR-783, a negatively charged and water-soluble near-infrared fluorescent dye, was electrostatically adsorbed into the silica shell. Transmission electron microscopy imaging, X-ray powder diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy indicated that Au@mSiO2-TTA had a clear core-shell structure, was monodisperse, had a large surface area (530 m2/g), and had a uniform pore size (2.2 nm). The mesoporous structure could effectively load fluorescent dye. After loading, the zeta potential of the nanoparticle dropped from 48 mV to 30 mV, and after additional modification with polyvinylpyrrolidone, it further reduced to 6 mV. Probe fluorescence was stable over time, and the probe was an effective CT contrast agent and as a near-infrared fluorescent probe. The half-life of the probe in the blood was 1.5 h, and the probe was mainly distributed in the spleen and liver 4 h after injection. Tissue sections showed that major organs were normal and without visible morphological changes, 6 days post injection, indicating the biocompatibility of the probe. PMID:26189815

  15. Mitochondrial staining allows robust elimination of apoptotic and damaged cells during cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Barteneva, Natasha S; Ponomarev, Eugeny D; Tsytsykova, Alla; Armant, Myriam; Vorobjev, Ivan A

    2014-04-01

    High-speed fluorescence-activated cell sorting is relevant for a plethora of applications, such as PCR-based techniques, microarrays, cloning, and propagation of selected cell populations. We suggest a simple cell-sorting technique to eliminate early and late apoptotic and necrotic cells, with good signal-to-noise ratio and a high-purity yield. The mitochondrial potential dye, TMRE (tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester perchlorate), was used to separate viable and non-apoptotic cells from the cell sorting samples. TMRE staining is reversible and does not affect cell proliferation and viability. Sorted TMRE(+) cells contained a negligible percentage of apoptotic and damaged cells and had a higher proliferative potential as compared with their counterpart cells, sorted on the basis of staining with DNA viability dye. This novel sorting technique using TMRE does not interfere with subsequent functional assays and is a method of choice for the enrichment of functionally active, unbiased cell populations. PMID:24394470

  16. Immunofluorescence Staining.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Julie G

    2015-01-01

    This unit provides a protocol for indirect immunofluorescence, which is a method that provides information about the locations of specific molecules and the structure of the cell. Antibody molecules for a specific target molecule are exposed to the cell or tissue being investigated. The binding of these molecules is detected by incubating the sample with a secondary antibody specific for immunoglobulin molecules and conjugated to a fluorophore. This provides both a visible signal and amplification of the signal and the results are observed with a fluorescence microscope. This unit describes the widely used and powerful technique of localization of proteins in cells by immunofluorescence. The location can be determined by double labeling with an antibody directed against a protein of known location. The technique can be used as a supplement to immunolocalization by electron microscopy and subcellular fractionation. It allows not only identification of the antigen distribution in the cell but also a survey of the dynamic aspects of protein movements in the cell-on and off membranes, into and out of the nucleus, and through membrane traffic pathways. 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26621373

  17. In Vitro Fluorescence Studies With Hematoporphyrin Derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulok, Janine R.; Wade, Margaret H.; Lin, Chi-Wei

    1989-03-01

    The translocation and localization pattern of hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD) in human bladder tumor cells (MGH-U1) in culture was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy and interactive laser cytometry. The qualitative and quantitative fluorescence labelling patterns of HpD were compared with other fluorescent dyes specific for subcellular localization sites. Labelling of MGH-U1 cells with HpD initially showed fluorescence at the cell membrane. Later, diffuse perinuclear fluorescence was evident in these cells. This fluorescent staining pattern did not appear to be site-specific to either the mitochondria or endoplasmic reticulum but appeared to be generally distibuted to the cytomembranous structures of the cell. Lateral diffusion measurements indicated that the fluorescent components of HpD were bound to cellular lipids. These results suggest that HpD may localize in cells in vitro by a spontaneous diffusion process and be distributed to lipophilic sites within the cell.

  18. Laser Excited Fluorescence For Forensic Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, Robert E.

    1986-07-01

    The application of laser excited fluorescence to the detection and identification of latent fingerprints was first accomplished ten years ago. The development of the technology has progressed rapidly with the introduction of commercial equipment by several manufacturers. Systems based on Argon-ion, Copper-vapor, and frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers are compared. The theoretical basis of detection by fluorescence is discussed along with the more useful techniques of dye staining. Other applications of the laser excited fluorescence in forensic investigation include gunshot residue analysis, serology, collection of trace evidence, and document examination.

  19. An imidazole functionalized pentameric thiophene displays different staining patterns in normal and malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Karin; Appelqvist, Hanna; Cie?lar-Pobuda, Artur; Bck, Marcus; Kgedal, Bertil; Jonasson, Jon A; Los, Marek J; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Molecular tools for fluorescent imaging of cells and their components are vital for understanding the function and activity of cells. Here, we report an imidazole functionalized pentameric oligothiophene, p-HTIm, that can be utilized for fluorescent imaging of cells. p-HTIm fluorescence in normal cells appeared in a peripheral punctate pattern partially co-localized with lysosomes, whereas a one-sided perinuclear Golgi associated localization of the dye was observed in malignant cells. The uptake of p-HTIm was temperature dependent and the intracellular target was reached within 1 h after staining. The ability of p-HTIm to stain cells was reduced when the imidazole side chain was chemically altered, verifying that specific imidazole side-chain functionalities are necessary for achieving the observed cellular staining. Our findings confirm that properly functionalized oligothiophenes can be utilized as fluorescent tools for vital staining of cells and that the selectivity toward distinct intracellular targets are highly dependent on the side-chain functionalities along the conjugated thiophene backbone. PMID:26501054

  20. An imidazole functionalized pentameric thiophene displays different staining patterns in normal and malignant cells

    PubMed Central

    Magnusson, Karin; Appelqvist, Hanna; Cie?lar-Pobuda, Artur; Bck, Marcus; Kgedal, Bertil; Jonasson, Jon A.; Los, Marek J.; Nilsson, K. Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular tools for fluorescent imaging of cells and their components are vital for understanding the function and activity of cells. Here, we report an imidazole functionalized pentameric oligothiophene, p-HTIm, that can be utilized for fluorescent imaging of cells. p-HTIm fluorescence in normal cells appeared in a peripheral punctate pattern partially co-localized with lysosomes, whereas a one-sided perinuclear Golgi associated localization of the dye was observed in malignant cells. The uptake of p-HTIm was temperature dependent and the intracellular target was reached within 1 h after staining. The ability of p-HTIm to stain cells was reduced when the imidazole side chain was chemically altered, verifying that specific imidazole side-chain functionalities are necessary for achieving the observed cellular staining. Our findings confirm that properly functionalized oligothiophenes can be utilized as fluorescent tools for vital staining of cells and that the selectivity toward distinct intracellular targets are highly dependent on the side-chain functionalities along the conjugated thiophene backbone. PMID:26501054

  1. An imidazole functionalized pentameric thiophene displays different staining patterns in normal and malignant cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Peter; Magnusson, Karin; Appelqvist, Hanna; Cieslar-Pobuda, Artur; Bäck, Marcus; Kågedal, Bertil; Jonasson, Jon; Los, Marek

    2015-10-01

    Molecular tools for fluorescent imaging of cells and their components are vital for understanding the function and activity of cells. Here, we report an imidazole functionalized pentameric oligothiophene, p-HTIm, that can be utilized for fluorescent imaging of cells. p-HTIm fluorescence in normal cells appeared in a peripheral punctate pattern partially co-localized with lysosomes, whereas a one-sided perinuclear Golgi associated localization of the dye was observed in malignant cells. The uptake of p-HTIm was temperature dependent and the intracellular target was reached within 1 h after staining. The ability of p-HTIm to stain cells was reduced when the imidazole side chain was chemically altered, verifying that specific imidazole side-chain functionalities are necessary for achieving the observed cellular staining. Our findings confirm that properly functionalized oligothiophenes can be utilized as fluorescent tools for vital staining of cells and that the selectivity towards distinct intracellular targets are highly dependent on the side-chain functionalities along the conjugated thiophene backbone.

  2. Synthesis, spectroscopic and DFT studies of novel fluorescent dyes: 3-Aminoimidazo[1,2-a]pyridines possessing 4-pyrone moieties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrisa, Aziz; Safa, Kazem Dindar; Esmati, Somayeh

    2014-01-01

    A series of novel imidazo[1,2-a]pyridines possessing 4-pyrone ring were synthesized by three-component condensation of 4-pyrone carbaldehydes, 2-aminopyridines and isocyanides. Bismuth (III) chloride was used as a catalyst in these reactions and desired products were synthesized in good yields at a very short period of time under solvent free conditions. UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence emission spectra of these compounds were investigated. It shown that two of these compounds (10f and 10g) exhibit intense fluorescence in dichloromethane. Optimized ground-state molecular geometries and orbital distributions of these two fluorescent dyes were obtained using density functional theory (DFT). Thermogravimetric analysis and electrochemical properties of these compounds were also studied.

  3. Synthesis, spectroscopic and DFT studies of novel fluorescent dyes: 3-aminoimidazo[1,2-a]pyridines possessing 4-pyrone moieties.

    PubMed

    Shahrisa, Aziz; Safa, Kazem Dindar; Esmati, Somayeh

    2014-01-01

    A series of novel imidazo[1,2-a]pyridines possessing 4-pyrone ring were synthesized by three-component condensation of 4-pyrone carbaldehydes, 2-aminopyridines and isocyanides. Bismuth (III) chloride was used as a catalyst in these reactions and desired products were synthesized in good yields at a very short period of time under solvent free conditions. UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence emission spectra of these compounds were investigated. It shown that two of these compounds (10f and 10g) exhibit intense fluorescence in dichloromethane. Optimized ground-state molecular geometries and orbital distributions of these two fluorescent dyes were obtained using density functional theory (DFT). Thermogravimetric analysis and electrochemical properties of these compounds were also studied. PMID:24113013

  4. A Novel Styryldehydropyridocolinium Homodimer: Synthesis and Fluorescence Properties Upon Interaction with DNA.

    PubMed

    Yao, Huirong; Chang, Lifang; Liu, Chang; Jiao, Xiaojie; He, Song; Liu, Haijun; Zeng, Xianshun

    2015-11-01

    A novel homodimer of the styryldehydropyridocolinium dye (TPTP) has been synthesized and characterized. Free TPTP exhibited low fluorescence quantum yield and large Stokes shift (over 160 nm) in water. However, it showed a significant fluorescence turn-on effect upon intercalation into DNA base pairs. Meanwhile, the fluorescence intensity of the intercalated structures formed by TPTP and DNA decreased quickly upon addition of deoxyribonuclease I, indicating that the dye can be used to monitor deoxyribonuclease I activity and DNA hydrolysis. Electrophoresis analysis revealed that the dye had intercalative binding to DNA and can potentially be used for DNA staining in electrophoresis. Thus, the innate nature of large Stokes shift and excellent fluorescence turn on effect upon interaction with DNA endue the dye with a wide range of applications. PMID:26384336

  5. Sea dye marker provides visibility for 20 hours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Laat, F.

    1966-01-01

    Sea dye marker block releases a visible slick which lasts at least twelve hours. The dye marker uses a fluorescent dye in a heat cured binder which, when immersed in seawater, releases the dye at a controlled rate.

