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Sample records for fluorescent lighting product

  1. NEXT GENERATION ENERGY EFFICIENT FLUORESCENT LIGHTING PRODUCT

    SciTech Connect

    Alok Srivastava; Anant Setlur

    2003-04-01

    This is the Final Report of the Next-Generation Energy Efficient Fluorescent Lighting Products program, Department of Energy (DOE). The overall goal of this three-year program was to develop novel phosphors to improve the color rendition and efficiency of compact and linear fluorescent lamps. The prime technical approach was the development of quantum-splitting phosphor (QSP) to further increase the efficiency of conventional linear fluorescent lamps and the development of new high color rendering phosphor blends for compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) as potential replacements for the energy-hungry and short-lived incandescent lamps in market segments that demand high color rendering light sources. We determined early in the project that the previously developed oxide QSP, SrAl{sub 12}O{sub 19}:Pr{sup 3+}, did not exhibit an quantum efficiency higher than unity under excitation by 185 nm radiation, and we therefore worked to determine the physical reasons for this observation. From our investigations we concluded that the achievement of quantum efficiency exceeding unity in SrAl{sub 12}O{sub 19}:Pr{sup 3+} was not possible due to interaction of the Pr{sup 3+} 5d level with the conduction band of the solid. The interaction which gives rise to an additional nonradiative decay path for the excitation energy is responsible for the low quantum efficiency of the phosphor. Our work has led to the development of a novel spectroscopic method for determining photoionzation threshold of luminescent centers in solids. This has resulted in further quantification of the requirements for host phosphor lattice materials to optimize quantum efficiency. Because of the low quantum efficiency of the QSP, we were unable to demonstrate a linear fluorescent lamp with overall performance exceeding that of existing mercury-based fluorescent lamps. Our work on the high color rendering CFLs has been very successful. We have demonstrated CFLs that satisfies the EnergyStar requirement with color

  2. Shedding Some Light on Fluorescent Bulbs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilbert, Nicholas R.

    1996-01-01

    Explores some of the principles behind the working of fluorescent bulbs using a specially prepared fluorescent bulb with the white inner fluorescent coating applied along only half its length. Discusses the spectrum, the bulb plasma, and light production. (JRH)

  3. Shelf life of fresh meat products under LED or fluorescent lighting.

    PubMed

    Steele, K S; Weber, M J; Boyle, E A E; Hunt, M C; Lobaton-Sulabo, A S; Cundith, C; Hiebert, Y H; Abrolat, K A; Attey, J M; Clark, S D; Johnson, D E; Roenbaugh, T L

    2016-07-01

    Enhanced pork loin chops, beef longissimus lumborum steaks, semimembranosus steaks (superficial and deep portions), ground beef, and ground turkey were displayed under light emitting diode (LED) and fluorescent (FLS) lighting in two multi-shelf, retail display cases with identical operating parameters. Visual and instrumental color, internal product temperature, case temperature, case cycling, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and Enterobacteriaceae and aerobic plate counts were evaluated. Under LED, beef products (except the deep portion of beef semimembranosus steaks) showed less (P<0.05) visual discoloration. Pork loin chops had higher (P<0.05) L* values for LED lighting. Other than beef longissimus lumborum steaks, products displayed under LED lights had colder internal temperatures than products under FLS lights (P<0.05). Under LED, pork loin chops, ground turkey, and beef semimembranosus steaks had higher (P<0.05) values for TBARS. LED provides colder case and product temperatures, more case efficiency, and extended color life by at least 0.5d for longissimus and semimembranosus steaks; however, some LED cuts showed increased lipid oxidation. PMID:26950612

  4. Fluorescence and Light Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Ronald J.; Oprysa, Anna

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the mentioned experiment is to aid students in developing tactics for distinguishing between signals originating from fluorescence and light scattering. Also, the experiment provides students with a deeper understanding of the physicochemical bases of each phenomenon and shows that the techniques are actually related.

  5. Scattered Light And Fluorescent Photomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourney, M. E.; Chang, Ban W.

    1987-02-01

    A new technique for determining the stress state in a three-dimensional transparent body is described. This method involves cast-ing dye molecules into a model material and using the fluorescent light to analysis the stress state. The techniques of scattered light photoelasticity and speckle interferometry are considered and the enhancement of these techniques by the use of fluorescent is reported. The amount of illumination is greatly increased and the wavelength red-shifted, which eliminates the undesirable boundary halo; however, at the expense of a loss of coherence and a degree of depolarization of the light. Rhodamine 6G dye molecules are cast into gelatin, epoxy resin (PLM-4) and urethane rubber (Solithane 113) model materials. The light scattering, fluorescent, and fringe formation processes of each material is investigated. It is observed that even for the standard scattered light photoelastic materials without dye molecules the scattering is not Rayleigh, but rather has a large amount of wavelength broadening, the center wavelength, is red-shifted, and a high degree of depolarization occurs. A theory of photoelastic fringe formation for fluorescent materials is proposed. Experimental results are presented and the use of digital image processor in filtering background illumination is shown to greatly enhance fringe visibility.

  6. Bi-Directional Fluorescence Distribution and its Correction for Estimates of Gross Ecosystem Productivity and Photosynthetic Light-Use Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liangyun; Liu, Xinjie

    2015-04-01

    Passive measurement of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) presents a new way for directly estimating the photosynthetic activities. In this study, one diurnal multi-angular spectral experiment and three independent diurnal flux experiments were carried out on winter wheat and maize to assess directional emission of SIF for estimating photosynthesis activities. Firstly, the Bi-Directional Fluorescence Distribution Function (BFDF) of SIF was investigated. A BFDF shape similar to the red Bi-Directional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) was observed for the directional SIF emissions at 688 nm. Secondly, the relationship between the directional emission of canopy SIF and BRDF reflectance was examined, finding a strict linear correlation between SIF and reflectance at 688 nm, with an R2> 0.80 for all seven BRDF observations on winter wheat. Then, a BFDF correction model for the canopy SIF at 688 nm was presented by dividing by the canopy reflectance, and about 65.3% of the directional variation was successfully removed. Finally, the BFDF-corrected SIF signals were linked to photosynthetic activities, including gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) and photosynthetic light-use efficiency (LUE), and the determination coefficients between photosynthetic activities and the BFDF-corrected SIF increased for most cases. For GEP, the determination coefficients were slightly improved from 0.563, 0.382, and 0.613 (for raw SIF signals) to 0.592, 0.473, and 0.640 for all three diurnal experiments. For LUE, the determination coefficients increased from 0.393, and 0.358 to 0.517, and 0.528 for two experiments, while deceased slightly from 0.695 to 0.607 for one experiment. Therefore, according to the above preliminary results, the canopy SIF cannot be regarded as isotropic, and the directional emission SIF may be an important uncertainty in estimates of GEP and LUE.

  7. High intensity portable fluorescent light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, F. B.

    1972-01-01

    Eight high intensity portable fluorescent lights were produced. Three prototype lights were also produced, two of which were subsequently updated to the physical and operational configuration of the qualification and flight units. Positioning of lamp apertures and reflectors in these lights is such that the light is concentrated and intensified in a specific pattern rather than widely diffused. Indium amalgam control of mercury vapor pressure in the lamp gives high output at lamp ambient temperatures up to 105 C. A small amount of amalgam applied to each electrode stem helps to obtain fast warm-up. Shrinking a Teflon sleeve on the tube and potting metal caps on each end of the lamp minimizes dispersion of mercury vapor and glass particles in the event of accidental lamp breakage. Operation at 20 kHz allows the lamps to consume more power than at low frequency, thus increasing their light output and raising their efficiency. When used to expose color photographic film, light from the lamps produces results approximately equal to sunlight.

  8. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM)

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Michael W.; Loftus, Andrew F.; Dunn, Sarah E.; Joens, Matthew S.; Fitzpatrick, James A.J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of confocal microscopy techniques introduced the ability to optically section fluorescent samples in the axial dimension, perpendicular to the image plane. These approaches, via the placement of a pinhole in the conjugate image plane, provided superior resolution in the axial (z) dimension resulting in nearly isotropic optical sections. However, increased axial resolution, via pinhole optics, comes at the cost of both speed and excitation efficiency. Light Sheet Fluorescent Microscopy (LSFM), a century old idea (Siedentopf and Zsigmondy, 1902) made possible with modern developments in both excitation and detection optics, provides sub-cellular resolution and optical sectioning capabilities without compromising speed or excitation efficiency. Over the past decade, several variations of LSFM have been implemented each with its own benefits and deficiencies. Here we discuss LSFM fundamentals and outline the basic principles of several major light sheet based imaging modalities (SPIM, inverted SPIM, multi-view SPIM, Bessel beam SPIM, and stimulated emission depletion SPIM while considering their biological relevance in terms of intrusiveness, temporal resolution, and sample requirements. PMID:25559221

  9. Sustainable LED Fluorescent Light Replacement Technology

    SciTech Connect

    2011-06-30

    Ilumisys and the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) partnered on a three-year project awarded by the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), to quantify the impacts of LED lamps, incandescent lamps and fluorescent benchmark lamps over a product lifecycle – i.e. to develop a sustainable design and manufacturing strategy that addresses product manufacturing, use, recycling and disposal scenarios for LED-based lighting. Based on the knowledge gained from extensive product tear-down studies of fluorescent and screw-in lighting products, lifecycle assessment tools, and accelerated lifecycle testing protocols, an interactive Sustainable LED Design Guide has been developed to aid architectural and lighting designers and engineers in making design decisions that consider three important environmental impacts (greenhouse gas emissions, energy use and mercury emission) across all phases of the life of an LED lighting product. Critical information developed for the lifecycle analysis and product feature comparisons is the useful life of the lighting product as well as its performance. The Design Guide is available at www.ncms.org, and was developed based on operational and durability testing of a variety of lighting products including power consumption, light output, and useful life of a lamp in order to allow a more realistic comparison of lamp designs. This report describes the main project tasks, results and innovative features of the lifecycle assessment (LCA)-based design tools, and the key considerations driving the sustainable design of LED lighting systems. The Design Guide incorporates the following three novel features for efficiently evaluating LED lighting features in value-chains: • Bill-of-Materials (BOM) Builder – Designers may import process data for each component and supply functional data for the product, including power, consumption, lumen output and expected useful life. • Environmental Impact Review – Designs are

  10. Modeling fluorescent light distributions in scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2010-02-01

    It is hoped that the non-invasive optical characterization of physiological features of normal and diseased epithelia can be assessed through the fluorescent emission of such tissues. With a high percentage of cancers arising in the epithelium, the characterization of carcinogenesis in such tissues is imperative. Fluorescent emission from the epithelium, e.g. oral mucosa, has been shown to be sensitive to physiological features, such as cellular morphology, and the amount and types of biochemical agents present in the tissue. Efforts to distinguish the spectral signatures of diseased and healthy states of tissues from fluorescence have been confounded by the distortion of the intrinsic fluorescent signature as a result of wavelength dependent absorption and scattering within the tissue. Theoretical models of light propagation in biological media are required for understanding the distortion of the intrinsic fluorescence arising from compromised tissues. In this work we model the distortion of the intrinsic fluorescence emitted from a tissue with wavelength dependent optical properties, arising from varying blood and water content, using the radiative transport equation. As an example, we demonstrate the ability of blood and water content to distort the signal of a white light source as it is embedded deeper into a tissue.

  11. An optical microsensor to measure fluorescent light intensity in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Beyenal, Haluk; Yakymyshyn, Chris; Hyungnak, Jeon; Davis, Catherine C; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2004-09-01

    We have developed an optical microsensor to quantify fluorescent light intensity distribution in biofilms. The optical system consisted of a beam splitter, light couplers, filters and a spectrophotometer able to accept the fiberoptic cable to measure fluorescent light intensity. The emitted light, fluorescence from the biofilm, was collected at the tip of the optical microsensor and was transferred to a spectrophotometer via a fiberoptic cable. The total fluorescent light intensity was evaluated from the emission spectrum by numerical integration. The newly developed fiberoptic microsensor was tested using a Staphylococcus aureus strain producing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) grown as biofilm. We used a 405-nm violet laser diode for excitation, and measured the emission intensity between 480 nm and 540 nm. The optical microsensor that quantifies fluorescent light intensity is a promising tool in biofilm research which often requires detection and quantification of fluorescent light intensity distribution generated by various fluorescent proteins. PMID:15279941

  12. Fluorescent lighting with aluminum nitride phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Cherepy, Nerine J.; Payne, Stephen A.; Seeley, Zachary M.; Srivastava, Alok M.

    2016-05-10

    A fluorescent lamp includes a glass envelope; at least two electrodes connected to the glass envelope; mercury vapor and an inert gas within the glass envelope; and a phosphor within the glass envelope, wherein the phosphor blend includes aluminum nitride. The phosphor may be a wurtzite (hexagonal) crystalline structure Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN phosphor, where M may be drawn from beryllium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, zinc, scandium, yttrium, lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, ytterbium, bismuth, manganese, silicon, germanium, tin, boron, or gallium is synthesized to include dopants to control its luminescence under ultraviolet excitation. The disclosed Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN:Mn phosphor provides bright orange-red emission, comparable in efficiency and spectrum to that of the standard orange-red phosphor used in fluorescent lighting, Y.sub.2O.sub.3:Eu. Furthermore, it offers excellent lumen maintenance in a fluorescent lamp, and does not utilize "critical rare earths," minimizing sensitivity to fluctuating market prices for the rare earth elements.

  13. Light-induced fluorescence for pulpal diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebihara, Arata; Liaw, Lih-Huei L.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Wilder-Smith, Petra B. B.

    2001-04-01

    A direct non-histological means of pulpal diagnosis remains elusive to clinical practice. Clinical vitality testing remains limited to electric, thermal criteria, or laser Doppler flowmetry. The goal of these investigations was to determine the feasibility of using light-induced fluorescence as a non-invasive modality for pulpal evaluation. Such a capability would, for example, permit expanded use of pulpotomy/pulpectomy techniques. Clinically healthy and diseased human extirpated pulpal tissues were used in this study. After excision, they were rapidly frozen and standard cryosections prepared. Measurement of tissue excitation/emission characteristics was performed using spectrographic analysis. A low-light level fluorescence microscopy system was then used to image autofluorescence localization and intensity at optimal excitation/detection parameters. Excitation/detection parameters used in this study included 405/605, 405/635, 405/670, 440/550, and 440/635. Autofluorescence intensities in healthy tissues were significantly stronger than those in diseased tissues at optimal parameters. It is postulated that autofluorescence characteristics are related to pathology- related structural changes in the pulp. This work provides the basis for further investigation into the relation between autofluorescence, histology and clinical symptoms.

  14. High-efficiency organic light-emitting diodes with fluorescent emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanotani, Hajime; Higuchi, Takahiro; Furukawa, Taro; Masui, Kensuke; Morimoto, Kei; Numata, Masaki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Sagara, Yuta; Yasuda, Takuma; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-05-01

    Fluorescence-based organic light-emitting diodes have continued to attract interest because of their long operational lifetimes, high colour purity of electroluminescence and potential to be manufactured at low cost in next-generation full-colour display and lighting applications. In fluorescent molecules, however, the exciton production efficiency is limited to 25% due to the deactivation of triplet excitons. Here we report fluorescence-based organic light-emitting diodes that realize external quantum efficiencies as high as 13.4-18% for blue, green, yellow and red emission, indicating that the exciton production efficiency reached nearly 100%. The high performance is enabled by utilization of thermally activated delayed fluorescence molecules as assistant dopants that permit efficient transfer of all electrically generated singlet and triplet excitons from the assistant dopants to the fluorescent emitters. Organic light-emitting diodes employing this exciton harvesting process provide freedom for the selection of emitters from a wide variety of conventional fluorescent molecules.

  15. Light metal production

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Qinbai

    2016-04-19

    An electrochemical process for the production of light metals, particularly aluminum. Such a process involves contacting a light metal source material with an inorganic acid to form a solution containing the light metal ions in high concentration. The solution is fed to an electrochemical reactor assembly having an anode side containing an anode and a cathode side containing a cathode, with anode side and the cathode side separated by a bipolar membrane, with the solution being fed to the anode side. Light metal ions are electrochemically transferred through the bipolar membrane to the cathode side. The process further involves reducing the light metal ions to light metal powder. An associated processing system is also provided.

  16. Comparison of milk oxidation by exposure to LED and fluorescent light.

    PubMed

    Brothersen, C; McMahon, D J; Legako, J; Martini, S

    2016-04-01

    Light-induced oxidation of milk has been well studied. Exposure of milk to UV light facilitates the oxidation of fats to aldehydes, and the degradation of sulfur-containing amino acids, both of which contribute to off-flavors. In addition, vitamin A and riboflavin are easily degraded by UV light. These reactions occur rapidly and are exacerbated by bright fluorescent lights in retail dairy cases. The invention of white light-emitting diodes (LED) may provide a solution to this oxidation problem. In this study, fresh milk containing 1% fat and fortified with vitamin A and riboflavin was exposed to LED at 4,000 lx, or fluorescent light at 2,200 lx for 24 h. Milk samples exposed to LED or fluorescent light, as well as milk protected from light, were analyzed by a consumer acceptance panel, and a trained flavor panel. In addition, vitamin A, riboflavin, and the production of volatile compounds were quantified. Exposure to light resulted in a reduction of cooked/sweet, milkfat, and sweet flavors and increased the intensity of butterscotch, cardboard, and astringency. In general, exposure to fluorescent light resulted in greater changes in the milk than exposure to LED even though the LED was at higher intensity. Consumers were able detect off-flavors in milk exposed to fluorescent light after 12 h and LED after 24 h of exposure. The riboflavin and vitamin A content was reduced by exposure to fluorescent light, whereas there was no significant reduction caused by LED compared with the non-light-exposed control. Production of hexanal, heptanal, 2-heptanal, octanal, 2-octanal nonanal, dimethyl sulfide, and caproic acid vinyl ester from the light-induced degradation of fats was significantly higher with fluorescent than LED. Production of these compounds was significantly higher with both light treatments than in the control milk. This study indicates that LED is less destructive to milk than fluorescent light. PMID:26874418

  17. High Hats, Swiss Cheese, and Fluorescent Lighting?

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, Jeffrey J.; Gordon, Kelly L.

    2002-08-30

    For DOE, PNNL is conducting a competitive procurement to promote market introduction of new residential recessed downlights (also known as ''recessed cans'' or ''high hats'') that are airtight, rated for insulated ceilings, and hard-wired for CFLs. This paper discusses the potential energy savings of new high-efficiency downlights, and the results of product testing to date. Recessed downlights are the most popular residential lighting fixtures in the United States, with 21.7 million fixtures sold in 2000. An estimated 350 million are currently installed in American homes. Recessed cans are relatively inexpensive, and provide an unobtrusive, directed source of light for kitchens, hallways, and living rooms. Recessed cans are energy-intensive in three ways. First, virtually all recessed cans currently installed in the residential sector use incandescent light sources, typically reflector-type lamps drawing 65-150 watts. Second, heat from incandescent lamps adds to air-conditioning loads. Third, most installed recessed cans are not airtight, so they allow conditioned air to escape from the living area into unconditioned spaces such as attics. Addressing both lighting energy use and air leakage in recessed cans has proven challenging. Lighting energy efficiency is greatly improved by using CFLs. Air leakage can be addressed by making fixtures airtight. But when CFLs are used in an airtight recessed can, heat generated by the lamp and ballast is trapped within the fixture. Excessive heat causes reduced light output and shorter lifespan of the CFL. The procurement was designed to overcome these technical challenges and make new products available in the marketplace.

  18. Photoreaction of indole-containing mycotoxins to fluorescent products.

    PubMed

    Maragos, C M

    2009-06-01

    Photochemical reaction of the non-fluorescent mycotoxin cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) to fluorescent products was recently reported. Because CPA contains an indole moiety, believed to contribute to the fluorescence, it was of interest to determine whether the effect might be more generally applicable to indole-containing mycotoxins. Three indole-containing tremorgens (penitrem A, paxilline, verruculogen) that have not previously been reported to be fluorescent were rendered fluorescent by exposure to ultraviolet light in a photoreactor. Naturally fluorescent ergot alkaloids, which also contain an indole-moiety, exhibited a diminished response after exposure. This suggests that the phenomenon may be most useful for detection of indole-containing tremorgens that are non-fluorescent, rather than for the enhancement of materials that are already fluorescent, such as the ergot alkaloids. The extent to which fluorescence enhancement was seen was strongly influenced by the reaction environment, in particular the solvent used and whether cyclodextrins were present. In an HPLC format, placement of the photoreactor post-column allowed for the fluorescence detection of penitrem A, paxilline, and verruculogen. The ability to photoreact indole-containing tremorgens and detect them by fluorescence may open up new avenues for detection of these mycotoxins alone or in combination. PMID:23604981

  19. Fluorescent light bulbs - energy saver or environmental hazard?

    SciTech Connect

    Christenson, S.M.

    1995-03-01

    Businesses and homeowners have installed millions of fluorescent light bulbs in buildings around the country in the last few decades. Because fluorescent light bulbs are energy efficient and save electricity, environmentalists and governmental officials - including U.S. EPA - have promoted their use. Yet, fluorescent bulbs raise environmental concerns of their own. When these bulbs burn out, environmental and facility managers face complex issues about whether the old bulbs are regulated as hazardous waste.

  20. Fluorescent Photochromic Diarylethene That Turns on with Visible Light.

    PubMed

    Sumi, Takaki; Kaburagi, Tomohiro; Morimoto, Masakazu; Une, Kanako; Sotome, Hikaru; Ito, Syoji; Miyasaka, Hiroshi; Irie, Masahiro

    2015-10-01

    A new fluorescent photochromic diarylethene that can be activated by irradiation with 405 nm light was synthesized. The turn-on mode switching of fluorescence with visible light is favorable for application to biological systems. The fluorescence quantum yield of the photogenerated closed-ring isomer was as high as 0.8 in less or medium polar solvents, and even in polar acetonitrile the yield was higher than 0.6. PMID:26376422

  1. Multimodal light-sheet microscopy for fluorescence live imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Y.; Kajiura-Kobayashi, H.; Nonaka, S.

    2012-03-01

    Light-sheet microscopy, it is known as single plane illumination microscope (SPIM), is a fluorescence imaging technique which can avoid phototoxic effects to living cells and gives high contrast and high spatial resolution by optical sectioning with light-sheet illumination in developmental biology. We have been developed a multifunctional light-sheet fluorescence microscopy system with a near infrared femto-second fiber laser, a high sensitive image sensor and a high throughput spectrometer. We performed that multiphoton fluorescence images of a transgenic fish and a mouse embryo were observed on the light-sheet microscope. As the results, two photon images with high contrast and high spatial resolution were successfully obtained in the microscopy system. The system has multimodality, not only mutiphoton fluorescence imaging, but also hyperspectral imaging, which can be applicable to fluorescence unmixing analysis and Raman imaging. It enables to obtain high specific and high throughput molecular imaging in vivo and in vitro.

  2. Light cone matrix product

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, Matthew B

    2009-01-01

    We show how to combine the light-cone and matrix product algorithms to simulate quantum systems far from equilibrium for long times. For the case of the XXZ spin chain at {Delta} = 0.5, we simulate to a time of {approx} 22.5. While part of the long simulation time is due to the use of the light-cone method, we also describe a modification of the infinite time-evolving bond decimation algorithm with improved numerical stability, and we describe how to incorporate symmetry into this algorithm. While statistical sampling error means that we are not yet able to make a definite statement, the behavior of the simulation at long times indicates the appearance of either 'revivals' in the order parameter as predicted by Hastings and Levitov (e-print arXiv:0806.4283) or of a distinct shoulder in the decay of the order parameter.

  3. Detail of window treatment, suspended radiators, and fluorescent lights, prop ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of window treatment, suspended radiators, and fluorescent lights, prop shop. View to east. - San Bernardino Valley College, Auditorium, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  4. Light emission from compound eye with conformal fluorescent coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Palma, Raúl J.; Miller, Amy E.; Pulsifer, Drew P.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2015-03-01

    Compound eyes of insects are attractive biological systems for engineered biomimicry as artificial sources of light, given their characteristic wide angular field of view. A blowfly eye was coated with a thin conformal fluorescent film, with the aim of achieving wide field-of-view emission. Experimental results showed that the coated eye emitted visible light and that the intensity showed a weaker angular dependence than a fluorescent thin film deposited on a flat surface.

  5. Organimetallic Fluorescent Complex Polymers For Light Emitting Applications

    DOEpatents

    Shi, Song Q.; So, Franky

    1997-10-28

    A fluorescent complex polymer with fluorescent organometallic complexes connected by organic chain spacers is utilized in the fabrication of light emitting devices on a substantially transparent planar substrate by depositing a first conductive layer having p-type conductivity on the planar surface of the substrate, depositing a layer of a hole transporting and electron blocking material on the first conductive layer, depositing a layer of the fluorescent complex polymer on the layer of hole transporting and electron blocking material as an electron transporting emissive layer and depositing a second conductive layer having n-type conductivity on the layer of fluorescent complex polymer.

  6. New method of acne disease fluorescent diagnostics in natural and fluorescent light and treatment control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimova, L. N.; Berezin, A. N.; Shevchik, S. A.; Kharnas, S. S.; Kusmin, S. G.; Loschenov, V. B.

    2005-08-01

    In the given research the new method of fluorescent diagnostics (FD) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) control of acne disease is submitted. Method is based on simultaneous diagnostics in natural and fluorescent light. PDT was based on using 5-ALA (5- aminolevulinic acid) preparation and 600-730 nanometers radiation. If the examined site of a skin possessed a high endogenous porphyrin fluorescence level, PDT was carried out without 5-ALA. For FD and treatment control a dot spectroscopy and the fluorescent imaging of the affected skin were used.

  7. RNA Fluorescence with Light-Up Aptamers.

    PubMed

    Ouellet, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Seeing is not only believing; it also includes understanding. Cellular imaging with GFP in live cells has been transformative in many research fields. Modulation of cellular regulation is tightly regulated and innovative imaging technologies contribute to further understand cellular signaling and physiology. New types of genetically encoded biosensors have been developed over the last decade. They are RNA aptamers that bind with their cognate fluorogen ligands and activate their fluorescence. The emergence and the evolution of these RNA aptamers as well as their conversion into a wide spectrum of applications are examined in a global way. PMID:27446908

  8. RNA Fluorescence with Light-Up Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Seeing is not only believing; it also includes understanding. Cellular imaging with GFP in live cells has been transformative in many research fields. Modulation of cellular regulation is tightly regulated and innovative imaging technologies contribute to further understand cellular signaling and physiology. New types of genetically encoded biosensors have been developed over the last decade. They are RNA aptamers that bind with their cognate fluorogen ligands and activate their fluorescence. The emergence and the evolution of these RNA aptamers as well as their conversion into a wide spectrum of applications are examined in a global way. PMID:27446908

  9. The photosensitizing potential of compact fluorescent vs incandescent light bulbs.

    PubMed

    Chignell, Colin F; Sik, Robert H; Bilski, Piotr J

    2008-01-01

    Recently an article about the new energy-saving compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs appeared in Parade magazine [Rosenfeld, I. (2008) Parade Feb 3, 22]. Under the heading "Bright Lights, Bad Headache?" the writer states that "new research suggests some dangers" involving these lights because they are fluorescent and "can aggravate skin rashes in people with lups, eczema, dermatitis or porphyria." We measured the emission spectrum of a 14 W compact fluorescent bulb (with the same luminous flux as a 60 W incandescent bulb) and compared it to 60 W soft white incandescent and cool white fluorescent (CWF) bulbs. Our results clearly show that the spectral irradiance of the compact fluorescent bulb is similar to that of the CWF bulb; both exhibit sharp Hg emission lines at 365 nm (very weak), 404 nm (weak), 435 nm (moderate) and 543 nm (strong). In contrast, the emission of the incandescent bulb begins at 375 nm and then increases monotonically to above 750 nm. From their respective absorption spectra we calculated the potential photosensitization indices of protoporphyrin IX (PPIX; a prototypic porphyria skin photosensitizer) and riboflavin (a putative lens photosensitizer) vs 14 W compact fluorescent, CWF and 60 W incandescent bulbs. A higher photosensitization index would indicate a greater chance that the light/photosensitizer combination would cause photosensitization of the skin or eyes. We found that for PPIX and riboflavin the photosensitization index of the compact fluorescent bulb is less than half that of the 60 W incandescent bulb. These results suggest that substitution of a compact fluorescent bulb for an incandescent bulb of the same luminous flux should not increase the phototoxicity of skin porphyrins or lens riboflavin. PMID:18494761

  10. Acrodynia: exposure to mercury from fluorescent light bulbs

    SciTech Connect

    Tunnessen, W.W. Jr.; McMahon, K.J.; Baser, M.

    1987-05-01

    Medical attention was sought for a 23-month-old toddler because of anorexia, weight loss, irritability, profuse sweating, peeling and redness of his fingers and toes, and a miliarial rash. The diagnosis was mercury poisoning, and an investigation of his environment disclosed that he had been exposed to mercury from broken fluorescent light bulbs. Acrodynia resulting from fluorescent bulbs has not been previously reported.

  11. Benefits and Costs of Ultraviolet Fluorescent Lighting

    PubMed Central

    Lestina, Diane C.; Miller, Ted R.; Knoblauch, Richard; Nitzburg, Marcia

    1999-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the improvements in detection and recognition distances using fluorescent roadway delineation and auxiliary ultra-violet (UVA) headlights and determine the reduction in crashes needed to recover increased costs of the UVA/flourescent technology. Methods Field study comparisons with and without UVA headlights. Crash types potentially reduced by UVA/flourescent technology were estimated using annual crash and injury incidence data from the General Estimates System (1995–1996) and the 1996 Fatality Analysis Reporting System. Crash costs were computed based on body region and threat-to-life injury severity. Results Significant improvements in detection and recognition distances for pedestrian scenarios, ranging from 34% to 117%. A 19% reduction in nighttime motor vehicle crashes involving pedestrians or pedal-cycles will pay for the additional UVA headlight costs. Alternatively, a 5.5% reduction in all relevant nighttime crashes will pay for the additional costs of UVA headlights and fluorescent highway paint combined. Conclusions If the increased detection and recognition distances resulting from using UVA/flourescent technology as shown in this field study reduce relevant crashes by even small percentages, the benefit cost ratios will still be greater than 2; thus, the UVA/flourescent technology is very cost-effective and a definite priority for crash reductions.

  12. Integrated ultrasonic particle positioning and low excitation light fluorescence imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bernassau, A. L.; Al-Rawhani, M.; Beeley, J.; Cumming, D. R. S.

    2013-12-09

    A compact hybrid system has been developed to position and detect fluorescent micro-particles by combining a Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) imager with an acoustic manipulator. The detector comprises a SPAD array, light-emitting diode (LED), lenses, and optical filters. The acoustic device is formed of multiple transducers surrounding an octagonal cavity. By stimulating pairs of transducers simultaneously, an acoustic landscape is created causing fluorescent micro-particles to agglomerate into lines. The fluorescent pattern is excited by a low power LED and detected by the SPAD imager. Our technique combines particle manipulation and visualization in a compact, low power, portable setup.

  13. Integrated ultrasonic particle positioning and low excitation light fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernassau, A. L.; Al-Rawhani, M.; Beeley, J.; Cumming, D. R. S.

    2013-12-01

    A compact hybrid system has been developed to position and detect fluorescent micro-particles by combining a Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) imager with an acoustic manipulator. The detector comprises a SPAD array, light-emitting diode (LED), lenses, and optical filters. The acoustic device is formed of multiple transducers surrounding an octagonal cavity. By stimulating pairs of transducers simultaneously, an acoustic landscape is created causing fluorescent micro-particles to agglomerate into lines. The fluorescent pattern is excited by a low power LED and detected by the SPAD imager. Our technique combines particle manipulation and visualization in a compact, low power, portable setup.

  14. NOTE: Fluorescent light effects on FWT-60 radiochromic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butson, Martin J.; Cheung, Tsang; Yu, Peter K. N.

    2005-08-01

    FWT-60 radiochromic film has been tested for colouration effects from fluorescent light sources and shown to produce a marked colouration when exposed to office fluorescent light sources showing an approximate 1 OD unit per 0.5 J m-2 exposure to a broad ultraviolet (UV) UVA + UVB spectrum at the peak absorption wavelength. This produces a measurable and quantifiable response to UV exposure. By choosing an appropriate wavelength of readout or band pass, the level of sensitivity can be changed to match the application or exposure level measurement required. These levels of UV response are significantly higher in sensitivity than other radiochromic films such as Gafchromic MD-55 by an order of magnitude. This feature may be of use for measurement of integrated UV exposure from fluorescent lights when required and produces a quantifiable history of total exposure.

