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Sample records for fluorocarbon coatings resisting

  1. water-soluble fluorocarbon coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanelli, P.

    1979-01-01

    Water-soluble fluorocarbon proves durable nonpolluting coating for variety of substrates. Coatings can be used on metals, masonry, textiles, paper, and glass, and have superior hardness and flexibility, strong resistance to chemicals fire, and weather.

  2. Study of the adhesion of thin plasma fluorocarbon coatings resisting plastic deformation for stent applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, F.; Horny, P.; Hale, P.; Turgeon, S.; Tatoulian, M.; Mantovani, D.

    2008-02-01

    Metallic intravascular stents are medical devices (316L stainless steel) used to support the narrowed lumen of atherosclerotic stenosed arteries. Despite the success of bare metal stents, restenosis remains the main complication after 3-6 months of implantation. To reduce the restenosis rate of bare metal stents, stent coating is an interesting alternative. Firstly, it allows the modification of the surface properties, which is in contact with the biological environment. Secondly, the coating could eventually act as a carrier for drug immobilization and release. Moreover, the in vivo stent implantation requires in situ stent expansion. This mandatory step generates local plastic deformation of up to 25% and may cause coating failures such as cracking and delamination. Fluorocarbon films were selected in this study as a potential stent coating, mainly due to their chemical inertness, high hydrophobicity, protein retention capabilities and thromboresistance properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the adhesion properties of fluorocarbon films of three different thicknesses deposited by plasma polymerization in C2F6/H2 on 316L stainless steel substrates. A previously developed small punch test was used to deform the coated samples. According to atomic force microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterizations, among the coatings with different thicknesses studied, only those with a thickness of 36 nm exhibited the required cohesion and interfacial adhesion to resist the stent expansion without cracking or delaminating. Otherwise, cracks were detected in the coatings having thicknesses equal or superior to 100 nm, indicating a lack of cohesion.

  3. Improvement of adhesion strength and scratch resistance of fluorocarbon thin films by cryogenic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaojun; Wang, Jun; Shen, Jinpeng; Li, Rui; Yang, Guangcheng; Huang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Fluorocarbon thin films have been widely applied as protective coatings due to unique physical and chemical properties, but the scratch resistance and adhesion strength between the films and substrates are rather poor. Coating technologies for stronger scratch resistance and adhesion strength are definitely needed and have great significance in coatings applications of fluorocarbon thin films. In this work, the scratch resistance and adhesion strength between silicon substrates and fluorocarbon thin films deposited by radio frequency (R.F.) magnetron sputtering were improved via a remarkably simple, flexible and nondestructive cryogenic treatment method. The effect of the cryogenic treatment on the microstructure, hardness, adhesion strength and scratch resistance of fluorocarbon thin films were investigated. XPS results indicated that the content of fluorine decreased slightly and the amount of cross-linked units increased after cryogenic treatment. Furthermore, the hardness of fluorocarbon thin films slightly improved. Nano-scratch test revealed that fluorocarbon thin films after this treatment had excellent scratch resistance and good adhesion strength.

  4. Tunable hydrophilicity on a hydrophobic fluorocarbon polymer coating on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kolari, K.; Hokkanen, A.

    2006-07-15

    An efficient, economic, reliable, and repeatable patterning procedure of hydrophobic surfaces was developed. A fluorocarbon polymer derived from the C{sub 4}F{sub 8} gas in an inductively coupled plasma etcher was used as the hydrophobic coating. For a subsequent patterning of hydrophilic apertures on the polymer, a short O{sub 2} plasma exposure through a silicon shadow mask was utilized. The overall hydrophilicity of the patterned surface can be tuned by the duration of the O{sub 2} plasma exposure, and also by the density and the size of the hydrophilic apertures. The laborious photolithography and tricky lift-off procedures are avoided. Optimization of the whole patterning process is explained thoroughly and supported with experimental data. The hydrophilic adhesion of the patterned polymer was evaluated with aqueous droplets, which were studied on matrices of the hydrophilic apertures of different sizes. The deposition parameters of the fluorocarbon polymer, the size of the droplet required to enable rolling on the patterned surface, and the duration of the O{sub 2} plasma exposure were considered as the main parameters. To determine the achievable resolution of the patterning procedure, the subsurface etching beneath the shadow mask was evaluated. The results show that a resolution of less than 10 {mu}m can be achieved. The simple hydrophilic patterning procedure described here can be used for the production of on-plane microfluidics, where a controlled adhesion or decohesion of 8-50 {mu}l droplets on the surface with a variable hydrophilicity from one location to another can be achieved.

  5. Improving adhesion between a segmented poly(ether-urethane) and a fluorocarbon copolymer coating

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.M.; Walkup, C.M.; Chiu, I.L.

    1984-01-01

    A moisture barrier coating of Kel-F 800, developed at LLNL to reduce uranium corrosion, had to be bonded to a porous ceramic. The adhesive could not bond too strongly or react with the coating and jeopardize its barrier properties. Methods of improving adhesion to the Kel-F coating were studied. Silane and titanate coupling agents and a fluorocarbon surfactant were somewhat effective at increasing adhesion depending on the application procedure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to demonstrate the presence of fluorosurfactant at the fracture interface. Postcuring at elevated temperatures (85/sup 0/C) also significantly improved adhesive strength to the fluorocarbon coating. This was attributed to thermal acceleration to interfacial diffusion of the urethane adhesive into the fluoropolymer surface.

  6. Composite fluorocarbon membranes by surface-initiated polymerization from nanoporous gold-coated alumina.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Carlos A; Zulkifli, Ahmad R; Faulkner, Christopher J; Trzeciak, Alex; Jennings, G Kane

    2012-02-01

    This manuscript describes the versatile fabrication and characterization of a novel composite membrane that consists of a porous alumina support, a 100 nm thick nanoporous gold coating, and a selective poly(5-(perfluorohexyl)norbornene) (pNBF6) polymer that can be grown exclusively from the nanoporous gold or throughout the membrane. Integration of the three materials is achieved by means of silane and thiol chemistry, and the use of surface-initiated ring-opening metathesis polymerization (SI-ROMP) to grow the pNBF6. The use of SI-ROMP allows tailoring of the extent of polymerization of pNBF6 throughout the structure by varying polymerization time. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images indicate that the thin polymer films cover the structure entirely. Cross-sectional SEM images of the membrane not only corroborate growth of the pNBF6 polymer within both the porous alumina and the nanoporous gold coating but also show the growth of a pNBF6 layer between these porous substrates that lifts the nanoporous gold coating away from the alumina. Advancing contact angle (θ(A)) measurements show that the surfaces of these composite membranes exhibit both hydrophobic (θ(A) = 121-129)° and oleophobic (θ(A) = 69-74)° behavior due to the fluorocarbon side chains of the pNBF6 polymer that dominate the surface. Results from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) confirm that the membranes provide effective barriers to aqueous ions, as evidenced by a resistive impedance on the order of 1 × 10(7) Ω cm(2). Sulfonation of the polymer backbone substantially enhances ion transport through the composite membrane, as indicated by a 40-60 fold reduction in resistive impedance. Ion transport and selectivity of the membrane change by regulating the polymerization time. The fluorinated nature of the sulfonated polymer renders the membrane selective toward molecules with similar chemical characteristics. PMID:22195729

  7. Comparative study of plasma-deposited fluorocarbon coatings on different substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farsari, E.; Kostopoulou, M.; Amanatides, E.; Mataras, D.; Rapakoulias, D. E.

    2011-05-01

    The deposition of hydrophobic fluorocarbon coatings from C2F6 and C2F6-H2 rf discharges on different substrates was examined. Polyester textile, glass and two different ceramic compounds were used as substrates. The effect of the total gas pressure, the rf power dissipation and the deposition time on the hydrophobic character of the samples was investigated. Films deposited on polyester textiles at low pressure (0.03 mbar) and power consumption (16 mW cm-2) using pure C2F6 presented the highest water contact angles (~150°). On the other hand, the addition of hydrogen was necessary in order to deposit stable hydrophobic coatings on glass and ceramic substrates. Coatings deposited on glass at intermediate deposition rates (~100 Å min-1) and pressures presented the highest angles (~105°). Concerning the heavy clay ceramics, samples treated in low-pressure (0.05 mbar) and low-power (16 mW cm-2) discharges showed the highest contact angles. The deposition time was found to play an important role in the hydrophobicity and long-term behaviour of porous and rough substrates.

  8. Hydrophobicity attainment and wear resistance enhancement on glass substrates by atmospheric plasma-polymerization of mixtures of an aminosilane and a fluorocarbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Múgica-Vidal, Rodolfo; Alba-Elías, Fernando; Sainz-García, Elisa; Pantoja-Ruiz, Mariola

    2015-08-01

    Mixtures of different proportions of two liquid precursors were subjected to plasma-polymerization by a non-thermal atmospheric jet plasma system in a search for a coating that achieves a hydrophobic character on a glass substrate and enhances its wear resistance. 1-Perfluorohexene (PFH) was chosen as a low-surface-energy precursor to promote a hydrophobic character. Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) was chosen for its contribution to the improvement of wear resistance by the formation of siloxane bonds. The objective of this work was to determine which of the precursors' mixtures that were tested provides the coating with the most balanced enhancement of both hydrophobicity and wear resistance, given that coatings deposited with fluorocarbon-based precursors such as PFH are usually low in resistance to wear and coatings deposited with APTES are generally hydrophilic. The coatings obtained were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), static Water Contact Angle (WCA) measurements, tribological ball-on-disc tests and contact profilometry. A relationship between the achievement of a hydrophobic character and the modifications to roughness and surface morphology and the incorporation of fluorocarbon groups in the surface chemistry was observed. Also, it was seen that the wear resistance was influenced by the SiOSi content of the coatings. In turn, the SiOSi content appears to be directly related to the percentage of APTES used in the mixture of precursors. The best conjunction of hydrophobicity and wear resistance in this work was found in the sample that was coated using a mixture of APTES and PFH in proportions of 75 and 25%, respectively. Its WCA (100.2 ± 7.5°) was the highest of all samples that were measured and more than three times that of the uncoated glass (31 ± 0.7°). This sample underwent a change from a hydrophilic to a

  9. Light-responsive nanoparticles with wettability changing from hydrophobicity to hydrophilicity and their application towards highly hydrophilic fluorocarbon coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Baozhong; Zhou, Shuxue

    2015-12-01

    Novel functional silica nanoparticles (SiO2-NBS-F) with irreversible light-responsive wettability were prepared by grafting of a light-responsive silane coupling agent (NBS) and further bonding with hydrophobic segments via a click reaction. The NBS was synthesized using an o-nitrobenzyl alcohol derivative of the photolabile protecting group. The SiO2-NBS-F nanoparticles exhibited considerable change of wettability from near-superhydrophobicity to near-superhydrophilicity after UV irradiation. The changing mechanism of wettability was confirmed by UV-Vis absorption spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectra. The SiO2-NBS-F nanoparticles were incorporated into fluorocarbon FEVE coatings by simple mixing. The nanoparticles occurred at the surface of the dried coatings even though their content was as low as 5 wt%, being due to their low surface free energy. The wettability of the SiO2-NBS-F filled FEVE coatings could transform from hydrophobicity (WCA 106.4°) to hydrophilicity (WCA 33.3°) after UV irradiation. It demonstrates that SiO2-NBS-F nanoparticles are useful to acquire highly hydrophilic surface for organic coatings.

  10. Corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.

    1997-08-19

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  11. Corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Wrobleski, Debra A.; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Thompson, Karen G.; Bryan, Coleman J.

    1997-01-01

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  12. Coatings for improved corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1992-05-01

    Several coating approaches are being developed to resist attack in coal-fired environments and thereby minimize corrosion of underlying substrate alloys and extend the time for onset of breakaway corrosion. In general, coating systems can be classified as either diffusion or overlay type, which are distinguished principally by the method of deposition and the structure of the resultant coating-substrate bond. The coating techniques examined are pack cementation, electrospark deposition, physical and chemical vapor deposition, plasma spray, and ion implantation. In addition, ceramic coatings are used in some applications.

  13. The performance of aminoalkyl/fluorocarbon/hydrocarbon-modified xerogel coatings against the marine alga Ectocarpus crouaniorum: relative roles of surface energy and charge.

    PubMed

    Evariste, Emmanuelle; Gatley, Caitlyn M; Detty, Michael R; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A

    2013-01-01

    The effect of a series of xerogel coatings modified with aminoalkyl/fluorocarbon/hydrocarbon groups on the adhesion of a new test species, the filamentous brown alga Ectocarpus crouaniorum, has been explored, and compared with the green alga Ulva linza. The results showed that E. crouaniorum adhered weakly to the less polar, low wettability coatings in the series, but stronger adhesion was shown on polar, higher surface energy coatings containing aminoalkyl groups. The results from a separate series of coatings tuned to have similar surface energies and polarities after immersion in artificial seawater (ASW), but widely different surface charges, demonstrated that surface charge was more important than surface energy and polarity in determining the adhesion strength of both E. crouaniorum and U. linza on xerogel coatings. No correlation was found between adhesion and contact angle hysteresis. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of samples after immersion in ASW confirmed the presence of charged ammonium groups on the surface of the aminoalkylated coatings. PMID:23330687

  14. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C.; Lee, Chuck K.; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  15. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2013-11-12

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  16. Corrosion resistant thermal barrier coating

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, S.R.; Miller, R.A.; Hodge, P.E.

    1981-03-01

    A thermal barrier coating system for protecting metal surfaces at high temperature in normally corrosive environments is described. The thermal barrier coating system includes a metal alloy bond coating, the alloy containing nickel, cobalt, iron, or a combination of these metals. The system further includes a corrosion resistant thermal barrier oxide coating containing at least one alkaline earth silicate. The preferred oxides are calcium silicate, barium silicate, magnesium silicate, or combinations of these silicates. Official Gazette of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

  17. PRODUCTION OF FLUOROCARBONS

    DOEpatents

    Sarsfield, N.F.

    1949-06-21

    This patent pertains to a process for recovering fluorocarbons from a liquid mixture of hydrocarbons with partially and completely fluorinated products thereof. It consists of contacting the mxture in the cold with a liquid which is a solvent for the hydrocarbons and which is a nonsolvent for the fluorocarbons, extracting the hydrocarbons, separating the fluorocarbon-containing layer from the solvent-containing layer, and submitting the fluorocarbon layer to fractlonal distillation, to isolate the desired fluorocarbon fraction. Suitable solvents wnich may be used in the process include the lower aliphatic alcohols, and the lower aliphatic ketones.

  18. Development of a special purpose spacecraft interior coating. Phase 2. [fire resistant fluoropolymer coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartoszek, E. J.; Christofas, A.; Nannelli, P.

    1977-01-01

    Numerous acrylic and epoxy modifiers for the fluorocarbon latex resin base were investigated. Optimum coatings were developed by modifying the fluorocarbon latex with an epoxy acrylic resin system. In addition, a number of other formulations, containing hard acrylics as modifiers, displayed attractive properties and potential for further improvements. The preferred formulations dried to touch in about one hour and were fully dried in about twenty four hours under normal room temperature and humidity conditions. In addition to physical and mechanical properties either comparable or superior to those of commercial solvent base polyurethane or polyester coatings, the preferred compositions meet the flammability and offgassing requirements specified by NASA.

  19. Corrosion-resistant coating development

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Kupp, D.M.; Martin, R.L.

    1997-12-01

    SiC-based heat exchangers have been identified as the prime candidate material for use as heat exchangers in advanced combined cycle power plants. Unfortunately, hot corrosion of the SiC-based materials created by alkali metal salts present in the combustion gases dictates the need for corrosion-resistant coatings. The well-documented corrosion resistance of CS-50 combined with its low (and tailorable) coefficient of thermal expansion and low modulus makes CS-50 an ideal candidate for this application. Coatings produced by gelcasting and traditional particulate processing have been evaluated.

  20. Corrosion resistant coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanna, S. K.; Thakoor, A. P.; Williams, R. M. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A method of coating a substrate with an amorphous metal is described. A solid piece of the metal is bombarded with ions of an inert gas in the presence of a magnetic field to provide a vapor of the metal which is deposited on the substrate at a sufficiently low gas pressure so that there is formed on the substrate a thin, uniformly thick, essentially pinhole-free film of the metal.

  1. A robust superhydrophobic PVDF composite coating with wear/corrosion-resistance properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huaiyuan; Liu, Zhanjian; Wang, Enqun; Yuan, Ruixia; Gao, Dong; Zhang, Xiguang; Zhu, Yanji

    2015-03-01

    A robust wear/corrosion-resistant superhydrophobic polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)/fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP)/carbon nanofibers (CNFs) composite coating with a water contact angle (WCA) of 164 ± 1.5° and a slide angle of 5 ± 0.2° has been fabricated through the combination of chemical etching and spraying technique. The WCA of the coating still maintains 141 ± 1.2° after 10,000 times rubbing due to the designed internal nano/micro-structure and the slide angle increases from 5 ± 0.2° to 20 ± 0.5°. The prepared coating also demonstrates excellent corrosion-resistance property under strongly acidic or alkaline conditions for 15 days. The wear-resistance of the superhydrophobic coating is approximately 5 times higher than the pure PVDF coating and commercial fluorocarbon coating. These excellent mechanical properties are attributed to the new groups of Cdbnd C and Csbnd C by dehydrofluorination of PVDF and the new β-phase of PVDF by recrystallization of the α-phase. Furthermore, the enhanced adhesive ability of the coating corresponds with Grade 1 according to GB/T9286, mainly because that the interaction force among PVDF macromolecules can be intensified by chemical cross-linking and the hydroxyl groups formed on the surface of the aluminum plate by etching. It is believed that this robust multifunctional superhydrophobic coating may have the potential values in large-scale application.

  2. Corrosion resistant coatings from conducting polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.

    1993-12-01

    Cr-based corrosion resistant undercoatings will have to be replaced because of environmental and health concerns. A coating system of a conducting polyaniline primer layer topcoated with epoxy or polyurethane, is being evaluated for corrosion resistance on mild steel in 0.1 M HCl or in a marine setting. Results of both laboratory and Beach Site testing indicate that this coating is very effective; even when the coatings are scratched to expose bare metal, the coated samples show very little signs of corrosion in the exposed area. 3 figs, 6 refs.

  3. Thermal sprayed zirconium coatings for corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Bamola, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    Vacuum Plasma Spraying (VPS) is conducted in inert reduced pressures. This results in higher particle velocities than in atmospheric plasma spraying. Reverse arc sputter cleaning and pre-heating of the workpiece lead to elevated substrate temperatures during deposition, allowing sintering of the coating and, thus, enhanced densities and bond strengths. Inert Environment Electric Arc Spraying (IEAS) is performed in inert gas chambers, utilizing wire as the feedstock. This leads to lower gas content in the coating, since the initial gas content in wire is lower than that of the powder feedstock used in VPS. Controlled atmosphere sprayed zirconium coatings had inferior mechanical and corrosion properties when compared with bulk zirconium. The VPS coatings displayed higher bond strengths and better cavitation erosion resistance than did the IEAS coatings. The IEAS coatings had lower gas content and showed better electrochemical and corrosion behavior. The lower gas content for IEAS was due to a lower initial gas level in the wire feedstock used in this process. Also, scanning electron microscopy revealed that larger particles result in the IEAS process. Thus, a smaller surface-area-to-volume ratio is available for gas-metal reactions to occur. Improvements in mechanical and corrosion properties for the IEAS coatings were due to elevated substrate temperatures during deposition. Compressive surface stresses induced by post-spray shot-peening enhanced corrosion and cavitation resistance of IEAS coatings. Coating porosity caused failure during immersion testing. Therefore, it was concluded that controlled environment thermal spraying of zirconium is not suitable for forming corrosion resistant coatings on steel. ZrN coatings were formed by electric arc spraying using a nitrogen shroud and post-spray nitriding. Two phases; ZrN and zirconium solid solution, exist in the as-sprayed coating. Nitriding increases the proportion of ZrN.

  4. Abrasion-resistant antireflective coating for polycarbonate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    Following plasma-polymerization technique, treatment in oxygen glow discharge further enhances abrasion resistance and transmission. Improvement in abrasion resistance was shown by measuring percentage of haze resulting from abrasion. Coating samples were analyzed for abrasion using standard fresh rubber eraser. Other tests included spectra measurements and elemental analysis with spectrometers and spectrophotometers.

  5. Conformal chemically resistant coatings for microflow devices

    DOEpatents

    Folta, James A.; Zdeblick, Mark

    2003-05-13

    A process for coating the inside surfaces of silicon microflow devices, such as electrophoresis microchannels, with a low-stress, conformal (uniform) silicon nitride film which has the ability to uniformly coat deeply-recessed cavities with, for example, aspect ratios of up to 40:1 or higher. The silicon nitride coating allows extended exposure to caustic solutions. The coating enables a microflow device fabricated in silicon to be resistant to all classes of chemicals: acids, bases, and solvents. The process involves low-pressure (vacuum) chemical vapor deposition. The ultra-low-stress silicon nitride deposition process allows 1-2 .mu.m thick films without cracks, and so enables extended chemical protection of a silicon microflow device against caustics for up to 1 year. Tests have demonstrated the resistance of the films to caustic solutions at both ambient and elevated temperatures to 65.degree. C.

  6. Corrosion-resistant ceramic thermal barrier coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, P. E.; Levine, S. R.; Miller, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    Two-layer thermal barrier coating, consisting of metal-CrA1Y bond coating and calcium silicate ceramic outer layer, greatly improves resistance of turbine parts to hot corrosion from fuel and air impurities. Both layers can be plasma sprayed, and ceramic layer may be polished to reduce frictional losses. Ceramic provides thermal barrier, so parts operate cooler metal temperatures, coolant flow can be reduced, or gas temperatures increased. Lower grade fuels also can be used.

  7. Conducting polymers as corrosion resistant coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.

    1994-09-01

    Although the majority of top coatings used for corrosion protection are electrically insulating, previous workers have proposed using an electrically active barrier for corrosion control. The most effective corrosion resistant undercoatings in use today are based on chromium compounds. Coatings based on other materials will need to replace these coatings by the turn of the century because of environmental and health concerns. For this reason the authors have begun an investigation of the use of conducting polymers as corrosion resistant coatings as an alternative to metal-based coatings. Conducting polymers have long been considered to be unsuitable for commercial processing, hindering their use for practical applications. Research in the field of electrically conducting polymers has recently produced a number of polymers such as polyaniline and its derivatives which are readily soluble in common organic solvents. The authors coating system, consisting of a conducting polyaniline primer layer, topcoated with epoxy or polyurethane, has been evaluated for corrosion resistance on mild steel substrates. In this paper, the authors report the results of laboratory testing under acidic and saline conditions and the results of testing in the severe launch environment at the Beach Testing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. The launch environment consists of exposure to corrosive HCl exhaust fumes and the salt spray from the Atlantic Ocean.

  8. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Steel Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Branagan, Daniel James; Swank, William David; Haggard, Delon C; Fincke, James Russell; Sordelet, D.

    2001-10-01

    In this article, amorphous and nanocomposite thermally deposited steel coatings have been formed by using both plasma and high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying techniques. This was accomplished by developing a specialized iron-based composition with a low critical cooling rate (?104 K/s) for metallic glass formation, processing the alloy by inert gas atomization to form micron-sized amorphous spherical powders, and then spraying the classified powder to form coatings. A primarily amorphous structure was formed in the as-sprayed coatings, independent of coating thickness. After a heat treatment above the crystallization temperature (568°C), the structure of the coatings self-assembled (i.e., devitrified) into a multiphase nanocomposite microstructure with 75 to 125 nm grains containing a distribution of 20 nm second-phase grain-boundary precipitates. Vickers microhardness testing revealed that the amorphous coatings were very hard (10.2 to 10.7 GPa), with further increases in hardness after devitrification (11.4 to 12.8 GPa). The wear characteristics of the amorphous and nanocomposite coatings were determined using both two-body pin-on-disk and three-body rubber wheel wet-slurry sand tests. The results indicate that the amorphous and nanocomposite steel coatings are candidates for a wide variety of wear-resistant applications.

  9. Oxidation corrosion resistant superalloys and coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Melvin R. (Inventor); Rairden, III, John R. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An article of manufacture having improved high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance comprising: (a) a superalloy substrate containing a carbide reinforcing phase, and (b) a coating consisting of chromium, aluminum, carbon, at least one element selected from iron, cobalt or nickel, and optionally an element selected from yttrium or the rare earth elements.

  10. Oxidation corrosion resistant superalloys and coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Melvin R. (Inventor); Rairden, III, John R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An article of manufacture having improved high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance comprising: (a) a superalloy substrate containing a carbide reinforcing phase, and (b) a coating consisting of chromium, aluminum, carbon, at least one element selected from iron, cobalt or nickel, and optionally an element selected from yttrium or the rare earth elements.

  11. Versatile Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A radome at Logan Airport and a large parabolic antenna at the Wang Building in Massachusetts are protected from weather, corrosion and ultraviolet radiation by a coating, specially designed for antennas and radomes, known as CRC Weathertite 6000. The CRC 6000 line that emerged from Boyd Coatings Research Co., Inc. is a solid dispersion of fluorocarbon polymer and polyurethane that yields a tough, durable film with superior ultraviolet resistance and the ability to repel water and ice over a long term. Additionally, it provides resistance to corrosion, abrasion, chemical attacks and impacts. Material can be used on a variety of substrates, such as fiberglass, wood, plastic and concrete in addition to steel and aluminum. In addition Boyd Coatings sees CRC 6000 applicability as an anti-icing system coated on the leading edge of aircraft wings.

  12. Erosion-resistance of plasma sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Z.; Zhang, X.; Song, J.

    1999-12-01

    Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}/NiCr, ZrO{sub 2}/NiCr, WTiC{sub 2}/NiCr, and X40 were plasma sprayed on the substrate 1Cr18NI9Ti in order to solve the erosion wear at high temperature encountered in the oil-refining industry. A series of properties of the coatings, including their microstructure, hardness, and erosion-behavior, have been tested. The test results show that the properties of the coatings have a significant effect on their erosion-resistant performance. Good erosion-resistant materials need to be hard and tough. Both Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}/NiCr and X40 have good erosion resistance at elevated temperature.

  13. Discoloration resistant, flexible, radiation curable coating compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Cassatta, J.C.; Garrett, D.L. Jr.; Van Oene, H.

    1984-10-16

    A low dosage radiation polymerizable protective and decorative coating composition or paint, coated articles bearing such a protective coating and processess for preparing such articles. The radiation polymerizable coating composition comprises an organic resin/monomer mixture of: (A) between about 97 and about 3 weight percent alphabeta olefinically unsaturated organic resin containing between about 0.5 and about 5 vinyl unsaturation units per 1000 molecular weight of said resin, and (B) between about 3 and about 97 weight percent vinyl monomers polymerizable with said resin upon exposure to radiation, characterized in that said vinyl monomers include N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone in an amount of from about 3 and up to about 10 weight percent based on the total weight of (A) and (B). The flexible coating exhibits excellent physical qualtities and good adhesion to a variety of substrates being particularly suitable for use on vinyl chloride fabric, wherein it is discoloration resistant after heat aging. Preferred articles bearing such a coating, which may comprise large amounts of pigment, are preferably cured by exposure to electron beam radiation.