  6. Polymorphism of Two-Dimensional Cyanine Dye J-Aggregates and Its Genesis: Fluorescence Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Prokhorov, Valery V; Perelygina, Olga M; Pozin, Sergey I; Mal'tsev, Eugene I; Vannikov, Anatoly V

    2015-12-01

    Polymorphic J-aggregates of monomethine cyanine dye 3,3'-di(?-sulfopropyl)-5,5'-dichlorotiamonomethinecyanine (TC) have been studied by fluorescence optical microscopy (FOM) and by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The in situ FOM observations in a solution drop distinguish two J-aggregate morphology classes: flexible strips and rigid rods. The AFM imaging of dried samples reveals a strong J-aggregate structural rearrangement under adsorption on a mica surface with the strips self-folding and the rods squashing into rectangular bilayers and much deeper destruction. In the present work, the following structural conclusions have been drawn on the basis of careful consideration of strip crystal habits and various structural features of squashed/destructed rods: (1) the tubular morphology of TC rods is directly proved by FOM measurements in the solution bulk; (2) the staircase model of molecular arrangement in strips is proposed explaining the characteristic ?44 skew angle in strip vertices; (3) a model of tube formation by a close-packed helical winding of flexible monolayer strips is proposed and justified which explains the observed J-aggregate polymorphism and strip-to-rod polymorphic transformations in a wide spatiotemporal scale; (4) at a nanoscale, an unexpectedly complex quasi-one-dimensional organization in J-aggregate two-dimensional monolayers is observed by high-resolution AFM imaging of constituent nanostrips separated by a characteristic distance in the range of 6-10 nm. The obtained results indicate that the underlying monolayer structure is the same for all J-aggregate polymorphs. PMID:26488202

  7. Real-time probing of β-amyloid self-assembly and inhibition using fluorescence self-quenching between neighbouring dyes.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Steven D; Dalgarno, Paul A; Cameron, Ryan T; Hedley, Gordon J; Hacker, Christian; Lucocq, John M; Baillie, George S; Samuel, Ifor D W; Penedo, J Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The fluorescence response of the Thioflavin-T (ThT) dye and derivatives has become the standard tool for detecting β-amyloid aggregates (Aβ) in solution. However, it is accepted that ThT-based methods suffer from important drawbacks. Some of these are due to the cationic structure of ThT, which limits its application at slightly acidic conditions; whereas some limitations are related to the general use of an extrinsic-dye sensing strategy and its intrinsic requirement for the formation of a sensor-binding site during the aggregation process. Here, we introduce fluorescence-self-quenching (FSQ) between N-terminally tagged peptides as a strategy to overcome some of these limitations. Using a combination of steady-state, picosecond time-resolved fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy, we characterize the fluorescence response of HiLyte fluor 555-labelled Aβ peptides and demonstrate that Aβ self-assembly organizes the covalently attached probes in close proximity to trigger the self-quenching sensing process over a broad range of conditions. Importantly, we prove that N-terminal tagging of β-amyloid peptides does not alter the self-assembly kinetics or the resulting aggregated structures. We also tested the ability of FSQ-based methods to monitor the inhibition of Aβ1-42 aggregation using the small heat-shock protein Hsp20 as a model system. Overall, FSQ-based strategies for amyloid-sensing fill the gap between current morphology-specific protocols using extrinsic dyes, and highly-specialized single-molecule techniques that are difficult to implement in high-throughput analytical determinations. When performed in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) format, the method becomes a ratiometric platform to gain insights into amyloid structure and for standardizing in vitro studies of amyloid aggregation. PMID:24170094

  8. Efficient staining of actinomycetoma and eumycetoma grains using henna extract.

    PubMed

    Batran, S E

    2015-12-01

    The use of natural, nontoxic, convenient and eco-friendly dyes for histopathological diagnosis avoids some of the synthetic dyes' hazards. I used an aqueous extract of henna at a concentration of 20 g/ml and acidified with acetic acid to stain mycetoma grains. Henna stained mycetoma grains orange-red to brown. The engulfed mycetoma grains within inflammatory cells stained well with henna extract compared to hematoxylin and eosin (H & E) and hexamine silver. PMID:26052737

  9. The congo red stain revisited.

    PubMed

    Elghetany, M T; Saleem, A; Barr, K

    1989-01-01

    The Congo red stain has undergone several modifications since it was first used by Bennhold in 1922 in order to increase the specificity for staining amyloid. Most of the laboratories in the United States use the method of Puchtler which uses alkaline Congo red solution. Some of the variables associated with the procedure were investigated by us. Our results showed the following: (1) amyloid showed green birefringence at all levels between 4 to 12 mu thick sections with better visualization of small deposits with increased thickness. Best results were obtained with 8 mu thick sections; (2) omission of the pretreatment with alkaline alcoholic solution of sodium chloride (NaCl) did not affect the sensitivity of the method; (3) the use of polar mounting media had no effect on amyloid and collagen birefringence; (4) 50 percent saturation of the Congo red staining solution with NaCl caused strong staining of collagen, elastic fibers and eosinophilic granules. In addition, collagen showed green birefringence and dichroism and its differentiation from amyloid became difficult; and (5) using the staining solution fully saturated with NaCl, no positive staining was seen with tissues other than amyloid. Collagen and elastic fibers showed red fluorescence which was of less intensity than amyloid. It is our conclusion that the method of Puchtler for detecting amyloid gives better results if the staining solution is fully saturated with NaCl. The pretreatment step may be deleted without compromising the quality of staining. Improved staining of amyloid enhances the specificity of green birefringence, dichroism, and red fluorescence. PMID:2471435

  10. White emitters by tuning the excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer fluorescence emission in 2-(2'-hydroxybenzofuran)benzoxazole dyes.

    PubMed

    Benelhadj, Karima; Muzuzu, Wenziz; Massue, Julien; Retailleau, Pascal; Charaf-Eddin, Azzam; Laurent, Adle D; Jacquemin, Denis; Ulrich, Gilles; Ziessel, Raymond

    2014-09-26

    The synthesis, structural, and photophysical properties of a new series of original dyes based on 2-(2'-hydroxybenzofuran)benzoxazole (HBBO) is reported. Upon photoexcitation, these dyes exhibit intense dual fluorescence with contribution from the enol (E*) and the keto (K*) emission, with K* being formed through excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). We show that the ratio of emission intensity E*/K* can be fine-tuned by judiciously decorating the molecular core with electron-donating or -attracting substituents. Push-pull dyes 9 and 10 functionalized by a strong donor (nNBu2 ) and a strong acceptor group (CF3 and CN, respectively) exhibit intense dual emission, particularly in apolar solvents such as cyclohexane in which the maximum wavelength of the two bands is the more strongly separated. Moreover, all dyes exhibit strong solid-state dual emission in a KBr matrix and polymer films with enhanced quantum yields reaching up to 54?%. A wise selection of substituents led to white emission both in solution and in the solid state. Finally, these experimental results were analyzed by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations, which confirm that, on the one hand, only E* and K* emission are present (no rotamer) and, on the other hand, the relative free energies of the two tautomers in the excited state guide the ratio of the E*/K* emission intensities. PMID:25145709

  11. Estimation of ground and excited state dipole moment of laser dyes C504T and C521T using solvatochromic shifts of absorption and fluorescence spectra.

    PubMed

    Basavaraja, Jana; Suresh Kumar, H M; Inamdar, S R; Wari, M N

    2016-02-01

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of laser dyes: coumarin 504T (C504T) and coumarin 521T (C521T) have been recorded at room temperature in a series of non-polar and polar solvents. The spectra of these dyes showed bathochromic shift with increasing in solvent polarity indicating the involvement of ???(?) transition. Kamlet-Taft and Catalan solvent parameters were used to analyze the effect of solvents on C504T and C521T molecules. The study reveals that both general solute-solvent interactions and specific interactions are operative in these two systems. The ground state dipole moment was estimated using Guggenheim's method and also by quantum mechanical calculations. The solvatochromic data were used to determine the excited state dipole moment (?e). It is observed that dipole moment value of excited state (?e) is higher than that of the ground state in both the laser dyes indicating that these dyes are more polar in nature in the excited state than in the ground state. PMID:26529635

  12. Estimation of ground and excited state dipole moment of laser dyes C504T and C521T using solvatochromic shifts of absorption and fluorescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basavaraja, Jana; Suresh Kumar, H. M.; Inamdar, S. R.; Wari, M. N.

    2016-02-01

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of laser dyes: coumarin 504T (C504T) and coumarin 521T (C521T) have been recorded at room temperature in a series of non-polar and polar solvents. The spectra of these dyes showed bathochromic shift with increasing in solvent polarity indicating the involvement of π → π* transition. Kamlet-Taft and Catalan solvent parameters were used to analyze the effect of solvents on C504T and C521T molecules. The study reveals that both general solute-solvent interactions and specific interactions are operative in these two systems. The ground state dipole moment was estimated using Guggenheim's method and also by quantum mechanical calculations. The solvatochromic data were used to determine the excited state dipole moment (μe). It is observed that dipole moment value of excited state (μe) is higher than that of the ground state in both the laser dyes indicating that these dyes are more polar in nature in the excited state than in the ground state.

  13. A simple chip free-flow electrophoresis for monosaccharide sensing via supermolecule interaction of boronic acid functionalized quencher and fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiao-Yang; Dong, Jing-Yu; Wang, Hou-Yu; Li, Si; Fan, Liu-Yin; Cao, Cheng-Xi

    2013-08-01

    Here, a simple micro free-flow electrophoresis (?FFE) was developed for fluorescence sensing of monosaccharide via supermolecule interaction of synthesized boronic acid functionalized benzyl viologen (?-BBV) and fluorescent dye. The ?FFE contained two open electrode cavities and an ion-exchange membrane was sandwiched between two polymethylmethacrylate plates. The experiments demonstrated the following merits of developed ?FFE: (i) up to 90.5% of voltage efficiency due to high conductivity of ion-exchange membrane; (ii) a strong ability against influence of bubble produced in two electrodes due to open design of electrode cavities; and (iii) reusable and washable separation chamber (45 mm 17 mm 100 ?m, 77 ?L) avoiding the discard of ?FFE due to blockage of solute precipitation in chamber. Remarkably, the ?FFE was first designed for the sensing of monosaccharide via the supermolecule interaction of synthesized ?-BBV, fluorescent dye, and monosaccharide. Under the optimized conditions, the minimum concentration of monosaccharide that could be detected was 1 10(-11) M. Finally, the developed device was used for the detection of 0.3 mM glucose spiked in human urine. All of the results demonstrated the feasibility of monosaccharide detection via the ?FFE. PMID:23712879

  14. Labeling the oily core of nanocapsules and lipid-core nanocapsules with a triglyceride conjugated to a fluorescent dye as a strategy to particle tracking in biological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiel, Luana Almeida; Contri, Renata Vidor; Bica, Juliane Freitas; Figueiró, Fabrício; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira; Guterres, Sílvia Stanisçuaski; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin

    2014-05-01

    The synthesis of novel fluorescent materials represents a very important step to obtain labeled nanoformulations in order to evaluate their biological behavior. The strategy of conjugating a fluorescent dye with triacylglycerol allows that either particles differing regarding supramolecular structure, i.e., nanoemulsions, nanocapsules, lipid-core nanocapsules, or surface charge, i.e., cationic nanocapsules and anionic nanocapsules, can be tracked using the same labeled material. In this way, a rhodamine B-conjugated triglyceride was obtained to prepare fluorescent polymeric nanocapsules. Different formulations were obtained, nanocapsules (NC) or lipid-core nanocapsules (LNC), using the labeled oil and Eudragit RS100, Eudragit S100, or poly(caprolactone) (PCL), respectively. The rhodamine B was coupled with the ricinolein by activating the carboxylic function using a carbodiimide derivative. Thin layer chromatography, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-vis, and fluorescence spectroscopy were used to identify the new product. Fluorescent nanocapsule aqueous suspensions were prepared by the solvent displacement method. Their pH values were 4.6 (NC-RS100), 3.5 (NC-S100), and 5.0 (LNC-PCL). The volume-weighted mean diameter ( D 4.3) and polydispersity values were 150 nm and 1.05 (NC-RS100), 350 nm and 2.28 (NC-S100), and 270 nm and 1.67 (LNC-PCL). The mean diameters determined by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) ( z-average) were around 200 nm. The zeta potential values were +5.85 mV (NC-RS100), -21.12 mV (NC-S100), and -19.25 mV (LNC-PCL). The wavelengths of maximum fluorescence emission were 567 nm (NC-RS100 and LNC-PCL) and 574 nm (NC-S100). Fluorescence microscopy was used to evaluate the cell uptake (human macrophage cell line) of the fluorescent nanocapsules in order to show the applicability of the approach. When the cells were treated with the fluorescent nanocapsules, red emission was detected around the cell nucleus. We demonstrated that the rhodamine B-conjugated triglyceride is a promising new material to obtain versatile dye-labeled nanocarriers presenting different chemical nature in their surfaces.

  15. Layer-by-layer films and colloidal dispersions of graphene oxide nanosheets for efficient control of the fluorescence and aggregation properties of the cationic dye acridine orange.

    PubMed

    Hansda, Chaitali; Chakraborty, Utsav; Hussain, Syed Arshad; Bhattacharjee, Debajyoti; Paul, Pabitra Kumar

    2016-03-15

    Chemically derived graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets have received great deal of interest for technological application such as optoelectronic and biosensors. Aqueous dispersions of GO become an efficient template to induce the association of cationic dye namely Acridine Orange (AO). Interactions of AO with colloidal GO was governed by both electrostatic and π-π stacking cooperative interactions. The type of dye aggregations was found to depend on the concentration of GO in the mixed ensemble. Spectroscopic calculations revealed the formation of both H and J-type dimers, but H-type aggregations were predominant. Preparation of layer-by-layer (LbL) electrostatic self-assembled films of AO and GO onto poly (allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) coated quartz substrate is also reported in this article. UV-Vis absorption, steady state and time resolve fluorescence and Raman spectroscopic techniques have been employed to explore the detail photophysical properties of pure AO, AO/GO mixed solution and AO/GO LbL films. Scanning electron microscopy was also used for visual evidence of the synthesized nanodimensional GO sheets. The fluorescence quenching of AO in the presence of GO in aqueous solution was due to the interfacial photoinduced electron transfer (PET) from photoexcited AO to GO i.e. GO acts as an efficient quenching agent for the fluorescence emission of AO. The quenching is found to be static in nature. Raman spectroscopic results also confirmed the interaction of AO with GO and the electron transfer. The formation of AO/GO complex via very fast excited state electron transfer mechanism may be proposed as to prepare GO-based fluorescence sensor for biomolecular detection without direct labeling the biomolecules by fluorescent probe. PMID:26722674

  16. Layer-by-layer films and colloidal dispersions of graphene oxide nanosheets for efficient control of the fluorescence and aggregation properties of the cationic dye acridine orange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansda, Chaitali; Chakraborty, Utsav; Hussain, Syed Arshad; Bhattacharjee, Debajyoti; Paul, Pabitra Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Chemically derived graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets have received great deal of interest for technological application such as optoelectronic and biosensors. Aqueous dispersions of GO become an efficient template to induce the association of cationic dye namely Acridine Orange (AO). Interactions of AO with colloidal GO was governed by both electrostatic and π-π stacking cooperative interactions. The type of dye aggregations was found to depend on the concentration of GO in the mixed ensemble. Spectroscopic calculations revealed the formation of both H and J-type dimers, but H-type aggregations were predominant. Preparation of layer-by-layer (LbL) electrostatic self-assembled films of AO and GO onto poly (allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) coated quartz substrate is also reported in this article. UV-Vis absorption, steady state and time resolve fluorescence and Raman spectroscopic techniques have been employed to explore the detail photophysical properties of pure AO, AO/GO mixed solution and AO/GO LbL films. Scanning electron microscopy was also used for visual evidence of the synthesized nanodimensional GO sheets. The fluorescence quenching of AO in the presence of GO in aqueous solution was due to the interfacial photoinduced electron transfer (PET) from photoexcited AO to GO i.e. GO acts as an efficient quenching agent for the fluorescence emission of AO. The quenching is found to be static in nature. Raman spectroscopic results also confirmed the interaction of AO with GO and the electron transfer. The formation of AO/GO complex via very fast excited state electron transfer mechanism may be proposed as to prepare GO-based fluorescence sensor for biomolecular detection without direct labeling the biomolecules by fluorescent probe.

