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Sample records for fluorescent thermo-responsive biotin-pnipaam-co-ndapm

  1. Swelling of thermo-responsive hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Drozdov, A D

    2014-10-01

    A model is developed for the elastic response and solvent diffusion through a thermo-responsive gel under an arbitrary deformation with finite strains. The constitutive equations involve the stress-strain relation, the nonlinear diffusion equation for solvent molecules, the heat conduction equation, and the Allen-Cahn equation for an order parameter (proportional to the concentration of hydrophilic segments in polymer chains). Material constants are found by fitting swelling diagrams for PNIPA gels under uniaxial tension. Numerical analysis demonstrates good agreement between predictions of the model and observations in tests with stress- and strain-controlled programs. PMID:25326783

  2. Thermo-responsive PNIPAM nanofibres crosslinked by OpePOSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Hurren, Christopher; Sutti, Alessandra; Lin, Tong; Wang, Xungai

    2013-08-01

    Stable and re-usable thermo-responsive hydrogel nanofibres were produced by electrospinning poly(Nisopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) in presence of a polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) possessing eight epoxide groups, and of a 2-ethyl-4-methylimidazole (EMI) as a catalyst, followed by a heat curing treatment. The roles of the organic-base catalyst in the formation of crosslinked polymer network, fibre morphologies, and hydrogel properties were examined in this paper.

  3. Doubly thermo-responsive copolymers in ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, H H; El Ezzi, M; Mingotaud, C; Destarac, M; Marty, J-D; Lauth-de Viguerie, N

    2016-04-01

    We report the behaviour of thermoresponsive block copolymers of n-butyl acrylate and N-alkyl acrylamides in [C2mim][NTf2]. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) exhibits an upper critical solution temperature in [C2mim][NTf2] whereas poly(n-butyl acrylate) has a lower critical solution temperature. Consequently, these polymers exhibit double thermo-responsiveness correlated with the macromolecular structure. Moreover, a switching from micellar to reverse micellar structures was induced by a change in temperature. This property enables the development of reversible shuttles between ionic liquids and water. PMID:26931173

  4. A thermo-responsive protein treatment for dry eyes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wan; Jashnani, Aarti; Aluri, Suhaas R.; Gustafson, Joshua A.; Hsueh, Pang-Yu; Yarber, Frances; McKown, Robert L.; Laurie, Gordon W.; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.; MacKay, J. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Millions of Americans suffer from dry eye disease, and there are few effective therapies capable of treating these patients. A decade ago, an abundant protein component of human tears was discovered and named lacritin(Lacrt). Lacrt has prosecretory activity in the lacrimal gland and mitogenic activity at the corneal epithelium. Similar to other proteins placed on the ocular surface, the durability of its effect is limited by rapid tear turnover. Motivated by the rationale that a thermo-responsive coacervate containing Lacrt would have better retention upon administration, we have constructed and tested the activity of a thermo-responsive Lacrt fused to an Elastin-like polypeptide (ELP). Inspired from the human tropoelastin protein, ELP protein polymers reversibly phase separate into viscous coacervates above a tunable transition temperature. This fusion construct exhibited the prosecretory function of native Lacrt as illustrated by its ability to stimulate β-hexosaminidase secretion from primary rabbit lacrimal gland acinar cells. It also increased tear secretion from non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, a model of autoimmune dacryoadenitis, when administered via intra-lacrimal injection. Lacrt ELP fusion proteins undergo temperature-mediated assembly to form a depot inside the lacrimal gland. We propose that these Lacrt ELP fusion proteins represent a potential therapy for dry eye disease and the strategy of ELP-mediated phase separation may have applicability to other diseases of the ocular surface. PMID:25481446

  5. Thermo-Responsive Polymers for Cell-based Therapeutic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Hodari-Sadiki

    Poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) is a well-known thermo-responsive polymer that has be shown to be biocompatible, with surfaces coated with PNIPAAm supporting the culture of cells. These surfaces support the adhesion and proliferation of multiple cell phenotypes at 37 °C, when surface is hydrophobic, as the polymer chains are collapse and lose their affinity for water. Reducing the temperature below the polymers lower critical solution temperature (LCST) elicits hydration and swelling of the polymer chains and leads to cell detachment. In vitro culture on thermo-responsive surfaces can be used to produce cell sheets for the use of different therapeutic treatments. PNIPAAm coated membranes were used to culture human keratinocyte cells to confluence, with cell release possible after exposing the membranes to room temperature (˜25 °C) for 10 minutes. Cell sheet transfer was possible from the coated membrane to cell culture dishes using a protocol that we developed. There was also a trend towards similar cell apoptosis on both PNIPAAm coated and uncoated surfaces.

  6. Thermo-responsive hydrogels for intravitreal injection and biomolecule release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drapala, Pawel

    In this dissertation, we develop an injectable polymer system to enable localized and prolonged release of therapeutic biomolecules for improved treatment of Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD). Thermo-responsive hydrogels derived from N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) and cross-linked with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) poly(L-Lactic acid) (PLLA) copolymer were synthesized via free-radical polymerization. These materials were investigated for (a) phase change behavior, (b) in-vitro degradation, (c) capacity for controlled drug delivery, and (d) biocompatibility. The volume-phase transition temperature (VPTT) of the PNIPAAm- co-PEG-b-PLLA hydrogels was adjusted using hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties so that it is ca. 33°C. These hydrogels did not initially show evidence of degradation at 37°C due to physical cross-links of collapsed PNIPAAm. Only after addition of glutathione chain transfer agents (CTA)s to the precursor did the collapsed hydrogels become fully soluble at 37°C. CTAs significantly affected the release kinetics of biomolecules; addition of 1.0 mg/mL glutathione to 3 mM cross-linker accelerated hydrogel degradation, resulting in 100% release in less than 2 days. This work also explored the effect of PEGylation in order to tether biomolecules to the polymer matrix. It was demonstrated that non-site-specific PEGylation can postpone the burst release of solutes (up to 10 days in hydrogels with 0.5 mg/mL glutathione). Cell viability assays showed that at least two 20-minute buffer extraction steps were needed to remove cytotoxic elements from the hydrogels. Clinically-used therapeutic biomolecules LucentisRTM and AvastinRTM were demonstrated to be both stable and bioactive after release form PNIPAAm-co-PEG-b-PLLA hydrogels. The thermo-responsive hydrogels presented here offer a promising platform for the localized delivery of proteins such as recombinant antibodies.

  7. Artificial phototropism based on a photo-thermo-responsive hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishna, Hamsini

    Solar energy is leading in renewable energy sources and the aspects surrounding the efforts to harvest light are gaining importance. One such aspect is increasing the light absorption, where heliotropism comes into play. Heliotropism, the ability to track the sun across the sky, can be integrated with solar cells for more efficient photon collection and other optoelectronic systems. Inspired by plants, which optimize incident sunlight in nature, several researchers have made artificial heliotropic and phototropic systems. This project aims to design, synthesize and characterize a material system and evaluate its application in a phototropic system. A gold nanoparticle (Au NP) incorporated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) hydrogel was synthesized as a photo-thermo-responsive material in our phototropic system. The Au NPs generate heat from the incident via plasmonic resonance to induce a volume phase change of the thermo-responsive hydrogel PNIPAAm. PNIPAAm shrinks or swells at temperature above or below 32°C. Upon irradiation, the Au NP-PNIPAAm micropillar actuates, specifically bending toward the incident light and precisely following the varying incident angle. Swelling ratio tests, bending angle tests with a static incident light and bending tests with varying angles were carried out on hydrogel samples with varying Au NP concentrations. Swelling ratios ranging from 1.45 to 2.9 were recorded for pure hydrogel samples and samples with very low Au NP concentrations. Swelling ratios of 2.41 and 3.37 were calculated for samples with low and high concentrations of Au NPs, respectively. A bending of up to 88° was observed in Au NP-hydrogel pillars with a low Au NP concentration with a 90° incident angle. The light tracking performance was assessed by the slope of the pillar Bending angle (response angle) vs. Incident light angle plot. A slope of 1 indicates ideal tracking with top of the pillar being normal to the incident light, maximizing the photon

  8. Autonomously-triggered microfluidic cooling using thermo-responsive hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Abhishek K; Dong, Liang; Beebe, David J; Jiang, Hongrui

    2007-03-01

    We present autonomously-triggered on-chip microfluidic cooling devices that utilize thermo-responsive hydrogels to adapt to local environmental temperatures. An external rotating magnetic stirrer couples with an in situ fabricated nickel impeller in these centrifugal-based microfluidic cooling devices to recirculate cooler water. Temperature-responsive hydrogels, which exhibit volumetric expansion and contraction, are integrated at the axle of the impeller. In this design, the hydrogels behave similar to an automotive clutch, to autonomously control the impeller's rotation as a function of the local environmental temperature. Therefore, the hydrogels act as both sensors and actuators and help take away the necessity for additional temperature sensing, feedback, and/or control units here. Cooling devices capable of on-chip thermal management at multiple predetermined onset operation points are realized by changes to the composition of hydrogel to alter its lowest critical solution temperature (LCST). Furthermore, the effect of magnetic stirrer frequency on the fluid cooling and flowrates for different two-blade nickel impeller designs are presented. PMID:17330161

  9. Colloidal stability and thermo-responsive properties of iron oxide nanoparticles coated with polymers: advantages of Pluronic® F68-PEG mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiper, Manuela; Hervé Aubert, Katel; Augé, Amélie; Fouquenet, Jean-François; Soucé, Martin; Chourpa, Igor

    2013-10-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are recognized to be an attractive platform for developing novel drug delivery approaches and thus several types of functionalized magnetic nanocarriers based on SPIONs have been synthesized and studied. The coating of the metal oxide surface was achieved in a one-pot synthesis with biocompatible polyethylene glycol (PEG) and thermo-responsive modified Pluronic® F68. The resulting thermo-responsive magnetic nanocarriers can incorporate water insoluble drugs into their hydrophobic compartment and later release them in a temperature dependent manner. Here we report novel magnetic nanocarriers with significant improvements regarding the colloidal stability and critical temperature obtained by mixing various molar ratios of hydrophilic PEG with thermo-responsive Pluronic® F68 bearing different end group functionalities. Various methods have been employed to characterize the magnetic nanocarriers, such as photon correlation spectroscopy (DLS), atomic absorption, FT-IR spectroscopy, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering. The transition temperature that determines changes in the conformation of the block copolymer chain was studied by DLS as a function of temperature. Moreover, the drug loading properties of SPION-(F68-OMe)-(F68-FA) and SPION-PEG-F68-FA were analyzed with a hydrophobic fluorescent dye, DID oil. The behavior of the encapsulated DID into the nanocarrier shell was studied as a function of temperature via fluorescence spectroscopy. These results offer original insights into the enhanced colloidal stability and thermo-sensitive properties of the novel synthesized magnetic nanocarriers.

  10. Colloidal stability and thermo-responsive properties of iron oxide nanoparticles coated with polymers: advantages of Pluronic® F68-PEG mixture.

    PubMed

    Chiper, Manuela; Hervé Aubert, Katel; Augé, Amélie; Fouquenet, Jean-François; Soucé, Martin; Chourpa, Igor

    2013-10-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are recognized to be an attractive platform for developing novel drug delivery approaches and thus several types of functionalized magnetic nanocarriers based on SPIONs have been synthesized and studied. The coating of the metal oxide surface was achieved in a one-pot synthesis with biocompatible polyethylene glycol (PEG) and thermo-responsive modified Pluronic® F68. The resulting thermo-responsive magnetic nanocarriers can incorporate water insoluble drugs into their hydrophobic compartment and later release them in a temperature dependent manner. Here we report novel magnetic nanocarriers with significant improvements regarding the colloidal stability and critical temperature obtained by mixing various molar ratios of hydrophilic PEG with thermo-responsive Pluronic® F68 bearing different end group functionalities. Various methods have been employed to characterize the magnetic nanocarriers, such as photon correlation spectroscopy (DLS), atomic absorption, FT-IR spectroscopy, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering. The transition temperature that determines changes in the conformation of the block copolymer chain was studied by DLS as a function of temperature. Moreover, the drug loading properties of SPION-(F68-OMe)-(F68-FA) and SPION-PEG-F68-FA were analyzed with a hydrophobic fluorescent dye, DID oil. The behavior of the encapsulated DID into the nanocarrier shell was studied as a function of temperature via fluorescence spectroscopy. These results offer original insights into the enhanced colloidal stability and thermo-sensitive properties of the novel synthesized magnetic nanocarriers. PMID:24013614

  11. Microfluidic synthesis of thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate microhydrogels as chemo-embolic microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duck Seo, Kyoung; Kim, Dong Sung

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we have successfully synthesized and characterized poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm)-poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) microhydrogels. Various combinations of PNIPAAm-PEGDA microhydrogels were fabricated by the generation of monodisperse microdroplets whose sizes were comparable to a blood vessel of 260 and 320 µm with the help of a hydrodynamic focusing microfluidic device (HFMD), followed by synthesis of the microhydrogels through UV irradiation to the microdroplets. The thermo-responsive behaviors of the various microhydrogels were investigated by changing the PEGDA crosslinker concentration, which was found to be a dominant factor in tuning the shrinkage ratio in response to temperature change. As an in vitro embolization performance evaluation of the microhydrogels as chemo-embolic microspheres, the deliverability of the microhydrogels through a microcatheter was first confirmed and the compact occlusion of a channel was demonstrated based on a tapered microchannel in response to the temperature increase to physiological temperature of 36 °C. The controlled release behavior of the fluorescent dye from the microhydrogel was also investigated for chemotherapeutic purposes as a proof of concept study. The PNIPAAm-PEGDA microhydrogels could be used widely in embolization procedures based on the advantages of tunable thermo-responsive and controlled release behaviors.

  12. Novel thermo-responsive fucose binding ligands for glycoprotein purification by affinity precipitation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lindsay; Chen, Rachel

    2014-02-01

    Novel thermo-responsive affinity sugar binders were developed by fusing a bacterial fucose lectin with a thermo-responsive polypeptide. These designer affinity ligand fusions were produced using an Escherichia coli system capable of extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins and were isolated with a high recovery yield (95%) directly from growth medium by Inverse Temperature Cycling (ITC). With horse radish peroxidase (HRP) as a model protein, we demonstrate here that the designer thermo-responsive ligands are capable of interacting with glycans on a glycoprotein, a property that was used to develop a novel affinity precipitation method for glycoprotein purification. The method, requiring only simple process steps, affords full recovery of a target glycoprotein, and is effective at a target glycoprotein concentration as low as 1.4 pM in the presence of large amounts of contaminants. By developing other sugar binders in the similar fashion, the method should be highly useful for glycoprotein purification and detection. PMID:25271333

  13. Water-dispersed thermo-responsive boron nitride nanotubes: synthesis and properties.

    PubMed

    Kalay, Saban; Stetsyshyn, Yurij; Lobaz, Volodymyr; Harhay, Khrystyna; Ohar, Halyna; Çulha, Mustafa

    2016-01-22

    In this study, water-dispersed thermo-responsive boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) were prepared in a simple two-step process, where on the first step oligoperoxide was grafted via the interaction of amino groups (defects) of BNNTs with pyromellitic chloroanhydride fragments in oligoperoxide molecules. The second step involves N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) graft polymerization 'from the surface' of oligoperoxide-functionalized BNNTs resulting in poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) coating. The pristine and functionalized BNNTs were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. PNIPAM-functionalized BNNTs exhibit excellent dispersibility in water and possess thermo-responsive properties. The water-dispersion of thermo-responsive PNIPAM-functionalized BNNTs can help their potential use in biomedical applications as 'smart' surfaces, nanotransducers and nanocarriers. PMID:26636569

  14. Water-dispersed thermo-responsive boron nitride nanotubes: synthesis and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalay, Saban; Stetsyshyn, Yurij; Lobaz, Volodymyr; Harhay, Khrystyna; Ohar, Halyna; Çulha, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    In this study, water-dispersed thermo-responsive boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) were prepared in a simple two-step process, where on the first step oligoperoxide was grafted via the interaction of amino groups (defects) of BNNTs with pyromellitic chloroanhydride fragments in oligoperoxide molecules. The second step involves N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) graft polymerization ‘from the surface’ of oligoperoxide-functionalized BNNTs resulting in poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) coating. The pristine and functionalized BNNTs were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. PNIPAM-functionalized BNNTs exhibit excellent dispersibility in water and possess thermo-responsive properties. The water-dispersion of thermo-responsive PNIPAM-functionalized BNNTs can help their potential use in biomedical applications as ‘smart’ surfaces, nanotransducers and nanocarriers.

  15. Hydrophilic magnetic nanoclusters with thermo-responsive properties and their drug controlled release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerod, Siraprapa; Rutnakornpituk, Boonjira; Wichai, Uthai; Rutnakornpituk, Metha

    2015-10-01

    Synthesis and drug controlled release properties of thermo-responsive magnetic nanoclusters grafted with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (poly(NIPAAm)) and poly(NIPAAm-co-poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (PEGMA) copolymers were described. These magnetic nanoclusters were synthesized via an in situ radical polymerization in the presence of acrylamide-grafted magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Poly(NIPAAm) provided thermo-responsive properties, while PEGMA played a role in good water dispersibility to the nanoclusters. The ratios of PEGMA to NIPAAm in the (co)polymerization in the presence of the MNPs were fine-tuned such that the nanoclusters with good water dispersibility, good magnetic sensitivity and thermo responsiveness were obtained. The size of the nanoclusters was in the range of 50-100 nm in diameter with about 100-200 particles/cluster. The nanoclusters were well dispersible in water at room temperature and can be suddenly agglomerated when temperature was increased beyond the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) (32 °C). The release behavior of an indomethacin model drug from the nanoclusters was also investigated. These novel magnetic nanoclusters with good dispersibility in water and reversible thermo-responsive properties might be good candidates for the targeting drug controlled release applications.

  16. Rheological properties of a biological thermo-responsive hydrogel produced from soybean oil polymers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rheological properties of a newly developed biological thermo-hydrogel made from vegetable oil were investigated. The material named HPSO-HG is a hydrolytic product of polymerized soybean oil (PSO). HPSO-HG is a thermo-responsive gel, and it exhibited viscoelastic behavior above 2% (wt.%) at roo...

  17. Design of Catch-and-release System by Utilizing Thermo-responsive Gel-Hairpin Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya; Kuksenok, Olga; He, Ximin; Balazs, Anna

    Inspired by properties of aptamers that can bind (unbind) to target proteins in their specific hairpin (chain) conformation dependent on external temperature, we use computational modeling to design an effective catch-and-release device by attaching an array of thermo-responsive hairpins to the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) thermo-responsive gels. With an increase in temperature, the polymer network swells and the hairpins can catch the target naroparticles in the upper mixture fluid. As the temperature decreases, the polymer network collapses and the hairpins unfold to a chain conformation, releasing the arrested particles into the lower fluid for collection. We pinpoint the optimal values for obtaining the robust structural changes of the hairpins and explore the effects of the shear flow on the catch-and-release process. Our approach can be utilized for the detection, separation, and sorting of the components within the multi-component mixtures.

  18. Thermo-responsive methylcellulose hydrogels as temporary substrate for cell sheet biofabrication.

    PubMed

    Altomare, Lina; Cochis, Andrea; Carletta, Andrea; Rimondini, Lia; Farè, Silvia

    2016-05-01

    Methylcellulose (MC), a water-soluble polymer derived from cellulose, was investigated as a possible temporary substrate having thermo-responsive properties favorable for cell culturing. MC-based hydrogels were prepared by a dispersion technique, mixing MC powder (2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 % w/v) with selected salts (sodium sulphate, Na2SO4), sodium phosphate, calcium chloride, or phosphate buffered saline, to evaluate the influence of different compositions on the thermo-responsive behavior. The inversion test was used to determine the gelation temperatures of the different hydrogel compositions; thermo-mechanical properties and thermo-reversibility of the MC hydrogels were investigated by rheological analysis. Gelation temperatures and rheological behavior depended on the MC concentration and type and concentration of salt used in hydrogel preparation. In vitro cytotoxicity tests, performed using L929 mouse fibroblasts, showed no toxic release from all the tested hydrogels. Among the investigated compositions, the hydrogel composed of 8 % w/v MC with 0.05 M Na2SO4 had a thermo-reversibility temperature at 37 °C. For that reason, this formulation was thus considered to verify the possibility of inducing in vitro spontaneous detachment of cells previously seeded on the hydrogel surface. A continuous cell layer (cell sheet) was allowed to grow and then detached from the hydrogel surface without the use of enzymes, thanks to the thermo-responsive behavior of the MC hydrogel. Immunofluorescence observation confirmed that the detached cell sheet was composed of closely interacting cells. PMID:26984360

  19. Investigation of internal microstructure and thermo-responsive properties of composite PNIPAM/silica microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Cejková, Jitka; Hanus, Jaroslav; Stepánek, Frantisek

    2010-06-15

    Composite microcapsules consisting of a thermo-responsive hydrogel poly-N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAM) and coated by silica (SiO(2)) nanoparticles have been synthesized by the inverse Pickering emulsion polymerization method. The composite capsules, whose mean diameter is in the 25-86 microm range in the expanded state, were characterized by static light scattering, atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM). It is reported that the hydrogel surface is uniformly covered by a monolayer of silica nanoparticles and that depending on the capsule size and degree of polymer cross-linking, either hollow-core or partially-filled hydrogel-core microcapsules can be created. Equilibrium thermo-responsive behavior of the composite microcapsules is investigated and it is found that after heating the particles above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of PNIPAM, the shrinkage ratio V/V(max) varies from 0.8 to 0.4 for a cross-linking ratio from 0.6% to 9% on a mass basis. Dynamic temperature cycling studies reveal no hysteresis in the shrinking and recovery phases, but a small measurable dependence of the asymptotic shrinkage ratio V/V(max) on the rate of temperature change exists. The composite capsules are stable under long-term storage in both dried and hydrated states and easily re-dispersible in water. PMID:20304409

  20. Thermo-responsive hydrogels from cellulose-based polyelectrolytes and catanionic vesicles for biomedical application.

    PubMed

    Milcovich, Gesmi; Antunes, Filipe; Golob, Samuel; Farra, Rossella; Grassi, Mario; Voinovich, Dario; Grassi, Gabriele; Asaro, Fioretta

    2016-07-01

    In this study, negatively charged catanionic vesicles/hydrophobically modified hydroxyethylcellulose polymers thermo-responsive hydrogels have been fabricated. Vesicular aggregates were found to act as multifunctional junctions for networking of modified-cellulose water solutions. The contributions of the electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions were evaluated by changing either vesicles composition or the polymer hydrophobic substitution. Thermal-induced size and lamellarity of hydrogel-enclosed vesicles were detected, with further polygonal shape changes induced by cellulose-based polymer addition. The thermal transition was also found to tune hydrogel mechanical behaviour. The network formation was further assessed through molecular insights, which allow to determine the arrangement of the polymer chains on the vesicles' surface. The examined systems exhibited interesting thermo-responsive characteristics. Thus, vesicularly cross-linked hydrogels herein presented can offer a wide variety of applications, i.e. in biomedical field, as multi-drug delivery systems, thanks to their ability to provide for different environments to guest molecules, comprising bulk water, vesicles' interior and bilayers, sites on polymeric chains. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1668-1679, 2016. PMID:26939864

  1. The microbial transglutaminase immobilization on carboxylated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) for thermo-responsivity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian Qin; He, Ting; Wang, Jian Wen

    2016-06-01

    Microbial transglutaminase (mTG) is widely utilized in the PEGylation of pharmaceutical proteins. mTG immobilization can be achieved via covalent bonding on solid supports. However, the catalytic efficiency of mTG immobilized on solid supports was significantly reduced by mass transfer limitation. To overcome this limitation, mTG was covalently immobilized on the thermo-responsive carboxylated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM). The pNIPAM-mTG conjugate exhibited reversibly solubility in aqueous solution with a low critical solution temperature (LCST) at 39°C, i.e., it was insoluble above 39°C and soluble below 39°C. The pH dependence of the pNIPAM-mTG conjugate was similar with that of the native mTG. Upon conjugation to pNIPAM, the optimal temperature of mTG shifted down from 50-55°C to 40-45°C, and the thermal stability of the conjugate was elevated. The easy separation of the pNIPAM-mTG conjugate with its substrate and the catalytic efficiency of the pNIPAM-mTG conjugate were demonstrated by employing the pNIPAM-mTG conjugate to cross-link bovine serum albumin (BSA) and catalyze PEGylation of therapeutic protein, cytochrome c (Cyt C), respectively. The thermo-responsive mTG is suitable to modify proteins in food processing and biomedical engineering. PMID:27178794

  2. Thermo-responsive behavior of borinic acid polymers: experimental and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Wan, Wen-Ming; Zhou, Peng; Cheng, Fei; Sun, Xiao-Li; Lv, Xin-Hu; Li, Kang-Kang; Xu, Hai; Sun, Miao; Jäkle, Frieder

    2015-09-28

    The thermo-responsive properties of borinic acid polymers were investigated by experimental and molecular dynamics simulation studies. The homopolymer poly(styrylphenyl(tri-iso-propylphenyl)borinic acid) (PBA) exhibits an upper critical solution temperature (UCST) in polar organic solvents that is tunable over a wide temperature range by addition of small amounts of H2O. The UCST of a 1 mg mL(-1) PBA solution in DMSO can be adjusted from 20 to 100 °C by varying the H2O content from ∼0-2.5%, in DMF from 0 to 100 °C (∼3-17% H2O content), and in THF from 0 to 60 °C (∼4-19% H2O). The UCST increases almost linearly from the freezing point of the solvent with higher freezing point to the boiling point of the solvent with the lower boiling point. The mechanistic aspects of this process were investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The latter indicate rapid and strong hydrogen-bond formation between BOH moieties and H2O molecules, which serve as crosslinkers to form an insoluble network. Our results suggest that borinic acid-containing polymers are promising as new "smart" materials, which display thermo-responsive properties that are tunable over a wide temperature range. PMID:26256052

  3. Systematic Studies of Phase Transitions in Thermo-Responsive Polymers Used in Targeted Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Janae; Denmark, Daniel; Witanachchi, Sarath

    2015-03-01

    Thermo-responsive polymers such as poly-N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAM) can undergo reversible phase transitions in aqueous solutions under varying temperatures. They are ideal candidates for the polymer shell of a targeted drug delivery capsule. Concentration and pH can affect the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the PNIPAM polymer and its physical properties. In this work, a systematic study of the factors that influence the LCST of the PNIPAM polymer mixed with Fe3O4 nanoparticles (MNPs) during thermal bath heating is presented. A series of PNIPAM solutions with varying concentrations of PNIPAM with MNPs were prepared and characterized using scanning electron microscopy. In-situ transmission measurements were used to determine the LCST of PNIPAM concentrations. A systematic decrease in the LCST was observed as the concentration of PNIPAM was increased. In addition, the impact of pH on the LCST of PNIPAM was examined by increasing the basicity of the PNIPAM solutions by adding adjusted KOH pellets. An increase in the thermal stability of the LCST was observed when the basicity of the PNIPAM solution was increased. The results from this study provide valuable information towards using these thermo-responsive polymers in targeted drug delivery. Principal Investigator

  4. Hepatitis B virus induced coupling of deadhesion and migration of HepG2 cells on thermo-responsive polymer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xi; Feng, Huixing; Chen, Wei Ning; Chan, Vincent

    2010-03-01

    The unique physical property of thermo-responsive polymer (TRP) has recently prompted its increasing applications in tissue engineering. On the other hand, TRP has not been exploited for potential applications in quantitative cell screening against external stimulations. In this study, TRP is applied as a model system for elucidating the effect of HBV replication on the biophysical responses of HepG2 cells transfected by wild type HBV genome. Moreover, mutant HBV genome is designed to assess the specific activity of the SH3-binding domain of HBx during HBV replication. The adhesion contact recession and geometry transformation of HepG2 cells transfected with empty vector (pcDNA3.1 cells), wild type HBV (wtHBV cells) and mutant HBV genome (mHBV cells) are probed during the thermal transformation across lower solution critical temperature of TRP. In comparison with pcDNA3.1 cells and mHBV cells, the initial rate of reduction in degree of deformation and average adhesion energy for wtHBV cells is significantly increased. Interestingly, migration speed and persistence time of cells are found to be correlated with the cell deadhesion kinetics. Immuno-fluorescence microscopy demonstrates that HBV replication reduces the actin concentration and focal adhesions at cell periphery during the initial 30 min cell deadhesion. The results strongly suggested that HBV infection triggers the dynamic responses of HepG2 cells through the cytoskeleton remodeling and subsequent mechanochemical transduction. Overall, it is shown that TRP provides a convenient platform for quantifying biological stimulations on adherent cells. PMID:19944459

  5. Thermo-responsive Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) Microgel Particles for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hsin-Yi

    Colloidal PNIPAM hydrogel particles have found the potential applications in biomedical field because of their thermo-responsiveness. In the current work, two novel applications of PNIPAM microgels are demonstrated. PNIPAM microgels were engineered to serve as thermo-responsive protein transfer agents, which can be applied to modify the surface of 2-D photonic crystals to create ultrasensitive biosensors. The particles were functionalized with metal chelating groups to enable the reversible affinity binding of peptides or proteins, and also grafted with polymeric stabilizers to maintain the colloidal stability under physiological conditions. Two designs were demonstrated in the study. The first type of particle was synthesized by incorporating the stabilizers and the functional groups separately via a two-stage dispersion polymerization. Another type of particle was copolymerized with end-functionalized stabilizers that can be readily conjugated to the chelating groups. Both types of particles were thermo-sensitive, colloidally stable, and able to reversibly bind to the model peptides. Nonionic block copolymers were used as surfactants for the dispersion polymerization of PNIPAM microgel particles to replace the less biocompatible ionic surfactants. The surfactants stabilized PNIPAM particles through physical adsorption but not chemical grafting. The effectiveness of the surfactants was evaluated by comparing the size of the resulting particles. Nonionic surfactants were also found to successfully enhance the colloidal stability at the post-polymerization stage. This allows one to use PNIPAM microgels in physiological environment in the form of particle dispersions without altering the particle composition and polymerization process. PNIPAM microgels were also deposited in micropatterns on substrates for the cell sheet engineering application. A simple dip coating method was employed to micropattern flat substrates with PNIPAM particles in a template free manner

  6. Utilizing Fiber-containing Thermo-responsive Gels to Extract Nanoparticles from Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya; Kuksenok, Olga; Balazs, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Using computer simulations, we model an array of flexible fibers that are embedded in a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) thermo-responsive gel, which swells at lower temperatures and collapses at higher temperatures. The system is immersed in a solution containing dispersed nanoparticles and this fluid is driven to flow by an imposed shear. When the gel is heated, it collapses to expose the fibers, and thereby, triggers the ``catch'' process. Namely, the fibers can act like ``arms'' that wrap around the nanoparticle and bring it from the outer solvent into the gel layer. Moreover, we show that depending on the flexibility and hydrophobicity of the fibers, as well as the imposed shear, we can position the nanoparticles at the desired height within the gel layer. Our approach can be utilized for the detection and separation of components in fluids and for the controlled insertion of nanoparticles within a hydrogel at a particular distance from the gel interface

