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Sample records for fluoroscopic imaging technique

  1. Computerized tomography using video recorded fluoroscopic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kak, A. C.; Jakowatz, C. V., Jr.; Baily, N. A.; Keller, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    The use of video-recorded fluoroscopic images as input data for digital reconstruction of objects from their projections is examined. The fluoroscopic and the scanning apparatus used for the experiments are of a commercial type already in existence in most hospitals. It is shown that for beams with divergence up to about 15 deg, one can use a convolution algorithm designed for the parallel radiation case with negligible degradation both quantitatively and from a visual quality standpoint. This convolution algorithm is computationally more efficient than either the algebraic techniques or the convolution algorithms for radially diverging data. Results from studies on Lucite phantoms and a freshly sacrificed rat are included.

  2. Computerized tomography using video recorded fluoroscopic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kak, A. C.; Jakowatz, C. V., Jr.; Baily, N. A.; Keller, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A computerized tomographic imaging system is examined which employs video-recorded fluoroscopic images as input data. By hooking the video recorder to a digital computer through a suitable interface, such a system permits very rapid construction of tomograms.

  3. Enhancement of fluoroscopic images with varying contrast.

    PubMed

    Ozanian, T O; Phillips, R

    2001-04-01

    A heuristic algorithm for enhancement of fluoroscopic images of varying contrast is proposed. The new technique aims at identifying a suitable type of enhancement for different locations in an image. The estimation relies on simple preliminary classification of image parts into one of the following types: uniform, sharp (with sufficient contrast), detail-containing (structure present) and unknown (for the cases where it is difficult to make a decision). Different smoothing techniques are applied locally in the different types of image parts. For those parts that are classified as detail-containing, probable object boundaries are identified and local sharpening is carried out to increase the contrast at these places. The adopted approach attempts to improve the quality of an image by reducing available noise and simultaneously increasing the contrast at probable object boundaries without increasing the overall dynamic range. In addition, it allows noise to be cleaned, that at some locations is stronger than the fine structure at other locations, whilst preserving the details. PMID:11223147

  4. Intrapelvic obturator internus muscle injections: a novel fluoroscopic technique.

    PubMed

    Valovska, Assia; Zaccagnino, Michael P; Weaver, Michael J; Valovski, Ivan; Kaye, Alan David; Urman, Richard D

    2015-01-01

    The obturator internus (OI) muscle is important in adult chronic noninfectious pelvic, perineal, gluteal, and retrotrochanteric pain syndromes. Evaluation and management of these patients' pain can be challenging because of the complex anatomy of this region, broad differential diagnosis, and lack of specific physical examination findings. Consequently, several clinicians have advocated the use of image guided injections to assist in the accurate diagnosis of OI-related symptoms and provide symptomatic relief to affected patients. We present 2 case series describing a novel fluoroscopically guided contrast controlled transpectineal approach to intrapelvic OI injections. Unlike prior fluoroscopically guided OI injection techniques, the approach described in the present 2 cases utilized multiple standard pelvic views, thus facilitating optimal needle positioning in three-dimensional space. This technique utilized standard fluoroscopic pelvic views to accurately measure needle depth within the pelvic cavity permitting the bulk of the OI to be injected in a controlled and safe fashion. The first patient underwent a left intrapelvic OI muscle injection with bupivacaine 0.25% and 40 mg methylprednisolone. The average pre- and postprocedural visual analog pain scale scores were 5 out of 10 and 2 out of 10, respectively, with a self-reported 75% pain reduction. The second patient underwent a right intrapelvic OI muscle injection with bupivacaine 0.25% and 40 mg methylprednisolone. The average pre- and postprocedural visual analog scale scores were 8 out of 10 and 1 out of 10, respectively, with a self-reported 90% pain reduction. Larger scale studies should be undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and generalized accuracy of this technique. PMID:25794225

  5. Temporomandibular joint arthrography: a comparison between a fluoroscopic and a nonfluoroscopic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, B.W.; Langlais, R.P.; Abramovitch, K.

    1989-05-01

    A nonfluoroscopic temporomandibular joint arthrographic technique is contrasted with a more widely employed fluoroscopically guided technique. The nonfluoroscopic technique uses a posterior approach to joint injection, as contrasted with the lateral injection approach of the fluoroscopically guided technique. The advantages of the nonfluoroscopic technique are less radiation dose to the patient, less expensive and less sophisticated imaging equipment, and less potential for neurovascular trauma. The fluoroscopic technique offers greater control of the procedure, less patient and operator time, and the capability for a dynamic videofluoroscopic study. Both techniques appear to be safe and efficacious. Differences in anatomy, imaging modalities, patient radiation exposure, and potential complications are also discussed as part of this comparison.48 references.

  6. Fluoroscopic tumor tracking for image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tong; Cerviño, Laura I.; Tang, Xiaoli; Vasconcelos, Nuno; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-02-01

    Accurate lung tumor tracking in real time is a keystone to image-guided radiotherapy of lung cancers. Existing lung tumor tracking approaches can be roughly grouped into three categories: (1) deriving tumor position from external surrogates; (2) tracking implanted fiducial markers fluoroscopically or electromagnetically; (3) fluoroscopically tracking lung tumor without implanted fiducial markers. The first approach suffers from insufficient accuracy, while the second may not be widely accepted due to the risk of pneumothorax. Previous studies in fluoroscopic markerless tracking are mainly based on template matching methods, which may fail when the tumor boundary is unclear in fluoroscopic images. In this paper we propose a novel markerless tumor tracking algorithm, which employs the correlation between the tumor position and surrogate anatomic features in the image. The positions of the surrogate features are not directly tracked; instead, we use principal component analysis of regions of interest containing them to obtain parametric representations of their motion patterns. Then, the tumor position can be predicted from the parametric representations of surrogates through regression. Four regression methods were tested in this study: linear and two-degree polynomial regression, artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM). The experimental results based on fluoroscopic sequences of ten lung cancer patients demonstrate a mean tracking error of 2.1 pixels and a maximum error at a 95% confidence level of 4.6 pixels (pixel size is about 0.5 mm) for the proposed tracking algorithm.

  7. 3D fluoroscopic image estimation using patient-specific 4DCBCT-based motion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhou, S.; Hurwitz, M.; Mishra, P.; Cai, W.; Rottmann, J.; Li, R.; Williams, C.; Wagar, M.; Berbeco, R.; Ionascu, D.; Lewis, J. H.

    2015-05-01

    3D fluoroscopic images represent volumetric patient anatomy during treatment with high spatial and temporal resolution. 3D fluoroscopic images estimated using motion models built using 4DCT images, taken days or weeks prior to treatment, do not reliably represent patient anatomy during treatment. In this study we developed and performed initial evaluation of techniques to develop patient-specific motion models from 4D cone-beam CT (4DCBCT) images, taken immediately before treatment, and used these models to estimate 3D fluoroscopic images based on 2D kV projections captured during treatment. We evaluate the accuracy of 3D fluoroscopic images by comparison to ground truth digital and physical phantom images. The performance of 4DCBCT-based and 4DCT-based motion models are compared in simulated clinical situations representing tumor baseline shift or initial patient positioning errors. The results of this study demonstrate the ability for 4DCBCT imaging to generate motion models that can account for changes that cannot be accounted for with 4DCT-based motion models. When simulating tumor baseline shift and patient positioning errors of up to 5 mm, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error in six datasets were 1.20 and 2.2 mm, respectively, for 4DCBCT-based motion models. 4DCT-based motion models applied to the same six datasets resulted in average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error of 4.18 and 5.4 mm, respectively. Analysis of voxel-wise intensity differences was also conducted for all experiments. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image generation in digital and physical phantoms and shows the potential advantage of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image estimation when there are changes in anatomy between the time of 4DCT imaging and the time of treatment delivery.

  8. 3D fluoroscopic image estimation using patient-specific 4DCBCT-based motion models

    PubMed Central

    Dhou, Salam; Hurwitz, Martina; Mishra, Pankaj; Cai, Weixing; Rottmann, Joerg; Li, Ruijiang; Williams, Christopher; Wagar, Matthew; Berbeco, Ross; Ionascu, Dan; Lewis, John H.

    2015-01-01

    3D fluoroscopic images represent volumetric patient anatomy during treatment with high spatial and temporal resolution. 3D fluoroscopic images estimated using motion models built using 4DCT images, taken days or weeks prior to treatment, do not reliably represent patient anatomy during treatment. In this study we develop and perform initial evaluation of techniques to develop patient-specific motion models from 4D cone-beam CT (4DCBCT) images, taken immediately before treatment, and use these models to estimate 3D fluoroscopic images based on 2D kV projections captured during treatment. We evaluate the accuracy of 3D fluoroscopic images by comparing to ground truth digital and physical phantom images. The performance of 4DCBCT- and 4DCT- based motion models are compared in simulated clinical situations representing tumor baseline shift or initial patient positioning errors. The results of this study demonstrate the ability for 4DCBCT imaging to generate motion models that can account for changes that cannot be accounted for with 4DCT-based motion models. When simulating tumor baseline shift and patient positioning errors of up to 5 mm, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error in six datasets were 1.20 and 2.2 mm, respectively, for 4DCBCT-based motion models. 4DCT-based motion models applied to the same six datasets resulted in average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error of 4.18 and 5.4 mm, respectively. Analysis of voxel-wise intensity differences was also conducted for all experiments. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image generation in digital and physical phantoms, and shows the potential advantage of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image estimation when there are changes in anatomy between the time of 4DCT imaging and the time of treatment delivery. PMID:25905722

  9. 21 CFR 892.1650 - Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. 892... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1650 Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. An image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a...

  10. 21 CFR 892.1650 - Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. 892... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1650 Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. An image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a...

  11. 21 CFR 892.1660 - Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1660 Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. A non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a...

  12. 21 CFR 892.1660 - Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1660 Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. A non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a...

  13. 21 CFR 892.1650 - Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. 892... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1650 Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. An image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a...

  14. 21 CFR 892.1660 - Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1660 Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. A non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a...

  15. 21 CFR 892.1650 - Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. 892... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1650 Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. An image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a...

  16. 21 CFR 892.1660 - Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1660 Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. A non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a...

  17. 21 CFR 892.1650 - Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. 892... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1650 Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. An image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a...

  18. 21 CFR 892.1660 - Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1660 Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. A non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a...

  19. A kernel-based method for markerless tumor tracking in kV fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyong; Homma, Noriyasu; Ichiji, Kei; Abe, Makoto; Sugita, Norihiro; Takai, Yoshihiro; Narita, Yuichiro; Yoshizawa, Makoto

    2014-09-01

    Markerless tracking of respiration-induced tumor motion in kilo-voltage (kV) fluoroscopic image sequence is still a challenging task in real time image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Most of existing markerless tracking methods are based on a template matching technique or its extensions that are frequently sensitive to non-rigid tumor deformation and involve expensive computation. This paper presents a kernel-based method that is capable of tracking tumor motion in kV fluoroscopic image sequence with robust performance and low computational cost. The proposed tracking system consists of the following three steps. To enhance the contrast of kV fluoroscopic image, we firstly utilize a histogram equalization to transform the intensities of original images to a wider dynamical intensity range. A tumor target in the first frame is then represented by using a histogram-based feature vector. Subsequently, the target tracking is then formulated by maximizing a Bhattacharyya coefficient that measures the similarity between the tumor target and its candidates in the subsequent frames. The numerical solution for maximizing the Bhattacharyya coefficient is performed by a mean-shift algorithm. The proposed method was evaluated by using four clinical kV fluoroscopic image sequences. For comparison, we also implement four conventional template matching-based methods and compare their performance with our proposed method in terms of the tracking accuracy and computational cost. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method is superior to conventional template matching-based methods.

  20. A kernel-based method for markerless tumor tracking in kV fluoroscopic images.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyong; Homma, Noriyasu; Ichiji, Kei; Abe, Makoto; Sugita, Norihiro; Takai, Yoshihiro; Narita, Yuichiro; Yoshizawa, Makoto

    2014-09-01

    Markerless tracking of respiration-induced tumor motion in kilo-voltage (kV) fluoroscopic image sequence is still a challenging task in real time image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Most of existing markerless tracking methods are based on a template matching technique or its extensions that are frequently sensitive to non-rigid tumor deformation and involve expensive computation. This paper presents a kernel-based method that is capable of tracking tumor motion in kV fluoroscopic image sequence with robust performance and low computational cost. The proposed tracking system consists of the following three steps. To enhance the contrast of kV fluoroscopic image, we firstly utilize a histogram equalization to transform the intensities of original images to a wider dynamical intensity range. A tumor target in the first frame is then represented by using a histogram-based feature vector. Subsequently, the target tracking is then formulated by maximizing a Bhattacharyya coefficient that measures the similarity between the tumor target and its candidates in the subsequent frames. The numerical solution for maximizing the Bhattacharyya coefficient is performed by a mean-shift algorithm. The proposed method was evaluated by using four clinical kV fluoroscopic image sequences. For comparison, we also implement four conventional template matching-based methods and compare their performance with our proposed method in terms of the tracking accuracy and computational cost. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method is superior to conventional template matching-based methods. PMID:25098382

  1. FLUOROSCOPIC EVALUATION OF ORO-PHARYNGEAL DYSPHAGIA: ANATOMY, TECHNIQUE, AND COMMON ETIOLOGIES

    PubMed Central

    Edmund, Dr; Au, Frederick Wing-Fai; Steele, Catriona M.

    2015-01-01

    Target Audience Radiologists and other professionals involved in imaging of oropharyngeal swallowing Objectives To review anatomy of the upper GI tract To review techniques and contrast agents used in the fluoroscopic examination of the oropharynx and hypopharynx To provide a pictorial review of some important causes of oropharyngeal dysphagia, and to link these to key findings in the clinical history to assist in establishing a clinical diagnosis To provide self-assessment questions to reinforce key learning points PMID:25539237

  2. Image-based respiratory motion compensation for fluoroscopic coronary roadmapping.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Tsin, Yanghai; Sundar, Hari; Sauer, Frank

    2010-01-01

    We present a new image-based respiratory motion compensation method for coronary roadmapping in fluoroscopic images. A temporal analysis scheme is proposed to identify static structures in the image gradient domain. An extended Lucas-Kanade algorithm involving a weighted sum-of-squared-difference (WSSD) measure is proposed to estimate the soft tissue motion in the presence of static structures. A temporally compositional motion model is used to deal with large image motion incurred by deep breathing. Promising results have been shown in the experiments conducted on clinical data. PMID:20879411

  3. A novel marker enhancement filter (MEF) for fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshko, Olesya; Davidson, Timothy N.; Modersitzki, Jan; Terlaky, Tamás; Moseley, Douglas J.

    2014-03-01

    To enhance the measurements of radio-opaque cylindrical fiducial markers in low contrast x-ray and fluoroscopic images, a novel nonlinear marker enhancement filter (MEF) has been designed. It was primarily developed to assist in automatic initialization of a tracking procedure for intra-fraction organ motion analysis in fluoroscopic sequences. Conventional procedures were not able to provide sufficient improvement due to the complications of noise, small marker size, cylindrical shape and multiple orientations, intensity variations of the background, and the presence of overlaying anatomical measurements in this application. The proposed MEF design is based on the principles of linear scale space. It includes measures that assess the probability of each pixel to belong to a marker measurement, morphological operations, and a novel contrast enhancement function for standardization of the filter output. The MEF was tested on fluoroscopic images of two phantoms and three prostate patients, and was shown to perform better or comparable to the existing filters in terms of marker enhancement and background suppression, while performing significantly better in marker shape preservation.

  4. The MEPUC concept adapts the C-arm fluoroscope to image-guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Suhm, Norbert; Müller, Paul; Bopp, Urs; Messmer, Peter; Regazzoni, Pietro

    2004-06-01

    Image-guided surgery requires surgeons to be able to manipulate the imaging modality themselves and without delay. Intraoperative fluoroscopic imaging does not meet this requirement as the C-arm fluoroscope cannot be operated or positioned by the surgeons themselves. The Motorized Exact Positioning Unit for C-arm (MEPUC) concept aims to optimize the workflow of positioning the C-arm fluoroscope. The hardware component of the MEPUC equips the fluoroscope with electric stepping motors. The software component allows the surgeon to control the fluoroscope's movements. The study presented here showed that translational movements within the x-y plane are most frequently performed when positioning the C-arm fluoroscope. Furthermore, reproducing a former projection was found to be a frequent task during image-guided procedures. In our opinion, the MEPUC concept adapts the fluoroscope to image-guided surgery. The most important improvement being definition of a bidirectional data exchange between the surgeon and the C-arm fluoroscope: positioning data from the surgeon to the C-arm fluoroscope and-subsequently-image information from C-arm fluoroscope to the surgeon. PMID:15183713

  5. Radiation Dose Reduction Methods For Use With Fluoroscopic Imaging, Computers And Implications For Image Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, E. W.; Hynes, D. M.; Rowlands, J. A.; Toth, B. D.; Porter, A. J.

    1988-06-01

    The use of a beam splitting device for medical gastro-intestinal fluoroscopy has demonstrated that clinical images obtained with a 100mm photofluorographic camera, and a 1024 X 1024 digital matrix with pulsed progressive readout acquisition techniques, are identical. In addition, it has been found that clinical images can be obtained with digital systems at dose levels lower than those possible with film. The use of pulsed fluoroscopy with intermittent storage of the fluoroscopic image has also been demonstrated to reduce the fluoroscopy part of the examination to very low dose levels, particularly when low repetition rates of about 2 frames per second (fps) are used. The use of digital methods reduces the amount of radiation required and also the heat generated by the x-ray tube. Images can therefore be produced using a very small focal spot on the x-ray tube, which can produce further improvement in the resolution of the clinical images.

  6. Cryo-balloon catheter localization in fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzendorfer, Tanja; Brost, Alexander; Jakob, Carolin; Mewes, Philip W.; Bourier, Felix; Koch, Martin; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2013-03-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation has become the preferred treatment option for atrial fibrillation. Although the standard ablation procedure involves ablation points set by radio-frequency catheters, cryo-balloon catheters have even been reported to be more advantageous in certain cases. As electro-anatomical mapping systems do not support cryo-balloon ablation procedures, X-ray guidance is needed. However, current methods to provide support for cryo-balloon catheters in fluoroscopically guided ablation procedures rely heavily on manual user interaction. To improve this, we propose a first method for automatic cryo-balloon catheter localization in fluoroscopic images based on a blob detection algorithm. Our method is evaluated on 24 clinical images from 17 patients. The method successfully detected the cryoballoon in 22 out of 24 images, yielding a success rate of 91.6 %. The successful localization achieved an accuracy of 1.00 mm +/- 0.44 mm. Even though our methods currently fails in 8.4 % of the images available, it still offers a significant improvement over manual methods. Furthermore, detecting a landmark point along the cryo-balloon catheter can be a very important step for additional post-processing operations.

  7. Percutaneous laser disk decompression under CT and fluoroscopic guidance: indications, technique, and clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Gangi, A; Dietemann, J L; Ide, C; Brunner, P; Klinkert, A; Warter, J M

    1996-01-01

    The aim of percutaneous laser disk decompression (PLDD) is to vaporize a small portion of the nucleus pulposus of an intervertebral disk, thereby reducing the volume and pressure of a diseased disk. This minimally invasive technique can be performed in patients who need surgical intervention for disk herniation with leg pain. PLDD is usually performed under fluoroscopic guidance with or without diskoscopy. However, it can also be performed under dual computed tomographic (CT) and fluoroscopic guidance as an outpatient procedure. CT and fluoroscopic guidance increases the safety and accuracy of PLDD, with high precision of instrument guidance, direct visualization of nucleus pulposus vaporization, and reduced risk of complications. Of 119 patients with lumbar disk herniation treated with PLDD under CT and fluoroscopic guidance, 91 (76.5%) had a good or fair response. PLDD performed with CT and fluoroscopic guidance appears to be a safe and effective treatment for herniated intervertebral disks. PMID:10946692

  8. SU-E-P-15: Technique Factor Modulation and Reference Plane Air Kerma Rates in Response to Simulated Patient Thickness Variations for a Sample of Current Generation Fluoroscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderle, K; Rakowski, J; Dong, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare approaches to technique factor modulation and air kerma rates in response to simulated patient thickness variations for four state-of-the-art and one previous-generation interventional fluoroscopes. Methods: A polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom was used as a tissue surrogate for the purposes of determining fluoroscopic reference plane air kerma rates, kVp, mA, and spectral filtration over a wide range of simulated tissue thicknesses. Data were acquired for each fluoroscopic and acquisition dose curve within a default abdomen or body imaging protocol. Results: The data obtained indicated vendor- and model-specific variations in the approach to technique factor modulation and reference plane air kerma rates across a range of tissue thicknesses. Some vendors have made hardware advances increasing the radiation output capabilities of their fluoroscopes; this was evident in the acquisition air kerma rates. However, in the imaging protocol evaluated, all of the state-of-the-art systems had relatively low air kerma rates in the fluoroscopic low-dose imaging mode as compared to the previous-generation unit. Each of the newest-generation systems also employ copper filtration in the selected protocol in the acquisition mode of imaging; this is a substantial benefit, reducing the skin entrance dose to the patient in the highest dose-rate mode of fluoroscope operation. Conclusion: Understanding how fluoroscopic technique factors are modulated provides insight into the vendor-specific image acquisition approach and provides opportunities to optimize the imaging protocols for clinical practice. The enhanced radiation output capabilities of some of the fluoroscopes may, under specific conditions, may be beneficial; however, these higher output capabilities also have the potential to lead to unnecessarily high dose rates. Therefore, all parties involved in imaging, including the clinical team, medical physicists, and imaging vendors, must work

  9. The response of fluoroscopic image intensifier-TV systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.; Keller, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Three different types of X-ray fluoroscopic TV chains were investigated: two standard clinical units, one with a vidicon camera tube, the other with a plumbicon camera tube; and the third was a large flat-screen unit. In each an X-ray beam generated at 100 kVp was passed through 10 cm of H2O before aluminum absorbers of varying thickness were introduced. Five video recordings were made at each absorber thickness. The video image was digitized directly from the disk recording and quantized into 128 gray levels. The five recordings were averaged on a point-to-point basis, and the central 900 averaged points were again averaged to yield a value for the gray level assigned to each particular image. This 30 by 30 matrix of points corresponds to input screen areas of 29, 8.2, and 3.6 sq cm for the three units investigated.