  14. Fabrication and testing of corrosion resistant coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Riester, L.

    1991-01-01

    The susceptibility of SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub n} to sodium corrosion mandates that corrosion resistant coatings be developed to protect silicon-based turbine engine components. Materials with good corrosion resistance and thermal expansions that nearly match SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} have been identified. Corrosion testing of hot-pressed pellets of these compounds has identified the most promising materials. Development of chemical vapor deposition system to apply these materials has been initiated. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh; Sabol, Stephen M.

    2001-01-01

    A device (10) having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10) and is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16). For a YSZ ceramic layer (16) the sintering resistant layer (22) may preferably be aluminum oxide or yttrium aluminum oxide, deposited as a continuous layer or as nodules.

  16. Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh; Seth, Brij B.

    2004-06-29

    A device (10) is made, having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10), is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16) and is applied by a process that is not an electron beam physical vapor deposition process.

  17. Spraylon fluorocarbon encapsulation for silicon solar cell arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A development program was performed for evaluating, modifying, and optimizing the Lockheed formulated liquid transparent filmforming Spraylon fluorocarbon protective coating for silicon solar cells and modules. The program objectives were designed to meet the requirements of the low-cost automated solar cell array fabrication process. As part of the study, a computer program was used to establish the limits of the safe working stress in the coated silicon solar cell array system under severe thermal shock.

  18. Antisoiling Coatings for Solar-Energy Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.; Willis, P.

    1986-01-01

    Fluorocarbons resist formation of adherent deposits. Promising coating materials reduce soiling of solar photovoltaic modules and possibly solar thermal collectors. Contaminating layers of various degrees of adherence form on surfaces of devices, partially blocking incident solar energy, reducing output power. Loose soil deposits during dry periods but washed off by rain. New coatings help prevent formation of more-adherent, chemically and physically bonded layers rain alone cannot wash away.

  19. Poly(aniline) in corrosion resistant coatings

    SciTech Connect

    McAndrew, T.P.; Miller, S.A.; Gilicinski, A.G.; Robeson, L.M.

    1996-10-01

    During the past two decades, one of the most active fields of solid-state science has been electrically conductive polymers. These are polymers which are insulators as prepared, but which can be converted to polymers having many or all the properties of a metal, by virtue of appropriate chemical/electrochemical oxidation or reduction. Typically, applications examined for electrically conductive polymers have been in areas such as rechargeable batteries and charge dissipative coatings. Recently it has been reported that poly(aniline), in its electrically conductive, protonated form, shows excellent performance as a coating for preventing the corrosion of carbon steel. The present research has shown that in fact, the non-conductive, unprotonated form of poly(aniline) shows even better performance in corrosion prevention than the conductive form. Moreover, it has been shown that poly(aniline) can be blended with other polymers to improve their corrosion resistance performance (e.g., polyimides), or used as a hardener for epoxides or diisocyanates, to give very good corrosion resistant coatings. Poly(aniline) performance is explained in terms of its ability to form dense, adherent films, and create a basic surface on carbon steel surfaces.

  20. Evaluation of Erosion Resistance of Advanced Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Miller, Robert A.; Cuy, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    The erosion resistant turbine thermal barrier coating system is critical to aircraft engine performance and durability. By demonstrating advanced turbine material testing capabilities, we will be able to facilitate the critical turbine coating and subcomponent development and help establish advanced erosion-resistant turbine airfoil thermal barrier coatings design tools. The objective of this work is to determine erosion resistance of advanced thermal barrier coating systems under simulated engine erosion and/or thermal gradient environments, validating advanced turbine airfoil thermal barrier coating systems based on nano-tetragonal phase toughening design approaches.

  1. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Racek, O

    2008-03-26

    Glass forming materials (critical cooling rate <10{sup 4}K.s{sup -1}) are promising for their high corrosion and wear resistance. During rapid cooling, the materials form an amorphous structure that transforms to nanocrystalline during a process of devitrification. High hardness (HV 1690) can be achieved through a controlled crystallization. Thermal spray process has been used to apply coatings, which preserves the amorphous/nanocomposite structure due to a high cooling rate of the feedstock particles during the impact on a substrate. Wear properties have been studied with respect to process conditions and feedstock material properties. Application specific properties such as sliding wear resistance have been correlated with laboratory tests based on instrumented indentation and scratch tests.

  2. A conformal oxidation-resistant, plasma-polymerized coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Morton A.; Wydeven, Theodore; Lerner, Narcinda R.

    1991-01-01

    A comparative study was made of the surface recession (etching) of thin films of plasma polymerized tetrafluoro ethylene (PPTFE), polytetrafluoro ethylene (PTFE), and ion-beam sputter deposited polytetrafluoro ethylene (SPTFE) exposed to ground-state atomic oxygen downstream from a nonequilibrium radio-frequency O2 plasma. At 22 C, the etch rates for PTFE, SPTFE, and PPTFE were in the ratio of 8.7:1.8:1.0. A thin, conformal coating of PPTFE (etch rate of 0.3 nm/h at 22 C) was found to protect an underlying cast film of a reactive polymer, cis-1,4 polybutadiene, against ground-state atomic oxygen attack for the time required to fully etch away the PPTFE coating. From ESCA analysis, PTFE exhibited only minor surface oxidation (uptake of 0.5 atom percent O) upon etching, its F/C ratio decreasing slightly from 2.00 to 1.97; PPTFE exhibited considerable surface oxidation (uptake of 5.9 atom percent O) intermediate between those of PTFE and PPTFE, with a decrease in F/C ratio from 1.73 to 1.67. A plasma-polymerized fluorocarbon coating such as PPTFE might be useful for space applications to protect polymers that are vulnerable to oxidation or degradation by oxygen atoms.

  3. Spraylon fluorocarbon encapsulation for silicon solar cell arrays, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naes, L. G.

    1978-01-01

    The liquid transparent film-forming, fluorocarbon, Spraylon, a protective coating for terrestrial solar cell modules was evaluated. Two modules were completed and field tested. Problems developed early in the field testing which led to the shortened test period, specifically, lifting of the antireflection coating, followed in some areas by complete film delamination. It is believed that although these problems were certainly induced by the presence of the SPRAYLON film, they were not failures of the material per se. Instead, assembly procedures, module design, and cell coating quality should be evaluated to determine cause of failure.

  4. Oxidation-resistant silicide coating applied to columbium alloy screen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgerson, R. T.

    1971-01-01

    Coated screens withstand temperature cycling in special transpiration-cooling systems and provide porous surface that is effective at temperatures well above those limiting superalloy screen efficiency. Thickness of coating depends on time, temperature and activator concentration. Coatings are uniform and resistant to thermal cycling.

  5. Oxidation-Resistant Coating For Bipolar Lead/Acid Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolstad, James J.

    1993-01-01

    Cathode side of bipolar substrate coated with nonoxidizable conductive layer. Coating prepared as water slurry of aqueous dispersion of polyethylene copolymer plus such conductive fillers as tin oxide, titanium, tantalum, or tungsten oxide. Applied easily to substrate of polyethylene carbon plastic. As slurry dries, conductive, oxidation-resistant coating forms on positive side of substrate.

  6. Porous alumina based ordered nanocomposite coating for wear resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Arti; Muthukumar, M.; Bobji, M. S.

    2016-08-01

    Uniformly dispersed nanocomposite coating of aligned metallic nanowires in a matrix of amorphous alumina is fabricated by pulsed electrodeposition of copper into the pores of porous anodic alumina. Uniform deposition is obtained by controlling the geometry of the dendritic structure at the bottom of pores through stepwise voltage reduction followed by mild etching. The tribological behaviour of this nanocomposite coating is evaluated using a ball on flat reciprocating tribometer under the dry contact conditions. The nanocomposite coating has higher wear resistance compared to corresponding porous alumina coating. Wear resistant nanocomposite coating has wide applications especially in protecting the internal surfaces of aluminium internal combustion engines.

  7. Demonstrating a Lack of Reactivity Using a Teflon-Coated Pan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Thomas G.

    1995-01-01

    Illustrates the chemical resistance of polytetrafluoroethene to mineral acids using an ordinary Teflon-coated frying pan. The demonstration can also be used to lead to a discussion of the long lifetimes of fluorocarbons and chlorofluorocarbons in the atmosphere and their roles in the breakdown of the ozone layer. (AIM)

  8. Predicted wear resistances of binary carbide coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, B.M.

    1986-11-01

    A mechanistic model of the tool wear process has been presented (B. M. Kramer and P. K. Judd, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 3, 2439 (1985)) that includes the effects of both the abrasion of the tool material by inclusions within the workpiece and the chemical dissolution of the tool material into the matrix of the workpiece. Machining tests have been run on steel with titanium carbide coated tooling and the resulting test data have been employed to produce a rough calibration of the proposed model. This model has been used to predict the wear resistances of the other group IV B carbides and of the (Ti,Hf)C system in the machining of steel.

  9. Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh; Seth, Brig B.

    2005-08-23

    A device (10) is made, having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10), is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16) and is applied by a process that is not an electron beam physical vapor deposition process. The sintering inhibiting material (22) has a morphology adapted to improve the functionality of the sintering inhibiting material (22), characterized as continuous, nodule, rivulet, grain, crack, flake and combinations thereof and being disposed within at least some of the vertical and horizontal gaps.

  10. Low friction and galling resistant coatings and processes for coating

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Roger N.

    1987-01-01

    The present invention describes coating processes and the resultant coated articles for use in high temperature sodium environments, such as those found in liquid metal fast breeder reactors and their associated systems. The substrate to which the coating is applied may be either an iron base or nickel base alloy. The coating itself is applied to the substrate by electro-spark deposition techniques which result in metallurgical bonding between the coating and the substrate. One coating according to the present invention involves electro-spark depositing material from a cemented chromium carbide electrode and an aluminum electrode. Another coating according to the present invention involves electro-spark depositing material from a cemented chromium carbide electrode and a nickel-base hardfacing alloy electrode.

  11. Corrosion Resistance of Friction Surfaced AISI 304 Stainless Steel Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid Rafi, H.; Phanikumar, G.; Prasad Rao, K.

    2013-02-01

    Corrosion resistance of friction surfaced AISI 304 coating in boiling nitric acid and chloride containing environments was found to be similar to that of its consumable rod counterpart. This was in contrast to the autogenous fusion zone of GTAW weld which showed inferior corrosion resistance with respect to the consumable rod. The superior corrosion resistance of friction surfaced coatings was attributed to the absence of δ-ferrite in it.

  12. Erosion-resistant coatings for gas turbine compressor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muboyadzhyan, S. A.

    2009-06-01

    The effect of ion-plasma coatings made from high-hardness metal compounds on the erosion and corrosion resistance and the mechanical properties of alloy (substrate) + coating compositions is comprehensively studied. The effects of the thickness, composition, deposition conditions, and design of coatings based on metal nitrides and carbides on the relative gas-abrasive wear of alloy + coating compositions in a gas-abrasive flux are analyzed. The flux contains quartz sand with an average fraction of 300-350 μm; the abrasive feed rate is 200 g/min; and the angles of flux incidence are 20° (tangential flow) and 70° (near-head-on attack flow). Alloy + coating compositions based on VN, VC, Cr3C2, ZrN, and TiN coatings 15-30 μ m thick or more are shown to have high erosion resistance. A detailed examination of the coatings with high erosion resistance demonstrates that a zirconium nitride coating is most appropriate for protecting gas turbine compressor blades made of titanium alloys; this coating does not decrease the fatigue strength of these alloys. A chromium carbide coating is the best coating for protecting compressor steel blades.

  13. Wear and impact resistance of HVOF sprayedceramic matrix composites coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prawara, B.; Martides, E.; Priyono, B.; Ardy, H.; Rikardo, N.

    2016-02-01

    Ceramic coating has the mechanical properties of high hardness and it is well known for application on wear resistance, but on the other hand the resistance to impact load is low. Therefore its use is limited to applications that have no impact loading. The aim of this research was to obtain ceramic-metallic composite coating which has improved impact resistance compared to conventional ceramic coating. The high impact resistance of ceramic-metallic composite coating is obtained from dispersed metallic alloy phase in ceramic matrix. Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) powder with chrome carbide (Cr3C2) base and ceramic-metal NiAl-Al2O3 with various particle sizes as reinforced particle was deposited on mild steel substrate with High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coating. Repeated impact test showed that reinforced metallic phase size influenced impact resistance of CMC coating. The ability of CMC coating to absorb impact energy has improved eight times and ten times compared with original Cr3C2 and hard chrome plating respectively. On the other hand the high temperature corrosion resistance of CMC coating showed up to 31 cycles of heating at 800°C and water quenching cooling.

  14. Hydroxyapatite/poly(epsilon-caprolactone) double coating on magnesium for enhanced corrosion resistance and coating flexibility.

    PubMed

    Jo, Ji-Hoon; Li, Yuanlong; Kim, Sae-Mi; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Koh, Young-Hag

    2013-11-01

    Hydroxyapatite was deposited on pure magnesium (Mg) with a flexible poly(ε-caprolactone) interlayer to reduce the corrosion rate of Mg and enhance coating flexibility. The poly(ε-caprolactone) interlayer was uniformly coated on Mg by a spraying method, followed by hydroxyapatite deposition on the poly(ε-caprolactone) using an aerosol deposition method. In scanning electron microscopy observations, inorganic/organic composite-like structure was observed between the hydroxyapatite and poly(ε-caprolactone) layers, resulting from the collisions of hydroxyapatite particles into the poly(ε-caprolactone) matrix at the initial stage of the aerosol deposition. The corrosion resistance of the coated Mg was examined using potentiodynamic polarization tests. The hydroxyapatite/poly(ε-caprolactone) double coating remarkably improved the corrosion resistance of Mg in Hank's solution. In the in vitro cell tests, the coated Mg showed better cell adhesion compared with the bare Mg due to the reduced corrosion rate and enhanced biocompatibility. The stability and flexibility of hydroxyapatite/poly(ε-caprolactone) double coating was investigated by scanning electron microscopy inspections after the coated Mg was deformed. The hydroxyapatite coating on the poly(ε-caprolactone) interlayer revealed enhanced coating stability and flexibility without cracking or delamination during bending and stretching compared with the hydroxyapatite single coating. These results demonstrated that the hydroxyapatite/poly(ε-caprolactone) double coating significantly improved the surface corrosion resistance of Mg and enhanced coating flexibility for use of Mg as a biodegradable implant. PMID:23241964

  15. Hydrogen and Wear Resistant Nanolaminate Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a study that will develop the concept of superhard coatings based on alternating nanoscale layers of sputter-deposited coatings with anticipated hydrogen compatibility and low friction coefficients.

  16. Corrosion resistant coatings suitable for elevated temperature application

    DOEpatents

    Chan, Kwai S.; Cheruvu, Narayana Sastry; Liang, Wuwei

    2012-07-31

    The present invention relates to corrosion resistance coatings suitable for elevated temperature applications, which employ compositions of iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and/or aluminum (Al). The compositions may be configured to regulate the diffusion of metals between a coating and a substrate, which may then influence coating performance, via the formation of an inter-diffusion barrier layer. The inter-diffusion barrier layer may comprise a face-centered cubic phase.

  17. Resistive coating for current conductors in cryogenic applications

    DOEpatents

    Hirayama, Chikara; Wagner, George R.

    1982-05-18

    This invention relates to a resistive or semiconducting coating for use on current conductors in cryogenic applications. This includes copper-clad superconductor wire, copper wire used for stabilizing superconductor magnets, and for hyperconductors. The coating is a film of cuprous sulfide (Cu.sub.2 S) that has been found not to degrade the properties of the conductors. It is very adherent to the respective conductors and satisfies the mechanical, thermal and electrical requirements of coatings for the conductors.

  18. Electrodeposition and Corrosion Resistance of Ni-Graphene Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeptycka, Benigna; Gajewska-Midzialek, Anna; Babul, Tomasz

    2016-03-01

    The research on the graphene application for the electrodeposition of nickel composite coatings was conducted. The study assessed an important role of graphene in an increased corrosion resistance of these coatings. Watts-type nickel plating bath with low concentration of nickel ions, organic addition agents, and graphene as dispersed particles were used for deposition of the composite coatings nickel-graphene. The results of investigations of composite coatings nickel-graphene deposited from the bath containing 0.33, 0.5, and 1 g/dm3 graphene and one surface-active substance were shown. The contents of particles in coatings, the surface morphology, the cross-sectional structures of the coated samples, and their thickness and the internal stresses were studied. Voltammetric method was used for examination of the corrosion resistance of samples of composite coatings in 0.5 M NaCl. The obtained results suggest that the content of incorporated graphene particles increases with an increasing amount of graphene in plating bath. The application of organic compounds was advantageous because it caused compressive stresses in the deposited coatings. All of the nickel-graphene composite layers had better corrosion resistance than the nickel coating.

  19. Resistance of dentin coating materials against abrasion by toothbrush.

    PubMed

    Gando, Iori; Ariyoshi, Meu; Ikeda, Masaomi; Sadr, Alireza; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    2013-01-01

    Thin-film coating of root dentin surface by all-in-one adhesives has been shown to be an effective option to prevent root surface caries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the wear resistance against toothbrush abrasion of two all-in-one coating materials; Shield Force (SF) and Hybrid Coat (HC). Bovine dentin surfaces were covered with one of the coating materials; SF or HC. After storage in water for 24 h, the testing surface was subjected to the toothbrush abrasion test up to 50,000 cycles either in water or toothpaste slurry. The remaining thickness of the coating material was measured using SEM. Toothpaste slurry significantly increased rate of tooth brush abrasion of the coating materials. While SF and HC wore at a similar pace under toothbrush abrasion, SF had a thicker coat and could protect dentin longer, up to 50,000 cycles. PMID:23370872

  20. Abrasion-resistant coatings for plastic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T.; Hollahan, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Optically clear composition of organosilicon compounds insulates plastic surfaces and protects them from abrasion. Plasma polymerization process produces superior uniformity and clarity than previous coating techniques.

  1. Fluorinated diamond bonded in fluorocarbon resin

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Gene W.

    1982-01-01

    By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

  2. Optically transparent, scratch-resistant, diamond-like carbon coatings

    DOEpatents

    He, Xiao-Ming; Lee, Deok-Hyung; Nastasi, Michael A.; Walter, Kevin C.; Tuszewski, Michel G.

    2003-06-03

    A plasma-based method for the deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings is described. The process uses a radio-frequency inductively coupled discharge to generate a plasma at relatively low gas pressures. The deposition process is environmentally friendly and scaleable to large areas, and components that have geometrically complicated surfaces can be processed. The method has been used to deposit adherent 100-400 nm thick DLC coatings on metals, glass, and polymers. These coatings are between three and four times harder than steel and are therefore scratch resistant, and transparent to visible light. Boron and silicon doping of the DLC coatings have produced coatings having improved optical properties and lower coating stress levels, but with slightly lower hardness.

  3. Splice Resistance Measurements in 2G YBCO Coated Conductor

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, Christopher M; Duckworth, Robert C; Zhang, Yifei

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been investigating the electrical splice resistance of second-generation (2G) YBCO coated conductor. The purpose of the experimental investigation is to study the splice resistance of 2G YBCO coated conductor as a function of: a) operating temperature, b) magnetic field strength (B-field), and c) magnetic field orientation ( ). Understanding the splice resistance with its corresponding variation as a function of surface preparation and operating conditions is essential to the practical implementation of electric utility devices; e.g., motors, generators, transformers, cables, and fault-current limiters, etc. Preliminary test results indicate that the 2G YBCO splice resistance shows a weak temperature dependence and a significantly stronger dependence upon magnetic field strength and magnetic field orientation. Surface preparation conditions are also briefly discussed. Index Terms coated conductor, splice, critical current, YBCO

  4. Frost resistance of concrete surfaces coated with waterproofing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klovas, A.; Dauksys, M.; Ciuprovaite, G.

    2015-03-01

    Present research lays emphasis on the problem of concrete surface exposed to aggressive surrounding quality. The test was conducted with concrete surfaces coated with different waterproofing materials exposed in solution of 3 % of sodium sulphate. Research was performed according to LST EN 1338:2003 standard requirements. Technological properties of concrete mixture as well as physical-mechanical properties of formed concrete specimens were established. The resistance of concrete to freezing - thawing cycles was prognosticated according to the porosity parameters established by the kinetic of water absorption. Five different waterproofing materials (coatings) such as liquid bitumen-rubber based, elastic fiber-strengthened, silane-siloxane based emulsion, mineral binder based and liquid rubber (caoutchouc) based coatings were used. Losses by mass of coating materials and specimens surface fractures were calculated based on the results of frost resistance test. Open code program "ImageJ" was used for visual analysis of concrete specimens. Based on the results, aggressive surrounding did not influence specimens coated with elastic, fibre-strengthened, mineral materials. On the other hand, specimens coated with liquid rubber (caoutchouc) based material were greatly influenced by aggressive surrounding. The biggest losses of specimen surface concrete (fractures) were obtained with silane-siloxane based emulsion coating. Generally, specimens coated with waterproofing materials were less influenced by aggressive surrounding compared with those without.

  5. Electrically resistive coating for remediation (regeneration) of a diesel particulate filter and method

    DOEpatents

    Phelps, Amanda C.; Kirby, Kevin K.; Gregoire, Daniel J.

    2012-02-14

    A resistively heated diesel particulate filter (DPF). The resistively heated DPF includes a DPF having an inlet surface and at least one resistive coating on the inlet surface. The at least one resistive coating is configured to substantially maintain its resistance in an operating range of the DPF. The at least one resistive coating has a first terminal and a second terminal for applying electrical power to resistively heat up the at least one resistive coating in order to increase the temperature of the DPF to a regeneration temperature. The at least one resistive coating includes metal and semiconductor constituents.

  6. Oxidation resistant nanocrystalline MCrAl(Y) coatings and methods of forming such coatings

    DOEpatents

    Cheruvu, Narayana S.; Wei, Ronghua

    2014-07-29

    The present disclosure relates to an oxidation resistant nanocrystalline coating and a method of forming an oxidation resistant nanocrystalline coating. An oxidation resistant coating comprising an MCrAl(Y) alloy may be deposited on a substrate, wherein M, includes iron, nickel, cobalt, or combinations thereof present greater than 50 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy, chromium is present in the range of 15 wt % to 30 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy, aluminum is present in the range of 6 wt % to 12 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy and yttrium, is optionally present in the range of 0.1 wt % to 0.5 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy. In addition, the coating may exhibit a grain size of 200 nm or less as deposited.

  7. Enhancement of Corrosion Resistance of Zinc Coatings Using Green Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punith Kumar, M. K.; Srivastava, Chandan

    2014-10-01

    In the present work, morphology, microstructure, and electrochemical behavior of Zn coatings containing non-toxic additives have been investigated. Zn coatings were electrodeposited over mild steel substrates using Zn sulphate baths containing four different organic additives: sodium gluconate, dextrose, dextrin, and saccharin. All these additives are "green" and can be derived from food contents. Morphological and structural characterization using electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and texture co-efficient analysis revealed an appreciable alteration in the morphology and texture of the deposit depending on the type of additive used in the Zn plating bath. All the Zn coatings, however, were nano-crystalline irrespective of the type of additive used. Polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic analysis, used to investigate the effect of the change in microstructure and morphology on corrosion resistance behavior, illustrated an improved corrosion resistance for Zn deposits obtained from plating bath containing additives as compared to the pure Zn coatings.

  8. Oxidation resistant slurry coating for carbon-based materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, J. L.; Rybicki, G. C. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An oxidation resistant coating is produced on carbon-base materials, and the same processing step effects an infiltration of the substrate with silicon containing material. The process comprises making a slurry of nickel and silicon powders in a nitrocellulose lacquer, spraying onto the graphite or carbon-carbon substrate, and sintering in vacuum to form a fused coating that wets and covers the surface as well as penetrates into the pores of the substrate. Optimum wetting and infiltration occurs in the range of Ni-60 w/o Si to Ni-90 w/o Si with deposited thicknesses of 25-100 mg/sq. cm. Sintering temperatures of about 1200 C to about 1400 C are used, depending on the melting point of the specific coating composition. The sintered coating results in Ni-Si intermetallic phases and SiC, both of which are highly oxidation resistant.

  9. MATE program: Erosion resistant compressor airfoil coating, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freling, Melvin

    1987-01-01

    The performance of candidate erosion resistant airfoil coatings installed in ground tested experimental JT8D and JT9D engines and subjected to cyclic endurance at idle, takeoff and intermediate power conditions has been evaluated. Engine tests were terminated prior to the scheduled 1000 cycles of endurance test due to high cycle fatigue fracture of the Gator-Gard plasma sprayed 88WC-12Co coating on titanium alloy airfoils. Coated steel (AMS5616) and nickel base alloy (Incoloy 901) performed well in both engine tests. Post test airfoil analyses consisted of binocular, scanning electron microscope and metallographic examinations.

  10. Final report of ''Fundamental Surface Reaction Mechanisms in Fluorocarbon Plasma-Based Processing''

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb S. Oehrlein; H. Anderson; J. Cecchi; D. Graves

    2004-09-21

    This report provides a summary of results obtained in research supported by contract ''Fundamental Surface Reaction Mechanisms in Fluorocarbon Plasma-Based Processing'' (Contract No. DE-FG0200ER54608). In this program we advanced significantly the scientific knowledge base on low pressure fluorocarbon plasmas used for patterning of dielectric films and for producing fluorocarbon coatings on substrates. We characterized important neutral and ionic gas phase species that are incident at the substrate, and the processes that occur at relevant surfaces in contact with the plasma. The work was performed through collaboration of research groups at three universities where significantly different, complementary tools for plasma and surface characterization, computer simulation of plasma and surface processes exist. Exchange of diagnostic tools and experimental verification of key results at collaborating institutions, both experimentally and by computer simulations, was an important component of the approach taken in this work.

  11. Corrosion Resistant Coatings for High Temperature Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Besman, T.M.; Cooley, K.M.; Haynes, J.A.; Lee, W.Y.; Vaubert, V.M.

    1998-12-01

    Efforts to increase efficiency of energy conversion devices have required their operation at ever higher temperatures. This will force the substitution of higher-temperature structural ceramics for lower temperature materials, largely metals. Yet, many of these ceramics will require protection from high temperature corrosion caused by combustion gases, atmospheric contaminants, or the operating medium. This paper discusses examples of the initial development of such coatings and materials for potential application in combustion, aluminum smelting, and other harsh environments.

  12. Wear Resistance of Coating Films on Hob Teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umezaki, Yoji; Funaki, Yoshiyuki; Kurokawa, Syuhei; Ohnishi, Osamu; Doi, Toshiro

    The wear resistance of coating films on hob teeth is investigated through the simulated hobbing tests with a flytool. The coating films on hob teeth are titanium family ceramics such as TiN, TiCN, TiSiN and TiAlN and aluminum chromium family ceramics such as AlCrN and AlCrSiN. The wear of coated tools is shown about film thickness, film materials, ingredient ratio in a film component and the oxidization of coating films. The oxidization is clarified from a result of the influence on the crater wear progress through wear cutting tests in atmosphere of nitrogen gas or oxygen gas. The oxidization of TiAlN coating films produces oxide products on the tool rake face, and this oxidation relates to the amount of crater wear. The increase of aluminum concentration in the TiAlN film improves the crater wear resistance in air atmosphere, while it has a reverse effect in nitrogen gases. The AlCrSiN film has effective wear resistance against the abrasive wear and/or oxidization wear. The oxidation film formed on the AlCrSiN film is very firm and this suppresses the oxidation wear on the rake face and works against the abrasive wear advantageously.