  7. Thermo-responsive properties driven by hydrogen bonding in aqueous cationic gemini surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xi-Lian; Han, Chuan-Hong; Geng, Pei-Pei; Chen, Xiao-Xiao; Guo, Yan; Liu, Jie; Sun, De-Zhi; Zhang, Jun-Hong; Yu, Meng-Jiao

    2016-02-01

    A series of unexpected thermo-responsive phenomena were discovered in an aqueous solution of the cationic gemini surfactant, 2-hydroxypropyl-1,3-bis(alkyldimethylammonium chloride) (n-3(OH)-n(2Cl), n = 14, 16), in the presence of an inorganic salt. The viscosity change trend for the 14-3(OH)-14(2Cl) system was investigated in the 20-40 °C temperature range. As the temperature increased, the viscosity of the solution first decreased to a minimum point corresponding to 27 °C, and then increased until a maximum was reached, after which the viscosity decreased again. In the 16-3(OH)-16(2Cl) system, the gelling temperature (T(gel)) and viscosity changes upon heating were similar to those in the 14-3(OH)-14(2Cl) system above 27 °C. The reversible conversion of elastic hydrogel to wormlike micelles in the aqueous solution of the 16-3(OH)-16(2Cl) system in the presence of an inorganic salt was observed at relatively low temperatures. Various techniques were used to study and verify the phase-transition processes in these systems, including rheological measurements, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), electric conductivity, and differential scanning calorimetry. The abovementioned phenomena were explained by the formation and destruction of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, and the transition mechanisms of the aggregates were analyzed accordingly. PMID:26659081

  8. Separation of transglutaminase by thermo-responsive affinity precipitation using l-thyroxin as ligand.

    PubMed

    Li, Sipeng; Ding, Zhaoyang; Cao, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Transglutaminase (TGase) is widely used in the food industry. In this study, TGase was purified by affinity precipitation using l-thyroxin, coupled to a thermo-responsive polymer (PNBN), as an affinity ligand. The lower critical solution temperature and recovery of the affinity polymer were 31.0 °C and 99.6 %, respectively. The optimal adsorption condition was 0.02 mol/L phosphate buffer (pH 5.0). The recoveries 99.01 % (protein) and 98.85 % (activity) were obtained by 0.2 mol/L Gly-NaOH buffer (pH 10.0) as the elution agent. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and FortéBio Octet system were used to explore the interactions between l-thyroxin and TGase. The results show that l-thyroxin is suitable for affinity precipitation of TGase. The purity of the final product was verified using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. PMID:26835219

  9. Synthesis of thermo-responsive polymers with both tunable UCST and LCST.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hai-Ying; Yan, Jun-Jie; Wang, Di; Gu, Chen; You, Ye-Zi; Chen, Xue-Si

    2011-04-19

    New water-soluble block copolymers of 2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl methacrylate (MEO(2) MA), oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (OEGMA), and N-(3-(dimethylamino) propyl) methacrylamide (DMAPMA) (poly(OEGMA-co-MEO(2) MA)-b-poly(DMAPMA)) were prepared via sequential reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Selective quaternization of poly(DMAPMA) block gives poly(OEGMA-co-MEO(2) MA)-b-poly((3-[N-(3-methacrylamidopropyl)-N,N-dimethyl]ammoniopropane sulfonate)-co-N-(3-(dimethylamino) propyl) methacrylamide), such block copolymer exhibits double thermo-responsive behavior in water, poly(MEO(2) MA-co-OEGMA) block shows a lower critical solution temperature (LCST), and poly((3-[N-(3-methacrylamidopropyl)-N,N-dimethyl]ammoniopropane sulfonate)-co-N-(3-(dimethylamino) propyl) methacrylamide) block shows a upper critical solution temperature (UCST). Both of LCST and UCST can be controlled: LCST could be tuned by the fraction of OEGMA units in poly(OEGMA-co-MEO(2) MA), and UCST was found to be dependent on the degree of quaternization (DQ). PMID:21480424

  10. On-chip single cell funneling operated by microfabricated thermo-responsive hydrogel layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santaniello, Tommaso; Yan, Yunsong; Tocchio, Alessandro; Martello, Federico; Gassa, Federico; Webb, Patrick; Zhao, Weiwei; Tamplenizza, Margherita; Schulte, Carsten; Liu, Yang; Hutt, David; Milani, Paolo; Conway, Paul; Lenardi, Cristina

    2015-07-01

    We present a multilayer microfluidic system having a KrF excimer laser micro-patterned thermo-responsive poly-(N-isopropyl)-acrylamide (PNIPAAm) based hydrogel layer integrated as a freestanding component that operates as a temperature-triggered cell isolation actuator for single cell assays applications. When the system is assembled, the size of the laser machined micro-through-hole (entrance diameter is 150 μm, while exit hole diameter varies from 10 to 80 μm) can be reversibly modulated as a consequence of the polymer volumetric phase transition induced by heating the device above the critical temperature of 32 °C as a result of the polymer water loss, the shrinkage of the layer caused the hole to homogeneously shrink, thus reducing its original size to about 40% in the polymer collapsed state. This actuation mechanism was exploited to trap a cellular sample in the shrunken exit hole on the top of the hydrogel layer by applying a negative pressure across the film when the system is brought to 37 °C. Subsequently, the funneling of the trapped cell took place through the orifice when the polymer’s natural relaxation at room temperature toward its initial state occurred; the functionality of the device was proved using optical microscopy to monitor MG63 cells as a model cell line during the funneling through the size-modulating structure.

  11. 3D patterned stem cell differentiation using thermo-responsive methylcellulose hydrogel molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonjae; Park, Jon

    2016-07-01

    Tissue-specific patterned stem cell differentiation serves as the basis for the development, remodeling, and regeneration of the multicellular structure of the native tissues. We herein proposed a cytocompatible 3D casting process to recapitulate this patterned stem cell differentiation for reconstructing multicellular tissues in vitro. We first reconstituted the 2D culture conditions for stem cell fate control within 3D hydrogel by incorporating the sets of the diffusible signal molecules delivered through drug-releasing microparticles. Then, utilizing thermo-responsivity of methylcellulose (MC), we developed a cytocompatible casting process to mold these hydrogels into specific 3D configurations, generating the targeted spatial gradients of diffusible signal molecules. The liquid phase of the MC solution was viscous enough to adopt the shapes of 3D impression patterns, while the gelated MC served as a reliable mold for patterning the hydrogel prepolymers. When these patterned hydrogels were integrated together, the stem cells in each hydrogel distinctly differentiated toward individually defined fates, resulting in the formation of the multicellular tissue structure bearing the very structural integrity and characteristics as seen in vascularized bones and osteochondral tissues.

  12. 3D patterned stem cell differentiation using thermo-responsive methylcellulose hydrogel molds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonjae; Park, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Tissue-specific patterned stem cell differentiation serves as the basis for the development, remodeling, and regeneration of the multicellular structure of the native tissues. We herein proposed a cytocompatible 3D casting process to recapitulate this patterned stem cell differentiation for reconstructing multicellular tissues in vitro. We first reconstituted the 2D culture conditions for stem cell fate control within 3D hydrogel by incorporating the sets of the diffusible signal molecules delivered through drug-releasing microparticles. Then, utilizing thermo-responsivity of methylcellulose (MC), we developed a cytocompatible casting process to mold these hydrogels into specific 3D configurations, generating the targeted spatial gradients of diffusible signal molecules. The liquid phase of the MC solution was viscous enough to adopt the shapes of 3D impression patterns, while the gelated MC served as a reliable mold for patterning the hydrogel prepolymers. When these patterned hydrogels were integrated together, the stem cells in each hydrogel distinctly differentiated toward individually defined fates, resulting in the formation of the multicellular tissue structure bearing the very structural integrity and characteristics as seen in vascularized bones and osteochondral tissues. PMID:27381562

  13. Thermo-responsive cross-linked liquid crystal bowl-shaped colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei-Shao; Xia, Yu; Yang, Shu; Yodh, A. G.

    In this work we create and investigate cross-linked bowl-shaped nematic liquid crystal (NLC) colloidal particles. Janus colloids are first formed via solvent-induced phase separation in emulsions consisting of NLC monomers and isotropic polymers. This scheme enables us to realize different particle morphologies such as bowl-shape by fine-tuning the confinement of NLCs within the droplets, e.g. by varying the size of droplets, the volume ratio between NLC and polymer, and the type/concentration of surfactants in aqueous background phase. The NLC compartment is composed of RM82 (1,4-Bis-[4-(6-acryloyloxyhexyloxy)benzoyloxy]-2-methylbenzene) monomers, which are then photocrosslinked by dithiol groups to form nematic liquid crystal elastomer. Finally, we remove the polymer parts of Janus colloids to obtain the target structures, which are temperature sensitive due to change of elasticity and molecular alignment of NLC near the isotropic to nematic phase transition temperature. We will explore novel mechanical and optical properties from the thermo-responsive structures as well as their applications, such as biomimic swimming behaviors and adjustable lensing effects. This work is supported by the foundation through NSF Grant DMR12-05463, NSF-MRSEC Grant DMR11-20901, and NASA Grant NNX08AO0G.

  14. Thermo-responsive and compression properties of TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofiber-modified PNIPAm hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jinguang; Chen, Yufei; Liu, Hongzhi; Du, Chungui; Yu, Huilong; Zhou, Zhongxi

    2016-08-20

    In this study, TEMPO-oxidized bamboo cellulose nanofibers (TO-CNF) with anionic carboxylate groups on the surfaces were in-situ incorporated into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm) matrix to improve its thermo-responsive and mechanical properties during the polymerization. The microstructure, swelling behaviors, and compressive strength of resultant PNIPAm composite hydrogels with varying contents of TO-CNFs (0-10wt%) were then examined, respectively. Modified hydrogels exhibited the similar light transparency to pure PNIPAm one due to the formation of semi-IPN structure between PNIPAm and TO-CNF. FT-IR spectra demonstrated that the presence of TO-CNF did not alter the position of characteristic peaks associated with PNIPAm. SEM observation suggested that the pore size of PNIPAm hydrogels was markedly increased after the incorporation of TO-CNF. Also, the composite hydrogels showed superior swelling behavior and much improved compression properties with respect to pure PNIPAm one. Thus, TO-CNF appeared to be a "green" nanofiller that can simultaneously improve swelling and mechanical properties of PNIPAm hydrogel. PMID:27178925

  15. 3D patterned stem cell differentiation using thermo-responsive methylcellulose hydrogel molds

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonjae; Park, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Tissue-specific patterned stem cell differentiation serves as the basis for the development, remodeling, and regeneration of the multicellular structure of the native tissues. We herein proposed a cytocompatible 3D casting process to recapitulate this patterned stem cell differentiation for reconstructing multicellular tissues in vitro. We first reconstituted the 2D culture conditions for stem cell fate control within 3D hydrogel by incorporating the sets of the diffusible signal molecules delivered through drug-releasing microparticles. Then, utilizing thermo-responsivity of methylcellulose (MC), we developed a cytocompatible casting process to mold these hydrogels into specific 3D configurations, generating the targeted spatial gradients of diffusible signal molecules. The liquid phase of the MC solution was viscous enough to adopt the shapes of 3D impression patterns, while the gelated MC served as a reliable mold for patterning the hydrogel prepolymers. When these patterned hydrogels were integrated together, the stem cells in each hydrogel distinctly differentiated toward individually defined fates, resulting in the formation of the multicellular tissue structure bearing the very structural integrity and characteristics as seen in vascularized bones and osteochondral tissues. PMID:27381562

  16. Investigation of cell behaviors on thermo-responsive PNIPAM microgel films.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jingjing; Cai, Jinge; Li, Yuan; Wu, Bo; Gong, Xiangjun; Ngai, To

    2015-08-01

    The use of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) as building blocks for engineering responsive coatings and their potential use as switchable substrates such as biosensors have attracted great attention in recent years. However, few studies have been conducted regarding the cell behaviors and the related mechanism on thermos-responsive surfaces consisting of PNIPAM microgel particles. In this work, monodisperse PNIPAM microgels were synthesized and used to prepare PINPAM microgel films. Uniform microgel surfaces can be fabricated by drop-coating with the precoating of a polyethylenimine (PEI) layer. Cell experiments indicate that unlike PNIPAM polymer brushes reported with controllable detachment ability, HepG2, which is a human liver carcinoma cell line, remains adherent on the microgel films upon cooling. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) experiments show an irreversible adsorption of serum proteins on the microgel surface upon cooling, whose adsorption is a prerequisite of cell adhesion during cell culture. This fact may account for the irreversible adhesion of HepG2 cells. PMID:26047883

  17. Human corneal endothelial cell sheets for transplantation: thermo-responsive cell culture carriers to meet cell-specific requirements.

    PubMed

    Teichmann, J; Valtink, M; Gramm, S; Nitschke, M; Werner, C; Funk, R H W; Engelmann, K

    2013-02-01

    Corneal endothelial diseases lead to severe vision impairment, motivating the transplantation of donor corneae or corneal endothelial lamellae, which is, however, impeded by endothelial cell loss during processing. Therefore, one prioritized aim in corneal tissue engineering is the generation of transplantable human corneal endothelial cell (HCEC) layers. Thermo-responsive cell culture carriers are widely used for non-enzymatic harvest of cell sheets. The current study presents a novel thermo-responsive carrier based on simultaneous electron beam immobilization and cross-linking of poly(vinyl methyl ether) (PVME) on polymeric surfaces, which allows one to adjust layer thickness, stiffness, switching amplitude and functionalization with bioactive molecules to meet cell type specific requirements. The efficacy of this approach for HCEC, which require elaborate cell culture conditions and are strongly adherent to the substratum, is demonstrated. The developed method may pave the way to tissue engineering of corneal endothelium and significantly improve therapeutic options. PMID:23099299

  18. A remotely operated drug delivery system with an electrolytic pump and a thermo-responsive valve.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ying; Zaher, Amir; Yassine, Omar; Kosel, Jurgen; Foulds, Ian G

    2015-09-01

    Implantable drug delivery devices are becoming attractive due to their abilities of targeted and controlled dose release. Currently, two important issues are functional lifetime and non-controlled drug diffusion. In this work, we present a drug delivery device combining an electrolytic pump and a thermo-responsive valve, which are both remotely controlled by an electromagnetic field (40.5 mT and 450 kHz). Our proposed device exhibits a novel operation mechanism for long-term therapeutic treatments using a solid drug in reservoir approach. Our device also prevents undesired drug liquid diffusions. When the electromagnetic field is on, the electrolysis-induced bubble drives the drug liquid towards the Poly (N-Isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) valve that consists of PNIPAM and iron micro-particles. The heat generated by the iron micro-particles causes the PNIPAM to shrink, resulting in an open valve. When the electromagnetic field is turned off, the PNIPAM starts to swell. In the meantime, the bubbles are catalytically recombined into water, reducing the pressure inside the pumping chamber, which leads to the refilling of the fresh liquid from outside the device. A catalytic reformer is included, allowing more liquid refilling during the limited valve's closing time. The amount of body liquid that refills the drug reservoir can further dissolve the solid drug, forming a reproducible drug solution for the next dose. By repeatedly turning on and off the electromagnetic field, the drug dose can be cyclically released, and the exit port of the device is effectively controlled. PMID:26339328

  19. A remotely operated drug delivery system with an electrolytic pump and a thermo-responsive valve

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ying; Zaher, Amir; Yassine, Omar; Kosel, Jurgen; Foulds, Ian G.

    2015-01-01

    Implantable drug delivery devices are becoming attractive due to their abilities of targeted and controlled dose release. Currently, two important issues are functional lifetime and non-controlled drug diffusion. In this work, we present a drug delivery device combining an electrolytic pump and a thermo-responsive valve, which are both remotely controlled by an electromagnetic field (40.5 mT and 450 kHz). Our proposed device exhibits a novel operation mechanism for long-term therapeutic treatments using a solid drug in reservoir approach. Our device also prevents undesired drug liquid diffusions. When the electromagnetic field is on, the electrolysis-induced bubble drives the drug liquid towards the Poly (N-Isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) valve that consists of PNIPAM and iron micro-particles. The heat generated by the iron micro-particles causes the PNIPAM to shrink, resulting in an open valve. When the electromagnetic field is turned off, the PNIPAM starts to swell. In the meantime, the bubbles are catalytically recombined into water, reducing the pressure inside the pumping chamber, which leads to the refilling of the fresh liquid from outside the device. A catalytic reformer is included, allowing more liquid refilling during the limited valve's closing time. The amount of body liquid that refills the drug reservoir can further dissolve the solid drug, forming a reproducible drug solution for the next dose. By repeatedly turning on and off the electromagnetic field, the drug dose can be cyclically released, and the exit port of the device is effectively controlled. PMID:26339328

  20. Heat-induced solution mixing in thermo-responsive polymer-coated microchannels for the fluorometric determination of polyamines in saliva.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Tohru; Suzuki, Norio; Furuse, Takehiro; Hiraide, Masataka

    2009-12-15

    We developed a simple and easy method for solution mixing based on the heat-induced regulation of capillary action in thermo-responsive polymer-coated microchannels. The channels having two T-junctions were fabricated on a glass plate by a sand-blast technique and then coated with a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) film. The polymer-coating was performed by the modification with allyltrimethoxysilane and the subsequent radical polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide and N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide. When the channel was warmed by a Peltier device, a capillarity-based solution flow completely stopped because of the water-repellency of channel surfaces. On the other hand, the cooling of the channels allowed the restart of the solution flow through hydrophilic channels. Solution mixing downstream a T-junction was readily conducted by a Peltier device that had placed at the junction. The technique was applied to the fluorometric analysis of polyamines in saliva. The saliva sample was mixed with nickel(II) chloride solution at the first junction to mask amino acids and then mixed with o-phthalaldehyde solution at the second junction to form the fluorometric derivatives of polyamines. Blue fluorescence was observed downstream the second junction. Linear correlation was obtained between the emission intensity and the spermine concentration in the range of 20-100 microM. No mechanical pump or valve was required for the fluid manipulation. PMID:19836588

  1. Thermo-responsive diblock copolymer worm gels in non-polar solvents.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Lee A; Lane, Jacob A; Derry, Matthew J; Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O; Armes, Steven P

    2014-04-16

    Benzyl methacrylate (BzMA) is polymerized using a poly(lauryl methacrylate) macromolecular chain transfer agent (PLMA macro-CTA) using reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization at 70 °C in n-dodecane. This choice of solvent leads to an efficient dispersion polymerization, with polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA) occurring via the growing PBzMA block to produce a range of PLMA-PBzMA diblock copolymer nano-objects, including spheres, worms, and vesicles. In the present study, particular attention is paid to the worm phase, which forms soft free-standing gels at 20 °C due to multiple inter-worm contacts. Such worm gels exhibit thermo-responsive behavior: heating above 50 °C causes degelation due to the onset of a worm-to-sphere transition. Degelation occurs because isotropic spheres interact with each other much less efficiently than the highly anisotropic worms. This worm-to-sphere thermal transition is essentially irreversible on heating a dilute solution (0.10% w/w) but is more or less reversible on heating a more concentrated dispersion (20% w/w). The relatively low volatility of n-dodecane facilitates variable-temperature rheological studies, which are consistent with eventual reconstitution of the worm phase on cooling to 20 °C. Variable-temperature (1)H NMR studies conducted in d26-dodecane confirm partial solvation of the PBzMA block at elevated temperature: surface plasticization of the worm cores is invoked to account for the observed change in morphology, because this is sufficient to increase the copolymer curvature and hence induce a worm-to-sphere transition. Small-angle X-ray scattering and TEM are used to investigate the structural changes that occur during the worm-to-sphere-to-worm thermal cycle; experiments conducted at 1.0 and 5.0% w/w demonstrate the concentration-dependent (ir)reversibility of these morphological transitions. PMID:24678949

  2. Thermo-responsive Diblock Copolymer Worm Gels in Non-polar Solvents

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Benzyl methacrylate (BzMA) is polymerized using a poly(lauryl methacrylate) macromolecular chain transfer agent (PLMA macro-CTA) using reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization at 70 °C in n-dodecane. This choice of solvent leads to an efficient dispersion polymerization, with polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA) occurring via the growing PBzMA block to produce a range of PLMA–PBzMA diblock copolymer nano-objects, including spheres, worms, and vesicles. In the present study, particular attention is paid to the worm phase, which forms soft free-standing gels at 20 °C due to multiple inter-worm contacts. Such worm gels exhibit thermo-responsive behavior: heating above 50 °C causes degelation due to the onset of a worm-to-sphere transition. Degelation occurs because isotropic spheres interact with each other much less efficiently than the highly anisotropic worms. This worm-to-sphere thermal transition is essentially irreversible on heating a dilute solution (0.10% w/w) but is more or less reversible on heating a more concentrated dispersion (20% w/w). The relatively low volatility of n-dodecane facilitates variable-temperature rheological studies, which are consistent with eventual reconstitution of the worm phase on cooling to 20 °C. Variable-temperature 1H NMR studies conducted in d26-dodecane confirm partial solvation of the PBzMA block at elevated temperature: surface plasticization of the worm cores is invoked to account for the observed change in morphology, because this is sufficient to increase the copolymer curvature and hence induce a worm-to-sphere transition. Small-angle X-ray scattering and TEM are used to investigate the structural changes that occur during the worm-to-sphere-to-worm thermal cycle; experiments conducted at 1.0 and 5.0% w/w demonstrate the concentration-dependent (ir)reversibility of these morphological transitions. PMID:24678949

  3. Thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-grafted hollow fiber membranes for osteoblasts culture and non-invasive harvest.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Meiling; Liu, Tianqing; Song, Kedong; Ge, Dan; Li, Xiangqin

    2015-10-01

    Hollow fiber membrane (HFM) culture system is one of the most important bioreactors for the large-scale culture and expansion of therapeutic cells. However, enzymatic and mechanical treatments are traditionally applied to harvest the expanded cells from HFMs, which inevitably causes harm to the cells. In this study, thermo-responsive cellulose acetate HFMs for cell culture and non-invasive harvest were prepared for the first time via free radical polymerization in the presence of cerium (IV). ATR-FTIR and elemental analysis results indicated that the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) was covalently grafted on HFMs successfully. Dynamic contact angle measurements at different temperatures revealed that the magnitude of volume phase transition was decreased with increasing grafted amount of PNIPAAm. And the amount of serum protein adsorbed on HFMs surface also displayed the same pattern. Meanwhile osteoblasts adhered and spread well on the surface of PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs at 37 °C. And Calcein-AM/PI staining, AB assay, ALP activity and OCN protein expression level all showed that PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs had good cell compatibility. After incubation at 20 °C for 120 min, the adhering cells on PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs turned to be round and detached after being gently pipetted. These results suggest that thermo-responsive HFMs are attractive cell culture substrates which enable cell culture, expansion and the recovery without proteolytic enzyme treatment for the application in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:26117772

  4. Thermo-responsive and aqueous dispersible ZnO/PNIPAM core/shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alem, Halima; Schejn, Aleksandra; Roques-Carmes, Thibault; Ghanbaja, Jaafar; Schneider, Raphaël

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we developed a new process to covalently graft a thermoresponsive polymer on the surface of fluorescent nanocrystals in order to synthesize materials that combine both responsive and fluorescent properties. For the first time, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) was grown by activator regenerated by electron transfer-atom transfer radical polymerization (ARGET-ATRP) from ZnO quantum dots (QDs) by surface-initiated polymerization. This process allowed the formation of fluorescent and responsive ZnO/PNIPAM core/shell QDs while only requiring the use of a ppm amount of copper for the synthesis. The influence of the nature of the silanized layer and the polymerization time on the properties of the final nanomaterials were investigated. Results clearly evidence that both the PNIPAM layer thickness and the temperature affected the luminescence properties of the core/shell nanoparticles, but also that the PNIPAM layer, when it is thick enough, could stabilize the QDs’ optical properties.

  5. Affinity precipitation of human serum albumin using a thermo-response polymer with an L-thyroxin ligand

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Affinity precipitation has been reported as a potential technology for the purification of proteins at the early stage of downstream processing. The technology could be achieved using reversible soluble-insoluble polymers coupled with an affinity ligand to purify proteins from large volumes of dilute solution material such as fermentation broths or plasma. In this study, a thermo-response polymer was synthesized using N-methylol acrylamide, N-isopropyl acrylamide and butyl acrylate as monomers. The molecular weight of the polymer measured by the viscosity method was 3.06 × 104 Da and the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) was 28.0°C.The recovery of the polymer above the LCST was over 95.0%. Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most abundant protein in the human serum system, and it has important functions in the human body. High purity HSA is required in pharmaceuticals. Safe and efficient purification is a crucial process during HSA production. Results A thermo-response polymer was synthesized and L-thyroxin immobilized on the polymer as an affinity ligand to enable affinity precipitation of HSA. The LCST of the affinity polymer was 31.0°C and the recovery was 99.6% of its original amount after recycling three times. The optimal adsorption condition was 0.02 M Tris–HCl buffer (pH 7.0) and the HSA adsorption capacity was 14.9 mg/g polymer during affinity precipitation. Circular dichroism spectra and a ForteBio Octet system were used to analyze the interactions between the affinity polymer and HSA during adsorption and desorption. The recovery of total HSA by elution with 1.0 mol/L NaSCN was 93.6%. When the affinity polymer was applied to purification of HSA from human serum, HSA could be purified to single-band purity according to SDS-PAGE. Conclusion A thermo-response polymer was synthesized and L-thyroxin was attached to the polymer. Affinity precipitation was used to purify HSA from human serum. PMID:24341315

  6. Thermo-Responsive Polyplex Micelles with PEG Shells and PNIPAM Layer to Protect DNA Cores for Systemic Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Junjie; Zha, Zengshi; Ge, Zhishen

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous achievement of prolonged retention in blood circulation and efficient gene transfection activity in target tissues has always been a major challenge hindering in vivo applications of nonviral gene vectors via systemic administration. The engineered strategies for efficient systemic gene delivery are under wide investigation. These approaches include the thermo-responsive formation of a hydrophobic intermediate layer on PEG-shielded polyplex micelles. Herein, we constructed novel rod-shaped ternary polyplex micelles (TPMs) via complexation between the mixed block copolymers of poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly{N'-[N-(2-aminoethyl)-2-aminoethyl]aspartamide} (PEG-b-PAsp(DET)) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-b-PAsp(DET) (PNIPAM-b-PAsp(DET)) and plasmid DNA (pDNA) at room temperature (RT), exhibiting distinct temperature-responsive formation of a hydrophobic intermediate layer between PEG shells and pDNA cores through facile temperature increase from RT to body temperature (~37 °C). PMID:27436325

  7. Continuum theory of swelling material surfaces with applications to thermo-responsive gel membranes and surface mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucantonio, Alessandro; Teresi, Luciano; DeSimone, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Soft membranes are commonly employed in shape-morphing applications, where the material is programmed to achieve a target shape upon activation by an external trigger, and as coating layers that alter the surface characteristics of bulk materials, such as the properties of spreading and absorption of liquids. In particular, polymer gel membranes experience swelling or shrinking when their solvent content change, and the non-homogeneous swelling field may be exploited to control their shape. Here, we develop a theory of swelling material surfaces to model polymer gel membranes and demonstrate its features by numerically studying applications in the contexts of biomedicine, micro-motility, and coating technology. We also specialize the theory to thermo-responsive gels, which are made of polymers that change their affinity with a solvent when temperature varies.

  8. Thermo-responsive drug release from self-assembled micelles of brush-like PLA/PEG analogues block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanfei; Darcos, Vincent; Monge, Sophie; Li, Suming

    2015-08-01

    Thermo-responsive brush-like amphiphilic poly[2-(2-methoxyethoxy) ethyl methacrylate-co-oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate]-b-poly(l-lactide)-b-poly[2-(2-methoxyethoxy) ethyl methacrylate-co-oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate] [P(MEO2MA-co-OEGMA)-b-PLLA-b-P(MEO2MA-co-OEGMA)] triblock copolymers were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization of MEO2MA and OEGMA co-monomers using a α,ω-Bromopropionyl poly(l-lactide) (Br-PLLA-Br) macroinitiator. The resulting copolymers with MEO2MA/OEGMA molar ratio ranging from 79/21 to 42/58 were characterized by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance and size exclusion chromatography. Thermo-responsive micelles were obtained by self-assembly of copolymers in aqueous medium. The micelles are spherical in shape with sizes varying from 20.7 to 102.5 nm. A hydrophobic anticancer drug, curcumin, was encapsulated in micelles by using membrane hydration method. The properties of drug loaded micelles were determined by dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and lower critical solution temperature (LCST) measurements. The micelles size decreases from 102.5 nm for blank micelles to 37.6 nm with 10.8% drug loading, suggesting that the drug plays an important role in the micellization procedure. The LCST decreases from 45.1°C for blank micelles to 40.6 and 38.3°C with 5.9 and 10.8% drug loading, respectively. In vitro drug release was performed in pH 7.4 PBS at different temperatures. Data show that the release rate was significantly enhanced above the LCST comparing with that below the LCST. The amount of released drug at 41°C was ca. 20% higher than that at 37°C. Burst-like release was depressed due to enhanced interaction between drug with hydrophobic PLA and PMA chains. PMID:26095914

  9. Non-Ionic, Thermo-Responsive DEA/DMA Nanogels: Synthesis, Characterization, and Use for DNA Separations by Microchip Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xihua; Sun, Mingyun; Barron, Annelise E.

    2011-01-01

    Thermo-responsive polymer “nanogels” (crosslinked hydrogel particles with sub-100 nm diameters) are intriguing for many potential applications in biotechnology and medicine. There have been relatively few reports of electrostatically neutral, thermosensitive nanogels comprising a high fraction of hydrophilic co-monomer. Here we demonstrate the syntheses and characterization of novel, nonionic nanogels based on random N,N-diethylacrylamide (DEA) / N,N-dimethylacrylamide (DMA) copolymers, made by free-radical, surfactant-free dispersion polymerization. The volume phase transition temperatures of these DEA/DMA nanogels are strongly affected by co-monomer composition, providing a way to “tune” the phase transition temperature of these non-ionic nanogels. While DEA nanogels (comprising no DMA) can be obtained at 70°C by standard emulsion precipitation, DEA/DMA random copolymer nanogels can be obtained only in a particular range of temperatures, above the initial phase transition temperature and below the critical precipitation temperature of the DEA/DMA copolymer, controlled by co-monomer composition. Increasing percentages of DMA in the nanogels raises the phase transition temperature, and attenuates and broadens it as well. We find that concentrated DEA/DMA nanogel dispersions are optically clear at room temperature. This good optical clarity was exploited for their use in a novel DNA sieving matrix for microfluidic chip electrophoresis. An ultrafast, high-efficiency dsDNA separation was achieved in less than 120 seconds for dsDNA ranging from 75 bp-15000 bp. PMID:21392778

  10. Swelling and shrinking properties of thermo-responsive polymeric ionic liquid hydrogels with embedded linear pNIPAAM.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Simon; Florea, Larisa; Fraser, Kevin J; Diamond, Dermot

    2014-01-01

    In this study, varying concentrations of linear pNIPAAM have been incorporated for the first time into a thermo-responsive polymeric ionic liquid (PIL) hydrogel, namely tributyl-hexyl phosphonium 3-sulfopropylacrylate (P-SPA), to produce semi-interpenetrating polymer networks. The thermal properties of the resulting hydrogels have been investigated along with their thermo-induced shrinking and reswelling capabilities. The semi-interpenetrating networks (IPN) hydrogels were found to have improved shrinking and reswelling properties compared with their PIL counterpart. At elevated temperatures (50-80 °C), it was found that the semi-IPN with the highest concentration of hydrophobic pNIPAAM exhibited the highest shrinking percentage of ~40% compared to the conventional P-SPA, (27%). This trend was also found to occur for the reswelling measurements, with semi-IPN hydrogels producing the highest reswelling percentage of ~67%, with respect to its contracted state. This was attributed to an increase in water affinity due to the presence of hydrophilic pNIPAAM. Moreover, the presence of linear pNIPAAM in the polymer matrix leads to improved shrinking and reswelling response compared to the equivalent PIL. PMID:24681582

  11. Self-Healing and Thermo-Responsive Dual-Crosslinked Alginate Hydrogels based on Supramolecular Inclusion Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Tianxin; Fenn, Spencer L.; Charron, Patrick N.; Oldinski, Rachael A.