  17. Structurally Rigid 9-Amino-benzo[c]cinnoliniums Make Up a Class of Compact and Large Stokes-Shift Fluorescent Dyes for Cell-Based Imaging Applications.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yanming; Shang, Zhihao; Yang, Yanhong; Zhu, Shaojia; Qian, Xuhong; Shi, Ping; Zheng, Jing; Yang, Youjun

    2015-06-01

    Classic fluorescent dyes, such as coumarin, naphthalimide, fluorescein, BODIPY, rhodamine, and cyanines, are cornerstones of various spectroscopic and microscopic methods, which hold a prominent position in biological studies. We recently found that 9-amino-benzo[c]cinnoliniums make up a novel group of fluorophores that can be used in biological studies. They are featured with a succinct conjugative push-pull backbone, a broad absorption band, and a large Stokes shift. They are potentially useful as a small-molecule alternative to R-phycoerythrin to pair with fluorescein in multiplexing applications. PMID:25951429

  18. Identification of cervidae DNA in feedstuff using a real-time polymerase chain reaction method with the new fluorescence intercalating dye EvaGreen.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Wu, Yajun; Wang, Jing; Xu, Baoliang; Zhong, Zhengyu; Xia, Jingshi

    2009-01-01

    A real-time qualitative and quantitative polymerase chain reaction method (cer-194) using the fluorescence dye EvaGreen and aimed at the cytochrome b sequence was established for detection of cervidae DNA in feedstuff. Eight meat meal samples derived from deer, bovine, ovine, camel, pig, rabbit, fish, and chicken and 17 cervidae hair samples covering 2 subfamilies, 4 genera, and 7 species were tested to prove the specificity of the cer-194 system and its universality within the cervidae family. Detection limit of 0.1% deer meat in fish meal, blood powder, and feather powder matrixes was confirmed. PMID:19382576

  19. A novel, simple and efficient dye laser with low amplified spontaneous emission background for analytical fluorescence and ionization spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Matveev, Oleg I.; Omenetto, Nicolo'

    1995-04-01

    A new, simple, compact and efficient, grazing- incidence type of dye laser is suggested which has a low level of Amplified Spontaneous Emission. By using a Coumarin dye (LD 5000) pumped with a 20 mJ XeCl excimer laser, and a diffraction grating with 3000 grooves/mm, an efficiency of 11%, a spectral bandwidth of 0.6 cm{sup -1} and a tuning range from 458 to 517 nm have been obtained.

  20. Pleural fluid Gram stain

    MedlinePLUS

    Gram stain of pleural fluid ... mixing it with a violet stain (called a Gram stain). A laboratory specialist uses a microscope to ... diaphragm, chest wall, pleura, and mediastinum. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. ...

  1. Sputum stain for mycobacteria

    MedlinePLUS

    Acid fast bacilli stain; AFB stain; Tuberculosis smear; TB smear ... Abnormal results show that the stain is positive for: Mycobacterium tuberculosis Mycobacterium avium-intracellular Other mycobacteria or acid-fast bacteria

  2. Bench-Top Antigen Detection Technique that Utilizes Nanofiltration and Fluorescent Dyes which Emit and Absorb Light in the Near Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varaljay-Spence, Vanessa A.; Scardelletti, Maximilian C.

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the development of a bench-top technique to detect antigens in fluids. The technique involves the use of near infrared NIR fluorescent dyes conjugated to antibodies, centrifugation, nanofilters, and spectrometry. The system used to detect the antigens utilizes a spectrometer, fiber optic cables, NIR laser, and laptop computer thus making it portable and ideally suited for desk top analysis. Using IgM as an antigen and the secondary antibody, anti-IgM conjugated to the near infrared dye, IRDye (trademark) 800, for detection, we show that nanofiltration can efficiently and specifically separate antibody-antigen complexes in solution and that the complexes can be detected by a spectrometer and software using NIR laser excitation at 778 nm and NIR dye offset emission at 804 nm. The peak power detected at 778 nm for the excitation emission and at 804 nm for the offset emission is 879 pW (-60.06 dBm) and 35.7 pW (-74.5 dBm), respectively.

  3. Quantum dot-based, quantitative, and multiplexed assay for tissue staining.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Xu, Jing; Wang, Xu; Wu, Daqing; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Wang, Andrew Y

    2013-04-24

    The excellent optical properties of quantum dots (QDs), such as high brightness, high photostability, continuous absorption, and narrow emission bandwidth, make them ideal as optical labels to develop QD-based immunohistofluorescence (IHF) imaging for multiplexing cancer biomarker detection on formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. IHF is very important for the prediction of a patient's response to cancer chemotherapy or radiotherapy. QD-based IHF faces several challenges that differ from those encountered by organic dye based IHF for clinical assays. The current work addresses some of these issues. Initially, the chemical stability of QDs and organic dyes were compared. The results showed that QDs were stable for at least 5 months on FFPE tissue, whereas organic dyes were photobleached shortly after exposure to light. Various staining methods were also studied. QD fluorescence intensity on the tissue stained with primary antibody (Ab, p16, survivin, EF1?) conjugated QDs from our company was comparable to the signal from a commercially available method in which the tissue was stained with a primary p16 Ab and a QD-labeled secondary goat anti mouse Ab respectively. Finally, the effect of the amount of Ab conjugated to QD on tissue imaging was also studied. There was no significant increase in the QD fluorescence signal on tissues when the Ab:QD ratio increased from 5 to 30. In addition, protein G was tested as an adaptor protein to link Ab to QDs for IHF staining. However, the proper blocking of the protein G on QDs was necessary to reduce crosstalk. The biomarker quantification in QD-based IHF was validated by conventional Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The results contained herein demonstrate a promising application of QDs in multiplex detection and quantification of biomarkers. PMID:23551017

  4. Fast and sensitive colloidal coomassie G-250 staining for proteins in polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Dyballa, Nadine; Metzger, Sabine

    2009-01-01

    Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB) is a dye commonly used for the visualization of proteins separated by SDS-PAGE, offering a simple staining procedure and high quantitation. Furthermore, it is completely compatible with mass spectrometric protein identification. But despite these advantages, CBB is regarded to be less sensitive than silver or fluorescence stainings and therefore rarely used for the detection of proteins in analytical gel-based proteomic approaches. Several improvements of the original Coomassie protocol(1) have been made to increase the sensitivity of CBB. Two major modifications were introduced to enhance the detection of low-abundant proteins by converting the dye molecules into colloidal particles: In 1988, Neuhoff and colleagues applied 20% methanol and higher concentrations of ammonium sulfate into the CBB G-250 based staining solution(2), and in 2004 Candiano et al. established Blue Silver using CBB G-250 with phosphoric acid in the presence of ammonium sulfate and methanol(3). Nevertheless, all these modifications just allow a detection of approximately 10 ng protein. A widely fameless protocol for colloidal Coomassie staining was published by Kang et al. in 2002 where they modified Neuhoff's colloidal CBB staining protocol regarding the complexing substances. Instead of ammonium sulfate they used aluminum sulfate and methanol was replaced by the less toxic ethanol(4). The novel aluminum-based staining in Kang's study showed superior sensitivity that detects as low as 1 ng/band (phosphorylase b) with little sensitivity variation depending on proteins. Here, we demonstrate application of Kang's protocol for fast and sensitive colloidal Coomassie staining of proteins in analytical purposes. We will illustrate the quick and easy protocol using two-dimensional gels routinely performed in our working group. PMID:19684561

  5. Differential staining of actin in metaphase spindles with 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole-phallacidin and fluorescent DNase: is actin involved in chromosomal movement?

    PubMed Central

    Barak, L S; Nothnagel, E A; DeMarco, E F; Webb, W W

    1981-01-01

    The distribution and polymerization state of actin in metaphase rat kangaroo cells was studied by fluorescence microscopy. Formaldehyde-fixed, acetone-extracted cells were labeled with either of two types of actin probes. The first, 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole-phallacidin, has high affinity for F actin and does not bind monomeric G actin. The second was a conjugate of DNase I labeled with either tetramethylrhodamine or fluorescein. DNase binds with high affinity to G actin and with lesser affinity to F actin. The polymerization state of actin was deduced by comparing the fluorescence distribution of the phallacidin derivative with that of the fluorescent DNase. The results indicate that the pole-to-chromosome region of the metaphase spindle contains G actin but little if any conventional F actin. F actin is found concentrated in a diffuse distribution outside the spindle region in metaphase cells and returns to the interzone area between the chromosomes by early telophase. These results exclude spindle models for chromosomal movement that require more than about five F actin filaments per chromosome, support the hypothesis that F actin is involved in force generation for cell cleavage, and are not inconsistent with the possibility that actin outside the spindle may be involved in chromosomal movement. Images PMID:6265933

  6. Organic Fluorescent Dyes Supported on Activated Boron Nitride: A Promising Blue Light Excited Phosphors for High-Performance White Light-Emitting Diodes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Lin, Jing; Huang, Yang; Xu, Xuewen; Liu, Zhenya; Xue, Yanming; Ding, Xiaoxia; Luo, Han; Jin, Peng; Zhang, Jun; Zou, Jin; Tang, Chengchun

    2015-01-01

    We report an effective and rare-earth free light conversion material synthesized via a facile fabrication route, in which organic fluorescent dyes, i.e. Rhodamine B (RhB) and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) are embedded into activated boron nitride (αBN) to form a composite phosphor. The composite phosphor shows highly efficient Förster resonance energy transfer and greatly improved thermal stability, and can emit at broad visible wavelengths of 500–650 nm under the 466 nm blue-light excitation. By packaging of the composite phosphors and a blue light-emitting diode (LED) chip with transparent epoxy resin, white LED with excellent thermal conductivity, current stability and optical performance can be realized, i.e. a thermal conductivity of 0.36 W/mk, a Commission Internationale de 1'Eclairage color coordinates of (0.32, 0.34), and a luminous efficiency of 21.6 lm·W−1. Our research opens the door toward to the practical long-life organic fluorescent dyes-based white LEDs. PMID:25682730

  7. Organic fluorescent dyes supported on activated boron nitride: a promising blue light excited phosphors for high-performance white light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Lin, Jing; Huang, Yang; Xu, Xuewen; Liu, Zhenya; Xue, Yanming; Ding, Xiaoxia; Luo, Han; Jin, Peng; Zhang, Jun; Zou, Jin; Tang, Chengchun

    2015-01-01

    We report an effective and rare-earth free light conversion material synthesized via a facile fabrication route, in which organic fluorescent dyes, i.e. Rhodamine B (RhB) and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) are embedded into activated boron nitride (?BN) to form a composite phosphor. The composite phosphor shows highly efficient Frster resonance energy transfer and greatly improved thermal stability, and can emit at broad visible wavelengths of 500-650?nm under the 466?nm blue-light excitation. By packaging of the composite phosphors and a blue light-emitting diode (LED) chip with transparent epoxy resin, white LED with excellent thermal conductivity, current stability and optical performance can be realized, i.e. a thermal conductivity of 0.36?W/mk, a Commission Internationale de 1'Eclairage color coordinates of (0.32, 0.34), and a luminous efficiency of 21.6?lmW(-1). Our research opens the door toward to the practical long-life organic fluorescent dyes-based white LEDs. PMID:25682730

  8. Fluorescence detection of proteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels using environmentally benign, nonfixative, saline solution.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, T H; Lauber, W M; Berggren, K; Kemper, C; Yue, S; Patton, W F