  13. DIFFUSION COATINGS FOR CORROSION RESISTANT COMPONENTS IN COAL GASIFICATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Angel Sanjurjo

    2004-05-01

    Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low cost alloy may improve is resistance to such sulfidation attack and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. A review of the literature indicated that the Fe- and Ni-based high-temperature alloys are susceptible to sulfidation attack unless they are fortified with high levels of Cr, Al, and Si. To impart corrosion resistance, these elements need not be in the bulk of the alloy and need only be present at the surface layers. We selected diffusion coatings of Cr and Al, and surface coatings of Si and Ti for the preliminary testing. These coatings will be applied using the fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition technique developed at SRI which is rapid and relatively inexpensive. We have procured coupons of typical alloys used in a gasifier. These coupons will be coated with Cr, Al, Si, and Ti. The samples will be tested in a bench-scale reactor using simulated coal gas compositions. In addition, we will be sending coated samples for insertion in the gas stream of the coal gasifier.

  14. Contamination-resistant silica antireflective coating with closed ordered mesopores.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jinghua; Zhang, Qinghua; Ding, Ruimin; Lv, Haibing; Yan, Hongwei; Yuan, Xiaodong; Xu, Yao

    2014-08-21

    Porous silica optical antireflective (AR) coatings prepared by traditional sol-gel method have been extensively used for high power laser systems, but a serious drawback is that contamination existing in the high vacuum is easily absorbed by the disordered open pore structure, resulting in a fast decrease in transmittance. To improve the stability of transmittance in vacuum, a contamination-resistant silica AR coating with ordered mesopores completely closed by hydrophobic-oleophobic groups was successfully developed on a fused quartz substrate. The ordered mesopores in the coating were controlled under the direction of surfactant F127 via an evaporation-induced-self-assembling process and then were closed by post-grafting long chain fluoroalkylsilane. The grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and the X-ray reflectivity (XRR) results indicated that the mesopores in the coating constructed a Fmmm orthorhombic symmetry structure with a (010) plane parallel to the substrate. Cage-like mesopores were confirmed by nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis. The obtained coatings showed low surface roughness, excellent abrase-resistance and high transmittance of 100% on quartz substrate. Especially, the decrease of transmittance tested with polydimethylsiloxane pollution in vacuum within one-month was as small as 0.02%. The laser induced damage threshold was up to 59.8 J cm(-2) at a 12 ns laser pulse of 1053 nm wavelength. This work provides an alternative way to fabricate AR coatings with high stability. PMID:25000419

  15. LOW VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) CHEMICAL AGENT RESISTANT COATING (CARC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical warfare causes many problems on the battlefield, among which is decontamination of exposed equipment. Because of this threat, the US Army ahs required the use of a Chemical Agent Resistant Coating (CARC) system on its equipment, beginning in FY 85. The equipment covere...

  16. Oxidation resistant coatings for ceramic matrix composite components

    SciTech Connect

    Vaubert, V.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Hirschfeld, D.A.

    1998-11-01

    Corrosion resistant Ca{sub 0.6}Mg{sub 0.4}Zr{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} (CMZP) and Ca{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} (CS-50) coatings for fiber-reinforced SiC-matrix composite heat exchanger tubes have been developed. Aqueous slurries of both oxides were prepared with high solids loading. One coating process consisted of dipping the samples in a slip. A tape casting process has also been created that produced relatively thin and dense coatings covering a large area. A processing technique was developed, utilizing a pre-sintering step, which produced coatings with minimal cracking.

  17. Microstructure and abrasion resistance of plasma sprayed titania coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ctibor, P.; Neufuss, K.; Chraska, P.

    2006-12-01

    Agglomerated titania nanopowder and a “classical” titania were sprayed by the high throughput water-stabilized plasma (WSP) and thoroughly compared. Optical microscopy with image analysis as well as mercury intrusion porosimetry were used for quantification of porosity. Results indicate that the “nano” coatings in general exhibit finer pores than coatings of the “conventional” micron-sized powders. Mechanical properties such as Vickers microhardness and slurry abrasion response were measured and linked to the structural investigation. Impact of the variation in the slurry composition on wear resistance of tested coatings and on character of the wear damage is discussed. The overall results, however, suggest that the “nano” coatings properties are better only for carefully selected sets of spraying parameters, which seem to have a very important impact.

  18. Coatings for directional eutectics. [for corrosion and oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felten, E. J.; Strangman, T. E.; Ulion, N. E.

    1974-01-01

    Eleven coating systems based on MCrAlY overlay and diffusion aluminide prototypes were evaluated to determine their capability for protecting the gamma/gamma prime-delta directionally solidified eutectic alloy (Ni-20Cb-6Cr-2.5Al) in gas turbine engine applications. Furnace oxidation and hot corrosion, Mach 0.37 burner-rig, tensile ductility, stress-rupture and thermomechanical fatigue tests were used to evaluate the coated gamma/gamma prime-delta alloy. The diffusion aluminide coatings provided adequate oxidation resistance at 1144 K (1600 F) but offered very limited protection in 114 K (1600 F) hot corrosion and 1366 K (2000 F) oxidation tests. A platinum modified NiCrAlY overlay coating exhibited excellent performance in oxidation testing and had no adverse effects upon the eutectic alloy.

  19. DIFFUSION COATINGS FOR CORROSION RESISTANT COMPONENTS IN COAL GASIFICATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Angel Sanjurjo

    2005-01-01

    Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low cost alloy may improve is resistance to such sulfidation attack and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. During this reporting period we coated coupons of selected alloy steels with diffusion coatings of Cr and Al, as well as with titanium and tantalum nitrides. The coated samples were analyzed for their surface composition. In several instances, the samples were also cut to determine the depth profile of the coating. Several of the early runs did not yield uniform or deep enough coatings and hence a significant portion of the effort in this period was devoted fixing the problems with our fluidized bed reactor. Before the end of the quarter we had prepared a number of samples, many of them in duplicates, and sent one set to Wabash River Energy Laboratory for them to install in their gasifier. The gasifier was undergoing a scheduled maintenance and thus presented an opportunity to place some of our coupons in the stream of an operating gasifier. The samples submitted included coated and uncoated pairs of different alloys.

  20. Erosion Resistant Coatings for Polymer Matrix Composites in Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, James K.; Naik, Subhash K.; Horan, Richard; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Bowman, Cheryl; Ma, Kong; Leissler, George; Sinatra, Raymond; Cupp, Randall

    2003-01-01

    Polymer Matrix Composites (PMCs) offer lightweight and frequently low cost alternatives to other materials in many applications. High temperature PMCs are currently used in limited propulsion applications replacing metals. Yet in most cases, PMC propulsion applications are not in the direct engine flow path since particulate erosion degrades PMC component performance and therefore restricts their use in gas turbine engines. This paper compares two erosion resistant coatings (SANRES and SANPRES) on PMCs that are useful for both low and high temperature propulsion applications. Collaborating over a multi-year period, researchers at NASA Glenn Research Center, Allison Advanced Developed Company, and Rolls-Royce Corporation have optimized these coatings in terms of adhesion, surface roughness, and erosion resistance. Results are described for vigorous hot gas/particulate erosion rig and engine testing of uncoated and coated PMC fan bypass vanes from the AE 3007 regional jet gas turbine engine. Moreover, the structural durability of these coatings is described in long-term high cycle fatigue tests. Overall, both coatings performed well in all tests and will be considered for applications in both commercial and defense propulsion applications.

  1. Impingement Resistance of HVAF WC-Based Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, C.; Liu, M.; Wu, C.; Zhou, K.; Song, J.

    2007-12-01

    High-velocity oxygen/air fuel (HVO/AF) WC-17Co and WC-10Co4Cr coatings exhibit great potential in the replacement of electrolytic hard chrome (EHC) plating, and comprehensive properties of such coatings should be superior to those of electrolytic hard chrome plating. The impingement resistance of HVAF WC-based coatings sprayed on 300M ultrahigh-strength steel was studied in this paper. As an important property index, the fracture toughness of HVAF WC-based coatings was measured using the microindentation method at loads of 9.8, 19.6, 24.5, 29.4, and 49.0 N, respectively. The cracks resulting from stress concentration in the microindentation were analyzed. The impingement resistance for two HVAF WC coatings and EHC was evaluated according to the ASTM D 3170 standard, and steel ball free-fall experiment was performed at the height of 0.61, 1.52, 1.83, 2.36, and 2.59 m, respectively. The cracks caused by both impingements were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM) in comparison with the cracks in microindentation test.

  2. Variability of laboratory coat resistance to blood strikethrough.

    PubMed

    Smith, J W; Muzik, A C; Lovitt, S A; Nichols, R L

    1994-03-01

    Protection from contamination by potentially infectious fluids is an increasingly important aspect of hospital safety programs. Technical personnel in clinical laboratories may handle numerous samples of human blood and other fluids daily, and to protect themselves against exposure to bloodborne pathogens they routinely wear laboratory coats. We studied the effectiveness of six disposable (polypropylene; either spun-bond or spun-bond/melt-blown/spun-bond construction) and four reusable (polyester-cotton) laboratory coats in preventing blood passage. Fabrics (1018 samples) were tested at six time durations (1 s-5 min) and five pressures [1.7-13.8 kPa (0.25-2.0 psi)]. A standard spray test used to evaluate resistance to wetting showed that reusable coats were less repellent than disposables (P < 0.05). Pressure testing showed that reusable and spun-bond coats allowed greater blood passage than the spun-bond/melt-blown/spun-bond. Laboratory coats should be chosen that have sufficient resistance to blood or other body fluid passage for the task performed and for the period of time used. PMID:8131283

  3. Electron attachment to fluorocarbon radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, Nicholas

    2014-10-01

    Most plasma environments contain populations of short-lived species such as radicals, the chemistry of which can have significant effects on the overall chemistry of the system. However, few experimental measurements of the kinetics of electron attachment to radicals exist due to the inherent difficulties of working with transient species. Calculations from first principles have been attempted, but are arduous and, because electron attachment is so sensitive to the specifics of the potential surface, their accuracy has not been established. Electron attachment to small fluorocarbon radicals is particularly important, as the data are needed for predictive modeling of plasma etching of semiconductor materials, a key process in the industrial fabrication of microelectronics. We have recently developed a novel flowing afterglow technique to measure several types of otherwise difficult to study plasma processes, including thermal electron attachment to radicals. Variable Electron and Neutral Density Attachment Mass Spectrometry (VENDAMS) exploits dissociative electron attachment in a weakly ionized plasma as a radical source. Here, we apply VENDAMS to a series of halofluorocarbon precursors in order to measure the kinetics of thermal electron attachment to fluorocarbon radicals. Results are presented for CF2, CF3, C2F5,C2F3,1-C3F7, 2-C3F7, and C3F5 from 300 K to 900 K. Both the magnitude and the temperature dependences of rate coefficients as well as product branching between associative and dissociative attachment are highly system specific; however, thermal attachment to all species is inefficient, never exceeding 5% of the collision rate. The data are analyzed using a recently developed kinetic modeling approach, which uses extended Vogt-Wannier theory as a starting point, accounts for dynamic effects such as coupling between the electron and nuclear motions through empirically validated functional forms, and finally uses statistical theory to determine the fate of

  4. Long Term Aging of Elastomers: Chemorheology of Viton B Fluorocarbon Elastomer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalfayan, S. H.; Silver, R. H.; Mazzeo, A. A.; Lui, S. T.

    1972-01-01

    The continuation of a study to ascertain the nature, extent, and the rate of chemical changes that take place in certain selected elastomers is reported. Under discussion is Viton B, regarded as a temperature and fuel resistant fluorocarbon rubber. The kinetic analysis of the chemical stress relaxation, and infrared and gel permeation chromatography analysis results are discussed.

  5. Heat sealable, flame and abrasion resistant coated fabric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tschirch, R. P.; Sidman, K. R. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Flame retardant, abrasion resistant elastomeric compositions are disclosed which are comprised of thermoplastic polyurethane polymer and flame retarding amounts of a filler selected from decabromodiphenyloxide and antimony oxide in a 3:1 weight ratio, and decabromodiphenyloxide, antimony oxide, and ammonium polyphosphate in a 3:1:3 weight ratio respectively. Heat sealable coated fabrics employing such elastomeric compositions as coating film are produced by dissolving the elastomeric composition to form a solution, casting the solution onto a release paper and drying it to form an elastomeric film. The film is then bonded to a woven, knitted, or felted fabric.

  6. Wear resistance of TiAlSiN thin coatings.

    PubMed

    Silva, F J G; Martinho, R P; Alexandre, R J D; Baptista, A P M

    2012-12-01

    In the last decades TiAIN coatings deposited by PVD techniques have been extensively investigated but, nowadays, their potential development for tribological applications is relatively low. However, new coatings are emerging based on them, trying to improve wear behavior. TiAlSiN thin coatings are now investigated, analyzing if Si introduction increases the wear resistance of PVD films. Attending to the application, several wear test configurations has been recently used by some researchers. In this work, TiAISiN thin coatings were produced by PVD Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering technique and they were conveniently characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) provided with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Electron Probe Micro-Analyzer (EPMA), Micro Hardness (MH) and Scratch Test Analysis. Properties as morphology, thickness, roughness, chemical composition and structure, hardness and film adhesion to the substrate were investigated. Concerning to wear characterization, two very different ways were chosen: micro-abrasion with ball-on-flat configuration and industrial non-standardized tests based on samples inserted in a feed channel of a selected plastic injection mould working with 30% (wt.) glass fiber reinforced polypropylene. TiAISiN coatings with a small amount of about 5% (wt.) Si showed a similar wear behavior when compared with TiAIN reported performances, denoting that Si addition does not improve the wear performance of the TiAIN coatings in these wear test conditions. PMID:23447962

  7. Abrasion resistant coating and method of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Sordelet, Daniel J.; Besser, Matthew F.

    2001-06-05

    An abrasion resistant coating is created by adding a ductile phase to a brittle matrix phase during spray coating where an Al--Cu--Fe quasicrystalline phase (brittle matrix) and an FeAl intermetallic (ductile phase) are combined. This composite coating produces a coating mostly of quasicrystal phase and an inter-splat layer of the FeAl phase to help reduce porosity and cracking within the coating. Coatings are prepared by plasma spraying unblended and blended quasicrystal and intermetallic powders. The blended powders contain 1, 5, 10 and 20 volume percent of the intermetallic powders. The unblended powders are either 100 volume percent quasicrystalline or 100 volume percent intermetallic; these unblended powders were studied for comparison to the others. Sufficient ductile phase should be added to the brittle matrix to transform abrasive wear mode from brittle fracture to plastic deformation, while at the same time the hardness of the composite should not be reduced below that of the original brittle phase material.

  8. Fire resistance properties of ceramic wool fiber reinforced intumescent coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, N.; Othman, W. M. S. W.; Ahmad, F.

    2015-07-01

    This research studied the effects of varied weight percentage and length of ceramic wool fiber (CWF) reinforcement to fire retardant performance of epoxy-based intumescent coating. Ten formulations were developed using ammonium polyphosphate (APP), expandable graphite (EG), melamine (MEL) and boric acid (BA). The mixing was conducted in two stages; powdered materials were grinded in Rocklabs mortar grinder and epoxy-mixed using Caframo mixer at low speed mixing. The samples were applied on mild steel substrate and exposed to 500°C heat inside Carbolite electric furnace. The char expansion and its physical properties were observed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses were conducted to inspect the fiber dispersion, fiber condition and the cell structure of both coatings and chars produced. Thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) were conducted to study the thermal properties of the coating such as degradation temperature and residual weight. Fire retardant performance was determined by measuring backside temperature of substrate in 1-hour, 1000°C Bunsen burner test according to UL 1709 fire regime. The results showed that intumescent coating reinforced with CWF produced better fire resistance performance. When compared to unreinforced coating, formulation S6-15 significantly reduced steel temperature at approximately 34.7% to around 175°C. However, higher fiber weight percentage had slightly decreased fire retardant performance of the coating.

  9. Abrasion Resistant Coating and Method of making the same

    SciTech Connect

    Sordelet, Daniel J.; Besser, Matthew F.

    1999-06-25

    An abrasion resistant coating is created by adding a ductile phase to a brittle matrix phase during spray coating where an Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystalline phase (brittle matrix) and an FeAl intermetallic (ductile phase) are combined. This composite coating produces a coating mostly of quasicrystal phase and an inter-splat layer of the FeAl phase to help reduce porosity and cracking within the coating. Coatings are prepared by plasma spraying unblended and blended quasicrystal and intermetallic powders. The blended powders contain 1, 5, 10 and 20 volume percent of the intermetallic powders. The unblended powders are either 100 volume percent quasicrystalline or 100 volume percent intermetallic; these unblended powders were studied for comparison to the others. Sufficient ductile phase should be added to the brittle matrix to transform abrasive wear mode from brittle fracture to plastic deformation, while at the same time the hardness of the composite should not be reduced below that of the original brittle phase material.

  10. Fire resistance properties of ceramic wool fiber reinforced intumescent coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Amir, N. Othman, W. M. S. W. Ahmad, F.

    2015-07-22

    This research studied the effects of varied weight percentage and length of ceramic wool fiber (CWF) reinforcement to fire retardant performance of epoxy-based intumescent coating. Ten formulations were developed using ammonium polyphosphate (APP), expandable graphite (EG), melamine (MEL) and boric acid (BA). The mixing was conducted in two stages; powdered materials were grinded in Rocklabs mortar grinder and epoxy-mixed using Caframo mixer at low speed mixing. The samples were applied on mild steel substrate and exposed to 500°C heat inside Carbolite electric furnace. The char expansion and its physical properties were observed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses were conducted to inspect the fiber dispersion, fiber condition and the cell structure of both coatings and chars produced. Thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) were conducted to study the thermal properties of the coating such as degradation temperature and residual weight. Fire retardant performance was determined by measuring backside temperature of substrate in 1-hour, 1000°C Bunsen burner test according to UL 1709 fire regime. The results showed that intumescent coating reinforced with CWF produced better fire resistance performance. When compared to unreinforced coating, formulation S6-15 significantly reduced steel temperature at approximately 34.7% to around 175°C. However, higher fiber weight percentage had slightly decreased fire retardant performance of the coating.

  11. Instabilities in fluorocarbon ICP plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Jean-Paul; Abada, Hana

    2000-10-01

    Several recent studies (Lieberman and al(M. A. Lieberman, A. J. Lichtenberg and A. M. Marakhtanov, App. Phys. Vol75,3617 (1999)), Tuszewski(M. Tuszewski, J. Appl. Phys. 79, 8967 (1996))) have shown the presence of instabilities in low pressure inductively coupled discharges with electronegative gases (O_2, Ar/SF_6). Lieberman and al^1 have proposed an explanation for this effect in terms of electon attachment processes causing an oscillation between capacitive and inductive coupling modes. We have observed similar instabilities in ICP fluorocarbon plasmas (CF_4, C_2F_6, CHF_3) by observing the optical emission from the plasma. In CF4 plasmas, the optical emission is modulated by up to 90% at frequencies 200-1 kHz at 1-20 mtorr with rf powers of 300 W and 500W. We have also observed an interesting phenomenon whereby inductive/capacitive oscillations occur during several hundreds of ms, in between periods of stable capactive operation lasting several hudreds of ms.

  12. Vapor pressures of new fluorocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, H.; Yamashita, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Makita, T. )

    1989-05-01

    The vapor pressures of four fluorocarbons have been measured at the following temperature ranges: R123 (2,2-dichloro-1,1,1-trifluoroethane), 273-457 K; R123a (1,2-dichloro-1,1,2-trifluoroethane), 303-458 K; R134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane), 253-373 K; and R132b (1,2-dichloro-1,1-difluoroethane), 273-398 K. Determinations of the vapor pressure were carried out by a constant-volume apparatus with an uncertainty of less than 1.0%. The vapor pressures of R123 and R123a are very similar to those of R11 over the whole experimental temperature range, but the vapor pressures of R134a and R132b differ somewhat from those of R12 and R113, respectively, as the temperature increases. The numerical vapor pressure data can be fitted by an empirical equation using the Chebyshev polynomial with a mean deviation of less than 0.3%.

  13. Wear resistance of boron nitride coated metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andoh, Yasunori; Nishiyama, Satoshi; Sakai, Shigeki; Ogata, Kiyoshi; Fujimoto, Fuminori

    1993-06-01

    The wear resistance of boron nitride films was studied. The films of 1 μm thickness were prepared on the surface of a cutting tool by simultaneous nitrogen ion irradiation and vapor depositon of boron; the Vickers hardness of the films was between 3000 and 5000 kg/mm 2. The test was performed by the cutting of steel. On the tool deposited directly, the wear of the surface is large and this could not be improved greatly. However, the tools prepared after nitridation of the surface layer by ion implantation and the one with another nitride layer in the interface showed decreasing wear, and the wear of the tool with an interlayer of silicon nitride could be decreased to about 15%. As a result, it became clear that boron nitride could be effectively used as a highly hard film by the optimization of the interface between the film and the matrix.

  14. Abrasion resistance of biaxially oriented polypropylene films coated with nanocomposite hard coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Zhu, Yaofeng; Fu, Yaqin

    2013-11-01

    KMnO4-treated, functionalized, biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) films coated with nano-silica hybrid material were synthesized. The abrasion resistance of the films was examined using a reciprocating fabric abrasion tester. Functional groups were confirmed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Contact angle measurements were performed on the BOPP film surface to quantify the effectiveness of the functionalization. Results indicate that the abrasion resistance and roughness of the composite film were significantly affected by the modification of the BOPP film. Water surface contact angle of the modified BOPP films decreased from 90.1° to 71.4°,when KMnO4 concentration increased from 0 M to 0.25 M. Wettability of the BOPP films clearly improved after KMnO4 treatment. Abrasion resistance of the functionalized films coated with hybrid materials improved by 27.4% compared with that of the original film.

  15. Wear resistance of composite coatings produced by thermal spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Klinskaya, N.A.

    1995-12-31

    Injection of refractory additions (carbides, borides, oxides etc.) into self-fluxing alloys is a well-known technique for their hardening. Nevertheless the matter of influence of refractory components on the structure and characteristics of composite coatings is not studied well enough. This paper presents the results of investigations of gas thermal coatings (plasma and detonation ones) on the base of stellite with refractory components in the form of borides such as CrB{sub 2}, TiB{sub 2}, (TiCr)B{sub 2}. This study is concerned with the influence of refractory additions (carbides, borides, oxides) on the wear resistance sprayed coatings based on self-fluxing alloys NiCrBSi and CoCrBSi.

  16. Gas-flame deposition of corrosion-resistant coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Lakhotkin, Yu.V.; Kuz`min, V.P.; Nikolaev, V.N.

    1995-07-01

    A technology has been developed for the gas-flame deposition of corrosion-resistant coatings. The coatings have a number of potential uses: for regulating valves and stop valves on oil and gas pipelines; for important friction elements subject to abrasive and corrosive wear during service; for hard-alloy cutting plates and tools made of high-speed steel that are used to machine metal, wood, stone, and glass; for dies and die plates used to shape metals. The technology makes is possible to obtain coatings of tungsten carbide on products made of hard alloys, structural and high-speed steels, copper, and nickel. The process is conducted at a temperature of 450-550{degrees}C. Deposition rate is 100-500 {mu}m/h. Coating thickness ranges up to 500 {mu}m. The microhardness of the coating can reach 3500 kg/mm{sup 2} (35 kN/mm{sup 2}), which is 2-3 times greater than the microhardness of hard alloys, titanium nitride, and galvanic chromium. Adhesion approaches 15-20 kg/mm{sup 2}. The coatings are resistant to corrosion in acidic and alkaline media and hydrogen sulfide. The most promising application of the technology is for important friction elements subject to corrosive wear during service. Tests of pipeline valves and bushings in corrosive media showed that service life is increased by a factor between ten and a hundred. The inventors of the method own the rights to this technology in the Russian Federation.

  17. Protective, Abrasion-Resistant Coatings With Tailorable Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Because of their light weight and impact resistance, transparent plastic structures are becoming increasingly desirable for use not only on aircraft but also in terrestrial applications such as automotive windshields and ophthalmic lenses. However, plastics are typically soft and scratch readily, reducing their transparency with use. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, reactively deposited aluminum oxide coatings as thin as 12,000 angstroms have been demonstrated to provide improved resistance to most scratches encountered during normal use. The properties of the coating can be adjusted to tailor the surface to meet other needs, such as water shedding. These adjustments can be made during the deposition process so that multiple manufacturing steps are eliminated.

  18. Fluorocarbon Adsorption in Hierarchical Porous Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Motkuri, Radha K.; Annapureddy, Harsha V.; Vijayakumar, M.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Martin, P F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Dang, Liem X.; Krishna, Rajamani; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2014-07-09

    The adsorption behavior of a series of fluorocarbon derivatives was examined on a set of microporous metal organic framework (MOF) sorbents and another set of hierarchical mesoporous MOFs. The microporous M-DOBDC (M = Ni, Co) showed a saturation uptake capacity for R12 of over 4 mmol/g at a very low relative saturation pressure (P/Po) of 0.02. In contrast, the mesoporous MOF MIL-101 showed an exceptionally high uptake capacity reaching over 14 mmol/g at P/Po of 0.4. Adsorption affinity in terms of mass loading and isosteric heats of adsorption were found to generally correlate with the polarizability of the refrigerant with R12 > R22 > R13 > R14 > methane. These results suggest the possibility of exploiting MOFs for separation of azeotropic mixtures of fluorocarbons and use in eco-friendly fluorocarbon-based adsorption cooling and refrigeration applications.

  19. Erosion-corrosion resistance of thermal sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.W.; Wang, B.Q.

    1996-11-01

    A series of laboratory erosion-corrosion experiments at the elevated temperature, 300 C and different impact velocities (2.5 m/s, 30 m/s) were carried on AISI 1018 low carbon steel and three different sprayed coating specimens. Angular silica quartz particles of 742 um were the erodent material for testing three different impact angles of 30{degree}, 45{degree}, and 90{degree}. Material wastage rates were determined from thickness loss measurements of the specimens. The morphologies of the specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The erosion-corrosion resistance of coating was found to be related to their composition and microstructure rather than to their hardness. The material wastage of the specimen was determined by weight and thickness loss measurements. The morphologies of the specimens were examined scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For the material wastage of the coating specimens, High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) coatings (DS200) and the arc-sprayed coating at elevated temperature condition exhibited 2 to 3 times lower erosion wastage than that of AISI 1018 steel.

  20. DIFFUSION COATINGS FOR CORROSION RESISTANT COMPONENTS IN COAL GASIFICATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Angel Sanjurjo

    2005-03-01

    Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low cost alloy may improve is resistance to such sulfidation attack and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. During this reporting period we conducted two exposure tests with coated and uncoated coupons. The first one was aborted after a short period, because of a leak in the pressure regulator of a CO/CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} gas mixture gas cylinder that was used to prepare the simulated coal gas stream. Nevertheless, this run was very instructive as it showed that during the brief exposure when the concentration of H{sub 2}S increased to 8.6%, even specialty alloys such as HR160 and I800 were badly corroded, yet the sample of a SS405-steel that was coated with Ti/Ta showed no signs of corrosion. After replacing the pressure regulator, a second run was conducted with a fresh set of coated and uncoated samples. The Ti/Ta-coated on to SS405 steel from the earlier runs was also exposed in this test. The run proceeded smoothly, and at the end of test the uncoated steels were badly damaged, some evidence of corrosion was found on coupons of HR160 and I800 alloys and the Cr-coated steels, but again, the Ti/Ta-coated sample appeared unaffected.