    2015-01-01

    β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), with a lipophilic inner cavity and hydrophilic outer surface, interacts with a large variety of non-polar guest molecules to form non-covalent inclusion complexes. Conjugation of β-CD onto biomacromolecules can form physically-crosslinked hydrogel networks upon mixing with a guest molecule. Herein describes the development and characterization of self-healing, thermo-responsive hydrogels, based on host-guest inclusion complexes between alginate-graft-β-CD and Pluronic® F108 (poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(propylene glycol)-b-poly(ethylene glycol)). The mechanics, flow characteristics, and thermal response were contingent on the polymer concentrations, and the host-guest molar ratio. Transient and reversible physical crosslinking between host and guest polymers governed self-assembly, allowing flow under shear stress, and facilitating complete recovery of the material properties within a few seconds of unloading. The mechanical properties of the dual-crosslinked, multi-stimuli responsive hydrogels were tuned as high as 30 kPa at body temperature, and are advantageous for biomedical applications such as drug delivery and cell transplantation. PMID:26509214

  12. Synthesis and click chemistry of a new class of biodegradable polylactide towards tunable thermo-responsive biomaterials†

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Quanxuan; Ren, Hong; Baker, Gregory L.

    2014-01-01

    A new class of clickable and biodegradable polylactide was designed and prepared via bulk polymerization of 3,6-dipropargyloxymethyl-1,4-dioxane-2,5-dione (1) which was synthesized from easily accessible propargyloxylactic acid (5). A homopolymer of 1 and random copolymer of 1 with l-lactide were obtained as amorphous materials and exhibit low Tg of 8.5 and 34 °C, respectively, indicating their promising potentials for biomedical applications. The statistical nature of random copolymers was investigated by DSC analysis and 13C NMR spectroscopy, which implies the random distribution of terminal alkyne groups along the back bone of copolymers. The efficient click post-modification of this new class of polylactide with alkyl and mPEG azides affords novel hydrophilic biomaterials, which exhibit reversible thermo-responsive properties as evidenced by their tunable LCST ranging from 22 to 69 °C depending on the balance of the incorporated hydrophilic/hydrophobic side chains. These results indicate the generality of this new class of clickable polylactide in preparing novel smart biomaterials in a simple and efficient manner via click chemistry. PMID:25685199

  13. Breast Tumor Targetable Fe3O4 Embedded Thermo-Responsive Nanoparticles for Radiofrequency Assisted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Rejinold, N Sanoj; Thomas, Reju George; Muthiah, Muthunarayanan; Lee, Hwa Jeongong; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Park, In-kyu; Jayakumar, R

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) frequency may be utilized as an energy source to activate thermo-responsive nanoparticles for the controlled local delivery of drugs to cancer cells. Herein, we demonstrate that 180 ± 20 nm sized curcumin encapsulated chitosan-graft-poly(N-vinyl caprolactam) nanoparticles containing iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4-CRC-TRC-NPs) were selectively internalized in cancer cells in vivo. Using an RF treatment at 80 watts for 2 min, Fe3O4-CRC-TRC-NPs, dissipated heat energy of 42 degrees C, which is the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the chitosan-graft-poly(N-vinyl caprolactam), causing controlled curcumin release and apoptosis to cultured 4T1 breast cancer cells. Further, the tumor localization studies on orthotopic breast cancer model revealed that Fe3O4-CRC-TRC-NPs selectively accumulated at the primary tumor as confirmed by in vivo live imaging followed by ex vivo tissue imaging and HPLC studies. These initial results strongly support the development of RF assisted drug delivery from nanoparticles for improved tumor targeting for breast cancer treatment. PMID:27301171

  14. A pH- and thermo-responsive poly(amino acid)-based drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Li, Bingqiang; Gong, Chu; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Yanming; Wu, Guolin

    2015-12-01

    A pH- and thermo-responsive poly(amino acid)-based amphiphilic copolymer was developed, functioning as a tumour targeting drug delivery system with good biocompatibility and biodegradability. To provide multi-stimuli sensitivity characteristics to the poly(amino acid)s, the polyaspartamide scaffold has been functionalized with N,N-diisopropylamide groups via aminolysis reaction of polysuccinimide. PEG chains have also been chemically grafted to the poly(amino acid) backbone through acid-labile hydrazone linkages, providing a removable shield for the poly(amino acid) based nanoparticles. Furthermore, doxorubicin was chemically linked to the copolymer chain via hydrazone bonds, acting as the hydrophobic moiety to drive the polymeric self-assembly. Free doxorubicin molecules could be encapsulated into the self-assembled nanoparticles via hydrophobic interactions and molecular π-π stacking. The results obtained show that the drug release can be triggered by the temperature with a significantly increased release being observed under acidic conditions. The cytotoxicity behaviour of the copolymers and drug-loaded nanoparticles was investigated in vitro at varying pH values and different temperatures. In doing so, superior characteristics concerning compatibility and anti-cancer activity could be observed. PMID:26454546

  15. A novel thermo-responsive hydrogel based on salecan and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide): synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Hu, Xinyu; Qi, Xiaoliang; Yu, Hao; Liu, Yucheng; Li, Junjian; Zhang, Jianfa; Dong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Salecan is a novel microbial polysaccharide produced by Agrobacterium sp. ZX09. The salt-tolerant strain was isolated from a soil sample in our laboratory and the 16S rDNA sequence was deposited in the GenBank database under the accession number GU810841. Salecan is suitable to fabricate hydrogel for biomedical applications due to the excellent hydrophilicity and biocompatibility. Here, salecan has been introduced into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm) network to form novel thermo-sensitive semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (semi-IPNs). The structure of salecan/PNIPAm semi-IPNs was confirmed by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) proved the stability of the semi-IPNs. Rheological and compressive tests revealed an elastic solid-like behavior and good mechanical properties of the hydrogels. Swelling behavior test showed the hydrogels possessed high water content at room temperature. An excellent thermo-sensitive property of fast response rates to temperature had been demonstrated as well. In vitro degradation measurements ensured the semi-IPNs were degradable. Cytotoxicity and cell adhesion study suggested the synthesized salecan/PNIPAm hydrogels were non-toxic and biocompatibility. The results indicated the novel thermo-responsive hydrogels could be a suitable candidate for biomedical applications. PMID:25460596

  16. Swelling and Shrinking Properties of Thermo-Responsive Polymeric Ionic Liquid Hydrogels with Embedded Linear pNIPAAM

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Simon; Florea, Larisa; Fraser, Kevin J.; Diamond, Dermot

    2014-01-01

    In this study, varying concentrations of linear pNIPAAM have been incorporated for the first time into a thermo-responsive polymeric ionic liquid (PIL) hydrogel, namely tributyl-hexyl phosphonium 3-sulfopropylacrylate (P-SPA), to produce semi-interpenetrating polymer networks. The thermal properties of the resulting hydrogels have been investigated along with their thermo-induced shrinking and reswelling capabilities. The semi-interpenetrating networks (IPN) hydrogels were found to have improved shrinking and reswelling properties compared with their PIL counterpart. At elevated temperatures (50–80 °C), it was found that the semi-IPN with the highest concentration of hydrophobic pNIPAAM exhibited the highest shrinking percentage of ~40% compared to the conventional P-SPA, (27%). This trend was also found to occur for the reswelling measurements, with semi-IPN hydrogels producing the highest reswelling percentage of ~67%, with respect to its contracted state. This was attributed to an increase in water affinity due to the presence of hydrophilic pNIPAAM. Moreover, the presence of linear pNIPAAM in the polymer matrix leads to improved shrinking and reswelling response compared to the equivalent PIL. PMID:24681582

  17. Synthesis of Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) Janus Microhydrogels for Anisotropic Thermo-responsiveness and Organophilic/Hydrophilic Loading Capability.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kyoung Duck; Choi, Andrew; Doh, Junsang; Kim, Dong Sung

    2016-01-01

    Janus microparticles are compartmentalized particles with differing molecular structures and/or functionality on each of their two sides. Because of this unique property, Janus microparticles have been recognized as a new class of materials, thereby attracting a great deal of attention from various research fields. The versatility of these microparticles has been exemplified through their uses as building blocks for self-assembly, electrically responsive actuators, emulsifiers for painting and cosmetics, and carriers for drug delivery. This study introduces a detailed protocol that explicitly describes a synthetic method for designing novel Janus microhydrogels composed of a single base material, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm). Janus microdroplets are firstly generated via a hydrodynamic focusing microfluidic device (HFMD) based on the separation of a supersaturated aqueous NIPAAm monomer solution and subsequently polymerized through exposure to UV irradiation. The resulting Janus microhydrogels were found to be entirely composed of the same base material, featured an easily identifiable compartmentalized morphology, and exhibited anisotropic thermo-responsiveness and organophilic/hydrophilic loading capability. We believe that the proposed method introduces a novel hydrogel platform with the potential for advanced synthesis of multi-functional Janus microhydrogels. PMID:26966860

  18. Injectable thermo-responsive hydrogel composed of xanthan gum and methylcellulose double networks with shear-thinning property.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhijia; Yao, Ping

    2015-11-01

    Injectable hydrogel precursor solution was prepared by physical blend of xanthan gum (XG) and methylcellulose (MC) in aqueous solution. Due to the formation of XG network composed of XG double helical strand structure, XG/MC blend was a high viscous solution with good shear-thinning property at room temperature. When the temperature was changed from 23 to 37 °C, thermo-responsive MC network formed, which caused XG/MC blend solution to gelate. The gelation time and storage modulus of the blend can be tuned by XG and/or MC concentrations. Both in vitro and in vivo investigations revealed that the blend solution immediately recovered its high viscosity and rapidly formed hydrogel at body temperature after injection using a syringe. In vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability of the hydrogel were validated by implantation of the hydrogel in rats. In vitro investigation demonstrated that XG/MC blend is a promising injectable hydrogel material for long-term drug delivery. PMID:26256374

  19. Preparation of thermo-responsive graft copolymer by using a novel macro-RAFT agent and its application for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Song, Cunfeng; Yu, Shirong; Liu, Cheng; Deng, Yuanming; Xu, Yiting; Chen, Xiaoling; Dai, Lizong

    2016-05-01

    A methodology to prepare thermo-responsive graft copolymer by using a novel macro-RAFT agent was proposed. The macro-RAFT agent with pendant dithioester (ZC(S)SR) was facilely prepared via the combination of RAFT polymerization and esterification reaction. By means of ZC(S)SR-initiated RAFT polymerization, the thermo-responsive graft copolymer consisting of poly(methyl methacrylate-co-hydroxylethyl methacrylate) (P(MMA-co-HEMA)) backbone and hydrophilic poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) side chains was constructed through the "grafting from" approach. The chemical compositions and molecular weight distributions of the synthesized polymers were respectively characterized by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Self-assembly behavior of the amphiphilic graft copolymers (P(MMA-co-HEMA)-g-PNIPAAm) was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and spectrofluorimeter. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) value was 0.052mgmL(-1). These micelles have thermo-responsibility and a low critical solution temperature (LCST) of 33.5°C. Further investigation indicated that the guest molecule release property of these micelles, which can be well described by a first-order kinetic model, was significantly affected by temperature. Besides, the micelles exhibited excellent biocompatibility and cellular uptake property. Hence, these micelles are considered to have potential application in controlled drug delivery. PMID:26952396

  20. Doxorubicin loaded dual pH- and thermo-responsive magnetic nanocarrier for combined magnetic hyperthermia and targeted controlled drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Hervault, Aziliz; Dunn, Alexander E; Lim, May; Boyer, Cyrille; Mott, Derrick; Maenosono, Shinya; Thanh, Nguyen T K

    2016-06-16

    Magnetic nanocarriers have attracted increasing attention for multimodal cancer therapy due to the possibility to deliver heat and drugs locally. The present study reports the development of magnetic nanocomposites (MNCs) made of an iron oxide core and a pH- and thermo-responsive polymer shell, that can be used as both hyperthermic agent and drug carrier. The conjugation of anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) to the pH- and thermo-responsive MNCs via acid-cleavable imine linker provides advanced features for the targeted delivery of DOX molecules via the combination of magnetic targeting, and dual pH- and thermo-responsive behaviour which offers spatial and temporal control over the release of DOX. The iron oxide cores exhibit a superparamagnetic behaviour with a saturation magnetization around 70 emu g(-1). The MNCs contained 8.1 wt% of polymer and exhibit good heating properties in an alternating magnetic field. The drug release experiments confirmed that only a small amount of DOX was released at room temperature and physiological pH, while the highest drug release of 85.2% was obtained after 48 h at acidic tumour pH under hyperthermia conditions (50 °C). The drug release kinetic followed Korsmeyer-Peppas model and displayed Fickian diffusion mechanism. From the results obtained it can be concluded that this smart magnetic nanocarrier is promising for applications in multi-modal cancer therapy, to target and efficiently deliver heat and drug specifically to the tumour. PMID:26892588

  1. Doxorubicin loaded dual pH- and thermo-responsive magnetic nanocarrier for combined magnetic hyperthermia and targeted controlled drug delivery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervault, Aziliz; Dunn, Alexander E.; Lim, May; Boyer, Cyrille; Mott, Derrick; Maenosono, Shinya; Thanh, Nguyen T. K.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic nanocarriers have attracted increasing attention for multimodal cancer therapy due to the possibility to deliver heat and drugs locally. The present study reports the development of magnetic nanocomposites (MNCs) made of an iron oxide core and a pH- and thermo-responsive polymer shell, that can be used as both hyperthermic agent and drug carrier. The conjugation of anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) to the pH- and thermo-responsive MNCs via acid-cleavable imine linker provides advanced features for the targeted delivery of DOX molecules via the combination of magnetic targeting, and dual pH- and thermo-responsive behaviour which offers spatial and temporal control over the release of DOX. The iron oxide cores exhibit a superparamagnetic behaviour with a saturation magnetization around 70 emu g-1. The MNCs contained 8.1 wt% of polymer and exhibit good heating properties in an alternating magnetic field. The drug release experiments confirmed that only a small amount of DOX was released at room temperature and physiological pH, while the highest drug release of 85.2% was obtained after 48 h at acidic tumour pH under hyperthermia conditions (50 °C). The drug release kinetic followed Korsmeyer-Peppas model and displayed Fickian diffusion mechanism. From the results obtained it can be concluded that this smart magnetic nanocarrier is promising for applications in multi-modal cancer therapy, to target and efficiently deliver heat and drug specifically to the tumour.Magnetic nanocarriers have attracted increasing attention for multimodal cancer therapy due to the possibility to deliver heat and drugs locally. The present study reports the development of magnetic nanocomposites (MNCs) made of an iron oxide core and a pH- and thermo-responsive polymer shell, that can be used as both hyperthermic agent and drug carrier. The conjugation of anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) to the pH- and thermo-responsive MNCs via acid-cleavable imine linker provides advanced

  2. Thermo-responsive polymer tethered metal-organic framework core-shell magnetic microspheres for magnetic solid-phase extraction of alkylphenols from environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yuqian; Su, Hao; Wong, Y-L Elaine; Chen, Xiangfeng; Dominic Chan, T-W

    2016-07-22

    In this work, the thermo-responsive polymer PNIPAM tethered to Fe3O4@SiO2@MOF core-shell magnetic microspheres was first synthesized by a surface-selective post-synthetic strategy and underwent highly efficient magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) of alkylphenols from aqueous samples. Alkylphenols, including 4-tert-octylphenol (OP) and 4-n-nonylphenol (NP), were selected as target compounds. The sample quantification was carried out using LC-MS/MS in multiple reaction monitor (MRM) mode. Under optimal working conditions, the developed method showed good linearity in the range of 5-1000ngL(-1), a low limit of detection (1.5ngL(-1)), and good repeatability (relative standard deviation, <8%, n=5) for NP and OP. Owning to the hydrophilic/hydrophobic switchable properties of the nanocomposite, high recoveries (78.7-104.3%) of alkylphenols were obtained under different extraction conditions. The levels of OP and NP in environmental samples collected from local river, lake and pond waters were analyzed using the developed method. It was believed that the synthesized material with the thermo-responsive coating, large surface areas and magnetic properties should have great potential in the extraction and removal of alkylphenols from environmental samples. PMID:27318505

  3. Preparation of Thermo-Responsive Poly(ionic liquid)s-Based Nanogels via One-Step Cross-Linking Copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Jingjiang; Zuo, Yong; Wang, Rongmin; Xiong, Yubing

    2015-01-01

    In this study, thermo-responsive polymeric nanogels were facilely prepared via one-step cross-linking copolymerization of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate/divinylbenzene and ionic liquid (IL)-based monomers, 1,n-dialkyl-3,3'-bis-1-vinyl imidazolium bromides ([CnVIm]Br; n = 6, 8, 12) in selective solvents. The results revealed that stable and blue opalescent biimidazolium (BIm)-based nanogel solutions could be obtained without any precipitation when the copolymerizations were conducted in methanol. Most importantly, these novel nanogels were thermo-response, and could reversibly transform to precipitation in methanol with temperature changes. Turbidity analysis and dynamic light scatting (DLS) measurement illustrated that PIL-based nanogel solutions presented the phase transform with upper critical solution temperature (UCST) in the range of 5-25 °C. The nanogels were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In addition, BIm-based nanogels could also be used as highly active catalysts in the cycloaddition reaction of CO₂ and epoxides. As a result, our attributes build a robust platform suitable for the preparation of polymeric nanomaterials, as well as CO₂ conversion. PMID:26393567

  4. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-coated thermo-responsive nanoparticles for controlled delivery of sulfonated Zn-phthalocyanine in Chinese hamster ovary cells in vitro and zebra fish in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jia; Chen, Ji-Yao; Wang, Pu; Wang, Pei-Nan; Guo, Jia; Yang, Wu-Li; Wang, Chang-Chun; Peng, Qian

    2007-10-01

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM)-coated Fe3O4@SiO2@CdTe multifunctional nanoparticles with photoluminescent (PL), thermosensitive and magnetic properties, were investigated as carriers to deliver water-soluble, fluorescent sulfonated Zn-phthalocyanine (ZnPcS), a photosensitizing drug for photodynamic therapy of cancer, in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells in vitro and zebra fish in vivo. PNIPAM is a well-known thermo-responsive polymer with a volume phase transition temperature. This property allows it to be swollen in water at temperatures lower than 32-34 °C to take up ZnPcS and shrunken to expel the drug at higher temperatures. Since the PL band of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) as indicators for the nanoparticles is at 585 nm and the emission band of ZnPcS is at 680 nm, it is possible to study the temperature-dependent release of ZnPcS from the nanoparticles by fluorescence measurements. ZnPcS was embedded in the PNIPAM of the nanoparticles at 25 °C in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution and released at 37 °C, measured with a spectrophotometer. When CHO cells had been incubated with the ZnPcS-loaded nanoparticles at 27 °C, a similar intracellular localization pattern of CdTe QDs and ZnPcS was seen by multichannel measurements in confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), but a diffuse pattern of only ZnPcS fluorescence was detected in the cytoplasm of the cells at 37 °C, indicating a release of ZnPcS from the nanoparticles. Similar results were also found in the intestinal tract of zebra fish in vivo after intake of the nanoparticles. Since the nanoparticles contain magnetic (Fe3O4) material, the nanoparticles could also be manipulated to change their location in the intestinal tract of the zebra fish with an external magnetic field gradient of 300 G mm-1. The results presented suggest that such multifunctional nanoparticles may have combined potential for temperature-dependent drug delivery, QD photodetection and magnetic manipulation in diagnosis and

  5. Functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with thermo-responsive azide-terminated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) via click reactions.

    PubMed

    Su, Xin; Shuai, Ya; Guo, Zanru; Feng, Yujun

    2013-01-01

    Covalently functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were prepared by grafting well-defined thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) via click reactions. First, azide-terminated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (N3-PNIPAM) was synthesized by reversible addition fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization, and then the N₃-PNIPAM moiety was connected onto MWNTs by click chemistry. The products were characterized by means of FT-IR, TGA and TEM. The results show that the modification of MWNTs is very successful and MWNTs functionalized by N₃-PNIPAM (MWNTs-PNIPAM) have good solubility and stability in water. TEM images show the functionalized MWNTs are dispersed individually, indicating that the bundles of original MWNTs are separated into individual tubes by surface modification with polymer chains. These MWNTs modified with PNIPAM represent a potential nano-material for preparation of hydrophilic composite materials. PMID:23599017

  6. Temperature-induced structure switch in thermo-responsive micellar interpolyelectrolyte complexes: toward core-shell-corona and worm-like morphologies.

    PubMed

    Dähling, Claudia; Lotze, Gudrun; Drechsler, Markus; Mori, Hideharu; Pergushov, Dmitry V; Plamper, Felix A

    2016-06-21

    The spontaneous formation and thermo-responsiveness of a colloidally-stable interpolyelectrolyte complex (IPEC) based on a linear temperature-sensitive diblock copolymer poly(vinyl sulfonate)31-b-poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide)27 (PVS31-b-PNIPAM27) and a star-shaped quaternized miktoarm polymer poly(ethylene oxide)114-(poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)17)4 (PEO114-(qPDMAEMA17)4) was investigated in aqueous media at 0.3 M NaCl by means of dynamic light scattering (DLS), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). The micellar macromolecular co-assemblies show a temperature-dependent size and morphology, which result from the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) behavior of the PNIPAM-blocks. Hence, the micellar co-assemblies grow upon heating. At 60 °C, spherical core-shell-corona co-assemblies are proposed with a hydrophobic PNIPAM core, a water-insoluble IPEC shell, and a hydrophilic PEO corona. These constructs develop into a rod-like structure upon extended equilibration. In turn, PEO-arms and PNIPAM-blocks within a hydrophilic mixed two-component corona surround the water-insoluble IPEC domain at 20 °C, thereby forming spherical core-corona co-assemblies. Reversibility of the structural changes is suggested by the scattering data. This contribution addresses the use of a combination of oppositely charged thermo-responsive and bis-hydrophilic star-shaped polymeric components toward IPECs of diverse morphological types. PMID:27194585

  7. Thermo-responsive cell culture carriers based on poly(vinyl methyl ether)—the effect of biomolecular ligands to balance cell adhesion and stimulated detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichmann, Juliane; Nitschke, Mirko; Pette, Dagmar; Valtink, Monika; Gramm, Stefan; Härtel, Frauke V.; Noll, Thomas; Funk, Richard H. W.; Engelmann, Katrin; Werner, Carsten

    2015-08-01

    Two established material systems for thermally stimulated detachment of adherent cells were combined in a cross-linked polymer blend to merge favorable properties. Through this approach poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNiPAAm) with its superior switching characteristic was paired with a poly(vinyl methyl ether)-based composition that allows adjusting physico-chemical and biomolecular properties in a wide range. Beyond pure PNiPAAm, the proposed thermo-responsive coating provides thickness, stiffness and swelling behavior, as well as an apposite density of reactive sites for biomolecular functionalization, as effective tuning parameters to meet specific requirements of a particular cell type regarding initial adhesion and ease of detachment. To illustrate the strength of this approach, the novel cell culture carrier was applied to generate transplantable sheets of human corneal endothelial cells (HCEC). Sheets were grown, detached, and transferred onto planar targets. Cell morphology, viability and functionality were analyzed by immunocytochemistry and determination of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) before and after sheet detachment and transfer. HCEC layers showed regular morphology with appropriate TEER. Cells were positive for function-associated marker proteins ZO-1, Na+/K+-ATPase, and paxillin, and extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin, laminin and collagen type IV before and after transfer. Sheet detachment and transfer did not impair cell viability. Subsequently, a potential application in ophthalmology was demonstrated by transplantation onto de-endothelialized porcine corneas in vitro. The novel thermo-responsive cell culture carrier facilitates the generation and transfer of functional HCEC sheets. This paves the way to generate tissue engineered human corneal endothelium as an alternative transplant source for endothelial keratoplasty.

  8. 5-Methyl Salicylic Acid-Induced Thermo Responsive Reversible Transition in Surface Active Ionic Liquid Assemblies: A Spectroscopic Approach.

    PubMed

    Roy, Arpita; Dutta, Rupam; Banerjee, Pavel; Kundu, Sangita; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2016-07-19

    This article describes the formation of stable unilamellar vesicles involving surface active ionic liquid (SAIL), 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (C16mimCl), and 5-methyl salicylic acid (5mS). Turbidity, dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and viscosity measurements suggest that C16mimCl containing micellar aggregates are transformed to elongated micelle and finally into vesicular aggregates with the addition of 5mS. Besides, we have also investigated the photophysical aspects of a hydrophobic (coumarin 153, C153) and a hydrophilic molecule (rhodamine 6G (R6G) perchlorate) during 5mS-induced micelle to vesicle transition. The rotational motion of C153 becomes slower, whereas faster motion is observed for R6G during micelle to vesicle transition. Moreover, the fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) measurements suggest that the translational diffusion of hydrophobic probe becomes slower in C16mimCl-5mS aggregates in comparison to C16mimCl micelle. However, a reverse trend in translational diffusion motion of hydrophilic molecule has been observed in C16mimCl-5mS aggregates. Moreover, we have also found that the C16mimCl-5mS containing vesicles are transformed into micelles upon enhanced temperature, and it is further confirmed by turbidity, DLS measurements that this transition is a reversible one. Finally, temperature-induced rotational motion of C153 and R6G has been monitored in C16mimCl-5mS aggregates to get a complete scenario regarding the temperature-induced vesicle to micelle transition. PMID:27345738

  9. SANS study on the solvated structure and molecular interactions of a thermo-responsive polymer in a room temperature ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Hirosawa, Kazu; Fujii, Kenta; Ueki, Takeshi; Kitazawa, Yuzo; Littrell, Kenneth C; Watanabe, Masayoshi; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2016-07-21

    We have utilized small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to quantitatively characterize the LCST-type phase behavior of the poly(benzyl methacrylate) (PBnMA) derivative poly(2-phenylethyl methacrylate) (PPhEtMA) in the deuterated ionic liquid (IL) d8-1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide (d8-[C2mIm(+)][TFSA(-)]). The SANS curves showed a discontinuous change from those characteristics of dispersed polymer chains to those of large aggregates of PPhEtMA chains suspended in the IL solution, indicating that phase separation occurs discontinuously at Tc. Furthermore, we evaluated the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the effective interaction parameter χeff of PPhEtMA in [C2mIm(+)][TFSA(-)] and compared them with those of PBnMA. The absolute value of the enthalpic contribution observed for PPhEtMA was smaller than that for PBnMA. This difference in the enthalpic term can be attributed to the unfavorable interaction between the IL and the alkyl group in the side chain of PPhEtMA. In addition, the temperature dependence of χeff was smaller than the previously reported value for a thermo-responsive polymer in an aqueous system. It was found out that the strong dependence of Tc on the chemical structure in IL systems originated from the relatively smaller temperature dependence of χeff. PMID:27314165

  10. Thermo-responsive release of curcumin from micelles prepared by self-assembly of amphiphilic P(NIPAAm-co-DMAAm)-b-PLLA-b-P(NIPAAm-co-DMAAm) triblock copolymers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanfei; Darcos, Vincent; Monge, Sophie; Li, Suming; Zhou, Yang; Su, Feng

    2014-12-10

    Thermo-responsive micelles are prepared by self-assembly of amphiphilic triblock copolymers composed of a poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) central block and two poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-N,N-dimethylacrylamide) (P(NIPAAm-co-DMAAm)) lateral blocks, using solvent evaporation/film hydration method. The resulting micelles exhibit very low critical micelle concentration (CMC) which slightly increases from 0.0113 to 0.0144 mg mL(-1) while the DMAAm content increases from 31.8 to 39.4% in the hydrophilic P(NIPAAm-co-DMAAm) blocks. The lower critical solution temperatures (LCST) of copolymers varies from 44.7 °C to 49.4 °C in water as determined by UV spectroscopy, and decreases by ca. 3.5 °C in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Curcumin was encapsulated in the core of micelles. High drug loading up to 20% is obtained with high loading efficiency (>94%). The LCST of drug loaded micelles ranges from 37.5 to 38.0 °C with drug loading increasing from 6.0 to 20%. The micelles with diameters ranging from 47.5 to 88.2 nm remain stable over one month due to the negative surface charge as determined by zeta potential (-12.4 to -18.7 mV). Drug release studies were performed under in vitro conditions at 37 °C and 40 °C, i.e. below and above the LCST, respectively. Initial burst release is observed in all cases, followed by a slower release. The release rate is higher at 40 °C than that at 37 °C due to thermo-responsive release across the LCST. On the other hand, micelles with lower drug loading exhibit higher release rate than those with higher drug loading, which is assigned to the solubility effect. Peppas' theory was applied to describe the release behaviors. Moreover, the in vitro cytotoxicity of copolymers was evaluated using MTT assay. The results show that the copolymers present good cytocompatibility. Therefore, the nano-scale size, low CMC, high drug loading and stability, as well as good biocompatibility indicate that these thermo-responsive triblock copolymer micelles

  11. Binding interactions between lysozyme and injectable hydrogels derived from albumin-pH/thermo responsive poly(amino urethane) conjugates in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Rapeekan, Jirathititiporn; Songtipya, Ponusa; Lee, Doo Sung; Manokruang, Kiattikhun

    2016-10-01

    Injectable hydrogels are alternative materials for drug and protein delivery in biomedical applications, which can potentially eliminate the need of surgical implantation in the treatment procedures. Prior to administration, such hydrogels, in a liquid state, must demonstrate good interactions with the incorporated molecules to maintain the sustain release of active agents and to avoid unappreciative burst release. The injectable hydrogels derived from BSA-pH/temperature responsive poly(amino urethane) conjugates have been reported to demonstrated good sustainability for delivery of lysozyme, both in vitro and in vivo. However, the interactions between such conjugates and the loading lysozyme were not fully understood. In this present work, we reported the binding interactions between the studied complex systems, BSA-pH/temperature responsive poly(amino urethane) conjugates (CONJ1 and CONJ2) and lysozyme. Fluorescence spectroscopy in a combination with thermodynamic analysis exhibited that the binding between the conjugates and lysozyme occurred through static quenching and the binding interactions in the complexes were mainly van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds. The binding constants (KA) determined at 300, 308 and 318K of CONJ1 to lysozyme were 7.96×10(4), 6.45×10(4) and 3.20×10(4)M(-1), respectively and those of CONJ2 to lysozyme were 2.63×10(4), 2.53×10(4) and 1.19×10(4)M(-1), respectively. FTIR analysis showed that the complexes between the conjugates and lysozyme demonstrated sufficiently small deviation in the conformational structures from the native lysozyme. In addition, the morphology revealed by TEM and AFM imaging portrayed the behavior of complex formation in such a way that the conjugates, before complex formation, displayed the core-shell structures. After the complex formation, a number of lysozyme particles were noticeably entrapped as if they penetrated into the preformed core-shell conjugates. PMID:27423103

  12. Fluorescent refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, Richard I.; Edwards, Bradley C.; Buchwald, Melvin I.; Gosnell, Timothy R.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement.

