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Sample records for fluorocarbons

  1. Subcooled flow boiling of fluorocarbons

    E-print Network

    Murphy, Richard Walter

    1971-01-01

    A study was conducted of heat transfer and hydrodynamic behavior for subcooled flow boiling of Freon-113, one of a group of fluorocarbons suitable for use in cooling of high-power-density electronic components. Problems ...

  2. Fluorinated diamond bonded in fluorocarbon resin

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Gene W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-01-01

    By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

  3. Fluorocarbon Adsorption in Hierarchical Porous Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Motkuri, Radha K.; Annapureddy, Harsha V.; Vijayakumar, M.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Martin, P F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Dang, Liem X.; Krishna, Rajamani; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2014-07-09

    The adsorption behavior of a series of fluorocarbon derivatives was examined on a set of microporous metal organic framework (MOF) sorbents and another set of hierarchical mesoporous MOFs. The microporous M-DOBDC (M = Ni, Co) showed a saturation uptake capacity for R12 of over 4 mmol/g at a very low relative saturation pressure (P/Po) of 0.02. In contrast, the mesoporous MOF MIL-101 showed an exceptionally high uptake capacity reaching over 14 mmol/g at P/Po of 0.4. Adsorption affinity in terms of mass loading and isosteric heats of adsorption were found to generally correlate with the polarizability of the refrigerant with R12 > R22 > R13 > R14 > methane. These results suggest the possibility of exploiting MOFs for separation of azeotropic mixtures of fluorocarbons and use in eco-friendly fluorocarbon-based adsorption cooling and refrigeration applications.

  4. Fluorocarbon adsorption in hierarchical porous frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Motkuri, RK; Annapureddy, HVR; Vijaykumar, M; Schaef, HT; Martin, PF; McGrail, BP; Dang, LX; Krishna, R; Thallapally, PK

    2014-07-09

    Metal-organic frameworks comprise an important class of solid-state materials and have potential for many emerging applications such as energy storage, separation, catalysis and bio-medical. Here we report the adsorption behaviour of a series of fluorocarbon derivatives on a set of microporous and hierarchical mesoporous frameworks. The microporous frameworks show a saturation uptake capacity for dichlorodifluoromethane of >4 mmol g(-1) at a very low relative saturation pressure (P/P-o) of 0.02. In contrast, the mesoporous framework shows an exceptionally high uptake capacity reaching >14 mmol g(-1) at P/P-o of 0.4. Adsorption affinity in terms of mass loading and isosteric heats of adsorption is found to generally correlate with the polarizability and boiling point of the refrigerant, with dichlorodifluoromethane >chlorodifluoromethane >chlorotrifluoromethane >tetrafluoromethane >methane. These results suggest the possibility of exploiting these sorbents for separation of azeotropic mixtures of fluorocarbons and use in eco-friendly fluorocarbon-based adsorption cooling.

  5. Process for synthesizing a new series of fluorocarbon polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, M. S.

    1970-01-01

    Two-step process for preparing fluorocarbon materials includes - /1/ adding gaseous fluorine to a polyperfluoropolyene to create fluorocarbon radicals, with reactive sites at unsaturated carbon atoms, and /2/ introducing a monomer, after evacuation of fluorine gas, and allowing copolymerization with the free radicals.

  6. Horse rug lung: toxic pneumonitis due to fluorocarbon inhalation.

    PubMed

    Wallace, G M F; Brown, P H

    2005-06-01

    Fluorocarbons are widely used in industry, and manifestations of inhalation toxicity include polymer fume fever, reactive airways dysfunction, and bronchospasm. Only seven cases of alveolitis occurring acutely after inhalation have been reported. This paper presents four cases of toxic pneumonitis due to direct inhalation of industrial fluorocarbon used as a waterproofing spray for horse rugs. These cases differ from previous reports and show that chronic as well as acute alveolitis can result from fluorocarbon inhalation. Corticosteroid treatment may be beneficial. The need for stricter control in the workplace is emphasised. PMID:15901890

  7. Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Gene W. (Los Alamos, NM); Roybal, Herman E. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1985-01-01

    A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

  8. Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, G.W.; Roybal, H.E.

    1983-11-14

    A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

  9. Thermodynamic properties of gaseous fluorocarbons and isentropic equilibrium expansions of two binary mixtures of fluorocarbons and argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talcott, N. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Equations and computer code are given for the thermodynamic properties of gaseous fluorocarbons in chemical equilibrium. In addition, isentropic equilibrium expansions of two binary mixtures of fluorocarbons and argon are included. The computer code calculates the equilibrium thermodynamic properties and, in some cases, the transport properties for the following fluorocarbons: CCl2F, CCl2F2, CBrF3, CF4, CHCl2F, CHF3, CCL2F-CCl2F, CCLF2-CClF2, CF3-CF3, and C4F8. Equilibrium thermodynamic properties are tabulated for six of the fluorocarbons(CCl3F, CCL2F2, CBrF3, CF4, CF3-CF3, and C4F8) and pressure-enthalpy diagrams are presented for CBrF3.

  10. Effect of fluorocarbons on acetylcholinesterase activity and some counter measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W.; Parker, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    An isolated vagal sympathetic heart system has been successfully used for the study of the effect of fluorocarbons (FCs) on cardiac performance and in situ enzyme activity. Dichlorodifluoromethane sensitizes this preparation to sympathetic stimulation and to exogenous epinephrine challenge. Partial and complete A-V block and even cardiac arrest have been induced by epinephrine challenge in the FC sensitized heart. Potassium chloride alone restores the rhythmicity but not the normal contractility of the heart in such a situation. Addition of glucose will, however, completely restore the normal function of the heart which is sensitized by dichlorodifluoromethane. The ED 50 values of acetylcholinesterase activity which are used as a measure of relative effectiveness of fluorocarbons are compared with the maximum permissible concentration. Kinetic studies indicate that all the fluorocarbons tested so far are noncompetitive.

  11. Cause and Effects of Fluorocarbon Degradation in Electronics and Opto-Electronic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Predmore, Roamer E.; Canham, John S.

    2002-01-01

    Trace degradation of fluorocarbon or halocarbon materials must be addressed in their application in sensitive systems. As the dimensions and/or tolerances of components in a system decrease, the sensitivity of the system to trace fluorocarbon or halocarbon degradation products increases. Trace quantities of highly reactive degradation products from fluorocarbons have caused a number of failures of flight hardware. It is of utmost importance that the risk of system failure, resulting from trace amounts of reactive fluorocarbon degradation products be addressed in designs containing fluorocarbon or halocarbon materials. Thermal, electrical, and mechanical energy input into the system can multiply the risk of failure.

  12. Fluoro-Carbonate Solvents for Li-Ion Cells

    SciTech Connect

    NAGASUBRAMANIAN,GANESAN

    1999-09-17

    A number of fluoro-carbonate solvents were evaluated as electrolytes for Li-ion cells. These solvents are fluorine analogs of the conventional electrolyte solvents such as dimethyl carbonate, ethylene carbonate, diethyl carbonate in Li-ion cells. Conductivity of single and mixed fluoro carbonate electrolytes containing 1 M LiPF{sub 6} was measured at different temperatures. These electrolytes did not freeze at -40 C. We are evaluating currently, the irreversible 1st cycle capacity loss in carbon anode in these electrolytes and the capacity loss will be compared to that in the conventional electrolytes. Voltage stability windows of the electrolytes were measured at room temperature and compared with that of the conventional electrolytes. The fluoro-carbon electrolytes appear to be more stable than the conventional electrolytes near Li voltage. Few preliminary electrochemical data of the fluoro-carbonate solvents in full cells are reported in the literature. For example, some of the fluorocarbonate solvents appear to have a wider voltage window than the conventional electrolyte solvents. For example, methyl 2,2,2 trifluoro ethyl carbonate containing 1 M LiPF{sub 6} electrolyte has a decomposition voltage exceeding 6 V vs. Li compared to <5 V for conventional electrolytes. The solvent also appears to be stable in contact with lithium at room temperature.

  13. Method and means for producing fluorocarbon finishes on fibrous structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, Madeline S. (Inventor); Stringham, Roger S. (Inventor); Fogg, Lawrence C. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An improved process and apparatus is provided for imparting chemically bonded fluorocarbon finishes to textiles. In the process, the textiles are contacted with a gaseous mixture of fluoroolefins in an inert diluent gas in the presence of ultraviolet light under predetermined conditions.

  14. Highly exothermic and superhydrophobic Mg/fluorocarbon core/shell nanoenergetic arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiang; Xu, Daguo; Yang, Guangcheng; Zhang, Qiaobao; Shen, Jinpeng; Lu, Jian; Zhang, Kaili

    2014-07-01

    Mg/fluorocarbon core/shell nanoenergetic arrays are prepared onto silicon substrate, with Mg nanorods as the core and fluorocarbon as the shell. Mg nanorods are deposited by the glancing angle deposition technique, and the fluorocarbon layer is then prepared as a shell to encase the Mg nanorods by the magnetron sputtering deposition process. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy show the core/shell structure of the Mg/fluorocarbon arrays. X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy are used to characterize the structural composition of the Mg/fluorocarbon. It is found that the as-prepared fluorocarbon layer consists of shorter molecular chains compared to that of bulk polytetrafluoroethylene, which is proven beneficial to the low onset reaction temperature of Mg/fluorocarbon. Water contact angle test demonstrates the superhydrophobicity of the Mg/fluorocarbon arrays, and a static contact angle as high as 162° is achieved. Thermal analysis shows that the Mg/fluorocarbon material exhibits a very low onset reaction temperature of about 270 °C as well as an ultrahigh heat of reaction approaching 9 kJ/g. A preliminary combustion test reveals rapid combustion wave propagation, and a convective mechanism is adopted to explain the combustion behaviors. PMID:24918872

  15. Spraylon fluorocarbon encapsulation for silicon solar cell arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A development program was performed for evaluating, modifying, and optimizing the Lockheed formulated liquid transparent filmforming Spraylon fluorocarbon protective coating for silicon solar cells and modules. The program objectives were designed to meet the requirements of the low-cost automated solar cell array fabrication process. As part of the study, a computer program was used to establish the limits of the safe working stress in the coated silicon solar cell array system under severe thermal shock.

  16. Effects of nano-fluorocarbon coating on icing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong; He, Guogeng; Tian, Qiqi

    2012-07-01

    Icing is a common phenomenon in many fields, from aeronautics to power lines. Recently, researchers have paid much attention on the superhydrophobic surface as one of the favorable anti-icing techniques. In the present study, we investigated the performance of water icing on a superhydrophobic surface with a nano-fluorocarbon film in the average thickness around 10 nm. The surface topographies and wettabilities were characterized by a scanning electron microscopy system and a video-based contact angle measurement system respectively. To investigate the effects of this nano-fluorocarbon coating on water icing, the water droplet shape, the starting icing time and the whole icing process were observed on both the coated and uncoated surface. It was found that the coated surface has a good ability to retard the starting time of icing while the whole icing time on the coated surface was longer compared the uncoated one under the experimental conditions. The test results showed that the nano-fluorocarbon coating expresses a good anti-icing performance and can be used as a coating material to avoid ice-blocking in the dynamic ice-making system.

  17. Effect of nonsinusoidal bias waveforms on ion energy distributions and fluorocarbon plasma etch selectivity

    E-print Network

    Kushner, Mark

    Effect of nonsinusoidal bias waveforms on ion energy distributions and fluorocarbon plasma etch profiles and selectivity during plasma etching. Control of ion energies is typically obtained by varying etching Si and SiO2 in fluorocarbon plasmas could be controlled by adjusting the width and energy

  18. Fluorocarbon plasma etching and profile evolution of porous low-dielectric-constant silica

    E-print Network

    Kushner, Mark

    Fluorocarbon plasma etching and profile evolution of porous low-dielectric-constant silica Arvind silicon dioxide PS is one such material. To address scaling issues during fluorocarbon plasma etching was validated by comparison to experiments for PS etching in CHF3 plasmas sustained in an inductively coupled

  19. Highly Stable Hysteresis-Free Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Transistors by Fluorocarbon Polymer Encapsulation

    E-print Network

    Javey, Ali

    Highly Stable Hysteresis-Free Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Transistors by Fluorocarbon Polymer report hysteresis-free carbon nanotube thin-film transistors (CNT-TFTs) employing a fluorocarbon polymer them highly susceptible to the environment.37,38 Specifically, large hysteresis has been commonly

  20. Discovery during Hydrogen Annealing: Formation of Nanoscale Fluorocarbon Tubular Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Xiuchun; Tanaka, Sinya; Masuda, Atsuhiko; Maenaka, Kazusuke; Higuchi, Kohei

    2013-09-01

    A novel fabrication method for nanoscale tubular structures is presented in this paper. The tubular structures can be obtained by heating single-crystal silicon trenches or pillars formed by the inductively coupled plasma reactive-ion etching (ICP-RIE) Bosch process in hydrogen ambient. The importance of initial vacuum in the reaction chamber for tube formation and the tube formation mechanism were discussed. The components and sidewall size of the tubular structure were also studied to verify that the tube is made of the fluorocarbon (CF) passivation layer deposited by the Bosch process. The CF tubular structure would be a promising structure for BioMEMS.

  1. Fluorocarbon 113 exposure and cardiac dysrhythmias among aerospace workers

    SciTech Connect

    Egeland, G.M.; Bloom, T.F.; Schnorr, T.M.; Hornung, R.W.; Suruda, A.J.; Wille, K.K. )

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the cardiotoxic effects of 1,1,2-Trichloro-1,2,2- Trifluoroethane (fluorocarbon 113 or FC113) exposures among healthy workers cleaning rocket and ground support equipment for the National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) programs. Exposure and ambulatory electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring data were evaluated on 16 workers, each of whom was examined on exposed and nonexposed workdays. We examined whether there was a greater rate of dysrhythmias on an exposed workday relative to a nonexposed workday. Overall, we found no within subject differences in the rate of ventricular and supraventricular premature beats (number per 1,000 heart beats), fluctuations in the length of the P-R interval, or heart rate. We found that levels of FC113 exposures below the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 8-hour time-weighted-average (TWA) standard of 1,000 ppm did not induce cardiac dysrhythmias or subtle changes in cardiac activity. However, because fluorocarbons may sensitize the heart to epinephrine, this study's negative findings based on sedentary and fairly healthy workers may not be generalizable to other populations of workers who are not as healthy or engaged in more physically demanding work.

  2. Laser-induced fluorocarbon coating onto fused silica optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funatsu, Takayuki; Murahara, Masataka M.; Okamoto, Takayuki

    2005-02-01

    The fluorocarbon thin film and fused silica glass was bonded for an ArF laser light transmittance by using silicon oil. The chemical main structure of the silicon oil has siloxane chains as in the same structure of quartz. This new bonding method was developed with silicone oil and excimer-lamp in an oxygen atmosphere. The silicone oil was put between the fused silica glass and the fluorocarbon (FEP), and an excimer-lamp was irradiated. The silicon oil ((-O-Si(CH3)-O)n) was photo-dissociated and reacted with the oxygen adsorbed on the silica glass surface to produce a SiO2. On the other hand, the H atoms photo-dissociated from the silicon oil pulled out the F atoms of the FEP. As a result, the FEP and the silica glass were combined. The results showed that the silicon oil changed to silica glass by the excited oxygen, which improved the UV rays under 200nm transmittance.

  3. Enhanced removal of radioactive particles by fluorocarbon surfactant solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, R.; Harling, O.K.

    1993-08-01

    The proposed research addressed the application of ESI`s particle removal process to the non-destructive decontamination of nuclear equipment. The cleaning medium used in this process is a solution of a high molecular weight fluorocarbon surfactant in an inert perfluorinated liquid which results in enhanced particle removal. The perfluorinated liquids of interest, which are recycled in the process, are nontoxic, nonflammable, and environmentally compatible, and do not present a hazard to the ozone layer. The information obtained in the Phase 1 program indicated that the proposed ESI process is technically effective and economically attractive. The fluorocarbon surfactant solutions used as working media in the ESI process survived exposure of up to 10 Mrad doses of gamma rays, and are considered sufficiently radiation resistant for the proposed process. Ultrasonic cleaning in perfluorinated surfactant solutions was found to be an effective method of removing radioactive iron (Fe 59) oxide particles from contaminated test pieces. Radioactive particles suspended in the process liquids could be quantitatively removed by filtration through a 0.1 um membrane filter. Projected economics indicate a pre-tax pay back time of 1 month for a commercial scale system.

  4. Marine biofouling on the fluorocarbon coatings comprising PTFE powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhan-ping; Qi, Yu-hong; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Zheng

    2009-07-01

    Fluorocarbon coatings were developed with respectively 10%, 20% and 30% PTFE powder to prevent marine biofouling. Influence of content of PTFE on microstructures and roughness of coatings was investigated using SEM and roughometer. It was studied that the effects of coating roughness on settlement of benthic diatom and Ectocarpus by using biological microscope, stereo microscope, image processing and spectrophotometer. Results indicated that the surface roughness of coatings decreases and the quantity of benthic diatom and Ectocarpus reduces attaching onto the coating with the increase of content of PTFE in paint studied. Benthic diatoms attached much more on horizontal specimen than on vertical one; they prefer to settle onto the coatings that there are lots of micro-cracks in it. These results are helpful for developing new non-toxic antifouling paints.

  5. Application of cyclic fluorocarbon/argon discharges to device patterning

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Metzler, Dominik; Uppiredi, Kishore; Bruce, Robert L.; Miyazoe, Hiroyuki; Zhu, Yu; Price, William; Sikorski, Ed S.; Li, Chen; Engelmann, Sebastian U.; Joseph, Eric A.; et al

    2015-11-13

    With increasing demands on device patterning to achieve smaller critical dimensions and pitches for the 5nm node and beyond, the need for atomic layer etching (ALE) is steadily increasing. In this study, a cyclic fluorocarbon/Ar plasma is successfully used for ALE patterning in a manufacturing scale reactor. Self-limited etching of silicon oxide is observed. The impact of various process parameters on the etch performance is established. The substrate temperature has been shown to play an especially significant role, with lower temperatures leading to higher selectivity and lower etch rates, but worse pattern fidelity. The cyclic ALE approach established with thismore »work is shown to have great potential for small scale device patterning, showing self-limited etching, improved uniformity and resist mask performance.« less

  6. Effective method of characterizing specific liquid fluorocarbon interactions using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ravi, S; Amoros, J; Arockia Jayalatha, K

    2008-05-22

    Several studies have used the analytical results available for structure factor, osmotic pressure, vapor pressure, and suspension viscosity to characterize nanoparticle interactions. In this work a novel attempt has been made to characterize seven different types of liquid per fluorocarbon nanoparticles (LPFC-np) by estimating packing factor, segment diameter, chemical potential, Rao's constant, and adiabatic and isothermal compressibilities using experimental ultrasonic velocity as input. The segment diameter has also been examined by using experimental surface tension and viscosity for comparison. The calculations were extended for different temperatures involving four different equations of state. We have tested the sensitivity of all these parameters to a very small change in the heat capacity ratio. This extensive calculation helps to make a reasonable description about the interactions among the LPFC-np. Also a better correlation could be determined between the interaction of ultrasound with LPFC-np (as a facilitator) and the pure absorption (propagation) of ultrasound by the entire system. PMID:18422360

  7. Application of cyclic fluorocarbon/argon discharges to device patterning

    SciTech Connect

    Metzler, Dominik; Uppiredi, Kishore; Bruce, Robert L.; Miyazoe, Hiroyuki; Zhu, Yu; Price, William; Sikorski, Ed S.; Li, Chen; Engelmann, Sebastian U.; Joseph, Eric A.; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.

    2015-11-13

    With increasing demands on device patterning to achieve smaller critical dimensions and pitches for the 5nm node and beyond, the need for atomic layer etching (ALE) is steadily increasing. In this study, a cyclic fluorocarbon/Ar plasma is successfully used for ALE patterning in a manufacturing scale reactor. Self-limited etching of silicon oxide is observed. The impact of various process parameters on the etch performance is established. The substrate temperature has been shown to play an especially significant role, with lower temperatures leading to higher selectivity and lower etch rates, but worse pattern fidelity. The cyclic ALE approach established with this work is shown to have great potential for small scale device patterning, showing self-limited etching, improved uniformity and resist mask performance.

  8. Selective Plasma Deposition of Fluorocarbon Films on SAMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crain, Mark M., III; Walsh, Kevin M.; Cohn, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    A dry plasma process has been demonstrated to be useful for the selective modification of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiolates. These SAMs are used, during the fabrication of semiconductor electronic devices, as etch masks on gold layers that are destined to be patterned and incorporated into the devices. The selective modification involves the formation of fluorocarbon films that render the SAMs more effective in protecting the masked areas of the gold against etching by a potassium iodide (KI) solution. This modification can be utilized, not only in the fabrication of single electronic devices but also in the fabrication of integrated circuits, microelectromechanical systems, and circuit boards. In the steps that precede the dry plasma process, a silicon mold in the desired pattern is fabricated by standard photolithographic techniques. A stamp is then made by casting polydimethylsiloxane (commonly known as silicone rubber) in the mold. The stamp is coated with an alkanethiol solution, then the stamp is pressed on the gold layer of a device to be fabricated in order to deposit the alkanethiol to form an alkanethiolate SAM in the desired pattern (see figure). Next, the workpiece is exposed to a radio-frequency plasma generated from a mixture of CF4 and H2 gases. After this plasma treatment, the SAM is found to be modified, while the exposed areas of gold remain unchanged. This dry plasma process offers the potential for forming masks superior to those formed in a prior wet etching process. Among the advantages over the wet etching process are greater selectivity, fewer pin holes in the masks, and less nonuniformity of the masks. The fluorocarbon films formed in this way may also be useful as intermediate layers for subsequent fabrication steps and as dielectric layers to be incorporated into finished products.

  9. Electron attachment and positive ion chemistry of monohydrogenated fluorocarbon radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiens, Justin P.; Shuman, Nicholas S.; Miller, Thomas M.; Viggiano, Albert A.

    2015-08-01

    Rate coefficients and product branching fractions for electron attachment and for reaction with Ar+ are measured over the temperature range 300-585 K for three monohydrogenated fluorocarbon (HFC) radicals (CF3CHF, CHF2CF2, and CF3CHFCF2), as well as their five closed-shell precursors (1-HC2F4I, 2-HC2F4I, 2-HC2F4Br, 1-HC3F6I, 2-HC3F6Br). Attachment to the HFC radicals is always fairly inefficient (between 0.1% and 10% of the Vogt-Wannier capture rate), but generally faster than attachment to analogous perfluorinated carbon radicals. The primary products in all cases are HF-loss to yield CnFm-1- anions, with only a minor branching to F- product. In all cases the temperature dependences are weak. Attachment to the precursor halocarbons is near the capture rate with a slight negative temperature dependence in all cases except for 2-HC2F4Br, which is ˜10% efficient at 300 K and becomes more efficient, approaching the capture rate at higher temperatures. All attachment kinetics are successfully reproduced using a kinetic modeling approach. Reaction of the HFC radicals with Ar+ proceeds at or near the calculated collisional rate coefficient in all cases, yielding a wide variety of product ions.

  10. Electron attachment and positive ion chemistry of monohydrogenated fluorocarbon radicals.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Justin P; Shuman, Nicholas S; Miller, Thomas M; Viggiano, Albert A

    2015-08-21

    Rate coefficients and product branching fractions for electron attachment and for reaction with Ar(+) are measured over the temperature range 300-585 K for three monohydrogenated fluorocarbon (HFC) radicals (CF3CHF, CHF2CF2, and CF3CHFCF2), as well as their five closed-shell precursors (1-HC2F4I, 2-HC2F4I, 2-HC2F4Br, 1-HC3F6I, 2-HC3F6Br). Attachment to the HFC radicals is always fairly inefficient (between 0.1% and 10% of the Vogt-Wannier capture rate), but generally faster than attachment to analogous perfluorinated carbon radicals. The primary products in all cases are HF-loss to yield C(n)F(m-1)(-) anions, with only a minor branching to F(-) product. In all cases the temperature dependences are weak. Attachment to the precursor halocarbons is near the capture rate with a slight negative temperature dependence in all cases except for 2-HC2F4Br, which is ?10% efficient at 300 K and becomes more efficient, approaching the capture rate at higher temperatures. All attachment kinetics are successfully reproduced using a kinetic modeling approach. Reaction of the HFC radicals with Ar(+) proceeds at or near the calculated collisional rate coefficient in all cases, yielding a wide variety of product ions. PMID:26298136

  11. Synthesis and tuning of bimodal mesoporous silica by combined hydrocarbon/fluorocarbon surfactant templating.

    PubMed

    Xing, Rong; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Knutson, Barbara L; Rankin, Stephen E

    2009-06-01

    Hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon surfactants show highly nonideal mixing that under some conditions results in demixing of the two types of surfactants into distinct populations of fluorocarbon-rich and hydrocarbon-rich aggregates. This also occurs in materials prepared by cooperative assembly of hydrolyzed tetraethoxysilane with mixtures of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) and 1,1,2,2-tetrahydro-perfluorodecylpyridinium chloride (HFDePC). Here, we report conditions under which demixed micelles lead to bimodal mesoporous materials (including specific concentrations of ammonia and salt in the synthesis solution) and show that the sizes of the hydrocarbon-templated and fluorocarbon-templated pores can be finely and independently controlled by adding lipophilic or fluorophilic oils, respectively. Nitrogen sorption isotherms and transmission electron microscopy provide clear evidence for a single phase of demixed but disordered wormhole-like pores. PMID:19323503

  12. Press Coverage of the Fluorocarbon Controversy: The Rise and Decline of a "Hot" Scientific Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahaffy, Cheryl

    This paper reviews press coverage of events surrounding the 1977 governmental decision to ban fluorocarbons in spray cans in the United States. The research reported focused on the years 1972 to 1978 and involved a count of the number of items published in selected newspapers and magazines or aired on the three major networks' evening news…

  13. 192 IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 7, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2007 Hydrocarbon and Fluorocarbon Monitoring by MIS

    E-print Network

    Moritz, Werner

    192 IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 7, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2007 Hydrocarbon and Fluorocarbon Monitoring by MIS Sensors Using an Ni Catalytic Thermodestructor Vladimir I. Filippov, Werner Moritz, Alexander A by sensors based on Pd-SiO2-Si (MIS) and Pt-LaF3-Si3N4- SiO2-Si (MEIS) structures was achieved

  14. Surface kinetics and plasma equipment model for Si etching by fluorocarbon plasmas

    E-print Network

    Kushner, Mark

    Surface kinetics and plasma equipment model for Si etching by fluorocarbon plasmas Da Zhanga August 1999; accepted for publication 18 October 1999 Plasma-surface interactions during plasma etching processing is towards the use of low pressure, high plasma density etching reactors in which re- active

  15. Synthesis and applications of vegetable oil-based fluorocarbon water repellent agents on cotton fabrics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tao; Zheng, Junzhi; Sun, Gang

    2012-06-01

    Vegetable oil-based fluorocarbon water repellent agents were prepared by chemical modifications of different vegetable oils - soybean and linseed oils through several reactions, including saponification, acidification, acylation of vegetable oil and trans-esterification with 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol and 2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropanol. The resulted fluorocarbon agents were then copolymerized with styrene. The structures of the vegetable oil based agents were characterized by FT-IR and NMR. By evaluating water contact angle and time of water disappearance on cotton fabrics, as well as whiteness and breaking strength of cotton fabrics that were treated by these agents, optimum fabric finishing conditions were explored. The cotton fabrics finished with the vegetable oil-based fluorocarbon agents showed excellent water repellency, while other properties of the cotton fabrics declined to certain level. The linseed oil-based tetrafluoropropanol water repellent agent displayed the highest water repellency among all modified oils. All the treated fabrics exhibited good durability of water repellency. The linseed oil-based tetrafluoropropanol water repellent agent demonstrated the best durability among all repellent agents. PMID:24750623

  16. The corrosion phenomena in the coin cell BR2325 of the ``superstoichiometric fluorocarbon-lithium'' system

    SciTech Connect

    Mitkin, V.N.; Galkin, P.S.; Denisova, T.N.

    1998-07-01

    It was noted at the earlier study and at the longer observations of the novel various types of superstoichiometric fluorocarbon materials CF{sub 1+x}, where x = 0.1--0.33 (FCM) and their behavior, that despite of their known hygroscopity during a storage of samples in laboratory and technological utensils nevertheless occurs an appreciable sorption of atmospheric moisture. The color of samples does not change but sometimes there appears a smell of hydrogen fluoride and even corrosion of glasswares at a long storage. On the basis of these facts was assumed that at a long storage the slow reactions of HF producing with a sorption moisture can proceed. This phenomena is necessary to take into account for successful manufacturing of long life lithium cells based on superstoichiometric fluorocarbon composite cathodes (FCC). The chemistry of such slow hydrolytic process and especially of processes which can proceed at manufacturing of FCC earlier was not investigated also of any data in the literature in this occasion is not present. Just for this reason the authors undertook a study of the corrosion phenomena which can proceed in industrial sources of a current at a long storage under influence of slow hydrolysis of C-F bonds by moisture. The goal of the study was to search long term damages in the slightly wet FCM and based on these materials cathodic composites for fluorocarbon-lithium cells. As a model for corrosion process investigation they have chosen a standard coin lithium battery of a type BR2325.

  17. Absorption and recovery of n-hexane in aqueous solutions of fluorocarbon surfactants.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiao; Yan, Bo; Fu, Jiamo; Xiao, Xianming

    2015-11-01

    n-Hexane is widely used in industrial production as an organic solvent. As an industrial exhaust gas, the contribution of n-hexane to air pollution and damage to human health are attracting increasing attention. In the present study, aqueous solutions of two fluorocarbon surfactants (FSN100 and FSO100) were investigated for their properties of solubilization and dynamic absorption of n-hexane, as well as their capacity for regeneration and n-hexane recovery by thermal distillation. The results show that the two fluorocarbon surfactants enhance dissolution and absorption of n-hexane, and their effectiveness is closely related to their concentrations in solution. For low concentration solutions (0.01%-0.30%), the partition coefficient decreases dramatically and the saturation capacity increases significantly with increasing concentration, but the changes for both are more modest when the concentration is over 0.30%. The FSO100 solution presents a smaller partition coefficient and a greater saturation capacity than the FSN100 solution at the same concentration, indicating a stronger solubilization for n-hexane. Thermal distillation is a feasible method to recover n-hexane from these absorption solutions, and to regenerate them. With 90sec heating at 80-85°C, the recovery of n-hexane ranges between 81% and 85%, and the regenerated absorption solution maintains its original performance during reuse. This study provides basic information on two fluorocarbon surfactants for application in the treatment of industrial n-hexane waste gases. PMID:26574100

  18. In situ analysis of aqueous structure and adsorption at fluorocarbon, hydrocarbon and mineral surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Adam Justin

    Altering and controlling the properties of solid surfaces in aqueous or other liquid phase environments has been a sought after objective for decades. With the discovery of chemisorbed self-assembled monolayers, this dream has become a reality. Oxide and metal surfaces can now be readily coated with an array of commercially available products to produce a desired fnctionality. The presence of these coatings on solid surfaces affects properties of the interfacial region by altering interfacial electrostatic fields, changing the structure of interfacial water molecules and altering the interactions of adsorbed species. This dissertation reports on in situ studies of adsorption at several solid/aqueous interfaces using vibrational sum-frequency spectroscopy, a surface specific technique. These studies are augmented by the use of atomic force microscopy and contact angle goniometry to characterize the prepared surfaces and their interactions with adsorbates. The studies investigate how changes in the surface structure and chemistry, as well as the bulk aqueous phase, affect interfacial structure. The studies within are primarily focused on the interactions of water with bare and functionalized fused silica and the relationship between the aqueous phase composition and the structure of fluorocarbon and hydrocarbon self-assembled monolayers. The variations in aqueous structure are then examined in detail using ionic strength controlled experiments to understand the direct interactions of water hydrophobically coated silica. This analysis is followed by an investigation of the competitive adsorption of methanol and water at fluorocarbon and hydrocarbon monolayers which show spectroscopic signatures of the interaction strength between fluorocarbons and hydrocarbons. Further studies are performed using butylammonium chloride to verify these spectroscopic signatures and reveal different molecular structures of adsorbed species at chemically different hydrophobic surfaces. Lastly, specific ion effects on the CaF2/water interface are shown using equilibrium and time-resolved sum-frequency spectroscopy. The results of all these studies have implications for an array of surface chemical applications from mineral flotation to biocompatibility. This dissertation includes previously published co-authored material.

  19. Real-Time Trace Gas Sensing of Fluorocarbons using a Swept-wavelength External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Cannon, Bret D.; Stahl, Robert D.; Schiffern, John T.; Myers, Tanya L.

    2014-05-04

    We present results demonstrating real-time sensing of four different fluorocarbons at low-ppb concentrations using an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) operating in a swept-wavelength configuration. The ECQCL was repeatedly swept over its full tuning range at a 20 Hz rate with a scan rate of 3535 cm-1/s, and a detailed characterization of the ECQCL scan stability and repeatability is presented. The sensor was deployed on a mobile automotive platform to provide spatially resolved detection of fluorocarbons in outdoor experiments. Noise-equivalent detection limits of 800-1000 parts-per-trillion (ppt) are demonstrated for 1 s integration times.

  20. Synthesis and self-assembly of fluorocarbon- and hydrocarbon-modified hydrophilic polymers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hogen-Esch, T.E.

    1996-11-01

    Over the past 3 years, work was done in several areas: effect of spacer lengths on degree of association of hydrophobically modified polyacrylamides; fluorocarbon mediated association of R{sub F}- substituted polyacrylamide-2-(acrylamido)-2-methyl-propane sodium sulfonate copolymers; hydrophobic association in R{sub F}(R{sub H})-modified poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide)(PDMA) and polyvinylpyrrolidone; synthesis of R{sub F}-containing poly(N- isopropyl acrylamide)`s; synthesis of HM narrow MWD telechelics PDMA and PDMA block copolymers; and studies of telechelic R{sub F}(R{sub H}) derivatives of polyethyleneglycols. 15 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs.

  1. Disappearance of fuel hydrazine vapors in fluorocarbon-film environmental chambers. Experimental observations and kinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, D.A.; Wiseman, F.L.; Kilduff, J.E.; Koontz, S.L.; Davis, D.D.

    1989-03-01

    Fluorocarbon-film environmental chambers, of the type often employed in air pollution studies, have been used to investigate the stability of the fuel hydrazines (hydrazine, methylhydrazine, and 1,1-dimethylhydrazine) with respect to atmospheric oxidation. These studies have shown that the observed disappearance of fuel hydrazine vapors in these chambers is caused by physical loss processes rather than oxidation. Vapor-phase decay is affected by chamber size, water content of the matrix gas, and previous chamber experiments. A kinetic model has been developed that incorporates adsorption, permeation, and surface site concentration to fit the observed decay data.

  2. Properties of solid polymer electrolyte fluorocarbon film. [used in hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    The ionic fluorocarbon film used as the solid polymer electrolyte in hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells was found to exhibit delamination failures. Polarized light microscopy of as-received film showed a lined region at the center of the film thickness. It is shown that these lines were not caused by incomplete saponification but probably resulted from the film extrusion process. The film lines could be removed by an annealing process. Chemical, physical, and tensile tests showed that annealing improved or sustained the water contents, spectral properties, thermo-oxidative stability, and tensile properties of the film. The resistivity of the film was significantly decreased by the annealing process.

  3. Structure and Depletion at Fluorocarbon and Hydrocarbon/Water Liquid/Liquid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kashimoto,K.; Yoon, J.; Hou, B.; Chen, C.; Lin, B.; Aratono, M.; Takiue, T.; Schlossman, M.

    2008-01-01

    The results of x-ray reflectivity studies of two oil/water (liquid/liquid) interfaces are inconsistent with recent predictions of the presence of a vaporlike depletion region at hydrophobic/aqueous interfaces. One of the oils, perfluorohexane, is a fluorocarbon whose superhydrophobic interface with water provides a stringent test for the presence of a depletion layer. The other oil, heptane, is a hydrocarbon and, therefore, is more relevant to the study of biomolecular hydrophobicity. These results are consistent with the subangstrom proximity of water to soft hydrophobic materials.

  4. Preparation of hydrocarbon/fluorocarbon double-chain phospholipid polymer brusheson polyurethane films by ATRP.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhicheng; Hao, Hongye; Zhao, Yun; Li, Jiehua; Tan, Hong; Fu, Qiang

    2015-04-01

    To fabricate artificial biomembrane mimicking cell surfaces, hydrocarbon/fluorocarbon double-chain phospholipid macromonomer was grafted on polyurethane (PU) film surfaces by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). The surface structures of modified PU film surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and water contact angle measurement. The results indicate that initiator densities on these polymer film surfaces have a significant impact on graft polymerization of this fluorocarbon phospholipid macromonomer. The phospholipid polymer brushes grafted on PU film surfaces could self-assemble into biomimetic membranes under water environment, as demonstrated by liquid/liquid static contact angle measurement, atomic force spectroscopy (AFM), and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR). These biomimetic membranes could maintain water within them as the "surrounding" water. Such would be favorable condition for the preservation of native conformational state of proteins and cell membranes. This work provides a new approach to fabricate biomimetic membranes on biomaterials surfaces. PMID:25731091

  5. The characterization of fluorocarbon films on NiTi alloy by magnetron sputtering *, F.T. Zi a

    E-print Network

    Zheng, Yufeng

    The characterization of fluorocarbon films on NiTi alloy by magnetron sputtering L. Li a, *, F of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China 1. Introduction NiTi shape memory alloys (SMAs) are widely used in biomedical fields because of their unique characteristics such as super- elasticity

  6. Correlation of elastohydrodynamic film thickness measurements for fluorocarbon type 2 ester, and polyphenyl ether lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1974-01-01

    A minimum films thickness correlation applicable to heavily loaded elastohydrodynamic (EHD) contacts was formulated from experimental data obtained by an X-ray transmission technique. The correlation, based on data generated with fluorocarbon, type II ester, and polyphenyl ether lubricants, extends a previous analysis developed from data for a synthetic paraffinic oil. The resulting correlation represents the data of the four lubricants reasonably well over a large range of operating conditions. Contained within the derived relation is a factor to account for the high-load dependence displayed by the measurements beyond that which is provided for by the theory. Thermal corrections applied to a commonly used film thickness formula showed little improvement to the general disagreement that exists between theory and test. Choice of contact geometry and material are judged to have a relatively mild influence on the form of the semiempirical model.

  7. Photoemission and vibrational studies of metal/organic interfaces modified by plasma-polymerized fluorocarbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J. X.; Li, Y. Q.; Dong, X.; Wang, S. D.; Lee, C. S.; Hung, L. S.; Lee, S. T.

    2004-12-01

    While gold and silver have high work functions, they are known to form relatively poor hole injecting contacts with organic semiconductors. We have found that inserting an ultrathin layer of plasma-polymerized fluorocarbon (CF x) between the metal and organic materials can substantially improve the hole injection. The working mechanism of the CF x interlayer was investigated with ultraviolet and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy. The hole injection enhancement was caused by the reduced hole injection barrier, attributed to an interfacial electric field induced by the partial charge transfer from the metal to the CF x layer. Stability of the dipolar interface upon exposure to air was also demonstrated.

  8. Overcoming inactivation of the lung surfactant by serum proteins: a potential role for fluorocarbons?

    PubMed

    Krafft, Marie Pierre

    2015-08-14

    In many pulmonary conditions serum proteins interfere with the normal adsorption of components of the lung surfactant to the surface of the alveoli, resulting in lung surfactant inactivation, with potentially serious untoward consequences. Here, we review the strategies that have recently been designed in order to counteract the biophysical mechanisms of inactivation of the surfactant. One approach includes protein analogues or peptides that mimic the native proteins responsible for innate resistance to inactivation. Another perspective uses water-soluble additives, such as electrolytes and hydrophilic polymers that are prone to enhance adsorption of phospholipids. An alternative, more recent approach consists of using fluorocarbons, that is, highly hydrophobic inert compounds that were investigated for partial liquid ventilation, that modify interfacial properties and can act as carriers of exogenous lung surfactant. The latter approach that allows fluidisation of phospholipid monolayers while maintaining capacity to reach near-zero surface tension definitely warrants further investigation. PMID:26110877

  9. Hierarchical ZnO particles grafting by fluorocarbon polymer derivative: Preparation and superhydrophobic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Dahai; Jia, Mengqiu

    2015-07-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces on the basis of hierarchical ZnO particles grafted by fluoroethylene-vinylether (FEVE) polymer derivative were prepared using a facile, mild and low-cost method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) revealed that the resulting ZnO particles via hydrothermal process exhibit micro-nano dual-scale morphology with high purity under a suitable surfactant amount and alkali concentration. The grafting of FEVE derivative was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS), suggesting that hierarchical surface of ZnO particles was an imported monomolecular layer of fluorocarbon polymer. The obtained surface fabricated by drop-casting shows considerably high contact angle and good resistance to water immersion. The wetting behavior in this work was furthermore analyzed by theoretical wetting model. This work demonstrates that the sufficient low-wettable surface and high roughness both take a vital role in the superhydrophobic behavior.

  10. Effect of a semifluorinated copolymer on the phase separation of a fluorocarbon/hydrocarbon mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Nostro, P.L.; Ku, C.Y.; Chen, S.H.; Lin, J.S.

    1995-07-06

    Fluorocarbons (C{sub n}F{sub 2n+2}) and hydrocarbons (C{sub n}H{sub 2n+2}) are mutually immiscible at room temperature, while they form clear and homogeneous mixtures at high temperatures. The phase separation curves of these systems show upper critical solution temperatures (UCST), which depend on the chemical formulas of the two liquids. In this paper we report the first observation of the mixing between perfluoroctane (PFO) and isooctane (FOCT) at low temperature upon addition of a semifluorinated diblock copolymer (F{sub 8}H{sub 16}). Further cooling results in phase separation or formation of solid gels, depending on the amount of copolymer added to the mixture. Phase diagrams, light-scattering, birefringence, and small-angle X-ray-scattering measurements indicate the presence of microdomains in the gel and in the liquid phase, depending on the temperature and on the copolymer volume fraction. 31 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Fluorocarbon-23 measure of cat cerebral blood flow by nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, J.R.; Branch, C.A.; Fagan, S.C.; Helpern, J.A.; Simkins, R.T.; Butt, S.M.; Welch, K.M. )

    1990-01-01

    We employed fluorocarbon-23 (trifluoromethane) as a nuclear magnetic resonance gaseous indicator of cerebral blood flow in seven cats. Pulsed inhalation of this indicator and switching between two coils allowed the acquisition of both an arterial input and a cerebral response function, making possible multicompartmental curve fits to cerebral uptake and clearance data. The brain:blood partition coefficient for trifluoromethane was 0.9 for both gray and white matter. Fast-compartment blood flows were normal and showed appropriate CO{sub 2} reactivity. Slow-compartment blood flows did not demonstrate CO{sub 2} reactivity, probably because cranial as well as white-matter blood flows were lumped together in the slow compartment. Although cerebral blood flow was stable during administration of 60% trifluoromethane, the compound did prove to be a mild cardiac sensitizer to epinephrine in five cats.

  12. Assessment of effects on vegetation of degradation products from alternative fluorocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccune, D. C.; Weinstein, L. H.

    1990-01-01

    Concern with the effects of fluorides on plants has been devoted to that resulting from dry deposition (mainly with reference to gaseous HF and secondarily with particulate forms). The occurrence of precipitation as rain or mist and the presence of dew or free water on the foliage has mainly been considered with respect to their effects on the accumulation of air-borne fluoride and not with fluoride in wet deposition. That is, precipitation has been viewed primarily with respect to its facilitation of the solution and subsequent absorption of deposits by the foliar tissues or its elution of deposited fluoride from foliage. Accordingly, our evaluation of inorganic fluoride from fluorocarbon degradation rests upon a comparison with what is known about the effects of industrial emissions and what could be considered the natural condition.

  13. Evaluating the robustness of top coatings comprising plasma-deposited fluorocarbons in electrowetting systems

    E-print Network

    Dimitrios P. Papageorgiou; Elias P. Koumoulos; Costas A. Charitidis; Andreas G. Boudouvis; Athanasios G. Papathanasiou

    2011-10-19

    Thin dielectric stacks comprising a main insulating layer and a hydrophobic top coating are commonly used in low voltage electrowetting systems. However, in most cases, thin dielectrics fail to endure persistent electrowetting testing at high voltages, namely beyond the saturation onset, as electrolysis indicates dielectric failure. Careful sample inspection via optical microscopy revealed possible local delamination of the top coating under high electric fields. Thus, improvement of the adhesion strength of the hydrophobic top coating to the main dielectric is attempted through a plasma-deposited fluorocarbon interlayer. Interestingly enough the proposed dielectric stack exhibited a) resistance to dielectric breakdown, b) higher contact angle modulation range, and c) electrowetting cycle reversibility. Appearance of electrolysis in the saturation regime is inhibited, suggesting the use of this hydrophobic dielectric stack for the design of more efficient electrowetting systems. The possible causes of the improved performance are investigated by nanoscratch characterization.

  14. A Microfluidic Cell Co-Culture Platform with a Liquid Fluorocarbon Separator

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Bryson M.; Shi, Mingjian; Edd, Jon F.; Webb, Donna J.; Li, Deyu

    2014-01-01

    A microfluidic cell co-culture platform that uses a liquid fluorocarbon oil barrier to separate cells into different culture chambers has been developed. Characterization indicates that the oil barrier could be effective for multiple days, and a maximum pressure difference between the oil barrier and aqueous media in the cell culture chamber could be as large as ?3.43 kPa before the oil barrier fails. Biological applications have been demonstrated with the separate transfection of two groups of primary hippocampal neurons with two different fluorescent proteins and subsequent observation of synaptic contacts between the neurons. In addition, the quality of the fluidic seal provided by the oil barrier is shown to be greater than that of an alternative solid-PDMS valve barrier design by testing the ability of each device to block low molecular weight CellTracker dyes used to stain cells in the culture chambers. PMID:24420386

  15. Modeling of implantation and mixing damage during etching of SiO2 over Si in fluorocarbon plasmas

    E-print Network

    Kushner, Mark

    Modeling of implantation and mixing damage during etching of SiO2 over Si in fluorocarbon plasmas August 2011) Energetic ion bombardment during plasma etching of microelectronics devices is necessary of underlying Si during HAR of SiO2 etching in Ar/C4F8/O2 plasmas for rf bias powers of 1­4 kW was investigated

  16. Integrated feature scale modeling of plasma processing of porous and solid SiO2 . I. Fluorocarbon etching

    E-print Network

    Kushner, Mark

    dimensions during plasma etching of PS are problematic due to the exposure of open pores. To investigate these issues, reaction mechanisms for fluorocarbon plasma etching of SiO2 in C2F6 , CHF3 , and C4F8 chemistries such as polytetrafluoroethylene PTFE and parylene are etched in oxygen based plasmas (O2 ­Ar and O2 ­N2).3­5 Inorganic dielectrics

  17. Polymer radiation curing: Epoxies, phenolics, fluorocarbons, and silicones. (Latest citations from the NTIS data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the processes and effects of radiation curing on epoxy resins, phenolics, fluorocarbons, and silicones. Gamma, ultraviolet, and infrared radiation are emphasized; however, polymer crosslinking by such electromagnetic wave radiation as microwave, laser, vacuum irradiation, and ionization is included. The citations also discuss the influence of radiation induced polymer curing on mechanical, electrical, and chemical properties of the polymers. (Contains a minimum of 235 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  18. Biofabrication Under Fluorocarbon: A Novel Freeform Fabrication Technique to Generate High Aspect Ratio Tissue-Engineered Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Blaeser, Andreas; Duarte Campos, Daniela F.; Weber, Michael; Neuss, Sabine; Theek, Benjamin; Fischer, Horst

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Bioprinting is a recent development in tissue engineering, which applies rapid prototyping techniques to generate complex living tissues. Typically, cell-containing hydrogels are dispensed layer-by-layer according to a computer-generated three-dimensional model. The lack of mechanical stability of printed hydrogels hinders the fabrication of high aspect ratio constructs. Here we present submerged bioprinting, a novel technique for freeform fabrication of hydrogels in liquid fluorocarbon. The high buoyant density of fluorocarbons supports soft hydrogels by floating. Hydrogel constructs of up to 30-mm height were generated. Using 3% (w/v) agarose as the hydrogel and disposable syringe needles as nozzles, the printer produced features down to 570-?m diameter with a lateral dispensing accuracy of 89??m. We printed thin-walled hydrogel cylinders measuring 4.8?mm in height, with an inner diameter of ?2.9?mm and a minimal wall thickness of ?650??m. The technique was successfully applied in printing a model of an arterial bifurcation. We extruded under fluorocarbon, cellularized alginate tubes with 5-mm outer diameter and 3-cm length. Cells grew vigorously and formed clonal colonies within the 7-day culture period. Submerged bioprinting thus seems particularly suited to fabricate hollow structures with a high aspect ratio like vascular grafts for cardiovascular tissue engineering as well as branching or cantilever-like structures, obviating the need for a solid support beneath the overhanging protrusions. PMID:24083093

  19. Beam Simulation Studies of Plasma-Surface Interactions in Fluorocarbon Etching of Silicon and Silicon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, David C.

    1992-01-01

    A molecular beam apparatus has been constructed which allows the synthesis of dominant species fluxes to a wafer surface during fluorocarbon plasma etching. These species include atomic F as the primary etchant, CF _2 as a potential polymer forming precursor, and Ar^{+} or CF _{rm x}^{+} type ions. Ionic and neutral fluxes employed are within an order of magnitude of those typical of fluorocarbon plasmas and are well characterized through the use of in -situ probes. Etching yields and product distributions have been measured through the use of in-situ laser interferometry and line-of-sight mass spectrometry. XPS studies of etched surfaces were performed to assess surface chemical bonding states and average surface stoichiometry. A useful design guide was developed which allows optimal design of straight -tube molecular beam dosers in the collisionally-opaque regime. Ion-enhanced surface reaction kinetics have been studied as a function of the independently variable fluxes of free radicals and ions, as well as ion energy and substrate temperature. We have investigated the role of Ar ^{+} ions in enhancing the chemistries of F and CF_2 separately, and in combination on undoped silicon and silicon dioxide surfaces. We have employed both reactive and inert ions in the energy range most relevant to plasma etching processes, 20-500 eV, through the use of Kaufman and ECR type ion sources. The effect of increasing ion energy on the etching of fluorine saturated silicon and silicon dioxide surfaces was quantified through extensions of available low energy physical sputtering theory. Simple "site"-occupation models were developed for the quantification of the ion-enhanced fluorine etching kinetics in these systems. These models are suitable for use in topography evolution simulators (e.g. SAMPLE) for the predictive modeling of profile evolution in non-depositing fluorine-based plasmas such as NF_3 and SF_6. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617 -253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.) (Abstract shortened with permission of school.).

  20. Comprehensive testing to measure the response of fluorocarbon rubber (FKM) to Hanford tank waste simulant

    SciTech Connect

    NIGREY,PAUL J.; BOLTON,DENNIS L.

    2000-02-01

    This report presents the findings of the Chemical Compatibility Program developed to evaluate plastic packaging components that may be incorporated in packaging mixed-waste forms for transportation. Consistent with the methodology outlined in this report, the authors performed the second phase of this experimental program to determine the effects of simulant Hanford tank mixed wastes on packaging seal materials. That effort involved the comprehensive testing of five plastic liner materials in an aqueous mixed-waste simulant. The testing protocol involved exposing the materials to {approximately}143, 286, 571, and 3,670 Krad of gamma radiation and was followed by 7-, 14-, 28-, 180-day exposures to the waste simulant at 18, 50, and 60 C. Fluorocarbon (FKM) rubber samples subjected to the same protocol were then evaluated by measuring seven material properties: specific gravity, dimensional changes, mass changes, hardness, compression set, vapor transport rates, and tensile properties. From the analyses, they determined that FKM rubber is not a good seal material to withstand aqueous mixed wastes having similar composition to the one used in this study. They have determined that FKM rubber has limited chemical durability after exposure to gamma radiation followed by exposure to the Hanford tank simulant mixed waste at elevated temperatures above 18 C.

  1. Selective adsorption of fluorocarbons and its effects on the adhesion of plasma polymer protective coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffitt, C. E.; Reddy, C. M.; Yu, Q. S.; Wieliczka, D. M.; Yasuda, H. K.

    2000-07-01

    Cathodic DC plasma deposited films have shown promise as intermediate adhesion and barrier layers for use in the interface engineering of corrosion protection systems on various materials. The surface treatment of plasma deposited trimethylsilane (TMS) films with various post-deposition plasma treatments can improve the adhesion of various paints to these films, which are usually strongly adhered to underlying substrates. Research into the application of these systems for corrosion protection of aluminum alloys included post-deposition treatments of the TMS films with hexafluoroethane (HFE) plasmas, which was seen to significantly improve the adhesion of primers. Oxygen plasma cleaning of the alloy surfaces, prior to deposition of the TMS film, is normally employed to remove organic contaminants. During testing of sample aluminum panels, one batch was processed without the oxygen plasma treatment and exhibited extensive adhesion failures. The investigation of these results shows that low levels of fluorocarbon contaminants readily react with the alloy surface and deposit a fluorine containing carbonaceous layer, which dramatically interferes with the adhesion of the plasma polymer to the alloys, but the adhesion with primer coatings remains tenacious. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies also show that the presence of even low levels of these contaminants in the chamber, during the oxygen cleaning process, is sufficient to induce the conversion of the surface from oxide to a mixture of oxide and fluoride. This conversion is considered detrimental to the corrosion resistance of these systems.

  2. Evaluation of the acute cardiac and central nervous system effects of the fluorocarbon trifluoromethane in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, C.A.; Goldberg, D.A.; Ewing, J.R.; Butt, S.S.; Gayner, J.; Fagan, S.C.

    1994-12-31

    The gaseous fluorocarbon trifluoromethane has recently been investigated for its potential as an in vivo gaseous indicator for nuclear magnetic resonance studies of brain perfusion. Trifluoromethane may also have significant value as a replacement for chlorofluorocarbon fire retardants. Because of possible species-specific cardiotoxic and anesthetic properties, the toxicological evaluation of trifluoromethane in primates (Papio anubis) is necessary prior to its evaluation in humans. We report the acute cardiac and central nervous system effects of trifluoromethane in eight anesthetized baboons. A dose-response effect was established for respiratory rate, electroencephalogram, and cardiac sinus rate, which exhibited a stepwise decrease from 10% trifluoromethane. No spontaneous arrhythmias were noted, and arterial blood pressure remained unchanged at any inspired level. Intravenous epinephrine infusions (1 {mu}g/kg) induced transient cardiac arrhythmia in 1 animal only at 70% FC-23 (v/v) trifluoromethane. Trifluoromethane appears to induce mild dose-related physiological changes at inspired levels of 30% or more, indicative of an anesthetic effect. These data suggest that trifluoromethane may be safe to use in humans, without significant adverse acute effects, at an inspired level of 30%. 23 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Global warming implications of non-fluorocarbon technologies as CFC replacements

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, S.K.; Tomlinson, J.J.

    1993-12-31

    Many technologies could be developed for use in place of conventional compression systems for refrigeration and air conditioning. Comparisons of the global warming impacts using TEWI (Total Equivalent Warming Impact) can be used to identify alternatives that have the potential for lower environmental impacts than electric-driven vapor compression systems using HCFCs and HFCs. Some options, such as secondary heat transfer loops in commercial refrigeration systems to reduce refrigerant charge and emission rates, could be useful in reducing the losses of refrigerants to the atmosphere. Use of ammonia instead of a fluorocarbon in a system with a secondary loop offers only a small potential for decreasing TEWI, and this may not warrant the increased complexity and risks of using ammonia in a retail sales environment. A few technologies, such as adsorption heat pumps, have efficiency levels that show reduced TEWI levels compared to conventional and state of the art compression systems, and further development could lead to an even more favorable comparison. Health and safety risks of the alternative technologies and the materials they employ must also be considered.

  4. Surface-Morphology-Induced Hydrophobicity of Fluorocarbon Films Grown by a Simultaneous Etching and Deposition Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, J. S.; Lin, C. S.; Huang, Y. Y.; Chin, T. S.

    2015-08-01

    Development of facile methods to prepare hydrophobic films is of great important. We report fluorocarbon films deposited by a simple plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method using C3F8 and C2H2 with extra Ar and/or O2 gases. The surface characteristics of the films were examined by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The hydrophobic and oleophobic properties of the films were evaluated by measurements of static contact angle. The results showed that the film deposited with C3F8, C2H2, Ar, and O2 exhibited a water contact angle of 114°, hexadecane contact angle of 45°, and transmittance of 94.5%. Photoelectron spectra further revealed that the films contained mainly CF and CF2 bonds and thus a high F/C ratio. Introduction of O2 increased the F/C ratio, which combined with the stripe-like surface of the films achieved better hydrophobicity.

  5. UV-assisted modification and removal mechanism of a fluorocarbon polymer film on low-k dielectric trench structure.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Tamal; Berhe, Seare A; Goswami, Arindom; Chyan, Oliver; Singh, Kanwal Jit; Brown, Ian

    2015-03-11

    In this study, we report the first chemical characterization of a plasma-deposited model fluoropolymer on low-k dielectric nanostructure and its decomposition in UV/O2 conditions. Carbonyl incorporation and progressive removal of fluorocarbon fragments from the polymer were observed with increasing UV (?230 nm) irradiation under atmospheric conditions. A significant material loss was achieved after 300 s of UV treatment and a subsequent wet clean completely removed the initially insoluble fluoropolymer from the patterned nanostructures. A synergistic mechanism of UV light absorption by carbonyl chromophore and oxygen incorporation is proposed to account for the observed photodegradation of the fluoropolymer. PMID:25679964

  6. Atmospheric degradation mechanisms of hydrogen containing chlorofluorocarbons (HCFC) and fluorocarbons (HFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellner, Reinhard

    1990-01-01

    The current knowledge of atmospheric degradation of hydrogen containing chlorofluorocarbons (HCFC 22 (CHClF2), HCFC 123 (CHCl2CF3), HCFC 124 (CHClFCF3), HCFC 141b (CFCl2CH3), HCFC 142b (CF2ClCH3)) and fluorocarbons (HFC 125 (CHF2CF3), HFC 134a (CH2FCF3), HFC 152a (CHF2CH3)) is assessed. Except for the initiation reaction by OH radicals, there are virtually no experimental data available concerning the subsequent oxidative breakdown of these molecules. However, from an analogy to the degradation mechanisms of simple alkanes, some useful guidelines as to the expected intermediates and final products can be derived. A noteable exception from this analogy, however, appears for the oxi-radicals. Here, halogen substitution induces new reaction types (C-Cl and C-C bond ruptures) which are unknown to the unsubstituted analogues and which modify the nature of the expected carbonyl products. Based on an evaluation of these processes using estimated bond strength data, the following simplified rules with regards to the chlorine content of the HCFC's may be deduced: (1) HCFC's containing one chlorine atom such as 22 and 142b seem to release their chlorine content essentially instantaneous with the initial attack on the parent by OH radicals, and for HCFC 124, such release is apparently prevented; (2) HCFC's such as 123 and 141b with two chlorine atoms are expected to release only one of these instantaneously; and the second chlorine atom may be stored in potentially long-lived carbonyl compounds such as CF3CClO or CClFO.

  7. Feature Profile Evolution of SiO2 Trenches In Fluorocarbon Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.; Arunachalam, Valli; Rauf, Shahid; Coronell, Dan; Carroll, Carol W. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Etching of silicon microstructures for semiconductor manufacturing in chlorine plasmas has been well characterized. The etching proceeds in a two-part process, where the chlorine neutrals passivate the Si surface and then the ions etch away SiClx. However, etching in more complicated gas mixtures and materials, such as etching of SiO2 in Ar/C4F8, requires knowledge of the ion and neutral distribution functions as a function of angle and velocity, in addition to modeling the gas surface reactions. In order to address these needs, we have developed and integrated a suite of models to simulate the etching process from the plasma reactor level to the feature profile evolution level. This arrangement allows for a better understanding, control, and prediction of the influence of equipment level process parameters on feature profile evolution. We are currently using the HPEM (Hybrid Plasma Equipment Model) and PCMCM (Plasma Chemistry Monte Carlo Model) to generate plasma properties and ion and neutral distribution functions for argon/fluorocarbon discharges in a GEC Reference Cell. These quantities are then input to the feature scale model, Simulation of Profile Evolution by Level Sets (SPELS). A surface chemistry model is used to determine the interaction of the incoming species with the substrate material and simulate the evolution of the trench profile. The impact of change of gas pressure and inductive power on the relative flux of CFx and F to the wafer, the etch and polymerization rates, and feature profiles will be examined. Comparisons to experimental profiles will also be presented.

  8. 157 nm Pellicles (Thin Films) for Photolithography: Mechanistic Investigation of the VUV and UV-C Photolysis of Fluorocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kwangjoo; Jockusch, Steffen; Turro, Nicholas J.; French, Roger H.; Wheland, Robert C.; Lemon, M F.; Braun, Andre M.; Widerschpan, Tatjana; Dixon, David A.; Li, Jun; Ivan, Marius; Zimmerman, Paul

    2005-06-15

    The use of 157 nm as the next lower wavelength for photolithography for the production of semiconductors has created a need for transparent and radiation-durable polymers for use in soft pellicles, the polymer films which protect the chip from particle deposition. The most promising materials for pellicles are fluorinated polymers, but currently available fluorinated polymers undergo photodegradation and/or photodarkening upon long term exposure to 157 nm irradiation. To understand the mechanism of the photodegradation and photodarkening of fluorinated polymers, mechanistic studies on the photolysis of liquid model fluorocarbons, including perfluorobutylethyl ether and perfluoro-2 H-3-oxa-heptane, were performed employing UV, NMR, FTIR, GC, and GC/MS analyses. All hydrogen-containing compounds showed decreased photostability compared to the fully perfluorinated compounds. Irradiation in the presence of atmospheric oxygen showed reduced photostability compared to deoxygenated samples. Photolysis of the samples was performed at 157, 172, 185, and 254 nm and showed only minor wavelength dependence. Mechanisms for photodegradation of the fluorocarbons are proposed, which involve Rydberg excited states. Time-dependent density functional theory has been used to predict the excitation spectra of model compounds.

  9. Effect of Fluorocarbon and Hydrocarbon Chain Lengths in Hybrid Surfactants for Supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Sagisaka, Masanobu; Ono, Shinji; James, Craig; Yoshizawa, Atsushi; Mohamed, Azmi; Guittard, Frédéric; Rogers, Sarah E; Heenan, Richard K; Yan, Ci; Eastoe, Julian

    2015-07-14

    Hybrid surfactants containing both fluorocarbon (FC) and hydrocarbon (HC) chains have recently been shown to solubilize water and form elongated reversed micelles in supercritical CO2. To clarify the most effective FC and HC chain lengths, the aggregation behavior and interfacial properties of hybrid surfactants FCm-HCn (FC length m/HC length n = 4/2, 4/4, 6/2, 6/4, 6/5, 6/6, and 6/8) were examined in W/CO2 mixtures as functions of pressure, temperature, and water-to-surfactant molar ratio (W0). The solubilizing power of hybrid surfactants for W/CO2 microemulsions was strongly affected by not only the FC length but also by that of the HC. Although the surfactants having short FC and/or HC tails (namely, m/n = 4/2, 4/4, and 6/2) did not dissolve in supercritical CO2 (even at ?17 mM, ?400 bar, temperature ? 75 °C, and W0 = 0-40), the other hybrid surfactants were able to yield transparent single-phase W/CO2 mixtures identified as microemulsions. The solubilizing power of FC6-HCm surfactants reached a maximum (W0 ? 80 at 45 °C and 350 bar) with a hydrocarbon length, m, of 4. The W0 value of 80 is the highest for a HC-FC hybrid surfactant, matching the highest value reported for a FC surfactant which contained more FC groups. High-pressure small-angle neutron scattering measurements from FCm-HCn/D2O/CO2 microemulsions were consistent with growth of the microemulsion droplets with increasing W0. In addition, not only spherical reversed micelles but also nonspherical assemblies (rodlike or ellipsoidal) were found for the systems with FC6-HCn (n = 4-6). At fixed surfactant concentration and W0 (17 mM and W0 = 20), the longest reversed micelles were obtained for FC6-HC6 where a mean aspect ratio of 6.3 was calculated for the aqueous cores. PMID:26080002

  10. Fluorocarbon chain end-capped poly(carbonate urethane)s as biomaterials: blood compatibility and chemical stability assessments.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xingyi; Wang, Ruifang; Li, Jiehua; Luo, Liang; Wen, Da; Zhong, Yinping; Zhao, Changsheng

    2009-04-01

    Previous work has shown the synthesis of fluorocarbon chain (CF(3)(CF(2))(6)CH(2)O-) end-capped poly(carbonate urethane)s (FPCUs) and confirmed the presence of a novel bilayered surface structure in FPCUs, that is, the top fluorocarbon and subsurface hard segment layers (Xie et al., J Biomed Mater Res Part A 2008; 84:30-43). In this work, the effects of such surface structure on blood compatibility were investigated using hemolytic test and platelet adhesion analysis. The chemical stability of the polymers was also determined by Zhao's glass wool-H(2)O(2)/CoCl(2) test and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, pH = 3.1-3.3) treatment. One of the FPCUs, FPCU-A, and two control materials, a poly(ether urethane) (PEU) and a poly(carbonate urethane) (PCU), were investigated. No significant difference in hemolytic indices was observed among the three materials, whereas the adherent density and deformation of platelets were much lower on FPCU-A compared with on PCU and PEU. Severe surface cracking and surface buckling developed in prestressed PEU and PCU films after H(2)O(2)/CoCl(2) treatment, respectively, whereas smooth surface was observed for the FPCU-A. PBS incubation resulted in parallel ridge-like morphology in PCU whereas PEU and FPCU-A retained their smooth surfaces. Under relatively high stress conditions, all the materials developed well-oriented strip-like surface patterns. Results from ATR-FTIR spectra revealed a surface oxidation mechanism as described in literature. However, observations of universal decrease of molecular weights under stress conditions further suggested the presence of another bulk stress oxidation mechanism. Regardless the degradation mechanisms involved, the unique bilayered surface structure really improved the blood compatibility and chemical stability of FPCU-A, indicating that further in vivo investigations are worthwhile. PMID:18837450

  11. Polymer radiation curing: epoxies, phenolics, fluorocarbons, and silicones. January 1970-February 1989 (Citations from the NTIS data base). Report for January 1970-February 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the processes and effects of radiation curing on the following polymers: epoxy resins, phenolics, fluorocarbons and silicones. Gamma, ultraviolet, and infrared radiation are emphasized; however, polymer crosslinking by such electromagnetic wave radiation as microwave, laser, vacuum irradiation and ionization is included. Influence of radiation-induced polymer curing on mechanical, electrical, and chemical properties of the polymers is also included. (This updated bibliography contains 303 citations, 13 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  12. Polymer radiation curing: epoxies, phenolics, fluorocarbons, and silicones. January 1970-January 1988 (citations from the NTIS data base). Report for January 1970-January 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the processes and effects of radiation curing on the following polymers: epoxy resins, phenolics, fluorocarbons, and silicones. Gamma, ultraviolet, and infrared radiation are emphasized; however, polymer crosslinking by such electromagnetic wave radiation as microwave, laser, vacuum irradiation, and ionization is included. Influence of radiation-induced polymer curing on mechanical, electrical, and chemical properties of the polymers is also included. (This updated bibliography contains 290 citations, 18 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  13. Light-responsive nanoparticles with wettability changing from hydrophobicity to hydrophilicity and their application towards highly hydrophilic fluorocarbon coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Baozhong; Zhou, Shuxue

    2015-12-01

    Novel functional silica nanoparticles (SiO2-NBS-F) with irreversible light-responsive wettability were prepared by grafting of a light-responsive silane coupling agent (NBS) and further bonding with hydrophobic segments via a click reaction. The NBS was synthesized using an o-nitrobenzyl alcohol derivative of the photolabile protecting group. The SiO2-NBS-F nanoparticles exhibited considerable change of wettability from near-superhydrophobicity to near-superhydrophilicity after UV irradiation. The changing mechanism of wettability was confirmed by UV-Vis absorption spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectra. The SiO2-NBS-F nanoparticles were incorporated into fluorocarbon FEVE coatings by simple mixing. The nanoparticles occurred at the surface of the dried coatings even though their content was as low as 5 wt%, being due to their low surface free energy. The wettability of the SiO2-NBS-F filled FEVE coatings could transform from hydrophobicity (WCA 106.4°) to hydrophilicity (WCA 33.3°) after UV irradiation. It demonstrates that SiO2-NBS-F nanoparticles are useful to acquire highly hydrophilic surface for organic coatings.

  14. Angular etching yields of polysilicon and dielectric materials in Cl{sub 2}/Ar and fluorocarbon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Yunpeng; Sawin, Herbert H.