    2000-02-01

    SYPRO Tangerine stain is an environmentally benign alternative to conventional protein stains that does not require solvents such as methanol or acetic acid for effective protein visualization. Instead, proteins can be stained in a wide range of buffers, including phosphate-buffered saline or simply 150 mM NaCl using an easy, one-step procedure that does not require destaining. Stained proteins can be excited by ultraviolet light of about 300 nm or with visible light of about 490 nm. The fluorescence emission maximum of the dye is approximately 640 nm. Noncovalent binding of SYPRO Tangerine dye is mediated by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and to a lesser extent by hydrophobic amino acid residues in proteins. This is in stark contrast to acidic silver nitrate staining, which interacts predominantly with lysine residues or Coomassie Blue R, which in turn interacts primarily with arginine and lysine residues. The sensitivity of SYPRO Tangerine stain is similar to that of the SYPRO Red and SYPRO Orange stains - about 4-10 ng per protein band. This detection sensitivity is comparable to colloidal Coomassie blue staining and rapid silver staining procedures. Since proteins stained with SYPRO Tangerine dye are not fixed, they can easily be eluted from gels or utilized in zymographic assays, provided that SDS does not inactivate the protein of interest. This is demonstrated with in-gel detection of rabbit liver esterase activity using alpha-naphthyl acetate and Fast Blue BB dye as well as Escherichia coli beta-glucuronidase activity using ELF-97 beta-D-glucuronide. The dye is also suitable for staining proteins in gels prior to their transfer to membranes by electroblotting. Gentle staining conditions are expected to improve protein recovery after electroelution and to reduce the potential for artifactual protein modifications such as the alkylation of lysine and esterification of glutamate residues, which complicate interpretation of peptide fragment profiles generated by mass spectrometry. PMID:10726749

  9. Wavelength Dependence of the Fluorescence Quenching Efficiency of Nearby Dyes by Gold Nanoclusters and Nanoparticles: The Roles of Spectral Overlap and Particle Size

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Sanchari; Wu, Zhikun; Jaquins-Gerstl, Andrea; Liu, Shengpeng; Dembska, Anna; Armitage, Bruce A.; Jin, Rongchao; Peteanu, Linda A.

    2011-01-01

    The efficiency of the glutathione monolayer-protected gold nanocluster (NC) Au25 (1.2 nm metal core diameter (d)) in quenching the emission of dyes intercalated into DNA is compared to that of 2 and 4 nm gold nanoparticles (NPs). In all cases, the DNA/dye moieties and the gold particles are not covalently attached but rather form non-covalent ground state complexes. Under these conditions, steady-state measurements reveal that the quenching efficiency of Au25 is a factor of 10 lower than that of plasmonic 4 nm gold NPs but comparable to that of 2 nm particles which do not show a distinct plasmon band. Nonetheless, significant emission quenching is observed even at very low (nM) concentrations of Au25. The quenching efficiency of the 4 nm NPs is significantly higher for dyes emitting near the wavelength of the plasmon peak whereas that of the 2 nm gold NPs is well described by the nano-surface energy transfer (NSET) model proposed by the Strouse group (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127, 3115 2005). Interestingly, for Au25 the maximum quenching efficiency occurs for dyes emitting in the same wavelength range as that of the 2 and 4 nm NPs (490-560 nm), where it shows no discrete absorption features, rather than for wavelengths coincident with its HOMO-LUMO, intra-band or inter-band transitions. The fluorescence quenching properties of Au25 NCs are therefore found to be distinct from those of larger NCs and NPs but do not appear to conform to theoretical predictions advanced thus far. PMID:22924090

  10. A novel water-soluble fluorescent polymer based on perylene bisimides dyes: one-pot preparation and its bio-imaging.

    PubMed

    Tan, Haijian; Liu, Hongmei; Liu, Yaojun; Duan, Wenfeng; Yi, Xuegang; Wu, Yonggang; Zhao, Hongchi; Bai, Libin

    2016-04-01

    Perylene bisimides dye-based water-soluble fluorescent polymer P3, N,N'-bis(3-amyl)-1-bromo-7-{4'-[3''-(S-poly(N-acryloyl ethylene diamine hydrochloride)-2'''-methyl propionic acid)propionyloxy hexyloxy]phenyl} perylene-3,4:9,10-tetracarboxylic bisimides, was synthesized with polyelectrolyte modification via one-pot reaction (the reduction reaction of trithioester and click reaction between the thiol group and carbon-carbon double bond were simultaneously conducted in one pot with high conversion). One-pot method can overcome the limitation that usual click reaction between thiol and other groups has low conversion because thiol group is subject to rapid oxidation during purification and storage. Chemical, structural, and optical properties of P3 and intermediate products were fully characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared, gel permeation chromatograph, UV-vis spectra, and fluorescence spectra, respectively. The results revealed that P3 displayed excellent water solubility and not only exhibited red strong fluorescence emission band in water but also had the similar photoluminescent spectra to those of intermediate products (M4 and P2) in chloroform. Allowing for the potential application in biological detection field, cell viability and live cell imaging with the presence of P3 were further investigated with Hela cells. The results showed that P3 had low cytotoxicity with strong intracellular fluorescence entry. Meanwhile, with the augment of concentration of P3 (0-0.500 mg mL(-1)), the cell uptake and accumulation of P3 increased and thereby result in enhancement of the intracellular fluorescence. These experiment results suggested that P3 had enormous potential as a fluorescence probe to be an important component in biological detection field. PMID:26719068

  11. Phase-0/phase-I study of dye-loaded lipid nanoparticles for near-infrared fluorescence imaging in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Sayag, David; Cabon, Quentin; Texier, Isabelle; Navarro, Fabrice P; Boisgard, Raphaël; Virieux-Watrelot, Dorothée; Carozzo, Claude; Ponce, Frédérique

    2016-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging using FDA-approved indocyanine green (ICG) has been the subject of numerous studies during the past few years. It could constitute a potentially exciting new paradigm shift in veterinary oncology, especially to develop in vivo fluorescence imaging diagnostics and surgery guidance methods. The objective of this study was to evaluate the pharmacologic and toxicological characteristics in healthy beagle dogs of LipImage™ 815, a formulation made of NIR-dye-loaded lipid nanoparticles. The initial dosage for the evaluation of biodistribution was extrapolated from data in mice and then adapted to define the more adapted dose (MAD) according to the fluorescence results obtained in 5 dogs using a Fluobeam® 800 imaging device (phase 0 study). A single dose acute toxicity study was then performed (3 dogs, phase I study). Before the systemic administration of LipImage™ 815, the dogs presented a very mild residual fluorescence, particularly in the liver and kidneys. After injection, the plasma fluorescence continuously decreased, and the signal was relatively homogeneously distributed throughout the different organs, though more pronounced in the liver and to a lesser extent in the steroid-rich organs (adrenal, ovaries), intestines, lymph nodes and kidneys. A MAD of 2.0μg/kg was found. No evidence of acute or delayed general, hepatic, renal or hematologic toxicity was observed at 1-fold, 5-fold or 10-fold MAD. The results of this phase-0/phase-I study showed that an optimal dosage of LipImage™ 815 of 2.0μg/kg allowed the achievement of a fluorescence signal suitable for surgery guidance application without any acute side effects. PMID:26777342

  12. Dye lasing in optically manipulated liquid aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadag, Yasin; Aas, Mehdi; Jonáš, Alexandr; Anand, Suman; McGloin, David; Kiraz, Alper

    2013-09-01

    We present dye lasing from optically manipulated glycerol-water aerosols with diameters ranging between 7.7 and 11.0 μm confined in optical tweezers. While being optically trapped near the focal point of an infrared laser, the droplets stained with Rhodamine B were pumped with a Q-switched green laser and their fluorescence emission spectra featuring whispering gallery modes (WGMs) were recorded with a spectrograph. Nonlinear dependence of the intensity of the droplet WGMs on the pump laser fluence indicates dye lasing. The average wavelength of the lasing WGMs could be tuned between 600 and 630 nm by adjusting the droplet size. These results may lead to new ways of probing airborne particles, exploiting the high sensitivity of stimulated emission to small perturbations in the droplet laser cavity and the gain medium.

  13. Fluorescent Gage Indication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barns, C. E.; Gilbaugh, B. L.; Gin, B.; Holt, W. L.; Lesak, P.; Mancini, R.; Spencer, H. F.

    1985-01-01

    Transfer of dye shows quality of contact between two mating parts. Mating parts checked for fit by spreading fluorescent dye on one, making brief light contact with other, and looking (under UV light) for transferred dye. Dye offers greater visibility under ultraviolet illumination, allowing better indication of how precisely parts match and what areas interfere.

  14. Two-stage desorption-controlled release of fluorescent dye and vitamin from solution-blown and electrospun nanofiber mats containing porogens.

    PubMed

    Khansari, S; Duzyer, S; Sinha-Ray, S; Hockenberger, A; Yarin, A L; Pourdeyhimi, B

    2013-12-01

    In the present work, a systematic study of the release kinetics of two embedded model drugs (one completely water soluble and one partially water soluble) from hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanofiber mats was conducted. Fluorescent dye Rhodamine B was used as a model hydrophilic drug in controlled release experiments after it was encapsulated in solution-blown soy-protein-containing hydrophilic nanofibers as well as in electrospun hydrophobic poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET)-containing nanofibers. Vitamin B2 (riboflavin), a partially water-soluble model drug, was also encapsulated in hydrophobic PET-containing nanofiber mats, and its release kinetics was studied. The nanofiber mats were submerged in water, and the amount of drug released was tracked by fluorescence intensity. It was found that the release process saturates well below 100% release of the embedded compound. This is attributed to the fact that desorption is the limiting process in the release from biopolymer-containing nanofibers similar to the previously reported release from petroleum-derived polymer nanofibers. Release from monolithic as well as core-shell nanofibers was studied in the present work. Moreover, to facilitate the release and ultimately to approach 100% release, we also incorporated porogens, for example, poly(ethylene glycol), PEG. It was also found that the release rate can be controlled by the porogen choice in nanofibers. The effect of nanocracks created by leaching porogens on drug release was studied experimentally and evaluated theoretically, and the physical parameters characterizing the release process were established. The objective of the present work is a detailed experimental and theoretical investigation of controlled drug release from nanofibers facilitated by the presence of porogens. The novelty of this work is in forming nanofibers containing biodegradable and biocompatible soy proteins to facilitate controlled drug release as well as in measuring detailed quantitative characteristics of the desorption processes responsible for release of the model substance (fluorescent dye) and the vitamin (riboflavin) in the presence of porogens. PMID:24191694

  15. Fluorescent styryl dyes FM1-43 and FM2-10 are muscarinic receptor antagonists: intravital visualization of receptor occupancy

    PubMed Central

    Mazzone, Stuart B; Mori, Nanako; Burman, Miriam; Palovich, Michael; Belmonte, Kristen E; Canning, Brendan J

    2006-01-01

    The fluorescent styryl dyes FM1-43 and FM2-10 have been used to visualize the endocytic and exocytic processes involved in neurotransmission in a variety of central and peripheral nerve preparations. Their utility is limited to some extent by a poorly understood vesicular-independent labelling of cells and tissues. We show here that one likely cause of this troublesome background labelling is that FM1-43 and FM2-10 are selective and competitive antagonists at both cloned and endogenously expressed muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. In radioligand binding studies, FM1-43 and FM2-10 bound with moderate affinity (23220 nm) to membranes of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing cloned human muscarinic receptors (M1M5). In functional studies in vitro, FM1-43 and FM2-10 inhibited electrical field stimulation (EFS) and acetylcholine-induced cholinergic contractions of guinea-pig tracheal strips (IC50: FM1-43, 0.4 0.1; FM2-10, 1.6 0.1 ?m; concentration of antagonist producing a 2-fold leftward shift in the acetylcholine concentrationresponse curve (Kb): FM1-43, 0.3 0.1; FM2-10, 15.8 10.1 ?m). Neither compound inhibited EFS-evoked, non-adrenergic non-cholinergic nerve-mediated relaxations or contractions of the airways, or contractions mediated by histamine H1 receptor or tachykinin NK2 receptor activation. Incubating freshly excised tracheal whole-mount preparations with 5 ?m FM1-43 resulted in intense fluorescence labelling of the smooth muscle that was reduced by up to 90% in the presence of selective M2 and M3 receptor antagonists. The potency of the FM dyes as muscarinic receptor antagonists is within the concentration range used to study vesicular cycling at nerve terminals. Given that muscarinic receptors play a key role in the regulation of neurotransmitter release from a variety of neurones, the anticholinergic properties of FM dyes may have important implications when studying vesicular events in the nervous system. In addition, these dyes may provide a novel tool for visualizing muscarinic receptor occupancy in living tissue or cell preparations. PMID:16728454

  16. Sequential double fluorescent detections of total proteins and phosphoproteins in SDS-PAGE.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sun-Young; Wang, Xu; Cong, Wei-Tao; Jin, Li-Tai; Choi, Jung-Kap

    2014-04-01

    A fluorescent staining technique, using selective chelation with fluorophore and metal ion to the phosphate groups of phosphoproteins in SDS-PAGE is described. As a fluorescent dye and a metal ion, Fura 2 pentapotassium salt and Al(3+) were employed, respectively. The staining method, Fura 2 stain, has sensitivities of 16-32 ng of ?-casein and ?-casein, 62 ng of ovalbumin, phosvitin, and ?-casein using an ultraviolet transilluminator. Furthermore, Fura 2 stain is able to carry out continuative double detection of total proteins and phosphoproteins on the same gel within 3.5 h. Consequently, selective phosphoprotein and total protein detections could be obtained without other poststaining. Considering the low cost, simplicity, and speed, Fura 2 staining may provide great practicalities in routine phosphoproteomics research. PMID:24488794

  17. Enhancing the color gamut of white displays using novel deep-blue organic fluorescent dyes to form color-changed thin films with improved efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei-ting; Huang, Wen-Yao

    2012-06-01

    This study used novel fluorescence based deep-blue-emitting molecules, namely BPVPDA, an organic fluorescence color thin film using BPVPDA exhibit deep blue fluorine with CIE coordinates of (0.13,0.16). The developed original Organic RGB color thin film technology enables the optimization of the distinctive features of an organic light emitting diode (OLED) and (TFT) LCD display. The color filter structure maintains the same high resolution to obtain a higher level of brightness, in comparison with conventional organic RGB color thin film. The image-processing engine is designed to achieve a sharp text image for a thin-film-transistor (TFT) LCD with organic color thin films. The organic color thin films structure uses organic dye dopent in limpid photo resist. With this technology , the following characteristics can be obtained: (1) high color reproduction of gamut ratio, and (2) improved luminous efficiency with organic color fluorescence thin film. This performance is among the best results ever reported for a color-filter used on TFT-LCD and OLED.