  13. Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Michael J.; Smith, Ian; Parker, Ian; Bootman, Martin D.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a major tool with which to monitor cell physiology. Although the concepts of fluorescence and its optical separation using filters remain similar, microscope design varies with the aim of increasing image contrast and spatial resolution. The basics of wide-field microscopy are outlined to emphasize the selection, advantages, and correct use of laser scanning confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, scanning disk confocal microscopy, total internal reflection, and super-resolution microscopy. In addition, the principles of how these microscopes form images are reviewed to appreciate their capabilities, limitations, and constraints for operation. PMID:25275114

  14. Fluorescent refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, R.I.; Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Gosnell, T.R.

    1995-09-05

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement. 6 figs.

  15. Fluorescence of dental porcelain.

    PubMed

    Monsénégo, G; Burdairon, G; Clerjaud, B

    1993-01-01

    This study of the fluorescence of natural enamel and of dental ceramics shows the fluorescence of ceramics not containing rare earths decreases when the color saturation increases; the fluorescence of samples of the same shade guide are not homogenous; some guides show a strong green fluorescence; and two shade guides of the same origin can present completely different fluorescence. The cementing medium can affect the fluorescence of a ceramic prosthesis. PMID:8455155

  16. Fabrication of thermo-responsive microfluidic membrane using photopolymerization patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyejeong; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-11-01

    The programmed manipulation of responsive functional hydrogels is receiving large attention because of its unique functions and wide range of engineering applications. In this study, we developed an innovative stomata-inspired membrane (SIM) by fabricating a temperature-responsive hydrogel with a simple, cost effective, and high-throughput photopolymerization patterning process. Polymerization-induced diffusion on the macro-scale surface gives rise to form a multi-parted polymer membrane with fine pores by simple UV irradiation. After heating the SIM, the less deformable thick frame supports the whole structure, and the highly deformable thin base regulates the size of pores. The morphological configuration of the SIM can be easily changed by varying the solution composition or selecting a suitable photomask with different pattern. The developed SIM has the special sensing-to-actuation functions of stimuli-responsive hydrogels. This membrane with temperature-responsive pores would be potentially utilized in numerous practical applications, such as filter membranes with self-adjustable pores, membrane-based sensors, membrane-based actuators, and multi-functional membranes etc. This study was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) and funded by the Korean government (MSIP) (Grant No. 2008-0061991).

  17. Thermo-responsive mechano-optical plasmonic nano-antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunbo; Park, Younggeun; Lee, Somin Eunice

    2016-07-01

    We propose and theoretically demonstrate a mechano-optical nano-antenna over a broad temperature range. We show that there is a tunable, temperature-dependent plasmonic resonance associated with the nano-antenna geometry. We also theoretically demonstrate a matching condition for mechanical properties that is essential for maximizing thermal expansion differences across a broad temperature range. We expect that mechano-optical nano-antennas should allow for spatiotemporal temperature mapping in applications where precise measurement of local temperature is needed in real time.

  18. Fundamentals of fluorescence and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wolf, David E

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental physics of fluorescence. The application of fluorescence to microscopy represents an important transition in the development of microscopy, particularly as it applies to biology. It enables quantitating the amounts of specific molecules within a cell, determining whether molecules are complexing on a molecular level, measuring changes in ionic concentrations within cells and organelles, and measuring molecular dynamics. This chapter also discusses the issues important to quantitative measurement of fluorescence and focuses on four of quantitative measurements of fluorescence--boxcar-gated detection, streak cameras, photon correlation, and phase modulation. Although quantitative measurement presents many pitfalls to the beginner, it also presents significant opportunities to one skilled in the art. This chapter also examines how fluorescence is measured in the steady state and time domain and how fluorescence is applied in the modern epifluorescence microscope. PMID:23931503

  19. A Fluorescence Lecture Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzelli, Joseph W.; Kemp, Marwin

    1982-01-01

    Describes fluorescence demonstrations related to several aspects of molecular theory and quantitized energy levels. Demonstrations use fluorescent chemical solutions having luminescence properties spanning the visible spectrum. Also describes a demonstration of spontaneous combustion of familiar substances in chlorine. (JN)

  20. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  1. Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Sue I.; Fergenson, David P.; Srivastava, Abneesh; Bogan, Michael J.; Riot, Vincent J.; Frank, Matthias

    2010-08-24

    A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

  2. Atmospheric Nitrogen Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K. U.; Sokolsky, Pierre; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric nitrogen fluorescence. The nitrogen fluorescence yield from air shower electrons depends on the atmospheric composition. We will discuss the uncertainties in the fluorescence yield form electrons in the real atmosphere and describe a concept for a small balloon payload to measure the atmospheric fluorescence yield as a function of attitude.

  3. Fluorescence study of sugars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thongjamroon, Sunida; Pattanaporkratana, Apichart

    2015-07-01

    We studied photoemission of monosaccharides and disaccharides using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. A 532- nm, 10 mW, laser was used to excite the samples and back-scattering signals were collected by a spectrometer. We found that most sugars show weak fluorescence in solid phase but do not fluoresce when dissolved in water solutions. The emission spectra show similar peak intensity at 590 nm, but they are different in emission intensities. We suggest that the fluorescence spectra may be used to differentiate sugar type, even though the origin of the fluorescence is unclear and needed further study.

  4. Fluorescence Live Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ettinger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of live cells has become an integral part of modern cell biology. Fluorescent protein tags, live cell dyes, and other methods to fluorescently label proteins of interest provide a range of tools to investigate virtually any cellular process under the microscope. The two main experimental challenges in collecting meaningful live cell microscopy data are to minimize photodamage while retaining a useful signal-to-noise ratio, and to provide a suitable environment for cells or tissues to replicate physiological cell dynamics. This chapter aims to give a general overview on microscope design choices critical for fluorescence live cell imaging that apply to most fluorescence microscopy modalities, and on environmental control with a focus on mammalian tissue culture cells. In addition, we provide guidance on how to design and evaluate fluorescent protein constructs by spinning disk confocal microscopy. PMID:24974023

  5. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-10-04

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  6. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-01-01

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  7. Botany: floral fluorescence effect.

    PubMed

    Gandía-Herrero, Fernando; García-Carmona, Francisco; Escribano, Josefa

    2005-09-15

    The way flowers appear to insects is crucial for pollination. Here we describe an internal light-filtering effect in the flowers of Mirabilis jalapa, in which the visible fluorescence emitted by one pigment, a yellow betaxanthin, is absorbed by another, a violet betacyanin, to create a contrasting fluorescent pattern on the flower's petals. This finding opens up new possibilities for pollinator perception as fluorescence has not previously been considered as a potential signal in flowers. PMID:16163341

  8. Fluorescent minerals, a review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Modreski, P.J.; Aumente-Modreski, R.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescent minerals are more than just an attractive novelty, and collecting them is a speciality for thousands of individuals who appreciate their beauty, rarity, and scientific value. Fluorescent properties can be used as an aid to mineral identification, locality determination, and distinction between natural and synthetic gemstones. This article gives an overview of those aspects of fluorescence that are of most interest to collectors, hobbyists, and mineralogists. -from Authors

  9. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of coral fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Cox, Guy; Matz, Mikhail; Salih, Anya

    2007-03-01

    Corals, like many other coelenterates, contain fluorescent pigments that show considerable homology with the well known green fluorescent protein of the jellyfish Aequoria. In corals, unlike jellyfish, multiple proteins are present and the range of excitations and emissions suggest the possibility of energy transfer. The occurrence of Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescent proteins in corals has already been reported and time-resolved spectra have shown the effect on fluorescent lifetime, but without any spatial resolution. Lifetime confocal microscopy offers lower time resolution but excellent spatial resolution. Lifetimes of the isolated A. millepora pigments amilFP490, amilFP504, and amilFP593 (names indicate emission peaks) were 2.8, 2.9, and 2.9 ns, respectively. In the coral sample, imaging the entire emission spectrum from 420 nm, the mean lifetime was reduced to 1.5 ns, implying that FRET was occurring. Looking just at the fluorescence from FRET donors the lifetime was even shorter, at 1.3 ns, supporting this interpretation. In contrast, no reduction in lifetime is seen in the coral Euphyllia ancora, where the pigment distribution also suggests that the pigments are unlikely to be involved in photoprotection. This study set out to determine the extent of FRET between pigments in two corals, Acropora millepora and Euphyllia, ancora which differ in the arrangement of their pigments and hence possibly in pigment function. PMID:17279514

  10. Fluorescence in insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Victoria L.; Van Hooijdonk, Eloise; Intrater, Nurit; Vigneron, Jean-Pol

    2012-10-01

    Fluorescent molecules are much in demand for biosensors, solar cells, LEDs and VCSEL diodes, therefore, considerable efforts have been expended in designing and tailoring fluorescence to specific technical applications. However, naturally occurring fluorescence of diverse types has been reported from a wide array of living organisms: most famously, the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, but also in over 100 species of coral and in the cuticle of scorpions, where it is the rule, rather than the exception. Despite the plethora of known insect species, comparatively few quantitative studies have been made of insect fluorescence. Because of the potential applications of natural fluorescence, studies in this field have relevance to both physics and biology. Therefore, in this paper, we review the literature on insect fluorescence, before documenting its occurrence in the longhorn beetles Sternotomis virescens, Sternotomis variabilis var. semi rufescens, Anoplophora elegans and Stellognatha maculata, the tiger beetles Cicindela maritima and Cicindela germanica and the weevil Pachyrrhynchus gemmatus purpureus. Optical features of insect fluorescence, including emitted wavelength, molecular ageing and naturally occurring combinations of fluorescence with bioluminescence and colour-producing structures are discussed.

  11. Responsive polymer-fluorescent carbon nanoparticle hybrid nanogels for optical temperature sensing, near-infrared light-responsive drug release, and tumor cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Ke, Fuyou; Mararenko, Anton; Wei, Zengyan; Banerjee, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2014-07-01

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCNPs) have been successfully immobilized into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) [poly(NIPAM-AAm)] nanogels based on one-pot precipitation copolymerization of NIPAM monomers with hydrogen bonded FCNP-AAm complex monomers in water. The resultant poly(NIPAM-AAm)-FCNP hybrid nanogels can combine functions from each building block for fluorescent temperature sensing, cell imaging, and near-infrared (NIR) light responsive drug delivery. The FCNPs in the hybrid nanogels not only emit bright and stable photoluminescence (PL) and exhibit up-conversion PL properties, but also increase the loading capacity of the nanogels for curcumin drug molecules. The reversible thermo-responsive swelling/shrinking transition of the poly(NIPAM-AAm) nanogel can not only modify the physicochemical environment of the FCNPs to manipulate the PL intensity for sensing the environmental temperature change, but also regulate the releasing rate of the loaded anticancer drug. In addition, the FCNPs embedded in the nanogels can convert the NIR light to heat, thus an exogenous NIR irradiation can further accelerate the drug release and enhance the therapeutic efficacy. The hybrid nanogels can overcome cellular barriers to enter the intracellular region and light up the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells upon laser excitation. The demonstrated hybrid nanogels with nontoxic and optically active FCNPs immobilized in responsive polymer nanogels are promising for the development of a new generation of multifunctional materials for biomedical applications. PMID:24881520

  12. FRET enhanced fluorescent nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Fudala, Rafal; Raut, Sangram; Maliwal, Badri P; Zerda, T W; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Simanek, Eric; Borejdo, Julian; Rich, Ryan; Akopova, Irina; Gryczynski, Zygmunt

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) are one of the new and very promising biocompatible nanomaterials that can be used both as a fluorescence imaging agent and a highly versatile platform for controlled functionalization to target and deliver a wide spectrum of therapeutic agents. Among the remarkable fluorescence properties are excellent photostability, emission between 600-700nm, quantum yield of 1 and moderately long fluorescence lifetimes. However the low absorption cross section of fluorescent (N-V)(-) centers limits FNDs' brightness. In this work we show that an approach based on the Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) may significantly enhance the fluorescence signal observed from a single ND. We demonstrate that organic dyes (fluorophores) attached to the FND surface can efficiently transfer the excitation energy to (N-V)(-) centers. Multiple dyes positioned in close proximity to the ND facile surface may serve as harvesting antennas transferring excitation energy to the fluorescent centers. We propose that, with the help of some of the functional groups present on the FND surface, we can either directly link flurophores or use scalable dendrimer chemistry to position many organic dyes at a calibrated distance. Also, the remaining multiple functional groups will be still available for particle targeting and drug delivery. This opens a new way for designing a new type of theranostics particles of ultrahigh brightness, high photostability, specific targeting, and high capacity for drug delivery. PMID:22394126

  13. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  14. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  15. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-11-29

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  16. Fluorescent discharge lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, E.; Otsuka, H.; Nomi, K.; Honmo, I.

    1982-01-01

    A rapidly illuminating fluorescent lamp 1,200 mm long and 32.5 mm in diameter with an interior conducting strip which is compatible with conventional fixtures and ballasts is described. The fluorescent lamp is composed of a linear glass tube, electrodes sealed at both ends, mercury and raregas sealed in the glass tube, a fluorescent substance clad on the inner walls of the glass tube, and a clad conducting strip extending the entire length of the glass tube in the axial direction on the inner surface of the tube.

  17. Hg2+-reactive double hydrophilic block copolymer assemblies as novel multifunctional fluorescent probes with improved performance.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinming; Li, Changhua; Liu, Shiyong

    2010-01-19

    We report on novel type of responsive double hydrophilic block copolymer (DHBC)-based multifunctional chemosensors to Hg(2+) ions, pH, and temperatures and investigate the effects of thermo-induced micellization on the detection sensitivity. Well-defined DHBCs bearing rhodamine B-based Hg(2+)-reactive moieties (RhBHA) in the thermo-responsive block, poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-RhBHA) (PEO-b-P(NIPAM-co-RhBHA)), were synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Nonfluorescent RhBHA moieties are subjected to selective ring-opening reaction upon addition of Hg(2+) ions or lowering solution pH, producing highly fluorescent acyclic species. Thus, at room temperature PEO-b-P(NIPAM-co-RhBHA) DHBCs can serve as water-soluble multifunctional and efficient fluorescent chemosensors to Hg(2+) ions and pH. Upon heating above the lower critical solution temperature (approximately 36 degrees C) of the PNIPAM block, they self-assemble into micelles possessing P(NIPAM-co-RhBHA) cores and well-solvated PEO coronas, which were fully characterized by dynamic and static laser light scattering. It was found that the detection sensitivity to Hg(2+) ions and pH could be dramatically improved at elevated temperatures due to fluorescence enhancement of RhBHA residues in the acyclic form, which were embedded within hydrophobic cores of thermo-induced micellar aggregates. This work represents a proof-of-concept example of responsive DHBC-based multifunctional fluorescent chemosensors for the highly efficient detection of Hg(2+) ions, pH, and temperatures with tunable detection sensitivity. Compared to reaction-based small molecule Hg(2+) probes in previous literature reports, the integration of stimuli-responsive block copolymers with well-developed small molecule-based selective sensing moieties in the current study are expected to exhibit preferred advantages including enhanced detection sensitivity, water dispersibility

  18. Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen; Sun, Yiru; Giebink, Noel; Thompson, Mark E.

    2010-08-03

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  19. Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Sun, Yiru; Giebink, Noel; Thompson, Mark E.

    2009-01-06

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  20. Fluorescent radiation converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A fluorescence radiation converter is described which includes a substantially undoped optically transparent substrate and a waveshifter coating deposited on at least one portion of the substrate for absorption of radiation and conversion of fluorescent radiation. The coating is formed to substantially 1000 g/liter of a solvent, 70 to 200 g/liter of an organic polymer, and 0.2 to 25 g/liter of at least one organic fluorescent dye. The incoming incident radiation impinges on the coating. Radiation is absorbed by the fluorescent dye and is re-emitted as a longer wavelength radiation. Radiation is trapped within the substrate and is totally internally reflected by the boundary surface. Emitted radiation leaves the substrate ends to be detected.

  1. Atmospheric Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K.; Sokolsky, P.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric fluorescence from these showers. Accurate knowledge of the conversion from atmospheric fluorescence to energy loss by ionizing particles in the atmosphere is key to this technique. In this paper we discuss a small balloon-borne instrument to make the first in situ measurements versus altitude of the atmospheric fluorescence yield. The instrument can also be used in the lab to investigate the dependence of the fluorescence yield in air on temperature, pressure and the concentrations of other gases that present in the atmosphere. The results can be used to explore environmental effects on and improve the accuracy of cosmic ray energy measurements for existing ground-based experiments and future space-based experiments.

  2. Fluorescent eye test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The fluorescent eye test is useful in determining if there is a scratch or other problem with the surface ... has thoroughly covered the eye a cobalt blue light is then directed on the eye. The light ...

  3. Fluorescent Applications to Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Achari, Aniruddha

    2006-01-01

    By covalently modifying a subpopulation, less than or equal to 1%, of a macromolecule with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of purification, and tests with model proteins have shown that labeling u to 5 percent of the protein molecules does not affect the X-ray data quality obtained . The presence of the trace fluorescent label gives a number of advantages. Since the label is covalently attached to the protein molecules, it "tracks" the protein s response to the crystallization conditions. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination crystals show up as bright objects against a darker background. Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, do not show up under fluorescent illumination. Crystals have the highest protein concentration and are readily observed against less bright precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries as the protein or protein structures is all that shows up. Fluorescence intensity is a faster search parameter, whether visually or by automated methods, than looking for crystalline features. Preliminary tests, using model proteins, indicates that we can use high fluorescence intensity regions, in the absence of clear crystalline features or "hits", as a means for determining potential lead conditions. A working hypothesis is that more rapid amorphous precipitation kinetics may overwhelm and trap more slowly formed ordered assemblies, which subsequently show up as regions of brighter fluorescence intensity. Experiments are now being carried out to test this approach using a wider range, of proteins. The trace fluorescently labeled crystals will also

  4. Fluorescence endoscopic video system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papayan, G. V.; Kang, Uk

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes a fluorescence endoscopic video system intended for the diagnosis of diseases of the internal organs. The system operates on the basis of two-channel recording of the video fluxes from a fluorescence channel and a reflected-light channel by means of a high-sensitivity monochrome television camera and a color camera, respectively. Examples are given of the application of the device in gastroenterology.

  5. Epi-Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Donna J.; Brown, Claire M.

    2012-01-01

    Epi-fluorescence microscopy is available in most life sciences research laboratories, and when optimized can be a central laboratory tool. In this chapter, the epi-fluorescence light path is introduced and the various components are discussed in detail. Recommendations are made for incident lamp light sources, excitation and emission filters, dichroic mirrors, objective lenses, and charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras in order to obtain the most sensitive epi-fluorescence microscope. The even illumination of metal-halide lamps combined with new “hard” coated filters and mirrors, a high resolution monochrome CCD camera, and a high NA objective lens are all recommended for high resolution and high sensitivity fluorescence imaging. Recommendations are also made for multicolor imaging with the use of monochrome cameras, motorized filter turrets, individual filter cubes, and corresponding dyes that are the best choice for sensitive, high resolution multicolor imaging. Images should be collected using Nyquist sampling and should be corrected for background intensity contributions and nonuniform illumination across the field of view. Photostable fluorescent probes and proteins that absorb a lot of light (i.e., high extinction co-efficients) and generate a lot of fluorescence signal (i.e., high quantum yields) are optimal. A neuronal immune-fluorescence labeling protocol is also presented. Finally, in order to maximize the utility of sensitive wide-field microscopes and generate the highest resolution images with high signal-to-noise, advice for combining wide-field epi-fluorescence imaging with restorative image deconvolution is presented. PMID:23026996

  6. Fluorescent Aptamer Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui William; Kim, Youngmi; Meng, Ling; Mallikaratchy, Prabodhika; Martin, Jennifer; Tang, Zhiwen; Shangguan, Dihua; O'Donoghue, Meghan; Tan, Weihong

    Aptamers are single-stranded nucleic acid probes that can be evolved to have high specificity and affinity for different targets. These targets include biomar-ker proteins, small molecules, and even whole live cells that express a variety of surface proteins of interest. Aptamers offer several advantages over protein-based molecular probes such as low immunogenic activity, flexible modification, and in vitro synthesis. In addition, aptamers used as molecular probes can be made with easy signaling for binding with their corresponding targets. There are a few different fluorescence-based signal transduction mechanisms, such as direct fluorophore labeling, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), fluorescence quenching, fluorescence anisotropy, and light-switching excimers. These signaling processes in combination with various labeling strategies of nucleic acid aptamers contribute to simple, rapid, sensitive, and selective biological assays. In this chapter, we discuss the optical signaling of aptamers for single proteins such as α-thrombin and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). We also present detailed discussion about fluorescent aptamers developed from cell-based systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) for the recognition of different target tumor cells.

  7. Fluorescent image tracking velocimeter

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, Franklin D.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple-exposure fluorescent image tracking velocimeter (FITV) detects and measures the motion (trajectory, direction and velocity) of small particles close to light scattering surfaces. The small particles may follow the motion of a carrier medium such as a liquid, gas or multi-phase mixture, allowing the motion of the carrier medium to be observed, measured and recorded. The main components of the FITV include: (1) fluorescent particles; (2) a pulsed fluorescent excitation laser source; (3) an imaging camera; and (4) an image analyzer. FITV uses fluorescing particles excited by visible laser light to enhance particle image detectability near light scattering surfaces. The excitation laser light is filtered out before reaching the imaging camera allowing the fluoresced wavelengths emitted by the particles to be detected and recorded by the camera. FITV employs multiple exposures of a single camera image by pulsing the excitation laser light for producing a series of images of each particle along its trajectory. The time-lapsed image may be used to determine trajectory and velocity and the exposures may be coded to derive directional information.

  8. Optically trapped fluorescent nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Viva R.; Alemán, Benjamin J.; Christle, David; Cleland, Andrew N.; Awschalom, David D.

    2012-02-01

    The electronic spin state of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond has gained considerable interest because it can be optically initialized, coherently manipulated, and optically read out at room temperature. In addition, nanoparticle diamonds containing NV centers can be integrated with biological and microfluidic systems. We have constructed and characterized an optical tweezers apparatus to trap fluorescent nanodiamonds in a fluid and measure their fluorescence. Particles are held and moved in three dimensions using an infrared trapping laser. Fluorescent detection of these optically trapped nanodiamonds enables us to observe nanoparticle dynamics and to measure electron spin resonance of NV centers. We will discuss applications using the electron spin resonance of trapped NV centers in nanodiamonds for magnetic field imaging in fluidic environments.

  9. Fiberized fluorescent dye microtubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladev, Veselin; Eftimov, Tinko

    2013-03-01

    In the present work we study the effect of the length of fluorescent dye-filled micro-capillaries on the fluorescence spectra. Two types of micro-capillaries have been studied: a 100 μm inner diameter fused silica capillary with a transparent coating and one of the holes of a fiber optic glass ferrule with 125 μm inner diameter. The tubes were filled with solutions of Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethanol and then in glycerin. Experimental data show that the maximum fluorescence and the largest spectral widths are observed for a sample length of about 0.25 mm for the used concentration. This results show that miniature tunable fiberized dye lasers can be developed using available standard micro-and fibre-optic components.

  10. Smartphone fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hojeong; Tan, Yafang; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate the first use of smartphone spectrophotometry for readout of fluorescence-based biological assays. We evaluated the smartphone fluorimeter in the context of a fluorescent molecular beacon (MB) assay for detection of specific nucleic acid sequences in a liquid test sample and compared performance against a conventional laboratory fluorimeter. The capability of distinguishing a one-point mismatch is also demonstrated by detecting single-base mutation in target nucleic acids. Our approach offers a route toward portable biomolecular assays for viral/bacterial pathogens, disease biomarkers, and toxins. PMID:25098859

  11. Smartphone fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hojoeng; Tan, Yafang; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate the first use of smartphone spectrophotometry for readout of fluorescence-based biological assays. We evaluated the smartphone fluorimeter in the context of a fluorescent molecular beacon (MB) assay for detection of a specific nucleic acid sequences in a liquid test sample. The capability of distinguishing a one-point mismatch is also demonstrated by detecting single-base mutation in target nucleic acids. Our approach offers a route towards portable biomolecular assays for viral/bacterial pathogens, disease biomarkers, and toxins.

  12. Fluorescence activated cell sorting.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. A.; Hulett, H. R.; Sweet, R. G.; Herzenberg, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    An instrument has been developed for sorting biological cells. The cells are rendered differentially fluorescent and incorporated into a small liquid stream illuminated by a laser beam. The cells pass sequentially through the beam, and fluorescent light from the cells gives rise to electrical signals. The stream is broken into a series of uniform size drops downstream of the laser. The cell signals are used to give appropriate electrostatic charges to drops containing the cells. The drops then pass between two charged plates and are deflected to appropriate containers. The system has proved capable of providing fractions containing large numbers of viable cells highly enriched in a particular functional type.

  13. Nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Leskovar, B.

    1985-03-01

    This article is a summary of a short course lecture given in conjunction with the 1984 Nuclear Science Symposium. Measuring systems for nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy using single-photon counting techniques are presented. These involve systems based on relaxation-type spark gap light pulser and synchronously pumped mode-locked dye lasers. Furthermore, typical characteristics and optimization of operating conditions of the critical components responsible for the system time resolution are discussed. A short comparison of the most important deconvolution methods for numerical analysis of experimental data is given particularly with respect to the signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescence signal. 22 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Fast fluorescence holographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Wan; Yang, Xiaoqi; Li, Yingying; Peng, Xiang; Qu, Xinghua; Yao, Hai; Gao, Bruce Z.

    2015-01-01

    FINCHSCOPE is a new technology of fluorescence holographic microscopy. It has been successfully applied to recording high-resolution three-dimensional fluorescence images of biological specimens without the need for scanning. In this study, we revealed and analyzed an intrinsic phenomenon, called ghost lens effect, on spatial light modulator which is the core element enabling the incoherent correlation in the FINCHSCOPE. The ghost lens effect can degrade the imaging quality by introducing multiple spherical waves with different focal lengths into the correlation and thus increasing the noise in the recorded holograms. PMID:25767693

  15. Ultraviolet fluorescence monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Preppernau, B.L.; Aragon, B.P.

    1997-05-01

    A multispectral ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence imaging fluorometer and a pulsed molecular beam laser fluorometer were developed to detect volatile organic compounds of interest in environmental monitoring and drug interdiction applications. The UV fluorescence imaging fluorometer is a relatively simple instrument which uses multiple excitation wavelengths to measure the excitation/emission matrix for irradiated samples. Detection limits in the high part-per-million to low part-per-million range were measured for a number of volatile organic vapors in the atmosphere. Detection limits in the low part-per-million range were obtained using cryogenic cooling to pre-concentrate unknown samples before introducing them into the imaging fluorometer. A multivariate analysis algorithm was developed to analyze the excitation/emission matrix and used to determine the relative concentrations of species in computer synthesized mixtures containing up to five organic compounds. Analysis results demonstrated the utility of multispectral UV fluorescence in analytical measurements. A transportable UV fluorescence imaging fluorometer was used in two field tests. Field test results demonstrated that detection limits in the part-per-billion range were needed to reliably identify volatile organic compounds in realistic field test measurements. The molecular beam laser fluorometer, a more complex instrument with detection limits in the part-per-billion to part-per-trillion range, was therefore developed to satisfy detection sensitivity requirements for field test measurements. High-resolution spectroscopic measurements made with the molecular beam laser fluorometer demonstrated its utility in identifying volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere.

  16. Inducible fluorescent speckle microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pereira, António J; Aguiar, Paulo; Belsley, Michael; Maiato, Helder

    2016-01-18

    The understanding of cytoskeleton dynamics has benefited from the capacity to generate fluorescent fiducial marks on cytoskeleton components. Here we show that light-induced imprinting of three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent speckles significantly improves speckle signal and contrast relative to classic (random) fluorescent speckle microscopy. We predict theoretically that speckle imprinting using photobleaching is optimal when the laser energy and fluorophore responsivity are related by the golden ratio. This relation, which we confirm experimentally, translates into a 40% remaining signal after speckle imprinting and provides a rule of thumb in selecting the laser power required to optimally prepare the sample for imaging. This inducible speckle imaging (ISI) technique allows 3D speckle microscopy to be performed in readily available libraries of cell lines or primary tissues expressing fluorescent proteins and does not preclude conventional imaging before speckle imaging. As a proof of concept, we use ISI to measure metaphase spindle microtubule poleward flux in primary cells and explore a scaling relation connecting microtubule flux to metaphase duration. PMID:26783303

  17. Inducible fluorescent speckle microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Paulo; Belsley, Michael; Maiato, Helder

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of cytoskeleton dynamics has benefited from the capacity to generate fluorescent fiducial marks on cytoskeleton components. Here we show that light-induced imprinting of three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent speckles significantly improves speckle signal and contrast relative to classic (random) fluorescent speckle microscopy. We predict theoretically that speckle imprinting using photobleaching is optimal when the laser energy and fluorophore responsivity are related by the golden ratio. This relation, which we confirm experimentally, translates into a 40% remaining signal after speckle imprinting and provides a rule of thumb in selecting the laser power required to optimally prepare the sample for imaging. This inducible speckle imaging (ISI) technique allows 3D speckle microscopy to be performed in readily available libraries of cell lines or primary tissues expressing fluorescent proteins and does not preclude conventional imaging before speckle imaging. As a proof of concept, we use ISI to measure metaphase spindle microtubule poleward flux in primary cells and explore a scaling relation connecting microtubule flux to metaphase duration. PMID:26783303

  18. Fluorescence and Light Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Ronald J.; Oprysa, Anna

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the mentioned experiment is to aid students in developing tactics for distinguishing between signals originating from fluorescence and light scattering. Also, the experiment provides students with a deeper understanding of the physicochemical bases of each phenomenon and shows that the techniques are actually related.

  19. Fluorescence Imaging in Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Orosco, Ryan K.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Nguyen, Quyen T.

    2013-01-01

    Although the modern surgical era is highlighted by multiple technological advances and innovations, one area that has remained constant is the dependence of the surgeon's vision on white-light reflectance. This renders different body tissues in a limited palette of various shades of pink and red, thereby limiting the visual contrast available to the operating surgeon. Healthy tissue, anatomic variations, and diseased states are seen as slight discolorations relative to each other and differences are inherently limited in dynamic range. In the upcoming years, surgery will undergo a paradigm shift with the use of targeted fluorescence imaging probes aimed at augmenting the surgical armamentarium by expanding the “visible” spectrum available to surgeons. Such fluorescent “smart probes” will provide real-time, intraoperative, pseudo-color, high-contrast delineation of both normal and pathologic tissues. Fluorescent surgical molecular guidance promises another major leap forward to improve patient safety and clinical outcomes, and to reduce overall healthcare costs. This review provides an overview of current and future surgical applications of fluorescence imaging in diseased and nondiseased tissues and focus on the innovative fields of image processing and instrumentation. PMID:23335674

  20. Fluorescent Gage Indication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barns, C. E.; Gilbaugh, B. L.; Gin, B.; Holt, W. L.; Lesak, P.; Mancini, R.; Spencer, H. F.