    2008-01-15

    The angular etching yields of polysilicon in Cl{sub 2}/Ar plasmas, and dielectric materials (thermal silicon dioxide and low-k dielectric coral) in fluorocarbon plasmas, have been characterized in an inductively coupled plasma beam apparatus. The effects of ion energy, feed gas composition, and plasma source pressure are studied. The experimental results showed that these etching parameters had a significant impact on the resulting angular etching yield curve. In particular, the angular etching yield curve was more sputteringlike at low plasma source pressure and/or low effective gas percentage (Cl{sub 2} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8}), with a peak around 60 deg. -70 deg. off-normal ion incident angle. In contrast, ion-enhanced-etching-like angular curves, which dropped gradually with off-normal angle, were formed at high plasma source pressure and/or high effective gas percentage. Further analysis indicated that the effective neutral-to-ion flux ratio reaching the surface was the primary factor influencing the angular etching yield curve. More specifically, the angular etching yield curve had physical sputtering characteristics at low neutral-to-ion flux ratios; while etching process was really dominated by ion-enhanced etching at high ratios and the angular curve was ion-enhanced-etching-like. The polymer deposition effects are also discussed in this article.

  15. The cooling capabilities of C2F6/C3F8 saturated fluorocarbon blends for the ATLAS silicon tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, R.; Battistin, M.; Berry, S.; Bitadze, A.; Bonneau, P.; Bousson, N.; Boyd, G.; Botelho-Direito, J.; Crespo-Lopez, O.; DiGirolamo, B.; Doubek, M.; Giugni, D.; Hallewell, G.; Lombard, D.; Katunin, S.; McMahon, S.; Nagai, K.; Robinson, D.; Rossi, C.; Rozanov, A.; Vacek, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate and address the performance limitations of the ATLAS silicon tracker fluorocarbon evaporative cooling system operation in the cooling circuits of the barrel silicon microstrip (SCT) sub-detector. In these circuits the minimum achievable evaporation temperatures with C3F8 were higher than the original specification, and were thought to allow an insufficient safety margin against thermal runaway in detector modules subject to a radiation dose initially foreseen for 10 years operation at LHC. We have investigated the cooling capabilities of blends of C3F8 with molar admixtures of up to 25% C2F6, since the addition of the more volatile C2F6 component was expected to allow a lower evaporation temperature for the same evaporation pressure.A custom built recirculator allowed the in-situ preparation of C2F6/C3F8 blends. These were circulated through a representative mechanical and thermal setup reproducing an as-installed ATLAS SCT barrel tracker cooling circuit. Blend molar compositions were verified to a precision of 3.10-3 in a custom ultrasonic instrument.Thermal measurements in a range of C2F6/C3F8 blends were compared with measurements in pure C3F8. These indicated that a blend with 25% C2F6 would allow a reduction in evaporation temperature of around 9oC to below -15oC, even at the highest module power dissipations envisioned after 10 years operation at LHC. Such a reduction would allow more than a factor two in safety margin against temperature dependant leakage power induced thermal runaway.Furthermore, a blend containing up to 25% C2F6 could be circulated without changes to the on-detector elements of the existing ATLAS inner detector evaporative cooling system.

  16. Fluorocarbon assisted atomic layer etching of SiO{sub 2} using cyclic Ar/C{sub 4}F{sub 8} plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Metzler, Dominik; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.; Bruce, Robert L.; Engelmann, Sebastian; Joseph, Eric A.

    2014-03-15

    The authors demonstrate atomic layer etching of SiO{sub 2} using a steady-state Ar plasma, periodic injection of a defined number of C{sub 4}F{sub 8} molecules, and synchronized plasma-based Ar{sup +} ion bombardment. C{sub 4}F{sub 8} injection enables control of the deposited fluorocarbon (FC) layer thickness in the one to several Ångstrom range and chemical modification of the SiO{sub 2} surface. For low energy Ar{sup +} ion bombardment conditions, the physical sputter rate of SiO{sub 2} vanishes, whereas SiO{sub 2} can be etched when FC reactants are present at the surface. The authors have measured for the first time the temporal variation of the chemically enhanced etch rate of SiO{sub 2} for Ar{sup +} ion energies below 30?eV as a function of fluorocarbon surface coverage. This approach enables controlled removal of Ångstrom-thick SiO{sub 2} layers. Our results demonstrate that development of atomic layer etching processes even for complex materials is feasible.

  17. Hydrophobicity attainment and wear resistance enhancement on glass substrates by atmospheric plasma-polymerization of mixtures of an aminosilane and a fluorocarbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Múgica-Vidal, Rodolfo; Alba-Elías, Fernando; Sainz-García, Elisa; Pantoja-Ruiz, Mariola

    2015-08-01

    Mixtures of different proportions of two liquid precursors were subjected to plasma-polymerization by a non-thermal atmospheric jet plasma system in a search for a coating that achieves a hydrophobic character on a glass substrate and enhances its wear resistance. 1-Perfluorohexene (PFH) was chosen as a low-surface-energy precursor to promote a hydrophobic character. Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) was chosen for its contribution to the improvement of wear resistance by the formation of siloxane bonds. The objective of this work was to determine which of the precursors' mixtures that were tested provides the coating with the most balanced enhancement of both hydrophobicity and wear resistance, given that coatings deposited with fluorocarbon-based precursors such as PFH are usually low in resistance to wear and coatings deposited with APTES are generally hydrophilic. The coatings obtained were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), static Water Contact Angle (WCA) measurements, tribological ball-on-disc tests and contact profilometry. A relationship between the achievement of a hydrophobic character and the modifications to roughness and surface morphology and the incorporation of fluorocarbon groups in the surface chemistry was observed. Also, it was seen that the wear resistance was influenced by the SiOSi content of the coatings. In turn, the SiOSi content appears to be directly related to the percentage of APTES used in the mixture of precursors. The best conjunction of hydrophobicity and wear resistance in this work was found in the sample that was coated using a mixture of APTES and PFH in proportions of 75 and 25%, respectively. Its WCA (100.2 ± 7.5°) was the highest of all samples that were measured and more than three times that of the uncoated glass (31 ± 0.7°). This sample underwent a change from a hydrophilic to a hydrophobic character. It also had the lowest wear rate of the hydrophobic samples obtained in this work, with a reduction of 28.8% in the wear rate of the uncoated glass.

  18. Fluorocarbon assisted atomic layer etching of SiO2 and Si using cyclic Ar/C4F8 and Ar/CHF3 plasma

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Metzler, Dominik; Li, Chen; Engelmann, Sebastian; Bruce, Robert L.; Joseph, Eric A.; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.

    2015-11-11

    The need for atomic layer etching (ALE) is steadily increasing as smaller critical dimensions and pitches are required in device patterning. A flux-control based cyclic Ar/C4F8 ALE based on steady-state Ar plasma in conjunction with periodic, precise C4F8 injection and synchronized plasma-based low energy Ar+ ion bombardment has been established for SiO2.1 In this work, the cyclic process is further characterized and extended to ALE of silicon under similar process conditions. The use of CHF3 as a precursor is examined and compared to C4F8. CHF3 is shown to enable selective SiO2/Si etching using a fluorocarbon (FC) film build up. Othermore »critical process parameters investigated are the FC film thickness deposited per cycle, the ion energy, and the etch step length. Etching behavior and mechanisms are studied using in situ real time ellipsometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Silicon ALE shows less self-limitation than silicon oxide due to higher physical sputtering rates for the maximum ion energies used in this work, ranged from 20 to 30 eV. The surface chemistry is found to contain fluorinated silicon oxide during the etching of silicon. As a result, plasma parameters during ALE are studied using a Langmuir probe and establish the impact of precursor addition on plasma properties.« less

  19. Impact of etching kinetics on the roughening of thermal SiO{sub 2} and low-k dielectric coral films in fluorocarbon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Yunpeng; Sawin, Herbert H.

    2007-07-15

    The impact of etching kinetics and etching chemistries on surface roughening was investigated by etching thermal silicon dioxide and low-k dielectric coral materials in C{sub 4}F{sub 8}/Ar plasma beams in an inductive coupled plasma beam reactor. The etching kinetics, especially the angular etching yield curves, were measured by changing the plasma pressure and the feed gas composition which influence the effective neutral-to-ion flux ratio during etching. At low neutral-to-ion flux ratios, the angular etching yield curves are sputteringlike, with a peak around 60 deg. -70 deg. off-normal angles; the surface at grazing ion incidence angles becomes roughened due to ion scattering related ion-channeling effects. At high neutral-to-ion flux ratios, ion enhanced etching dominates and surface roughening at grazing angles is mainly caused by the local fluorocarbon deposition induced micromasking mechanism. Interestingly, the etched surfaces at grazing angles remain smooth for both films at intermediate neutral-to-ion flux ratio regime. Furthermore, the oxygen addition broadens the region over which the etching without roughening can be performed.

  20. Neutral gas temperature measurements of high-power-density fluorocarbon plasmas by fitting swan bands of C{sub 2} molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Bo; Sawin, Herbert H.; Cruden, Brett A.

    2006-01-01

    The neutral gas temperature of fluorocarbon plasmas in a remote toroidal transformer-coupled source was measured to be greater than 5000 K, under the conditions of a power density greater than 15 W/cm{sup 3} and pressures above 2 torr. The rovibrational bands of C{sub 2} molecules (swan bands, d {sup 3}{pi}{sub g}{yields}a {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}) were fitted to obtain the rotational temperature that was assumed to equal the translational temperature. This rotational-translational temperature equilibrium assumption was supported by the comparison with the rotational temperature of second positive system of added N{sub 2}. For the same gas mixture, the neutral gas temperature is nearly a linear function of plasma power, since the conduction to chamber wall and convection are the major energy-loss processes, and they are both proportional to neutral gas temperature. The dependence of the neutral gas temperature on O{sub 2} flow rate and pressure can be well represented through the power dependence, under the condition of constant current operation. An Arrhenius type of dependence between the etching rate of oxide film and the neutral gas temperature is observed, maybe indicating the importance of the pyrolytic dissociation in the plasma formation process when the temperature is above 5000 K.

  1. Surface kinetics modeling of silicon and silicon oxide plasma etching. I. Effect of neutral and ion fluxes on etching yield of silicon oxide in fluorocarbon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Ohseung; Sawin, Herbert H.

    2006-09-15

    Silicon oxide etching processes in C{sub 2}F{sub 6} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8}+80% Ar plasmas were investigated. Neutral and ion compositions in the plasma were measured using quadrupole mass spectrometry and etching yield was measured by a quartz-crystal microbalance. In C{sub 2}F{sub 6} plasma, the concentration of atomic fluorine in the neutral flux was 5%-25%, whereas there was less than 0.5% of atomic fluorine in C{sub 4}F{sub 8}+80% Ar plasma. A surface plot representing the etching yield as a function of neutral and ion fluxes was constructed and used to qualitatively explain the etching characteristics of silicon oxide in fluorocarbon plasmas. In C{sub 2}F{sub 6} chemistry, etching yield decreases slightly with increasing rf coil power. This is attributed to the decrease in both F/ion and CF{sub x}/ion, which is caused by an increase in ion flux, with a more significant effect due to a decrease in F/ion. In C{sub 4}F{sub 8}+80% Ar chemistry, however, etching yield increases with increasing rf coil power. This is attributed to the decrease in CF{sub x}, without the effect of F/ion due to the low atomic fluorine concentration. With increased operating pressure, etching yield decreases for both chemistries because as the pressure increases, ion current decreases, and CF{sub x} neutral concentration increases to have more deposition and less etching.

  2. Investigation of the roles of gas-phase CF{sub 2} molecules and F atoms during fluorocarbon plasma processing of Si and ZrO{sub 2} substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Cuddy, Michael F.; Fisher, Ellen R.

    2010-08-15

    The molecular-level chemistry involved in the processing of silicon and zirconia substrates by inductively coupled fluorocarbon (FC) plasmas produced from CF{sub 4} and C{sub 2}F{sub 6} precursors has been explored. The roles of gas-phase excited, neutral, and ionic species, especially CF{sub 2} and F, were examined as they contribute to FC film formation and substrate etching. The surface reactivity of CF{sub 2} radicals in C{sub 2}F{sub 6} plasmas has a dependence on substrate material and plasma system, as measured by our imaging of radicals interacting with surfaces (IRIS) technique. Relative concentrations of excited state species are also dependent upon substrate type. Moreover, differences in the nature and concentrations of gas-phase species in CF{sub 4} and C{sub 2}F{sub 6} plasmas contribute to markedly different surface compositions for FC films deposited on substrates as revealed from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis. These data have led to the development of a scheme that illustrates the mechanisms of film formation and destruction in these FC/substrate systems with respect to CF{sub 2} and F gas-phase species and also Si and ZrO{sub 2} substrates.

  3. Fluorocarbon assisted atomic layer etching of SiO2 and Si using cyclic Ar/C4F8 and Ar/CHF3 plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Metzler, Dominik; Li, Chen; Engelmann, Sebastian; Bruce, Robert L.; Joseph, Eric A.; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.

    2015-11-11

    The need for atomic layer etching (ALE) is steadily increasing as smaller critical dimensions and pitches are required in device patterning. A flux-control based cyclic Ar/C4F8 ALE based on steady-state Ar plasma in conjunction with periodic, precise C4F8 injection and synchronized plasma-based low energy Ar+ ion bombardment has been established for SiO2.1 In this work, the cyclic process is further characterized and extended to ALE of silicon under similar process conditions. The use of CHF3 as a precursor is examined and compared to C4F8. CHF3 is shown to enable selective SiO2/Si etching using a fluorocarbon (FC) film build up. Other critical process parameters investigated are the FC film thickness deposited per cycle, the ion energy, and the etch step length. Etching behavior and mechanisms are studied using in situ real time ellipsometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Silicon ALE shows less self-limitation than silicon oxide due to higher physical sputtering rates for the maximum ion energies used in this work, ranged from 20 to 30 eV. The surface chemistry is found to contain fluorinated silicon oxide during the etching of silicon. As a result, plasma parameters during ALE are studied using a Langmuir probe and establish the impact of precursor addition on plasma properties.

  4. 21 CFR 177.1380 - Fluorocarbon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...that have been ground or cut into small particles that will pass through a U.S. Standard Sieve No. 6 and that will be held on a U.S. Standard Sieve No. 10. (1) A 100-gram sample of the resin pellets, when extracted with 100...

  5. 21 CFR 177.1380 - Fluorocarbon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the American Society for Testing and Materials, 1916 Race... practice, those food-contact articles intended for repeated use shall be thoroughly cleansed prior to...

  6. 21 CFR 177.1380 - Fluorocarbon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Materials,” which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies..., those food-contact articles intended for repeated use shall be thoroughly cleansed prior to their...

  7. 21 CFR 177.1380 - Fluorocarbon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the American Society for Testing and Materials, 1916 Race... practice, those food-contact articles intended for repeated use shall be thoroughly cleansed prior to...

  8. 21 CFR 177.1380 - Fluorocarbon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the American Society for Testing and Materials, 1916 Race... practice, those food-contact articles intended for repeated use shall be thoroughly cleansed prior to...

  9. 21 CFR 177.1380 - Fluorocarbon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the American Society for Testing and Materials, 1916 Race... practice, those food-contact articles intended for repeated use shall be thoroughly cleansed prior to...

  10. 21 CFR 177.1380 - Fluorocarbon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...of nominally 50 mole percent of ethylene and 50 mole percent of chlorotrifluoroethylene. The copolymer shall have a melting point of 239 to 243 °C and a melt index of less than or equal to 20 as determined by ASTM Method D 3275-89...

  11. 21 CFR 177.1380 - Fluorocarbon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...of nominally 50 mole percent of ethylene and 50 mole percent of chlorotrifluoroethylene. The copolymer shall have a melting point of 239 to 243 °C and a melt index of less than or equal to 20 as determined by ASTM Method D 3275-89...

  12. Total cross section of electron scattering by fluorocarbon molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.; Ushiroda, S.; Kondo, Y.

    2008-12-01

    A compact linear electron transmission apparatus was used for the measurement of the total electron scattering cross section at 4-500 eV. Total cross sections of chlorofluorocarbon (CCl2F2), hydrochlorofluorocarbon (CHClF2), perfluoropropane (C3F8), perfluoro-n-pentane (C5F12), perfluoro-n-hexane (C6F14) and perfluoro-n-octane (C8F18) were obtained experimentally and compared with the values obtained from a theoretical calculation and semi-empirical model calculation.

  13. Role of surface temperature in fluorocarbon plasma-surface interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Caleb T.; Overzet, Lawrence J.; Goeckner, Matthew J.

    2012-07-15

    This article examines plasma-surface reaction channels and the effect of surface temperature on the magnitude of those channels. Neutral species CF{sub 4}, C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, and C{sub 3}F{sub 8} are produced on surfaces. The magnitude of the production channel increases with surface temperature for all species, but favors higher mass species as the temperature is elevated. Additionally, the production rate of CF{sub 2} increases by a factor of 5 as the surface temperature is raised from 25 Degree-Sign C to 200 Degree-Sign C. Fluorine density, on the other hand, does not change as a function of either surface temperature or position outside of the plasma glow. This indicates that fluorine addition in the gas-phase is not a dominant reaction. Heating reactors can result in higher densities of depositing radical species, resulting in increased deposition rates on cooled substrates. Finally, the sticking probability of the depositing free radical species does not change as a function of surface temperature. Instead, the surface temperature acts together with an etchant species (possibly fluorine) to elevate desorption rates on that surface at temperatures lower than those required for unassisted thermal desorption.

  14. Use of fluorocarbons in the cooling of LHC experiments

    E-print Network

    Pimenta dos Santos, M

    2003-01-01

    Perfluorochemicals sold by 3M under the trade name 3M Fluorinert Electronic Liquids have been used for many years as heat transfer media in a variety of industries. The suitability of these liquids for the cooling of LHC experiment originates from their high dielectric strength as well as from their chemical stability under ionizing radiation. The Fluorinerts are clear, colorless, non-flammable with low toxicity and low corrosiveness. Additionally, they offer low global waming potential – GWP – and zero ozone-depletion potential – ODP. Some examples of fluorinert application in the cooling of LHC experiments will be presented : (a) the ATLAS Inner detector C3F8 evaporative cooling system (b) the ATLAS TRF C6F14 monophase cooling system and (c) the ALICE SPD “active heat pipe” C4F10 evaporative cooling system. A brief comparison of evaporative and monophase cooling systems will be outlined.

  15. Fluorocarbons: Surface Free Energies and van der Waals Interaction

    E-print Network

    Chan, Derek Y C

    . The critical surface tension defines the wettability of a solid by noting the lowest surface tension a liquid () measurements. Zisman critical surface tensions (c) and surface tensions derived from the Good-Girafalco- Fowkes tensions of dispersive liquids (LV) with the extrapolation of LV to cos ) 1 giving c

  16. Evaluation of unsaturated fluorocarbons for dielectric Etch applications

    E-print Network

    Chatterjee, Ritwik, 1974-

    2003-01-01

    The semiconductor industry is currently faced with the problem of the use and emissions of strong global warming compounds, known as perfluorocompounds (PFCs) for dielectric etch applications. The release of global warming ...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart F of... - Specifications for Fluorocarbon and Other Refrigerants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... existing refrigeration and air-conditioning products as required under 40 CFR part 82. 1.1.1Intent. This... following general classifications: 4.1.1Characterization a. Gas Chromatography b. Boiling point and boiling... chromatography (GC) as described in Appendix C to ARI Standard 700-1995. The chromatogram of the sample shall...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart F of... - Specifications for Fluorocarbon and Other Refrigerants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... existing refrigeration and air-conditioning products as required under 40 CFR part 82. 1.1.1Intent. This... following general classifications: 4.1.1Characterization a. Gas Chromatography b. Boiling point and boiling... chromatography (GC) as described in Appendix C to ARI Standard 700-1995. The chromatogram of the sample shall...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart F of... - Specifications for Fluorocarbon and Other Refrigerants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... existing refrigeration and air-conditioning products as required under 40 CFR part 82. 1.1.1Intent. This... following general classifications: 4.1.1Characterization a. Gas Chromatography b. Boiling point and boiling... chromatography (GC) as described in Appendix C to ARI Standard 700-1995. The chromatogram of the sample shall...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart F of... - Specifications for Fluorocarbon and Other Refrigerants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... existing refrigeration and air-conditioning products as required under 40 CFR part 82. 1.1.1Intent. This... following general classifications: 4.1.1Characterization a. Gas Chromatography b. Boiling point and boiling... chromatography (GC) as described in Appendix C to ARI Standard 700-1995. The chromatogram of the sample shall...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart F of... - Specifications for Fluorocarbon and Other Refrigerants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... existing refrigeration and air-conditioning products as required under 40 CFR part 82. 1.1.1Intent. This... following general classifications: 4.1.1Characterization a. Gas Chromatography b. Boiling point and boiling... chromatography (GC) as described in Appendix C to ARI Standard 700-1995. The chromatogram of the sample shall...

  2. New fluorocarbon elastomers for seals for geothermal and other aggressive environments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lagow, R.J.

    1982-12-01

    Saturated ethyllenic elastomers having a range of methyl group substitution, and a range of partial fluorine substitution were screened. Elastomers based on vinylidene fluoride hexafluoropropylene (VDFHFP) and those based on tetrafluoroethylenepropylene (TFEP) (alternating) were successfully cross-linked by electron-beam radiation and fluorinated to yield elastomeric products, but those based on ethylene-propylene-diene (EPDM) elastomer became brittle after fluorination. The best products were evaluated using tensile strength, elongation at break, solvent swelling, thermogravimetric analysis and infrared. A wide range of carbon-black filled compositions using the TFEP elastomer were cross-linked. The compositions were then fluorinated at or near room temperature for extended periods of time. After fluorination the samples were subjected to geothermal brine at 300/sup 0/C. The best carbon-black filled composition again lasted at least 100 days in the geothermal brine. This filler-elastomer composition was chosen for use in the production of 0-rings. The 0-rings were produced by compression molding using a 30 ton hydraulic press. Various sizes of 0-rings were produced ranging fro 0.8 to 2.0 inches in diameter and from 1/16 to 3/16 inches in width. The final 0-rings were cross-linked at 40 Mrad and fluorinated under the optimized conditions developed for the samples.

  3. An on-line acoustic fluorocarbon coolant mixture analyzer for the ATLAS silicon tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, R.; Battistin, M.; Berry, S.; Bitadze, A.; Bonneau, P.; Bousson, N.; Boyd, G.; Botelho-Direito, J.; DiGirolamo, B.; Doubek, M.; Egorov, K.; Godlewski, J.; Hallewell, G.; Katunin, S.; Mathieu, M.; McMahon, S.; Nagai, K.; Perez-Rodriguez, E.; Rozanov, A.; Vacek, V.; Vitek, M.

    2011-07-01

    The ATLAS silicon tracker community foresees an upgrade from the present octafluoro-propane (C{sub 3}F{sub 8}) evaporative cooling fluid - to a composite fluid with a probable 10-20% admixture of hexafluoro-ethane (C{sub 2}F{sub 6}). Such a fluid will allow a lower evaporation temperature and will afford the tracker silicon substrates a better safety margin against leakage current-induced thermal runaway caused by cumulative radiation damage as the luminosity profile at the CERN Large Hadron Collider increases. Central to the use of this new fluid is a new custom-developed speed-of-sound instrument for continuous real-time measurement of the C{sub 3}F{sub 8}/C{sub 2}F{sub 6} mixture ratio and flow. An acoustic vapour mixture analyzer/flow meter with new custom electronics allowing ultrasonic frequency transmission through gas mixtures has been developed for this application. Synchronous with the emission of an ultrasound 'chirp' from an acoustic transmitter, a fast readout clock (40 MHz) is started. The clock is stopped on receipt of an above threshold sound pulse at the receiver. Sound is alternately transmitted parallel and anti-parallel with the vapour flow for volume flow measurement from transducers that can serve as acoustic transmitters or receivers. In the development version, continuous real-time measurement of C{sub 3}F{sub 8}/C{sub 2}F{sub 6} flow and calculation of the mixture ratio is performed within a graphical user interface developed in PVSS-II, the Supervisory, Control and Data Acquisition standard chosen for LHC and its experiments at CERN. The described instrument has numerous potential applications - including refrigerant leak detection, the analysis of hydrocarbons, vapour mixtures for semiconductor manufacture and anesthetic gas mixtures. (authors)

  4. New surfactants design for CO2 applications: Molecular dynamics simulations of fluorocarbon-hydrocarbon oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirmizialtin, Serdal; Menceloglu, Yusuf Z.; Baysal, Canan

    2003-09-01

    Novel block co-oligomers are designed as candidate surfactants in near-supercritical CO2 environment, with the CO2-phobic block consisting of ethyl propionate and ten different types of ethylene monomers, flanked on either side by eight repeat unit fluorinated CO2-philic blocks. Single chain molecular dynamics simulations are performed to understand their conformational and dynamic properties. Depending on the side chain type, the CO2-phobic blocks are prone to shrinkage in the CO2 environment, while the CO2-philic blocks preserve their vacuum dimensions. The overall chains form U-shaped planar structures with flapping motion of the fluorinated arms; thus, we expect bilayer micelle formation under these conditions. The origin of the CO2-oligomer interactions is investigated and van der Waals interactions are found to dominate over electrostatic interactions in the CO2 environment. Calculations of the radial distribution function for the solvent molecules around the oligomer backbone show a solvation shell around 5-6 Å, irrespective of the oligomer type; density of the solvent around the oligomer, on the other hand, varies with type of side chain due to the interactions between the CO2 molecules and the oligomer, and the available volume around the side chain. The local chain dynamics is investigated by orientational autocorrelation functions, and the characteristic time of the relaxation of selected C-H and C-F bonds is found to depend on the local friction experienced by the fluctuating atoms and the energy barrier that needs to be surmounted during the relaxation process. The simple exponential decay of the correlation functions for the C-H bond is common for all oligomer types, whereas the stretched exponents take on smaller values depending on the side chain for the C-F bond vector, implying that the fluorinated blocks are exposed to more complicated dynamical processes.

  5. [Action of the fluorocarbons, 12 (difluorodichloromethane) and 11 (monofluorotrichloromethane), on smooth muscle].

    PubMed

    Paulet, G; Lessard, Y

    1975-01-01

    We have studied the action of difluorodichloromethane (F12) and monofluorotrichloromethane (F11) on the rat isolated uterine muscle and the rabbit isolated duodenum. Both gases in the nutritive solution after the functioning of these organs in a way which is, moreover, non identical. On the uterus both gases show an inhibitory effect against the spontaneous contractions. On the duodenum, both gases inhibit the phasic contractions but the basal tonus is strongly increased by F12, and on the contrary reduced by F11. The action is a musculotrop one and quite reversible in every case. Both gases do not modify the action of acetylcholin, epinephrin and histamin. PMID:129214

  6. Design Rules for Fluorocarbon-Free Omniphobic Solvent Barriers in Paper-Based Devices.

    PubMed

    Jahanshahi-Anbuhi, Sana; Pennings, Kevin; Leung, Vincent; Kannan, Balamurali; Brennan, John D; Filipe, Carlos D M; Pelton, Robert H

    2015-11-18

    The utility of hydrophobic wax barriers in paper-based lateral flow and multiwell devices for containment of aqueous solvents was extended to organic solvents and challenging aqueous surfactant solutions by preparation of a three layer barrier, consisting of internal pullulan impregnated paper barriers surrounded by external wax barriers. When paper impregnated with pullulan solution dries, the polymer forms solvent blocking lenses in the paper structure. Lens formation was illustrated by forming pullulan lenses in glass capillaries. The lens shapes were less curved compared to the predictions of a model based upon minimizing surface area. For barriers on Whatman # 1 filter paper, the pullulan molecular weight must be greater than ?70 kDa, the mass fraction of pullulan in the barrier zone must be at least 32%, and there are restrictions on the minimum width of the pullulan impregnated zone. PMID:26496157

  7. An assessment of potential impact of alternative fluorocarbons on tropospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niki, Hiromi

    1990-01-01

    While the chlorofuorocarbons (CFCs) such as CFC-11 (CFCl3) and CFC-12 (CF2Cl2) are chemically inert in the troposphere, the hydrogen-containing halocarbons being considered as their replacements can, to a large extent, be removed in the troposphere by the HO radical. These alternative halocarbons include the hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) 123 (CF3CHCl2), 141b (CFCl2CH3), 142b (CF2ClCH3), 22 (CHF2Cl), and 124 (CF3CHFCl) and the hydrofluorocarbons (HCFs) 134a (CF3CH2F), 152a (CHF2CH3) and 125 (CF3CHF2). Listed are the rate constants (k) for the HO radical reaction of these compounds and their estimated chemical lifetimes in the troposphere. In this table, values of the lifetimes of these selected HCFCs and HCFs are seen to vary by more than a factor of more than ten ranging from 1.6 years for HFC 152a and HCFC 125 to as long as 28 years for HFC 125. Clearly, from the standpoint of avoiding or minimizing impact on stratospheric O3, those halocarbons with short tropospheric lifetimes are the desirable alternates. However, potential environmental consequences of their degradation in the troposphere should be assessed and taken into account in the selection process.

  8. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 16. THE FLUOROCARBON-HYDROGEN FLORIDE INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the United States. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. The materials of...

  9. ULTRASONIC CLEANING AS A REPLACEMENT FOR A CHLORO- FLUOROCARBON-BASED SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the technical and economic evaluation of the replacement of a vapor degreasing system with an ultrasonic cleaning system to clean stainless steel components. Heated inorganic water-based cleaning fluid was utilized in lieu of a chlorofluorocarbon (CFC, freon...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart F of... - Specifications for Fluorocarbon and Other Refrigerants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Recycling and Emissions Reduction Pt. 82, Subpt. F, App. A Appendix A to Subpart F of Part 82—Specifications for...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart F of... - Specifications for Fluorocarbon and Other Refrigerants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Recycling and Emissions Reduction Pt. 82, Subpt. F, App. A Appendix A to Subpart F of Part 82—Specifications for...

  12. Proceedings of the 1993 Non-Fluorocarbon Insulation, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Technology Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessions included: HFC blown polyurethanes, carbon dioxide blown foam and extruded polystyrenes, plastic foam insulations, evacuated panel insulation, refrigeration and air conditioning, absorption and adsorption and stirling cycle refrigeration, innovative cooling technologies, and natural refrigerants. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  13. Synthesis and biological screening by novel hybrid fluorocarbon hydrocarbon compounds for use as artificial blood substitutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moacanin, J.; Scherer, K.; Toronto, A.; Lawson, D.; Terranova, T.; Yavrouian, A.; Astle, L.; Harvey, S.; Kaaelble, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    A series of hybrid fluorochemicals of general structure R(1)R(2)R(3)CR(4) was prepared where the R(i)'s (i=1,2,3) is a saturated fluoroalkyl group of formula C sub N F sub 2n+1, and R(4) is an alkyl group C sub n H sub 2n+1 or a related moiety containing amino, ether, or ester functions but no CF bonds. Compounds of this class containing approximately eight to twenty carbons total have physical properties suitable for use as the oxygen carrying phase of fluorochemical emulsion artificial blood. The chemical synthesis, and physical and biological testing of pure single isomers of the proposed artificial blood candidate compounds are included. Significant results are given.

  14. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart F of... - Specifications for Fluorocarbon and Other Refrigerants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Content. 5.4.1Method. The Coulometric Karl Fischer Titration shall be the primary test method for determining the water...6Acidity. 5.6.1Method. The acidity test uses the titration principle to detect any compound that is highly soluble...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart F of... - Specifications for Fluorocarbon and Other Refrigerants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Content. 5.4.1Method. The Coulometric Karl Fischer Titration shall be the primary test method for determining the water...6Acidity. 5.6.1Method. The acidity test uses the titration principle to detect any compound that is highly soluble...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart F of... - Specifications for Fluorocarbon and Other Refrigerants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Content. 5.4.1Method. The Coulometric Karl Fischer Titration shall be the primary test method for determining the water...6Acidity. 5.6.1Method. The acidity test uses the titration principle to detect any compound that is highly soluble...

  17. Preparation, characterization, physical testing and performance of fluorocarbon membranes and separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagow, R. J.; Dumitru, E. T.

    1982-01-01

    The direct fluorination method of converting carefully selected hydrocarbon substrates to fluorinated membranes was successfully applied to produce promising, novel membranes for electrochemical devices. A family of polymer blends was identified which permits wide latitude in the concentration of both crosslinks and carboxyl groups in hydrocarbon membranes. These membranes were successfully fluorinated and are potentially competitive with commercial membranes in performance, and potentially much cheaper in price.

  18. Proceedings of the 1993 non-fluorocarbon insulation, refrigeration and air conditioning technology workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    Sessions included: HFC blown polyurethanes, carbon dioxide blown foam and extruded polystyrenes, plastic foam insulations, evacuated panel insulation, refrigeration and air conditioning, absorption and adsorption and stirling cycle refrigeration, innovative cooling technologies, and natural refrigerants. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition and functionalization of fluorocarbon-organosilicon copolymer thin films

    E-print Network

    Murthy, Shashi Krishna, 1977-

    2003-01-01

    Neural prostheses are micron-scale integrated circuit devices that are under development for the treatment of brain and spinal cord injuries. A key challenge in the fabrication of these silicon- based devices is the ...

  20. Chemistry of the global troposphere - Fluorocarbons as tracers of air motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prather, Michael; Russell, Gary; Rind, David; Mcelroy, Michael; Wofsy, Steven

    1987-01-01

    Winds and convective mixing from a general circulation model of the atmosphere have been applied in a chemical tracer model (CTM) to simulate the global distribution and temporal variability of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). The seasonal cycle in moist convection, with maximum activity over continents in summer, leads to an annual cycle in the surface concentration of CFCs. Emissions are retained in the lowest levels of the atmosphere during winter, and surface concentrations peak near sources. In this season, CFCs from European sources are carried by low-level winds into the Arctic. During summer, vertical exchange is more efficient, and pollutants are transported more rapidly to the middle atmosphere. Consequently, concentrations of CFCs during summer are relatively low near the surface and elevated in the middle troposphere. Time series analysis of data from Adrigole, Ireland, indicates that the model accurately simulates long-range transport of air pollution. The model reproduces global distributions and trends for CFC-11 and CFC-12 observed by the ALE experiment; however, subgrid diffusion must be introduced into the model in order to reproduce the observed interhemispheric gradient. Interhemispheric exchange occurs mainly in the upper tropical troposphere, producing a profile which increases with altitude in the Southern Hemisphere, in agreement with observations. The distribution of CFCs is such that it is necessary to apply important corrections to observations at surface stations in order to derive global distributions.

  1. A Combine On-Line Acoustic Flowmeter and Fluorocarbon Coolant Mixture Analyzer for The ATLAS Silicon Tracker

    E-print Network

    A. Bitadze; R. Bates; M. Battistin; S. Berry; P. Bonneau; J. Botelho-Direito; B. DiGirolamo; J. Godlewski; E. Perez-Rodriguez; L. Zwalinski; N. Bousson; G. Hallewell; M. Mathieu; A. Rozanov; G. Boyd; M. Doubek; V. Vacek; M. Vitek; K. Egorov; S. Katunin; S. McMahon; K. Nagai

    2012-01-12

    An upgrade to the ATLAS silicon tracker cooling control system may require a change from C3F8 (octafluoro-propane) to a blend containing 10-30% of C2F6 (hexafluoro-ethane) to reduce the evaporation temperature and better protect the silicon from cumulative radiation damage with increasing LHC luminosity. Central to this upgrade is a new acoustic instrument for the real-time measurement of the C3F8/C2F6 mixture ratio and flow. The instrument and its Supervisory, Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) software are described in this paper. The instrument has demonstrated a resolution of 3.10-3 for C3F8/C2F6 mixtures with ~20%C2F6, and flow resolution of 2% of full scale for mass flows up to 30gs-1. In mixtures of widely-differing molecular weight (mw), higher mixture precision is possible: a sensitivity of < 5.10-4 to leaks of C3F8 into the ATLAS pixel detector nitrogen envelope (mw difference 160) has been seen. The instrument has many potential applications, including the analysis of mixtures of hydrocarbons, vapours for semi-conductor manufacture and anaesthesia.

  2. Development of atmospheric characteristics of chlorine-free alternative fluorocarbons. Report on R-134a and E-143a

    SciTech Connect

    Orkin, V.L.; Khamaganov, V.G.; Guschin, A.G.; Kasimovskaya, E.E.; Larin, I.K.

    1993-04-01

    Rate constants have been measured for the gas phase reaction of OH radicals with 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane R-134a (CH{sub 2}F-CF{sub 3}) and methyl trifluoromethyl ether E-143a (CH{sub 3}-O-CF{sub 3}) over the temperature range 298--460 K. Arrhenius expressions were derived for atmospheric modeling. The infrared absorption cross-sections for R-134a and E-143a have been measured in the region from 400 to 1600 cm{sup {minus}1} and the integrated band strengths have been calculated. The atmospheric lifetimes R-134a and E-143a have been estimated to be 11.6 years and 4.1 years respectively. Global warming potentials have been estimated over time horizons of 20, 50, 100, 200, and 500 years.

  3. Tropospheric reactions of the haloalkyl radicals formed from hydroxyl radical reaction with a series of alternative fluorocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, Roger

    1990-01-01

    In the present assessment, the hydrogen containing halocarbons being considered as alternatives to the the presently used chlorofluorocarbons are the hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) 123 (CF3CHCl2), 141b (CFCl2CH3), 142b (CF2ClCH3), 22 (CHF2Cl) and 124 (CF3CHFCl) and the hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) 134a (CF3CH2F), 152a (CHF2CH3) and 125 (CF3CHF2). All of these HCFCs and HFCs will react with the hydroxyl (OH) radical in the troposphere, giving rise to haloalkyl radicals which then undergo a complex series of reactions in the troposphere. These reactions of the haloalkyl radicals formed from the initial OH radical reactions with the HCFCs and HFCs under tropospheric conditions are the focus here.

  4. Estimation of Flammability Limits of Selected Fluorocarbons with F(sub 2) and CIF(sub3)

    SciTech Connect

    Trowbridge, L.D.

    1999-09-01

    During gaseous diffusion plant operations, conditions leading to the formation of flammable gas mixtures may occasionally arise. Currently, these could consist of the evaporative coolant CFC-114 and fluorinating agents such as F(sub 2) and CIF(sub 3). Replacement of CFC-114 with non-ozone-depleting substitutes such as c-C(sub 4)F(sub 8) and C(sub 4)F(sub 10) is planned. Consequently, in the future, these too must be considered potential ''fuels'' in flammable gas mixtures. Two questions of practical interest arise: (1) can a particular mixture sustain and propagate a flame if ignited, and (2) what is the maximum pressure that can be generated by the burning (and possibly exploding) gas mixture, should ignite? Experimental data on these systems are limited. To assist in answering these questions, a literature search for relevant data was conducted, and mathematical models were developed to serve as tools for predicting potential detonation pressures and estimating (based on empirical correlations between gas mixture thermodynamics and flammability for known systems) the composition limits of flammability for these systems. The models described and documented in this report are enhanced versions of similar models developed in 1992.

  5. Modeling of implantation and mixing damage during etching of SiO{sub 2} over Si in fluorocarbon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Mingmei; Kushner, Mark J.

    2011-09-15

    Energetic ion bombardment during plasma etching of microelectronics devices is necessary to activate chemical process and define features through the ions' anisotropic trajectories. These energetic fluxes can also cause damage and mixing of the constituents of crystalline lattices. These properties are likely best modeled using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The computational expense of these techniques makes feature scale simulations difficult, and so motivates development of approximate methods that can be used to model full features. In this regard, an implantation and mixing model has been developed and implemented into a Monte Carlo feature profile model to simulate the mixing and damage to the underlying Si during high aspect ratio (HAR) etching of SiO{sub 2} trenches. Fluxes to the surface were provided by a reactor scale model. The feature scale model was validated by comparison to the mixing produced by Ar{sup +} bombardment of Si with and without F and CF fluxes as predicted by MD simulations. Scaling of mixing damage of underlying Si during HAR of SiO{sub 2} etching in Ar/C{sub 4}F{sub 8}/O{sub 2} plasmas for rf bias powers of 1-4 kW was investigated. The authors found that mixing damage at the bottom of HAR features, though increasing in magnitude with increasing ion energy, does not scale as dramatically as on flat surfaces. This is due to the reflection of ions off of sidewalls which moderate the ion energies.

  6. Conclusions and Federal actions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Findings regarding fluorocarbon production, the roles of ozone and fluorocarbons in atmospheric chemistry, the depletion of stratospheric ozone by fluorocarbons, and various effects of this depletion are outlined. Research into these areas is described and recommendations are given for governmental action to reduce the release of fluorocarbons to the environment.

  7. Effect of fluorocarbon self-assembled monolayer films on sidewall adhesion and friction of surface micromachines with impacting and sliding contact interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, H.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2013-06-01

    A self-assembled monolayer film consisting of fluoro-octyltrichlorosilane (FOTS) was vapor-phase deposited on Si(100) substrates and polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) surface micromachines. The hydrophobic behavior and structural composition of the FOTS film deposited on Si(100) were investigated by goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The effects of contact pressure, relative humidity, temperature, and impact/sliding cycles on the adhesive and friction behavior of uncoated and FOTS-coated polysilicon micromachines (referred to as the Si and FOTS/Si micromachines, respectively) were investigated under controlled loading and environmental conditions. FOTS/Si micromachines demonstrated much lower and stable adhesion than Si micromachines due to the highly hydrophobic and conformal FOTS film. Contrary to Si micromachines, sidewall adhesion of FOTS/Si micromachines demonstrated a weak dependence on relative humidity, temperature, and impact cycles. In addition, FOTS/Si micromachines showed low and stable adhesion and low static friction for significantly more sliding cycles than Si micromachines. The adhesive and static friction characteristics of Si and FOTS/Si micromachines are interpreted in the context of physicochemical surface changes, resulting in the increase of the real area of contact and a hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic transition of the surface chemical characteristics caused by nanoscale surface smoothening and the removal of the organic residue (Si micromachines) or the FOTS film (FOTS/Si micromachines) during repetitive impact and oscillatory sliding of the sidewall surfaces.

  8. Coatings based on side-chain ether-linked poly(ethylene glycol) and fluorocarbon polymers for the control of marine biofouling.

    PubMed

    Youngblood, Jeffrey P; Andruzzi, Luisa; Ober, Christopher K; Hexemer, Alexander; Kramer, Edward J; Callow, James A; Finlay, John A; Callow, Maureen E

    2003-04-01

    The preparation of side group modified polystyrene-based surface-active block copolymers (SABC) for use as marine fouling resistance/release applications is described. Modifying moieties such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and semifluorinated segments were used. A novel bilayer methodology has been employed that provides both suitable mechanical properties through the use of an elastomeric primer layer of styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene (SEBS) and control of surface-chemistry through use of the SABCs. This approach has potential as a cost-effective technology for environmentally benign coatings that resist and release marine biofouling. Initial testing of these materials included determination of captive bubble contact angles and protein adsorption. Testing against marine fouling organisms was performed using settlement and adhesion bioassays with zoospores of the green alga Enteromorpha. The results showed that all surfaces had markedly reduced levels of zoospore settlement compared with glass controls and that adhesion strength was strongly affected by the semifluorinated SABC. The results are discussed in terms of surface properties. PMID:14618709

  9. Surface kinetics modeling of silicon and silicon oxide plasma etching. III. Modeling of silicon oxide etching in fluorocarbon chemistry using translating mixed-layer representation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Ohseung; Bai Bo; Sawin, Herbert H.

    2006-09-15

    Silicon oxide etching was modeled using a translating mixed-layer model, a novel surface kinetic modeling technique, and the model showed good agreement with measured data. Carbon and fluorine were identified as the primary contributors to deposition and etching, respectively. Atomic fluorine flux is a major factor that determines the etching behavior. With a chemistry having a small amount of atomic fluorine (such as the C{sub 4}F{sub 8} chemistry), etching yield shows stronger dependence on the composition change in the gas flux.

  10. Effect of fluorocarbon self-assembled monolayer films on sidewall adhesion and friction of surface micromachines with impacting and sliding contact interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, H.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2013-06-14

    A self-assembled monolayer film consisting of fluoro-octyltrichlorosilane (FOTS) was vapor-phase deposited on Si(100) substrates and polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) surface micromachines. The hydrophobic behavior and structural composition of the FOTS film deposited on Si(100) were investigated by goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The effects of contact pressure, relative humidity, temperature, and impact/sliding cycles on the adhesive and friction behavior of uncoated and FOTS-coated polysilicon micromachines (referred to as the Si and FOTS/Si micromachines, respectively) were investigated under controlled loading and environmental conditions. FOTS/Si micromachines demonstrated much lower and stable adhesion than Si micromachines due to the highly hydrophobic and conformal FOTS film. Contrary to Si micromachines, sidewall adhesion of FOTS/Si micromachines demonstrated a weak dependence on relative humidity, temperature, and impact cycles. In addition, FOTS/Si micromachines showed low and stable adhesion and low static friction for significantly more sliding cycles than Si micromachines. The adhesive and static friction characteristics of Si and FOTS/Si micromachines are interpreted in the context of physicochemical surface changes, resulting in the increase of the real area of contact and a hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic transition of the surface chemical characteristics caused by nanoscale surface smoothening and the removal of the organic residue (Si micromachines) or the FOTS film (FOTS/Si micromachines) during repetitive impact and oscillatory sliding of the sidewall surfaces.

  11. Fluorocarbon Contamination from the Drill on the Mars Science Laboratory: Potential Science Impact on Detecting Martian Organics by Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eigenbrode, J. L.; McAdam, A.; Franz, H.; Freissinet, C.; Bower, H.; Floyd, M.; Conrad, P.; Mahaffy, P.; Feldman, J.; Hurowitz, J.; Evans, J.; Anderson, M.; Jandura, L.; Brown, K.; Logan, C.; Kuhn, S.; Anderson, R.; Beegle, L.; Limonadi, D.; Rainen, R.; Umland, J.

    2013-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or trade name: Teflon by Dupont Co.) has been detected in rocks drilled during terrestrial testing of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) drilling hardware. The PTFE in sediments is a wear product of the seals used in the Drill Bit Assemblies (DBAs). It is expected that the drill assembly on the MSL flight model will also shed Teflon particles into drilled samples. One of the primary goals of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on MSL is to test for the presence of martian organics in samples. Complications introduced by the potential presence of PTFE in drilled samples to the SAM evolved gas analysis (EGA or pyrolysisquadrupole mass spectrometry, pyr-QMS) and pyrolysis- gas chromatography mass spectrometry (Pyr- GCMS) experiments was investigated.

  12. 40 CFR 414.30 - Applicability; description of the other fibers subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Polyacrylonitrile) *Cellulose Acetate Fibers *Fluorocarbon (Teflon) Fibers *Modacrylic Fibers *Nylon 6 Fibers Nylon 6 Monofilament *Nylon 66 Fibers Nylon 66 Monofilament *Polyamide Fibers (Quiana) *Polyaramid (Kevlar)...

  13. 46 CFR 96.30-1 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Protection From Refrigerants § 96.30-1 Application. (a) This subpart, except... 20 cubic feet; or (2) Fluorocarbons to refrigerate any space with a volume of more than 1000 cubic... 20 cubic feet; or (2) Fluorocarbons to refrigerate any space with a volume of more than 1000...

  14. 46 CFR 195.30-1 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Protection From Refrigerants § 195.30-1 Application. (a) This subpart... 20 cubic feet; or (2) Fluorocarbons to refrigerate any space with a volume of more than 1000 cubic... more than 20 cubic feet, or (2) Fluorocarbons to refrigerate any space with a volume of more than...

  15. 30 CFR 7.86 - Test equipment and specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-grade gas (purified synthetic air or purified nitrogen) impurity concentrations shall not exceed ? 1ppm... filters shall— (i) Be fluorocarbon-coated glass fiber filters or fluorocarbon-based (membrane) filters and... value except for the exhaust gas temperature device that provides an accuracy of ±27 °F (15 °C); (iv)...

  16. Development of a special purpose spacecraft coating, phase 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillman, H. D.

    1980-01-01

    Coating formulations based on a fluorocarbon resin were evaluated for use on spacecraft exteriors. Formulations modified with an acrylic resin were found to have excellent offgassing properties. A much less expensive process for increasing to solid content of the fluorocarbon latex was developed.

  17. Investigations of surface reactions during C2F6 plasma etching of SiO2 with equipment and feature scale models

    E-print Network

    Kushner, Mark

    Investigations of surface reactions during C2F6 plasma etching of SiO2 with equipment and feature; accepted 22 December 2000 During fluorocarbon plasma etching of SiO2 , a polymer passivation layer these processes, a surface reaction mechanism for fluorocarbon plasma etching of SiO2 has been developed

  18. Method of bonding diamonds in a matrix and articles thus produced

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, G.W.

    1981-01-27

    By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

  19. Utilization of oxygen difluoride for syntheses of fluoropolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, M. S. (inventor)

    1976-01-01

    The reaction oxygen difluoride, OF2, with ethylenically unsaturated fluorocarbon compounds is examined. Depending upon the fluorocarbon material and reaction conditions, OF2 can chain extend fluoropolyenes, convert functional perfluorovinyl groups to acyl fluoride and/or epoxide groups, and act as a monomer for an addition type copolymerization with diolefins.

  20. Texturing polymer surfaces by transfer casting. [cardiovascular prosthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Weigand, A. J.; Sovey, J. S. (inventors)

    1982-01-01

    A technique for fabricating textured surfaces on polymers without altering their surface chemistries is described. A surface of a fluorocarbon polymer is exposed to a beam of ions to texture it. The polymer which is to be surface-roughened is then cast over the textured surface of the fluorocarbon polymer. After curing, the cast polymer is peeled off the textured fluorocarbon polymer, and the peeled off surface has negative replica of the textured surface. The microscopic surface texture provides large surface areas for adhesive bonding. In cardiovascular prosthesis applications the surfaces are relied on for the development of a thin adherent well nourished thrombus.

  1. Search for plutonium-244 tracks in mountain pass bastnaesite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleischer, R.L.; Naeser, C.W.

    1972-01-01

    WE have found that bastnaesite, a rare earth fluorocarbonate, from the Precambrian Mountain Pass deposit has an apparent Cretaceous fission track age, and hence does not reveal any anomalous fission tracks due to 244Pu. ?? 1972 Nature Publishing Group.

  2. 614 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON DEVICE AND MATERIALS RELIABILITY, VOL. 4, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2004 Spray Cooling Using Multiple Nozzles: Visualization

    E-print Network

    Kim, Jungho

    -temperature boiling point dielectric liquid compatible with electronics (e.g., fluorocarbons) is an attractive option transfer rates much higher than can be attained in pool boiling (typical CHF for pool boiling of FC-72 is W

  3. Synthesis of new high performance lubricants and solid lubricants. Progress report, April 1992--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lagow, R.J.

    1993-04-01

    Synthesis and testing was begun on a number of new classes of lubricants: perfluoropolyethers (branching effects), perfluoromethylene oxide ethers, chlorine-substituted fluorocarbon polyethers, fluorine-containing branched ether lubricants, glycerine- based perfluoropolyesters, perfluoro epoxy ether chains, etc.

  4. Synthesis of new high performance lubricants and solid lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Lagow, R.J.

    1993-04-01

    Synthesis and testing was begun on a number of new classes of lubricants: perfluoropolyethers (branching effects), perfluoromethylene oxide ethers, chlorine-substituted fluorocarbon polyethers, fluorine-containing branched ether lubricants, glycerine- based perfluoropolyesters, perfluoro epoxy ether chains, etc.

  5. 16 CFR 423.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... uses any common organic solvent (e.g. petroleum, perchlorethylene, fluorocarbon). The process may also... and agitation. When no temperature is given, e.g., warm or cold, hot water up to 145 degrees F...

  6. 16 CFR 423.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... uses any common organic solvent (e.g. petroleum, perchlorethylene, fluorocarbon). The process may also... and agitation. When no temperature is given, e.g., warm or cold, hot water up to 145 degrees F...

  7. 16 CFR 423.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... uses any common organic solvent (e.g. petroleum, perchlorethylene, fluorocarbon). The process may also... and agitation. When no temperature is given, e.g., warm or cold, hot water up to 145 degrees F...

  8. Earth's Endangered Ozone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panofsky, Hans A.

    1978-01-01

    Included are (1) a discussion of ozone chemistry; (2) the effects of nitrogen fertilizers, fluorocarbons, and high level aircraft on the ozone layer; and (3) the possible results of a decreasing ozone layer. (MR)

  9. Atmospheric trace gas measurements with a new clean air sampling system

    SciTech Connect

    Leifer, R.; Sommers, K.; Guggenheim, S.F.

    1981-10-01

    The development of a new clean air sampling system for the Department of Energy's WB-57F aircraft has allowed the analysis of CCl/sub 3/F (Fluorocarbon-11), CCl/sub 2/F/sub 2/ (Fluorocarbon-12), CHClF/sub 2/ (Fluorocarbon-22), C/sub 2/Cl/sub 3/F/sub 3/ (Fluorocarbon-113), CH/sub 4/, CO, CO/sub 2/, N/sub 2/O, CH/sub 3/Cl, CCl/sub 4/, CH/sub 3/CCl/sub 3/, OCS and SF/sub 6/ in tropospheric and stratospheric samples. Samples collected during the interception of the plume from the eruption of Mount St. Helens indicate that OCS was injected into the stratosphere during the eruption. A large CO/sub 2/ gradient was found at 19.2 km on this flight.

  10. Origin, evolution, and control of sidewall line edge roughness transfer during plasma etching

    E-print Network

    Rasgon, Stacy A., 1974-

    2005-01-01

    (cont.) micromasking. Porous films seem especially prone, perhaps due to polymer diffusion into the pore structure. Control of polymerization during the etch through the use of lower-polymerizing fluorocarbons or the ...

  11. Condensing Heat Exchangers Optimize Steam Boilers 

    E-print Network

    Sullivan, B.; Sullivan, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    The development of fluorocarbon resin covered tubes has advanced to the point where full scale marketing in connection with condensing heat exchangers has begun. Field installations show simple paybacks of one to one and a half years with resulting...

  12. 46 CFR 128.410 - Ship's service refrigeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... this chapter if— (a) The unit uses a fluorocarbon refrigerant allowed by part 147 of this chapter; (b... service refrigeration systems. No self-contained unit either for air-conditioning or for...

  13. Comprehensive Bio-Imaging with Fluorinated Nanoparticles Using Breathable Liquids

    PubMed Central

    Kurczy, Michael E.; Zhu, Zheng Jiang; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Schuyler, Adam M.; Lalwani, Kush; Santidrian, Antonio F.; David, John W.; Giddabasappa, Anand; Roberts, Amanda; Olivos, Hernando J.; O'Brien, Peter J.; Franco, Lauren; Fields, Matthew W.; Paris, Liliana P.; Friedlander, Martin; Johnson, Caroline H.; Epstein, Adrian; Gendleman, Howard E.; Wood, Malcolm; Felding-Habermann, Brunhilde; Patti, Gary J.; Spilker, Mary E.; Siuzdak, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Fluorocarbons are lipophobic and non-polar molecules that exhibit remarkable bio-compatibility, with applications in liquid ventilation and synthetic blood. The unique properties of these compounds have also enabled mass spectrometry imaging of tissues where the fluorocarbons act as a Teflon-like coating for nanostructured surfaces to assist in desorption/ionization. Here we report fluorinated gold nanoparticles (f-AuNPs) designed to facilitate nanostructure imaging mass spectrometry. Irradiation of f-AuNPs results in the release of the fluorocarbon ligands providing a driving force for analyte desorption. The f-AuNPs allow for the mass spectrometry analysis of both lipophilic and polar (central carbon) metabolites. An important property of AuNPs is that they also act as contrast agents for X-ray microtomography and electron microscopy, a feature we have exploited by infusing f-AuNPs into tissue via fluorocarbon liquids to facilitate multi-modal (molecular and anatomical) imaging. PMID:25601659

  14. Thermally resistant polymers for fuel tank sealants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    Conversion of fluorocarbon dicarboxylic acid to intermediates whose terminal functional groups permit polymerization is discussed. Resulting polymers are used as fuel tank sealers for jet fuels at elevated temperatures. Stability and fuel resistance of the prototype polymers is explained.

  15. HYDRAULIC STUDIES AND CLEANING EVALUATIONS OF ULTRAVIOLET DISINFECTION UNITS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Various types of operating ultraviolet disinfection reactor designs were evaluated for hydraulic characteristics and cleaning requirements. The fluorocarbon polymer tube designs promote plug-flow behavior because of their relatively high length-to-diameter ratio. Hydraulic evalua...

  16. Long-lasting solid-polymer electrolytic hygrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.

    1978-01-01

    Device consists of hollow tube node of oxidation-resistant sulfonated fluorocarbon polymer. Tube absorbs moisture from air passing across inner and outer surfaces, causing change in polymer conductance. Change is related to change in water content in gas sample.

  17. HYDROGEN FLUORIDE Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) is an extremely

    E-print Network

    Lance, Veronica P.

    be stored in tightly closed polyethylene or fluorocarbon plastic lead or platinum containers Place storage.854.8749 #12;WASTE DISPOSAL Drain disposal of HF is not permitted Spent HF is hazardous waste and MUST

  18. SUMMARY REVIEW OF HEALTH EFFECTS ASSOCIATED WITH HYDROGEN FLUORIDE AND RELATED COMPOUNDS: HEALTH ISSUE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major natural sources of airborne hydrogen fluoride (HF) are volcanic activity, ocean spray, and crustal weathering of fluoride-containing rocks. Anthropogenic sources include emissions from industrial operations such as aluminum and fluorocarbon production, and uranium proce...

  19. Flame-resistant textiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogg, L. C.; Stringham, R. S.; Toy, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    Flame resistance treatment for acid resistant polyamide fibers involving photoaddition of fluorocarbons to surface has been scaled up to treat 10 yards of commercial width (41 in.) fabric. Process may be applicable to other low cost polyamides, polyesters, and textiles.

  20. Development of an all-metal thick film cost effective metallization system for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, B.; Parker, J.

    1982-01-01

    Electrodes made with pastes produced under the previous contract were analyzed and compared with raw materials. A needle-like structure observed on the electroded solar cell was identified as eutectic copper-silicon, a phase considered to benefit the electrical and metallurgical properties of the contact. Electrodes made from copper fluorocarbon and copper silver fluoride also contained this phase but had poor adhesion. A liquid medium, intended to provide transport during carbon fluoride decomposition was incorporated into the paste resulting in better adhesion. The product survived preliminary environmental tests. A 2 cm by 2 cm solar cell made with fluorocarbon activated copper electrodes and gave 7% AMI efficiency (without AR coating). Both silver fluoride and fluorocarbon screened paste electrodes can be produced for approximately $0.04 per watt.

  1. Novel CO{sub 2}-thickeners for improved mobility control

    SciTech Connect

    Enick, Dr. Robert M.; Beckman, Dr. Eric J.; Hamilton, Dr. Andrew

    2000-02-02

    The objective of this study was to design, synthesize, and characterize thickening agents for dense carbon dioxide and to evaluate their solubility and viscosity-enhancing potential in CO{sub 2}. Previously, fluoroacrylate homopolymers and fluorinated telechelic ionomers were shown to increase the viscosity of carbon dioxide by a factor of 3--4 at concentrations of 2--3 at concentrations of 4--5 wt%. This report details the findings for several new types of carbon dioxide thickening candidates. Hydrocarbon-fluorocarbon random copolymers, sulfonated hydrocarbon-fluorocarbon random copolymers, semifluorinated trialkyltin fluorides and small hydrogen-bounding compounds were evaluated.

  2. Development of a special purpose spacecraft interior coating. Phase 2. [fire resistant fluoropolymer coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartoszek, E. J.; Christofas, A.; Nannelli, P.

    1977-01-01

    Numerous acrylic and epoxy modifiers for the fluorocarbon latex resin base were investigated. Optimum coatings were developed by modifying the fluorocarbon latex with an epoxy acrylic resin system. In addition, a number of other formulations, containing hard acrylics as modifiers, displayed attractive properties and potential for further improvements. The preferred formulations dried to touch in about one hour and were fully dried in about twenty four hours under normal room temperature and humidity conditions. In addition to physical and mechanical properties either comparable or superior to those of commercial solvent base polyurethane or polyester coatings, the preferred compositions meet the flammability and offgassing requirements specified by NASA.

  3. Vacuum ultraviolet radiation/atomic oxygen synergism in materials reactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven; Leger, Lubert; Albyn, Keith; Cross, Jon

    1990-01-01

    Experimental results are presented which indicate that low fluxes of vacuum UV (VUV) radiation exert a pronounced influence on the atomic oxygen reactivity of such fluorocarbon and fluorocarbon spacecraft materials as the FEP Teflon and PCTFE that are under consideration for the Space Station Freedom. With simultaneous exposure to VUV fluxes comparable to those experienced in LEO, the reactivity of these materials becomes comparable to that of Kapton; VUV radiation has also been shown to increase the reactivity of Kapton with thermal-energy oxygen atoms.

  4. Novel CO{sub 2}-thickeners for improved mobility control

    SciTech Connect

    Enick, Dr. Robert M.; Beckman, Dr. Eric J.; Hamilton, Dr. Andrew

    2000-02-02

    The objective of this study was to design, synthesize, and characterize thickening agents for dense carbon dioxide and to evaluate their solubility and viscosity-enhancing potential in CO{sub 2}. Hydrocarbon-fluorocarbon random copolymers, sulfated hydrocarbon-fluorocarbon random copolymers, semifluorinated trialkyltin fluorides and small hydrogen-bonding compounds were evaluated. Random copolymers of styrene and heptadecafluorodecyl acrylate were characterized by high solubility ion dense carbon dioxide and the most substantial increases in solution viscosity. Falling cylinder viscometry results indicated that the 29%styrene--71%fluoroacylate bulk-polymerized copolymer induced 2--250 fold increases in viscosity at copolymer concentrations of 0.2--5.0wt%.

  5. Novel CO{sub 2}-thickeners for improved mobility control

    SciTech Connect

    Enick, Dr. Robert M.; Beckman, Dr. Eric J.; Hamilton, Dr. Andrew

    2000-02-02

    The objective of this study was to design, synthesize, and characterize thickening agents for dense carbon dioxide and to evaluate their solubility and viscosity-enhancing potential in CO{sub 2}. Hydrocarbon-fluorocarbon random copolymers, sulfonated hydrocarbon-fluorocarbon random copolymers, semifluorinated trialkyltin fluorides and small hydrogen-bonding compounds have been evaluated. Random copolymers of styrene and heptadecafluorodecyl acrylate yielded substantial increases in viscosity. Falling cylinder viscometry results indicated that the 29%styrene--71%fluoroacrylate bulk-polymerized copolymer induced very significant viscosity increases at copolymer concentrations of 0.1--5.0wt%.

  6. Organofluorine chemistry: A Janus cyclohexane ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santschi, Nico; Gilmour, Ryan

    2015-06-01

    The first synthesis of the all-cis isomer of 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexafluorocyclohexane, a molecule with one hydrocarbon face and one fluorocarbon face, is a tour de force of organofluorine chemistry and opens up new possibilities for molecular design.

  7. Polyphosphazene Icephobic Coating Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Paul B.

    1992-01-01

    Coating materials consisting mostly of modified polyphosphazene (Class FZ) elastomers provide better protection against icing than fluorocarbon polymers and silicone elastomers. Reduces adhesive force between ice and surface. As consequence, increasing weight of ice, wind loading, or vibration of surface causes ice to be shed. New icephobic coats reduce accumulation of ice on aircraft, radomes, antennas, ships, and power-transmission lines.

  8. RETENTION OF HALOCARBONS ON A HEXAFLUOROPROPYLENE EPOXIDE-MODIFIED GRAPHITIZED CARBON BLACK - IV. PROPANE- BASED COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The retention characteristics of 25 propane-based bromofluorocarbon, chlorocarbon, chlorofluorocarbon, and fluorocarbon fluids have been studied as a function of temperature on a stationary phase consisting of a 5% (m/m) coating of a low-molecular-mass polymer of hexafluoropropyl...

  9. The Great Spray Can Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassow, Herb

    This booklet, designed to be used in high school classrooms, concerns the technological, economic, and political contexts of the fluorocarbon-ozone depletion controversy. The curriculum is divided into three phases: the scientific dimension, which is a pure science analysis using lab-classroom tools and methodologies; the philosophical dimension,…

  10. Gas mixtures for spark gap closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; McCorkle, D.L.; Hunter, S.R.

    1987-02-20

    Gas mixtures for use in spark gap closing switches comprised of fluorocarbons and low molecular weight, inert buffer gases. To this can be added a third gas having a low ionization potential relative to the buffer gas. The gas mixtures presented possess properties that optimized the efficiency spark gap closing switches. 6 figs.

  11. Combustion of PTFE: The effects of gravity on ultrafine particle generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKinnon, Thomas; Todd, Paul; Oberdorster, Gunter

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this project is to obtain an understanding of the effect of gravity on the toxicity of ultrafine particle and gas phase materials produced when fluorocarbon polymers are thermally degraded or burned. The motivation for the project is to provide a basic technical foundation on which policies for spacecraft health and safety with regard to fire and polymers can be formulated.

  12. J. Physiol. (I959) I47, 226-238 SINGLE UNIT ACTIVITY IN STRIATE CORTEX OF

    E-print Network

    Hubel, David

    of recording (Text-fig. 1). The peg was made of the plastic Kel-F (fluorocarbon polymer made by Minnesota of the neck. No recordings were made until at least twenty-four hours after operation. I cm nector 011 vent Adapter Implant Text-fig. 1. Diagram of hydraulic micropositioner and implant. Lid, piston and cylinder

  13. Demonstrating a Lack of Reactivity Using a Teflon-Coated Pan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Thomas G.

    1995-01-01

    Illustrates the chemical resistance of polytetrafluoroethene to mineral acids using an ordinary Teflon-coated frying pan. The demonstration can also be used to lead to a discussion of the long lifetimes of fluorocarbons and chlorofluorocarbons in the atmosphere and their roles in the breakdown of the ozone layer. (AIM)

  14. Z .Sensors and Actuators B 58 1999 486490 www.elsevier.nlrlocatersensorb

    E-print Network

    Moritz, Werner

    Z .Sensors and Actuators B 58 1999 486­490 www.elsevier.nlrlocatersensorb Silicon carbide based semiconductor sensor for the detection of fluorocarbons W. Moritz a,) , V. Fillipov b , A. Vasiliev b , A the substantial role for the sensor3 detection principal. q 1999 Elsevier Science S.A. All rights reserved

  15. 16 CFR Appendix A to Part 423 - Glossary of Standard Terms

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... bleach” or “Do not bleach”—no bleaches may be used. c. “Only non-chlorine bleach, when needed”—only the... common organic solvent (for example, petroleum, perchlorethylene, fluorocarbon) located in any commercial... drying up to 160 °F (71 °C) and restoration by steam press or steam-air finishing. b....

  16. 16 CFR Appendix A to Part 423 - Glossary of Standard Terms

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... bleach” or “Do not bleach”—no bleaches may be used. c. “Only non-chlorine bleach, when needed”—only the... common organic solvent (for example, petroleum, perchlorethylene, fluorocarbon) located in any commercial... drying up to 160 °F (71 °C) and restoration by steam press or steam-air finishing. b....

  17. 16 CFR 423.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... will not become separated from the product and will remain legible during the useful life of the... uses any common organic solvent (e.g. petroleum, perchlorethylene, fluorocarbon). The process may also... (71 degrees C) and restoration by steam press or steam-air finishing. (d) Machine Wash means a...

  18. 46 CFR 77.30-10 - Stowage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... any space with a volume of more than 20 cubic feet or with any refrigeration unit using fluorocarbons to refrigerate any space with a volume of more than 1000 cubic feet. (b) If a separate self-contained breathing apparatus is maintained for protection against gas leaking from a refrigeration unit, it must...

  19. 40 CFR 92.114 - Exhaust gas and particulate sampling and analytical system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... filters or fluorocarbon-based (membrane) filters are required. (2) Particulate filters must have a... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exhaust gas and particulate sampling... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES...

  20. 46 CFR 77.30-10 - Stowage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... any space with a volume of more than 20 cubic feet or with any refrigeration unit using fluorocarbons to refrigerate any space with a volume of more than 1000 cubic feet. (b) If a separate self-contained breathing apparatus is maintained for protection against gas leaking from a refrigeration unit, it must...

  1. 16 CFR 423.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... will not become separated from the product and will remain legible during the useful life of the... uses any common organic solvent (e.g. petroleum, perchlorethylene, fluorocarbon). The process may also... (71 degrees C) and restoration by steam press or steam-air finishing. (d) Machine Wash means a...

  2. 46 CFR 130.230 - Protection from refrigerants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... storage capacity if using a fluorocarbon, as a refrigerant, there must be available one pressure-demand... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Protection from refrigerants. 130.230 Section 130.230... refrigerants. (a) For each refrigeration system that exceeds 0.6 cubic meters (20 cubic feet) of...