  18. Enhancing the color gamut of white displays using novel deep-blue organic fluorescent dyes to form color-changed thin films with improved efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei-Ting; Huang, Wen-Yao

    2012-10-01

    This study used the novel fluorescence based deep-blue-emitting molecule BPVPDA in an organic fluorescent color thin film to exhibit deep blue color with CIE coordinates of (0.13, 0.16). The developed original organic RGB color thin film technology enables the optimization of the distinctive features of an organic light emitting diode (OLED) and thin-film-transistor (TFT) LCD display. The color filter structure maintains the same high resolution to obtain a higher level of brightness in comparison with conventional organic RGB color thin film. The image-processing engine is designed to achieve a sharp text image for a TFT LCD with organic color thin films. The organic color thin films structure uses an organic dye dopant in a limpid photoresist. With this technology, the following characteristics can be obtained: 1. high color reproduction of gamut ratio, and 2. improved luminous efficiency with organic color fluorescent thin film. This performance is among the best results ever reported for a color-filter used on TFT-LCD or OLED.

  19. Water-Soluble NIR-Absorbing Rylene Chromophores for Selective Staining of Cellular Organelles.

    PubMed

    Kaloyanova, Stefka; Zagranyarski, Yulian; Ritz, Sandra; Hanulová, Mária; Koynov, Kaloian; Vonderheit, Andreas; Müllen, Klaus; Peneva, Kalina

    2016-03-01

    Biocompatible organic dyes emitting in the near-infrared are highly desirable in fluorescence imaging techniques. Herein we report a synthetic approach for building novel small peri-guanidine-fused naphthalene monoimide and perylene monoimide chromophores. The presented structures possess near-infrared absorption and emission, high photostability, and good water solubility. After a fast cellular uptake, they selectively stain mitochondria with a low background in live and fixed cells. They can be additionally modified in a one-step reaction with functional groups for covalent labeling of proteins. The low cytotoxicity allows a long time exposure of live cells to the dyes without the necessity of washing. Successful application in localization super-resolution microscopy was demonstrated in phosphate-buffered saline without any reducing or oxidizing additives. PMID:26891229

  20. A fluorescent codetection system for immunoblotting and proteomics through ECL-Plex and CyDye labeling.

    PubMed

    McManus, Ciara A; Donoghue, Pamela M; Dunn, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative capabilities of 2-D electrophoresis and its use in widespread proteome analysis has been revolutionized over the past decade with the introduction of differential gel electrophoresis commonly known as DIGE. This highly sensitive CyDye protein labeling technique now attempts to advance conventional western blotting by the combination of DIGE labeling with the recently developed ECL-Plex CyDye conjugated secondary antibodies. The ability of this method to simultaneously visualize the total protein expression profile as well as the specific immunodetection of an individual protein species will significantly aid protein validation following 2-D gel separation by confirming the exact location of proteins of interest. This simple, rapid, and reproducible technique is demonstrated by 1-D and 2-D electrophoresis through the detection of the small 27-kDa heat shock protein (hsp 27), a protein known to be expressed in the human heart, from a complex cardiac protein extract. PMID:19378088

  1. Fluorescent Styryl Dyes from 4-Chloro-2-(Diphenylamino)-1, 3-Thiazole-5-Carbaldehyde-Synthesis, Optical Properties and TDDFT Computations.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Nagaiyan; Umape, Prashant G; Patil, Sharad R

    2015-11-01

    4-Chloro-2-(diphenylamino)-1,3-thiazole-5-carbaldehyde was reacted with an active methylene compounds, cyanomethyl benzimidazole, cyanomethyl benzothiazole, barbituric acid and Meldrum's acid under Knoevenagel conditions to give novel push-pull styryl chromophores 8a-8d. The synthesized styryl chromophores were characterized by FT-IR, Mass and (1)H NMR spectral analysis. The photophysical characteristics of these styryl chromophores were evaluated. The effect of solvent polarity and viscosity on the absorption and emission properties of these chromophores was studied. The structural, molecular, electronic and photophysical parameters of the push-pull dyes were studied by using density functional theory (DFT) and time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) computations. The ratio of the ground to the excited state dipole moment of the synthesized novel styryl dyes were calculated by Bakhshiev and Bilot-Kawski correlations. PMID:26467548

  2. Accomplishments of the Trustees and laboratory staff of the Biological Stain Commission, 2002-2013.

    PubMed

    Dapson, R W

    2014-08-01

    During the 12 years from 2002 to 2013, the Trustees and laboratory personnel of the Biological Stain Commission (BSC) can claim many accomplishments. These accomplishments are itemized under 11 categories: continuous publication of the official journal, Biotechnic & Histochemistry; production of four special issues of Biotechnic & Histochemistry devoted to specific dyes or stains; standardization of staining and dye purity; mechanisms of staining and prediction of dye behavior; publication of books or book chapters; effects of fixation and processing on staining; cancer research; immunohistochemistry; BSC Laboratory activities; miscellaneous publications; and administrative accomplishments. PMID:24665939

  3. Fluorescent probes to detect lymphocyte activation.

    PubMed Central

    Nairn, R C; Rolland, J M

    1980-01-01

    Fluorescent probes can monitor events in lymphocytes stimulated by mitogens and antigens. Early activation is associated with conformational changes in membrane macromolecules, and has been studied by measurement of fluorescence intensity or polarization of the membrane-localizing probes ANS, NPN, DPH and TMRITC. Subsequent changes in cytoplasmic macromolecules have been detected by altered fluorescence polarization of intracellular fluorescein. Altered metabolic activity in the activated lymphocyte is also revealed by fluorescent probes: the increased red fluorescence of lysosomes seen by AO staining, is attributable to altered lysosome membrane permeability. AO fluorescence has also detected early changes in the nuclear nucleoprotein complex. The later synthesis of new DNA is readily demonstrated by increased staining with the nuclear probes AO, ethidium bromide, propidium iodide, mithramycin and the Hoechst dyes. Adaptation of fluorescent probe analyses to the now rapidly developing flow microfluorimeters is providing rapid and sensitive assays of lymphocyte stimulation. Such methods will permit routine detection of lymphocyte response to particular antigens or mitogens, as well as identification of antigenic substances by their stimulation of known reactive lymphocytes. Last but not least, fluorescent probes are providing new understanding of the cellular events and regulatory mechanisms associated with lymphocyte activation. PMID:6156040

  4. DNA fragment sizing and sorting by laser-induced fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Mark L.; Jett, James H.; Keller, Richard A.; Marrone, Babetta L.; Martin, John C.

    1996-01-01

    A method is provided for sizing DNA fragments using high speed detection systems, such as flow cytometry to determine unique characteristics of DNA pieces from a sample. In one characterization the DNA piece is fragmented at preselected sites to produce a plurality of DNA fragments. The DNA piece or the resulting DNA fragments are treated with a dye effective to stain stoichiometrically the DNA piece or the DNA fragments. The fluorescence from the dye in the stained fragments is then examined to generate an output functionally related to the number of nucleotides in each one of the DNA fragments. In one embodiment, the intensity of the fluorescence emissions from each fragment is linearly related to the fragment length. The distribution of DNA fragment sizes forms a characterization of the DNA piece for use in forensic and research applications.

  5. FISH and Calcofluor staining techniques to detect in situ filamentous fungal biofilms in water.

    PubMed

    Gonalves, Ana B; Santos, Isabel M; Paterson, R Russell M; Lima, Nelson

    2006-09-01

    Filamentous fungi are a ubiquitous and diverse group of eukaryotic organisms and may contribute, along with bacteria, yeasts, protozoa and viruses, to the formation of biofilms in water distribution systems. However, fungal involvement in biofilms has not been demonstrated unambiguously. Furthermore, these fungi may be responsible for the production of tastes, odours and mycotoxins in drinking water making their early detection important. The detection of fme these problems a combination of two fluorescent techniques for direct detection was tested: (a) Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) employing the universal rRNA probe EUK516, labelled with the red Cy3, followed by (b) staining with Calcofluor White MR2 fluorescent dye which stains fungal cell walls blue. Pure cultures of Penicillium brevicompactum were used to establish the methods followed by separate experiments with real water biofilm samples in PVC-C and cast iron coupons. FISH demonstrated eukaryotic microrganisms after approximately 5 h while the calcofluor method revealed chitinous filamentous structures in less than one hour. When the two methods were combined, additional resolution was obtained from the images of filamentous walls (blue) with intact protoplasm (red). In conclusion, FISH and Calcofluor staining provide rapid, direct and unambiguous information on the involvement of ff in biofilms which form in water. PMID:17196030

  6. Evaluation of a cholecystokinin 2 receptor-targeted near-infrared dye for fluorescence-guided surgery of cancer.

    PubMed

    Wayua, Charity; Low, Philip S

    2014-02-01

    Surgical resection of malignant disease remains one of the most effective tools for treating cancer. Tumor-targeted near-infrared dyes have the potential to improve contrast between normal and malignant tissues, thereby enabling surgeons to more quantitatively resect malignant disease. Because the cholecystokinin 2 receptor (CCK2R and its tumor-specific splice variant CCK2i4svR) is overexpressed in cancers of the lungs, colon, thyroid, pancreas, and stomach, but absent or inaccessible to parenterally administered drugs in most normal tissues, we have undertaken to design a targeting ligand that can deliver attached near-infrared dyes to CCK2R+ tumors. We report here the synthesis and biological characterization of a CCK2R-targeted conjugate of the near-infrared dye, LS-288 (CRL-LS288). We demonstrate that CRL-LS288 binds selectively to CCK2R+ cancer cells with low nanomolar affinity (Kd = 7 10(-9) M). We further show that CRL-LS288 localizes primarily to CCK2R-expressing HEK 293 murine tumor xenografts and that dye uptake in these xenografts is significantly reduced when CCK2R are blocked by preinjection of excess ligand (CRL) or when mice are implanted with CCK2R-negative tumors. Because CRL-LS288 is also found to reveal the locations of distant tumor metastases, we suggest that CRL-LS288 has the potential to facilitate intraoperative identification of malignant disease during a variety of cancer debulking surgeries. PMID:24325469

  7. Stains, labels and detection strategies for nucleic acids assays.

    PubMed

    Kricka, Larry J

    2002-03-01

    Selected developments and trends in stains, labels and strategies for detecting and measuring nucleic acids (DNA, RNA) and related molecules [e.g. oligo(deoxy)nucleotides, nucleic acid fragments and polymerase chain reaction products] are surveyed based on the literature in the final decade of the 20th century (1991-2000). During this period, important families of cyanine dyes were developed for sensitive detection of double-stranded DNA, single-stranded DNA, and oligo(deoxy)nucleotides in gels and in solution, and families of energy transfer primers were produced for DNA sequencing applications. The continuing quest for improved labels for hybridization assays has produced a series of candidate labels including genes encoding enzymes, microparticles (e.g. quantum dots, nanocrystals, phosphors), and new examples of the fluorophore (e.g. cyanine dyes) and enzyme class of labels (e.g. firefly luciferase mutants). Label detection technologies for use in northern and southern blotting assays have focused on luminescent methods, particularly enhanced chemiluminescence for peroxidase labels and adamantyl 1,2-dioxetanes for alkaline phosphatase labels. Sets of labels have been selected to meet the demands of multicolour assays (e.g. four-colour sequencing and single nucleotide primer extension assays). Non-separation assay formats have emerged based on fluorescence polarization, fluorescence energy transfer (TaqMan, molecular beacons) and channelling principles. Microanalytical devices (microchips), high-throughput simultaneous test arrays (microarrays, gene chips), capillary electrophoretic analysis and dipstick devices have presented new challenges and requirements for nucleic acid detection, and fluorescent methods currently dominate in many of these applications. PMID:11928759