  10. Radiation exposure to angiographers under different fluoroscopic imaging conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, J.M.; Levin, D.C. )

    1991-09-01

    Radiation levels near an imaging chain commonly used in angiography were measured with both a 100- and a 200-mm-thick scatter phantom. The scatter was measured in lines parallel in space to the central ray of the x-ray beam, at lateral distances of 300, 500, and 800 mm. The effects of fluoroscopic kilovoltage and image intensifier magnification mode were also measured. The results indicate that the highest scattered radiation levels occur near the surface of the patient where the x-ray beam enters. Exposure rates were measured in both anteroposterior (AP) and posteroanterior (PA) geometries on a U-arm system. In PA geometry, the highest radiation levels occur below the angiographer's waist, an area well protected by the lead apron. The AP geometry increases the exposure rate to the neck, head, and upper extremities, areas where apron shielding is less effective.

  11. Dynamic imaging of pulmonary ventilation. Description of a novel digital fluoroscopic system.

    PubMed

    Kiuru, A; Svedström, E; Kuuluvainen, I

    1991-03-01

    A new fluoroscopic imaging device consisting of an AT-microcomputer and a digital image memory unit has been used in experimental and clinical ventilation studies during a 2-year period. Digital images with 256 shades of gray were collected during one to 3 ventilation cycles at the rate of 6 to 25 images/s and stored on an optical laser disc. Both subtracted time interval difference (TID-) images and images relative, for example, to the mean image of the cycle (REL-images) were produced. The series of images could also be evaluated dynamically using animation sequences or analyzed using region of interest calculations. The method gave dynamic information with adequate spatial resolution and was easy to use in clinical practice. The radiation dose was kept low due to the high kilovoltage and heavy beam filtration technique. In experimental studies the software enabled flexible measurements of physiological pulmonary parameters. PMID:2031793

  12. Auto-shape lossless compression of pharynx and esophagus fluoroscopic images.

    PubMed

    Arif, Arif Sameh; Mansor, Sarina; Logeswaran, Rajasvaran; Karim, Hezerul Abdul

    2015-02-01

    The massive number of medical images produced by fluoroscopic and other conventional diagnostic imaging devices demand a considerable amount of space for data storage. This paper proposes an effective method for lossless compression of fluoroscopic images. The main contribution in this paper is the extraction of the regions of interest (ROI) in fluoroscopic images using appropriate shapes. The extracted ROI is then effectively compressed using customized correlation and the combination of Run Length and Huffman coding, to increase compression ratio. The experimental results achieved show that the proposed method is able to improve the compression ratio by 400 % as compared to that of traditional methods. PMID:25628161

  13. Localization and tracking of aortic valve prosthesis in 2D fluoroscopic image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karar, M.; Chalopin, C.; Merk, D. R.; Jacobs, S.; Walther, T.; Burgert, O.; Falk, V.

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents a new method for localization and tracking of the aortic valve prosthesis (AVP) in 2D fluoroscopic image sequences to assist the surgeon to reach the safe zone of implantation during transapical aortic valve implantation. The proposed method includes four main steps: First, the fluoroscopic images are preprocessed using a morphological reconstruction and an adaptive Wiener filter to enhance the AVP edges. Second, a target window, defined by a user on the first image of the sequences which includes the AVP, is tracked in all images using a template matching algorithm. In a third step the corners of the AVP are extracted based on the AVP dimensions and orientation in the target window. Finally, the AVP model is generated in the fluoroscopic image sequences. Although the proposed method is not yet validated intraoperatively, it has been applied to different fluoroscopic image sequences with promising results.

  14. Exploiting the multiplicative nature of fluoroscopic image stochastic noise to enhance calcium imaging recording quality.

    PubMed

    Esposti, Federico; Ripamonti, Maddalena; Signorini, Maria G

    2009-01-01

    One of the main problems that affect fluoroscopic imaging is the difficulty in coupling the recorded activity with the morphological information. The comprehension of fluorescence events in relationship with the internal structure of the cell can be very difficult. At this purpose, we developed a new method able to maximize the fluoroscopic movie quality. The method (Maximum Intensity Enhancement, MIE) works as follow: considering all the frames that compose the fluoroscopic movie, the algorithm extracts, for each pixel of the matrix, the maximal brightness value assumed along all the frames. Such values are collected in a maximum intensity matrix. Then, the method provides the projection of the target molecule oscillations which are present in the DeltaF/F(0) movie onto the maximum intensity matrix. This is done by creating a RGB movie and by assigning to the normalized (DeltaF/F(0)) activity a single channel and by reproducing the maximum intensity matrix on all the frames by using the remaining color channels. The application of such a method to fluoroscopic calcium imaging of astrocyte cultures demonstrated a meaningful enhancement in the possibility to discern the internal and external structure of cells. PMID:19964305

  15. Accurate 3D kinematic measurement of temporomandibular joint using X-ray fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Takaharu; Matsumoto, Akiko; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Matsumoto, Ken; Kakimoto, Naoya; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2014-04-01

    Accurate measurement and analysis of 3D kinematics of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very important for assisting clinical diagnosis and treatment of prosthodontics and orthodontics, and oral surgery. This study presents a new 3D kinematic measurement technique of the TMJ using X-ray fluoroscopic images, which can easily obtain the TMJ kinematic data in natural motion. In vivo kinematics of the TMJ (maxilla and mandibular bone) is determined using a feature-based 2D/3D registration, which uses beads silhouette on fluoroscopic images and 3D surface bone models with beads. The 3D surface models of maxilla and mandibular bone with beads were created from CT scans data of the subject using the mouthpiece with the seven strategically placed beads. In order to validate the accuracy of pose estimation for the maxilla and mandibular bone, computer simulation test was performed using five patterns of synthetic tantalum beads silhouette images. In the clinical applications, dynamic movement during jaw opening and closing was conducted, and the relative pose of the mandibular bone with respect to the maxilla bone was determined. The results of computer simulation test showed that the root mean square errors were sufficiently smaller than 1.0 mm and 1.0 degree. In the results of clinical application, during jaw opening from 0.0 to 36.8 degree of rotation, mandibular condyle exhibited 19.8 mm of anterior sliding relative to maxillary articular fossa, and these measurement values were clinically similar to the previous reports. Consequently, present technique was thought to be suitable for the 3D TMJ kinematic analysis.

  16. Detection of respiratory motion in fluoroscopic images for adaptive radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, T.; Biederer, J.; Nill, S.; Remmert, G.; Bendl, R.

    2008-06-01

    Respiratory motion limits the potential of modern high-precision radiotherapy techniques such as IMRT and particle therapy. Due to the uncertainty of tumour localization, the ability of achieving dose conformation often cannot be exploited sufficiently, especially in the case of lung tumours. Various methods have been proposed to track the position of tumours using external signals, e.g. with the help of a respiratory belt or by observing external markers. Retrospectively gated time-resolved x-ray computed tomography (4D CT) studies prior to therapy can be used to register the external signals with the tumour motion. However, during treatment the actual motion of internal structures may be different. Direct control of tissue motion by online imaging during treatment promises more precise information. On the other hand, it is more complex, since a larger amount of data must be processed in order to determine the motion. Three major questions arise from this issue. Firstly, can the motion that has occurred be precisely determined in the images? Secondly, how large must, respectively how small can, the observed region be chosen to get a reliable signal? Finally, is it possible to predict the proximate tumour location within sufficiently short acquisition times to make this information available for gating irradiation? Based on multiple studies on a porcine lung phantom, we have tried to examine these questions carefully. We found a basic characteristic of the breathing cycle in images using the image similarity method normalized mutual information. Moreover, we examined the performance of the calculations and proposed an image-based gating technique. In this paper, we present the results and validation performed with a real patient data set. This allows for the conclusion that it is possible to build up a gating system based on image data, solely, or (at least in avoidance of an exceeding exposure dose) to verify gates proposed by the various external systems.

  17. Registration of preoperative CTA and intraoperative fluoroscopic image sequence for assisting endovascular stent grafting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Naozo; Eiho, Shigeru; Urayama, Shin-ichi; Ueno, Katsuya; Inoue, Kanji

    2002-05-01

    We have investigated a registration method between pre-operative 3D CT angiography (3D-CTA) and intra-operative fluoroscopic image sequence (with/without contrast injection) during intervention. Most registration methods are developed for assisting neurosurgery or orthopedic surgery, but our method is developed for interventional procedure such as endovascular stent grafting. In our method, DRR (Digitally Reconstructed Radiograph) are generated by voxel projection of 3D-CTA after extracting an aorta region. By increasing/decreasing CT value in the aorta region of CTA, DRR with/without contrast media injection are obtained. Subsequently we calculate distance (or similarity) measures between DRR and fluoroscopic image iteratively by changing imaging parameters. The most similar DRR to fluoroscopy is selected. We validated our algorithm by using simulated/clinical fluoroscopic images and DRR (with/without contrast media injection) of thorax and abdomen. Several distance (or similarity) measures were investigated in this experiment. Validation results show that M-estimator of residual is good as matching measure, and registration is well performed for almost all cases. However, accuracy is not enough for non-contrasted thoracic images, and calculation time should be reduced for all cases.

  18. Echocardiographic and Fluoroscopic Fusion Imaging for Procedural Guidance: An Overview and Early Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Thaden, Jeremy J; Sanon, Saurabh; Geske, Jeffrey B; Eleid, Mackram F; Nijhof, Niels; Malouf, Joseph F; Rihal, Charanjit S; Bruce, Charles J

    2016-06-01

    There has been significant growth in the volume and complexity of percutaneous structural heart procedures in the past decade. Increasing procedural complexity and accompanying reliance on multimodality imaging have fueled the development of fusion imaging to facilitate procedural guidance. The first clinically available system capable of echocardiographic and fluoroscopic fusion for real-time guidance of structural heart procedures was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2012. Echocardiographic-fluoroscopic fusion imaging combines the precise catheter and device visualization of fluoroscopy with the soft tissue anatomy and color flow Doppler information afforded by echocardiography in a single image. This allows the interventionalist to perform precise catheter manipulations under fluoroscopy guidance while visualizing critical tissue anatomy provided by echocardiography. However, there are few data available addressing this technology's strengths and limitations in routine clinical practice. The authors provide a critical review of currently available echocardiographic-fluoroscopic fusion imaging for guidance of structural heart interventions to highlight its strengths, limitations, and potential clinical applications and to guide further research into value of this emerging technology. PMID:27021355

  19. X-ray characterization of CMOS imaging detector with high resolution for fluoroscopic imaging application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Bo Kyung; Kim, Cho Rong; Jeon, Seongchae; Kim, Ryun Kyung; Seo, Chang-Woo; Yang, Keedong; Heo, Duchang; Lee, Tae-Bum; Shin, Min-Seok; Kim, Jong-Boo; Kwon, Oh-Kyung

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS)-based X-ray imaging detectors with high spatial resolution for medical imaging application. In this study, our proposed X-ray CMOS imaging sensor has been fabricated by using a 0.35 μm 1 Poly 4 Metal CMOS process. The pixel size is 100 μm×100 μm and the pixel array format is 24×96 pixels, which provide a field-of-view (FOV) of 9.6 mm×2.4 mm. The 14.3-bit extend counting analog-to digital converter (ADC) with built-in binning mode was used to reduce the area and simultaneously improve the image resolution. Both thallium-doped CsI (CsI:Tl) and Gd2O2S:Tb scintillator screens were used as converters for incident X-rays to visible light photons. The optical property and X-ray imaging characterization such as X-ray to light response as a function of incident X-ray exposure dose, spatial resolution and X-ray images of objects were measured under different X-ray energy conditions. The measured results suggest that our developed CMOS-based X-ray imaging detector has the potential for fluoroscopic imaging and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging applications.

  20. Nonrigid 2D registration of fluoroscopic coronary artery image sequence with layered motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Taewoo; Jung, Hoyup; Yun, Il Dong

    2016-03-01

    We present a new method for nonrigid registration of coronary artery models with layered motion information. 2D nonrigid registration method is proposed that brings layered motion information into correspondence with fluoroscopic angiograms. The registered model is overlaid on top of interventional angiograms to provide surgical assistance during image-guided chronic total occlusion procedures. The proposed methodology is divided into two parts: layered structures alignments and local nonrigid registration. In the first part, inpainting method is used to estimate a layered rigid transformation that aligns layered motion information. In the second part, a nonrigid registration method is implemented and used to compensate for any local shape discrepancy. Experimental evaluation conducted on a set of 7 fluoroscopic angiograms results in a reduced target registration error, which showed the effectiveness of the proposed method over single layered approach.

  1. 4DCBCT-based motion modeling and 3D fluoroscopic image generation for lung cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhou, Salam; Hurwitz, Martina; Mishra, Pankaj; Berbeco, Ross; Lewis, John

    2015-03-01

    A method is developed to build patient-specific motion models based on 4DCBCT images taken at treatment time and use them to generate 3D time-varying images (referred to as 3D fluoroscopic images). Motion models are built by applying Principal Component Analysis (PCA) on the displacement vector fields (DVFs) estimated by performing deformable image registration on each phase of 4DCBCT relative to a reference phase. The resulting PCA coefficients are optimized iteratively by comparing 2D projections captured at treatment time with projections estimated using the motion model. The optimized coefficients are used to generate 3D fluoroscopic images. The method is evaluated using anthropomorphic physical and digital phantoms reproducing real patient trajectories. For physical phantom datasets, the average tumor localization error (TLE) and (95th percentile) in two datasets were 0.95 (2.2) mm. For digital phantoms assuming superior image quality of 4DCT and no anatomic or positioning disparities between 4DCT and treatment time, the average TLE and the image intensity error (IIE) in six datasets were smaller using 4DCT-based motion models. When simulating positioning disparities and tumor baseline shifts at treatment time compared to planning 4DCT, the average TLE (95th percentile) and IIE were 4.2 (5.4) mm and 0.15 using 4DCT-based models, while they were 1.2 (2.2) mm and 0.10 using 4DCBCT-based ones, respectively. 4DCBCT-based models were shown to perform better when there are positioning and tumor baseline shift uncertainties at treatment time. Thus, generating 3D fluoroscopic images based on 4DCBCT-based motion models can capture both inter- and intra- fraction anatomical changes during treatment.

  2. Fluoroscopically guided tunneled trans-caudal epidural catheter technique for opioid-free neonatal epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Andrew D; Hughes, Elisabeth M

    2016-06-01

    Epidural analgesia confers significant perioperative advantages to neonates undergoing surgical procedures but may be very technically challenging to place using a standard interlaminar loss-of-resistance to saline technique given the shallow depth of the epidural space. Thoracic epidural catheters placed via the caudal route may reduce the risk of direct neural injury from needle placement, but often pose higher risks of infection and/or improper positioning if placed without radiographic guidance. We present a detailed method of placing a fluoroscopically guided, tunneled transcaudal epidural catheter, which may reduce both of these risks. The accuracy and precision of this technique often provides adequate analgesia to allow for opioid-free epidural infusions as well as significant reductions in systemic opioids through the perioperative period. Opioid-free analgesia using a regional anesthetic technique allows for earlier extubation and reduced perioperative sedation, which may have a less deleterious neurocognitive effect on the developing brain of the neonate. PMID:26896945

  3. Contrast changes in fluoroscopic imaging systems and statistical variations of these changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, N. A.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental studies have indicated that: (1) The response of digitized fluoroscopic imaging systems is linear systems is linear with contrast over a rather wide range of absorber and cavity thicknesses. (2) Contrast changes associated with the addition of aluminum, iodine containing contrast agents and air of thicknesses 1mm or less can be detected with a 95% confidence level. (3) The standard deviation associated with such determination using clinically available X-ray generators and video disc recording is less than 1 percent. A large flat screen X-ray image intensifier has been constructed and some preliminary results obtained. Sensitivity achieved makes dose reduction a factor often greater than previously reported for a system using a conventional X-ray image intensifier.

  4. X-ray region of interest imaging system for rapid-sequence angiography and fluoroscopy: The micro-angiographic fluoroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ye

    Neuro-endovascular interventional diagnosis and treatment require high resolution x-ray imaging guidance of fluoroscopy and angiography. Our group has developed a small field of view, 5 frames per second, high-resolution micro-angiographic imager. This imager has demonstrated substantial high-resolution advantages for angiography over the conventional image intensifier. The work of this dissertation is to build a new micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF) to expand the capabilities of the micro-angiographic imager to include fluoroscopic imaging over a small field of view. The components of the MAF are all commercially available including CsI (T1) scintillator, fiber-optic taper, light image intensifier (LII), mirror, lens, and CCD camera. The critical component is the microchannel plate based LII with very high spatial resolution. The LII has a large range of gain that can be controlled easily by a 5V to 9V DC voltage. This property enables the MAF to be used for angiography with a low gain of the LII, and for fluoroscopy with a high gain of the LII. This design was justified by the quantum accounting diagram calculation. The preliminary experimental results from the test model MAF demonstrated the feasibility of this design. The improved prototype MAF model demonstrates high-resolution imaging for both fluoroscopy and angiography. The performance descriptors of the prototype MAF such as MTF, NPS, and DQE, were measured in both angiographic mode and fluoroscopic mode. For angiographic mode, at spatial frequencies of 4 and 10 lp/mm, the MTF for the MAF was 14% and 1.5% respectively, the DQE for the MAF was 12% and 1.2% respectively, while the DQE (0) was about 60%. For fluoroscopic mode, at spatial frequency of 4 lp/mm, the MTF for the MAF was 11%, and the DQE for the MAF was 9.5%. The image lag for the MAF in fluoroscopic mode at a rate of 30 fps was measured to be minimal. The allowable maximum entrance exposure rate was found to be related with the maximum LII

  5. Three-dimensional kinematic estimation of mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty from x-ray fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Takaharu; Futai, Kazuma; Tomita, Tetsuya; Sato, Yoshinobu; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Tamura, Shinichi; Sugamoto, Kazuomi

    2011-03-01

    To achieve 3D kinematic analysis of total knee arthroplasty (TKA), 2D/3D registration techniques, which use X-ray fluoroscopic images and computer-aided design (CAD) model of the knee implant, have attracted attention in recent years. These techniques could provide information regarding the movement of radiopaque femoral and tibial components but could not provide information of radiolucent polyethylene insert, because the insert silhouette on X-ray image did not appear clearly. Therefore, it was difficult to obtain 3D kinemaitcs of polyethylene insert, particularly mobile-bearing insert that move on the tibial component. This study presents a technique and the accuracy for 3D kinematic analysis of mobile-bearing insert in TKA using X-ray fluoroscopy, and finally performs clinical applications. For a 3D pose estimation technique of the mobile-bearing insert in TKA using X-ray fluoroscopy, tantalum beads and CAD model with its beads are utilized, and the 3D pose of the insert model is estimated using a feature-based 2D/3D registration technique. In order to validate the accuracy of the present technique, experiments including computer simulation test were performed. The results showed the pose estimation accuracy was sufficient for analyzing mobile-bearing TKA kinematics (the RMS error: about 1.0 mm, 1.0 degree). In the clinical applications, seven patients with mobile-bearing TKA in deep knee bending motion were studied and analyzed. Consequently, present technique enables us to better understand mobile-bearing TKA kinematics, and this type of evaluation was thought to be helpful for improving implant design and optimizing TKA surgical techniques.

  6. Location constraint based 2D-3D registration of fluoroscopic images and CT volumes for image-guided EP procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Rui; Xu, Ning; Sun, Yiyong

    2008-03-01

    Presentation of detailed anatomical structures via 3D Computed Tomographic (CT) volumes helps visualization and navigation in electrophysiology procedures (EP). Registration of the CT volume with the online fluoroscopy however is a challenging task for EP applications due to the lack of discernable features in fluoroscopic images. In this paper, we propose to use the coronary sinus (CS) catheter in bi-plane fluoroscopic images and the coronary sinus in the CT volume as a location constraint to accomplish 2D-3D registration. Two automatic registration algorithms are proposed in this study, and their performances are investigated on both simulated and real data. It is shown that compared to registration using mono-plane fluoroscopy, registration using bi-plane images results in substantially higher accuracy in 3D and enhanced robustness. In addition, compared to registering the projection of CS to the 2D CS catheter, it is more desirable to reconstruct a 3D CS catheter from the bi-plane fluoroscopy and then perform a 3D-3D registration between the CS and the reconstructed CS catheter. Quantitative validation based on simulation and visual inspection on real data demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed workflow in EP procedures.

  7. Evaluation of 3D fluoroscopic image generation from a single planar treatment image on patient data with a modified XCAT phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Pankaj; Li, Ruijiang; St. James, Sara; Mak, Raymond H.; Williams, Christopher L.; Yue, Yong; Berbeco, Ross I.; Lewis, John H.

    2013-02-01

    Accurate understanding and modeling of respiration-induced uncertainties is essential in image-guided radiotherapy. Explicit modeling of the overall lung motion and interaction among different organs promises to be a useful approach. Recently, preliminary studies on 3D fluoroscopic treatment imaging and tumor localization based on principal component analysis motion models and cost function optimization have shown encouraging results. However, the performance of this technique for varying breathing parameters and under realistic conditions remains unclear and thus warrants further investigation. In this work, we present a systematic evaluation of a 3D fluoroscopic image generation algorithm via two different approaches. In the first approach, the model's accuracy is tested for changing parameters for sinusoidal breathing. These parameters include changing respiratory motion amplitude, period and baseline shift. The effects of setup error, imaging noise and different tumor sizes are also examined. In the second approach, we test the model for anthropomorphic images obtained from a modified XCAT phantom. This set of experiments is important as all the underlying breathing parameters are simultaneously tested, as in realistic clinical conditions. Based on our simulation results for more than 250 s of breathing data for eight different lung patients, the overall tumor localization accuracies of the model in left-right, anterior-posterior and superior-inferior directions are 0.1 ± 0.1, 0.5 ± 0.5 and 0.8 ± 0.8 mm, respectively. 3D tumor centroid localization accuracy is 1.0 ± 0.9 mm.