  3. GLOBAL DISTRIBUTION OF SELECTED HALOCARBONS, HYDROCARBONS, SF6, AND N2O

    EPA Science Inventory

    Northern and Southern hemispheric distributions of halogenated species, hydrocarbons, SF6, and N2O are presented. The atmospheric growth rates of selected halocarbons and N2O are characterized. The fluorocarbon 11 and 12 global burden and hemispheric distribution is consistent wi...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix D to Subpart B of... - SAE J2810 Standard for Recovery Only Equipment for HFC-134a Refrigerant

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 700Specifications for Fluorocarbon Refrigerants. 2.1.3CGA Publication Available from Compressed Gas Association... SAE J2788-certified equipment. It is not acceptable that the refrigerant removed from a mobile air... refrigerant recovery to reduce emissions and provide for accurate recharging of mobile air...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix D to Subpart B of... - SAE J2810 Standard for Recovery Only Equipment for HFC-134a Refrigerant

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 700Specifications for Fluorocarbon Refrigerants. 2.1.3CGA Publication Available from Compressed Gas Association... SAE J2788-certified equipment. It is not acceptable that the refrigerant removed from a mobile air... refrigerant recovery to reduce emissions and provide for accurate recharging of mobile air...

  6. 46 CFR 130.230 - Protection from refrigerants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... storage capacity if using a fluorocarbon, as a refrigerant, there must be available one pressure-demand... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Protection from refrigerants. 130.230 Section 130.230... refrigerants. (a) For each refrigeration system that exceeds 0.6 cubic meters (20 cubic feet) of...

  7. An Overview Fluorination Strategies

    E-print Network

    Porco Jr., John A.

    An Overview of Fluorination Strategies Kiel Lazarski Porco Research Group Literature Presentation February 13th, 2014 #12;The Relevance of Fluorocarbons The carbon­fluorine bond is the strongest carbon­heteroatom bond · C­F ~125 kcal/mol; C­C ~88 kcal/mol . Fluorine is significantly more electronegative than carbon

  8. Formation of C2 Radicals in High-Density C4F8 Plasmas Studied by Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Chihiro; Sasaki, Koichi; Kadota, Kiyoshi

    1999-12-01

    Spatial and temporal variations of C2 radical density in high-density C4F8 plasmas have been investigated by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy. Hollow-shaped spatial distributions have been observed for the C2 density, indicating that C2 radicals are produced from fluorocarbon film on the chamber wall and are lost in the plasma column by electron impact processes. The C2 density depends largely on the seasoning condition of the vacuum chamber, which supports the surface production of C2 radicals. Bombardment of positive ions onto fluorocarbon film is necessary for such surface production. The mechanism of this surface production is not the physical sputtering of fluorocarbon film but ion-enhanced chemical reactions with fluorocarbon film. Lifetime measurements of C2 radicals have also been carried out in the afterglow. The observed decay time constants (less than 0.8 ms) are shorter for high gas pressures, indicating the loss of C2 due to gas-phase reactions.

  9. Fast-drying coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartoszek, E. J.

    1978-01-01

    Nontoxic coating has excellent optical properties and can be pigmented in many different colors. It bonds well, can be applied by conventional methods, weathers well, and is self-extinguishing. Coating composition comprises latex blends of fluorocarbons, acrylic resins, stabilizers, modifiers, variety of inorganic pigments, and other additives. Suitable latex primers have also been developed from acrylic latex base.

  10. Title of Document: PLASMA ETCHING OF DIELECTIRC MATERIALS USING INDUCTIVELY AND

    E-print Network

    Anlage, Steven

    ABSTRACT Title of Document: PLASMA ETCHING OF DIELECTIRC MATERIALS USING INDUCTIVELY Fluorocarbon (FC) plasmas are commonly used for dielectric materials etching. Our initial work was performed of CO addition to C4F8 or C4F8/Ar plasmas for selective etching of organosilicate glass (OSG), which

  11. Properties of C4F8 inductively coupled plasmas. I. Studies of Arc-C4F8 magnetically confined plasmas for etching of SiO2

    E-print Network

    Kushner, Mark

    plasmas for etching of SiO2 Xi Li,a) Li Ling, Xuefeng Hua, and Gottlieb S. Oehrleinb) Department for the plasma etching of dielectric materials such as SiO2 . To quantify the dependence of fundamental plasma: 10.1116/1.1697482 I. INTRODUCTION Fluorocarbon plasmas are extensively used for etching

  12. Cardiovascular disease and environmental exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenman, K D

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews the possible association between cardiovascular disease and occupational and environmental agents. The effects of carbon monoxide, fibrogenic dusts, carbon disulphide, heavy metals, noise, radiation, heat, cold, solvents and fluorocarbons are discussed. New directions for investigation are suggested. PMID:465378

  13. Comparative description of PFAA developmental toxicity: An update

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are a family of fluorocarbons consisting of a perfluorinated carbon tail (typically 4-12 carbons in length) and an acidic functional moiety, usually carboxylate or sulfonate. These compounds have excellent surface tension reducing properties and h...

  14. Development of an all-metal thick-film cost-effective metallization system for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, B.

    1981-01-01

    Screened electrodes made from fluorocarbon activated copper paste and silver fluoride activated copper paste, tape adhesion and scratch tests were studied. Experiments were conducted with variations in past parameters, firing conditions, including gas ambients, furnace furniture, silicon surface and others. A liquid medium intended to provide transport during the carbon fluoride decomposition, is incorporated in the paste.

  15. Adsorption of Hydrofluorocarbons HFC-134 and HFC-134A on X and Y Zeolites: Effect of Ion-Exchange on Selectivity and Heat of Adsorption

    E-print Network

    Siperstein, Flor R.

    rapidly as worldwide refrigerator and air-conditioner production rises almost exponentially.1 A byproduct zeolite would be highly effective for gas separation. 1. Introduction HFC-134a (CH2FCF3) is a hydrofluorocarbon coolant for refrigerators designated to replace the ozone-damaging chloro- fluorocarbons (CFCs

  16. Lab on a Chip Cite this: DOI: 10.1039/c4lc01285b

    E-print Network

    . To coalesce a bulk emulsion of aqueous droplets in fluori- nated oil, a concentration of 20 vol microfluidic method to coalesce pairs of surfactant-stabilized water-in-fluorocarbon oil droplets. We achieve December 2014 DOI: 10.1039/c4lc01285b www.rsc.org/loc Chemically induced coalescence in droplet

  17. High-power, ultralow-mass solar arrays: FY-77 solar arrays technology readiness assessment report, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costogue, E. N.; Young, L. E.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Development efforts are reported in detail for: (1) a lightweight solar array system for solar electric propulsion; (2) a high efficiency thin silicon solar cell; (3) conceptual design of 200 W/kg solar arrays; (4) fluorocarbon encapsulation for silicon solar cell array; and (5) technology assessment of concentrator solar arrays.

  18. Lighter-than-Air Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Reviews practical applications, particularly in scientific research, of hot air balloons. Recent U.S. governmental projects in near-space research are described. Lists (1) major accomplishments of scientific ballooning, including discoveries in cosmic ray particles, gamma and x-rays, and other radiation; (2) measurement of fluorocarbon

  19. Energy and Global Warming Impacts of CFC Alternative Technologies

    E-print Network

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    #12;Energy and Global Warming Impacts of CFC Alternative Technologies S. K. Fischer P. J. Hughes P Arthur D. Little, Inc. Sponsored by the Alternative Fluorocarbons Environmental Acceptability Study (AFEAS) and the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) December 1991 #12;This report was printed as two

  20. 46 CFR 77.30-10 - Stowage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Self-contained breathing apparatus for refrigeration 1 Flame safety lamps Ocean and...Required only on vessels equipped with any refrigeration unit using ammonia to refrigerate...more than 20 cubic feet or with any refrigeration unit using fluorocarbons to...

  1. 46 CFR 77.30-10 - Stowage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Self-contained breathing apparatus for refrigeration 1 Flame safety lamps Ocean and...Required only on vessels equipped with any refrigeration unit using ammonia to refrigerate...more than 20 cubic feet or with any refrigeration unit using fluorocarbons to...

  2. 46 CFR 77.30-10 - Stowage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Self-contained breathing apparatus for refrigeration 1 Flame safety lamps Ocean and...Required only on vessels equipped with any refrigeration unit using ammonia to refrigerate...more than 20 cubic feet or with any refrigeration unit using fluorocarbons to...

  3. 46 CFR 77.30-10 - Stowage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Self-contained breathing apparatus for refrigeration 1 Flame safety lamps Ocean and...Required only on vessels equipped with any refrigeration unit using ammonia to refrigerate...more than 20 cubic feet or with any refrigeration unit using fluorocarbons to...

  4. 46 CFR 77.30-10 - Stowage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Self-contained breathing apparatus for refrigeration 1 Flame safety lamps Ocean and...Required only on vessels equipped with any refrigeration unit using ammonia to refrigerate...more than 20 cubic feet or with any refrigeration unit using fluorocarbons to...

  5. A facile method of fabricating mechanical durable anti-icing coatings based on CeO2 microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pengren; Peng, Chaoyi; Wu, Binrui; Yuan, Zhiqing; Yang, Fubiao; Zeng, Jingcheng

    2015-07-01

    Compromising between hydrophobicity and mechanical durability may be a feasible approach to fabricating usable anti-icing coatings. This work improves the contact angle of current commercial anti-icing coatings applied to wind turbine blades dramatically and keeps relatively high mechanical durability. CeO2 microparticles and diluent were mixed with fluorocarbon resin to fabricate high hydrophobic coatings on the glass fiber reinforced epoxy composite substrates. The proportion of CeO2 microparticles and diluent influences the contact angles significantly. The optimum mass ratio of fluorocarbon resin to CeO2 microparticles to diluent is 1:1.5:1, which leads to the highest contact angle close to 140°. The microscopy analysis shows that the CeO2 microparticles form nano/microscale hierarchical structure on the surface of the coatings.

  6. Reactivation of Newcastle Disease Virus Neutralized by Antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Brugh, M

    1977-01-01

    In an effort to improve current technology for detection of Newcastle disease virus in convalescent birds, a procedure has been developed for efficient reactivation of virus that has been neutralized by antibody. The reactivation capabilities of fluorocarbon treatment, ultrasonic treatment, pH extremes, and proteolytic digestion were evaluated using the LaSota strain of virus. Reactivation was maximum after proteolytic digestion with either trypsin or papain, and reactivation effciency was up to 100%, depending on the enzyme used for digestion and the amount of antibody in the neutralization mixture. Reactivation at pH extremes was considerably less efficient than reactiviation by proteolytic digestion, and neither fluorocarbon nor ultrasonic treatments effectively recovered antibody-neutralized Newcastle disease virus. PMID:16035

  7. Role and fate of ozone in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. G.

    Rapid gas phase catalysis of ozone recombination to molecular oxygen by nitrogen oxides could alter stratospheric ozone concentrations. A mechanism for reducing the atmosphere's ability to screen solar ultraviolet radiation and the means for disturbing natural patterns of heating and cooling in the upper atmosphere were provided. The surface release of fluorocarbons was linked to the mid-stratospheric destruction of ozone by the catalytic reaction couplet. Photolytic decomposition of the fluorocarbon molecular augments the natural concentration of the Cl and ClO radicals, thereby accelerating the odd oxygen (ozone plus atomic oxygen) conversion to O2. The photochemical structure of the stratosphere is summarized by focussing on the free radicals which control the rate of transformation between classes of reactants within the atmosphere.

  8. Scientific Assessment of Stratospheric Ozone: 1989, volume 2. Appendix: AFEAS Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The results are presented of the Alternative Fluorocarbon Environmental Acceptability Study (AFEAS), which was organized to evaluate the potential effects on the environment of alternate compounds targeted to replace fully halogenated chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). All relevant current scientific information to determine the environmental acceptability of the alternative fluorocarbons. Special emphasis was placed on: the potential of the compounds to affect stratospheric ozone; their potential to affect tropospheric ozone; their potential to contribute to model calculated global warming; the atmospheric degradation mechanisms of the compounds, in order to identify their products; and the potential environmental effects of the decomposition products. The alternative compounds to be studied were hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) with one or two carbon atoms and one or more each of fluorine and hydrogen.

  9. Investigation of test methods, material properties and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1977-01-01

    The potentially useful encapsulating materials for Task 3 of the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array project were studied to identify, evaluate, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules. Materials for study were chosen on the basis of existing knowledge of generic chemical types having high resistance to environmental weathering. The materials varied from rubbers to thermoplastics and presented a broad range of mechanical properties and processing requirements. Basic physical and optical properties were measured on the polymers and were redetermined after exposure to indoor artificial accelerated aging conditions covering four time periods. Strengths and weaknesses of the various materials were revealed and data was accumulated for the development of predictive methodologies. To date, silicone rubbers, fluorocarbons, and acrylic polymers appear to have the most promising combination of characteristics. The fluorocarbons may be used only as films, however, because of their high cost.

  10. Novel CO{sub 2}-thickeners for improved mobility control

    SciTech Connect

    Enick, Dr. Robert M.; Beckman, Dr. Eric J.; Hamilton, Dr. Andrew

    2000-02-02

    The objective of this study was to design, synthesize, and characterize thickening agents for dense carbon dioxide and to evaluate their solubility and viscosity-enhancing potential in CO{sub 2}. Previously, hydrocarbon-fluorocarbon random copolymers, sulfated hydrocarbon-fluorocarbon random copolymers, semifluorinated trialkyltin fluorides and small hydrogen-bonding compounds were evaluated. Random copolymers of styrene and heptadecafluorodecyl acrylate yielded substantial increases in viscosity. The amount of styrene varied between 22--40 mole% in the copolymer. Falling cylinder viscometry results indicated that the 29% styrene--71% fluoroacrylate copolymer induced (at 295K and 34.5 Mpa) increases of 10, 60 and 250 at copolymer concentrations of 1, 3 and 5wt%, respectively.

  11. Fluorspar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, M.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. consumed about 525 kt of fluorspar in 1995, with more than 70 percent being used for the production of hydrofluoric acid. Fluorspar is also used for the production of aluminum and steel. About 558 kt of fluorspar was imported in 1995, with a further 186 kt made available from the National Defense Stockpile. The market in the U.S. is expected to grow as increasing use is made of fluorocarbons to replace chlorofluorocarbons.

  12. Greenhouse effect of chlorofluorocarbons and other trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James; Lacis, Andrew; Prather, Michael

    1989-01-01

    A comparison is made of the radiative (greenhouse) forcing of the climate system due to changes of atmospheric chlorofluorocarbons and other trace gases. It is found that CFCs, defined to include chlorofluorocarbons, chlorocarbons, and fluorocarbons, now provide about one-quater of current annual increases in anthropogenic greenhouse climate forcing. If the growth rates of CFC production in the early 1970s had continued to the present, current annual growth of climate forcing due to CFCs would exceed that due to CO2.

  13. The synthesis of poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) derived from 1,1-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1-phenyl-2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluorobutane

    SciTech Connect

    Peterman, J.A.; Feld, W.A.

    1995-12-31

    Poly(ether ether ketone)s (PEEK) are of interest due to their high thermal stability. Most PEEK materials are prepared by aromatic nucleophilic substitution between an activated aromatic dihalide and an alkali-metal bisphenolate in polar, aprotic solvents. We now report the preparation of a PEEK containing an extended fluorocarbon chain in the bisphenol, analogous to that produced by McGrath, et. al which contained a trifluoromethyl group in the bisphenol, and examine the effect on thermal properties.

  14. General Chemistry Division. Quarterly report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-15

    Progress is reported on analytical R and D for the nuclear explosives programs (coupling of gas chromatograph, mass spectrometer, and infrared spectrometer; analysis of fluorocarbon FC-86; far-infrared laser development; transient behavior of n-type TiO/sub 2/ semiconductor photoelectrodes; and impurities on Kevlar 49 fibers) and for the energy programs (on-line mass spectroscopy of oil shale and testing of additives for controlling the scaling of hypersaline geothermal brine). (DLC)

  15. Contraband Detection with Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence: Feasibility and Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Pruet, J; Lange, D

    2007-01-03

    In this report they show that cargo interrogation systems developed to thwart trafficking of illicit nuclear materials could also be powerful tools in the larger fight against contraband smuggling. In particular, in addition to detecting special nuclear materials, cargo scanning systems that exploit nuclear resonance fluorescence to detect specific isotopes can be used to help find: chemical weapons; some drugs as well as some chemicals regulated under the controlled substances act; precious metals; materials regulated under export control laws; and commonly trafficked fluorocarbons.

  16. Industrial and Commercial Heat Pump Applications in the United States 

    E-print Network

    Niess, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    readily available fluorocarbon refrigerants as the heat pump working fluid, this cycle is commonly used because of its wide application opportunities. Compressed Vapors Heat Pump Compressor Heat Sink PrOCess (Condenser) Vapors Figure 3. Waste... process heating. The waste heat can corne from the condensers of refrigeration systems on air-conditioning systems for bUildings or plants, low-level process heat from annealing and heat-treating furnaces, quench tanks, electric seam welders, air...

  17. Uptake of trifluoroacetate by Pinus ponderosa via atmospheric pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benesch, J. A.; Gustin, M. S.

    Trifluoroacetate (TFA, CF 3COO -), a break down product of hydro(chloro)-fluorocarbons (HFC/HCFCs), has been suggested to contribute to forest decline syndrome. To investigate the possible effects, Pinus ponderosa was exposed to TFA applied as mist (150 and 10,000 ng l -1) to foliar surfaces. Needles accumulated TFA as a function of concentration and time. However, no adverse physiological responses, as plant morphology, photosynthetic and conductance rates, were observed at the TFA concentrations used in this study.

  18. New textile composite materials development, production, application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikhailov, Petr Y.

    1993-01-01

    New textile composite materials development, production, and application are discussed. Topics covered include: super-high-strength, super-high-modulus fibers, filaments, and materials manufactured on their basis; heat-resistant and nonflammable fibers, filaments, and textile fabrics; fibers and textile fabrics based on fluorocarbon poylmers; antifriction textile fabrics based on polyfen filaments; development of new types of textile combines and composite materials; and carbon filament-based fabrics.

  19. Development of a special purpose spacecraft interior coating, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillman, H. D.; Nannelli, P.

    1979-01-01

    A variety of intumescent coatings based on a fluorocarbon latex resin modified with either an acrylic resin or an epoxy resin were prepared. Several intumescent systems were used for these studies including some based on ammonium polyphosphate and others based on sulfanilamide. The best coatings developed had a high concentration (60-70% by wt.) of intumescent additives and had to be applied thick, approximately 100 mils, in order to have adequate intumescent/fire protection properties.

  20. International research into chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Marseille, T.J.; Shankle, D.L.; Thurman, A.G.

    1992-05-01

    Selected researchers from 21 countries were queried through questionnaires about their current and planned research activities. The results of the survey show that the majority of research being conducted by the respondents is devoted to investigating the hydrogenated fluorocarbon HFC-134a as a replacement for CFC-12 in refrigeration applications. The main issue with this alternative is identifying compatible lubricants that do not reduce its effectiveness.

  1. Fluorination of silicone rubber by plasma polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, Jennifer Chase

    Plasma polymerized fluorocarbon (PPFC) films were deposited onto various silicone rubber substrates, including O-rings, to decrease oil uptake. Depositions were performed using a radio frequency (rf)-powered plasma reactor and various fluorocarbon monomers, such as C2F6, C2F 5H, C3F6, and 1H,1H,2H-perfluoro-1-dodecene. PPFC films which were most promising for inhibiting oil uptake were deposited with 1H,1H,2H-perfluoro-1-dodecene, and were composed predominantly of perfluoromethylene (CF2) species. These films displayed low critical surface energies (as low as 2.7 mJ/m2), and high contact angles with oil (84°), which were correlated with the amount of CF2 species present in the film. For the films with the highest degree of CF2 (up to 67%), CF2 chains may have been oriented slightly perpendicular to the substrate and terminated by CF3 species. Adhesion of the PPFC films directly to silicone rubber was found to be poor. However, when a plasma polymerized hydrocarbon interlayer was deposited on the silicone rubber prior to the fluorocarbon films, adhesion was excellent. O-rings coated with multilayer fluorocarbon films showed 2.6% oil uptake after soaking in oil for 100 hrs at 100°C. Due to variability in data, and the low quality of the industrial grade silicone rubber, the oil uptake mechanism was determined to be from oil flowing through flaws in the film due to defects within the substrate, not from generalized diffusion through the film. This mechanism was confirmed using higher quality silicone rubber, which showed little or no oil diffusion. Therefore, this film may perform well as an oil-repelling barrier when deposited on a high quality silicone rubber.

  2. Antisoiling Coatings for Solar-Energy Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.; Willis, P.

    1986-01-01

    Fluorocarbons resist formation of adherent deposits. Promising coating materials reduce soiling of solar photovoltaic modules and possibly solar thermal collectors. Contaminating layers of various degrees of adherence form on surfaces of devices, partially blocking incident solar energy, reducing output power. Loose soil deposits during dry periods but washed off by rain. New coatings help prevent formation of more-adherent, chemically and physically bonded layers rain alone cannot wash away.

  3. Novel fluorohydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherer, Kirby V. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Novel fluorohydrocarbons include a fluoroalkyl unit terminating in a tertiary carbon atom which is directly linked to an aliphatic moiety of the compound. The compounds contain at least 9 carbon atoms and usually no more than 13 carbon atoms. The compounds are synthesized by addition of a fluoride atom to the tertiary carbon atom of a fluorocarbon material to form a carbanion followed by alkylation of the carbanion. The fluorohydrocarbons will find use as blood substitutes or as electronic fluids.

  4. Fuel cell ion-exchange membrane investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, M. S.

    1972-01-01

    The present deficiencies in the fluorocarbon sulfonic acid membrane used as the solid polymer electrolyte in the H2/O2 fuel cell are studied. Considered are: Adhesives selection, elastomeric formulations, scavenger exploration, and membrane characterization. The significant data are interpreted and recommendations are given for both short and long range further investigations in two of the four major areas: membrane adhesives and membrane stabilization.

  5. Energetics and structures of fluoro- and chlorofluorocarbons in zeolites: Force field development and Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mellot, C.F.; Cheetham, A.K.

    1999-05-13

    Canonical Monte Carlo simulations on the adsorption of a series of fluoro-, chlorofluoro-, and hydrofluorocarbons (CF{sub 4}, CF{sub 3}Cl, CF{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, CFCl{sub 3}, CHF{sub 3}) in siliceous Y and NaY zeolites have been performed and are compared with available calorimetric data on the same host-guest systems. A new force field for fluorocarbon-type molecules in zeolites has been developed, and the (N,V,T) simulations predict adsorption heats with good accuracy. Further insights into the key features of host-guest interactions are gleaned from the relative contributions of the short-range and electrostatic interactions to the total adsorption heats and the analysis of host-guest pair functions. In siliceous Y, host-guest interactions are driven primarily by F{hor_ellipsis}O{sub zeolite} and Cl{hor_ellipsis}O{sub zeolite} van der Waals interactions, and H{hor_ellipsis}O{sub zeolite} hydrogen bonding in the case of hydrogen-containing fluorocarbons. When the fluorocarbon is adsorbed in a cation-containing zeolite, such as NaY, additional F{hor_ellipsis}Na{sub zeolite} electrostatic interactions with Na cations of the supercage are clearly revealed and control the orientation of the sorbate molecules within the supercages. In addition, (N,V,T) simulations have enabled us to compare the behavior of CHF{sub 3} with that of CHCl{sub 3}. The heats of adsorption at zero loading are very similar, but the relative contributions of the short-range and long-range interactions are inverted between the two systems, with the electrostatic term dominating in the case of the fluorocarbon.

  6. Sensitivity of an atmospheric photochemistry model to chlorine perturbations including consideration of uncertainty propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, R. S.; Douglass, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    Models of stratospheric photochemistry are generally tested by comparing their predictions for the composition of the present atmosphere with measurements of species concentrations. These models are then used to make predictions of the atmospheric sensitivity to perturbations. Here the problem of the sensitivity of such a model to chlorine perturbations ranging from the present influx of chlorine-containing compounds to several times that influx is addressed. The effects of uncertainties in input parameters, including reaction rate coefficients, cross sections, solar fluxes, and boundary conditions, are evaluated using a Monte Carlo method in which the values of the input parameters are randomly selected. The results are probability distributions for present atmosheric concentrations and for calculated perturbations due to chlorine from fluorocarbons. For more than 300 Monte Carlo runs the calculated ozone perturbation for continued emission of fluorocarbons at today's rates had a mean value of -6.2 percent, with a 1-sigma width of 5.5 percent. Using the same runs but only allowing the cases in which the calculated present atmosphere values of NO, NO2, and ClO at 25 km altitude fell within the range of measurements yielded a mean ozone depletion of -3 percent, with a 1-sigma deviation of 2.2 percent. The model showed a nonlinear behavior as a function of added fluorocarbons. The mean of the Monte Carlo runs was less nonlinear than the model run using mean value of the input parameters.

  7. Detection of Chamber Conditioning Through Optical Emission and Impedance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    During oxide etch processes, buildup of fluorocarbon residues on reactor sidewalls can cause run-to-run drift and will necessitate some time for conditioning and seasoning of the reactor. Though diagnostics can be applied to study and understand these phenomena, many of them are not practical for use in an industrial reactor. For instance, measurements of ion fluxes and energy by mass spectrometry show that the buildup of insulating fluorocarbon films on the reactor surface will cause a shift in both ion energy and current in an argon plasma. However, such a device cannot be easily integrated into a processing system. The shift in ion energy and flux will be accompanied by an increase in the capacitance of the plasma sheath. The shift in sheath capacitance can be easily measured by a common commercially available impedance probe placed on the inductive coil. A buildup of film on the chamber wall is expected to affect the production of fluorocarbon radicals, and thus the presence of such species in the optical emission spectrum of the plasma can be monitored as well. These two techniques are employed on a GEC (Gaseous Electronics Conference) Reference Cell to assess the validity of optical emission and impedance monitoring as a metric of chamber conditioning. These techniques are applied to experimental runs with CHF3 and CHF3/O2/Ar plasmas, with intermediate monitoring of pure argon plasmas as a reference case for chamber conditions.

  8. The 1980 stratospheric-tropospheric exchange experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margozzi, A. P. (editor)

    1983-01-01

    Data are presented from the Stratospheric-Tropospheric Water Vapor Exchange Experiment. Measurements were made during 11 flights of the NASA U-2 aircraft which provided data from horizontal traverser and samplings in and about the tops of extensive cirrus-anvil clouds produced by overshooting cumulus turrets. Aircraft measurements were made of water vapor, ozone, ambient and cloud top temperature, fluorocarbons, nitrous oxide, nitric acid, aerosols, and ice crystal populations. Balloonsondes were flown about twice daily providing data on ozone, wind fields, pressure and temperature to altitudes near 30 km. Satellite photography provided detailed cloud and cloud top temperature information. Descriptions of individual experiments and detailed compilations of all results are provided.

  9. Factors affecting the sticking of insects on modified aircraft wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, O.; Chan, R.; Eiss, N. S.; Pingali, U.; Wightman, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    The adhesion of insects to aircraft wings is studied. Insects were collected in road tests in past studies and a large experimental error was introduced caused by the variability of insect flux. The presence of such errors has been detected by studying the insect distribution across an aluminum-strip covered half-cylinder mounted on the top of a car. After a nonuniform insect distribution (insect flux) was found from three road tests, a new arrangement of samples was developed. The feasibility of coating aircraft wing surfaces with polymers to reduce the number of insects sticking onto the surfaces was studied using fluorocarbon elastomers, styrene butadiene rubbers, and Teflon.

  10. Selective protection of poly(tetra-fluoroethylene) from effects of chemical etching

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Robert J. (Albuquerque, NM); Rye, Robert R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A photolithographic method for treating an article formed of polymeric material comprises subjecting portions of a surface of the polymeric article to ionizing radiation; and then subjecting the surface to chemical etching. The ionizing radiation treatment according to the present invention minimizes the effect of the subseuent chemical etching treatment. Thus, selective protection from the effects of chemical etching can be easily provided. The present invention has particular applicability to articles formed of fluorocarbons, such as PTFE. The ionizing radiation employed in the method may comprise Mg(k.alpha.) X-rays or lower-energy electrons.

  11. Looming ban on production of CFCs, halons spurs switch to substitutes

    SciTech Connect

    Zurer, P.S. )

    1993-11-15

    The tight time frame is set by the international treaty called the Montreal Protocol on Substances That Deplete the Ozone Layer. The latest revisions to the treaty dictate an end to industrialized countries' production of CFCs, carbon tetrachloride, and methyl chloroform by Jan. 1, 1996. Halons -- brominated fluorocarbons used for fighting fires -- face a production ban Jan. 1, 1994, just seven weeks from now. This paper reviews the status of the substitution products already available and the work being done to improve these substitute products even more, since some carry ozone-depleting chlorine into the atmosphere, even though they are not as damaging as the CFCs they replace.

  12. Infrared multiphoton dissociation of two perfluorobutenes

    E-print Network

    Longfellow, Cheryl A.; Berrie, Cindy L.; Suits, Arthur G.; Lee, Yuan T.

    1997-08-04

    Measurements were taken at detector to source angles of 15°, 20°, 30°, 40°, and 50°. Dissociation signal was observed at a large number of m/e ratios. The fragmentation of fluo- rocarbon species in the electron impact ionizer was signifi- cant. In a typical.... This assignment be- comes more difficult if each m/e ratio contains contributions from the dissociative ionization of numerous products. In addition, there are fluorocarbons that fragment so extensively in the electron impact ionization that no parent survives. CF...

  13. Characterization of elastomeric materials with application to design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, Mark V.

    1986-01-01

    Redesign of the Space Shuttle Solid Booster has necessitated re-evaluation of the material used in the field joint O-ring seals. The viscoelastic characteristics of five candidate materials were determined. The five materials are: two fluorocarbon compounds, two nitrile compounds, and a silicon compound. The materials were tested in a uniaxial compression test to determine the characteristic relaxation functions. These tests were performed at five different temperatures. A master material curve was developed for each material from the experimental data. The results are compared to tensile relaxation tests. Application of these results to the design analysis is discussed in detail.

  14. Low-cost encapsulation materials for terrestrial solar cell modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.; Baum, B.; Willis, P.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents the findings of material surveys intended to identify low cost materials which could be functional as encapsulants (by 1986) for terrestrial solar cell modules. Economic analyses have indicated that in order to meet the low cost goal of $2.70 per sq m, some or all of the following material technologies must be developed or advanced: (1) UV screening outer covers; (2) elastomeric acrylics; (3) weatherproofing and waterproofing of structural wood and paper products; (4) transparent UV stabilizers for the UV-sensitive transparent pottants; and (5) cost-effective utilization of silicone and fluorocarbon materials.

  15. Implementation of Ultrasonic Sensing for High Resolution Measurement of Binary Gas Mixture Fractions

    E-print Network

    Bates, Richard; Berry, Stephane; Bitadze, Alexander; Bonneau, Pierre; Bousson, Nicolas; Boyd, George; Bozza, Gennaro; Crespo-Lopez, Olivier; Da Riva, Enrico; Degeorge, Cyril; Deterre, Cecile; DiGirolamo, Beniamino; Doubek, Martin; Favre, Gilles; Godlewski, Jan; Hallewell, Gregory; Hasib, Ahmed; Katunin, Sergey; Langevin, Nicolas; Lombard, Didier; Mathieu, Michel; McMahon, Stephen; Nagai, Koichi; Pearson, Benjamin; Robinson, David; Rossi, Cecilia; Rozanov, Alexandre; Strauss, Michael; Vitek, Michal; Vacek, Vaclav; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    We describe an ultrasonic instrument for continuous real-time analysis of the fractional mixture of a binary gas system. The instrument is particularly well suited to measurement of leaks of a high molecular weight gas into a system that is nominally composed of a single gas. Sensitivity ultrasonic leak detection systems are also described. Although development of the described systems was motivated by the requirements of an evaporative fluorocarbon cooling system, the instrument is applicable to the detection of leaks of many other gases and to proce...

  16. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Encapsulation task of the low-cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    During this quarter, flat-plate solar collector systems were considered and six basic construction elements were identified: outer coatings, superstrates, pottants, substrates, undercoats, and adhesives. Materials surveys were then initiated to discover either generic classes or/and specific products to function as each construction element. Cost data included in the surveys permit ready evaluation of each material. Silicones, fluorocarbons, glass, and acrylic polymers have the highest inherent weatherability of materials studied to date. Only acrylics, however, combine low costs, environmental resistance, and potential processability. This class will receive particular emphasis.

  17. Nano-particulate coating on cotton fabric through DBD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ying; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Jinzhou; Zhou, Rongming; Yu, Jianyong

    2008-02-01

    Plasma polymerization of fluorocarbon was processed through dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). A thin hydrophobic film packed with nano-particulate structure was obtained on cotton fabric surface. The contact angle of the water and 1-bromonaphthalene on coated cotton fabric was 133° and 124° separately. The surface morphology of the coating was observed through SEM (Scanning Electronic Microscope). It was found that cotton fabric surface was tightly adhered to a thin film packed by nano-particles from 10nm to 200nm. This process showed potential applications in continuous coating of textiles with functional nano-particulate polymers, but without changing their softness performance.

  18. A new concept for very low energy detonators and torches

    SciTech Connect

    Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Grubelich, M.C.; Romero, J.A.; Staley, D.J.; Buss, R.J.; Ward, P.P.; Erickson, K.L.

    1996-03-01

    We deposited secondary explosive and multilayer thermite films directly onto semiconductor bridges (SCBs) and other substrates. Methods for the deposition of two thermite films (aluminum/copper oxide and magnesium/fluorocarbon polymer) were developed as part of this study and a new capability was obtained for depositing adherent films on any material, including Teflon and Gore-Tex. Our experimental program determined conditions for the SCB ignition of the deposited films, and with the aluminum/copper oxide film, we observed a lower threshold for ignition of a powder pressed against the bridge. We also looked at other ignition methods including lasers, spark discharges, primers and hot combustion gases.

  19. Methods for study of cardiovascular adaptation of small laboratory animals during exposure to altered gravity. [hypothermia for cardiovascular control and cancer therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, V.

    1973-01-01

    Several new techniques are reported for studying cardiovascular circulation in small laboratory animals kept in metabolic chambers. Chronical cannulation, miniaturized membrane type heart-lung machines, a prototype walking chamber, and a fluorocarbon immersion method to simulate weightlessness are outlined. Differential hypothermia work on rat cancers provides localized embedding of radionuclides and other chemotherapeutical agents in tumors and increases at the same time blood circulation through the warmed tumor as compared to the rest of the cold body. Some successful clinical applications of combined chemotherapy and differential hypothermia in skin cancer, mammary tumors, and brain gliomas are described.

  20. Development of a high-tensile-strain plastic-bonded TATB explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Pruneda, C.; McGuire, R.; Clements, R.

    1990-04-05

    Typical plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) with greater than 90 weight-percent explosive filler in a fluorocarbon binder have tensile strains which range from 0.2 to 0.6{percent}. We have recently developed a TATB-based PBX with a tensile strain approaching 1{percent} while maintaining a high-volume loading of the crystalline explosive component. We discuss our formulation efforts to design a TATB/poly(styrene-(ethylene-butylene)-styrene)(Kraton){sup 1} PBX and the critical processing parameters which affect the ultimate mechanical properties of this PBX. 9 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. A New Energy-Efficient and Environmentally Friendly Process to Produce Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, T. R.

    2013-02-01

    The Hall-Heroult process to produce aluminum is more than 125 years old. Larger, more efficient cells have been developed, and process control has improved, but the process is basically unchanged. A new process has been under development since 1990 that promises 20% lower capital cost and 20% lower operating cost and no CO2 or fluorocarbon emissions. A new cell design, new anode and cathode materials, new electrolyte, and new operating conditions are based on experience over the past six decades. The evolution of this technology to its present state is described here.

  2. Evaluations of candidate encapsulation designs and materials for low-cost silicon photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaines, G. B.; Carmichael, D. C.; Sliemers, F. A.; Brockway, M. C.; Bunk, A. R.; Nance, G. P.

    1978-01-01

    Three encapsulation designs for silicon photovoltaic arrays based on cells with silk-screened Ag metallization have been evaluated: transparent polymeric coatings over cells laminated between two films or sheets of polymeric materials; cells adhesively bonded to a glass cover with a polymer pottant and a glass or other substrate component. Silicone and acrylic coatings were assessed, together with acrylic sheet, 0.635 mm fiberglass-reinforced polyester sheet, 0.102 mm polycarbonate/acrylic dual-layer film, 0.127 mm fluorocarbon film, soda-lime glass, borosilicate glass, low-iron glass, and several adhesives. The encapsulation materials were characterized by light transmittance measurements, determination of moisture barrier properties and bond strengths, and by the performance of cells before and after encapsulation. Silicon and acrylic coatings provided inadequate protection. Acrylic and fluorocarbon films displayed good weatherability and acceptable optical transmittance. Borosilicate, low-iron and soda-lime-float glasses were found to be acceptable candidate encapsulants for most environments.

  3. Synthesis of perfluoroalkylated xylitol ethers and esters: new surfactants for biomedical uses.

    PubMed

    Zarif, L; Greiner, J; Pace, S; Riess, J G

    1990-04-01

    New, well-defined surfactants and cosurfactants were synthesized with the objective of enhancing the stability of fluorocarbon emulsions destined to serve as oxygen carriers for biomedical applications. Monoperfluoroalkylated ethers of xylitol were achieved by addition of perfluoroalkyl iodide on the double bond of a protected xylitol allyl ether in a one-step addition-elimination reaction. Monoesters were obtained specifically on position 5 by treating 1,2:3,4-di-O-isopropylidenexylitol with perfluoroalkylated acid chlorides of various chain lengths in pyridine at room temperature. The products display strong surface activity and produce a remarkable synergistic stabilization of a fluorocarbon/Pluronic F-68 type emulsion. Biocompatibility data are reported, which include in vitro toxicity tests on Namalva cell cultures and hemolysis tests on human blood cells; the latter was found to decrease as the length of the F-alkyl chain increased. IV injection in mice (n = 10) showed that these products were innocuous at 400-1000 mg/kg of body weight. Preliminary exchange-perfusion experiments on rats with an emulsion containing the F-octyl xylitol ether were encouraging. PMID:2319569

  4. Characterization method of hydrophobic anti-icing coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Katsuaki; Sakaue, Hirotaka

    2015-11-01

    For anti-icing, supercooled water should be removed before frozen onto the contact surface. We use a hydrophobic coating for anti-icing and introduce the static- and dynamic-evaluation methods. The methods describe the contact surface between the hydrophobic surface and a supercooled-water droplet. The former is based on the contact angle, and the latter is based on the sliding angle. The temperature factor is included in these models to evaluate the hydrophobic coating under the supercooled conditions. Four hydrophobic coatings are experimentally evaluated based on the static- and dynamic evaluation methods: C1-C3 (commercial fluorocarbon coatings), and Jaxa coating (original fluorocarbon coating). These are evaluated under the supercooled conditions of -10 to 0 °C. The static-evaluation shows variations in the temperature. However, change in the contact angle by the temperature is relatively small compared to that of the sliding angle for the dynamic evaluation. Only C3 and Jaxa coatings are tolerant to the sliding angle under the supercooled conditions tested. The dynamic evaluation shows that even if the coating is hydrophobic, the dynamic evaluation should be included to understand the characteristic of removal for a supercooled-water droplet.

  5. Antisoiling technology: Theories of surface soiling and performance of antisoiling surface coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.; Willis, P. B.

    1984-01-01

    Physical examination of surfaces undergoing natural outdoor soiling suggests that soil matter accumulates in up to three distinct layers. The first layer involves strong chemical attachment or strong chemisorption of soil matter on the primary surface. The second layer is physical, consisting of a highly organized arrangement of soil creating a gradation in surface energy from a high associated with the energetic first layer to the lowest possible state on the outer surfce of the second layer. The lowest possible energy state is dictated by the physical nature of the regional atmospheric soiling materials. These first two layers are resistant to removal by rain. The third layer constitutes a settling of loose soil matter, accumulating in dry periods and being removed during rainy periods. Theories and evidence suggest that surfaces that should be naturally resistant to the formation of the first two-resistant layers should be hard, smooth, hydrophobic, free of first-period elements, and have the lowest possible surface energy. These characteristics, evolving as requirements for low-soiling surfaces, suggest that surfaces or surface coatings should be of fluorocarbon chemistry. Evidence for the three-soil-layer concept, and data on the positive performance of candidate fluorocarbon coatings on glass and transparent plastic films after 28 months of outdoor exposure, are presented.

  6. Characterization method of hydrophobic anti-icing coatings.

    PubMed

    Morita, Katsuaki; Sakaue, Hirotaka

    2015-11-01

    For anti-icing, supercooled water should be removed before frozen onto the contact surface. We use a hydrophobic coating for anti-icing and introduce the static- and dynamic-evaluation methods. The methods describe the contact surface between the hydrophobic surface and a supercooled-water droplet. The former is based on the contact angle, and the latter is based on the sliding angle. The temperature factor is included in these models to evaluate the hydrophobic coating under the supercooled conditions. Four hydrophobic coatings are experimentally evaluated based on the static- and dynamic evaluation methods: C1-C3 (commercial fluorocarbon coatings), and Jaxa coating (original fluorocarbon coating). These are evaluated under the supercooled conditions of -10 to 0?°C. The static-evaluation shows variations in the temperature. However, change in the contact angle by the temperature is relatively small compared to that of the sliding angle for the dynamic evaluation. Only C3 and Jaxa coatings are tolerant to the sliding angle under the supercooled conditions tested. The dynamic evaluation shows that even if the coating is hydrophobic, the dynamic evaluation should be included to understand the characteristic of removal for a supercooled-water droplet. PMID:26628173

  7. Designing novel hybrid materials by one-pot co-condensation: from hydrophobic mesoporous silica nanoparticles to superamphiphobic cotton textiles.

    PubMed

    Pereira, C; Alves, C; Monteiro, A; Magén, C; Pereira, A M; Ibarra, A; Ibarra, M R; Tavares, P B; Araújo, J P; Blanco, G; Pintado, J M; Carvalho, A P; Pires, J; Pereira, M F R; Freire, C

    2011-07-01

    This work reports the synthesis and characterization of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) functionalized with tridecafluorooctyltriethoxysilane (F13) and their in situ incorporation onto cotton textiles. The hybrid MSNs and the functional textiles were prepared by a one-pot co-condensation methodology between tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) and F13, with hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) as the template and triethanolamine as the base. The influence of the F13 to TEOS molar ratio (1:10, 1:5 and 1:3) on the nanoparticle morphology, porosity, degree of functionalization, and hydro/oleophobic properties is discussed. The hybrid nanosilicas presented high colloidal stability and were spherical and monodispersed with average particle size of ?45 nm. They also showed high surface areas, large pore volumes, and a wormhole-type mesoporous structure. The increase in the organosilane proportion during the co-condensation process led to a more radially branched wormhole-like mesoporosity, a decrease in the surface area, pore volume, and amount of surface silanol groups, and an enrichment of the surface with fluorocarbon moieties. These changes imparted hydrophobic and oleophobic properties to the materials, especially to that containing the highest F13 loading. Cotton textiles were coated with the F13-MSNs through an efficient and less time-consuming route. The combination between surface roughness and mesoporosity imparted by the MSNs, and the low surface energy provided by the organosilane resulted in superhydrophobic functional textiles. Moreover, the textile with the highest loading of fluorocarbon groups was superamphiphobic. PMID:21615151

  8. On the etching characteristics and mechanisms of HfO2 thin films in CF4/O2/Ar and CHF3/O2/Ar plasma for nano-devices.

    PubMed

    Lim, Nomin; Efremov, Alexander; Yeom, Geun Young; Kwon, Kwang-Ho

    2014-12-01

    The study of etching characteristics and mechanisms for HfO2 and Si in CF4/O2/Ar and CHF3/O2/Ar inductively-coupled plasmas was carried out. The etching rates of HfO2 thin films as well as the HfO2/Si etching selectivities were measured as functions of Ar content in a feed gas (0-50% Ar) at fixed fluorocarbon gas content (50%), gas pressure (6 mTorr), input power (700 W), bias power (200 W), and total gas flow rate (40 sccm). Plasma parameters as well as the differences in plasma chemistries for CF4- and CHF3-based plasmas were analyzed using Langmuir probe diagnostics and 0-dimensional plasma modeling. It was found that, in both gas systems, the non-monotonic (with a maximum at about 15-20% Ar) HfO2 etching rate does not correlate with monotonic changes of F atom flux and ion energy flux. It was proposed that, under the given set of experimental conditions, the HfO2 etching process is affected by the factors determining the formation and decomposition kinetics of the fluorocarbon polymer layer. These factor are the fluxes of CF(x) (x = 1, 2) radicals, O atoms and H atoms. PMID:25971118

  9. Radio-frequency gas discharge (RFGD) fluorination of polymers: Protein and cell interactions at RFGD-fluorinated interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiaei, David; Hoffman, Allan S.; Horbett, Thomas A.

    1995-08-01

    Proteins naturally adsorb at foreign surfaces. Adsorbed proteins on biomaterial surfaces are important to the biocompatibility of medical implants and devices, as well as to uses in biosensors, diagnostics, separations and industrial bioprocesses. There is ample evidence that the composition, organization, and conformations of the proteins adsorbed at a foreign interface are sensitive to the composition, topography, and molecular mobility of the substrate surface. The protein layer can also change in all the above aspects with time. Thus, it is a dynamic, "living" coating whose character is a direct reflection of the character of the substrate surface. Therefore, it is not surprising that many researchers have modified biomaterial surface compositions in order to influence protein absorption and subsequent conformational changes. The gas discharge process is one of the more useful methods for modification of biomaterial surfaces. Surfaces may be ablated (or etched) in a process which removes material and creates a cleaner, but chemically-modified surface. Gas discharge may also be used to deposit a polymer-like coating of a new composition on the surface, such as silicone and fluorocarbon coatings on hydrocarbon polymer surfaces. Certain of these fluorocarbon discharge-deposited polymers have been shown to enhance retention of adsorbed proteins, presumably by increased hydrophobic interactions with the modified substrate. Furthermore, platelet adhesion on such surfaces may be increasingly reduced as the adsorbed protein is increasingly bound to the fluorinated surface. These unusual results and their biologic implications are discussed in this paper.

  10. Structure-Based Design of Dendritic Peptide Bolaamphiphiles for siRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Development of safe and effective delivery vectors is a critical challenge for the application of RNA interference (RNAi)-based biotechnologies. In this study we show the rational design of a series of novel dendritic peptide bolaamphiphile vectors that demonstrate high efficiency for the delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) while exhibiting low cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity. Systematic investigation into structure–property relationships revealed an important correlation between molecular design, self-assembled nanostructure, and biological activity. The unique bolaamphiphile architecture proved a key factor for improved complex stability and transfection efficiency. The optimal vector contains a fluorocarbon core and exhibited enhanced delivery efficiency to a variety of cell lines and improved serum resistance when compared to hydrocarbon analogues and lipofectamine RNAiMAX. In addition to introducing a promising new vector system for siRNA delivery, the structure–property relationships and “fluorocarbon effect” revealed herein offer critical insight for further development of novel materials for nucleic acid delivery and other biomaterial applications. PMID:26436138

  11. Possible atmospheric lifetimes and chemical reaction mechanisms for selected HCFCs, HFCs, CH3CCl3, and their degradation products against dissolution and/or degradation in seawater and cloudwater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wine, P. H.; Chameides, W. L.

    1990-01-01

    For a wide variety of atmospheric species including CO2, HNO3, and SO2, dissolution in seawater or cloudwater followed by hydrolysis or chemical reaction represents a primary pathway for removal from the atmosphere. In order to determine if this mechanism can also remove significant amounts of atmospheric chlorofluorocarbons (HCFC's), fluorocarbons (HFC's), and their degradation products, an investigation was undertaken as part of the Alternative Fluorocarbons Environmental Acceptability Study (AFEAS). In this investigation, the rates at which CHCl2CF3 (HCFC-123), CCl2FCH3 (HCFC-141b), CClF2CH3 (HCFC-142b), CHClF2 (HCFC-22), CHClFCF3 (HCFC-124) CH2FCF3 (HFC-134a) CHF2CH3 (HFC-152a), CHF2CF3 (HFC-125), and CH3CCl3 can be dissolved in the oceans and in cloudwater were estimated from the species' thermodynamic and chemical properties using simple mathematical formulations to simulate the transfer of gases from the atmosphere to the ocean or cloudwater. The ability of cloudwater and rainwater to remove gas phase degradation products of these compounds was also considered as was the aqueous phase chemistry of the degradation products. The results of this investigation are described.

  12. Self-organizing conjugated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xiaoyong Michael

    2000-10-01

    A general and efficient synthetic route to semifluoroalkyl substituted thiophenes has been developed and a series of 3-semifluoroalkylthiophenes were synthesized. The lengths of the fluorocarbon chain and hydrocarbon spacer between thiophene and fluorocarbon were systematically altered to study their effect on the properties of the resulting polymers. Oxidative polymerization (FeCl3) and electrochemical polymerization of 3-semifluoroalkylthiophenes afforded regiorandom (head-to-tail coupling ˜70%) homopolymers. The solubility and thermal transition temperatures of the polymers are also dependent on the nature of side chains. The surface properties of the polymers are also a function of the length of fluoroalkyl side chains. From x-ray diffraction, the regiorandom polymers have low crystallinity. Two synthetic methods have been successfully utilized to prepare regioregular poly(3-semifluoroalkylthiophene)s (head-to-tail coupling >90%) and gave identical polymers. The regioregular polymers are highly conjugated and highly ordered. The long side chain substituted polythiophenes form a liquid crystal mesophase between the crystal solid and isotropic liquid phases. To prepare polymers bearing alternating 3-semifluoroalkylthiophene and alkylthiophene units, we developed synthetic methods to 3-semifluoroalkyl-4 '-alkyl-2,2'-bithiophenes. The 3-semifluoroalkyl-4 '-alkyl-2,2'-bithiophenes were polymerized to afford regiorandom and regioregular polymers. Regiorandom polymers have low crystallinity and conjugation. Regioregular, strictly alternating copolymer with 3-semifluoroalkylthiophene and alkylthiophene units are highly conjugated and ordered. The regioregular polymers self-assemble into bilayer structure in solid state due to phase separation between fluorocarbon and hydrocarbon. At high temperatures close to melting transition, the thiophene rings rotate and twist along the molecular axis to give a single layer structure. Methylene bridges were placed between the thiophene and benzene rings of substituted 1,4-bis(2-thienyl)benzene polymers to increase conjugation. Compared to the unbridged polymer, poly(2,5-dioctyl-1,4-bis(2-thienyl)benzene), the methylene bridged polymer has higher conjugation, lower oxidation potential, higher electrical conductivity. The bridged polymer is semicrystalline with a lamellar structure, clearly show melting and crystallization on heating and cooling processes, while the unbridged polymer is amorphous. Thus, introduction of methylene bridge affords a more conjugated polymer with a more rigid, planar backbone which promotes crystallization.

  13. Control of atomic layer degradation on Si substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Y.; Tatsumi, T.; Kobayashi, S.; Kugimiya, K.; Harano, T.; Ando, A.; Kawase, T.; Hamaguchi, S.; Iseda, S.

    2007-07-15

    To develop 32 nm node devices, the degradation of atomic layers on the surface of Si substrates must be controlled. During the etching of a SiO{sub 2} or Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} hard mask or sidewall, the surface of Si is attended due to exposure to fluorocarbon plasma. The authors have quantitatively evaluated the relationship between the energy of incident ions and the thickness of the fluorocarbon polymer for a CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}/CF{sub 4}/Ar/O{sub 2} plasma in a dual frequency CCP system. At a fixed ion energy the thickness of the damage layer (T{sub d}) basically depended on the thickness of the fluorocarbon polymer (T{sub C-F}). When the T{sub C-F} was changed by controlling the O/CF{sub x} gas ratio, T{sub d} had a minimum thickness under the conditions at balance point: P{sub b}, under which the T{sub C-F} was nearly equal to ion penetration depth: D{sub p}. Using molecular dynamics simulation, reaction around the transition from SiO{sub 2} to Si was clarified. The damage was done to the Si before the SiO{sub 2} was completely removed, and the largest T{sub d} was observed when the SiO{sub 2} was etched off. After that, T{sub C-F} began to increase because there was no longer an outflux of O from SiO{sub 2} and the damage decreased as the unstable SiF{sub x} species in the damaged layer desorbed. Once the T{sub C-F} became thicker than the ion penetration depth, the damaged layer got buried and T{sub d} stopped changing. When the ion penetration depth was controlled to be equal to T{sub C-F} in a steady state under low ion energy conditions, the T{sub d} was reduced to less than 1 nm.

  14. Surface Dipoles: A Growing Body of Evidence Supports Their Impact and Importance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han Ju; Jamison, Andrew C; Lee, T Randall

    2015-12-15

    Surface dipoles arise from differences in the distribution of electron density of interfacial molecular structures as expressed by charge separation. The direction and magnitude of the associated dipole moments directly impact a variety of interfacial phenomena. For example, the wettability of thin film-coated solid surfaces toward polar contacting liquids can be systematically adjusted by reorienting the direction of an array of interfacial dipoles, while the vector sum total of all of the dipole moments associated with such thin films can be used to tune the work function of a metal. One method of producing such dipole arrays is by coating a surface with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM), which is a thin organic film of amphiphilic adsorbates that spontaneously assemble on a surface. The interfacial properties of SAMs can be menu-selected by choice of adsorbate structure using ?-terminated thiols on gold surfaces as a convenient system for studying and utilizing these properties. In this Account, we describe the impact of an array of oriented surface dipoles upon the interfacial energy of the thin film bearing such an array. Our analysis of these films divides the subject of surface dipole arrays into three types: (1) those directing a well-defined electronegative pole toward the interface, (2) those incorporating an invertable polar group, and (3) those directing a well-defined electropositive pole toward the interface. With regard to the first category, we analyze the impact of permanent dipoles on the wettability of alkanethiolate SAMs generated from adsorbates possessing well-defined transitions between terminal fluorocarbon and underlying hydrocarbon chain segments. The second category covers recent reports of light-responsive SAMs formed from azobenzene-based adsorbates. Finally, the third category explores a unique example of a dipole array that exposes the positive ends of the interfacial dipoles formed from CH3-terminated fluorocarbon tailgroups. Our analysis of the SAMs formed from these carefully crafted adsorbates encompassing several series of fluorocarbon-containing thiols provides support for a conclusion that oriented surface dipoles exert a significant influence on interfacial energetics and wettability. In contrast to the limited distance from the interface that a surface dipole array will have upon contacting liquids, the work function of a thin film reflects the influence of all the polar groups within the film. Therefore, we also explore the change in the substrate work function for n-alkanethiol-modified gold surfaces as a function of molecular length and for other adsorbates as a function of their chemical composition. PMID:26579883

  15. Synthesis of new high performance lubricants and solid lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Lagow, Richard J.

    1993-04-08

    In our second year of funding we began the testing phase of a number of new classes of lubricants. Three different testing collaborations have already begun and a fourth one is In the works with Dr. Stephen Hsu of the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Dr. Hsu also plans to test some of the same materials for us that Shell Development is studying. With Dr. Bill Jones of NASA, we are studying the effects of branching an high temperature lubricant properties in perfluoropolyethers, Initially Bill Jones is comparing the lubrication and physical properties of perfluorotetraglyme and the following two spherical perfluoropolyethers, Note that one contains a fluorocarbon chain and the other one contains a fluorocarbon ether chain. The synthesis of these was reported in the last progress report. With Professor Patricia Thiel of Iowa State University, we are working on studies of perfluoromethylene oxide ethers and have prepared a series of four of these polyethers to study in collaboration with her research group. These perfluoromethylene oxide ethers have the best low temperature properties of any known lubricants. Thiel's group is studying their interactions with metals under extreme conditions. Thirdly, we have also begun an Interaction with W. August Birke of Shell Development Company in Houston for whom we have already prepared samples of the chlorine-substituted fluorocarbon polyether lubricants whose structures appear on page 54 of our research proposal. Each of these four structures is thought to have potential as lubricant additives to motor oils. We also have underway syntheses of other fluorine-containing branched ether lubricants. These new materials which are also promising as antifriction additives for motor oils appear ahead of the perfluoro additives as Appendix I to the progress report. Additionally for Birke and Shell Development we have at their request prepared the novel compound perfluoro salicylic acid. This synthesis was suggested by the Shell staff who thought that esters of perfluoro salicylic acid might be an excellent antifriction additive for motor oil fuels. One of the best additives currently used in motor oils is the hydrocarbon ester of salicylic acid.

  16. Network flow model analysis of the impact of chlorofluorocarbon phaseout on acid-grade fluorspar. Information circular/1994

    SciTech Connect

    Slatnick, J.A.; Fulton, R.B.

    1994-12-31

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFC`s) are being phased out and eventually banned under extensive international agreements because the chlorine in CFC`s is thought to deplete the Earth`s ozone layer. As a result, the fluorspar mining industry, which is the source of fluorine in fluorocarbons through intermediate hydrofluoric acid, is being affected. Concern for this impact has led the U.S. Bureau of Mines to employ its capabilities to analyze various scenarios in the evolution of CFC replacements and substitutes to determine their effect on fluorspar mining. This report utilizes a network flow model to examine the effects of proposed replacements for CFC`s, in terms of fluorine content, on fluorspar operations worldwide and on hydrofluoric acid plants in North America and Europe.

  17. New chemical alternative for ozone-depleting substances: HFC-245ca. Final report, August 1987-June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, N.D.; Gage, C.L.; Baskin, E.; Hendriks, R.V.

    1996-12-01

    The report gives results of a preliminary evaluation of a new hydrofluoro-carbon (HF)--HFC-245ca or 1,1,2,2,3-pentafluoropropane as a possible alternative for chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-11 (trichlorofluoromethane) and hydrochloro-fluorocarbon (HCFC)-123 (1,1,1-trifluoro- 2,2-dichloroethane) refrigerant for low-pressure chillers and as a possible alternative for CFC-111 and HCFC-14lb (1-fluoro-1,1-dichloroethane) blowing agents for polyisocyanurate/polyurethane insulation forms. Evaluation tests included an examination of its flammability, stability, thermophysical properties, lubricant miscibility and lubricity, materials compatibility, acute inhalation toxicity, and refrigeration performance.An azeotrope composed of HFC-245ca and HFC-338mccq (1,1,1,2,3,4,4,4-octafluorobutane) was also examined from the standpointof reducing the flammability of HFC-245ca.

  18. Metallic and nonmetallic coatings for ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, C.D.; Crane, J.K.; Hsieh, E.J.; Meyer, S.F.

    1981-04-17

    Some fusion targets designed to be driven by 0.35 to 1 ..mu..m laser light are glass spheres coated with layers of various materials such as hydrocarbons, fluorocarbons, beryllium, copper, gold, platinum, etc. The glass shell, which is filled with gas, liquid or solid deuterium-tritium fuel, must have remarkably good surface and wall thickness uniformity. Methods for depositing the various materials will be discussed. They include plasma polymerization, electro-deposition, sputtering and evaporation. Many of the difficulties encountered in the coating processes are the result of coating on free spheres with very small radii - 35 to 500 micrometers. Several means of overcoming the problems will be described and experimental results presented.

  19. Total reflection X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy as a semiconductor lubricant elemental analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshehabi, Abbas; Sasaki, Nobuharu; Kawai, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Photoelectron spectra from a typical hard disk storage media device (HDD) were measured at total reflection and non-total reflection at unburnished, acetone-cleaned, and argon-sputtered conditions. F, O, N, and C usually making the upper layer of a typical hard disk medium were detected. Enhancement of the photoelectron emission of the fluorocarbon lubricant was observed at total reflection. Pt and Co were only found by non-total X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) because they are constituents of a deeper region than the top and interface regions. Argon-sputtered, ultrasonic acetone-cleaned, and unburnished top layers were compared at total and non-total reflection conditions. Total reflection X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (TRXPS) is demonstrated to be a powerful tool for storage media lubrication layer chemical state analysis, reliable for industrial quality control application , and reproducible.

  20. Evaluation of containment and control options for methyl bromide in commodity treatment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    DeWolf, G.B.; Harrison, M.R.

    1994-07-01

    Methyl bromide (MeBr), with the chemical formula CH3Br, also called bromomethane, is listed by the 1991 Montreal Protocol as an ozone depleting chemical similar to the other halogenated hydrocarbons such as the chloro-fluorocarbons (CFCs). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) regulations authorized by the Clean Air Act (CAA) call for a phaseout of MeBr by the year 2001. MeBr is widely used in United States agriculture as a fumigant. This study has gathered preliminary data that can be used to determine if some of the essential agricultural commodity fumigation applications for MeBr could be continued by the use of some emission control methods on those commodity fumigation applications.

  1. Role of CFC's, substitutes, and other halogenated chemicals in climate change

    SciTech Connect

    den Elzen, M.G.J.; Rotmans, J.; Swart, R.J.

    1990-07-01

    Because of their ozone depleting potential the most important chlorofluorocarbons and halons have been subjected to international control by the Montreal Protocol. Generally these substances play also a significant role in the greenhouse effect. For the implementation of the Montreal agreement measures have to be taken, including conservation, recycling and the application of alternative products. Presently a complete phase out of the regulated CFCs is being negotiated. The feasibility of such a phase out is suggested to be dependent on the development of alternative halocarbons, notably the partly halogenated chlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) and fluorocarbons (HFCs). Also other existing ozone depleting substances have been brought into the discussion: carbon tetrachloride and methylchloroform. The report evaluates the consequences of different policies with respect to these nonregulated products for climate change.

  2. The importance of the Montreal Protocol in protecting climate.

    PubMed

    Velders, Guus J M; Andersen, Stephen O; Daniel, John S; Fahey, David W; McFarland, Mack

    2007-03-20

    The 1987 Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer is a landmark agreement that has successfully reduced the global production, consumption, and emissions of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs). ODSs are also greenhouse gases that contribute to the radiative forcing of climate change. Using historical ODSs emissions and scenarios of potential emissions, we show that the ODS contribution to radiative forcing most likely would have been much larger if the ODS link to stratospheric ozone depletion had not been recognized in 1974 and followed by a series of regulations. The climate protection already achieved by the Montreal Protocol alone is far larger than the reduction target of the first commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol. Additional climate benefits that are significant compared with the Kyoto Protocol reduction target could be achieved by actions under the Montreal Protocol, by managing the emissions of substitute fluorocarbon gases and/or implementing alternative gases with lower global warming potentials. PMID:17360370

  3. Effects of space radiation on thin polymers and nonmetallics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogdall, L. B.; Cannaday, S. S.; Slemp, W. S.

    1977-01-01

    Advanced materials for various spacecraft systems in the 1980s and 1990s have been evaluated in situ after exposure to space radiation. Emphasis has been placed on materials having little or no previous base of environmental effects data. Applications ranging from earth orbit to near-sun have been covered. High temperature polymers and composites have been included. Silica composites may offer improved reflectance stability compared with metallized fluorocarbons. Directional reflectance properties of FEP are a function of charged particle energy and flux as well as total exposure fluence and material characteristics. Data obtained on polyimides and polyxylylenes under high temperature radiation exposure conditions will be discussed in the context of near-sun solar sailing and rendezvousing.

  4. Development of a high-efficiency, gas-fired, heat-pipe, warm-air heating system. Final report, January 1983-December 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, S.; Becker, F.

    1985-01-01

    With the introduction by Borg-Warner of the Heatpipe Furnace, one of the major goals of this program was achieved. This milestone was reached after a 105,000 Btu/hr, 85% efficient manufacturing prototype heat-pipe furnace was designed, fabricated, and tested by Thermo Electron. Other prototype units of different capacities were also designed. The prototypes underwent extensive field testing and in-house accelerated life-cycle testing, indicating that they were reliable, safe, and cost-competitive. Specific issues like freeze protection and oil contamination were addressed. Two different prototype ultrahigh-efficiency condensing furnaces were designed, fabricated, and tested. One approach utilized a fluorocarbon-filled heat pipe as a secondary-stage heat exchanger; the other used a plate finned-tube coil as the heat exchanger.

  5. Development and evaluation of elastomeric materials for geothermal applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, W. A.; Kalfayan, S. H.; Reilly, W. W.; Ingham, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    A material for a casing packer for service for 24 hours in a geothermal environment was developed by synthesis of new elastomers and formulation of available materials. Formulation included use of commercial elastomer gumstocks and also crosslinking of plastic (high Tg) materials. Fibrous reinforcement of fluorocarbon rubbers was emphasized. Organic fiber reinforcement did not increase hot properties significantly. Glass fiber reinforcement gave significant increase in tensile properties. Elongation was reduced, and the glass-reinforced composition examined so far did not hold up well in the geothermal environment. Colloidal asbestos fibers were also investigated. A few experiments with polyphenyl ether gave material with low tensile and high compression set. Available high styrene SBR compositions were studied. Work to date suggests that new synthetic polymers will be required for service in geothermal environments.

  6. Cathodic electrocatalyst layer for electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Christopher P. (Inventor); Tennakoon, Charles L. K. (Inventor); Singh, Waheguru Pal (Inventor); Anderson, Kelvin C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cathodic gas diffusion electrode for the electrochemical production of aqueous hydrogen peroxide solutions. The cathodic gas diffusion electrode comprises an electrically conductive gas diffusion substrate and a cathodic electrocatalyst layer supported on the gas diffusion substrate. A novel cathodic electrocatalyst layer comprises a cathodic electrocatalyst, a substantially water-insoluble quaternary ammonium compound, a fluorocarbon polymer hydrophobic agent and binder, and a perfluoronated sulphonic acid polymer. An electrochemical cell using the novel cathodic electrocatalyst layer has been shown to produce an aqueous solution having between 8 and 14 weight percent hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, such electrochemical cells have shown stable production of hydrogen peroxide solutions over 1000 hours of operation including numerous system shutdowns.

  7. Electrical conduction control of carbon nanowalls

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Wakana; Ura, Masato; Hori, Masaru; Hiramatsu, Mineo; Tokuda, Yutaka; Kano, Hiroyuki

    2008-05-26

    The electrical conduction behavior of carbon nanowalls (CNWs) has been evaluated by Hall measurement. CNWs, which comprise stacks of graphene sheets standing on the substrate, are fabricated by fluorocarbon/hydrogen plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. We have investigated the effect of N{sub 2} addition to C{sub 2}F{sub 6}/H{sub 2} system on the electrical properties of CNWs. The CNWs grown with the C{sub 2}F{sub 6}/H{sub 2} plasma exhibit p-type conduction. As a result of the nitrogen inclusion in the CNWs, the conduction type of the CNWs changes to n type. The carrier concentration is controllable by changing the flow rate of the additional N{sub 2} during the CNW growth process.

  8. Investigation on surface structure of potassium permanganate/nitric acid treated poly(tetrafluoroethylene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Congli; Liu, Shuling; Gong, Tianlong; Gu, Aiqun; Yu, Zili

    2014-10-01

    In the previous articles concerning the treatment of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) with potassium permanganate/nitric acid mixture, the conversion of a hydrophobic to a hydrophilic surface was partially assigned to the defluorination of PTFE and then the introduction of carbonyl and hydroxyl groups into the defluorinated sites. In the present work, PTFE sheets were treated with potassium permanganate/nitric acid, and the surfaces before and after treatment were comparatively characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The surface sediments of the treated PTFE were also determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The results indicate that the conversion of the hydrophobicity to the hydrophilicity on the modified PTFE surface is mainly due to the deposition of hydrophilic manganese oxides which covered the fluorocarbon surface, and no detectable chemical reactions of PTFE occur in the treating process.

  9. Wide Angle, Single Screen, Gridded Square-Loop Frequency Selective Surface for Diplexing Two Closely Separated Frequency Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The design and performance of a wide angle, single screen, frequency selective surface (FSS) with gridded square-loop path elements are described for diplexing closely separated signal bands, for example, X- and Ku-band signals in an Orbiting Very Long Baseline Interferometer (OVLBI) earth station reflector antenna system, as well as other applications such as military and commercial communications via satellites. Excellent agreement is obtained between the predicted and measured results of this FSS design using the gridded square-loop patch elements sandwiched between 0.0889 cm thick tetrafluoroethylene fluorocarbon polymer (PTFE) slabs. Resonant frequency drift is reduced by 1 GHz with an incidence angle from 0 deg normal to 40 deg from normal.

  10. The use of atmospheric measurements to constrain model predictions of ozone change from chlorine perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, Anne R.; Stolarski, Richard S.

    1987-01-01

    Atmospheric photochemistry models have been used to predict the sensitivity of the ozone layer to various perturbations. These same models also predict concentrations of chemical species in the present day atmosphere which can be compared to observations. Model results for both present day values and sensitivity to perturbation depend upon input data for reaction rates, photodissociation rates, and boundary conditions. A method of combining the results of a Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis with the existing set of present atmospheric species measurements is developed. The method is used to examine the range of values for the sensitivity of ozone to chlorine perturbations that is possible within the currently accepted ranges for input data. It is found that model runs which predict ozone column losses much greater than 10 percent as a result of present fluorocarbon fluxes produce concentrations and column amounts in the present atmosphere which are inconsistent with the measurements for ClO, HCl, NO, NO2, and HNO3.