  1. High temperature resistant cermet and ceramic compositions. [for thermal resistant insulators and refractory coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    High temperature oxidation resistance, high hardness and high abrasion and wear resistance are properties of cermet compositions particularly to provide high temperature resistant refractory coatings on metal substrates, for use as electrical insulation seals for thermionic converters. The compositions comprise a sintered body of particles of a high temperature resistant metal or metal alloy, preferably molybdenum or tungsten particles, dispersed in and bonded to a solid solution formed of aluminum oxide and silicon nitride, and particularly a ternary solid solution formed of a mixture of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride. Ceramic compositions comprising a sintered solid solution of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride are also described.

  2. Diffusion Coatings for Corrosion Resistant Components in Coal Gasification Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Angel Sanjurjo

    2005-01-01

    Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low cost alloy may improve its resistance to such sulfidation attack and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. During this reporting period we focused on getting a bench-scale test system to expose alloy coupons to simulated gasifier environment. The test facility was designed to allow about 20 specimen coupons to be exposed simultaneously for an extend period to a simulated coal gas stream at temperatures up to 1000 C. The simulated gas stream contained about 26%H{sub 2}, 39%CO, 17%CO{sub 2}, 1.4% H{sub 2}S and balance steam. We successfully ran a 100+h test with coated and uncoated stainless steel coupons. The tested alloys include SS304, SS316, SS405, SS409, SS410, and IN800. The main finding is that Ti/Ta coating provides excellent protection to SS405 under conditions where uncoated austenitic and ferritic stainless steel alloy coupons are badly corroded. Cr coatings also appear to afford some protection against corrosion.

  3. 21 CFR 177.1380 - Fluorocarbon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fluorocarbon resins. 177.1380 Section 177.1380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food...

  4. Sub millimeter absorption spectroscopy of oxygen containing fluorocarbon etching plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benck, Eric; Siegrist, Karen

    2004-09-01

    The role of oxygen in fluorocarbon etching plasmas is investigated using sub millimeter wavelength absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas were created in a specially modified capacitively coupled Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) Reference Reactor with a commercial electrostatic chuck. Photoresist and SiO2 blanket coated wafers were etched in C_4F_8/O_2/Ar, C_5F_8/O_2/Ar, and C_4F_6/O_2/Ar discharges. The absolute density of various radicals (CF, CF_2, CHF_3, COF_2, CO, etc.) were measured as a function of the percentage of oxygen in the feed gas mixture using a sub millimeter source based on a 48x frequency multiplication chain. These results are also compared with C_xF_y/O_2/Xe mixtures.

  5. Enhanced removal of radioactive particles by fluorocarbon surfactant solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, R.; Harling, O.K.

    1993-08-01

    The proposed research addressed the application of ESI`s particle removal process to the non-destructive decontamination of nuclear equipment. The cleaning medium used in this process is a solution of a high molecular weight fluorocarbon surfactant in an inert perfluorinated liquid which results in enhanced particle removal. The perfluorinated liquids of interest, which are recycled in the process, are nontoxic, nonflammable, and environmentally compatible, and do not present a hazard to the ozone layer. The information obtained in the Phase 1 program indicated that the proposed ESI process is technically effective and economically attractive. The fluorocarbon surfactant solutions used as working media in the ESI process survived exposure of up to 10 Mrad doses of gamma rays, and are considered sufficiently radiation resistant for the proposed process. Ultrasonic cleaning in perfluorinated surfactant solutions was found to be an effective method of removing radioactive iron (Fe 59) oxide particles from contaminated test pieces. Radioactive particles suspended in the process liquids could be quantitatively removed by filtration through a 0.1 um membrane filter. Projected economics indicate a pre-tax pay back time of 1 month for a commercial scale system.

  6. Low conductivity and sintering-resistant thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating composition is provided. The composition has a base oxide, a primary stabilizer, and at least two additional cationic oxide dopants. Preferably, a pair of group A and group B defect cluster-promoting oxides is used in conjunction with the base and primary stabilizer oxides. The new thermal barrier coating is found to have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better sintering resistance. In preferred embodiments, the base oxide is selected from zirconia and hafnia. The group A and group B cluster-promoting oxide dopants preferably are selected such that the group A dopant has a smaller cationic radius than the primary stabilizer oxide, and so that the primary stabilizer oxide has a small cationic radius than that of the group B dopant.

  7. Low conductivity and sintering-resistant thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating composition comprising a base oxide, a primary stabilizer oxide, and at least one dopant oxide is disclosed. Preferably, a pair of group A and group B defect cluster-promoting oxides is used in conjunction with the base and primary stabilizer oxides. The new thermal barrier coating is found to have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better sintering resistance. The base oxide is selected from the group consisting of zirconia and hafnia and combinations thereof. The primary stabilizing oxide is selected from the group consisting of yttria, dysprosia, erbia and combinations thereof. The dopant or group A and group B cluster-promoting oxide dopants are selected from the group consisting of rare earth metal oxides, transitional metal oxides, alkaline earth metal oxides and combinations thereof. The dopant or dopants preferably have ionic radii different from those of the primary stabilizer and/or the base oxides.

  8. Low conductivity and sintering-resistant thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating composition is provided. The composition has a base oxide, a primary stabilizer, and at least two additional cationic oxide dopants. Preferably, a pair of group A and group B defect cluster-promoting oxides is used in conjunction with the base and primary stabilizer oxides. The new thermal barrier coating is found to have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better sintering resistance. In preferred embodiments, the base oxide is selected from zirconia and hafnia. The group A and group B cluster-promoting oxide dopants preferably are selected such that the group A dopant has a smaller cationic radius than the primary stabilizer oxide, and so that the primary stabilizer oxide has a small cationic radius than that of the group B dopant.

  9. Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure and method of processing

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Jr., Jesse J.; Hirschfeld, Deidre A.; Li, Tingkai

    1993-12-07

    Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure are created using sol-gel processes. The processes have particular application in creating calcium magnesium zirconium phosphate, CMZP, coatings and foams.

  10. White primer permits a corrosion-resistant coating of minimum weight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, R. H.; Jensen, D. P.; Schnake, P.

    1966-01-01

    White primer for coating 2219 aluminum alloy supplies a base for a top coating of enamel. A formulation of pigments and vehicle results in a primer with high corrosion resistance and minimum film thickness.

  11. Tantalum-based thin film coatings for wear resistant arthroprostheses.

    PubMed

    Balagna, C; Faga, M G; Spriano, S

    2011-10-01

    Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys with high carbon content (HC-CoCrMo) are widely used as materials for arthroprosthesis, in particular in metal-on-metal (MoM) hip joints. In spite of their good wear and corrosion resistance, production of metallic wear particles and metal ion release will occur on a large time-scale. An enhancement of the metal ion level in the patient's blood and urine is often reported in clinical data. Hypersensitivity, inflammatory response and cell necrosis can occur as consequence. So implants on young patients and women on childbearing age are not so widespread. The aim of this research is the realization of a thin film coating in order to improve the biocompatibility of Co-based alloys and to reduce debris production, ion release and citotoxicity. The innovative process consists of a thermal treatment in molten salts, in order to obtain a tantalum enriched thin film coating. Tantalum is chosen because it is considered a biocompatible metal with high corrosion resistance and low ion release. Three HC-CoCrMo alloys, produced by different manufacturing processes, are tested as substrates. The coating is a thin film of TaC or it can be composed by a multilayer of two tantalum carbides and metallic tantalum, depending on the temperature of the treatment and on the carbon content of the substrate. The thin films as well the substrates are characterized from the structural, chemical and morphological point of view. Moreover mechanical behaviour of treated and untreated materials is analyzed by means of nanohardness, scratch and ball-on-disc wear tests. The coating increases the mechanical and tribological properties of HC-CoCrMo. PMID:22400292

  12. Microstructure and corrosion resistance of phytic acid conversion coatings for magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiufang; Li, Qingfen; Li, Ying; Wang, Fuhui; Jin, Guo; Ding, Minghui

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, a new innoxious and pollution-free chemical protective coating for magnesium alloys, phytic acid conversion coating, was prepared. The conversion coatings are found to have high cover ratio and no cracks are found by atomic force microscopes (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The main elements of the conversion coatings are Mg, Al, O, P and C by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The chemical state of the elements in the coatings was also investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). AES depth profile analysis suggests that the thickness of the conversion coating is about 340 nm. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was evaluated by polarization curves. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance for the conversion coated AZ91D magnesium alloys in 3.5% NaCl solution increases markedly. The mechanisms of corrosion resistance and coatings formation are also discussed.

  13. Peripheral vascular responses to fluorocarbon administration.

    PubMed

    Faithfull, N S; King, C E; Cain, S M

    1987-03-01

    To detect the local effect of hyperoxia on skeletal muscle vasculature, 2.5-ml boluses of oxygenated or deoxygenated fluorocarbon emulsion (F-O2 or F-N2) were washed through the hindlimb of anesthetized dogs at prevailing arterial pressure. Instantaneous hematocrit changes at the outflow were registered and stored in digital form with the red cells serving as the nondiffusible tracer in the resulting washout curves. A gamma density function was fitted and the gamma index (1/square root of alpha) was derived as a measure of skewness or perfusion heterogeneity. After recovery from the initial hypotensive reaction to fluorocarbon emulsion, washout curves for F-O2 and F-N2 were registered and blood samples were taken during 40 min of normoxia followed by 40 min of hypoxic hypoxia. The initial reaction to fluorocarbon significantly increased the gamma index so that the experiments began with a high index of perfusion heterogeneity in the limb vasculature. No significant difference was seen between F-O2 and F-N2 in normoxia but F-O2 maintained greater heterogeneity during hypoxia. The increased heterogeneity observed after the fluorocarbon reaction correlated highly with the severity of the hypotensive reaction which was also found to correlate inversely with the ability of the limb musculature to increase the O2 extraction ratio with onset of hypoxia. This blunting of microcirculatory reactivity to hyperoxia and hypoxia was attributed, in part, to the initial transient fluorocarbon reaction, possibly mediated by complement activation. PMID:3587075

  14. High-temperature corrosion resistance of ceramics and ceramic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.

    1996-06-01

    Ceramics and ceramic composites offer the potential to operate fossil energy systems at the higher temperatures necessary for improved energy efficiency and better environmental control. However, because many fossil fuel-derived processes contain sulfur, chlorine, and carbon, as well as oxygen, degradation from high-temperature corrosion and environmental effects arising from reactions of solids with gases and condensable products is a common life-determining factor in operating systems. Ceramic-based products are not immune to such degradation; adequate corrosion resistance must be assured to exploit the technical and economic potential of such materials. This is normally accomplished by using stable, sound oxides that exist in their bulk form, that naturally grow as surface layers upon exposure to an oxidizing environment, or that are deposited as a coating on a susceptible material. It is therefore important to examine the critical issues with respect to more environmental stability of ceramics that have the potential to be corrosion resistant in particular fossil environments. Key aspects include not only chemical compatibility, but the influence of the environment on the mechanical behavior of the ceramic materials. In addition, for coatings, the mechanical reliability of the ceramic is a key issue in that an otherwise corrosion-resistant surface layer must remain sound and adherent in order to provide protection to the underlying substrate. The purpose of this work is to support the development of advanced ceramics and ceramic composites for applications in fossil environments by examining critical issues related to high-temperature corrosion resistance. More specifically, the overall objective of this task is to examine the chemical compatibility and reliability of potentially corrosion-resistant ceramics being developed as protective overcoats and/or structural materials as parts of other work elements funded by the AR&TD Program.

  15. Highly defective oxides as sinter resistant thermal barrier coating

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2005-08-16

    A thermal barrier coating material formed of a highly defective cubic matrix structure having a concentration of a stabilizer sufficiently high that the oxygen vacancies created by the stabilizer interact within the matrix to form multi-vacancies, thereby improving the sintering resistance of the material. The concentration of stabilizer within the cubic matrix structure is greater than that concentration of stabilizer necessary to give the matrix a peak ionic conductivity value. The concentration of stabilizer may be at least 30 wt. %. Embodiments include a cubic matrix of zirconia stabilized by at least 30-50 wt. % yttria, and a cubic matrix of hafnia stabilized by at least 30-50 wt. % gadolinia.

  16. Hybrid organic/inorganic coatings for abrasion resistance on plastic and metal substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, J.; Jordens, K.; Wilkes, G.L.

    1996-12-31

    Novel abrasion resistant coatings have been successfully prepared by the sol-gel method. These materials are spin coated onto bisphenol-A polycarbonate, diallyl diglycol carbonate resin (CR-39) sheet, aluminum, and steel substrates and are thermally cured to obtain a transparent coating of a few microns in thickness. Following the curing, the abrasion resistance is measured and compared with an uncoated control. It was found that these hybrid organic/inorganic networks partially afford excellent abrasion resistance to the polycarbonate substrates investigated. In addition to having excellent abrasion resistance comparable to current commercial coatings, some newly developed systems are also UV resistant. Similar coating formulations applied to metals can greatly improve the abrasion resistance despite the fact that the coatings are lower in density than their substrates.

  17. A new diffusion-inhibited oxidation-resistant coating for superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedwill, M. A.; Glasgow, T. K.; Levine, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    A concept for enhanced protection of superalloys consists of adding an oxidation- and diffusion-resistant cermet layer between the superalloy and the outer oxidation-resistant metallic alloy coating. Such a duplex coating was compared with a physical-vapor-deposited (PVD) NiCrAlY coating in cyclic oxidation at 1150 C. The substrate alloy was MA 754 - an oxide-dispersion-strengthened superalloy that is difficult to coat. The duplex coating, applied by plasma spraying, outperformed the PVD coating on the basis of weight change and both macroscopic and metallographic observations.

  18. DIFFUSION COATINGS FOR CORROSION RESISTANT COMPONENTS IN COAL GASIFICATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Angel Sanjurjo

    2004-05-01

    Heat-exchangers, filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand demanding conditions of high temperatures and pressure differentials. Under the highly sulfiding conditions of the high temperature coal gas, the performance of components degrade significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low cost alloy may improve is resistance to such sulfidation attack and decrease capital and operating costs. A review of the literature indicates that the corrosion reaction is the competition between oxidation and sulfidation reactions. The Fe- and Ni-based high-temperature alloys are susceptible to sulfidation attack unless they are fortified with high levels of Cr, Al, and Si. To impart corrosion resistance, these elements need not be in the bulk of the alloy and need only be present at the surface layers.

  19. An Oxidation-Resistant Coating Alloy for Gamma Titanium Aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, Michael P.; Smialek, James L.; Brindley, William J.

    1997-01-01

    Titanium aluminides based on the g-phase (TiAl) offer the potential for component weight savings of up to 50 percent over conventional superalloys in 600 to 850 C aerospace applications. Extensive development efforts over the past 10 years have led to the identification of "engineering" gamma-alloys, which offer a balance of room-temperature mechanical properties and high-temperature strength retention. The gamma class of titanium aluminides also offers oxidation and interstitial (oxygen and nitrogen) embrittlement resistance superior to that of the alpha(sub 2) (Ti3Al) and orthorhombic (Ti2AlNb) classes of titanium aluminides. However, environmental durability is still a concern, especially at temperatures above 750 to 800 C. Recent work at the NASA Lewis Research Center led to the development of an oxidation-resistant coating alloy that shows great promise for the protection of gamma titanium aluminides.

  20. Wear-Resistant, Self-Lubricating Surfaces of Diamond Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1995-01-01

    In humid air and dry nitrogen, as-deposited, fine-grain diamond films and polished, coarse-grain diamond films have low steady-state coefficients of friction (less than 0.1) and low wear rates (less than or equal to 10(exp -6) mm(exp 3)/N-m). In an ultrahigh vacuum (10(exp -7) Pa), however, they have high steady-state coefficients of friction (greater than 0.6) and high wear rates (greater than or equal to 10(exp -4) mm(exp 3)/N-m). Therefore, the use of as-deposited, fine-grain and polished, coarse-grain diamond films as wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings must be limited to normal air or gaseous environments such as dry nitrogen. On the other hand, carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain diamond films and nitrogen-ion-implanted, coarse-grain diamond films have low steady-state coefficients of friction (less than 0.1) and low wear rates (less than or equal to 10(exp -6) mm(exp 3)/N-m) in all three environments. These films can be effectively used as wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings in an ultrahigh vacuum as well as in normal air and dry nitrogen.

  1. Development of wear resistant ceramic coatings for diesel engine components

    SciTech Connect

    Haselkorn, M.H. )

    1992-04-01

    Improved fuel economy and a reduction of emissions can be achieved by insulation of the combustion chamber components to reduce heat rejection. However, insulating the combustion chamber components will also increase the operating temperature of the piston ring/cylinder liner interface from approximately 150{degree}C to over 300{degree}C. Existing ring/liner materials can not withstand these higher operating temperatures and for this reason, new materials need to be developed for this critical tribological interface. The overall goal of this program is the development of piston ring/cylinder liner material pairs which would be able to provide the required friction and wear properties at these more severe operating conditions. More specifically, this program first selected, and then evaluated, potential d/wear resistant coatings which could be applied to either piston rings an or cylinder liners and provide, at 350{degree}C under lubricated conditions, coefficients of friction below 0.1 and wear rates of less than 25 {times} lO{sup {minus}6} mm/hour. The processes selected for applying the candidate wear resistant coatings to piston rings and/or cylinder liners were plasma spraying, chemical vapor, physical vapor and low temperature arc vapor deposition techniques as well as enameling techniques.

  2. Microstructure and wear resistance of Al-SiC composites coatings on ZE41 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, P.; Campo, M.; Torres, B.; Escalera, M. D.; Otero, E.; Rams, J.

    2009-08-01

    Al and Al-SiC composites coatings were prepared by oxyacetylene flame spraying on ZE41 magnesium alloy substrates. Coatings with controlled reinforcement rate of up to 23 vol.% were obtained by spraying mixtures containing aluminium powder with up to 50 vol.% SiC particles. The coatings were sprayed on the magnesium alloy with minor degradation of its microstructure or mechanical properties. The coatings were compacted to improve their microstructure and protective behaviour. The wear behaviour of these coatings has been tested using the pin-on-disk technique and the reinforced coatings provided 85% more wear resistance than uncoated ZE41 and 400% more than pure Al coatings.

  3. Oxidation resistance and mechanical properties of HfC nanowire-toughened ultra-high temperature ceramic coating for SiC-coated C/C composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jincui; Zhang, Yulei; Hu, Heng; Fei, Tian; Li, Hejun

    2016-01-01

    To improve the oxidation resistance of carbon/carbon (C/C) composites, a dense HfC nanowire-toughened ultra-high temperature ceramic multiphase coating was prepared on SiC-coated C/C composites by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and pack cementation. The microstructure, mechanical and oxidation resistance properties of the coating were investigated. The results show that the HfC nanowires in the coating could suppress the cracking of the coating and then improve the toughness of the coating. The flexural property, thermal shock and isothermal oxidation resistance of the coating were all improved due to the incorporation of HfC nanowires.

  4. Pretreatment of Kapton-coated cable for epoxy adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Carley, J.F.

    1984-01-09

    Preliminary testing of a new system for protecting bonded strain gages that will be attached to the MFTF magnets indicated falling electrical resistance to ground, attributed to the infiltration of moisture. The most likely infiltration route seemed to be along the Kapton lead cable, which has an outer surface of FEP fluorocarbon resin. Samples of the cable were pretreated with a fluorocarbon etchant, Tetra-Etch, for periods of 10, 25, and 40 s at room temperature, followed by rinsing with demineralized water. The treated ends were embedded in the proposed epoxy sealant, Hysol EA 934, a compound containing 70 wt % of asbestos. The tensile-shear stresses required to pull the wires out of these embedments were measured. Results show that the three levels of treatment are equally effective in raising the bond strength from 377 psi for the untreated cable to about twice that, 763 psi. The 40-s exposure to Tetra-Etch appears to have penetrated the 0.5-mil fluorocarbon coating and attacked the Kapton film and the conductor coatings inside it.

  5. Application of cyclic fluorocarbon/argon discharges to device patterning

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Metzler, Dominik; Uppiredi, Kishore; Bruce, Robert L.; Miyazoe, Hiroyuki; Zhu, Yu; Price, William; Sikorski, Ed S.; Li, Chen; Engelmann, Sebastian U.; Joseph, Eric A.; et al

    2015-11-13

    With increasing demands on device patterning to achieve smaller critical dimensions and pitches for the 5nm node and beyond, the need for atomic layer etching (ALE) is steadily increasing. In this study, a cyclic fluorocarbon/Ar plasma is successfully used for ALE patterning in a manufacturing scale reactor. Self-limited etching of silicon oxide is observed. The impact of various process parameters on the etch performance is established. The substrate temperature has been shown to play an especially significant role, with lower temperatures leading to higher selectivity and lower etch rates, but worse pattern fidelity. The cyclic ALE approach established with thismore » work is shown to have great potential for small scale device patterning, showing self-limited etching, improved uniformity and resist mask performance.« less

  6. Application of cyclic fluorocarbon/argon discharges to device patterning

    SciTech Connect

    Metzler, Dominik; Uppiredi, Kishore; Bruce, Robert L.; Miyazoe, Hiroyuki; Zhu, Yu; Price, William; Sikorski, Ed S.; Li, Chen; Engelmann, Sebastian U.; Joseph, Eric A.; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.

    2015-11-13

    With increasing demands on device patterning to achieve smaller critical dimensions and pitches for the 5nm node and beyond, the need for atomic layer etching (ALE) is steadily increasing. In this study, a cyclic fluorocarbon/Ar plasma is successfully used for ALE patterning in a manufacturing scale reactor. Self-limited etching of silicon oxide is observed. The impact of various process parameters on the etch performance is established. The substrate temperature has been shown to play an especially significant role, with lower temperatures leading to higher selectivity and lower etch rates, but worse pattern fidelity. The cyclic ALE approach established with this work is shown to have great potential for small scale device patterning, showing self-limited etching, improved uniformity and resist mask performance.

  7. Flame-resistant textiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogg, L. C.; Stringham, R. S.; Toy, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    Flame resistance treatment for acid resistant polyamide fibers involving photoaddition of fluorocarbons to surface has been scaled up to treat 10 yards of commercial width (41 in.) fabric. Process may be applicable to other low cost polyamides, polyesters, and textiles.

  8. Selective Plasma Deposition of Fluorocarbon Films on SAMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crain, Mark M., III; Walsh, Kevin M.; Cohn, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    A dry plasma process has been demonstrated to be useful for the selective modification of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiolates. These SAMs are used, during the fabrication of semiconductor electronic devices, as etch masks on gold layers that are destined to be patterned and incorporated into the devices. The selective modification involves the formation of fluorocarbon films that render the SAMs more effective in protecting the masked areas of the gold against etching by a potassium iodide (KI) solution. This modification can be utilized, not only in the fabrication of single electronic devices but also in the fabrication of integrated circuits, microelectromechanical systems, and circuit boards. In the steps that precede the dry plasma process, a silicon mold in the desired pattern is fabricated by standard photolithographic techniques. A stamp is then made by casting polydimethylsiloxane (commonly known as silicone rubber) in the mold. The stamp is coated with an alkanethiol solution, then the stamp is pressed on the gold layer of a device to be fabricated in order to deposit the alkanethiol to form an alkanethiolate SAM in the desired pattern (see figure). Next, the workpiece is exposed to a radio-frequency plasma generated from a mixture of CF4 and H2 gases. After this plasma treatment, the SAM is found to be modified, while the exposed areas of gold remain unchanged. This dry plasma process offers the potential for forming masks superior to those formed in a prior wet etching process. Among the advantages over the wet etching process are greater selectivity, fewer pin holes in the masks, and less nonuniformity of the masks. The fluorocarbon films formed in this way may also be useful as intermediate layers for subsequent fabrication steps and as dielectric layers to be incorporated into finished products.

  9. Fluorocarbon adsorption in hierarchical porous frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motkuri, Radha Kishan; Annapureddy, Harsha V. R.; Vijaykumar, M.; Schaef, H. Todd; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Dang, Liem X.; Krishna, Rajamani; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2014-07-01

    Metal-organic frameworks comprise an important class of solid-state materials and have potential for many emerging applications such as energy storage, separation, catalysis and bio-medical. Here we report the adsorption behaviour of a series of fluorocarbon derivatives on a set of microporous and hierarchical mesoporous frameworks. The microporous frameworks show a saturation uptake capacity for dichlorodifluoromethane of >4 mmol g-1 at a very low relative saturation pressure (P/Po) of 0.02. In contrast, the mesoporous framework shows an exceptionally high uptake capacity reaching >14 mmol g-1 at P/Po of 0.4. Adsorption affinity in terms of mass loading and isosteric heats of adsorption is found to generally correlate with the polarizability and boiling point of the refrigerant, with dichlorodifluoromethane >chlorodifluoromethane >chlorotrifluoromethane >tetrafluoromethane >methane. These results suggest the possibility of exploiting these sorbents for separation of azeotropic mixtures of fluorocarbons and use in eco-friendly fluorocarbon-based adsorption cooling.

  10. Fluorocarbon adsorption in hierarchical porous frameworks.

    PubMed

    Motkuri, Radha Kishan; Annapureddy, Harsha V R; Vijaykumar, M; Schaef, H Todd; Martin, Paul F; McGrail, B Peter; Dang, Liem X; Krishna, Rajamani; Thallapally, Praveen K

    2014-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks comprise an important class of solid-state materials and have potential for many emerging applications such as energy storage, separation, catalysis and bio-medical. Here we report the adsorption behaviour of a series of fluorocarbon derivatives on a set of microporous and hierarchical mesoporous frameworks. The microporous frameworks show a saturation uptake capacity for dichlorodifluoromethane of >4 mmol g(-1) at a very low relative saturation pressure (P/Po) of 0.02. In contrast, the mesoporous framework shows an exceptionally high uptake capacity reaching >14 mmol g(-1) at P/Po of 0.4. Adsorption affinity in terms of mass loading and isosteric heats of adsorption is found to generally correlate with the polarizability and boiling point of the refrigerant, with dichlorodifluoromethane > chlorodifluoromethane > chlorotrifluoromethane > tetrafluoromethane > methane. These results suggest the possibility of exploiting these sorbents for separation of azeotropic mixtures of fluorocarbons and use in eco-friendly fluorocarbon-based adsorption cooling. PMID:25006832

  11. Fluorocarbon adsorption in hierarchical porous frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Motkuri, RK; Annapureddy, HVR; Vijaykumar, M; Schaef, HT; Martin, PF; McGrail, BP; Dang, LX; Krishna, R; Thallapally, PK

    2014-07-09

    Metal-organic frameworks comprise an important class of solid-state materials and have potential for many emerging applications such as energy storage, separation, catalysis and bio-medical. Here we report the adsorption behaviour of a series of fluorocarbon derivatives on a set of microporous and hierarchical mesoporous frameworks. The microporous frameworks show a saturation uptake capacity for dichlorodifluoromethane of >4 mmol g(-1) at a very low relative saturation pressure (P/P-o) of 0.02. In contrast, the mesoporous framework shows an exceptionally high uptake capacity reaching >14 mmol g(-1) at P/P-o of 0.4. Adsorption affinity in terms of mass loading and isosteric heats of adsorption is found to generally correlate with the polarizability and boiling point of the refrigerant, with dichlorodifluoromethane >chlorodifluoromethane >chlorotrifluoromethane >tetrafluoromethane >methane. These results suggest the possibility of exploiting these sorbents for separation of azeotropic mixtures of fluorocarbons and use in eco-friendly fluorocarbon-based adsorption cooling.