    1985-01-01

    Transfer of dye shows quality of contact between two mating parts. Mating parts checked for fit by spreading fluorescent dye on one, making brief light contact with other, and looking (under UV light) for transferred dye. Dye offers greater visibility under ultraviolet illumination, allowing better indication of how precisely parts match and what areas interfere.

  1. A fluorescent molecularly-imprinted polymer gate with temperature and pH as inputs for detection of alpha-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    Karfa, Paramita; Roy, Ekta; Patra, Santanu; Kumar, Deepak; Madhuri, Rashmi; Sharma, Prashant K

    2016-04-15

    In this work, we have reported a new approach on the use of stimuli-responsive molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for trace level sensing of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), which is a well know cancer biomarker. The stimuli-responsive MIP is composed of three components, a thermo-responsive monomer, a pH responsive component (tyrosine derivative) and a highly fluorescent vinyl silane modified carbon dot. The synthesized AFP-imprinted polymer possesses excellent selectivity towards their template molecule and dual-stimuli responsive behavior. Along with this, the imprinted polymer was also explored as 'OR' logic gate with two stimuli (pH and temperature) as inputs. However, the non-imprinted polymers did not have such 'OR' gate property, which confirms the role of template binding. The imprinted polymer was also used for estimation of AFP in the concentration range of 3.96-80.0 ng mL(-1), with limit of detection (LOD) 0.42 ng mL(-1). The role of proposed sensor was successfully exploited for analysis of AFP in real human blood plasma, serum and urine sample. PMID:26657588

  2. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Katy A; O'Bryan, John P

    2011-01-01

    Defining the subcellular distribution of signaling complexes is imperative to understanding the output from that complex. Conventional methods such as immunoprecipitation do not provide information on the spatial localization of complexes. In contrast, BiFC monitors the interaction and subcellular compartmentalization of protein complexes. In this method, a fluororescent protein is split into amino- and carboxy-terminal non-fluorescent fragments which are then fused to two proteins of interest. Interaction of the proteins results in reconstitution of the fluorophore (Figure 1). A limitation of BiFC is that once the fragmented fluorophore is reconstituted the complex is irreversible. This limitation is advantageous in detecting transient or weak interactions, but precludes a kinetic analysis of complex dynamics. An additional caveat is that the reconstituted flourophore requires 30min to mature and fluoresce, again precluding the observation of real time interactions. BiFC is a specific example of the protein fragment complementation assay (PCA) which employs reporter proteins such as green fluorescent protein variants (BiFC), dihydrofolate reductase, b-lactamase, and luciferase to measure protein:protein interactions. Alternative methods to study protein:protein interactions in cells include fluorescence co-localization and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). For co-localization, two proteins are individually tagged either directly with a fluorophore or by indirect immunofluorescence. However, this approach leads to high background of non-interacting proteins making it difficult to interpret co-localization data. In addition, due to the limits of resolution of confocal microscopy, two proteins may appear co-localized without necessarily interacting. With BiFC, fluorescence is only observed when the two proteins of interest interact. FRET is another excellent method for studying protein:protein interactions, but can be technically challenging. FRET

  3. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  4. Fluorescent noble metal nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jie

    Water-soluble fluorescent metallic clusters at sizes comparable to the Fermi wavelength of an electron (˜0.5 nm for gold and silver) were created and their photophysical properties were investigated at the bulk and single molecule levels. We employed biocompatible dendrimer and peptide to prepare a series of strong fluorescent gold and silver clusters with chemical or photo reduction methods. Facilitated by the well-defined dendrimer size, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry indicates that the fluorescent silver nanocluster size ranges from 2 to 8 Ag atoms. The correlation of emission energy with the number of atoms, N, in each gold nanocluster is quantitatively fit for the smallest nanoclusters with no adjustable parameters by the simple scaling relation of EFermi/N1/3, in which EFermi is the Fermi energy of bulk gold. The transition energy scaling inversely with cluster radius indicates that electronic structure can be well described with the spherical jellium model and further demonstrates that these nanomaterials are "multi-electron artificial atoms". Fluorescence from these small metal clusters can be considered protoplasmonic, molecular transitions of the free conduction electrons before the onset of collective dipole oscillations occurring when a continuous density of states is reached. In addition, very strong single molecular Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman enhancement by fluorescent silver clusters was observed. Pushing to larger sizes, we also created ˜2nm diameter glutathione encapsulated luminescent gold nanoparticles. Distinct from similarly sized but nonluminescent gold nanoparticles, these 2 nm gold nanoparticles show bright, long lifetime emission but no plasmon absorption. The emission might arise from charge transfer between gold atoms and the thiol ligand. Providing the "missing link" between atomic and nanoparticle behavior in noble metals, these highly fluorescent, water-soluble gold and silver nanoclusters offer complementary transition

  5. Holograms of fluorescent albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordóñez-Padilla, M. J.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Berriel-Valdos, L. R.; Mejias-Brizuela, N. Y.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2011-09-01

    We report the characterization and analysis of photochromic films gallus gallus albumin as a matrix modified for holographic recording. Photo-oxidation of homogeneous mixtures prepared with albumin-propylene glycol, to combine chemically with aqueous solution of ammonium dichromate at certain concentrations. We analyzed the diffraction gratings, through the diffraction efficiency of the proposed material. Also, eosin was used as a fluorescent agent, so it is found that produces an inhibitory effect, thus decreasing the diffraction efficiency of the matrices prepared in near-identical circumstances. The work was to achieve stability of albumin films, were prepared with propylene glycol. Finally, experimental studies were performed with films when subjected to aqueous solution of eosin (fluorescent agent) to verify the ability to increase or decrease in diffraction efficiency.

  6. Integrated fluorescence analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Buican, Tudor N.; Yoshida, Thomas M.

    1992-01-01

    An integrated fluorescence analysis system enables a component part of a sample to be virtually sorted within a sample volume after a spectrum of the component part has been identified from a fluorescence spectrum of the entire sample in a flow cytometer. Birefringent optics enables the entire spectrum to be resolved into a set of numbers representing the intensity of spectral components of the spectrum. One or more spectral components are selected to program a scanning laser microscope, preferably a confocal microscope, whereby the spectrum from individual pixels or voxels in the sample can be compared. Individual pixels or voxels containing the selected spectral components are identified and an image may be formed to show the morphology of the sample with respect to only those components having the selected spectral components. There is no need for any physical sorting of the sample components to obtain the morphological information.

  7. Fluorescence biosensing in nanopores.

    PubMed

    Karolin, Jan; Pánek, Dalibor; MacMillan, Alexander; Rolinski, Olaf; Birch, David

    2009-01-01

    Hydrated nanopores offer a unique environment for studying biological molecules under controlled conditions and fabricating sensors using fluorescence. Silica nanopores for example are non-toxic, biologically and optically compatible with protein, and can be easily synthesized to entrap protein and exclude potentially interfering macromolecules, while transmitting analytes of interest. A well known problem when polymerizing orthosilicates to fabricate silica sol-gel nanopores is the release of alcohol, which denatures proteins. We will describe how using the fluorescence of PRODAN (6-propionyl-2-(N,N-dimethylamino) naphthalene) to monitor methanol generated during polymerization has helped define a protocol with enhanced biocompatibility. The improved biocompatibility of sol-gel nanopores synthesized using tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) has been demonstrated by preserving the unstable native trimer form of allophycocyanin (APC) for up to 500 Hrs without the need to covalently binding the subunits together. This has enabled the observation of native APC trimer by means of its fluorescence in a pore down to the single molecule level. In this paper we demonstrate how PRODAN and another polarity sensitive dye, 9-diethylamino-5H-benzo[alpha]phenoxazine-5-one, Nile red (NR) report on pore polarity and successfully extend protein encapsulation to nano-channels of alumina (Al2O3). Improved biocompatibility of nanopores has potential impact in nanomedicine where the ability to study single biomolecules is a primary goal as it underpins our understanding of disease pathology and therapeutics at the most fundamental level. In sensing also the advantages of nanopore isolation of metabolite-specific protein for detecting non-fluorescent metabolites has been demonstrated. Similar approaches can in principle be developed for both single-molecules and lab-on-a-chip sensors. PMID:19964618

  8. Magnetic fluorescent lamp

    DOEpatents

    Berman, S.M.; Richardson R.W.

    1983-12-29

    The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  9. Green fluorescent protein: A perspective

    PubMed Central

    Remington, S James

    2011-01-01

    A brief personal perspective is provided for green fluorescent protein (GFP), covering the period 1994–2011. The topics discussed are primarily those in which my research group has made a contribution and include structure and function of the GFP polypeptide, the mechanism of fluorescence emission, excited state protein transfer, the design of ratiometric fluorescent protein biosensors and an overview of the fluorescent proteins derived from coral reef animals. Structure-function relationships in photoswitchable fluorescent proteins and nonfluorescent chromoproteins are also briefly covered. PMID:21714025

  10. Fluorescent Ligands for Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kozma, Eszter; Jayasekara, P Suresh; Squarcialupi, Lucia; Paoletta, Silvia; Moro, Stefano; Federico, Stephanie; Spalluto, Giampiero; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Interest is increasing in developing fluorescent ligands for characterization of adenosine receptors (ARs), which hold a promise of usefulness in the drug discovery process. The size of a strategically labeled AR ligand can be greatly increased after the attachment of a fluorophore. The choice of dye moiety (e.g. Alexa Fluor 488), attachment point and linker length can alter the selectivity and potency of the parent molecule. Fluorescent derivatives of adenosine agonists and antagonists (e.g. XAC and other heterocyclic antagonist scaffolds) have been synthesized and characterized pharmacologically. Some are useful AR probes for flow cytometry, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence polarization, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and scanning confocal microscopy. Thus, the approach of fluorescent labeled GPCR ligands, including those for ARs, is a growing dynamic research field. PMID:23200243

  11. Fluorescence photodiagnosis in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Moghissi, K; Stringer, M R; Dixon, Kate

    2008-12-01

    Fluorescence diagnosis has become an important method of investigation in clinical practice particularly in identification and localisation of pre and early cancerous lesions as well as image guided therapy. The method relies on the principle of differential fluorescence emission between abnormal and normal tissues in response to excitation by a specific wavelength of light within the visible spectrum range. In clinical practice two types of fluorescence diagnostic methods are used, namely autofluorescence and drug-induced fluorescence. The former relies on the differential fluorescence of "native" fluorophores whereas the latter requires a photosensitiser which enhances the differential fluorescence emission of the normal versus the abnormal tissues. Development and advances in fibreoptic, endoscopic instrumentation currently permit fluorescence endoscopy to be carried out in a number of situations. PMID:19356662

  12. Spectrally resolved multidepth fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yuan; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Oh, Se Baek; Kamm, Roger D.; Barbastathis, George

    2011-01-01

    We present a multicolor fluorescence imaging modality to visualize in real-time tissue structures emitting multispectral fluorescent light from different focal depths. Each designated spectrum of fluorescent emission from a specific depth within a volumetric tissue is probed by a depth-spectrum selective holographic grating. The grating for each fluorescent color are multiplexed within a volume hologram, which enables simultaneously obtaining multicolored fluorescent information at different depths within a biological tissue sample. We demonstrate the imaging modality's ability to obtain laser-induced multicolored fluorescence images of a biological sample from different depths without scanning. We also experimentally demonstrate that the imaging modality can be simultaneously operated at both fluorescent and bright field modes to provide complementary information of volumetric tissue structures at different depths in real-time. PMID:21950929

  13. Spectrally resolved multidepth fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yuan; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Oh, Se Baek; Kamm, Roger D.; Barbastathis, George

    2011-09-01

    We present a multicolor fluorescence imaging modality to visualize in real-time tissue structures emitting multispectral fluorescent light from different focal depths. Each designated spectrum of fluorescent emission from a specific depth within a volumetric tissue is probed by a depth-spectrum selective holographic grating. The grating for each fluorescent color are multiplexed within a volume hologram, which enables simultaneously obtaining multicolored fluorescent information at different depths within a biological tissue sample. We demonstrate the imaging modality's ability to obtain laser-induced multicolored fluorescence images of a biological sample from different depths without scanning. We also experimentally demonstrate that the imaging modality can be simultaneously operated at both fluorescent and bright field modes to provide complementary information of volumetric tissue structures at different depths in real-time.

  14. Responsive polymer-fluorescent carbon nanoparticle hybrid nanogels for optical temperature sensing, near-infrared light-responsive drug release, and tumor cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Ke, Fuyou; Mararenko, Anton; Wei, Zengyan; Banerjee, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2014-06-01

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCNPs) have been successfully immobilized into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) [poly(NIPAM-AAm)] nanogels based on one-pot precipitation copolymerization of NIPAM monomers with hydrogen bonded FCNP-AAm complex monomers in water. The resultant poly(NIPAM-AAm)-FCNP hybrid nanogels can combine functions from each building block for fluorescent temperature sensing, cell imaging, and near-infrared (NIR) light responsive drug delivery. The FCNPs in the hybrid nanogels not only emit bright and stable photoluminescence (PL) and exhibit up-conversion PL properties, but also increase the loading capacity of the nanogels for curcumin drug molecules. The reversible thermo-responsive swelling/shrinking transition of the poly(NIPAM-AAm) nanogel can not only modify the physicochemical environment of the FCNPs to manipulate the PL intensity for sensing the environmental temperature change, but also regulate the releasing rate of the loaded anticancer drug. In addition, the FCNPs embedded in the nanogels can convert the NIR light to heat, thus an exogenous NIR irradiation can further accelerate the drug release and enhance the therapeutic efficacy. The hybrid nanogels can overcome cellular barriers to enter the intracellular region and light up the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells upon laser excitation. The demonstrated hybrid nanogels with nontoxic and optically active FCNPs immobilized in responsive polymer nanogels are promising for the development of a new generation of multifunctional materials for biomedical applications.Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCNPs) have been successfully immobilized into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) [poly(NIPAM-AAm)] nanogels based on one-pot precipitation copolymerization of NIPAM monomers with hydrogen bonded FCNP-AAm complex monomers in water. The resultant poly(NIPAM-AAm)-FCNP hybrid nanogels can combine functions from each building block for fluorescent temperature sensing, cell imaging

  15. Fluorescent microthermographic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, D.L.

    1993-09-01

    In the early days of microelectronics, design rules and feature sizes were large enough that sub-micron spatial resolution was not needed. Infrared or IR thermal techniques were available that calculated the object`s temperature from infrared emission. There is a fundamental spatial resolution limitation dependent on the wavelengths of light being used in the image formation process. As the integrated circuit feature sizes began to shrink toward the one micron level, the limitations imposed on IR thermal systems became more pronounced. Something else was needed to overcome this limitation. Liquid crystals have been used with great success, but they lack the temperature measurement capabilities of other techniques. The fluorescent microthermographic imaging technique (FMI) was developed to meet this need. This technique offers better than 0.01{degrees}C temperature resolution and is diffraction limited to 0.3 {mu}m spatial resolution. While the temperature resolution is comparable to that available on IR systems, the spatial resolution is much better. The FMI technique provides better spatial resolution by using a temperature dependent fluorescent film that emits light at 612 nm instead of the 1.5 {mu}m to 12 {mu}m range used by IR techniques. This tutorial starts with a review of blackbody radiation physics, the process by which all heated objects emit radiation to their surroundings, in order to understand the sources of information that are available to characterize an object`s surface temperature. The processes used in infrared thermal imaging are then detailed to point out the limitations of the technique but also to contrast it with the FMI process. The FMI technique is then described in detail, starting with the fluorescent film physics and ending with a series of examples of past applications of FMI.

  16. Fluorescence dynamics of green fluorescent protein in AOT reversed micelles.

    PubMed

    Uskova, M A; Borst, J W; Hink, M A; van Hoek, A; Schots, A; Klyachko, N L; Visser, A J

    2000-09-15

    We have used the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) to investigate the properties of surfactant-entrapped water pools in organic solvents (reversed micelles) with steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence methods. The surfactant used was sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) and the organic solvents were isooctane and (the more viscous) dodecane, respectively. The water content of the water pools could be controlled through the parameter w0, which is the water-to-surfactant molar ratio. With steady-state fluorescence, it was observed that subtle fluorescence changes could be noted in reversed micelles of different water contents. EGFP can be used as a pH-indicator of the water droplets in reversed micelles. Time-resolved fluorescence methods also revealed subtle changes in fluorescence decay times when the results in bulk water were compared with those in reversed micelles. The average fluorescence lifetimes of EGFP scaled with the relative fluorescence intensities. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy of EGFP in aqueous solution and reversed micelles yielded single rotational correlation times. Geometrical considerations could assign the observed correlation times to dehydrated protein at low w0 and internal EGFP rotation within the droplet at the highest w0. PMID:11036971

  17. Fluorescence Detection In Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarner, Susan

    1988-04-01

    Fluorescence detection is in common usage in forensic science laboratories for the visualization of three enzyme markers. The fluorogenic substrates, 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate, 4-methylutbel-liveryl acetate, and fluorecein diacetate, are acted upon by the enzymes Erythrocyte Acid Phospha, tase, Esterase-D, and Carbonic Anhydrase-III, respectively, to produce compounds visible to the analyst when viewed with transmitted UV light at 365 nm. Additionally, the choice of fluorogenic corn, pounds may help detect a specific enzyme from a related enzyme. One of the responsibilities of a forensic science laboratory may be the analysis of blood for genetically controlled polymorphic enzymes and protein markers. The genetic markers are said to be polymorphic because each exhibits types which can be differentiated and allows for the inclusion or exclusion of possible-donors of the blood. Each genetic marker can be separated into these recognizable types by electrophoresis, a technique which separates compounds based on electrical charges. Electrophoresis is conducted by placing a portion or extract of each bloodstain into a support medium which will conduct electricity. This is known as a plate or membrane. By controlling the pH of the buffer and the potential that is applied to the plate, the analyst can achieve separation of the types within an enzyme marker. The types appear as differing patterns of bands. Once the bloodstain has been subjected to electrophoresis, the enzymes must be visualized. This is generally best accomplished by using the specific activity of the enzyme. For the enzymes described in the present work, the visualization is performed by over-layering the plate with a piece of filter paper that 'has been saturated with the appropriate non-fluorescent substrate and buffer. The bands of enzyme, which is now in discrete patterns, will act upon the non-fluorescent substrate to create a fluorescent compound. The plate is then viewed with transmitted UV

  18. Emerging fluorescent protein technologies.

    PubMed

    Enterina, Jhon Ralph; Wu, Lanshi; Campbell, Robert E

    2015-08-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs), such as the Aequorea jellyfish green FP (GFP), are firmly established as fundamental tools that enable a wide variety of biological studies. Specifically, FPs can serve as versatile genetically encoded markers for tracking proteins, organelles, or whole cells, and as the basis for construction of biosensors that can be used to visualize a growing array of biochemical events in cells and tissues. In this review we will focus on emerging applications of FPs that represent unprecedented new directions for the field. These emerging applications include new strategies for using FPs in biosensing applications, and innovative ways of using FPs to manipulate protein function or gene expression. PMID:26043278

  19. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Gary A; Baker, Sheila N; McCleskey, T Mark

    2009-03-03

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  20. Fluorescent penetrant inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastri, Sankar

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to familiarize the student with fluorescent penetrant inspection and to relate it to classification of various defects. The penetrant method of nondestructive testing is a method for finding discontinuities open to the surface in solids and essentially nonporous bodies. The method employs a penetrating liquid which is applied over the surface and enters the discontinuity or crack. After the excess of penetrant has been cleaned from the surface, the penetrant which exudes or is drawn back out of the crack indicates the presence and location of a discontinuity. The experimental procedure is described.

  1. Fluorescence analyzer for lignin

    DOEpatents

    Berthold, John W.; Malito, Michael L.; Jeffers, Larry

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring lignin concentration in a sample of wood pulp or black liquor comprises a light emitting arrangement for emitting an excitation light through optical fiber bundles into a probe which has an undiluted sensing end facing the sample. The excitation light causes the lignin concentration to produce fluorescent emission light which is then conveyed through the probe to analyzing equipment which measures the intensity of the emission light. Measures a This invention was made with Government support under Contract Number DOE: DE-FC05-90CE40905 awarded by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  2. Development of a fluorescent cryocooler

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Epstein, R.I.; Gosnell, T.R.; Mungan, C.E.

    1995-10-01

    Recent work at Los Alamos National Laboratory has demonstrated the physical principles for a new type of solid-state cryocooler based on anti-Stokes fluorescence. Design studies indicate that a vibration-free, low-mass ``fluorescent cryocooler`` could operate for years with efficiencies and cooling powers comparable to current commercial systems. This paper presents concepts for a fluorescent cryocooler, design considerations and expected performance.

  3. Fluorescence-Based Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, Guillermo

    The natural luminescent phenomena (from the Latin words "lumen" and "essentia", i.e., "made of light") such as northern lights (aurora borealis), marine brightness, glow-worms, shining putrid fish scales, "bluish"- appearing water when contained in certain wooden cups (quinine fluorescence), some stones heated at high temperatures with reducing agents (BaS phosphorescence), or light emitted while crushing sugar (triboluminescence) already fascinated our ancestors. Nowadays we understand that ultraviolet and visible emission of light originates from a competitive deactivation pathway of the lowest electronic excited state of atoms and molecules that produces the so called luminescence (the sub-terms fluorescence and phosphorescence just designate whether the return of the excited to the ground state is an "allowed" or "forbidden" process, namely it is fast or slow, the loosely-defined border between them being a 1-μs-1 rate constant). Actually, luminescence is the only method to generate light in the known Universe regardless it is powered by the nuclear reactions in the stars, the ohmical heating in bulbs, an electric discharge, the absorption of light or a (bio)chemical reaction (chemiluminescence).

  4. Reversible fluorescence photoswitching in DNA.

    PubMed

    Smith, Darren A; Holliger, Philipp; Flors, Cristina

    2012-08-30

    We describe the engineering of reversible fluorescence photoswitching in DNA with high-density substitution, and its applications in advanced fluorescence microscopy methods. High-density labeling of DNA with cyanine dyes can be achieved by polymerase chain reaction using a modified DNA polymerase that has been evolved to efficiently incorporate Cy3- and Cy5-labeled cytosine base analogues into double-stranded DNA. The resulting biopolymer, "CyDNA", displays hundreds of fluorophores per DNA strand and is strongly colored and highly fluorescent, although previous observations suggest that fluorescence quenching at such high density might be a concern, especially for Cy5. Herein, we first investigate the mechanisms of fluorescence quenching in CyDNA and we suggest that two different mechanisms, aggregate formation and resonance energy transfer, are responsible for fluorescence quenching at high labeling densities. Moreover, we have been able to re-engineer CyDNA into a reversible fluorescence photoswitchable biopolymer by using the properties of the Cy3-Cy5 pair. This novel biopolymer constitutes a new class of photoactive DNA-based nanomaterial and is of great interest for advanced microscopy applications. We show that reversible fluorescence photoswitching in CyDNA can be exploited in optical lock-in detection imaging. It also lays the foundations for improved and sequence-specific super-resolution fluorescence microscopy of DNA. PMID:22861666

  5. Quantitative approach of speleothems fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiers, Marine; Perrette, Yves; Poulenard, Jérôme; Chalmin, Emilie; Revol, Morgane

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we propose a framework to interpret quantitatively the fluorescence of speleothems organic matter (OM) by the way of a bank of water-extracted organic matter. Due to its efficiency to described dissolved organic matter (DOM) characteritics, fluorescence has been used to determined DOM signatures in natural systems, water circulations, OM transfer from soils, OM evolution in soils or recently, DOM changes in engineered treatment systems. Fluorescence has also been used in speleothems studies, mainly as a growth indicator. Only few studies interpret it as an environmental proxy. Indeed, the fluorescence of OM provides information on the type of organic molecules trapped in speleothems and their evolutions. But the most direct information given by fluorescence is the variation of OM quantities. Actually, increase of fluorescence intensity is generally related to an increase in OM quantity but may also be induced by calcite optical effect or qualitative change of OM. However, analytical technics used in water environments cannot be used for speleothem samples. In this study we propose to give a frame to interpret quantitatively the fluorescence signal of speleothems. 3 different samples of stalagmites from french northern Prealps were used. To allow the quantification of the fluorescence signal, we need to measure the fluorescence and the quantity of organic matter on the same sample. OM of speleothems was extracted by an acid digestion method and analysed with a spectrofluorimeter. However, it was not possible to quantify directly the OM, as the extract solvant was a high-concentrated acid. To solve this problem, a calibration using soil extracts was realised. Soils were chosen in order to represent the diversity of OM present in the environment above the caves. Attention was focused on soil and vegetation types, and landuse. Organic material was water extracted from soils and its fluorescence was also measured. Total organic carbon was performed on the

  6. Fluorescence Reveals Contamination From Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikolia, William

    1992-01-01

    Contamination of nearby surfaces from ingredients in some adhesive materials detected by ultraviolet illumination and observation of resulting fluorescence. Identification of contaminants via telltale fluorescence not new; rather, significance lies in method of implementation and potential extension to wider variety of materials and applications.

  7. Assessing Photosynthesis by Fluorescence Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saura, Pedro; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    This practical paper describes a novel fluorescence imaging experiment to study the three processes of photochemistry, fluorescence and thermal energy dissipation, which compete during the dissipation of excitation energy in photosynthesis. The technique represents a non-invasive tool for revealing and understanding the spatial heterogeneity in…

  8. Fiber-optic fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Flusberg, Benjamin A; Cocker, Eric D; Piyawattanametha, Wibool; Jung, Juergen C; Cheung, Eunice L M; Schnitzer, Mark J

    2010-01-01

    Optical fibers guide light between separate locations and enable new types of fluorescence imaging. Fiber-optic fluorescence imaging systems include portable handheld microscopes, flexible endoscopes well suited for imaging within hollow tissue cavities and microendoscopes that allow minimally invasive high-resolution imaging deep within tissue. A challenge in the creation of such devices is the design and integration of miniaturized optical and mechanical components. Until recently, fiber-based fluorescence imaging was mainly limited to epifluorescence and scanning confocal modalities. Two new classes of photonic crystal fiber facilitate ultrashort pulse delivery for fiber-optic two-photon fluorescence imaging. An upcoming generation of fluorescence imaging devices will be based on microfabricated device components. PMID:16299479

  9. Exogenous specific fluorescence marker location reconstruction using surface fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avital, Garashi; Gannot, Israel; Chernomordik, Victor V.; Gannot, Gallya; Gandjbakhche, Amir H.

    2003-07-01

    Diseased tissue may be specifically marked by an exogenous fluorescent marker and then, following laser activation of the marker, optically and non-invasively detected through fluorescence imaging. Interaction of a fluorophore, conjugated to an appropriate antibody, with the antigen expressed by the diseased tissue, can indicate the presence of a specific disease. Using an optical detection system and a reconstruction algorithm, we were able to determine the fluorophore"s position in the tissue. We present 3D reconstructions of the location of a fluorescent marker, FITC, in the tongues of mice. One group of BALB/c mice was injected with squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) cell line to the tongue, while another group served as the control. After tumor development, the mice"s tongues were injected with FITC conjugated to anti-CD3 and anti-CD 19 antibodies. An Argon laser excited the marker at 488 nm while a high precision fluorescent camera collected the emitted fluorescence. Measurements were performed with the fluorescent marker embedded at various simulated depths. The simulation was performed using agarose-based gel slabs applied to the tongue as tissue-like phantoms. A biopsy was taken from every mouse after the procedure and the excised tissue was histologically evaluated. We reconstruct the fluorescent marker"s location in 3D using an algorithm based on the random walk theory.

  10. Shedding Some Light on Fluorescent Bulbs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilbert, Nicholas R.

    1996-01-01

    Explores some of the principles behind the working of fluorescent bulbs using a specially prepared fluorescent bulb with the white inner fluorescent coating applied along only half its length. Discusses the spectrum, the bulb plasma, and light production. (JRH)

  11. New component in protein fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Longworth, J W

    1980-01-01

    Tryptophyl residues in proteins absorb at longer wavelengths than tyrosyl residues and thus the tryptophyl fluorescence can be selectively excited. In addition, tryptophyl residues have a fluorescence maximum at much longer wavelengths than tyrosyl residues and are the predominant source of fluorescence at the long wavelength region. The contribution of tyrosyl fluorescence to protein fluorescence can be determined by exploiting these spectral properties. The tyrosyl fluorescence of native human serum albumin is different than the fluorescence of N-acetyl-L-tyrosinamide. The spectral maximum is at longer wavelength and the spectral width is greater. This is caused by a second component with a maximum at 345 nm. The excitation spectrum of the 345 nm component is similar to the excitation spectrum of the normal 304 nm tyrosyl component. The 345 nm is largely absent from denatured serum albumin. An excited singlet state protolysis from the buried tyrosyl residues explains the appearance of the 345 nm component. A possible acceptor base is an amino group of buried lysyl residue.

  12. High-Pressure Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maeno, Akihiro; Akasaka, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The combination of fluorescence and pressure perturbation is a widely used technique to study the effect of pressure on a protein system to obtain thermodynamic, structural and kinetic information on proteins. However, we often encounter the situation where the available pressure range up to 400 MPa of most commercial high-pressure fluorescence spectrometers is insufficient for studying highly pressure-stable proteins like inhibitors and allergenic proteins. To overcome the difficulty, we have recently developed a new high-pressure fluorescence system that allows fluorescence measurements up to 700 MPa. Here we describe the basic design of the apparatus and its application to study structural and thermodynamic properties of a couple of highly stable allergenic proteins, hen lysozyme and ovomucoid, using Tryptophan and Tyrosine/Tyrosinate fluorescence, respectively. Finally, we discuss the utility and the limitation of Trp and Tyr fluorescence. We discuss pitfalls of fluorescence technique and importance of simultaneous use of other high-pressure spectroscopy, particularly high-pressure NMR spectroscopy. PMID:26174405

  13. Fluorescent blood cell angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-nun, Joshua; Constable, Ian J.

    1994-06-01

    Fluorescein angiography is currently the main method for evaluation of the retinal vascular patency. Ashton noted that capillary patency to the small fluorescein molecule may differ from that of the larger red blood cells. He concluded that fluorescein angiography is not able to demonstrate a developing stenosis, that might be the precipitating cause of a later capillary closure in various microvasculopathies. Sarelius et al have shown, in hamster cheek pouch and cremaster muscle, that fluorescently labeled erythrocytes in known concentrations can be used for the direct measurement of capillary flow parameters. The only assumption that this method relies on, is that the labeled cells are rheologically normal and therefore reflect the behavior of the total cell population. We have developed a new method for an in-vivo, real-time demonstration of the blood cell flow in the retinal capillary net. Based on the assumption presented by Sarelius et al, measurement and analysis of the retinal capillary blood cell flow is also possible from the results achieved by the new method.