  15. Fluorescence enhancement in visible light: dielectric or noble metal?

    PubMed

    Sun, S; Wu, L; Bai, P; Png, C E

    2016-07-28

    A high permittivity dielectric gives the impression of outperforming plasmonic noble metal in visible light fluorescence enhancement primarily because of its small loss. Nonetheless, the performances of these two platforms in various situations remain obscure due to the different optical confinement mechanisms as well as the complexity in the fluorescence enhancement process. This study presents a comprehensive comparison between these two platforms based on nanoparticles (NPs) to evaluate their capability and applicability in fluorescence enhancement by taking into account the fluorescence excitation rate, the quantum yield, the fluorophore wavelengths and Stokes shifts as well as the far field intensity. In a low permittivity sensing medium (e.g. air), the dielectric NP can achieve comparable or higher fluorescence enhancement than the metal NP due to its decent NP-enhanced excitation rate and larger quantum yield. In a relatively high permittivity sensing medium (e.g. water), however, there is a significant decrement of the excitation rate of the dielectric NP as the permittivity contrast decreases, leading to a smaller fluorescence enhancement compared to the metallic counterpart. Combining the fluorescence enhancement and the far field intensity studies, we further conclude that for both dielectric and plasmonic NPs, the optimal situation occurs when the fluorescence excitation wavelength, the fluorescence emission wavelength and the electric-dipole-mode of the dielectric NP (or the plasmonic resonance of the metal NP) are the same and all fall in the low conductivity region of the NP material. We also find that the electric-dipole-mode of the dielectric NP performs better than the magnetic-dipole-mode for fluorescence enhancement applications because only the electric-dipole-mode can be strongly excited by the routinely used fluorescent dyes and quantum dots, which behave as electric dipoles by nature. PMID:27374052

  16. Delayed light emission and fluorescence responses of plants to chilling

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, J.A.; Campbell, T.A.; Massie, D.R. . Agricultural Research Service)

    1994-01-01

    Delayed light emission (DLE) of chlorophyll has the same excitation and emission spectra as chlorophyll fluorescence and was formerly called delayed fluorescence. DLE has a much longer time response than true chlorophyll fluorescence and is detectable for times ranging from milliseconds to many minutes. DLE is induced by back reactions of the photosynthetic pathway and therefore requires functional chloroplasts. It is detectable only in the dark following light excitation, yields very low energy, and decays very rapidly. DLE repetitively excited over time, which they term refreshed DLE (RDLE), shows a shoulder and broad peak in the measurements, indicating participation of at least two energy pools. DLE is altered by physiological stresses that affect chloroplasts or photosynthesis, and as illustration, plant species known to be very susceptible or very tolerant to chilling were exposed to chilling temperatures for varying times. RDLE at 0.3 s (the initial shoulder on the curves) rose in response to chilling damage in the susceptible species. The major RDLE peak was greatly inhibited in the susceptible species and showed only small changes in the tolerant species. Fluorescence measurements made on the chilling-tolerant species indicated similar responses and similar coefficients of determination were derived. These results indicate that measurement of precisely timed delayed light emission or of refreshed delayed light emission at a less precisely controlled time can be used to detect chilling stress.

  17. Evaluation of premalignant and malignant lesions by fluorescent light (VELscope)

    PubMed Central

    Sawan, Dania; Mashlah, Ammar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was the early detection of premalignant and malignant oral soft lesions by fluorescent light (VELscope). Materials and Methods: A total of 748 patients were evaluated through clinical and fluorescent light analysis of the entire oral cavity. Any lesion that was detected underwent a surgical excision biopsy as the golden standard for the detection of the lesion's histology; then a comparison was made between the results to assure the efficacy of the fluorescent light analysis outcome. Results: About 9.4% of the lesions detected were abnormal lesions and 83.09% had loss of fluorescent light effect. Based on the use of surgical biopsy, the machine had a sensitivity of 74.1% and a specificity of 96.3%. According to the statistical analysis, the P value was much lower than 0.05, so we can conclude that at 95% confidence level, there was significant agreement between VELscope results and biopsy results. Kappa coefficient value was approximately 0.5, which means that the strength of the agreement was medium. Conclusion: VELscope can be used as a clinical diagnostic aid in the detection of premalignant and malignant lesions of the oral cavity. In addition, it helps in the detection of the borders in both surgical biopsy and surgical excision. PMID:26236687

  18. Three Dimensional Fluorescence Imaging Using Multiple Light-Sheet Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Kavya; Purnapatra, Subhajit B.; Mondal, Partha Pratim

    2014-01-01

    We developed a multiple light-sheet microscopy (MLSM) system capable of 3D fluorescence imaging. Employing spatial filter in the excitation arm of a SPIM system, we successfully generated multiple light-sheets. This improves upon the existing SPIM system and is capable of 3D volume imaging by simultaneously illuminating multiple planes in the sample. Theta detection geometry is employed for data acquisition from multiple specimen layers. This detection scheme inherits many advantages including, background reduction, cross-talk free fluorescence detection and high-resolution at long working distance. Using this technique, we generated equi-intense light-sheets of thickness approximately with an inter-sheet separation of . Moreover, the light-sheets generated by MLSM is found to be 2 times thinner than the state-of-art SPIM system. Imaging of fluorescently coated yeast cells of size (encaged in Agarose gel-matrix) is achieved. Proposed imaging technique may accelerate the field of fluorescence microscopy, cell biology and biophotonics. PMID:24911061

  19. Fluorescent photography of spray droplets using a laser light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, J.; Hiroyasu, H.; Sowls, R.

    1969-01-01

    Monochromatic laser emission transformed by a fluorescent process into droplet emission over a wavelength band provides high light intensities for obtaining adequate time resolution to stop droplet motion in photographic spray studies. Experiments showed that the Q-switched laser-optical harmonic generator combination produced sharp, well-exposed droplet images.

  20. High-intensity xenon pulse light source for fluorescence excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Makoto; Ueno, Kazuo

    1997-05-01

    A newly developed 60W xenon flash lamp, L6604 and L6605, achieves the goals of longer operating life, higher output, and improved light stability. It operates at 2 Joules per flash input energy with approximately a 4 microsecond flash duration. The stability achieved is 2-3 percent peak-to-peak during a lifetime of 5 X 10e7 flashes, which is almost double that of conventional xenon flash lamps. This newly developed xenon flashlamp should serve as an excellent light source for analytical cytology and other fluorescence instruments. It can function as a high output, stable excitation light source for conventional fluorescence or delayed luminescence with a CCD. Besides providing powerful and stable illumination for absorption analysis of cells on slides, this lamp eliminates the optical artifacts associated with vibration of the stage which often limit throughput. This paper will describe in detail performance improvements obtained from this newly developed xenon flash lamp.

  1. Host Engineering for High Quantum Efficiency Blue and White Fluorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Song, Wook; Lee, Inho; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2015-08-01

    High quantum efficiency in blue and white fluorescence organic light-emitting diodes is achieved by developing a novel device architecture with fluorescent emitters doped in a thermally activated delayed fluorescent emitter as a host material. PMID:26078193

  2. A compact multi-channel fluorescence sensor with ambient light suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egly, Dominik; Geörg, Daniel; Rädle, Matthias; Beuermann, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    A multi-channel fluorescence sensor has been developed for process monitoring and fluorescence diagnostics. It comprises a fiber-optic set-up with an immersion probe and an intensity-modulated high power ultraviolet light-emitting diode as a light source for fluorescence excitation. By applying an electronic lock-in procedure, fluorescence signals are selectively detectable at ambient light levels of 1000 000 times higher intensity. The sensor was designed to be compact, low cost and easily adaptable to a wide field of application. The set-up was used to simultaneously monitor three important metabolic fluorophores: NAD(P)H, flavins and porphyrins during the cultivation of a baker's yeast. Moreover, the accumulation and degradation kinetics of protoporphyrin IX induced by 5-aminolevulinic acid on the skin could be recorded by the sensor. The detection limit for protoporphyrin IX was determined to be 4 × 10-11 mol L-1. The linear signal amplification of the sensor and time courses of fluorescence signals monitored during yeast fermentations were validated using a commercial CCD spectrometer. The robust and flexible set-up of the fiber-optic measurement system promises easy implementation of this non-invasive analytical tool to fluorescence monitoring and diagnostics in R&D and production.

  3. Make caffeine visible: a fluorescent caffeine "traffic light" detector.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wang; Kim, Tae-Hyeong; Zhai, Duanting; Er, Jun Cheng; Zhang, Liyun; Kale, Anup Atul; Agrawalla, Bikram Keshari; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung; Chang, Young-Tae

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine has attracted abundant attention due to its extensive existence in beverages and medicines. However, to detect it sensitively and conveniently remains a challenge, especially in resource-limited regions. Here we report a novel aqueous phase fluorescent caffeine sensor named Caffeine Orange which exhibits 250-fold fluorescence enhancement upon caffeine activation and high selectivity. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicate that π-stacking and hydrogen-bonding contribute to their interactions while dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy experiments demonstrate the change of Caffeine Orange ambient environment induces its fluorescence emission. To utilize this probe in real life, we developed a non-toxic caffeine detection kit and tested it for caffeine quantification in various beverages. Naked-eye sensing of various caffeine concentrations was possible based on color changes upon irradiation with a laser pointer. Lastly, we performed the whole system on a microfluidic device to make caffeine detection quick, sensitive and automated. PMID:23877095

  4. Blue-green phosphor for fluorescent lighting applications

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Alok; Comanzo, Holly; Manivannan, Venkatesan; Setlur, Anant Achyut

    2005-03-15

    A fluorescent lamp including a phosphor layer including Sr.sub.4 Al.sub.14 O.sub.25 :Eu.sup.2+ (SAE) and at least one of each of a red, green and blue emitting phosphor. The phosphor layer can optionally include an additional, deep red phosphor and a yellow emitting phosphor. The resulting lamp will exhibit a white light having a color rendering index of 90 or higher with a correlated color temperature of from 2500 to 10000 Kelvin. The use of SAE in phosphor blends of lamps results in high CRI light sources with increased stability and acceptable lumen maintenance over, the course of the lamp life.

  5. Affective and cognitive reactions to subliminal flicker from fluorescent lighting.

    PubMed

    Knez, Igor

    2014-05-01

    This study renews the classical concept of subliminal perception (Peirce & Jastrow, 1884) by investigating the impact of subliminal flicker from fluorescent lighting on affect and cognitive performance. It was predicted that low compared to high frequency lighting (latter compared to former emits non-flickering light) would evoke larger changes in affective states and also impair cognitive performance. Subjects reported high rather than low frequency lighting to be more pleasant, which, in turn, enhanced their problem solving performance. This suggests that sensory processing can take place outside of conscious awareness resulting in conscious emotional consequences; indicating a role of affect in subliminal/implicit perception, and that positive affect may facilitate cognitive task performance. PMID:24685568

  6. Spectroscopic Analysis of Today's Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluhar, Edward

    2012-03-01

    In today's consumer market, there are many different light bulbs that claim to produce `natural' light. In my research, I both quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed this claim. First, utilizing a spectroscope, I compared the spectra emitted by different brands and types of compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs to the spectra emitted by the Sun. Once the bulbs were quantitatively analyzed, I proceeded to qualitatively analyze them by exposing subjects to the different bulbs. The subjects were asked to rate the quality of color in different pictures illuminated by each type of CFL. From these tests, I was able to determine the ``best'' CFL bulbs, and conclude whether the health risks associated with CFL bulbs outweigh the cost savings, longevity of the bulbs, and/or quality of light benefits.

  7. The instantaneous light-intensity function of a fluorescent lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluskin, Emanuel; Topalis, Frangiskos V.; Kateri, Ifigenia; Bisketzis, Nikolas

    2006-05-01

    Using some simple physics and “system” considerations, the instantaneous light intensity function ψ(t) of a fluorescent lamp fed via a regular ballast from the 50 60 Hz line is argued to be ψ(t)=ψ+bp(t), where p(t) is the instantaneous power function of the lamp, and b is a constant, and experiment confirms this formula well. The main frequency of ψ(t), the very significant singularity of its waveform, and the relative intensity of the ripple, i.e., the depth of the modulation, are the focus. The results are important for research into the vision problem that some humans (autistic, but others, too) experience regarding fluorescent light. The inertia of the processes in the lamp which are responsible for the light emission, provides some nonzero emission at the instants when p(t) has zeros. The smaller the volume of the tube and the mass of the gas are, the more weakly the inertia of the processes is expressed, and the relatively smaller is ψ. However, it should be very difficult to theoretically obtain ψ(t), in particular ψ, from the very complicated physics of the low-pressure discharge in the tube. We conclude that ψ has to be connected with the (also easily measured) lamp's inductance. The work should attract more attention of the physicists to the properties of the common fluorescent lamps.

  8. Remediation plan for fluorescent light fixtures containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)

    SciTech Connect

    1992-04-30

    This report describes the remedial action to achieve compliance with 29 CFR 1910 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements of fluorescent light fixtures containing PCBs at K-25 site. This remedial action is called the Remediation Plan for Fluorescent Light Fixtures Containing PCBs at the K-25 Site (The Plan). The Plan specifically discusses (1) conditions of non-compliance, (2) alternative solutions, (3) recommended solution, (4) remediation plan costs, (5) corrective action, (6) disposal of PCB waste, (7) training, and (8) plan conclusions. The results from inspections by Energy Systems personnel in 2 buildings at K-25 site and statistical extension of this data to 91 selected buildings at the K-25 site indicates that there are approximately 28,000 fluorescent light fixtures containing 47,036 ballasts. Approximately 38,531 contain PCBs and 2,799 of the 38,531 ballasts are leaking PCBs. Review of reportable occurrences at K-25 for the 12 month period of September 1990 through August 1991 shows that Energy Systems personnel reported 69 ballasts leaking PCBs. Each leaking ballast is in non-compliance with 29 CFR 1910 - Table Z-1-A. The age of the K-25 facilities indicate a continued and potential increase in ballasts leaking PCBs. This report considers 4 alternative solutions for dealing with the ballasts leaking PCBs. The advantages and disadvantages of each alternative solution are discussed and ranked using cost of remediation, reduction of health risks, and compliance with OSHA as criteria.

  9. Infrared imaging of LED lighting tubes and fluorescent tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siikanen, Sami; Kivi, Sini; Kauppinen, Timo; Juuti, Mikko

    2011-05-01

    The low energy efficiency of conventional light sources is mainly caused by generation of waste heat. We used infrared (IR) imaging in order to monitor the heating of both LED tube luminaires and ordinary T8 fluorescent tubes. The IR images showed clearly how the surface temperatures of the fluorescent tube ends quickly rose up to about +50...+70°C, whereas the highest surface temperatures seen on the LED tubes were only about +30...+40°C. The IR images demonstrated how the heat produced by the individual LED chips can be efficiently guided to the supporting structure in order to keep the LED emitters cool and hence maintain efficient operation. The consumed electrical power and produced illuminance were also recorded during 24 hour measurements. In order to assess the total luminous efficacy of the luminaires, separate luminous flux measurements were made in a large integrating sphere. The currently available LED tubes showed efficacies of up to 88 lm/W, whereas a standard "cool white" T8 fluorescent tube produced ca. 75 lm/W. Both lamp types gave ca. 110 - 130 lx right below the ceiling-mounted luminaire, but the LED tubes consume only 40 - 55% of the electric power compared to fluorescent tubes.

  10. Structured light illumination for extended resolution in fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedosseev, R.; Belyaev, Y.; Frohn, J.; Stemmer, A.

    2005-03-01

    During the last two decades fluorescence microscopy has become a powerful experimental tool in modern biology. Resolution of optical microscopes is limited by the diffraction nature of light and amounts to approximately 200 nm for point objects imaged with green light and high-NA objectives. Recently, several successful attempts have been made to break the resolution limit of microscopes. One of them is the so-called harmonic excitation light microscopy. 2D structured illumination produced by four interfering laser beams improves the lateral resolution by a factor of 2 to reach 100 nm. Structured illumination extends optical resolution since spatial frequencies beyond the classical cut-off frequency are brought into the passband of the optical microscope by frequency mixing. The extended passband is reconstructed computationally from several images acquired with shifted illumination patterns. Here we discuss an extension towards high resolution imaging of thick specimens by combining 2D structured illumination with deconvolution techniques.

  11. Blue fluorescent organic light emitting diodes with multilayered graphene anode

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Joohyun; Choi, Hong Kyw; Moon, Jaehyun; Shin, Jin-Wook; Joo, Chul Woong; Han, Jun-Han; Cho, Doo-Hee; Huh, Jin Woo; Choi, Sung-Yool; Lee, Jeong-Ik; Chu, Hye Yong

    2012-10-15

    As an innovative anode for organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), we have investigated graphene films. Graphene has importance due to its huge potential in flexible OLED applications. In this work, graphene films have been catalytically grown and transferred to the glass substrate for OLED fabrications. We have successfully fabricated 2 mm × 2 mm device area blue fluorescent OLEDs with graphene anodes which showed 2.1% of external quantum efficiency at 1000 cd/m{sup 2}. This is the highest value reported among fluorescent OLEDs using graphene anodes. Oxygen plasma treatment on graphene has been found to improve hole injections in low voltage regime, which has been interpreted as oxygen plasma induced work function modification. However, plasma treatment also increases the sheet resistance of graphene, limiting the maximum luminance. In summary, our works demonstrate the practical possibility of graphene as an anode material for OLEDs and suggest a processing route which can be applied to various graphene related devices.

  12. Spectral conversion with fluorescent microspheres for light emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Hui, K N; Lai, P T; Choi, H W

    2008-01-01

    An innovative spectral conversion scheme for light emitting diodes using fluorescent microspheres has been demonstrated. An optimally mixed proportion of green and red fluorescent microspheres were coated onto a high-extraction-efficiency GaN micro-LED with emission centred at 470 nm. The microspheres self-assemble into ordered hexagonally arrays, forming regular and uniform coating layers. Devices with cool and warm white emission were achieved. The bluish-white LED has a luminous efficacy of 27.3 lm/W (at 20 mA) with CIE coordinates of (0.26, 0.28) and 8500K CCT, while the yellowish-white LED has a luminous efficacy of 26.67 lm/W (at 20 mA) with CIE coordinates of (0.36, 0.43) and 13000K CCT. PMID:18521128

  13. Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM): past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Lim, John; Lee, Hwee Kuan; Yu, Weimiao; Ahmed, Sohail

    2014-10-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) has emerged as an important imaging modality to follow biology in live 3D samples over time with reduced phototoxicity and photobleaching. In particular, LSFM has been instrumental in revealing the detail of early embryonic development of Zebrafish, Drosophila, and C. elegans. Open access projects, DIY-SPIM, OpenSPIM, and OpenSPIN, now allow LSFM to be set-up easily and at low cost. The aim of this paper is to facilitate the set-up and use of LSFM by reviewing and comparing open access projects, image processing tools and future challenges. PMID:25118817

  14. Photolysis of Indole-Containing Mycotoxins to Fluorescent Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Photochemical reaction of the non-fluorescent mycotoxin cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) to fluorescent products was recently reported. Because CPA contains an indole moiety, believed to contribute to the fluorescence, it was of interest to determine whether the effect might be more generally applicable to ...

  15. Diagnosis of dental caries using quantitative light-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaechi, Bennett T.; Higham, Susan M.

    2001-10-01

    Current dental diagnostic methods can detect caries but cannot quantify the mineral status of the lesion. Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence (QLF) measures the percentage fluorescence radiance change of demineralised enamel with respect to surround sound enamel, and related it directly to the amount of mineral lost during demineralisation. Demineralisation of teeth to produce caries-like lesions and the subsequent remineralisation of the lesions were monitored quantitatively and longitudinally with QLF. The influence of factors such as presence of plaque or saliva, lesion staining, lesion magnification, tooth thickness and developmental hypomineralisation, on the reproducibility of QLF imaging and analysis were investigated, Results showed that the integrated fluorescence change (hence the mineral loss) increased linearly with demineralisation time and decreased with increasing remineralisation time. Caries detection was limited by saliva or plaque, but enhanced by staining. QLF could not discriminate between developmental hypomineralisation and caries. Neither the variation in tooth thickness nor lesion magnification within the limit of a sharp image made a significant difference in QLF analysis. It was concluded that QLF could detect and quantitatively monitor the mineral changes in an incipient caries on a longitudinal basis, however detection may be limited by the presence of saliva or plaque or enhanced by staining.

  16. Light-cone matrix product

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, M. B.

    2009-09-15

    We show how to combine the light-cone and matrix product algorithms to simulate quantum systems far from equilibrium for long times. For the case of the XXZ spin chain at {delta}=0.5, we simulate to a time of {approx_equal}22.5. While part of the long simulation time is due to the use of the light-cone method, we also describe a modification of the infinite time-evolving bond decimation algorithm with improved numerical stability, and we describe how to incorporate symmetry into this algorithm. While statistical sampling error means that we are not yet able to make a definite statement, the behavior of the simulation at long times indicates the appearance of either 'revivals' in the order parameter as predicted by Hastings and Levitov (e-print arXiv:0806.4283) or of a distinct shoulder in the decay of the order parameter.

  17. Shedding light on azopolymer brush dynamics by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kollarigowda, R H; De Santo, I; Rianna, C; Fedele, C; Manikas, A C; Cavalli, S; Netti, P A

    2016-09-14

    Understanding the response to illumination at a molecular level as well as characterising polymer brush dynamics are key features that guide the engineering of new light-stimuli responsive materials. Here, we report on the use of a confocal microscopy technique that was exploited to discern how a single molecular event such as the photoinduced isomerisation of azobenzene can affect an entire polymeric material at a macroscopic level leading to photodriven mass-migration. For this reason, a set of polymer brushes, containing azobenzene (Disperse Red 1, DR) on the side chains of poly(methacrylic acid), was synthesised and the influence of DR on the polymer brush dynamics was investigated for the first time by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS). Briefly, two dynamics were observed, a short one coming from the isomerisation of DR and a long one related to the brush main chain. Interestingly, photoinduced polymer aggregation in the confocal volume was observed. PMID:27491890

  18. Artifactual formation of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine: role of fluorescent light and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Arif, Jamal M; Gupta, Ramesh C

    2003-01-01

    The pro-mutagenic oxidative DNA lesion, 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) has been a subject of numerous studies. However, the absolute 8-oxodG levels in tissue DNA reported by various methods have been debated due to its artifactual production during DNA isolation and/or the DNA processing. We have investigated factors that may result in such artifacts during isolation and analysis of DNA as well as means for its prevention. 8-OxodG content was measured by a recently described TLC enrichment-mediated 32P-postlabeling. Liver DNA from 3 month-old, female Sprague-Dawley rats was isolated by a standard solvent-extraction procedure (phenol, phenol:Sevag, and Sevag; 23 degrees C), a modified solvent-extraction procedure (phenol:Sevag, and Sevag; 4 degrees C; KCl-SDS-protein precipitation) or sodium iodide extraction procedure. 8-OxodG was analyzed in the DNA by the 32P-postlabeling assay using a fluorescent light box during the workup, as well as in its absence. The 8-oxodG levels, when the fluorescent light box was used, were in similar range irrespective of the DNA isolation procedure (16.4+/-1.6 to 28.7+/-6 8-oxodG/10(6) nucleotides). However, the values were significantly lower (3.1+/-0.4 to 3.4+/-0.2 8-oxodG/10(6) nucleotides) in the absence of fluorescence light box, room fluorescent light (suspended through the ceiling) and natural room light did not alter the 8-oxodG levels. Further, the addition of 0.3 mM of PBN (N-t-butyl-alpha-phenyl nitrone) or TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl), or 6.8 mM 8-hydroxy-quinoline during the DNA isolation resulted in still lower values (0.8+/-0.1 to 1.8+/-0.5 8-oxodG/10(6) nucleotides) although this reduction was not consistently observed in different experiments. These results suggest that fluorescent light is the major 'culprit' in artifactual production and variability reported in the 8-oxodG levels. PMID:14534745

  19. Engineering light-emitting diode surgical light for near-infrared fluorescence image-guided surgical systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Nan; Mondal, Suman; Gao, Shengkui; Achilefu, Samuel; Gruev, Viktor; Liang, Rongguang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. The near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence signal in the 700 to 900 nm from molecular probes used in fluorescence image-guided surgery (FIGS) is usually weak compared to the NIR component from white light-emitting diode surgical light, which is typically switched off during FIGS to enhance the molecular fluorescence contrast of the image. We propose a simple solution to this critical issue in FIGS by removing NIR light from surgical light with a low cost commercial 3M cool mirror film 330. PMID:25057962

  20. Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy to Image Zebrafish Eye Development.

    PubMed

    Icha, Jaroslav; Schmied, Christopher; Sidhaye, Jaydeep; Tomancak, Pavel; Preibisch, Stephan; Norden, Caren

    2016-01-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) is gaining more and more popularity as a method to image embryonic development. The main advantages of LSFM compared to confocal systems are its low phototoxicity, gentle mounting strategies, fast acquisition with high signal to noise ratio and the possibility of imaging samples from various angles (views) for long periods of time. Imaging from multiple views unleashes the full potential of LSFM, but at the same time it can create terabyte-sized datasets. Processing such datasets is the biggest challenge of using LSFM. In this protocol we outline some solutions to this problem. Until recently, LSFM was mostly performed in laboratories that had the expertise to build and operate their own light sheet microscopes. However, in the last three years several commercial implementations of LSFM became available, which are multipurpose and easy to use for any developmental biologist. This article is primarily directed to those researchers, who are not LSFM technology developers, but want to employ LSFM as a tool to answer specific developmental biology questions. Here, we use imaging of zebrafish eye development as an example to introduce the reader to LSFM technology and we demonstrate applications of LSFM across multiple spatial and temporal scales. This article describes a complete experimental protocol starting with the mounting of zebrafish embryos for LSFM. We then outline the options for imaging using the commercially available light sheet microscope. Importantly, we also explain a pipeline for subsequent registration and fusion of multiview datasets using an open source solution implemented as a Fiji plugin. While this protocol focuses on imaging the developing zebrafish eye and processing data from a particular imaging setup, most of the insights and troubleshooting suggestions presented here are of general use and the protocol can be adapted to a variety of light sheet microscopy experiments. PMID:27167079

  1. Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy to Image Zebrafish Eye Development

    PubMed Central

    Sidhaye, Jaydeep; Tomancak, Pavel; Preibisch, Stephan; Norden, Caren

    2016-01-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) is gaining more and more popularity as a method to image embryonic development. The main advantages of LSFM compared to confocal systems are its low phototoxicity, gentle mounting strategies, fast acquisition with high signal to noise ratio and the possibility of imaging samples from various angles (views) for long periods of time. Imaging from multiple views unleashes the full potential of LSFM, but at the same time it can create terabyte-sized datasets. Processing such datasets is the biggest challenge of using LSFM. In this protocol we outline some solutions to this problem. Until recently, LSFM was mostly performed in laboratories that had the expertise to build and operate their own light sheet microscopes. However, in the last three years several commercial implementations of LSFM became available, which are multipurpose and easy to use for any developmental biologist. This article is primarily directed to those researchers, who are not LSFM technology developers, but want to employ LSFM as a tool to answer specific developmental biology questions. Here, we use imaging of zebrafish eye development as an example to introduce the reader to LSFM technology and we demonstrate applications of LSFM across multiple spatial and temporal scales. This article describes a complete experimental protocol starting with the mounting of zebrafish embryos for LSFM. We then outline the options for imaging using the commercially available light sheet microscope. Importantly, we also explain a pipeline for subsequent registration and fusion of multiview datasets using an open source solution implemented as a Fiji plugin. While this protocol focuses on imaging the developing zebrafish eye and processing data from a particular imaging setup, most of the insights and troubleshooting suggestions presented here are of general use and the protocol can be adapted to a variety of light sheet microscopy experiments. PMID:27167079

  2. A light diet for a giant appetite: An assessment of China's proposed fluorescent lamp standard

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiang

    2002-04-11

    Lighting has been one of the fastest growing electric end-uses in China over the last twenty years, with an average annual growth rate of 14%. Fluorescent lighting provides a significant portion of China's lighting need. In 1998, China produced 680 million fluorescent lamps, of which 420 million were linear fluorescent lamps of various diameters (T8 to T12). There are substantial variations both in energy efficiency and lighting performance among locally produced fluorescent lamps. Such variations present a perfect opportunity for policy intervention through efficiency standards to promote the adoption of more efficient fluorescent lamps in China. This paper analyzes China's proposed minimum efficiency standard for fluorescent lamps and presents an assessment of its likely impacts on China's lighting energy consumption and GHG emissions.

  3. Understanding the Fluorescence of TADF Light-Emitting Dyes.

    PubMed

    Valchanov, Georgi; Ivanova, Anela; Tadjer, Alia; Chercka, Dennis; Baumgarten, Martin

    2016-09-01

    In order to afford in a controlled fashion fine-tuning of the color and the intensity of the emitted light of potential fluorophores for organic light-emitting diodes (OLED), directed molecular design based on a donor-spacer-acceptor model is undertaken. One way of increasing emission efficiency is triplet harvesting. This can be achieved by thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) when triplet and singlet excited states are quasi degenerate. Molecular building units are selected and bound in a specific pattern to allow for increase in emission performance, also due to TADF. Using time-dependent density functional theory, the relevant singlet-singlet and triplet-singlet energy gaps corresponding to absorption or emission transitions of the compounds are computed to simulate the electroluminescent spectrum. The results are analyzed in depth and relations between some spectral and structural properties are proposed. The best suited molecules are delineated as potential OLED building blocks. Guidelines for systematic improvement of the molecular characteristics are outlined. PMID:27529727

  4. Light emitting diode-based nanosecond ultraviolet light source for fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Tsutomu; Misawa, Hiroaki

    1995-12-01

    A compact pulsed-light source is devised from an InGaN/AlGaN double heterostructure light-emitting diode (LED). The LED emits a 450-nm (blue) light under conventional dc operation below 30 mA. When a current larger than 50 mA is applied, the intensity of the 450-nm light saturates, but that of the 380-nm light due to the InGaN component continues to increase. This phenomenon is utilized to realize a nanosecond ultraviolet (UV) light source. Under repetitive, large current pulsing (frequency=10 kHz, pulse width=4 ns, peak current=2 A), the peak LED emission shifts from 450 to 380 nm. Intense light pulses (peak value=40 mW) of 4-ns duration were generated. To evaluate the potential of the pulsed LED as an excitation source, the fluorescence lifetime of a quinine-sulfate solution was measured. The observed lifetime characteristics agreed well with the generally accepted behavior.