  8. Electrophysiology Catheter Detection and Reconstruction From Two Views in Fluoroscopic Images.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Matthias; Brost, Alexander; Koch, Martin; Bourier, Felix; Maier, Andreas; Kurzidim, Klaus; Strobel, Norbert; Hornegger, Joachim

    2016-02-01

    Electrophysiology (EP) studies and catheter ablation have become important treatment options for several types of cardiac arrhythmias. We present a novel image-based approach for automatic detection and 3-D reconstruction of EP catheters where the physician marks the catheter to be reconstructed by a single click in each image. The result can be used to provide 3-D information for enhanced navigation throughout EP procedures. Our approach involves two X-ray projections acquired from different angles, and it is based on two steps: First, we detect the catheter in each view after manual initialization using a graph-search method. Then, the detection results are used to reconstruct a full 3-D model of the catheter based on automatically determined point pairs for triangulation. An evaluation on 176 different clinical fluoroscopic images yielded a detection rate of 83.4%. For measuring the error, we used the coupling distance which is a more accurate quality measure than the average point-wise distance to a reference. For successful outcomes, the 2-D detection error was 1.7 mm ±1.2 mm. Using successfully detected catheters for reconstruction, we obtained a reconstruction error of 1.8 mm ±1.1 mm on phantom data. On clinical data, our method yielded a reconstruction error of 2.2 mm ±2.2 mm. PMID:26441411

  9. Rigorous geometric self-calibrating bundle adjustment for a dual fluoroscopic imaging system.

    PubMed

    Lichti, Derek D; Sharma, Gulshan B; Kuntze, Gregor; Mund, Braden; Beveridge, Jillian E; Ronsky, Janet L

    2015-02-01

    High-speed dual fluoroscopy is a noninvasive imaging technology for three-dimensional skeletal kinematics analysis that finds numerous biomechanical applications. Accurate reconstruction of bone translations and rotations from dual-fluoroscopic data requires accurate calibration of the imaging geometry and the many imaging distortions that corrupt the data. Direct linear transformation methods are commonly applied for performing calibration using a two-step process that suffers from a number of potential shortcomings including that each X-ray source and corresponding camera must be calibrated separately. Consequently, the true imaging set-up and the constraints it presents are not incorporated during calibration. A method to overcome such drawbacks is the single-step self-calibrating bundle adjustment method. This procedure, based on the collinearity principle augmented with imaging distortion models and geometric constraints, has been developed and is reported herein. Its efficacy is shown with a carefully controlled experiment comprising 300 image pairs with 48 507 image points. Application of all geometric constraints and a 31 parameter distortion model resulted in up to 91% improvement in terms of precision (model fit) and up to 71% improvement in terms of 3-D point reconstruction accuracy (0.3-0.4 mm). The accuracy of distance reconstruction was improved from 0.3±2.0 mm to 0.2 ±1.1 mm and angle reconstruction accuracy was improved from -0.03±0.55(°) to 0.01±0.06(°). Such positioning accuracy will allow for the accurate quantification of in vivo arthrokinematics crucial for skeletal biomechanics investigations. PMID:25330483

  10. Directional denoising and line enhancement for device segmentation in real time fluoroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Martin; Royalty, Kevin; Oberstar, Erick; Strother, Charles; Mistretta, Charles

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to improve the segmentation of interventional devices (e.g. guidewires) in fluoroscopic images. This is required for the real time 3D reconstruction from two angiographic views where noise can cause severe reconstruction artifacts and incomplete reconstruction. The proposed method reduces the noise while enhancing the thin line structures of the device in images with subtracted background. Methods: A two-step approach is presented here. The first step estimates, for each pixel and a given number of directions, a measure for the probability that the point is part of a line segment in the corresponding direction. This can be done efficiently using binary masks. In the second step, a directional filter kernel is applied for pixel that are assumed to be part of a line. For all other pixels a mean filter is used. Results: The proposed algorithm was able to achieve an average contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of 6.3 compared to the bilateral filter with 5.8. For the device segmentation using global thresholding the number of missing or wrong pixels is reduced to 25 % compared to 40 % using the bilateral approach. Conclusion: The proposed algorithm is a simple and efficient approach, which can easily be parallelized for the use on modern graphics processing units. It improves the segmentation results of the device compared to other denoising methods, and therefore reduces artifacts and increases the quality of the reconstruction without increasing the delay in real time applications notably.

  11. Image intensifier distortion correction for fluoroscopic RSA: the need for independent accuracy assessment.

    PubMed

    Kedgley, Angela E; Fox, Anne-Marie V; Jenkyn, Thomas R

    2012-01-01

    Fluoroscopic images suffer from multiple modes of image distortion. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the effects of correction using a range of two-dimensional polynomials and a global approach. The primary measure of interest was the average error in the distances between four beads of an accuracy phantom, as measured using RSA. Secondary measures of interest were the root mean squared errors of the fit of the chosen polynomial to the grid of beads used for correction, and the errors in the corrected distances between the points of the grid in a second position. Based upon the two-dimensional measures, a polynomial of order three in the axis of correction and two in the perpendicular axis was preferred. However, based upon the RSA reconstruction, a polynomial of order three in the axis of correction and one in the perpendicular axis was preferred. The use of a calibration frame for these three-dimensional applications most likely tempers the effects of distortion. This study suggests that distortion correction should be validated for each of its applications with an independent "gold standard" phantom. PMID:22231207

  12. Characterization of a fluoroscopic imaging system for kV and MV radiography.

    PubMed

    Drake, D G; Jaffray, D A; Wong, J W

    2000-05-01

    An on-line kilovoltage (kV) imaging system has been implemented on a medical linear accelerator to verify radiotherapy field placement. A kV x-ray tube is mounted on the accelerator at 90 degrees to the megavoltage (MV) source and shares the same isocenter. Nearly identical CCD-based fluoroscopic imagers are mounted opposite the two x-ray sources. These systems are being used in a clinical study of patient setup error that examines the advantage of kV imaging for on-line localization. In the investigation reported here, the imaging performance of the kV and MV systems are characterized to provide support to the conclusions of the studies of setup error. A spatial-frequency-dependent linear systems model is used to predict the detective quantum efficiencies (DQEs) of the two systems. Each is divided into a series of gain and spreading stages. The parameters of each stage are either measured or obtained from the literature. The model predicts the system gain to within 7% of the measured gain for the MV system and to within 10% for the kV system. The systems' noise power spectra (NPSs) and modulation transfer functions (MTFs) are measured to construct the measured DQEs. X-ray fluences are calculated using modeled polyenergetic spectra. Measured DQEs agree well with those predicted by the model. The model reveals that the MV system is well optimized, and is x-ray quantum noise limited at low spatial frequencies. The kV system is suboptimal, but for purposes of patient positioning yields images superior to those produced by the MV system. This is attributed to the kV system's higher DQE and to the inherently higher contrasts present at kV energies. PMID:10841392

  13. Optimization of multi-image pose recovery of fluoroscope tracking (FTRAC) fiducial in an image-guided femoroplasty system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen P.; Armand, Mehran; Otake, Yoshito; Taylor, Russell H.

    2011-03-01

    Percutaneous femoroplasty [1], or femoral bone augmentation, is a prospective alternative treatment for reducing the risk of fracture in patients with severe osteoporosis. We are developing a surgical robotics system that will assist orthopaedic surgeons in planning and performing a patient-specific, augmentation of the femur with bone cement. This collaborative project, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has been the topic of previous publications [2],[3] from our group. This paper presents modifications to the pose recovery of a fluoroscope tracking (FTRAC) fiducial during our process of 2D/3D registration of X-ray intraoperative images to preoperative CT data. We show improved automata of the initial pose estimation as well as lower projection errors with the advent of a multiimage pose optimization step.

  14. Investigation on effect of image lag in fluoroscopic images obtained with a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD) on accuracy of target tracking in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Mori, Shinichiro; Dobashi, Suguru; Kumagai, Motoki; Kawashima, Hiroki; Minohara, Shinichi; Sanada, Sigeru

    2010-01-01

    Real-time tumor tracking in external radiotherapy can be achieved by diagnostic (kV) X-ray imaging with a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD). The purpose of this study was to address image lag in target tracking and its influence on the accuracy of tumor tracking. Fluoroscopic images were obtained using a direct type of dynamic FPD. Image lag properties were measured without test devices according to IEC 62220-1. Modulation transfer function (MTF) and profile curves were measured on the edges of a moving tungsten plate at movement rate of 10 and 20 mm/s, covering lung tumor movement of normal breathing. A lung tumor and metal sphere with blurred edge due to image lag was simulated using the results and then superimposed on breathing chest radiographs of a patient. The moving target with and without image lag was traced using a template-matching technique. In the results, the image lag for the first frame after X-ray cutoff was 2.0% and decreased to less than 0.1% in the fifth frame. In the measurement of profile curves on the edges of static and moving tungsten material plates, the effect of image lag was seen as blurred edges of the plate. The blurred edges of a moving target were indicated as reduction of MTF. However, the target could be traced within an error of ± 5 mm. The results indicated that there was no effect of image lag on target tracking in usual breathing speed in a radiotherapy situation. PMID:21030796

  15. A simple method for the generation of organ and vessel contours from roentgenographic or fluoroscopic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, J. D.; Keller, R. A.; Baily, N. A.

    1974-01-01

    A simple method for outlining or contouring any area defined by a change in film density or fluoroscopic screen intensity is described. The entire process, except for the positioning of an electronic window, is accomplished using a small computer having appropriate softwave. The electronic window is operator positioned over the area to be processed. The only requirement is that the window be large enough to encompass the total area to be considered.

  16. Investigation of first ray mobility during gait by kinematic fluoroscopic imaging-a novel method

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It is often suggested that sagittal instability at the first tarso-metatarsal joint level is a primary factor for hallux valgus and that sagittal instability increases with the progression of the deformity. The assessment of the degree of vertical instability is usually made by clinical evaluation while any measurements mostly refer to a static assessment of medial ray mobility (i.e. the plantar/dorsal flexion in the sagittal plane). Testing methods currently available cannot attribute the degree of mobility to the corresponding anatomical joints making up the medial column of the foot. The aim of this study was to develop a technique which allows for a quantification of the in-vivo sagittal mobility of the joints of the medial foot column during the roll-over process under full weight bearing. Methods Mobility of first ray bones was investigated by dynamic distortion-free fluoroscopy (25 frames/s) of 14 healthy volunteers and 8 patients with manifested clinical instability of the first ray. A CAD-based evaluation method allowed the determination of mobility and relative displacements and rotations of the first ray bones within the sagittal plane during the stance phase of gait. Results Total flexion of the first ray was found to be 13.63 (SD 6.14) mm with the healthy volunteers and 13.06 (SD 8.01) mm with the patients (resolution: 0.245 mm/pixel). The dorsiflexion angle was 5.27 (SD 2.34) degrees in the healthy volunteers and increased to 5.56 (SD 3.37) degrees in the patients. Maximum rotations were found at the naviculo-cuneiform joints and least at the first tarso-metatarsal joint level in both groups. Conclusions Dynamic fluoroscopic assessment has been shown to be a valuable tool for characterisation of the kinematics of the joints of the medial foot column during gait. A significant difference in first ray flexion and angular rotation between the patients and healthy volunteers however could not be found. PMID:22316084

  17. Percutaneous Cervical Vertebroplasty in a MultifunctionalImage-Guided Therapy Suite: Hybrid Lateral Approach to C1 andC4 Under CT and Fluoroscopic Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Huegli, R.W. Schaeren, S.; Jacob, A.L.; Martin, J.B.; Wetzel, S.G.

    2005-06-15

    A 76-year-old patient suffering from two painful osteolytic metastases in C1 and C4 underwent percutaneous vertebroplasty by a hybrid technique in a multi-functional image-guided therapy suite (MIGTS). Two trocars were first placed into the respective bodies of C1 and C4 under fluoroscopic computed tomography guidance using a lateral approach. Thereafter, the patient was transferred on a moving table to the digital subtraction angiography unit in the same room for implant injection. Good pain relief was achieved by this minimally invasive procedure without complications. A hybrid approach for vertebroplasty in a MIGTS appears to be safe and feasible and might be indicated in selected cases for difficult accessible lesions.

  18. SU-E-J-01: 3D Fluoroscopic Image Estimation From Patient-Specific 4DCBCT-Based Motion Models

    SciTech Connect

    Dhou, S; Hurwitz, M; Lewis, J; Mishra, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: 3D motion modeling derived from 4DCT images, taken days or weeks before treatment, cannot reliably represent patient anatomy on the day of treatment. We develop a method to generate motion models based on 4DCBCT acquired at the time of treatment, and apply the model to estimate 3D time-varying images (referred to as 3D fluoroscopic images). Methods: Motion models are derived through deformable registration between each 4DCBCT phase, and principal component analysis (PCA) on the resulting displacement vector fields. 3D fluoroscopic images are estimated based on cone-beam projections simulating kV treatment imaging. PCA coefficients are optimized iteratively through comparison of these cone-beam projections and projections estimated based on the motion model. Digital phantoms reproducing ten patient motion trajectories, and a physical phantom with regular and irregular motion derived from measured patient trajectories, are used to evaluate the method in terms of tumor localization, and the global voxel intensity difference compared to ground truth. Results: Experiments included: 1) assuming no anatomic or positioning changes between 4DCT and treatment time; and 2) simulating positioning and tumor baseline shifts at the time of treatment compared to 4DCT acquisition. 4DCBCT were reconstructed from the anatomy as seen at treatment time. In case 1) the tumor localization error and the intensity differences in ten patient were smaller using 4DCT-based motion model, possible due to superior image quality. In case 2) the tumor localization error and intensity differences were 2.85 and 0.15 respectively, using 4DCT-based motion models, and 1.17 and 0.10 using 4DCBCT-based models. 4DCBCT performed better due to its ability to reproduce daily anatomical changes. Conclusion: The study showed an advantage of 4DCBCT-based motion models in the context of 3D fluoroscopic images estimation. Positioning and tumor baseline shift uncertainties were mitigated by the 4DCBCT

  19. A study of the x-ray image quality improvement in the examination of the respiratory system based on the new image processing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Yuichi; Kitagawa, Mayumi; Torii, Jun; Iwase, Takumi; Aso, Tomohiko; Ihara, Kanyu; Fujikawa, Mari; Takeuchi, Yumiko; Suzuki, Katsumi; Ishiguro, Takashi; Hara, Akio

    2014-03-01

    Recently, the double contrast technique in a gastrointestinal examination and the transbronchial lung biopsy in an examination for the respiratory system [1-3] have made a remarkable progress. Especially in the transbronchial lung biopsy, better quality of x-ray fluoroscopic images is requested because this examination is performed under a guidance of x-ray fluoroscopic images. On the other hand, various image processing methods [4] for x-ray fluoroscopic images have been developed as an x-ray system with a flat panel detector [5-7] is widely used. A recursive filtering is an effective method to reduce a random noise in x-ray fluoroscopic images. However it has a limitation for its effectiveness of a noise reduction in case of a moving object exists in x-ray fluoroscopic images because the recursive filtering is a noise reduction method by adding last few images. After recursive filtering a residual signal was produced if a moving object existed in x-ray images, and this residual signal disturbed a smooth procedure of the examinations. To improve this situation, new noise reduction method has been developed. The Adaptive Noise Reduction [ANR] is the brand-new noise reduction technique which can be reduced only a noise regardless of the moving object in x-ray fluoroscopic images. Therefore the ANR is a very suitable noise reduction method for the transbronchial lung biopsy under a guidance of x-ray fluoroscopic images because the residual signal caused of the moving object in x-ray fluoroscopic images is never produced after the ANR. In this paper, we will explain an advantage of the ANR by comparing of a performance between the ANR images and the conventional recursive filtering images.

  20. A randomized comparison of fluoroscopic techniques for implanting pacemaker lead on the right ventricular outflow tract septum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongli; Wei, Huiqiang; Tang, Jiaojiao; Liu, Lie; Wu, Shulin; Lin, Chunying; Zhang, Qianhuan; Liang, Yuanhong; Chen, Silin

    2016-05-01

    Right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) septal pacing is commonly performed under the standard fluoroscopic positions during procedure. The aim of the prospective, randomized study was to evaluate the accuracy of the combination of standard fluoroscopic and left lateral (LL) fluoroscopic views for determination of RVOT septal position compared with standard fluoroscopic views alone. We prospectively enrolled patients who had indications for implantation of a permanent pacemaker. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups based on intraoperative fluoroscopic views as follows: LL group (three standard fluoroscopic views + LL fluoroscopic view) or standard group (three standard fluoroscopic views). Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) determination of pacing sites was applied in all patients 3 days after pacemaker implantation. The implantation success rate of RVOT septal pacing was compared between groups. A total of 143 patients (59 males, mean age 57.6 ± 16.3 years) with symptomatic bradyarrhythmia were studied, of whom, 72 patients were randomized to LL group and 71 to standard group. TTE determination of pacing sites was compared with two groups. In the LL group, 60 patients (83 %) were achieved in RVOT septal position. In the standard group, however, the position of RVOT septum was only observed in 48 patients (68 %). The success rate of RVOT septal position in LL group was significantly higher than standard group (p = 0.029). Comparing to traditional views, combining LL view in the procedure will approve the accuracy of RVOT septal pacing site. PMID:26797500

  1. SU-E-I-37: Low-Dose Real-Time Region-Of-Interest X-Ray Fluoroscopic Imaging with a GPU-Accelerated Spatially Different Bilateral Filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H; Lee, J; Pua, R; Cho, S; Jung, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of our study is to reduce imaging radiation dose while maintaining image quality of region of interest (ROI) in X-ray fluoroscopy. A low-dose real-time ROI fluoroscopic imaging technique which includes graphics-processing-unit- (GPU-) accelerated image processing for brightness compensation and noise filtering was developed in this study. Methods: In our ROI fluoroscopic imaging, a copper filter is placed in front of the X-ray tube. The filter contains a round aperture to reduce radiation dose to outside of the aperture. To equalize the brightness difference between inner and outer ROI regions, brightness compensation was performed by use of a simple weighting method that applies selectively to the inner ROI, the outer ROI, and the boundary zone. A bilateral filtering was applied to the images to reduce relatively high noise in the outer ROI images. To speed up the calculation of our technique for real-time application, the GPU-acceleration was applied to the image processing algorithm. We performed a dosimetric measurement using an ion-chamber dosimeter to evaluate the amount of radiation dose reduction. The reduction of calculation time compared to a CPU-only computation was also measured, and the assessment of image quality in terms of image noise and spatial resolution was conducted. Results: More than 80% of dose was reduced by use of the ROI filter. The reduction rate depended on the thickness of the filter and the size of ROI aperture. The image noise outside the ROI was remarkably reduced by the bilateral filtering technique. The computation time for processing each frame image was reduced from 3.43 seconds with single CPU to 9.85 milliseconds with GPU-acceleration. Conclusion: The proposed technique for X-ray fluoroscopy can substantially reduce imaging radiation dose to the patient while maintaining image quality particularly in the ROI region in real-time.

  2. Fluoroscopic-guided radiofrequency ablation of the basivertebral nerve: application and analysis with multiple imaging modalities in an ovine model (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Jeffrey A.; Eskey, Cliff J.; Attawia, Mohammed; Patel, Samit J.; Ryan, Thomas P.; Pellegrino, Richard; Sutton, Jeffrey; Crombie, John; Paul, B. T.; Hoopes, P. J.

    2005-04-01

    Pathologic involvement of the basivertebral nerve, an intraosseous vertebral nerve found in humans and most mammalian species, may play a role in some forms of back pain. This study was designed to assess the feasibility and effects of the percutaneous delivery of radiofrequency (RF) energy to thermally ablate the basivertebral nerve in the lumbar vertebrae of mature sheep. Using fluoroscopic guidance, a RF bipolar device was placed and a thermal dose delivered to lumbar vertebral bodies in sheep. Post-treatment assessment included multiple magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques and computed tomography (CT). These data were analyzed and correlated to histopathology and morphometry findings to describe the cellular and boney structural changes resulting from the treatment. Imaging modalities MRI and CT can be implemented to non-invasively describe treatment region and volume, marrow cellular effects, and bone density alterations immediately following RF treatment and during convalescence. Such imaging can be utilized to assess treatment effects and refine the thermal dose to vertebral body volume ratio used in treatment planning. This information will be used to improve the therapeutic ratio and develop a treatment protocol for human applications.