  12. Structure Analysis Of Corrosion Resistant Thermal Sprayed Coatings On Low Alloy Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chaliampalias, D.; Vourlias, G.; Pistofidis, N.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergiou, A.; Stergioudis, G.; Polychroniadis, E. K.

    2007-04-23

    Metallic coatings have been proved to reduce the rate of corrosion of steel in various atmospheres. In this work the structure of Al, Cu-Al and Zn thermal sprayed coatings is examined. The as formed coatings are extremely rough, and they are composed of several phases which increase corrosion resistance as it was determined Salt Spray Chamber tests.

  13. Corrosion-resistant coating prepared by the thermal decomposition of lithium permanganate

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrando, W.A.

    1999-09-01

    A ceramic, metal, or metal alloy surface is covered with lithium permanganate which is then thermally decomposed to produce a corrosion resistant coating on the surface. This coating serves as a primer coating which is preferably covered with an overcoat of a sealing paint.

  14. Blanch Resistant and Thermal Barrier NiAl Coating Systems for Advanced Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, Sai V. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method of forming an environmental resistant thermal barrier coating on a copper alloy is disclosed. The steps include cleansing a surface of a copper alloy, depositing a bond coat on the cleansed surface of the copper alloy, depositing a NiAl top coat on the bond coat and consolidating the bond coat and the NiAl top coat to form the thermal barrier coating. The bond coat may be a nickel layer or a layer composed of at least one of copper and chromium-copper alloy and either the bond coat or the NiAl top coat or both may be deposited using a low pressure or vacuum plasma spray.

  15. Investigation to identify paint coatings resistive to microorganism growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, C. W.; Kemp, H. T.

    1971-01-01

    All selected coatings contain nutrients that support microbial growth and survival. Incorporation of microbiocidal agents into coatings more susceptible to attack is recommended for improved inhibition of microorganism growth and for increased protection against deterioration of coatings by microorganisms.

  16. Detecting Corrosion Resistance of Coated Steel Rebars by Electrochemical Technique (eis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryou, J.; Shah, S.

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is one of the electrochemical techniques used in materials science. The present measurements are used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of new types of coated steel rebar used in reinforced concrete. In this study, Si-based coating materials are used and evaluated, because adding Si to metals and alloys, including steel, generally increases their corrosion, oxidation, and erosion resistance. The result suggests that electrochemical impedance spectroscopy may be useful for monitoring corrosion activity on coated steel rebars. Based upon impedance changes, it appears that the silicon powder coating bonds well to the steel, and that the coating has a good performance.

  17. A corrosion resistant cerium oxide based coating on aluminum alloy 2024 prepared by brush plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Junlei; Han, Zhongzhi; Zuo, Yu; Tang, Yuming

    2011-01-01

    Cerium oxide based coatings were prepared on AA2024 Al alloy by brush plating. The characteristic of this technology is that hydrogen peroxide, which usually causes the plating solution to be unstable, is not necessary in the plating electrolyte. The coating showed laminated structures and good adhesive strength with the substrate. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that the coatings were composed of Ce(III) and Ce(IV) oxides. The brush plated coatings on Al alloys improved corrosion resistance. The influence of plating parameters on structure and corrosion resistance of the cerium oxide based coating was studied.

  18. Fast-drying coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartoszek, E. J.

    1978-01-01

    Nontoxic coating has excellent optical properties and can be pigmented in many different colors. It bonds well, can be applied by conventional methods, weathers well, and is self-extinguishing. Coating composition comprises latex blends of fluorocarbons, acrylic resins, stabilizers, modifiers, variety of inorganic pigments, and other additives. Suitable latex primers have also been developed from acrylic latex base.

  19. The Development of Erosion and Impact Resistant Turbine Airfoil Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are used in gas turbine engines to protect engine hot-section components in the harsh combustion environments and extend component lifetimes. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Advanced erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the doped thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion and impact damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be discussed.

  20. Performance Evaluation and Modeling of Erosion Resistant Turbine Engine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming; Kuczmarski, Maria

    2008-01-01

    The erosion resistant turbine thermal barrier coating system is critical to the rotorcraft engine performance and durability. The objective of this work was to determine erosion resistance of advanced thermal barrier coating systems under simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments, thus validating a new thermal barrier coating turbine blade technology for future rotorcraft applications. A high velocity burner rig based erosion test approach was established and a new series of rare earth oxide- and TiO2/Ta2O5- alloyed, ZrO2-based low conductivity thermal barrier coatings were designed and processed. The low conductivity thermal barrier coating systems demonstrated significant improvements in the erosion resistance. A comprehensive model based on accumulated strain damage low cycle fatigue is formulated for blade erosion life prediction. The work is currently aiming at the simulated engine erosion testing of advanced thermal barrier coated turbine blades to establish and validate the coating life prediction models.

  1. On the Problem of Wear Resistant Coatings Separation From Tools and Machine Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrushin, S. I.; Gubaidulina, R. H.; Gruby, S. V.; Likholat, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    The article considers separation of wear resistant coatings of tool and engineering materials which arises both during coating fabrication and use of the product. The cause of this phenomenon is assumed to be related to thermal residual stresses generating on the coating- substrate border. These stresses have been analyzed and methods are provided to calculate it after produced composite material is cooled down from the temperature of coating synthesis to the ambient temperature. A no-fracture condition has been stated in relation to coating- substrate thicknesses, temperature differences and physical and mechanical properties of combined materials. The issue of intermediate layer incorporation with pre-set parameters has been discussed. A co-effect of thermal residual and functional stresses on the strength of the boundary layer has been considered when heating, tension and compression of a product with wear resistant coating. Conclusions have been made, as well as recommendations to improve fracture strength of products with thin wear resistant coatings.

  2. Rolling-contact and wear resistance of hard coatings on bearing-steel substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, A.

    1992-02-01

    Ever-increasing needs for high-performance ball- and roller-bearing components that can endure extreme applications have led to a growing interest in hard coatings for improved fatigue life and wear resistance. In particular, hard TiN and TiC coatings and, quite recently, diamond like carbon films have attracted much attention from manufacturers that produce bearing systems for both rolling- and sliding-contact applications. This paper presents an overview that highlights recent incremental progress in achieving improved fatigue and wear resistance in bearing steels through the use of hard coatings. Effects of coating adhesion, thickness, and morphology on fatigue and wear resistance of hard coatings are discussed in detail. Specific references are made to a few mechanistic models that correlate coating thickness and adhesion to improved fatigue life and wear resistance.

  3. Resistance to Corrosion of Zirconia Coatings Deposited by Spray Pyrolysis in Nitrided Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubillos, G. I.; Olaya, J. J.; Bethencourt, M.; Cifredo, G.; Blanco, G.

    2013-10-01

    Coatings of zirconium oxide were deposited onto three types of stainless steel, AISI 316L, 2205, and tool steel AISI D2, using the ultrasonic spray pyrolysis method. The effect of the flux ratio on the process and its influence on the structure and morphology of the coatings were investigated. The coatings obtained, 600 nm thick, were characterized using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The resistance to corrosion of the coatings deposited over steel (not nitrided) and stainless steel nitrided (for 2 h at 823 K) in an ammonia atmosphere was evaluated. The zirconia coating enhances the stainless steel's resistance to corrosion, with the greatest increase in corrosion resistance being observed for tool steel. When the deposition is performed on previously nitrided stainless steel, the morphology of the surface improves and the coating is more homogeneous, which leads to an improved corrosion resistance.

  4. Development and study of dielectric coatings with a high radiation resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Babayants, Gennadi I; Zhupanov, V G; Klyuev, Evgeni V; Garanin, Sergey G; Savkin, Anton V; Sukharev, Stanislav A; Sharov, Oleg A

    2005-07-31

    Technological methods for applying dielectric coatings on glass substrates are proposed and studied, which substantially enhanced the radiation resistance of the coating to irradiation by nanosecond pulses. A rapid method for measuring the radiation resistance of optical elements by using an array of Gaussian laser beams is described. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  5. Erosion Resistance of High Velocity Oxy-Fuel WC-Co-Cr Thermal Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imeson, Chris

    Thermal spray coatings have been incorporated in oil and gas extraction efforts for many years. Recently, High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) has become increasingly incorporated where erosive environments are present. This study investigates the microstructural and mechanical properties of HVOF WC-Co-Cr coatings deposited at SharkSkin Coatings ltd. The deposited coatings exhibited a low porosity with high adhesion strength, hardness, and superior erosion resistance. In this study, a recirculating solid particle erosion testing machine was designed and fabricated to simulate an erosive environment on a laboratory scale. This study was also aimed at improving microstructures and mechanical properties of the coatings by modifying the two coating deposition parameters e.g. standoff and pre-cycle heating. It was determined that pre-spray substrate heating negatively affected the coatings microstructures e.g. porosity, while reducing the stand-off distance positively influenced the coating microstructures and mechanical properties, e.g. erosion resistance.

  6. DIFFUSION COATINGS FOR CORROSION RESISTANT COMPONENTS IN COAL GASIFICATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gopala N. Krishnan

    2004-05-01

    Advanced electric power generation systems use a coal gasifier to convert coal to a gas rich in fuels such as H{sub 2} and CO. The gas stream contains impurities such as H{sub 2}S and HCl, which attack metal components of the coal gas train, causing plant downtime and increasing the cost of power generation. Corrosion-resistant coatings would improve plant availability and decrease maintenance costs, thus allowing the environmentally superior integrated gasification combined cycle plants to be more competitive with standard power-generation technologies. A startup meeting was held at the National Energy Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA site on July 28, 2003. SRI staff described the technical approach of the project.

  7. A superficial coating to improve oxidation and decarburization resistance of bearing steel at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaojing; Wei, Lianqi; Zhou, Xun; Zhang, Xiaomeng; Ye, Shufeng; Chen, Yunfa

    2012-03-01

    The coating material consisted of aqueous slurry of dolomite, bauxite and silicon carbide mixture. Such a coating material when applied superficially on the steel surface not only enhances oxidation resistance but also helps in inhibiting the decarburization even up to 1250 °C. Metalloscope, XRD and TG-DTA thermal analysis revealed that the formation of a newly densified coating comprised of spinels and the reducing atmosphere formed by the oxidation of SiC improved the resistance of oxidation and decarburization.

  8. One-step spray-coating process for the fabrication of colorful superhydrophobic coatings with excellent corrosion resistance.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Wu, Runni; Jing, Zhijiao; Yan, Long; Zha, Fei; Lei, Ziqiang

    2015-10-01

    A simple method was used to generate colorful hydrophobic stearate particles via chemical reactions between inorganic salts and sodium stearate. Colored self-cleaning superhydrophobic coatings were prepared through a facile one-step spray-coating process by spraying the stearate particle suspensions onto stainless steel substrates. Furthermore, the colorful superhydrophobic coating maintains excellent chemical stability under both harsh acidic and alkaline circumstances. After being immersed in a 3.5 wt % NaCl aqueous solution for 1 month, the as-prepared coatings remained superhydrophobic; however, they lost their self-cleaning property with a sliding angle of about 46 ± 3°. The corrosion behavior of the superhydrophobic coatings on the Al substrate was characterized by the polarization curve and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The electrochemical corrosion test results indicated that the superhydrophobic coatings possessed excellent corrosion resistance, which could supply efficient and long-term preservation for the bare Al substrate. PMID:26365307

  9. Corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of SrHAp/ZnO composite implant coating on titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Zeng, Hongjuan; Wang, Xuexin; Wang, Deshun

    2014-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of electrodeposited ZnO containing and strontium doped hydroxyapatite (SrHAp/ZnO) coating on titanium (Ti) substrate was investigated. The microstructure, phase composition and corrosion resistance of the coating were studied. The results reveal that Sr2+ and ZnO incorporation markedly increased the density of HAp coating, i.e. the fabricated coating had significantly lower porosity than the original HAp coating. The SrHAp/ZnO coating was dense and uniform, with a flocculent morphological structure of apatite. The SrHAp/ZnO crystals were carbonated calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite, and Sr2+ and ZnO were homogeneously distributed in the coating. The thickness of the composite coating was almost 10 μm without delamination or cracks at the interface. Bond strength test revealed that the adhesion of the SrHAp/ZnO coating was more enhanced than that of the HAp coating. The SrHAp/ZnO-coated Ti had a lower corrosion rate than the pure HAp-coated sample, which suggests the protective characteristic of the composite coating. Osteoblast cellular tests demonstrated that the SrHAp/ZnO composite coating greatly enhanced the in vitro biocompatibility of the Ti substrate.

  10. A study of the deposition of carbide coatings on graphite fibers. [to increase electrical resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suplinskas, R. J.; Henze, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition of boron carbide and silicon carbide on graphite fibers to increase their electrical resistance was studied. Silicon carbide coatings were applied without degradation of the mechanical properties of the filaments. These coatings typically added 1000 ohms to the resistance of a filament as measured between two mercury pools. When SiC-coated filaments were oxidized by refluxing in boiling phosphoric acid, average resistance increased by an additional 1000 ohms; in addition resistance increases as high as 150 K ohms and breakdown voltages as high as 17 volts were noted. Data on boron carbide coatings indicated that such coatings would not be effective in increasing resistance, and would degrade the mechanical properties.

  11. A review of the use of wear-resistant coatings in the cutting-tool industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.

    1983-01-01

    The main mechanisms involved in the wear of cutting tools are reviewed. Evaluation of the different coating properties required for the reduction of the different kinds of wear was also reviewed. The types of coatings and their ranges of applicability are presented and discussed in view of their properties. Various coating processes as well as their advantages and shortcomings are described. Potential future developments in the field of wear-resistant coatings are discussed.

  12. Corrosion resistant thermal barrier coating. [protecting gas turbines and other engine parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.; Miller, R. A.; Hodge, P. E. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating system for protecting metal surfaces at high temperature in normally corrosive environments is described. The thermal barrier coating system includes a metal alloy bond coating, the alloy containing nickel, cobalt, iron, or a combination of these metals. The system further includes a corrosion resistant thermal barrier oxide coating containing at least one alkaline earth silicate. The preferred oxides are calcium silicate, barium silicate, magnesium silicate, or combinations of these silicates.

  13. Bioinspired Zwitterionic Surface Coatings with Robust Photostability and Fouling Resistance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Jen; Chu, Sz-Hau; Wang, Lin-Chuan; Li, Chien-Hung; Lee, T Randall

    2015-10-28

    Great care has been paid to the biointerface between a bulk material and the biological environment, which plays a key role in the optimized performance of medical devices. In this work, we report a new superhydrophilic adsorbate, called L-cysteine betaine (Cys-b), having branched zwitterionic groups that give rise to surfaces and nanoparticles with enhanced chemical stability, biofouling resistance, and inertness to environmental changes. Cys-b was synthesized from the amphoteric sulfur-containing amino acid, L-cysteine (Cys), by quaternization of its amino group. Gold surfaces modified with Cys-b exhibited prominent repellence against the nonspecific adsorption of proteins, bacteria, and fibroblast cells. In addition, Cys-b existed in zwitterionic form over a wide pH range (i.e., pH 3.4 to 10.8), and showed excellent suppression in photoinduced oxidation on gold substrates. Furthermore, the modification of hollow Ag@Au nanoshells with Cys-b gave rise to nanoparticles with excellent colloidal stability and resistance to coordinative interaction with Cu(2+). Taken together, the unique features of Cys-b offer a new nanoscale coating for use in a wide spectrum of applications. PMID:26452141

  14. Process for synthesizing a new series of fluorocarbon polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, M. S.

    1970-01-01

    Two-step process for preparing fluorocarbon materials includes - /1/ adding gaseous fluorine to a polyperfluoropolyene to create fluorocarbon radicals, with reactive sites at unsaturated carbon atoms, and /2/ introducing a monomer, after evacuation of fluorine gas, and allowing copolymerization with the free radicals.

  15. Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Resistant Nuclear Waste Container Evaluated in Simulated Ground Water at 90?C

    SciTech Connect

    Haslam, J J; Farmer, J C

    2004-03-31

    Ceramic materials have been considered as corrosion resistant coatings for nuclear waste containers. Their suitability can be derived from the fully oxidized state for selected metal oxides. Several types of ceramic coatings applied to plain carbon steel substrates by thermal spray techniques have been exposed to 90 C simulated ground water for nearly 6 years. In some cases no apparent macroscopic damage such as coating spallation was observed in coatings. Thermal spray processes examined in this work included plasma spray, High Velocity Oxy Fuel (HVOF), and Detonation Gun. Some thermal spray coatings have demonstrated superior corrosion protection for the plain carbon steel substrate. In particular the HVOF and Detonation Gun thermal spray processes produced coatings with low connected porosity, which limited the growth rate of corrosion products. It was also demonstrated that these coatings resisted spallation of the coating even when an intentional flaw (which allowed for corrosion of the carbon steel substrate underneath the ceramic coating) was placed in the coating. A model for prediction of the corrosion protection provided by ceramic coatings is presented. The model includes the effect of the morphology and amount of the porosity within the thermal spray coating and provides a prediction of the exposure time needed to produce a crack in the ceramic coating.

  16. The hardness, adhesion, and wear resistance of coatings developed for cobalt-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.; Wilson, W.L.

    2000-05-01

    One potential approach for reducing the level of nuclear plant radiation exposure that results from activated cobalt wear debris is the use of a wear resistant coating. However, large differences in stiffness between a coating/substrate can result in high interfacial stresses that produce coating de-adhesion when a coated substrate is subjected to high stress wear contact. Scratch adhesion and indentation tests have been used to identify four promising coating processes [1,2]: (1) the use of a thin Cr-nitride coating with a hard and less-stiff interlayer, (2) the use of a thick, multilayered Cr-nitride coating with graded layers, (3) use of the duplex approach, or nitriding to harden the material subsurface followed by application of a multilayered Cr-nitride coating, and (4) application of nitriding alone. The processing, characterization, and adhesion of these coating systems are discussed. The wear resistance and performance has been evaluated using laboratory pin-on-disc, 4-ball, and high stress rolling contact tests. Based on the results of these tests, the best coating candidate from the high-stress rolling contact wear test was the thin duplex coating, which consists of ion nitriding followed deposition of a thin Cr-nitride coating, while the thin Cr-nitride coating exhibited the best results in the 4-ball wear test.

  17. Materials for Advanced Turbine Engines (MATE). Project 4: Erosion resistant compressor airfoil coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashid, J. M.; Freling, M.; Friedrich, L. A.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of coatings to provide at least a 2X improvement in particulate erosion resistance for steel, nickel and titanium compressor airfoils was identified and demonstrated. Coating materials evaluated included plasma sprayed cobalt tungsten carbide, nickel carbide and diffusion applied chromium plus boron. Several processing parameters for plasma spray processing and diffusion coating were evaluated to identify coating systems having the most potential for providing airfoil erosion resistance. Based on laboratory results and analytical evaluations, selected coating systems were applied to gas turbine blades and evaluated for surface finish, burner rig erosion resistance and effect on high cycle fatigue strength. Based on these tests, the following coatings were recommended for engine testing: Gator-Gard plasma spray 88WC-12Co on titanium alloy airfoils, plasma spray 83WC-17Co on steel and nickel alloy airfoils, and Cr+B on nickel alloy airfoils.

  18. Development of a special purpose spacecraft coating, phase 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillman, H. D.

    1980-01-01

    Coating formulations based on a fluorocarbon resin were evaluated for use on spacecraft exteriors. Formulations modified with an acrylic resin were found to have excellent offgassing properties. A much less expensive process for increasing to solid content of the fluorocarbon latex was developed.

  19. Wear and corrosion resistance of anti-bacterial Ti-Cu-N coatings on titanium implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haibo; Zhang, Xiangyu; He, Xiaojing; Li, Meng; Huang, Xiaobo; Hang, Ruiqiang; Tang, Bin

    2014-10-01

    Anti-bacterial coatings with excellent wear and corrosion resistance play a vital role in ensuring the durability of implant materials in constant use. To this end, a novel anti-bacterial surface modification by combining magnetron sputtering with plasma nitriding was adopted in this paper to fabricate Cu-bearing Ti-based nitrides coatings (Ti-Cu-N) on titanium surface. The anti-bacterial properties of Ti-Cu-N coatings were evaluated. The microstructures and composition of the coatings were investigated by using FESEM, EDS, GDOES, XRD. The wear and corrosion resistance of the coatings were investigated. The results confirmed that an anti-bacterial Ti-Cu-N coating with a thickness of 6 μm and good adhesive strength to substrate was successfully achieved on titanium surface. As implied by XRD, the coatings were consisted of TiN, Ti2N, TiN0.3 phases. The surface micro-hardness and wear resistance of Ti-Cu-N coatings were significantly enhanced after plasma nitriding treatment. The analysis of potentiodynamic polarization curves and Nyquist plots obtained in 0.9 wt.% NaCl solution suggested that the Ti-Cu-N coatings also exhibited an excellent corrosion resistance. As mentioned above, it can be concluded that the duplex-treatment reported here was a versatile approach to develop anti-bacterial Ti-Cu-N coatings with excellent comprehensive properties on titanium implants.

  20. Effect of Micro Arc Oxidation Coatings on Corrosion Resistance of 6061-Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasekar, Nitin P.; Jyothirmayi, A.; Rama Krishna, L.; Sundararajan, G.

    2008-10-01

    In the present study, the corrosion behavior of micro arc oxidation (MAO) coatings deposited at two current densities on 6061-Al alloy has been investigated. Corrosion in particular, simple immersion, and potentiodynamic polarization tests have been carried out in 3.5% NaCl in order to evaluate the corrosion resistance of MAO coatings. The long duration (up to 600 h) immersion tests of coated samples illustrated negligible change in weight as compared to uncoated alloy. The anodic polarization curves were found to exhibit substantially lower corrosion current and more positive corrosion potential for MAO-coated specimens as compared to the uncoated alloy. The electrochemical response was also compared with SS-316 and the hard anodized coatings. The results indicate that the overall corrosion resistance of the MAO coatings is significantly superior as compared to SS316 and comparable to hard anodized coating deposited on 6061 Al alloy.

  1. Development and Life Prediction of Erosion Resistant Turbine Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2010-01-01

    Future rotorcraft propulsion systems are required to operate under highly-loaded conditions and in harsh sand erosion environments, thereby imposing significant material design and durability issues. The incorporation of advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in high pressure turbine systems enables engine designs with higher inlet temperatures, thus improving the engine efficiency, power density and reliability. The impact and erosion resistance of turbine thermal barrier coating systems are crucial to the turbine coating technology application, because a robust turbine blade TBC system is a prerequisite for fully utilizing the potential coating technology benefit in the rotorcraft propulsion. This paper describes the turbine blade TBC development in addressing the coating impact and erosion resistance. Advanced thermal barrier coating systems with improved performance have also been validated in laboratory simulated engine erosion and/or thermal gradient environments. A preliminary life prediction modeling approach to emphasize the turbine blade coating erosion is also presented.

  2. Abrasion, erosion and scuffing resistance of carbide and oxide ceramic thermal sprayed coatings for different applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbezat, G.; Nicoll, A. R.; Sickinger, A.

    1993-04-01

    In the area of antiwear coatings, carbide-containing coatings and oxide ceramic coatings are applied using different thermal spray processes in the form of individual layers. In many industries these coatings have become technically significant on components where wear and friction can cause critical damage in the form of abrasion, erosion and scuffing together with corrosion. Carbide-containing and ceramic coatings have been produced with different thermal spray processes for the determination of abrasive, adhesive and erosive wear resistance. Two types of abrasion test, namely an adhesion wear test and an erosion test in water at a high velocity, were used for the characterization of wear resistance under different conditions. The coatings were also characterized with regard to microstructure, composition and fracture toughness. The influence of the thermal spraying process parameters on the microstructure is presented together with the influence of the microstructure on the behavior of the coatings under simulated service conditions.

  3. Development of combinatorial chemistry methods for coatings: high-throughput screening of abrasion resistance of coatings libraries.

    PubMed

    Potyrailo, Radislav A; Chisholm, Bret J; Olson, Daniel R; Brennan, Michael J; Molaison, Chris A

    2002-10-01

    Design, validation, and implementation of an optical spectroscopic system for high-throughput analysis of combinatorially developed protective organic coatings are reported. Our approach replaces labor-intensive coating evaluation steps with an automated system that rapidly analyzes 8 x 6 arrays of coating elements that are discretely deposited on a single plastic substrate. Each coating element of the library is 10 mm in diameter and 2-5 microm thick. Performance of coatings is evaluated with respect to their resistance to wear abrasion because this parameter is one of the primary considerations in end-use applications. Upon testing, the coating materials undergo changes that are impossible to quantitatively predict using existing knowledge. Coatings are abraded using industry-accepted abrasion test methods at a single or multiple abrasion conditions followed by the high-throughput analysis of abrasion-induced light scatter. The developed automated system is optimized for the analysis of diffusively scattered light that corresponds to 0-30% haze. System precision of 0.1-2.5% relative standard deviation provides capability for the reliable ranking of coatings performance. Although the system was implemented for high-throughput screening of combinatorially developed organic protective coatings for automotive applications, it can be applied for a variety of other applications for which materials ranking can be achieved using optical spectroscopic tools. PMID:12380837

  4. Development of wear-resistant coatings for cobalt-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-03-01

    The costs and hazards resulting from nuclear plant radiation exposure with activated cobalt wear debris could potentially be reduced by covering the cobalt-base materials with a wear resistant coating. However, the hardnesses of many cobalt-base wear alloys are significantly lower than conventional PVD hard coatings, and mechanical support of the hard coating is a concern. Four approaches have been taken to minimize the hardness differences between the substrate and PVD hard coating: (1) use a thin Cr-nitride hard coating with layers that are graded with respect to hardness, (2) use a thicker, multilayered coating (Cr-nitride or Zr-nitride) with graded layers, (3) use nitriding to harden the alloy subsurface followed by application of a multilayered coating of Cr-nitride, and (4) use of nitriding alone. Since little work has been done on application of PVD hard coatings to cobalt-base alloys, some details on process development and characterization of the coatings is presented. Scratch testing was used to evaluate the adhesion of the different coatings. A bench-top rolling contact test was used to evaluate the wear resistance of the coatings. The test results are discussed, and the more desirable coating approaches are identified.

  5. Pack Cementation Coatings for High-Temperature Oxidation Resistance of AISI 304 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandrahimi, Morteza; Vatandoost, Javad; Ebrahimifar, Hadi

    2012-10-01

    Aluminum and titanium are deposited on the surface of steel by the pack cementation method to improve its hot-corrosion and high-temperature oxidation resistance. In this research, coatings of aluminum and titanium and a two-step coating of aluminum and titanium were applied on an AISI 304 stainless steel substrate. The coating layers were examined by carrying out scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The SEM results showed that the aluminized coating consisted of two layers with a thickness of 450 μm each, the titanized coating consisted of two layers with a thickness of 100 μm each, and the two-step coatings of Al and Ti consisted of three layers with a thickness of 200 μm each. The XRD investigation of the coatings showed that the aluminized coating consisted of Al2O3, AlCr2, FeAl, and Fe3Al phases; the titanized layers contained TiO2, Ni3Ti, FeNi, and Fe2TiO5 phases; and the two-step coating contained AlNi, Ti3Al, and FeAl phases. The uncoated and coated specimens were subjected to isothermal oxidation at 1050 °C for 100 h. The oxidation results revealed that the application of a coating layer increased the oxidation resistance of the coated AISI 304 samples as opposed to the uncoated ones.