  5. Monitoring of Apoptosis in 3D Cell Cultures by FRET and Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Petra; Schickinger, Sarah; Wagner, Michael; Angres, Brigitte; Bruns, Thomas; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Non-radiative cell membrane associated Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) from an enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP) to an enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) is used for detection of apoptosis in 3-dimensional cell cultures. FRET is visualized in multi-cellular tumor spheroids by light sheet based fluorescence microscopy in combination with microspectral analysis and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). Upon application of staurosporine and to some extent after treatment with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), a specific activator of protein kinase c, the caspase-3 sensitive peptide linker DEVD is cleaved. This results in a reduction of acceptor (EYFP) fluorescence as well as a prolongation of the fluorescence lifetime of the donor (ECFP). Fluorescence spectra and lifetimes may, therefore, be used for monitoring of apoptosis in a realistic 3-dimensional system, while light sheet based microscopy appears appropriate for 3D imaging at low light exposure. PMID:25761242

  6. Physically-based in silico light sheet microscopy for visualizing fluorescent brain models

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background We present a physically-based computational model of the light sheet fluorescence microscope (LSFM). Based on Monte Carlo ray tracing and geometric optics, our method simulates the operational aspects and image formation process of the LSFM. This simulated, in silico LSFM creates synthetic images of digital fluorescent specimens that can resemble those generated by a real LSFM, as opposed to established visualization methods producing visually-plausible images. We also propose an accurate fluorescence rendering model which takes into account the intrinsic characteristics of fluorescent dyes to simulate the light interaction with fluorescent biological specimen. Results We demonstrate first results of our visualization pipeline to a simplified brain tissue model reconstructed from the somatosensory cortex of a young rat. The modeling aspects of the LSFM units are qualitatively analysed, and the results of the fluorescence model were quantitatively validated against the fluorescence brightness equation and characteristic emission spectra of different fluorescent dyes. AMS subject classification Modelling and simulation PMID:26329404

  7. Heat generation and light scattering of green fluorescent protein-like pigments in coral tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lyndby, Niclas H.; Kühl, Michael; Wangpraseurt, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like pigments have been proposed to have beneficial effects on coral photobiology. Here, we investigated the relationships between green fluorescence, coral heating and tissue optics for the massive coral Dipsastraea sp. (previously Favia sp.). We used microsensors to measure tissue scalar irradiance and temperature along with hyperspectral imaging and combined imaging of variable chlorophyll fluorescence and green fluorescence. Green fluorescence correlated positively with coral heating and scalar irradiance enhancement at the tissue surface. Coral tissue heating saturated for maximal levels of green fluorescence. The action spectrum of coral surface heating revealed that heating was highest under red (peaking at 680 nm) irradiance. Scalar irradiance enhancement in coral tissue was highest when illuminated with blue light, but up to 62% (for the case of highest green fluorescence) of this photon enhancement was due to green fluorescence emission. We suggest that GFP-like pigments scatter the incident radiation, which enhances light absorption and heating of the coral. However, heating saturates, because intense light scattering reduces the vertical penetration depth through the tissue eventually leading to reduced light absorption at high fluorescent pigment density. We conclude that fluorescent pigments can have a central role in modulating coral light absorption and heating. PMID:27225857

  8. Heat generation and light scattering of green fluorescent protein-like pigments in coral tissue.

    PubMed

    Lyndby, Niclas H; Kühl, Michael; Wangpraseurt, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like pigments have been proposed to have beneficial effects on coral photobiology. Here, we investigated the relationships between green fluorescence, coral heating and tissue optics for the massive coral Dipsastraea sp. (previously Favia sp.). We used microsensors to measure tissue scalar irradiance and temperature along with hyperspectral imaging and combined imaging of variable chlorophyll fluorescence and green fluorescence. Green fluorescence correlated positively with coral heating and scalar irradiance enhancement at the tissue surface. Coral tissue heating saturated for maximal levels of green fluorescence. The action spectrum of coral surface heating revealed that heating was highest under red (peaking at 680 nm) irradiance. Scalar irradiance enhancement in coral tissue was highest when illuminated with blue light, but up to 62% (for the case of highest green fluorescence) of this photon enhancement was due to green fluorescence emission. We suggest that GFP-like pigments scatter the incident radiation, which enhances light absorption and heating of the coral. However, heating saturates, because intense light scattering reduces the vertical penetration depth through the tissue eventually leading to reduced light absorption at high fluorescent pigment density. We conclude that fluorescent pigments can have a central role in modulating coral light absorption and heating. PMID:27225857

  9. Heat generation and light scattering of green fluorescent protein-like pigments in coral tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyndby, Niclas H.; Kühl, Michael; Wangpraseurt, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like pigments have been proposed to have beneficial effects on coral photobiology. Here, we investigated the relationships between green fluorescence, coral heating and tissue optics for the massive coral Dipsastraea sp. (previously Favia sp.). We used microsensors to measure tissue scalar irradiance and temperature along with hyperspectral imaging and combined imaging of variable chlorophyll fluorescence and green fluorescence. Green fluorescence correlated positively with coral heating and scalar irradiance enhancement at the tissue surface. Coral tissue heating saturated for maximal levels of green fluorescence. The action spectrum of coral surface heating revealed that heating was highest under red (peaking at 680 nm) irradiance. Scalar irradiance enhancement in coral tissue was highest when illuminated with blue light, but up to 62% (for the case of highest green fluorescence) of this photon enhancement was due to green fluorescence emission. We suggest that GFP-like pigments scatter the incident radiation, which enhances light absorption and heating of the coral. However, heating saturates, because intense light scattering reduces the vertical penetration depth through the tissue eventually leading to reduced light absorption at high fluorescent pigment density. We conclude that fluorescent pigments can have a central role in modulating coral light absorption and heating.

  10. Spectral signatures of fluorescence and light absorption to identify crude oils found in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baszanowska, E.; Otremba, Z.

    2014-08-01

    To protect the natural marine ecosystem, it is necessary to continuously enhance knowledge of environmental contamination, including oil pollution. Therefore, to properly track the qualitative and quantitative changes in the natural components of seawater, a description of the essential spectral features describing petroleum products is necessary. This study characterises two optically-different types of crude oils (Petrobaltic and Romashkino) - substances belonging to multi-fluorophoric systems. To obtain the spectral features of crude oils, the excitation-emission spectroscopy technique was applied. The fluorescence and light absorption properties for various concentrations of oils at a stabilised temperature are described. Both excitation-emission spectra (EEMs) and absorption spectra of crude oils are discussed. Based on the EEM spectra, both excitation end emission peaks for the wavelengthindependent fluorescence maximum (Exmax/ Emmax) - characteristic points for each type of oil - were identified and compared with the literature data concerning typical marine chemical structures.

  11. Obstacles and opportunities in the commercialization of the solid-state-electronic fluorescent-lighting ballast

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.; Marcus, A.A.; Campbell, R.S.; Sommers, P.; Skumatz, L.; Berk, B.; Petty, P.; Eschbach, C.

    1981-10-01

    The Solid State Ballast (SSB) Program, aimed at improving the efficiency of fluorescent lights, is described. The first generation of solid state electronic ballasts has been developed and the technology has been transferred to the private sector. This report examines the opportunities for rapid dissemination of this technology into the marketplace. It includes a description of product characteristics and their influence on the commercialization of the SSB, a description of the technology delivery system presently used by the ballast industry, an analysis of the market for SSB, and identification of some high-leverage opportunities to accelerate the commercialization process. (MCW)

  12. Obstacles and opportunities in the commercialization of the solid state electronic fluorescent lighting ballast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, D. R.; Marcus, A. A.; Campbell, R. S.; Sommers, P.; Skumatz, L.; Berk, B.; Petty, P.; Eschbach, C.

    1981-10-01

    A solid state ballast (SSB), which improves the efficiency of fluorescent lights, is described. The first generation of solid state electronic ballasts was developed and the technology was transferred to the private sector. The opportunities for rapid dissemination of this technology into the marketplace is examined. Product characteristics and their influence on the commercialization of the SSB, a description of the technology delivery system presently used by the ballast industry, an analysis of the market for SSB, and identification of some high leverage opportunities to accelerate the commercialization process are included.

  13. 78 FR 14357 - Certain Compact Fluorescent Reflector Lamps, Products Containing Same and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... COMMISSION Certain Compact Fluorescent Reflector Lamps, Products Containing Same and Components Thereof... importation of certain compact fluorescent reflector lamps, products containing same and components thereof by... importation of certain compact fluorescent reflector lamps, products containing same and components thereof...

  14. Fluorescent property of indocyanine green (ICG) rubber ring using LED and laser light sources

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Nha Young; Kim, Hong Rae; Lee, Hyun Min; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Kwang Gi

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent properties of ICG depends on solvent. Fluorescent characteristics of ICG rubber rings and optimized detection system condition were identified. The fluorescent rubber rings are produced by drying mixture of ICG solution and liquid rubber. LED and laser light sources were used to test differences between them. Other variables are ICG molar concentration (100, 80, 60, 40, 20, 10μM), excitation light spectrum (740, 760, 785nm) and angle of view (0~80°). We observed that ICG ring emitted fluorescence at longer wavelength than in blood and aqueous state. Observation angle between 0 and 50 provided similar brightness of images, while others are significantly less luminous. Excitation light between 740~760nm ensured non-overlapping spectrums of excitation light and fluorescence emission. PMID:27280060

  15. Fluorescent property of indocyanine green (ICG) rubber ring using LED and laser light sources.

    PubMed

    Hong, Nha Young; Kim, Hong Rae; Lee, Hyun Min; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Kwang Gi

    2016-05-01

    Fluorescent properties of ICG depends on solvent. Fluorescent characteristics of ICG rubber rings and optimized detection system condition were identified. The fluorescent rubber rings are produced by drying mixture of ICG solution and liquid rubber. LED and laser light sources were used to test differences between them. Other variables are ICG molar concentration (100, 80, 60, 40, 20, 10μM), excitation light spectrum (740, 760, 785nm) and angle of view (0~80°). We observed that ICG ring emitted fluorescence at longer wavelength than in blood and aqueous state. Observation angle between 0 and 50 provided similar brightness of images, while others are significantly less luminous. Excitation light between 740~760nm ensured non-overlapping spectrums of excitation light and fluorescence emission. PMID:27280060

  16. Comparative Study of Lettuce and Radish Grown Under Red and Blue Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) and White Fluorescent Lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Growing vegetable crops in space will be an essential part of sustaining astronauts during long-term missions. To drive photosynthesis, red and blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have attracted attention because of their efficiency, longevity, small size, and safety. In efforts to optimize crop production, there have also been recent interests in analyzing the subtle effects of green light on plant growth, and to determine if it serves as a source of growth enhancement or suppression. A comparative study was performed on two short cycle crops of lettuce (Outredgeous) and radish (Cherry Bomb) grown under two light treatments. The first treatment being red and blue LEDs, and the second treatment consisting of white fluorescent lamps which contain a portion of green light. In addition to comparing biomass production, physiological characterizations were conducted on how the light treatments influence morphology, water use, chlorophyll content, and the production of A TP within plant tissues.

  17. Ultraviolet light output of compact fluorescent lamps: comparison to conventional incandescent and halogen residential lighting sources.

    PubMed

    Nuzum-Keim, A D; Sontheimer, R D

    2009-05-01

    Patients with photosensitive dermatologic and systemic diseases often question the ultraviolet light (UVL) output of household lighting sources. Such individuals have increasing concern about potential UVL exposure from energy-efficient compact fluorescent lamps (CFL), as little data have been presented concerning their UVL output. The objective was to compare, via pilot study, the levels of ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) leak between residential lighting sources. Equivalent wattage CFL, incandescent and halogen bulbs were purchased from local retailers in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA. The UVA and UVB outputs of these sources were measured under controlled conditions at 10, 25, 50, 100 and 150 cm away from the light source using an IL-1700 research radiometer equipped with UVA and UVB detectors. Negligible UVB and UVA was detected at 100 and 150 cm. Therefore, data were analysed from measurements at 10, 25 and 50 cm only. The results demonstrated UVA leak highest from incandescent and halogen bulbs, and UVB leak highest from CFL. The overall UVA/UVB leak was lowest from CFL shielded during the manufacturing process. In conclusion, patients with photosensitivity have choices depending on their relative risk from different UVL wavelength spectra. UVB exposure risk may be reduced the greatest by utilising CFL with manufacturer-provided shields. PMID:19395458

  18. Light-induced fluorescence endoscopy (LIFE) imaging system for early cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Haishan; MacAulay, Calum E.; Lam, Stephen; Palcic, Branko

    1999-09-01

    This paper summarizes our experiences on the development of a Light Induced Fluorescence Endoscopy (LIFE) imaging system for early cancer detection in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract. The system utilizes tissue autofluorescence to provide real time video imaging of the examined organ. No exogenous fluorescent tumor markers are needed. It is used by a physician in adjunct to conventional white-light endoscopy. Suspicious areas are identified in pseudo color to guide biopsy. A multi- center clinical trial has demonstrated that in the lung, the relative sensitivity of white-light imaging + LIFE imaging vs. white-light imaging alone was 6.3 for intraepithelial neoplastic lesion detection and 2.71 when invasive carcinomas were also included. The following issues will be discussed: (1) spectroscopy study design for imaging system development; (2) architecture of the imaging systems; (3) different imaging modalities (white-light imaging, dual channel fluorescence imaging, and combined fluorescence/reflectance imaging); and (4) clinical applications.

  19. Deeper Insight into Fluorescence-Excitation of Molecules by Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahab, M. Farooq; Gore, Gordon R.

    2013-01-01

    In a recent issue of "TPT," Gordon Gore made interesting observations about the red or yellow fluorescence when laser beams are passed through olive oil. With the excellent visuals contained in that article, we present a pictorial explanation of the questions that were raised in Ref 1 ("Fun with Fluorescence in Olive Oil,"…

  20. Strong antenna-enhanced fluorescence of a single light-harvesting complex shows photon antibunching

    PubMed Central

    Wientjes, Emilie; Renger, Jan; Curto, Alberto G.; Cogdell, Richard; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the highly efficient energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes is a subject of intense research. Unfortunately, the low fluorescence efficiency and limited photostability hampers the study of individual light-harvesting complexes at ambient conditions. Here we demonstrate an over 500-fold fluorescence enhancement of light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) at the single-molecule level by coupling to a gold nanoantenna. The resonant antenna produces an excitation enhancement of circa 100 times and a fluorescence lifetime shortening to ~\

  1. White light-informed optical properties improve ultrasound-guided fluorescence tomography of photoactive protoporphyrin IX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Brendan P.; DSouza, Alisha V.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Davis, Scott C.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-04-01

    Subsurface fluorescence imaging is desirable for medical applications, including protoporphyrin-IX (PpIX)-based skin tumor diagnosis, surgical guidance, and dosimetry in photodynamic therapy. While tissue optical properties and heterogeneities make true subsurface fluorescence mapping an ill-posed problem, ultrasound-guided fluorescence-tomography (USFT) provides regional fluorescence mapping. Here USFT is implemented with spectroscopic decoupling of fluorescence signals (auto-fluorescence, PpIX, photoproducts), and white light spectroscopy-determined bulk optical properties. Segmented US images provide a priori spatial information for fluorescence reconstruction using region-based, diffuse FT. The method was tested in simulations, tissue homogeneous and inclusion phantoms, and an injected-inclusion animal model. Reconstructed fluorescence yield was linear with PpIX concentration, including the lowest concentration used, 0.025 μg/ml. White light spectroscopy informed optical properties, which improved fluorescence reconstruction accuracy compared to the use of fixed, literature-based optical properties, reduced reconstruction error and reconstructed fluorescence standard deviation by factors of 8.9 and 2.0, respectively. Recovered contrast-to-background error was 25% and 74% for inclusion phantoms without and with a 2-mm skin-like layer, respectively. Preliminary mouse-model imaging demonstrated system feasibility for subsurface fluorescence measurement in vivo. These data suggest that this implementation of USFT is capable of regional PpIX mapping in human skin tumors during photodynamic therapy, to be used in dosimetric evaluations.

  2. Fluorescence properties of light-sensitive chromones used in archival polymer recording media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynov, I. Yu.; Barachevsky, V. A.; Ayt, A. O.; Kobeleva, O. I.; Valova, T. M.; Levchenko, K. S.; Yarovenko, V. N.; Krayushkin, M. M.

    2014-11-01

    The fluorescence properties of compounds formed upon irreversible photochemical transformation of some chromone derivatives in toluene were studied. At the first time, the quantum yields of the photoproducts were measured. The relationship between the fluorescence properties and the structure of these photoproducts was elucidated. It was shown that the properties of some chromones make them suitable for the design of light-sensitive recording media for optical discs with non-destructive fluorescence readout of optical information.

  3. Highly Efficient, Simplified, Solution-Processed Thermally Activated Delayed-Fluorescence Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Wolf, Christoph; Cho, Himchan; Jeong, Su-Hun; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-27

    Highly efficient, simplified, solution-processed thermally activated delayed-fluorescence organic light-emitting diodes can be realized by using pure-organic thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitters and a multifunctional buffer hole-injection layer, in which high EQE (≈24%) and current efficiency (≈73 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated. High-efficiency fluorescence red-emitting and blue-emitting devices can also be fabricated in this manner. PMID:26619309

  4. Fixation-resistant photoactivatable fluorescent proteins for correlative light and electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Paez Segala, Maria G.; Sun, Mei G.; Shtengel, Gleb; Viswanathan, Sarada; Baird, Michelle A.; Macklin, John J.; Patel, Ronak; Allen, John R.; Howe, Elizabeth S.; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Hess, Harald F.; Davidson, Michael W.; Wang, Yalin; Looger, Loren L.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins facilitate a variety of imaging paradigms in live and fixed samples. However, they cease to function following heavy fixation, hindering advanced applications such as correlative light and electron microscopy. Here we report engineered variants of the photoconvertible Eos fluorescent protein that function normally in heavily fixed (0.5–1% OsO4), plastic resin-embedded samples, enabling correlative super-resolution fluorescence imaging and high-quality electron microscopy. PMID:25581799

  5. Organic Light Emitting Device as a fluorescence spectroscopy's light source : one step towards the lab-on-a-chip device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camou, S.; Kitamura, M.; Gouy, Jean-Philippe; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Arakawa, Yasuhiko; Fujii, Teruo

    2003-02-01

    Many papers were recently dedicated to the lab-on-a-chip applications, where all the basic elements should be integrated directly onto the microchip. The fluorescence spectroscopy is mostly used as a detection method due to its high reliability and sensitivity, but requires light source and photo-detector. For the first time, we then propose to use Organic material Light Emitting Diode (OLED) to supply a light source for the optical detection based on fluorescence spectroscopy. By combining this OLED with micro-fluidic channels patterned in PDMS layer, the integration of light source on the chip is then achieved. First, the ability of Organic Material to excite fluorescent response from dye is demonstrated. Then, some configurations are described in order to decrease the major drawbacks that have to be solved before applying such kind of devices.

  6. Increased mycelial biomass production by Lentinula edodes intermittently illuminated by green light emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Glukhova, Lubov B; Sokolyanskaya, Ludmila O; Plotnikov, Evgeny V; Gerasimchuk, Anna L; Karnachuk, Olga V; Solioz, Marc; Karnachuk, Raisa A

    2014-11-01

    Fungi possess a range of light receptors to regulate metabolism and differentiation. To study the effect of light on Lentinula edodes (the shiitake mushroom), mycelial cultures were exposed to blue, green, and red fluorescent lights and light-emitting diodes, as well as green laser light. Biomass production, morphology, and pigment production were evaluated. Exposure to green light at intervals of 1 min/d at 0.4 W/m(2) stimulated biomass production by 50-100 %, depending on the light source. Light intensities in excess of 1.8 W/m(2) or illumination longer than 30 min/d did not affect biomass production. Carotenoid production and morphology remained unaltered during increased biomass production. These observations provide a cornerstone to the study of photoreception by this important fungus. PMID:25048231

  7. Evaluation of dental enamel caries assessment using Quantitative Light Induced Fluorescence and Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Maia, Ana Marly Araújo; de Freitas, Anderson Zanardi; de L Campello, Sergio; Gomes, Anderson Stevens Leônidas; Karlsson, Lena

    2016-06-01

    An in vitro study of morphological alterations between sound dental structure and artificially induced white spot lesions in human teeth, was performed through the loss of fluorescence by Quantitative Light-Induced Fluorescence (QLF) and the alterations of the light attenuation coefficient by Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). To analyze the OCT images using a commercially available system, a special algorithm was applied, whereas the QLF images were analyzed using the software available in the commercial system employed. When analyzing the sound region against white spot lesions region by QLF, a reduction in the fluorescence intensity was observed, whilst an increase of light attenuation by the OCT system occurred. Comparison of the percentage of alteration between optical properties of sound and artificial enamel caries regions showed that OCT processed images through the attenuation of light enhanced the tooth optical alterations more than fluorescence detected by QLF System. QLF versus OCT imaging of enamel caries: a photonics assessment. PMID:26351155

  8. Cancer detection using NIR elastic light scattering and tissue fluorescence imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Staggs, M; Radousky, H B; Gandour-Edwards, R; deVere White, R

    2000-12-04

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue fluorescence under long-wavelength laser excitation are explored for cancer detection. Various types of normal and malignant human tissue samples were utilized in this investigation.

  9. Energy Conservation Using Scotopically Enhanced Fluorescent Lighting In An Office Environment

    SciTech Connect

    2004-03-01

    This study was conducted in a recently built and occupied office building to determine whether the energy savings benefits of scotopically enhanced fluorescent lighting can be achieved while maintaining user acceptability.

  10. Organic light-emitting device with a phosphor-sensitized fluorescent emission layer

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen; Kanno, Hiroshi

    2009-08-25

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters. The emissive region of the devices of the present invention comprise at least one phosphor-sensitized layer which has a combined emission from a phosphorescent emitter and a fluorescent emitter. In preferred embodiments, the invention relates to white-emitting OLEDS (WOLEDs).

  11. Regulation of red fluorescent light emission in a cryptic marine fish

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Animal colouration is a trade-off between being seen by intended, intra- or inter-specific receivers while not being seen by the unintended. Many fishes solve this problem by adaptive colouration. Here, we investigate whether this also holds for fluorescent pigments. In those aquatic environments in which the ambient light is dominated by bluish light, red fluorescence can generate high-contrast signals. The marine, cryptic fish Tripterygion delaisi inhabits such environments and has a bright red-fluorescent iris that can be rapidly up- and down-regulated. Here, we described the physiological and cellular mechanism of this phenomenon using a neurostimulation treatment with KCl and histology. Results KCl-treatment revealed that eye fluorescence regulation is achieved through dispersal and aggregation of black-pigmented melanosomes within melanophores. Histology showed that globular, fluorescent iridophores on the anterior side of the iris are grouped and each group is encased by finger-like extensions of a single posterior melanophore. Together they form a so-called chromatophore unit. By dispersal and aggregation of melanosomes into and out of the peripheral membranous extensions of the melanophore, the fluorescent iridophores are covered or revealed on the anterior (outside) of the iris. Conclusion T. delaisi possesses a well-developed mechanism to control the fluorescent emission from its eyes, which may be advantageous given its cryptic lifestyle. This is the first time chromatophore units are found to control fluorescent emission in marine teleost fishes. We expect other fluorescent fish species to use similar mechanisms in the iris or elsewhere in the body. In contrast to a previously described mechanism based on dendritic fluorescent chromatophores, chromatophore units control fluorescent emission through the cooperation between two chromatophore types: an emitting and an occluding type. The discovery of a second mechanism for fluorescence

  12. Enhanced light collection in fluorescence microscopy using self-assembled micro-reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göröcs, Zoltán; McLeod, Euan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-06-01

    In fluorescence microscopy, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the optical system is directly linked to the numerical aperture (NA) of the microscope objective, which creates detection challenges for low-NA, wide-field and high-throughput imaging systems. Here we demonstrate a method to increase the light collection efficiency from micron-scale fluorescent objects using self-assembled vapor-condensed polyethylene glycol droplets, which act as micro-reflectors for fluorescent light. Around each fluorescent particle, a liquid meniscus is formed that increases the excitation efficiency and redirects part of the laterally-emitted fluorescent light towards the detector due to internal reflections at the liquid-air interface of the meniscus. The three-dimensional shape of this micro-reflector can be tuned as a function of time, vapor temperature, and substrate contact angle, providing us optimized SNR performance for fluorescent detection. Based on these self-assembled micro-reflectors, we experimentally demonstrate ~2.5-3 fold enhancement of the fluorescent signal from 2-10 μm sized particles. A theoretical explanation of the formation rate and shapes of these micro-reflectors is presented, along with a ray tracing model of their optical performance. This method can be used as a sample preparation technique for consumer electronics-based microscopy and sensing tools, thus increasing the sensitivity of low-NA systems that image fluorescent micro-objects.

  13. Enhanced light collection in fluorescence microscopy using self-assembled micro-reflectors

    PubMed Central

    Göröcs, Zoltán; McLeod, Euan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-01-01

    In fluorescence microscopy, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the optical system is directly linked to the numerical aperture (NA) of the microscope objective, which creates detection challenges for low-NA, wide-field and high-throughput imaging systems. Here we demonstrate a method to increase the light collection efficiency from micron-scale fluorescent objects using self-assembled vapor-condensed polyethylene glycol droplets, which act as micro-reflectors for fluorescent light. Around each fluorescent particle, a liquid meniscus is formed that increases the excitation efficiency and redirects part of the laterally-emitted fluorescent light towards the detector due to internal reflections at the liquid-air interface of the meniscus. The three-dimensional shape of this micro-reflector can be tuned as a function of time, vapor temperature, and substrate contact angle, providing us optimized SNR performance for fluorescent detection. Based on these self-assembled micro-reflectors, we experimentally demonstrate ~2.5-3 fold enhancement of the fluorescent signal from 2-10 μm sized particles. A theoretical explanation of the formation rate and shapes of these micro-reflectors is presented, along with a ray tracing model of their optical performance. This method can be used as a sample preparation technique for consumer electronics-based microscopy and sensing tools, thus increasing the sensitivity of low-NA systems that image fluorescent micro-objects. PMID:26083081

  14. Far wing depolarization of light - Generalized absorption profiles. [in laser fluorescence spectroscopy of Sr vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomann, P.; Burnett, K.; Cooper, J.

    1981-01-01

    An absorption (and/or emission) event which takes place during a strong collision is called a 'correlated event'. It is discussed how correlated events affect the far red wing depolarization of fluorescence. Attention is given to an atomic vapor which is irradiated by linearly polarized light of a frequency on the red side of the resonance line. Two limiting cases are considered, corresponding to excitation in the impact region and in the quasi-static wing. In the quasi-static wing, absorption of a photon followed by fluorescence (rather than Rayleigh scattering), occurs mostly during a collision. Correlated events dominate the scattering process. Expressions derived for the polarization of the fluorescent light are applied to far red wing depolarization. It is found that the polarization of the fluorescent light does not go to zero in the far wing, but depends crucially on the detailed nature of the anisotropy in the long-range part of the interatomic potential.

  15. Deeper Insight into Fluorescence--Excitation of Molecules by Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, M. Farooq; Gore, Gordon R.

    2013-05-01

    In a recent issue of TPT, Gordon Gore made interesting observations about the red or yellow fluorescence when laser beams are passed through olive oil. With the excellent visuals contained in that article, we present a pictorial explanation of the questions that were raised in Ref 1.

  16. Implantable biosensors: analysis of fluorescent light propagation through skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neal, D. P.; McShane, Michael J.; Pishko, Michael V.; Cote, Gerard L.

    2001-06-01

    Progress towards a painless and hygienic glucose monitoring procedure for diabetics continues as the growth of diabetes mellitus reaches epidemic proportions in the American population. Utilizing an implantable fluorescence based glucose assay, the minimally invasive approach presented here has previously shown promise towards this goal in terms of glucose specificity and quantification for in vitro environments. However, in realistic physiological circumstances the depth of the implant can vary and optical properties of skin can change due to normal physiological conditions. Additionally, naturally occurring auto-fluorescence can obscure the sensor signal. An important concern under these conditions is that variations of fluorescent intensity due to these or other causes might be mistaken for glucose concentration fluctuations. New data shows that fluorescence-based glucose assays can be probed and interpreted in terms of glucose concentrations through pig skin at depths of up to 700 mm when immobilized in a bio-compatible polymer. When a combination of two fluorophores are employed as demonstrated here, reasonable changes in skin thickness and the confounding effects of the variations inherent in skin can be overcome for this glucose sensing application.

  17. Numerical optix: A time-domain simulator of fluorescent light diffusion in turbid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guobin; Delorme, Jean-François; Guilman, Olga; Leblond, Frédéric; Khayat, Mario

    2007-02-01

    The interest in fluorescence imaging has increased steadily in the last decade. Using fluorescence techniques, it is feasible to visualize and quantify the function of genes and the expression of enzymes and proteins deep inside tissues. When applied to small animal research, optical imaging based on fluorescent marker probes can provide valuable information on the specificity and efficacy of drugs at reduced cost and with greater efficiency. Meanwhile, fluorescence techniques represent an important class of optical methods being applied to in vitro and in vivo biomedical diagnostics, towards noninvasive clinical applications, such as detecting and monitoring specific pathological and physiological processes. ART has developed a time domain in vivo small animal fluorescence imaging system, eXplore Optix. Using the measured time-resolved fluorescence signal, fluorophore location and concentration can be quickly estimated. Furthermore, the 3D distribution of fluorophore can be obtained by fluorescent diffusion tomography. To accurately analyze and interpret the measured fluorescent signals from tissue, complex theoretical models and algorithms are employed. We present here a numerical simulator of eXplore Optix. It generates virtual data under well-controlled conditions that enable us to test, verify, and improve our models and algorithms piecewise separately. The theoretical frame of the simulator is an analytical solution of the fluorescence diffusion equation. Compared to existing models, the coupling of fluorophores with finite volume size is taken into consideration. Also, the influences of fluorescent inclusions to excitation and emission light are both accounted for. The output results are compared to Monte-Carlo simulations.

  18. Angular distribution of light emission from compound-eye cornea with conformal fluorescent coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Palma, Raúl J.; Miller, Amy E.; Pulsifer, Drew P.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2014-09-01

    The complex morphology of the apposition compound eyes of insects of many species provides them a wide angular field of view. This characteristic makes these eyes attractive for bioreplication as artificial sources of light. The cornea of a blowfly eye was conformally coated with a fluorescent thin film with the aim of achieving wide field-of-view emission. On illumination by shortwave-ultraviolet light, the conformally coated eye emitted visible light whose intensity showed a weaker angular dependence than a fluorescent thin film deposited on a flat surface.

  19. Upgrading of light Fischer-Tropsch products

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, P.P.

    1990-11-30

    The upgrading of Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) light ends was studied at UOP in a program sponsored by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy. The goal of the program was to increase the overall yield of marketable transportation fuels from the F-T upgrading complex by focusing on liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and naphtha. An overview of the entire light-ends program is presented in this paper. Although this contract is specifically concerned with light products (C{sub 3}-C{sub 11}), a separate DOE-sponsored program at UOP investigated the characterization and upgrading of the heavy end of the F-T product spectrum: F-T wax. An economic analysis of the light and heavy ends upgrading was performed to evaluate the conversion of F-T products to marketable transportation fuels. 9 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. Cobalt phosphide nanowires: efficient nanostructures for fluorescence sensing of biomolecules and photocatalytic evolution of dihydrogen from water under visible light.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jingqi; Cheng, Ningyan; Liu, Qian; Xing, Wei; Sun, Xuping

    2015-04-27

    The detection of specific DNA sequences plays an important role in the identification of disease-causing pathogens and genetic diseases, and photochemical water splitting offers a promising avenue to sustainable, environmentally friendly hydrogen production. Cobalt-phosphorus nanowires (CoP NWs) show a high fluorescence quenching ability and different affinity toward single- versus double-stranded DNA. Based on this result, the utilization of CoP NWs as fluorescent DNA nanosensors with a detection limit of 100 pM and a selectivity down to single-base mismatch was demonstrated. The use of a thrombin-specific DNA aptamer also enabled the selective detection of thrombin. The photoinduced electron transfer from the excited dye that labels the oligonucleotide probe to the CoP semiconductor led to efficient fluorescence quenching, and largely enhanced the photocatalytic evolution of hydrogen from water under visible light. PMID:25721096

  1. Iron oxide nanozyme catalyzed synthesis of fluorescent polydopamine for light-up Zn(2+) detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Biwu; Han, Xiao; Liu, Juewen

    2016-07-14

    Fluorescent polydopamine (FPD) is an interesting material with excellent biocompatibility. However, its preparation is currently a lengthy and potentially dangerous process. We herein employ magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles as a peroxidase-mimicking nanozyme to produce FPD under mild conditions. Different from previous protocols using multiple steps with up to 6% (∼2 M) H2O2, this preparation takes place in a single step with just 5 mM H2O2 at room temperature. The oxidized product shows excitation-wavelength-dependent emission peaks, similar to previous reports. The reaction kinetics, pH, temperature, and ionic strength are individually optimized. Among a diverse range of other nanomaterials tested, including Fe2O3, CeO2, CoO, Co3O4, NiO, TiO2, gold nanoparticles, and graphene oxide, Fe2O3 and graphene oxide yielded relatively weak emission, while the rest of the materials failed to produce FPD. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles retained ∼90% catalytic activity even after ten cycles of synthesis. Finally, Zn(2+) can enhance the fluorescence of FPD under 360 nm excitation but not under 480 nm excitation, leading to a sensitive light-up sensor with a detection limit of 60 nM Zn(2+). Therefore, this work has demonstrated not only a novel use of nanozymes, but also an interesting application of FPD. PMID:27364882

  2. A Combined Light Sheet Fluorescence and Differential Interference Contrast Microscope for Live Imaging of Multicellular Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Ryan; Taormina, Michael; Jemielita, Matthew; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2015-03-01

    We present a microscope capable of both light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) and differential interference contrast microscopy (DICM). The two imaging modes, which to the best of our knowledge have not previously been combined, are complementary: LSFM provides high speed three-dimensional imaging of fluorescently labeled components of multicellular systems, large fields of view, and low phototoxicity, while DICM reveals the unlabeled neighborhood of tissues, organs, and other structures with high contrast and inherent optical sectioning. Use of a shared detection path for both imaging modes enables simple integration of the two techniques in one microscope. To demonstrate the instrument's utility, we provide several examples which focus on the digestive tract of the larval zebrafish. We show that DICM can sometimes circumvent the need for fluorescent based techniques, augmenting the number of parameters obtainable per experiment when used alongside LSFM, and that DICM can be used to augment each experiment by imaging complementary features, such as non-fluorescent local environments near fluorescent samples (e.g. fluorescent enteric neurons imaged alongside the non-fluorescent gut wall), interactions between fluorescent and non-fluorescent samples (e.g. bacteria), and more. NSF Award 0922951, NIH Award 1P50 GM098911

  3. Separation of ballistic and diffusive fluorescence photons in confocal Light-Sheet Microscopy of Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Meinert, Tobias; Tietz, Olaf; Palme, Klaus J; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Image quality in light-sheet fluorescence microscopy is strongly affected by the shape of the illuminating laser beam inside embryos, plants or tissue. While the phase of Gaussian or Bessel beams propagating through thousands of cells can be partly controlled holographically, the propagation of fluorescence light to the detector is difficult to control. With each scatter process a fluorescence photon loses information necessary for the image generation. Using Arabidopsis root tips we demonstrate that ballistic and diffusive fluorescence photons can be separated by analyzing the image spectra in each plane without a priori knowledge. We introduce a theoretical model allowing to extract typical scattering parameters of the biological material. This allows to attenuate image contributions from diffusive photons and to amplify the relevant image contributions from ballistic photons through a depth dependent deconvolution. In consequence, image contrast and resolution are significantly increased and scattering artefacts are minimized especially for Bessel beams with confocal line detection. PMID:27553506

  4. Fluorescent Brighteners as Visible LED-Light Sensitive Photoinitiators for Free Radical Photopolymerizations.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Xiaoling; Morlet-Savary, Fabrice; Graff, Bernadette; Blanchard, Nicolas; Goddard, Jean-Philippe; Lalevée, Jacques

    2016-05-01

    The photochemical and electrochemical investigations of commercially available, safe, and cheap fluorescent brighteners, namely, triazinylstilbene (commercial name: fluorescent brightener 28) and 2,5-bis(5-tert-butyl-benzoxazol-2-yl)thiophene, as well as their original use as photoinitiators of polymerization upon light emitting diode (LED) irradiation are reported. Remarkably, their excellent near-UV-visible absorption properties combined with outstanding fluorescent properties allow them to act as high-performance photoinitiators when used in combination with diaryliodonium salt. These two-component photoinitiating systems can be employed for free radical polymerizations of acrylate. In addition, this brightener-initiated photopolymerization is able to overcome oxygen inhibition even upon irradiation with low LED light intensity. The underlying photochemical mechanisms are investigated by electron-spin resonance-spin trapping, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry, and steady-state photolysis techniques. PMID:27072016

  5. Manipulation of cellular light from green fluorescent protein by a femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hao; Li, Shiyang; Wang, Shaoyang; Hu, Minglie; Cao, Youjia; Wang, Chingyue

    2012-10-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is one of the most widely studied and exploited proteins in biochemistry and cell biology. It emits fluorescence following optical excitation, which is usually provided by a laser. Here, we report that fluorescence from enhanced GFP can be `turned off' by exposing cells to laser light. A short flash of femtosecond laser light is shown to deplete calcium in the endoplasmic reticulum of cells. Calcium-release-activated calcium channels are then activated by stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1). The rise in intracellular Ca2+ depolarizes mitochondria and increases the leakage of reactive oxygen species, which then permanently bleach the GFP. This controllable optical scheme for reactive oxygen species generation can also be used to modulate the photoconversion of GFP fluorescence from green to red emission and provide a mechanism for influencing cellular molecular dynamics.