  14. FLEX: fluorescence explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Marc-Ph.; Court, Andrew; Smorenburg, Kees; Visser, Huib; Crocco, Luiggi; Heilimo, Jyro; Honig, Andre

    1999-12-01

    FLEX is a scientifically driven space mission to provide demonstration/validation of the instrumentation and technique for measuring the natural fluorescence of vegetation in the Fraunhofer lines. The payload consists of high spectral resolution (0.1 - 0.3 nm) CCD imaging grating spectrometer with two channels: one in the red (648 - 664 nm) and one in the blue (391 - 438 nm) for working with several Fraunhofer lines. The across track FOV is 8.4 degrees; ground spatial resolution is better than 0.5 X 0.5 km2. To increase the S/N ratio a steering mirror will be used, if necessary, to 'freeze' the image and also to provide plus or minus 4 degrees across track depointing. Calibration is made by viewing the sun via a diffuser plate switched into the telescope field of view. A separate CCD camera will allow cloud detection and scene identification. A TIR radiometer will provide simultaneous surface temperature measurements. The spacecraft, overall mass estimated at 200 kg, is derived from the ASI-MITA bus which provides all the necessary subsystems and stabilized platform. By use of on-board storage, ground requirements for satellite control and data link are minimized; the possibility of local stations for real time reception/distribution is also envisaged. Provisional orbit characteristics are: LEO sun synchronous, 500 - 900 km altitude. Priority will be given to highest revisit frequency on a sufficient number of selected test sites.

  15. Fluorescent fluid interface position sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2004-02-17

    A new fluid interface position sensor has been developed, which is capable of optically determining the location of an interface between an upper fluid and a lower fluid, the upper fluid having a larger refractive index than a lower fluid. The sensor functions by measurement, of fluorescence excited by an optical pump beam which is confined within a fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the lower fluid, but escapes from the fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the upper fluid.

  16. Multiphoton excitation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of fluorescent DNA base analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katilius, Evaldas; Woodbury, Neal W.

    2004-06-01

    Two- and three-photon excitation was used to investigate the properties of two fluorescent DNA base analogs: 2-aminopurine and 6-methylisoxanthopterin. 2-aminopurine is a widely used fluorescent analog of the DNA base adenine. Three-photon excitation of 2-aminopurine is achievable by using intense femtosecond laser pulses in 850-950 nm spectral region. Interestingly, the three-photon excitation spectrum is blue-shifted relative to the three-times-wavelength single-photon excitation spectrum. The maximum of the absorbance band in the UV is at 305 nm, while the three-photon excitation spectrum has a maximum at around 880 nm. Fluorescence correlation measurements were attempted to evaluate the feasibility of using three-photon excitation of 2-aminopurine for DNA-protein interaction studies. However, due to relatively small three-photon absorption cross-section, a good signal-to-noise fluorescence correlation curves take very long time to obtain. Fluorescence properties of 6-methylisoxanthopterin, the fluorescent analog of guanine, were investigated using two-photon excitation. This molecule has the lowest energy absorption band centered around 350 nm, thus, two-photon excitation is attainable using 700 to 760 nm output of Ti-sapphire laser. The excitation spectrum of this molecule in the infrared well matches the doubled-wavelength single-photon excitation spectrum in the UV. The high fluorescence quantum yield of 6-methylisoxanthopterin allows efficient fluorescence correlation measurements and makes this molecule a very good candidate for using in in vitro DNA-protein interaction studies.

  17. TOPICAL REVIEW: Surface enhanced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fort, Emmanuel; Grésillon, Samuel

    2008-01-01

    Fluorescence is widely used in optical devices, microscopy imaging, biology, medical research and diagnosis. Improving fluorescence sensitivity, all the way to the limit of single-molecular detection needed in many applications, remains a great challenge. The technique of surface enhanced fluorescence (SEF) is based upon the design of surfaces in the vicinity of the emitter. SEF yields an overall improvement in the fluorescence detection efficiency through modification and control of the local electromagnetic environment of the emitter. Near-field coupling between the emitter and surface modes plays a crucial role in SEF. In particular, plasmonic surfaces with localized and propagating surface plasmons are efficient SEF substrates. Recent progress in tailoring surfaces at the nanometre scale extends greatly the realm of SEF applications. This review focuses on the recent advances in the different mechanisms involved in SEF, in each case highlighting the most relevant applications.

  18. Fluorescence Studies of Lysozyme Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Smith, Lori

    1998-01-01

    Fluorescence is one of the most powerful tools available for the study of macromolecules. For example, fluorescence can be used to study self association through methods such as anisotropy (the rotational rate of the molecule in solution), quenching (the accessibility of a bound probe to the bulk solution), and resonance energy transfer (measurement of the distance between two species). Fluorescence can also be used to study the local environment of the probe molecules, and the changes in that environment which accompany crystal nucleation and growth. However fluorescent techniques have been very much underutilized in macromolecular growth studies. One major advantage is that the fluorescent species generally must be at low concentration, typically ca 10-5 to 10-6 M. Thus one can study a very wide range of solution conditions, ranging from very high to very low protein concentration, he latter of which are not readily accessible to scattering techniques. We have prepared a number of fluorescent derivatives of chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL). Fluorescent probes have been attached to two different sites, ASP 101 and the N-terrninal amine, with a sought for use in different lines of study. Preliminary resonance energy transfer studies have been -carried out using pyrene acetic acid (Ex 340 mn, Em 376 nm) lysozyme as a donor and cascade blue (Ex 377 run, Em 423 nm) labeled lysozyme as an acceptor. The emission of both the pyrene and cascade blue probes was followed as a function of the salt protein concentrations. The data show an increase in cascade blue and a concomitant decrease in the pyrene fluorescence as either the salt or protein concentrations are increased, suggesting that the two species are approaching each other close enough for resonance energy transfer to occur. This data can be analyzed to measure the distance between the probe molecules and, knowing their locations on the protein molecule their distances from and orientations with respect to each

  19. Multi-wavelength fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Tiffany C.; Lo, Pei-An; Cho, Jaedu; Nouizi, Farouk; Chiang, Huihua K.; Kim, Chang-Seok; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2016-03-01

    The strong scattering and absorption of light in biological tissue makes it challenging to model the propagation of light, especially in deep tissue. This is especially true in fluorescent tomography, which aims to recover the internal fluorescence source distribution from the measured light intensities on the surface of the tissue. The inherently ill-posed and underdetermined nature of the inverse problem along with strong tissue scattering makes Fluorescence Tomography (FT) extremely challenging. Previously, multispectral detection fluorescent tomography (FT) has been shown to improve the image quality of FT by incorporating the spectral filtering of biological tissue to provide depth information to overcome the inherent absorption and scattering limitations. We investigate whether multi-wavelength fluorescent tomography can be used to distinguish the signals from multiple fluorophores with overlapping fluorescence spectrums using a unique near-infrared (NIR) swept laser. In this work, a small feasibility study was performed to see whether multi-wavelength FT can be used to detect subtle shifts in the absorption spectrum due to differences in fluorophore microenvironment.

  20. Passive fluorescence measurements during SIFLEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moya, I.; Ounis, A.; Louis, J.; Evain, S.; Ducruet, J.-M.

    The goal of the participation of the LURE team to the SIFLEX campaign was %to provide clear evidence of quantitative absolute measurements of natural fluorescence andfluorescence flux evaluation by passive methods in the Fraunhofer lines. More specifically, to quantify the fluorescence flux in A and B absorption bands of atmospheric oxygen. The measurements have been focus on: Testing specific passive fluorescence instrumentation recently developed at LURE for assessing the sun induced fluorescence radiance from vegetation. Investigating diurnal and seasonal change of fluorescence and its behaviour with respect to plant condition, pigment content, global radiation amount and its correlation against accumulated biomass during growing period, Cross-correlate the fluorescence signal with hyperspectral reflectance and thermal IR radiance. A special attention has been paid to diurnal cycle and seasonal variations. Comparing fluorescence fluxes with CO2 fluxes measured by the already existing gas exchange equipment of the site. Instrumentation PMFD (Passive Multiwavelength Fluorescence Detector) was the main instrument used to asses fluorescence fluxes. The instrument was based on the Fraunhofer line principle, applied in the atmospheric oxygen A and B bands (760nm and 687nm, respectively). The output parameters were two stationary fluorescence flux at 687nm and 760nm and the NDVI (NDVI = (R760-R687) / (R760+R687)) index. Two additional channels of the instrument are devoted to measure reflectance variations at 531nm and 570 nm in order to calculate the PRI (PRI = (R531-R570) / (R531+R570)) index. This instrument was installed on the main tower, 10 m above the crown of the trees and maintained in the same viewing direction during the campaign (towards the north direction). The zenith angle was set to about 50-65 degrees. The footprint of the instrument contained the crowns of several trees. BD was a second passive detector operating solely in the atmospheric oxygen A

  1. A Convenient Lecture Demonstration of Fluorescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrows, Hugh D.; Axtell, Darrell D.

    1983-01-01

    Describes fluorescence experiments demonstrating that emitted light is at longer wavelengths than absorbed light and that fluorescence decays rapidly when the source of excitation is removed. Systems whose acidic and basic forms have different fluorescent characteristics are used to demonstrate fluorescence visible and invisible to the naked eye.…

  2. Design Strategies for Fluorescent Biodegradable Polymeric Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Yang, Jian

    2013-01-01

    The marriage of biodegradable polymer and fluorescent imaging has resulted in an important area of polymeric biomaterials: biodegradable fluorescent polymers. Researchers have put significant efforts on developing versatile fluorescent biomaterials due to their promising in biological/biomedical labeling, tracking, monitoring, imaging, and diagnostic applications, especially in drug delivery, tissue engineering, and cancer imaging applications. Biodegradable fluorescent polymers can function not only as implant biomaterials but also as imaging probes. Currently, there are two major classes of biodegradable polymers used as fluorescent materials. The first class is the combination of non-fluorescent biodegradable polymers and fluorescent agents such as organic dyes and quantum dots. Another class of polymers shows intrinsic photoluminescence as polymers by themselves carrying integral fluorescent chemical structures in or pendent to their polymer backbone, such as Green Fluorescent protein (GFP), and the recently developed biodegradable photoluminescent polymer (BPLP). Thus there is no need to conjugate or encapsulate additional fluorescent materials for the latter. In the present review, we will review the fluorescent biodegradable polymers with emphases on material fluorescence mechanism, design criteria for fluorescence, and their cutting-edge applications in biomedical engineering. We expect that this review will provide insightful discussion on the fluorescent biomaterial design and lead to innovations for the development of the next generation of fluorescent biomaterials and fluorescence-based biomedical technology. PMID:23710326

  3. Investigation of Quenching Mechanism in Thermoreversible Fluorescent Recording Materials of Fluorescence Using Thermochromic Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuzo Hirata,; Martin Vacha,; Toshiyuki Watanabe,

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrated reversible thermosensitive recording of a fluorescent image (TRF) using a low-molecular-weight mixture consisting of a fluorescent dye, a fluoran dye, a developer, and a reversible matrix. In this material, reversible thermoresponsive disorder-crystal transition triggers a cyclical colorless-color change of a fluoran dye, which induces on-off switching of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from a fluorescent dye to a fluoran dye. On-off switching of fluorescence is induced by heat-promoted off-on switching of FRET. Modulation of fluorescence is held at room temperature by utilizing thermal hysteresis, and nondestructive readout of the fluorescent image is accomplished in the presence of excitation light. Here, we investigate the on-off switching mechanism of fluorescence in this recording material. We analyzed the theoretical factor of emission quenching in the erasing state by comparing the theoretical overlap integral Ω between fluorescent dyes and fluoran dyes on the basis of the FRET theory with experimental emission contrast for various combinations of fluorescent dyes and fluoran dyes. It was proved that fluorescence on-off switching occurs mainly by concentration quenching due to the aggregation of fluorescent dyes and FRET from isolated fluorescent dyes to colored fluoran dyes. The key issue to obtain both high-contrast fluorescence and high fluorescence quantum yield is to control these two factors.

  4. On the origin of fluorescence in bacteriophytochrome infrared fluorescent proteins

    PubMed Central

    Samma, Alex A.; Johnson, Chelsea K.; Song, Shuang; Alvarez, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Tsien (Science, 2009, 324, 804-807) has recently reported the creation of the first infrared fluorescent protein (IFP). It was engineered from bacterial phytochrome by removing the PHY and histidine kinase-related domains, by optimizing the protein to prevent dimerization and by limiting the biliverdins conformational freedom, especially around its D ring. We have used database analyses and molecular dynamics simulations with freely rotating chromophoric dihedrals in order to model the dihedral freedom available to the biliverdin D ring in the excited state; to show that the tetrapyrrole ligands in phytochromes are flexible and can adopt many conformations, however their conformational space is limited/defined by the chemospatial characteristics of the protein cavity. Our simulations confirm that the reduced accessibility to conformations geared to an excited state proton transfer may be responsible for the fluorescence in IFP, just as has been suggested by Kennis (PNAS, 2010, 107, 9170-9175) for fluorescent bacteriophytochrome from Rhodopseudomonas palustris. PMID:21047084

  5. Fluorescent Ribozyme and Deoxyribozyme Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiuman, William; Li, Yingfu

    The development of allosteric nucleic acid enzymes (NAEs) has made NAEs very attractive for a wide variety of biotechnological applications, including biosensing, diagnostics, drug screening, and molecular computation. Although NAEs alone might have limited values for analytical application due to the rather small scope of their substrates and cofactors, modular characteristics of aptamers and NAEs permit the easy design of combined sensors where the aptamer acts as the molecular recognition element (MRE) and the NAE functions as a reporter. To facilitate the exploitation of NAEs for biosensing applications, fluorescence methods have been increasingly explored as better alternatives to radioisotope-based detection techniques. In this chapter, we first survey the strategies that have been employed to graft fluorescence-signaling moieties onto NAEs. We then review our experimental efforts in creating a group of fluorescence-signaling and RNA-cleaving deoxyribozymes (DNAzymes) intended for the design of fluorescent sensors. Last, we discuss the diverse engineering approaches that can transmit the binding status of an aptamer to the activation or repression of catalytic activity in fluorescent NAE sensors.

  6. Multipoint fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with total internal reflection fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed

    Ohsugi, Yu; Kinjo, Masataka

    2009-01-01

    We report simultaneous determination of diffusion coefficients at different points of a cell membrane using a multipoint fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) system. A system carrying seven detection areas in the evanescent field is achieved by using seven optical fibers on the image plane in the detection port of an objective-type total internal reflection FCS (TIR-FCS) system. Fluctuation of fluorescence intensity is monitored and evaluated using seven photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and a newly constructed multichannel correlator. We demonstrate simultaneous-multipoint FCS, with a 3-mus time resolution, to investigate heterogeneous structures such as cell membranes and membrane-binding molecular dynamics near glass surfaces in live cells. PMID:19256718

  7. Quantitative assessment of fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Cranfill, Paula J; Sell, Brittney R; Baird, Michelle A; Allen, John R; Lavagnino, Zeno; de Gruiter, H Martijn; Kremers, Gert-Jan; Davidson, Michael W; Ustione, Alessandro; Piston, David W

    2016-07-01

    The advent of fluorescent proteins (FPs) for genetic labeling of molecules and cells has revolutionized fluorescence microscopy. Genetic manipulations have created a vast array of bright and stable FPs spanning blue to red spectral regions. Common to autofluorescent FPs is their tight β-barrel structure, which provides the rigidity and chemical environment needed for effectual fluorescence. Despite the common structure, each FP has unique properties. Thus, there is no single 'best' FP for every circumstance, and each FP has advantages and disadvantages. To guide decisions about which FP is right for a given application, we have quantitatively characterized the brightness, photostability, pH stability and monomeric properties of more than 40 FPs to enable straightforward and direct comparison between them. We focus on popular and/or top-performing FPs in each spectral region. PMID:27240257

  8. Fluorescence applications in molecular neurobiology

    PubMed Central

    Taraska, Justin W.; Zagotta, William N.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Macromolecules drive the complex behavior of neurons. For example, channels and transporters control the movements of ions across membranes, SNAREs direct the fusion of vesicles at the synapse, and motors move cargo throughout the cell. Understanding the structure, assembly, and conformational movements of these and other neuronal proteins is essential to understanding the brain. Developments in fluorescence have allowed the architecture and dynamics of proteins to be studied in real time and in a cellular context with great accuracy. In this review, we cover classic and recent methods for studying protein structure, assembly, and dynamics with fluorescence. These methods include fluorescence and luminescence resonance energy transfer, single molecule bleaching analysis, intensity measurements, co-localization microscopy, electron transfer, and bi-molecular complementation analysis. We present the principles of these methods, highlight recent work that uses the methods, and discuss a framework for interpreting results as they apply to molecular neurobiology. PMID:20434995

  9. Lasing from fluorescent protein crystals.

    PubMed

    Oh, Heon Jeong; Gather, Malte C; Song, Ji-Joon; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2014-12-15

    We investigated fluorescent protein crystals for potential photonic applications, for the first time to our knowledge. Rod-shaped crystals of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were synthesized, with diameters of 0.5-2 μm and lengths of 100-200 μm. The crystals exhibit minimal light scattering due to their ordered structure and generate substantially higher fluorescence intensity than EGFP or dye molecules in solutions. The magnitude of concentration quenching in EGFP crystals was measured to be about 7-10 dB. Upon optical pumping at 485 nm, individual EGFP crystals located between dichroic mirrors generated laser emission with a single-mode spectral line at 513 nm. Our results demonstrate the potential of protein crystals as novel optical elements for self-assembled, micro- or nano-lasers and amplifiers in aqueous environment. PMID:25607090

  10. Interference techniques in fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Mehmet

    We developed a set of interference-based optical microscopy techniques to study biological structures through nanometer-scale axial localization of fluorescent biomarkers. Spectral self-interference fluorescence microscopy (SSFM) utilizes interference of direct and reflected waves emitted from fluorescent molecules in the vicinity of planar reflectors to reveal the axial position of the molecules. A comprehensive calculation algorithm based on Green's function formalism is presented to verify the validity of approximations used in a far-field approach that describes the emission of fluorescent markers near interfaces. Using the validated model, theoretical limits of axial localization were determined with emphasis given to numerical aperture (NA) dependence of localization uncertainty. SSFM was experimentally demonstrated in conformational analysis of nucleoproteins. In particular, interaction between surface-tethered 75-mer double strand DNA and integration host factor (IHF) protein was probed on Si-SiO2 substrates by determining the axial position of fluorescent labels attached to the free ends of DNA molecules. Despite its sub-nanometer precision axial localization capability, SSFM lacks high lateral resolution due to the low-NA requirement for planar reflectors. We developed a second technique, 4Pi-SSFM, which improves the lateral resolution of a conventional SSFM system by an order of magnitude while achieving nanometer-scale axial localization precision. Using two opposing high-NA objectives, fluorescence signal is interferometrically collected and spectral interference pattern is recorded. Axial position of emitters is found from analysis of the spectra. The 4Pi-SSFM technique was experimentally demonstrated by determining the surface profiles of fabricated glass surfaces and outer membranes of Shigella, a type of Gram-negative bacteria. A further discussion is presented to localize surface O antigen, which is an important oligosaccharide structure in the

  11. Thermo-responsive hydrogels with N-isopropylacrylamide/acrylamide interpenetrating networks for controlled drug release.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Wu, Yanye; Huo, Yinlei

    2015-01-01

    Series of thermo-sensitive hydrogels (PNAs) based on N-isopropylacrylamide/acrylamide interpenetrating polymer networks were synthesized via in situ free-radical polymerization. Poly (ethylene glycol diacrylate) and poly (ε-caprolactone diacrylate) were synthesized as macro-cross-linkers due to their excellent biocompatibilities. The macro-cross-linkers and hydrogels were characterized by (1)H NMR and FT-IR, respectively. The interior morphology of the hydrogels was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The swelling ratios at different temperatures and the swelling/deswelling kinetics of the hydrogels were studied. Their volume phase transition temperatures were also measured by differential scanning calorimetry characterization. The results indicated that the PNA hydrogels had uniform macroporous structures, and they not only had considerable swelling ratios, but also exhibited rapid swelling/deswelling kinetics and response sensitivities. In addition, the weight ratio of AAm/NIPAAm also affected the swelling performance and phase transition temperature of hydrogels, and its value less than 5% was the optimal proportion to achieve excellent comprehensive properties. Levofloxacin lactate and Naproxen were selected as drugs and simulated in vitro condition release, and the drug release results showed that the PNA hydrogels behaved fast release performance. PMID:26146984

  12. Effective electrostatic interactions among charged thermo-responsive microgels immersed in a simple electrolyte.

    PubMed

    González-Mozuelos, P

    2016-02-01

    This work explores the nature and thermodynamic behavior of the effective electrostatic interactions among charged microgels immersed in a simple electrolyte, taking special interest in the effects due to the thermally induced variation of the microgel size while the remaining parameters (microgel charge and concentration, plus the amount of added salt) are kept constant. To this end, the rigorous approach obtained from applying the precise methodology of the dressed ion theory to the proper definition of the effective direct correlation functions, which emerge from tracing-out the degrees of freedom of the microscopic ions, is employed to provide an exact description of the parameters characterizing such interactions: screening length, effective permittivity, and renormalized charges. A model solution with three components is assumed: large permeable anionic spheres for the microgels, plus small charged hard spheres of equal size for the monovalent cations and anions. The two-body correlations among the components of this model suspension, used as the input for the determination of the effective interaction parameters, are here calculated by using the hyper-netted chain approximation. It is then found that at finite microgel concentrations the values of these parameters change as the microgel size increases, even though the ionic strength of the supporting electrolyte and the bare charge of the microgels remain fixed during this process. The variation of the screening length, as well as that of the effective permittivity, is rather small, but still interesting in view of the fact that the corresponding Debye length stays constant. The renormalized charges, in contrast, increase markedly as the microgels swell. The ratio of the renormalized charge to the corresponding analytic result obtained in the context of an extended linear response theory allows us to introduce an effective charge that accounts for the non-linear effects induced by the short-ranged association of microions to the microgels. The behavior of these effective charges as a function of the amount of added salt and the macroion charge, size, and concentration reveals the interplay among all these system parameters. PMID:26851932

  13. Effective electrostatic interactions among charged thermo-responsive microgels immersed in a simple electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Mozuelos, P.

    2016-02-01

    This work explores the nature and thermodynamic behavior of the effective electrostatic interactions among charged microgels immersed in a simple electrolyte, taking special interest in the effects due to the thermally induced variation of the microgel size while the remaining parameters (microgel charge and concentration, plus the amount of added salt) are kept constant. To this end, the rigorous approach obtained from applying the precise methodology of the dressed ion theory to the proper definition of the effective direct correlation functions, which emerge from tracing-out the degrees of freedom of the microscopic ions, is employed to provide an exact description of the parameters characterizing such interactions: screening length, effective permittivity, and renormalized charges. A model solution with three components is assumed: large permeable anionic spheres for the microgels, plus small charged hard spheres of equal size for the monovalent cations and anions. The two-body correlations among the components of this model suspension, used as the input for the determination of the effective interaction parameters, are here calculated by using the hyper-netted chain approximation. It is then found that at finite microgel concentrations the values of these parameters change as the microgel size increases, even though the ionic strength of the supporting electrolyte and the bare charge of the microgels remain fixed during this process. The variation of the screening length, as well as that of the effective permittivity, is rather small, but still interesting in view of the fact that the corresponding Debye length stays constant. The renormalized charges, in contrast, increase markedly as the microgels swell. The ratio of the renormalized charge to the corresponding analytic result obtained in the context of an extended linear response theory allows us to introduce an effective charge that accounts for the non-linear effects induced by the short-ranged association of microions to the microgels. The behavior of these effective charges as a function of the amount of added salt and the macroion charge, size, and concentration reveals the interplay among all these system parameters.

  14. A new pH and thermo-responsive chiral hydrogel for stimulated release.

    PubMed

    Shankar, B Vijai; Patnaik, Archita

    2007-08-01

    Chirality of the amphiphile to promote gelation in the given solvent medium is narrated in a new catanionic surfactant mixture from a twin-chiral, twin-tailed surfactant derived from tartaric acid and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The surfactant bis(decyloxy) succinic acid (BDSA), a chiral Gemini-type surfactant with a rigid spacer, in association with CTAB formed pH and temperature responsive vesicles and hydrogels. Molecular chirality gave rise to supertwisted fibrillar hydrogels at a BDSA:CTAB molar ratio of 1:2 and in 31% water content. The hydrogels from enantiomeric BDSA were reversibly pH and irreversibly temperature responsive at pH<6.2 and at 55 degrees C, respectively, whereas the corresponding sodium succinates formed transparent clear gels reversible to both pH and temperature. The hydrogels were able to entrap and release model dye molecules, Rhodamine B, and Congo red, responding to thermal and pH stimuli. Circular dichroism unraveled the chiro-optical behavior of the assembled fibers, allowing monitoring of aggregation and packing. The presence and the relative configuration of the stereogenic centers in the structure of this low molecular weight gelator have been observed to be critical to form gels. The high curvature Gaussian gel network was modeled based on the chiral elastic membrane approach and the pitch angle of the Gaussian twist was estimated to be 45 degrees. PMID:17629325

  15. Functionalized thermo-responsive microgels for high performance forward osmosis desalination.

    PubMed

    Hartanto, Yusak; Yun, Seonho; Jin, Bo; Dai, Sheng

    2015-03-01

    Stimuli-responsive hydrogels were recently proposed for energy-saving forward osmosis (FO) process. However, their low water flux and dewatering ability for reuse make them less attractive for industrial desalination process. In this work, the co-polymer microgels of N-isopropylacrylamide and acrylic acid with different mixing ratios were synthesized using surfactant-free emulsion polymerization to produce submicron-size hydrogels with high surface area and fast swelling-deswelling response. The microgels were employed as draw agents in a laboratory scale FO desalination system. The microgel-based FO process performed a high water flux up to 23.8 LMH and high water recovery ability of 72.4%. In addition, we explored a new conductivity measurement method to online analyze water flux of the FO system. This on-line conductivity analysis approach appeared to be an accurate and efficient method for evaluating microgel-based FO desalination performance. Our experimental data revealed that the stimuli-responsive microgel was an efficient draw agent for FO desalination. PMID:25549211

  16. Thermo-responsive polymer aided spheroid culture in cryogel based platform for high throughput drug screening.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, J; Kumar, A

    2016-04-21

    In high throughput cell culture, the paradigm is now shifting from 2D to 3D systems. However, in 3D cell culture systems, it is important that the cells form spheroids with robust cell-cell interactions. We fabricated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-gelatin) cryogel scaffolds for cell culture and inserted them into open-ended 96-well plates that formed a drainage and leakage protected, easy to handle high throughput platform. This platform was used to screen for the optimal concentration of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAAm) as an external aid to the formation of cellular spheroids. It was found that hepatic cells (Hep G2) seeded in the presence of 0.03% pNIPAAm formed better hepatic spheroids in terms of morphology (as assessed by microscopic analysis and formation of bile canaliculi-like structures) and functionality by day 5 of culture. An increase of 44.22%, 15.75%, 36.44%, 32.05% and 27.02% was observed in glucose consumption (1.925 mM per day per 10(4) cells), albumin synthesis (164.18 ng per day per 10(4) cells), CYP1A1 (304.92 pg per min per 10(4) cells), CYP2A6 (441.23 nM per min per 10(4) cells) and phase II metabolic activity (386.18 nM per min(-1) per 10(4) cells), respectively, upon using 0.03% pNIPAAm, as compared to the 3D control. The platform was tested with other cells such as breast and lung cancer cells and found to be compatible. The cell spheroids were subjected to drug toxicity screening in cryogel based open-ended platforms. It was observed that the spheroids were more resistant to anticancer drugs, as compared to 2D and 3D controls, with approximately 11%-67% increase in the IC50 values of tamoxifen and paclitaxel. The platform also showed dose dependent and reproducible responses to drugs. PMID:27027476

  17. Rheological properties of a biological thermo-responsive hydrogel produced from soybean oil polymers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rheological properties of a newly developed biological thermo-hydrogel made from vegetable oil were investigated. The material named HPSO-VI is a hydrolytic product of polymerized soybean oil (PSO). HPSO-VI exhibited viscoelastic behavior above 2% (wt. %) at room temperature and viscous fluid ...

  18. Rheological properties of a biological thermo-responsive hydrogel prepared from vegetable oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrogel is a colloidal gel in which water is the dispersion medium. The unique properties of hydrogels make this kind of materials have many utilization potentials, such as drug delivery, gene therapy, wound care products, breast implant materials, cosmetic products, and tissue engineering. Hydroge...

  19. Multichromophoric sugar for fluorescence photoswitching

    PubMed Central

    Maisonneuve, Stéphane; Yu, Pei; Nakatani, Keitaro

    2014-01-01

    Summary A multichromophoric glucopyranoside 2 bearing three dicyanomethylenepyran (DCM) fluorophores and one diarylethene (DAE) photochrome has been prepared by Cu(I)-catalyzed alkyne–azide cycloaddition reaction. The fluorescence of 2 was switched off upon UV irradiation, in proportion with the open to closed form (OF to CF) conversion extent of the DAE moiety. A nearly 100% Förster-type resonance energy transfer (FRET) from all three DCM moieties to a single DAE (in its CF) moiety was achieved. Upon visible irradiation, the initial fluorescence intensity was recovered. The observed photoswiching is reversible, with excellent photo resistance. PMID:24991302

  20. Going Viral with Fluorescent Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Lindsey M.

    2015-01-01

    Many longstanding questions about dynamics of virus-cell interactions can be answered by combining fluorescence imaging techniques with fluorescent protein (FP) tagging strategies. Successfully creating a FP fusion with a cellular or viral protein of interest first requires selecting the appropriate FP. However, while viral architecture and cellular localization often dictate the suitability of a FP, a FP's chemical and physical properties must also be considered. Here, we discuss the challenges of and offer suggestions for identifying the optimal FPs for studying the cell biology of viruses. PMID:26202231

  1. PH-sensitive fluorescence detection by diffuse fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiao; Gao, Feng; Duan, Linjing; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Limin; Zhao, Huijuan

    2012-03-01

    The importance of cellular pH has been shown clearly in the study of cell activity, pathological feature, drug metabolism, etc. Monitoring pH changes of living cells and imaging the regions with abnormal pH values in vivo could provide the physiologic and pathologic information for the research of the cell biology, pharmacokinetics, diagnostics and therapeutics of certain diseases such as cancer. Thus, pH-sensitive fluorescence imaging of bulk tissues has been attracting great attention in the regime of near-infrared diffuse fluorescence tomography (DFT), an efficient small-animal imaging tool. In this paper, the feasibility of quantifying pH-sensitive fluorescence targets in turbid medium is investigated using both time-domain and steady-state DFT methods. By use of the specifically designed time-domain and continuous-wave systems and the previously proposed image reconstruction scheme, we validate the method through 2-dimensional imaging experiments on a small-animal-sized phantom with multiply targets of distinct pH values. The results show that the approach can localize the targets with reasonable accuracy and achieve quantitative reconstruction of the pH-sensitive fluorescent yield.