  3. Risk of whole body radiation exposure and protective measures in fluoroscopically guided interventional techniques: a prospective evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Cash, Kim A; Moss, Tammy L; Rivera, Jose; Pampati, Vidyasagar

    2003-01-01

    Background Fluoroscopic guidance is frequently utilized in interventional pain management. The major purpose of fluoroscopy is correct needle placement to ensure target specificity and accurate delivery of the injectate. Radiation exposure may be associated with risks to physician, patient and personnel. While there have been many studies evaluating the risk of radiation exposure and techniques to reduce this risk in the upper part of the body, the literature is scant in evaluating the risk of radiation exposure in the lower part of the body. Methods Radiation exposure risk to the physician was evaluated in 1156 patients undergoing interventional procedures under fluoroscopy by 3 physicians. Monitoring of scattered radiation exposure in the upper and lower body, inside and outside the lead apron was carried out. Results The average exposure per procedure was 12.0 ± 9.8 seconds, 9.0 ± 0.37 seconds, and 7.5 ± 1.27 seconds in Groups I, II, and III respectively. Scatter radiation exposure ranged from a low of 3.7 ± 0.29 seconds for caudal/interlaminar epidurals to 61.0 ± 9.0 seconds for discography. Inside the apron, over the thyroid collar on the neck, the scatter radiation exposure was 68 mREM in Group I consisting of 201 patients who had a total of 330 procedures with an average of 0.2060 mREM per procedure and 25 mREM in Group II consisting of 446 patients who had a total of 662 procedures with average of 0.0378 mREM per procedure. The scatter radiation exposure was 0 mREM in Group III consisting of 509 patients who had a total 827 procedures. Increased levels of exposures were observed in Groups I and II compared to Group III, and Group I compared to Group II. Groin exposure showed 0 mREM exposure in Groups I and II and 15 mREM in Group III. Scatter radiation exposure for groin outside the apron in Group I was 1260 mREM and per procedure was 3.8182 mREM. In Group II the scatter radiation exposure was 400 mREM and with 0.6042 mREM per procedure. In Group III

  4. Real-time equalization of region-of-interest fluoroscopic images using binary masks.

    PubMed

    Rudin, S; Bednarek, D R; Yang, C Y

    1999-07-01

    In region-of-interest (ROI) radiologic imaging, the x-ray beam is attenuated peripherally to the region of interest to reduce patient exposure. This attenuation reduces the peripheral image brightness which may cause contrast in the periphery to also be reduced due to video chain nonlinearity. For optimal viewing, it is necessary that the image brightness and contrast in the periphery be brought back to the levels in the ROI. Previously, digital subtraction angiography roadmapping equipment has been used for this equalization; however, the procedure is not independent of patient and gantry motion. A new motion independent method to achieve this equalization involves dividing the real-time video signal into two digital streams one of which is brightness and contrast enhanced. A pre-acquired binary mask image is created by thresholding the image of a uniform object obtained with the ROI filter in place. This binary mask is used to control the recombination of the two image streams in a digital pipeline processor in order to select the ROI from the unprocessed stream and the periphery from the enhanced stream. This system provides image equalization at 30 frame/s for real-time ROI imaging display. Images from this method demonstrate excellent image quality even for peripheral exposure reduction factors exceeding 10. PMID:10435538

  5. SU-E-I-42: Normalized Embryo/fetus Doses for Fluoroscopically Guided Pacemaker Implantation Procedures Calculated Using a Monte Carlo Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Damilakis, J; Stratakis, J; Solomou, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is well known that pacemaker implantation is sometimes needed in pregnant patients with symptomatic bradycardia. To our knowledge, there is no reported experience regarding radiation doses to the unborn child resulting from fluoroscopy during pacemaker implantation. The purpose of the current study was to develop a method for estimating embryo/fetus dose from fluoroscopically guided pacemaker implantation procedures performed on pregnant patients during all trimesters of gestation. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code was employed in this study. Three mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing the average pregnant patient at the first, second and third trimesters of gestation were generated using Bodybuilder software (White Rock science, White Rock, NM). The normalized embryo/fetus dose from the posteroanterior (PA), the 30° left-anterior oblique (LAO) and the 30° right-anterior oblique (RAO) projections were calculated for a wide range of kVp (50–120 kVp) and total filtration values (2.5–9.0 mm Al). Results: The results consist of radiation doses normalized to a) entrance skin dose (ESD) and b) dose area product (DAP) so that the dose to the unborn child from any fluoroscopic technique and x-ray device used can be calculated. ESD normalized doses ranged from 0.008 (PA, first trimester) to 2.519 μGy/mGy (RAO, third trimester). DAP normalized doses ranged from 0.051 (PA, first trimester) to 12.852 μGy/Gycm2 (RAO, third trimester). Conclusion: Embryo/fetus doses from fluoroscopically guided pacemaker implantation procedures performed on pregnant patients during all stages of gestation can be estimated using the method developed in this study. This study was supported by the Greek Ministry of Education and Religious Affairs, General Secretariat for Research and Technology, Operational Program ‘Education and Lifelong Learning’, ARISTIA (Research project: CONCERT)

  6. Automatic segmentation of seeds and fluoroscope tracking (FTRAC) fiducial in prostate brachytherapy x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Nathanael; Lee, Junghoon; Deguet, Anton; Song, Danny; Burdette, E. Clif; Prince, Jerry

    2010-02-01

    C-arm X-ray fluoroscopy-based radioactive seed localization for intraoperative dosimetry of prostate brachytherapy is an active area of research. The fluoroscopy tracking (FTRAC) fiducial is an image-based tracking device composed of radio-opaque BBs, lines, and ellipses that provides an effective means for pose estimation so that three-dimensional reconstruction of the implanted seeds from multiple X-ray images can be related to the ultrasound-computed prostate volume. Both the FTRAC features and the brachytherapy seeds must be segmented quickly and accurately during the surgery, but current segmentation algorithms are inhibitory in the operating room (OR). The first reason is that current algorithms require operators to manually select a region of interest (ROI), preventing automatic pipelining from image acquisition to seed reconstruction. Secondly, these algorithms fail often, requiring operators to manually correct the errors. We propose a fast and effective ROI-free automatic FTRAC and seed segmentation algorithm to minimize such human intervention. The proposed algorithm exploits recent image processing tools to make seed reconstruction as easy and convenient as possible. Preliminary results on 162 patient images show this algorithm to be fast, effective, and accurate for all features to be segmented. With near perfect success rates and subpixel differences to manual segmentation, our automatic FTRAC and seed segmentation algorithm shows promising results to save crucial time in the OR while reducing errors.

  7. Emerging Imaging Techniques

    PubMed Central

    McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in selected imaging technologies focused on the cardiovascular system. The techniques covered are: ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM), microSPECT, microPET, near infrared imaging, and quantum dots. For each technique, the basic physical principles are explained and recent example applications demonstrated. PMID:16614313

  8. Automatic detection of multiple and overlapping EP catheters in fluoroscopic sequences.

    PubMed

    Milletari, Fausto; Navab, Nassir; Fallavollita, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    We propose a method to perform automatic detection of electrophysiology (EP) catheters in fluoroscopic sequences. Our approach does not need any initialization, is completely automatic, and can detect an arbitrary number of catheters at the same time. The method is based on the usage of blob detectors and clustering in order to detect all catheter electrodes, overlapping or not, within the X-ray images. The proposed technique is validated on 1422 fluoroscopic images yielding a tip detection rate of 99.3% and mean distance of 0.5mm from manually labeled ground truth centroids for all electrodes. PMID:24505783

  9. Geometric Verification of Dynamic Wave Arc Delivery With the Vero System Using Orthogonal X-ray Fluoroscopic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Burghelea, Manuela; Verellen, Dirk; Poels, Kenneth; Gevaert, Thierry; Depuydt, Tom; Tournel, Koen; Hung, Cecilia; Simon, Viorica; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ridder, Mark de

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to define an independent verification method based on on-board orthogonal fluoroscopy to determine the geometric accuracy of synchronized gantry–ring (G/R) rotations during dynamic wave arc (DWA) delivery available on the Vero system. Methods and Materials: A verification method for DWA was developed to calculate O-ring-gantry (G/R) positional information from ball-bearing positions retrieved from fluoroscopic images of a cubic phantom acquired during DWA delivery. Different noncoplanar trajectories were generated in order to investigate the influence of path complexity on delivery accuracy. The G/R positions detected from the fluoroscopy images (DetPositions) were benchmarked against the G/R angulations retrieved from the control points (CP) of the DWA RT plan and the DWA log files recorded by the treatment console during DWA delivery (LogActed). The G/R rotational accuracy was quantified as the mean absolute deviation ± standard deviation. The maximum G/R absolute deviation was calculated as the maximum 3-dimensional distance between the CP and the closest DetPositions. Results: In the CP versus DetPositions comparison, an overall mean G/R deviation of 0.13°/0.16° ± 0.16°/0.16° was obtained, with a maximum G/R deviation of 0.6°/0.2°. For the LogActed versus DetPositions evaluation, the overall mean deviation was 0.08°/0.15° ± 0.10°/0.10° with a maximum G/R of 0.3°/0.4°. The largest decoupled deviations registered for gantry and ring were 0.6° and 0.4° respectively. No directional dependence was observed between clockwise and counterclockwise rotations. Doubling the dose resulted in a double number of detected points around each CP, and an angular deviation reduction in all cases. Conclusions: An independent geometric quality assurance approach was developed for DWA delivery verification and was successfully applied on diverse trajectories. Results showed that the Vero system is capable of following complex

  10. Infrared diaphanoscopy (IRD) and infrared fluoroscopic imaging (IRF) in biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuthan, Juergen; Mueller, Gerhard J.; Minet, Olaf; Roggan, Andre; Prapavat, Viravuth

    1993-09-01

    A procedure is described which is based on the imaging of scattered photons in human tissue. This is demonstrated in diagnostic of the maxillary. When an applicator radiation (NIR) is brought into the nasopharynx the photons transmit through the maxillary. In dependence of the optical parameters of the tissue ((mu) a, (mu) s, g) a part of the photons reach the ground of the Orbita, they are scattered there and detected with a CCD-camera which is positioned in front of the maxillary. During disease of the maxillary the optical parameters are changing drastically. The detected part of scattered photons are in correlation with these changes. These changes are demonstrated in IRD-pictures. The IRF is a modification of the IRD. A `light source' is produced in the tissue structure, i.e. during fluorescence angiography through adequate excitation of these markers with laser light. In dependence of the optical parameters of the tissue layers structure relevant scattered light is detectable. With a CCD- camera two dimensional pictures are detected with use of special filter components.

  11. Image compression technique

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Chi-Yung; Petrich, Loren I.

    1997-01-01

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace's equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image.

  12. Image compression technique

    DOEpatents

    Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

    1997-03-25

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace`s equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image. 16 figs.

  13. Image quality evaluation and patient dose assessment of medical fluoroscopic X-ray systems: a national study.

    PubMed

    Economides, S; Hourdakis, C J; Kalivas, N; Kalathaki, M; Simantirakis, G; Tritakis, P; Manousaridis, G; Vogiatzi, S; Kipouros, P; Boziari, A; Kamenopoulou, V

    2008-01-01

    This study presents the results from a survey conducted by the Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC), during the period 1998-2003, in 530 public and private owned fluoroscopic X-ray systems in Greece. Certain operational parameters for conventional and remote control systems were assessed, according to a quality control protocol developed by GAEC on the basis of the current literature. Public (91.5%) and private (81.5%) owned fluoroscopic units exhibit high-contrast resolution values over 1 lp mm(-1). Moreover, 88.5 and 87.1% of the fluoroscopic units installed in the public and private sector, respectively, present Maximum Patient Entrance Kerma Rate values lower than 100 mGy min(-1). Additionally, 68.3% of the units assessed were found to perform within the acceptance limits. Finally, the third quartile of the Entrance Surface Dose Rate distribution was estimated according to the Dose Reference Level definition and found equal to 35 mGy min(-1). PMID:17971345

  14. Renal imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Hierholzer, K; Hierholzer, J

    1997-01-01

    The ancient approach to obtain an image of the kidneys (and other internal organs) was 'section-inspection-imaging' by drawing, painting, sculpturing, and modelling. The present study follows chronologically the development and use of sectioning techniques from ancient (often forbidden) methods to modern microdissection and maceration of silicone-rubber-injected tubules. Inspection evolved from the use of the naked eye to magnifying lenses, microscopes and finally electron microscopy. Pertinent examples such as the description of the kidneys as the site of urine formation, the visualization of loop structures in the renal medulla and the imaging of tight junction strands are discussed. Inspection or visualization of renal structure and function has been revolutionized by modern noninvasive techniques, such as X-ray imaging, imaging by radioisotopes, ultrasound, computer tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance. Pertinent examples are given demonstrating the potency of the various techniques. The contribution of computerized data evaluation is discussed. The development of micropuncture and microperfusion techniques has opened the field for direct imaging not only of renal (sub)structural details but also of functional parameters such as transtubular reabsorption rates, single glomerular capillary filtration and conductance of the paracellular pathway. We focus particularly on techniques specifically designed to visualize renal hemodynamic and transport parameters. PMID:9189257

  15. NOTE: A feasibility study of markerless fluoroscopic gating for lung cancer radiotherapy using 4DCT templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruijiang; Lewis, John H.; Cerviño, Laura I.; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-10-01

    A major difficulty in conformal lung cancer radiotherapy is respiratory organ motion, which may cause clinically significant targeting errors. Respiratory-gated radiotherapy allows for more precise delivery of prescribed radiation dose to the tumor, while minimizing normal tissue complications. Gating based on external surrogates is limited by its lack of accuracy, while gating based on implanted fiducial markers is limited primarily by the risk of pneumothorax due to marker implantation. Techniques for fluoroscopic gating without implanted fiducial markers (markerless gating) have been developed. These techniques usually require a training fluoroscopic image dataset with marked tumor positions in the images, which limits their clinical implementation. To remove this requirement, this study presents a markerless fluoroscopic gating algorithm based on 4DCT templates. To generate gating signals, we explored the application of three similarity measures or scores between fluoroscopic images and the reference 4DCT template: un-normalized cross-correlation (CC), normalized cross-correlation (NCC) and normalized mutual information (NMI), as well as average intensity (AI) of the region of interest (ROI) in the fluoroscopic images. Performance was evaluated using fluoroscopic and 4DCT data from three lung cancer patients. On average, gating based on CC achieves the highest treatment accuracy given the same efficiency, with a high target coverage (average between 91.9% and 98.6%) for a wide range of nominal duty cycles (20-50%). AI works well for two patients out of three, but failed for the third patient due to interference from the heart. Gating based on NCC and NMI usually failed below 50% nominal duty cycle. Based on this preliminary study with three patients, we found that the proposed CC-based gating algorithm can generate accurate and robust gating signals when using 4DCT reference template. However, this observation is based on results obtained from a very limited

  16. Management of pediatric radiation dose using GE fluoroscopic equipment.

    PubMed

    Belanger, Barry; Boudry, John

    2006-09-01

    In this article, we present GE Healthcare's design philosophy and implementation of X-ray imaging systems with dose management for pediatric patients, as embodied in its current radiography and fluoroscopy and interventional cardiovascular X-ray product offerings. First, we present a basic framework of image quality and dose in the context of a cost-benefit trade-off, with the development of the concept of imaging dose efficiency. A set of key metrics of image quality and dose efficiency is presented, including X-ray source efficiency, detector quantum efficiency (DQE), detector dynamic range, and temporal response, with an explanation of the clinical relevance of each. Second, we present design methods for automatically selecting optimal X-ray technique parameters (kVp, mA, pulse width, and spectral filtration) in real time for various clinical applications. These methods are based on an optimization scheme where patient skin dose is minimized for a target desired image contrast-to-noise ratio. Operator display of skin dose and Dose-Area Product (DAP) is covered, as well. Third, system controls and predefined protocols available to the operator are explained in the context of dose management and the need to meet varying clinical procedure imaging demands. For example, fluoroscopic dose rate is adjustable over a range of 20:1 to adapt to different procedure requirements. Fourth, we discuss the impact of image processing techniques upon dose minimization. In particular, two such techniques, dynamic range compression through adaptive multiband spectral filtering and fluoroscopic noise reduction, are explored in some detail. Fifth, we review a list of system dose-reduction features, including automatic spectral filtration, virtual collimation, variable-rate pulsed fluoroscopic, grid and no-grid techniques, and fluoroscopic loop replay with store. In addition, we describe a new feature that automatically minimizes the patient-to-detector distance, along with an

  17. A study on quality improvement of x-ray imaging of the respiratory-system based on a new image processing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, Jun; Nagai, Yuichi; Horita, Tatsuya; Matsumoto, Yuuji; Izumo, Takehiro; Kitagawa, Mayumi; Ihara, Kanyu; Nakamura, Tadashi; Mukoyoshi, Wataru; Tennmei, Kounosuke; Suzuki, Katsumi; Hara, Akio; Sasada, Shinji; Aso, Tomohiko

    2015-03-01

    Recently, the double contrast technique in a gastrointestinal examination and the transbronchial lung biopsy in an examination for the respiratory system [1-3] have made a remarkable progress. Especially in the transbronchial lung biopsy, better quality of x-ray fluoroscopic images is requested because this examination is performed under a guidance of x-ray fluoroscopic images. On the other hand, various image processing methods [4] for x-ray fluoroscopic images have been developed as an x-ray system with a flat panel detector [5-7] is widely used. New noise reduction processing, Adaptive Noise Reduction [ANR], was announced in SPIE last year.[8] ANR is a new image processing technique which is capable of extracting and reducing noise components regardless of moving objects in fluoroscopy images. However, for further enhancement of noise reduction effect in clinical use, it was used in combination with a recursive filter, which is a time axis direction filter. Due to this, the recursive filter generated image lags when there are moving objects in the fluoroscopic images, and these image lags sometimes became hindrance in performing smooth bronchoscopy. This is because recursive filters reduce noise by adding multiple fluoroscopy images. Therefore, we have developed new image processing technique, Motion Tracking Noise Reduction [MTNR] for decreasing image lags as well as noise. This ground-breaking image processing technique detects global motion in images with high accuracy, determines the pixels to track the motion, and applies a motion tracking-type time filter. With this, image lags are removed remarkably while realizing the effective noise reduction. In this report, we will explain the effect of MTNR by comparing the performance of MTNR images [MTNR] and ANR + Recursive filter-applied images [ANR + Recursive filter].

  18. 21 CFR 1020.32 - Fluoroscopic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... indicating the date of the modification and the statement: Modified to comply with 21 CFR 1020.32(h)(2). (v... indicating the statement: Modified to comply with 21 CFR 1020.32(h)(2). (ii) As an alternative to the... images from the fluoroscopic image receptor, except computed tomography x-ray systems manufactured on...

  19. 21 CFR 1020.32 - Fluoroscopic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... indicating the date of the modification and the statement: Modified to comply with 21 CFR 1020.32(h)(2). (v... indicating the statement: Modified to comply with 21 CFR 1020.32(h)(2). (ii) As an alternative to the... images from the fluoroscopic image receptor, except computed tomography x-ray systems manufactured on...

  20. 21 CFR 1020.32 - Fluoroscopic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... indicating the date of the modification and the statement: Modified to comply with 21 CFR 1020.32(h)(2). (v... indicating the statement: Modified to comply with 21 CFR 1020.32(h)(2). (ii) As an alternative to the... images from the fluoroscopic image receptor, except computed tomography x-ray systems manufactured on...

  1. 21 CFR 1020.32 - Fluoroscopic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... indicating the date of the modification and the statement: Modified to comply with 21 CFR 1020.32(h)(2). (v... indicating the statement: Modified to comply with 21 CFR 1020.32(h)(2). (ii) As an alternative to the... images from the fluoroscopic image receptor, except computed tomography x-ray systems manufactured on...

  2. 21 CFR 1020.32 - Fluoroscopic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... indicating the date of the modification and the statement: Modified to comply with 21 CFR 1020.32(h)(2). (v... indicating the statement: Modified to comply with 21 CFR 1020.32(h)(2). (ii) As an alternative to the... images from the fluoroscopic image receptor, except computed tomography x-ray systems manufactured on...

  3. [Progress in imaging techniques].

    PubMed

    Mishima, Kazuaki; Otsuka, Tsukasa

    2013-05-01

    Today it is common to perform real-time diagnosis and treatment via live broadcast as a method of education and to spread new technology for diagnosis and therapy in medical fields. Live medical broadcasts have developed along with broadcast technology. In the early days, live video feeds were sent from operating rooms to classrooms and lecture halls in universities and hospitals. However, the development of imaging techniques and communication networks enabled live broadcasts that bi-directionally link operating rooms and meeting halls during scientific meetings and live demonstration courses. Live broadcasts therefore became an important method for education and the dissemination of new medical technologies. The development of imaging techniques has contributed to more realistic live broadcasts through such innovative techniques as three-dimensional viewing and higher-definition 4K technology. In the future, live broadcasts will be transmitted on personal computers using regular Internet connections. In addition to the enhancement of image delivery technology, it will also be necessary to examine the entire image delivery environment carefully, including issues of security and privacy of personal information. PMID:23789334

  4. Understanding and using fluoroscopic dose display information.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Brent D; Guild, Jeffrey B; Arbique, Gary M; Chason, David P; Anderson, Jon A

    2015-01-01

    Fluoroscopically guided procedures are an area of radiology in which radiation exposure to the patient is highly operator dependent. Modern fluoroscopy machines display a variety of information, including technique factors, field of view, operating geometry, exposure mode, fluoroscopic time, air kerma at the reference point (RAK), and air kerma area-product. However, the presentation of this information is highly vendor specific, and many users are unaware of how to interpret this information and use it to perform a study with the minimum necessary dose. A conceptual framework for understanding the radiation dose readout during a procedure is to compare it to the dashboard of an automobile, where the rate at which radiation is being applied (the RAK rate [mGy/min]) is the dose "speed" and the cumulative amount of radiation applied (cumulative RAK [mGy]) is the dose "odometer." This analogy can be used as a starting point to improve knowledge of these parameters, including how RAK is measured, how RAK correlates with skin dose, and how parameters are displayed differently during fluoroscopy and fluorography. Awareness of these factors is critical to understanding how dose parameters translate to patient risk and the consequences of high-dose studies. With this increased awareness, physicians performing fluoroscopically guided procedures can understand how to use built-in features of the fluoroscopic equipment (pulse rate, beam filtration, and automatic exposure control) and fluoroscopic techniques (procedure planning, patient positioning, proper collimation, and magnification) to reduce patient radiation dose, thereby improving patient safety. PMID:25442356

  5. Psychophysical evaluation of the image quality of a dynamic flat-panel digital x-ray image detector using the threshold contrast detail detectability (TCDD) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Andrew G.; Cowen, Arnold R.; Bruijns, Tom J. C.

    1999-05-01

    We are currently in an era of active development of the digital X-ray imaging detectors that will serve the radiological communities in the new millennium. The rigorous comparative physical evaluations of such devices are therefore becoming increasingly important from both the technical and clinical perspectives. The authors have been actively involved in the evaluation of a clinical demonstration version of a flat-panel dynamic digital X-ray image detector (or FDXD). Results of objective physical evaluation of this device have been presented elsewhere at this conference. The imaging performance of FDXD under radiographic exposure conditions have been previously reported, and in this paper a psychophysical evaluation of the FDXD detector operating under continuous fluoroscopic conditions is presented. The evaluation technique employed was the threshold contrast detail detectability (TCDD) technique, which enables image quality to be measured on devices operating in the clinical environment. This approach addresses image quality in the context of both the image acquisition and display processes, and uses human observers to measure performance. The Leeds test objects TO[10] and TO[10+] were used to obtain comparative measurements of performance on the FDXD and two digital spot fluorography (DSF) systems, one utilizing a Plumbicon camera and the other a state of the art CCD camera. Measurements were taken at a range of detector entrance exposure rates, namely 6, 12, 25 and 50 (mu) R/s. In order to facilitate comparisons between the systems, all fluoroscopic image processing such as noise reduction algorithms, were disabled during the experiments. At the highest dose rate FDXD significantly outperformed the DSF comparison systems in the TCDD comparisons. At 25 and 12 (mu) R/s all three-systems performed in an equivalent manner and at the lowest exposure rate FDXD was inferior to the two DSF systems. At standard fluoroscopic exposures, FDXD performed in an equivalent

  6. Automated quantification of lumbar vertebral kinematics from dynamic fluoroscopic sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Jon; Zhao, Kristin; Morel, Etienne; White, Dan; Magnuson, Dixon; Gay, Ralph; An, Kai-Nan; Robb, Richard

    2009-02-01

    We hypothesize that the vertebra-to-vertebra patterns of spinal flexion and extension motion of persons with lower back pain will differ from those of persons who are pain-free. Thus, it is our goal to measure the motion of individual lumbar vertebrae noninvasively from dynamic fluoroscopic sequences. Two-dimensional normalized mutual information-based image registration was used to track frame-to-frame motion. Software was developed that required the operator to identify each vertebra on the first frame of the sequence using a four-point "caliper" placed at the posterior and anterior edges of the inferior and superior end plates of the target vertebrae. The program then resolved the individual motions of each vertebra independently throughout the entire sequence. To validate the technique, 6 cadaveric lumbar spine specimens were potted in polymethylmethacrylate and instrumented with optoelectric sensors. The specimens were then placed in a custom dynamic spine simulator and moved through flexion-extension cycles while kinematic data and fluoroscopic sequences were simultaneously acquired. We found strong correlation between the absolute flexionextension range of motion of each vertebra as recorded by the optoelectric system and as determined from the fluoroscopic sequence via registration. We conclude that this method is a viable way of noninvasively assessing twodimensional vertebral motion.