  6. Separation of ballistic and diffusive fluorescence photons in confocal Light-Sheet Microscopy of Arabidopsis roots

    PubMed Central

    Meinert, Tobias; Tietz, Olaf; Palme, Klaus J.; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Image quality in light-sheet fluorescence microscopy is strongly affected by the shape of the illuminating laser beam inside embryos, plants or tissue. While the phase of Gaussian or Bessel beams propagating through thousands of cells can be partly controlled holographically, the propagation of fluorescence light to the detector is difficult to control. With each scatter process a fluorescence photon loses information necessary for the image generation. Using Arabidopsis root tips we demonstrate that ballistic and diffusive fluorescence photons can be separated by analyzing the image spectra in each plane without a priori knowledge. We introduce a theoretical model allowing to extract typical scattering parameters of the biological material. This allows to attenuate image contributions from diffusive photons and to amplify the relevant image contributions from ballistic photons through a depth dependent deconvolution. In consequence, image contrast and resolution are significantly increased and scattering artefacts are minimized especially for Bessel beams with confocal line detection. PMID:27553506

  7. Whole-body Fluorescent Optical Imaging Based on Power Light Emitting Diode.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanping; Xiong, Tao; Yu, Li; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2005-01-01

    With complex configuration, the general whole-body fluorescence optical imaging system is power-consuming for it is mainly composed of laser or mercury lamp, filter and fiber-optic cable. In this paper we aimed at setting up a compact imaging system based on power light emitting diode (LED). We first discussed fluorescence excitation efficiency of mercury lamp and LED. Then we developed a compact prototype whole-body fluorescence optical imaging system based on power LED. With the prototype, we monitored the dynamic course of green fluorescence protein (GFP) expressing tumors in the same intact nude mice. We also recorded the temporal behavior of the infectious process of GFP-expressing bacteria from outside intact infected animals. This study puts forward a platform for monitoring tumor growth. The experiment reveals that it is doable to substitute power LED for mercury lamp for whole-body fluorescence optical imaging. PMID:17282471

  8. Up-converted fluorescence from photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes linearly dependent on excitation intensity.

    PubMed

    Leiger, Kristjan; Freiberg, Arvi

    2016-01-01

    Weak up-converted fluorescence related to bacteriochlorophyll a was recorded from various detergent-isolated and membrane-embedded light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes as well as from the functional membranes of photosynthetic purple bacteria under continuous-wave infrared laser excitation at 1064 nm, far outside the optically allowed singlet absorption bands of the chromophore. The fluorescence increases linearly with the excitation power, distinguishing it from the previously observed two-photon excited fluorescence upon femtosecond pulse excitation. Possible mechanisms of this excitation are discussed. PMID:25764015

  9. Fluorescence enhancement of light-harvesting complex 2 from purple bacteria coupled to spherical gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bujak, Ł.; Czechowski, N.; Piatkowski, D.; Litvin, R.; Mackowski, S.; Brotosudarmo, T. H. P.; Pichler, S.; Cogdell, R. J.; Heiss, W.

    2011-10-24

    The influence of plasmon excitations in spherical gold nanoparticles on the optical properties of a light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from the purple bacteria Rhodopseudomonas palustris has been studied. Systematic analysis is facilitated by controlling the thickness of a silica layer between Au nanoparticles and LH2 complexes. Fluorescence of LH2 complexes features substantial increase when these complexes are separated by 12 nm from the gold nanoparticles. At shorter distances, non-radiative quenching leads to a decrease of fluorescence emission. The enhancement of fluorescence originates predominantly from an increase of absorption of pigments comprising the LH2 complex.

  10. Fluorescence enhancement of light-harvesting complex 2 from purple bacteria coupled to spherical gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujak, Ł.; Czechowski, N.; Piatkowski, D.; Litvin, R.; Mackowski, S.; Brotosudarmo, T. H. P.; Cogdell, R. J.; Pichler, S.; Heiss, W.

    2011-10-01

    The influence of plasmon excitations in spherical gold nanoparticles on the optical properties of a light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from the purple bacteria Rhodopseudomonas palustris has been studied. Systematic analysis is facilitated by controlling the thickness of a silica layer between Au nanoparticles and LH2 complexes. Fluorescence of LH2 complexes features substantial increase when these complexes are separated by 12 nm from the gold nanoparticles. At shorter distances, non-radiative quenching leads to a decrease of fluorescence emission. The enhancement of fluorescence originates predominantly from an increase of absorption of pigments comprising the LH2 complex.

  11. Investigation of Relative Illuminance as a Function of Distance between Reflector and Fluorescent Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Softic, Amela

    2007-04-01

    Although fluorescent lighting is considerably more efficient then incandescent, and is in wide use, manufacturers find new ways to improve its configuration and reduce energy use. Based on the fundamentals of ``Non-imaging Optics'', was experimentally investigated the dependence of illumination of a point in the space on the distance between the reflection and fluorescent light source. Monitoring of changes in illumination is performed by optical sensor and corresponding computer software. Investigation of the influence of the distance between the fluorescent light and the reflector on the relative illumination has shown, for the tested geometries, that by reducing the distance between them the illumination increased, even though the distance among the source and the measuring point got greater.

  12. Light adaptation of the unicellular red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae, probed by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Yoshifumi; Aikawa, Shimpei; Kondo, Akihiko; Akimoto, Seiji

    2015-08-01

    Photosynthetic organisms change the quantity and/or quality of their pigment-protein complexes and the interactions among these complexes in response to light conditions. In the present study, we analyzed light adaptation of the unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae, whose pigment composition is similar to that of cyanobacteria because its phycobilisomes (PBS) lack phycoerythrin. C. merolae were grown under different light qualities, and their responses were measured by steady-state absorption, steady-state fluorescence, and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies. Cells were cultivated under four monochromatic light-emitting diodes (blue, green, yellow, and red), and changes in pigment composition and energy transfer were observed. Cells grown under blue and green light increased their relative phycocyanin levels compared with cells cultured under white light. Energy-transfer processes to photosystem I (PSI) were sensitive to yellow and red light. The contribution of direct energy transfer from PBS to PSI increased only under yellow light, while red light induced a reduction in energy transfer from photosystem II to PSI and an increase in energy transfer from light-harvesting chlorophyll protein complex I to PSI. Differences in pigment composition, growth, and energy transfer under different light qualities are discussed. PMID:25577254

  13. High efficiency and brightness fluorescent organic light emitting diode by triplet-triplet fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, Stephen; Zhang, Yifan

    2015-02-10

    A first device is provided. The first device further comprises an organic light emitting device. The organic light emitting device further comprises an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer may include an organic host compound and at least one organic emitting compound capable of fluorescent emission at room temperature. Various configurations are described for providing a range of current densities in which T-T fusion dominates over S-T annihilation, leading to very high efficiency fluorescent OLEDs.

  14. Iron oxide nanozyme catalyzed synthesis of fluorescent polydopamine for light-up Zn2+ detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Biwu; Han, Xiao; Liu, Juewen

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescent polydopamine (FPD) is an interesting material with excellent biocompatibility. However, its preparation is currently a lengthy and potentially dangerous process. We herein employ magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles as a peroxidase-mimicking nanozyme to produce FPD under mild conditions. Different from previous protocols using multiple steps with up to 6% (~2 M) H2O2, this preparation takes place in a single step with just 5 mM H2O2 at room temperature. The oxidized product shows excitation-wavelength-dependent emission peaks, similar to previous reports. The reaction kinetics, pH, temperature, and ionic strength are individually optimized. Among a diverse range of other nanomaterials tested, including Fe2O3, CeO2, CoO, Co3O4, NiO, TiO2, gold nanoparticles, and graphene oxide, Fe2O3 and graphene oxide yielded relatively weak emission, while the rest of the materials failed to produce FPD. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles retained ~90% catalytic activity even after ten cycles of synthesis. Finally, Zn2+ can enhance the fluorescence of FPD under 360 nm excitation but not under 480 nm excitation, leading to a sensitive light-up sensor with a detection limit of 60 nM Zn2+. Therefore, this work has demonstrated not only a novel use of nanozymes, but also an interesting application of FPD.Fluorescent polydopamine (FPD) is an interesting material with excellent biocompatibility. However, its preparation is currently a lengthy and potentially dangerous process. We herein employ magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles as a peroxidase-mimicking nanozyme to produce FPD under mild conditions. Different from previous protocols using multiple steps with up to 6% (~2 M) H2O2, this preparation takes place in a single step with just 5 mM H2O2 at room temperature. The oxidized product shows excitation-wavelength-dependent emission peaks, similar to previous reports. The reaction kinetics, pH, temperature, and ionic strength are individually optimized. Among a diverse range

  15. Protein oxidative changes in whole and skim milk after ultraviolet or fluorescent light exposure.

    PubMed

    Scheidegger, D; Pecora, R P; Radici, P M; Kivatinitz, S C

    2010-11-01

    We investigated how protein changes occur, at the primary or higher structural levels, when proteins are exposed to UV or fluorescent (FL) light while in the complex matrix, milk. Whole milk (WM) or skim milk (SM) samples were exposed to FL or UV light from 0 to 24h at 4°C. Protein oxidation was evaluated by the formation of protein carbonyls (PC), dityrosine bond (DiTyr), and changes in molecular weight (protein fragmentation and polymerization). Oxidative changes in AA residues were measured by PC. Dityrosine and N'-formylkynurenine (NFK), a carbonylation derivative of Trp, were measured by fluorometry. Protein carbonyls increased as a function of irradiation time for both WM and SM. The initial rate for PC formation by exposure to FL light (0.25 or 0.27 nmol/h for WM and SM, respectively) was slower than that following exposure to UV light (1.95 or 1.20 nmol/h, respectively). The time course of NFK formation resembled that of PC. After 24h of UV exposure, SM had significantly higher levels of NFK than did WM. In contrast, WM samples irradiated with UV had higher levels of DiTyr than did SM samples, indicating different molecular pathways. The formation of intra- or intermolecular DiTyr bonds could be indicative of changes in the tertiary structure or oligomerization of proteins. The existence of NFK suggests the occurrence of protein fragmentation. Thus, proteolysis and oligomerization were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE. After 24h of exposing WM to UV or FL light, all the proteins were affected by both types of light, as evidenced by loss of material in most of the bands. Aggregates were produced only by UV irradiation. Hydrolysis by pepsin and enzyme-induced coagulation by rennet were performed to evaluate altered biological properties of the oxidized proteins. No effect on pepsin digestion or rennet coagulation was found in irradiated SM or WM. The oxidative status of proteins in milk and dairy products is of interest to the dairy industry and

  16. Mechanistic Studies of the Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Protein Voltage Probe ArcLight

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zhou; Jin, Lei; Chen, Fuyi; Loturco, Joseph J.; Cohen, Lawrence B.; Bondar, Alexey; Lazar, Josef; Pieribone, Vincent A.

    2014-01-01

    ArcLight, a genetically encoded fluorescent protein voltage probe with a large ΔF/ΔV, is a fusion between the voltage sensing domain of the Ciona instestinalis voltage sensitive phosphatase and super ecliptic pHluorin carrying a single mutation (A227D in the fluorescent protein). Without this mutation the probe produces only a very small change in fluorescence in response to voltage deflections (∼1%). The large signal afforded by this mutation allows optical detection of action potentials and sub-threshold electrical events in single-trials in vitro and in vivo. However, it is unclear how this single mutation produces a probe with such a large modulation of its fluorescence output with changes in membrane potential. In this study, we identified which residues in super ecliptic pHluorin (vs eGFP) are critical for the ArcLight response, as a similarly constructed probe based on eGFP also exhibits large response amplitude if it carries these critical residues. We found that D147 is responsible for determining the pH sensitivity of the fluorescent protein used in these probes but by itself does not result in a voltage probe with a large signal. We also provide evidence that the voltage dependent signal of ArcLight is not simply sensing environmental pH changes. A two-photon polarization microscopy study showed that ArcLight's response to changes in membrane potential includes a reorientation of the super ecliptic pHluorin. We also explored different changes including modification of linker length, deletion of non-essential amino acids in the super ecliptic pHluorin, adding a farnesylation site, using tandem fluorescent proteins and other pH sensitive fluorescent proteins. PMID:25419571

  17. 78 FR 24233 - Certain Dimmable Compact Fluorescent Lamps and Products Containing Same: Notice of Institution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Dimmable Compact Fluorescent Lamps and Products Containing Same: Notice of Institution of... importation of certain dimmable compact fluorescent lamps (``CFLs'') and products containing the same by...

  18. Biocidal activity of a light-absorbing fluorescent conjugated polyelectrolyte.

    PubMed

    Lu, Liangde; Rininsland, Frauke H; Wittenburg, Shannon K; Achyuthan, Komandoor E; McBranch, Duncan W; Whitten, David G

    2005-10-25

    Herein we describe studies that indicate a cationic conjugated polyelectrolyte shows biocidal activity against gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, E. coli, BL21, with plasmids for Azurin and ampicillin resistance) and gram-positive bacterial spores (Bacillus anthracis, Sterne, B. anthracis, Sterne). These studies were carried out with aqueous suspensions of the conjugated polyelectrolyte, with the polyelectrolyte in supported formats and with samples in which the conjugated polyelectrolyte was coated on the bacteria. The results are interesting in that the biocidal activity is light-induced and appears effective due to the ability of the conjugated polyelectrolyte to form a surface coating on both types of bacteria. The effects observed here should be general and suggest that a range of conjugated polyelectrolytes in different formulations may provide a useful new class of biocides for both dark and light-activated applications. PMID:16229539

  19. Online multispectral fluorescence lifetime values estimation and overlay onto tissue white-light video frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Ma, Dinglong; Bec, Julien; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Marcu, Laura

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging has been shown to be a robust technique for biochemical and functional characterization of tissues and to present great potential for intraoperative tissue diagnosis and guidance of surgical procedures. We report a technique for real-time mapping of fluorescence parameters (i.e. lifetime values) onto the location from where the fluorescence measurements were taken. This is achieved by merging a 450 nm aiming beam generated by a diode laser with the excitation light in a single delivery/collection fiber and by continuously imaging the region of interest with a color CMOS camera. The interrogated locations are then extracted from the acquired frames via color-based segmentation of the aiming beam. Assuming a Gaussian profile of the imaged aiming beam, the segmentation results are fitted to ellipses that are dynamically scaled at the full width of three automatically estimated thresholds (50%, 75%, 90%) of the Gaussian distribution's maximum value. This enables the dynamic augmentation of the white-light video frames with the corresponding fluorescence decay parameters. A fluorescence phantom and fresh tissue samples were used to evaluate this method with motorized and hand-held scanning measurements. At 640x512 pixels resolution the area of interest augmented with fluorescence decay parameters can be imaged at an average 34 frames per second. The developed method has the potential to become a valuable tool for real-time display of optical spectroscopy data during continuous scanning applications that subsequently can be used for tissue characterization and diagnosis.

  20. Multicolor 4D Fluorescence Microscopy using Ultrathin Bessel Light Sheets

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Teng; Lau, Sze Cheung; Wang, Ying; Su, Yumian; Wang, Hao; Cheng, Aifang; Herrup, Karl; Ip, Nancy Y.; Du, Shengwang; Loy, M. M. T.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple and efficient method for producing ultrathin Bessel (‘non-diffracting’) light sheets of any color using a line-shaped beam and an annulus filter. With this robust and cost-effective technology, we obtained two-color, 3D images of biological samples with lateral/axial resolution of 250 nm/400 nm, and high-speed, 4D volume imaging of 20 μm sized live sample at 1 Hz temporal resolution. PMID:27189786

  1. Multicolor 4D Fluorescence Microscopy using Ultrathin Bessel Light Sheets.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Teng; Lau, Sze Cheung; Wang, Ying; Su, Yumian; Wang, Hao; Cheng, Aifang; Herrup, Karl; Ip, Nancy Y; Du, Shengwang; Loy, M M T

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple and efficient method for producing ultrathin Bessel ('non-diffracting') light sheets of any color using a line-shaped beam and an annulus filter. With this robust and cost-effective technology, we obtained two-color, 3D images of biological samples with lateral/axial resolution of 250 nm/400 nm, and high-speed, 4D volume imaging of 20 μm sized live sample at 1 Hz temporal resolution. PMID:27189786

  2. Enhanced biomass production and lipid accumulation of Picochlorum atomus using light-emitting diodes (LEDs).

    PubMed

    Ra, Chae Hun; Kang, Chang-Han; Jung, Jang-Hyun; Jeong, Gwi-Taek; Kim, Sung-Koo

    2016-10-01

    The effects of light-emitting diode (LED) wavelength, light intensity, nitrate concentration, and time of exposure to different LED wavelength stresses in a two-phase culture on lipid production were evaluated in the microalga, Picochlorum atomus. The biomass produced by red LED light was higher than that produced by purple, blue, green, or yellow LED and fluorescent lights from first phase of two-phase culture. The highest lipid production of P. atomus was 50.3% (w/w) with green LED light at 2days of second phase as light stress. Fatty acid analysis of the microalgae showed that palmitic acid (C16:0) and linolenic acid (C18:3) accounted for 84-88% (w/w) of total fatty acids from P. atomus. The two-phase culture of P. atomus is suitable for biofuel production due to higher lipid productivity and favorable fatty acid composition. PMID:27474341

  3. 78 FR 7450 - Certain Fluorescent Reflector Lamps and Products and Components Containing Same; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... COMMISSION Certain Fluorescent Reflector Lamps and Products and Components Containing Same; Notice of Receipt... Commission has received a complaint entitled Certain Compact Fluorescent Reflector Lamps and Products and... importation of certain fluorescent reflector lamps and products and components containing same. The...

  4. 77 FR 11587 - Certain Dimmable Compact Fluorescent Lamps and Products Containing Same; Institution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... COMMISSION Certain Dimmable Compact Fluorescent Lamps and Products Containing Same; Institution of... States after importation of certain dimmable compact fluorescent lamps and products containing same by... certain dimmable compact fluorescent lamps and products containing same that infringe one or more of...

  5. Development of a noninvasive diabetes screening device using the ratio of fluorescence to Rayleigh scattered light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Nai-Teng; Krantz, Brian S.; Eppstein, Jonathan A.; Ignotz, Keith D.; Samuels, Mark A.; Long, James R.; Price, John

    1996-07-01

    We have developed a new lens measurement system that simultaneously measures the intensities of fluorescence and Rayleigh components at various distances into the lens along the optical axis. The noninvasive measurement is performed through an undilated pupil, and with the assistance of a pupil tracking system that facilitates maintaining the x and y positions of the sample volume to within +/- 100 micrometers of any programmed 'lock' position. The intensity of the Rayleigh component that is used to normalize the measured fluorescent signal serves to correct the attenuation effects due to absorption and lens light scatter. This report, resulting from a SpectRx Site L clinical study using a refined instrumentation, presents analysis of fluorescence and Rayleigh data from the lenses of 923 controls and 239 diabetic subjects ranging from 23 to 75 years old. Fluorescence and Rayleigh data have been obtained via confocal mode from various locations nominally along the lens optical axis for controls and diabetics, at different ages, using three pairs of excitation and collection wavelengths: 364/495 nm, 434/495 nm, and 485/515 nm. For control subjects, there exists a strong, almost linear relationship between age and fluorescence, while diabetic subjects tend to deviate from this age-fluorescence relationship. Our data show that the lenses of diabetic patients are subject to an accelerated aging process, presumably due to an elevated level of brown and fluorescence protein adducts and crosslinks from nonenzymatic glycosylation. We have also shown that by using the measured Rayleigh profiles to normalize the measured fluorescence, most of the absorption effects are removed and therefore the separation between the fluorescence of diabetics and controls is greatly improved. Thus, the device for measuring fluorescence/Rayleigh ratios can be used to noninvasively screen populations for possible undiagnosed diabetes.

  6. A combined light sheet fluorescence and differential interference contrast microscope for live imaging of multicellular specimens.

    PubMed

    Baker, R P; Taormina, M J; Jemielita, M; Parthasarathy, R

    2015-05-01

    We describe a microscope capable of both light sheet fluorescence microscopy and differential interference contrast microscopy (DICM). The two imaging modes, which to the best of our knowledge have not previously been combined, are complementary: light sheet fluorescence microscopy provides three-dimensional imaging of fluorescently labelled components of multicellular systems with high speed, large fields of view, and low phototoxicity, whereas differential interference contrast microscopy reveals the unlabelled neighbourhood of tissues, organs, and other structures with high contrast and inherent optical sectioning. Use of a single Nomarski prism for differential interference contrast microscopy and a shared detection path for both imaging modes enables simple integration of the two techniques in one custom microscope. We provide several examples of the utility of the resulting instrument, focusing especially on the digestive tract of the larval zebrafish, revealing in this complex and heterogeneous environment anatomical features, the behaviour of commensal microbes, immune cell motions, and more. PMID:25611324

  7. The impact of algal fluorescence on the underwater polarized light field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonizzo, A.; Ibrahim, A.; Zhou, J.; Gilerson, A.; Gross, B.; Moshary, F.; Ahmed, S.

    2010-04-01

    Multiangular, hyperspectral measurements of the underwater polarization light field, as well as comprehensive measurements of IOPs were collected in several cruise campaigns in the Chesapeake/Virginia area and New York Harbor/Hudson River areas. The waters examined were mostly eutropic water with Chlorophyll a concentration up to approximately 57 μg/L. It is found that Chlorophyll a fluorescence markedly impacts (reduces) the underwater degree of polarization (DOP) in the 650 - 700 nm spectral region. By taking note of the unpolarized nature of algal fluorescence and the partially polarized properties of elastic scattering, particularly by non-algal particles, we were able to separate the Chlorophyll a fluorescence signal from the total radiance. The analysis is based on comparisons of the underwater multiangular, hyperspectral polarization measurements which include fluorescence, compared with adding - doubling polarized radiative transfer simulations of elastic scattering which use measured IOPs as input, and which do not include fluorescence. The difference between the two shows the impact of fluorescence. These relationships are examined in detail, and the efficacy of using DOP measurements for underwater fluorescence retrieval is evaluated for different scattering geometries and water conditions.

  8. Cutaneous melanin exhibiting fluorescence emission under near-infrared light excitation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiwei; Zeng, Haishan; Hamzavi, Iltefat; Alajlan, Abdulmajeed; Tan, Eileen; McLean, David I; Lui, Harvey

    2006-01-01

    Under ultraviolet and visible light excitation, melanin is essentially a nonfluorescent substance. This work reports our study on near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence properties of melanins, and explores potential applications of NIR fluorescence techniques for evaluating skin disorders involving melanin. The NIR fluorescence spectrum is obtained using a fiber optic NIR spectrometer under 785-nm laser excitation. In vitro measurements are performed on synthetic dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) melanin, melanin extracted from Sepia ink sacs, human hair, animal fur, and bird feathers. Paired spectral comparisons of white and black skin appendages show that melanization of hair, fur, or feathers more than doubles the NIR fluorescence. In vivo NIR autofluorescence of normal dorsal and volar forearm skin of 52 volunteers is measured. Dorsal forearm skin, which is darker than volar skin, exhibits significantly greater NIR fluorescence. Patients with vitiligo (n=4), compound nevus (n=3), nevus of Ota (n=1), superficial spreading melanoma (n=3), and postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (n=1) are also evaluated. NIR fluorescence is greater within the lesion than the surrounding normal skin for all these conditions except vitiligo, where the converse was true. The observed melanin NIR fluorescence provides a new approach to in vitro and in vivo melanin detection and quantification that may be particularly useful for evaluating pigmented skin lesions. PMID:16822060

  9. Fluorescent light irradiation and its mutagenic potential in cultured mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pant, K.; Thilager, A.

    1994-12-31

    The photobiological effect of light is characterized by its energy emission at different wave lengths. Therefore by studying the energy emission spectra at different light sources and their photobiological activities, one can relate wavelength range(s) of the spectrum to a particular photobiological effect. We studied the potential of light irradiation from standard fluorescent bulbs (Sylvania 34WT-12) used in offices and laboratories to induce unscheduled DNA Synthesis (UDS) and mutations in cultured mammalian cells. The energy emission spectrum of the bulbs was determined at every 10 nanometers from 300nM to 700nM. The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were used to study the induction of mutations at the Hypoxanthine Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase (HGPRT) locus. Primary rat hepatocyte cultures were used to study the effect of light irradiation on UDS. The CHO cells were cultured in tissue culture flasks in minimum light conditions (.02mw/cm{sup 2}) and exposed to light irradiations with durations from 0 to 40 minutes. The cultures were maintained in darkness during the expression period and evaluated for HGPRT mutant frequencies. Similarly, the primary rat hepatocyte cultures were cultured on cover slips under minimal light conditions except for light irradiation and evaluated for UDS using 3H-thymidine labelled auto-radiography. The results of the study indicate that irradiation from fluorescent lights caused a slight elevation in the HGPRT mutant frequency in CHO cells. However a significant increase in UDS was not observed even at the maximum light irradiation dose. These results were compared to data obtained from similar experiments conducted with fluorescent bulbs with different energy emission spectra.

  10. Light-Enhanced Fluorescence of Multi-Level Cavitands Possessing Pyridazine Upper rim.

    PubMed

    Janosi, Tibor Zoltan; Makkai, Geza; Kegl, Timea; Matyus, Peter; Kollar, Laszlo; Erostyak, Janos

    2016-03-01

    Completely different fluorescence behaviour of cavitands based on a same calix[4]resorcinarene compound was observed. While the fluorescence intensity of the parent compound, tetramethyl-cavitand (1) slowly faded as a result of UV-light exposure, the emission of the three-level cavitand with pyridazine moieties at the upper rim (5a) was enhanced by the excitation in the UV-region. The structure of fluorescence emission (characterized by excitation-emission matrices) and the absorption of 5a remained unaltered. The analysis of fluorescence decay curves reveals the presence of two separated components assigned to two individual emitting species. The measured significant increase of the average lifetime and quantum yield is the consequence of the UV-light induced transition between the different states of 5a. These observations can be explained by the structural difference between 5a and 1. As a counterpart of the naked cavitand (1) with methyl substituents at the upper rim only, 5a has three additional moieties benzene, triazole and pyridazine levels. Computational studies proved the existence of two conformational isomers of 5a. Upon ultraviolet light excitation a "dark" to "light" conformational transition occurs between the two isomers. This hypothesis was confirmed by anisotropy decay measurements. PMID:26715516

  11. The influence of visible light and inorganic pigments on fluorescence excitation emission spectra of egg-, casein- and collagen-based painting media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevin, A.; Anglos, D.; Cather, S.; Burnstock, A.

    2008-07-01

    Spectrofluorimetric analysis of proteinaceous binding media is particularly promising because proteins employed in paintings are often fluorescent and media from different sources have significantly different fluorescence spectral profiles. Protein-based binding media derived from eggs, milk and animal tissue have been used for painting and for conservation, but their analysis using non-destructive techniques is complicated by interferences with pigments, their degradation and their low concentration. Changes in the fluorescence excitation emission spectra of films of binding media following artificial ageing to an equivalent of 50 and 100 years of museum lighting include the reduction of bands ascribed to tyrosine, tryptophan and Maillard reaction products and an increase in fluorescent photodegradation. Fluorescence of naturally aged paint is dependent on the nature of the pigment present and, with egg-based media, in comparison with un-pigmented films, emissions ascribed to amino acids are more pronounced.

  12. [Derivative fluorescence probe recognition results of the light physical mechanism of metal ions].

    PubMed

    Dai, Yu-mei; Hu, Xiao-jun; Li, Fu-jun; Xie, Yu-meng; Zhao, Yang-yang; Zhou, Qiao

    2015-02-01

    As people deeply study the electronic spectra of fluorescent compounds and photophysical behavior, enormous progress has been made in the aspect of changes and states of different systems in the use of fluorescent molecules as probes. PTC-DA is a kind of typical fluorescent molecular probe that is highly sensitive and selective in water environment. This paper makes a research on the physical mechanism of light of PTCDA by TDF (Density Functional Theory), calculates the optimal configuration the charge population and excitation spectra of PTCDA molecules under ideal condition and acquires PTCDA fluorescence emission spectra then analyses that PTCDA is a kind of quenching and dual colorimetric signal probe response. Its optical signal response mechanism belongs to ICT (Intramolecular Charge Transfer) mechanism. According to the results, this perylene derivatives is fitted with Cu2+ excited state absorption spectra. Before and after the combination with Cu2+, the peak shape of absorption spectrum is similar. When copper is added, the overall absorption peak position occurred redshift, quenching discoloration happens. By comparing with experimental values, the calculated molecular configuration is reasonable and effective and the peak of excitation spectra is realistic. Analysis shows that: PTCDA molecules divalent copper ions have better fluorescence detection activity, the optical signal response mechanisms are intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) mechanisms. When a molecule receives divalent copper ions, the absorption spectrum peak position redshifts, intramolecular charge transfer direction and intensity changes. There occur both quenching signal and discoloration signal. It is a kind of fluorescent probe material with double quenching and discoloration fluorescent signal, which has great potential for development. This paper makes an early-stage exploration of the physical mechanism of light response mechanism analysis in molecular fluorescent probe field and

  13. White polymer light emitting diode using blend of fluorescent polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Asit; Katiyar, Monica

    2012-10-01

    White polymer light emitting diodes (WPLEDs) are fabricated using poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-2,7-diyl) (PFO) as host and poly [2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)]-1,4-phenylene vinylene (MEH-PPV) as guest material having structure ITO(150nm)/PEDOT:PSS(40nm)/PFO:MEH-PPV(75-90nm)/Ca(20nm)/Al(120nm). Photoluminescence spectra of blends with different MEH-PPV concentration reveal that at low doping level of MEH-PPV, blue emission from PFO and yellow emission from MEH-PPV co-exist due to incomplete energy transfer from PFO to MEH-PPV. Surface morphology of the spin coated blend films with different concentrations of MEH-PPV were studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). It shows segregation/agglomeration of polymers at higher concentration of MEH-PPV (~2.0 wt %). Finally, WPLEDs, having MEH-PPV in the range of 0.8-2.0 wt%, were fabricated. We obtained best device at 0.8 wt% of MEH-PPV, it shows white light with Commission Internationale de l'Enclairage (CIE) coordinate of (0.30, 0.38). Electroluminescence turn-on voltage of the device was 4.0 V and maximum luminance reaches 1234 cd/m2 at 8.5 V. The luminous current and power efficiency at current density of 22 mA/cm2 were found to be 2.3 cd/A and 1.1 lm/W, respectively.