  6. Corrosion resistance of a composite polymeric coating applied on biodegradable AZ31 magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    Zomorodian, A; Garcia, M P; Moura e Silva, T; Fernandes, J C S; Fernandes, M H; Montemor, M F

    2013-11-01

    The high corrosion rate of magnesium alloys is the main drawback to their widespread use, especially in biomedical applications. There is a need for developing new coatings that provide simultaneously corrosion resistance and enhanced biocompatibility. In this work, a composite coating containing polyether imide, with several diethylene triamine and hydroxyapatite contents, was applied on AZ31 magnesium alloys pre-treated with hydrofluoric acid by dip coating. The coated samples were immersed in Hank's solution and the coating performance was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the behavior of MG63 osteoblastic cells on coated samples was investigated. The results confirmed that the new coatings not only slow down the corrosion rate of AZ31 magnesium alloys in Hank's solution, but also enhance the adhesion and proliferation of MG63 osteoblastic cells, especially when hydroxyapatite nanoparticles were introduced in the coating formulation. PMID:23454214

  7. Oxidation resistant high temperature thermal cycling resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates and process for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, V.K.

    1990-08-21

    An oxidation resistant, high temperature thermal cycling resistant coated ceramic article for ceramic heat engine applications is disclosed. The substrate is a silicon-based material, i.e. a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based monolithic or composite material. The coating is a graded coating of at least two layers: an intermediate AlN or Al[sub x]N[sub y]O[sub z] layer and an aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. The composition of the coating changes gradually from that of the substrate to that of the AlN or Al[sub x]N[sub y]O[sub z] layer and further to the composition of the aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. Other layers may be deposited over the aluminum oxide layer. A CVD process for depositing the graded coating on the substrate is also disclosed.

  8. Oxidation resistant high temperature thermal cycling resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates and process for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, Vinod K.

    1990-01-01

    An oxidation resistant, high temperature thermal cycling resistant coated ceramic article for ceramic heat engine applications. The substrate is a silicon-based material, i.e. a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based monolithic or composite material. The coating is a graded coating of at least two layers: an intermediate AlN or Al.sub.x N.sub.y O.sub.z layer and an aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. The composition of the coating changes gradually from that of the substrate to that of the AlN or Al.sub.x N.sub.y O.sub.z layer and further to the composition of the aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. Other layers may be deposited over the aluminum oxide layer. A CVD process for depositing the graded coating on the substrate is also disclosed.

  9. High temperature ceramic articles having corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Stinton, David P.; Lee, Woo Y.

    1997-01-01

    A ceramic article which includes a porous body of SiC fibers, Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 fibers, SiC coated fibers or Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 coated fibers, having at least one surface, the article having a coating of AlN adherently disposed throughout at least a portion of the porous body.

  10. In situ analysis of aqueous structure and adsorption at fluorocarbon, hydrocarbon and mineral surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Adam Justin

    Altering and controlling the properties of solid surfaces in aqueous or other liquid phase environments has been a sought after objective for decades. With the discovery of chemisorbed self-assembled monolayers, this dream has become a reality. Oxide and metal surfaces can now be readily coated with an array of commercially available products to produce a desired fnctionality. The presence of these coatings on solid surfaces affects properties of the interfacial region by altering interfacial electrostatic fields, changing the structure of interfacial water molecules and altering the interactions of adsorbed species. This dissertation reports on in situ studies of adsorption at several solid/aqueous interfaces using vibrational sum-frequency spectroscopy, a surface specific technique. These studies are augmented by the use of atomic force microscopy and contact angle goniometry to characterize the prepared surfaces and their interactions with adsorbates. The studies investigate how changes in the surface structure and chemistry, as well as the bulk aqueous phase, affect interfacial structure. The studies within are primarily focused on the interactions of water with bare and functionalized fused silica and the relationship between the aqueous phase composition and the structure of fluorocarbon and hydrocarbon self-assembled monolayers. The variations in aqueous structure are then examined in detail using ionic strength controlled experiments to understand the direct interactions of water hydrophobically coated silica. This analysis is followed by an investigation of the competitive adsorption of methanol and water at fluorocarbon and hydrocarbon monolayers which show spectroscopic signatures of the interaction strength between fluorocarbons and hydrocarbons. Further studies are performed using butylammonium chloride to verify these spectroscopic signatures and reveal different molecular structures of adsorbed species at chemically different hydrophobic surfaces

  11. Effect of manufacturing process sequence on the corrosion resistance characteristics of coated metallic bipolar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dur, Ender; Cora, Ömer Necati; Koç, Muammer

    2014-01-01

    Metallic bipolar plate (BPP) with high corrosion and low contact resistance, durability, strength, low cost, volume, and weight requirements is one of the critical parts of the PEMFC. This study is dedicated to understand the effect of the process sequence (manufacturing then coating vs. coating then manufacturing) on the corrosion resistance of coated metallic bipolar plates. To this goal, three different PVD coatings (titanium nitride (TiN), chromium nitride (CrN), zirconium nitride (ZrN)), with three thicknesses, (0.1, 0.5, 1 μm) were applied on BPPs made of 316L stainless steel alloy before and after two types of manufacturing (i.e., stamping or hydroforming). Corrosion test results indicated that ZrN coating exhibited the best corrosion protection while the performance of TiN coating was the lowest among the tested coatings and thicknesses. For most of the cases tested, in which coating was applied before manufacturing, occurrence of corrosion was found to be more profound than the case where coating was applied after manufacturing. Increasing the coating thickness was found to improve the corrosion resistance. It was also revealed that hydroformed BPPs performed slightly better than stamped BPPs in terms of the corrosion behavior.

  12. NASA Glenn/AADC-Rolls Royce Collaborated to Measure Erosion Resistance on Coated Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Sutter, James K.; Mondry, Richard; Ma, Kong; Horan, Dick; Naik, Subhash; Cupp, Randall

    2003-01-01

    Polymer matrix composites (PMCs) are increasingly used in aerospace and automotive applications because of their light weight and high strength-to-weight ratio relative to metals. However, a major drawback of PMCs is poor abrasion resistance, which restricts their use, especially at high temperatures. Simply applying a hard coating on PMCs to improve abrasion and erosion resistance is not effective since coating durability is short lived (ref. 1). Generally, PMCs have higher coefficients of thermal expansion than metallic or ceramic coatings have, and coating adhesion suffers because of poor interfacial adhesion strength. One technique commonly used to improve coating adhesion or durability is the use of bond coats that are interleaved between a coating and a substrate with vastly different coefficients of thermal expansion. An example of this remedy is the use of bondcoats for ceramic thermal barrier coatings on metallic turbine components (ref. 2). Prior collaborative research between the NASA Glenn Research Center and the Allison Advanced Development Company (AADC) demonstrated that bond coats sandwiched between PMCs and high-quality plasma-sprayed, erosion-resistant coatings substantially improved the erosion resistance of PMCs (ref. 3). One unresolved problem in this earlier collaboration was that there was no easy, accurate way to measure the coating erosion wear scar. Coating wear was determined by both profilometry and optical microscopy. Both techniques are time consuming. Wear measurement by optical microscopy requires sample destruction and does not provide a comprehensive measure of the entire wear volume. An even more subtle, yet critical, problem is that these erosion coatings contain two or more materials with different densities. Therefore, simply measuring specimen mass loss before and after erosion will not provide an accurate gauge for coating and/or substrate volume loss. By using a noncontact technique called scanning optical interferometry

  13. Contact Resistance and Metallurgical Connections Between Silver Coated Polymer Particles in Isotropic Conductive Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, Sigurd R.; Kristiansen, Helge; Nagao, Shijo; Helland, Susanne; Njagi, John; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Zhang, Zhiliang; He, Jianying

    2016-04-01

    Recently, there has been an increasing interest in silver thin film coated polymer spheres as conductive fillers in isotropic conductive adhesives (ICAs). Such ICAs yield resistivities similar to conventional silver flake based ICAs while requiring only a fraction of the silver content. In this work, effects of the nanostructure of silver thin films on inter-particle contact resistance were investigated. The electrical resistivity of ICAs with similar particle content was shown to decrease with increasing coating thickness. Scanning electron micrographs of ion milled cross-sections revealed that the silver coatings formed continuous metallurgical connections at the contacts between the filler particles after adhesive curing at 150°C. The electrical resistivity decreased for all samples after environmental treatment for 3 weeks at 85°C/85% relative humidity. It was concluded that after the metallurgical connections formed, the bulk resistance of these ICAs were no longer dominated by the contact resistance, but by the geometry and nanostructure of the silver coatings. A figure of merit (FoM) was defined based on the ratio between bulk silver resistivity and the ICA resistivity, and this showed that although the resistivity was lowest in the ICAs containing the most silver, the volume of silver was more effectively used in the ICAs with intermediate silver contents. This was attributed to a size effect due to smaller grains in the thickest coating.

  14. Contact Resistance and Metallurgical Connections Between Silver Coated Polymer Particles in Isotropic Conductive Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, Sigurd R.; Kristiansen, Helge; Nagao, Shijo; Helland, Susanne; Njagi, John; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Zhang, Zhiliang; He, Jianying

    2016-07-01

    Recently, there has been an increasing interest in silver thin film coated polymer spheres as conductive fillers in isotropic conductive adhesives (ICAs). Such ICAs yield resistivities similar to conventional silver flake based ICAs while requiring only a fraction of the silver content. In this work, effects of the nanostructure of silver thin films on inter-particle contact resistance were investigated. The electrical resistivity of ICAs with similar particle content was shown to decrease with increasing coating thickness. Scanning electron micrographs of ion milled cross-sections revealed that the silver coatings formed continuous metallurgical connections at the contacts between the filler particles after adhesive curing at 150°C. The electrical resistivity decreased for all samples after environmental treatment for 3 weeks at 85°C/85% relative humidity. It was concluded that after the metallurgical connections formed, the bulk resistance of these ICAs were no longer dominated by the contact resistance, but by the geometry and nanostructure of the silver coatings. A figure of merit (FoM) was defined based on the ratio between bulk silver resistivity and the ICA resistivity, and this showed that although the resistivity was lowest in the ICAs containing the most silver, the volume of silver was more effectively used in the ICAs with intermediate silver contents. This was attributed to a size effect due to smaller grains in the thickest coating.

  15. Selected fretting-wear-resistant coatings for Ti-6 pct Al-4 pct V alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The ability of several wear-resistant coatings to reduce fretting in the Ti-6Al-4V alloy is investigated. The experimental apparatus and procedures for evaluating fretting in uncoated Ti-6Al-4V alloy and in the alloy with plasma-sprayed coatings, polymer-bonded coating, and surface treatments are described. The wear volume and wear rate for the alloys are measured and compared. It is concluded that Al2O3 with 13 percent TiO2, preoxidation and nitride surface treatments, and MoS2 sputtering result in wear-resistant surfaces; however, the polyimide coating is the most wear resistant coating in both dry and moist air, and it causes the least wear to the uncoated alloy surface.

  16. Ultrathin high-temperature oxidation-resistant coatings of hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng; Gong, Yongji; Zhou, Wu; Ma, Lulu; Yu, Jingjiang; Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Jung, Jeil; MacDonald, Allan H.; Vajtai, Robert; Lou, Jun; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2013-10-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride is a two-dimensional layered material that can be stable at 1,500 °C in air and will not react with most chemicals. Here we demonstrate large-scale, ultrathin, oxidation-resistant coatings of high-quality hexagonal boron nitride layers with controlled thicknesses from double layers to bulk. We show that such ultrathin hexagonal boron nitride films are impervious to oxygen diffusion even at high temperatures and can serve as high-performance oxidation-resistant coatings for nickel up to 1,100 °C in oxidizing atmospheres. Furthermore, graphene layers coated with a few hexagonal boron nitride layers are also protected at similarly high temperatures. These hexagonal boron nitride atomic layer coatings, which can be synthesized via scalable chemical vapour deposition method down to only two layers, could be the thinnest coating ever shown to withstand such extreme environments and find applications as chemically stable high-temperature coatings.

  17. Abrasive resistance of arc sprayed carbonitride alloying self-shielded coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yu; Yu, Shengfu; Xing, Shule; Huang, Linbing; Lu, Yan

    2011-10-01

    Wear-resistant coatings were prepared on the surface of the Q235 low-carbon steel plate by HVAS with the carbonitride alloying self-shielded flux-cored wire. Detection and analysis on the microstructure and properties of the coatings were carried out by using scanning electron microscope, microhardness tester and wear tester. The forming, the wear resistance and its mechanism of the coatings were studied. The results show that the coatings have good forming, homogeneous microstructure and compact structure. The coatings have good hardness, the average microhardness value reaches 520 HV 0.1, and the highest value is up to about 560 HV 0.1. As a result, the coatings have good abrasive wear performance and adhesion strength.

  18. Ultrathin high-temperature oxidation-resistant coatings of hexagonal boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Gong, Yongji; Zhou, Wu; Ma, Lulu; Yu, Jingjiang; Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Jung, Jeil; MacDonald, Allan H; Vajtai, Robert; Lou, Jun; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2013-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride is a two-dimensional layered material that can be stable at 1,500 °C in air and will not react with most chemicals. Here we demonstrate large-scale, ultrathin, oxidation-resistant coatings of high-quality hexagonal boron nitride layers with controlled thicknesses from double layers to bulk. We show that such ultrathin hexagonal boron nitride films are impervious to oxygen diffusion even at high temperatures and can serve as high-performance oxidation-resistant coatings for nickel up to 1,100 °C in oxidizing atmospheres. Furthermore, graphene layers coated with a few hexagonal boron nitride layers are also protected at similarly high temperatures. These hexagonal boron nitride atomic layer coatings, which can be synthesized via scalable chemical vapour deposition method down to only two layers, could be the thinnest coating ever shown to withstand such extreme environments and find applications as chemically stable high-temperature coatings. PMID:24092019

  19. Development of wear-resistant coatings for cobalt-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-10-22

    The level of nuclear plant radiation exposure due to activated cobalt wear debris could potentially be reduced by covering the cobalt-base materials with a wear resistant coating. Laboratory pin-on-disc and rolling contact wear tests were used to evaluate the wear performance of several coatings. Based on the results of these tests, multilayer Cr-nitride coatings and ion nitriding are the most promising approaches.

  20. The abrasion-wear resistance of arc sprayed stainless steel and composite stainless steel coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Dallaire, S.; Legoux, J.G.; Levert, H.

    1994-12-31

    Stainless steels are often used to palliate wear problems in various industries. Though they are not wear resistant, they have been used to a limited extent in applications involving both corrosive and abrasive/erosive environments. The protection of industrial components by arc sprayed stainless steel composite coatings could be considered very attractive provided these coatings offer a better wear protection than bulk stainless steel. The wear resistance of stainless steel and composite stainless steel-titanium boride coatings arc sprayed with air and argon was evaluated following the ASTM G-65 Abrasion Wear Test procedures. Wear volume loss measurements show that stainless steel coatings arc sprayed with air were slightly more resistant than bulk stainless steel while those sprayed with argon were slightly less resistant. The abrasion wear resistance of composite stainless steel-titanium diboride coatings is by two or four times beyond the wear resistance of bulk stainless steel depending upon the core wire constitution and the type of gas used for spraying. Microstructural analysis of coatings, microhardness measurements of sprayed lamellae and optical profilometry were used to characterize coatings and wear damages. Spraying with air instead of argon produced much more small particles. These particles, being removed from the metal sheath surface, are individually sprayed without diluting the concentration hard phases within cores. It results in coatings that contain large lamellae with hardnesses sufficient to withstand abrasion. By considering both the wire constitution and the spraying conditions, it was found possible to fabricate composite stainless steel coatings that show a 400% increase in wear resistance over bulk stainless steel.

  1. Investigation of heat-resistant layered coating of Al-Cr-Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmorgun, V. G.; Trykov, Y. P.; Bogdanov, A. I.; Taube, A. O.

    2016-02-01

    The paper shows the transformation of the structure and phase composition of the layered coating system Al-Cr-Ni, obtained by the heat treatment of multilayered composite H20N80+AD1, welded by explosion, in the time range 1-300 hours. The cyclic heat resistance of the coating at 1150 ° C is studied.

  2. Ultrasonic irradiation and its application for improving the corrosion resistance of phosphate coatings on aluminum alloys.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Minqi; Wang, Chao; Zhong, Qingdong; Wei, Yinyin; Wang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, ultrasonic irradiation was utilized for improving the corrosion resistance of phosphate coatings on aluminum alloys. The chemical composition and morphology of the coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effect of ultrasonic irradiation on the corrosion resistance of phosphate coatings was investigated by polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Various effects of the addition of Nd(2)O(3) in phosphating bath on the performance of the coatings were also investigated. Results show that the composition of phosphate coating were Zn(3)(PO(4))(2).4H(2)O(hopeite) and Zn crystals. The phosphate coatings became denser with fewer microscopic holes by utilizing ultrasonic irradiation treatment. The addition of Nd(2)O(3) reduced the crystallinity of the coatings, with the additional result that the crystallites were increasingly nubby and spherical. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was also significantly improved by ultrasonic irradiation treatment; both the anodic and cathodic processes of corrosion taking place on the aluminum alloy substrate were suppressed consequently. In addition, the electrochemical impedance of the coatings was also increased by utilizing ultrasonic irradiation treatment compared with traditional treatment. PMID:19692286

  3. Impact of substrate surface scratches on the laser damage resistance of multilayer coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, S; Wolfe, J; Monterrosa, A; Teslich, N; Feit, M; Pistor, T; Stolz, C

    2010-11-03

    Substrate scratches can limit the laser resistance of multilayer mirror coatings on high-peak-power laser systems. To date, the mechanism by which substrate surface defects affect the performance of coating layers under high power laser irradiation is not well defined. In this study, we combine experimental approaches with theoretical simulations to delineate the correlation between laser damage resistance of coating layers and the physical properties of the substrate surface defects including scratches. A focused ion beam technique is used to reveal the morphological evolution of coating layers on surface scratches. Preliminary results show that coating layers initially follow the trench morphology on the substrate surface, and as the thickness increases, gradually overcoat voids and planarize the surface. Simulations of the electrical-field distribution of the defective layers using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method show that field intensification exists mostly near the top surface region of the coating near convex focusing structures. The light intensification could be responsible for the reduced damage threshold. Damage testing under 1064 nm, 3 ns laser irradiation over coating layers on substrates with designed scratches show that damage probability and threshold of the multilayer depend on substrate scratch density and width. Our preliminary results show that damage occurs on the region of the coating where substrate scratches reside and etching of the substrate before coating does not seem to improve the laser damage resistance.

  4. Microstructure and corrosion resistance of Fe/Mo composite amorphous coatings prepared by air plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chao-ping; Xing, Ya-zhe; Zhang, Feng-ying; Hao, Jian-min

    2012-07-01

    Fe/Mo composite coatings were prepared by air plasma spraying (APS) using Fe-based and Mo-based amorphous and nanocrystalline mixed powders. Microstructural studies show that the composite coatings present a layered structure with low porosity due to adding the self-bonded Mo-based alloy. Corrosion behaviors of the composite coatings, the Fe-based coatings and the Mo-based coatings were investigated by electrochemical measurements and salt spray tests. Electrochemical results show that the composite coatings exhibit a lower polarization current density and higher corrosion potentials than the Fe-based coating when tested in 3.5wt% NaCl solutions, indicating superior corrosion resistance compared with the Fe-based coating. Also with the increase in addition of the Mo-based alloy, a raised corrosion resistance, inferred by an increase in corrosion potential and a decrease in polarization current density, can be found. The results of salt spray tests again show that the corrosion resistance is enhanced by adding the Mo-based alloy, which helps to reduce the porosity of the composite coatings and enhance the stability of the passive films.

  5. Corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility of biodegradable surgical magnesium alloy coated with hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yunchang; Jiang, Jiang; Huo, Kaifu; Tang, Guoyi; Tian, Xiubo; Chu, Paul K

    2009-06-01

    The fast degradation rates in the physiological environment constitute the main limitation for the applications of surgical magnesium alloys as biodegradable hard-tissue implants. In this work, a stable and dense hydrogenated amorphous silicon coating (a-Si:H) with desirable bioactivity is deposited on AZ91 magnesium alloy using magnetron sputtering deposition. Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reveal that the coating is mainly composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The hardness of the coated alloy is enhanced significantly and the coating is quite hydrophilic as well. Potentiodynamic polarization results show that the corrosion resistance of the coated alloy is enhanced dramatically. In addition, the deterioration process of the coating in simulated body fluids is systematically investigated by open circuit potential evolution and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The cytocompatibility of the coated Mg is evaluated for the first time using hFOB1.19 cells and favorable biocompatibility is observed. PMID:18449935

  6. High temperature ceramic articles having corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Stinton, D.P.; Lee, W.Y.

    1997-09-30

    A ceramic article is disclosed which includes a porous body of SiC fibers, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} fibers, SiC coated fibers or Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} coated fibers, having at least one surface, the article having a coating of AlN adherently disposed throughout at least a portion of the porous body. 1 fig.

  7. Effect of Annealing Temperature on Hardness and Wear Resistance of Electroless Ni-B-Mo Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serin, Ihsan Gökhan; Göksenli, Ali

    2015-06-01

    Formation of nickel-boron-molybdenum (Ni-B-Mo) coating on steel by electroless plating and evaluation of their morphology, hardness and tribological properties post heat treatment at different temperatures for 1 h is investigated. The 25 μm thick coating is uniform and adhesion between the substrate and coating is good. Ni-B-Mo coating was amorphous-like structure in their as-plated condition and by 400°C heat-treated coating, nickel fully crystallized and nickel borides and molybdenum carbide were formed. All coatings exhibited higher hardness than the substrate steel. Hardness values of all coatings up to 400°C did not change distinctively but decreased partly beyond 400°C. Friction coefficient reached lowest value post heat treatment at 300°C but later increased with increasing tempering temperature. Wear resistance was lowest in as-plated coating; however it reached the highest value at 300°C. Worn surface of the coatings showed the abrasive wear as the dominant wear mechanism. An additional adhesive wear mechanism was detected in coating tempered at 550°C. Moreover, our results confirmed that the molybdenum addition improved the thermal stability of the resulting coating. Therefore, Ni-B-Mo coating has potential for application in precision mould, optical parts mould or bipolar plates, where thermal stability is essential.

  8. Cellulose acetate/hydroxyapatite/chitosan coatings for improved corrosion resistance and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhenyu; Qin, Jinli; Ma, Jun

    2015-04-01

    Cellulose acetate (CA) nanofibers were deposited on stainless steel plates by electrospinning technique. The composite of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanoparticles and chitosan (CHI) was coated subsequently by dip-coating. The structure and morphology of the obtained coatings were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The stability of the coatings in physiological environment was studied using electrochemical polarization and impedance spectroscopy. The CA nanofibers were embedded in the HAP/CHI coating and the resulted composite film was densely packed and uniform on the substrate. The in vitro biomineralization study of the coated samples immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) confirmed the formation ability of bone-like apatite layer on the surface of HAP-containing coatings. Furthermore, the coatings could provide corrosion resistance to the stainless steel substrate in SBF. The electrochemical results suggested that the incorporation of CA nanofibers could improve the corrosion resistance of the HAP/CHI coating. Thus, biocompatible CA/HAP/CHI coated metallic implants could be very useful in the long-term stability of the biomedical applications. PMID:25686946

  9. Corrosion resistance of duplex and gradient CrN x coated H13 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Q. G.; Bai, X. D.; Chen, X. W.; Peng, D. Q.; Ling, Y. H.; Wang, D. R.

    2003-04-01

    The electrochemical behavior of H13 steel coated with duplex and gradient CrN x coatings deposited by cathodic arc deposition has been studied. The substrate material was coated with CrN by cathodic arc deposition technique. Duplex layers of CrN x, which normally include an interlayer approximately 100-200 nm of Cr under the main CrN coating, were prepared; gradient CrN x coating were produced with continuous elevated nitrogen pressure. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was applied to characterize the chemical composition, and the glancing angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD) was used to examine the crystallographic structure. The potentiodynamic polarization was examined by Zahner IM6e electrochemical workstation in a 0.5 M H 2SO 4 solution at ambient temperature, and the corrosive surface was detected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was shown that the gradient coating could enhance the corrosion performance of CrN x coated H13 steel. The corrosion resistance improvement was not only attributed to the increase in thickness, but also to the internal microstructure and phase composition. Gradient CrN x coating produced in this work was proved to be particularly promising in terms of corrosion resistance, owing to its incontinuous pinholes and different composition: Cr, Cr 2N in inner part and CrN in surface. The results showed that the gradient coating had an improved electrochemical performance than duplex CrN coating.

  10. Tribological properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of magnetron sputtered titanium-amorphous carbon coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhandapani, Vishnu Shankar; Subbiah, Ramesh; Thangavel, Elangovan; Arumugam, Madhankumar; Park, Kwideok; Gasem, Zuhair M.; Veeraragavan, Veeravazhuthi; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous carbon incorporated with titanium (a-C:Ti) was coated on 316L stainless steel (SS) by magnetron sputtering technique to attain superior tribological properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. The morphology, topography and functional groups of the nanostructured a-C:Ti coatings in various concentrations were analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman, X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Raman and XPS analyses confirmed the increase in sp2 bonds with increasing titanium content in the a-C matrix. TEM analysis confirmed the composite nature of the coating and the presence of nanostructured TiC for Ti content of 2.33 at.%. This coating showed superior tribological properties compared to the other a-C:Ti coatings. Furthermore, electrochemical corrosion studies were performed against stimulated body fluid medium in which all the a-C:Ti coatings showed improved corrosion resistance than the pure a-C coating. Preosteoblasts proliferation and viability on the specimens were tested and the results showed that a-C:Ti coatings with relatively high Ti (3.77 at.%) content had better biocompatibility. Based on the results of this work, highly durable coatings with good biocompatibility could be achieved by incorporation of optimum amount of Ti in a-C coatings deposited on SS by magnetron sputtering technique.

  11. Modification of aluminide coating with yttrium for improved resistance to corrosive erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T.; Luo, Y.; Li, D.Y.

    1999-12-01

    Aluminide coatings on a mild steel substrate were modified by using an oxygen-active element, yttrium, for improved resistance to corrosive erosion. The performance of the yttrium-containing coating during the following three erosion conditions was evaluated: dry sand erosion at different temperatures, erosion in a dilute NaCl slurry containing 30% silica sand, and erosion in a dilute H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} slurry containing 30% silica sand. Results of the study demonstrated that yttrium significantly improved the resistance of the aluminide coating to both corrosive erosion and dry sand erosion.

  12. PROCESS FOR DECONTAMINATING LIQUID FLUOROCARBONS OF OIL SUSPENDED THEREIN

    DOEpatents

    Schneider, H.; Massey, B.J.

    1958-12-01

    Decontaminatlon of a bulk of liquld fluorocarbon contaminated with oil and water can be accomplished by passlng the contaminated material through a bed of either silica gel, activated alumina or activated carbon to absorb the contaminants.

  13. Decontamination by cleaning with fluorocarbon surfactant solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, R.; Benson, C.E.; Meyers, E.S.; Vaughen, V.C.A.