  8. Preliminary study on the inhibition of nuclear internalization of Tat peptides by conjugation with a receptor-specific peptide and fluorescent dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Duanwen; Liang, Kexiang; Ye, Yunpeng; Tetteh, Elizabeth; Achilefu, Samuel

    2006-02-01

    Numerous studies have shown that basic Tat peptide (48-57) internalized non-specifically in cells and localized in the nucleus. However, localization of imaging agents in cellular nucleus is not desirable because of the potential mutagenesis. When conjugated to the peptides that undergo receptor-mediated endocytosis, Tat peptide could target specific cells or pathologic tissue. We tested this hypothesis by incorporating a somatostatin receptor-avid peptide (octreotate, Oct) and two different fluorescent dyes, Cypate 2 (Cy2) and fluorescein 5'-carboxlic acid (5-FAM), into the Tat-peptide sequence. In addition to the Cy2 or 5-FAM-labeled Oct conjugated to Tat peptide (Tat) to produce Tat-Oct-Cypate2 or Tat-Oct-5-FAM, we also labeled the Tat the Tat peptide with these dyes (Tat-Cy2 and Tat-5-FAM) to serve as positive control. A somatostatin receptor-positive pancreatic tumor cell line, AR42J, was used to assess cell internalization. The results show that Tat-5-FAM and Tat-Cypate2 localized in both nucleus and cytoplasm of the cells. In contrast to Tat-Oct-Cypate2, which localized in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, Tat-Oct-5-FAM internalized in the cytoplasm but not in the nucleus of AR42J cells. The internalizations were inhibited by adding non-labeled corresponding peptides, suggesting that the endocytoses of each group of labeled and the corresponding unlabeled compounds occurred through a common pathway. Thus, fluorescent probes and endocytosis complex between octreotate and somatostatin receptors in cytoplasm could control nuclear internalization of Tat peptides.

  9. Port-Wine Stains

    MedlinePLUS

    ... wine stains much less noticeable and give kids' self-esteem a much-needed boost. Cause Port-wine stains ... A Birthmark: Evan's Story Albinism Body Image and Self-Esteem Stretch Marks Contact Us Print Resources Send to ...

  10. Port-wine stain

    MedlinePLUS

    A port-wine stain is a birthmark in which swollen blood vessels create a reddish-purplish discoloration of the skin. ... Port-wine stains occur in about 3 out of 1,000 people. In rare cases, port-wine stains are a sign ...

  11. An improved flow cytometry-based natural killer cytotoxicity assay involving calcein AM staining of effector cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Youn-Young; Cho, Duck; Kim, Sang-Ki; Shin, Dong-Jun; Park, Min-Ho; Lee, Je-Jung; Shin, Myung-Geun; Shin, Jong-Hee; Suh, Soon-Pal; Ryang, Dong-Wook

    2012-01-01

    Several flow cytometric methods for measuring natural killer cell activity have been developed. Commonly used protocols involve the staining of target cells with various fluorescent dyes. However, these protocols are not applicable to certain experimental settings. Therefore, we used Calcein AM (CAM), which has been reported to be the most suitable dye for use in target cell staining protocols, as a means of developing an improved flow cytometry-based NK cytotoxicity assay involving effector cell staining. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated by gradient density centrifugation and expanded NK cells were used as effector cells. Cytotoxicity against K562 cells and several hematologic cancer cell lines was measured by a flow cytometry-based method using CAM and propidium iodide. The new assay was compared with a standard (51)Cr release assay (CRA) in terms of its ability to measure the cytotoxicity of NK cells in PBMCs and expanded NK cells against K562 cells. The optimal concentration of CAM for staining effector cells was 0.05 μM, and CAM fluorescence intensity in effector cells was maintained for 4 hours. CAM staining had no significant effect on NK cell activity in human PBMCs or expanded NK cells. Comparison of the CRA and this new assay using K562 cells revealed a good correlation (PBMCs, r = 0.894; expanded NK cells, r = 0.887). Distinct separation between target tumor cells (Daudi, Raji, RPMI8226, U266, U937, and K562 cells) and CAM-stained PBMCs (E:T ratio, 12.5:1 to 50:1) or expanded NK cells (E:T ratio, 0.5 to 4:1) was observed after incubation for 1 or 4 hours. In summary, we successfully developed an effective flow cytometry-based assay for assessing the activity of NK cells in PBMCs and expanded NK cells against K562 cells and various types of hematologic cancer cells. PMID:22371909

  12. An improved flow cytometry-based natural killer cytotoxicity assay involving calcein AM staining of effector cells.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Jang YY; Cho D; Kim SK; Shin DJ; Park MH; Lee JJ; Shin MG; Shin JH; Suh SP; Ryang DW

    2012-01-01

    Several flow cytometric methods for measuring natural killer cell activity have been developed. Commonly used protocols involve the staining of target cells with various fluorescent dyes. However, these protocols are not applicable to certain experimental settings. Therefore, we used Calcein AM (CAM), which has been reported to be the most suitable dye for use in target cell staining protocols, as a means of developing an improved flow cytometry-based NK cytotoxicity assay involving effector cell staining. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated by gradient density centrifugation and expanded NK cells were used as effector cells. Cytotoxicity against K562 cells and several hematologic cancer cell lines was measured by a flow cytometry-based method using CAM and propidium iodide. The new assay was compared with a standard (51)Cr release assay (CRA) in terms of its ability to measure the cytotoxicity of NK cells in PBMCs and expanded NK cells against K562 cells. The optimal concentration of CAM for staining effector cells was 0.05 μM, and CAM fluorescence intensity in effector cells was maintained for 4 hours. CAM staining had no significant effect on NK cell activity in human PBMCs or expanded NK cells. Comparison of the CRA and this new assay using K562 cells revealed a good correlation (PBMCs, r = 0.894; expanded NK cells, r = 0.887). Distinct separation between target tumor cells (Daudi, Raji, RPMI8226, U266, U937, and K562 cells) and CAM-stained PBMCs (E:T ratio, 12.5:1 to 50:1) or expanded NK cells (E:T ratio, 0.5 to 4:1) was observed after incubation for 1 or 4 hours. In summary, we successfully developed an effective flow cytometry-based assay for assessing the activity of NK cells in PBMCs and expanded NK cells against K562 cells and various types of hematologic cancer cells.

  13. A water-soluble fluorescent pH probe based on perylene dyes and its application to cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yongshan; Zhang, Fengxia; Zhang, Jinfeng; Jiang, Tianyi; Li, Xuemei; Wu, Junsen; Ren, Huixue

    2016-02-01

    A fluorescent pH probe, N,N'-bi( l-phenylalanine amine)-perylene-3,4;9,10-dicarboxylic diimide (PDCDA) was synthesized and used for pH sensing in living cells. A significant fluorescence intensity change was observed over a pH range from 7.0 to 4.0. Electrostatic potential maps (MEP) suggested that the electronic repulsion between PDCDAs was increased by the high negative electrostatic potential which resulted in a high water solubility of PDCDA. PDCDA was successfully applied as a high-performance fluorochrome for living HeLa cell imaging. The results demonstrate that the probe PDCDA is a good candidate for monitoring pH fluctuations in living cells with good water solubility, low cytotoxicity, high fluorescence quantum yield and photostability. Copyright 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26009881

  14. Simultaneous Enhancement of Intracellular Optical Imaging and Photothermal Therapeutic Response by Octaarginine-Modified Fluorescent Dye Doped Pd@Ag@SiO2(RITC) Multifunctional Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Saige; Zhu, Xianglong; Huang, Yizhuan; Jiang, Mengying; Zhao, Zengxia; Chen, Xiaolan

    2015-02-01

    In the work, a novel multifunctional silica-based nanoplatform (Pd@Ag@SiO2(RITC)-R8) for bioimaging and photothermal therapy (PTT) of cancer cells has been developed. The Pd@Ag nanosheets encapsulated inside silica can act as effective near-infrared (NIR) absorbers for cancer photothermal therapy. Fluorescent dye, rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RITC), was covalently doped into the silica network to provide the capacity for optical imaging. After amine modification, the Pd@Ag@SiO2(RITC)-NH2 can be further conjugated with octaarginine (R8, a cell penetrating peptide) for enhancing the uptake of nanoparticles by cells. Confocal fluorescent images and flow cytometry analysis revealed that R8-conjugated nanoparticles (Pd@Ag@SiO2(RITC)-R8) were taken up by cells more efficiently. Correspondingly, the optical imaging and photothermal therapeutic efficiency of Pd@Ag@SiO2(RITC)-R8 upon cancer cells were also raised due to their higher cellular uptake when compared with that of Pd@Ag@SiO2(RITC)-NH2. Our results indicate that these multifunctional Pd@Ag@SiO2(RITC)-R8 may have great potential for applications in imaging-guided cancer photothermal therapy. PMID:26353642

  15. Analysis of Ground-Water Flow in the Madison Aquifer using Fluorescent Dyes Injected in Spring Creek and Rapid Creek near Rapid City, South Dakota, 2003-04

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Putnam, Larry D.; Long, Andrew J.

    2007-01-01

    The Madison aquifer, which contains fractures and solution openings in the Madison Limestone, is used extensively for water supplies for the city of Rapid City and other suburban communities in the Rapid City, S. Dak., area. The 48 square-mile study area includes the west-central and southwest parts of Rapid City and the outcrops of the Madison Limestone extending from south of Spring Creek to north of Rapid Creek. Recharge to the Madison Limestone occurs when streams lose flow as they cross the outcrop. The maximum net loss rate for Spring and Rapid Creek loss zones are 21 and 10 cubic feet per second (ft3/s), respectively. During 2003 and 2004, fluorescent dyes were injected in the Spring and Rapid Creek loss zones to estimate approximate locations of preferential flow paths in the Madison aquifer and to measure the response and transit times at wells and springs. Four injections of about 2 kilograms of fluorescein dye were made in the Spring Creek loss zone during 2003 (sites S1, S2, and S3) and 2004 (site S4). Injection at site S1 was made in streamflow just upstream from the loss zone over a 12-hour period when streamflow was about equal to the maximum loss rate. Injections at sites S2, S3, and S4 were made in specific swallow holes located in the Spring Creek loss zone. Injection at site R1 in 2004 of 3.5 kilograms of Rhodamine WT dye was made in streamflow just upstream from the Rapid Creek loss zone over about a 28-hour period. Selected combinations of 27 wells, 6 springs, and 3 stream sites were monitored with discrete samples following the injections. For injections at sites S1-S3, when Spring Creek streamflow was greater than or equal to 20 ft3/s, fluorescein was detected in samples from five wells that were located as much as about 2 miles from the loss zone. Time to first arrival (injection at site S1) ranged from less than 1 to less than 10 days. The maximum fluorescein concentration (injection at site S1) of 120 micrograms per liter (ug/L) at well CO, which is located adjacent to the loss zone, was similar to the concentration in the stream. Fluorescein arrived at well NON (injection at site S1), which is located about 2 miles northeast of the loss zone, within about 1.6 days, and the maximum concentration was 44 ug/L. For injection at site S4, when streamflow was about 12 ft3/s, fluorescein was detected in samples from six wells and time to first arrival ranged from 0.2 to 16 days. Following injection at site S4 in 2004, the length of time that dye remained in the capture zone of well NON, which is located approximately 2 miles from the loss zone, was almost an order of magnitude greater than in 2003. For injection at site R1, Rhodamine WT was detected at well DRU and spring TI-SP with time to first arrival of about 0.5 and 1.1 days and maximum concentrations of 6.2 and 0.91 ug/L, respectively. Well DRU and spring TI-SP are located near the center of the Rapid Creek loss zone where the creek has a large meander. Measurable concentrations were observed for spring TI-SP as many as 109 days after the dye injection. The direction of a conduit flow path in the Spring Creek area was to the northeast with ground-water velocities that ranged from 770 to 6,500 feet per day. In the Rapid Creek loss zone, a conduit flow path east of the loss zone was not evident from the dye injection.

  16. Single Fluorescence Channel-based Multiplex Detection of Avian Influenza Virus by Quantitative PCR with Intercalating Dye.