  14. The Effects of Fluorescent and Incandescent Lighting on the Repetitive Behaviours of Autistic and Intellectually Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenton, D. M.; Penney, R.

    1985-01-01

    Repetitive behaviors of five autistic and five intellectually disabled children were observed under both fluorescent and incandescent lighting conditions. Findings supported the hypothesis that autistic children engage in a significantly greater frequency of stereotypes under fluorescent lighting, while there is no significant difference among…

  15. High-efficiency white organic light-emitting diodes based on a blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent emitter combined with green and red fluorescent emitters.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Takahiro; Nakanotani, Hajime; Adachi, Chihaya

    2015-03-25

    A new device architecture for highly efficient white organic light-emitting diodes is proposed, using a molecule exhibiting blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence as a common source of singlet excitons for molecules emitting red and green light based on conventional fluorescence. The device, with an optimum combination of materials, shows a maximum external quantum efficiency of over 12% without using phosphorescent emitters. PMID:25664428

  16. Flexible fluorescent white organic light emitting diodes with ALD encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yu-Sheng; Chittawanij, Apisit; Juang, Fuh-Shyang; Lin, Pen-Chu; Hong, Lin-Ann; Tsai, Feng-Yu; Tseng, Ming-Hong; Wang, Ching-Chiun; Chen, Chien-Chih; Lin, Kung-Liang; Chen, Szu-Hao

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the flexible white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLED) was fabricated on polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) with structure of ITO/EHI608 (75 nm)/HTG-1 (10 nm)/3% EB502:0.8% EY53 (5 nm)/3% EB502 (35 nm)/Alq3 (10 nm)/LiF (0.8 nm)/Al (150 nm) and was compared with glass substrate the same structure. It was seen that the performances of flexible and glass substrate are almost the same. The luminance, current efficiency, and CIE coordinates of flexible device is 6351 cd/m2, 12.7 cd/A, and (0.31, 0.38) at 50 mA/cm2, respectively. Then, an Al2O3/HfO2 film on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) was deposited using atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a thin film encapsulation layer have been described and compared, such as the characteristics of water permeability and lifetime of flexible WOLED. The results show that the PET/ALD film low value of about 0.04 g/m2d, and the PET film shows WVTR of about 3.8 g/m2/d. The lifetimes of PET/ALD and PET encapsulations are 840 min and 140 min, respectively. Simultaneous deposition of ALD film on PET film gave the lifetime of flexible WOLED is six times longer than device without ALD encapsulation.

  17. Fluorescence lifetime measurement via a radionuclide-scintillation light source and analog cross correlation.

    PubMed

    Burden, D L; Hobbs, S E; Hieftje, G M

    1997-05-15

    beta-Emitting 90Sr is used with a plastic scintillator to produce excitation-light pulses for fluorescence lifetime analysis. This light source is less expensive, more compact, and much more reliable than traditionally employed excitation sources such as lasers or pulsed flash lamps. The pulse train from this light source varies randomly in amplitude and time. Cross-correlation signal analysis is ideal for such a source because, unlike other time domain techniques, cross correlation takes complete advantage of its random nature. Here we report on the construction of an instrument and the methods employed to make fluorescence lifetime measurements via the new source and an analog correlation processor. Although the light intensity of the scintillator-based excitation source is comparatively low, an adequate signal level can be generated. The fluorescence lifetimes of three fluorophores are measured with a 1-mCi radionuclide to demonstrate a lifetime range from less than 1.5 to 28 ns. Long-lifetime measurements require an extra calibration step in order to compensate for delay cable energy loss. The light collection efficiency of the current instrument was found to be undesirably low; improvements in the instrument optics are suggested that will increase the collection efficiency and enhance the detection capability. PMID:9164162

  18. A compact fluorescence and white light imaging system for intraoperative visualization of nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Dan; Kim, Evgenia; Cotero, Victoria; Staudinger, Paul; Yazdanfar, Siavash; Tan Hehir, Cristina

    2012-03-01

    Fluorescence image guided surgery (FIGS) allows intraoperative visualization of critical structures, with applications spanning neurology, cardiology and oncology. An unmet clinical need is prevention of iatrogenic nerve damage, a major cause of post-surgical morbidity. Here we describe the advancement of FIGS imaging hardware, coupled with a custom nerve-labeling fluorophore (GE3082), to bring FIGS nerve imaging closer to clinical translation. The instrument is comprised of a 405nm laser and a white light LED source for excitation and illumination. A single 90 gram color CCD camera is coupled to a 10mm surgical laparoscope for image acquisition. Synchronization of the light source and camera allows for simultaneous visualization of reflected white light and fluorescence using only a single camera. The imaging hardware and contrast agent were evaluated in rats during in situ surgical procedures.

  19. Compact fluorescence and white-light imaging system for intraoperative visualization of nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Dan; Kim, Evgenia; Cotero, Victoria; Staudinger, Paul; Yazdanfar, Siavash; tan Hehir, Cristina

    2012-02-01

    Fluorescence image guided surgery (FIGS) allows intraoperative visualization of critical structures, with applications spanning neurology, cardiology and oncology. An unmet clinical need is prevention of iatrogenic nerve damage, a major cause of post-surgical morbidity. Here we describe the advancement of FIGS imaging hardware, coupled with a custom nerve-labeling fluorophore (GE3082), to bring FIGS nerve imaging closer to clinical translation. The instrument is comprised of a 405nm laser and a white light LED source for excitation and illumination. A single 90 gram color CCD camera is coupled to a 10mm surgical laparoscope for image acquisition. Synchronization of the light source and camera allows for simultaneous visualization of reflected white light and fluorescence using only a single camera. The imaging hardware and contrast agent were evaluated in rats during in situ surgical procedures.

  20. Development of image reconstruction algorithms for fluorescence diffuse optical tomography using total light approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okawa, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Miwa, Y.; Yamada, Y.

    2011-07-01

    Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) based on the total light approach is developed. The continuous wave light is used for excitation in this system. The reconstruction algorithm is based on the total light approach that reconstructs the absorption coefficients increased by the fluorophore. Additionally we propose noise reduction using the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) incorporating the truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD). Numerical and phantom experiments show that the developed system successfully reconstructs the fluorophore concentration in the biological media, and the ART with TSVD alleviates the influence of noises. In vivo experiment demonstrated that the developed FDOT system localized the fluorescent agent which was concentrated in the cancer transplanted into a kidney in a mouse.

  1. Light scattering measurement of sodium polyacrylate products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lama, Nisha; Norwood, David; Boone, Steven; Massie-Boyer, Valerie

    2015-03-01

    In the presentation, we will describe the use of a multi-detector HPLC incorporating the DAWN EOS multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) detector to measure the properties such as molecular weight, RMS radius, contour and persistence length and polydispersity of sodium polyacrylate products. The samples of sodium polyacrylate are used in various industries as thickening agents, coating dispersants, artificial snow, laundry detergent and disposable diapers. Data and results obtained from the experiment will be presented.

  2. Calibration of a wide-field frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime microscopy system using light emitting diodes as light sources.

    PubMed

    Elder, A D; Frank, J H; Swartling, J; Dai, X; Kaminski, C F

    2006-11-01

    High brightness light emitting diodes are an inexpensive and versatile light source for wide-field frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. In this paper a full calibration of an LED based fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy system is presented for the first time. A radio-frequency generator was used for simultaneous modulation of light emitting diode (LED) intensity and the gain of an intensified charge coupled device (CCD) camera. A homodyne detection scheme was employed to measure the demodulation and phase shift of the emitted fluorescence, from which phase and modulation lifetimes were determined at each image pixel. The system was characterized both in terms of its sensitivity to measure short lifetimes (500 ps to 4 ns), and its capability to distinguish image features with small lifetime differences. Calibration measurements were performed in quenched solutions containing Rhodamine 6G dye and the results compared to several independent measurements performed with other measurement methodologies, including time correlated single photon counting, time gated detection, and acousto optical modulator (AOM) based modulation of excitation sources. Results are presented from measurements and simulations. The effects of limited signal-to-noise ratios, baseline drifts and calibration errors are discussed in detail. The implications of limited modulation bandwidth of high brightness, large area LED devices ( approximately 40 MHz for devices used here) are presented. The results show that phase lifetime measurements are robust down to sub ns levels, whereas modulation lifetimes are prone to errors even at large signal-to-noise ratios. Strategies for optimizing measurement fidelity are discussed. Application of the fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy system is illustrated with examples from studies of molecular mixing in microfluidic devices and targeted drug delivery research. PMID:17204064

  3. Fluorescent Carbon Quantum Dots as Single Light Converter for White LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiaoting; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Yaling; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Yongzhen; Liu, Xuguang

    2016-06-01

    Synthesis of fluorescent carbon quantum dots (CQDs) as single light converter and their application in white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are reported. CQDs were prepared by a one-step hydrothermal method using glucose and polyethylene glycol 200 as precursors. The structural and optical properties of the CQDs were investigated. The CQDs with uniform size of 4 nm possessed typical excitation-dependent emission wavelength and quantum yield of 3.5%. Under ultraviolet illumination, the CQDs in deionized water emitted bright blue fluorescence and produced broad visible-light emission with high red, green, and blue spectral component ratio of 63.5% (red-to-blue intensity to total intensity), suggesting great potential as single light converter for white LEDs. To demonstrate their potential, a white LED using CQDs as a single light converter was built. The device exhibited cool white light with corresponding color temperature of 5584 K and color coordinates of (0.32, 0.37), belonging to the white gamut. This research suggests that CQDs could be a promising candidate single light converter for white LEDs.

  4. Far-red light photoactivatable near-infrared fluorescent proteins engineered from a bacterial phytochrome

    PubMed Central

    Piatkevich, Kiryl D.; Subach, Fedor V.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2013-01-01

    Ability to modulate fluorescence of optical probes can be used to enhance signal-to-noise ratio for imaging within highly autofluorescent environments, such as intact tissues and living organisms. Here we report two phytochrome-based photoactivatable near-infrared fluorescent proteins, named PAiRFP1 and PAiRFP2. PAiRFPs utilize heme-derived biliverdin, ubiquitous in mammalian tissues, as the chromophore. Initially weakly fluorescent PAiRFPs undergo photoconversion into a highly fluorescent state with excitation/emission at 690 nm/717 nm following a brief irradiation with far-red light. After photoactivation, PAiRFPs slowly revert back to initial state, enabling multiple photoactivation-relaxation cycles. Low-temperature optical spectroscopy reveals several intermediates involved in PAiRFP photocycles, which all differ from that of the bacteriophytochrome precursor. PAiRFPs can be photoactivated in a spatially selective manner in mouse tissues, and optical modulation of their fluorescence allows for substantial contrast enhancement, making PAiRFPs advantageous over permanently fluorescent probes for in vivo imaging conditions of high autofluorescence and low signal levels. PMID:23842578

  5. [Normal light and fluorescence microscopy for authentication of Delphinii Brunoniani Herba of Tibet].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Qiong; Xu, Fu-Chun; Dongzhi, Zhuo-Ma; Liu, E-Hu; Xu, Luo-Shan; Liu, Hui-Juan; Li, Ping

    2012-11-01

    Dried herb of Delphinium brunonianum Royle (Ranunculaceae) has long been used under the herbal name "Xiaguobei" (Delphinii Brunoniani Herba) in traditional Tibetan medicine and prescribed for the treatment of influenza, itchy skin rash and snake bites. In order to find a useful and convenient method for the identification of microscopic features, the technique of fluorescence microscopy was applied to authenticate "Xiaguobei" of Tibet. The transverse sections of stem and leaf, as well as the powder of "Xiaguobei" were observed to seek for typical microscopic features by normal light and fluorescence microscopy. A style-like, single-cell glandular hair containing yellow secretions on the leaf, young stem and sepal of "Xiaguobei" was found. Under the fluorescence microscope, the xylem and pericycle fiber group emitted significant fluorescence. This work indicated that fluorescence microscopy could be an useful additional method for the authentication work. Without the traditional dyeing methods, the main microscopic features could be easily found by fluorescence microscopy. The results provided reliable references for the authentication of "Xiaguobei". PMID:23387092

  6. 77 FR 4363 - Certain Dimmable Compact Fluorescent Lamps and Products Containing Same; Receipt of Complaint...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... COMMISSION Certain Dimmable Compact Fluorescent Lamps and Products Containing Same; Receipt of Complaint... complaint entitled In Re Certain Dimmable Compact Fluorescent Lamps and Products Containing Same, DN 2873... within the United States after importation of certain dimmable compact fluorescent lamps and...

  7. Image-guided surgery using near-infrared fluorescent light: from bench to bedside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boogerd, Leonora S. F.; Handgraaf, Henricus J. M.; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.

    2015-03-01

    Due to its relatively high tissue penetration, near-infrared (NIR; 700-900 nm) fluorescent light has the potential to visualize structures that need to be resected (e.g. tumors, lymph nodes) and structures that need to be spared (e.g. nerves, ureters, bile ducts). Until now, most clinical trials have focused on suboptimal, non-targeted dyes. Although successful, a new era in image-guided surgery has begun by the introduction of tumor-targeted agents. In this paper, we will describe how tumor-targeted NIR fluorescent imaging can be applied in a clinical setting.

  8. 78 FR 20946 - Certain Dimmable Compact Fluorescent Lamps and Products Containing Same; Notice of Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Dimmable Compact Fluorescent Lamps and Products Containing Same; Notice of Request for... limited exclusion order against certain infringing dimmable compact fluorescent lamps and...

  9. Comparison of Light Emitting Diodes (LED) and Fluorescent Light on Suppression of Pineal Melatonin in the Rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, Charles M.; Heeke, D. S.; Holley, D. C.; Mele, G.; Brainard, G. C.; Hanifin, J. P.; Rollag, M. D.; Savage, Paul D. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    To validate a novel LED array for use in animal habitat lighting by comparing its effectiveness to cool-white fluorescent (CWF) lighting in suppressing pineal gland melatonin. Male Sprague-Dawley rats, 175-200 g, were maintained under control conditions for 2 weeks (food and water ad lib, 12L: 12D CWF, 18 uW/square cm). Dark adapted animals (animals before lights on) were exposed to 5 min of LED or CWF light of similar spectral power distribution. Two groups of rats (LED vs. CWF) were compared at 5 light intensities (100, 40, 1, 1.0, and 0. 1 lux). A control group was placed into the exposure apparatus but not exposed to light. After exposure, pineal glands were rapidly removed and assayed for melatonin by RIA. Results. The dark-exposed control groups matched with the 5 intensity groups (100, 40, 10, 1.0, and 0.1 lux) showed mean + SEM pineal melatonin values of 1167 +/- 136, 1569 +/- 126, 353 +/- 34, 650 +/- 124, and 464 +/- 85, pg/ml respectively. The corresponding CWF exposure data were 393 1 41, 365 +34, 257 +/- 13, 218 +/- 42, and 239 +/- 71 pg/ml, respectively. Corresponding LED exposure data were 439 +/- 25, 462 +/- 50, 231 +/- 6, 164 +/- 12, and 158 +/- 12 pg/ml, respectively. Rats exposed to both experimental light conditions at all illuminances studied showed significant melatonin suppression (p less than 0.01, ANOVA). In no case was the melatonin suppression induced by LED illuminance significantly different from the melatonin suppression elicited by the same intensity of CWF light. The results show that a novel LED light source can suppress pineal melatonin equal to that of a conventional CWF light source.

  10. Life History Changes in Coral Fluorescence and the Effects of Light Intensity on Larval Physiology and Settlement in Seriatopora hystrix

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Melissa S.; Fan, Tung-Yung; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence is common in both coral adult and larval stages, and is produced by fluorescent proteins that absorb higher energy light and emit lower energy light. This study investigated the changes of coral fluorescence in different life history stages and the effects of parental light environment on larval fluorescence, larval endosymbiotic dinoflagellate abundance, larval size and settlement in the brooding coral Seriatopora hystrix. Data showed that coral fluorescence changed during development from green in larvae to cyan in adult colonies. In larvae, two green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) co-occur where the peak emission of one GFP overlaps with the peak excitation of the second GFP allowing the potential for energy transfer. Coral larvae showed great variation in GFP fluorescence, dinoflagellate abundance, and size. There was no obvious relationship between green fluorescence intensity and dinoflagellate abundance, green fluorescence intensity and larval size, or dinoflagellate abundance and larval size. Larvae of parents from high and low light treatments showed similar green fluorescence intensity, yet small but significant differences in size, dinoflagellate abundance, and settlement. The large variation in larval physiology combined with subtle effects of parental environment on larval characteristics seem to indicate that even though adult corals produce larvae with a wide range of physiological capacities, these larvae can still show small preferences for settling in similar habitats as their parents. These data highlight the importance of environmental conditions at the onset of life history and parent colony effects on coral larvae. PMID:23544072

  11. Malignant melanoma in relation to moles, pigmentation, and exposure to fluorescent and other lighting sources.

    PubMed Central

    Elwood, J. M.; Williamson, C.; Stapleton, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    Interviews were performed on 83 patients with malignant melanoma, being 74% of all new NHS patients over a 33 month period who were resident in a defined area of Nottingham, and on age and sex matched controls chosen from all outpatients and inpatients of the same hospitals with the same area of residence. Significantly increased risks of melanoma were found in subjects with 3 or more raised moles on the upper arms (relative risk = 17.0), in association with heavy freckling of the face and arms, and with a tendency to sunburn easily and tan poorly, these factors having independent effects. While no significant and consistent association with exposure to fluorescent light was seen, the observed risks were higher in subjects with greater exposure, and higher in association with exposure to undiffused than to diffused light. Cases had a significantly greater number of hours' exposure to undiffused light than did controls. The associations with fluorescent light exposure were stronger when based on interview data than on a subsequent postal questionnaire. Twenty-one cases and 11 controls reported exposure to unusual occupational lighting sources which may have had an ultraviolet component; these included various intense lighting sources and lamps used in printing and dyeline copying. PMID:3947517

  12. Quantified light-induced fluorescence, review of a diagnostic tool in prevention of oral disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Josselin de Jong, Elbert; Higham, Susan M.; Smith, Philip W.; van Daelen, Catherina J.; van der Veen, Monique H.

    2009-05-01

    Diagnostic methods for the use in preventive dentistry are being developed continuously. Few of these find their way into general practice. Although the general trend in medicine is to focus on disease prevention and early diagnostics, in dentistry this is still not the case. Nevertheless, in dental research some of these methods seem to be promising for near future use by the general dental professional. In this paper an overview is given of a method called quantitative light-induced fluorescence or (QLF) in which visible and harmless light excites the teeth in the patient's mouth to produce fluorescent images, which can be stored on disk and computer analyzed. White spots (early dental caries) are detected and quantified as well as bacterial metabolites on and in the teeth. An overview of research to validate the technique and modeling to further the understanding of the technique by Monte Carlo simulation is given and it is shown that the fluorescence phenomena can be described by the simulation model in a qualitative way. A model describing the visibility of red fluorescence from within the dental tissue is added, as this was still lacking in current literature. An overview is given of the clinical images made with the system and of the extensive research which has been done. The QLF™ technology has been shown to be of importance when used in clinical trials with respect to the testing of toothpastes and preventive treatments. It is expected that the QLF™ technology will soon find its way into the general dental practice.

  13. Light-sheet-based fluorescence microscopy for three-dimensional imaging of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Swoger, Jim; Pampaloni, Francesco; Stelzer, Ernst H K

    2014-01-01

    In modern biology, most optical imaging technologies are applied to two-dimensional cell culture systems; that is, they are used in a cellular context that is defined by hard and flat surfaces. However, a physiological context is not found in single cells cultivated on coverslips. It requires the complex three-dimensional (3D) relationship of cells cultivated in extracellular matrix (ECM) gels, tissue sections, or in naturally developing organisms. In fact, the number of applications of 3D cell cultures in basic research as well as in drug discovery and toxicity testing has been increasing over the past few years. Unfortunately, the imaging of highly scattering multicellular specimens is still challenging. The main issues are the limited optical penetration depth, the phototoxicity, and the fluorophore bleaching. Light-sheet-based fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) overcomes many drawbacks of conventional fluorescence microscopy by using an orthogonal/azimuthal fluorescence arrangement with independent sets of lenses for illumination and detection. The basic idea is to illuminate the specimen from the side with a thin light sheet that overlaps with the focal plane of a wide-field fluorescence microscope. Optical sectioning and minimal phototoxic damage or photobleaching outside a small volume close to the focal plane are intrinsic properties of LSFM. We discuss the basic principles of LSFM and methods for the preparation, embedding, and imaging of 3D specimens used in the life sciences in an implementation of LSFM known as the single (or selective) plane illumination microscope (SPIM). PMID:24371323

  14. Breaking the diffraction limit of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by RESOLFT.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Patrick; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Norlin, Nils; Besir, Christina; Hanne, Janina; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J; Hell, Stefan W; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-03-29

    We present a plane-scanning RESOLFT [reversible saturable/switchable optical (fluorescence) transitions] light-sheet (LS) nanoscope, which fundamentally overcomes the diffraction barrier in the axial direction via confinement of the fluorescent molecular state to a sheet of subdiffraction thickness around the focal plane. To this end, reversibly switchable fluorophores located right above and below the focal plane are transferred to a nonfluorescent state at each scanning step. LS-RESOLFT nanoscopy offers wide-field 3D imaging of living biological specimens with low light dose and axial resolution far beyond the diffraction barrier. We demonstrate optical sections that are thinner by 5-12-fold compared with their conventional diffraction-limited LS analogs. PMID:26984498

  15. Breaking the diffraction limit of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by RESOLFT

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Patrick; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Norlin, Nils; Besir, Christina; Hanne, Janina; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J.; Hell, Stefan W.; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-01-01

    We present a plane-scanning RESOLFT [reversible saturable/switchable optical (fluorescence) transitions] light-sheet (LS) nanoscope, which fundamentally overcomes the diffraction barrier in the axial direction via confinement of the fluorescent molecular state to a sheet of subdiffraction thickness around the focal plane. To this end, reversibly switchable fluorophores located right above and below the focal plane are transferred to a nonfluorescent state at each scanning step. LS-RESOLFT nanoscopy offers wide-field 3D imaging of living biological specimens with low light dose and axial resolution far beyond the diffraction barrier. We demonstrate optical sections that are thinner by 5–12-fold compared with their conventional diffraction-limited LS analogs. PMID:26984498

  16. Simultaneous light scattering and intrinsic fluorescence measurement for the classification of airborne particles.

    PubMed

    Kaye, P H; Barton, J E; Hirst, E; Clark, J M

    2000-07-20

    We describe a prototype laboratory light-scattering instrument that integrates two approaches to airborne particle characterization: spatial light-scattering analysis and intrinsic fluorescence measurement, with the aim of providing an effective means of classifying biological particles within an ambient aerosol. The system uses a single continuous-wave 266-nm ultraviolet laser to generate both the spatial elastic scatter data (from which an assessment of particle size and shape is made) and the particle intrinsic fluorescence data from particles in the approximate size range of 1-10-mum diameter carried in a sample airflow through the laser beam. Preliminary results suggest that this multiparameter measurement approach can provide an effective means of classifying different particle types and can reduce occurrences of false-positive detection of biological aerosols. PMID:18349949

  17. Simultaneous Measurement of Amyloid Fibril Formation by Dynamic Light Scattering and Fluorescence Reveals Complex Aggregation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Streets, Aaron M.; Sourigues, Yannick; Kopito, Ron R.; Melki, Ronald; Quake, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    An apparatus that combines dynamic light scattering and Thioflavin T fluorescence detection is used to simultaneously probe fibril formation in polyglutamine peptides, the aggregating subunit associated with Huntington's disease, in vitro. Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder in a class of human pathologies that includes Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. These pathologies are all related by the propensity of their associated protein or polypeptide to form insoluble, β-sheet rich, amyloid fibrils. Despite the wide range of amino acid sequence in the aggregation prone polypeptides associated with these diseases, the resulting amyloids display strikingly similar physical structure, an observation which suggests a physical basis for amyloid fibril formation. Thioflavin T fluorescence reports β-sheet fibril content while dynamic light scattering measures particle size distributions. The combined techniques allow elucidation of complex aggregation kinetics and are used to reveal multiple stages of amyloid fibril formation. PMID:23349924

  18. Breaking the diffraction limit of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by RESOLFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Patrick; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Norlin, Nils; Besir, Christina; Hanne, Janina; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J.; Hell, Stefan W.; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-03-01

    We present a plane-scanning RESOLFT [reversible saturable/switchable optical (fluorescence) transitions] light-sheet (LS) nanoscope, which fundamentally overcomes the diffraction barrier in the axial direction via confinement of the fluorescent molecular state to a sheet of subdiffraction thickness around the focal plane. To this end, reversibly switchable fluorophores located right above and below the focal plane are transferred to a nonfluorescent state at each scanning step. LS-RESOLFT nanoscopy offers wide-field 3D imaging of living biological specimens with low light dose and axial resolution far beyond the diffraction barrier. We demonstrate optical sections that are thinner by 5-12-fold compared with their conventional diffraction-limited LS analogs.

  19. Instrument for fluorescence sensing of circulating cells with diffuse light in mice in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettergren, Eric; Vickers, Dwayne; Runnels, Judith; Murthy, Shashi K.; Lin, Charles P.; Niedre, Mark

    2012-03-01

    Accurate quantification of circulating cell populations in mice is important in many areas of preclinical biomedical research. Normally, this is done either by extraction and analysis of small blood samples or, more recently, by using microscopy-based in vivo fluorescence flow cytometry. We describe a new technological approach to this problem using detection of diffuse fluorescent light from relatively large blood vessels in vivo. The diffuse fluorescence flow cytometer (DFFC) uses a laser to illuminate a mouse limb and an array of optical fibers coupled to a high-sensitivity photomultiplier tube array operating in photon counting mode to detect weak fluorescence signals from cells. We first demonstrate that the DFFC instrument is capable of detecting fluorescent microspheres and Vybrant-DiD-labeled cells in a custom-made optical flow phantom with similar size, optical properties, linear flow rates, and autofluorescence as a mouse limb. We also present preliminary data demonstrating that the DFFC is capable of detecting circulating cells in nude mice in vivo. In principle, this device would allow interrogation of the whole blood volume of a mouse in minutes, with sensitivity improvement by several orders of magnitude compared to current approaches.

  20. Outbreak of illness due to volatilized asphalt coming from a malfunctioning fluorescent lighting fixture.

    PubMed Central

    Tavris, D R; Field, L; Brumback, C L

    1984-01-01

    We investigated an outbreak of headache, eye irritation, sore throat, nasal congestion, and nausea in an office complex, ongoing for three months and regularly resolved upon leaving the building. Investigation suggested that the etiology of the illness was malfunctioning fluorescent light ballasts , which overheated and resulted in melting and volatilization of contained asphalt . Correction of the problem resulted in almost complete disappearance of symptoms within two weeks. PMID:6721022

  1. Outbreak of illness due to volatilized asphalt coming from a malfunction fluorescent lighting fixture

    SciTech Connect

    Tavris, D.R.; Field, L.; Brumback, C.L.

    1984-06-01

    An investigation was made of an outbreak of headache, eye irritation, sore throat, nasal congestion, and nausea in an office complex, ongoing for three months and regularly resolved upon leaving the building. Investigation suggested that the etiology of the illness was malfunctioning fluorescent light ballasts, which overheated and resulted in melting and volatilization of contained asphalt. Correction of the problem resulted in almost complete disappearance of symptoms within two weeks.

  2. High-efficiency white organic light-emitting diodes using thermally activated delayed fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Nishide, Jun-ichi; Hiraga, Yasuhide; Nakanotani, Hajime; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-06-09

    White organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) have attracted much attention recently, aimed for next-generation lighting sources because of their high potential to realize high electroluminescence efficiency, flexibility, and low-cost manufacture. Here, we demonstrate high-efficiency WOLED using red, green, and blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials as emissive dopants to generate white electroluminescence. The WOLED has a maximum external quantum efficiency of over 17% with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage coordinates of (0.30, 0.38).

  3. High-efficiency white organic light-emitting diodes using thermally activated delayed fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishide, Jun-ichi; Nakanotani, Hajime; Hiraga, Yasuhide; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-06-01

    White organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) have attracted much attention recently, aimed for next-generation lighting sources because of their high potential to realize high electroluminescence efficiency, flexibility, and low-cost manufacture. Here, we demonstrate high-efficiency WOLED using red, green, and blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials as emissive dopants to generate white electroluminescence. The WOLED has a maximum external quantum efficiency of over 17% with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage coordinates of (0.30, 0.38).