  11. Development of inspection techniques for quantitatively measuring surface contamination on SRM hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, R. D.

    1989-01-01

    A contaminant is any material or substance which is potentially undesirable or which may adversely affect any part, component, or assembly. Contamination control of SRM hardware surfaces is a serious concern, for both Thiokol and NASA, with particular concern for contaminants which may adversely affect bonding surfaces. The purpose of this study is to develop laboratory analytical techniques which will make it possible to certify the cleanliness of any designated surface, with special focus on particulates (dust, dirt, lint, etc.), oils (hydrocarbons, silicones, plasticizers, etc.), and greases (HD-2, fluorocarbon grease, etc.). The hardware surfaces of concern will include D6AC steel, aluminum alloys, anodized aluminum alloys, glass/phenolic, carbon/phenolic, NBR/asbestos-silica, and EPDM rubber.

  12. The 1977 intertropical convergence zone experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppoff, I. G. (editor); Page, W. A. (editor); Margozzi, A. P. (editor)

    1979-01-01

    Data are presented from the 1977 Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) Experiment conducted in the Panama Canal Zone in July 1977. Measurements were made daily over a 16-day period when the ITCZ moved across the Canal Zone. Two aircraft (Learjet and U-2) flew daily and provided data from horizontal traverses at several altitudes to 21.3 km of ozone, temperature, pressure, water vapor, aerosols, fluorocarbons, methane, nitrous oxide, nitric oxide, and nitric acid. Balloonsondes flown four times per day provided data on ozone, wind fields, pressure, temperature, and humidities to altitudes near 30 km. Rocketsondes provided daily data to altitudes near 69 km. Satellite photography provided detailed cloud information. Descriptions of individual experiments and detailed compilations of all results are provided.

  13. Ultrasmooth plasma polymerized coatings for laser-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Letts, S.A.; Myers, D.W.; Witt, L.A.

    1980-08-26

    Coatings for laser fusion targets were deposited up to 135 ..mu..m thick by plasma polymerization onto 140 ..mu..m diameter DT filled glass microspheres. Ultrasmooth surfaces (no defect higher than 0.1 ..mu..m) were achieved by eliminating particulate contamination. Process generated particles were eliminated by determining the optimum operating conditions of power, gas flow, and pressure, and maintaining these conditions through feedback control. From a study of coating defects grown over known surface irregularities, a quantitative relationship between irregularity size, film thickness, and defect size was determined. This relationship was used to set standards for the maximum microshell surface irregularity tolerable in the production of hydrocarbon or fluorocarbon coated laser fusion targets.

  14. Restoring Susceptibility Induced MRI Signal Loss in Rat Brain at 9.4 T: A Step towards Whole Brain Functional Connectivity Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rupeng; Liu, Xiping; Sidabras, Jason W.; Paulson, Eric S.; Jesmanowicz, Andrzej; Nencka, Andrew S.; Hudetz, Anthony G.; Hyde, James S.

    2015-01-01

    The aural cavity magnetic susceptibility artifact leads to significant echo planar imaging (EPI) signal dropout in rat deep brain that limits acquisition of functional connectivity fcMRI data. In this study, we provide a method that recovers much of the EPI signal in deep brain. Needle puncture introduction of a liquid-phase fluorocarbon into the middle ear allows acquisition of rat fcMRI data without signal dropout. We demonstrate that with seeds chosen from previously unavailable areas, including the amygdala and the insular cortex, we are able to acquire large scale networks, including the limbic system. This tool allows EPI-based neuroscience and pharmaceutical research in rat brain using fcMRI that was previously not feasible. PMID:25844644

  15. Chlorofluoromethanes in the stratosphere and some possible consequences for ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Whitten, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Inert chlorofluoromethanes are used by man as refrigerants and aerosol propellants. These substances eventually escape and diffuse upward into the stratosphere. At great enough heights, UV sunlight can photodissociate these chlorofluorocarbons into chlorine atoms which will catalytically destroy ozone molecules. Chlorofluoromethane production has been increasing steadily in recent years to its present level of about a megaton per year, and chlorofluorocarbon usage will probably continue to grow in the future. Calculations with a one-dimensional time-dependent atmospheric model suggests that, if projected increases in chlorofluoromethane use materialize and there is no tropospheric destruction mechanism for these gases, the total global abundance of ozone may be reduced by more than 20 per cent over the next 50 years. If the residence times for these fluorocarbons in the troposphere are in the range of 10-30 years, however, predicted ozone depletions would be significantly smaller.

  16. Apparatus and method for atmospheric pressure reactive atom plasma processing for shaping of damage free surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Carr; Jeffrey W. (Livermore, CA)

    2009-03-31

    Fabrication apparatus and methods are disclosed for shaping and finishing difficult materials with no subsurface damage. The apparatus and methods use an atmospheric pressure mixed gas plasma discharge as a sub-aperture polisher of, for example, fused silica and single crystal silicon, silicon carbide and other materials. In one example, workpiece material is removed at the atomic level through reaction with fluorine atoms. In this example, these reactive species are produced by a noble gas plasma from trace constituent fluorocarbons or other fluorine containing gases added to the host argon matrix. The products of the reaction are gas phase compounds that flow from the surface of the workpiece, exposing fresh material to the etchant without condensation and redeposition on the newly created surface. The discharge provides a stable and predictable distribution of reactive species permitting the generation of a predetermined surface by translating the plasma across the workpiece along a calculated path.

  17. Adenovirus of ring-necked pheasants: purification and partial characterization of marble spleen disease virus.

    PubMed Central

    Iltis, J P; Daniels, S B

    1977-01-01

    A method for purification of marble spleen disease virus (MSDV) from the spleens of infected turkeys and pheasants is described. It combines chloroform or fluorocarbon extraction with subsequent purification by centrifugation on a cushion of cesium chloride (CsCl). Further purification of MSDV was accomplished with a CsCl equilibrium density gradient. A viral buoyant density of approximately 1.32 to 1.33 g/cm3 was determined. Negative-stain electron microscopy revealed that virus isopycnically banded by CsCl gradient had non-enveloped icosahedral capsids composed of 252 capsomeres. The direct colorimetric diphenylamine assay indicated that MSDV has deoxyribonucleic acid as its nucleic acid. The above evidence demonstrates that MSDV is an avian adenovirus, the first recognized in the ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus L.). Images PMID:193796

  18. Laboratory Studies of Chemical and Photochemical Processes Relevant to Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahniser, Mark S.; Nelson, David D.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kolb, Charles E.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to reduce the uncertainty in several key gas-phase kinetic processes which impact our understanding of stratospheric ozone. The main emphasis of this work is on measuring rate coefficients and product channels for reactions of HOx and NOx species in the temperature range 200 K to 240 K relevant to the lower stratosphere. Other areas of study have included infrared spectroscopic studies of the HO radical, measurements of OH radical reactions with alternative fluorocarbons, and determination of the vapor pressures of nitric acid hydrates under stratospheric conditions. The results of these studies will improve models of stratospheric ozone chemistry and predictions of perturbations due to human influences.

  19. An e.s.c.a. study of atomic oxygen interactions with phosphazene-coated polyimide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fewell, Larry L.; Finney, Lorie

    1991-01-01

    Metallic as well as most nonmetallic materials experience oxidation and mass loss via surface erosion in low earth orbit as shown in previous Space Shuttle flights. This study is an evaluation of select polyphosphazene polymers and their resistance to atomic oxygen attack. Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis examinations of the surfaces of polyphosphazene coatings were monitored for microstructural changes induced during exposures to atomic oxygen. Sample exposures in oxygen plasmas and O(3P) beam were compared as to their effect on surface compositional changes in the polyphosphazene coating. High resolution line scans revealed rearrangements in the polymer backbone and scissioning reactions involving fluorocarbon units of long chain fluoroalkoxy pendant groups. Atom percents and peak areas of all species provided a detailed profile of the microstructural changes induced in phosphazene polymers as a result of exposures to atomic oxygen.

  20. Acute inhalation toxicity evaluation of a 93:7 mixture of perfluoro-2-butene and 1-bromopropane, a replacement candidate for ozone depleting substances. Interim report, July--August 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Feldmann, M.L.; Leahy, H.F.; Vinegar, A.

    1997-10-01

    The DoD requires the development of toxicity profiles for chemical substitute candidates proposed to replace ozone depleting substances such as chloro- and fluorocarbons and halons. A 93:7 mixture of perfluoro-2-butene and 1-bromopropane was identified as a possible replacement candidate for ozone-depleting fire extinguishants. An acute inhalation toxicity test utilizing male and female Fischer 344 rats was performed on this test material. No deaths occurred in any of the rats exposed to 5.3 mg/L of the 93:7 perfluoro-2-butene and 1-bromopropane mixture. Body weights of male and female rats during the subsequent 14-day observation period were unaffected by treatment. The test material did not produce acute toxicity via the inhalation route.

  1. Aggregation behavior and total miscibility of fluorinated ionic liquids in water.

    PubMed

    Pereiro, Ana B; Araújo, João M M; Teixeira, Fabiana S; Marrucho, Isabel M; Piñeiro, Manuel M; Rebelo, Luis Paulo N

    2015-02-01

    In this work, novel and nontoxic fluorinated ionic liquids (FILs) that are totally miscible in water and could be used in biological applications, where fluorocarbon compounds present a handicap because their aqueous solubility (water and biological fluids) is in most cases too low, have been investigated. The self-aggregation behavior of perfluorosulfonate-functionalized ionic liquids in aqueous solutions has been characterized using conductometric titration, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), surface tension measurements, dynamic light scattering (DLS), viscosity and density measurements, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Aggregation and interfacial parameters have been computed by conductimetry, calorimetry, and surface tension measurements in order to study various thermodynamic and surface properties that demonstrate that the aggregation process is entropy-driven and that the aggregation process is less spontaneous than the adsorption process. The novel perfluorosulfonate-functionalized ILs studied in this work show improved surface activity and aggregation behavior, forming distinct self-assembled structures. PMID:25580898

  2. Burst behavior at a capillary tip: Effect of low and high surface tension.

    PubMed

    Agonafer, Damena D; Lopez, Ken; Palko, James W; Won, Yoonjin; Santiago, Juan G; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2015-10-01

    Liquid retention in micron and millimeter scale devices is important for maintaining stable interfaces in various processes including bimolecular separation, phase change heat transfer, and water desalination. There have been several studies of re-entrant geometries, and very few studies on retaining low surface tension liquids such as fluorocarbon-based dielectric liquids. Here, we study retention of a liquid with very low contact angles using borosilicate glass capillary tips. We analyzed capillary tips with outer diameters ranging from 250 to 840 ?m and measured Laplace pressures up to 2.9 kPa. Experimental results agree well with a numerical model that predicts burst pressure (the maximum Laplace pressure for liquid retention), which is a function of the outer diameter (D) and capillary exit edge radius of curvature (r). PMID:26046980

  3. Development of a high-efficiency, gas-fired, heat pipe, warm-air heating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, S.; Becker, F.

    1985-01-01

    With the introduction by Borg-Warner of the Heatpipe Furnace, one of the major goals of this program was achieved. This milestone was reached after a 105,000 Btu/hr, 85 percent efficient manufacturing prototype heat pipe furnace was designed, fabricated, and tested by Thermo Electron. Other prototype units of different capacities were also designed. The prototypes underwent extensive field testing and in-house accelerated life-cycle testing, indicating that they were reliable, safe, and cost-competitive. Specific issues like freeze protection and oil contamination were addressed. Two different prototype ultrahigh-efficiency condensing furnaces were designed, fabricated and tested. One approach utilized a fluorocarbon-filled heat pipe as a secondary-stage heat exchanger; the other used a plate finned tube coil as the heat exchanger.

  4. Economical Analysis about Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Toshitaka

    NH3-H2O absorption refrigeration plant is attractive from each standpoint of electric power saving, non-fluorocarbon and energy saving. The plant can be the economic alternative of power compression refrigeration for evaporation temperature range from 0°C to -60°C, using suitable waste heat (co-generation system, waste incinerator), oil and natural gas. In the application of the plant, the equipment cost and the COP must be reasonable from economical standpoint. Therefore, the paper shows the following. 1) Necessary heating temparature analysis for absorption plant 2) Equipment cost analysis for heating temperature 3) Equipment cost analysis for COP 4) Number of trays in the rectifying column for COP 5) Equipment cost analysis and COP in two-stage absorption

  5. Pulsed Plasma Thruster Plume Study: Symmetry and Impact on Spacecraft Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, Lynn A.; Marrese, Colleen M.; Blandino, John J.

    2000-01-01

    Twenty-four witness plates were positioned on perpendicular arrays near a breadboard Pulsed Plasma Thruster (PPT) to collect plume constituents for analysis. Over one million shots were fired during the experiment at 43 J using fluorocarbon polymer propellant. The asymmetry of the film deposition on the witness plates was investigated with mass and thickness measurements and correlated with off-axis thrust vector measurements. The composition of the films was determined. The transmittance and reflectance of the films were measured and the absorption coefficients were calculated in the wavelength range from 350 to 1200 mn. These data were applied to calculate the loss in signal intensity through the films, which will impact the visibility of spaceborne interferometer systems positioned by these thrusters.

  6. Extraction studies. Final report, May 6, 1996--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-09

    During the first week of this effort, an Alpkem RFA-300 4-channel automated chemical analyzer was transferred to the basement of building 42 at TA-46 for the purpose of performing extraction studies. Initially, this instrumentation was applied to soil samples known to contain DNA. Using the SFA (Segmented Flow Analysis) technique, several fluidic systems were evaluated to perform on-line filtration of several varieties of soil obtained from Cheryl Kuske and Kaysie Banton (TA-43, Bldg. 1). Progress reports were issued monthly beginning May 15, 1996. Early in 1997 there was a shift from the conventional 2-phase system (aqueous + air) to a 3-phase system (oil + aqueous + air) to drastically reduce sample size and reagent consumption. Computer animation was recorded on videotape for presentations. The time remaining on the subcontract was devoted to setting up existing equipment to incorporate the 3rd phase (a special fluorocarbon oil obtained from DuPont).

  7. Nano-coatings on carbon structures for interfacial modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulikollu, Rajasekhar V.

    Surface modification of materials is a rapidly growing field as structures become smaller, more integrated and complex. It opens up the possibility of combining the optimum bulk properties of a material with optimized surface properties such as enhanced bonding, corrosion resistance, reactivity, stress transfer, and thermal, optical or electrical behavior. Therefore, surface functionalization or modification can be an enabling step in a wide variety of modern applications. In this dissertation several surface modification approaches on carbon foam and carbon nano-fibers will be discussed. These are recently developed sp2 graphitic carbon based structures that have significant potential in aerospace, automotive and thermal applications. Influence of surface modification on composite formation and properties have also been investigated. Two types of property changes have been investigated: one for enhancing the surface reactivity and another for surface inertness. Characterization techniques such as X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Contact Angle Measurement, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and mechanical testing are used in this study to find out the influence of these coatings on surface composition, chemistry and morphology. Mechanical testing has been performed on composites and stand alone foam to study the influence of surface modification on physical and mechanical properties of the composite materials. The effectiveness of these coatings on metallic/graphite interface has also been investigated for metal-matrix composite related applications. Additionally, the influence of plasma coatings on nucleation and growth of nanotubes on larger carbon structures (to produce multiscale, multifunctional materials) have also been studied. It is seen that the liquid phase activation treatment introduces oxygen functional groups on the surface, but may cause severe enough degradation that damages the ligaments and cell walls of carbon foam. This results in higher elastic modulus but lower strength. So, to get any benefit from such approaches the optimization window may be very narrow and marginal in controllability. An alternative solution would be to synthesize ultra thin film coatings without etching the surfaces. It is observed that plasma assisted coatings having thickness in the range of few nanometers (4-5nm) are completely covering the graphite substrates. The coating surface chemistry and morphology information is based upon XPS and AFM studies on pyrolytic graphite substrate. Two types of plasma surface modification techniques have been attempted: one is to make the surface more reactive for structural components and the other is to make the surface more inert for stand-alone structures. In order to achieve these goals plasma assisted oxide and fluorocarbon coatings are studied in detail. The synthesized oxide and fluorocarbon coating chemistries are comparable to conventional silica (SiO2) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, -CF2-). It is seen that the fluorocarbon coatings provide moisture resistance to graphitic foam by making the surface inert at the nanometer scale. On the other hand, plasma assisted oxide coating is a feasible and effective means of improving the wettability and dispersion of foam and nanofibers in organic polymer matrix material. Surface analysis as well as microstructural studies and mechanical tests have shown encouraging results. The interface reactions between graphite (coated and uncoated) and epoxy have also been studied in detail. Nano-scale plasma coatings have also been applied for metal matrix composites and semiconductor related applications. The fluorocarbon coating promote delamination/exfoliation of the metal on graphite, hence may be used for patterning or lithography. Oxide coatings seem to enhance the adhesion and metallic diffusion between graphite and metal, hence can be used for the development of metal matrix composites. Additionally, oxide coating seems to enhance the length and density of nanotub

  8. Development of a custom on-line ultrasonic vapour analyzer/flowmeter for the ATLAS inner detector, with application to gaseous tracking and Cherenkov detectors

    E-print Network

    R. Bates; M. Battistin; S. Berry; J. Berthoud; A. Bitadze; P. Bonneau; J. Botelho-Direito; N. Bousson; G. Boyd; G. Bozza; E. Da Riva; C. Degeorge; B. DiGirolamo; M. Doubek; J. Godlewski; G. Hallewell; S. Katunin; D. Lombard; M. Mathieu; S. McMahon; K. Nagai; E. Perez-Rodriguez; C. Rossi; A. Rozanov; V. Vacek; M. Vitek; L. Zwalinski

    2012-10-30

    Precision sound velocity measurements can simultaneously determine binary gas composition and flow. We have developed an analyzer with custom electronics, currently in use in the ATLAS inner detector, with numerous potential applications. The instrument has demonstrated ~0.3% mixture precision for C3F8/C2F6 mixtures and < 10-4 resolution for N2/C3F8 mixtures. Moderate and high flow versions of the instrument have demonstrated flow resolutions of +/- 2% F.S. for flows up to 250 l.min-1, and +/- 1.9% F.S. for linear flow velocities up to 15 ms-1; the latter flow approaching that expected in the vapour return of the thermosiphon fluorocarbon coolant recirculator being built for the ATLAS silicon tracker.

  9. Development of a custom on-line ultrasonic vapour analyzer/flowmeter for the ATLAS inner detector, with application to gaseous tracking and Cherenkov detectors

    E-print Network

    Bates, R; Berry, S; Berthoud, J; Bitadze, A; Bonneau, P; Botelho-Direito, J; Bousson, N; Boyd, G; Bozza, G; Da Riva, E; Degeorge, C; DiGirolamo, B; Doubek, M; Godlewski, J; Hallewell, G; Katunin, S; Lombard, D; Mathieu, M; McMahon, S; Nagai, K; Perez-Rodriguez, E; Rossi, C; Rozanov, A; Vacek, V; Vitek, M; Zwalinski, L

    2013-01-01

    Precision sound velocity measurements can simultaneously determine binary gas composition and flow. We have developed an analyzer with custom electronics, currently in use in the ATLAS inner detector, with numerous potential applications. The instrument has demonstrated ~0.3% mixture precision for C3F8/C2F6 mixtures and < 10-4 resolution for N2/C3F8 mixtures. Moderate and high flow versions of the instrument have demonstrated flow resolutions of +/- 2% F.S. for flows up to 250 l.min-1, and +/- 1.9% F.S. for linear flow velocities up to 15 ms-1; the latter flow approaching that expected in the vapour return of the thermosiphon fluorocarbon coolant recirculator being built for the ATLAS silicon tracker.

  10. Versatile Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A radome at Logan Airport and a large parabolic antenna at the Wang Building in Massachusetts are protected from weather, corrosion and ultraviolet radiation by a coating, specially designed for antennas and radomes, known as CRC Weathertite 6000. The CRC 6000 line that emerged from Boyd Coatings Research Co., Inc. is a solid dispersion of fluorocarbon polymer and polyurethane that yields a tough, durable film with superior ultraviolet resistance and the ability to repel water and ice over a long term. Additionally, it provides resistance to corrosion, abrasion, chemical attacks and impacts. Material can be used on a variety of substrates, such as fiberglass, wood, plastic and concrete in addition to steel and aluminum. In addition Boyd Coatings sees CRC 6000 applicability as an anti-icing system coated on the leading edge of aircraft wings.

  11. The PICASSO Dark Matter Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wichoski, Ubi; Collaboration: PICASSO Collaboration

    2011-12-16

    The PICASSO experiment searches for cold dark matter through the direct detection of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) via their spin-dependent interactions with fluorine at SNOLAB, Sudbury--ON, Canada since 2002. The detection principle is based on the superheated droplet technique; the detectors consist of a gel matrix with millions of liquid droplets of superheated fluorocarbon (C4F10) dispersed in it. Recently, a new setup has been built and installed in the Ladder Lab area at SNOLAB. In the present phase of the experiment the Collaboration is running 4.5-litre detector modules with approximately 85 g of active mass per module. Here, we give an overview of the experiment and discuss the progress in background mitigation, in particular background discrimination in the PICASSO detectors.

  12. Cell separations and the demixing of aqueous two phase polymer solutions in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Donald E.; Bamberger, Stephan; Harris, J. M.; Van Alstine, James M.

    1991-01-01

    Partition in phase separated aqueous polymer solutions is a cell separation procedure thought to be adversely influenced by gravity. In preparation for performing cell partitioning experiments in space, and to provide general information concerning the demixing of immiscible liquids in low gravity, a series of phase separated aqueous polymer solutions have been flown on two shuttle flights. Fluorocarbon oil and water emulsions were also flown on the second flight. The aqueous polymer emulsions, which in one g demix largely by sedimentation and convection due to the density differences between the phases, demixed more slowly than on the ground and the final disposition of the phases was determined by the wetting of the container wall by the phases. The demixing behavior and kinetics were influenced by the phase volume ratio, physical properties of the systems and chamber wall interaction. The average domain size increased linearly with time as the systems demixed.

  13. Plasma Reactor Modeling and Validation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, M.; Bose, D.; Hash, D.; Hwang, H.; Cruden, B.; Sharma, S. P.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Plasma processing is a key processing stop in integrated circuit manufacturing. Low pressure, high density plum reactors are widely used for etching and deposition. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source has become popular recently in many processing applications. In order to accelerate equipment and process design, an understanding of the physics and chemistry, particularly, plasma power coupling, plasma and processing uniformity and mechanism is important. This understanding is facilitated by comprehensive modeling and simulation as well as plasma diagnostics to provide the necessary data for model validation which are addressed in this presentation. We have developed a complete code for simulating an ICP reactor and the model consists of transport of electrons, ions, and neutrals, Poisson's equation, and Maxwell's equation along with gas flow and energy equations. Results will be presented for chlorine and fluorocarbon plasmas and compared with data from Langmuir probe, mass spectrometry and FTIR.

  14. Manufacture and quality control of interconnecting wire hardnesses, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A standard is presented for manufacture, installation, and quality control of eight types of interconnecting wire harnesses. The processes, process controls, and inspection and test requirements reflected are based on acknowledgment of harness design requirements, acknowledgment of harness installation requirements, identification of the various parts, materials, etc., utilized in harness manufacture, and formulation of a typical manufacturing flow diagram for identification of each manufacturing and quality control process, operation, inspection, and test. The document covers interconnecting wire harnesses defined in the design standard, including type 1, enclosed in fluorocarbon elastomer convolute, tubing; type 2, enclosed in TFE convolute tubing lines with fiberglass braid; type 3, enclosed in TFE convolute tubing; and type 5, combination of types 3 and 4. Knowledge gained through experience on the Saturn 5 program coupled with recent advances in techniques, materials, and processes was incorporated.

  15. Development of Compact C2F4 Gas Supply Equipment and Its Application to Etching of Dielectrics in an Environmental Benign Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Shunji; Den, Shoji; Katagiri, Toshirou; Yamakawa, Koji; Kano, Hiroyuki; Hori, Masaru

    2005-06-01

    Compact C2F4 gas supply equipment, which controls the gas supply with sufficient accuracy by irradiation of a carbon dioxide laser (CO2) onto a solid source (PTFE) without using any fluorocarbon gas, has been developed to combat global warming. Although C2F4 gas has a very low Global Warming Potential (GWP <1), it is very unstable and thus considerably difficult to handle. This gas is used in the semiconductor manufacture process, where it is obtained from a conventional high-pressure cylinder. By changing the output of the laser, the amount of C2F4 gas generated can be precisely controlled in this equipment while also ensuring safety. The gas is supplied to the VHF excited parallel plate plasma reactor through a gas shower head with Ar carrier gas and, in actual tests, this environmental benign technology achieved high etching performances for low-k SiOCH and SiO2 films.

  16. Spacecraft dielectric material properties and spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederickson, A. R.; Wall, J. A.; Cotts, D. B.; Bouquet, F. L.

    1986-01-01

    The physics of spacecraft charging is reviewed, and criteria for selecting and testing semiinsulating polymers (SIPs) to avoid charging are discussed and illustrated. Chapters are devoted to the required properties of dielectric materials, the charging process, discharge-pulse phenomena, design for minimum pulse size, design to prevent pulses, conduction in polymers, evaluation of SIPs that might prevent spacecraft charging, and the general response of dielectrics to space radiation. SIPs characterized include polyimides, fluorocarbons, thermoplastic polyesters, poly(alkanes), vinyl polymers and acrylates, polymers containing phthalocyanine, polyacene quinones, coordination polymers containing metal ions, conjugated-backbone polymers, and 'metallic' conducting polymers. Tables summarizing the results of SIP radiation tests (such as those performed for the NASA Galileo Project) are included.

  17. Study of toxicological evaluation of fire suppressants and extinguishers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The application of fluorocarbons as possible candidates for fire extinguishers and/or suppressants in confined spaces (such as spacecraft, aircraft, or submarines) was investigated, with special emphasis on their safety to man since they would be inhaled on an almost continuous basis. Short-term exposure experiments, using various animal species, were devised to look at specific parameters in order to determine which of the candidate compounds were sufficiently non-toxic to warrant long-term investigations. The following physiologic criteria were examined; tissue distribution, fluoride concentration, effect on mitochondria, microsomes, liposomes, and liver cell nuclei, erythrocyte fragility, clinical chemistry values, hematology, pathology, cardiac sensitization, behavioral effects. Various rodent species were used for initial investigations, with non-human primate exposures for Freon 116 which was warranted for negative results on rodents. Various types of exposure chambers were used, including closed dynamic chambers allowing for a recirculating atmosphere.

  18. Results of apparent atomic oxygen reactions with spacecraft materials during shuttle flight STS-41G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimcik, D. G.; Maag, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of atomic oxygen interaction experienced by polymeric-based spacecraft materials is described. An experimental package (ACOMEX) flown on shuttle mission STS-41G carried out the investigation of advanced composite specimens such as carbon-epoxy and Kevlar-epoxy both with and without protective coatings added to thermal protective paints and films. Information on the exposure environment of the specimens was provided by a carbon coated atomic oxygen fluence monitor together with a photographic record. Mass loss measurements and photomicrographs made possible the analysis of the effect of interaction. After a total of about 38 hours of equivalent normal exposure at 225 km altitude the results showed that unprotected exposed surfaces exhibited severe erosion and mass loss with the possibility of seriously degrading structural and thermal performance. However, the specimens with a thin fluorocarbon overcoat showed promise of providing a protective barrier to the attack without altering the base properties of the material.

  19. Neutron Radiography of Fluid Flow for Geothermal Energy Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, P.; Polsky, Y.; Anovitz, L.; Carmichael, J.; Bilheux, H.; Jacobsen, D.; Hussey, D.

    Enhanced geothermal systems seek to expand the potential for geothermal energy by engineering heat exchange systems within the earth. A neutron radiography imaging method has been developed for the study of fluid flow through rock under environmental conditions found in enhanced geothermal energy systems. For this method, a pressure vessel suitable for neutron radiography was designed and fabricated, modifications to imaging instrument setups were tested, multiple contrast agents were tested, and algorithms developed for tracking of flow. The method has shown success for tracking of single phase flow through a manufactured crack in a 3.81 cm (1.5 inch) diameter core within a pressure vessel capable of confinement up to 69 MPa (10,000 psi) using a particle tracking approach with bubbles of fluorocarbon-based fluid as the "particles" and imaging with 10 ms exposures.

  20. Alternative training agents, phase 1. Survey of near-term candidate fire extinguishing agents and predicting properties of halocarbon mixtures, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimitz, Jonathan S.; Tapscott, Robert E.; Skaggs, Stephanie R.; Beeson, Harold D.

    1991-02-01

    In this report, 14 compounds are examined as potential near-term candidates for alternative firefighter training agents for streaming applications. This list consists of suitable fluorine-containing compounds (primarily fluorocarbons, hydrofluorocarbons, and hydrochlorofluorocarbons) known to have had significant toxicity testing completed, with bulk production capabilities existing in the past, present, or anticipated near future. Many of these compounds are being produced or considered as replacements for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in refrigeration and foam-blowing applications. The ozone depletion potential, global warming potential, stage of toxicity testing, toxicity, availability, and relative cost of each compound are discussed. Physical and thermodynamic properties and estimated and measured flame suppression concentrations are reported. Those compounds that have low toxicity (with significant testing completed) are available in bulk and have desirable properties are discussed in detail. It is recommended that HCFC-123 be tested both in pure form and in blends as potential replacement training agents. Twelve blends are recommended for fire suppression.

  1. Alternative training agents, Phase 1. Survey of near-term-candidate fire-extinguishing agents and predicting properties of halocarbon mixtures. Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nimitz, J.S.; Tapscott, R.E.; Skaggs, S.R.; Beeson, H.D.

    1991-02-01

    In this report, 14 compounds are examined as potential near-term candidates for alternative firefighter training agents for streaming applications. This list consists of suitable fluorine-containing compounds(primarily fluorocarbons, hydrofluorocarbons, and hydrochlorofluorocarbons) known to have had significant toxicity testing completed, with bulk production capabilities existing in the past, present, or anticipated near future. Many of these compounds are being produced or considered as replacements for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in refrigeration and foam-blowing applications. The ozone depletion potential, global warming potential, stage of toxicity testing, toxicity, availability, and relative cost of each compound are discussed. Physical and thermodynamic properties and estimated and measured flame suppression concentrations are reported. Those compounds that have low toxicity (with significant testing completed) are available in bulk and have desirable properties are discussed in detail. It is recommended that HCFC-123 be tested both in pure form and in blends as potential replacement training agents. Twelve blends are recommended for fire suppression.

  2. Comparison of Hyperthermal Ground Laboratory Atomic Oxygen Erosion Yields With Those in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Dill, Grace C.; Loftus, Ryan J.; deGroh, Kim K.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic oxygen erosion yields of 26 materials (all polymers except for pyrolytic graphite) were measured in two directed hyperthermal radio frequency (RF) plasma ashers operating at 30 or 35 kHz with air. The hyperthermal asher results were compared with thermal energy asher results and low Earth orbital (LEO) results from the Materials International Space Station Experiment 2 and 7 (MISSE 2 and 7) flight experiments. The hyperthermal testing was conducted to a significant portion of the atomic oxygen fluence similar polymers were exposed to during the MISSE 2 and 7 missions. Comparison of the hyperthermal asher prediction of LEO erosion yields with thermal energy asher erosion yields indicates that except for the fluorocarbon polymers of PTFE and FEP, the hyperthermal energy ashers are a much more reliable predictor of LEO erosion yield than thermal energy asher testing, by a factor of four.

  3. Development of a special purpose spacecraft interior coating, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartoszek, E. J.; Nannelli, P.

    1975-01-01

    Coating formulations were developed consisting of latex blends of fluorocarbon polymers, acrylic resins, stabilizers, modifiers, other additives, and a variety of inorganic pigments. Suitable latex primers were also developed from an acrylic latex base. The formulations dried to touch in about one hour and were fully dry in about twenty-four hours under normal room temperature and humidity conditions. The resulting coatings displayed good optical and mechanical properties, including excellent bonding to (pre-treated) substrates. In addition, the preferred compositions were found to be self-extinguishing when applied to nonflammable substrates and could meet the offgassing requirements specified by NASA for the intended application. Improvements are needed in abrasion resistance and hardness.

  4. Electron ionization of open/closed chain isocarbonic molecules relevant in plasma processing: Theoretical cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Umang R.; Joshipura, K. N.; Kothari, Harshit N.; Pandya, Siddharth H.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report theoretical electron impact ionization cross sections from threshold to 2000 eV for isocarbonic open chain molecules C4H6, C4H8, C4F6 including their isomers, and closed chain molecules c-C4H8 and c-C4F8. Theoretical formalism employed presently, viz., Complex Scattering Potential-ionization contribution method has been used successfully for a variety of polyatomic molecules. The present ionization calculations are very important since results available for the studied targets are either scarce or none. Our work affords comparison of C4 containing hydrocarbon versus fluorocarbon molecules. Comparisons of the present ionization cross sections are made wherever possible, and new ionization data are also presented.

  5. Tetraperchlorate of methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schack, C. J.

    1972-01-01

    The preparation of the tetraperchlorate of methane (TPM) was attempted. Displacement of halogen from carbon tetrahalides was accomplished with either CCl4 or CBr4 using the halogen perchlorates, ClOClO3, and BOClO3. Although the displacement process was successful, the generated carbon perchlorate intermediates were not isolated. Instead, these species decomposed to COCl2, CO2, and Cl2O7. The vigorous displacement reaction that often occurred required moderation. Fluorocarbon solvents and chlorine perchlorate were successfully tested for compatibility, permitting their use in these synthetic reactions. While the sought for moderating effect was obtained, the net result of the displacement of halogen from CX sub 4 substrates was the same as before. Thus only CO2, COCl2, and Cl2O7 were isolated.

  6. Control of internal and external short circuits in lithium batteries using a composite thermal switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Robert C.; Pickett, Jerome; Goebel, Franz

    1991-01-01

    A composite material has been developed, consisting of a blend of metal and fluorocarbon particles, which behaves as an electronic conductor at room temperature and which abruptly becomes an insulator at a predetermined temperature. This switching behavior results from the difference in thermal expansion coefficients between the conductive and non-conductive portions of the composite. This material was applied as a thin film between the carbon cathode in Li/SOCl2 cells, and the metallic cathode current collector. Using test articles incorporating this feature it was shown that lithium cells externally heated or internally heated during a short circuit lost rate capability and the ability to overheat well below the melting point of lithium (180 C). Thus, during an internal or external cell short circuit, the potential for thermal runaway involving reactions of molten lithium is avoided.

  7. Implications of the Montreal Protocol for atmospheric emissions of alternative chemicals. Report for January-March 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Hummel, K.E.; Smith, N.D.; Harmon, D.L.

    1988-08-01

    This paper is about alternative chemicals. The substitution, of less ozone-depleting chemicals wherever it is cost effective and technically feasible, is expected because of anticipated future limitations on production and consumption of the fully halogenated chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and halons (fluorocarbons containing bromine atoms) covered by the Montreal Protocol. Certain alternative chemicals (e.g., HCFC-22 and methyl chloroform) are already used in applications other than as CFC substitutes. Projected future consumption of alternative chemicals includes such non-substitution use. Study results indicate that the 50% reduction in weighted CFC/halon consumption (weighted for ozone-depletion potential) required by the Protocol in 1998 could initially be achieved by alternative chemicals alone. However, alternative processes or products not requiring either the controlled substances or their substitute chemicals and/or substantial recovery and reuse of the chemicals would be needed to maintain the 50% level of reduction in the longer term.

  8. Energy Efficient Commercial Refrigeration with Carbon Dioxide Refrigerant and Scroll Expanders

    SciTech Connect

    Dieckmann, John

    2013-04-04

    Current supermarket refrigeration systems are built around conventional fluorocarbon refrigerants – HFC-134a and the HFC blends R-507 and R404A, which replaced the CFC refrigerants, R-12 and R-502, respectively, used prior to the Montreal Protocol phase out of ozone depleting substances. While the HFC refrigerants are non-ozone depleting, they are strong greenhouse gases, so there has been continued interest in replacing them, particularly in applications with above average refrigerant leakage. Large supermarket refrigeration systems have proven to be particularly difficult to maintain in a leak-tight condition. Refrigerant charge losses of 15% of total charge per year are the norm, making the global warming impact of refrigerant emissions comparable to that associated with the energy consumption of these systems.

  9. Coolant controversy heats up

    SciTech Connect

    Shanley, A.

    1997-11-01

    In 1987, nations of the world banded together under the Montreal Protocol to help protect the earth`s ozone layer. Now, ten years and $2.4 billion in new fluorocarbon R and D later, the ozone hole is still with us, as a black market in illegal chlorofluorocarbons thrives and legal trade in recycled CFCs continues. Unfortunately, each alternative to CFCs poses tradeoffs. Some hydrochlorofluorocarbons present lubricant compatibility problems, and, because they are also somewhat ozone depleting, they`ll be phased out in the US between 2010 and 2030, and earlier in Europe. Chlorine-free hydrofluorocarbons contribute to global warming and some require lubricant changes and retooling, while the processes that make them emit halogenated organics. This paper discusses compatibility, flammability, global warming, and supply problems.

  10. Manipulating surface wettability and oil absorbency of diatomite depending on processing and ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özen, ?lhan; ?im?ek, Süleyman; Okyay, Gamze

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a diatomite sample, which is a natural inorganic mineral with inherently high water and oil absorption capacity, was subjected to grinding before surface modification. Afterwards, the diatomite surface was modified via facile methods using a fluorocarbon (FC) chemical and stearic acid (SA) in addition to the sol-gel fluorosilanization (FS) process. The water and oil wettability, and oil absorbency properties of the unmodified and modified diatomites were investigated in addition to diatomite characterizations such as chemical content, surface area, particle size distribution, morphology, and modification efficiency. It was revealed that the wettability was changed completely depending on the surface modification agent and the media used, while the oil absorbency property surprisingly did not change. On the other hand, the oil absorbency was worsened by the grinding process, whereas the wettability was not affected.

  11. Metal Surface Decontamination by the PFC Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Hui-Jun Won; Gye-Nam Kim; Wang-Kyu Choi; Chong-Hun Jung; Won-Zin Oh

    2006-07-01

    PFC (per-fluorocarbon) spray decontamination equipment was fabricated and its decontamination behavior was investigated. Europium oxide powder was mixed with the isotope solution which contains Co-60 and Cs-137. The different shape of metal specimens artificially contaminated with europium oxide powder was used as the surrogate contaminants. Before and after the application of the PFC spray decontamination method, the radioactivity of the metal specimens was measured by MCA. The decontamination factors were in the range from 9.6 to 62.4. The spent PFC solution was recycled by distillation. Before and after distillation, the turbidity of PFC solution was also measured. From the test results, it was found that more than 98% of the PFC solution could be recycled by a distillation. (authors)

  12. Ultrasonic decontamination in perfluorinated liquids of radioactive circuit boards

    SciTech Connect

    Yam, C.S.; Harling, O.K.; Kaiser, R.

    1994-12-31

    A laboratory-scale ultrasonic decontamination system has been developed to demonstrate the application of Entropic System`s enhanced particle removal process to the radioactive decontamination of electronic circuit boards. The process uses inert perfluorinated liquids as the working media; the liquids have zero ozone depletion potential, are nontoxic, non-flammable, and are generally recognized as nonhazardous materials. The parts to be cleaned are first sonicated with a dilute solution of a high-molecular-weight fluorocarbon surfactant in an inert perfluorinated liquid. The combination of ultrasonic agitation and liquid flow promotes the detachment of the particles from the surface of the part being cleaned, their transfer from the boundary layer into the bulk liquid, and their removal from the cleaning environment, thereby reducing the probability of particle redeposition. After the cleaning process, the parts are rinsed with the pure perfluorinated liquid to remove residual surfactant. The parts are recovered after the perfluorinated liquid is evaporated into air.

  13. Damage by radicals and photons during plasma cleaning of porous low-k SiOCH. I. Ar/O{sub 2} and He/H{sub 2} plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shoeb, Juline; Wang Mingmei; Kushner, Mark J.

    2012-07-15

    Porous dielectric materials offer lower capacitances that reduce RC time delays in integrated circuits. Typical porous low dielectric (low-k) materials include SiOCH-silicon dioxide with carbon groups, principally -CH{sub 3}, lining the pores. Fluorocarbon plasmas are often used to etch such low-k materials. These processes leave a fluorocarbon polymer on the SiOCH surface that must be removed, often with oxygen or hydrogen containing plasmas. Pores open to the surface and that are internally connected provide pathways for reactive species to enter into the porous network and produce damage. For example, during cleaning using O{sub 2} containing plasmas, reactions of O atoms with -CH{sub 3} groups can increase the k-value by removing C atoms. Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons produced by the plasma and that penetrate into the material can scission -Si-CH{sub 3} bonds and accelerate the removal of -CH{sub 3} groups. This paper reports on results from a computational investigation of Ar/O{sub 2} and He/H{sub 2} plasma cleaning of porous SiOCH when including the effects of VUV photons. The authors found that He/H{sub 2} plasmas are able to clean CF{sub x} polymers deposited during etching while producing milder damage to underlying -CH{sub 3} sites compared to O{sub 2} plasmas due to the lower reactivity of H atoms and the shorter penetration distance of photons produced in He/H{sub 2} plasmas.

  14. Patterns of trace gases near sources of global pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, M.A.K.; Rasmussen, R.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Many trace gases are increasing in the earth's armosphere and may couase global environmental changes in the future. Consequently there has been growing interest in the cycles of the long-lived gases that are likely to contribute the most to global change. At present there are four such gases: methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}0), trichlorofluoromethane (CCl{sub 3}F,F-11), and dichlorodifluoromethane (CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2},F-12). Methane and N{sub 2}O are involved mostly in adding to the greenhouse effect with some role in the stratospheric ozone cycle, and the two main fluorocarbons (F-11 and F-12) are involved in the depletion of the ozone layer with some role in global warming. This paper is about the patterns of these trace gases near regions of global scale pollution. Our purpose is to provide a synthesis of observations from diverse environments and ecosystems of the world and to provide readers with intuitive connections between sources and concentrations. We will consider four types of regions: rice fields in CHina that are a major source of methane, urban areas of the United States and China that are sources of fluorocarbons and other gases, rivers and surrounding wetlands, specifically the Yangtze in China and the Amazon in Brazil, and finally the environment of Boola Boola National Forest in Australia populated by many speices of termites that are a source of methane to the atmosphere. Eventually these patterns can be translated into estimeates of fluxes from the various sources of global pollution.

  15. Diode Laser Absorption Measurements of Species Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Harold

    1996-10-01

    Characterization of gas phase species densities is critically important to the understanding of complex plasma chemistry and the mechanistic development of plasma processes. Infrared diode laser absorption provides a relatively simple and cost effective means of gaining access to species concentrations for a large number radicals important to plasma etching. It is particularly well suited for aiding it process development in new high density plasma etch tools where the combination of low pressure and high dissociation means the plasma chemistry component is largely comprised of atomic or two- and three-body molecular fragment species at low partial pressures. This paper describes how single-pass, FM diode laser absorption spectroscopy has been used to measure chlorine and fluorocarbon dissociation in inductively coupled discharges in a variety of both laboratory and commercial plasma etchers. The detection of atomic chlorine by measurement of the spin orbit transition around 882 cm-1 in a GEC/ICP Reference Cell plasma is discussed. Both bulk and spatially resolved diode laser measurements were performed. The results are used to show chlorine is largely dissociated throughout the chamber at almost power in the inductive mode and that a large fraction of the atomic chlorine is in the long lived ^2P_1/2 spin orbit level due to increased electron collisions at high power. Measurements of CFx radicals made in both the Reference Cell and in commercial ICP plasma etchers are also discussed. A relatively small, portable version of the diode laser system is described which has actually been transported and used on site at semiconductor fab facilities for etch tool process characterization. The utility of this information in defining critical reaction pathways in complex fluorocarbon oxide etch chemistries is described. (This work has been supported by grants from both SEMATECH and Sandia National Labortories)

  16. Self-Assembled Monolayers Generated from Unsymmetrical Partially Fluorinated Spiroalkanedithiols.

    PubMed

    Chinwangso, Pawilai; Lee, Han Ju; Lee, T Randall

    2015-12-15

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were prepared on gold substrates from an unsymmetrical partially fluorinated spiroalkanedithiol adsorbate with the specific structure of [CH3(CH2)7][CF3(CF2)7(CH2)8]C[CH2SH]2 (SADT) and compared to SAMs formed from the semifluorinated monothiol F8H10SH [CF3(CF2)7(CH2)10SH] of analogous chain length and n-octadecanethiol. The adsorbate with two alkyl chains, one terminally fluorinated and the other nonfluorinated, was designed to form monolayers in which the bulky helical fluorocarbon segments assemble on top of an underlying layer of well-packed trans-extended alkyl chains. Different combinations of deposition solvents and temperatures were used to produce the bidentate SAMs. Characterization of the resulting monolayers revealed that SAMs formed in DMF at room temperature allow complete binding of the sulfur headgroups to the surface and exhibit higher conformational order than those produced using alternative solvent/temperature combinations. The reduced film thicknesses and enhanced wettability of the SADT SAMs, as compared to the SAMs generated from F8H10SH, suggest loose packing and an increase in the tilt of the terminal fluorocarbon chain segments. Nevertheless, the density of the underlying hydrocarbon chains of the SADT SAMs was higher than that of the F8H10SH SAMs, owing to the double-chained structure of the new adsorbate. The conformational orders of the SAM systems were observed to decrease as follows: C18SH > F8H10SH > SADT. However, the SAMs formed from this new double-chained bidentate adsorbate in DMF expose a fluorinated interface with a relatively low surface roughness, as determined by contact-angle hysteresis. PMID:26575960

  17. Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Technology Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, P. J.; Counce, D. M.

    1993-12-01

    The Alternative Fluorocarbon Environmental Acceptability Study (AFEAS), a consortium of fluorocarbon manufacturers, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are collaborating on a project to evaluate the energy use and global warming impacts of CFC alternatives. The goal of this project is to identify technologies that could replace the use of CFC's in refrigeration, heating, and air-conditioning equipment; to evaluate the direct impacts of chemical emissions on global warming; and to compile accurate estimates of energy use and indirect CO2 emissions of substitute technologies. The first phase of this work focused on alternatives that could be commercialized before the year 2000. The second phase of the project is examining not-in-kind and next-generation technologies that could be developed to replace CFC's, HCFC's, and HFC's over a longer period. As part of this effort, Oak Ridge National Laboratory held a workshop on June 23-25, 1993. The preliminary agenda covered a broad range of alternative technologies and at least one speaker was invited to make a brief presentation at the workshop on each technology. Some of the invited speakers were unable to participate, and in a few cases other experts could not be identified. As a result, those technologies were not represented at the workshop. Each speaker was asked to prepare a five to seven page paper addressing six key issues concerning the technology he/she is developing. These points are listed in the sidebar. Each expert also spoke for 20 to 25 minutes at the workshop and answered questions from the other participants concerning the presentation and area of expertise. The primary goal of the presentations and discussions was to identify the developmental state of the technology and to obtain comparable data on system efficiencies.

  18. Protic ionic liquids with fluorous anions: physicochemical properties and self-assembly nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Kennedy, Danielle F; Greaves, Tamar L; Weerawardena, Asoka; Mulder, Roger J; Kirby, Nigel; Song, Gonghua; Drummond, Calum J

    2012-06-14

    A series of 11 new protic ionic liquids with fluorous anions (FPILs) have been identified and their self-assembled nanostructure, thermal phase transitions and physicochemical properties were investigated. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that fluorocarbon domains have been reported in PILs. The FPILs were prepared from a range of hydrocarbon alkyl and heterocyclic amine cations in combination with the perfluorinated anions heptafluorobutyrate and pentadecafluorooctanoate. The nanostructure of the FPILs was established by using small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS). In the liquid state many of the FPILs showed an intermediate range order, or self-assembled nanostructure, resulting from segregation of the polar and nonpolar hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon domains of the ionic liquid. In addition, the physicochemical properties of the FPILs were determined including the melting point (T(m)), glass transition (T(g)), devitrification temperature (T(c)), thermal stability and the density ?, viscosity ?, air/liquid surface tension ?(LV), refractive index n(D), and ionic conductivity ?. The FPILs were mostly solids at room temperature, however two examples 2-pyrrolidinonium heptafluorobutyrate (PyrroBF) and pyrrolidinium heptafluorobutyrate (PyrrBF) were liquids at room temperature and all of the FPILs melted below 80 °C. Four of the FPILs exhibited a glass transition. The two liquids at room temperature, PyrroBF and PyrrBF, had a similar density, surface tension and refractive index but their viscosity and ionic conductivity were very different due to dissimilar self-assembled nanostructure. PMID:22569799

  19. Lyotropic liquid crystal phases of phytantriol in a protic ionic liquid with fluorous anion.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Greaves, Tamar L; Kennedy, Danielle F; Weerawardena, Asoka; Kirby, Nigel; Song, Gonghua; Drummond, Calum J

    2014-10-21

    The phase behaviour of phytantriol in the protic ionic liquid (PIL) 1-methylimidazolium pentadecafluorooctanoate (MImOF) and four different MImOF-water compositions was investigated by small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS), cross polarised optical microscopy (CPOM) and infrared spectroscopy (IR). MImOF is a distinct protic ionic liquid in that it contains a fluorocarbon anion and a hydrocarbon cation. This leads to MImOF having an unusual liquid nanostructure, such that it contains fluorocarbon, hydrocarbon and polar domains. No lyotropic liquid crystal phases were observed for phytantriol in neat MImOF. However, on addition of water, lamellar, cubic Ia3¯d and micellar phases were observed for specific MImOF-phytantriol-water compositions at room temperature, and up to 60 °C. The phase behaviour for phytantriol in the solvent mixture of 25 wt%-MImOF-75 wt%-water was the most similar to the phytantriol-water phase diagram. Only this MImOF-water composition supported the Ia3¯d cubic phase, which had a lattice parameter between 100-140 Å compared to 86-100 Å in deionised water, indicating significant swelling due to the MImOF. IR spectroscopy showed that a percentage of the water molecules were hydrogen bonded to the N-H of the MIm cation, and this water decreased the hydrogen bonding present between the cation and anion of the ionic liquid. This investigation furthers our understanding of the interaction of ionic liquids with solutes, and the important role that the different IL nanostructures can have on influencing these interactions. PMID:25177837

  20. Negative Ion Measurements in Electron Cyclotron Resonance Etching Plasmas [1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Bon-Woong; Hershkowitz, Noah

    1997-10-01

    Negative ions are known to be the precursor for particle formation in processing plasmas. Significant concentrations of negative ions have previously been identified in capacitively-coupled low pressure fluorocarbon and silane plasmas, low pressure multi-dipole hydrogen plasmas, etc. Negative ions can also change the plasma potential, spatial plasma profiles and plasma density in processing plasmas. Since electronegative gases are often used in plasma etching, it is interesting to know what negative ion species are present. Here we report measurements of negative ions in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) etching tool. An omegatron mass analyzer, which took advantage of the dc magnetic field in the etching tool, was used to make measurements at pressures of 0.1 5.0mTorr. The omegatron mass analyzer was geometrically modified to detect both positive and negative ions by changing the polarity and magnitude of the bias voltage of the electrodes inside the omegatron chamber. The geometry also provides differential pumping with pressure inside the omegatron below the 0.05 mTorr range, reducing collisional effects and insulating film deposition. The main goals of this study are to understand omegatron physics and (2) to measure the negative ion species in ECR etching plasmas. Positive ions were also measured mainly to calibrate the ion mass in negative ion measurements. Preliminary results show H(+), H2(+), H3(+) and He(+) ions in an H2 + He plasmas, H(-) and H2(-) in hydrogen plasmas, N(+), N2(+) in nitrogen plasmas, F(-), F2(-) in fluorocarbon ECR plasmas. Recent experiments will be presented.

  1. Role of Acentric Displacements on the Crystal Structure and Second-Harmonic Generating Properties of RbPbCO3F and CsPbCO3F

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two lead fluorocarbonates, RbPbCO3F and CsPbCO3F, were synthesized and characterized. The materials were synthesized through solvothermal and conventional solid-state techniques. RbPbCO3F and CsPbCO3F were structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and exhibit three-dimensional (3D) crystal structures consisting of corner-shared PbO6F2 polyhedra. For RbPbCO3F, infrared and ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy and thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis measurements were performed. RbPbCO3F is a new noncentrosymmetric material and crystallizes in the achiral and nonpolar space group P6?m2 (crystal class 6?m2). Powder second-harmonic generation (SHG) measurements on RbPbCO3F and CsPbCO3F using 1064 nm radiation revealed an SHG efficiency of approximately 250 and 300 × ?-SiO2, respectively. Charge constants d33 of approximately 72 and 94 pm/V were obtained for RbPbCO3F and CsPbCO3F, respectively, through converse piezoelectric measurements. Electronic structure calculations indicate that the nonlinear optical response originates from the distorted PbO6F2 polyhedra, because of the even–odd parity mixing of the O 2p states with the nearly spherically symmetric 6s electrons of Pb2+. The degree of inversion symmetry breaking is quantified using a mode-polarization vector analysis and is correlated with cation size mismatch, from which it is possible to deduce the acentric properties of 3D alkali-metal fluorocarbonates. PMID:24867361

  2. TEWI Analysis: Its Utility, Its Shortcomings, and Its Results

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, V.D.; Fischer, S.K.; Sand, J.R.

    1999-09-13

    The past decade has been a challenging time for the refrigeration and air conditioning industry worldwide. Provisions of the Montreal Protocol and its amendments require the phaseout of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) compounds that have been used extensively as insulating foam blowing agents and refrigerants in refrigeration systems, heat pumps, and air conditioners. In response, hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) compounds were proposed, developed, and are starting to be used as the primary alternatives to CFCs and HCFCs. However, in 1997 under the Kyoto Protocol, industrialized nations have agreed to roll back emissions of HCFCs, carbon dioxide (CO*), and four other greenhouse gases which threaten to cause excessive global warming. The US. Department of Energy and the Alternative Fluorocarbon Environmental Acceptability Study (AFEAS) jointly sponsored research projects to identify the major applications of CFCs, HCFCs, and HFCs and to examine the impacts of these compounds and the energy use of applications employing these compounds on global warming. The five major uses of fluorocarbons based on sales were automobile air conditioning, supermarket refrigeration, unitary heat pumps and air conditioning, chillers for cooling large office buildings, and household refrigeration. Almost all of the refrigerants used in these applications are global warming gases, and if the refrigerant leaks out of the system during operation, is lost during maintenance or is not recovered when the system is scraped, it contributes to global warming. But, it is also true that the energy consumed by refrigeration and air conditioning systems, in the form of electricity or the direct combustion of fossil fuel, results in the release of CO*, the primary cause of atmospheric global warming.

  3. Composite propellant aluminum agglomeration reduction using tailored Al/PTFE particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippel, Travis R.

    Micron aluminum is widely used in propellants; however, performance could be significantly improved if ignition barriers could be disrupted and combustion tailored. In solid propellants for example, aluminum increases theoretical specific impulse performance, yet theoretical levels cannot be achieved largely because of two-phase flow losses. These losses could be reduced if particles quickly ignited, more gaseous products were produced, and if particle breakup occurred during combustion. To achieve altered aluminum ignition and particle combustion, this work explores the use of low level (10-30 wt.%) fluorocarbon (polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) or poly(carbon monofluoride) (PMF)) inclusion inside of aluminum via low or high energy mechanical activation. Aluminum/PTFE particles are found to be amenable to use in binder based energetics, having average particle sizes ranging from 15 to 78 ?m, ~2-7 m2/g, specific surface area, and combustion enthalpies as high as 20.2 kJ/g. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments indicate high energy MA reduces both reaction and oxidation onset to ~440 °C that is far below aluminum alone. Safety testing shows these particles have high electrostatic discharge (ESD) (89.9-108 mJ), impact (> 213 cm), and friction (> 360 N) ignition thresholds. The idea of further increasing reactivity and increasing particle combustion enthalpy is explored by reducing fluorocarbon inclusion content to 10 wt.% and through the use of the strained fluorocarbon PMF. Combustion enthalpy and average particle size range from 18.9 to 28.5 kJ/g and 23.0 to 67.5 ?m, respectively and depend on MA intensity, duration, and inclusion level. Specific surface areas are high (5.3 to 34.8 m2/g) and as such, Al/PMF particles are appropriate for energetic applications not requiring a curable liquid binder. Mechanical activation reduces oxidation onset (DSC) from 555 to 480 °C (70/30 wt.%). Aluminum/PMF particles are sensitive to ESD (11.5-47.5 mJ) and some can be ignited via optical flash. Propellant aluminum agglomeration is assessed through replacement of reference aluminum powders (spherical, flake, or nanoscale) with Al/PTFE (90/10 or 70/30 wt.%) particles. The effects on burning rate, pressure dependence, and aluminum ignition, combustion, and agglomeration are quantified. Microscopic imaging shows tailored particles promptly ignite at the burning surface and appear to breakup into smaller particles. Replacement of spherical aluminum with Al/PTFE 70/30 wt.% also increases the pressure exponent from 0.36 to 0.58, which results in a 50% increase in propellant burning rate at 13.8 MPa. Combustion products were quench collected using a liquid-free technique at 2.1 and 6.9 MPa. Sizing of products indicates that composite particles result in nominally 25 ?m coarse products, which are smaller than the original, average particle size and are also 66% smaller in diameter (96% by volume) than the 76 ?m products collected from reference spherical aluminized propellant. Smaller diameter condensed phase products and more gaseous products will likely decrease two-phase flow loss and reduce slag accumulation in solid rocket motors.

  4. Effect of SiO2 on relaxation phenomena and mechanism of ion conductivity of [Nafion/(SiO2)x] composite membranes.

    PubMed

    Di Noto, Vito; Gliubizzi, Rocco; Negro, Enrico; Pace, Giuseppe

    2006-12-14

    This report describes a study of the effect of SiO2 nanopowders on the mechanism of ionic motion and interactions taking place in hybrid inorganic-organic membranes based on Nafion. Five nanocomposite membranes of the formula [Nafion/(SiO2)x] with SiO2 ranging from 0 to 15 wt % were prepared by a solvent casting procedure. TG measurements demonstrated that the membranes are thermally stable up to 170 degrees C but with the loss water it changes the cluster environments and changes the conductivity properties. MDSC investigations in the 90-300 degrees C temperature range revealed the presence of three intense overlapping endothermal peaks indicated as I, II, and III. Peak I measures the order-disorder molecular rearrangement in hydrophilic polar clusters, II corresponds to the endothermic decomposition of -SO3 groups, and III describes the melting process in microcrystalline regions of hydrophobic fluorocarbon domains of the Nafion moiety. ESEM with EDAX measurements revealed that the membranes are homogeneous materials with smooth surfaces. DMA studies allowed us to measure two relaxation modes. The mechanical relaxation detected at ca. 100 degrees C is attributed to the motion of cluster aggregates of side chains and is diagnostic for R-SO3H...SiO2 nanocluster interactions. DMA disclosed that at SiO2/-SO3H (psi) molar ratios lower than 1.9, the oxoclusters act to restrict chain mobility of hydrophobic domains of Nafion and the dynamics inside polar cages of [Nafion/(SiO2)x] systems; at psi higher than 1.9, the oxoclusters reduce the cohesiveness of hydrophilic polar domains owing to a reduction in the density of cross-links. FT-IR and FT-Raman studies of the [Nafion/(SiO2)x] membranes indicated that the fluorocarbon chains of Nafion hydrophobic domains assume the typical helical conformation structure with a D(14pi/15) symmetry. These analyses revealed four different species of water domains embedded inside polar cages and their interconnecting channels: (a) bulk water [(H2O)n]; (b) water solvating the oxonium ions directly interacting with sulfonic acid groups [H3O+...SO3(-)-].(H2O)n; (c) water aggregates associated with H3O+ ions [H3O+.(H2O)n]; and (d) low associated water species in dimer form [(H2O)2]. The conductivity mechanism and relaxation events were investigated by broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS). [Nafion/(SiO2)x] nanocomposite membranes were found to possess two different molecular relaxation phenomena which are associated with the alpha-relaxation mode of PTFE-like fluorocarbon domains and the beta-relaxation mode of acid side groups of the Nafion component. Owing to their strong coupling, both these relaxation modes are diagnostic for the interactions between the polar groups of the Nafion host polymer and the (SiO2)x oxoclusters and play a determining role in the conductivity mechanism of the membranes. The studies support the proposal that long-range proton charge transfer in [Nafion/(SiO2)x] composites takes place due to a mechanism involving exchange of the proton between the four water domains. This latter proton transfer occurs owing to a subsequent combination of domain intersections resulting from the water domain fluctuations induced by the molecular relaxation events of host Nafion polymer. PMID:17149919

  5. Calibration and Sequence Development Status for the Sample Analysis at Mars Investigation on the Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    The measurement goals of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on the "Curiosity" Rover of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) include chemical and isotopic analysis of organic and inorganic volatiles for both atmospheric and solid samples [1,2]. SAM directly supports the ambitious goals of the MSL mission to provide a quantitative assessment of habitability and preservation in Gale crater by means of a range of chemical and geological measurements [3]. The SAM FM combined calibration and environmental testing took place primarily in 2010 with a limited set of tests implemented after integration into the rover in January 2011. The scope of SAM FM testing was limited both to preserve SAM consumables such as life time of its electromechanical elements and to minimize the level of terrestrial contamination in the SAM instrument. A more comprehensive calibration of a SAM-like suite of instruments will be implemented in 2012 with calibration runs planned for the SAM testbed. The SAM Testbed is nearly identical to the SAM FM and operates in a ambient pressure chamber. The SAM Instrument Suite: SAM's instruments are a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS), a 6-column Gas Chromatograph (GC), and a 2-channel Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS). Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry is designed for identification of even trace organic compounds. The TLS [5] secures the C, H, and O isotopic composition in carbon dioxide, water, and methane. Sieved materials are delivered from the MSL sample acquisition and processing system to one of68 cups of the Sample Manipulation System (SMS). 59 of these cups are fabricated from inert quartz. After sample delivery, a cup is inserted into one of 2 ovens for evolved gas analysis (EGA ambient to >9500C) by the QMS and TLS. A portion of the gas released can be trapped and subsequently analyzed by GCMS. Nine sealed cups contain liquid solvents and chemical derivatization or thermochemolysis agents to extract and transform polar molecules such as amino acids, nucleobases, and carboxylic acids into compounds that are sufficiently volatile to transmit through the GC columns. The remaining 6 cups contain calibrants. SAM FM Calibration Overview: The SAM FM calibration in the Mars chamber employed a variety of pure gases, gas mixtures, and solid materials. Isotope calibration runs for the TLS utilized 13C enriched C02 standards and 0 enriched CH4. A variety of fluorocarbon compounds that spanned the entire mass range of the QMS as well as C3-C6 hydrocarbons were utilized for calibration of the GCMS. Solid samples consisting of a mixture of calcite, melanterite, and inert silica glass either doped or not with fluorocarbons were introduced into the SAM FM cups through the SAM inlet funnel/tube system.

  6. Efficient, environmentally acceptable method for waterproofing insulation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blohowiak, Kay Y. (Inventor); Krienke, Kenneth A. (Inventor); Olli, Larry K. (Inventor); Newquist, Charles W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process of waterproofing alumina-rich or silica-rich fibrous thermal insulation material, the process including the steps of: (a) providing an alumina-rich or a silica-rich fibrous material; (b) providing a waterproofing solution including: (1) a carrier solvent selected from the group consisting of aliphatic alcohols having from 1C to 6C, water, and mixtures thereof; and (2) an alkoxysilane defined by the formula R.sub.4-x -Si-(O-R').sub.x where x is 1-3 and R is selected from the group consisting of alkyl groups having from 1C to 10C, hydrogen, or fluorocarbon groups having from 1F to 15F; and where O-R' is an alkoxy group having from 1C to 5C, or a mixture of alkoxysilanes defined by the above formula R.sub.4-x -Si-(O-R').sub.x ; and optionally (3) modifiers including acids, such as acetic acid or nitric acid, or bases, such as ammonium hydroxide, RNH.sub.2, R.sub.2 NH, or R.sub.3 N, or MOH, where R is selected from the group consisting of alkyl groups having from 1C to 10C or hydrogen, and where M=Na, Li, or K; (c) contacting the fibrous material with the waterproofing solution for a sufficient amount of time to waterproof the fibrous material; and (d) curing the coated fibrous material to render it sufficiently waterproof. A chemical solution for waterproofing alumina-rich or silica-rich fibrous thermal insulation materials, the solution including: (a) a carrier solvent selected from the group consisting of aliphatic alcohols having from 1C to 6C, water, and mixtures thereof; and (b) an alkoxysilane defined by the formula R.sub.4-x -Si-(O-R').sub.x where x is 1-3 and R is selected from the group consisting of alkyl groups having from 1C to 10C, hydrogen, or fluorocarbon groups having from 1F to 15F; and where O-R' is an alkoxy group having from 1C to 5C, or a mixture of alkoxysilanes defined by the above formula R.sub.4-x -Si-(O-R').sub.x ; and optionally (c) modifiers including acids, such as acetic acid or nitric acid, or bases, such as ammonium hydroxide, RNH.sub.2, R.sub.2 NH, or R.sub.3 N, or MOH, where R is selected from the group consisting of alkyl groups having from 1C to 10C or hydrogen, and where M=Na, Li, or K.

  7. Multi-functional Textiles for Military Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malshe, Priyadarshini

    The objective of this research was to develop the standard rip-stop weave military uniform fabric made of 50/50 nylon/cotton (NyCo) to achieve a repellent front surface and an antibacterial bulk for protection from chemical-biological warfare agents. Diallyldimethylammonium chloride (DADMAC), a quaternary ammonium salt monomer was graft polymerized on NyCo fabric to impart antimicrobial capability using atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma. Plasma was used to induce free radical chain polymerization of the DADMAC monomer to introduce a graft polymerized network on the fabric with durable antimicrobial properties. Pentaerythritol tertraacrylate was used as a cross-linking agent to obtain a highly cross-linked, durable polymer network. The presence of polyDADMAC on the fabric surface was confirmed using acid dye staining, SEM, and TOF-SIMS. Antibacterial performance was evaluated using standard AATCC test method 100 for both gram positive and gram negative bacteria. Results showed 99.9% reduction in the bacterial activities of K. pneumoniae and S. aureus. To achieve repellency on NyCo front surface, an environmentally benign C6 fluorocarbon monomer, 2-(perfluorohexyl) ethyl acrylate was graft polymerized using plasma on the front surface of the NyCo fabric which was already grafted with polyDADMAC for anti-microbial properties. The surface was characterized by IR spectroscopy and XPS. The presence of fluorine on the surface was mapped and confirmed by TOF-SIMS. SEM images showed a uniform layer of fluorocarbon polymer on the fiber surface. High water contact angle of 144° was obtained on the surface. The surface also achieved a high AATCC Test Method 193 rating of 9 and AATCC Test Method 118 rating of 5, indicating that the surface could repel a fluid with surface tension as low as 24 dynes/cm. Appropriate experimental designs and statistical modeling of data helped identify the experimental space and optimal factor combinations for best response. The study helped create a multi-functional fabric with an anti-bacterial bulk, hydrophilic back surface and repellent front surface for enhanced protective and aesthetic values.

  8. Synthesis of hybrid inorganic/organic nitric oxide-releasing silica nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Alexis Wells

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an endogenously produced free radical involved in a number of physiological processes. Thus, much research has focused on developing scaffolds that store and deliver exogenous NO. Herein, the synthesis of N-diazeniumdiolate-modified silica nanoparticles of various physical and chemical properties for biomedical applications is presented. To further develop NO-releasing silica particles for antimicrobial applications, a reverse microemulsion synthesis was designed to achieve nanoparticles of distinct sizes and similar NO release characteristics. Decreasing scaffold size resulted in improved bactericidal activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Confocal microscopy revealed that the improved efficacy resulted from faster particle-bacterium association kinetics. To broaden the therapeutic potential of NO-releasing silica particles, strategies to tune NO release characteristics were evaluated. Initially, surface hydrophobicity and NO release kinetics were tuned by grafting hydrocarbon- and fluorocarbon-based silanes onto the surface of N-diazeniumdiolate-modified particles. The addition of fluorocarbons resulted in a 10x increase in the NO release half-life. The addition of short-chained hydrocarbons to the particle surface increased their stability in hydrophobic electrospun polyurethanes. Although NO release kinetics were longer than that of unmodified particles, durations were still limited to <7 days. An alternative strategy for increasing NO release duration involved directly stabilizing the N-diazeniumdiolate using O2-protecting groups. O2-Methoxymethyl 1-(4-(3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl))piperazin-1-yl)diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (MOM-Pip/NO) was grafted onto mesoporous silica nanoparticles to yield scaffolds with an NO payload of 2.5 ?mol NO/mg and an NO release half-life of 23 d. Doping the MOM-Pip/NO-modified particles into resin composites yielded antibacterial NO-releasing dental restorative materials. A 3-log reduction in viable adhered Streptococcus mutans was observed with the MOM-Pip/NO-doped composites compared to undoped controls. The greater chemical flexibility of macromolecular scaffolds is a major advantage over LMW NO donors as it allows for the incorporation of multiple functionalities onto a single scaffold. To demonstrate this advantage, dual functional particles were synthesized by covalently binding quaternary ammonium (QA) functionalities to the surface of NO-releasing silica particles. The QA functionality proved more effective against Staphylococcus aureus than P. aeruginosa, and increasing alkyl chain length correlated with increased efficacy. Nitric oxide-releasing QA-functionalized particles were found to be more effective against S. aureus compared to monofunctional particles.