    PubMed

    Ahberg, Christian D; Manz, Andreas; Neuzil, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Since its invention in 1985 the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has become a well-established method for amplification and detection of segments of double-stranded DNA. Incorporation of fluorogenic probe or DNA intercalating dyes (such as SYBR Green) into the PCR mixture allowed real-time reaction monitoring and extraction of quantitative information (qPCR). Probes with different excitation spectra enable multiplex qPCR of several DNA segments using multi-channel optical detection systems. Here we show multiplex qPCR using an economical EvaGreen-based system with single optical channel detection. Previously reported non quantitative multiplex real-time PCR techniques based on intercalating dyes were conducted once the PCR is completed by performing melting curve analysis (MCA). The technique presented in this paper is both qualitative and quantitative as it provides information about the presence of multiple DNA strands as well as the number of starting copies in the tested sample. Besides important internal control, multiplex qPCR also allows detecting concentrations of more than one DNA strand within the same sample. Detection of the avian influenza virus H7N9 by PCR is a well established method. Multiplex qPCR greatly enhances its specificity as it is capable of distinguishing both haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes as well as their ratio. PMID:26088868

  17. High-speed, random-access fluorescence microscopy: II. Fast quantitative measurements with voltage-sensitive dyes.

    PubMed

    Bullen, A; Saggau, P

    1999-04-01

    An improved method for making fast quantitative determinations of membrane potential with voltage-sensitive dyes is presented. This method incorporates a high-speed, random-access, laser-scanning scheme (Bullen et al., 1997. Biophys. J. 73:477-491) with simultaneous detection at two emission wavelengths. The basis of this ratiometric approach is the voltage-dependent shift in the emission spectrum of the voltage-sensitive dye di-8-butyl-amino-naphthyl-ethylene-pyridinium-propyl-sulfonate (di-8-ANEPPS). Optical measurements are made at two emission wavelengths, using secondary dichroic beamsplitting and dual photodetectors (<570 nm and >570 nm). Calibration of the ratiometric measurements between signals at these wavelengths was achieved using simultaneous optical and patch-clamp measurements from adjacent points. Data demonstrating the linearity, precision, and accuracy of this technique are presented. Records obtained with this method exhibited a voltage resolution of approximately 5 mV, without any need for temporal or spatial averaging. Ratiometric recordings of action potentials from isolated hippocampal neurons are used to illustrate the usefulness of this approach. This method is unique in that it is the first to allow quantitative determination of dynamic membrane potential changes in a manner optimized for both high spatiotemporal resolution (2 micrometers and <0.5 ms) and voltage discrimination. PMID:10096922

  18. High-speed, random-access fluorescence microscopy: II. Fast quantitative measurements with voltage-sensitive dyes.

    PubMed Central

    Bullen, A; Saggau, P

    1999-01-01

    An improved method for making fast quantitative determinations of membrane potential with voltage-sensitive dyes is presented. This method incorporates a high-speed, random-access, laser-scanning scheme (Bullen et al., 1997. Biophys. J. 73:477-491) with simultaneous detection at two emission wavelengths. The basis of this ratiometric approach is the voltage-dependent shift in the emission spectrum of the voltage-sensitive dye di-8-butyl-amino-naphthyl-ethylene-pyridinium-propyl-sulfonate (di-8-ANEPPS). Optical measurements are made at two emission wavelengths, using secondary dichroic beamsplitting and dual photodetectors (<570 nm and >570 nm). Calibration of the ratiometric measurements between signals at these wavelengths was achieved using simultaneous optical and patch-clamp measurements from adjacent points. Data demonstrating the linearity, precision, and accuracy of this technique are presented. Records obtained with this method exhibited a voltage resolution of approximately 5 mV, without any need for temporal or spatial averaging. Ratiometric recordings of action potentials from isolated hippocampal neurons are used to illustrate the usefulness of this approach. This method is unique in that it is the first to allow quantitative determination of dynamic membrane potential changes in a manner optimized for both high spatiotemporal resolution (2 micrometers and <0.5 ms) and voltage discrimination. PMID:10096922

  19. Impact of Substituents in Tumor Uptake and Fluorescence Imaging Ability of Near-Infrared Cyanine-like Dyes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nayan J; Manivannan, Ethirajan; Joshi, Penny; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish J; Nani, Roger R; Schnermann, Martin J; Pandey, Ravindra K

    2015-01-01

    This report presents a simple strategy to introduce various functionalities in a cyanine dye (bis-indole-N-butylsulfonate-polymethine bearing a fused cyclic chloro-cyclohexene ring structure), and assess the impact of these substitutions in tumor uptake, retention and imaging. The results obtained from the structural activity relationship (SAR) study demonstrate that certain structural features introduced in the cyanine dye moiety make a remarkable difference in tumor avidity. Among the compounds investigated, the symmetrical CDs containing an amino-phenyl thioether group attached to a cyclohexene ring system and the two N-butyl linkers with terminal sulfonate groups in benzoindole moieties exhibited excellent tumor imaging ability in BALB/c mice bearing Colon26 tumors. Compared to indocyanine green (ICG), approved by FDA as a blood pooling agent, which has also been investigated for the use in tumor imaging, the modified CD selected on the basis of SAR study produced enhanced uptake and longer retention in tumor(s). A facile approach reported herein for introducing a variety of functionalities in tumor-avid CD provides an opportunity to create multi-imaging modality agent(s). Using a combination of mass spectrometry and absorbance techniques, the photobleaching of one of the CDs was analyzed and significant regioselective photooxidation was observed. PMID:26108696

  20. Cyanine dyes as contrast agents for near-infrared imaging in vivo: acute tolerance, pharmacokinetics, and fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Bernd; Riefke, Björn; Sukowski, Uwe; Licha, Kai

    2011-06-01

    We compare pharmacokinetic, tolerance, and imaging properties of two near-IR contrast agents, indocyanine green (ICG) and 1,1'-bis-(4-sulfobutyl) indotricarbocyanine-5,5'-dicarboxylic acid diglucamide monosodium salt (SIDAG). ICG is a clinically approved imaging agent, and its derivative SIDAG is a more hydrophilic counterpart that has recently shown promising imaging properties in preclinical studies. The rather lipophilic ICG has a very short plasma half-life, thus limiting the time available to image body regions during its vascular circulation (e.g., the breast in optical mammography where scanning over several minutes is required). In order to change the physicochemical properties of the indotricarbocyanine dye backbone, several derivatives were synthesized with increasing hydrophilicity. The most hydrophilic dye SIDAG is selected for further biological characterization. The acute tolerance of SIDAG in mice is increased up to 60-fold compared to ICG. Contrary to ICG, the pharmacokinetic properties of SIDAG are shifted toward renal elimination, caused by the high hydrophilicity of the molecule. N-Nitrosomethylurea (NMU)-induced rat breast carcinomas are clearly demarcated, both immediately and 24 h after intravenous administration of SIDAG, whereas ICG shows a weak tumor contrast under the same conditions. Our findings demonstrate that SIDAG is a high potential contrast agent for optical imaging, which could increase the sensitivity for detection of inflamed regions and tumors.

  1. Proflavine Hemisulfate as a Fluorescent Contrast Agent for Point-of-Care Cytology

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Sandra P.; Powless, Amy J.; Boice, Jackson W.; Sharma, Shree G.; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Proflavine hemisulfate, an acridine-derived fluorescent dye, can be used as a rapid stain for cytologic examination of biological specimens. Proflavine fluorescently stains cell nuclei and cytoplasmic structures, owing to its small amphipathic structure and ability to intercalate DNA. In this manuscript, we demonstrated the use of proflavine as a rapid cytologic dye on a number of specimens, including normal exfoliated oral squamous cells, cultured human oral squamous carcinoma cells, and leukocytes derived from whole blood specimens using a custom-built, portable, LED-illuminated fluorescence microscope. No incubation time was needed after suspending cells in 0.01% (w/v) proflavine diluted in saline. Images of proflavine stained oral cells had clearly visible nuclei as well as granular cytoplasm, while stained leukocytes exhibited bright nuclei, and highlighted the multilobar nature of nuclei in neutrophils. We also demonstrated the utility of quantitative analysis of digital images of proflavine stained cells, which can be used to detect significant morphological differences between different cell types. Proflavine stained oral cells have well-defined nuclei and cell membranes which allowed for quantitative analysis of nuclear to cytoplasmic ratios, as well as image texture analysis to extract quantitative image features. PMID:25962131

  2. Sensitive immunoassay detection of multiple environmental chemicals on protein microarrays using DNA/dye conjugate as a fluorescent label

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Indirect competitive immunoassays were developed on protein microarrays for the sensitive and simultaneous detection of multiple environmental chemicals in one sample. In this assay, a DNA/SYTOX Orange conjugate was employed as antibody labels to increase the fluorescence signal and sensitivity. Ep...

  3. Selective recognition of parallel and anti-parallel thrombin-binding aptamer G-quadruplexes by different fluorescent dyes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dan; Dong, Xiongwei; Jiang, Nan; Zhang, Dan; Liu, Changlin

    2014-01-01

    G-quadruplexes (G4) have been found increasing potential in applications, such as molecular therapeutics, diagnostics and sensing. Both Thio?avin T (ThT) and N-Methyl mesoporphyrin IX (NMM) become fluorescent in the presence of most G4, but thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) has been reported as the only exception of the known G4-forming oligonucleotides when ThT is used as a high-throughput assay to identify G4 formation. Here, we investigate the interactions between ThT/NMM and TBA through fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism and molecular docking simulation experiments in the absence or presence of cations. The results display that a large ThT ?uorescence enhancement can be observed only when ThT bind to the parallel TBA quadruplex, which is induced to form by ThT in the absence of cations. On the other hand, great promotion in NMM fluorescence can be obtained only in the presence of anti-parallel TBA quadruplex, which is induced to fold by K+ or thrombin. The highly selective recognition of TBA quadruplex with different topologies by the two probes may be useful to investigate the interactions between conformation-specific G4 and the associated proteins, and could also be applied in label-free fluorescent sensing of other biomolecules. PMID:25245945

  4. Laser treatment of port-wine stains.

    PubMed

    Brightman, Lori A; Geronemus, Roy G; Reddy, Kavitha K

    2015-01-01

    Port-wine stains are a type of capillary malformation affecting 0.3% to 0.5% of the population. Port-wine stains present at birth as pink to erythematous patches on the skin and/or mucosa. Without treatment, the patches typically darken with age and may eventually develop nodular thickening or associated pyogenic granuloma. Laser and light treatments provide improvement through selective destruction of vasculature. A variety of vascular-selective lasers may be employed, with the pulsed dye laser being the most common and well studied. Early treatment produces more optimal results. Advances in imaging and laser treatment technologies demonstrate potential to further improve clinical outcomes. PMID:25624768

  5. Laser treatment of port-wine stains

    PubMed Central

    Brightman, Lori A; Geronemus, Roy G; Reddy, Kavitha K

    2015-01-01

    Port-wine stains are a type of capillary malformation affecting 0.3% to 0.5% of the population. Port-wine stains present at birth as pink to erythematous patches on the skin and/or mucosa. Without treatment, the patches typically darken with age and may eventually develop nodular thickening or associated pyogenic granuloma. Laser and light treatments provide improvement through selective destruction of vasculature. A variety of vascular-selective lasers may be employed, with the pulsed dye laser being the most common and well studied. Early treatment produces more optimal results. Advances in imaging and laser treatment technologies demonstrate potential to further improve clinical outcomes. PMID:25624768

  6. Detection Of Concrete Deterioration By Staining

    DOEpatents

    Guthrie, Jr., George D.; Carey, J. William

    1999-09-21

    A method using concentrated aqueous solutions of sodium cobaltinitrite and a rhodamine dye is described which can be used to identify concrete that contains gels formed by the alkali-silica reaction (ASR), and to identify degraded concrete which results in a porous or semi-permeable paste due to carbonation or leaching. These solutions present little health or environmental risk, are readily applied, and rapidly discriminate between two chemically distinct gels; K-rich, Na--K--Ca--Si gels are identified by yellow staining, and alkali-poor, Ca--Si gels are identified by pink staining.

  7. Introduction of impermeable actin-staining molecules to mammalian cells by optoporation

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Kamal; Black, Bryan; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2014-01-01

    The selective insertion of foreign materials, such as fluorescent markers or plasmids, into living cells has been a challenging problem in cell biology due to the cell membrane's selective permeability. However, it is often necessary that researchers insert such materials into cells for various dynamical and/or drug delivery studies. This problem becomes even more challenging if the study is to be limited to specific cells within a larger population, since other transfection methods, such as viral transfection and lipofection, are not realizable with a high degree of spatial selectivity. Here, we have used a focused femtosecond laser beam to create a small transient hole in the cellular membrane (optoporation) in order to inject nanomolar concentrations of rhodamine phalloidin (an impermeable dye molecule for staining filamentous actin) into targeted living mammalian cells (both HEK and primary cortical neurons). Following optoporation, the dye bound to the intracellular actin network and rise in fluorescence intensity was observed. Theoretical dynamics of the dye's diffusion is discussed, and numerical simulations of diffusion time constants are found to match well with experimental values. PMID:25315642

  8. Application of 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole in analysis: Fluorescent dyes and unexpected reaction with tertiary amines.