  4. Phantom and mouse experiments of time-domain fluorescence tomography using total light approach

    PubMed Central

    Okawa, Shinpei; Yano, Akira; Uchida, Kazuki; Mitsui, Yohei; Yoshida, Masaki; Takekoshi, Masashi; Marjono, Andhi; Gao, Feng; Hoshi, Yoko; Kida, Ikuhiro; Masamoto, Kazuto; Yamada, Yukio

    2013-01-01

    Phantom and mouse experiments of time-domain fluorescence tomography were conducted to demonstrate the total light approach which was previously proposed by authors. The total light approach reduces the computation time to solve the forward model for light propagation. Time-resolved temporal profiles were acquired for cylindrical phantoms having single or double targets containing indocyanine green (ICG) solutions. The reconstructed images of ICG concentration reflected the true distributions of ICG concentration with a spatial resolution of about 10 mm. In vivo experiments were conducted using a mouse in which an ICG capsule was embedded beneath the skin in the abdomen. The reconstructed image of the ICG concentration again reflected the true distribution of ICG although artifacts due to autofluorescence appeared in the vicinity of the skin. The effectiveness of the total light approach was demonstrated by the phantom and mouse experiments. PMID:23577297

  5. Removal of fluorescence and ultraviolet absorbance of dissolved organic matter in reclaimed water by solar light.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qianyuan; Li, Chao; Wang, Wenlong; He, Tao; Hu, Hongying; Du, Ye; Wang, Ting

    2016-05-01

    Storing reclaimed water in lakes is a widely used method of accommodating changes in the consumption of reclaimed water during wastewater reclamation and reuse. Solar light serves as an important function in degrading pollutants during storage, and its effect on dissolved organic matter (DOM) was investigated in this study. Solar light significantly decreased the UV254 absorbance and fluorescence (FLU) intensity of reclaimed water. However, its effect on the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) value of reclaimed water was very limited. The decrease in the UV254 absorbance intensity and FLU excitation-emission matrix regional integration volume (FLU volume) of reclaimed water during solar light irradiation was fit with pseudo-first order reaction kinetics. The decrease of UV254 absorbance was much slower than that of the FLU volume. Ultraviolet light in solar light had a key role in decreasing the UV254 absorbance and FLU intensity during solar light irradiation. The light fluence-based removal kinetic constants of the UV254 and FLU intensity were independent of light intensity. The peaks of the UV254 absorbance and FLU intensity with an apparent molecular weight (AMW) of 100Da to 2000Da decreased after solar irradiation, whereas the DOC value of the major peaks did not significantly change. PMID:27155416

  6. Theory of light quenching: effects of fluorescence polarization, intensity, and anisotropy decays.

    PubMed Central

    Kuśba, J; Bogdanov, V; Gryczynski, I; Lakowicz, J R

    1994-01-01

    Experimental studies have recently demonstrated that fluorescence emission can be quenched by laser light pulses from modern high repetition rate lasers, a phenomenon we call "light quenching." We now describe the theory of light quenching and some of its effects on the steady-state and time-resolved intensity and anisotropy decays of fluorophores. Light quenching can decrease or increase the steady-state or time-zero anisotropy. Remarkably, the light quenching can break the usual z axis symmetry of the excited-state population, and the emission polarization can range from -1 to +1 under selected conditions. The measured anisotropy (or polarization) depends upon whether the observation axis is parallel or perpendicular to the propagation direction of the light quenching beam. The effects of light quenching are different for a single pulse, which results in both excitation and quenching, as compared with a time-delayed quenching pulse. Time-delayed light quenching pulses can result in step-like changes in the time-dependent intensity or anisotropy and are predicted to cause oscillations in the frequency-domain intensity and anisotropy decays. The increasing availability of pulsed laser sources offers the opportunity for a new class of two-pulse or multiple-pulse experiments where the sample is prepared by an excitation pulse, the excited state population is modified by the quenching pulse(s), followed by time- or frequency-domain measurements of the resulting emission. PMID:7858140

  7. Stable blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent organic light-emitting diodes with three times longer lifetime than phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mounggon; Jeon, Sang Kyu; Hwang, Seok-Ho; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2015-04-17

    High quantum efficiency above 18% and extended lifetime three times longer than that of phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are demonstrated in blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent OLEDs. PMID:25757226

  8. Synthesis of polymeric fluorescent brightener based on coumarin and its performances on paper as light stabilizer, fluorescent brightener and surface sizing agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guanghua; Zheng, Hua; Guo, Mingyuan; Du, Lun; Liu, Guojun; Wang, Peng

    2016-03-01

    In this work, a novel polymeric fluorescent brightener based on coumarin (PFBC) was synthesized, using three-step synthetic route, from 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin, coumarin monomer (FBC), Acrylamide (AM) and methacrylatoethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (DMC). The structure of PFBC was characterized by FT-IR, 1HNMR and GPC. PFBC was applied to paper fiber as light stabilizer, fluorescent brightener and surface sizing agent and its performances were evaluated by measuring the UV-vis, fluorescence, thermal stability, the cationic degree, surface strength and smoothness of paper, the brightness degree of paper and the PC value of paper. Results showed that PFBC had better solubility in water than that of FBC, by measuring the optical properties. Through the surface sizing experiment and UV aging experiment, PFBC not only enhanced the surface strength and smoothness of paper as a surface sizing agent, but also had better effect on anti-UV aging than that of FBC as light stabilizer and fluorescent brightener.

  9. A method for tuning the excitation wavelength of an LED light source during fluorescence-based cystoscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindvold, Lars R.; Hermannn, Gregers G.

    2016-02-01

    In clinical applications of fluorescence-guided endoscopy of the bladder (cystoscopy) it can be observed that the contrast in light from autofluorescence and from photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) varies from patient to patient. To compensate for this effect, a new method is presented for tuning the wavelength of a LED-based light source during fluorescence guided endoscopy of the bladder i.e. photodynamic diagnosis of bladder tumours. In the present embodiment, the wavelength of the LED source, developed in our laboratory, can be tuned to vary the excitation wavelength of both the sensitised fluorescence in the tumours (PDD) as well as the native fluorescence of the bladder mucosa and blood vessels. The contrast of the image observed through the CCD-camera attached to the cystoscope is thereby increased. In this way, patient to patient variations in autofluorescence and in sensitised fluorescence of tumours can be compensated for during fluorescence-guided cystoscopy in the clinic.

  10. Filter-less fluorescence sensor with high separation ability achieved by the suppression of forward-scattered light in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong Joon; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Motoharu; Hizawa, Takeshi; Moriwaki, Yu; Dasai, Fumihiro; Kimura, Yasuyuki; Akita, Ippei; Iwata, Tatsuya; Ishida, Makoto; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2016-04-01

    The improvement of a filter-less fluorescence sensor, by suppressing forward scattering in silicon by surface planarization is presented. A fluorescence microscope has been widely used in biochemical fields. However, it is difficult to miniaturize because optical filters and other parts are necessary. We previously developed a filter-less fluorescence sensor. The separation ability of excitation light and fluorescence in the previous device was 550:1. It is necessary to improve the separation ability. This study focuses on the suppression of forward-scattered incident light in silicon, through the enhanced surface planarization of polysilicon, which is the gate electrode material. The separation ability of the filter-less fluorescence sensor was increased from 550:1 to 1250:1 by the suppression of forward-scattered light.

  11. A portable system for noninvasive assessment of advanced glycation end-products using skin fluorescence and reflectance spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. K.; Zhu, L.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, G.; Liu, Y.; Wang, A.

    2012-07-01

    An optical system has been developed for noninvasive assessment of skin advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). The system comprises mainly a high-power ultraviolet light emitting diode (LED) as an excitation source, an LED array for the reflectance measurement, a trifurcated fiber-optic probe for light transmitting and receiving, and a compact spectrometer for light detecting. Both skin fluorescence of a subject and the reflectance spectrum of the same site can be obtained in a single measurement with the system. Demonstrative measurements with the system have been conducted. Results indicate that the measured reflectance spectrum can be used to compensate for the distortion of AGEs fluorescence, which is caused by skin absorption and scattering. The system is noninvasive, portable, easy to operate, and has potential applications for clinical diagnosis of AGE-related diseases, especially diabetes mellitus.

  12. Development of a High Output Fluorescent Light Module for the Commercial Plant Biotechnology Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Mark; Zhou, Wei-Jia; Doty, Laura (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    To maximize the use of available resources provided onboard the International Space Station, the development of an efficient lighting 1 system is critical to the overall performance of the CPBF. Not only is it important to efficiently generate photon energy, but thermal loads on the CPBF Temperature and Humidity Control System must be minimized. By utilizing optical coatings designed to produce highly diffuse reflectance in the visible wavelengths while minimizing reflectance in the infrared region, the design of the fluorescent light module for the CPBF is optimized for maximum photon flux, spatial uniformity and energy efficiency. Since the Fluorescent Light Module must be fully enclosed to meet (ISS) requirements for containment of particulates and toxic materials, heat removal from the lights presented some unique design challenges. By using the Express Rack moderate C, temperature-cooling loop, heat is rejected by means of a liquid/air coolant manifold. Heat transfer to the manifold is performed by conduction using copper fins, by forced air convection using miniature fans, and by radiation using optically selective coatings that absorb in the infrared wavelengths. Using this combination of heat transfer mechanisms builds in redundancy to prevent thermal build up and premature bulb failure.

  13. High Density Labeling of PCR Products with the Fluorescent Analogue tCo

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Gudrun; Urban, Milan; Purse, Byron W.; Kuchta, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescent DNA of high molecular weight is an important tool for studying the physical properties of DNA and DNA-protein interactions and it plays a key role in modern biotechnology for DNA sequencing and detection. While several DNA polymerases can incorporate large numbers of dye-linked nucleotides into primed DNA templates, the amplification of the resulting densely labeled DNA strands by PCR is problematic. Here, we report a method for high density labeling of DNA in PCR reactions employing the 5’-triphosphate of 1, 3-diaza-2-oxo-phenoxazine (tCo) and Deep Vent DNA polymerase. tCo is a fluorescent cytosine analogue that absorbs and emits light at 365 and 460 nm, respectively. We obtained PCR products that were fluorescent enough to directly visualize them in a gel by excitation with long UV light, thus eliminating the need for staining with ethidium bromide. Reactions with Taq polymerase failed to produce PCR products in the presence of only small amounts of dtCoTP. A comparative kinetic study of Taq and Deep Vent polymerase revealed that Taq polymerase, although it inserts dtCoTP with high efficiency opposite G, is prone to forming mutagenic tCo-A base pairs and does not efficiently extend base pairs containing tCo. These kinetics features explain the poor outcome of the PCR reactions with Taq polymerase. Since tCo substitutes structurally for cytosine, the presented labeling method is believed to be less invasive than labeling with dye-linked nucleotides and therefore produces DNA that is ideally suited for biophysical studies. PMID:19810708

  14. Low Light CMOS Contact Imager with an Integrated Poly-Acrylic Emission Filter for Fluorescence Detection

    PubMed Central

    Dattner, Yonathan; Yadid-Pecht, Orly

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the fabrication of a low cost poly-acrylic acid (PAA) based emission filter integrated with a low light CMOS contact imager for fluorescence detection. The process involves the use of PAA as an adhesive for the emission filter. The poly-acrylic solution was chosen due its optical transparent properties, adhesive properties, miscibility with polar protic solvents and most importantly its bio-compatibility with a biological environment. The emission filter, also known as an absorption filter, involves dissolving an absorbing specimen in a polar protic solvent and mixing it with the PAA to uniformly bond the absorbing specimen and harden the filter. The PAA is optically transparent in solid form and therefore does not contribute to the absorbance of light in the visible spectrum. Many combinations of absorbing specimen and polar protic solvents can be derived, yielding different filter characteristics in different parts of the spectrum. We report a specific combination as a first example of implementation of our technology. The filter reported has excitation in the green spectrum and emission in the red spectrum, utilizing the increased quantum efficiency of the photo sensitive sensor array. The thickness of the filter (20 μm) was chosen by calculating the desired SNR using Beer-Lambert’s law for liquids, Quantum Yield of the fluorophore and the Quantum Efficiency of the sensor array. The filters promising characteristics make it suitable for low light fluorescence detection. The filter was integrated with a fully functional low noise, low light CMOS contact imager and experimental results using fluorescence polystyrene micro-spheres are presented. PMID:22399920

  15. The fluorescence detection of glutathione by ∙OH radicals' elimination with catalyst of MoS2/rGO under full spectrum visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Ma, Weiguang; Han, Dongxue; Wang, Lingnan; Wu, Tongshun; Niu, Li

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a new method for the detection of glutathione (GSH) was designed based on the ∙OH radicals' elimination system due to the reducing ability of GSH for the first time. Fluorescence method with terephthalic acid (TA) as the probe was employed for the quantification of ∙OH radicals' production and elimination. Experimental conditions of ∙OH radicals' production were optimized in detail, and ∙OH radicals were found to be efficiently produced by the excellent catalysis performance of MoS2/rGO under full spectrum visible light irradiation. The introduction of GSH make fluorescent intensity decrease due to the elimination of ∙OH radicals. For the present fluorescence based GSH sensor, a wide detection range of 60.0-700.0 µM and excellent selectivity have been achieved. Furthermore, it has been successfully employed for the determination of GSH in commercial drug tablets and human serum. PMID:26452861

  16. Light irradiance and spectral distribution effects on cyanobacterial hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatihah Salleh, Siti; Kamaruddin, Azlina; Hekarl Uzir, Mohamad; Rahman Mohamed, Abdul; Halim Shamsuddin, Abdul

    2016-03-01

    Light is an essential energy source for photosynthetic cyanobacteria. Changes in both light irradiance and spectral distribution will affect their photosynthetic productivity. Compared to the light irradiance, little investigations have been carried out on the effect of light spectra towards cyanobacterial hydrogen production. Hence, this work aims to investigate the effects of both light quantity and quality on biohydrogen productivity of heterocystous cyanobacterium, A.variabilis. Under white light condition, the highest hydrogen production rate of 31 µmol H2 mg chl a -1 h-1 was achieved at 70 µE m-2 s-1. When the experiment was repeated at the same light irradiance but different light spectra of blue, red and green, the accumulations of hydrogen were significantly lower than the white light except for blue light. As the light irradiance was increased to 350 µE m-2 s-1, the accumulated hydrogen under the blue light doubled that of the white light. Besides that, an unusual prolongation of the hydrogen production up to 120 h was observed. The results obtained suggest that blue light could be the most desirable light spectrum for cyanobacterial hydrogen production.

  17. Parameterization for light ion production from electromagnetic dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norbury, John

    2014-09-01

    Light ion (hydrogen and helium isotopes) production from relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions is important in space radiation protection problems, when galactic cosmic rays interact with spacecraft. In fact, for thick spacecraft shields, such as the International Space Station, light ion and neutron production can dominate the contribution to dose equivalent. Both strong and electromagnetic interactions can contribute to light ion production. The present work extends a previous parameterization of electromagnetically produced light ions, so that particle branching ratios are described more realistically.

  18. The role of plasmonic resonance in enhancement of interaction of light and silver nanostructures in fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shy-Haugh

    -coated silicon substrates and oxide-coated noble-metallic films. In analyzing these results we applied both the discrete dipole approximation (DDA)and finite difference time domain (FDTD)methods, calculating the electromagnetic field response of our arrays to incident light. Comparison between these calculations and experiment provides physical insight as to the mechanisms of nano-metal particle-enhanced fluorescence: our results indicate local field enhancement from silver nanoparticles is crucial in nMEF.

  19. Quantitative Light Fluorescence (QLF) and Polarized White Light (PWL) assessments of dental fluorosis in an epidemiological setting

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To determine if a novel dual camera imaging system employing both polarized white light (PWL) and quantitative light induced fluorescence imaging (QLF) is appropriate for measuring enamel fluorosis in an epidemiological setting. The use of remote and objective scoring systems is of importance in fluorosis assessments due to the potential risk of examiner bias using clinical methods. Methods Subjects were recruited from a panel previously characterized for fluorosis and caries to ensure a range of fluorosis presentation. A total of 164 children, aged 11 years (±1.3) participated following consent. Each child was examined using the novel imaging system, a traditional digital SLR camera, and clinically using the Dean’s and Thylstrup and Fejerskov (TF) Indices on the upper central and lateral incisors. Polarized white light and SLR images were scored for both Dean’s and TF indices by raters and fluorescence images were automatically scored using software. Results Data from 164 children were available with a good distribution of fluorosis severity. The automated software analysis of QLF images demonstrated significant correlations with the clinical examinations for both Dean’s and TF index. Agreement (measured by weighted Kappa’s) between examiners scoring clinically, from polarized photographs and from SLR images ranged from 0.56 to 0.92. Conclusions The study suggests that the use of a digital imaging system to capture images for either automated software analysis, or remote assessment by raters is suitable for epidemiological work. The use of recorded images enables study archiving, assessment by multiple examiners, remote assessment and objectivity due to the blinding of subject status. PMID:22607363

  20. Light-scattering submicroscopic particles as highly fluorescent analogs and their use as tracer labels in clinical and biological applications.

    PubMed

    Yguerabide, J; Yguerabide, E E

    1998-09-10

    Submicroscopic gold particle suspensions scatter colored light when illuminated with white light, and we have observed that a light-scattering gold particle suspension has the same appearance as a fluorescing solution. Thus, when illuminated by a narrow beam of white light, a 40-nm gold sol displays a clear (not cloudy), green scattered light (Tyndall) beam and has the same appearance as a fluorescing fluorescein solution. These, as well as other, observations have suggested to us that, in general, light-scattering particles can be treated as fluorescent analogs and used as fluorescent analog tracers in immuno- and DNA probe assays as well as in cell and molecular biology studies. Light-scattering particles are advantageous in these applications because particles such as gold and silver have very high light-scattering powers, which allows these particles to be easily detected, by light-scattering, at particle concentrations as low as 10(-16) M. The scattered light can be detected by the unaided eye for qualitative measurements or with a simple light-sensitive detector for quantitative measurements. Moreover, individual particles can be easily detected by eye or a video camera using a simple light microscope with a proper illuminating system. In addition, submicroscopic particles which scatter blue, green, yellow, orange, or red light can be readily synthesized. Antibodies, DNA probes, and other tracer substances can be readily attached to gold and other particles without altering their light-scattering properties. In this article we present the theory which allows one to predict the light-scattering properties of particles of different sizes and compositions and identify those particle sizes and compositions which appear most adequate for particular applications. Furthermore, we calculate molar extinction coefficients and emission efficiencies for particles of different sizes and compositions which allows us to compare the light-producing powers of these particles

  1. Imaging green fluorescent protein-labeled neurons using light and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Knott, Graham W

    2013-06-01

    The ability to observe axons and dendrites with transmission electron microscopy (EM) after they have been previously imaged live with laser-scanning microscopy is a useful technique to study their synaptic connectivity. This protocol provides a detailed method by which neurons that were imaged in a live brain or slice culture can be reimaged using EM. First, brain tissue expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) is chemically fixed. Then, an immunocytochemistry process is used to render the fluorescent protein electron dense so that it can first be located using light microscopy and then serial thin-sectioned for EM so that the ultrastructure of specific parts of neurites can be analyzed in three dimensions. Patterns of blood vessels observed in the live brain are used to locate the previously imaged neurons. The method described here allows for a complete three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction to be made of the imaged structures from serial electron micrographs. PMID:23734023

  2. A Combined Light Sheet Fluorescence and Differential Interference Contrast Microscope for Live Imaging of Multicellular Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Ryan P.; Taormina, Michael J.; Jemielita, Matthew; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2014-01-01

    We describe a microscope capable of both light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) and differential interference contrast microscopy (DICM). The two imaging modes, which to the best of our knowledge have not previously been combined, are complementary: LSFM provides three-dimensional imaging of fluorescently labeled components of multicellular systems with high speed, large fields of view, and low phototoxicity, while DICM reveals the unlabeled neighborhood of tissues, organs, and other structures with high contrast and inherent optical sectioning. Use of a single Nomarski prism for DICM and a shared detection path for both imaging modes enables simple integration of the two techniques in one custom microscope. We provide several examples of the utility of the resulting instrument, focusing especially on the digestive tract of the larval zebrafish, revealing in this complex and heterogeneous environment anatomical features, the behavior of commensal microbes, immune cell motions, and more. PMID:25611324

  3. Focused fluorescence excitation with time-reversed ultrasonically encoded light and imaging in thick scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Puxiang; Suzuki, Yuta; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-07-01

    Scattering dominates light propagation in biological tissue, and therefore restricts both resolution and penetration depth in optical imaging within thick tissue. As photons travel into the diffusive regime, typically 1 mm beneath human skin, their trajectories transition from ballistic to diffusive due to the increased number of scattering events, which makes it impossible to focus, much less track, photon paths. Consequently, imaging methods that rely on controlled light illumination are ineffective in deep tissue. This problem has recently been addressed by a novel method capable of dynamically focusing light in thick scattering media via time reversal of ultrasonically encoded (TRUE) diffused light. Here, using photorefractive materials as phase conjugate mirrors, we show a direct visualization and dynamic control of optical focusing with this light delivery method, and demonstrate its application for focused fluorescence excitation and imaging in thick turbid media. These abilities are increasingly critical for understanding the dynamic interactions of light with biological matter and processes at different system levels, as well as their applications for biomedical diagnosis and therapy.

  4. Teaching about photosynthesis with simple equipment: analysis of light-induced changes in fluorescence and reflectance of plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Björn, Lars Olof; Li, Shaoshan

    2013-10-01

    Solar energy absorbed by plants results in either reflection or absorption. The latter results in photosynthesis, fluorescence, or heat. Measurements of fluorescence changes have been used for monitoring processes associated with photosynthesis. A simple method to follow changes in leaf fluorescence and leaf reflectance associated with nonphotochemical quenching and light acclimation of leaves is described. The main equipment needed consists of a green-light emitting laser pointer, a digital camera, and a personal computer equipped with the camera acquisition software and the programs ImageJ and Excel. Otherwise, only commonly available cheap materials are required. PMID:23728512

  5. Localization of fluorescently labeled structures in frozen-hydrated samples using integrated light electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Faas, F G A; Bárcena, M; Agronskaia, A V; Gerritsen, H C; Moscicka, K B; Diebolder, C A; van Driel, L F; Limpens, R W A L; Bos, E; Ravelli, R B G; Koning, R I; Koster, A J

    2013-03-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy is an increasingly popular technique to study complex biological systems at various levels of resolution. Fluorescence microscopy can be employed to scan large areas to localize regions of interest which are then analyzed by electron microscopy to obtain morphological and structural information from a selected field of view at nm-scale resolution. Previously, an integrated approach to room temperature correlative microscopy was described. Combined use of light and electron microscopy within one instrument greatly simplifies sample handling, avoids cumbersome experimental overheads, simplifies navigation between the two modalities, and improves the success rate of image correlation. Here, an integrated approach for correlative microscopy under cryogenic conditions is presented. Its advantages over the room temperature approach include safeguarding the native hydrated state of the biological specimen, preservation of the fluorescence signal without risk of quenching due to heavy atom stains, and reduced photo bleaching. The potential of cryo integrated light and electron microscopy is demonstrated for the detection of viable bacteria, the study of in vitro polymerized microtubules, the localization of mitochondria in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, and for a search into virus-induced intracellular membrane modifications within mammalian cells. PMID:23261400

  6. Two-photon fluorescence and confocal reflected light imaging of thick tissue structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki H.; So, Peter T. C.; Kochevar, Irene E.; Masters, Barry R.; Gratton, Enrico

    1998-04-01

    The technology of two-photon excitation has opened a window of opportunity for developing non-invasive medical diagnostic tools capable of monitoring thick tissue biochemical states. Using cellular endogenous chromophores, (beta) -nicotinamide- adenine dinucleotide phosphate [NAD(P)H], the cellular metabolic rates in living human skin were determined. Although important functional information can be obtained from the fluorescence spectroscopy of endogenous chromophores, these chromophores are rather poor contrast enhancing agent for mapping cellular morphology. First, most endogenous chromophores are confined to the cellular cytoplasm which prevents the visualization of other cellular organelles. Second, there is significant variability in the distribution and the quantum yield of endogenous chromophores which depends on tissue biochemistry but prevents consistent comparison of cellular morphology. On the other hand, the deep tissue cellular morphology has been imaged with excellent resolution using reflected light confocal microscopy. In reflected light microscopy, the image contrast originates from the index of refraction differences of the cellular structures. The organelle boundaries with significant index differences such as the plasma membrane and the nucleus envelope can be consistently visualized. A combination of morphological and functional information is required for a thorough tissue study. This presentation describes the development of a new microscope which is capable of simultaneously collecting both two-photon fluorescence and confocal reflected light signals. Promising biomedical applications include the non-invasive diagnosis of skin cancer and the study of wound healing.

  7. Comparing phototoxicity during the development of a zebrafish craniofacial bone using confocal and light sheet fluorescence microscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Jemielita, Matthew; Taormina, Michael J; Delaurier, April; Kimmel, Charles B; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2013-12-01

    The combination of genetically encoded fluorescent proteins and three-dimensional imaging enables cell-type-specific studies of embryogenesis. Light sheet microscopy, in which fluorescence excitation is provided by a plane of laser light, is an appealing approach to live imaging due to its high speed and efficient use of photons. While the advantages of rapid imaging are apparent from recent work, the importance of low light levels to studies of development is not well established. We examine the zebrafish opercle, a craniofacial bone that exhibits pronounced shape changes at early developmental stages, using both spinning disk confocal and light sheet microscopies of fluorescent osteoblast cells. We find normal and aberrant opercle morphologies for specimens imaged with short time intervals using light sheet and spinning disk confocal microscopies, respectively, under equivalent exposure conditions over developmentally-relevant time scales. Quantification of shapes reveals that the differently imaged specimens travel along distinct trajectories in morphological space. PMID:23242824

  8. MUTATION SPECTRA IN SALMONELLA OF SUNLIGHT, WHITE FLUORESCENT LIGHT, AND LIGHT FROM TANNING SALON BEDS: INDUCTION OF TANDEM MUTATIONS AND ROLE OF DNA REPAIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated the mutagenicity of sunlight (SUN), uncovered cool white fluorescent light (FLR), and light from a tanning salon bed (TAN) at the base-substitution allele hisG46 of Salmonella in four DNA repair backgrounds (wild type, uvrB, pKM101, and uvrB+pKM101). Approximately 80...

  9. Integrated OLED as excitation light source in fluorescent lateral flow immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Vishak; Steckl, Andrew J

    2015-12-15

    The integration of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) as excitation light sources for quantum dot-based fluorescent lateral flow immunoassay systems (LFIA) was investigated. This approach has the potential to deliver a sensitive visible detection scheme for low-cost, disposable lab-on-chip point-of-care (POC) diagnosis system. Thin film phosphorescent green OLEDs fabricated on plastic substrates were integrated on-chip to excite the test line of a quantum dot-based LFIA (QD-LFIA). OLEDs were fabricated by sequential deposition of organic thin films (total of ~100 nm) onto ITO-coated PET substrates. CdSe/ZnS QDs emitting at 655 nm and Au nanoparticles (NP - 10 nm size) conjugated antibodies were used for the fluorescence QD-LFIA and conventional reflection-mode Au NP-LFIA, respectively. Thin plastic color light filters were integrated for filtering the excitation light source and, thereby, increasing the contrast of the emitted light for optimized visual detection. Integration of the OLED and color filters with the analytical membrane was achieved using adhesive techniques facilitated by the planar nature of the layers, which suggests possible large scale manufacturing using roll-to-roll processing. Gray scale analysis from digital images captured with a digital camera was used to quantify the visual sensitivity. The signal intensity, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the limit of detection (LOD) of OLED integrated QD-LFIAs were compared to Au NP LFIAs. OLED QD-LFIA exhibited superior performance in all signal aspects: 7-8× higher signal intensity and SNR, and a 7× lower LOD of 3 nM (measured at S/N=3). These results demonstrate the potential of OLED-integrated in LFIA devices for obtaining sensitive, fast and low-cost POC diagnostics. PMID:26134292

  10. The Effect of Time on Bone Fluorescence: Implications for Using Alternate Light Sources to Search for Skeletal Remains.

    PubMed

    Swaraldahab, Mohamed A H; Christensen, Angi M

    2016-03-01

    Bones fluoresce when exposed to certain wavelengths of shortwave light, and this property can be useful in locating and sorting skeletal remains in forensic contexts. The proteins in bone collagen are largely responsible for its fluorescent properties, but these proteins degrade and denature over time. This study examined the fluorescence of bones from four temporal groups (recent, semi-recent, ancient, and historic) ranging from 0 to 1064 years before present. Specimens were photographed under 490 nm wavelength light, and fluorescence was quantified by converting intensity to a gray scale value based on the RGB color model using ImageJ(®) software. Significant (p < 0.05) differences were found in mean fluorescence between all four temporal groups, and a 0.324 coefficient of correlation indicates a significant (inverse) relationship between fluorescence and time. Bone fluorescence decreases with time, but some fluorescence is retained even in older samples. Fluorescence can therefore be reliably used in many modern skeletal remains searches. PMID:27404617

  11. Fluorescence molecular tomography on animal model by means of multiple views structured light illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducros, N.; Bassi, A.; Valentini, G.; Canti, G.; Arridge, S.; D'Andrea, C.

    2013-03-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) is quite demanding in terms of acquisition/computational times due to the huge amount of data. Different research groups have proposed compression approaches regarding both illumination (wide field structured light instead of raster point scanning) and detection (compression of the acquired images). The authors have previously proposed a fast FMT reconstruction method based on the combination of a multiple-view approach with a full compression scheme. This method had been successfully tested on a cylindrical phantom and is being generalized in this paper to samples of arbitrary shape. The devised procedure and algorithms have been tested on an ex-vivo mouse.

  12. Light-assisted non-Poissonian fluorescence blinking from bosonic composite reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Budini, Adrian A.

    2007-08-15

    Single fluorophore systems attached to complex hosting molecules may exhibit a light-assisted fluorescence blinking phenomenon between two or more different intensity states whose sojourn statistic depends on the pumping laser intensity and also may depart from an exponential law. In contrast with standard phenomenological models, here we demonstrate that such kind of radiation patterns can be microscopically derived and characterized by describing the fluorophore decay through a composite reservoir where quantum degrees of freedom associated to the host molecule mediate the interaction between the fluorophore and a bosonic bath associated to its natural decay.

  13. OSL response bleaching of BeO samples, using fluorescent light and blue LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groppo, D. P.; Caldas, L. V. E.

    2016-07-01

    The optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) is widely used as a dosimetric technique for many applications. In this work, the OSL response bleaching of BeO samples was studied. The samples were irradiated using a beta radiation source (90Sr+90Y); the bleaching treatments (fluorescent light and blue LEDs) were performed, and the results were compared. Various optical treatment time intervals were tested until reaching the complete bleaching of the OSL response. The best combination of the time interval and bleaching type was analyzed.

  14. Compact Fluorescent Lighting in America: Lessons Learned on the Way to Market

    SciTech Connect

    Sandahl, Linda J.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Ledbetter, Marc R.; Steward, Heidi E.; Calwell, Chris

    2006-05-22

    This report describes the history of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) in America. CFLs were introduced in the 1970s; however, it has taken more than 20 years for them to gain widespread recognition in the U.S. residential lighting market. This report reviews the development of CFLs, efforts to increase market acceptance of them, and barriers to that acceptance. Lessons to be learned from this study of CFLs are identified in hopes of assisting future market introduction efforts for other promising energy-efficient technologies. This report was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Building Technologies, Emerging Technologies Program.

  15. UV-A emission from fluorescent energy-saving light bulbs alters local retinoic acid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hellmann-Regen, Julian; Heuser, Isabella; Regen, Francesca

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide bans on incandescent light bulbs (ILBs) drive the use of compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs, which emit ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Potential health issues of these light sources have already been discussed, including speculation about the putative biological effects on light exposed tissues, yet the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesized photoisomerization of all-trans retinoic acid (at-RA), a highly light sensitive morphogen, into biologically less active isomers, as a mechanism mediating biological effects of CFLs. Local at-RA is anti-carcinogenic, entrains molecular rhythms and is crucial for skin homeostasis. Therefore, we quantified the impact of CFL irradiation on extra- and intracellular levels of RA isomers using an epidermal cell culture model. Moreover, a biologically relevant impact of CFL irradiation was assessed using highly at-RA-sensitive human neuroblastoma cells. Dose-dependent conversion of extra- and intracellular at-RA into the biologically less active 13-cis-isomer was significantly higher in CFL vs. ILB exposure and completely preventable by employing a UV-filter. Moreover, pre-irradiation of culture media by CFL attenuated at-RA-specific effects on cell viability in human at-RA-sensitive cells in a dose-dependent manner. These findings point towards a biological relevance of CFL-induced at-RA decomposition, providing a mechanism for CFL-mediated effects on environmental health. PMID:24135972

  16. The health risks associated with energy efficient fluorescent, LEDs, and artificial lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panahi, Allen

    2014-09-01

    With the phasing out of incandescent lamps in many countries, the introduction of new LED based light sources and luminaries sometimes raise the question of whether the spectral characteristics of the LED and other energy savings Fluorescent lights including the popular CFLs are suitable to replace the traditional incandescent lamps. These concerns are sometimes raised particularly for radiation emissions in the UV and Blue parts of the spectrum. This paper aims to address such concerns for the common `white light' sources typically used in household and other general lighting used in the work place. Recent studies have shown that women working the night shift have an increased probability of developing breast cancer. We like to report on the findings of many studies done by medical professionals, in particular the recent announcement of AMA in the US and many studies conducted in the UK, as well as the European community to increase public awareness on the long term health risks of the optical and opto-biological effects on the human health caused by artificial lighting.