  7. Accuracy of Percutaneous Lumbosacral Pedicle Screw Placement Using the Oblique Fluoroscopic View Based on Computed Tomography Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Koji; Kanemura, Tokumi; Iwase, Toshiki; Togawa, Daisuke; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective. Purpose This study aims to investigate the accuracy of the oblique fluoroscopic view, based on preoperative computed tomography (CT) images for accurate placement of lumbosacral percutaneous pedicle screws (PPS). Overview of Literature Although PPS misplacement has been reported as one of the main complications in minimally invasive spine surgery, there is no comparative data on the misplacement rate among different fluoroscopic techniques, or comparing such techniques with open procedures. Methods We retrospectively selected 230 consecutive patients who underwent posterior spinal fusion with a pedicle screw construct for degenerative lumbar disease, and divided them into 3 groups, those who had undergone: minimally invasive percutaneous procedure using biplane (lateral and anterior-posterior views using a single C-arm) fluoroscope views (group M-1), minimally invasive percutaneous procedure using the oblique fluoroscopic view based on preoperative CT (group M-2), and conventional open procedure using a lateral fluoroscopic view (group O: controls). The relative position of the screw to the pedicle was graded for the pedicle breach as no breach, <2 mm, 2–4 mm, or >4 mm. Inaccuracy was calculated and assessed according to the spinal level, direction and neurological deficit. Inter-group radiation exposure was estimated using fluoroscopy time. Results Inaccuracy involved an incline toward L5, causing medial or lateral perforation of pedicles in group M-1, but it was distributed relatively equally throughout multiple levels in groups M-2 and controls. The mean fluoroscopy time/case ranged from 1.6 to 3.9 minutes. Conclusions Minimally invasive lumbosacral PPS placement using the conventional fluoroscopic technique carries an increased risk of inaccurate screw placement and resultant neurological deficits, compared with that of the open procedure. Inaccuracy tended to be distributed between medial and lateral perforations of the L5 pedicle

  8. Application of image fusion techniques in DSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Feng; Wu, Jian; Cui, Zhiming; Xu, Jing

    2007-12-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is an important technology in both medical diagnoses and interposal therapy, which can eliminate the interferential background and give prominence to blood vessels by computer processing. After contrast material is injected into an artery or vein, a physician produces fluoroscopic images. Using these digitized images, a computer subtracts the image made with contrast material from a series of post injection images made without background information. By analyzing the characteristics of DSA medical images, this paper provides a solution of image fusion which is in allusion to the application of DSA subtraction. We fuse the images of angiogram and subtraction, in order to obtain the new image which has more data information. The image that fused by wavelet transform can display the blood vessels and background information clearly, and medical experts gave high score on the effect of it.

  9. Advanced radiographic imaging techniques.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beal, J. B.; Brown, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Examination of the nature and operational constraints of conventional X-radiographic and neutron imaging methods, providing a foundation for a discussion of advanced radiographic imaging systems. Two types of solid-state image amplifiers designed to image X rays are described. Operational theory, panel construction, and performance characteristics are discussed. A closed-circuit television system for imaging neutrons is then described and the system design, operational theory, and performance characteristics are outlined. Emphasis is placed on a description of the advantages of these imaging systems over conventional methods.

  10. A theoretical and experimental evaluation of the microangiographic fluoroscope: A high-resolution region-of-interest x-ray imager

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, D. R.; Ionita, Ciprian; Rudin, S.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: The increasing need for better image quality and high spatial resolution for successful endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs) and the inherent limitations of the state-of-the-art detectors provide motivation to develop a detector system tailored to the specific, demanding requirements of neurointerventional applications.Method: A microangiographic fluoroscope (MAF) was developed to serve as a high-resolution, region-of-interest (ROI) x-ray imaging detector in conjunction with large lower-resolution full field-of-view (FOV) state-of-the-art x-ray detectors. The newly developed MAF is an indirect x-ray imaging detector capable of providing real-time images (30 frames per second) with high-resolution, high sensitivity, no lag and low instrumentation noise. It consists of a CCD camera coupled to a Gen 2 dual-stage microchannel plate light image intensifier (LII) through a fiber-optic taper. A 300 {mu}m thick CsI(Tl) phosphor serving as the front end is coupled to the LII. The LII is the key component of the MAF and the large variable gain provided by it enables the MAF to operate as a quantum-noise-limited detector for both fluoroscopy and angiography. Results: The linear cascade model was used to predict the theoretical performance of the MAF, and the theoretical prediction showed close agreement with experimental findings. Linear system metrics such as MTF and DQE were used to gauge the detector performance up to 10 cycles/mm. The measured zero frequency DQE(0) was 0.55 for an RQA5 spectrum. A total of 21 stages were identified for the whole imaging chain and each stage was characterized individually. Conclusions: The linear cascade model analysis provides insight into the imaging chain and may be useful for further development of the MAF detector. The preclinical testing of the prototype detector in animal procedures is showing encouraging results and points to the potential for significant impact on EIGIs when used in conjunction with a state

  11. A theoretical and experimental evaluation of the microangiographic fluoroscope: A high-resolution region-of-interest x-ray imager

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, D. R.; Ionita, Ciprian; Rudin, S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The increasing need for better image quality and high spatial resolution for successful endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs) and the inherent limitations of the state-of-the-art detectors provide motivation to develop a detector system tailored to the specific, demanding requirements of neurointerventional applications.Method: A microangiographic fluoroscope (MAF) was developed to serve as a high-resolution, region-of-interest (ROI) x-ray imaging detector in conjunction with large lower-resolution full field-of-view (FOV) state-of-the-art x-ray detectors. The newly developed MAF is an indirect x-ray imaging detector capable of providing real-time images (30 frames per second) with high-resolution, high sensitivity, no lag and low instrumentation noise. It consists of a CCD camera coupled to a Gen 2 dual-stage microchannel plate light image intensifier (LII) through a fiber-optic taper. A 300 μm thick CsI(Tl) phosphor serving as the front end is coupled to the LII. The LII is the key component of the MAF and the large variable gain provided by it enables the MAF to operate as a quantum-noise-limited detector for both fluoroscopy and angiography.Results: The linear cascade model was used to predict the theoretical performance of the MAF, and the theoretical prediction showed close agreement with experimental findings. Linear system metrics such as MTF and DQE were used to gauge the detector performance up to 10 cycles∕mm. The measured zero frequency DQE(0) was 0.55 for an RQA5 spectrum. A total of 21 stages were identified for the whole imaging chain and each stage was characterized individually.Conclusions: The linear cascade model analysis provides insight into the imaging chain and may be useful for further development of the MAF detector. The preclinical testing of the prototype detector in animal procedures is showing encouraging results and points to the potential for significant impact on EIGIs when used in conjunction with a state

  12. Fluoroscopic dose reduction using a digital television nose-reduction device

    SciTech Connect

    Albow, R.C.; Jaffe, C.C.; Orphanoudakis, S.C.; Markowitz, R.I.; Rosenfield, N.S.

    1983-07-01

    A digital video image processor, connected to a video system in a conventional pediatric fluoroscopy room, was used to determine whether the device could provide satisfactory fluoroscopic images during routine examinations when the x-ray tube was operated at substantially lower than normal radiation-dose levels. A 50% reduction resulted in image quality which was indistinguishable from conventional fluoroscopic views.

  13. Multiple template-based fluoroscopic tracking of lung tumor mass without implanted fiducial markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ying; Dy, Jennifer G.; Sharp, Gregory C.; Alexander, Brian; Jiang, Steve B.

    2007-10-01

    Precise lung tumor localization in real time is particularly important for some motion management techniques, such as respiratory gating or beam tracking with a dynamic multi-leaf collimator, due to the reduced clinical tumor volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margin and/or the escalated dose. There might be large uncertainties in deriving tumor position from external respiratory surrogates. While tracking implanted fiducial markers has sufficient accuracy, this procedure may not be widely accepted due to the risk of pneumothorax. Previously, we have developed a technique to generate gating signals from fluoroscopic images without implanted fiducial markers using a template matching method (Berbeco et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 4481-90, Cui et al 2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 741-55). In this paper, we present an extension of this method to multiple-template matching for directly tracking the lung tumor mass in fluoroscopy video. The basic idea is as follows: (i) during the patient setup session, a pair of orthogonal fluoroscopic image sequences are taken and processed off-line to generate a set of reference templates that correspond to different breathing phases and tumor positions; (ii) during treatment delivery, fluoroscopic images are continuously acquired and processed; (iii) the similarity between each reference template and the processed incoming image is calculated; (iv) the tumor position in the incoming image is then estimated by combining the tumor centroid coordinates in reference templates with proper weights based on the measured similarities. With different handling of image processing and similarity calculation, two such multiple-template tracking techniques have been developed: one based on motion-enhanced templates and Pearson's correlation score while the other based on eigen templates and mean-squared error. The developed techniques have been tested on six sequences of fluoroscopic images from six lung cancer patients against the reference

  14. Sensor image prediction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenger, A. J.; Stone, W. R.; Berry, L.; Murray, T. J.

    1981-02-01

    The preparation of prediction imagery is a complex, costly, and time consuming process. Image prediction systems which produce a detailed replica of the image area require the extensive Defense Mapping Agency data base. The purpose of this study was to analyze the use of image predictions in order to determine whether a reduced set of more compact image features contains enough information to produce acceptable navigator performance. A job analysis of the navigator's mission tasks was performed. It showed that the cognitive and perceptual tasks he performs during navigation are identical to those performed for the targeting mission function. In addition, the results of the analysis of his performance when using a particular sensor can be extended to the analysis of this mission tasks using any sensor. An experimental approach was used to determine the relationship between navigator performance and the type of amount of information in the prediction image. A number of subjects were given image predictions containing varying levels of scene detail and different image features, and then asked to identify the predicted targets in corresponding dynamic flight sequences over scenes of cultural, terrain, and mixed (both cultural and terrain) content.

  15. SPECTRAL IMAGING TECHNIQUES FOR GRAIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three spectral imaging techniques were employed for the purpose of assessing the quality of cereal grains. Each of these techniques provided unique, yet complementary, information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), also called magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was used to detect mobile components ...

  16. Fluoroscopic chest tube insertion and patient care.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J. D.; Shaver, M. L.; Disher, A. C.; Miller, T. Q.

    1992-01-01

    Catheters and chest tubes may be placed under fluoroscopic control to reduce pleural effusions. This procedure has been adopted as a routine procedure at the UCLA School of Medicine in Los Angeles, California to improve patient care. This technique was modified for the placement of large chest tubes, which can be placed by a radiologist without multiple attempts or complications. Our experience with 2234 patients who underwent this procedure between 1977 and 1990 is described. PMID:1404463

  17. Generation of fluoroscopic 3D images with a respiratory motion model based on an external surrogate signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, Martina; Williams, Christopher L.; Mishra, Pankaj; Rottmann, Joerg; Dhou, Salam; Wagar, Matthew; Mannarino, Edward G.; Mak, Raymond H.; Lewis, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory motion during radiotherapy can cause uncertainties in definition of the target volume and in estimation of the dose delivered to the target and healthy tissue. In this paper, we generate volumetric images of the internal patient anatomy during treatment using only the motion of a surrogate signal. Pre-treatment four-dimensional CT imaging is used to create a patient-specific model correlating internal respiratory motion with the trajectory of an external surrogate placed on the chest. The performance of this model is assessed with digital and physical phantoms reproducing measured irregular patient breathing patterns. Ten patient breathing patterns are incorporated in a digital phantom. For each patient breathing pattern, the model is used to generate images over the course of thirty seconds. The tumor position predicted by the model is compared to ground truth information from the digital phantom. Over the ten patient breathing patterns, the average absolute error in the tumor centroid position predicted by the motion model is 1.4 mm. The corresponding error for one patient breathing pattern implemented in an anthropomorphic physical phantom was 0.6 mm. The global voxel intensity error was used to compare the full image to the ground truth and demonstrates good agreement between predicted and true images. The model also generates accurate predictions for breathing patterns with irregular phases or amplitudes.

  18. Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) implementation of image processing algorithms to improve system performance of the Control, Acquisition, Processing, and Image Display System (CAPIDS) of the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF).

    PubMed

    Vasan, S N Swetadri; Ionita, Ciprian N; Titus, A H; Cartwright, A N; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2012-02-23

    We present the image processing upgrades implemented on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) in the Control, Acquisition, Processing, and Image Display System (CAPIDS) for the custom Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector. Most of the image processing currently implemented in the CAPIDS system is pixel independent; that is, the operation on each pixel is the same and the operation on one does not depend upon the result from the operation on the other, allowing the entire image to be processed in parallel. GPU hardware was developed for this kind of massive parallel processing implementation. Thus for an algorithm which has a high amount of parallelism, a GPU implementation is much faster than a CPU implementation. The image processing algorithm upgrades implemented on the CAPIDS system include flat field correction, temporal filtering, image subtraction, roadmap mask generation and display window and leveling. A comparison between the previous and the upgraded version of CAPIDS has been presented, to demonstrate how the improvement is achieved. By performing the image processing on a GPU, significant improvements (with respect to timing or frame rate) have been achieved, including stable operation of the system at 30 fps during a fluoroscopy run, a DSA run, a roadmap procedure and automatic image windowing and leveling during each frame. PMID:24027619

  19. Graphics processing unit (GPU) implementation of image processing algorithms to improve system performance of the control acquisition, processing, and image display system (CAPIDS) of the micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Titus, A. H.; Cartwright, A. N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2012-03-01

    We present the image processing upgrades implemented on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) in the Control, Acquisition, Processing, and Image Display System (CAPIDS) for the custom Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector. Most of the image processing currently implemented in the CAPIDS system is pixel independent; that is, the operation on each pixel is the same and the operation on one does not depend upon the result from the operation on the other, allowing the entire image to be processed in parallel. GPU hardware was developed for this kind of massive parallel processing implementation. Thus for an algorithm which has a high amount of parallelism, a GPU implementation is much faster than a CPU implementation. The image processing algorithm upgrades implemented on the CAPIDS system include flat field correction, temporal filtering, image subtraction, roadmap mask generation and display window and leveling. A comparison between the previous and the upgraded version of CAPIDS has been presented, to demonstrate how the improvement is achieved. By performing the image processing on a GPU, significant improvements (with respect to timing or frame rate) have been achieved, including stable operation of the system at 30 fps during a fluoroscopy run, a DSA run, a roadmap procedure and automatic image windowing and leveling during each frame.

  20. Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) implementation of image processing algorithms to improve system performance of the Control, Acquisition, Processing, and Image Display System (CAPIDS) of the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF)

    PubMed Central

    Vasan, S.N. Swetadri; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Titus, A.H.; Cartwright, A.N.; Bednarek, D.R.; Rudin, S.

    2012-01-01

    We present the image processing upgrades implemented on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) in the Control, Acquisition, Processing, and Image Display System (CAPIDS) for the custom Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector. Most of the image processing currently implemented in the CAPIDS system is pixel independent; that is, the operation on each pixel is the same and the operation on one does not depend upon the result from the operation on the other, allowing the entire image to be processed in parallel. GPU hardware was developed for this kind of massive parallel processing implementation. Thus for an algorithm which has a high amount of parallelism, a GPU implementation is much faster than a CPU implementation. The image processing algorithm upgrades implemented on the CAPIDS system include flat field correction, temporal filtering, image subtraction, roadmap mask generation and display window and leveling. A comparison between the previous and the upgraded version of CAPIDS has been presented, to demonstrate how the improvement is achieved. By performing the image processing on a GPU, significant improvements (with respect to timing or frame rate) have been achieved, including stable operation of the system at 30 fps during a fluoroscopy run, a DSA run, a roadmap procedure and automatic image windowing and leveling during each frame. PMID:24027619

  1. Dose reduction technique using a combination of a region of interest (ROI) material x-ray attenuator and spatially different temporal filtering for fluoroscopic interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Panse, A.; Jain, A.; Sharma, P.; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Titus, A. H.; Cartwright, A. N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel approach for achieving patient dose savings during image-guided neurovascular interventions, involving a combination of a material x-ray region of interest (ROI) attenuator and a spatially different ROI temporal filtering technique. The part of the image under the attenuator is reduced in dose but noisy and less bright due to fewer x-ray quanta reaching the detector, as compared to the non-attenuating (or less attenuating) region. First the brightness is equalized throughout the image by post processing and then a temporal filter with higher weights is applied to the high attenuating region to reduce the noise, at the cost of increased lag; however, in the regions where less attenuation is present, a lower temporal weight is needed and is applied to preserve temporal resolution. A simulation of the technique is first presented on an actual image sequence obtained from an endovascular image guided interventional (EIGI) procedure. Then the actual implementation of the technique with a physical ROI attenuator is presented. Quantitative analysis including noise analysis and integral dose calculations are presented to validate the proposed technique.

  2. Dose Reduction Technique Using a Combination of a Region of Interest (ROI) Material X-Ray Attenuator and Spatially Different Temporal Filtering for Fluoroscopic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Vasan, S.N Swetadri; Panse, A.; Jain, A.; Sharma, P.; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Titus, A.H.; Cartwright, A.N.; Bednarek, D.R; Rudin, S.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel approach for achieving patient dose savings during image-guided neurovascular interventions, involving a combination of a material x-ray region of interest (ROI) attenuator and a spatially different ROI temporal filtering technique. The part of the image under the attenuator is reduced in dose but noisy and less bright due to fewer x-ray quanta reaching the detector, as compared to the non-attenuating (or less attenuating) region. First the brightness is equalized throughout the image by post processing and then a temporal filter with higher weights is applied to the high attenuating region to reduce the noise, at the cost of increased lag; however, in the regions where less attenuation is present, a lower temporal weight is needed and is applied to preserve temporal resolution. A simulation of the technique is first presented on an actual image sequence obtained from an endovascular image guided interventional (EIGI) procedure. Then the actual implementation of the technique with a physical ROI attenuator is presented. Quantitative analysis including noise analysis and integral dose calculations are presented to validate the proposed technique. PMID:24027617

  3. EDITORIAL: Imaging Systems and Techniques Imaging Systems and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giakos, George; Yang, Wuqiang; Petrou, M.; Nikita, K. S.; Pastorino, M.; Amanatiadis, A.; Zentai, G.

    2011-10-01

    This special feature on Imaging Systems and Techniques comprises 27 technical papers, covering essential facets in imaging systems and techniques both in theory and applications, from research groups spanning three different continents. It mainly contains peer-reviewed articles from the IEEE International Conference on Imaging Systems and Techniques (IST 2011), held in Thessaloniki, Greece, as well a number of articles relevant to the scope of this issue. The multifaceted field of imaging requires drastic adaptation to the rapid changes in our society, economy, environment, and the technological revolution; there is an urgent need to address and propose dynamic and innovative solutions to problems that tend to be either complex and static or rapidly evolving with a lot of unknowns. For instance, exploration of the engineering and physical principles of new imaging systems and techniques for medical applications, remote sensing, monitoring of space resources and enhanced awareness, exploration and management of natural resources, and environmental monitoring, are some of the areas that need to be addressed with urgency. Similarly, the development of efficient medical imaging techniques capable of providing physiological information at the molecular level is another important area of research. Advanced metabolic and functional imaging techniques, operating on multiple physical principles, using high resolution and high selectivity nanoimaging techniques, can play an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, as well as provide efficient drug-delivery imaging solutions for disease treatment with increased sensitivity and specificity. On the other hand, technical advances in the development of efficient digital imaging systems and techniques and tomographic devices operating on electric impedance tomography, computed tomography, single-photon emission and positron emission tomography detection principles are anticipated to have a significant impact on a

  4. Simultaneous multislice (SMS) imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Barth, Markus; Breuer, Felix; Koopmans, Peter J; Norris, David G; Poser, Benedikt A

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous multislice imaging (SMS) using parallel image reconstruction has rapidly advanced to become a major imaging technique. The primary benefit is an acceleration in data acquisition that is equal to the number of simultaneously excited slices. Unlike in-plane parallel imaging this can have only a marginal intrinsic signal-to-noise ratio penalty, and the full acceleration is attainable at fixed echo time, as is required for many echo planar imaging applications. Furthermore, for some implementations SMS techniques can reduce radiofrequency (RF) power deposition. In this review the current state of the art of SMS imaging is presented. In the Introduction, a historical overview is given of the history of SMS excitation in MRI. The following section on RF pulses gives both the theoretical background and practical application. The section on encoding and reconstruction shows how the collapsed multislice images can be disentangled by means of the transmitter pulse phase, gradient pulses, and most importantly using multichannel receiver coils. The relationship between classic parallel imaging techniques and SMS reconstruction methods is explored. The subsequent section describes the practical implementation, including the acquisition of reference data, and slice cross-talk. Published applications of SMS imaging are then reviewed, and the article concludes with an outlook and perspective of SMS imaging. PMID:26308571

  5. Simultaneous multislice (SMS) imaging techniques

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Markus; Breuer, Felix; Koopmans, Peter J.; Poser, Benedikt A.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous multislice imaging (SMS) using parallel image reconstruction has rapidly advanced to become a major imaging technique. The primary benefit is an acceleration in data acquisition that is equal to the number of simultaneously excited slices. Unlike in‐plane parallel imaging this can have only a marginal intrinsic signal‐to‐noise ratio penalty, and the full acceleration is attainable at fixed echo time, as is required for many echo planar imaging applications. Furthermore, for some implementations SMS techniques can reduce radiofrequency (RF) power deposition. In this review the current state of the art of SMS imaging is presented. In the Introduction, a historical overview is given of the history of SMS excitation in MRI. The following section on RF pulses gives both the theoretical background and practical application. The section on encoding and reconstruction shows how the collapsed multislice images can be disentangled by means of the transmitter pulse phase, gradient pulses, and most importantly using multichannel receiver coils. The relationship between classic parallel imaging techniques and SMS reconstruction methods is explored. The subsequent section describes the practical implementation, including the acquisition of reference data, and slice cross‐talk. Published applications of SMS imaging are then reviewed, and the article concludes with an outlook and perspective of SMS imaging. Magn Reson Med 75:63–81, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society of Medicine in Resonance. PMID:26308571

  6. Automated medical image segmentation techniques

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neeraj; Aggarwal, Lalit M.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate segmentation of medical images is a key step in contouring during radiotherapy planning. Computed topography (CT) and Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are the most widely used radiographic techniques in diagnosis, clinical studies and treatment planning. This review provides details of automated segmentation methods, specifically discussed in the context of CT and MR images. The motive is to discuss the problems encountered in segmentation of CT and MR images, and the relative merits and limitations of methods currently available for segmentation of medical images. PMID:20177565

  7. Urologic imaging and interventional techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, W.H.

    1989-01-01

    This book provides an overview of all imaging modalities and invasive techniques of the genitourinary system. Three general chapters discuss ionic and nonionic contrast media, the management of reactions to contrast media, and radiation doses from various uroradiologic procedures. Chapters are devoted to intravenous pyelography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, nuclear medicine, lymphography, arteriography, and venography. Two chapters discuss the pediatric applications of uroradiology and ultrasound. Two chapters integrate the various imaging techniques of the upper and lower genitourinary systems into an algorithmic approach for various pathologic entities.