  9. Damage by radicals and photons during plasma cleaning of porous low-k SiOCH. II. Water uptake and change in dielectric constant

    SciTech Connect

    Shoeb, Juline; Kushner, Mark J.

    2012-07-15

    Porous dielectric materials provide lower capacitances that reduce RC time delays in integrated circuits. Typical low-k materials include porous SiOCH-silicon dioxide with carbon groups, principally CH{sub 3}, lining the pores. With a high porosity, internally connected pores provide pathways for reactive species to enter into the material. Fluorocarbon plasmas are often used to etch SiOCH, a process that leaves a fluorocarbon polymer on the surface that must later be removed. During cleaning using Ar/O{sub 2} or He/H{sub 2} plasmas, reactions of radicals that diffuse into the SiOCH and photons that penetrate into the SiOCH can remove -CH{sub 3} groups. Due to its higher reactivity, cleaning with Ar/O{sub 2} plasmas removes more -CH{sub 3} groups than He/H{sub 2} plasmas, and so produce more free radical sites, such as -SiO{sub 2} Bullet (a -SiO{sub 2}-CH{sub 3} site with the -CH{sub 3} group removed).Upon exposure to humid air, these free radical sites can chemisorb H{sub 2}O to form hydrophilic Si-OH which can further physisorb H{sub 2}O through hydrogen bonding to form Si-OH(H{sub 2}O). With the high dielectric constant of water, even a small percentage of water uptake can significantly increase the effective dielectric constant of SiOCH. In this paper, we report on results from a computational investigation of the cleaning of SiOCH using Ar/O{sub 2} or He/H{sub 2} plasmas and subsequent exposure to humid air. The authors found that plasma cleaning with He/H{sub 2} mixtures produce less demethylation than cleaning with Ar/O{sub 2} plasmas, as so results in less water uptake, and a smaller increase in dielectric constant. The water that produces the increase in dielectric constant is roughly half chemisorbed and half physisorbed, the latter of which can be removed with mild heating. Sealing the pores with NH{sub 3} plasma treatment reduces water uptake and helps prevent the increase in dielectric constant.

  10. Bulk plasma fragmentation in a C4F8 inductively coupled plasma: A hybrid modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shu-Xia; Zhang, Yu-Ru; Gao, Fei; Wang, You-Nian; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2015-06-01

    A hybrid model is used to investigate the fragmentation of C4F8 inductive discharges. Indeed, the resulting reactive species are crucial for the optimization of the Si-based etching process, since they determine the mechanisms of fluorination, polymerization, and sputtering. In this paper, we present the dissociation degree, the density ratio of F vs. CxFy (i.e., fluorocarbon (fc) neutrals), the neutral vs. positive ion density ratio, details on the neutral and ion components, and fractions of various fc neutrals (or ions) in the total fc neutral (or ion) density in a C4F8 inductively coupled plasma source, as well as the effect of pressure and power on these results. To analyze the fragmentation behavior, the electron density and temperature and electron energy probability function (EEPF) are investigated. Moreover, the main electron-impact generation sources for all considered neutrals and ions are determined from the complicated C4F8 reaction set used in the model. The C4F8 plasma fragmentation is explained, taking into account many factors, such as the EEPF characteristics, the dominance of primary and secondary processes, and the thresholds of dissociation and ionization. The simulation results are compared with experiments from literature, and reasonable agreement is obtained. Some discrepancies are observed, which can probably be attributed to the simplified polymer surface kinetics assumed in the model.

  11. Ultra-rapid plasma freezing with halocarbon heat transfer liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, P.H.; Comerchero, V.

    1988-03-15

    A process of freezing plasma is described comprising the steps of exposing thin wall containers of plasma to be frozen to direct contact with a heat transfer liquid selected from the group consisting of the chlorofluorocarbon 1,1,2 trichloro-1,2,2, trifluoro-ethane (CFC 113) and mixtures of the chlorofluorocarbon 1,1,2 trichloro-1,2,2, trifluoro-ethane (Freon 113) and at least one of the fluorocarbons perfluoropentane (C/sub 5/F/sub 12/), perfluorohexane (C/sub 6/F/sub 14/), perfluoromethylcyclohexane (C/sub 7/F/sub 14/), perfluoroheptane (C/sub 7/F/sub 16/), perfluoromonomethyldimethylcyclohexanes (C/sub 7/F/sub 14/C/sub 8/F/sub 16/), perfluorodecalin isomers (C/sub 10/F/sub 18/), mixed perfluorodecalin and methyldecalin isomers (C/sub 10/F/sub 18/+C/sub 11/F/sub 20/), and perfluorinatd polyethers ((OCF(CF/sub 3/)CF/sub 2/)/sub n/ - (OCF/sub 2/)/sub m/, and maintaining the liquid at a temperature sufficiently low enough to freeze the plasma in the desired amount of time.

  12. Langmuir Probe Measurements in an Inductively Coupled Ar/CF4 Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. V. V. S.; Meyyappan, M.; Sharma, S. P.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Technological advancement in the microelectronics industry requires an understanding of the physical and chemical processes occurring in plasmas of fluorocarbon gases, such as carbon tetrafluoride (CF4) which is commonly used as an etchant, and their mixtures to optimize various operating parameters. In this paper we report data on electron number density (ne), electron temperature'(Te), electron energy distribution function (EEDF), mean electron energy, ion number density (ni), and plasma potential (Vp) measured by using Langmuir probe in an inductively coupled 13.56 MHz radio frequency plasmas generated in 50%Ar:50%CF4 mixture in the GEC cell. The probe data were recorded at various radial positions providing radial profiles of these plasma parameters at 10-50 mTorr pressures and 200 W and 300 W of RF power. Present measurements indicate that the electron and ion number densities increase with increase in pressure and power. Whereas the plasma potential and electron temperature decrease with increase in pressure, and they weakly depend on RF power. The radial profiles exhibit that the electron and ion number densities and the plasma potential peak at the center of the plasma with an exponential fall away from it, while the electron temperature has a minimum at the center and it increases steadily towards the electrode edge. The EEDFs have a characteristic drop near the low energy end at all pressures and pressures and their shapes represent non-Maxwellian plasma and exhibit more like Druyvesteyn energy distribution.v

  13. Stationary nanoliter droplet array with a substrate of choice for single adherent/nonadherent cell incubation and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shemesh, Jonathan; Ben Arye, Tom; Avesar, Jonathan; Kang, Joo H.; Fine, Amir; Super, Michael; Meller, Amit; Ingber, Donald E.; Levenberg, Shulamit

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic water-in-oil droplets that serve as separate, chemically isolated compartments can be applied for single-cell analysis; however, to investigate encapsulated cells effectively over prolonged time periods, an array of droplets must remain stationary on a versatile substrate for optimal cell compatibility. We present here a platform of unique geometry and substrate versatility that generates a stationary nanodroplet array by using wells branching off a main microfluidic channel. These droplets are confined by multiple sides of a nanowell and are in direct contact with a biocompatible substrate of choice. The device is operated by a unique and reversed loading procedure that eliminates the need for fine pressure control or external tubing. Fluorocarbon oil isolates the droplets and provides soluble oxygen for the cells. By using this approach, the metabolic activity of single adherent cells was monitored continuously over time, and the concentration of viable pathogens in blood-derived samples was determined directly by measuring the number of colony-formed droplets. The method is simple to operate, requires a few microliters of reagent volume, is portable, is reusable, and allows for cell retrieval. This technology may be particularly useful for multiplexed assays for which prolonged and simultaneous visual inspection of many isolated single adherent or nonadherent cells is required. PMID:25053808

  14. Facile Fabrication of Lubricant-Infused Wrinkling Surface for Preventing Thrombus Formation and Infection.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuaishuai; Luan, Shifang; Yan, Shunjie; Shi, Hengchong; Yin, Jinghua

    2015-09-01

    Despite the advanced modern biotechniques, thrombosis and bacterial infection of biomedical devices remain common complications that are associated with morbidity and mortality. Most antifouling surfaces are in solid form and cannot simultaneously fulfill the requirements for antithrombosis and antibacterial efficacy. In this work, we present a facile strategy to fabricate a slippery surface. This surface is created by combining photografting polymerization with osmotically driven wrinkling that can generate a coarse morphology, and followed by infusing with fluorocarbon liquid. The lubricant-infused wrinkling slippery surface can greatly prevent protein attachment, reduce platelet adhesion, and suppress thrombus formation in vitro. Furthermore, E. coli and S. aureus attachment on the slippery surfaces is reduced by ?98.8% and ?96.9% after 24 h incubation, relative to poly(styrene-b-isobutylene-b-styrene) (SIBS) references. This slippery surface is biocompatible and has no toxicity to L929 cells. This surface-coating strategy that effectively reduces thrombosis and the incidence of infection will greatly decrease healthcare costs. PMID:26268298

  15. Implementation of ultrasonic sensing for high resolution measurement of binary gas mixture fractions.

    PubMed

    Bates, Richard; Battistin, Michele; Berry, Stephane; Bitadze, Alexander; Bonneau, Pierre; Bousson, Nicolas; Boyd, George; Bozza, Gennaro; Crespo-Lopez, Olivier; Da Riva, Enrico; Degeorge, Cyril; Deterre, Cecile; DiGirolamo, Beniamino; Doubek, Martin; Favre, Gilles; Godlewski, Jan; Hallewell, Gregory; Hasib, Ahmed; Katunin, Sergey; Langevin, Nicolas; Lombard, Didier; Mathieu, Michel; McMahon, Stephen; Nagai, Koichi; Pearson, Benjamin; Robinson, David; Rossi, Cecilia; Rozanov, Alexandre; Strauss, Michael; Vitek, Michal; Vacek, Vaclav; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    We describe an ultrasonic instrument for continuous real-time analysis of the fractional mixture of a binary gas system. The instrument is particularly well suited to measurement of leaks of a high molecular weight gas into a system that is nominally composed of a single gas. Sensitivity < 5 × 10(-5) is demonstrated to leaks of octaflouropropane (C3F8) coolant into nitrogen during a long duration (18 month) continuous study. The sensitivity of the described measurement system is shown to depend on the difference in molecular masses of the two gases in the mixture. The impact of temperature and pressure variances on the accuracy of the measurement is analysed. Practical considerations for the implementation and deployment of long term, in situ ultrasonic leak detection systems are also described. Although development of the described systems was motivated by the requirements of an evaporative fluorocarbon cooling system, the instrument is applicable to the detection of leaks of many other gases and to processes requiring continuous knowledge of particular binary gas mixture fractions. PMID:24961217

  16. Molecular modeling of the morphology and transport properties of two direct methanol fuel cell membranes: phenylated sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone ketone) versus Nafion

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ramaswami; Idupulapati, Nagesh B.; Dupuis, Michel

    2012-08-14

    We have used molecular dynamics simulations to examine membrane morphology and the transport of water, methanol and hydronium in phenylated sulfonated poly ether ether ketone ketone (Ph-SPEEKK) and Nafion membranes at 360 K for a range of hydration levels. At comparable hydration levels, the pore diameter is smaller, the sulfonate groups are more closely packed, the hydronium ions are more strongly bound to sulfonate groups, and the diffusion of water and hydronium is slower in Ph-SPEEKK relative to the corresponding properties in Nafion. The aromatic carbon backbone of Ph-SPEEKK is less hydrophobic than the fluorocarbon backbone of Nafion. Water network percolation occurs at a hydration level ({lambda}) of {approx}8 H{sub 2}O/SO{sub 3}{sup -}. At {lambda} = 20, water, methanol and hydronium diffusion coefficients were 1.4 x 10{sup -5}, 0.6 x 10{sup -5} and 0.2 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2}/s, respectively. The pore network in Ph-SPEEKK evolves dynamically and develops wide pores for {lambda} > 20, which leads to a jump in methanol crossover and ion transport. This study demonstrates the potential of aromatic membranes as low-cost challengers to Nafion for direct methanol fuel cell applications and the need to develop innovative strategies to combat methanol crossover at high hydration levels.

  17. Fluorine: A new element in protein design

    PubMed Central

    Buer, Benjamin C; Marsh, E Neil G

    2012-01-01

    Fluorocarbons are quintessentially man-made molecules, fluorine being all but absent from biology. Perfluorinated molecules exhibit novel physicochemical properties that include extreme chemical inertness, thermal stability, and an unusual propensity for phase segregation. The question we and others have sought to answer is to what extent can these properties be engineered into proteins? Here, we review recent studies in which proteins have been designed that incorporate highly fluorinated analogs of hydrophobic amino acids with the aim of creating proteins with novel chemical and biological properties. Fluorination seems to be a general and effective strategy to enhance the stability of proteins, both soluble and membrane bound, against chemical and thermal denaturation, although retaining structure and biological activity. Most studies have focused on small proteins that can be produced by peptide synthesis as synthesis of large proteins containing specifically fluorinated residues remains challenging. However, the development of various biosynthetic methods for introducing noncanonical amino acids into proteins promises to expand the utility of fluorinated amino acids in protein design. PMID:22274989

  18. Facile catalyst separation without water: Fluorous biphase hydroformylation of olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, I.T.; Rabai, J.

    1994-10-07

    A novel concept for performing stoichiometric and catalytic chemical transformations has been developed that is based on the limited miscibility of partially or fully fluorinated compounds with nonfluorinated compounds. A fluorous biphase system (FBS) consists of a fluorous phase containing a dissolved reagent or catalyst and another phase, which could be any common organic or nonorganic solvent with limited or no solubility in the fluorous phase. The fluorous phase is defined as the fluorocarbon (mostly perfluorinated alkanes, ethers, and tertiary amines)-rich phase of a biphase system. An FBS compatible reagent or catalyst contains enough fluorous moieties that it will be soluble only or preferentially in the fluorous phase. The most effective fluorous moieties are linear or branched perfuoralkyl chains with high carbon number; they may also contain heteroatoms. The chemical transformation may occur either in the fluorous phase or at the interface of the two phases. The application of FBS has been demonstrated for the extraction of rhodium from toluene and for the hydroformylation of olefins. The ability to separate a catalyst or a reagent from the products completely at mild conditions could lead to industrial application of homogeneous catalysts or reagents and to the development of more environmentally benign processes.

  19. Structural basis for the enhanced stability of highly fluorinated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Buer, Benjamin C.; Meagher, Jennifer L.; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Marsh, E. Neil G.

    2012-01-01

    Noncanonical amino acids have proved extremely useful for modifying the properties of proteins. Among them, extensively fluorinated (fluorous) amino acids seem particularly effective in increasing protein stability; however, in the absence of structural data, the basis of this stabilizing effect remains poorly understood. To address this problem, we solved X-ray structures for three small proteins with hydrophobic cores that are packed with either fluorocarbon or hydrocarbon side chains and compared their stabilities. Although larger, the fluorinated residues are accommodated within the protein with minimal structural perturbation, because they closely match the shape of the hydrocarbon side chains that they replace. Thus, stability increases seem to be better explained by increases in buried hydrophobic surface area that accompany fluorination than by specific fluorous interactions between fluorinated side chains. This finding is illustrated by the design of a highly fluorinated protein that, by compensating for the larger volume and surface area of the fluorinated side chains, exhibits similar stability to its nonfluorinated counterpart. These structure-based observations should inform efforts to rationally modulate protein function using noncanonical amino acids. PMID:22411812

  20. Global warming and end-use efficiency implications of replacing CFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, P.D.; Fischer, S.K.

    1991-12-31

    The direct contribution of CFCs to calculated global warming has been recognized for some time. As a result of the international agreement to phase out CFCs due to stratospheric ozone and the ensuing search for suitable alternatives, there has recently been increased attention on the DIRECT global warming potential (GWP) of the fluorocarbon alternatives as greenhouse gases. However, to date there has been little focus on the INDIRECT global warming effect arising from end-use efficiency changes and associated CO{sub 2} emissions. A study being conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) addresses this combined or total global warming impact of viable options to replace CFCs in their major energy-related applications. This paper reviews selected results for air-conditioning, refrigeration, and heat pump applications. The analysis indicates that the CFC user industries have made substantial progress in approaching near-equal energy efficiency with the HCFC/HFC alternative refrigerants. The findings also bring into question the relative importance of the DIRECT (chemical-related) effect in many applications. Replacing CFCs is an important step in reducing the total global warming impact, and at present the HCFC and HFCS appear to offer the best efficiency and lowest total impact of options available in the relatively short time period required for the transition away from CFCs.

  1. Development of a passive dosimeter for hydrogen fluoride monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.S.; Monat, J.P.

    1983-02-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF), a toxic industrial chemical, is used in the manufacture of most fluorine products and in many other industrial processes. Major uses are in fluorocarbon manufacture, aluminum production, glass etching, steel pickling, uranium processing, and as a catalyst for petroleum refining. A reliable passive dosimeter has been developed for sampling of airborne hydrogen fluoride vapor. The device is small (7.7 cm x 5.4 cm x 1.9 cm) and can easily and conveniently be worn on one's lapel. It consists of polyethylene and polypropylene parts and an alkaline impregnated polypropylene collection element. It is completely self-contained requiring no pumps, impingers, or sampling tubes. Subsequent to sampling, the collection element is analyzed quickly and easily with a fluoride selective-ion electrode. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine precision, linearity, interference effects, influences of temperature and humidity, and collection element stability over time. Results of the tests indicate that the Gasbadge/sup TM/ HF dosimeter is an excellent passive HF monitor for work spaces, and that results obtained with it are accurate within +/- 17.4% in the action range and +/- 10.3% overall. These results have been corroborated in a field study. (JMT)

  2. Surface microstructuring of transparent materials by laser-induced backside wet etching using excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niino, Hiroyuki; Ding, Ximing; Kurosaki, Ryozo; Narazaki, Aiko; Sato, Tadatake; Kawaguchi, Yoshizo

    2003-11-01

    Silica glass is an important material in optics and optoelectronics because of its outstanding properties, such as transparence in a wide wavelength range, strong damage resistance for laser irradiation, and high chemical stability. In order to develop simpler processes of micro-fabricating silica glass using a pulsed laser, we have investigated a one-step method to microfabricate a silica glass plate using laser-induced backside wet etching (LIBWE) upon irradiation with a ns-pulsed excimer laser. Our idea of LIBWE is based on the deposition of laser energy on the surface of silica glass using ablation of a dye solution. When the dye solution was ablated upon the laser irradiation, the etching of a surface layer was performed on the silica glass. We have succeeded in the micro-fabrication of such transparent materials as silica glass, quartz, calcium fluoride, sapphire and fluorocarbon resin. The advantages of our LIBWE method are as follows, (1) a lwo laser fluence and constant etch rate, (2) microfabrication without debris and cracks formation, (3) large area irradiation with an excimer laser beam through a mask projection, (4) simple pre/post-treatment on target substrates. This is a one-step process simpler method at ambient pressure, which would be used for mass production.

  3. Void fraction in two-phase flow in liquid impingement cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsone, Yasuo; Nakajima, Tadakatsu; Sasaki, Shigeyuki; Nishihara, Atsuo; Hirasawa, Shigeki

    1995-12-31

    Void fractions in forced-convection subcooled boiling were analyzed to gain information for designing a liquid impingement cooling system for electronic devices. The boiling vessel used in this study has a 160 mm x 160 mm heater. The heater is positioned to face jets of dielectric fluorocarbon (C{sub 6}F{sub 14},FC-72) liquid from circular nozzles 4 mm in diameter. The distance between the heater surface and the nozzles is 6 mm. The test section, which can be rotated 360 degrees, consists of 1.03-m-long acrylic pipes, 20 mm and 15 mm in diameter allows experiments to be conducted for both horizontal and vertical flow. Void fractions in the test section were examined with respect to variations in liquid jet temperature (T{sub Lin} = 26 C and 36C); nozzle exit velocity (U = 0.37--10 m/s); liquid pressure in the vessel (P{sub m} = 115--118 kPa); and heat flux in the heater (q = 3--50 W/cm{sup 2}). Results show that the effects on void fractions during liquid jet impingement flow boiling of nozzle exit velocity, pressure in the vessel, and heat flux in the heater, can be estimated by revising the exponents of these variables depending on the pressure of Miropolskii`s correlation of channel flow boiling.

  4. Tris(Cyclopentadienyl)Uranium-t-Butyl: Synthesis, reactions, and mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Weydert, M.

    1993-04-01

    Compounds (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 3]U(t-Bu) were prepared for R = H, Me, Et. Their decomposition products in aromatic solvents are consistent with a radical decomposition pathway induced by solvent-assisted U-C bond homolysis. NMR was used to study the reactions of (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 3]UCl with t-BuLi (R = t-Bu, Me[sub 3]Si). Reactions of (MeC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 3]U(t-Bu) with Lewis bases and fluorocarbons were studied. Analogous reaction chemistry between (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 3]ThX systems and t-BuLi was also studied, and reactivity differences between U and Th are discussed. Synthesis of sterically crowded (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 4]U compounds is next considered. Reaction of the trivalent (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 3]U with (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 2]Hg results in formation of (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 4]U. Steric congestion, cyclopentadienyl ligand exchange, and electron transfer are discussed. (DLC)

  5. Tris(Cyclopentadienyl)Uranium-t-Butyl: Synthesis, reactions, and mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Weydert, M.

    1993-04-01

    Compounds (RC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 3}U(t-Bu) were prepared for R = H, Me, Et. Their decomposition products in aromatic solvents are consistent with a radical decomposition pathway induced by solvent-assisted U-C bond homolysis. NMR was used to study the reactions of (RC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 3}UCl with t-BuLi (R = t-Bu, Me{sub 3}Si). Reactions of (MeC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 3}U(t-Bu) with Lewis bases and fluorocarbons were studied. Analogous reaction chemistry between (RC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 3}ThX systems and t-BuLi was also studied, and reactivity differences between U and Th are discussed. Synthesis of sterically crowded (RC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 4}U compounds is next considered. Reaction of the trivalent (RC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 3}U with (RC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 2}Hg results in formation of (RC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 4}U. Steric congestion, cyclopentadienyl ligand exchange, and electron transfer are discussed. (DLC)

  6. Fluorine-Rich Planetary Environments as Possible Habitats for Life

    PubMed Central

    Budisa, Nediljko; Kubyshkin, Vladimir; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    In polar aprotic organic solvents, fluorine might be an element of choice for life that uses selected fluorinated building blocks as monomers of choice for self-assembling of its catalytic polymers. Organofluorine compounds are extremely rare in the chemistry of life as we know it. Biomolecules, when fluorinated such as peptides or proteins, exhibit a “fluorous effect”, i.e., they are fluorophilic (neither hydrophilic nor lipophilic). Such polymers, capable of creating self-sorting assemblies, resist denaturation by organic solvents by exclusion of fluorocarbon side chains from the organic phase. Fluorous cores consist of a compact interior, which is shielded from the surrounding solvent. Thus, we can anticipate that fluorine-containing “teflon”-like or “non-sticking” building blocks might be monomers of choice for the synthesis of organized polymeric structures in fluorine-rich planetary environments. Although no fluorine-rich planetary environment is known, theoretical considerations might help us to define chemistries that might support life in such environments. For example, one scenario is that all molecular oxygen may be used up by oxidation reactions on a planetary surface and fluorine gas could be released from F-rich magma later in the history of a planetary body to result in a fluorine-rich planetary environment. PMID:25370378

  7. Investigation of mixed fluorinated and triblock copolymer liquid crystals: imprint for mesostructured bimodal silica.

    PubMed

    Assaker, Karine; Naboulsi, Issam; Stébé, Marie-José; Emo, Mélanie; Blin, Jean-Luc

    2015-05-15

    Due to the difference in «mutual phobicity» between fluorocarbon and hydrocarbon chains, mixtures of fluorinated and hydrogenated surfactants are excellent candidates to design bimodal systems having two types of mesopores. In literature, only a few papers deal with these bimodal systems. Here hexagonal liquid crystal mixtures of the polyoxyethylene fluoroalkyl ether [R(F)8(EO)9] and the Pluronic [P123] have been used to template this kind of mesostructure through the liquid crystal mechanism, which is barely considered. After the detailed investigation of the R(F)8(EO)9/P123/water liquid crystal domain, materials have been synthesized and characterized by small angle X-ray scattering, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis. Our results show that this system provides two separate pore sizes in the materials over the mesoporous range. The ratio between the small mesopores and the large ones depends on the proportion between the porogens in the mixture. Nonetheless, we also outline that a minimum quantity of silica is required to recover the two hexagonal networks. PMID:25666458

  8. A robust superhydrophobic PVDF composite coating with wear/corrosion-resistance properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huaiyuan; Liu, Zhanjian; Wang, Enqun; Yuan, Ruixia; Gao, Dong; Zhang, Xiguang; Zhu, Yanji

    2015-03-01

    A robust wear/corrosion-resistant superhydrophobic polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)/fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP)/carbon nanofibers (CNFs) composite coating with a water contact angle (WCA) of 164 ± 1.5° and a slide angle of 5 ± 0.2° has been fabricated through the combination of chemical etching and spraying technique. The WCA of the coating still maintains 141 ± 1.2° after 10,000 times rubbing due to the designed internal nano/micro-structure and the slide angle increases from 5 ± 0.2° to 20 ± 0.5°. The prepared coating also demonstrates excellent corrosion-resistance property under strongly acidic or alkaline conditions for 15 days. The wear-resistance of the superhydrophobic coating is approximately 5 times higher than the pure PVDF coating and commercial fluorocarbon coating. These excellent mechanical properties are attributed to the new groups of Cdbnd C and Csbnd C by dehydrofluorination of PVDF and the new ?-phase of PVDF by recrystallization of the ?-phase. Furthermore, the enhanced adhesive ability of the coating corresponds with Grade 1 according to GB/T9286, mainly because that the interaction force among PVDF macromolecules can be intensified by chemical cross-linking and the hydroxyl groups formed on the surface of the aluminum plate by etching. It is believed that this robust multifunctional superhydrophobic coating may have the potential values in large-scale application.

  9. Fluorinated lamellar phases: structural characterisation and use as templates for highly ordered silica materials.

    PubMed

    Pottage, Matthew J; Kusuma, Tiara; Grillo, Isabelle; Garvey, Christopher J; Stickland, Anthony D; Tabor, Rico F

    2014-07-21

    Highly ordered silica was synthesised by using a lamellar phase comprising the anionic fluorinated surfactant sodium perfluorooctanoate and the partially-fluorinated co-surfactant/oil 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctan-1-ol in water. The phase behaviour of this system was thoroughly analysed, and it was found that even low levels of the alcohol (<0.5 mol%) were sufficient to induce a phase change from normal micelles to a lamellar phase, rationalised as a result of geometric and electrostatic effects. The properties of these phases were compared to their hydrocarbon analogues, demonstrating the unique and valuable properties exhibited by fluorocarbons, directly related with the observed nanostructure. Small-angle neutron scattering was used to analyse the internal structure of the systems, providing information on the inter-lamellar spacing, bilayer thickness and membrane elasticity. The potential for these phases to act as shear-thinning lubricants was assessed using oscillatory rheology, obtaining shear-dependent viscosity along with storage and loss moduli. PMID:24871766

  10. Computational modeling study of the radial line slot antenna microwave plasma source with comparisons to experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Raja, Laxminarayan L.; Mahadevan, Shankar; Ventzek, Peter L. G.; Yoshikawa, Jun

    2013-05-15

    The radial line slot antenna plasma source is a high-density microwave plasma source comprising a high electron temperature source region within the plasma skin depth from a coupling window and low electron temperature diffusion region far from the window. The plasma is typically comprised of inert gases like argon and mixtures of halogen or fluorocarbon gases for etching. Following the experimental study of Tian et al.[J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 24, 1421 (2006)], a two-dimensional computational model is used to describe the essential features of the source. A high density argon plasma is described using the quasi-neutral approximation and coupled to a frequency-domain electromagnetic wave solver to describe the plasma-microwave interactions in the source. The plasma is described using a multispecies plasma chemistry mechanism developed specifically for microwave excitation conditions. The plasma is nonlocal by nature with locations of peak power deposition and peak plasma density being very different. The spatial distribution of microwave power coupling depends on whether the plasma is under- or over-dense and is described well by the model. The model predicts the experimentally observed low-order diffusion mode radial plasma profiles. The trends of spatial profiles of electron density and electron temperature over a wide range of power and pressure conditions compare well with experimental results.

  11. Nonfunctionalized Polydimethyl Siloxane Superhydrophobic Surfaces Based on Hydrophobic-Hydrophilic Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Polizos, Georgios; Tuncer, Enis; Qiu, Xiaofeng; Aytug, Tolga; Kidder, Michelle; Messman, Jamie M; Sauers, Isidor

    2011-01-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces based on polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) were fabricated using a 50:50 PDM-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) blend. PDMS was mixed with PEG, and incomplete phase separation yielded a hierarchic structure. The phase-separated mixture was annealed at a temperature close to the crystallization temperature of the PEG. The PEG crystals were formed isothermally at the PDMS/PEG interface, leading to an engineered surface with PDMS spherulites. The resulting roughness of the surface was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The PDMS spherulites, a few micrometers in diameter observed from SEM images, were found to have an undulated (rippled) surface with nanometer-sized features. The combination of micrometer- and nanometer-sized surface features created a fractal surface and increased the water contact angle (WCA) of PDMS more than 60, resulting in a superhydrophobic PDMS surface with WCA of >160 degrees. The active surface layer for the superhydrophobicity was approximately 100 mu m thick, illustrating that the material had bulk superhydrophobicity compared to conventional fluorocarbon or fluorinated coated rough surfaces. Theoretical analysis of the fractal surface indicates that the constructed surface has a fractal dimension of 2.5, which corresponds to the Apollonian sphere packing.

  12. Quantum cascade laser based monitoring of CF{sub 2} radical concentration as a diagnostic tool of dielectric etching plasma processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hübner, M.; Lang, N.; Röpcke, J.; Helden, J. H. van; Zimmermann, S.; Schulz, S. E.; Buchholtz, W.

    2015-01-19

    Dielectric etching plasma processes for modern interlevel dielectrics become more and more complex by the introduction of new ultra low-k dielectrics. One challenge is the minimization of sidewall damage, while etching ultra low-k porous SiCOH by fluorocarbon plasmas. The optimization of this process requires a deeper understanding of the concentration of the CF{sub 2} radical, which acts as precursor in the polymerization of the etch sample surfaces. In an industrial dielectric etching plasma reactor, the CF{sub 2} radical was measured in situ using a continuous wave quantum cascade laser (cw-QCL) around 1106.2?cm{sup ?1}. We measured Doppler-resolved ro-vibrational absorption lines and determined absolute densities using transitions in the ?{sub 3} fundamental band of CF{sub 2} with the aid of an improved simulation of the line strengths. We found that the CF{sub 2} radical concentration during the etching plasma process directly correlates to the layer structure of the etched wafer. Hence, this correlation can serve as a diagnostic tool of dielectric etching plasma processes. Applying QCL based absorption spectroscopy opens up the way for advanced process monitoring and etching controlling in semiconductor manufacturing.

  13. Surface-catalyzed air oxidation of hydrazines: Environmental chamber studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilduff, Jan E.; Davis, Dennis D.; Koontz, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    The surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of fuel hydrazines were studied in a 6500-liter fluorocarbon-film chamber at 80 to 100 ppm concentrations. First-order rate constants for the reactions catalyzed by aluminum, water-damaged aluminum (Al/Al2O3), stainless steel 304L, galvanized steel and titanium plates with surface areas of 2 to 24 sq m were determined. With 23.8 sq m of Al/Al2O3 the surface-catalyzed air oxidation of hydrazine had a half-life of 2 hours, diimide (N2H2) was observed as an intermediate and traces of ammonia were present in the final product mixture. The Al/Al2O3 catalyzed oxidation of monomethylhydrazine yielded methyldiazine (HN = NCH3) as an intermediate and traces of methanol. Unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine gave no detectable products. The relative reactivities of hydrazine, MMH and UDMH were 130 : 7.3 : 1.0, respectively. The rate constants for Al/Al2O3-catalyzed oxidation of hydrazine and MMH were proportional to the square of the surface area of the plates. Mechanisms for the surface-catalyzed oxidation of hydrazine and diimide and the formation of ammonia are proposed.

  14. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar-cell encapsulants. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1982-07-01

    Potentially useful low cost encapsulation materials are evaluated. The goal of the program is to identify, evaluate, test, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long life solar cell modules. Technical investigations have concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants, the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatments, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. Experiments are underway to assess the durability and cost effectiveness of coatings for protection of steel. Investigations are continuing with commercial maintenance coatings based on fluorocarbon and silicone-alkyd chemistries. Experiments were conducted to determine the effectiveness of occlusive coatings for wood products such as hard-board. An experimental program continued to determine the usefulness of soil resistant coatings. Primers were evaluated for effectiveness in bonding candidate pottants to outer covers, glass and substate materials. A program of accelerated aging and life predictive strategies is being conducted and data are reported for sunlamp exposure and thermal aging. Supporting activities are also discussed briefly. (LEW)

  15. Effects of feedstock availability on the negative ion behavior in a C4F8 inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shu-Xia; Gao, Fei; Wang, Ya-Ping; Wang, You-Nian; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, the negative ion behavior in a C4F8 inductively coupled plasma (ICP) is investigated using a hybrid model. The model predicts a non-monotonic variation of the total negative ion density with power at low pressure (10-30 mTorr), and this trend agrees well with experiments that were carried out in many fluorocarbon (fc) ICP sources, like C2F6, CHF3, and C4F8. This behavior is explained by the availability of feedstock C4F8 gas as a source of the negative ions, as well as by the presence of low energy electrons due to vibrational excitation at low power. The maximum of the negative ion density shifts to low power values upon decreasing pressure, because of the more pronounced depletion of C4F8 molecules, and at high pressure (˜50 mTorr), the anion density continuously increases with power, which is similar to fc CCP sources. Furthermore, the negative ion composition is identified in this paper. Our work demonstrates that for a clear understanding of the negative ion behavior in radio frequency C4F8 plasma sources, one needs to take into account many factors, like the attachment characteristics, the anion composition, the spatial profiles, and the reactor configuration. Finally, a detailed comparison of our simulation results with experiments is conducted.

  16. Liquid ventilation in dogs: an apparatus for normobaric and hyperbaric studies.

    PubMed

    Harris, D J; Coggin, R R; Roby, J; Feezor, M; Turner, G; Bennett, P B

    1983-04-01

    A liquid-breathing apparatus is described for remote surface studies and for use in experiments of near-hydraulic compression in dogs. It consists of a flexible tank sealed against chamber gas, containing a supply of clean warmed (38 degrees C) fluorocarbon (FC-80) equilibrated with 1 bar O2 and an electronically controlled means of delivering the liquid to the dog. Each breath (tidal volume 290 ml) was "weighed" into the animal by the signal from a force platform supporting the dog and a digital control unit that automatically actuated inspired-and expired-line solenoid valves. The apparatus was successfully used to remotely maintain liquid ventilation in awake dogs for 2 h during surface studies (5 dogs) and in dives to 1,000 m seawater (5 dogs). During liquid breathing, mean arterial O2 partial pressure was always adequate (congruent to 300 Torr) and mean arterial CO2 partial pressure was normal (less than or equal to 40 Torr). An uncompensated metabolic acidosis was indicated by low pH values and a decrease in arterial base excess to--4.5 meq x 1(-1). O2 uptake and CO2 output appeared to be significantly lower (42 and 35%, respectively) during liquid ventilation. PMID:6222021

  17. A microfluidic apparatus for the study of ice nucleation in supercooled water drops.

    PubMed

    Stan, Claudiu A; Schneider, Grégory F; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S; Hashimoto, Michinao; Ibanescu, Mihai; Wiley, Benjamin J; Whitesides, George M

    2009-08-21

    This paper describes a microfluidic instrument that produces drops of supercooled water suspended in a moving stream of liquid fluorocarbon, and measures the temperatures at which ice nucleates in the drops. A microfluidic chip containing a monodisperse drop generator and a straight channel with 38 embedded resistance thermometers was placed in contact with a seven-zone temperature-control plate and imaged under a microscope with a high-speed camera. This instrument can record the freezing temperatures of tens of thousands of drops within minutes, with an accuracy of 0.4 degrees C. The ice-nucleation temperatures in approximately 80-microm drops were reported for the freezing of 37 061 drops of pure water, and of 8898 drops of water seeded with silver iodide. Nucleation of ice in pure water was homogenous and occurred at temperatures between -36 and -37.8 degrees C, while water containing silver iodide froze between -10 and -19 degrees C. The instrument recorded the largest sets of individual freezing temperatures (37 061), had the fastest data acquisition rate (75 measurements/s), and the best optical (3 microm) and temporal (70 micros) resolutions among instruments designed to study nucleation of ice. The dendritic growth of ice in 150-microm drops of supercooled water at -35 degrees C was observed and imaged at a rate of 16 000 frames/s. PMID:19636459

  18. Cask systems development program seal technology

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, M.M.; Edwards, K.R.; Humphreys, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    General design or test performance requirements for radioactive materials (RAM) packages are specified in Title 10 of the US Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 (10 CFR 71). Seals that provide the containment system interface between the packaging body and the closure must function in both high- and low-temperature environments under dynamic and static conditions. Experiments were performed to characterize the performance of several seal materials at low temperatures. Helium leak tests on face seals were used to compare the materials. Materials tested include butyl, neoprene, ethylene propylene, fuorosilicone, silicone, Eypel, Kalrez, Teflon, fluorocarbon, and Teflon/silicone composites. Results show that the seal materials tested, with the exception of silicone S613-60, are not leak tight at manufacturer low-temperature ratings. This paper documents the initial series of experiments developed to characterize the performance of several static seals under conditions representative of RAM transport container environments. Helium leak rates of face seals were measured at low and ambient temperatures to compare seal materials. As scaling laws have not been developed for seals, the leakage rates measured in this program are intended to be used in a qualitative rather than quantitative manner. 5 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Lubricant replacement in rolling element bearings for weapon surety devices

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, R.; Dugger, M.T.; Varga, K.S.

    1996-05-01

    Stronglink switches are a weapon surety device that is critical to the nuclear safety theme in modem nuclear weapons. These stronglink switches use rolling element bearings which contain a lubricant consisting of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) fragments. Ozone-depleting solvents are used in both the manufacture and application of this lubricant. An alternate bearing lubrication for stronglink switches is needed that will provide long-term chemical stability, low migration and consistent performance. Candidates that were evaluated include bearings with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers, bearings with TiC-coated balls, and bearings with Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls and steel races. These candidates were compared to the lubricants currently used which are bearings lubricated with PTFE fragments of low molecular weight in a fluorocarbon solvent. The candidates were also compared to bearings lubricated with a diester oil which is representative of bearing lubricants used in industrial applications. Evaluation consisted of cycling preloaded bearings and subjecting them to 23 gRMS random vibration. All of the candidates are viable substitutes for low load application where bearing preload is approximately 1 pound. For high load applications where the bearing preload is approximately 10 pounds, bearings with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers appear to be the best substitutes. Bearings with TiC-coated balls also appear to be a viable candidate but these bearings did not perform as well as the sputtered MoS{sub 2}.

  20. A conformal oxidation-resistant, plasma-polymerized coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Morton A.; Wydeven, Theodore; Lerner, Narcinda R.

    1991-01-01

    A comparative study was made of the surface recession (etching) of thin films of plasma polymerized tetrafluoro ethylene (PPTFE), polytetrafluoro ethylene (PTFE), and ion-beam sputter deposited polytetrafluoro ethylene (SPTFE) exposed to ground-state atomic oxygen downstream from a nonequilibrium radio-frequency O2 plasma. At 22 C, the etch rates for PTFE, SPTFE, and PPTFE were in the ratio of 8.7:1.8:1.0. A thin, conformal coating of PPTFE (etch rate of 0.3 nm/h at 22 C) was found to protect an underlying cast film of a reactive polymer, cis-1,4 polybutadiene, against ground-state atomic oxygen attack for the time required to fully etch away the PPTFE coating. From ESCA analysis, PTFE exhibited only minor surface oxidation (uptake of 0.5 atom percent O) upon etching, its F/C ratio decreasing slightly from 2.00 to 1.97; PPTFE exhibited considerable surface oxidation (uptake of 5.9 atom percent O) intermediate between those of PTFE and PPTFE, with a decrease in F/C ratio from 1.73 to 1.67. A plasma-polymerized fluorocarbon coating such as PPTFE might be useful for space applications to protect polymers that are vulnerable to oxidation or degradation by oxygen atoms.

  1. Influence of open area ratio on microstructure shape in Cu-Ni alloy electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Min; Lee, Sung Ho; Ko, Jong Soo

    2015-02-01

    This research experimentally analyzed the influence of the open area ratio (OAR) on the formation and growth of the microstructure in Cu-Ni alloy electrodeposition. The OAR was controlled by changing the pitch of circular patterns with a diameter of 20 µm. For an OAR higher than 20 %, the electrodeposited structures grew vertically in pillar-like formations. As the OAR was decreased from 100 to 20 %, the density, height, and width of the structures increased. In addition, in this OAR range, the structures formed along the edge area of the circular patterns. In contrast, for an OAR lower than 10 %, dendrite structures were generated. The electrodeposited structures were coated with a hydrophobic plasma-polymerized fluorocarbon (PPFC) layer. In the electrodeposited sample without circular patterns (OAR = 100 %) with an OAR smaller than 1.25 %, the measured contact angles were almost the same as the contact angle (107°) measured from the flat surface without electrodeposition. In contrast, the samples with an OAR range of 2.5-50 % were modified to be superhydrophobic, and they demonstrated an excellent self-cleaning ability.

  2. Influence of open area ratio on microstructure shape in Cu-Ni alloy electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Min; Lee, Sung Ho; Ko, Jong Soo

    2014-09-01

    This research experimentally analyzed the influence of the open area ratio (OAR) on the formation and growth of the microstructure in Cu-Ni alloy electrodeposition. The OAR was controlled by changing the pitch of circular patterns with a diameter of 20 µm. For an OAR higher than 20 %, the electrodeposited structures grew vertically in pillar-like formations. As the OAR was decreased from 100 to 20 %, the density, height, and width of the structures increased. In addition, in this OAR range, the structures formed along the edge area of the circular patterns. In contrast, for an OAR lower than 10 %, dendrite structures were generated. The electrodeposited structures were coated with a hydrophobic plasma-polymerized fluorocarbon (PPFC) layer. In the electrodeposited sample without circular patterns (OAR = 100 %) with an OAR smaller than 1.25 %, the measured contact angles were almost the same as the contact angle (107°) measured from the flat surface without electrodeposition. In contrast, the samples with an OAR range of 2.5-50 % were modified to be superhydrophobic, and they demonstrated an excellent self-cleaning ability.

  3. Transient Pressure Test Article (TPTA) 1.1 and 1.1A, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebells, Clarence A.

    1988-01-01

    This final test report presents the results obtained during the static hot firing and cold-gas high Q tests of the first Transient Pressure Test Article (TPTA) 1.1. The TPTA consisted of field test joints A and B, which were the original RSRM J-insulation configuration, with a metal capture feature. It also consisted of a flight configuration nozzle-to-case test joint (Joint D) with shorter vent slots. Fluorocarbon O-rings were used in all the test joints. The purpose of the TPTA tests is to evaluate and characterize the RSMR field and nozzle-to-case joints under the influence of ignition and strut loads during liftoff anf high Q. All objectives of the cold-gas high Q (TPTA 1.1A) test were met and all measurements were close to predicted values. During the static hot-firing test (TPTA 1.1), the motor was inadvertently plugged by the quench injector plug, making it a more severe test, although no strut loads were applied. The motor was depressurized after approximately 11 min using an auxiliary system, and no anomalies were noted. In the static hot-firing test, pressure was incident on the insulation and the test joint gaps were within the predicted range. During the static hot-firing test, no strut loads were applied because the loading system malfunctioned. For this test, all measurements were within range of similar tests performed without strut loads.

  4. Solar silicon via improved and expanded metallurgical silicon technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. P.; Dosaj, V. D.; Mccormick, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    A completed preliminary survey of silica sources indicates that sufficient quantities of high-purity quartz are available in the U.S. and Canada to meet goals. Supply can easily meet demand for this little-sought commodity. Charcoal, as a reductant for silica, can be purified to a sufficient level by high-temperature fluorocarbon treatment and vacuum processing. High-temperature treatment causes partial graphitization which can lead to difficulty in smelting. Smelting of Arkansas quartz and purified charcoal produced kilogram quantities of silicon having impurity levels generally much lower than in MG-Si. Half of the goal was met of increasing the boron resistivity from 0.03 ohm-cm in metallurgical silicon to 0.3 ohm-cm in solar silicon. A cost analysis of the solidification process indicate $3.50-7.25/kg Si for the Czochralski-type process and $1.50-4.25/kg Si for the Bridgman-type technique.

  5. Soil solution chemistry of sewage-sludge incinerator ash and phosphate fertilizer amended soil

    SciTech Connect

    Bierman, P.M.; Rosen, C.J.; Bloom, P.R.; Nater, E.A.

    1995-03-01

    The chemical composition of the soil provides useful information on the feasibility of amending agricultural land with municipal and industrial waste, because the soil solution is the medium for most soil chemical reactions, the mobile phase in soils, and the medium for mineral adsorption by plant roots. The soil solutions studies in this research were from plots in a 4-yr field experiment conducted to evaluate the effects of the trace metals and P in sewage-sludge incinerator ash. Treatments compared ash with equivalent P rates from triple-superphosphate fertilizer and a control receiving no P application. Ash and phosphate fertilizer were applied annually at rates of 35, 70, and 140 kg citrate-soluble P ha{sup -1}. Cumulative ash applications during 4 yr amounted to 3.6, 7.2, and 14.4 Mg ash ha{sup -1}. Soil solutions were obtained by centrifugation-immiscible liquid displacement using a fluorocarbon displacing agent. Following chemical analysis, a chemical speciation model was used to determine possible solubility-controlling minerals for trace metals and P, and correlations between solution composition and plant uptake were analyzed. 37 refs., 5 tabs.

  6. The evolution of spatial ordering of oil drops fast spreading on a water surface.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Daigo; Nakajima, Chika; Shioi, Akihisa; Krafft, Marie Pierre; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    The design of dynamically self-assembled systems is of high interest in science and technology. Here, we report a unique cascade in the self-ordering of droplets accompanied by a dewetting transition. The dynamic self-emergent droplets are observed when a thin liquid layer of an immiscible fluorocarbon oil (perfluorooctyl bromide, PFOB) is placed on a water surface. Due to the gradual evaporation of PFOB, a circular PFOB-free domain appears as a result of a local dewetting transition. A circular pearling structure is generated at the rim with the growth of the dewetting hole. As the next stage, linear arrays of droplets are generated in a radial manner from the centre of the hole. These one-dimensional arrangements then evolve into two-dimensional hexagonal arrays of microdroplets through collective rhythmical shrinking/expanding motions. The emergence of such dynamic patterns is discussed in terms of the nonlinear kinetics of the dewetting transition under thermodynamically dissipative conditions. PMID:25998157

  7. Discrete elements for 3D microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Krisna C; Thompson, Bryant; Malmstadt, Noah

    2014-10-21

    Microfluidic systems are rapidly becoming commonplace tools for high-precision materials synthesis, biochemical sample preparation, and biophysical analysis. Typically, microfluidic systems are constructed in monolithic form by means of microfabrication and, increasingly, by additive techniques. These methods restrict the design and assembly of truly complex systems by placing unnecessary emphasis on complete functional integration of operational elements in a planar environment. Here, we present a solution based on discrete elements that liberates designers to build large-scale microfluidic systems in three dimensions that are modular, diverse, and predictable by simple network analysis techniques. We develop a sample library of standardized components and connectors manufactured using stereolithography. We predict and validate the flow characteristics of these individual components to design and construct a tunable concentration gradient generator with a scalable number of parallel outputs. We show that these systems are rapidly reconfigurable by constructing three variations of a device for generating monodisperse microdroplets in two distinct size regimes and in a high-throughput mode by simple replacement of emulsifier subcircuits. Finally, we demonstrate the capability for active process monitoring by constructing an optical sensing element for detecting water droplets in a fluorocarbon stream and quantifying their size and frequency. By moving away from large-scale integration toward standardized discrete elements, we demonstrate the potential to reduce the practice of designing and assembling complex 3D microfluidic circuits to a methodology comparable to that found in the electronics industry. PMID:25246553

  8. Sorption of perfluorooctanoic acid, perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluoroheptanoic acid on granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Di; Luo, Qi; Gao, Bin; Chiang, Sheau-Yun Dora; Woodward, David; Huang, Qingguo

    2016-02-01

    The sorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA) on granular activated carbon (GAC) was characterized and compared to explore the underlying mechanisms. Sorption of the three perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) on GAC appeared to be a rapid intra-particle diffusion process, which were well represented by the pseudo-second-order rate model with the sorption rate following the order PFOS > PFOA > PFHpA. Sorption isotherm data were well fitted by the Freundlich model with the sorption capacity (Kf) of PFOS, PFOA and PFHpA being 4.45, 2.42 and 1.66 respectively. This suggests that the hydrophilic head group on PFAAs, i.e. sulfonate vs carboxylic, has a strong influence on their sorption. Comparison between PFOA and PFHpA revealed that hydrophobicity could also play a role in the sorption of PFAAs on GAC when the fluorocarbon chain length is different. Analyses using Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR)-Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy suggested possible formation of a negative charge-assisted H-bond between PFAAs and the functionalities on GAC surfaces, including non-aromatic ketones, sulfides, and halogenated hydrocarbons. PMID:26606188

  9. HSQ process development for a superior resolution and a reasonable sensitivity for an EB master-mold for nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hideo; Iyama, Hiromasa; Kagatsume, Takeshi; Sato, Takashi; Kishimoto, Shuji; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2013-09-01

    Half-pitch (hp) 11 to 7.5nm will be resolution requirement for 3 to 5 years later in lithography technology. In specific, hp16nm in 2015 and hp11nm in 2019 for flash memory, bit pitch (bp) 18nm in 2015, bp15nm in 2018 for HDD patterned media, such extremely fine patterning capability is expected. We have been studying a positive resist ZEP520A particularly on its developers and process for the last 5 years. And, its resolution limit is hp16nm in lines and spaces pattern and bp22nm bit patterns for patterned media, in a large and practical patterning area (Figure 1). ZE520A is an option to pursue the resolution limit for the future. However, since it is a positive-tone resist, dark erosion is significant between holes particularly on bp25nm and below, even when the highest resolution developer of an alcohol and a fluoro-carbon mixture is used. ZEP holes in the nearest were not isolated but connected due to excess dark erosion, which seemed to be caused by EB back-scattering and fogging. If a negative-tone resist is employed, it would cause residue instead between pillars. However, the residue can be eliminated by etching back to the bottom, and the pillars can be remained without defects (Figure 2).

  10. Regulation of adhesion behavior of murine macrophage using supported lipid membranes displaying tunable mannose domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaindl, T.; Oelke, J.; Pasc, A.; Kaufmann, S.; Konovalov, O. V.; Funari, S. S.; Engel, U.; Wixforth, A.; Tanaka, M.

    2010-07-01

    Highly uniform, strongly correlated domains of synthetically designed lipids can be incorporated into supported lipid membranes. The systematic characterization of membranes displaying a variety of domains revealed that the equilibrium size of domains significantly depends on the length of fluorocarbon chains, which can be quantitatively interpreted within the framework of an equivalent dipole model. A mono-dispersive, narrow size distribution of the domains enables us to treat the inter-domain correlations as two-dimensional colloidal crystallization and calculate the potentials of mean force. The obtained results demonstrated that both size and inter-domain correlation can precisely be controlled by the molecular structures. By coupling ?-D-mannose to lipid head groups, we studied the adhesion behavior of the murine macrophage (J774A.1) on supported membranes. Specific adhesion and spreading of macrophages showed a clear dependence on the density of functional lipids. The obtained results suggest that such synthetic lipid domains can be used as a defined platform to study how cells sense the size and distribution of functional molecules during adhesion and spreading.

  11. Superior performance of multilayered fluoropolymer films in low voltage electrowetting.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Dimitrios P; Tserepi, Angeliki; Boudouvis, Andreas G; Papathanasiou, Athanasios G

    2012-02-15

    The requirement for low operational voltage in electrowetting devices, met using thin dielectrics, is usually connected with serious material failure issues. Dielectric breakdown (visible as electrolysis) is frequently evident slightly beyond the onset of the contact angle saturation. Here, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is used to deposit thin fluorocarbon films prior to the spin-coating of Teflon® amorphous fluoropolymer. The resulting multilayered hydrophobic top coating improves the electrowetting performance of the stack, by showing high resistance to dielectric breakdown at high applied voltages and for continuous long term application of DC and AC voltage. Leakage current measurements during electrowetting experiments with the proposed composite coating showed that current remains fairly constant at consecutive electrowetting tests in contrast to plain Teflon® coating in which material degradation is evident by a progressive increase in the leakage current after multiple electrowetting tests. Since the proposed composite coating demonstrates increased resistance to material failure and to dielectric breakdown even at thin configurations, its integration in electrowetting devices may impact their reliability, robustness, and lifetime. PMID:22093871

  12. Membrane treatment of Aqueous Film Forming Foam (AFFF) wastes for recovery of its active ingredients. Final report, Mar 79-Sep 80

    SciTech Connect

    Chian, E.S.K.; Wu, T.P.; Rowland, R.W.

    1980-10-01

    Ultrafiltration (UF) and Reverse Osmosis (RO) treatment of Aqueous Film Forming Foam (AFFF) solutions was investigated to determine the feasibility of employing membrane processes to separate and recover AFFF active ingredients for reuse. Studies were performed on both 6% AFFF in tap-water solutions and on actual wastewaters spiked with 3% or 6% AFFF. The AFFF materials used in this study consisted of Ansul, 3M FC-206, and 3M FC-780. Membrane employed for these studies included Abcor HFD, HFF, HFJ, and HFK tubular ultrafiltration (UF) membranes and a DuPont B-10 reverse osmosis (RO) module. Parameters monitored to represent AFFF ingredients were TOC, dissolved solids, surfactants, and % glycol. An attempt was also made to determine fluorocarbons as fluoride. Membrane fluxes were also determined. Results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of employing UF-RO processes to separate and recover the AFFF active ingredients for reuse. Approximately 75% recovery of the AFFF active ingredients as represented by the foam test was attained. An economic analysis of the membrane treatment processes indicates that it is extremely favorable in recovering the AFFF wastewater for reuse. Pilot-scale studies are, however, necessary to fully establish the process feasibilities and economics of the AFFF recovery system.

  13. Alternating SiCl4/O2 passivation steps with SF6 etch steps for silicon deep etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duluard, C. Y.; Ranson, P.; Pichon, L. E.; Pereira, J.; Oubensaid, E. H.; Lefaucheux, P.; Puech, M.; Dussart, R.

    2011-06-01

    Deep etching of silicon has been investigated in an inductively coupled plasma etch reactor using short SiCl4/O2 plasma steps to passivate the sidewalls of the etched structures. A study was first carried out to define the appropriate parameters to create, at a substrate temperature of -20 °C, a passivation layer by SiCl4/O2 plasma that resists lateral chemical etching in SF6 plasma. The most efficient passivation layer was obtained for a SiCl4/O2 gas flow ratio of 2:1, a pressure of 1 Pa and a source power of 1000 W. Ex situ analyses on a film deposited with these parameters show that it is very rich in oxygen. Silicon etching processes that alternate SF6 plasma etch steps with SiCl4/O2 plasma passivation steps were then developed. Preliminary tests in pulsed-mode conditions have enabled etch rates greater than 2 µm min-1 with selectivities higher than 220. These results show that it is possible to develop a silicon deep etching process at substrate temperatures around -20 °C that uses low SiCl4 and O2 gas flows instead of conventional fluorocarbon gases for sidewall protection.

  14. Discrete elements for 3D microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Krisna C.; Thompson, Bryant; Malmstadt, Noah

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic systems are rapidly becoming commonplace tools for high-precision materials synthesis, biochemical sample preparation, and biophysical analysis. Typically, microfluidic systems are constructed in monolithic form by means of microfabrication and, increasingly, by additive techniques. These methods restrict the design and assembly of truly complex systems by placing unnecessary emphasis on complete functional integration of operational elements in a planar environment. Here, we present a solution based on discrete elements that liberates designers to build large-scale microfluidic systems in three dimensions that are modular, diverse, and predictable by simple network analysis techniques. We develop a sample library of standardized components and connectors manufactured using stereolithography. We predict and validate the flow characteristics of these individual components to design and construct a tunable concentration gradient generator with a scalable number of parallel outputs. We show that these systems are rapidly reconfigurable by constructing three variations of a device for generating monodisperse microdroplets in two distinct size regimes and in a high-throughput mode by simple replacement of emulsifier subcircuits. Finally, we demonstrate the capability for active process monitoring by constructing an optical sensing element for detecting water droplets in a fluorocarbon stream and quantifying their size and frequency. By moving away from large-scale integration toward standardized discrete elements, we demonstrate the potential to reduce the practice of designing and assembling complex 3D microfluidic circuits to a methodology comparable to that found in the electronics industry. PMID:25246553

  15. Implementation of Ultrasonic Sensing for High Resolution Measurement of Binary Gas Mixture Fractions

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Richard; Battistin, Michele; Berry, Stephane; Bitadze, Alexander; Bonneau, Pierre; Bousson, Nicolas; Boyd, George; Bozza, Gennaro; Crespo-Lopez, Olivier; Riva, Enrico Da; Degeorge, Cyril; Deterre, Cecile; DiGirolamo, Beniamino; Doubek, Martin; Favre, Gilles; Godlewski, Jan; Hallewell, Gregory; Hasib, Ahmed; Katunin, Sergey; Langevin, Nicolas; Lombard, Didier; Mathieu, Michel; McMahon, Stephen; Nagai, Koichi; Pearson, Benjamin; Robinson, David; Rossi, Cecilia; Rozanov, Alexandre; Strauss, Michael; Vitek, Michal; Vacek, Vaclav; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    We describe an ultrasonic instrument for continuous real-time analysis of the fractional mixture of a binary gas system. The instrument is particularly well suited to measurement of leaks of a high molecular weight gas into a system that is nominally composed of a single gas. Sensitivity < 5 × 10?5 is demonstrated to leaks of octaflouropropane (C3F8) coolant into nitrogen during a long duration (18 month) continuous study. The sensitivity of the described measurement system is shown to depend on the difference in molecular masses of the two gases in the mixture. The impact of temperature and pressure variances on the accuracy of the measurement is analysed. Practical considerations for the implementation and deployment of long term, in situ ultrasonic leak detection systems are also described. Although development of the described systems was motivated by the requirements of an evaporative fluorocarbon cooling system, the instrument is applicable to the detection of leaks of many other gases and to processes requiring continuous knowledge of particular binary gas mixture fractions. PMID:24961217

  16. Langmuir Probe Measurements of Inductively Coupled Plasmas in CF4/Ar/O2 Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. V. V. S.; Meyyappan, M.; Sharma, S. P.

    2000-01-01

    Fluorocarbon gases, such as CF4, and their mixtures are widely used in contemporary low-pressure and high-density plasma processing techniques. In such plasmas Langmuir probe is one of the most commonly employed diagnostic techniques to obtain electron number density (ne), electron temperature (Te), electron energy distribution function (EEDF), mean electron energy (Ee), ion number density (ni), and plasma potential (Vp). In this paper we report probe data for planar inductively coupled plasmas in CF4/O2/Ar mixtures. By varying the relative concentrations in the mixture, radial profiles of ne, ni, Te, Ee, Vp, EEDF were measured in the mid-plane of the plasma at 10 mTorr and 20 mTorr of gas pressures, and 200 W and 300 W of RF powers. Data show that ne and ni decrease with increase of CF4 content and decrease of gas-pressure but they increase with increase of RF-power, whereas Vp increases with decrease of gas-pressure and remains independent of RF-power. However, they all peak at the center of the plasma and decrease towards the edge while Te follows the other way and increases a little with increase of power. The measured EEDFs exhibit Druyvesteyn-like distribution at all pressures and powers. Data are analyzed and will be presented.

  17. 2H,3H-Decafluoropentane-Based Nanodroplets: New Perspectives for Oxygen Delivery to Hypoxic Cutaneous Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Jithin; Khadjavi, Amina; Cavallo, Federica; Quaglino, Elena; Panariti, Alice; Rivolta, Ilaria; Benintende, Emilio; Varetto, Gianfranco; Argenziano, Monica; Troia, Adriano; Cavalli, Roberta; Guiot, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Perfluoropentane (PFP)-based oxygen-loaded nanobubbles (OLNBs) were previously proposed as adjuvant therapeutic tools for pathologies of different etiology sharing hypoxia as a common feature, including cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. Here we introduce a new platform of oxygen nanocarriers, based on 2H,3H-decafluoropentane (DFP) as core fluorocarbon. These new nanocarriers have been named oxygen-loaded nanodroplets (OLNDs) since DFP is liquid at body temperature, unlike gaseous PFP. Dextran-shelled OLNDs, available either in liquid or gel formulations, display spherical morphology, ~600 nm diameters, anionic charge, good oxygen carrying capacity, and no toxic effects on human keratinocytes after cell internalization. In vitro OLNDs result more effective in releasing oxygen to hypoxic environments than former OLNBs, as demonstrated by analysis through oxymetry. In vivo, OLNDs effectively enhance oxy-hemoglobin levels, as emerged from investigation by photoacoustic imaging. Interestingly, ultrasound (US) treatment further improves transdermal oxygen release from OLNDs. Taken together, these data suggest that US-activated, DFP-based OLNDs might be innovative, suitable and cost-effective devices to topically treat hypoxia-associated pathologies of the cutaneous tissues. PMID:25781463

  18. The effect of die materials and pressure-dependent slip on the extrusion of linear low-density polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Person, T.J.; Denn, M.M.

    1997-03-01

    The flow of linear low-density polyethylene through stainless-steel slit dies occurred at shear rates approximately 12{percent} higher than in identical {alpha}-brass dies at the same wall shear stresses, indicating near-wall slip. The flow curves were independent of gap spacing. We show through the slip theory of Hill and co-workers [J. Rheol. {bold 34}, 891{endash}918 (1990)] that a measurable gap dependence of the flow curve is not a necessary consequence of wall slip; the flow curves for both stainless steel and {alpha}-brass dies can be fit with the same rheological parameters, with a difference in the work of adhesion accounting for the differences in the flow curves. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed differences in the chemistry of brass surfaces with different pretreating, corresponding to small differences in flow curves. Fluorocarbon-coated die surfaces showed no more slip than stainless steel, while the flow curve with gold-coated surfaces followed stainless steel at intermediate stress and brass at high stress. {copyright} {ital 1997 Society of Rheology.}

  19. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Fluoroalkylsilane Monolayer Films for Adhesion Control in Microelectromechanical Systems

    SciTech Connect

    MAYER,THOMAS M.; DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; SHINN,NEAL D.; CLEWS,PEGGY J.; MICHALSKE,TERRY A.

    2000-01-26

    We have developed a new process for applying a hydrophobic, low adhesion energy coating to microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices. Monolayer films are synthesized from tridecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrooctyltrichlorosilane (FOTS) and water vapor in a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition process at room temperature. Film thickness is self-limiting by virtue of the inability of precursors to stick to the fluorocarbon surface of the film once it has formed. We have measured film densities of {approx}3 molecules nm{sup 2} and film thickness of {approx}1 nm. Films are hydrophobic, with a water contact angle >110{sup o}. We have also incorporated an in-situ downstream microwave plasma cleaning process, which provides a clean, reproducible oxide surface prior to film deposition. Adhesion tests on coated and uncoated MEMS test structures demonstrate superior performance of the FOTS coatings. Cleaned, uncoated cantilever beam structures exhibit high adhesion energies in a high humidity environment. An adhesion energy of 100 mJ m{sup -2} is observed after exposure to >90% relative humidity. Fluoroalkylsilane coated beams exhibit negligible adhesion at low humidity and {<=} 20 {micro}J m{sup -2} adhesion energy at >90% relative humidity. No obvious film degradation was observed for films exposed to >90% relative humidity at room temperature for >24 hr.

  20. Atomistic Simulations of Perfluoro Phosphonic and Phosphinic Acid Membranes and Comparisons to Nafion

    SciTech Connect

    Idupulapati, Nagesh B.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Dupuis, Michel

    2011-03-31

    We used classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the nanoscale morphology and proton transport properties of perfluoro phosphonic (FPA) and phosphinic acid (FPA-I) membranes as they are being considered for use in low temperature fuel cells. We systematically investigated these properties as a function of the hydration level. The changes in nanostructure, in transport dynamics of water and hydronium ions, and in water network percolation were extracted from MD simulations and compared with Nafion. Phosphonic and phosphinic acid moieties in FPA and FPA-I, have lower acidity than sulfonic acid in Nafion, yet the diffusion of water was observed to be faster in FPA and FPA-I than in Nafion, particularly at low hydration levels. However this did not give rise to notable differences in hydronium ion diffusion and water network percolation for these membranes over Nafion. Similar observations were also reported by our group recently in a study of perfluoro-sulfonyl imide membranes carrying stronger super-acids than sulfonic acid of Nafion. These findings together suggest no strong apparent correlation between the acidity strength of the functional acid groups and the dynamics of water and hydronium ions in hydrated polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) with similar fluorocarbon backbones and acidic group-carrying side chains. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  1. Ab Initio Study of Hydration and Proton Dissociation in Ionomer Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Idupulapati, Nagesh B.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Dupuis, Michel

    2010-07-01

    We present a comparative study of proton dissociation in various functional acidic units that are promising candidates as building blocks for polymeric electrolyte membranes. Minimum energy structures for four acidic moieties with clusters of 1-6 water molecules were determined using density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311G** level starting from chemically rational initial configurations. The perfluoro sulfonyl imide acid group (CF3CF2SO2NHSO2CF3) was observed to be the strongest acid, due to the substantial electron withdrawing effect of both fluorocarbon groups. The hydrophilic functional group (CH3OC6H3OCH3C6H4SO3H) of sulfonated polyetherether ketone (SPEEK) membrane was found to be the strongest base with the acidic proton dissociation requiring the addition of six water molecules and the hydrated proton being more tightly bound to the conjugate base. Even though both perfluoro sulfonyl imides and sulfonic acids (hydrophilic functional groups for sulfonyl imide and Nafion ionomers respectively) required only three water molecules to exhibit spontaneous proton dissociation, the largest possible solvent-separated hydronium ion was attained only for the sulfonyl imide moiety. These results provide a scientific basis for understanding the improved conductivity of perfluorinated sulfonyl imide-based membranes relative to that of the widely-used Nafion membrane.

  2. Martensitic Transformation During Compressive Deformation of a Non-conventional Stainless Steel and Its Quantitative Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreethi, R.; Sampark, P.; Majhi, Goutam Kumar; Dutta, Krishna

    2015-11-01

    This report aims to examine the extent of deformation-induced phase transformation in a non-conventional austenitic stainless steel known as ISO/TR 15510 X12CrMnNiN17-7-5, upon compressive loading at room temperature. Experiments were carried out under varying length to diameter ratios (0.8, 1.0, 1.2, 1.4, and 1.6). TFE (Tetrafluoroethylene)-fluorocarbon tapes were used at specimen-platen interfaces to reduce the effect of friction. The results indicate that the lubrication was effective up to 15% of strain. Optical microscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) studies indicated martensitic phase transformation in the deformed specimens. The extent of phase transformation was determined by analyzing the XRD peaks using integrated intensity of the corresponding phases. The results are correlated with the extent of deformation in the respective samples. The presence of ? and ?'-martensite on the deformed samples has been substantiated by some limited experiments using transmission electron microscopy.

  3. Evaluation of HFC 245ca and HFC 236ea as foam blowing agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, Jon; Macarthur, Doug; Kollie, Tom; Graves, Ron; Liu, Matthew; Hendriks, Robert V.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) 141b has been selected as the interim blowing agent for use in urethane insulations on NASA's Space Shuttle External Tank. Due to the expected limited commercial lifetime of this material, research efforts at the NASA Thermal Protection Systems Materials Research Laboratory at the Marshall Space Flight Center are now being devoted to the identification and development of alternatives with zero ozone depletion potential. Physical blowing agents identified to date have included hydrocarbons, fluorocarbons, hydrofluoroethers, and more predominantly, hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). The majority of the HFC evaluations in industry have focused on the more readily available, low boiling candidates such as HFC 134a. Higher boiling HFC candidates that could be handled at ambient conditions and use current processing equipment would be more desirable. This paper will describe results from a research program of two such candidate HFC's performed as a cooperative effort between Martin Marietta Manned Space Systems, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Oak Ridge National Laboratories. The purpose of this effort was to perform a cursory evaluation of the developmental HFC's 245ca and 236ea as blowing agents in urethane based insulations. These two materials were selected from screening tests of 37 C2, C3, and C4 isomers based on physical properties, atmospheric lifetime, flammability, estimated toxicity, difficulty of synthesis, suitability for dual use as a refrigerant, and other factors. Solubility of the two materials in typical foam components was tested, pour foaming trials were performed, and preliminary data were gathered regarding foam insulation performance.