    1994-02-01

    In the nuclear industry, facilities and their components inevitably become contaminated with radioactive materials. This report documents the application of a novel particle-removal process developed by Entropic Systems, Inc. (ESI), to decontaminate critical instruments and parts that are contaminated with small radioactive particles that adhere to equipment surfaces. The tests were performed as a cooperative effort between ESI and the Chemical Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ESI developed a new, environmentally compatible process to remove small particles from solid surfaces that is more effective than spraying or sonicating with CFC-113. This process uses inert perfluorinated liquids as working media; the liquids have zero ozone-depleting potential, are nontoxic and nonflammnable, and are generally recognized as nonhazardous materials. In the ESI process, parts to be cleaned are first sprayed or sonicated with a dilute solution of a high-molecular-weight fluorocarbon surfactant in an inert perfluorinated liquid to effect particle removal. The parts are then rinsed with the perfluorinated liquid to remove the fluorocarbon surfactant applied in the first step, and the residual rinse liquid is then evaporated from the parts into an air or nitrogen stream from which it is recovered. Nuclear contamination is inherently a surface phenomenon. The presence of radioactive particles is responsible for all ``smearable`` contamination and, if the radioactive particles are small enough, for some of the fixed contamination. Because radioactivity does not influence the physical chemistry of particle adhesion, the ESI process should be just as effective in removing radioactive particles as it is in removing nonradioactive particles.

  14. Titanium Carbides Coatings for Wear Resistant Biomedical Devices: Manufacturing and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Contro, R.; Vena, P.; Gastaldi, D.; Masante, S.; Cavallotti, P. L.; Nobili, L.; Bestetti, M.

    2008-02-15

    Deposition of Titanium Carbide coatings on Ti6Al4V substrate, through the reactive magnetron sputtering technique is here presented. The mechanical characterization of the coatings has been carried out through a set of indentation tests at different maximum applied loads. The elastic stiffness as well as the hardness of the coating-substrate system indicate that these coatings are suitable candidates for wear resistance applications in the orthopaedic field. Numerical simulation of the indentation tests allowed the identification of the constitutive parameters of the titanium carbide. Good agreement was achieved between experimental and numerical results.

  15. Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of Fe-Based Coatings Prepared by Twin Wires Arc Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jinran; Wang, Zehua; Lin, Pinghua; Cheng, Jiangbo; Zhang, Jingjing; Zhang, Xin

    2014-02-01

    FeB, FeBSi, and FeNiCrBSiNbW coatings were prepared by twin wires arc spraying process on AISI 1045 steel substrate, and the microstructure and phases were characterized by scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and x-ray diffraction. The corrosion resistance was investigated by means of electrochemical tests. It was found that FeB coating and FeBSi coating were composed of α-Fe, FeO, and Fe2O3 phases. FeNiCrBSiNbW coating consisted of amorphous phase and α-(Fe, Cr) nanocrystalline phase, with porosity of 1.8%, hardness of 807 Hv0.1 and tensile bonding strength of 52.1 MPa. Three kinds of electrochemical tests were employed to identify the corrosion resistance of the coatings. The results indicated that the FeNiCrBSiNbW coating had a superior corrosion resistance, much better than FeB and FeBSi coatings. It was attributed to the amorphous/nanocrystalline structure and the presence of corrosion-resistant element Cr.

  16. Fluorocarbon compounds in MRI diagnostics and medical therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirogov, Yu

    2016-02-01

    The lecture describes the application of fluorocarbon compounds as blood substitutes and contrasting preparations in MRI diagnostics. A blood substitute product fluorocarbon Perfluorane® has shown effectiveness in oxygen delivery to the tissues of living organisms, and cardioprotective effect which does not depend on the patient's blood group. Inclusion of paramagnetic atoms (gadolinium, iron, etc.) to the Perfluorane® chemical formula creates a new compound with high MRI contrast efficiencies at Larmor frequencies of protons so and fluorine-19 nuclei.

  17. Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, G.W.; Roybal, H.E.

    1983-11-14

    A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

  18. Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Gene W.; Roybal, Herman E.

    1985-01-01

    A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

  19. Characterization, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of biocompatible Zn-HA/TiO2 nanocomposite coatings.

    PubMed

    Mirak, Mohammad; Alizadeh, Morteza; Ghaffari, Mohammad; Ashtiani, Mohammad Najafi

    2016-09-01

    Biocompatible Zinc-hydroxyapatite-titania and Zinc-hydroxyapatite nanocomposite coatings have been prepared by electrodeposition on NiTi shape memory alloy. Structures of coatings were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD). It was found that addition of TiO2 particles cause to reduction of crystallite size of coating. Scanning Electronic Microscope (SEM) observation showed that the Zn-HA/TiO2 coating consists of plate-like regions which can express that this plate-like structure can facilitate bone growth. X-ray photoelectron microscope (XPS) was performed to investigation of chemical state of composite coating and showed that Zinc matrix was bonded to oxygen. high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) result illustrated the crystalline structure of nanocomposite coating. Mechanical behavior of coating was evaluated using microhardness and ball on disk wear test. The TiO2 incorporated composite coatings exhibited the better hardness and anti-wear performance than the Zn-HA coatings. Polarization measurements have been used to evaluate the electrochemical coatings performance. The Zn-HA/TiO2 composite coatings showed the highest corrosion resistance compared with Zn-HA and bare NiTi. PMID:27232830

  20. The corrosion resistance and neutron-absorbing properties of coatings based on amorphous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevryukov, O. N.; Polyansky, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    The object of the present study was the corrosion-resistant amorphizing alloys with an increased content of boron for cladding the surface of metals, rapidly quenched alloys without boron for protective coatings on a high-boron cladding layer, as well as steel samples with a protective coating with a high content of boron and without boron. The aim of the work is to investigate the corrosion resistance of a coating in water at the temperature of 40 °C in conditions of an open access of oxygen for 1000 h, as well as the features of the microstructure of clad samples before and after the corrosion tests. New data on the corrosion resistance of Cr18Ni10Ti steel samples with a protective layer from a rapidly quenched alloy Ni-19Cr-10Si (in wt.%) on a high-boron coating have been obtained.

  1. Evolution of the microstructure and oxidation resistance in co-sputtered Zr-Y-N coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhengtao; Qi, Zhengbing; Zhang, Dongfang; Wang, Zhoucheng

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates the influence of Y addition to the microstructure and oxidation resistance of ZrN coating. Zr-Y-N coatings with a 0-5.8 at.% Y addition were fabricated by reactive co-sputtering in an Ar-N2 atmosphere. The results indicate that solid solution-type Zr-Y-N coatings show a columnar structure with a strong (1 1 1) preferred orientation. The grain size decreases from 76 to 21 nm with an increase in the amount of Y from 0 to 5.8 at.%. The oxidation results demonstrate that the most beneficial addition of Y to improve the oxidation resistance of ZrN coating is 1.0 at.%. An excessive addition of Y produces detrimental effects. Cracking in the oxide scale and oxygen inward diffusion through the scale have been identified as the primary reasons for the loss of oxidation resistance.

  2. Hot Corrosion Resistance and Mechanical Behavior of Atmospheric Plasma Sprayed Conventional and Nanostructured Zirconia Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saremi, Mohsen; Keyvani, Ahmad; Heydarzadeh Sohi, Mahmoud

    Conventional and nanostructured zirconia coatings were deposited on In-738 Ni super alloy by atmospheric plasma spray technique. The hot corrosion resistance of the coatings was measured at 1050°C using an atmospheric electrical furnace and a fused mixture of vanadium pent oxide and sodium sulfate respectively. According to the experimental results nanostructured coatings showed a better hot corrosion resistance than conventional ones. The improved hot corrosion resistance could be explained by the change of structure to a dense and more packed structure in the nanocoating. The evaluation of mechanical properties by nano indentation method showed the hardness (H) and elastic modulus (E) of the YSZ coating increased substantially after hot corrosion.

  3. Nanocomposite coatings on biomedical grade stainless steel for improved corrosion resistance and biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Srinivasan; Mohana, Marimuthu; Sudhagar, Pitchaimuthu; Raman, Vedarajan; Nishimura, Toshiyasu; Kim, Sanghyo; Kang, Yong Soo; Rajendran, Nallaiyan

    2012-10-24

    The 316 L stainless steel is one of the most commonly available commercial implant materials with a few limitations in its ease of biocompatibility and long-standing performance. Hence, porous TiO(2)/ZrO(2) nanocomposite coated over 316 L stainless steels was studied for their enhanced performance in terms of its biocompatibility and corrosion resistance, following a sol-gel process via dip-coating technique. The surface composition and porosity texture was studied to be uniform on the substrate. Biocompatibility studies on the TiO(2)/ZrO(2) nanocomposite coatings were investigated by placing the coated substrate in a simulated body fluid (SBF). The immersion procedure resulted in the complete coverage of the TiO(2)/ZrO(2) nanocomposite (coated on the surface of 316 L stainless steel) with the growth of a one-dimensional (1D) rod-like carbonate-containing apatite. The TiO(2)/ZrO(2) nanocomposite coated specimens showed a higher corrosion resistance in the SBF solution with an enhanced biocompatibility, surpassing the performance of the pure oxide coatings. The cell viability of TiO(2)/ZrO(2) nanocomposite coated implant surface was examined under human dermal fibroblasts culture, and it was observed that the composite coating enhances the proliferation through effective cellular attachment compared to pristine 316 L SS surface. PMID:22967070

  4. Heat-resistance of composite electrochemical coatings based on nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Pokmurskii, V.I.; Dalisov, V.B.; Guslienko, Y.A.; Mardarevich, R.S.

    1986-02-01

    The authors study the features of oxidation and determine the temperature limits in the application of carbon steels with composite electrochemical coatings based on the Ni-B system. Coatings based on the Ni-B system deposited on carbon steels can operate for a long time at temperatures up to 750 degrees C. Above this temperature, they begin to decompose and oxidize strongly owing to the instability of nickel borides. A reliable functioning of a composite coating of the composition is possible in the absence of unreacted boron in it.

  5. Oxidation-resistant interfacial coatings for continuous fiber ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Bleier, A.; Shanmugham, S.; Liaw, P.K.

    1995-08-01

    Continuous fiber ceramic composites mechanical behavior are influenced by the bonding characteristics between the fiber and the matrix. Finite modeling studies suggest that a low-modulus interfacial coating material will be effective in reducing the residual thermal stresses that are generated upon cooling from processing temperatures. Nicalon{trademark}/SiC composites with carbon, alumina and mullite interfacial coatings were fabricated with the SiC matrix deposited using a forced-flow, thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process. Composites with mullite interfacial coatings exhibited considerable fiber pull-out even after oxidation and have potential as a composite system.

  6. Thermodynamic properties of gaseous fluorocarbons and isentropic equilibrium expansions of two binary mixtures of fluorocarbons and argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talcott, N. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Equations and computer code are given for the thermodynamic properties of gaseous fluorocarbons in chemical equilibrium. In addition, isentropic equilibrium expansions of two binary mixtures of fluorocarbons and argon are included. The computer code calculates the equilibrium thermodynamic properties and, in some cases, the transport properties for the following fluorocarbons: CCl2F, CCl2F2, CBrF3, CF4, CHCl2F, CHF3, CCL2F-CCl2F, CCLF2-CClF2, CF3-CF3, and C4F8. Equilibrium thermodynamic properties are tabulated for six of the fluorocarbons(CCl3F, CCL2F2, CBrF3, CF4, CF3-CF3, and C4F8) and pressure-enthalpy diagrams are presented for CBrF3.

  7. Structure and corrosion resistance of nickel coatings containing tungsten and silicon powders

    SciTech Connect

    Popczyk, Magdalena . E-mail: mpopczyk@us.edu.pl; Budniok, Antoni; Lagiewka, Eugeniusz

    2007-04-15

    Ni + W + Si coatings were prepared by nickel deposition from a bath containing a suspension of tungsten and silicon powders. These coatings were obtained at galvanostatic conditions, at the current density of j {sub dep} = - 0.100 A cm{sup -2} and at the temperature of 338 K. For determination of the influence of phase composition and surface morphology of these coatings on changes in the corrosion resistance, these coatings were modified in an argon atmosphere by thermal treatment at 1373 K during 1 h. A scanning electron microscope was used for surface morphology characterization of the coatings. The chemical composition of the coatings was determined by EDS and phase composition investigations were conducted by X-ray diffraction. It was found that the as-deposited coatings consist of a three-phase structure, i.e., nickel, tungsten and silicon. The phase composition for the Ni + W + Si coatings after thermal treatment is markedly different. The main peaks corresponding to Ni and W coexist with the new phases: NiW, NiWSi and a solid solution of W in Ni. Electrochemical corrosion resistance investigations were carried out in 5 M KOH, using potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) methods. On the basis of these investigations it was found that the Ni + W + Si coatings after thermal treatment are more corrosion resistant in alkaline solution than the as-deposited coatings. The reasons for this are a reduction in the amount of free nickel and tungsten, the presence of new phases (in particular polymetallic silicides), and a decrease of the active surface area of the coatings after thermal treatment.

  8. Mechanical and corrosion resistance properties of TiO2 nanoparticles reinforced Ni coating by electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, W.; Nabb, D.; Renevier, N.; Sherrington, I.; Luo, J. K.

    2012-09-01

    Coatings have been widely used in engineering and decoration to protect components and products and enhance their life span. Nickel (Ni) is one of the most important hard coatings. Improvement in its tribological and mechanical properties would greatly enhance its use in industry. Nanocomposite coatings of metals with various reinforced nanoparticles have been developed in last few decades. Titania (TiO2) exhibit excellent mechanical properties. It is believed that TiO2 incorporation in Ni matrix will improve the properties of Ni coatings significantly. The main purpose of the current work is to investigate the mechanical and anti-corrosion properties of the electroplated nickel nanocomposite with a small percentage of TiO2. The surface morphology of nanocomposite coating was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The hardness of the nanocoating was carried out using micromaterials nanoplatform. The sliding wear rate of the coating at room temperature in dry condition was assessed by a reciprocating ball-on-disk computer-controlled oscillating tribotester. The results showed the nanocomposite coatings have a smoother and more compact surface than the pure Ni layer and have higher hardness and lower wear rate than the pure Ni coating. The anti-corrosion property of nanocomposite coating was carried out in 3.5% NaCl and high concentrated 35% NaCl solution, respectively. The results also showed that the nanocomposite coating improves the corrosion resistance significantly. This present work reveals that incorporation of TiO2 in nickel nanocomposite coating can achieve improved corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of both hardness and wear resistance performances, and the improvement becomes stronger as the content of TiO2 is increased.

  9. Improvement of corrosion resistance of Nisbnd Mo alloy coatings: Effect of heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, R.; Bahrololoom, M. E.; Deflorian, F.; Ecco, L.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, Nisbnd Mo alloy coatings were deposited from bath containing sodium citrate, nickel sulphate, and sodium molybdate. Essentially, this work is divided into two mains parts: (i) the optimization on the coatings deposition parameters and (ii) the effect of the heat treatment. Polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were acquired using potentiostat/galvanostat and a frequency response analyzer, respectively. Morphology and chemical composition of the coatings were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy, respectively. Polarization curves at different condition revealed that electroplating at temperature 40 oC, pH 9 provides a dense coating with high efficiency. Following the optimization of the deposition parameters, the coatings were annealed at 200, 400, and 600 oC for 25 min. The results showed that the coatings obtained at temperature 40 oC, pH 9, and annealing at 600 oC has the highest corrosion resistance and microhardness.

  10. Moisture resistant and anti-reflection optical coatings produced by plasma polymerization of organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollahan, J. R.; Wydeven, T.

    1975-01-01

    The need for protective coatings on critical optical surfaces, such as halide crystal windows or lenses used in spectroscopy, has long been recognized. It has been demonstrated that thin, one micron, organic coatings produced by polymerization of flourinated monomers in low temperature gas discharge (plasma) exhibit very high degrees of moisture resistence, e.g., hundreds of hours protection for cesium iodide vs. minutes before degradation sets in for untreated surfaces. The index of refraction of these coatings is intermediate between that of the halide substrate and air, a condition for anti-reflection, another desirable property of optical coatings. Thus, the organic coatings not only offer protection, but improved transmittance as well. The polymer coating is non-absorbing over the range 0.4 to 40 microns with an exception at 8.0 microns, the expected absorption for C-F bonds.

  11. The impact of coating architecture on the hardness, friction and wear resistance of hard and tribological nanocomposite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endrino, Jose Luis

    Future generations of mechanical systems will place new demands on the tribological performance of interacting surfaces. Vapor-deposited surface coatings can provide extended lifetimes, increased efficiencies and energy savings for mechanical components and tools. These benefits can also be extended to space mechanisms and satellites with the use of vacuum solid lubricants. The material properties of surface coatings such as hardness, friction, and wear resistance in a particular environment are influenced by the characteristics of the coating microstructure which include density, grain size, grain boundary chemistry, porosity, and grain orientation. In this research effort bias sputter deposition, co-sputtering, and magnetron sputtering-pulsed laser deposition are used to deposit and control the formation of composite coating architectures. The developed microstructures were studied by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Mechanical and tribological tests included nanoindentation and pin-on-disk. Results were analyzed in relation to the coatings' chemical composition and microstructure with the objective of establishing structure-property relations for these films. Hard coatings presented in this thesis include carbides that form a solid solution (Ti-Hf-C) as well as carbides that form composite microstructures (WC-SiC, HfC-SiC). Hardness measurements on these films indicated the potential of transition metal carbide-silicon carbide composites to be utilized as protective coatings. With the use of a substrate bias potential, a hardness of over 35 GPa was achieved for some HfC-SiC samples. By co-depositing from carbide and silver targets, composite tribological coatings (e.g. SiC-Ag, WC-Ag, TiC-Ag, HfC-Ag) were developed. These systems revealed how critical materials selection can be in the determination of a coating's architecture, and how carbide-silver films can be used to provide low friction

  12. Evaluation of Heat Checking and Washout of Heat Resistant Superalloys and Coatings for Die inserts

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Yulong Zhu; Edward Courtright; Harold Adkins

    2005-01-30

    This project had two main objectives: (1) To design, fabricate and run a full size test for evaluating soldering and washout in die insert materials. This test utilizes the unique capabilities of the 350 Ton Squeeze Casting machine available in the Case Meal Casting Laboratory. Apply the test to evaluate resistance of die materials and coating, including heat resistant alloys to soldering and washout damage. (2) To evaluate materials and coatings, including heat resistant superalloys, for use as inserts in die casting of aluminum alloys.

  13. Fabrication of intermetallic coatings for electrical insulation and corrosion resistance on high-temperature alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.-H.; Cho, W.D.

    1996-11-01

    Several intermetallic films were applied to high-temperature alloys (V alloys and 304, 316 stainless steels) to provide electrical insulation and corrosion resistance. Alloy grain growth at 1000 C for the V-5Cr-5Ti alloy was investigated to determine stability of the alloy substrate during coating formation by CVD or metallic vapor processes at 800-850 C. Film layers were examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy and by electron-energy-dispersive and XRD analysis; they were also tested for electrical resistivity and corrosion resistance. Results elucidated the nature of the coatings, which provided both electrical insulation and high-temperature corrosion protection.

  14. Nano-coatings on carbon structures for interfacial modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulikollu, Rajasekhar V.

    damages the ligaments and cell walls of carbon foam. This results in higher elastic modulus but lower strength. So, to get any benefit from such approaches the optimization window may be very narrow and marginal in controllability. An alternative solution would be to synthesize ultra thin film coatings without etching the surfaces. It is observed that plasma assisted coatings having thickness in the range of few nanometers (4-5nm) are completely covering the graphite substrates. The coating surface chemistry and morphology information is based upon XPS and AFM studies on pyrolytic graphite substrate. Two types of plasma surface modification techniques have been attempted: one is to make the surface more reactive for structural components and the other is to make the surface more inert for stand-alone structures. In order to achieve these goals plasma assisted oxide and fluorocarbon coatings are studied in detail. The synthesized oxide and fluorocarbon coating chemistries are comparable to conventional silica (SiO2) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, -CF2-). It is seen that the fluorocarbon coatings provide moisture resistance to graphitic foam by making the surface inert at the nanometer scale. On the other hand, plasma assisted oxide coating is a feasible and effective means of improving the wettability and dispersion of foam and nanofibers in organic polymer matrix material. Surface analysis as well as microstructural studies and mechanical tests have shown encouraging results. The interface reactions between graphite (coated and uncoated) and epoxy have also been studied in detail. Nano-scale plasma coatings have also been applied for metal matrix composites and semiconductor related applications. The fluorocarbon coating promote delamination/exfoliation of the metal on graphite, hence may be used for patterning or lithography. Oxide coatings seem to enhance the adhesion and metallic diffusion between graphite and metal, hence can be used for the development of metal

  15. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings with improved corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, J.T.; Courtright, E.L.

    1987-02-01

    A method for limiting the ingress of corrosive species into physical vapor deposited zirconia thermal barrier coatings by inserting dense ceramic sealing layers into the usual columnar (segmented) ceramic microstructure has been examined. The concept was evaluated by sputtering a series of ZrO/sub 2/-2OY/sub 2/O/sub 3/ deposits onto In792 substrates coated with a CoCrAlY bondlayer.

  16. Stress crack resistance of some pigmented and unpigmented tablet film coating systems.

    PubMed

    Okhamafe, A O; York, P

    1985-07-01

    Stress crack resistance parameters--tensile strength: Young's modulus ratio, relative surface energy, and toughness index--have been examined for unpigmented free films of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose containing polyvinyl alcohol, and polyethylene glycols 400 and 1000, as well as similar film systems pigmented with either talc or titanium dioxide. Incorporation of either polyvinyl alcohol or polyethylene glycols 400 and 1000 in hydroxypropyl methylcellulose film coatings eliminated the incidence of edge splitting in the coated tablets. Increase in pigment concentration generally led to a decrease in the crack resistance of pigmented films. There was a relation between the stress crack resistance of pigmented free films and the incidence of edge splitting of corresponding film coatings applied to aspirin tablets--generally, the higher the crack resistance the lower the incidence of edge splitting. A similar relationship applied to the unpigmented films only when the tensile strength: Young's modulus ratio was considered. PMID:2863345

  17. Polyglycerol coatings of glass vials for protein resistance.

    PubMed

    Höger, Kerstin; Becherer, Tobias; Qiang, Wei; Haag, Rainer; Friess, Wolfgang; Küchler, Sarah

    2013-11-01

    Proteins are surface active molecules which undergo non-specific adsorption when getting in contact with surfaces such as the primary packaging material. This process is critical as it may cause a loss of protein content or protein aggregation. To prevent unspecific adsorption, protein repellent coatings are of high interest. We describe the coating of industrial relevant borosilicate glass vials with linear methoxylated polyglycerol, hyperbranched polyglycerol, and hyperbranched methoxylated polyglycerol. All coatings provide excellent protein repellent effects. The hyperbranched, non-methoxylated coating performed best. The protein repellent properties were maintained also after applying industrial relevant sterilization methods (≥200 °C). Marginal differences in antibody stability between formulations stored in bare glass vials and coated vials were detected after 3 months storage; the protein repellent effect remained largely stable. Here, we describe a new material suitable for the coating of primary packaging material of proteins which significantly reduces the protein adsorption and thus could present an interesting new possibility for biomedical applications. PMID:23624376

  18. Nanostructured wear resistant coating for reversible cultivator shovels: An experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, V.; Rao, G. P.; Tiwari, G. S.; Sanger, A.; Kumar, A.; Chandra, R.

    2016-04-01

    Cultivator, one of the agriculture farm tool, extensively suffers from the wear problem. In this paper, we report nanostructured chromium nitrite (CrN) coating for the cultivator shovels to mitigate wear problem. The (CrN) coating was developed using DC magnetron sputtering technique at 200 °C. The structural, morphological, hydrophobic and wear properties were investigated using X-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscope, contact angle goniometer and custom designed soil bin assembly. The XRD reveals that the deposited coating was polycrystalline in nature with cubic structure. Also, The deposited coating was found to be anti wear resistant as well as hydrophobic in nature. The gravimetric wear for the coating developed at 200 °C coated was found out to be 8.15 gm and for non coated it was 14.48 gm tested for 100 hrs. The roughness of the coating plays an important role in determining the hydrophobicity of the coated film. Roughness and contact angle measured for 200 °C coated shovel was found out to be 11.17 nm and 105 ° respectively.

  19. Corrosion and wear resistance study of Ni-P and Ni-P-PTFE nanocomposite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankita, Sharma; Singh, Ajay

    2011-09-01

    This article reports on the corrosion and wear resistance of Ni-P and Ni-P-PTFE nanocomposite coatings deposited on mild steel substrates using the electroless plating technique. The coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive analysis of X-Ray (EDAX), and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The coatings were smooth and had thicknesses between 7 and 23 µm. They contained Ni, P, and additionally, F, in the case of the Ni-P-PTFE films. A broadening of the Ni peak in XRD was attributed to the amorphous nature and/or fine grain size of the films. Corrosion resistance was measured using immersion and electrochemical polarization tests in 3.5% NaCl solution whereas wear resistance was determined by the pin-on-disc method. Both Ni-P and Ni-P-PTFE coatings exhibited significant improvement in corrosion (in salty media) and wear behavior. Furthermore, the addition of PTFE in the coatings showed improvement in their corrosion resistance as well as a reduction in friction coefficient. Our testing revealed that the coatings' wore out following the "adhesive type" mechanism.

  20. Properties of solid polymer electrolyte fluorocarbon film. [used in hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    The ionic fluorocarbon film used as the solid polymer electrolyte in hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells was found to exhibit delamination failures. Polarized light microscopy of as-received film showed a lined region at the center of the film thickness. It is shown that these lines were not caused by incomplete saponification but probably resulted from the film extrusion process. The film lines could be removed by an annealing process. Chemical, physical, and tensile tests showed that annealing improved or sustained the water contents, spectral properties, thermo-oxidative stability, and tensile properties of the film. The resistivity of the film was significantly decreased by the annealing process.

  1. Effect of ceramic coating by aerosol deposition on abrasion resistance of a resin composite material.

    PubMed

    Taira, Yohsuke; Hatono, Hironori; Mizukane, Masahiro; Tokita, Masahiro; Atsuta, Mitsuru

    2006-12-01

    Aerosol deposition (AD coating) is a novel technique to coat solid substances with a ceramic film. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of AD coating on abrasion resistance of a resin composite material. A 5-microm-thick aluminum oxide layer was created on the polymerized resin composite. The specimen was cyclically abraded using a toothbrush abrasion simulator for 100,000 cycles. Abraded surface was then measured with a profilometer to determine the average roughness (Ra) and maximum roughness (Rmax). It was found that abrasion cycling increased the Ra value of the No-AD-coating group, but decreased the Ra and Rmax values of the AD coating group. Moreover, the AD coating group showed significantly smaller Ra and Rmax values after 100,000 abrasion cycles as compared to the No-coating control group. Microscopic observation supported these findings. In conclusion, the resistance of the resin composite against toothbrush abrasion was improved by AD coating. PMID:17338303

  2. Synergy Between Polyvinylpyrrolidone-Coated Silver Nanoparticles and Azole Antifungal Against Drug-Resistant Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lingmei; Liao, Kai; Li, Yiping; Zhao, Lei; Liang, Sai; Guo, Dan; Hu, Jun; Wang, Dayong

    2016-03-01

    In the clinical practice, resistance of Candida albicans to antifungal agents has frequently emerged. Silver-nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) have been demonstrated to have the antifungal property. We investigated the potential for synergy between polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-coated Ag-NPs and azole antifungal, such as fluconazole or voriconazole, against drug-resistant C. albicans strain CA10. When antifungal agent was examined alone, fluconazole and voriconazole did not kill drug-resistant C. albicans, and PVP-coated Ag-NPs had only the moderate killing ability. In contrast, the combinational treatment of PVP-coated Ag-NPs with fluconazole or voriconazole was effective in being against the drug-resistant C. albicans. After the combinational treatment, we detected the disruption of cell membrane integrity, the tendency of PVP-coated Ag-NPs to adhere to cell membrane, and the inhibition of budding process. Moreover, after the combinational treatment, the defects in ergosterol signaling and efflux pump functions were detected. Our results suggest that the combinational use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), such as PVP-coated Ag-NPs, with the conventional antifungal may be a viable strategy to combat drug-resistant fungal infection. PMID:27455637

  3. NANOSCALE BOEHMITE FILLER FOR CORROSION AND WEAR RESISTANT POLYPHENYLENESULFIDE COATINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.