  2. Fluorescence lifetime standards for time and frequency domain fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Boens, Noël; Qin, Wenwu; Basarić, Nikola; Hofkens, Johan; Ameloot, Marcel; Pouget, Jacques; Lefèvre, Jean-Pierre; Valeur, Bernard; Gratton, Enrico; vandeVen, Martin; Silva, Norberto D; Engelborghs, Yves; Willaert, Katrien; Sillen, Alain; Rumbles, Garry; Phillips, David; Visser, Antonie J W G; van Hoek, Arie; Lakowicz, Joseph R; Malak, Henryk; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Szabo, Arthur G; Krajcarski, Don T; Tamai, Naoto; Miura, Atsushi

    2007-03-01

    A series of fluorophores with single-exponential fluorescence decays in liquid solution at 20 degrees C were measured independently by nine laboratories using single-photon timing and multifrequency phase and modulation fluorometry instruments with lasers as excitation source. The dyes that can serve as fluorescence lifetime standards for time-domain and frequency-domain measurements are all commercially available, are photostable under the conditions of the measurements, and are soluble in solvents of spectroscopic quality (methanol, cyclohexane, water). These lifetime standards are anthracene, 9-cyanoanthracene, 9,10-diphenylanthracene, N-methylcarbazole, coumarin 153, erythrosin B, N-acetyl-l-tryptophanamide, 1,4-bis(5-phenyloxazol-2-yl)benzene, 2,5-diphenyloxazole, rhodamine B, rubrene, N-(3-sulfopropyl)acridinium, and 1,4-diphenylbenzene. At 20 degrees C, the fluorescence lifetimes vary from 89 ps to 31.2 ns, depending on fluorescent dye and solvent, which is a useful range for modern pico- and nanosecond time-domain or mega- to gigahertz frequency-domain instrumentation. The decay times are independent of the excitation and emission wavelengths. Dependent on the structure of the dye and the solvent, the excitation wavelengths used range from 284 to 575 nm, the emission from 330 to 630 nm. These lifetime standards may be used to either calibrate or test the resolution of time- and frequency-domain instrumentation or as reference compounds to eliminate the color effect in photomultiplier tubes. Statistical analyses by means of two-sample charts indicate that there is no laboratory bias in the lifetime determinations. Moreover, statistical tests show that there is an excellent correlation between the lifetimes estimated by the time-domain and frequency-domain fluorometries. Comprehensive tables compiling the results for 20 (fluorescence lifetime standard/solvent) combinations are given. PMID:17269654

  3. Fluorescent sensors based on bacterial fusion proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prats Mateu, Batirtze; Kainz, Birgit; Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Toca-Herrera, José L.

    2014-06-01

    Fluorescence proteins are widely used as markers for biomedical and technological purposes. Therefore, the aim of this project was to create a fluorescent sensor, based in the green and cyan fluorescent protein, using bacterial S-layers proteins as scaffold for the fluorescent tag. We report the cloning, expression and purification of three S-layer fluorescent proteins: SgsE-EGFP, SgsE-ECFP and SgsE-13aa-ECFP, this last containing a 13-amino acid rigid linker. The pH dependence of the fluorescence intensity of the S-layer fusion proteins, monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy, showed that the ECFP tag was more stable than EGFP. Furthermore, the fluorescent fusion proteins were reassembled on silica particles modified with cationic and anionic polyelectrolytes. Zeta potential measurements confirmed the particle coatings and indicated their colloidal stability. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that the fluorescence of the fusion proteins was pH dependent and sensitive to the underlying polyelectrolyte coating. This might suggest that the fluorescent tag is not completely exposed to the bulk media as an independent moiety. Finally, it was found out that viscosity enhanced the fluorescence intensity of the three fluorescent S-layer proteins.

  4. Exploring the World of Fluorescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czarnik, Stanley A.

    1991-01-01

    Provides a basic introduction to fluorescence enabling the amateur scientist to easily, and safely, demonstrate and photograph this phenomenon with the aid of an ultraviolet lamp. Includes a list of necessary equipment and materials, as well as catalog availability from several hardware suppliers. (JJK)

  5. Green fluorescent protein glows gold.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2008-12-12

    The awarding of this year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Osamu Shimomura, Martin Chalfie, and Roger Tsien for their discovery and development of green fluorescent protein earns this humble jellyfish protein a place of honor in the biology research hall of fame. PMID:19070562

  6. Fluorescence diagnostics in oncological gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaeva, Ludmila A.; Adamyan, Leila V.; Kozachenko, Vladimir P.; Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Stranadko, Eugene F.; Loschenov, Victor B.

    2003-10-01

    The method of fluorescent diagnostics (FD) of tumors is a promising tool that may allow to increase sensitivity of tumor detection especially at initial stages. One of the most promising photosensitizers today is 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) that, actually, is not photosensitizer itself but precursor of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). This paper deals with cancer diagnostics in gynecology by means of ALA-induced Pp IX laser-fluorescence spectroscopy. The tissue fluorescence spectra in vivo were studied in patients with various pathologies of ovaries, uterine and vulva after 5-aminolevulinic acid administration. It was shown that different pathologies varies in accumulation of Pp IX. Coefficient of fluorescence kf for normal tissue is not high, but exceptions are endometrium and mucous membrane of uterine tubes. Benign tumors of uterus and ovary have low values of kf, but polyps of endometrium exhibit high kf. Optical express-biopsy is important for diagnosis of ovarian cancer and micrometastatic spread. Coefficients of diagnostic contrast were determined for cancer of endometrium, cervical cancer, vulvar cancer.

  7. Studying Photosynthesis by Measuring Fluorescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Jose Francisco; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an easy experiment to study the absorption and action spectrum of photosynthesis, as well as the inhibition by heat, high light intensity and the presence of the herbicide 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) on the photosynthetic process. The method involves measuring the chlorophyll fluorescence emitted by intact…

  8. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Annie; Gibbons, Anne E.; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Genetically-encoded fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) reporters are powerful tools to analyze cell signaling and function at single cell resolution in standard two-dimensional cell cultures, but these reporters rarely have been applied to three-dimensional environments. FRET interactions between donor and acceptor molecules typically are determined by changes in relative fluorescence intensities, but wavelength-dependent differences in absorption of light complicate this analysis method in three-dimensional settings. Here we report fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with phasor analysis, a method that displays fluorescence lifetimes on a pixel-wise basis in real time, to quantify apoptosis in breast cancer cells stably expressing a genetically encoded FRET reporter. This microscopic imaging technology allowed us to identify treatment-induced apoptosis in single breast cancer cells in environments ranging from two-dimensional cell culture, spheroids with cancer and bone marrow stromal cells, and living mice with orthotopic human breast cancer xenografts. Using this imaging strategy, we showed that combined metabolic therapy targeting glycolysis and glutamine pathways significantly reduced overall breast cancer metabolism and induced apoptosis. We also determined that distinct subpopulations of bone marrow stromal cells control resistance of breast cancer cells to chemotherapy, suggesting heterogeneity of treatment responses of malignant cells in different bone marrow niches. Overall, this study establishes FLIM with phasor analysis as an imaging tool for apoptosis in cell-based assays and living mice, enabling real-time, cellular-level assessment of treatment efficacy and heterogeneity. PMID:26771007

  9. A fluorescent probe for ecstasy.

    PubMed

    Masseroni, D; Biavardi, E; Genovese, D; Rampazzo, E; Prodi, L; Dalcanale, E

    2015-08-18

    A nanostructure formed by the insertion in silica nanoparticles of a pyrene-derivatized cavitand, which is able to specifically recognize ecstasy in water, is presented. The absence of effects from interferents and an efficient electron transfer process occurring after complexation of ecstasy, makes this system an efficient fluorescent probe for this popular drug. PMID:26166808

  10. Scattered Light And Fluorescent Photomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourney, M. E.; Chang, Ban W.

    1987-02-01

    A new technique for determining the stress state in a three-dimensional transparent body is described. This method involves cast-ing dye molecules into a model material and using the fluorescent light to analysis the stress state. The techniques of scattered light photoelasticity and speckle interferometry are considered and the enhancement of these techniques by the use of fluorescent is reported. The amount of illumination is greatly increased and the wavelength red-shifted, which eliminates the undesirable boundary halo; however, at the expense of a loss of coherence and a degree of depolarization of the light. Rhodamine 6G dye molecules are cast into gelatin, epoxy resin (PLM-4) and urethane rubber (Solithane 113) model materials. The light scattering, fluorescent, and fringe formation processes of each material is investigated. It is observed that even for the standard scattered light photoelastic materials without dye molecules the scattering is not Rayleigh, but rather has a large amount of wavelength broadening, the center wavelength, is red-shifted, and a high degree of depolarization occurs. A theory of photoelastic fringe formation for fluorescent materials is proposed. Experimental results are presented and the use of digital image processor in filtering background illumination is shown to greatly enhance fringe visibility.

  11. Fluorescent Particles For Flow Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnell, Jeremy L.; Stern, Susan M.; Torkelson, Jan R.

    1995-01-01

    Small alumina spheres coated with fluorescent dye used in flow testing of transparent plastic model of check valve. Entrained fluroescent particles make flows visible. After completion of flow test, particles remaining in valve easily detectable and removed for measurement of their sizes.

  12. Fluorescence Spectroscopy in a Shoebox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooq Wahab, M.

    2007-08-01

    This article describes construction of a simple, inexpensive fluorometer. It utilizes a flashlight or sunlight source, highlighter marker ink, bowl of water with mirror as dispersing element, and colored cellophane sheets as filters. The human eye is used as a detector. This apparatus is used to demonstrate important concepts related to fluorescence spectroscopy. Using ink from a highlighter marker, one can demonstrate the difference between light scattering and fluorescence emission, the need for an intense light source, phenomenon of the Stokes shift, the choice of filters, the preferred geometry of excitation source and emission detector, and the low detection limits that can be achieved by fluorescence measurements. By reflecting the fluorescence emission from a compact disk, it can be seen that the light emitted by molecules is not monochromatic. Furthermore, a spectrofluorometer is constructed using gratings made from a DVD or a CD. The shoebox fluorometer and spectrofluorometer can serve as useful teaching aids in places where commercial instruments are not available, and it avoids the black box problem of modern instruments.

  13. Anorganic fluorescence reference materials for decay time of fluorescence emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, A.; Ottermann, C.; Klahn, J.; Korb, T.; Resch-Genger, U.; Hoffmann, K.; Kynast, U.; Rupertus, V.

    2008-02-01

    Fluorescence techniques are known for their high sensitivity and are widely used as analytical tools, detection methods and imaging applications for product and process control, material sciences, environmental and bio-technical analysis, molecular genetics, cell biology, medical diagnostics, and drug screening. According to DIN/ISO 17025 certified standards are used for steady state fluorescence diagnostics, a method having the drawback of giving relative values for fluorescence intensities only. Therefore reference materials for a quantitative characterization have to be related directly to the materials under investigation. In order to evaluate these figures it is necessary to calculate absolute numbers such as absorption/excitation cross sections and quantum yield. This has been done for different types of dopands in different materials such as glass, glass ceramics, crystals or nano crystalline material embedded in polymer matrices. Samples doped with several fluophores of different emission wavelengths and decay times are required for fluorescent multiplexing applications. Decay times shorter than 100 ns are of special interest. In addition, a proper knowledge is necessary of quantum efficiency in highly scattering media. Recently, quantum efficiency in YAG:Ce glass ceramics has been successfully investigated. Glass and glass ceramics doped with threefold charged rare earth elements are available. However, these samples have the disadvantage of emission decay times much longer than 1 microsecond, due to the excitation and emission of their optical forbidden electronic transitions. Therefore first attempts have been made to produce decay-time standards based on organic and inorganic fluophores. Stable LUMOGEN RED pigments and YAG:Ce phosphors are diluted simultaneously in silicone matrices using a wide range of concentrations between 0.0001 and 2 wt%. Organic LUMOGEN RED has decay times in the lower nanosecond range with a slight dependency on concentration

  14. The Rate Constant for Fluorescence Quenching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legenza, Michael W.; Marzzacco, Charles J.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment that utilizes fluorescence intensity measurements from a Spectronic 20 to determine the rate constant for the fluorescence quenching of various aromatic hydrocarbons by carbon tetrachloride in an ethanol solvent. (MLH)

  15. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research.

    PubMed

    Hogue, Ian B; Bosse, Jens B; Engel, Esteban A; Scherer, Julian; Hu, Jiun-Ruey; Del Rio, Tony; Enquist, Lynn W

    2015-11-01

    In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP), fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and pseudorabies virus (PRV) structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer. PMID:26610544

  16. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research

    PubMed Central

    Hogue, Ian B.; Bosse, Jens B.; Engel, Esteban A.; Scherer, Julian; Hu, Jiun-Ruey; del Rio, Tony; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2015-01-01

    In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP), fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and pseudorabies virus (PRV) structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer. PMID:26610544

  17. Modern developments in electron-beam fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattolica, Robert J.

    Recent developments in the area of electron-beam fluorescence are discussed with special attention given to the experience in the use of the electron-beam fluorescence in flight research. A new measurement approach, called electron-photon fluorescence (EPF), is described, and it is shown that EPF offers the potential of overcoming some of the disadvantages of electron-beam fluorescence in high-density flows. Examples of using the EPF technique are presented.

  18. Modern developments in electron-beam fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattolica, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    Recent developments in the area of electron-beam fluorescence are discussed with special attention given to the experience in the use of the electron-beam fluorescence in flight research. A new measurement approach, called electron-photon fluorescence (EPF), is described, and it is shown that EPF offers the potential of overcoming some of the disadvantages of electron-beam fluorescence in high-density flows. Examples of using the EPF technique are presented.

  19. Sunlight induced 685 nm fluorescence imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hongsuk H.; Van Der Piepen, Heinz

    1986-01-01

    The capability of a new fluorescence method is evaluated using data from an aircraft fluorescence experiment conducted on the Elbe River on August 10-14, 1981. The technique measures chlorophyll concentrations by monitoring sunlight-induced fluorescence at 685 nm. Upwelling radiance spectra and vertical profiles of upwelling radiances are presented and analyzed. The image-processing algorithm used to retrieve fluorescence signals from raw data is described.

  20. A fluorescence high-temperature sensor based on fluorescence lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jinling; Wang, Yutian; Wang, Xinian

    2006-11-01

    A kind of fluorescence optic-fiber temperature sensor is devised based on the alexandrite crystal. In this system, a new optic- fiber probe fabrication techniques is proposed. This system is particularly adapted to the temperature measurement in the range of room temperature to 650°C. During the cause of experimentation, using the PLD-PMTR (termed the Pulse Modulated Phase-locked detection with Two References) signal processing scheme. This temperature measurement method is proved to be effective and useful for its highly resolution and precision. It ensured the detected fluorescence signal to noise ratio was high enough to be measurable when the temperature is raised to 650°C.

  1. Plasmonic enhancement of ultraviolet fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Xiaojin

    Plasmonics relates to the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and conduction electrons at metallic interfaces or in metallic nanostructures. Surface plasmons are collective electron oscillations at a metal surface, which can be manipulated by shape, texture and material composition. Plasmonic applications cover a broad spectrum from visible to near infrared, including biosensing, nanolithography, spectroscopy, optoelectronics, photovoltaics and so on. However, there remains a gap in this activity in the ultraviolet (UV, < 400 nm), where significant opportunity exists for both fundamental and application research. Motivating factors in the study of UV Plasmonics are the direct access to biomolecular resonances and native fluorescence, resonant Raman scattering interactions, and the potential for exerting control over photochemical reactions. This dissertation aims to fill in the gap of Plasmonics in the UV with efforts of design, fabrication and characterization of aluminium (Al) and magnesium (Mg) nanostructures for the application of label-free bimolecular detection via native UV fluorescence. The first contribution of this dissertation addresses the design of Al nanostructures in the context of UV fluorescence enhancement. A design method that combines analytical analysis with numerical simulation has been developed. Performance of three canonical plasmonic structures---the dipole antenna, bullseye nanoaperture and nanoaperture array---has been compared. The optimal geometrical parameters have been determined. A novel design of a compound bullseye structure has been proposed and numerically analyzed for the purpose of compensating for the large Stokes shift typical of UV fluorescence. Second, UV lifetime modification of diffusing molecules by Al nanoapertures has been experimentally demonstrated for the first time. Lifetime reductions of ~3.5x have been observed for the high quantum yield (QY) laser dye p-terphenyl in a 60 nm diameter aperture with 50

  2. Characterization of natural fluorescence in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djeziri, Salim; Ma, Guobin; Mincu, Niculae; Benyamin Seeyar, Anader; Khayat, Mario

    2008-02-01

    One important challenge for in-vivo imaging fluorescence in cancer research and related pharmaceutical studies is to discriminate the exogenous fluorescence signal of the specific tagged agents from the natural fluorescence. For mice, natural fluorescence is composed of endogenous fluorescence from organs like the skin, the bladder, etc. and from ingested food. The discrimination between the two kinds of fluorescence makes easy monitoring the targeted tissues. Generally, the amplitude of the fluorescence signal depends on the location and on the amount of injected fluorophore, which is limited in in-vivo experiments. This paper exposes some results of natural fluorescence analysis from in-vivo mice experiments using a time domain small animal fluorescence imaging system: eXplore Optix TM. Fluorescence signals are expressed by a Time Point Spread Function (TPSF) at each scan point. The study uses measures of similarity applied purposely to the TPSF to evaluate the discrepancy and/or the homogeneity of scanned regions of a mouse. These measures allow a classification scheme to be performed on the TPSF's based on their temporal shapes. The work ends by showing how the exogenous fluorescence can be distinguished from natural fluorescence by using the TPSF temporal shape.

  3. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-01-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and…

  4. Plasmon-controlled fluorescence: a new paradigm in fluorescence spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Ray, Krishanu; Chowdhury, Mustafa; Szmacinski, Henryk; Fu, Yi; Zhang, Jian; Nowaczyk, Kazimierz

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is widely used in biological research. Until recently, essentially all fluorescence experiments were performed using optical energy which has radiated to the far-field. By far-field we mean at least several wavelengths from the fluorophore, but propagating far-field radiation is usually detected at larger macroscopic distances from the sample. In recent years there has been a growing interest in the interactions of fluorophores with metallic surfaces or particles. Near-field interactions are those occurring within a wavelength distance of an excited fluorophore. The spectral properties of fluorophores can be dramatically altered by near-field interactions with the electron clouds present in metals. These interactions modify the emission in ways not seen in classical fluorescence experiments. In this review we provide an intuitive description of the complex physics of plasmons and near-field interactions. Additionally, we summarize the recent work on metal–fluorophore interactions and suggest how these effects will result in new classes of experimental procedures, novel probes, bioassays and devices. PMID:18810279

  5. Correlative Fluorescence and Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schirra, Randall T.; Zhang, Peijun

    2014-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy (CFEM) is a multimodal technique that combines dynamic and localization information from fluorescence methods with ultrastructural data from electron microscopy, to give new information about how cellular components change relative to the spatiotemporal dynamics within their environment. In this review, we will discuss some of the basic techniques and tools of the trade for utilizing this attractive research method, which is becoming a very powerful tool for biology labs. The information obtained from correlative methods has proven to be invaluable in creating consensus between the two types of microscopy, extending the capability of each, and cutting the time and expense associate with using each method separately for comparative analysis. The realization of the advantages of these methods in cell biology have led to rapid improvement in the protocols and have ushered in a new generation of instruments to reach the next level of correlation – integration. PMID:25271959

  6. Fluorescent optical liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2001-01-01

    A liquid level sensor comprising a transparent waveguide containing fluorescent material that is excited by light of a first wavelength and emits at a second, longer wavelength. The upper end of the waveguide is connected to a light source at the first wavelength through a beveled portion of the waveguide such that the input light is totally internally reflected within the waveguide above an air/liquid interface in a tank but is transmitted into the liquid below this interface. Light is emitted from the fluorescent material only in those portions of the waveguide that are above the air/liquid interface, to be collected at the upper end of the waveguide by a detector that is sensitive only to the second wavelength. As the interface moves down in the tank, the signal strength from the detector will increase.

  7. Multi Spectral Fluorescence Imager (MSFI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caron, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Genetic transformation with in vivo reporter genes for fluorescent proteins can be performed on a variety of organisms to address fundamental biological questions. Model organisms that may utilize an ISS imager include unicellular organisms (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), plants (Arabidopsis thaliana), and invertebrates (Caenorhabditis elegans). The multispectral fluorescence imager (MSFI) will have the capability to accommodate 10 cm x 10 cm Petri plates, various sized multi-well culture plates, and other custom culture containers. Features will include programmable temperature and light cycles, ethylene scrubbing (less than 25 ppb), CO2 control (between 400 ppm and ISS-ambient levels in units of 100 ppm) and sufficient airflow to prevent condensation that would interfere with imaging.

  8. X-ray fluorescence holography.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kouichi; Happo, Naohisa; Hosokawa, Shinya; Hu, Wen; Matsushita, Tomohiro

    2012-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a method of atomic resolution holography which utilizes fluorescing atoms as a wave source or a monitor of the interference field within a crystal sample. It provides three-dimensional atomic images around a specified element and has a range of up to a few nm in real space. Because of this feature, XFH is expected to be used for medium-range local structural analysis, which cannot be performed by x-ray diffraction or x-ray absorption fine structure analysis. In this article, we explain the theory of XFH including solutions to the twin-image problem, an advanced measuring system, and data processing for the reconstruction of atomic images. Then, we briefly introduce our recent applications of this technique to the analysis of local lattice distortions in mixed crystals and nanometer-size clusters appearing in the low-temperature phase of a shape-memory alloy. PMID:22318258

  9. Sorting fluorescent nanocrystals with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Gerion, Daniele; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Williams, Shara C.; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2001-12-10

    Semiconductor nanocrystals with narrow and tunable fluorescence are covalently linked to oligonucleotides. These biocompounds retain the properties of both nanocrystals and DNA. Therefore, different sequences of DNA can be coded with nanocrystals and still preserve their ability to hybridize to their complements. We report the case where four different sequences of DNA are linked to four nanocrystal samples having different colors of emission in the range of 530-640 nm. When the DNA-nanocrystal conjugates are mixed together, it is possible to sort each type of nanoparticle using hybridization on a defined micrometer -size surface containing the complementary oligonucleotide. Detection of sorting requires only a single excitation source and an epifluorescence microscope. The possibility of directing fluorescent nanocrystals towards specific biological targets and detecting them, combined with their superior photo-stability compared to organic dyes, opens the way to improved biolabeling experiments, such as gene mapping on a nanometer scale or multicolor microarray analysis.

  10. Supercritical Angle Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ries, Jonas; Ruckstuhl, Thomas; Verdes, Dorinel; Schwille, Petra

    2008-01-01

    We explore the potential of a supercritical angle (SA) objective for fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). This novel microscope objective combines tight focusing by an aspheric lens with strong axial confinement of supercritical angle fluorescence collection by a parabolic mirror lens, resulting in a small detection volume. The tiny axial extent of the detection volume features an excellent surface sensitivity, as is demonstrated by diffusion measurements in model membranes with an excess of free dye in solution. All SA-FCS measurements are directly compared to standard confocal FCS, demonstrating a clear advantage of SA-FCS, especially for diffusion measurements in membranes. We present an extensive theoretical framework that allows for accurate and quantitative evaluation of the SA-FCS correlation curves. PMID:17827221

  11. Fluorescence spectroscopy for neoplasms control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratchenko, I. A.; Kristoforova, Yu. A.; Myakinin, O. O.; Artemyev, D. N.; Kozlov, S. V.; Moryatov, A. A.; Zakharov, V. P.

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of malignant skin tumors diagnosis was performed involving two setups for native tissues fluorescence control in visible and near infrared regions. Combined fluorescence analysis for skin malignant melanomas and basal cell carcinomas was performed. Autofluorescence spectra of normal skin and oncological pathologies stimulated by 457 nm and 785 nm lasers were registered for 74 skin tissue samples. Spectra of 10 melanomas and 27 basal cell carcinomas were registered ex vivo. Skin tumors analysis was made on the basis of autofluorescence spectra intensity and curvature for analysis of porphyrins, lipo-pigments, flavins and melanin. Separation of melanomas and basal cell carcinomas was performed on the basis of discriminant analysis. Overall accuracy of basal cell carcinomas and malignant melanomas separation in current study reached 86.5% with 70% sensitivity and 92.6% specificity.

  12. Fluorescence investigations of cresol photolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, T. V.; Mayer, Georgy V.; Chaikovskaya, Olga N.; Sokolova, Irina V.; Sosnin, Edward A.

    2004-12-01

    The method of fluorescent spectroscopy is used to investigate the influence of the pH of the medium on phototransformations of o- and p-cresol in water under UV irradiation. It is demonstrated that the efficiency of cresol photodecomposition decreases with the increasing pH of the medium. The efficiency of cresol phototransformations in an alkaline medium is higher under irradiation at 283 nm, whereas in a neutral medium, it is higher under irradiation at 222 nm.

  13. Fluorescence quenching of flavins by reductive agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penzkofer, A.; Bansal, A. K.; Song, S.-H.; Dick, B.

    2007-07-01

    The fluorescence behaviour of the flavins riboflavin, flavin mononucleotide (FMN), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), and lumiflavin in aqueous solution at pH 8 in the presence of the reducing agents β-mercaptoethanol (β-ME), dithiothreitol (DTT), and sodium nitrite (NaNO 2) is studied under aerobic conditions. The fluorescence quantum yields and fluorescence lifetimes are determined as a function of the reducing agent concentration. For all three reducing agents diffusion controlled dynamic fluorescence quenching is observed which is thought to be due to photo-induced reductive electron transfer. For DTT additionally static fluorescence quenching occurs.

  14. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patalay, Rakesh; Talbot, Clifford; Munro, Ian; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten; Alexandrov, Yuri; Warren, Sean; Neil, Mark A. A.; French, Paul M. W.; Chu, Anthony; Stamp, Gordon W.; Dunsby, Chris

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) using two photon microscopy (TPM) have been used to study tissue autofluorescence in ex vivo skin cancer samples. A commercially available system (DermaInspect®) was modified to collect fluorescence intensity and lifetimes in two spectral channels using time correlated single photon counting and depth-resolved steady state measurements of the fluorescence emission spectrum. Uniquely, image segmentation has been used to allow fluorescence lifetimes to be calculated for each cell. An analysis of lifetime values obtained from a range of pigmented and non-pigmented lesions will be presented.

  15. Fluorescence-detected DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Haugland, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    Our research effort funded by this grant primarily focused on development of suitable fluorescent dyes for DNA sequencing studies. Prior to our efforts, the dyes being sued in commercial DNA sequencers were various versions of fluorescein dyes for the shorter wavelengths and of rhodamine dyes for the longer wavelengths. Our initial goal was to synthesize a set of four dyes that could all be excited by the 488 and 514 nm line of the argon laser lines and that have emission spectra that minimize spectral overlap. The specific result sought was higher fluorescent intensity, particularly of the longest wavelength dyes than was available using existing dyes. Another important property of the desired set of dyes was uniform ionic charge in order to have minimum interference on the electrophoretic mobility during the sequencing. During the period of this grant we prepared and characterized four types of dyes: fluorescent bifluorophores, derivatives of rhodamine dyes, derivatives of rhodol dyes and derivatives of boron dipyrromethene difluoride (BODIPY{trademark}) dyes.

  16. Biochemical Applications Of 3-Dimensional Fluorescence Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiner, Marc J.; Wolfbeis, Otto S.

    1988-06-01

    We investigated the 3-dimensional fluorescence of complex mixtures of bioloquids such as human serum, serum ultrafiltrate, human urine, and human plasma low density lipoproteins. The total fluorescence of human serum can be divided into a few peaks. When comparing fluorescence topograms of sera, from normal and cancerous subjects, we found significant differences in tryptophan fluorescence. Although the total fluorescence of human urine can be resolved into 3-5 distinct peaks, some of them. do not result from single fluorescent urinary metabolites, but rather from. several species having similar spectral properties. Human plasma, low density lipoproteins possess a native fluorescence that changes when submitted to in-vitro autoxidation. The 3-dimensional fluorescence demonstrated the presence of 7 fluorophores in the lipid domain, and 6 fluorophores in the protein. dovain- The above results demonstrated that 3-dimensional fluorescence can resolve the spectral properties of complex ,lxtures much better than other methods. Moreover, other parameters than excitation and emission wavelength and intensity (for instance fluorescence lifetime, polarization, or quenchability) may be exploited to give a multidl,ensio,a1 matrix, that is unique for each sample. Consequently, 3-dimensio:Hhal fluorescence as such, or in combination with separation techniques is therefore considered to have the potential of becoming a useful new H.ethod in clinical chemistry and analytical biochemistry.

  17. An operational fluorescence system for crop assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belzile, Charles; Belanger, Marie-Christine; Viau, Alain A.; Chamberland, Martin; Roy, Simon

    2004-03-01

    The development of precision farming requires new tools for plant nutritional stress monitoring. An operational fluorescence system has been designed for vegetation status mapping and stress detection at plant and field scale. The instrument gives relative values of fluorescence at different wavelengths induced by the two-excitation sources. Lightinduced fluorescence has demonstrated successful crop health monitoring and plant nutritional stress detection capabilities. The spectral response of the plants has first been measured with an hyperspectral imager using laser-induced fluorescence. A tabletop imaging fluorometer based on flash lamp technology has also been designed to study the spatial distribution of fluorescence on plant leaves. For field based non-imaging system, LED technology is used as light source to induce fluorescence of the plant. The operational fluorescence system is based on ultraviolet and blue LED to induce fluorescence. Four narrow fluorescence bands centered on 440, 520, 690 and 740nm are detected. The instrument design includes a modular approach for light source and detector. It can accommodate as many as four different light sources and six bands of fluorescence detection. As part of the design for field application, the instrument is compatible with a mobile platform equipped with a GPS and data acquisition system. The current system developed by Telops/GAAP is configured for potato crops fluorescence measurement but can easily be adapted for other crops. This new instrument offers an effective and affordable solution for precision farming.

  18. Fluorescence spectroscopy applied to orange trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcassa, L. G.; Gasparoto, M. C. G.; Belasque, J., Jr.; Lins, E. C.; Dias Nunes, F.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2006-05-01

    In this work, we have applied laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate biological processes in orange trees (Citrus aurantium L.). We have chosen to investigate water stress and Citrus Canker, which is a disease caused by the Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri bacteria. The fluorescence spectroscopy was investigated by using as an excitation source a 442-nm 15-mW HeCd gas multimode discharge laser and a 532-nm 10-mW Nd3+:YAG laser. The stress manifestation was detected by the variation of fluorescence ratios of the leaves at different wavelengths. The fluorescence ratios present a significant variation, showing the possibility to observe water stress by fluorescence spectrum. The Citrus Canker’s contaminated leaves were discriminated from the healthy leaves using a more complex analysis of the fluorescence spectra. However, we were unable to discriminate it from another disease, and new fluorescence experiments are planned for the future.