  17. Efficient White-Light Generation from Ionically Self-Assembled Triply-Fluorescent Organic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Das, Susmita; Debnath, Tanay; Basu, Amrita; Ghosh, Deepanwita; Das, Abhijit Kumar; Baker, Gary A; Patra, Amitava

    2016-06-20

    Low cost, simple, and environmentally friendly strategies for white-light generation which do not require rare-earth phosphors or other toxic or elementally scare species remain an essentially unmet challenge. Progress in the area of all-organic approaches is highly sought, single molecular systems remaining a particular challenge. Taking inspiration from the designer nature of ionic-liquid chemistry, we now introduce a new strategy toward white-light emission based on the facile generation of nanoparticles comprising three different fluorophores assembled in a well-defined stoichiometry purely through electrostatic interactions. The building blocks consist of the fluorophores aminopyrene, fluorescein, and rhodamine 6G which represent blue, green, and red-emitting species, respectively. Spherical nanoparticles 16(±5) nm in size were prepared which display bright white-light emission with high fluorescence quantum efficiency (26 %) and color coordinate at (0.29, 0.38) which lie in close proximity to pure white light (0.33, 0.33). It is noteworthy that this same fluorophore mixture in free solution yields only blue emission. Density functional theory calculations reveal H-bond and ground-state proton transfer mediated absolute non-parallel orientation of the constituent units which result in frustrated energy transfer, giving rise to emission from the individual centers and concomitant white-light emission. PMID:27219524

  18. Light quality and efficiency of consumer grade solid state lighting products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dam-Hansen, Carsten; Corell, Dennis Dan; Thorseth, Anders; Poulsen, Peter Behrensdorff

    2013-03-01

    The rapid development in flux and efficiency of Light Emitting Diodes (LED) has resulted in a flooding of the lighting market with Solid State Lighting (SSL) products. Many traditional light sources can advantageously be replaced by SSL products. There are, however, large variations in the quality of these products, and some are not better than the ones they are supposed to replace. A lack of quality demands and standards makes it difficult for consumers to get an overview of the SSL products. Here the results of a two year study investigating SSL products on the Danish market are presented. Focus has been on SSL products for replacement of incandescent lamps and halogen spotlights. The warm white light and good color rendering properties of these traditional light sources are a must for lighting in Denmark and the Nordic countries. 266 SSL replacement lamps have been tested for efficiency and light quality with respect to correlated color temperature and color rendering properties. This shows a trade-off between high color rendering warm white light and energy efficiency. The lumen and color maintenance over time has been investigated and results for products running over 11000 h will be presented. A new internet based SSL product selection tool will be shown. Here the products can be compared on efficiency, light quality parameters, thus providing a better basis for the selection of SSL products for consumers.

  19. Effects of fluorescent lighting on in vitro micropropagation of Lemna minor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somsri, Kollawat; Pinyopich, Pataradawn; Mohammed, Waleed S.

    2010-05-01

    The vegetative in vitro propagation of Lemna minor stain SING-4 exposed to two different types of fluorescent light sources, Philips TLD 36W/54 and Toshiba FL40T8BRF/36, was studied. The liquid culture medium contained 4.43gl-1 phytohormone-free full-strength Murashige & Skoog (MS) basal medium with vitamins, 30gl-1 sucrose, and 1gl-1 MES. The results showed that both plant cultures had undergone normal asexual reproduction with an exponential increase trend. Cultures exposed to Toshiba FL40T8BRF/36 reproduced at a slightly faster rate while expressing significantly greener foliage (leaf color chart shade No.8), which indicates the presence of more chlorophyll, than cultures exposed to Philips TLD 36W/54 (leaf color chart shade No.4). The data obtained from our experiment reveals that light emitted from Toshiba FL40T8BRF/36 produces healthier and higher quality cultures.

  20. Modeling of fluorescence quenching by lutein in the plant light-harvesting complex LHCII.

    PubMed

    Duffy, C D P; Chmeliov, J; Macernis, M; Sulskus, J; Valkunas, L; Ruban, A V

    2013-09-26

    Photoprotective non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) in higher plants is the result of the formation of energy quenching traps in the light-harvesting antenna of photosystem II (PSII). It has been proposed that this quenching trap is a lutein molecule closely associated with the chlorophyll terminal emitter of the major light-harvesting complex LHCII. We have used a combination of time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and the semiempirical MNDO-CAS-CI method to model the chlorophyll-lutein energy transfer dynamics of the highly quenched crystal structure of LHCII. Our calculations reveal that the incoherent "hopping" of energy from Chla612 to the short-lived, dipole forbidden 2(1)A(g)(-) state of lutein620 accounts for the strong fluorescence quenching observed in these crystals. This adds weight to the argument that the same dissipative pathway is responsible for in vivo NPQ. PMID:23234311

  1. Light-dependent regulation of structural flexibility in a photochromic fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Hideaki; Mal, Tapas Kumar; Wälchli, Markus; Kikuchi, Akihiro; Fukano, Takashi; Ando, Ryoko; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman; Taka, Junichiro; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Ikura, Mitsuhiko; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    The structural basis for the photochromism in the fluorescent protein Dronpa is poorly understood, because the crystal structures of the bright state of the protein did not provide an answer to the mechanism of the photochromism, and structural determination of the dark state has been elusive. We performed NMR analyses of Dronpa in solution at ambient temperatures to find structural flexibility of the protein in the dark state. Light-induced changes in interactions between the chromophore and β-barrel are responsible for switching between the two states. In the bright state, the apex of the chromophore tethers to the barrel by a hydrogen bond, and an imidazole ring protruding from the barrel stabilizes the plane of the chromophore. These interactions are disrupted by strong illumination with blue light, and the chromophore, together with a part of the β-barrel, becomes flexible, leading to a nonradiative decay process. PMID:18574155

  2. Imaging of human differentiated 3D neural aggregates using light sheet fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gualda, Emilio J.; Simão, Daniel; Pinto, Catarina; Alves, Paula M.; Brito, Catarina

    2014-01-01

    The development of three dimensional (3D) cell cultures represents a big step for the better understanding of cell behavior and disease in a more natural like environment, providing not only single but multiple cell type interactions in a complex 3D matrix, highly resembling physiological conditions. Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) is becoming an excellent tool for fast imaging of such 3D biological structures. We demonstrate the potential of this technique for the imaging of human differentiated 3D neural aggregates in fixed and live samples, namely calcium imaging and cell death processes, showing the power of imaging modality compared with traditional microscopy. The combination of light sheet microscopy and 3D neural cultures will open the door to more challenging experiments involving drug testing at large scale as well as a better understanding of relevant biological processes in a more realistic environment. PMID:25161607

  3. Use of quantitative light-induced fluorescence to monitor tooth whitening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaechi, Bennett T.; Higham, Susan M.

    2001-04-01

    The changing of tooth shade by whitening agents occurs gradually. Apart from being subjective and affected by the conditions of the surroundings, visual observation cannot detect a very slight change in tooth color. An electronic method, which can communicate the color change quantitatively, would be more reliable. Quantitative Light- induced Fluorescence (QLF) was developed to detect and assess dental caries based on the phenomenon of change of autofluorescence of a tooth by demineralization. However, stains on the tooth surface exhibit the same phenomenon, and therefore QLF can be used to measure the percentage fluorescence change of stained enamel with respect to surrounding unstained enamel. The present study described a technique of assessing the effect of a tooth-whitening agent using QLF. This was demonstrated in two experiments in which either wholly or partially stained teeth were whitened by intermittent immersion in sodium hypochlorite. Following each immersion, the integrated fluorescence change due to the stain was quantified using QLF. In either situation, the value of (Delta) Q decreased linearly as the tooth regained its natural shade. It was concluded that gradual changing of the shade of discolored teeth by a whitening agent could be quantified using QLF.

  4. Oligomeric state of lipocalin-1 (LCN1) by multiangle laser light scattering and fluorescence anisotropy decay.

    PubMed

    Gasymov, Oktay K; Abduragimov, Adil R; Merschak, Petra; Redl, Bernhard; Glasgow, Ben J

    2007-10-01

    Multiangle laser light scattering and fluorescence anisotropy decay measurements clarified the oligomeric states of native and recombinant tear lipocalin (lipocalin-1, TL). Native TL is monomeric. Recombinant TL (5-68 microM) with or without the histidine tag shows less than 7% dimer formation that is not in equilibrium with the monomeric form. Fluorescence anisotropy decay showed a correlation time of 9-10 ns for TL (10 microM-1 mM). Hydrodynamic calculations based on the crystallographic structure of a monomeric TL mutant closely concur with the observed correlation time. The solution properties calculated with HYDROPRO and SOLPRO programs from the available crystallographic structure of a monomeric TL mutant concur closely with the observed fluorescence anisotropy decay. The resulting model shows that protein topology is the major determinant of rotational correlation time and accounts for deviation from the Stokes-Einstein relation. The data challenge previous gel filtration studies to show that native TL exists predominantly as a monomer in solution rather than as a dimer. Delipidation of TL results in a formation of a complex oligomeric state (up to 25%). These findings are important as the dynamic processes in the tear film are limited by diffusional, translational as well as rotational, properties of the protein. PMID:17869594

  5. Oligomeric State of Lipocalin-1 (LCN1) by Multiangle Laser Light Scattering and Fluorescence Anisotropy Decay

    PubMed Central

    Gasymov, Oktay K.; Abduragimov, Adil R.; Merschak, Petra; Redl, Bernhard; Glasgow, Ben J.

    2007-01-01

    Multiangle laser light scattering and fluorescence anisotropy decay measurements clarified the oligomeric states of native and recombinant tear lipocalin (lipocalin-1, TL). Native TL is monomeric. Recombinant TL (5-68 μM) with or without the histidine tag shows less than 7% dimer formation that is not in equilibrium with the monomeric form. Fluorescence anisotropy decay showed a correlation time of 9-10 ns for TL (10 μM- 1mM). Hydrodynamic calculations based on the crystallographic structure of a monomeric TL mutant closely concur with the observed correlation time. The solution properties calculated with HYDROPRO and SOLPRO programs from the available crystallographic structure of a monomeric TL mutant concur closely with the observed fluorescence anisotropy decay. The resulting model shows that protein topology is the major determinant of rotational correlation time and accounts for deviation from the Stokes-Einstein relation. The data challenge previous gel filtration studies to show that native TL exists predominantly as a monomer in solution rather than as a dimer. Delipidation of TL results in a formation of a complex oligomeric state (up to 25%). These findings are important as the dynamic processes in the tear film are limited by diffusional, translational as well as rotational, properties of the protein. PMID:17869594

  6. MACROscopic imaging of tumor xenografts using fluorescence, phase contrast, and transmitted light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinou, Paul; Nicklee, Trudey; Hedley, David W.; Wilson, Brian C.; Damaskinos, Savvas

    2004-10-01

    Recent advances in imaging technology have contributed greatly to biological science. Confocal fluorescence microscopes (CFM) can acquire 2D and 3D images of biological samples such as live or fixed cells and tissues. Specimens that are large (e.g., a 10 mm x 10 mm tissue section) and overfill the field of view (FOV) of typical microscope objectives require use of image tiling to cover the entire specimen. This can be time consuming and cause artefacts in the composite image. The MACROscope system (Biomedical Photometrics Inc, Waterloo, Canada), is a confocal device with a 22 mm x 70 mm FOV; ideal for imaging large tissue sections in a single frame. The system used here is a prototype capable of simultaneous acquisition from up to three detection channels. Fluorescence images of SiHa mouse tumour xenografts stained with CD31-Cy3, showing blood vessel location, and EF5-Cy5, showing areas of tissue hypoxia, were collected. Differential phase contrast (DPC) images of the same section were also recorded to show tissue morphology. Finally, RGB transmitted light images of human tongue and pancreas tissues were obtained. This new device avoids the need for image tiling and provides simultaneous imaging of multiple fluorescently-labeled tissue specific markers in large biological samples. This enables time- and cost-efficient high-throughput screening of (immuno)histopathological samples. This device may also serve in the imaging of high-throughput DNA and tissue arrays.

  7. Lighting Up Clostridium Difficile: Reporting Gene Expression Using Fluorescent Lov Domains

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Anthony M.; Jukes, Caitlin; Candlish, Denise; Irvine, June J.; Spencer, Janice; Fagan, Robert P.; Roe, Andrew J.; Christie, John M.; Fairweather, Neil F.; Douce, Gillian R.

    2016-01-01

    The uses of fluorescent reporters derived from green fluorescent protein have proved invaluable for the visualisation of biological processes in bacteria grown under aerobic conditions. However, their requirement for oxygen has limited their application in obligate anaerobes such as Clostridium difficile. Fluorescent proteins derived from Light, Oxygen or Voltage sensing (LOV) domains have been shown to bridge this limitation, but their utility as translational fusions to monitor protein expression and localisation in a strict anaerobic bacterium has not been reported. Here we demonstrate the utility of phiLOV in three species of Clostridium and its application as a marker of real-time protein translation and dynamics through genetic fusion with the cell division protein, FtsZ. Time lapse microscopy of dividing cells suggests that Z ring assembly arises through the extension of the FtsZ arc starting from one point on the circumference. Furthermore, through incorporation of phiLOV into the flagella subunit, FliC, we show the potential of bacterial LOV-based fusion proteins to be successfully exported to the extracellular environment. PMID:26996606

  8. In-vacuum scattered light reduction with black cupric oxide surfaces for sensitive fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Norrgard, E B; Sitaraman, N; Barry, J F; McCarron, D J; Steinecker, M H; DeMille, D

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a simple and easy method for producing low-reflectivity surfaces that are ultra-high vacuum compatible, may be baked to high temperatures, and are easily applied even on complex surface geometries. Black cupric oxide (CuO) surfaces are chemically grown in minutes on any copper surface, allowing for low-cost, rapid prototyping, and production. The reflective properties are measured to be comparable to commercially available products for creating optically black surfaces. We describe a vacuum apparatus which uses multiple blackened copper surfaces for sensitive, low-background detection of molecules using laser-induced fluorescence. PMID:27250404

  9. Highly efficient white organic light-emitting diodes based on fluorescent blue emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenow, Thomas C.; Furno, Mauro; Reineke, Sebastian; Olthof, Selina; Lüssem, Björn; Leo, Karl

    2010-12-01

    Beside inorganic LEDs and fluorescent lamps, organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are evolving into a serious alternative to incandescent lamps. Up to now, it was assumed that all-phosphorescent OLEDs are required for reaching sufficiently high efficiencies. However, the stability of phosphorescent blue emitters is a major challenge. We present a novel approach to achieve highly efficient (up to 90 lm/W at 1000 cd/m2 using a macroextractor) white light emission from OLEDs. The here presented combination of a fluorescent blue and a phosphorescent red emitter simultaneously allows for a strong blue emission and efficient triplet transfer to the phosphor. The spectrum is extended in the green and yellow region by a full phosphorescent unit stacked on top of the triplet harvesting device. This superposition of four different emitters results in color coordinates close to illuminant A and a color rendering index of 80. Furthermore, color stability is given with respect to varying driving conditions and estimations of the electrical and optical efficiencies are provided.

  10. Improved micro x-ray fluorescence spectrometer for light element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smolek, Stephan; Streli, Christina; Zoeger, Norbert; Wobrauschek, Peter

    2010-05-15

    Since most available micro x-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) spectrometers operate in air, which does not allow the analysis of low-Z elements (Z{<=}14), a special micro-XRF spectrometer has been designed to extend the analytical range down to light elements (Z{>=}6). It offers improved excitation and detection conditions necessary for light element analysis. To eliminate absorption of the exciting and fluorescent radiation, the system operates under vacuum condition. Sample mapping is automated and controlled by specialized computer software developed for this spectrometer. Several different samples were measured to test and characterize the spectrometer. The spot size has been determined by scans across a 10 {mu}m Cu wire which resulted in a full width at half maximum of 31 {mu}m for Mo K{alpha} line (17.44 keV) and 44 {mu}m effective beam size for the Cu K edge and 71 {mu}m effective beam size for the Cu L edge. Lower limits of detection in the picogram range for each spot (or {mu}g/cm{sup 2}) were obtained by measuring various thin metal foils under different conditions. Furthermore, detection limits in the parts per million range were found measuring NIST621 standard reference material. Area scans of a microscopic laser print and NaF droplet were performed to show mapping capabilities.

  11. Polychromatic light-emitting diodes with a fluorescent nanosphere opal coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, K. N.; Fu, W. Y.; Ng, W. N.; Leung, C. H.; Lai, P. T.; Wong, K. K. Y.; Choi, H. W.

    2008-09-01

    A hexagonally close-packed array consisting of fluorescent nanospheres was coated onto short-wavelength GaN light-emitting diodes to demonstrate polychromatic white light emission. The spherical particles self-assemble into ordered three-dimensional opal structures, performing the role of color conversion to generate a polychromatic spectrum with smooth and uniform emission patterns. Different ratios of green and orange-red fluorescent nanospheres were mixed and coated onto high-extraction-efficiency micro-LEDs. Four devices with different shades of white emission were demonstrated. Device A, with a high content of orange-red nanospheres, offers the highest CRI value of 80, whereas device C with a well-balanced ratio of green and orange-red nanospheres exhibits color characteristics closest to ideal white with CIE coordinate at (0.34, 0.34). At 20 mA driving current, the luminous efficacy of the devices A, B, C, and D are 40.5 lm W-1, 57.7 lm W-1, 63.1 lm W-1, and 67.2 lm W-1 respectively, while the correlated color temperatures (CCTs) of the corresponding devices are 3587, 4778, 5271, and 13 000 K.

  12. The performance of 2D array detectors for light sheet based fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anand Pratap; Krieger, Jan Wolfgang; Buchholz, Jan; Charbon, Edoardo; Langowski, Jörg; Wohland, Thorsten

    2013-04-01

    Single plane illumination microscopy based fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (SPIM-FCS) is a new method for imaging FCS in 3D samples, providing diffusion coefficients, transport, flow velocities and concentrations in an imaging mode. SPIM-FCS records correlation functions over a whole plane in a sample, which requires array detectors for recording the fluorescence signal. Several types of image sensors are suitable for FCS. They differ in properties such as effective area per pixel, quantum efficiency, noise level and read-out speed. Here we compare the performance of several low light array detectors based on three different technologies: (1) Single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) arrays, (2) passive-pixel electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) and (3) active-pixel scientific-grade complementary metal oxide semiconductor cameras (sCMOS). We discuss the influence of the detector characteristics on the effective FCS observation volume, and demonstrate that light sheet based SPIM-FCS provides absolute diffusion coefficients. This is verified by parallel measurements with confocal FCS, single particle tracking (SPT), and the determination of concentration gradients in space and time. While EMCCD cameras have a temporal resolution in the millisecond range, sCMOS cameras and SPAD arrays can extend the time resolution of SPIM-FCS down to 10 μs or lower. PMID:23571955

  13. The effects of UV emission from compact fluorescent light exposure on human dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mironava, Tatsiana; Hadjiargyrou, Michael; Simon, Marcia; Rafailovich, Miriam H

    2012-01-01

    Compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs can provide the same amount of lumens as incandescent light bulbs, using one quarter of the energy. Recently, CFL exposure was found to exacerbate existing skin conditions; however, the effects of CFL exposure on healthy skin tissue have not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we studied the effects of exposure to CFL illumination on healthy human skin tissue cells (fibroblasts and keratinocytes). Cells exposed to CFLs exhibited a decrease in the proliferation rate, a significant increase in the production of reactive oxygen species, and a decrease in their ability to contract collagen. Measurements of UV emissions from these bulbs found significant levels of UVC and UVA (mercury [Hg] emission lines), which appeared to originate from cracks in the phosphor coatings, present in all bulbs studied. The response of the cells to the CFLs was consistent with damage from UV radiation, which was further enhanced when low dosages of TiO(2) nanoparticles (NPs), normally used for UV absorption, were added prior to exposure. No effect on cells, with or without TiO(2) NPs, was observed when they were exposed to incandescent light of the same intensity. PMID:22724459

  14. THE IMPACT OF NONPHOTOCHEMICAL QUENCHING OF FLUORESCENCE ON THE PHOTON BALANCE IN DIATOMS UNDER DYNAMIC LIGHT CONDITIONS(1).

    PubMed

    Su, Wanwen; Jakob, Torsten; Wilhelm, Christian

    2012-04-01

    The nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) of fluorescence is an important photoprotective mechanism in particular under dynamic light conditions. Its photoprotective potential was suggested to be a functional trait of algal diversity. In the present study, the influence of the photoprotective capacity on the growth balance was investigated in two diatoms, which possess different NPQ characteristics. It was hypothesized that under fluctuating light conditions Cyclotella meneghiniana Kütz. would benefit from its large and flexible NPQ potential, whereas the comparably small NPQ capacity in Skeletonema costatum (Grev.) Cleve should exert an unfavorable impact on growth. The results of the study clearly falsify this hypothesis. Although C. meneghiniana possesses a fast NPQ component, this diatom was not able to recover its full NPQ capacity under fluctuating light. On the other hand, the induction of NPQ at relatively low irradiance in S. costatum resulted in rather small differences in the fraction of energy dissipation by the NPQ mechanism in the comparison of both diatoms. Larger differences were found in the metabolic characteristics. Both diatoms differed in their biomass composition, with a higher content of lipids in C. meneghiniana but higher amounts of carbohydrates in S. costatum. Finally, the lower degree of reduction in the biomass compensated for the higher respiration rates in S. costatum and resulted in a higher quantum efficiency of biomass production. An indirect correlation between the photoprotective and the metabolic capacity is discussed. PMID:27009723

  15. Intraoperative Localization of Insulinoma and Normal Pancreas using Invisible Near-Infrared Fluorescent Light

    PubMed Central

    Winer, Joshua; Choi, Hak Soo; Gibbs-Strauss, Summer L.; Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Colson, Yolonda L.; Frangioni, John V.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas, such as insulinoma, are difficult to localize and complete resection is essential for cure. Our hypothesis is that a near-infrared (NIR) fluorophore exhibiting uptake in insulinoma could provide high sensitivity detection intraoperatively. Methods: The optical properties of methylene blue (MB) were measured in vitro in 100% serum at 37°C, and in vivo after tissue uptake. MB was injected as a rapid intravenous bolus at doses ranging from 0.25 to 2 mg/kg into wildtype rats and pigs, and into insulinoma-bearing transgenic mice. The FLARE™ imaging system was used to acquire color video and NIR fluorescence images simultaneously, and in real-time. The signal-to-background ratios (SBR) of tissues and tumors were quantified using FLARE™ software. Results: When appropriately diluted, MB exhibits moderate NIR fluorescence emission peaking at 688 nm. At doses ≥ 1 mg/kg, certain normal tissues, such as pancreas, accumulate MB and remain NIR fluorescent for up to 1 hr with an SBR ≥ 1.6. MB spectral properties are maintained after uptake into tissue. Interestingly, insulinoma exhibits even higher uptake for MB than normal pancreas, resulting in insulinoma-to-pancreas ratios of 3.7 and insulinoma-to-muscle ratios of 16.2. MB permitted high-sensitivity, real-time localization of primary, multi-centric, and metastatic insulinoma, and permitted differentiation among tumor, normal pancreas, and other abdominal structures. Conclusion: A single intravenous injection of a clinically available, commonly used NIR fluorophore provides prolonged intraoperative localization of normal pancreas and insulinoma using invisible NIR fluorescent light. PMID:20033320

  16. Compact fluorescent lighting in Wisconsin: elevated atmospheric emission and landfill deposition post-EISA implementation.

    PubMed

    Arendt, John D; Katers, John F

    2013-07-01

    The majority of states in the USA, including Wisconsin, have been affected by elevated air, soil and waterborne mercury levels. Health risks associated with mercury increase from the consumption of larger fish species, such as Walleye or Pike, which bio-accumulate mercury in muscle tissue. Federal legislation with the 2011 Mercury and Air Toxics Standards and the Wisconsin legislation on mercury, 2009 Wisconsin Act 44, continue to aim at lowering allowable levels of mercury emissions. Meanwhile, mercury-containing compact fluorescent lights (CFL) sales continue to grow as businesses and consumers move away from energy intensive incandescent light bulbs. An exchange in pollution media is occurring as airborne mercury emissions from coal-burning power plants, the largest anthropogenic source of mercury, are being reduced by lower energy demand and standards, while more universal solid waste containing mercury is generated each time a CFL is disposed. The treatment of CFLs as a 'universal waste' by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) led to the banning of non-household fluorescent bulbs from most municipal solid waste. Although the EPA encourages recycling of bulbs, industry currently recycles fluorescent lamps and CFLs at a rate of only 29%. Monitoring programs at the federal and state level have had only marginal success with industrial and business CFL recycling. The consumer recycling rate is even lower at only 2%. A projected increase in residential CFL use in Wisconsin owing to the ramifications of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 will lead to elevated atmospheric mercury and landfill deposition in Wisconsin. PMID:23635464

  17. Highly sensitive analysis of flavonoids by zwitterionic microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography coupled with light-emitting diode-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wan; Hu, Shuai-Shuai; Li, Xing-Ying; Pang, Xiao-Qing; Cao, Jun; Ye, Li-Hong; Dai, Han-Bin; Liu, Xiao-Juan; Da, Jian-Hua; Chu, Chu

    2014-09-01

    A rapid zwitterionic microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (ZI-MEEKC) approach coupled with light-emitting-diode-induced fluorescence (LED-IF, 480nm) detection was proposed for the analysis of flavonoids. In the optimization process, we systematically investigated the separation conditions, including the surfactants, cosurfactants, pH, buffers and fluorescence parameters. It was found that the baseline separation of the seven flavonoids was obtained in less than 5min with a running buffer consisting of 92.9% (v/v) 5mM sodium borate, 0.6% (w/v) ZI surfactant, 0.5% (w/v) ethyl acetate and 6.0% (w/v) 1-butanol. High sensitivity was obtained by the application of LED-IF detection. The limits of detection for seven flavonoids were in the range of 3.30×10(-8) to 2.15×10(-6)molL(-1) without derivatization. Ultimately, the detection method was successfully applied to the analysis of flavonoids in hawthorn plant and food products with satisfactory results. PMID:25047822

  18. Estimate of federal relighting potential and demand for efficient lighting products

    SciTech Connect

    Shankle, S.A.; Dirks, J.A.; Elliott, D.B.; Richman, E.E.; Grover, S.E.

    1993-11-01

    The increasing level of electric utility rebates for energy-efficient lighting retrofits has recently prompted concern over the adequacy of the market supply of energy-efficient lighting products (Energy User News 1991). In support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Federal Energy Management Program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has developed an estimate of the total potential for energy-efficient lighting retrofits in federally owned buildings. This estimate can be used to address the issue of the impact of federal relighting projects on the supply of energy-efficient lighting products. The estimate was developed in 1992, using 1991 data. Any investments in energy-efficient lighting products that occurred in 1992 will reduce the potential estimated here. This analysis proceeds by estimating the existing stock of lighting fixtures in federally owned buildings. The lighting technology screening matrix is then used to determine the minimum life-cycle cost retrofit for each type of existing lighting fixture. Estimates of the existing stock are developed for (1) four types of fluorescent lighting fixtures (2-, 3-, and 4-lamp, F40 4-foot fixtures, and 2-lamp, F96 8-foot fixtures, all with standard magnetic ballasts); (2) one type of incandescent fixture (a 75-watt single bulb fixture); and (3) one type of exit sign (containing two 20-watt incandescent bulbs). Estimates of the existing stock of lighting fixtures in federally owned buildings, estimates of the total potential demand for energy-efficient lighting products if all cost-effective retrofits were undertaken immediately, and total potential annual energy savings (in MWh and dollars), the total investment required to obtain the energy savings and the present value of the efficiency investment, are presented.

  19. Light-Induced Conformational Changes of Rhodopsin Probed by Fluorescent Alexa594 Immobilized on the Cytoplasmic Surface†

    PubMed Central

    Imamoto, Yasushi; Kataoka, Mikio; Tokunaga, Fumio; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2006-01-01

    A novel fluorescence method has been developed for detecting the light-induced conformational changes of rhodopsin and for monitoring the interaction between photolyzed rhodopsin and G-protein or arrestin. Rhodopsin in native membranes was selectively modified with fluorescent Alexa594–maleimide at the Cys316 position, with a large excess of the reagent Cys140 that was also derivatized. Modification with Alexa594 allowed the monitoring of fluorescence changes at a red excitation light wavelength of 605 nm, thus avoiding significant rhodopsin bleaching. Upon absorption of a photon by rhodopsin, the fluorescence intensity increased as much as 20% at acidic pH with an apparent pKa of ∼6.8 at 4 °C, and was sensitive to the presence of hydroxylamine. These findings indicated that the increase in fluorescence is specific for metarhodopsin II. In the presence of transducin, a significant increase in fluorescence was observed. This increase of fluorescence emission intensity was reduced by addition of GTP, in agreement with the fact that transducin enhances the formation of metarhodopsin II. Under conditions that favored the formation of a metarhodopsin II–Alexa594 complex, transducin slightly decreased the fluorescence. In the presence of arrestin, under conditions that favored the formation of metarhodopsin I or II, a phosphorylated, photolyzed rhodopsin–Alexa594 complex only slightly decreased the fluorescence intensity, suggesting that the cytoplasmic surface structure of metarhodopsin II is different in the complex with arrestin and transducin. These results demonstrate the application of Alexa594-modified rhodopsin (Alexa594–rhodopsin) to continuously monitor the conformational changes in rhodopsin during light-induced transformations and its interactions with other proteins. PMID:11106502

  20. Scenedesmus dimorphus biofilm: Photoefficiency and biomass production under intermittent lighting

    PubMed Central

    Toninelli, Andrea Efrem; Wang, Junfeng; Liu, Mingshen; Wu, Hong; Liu, Tianzhong

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of intermittent lighting on the growth performances of a Scenedesmus dimorphus biofilm. Flashing light effect (FLE) is common in traditional suspended cultures of microalgae; yet, publications about this phenomenon, in the context of biofilm cultivation, are scarce. In this work we demonstrate that, thanks to intermittent illumination, it is possible for attached cultivations to fulfill FLE, improve photoefficiency and productivity as well as providing protection from photoinhibition using much lower flashing light frequencies than those usually required with suspended cultures. Medium frequency intermittent lighting (0.1 Hz) guaranteed excellent light integration resulting in 9.13 g m−2 d−1 biomass productivity, which was 8.9% higher than with continuous lighting. Results showed that a light fraction value of 0.5 always improved photoefficiency values as related to continuous light with a 118.8% maximum increase. PMID:27561323

  1. Scenedesmus dimorphus biofilm: Photoefficiency and biomass production under intermittent lighting.

    PubMed

    Toninelli, Andrea Efrem; Wang, Junfeng; Liu, Mingshen; Wu, Hong; Liu, Tianzhong

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of intermittent lighting on the growth performances of a Scenedesmus dimorphus biofilm. Flashing light effect (FLE) is common in traditional suspended cultures of microalgae; yet, publications about this phenomenon, in the context of biofilm cultivation, are scarce. In this work we demonstrate that, thanks to intermittent illumination, it is possible for attached cultivations to fulfill FLE, improve photoefficiency and productivity as well as providing protection from photoinhibition using much lower flashing light frequencies than those usually required with suspended cultures. Medium frequency intermittent lighting (0.1 Hz) guaranteed excellent light integration resulting in 9.13 g m(-2) d(-1) biomass productivity, which was 8.9% higher than with continuous lighting. Results showed that a light fraction value of 0.5 always improved photoefficiency values as related to continuous light with a 118.8% maximum increase. PMID:27561323

  2. Light emitting diode, photodiode-based fluorescence detection system for DNA analysis with microchip electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Hall, Gordon H; Glerum, D Moira; Backhouse, Christopher J

    2016-02-01

    Electrophoretic separation of fluorescently end-labeled DNA after a PCR serves as a gold standard in genetic diagnostics. Because of their size and cost, instruments for this type of analysis have had limited market uptake, particularly for point-of-care applications. This might be changed through a higher level of system integration and lower instrument costs that can be realized through the use of LEDs for excitation and photodiodes for detection--if they provide sufficient sensitivity. Here, we demonstrate an optimized microchip electrophoresis instrument using polymeric fluidic chips with fluorescence detection of end-labeled DNA with a LOD of 0.15 nM of Alexa Fluor 532. This represents orders of magnitude improvement over previously reported instruments of this type. We demonstrate the system with an electrophoretic separation of two PCR products and their respective primers. We believe that this is the first LED-induced fluorescence microchip electrophoresis system with photodiode-based detection that could be used for standard applications of PCR and electrophoresis. PMID:26412502

  3. Developing methods based on light sheet fluorescence microscopy for biophysical investigations of larval zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taormina, Michael J.

    Adapting the tools of optical microscopy to the large-scale dynamic systems encountered in the development of multicellular organisms provides a path toward understanding the physical processes necessary for complex life to form and function. Obtaining quantitatively meaningful results from such systems has been challenging due to difficulty spanning the spatial and temporal scales representative of the whole, while also observing the many individual members from which complex and collective behavior emerges. A three-dimensional imaging technique known as light sheet fluorescence microscopy provides a number of significant benefits for surmounting these challenges and studying developmental systems. A thin plane of fluorescence excitation light is produced such that it coincides with the focal plane of an imaging system, providing rapid acquisition of optically sectioned images that can be used to construct a three-dimensional rendition of a sample. I discuss the implementation of this technique for use in larva of the model vertebrate Danio rerio (zebrafish). The nature of light sheet imaging makes it especially well suited to the study of large systems while maintaining good spatial resolution and minimizing damage to the specimen from excessive exposure to excitation light. I show the results from a comparative study that demonstrates the ability to image certain developmental processes non-destructively, while in contrast confocal microscopy results in abnormal growth due to phototoxicity. I develop the application of light sheet microscopy to the study of a previously inaccessible system: the bacterial colonization of a host organism. Using the technique, we are able to obtain a survey of the intestinal tract of a larval zebrafish and observe the location of microbes as they grow and establish a stable population in an initially germ free fish. Finally, I describe a new technique to measure the fluid viscosity of this intestinal environment in vivo using

  4. Highly Efficient Sky-Blue Fluorescent Organic Light Emitting Diode Based on Mixed Cohost System for Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Emitter (2CzPN).