  8. Imaging equipment and techniques for optimal intraoperative imaging during endovascular interventions.

    PubMed

    Fillinger, M F; Weaver, J B

    1999-12-01

    Because endovascular procedures represent an ever-increasing portion of many vascular surgery practices, many surgeons are faced with difficult choices. Endovascular procedures often require open surgery, and open surgical techniques increasingly require fluoroscopic imaging. Without good intraoperative imaging, endovascular procedures are difficult and endovascular aneurysm repair is impossible. How does one balance the need for optimal imaging without sacrificing the ability to safely perform open surgical procedures, especially in the early stages of a developing endovascular program? Strategies include the use of a portable c-arm and carbon fiber table in the operating room (OR), adding a fixed imaging platform to an OR, gaining access to an angiography suite that does not meet OR requirements, and modifying it into an interventional suite that does meet operating room standards. Once the optimal equipment and facilities have been chosen, other choices must be considered. Should a radiology technician be hired? Should an interventional radiologist be available to assist or be incorporated as a routine member of the team? How will typical operating room procedures and technique need to be altered in an effort to optimize intraoperative imaging for endovascular procedures? This article gives an overview of the many issues that arise as a vascular surgery practice evolves to incorporate complex endovascular procedures. PMID:10651460

  9. EDITORIAL: Imaging systems and techniques Imaging systems and techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wuqiang; Giakos, George; Nikita, Konstantina; Pastorino, Matteo; Karras, Dimitrios

    2009-10-01

    The papers in this special issue focus on providing the state-of-the-art approaches and solutions to some of the most challenging imaging areas, such as the design, development, evaluation and applications of imaging systems, measuring techniques, image processing algorithms and instrumentation, with an ultimate aim of enhancing the measurement accuracy and image quality. This special issue explores the principles, engineering developments and applications of new imaging systems and techniques, and encourages broad discussion of imaging methodologies, shaping the future and identifying emerging trends. The multi-faceted field of imaging requires drastic adaptation to the rapid changes in our society, economy, environment and technological evolution. There is an urgent need to address new problems, which tend to be either static but complex, or dynamic, e.g. rapidly evolving with time, with many unknowns, and to propose innovative solutions. For instance, the battles against cancer and terror, monitoring of space resources and enhanced awareness, management of natural resources and environmental monitoring are some of the areas that need to be addressed. The complexity of the involved imaging scenarios and demanding design parameters, e.g. speed, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), specificity, contrast, spatial resolution, scatter rejection, complex background and harsh environments, necessitate the development of a multi-functional, scalable and efficient imaging suite of sensors, solutions driven by innovation, and operation on diverse detection and imaging principles. Efficient medical imaging techniques capable of providing physiological information at the molecular level present another important research area. Advanced metabolic and functional imaging techniques, operating on multiple physical principles, and using high-resolution, high-selectivity nano-imaging methods, quantum dots, nanoparticles, biomarkers, nanostructures, nanosensors, micro-array imaging chips

  10. Implementation of a high-sensitivity Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (HS-MAF) for in-vivo endovascular image guided interventions (EIGI) and region-of-interest computed tomography (ROI-CT)

    PubMed Central

    Ionita, C N; Keleshis, C.; Patel, V.; Yadava, G.; Hoffmann, K R; Bednarek, D R; Jain, A.; Rudin, S

    2008-01-01

    New advances in catheter technology and remote actuation for minimally invasive procedures are continuously increasing the demand for better x-ray imaging technology. The new x-ray high-sensitivity Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (HS-MAF) detector offers high resolution and real-time image-guided capabilities which are unique when compared with commercially available detectors. This detector consists of a 300 μm CsI input phosphor coupled to a dual stage GEN2 micro-channel plate light image intensifier (LII), followed by minifying fiber-optic taper coupled to a CCD chip. The HS-MAF detector image array is 1024×1024 pixels, with a 12 bit depth capable of imaging at 30 frames per second. The detector has a round field of view with 4 cm diameter and 35 microns pixels. The LII has a large variable gain which allows usage of the detector at very low exposures characteristic of fluoroscopic ranges while maintaining very good image quality. The custom acquisition program allows real-time image display and data storage. We designed a set of in-vivo experimental interventions in which placement of specially designed endovascular stents were evaluated with the new detector and with a standard x-ray image intensifier (XII). Capabilities such fluoroscopy, angiography and ROI-CT reconstruction using rotational angiography data were implemented and verified. The images obtained during interventions under radiographic control with the HS-MAF detector were superior to those with the XII. In general, the device feature markers, the device structures, and the vessel geometry were better identified with the new detector. High-resolution detectors such as HS-MAF can vastly improve the accuracy of localization and tracking of devices such stents or catheters. PMID:18958294

  11. Implementation of a high-sensitivity micro-angiographic fluoroscope (HS-MAF) for in-vivo endovascular image guided interventions (EIGI) and region-of-interest computed tomography (ROI-CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, C. N.; Keleshis, C.; Patel, V.; Yadava, G.; Hoffmann, K. R.; Bednarek, D. R.; Jain, A.; Rudin, S.

    2008-03-01

    New advances in catheter technology and remote actuation for minimally invasive procedures are continuously increasing the demand for better x-ray imaging technology. The new x-ray high-sensitivity Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (HS-MAF) detector offers high resolution and real-time image-guided capabilities which are unique when compared with commercially available detectors. This detector consists of a 300 μm CsI input phosphor coupled to a dual stage GEN2 micro-channel plate light image intensifier (LII), followed by minifying fiber-optic taper coupled to a CCD chip. The HS-MAF detector image array is 1024X1024 pixels, with a 12 bit depth capable of imaging at 30 frames per second. The detector has a round field of view with 4 cm diameter and 35 microns pixels. The LII has a large variable gain which allows usage of the detector at very low exposures characteristic of fluoroscopic ranges while maintaining very good image quality. The custom acquisition program allows real-time image display and data storage. We designed a set of in-vivo experimental interventions in which placement of specially designed endovascular stents were evaluated with the new detector and with a standard x-ray image intensifier (XII). Capabilities such fluoroscopy, angiography and ROI-CT reconstruction using rotational angiography data were implemented and verified. The images obtained during interventions under radiographic control with the HS-MAF detector were superior to those with the XII. In general, the device feature markers, the device structures, and the vessel geometry were better identified with the new detector. High-resolution detectors such as HS-MAF can vastly improve the accuracy of localization and tracking of devices such stents or catheters.

  12. Development and evaluation of a new radiographic and fluoroscopic imager based on electron-multiplying CCDs: The solid state x-ray image intensifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew Thomas

    A new dual detector system was developed which utilizes a low resolution, large field-of-view x-ray image intensifier (II) and a high resolution, region-of-interest microangiographic (MA) detector on the same c-arm gantry. With this new MA-II system, the larger field-of-view (FOV) II can be operated when the demands of the task are not as high, and a larger imaging area is desired. However, when a higher-resolution image with greater image quality is desired at a targeted region-of-interest (ROI), the MA can be deployed to take on these greater demands. To quantitatively and qualitatively assess the imaging performance of each detector under realistic conditions, angiographic images of simulated vessels and rabbit neurovasculature were acquired with both detectors under nearly identical conditions. With the MA detector deployed, vessels as small as 95 mum were visible, whereas the II could not detect vessels smaller than 235 mum. The ROI MA mode was also shown to provide sharper images with higher contrast-to-noise ratios and was four times as likely to successfully detect overlapping vessels as compared to the II. More accurate three-dimensional center lines of vasculature using multi-view reconstruction techniques were also obtained with the MA. The solid state x-ray image intensifier (SSXII) was developed to provide similar high-resolution imaging capabilities as the MA and a built in adjustable gain to provide high-sensitivity imaging capabilities for operation at all exposures used in medical x-ray imaging procedures. The imaging components used in construction of the prototype SSXII were selected based on a theoretical performance evaluation, using a Fourier-based linear-systems model analysis. The performance of the prototype SSXII was then extensively evaluated. Images of various objects and image comparisons with current state-of-the-art detectors qualitatively demonstrated that the SSXII is capable of providing substantial improvements. A quantitative

  13. ALARA in pediatric interventional and fluoroscopic imaging: striving to keep radiation doses as low as possible during fluoroscopy of pediatric patients--a white paper executive summary.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Keith J; Kaste, Sue C

    2006-09-01

    Pediatric patients might be as much as 10 times more radiosensitive than adults. Thus, adherence to the principle of "As low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA) represents a practice mandate that minimizes ionizing radiation exposure while optimizing imaging results. This symposium is the third multidisciplinary program that focused on the ALARA principle in pediatric imaging and addressed issues associated with pediatric fluoroscopy and interventional imaging techniques. PMID:17412149

  14. Diagnostic cardiology: Noninvasive imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Come, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 23 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The chest x-ray and cardiac series; Computed tomographic scanning of the heart, coronary arteries, and great vessels; Digital subtraction angiography in the assessment of cardiovascular disease; Magnetic resonance: technique and cardiac applications; Basics of radiation physics and instrumentation; and Nuclear imaging: the assessment of cardiac performance.

  15. Fluoroscopic tomography. [for body section synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.; Crepeau, R. L.; Lasser, E. C.

    1974-01-01

    A fluoroscopic tomography system capable of synthesizing body sections at a number of levels within the body has been developed. The synthesized body sections may lie either in a range of planes parallel to, tilted with respect to, skewed with respect to, or both tilted and skewed with respect to the plane of motion of the X-ray tube target. In addition, body sections can be presented which are contoured to the patient's anatomy. That is to say, they may even encompass such complex surfaces as a quadratic hyperplane. In addition, tomograms of organs in motion can be imaged.

  16. Fast Hadamard Spectroscopic Imaging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goelman, G.

    1994-07-01

    Fast Hadamard spectroscopic imaging (HSI) techniques are presented. These techniques combine transverse and longitudinal encoding to obtain multiple-volume localization. The fast techniques are optimized for nuclei with short T2 and long T1 relaxation times and are therefore suitable for in vivo31P spectroscopy. When volume coils are used in fast HSI techniques, the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time (SNRT) is equal to the SNRT in regular HSI techniques. When surface coils are used, fast HSI techniques give significant improvement of SNRT over conventional HSI. Several fast techniques which are different in total experimental time and pulse demands are presented. When the number of acquisitions in a single repetition time is not higher than two, fast HSI techniques can be used with surface coils and the B1 inhomogeneity does not affect the localization. Surface-coil experiments on phantoms and on human calf muscles in vivo are presented. In addition, it is shown that the localization obtained by the HSI techniques are independent of the repetition times.

  17. Improving accuracy of markerless tracking of lung tumours in fluoroscopic video by incorporating diaphragm motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, M.; Teske, H.; Stoll, M.; Bendl, Rolf

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Conformal radiation of moving tumours is a challenging task in radiotherapy. Tumour motion induced by respiration can be visualized in fluoroscopic images recorded during patients breathing. Markerless methods making use of registration techniques can be used to estimate tumour motion. However, registration methods might fail when the tumour is hidden by ribs. Using motion of anatomical surrogates, like the diaphragm, is promising to model tumour motion. Methods: A sequence of 116 fluoroscopic images was analyzed and the tumour positions were manually defined by three experts. A block matching (BM) technique is used to calculate the displacement vector relatively to a selected reference image of the first breathing cycle. An enhanced method was developed: Positions, when the tumour is not located behind a rib, are taken as valid estimations of the tumour position. Furthermore, these valid estimations are used to establish a linear model of tumour position and diaphragm motion. For invalid estimations the calculated tumour positions are not taken into consideration, and instead the model is used to determine tumour motion. Results: Enhancing BM with a model of tumour motion from diaphragm motion improves the tracking accuracy when the tumour moves behind a rib. The error (mean ± SD) in longitudinal dimension was 2.0 ± 1.5mm using only BM and 1.0 ± 1.1mm when the enhanced approach was used. Conclusion: The enhanced tracking technique is capable to improve tracking accuracy compared to BM in the case that the tumour is occluded by ribs.

  18. NMR Imaging: Instrumentation and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingle, Jeremy Mark

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis presents three original contributions to the field of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR): the experimental framework and analysis for the measurement of a new imaging parameter to describe perfusion; the measurement and analysis of magnetic field inhomogeneity and a practical correction system for their reduction; a novel system for the synchronous control of NMR experiments based on the microprogrammed concept. The thesis begins with an introduction to the theory of NMR. The application of NMR to imaging is also introduced with emphasis on the techniques which developed into those in common use today. Inaccurate determination of the traditional NMR parameters (T_1 and T_2 and the molecular diffusion coefficient) can be caused by non-diffusive fluid movement within the sample. The experimental basis for determining a new imaging parameter --the Perfusion coefficient--is presented. This provides a measure of forced isotropic fluid motion through an organ or tissue. The instrumentation required for conducting NMR experiments is described in order to introduce the contribution made in this area during this research: A sequence controller. The controller is based on the concept of microprogramming and enables completely synchronous output of 128 bits of data. The software for the generation and storage of control data and the regulation of the data to provide experimental control is microcomputer based. It affords precise and accurate regulation of the magnetic field gradients, the rf synthesizer and the spectrometer for spectroscopic and imaging applications. Fundamental to the science of NMR is the presence of a magnetic field. A detailed study of the analysis of magnetic field inhomogeneity in terms of spherical harmonics is presented. The field of a whole body imaging system with poor inhomogeneity was measured and analyzed to determine and describe the components of the inhomogeneity. Finally a

  19. Integration of kerma-area product and cumulative air kerma determination into a skin dose tracking system for fluoroscopic imaging procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, Sarath; Shankar, Alok; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2016-03-01

    The skin dose tracking system (DTS) that we developed provides a color-coded mapping of the cumulative skin dose distribution on a 3D graphic of the patient during fluoroscopic procedures in real time. The DTS has now been modified to also calculate the kerma area product (KAP) and cumulative air kerma (CAK) for fluoroscopic interventions using data obtained in real-time from the digital bus on a Toshiba Infinix system. KAP is the integral of air kerma over the beam area and is typically measured with a large-area transmission ionization chamber incorporated into the collimator assembly. In this software, KAP is automatically determined for each x-ray pulse as the product of the air kerma/ mAs from a calibration file for the given kVp and beam filtration times the mAs per pulse times the length and width of the beam times a field nonuniformity correction factor. Field nonuniformity is primarily the result of the heel effect and the correction factor was determined from the beam profile measured using radio-chromic film. Dividing the KAP by the beam area at the interventional reference point provides the area averaged CAK. The KAP and CAK per x-ray pulse are summed after each pulse to obtain the total procedure values in real-time. The calculated KAP and CAK were compared to the values displayed by the fluoroscopy machine with excellent agreement. The DTS now is able to automatically calculate both KAP and CAK without the need for measurement by an add-on transmission ionization chamber.

  20. FTRAC--A robust fluoroscope tracking fiducial

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Ameet Kumar; Mustafa, Tabish; Zhou, Yu; Burdette, Clif; Chirikjian, Gregory S.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2005-10-15

    C-arm fluoroscopy is ubiquitous in contemporary surgery, but it lacks the ability to accurately reconstruct three-dimensional (3D) information. A major obstacle in fluoroscopic reconstruction is discerning the pose of the x-ray image, in 3D space. Optical/magnetic trackers tend to be prohibitively expensive, intrusive and cumbersome in many applications. We present single-image-based fluoroscope tracking (FTRAC) with the use of an external radiographic fiducial consisting of a mathematically optimized set of ellipses, lines, and points. This is an improvement over contemporary fiducials, which use only points. The fiducial encodes six degrees of freedom in a single image by creating a unique view from any direction. A nonlinear optimizer can rapidly compute the pose of the fiducial using this image. The current embodiment has salient attributes: small dimensions (3x3x5 cm); need not be close to the anatomy of interest; and accurately segmentable. We tested the fiducial and the pose recovery method on synthetic data and also experimentally on a precisely machined mechanical phantom. Pose recovery in phantom experiments had an accuracy of 0.56 mm in translation and 0.33 deg. in orientation. Object reconstruction had a mean error of 0.53 mm with 0.16 mm STD. The method offers accuracies similar to commercial tracking systems, and appears to be sufficiently robust for intraoperative quantitative C-arm fluoroscopy. Simulation experiments indicate that the size can be further reduced to 1x1x2 cm, with only a marginal drop in accuracy.

  1. Imaging techniques in biology and medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Swenberg, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    This book serves as an introduction to some aspects of imaging techniques as utilized in biology and medicine. Techniques presented include image processing, ultrasound, radiotracers, autoradiography, computed tomography, and MRI (all major imaging techniques). The underlying mathematics and physics are kept to a minimum.

  2. Tooling Techniques Enhance Medical Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    mission. The manufacturing techniques developed to create the components have yielded innovations advancing medical imaging, transportation security, and even energy efficiency.

  3. Bone fragility and imaging techniques

    PubMed Central

    D’Elia, Giovanni; Caracchini, Giuseppe; Cavalli, Loredana; Innocenti, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Bone fragility is a silent condition that increases bone fracture risk, enhanced by low bone mass and microarchitecture deterioration of bone tissue that lead to osteoporosis. Fragility fractures are the major clinical manifestation of osteoporosis. A large body of epidemiological data indicates that the current standard for predicting fragility fracture risk is an areal BMD (aBMD) measurement by DXA. Although mineral density measurements assess the quantity of bone, the quality of the tissue is an important predictor of fragility. Thus, bone strength is explained not only by BMD but also by macrostructural and microstructural characteristics of bone tissue. Imaging diagnostics, through the use of X-rays, DXA, Ultrasonography, CT and MR, provides methods for diagnosis and characterization of fractures, and semi- and quantitative methods for assessment of bone consistency and strength, that become precious for bone fragility clinical management if they are integrated by clinical risk factors. The last employment of sophisticated non-invasively imaging techniques in clinical research as high-resolution CT (hrCT), microCT (μ-CT), high-resolution MR (hrMR) and, microRM (μRM), combined with finite element analysis methods, open to new challenges in a better bone strength assessment to enhance the comprehension of biomechanical parameters and the prediction of fragility fractures. PMID:22461252

  4. Imaging Techniques in Endodontics: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Deepak, B. S.; Subash, T. S.; Narmatha, V. J.; Anamika, T.; Snehil, T. K.; Nandini, D. B.

    2012-01-01

    This review provides an overview of the relevance of imaging techniques such as, computed tomography, cone beam computed tomography, and ultrasound, to endodontic practice. Many limitations of the conventional radiographic techniques have been overcome by the newer methods. Advantages and disadvantages of various imaging techniques in endodontic practice are also discussed. PMID:22530184

  5. Access Techniques for Document Image Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Frank L.; Thoma, George R.

    1990-01-01

    Describes access and retrieval techniques implemented as part of a research and development program in electronic imaging applied to document storage and retrieval at the National Library of Medicine. Design considerations for large image databases are discussed. (six references) (EAM)

  6. Biplane reconstruction and visualization of virtual endoscopic and fluoroscopic views for interventional device navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Martin G.; Strother, Charles M.; Schafer, Sebastian; Mistretta, Charles A.

    2016-03-01

    Biplane fluoroscopic imaging is an important tool for minimally invasive procedures for the treatment of cerebrovascular diseases. However, finding a good working angle for the C-arms of the angiography system as well as navigating based on the 2D projection images can be a difficult task. The purpose of this work is to propose a novel 4D reconstruction algorithm for interventional devices from biplane fluoroscopy images and to propose new techniques for a better visualization of the results. The proposed reconstruction methods binarizes the fluoroscopic images using a dedicated noise reduction algorithm for curvilinear structures and a global thresholding approach. A topology preserving thinning algorithm is then applied and a path search algorithm minimizing the curvature of the device is used to extract the 2D device centerlines. Finally, the 3D device path is reconstructed using epipolar geometry. The point correspondences are determined by a monotonic mapping function that minimizes the reconstruction error. The three dimensional reconstruction of the device path allows the rendering of virtual fluoroscopy images from arbitrary angles as well as 3D visualizations like virtual endoscopic views or glass pipe renderings, where the vessel wall is rendered with a semi-transparent material. This work also proposes a combination of different visualization techniques in order to increase the usability and spatial orientation for the user. A combination of synchronized endoscopic and glass pipe views is proposed, where the virtual endoscopic camera position is determined based on the device tip location as well as the previous camera position using a Kalman filter in order to create a smooth path. Additionally, vessel centerlines are displayed and the path to the target is highlighted. Finally, the virtual endoscopic camera position is also visualized in the glass pipe view to further improve the spatial orientation. The proposed techniques could considerably improve

  7. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangial drainage: direct approach under fluoroscopic control.