    PubMed

    Annenkov, Vadim V; Verkhozina, Olga N; Shishlyannikova, Tatyana A; Danilovtseva, Elena N

    2015-10-01

    4-Chloro-7-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD-Cl) is widely applied as a fluorescent tagging reagent in biochemistry, as a derivatization agent in analytical chemistry, and as a component for design of fluorescent nanoparticles. Four new 7-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD)-tagged polyamines containing two to four amine moieties were synthesized and used as an effective tool for staining of siliceous frustules of the diatom algae and spicules of the siliceous sponges, including fossilized samples. An unexpected reaction between NBD-Cl and tertiary amine groups was found, giving rise to NBD-tagged amines with elimination of an alkyl group. The reaction proceeds through the Meisenheimer complex and quaternary salt, which transform to the product by Hofmann reaction (alkene elimination) or nucleophilic substitution (halogenated compound formation). In the case of polyamines, NBD-Cl causes chain scissoring, giving a set of NBD-tagged amines. The found NBD-Cl reaction with tertiary amines must be taken into account when using NBD-Cl and similar activated aromatic systems for amine derivatization in analytical and biochemistry applications. The reaction with polyamines opens the way to libraries of NBD-tagged compounds. PMID:26103595

  9. Microwave synthesis of cyanine dyes.

    PubMed

    Winstead, Angela J; Williams, Richard; Zhang, Yongchao; McLean, Charlee; Oyaghire, Stanley

    2010-01-01

    Heptamethine cyanine dyes are a class of near infrared (NIR) dyes that have captured the interest of the scientific community. Although applications that utilize NIR fluorescence technology are rapidly expanding, progress is limited by the lack of availability and cost of suitable compounds that can be utilized as labels and/or probes. Herein, we report the use of microwave assisted organic synthesis of five NIR cyanine dyes in yields ranging from 64-83% with a significant reduction in solvent use. Spectra characteristics including absorbance and emission spectra, molar absorptivity, quantum yield, fluorescence lifetime, and redox potentials were determined for each synthesized NIR cyanine dye. PMID:21721469

  10. Detection of chloroform in water using an azo dye-modified ?-cyclodextrin - Epichlorohydrin copolymer as a fluorescent probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ncube, Phendukani; Krause, Rui W. M.; Mamba, Bhekie B.

    Chlorination disinfection by-products (DBPs) in water pose a health threat to humans and the aquatic environment. Their detection in water sources is therefore vital. Herein we present the detection of chloroform, a DBP, using a molecular fluorescent probe. The detection was based on the quenching of fluorescence of the probe by chloroform due to host-guest complex formation between ?-cyclodextrin in the probe and the chloroform molecule. The stability constant for the host-guest complex was high at 3.825 104 M-1. Chloroform quenched the fluorescence of the copolymer the most compared to the other small chlorinated compounds studied, suggesting that the probe was more sensitive to chloroform, with a sensing factor of 0.35 compared to as low as 0.0073 for dichloromethane. There was no interference from other chloroalkanes on the quenching efficiency of chloroform. The probe was used to detect chloroform in dam water as well as in bottled water. Detection of chloroform in both water samples using the probe was possible without chemically treating the water samples which may introduce other pollutants.

  11. Structure-staining relationships in histochemistry and biological staining. Part 3. Some comments on the intentional and artifactual staining of lipids.

    PubMed

    Horobin, R W

    1981-01-01

    The choice, basis and calculation of certain numerical coefficients for describing chemical structures of such staining reagents as dyes, enzyme substrates and visualising agents as described. The general value of electric charge, conjugated bond number, Hansch pi values, and molecular or ionic weights is emphasised. Hansch pi values as indicators of hydrophobic character, are then used to analyse reagents giving rise to the staining of neutral lipids. Dyestuffs used to stain lipids all have high Hansch pi values (greater than or equal to +1.0), with superior stains, e.g. Sudan Black B and Oil Red O, having values of greater than or equal to +7.0. In keeping with this, conversion of the basic dyes Nile Blue and Brilliant Cresyl Blue, with Hansch pi values of -2.4 and -3.6, into their oxazone derivatives, with Hansch pi values of +4.4, and 3.6, generates lipid staining compounds. Also in keeping with this correlation of lipophilia with Hansch pi values greater than +1.0 is the occurrence of artifactual lipid staining in enzyme histochemistry. Such artifacts can arise for instance when using certain naphthyl substrates which give rise to naphthoic intermediate reaction products, or when tetrazolium salts as used as visualising agents, yielding formazans as final reaction products. The Hansch pi values of the naphthols and formazans generated histochemically typically fall into the lipophilic range. Another artifact of lipid staining is the staining of basophilic entities, such as cell nuclei, by fat stains which carry amino substituents. Calculation of the Hansch pi values for protonated (and hence cationic) derivatives of such dyes yields values typical of basic dyes. PMID:6165042

  12. Evans Blue Staining of Cardiomyocytes Induced by Myocardial Contrast Echocardiography in Rats: Evidence for Necrosis Instead of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Douglas L.; Li, Peng; Dou, Chunyan; Armstrong, William F.; Gordon, David

    2008-01-01

    High Mechanical Index (MI) echocardiography with contrast agent has been shown to induce Evans blue staining of cardiomyocytes, seen one day after exposure, in addition to contraction band necrosis, seen immediately after exposure. This research examined the roles of necrosis vs. apoptosis in these bioeffects. Myocardial contrast echocardiography at high MI with 1:4 ECG triggering was performed in anesthetized rats at 1.5 MHz. Histologically observable cell injury was accumulated by infusing a high dose of 50 μl/kg Definity® via tail vein for 5 min at the start of 10 min of scanning. Evans blue dye or propidium iodide was injected as an indicator of cardiomyocyte plasma membrane integrity. Histological sections were stained using the TUNEL method for labeling nuclei with DNA degradation (e.g. apoptosis). Evans blue fluorescent cells were counted on frozen sections or on hematoxylin-stained and TUNEL labeled paraffin sections. In addition, transmission electron microscopy was used to assess potential apoptotic nuclei. Hypercontraction and propidium iodide staining were observed immediately after imaging-exposure. Although TUNEL positive cells were evident after 4 h, these also had indications of contraction band necrosis and features of apoptosis were not confirmed by electron microscopy. Inflammatory cell infiltration was evident after 24 h. A second, more subtle injury was recognized by Evans blue staining, with minimal inflammatory cell infiltration at the morphologically intact stained cells after 24 h. Apoptosis was not detected by the TUNEL method in the cardiomyocytes stained with Evans blue at 24 h. However, Evans blue stained cell numbers declined after 48 h, with continued inflammatory cell infiltration. The initial insult for Evans blue stained cardiomyocytes apparently induced partial permeability of the plasma membrane, which led to gradual degeneration (but not apoptosis) and necrosis after 24–48 h. PMID:17689176

  13. Acid-fast stain

    MedlinePLUS

    The acid-fast stain is a laboratory test that determines if a sample of tissue, blood, or other body substance is infected with ... washed with an acid solution and a different stain is applied. Bacteria that hold onto the first ...

  14. Differential staining of bacteria: acid fast stain.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Jackie; Moyes, Rita B; Breakwell, Donald P

    2009-11-01

    Acid-fastness is an uncommon characteristic shared by the genera Mycobacterium (Section 10A) and Nocardia. Because of this feature, this stain is extremely helpful in identification of these bacteria. Although Gram positive, acid-fast bacteria do not take the crystal violet into the wall well, appearing very light purple rather than the deep purple of normal Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:19885935

  15. Effect of nucleic acid binding dyes on DNA extraction, amplification, and STR typing.

    PubMed

    Haines, Alicia M; Tobe, Shanan S; Kobus, Hilton J; Linacre, Adrian

    2015-10-01

    We report on the effects of six dyes used in the detection of DNA on the process of DNA extraction, amplification, and detection of STR loci. While dyes can be used to detect the presence of DNA, their use is restricted if they adversely affect subsequent DNA typing processes. Diamond Nucleic Acid Dye, GelGreen, GelRed, RedSafe, SYBR() Green I, and EvaGreen were evaluated in this study. The percentage of dye removed during the extraction process was determined to be: 70.3% for SYBR() Green I; 99.6% for RedSafe; 99.4% for EvaGreen; 52.7% for Diamond Dye; 50.6% for GelRed, and; could not be determined for GelGreen. It was then assumed that the amount of dye in the fluorescent quantification assay had no effect on the DNA signal. The presence of all six dyes was then reviewed for their effect on DNA extraction. The t-test showed no significant difference between the dyes and the control. These extracts were then STR profiled and all dyes and control produced full DNA profiles. STR loci in the presence of GelGreen(TM) at 1X concentration showed increased amplification products in comparison to the control samples. Full STR profiles were detected in the presence of EvaGreen (1X), although with reduced amplification products. RedSafe (1X), Diamond Dye (1X), and SYBR() Green I (1X) all exhibited varying degrees of locus drop-out with GelRed generating no loci at all. We provide recommendations for the best dye to visualize the presence of DNA profile as a biological stain and its subsequent amplification and detection. PMID:26202628

  16. Gram stain of tissue biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    Gram stain of tissue biopsy test involves using crystal violet stain to test a sample of tissue ... a microscope slide. The specimen is stained with crystal violet stain and goes through more processing before ...

  17. Standard specimens for stain calibration and their application to the Papanicolaou stain.

    PubMed

    Turner, J N; Collins, D N

    1987-12-01

    Standardized specimens composed of extracts of biologic objects (nucleoprotamine and bovine liver) were developed as tools for the quantitative evaluation of stain performance on biologic substrates. The specimens are mixtures of proteins and nucleic acids and thus mimic the staining characteristics of cytologic smears. The concentration of each mixture and the specimen thickness can be precisely controlled, ensuring the production of a large number of samples with a nearly identical capability for dye binding. The transmitted light spectra of the standardized specimens varied depending on the extract and the preparation conditions. Spectra similar to those reported from the nuclei and cytoplasm of cell types in Papanicolaou-stained cervicovaginal smears were observed. Light transmission was uniform to +/- 5% across each specimen and from specimen to specimen. The specimen thickness was uniform within +/- 2%. Studies with these standardized samples could reveal the much-needed correlations between the chemical and optical characteristics of dyes and dye solutions and the performance of the dyes on biologic substrates. PMID:2449228

  18. A preservable two color staining procedure to detect toxicant impacts on algae (Selenastrum capricornutum) using flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Faber, M.; Smith, L.; Boermans, H.; Stephenson, G.; Thompson, D.G.

    1995-12-31

    Over the last several years, the use of flow cytometry to assess the impacts of toxicants on algae has increased. Previous studies have tested cell viability using chlorophyll autofluorescence or single stain flow cytometric analysis in fresh algal cultures. A rapid, two-color flow cytometric assay to evaluate viability and cytotoxicity of Selenastrum capricomutum in preserved samples is described. The staining procedure involved fluorescein diacetate, a fluorogenic esterase substrate cleaved in viable cells to fluorescein (green 525 nm) and ethidium homodimer-1 dye which passes through plasma membranes of compromised and dead cells staining DNA (red 620 nm). The auto fluorescence of chlorophyll-a (deep red 675 nm) was used to assess cell viability and examined for use as an internal comparison with the staining procedure. For storage, stained cells were fixed in glutaraldehyde, flash frozen in liquid nitrogen and stored frozen ({minus}20C) for assessment at a later date. Weekly analysis of stored samples showed that the fluorescence of fluorescein diacetate and ethidium homodimer-1 stained cells was stable under these conditions for the 2 months used in this study. A prepared culture of Selenastrum capricomutum containing a 50% (v/v) mixture of live and heat killed cells showed 36.1 % stained live, 13.2% as compromised, 12% unlabeled, and 38.7% dead algal cells. This two-color flow cytometric procedure has proven to be a reliable, sensitive assay to determine viability of Selenastrum capricomutum in preserved samples. The sensitivity of this dual-color assay and the ability to store samples for later analysis are significant improvements over current techniques. This method is being tested for detection of chemical induced algal cytotoxicity and for potential adaptations to field studies.

  19. Rapid coomassie blue staining of protein gels.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Richard J

    2010-04-01

    Coomassie brilliant blue R250 (CBR-250) and silver staining are the most widely used methods for the routine visualization of proteins separated by SDS-PAGE. CBR-250 is an organic dye that complexes with basic amino acids, such as arginine, lysine, and histidine, as well as tyrosine. Conventional CBR-250 staining is capable of detecting as little as 30-100 ng of protein, but sensitivity can be improved by performing the staining and destaining at elevated temperatures. The method described in this protocol, which is a modified version of the conventional Coomassie protocol, speeds up the destaining process for faster results with increased sensitivity and is compatible with mass-spectrometry-based methods for identifying proteins. PMID:20360367

  20. Target molecule imaging on tissue specimens by fluorescent metal nanoprobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Fu, Yi; Xu, Xuehong; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, fluorescence metal nanoshells (FMNs) were synthesized for target molecule detection on tissue specimens by fluorescence imaging method. FMNs were made with 40 nm silica spherical cores and 10 nm silver shells. Ru(bpy)32+ complexes were encapsulated in the silica cores for fluorescence properties. Avidin molecules were covalently bound on FMNs and formed avidin-Ag complexes could be site-specially conjugated on bone tissue specimens. Fluorescence intensity and lifetime images were recorded on a time-resolved confocal microscope. Imaging measurements showed that the emissions by avidin-FMN complexes could be distinctly isolated as individuals from the cellular backgrounds on lifetime images even when the tissues were stained with additional organic dyes. This observation demonstrates that the metal nanoprobes can be used for single target molecule detection on tissues during fluorescence imaging measurements.