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin Won; Kim, Kwon-Hyeon; Moon, Chang-Ki; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Jang-Joo

    2016-04-20

    The mixed cohosts of 1,3-bis(N-carbazolyl)benzene and 2,8-bis(diphenylphosphoryl)dibenzothiophene have been developed for a highly efficient blue fluorescent oragnic light emitting diode (OLED) doped with a thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitter [4,5-di (9H-carbazol-9-yl) phthalonitrile (2CzPN)]. We have demonstrated one of the highest external quantum efficiency of 21.8% in blue fluorescent OLEDs, which is identical to the theoretically achievable maximum electroluminescence efficiency using the emitter. Interestingly, the efficiency roll-off is large even under the excellent charge balance in the device and almost the same as the single host based devices, indicating that the efficiency roll-off in 2CzPN based TADF host is related to the material characteristics, such as low reverse intesystem crossing rate rather than charge imbalance. PMID:27019330

  5. Energy transfer and light tolerance studies in a fluorescent tandem phycobiliprotein conjugate.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu; Pappas, Dimitri

    2011-09-01

    Light harvesting and energy transfer between allophycocyanin (APC) and a tandem conjugate dye was investigated using single-molecule recrossings in the probe volume. By comparing saturation irradiance and recrossing events of APC and the tandem conjugate Streptavidin Allophycocyanin-AlexaFluor-680 (APC-680), it was demonstrated that the light tolerance and photostability of APC-680 were improved over APC. This improvement was due to conjugating a tandem dye to APC, which provided an alternative pathway for energy transfer. This additional pathway decreases photobleaching and triplet-state conversion. In this study, the average fluorescence intensity at different laser powers was calculated from extracted signal peaks. Saturation irradiance was determined by interpolating the average intensity as a function of excitation power. By comparing the saturation irradiance of APC and APC-680, it was demonstrated that light tolerance was not significantly increased by having a small fluorophore covalently linked to the protein. The molecular recrossing method was used to determine triplet-state conversion and photobleaching effects. The number of molecules that were detected within 2 ms of each other was defined as the number of recrossing events (N(r)). The total number of molecules detected was defined as N(t). The normalized number of recrossings events (N(r)/N(t)) showed that energy transfer between APC and AlexaFluor-680 could reduce triplet-state formation of phycobiliproteins. In this case, the saturation irradiance was not improved, but the resistance to photobleaching and triplet-state conversion was improved. PMID:21929852

  6. Broadband Antireflection and Light Extraction Enhancement in Fluorescent SiC with Nanodome Structures

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Yiyu; Zhu, Xiaolong; Jokubavicius, Valdas; Yakimova, Rositza; Mortensen, N. Asger; Syväjärvi, Mikael; Xiao, Sanshui; Ou, Haiyan

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a time-efficient and low-cost approach to fabricate Si3N4 coated nanodome structures in fluorescent SiC. Nanosphere lithography is used as the nanopatterning method and SiC nanodome structures with Si3N4 coating are formed via dry etching and thin film deposition process. By using this method, a significant broadband surface antireflection and a considerable omnidirectional luminescence enhancement are obtained. The experimental observations are then supported by numerical simulations. It is believed that our fabrication method will be well suitable for large-scale production in the future. PMID:24722521

  7. Light-Emitting Diodes and Cool White Fluorescent Light Similarly Suppress Pineal Gland Melatonin and Maintain Retinal Function and Morphology in the Rat. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holley, Daniel C.; Heeke, D.; Mele, G.

    1999-01-01

    Currently, the light sources most commonly used in animal habitat lighting are cool white fluorescent or incandescent lamps. We evaluated a novel light-emitting diode (LED) light source for use in animal habitat lighting by comparing its effectiveness to cool white fluorescent light (CWF) in suppressing pineal gland melatonin and maintaining normal retinal physiology and morphology in the rat. Results of pineal melatonin suppression experiments showed equal suppression of pineal melatonin concentrations for LED light and CWF light at five different light illuminances (100, 40, 10, 1 and 0.1 lux). There were no significant differences in melatonin suppression between LED and CWF light when compared to unexposed controls. Retinal physiology was evaluated using electroretinography. Results show no differences in a-wave implicit times and amplitudes or b-wave implicit times and amplitudes between 100-lux LED-exposed rats and 100-lux CWF-exposed rats. Results of retinal histology assessment show no differences in retinal thickness rod outer segment length and number of rod nuclei between rats exposed to 100-lux LED and 100-lux CWF for days. Furthermore, the retinal pigmented epithelium and rod outer segments of all eyes observed were in good condition and of normal thickness. This study indicates that LED light does not cause retinal damage and can suppress pineal melatonin at similar intensities as a conventional CWF light source. These data suggest that LED light sources may be suitable replacements for conventional light sources used in the lighting of rodent vivariums while providing many mechanical and economical advantages.

  8. Efficient near-infrared organic light-emitting devices based on low-gap fluorescent oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yixing; Farley, Richard T.; Steckler, Timothy T.; Eom, Sang-Hyun; Reynolds, John R.; Schanze, Kirk S.; Xue, Jiangeng

    2009-08-01

    We report efficient near-infrared (NIR) organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) based on fluorescent donor-acceptor-donor conjugated oligomers. The energies of the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals of these oligomers are controlled by the donor and acceptor components, respectively; hence the energy gap and therefore the emission wavelength can be tuned by changing the strengths of the donor and acceptor components. External quantum efficiencies (EQEs) up to 1.6% and power efficiencies up to 7.0 mW/W are achieved in NIR OLEDs based on 4,9-bis(2,3-dihydrothieno[3,4-b][1,4]dioxin-5-yl)-6,7-dimethyl-[1,2,5]thiadiazolo[3,4-g]-quinoxaline (BEDOT-TQMe2), in which the electroluminescence peaks at a wavelength of 692 nm but extends to well above 800 nm. With a stronger acceptor in the oligomer, 4,8-bis(2,3-dihydrothieno-[3,4-b][1,4]dioxin-5-yl)benzo[1,2-c;4,5-c']bis [1,2,5]thiadiazole (BEDOT-BBT) based devices show longer wavelength emission peaked at 815 nm, although the maximum EQE is reduced to 0.51% due to the lower fluorescent quantum yield of the NIR emitter. The efficiencies of these NIR OLEDs are further increased by two to three times by using the sensitized fluorescent device structure, leading to a maximum EQE of 3.1% for BEDOT-TQMe2 and 1.6% for BEDOT-BBT based devices.

  9. UV-Light-Induced Improvement of Fluorescence Quantum Yield of DNA-Templated Gold Nanoclusters: Application to Ratiometric Fluorescent Sensing of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Zong-Yu; Wu, Yun-Tse; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2015-10-28

    The use of DNA as a template has been demonstrated as an effective method for synthesizing different-sized silver nanoclusters. Although DNA-templated silver nanoclusters show outstanding performance as fluorescent probes for chemical sensing and cellular imaging, the synthesis of DNA-stabilized gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with high fluorescence intensity remains a challenge. Here a facile, reproducible, scalable, NaBH4-free, UV-light-assisted method was developed to prepare AuNCs using repeats of 30 adenosine nucleotides (A30). The maximal fluorescence of A30-stabilized AuNCs appeared at 475 nm with moderate quantum yield, two fluorescence lifetimes, and a small amount of Au(+) on the surface of the Au core. Results of size-exclusion chromatography revealed that A30-stabilized AuNCs were more compact than A30. A series of control experiments showed that UV light played a dual role in the reduction of gold-ion precursors and the decomposition of citrate ions. A30 also acted as a stabilizer to prevent the aggregation of AuNCs. In addition, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) consisting of an AuNC-nucleation sequence and a hybridization sequence was utilized to develop a AuNC-based ratiometric fluorescent probe in the presence of the double-strand-chelating dye SYBR Green I (SG). Under conditions of single-wavelength excitation, the combination of AuNC/SG-bearing ssDNA and perfectly matched DNA emitted fluorescence at 475 and 525 nm, respectively. The formed AuNC/SG-bearing ssDNA enabled the sensitive, selective, and ratiometric detection of specific nucleic acid targets. Finally, the AuNC-based ratiometric probes were successfully applied to determine specific nucleic acid targets in human serum. PMID:26443919

  10. Mixed-Dye-Based Label-Free and Sensitive Dual Fluorescence for the Product Detection of Nucleic Acid Isothermal Multiple-Self-Matching-Initiated Amplification.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiong; Wu, Wenshuai; Zhu, Qiangyuan; Zhang, Tao; Jin, Wei; Mu, Ying

    2015-10-20

    Visual detections based on fluorescence and the color changes under natural light are two promising product detections for isothermal nucleic acid amplifications (INAAs) such as the isothermal multiple-self-matching-initiated amplification (IMSA) as point-of-care testing techniques. However, the currently used approaches have shortcomings in application. For the former, fluorescence changes recognized by naked eye may be indistinguishable because of single fluorescence emitted and strong background noise, which requires empirical preset of cutoff intensity values. For the latter, visual detection sensitivity under natural light is not comparable to that based on fluorescence. Herein, hydroxyl naphthol blue (HNB) and SYBR Green I (SG) were coupled to acquire a label-free dual fluorescence for the visual product detection of IMSA. The mixed-dye-loaded off-chip (tube-based) and on-chip (microfluidic chip-based) IMSAs for the detection of hepatitis B virus were conducted. The results demonstrated that this dual fluorescence could realize distinguishable fluorescent color changes to improve visual detection sensitivity and avoid the preset of cutoff values. Moreover, the mixed dye is stable when kept at room temperature and compatible with the IMSA's reagents without a contamination-prone step of opening tubes after amplification. Also, this coupled dye inherits the advantages of achieving color changes under natural light from HNB and real-time detection from SG. In conclusion, the mixed-dye-based dual fluorescence has a potential in the point-of-care testing application for realizing off-chip and on-chip product detection of IMSA, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), or other INAAs. PMID:26383158

  11. Robust incremental compensation of the light attenuation with depth in 3D fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kervrann, C; Legland, D; Pardini, L

    2004-06-01

    Summary Fluorescent signal intensities from confocal laser scanning microscopes (CLSM) suffer from several distortions inherent to the method. Namely, layers which lie deeper within the specimen are relatively dark due to absorption and scattering of both excitation and fluorescent light, photobleaching and/or other factors. Because of these effects, a quantitative analysis of images is not always possible without correction. Under certain assumptions, the decay of intensities can be estimated and used for a partial depth intensity correction. In this paper we propose an original robust incremental method for compensating the attenuation of intensity signals. Most previous correction methods are more or less empirical and based on fitting a decreasing parametric function to the section mean intensity curve computed by summing all pixel values in each section. The fitted curve is then used for the calculation of correction factors for each section and a new compensated sections series is computed. However, these methods do not perfectly correct the images. Hence, the algorithm we propose for the automatic correction of intensities relies on robust estimation, which automatically ignores pixels where measurements deviate from the decay model. It is based on techniques adopted from the computer vision literature for image motion estimation. The resulting algorithm is used to correct volumes acquired in CLSM. An implementation of such a restoration filter is discussed and examples of successful restorations are given. PMID:15157197

  12. Polarized fluorescence and absorption of macroscopically aligned Light Harvesting Complex II.

    PubMed Central

    van Amerongen, H; Kwa, S L; van Bolhuis, B M; van Grondelle, R

    1994-01-01

    Polarized absorption and fluorescence measurements have been performed at 77 K on isotropic and anisotropic preparations of trimeric Light Harvesting Complex II (LHC-II) from spinach. The results enable a decomposition of the absorption spectrum into components parallel and perpendicular to the trimeric plane. For the first time, it is shown quantitatively that the strong absorption band around 676 nm is polarized essentially parallel to the plane of the trimer, i.e., the average angle between the corresponding transition dipole moments and this plane is at most 12 degrees. The different absorption bands for LHC-II should not be considered as corresponding to individual pigments but to collective excitations of different pigments. Nevertheless, the average angle between the Qy transition dipole moments of all chlorophyll a pigments in LHC-II and the trimeric plane could be determined and was found to be 17.5 degrees +/- 2.5 degrees. For the chlorophyll b pigments, this angle is significantly larger (close to 35 degrees). At 77 K, most of the fluorescence stems from a weak band above 676 nm and the corresponding transition dipole moments are oriented further out of plane than the dipole moments corresponding to the 676-nm band. The results are shown to be of crucial significance for understanding the relation between the LHC-II structure and its spectroscopy. PMID:7948696

  13. Eyecup scope—optical recordings of light stimulus-evoked fluorescence signals in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Hausselt, Susanne E.; Breuninger, Tobias; Castell, Xavier; Denk, Winfried; Margolis, David J.; Detwiler, Peter B.

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic signals play an essential role in processing visual information in the retina. To study them in neurites too small for electrical recording, we developed an instrument that combines a multi-photon (MP) microscope with a through-the-objective high-resolution visual stimulator. An upright microscope was designed that uses the objective lens for both MP imaging and delivery of visual stimuli to functionally intact retinal explants or eyecup preparations. The stimulator consists of a miniature liquid-crystal-on-silicon display coupled into the optical path of an infrared-excitation laser-scanning microscope. A pair of custom-made dichroic filters allows light from the excitation laser and three spectral bands (‘colors’) from the stimulator to reach the retina, leaving two intermediate bands for fluorescence imaging. Special optics allow displacement of the stimulator focus relative to the imaging focus. Spatially resolved changes in calcium-indicator fluorescence in response to visual stimuli were recorded in dendrites of different types of mammalian retinal neurons. PMID:19023590

  14. Light-emitting diode and laser fluorescence-based devices in detecting occlusal caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Jonas A.; Hug, Isabel; Neuhaus, Klaus W.; Lussi, Adrian

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of two light-emitting diode (LED)- and two laser fluorescence-based devices in detecting occlusal caries in vitro. Ninety-seven permanent molars were assessed twice by two examiners using two LED- (Midwest Caries - MID and VistaProof - VP) and two laser fluorescence-based (DIAGNOdent 2095 - LF and DIAGNOdent pen 2190 - LFpen) devices. After measuring, the teeth were histologically prepared and classified according to lesion extension. At D1 the specificities were 0.76 (LF and LFpen), 0.94 (MID), and 0.70 (VP); the sensitivities were 0.70 (LF), 0.62 (LFpen), 0.31 (MID), and 0.75 (VP). At D3 threshold the specificities were 0.88 (LF), 0.87 (LFpen), 0.90 (MID), and 0.70 (VP); the sensitivities were 0.63 (LF and LFpen), 0.70 (MID), and 0.96 (VP). Spearman's rank correlations with histology were 0.56 (LF), 0.51 (LFpen), 0.55 (MID), and 0.58 (VP). Inter- and intraexaminer ICC values were high and varied from 0.83 to 0.90. Both LF devices seemed to be useful auxiliary tools to the conventional methods, presenting good reproducibility and better accuracy at D3 threshold. MID was not able to differentiate sound surfaces from enamel caries and VP still needs improvement on the cut-off limits for its use.

  15. Above 30% external quantum efficiency in green delayed fluorescent organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Ryun; Kim, Bo Seong; Lee, Chil Won; Im, Yirang; Yook, Kyoung Soo; Hwang, Seok-Ho; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2015-05-13

    Highly efficient green thermally activated delayed fluorescent organic light-emitting diodes with an external quantum efficiency of 31.2% were investigated by using 3-(3-(carbazole-9-yl)phenyl) pyrido[3',2':4,5]furo[2,3-b]pyridine (3CzPFP) derived from carbazole and pyrido[3',2':4,5]furo[2,3-b]pyridine. The host material showed well-matched photoluminescence emission with absorption of the green dopant material, (4s,6s)-2,4,5,6-tetra(9H-carbazol-9-yl)isophthalonitrile (4CzIPN) and harvested all excitons of 4CzIPN. The 3CzPFP:4CzIPN film exhibited high photoluminescence quantum yield of 100%, and the green delayed fluorescence device employing the 3CzPFP host showed high maximum quantum efficiency of 31.2 ± 0.5% at 1% doping after optimization of the device structure. PMID:25924007

  16. Combined application of dynamic light scattering imaging and fluorescence intravital microscopy in vascular biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchenko, V.; Ziv, K.; Addadi, Y.; Madar-Balakirski, N.; Meglinski, I.; Neeman, M.; Harmelin, A.

    2010-08-01

    The dynamic light scattering imaging (DLSI) system combined with the conventional fluorescence intravital microscope (FIM) has been applied for the examination of blood and lymph vessels in the mouse ear in vivo. While the CCD camera can be shared by both techniques the combined application of DLSI and FIM allows rapid switching between the modalities. In current study temporal speckles fluctuations are used for rendering blood vessels structure and monitoring blood perfusion with the higher spatial resolution, whereas FIM provides the images of lymphatic vessels. The results clearly demonstrate that combined application of DLSI and FIM approaches provides synchronic in vivo images of blood and lymph vessels with higher contrast and specificity. The use of this new dual-modal diagnostic system is particularly important and has a great potential to significantly expand the capabilities of vascular diagnostics providing synchronic in vivo images of blood and lymph vessels.

  17. Triarylboron-Based Fluorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with External Quantum Efficiencies Exceeding 20 .

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Katsuaki; Kubo, Shosei; Shizu, Katsuyuki; Fukushima, Tatsuya; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Murata, Yasujiro; Adachi, Chihaya; Kaji, Hironori

    2015-12-01

    Triarylboron compounds have attracted much attention, and found wide use as functional materials because of their electron-accepting properties arising from the vacant p orbitals on the boron atoms. In this study, we design and synthesize new donor-acceptor triarylboron emitters that show thermally activated delayed fluorescence. These emitters display sky-blue to green emission and high photoluminescence quantum yields of 87-100 % in host matrices. Organic light-emitting diodes using these emitting molecules as dopants exhibit high external quantum efficiencies of 14.0-22.8 %, which originate from efficient up-conversion from triplet to singlet states and subsequent efficient radiative decay from singlet to ground states. PMID:26563845

  18. A wide field fluorescence lifetime imaging system using a light sheet microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, Phil M.; Moore, Lamar; Li, Xiaofei; Phillips, Roger; Young, Rupert; Chatwin, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has allowed scientists to discern information about the chemical properties of biological processes and has become a vital tool in the life sciences and medical research communities. Measuring the spatial lifetime distribution of the fluorophores as well as the intensity distribution enables users to discern vital information about the chemical environment. It however, remains challenging and often involves slow scanning. We present a new microscope system based on light sheet illumination that uses a micro channel plate (MCP) device called a Capacitive Division Imaging Readout (CDIR) which has been developed by Photek Ltd. The device uses an array of capacitors to move the charge site from the MCP to four pre-amplifiers and time-over-threshold discriminators. This camera has the ability to image photons as well as measure the arrival time, enabling high speed FLIM imaging of biological samples.

  19. High-efficiency fluorescent organic light-emitting diodes enabled by triplet-triplet annihilation and horizontal emitter orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, Christian Schmidt, Tobias D.; Brütting, Wolfgang

    2014-11-03

    A green organic light-emitting diode with the fluorescent emitter Coumarin 545T shows an external quantum efficiency (η{sub EQE}) of 6.9%, clearly exceeding the classical limit of 5% for fluorescent emitters. The analysis of the angular dependent photoluminescence spectrum of the emission layer reveals that 86% of the transition dipole moments are horizontally oriented. Furthermore, transient electroluminescence measurements demonstrate the presence of a delayed emission originating from triplet-triplet annihilation. A simulation based efficiency analysis reveals quantitatively the origin for the high η{sub EQE}: a radiative exciton fraction higher than 25% and a light-outcoupling efficiency of nearly 30%.

  20. Relating productivity to visibility and lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Clear, R.; Berman, S.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of determining the appropriate light levels for visual tasks is a cost-benefit problem. Existing light level recommendations seriously underweight the importance of economic factors. Furthermore, the relative importance of the visibility factors in determining the optimal light levels appears inconsistent with the importance of these factors in determining visibility and visual performance. It is shown that calculations based on acuities give a lower limit of 100 to 200 lux for cost-effective light levels for office tasks. Upper limits are calculated from correlations of task performance to visibility levels. Visibility levels become progressively insensitive to luminance as luminance increases. Average power densities above 100 watts/m/sup 2/ are cost-effective only when visibility is very low. However, there is a 3-to-10 times larger increase in benefits from improving contrast or contrast sensitivity than from using more than 10 watts/m/sup 2/. Contrast or contrast sensitivity can be improved by using forms with larger print, using xerographic copy instead of carbon or mimeo, making sure office workers have the right eyeglasses, or even by transferring workers with visual problems to less visually demanding tasks. Once these changes are made it is no longer cost-effective to use more than 10 watts/m/sup 2/. This conclusion raises serious questions about recommendations that lead to greater than about 10 watts/m/sup 2/ of installed lighting for general office work.

  1. Scaling properties of light-cluster production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chajecki, Zbigniew; Youngs, Michael; Coupland, Daniel D.; Lynch, William; Tsang, Betty; Chbihi, Abdelouahad; Danielewicz, Pawel; Desouza, Romualdo; Famiano, Michael; Ghosh, Tilak; Giacherio, B.; Henzl, Vlad; Henzlova, Daniela; Hudan, Sylvie; Kilburn, Micha; Lee, Jenny; Lu, Fei; Rogers, Andrew; Russotto, Paulo; Verde, Giuseppe; Sanetullaev, Alisher; Showalter, Rachel; Sobotka, Lee; Wallace, Mark; Winkelbauer, Jack

    2014-09-01

    We show, using the experimental data from Ca+Ca and Sn+Sn collisions, that ratios of light-particle energy spectra display scaling properties that can be accurately described by effective local chemical potentials. This demonstrates the equivalence of t/3He and n/p spectral ratios and provides an essential test of theoretical predictions of isotopically resolved light-particle spectra. In addition, this approach allows direct comparisons of many theoretical n/p spectral ratios to experiments where charged-particle spectra but not neutron spectra are accurately measured. Such experiments may provide much more quantitative constraints on the density and momentum dependence of the symmetry energy.

  2. Tracing the long-term microbial production of recalcitrant fluorescent dissolved organic matter in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, Linda; Stedmon, Colin A.; Granskog, Mats A.; Middelboe, Mathias

    2014-04-01

    The majority of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the ocean is resistant to microbial degradation, yet its formation remains poorly understood. The fluorescent fraction of DOM can be used to trace the formation of recalcitrant DOM (RDOM). A long-term (> 1 year) experiment revealed 27-52% removal of dissolved organic carbon and a nonlinear increase in RDOM fluorescence associated with microbial turnover of semilabile DOM. This fluorescence was also produced using glucose as the only initial carbon source, suggesting that degradation of prokaryote remnants contributes to RDOM. Our results indicate that the formation of a fluorescent RDOM component depends on the bioavailability of the substrate: the less labile, the larger the production of fluorescent RDOM relative to organic carbon remineralized. The anticipated increase in microbial carbon demand due to ocean warming can potentially force microbes to degrade less labile substrates, thereby increasing RDOM production and stimulating ocean carbon storage.

  3. Comparing phototoxicity during the development of a zebrafish craniofacial bone using confocal and light sheet fluorescence microscopy techniques

    PubMed Central

    Jemielita, Matthew; Taormina, Michael J.; DeLaurier, April; Kimmel, Charles B.; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2013-01-01

    The combination of genetically encoded fluorescent proteins and three-dimensional imaging enables cell-type-specific studies of embryogenesis. Light sheet microscopy, in which fluorescence excitation is provided by a plane of laser light, is an appealing approach to live imaging due to its high speed and efficient use of photons. While the advantages of rapid imaging are apparent from recent work, the importance of low light levels to studies of development is not well established. We examine the zebrafish opercle, a craniofacial bone that exhibits pronounced shape changes at early developmental stages, using both spinning disk confocal and light sheet microscopies of fluorescent osteoblast cells. We find normal and aberrant opercle morphologies for specimens imaged with short time intervals using light sheet and spinning disk confocal microscopies, respectively, under equivalent exposure conditions over developmentally-relevant time scales. Quantification of shapes reveals that the differently imaged specimens travel along distinct trajectories in morphological space. (A) Schematic: Light sheet microscopy of zebrafish embryos. Opercle-forming osteoblasts following twenty-four hours of (B) light sheet imaging, showing normal growth, and (C) spinning disk confocal imaging, showing aberrant growth. PMID:23242824

  4. Low-frequency wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging using a high-power near-infrared light-emitting diode light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioux, Sylvain; Lomnes, Stephen J.; Choi, Hak Soo; Frangioni, John V.

    2010-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLi) could potentially improve exogenous near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging, because it offers the capability of discriminating a signal of interest from background, provides real-time monitoring of a chemical environment, and permits the use of several different fluorescent dyes having the same emission wavelength. We present a high-power, LED-based, NIR light source for the clinical translation of wide-field (larger than 5 cm in diameter) FLi at frequencies up to 35 MHz. Lifetime imaging of indocyanine green (ICG), IRDye 800-CW, and 3,3'-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI) was performed over a large field of view (10 cm by 7.5 cm) using the LED light source. For comparison, a laser diode light source was employed as a gold standard. Experiments were performed both on the bench by diluting the fluorescent dyes in various chemical environments in Eppendorf tubes, and in vivo by injecting the fluorescent dyes mixed in Matrigel subcutaneously into CD-1 mice. Last, measured fluorescence lifetimes obtained using the LED and the laser diode sources were compared with those obtained using a state-of-the-art time-domain imaging system and with those previously described in the literature. On average, lifetime values obtained using the LED and the laser diode light sources were consistent, exhibiting a mean difference of 3% from the expected values and a coefficient of variation of 12%. Taken together, our study offers an alternative to laser diodes for clinical translation of FLi and explores the use of relatively low frequency modulation for in vivo imaging.

  5. Efficient stray-light suppression for resonance fluorescence in quantum dot micropillars using self-aligned metal apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopfmann, Caspar; Musiał, Anna; Maier, Sebastian; Emmerling, Monika; Schneider, Christian; Höfling, Sven; Kamp, Martin; Reitzenstein, Stephan

    2016-09-01

    Within this work we propose and demonstrate a technological approach to efficiently suppress excitation laser stray-light in resonance fluorescence experiments on quantum dot micropillars. To ensure efficient stray-light suppression, their fabrication process includes a planarization step and subsequent covering with a titanium mask to fabricate self-aligned apertures at the micropillar positions. These apertures aim to limit laser stray-light in the side-excitation vertical-detection configuration, while enabling detection of the optical signal through the top facet of the micropillars. The beneficial effects of these apertures are proven and quantitatively evaluated within a statistical study in which we determine and compare the stray-light suppression of 48 micropillars with and without metal apertures. Actual resonance fluorescence experiments on single quantum dots coupled to the cavity mode prove the relevance of the proposed approach and demonstrate that it will foster further studies on cavity quantum electrodynamics phenomena under coherent optical excitation.

  6. Fluorescent all-fiber light source based on micro-capillaries and on microstructured optical fibers terminated with a microbulb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladev, Veselin; Eftimov, Tinko; Bock, Wojtek

    2015-12-01

    An integrated fiber-optic fluorescent light source compatible with photonic-crystal and hollow-core fibers is presented in this paper. We have studied the dependence of the fluorescence spectra on the length of a micro-capillary filled with Rhodamine 6G dissolved in glycerin. As the capillary, we used a standard fiber-optic glass ferrule with two parallel holes having an inner diameter of 125 μm. One of the holes was filled with fluorescing solution, while an SMF-28 fiber polished at 45° with aluminum coating was placed in the second hole to serve as a pumping fiber. As the solution was pumped by continuous-wave laser light at 532 nm, the fluorescence was captured by a microstructured optical fiber immersed in the filled hole. To prevent the solution from penetrating into this receiving fiber, its end was capped by molten borosilicate glass forming a ball lens. Combining the spectra of several fluorescent organic dyes can create a broadband light source compatible with optical fibers that could be used for the development of compact photonic-crystal and hollow-core fiber sensors.

  7. Virtual unfolding of light sheet fluorescence microscopy dataset for quantitative analysis of the mouse intestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candeo, Alessia; Sana, Ilenia; Ferrari, Eleonora; Maiuri, Luigi; D'Andrea, Cosimo; Valentini, Gianluca; Bassi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy has proven to be a powerful tool to image fixed and chemically cleared samples, providing in depth and high resolution reconstructions of intact mouse organs. We applied light sheet microscopy to image the mouse intestine. We found that large portions of the sample can be readily visualized, assessing the organ status and highlighting the presence of regions with impaired morphology. Yet, three-dimensional (3-D) sectioning of the intestine leads to a large dataset that produces unnecessary storage and processing overload. We developed a routine that extracts the relevant information from a large image stack and provides quantitative analysis of the intestine morphology. This result was achieved by a three step procedure consisting of: (1) virtually unfold the 3-D reconstruction of the intestine; (2) observe it layer-by-layer; and (3) identify distinct villi and statistically analyze multiple samples belonging to different intestinal regions. Even if the procedure has been developed for the murine intestine, most of the underlying concepts have a general applicability.

  8. Electro-Production of Light Lambda Hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Satoshi N.

    2013-02-01

    Through the study of light hypernuclei, we can learn about hyperon nucleon interaction. The hypernuclear spectroscopy with electron beams is one of most powerful methods to study detailed structure of light hypernuclei thanks to its high energy resolution. With a decade of efforts at Jefferson Lab, the spectroscopy of Λ hypernuclei with an electron beam is now established. Observation of {sup 7}{sub Λ}He which gave the last missing binding energy of the A = 7, T = 1 iso-triplet hypernuclei provides an important experimental input for the charge symmetry breaking (CSB) effect of the ΛN interaction. Further study about A = 4 hypernuclear iso-doublet, {sup 4}{sub Λ}H and {sup 4}{sub Λ}He , is necessary and such experiments are now planned.

  9. Correlative and integrated light and electron microscopy of in-resin GFP fluorescence, used to localise diacylglycerol in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Peddie, Christopher J; Blight, Ken; Wilson, Emma; Melia, Charlotte; Marrison, Jo; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; O'Toole, Peter; Larijani, Banafshe; Collinson, Lucy M

    2014-08-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of GFP-tagged proteins is a fundamental tool in cell biology, but without seeing the structure of the surrounding cellular space, functional information can be lost. Here we present a protocol that preserves GFP and mCherry fluorescence in mammalian cells embedded in resin with electron contrast to reveal cellular ultrastructure. Ultrathin in-resin fluorescence (IRF) sections were imaged simultaneously for fluorescence and electron signals in an integrated light and scanning electron microscope. We show, for the first time, that GFP is stable and active in resin sections in vacuo. We applied our protocol to study the subcellular localisation of diacylglycerol (DAG), a modulator of membrane morphology and membrane dynamics in nuclear envelope assembly. We show that DAG is localised to the nuclear envelope, nucleoplasmic reticulum and curved tips of the Golgi apparatus. With these developments, we demonstrate that integrated imaging is maturing into a powerful tool for accurate molecular localisation to structure. PMID:24637200

  10. Correlative and integrated light and electron microscopy of in-resin GFP fluorescence, used to localise diacylglycerol in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Peddie, Christopher J.; Blight, Ken; Wilson, Emma; Melia, Charlotte; Marrison, Jo; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; O׳Toole, Peter; Larijani, Banafshe; Collinson, Lucy M.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of GFP-tagged proteins is a fundamental tool in cell biology, but without seeing the structure of the surrounding cellular space, functional information can be lost. Here we present a protocol that preserves GFP and mCherry fluorescence in mammalian cells embedded in resin with electron contrast to reveal cellular ultrastructure. Ultrathin in-resin fluorescence (IRF) sections were imaged simultaneously for fluorescence and electron signals in an integrated light and scanning electron microscope. We show, for the first time, that GFP is stable and active in resin sections in vacuo. We applied our protocol to study the subcellular localisation of diacylglycerol (DAG), a modulator of membrane morphology and membrane dynamics in nuclear envelope assembly. We show that DAG is localised to the nuclear envelope, nucleoplasmic reticulum and curved tips of the Golgi apparatus. With these developments, we demonstrate that integrated imaging is maturing into a powerful tool for accurate molecular localisation to structure. PMID:24637200