    PubMed

    Takada, T; Hanyu, F; Kobayashi, S; Uchida, Y

    1976-01-01

    We devised a direct percutaneous transhepatic cholangial drainage under fluoroscopic control. The principle is as follows. After percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, the three dimensional structure of intrahepatic bile ducts is projected to a two dimensional plane under fluoroscopy; the needle can then be introduced into the selected bile duct with accuracy. The technique can be used as a preoperative management of operations of patients with jaundice and also as a palliative management of advanced cancer without much complication. PMID:1249944

  8. Novel Technique for Coregistration of Biological Images in a Multimodality Detector Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranck, Amoreena; Feldmann, John; Welsh, Robert E.; Bradley, Eric L.; Saha, Margaret S.; Kross, Brian; Majewski, Stan; Popov, Vladimir; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Wojcik, Randolph

    2000-11-01

    Imaging of small animals makes use of a range of techniques. In a system under development here, biological ligands tagged with ^125I are followed in a subject animal using a pixelated CsI(Tl) scintillator coupled to a large position-sensitive photomultiplier tube(PSPMT). The same animal is also viewed with an x-ray fluoroscope (Lixi, Inc.) to obtain structural information which is then correlated to the radioligand view. Owing to the need to move the animal from x-ray to PSPMT, we have developed a simple technique for making a precise overlay of the two views of the same animal. Small metal rings (washers) have been filled with plaster of paris which is loaded with 2-6 microcuries of ^125I. The rings then give both a small ``hot" spot in the pspmt view and a dark ring image in the x-ray view. Correlating these with image software permits accurate registration of the images to better than 1mm. Examples of images taken in the study of uptake of tagged insulin in diabetic mice will be discussed.

  9. Three dimensional scattering center imaging techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Younger, P. R.; Burnside, W. D.

    1991-01-01

    Two methods to image scattering centers in 3-D are presented. The first method uses 2-D images generated from Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR) measurements taken by two vertically offset antennas. This technique is shown to provide accurate 3-D imaging capability which can be added to an existing ISAR measurement system, requiring only the addition of a second antenna. The second technique uses target impulse responses generated from wideband radar measurements from three slightly different offset antennas. This technique is shown to identify the dominant scattering centers on a target in nearly real time. The number of measurements required to image a target using this technique is very small relative to traditional imaging techniques.

  10. NOTE: Fluoroscopic gating without implanted fiducial markers for lung cancer radiotherapy based on support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ying; Dy, Jennifer G.; Alexander, Brian; Jiang, Steve B.

    2008-08-01

    Various problems with the current state-of-the-art techniques for gated radiotherapy have prevented this new treatment modality from being widely implemented in clinical routine. These problems are caused mainly by applying various external respiratory surrogates. There might be large uncertainties in deriving the tumor position from external respiratory surrogates. While tracking implanted fiducial markers has sufficient accuracy, this procedure may not be widely accepted due to the risk of pneumothorax. Previously, we have developed a technique to generate gating signals from fluoroscopic images without implanted fiducial markers using template matching methods (Berbeco et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 4481-90, Cui et al 2007b Phys. Med. Biol. 52 741-55). In this note, our main contribution is to provide a totally different new view of the gating problem by recasting it as a classification problem. Then, we solve this classification problem by a well-studied powerful classification method called a support vector machine (SVM). Note that the goal of an automated gating tool is to decide when to turn the beam ON or OFF. We treat ON and OFF as the two classes in our classification problem. We create our labeled training data during the patient setup session by utilizing the reference gating signal, manually determined by a radiation oncologist. We then pre-process these labeled training images and build our SVM prediction model. During treatment delivery, fluoroscopic images are continuously acquired, pre-processed and sent as an input to the SVM. Finally, our SVM model will output the predicted labels as gating signals. We test the proposed technique on five sequences of fluoroscopic images from five lung cancer patients against the reference gating signal as ground truth. We compare the performance of the SVM to our previous template matching method (Cui et al 2007b Phys. Med. Biol. 52 741-55). We find that the SVM is slightly more accurate on average (1-3%) than

  11. Ultra high speed image processing techniques. [electronic packaging techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, T.; Hoeschele, D. F.; Connery, R.; Ehland, J.; Billings, J.

    1981-01-01

    Packaging techniques for ultra high speed image processing were developed. These techniques involve the development of a signal feedthrough technique through LSI/VLSI sapphire substrates. This allows the stacking of LSI/VLSI circuit substrates in a 3 dimensional package with greatly reduced length of interconnecting lines between the LSI/VLSI circuits. The reduced parasitic capacitances results in higher LSI/VLSI computational speeds at significantly reduced power consumption levels.

  12. Imaging techniques in childhood arthritis.

    PubMed

    Harcke, H T; Mandell, G A; Cassell, I L

    1997-08-01

    Technological advances in imaging have given physicians caring for children with arthritis a greater opportunity to detect abnormalities early in the course of a disease and better methods for monitoring chronic changes. Indications for using radiography, bone densitometry, nuclear medicine, ultrasound, CT scanning, and MR imaging are discussed in this article. In this era of managed care, the practicing clinician is urged more than ever to consult with the radiologist in selecting the study or sequence of studies to be used in particular case. In this way, evaluation can be limited to the most effective strategy from both the clinical and cost perspectives. PMID:9287376

  13. Electronic imaging system and technique

    DOEpatents

    Bolstad, Jon O.

    1987-01-01

    A method and system for viewing objects obscurred by intense plasmas or flames (such as a welding arc) includes a pulsed light source to illuminate the object, the peak brightness of the light reflected from the object being greater than the brightness of the intense plasma or flame; an electronic image sensor for detecting a pulsed image of the illuminated object, the sensor being operated as a high-speed shutter; and electronic means for synchronizing the shutter operation with the pulsed light source.

  14. Electronic imaging system and technique

    DOEpatents

    Bolstad, J.O.

    1984-06-12

    A method and system for viewing objects obscurred by intense plasmas or flames (such as a welding arc) includes a pulsed light source to illuminate the object, the peak brightness of the light reflected from the object being greater than the brightness of the intense plasma or flame; an electronic image sensor for detecting a pulsed image of the illuminated object, the sensor being operated as a high-speed shutter; and electronic means for synchronizing the shutter operation with the pulsed light source.

  15. An accurate registration technique for distorted images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delapena, Michele; Shaw, Richard A.; Linde, Peter; Dravins, Dainis

    1990-01-01

    Accurate registration of International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) images is crucial because the variability of the geometrical distortions that are introduced by the SEC-Vidicon cameras ensures that raw science images are never perfectly aligned with the Intensity Transfer Functions (ITFs) (i.e., graded floodlamp exposures that are used to linearize and normalize the camera response). A technique for precisely registering IUE images which uses a cross correlation of the fixed pattern that exists in all raw IUE images is described.

  16. Minimizing dose during fluoroscopic tracking through geometric performance feedback

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, S.; Fiume, E.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: There is a growing concern regarding the dose delivered during x-ray fluoroscopy guided procedures, particularly in interventional cardiology and neuroradiology, and in real-time tumor tracking radiotherapy and radiosurgery. Many of these procedures involve long treatment times, and as such, there is cause for concern regarding the dose delivered and the associated radiation related risks. An insufficient dose, however, may convey less geometric information, which may lead to inaccuracy and imprecision in intervention placement. The purpose of this study is to investigate a method for achieving the required tracking uncertainty for a given interventional procedure using minimal dose.Methods: A simple model is used to demonstrate that a relationship exists between imaging dose and tracking uncertainty. A feedback framework is introduced that exploits this relationship to modulate the tube current (and hence the dose) in order to maintain the required uncertainty for a given interventional procedure. This framework is evaluated in the context of a fiducial tracking problem associated with image-guided radiotherapy in the lung. A particle filter algorithm is used to robustly track the fiducial as it traverses through regions of high and low quantum noise. Published motion models are incorporated in a tracking test suite to evaluate the dose-localization performance trade-offs.Results: It is shown that using this framework, the entrance surface exposure can be reduced by up to 28.6% when feedback is employed to operate at a geometric tracking uncertainty of 0.3 mm.Conclusions: The analysis reveals a potentially powerful technique for dynamic optimization of fluoroscopic imaging parameters to control the applied dose by exploiting the trade-off between tracking uncertainty and x-ray exposure per frame. PMID:21776784

  17. Image processing technique for arbitrary image positioning in holographic stereogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Der-Kuan; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Honda, Toshio; Ohyama, Nagaaki

    1990-12-01

    In a one-step holographic stereogram, if the series of original images are used just as they are taken from perspective views, three-dimensional images are usually reconstructed in back of the hologram plane. In order to enhance the sense of perspective of the reconstructed images and minimize blur of the interesting portions, we introduce an image processing technique for making a one-step flat format holographic stereogram in which three-dimensional images can be observed at an arbitrary specified position. Experimental results show the effect of the image processing. Further, we show results of a medical application using this image processing.

  18. A comparison of image inpainting techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaojie; Shu, Chang

    2015-03-01

    Image inpainting is an important research topic in the field of image processing. The objective of inpainting is to "guess" the lost information according to surrounding image information, which can be applied in old photo restoration, object removal and demosaicing. Based on the foundation of previous literature of image inpainting and image modeling, this paper provides an overview of the state-of-art image inpainting methods. This survey first covers mathematics models of inpainting and different kinds of image impairment. Then it goes to the main components of an image, the structure and the texture, and states how these inpainting models and algorithms deal with the two separately, using PDE's method, exemplar-based method and etc. Afterwards sparse-representation-based inpainting and related techniques are introduced. Experimental analysis will be presented to evaluate the relative merits of different algorithms, with the measure of Peak Signal to Noise Ratio (PSNR) as well as direct visual perception.

  19. Reconstruction techniques for optoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenz, Martin; Koestli, Kornel P.; Paltauf, Guenther; Schmidt-Kloiber, Heinz; Weber, Heinz P.

    2001-06-01

    Optoacoustics is a method to gain information from inside a tissue. This is done by irradiating a tissue with a short light pulse, which generates a pressure distribution inside the tissue that mirrors the absorber distribution. The pressure distribution measured on the tissue-surface allows, by applying a back-projection method, to calculate a tomography image of the absorber distribution. This study presents a novel computational algorithm based on Fourier transform, which, at least in principle, yields an exact 3D reconstruction of the distribution of absorbed energy density inside turbid media. The reconstruction is based on 2D pressure distributions captured outside at different times. The FFT reconstruction algorithm is first tested in the back projection of simulated pressure transients of small model absorbers, and finally applied to reconstruct the distribution of artificial blood vessels in three dimensions.

  20. Utilizing image processing techniques to compute herbivory.

    PubMed

    Olson, T E; Barlow, V M

    2001-01-01

    Leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula L. sensu lato) is a perennial weed species common to the north-central United States and southern Canada. The plant is a foreign species toxic to cattle. Spurge infestation can reduce cattle carrying capacity by 50 to 75 percent [1]. University of Wyoming Entomology doctoral candidate Vonny Barlow is conducting research in the area of biological control of leafy spurge via the Aphthona nigriscutis Foudras flea beetle. He is addressing the question of variability within leafy spurge and its potential impact on flea beetle herbivory. One component of Barlow's research consists of measuring the herbivory of leafy spurge plant specimens after introducing adult beetles. Herbivory is the degree of consumption of the plant's leaves and was measured in two different manners. First, Barlow assigned each consumed plant specimen a visual rank from 1 to 5. Second, image processing techniques were applied to "before" and "after" images of each plant specimen in an attempt to more accurately quantify herbivory. Standardized techniques were used to acquire images before and after beetles were allowed to feed on plants for a period of 12 days. Matlab was used as the image processing tool. The image processing algorithm allowed the user to crop the portion of the "before" image containing only plant foliage. Then Matlab cropped the "after" image with the same dimensions, converted the images from RGB to grayscale. The grayscale image was converted to binary based on a user defined threshold value. Finally, herbivory was computed based on the number of black pixels in the "before" and "after" images. The image processing results were mixed. Although, this image processing technique depends on user input and non-ideal images, the data is useful to Barlow's research and offers insight into better imaging systems and processing algorithms. PMID:11347423

  1. Accuracy test procedure for image evaluation techniques.

    PubMed

    Jones, R A

    1968-01-01

    A procedure has been developed to determine the accuracy of image evaluation techniques. In the procedure, a target having orthogonal test arrays is photographed with a high quality optical system. During the exposure, the target is subjected to horizontal linear image motion. The modulation transfer functions of the images in the horizontal and vertical directions are obtained using the evaluation technique. Since all other degradations are symmetrical, the quotient of the two modulation transfer functions represents the modulation transfer function of the experimentally induced linear image motion. In an accurate experiment, any discrepancy between the experimental determination and the true value is due to inaccuracy in the image evaluation technique. The procedure was used to test the Perkin-Elmer automated edge gradient analysis technique over the spatial frequency range of 0-200 c/m. This experiment demonstrated that the edge gradient technique is accurate over this region and that the testing procedure can be controlled with the desired accuracy. Similarly, the test procedure can be used to determine the accuracy of other image evaluation techniques. PMID:20062421

  2. Image processing techniques for digital orthophotoquad production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hood, Joy J.; Ladner, L. J.; Champion, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    Orthophotographs have long been recognized for their value as supplements or alternatives to standard maps. Recent trends towards digital cartography have resulted in efforts by the US Geological Survey to develop a digital orthophotoquad production system. Digital image files were created by scanning color infrared photographs on a microdensitometer. Rectification techniques were applied to remove tile and relief displacement, thereby creating digital orthophotos. Image mosaicking software was then used to join the rectified images, producing digital orthophotos in quadrangle format.

  3. Superresolution imaging: a survey of current techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristóbal, G.; Gil, E.; Šroubek, F.; Flusser, J.; Miravet, C.; Rodríguez, F. B.

    2008-08-01

    Imaging plays a key role in many diverse areas of application, such as astronomy, remote sensing, microscopy, and tomography. Owing to imperfections of measuring devices (e.g., optical degradations, limited size of sensors) and instability of the observed scene (e.g., object motion, media turbulence), acquired images can be indistinct, noisy, and may exhibit insuffcient spatial and temporal resolution. In particular, several external effects blur images. Techniques for recovering the original image include blind deconvolution (to remove blur) and superresolution (SR). The stability of these methods depends on having more than one image of the same frame. Differences between images are necessary to provide new information, but they can be almost unperceivable. State-of-the-art SR techniques achieve remarkable results in resolution enhancement by estimating the subpixel shifts between images, but they lack any apparatus for calculating the blurs. In this paper, after introducing a review of current SR techniques we describe two recently developed SR methods by the authors. First, we introduce a variational method that minimizes a regularized energy function with respect to the high resolution image and blurs. In this way we establish a unifying way to simultaneously estimate the blurs and the high resolution image. By estimating blurs we automatically estimate shifts with subpixel accuracy, which is inherent for good SR performance. Second, an innovative learning-based algorithm using a neural architecture for SR is described. Comparative experiments on real data illustrate the robustness and utilization of both methods.

  4. Google Glass as an Alternative to Standard Fluoroscopic Visualization for Percutaneous Fixation of Hand Fractures: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, Peter C; Mitten, David J

    2015-08-01

    This pilot study investigated the feasibility of Google Glass to assist visualization of fluoroscopic images during percutaneous pinning of hand fractures. Cadavers were used to compare total time to pin each fracture and total number of radiographs per fracture from a mini C-arm. A FluoroScan monitor was used for radiographic visualization compared to projecting the images in the Google Glass display. All outcome measures significantly improved for proximal phalanx fractures (127 versus 86 seconds, p = 0.017; 5.3 versus 2.2 images, p = 0.003), and fewer images were obtained during fixation of metacarpal fractures using Google Glass compared with traditional techniques (6.4 versus 3.6, p < 0.001). Typical FluoroScan monitor placement may require the surgeon to alter focus away from the operative field, whereas Google Glass allows constant attention directed toward the operative field. PMID:26218380

  5. Ultrasonic imaging techniques for breast cancer detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, N. R.; Marquez, J. D.; Prewett, E. M.; Claytor, T. N.; Nadler, B. R.; Huang, L.

    2006-01-01

    Improving the resolution and specificity of current ultrasonic imaging technology can enhance its relevance to detection of early-stage breast cancers. Ultrasonic evaluation of breast lesions is desirable because it is quick, inexpensive, and does not expose the patient to potentially harmful ionizing radiation. Improved image quality and resolution enables earlier detection and more accurate diagnoses of tumors, thus reducing the number of biopsies performed, increasing treatment options, and lowering mortality, morbidity, and remission percentages. In this work, a novel ultrasonic imaging reconstruction method that exploits straight-ray migration is described. This technique, commonly used in seismic imaging, accounts for scattering more accurately than standard ultrasonic approaches, thus providing superior image resolution. A breast phantom with various inclusions is imaged using a pulse-echo approach. The data are processed using the ultrasonic migration method and results are compared to standard linear ultrasound and to x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans. For an ultrasonic frequency of 2.25 MHz, imaged inclusions and features of approximately 1mm are resolved, although better resolution is expected with minor modifications. Refinement of this application using other imaging techniques such as time-reversal mirrors (TRM), synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), decomposition of the time reversal operator (DORT), and factorization methods is also briefly discussed.

  6. Review: Magnetic resonance imaging techniques in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging the eye with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved difficult due to the eye’s propensity to move involuntarily over typical imaging timescales, obscuring the fine structure in the eye due to the resulting motion artifacts. However, advances in MRI technology help to mitigate such drawbacks, enabling the acquisition of high spatiotemporal resolution images with a variety of contrast mechanisms. This review aims to classify the MRI techniques used to date in clinical and preclinical ophthalmologic studies, describing the qualitative and quantitative information that may be extracted and how this may inform on ocular pathophysiology. PMID:23112569

  7. Geometric assessment of image quality using digital image registration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tisdale, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    Image registration techniques were developed to perform a geometric quality assessment of multispectral and multitemporal image pairs. Based upon LANDSAT tapes, accuracies to a small fraction of a pixel were demonstrated. Because it is insensitive to the choice of registration areas, the technique is well suited to performance in an automatic system. It may be implemented at megapixel-per-second rates using a commercial minicomputer in combination with a special purpose digital preprocessor.

  8. Update on imaging techniques in oculoplastics

    PubMed Central

    Cetinkaya, Altug

    2012-01-01

    Imaging is a beneficial aid to the oculoplastic surgeon especially in orbital and lacrimal disorders when the pathology is not visible from outside. It is a powerful tool that may be benefited in not only diagnosis but also management and follow-up. The most common imaging modalities required are CT and MRI, with CT being more frequently ordered by oculoplastic surgeons. Improvements in technology enabled the acquisition times to shorten incredibly. Radiologists can now obtain images with superb resolution, and isolate the site and tissue of interest from other structures with special techniques. Better contrast agents and 3D imaging capabilities make complicated cases easier to identify. Color Doppler imaging is becoming more popular both for research and clinical purposes. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) added so much to the vascular system imaging recently. Although angiography is still the gold standard, new software and techniques rendered MRA as valuable as angiography in most circumstances. Stereotactic navigation, although in use for a long time, recently became the focus of interest for the oculoplastic surgeon especially in orbital decompressions. Improvements in radiology and nuclear medicine techniques of lacrimal drainage system imaging provided more detailed analysis of the system. PMID:23961020

  9. Comparison of various enhanced radar imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Inder J.; Gandhe, Avinash

    1998-09-01

    Recently, many techniques have been proposed to enhance the quality of radar images obtained using SAR and/or ISAR. These techniques include spatially variant apodization (SVA), adaptive sidelobe reduction (ASR), the Capon method, amplitude and phase estimation of sinusoids (APES) and data extrapolation. SVA is a special case of ASR; whereas the APES algorithm is similar to the Capon method except that it provides a better amplitude estimate. In this paper, the ASR technique, the APES algorithm and data extrapolation are used to generate radar images of two experimental targets and an airborne target. It is shown that although for ideal situations (point targets) the APES algorithm provides the best radar images (reduced sidelobe level and sharp main lobe), its performance degrades quickly for real world targets. The ASR algorithm gives radar images with low sidelobes but at the cost of some loss of information about the target. Also, there is not much improvement in radar image resolution. Data extrapolation, on the other hand, improves image resolution. In this case one can reduce the sidelobes by using non-uniform weights. Any loss in the radar image resolution due to non-uniform weights can be compensated by further extrapolating the scattered field data.

  10. Interpretation techniques. [image enhancement and pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragg, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    The image enhancement and geometric correction and registration techniques developed and/or demonstrated on ERTS data are relatively mature and greatly enhance the utility of the data for a large variety of users. Pattern recognition was improved by the use of signature extension, feature extension, and other classification techniques. Many of these techniques need to be developed and generalized to become operationally useful. Advancements in the mass precision processing of ERTS were demonstrated, providing the hope for future earth resources data to be provided in a more readily usable state. Also in evidence is an increasing and healthy interaction between the techniques developers and the user/applications investigators.

  11. A summary of image segmentation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spirkovska, Lilly

    1993-01-01

    Machine vision systems are often considered to be composed of two subsystems: low-level vision and high-level vision. Low level vision consists primarily of image processing operations performed on the input image to produce another image with more favorable characteristics. These operations may yield images with reduced noise or cause certain features of the image to be emphasized (such as edges). High-level vision includes object recognition and, at the highest level, scene interpretation. The bridge between these two subsystems is the segmentation system. Through segmentation, the enhanced input image is mapped into a description involving regions with common features which can be used by the higher level vision tasks. There is no theory on image segmentation. Instead, image segmentation techniques are basically ad hoc and differ mostly in the way they emphasize one or more of the desired properties of an ideal segmenter and in the way they balance and compromise one desired property against another. These techniques can be categorized in a number of different groups including local vs. global, parallel vs. sequential, contextual vs. noncontextual, interactive vs. automatic. In this paper, we categorize the schemes into three main groups: pixel-based, edge-based, and region-based. Pixel-based segmentation schemes classify pixels based solely on their gray levels. Edge-based schemes first detect local discontinuities (edges) and then use that information to separate the image into regions. Finally, region-based schemes start with a seed pixel (or group of pixels) and then grow or split the seed until the original image is composed of only homogeneous regions. Because there are a number of survey papers available, we will not discuss all segmentation schemes. Rather than a survey, we take the approach of a detailed overview. We focus only on the more common approaches in order to give the reader a flavor for the variety of techniques available yet present enough

  12. Electrostatic Capacitive Imaging: A New NDE Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond, G.; Hutchins, D. A.; Leong, K. K.; Gan, T. H.