  4. Hydrogen effects in hydrofluorocarbon plasma etching of silicon nitride: Beam study with CF{sup +}, CF{sub 2}{sup +}, CHF{sub 2}{sup +}, and CH{sub 2}F{sup +} ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Tomoko; Karahashi, Kazuhiro; Fukasawa, Masanaga; Tatsumi, Tetsuya; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2011-09-15

    Hydrogen in hydrofluorocarbon plasmas plays an important role in silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) reactive ion etching. This study focuses on the elementary reactions of energetic CHF{sub 2}{sup +} and CH{sub 2}F{sup +} ions with Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} surfaces. In the experiments, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} surfaces were irradiated by monoenergetic (500-1500 eV) beams of CHF{sub 2}{sup +} and CH{sub 2}F{sup +} ions as well as hydrogen-free CF{sub 2}{sup +} and CF{sup +} ions generated by a mass-selected ion beam system and their etching yields and surface properties were examined. It has been found that, when etching takes place, the etching rates of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} by hydrofluorocarbon ions, i.e., CHF{sub 2}{sup +} and CH{sub 2}F{sup +}, are higher than those by the corresponding fluorocarbon ions, i.e., CF{sub 2}{sup +} and CF{sup +}, respectively. When carbon film deposition takes place, it has been found that hydrogen of incident hydrofluorocarbon ions tends to scavenge fluorine of the deposited film, reducing its fluorine content.

  5. O-ring sealing verification for the space shuttle redesign solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lach, Cynthia L.

    1989-01-01

    As a part of the redesign of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor, the field and nozzle-to-case joints were redesigned to minimize the dynamic flexure caused by internal motor pressurization during ignition. The O-ring seals and glands for the joints were designed to accommodate both structural deflections and to promote pressure assistance. A test program was conducted to determine if a fluorocarbon elastomeric O-ring could meet this criteria in the redesigned gland. Resiliency tests were used to investigate the O-ring response to gap motion while static seal tests were used to verify design criteria of pressure assistance for sealing. All tests were conducted in face seal fixtures mounted in servo-hydraulic test machines. The resiliency of the O-ring was found to be extremely sensitive to the effects of temperature. The External Tank/Solid Rocket Booster attach strut loads had a negligible affect on the ability of the O-ring to track the simulated SRB field joint deflection. In the static pressure-assisted seal tests, as long as physical contact was maintained between the O-ring and the gland sealing surface, pressure assistance induced instantaneous sealing.

  6. X-ray evaluation of the boundary between polymer electrolyte and platinum and carbon functionalization to conduct protons in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Kazuki; Ogura, Yuta; Izumi, Yasuo

    2014-07-01

    In polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), it is important to secure proximate diffusion paths of reactants and electrons. One approach is to optimize the boundary between polymer electrolyte and Pt nanoparticle surface. Based on synchrotron X-ray absorption fine structure to monitor directly the status of catalysts in PEFCs, it was found that Pt sites were reduced to Pt0 by alcohols contained in polymer electrolyte dispersion solution during the preparation of cathode of PEFC. As in membrane electrolyte assembly, only the Pt sites not covered by polymer electrolyte re-oxidized to Pt2+/4+. Thus, the interface between Pt and polymer electrolyte was evaluated. The other approach is to functionalize carbon surface with sulfonate/sulfate group to conduct protons. Similar level of proton conductivity was observed in current-voltage dependence compared to using polymer electrolyte, but polymer electrolyte was advantageous to lose less voltage for activation. Based on this comparison, optimum catalyst on cathode is proposed comprising surface sulfonate/sulfate group on carbon mixed with polymer electrolyte. Further optimization of cathode catalyst is proposed to functionalize carbon with sulfonate group linked to fluorocarbon branch.

  7. Investigation of a sterilization system using active oxygen species generated by ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Iwasaki, Tatsuyuki; Kinoshita, Shinobu; Noda, Kazutoshi; Oya, Kei; Iwamori, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    We have been investigating an advanced sterilization system that employs active oxygen species (AOS). We designed the sterilization equipment, including an evacuation system, which generates AOS from pure oxygen gas using ultraviolet irradiation, in order to study the conditions necessary for sterilization in the system's chamber. Using Geobachillus stearothermophilus spores (10(6) CFU) in a sterile bag as a biological indicator (BI) in the chamber of the AOS sterilization apparatus, we examined the viability of the BI as a function of exposure time, assessing the role of the decompression level in the sterilization performance. We found that the survival curves showed exponential reduction, and that the decompression level did not exert a significant influence on the survival curve. Subsequently, we investigated the sterilization effect as influenced by the spatial and environmental temperature variation throughout the chamber, and found that the sterilization effect varied with position, due to the varying environmental temperature in the respective areas. We confirmed that temperature is one of the most important factors influencing sterilization in the chamber, and estimated the temperature effect on the distribution of atomic oxygen concentration, using the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) method with fluorocarbon thin film prepared by radio frequency sputtering. PMID:25817808

  8. The Zero Boil-Off Tank Experiment Contributions to the Development of Cryogenic Fluid Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.; Kassemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The Zero Boil-Off Technology (ZBOT) Experiment involves performing a small scale ISS experiment to study tank pressurization and pressure control in microgravity. The ZBOT experiment consists of a vacuum jacketed test tank filled with an inert fluorocarbon simulant liquid. Heaters and thermo-electric coolers are used in conjunction with an axial jet mixer flow loop to study a range of thermal conditions within the tank. The objective is to provide a high quality database of low gravity fluid motions and thermal transients which will be used to validate Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) modeling. This CFD can then be used in turn to predict behavior in larger systems with cryogens. This paper will discuss the current status of the ZBOT experiment as it approaches its flight to installation on the International Space Station, how its findings can be scaled to larger and more ambitious cryogenic fluid management experiments, as well as ideas for follow-on investigations using ZBOT like hardware to study other aspects of cryogenic fluid management.

  9. Structural investigation of nonionic fluorinated micelles by SANS in relation to mesoporous silica materials.

    PubMed

    Michaux, Florentin; Blin, Jean-Luc; Teixeira, José; Stébé, Marie José

    2012-01-12

    In an attempt to answer the question if there is dependence between the pore ordering of the mesoporous silica, obtained through the cooperative template mechanism, and the shape of the micellar aggregates of the surfactant solutions, the micellar structures of two nonionic fluorinated surfactant based-systems are studied by SANS. By fitting the experimental spectra with theoretical models, the structural evolution of the molecular aggregates can be described, and some important parameters can be obtained, such as the water and eventually oil penetration into the surfactant film, the aggregation number, the area per polar head of the surfactant, and the surfactant chain conformations. We have shown that for the C(8)F(17)C(2)H(4)(OC(2)H(4))(9)OH system, the micelles are prolate spheroids. The increase of the surfactant concentration in water does not change the characteristics of the interfacial film, but the aggregation number raises and the particles become more elongated. By contrast, the experimental curves of C(7)F(15)C(2)H(4)(OC(2)H(4))(8)OH cannot be fitted considering a small particle model. However, progressive incorporation of fluorocarbon induces a change of size and shape of the globules, which become smaller and more and more spherical. Regarding the material mesopore ordering, it appears that the micelles that lead to hexagonal mesoporous silica materials are described with a model of quasi-spherical globules. On the contrary, when large micelles are found, only wormhole-like structures are obtained. PMID:22145934

  10. The evolution of spatial ordering of oil drops fast spreading on a water surface

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Daigo; Nakajima, Chika; Shioi, Akihisa; Krafft, Marie Pierre; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    The design of dynamically self-assembled systems is of high interest in science and technology. Here, we report a unique cascade in the self-ordering of droplets accompanied by a dewetting transition. The dynamic self-emergent droplets are observed when a thin liquid layer of an immiscible fluorocarbon oil (perfluorooctyl bromide, PFOB) is placed on a water surface. Due to the gradual evaporation of PFOB, a circular PFOB-free domain appears as a result of a local dewetting transition. A circular pearling structure is generated at the rim with the growth of the dewetting hole. As the next stage, linear arrays of droplets are generated in a radial manner from the centre of the hole. These one-dimensional arrangements then evolve into two-dimensional hexagonal arrays of microdroplets through collective rhythmical shrinking/expanding motions. The emergence of such dynamic patterns is discussed in terms of the nonlinear kinetics of the dewetting transition under thermodynamically dissipative conditions. PMID:25998157

  11. Etching characteristics and mechanism of SiN(x) films for nano-devices in CH2F2/O2/Ar inductively coupled plasma: effect of O2 mixing ratio.

    PubMed

    Son, Jinyoung; Efremov, Alexander; Yun, Sun Jin; Yeom, Geun Young; Kwonl, Kwang-ho

    2014-12-01

    Etching characteristics and mechanisms of low-temperature SiN(x) thin films for nano-devices in CH2F2/O2/Ar inductively-coupled plasmas were studied. The etching rates of SiN(x) thin films as well as the etching selectivities over Si and photoresist were measured in the range of 25-75% O2 in a feed gas at fixed CH2F2 content (25%), gas pressure (6 mTorr), input power (900 W), bias power (200 W), and total gas flow rate (40 sccm). Plasma parameters were analyzed using the Langmuir probe diagnostics and optical emission spectroscopy. The chemical states of the etched surfaces were examined by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that the non-monotonic (with a maximum at about 50-60% O2) SiN(x) etching rate does not correlate with monotonically decreasing F atom flux and ion energy flux. It was proposed that, under the given set of experimental conditions, the SiN(x) etching process is also controlled by the O and H atom fluxes through the destruction of the fluorocarbon polymer layer. PMID:25971095

  12. Atomic layer etching removal of damaged layers in a contact hole for low sheet resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jong Kyu; Cho, Sung Il; Lee, Sung Ho; Kim, Chan Kyu; Min, Kyung Suk; Yeom, Geun Young

    2013-11-15

    A damaged layer remains on silicon substrates after high-aspect-ratio contact (HARC) etching when using a fluorocarbon gas. Atomic layer etching (ALET) is a technique that can be applied to remove the damaged layer of silicon, removing about 1.36 Å per etch cycle. The characteristics of contact damage removal by ALET are investigated and compared with the conventional damage removal technique of low-power CF{sub 4} plasma etching. The low-power CF{sub 4} plasma etching technique not only has inadequate etch depth control, but also introduces secondary damage by implanting impurities about 25 Å into the contact bottom of the silicon surface. However, ALET allows contact damage to be removed effectively without introducing secondary damage to the substrate, and with precision etch depth control at the angstrom scale. When ALET is applied subsequent to low-power CF{sub 4} plasma etching, the fluorine- and carbon-damaged silicon is effectively removed in about 10 cycles. The sheet resistance of HARC etched silicon decreases from 142 to 137 ?/? after using low-power CF{sub 4} plasma etching, and subsequent ALET treatment further decreases the sheet resistance to 129 ?/?, which is close to the reference value of 124 ?/?.

  13. Improvement of feature-scale profile evolution in a silicon dioxide plasma etching simulator using the level set method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoliu, C.; Baer, E.; Cerdá, J.; Colom, R. J.

    2015-06-01

    We present a three-dimensional simulator of silicon dioxide etching in a fluorocarbon plasma process. Explicit parametrization of the surface is currently one of the most frequently used methods to evolve the etched surface according to the equipment simulation results. These techniques update the coordinates of the vertices and need to add and/or remove faces to keep an accurate surface representation. These processes can introduce errors and produce unrealistic results, especially in complex structures. In this paper we prove the effectiveness of our level set (LS) implementation to evolve the etched surface according to etching models, resulting in a fully operational plasma etching simulator. The LS implementation is based on a surface reconstruction algorithm from scattered points enabling the simulation of complex topological changes such as coalescing or splitting of contiguous regions. Additionally, our algorithm is based on the sparse field method for reducing computational time of the surface evolution process and it is perfectly suited to be used with the Anetch software package. Finally, several structures are simulated and an experimental result is used to compare and validate the effectiveness of the simulator we have developed.

  14. Study and development of a cryogenic heat exchanger for life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soliman, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    A prototype cryogenic heat exchanger for removal of waste heat from a spacecraft environmental control life support system was developed. The heat exchanger uses the heat sink capabilities of the cryogenic propellants and, hence, can operate over all mission phases from prelaunch to orbit, to post landing, with quiescent periods during orbit. A survey of candidate warm fluids resulted in the selection of E-2, a fluorocarbon compound, because of its low freezing point and high boiling point. The final design and testing of the heat exchanger was carried out, however, using Freon-21, which is similar to E-2 except for its low boiling point. This change was motivated by the desire for cost effectiveness of the experimental program. The transient performance of the heat exchanger was demonstrated by an analog simulation of the heat sink system. Under the realistic transient heat load conditions (20 sec ramp from minimum to maximum Freon-21 inlet temperature), the control system was able to maintain the warm fluid outlet temperature within + or - 3 F. For a 20-sec ramp from 0 F to -400 F in the hydrogen inlet temperature, at maximum heat load, the warm fluid outlet temperature was maintained within + or - 7 F.

  15. Nuclear criticality safety assessment of the proposed CFC replacement coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, W.C.; Dyer, H.R.

    1993-12-01

    The neutron multiplication characteristics of refrigerant-114 (R-114) and proposed replacement coolants perfluorobutane (C{sub 4}F{sub 10}) and cycloperfluorobutane C{sub 4}F{sub 8}) have been compared by evaluating the infinite media multiplication factors of UF{sub 6}/H/coolant systems and by replacement calculations considering a 10-MW freezer/sublimer. The results of these comparisons demonstrate that R-114 is a neutron absorber, due to its chlorine content, and that the alternative fluorocarbon coolants are neutron moderators. Estimates of critical spherical geometries considering mixtures of UF{sub 6}/HF/C{sub 4}F{sub 10} indicate that the flourocarbon-moderated systems are large compared with water-moderated systems. The freezer/sublimer calculations indicate that the alternative coolants are more reactive than R-114, but that the reactivity remains significantly below the condition of water in the tubes, which was a limiting condition. Based on these results, the alternative coolants appear to be acceptable; however, several follow-up tasks have been recommended, and additional evaluation will be required on an individual equipment basis.

  16. Climate change and air pollution jointly creating nightmare for tourism industry.

    PubMed

    Sajjad, Faiza; Noreen, Umara; Zaman, Khalid

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the study is to examine the long-run and causal relationship between climate change (i.e., greenhouse gas emissions, hydrofluorocarbons, per fluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride), air pollution (i.e., methane emissions, nitrous oxide emissions, and carbon dioxide emissions), and tourism development indicators (i.e., international tourism receipts, international tourism expenditures, natural resource depletion, and net forest depletion) in the World's largest regions. The aggregate data is used for robust analysis in the South Asia, the Middle East and North Africa, sub-Saharan Africa, and East Asia and the Pacific regions, over a period of 1975-2012. The results show that climatic factors and air pollution have a negative impact on tourism indicators in the form of deforestation and natural resource depletion. The impact is evident, as we have seen the systematic eroding of tourism industry, due to severe changes in climate and increasing strain of air pollution. There are several channels of cause-effect relationship between the climatic factors, air pollution, and tourism indicators in the World's region. The study confirms the unidirectional, bidirectional, and causality independent relationship between climatic factors, air pollution, and tourism indicators in the World. It is conclusive that tourism industry is facing all time bigger challenges of reduce investment, less resources, and minor importance from the government agencies because of the two broad challenges, i.e., climate change and air pollution, putting them in a dismal state. PMID:24938808

  17. A Roof for the Lion's House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Fans of the National Football League's Detroit Lions don't worry about gameday weather. Their magnificent new Pontiac Stadium has a domed, air-supported, fabric roof that admits light but protects the playing field and patrons from the elements. The 80,000-seat "Silverdome" is the world's largest fabric-covered structure-and aerospace technology played an important part in its construction. The key to economical construction of the Silverdome-and many other types of buildings-is a spinoff of fiber glass Beta yarn coated with Teflon TFE fluorocarbon resin. The big advance it offers is permanency. Fabric structures-tents, for example have been around since the earliest years of human civilization. But their coverings-hides, canvas and more recently plastics-were considered temporary; though tough, these fabrics were subject to weather deterioration. Teflon TFE-coated Beta Fiberglas is virtually impervious to the effects of weather and sunlight and it won't stretch, shrink, mildew or rot, thus has exceptional longevity; it is also very strong, lightweight, flame resistant and requires no periodic cleaning, because dirt will not stick to the surface of Teflon TFE. And to top all that, it costs only 30 to 40 percent as much as conventional roofing.

  18. A Roof for the Lions' House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Fans of the National Football League s Detroit Lions don't worry about game day weather. Their magnificent new Pontiac Stadium has a domed, air-supported, fabric roof that admits light but protects the playing field and patrons from the elements. The 80,000-seat Silverdome is the world s largest fabric-covered structure-and aerospace technology played an important part in its construction. The key to economical construction of the Silverdome--and many other types of buildings--is a spinoff of fiber glass Beta yarn coated with Teflon TFE fluorocarbon resin. The big advance it offers is permanency.The team of DuPont, Chemical Fabrics and Birdair have collaborated on a number of fabric structures. Some are supported by air pressure, others by cables alone. Most of the structures are in the recreational category. With conventional construction costs still on the upswing, you're likely to see a great many more permanent facilities enclosed by the aerospace spinoff fabric.

  19. Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy of Etching Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Jean-Paul; Cunge, Gilles; Biennier, Ludovic; Romanini, Daniele; Katachanov, Alexander

    1999-10-01

    Many of the reactive species of interest in etching plasmas absorb light in the UV spectral region (200 ~ 300 nm). Measurement of these weak absorbances (10-2 ~ 10-4 for a single pass) allows their absolute concentration to be determined. Previously, low-resolution spectra have been obtained using broad-band absorption spectroscopy, using a Xe arc lamp as the light source and a small monochromator equipped with a CCD Camera. Here we report high-resolution measurements using the recently developed Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) technique. The pulsed tunable output of an excimer pumped doubled dye laser was injected into a high-Q optical cavity in which the plasma is included. The absorbance as a function of wavelength is then deduced from the lifetime of the light pulse in the cavity. This technique offers the possibility of real-time (1 second) absolute concentration measurements. Results have been obtained for the detection of CF, CF_2, AlF and SiF2 radicals in capacitively-coupled radio-frequency plasmas in fluorocarbon gases. However, the deduction of absolute concentrations from CRDS spectra is complicated by the phenomenon of non-single exponential decays when the line-width of the laser is greater then that of the transition observed.

  20. Slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces showing marine antibiofouling properties.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Linlin; Li, Junsheng; Mieszkin, Sophie; Di Fino, Alessio; Clare, Anthony S; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A; Grunze, Michael; Rosenhahn, Axel; Levkin, Pavel A

    2013-10-23

    Marine biofouling is a longstanding problem because of the constant challenges placed by various fouling species and increasingly restricted environmental regulations for antifouling coatings. Novel nonbiocidal strategies to control biofouling will necessitate a multifunctional approach to coating design. Here we show that slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces (SLIPSs) provide another possible strategy to obtaining promising antifouling coatings. Microporous butyl methacrylate-ethylene dimethacrylate (BMA-EDMA) surfaces are prepared via UV-initiated free-radical polymerization. Subsequent infusion of fluorocarbon lubricants (Krytox103, Krytox100, and Fluorinert FC-70) into the porous microtexture results in liquid-repellent slippery surfaces. To study the interaction with marine fouling organisms, settlement of zoospores of the alga Ulva linza and cypris larvae of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite is tested in laboratory assays. BMA-EDMA surfaces infused with Krytox103 and Krytox100 exhibit remarkable inhibition of settlement (attachment) of both spores and cyprids to a level comparable to that of a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-terminated self-assembled monolayer. In addition, the adhesion strength of sporelings (young plants) of U. linza is reduced for BMA-EDMA surfaces infused with Krytox103 and Krytox100 compared to pristine (noninfused) BMA-EDMA and BMA-EDMA infused with Fluorinert FC-70. Immersion tests suggest a correlation between the stability of slippery coatings in artificial seawater and fouling resistance efficacy. The results indicate great potential for the application of this concept in fouling-resistant marine coatings. PMID:24067279

  1. Surface roughening of ground fused silica processed by atmospheric inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Qiang; Li, Na; Wang, Jun; Wang, Bo; Li, Guo; Ding, Fei; Jin, Huiliang

    2015-06-01

    Subsurface damage (SSD) is a defect that is inevitably induced during mechanical processes, such as grinding and polishing. This defect dramatically reduces the mechanical strength and the laser damage thresholds of optical elements. Compared with traditional mechanical machining, atmospheric pressure plasma processing (APPP) is a relatively novel technology that induces almost no SSD during the processing of silica-based optical materials. In this paper, a form of APPP, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), is used to process fused silica substrates with fluorocarbon precursor under atmospheric pressure. The surface morphology evolution of ICP-processed substrates was observed and characterized by confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM), field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that the roughness evolves with the etching depth, and the roughness evolution is a single-peaked curve. This curve results from the opening and the coalescing of surface cracks and fractures. The coalescence procedure of these microstructures was simulated with two common etched pits on a polished fused silica surface. Understanding the roughness evolution of plasma-processed surface might be helpful in optimizing the optical fabrication chain that contains APPP.

  2. High octane ethers from synthesis gas-derived alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Bastian, R.D.; DeTavernier, S.

    1991-04-01

    The objective of the proposed research is to synthesize high octane ethers, primarily methyl isobuty ether (MIBE) and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), directly from H{sub 2}/CO/CO{sub 2} coal-derived synthesis gas via alcohol mixtures that are rich in methanol and 2-methyl-1-butanol (isobutanol). The overall scheme involves gasification of coal, purification and shifting of the synthesis gas, higher alcohol synthesis, and direct synthesis of ethers. The last stage of the synthesis involves direct coupling of synthesis gas-derived methanol and isobutanol that has been demonstrated by us to occur over superacid catalysts to yield methyl isobutyl ether (MIBE) at moderate pressures and a mixture of methanol and isobutene at low pressures. This will be achieved by the proper choice of reaction conditions, i.e. intermediate pressures, and of inorganic acid catalysts that are stable at temperatures higher than 200{degrees}C, at which the carbonium ion reaction coupling of the two alcohols to MTBE is more effective than the oxonium ion or ester reaction coupling to MIBE. Both organic and inorganic catalysts will be investigated. This quarter, the catalysts investigated were the Dow Chemical Co. fluorocarbon sulfonic acid and (FSA) resin supported on SiC and the DuPont Nafion-H microsaddles. 2 refs., 11 figs., 11 tabs.

  3. Etching radical controlled gas chopped deep reactive ion etching

    DOEpatents

    Olynick, Deidre; Rangelow, Ivo; Chao, Weilun

    2013-10-01

    A method for silicon micromachining techniques based on high aspect ratio reactive ion etching with gas chopping has been developed capable of producing essentially scallop-free, smooth, sidewall surfaces. The method uses precisely controlled, alternated (or chopped) gas flow of the etching and deposition gas precursors to produce a controllable sidewall passivation capable of high anisotropy. The dynamic control of sidewall passivation is achieved by carefully controlling fluorine radical presence with moderator gasses, such as CH.sub.4 and controlling the passivation rate and stoichiometry using a CF.sub.2 source. In this manner, sidewall polymer deposition thicknesses are very well controlled, reducing sidewall ripples to very small levels. By combining inductively coupled plasmas with controlled fluorocarbon chemistry, good control of vertical structures with very low sidewall roughness may be produced. Results show silicon features with an aspect ratio of 20:1 for 10 nm features with applicability to nano-applications in the sub-50 nm regime. By comparison, previous traditional gas chopping techniques have produced rippled or scalloped sidewalls in a range of 50 to 100 nm roughness.

  4. Laboratory studies of chemical and photochemical processes relevant to stratospheric ozone. Annual report No. 2, May 1993-April 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Zahniser, M.S.; Nelson, D.D.; Worsnop, D.R.; Kolb, C.E.

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of this project is to reduce the uncertainty in several key gas-phase kinetic processes which impact present understanding of stratospheric ozone. The main emphasis of this work is on measuring rate coefficients and product channels for reactions of HO[sub x] and NO[sub x] species in the temperature range 200 K to 240 K relevant to the lower stratosphere. Other areas of study have included infrared spectroscopic studies of the HO2 radical, measurements of OH radical reactions with alternative fluorocarbons, and determination of the vapor pressures of nitric acid hydrates under stratospheric conditions. The results of these studies will improve models of stratospheric ozone chemistry and predictions of perturbations due to human influences. In this annual report, the authors focus on recent accomplishments in the quantitative spectroscopy of the HO2 radical. This report details the measurements of the broadening coefficients for the v[sub 2] vibrational band. Further measurements of the vapor pressures of nitric acid hydrates relevant to the polar stratospheric cloud formation indicate the importance of metastable crystalline phases of H2SO4, HNO3, and H2O. Large particles produced from these metastable phases may provide a removal mechanism for HNO3 in the polar stratosphere.

  5. An injectable, thermosensitive and multicompartment hydrogel for simultaneous encapsulation and independent release of a drug cocktail as an effective combination therapy platform.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiwei; Song, Huijuan; Zhang, Ju; Li, Pan; Li, Chen; Wang, Chun; Kong, Deling; Zhao, Qiang

    2015-04-10

    Combination chemotherapy is potent to combat diseases. Simultaneous and segregated delivery of multiple drugs in a single vehicle is essential to achieve this objective. In the present study, an injectable, thermosensitive and multicompartment hydrogel (MCH) was developed by the facile cooperative and incompatible assembly of PEGylated hydrocarbon nanoparticles with PEGylated fluorocarbon nanoparticles. The cooperative assembly behavior was investigated by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology, and the result demonstrated that the incompatible nanoparticle cores possibly accounted for the multicompartment formation in hydrogel. Paclitaxel and doxorubicin could be easily and separately integrated into the different compartments of MCH serving as a sustained drug cocktail formulation. In vitro drug release indicated drugs were liberated in a simultaneous but independent manner without any effect on each other. In vitro and in vivo antitumor activity indicated that peritumoral injection of drug cocktail encapsulated MCH formulation could well achieve the combination effect, which significantly improved the tumor growth inhibition efficiency as well as minimized the drug-associated side effects compared to intravenous injection of free drug cocktail. Furthermore, such a delivery device would allow precise adjustment of drug dosage to the desired effect, achieve spatial-temporal simultaneous and synchronized presence of combination drugs in the target tissue and obviate repeated drug administrations to improve patient compliance. The thermosensitive multicompartment hydrogel cocktail formulation holds great promise for simultaneous and segregated delivery of multiple bioactive agents for sustained combination therapy. PMID:25683618

  6. Superior performance of multilayered fluoropolymer films in low voltage electrowetting

    E-print Network

    Dimitrios P. Papageorgiou; Angeliki Tserepi; Andreas G. Boudouvis; Athanasios G. Papathanasiou

    2011-10-18

    The requirement for low operational voltage in electrowetting devices, met using thin dielectrics, is usually connected with serious material failure issues. Dielectric breakdown (visible as electrolysis) is frequently evident slightly beyond the onset of the contact angle saturation. Here, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is used to deposit thin fluorocarbon films prior to the spin-coating of Teflon\\textregistered amorphous fluoropolymer on tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) substrates. The resulting multilayered hydrophobic top coating improves the electrowetting performance of the stack, by showing high resistance to dielectric breakdown at high applied voltages and for continuous long term application of DC and AC voltage. Leakage current measurements during electrowetting experiments with the proposed composite coating showed that current remains fairly constant at consecutive electrowetting tests in contrast to plain Teflon\\textregistered coating in which material degradation is evident by a progressive increase of the leakage current after multiple electrowetting tests. Since the proposed composite coating demonstrates increased resistance to material failure and to dielectric breakdown even at thin configurations, its integration in electrowetting devices may impact their reliability, robustness and lifetime.

  7. Waveguide and articulated arm for Er:YAG laser system: shape and depth of laser cavity in hard dental tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinkova, Helena; Dostalova, Tatjana; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Wang, You; Shi, Yi-Wei; Dolezalova, Libuse; Hamal, Karel; Krejsa, Otakar; Kubelka, Jiri; Prochazka, Stanislav

    1998-04-01

    The aim of our study was to verify the efficiency of delivery systems for Er:YAG laser radiation which could be used in dentistry. The influence of increasing energy and number of pulses on a profile and depth of drilled holes was investigated. Er:YAG laser was operating in a free-running mode, generating a length of pulses 200 microsecond with a maximum energy of 500 mJ. The delivery systems investigated were an articulated arm and a fluorocarbon polymer-coated silver hollow glass waveguide. The prepared hard tissues were a sliced part of enamel, dentine and ivory. The laser radiation was directed on them by focusing optics (CaF2 lens) together with the cooling water to ensure that the tissues will not be burned. For the evaluation of shapes, depth and profiles of the prepared cavities the metallographic microscope, x-ray microtomograph and scanning electron microscope were used. From the results it was observed that the profile and depth of the cavities prepared by the laser radiation delivered by the various systems (waveguide or articulated arm) are not the same. The laser radiation delivered by waveguide produces a larger diameter cavity with a lower depth. The holes are smoother and without side effects.

  8. Preparation of hierarchical porous Zn-salt particles and their superhydrophobic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Dahai; Jia, Mengqiu

    2015-12-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces arranged by hierarchical porous particles were prepared using modified hydrothermal routes under the effect of sodium citrate. Two particle samples were generated in the medium of hexamethylenetetramine (P1) and urea (P2), respectively. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope were adopted for the investigation, and results revealed that the P1 and P2 particles are porous microspheres with crosslinked extremely thin (10-30 nm) sheet crystals composed of Zn5(OH)8Ac2·2H2O and Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6, respectively. The prepared particles were treated with a fluoroethylene vinyl ether derivative and studied using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer. Results showed that the hierarchical surfaces of these particles were combined with low-wettable fluorocarbon layers. Moreover, the fabricated surface composed of the prepared hierarchical particles displayed considerably high contact angles, indicating great superhydrophobicity for the products. The wetting behavior of the particles was analyzed with a theoretical wetting model in comparison with that of chestnut-like ZnO products obtained through a conventional hydrothermal route. Correspondingly, this study provided evidence that high roughness surface plays a great role in superhydrophobic behavior.

  9. Uncertainties in Air Exchange using Continuous-Injection, Long-Term Sampling Tracer-Gas Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.; Lunden, Melissa M.

    2013-12-01

    The PerFluorocarbon Tracer (PFT) method is a low-cost approach commonly used for measuring air exchange in buildings using tracer gases. It is a specific application of the more general Continuous-Injection, Long-Term Sampling (CILTS) method. The technique is widely used but there has been little work on understanding the uncertainties (both precision and bias) associated with its use, particularly given that it is typically deployed by untrained or lightly trained people to minimize experimental costs. In this article we will conduct a first-principles error analysis to estimate the uncertainties and then compare that analysis to CILTS measurements that were over-sampled, through the use of multiple tracers and emitter and sampler distribution patterns, in three houses. We find that the CILTS method can have an overall uncertainty of 10-15percent in ideal circumstances, but that even in highly controlled field experiments done by trained experimenters expected uncertainties are about 20percent. In addition, there are many field conditions (such as open windows) where CILTS is not likely to provide any quantitative data. Even avoiding the worst situations of assumption violations CILTS should be considered as having a something like a ?factor of two? uncertainty for the broad field trials that it is typically used in. We provide guidance on how to deploy CILTS and design the experiment to minimize uncertainties.

  10. Easy route to superhydrophobic copper-based wire-guided droplet microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Mumm, Florian; van Helvoort, Antonius T J; Sikorski, Pawel

    2009-09-22

    Droplet-based microfluidic systems are an expansion of the lab on a chip concept toward flexible, reconfigurable setups based on the modification and analysis of individual droplets. Superhydrophobic surfaces are one suitable candidate for the realization of droplet-based microfluidic systems as the high mobility of aqueous liquids on such surfaces offers possibilities to use novel or more efficient approaches to droplet movement. Here, copper-based superhydrophobic surfaces were produced either by the etching of polycrystalline copper samples along the grain boundaries using etchants common in the microelectronics industry, by electrodeposition of copper films with subsequent nanowire decoration based on thermal oxidization, or by a combination of both. The surfaces could be easily hydrophobized with thiol-modified fluorocarbons, after which the produced surfaces showed a water contact angle as high as 171 degrees +/- 2 degrees . As copper was chosen as the base material, established patterning techniques adopted from printed circuit board fabrication could be used to fabricate macrostructures on the surfaces with the intention to confine the droplets and, thus, to reduce the system's sensitivity to tilting and vibrations. A simple droplet-based microfluidic chip with inlets, outlets, sample storage, and mixing areas was produced. Wire guidance, a relatively new actuation method applicable to aqueous liquids on superhydrophobic surfaces, was applied to move the droplets. PMID:19681579

  11. Nonflammable, Nonaqueous, Low Atmospheric Impact, High Performance Cleaning Solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhooge, P. M.; Glass, S. M.; Nimitz, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    For many years, chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and chlorocarbon solvents have played an important part in aerospace operations. These solvents found extensive use as cleaning and analysis (EPA) solvents in precision and critical cleaning. However, CFCs and chlorocarbon solvents have deleterious effects on the ozone layer, are relatively strong greenhouse gases, and some are suspect or known carcinogens. Because of their ozone-depletion potential (ODP), the Montreal Protocol and its amendments, as well as other environmental regulations, have resulted in the phaseout of CFC-113 and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA). Although alternatives have been recommended, they do not perform as well as the original solvents. In addition, some analyses, such as the infrared analysis of extracted hydrocarbons, cannot be performed with the substitute solvents that contain C-H bonds. CFC-113 solvent has been used for many critical aerospace applications. CFC-113, also known as Freon (registered) TF, has been used extensively in NASA's cleaning facilities for precision and critical cleaning, in particular the final rinsing in Class 100 areas, with gas chromatography analysis of rinse residue. While some cleaning can be accomplished by other processes, there are certain critical applications where CFC-113 or a similar solvent is highly cost-effective and ensures safety. Oxygen system components are one example where a solvent compatible with oxygen and capable of removing fluorocarbon grease is needed. Electronic components and precision mechanical components can also be damaged by aggressive cleaning solvents.

  12. Midwestern efforts to address climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Stenberg

    2008-12-15

    Six Midwestern governors and a Canadian premier signed the Midwestern Greenhouse Gas Reduction Accord in November 2007. The governors agreed to begin the process of developing a market-based cap-and-trade program that would reduce GHG emissions (e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, hydro-fluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride) to meet reduction targets. Member jurisdictions include Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Manitoba, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. Observer jurisdictions - those who are participating in the program design, but will decide later whether to be full members-include Indiana, Ohio, Ontario, and South Dakota. To date, the advisory group has proposed target ranges for GHG emissions reductions of 15-25% below 2005 levels by 2020 and 60-80% by 2050. The following sectors are currently being considered for the cap-and-trade program: electricity generation and imports (power plants); industrial combustion sources (factories and other industrial facilities); and industrial process sources (to the extent credible measurement and monitoring protocols exist or can be developed prior to inclusion).

  13. Modeling Surface Water Transport in the Central Pacific Ocean With 129I Records From Coral Skeletons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, W.; Biddulph, D. L.; Russell, J. L.; Burr, G. S.; Jull, T. J.; Correge, T.; Roeder, B.

    2008-12-01

    129I occurs naturally in extremely low abundance via cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere as well as by spontaneous fission of uranium. Oceanic concentrations of 129I have risen by several orders of magnitude during the last half century largely from environmental pollution coming from several point-source nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. In the Pacific basin, much of the increase has apparently come from the Hanford Nuclear reprocessing plant in the United States, with iodine primarily arriving via the Columbia River. Coral skeletons preserve records of 129I concentration of the surface waters from which they were deposited, yielding records with annual resolution or better. We will present three such records from different locations in the Pacific Ocean: the Solomon Islands, Easter Island and Clipperton Atoll. For this study, drill cores from living massive coral skeletons of the species Porites Lobata were collected from these sites. 129I/127I values were measured using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at the University of Arizona with an NEC 3 MV Pelletron accelerator. Results from the analysis of the corals will be compared to the distribution of other mixed-layer tracers (chloro-fluorocarbons and tritium) collected during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment cruises conducted between 1990 and 2002. The 129I/127I records observed in these corals will also be compared to tracer transit time calculations determined from a 20th century simulation of the GFDL coupled-climate passive-tracer model.

  14. Laboratory studies of chemical and photochemical processes relevant to stratospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahniser, Mark S.; Nelson, David D.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kolb, Charles E.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to reduce the uncertainty in several key gas-phase kinetic processes which impact our understanding of stratospheric ozone. The main emphasis of this work is on measuring rate coefficients and product channels for reactions of HO(sub x) and NO(sub x) species in the temperature range 200 K to 240 K relevant to the lower stratosphere. Other areas of study have included infrared spectroscopic studies of the HO2 radical, measurements of OH radical reactions with alternative fluorocarbons, and determination of the vapor pressures of nitric acid hydrates under stratospheric conditions. The results of these studies will improve models of stratospheric ozone chemistry and predictions of perturbations due to human influences. In this annual report, we focus on our recent accomplishments in the quantitative spectroscopy of the HO2 radical. This report details the measurements of the broadening coefficients for the v(sub 2) vibrational band. Further measurements of the vapor pressures of nitric acid hydrates relevant to the polar stratospheric cloud formation indicate the importance of metastable crystalline phases of H2SO4, HNO3, and H2O. Large particles produced from these metastable phases may provide a removal mechanism for HNO3 in the polar stratosphere.

  15. Failure analysis of the lithium battery: A study of the header deposit on the cell top and diffusion within the electrode glass seal using nuclear microanalysis and FFTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, Razi A.

    1991-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster Range Safety System (SRBRSS) uses a lithium/poly-carbon monofluoride primary battery as a source of electrical power. After cell fabrication and activation, some battery cells have shown self discharge. One possible source of this cell discharge has been suggested to be the formation and growth of a conducting crystallized chemical compound across the glass bead insulator, electrically shorting the glass bead to the casing. This laboratory has begun an analysis of this compound, the glass seal holding the cathode into place, and the cell electrolyte, using Fast Fourier Transform Infrared (FFTIR) Analysis, Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), and Nuclear Reaction Microanalysis. Preliminary measurements have confirmed the existence of lithium, nitrogen, fluorine, and oxygen on a reddish-brown deposit covering parts of the glass seal holding the positive electrode in place. Cells using Li metal electrodes, have many advantages over conventional primary batteries. One principal disadvantage of using Li batteries on a commercial basis would be the environmental impact of the fluorocarbon material. Another would be the relatively high expense of (CF)n.

  16. In-flight gas phase passivation of silicon nanocrystals for novel inorganic-silicon nanocrystal based electroluminescent devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liptak, Richard William

    Silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) have become a heavily researched material over the past several years. Researchers envision that this material can be used in many diverse applications such as electronic devices, non-toxic biological tags, optical devices such as LEDs, lasers or displays, thermoelectrics, and photovoltaic (PV) applications. For many of these proposed applications one needs to properly control the NC size and the surface chemistry via passivation. Current passivation techniques allow for the creation of highly efficient SiNC optical emitters, however the emission of these NCs are fixed in the red-NIR range. To resolve this issue several novel in-flight passivation techniques were investigated. A novel dual-plasma setup which allows for the in-flight passivation of SiNCs through a thermal or LPCVD based nitridation process was developed first. FTIR and XPS analysis were used to study the surface chemistry on of the nitride passivated NCs while TEM was used to investigate whether or not a "shell" was grown on the surface. PL measurements and thermal stability tests were performed on the nitride passivated NCs to gain a further understanding of the stability (in both air as well as other ambients) of the NCs and their surface chemistry. Tunable full color emission from SiNCs was developed for the dual-plasma reactor utilizing CF4 as both an etching and passivating source. F radicals generated in the etching plasma remove Si from the surface of the NC, while at the same time CF2 radicals lead to the formation of a fluorocarbon passivation layer on the NC surface. By controlling the parameters of the reactor (CF4 flow rate, power), the NC size and thus its color can be controlled. Red to green luminescence was observed from SiNCs and is believed to be due to the quantum confinement effect. The blue emission observed from the NCs is appears to be related to oxide related surface states. Despite the defects, high QY was observed from these CF4-etched NCs. The fluorocarbon passivation layer, although stable, prevents further functionalization of the NCs. To counteract this problem another silicon-based dry etch chemistry, SF6 was investigated. Full-color emission was observed from SF6 etched NCs, with QY 2X higher than that of CF 4-etched NCs. A maximum QY of nearly 55% at 700 nm was observed after several weeks in air, comparable to that observed with alkyl passivation. The native oxidation of the bare oxidized and SF6-etched NCs were also studied. Results show that the NC oxidation follows the Cabrera-Mott mechanism for low temperature oxidation. Inorganic-NC based LED structures were then investigated. Fabrication processes for the inorganic hole and electron transport layers were developed by RF sputtering and atomic layer deposition (ALD). Thorough characterization was performed on the metal-oxide films (ZnO, TiO2, NiO) to verify their stoichiometry as well as study their optical and electrical properties. Novel inorganic-NC device structures were fabricated. Inorganic NC devices which use a metal-oxide HTL but no ETL, emit light, however their emission is so weak. The addition of an ETL increases the light output by a factor of 4, but the device reproducibility is poor. To improve efficiency two insulating matrix layers were investigated. In both cases, the film deposited on the top of the NC is rough, porous, discontinuous, and potentially full of traps -- certainly not the ideal film for a device. Therefore, more work is needed, specifically on the NC layer to improve the structure of the as-deposited NC film, but efficient device structures appear to be possible.

  17. Polymerization in emulsion microdroplet reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Nick J.

    The goal of this research project is to utilize emulsion droplets as chemical reactors for execution of complex polymerization chemistries to develop unique and functional particle materials. Emulsions are dispersions of immiscible fluids where one fluid usually exists in the form of drops. Not surprisingly, if a liquid-to-solid chemical reaction proceeds to completion within these drops, the resultant solid particles will possess the shape and relative size distribution of the drops. The two immiscible liquid phases required for emulsion polymerization provide unique and complex chemical and physical environments suitable for the engineering of novel materials. The development of novel non-ionic fluorosurfactants allows fluorocarbon oils to be used as the continuous phase in a water-free emulsion. Such emulsions enable the encapsulation of almost any hydrocarbon compound in droplets that may be used as separate compartments for water-sensitive syntheses. Here, we exemplify the promise of this approach by suspension polymerization of polyurethanes (PU), in which the liquid precursor is emulsified into droplets that are then converted 1:1 into polymer particles. The stability of the droplets against coalescence upon removal of the continuous phase by evaporation confirms the formation of solid PU particles. These results prove that the water-free environment of fluorocarbon based emulsions enables high conversion. We produce monodisperse, cross-linked, and fluorescently labeled PU-latexes with controllable mesh size through microfluidic emulsification in a simple one-step process. A novel method for the fabrication of monodisperse mesoporous silica particles is presented. It is based on the formation of well-defined equally sized emulsion droplets using a microfluidic approach. The droplets contain the silica precursor/surfactant solution and are suspended in hexadecane as the continuous oil phase. The solvent is then expelled from the droplets, leading to concentration and micellization of the surfactant. At the same time, the silica solidifies around the surfactant structures, forming equally sized mesoporous particles. The procedure can be tuned to produce well-separated particles or alternatively particles that are linked together. The latter allows us to create 2D or 3D structures with hierarchical porosity. Oil, water, and surfactant liquid mixtures exhibit very complex phase behavior. Depending on the conditions, such mixtures give rise to highly organized structures. A proper selection of the type and concentration of surfactants determines the structuring at the nanoscale level. In this work, we show that hierarchically bimodal nanoporous structures can be obtained by templating silica microparticles with a specially designed surfactant micelle/microemulsion mixture. Tuning the phase state by adjusting the surfactant composition and concentration allows for the controlled design of a system where microemulsion droplets coexist with smaller surfactant micellar structures. The microemulsion droplet and micellar dimensions determine the two types of pore sizes (single nanometers and tens of nanometers). We also demonstrate the fabrication of carbon and carbon/platinum replicas of the silica microspheres using a "lost-wax" approach. Such particles have great potential for the design of electrocatalysts for fuel cells, chromatography separations, and other applications. It was determined that slight variations in microemulsion mixture components (electrolyte concentration, wt% of surfactants, oil to sol ratio, etc.) produces strikingly different pore morphologies and particle surface areas. Control over the size and structure of the smaller micelle-templated pores was made possible by varying the length of the hydrocarbon block within the trimethyl ammonium bromide surfactant and characterized using X-ray diffraction. The effect of emulsion aging was studied by synthesizing particles at progressive time levels from a sample emulsion. It was discovered surface pore size increases after just a few hours, with

  18. Archer John Porter Martin CBE 1 March 1910 - 28 July 2002.

    PubMed

    Lovelock, James

    2004-01-01

    We judge the worth of a scientist by the benefits he or she brings to science and society; by this measure Archer Martin was outstanding, and rightfully his contribution was recognized with a Nobel Prize. Scientific instruments and instrumental methods now come almost entirely from commercial sources and we take them for granted and often have little idea how they work. Archer Martin was of a different time when scientists would often devise their own new instruments, which usually they fully understood, and then they would use them to explore the world. The chromatographic methods and instruments Martin devised were at least as crucial in the genesis and development of molecular biology as were those from X-ray crystallography. Liquid partition chromatography, especially in its two-dimensional paper form, revealed the amino acid composition of proteins and the nucleic acid composition of DNA and RNA with a rapid and elegant facility. Gas chromatography (GC) enabled the accurate and rapid analysis of lips, which previously had been painfully slow and little more than a greasy sticky confusion of beaker chemistry. Martin's instruments enabled progress in the sciences ranging from geophysics to biology , and without im we might have waited decades before another equivalent genius appeared. More than this, the environmental awareness that Rachel Carson gave us would never had solidified as it did without the evidence of global change measured by GC. This instrumental method provided accurate evidence about the ubiquity of pesticides and pollutants and later made us aware of the growing accumulation in the atmosphere of chlorinated fluorocarbons, nitrous oxide and other ozone-depleting chemicals. If all this were not enough to glorify Martin's partition chromatography, there is the undoubted fact that its simplicity, economy and exquisite resolving power transformed the chemical industry and made possible so many of the conveniences we now take for granted. PMID:15754473

  19. Verification of threshold activation detection (TAD) technique in prompt fission neutron detection using scintillators containing 19F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibczynski, P.; Kownacki, J.; Moszy?ski, M.; Iwanowska-Hanke, J.; Syntfeld-Ka?uch, A.; Gójska, A.; Gierlik, M.; Ka?mierczak, ?.; Jakubowska, E.; K?dzierski, G.; Kujawi?ski, ?.; Wojnarowicz, J.; Carrel, F.; Ledieu, M.; Lainé, F.

    2015-09-01

    In the present study ? 5''× 3'' and ? 2''× 2'' EJ-313 liquid fluorocarbon as well as ? 2'' × 3'' BaF2 scintillators were exposed to neutrons from a 252Cf neutron source and a Sodern Genie 16GT deuterium-tritium (D+T) neutron generator. The scintillators responses to ?- particles with maximum endpoint energy of 10.4 MeV from the n+19F reactions were studied. Response of a ? 5'' × 3'' BC-408 plastic scintillator was also studied as a reference. The ?- particles are the products of interaction of fast neutrons with 19F which is a component of the EJ-313 and BaF2 scintillators. The method of fast neutron detection via fluorine activation is already known as Threshold Activation Detection (TAD) and was proposed for photofission prompt neutron detection from fissionable and Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) in the field of Homeland Security and Border Monitoring. Measurements of the number of counts between 6.0 and 10.5 MeV with a 252Cf source showed that the relative neutron detection efficiency ratio, defined as epsilonBaF2 / epsilonEJ-313-5'', is 32.0% ± 2.3% and 44.6% ± 3.4% for front-on and side-on orientation of the BaF2, respectively. Moreover, the ? 5'' EJ-313 and side-on oriented BaF2 were also exposed to neutrons from the D+T neutron generator, and the relative efficiency epsilonBaF2 / epsilonEJ-313-5'' was estimated to be 39.3%. Measurements of prompt photofission neutrons with the BaF2 detector by means of data acquisition after irradiation (out-of-beam) of nuclear material and between the beam pulses (beam-off) techniques were also conducted on the 9 MeV LINAC of the SAPHIR facility.

  20. Molecular-Scale Lubricants for Micromachine Applications: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, A.R.; Dugger, M.T.; Houston, J.E.; Lopez, G.P.; Mayer, T.M.; Michalske, T.A.; Miller, S.L.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Stevens, M.J.; Zhou, Y.

    1998-12-01

    The nature of this work was to develop the physics and chemistry base for understanding molecular-scale lubricants used to reduce of friction- and adhesion-induced failure in silicon micromachines (MEMS). We acquired this new knowledge by tailoring the molecular properties of the lubricants, applying local probes that can directly monitor the response of lubricants in contact conditions, and evaluating the performance of model lubricants MEMS devices. Model lubricants under investigation were the silane coupling agents that form monolayer films on native oxide silicon surfaces, which is the substrate in MEMS. These molecules bind via strong surface bonds and produce a layer of hydro- or fluoro-carbon chains normal to the substrate. "Tailoring" the lubricants entails modifying the chain length, the chain chemical reactivity (H or F), and the density of chain structures. Thus much effort went into understanding the surface chemistry of silane-silicon oxide coupling. With proximal probes such as atomic force microscopy (AFM), interracial force microscopy (FM), and shear force microscopy in combination with IFM, we examined the frictional and adhesive properties of the silane films with very high spatial resolution (< 100 nm) and sensitivity. MEMS structures are treated with silanes under identical conditions, and examined for friction and adhesion under operating conditions. Proper assessment of the lubricants required quantitative analysis of MEMS performance at high speeds and long operating times. Our proximal probe measurements and WS performance analyses form a very important link for future molecular dynamics simulations, that, in turn, should be able to predict MEMS performance under all conditions.

  1. SlipChip†

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wenbin; Li, Liang; Nichols, Kevin P.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    2009-01-01

    The SlipChip is a microfluidic device designed to perform multiplexed microfluidic reactions without pumps or valves. The device has two plates in close contact. The bottom plate contains wells preloaded with many reagents; in this paper plates with 48 reagents were used. These wells are covered by the top plate that acts as a lid for the wells with reagents. The device also has a fluidic path, composed of ducts in the bottom plate and wells in the top plate, which is connected only when the top and bottom plate are aligned in a specific configuration. Sample can be added into the fluidic path, filling both wells and ducts. Then, the top plate is “slipped”, or moved, relative to the bottom plate so the complementary patterns of wells in both plates overlap, exposing the sample-containing wells of the top plate to the reagent-containing wells of the bottom plate, and enabling diffusion and reactions. Between the two plates, a lubricating layer of fluorocarbon was used to facilitate relative motion of the plates. This paper implements this approach on a nanoliter scale using devices fabricated in glass. Stability of preloaded solutions, control of loading, and lack of cross-contamination were tested using fluorescent dyes. Functionality of the device was illustrated via crystallization of a model membrane protein. Fabrication of this device is simple and does not require a bonding step. This device requires no pumps or valves and is applicable to resource-poor settings. Overall, this device should be valuable for multiplexed applications that require exposing one sample to many reagents in small volumes. One may think of the SlipChip as an easy-to-use analogue of a preloaded multi-well plate, or a preloaded liquid-phase microarray. PMID:19636458

  2. X-ray crystallography and mineral chemistry of bastnaesite from Kanigiri granite, Prakasam district, Andhra Pradesh, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Yamuna; Nagendra Babu, G.; Viswanathan, R.; Sai Baba, M.; Rai, A.; Parihar, P.

    2014-12-01

    The authors report the results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and geochemical studies on bastnaesites (lanthanum cerium fluoro-carbonate) hosted in alkali Kanigiri Granite of the Prakasam district in Andhra Pradesh, India. The XRD pattern of the investigated bastnaesite displays sharply-defined reflections. The observed d-spacings of the bastnaesite are in very close agreement with those published for bastnaesite standard in International Centre for Diffraction Data (ICDD) Card No. 11-340. The calculated unit cell parameters (a o; c o) and unit cell volume (V) of the studied bastnaesite (a o 7.1301-7.1413 Å, c o 9.7643-9.7902Å and V 429.8940-432.3875 Å3) are almost equal to values published for bastnaesite standard (c o 7.1290 Å, c o 9.7744 Å and V 430.19 Å3) in the relevant data card. Geochemical data of bastnaesite reveals high content of Ce (mean 27.22%) followed by La (mean 16.82%), Nd (mean 6.12%) and Pr (mean 1.91%). Compared to light REE (LREE) content (mean 437165 ppm), heavy REE (HREE) content (mean 5867 ppm) is drastically low, with unusually high LREE/HREE ratio (mean 80). The chondrite-normalised plot also exhibits drastic enrichment of LREE relative to HREE with pronounced negative Euanomaly (mean Eu/Eu* = 0.15). High (LREE)N / (HREE)N, (La/Lu)N, (La/Yb)N and (Ce/Yb)N ratios reveal higher fractionation of LREE relative to HREE. The rare earth element (REE) contents of the studied bastnaesite are very close to REE contents of bastnaesite hosted in alkali syenite from Madagascar. The presence of bastnaesite in Kanigiri Granite and soils derived from it enhances the scope of further exploration for bastnaesite in several bodies of alkaline rocks and alkali granitoids present along the eastern margins of the Cuddapah basin, Andhra Pradesh.

  3. X-ray crystallography and mineral chemistry of bastnaesite from Kanigiri granite, Prakasam district, Andhra Pradesh, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Yamuna; Nagendra Babu, G.; Viswanathan, R.; Sai Baba, M.; Rai, A. K.; Parihar, P. S.

    2014-12-01

    The authors report the results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and geochemical studies on bastnaesites (lanthanum cerium fluoro-carbonate) hosted in alkali Kanigiri Granite of the Prakasam district in Andhra Pradesh, India. The XRD pattern of the investigated bastnaesite displays sharply-defined reflections. The observed d-spacings of the bastnaesite are in very close agreement with those published for bastnaesite standard in International Centre for Diffraction Data (ICDD) Card No. 11-340. The calculated unit cell parameters ( a o ; c o ) and unit cell volume (V) of the studied bastnaesite ( a o 7.1301-7.1413 Å, c o 9.7643-9.7902Å and V 429.8940-432.3875 Å3) are almost equal to values published for bastnaesite standard ( c o 7.1290 Å, c o 9.7744 Å and V 430.19 Å3) in the relevant data card. Geochemical data of bastnaesite reveals high content of Ce (mean 27.22%) followed by La (mean 16.82%), Nd (mean 6.12%) and Pr (mean 1.91%). Compared to light REE (LREE) content (mean 437165 ppm), heavy REE (HREE) content (mean 5867 ppm) is drastically low, with unusually high LREE/HREE ratio (mean 80). The chondrite-normalised plot also exhibits drastic enrichment of LREE relative to HREE with pronounced negative Euanomaly (mean Eu/Eu* = 0.15). High (LREE) N / (HREE) N , (La/Lu) N , (La/Yb) N and (Ce/Yb) N ratios reveal higher fractionation of LREE relative to HREE. The rare earth element (REE) contents of the studied bastnaesite are very close to REE contents of bastnaesite hosted in alkali syenite from Madagascar. The presence of bastnaesite in Kanigiri Granite and soils derived from it enhances the scope of further exploration for bastnaesite in several bodies of alkaline rocks and alkali granitoids present along the eastern margins of the Cuddapah basin, Andhra Pradesh.

  4. Simple Check Valves for Microfluidic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Peter A.; Greer, Harold F.; Smith, J. Anthony

    2010-01-01

    A simple design concept for check valves has been adopted for microfluidic devices that consist mostly of (1) deformable fluorocarbon polymer membranes sandwiched between (2) borosilicate float glass wafers into which channels, valve seats, and holes have been etched. The first microfluidic devices in which these check valves are intended to be used are micro-capillary electrophoresis (microCE) devices undergoing development for use on Mars in detecting compounds indicative of life. In this application, it will be necessary to store some liquid samples in reservoirs in the devices for subsequent laboratory analysis, and check valves are needed to prevent cross-contamination of the samples. The simple check-valve design concept is also applicable to other microfluidic devices and to fluidic devices in general. These check valves are simplified microscopic versions of conventional rubber- flap check valves that are parts of numerous industrial and consumer products. These check valves are fabricated, not as separate components, but as integral parts of microfluidic devices. A check valve according to this concept consists of suitably shaped portions of a deformable membrane and the two glass wafers between which the membrane is sandwiched (see figure). The valve flap is formed by making an approximately semicircular cut in the membrane. The flap is centered over a hole in the lower glass wafer, through which hole the liquid in question is intended to flow upward into a wider hole, channel, or reservoir in the upper glass wafer. The radius of the cut exceeds the radius of the hole by an amount large enough to prevent settling of the flap into the hole. As in a conventional rubber-flap check valve, back pressure in the liquid pushes the flap against the valve seat (in this case, the valve seat is the adjacent surface of the lower glass wafer), thereby forming a seal that prevents backflow.

  5. Two episodes of acute illness in a machine shop.

    PubMed Central

    Sinks, T; Kerndt, P R; Wallingford, K M

    1989-01-01

    Following an explosion in a machine shop and temporary plant closure, on the day the plant returned to full operations a degreaser malfunctioned. Workers in the assembly room were exposed to trichloroethylene levels later estimated to have exceeded 220 ppm (OSHA PEL 100 ppm). The plant was evacuated and the degreaser taken out of operation. Blood testing for carbon monoxide (CO) on five employees found carboxyhemoglobin levels in excess of normal. The plant reopened the following morning. Over the next two weeks, 15 employees were seen by the plant nurses for similar complaints; although all returned to work, their carboxyhemoglobin levels, later found to be inaccurate, were reported by a local medical clinic to range from 13.7 to 20.0 percent. At the end of the second week, another outbreak of illness occurred, but carboxyhemoglobin, trichloroethylene, fluorocarbons, and methylene chloride were not elevated in all 17 persons tested; plant-wide monitoring for CO found no elevated levels. During the first outbreak of illness, cases were 2.26 times as likely to have entered the assembly room as noncases. During the second outbreak, cases were no more likely than noncases to have entered the assembly room. We believe the explosion, earlier toxic exposures and illness, and the misleading blood test results led to plant-wide anxiety which culminated in a collective stress reaction and the second outbreak. An open meeting with all employees, informing them of our findings, provided reassurance and no further episodes of illness occurred in this workforce. PMID:2751018

  6. Ion and Neutral Species in C(2)F(6) and CHF(3) Dielectric Etch Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Hebner, G.; Jayaraman, R.P.; McGrath, R.T.

    1999-01-26

    Relative concentrations of reactive ions, neutral radicals, resist and substrate etch products have been measured in dielectric etch chemistries using an uncollided beam mass spectrometer / ion extractor from Hiden Analytical. Analysis techniques employed include both electron impact ionization and dissociative ionization of neutral gas, and potential bias extraction of positive ions from the reactor discharge volume. Measurements were made in C{sub 2}F{sub 6} and CHF{sub 3} discharges in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP-GEC) research reactor operating with power densities, pressures, gas compositions and wafer materials typical of those found in etch processing tools. Wafer substrates investigated included blanket silicon wafers and silicon wafers with varying amounts of photo-resist coverage of the surface (20%, 80% and 100%). In C{sub 2}F{sub 6} discharges CF{sub 3}{sup +} was consistently the dominant fluorocarbon ion present, in agreement with published cross sections for dissociative ionization [ 1,2.3,4.5,6]. Smaller concentrations of CF+, CF{sub 2}{sup -}, and C{sub 2}F{sub 5}{sup +}, were also observed, though the dissociative ionization production of C{sub 2}F{sub 5}{sup +} was a factor of five smaller than would be expected from published cross section values. The presence of photo-resist, even in small amounts, was found to produce marked changes in the discharge composition. For example in C{sub 2}F{sub 6} discharges, concentrations of SiF{sub x} etch products relative to concentrations of C{sub x}F{sub y} species were notably diminished and larger concentrations of water vapor were observed when resist was present. In CHF{sub 3} discharges, CF{sub 3}{sup +} and CHF{sub 2}{sup +} were found to be the main species present, along with smaller concentrations of CF{sub 2}{sup +}, CF{sup +}, CHF{sup +}, CH{sup +} and F{sup -}.

  7. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in exhaust emissions from diesel engines powered by rapeseed oil methylester and heated non-esterified rapeseed oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojtisek-Lom, Michal; Czerwinski, Jan; Lení?ek, Jan; Sekyra, Milan; Topinka, Jan

    2012-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of exhaust emissions were studied in four direct-injection turbocharged four-cylinder diesel engines, with power ratings of 90-136 kW. The engines were operated on biodiesel (B-100), a blend of 30% biodiesel in diesel fuel (B-30), and heated rapeseed oil (RO) in two independent laboratories. Diesel particle filters (DPF) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems were used with B-30 and B-100. Concentrations of individual PAHs sampled in different substrates (quartz, borosilicate fiber and fluorocarbon membrane filters, polyurethane foam) were analyzed using different methods. Benzo[a]pyrene toxic equivalents (BaP TEQ) were calculated using different sets of toxic equivalency factors (TEF). Operation on B-100 without aftertreatment devices, compared to diesel fuel, yielded a mean reduction in PAHs of 73%, consistent across engines and among TEF used. A lower PAH reduction was obtained using B-30. The BaP TEQ reductions on DPF were 91-99% using B-100, for one non-catalyzed DPF, and over 99% in all other cases. The BaP TEQ for heated RO were higher than those for B-100 and one half lower to over twice as high as that of diesel fuel. B-100 and RO samples featured, compared to diesel fuel, a relatively high share of higher molecular weight PAH and a relatively low share of lighter PAHs. Using different sets of TEF or different detection methods did not consistently affect the observed effect of fuels on BaP TEQ. The compilation of multiple tests was helpful for discerning emerging patterns. The collection of milligrams of particulate matter per sample was generally needed for quantification of all individual PAHs.

  8. Energy and global climate change: Why ORNL?

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, M.P.

    1995-12-31

    Subtle signs of global warming have been detected in studies of the climate record of the past century after figuring in the cooling effects of sulfur emissions from volcanoes and human sources. According to the December 1995 report of the Intergovernment Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the earth`s surface temperature has increased by about 0.2{degrees}C per decade since 1975. the panel projects about a 2{degrees} increase in global temperature by 2100. The IPCC report states that pollutants-greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and fluorocarbons that warm the globe and sulfur emission that cool it-are responsible for recent patterns of climate change. {open_quotes}The balance of evidence,{close_quotes} states the report, {open_quotes}suggests that there is a discrenible human influence on global climate.{close_quotes} This human influence stems largely from fossil fuel combustion, cement production, and the burning of forests, and could intensify as populations grow and developing countries increase energy production and industrial development. The two facts have caught the attention of the news media and public. First, 1995 was declared the hottest year in the 140-year-long record of reliable global measurements. Second, recent years have been marked by an unusually high number of extreme weather events, such as hurricanes, blizzards, and floods. In the 1990`s the world has become more aware of the prospect and possible impacts of global climate change. In the late 1950`s, global climate change was an unknown threat to the world`s environment and social systems. Except for a few ORNL researchers who had just completed their first briefing to the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission on the need to understand the global carbon cycle, the connection between rising carbon dioxide concentrations and potential changes in global climate was not common knowledge, nor were the consequences of climate change understood.

  9. Chemical compatibility screening test results

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

    1997-12-01

    A program for evaluating packaging components that may be used in transporting mixed-waste forms has been developed and the first phase has been completed. This effort involved the screening of ten plastic materials in four simulant mixed-waste types. These plastics were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer rubber, cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE), epichlorohydrin rubber, ethylene-propylene rubber (EPDM), fluorocarbon (Viton or Kel-F), polytetrafluoroethylene, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), isobutylene-isoprene copolymer rubber (butyl), polypropylene, and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). The selected simulant mixed wastes were (1) an aqueous alkaline mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite; (2) a chlorinated hydrocarbon mixture; (3) a simulant liquid scintillation fluid; and (4) a mixture of ketones. The testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to 286,000 rads of gamma radiation followed by 14-day exposures to the waste types at 60{degrees}C. The seal materials were tested using vapor transport rate (VTR) measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. For these tests, a screening criterion of 0.9 g/hr/m{sup 2} for VTR and a specific gravity change of 10% was used. Based on this work, it was concluded that while all seal materials passed exposure to the aqueous simulant mixed waste, EPDM and SBR had the lowest VTRs. In the chlorinated hydrocarbon simulant mixed waste, only Viton passed the screening tests. In both the simulant scintillation fluid mixed waste and the ketone mixture simulant mixed waste, none of the seal materials met the screening criteria. For specific gravity testing of liner materials, the data showed that while all materials with the exception of polypropylene passed the screening criteria, Kel-F, HDPE, and XLPE offered the greatest resistance to the combination of radiation and chemicals.

  10. Gas phase preparation and analysis of semiconductor surfaces in a clustered reactor apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Finstad, Casey C.; Montano-Miranda, Gerardo; Thorsness, Adam G.; Muscat, Anthony J.

    2006-09-15

    An integrated reactor system was built for studying gas phase surface preparation chemistries. The system integrates HF/vapor and UV photochemistry modules with an ultrahigh vacuum deposition reactor and a surface analysis chamber (x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger) for in situ surface preparation, deposition, and analysis. Each vacuum chamber is mounted on a separate, isolated branch from a main sample transfer tube. The system was designed for samples with variable shapes and thickness, but less than 64 mm (2(1/2) in.) in diameter. This design allows for rapid transfer times between chambers (<5 min) and for the simultaneous processing and storage of up to four samples. Use of standard sample transfer and vacuum hardware components minimized initial equipment costs and system maintenance. The capabilities of the clustered reactor apparatus and the importance of surface termination were demonstrated by (1) the removal of a mixed oxide and fluorocarbon residue on silicon, leaving the surface completely terminated with Cl atoms, (2) the removal of copper oxide and copper metal from silicon, (3) the deposition of Ti preferentially on a nonannealed, aqueous-cleaned SiO{sub 2} surface relative to an annealed surface, and (4) the use of complementary surface analysis techniques to chemically identify hydrogen-bonded silanol groups on a silicon surface after HF/vapor etching. Gas phase cleaning and surface termination utilized a combination of HF/vapor (100 Torr, 27 deg. C for 200 s) and UV/Cl{sub 2} (10 SCCM Cl{sub 2}, 90 deg. C for 15 min) steps. The results demonstrate that integrated processing provides a means to clean thin layers of organic, oxide, and metal contaminants from semiconductor surfaces and to control the terminating atom or chemical group.

  11. Faceted fatty acid vesicles formed from single-tailed perfluorinated surfactants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; Xu, Guiying; Song, Aixin; Wang, Lin; Lin, Meiqin; Dong, Zhaoxia; Yang, Zihao

    2015-09-28

    The aggregation behavior and rheological properties of two mixtures of perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA)/NaOH and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA)/NaOH were investigated in aqueous solutions. Interestingly, pH-sensitive polyhedral fatty acid vesicles were spontaneously formed in both systems, which were determined by freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy (FF-TEM) measurements. Especially, a phase transition from faceted vesicles to the L3 phase with the increase of pH was observed in the PFNA/NaOH system while it was not observed in the PFDA/NaOH system. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) measurements confirmed that the bilayers of the faceted vesicles were in the crystalline station indicating that the crystallization of fluorocarbon chains was the main driving force for their formation. Besides, the two systems of faceted perfluorofatty acid vesicles exhibit interesting rheological properties, for instance, they showed high viscoelasticity and shear-thinning behaviour, and the elastic modulus (G') and viscous modulus (G'') of PFDA/NaOH vesicles were much higher than those of PFNA/NaOH vesicles. Conversely, the solution of the L3 phase with fluid bilayers did not present viscoelastic properties. Therefore, the viscoelastic properties of vesicles resulted from the crystalline fluorinated alkyl chains with high rigidity at room temperature and the dense packing of vesicles. As far as we know, such faceted fatty acid vesicles formed from single-tailed perfluorinated surfactants have been rarely reported. Our work successfully constructs polyhedral fatty acid vesicles and proposes their formation mechanism, which should be a great advance in the fundamental research of fatty acid vesicles. PMID:26252803

  12. Development of an all-metal thick film cost effective metallization system for solar cells. Final report, May 1980-January 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, B.; Parker, J.