  19. Anomalous fluorescence line intensity in megavoltage bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Nino; Litz, Marc; Merkel, George; Schumer, Joseph; Seely, John; Carroll, Jeff

    2009-11-01

    A Cauchois transmission crystal spectrometer intended for laser plasma diagnostics has measured an anomalous ratio between the fluorescence lines in megavoltage bremsstrahlung. When observed in reflection, Kα1 fluorescence is twice as strong as the Kβ line, as is usual. However, in forward-directed bremsstrahlung from a 2 MV end point linear accelerator with a tungsten converter, the Kα1 and Kβ fluorescence are approximately equal. The anomalous fluorescence line ratio, unity, reflects the large amount of fluorescence generated on the side of the converter where the electrons enter, and the differential attenuation of the fluorescence photons as they pass through the converter to opposite side. Understanding of fluorescence in megavoltage bremsstrahlung is relevant to the explanation of anomalous line ratios in spectra produced by high-energy electrons generated by intense femtosecond laser irradiation.

  20. Metal enhanced fluorescence with gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattingly, Shaina LaRissa Strating

    A novel hybrid nanocomposite of Au nanoparticle-modified silicon nanowire was developed for surface enhanced fluorescence applications. The designed nanocomposite contained a silicon nanowire, gold nanoparticles and a silica layer doped with dye molecules. The hybrid nanomaterial was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), fluorescence measurements, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The results showed that the gold nanoparticles were uniformly adhered on the silicon nanowires and covered by a thin silica layer. The nanostructure exhibited strong capacity for surface enhanced fluorescence. Different enhancement factors were obtained by changing synthetic conditions. The second goal of the project was to determine if the shape of gold nanoparticles affects the extent of its fluorescence enhancement under constant external factors. Two shapes of gold nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized by SEM, STEM, zeta potential and absorbance measurements. Then they were coated with fluorescent dye-doped silica and the fluorescence intensity was measured and compared to the pure fluorescent dye. Gold nanorods enhanced fluorescence more than gold nanostars and that the fluorescent dye Alexafluor 700 showed a greater fluorescence intensity change in the presence of nanoparticles than methylene blue.

  1. Three-dimensional fluorescence lifetime tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Godavarty, Anuradha; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Eppstein, Margaret J.

    2005-04-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence tomography using molecularly targeted lifetime-sensitive, fluorescent contrast agents have applications for early-stage cancer diagnostics. Yet, although the measurement of fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is extensively used in microscopy and spectroscopy applications, demonstration of fluorescence lifetime tomography for medical imaging is limited to two-dimensional studies. Herein, the feasibility of three-dimensional fluorescence-lifetime tomography on clinically relevant phantom volumes is established, using (i) a gain-modulated intensified charge coupled device (CCD) and modulated laser diode imaging system, (ii) two fluorescent contrast agents, e.g., Indocyanine green and 3-3'-Diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide differing in their fluorescence lifetime by 0.62 ns, and (iii) a two stage approximate extended Kalman filter reconstruction algorithm. Fluorescence measurements of phase and amplitude were acquired on the phantom surface under different target to background fluorescence absorption (70:1, 100:1) and fluorescence lifetime (1:1, 2.1:1) contrasts at target depths of 1.4-2 cm. The Bayesian tomography algorithm was employed to obtain three-dimensional images of lifetime and absorption owing to the fluorophores.

  2. Monitoring dynamic systems with multiparameter fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Kudryavtsev, Volodymyr; Felekyan, Suren; Woźniak, Anna K; König, Marcelle; Sandhagen, Carl; Kühnemuth, Ralf; Seidel, Claus A M; Oesterhelt, Filipp

    2007-01-01

    A new general strategy based on the use of multiparameter fluorescence detection (MFD) to register and quantitatively analyse fluorescence images is introduced. Multiparameter fluorescence imaging (MFDi) uses pulsed excitation, time-correlated single-photon counting and a special pixel clock to simultaneously monitor the changes in the eight-dimensional fluorescence information (fundamental anisotropy, fluorescence lifetime, fluorescence intensity, time, excitation spectrum, fluorescence spectrum, fluorescence quantum yield, distance between fluorophores) in real time. The three spatial coordinates are also stored. The most statistically efficient techniques known from single-molecule spectroscopy are used to estimate fluorescence parameters of interest for all pixels, not just for the regions of interest. Their statistical significance is judged from a stack of two-dimensional histograms. In this way, specific pixels can be selected for subsequent pixel-based subensemble analysis in order to improve the statistical accuracy of the parameters estimated. MFDi avoids the need for sequential measurements, because the registered data allow one to perform many analysis techniques, such as fluorescence-intensity distribution analysis (FIDA) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), in an off-line mode. The limitations of FCS for counting molecules and monitoring dynamics are discussed. To demonstrate the ability of our technique, we analysed two systems: (i) interactions of the fluorescent dye Rhodamine 110 inside and outside of a glutathione sepharose bead, and (ii) microtubule dynamics in live yeast cells of Schizosaccharomyces pombe using a fusion protein of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) with Minichromosome Altered Loss Protein 3 (Mal3), which is involved in the dynamic cycle of polymerising and depolymerising microtubules. PMID:17160654

  3. Far-Field Fluorescence Nanoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hell, Stefan

    2009-03-01

    The resolution of a far-field optical microscopy is usually limited to d=λ/ λ( 2,α ) . - ( 2,α ) > 200 nm, with nα denoting the numerical aperture of the lens and λ the wavelength of light. While the diffraction barrier has prompted the invention of electron, scanning probe, and x-ray microscopy, the 3D-imaging of the interior of (live) cells requires the use of focused visible light. I will discuss new developments of optical microscopy that I anticipate to have a lasting impact on our understanding of living matter. Emphasis will be placed on physical concepts that have overcome the diffraction barrier in far-field fluorescence microscopy. To set the scene for future directions, I will show that all these concepts share a common strategy: exploiting selected states and transitions of the fluorescent marker to neutralize the limiting role of diffraction. The first viable concept of this kind was Stimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy where the spot diameter followsd λ/ λ( 2,α√1+I / I Is . - Is ) . - ( 2,α√1+I / I Is . - Is ); I / I Is . - Isis a measure of the strength with which the molecule is send from the fluorescent state to the dark ground state. For I / I Is . - Is->∞ it follows that d->0, meaning that the resolution that can, in principle, be molecular. The concept underlying STED microscopy can be expanded by employing other transitions that shuffle the molecule between a dark and a bright state, such as (i) shelving the fluorophore in a dark triplet state, and (ii) photoswitching between a `fluorescence activated' and a `fluorescence deactivated' conformational state. Examples for the latter include photochromic organic compounds, and fluorescent proteins which undergo a cis-trans photoisomerizations. Photoswitching provides ultrahigh resolution at ultralow light levels. Switching can be performed in an ensemble or individually in which case the image is assembled molecule by molecule at high resolution. By providing molecular

  4. Fluorescence imaging spectrometer optical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taiti, A.; Coppo, P.; Battistelli, E.

    2015-09-01

    The optical design of the FLuORescence Imaging Spectrometer (FLORIS) studied for the Fluorescence Explorer (FLEX) mission is discussed. FLEX is a candidate for the ESA's 8th Earth Explorer opportunity mission. FLORIS is a pushbroom hyperspectral imager foreseen to be embarked on board of a medium size satellite, flying in tandem with Sentinel-3 in a Sun synchronous orbit at a height of about 815 km. FLORIS will observe the vegetation fluorescence and reflectance within a spectral range between 500 and 780 nm. Multi-frames acquisitions on matrix detectors during the satellite movement will allow the production of 2D Earth scene images in two different spectral channels, called HR and LR with spectral resolution of 0.3 and 2 nm respectively. A common fore optics is foreseen to enhance by design the spatial co-registration between the two spectral channels, which have the same ground spatial sampling (300 m) and swath (150 km). An overlapped spectral range between the two channels is also introduced to simplify the spectral coregistration. A compact opto-mechanical solution with all spherical and plane optical elements is proposed, and the most significant design rationales are described. The instrument optical architecture foresees a dual Babinet scrambler, a dioptric telescope and two grating spectrometers (HR and LR), each consisting of a modified Offner configuration. The developed design is robust, stable vs temperature, easy to align, showing very high optical quality along the whole field of view. The system gives also excellent correction for transverse chromatic aberration and distortions (keystone and smile).

  5. Analysis of ultrasensitive fluorescence experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuxing

    2000-12-01

    This work primarily investigates use of the neural network(NN) method to analyze spectral data collected in single molecule detection(SMD) and identification (SMI) experiments. The 2-layer neural networks, with sigmoid as the activation function, are constructed and trained on a set of simulated data using back-propagation and the δ-learning rule. The trained networks are then used for identification of photon bursts in subsequent simulations. Results show that the NN method yields better identification of individual photon bursts than the traditional maximum likelihood estimation (MLE), particularly in cases where the fluorophores have disparate fluorescence quantum efficiencies, absorption cross-sections, or photodegradation efficiencies. In addition, this work reports several improvements over the prior version of the Monte Carlo simulation program. The improved version considers the fluorescence probability as the convolution of the pure exponential decay function characterized by the fluorescence lifetime and the instrument impulse response function in the experiment. The setting of the time window is then implemented by monitoring the variation of signal and noise. A number of problems have been investigated by using the improved version. In particular, the effects of the number and widths of the bins within the time window on the precision of identification of molecules are studied. The results from the improved version of the simulation show that only a small number of bins (4-8) are required to achieve approximately 90% correct predictions with the NN method. Bin widths chosen in accordance with the intuitive algorithm, or equal bin widths, generally give better predictions. Experimental improvements are also reported in this work. In particular, the transit time of BODIBY-TR(D-6116) dye molecules in an SMD experiment was improved to less than 200 μs, and a circuit is implemented to accomplish fast and continuous data collection to be used in future

  6. Bioaerosol Analysis by Online Fluorescence Detection and Fluorescence Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, Alex; Pöhlker, Christopher; Treutlein, Bärbel; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs), including bacteria, spores and pollen, are essential for the spread of organisms and disease in the biosphere, and numerous studies have suggested that they may be important for atmospheric processes, including the formation of clouds and precipitation. The atmospheric abundance and size distribution of PBAPs, however, are largely unknown. At a semi-urban site in Mainz, Germany, we used an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) to measure fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAPs), which can be regarded as viable bioaerosol particles representing a lower limit for the actual abundance of PBAPs. Fluorescence of non-biological aerosol components are likely to influence the measurement results obtained for fine particles (< 1 μm), but not for coarse particles (1 - 20 μm). Microscopy studies were later performed at the same location to more directly investigate and identify biological particles. Averaged over the four-month measurement period (August - December 2006), the mean number concentration of coarse FBAPs was 3x10-2 cm-3, corresponding to 4% of total coarse particle number [1]. The mean mass concentration of FBAPs was 1 ?g m-3, corresponding to 20% of total coarse particle mass. The FBAP number size distributions exhibited alternating patterns with peaks at various diameters, though a pronounced peak at 3 μm was essentially always observed. This peak is likely due to fungal spores or agglomerated bacteria, and it exhibited a pronounced diel cycle with maximum intensity during early/mid-morning. FBAP peaks around 1.5 μm, 5 μm, and 13 μm were also observed, but less pronounced and less frequent. These may be explained by single bacterial cells, larger fungal spores, and pollen grains, respectively. The observed number concentrations and characteristic sizes of FBAPs are consistent with microscopic, biological and chemical analyses of PBAPs in aerosol filter samples. To our knowledge, however, this

  7. Fluorescent whitening agents in detergents.

    PubMed

    Eckhardt, C; von Rütte, R

    1975-01-01

    Washing is a form of textile care which is characterized by its repetitive nature. Washing methods vary enormously in different parts of the world. The main types of detergents and fluorescent whitening agents (FWAs) are described. Washing slows down the deterioration in use of white goods, and yellowing is counteracted by FWAs. FWAs also enhance the freshness and brightness of most pale shades. Cost calculations show clearly the economic advantages of using FWAs in washing: the useful life of textiles can be prolonged considerably for a very small additional cost. PMID:1064549

  8. Fluorescence support in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Animas, J. G.; Arronte, M.; Flores, T.; Ponce, L.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents the development of an installation for proves for characterization by fluorescence of micrometer and nanometer particles supported on the trapping and manipulation by optical trapping technique (optical tweezers). The system features an laser operating at 480 nm, CCD camera for image acquisition, Thor Labs micrometric table X, Y, Z for the movement of the sample and the trap in the visual field. The design includes the use of intensity modulated optical trap, with the option of being used in pulsed, opening up possibilities for the use of resonant phenomena optomechanical type for particle capture.

  9. Particle Tracking of Fluorescent Microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Zofia; Mueller, Joachim; Berk, Serkan

    2010-10-01

    In this research, the diffusion coefficients of the fluorescent microspheres and the relation of those coefficients to particle radius were investigated. An additional focus was to see how well the measured radius of the microspheres compared to the radius as reported by the manufacturer and to measure the distribution of radii in a sample. This study further developed the critical process of ensuring particle movement within the sample volume and made preliminary sample measurements.The methods developed for tracking microspheres will later be used to determine the radii of virus like particles (VLPs), which are a non-infectious model system of the HIV virus. Results from our measurements will be reported.

  10. DNA nanotechnology and fluorescence applications.

    PubMed

    Schlichthaerle, Thomas; Strauss, Maximilian T; Schueder, Florian; Woehrstein, Johannes B; Jungmann, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Structural DNA nanotechnology allow researchers to use the unique molecular recognition properties of DNA strands to construct nanoscale objects with almost arbitrary complexity in two and three dimensions. Abstracted as molecular breadboards, DNA nanostructures enable nanometer-precise placement of guest molecules such as proteins, fluorophores, or nanoparticles. These assemblies can be used to study biological phenomena with unprecedented control over number, spacing, and molecular identity. Here, we give a general introduction to structural DNA nanotechnology and more specifically discuss applications of DNA nanostructures in the field of fluorescence and plasmonics. PMID:26773303

  11. Fluorescence Immunoassay for Cocaine Detection.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kenjjou, Noriko; Shigetoh, Nobuyuki; Ito, Yuji

    2016-04-01

    A fluorescence immunoassay (FIA) has been developed for the detection of cocaine using norcocaine labeled with merocyanine dye and a monoclonal antibody specific to cocaine. Using this FIA, the detection range for cocaine was between 20.0 and 1700 μg/L with a limit of detection of 20.0 μg/L. Other cocaine derivatives did not interfere significantly with the detection when using this immunoassay technique with cross-reactivity values of less than 20%. Thus this FIA could be considered a useful tool for the detection of cocaine. PMID:26977890

  12. Saccharide sensing molecules having enhanced fluorescent properties

    DOEpatents

    Satcher Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Darrow, Christopher B.; Cary, Douglas R.; Tran, Joe Anh

    2004-01-06

    The present invention provides formulae for fluorescent compounds that have a number of properties which make them uniquely suited for use in sensors of analytes such as saccharides. The advantageous fluorescent properties include favorable excitation wavelengths, emission wavelengths, fluorescence lifetimes, and photostability. Additional advantageous properties include enhanced aqueous solubility, as well as temperature and pH sensitivity. The compound comprises an aryl or a substituted phenyl botonic acid that acts as a substrate recognition component, a fluorescence switch component, and a fluorophore. Fluorescent compounds are described that are excited at wavelengths greater than 400 nm and emit at wavelengths greater than 450 nm, which is advantageous for optical transmission through skin. The fluorophore is typically selected from transition metal-ligand complexes and thiazine, oxazine, oxazone, or oxazine-one as well as anthracene compounds. The fluorescent compound can be immobilized in a glucose permeable biocompatible polymer matrix that is implantable below the skin.

  13. Chromosome characterization using single fluorescent dye

    DOEpatents

    Crissman, Harry A.; Hirons, Gregory T.

    1995-01-01

    Chromosomes are characterized by fluorescent emissions from a single fluorescent dye that is excited over two different wavelengths. A mixture containing chromosomes is stained with a single dye selected from the group consisting of TOTO and YOYO and the stained chromosomes are placed in a flow cytometer. The fluorescent dye is excited sequentially by a first light having a wavelength in the ultraviolet range to excite the TOTO or YOYO to fluoresce at a first intensity and by a second light having a wavelength effective to excite the TOTO or YOYO dye to fluoresce at a second intensity. Specific chromosomes may be identified and sorted by intensity relationships between the first and second fluorescence emissions.

  14. Antibody-based fluorescent and fluorescent ratiometric indicators for detection of phosphotyrosine.

    PubMed

    Huynh Nhat, Kim Phuong; Watanabe, Takayoshi; Yoshikoshi, Kensuke; Hohsaka, Takahiro

    2016-08-01

    Fluorescent indicators for protein phosphorylation are very important in not only fundamental biology but also biomedical applications. In this study, we developed novel fluorescent and fluorescent ratiometric indicators for detection of phosphotyrosine (pTyr) derivatives. A single-chain antibody variable fragment (scFv) against phosphotyrosine was fluorescent-labeled by incorporation of tetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA)-linked nonnatural amino acid at the N- or C-terminus. The TAMRA-labeled scFv showed fluorescence enhancement upon addition of pTyr-containing peptides based on antigen-dependent fluorescence quenching effect on TAMRA. The TAMRA-labeled scFv was further fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) to generate a double-labeled scFv for pTyr. In the absence of antigen, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurred from EGFP to TAMRA but TAMRA was quenched. The antigen-binding removed the quenching of TAMRA while FRET occurred without altering its efficiency. As a result of the FRET and antigen-dependent fluorescence quenching effect, the double-labeled scFv exhibited fluorescence ratio enhancement upon the antigen-binding. The fluorescent and fluorescent ratiometric indicators obtained in this study will become a novel tool for analysis of protein phosphorylation. Moreover, this strategy utilizes antibody derivatives, and therefore, can be easily applied to other antigen-antibody pairs to generate fluorescent ratiometric indicators for various target molecules. PMID:26896314

  15. Fluorescence goggle for intraoperative breast cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Bauer, Adam Q.; Akers, Walter; Sudlow, Gail; Liang, Kexian; Charanya, Tauseef; Mondal, Suman; Culver, Joseph P.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a fluorescence goggle device for intraoperative oncologic imaging. With our system design, the surgeon can directly visualize the fluorescence information from the eyepieces in real time without any additional monitor, which can improve one's coordination and surgical accuracy. In conjunction with targeting fluorescent dyes, the goggle device can successfully detect tumor margins and small nodules that are not obvious to naked eye. This can potentially decrease the incidence of incomplete resection.

  16. Combined fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheslavskiy, V. I.; Neubauer, A.; Bukowiecki, R.; Dinter, F.; Becker, W.

    2016-02-01

    We present a lifetime imaging technique that simultaneously records the fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime images in confocal laser scanning systems. It is based on modulating a high-frequency pulsed laser synchronously with the pixel clock of the scanner, and recording the fluorescence and phosphorescence signals by multidimensional time-correlated single photon counting board. We demonstrate our technique on the recording of the fluorescence/phosphorescence lifetime images of human embryonic kidney cells at different environmental conditions.

  17. Long Wavelength Fluorescence Ratiometric Zinc Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hui Hui; Matveeva, Evgenia; Stoddard, Andrea K.; Fierke, Carol A.; Thompson, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    A protein-based emission ratiometric fluorescence biosensor is described that exhibits sensitivity to free zinc ion solutions down to picomolar concentrations. Ratiometric measurements are widely used to assure accurate quantitation, and emission ratios are preferred for laser scanning microscopes such as confocal fluorescence microscopes. The relatively long emission wavelengths used are well suited to studies in tissues and other matrices which exhibit significant fluorescence background, and the apo-carbonic anhydrase moiety recognizes zinc ion with high and controllable specificity. PMID:23345045

  18. Thermochromism and fluorescence in dyed PEO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamath, Archana; S, Raghu; V, Mini; C, Sharanappa; H, Devendrappa

    2015-06-01

    The optical absorbance spectra of solution casted pure & methyl blue (MB) dyed polyethylene oxide (PEO) films were recorded in a wavelength range from 190-1100nm at different temperatures. The absorbance was found to increases with increasing temperature. Fluorescence micrographs confirmed the interaction between polymer and dye and also revealed decreased crystallinity of the sample. Fluorescence quantum yield has been calculated with the help of fluorescence spectra.

  19. Scanning fluorescent microthermal imaging apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Barton, Daniel L.; Tangyunyong, Paiboon

    1998-01-01

    A scanning fluorescent microthermal imaging (FMI) apparatus and method is disclosed, useful for integrated circuit (IC) failure analysis, that uses a scanned and focused beam from a laser to excite a thin fluorescent film disposed over the surface of the IC. By collecting fluorescent radiation from the film, and performing point-by-point data collection with a single-point photodetector, a thermal map of the IC is formed to measure any localized heating associated with defects in the IC.

  20. Scanning fluorescent microthermal imaging apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Barton, D.L.; Tangyunyong, P.

    1998-01-06

    A scanning fluorescent microthermal imaging (FMI) apparatus and method is disclosed, useful for integrated circuit (IC) failure analysis, that uses a scanned and focused beam from a laser to excite a thin fluorescent film disposed over the surface of the IC. By collecting fluorescent radiation from the film, and performing point-by-point data collection with a single-point photodetector, a thermal map of the IC is formed to measure any localized heating associated with defects in the IC. 1 fig.

  1. Thermochromism and fluorescence in dyed PEO films

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, Archana; S, Raghu; V, Mini; C, Sharanappa; H, Devendrappa

    2015-06-24

    The optical absorbance spectra of solution casted pure & methyl blue (MB) dyed polyethylene oxide (PEO) films were recorded in a wavelength range from 190-1100nm at different temperatures. The absorbance was found to increases with increasing temperature. Fluorescence micrographs confirmed the interaction between polymer and dye and also revealed decreased crystallinity of the sample. Fluorescence quantum yield has been calculated with the help of fluorescence spectra.

  2. Fluorescent Protein Biosensors Applied to Microphysiological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Senutovitch, Nina; Vernetti, Lawrence; Boltz, Robert; DeBiasio, Richard; Gough, Albert; Taylor, D. Lansing

    2015-01-01

    This mini-review discusses the evolution of fluorescence as a tool to study living cells and tissues in vitro and the present role of fluorescent protein biosensors (FPBs) in microphysiological systems (MPS). FPBs allow the measurement of temporal and spatial dynamics of targeted cellular events involved in normal and perturbed cellular assay systems and microphysiological systems in real-time. FPBs evolved from fluorescent analog cytochemistry (FAC) that permitted the measurement of the dynamics of purified proteins covalently labeled with environmentally insensitive fluorescent dyes and then incorporated into living cells, as well as a large list of diffusible fluorescent probes engineered to measure environmental changes in living cells. In parallel, a wide range of fluorescence microscopy methods were developed to measure the chemical and molecular activities of the labeled cells, including ratio imaging, fluorescence lifetime, total internal reflection, 3D imaging, including super-resolution, as well as high content screening (HCS). FPBs evolved from FAC by combining environmentally sensitive fluorescent dyes with proteins in order to monitor specific physiological events such as post-translational modifications, production of metabolites, changes in various ion concentrations and the dynamic interaction of proteins with defined macromolecules in time and space within cells. Original FPBs involved the engineering of fluorescent dyes to sense specific activities when covalently attached to particular domains of the targeted protein. The subsequent development of fluorescent proteins (FPs), such as the green fluorescent protein (GFP), dramatically accelerated the adoption of studying living cells, since the genetic “labeling” of proteins became a relatively simple method that permitted the analysis of temporal-spatial dynamics of a wide range of proteins. Investigators subsequently engineered the fluorescence properties of the FPs for environmental

  3. Molecularly Tunable Fluorescent Quantum Defects.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyejin; Furmanchuk, Al'ona; Kim, Mijin; Meany, Brendan; Guo, Yong; Schatz, George C; Wang, YuHuang

    2016-06-01

    We describe the chemical creation of molecularly tunable fluorescent quantum defects in semiconducting carbon nanotubes through covalently bonded surface functional groups that are themselves nonemitting. By variation of the surface functional groups, the same carbon nanotube crystal is chemically converted to create more than 30 distinct fluorescent nanostructures with unique near-infrared photoluminescence that is molecularly specific, systematically tunable, and significantly brighter than that of the parent semiconductor. This novel exciton-tailoring chemistry readily occurs in aqueous solution and creates functional defects on the sp(2) carbon lattice with highly predictable C-C bonding from virtually any iodine-containing hydrocarbon precursor. Our new ability to control nanostructure excitons through a single surface functional group opens up exciting possibilities for postsynthesis chemical engineering of carbon nanomaterials and suggests that the rational design and creation of a large variety of molecularly tunable quantum emitters-for applications ranging from in vivo bioimaging and chemical sensing to room-temperature single-photon sources-can now be anticipated. PMID:27159413

  4. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM)

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Michael W.; Loftus, Andrew F.; Dunn, Sarah E.; Joens, Matthew S.; Fitzpatrick, James A.J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of confocal microscopy techniques introduced the ability to optically section fluorescent samples in the axial dimension, perpendicular to the image plane. These approaches, via the placement of a pinhole in the conjugate image plane, provided superior resolution in the axial (z) dimension resulting in nearly isotropic optical sections. However, increased axial resolution, via pinhole optics, comes at the cost of both speed and excitation efficiency. Light Sheet Fluorescent Microscopy (LSFM), a century old idea (Siedentopf and Zsigmondy, 1902) made possible with modern developments in both excitation and detection optics, provides sub-cellular resolution and optical sectioning capabilities without compromising speed or excitation efficiency. Over the past decade, several variations of LSFM have been implemented each with its own benefits and deficiencies. Here we discuss LSFM fundamentals and outline the basic principles of several major light sheet based imaging modalities (SPIM, inverted SPIM, multi-view SPIM, Bessel beam SPIM, and stimulated emission depletion SPIM while considering their biological relevance in terms of intrusiveness, temporal resolution, and sample requirements. PMID:25559221

  5. Analysis of ultrasensitive fluorescence experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuxing; Whitehead, Bruce A.; Davis, Lloyd M.

    1999-05-01

    DNA sequencing and several other applications of single- molecule detection (SMD) currently under development utilize spectroscopic measurements for categorization of different types of fluorophores. In the collection and analysis of data from such experiments, the photon signals are sorted into different channels, depending upon their arrival time, emission wavelength, or other distinguishable properties. If the photon statistics are adequate, maximum-likelihood estimation (MLE) techniques can be successfully applied to determine which fluorophore is present. However, data analysis using neural network (NN) methods can offer several advantages. We consider data from a Monte Carlo simulation of SMD in a flow-cell, in which a time-resolved fluorescence decay profile is accumulated for each photon burst. A 2-layer NN, with sigmoid as the activation function, is trained on a set of simulated data using back-propagation and the (delta) - learning rule, and then used for identification of photon bursts in subsequent simulations. The NN is able to consider additional input parameters, such as the amplitudes of the weighted-sliding-sum digital-filter output of the photon bursts and the durations of the bursts. It can yield superior identification of photon bursts, particularly in cases where the fluorophores have disparate fluorescence quantum efficiencies, absorption cross-sections, or photodegradation efficiencies, or where the categorization includes other possibilities, such as background fluctuations, or the simultaneous presence of both fluorophores.

  6. TIR lenses for fluorescent lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkyn, William A.; Pelka, David G.

    1995-08-01

    The total internal reflection lens has been successfully applied to the efficient collimation of light from incandescent lamps and light-emitting diodes, and it is currently being marketed in several retail products. These circularly symmetric designs operated with relatively small sources. Two new forms of the TIR lens have been designed, and prototypes fabricated, for forming beams from fluorescent lamps. The toroidal fluorescent lamp is formed by circularly sweeping a faceted profile about its outer edge. A 5 inch diameter prototype lens has been diamond turned, and has 80% efficiency. When covering a 2.5 inch toroidal source of 0.25 inch minor diameter, it forms a smooth structureless beam of 40 degrees FWHM. The linear TIR lens has a faceted profile that is extended in cylindrical symmetry. In conjunction with a planar back mirror, a 6 inch diameter lens collects 85% of the light from a 5/8 inch lamp. The full width at half maximum is 30 degrees transversely and 120 degrees longitudinally, in a stripe pattern with twin peaks at +/- 47 degrees parallel to the lamp axis. These designs are applicable to other tubular light sources: discharge lamps, such as aircraft strobes and camera flashlamps, as well as neon lamps. They offer greater efficiency, narrower beamwidths, and much more compact profiles than conventional relfector designs.

  7. Characterization of marine macroalgae by fluorescence signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Topinka, J. A.; Bellows, W. Korjeff; Yentsch, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of distinguishing macroalgal classes by their fluorescence signatures was investigated using narrow-waveband light to excite groups of accessory pigments in brown, red, and green macroalgae and measuring fluorescence emission at 685 nm. Results obtained on 20 marine macroalgae field-collected samples showed that fluorescence excitation signatures were relatively uniform within phylogenetic classes but were substantially different for different classes. It is suggested that it may be possible to characterize the type and the abundance of subtidal macroalgae from low-flying aircraft using existing laser-induced fluorescence methodology.

  8. Safranine fluorescent staining of wood cell walls.

    PubMed

    Bond, J; Donaldson, L; Hill, S; Hitchcock, K

    2008-06-01

    Safranine is an azo dye commonly used for plant microscopy, especially as a stain for lignified tissues such as xylem. Safranine fluorescently labels the wood cell wall, producing green/yellow fluorescence in the secondary cell wall and red/orange fluorescence in the middle lamella (ML) region. We examined the fluorescence behavior of safranine under blue light excitation using a variety of wood- and fiber-based samples of known composition to interpret the observed color differentiation of different cell wall types. We also examined the basis for the differences in fluorescence emission using spectral confocal microscopy to examine lignin-rich and cellulose-rich cell walls including reaction wood and decayed wood compared to normal wood. Our results indicate that lignin-rich cell walls, such as the ML of tracheids, the secondary wall of compression wood tracheids, and wood decayed by brown rot, tend to fluoresce red or orange, while cellulose-rich cell walls such as resin canals, wood decayed by white rot, cotton fibers and the G-layer of tension wood fibers, tend to fluoresce green/yellow. This variation in fluorescence emission seems to be due to factors including an emission shift toward red wavelengths combined with dye quenching at shorter wavelengths in regions with high lignin content. Safranine fluorescence provides a useful way to differentiate lignin-rich and cellulose-rich cell walls without counterstaining as required for bright field microscopy. PMID:18802812

  9. Recent Progress in Fluorescent Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Yen Leng; Swamy, K. M. K.; Yoon, Juyoung

    2015-01-01

    Due to the simplicity and low detection limit, especially the bioimaging ability for cells, fluorescence probes serve as unique detection methods. With the aid of molecular recognition and specific organic reactions, research on fluorescent imaging probes has blossomed during the last decade. Especially, reaction based fluorescent probes have been proven to be highly selective for specific analytes. This review highlights our recent progress on fluorescent imaging probes for biologically important species, such as biothiols, reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, metal ions including Zn2+, Hg2+, Cu2+ and Au3+, and anions including cyanide and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). PMID:26402684

  10. Fluorescent Quantum Dots for Biological Labeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, Gene; Nadeau, Jay; Nealson, Kenneth; Storrie-Lomardi, Michael; Bhartia, Rohit

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots that can serve as "on/off" labels for bacteria and other living cells are undergoing development. The "on/off" characterization of these quantum dots refers to the fact that, when properly designed and manufactured, they do not fluoresce until and unless they come into contact with viable cells of biological species that one seeks to detect. In comparison with prior fluorescence-based means of detecting biological species, fluorescent quantum dots show promise for greater speed, less complexity, greater sensitivity, and greater selectivity for species of interest. There are numerous potential applications in medicine, environmental monitoring, and detection of bioterrorism.