    2003-06-26

    The authors evaluated the usefulness of nanoscale boehmite crystals as a filler for anti-wear and anti-corrosion polyphenylenesulfide (PPS) coatings exposed to a very harsh, 300 C corrosive geothermal environment. The boehmite fillers dispersed uniformly into the PPS coating, conferring two advanced properties: First, they reduced markedly the rate of blasting wear; second, they increased the PPS's glass transition temperature and thermal decomposition temperature. The wear rate of PPS surfaces was reduced three times when 5wt% boehmite was incorporated into the PPS. During exposure for 15 days at 300 C, the PPS underwent hydrothermal oxidation, leading to the substitution of sulfide linkages by the sulfite linkages. However, such molecular alteration did not significantly diminish the ability of the coating to protect carbon steel against corrosion. In fact, PPS coating filled with boehmite of {le} 5wt% adequately mitigated its corrosion in brine at 300 C. One concern in using this filler was that it absorbs brine. Thus, adding an excess amount of boehmite was detrimental to achieving the maximum protection afforded by the coatings.

  4. Oxidation resistant coatings for CoSb3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzka, K.; Godlewska, E.; Mars, K.; Nocun, M.

    2012-06-01

    Doped cobalt antimonides, are used as components of thermoelectric devices at temperatures not exceeding 450 °C because of poor thermal and chemical stability. In absence of oxygen they degrade by sublimation of antimony, while in air they easily oxidize to form volatile antimony oxides and non-volatile thick double oxide scales [1]. In both cases, protective coatings are indispensable to ensure safe performance of thermoelectric devices over extended times. The most promising solution, reported so far, is a thick aerogel coating, which practically stops antimony loss by sublimation. The assessment of coating effectiveness is generally based on thermogravimetric tests in vacuum, so permeability of oxygen and protection from oxidation cannot be evaluated. The paper presents investigations on the development of protective coatings, which would prevent oxidation of CoSb3. Two types of coatings were applied: magnetron sputtered Cr-Si thin layers [2] and thick enamel layers. Testing involved interrupted oxidation in air for 20-80 h at 500 °C and 600 °C. The Cr-Si thin layers appeared oxygen-tight at 500 °C while the enamel layers - even at 600 °C.

  5. Structure and properties of moisture-resistant konjac glucomannan films coated with shellac/stearic acid coating.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xueqin; Pang, Jie; Zhang, Changfeng; Yu, Chengcheng; Chen, Han; Xie, Bingqing

    2015-03-15

    A series of moisture-resistant konjac glucomannan films were prepared by coating shellac/stearic acid emulsion on deacetylated konjac glucomannan films (dKGM). The effect of stearic acid content on structure and properties of the coated films were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV), water vapor permeability (WVP), water uptake, water contact angle, and tensile testing. The results revealed that shellac in the coating adhered intimately to the surface of dKGM film, and provided a substrate for the dispersion of stearic acid which played an important role in enhancement of the moisture barrier properties and mechanical properties of the coated films. The WVP of the coated films decreased from 2.63×10(-11) to 0.37×10(-11)g/(msPa) and the water contact angle increased from 68° to 101.2° when stearic acid content increased from 0wt% to 40wt%, showing the potential applications in food preservation. PMID:25542116

  6. High temperature oxidation resistant coatings for the directionally solidified Ni-Nb-Cr-Al eutectic superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangman, T. E.; Ulion, N. E.; Felten, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    Protective coatings required for the Ni-Nb-Cr-Al directionally solidified eutectic superalloy were developed and evaluated on the basis of oxidation resistance, diffusional stability, thermal fatigue, and creep resistance. NiCrAlY+Pt and NiCrAlY physical vapor-deposition coating systems exhibited the best combination of properties. Burner-rig testing indicated that the useful life of a 127-micron-thick NiCrAlY+Pt coating exceeds 1000 h at 1366 K. Eutectic-alloy creep lives at 1311 K and a stress of 151.7 MN/sq m were greater for NiCrAlY+Pt-coated specimens than for uncoated specimens by a factor of two.

  7. Cavitation and Sand Slurry Erosion Resistances of WC-10Co-4Cr Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qun; Tang, Zhaoxi; Cha, Limei

    2015-06-01

    Two WC-10Co-4Cr coatings were deposited by high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) and high-velocity air fuel (HVAF) spray processes, respectively, and their basic mechanical properties, cavitation and sand slurry erosion resistances were investigated. The results show that the HVAF-sprayed WC-10Co-4Cr coating exhibited a lower degree of decarburization and better properties in terms of hardness, fracture toughness, porosity, cavitation and sand slurry erosion resistances than those of the HVOF-sprayed WC-10Co-4Cr coatings, respectively. Therefore, HVAF-sprayed WC-10Co-4Cr coatings may be better employed for the protection of hydro-turbine component surfaces against cavitation and sand slurry erosion.

  8. Development of multilayer oxidation resistant coatings on Cr-50Nb alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Haizhong; Xiong, Lingling; Luo, Qinhao; Lu, Shiqiang

    2015-12-01

    To protect Cr-50Nb alloys from high-temperature oxidation, the Al2O3/Si-Al multilayer coatings were produced by pack cementation process, followed by sol-gel process and hot pressing. The results indicate that the multilayer coating is dense and exhibits good adherence to the substrate, which consists of a compact Al2O3 outer layer and an inner layer composed of Si, Al, Cr, Nb. Uncoated Cr-50Nb alloy occurs catastrophic oxidation at the initial oxidation stage at 1200 °C. However, the scale spalling resistance of the multilayer coating is improved significantly, and the multilayer coating exhibits good resistance to oxidation. During cyclic oxidation in air at 1200 °C for 100 h, the weight loss is 0.13 mg/cm2 and the mass gain is 3.38 mg/cm2.

  9. Plasma spray processing of TiC-based coatings for sliding wear resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Mahesh

    Titanium carbide-reinforced metallic coatings, produced by plasma spraying, can be used for sliding wear resistant applications. The sliding wear properties of such coatings are governed to a large extent by the strength, structure and stability of the bond interface between the carbide and the metallic phases. In the present investigation, the microstructure and sliding wear properties of plasma sprayed metal-bonded TiC coatings containing up to 90 v/o carbide have been studied. It was shown that alloying of the metallic phase improved carbide retention in TiC cermets due to better interface bonding, and increased wear resistance and lowered sliding coefficient of friction. TiC-based coatings were produced from both physically blended and synthesized feed powders. It was observed that the precursor TiC-based powder morphology and structure greatly affected the plasma sprayed coating microstructures and the resultant physical and mechanical characteristics. Physical blending of powders induced segregation during spraying, leading to somewhat lower deposit efficiencies and coating uniformity, while synthesized and alloyed titanium carbide/metal composite powders reduced problems of segregation and reactions associated with plasma spraying of physically blended powders where the TiC was in direct contact with the plasma jet. To understand oxidation effects of the environment, Ti and TiC-based coatings were produced under low pressure (VPS), air plasma (APS) and shrouded plasma sprayed conditions. APS Ti and TiC-based powders with reactive matrices suffered severe oxidation decomposition during flight, leading to poor deposition efficiencies and oxidized microstructures. High particle temperatures and cold air plasma spraying. Coating oxidation due to reactions of the particles with the surrounding air during spraying reduced coating hardness and wear resistance. TiC-with Ti or Ti-alloy matrix coatings with the highest hardness, density and wear resistance was

  10. Gastro-resistant characteristics of GRAS-grade enteric coatings for pharmaceutical and nutraceutical products.

    PubMed

    Czarnocka, Justyna K; Alhnan, Mohamed A

    2015-01-01

    The use of naturally derived excipients to develop enteric coatings offers significant advantages over conventional synthetic polymers. Unlike synthetic polymers, they are biodegradable, relatively abundant, have no daily intake limits or restrictions on use for dietary and nutraceutical products. However, little information is available on their dissolution properties under different gastrointestinal conditions and in comparison to each other. This work investigated the gastric resistance properties of commercially available GRAS-based coating technologies. Three coating systems were evaluated: ethyl cellulose+carboxymethyl cellulose (EC-CMC), ethyl cellulose+sodium alginate (EC-Alg) and shellac+sodium alginate (Sh-Alg) combinations. The minimum coating levels were optimized to meet USP pharmacopoeial criteria for delayed release formulations (<10% release after 2h in pH 1.2 followed by >80% release after 45 min of pH change). Theophylline 150 mg tablets were coated with 6.5%, 7%, and 2.75% coating levels of formulations EC-CMC, EC-Alg and Sh-Alg, respectively. In vitro dissolution test revealed a fast release in pH 6.8 for ethyl cellulose based coatings: t80% value of 65 and 45 min for EC-CMC and EC-Alg respectively, while a prolonged drug release from Sh-Alg coating was observed in both pH 6.8 and 7.4 phosphate buffers. However, when more biologically relevant bicarbonate buffer was used, all coatings showed slower drug release. Disintegration test, carried out in both simulated gastric and intestinal fluid, confirmed good mechanical resistance of EC-CMC and EC-Alg coating, and revealed poor durability of the thinner Sh-Alg. Under elevated gastric pH conditions (pH 2, 3 and 4), EC-CMC and EC-Alg coatings were broken after 70, 30, 55 min and after 30, 15, 15 min, respectively, while Sh-Alg coated tablets demonstrated gastric resistance at all pH values. In conclusion, none of the GRAS-grade coatings fully complied with the different biological demands of delayed

  11. Optical tools for high-throughput screening of abrasion resistance of combinatorial libraries of organic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potyrailo, Radislav A.; Chisholm, Bret J.; Olson, Daniel R.; Brennan, Michael J.; Molaison, Chris A.

    2002-02-01

    Design, validation, and implementation of an optical spectroscopic system for high-throughput analysis of combinatorially developed protective organic coatings are reported. Our approach replaces labor-intensive coating evaluation steps with an automated system that rapidly analyzes 8x6 arrays of coating elements that are deposited on a plastic substrate. Each coating element of the library is 10 mm in diameter and 2 to 5 micrometers thick. Performance of coatings is evaluated with respect to their resistance to wear abrasion because this parameter is one of the primary considerations in end-use applications. Upon testing, the organic coatings undergo changes that are impossible to quantitatively predict using existing knowledge. Coatings are abraded using industry-accepted abrasion test methods at single-or multiple-abrasion conditions, followed by high- throughput analysis of abrasion-induced light scatter. The developed automated system is optimized for the analysis of diffusively scattered light that corresponds to 0 to 30% haze. System precision of 0.1 to 2.5% relative standard deviation provides capability for the reliable ranking of coatings performance. While the system was implemented for high-throughput screening of combinatorially developed organic protective coatings for automotive applications, it can be applied to a variety of other applications where materials ranking can be achieved using optical spectroscopic tools.

  12. Fluorocarbon seal replaces metal piston ring in low density gas environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morath, W. D.; Morgan, N. E.

    1967-01-01

    Reinforced fluorocarbon cupseal, which provides an integral lip-type seal, replaces the metal piston rings in piston-cylinder configurations used in the compression of low density gases. The fluorocarbon seal may be used as cryogenic compressor piston seals.

  13. Direct Resistance Joule Heating of Al-10 pct Si-Coated Press Hardening Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang Wook; Choi, Won Seok; Cho, Yeol Rae; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-06-01

    Various rapid heating methods have been developed to increase the productivity of press hardening steel. One of these methods is direct resistance Joule heating. This heating method results in the melting of the surface coating and the formation of a persistent liquid trail as a result of the high thermal conductivity and low melting temperature of the Al-10 pct Si alloy coating. This can be addressed by an alloying preheating treatment prior to the press hardening process.

  14. Ion Implanted Nanolayers in Alloys and Ceramic Coatings for Improved Resistance to High-Temperature Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Z.; Szymczyk, W.; Piekoszewski, J.

    Ion implantation effects on resistance of alloys and ceramic coatings to the high-temperature corrosion have been reviewed. The most significant results on implantation of reactive elements (Y, La, Ce and other rare earth elements) into alloys and aluminum, boron, silicon, tantalum, and titanium into ceramic coatings have been cited. Ion implantation affects not only the oxide growth rate, but also seems to modify the growth mechanism and the oxide structure.

  15. Direct Resistance Joule Heating of Al-10 pct Si-Coated Press Hardening Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang Wook; Choi, Won Seok; Cho, Yeol Rae; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-03-01

    Various rapid heating methods have been developed to increase the productivity of press hardening steel. One of these methods is direct resistance Joule heating. This heating method results in the melting of the surface coating and the formation of a persistent liquid trail as a result of the high thermal conductivity and low melting temperature of the Al-10 pct Si alloy coating. This can be addressed by an alloying preheating treatment prior to the press hardening process.

  16. Investigation of erosion-resistant chromium carbide coatings sprayed with the high pressure HVOF process

    SciTech Connect

    Irons, G.; Kratochvil, W.R.; Bullock, W.R.; Roy, A.

    1994-12-31

    Eight different chromium carbide materials were sprayed at various conditions with the high pressure HVOF process. The coatings were erosion tested with both high and low angle impingement of erodent. All of the materials, including a less-expensive blended powder, exhibited excellent erosion resistance compared to standard plasma sprayed coatings. Other evaluations included metallographic examinations, macro and microhardness tests, bond tests, X-ray diffraction and chemical analyses. Several important correlations were investigated, including the effects of powder size and heat treatment.

  17. Heat sealable, flame and abrasion resistant coated fabric. [clothing and containers for space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tschirch, R. P.; Sidman, K. R. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Flame retardant, abrasion resistant elastomeric compositions are comprised of thermoplastic polyurethane polymer and flame retarding amounts of a filler selected from decabromodiphenyloxide and antimony oxide in a 3:1 weight ratio, and decabromodiphenyloxide, antimony oxide, and ammonium polyphosphate in a 3:1:3 weight ratio respectively. Coated fabrics employing such elastomeric compositions as coating film are flexible, lightweight, and air impermeable and can be made using heat or dielectric sealing procedures.

  18. A durability test rig and methodology for erosion-resistant blade coatings in turbomachinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leithead, Sean Gregory

    A durability test rig for erosion-resistant gas turbine engine compressor blade coatings was designed, completed and commissioned. Bare and coated 17-4PH steel V103-profile blades were rotated at up to 11500 rpm and impacted with Garnet sand for 5 hours at an average concentration of 2.51 gm3of air , at a blade leading edge Mach number of 0.50. The rig was determined to be an acceptable first stage axial compressor representation. Two types of 16 microm-thick coatings were tested: Titanium Nitride (TiN) and Chromium-Aluminum-Titanium Nitride (CrAlTiN), both applied using an Arc Physical Vapour Deposition technique at the National Research Council in Ottawa, Canada. A Leithead-Allan-Zhao (LAZ) score was created to compare the durability performance of uncoated and coated blades based on mass-loss and blade dimension changes. The bare blades' LAZ score was set as a benchmark of 1.00. The TiN-coated and CrAlTiN-coated blades obtained LAZ scores of 0.69 and 0.41, respectively. A lower score meant a more erosion-resistant coating. Major modes of blade wear included: trailing edge, leading edge and the rear suction surface. Trailing edge thickness was reduced, the leading edge became blunt, and the rear suction surface was scrubbed by overtip and recirculation zone vortices. It was found that the erosion effects of vortex flow were significant. Erosion damage due to reflected particles was not present due to the low blade solidity of 0.7. The rig is best suited for studying the performance of erosion-resistant coatings after they are proven effective in ASTM standardized testing. Keywords: erosion, compressor, coatings, turbomachinery, erosion rate, blade, experimental, gas turbine engine

  19. Method For Improving The Oxidation Resistance Of Metal Substrates Coated With Thermal Barrier Coatings

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Anthony Mark; Gray, Dennis Michael; Jackson, Melvin Robert

    2003-05-13

    A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described. A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described.

  20. Chemical vapor deposition of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} corrosion resistant coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, D.W.; Stinton, D.P.

    1992-12-31

    Silicon carbide and silicon nitride heat engine components are susceptible to hot corrosion by molten Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} which forms from impurities present in fuel and the environment. Chemically vapor deposited Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} coatings are being developed as a means to protect components from reaction with these salts and preserve their structural properties. Investigations to optimize the structure of the coating have revealed that the deposition conditions dramatically affect the coating morphology. Coatings deposited at high temperatures are typically columnar in structure; high concentrations of the reactant gases produce oxide powders on the substrate surface. Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} deposited at low temperatures consists of grains that are finer and have significantly less porosity than that formed at high temperatures. Samples of coatings which have been produced by CVD have successfully completed preliminary testing for resistance to corrosion by Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}.

  1. Electrodeposition of high corrosion resistance Cu/Ni-P coating on AZ91D magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shan; Cao, Fahe; Chang, Linrong; Zheng, JunJun; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Jianqing; Cao, Chunan

    2011-08-01

    High corrosion resistance Cu/Ni-P coatings were electrodeposited on AZ91D magnesium alloy via suitable pretreatments, such as one-step acid pickling-activation, once zinc immersion and environment-friendly electroplated copper as the protective under-layer, which made Ni-P deposit on AZ91D Mg alloy in acid plating baths successfully. The pH value and current density for Ni-P electrodeposition were optimized to obtain high corrosion resistance. With increasing the phosphorous content of the Ni-P coatings, the deposits were found to gradually transform to amorphous structure and the corrosion resistance increased synchronously. The anticorrosion ability of AZ91D Mg alloy was greatly improved by the amorphous Ni-P deposits, which was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization curve and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The corrosion current density ( Icorr) of the coated Mg alloy substrate is about two orders of magnitude less than that of the uncoated.

  2. Study of coatings for improved fire and decay resistance of mine timbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, B.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to find a fire- and rot-retardant polymer/fungicide reaction product for coating mine timbers. Fire-retardant polymers were screened as films and coatings on fir wood. Curable polyimide appeared to be flame retardant and evolved a minimum of fumes when exposed to a flame. Several organic and metal, low toxicity, fungicides were reacted with the polyimide in-situ on the wood. These coated samples were screened for fungus resistance. All formulations rated well - even the polyimide film without additives was fungicidal. The fir wood control itself resisted internal damage during the ten weeks of fungus exposure. A more severe test for fungus resistance will be required.

  3. Coating Hydrostatic Bearings To Resist Ignition In Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funkhouser, Merle E.

    1993-01-01

    Coats of superalloy MA754 plasma-sprayed onto occasionally rubbing surfaces of hydrostatic journal bearings operating in liquid and/or gaseous oxygen, according to proposal. Prevents ignition and combustion occurring when components made of stainless steels or other conventional bearing alloys rub against each other in oxygen. Eliminates need for runner and enhances control over critical bearing clearance.

  4. Sliding and abrasive wear resistance of thermal-sprayed WC-CO coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yunfei; Liu, Yourong; Fischer, Traugott E.

    2001-03-01

    We studied the resistance of the coatings to abrasive and unlubricated sliding wear of 40 WC/Co coatings applied by high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF), high-energy plasma spray (HEPS), and high velocity plasma spray (HVPS), using commercial and nanostructured experimental powders. The hardness of the coatings varies from 3 to 13 GPA, which is much lower than that of sintered samples (10 to 23 GPA) because of the porosity of the coatings. Phase analysis by x-ray diffraction revealed various amounts of decarburization in the coatings, some of which contain WC, W2C, W, and η phase. The abrasive and sliding wear resistance is limited by the hardness of the samples. For a given hardness, the wear resistance is lowered by decarburization, which produces a hard but brittle phase. Nanocarb powders have the shape of thin-walled hollow spheres that heat up rapidly in the gun and are more prone to decarburization than commercial materials. The work shows that, in order to obtain the performance of nanostructured coatings, the powder and spray techniques must be modified.

  5. Radiation-Resistant Hybrid Lotus Effect for Achieving Photoelectrocatalytic Self-Cleaning Anticontamination Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Edward W.; Pirich, Ronald G.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment involving radiation-resistant hydrophobic coatings is planned for space exposure and experimental testing on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2011. The Lotus biocide coatings are designed for supporting space exploration missions. This innovation is an antibacterial, anti-contamination, and self-cleaning coating that uses nano-sized semiconductor semimetal oxides to neutralize biological pathogens and toxic chemicals, as well as to mitigate dust accumulation (see figure). The Lotus biocide coating is thin (approximately microns thick), lightweight, and the biocide properties will not degrade with time or exposure to biological or chemical agents. The biocide is stimulated chemically (stoichiometric reaction) through exposure to light (photocatalysis), or by an applied electric field (electrocatalysis). The hydrophobic coating samples underwent preliminary high-energy proton and alpha-ray (helium ion) irradiations at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88" cyclotron and demonstrated excellent radiation resistance for a portion of the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GRC) and Solar Proton spectrum. The samples will undergo additional post-flight studies when returned to Earth to affirm further the radiation resistance properties of the space exposed coatings.

  6. Biocorrosion resistance of coated magnesium alloy by microarc oxidation in electrolyte containing zirconium and calcium salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ya-Ming; Guo, Jun-Wei; Wu, Yun-Feng; Liu, Yan; Cao, Jian-Yun; Zhou, Yu; Jia, De-Chang

    2014-09-01

    The key to use magnesium alloys as suitable biodegradable implants is how to adjust their degradation rates. We report a strategy to prepare biocompatible ceramic coating with improved biocorrosion resistance property on AZ91D alloy by microarc oxidation (MAO) in a silicate-K2ZrF6 solution with and without Ca(H2PO4)2 additives. The microstructure and biocorrosion of coatings were characterized by XRD and SEM, as well as electrochemical and immersion tests in simulated body fluid (SBF). The results show that the coatings are mainly composed of MgO, Mg2SiO4, m-ZrO2 phases, further Ca containing compounds involve the coating by Ca(H2PO4)2 addition in the silicate-K2ZrF6 solution. The corrosion resistance of coated AZ91D alloy is significantly improved compared with the bare one. After immersing in SBF for 28 d, the Si-Zr5-Ca0 coating indicates a best corrosion resistance performance.

  7. Study on Corrosion Resistance of Fe-based Amorphous Coating by Laser Cladding in Hydrochloric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. J.; Guo, S. B.; Yang, X. J.; Zhou, X. L.; Hua, X. Z.; Zhu, X. H.; Duan, Z.

    In this study, the Fe41Co7Cr15Mo14C15B6Y2 bulk amorphous alloy with high glass-forming ability was prepared using the arc- melting copper mold casting technique, and corresponding amorphous coating was obtained using the laser melt amorphous powders on the surface of carbon steel. The corrosion resistance performance of the laser cladding coating in hydrochloric acid was analyzed and tested in experiments under the conditions of different laser cladding speeds. The amorphous alloy coating with different fabrication parameters have the difference internal structure, which lead to the difference corrosion resistance in the same environment to some extent. The nature of amorphous alloy and the corrosion morphology were investigated using XRD and SEM method, respectively. The corrosion experiments showed that: when the laser power was 3300W, the corrosion resistance of four kinds of samples in hydrochloric acid from strong to weak as follows: as-cast sample > the coating with laser cladding speed 110 mm/min > the coating with laser cladding speed 120 mm/min > the coating with laser cladding speed 130 mm/min. The free corrosion current density of casting sample, sample 1, sample 2 and sample 3 is 3.304 × 10-6 A/cm2, 2.600×10-3 A/cm2, 2.030×10-3 A/cm2 and 3.396×10-4 A/cm2, respectively.

  8. NMR analysis of a fluorocarbon copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.; Smith, C.H.

    1987-10-01

    Vinylidene fluoride (VF/sub 2/) can be copolymerized with chlorotrifluoroethylene (CTFE) in an aqueous emulsion using a peroxide chain initiator. The physical properties of the resulting fluorocarbon polymer depend on the ratio of VF/sub 2/ to CTFE and the randomness of the copolymerization. When CTFE and VF are polymerized in an approximately 3:1 mole ratio, the resulting polymer is soluble in acetone (and other solvents) at room temperature. Using proton and fluorine-19 NMR, the mole ratio of CTFE to VF/sub 2/, the emulsifier (perfluorodecanoate) concentration, and the randomness of copolymerization can be determined. A trifluorotoluene internal standard is added to a d/sub 6/-acetone solution of the fluoropolymer. Proton NMR is used to determine the amount of VF/sub 2/. Fluorine-19 NMR is used to measure the amount of emulsifier and the randomness of copolymerization. Each analysis requires about 5 minutes, and is quite precise, with relative standard deviations from 3 to 10% (10 replicates analyzed). In addition, the results from NMR analyses agree well with wet chemical analyses. 4 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Electrically Conductive, Corrosion-Resistant Coatings Through Defect Chemistry for Metallic Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Anil V. Virkar

    2006-12-31

    The principal objective of this work was to develop oxidation protective coatings for metallic interconnect based on a defect chemistry approach. It was reasoned that the effectiveness of a coating is dictated by oxygen permeation kinetics; the slower the permeation kinetics, the better the protection. All protective coating materials investigated to date are either perovskites or spinels containing metals exhibiting multiple valence states (Co, Fe, Mn, Cr, etc.). As a result, all of these oxides exhibit a reasonable level of electronic conductivity; typically at least about {approx}0.05 S/cm at 800 C. For a 5 micron coating, this equates to a maximum {approx}0.025 {Omega}cm{sup 2} area specific resistance due to the coating. This suggests that the coating should be based on oxygen ion conductivity (the lower the better) and not on electronic conductivity. Measurements of ionic conductivity of prospective coating materials were conducted using Hebb-Wagner method. It was demonstrated that special precautions need to be taken to measure oxygen ion conductivity in these materials with very low oxygen vacancy concentration. A model for oxidation under a protective coating is presented. Defect chemistry based approach was developed such that by suitably doping, oxygen vacancy concentration was suppressed, thus suppressing oxygen ion transport and increasing effectiveness of the coating. For the cathode side, the best coating material identified was LaMnO{sub 3} with Ti dopant on the Mn site (LTM). It was observed that LTM is more than 20 times as effective as Mn-containing spinels. On the anode side, LaCrO3 doped with Nb on the Cr site (LNC) was the material identified. Extensive oxidation kinetics studies were conducted on metallic alloy foils with coating {approx}1 micron in thickness. From these studies, it was projected that a 5 micron coating would be sufficient to ensure 40,000 h life.

  10. Amorphous metal formulations and structured coatings for corrosion and wear resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, Joseph C.

    2014-07-15

    A system for coating a surface comprising providing a source of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements and applying the amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements to the surface by a spray. Also a coating comprising a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements. An apparatus for producing a corrosion-resistant amorphous-metal coating on a structure comprises a deposition chamber, a deposition source in the deposition chamber that produces a deposition spray, the deposition source containing a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements, and a system that directs the deposition spray onto the structure.