    1983-12-01

    Properties of copper pastes did not reproduce earlier results in rheology and metallurgy. Electrodes made with pastes produced under the previous contract were analyzed and raw material characteristics were compared. A needle-like structure was observed on the earlier electroded solar cells, and was identified as eutectic copper-silicon. Experiments were conducted with variations in paste parameters, firing conditions, including gas ambients, furnace furniture, silicon surface and others to improve performance characteristics. Improved adhesion with copper pastes containing silver fluoride, as well as those containing fluorocarbon powder was obtained. Front contact experiments were done with silver fluoride activated pastes on bare silicon, silicon oxide and silicon nitride coated silicon wafers. Adhesion of pastes with AgF on silicon nitride coated wafers was good, but indications were that all cells were shunted and the conclusion was that these systems were unsuitable for front contacts. Experiments with aluminum back surfaces and screened contacts to that surface were begun. Low temperature firing tended to result in S shaped IV curves. This was attributed to a barrier formed at the silicon-copper interface. A cooperative experiment was initiated on the effect of heat-treatments in various atmospheres on the hydrogen profile of silicon surfaces. Contact theory was explored to determine the role of various parameters on tunneling and contact resistance. Data confirm that the presence of eutectic Al-Si additions are beneficial for low contact resistance and fill factors in back contacts. Copper pastes with different silver fluoride additions were utilized as front contacts at two temperatures. Data shows various degrees of shunting. Finally, an experiment was run with carbon monoxide gas used as the reducing ambient during firing.

  13. Self-assembly of the perfluoroalkyl-alkane F14H20 in ultrathin films.

    PubMed

    Mourran, Ahmed; Tartsch, Bernd; Gallyamov, Marat; Magonov, Sergei; Lambreva, Denitza; Ostrovskii, Boris I; Dolbnya, Igor P; de Jeu, Wim H; Moeller, Martin

    2005-03-15

    Scanning force microscopy on monomolecular films of eicosylperfluorotetradecane, F(CF(2))(14)(CH(2))(20)H, on mica, silicon oxide, or water revealed spontaneous organization to well-defined nanoscopic ribbon and spiral or toroidal superstructures. Whether ribbons or nanospirals were formed depended on the solvent from which the molecular monofilm was cast. Ribbons were observed when a hydrocarbon or a perfluorocarbon solvent was used, e.g., decalin or perfluorodecalin. When the compound, however, was deposited from nonselective hexafluoroxylene, the molecules assembled into spirals of defined size. The spirals/toroids transformed to ribbons when exposed either to decalin or perfluorodecalin vapor, and the ribbons transformed to toroids when exposed to hexafluoroxylene vapor. These changes could be observed in situ. Scanning force microscopy yielded an identical height and width for the bands forming the spirals and for the parallel flat ribbons. X-ray reflectivity yielded a height of 3.61 +/- 0.05 nm, again identical for both morphologies. Yet, the length of the extended F(CF(2))(14)(CH(2))(20)H molecule, i.e., 4.65 nm, exceeds the layer thickness obtained from X-ray reflectometry. It is, however, consistent with an arrangement where the fluorinated chains are oriented normal to the surface layer and where the alkyl segments are tilted with a 122 degrees angle between the two segments. Within the plane defined by the tilt, this angle allows a dense packing of the alkyl segments compensating for the larger cross-section of the fluorocarbon segment. The tilt plane defines an "easy" direction along which the monolayer structure can preserve order. In the plane perpendicular to this axis, long-range ordered dense packing of the alkyl chains is not possible. Incommensurable packing can in principle explain the finite and regular width of the ribbons and the stepwise turn in the spirals. PMID:15752020

  14. Thermal and Chemical Characterization of Non-Metallic Materials Using Coupled Thermogravimetric Analysis and Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Timothy L.

    2002-01-01

    Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) is widely employed in the thermal characterization of non-metallic materials, yielding valuable information on decomposition characteristics of a sample over a wide temperature range. However, a potential wealth of chemical information is lost during the process, with the evolving gases generated during thermal decomposition escaping through the exhaust line. Fourier Transform-Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) is a powerful analytical technique for determining many chemical constituents while in any material state, in this application, the gas phase. By linking these two techniques, evolving gases generated during the TGA process are directed into an appropriately equipped infrared spectrometer for chemical speciation. Consequently, both thermal decomposition and chemical characterization of a material may be obtained in a single sample run. In practice, a heated transfer line is employed to connect the two instruments while a purge gas stream directs the evolving gases into the FT-IR. The purge gas can be either high purity air or an inert gas such as nitrogen to allow oxidative and pyrolytic processes to be examined, respectively. The FT-IR data is collected realtime, allowing continuous monitoring of chemical compositional changes over the course of thermal decomposition. Using this coupled technique, an array of diverse materials has been examined, including composites, plastics, rubber, fiberglass epoxy resins, polycarbonates, silicones, lubricants and fluorocarbon materials. The benefit of combining these two methodologies is of particular importance in the aerospace community, where newly developing materials have little available data with which to refer. By providing both thermal and chemical data simultaneously, a more definitive and comprehensive characterization of the material is possible. Additionally, this procedure has been found to be a viable screening technique for certain materials, with the generated data useful in the selection of other appropriate analytical procedures for further material characterization.

  15. Thermal and Chemical Characterization of Non-metallic Materials Using Coupled Thermogravimetric Analysis and Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Timothy L.; Griffin, Dennis E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) is widely employed in the thermal characterization of non-metallic materials, yielding valuable information on decomposition characteristics of a sample over a wide temperature range. However, a potential wealth of chemical information is lost during the process, with the evolving gases generated during thermal decomposition escaping through the exhaust line. Fourier Transform-Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) is a powerful analytical technique for determining many chemical constituents while in any material state, in this application, the gas phase. By linking these two techniques, evolving gases generated during the TGA process are directed into an appropriately equipped infrared spectrometer for chemical speciation. Consequently, both thermal decomposition and chemical characterization of a material may be obtained in a single sample run. In practice, a heated transfer line is employed to connect the two instruments while a purge gas stream directs the evolving gases into the FT-IR, The purge gas can be either high purity air or an inert gas such as nitrogen to allow oxidative and pyrolytic processes to be examined, respectively. The FT-IR data is collected real-time, allowing continuous monitoring of chemical compositional changes over the course of thermal decomposition. Using this coupled technique, an array of diverse materials has been examined, including composites, plastics, rubber, fiberglass epoxy resins, polycarbonates, silicones, lubricants and fluorocarbon materials. The benefit of combining these two methodologies is of particular importance in the aerospace community, where newly developing materials have little available data with which to refer. By providing both thermal and chemical data simultaneously, a more definitive and comprehensive characterization of the material is possible. Additionally, this procedure has been found to be a viable screening technique for certain materials, with the generated data useful in the selection of other appropriate analytical procedures for further material characterization.

  16. Sorption of Perfluorochemicals to Matrices Relevant to Sites Impacted by Aqueous Film-Forming Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepulvado, J.; Higgins, C.

    2011-12-01

    Perfluorochemicals are a class of emerging contaminants consisting of fluorinated surfactants that are chemically and thermally stable and which contain a fluorocarbon tail that is both hydro- and oleophobic. Because of these unique properties, PFCs have a wide variety of uses including food paper packaging products, stain repellants, nonstick coatings, and aqueous film-forming foams (AFFF). At fire-training facilities, repeated application of AFFF is used to extinguish hydrocarbon fuel fires ignited for training purposes. The presence of perfluochemicals (PFCs) in groundwater as a result of repeated AFFF application at these facilities has been documented. Due to factors such as the recent push towards regulation of PFCs in drinking water, concerns have arisen about the fate of these compounds in the subsurface. Groundwater plumes containing PFC subclasses such as perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs), perfluoroalkylsulfonates (PFAS), and fluorotelomer sulfonates (FtSs) in the ?g/L to mg/L range have been detected. These plumes also may contain co-contaminants such as hydrocarbon fuel components and chlorinated solvents, some of which may exist as nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPL). This study examined the sorption of PFCs to soil and aquifer material across the concentration range applicable to AFFF-impacted sites (?g/L - mg/L) and looked at the impact of co-contaminants, including NAPL, on PFC sorption. PFC sorption was variable and indicated that similar to previous work on PFC sorption to sediment, subsurface PFC transport will depend on factors such as the sorbent organic carbon content, PFC subclass, solution chemistry, and PFC chain length.

  17. Effects of simulant mixed waste on EPDM and butyl rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

    1997-11-01

    The authors have developed a Chemical Compatibility Testing Program for the evaluation of plastic packaging components which may be used in transporting mixed waste forms. In this program, they have screened 10 plastic materials in four liquid mixed waste simulants. These plastics were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer (Nitrile) rubber, cross-linked polyethylene, epichlorohydrin rubber, ethylene-propylene (EPDM) rubber, fluorocarbons (Viton and Kel-F{trademark}), polytetrafluoro-ethylene (Teflon), high-density polyethylene, isobutylene-isoprene copolymer (Butyl) rubber, polypropylene, and styrene-butadiene (SBR) rubber. The selected simulant mixed wastes were (1) an aqueous alkaline mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite; (2) a chlorinated hydrocarbon mixture; (3) a simulant liquid scintillation fluid; and (4) a mixture of ketones. The screening testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to approximately 3 kGy of gamma radiation followed by 14-day exposures to the waste simulants at 60 C. The rubber materials or elastomers were tested using Vapor Transport Rate measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. The authors have developed a chemical compatibility program for the evaluation of plastic packaging components which may be incorporated in packaging for transporting mixed waste forms. From the data analyses performed to date, they have identified the thermoplastic, polychlorotrifluoroethylene, as having the greatest chemical compatibility after having been exposed to gamma radiation followed by exposure to the Hanford Tank simulant mixed waste. The most striking observation from this study was the poor performance of polytetrafluoroethylene under these conditions. In the evaluation of the two elastomeric materials they have concluded that while both materials exhibit remarkable resistance to these environmental conditions, EPDM has a greater resistance to this corrosive simulant mixed waste.

  18. NASA Tech Briefs, January 2006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Topics covered include: Semiautonomous Avionics-and-Sensors System for a UAV; Biomimetic/Optical Sensors for Detecting Bacterial Species; System Would Detect Foreign-Object Damage in Turbofan Engine; Detection of Water Hazards for Autonomous Robotic Vehicles; Fuel Cells Utilizing Oxygen From Air at Low Pressures; Hybrid Ion-Detector/Data-Acquisition System for a TOF-MS; Spontaneous-Desorption Ionizer for a TOF-MS; Equipment for On-Wafer Testing From 220 to 325 GHz; Computing Isentropic Flow Properties of Air/R-134a Mixtures; Java Mission Evaluation Workstation System; Using a Quadtree Algorithm To Assess Line of Sight; Software for Automated Generation of Cartesian Meshes; Optics Program Modified for Multithreaded Parallel Computing; Programs for Testing Processor-in-Memory Computing Systems; PVM Enhancement for Beowulf Multiple-Processor Nodes; Ion-Exclusion Chromatography for Analyzing Organics in Water; Selective Plasma Deposition of Fluorocarbon Films on SAMs; Water-Based Pressure-Sensitive Paints; System Finds Horizontal Location of Center of Gravity; Predicting Tail Buffet Loads of a Fighter Airplane; Water Containment Systems for Testing High-Speed Flywheels; Vapor-Compression Heat Pumps for Operation Aboard Spacecraft; Multistage Electrophoretic Separators; Recovering Residual Xenon Propellant for an Ion Propulsion System; Automated Solvent Seaming of Large Polyimide Membranes; Manufacturing Precise, Lightweight Paraboloidal Mirrors; Analysis of Membrane Lipids of Airborne Micro-Organisms; Noninvasive Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease Using 12-Lead High-Frequency Electrocardiograms; Dual-Laser-Pulse Ignition; Enhanced-Contrast Viewing of White-Hot Objects in Furnaces; Electrically Tunable Terahertz Quantum-Cascade Lasers; Few-Mode Whispering-Gallery-Mode Resonators; Conflict-Aware Scheduling Algorithm; and Real-Time Diagnosis of Faults Using a Bank of Kalman Filters.

  19. Teflon lined process pumps save over $25,000/yr in acid regeneration plant

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, L.; Gaines, A.

    1982-03-01

    Armco's Eastern Steel Division Works in Ashland, KY includes an acid regeneration plant that uses the spray/roaster process to recover hydrochloric acid and high purity iron oxides from spent pickling liquor. Two centrifugal pumps, one operating and one on standby, were used to pump the corrosive and erosive mixture at 175-200/sup 0/F to the spray nozzles in the roaster. The impeller, casing and other wetted parts were of an acid resistant exotic metal, but the pumps had a service life of only 2 to 3 months. The impellers had to be replaced after about six weeks because of wear that reduced the discharge pressure and impaired the performance of the spray nozzles. Maintaining the pumps and replacing them several times a year was extremely expensive, since each pump cost about $6000. A 3 X 1 1/2 X 8 1/2'' centrifugal pump specifically designed for severe corrosive service was installed on a trial basis in February 1980. The process pump is built to AVS standards and features a 3/16'' thick fluoropolymer liner molded in place to the ductile iron case, and a fully open faced ductile iron impeller encapsulated with fluoropolymer. The pumps have been available for a number of years with liners and impeller coverings of Du Pont's Teflon-FEP fluorocarbon, and the acid regenerating plant has been using them in various corrosive applications since the startup in 1972. The acid regeneration plant is very pleased with the trouble-free performance of the Teflon-FEP lined pumps. They are reliable, essentially maintenance free, and maintain the discharge pressures required for efficient operation of the spray nozzles.

  20. Environmentally benign etching process of amorphous silicon and tungsten using species evaporated from polytetrafluoroethylene and fluorinated ethylene propylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Kazushi; Hori, Masaru; Goto, Toshio; Ito, Masafumi

    2003-01-01

    Environmentally benign etching process of amorphous silicon (a-Si) and tungsten (W) by using a plasma process with an evaporation of solid materials system has been developed for replacing a conventional plasma process using green house gases, such as SF6 gas and perfluorocompound gases causing global warming. The evaporation system was designed to generate fluorocarbon species from solid materials by a CO2 laser irradiation. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma using O2 accompanied with injection of species evaporated from solid materials has been applied to a-Si and W etching for cleaning process in chemical vapor deposition chamber. Fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) are selected as the solid material and the etching characteristics between FEP and PTFE have been compared. Furthermore, the etching of a-Si and W films has been performed in the divergent magnetic field ECR downstream plasma [electron density (ne); ~1010 cm-3, electron temperature (Te); 1.5-2.8 eV] and a planar ECR plasma [ne ~1010 cm-3, Te 3.4-4.4 eV] using O2 gas with FEP evaporation. As a result, high etching rates of a-Si and W films of above 100 nm/min were successfully obtained at a substrate temperature of 400 °C in the planar ECR plasma of higher electron temperature. CFx (x=1-3) radical densities and F atom density in plasmas were measured by an infrared diode laser absorption spectroscopy and an actinometric optical emission spectroscopy, respectively. On the basis of these measurements of species, the etching mechanisms of a-Si and W films are discussed.

  1. Oil-in-oil emulsions stabilised solely by solid particles.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Tyowua, Andrew T

    2016-01-21

    A brief review of the stabilisation of emulsions of two immiscible oils is given. We then describe the use of fumed silica particles coated with either hydrocarbon or fluorocarbon groups in acting as sole stabilisers of emulsions of various vegetable oils with linear silicone oils (PDMS) of different viscosity. Transitional phase inversion of emulsions, containing equal volumes of the two oils, from silicone-in-vegetable (S/V) to vegetable-in-silicone (V/S) occurs upon increasing the hydrophobicity of the particles. Close to inversion, emulsions are stable to coalescence and gravity-induced separation for at least one year. Increasing the viscosity of the silicone oil enables stable S/V emulsions to be prepared even with relatively hydrophilic particles. Predictions of emulsion type from calculated contact angles of a silica particle at the oil-oil interface are in agreement with experiment provided a small polar contribution to the surface energy of the oils is included. We also show that stable multiple emulsions of V/S/V can be prepared in a two-step procedure using two particle types of different hydrophobicity. At fixed particle concentration, catastrophic phase inversion of emulsions from V/S to S/V can be effected by increasing the volume fraction of vegetable oil. Finally, in the case of sunflower oil + 20 cS PDMS, the study is extended to particles other than silica which differ in chemical type, particle size and particle shape. Consistent with the above findings, we find that only sufficiently hydrophobic particles (clay, zinc oxide, silicone, calcium carbonate) can act as efficient V/S emulsion stabilisers. PMID:26549699

  2. Anesthetic gases and global warming: Potentials, prevention and future of anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Gadani, Hina; Vyas, Arun

    2011-01-01

    Global warming refers to an average increase in the earth?s temperature, which in turn causes changes in climate. A warmer earth may lead to changes in rainfall patterns, a rise in sea level, and a wide range of impacts on plants, wildlife, and humans. Greenhouse gases make the earth warmer by trapping energy inside the atmosphere. Greenhouse gases are any gas that absorbs infrared radiation in the atmosphere and include: water vapor, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), halogenated fluorocarbons (HCFCs), ozone (O3), perfluorinated carbons (PFCs), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). Hazardous chemicals enter the air we breathe as a result of dozens of activities carried out during a typical day at a healthcare facility like processing lab samples, burning fossil fuels etc. We sometimes forget that anesthetic agents are also greenhouse gases (GHGs). Anesthetic agents used today are volatile halogenated ethers and the common carrier gas nitrous oxide known to be aggressive GHGs. With less than 5% of the total delivered halogenated anesthetic being metabolized by the patient, the vast majority of the anesthetic is routinely vented to the atmosphere through the operating room scavenging system. The global warming potential (GWP) of a halogenated anesthetic is up to 2,000 times greater than CO2. Global warming potentials are used to compare the strength of different GHGs to trap heat in the atmosphere relative to that of CO2. Here we discuss about the GWP of anesthetic gases, preventive measures to decrease the global warming effects of anesthetic gases and Xenon, a newer anesthetic gas for the future of anesthesia. PMID:25885293

  3. Polymer Composites for High-Temperature Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiuling; Liu, Yuxiu; Zhu, Lei

    Recent advances in composite proton-exchange membranes for fuel cell applications at elevated temperature and low relative humidity are briefly reviewed in this chapter. Although a majority of research has focused on new sulfonated hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon polymers and their blends to directly enhance high temperature performance, we emphasize on polymer/inorganic composite membranes with the aim of improving the mechanical strength, thermal stability, and proton conductivity, which depend on water retention at elevated temperature and low relative humidity conditions. The polymer systems include perfluoronated polymers such as Nafion, sulfonated poly(arylene ether)s, polybenzimidazoles (PBI)s, and many others. The inorganic proton conductors are silica, heteropolyacids (HPA)s, layered zirconium phosphates, and liquid phosphoric acid. Direct use of sol-gel silica requires pressurization of fuel cells to maintain 100% relative humidity for high proton conductivity above 100°C. Direct incorporation of HPAs such as phosphotungstic acid (PTA) into polyelectrolyte membranes is capable of improving both proton conductivity and fuel cell performance above 100°C; however, they tend to leach out of the membrane whenever fuel cell flooding happens. To prevent HPA leaching, amine-functionalized mesoporous silica is used to immobilize PTA in Nafion membranes, whose proton conductivity and fuel cell performance are discussed. Compared with Nafion, sulfonated poly(arylene ether)s such as sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone)s are cost-effective materials with excellent thermal and electrochemical stability. Their composites with HPAs show increased proton conductivity at elevated temperatures when fully hydrated. Organic/inorganic hybrid membranes from acid-doped PBIs and other polymers are also discussed.

  4. Thermal activation of superheated lipid-coated perfluorocarbon drops.

    PubMed

    Mountford, Paul A; Thomas, Alec N; Borden, Mark A

    2015-04-28

    This study explored the thermal conditions necessary for the vaporization of superheated perfluorocarbon nanodrops. Droplets C3F8 and C4F10 coated with a homologous series of saturated diacylphosphatidylcholines were formed by condensation of 4 ?m diameter microbubbles. These drops were stable at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, but they vaporized back into microbubbles at higher temperatures. The vaporization transition was measured as a function of temperature by laser light extinction. We found that C3F8 and C4F10 drops experienced 90% vaporization at 40 and 75 °C, respectively, near the theoretical superheat limits (80-90% of the critical temperature). We therefore conclude that the metastabilty of these phase-change agents arises not from the droplet Laplace pressure altering the boiling point, as previously reported, but from the metastability of the pure superheated fluid to homogeneous nucleation. The rate of C4F10 drop vaporization was quantified at temperatures ranging from 55 to 75 °C, and an apparent activation energy barrier was calculated from an Arrhenius plot. Interestingly, the activation energy increased linearly with acyl chain length from C14 to C20, indicating that lipid interchain cohesion plays an important role in suppressing the vaporization rate. The vaporized drops (microbubbles) were found to be unstable to dissolution at high temperatures, particularly for C14 and C16. However, proper choice of the fluorocarbon and lipid species provided a nanoemulsion that could undergo at least ten reversible condensation/vaporization cycles. The vaporization properties presented in this study may facilitate the engineering of tunable phase-shift particles for diagnostic imaging, targeted drug delivery, tissue ablation, and other applications. PMID:25853278

  5. Bubble departure in the direct-contact boiling field with a continuous liquid-liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Kadoguchi, Katsuhiko

    2007-01-15

    Behavior of vapor bubbles was experimentally investigated in the boiling field where a volatile liquid layer of per-fluorocarbon PF5050 (boiling point 306K) was directly in contact with an immiscible hot liquid layer of water above it. Heat was supplied to the continuous liquid-liquid interface by the impingement of the downward hot water jet. Vapor bubbles were generated not only from this continuous interface but from a large number of PF5050 droplets floating on it. According to precise observation, incipience of boiling did not occur at the liquid-liquid interface but in the PF5050 liquid close to the interface in both cases of continuous and dispersed interfaces. As a result, the bubbles broke up the thin PF5050 liquid film above them and rose up into the water layer. This bubble departure phenomenon, which does not occur in the ordinary pool boiling field on the solid heating wall, is very important to evaluate the heat transfer performance in the present direct-contact boiling system. For modeling this behavior, sizes of the bubbles were measured at the moment just after they were released into the water pool. Volumes of the bubbles were larger in the case of departing from the continuous liquid-liquid interface than from the droplets. This tendency could be explained by taking into account the buoyancy force acting on unit area of the thin PF5050 liquid film above the bubble before departure, which was one of the most important parameters for the liquid film breakdown. (author)

  6. Polymer-Oxygen Compatibility Testing: Effect of Oxygen Aging on Ignition and Combustion Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess M.; Haas, Jon P.; Wilson, D. Bruce; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The oxygen compatibility of six polymers used in oxygen service was evaluated after exposure for 48 hours to oxygen pressures ranging from 350 to 6200 kPa (50 to 900 psia), and temperatures ranging from 50 to 250 C (122 to 302 F). Three elastomers were tested: CR rubber (C873-70), FKM fluorocarbon rubber (Viton A), and MPQ silicone rubber (MIL-ZZ-765, Class 2); and three thermoplastics were tested: polyhexamethylene adipamide (Zytel 42), polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon TFE), and polychlorotrifluoroethylene (Neoflon CTFE M400H). Post-aging changes in mass, dimensions, tensile strength, elongation at break, and durometer hardness were determined. Also, the compression set was determined for the three elastomers. Results show that the properties under investigation were more sensitive to oxygen pressure at low to moderate temperatures, and more sensitive to temperature at low to moderate oxygen pressures. Inspection of the results also suggested that both chain scissioning and cross-linking processes were operative, consistent with heterogeneous oxidation. Attempts are underway to verify conclusively the occurrence of heterogeneous oxidation using a simple modulus profiling technique. Finally, the effect of aging at 620 kpa (90 psia) and 121 C (250 F) on ignition and combustion resistance was determined. As expected, aged polymers were less ignitable and combustible (had higher AlTs and lower heats of combustion). Special attention was given to Neoflon CTFE. More specifically, the effect of process history (compression versus extrusion molding) and percent crystallinity (quick- versus slow-quenched) on the AIT, heat of combustion, and impact sensitivity of Neoflon CTFE was investigated. Results show the AIT, heat of combustion, and impact sensitivity to be essentially independent of Neoflon CTFE process history and structure.

  7. Novel low-permittivity dielectrics for Si-based microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.P.

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this laboratory-directed research and development (LDRD) project was to develop and assess novel low-permittivity dielectric materials for applications as interlevel dielectrics (ILDs) in Si-based microelectronics. There were three classes of materials investigated: (1) novel covalently-bonded ceramics containing carbon, boron, and/or nitrogen, (2) fluorinated SiO{sub 2} (SiOF), and (3) plasma polymerized fluorocarbon (PPFC). The specific advantages and disadvantages for each potential low k ILD material were evaluated. It was discovered that highly energetic deposition processes are required for the formation of thermally and environmentally stable carbon or boron nitride ceramics, and the resulting films may have many potentially valuable applications, such as diffusion barriers, tribological coatings, micro-sensor materials, etc. The films are not suitable as low k ILDs, however, because the highly energetic deposition process leads to films with high atomic density, and this leads to high dielectric constants. SiOF shows a promise as low k ILD material for near-term applications, but special passivation or encapsulation strategies may be required in order to reduce two instability problems that the authors have discovered: moisture absorption and thermal instability of the SiOF/Al interface. PPFC films offer promise for even lower dielectric constant ILDs than SiOF, but it will be necessary to develop new strategies to passivate the free radicals in the films generated during deposition. These free radicals lead to increase in dielectric loss over time when the films are exposed to room ambient conditions.

  8. A combined ultrasonic flow meter and binary vapour mixture analyzer for the ATLAS silicon tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, R.; Battistin, M.; Berry, S.; Berthoud, J.; Bitadze, A.; Bonneau, P.; Botelho-Direito, J.; Bousson, N.; Boyd, G.; Bozza, G.; Da Riva, E.; Degeorge, C.; Deterre, C.; DiGirolamo, B.; Doubek, M.; Giugni, D.; Godlewski, J.; Hallewell, G.; Katunin, S.; Lombard, D.; Mathieu, M.; McMahon, S.; Nagai, K.; Perez-Rodriguez, E.; Rossi, C.; Rozanov, A.; Vacek, V.; Vitek, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2013-02-01

    We describe a combined ultrasonic instrument for gas flow metering and continuous real-time binary gas composition measurements. The combined flow measurement and mixture analysis algorithm employs sound velocity measurements in two directions in combination with measurements of the pressure and temperature of the process gas mixture. The instrument has been developed in two geometries following extensive computational fluid dynamics studies of various mechanical layouts. A version with an axial sound path has been used with binary gas flows up to 230 l.min-1, while a version with a sound path angled at 45° to the gas flow direction has been developed for use in gas flows up to 20000 l.min-1. The instrument with the axial geometry has demonstrated a flow resolution of <= 1 % of full scale for flows up to 230 l.min-1 and a mixture resolution of 3.10-3 for C3F8/C2F6 molar mixtures with ~ 20 %C2F6. Higher mixture precision is possible in mixtures of gases with widely-differing molecular weight (mw): a sensitivity of < 5.10-5 to traces of C3F8 in nitrogen (mw difference 160) has been seen in a long duration ( > 1yr) continuous study. A prototype instrument with 45° crossing angle has demonstrated a flow resolution of 1.9 % of full scale for linear flow velocities up to 15 ms-1. Although this development was motivated by a requirement of the ATLAS silicon tracker evaporative fluorocarbon cooling system, the developed instrument can be used in many applications where continuous knowledge of binary gas composition is required. Applications include the analysis of hydrocarbons, vapour mixtures for semi-conductor manufacture and anaesthetic gas mixtures.

  9. Dynamically reconfigurable complex emulsions via tunable interfacial tensions.

    PubMed

    Zarzar, Lauren D; Sresht, Vishnu; Sletten, Ellen M; Kalow, Julia A; Blankschtein, Daniel; Swager, Timothy M

    2015-02-26

    Emulsification is a powerful, well-known technique for mixing and dispersing immiscible components within a continuous liquid phase. Consequently, emulsions are central components of medicine, food and performance materials. Complex emulsions, including Janus droplets (that is, droplets with faces of differing chemistries) and multiple emulsions, are of increasing importance in pharmaceuticals and medical diagnostics, in the fabrication of microparticles and capsules for food, in chemical separations, in cosmetics, and in dynamic optics. Because complex emulsion properties and functions are related to the droplet geometry and composition, the development of rapid, simple fabrication approaches allowing precise control over the droplets' physical and chemical characteristics is critical. Significant advances in the fabrication of complex emulsions have been made using a number of procedures, ranging from large-scale, less precise techniques that give compositional heterogeneity using high-shear mixers and membranes, to small-volume but more precise microfluidic methods. However, such approaches have yet to create droplet morphologies that can be controllably altered after emulsification. Reconfigurable complex liquids potentially have great utility as dynamically tunable materials. Here we describe an approach to the one-step fabrication of three- and four-phase complex emulsions with highly controllable and reconfigurable morphologies. The fabrication makes use of the temperature-sensitive miscibility of hydrocarbon, silicone and fluorocarbon liquids, and is applied to both the microfluidic and the scalable batch production of complex droplets. We demonstrate that droplet geometries can be alternated between encapsulated and Janus configurations by varying the interfacial tensions using hydrocarbon and fluorinated surfactants including stimuli-responsive and cleavable surfactants. This yields a generalizable strategy for the fabrication of multiphase emulsions with controllably reconfigurable morphologies and the potential to create a wide range of responsive materials. PMID:25719669

  10. Selected physicochemical aspects of poly- and perfluoroalkylated substances relevant to performance, environment and sustainability-part one.

    PubMed

    Krafft, Marie Pierre; Riess, Jean G

    2015-06-01

    The elemental characteristics of the fluorine atom tell us that replacing an alkyl chain by a perfluoroalkyl or polyfluorinated chain in a molecule or polymer is consequential. A brief reminder about perfluoroalkyl chains, fluorocarbons and fluorosurfactants is provided. The outstanding, otherwise unattainable physicochemical properties and combinations thereof of poly and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are outlined, including extreme hydrophobic and lipophobic character; thermal and chemical stability in extreme conditions; remarkable aptitude to self-assemble into sturdy thin repellent protecting films; unique spreading, dispersing, emulsifying, anti-adhesive and levelling, dielectric, piezoelectric and optical properties, leading to numerous industrial and technical uses and consumer products. It was eventually discovered, however, that PFASs with seven or more carbon-long perfluoroalkyl chains had disseminated in air, water, soil and biota worldwide, are persistent in the environment and bioaccumulative in animals and humans, raising serious health and environmental concerns. Further use of long-chain PFASs is environmentally not sustainable. Most leading manufacturers have turned to shorter four to six carbon perfluoroalkyl chain products that are not considered bioaccumulative. However, many of the key performances of PFASs decrease sharply when fluorinated chains become shorter. Fluorosurfactants become less effective and less efficient, provide lesser barrier film stability, etc. On the other hand, they remain as persistent in the environment as their longer chain homologues. Surprisingly little data (with considerable discrepancies) is accessible on the physicochemical properties of the PFASs under examination, a situation that requires consideration and rectification. Such data are needed for understanding the environmental and in vivo behaviour of PFASs. They should help determine which, for which uses, and to what extent, PFASs are environmentally sustainable. PMID:25245564

  11. Reaction and Protection of Electrical Wire Insulators in Atomic-oxygen Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Cantrell, Gidget

    1994-01-01

    Atomic-oxygen erosion on spacecraft in low Earth orbit is an issue which is becoming increasingly important because of the growing number of spacecraft that will fly in the orbits which have high concentrations of atomic oxygen. In this investigation, the atomic-oxygen durability of three types of electrical wire insulation (carbon-based, fluoropolymer, and polysiloxane elastomer) were evaluated. These insulation materials were exposed to thermal-energy atomic oxygen, which was obtained by RF excitation of air at a pressure of 11-20 Pa. The effects of atomic-oxygen exposure on insulation materials indicate that all carbon-based materials erode at about the same rate as polyamide Kapton and, therefore, are not atomic-oxygen durable. However, the durability of fluoropolymers needs to be evaluated on a case by case basis because the erosion rates of fluoropolymers vary widely. For example, experimental data suggest the formation of atomic fluorine during atomic-oxygen amorphous-fluorocarbon reactions. Dimethyl polysiloxanes (silicone) do not lose mass during atomic-oxygen exposure, but develop silica surfaces which are under tension and frequently crack as a result of loss of methyl groups. However, if the silicone sample surfaces were properly pretreated to provide a certain roughness, atomic oxygen exposure resulted in a sturdy, non-cracked atomic-oxygen durable SiO2 layer. Since the surface does not crack during such silicone-atomic oxygen reaction, the crack-induced contamination by silicone can be reduced or completely stopped. Therefore, with proper pretreatment, silicone can be either a wire insulation material or a coating on wire insulation materials to provide atomic-oxygen durability.

  12. Multiple-orifice liquid injection into hypersonic airstreams and applications to ram C-3 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental data are presented for the oblique injection of water and three electrophilic liquids (fluorocarbon compounds) through multiple-orifice nozzles from a flat plate and the sides of a hemisphere-cone (0.375 scale of RAM C spacecraft) into hypersonic airstreams. The nozzle patterns included single and multiple orifices, single rows of nozzles, and duplicates of the RAM C-III nozzles. The flat-plate tests were made at Mach 8. Total pressure was varied from 3.45 MN/m2 to 10.34 MN/m2, Reynolds number was varied form 9,840,000 per meter to 19,700,000 per meter, and liquid injection pressure was varied from 0.69 MN/m2 to 3.5 MN/m2. The hemisphere-cone tests were made at Mach 7.3. Total pressure was varied from 1.38 MN/m2, to 6.89 MN/m2, Reynolds number was varied from 3,540,000 per meter to 17,700,000 per meter, and liquid-injection pressure was varied from 0.34 MN/m2 to 4.14 MN/m2. Photographs of the tests and plots of liquid-penetration and spray cross-section area are presented. Maximum penetration was found to vary as the square root of the dynamic-pressure ratio and the square root of the total injection nozzle area. Spray cross-section area was linear with maximum penetration. The test results are used to compute injection parameters for the RAM C-3 flight injection experiment.

  13. Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry on nanostructured semiconductor substrates: DIOS(TM) and QuickMass(TM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, K. P.

    2010-02-01

    In the era of systems biology, new analytical platforms are under demand. Desorption/ionization on silicon mass spectrometry (DIOS-MS) is a promising high throughput laser mass spectrometry approach that has attracted a lot of attention, and has been commercialized. Another substrate material manufactured by physical method has also been made commercially available under the trade name of QuickMass(TM). These two commercial substrates, DIOS(TM) and QuickMass(TM), were investigated independently from the manufacturers and were characterized by a number of advanced surface techniques. This work determined (1) the correlation between the substrate physicochemical properties and their LDI activity, (2) the feasibility of metabolic profiling from complex biological matrices and (3) the laser desorption/ionization mechanism. The DIOS(TM) substrate was characterized with a thick nano-sized porous layer, a high surface concentration of fluorocarbon and silicon oxides and super-hydrophobicity. In contrast, the QuickMass(TM) substrate consisted of a non-porous germanium thin-film. The relatively high ionization efficiency obtained from the DIOS(TM) substrate was contributed to the fluorosilane manufacturing processes and its porous morphology. Despite the QuickMass(TM) substrate being less effective, it was noted that the use of germanium affords a self-cleaning mechanism and suppresses background interference of mass spectra. The suitability of DIOS(TM) substrates for metabolic profiling of complex biological matrices was demonstrated. DIOS mass spectra of human blood plasma, human urine and animal liver tissue extracts were produced. Suitable extraction methods were found to be important, but relatively simplified approaches were sufficient. Further investigations of the DIOS desorption/ionization mechanism were carried out. The previously proposed sub-surface state reaction could be a molten-solid interfacial state reaction of the substrate and this had a significant effect toward the protonation reaction of amines.

  14. Dynamically reconfigurable complex emulsions via tunable interfacial tensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarzar, Lauren D.; Sresht, Vishnu; Sletten, Ellen M.; Kalow, Julia A.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Swager, Timothy M.

    2015-02-01

    Emulsification is a powerful, well-known technique for mixing and dispersing immiscible components within a continuous liquid phase. Consequently, emulsions are central components of medicine, food and performance materials. Complex emulsions, including Janus droplets (that is, droplets with faces of differing chemistries) and multiple emulsions, are of increasing importance in pharmaceuticals and medical diagnostics, in the fabrication of microparticles and capsules for food, in chemical separations, in cosmetics, and in dynamic optics. Because complex emulsion properties and functions are related to the droplet geometry and composition, the development of rapid, simple fabrication approaches allowing precise control over the droplets' physical and chemical characteristics is critical. Significant advances in the fabrication of complex emulsions have been made using a number of procedures, ranging from large-scale, less precise techniques that give compositional heterogeneity using high-shear mixers and membranes, to small-volume but more precise microfluidic methods. However, such approaches have yet to create droplet morphologies that can be controllably altered after emulsification. Reconfigurable complex liquids potentially have great utility as dynamically tunable materials. Here we describe an approach to the one-step fabrication of three- and four-phase complex emulsions with highly controllable and reconfigurable morphologies. The fabrication makes use of the temperature-sensitive miscibility of hydrocarbon, silicone and fluorocarbon liquids, and is applied to both the microfluidic and the scalable batch production of complex droplets. We demonstrate that droplet geometries can be alternated between encapsulated and Janus configurations by varying the interfacial tensions using hydrocarbon and fluorinated surfactants including stimuli-responsive and cleavable surfactants. This yields a generalizable strategy for the fabrication of multiphase emulsions with controllably reconfigurable morphologies and the potential to create a wide range of responsive materials.

  15. The Materials Chemistry of Atomic Oxygen with Applications to Anisotropic Etching of Submicron Structures in Microelectronics and the Surface Chemistry Engineering of Porous Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steve L.; Leger, Lubert J.; Wu, Corina; Cross, Jon B.; Jurgensen, Charles W.

    1994-01-01

    Neutral atomic oxygen is the most abundant component of the ionospheric plasma in the low Earth orbit environment (LEO; 200 to 700 kilometers altitude) and can produce significant degradation of some spacecraft materials. In order to produce a more complete understanding of the materials chemistry of atomic oxygen, the chemistry and physics of O-atom interactions with materials were determined in three radically different environments: (1) The Space Shuttle cargo bay in low Earth orbit (the EOIM-3 space flight experiment), (2) a high-velocity neutral atom beam system (HVAB) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and (3) a microwave-plasma flowing-discharge system at JSC. The Space Shuttle and the high velocity atom beam systems produce atom-surface collision energies ranging from 0.1 to 7 eV (hyperthermal atoms) under high-vacuum conditions, while the flowing discharge system produces a 0.065 eV surface collision energy at a total pressure of 2 Torr. Data obtained in the three different O-atom environments referred to above show that the rate of O-atom reaction with polymeric materials is strongly dependent on atom kinetic energy, obeying a reactive scattering law which suggests that atom kinetic energy is directly available for overcoming activation barriers in the reaction. General relationships between polymer reactivity with O atoms and polymer composition and molecular structure have been determined. In addition, vacuum ultraviolet photochemical effects have been shown to dominate the reaction of O atoms with fluorocarbon polymers. Finally, studies of the materials chemistry of O atoms have produced results which may be of interest to technologists outside the aerospace industry. Atomic oxygen 'spin-off' or 'dual use' technologies in the areas of anisotropic etching in microelectronic materials and device processing, as well as surface chemistry engineering of porous solid materials are described.

  16. Fluoropolymer Films Deposited by Argon Ion-Beam Sputtering of Polytetrafluoroethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Morton A.; Banks, Bruce A.; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The FT-IR, XPS and UV spectra of fluoropolymer films (SPTFE-I) deposited by argon ion-beam sputtering of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were obtained and compared with prior corresponding spectra of fluoropolymer films (SPTFE-P) deposited by argon rf plasma sputtering of PTFE. Although the F/C ratios for SPTFE-I and -P (1.63 and 1.51) were similar, their structures were quite different in that there was a much higher concentration of CF2 groups in SPTFE-I than in SPTFE-P, ca. 61 and 33% of the total carbon contents, respectively. The FT-IR spectra reflect that difference, that for SPTFE-I showing a distinct doublet at 1210 and 1150 per centimeter while that for SPTFE-P presents a broad, featureless band at ca. 1250 per centimeter. The absorbance of the 1210-per centimeter band in SPTFE-I was proportional to the thickness of the film, in the range of 50-400 nanometers. The SPTFE-I was more transparent in the UV than SPTFE-P at comparable thickness. The mechanism for SPTFE-I formation likely involves "chopping off" of oligomeric segments of PTFE as an accompaniment to "plasma" polymerization of TFE monomer or other fluorocarbon fragments generated in situ from PTFE on impact with energetic Ar ions. Data are presented for SPTFE-I deposits and the associated Ar(+) bombarded PTFE targets where a fresh target was used for each run or a single target was used for a sequence of runs.

  17. Kizilcaören ore-bearing complex with carbonatites (northwestern Anatolia, Turkey): Formation time and mineralogy of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, A. V.; Öztürk, H.; Altuncu, S.; Lebedev, V. A.

    2014-02-01

    The results of isotope-geochronological and mineralogical studies of the rocks making up the Kizilcaören fluorite-barite-REE deposit, northwestern Anatolia, Turkey are discussed in the paper. The ore is a constituent of the subvolcanic complex localized in a large fault zone. The complex combines (from earlier to later rocks): (1) phonolite and trachyte stocks, (2) carbonatite and carbonate-silicate dikelike bodies; and (3) fluorite-barite-bastnaesite ore in the form of thick homogeneous veins and cement in breccia. The K-Ar dating of silicate igneous rocks and carbonatites shows that they were formed in the Chattian Age of the Oligocene 25-24 Ma ago. Mineralogical observations show that the ore is the youngest constituent in the rock complex. Supergene alteration deeply transformed ore-bearing rocks, in particular, resulting in leaching of primary minerals, presumably Ca-Mn-Fe carbonates, and in cementation of the residual bastnaesitefluorite framework by Fe and Mn hydroxides. Most of the studied rocks contain pyrochlore, LREE fluorocarbonates, Nb-bearing rutile, Fe-Mg micas, and K-feldspar. The genetic features of the deposit have been considered. In general, the ore-bearing rock complex is compared in the set of rocks and their mineralogy and geochemistry with deposits of the Gallinas Mountains in the United States, the Arshan and Khalyuta deposits in the western Transbaikalia region, and Mushugai-Khuduk deposit in Mongolia. The Kizilcaören deposit represents a variant of postmagmatic mineralization closely related to carbonatite magmatism associated with alkaline and subalkaline intermediate rocks.

  18. Krypton-85 health risk assessment for a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    SciTech Connect

    Mellinger, P.J.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Tanner, J.E.; Gilbert, E.S.

    1984-08-01

    The risks involved in the routine release of /sup 85/Kr from nuclear fuel reprocessing operations to the environment were compared to those resulting from the capture and storage of /sup 85/Kr. Instead of releasing the /sup 85/Kr to the environment when fuel is reprocessed, it can be captured, immobilized and stored. Two alternative methods of capturing /sup 85/Kr (cryogenic distillation and fluorocarbon absorption) and one method of immobilizing the captured gas (ion implantation/sputtering) were theoretically incorporated into a representative fuel reprocessing plant, the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant, even though there are no known plans to start up this facility. Given the uncertainties in the models used to generate lifetime risk numbers (0.02 to 0.027 radiation induced fatal cancers expected in the occupational workforce and 0.017 fatal cancers in the general population), the differences in total risks for the three situations, (i.e., no-capture and two-capture alternatives) cannot be considered meaningful. It is possible that no risks would occur from any of the three situations. There is certainly no reason to conclude that risks from /sup 85/Kr routinely released to the environment are greater than those that would result from the other two situations considered. Present regulations mandate recovery and disposal of /sup 85/Kr from the off gases of a facility reprocessing spent fuel from commercial sources. Because of the lack of a clear-cut indication that recovery woud be beneficial, it does not seem prudent to burden the facilities with a requirement for /sup 85/Kr recovery, at least until operating experience demonstrates the incentive. The probable high aging of the early fuel to be processed and the higher dose resulting from the release of the unregulated /sup 3/H and /sup 14/C also encourage delaying implementation of the /sup 85/Kr recovery in the early plants.

  19. Interactive stereo electron microscopy enhanced with virtual reality

    SciTech Connect

    Bethel, E.Wes; Bastacky, S.Jacob; Schwartz, Kenneth S.

    2001-12-17

    An analytical system is presented that is used to take measurements of objects perceived in stereo image pairs obtained from a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Our system operates by presenting a single stereo view that contains stereo image data obtained from the SEM, along with geometric representations of two types of virtual measurement instruments, a ''protractor'' and a ''caliper''. The measurements obtained from this system are an integral part of a medical study evaluating surfactant, a liquid coating the inner surface of the lung which makes possible the process of breathing. Measurements of the curvature and contact angle of submicron diameter droplets of a fluorocarbon deposited on the surface of airways are performed in order to determine surface tension of the air/liquid interface. This approach has been extended to a microscopic level from the techniques of traditional surface science by measuring submicrometer rather than millimeter diameter droplets, as well as the lengths and curvature of cilia responsible for movement of the surfactant, the airway's protective liquid blanket. An earlier implementation of this approach for taking angle measurements from objects perceived in stereo image pairs using a virtual protractor is extended in this paper to include distance measurements and to use a unified view model. The system is built around a unified view model that is derived from microscope-specific parameters, such as focal length, visible area and magnification. The unified view model ensures that the underlying view models and resultant binocular parallax cues are consistent between synthetic and acquired imagery. When the view models are consistent, it is possible to take measurements of features that are not constrained to lie within the projection plane. The system is first calibrated using non-clinical data of known size and resolution. Using the SEM, stereo image pairs of grids and spheres of known resolution are created to calibrate the measurement system. After calibration, the system is used to take distance and angle measurements of clinical specimens.

  20. Dynamically reconfigurable complex emulsions via tunable interfacial tensions

    PubMed Central

    Zarzar, Lauren D.; Sresht, Vishnu; Sletten, Ellen M.; Kalow, Julia A.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Swager, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Emulsification is a powerful, well-known technique for mixing and dispersing immiscible components within a continuous liquid phase. Consequently, emulsions are central components of medicine, food and performance materials. Complex emulsions, including multiple emulsions and Janus droplets which contain hemispheres of differing material, are of increasing importance1 in pharmaceuticals and medical diagnostics2, in the fabrication of microparticles and capsules3–5 for food6, in chemical separations7, in cosmetics8, and in dynamic optics9. Because complex emulsion properties and functions are related to the droplet geometry and composition, the development of rapid, simple fabrication approaches allowing precise control over the droplets’ physical and chemical characteristics is critical. Significant advances in the fabrication of complex emulsions have been made using a number of procedures, ranging from large-scale, less precise techniques that give compositional heterogeneity using high-shear mixers and membranes10, to small-volume but more precise microfluidic methods11,12. However, such approaches have yet to create droplet morphologies that can be controllably altered after emulsification. Reconfigurable complex liquids potentially have greatly increased utility as dynamically tunable materials. Here we describe an approach to the one-step fabrication of three- and four-phase complex emulsions with highly controllable and reconfigurable morphologies. The fabrication makes use of the temperature-sensitive miscibility of hydrocarbon, silicone and fluorocarbon liquids, and is applied to both the microfluidic and the scalable batch production of complex droplets. We demonstrate that droplet geometries can be alternated between encapsulated and Janus configurations by varying the interfacial tensions using hydrocarbon and fluorinated surfactants including stimuli-responsive and cleavable surfactants. This yields a generalizable strategy for the fabrication of multiphase emulsions with controllably reconfigurable morphologies and the potential to create a wide range of responsive materials. PMID:25719669

  1. On-Chip Titration of an Anticoagulant Argatroban and Determination of the Clotting Time within Whole Blood or Plasma Using a Plug-Based Microfluidic System

    PubMed Central

    Song, Helen; Li, Hung-Wing; Munson, Matthew S.; Van Ha, Thuong G.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes extending plug-based microfluidics to handling complex biological fluids such as blood, solving the problem of injecting additional reagents into plugs, and applying this system to measuring of clotting time in small volumes of whole blood and plasma. Plugs are droplets transported through microchannels by fluorocarbon fluids. A plug-based microfluidic system was developed to titrate an anticoagulant (argatroban) into blood samples and to measure the clotting time using the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) test. To carry out these experiments, the following techniques were developed for a plug-based system: (i) using Teflon AF coating on the microchannel wall to enable formation of plugs containing blood and transport of the solid fibrin clots within plugs, (ii) using a hydrophilic glass capillary to enable reliable merging of a reagent from an aqueous stream into plugs, (iii) using bright-field microscopy to detect the formation of a fibrin clot within plugs and using fluorescent microscopy to detect the production of thrombin using a fluorogenic substrate, and (iv) titration of argatroban (0–1.5 ?g/mL) into plugs and measurement of the resulting APTTs at room temperature (23 °C) and physiological temperature (37 °C). APTT measurements were conducted with normal pooled plasma (platelet-poor plasma) and with donor’s blood samples (both whole blood and platelet-rich plasma). APTT values and APTT ratios measured by the plug-based microfluidic device were compared to the results from a clinical laboratory at 37 °C. APTT obtained from the on-chip assay were about double those from the clinical laboratory but the APTT ratios from these two methods agreed well with each other. PMID:16841902

  2. Waste reduction using carbon dioxide: A solvent substitute for precision cleaning applications

    SciTech Connect

    Phelphs, M.R.; Hogan, M.O.; Snowden-Swan, L.J.

    1995-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Industrial Waste Program (IWP) has been sponsoring the research, development, and commercialization of supercritical fluid cleaning technology for replacement of traditional solvent cleaning processes. Los Alamos National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest Laboratory have been working through this collaborative effort to test the efficacy of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) cleaning. Tests were performed on a variety of substrates at various solvent conditions for a large number of common contaminants to characterize cleaning performance. Cleaning efficiencies with respect to system dynamics were also studied. Results of these tests show that supercritical and near-critical carbon dioxide is not only an effective solvent for precision cleaning applications of parts such as gyroscopes, bearing assemblies, and machine tools but is also feasible for bulk cleaning operations for a variety of industrial needs. It has been tested and shown to be effective for a range of substrates including laser optics components, computer disk drives, and cloth rags. Metals, including stainless steel, beryllium, gold, silver, copper and others; ceramics; and elastomeric seals such as Teflon, silicone, and epoxy potting compounds are highly compatible with SuperCritical CO{sub 2} (SCCO{sub 2}). Many contaminants, including silicones, Krytox, hydrocarbons, esters, fluorocarbons, gyroscope damping and fill fluids, and machining oils and lubricating oils, will dissolve in SCCO{sub 2}. In general, nonpolar, hydrophobic contaminants such as oils dissolve well, while hydrophilic contaminants such as inorganic salts do not. The parts and contaminants mentioned here are not the only applications for SCCO, cleaning, as the full range of possibilities is still being defined by developers and users of the technology. The many advantages of SCCO{sub 2} indicate that it is a technology that should carry industrial cleaning operations into the future.

  3. Green Solvents for Precision Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandelli, Heather; Maloney, Phillip; DeVor, Robert; Surma, Jan; Hintze, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace machinery used in liquid oxygen (LOX) fuel systems must be precision cleaned to achieve a very low level of non-volatile residue (< 1 mg0.1 m2), especially flammable residue. Traditionally chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have been used in the precision cleaning of LOX systems, specifically CFC 113 (C2Cl3F3). CFCs have been known to cause the depletion of ozone and in 1987, were banned by the Montreal Protocol due to health, safety and environmental concerns. This has now led to the development of new processes in the precision cleaning of aerospace components. An ideal solvent-replacement is non-flammable, environmentally benign, non-corrosive, inexpensive, effective and evaporates completely, leaving no residue. Highlighted is a green precision cleaning process, which is contaminant removal using supercritical carbon dioxide as the environmentally benign solvent. In this process, the contaminant is dissolved in carbon dioxide, and the parts are recovered at the end of the cleaning process completely dry and ready for use. Typical contaminants of aerospace components include hydrocarbon greases, hydraulic fluids, silicone fluids and greases, fluorocarbon fluids and greases and fingerprint oil. Metallic aerospace components range from small nuts and bolts to much larger parts, such as butterfly valves 18 in diameter. A fluorinated grease, Krytox, is investigated as a model contaminant in these preliminary studies, and aluminum coupons are employed as a model aerospace component. Preliminary studies are presented in which the experimental parameters are optimized for removal of Krytox from aluminum coupons in a stirred-batch process. The experimental conditions investigated are temperature, pressure, exposure time and impeller speed. Temperatures of 308 - 423 K, pressures in the range of 8.3 - 41.4 MPa, exposure times between 5 - 60 min and impeller speeds of 0 - 1000 rpm were investigated. Preliminary results showed up to 86 cleaning efficiency with the moderate processing conditions of 323 K, 13.8 MPa, 30 min and 750 rpm.

  4. Capillary isoelectric focusing method development and validation for investigation of recombinant therapeutic monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Suba, Dávid; Urbányi, Zoltán; Salgó, András

    2015-10-10

    Capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF) is a basic and highly accurate routine analytical tool to prove identity of protein drugs in quality control (QC) and release tests in biopharmaceutical industries. However there are some "out-of-the-box" applications commercially available which provide easy and rapid isoelectric focusing solutions for investigating monoclonal antibody drug proteins. However use of these kits in routine testings requires high costs. A capillary isoelectric focusing method was developed and validated for identification testing of monoclonal antibody drug products with isoelectric point between 7.0 and 9.0. A method was developed providing good pH gradient for internal calibration (R(2)>0.99) and good resolution between all of the isoform peaks (R=2), minimizing the time and complexity of sample preparation (no urea or salt used). The method is highly reproducible and it is suitable for validation and method transfer to any QC laboratories. Another advantage of the method is that it operates with commercially available chemicals which can be purchased from any suppliers. The interaction with capillary walls (avoid precipitation and adsorption as far as possible) was minimized and synthetic isoelectric small molecular markers were used instead of peptide or protein based markers. The developed method was validated according to the recent ICH guideline (Q2(R1)). Relative standard deviation results were below 0.2% for isoelectric points and below 4% according to the normalized migration times. The method is robust to buffer components with different lot numbers and neutral capillaries with different type of inner coatings. The fluoro-carbon coated column was chosen because of costs-effectivity aspects. PMID:26025812

  5. Surface contamination analysis technology team overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, H. Dewitt, Jr.

    1996-11-01

    The surface contamination analysis technology (SCAT) team was originated as a working roup of NASA civil service, Space Shuttle contractor, and university groups. Participating members of the SCAT Team have included personnel from NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Materials and Processes Laboratory and Langley Research Center's Instrument Development Group; contractors-Thiokol Corporation's Inspection Technology Group, AC Engineering support contractor, Aerojet, SAIC, and Lockheed MArtin/Oak Ridge Y-12 support contractor and Shuttle External Tank prime contractor; and the University of Alabama in Huntsville's Center for Robotics and Automation. The goal of the SCAT team as originally defined was to develop and integrate a multi-purpose inspection head for robotic application to in-process inspection of contamination sensitive surfaces. One area of interest was replacement of ozone depleting solvents currently used for surface cleanliness verification. The team approach brought together the appropriate personnel to determine what surface inspection techniques were applicable to multi-program surface cleanliness inspection. Major substrates of interest were chosen to simulate space shuttle critical bonding surface or surfaces sensitive to contamination such as fuel system component surfaces. Inspection techniques evaluated include optically stimulated electron emission or photoelectron emission; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; near infrared fiber optic spectroscopy; and, ultraviolet fluorescence. Current plans are to demonstrate an integrated system in MSFC's Productivity Enhancement Complex within five years from initiation of this effort in 1992. Instrumentation specifications and designs developed under this effort include a portable diffuse reflectance FTIR system built by Surface Optics Corporation and a third generation optically stimulated electron emission system built by LaRC. This paper will discuss the evaluation of the various techniques on a number of substrate materials contaminated with hydrocarbons, silicones, and fluorocarbons. Discussion will also include standards development for instrument calibration and testing.

  6. A testing program to evaluate the effects of simulant mixed wastes on plastic transportation packaging components

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.; Dickman, P.T.

    1997-08-01

    Based on regulatory requirements for Type A and B radioactive material packaging, a Testing Program was developed to evaluate the effects of mixed wastes on plastic materials which could be used as liners and seals in transportation containers. The plastics evaluated in this program were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer (Nitrile rubber), cross-linked polyethylene, epichlorohydrin, ethylene-propylene rubber (EPDM), fluorocarbons, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), butyl rubber, polypropylene, polytetrafluoroethylene, and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). These plastics were first screened in four simulant mixed wastes. The liner materials were screened using specific gravity measurements and seal materials by vapor transport rate (VTR) measurements. For the screening of liner materials, Kel-F, HDPE, and XLPE were found to offer the greatest resistance to the combination of radiation and chemicals. The tests also indicated that while all seal materials passed exposure to the aqueous simulant mixed waste, EPDM and SBR had the lowest VTRs. In the chlorinated hydrocarbon simulant mixed waste, only Viton passed the screening tests. In both the simulant scintillation fluid mixed waste and the ketone mixture waste, none of the seal materials met the screening criteria. Those materials which passed the screening tests were subjected to further comprehensive testing in each of the simulant wastes. The materials were exposed to four different radiation doses followed by exposure to a simulant mixed waste at three temperatures and four different exposure times (7, 14, 28, 180 days). Materials were tested by measuring specific gravity, dimensional, hardness, stress cracking, VTR, compression set, and tensile properties. The second phase of this Testing Program involving the comprehensive testing of plastic liner has been completed and for seal materials is currently in progress.

  7. Accessory minerals of the Cínovec (Zinnwald) granite cupola, Czech Republic: indicators of petrogenetic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johan, Z.; Johan, V.

    2005-01-01

    A fully cored drillhole was drilled to 1596 m by the Czech Geological Survey in 1961 1963 in the central part of the Cínovec (Zinnwald) granite cupola. Two types of granite were intersected: zinnwaldite granite (ZG), observed down to a depth of 730 m, and protolithionite granite (PG), occurring to the end of the hole. The core was used to study the distribution and chemistry of: zircon, thorite, xenotime, monazite, bastnäsite, synchysite, REE oxyfluorides and hydroxyfluorides. Zircon occurs throughout the drillcore; it is strongly hydrated and fluorinated with about 18.5 wt.% H2O content in the apical part of the cupola. Its F-content reaches 2.41 wt.%. Within the PG, the F concentration in zircon is low. Zircon is poor in Th and U and its HfO2 contents vary from 1.01 to 5.24 wt.%. Thorite is common in the PG, becoming rare in the ZG. It is strongly hydrated (up to 14 wt.% H2O) and fluorinated (up to 2.04 wt.% F). Extensive solid solution between ThSiO4 and YPO4 was observed. Xenotime is strongly hydrated (up to 16 wt.% H2O), but its F content is low (<0.31 wt.%). Two types of monazite were identified: Th-rich (up to 9.3 wt.% ThO2) in the ZG, and Th-poor (<2.5 wt.% ThO2) in the PG. Monazite remained stable during the hydration and fluorination process. Its REE chondrite-normalized distribution patterns show negative anomalies for La and Nd and a pronounced negative anomaly for Eu. Chemical compositions of several REE oxyfluorides and hydroxyfluorides were studied. REE fluorocarbonates are represented by bastnäsite and synchysite. Bastnäsite is abundant in the ZG. Its chondrite-normalized REE patterns are characterized by an important negative Eu anomaly and downward kinks at La and Nd. Synchysite-(Ce) and synchysite-(Y) are particularly well developed in the deeper parts of the cupola, and exhibit REE distribution patterns characterized by a weak negative Eu anomaly (synchysite-(Ce)), or a weak positive Eu anomaly (synchysite-(Y)).

  8. Uranium hexafluoride liquid thermal expansion, elusive eutectic with hydrogen fluoride, and very first production using chlorine trifluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, G.P.

    1991-12-31

    Three unusual incidents and case histories involving uranium hexafluoride in the enrichment facilities of the USA in the late 1940`s and early 1950`s are presented. The history of the measurements of the thermal expansion of liquids containing fluorine atoms within the molecule is reviewed with special emphasis upon uranium hexafluoride. A comparison is made between fluorinated esters, fluorocarbons, and uranium hexafluoride. The quantitative relationship between the thermal expansion coefficient, a, of liquids and the critical temperature, T{sub c} is presented. Uranium hexafluoride has an a that is very high in a temperature range that is used by laboratory and production workers - much higher than any other liquid measured. This physical property of UF{sub 6} has resulted in accidents involving filling the UF{sub 6} containers too full and then heating with a resulting rupture of the container. Such an incident at a uranium gaseous diffusion plant is presented. Production workers seldom {open_quotes}see{close_quotes} uranium hexafluoride. The movement of UF{sub 6} from one container to another is usually trailed by weight, not sight. Even laboratory scientists seldom {open_quotes}see{close_quotes} solid or liquid UF{sub 6} and this can be a problem at times. This inability to {open_quotes}see{close_quotes} the UF{sub 6}-HF mixtures in the 61.2{degrees}C to 101{degrees}C temperature range caused a delay in the understanding of the phase diagram of UF{sub 6}-HF which has a liquid - liquid immiscible region that made the eutectic composition somewhat elusive. Transparent fluorothene tubes solved the problem both for the UF{sub 6}-HF phase diagram as well as the UF{sub 6}-HF-CIF{sub 3} phase diagram with a miscibility gap starting at 53{degrees}C. The historical background leading to the first use of CIF{sub 3} to produce UF{sub 6} in both the laboratory and plant at K-25 is presented.

  9. Biotransformation of 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene (HFO-1234yf) in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Paul; Bertermann, Ruediger; Rusch, Georg M.; Dekant, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    2,3,3,3-Tetrafluoropropene (HFO-1234yf) is a non-ozone-depleting fluorocarbon replacement with a low global warming potential and is developed as refrigerant. Due to lethality observed after high concentration inhalation exposures of HFO-1234yf in a developmental toxicity study with rabbits, the biotransformation of HFO-1234yf was investigated in this species. Female New Zealand White rabbits were exposed to air containing 2000; 10,000; or 50,000 ppm (n = 3/concentration) HFO234yf. All inhalation exposures were conducted for 6 h in a dynamic exposure chamber. Animals were individually housed in metabolic cages after the end of the exposures and urines were collected at 12 h intervals for 60 h. For metabolite identification, urine samples were analyzed by {sup 1}H-coupled and {sup 1}H-decoupled {sup 19}F-NMR and by LC/MS-MS or GC/MS. Metabolites were identified by {sup 19}F-NMR chemical shifts, signal multiplicity, {sup 1}H-{sup 19}F coupling constants and by comparison with synthetic reference compounds. In urine samples of rabbits exposed to 2000; 10,000; or 50,000 ppm HFO-1234yf, the predominant metabolite was N-acetyl-S-(3,3,3-trifluoro-2-hydroxypropanyl)-L-cysteine and accounted for app. 48% of total {sup 19}F-NMR signal intensities. S-(3,3,3-Trifluoro-2-hydroxypropanyl)mercaptolactic acid, 3,3,3-trifluoro-1,2-dihydroxypropane, 3,3,3-trifluoro-2-propanol and inorganic fluoride were also present as urinary metabolites. In incubations of rabbit liver S9 fractions containing glutathione, NADPH and HFO-1234yf, 3,3,3-trifluoro-1,2-dihydroxypropane, S-(3,3,3-trifluoro-2-hydroxypropanyl)glutathione, 3,3,3-trifluoro-2-propanol and inorganic fluoride were identified as metabolites of HFO-1234yf by {sup 19}F-NMR. The quantity of recovered metabolites in urine suggest a low extent (< 0.1% of dose received) of biotransformation of HFO-1234yf in rabbits, and 95% of all metabolites were excreted within 12 h after the end of the exposures (t{sub 1/2} app. 9.5 h). The obtained results indicate that HFO-1234yf is metabolized in rabbits by a CYP450-mediated epoxidation at low rates and glutathione conjugation of the epoxide. The differences in urinary metabolite patterns between rats and rabbits seen with HFO-1234yf are likely due to species-specific processing of glutathione S-conjugates. Rabbits also show a larger extent of biotransformation of HFO-1234yf.

  10. Molecular orientation and multilayer formation in the adsorbed film of 1H,1H,10H,10H-perfluorodecane-1,10-diol at the hexane/water interface; pressure effect on the adsorption of fluoroalkane-diol.

    PubMed

    Takiue, Takanori; Fukuda, Tsubasa; Murakami, Daiki; Sakamoto, Hiroyasu; Matsubara, Hiroki; Aratono, Makoto

    2009-11-01

    The adsorption of 1H,1H,10H,10H-perfluorodecane-1,10-diol (FC10diol) at the hexane solution/water interface was investigated by the measurement of interfacial tension gamma as a function of pressure p and concentration m1 and the thermodynamic data analysis. The results obtained were compared with those of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecanol (TFC10OH) in order to clarify the effect of molecular orientation on the structure and property of the adsorbed film from the viewpoint of volume change of adsorption. The interfacial pressure pi versus mean area per adsorbed molecule A curve revealed two types of phase transitions among expanded, parallel condensed, and multilayer states. The A value in the condensed state and the transition pressure between the expanded and condensed states were larger for FC10diol than for TFC10OH, which manifests the different molecular orientation that the dispersion interaction between hydrophobic chains is weaker in the parallel orientation of FC10diol than in the perpendicular orientation of TFC10OH. The partial molar volume of FC10diol in the condensed state nu1H.C is slightly larger than that of TFC10OH, although the partial molar volume in the hexane solution is much smaller for FC10diol than for TFC10OH. This supports the view that the fluorocarbon chains of FC10diol remain in their contact with hexane even in the condensed film because of the parallel molecular orientation. The partial molar volume in the nu1H,M was very close to the molar volume of solid FC10diol nu1S and smaller than that of nu1H.C at the condensed-multilayer phase transition, and increased gradually with molecular piling. This substantiates that FC10diol molecules are densely packed in a first few layers just above the phase transition and a little loosely packed in the upper layers of the multilayer with increasing molecular piling. Furthermore, the volume change associated with adsorption from the solid FC10diol Delta(nu)(S) evaluated from the gamma versus p curve under the existence of solid deposit was positive and showed a minimum against concentration for the multilayer state. This is primarily due to the minimum in interfacial density at the solubility limit Gamma1H,S and thus due to the minimum in nu1H,M. PMID:19817437

  11. Structures, thermochemistry, and electron affinities of the disilicon fluorides, Si2Fn/Si2Fn- (n = 1-6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoliang; Li, Qianshu; Xu, Wenguo; Xie, Yaoming; Schaefer, Henry F., III

    A systematic investigation of Si2F n/Si2F n systems is carried out with five density functional (DFT) methods in conjunction with DZP++ basis sets. For each system, various structures, including minima, transition states, and energetically low lying saddle points, are optimized. The geometries and the relative energies are discussed and compared. Three kinds of electron affinity and dissociation energy pertaining to the global minimum for each compound are reported. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the limited experimental results. The zero-point vibrational energy (ZPVE) corrected adiabatic electron affinities (EAad) are predicted as 1.97 (Si2F), 1.92 (Si2F2), 2.39 (Si2F3), 2.02 (Si2F4), 2.68 (Si2F5), and 0.73 (Si2F6) eV by the BHLYP method, which is considered to be the most reliable method in the present study for predicting the EAs. These theoretical predictions are quite different from those for the analogous silicon hydrides and fluorocarbons. For example, both Si2F2 and its anions have vinylidene-like (Si-SiF2) global minima. The anion SiSi bond distance is about 0.1 Å shorter than that for the Si-SiF2 neutral. Both Si2F3 and its anion have carbyne-like (SiSiF3) global minima, with the anion SiSi distance about 0.05 Å> shorter. Both Si2F4 and its anion have carbene-like (FSi-SiF3) global minima, again with the negative ion SiSi distance ~0.05 Å shorter. Surprisingly, doubly bridged structures of Si2F4 are energetically competitive. For the ethyl-radical-like Si2F5, the expected longer SiSi distance (by 0.13 Å) for the anion is predicted. Whereas Si2H4, C2F4, Si2H6, and C2F6 do not have significant electron affinities, Si2F4 and Si2F6 do bind an electron. However, the unexpected Si2F6 species has a significantly longer SiSi distance (by 0.15 Å) than that of neutral Si2F6.

  12. Investigating Low Temperature Properties of Rubber Seals - 13020

    SciTech Connect

    Jaunich, M.; Wolff, D.; Stark, W.

    2013-07-01

    To achieve the required tightness levels of containers for low and intermediate level radioactive wastes rubbers are widely applied as main sealing materials. The save encapsulation of the radioactive container contents has to be guaranteed according to legislation and appropriate guidelines for long storage periods as well as down to temperatures of -40 deg. C during transportation. Therefore the understanding of failure mechanisms that lead to leakage at low temperatures is of high importance. It is known that the material properties of rubbers are strongly influenced by temperature. At low temperatures this is caused by the rubber-glass transition (abbr. glass transition). During continuous cooling the material changes from rubber-like entropy-elastic to stiff energy-elastic behaviour, that allows nearly no strain or retraction. Therefore, rubbers are normally used above their glass transition but the minimum working temperature limit is not defined precisely, what can cause problems during application. The temperature range where full functionality is possible is strongly dependent on the application conditions and the material. For this investigation mainly ethylene propylene diene (EPDM) and fluorocarbon rubbers (FKM) were selected as they are often used for radioactive waste containers. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) are typically used for the determination of the temperature range of the glass transition process. The standardized compression set measurement according to ISO 815 is common for investigation of rubber sealing materials as the test simulates the seal behaviour after release. To reduce the test time of the standard tests a faster technique giving the same information was developed. Additionally, the breakdown temperature of the sealing function of complete O-ring seals is measured in a component test setup to compare it with the results of the other tests. The experimental setup is capable of measuring the leakage rate at low temperatures by the pressure rise method. A model was developed that allows calculating the minimum working temperature limit of a seal by combining the results of the applied methods. (authors)

  13. Stratospheric Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf, F.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosols affect the atmospheric energy balance by scattering and absorbing solar and terrestrial radiation. They also can alter stratospheric chemical cycles by catalyzing heterogeneous reactions which markedly perturb odd nitrogen, chlorine and ozone levels. Aerosol measurements by satellites began in NASA in 1975 with the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) program, to be followed by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) starting in 1979. Both programs employ the solar occultation, or Earth limb extinction, techniques. Major results of these activities include the discovery of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in both hemispheres in winter, illustrations of the impacts of major (El Chichon 1982 and Pinatubo 1991) eruptions, and detection of a negative global trend in lower stratospheric/upper tropospheric aerosol extinction. This latter result can be considered a triumph of successful worldwide sulfur emission controls. The SAGE record will be continued and improved by SAGE III, currently scheduled for multiple launches beginning in 2000 as part of the Earth Observing System (EOS). The satellite program has been supplemented by in situ measurements aboard the ER-2 (20 km ceiling) since 1974, and from the DC-8 (13 km ceiling) aircraft beginning in 1989. Collection by wire impactors and subsequent electron microscopic and X-ray energy-dispersive analyses, and optical particle spectrometry have been the principle techniques. Major findings are: (1) The stratospheric background aerosol consists of dilute sulfuric acid droplets of around 0.1 micrometer modal diameter at concentration of tens to hundreds of monograms per cubic meter; (2) Soot from aircraft amounts to a fraction of one percent of the background total aerosol; (3) Volcanic eruptions perturb the sulfuric acid, but not the soot, aerosol abundance by several orders of magnitude; (4) PSCs contain nitric acid at temperatures below 195K, supporting chemical hypotheses implicating manmade fluorocarbons as cause of the --'ozone hole'; (5) The current soot loading is too small to be of environmental (radiative and chemical) consequence. However, the fractal nature of soot distinguishes it aerodynamically and radiatively from sulfuric acid droplets such that its stratospheric residence time is longer, mainly because of vertical transport against gravity due to gravito-photophoretic forces. Thus it may accumulate and become of environmental concern in the future.

  14. Origin of REE mineralization in the Bastnäs-type Fe-REE-(Cu-Mo-Bi-Au) deposits, Bergslagen, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtstam, Dan; Andersson, Ulf B.; Broman, Curt; Mansfeld, Joakim

    2014-12-01

    The Bastnäs-type deposits, with mineral assemblages of Fe oxides, Ca-Mg silicates, rare earth element (REE) silicates, REE fluorocarbonates, and Cu-Fe-Mo-Bi sulfides, are associated with marble horizons in a strongly Na, K, and/or Mg altered, metavolcanic succession, over a distance of at least 80 km in a SW-NE trending zone in western Bergslagen. Two subtypes occur: (1) enriched (relative to the other type) in light REE (LREE) and Fe, exemplified by the Bastnäs and Rödbergsgruvan deposits, and (2) enriched in heavy REE (HREE), Y, Mg, Ca, and F, represented by deposits in the Norberg district. Bastnäsite hosts primary fluid H2O-CO2 inclusions with salinities of 6-29 eq. wt% CaCl2 and with total homogenization temperatures ( Th tot) of ca. 300-400 °C. Subtype 2 has late-stage fluorite with fluid inclusions that show 1-16 eq. wt% NaCl and Th tot of ca. 90-150 °C. Molybdenite Re-Os ages obtained from three deposits are 1,904 ± 6, 1,863 ± 4, and 1,842 ± 4 Ma. Nd isotopic data from five different REE minerals yielded no defined isochron, but a range in ?Nd (1.88 Ga) of +0.2 to +1.6. The oxygen isotope values (?18OSMOW) of dolomite and calcite from the associated REE-mineralized skarn and recrystallized carbonate assemblages lie in the range 6.1-8.6 ‰, overlapping with those of the host marbles. Carbon isotope values (?13CPDB) show typical magmatic signatures of -6.7 to -4.4 ‰, while the host marbles group around ca. -2.4 ‰. The sulfur isotope (?34SCDT) values of associated sulfides range between -10.8 and +0.2 ‰. The combined evidence suggests REE mineralization, beginning at 1.9 Ga, from mainly Svecofennian, juvenile magmatic (>400 °C) fluids carrying Si, F, Cl, S, CO2, and the REE in addition to other metals; mineralization occurred through reactions with dolomitic layers in the supracrustal units coevally with regional metasomatic alteration associated with fluid circulation through an extensive active volcano-plutonic complex.

  15. Development and Implementation of Discrete Polymeric Microstructural Cues for Applications in Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinney, James Richardson

    Chronic fibrosis caused by acute myocardial infarction (MI) leads to increased morbidity and mortality due to cardiac dysfunction. Despite care in the acute setting of MI, subsequent development of scar tissue and a lack of treatments for this maladaptive response lead to a poor prognosis. This has increased burdens on the cost of healthcare due to chronic disability. Here a novel therapeutic strategy that aims to mitigate myocardial fibrosis by utilizing injectable polymeric microstructural cues to attenuate the fibrotic response and improve functional outcomes is presented. Additionally, applications of integrated chemical functionalizations into discrete, micro-scale polymer structures are discussed in the realm of tissue engineering in order to impart enhancements in in vivo localization, three-dimensional manipulation and drug delivery. Polymeric microstructures, termed "microrods" and "microcubes", were fabricated using photolithographic techniques and studied in three-dimensional culture models of the fibrotic environment and by direct injection into the infarct zone of adult Sprague-Dawley rats. In vitro gene expression and functional and histological results were analyzed, showing a dose-dependent down-regulation fibrotic indicators and improvement in cardiac function. Furthermore, iron oxide nanoparticles and functionalized fluorocarbons were incorporated into the polymeric microdevices to promote in situ visualization by magnetic resonance imaging as well as to facilitate the manipulation and alignment of microstructural cues in a tissue-realistic environment. Lastly, successful encapsulation of native MGF peptide within microrods is demonstrated with release over two weeks as a proof of concept in the ability to locally deliver myogenic or supportive pharmacotherapeutics to the injured myocardium. This work demonstrates the efficacy and versatility of discrete microtopographical cues to attenuate the fibrotic response after MI and suggests a novel therapeutic strategy for combatting the chronic sequelae of pathologic fibrosis that is biocompatible, localizable, functionalizable, and biologically, mechanically, and chemically active. By integrating this multifunctional strategy into post-infarctive care, as well as a wide range of other fibrotic and mechanically sensitive disease processes, more directed and effective therapeutics could be developed to aid in combatting these complex and challenging pathologies.

  16. Black silicon method XI: oxygen pulses in SF6 plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, H. V.; de Boer, M. J.; Ma, K.; Gironès, M.; Unnikrishnan, S.; Louwerse, M. C.; Elwenspoek, M. C.

    2010-07-01

    A detailed study is performed to understand and show the potential of high-speed, deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) of silicon using oxygen inhibitor pulses as a replacement for hydro-fluorocarbons (HFCs). This process might be considered the 'holy grail' in DRIE as the environmental restrictions for the use of HFCs are becoming increasingly stronger. When compared to the usual cryogenic mixed oxygen DRIE and with respect to profile control, the proposed cryogenic pulsed oxygen DRIE is virtually independent of silicon loading, mask material and trench width, and it is less prone to the formation of black silicon (BS). Some indication is found that one of the major causes for the formation of BS is the existence of dust inside the plasma. Dust is created when oxygen and silicon tetra fluoride (SiF4 being the reaction product of silicon etching) coincide inside the plasma glow. This occurs in mixed oxygen plasma; the silica dust falls onto the wafer where it starts to form BS when directional etching is requested. Dust particles can also form when strong polymerizing gases are fed into the plasma. This is the case for the Bosch process using HFC pulses forming carbonic dust. The particles, and consequently the BS, are observed to be limited when the SiF4 and O2 gases are time separated, which forms the basis of the proposed pulsed oxygen DRIE. Another advantage of pulsed oxygen DRIE with respect to Bosch processing is that the protective skin of the sidewall during etching—a kind of native oxide—is believed to be self-terminating. This makes the process insensitive to profile variations caused by parameter fluctuations. It is found that inhibiting oxygen pulses give excellent results with respect to profile control at cryogenic temperatures (between -120 and -80 °C) and can still compete with HFC pulses up to intermediate low temperatures (between -80 and -40 °C). When selecting the proper DRIE conditions, the oxygen pulsed mode performs with excellent profile verticality and selectivity while keeping the silicon clean. It also shows a high etch rate up to 25 µm min-1 (<1% Si load of a 100 mm wafer). When the temperature is raised further (between -40 and 0 °C), the strength of the oxygen sidewall protection progressively fails and more oxygen with more bias is needed to keep sufficient profile directionality. The use of stronger oxide-forming agents is suggested in order to enable good performance at the more convenient, higher temperature, low bias conditions.

  17. A (pentafluoroethyl)(trifluoromethyl)carbene complex of iridium and reductive activation of its sp(3)?, ?, and ? carbon-fluorine bonds to give perfluoro-2-butyne, perfluoro-1,2,3-butatriene and perfluoro-1-irida-2-methyl-2-cyclobutene) complexes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jian; Hughes, Russell P; Rheingold, Arnold L

    2015-12-01

    The (pentafluoroethyl)(trifluoromethyl)carbene complex Cp*Ir(CO)[[double bond, length as m-dash]C(CF3)(C2F5)] was synthesized by the reductive activation of the ?-C-F bond in the perfluoro-sec-butyl-iridium complex Cp*Ir(CO)[CF(CF3)(C2F5)](I) with Na/Pb alloy. This compound exists as two geometric isomers in solution; the structure of one isomer has been determined by a single crystal X-ray diffraction study and contains two independent molecules in the asymmetric unit. Further reduction of this carbene complex with Na/Pb alloy afforded the perfluoro-2-butyne iridium complex Cp*Ir(CO)(?(2)-CF3C[triple bond, length as m-dash]CCF3) by an overall 2-electron reduction and elimination of two ?-fluorides. When magnesium graphite was utilized as the reducing agent for the further reduction, Cp*Ir(CO)(?(2)-CF3C[triple bond, length as m-dash]CCF3) was produced as a minor product and the major product was the perfluoroiridacyclobutene complex Cp*Ir(CO)(?(2,4)-CF3CCFCF2) resulting from a ?-C-F bond activation. Direct reduction of the precursor Cp*Ir(CO)[CF(CF3)(C2F5)](i) with magnesium graphite generated the tetrafluorobutatriene iridium complex Cp*Ir(CO)(?(2,3)-CF2[double bond, length as m-dash]C[double bond, length as m-dash]C[double bond, length as m-dash]CF2) along with the perfluoro-2-butyne complex and perfluoroiridacyclobutene complexes in a ratio of 1?:?2?:?6. These reductive inner-sphere pathways to unsaturated fluorocarbon ligands illustrate that carbon-fluorine bond activation can take place at ?-, ?- and ?-carbons but that selectivity in these heterogeneous reductions is difficult to control, with a variety of fluoride eliminations possible for complex perfluoroalkyl ligands. Density Functional Theory (DFT/B3LYP-D3/LACV3P**++) is used to explore the relative energetics of products and intermediates in these reactions. PMID:26158776

  18. Does wet precipitation represent local and regional atmospheric transportation by perfluorinated alkyl substances?

    PubMed

    Taniyasu, Sachi; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Kwok, Karen Y; Lam, Paul K S; Horii, Yuichi; Petrick, Gert; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2013-05-01

    Perfluorinated alkyl substances (PFASs) have been found widely in the environment including remote marine locations. The mode of transport of PFASs to remote marine locations is a subject of considerable scientific interest. Assessment of distribution of PFASs in wet precipitation samples (i.e., rainfall and snow) collected over an area covering continental, coastal, and open ocean will enable an understanding of not only the global transport but also the regional transport of PFASs. Nevertheless, it is imperative to examine the representativeness and suitability of wet precipitation matrixes to allow for drawing conclusions on the transport PFASs. In this study, we collected wet precipitation samples including rainfall, surface snow, and snow core from several locations in Japan to elucidate the suitability of these matrixes for describing local and regional transport of PFASs. Rain water collected at various time intervals within a single rainfall event showed high fluxes of PFASs in the first 1-mm deposition. The scavenging rate of PFASs by wet deposition varied depending on the fluorocarbon chain length of PFAS. The depositional fluxes of PFASs measured for continental (Tsukuba, Japan) and open ocean (Pacific Ocean, 1000km off Japanese coast) locations were similar, on the order of a few nanograms per square meter. The PFAS profiles in "freshly" deposited and "aged" (deposited on the ground for a few days) snow samples taken from the same location varied considerably. The freshly deposited snow represents current atmospheric profiles of PFASs, whereas the aged snow sample reflects sequestration of local sources of PFASs from the atmosphere. Post-depositional modifications in PFAS profiles were evident, suggesting reactions of PFASs on snow/ice surface. Transformation of precursor chemicals such as fluorotelomer alcohols into perfluoroalkylcarboxylates is evident on snow surface. Snow cores have been used to evaluate time trends of PFAS contamination in remote environments. Snow collected at various depths from a core of up to 7.7m deep, at Mt. Tateyama (2450m), Japan, showed the highest concentrations of PFASs in the surface layer and the concentrations decreased with increasing depth for most PFASs, except for perfluorobutanesulfonate (PFBS). Downward movement of highly water soluble PFASs such as PFBS, following melting and freezing cycles of snow, was evident from the analysis of snow core. PMID:23506970

  19. Use of formulations based on choline chloride-malonic acid deep eutectic solvent for back end of line cleaning in integrated circuit fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubert, Jenny

    Interconnection layers fabricated during back end of line processing in semiconductor manufacturing involve dry etching of a low-k material and deposition of copper and metal barriers to create copper/dielectric stacks. After plasma etching steps used to form the trenches and vias in the dielectric, post etch residues (PER) that consist of organic polymer, metal oxides and fluorides, form on top of copper and low-k dielectric sidewalls. Currently, most semiconductor companies use semi aqueous fluoride (SAF) based formulations containing organic solvent(s) for PER removal. Unfortunately, these formulations adversely impact the environmental health and safety (EHS) requirements of the semiconductor industry. Environmentally friendly "green" formulations, free of organic solvents, are preferred as alternatives to remove PER. In this work, a novel low temperature molten salt system, referred as deep eutectic solvent (DES) has been explored as a back end of line cleaning (BEOL) formulation. Specifically, the DES system comprised of two benign chemicals, malonic acid (MA) and choline chloride (CC), is a liquid at room temperature. In certain cases, the formulation was modified by the addition of glacial acetic acid (HAc). Using these formulations, selective removal of three types of PER generated by timed CF4/O2 etching of DUV PR films on Cu was achieved. Type I PER was mostly organic in character (fluorocarbon polymer type) and had a measured thickness of 160 nm. Type II PER was much thinner (25 nm) and consisted of a mixture of organic and inorganic compounds (copper fluorides). Further etching generated 17 nm thick Type III PER composed of copper fluorides and oxides. Experiments were also conducted on patterned structures. Cleaning was performed by immersing samples in a temperature controlled (30 or 40° C) double jacketed vessel for a time between 1 and 5 minutes. Effectiveness of cleaning was characterized using SEM, XPS and single frequency impedance measurements. Type II and III residues, which contained copper compounds were removed in CC/MA DES within five minutes through dissolution and subsequent complexation of copper by malonic acid. Removal of Type I PER required the addition of glacial acetic acid to the DES formulation. Single frequency impedance measurement appears to be a good in situ method to follow the removal of the residues. High water solubility of the components of the system in conjunction with their environmental friendly nature, make the DES an attractive alternative to SAF.

  20. Climate Change, Air Pollution, and the Economics of Health Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, J.; Yang, T.; Paltsev, S.; Wang, C.; Prinn, R.; Sarofim, M.

    2003-12-01

    Climate change and air pollution are intricately linked. The distinction between greenhouse substances and other air pollutants is resolved at least for the time being in the context of international negotiations on climate policy through the identification of CO2, CH4, N2O, SF6 and the per- and hydro- fluorocarbons as substances targeted for control. Many of the traditional air pollutant emissions including for example CO, NMVOCs, NOx, SO2, aerosols, and NH3 also directly or indirectly affect the radiative balance of the atmosphere. Among both sets of gases are precursors of and contributors to pollutants such as tropopospheric ozone, itself a strong greenhouse gas, particulate matter, and other pollutants that affect human health. Fossil fuel combustion, production, or transportation is a significant source for many of these substances. Climate policy can thus affect traditional air pollution or air pollution policy can affect climate. Health effects of acute or chronic exposure to air pollution include increased asthma, lung cancer, heart disease and bronchitis among others. These, in turn, redirect resources in the economy toward medical expenditures or result in lost labor or non-labor time with consequent effects on economic activity, itself producing a potential feedback on emissions levels. Study of these effects ultimately requires a fully coupled earth system model. Toward that end we develop an approach for introducing air pollution health impacts into the Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, a component of the MIT Integrated Global Systems Model (IGSM) a coupled economics-chemistry-atmosphere-ocean-terrestrial biosphere model of earth systems including an air pollution model resolving the urban scale. This preliminary examination allows us to consider how climate policy affects air pollution and consequent health effects, and to study the potential impacts of air pollution policy on climate. The novel contribution is the effort to endogenize air pollution impacts within the EPPA model, allowing us to study potential economic effects and feedbacks. We find strong interaction between air pollution and economies, although precise estimates of the effects require further investigation and refined resolution of the urban scale chemistry model.

  1. Fluoroalkyl and Alkyl Chains Have Similar Hydrophobicities in Binding to the “Hydrophobic Wall” of Carbonic Anhydrase

    SciTech Connect

    J Mecinovic; P Snyder; K Mirica; S Bai; E Mack; R Kwant; D Moustakas; A Heroux; G Whitesides

    2011-12-31

    The hydrophobic effect, the free-energetically favorable association of nonpolar solutes in water, makes a dominant contribution to binding of many systems of ligands and proteins. The objective of this study was to examine the hydrophobic effect in biomolecular recognition using two chemically different but structurally similar hydrophobic groups, aliphatic hydrocarbons and aliphatic fluorocarbons, and to determine whether the hydrophobicity of the two groups could be distinguished by thermodynamic and biostructural analysis. This paper uses isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to examine the thermodynamics of binding of benzenesulfonamides substituted in the para position with alkyl and fluoroalkyl chains (H{sub 2}NSO{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-CONHCH{sub 2}(CX{sub 2}){sub n}CX{sub 3}, n = 0-4, X = H, F) to human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II). Both alkyl and fluoroalkyl substituents contribute favorably to the enthalpy and the entropy of binding; these contributions increase as the length of chain of the hydrophobic substituent increases. Crystallography of the protein-ligand complexes indicates that the benzenesulfonamide groups of all ligands examined bind with similar geometry, that the tail groups associate with the hydrophobic wall of HCA II (which is made up of the side chains of residues Phe131, Val135, Pro202, and Leu204), and that the structure of the protein is indistinguishable for all but one of the complexes (the longest member of the fluoroalkyl series). Analysis of the thermodynamics of binding as a function of structure is compatible with the hypothesis that hydrophobic binding of both alkyl and fluoroalkyl chains to hydrophobic surface of carbonic anhydrase is due primarily to the release of nonoptimally hydrogen-bonded water molecules that hydrate the binding cavity (including the hydrophobic wall) of HCA II and to the release of water molecules that surround the hydrophobic chain of the ligands. This study defines the balance of enthalpic and entropic contributions to the hydrophobic effect in this representative system of protein and ligand: hydrophobic interactions, here, seem to comprise approximately equal contributions from enthalpy (plausibly from strengthening networks of hydrogen bonds among molecules of water) and entropy (from release of water from configurationally restricted positions).

  2. XeF2 vapor phase silicon etch used in the fabrication of movable SOI structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Wiwi, M.; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony; Plut, Thomas Alvin; Salazar, M.; Stevens, Jeffrey; Bauer, Todd M.; Ford, C.; Shul, Randy John; Grossetete, Grant David

    2010-10-01

    Vapor phase XeF{sub 2} has been used in the fabrication of various types of devices including MEMS, resonators, RF switches, and micro-fluidics, and for wafer level packaging. In this presentation we demonstrate the use of XeF{sub 2} Si etch in conjunction with deep reactive ion etch (DRIE) to release single crystal Si structures on Silicon On Insulator (SOI) wafers. XeF{sub 2} vapor phase etching is conducive to the release of movable SOI structures due to the isotropy of the etch, the high etch selectivity to silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) and fluorocarbon (FC) polymer etch masks, and the ability to undercut large structures at high rates. Also, since XeF{sub 2} etching is a vapor phase process, stiction problems often associated with wet chemical release processes are avoided. Monolithic single crystal Si features were fabricated by etching continuous trenches in the device layer of an SOI wafer using a DRIE process optimized to stop on the buried SiO{sub 2}. The buried SiO{sub 2} was then etched to handle Si using an anisotropic plasma etch process. The sidewalls of the device Si features were then protected with a conformal passivation layer of either FC polymer or SiO{sub 2}. FC polymer was deposited from C4F8 gas precursor in an inductively coupled plasma reactor, and SiO{sub 2} was deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). A relatively high ion energy, directional reactive ion etch (RIE) plasma was used to remove the passivation film on surfaces normal to the direction of the ions while leaving the sidewall passivation intact. After the bottom of the trench was cleared to the underlying Si handle wafer, XeF{sub 2} was used to isotropically etch the handle Si, thus undercutting and releasing the features patterned in the device Si layer. The released device Si structures were not etched by the XeF{sub 2} due to protection from the top SiO{sub 2} mask, sidewall passivation, and the buried SiO{sub 2} layer. Optimization of the XeF{sub 2} process and the sidewall passivation layers will be discussed. The advantages of releasing SOI devices with XeF{sub 2} include avoiding stiction, maintaining the integrity of the buried SiO{sub 2}, and simplifying the fabrication flow for thermally actuated devices.

  3. The Ozone Trends Panel - CFCs and evidence-based policymaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, R.

    2012-12-01

    My involvement with the issue of stratospheric ozone depletion started with my Ph.D studies, which predated the seminal paper of Rowland and Molina in 1974, and focussed on understanding how chlorine and bromine atoms and free radicals interacted with atmospheric constituents (e.g., ozone, oxygen atoms, nitric oxide, nitrogen oxide, methane, etc). My post-doctoral studies and work at the Jet Propulsion laboratory continued my gas-phase kinetic studies into reactions of both stratospheric and tropospheric importance, including understanding the rates of reactions between the hydroxyl radical and HCFCs. This work, along with the results of other laboratory studies, provided a major input to the theoretical modelling work which was projecting significant ozone losses from continued use of chlorofluorocarbons and halons. In 1980 I became the program manager for stratospheric ozone depletion at NASA and provided funding for some ground-breaking laboratory studies, field measurements and theoretical modelling, some in collaboration with NOAA, the fluorocarbon industry and international partners. Highlights included the Antarctic and Arctic aircraft campaigns, which demonstrated beyond doubt that chlorinated and brominated species were the cause of the significant losses of ozone in the polar spring, initiated through novel heterogeneous chemical reactions in the lower stratosphere - the most dramatic observation being the so-called Antarctic Ozone hole. These findings played a critical role in strengthening the Montreal Protocol. In 1980, after joining NASA, I initiated the first International Stratospheric Ozone Assessment, which provided much of the scientific evidence used to develop the 1985 Convention to protect stratospheric ozone. Subsequent international assessments provided the scientific basis for the 1987 Montreal Protocol and the following adjustments and amendments. Key among these assessments was the International Ozone Trends Panel where Sherry Rowland played a pivotal role by chairing the chapter which demonstrated, using ground-based Dobson measurements and satellite observations, significant ozone losses in mid- and high latitudes in both hemispheres, especially in winter. These findings that basically validated the models focussed the attention of Governments that it was not only polar ozone that was being depleted, but ozone over heavily inhabited areas. This provided a stimulus for even stronger regulations to protect the ozone layer. Another facet of my career was to be the technical advisor to the US Government as the Ozone Convention and Montreal Protocol were negotiated. It was a pleasure to see that Governments recognized the importance of world-class research and the international assessments, in developing the Montreal Protocol and the subsequent amendments and adjustments. It is possibly the best example to date of evidence-based policymaking at the global scale.

  4. Miscibility Evaluation Of The Next Generation Solvent With Polymers Currently Used At DWPF, MCU, And Saltstone

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F. F.

    2013-04-17

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, funded the development of an enhanced Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. This effort lead to the development of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) with Tris (3,7-dimethyl octyl) guanidine (TiDG). The first deployment target for the NGS solvent is within the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the new chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the affected facility. This report provides the calculated data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers known to be used or present in the MCU, Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Saltstone facilities that will be exposed to the NGS showed that TiDG could selectively affect the elastomers and some thermoplastics to varying extents, but the typical use of these polymers in a confined geometry will likely prevent the NGS from impacting component performance. The polymers identified as of primary concern include Grafoil® (flexible graphite), Tefzel®, Isolast®, ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM) rubber, nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR), styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), and fluorocarbon rubber (FKM). Certain polymers like NBR and EPDM were found to interact mildly with NGS but their calculated swelling and the confined geometry will impede interaction with NGS. In addition, it was found that Vellumoid (cellulose fibers-reinforced glycerin and protein) may leach protein and Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) may leach plasticizer (such as Bis-Ethylhexyl-Phthalates) into the NGS solvent. Either case will not impact decontamination or immobilization operations at Savannah River Site (SRS). Some applications have zero tolerance for dimensional changes such as the operation of valves while other applications a finite dimensional change improves the function of the application such as seals and gaskets. Additional considerations are required before using the conclusions from this work to judge outcomes in field applications. Decane, a component of Isopar?L that is most likely to interact with the polymers, mildly interacted with the elastomers and the propylene based polymers but their degree of swelling is at most 10% and the confined geometry that they are typically placed in indicate this is not significant. In addition, it was found that Vellumoid may leach protein into the NGS solvent. Since Vellumoid is used at the mixer in Saltstone where it sees minimum quantities of solvent, this leaching has no effect on the extraction process at MCU or the immobilization process at saltstone. No significant interaction is expected between MaxCalix and the polymers and elastomers used at MCU, DWPF, and Saltstone. Overall, minimal and insignificant interactions are expected on extraction and immobilization operations when MCU switches from CSSX to NGS solvent. It is expected that contacting NGS will not accelerate the aging rate of polymers and elastomers under radiation and heat. This is due to the minimal interaction between NGS and the polymers and the confined geometries for these polymers. SRNL recommends the use of the HSP method (for screening) and some testing to evaluate the impact of other organic such as alcohols, glycolate, and their byproducts on the polymers used throughout the site.

  5. High Throughput Single-cell and Multiple-cell Micro-encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Lagus, Todd P.; Edd, Jon F.

    2012-01-01

    Microfluidic encapsulation methods have been previously utilized to capture cells in picoliter-scale aqueous, monodisperse drops, providing confinement from a bulk fluid environment with applications in high throughput screening, cytometry, and mass spectrometry. We describe a method to not only encapsulate single cells, but to repeatedly capture a set number of cells (here we demonstrate one- and two-cell encapsulation) to study both isolation and the interactions between cells in groups of controlled sizes. By combining drop generation techniques with cell and particle ordering, we demonstrate controlled encapsulation of cell-sized particles for efficient, continuous encapsulation. Using an aqueous particle suspension and immiscible fluorocarbon oil, we generate aqueous drops in oil with a flow focusing nozzle. The aqueous flow rate is sufficiently high to create ordering of particles which reach the nozzle at integer multiple frequencies of the drop generation frequency, encapsulating a controlled number of cells in each drop. For representative results, 9.9 ?m polystyrene particles are used as cell surrogates. This study shows a single-particle encapsulation efficiency Pk=1 of 83.7% and a double-particle encapsulation efficiency Pk=2 of 79.5% as compared to their respective Poisson efficiencies of 39.3% and 33.3%, respectively. The effect of consistent cell and particle concentration is demonstrated to be of major importance for efficient encapsulation, and dripping to jetting transitions are also addressed. Introduction Continuous media aqueous cell suspensions share a common fluid environment which allows cells to interact in parallel and also homogenizes the effects of specific cells in measurements from the media. High-throughput encapsulation of cells into picoliter-scale drops confines the samples to protect drops from cross-contamination, enable a measure of cellular diversity within samples, prevent dilution of reagents and expressed biomarkers, and amplify signals from bioreactor products. Drops also provide the ability to re-merge drops into larger aqueous samples or with other drops for intercellular signaling studies.1,2 The reduction in dilution implies stronger detection signals for higher accuracy measurements as well as the ability to reduce potentially costly sample and reagent volumes.3 Encapsulation of cells in drops has been utilized to improve detection of protein expression,4 antibodies,5,6 enzymes,7 and metabolic activity8 for high throughput screening, and could be used to improve high throughput cytometry.9 Additional studies present applications in bio-electrospraying of cell containing drops for mass spectrometry10 and targeted surface cell coatings.11 Some applications, however, have been limited by the lack of ability to control the number of cells encapsulated in drops. Here we present a method of ordered encapsulation12 which increases the demonstrated encapsulation efficiencies for one and two cells and may be extrapolated for encapsulation of a larger number of cells. To achieve monodisperse drop generation, microfluidic "flow focusing" enables the creation of controllable-size drops of one fluid (an aqueous cell mixture) within another (a continuous oil phase) by using a nozzle at which the streams converge.13 For a given nozzle geometry, the drop generation frequency f and drop size can be altered by adjusting oil and aqueous flow rates Qoil and Qaq. As the flow rates increase, the flows may transition from drop generation to unstable jetting of aqueous fluid from the nozzle.14 When the aqueous solution contains suspended particles, particles become encapsulated and isolated from one another at the nozzle. For drop generation using a randomly distributed aqueous cell suspension, the average fraction of drops Dk containing k cells is dictated by Poisson statistics, where Dk = ?k exp(-?)/(k!) and ? is the average number of cells per drop. The fraction of cells which end up in the "correctly" encapsulated drops is calculated using Pk = (k x Dk)/?(k' x Dk')

  6. Development of Chiral LC-MS Methods for small Molecules and Their Applications in the Analysis of Enantiomeric Composition and Pharmacokinetic Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Meera Jay Desai

    2004-12-19

    The purpose of this research was to develop sensitive LC-MS methods for enantiomeric separation and detection, and then apply these methods for determination of enantiomeric composition and for the study of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of a chiral nutraceutical. Our first study, evaluated the use of reverse phase and polar organic mode for chiral LC-API/MS method development. Reverse phase methods containing high water were found to decrease ionization efficiency in electrospray, while polar organic methods offered good compatibility and low limits of detection with ESI. The use of lower flow rates dramatically increased the sensitivity by an order of magnitude. Additionally, for rapid chiral screening, the coupled Chirobiotic column afforded great applicability for LC-MS method development. Our second study, continued with chiral LC-MS method development in this case for the normal phase mode. Ethoxynonafluorobutane, a fluorocarbon with low flammability and no flashpoint, was used as a substitute solvent for hexane/heptane mobile phases for LC-APCI/MS. Comparable chromatographic resolutions and selectivities were found using ENFB substituted mobile phase systems, although, peak efficiencies were significantly diminished. Limits of detection were either comparable or better for ENFB-MS over heptane-PDA detection. The miscibility of ENFB with a variety of commonly used organic modifiers provided for flexibility in method development. For APCI, lower flow rates did not increase sensitivity as significantly as was previously found for ESI-MS detection. The chiral analysis of native amino acids was evaluated using both APCI and ESI sources. For free amino acids and small peptides, APCI was found to have better sensitivities over ESI at high flow rates. For larger peptides, however, sensitivity was greatly improved with the use of electrospray. Additionally, sensitivity was enhanced with the use of non-volatile additives, This optimized method was then used to simultaneously separate all 19 native amino acids enantiomerically in less than 20 minutes, making it suitable for complex biological analysis. The previously developed amino acid method was then used to enantiomerically separate theanine, a free amino acid found in tea leaves. Native theanine was found to have lower limits of detection and better sensitivity over derivatized theanine samples. The native theanine method was then used to determine the enantiomeric composition of six commercially available L-theanine products. Five out of the six samples were found to be a racemic mixture of both D- and L-theanine. Concern over the efficacy of these theanine products led to our final study evaluating the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of theanine in rats using LC-ESI/MS. Rats were administered D-, L, and QL-theanine both orally and intra-peritoneally. Oral administration data demonstrated that intestinal absorption of L-theanine was greater than that of D-theanine, while i.p. data showed equal plasma uptake of both isomers. This suggested a possible competitive binding effect with respect to gut absorption. Additionally, it was found that regardless of administration method, the presence of the other enantiomer always decreased overall theanine plasma concentration. This indicated that D- and L- theanine exhibit competitive binding with respect to urinary reabsorption as well. The large quantities of D-theanine detected in the urine suggested that D-themine was eliminated with minimal metabolism, while L-theanine was preferentially reabsorbed and metabolized to ethylamine. Clearly, the metabolic fate of racemic theanine and its individual enantiomers was quite different, placing into doubt the utility of the commercial theanine products.

  7. Tribology of polymeric coatings for aggressive bearing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Seung Min

    To meet the higher performance requirements of today's air-conditioning and refrigeration (ACR) compressors, their operating conditions have been getting harsher under higher speed and load, thus making tribological characteristics of interacting surfaces playing a significant role in compressor's reliability. However, the capabilities of conventional fluid lubricants are limited such that the state of lubrication is usually unknown, and, at best, in the boundary/mixed lubrication regimes. Therefore, it becomes necessary to implement some type of advanced protective coatings on the interacting surfaces to withstand stringent contact conditions. Due to favorable tribological performance, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)- and polyetheretherketone (PEEK)-based polymeric coatings have received interest in ACR compressor applications, as a potential solution to supplement and potentially replace conventional oil lubricants. However, compared to a great amount of research and experiments done so far for bulk of polymers, there is limited literature on the tribological performance of PTFE- and PEEK-based polymeric coatings. In this work, several PTFE-, PEEK-, resin- and fluorocarbon-based polymeric coatings, coated on gray cast iron were tribologically evaluated using a specialized tribometer under compressor specific conditions. The coatings showed good to excellent tribological performance, and in general PTFE-based coatings exhibited better friction and wear behavior than the rest of the coatings, including PEEK-based coatings. The micromechanical properties of polymeric coatings were examined using instrumented microindentation. The load-unload responses were used to measure the load-bearing properties of the coatings, as well as to extract their elastic modulus and hardness values. Induced structural differences between the PTFE- and PEEK-based coatings were confirmed using scanning electron microscopy. These measurements were used to explain the difference in the tribological performance between PTFE- and PEEK-based coatings. Additionally, the polymeric coatings were tested under elevated (aggressive) temperature conditions to investigate the effect of increasing temperature on their tribological behavior. The friction coefficient of the polymeric coatings usually increased with temperature, reaching a maximum value in the vicinity of their glass transition temperature, and then dropped significantly with further increase of temperature. A measured property called "recovery" was investigated as a key factor affecting the frictional behavior of these coating surfaces using scratch testing, showing that surfaces with higher recovery exhibited lower friction coefficient. Finally, the tribological performance of two representative PTFE- and PEEK-based polymeric coatings was evaluated under fretting motion testing. The effect of oil on the friction and wear behavior of the coatings was also studied under fretting test conditions. It was found that the eventual tribological behavior of a polymeric coating depended greatly on the transfer film formed on the counterface. Coating tested with oil showed worse performance than dry condition because the oil prevented the formation of transfer film on the counterface. The morphology of the transfer films on the counterface was observed using SEM and profilometer measurements along with detailed discussion of mechanism of transfer film development and its effect on polymer tribology.

  8. Not-In-Kind Technologies for Residential and Commercial Unitary Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, S.K.

    2001-01-11

    This project was initiated by the Department of Energy in response to a request from the HVAC industry for consolidated information about alternative heating and cooling cycles and for objective comparisons of those cycles in space conditioning applications. Twenty-seven different heat pumping technologies are compared on energy use and operating costs using consistent operating conditions and assumptions about component efficiencies for all of them. This report provides a concise summary of the underlying principals of each technology, its advantages and disadvantages, obstacles to commercial development, and economic feasibility. Both positive and negative results in this study are valuable; the fact that many of the cycles investigated are not attractive for space conditioning avoids any additional investment of time or resources in evaluating them for this application. In other cases, negative results in terms of the cost of materials or in cycle efficiencies identify where significant progress needs to be made in order for a cycle to become commercially attractive. Specific conclusions are listed for many of the technologies being promoted as alternatives to electrically-driven vapor compression heat pumps using fluorocarbon refrigerants. Although reverse Rankine cycle heat pumps using hydrocarbons have similar energy use to conventional electric-driven heat pumps, there are no significant energy savings due to the minor differences in estimated steady-state performance; higher costs would be required to accommodate the use of a flammable refrigerant. Magnetic and compressor-driven metal hydride heat pumps may be able to achieve efficiencies comparable to reverse Rankine cycle heat pumps, but they are likely to have much higher life cycle costs because of high costs for materials and peripheral equipment. Both thermoacoustic and thermionic heat pumps could have lower life cycle costs than conventional electric heat pumps because of reduced equipment and maintenance costs although energy use would be higher. There are strong opportunities for gas-fired heat pumps to reduce both energy use and operating costs outside of the high cooling climates in the southeast, south central states, and the southwest. Diesel and IC (Otto) engine-driven heat pumps are commercially available and should be able to increase their market share relative to gas furnaces on a life cycle cost basis; the cost premiums associated with these products, however, make it difficult to achieve three or five year paybacks which adversely affects their use in the U.S. Stirling engine-driven and duplex Stirling heat pumps have been investigated in the past as potential gas-fired appliances that would have longer lives and lower maintenance costs than diesel and IC engine-driven heat pumps at slightly lower efficiencies. These potential advantages have not been demonstrated and there has been a low level of interest in Stirling engine-driven heat pumps since the late 1980's. GAX absorption heat pumps have high heating efficiencies relative to conventional gas furnaces and are viable alternatives to furnace/air conditioner combinations in all parts of the country outside of the southeast, south central states, and desert southwest. Adsorption heat pumps may be competitive with the GAX absorption system at a higher degree of mechanical complexity; insufficient information is available to be more precise in that assessment.

  9. Biotransformation of trans-1,1,1,3-tetrafluoropropene (HFO-1234ze)

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Paul; Bertermann, Ruediger; Rusch, George M.; Dekant, Wolfgang

    2009-09-15

    trans-1,1,1,3-Tetrafluoropropene (HFO-1234ze) is a non-ozone-depleting fluorocarbon replacement with a low global warming potential and is developed as foam blowing agent. The biotransformation of HFO-1234ze was investigated after inhalation exposure. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to air containing 2000; 10,000; or 50,000 ppm (n = 5/concentration) HFO-1234ze. Male B6C3F1 mice were only exposed to 50,000 ppm HFO-1234ze. All inhalation exposures were conducted for 6 h in a dynamic exposure chamber. After the end of the exposures, animals were individually housed in metabolic cages and urines were collected at 6 or 12 h intervals for 48 h. For metabolite identification, urine samples were analyzed by {sup 1}H-coupled and {sup 1}H-decoupled {sup 19}F-NMR and by LC/MS-MS or GC/MS. Metabolites were identified by {sup 19}F-NMR chemical shifts, signal multiplicity, {sup 1}H-{sup 19}F coupling constants and by comparison with synthetic reference compounds. In urine samples of rats exposed to 50,000 ppm HFO-1234ze, the predominant metabolite was S-(3,3,3-trifluoro-trans-propenyl)-mercaptolactic acid and accounted for 66% of all integrated {sup 19}F-NMR signals in urines. No {sup 19}F-NMR signals were found in spectra of rat urine samples collected after inhalation exposure to 2000 or 10,000 ppm HFO-1234ze likely due to insufficient sensitivity. S-(3,3,3-Trifluoro-trans-propenyl)-L-cysteine, N-acetyl-S-(3,3,3-trifluoro-trans-propenyl)-L-cysteine and 3,3,3-trifluoropropionic acid were also present as metabolites in urine samples of rats and mice. A presumed amino acid conjugate of 3,3,3-trifluoropropionic acid was the major metabolite of HFO-1234ze in urine samples of mice exposed to 50,000 ppm and related to 18% of total integrated {sup 19}F-NMR signals. Quantification of three metabolites in urines of rats and mice was performed, using LC/MS-MS and GC/MS. The quantified amounts of the metabolites excreted with urine in both mice and rats, suggest only a low extent (< 1% of dose received) of biotransformation of HFO-1234ze and 95% of all metabolites were excreted within 18 h after the end of the exposures (t{sub 1/2} app. 6 h). The obtained results suggest that HFO-1234ze is likely subjected to an addition-elimination reaction with glutathione and to a CYP 450 mediated epoxidation at low rates.

  10. Biotransformation of 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene (HFO-1234yf)

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Paul; Bertermann, Ruediger; Snow, Timothy A.; Han Xing; Rusch, George M.; Jepson, Gary W.; Dekant, Wolfgang

    2008-12-01

    2,3,3,3-Tetrafluoropropene (HFO-1234yf) is a non-ozone-depleting fluorocarbon replacement with a low global warming potential which has been developed as refrigerant. The biotransformation of HFO-1234yf was investigated after inhalation exposure. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to air containing 2000, 10,000, or 50,000 ppm HFO-1234yf for 6 h and male B6C3F1 mice were exposed to 50,000 ppm HFO-1234yf for 3.5 h in a dynamic exposure chamber (n = 5/concentration). After the end of the exposure, animals were individually housed in metabolic cages and urines were collected at 6 or 12-hour intervals for 48 h. For metabolite identification, urine samples were analyzed by {sup 1}H-coupled and decoupled {sup 19}F-NMR and by LC/MS-MS or GC/MS. Metabolites were identified by {sup 19}F-NMR chemical shifts, signal multiplicity, {sup 1}H-{sup 19}F coupling constants and by comparison with synthetic reference compounds. In all urine samples, the predominant metabolites were two diastereomers of N-acetyl-S-(3,3,3-trifluoro-2-hydroxy-propyl)-L-cysteine. In {sup 19}F-NMR, the signal intensity of these metabolites represented more than 85% (50,000 ppm) of total {sup 19}F related signals in the urine samples. Trifluoroacetic acid, 3,3,3-trifluorolactic acid, 3,3,3-trifluoro-1-hydroxyacetone, 3,3,3-trifluoroacetone and 3,3,3-trifluoro-1,2-dihydroxypropane were present as minor metabolites. Quantification of N-acetyl-S-(3,3,3-trifluoro-2-hydroxy-propyl)-L-cysteine by LC/MS-MS showed that most of this metabolite (90%) was excreted within 18 h after the end of exposure (t{sub 1/2} app. 6 h). In rats, the recovery of N-acetyl-S-(3,3,3-trifluoro-2-hydroxy-propyl)-L-cysteine excreted within 48 h in urine was determined as 0.30 {+-} 0.03, 0.63 {+-} 0.16, and 2.43 {+-} 0.86 {mu}mol at 2000, 10,000 and 50,000 ppm, respectively suggesting only a low extent (<< 1% of dose received) of biotransformation of HFO-1234yf. In mice, the recovery of this metabolite was 1.774 {+-} 0.4 {mu}mol. Metabolites identified after in vitro incubations of HFO-1234yf in liver microsomes from rat, rabbit, and human support the metabolic pathways of HFO-1234yf revealed in vivo. The obtained results suggest that HFO-1234yf is subjected to a typical biotransformation reaction for haloolefins, likely by a cytochrome P450 2E1-catalyzed formation of 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoroepoxypropane at low rates, followed by glutathione conjugation or hydrolytic ring opening.

  11. Shock tube study of the oxidation of C{sub 3}F{sub 6} by N{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, R.G.; Mackie, J.C.; Masri, A.R.

    1999-07-29

    The kinetics of the high-temperature oxidation of C{sub 3}F{sub 6} by O({sup 3}P) have been studied by experiment, using a single-pulse shock tube, and by kinetic modeling. The O atoms were generated by the thermal decomposition of N{sub 2}O. Three mixtures, each diluted in argon, were studied: 0.6 mol % of C{sub 3}F{sub 6} with 1.5 mol % N{sub 2}O; 6.2 mol % of C{sub 3}F{sub 6} with 0.6 mol % of N{sub 2}O; and 6.3 mol % of N{sub 2}O and 0.7 mol % of C{sub 3}F{sub 6}. The temperatures were in the range 1300--1600 K, the residence times behind the reflected shock were in the range 550--850 {micro}s, and the pressures were between 16 and 20 atm. Fluorinated products have been quantified with gas chromatography, oxidized products with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; identification of unknown fluorocarbons has been performed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The most significant products detected were C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, C{sub 2}F{sub 4}, CF{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, and CF{sub 4}. A detailed kinetic scheme is presented to model the experimental reactant and product yields as a function of temperature., Modeling showed that O-addition to either carbon of the double bond of C{sub 3}F{sub 6} occurs. The rate constant for O-addition to the terminal carbon of the double bond, C{sub 3}F{sub 6} + O({sup 3}P) {yields} {sup 3}CF{sub 3}CF + CF{sub 2}O, was deduced to be {kappa}{sub 71} = 10{sup 12.7}T{sup 0.05} exp({minus}0.4 kJ mol{sup {minus}1}/RT) cm{sup 3} mol{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, and for addition to the central carbon, C{sub 3}F{sub 6} + O({sup 3}P) {yields} CF{sub 3} + CF{sub 2}CF{double_bond}O, {kappa}{sub 72} = 10{sup 12.5} cm{sup 3} mol{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. Under oxidizer-rich conditions, ignition of the C{sub 3}F{sub 6} occurred. Rate of production analyses showed that ignition was propagated by an F atom chain involving the CF{sub 2} + O and unimolecular CFO decomposition reactions. Under C{sub 3}F{sub 6}-rich conditions, single- and double-bond pyrolysis were the important destruction routes.

  12. Miscibility and multilayer formation of fluoroalkane-?,?-diol mixtures at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Takiue, Takanori; Nakamura, Fumiya; Sakamoto, Hiroyasu; Matsubara, Hiroki; Aratono, Makoto

    2011-01-27

    The surface tension ? of the aqueous solution of 1H,1H,6H,6H-perfluorohexane-1,6-diol (FC?diol) and 1H,1H,8H,8H-perfluorooctane-1,8-diol (FC8diol) mixtures was measured as a function of total molality m and composition of FC?diol in the mixture X? at 293.15 K under atmospheric pressure. The ? vs m curves except at X? = 0 and 0.05 have a distinct break point due to a phase transition in the adsorbed film. The surface pressure ? vs mean area per adsorbed molecule A curves consist of two parts connected by a discontinuous change. The curve was almost vertical just below the phase transition, and the variation of the A value with film composition X(2)(H) was linear corresponding to the fact that FC?diol and FC?diol molecules orient parallel to the surface and are densely packed with the same areas of individual condensed films. Above the phase transition, the A value further decreases to around 0.12-0.19 nm² which is much smaller than the cross-sectional area of the fluorocarbon chain, indicating the multilayer formation at the surface. The phase diagram of adsorption (PDA) in the condensed film showed that the m vs film composition X(2)(H) curve is almost linear and the excess Gibbs energy of adsorption g(HE)/RT is at most 0.01, manifesting the ideal mixing of molecules. This is in contrast to a positive deviation (g(HE)/RT ~0.12) observed in the condensed film of the mixture of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecanol (FC??OH) and 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorododecanol (FC??OH) with perpendicular molecular orientation. The loss of dispersion interaction between different species having different chain lengths is more appreciable in the perpendicular condensed films and thus leads to less miscibility of FC??OH and FC??OH. In the parallel condensed film, on the other hand, FC?diol and FC?diol molecules can arrange their position as close as possible to minimize the loss of dispersion interaction. The X(2)(H) value in the multilayer is close to unity, and thus, the multilayer consists of almost FC?diol molecules which form a multilayer in the single-component system. Furthermore, the condensed monolayer-multilayer phase transition was accompanied by a large increase in surface density of FC?diol and a small decrease in that of FC?diol, indicating that FC?diol molecules pile preferentially to form a multilayer. PMID:21192649

  13. Study of fixed abrasive polishing and characterization of diamondlike carbon film as a low-k material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venigalla, Rajasekhar

    2001-12-01

    Shallow Trench Isolation is the preferred method of isolation for devices with feature size less than 0.25muM. With its excellent selectivity to topography, fixed abrasive polishing is an excellent alternative to conventional CMP processes for the STI CMP step. The polishing mechanism in a fixed abrasive CMP process is studied in great detail by polishing some STI test wafers with different pattern densities for different times. The pattern density effects in fixed abrasive CMP have also been investigated in this project by polishing various masks, to end-point, and analyzing their pattern density distribution in relation with their polishing characteristics. Polishing the test wafers and studying the results obtained from those experiments suggested that the lower pattern densities polish faster than the higher pattern densities. Also, it was apparent that the structures having a lower pattern density had an effect on the polishing characteristics of structures having higher pattern density. It was found that the recessed regions ('DOWN' areas) did not show any removal of the oxide till the step height reached 100A. At this step height there was a dramatic increase in the polish rate of the 'DOWN' areas, till planarity was achieved. From this point on, oxide was removed from the wafer at a very low rate. An empirical model has been proposed based on the results obtained here. Analysis of material removal from various sections of the STI test wafers suggested that there is minimal effect of pitch on the removal rate for features greater than 10mum wide. Submicron features, however, exhibited a much higher removal rate for the same pattern density. Comparison of the pattern density distribution of various masks to their polishing characteristics suggested that the presence of a certain amount of structures having low pattern density is essential to effect any removal of material from the wafer. This behavior is ascribed to the fact that the low pattern density structures activate the pad more effectively than the higher pattern density structures, thereby resulting in a faster removal of material from the wafer. Also as a part of this project diamondlike carbon (DLC) and fluorocarbon films were characterized for use as inter-layer dielectric materials. In addition to measuring the dielectric constant of these films, they were also tested for their moisture retention, thermal stability and CMP compatibility. The dielectric constant of the DLC films was measured to be between 2.8 and 3.2 depending on the deposition conditions. It was found that the dielectric constant of the DLC films increases after thermal treatment. The moisture retention of the DLC films was measured to be less than 0.8 mug/cm2. It was also proved by electrochemical measurements that the DLC films are stable in highly acidic environments. CMP experiments of the DLC films with various abrasive particles in the presence and absence of any chemistry did not show any appreciable removal rate of these films.

  14. Linac based photofission inspection system employing novel detection concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, John; Gozani, Tsahi; Elsalim, Mashal; Condron, Cathie; Brown, Craig

    2011-10-01

    Rapiscan Systems is developing a LINAC based cargo inspection system for detection of special nuclear material (SNM) in cargo containers. The system, called Photofission Based Alarm Resolution (PBAR) is being developed under a DHD/DNDO Advanced Technology Demonstration (ATD) program. The PBAR system is based on the Rapiscan Eagle P9000 X-ray system, which is a portal system with a commercial 9 MeV LINAC X-ray source. For the purposes of the DNDO ATD program, a conveyor system was installed in the portal to allow scanning and precise positioning of 20 ft ISO cargo containers. The system uses a two step inspection process. In the first step, the basic scan, the container is quickly and completely inspected using two independent radiography arrays: the conventional primary array with high spatial resolution and a lower resolution spectroscopic array employing the novel Z-Spec method. The primary array uses cadmium tungstate (CdWO 4) detectors with conventional current mode readouts using photodiodes. The Z-Spec array uses small plastic scintillators capable of performing very fast (up to 10 8 cps) gamma-ray spectroscopy. The two radiography arrays are used to locate high-Z objects in the image such as lead, tungsten, uranium, which could be potential shielding materials as well as SNM itself. In the current system, the Z-Spec works by measuring the energy spectrum of transmitted X-rays. For high-Z materials the higher end of the energy spectrum is more attenuated than for low-Z materials and thus has a lower mean energy and a narrower width than low- and medium-Z materials. The second step in the inspection process is the direct scan or alarm clearing scan. In this step, areas of the container image, which were identified as high Z, are re-inspected. This is done by precisely repositioning the container to the location of the high-Z object and performing a stationary irradiation of the area with X-ray beam. Since there are a large number of photons in the 9 MV Bremsstrahlung spectrum above the photofission "threshold" of about 6 MeV, the X-ray beam induces numerous fissions if nuclear material is present. The PBAR system looks for the two most prolific fission signatures to confirm the presence of special nuclear materials (SNM). These are prompt neutrons and delayed gamma rays. The PBAR system uses arrays of two types of fast and highly efficient gamma ray detectors: plastic and fluorocarbon scintillators. The latter serves as a detector of fission prompt neutrons using the novel threshold activation detector (TAD) concept as well as a very efficient delayed gamma ray detector. The major advantage of TAD for detecting the prompt neutrons is its insensitivity to the intense source related backgrounds. The current status of the system and experimental results will be shown and discussed.

  15. Lower critical solution temperature behavior of alpha-substituted poly(acrylic acids)s, cyclopolymerization of N-vinylformamido-methylacrylates, and use of the World-Wide Web in polymer science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalovic, Mark Stephen

    A series of alpha-substituted poly(acrylic acid)s was synthesized and characterized. Their aqueous solution properties were investigated with respect to lower critical solution temperature (LCST) behavior. Poly(alpha-methoxymethylacrylic acid) was found to have a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of 46°C, poly(alpha-methoxyethoxymethylacrylic acid) showed an LCST of 26.5°C and poly(alpha-methoxyethoxyethoxymethylacrylic acid) showed an LCST of 66°C. The cloud points of the solutions of these polymers were found to be sensitive to pH, and to concentrations of additives such as urea, salts, and surfactants. Because of low molecular weight due to chain transfer, high molecular weight analogs of the ether-linked polymers were synthesized in which ester linkages joined the oligo-oxyethylene segment to the acrylate moiety. Poly(alpha-methoxyethoxyacetoxymethylacrylic acid) was the only one of this series to give an LCST with a value of 52.5°C. Copolymers of t-butyl alpha-methoxymethylacrylate (tBMMA) with alpha-(1H,1H- perfluorooctyloxymethyl)acrylic acid (PFOMA) were synthesized, deprotected and their lower critical solution temperatures (LCSTs) evaluated. At PFOMA feed ratios of 0.25 mol % or less, no observable change in the LCST was observed, while at PFOMA feed ratios of above 0.25 mol % to 1.125 mol %, a large linear decrease in the LCST was observed with increasing fluorocarbon content. t-Butyl alpha-(N-vinylformamidomethyl)acrylate (tBVFA) and ethyl alpha-(N-vinylformamidomethyl)acrylate (EVFA) were synthesized from t-butyl alpha-bromomethylacrylate and ethyl alpha-chloromethylacrylate, respectively. tBVFA was found to cyclopolymerize at 120°C in DMF, DMSO, and 1,2-dichlorobenzene at solvent:monomer ratios of 10:1 vol:wt. Molecular weights for poly(tBVFA) ranged from 10,000 to 13,000 as estimated by size-exclusion chromatography. At lower solvent monomer ratio (1:1), and at lower temperature (71°C), crosslinking occurred. EVFA was found to cyclopolymerize, but only in DMF at 122°C and at a 10:1 solvent:monomer ratio. A multimedia educational program called The Macrogalleria dealing with polymer science was created and distributed by the world wide web and on cd-rom. The site is made in the form of a virtual shopping mall in which each store is a lesson on some aspect of polymer science. The lessons are written in informal language to make the material more accessible. Also, the lessons are connected by hypertext links in a nonlinear fashion to allow students to create their own pathways through the material. The Macrogalleria has been very successful, being used by educational institutions to incorporate polymer science into the undergraduate chemistry curriculum, and by many industrial users as well. It has received numerous awards as well.

  16. Atmospheric Science and the CFC Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steed, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Industry involvement with developing atmospheric science and subsequent regulations to protect ozone was unusual. Chlorofluorocarbon manufacturers were research-based businesses accustomed to understanding the science behind product-related issues. When Lovelock's measurements in 1971 implied most of the cumulative production of CFCs remained in the atmosphere, global CFC producers funded academic research to identify natural sinks for the materials. The Fluorocarbon Program Panel (FPP) began in 1972, but changed focus to atmospheric photochemistry following Rowland and Molina's work in 1974. Despite early vociferous opposition, especially by the CFC-using aerosol industry, to any regulations, leaders among the producers worked to build their scientific understanding, expanding FPP funding and launching internal work in modeling and ozone trend analysis. The key first question for industry was not how much depletion might occur, but whether it would occur at all. If so, regardless of the amount, regulations and a major transition would be required in CFC-using industries, and the response would need to be global and prompt. So long as that basic question was in doubt, some businesses and countries would resist the economic cost of action. In the meantime, the producing industry worked to identify potential alternatives and to communicate atmospheric science to the downstream industries. Although the industry science effort was often disparaged as an attack on "real" science, my only assignment when I joined DuPont's Central Research Department in 1979 was to understand and contribute to the science, keeping both the company and our customers informed. Our modeling results were published freely. FPP funding led to better knowledge of the ClO + O rate constant, significantly increasing depletion in model calculations; supported the development of the techniques used to measure in situ atmospheric ClO, so important in later strengthening the case for chlorine-catalyzed depletion; and supported international participation in several global collaborations led by NASA. By the mid-1980s, the combination of renewed growth in global production and modelers' unanimity that depletion eventually would occur in any scenario of sustained growth led most of the industry to support actively the UN-led international negotiations. Knowing that any limit to global growth would eventually stimulate development of replacements, broad agreement was far more important than any specific target for limiting growth. The Montreal Protocol achieved that agreement, and support from the broad US industry coalition in the Alliance for Responsible CFC Policy was instrumental in its approval by the Reagan administration. Just as Rowland's work in 1974 had driven the industry to understand and contribute to atmospheric science, his participation in the ozone trends panel results announced in March, 1988 led to another shift. The combination of solid links between CFCs and stratospheric chlorine, between chlorine and ozone depletion, at least at the poles, and the likely presence of depletion at mid-latitudes, whether or not caused by chlorine, led DuPont to announce a week later a complete phaseout of CFCs. Broader industry support followed, culminating what is still the best example of government, industry, scientific, and environmentalist collaboration on a global scale.

  17. Indirectly detected chemical shift correlation NMR spectroscopy in solids under fast magic angle spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Kanmi

    2011-08-15

    The development of fast magic angle spinning (MAS) opened up an opportunity for the indirect detection of insensitive low-{gamma} nuclei (e.g., {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N) via the sensitive high-{gamma} nuclei (e.g., {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F) in solid-state NMR, with advanced sensitivity and resolution. In this thesis, new methodology utilizing fast MAS is presented, including through-bond indirectly detected heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectroscopy, which is assisted by multiple RF pulse sequences for {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H homonuclear decoupling. Also presented is a simple new strategy for optimization of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H homonuclear decoupling. As applications, various classes of materials, such as catalytic nanoscale materials, biomolecules, and organic complexes, are studied by combining indirect detection and other one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR techniques. Indirectly detected through-bond HETCOR spectroscopy utilizing refocused INEPT (INEPTR) mixing was developed under fast MAS (Chapter 2). The time performance of this approach in {sup 1}H detected 2D {sup 1}H{l_brace}{sup 13}C{r_brace} spectra was significantly improved, by a factor of almost 10, compared to the traditional {sup 13}C detected experiments, as demonstrated by measuring naturally abundant organic-inorganic mesoporous hybrid materials. The through-bond scheme was demonstrated as a new analytical tool, which provides complementary structural information in solid-state systems in addition to through-space correlation. To further benefit the sensitivity of the INEPT transfer in rigid solids, the combined rotation and multiple-pulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS) was implemented for homonuclear {sup 1}H decoupling under fast MAS (Chapter 3). Several decoupling schemes (PMLG5{sub m}{sup {bar x}}, PMLG5{sub mm}{sup {bar x}x} and SAM3) were analyzed to maximize the performance of through-bond transfer based on decoupling efficiency as well as scaling factors. Indirect detection with assistance of PMLG{sub m}{sup {bar x}} during INEPTR transfer proved to offer the highest sensitivity gains of 3-10. In addition, the CRAMPS sequence was applied under fast MAS to increase the {sup 1}H resolution during t{sub 1} evolution in the traditional, {sup 13}C detected HETCOR scheme. Two naturally abundant solids, tripeptide N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (f-MLF-OH) and brown coal, with well ordered and highly disordered structures, respectively, are studied to confirm the capabilities of these techniques. Concomitantly, a simple optimization of {sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar decoupling at MAS rates exceeding 10 kHz was developed (Chapter 4). The fine-tuned decoupling efficiency can be obtained by minimizing the signal loss due to transverse relaxation in a simple spin-echo experiment, using directly the sample of interest. The excellent agreement between observed decoupling pattern and earlier theoretical predictions confirmed the utility of this strategy. The properties of naturally abundant surface-bound fluorocarbon groups in mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) were investigated by the above-mentioned multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments and theoretical modeling (Chapter 5). Two conformations of (pentafluorophenyl)propyl groups (abbreviated as PFP) were determined as PFP-prone and PFP-upright, whose aromatic rings are located above the siloxane bridges and in roughly upright position, respectively. Several 1D and 2D NMR techniques were implemented in the characterizations, including indirectly detected {sup 1}H{l_brace}{sup 13}C{r_brace} and {sup 19}F{l_brace}{sup 13}C{r_brace} 2D HETCOR, Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) assisted {sup 29}Si direct polarization and {sup 29}Si{sup 19}F 2D experiments, 2D double-quantum (DQ) {sup 19}F MAS NMR spectra and spin-echo measurements. Furthermore, conformational details of two types of PFP were confirmed by theoretical calculation, operated by Dr. Takeshi Kobayashi. Finally, the arrangement of two surfactants, cetyltrimetylammoium bromide (CTAB) and cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB), mixed inside th

  18. ER-2 in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In this film clip, we see an ER-2 on its take off roll and climb as it departs from runway 22 at Edwards AFB, California. In 1981, NASA acquired its first ER-2 aircraft. The agency obtained a second ER-2 in 1989. These airplanes replaced two Lockheed U-2 aircraft, which NASA had used to collect scientific data since 1971. The U-2, and later the ER-2, were based at the Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, until 1997. In 1997, the ER-2 aircraft and their operations moved to NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Since the inaugural flight for this program, August 31, 1971, NASA U-2 and ER-2 aircraft have flown more than 4,000 data missions and test flights in support of scientific research conducted by scientists from NASA, other federal agencies, states, universities, and the private sector. NASA is currently using two ER-2 Airborne Science aircraft as flying laboratories. The aircraft, based at NASA Dryden, collect information about our surroundings, including Earth resources, celestial observations, atmospheric chemistry and dynamics, and oceanic processes. The aircraft also are used for electronic sensor research and development, satellite calibration, and satellite data validation. The ER-2 is a versatile aircraft well-suited to perform multiple mission tasks. It is 30 percent larger than the U-2 with a 20 feet longer wingspan and a considerably increased payload over the older airframe. The aircraft has four large pressurized experiment compartments and a high-capacity AC/DC electrical system, permitting it to carry a variety of payloads on a single mission. The modular design of the aircraft permits rapid installation or removal of payloads to meet changing mission requirements. The ER-2 has a range beyond 3,000 miles (4800 kilometers); is capable of long flight duration and can operate at altitudes up to 70,000 feet (21.3 kilometers) if required. Operating at an altitude of 65,000 feet (19.8 kilometers) the ER-2 acquires data above 95 percent of the Earth's atmosphere. At this altitude the aircraft provides a stable platform for Earth imagery, atmospheric research, and electronic sensor development. Because the ER-2 can fly so high, its sensors 'mimic' sensors carried aboard orbiting satellites. For most missions the ER-2 operates at altitudes between 65,000 feet and 70,000 feet. Depending on aircraft weight, the ER-2 reaches a cruise altitude of 65,000 feet within 20 minutes. Typical cruise speed is 410 knots. The range for a normal 6-hour mission is 2,200 nautical miles (4,070 kilometers), which yields 5 hours of data collection at high altitude. The aircraft is capable of longer missions of up to 8 hours and ranges of up to 3,000 nautical miles (5,500 kilometers). The ER-2 can carry a maximum payload of 2,600 pounds (1,179 kilograms) distributed in the equipment bay, nose area, and wing pods. In 1991, NASA launched a comprehensive program to study the Earth as an environmental system, now called the Earth Science Enterprise. By using satellites and other tools like the ER-2 to intensively study the Earth, NASA hopes to expand human understanding of how natural processes affect people and how people might be affecting them. Such studies will yield improved weather forecasts, tools for managing agriculture and forests, information for fishermen and local planners, and, eventually, the ability to predict how the climate will change in the future. NASA ER-2 aircraft have played an important role in Earth Science research, like studying ozone depletion over Antarctica and the Arctic. In August and September 1987 an ER-2 traveled to Punta Arenas, Chile, to conduct overflights of the Antarctic. Results from this study provided information suggesting that human-made chemical compounds, specifically chloro-fluorocarbons, caused enormous ozone depletion over the Antarctic region. Subsequent deployments have continued the study of the production and loss of ozone in the polar stratosphere. Atmospheric experiments were flown from Stavanger, Norway in January and February 1989 north of the Arcti

  19. TOPICAL REVIEW: Black silicon method X: a review on high speed and selective plasma etching of silicon with profile control: an in-depth comparison between Bosch and cryostat DRIE processes as a roadmap to next generation equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, H V; de Boer, M J; Unnikrishnan, S; Louwerse, M C; Elwenspoek, M C

    2009-03-01

    An intensive study has been performed to understand and tune deep reactive ion etch (DRIE) processes for optimum results with respect to the silicon etch rate, etch profile and mask etch selectivity (in order of priority) using state-of-the-art dual power source DRIE equipment. The research compares pulsed-mode DRIE processes (e.g. Bosch technique) and mixed-mode DRIE processes (e.g. cryostat technique). In both techniques, an inhibitor is added to fluorine-based plasma to achieve directional etching, which is formed out of an oxide-forming (O2) or a fluorocarbon (FC) gas (C4F8 or CHF3). The inhibitor can be introduced together with the etch gas, which is named a mixed-mode DRIE process, or the inhibitor can be added in a time-multiplexed manner, which will be termed a pulsed-mode DRIE process. Next, the most convenient mode of operation found in this study is highlighted including some remarks to ensure proper etching (i.e. step synchronization in pulsed-mode operation and heat control of the wafer). First of all, for the fabrication of directional profiles, pulsed-mode DRIE is far easier to handle, is more robust with respect to the pattern layout and has the potential of achieving much higher mask etch selectivity, whereas in a mixed-mode the etch rate is higher and sidewall scalloping is prohibited. It is found that both pulsed-mode CHF3 and C4F8 are perfectly suited to perform high speed directional etching, although they have the drawback of leaving the FC residue at the sidewalls of etched structures. They show an identical result when the flow of CHF3 is roughly 30 times the flow of C4F8, and the amount of gas needed for a comparable result decreases rapidly while lowering the temperature from room down to cryogenic (and increasing the etch rate). Moreover, lowering the temperature lowers the mask erosion rate substantially (and so the mask selectivity improves). The pulsed-mode O2 is FC-free but shows only tolerable anisotropic results at -120 °C. The downside of needing liquid nitrogen to perform cryogenic etching can be improved by using a new approach in which both the pulsed and mixed modes are combined into the so-called puffed mode. Alternatively, the use of tetra-ethyl-ortho-silicate (TEOS) as a silicon oxide precursor is proposed to enable sufficient inhibiting strength and improved profile control up to room temperature. Pulsed-mode processing, the second important aspect, is commonly performed in a cycle using two separate steps: etch and deposition. Sometimes, a three-step cycle is adopted using a separate step to clean the bottom of etching features. This study highlights an issue, known by the authors but not discussed before in the literature: the need for proper synchronization between gas and bias pulses to explore the benefit of three steps. The transport of gas from the mass flow controller towards the wafer takes time, whereas the application of bias to the wafer is relatively instantaneous. This delay causes a problem with respect to synchronization when decreasing the step time towards a value close to the gas residence time. It is proposed to upgrade the software with a delay time module for the bias pulses to be in pace with the gas pulses. If properly designed, the delay module makes it possible to switch on the bias exactly during the arrival of the gas for the bottom removal step and so it will minimize the ionic impact because now etch and deposition steps can be performed virtually without bias. This will increase the mask etch selectivity and lower the heat impact significantly. Moreover, the extra bottom removal step can be performed at (also synchronized!) low pressure and therefore opens a window for improved aspect ratios. The temperature control of the wafer, a third aspect of this study, at a higher etch rate and longer etch time, needs critical attention, because it drastically limits the DRIE performance. It is stressed that the exothermic reaction (high silicon loading) and ionic impact (due to metallic masks and/or exposed silicon) are the main sources of heat that might r