    2007-03-01

    A new technique for NDE has been developed which is capable of imaging a wide range of materials and structures, ranging from insulators to metallic conductors. The approach, known as Capacitive Imaging (CI) uses electrode arrays in air to produce an AC electric field distribution within the material. Scanning the electrodes over the material causes a change in the field distribution, and hence changes in output voltage. Capacitive coupling allows the technique to work on a wide variety of material conductivities without some of the disadvantages associated with conventional eddy current and potential drop methods. Images are presented of carbon fibre composite materials, concrete and Plexiglas, illustrating the range of application in NDE. The effect of electrode shape and excitation frequency will be discussed in terms of image resolution and depth of penetration.

  13. Imaging through scattering media by interferometric techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, A. M.; Aleksoff, C. C.; Chang, B. J.

    1981-07-01

    It is shown that while holographic techniques are effective in seeing through such scattering media as fog, their usefulness in field applications is limited by the requirement of a separate reference beam. An alternative interferometric technique that uses a grating interferometric imaging system is presented, whose main advantage is a relatively high tolerance to normal vibration and air disturbances. It is proposed that the system incorporate a recording device that combines an image converter-intensifier with a real time light modulator. In addition to permitting real time operation, such a device would also increase system sensitivity and permit the use of IR illumination.

  14. Retinal Image Simulation of Subjective Refraction Techniques.

    PubMed

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Refraction techniques make it possible to determine the most appropriate sphero-cylindrical lens prescription to achieve the best possible visual quality. Among these techniques, subjective refraction (i.e., patient's response-guided refraction) is the most commonly used approach. In this context, this paper's main goal is to present a simulation software that implements in a virtual manner various subjective-refraction techniques--including Jackson's Cross-Cylinder test (JCC)--relying all on the observation of computer-generated retinal images. This software has also been used to evaluate visual quality when the JCC test is performed in multifocal-contact-lens wearers. The results reveal this software's usefulness to simulate the retinal image quality that a particular visual compensation provides. Moreover, it can help to gain a deeper insight and to improve existing refraction techniques and it can be used for simulated training. PMID:26938648

  15. Red flag imaging techniques in Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Payal; Canto, Marcia Irene

    2013-07-01

    The key to detection and treatment of early neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus (BE) is thorough and careful inspection of the Barrett's segment. The greatest role for red flag techniques is to help identify neoplastic lesions for targeted biopsy and therapy. High-definition white light endoscopy (HD-WLE) can potentially improve endoscopic imaging of BE compared with standard endoscopy, but little scientific evidence supports this. The addition of autofluorescence imaging to HD-WLE and narrow band imaging increases sensitivity and the false-positive rate without significantly improving overall detection of BE-related neoplasia. PMID:23735101

  16. Angular Differential Imaging: a Powerful High-Contrast Imaging Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Marois, C; Lafreniere, D; Doyon, R; Macintosh, B; Nadeau, D

    2005-11-07

    Angular differential imaging is a high-contrast imaging technique that reduces speckle noise from quasi-static optical aberrations and facilitates the detection of faint nearby companions. A sequence of images is acquired with an altitude/azimuth telescope, the instrument rotator being turned off. This keeps the instrument and telescope optics aligned, stabilizes the instrumental PSF and allows the field of view to rotate with respect to the instrument. For each image, a reference PSF obtained from other images of the sequence is subtracted. All residual images are then rotated to align the field and are median combined. Observed performances are reported for Gemini Altair/NIRI data. Inside the speckle dominated region of the PSF, it is shown that quasi-static PSF noise can be reduced by a factor {approx}5 for each image subtraction. The combination of all residuals then provides an additional gain of the order of the square root of the total number of images acquired. To our knowledge, this is the first time an acquisition strategy and reduction pipeline designed for speckle attenuation and high contrast imaging is demonstrated to significantly get better detection limits with longer integration times at all angular separations. A PSF noise attenuation of 100 was achieved from 2-hour long sequences of images of Vega, reaching a 5-sigma contrast of 20 magnitudes for separations greater than 7''. This technique can be used with currently available instruments to search for {approx} 1 M{sub Jup} exoplanets with orbits of radii between 50 and 300 AU around nearby young stars. The possibility of combining the technique with other high-contrast imaging methods is briefly discussed.

  17. Three-dimensional curvilinear device reconstruction from two fluoroscopic views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmas, Charlotte; Berger, Marie-Odile; Kerrien, Erwan; Riddell, Cyril; Trousset, Yves; Anxionnat, René; Bracard, Serge

    2015-03-01

    In interventional radiology, navigating devices under the sole guidance of fluoroscopic images inside a complex architecture of tortuous and narrow vessels like the cerebral vascular tree is a difficult task. Visualizing the device in 3D could facilitate this navigation. For curvilinear devices such as guide-wires and catheters, a 3D reconstruction may be achieved using two simultaneous fluoroscopic views, as available on a biplane acquisition system. The purpose of this paper is to present a new automatic three-dimensional curve reconstruction method that has the potential to reconstruct complex 3D curves and does not require a perfect segmentation of the endovascular device. Using epipolar geometry, our algorithm translates the point correspondence problem into a segment correspondence problem. Candidate 3D curves can be formed and evaluated independently after identifying all possible combinations of compatible 3D segments. Correspondence is then inherently solved by looking in 3D space for the most coherent curve in terms of continuity and curvature. This problem can be cast into a graph problem where the most coherent curve corresponds to the shortest path of a weighted graph. We present quantitative results of curve reconstructions performed from numerically simulated projections of tortuous 3D curves extracted from cerebral vascular trees affected with brain arteriovenous malformations as well as fluoroscopic image pairs of a guide-wire from both phantom and clinical sets. Our method was able to select the correct 3D segments in 97.5% of simulated cases thus demonstrating its ability to handle complex 3D curves and can deal with imperfect 2D segmentation.

  18. Retinal Imaging Techniques for Diabetic Retinopathy Screening.

    PubMed

    Goh, James Kang Hao; Cheung, Carol Y; Sim, Shaun Sebastian; Tan, Pok Chien; Tan, Gavin Siew Wei; Wong, Tien Yin

    2016-03-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus, demand for diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening platforms is steeply increasing. Early detection and treatment of DR are key public health interventions that can greatly reduce the likelihood of vision loss. Current DR screening programs typically employ retinal fundus photography, which relies on skilled readers for manual DR assessment. However, this is labor-intensive and suffers from inconsistency across sites. Hence, there has been a recent proliferation of automated retinal image analysis software that may potentially alleviate this burden cost-effectively. Furthermore, current screening programs based on 2-dimensional fundus photography do not effectively screen for diabetic macular edema (DME). Optical coherence tomography is becoming increasingly recognized as the reference standard for DME assessment and can potentially provide a cost-effective solution for improving DME detection in large-scale DR screening programs. Current screening techniques are also unable to image the peripheral retina and require pharmacological pupil dilation; ultra-widefield imaging and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, which address these drawbacks, possess great potential. In this review, we summarize the current DR screening methods using various retinal imaging techniques, and also outline future possibilities. Advances in retinal imaging techniques can potentially transform the management of patients with diabetes, providing savings in health care costs and resources. PMID:26830491

  19. New techniques in articular cartilage imaging.

    PubMed

    Potter, Hollis G; Black, Brandon R; Chong, Le Roy

    2009-01-01

    Standardized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pulse sequences provide an accurate, reproducible assessment of cartilage morphology. Three-dimensional (3D) modeling techniques enable semiautomated models of the joint surface and thickness measurements, which may eventually prove essential in templating before partial or total joint resurfacing as well as focal cartilage repair. Quantitative MRI techniques, such as T2 mapping, T1 rho, and delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC), provide noninvasive information about cartilage and repair tissue biochemistry. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) demonstrate information regarding the regional anisotropic variation of cartilage ultrastructure. Further research strengthening the association between quantitative MRI and cartilage material properties may predict the functional capacity of native and repaired tissue. MRI provides an essential objective assessment of cartilage regenerative procedures. PMID:19064167

  20. Imaging Instrumentation and Techniques for Precision Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parodi, Katia; Parodi, Katia; Thieke, Christian; Thieke, Christian

    Over the last decade, several technological advances have considerably improved the achievable precision of dose delivery in radiation therapy. Clinical exploitation of the superior tumor-dose conformality offered by modern radiotherapy techniques like intensity-modulated radiotherapy and ion beam therapy requires morphological and functional assessment of the tumor during the entire therapy chain from treatment planning to beam application and treatment response evaluation. This chapter will address the main rationale and role of imaging in state-of-the-art external beam radiotherapy. Moreover, it will present the status of novel imaging instrumentation and techniques being nowadays introduced in clinical use or still under development for image guidance and, ultimately, dose guidance of precision radiotherapy.

  1. [Cucumber diseases diagnosis using multispectral imaging technique].

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Liao, Ning-Fang; Zhao, Bo; Luo, Yong-Dao; Li, Bao-Ju

    2009-02-01

    For a reliable diagnosis of plant diseases and insect pests, spectroscopy analysis technique and mutispectral imaging technique are proposed to diagnose five cucumber diseases, namely Trichothecium roseum, Sphaerotheca fuliginea, Cladosporium cucumerinum, Corynespora cassiicola and Pseudoperonospora cubensis. In the experiment, the cucumbers' multispectral images of 14 visible lights channels, near infrared channel and panchromatic channel were captured using narrow-band multispectral imaging system under standard observation environment. And the 5 cucumber diseases, healthy leaves and reference white were classified using their multispectral information, the distance, angle and relativity. The discrimination of Trichothecium roseum, Sphaerotheca fuliginea, Cladosporium cucumerinum, and reference white was 100%, and that of Pseudoperonospora cubensis and healthy leaves was 80% and 93.33% respectively. The mean correct discrimination of diseases was 81.90% when the distance and relativity were used together. The result shows that the method realized good accuracy in the cucumber diseases diagnosis. PMID:19445229

  2. A physical comparison of a fluoroscopic CAT system and the EMI head scanner. [Computerized Axial Tomograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.; Keller, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A quantitative comparison of the capabilities to produce computerized tomograms was made between the EMI head scanner and reconstructions from images provided by a large screen low light level-TV camera fluoroscopic system. A phantom made from lucite containing rods of various materials and sizes was used. The computer printout of each was analyzed and a correlation of 0.8 was noted between the results of both systems. The differential attenuation detectability of the fluoroscopic system was found to be comparable to or better than the EMI unit. As expected from a consideration of the quantum statistics for each system, the noise in the obtained reconstructions was also comparable. It is concluded that such a fluoroscopic system performs favorably when compared to the presently available commercial systems.

  3. Retinal Image Simulation of Subjective Refraction Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M. Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Refraction techniques make it possible to determine the most appropriate sphero-cylindrical lens prescription to achieve the best possible visual quality. Among these techniques, subjective refraction (i.e., patient’s response-guided refraction) is the most commonly used approach. In this context, this paper’s main goal is to present a simulation software that implements in a virtual manner various subjective-refraction techniques—including Jackson’s Cross-Cylinder test (JCC)—relying all on the observation of computer-generated retinal images. This software has also been used to evaluate visual quality when the JCC test is performed in multifocal-contact-lens wearers. The results reveal this software’s usefulness to simulate the retinal image quality that a particular visual compensation provides. Moreover, it can help to gain a deeper insight and to improve existing refraction techniques and it can be used for simulated training. PMID:26938648

  4. Use of the Microangiographic Fluoroscope for Coiling of Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Binning, Mandy J.; Orion, David; Yashar, Parham; Webb, Sharon; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Jain, Amit; Rudin, Stephen; Hopkins, L. Nelson; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Levy, Elad I.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Neurointervention is an ever-evolving specialty with tools including microcatheters, microwires, and coils that allow treatment of pathological conditions in increasingly smaller intracranial arteries, requiring increasing accuracy. As endovascular tools evolve, so too should the imaging. OBJECTIVE To detail the use of microangiography performed with a novel fluoroscope during coiling of intracranial aneurysms in 2 separate patients and discuss the benefits and potential limitations of the technology. METHODS The microangiographic fluoroscope (MAF) is an ultra high-resolution x-ray detector with superior resolution over a small field of view. The MAF can be incorporated into a standard angiographic C-arm system for use during endovascular procedures. RESULTS The MAF was useful for improved visualization during endovascular coiling of 2 unruptured intracranial aneurysms, without adding significant time to the procedure. No significant residual aneurysm filling was identified post-coiling, and no complications occurred. CONCLUSION The MAF is a high-resolution detector developed for use in neurointerventional cases in which superior image quality over a small field of view is required. It has been used with success for coiling of 2 unruptured aneurysms at our institution. It shows promise as an important tool in improving the accuracy with which neurointerventionists can perform certain intracranial procedures. PMID:21694658

  5. Image Recognition Techniques for Gamma Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vlachos, D. S.; Tsabaris, C. G.

    2007-12-26

    Photons, after generated from a radioactive source and before they deposit their energy in a photo detector, are subsequent to multiple scattering mechanisms. As a result, the measured energy from the photo detector is different from the energy the photon had when generated. This is known as folding of the photon energy. Moreover, statistical fluctuation inside the detector contribute to energy folding. In this work, a new method is presented for unfolding the gamma ray spectrum. The method uses a 2-dimensional representation of the measured spectrum (image) and then uses image recognition techniques, and especially differential edge detection, to generate the original spectrum.

  6. Advanced Optical Imaging Techniques for Neurodevelopment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yicong; Christensen, Ryan; Colón-Ramos, Daniel; Shroff, Hari

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, developmental neuroscience has been transformed by the widespread application of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Even greater progress is imminent, as recent innovations in microscopy now enable imaging with increased depth, speed, and spatial resolution; reduced phototoxicity; and in some cases without external fluorescent probes. We discuss these new techniques and emphasize their dramatic impact on neurobiology, including the ability to image neurons at depths exceeding 1 mm, to observe neurodevelopment noninvasively throughout embryogenesis, and to visualize neuronal processes or structures that were previously too small or too difficult to target with conventional microscopy. PMID:23831260

  7. Respiratory-aspirated 35-mm hairpin successfully retrieved with a Teflon® snare system under fluoroscopic guidance via a split endotracheal tube: a useful technique in cases of failed extraction by bronchoscopy and avoiding the need for a thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Gill, S S; Pease, R A; Ashwin, C J; Gill, S S; Tait, N P

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory foreign body aspiration (FBA) is a common global health problem requiring prompt recognition and early treatment to prevent potentially fatal complications. The majority of FBAs are due to organic objects and treatment is usually via either endoscopic or surgical extraction. FBA of a straight hairpin has been described as a unique entity in the literature, occurring most commonly in females, particularly during adolescence. In the process of inserting hairpins, the pins will typically be between the teeth with the head tilted backwards, while tying their hair with both hands. This position increases the risk of aspiration, particularly if there is any sudden coughing or laughing. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a 35-mm straight metallic hairpin foreign body that has been successfully retrieved by a radiological snare system under fluoroscopic guidance. This was achieved with the use of a split endotracheal tube, and therefore avoided the need for a thoracotomy in an adolescent female patient. PMID:22919019

  8. Effect of Off-Axis Fluoroscopy Imaging on Two-Dimensional Kinematics in the Lumbar Spine: A Dynamic In Vitro Validation Study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kristin D; Ben-Abraham, Ephraim I; Magnuson, Dixon J; Camp, Jon J; Berglund, Lawrence J; An, Kai-Nan; Bronfort, Gert; Gay, Ralph E

    2016-05-01

    Spine intersegmental motion parameters and the resultant regional patterns may be useful for biomechanical classification of low back pain (LBP) as well as assessing the appropriate intervention strategy. Because of its availability and reasonable cost, two-dimensional (2D) fluoroscopy has great potential as a diagnostic and evaluative tool. However, the technique of quantifying intervertebral motion in the lumbar spine must be validated, and the sensitivity assessed. The purpose of this investigation was to (1) compare synchronous fluoroscopic and optoelectronic measures of intervertebral rotations during dynamic flexion-extension movements in vitro and (2) assess the effect of C-arm rotation to simulate off-axis patient alignment on intervertebral kinematics measures. Six cadaveric lumbar-sacrum specimens were dissected, and active marker optoelectronic sensors were rigidly attached to the bodies of L2-S1. Fluoroscopic sequences and optoelectronic kinematic data (0.15-mm linear, 0.17-0.20 deg rotational, accuracy) were obtained simultaneously. After images were obtained in a true sagittal plane, the image receptor was rotated in 5 deg increments (posterior oblique angulations) from 5 deg to 15 deg. Quantitative motion analysis (qma) software was used to determine the intersegmental rotations from the fluoroscopic images. The mean absolute rotation differences between optoelectronic values and dynamic fluoroscopic values were less than 0.5 deg for all the motion segments at each off-axis fluoroscopic rotation and were not significantly different (P > 0.05) for any of the off-axis rotations of the fluoroscope. Small misalignments of the lumbar spine relative to the fluoroscope did not introduce measurement variation in relative segmental rotations greater than that observed when the spine and fluoroscope were perpendicular to each other, suggesting that fluoroscopic measures of relative segmental rotation during flexion-extension are likely robust

  9. Pork grade evaluation using hyperspectral imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Rui; Cai, Bo; Wang, Shoubing; Ji, Huihua; Chen, Huacai

    2011-11-01

    The method to evaluate the grade of the pork based on hyperspectral imaging techniques was studied. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed on the hyperspectral image data to extract the principal components which were used as the inputs of the evaluation model. By comparing the different discriminating rates in the calibration set and the validation set under different information, the choice of the components can be optimized. Experimental results showed that the classification evaluation model was the optimal when the principal of component (PC) of spectra was 3, while the corresponding discriminating rate was 89.1% in the calibration set and 84.9% in the validation set. It was also good when the PC of images was 9, while the corresponding discriminating rate was 97.2% in the calibration set and 91.1% in the validation set. The evaluation model based on both information of spectra and images was built, in which the corresponding PCs of spectra and images were used as the inputs. This model performed very well in grade classification evaluation, and the discriminating rates of calibration set and validation set were 99.5% and 92.7%, respectively, which were better than the two evaluation models based on single information of spectra or images.

  10. Research on hyperspectral polarization imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Haibo; Feng, Lei; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Zheng; Lin, Xuling

    2015-08-01

    The summary of hyperspectral polarization remote sensing detection is presented, including the characteristics and mechanism of polarization detection, the expression of polarization light and the detection method. The present research of hyperspectral polarization remote sensing is introduced. A novel method of hyperspectral polarization imaging technique is discussed, which is based on static modulation adding with the double refraction crystal. The static modulation is composed of one polarizer and two retarders. The double refraction crystal is used to generate interference image. The four Stokes vectors and spectral information can be detected only by one measurement. The method of static modulation is introduced in detail and is simulated by computer. The experimental system is also established in laboratory. The basic concept of the technique is verified. The simulation error of DOP (polarization degree detection) is about 1%. The experimental error of DOP is less than 5%. The merits of the novel system are no moving parts, compactness and no electrical element.

  11. Lunar surface chemistry: A new imaging technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andre, C.G.; Bielefeld, M.J.; Eliason, E.; Soderblom, L.A.; Adler, I.; Philpotts, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    Detailed chemical maps of the lunar surface have been constructed by applying a new weighted-filter imaging technique to Apollo 15 and Apollo 16 x-ray fluorescence data. The data quality improvement is amply demonstrated by (i) modes in the frequency distribution, representing highland and mare soil suites, which are not evident before data filtering and (ii) numerous examples of chemical variations which are correlated with small-scale (about 15 kilometer) lunar topographic features.

  12. Noncontrast MR techniques and imaging of cartilage.

    PubMed

    Koff, Mathew F; Potter, Hollis G

    2009-05-01

    Recent advances in noncontrast MR imaging produce images with higher quality for standardized diagnostic interpretation and in many cases may obviate the need for intra-articular contrast agents. These techniques may now be applied to all joints, and are particularly efficacious in the assessment of articular cartilage. Additional specialized noncontrast sequences enable the direct quantitative assessment of articular cartilage and other joint structures, thereby providing indirect assessment of tissue health and biochemistry. T2 mapping displays local water content and collagen fibril orientation, and the method of T1 rho mapping displays the local proteoglycan content of the tissue. Ultrashort echo imaging improves the contrast of joint structures with high tissue isotropy or low water content, such as ligament, tendon, and meniscus. PMID:19361672

  13. [Direct and indirect mucosal wave imaging techniques].

    PubMed

    Krasnodębska, Paulina; Szkiełkowska, Agata

    2016-04-01

    The vocal folds play a key role in the process of phonation. Cyclical movements of the vocal folds model a space called glottis, what leads to voice formation. The space contains surface between the vocal folds and the inner surface of the arytenoid cartilages. The best indicator of the vocal folds vibratory function is the mucosal wave. The presence and size of the mucosal wave is widely recognized as an indicator of tension and plasticity of vocal folds. It is also essential in the process of creating a proper, resonant voice. In the article, current knowledge of mucosal wave imaging techniques is given. Imaging can be carried out directly and indirectly. Among the direct methods, the following are distinguished: laryngostroboscopy, laryngovideostroboscopy, videokymography and high-speed digital imaging. Indirect methods include: electroglottography, photoglottography and ultrasonography. PMID:27137829

  14. Biometric Identification Using Holographic Radar Imaging Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, Douglas L.; Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.; Kennedy, Mike O.; Foote, Harlan P.

    2007-04-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers have been at the forefront of developing innovative screening systems to enhance security and a novel imaging system to provide custom-fit clothing using holographic radar imaging techniques. First-of-a-kind cylindrical holographic imaging systems have been developed to screen people at security checkpoints for the detection of concealed, body worn, non-metallic threats such as plastic and liquid explosives, knifes and contraband. Another embodiment of this technology is capable of obtaining full sized body measurements in near real time without the person under surveillance removing their outer garments. Radar signals readily penetrate clothing and reflect off the water in skin. This full body measurement system is commercially available for best fitting ready to wear clothing, which was the first “biometric” application for this technology. One compelling feature of this technology for security biometric applications is that it can see effectively through disguises, appliances and body hair.

  15. Imaging Body Fat: Techniques and Cardiometabolic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H.; Chen, Y. E; Eitzman, D.T.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a world-wide epidemic and is associated with multiple comorbidities. The mechanisms underlying the relationship between obesity and adverse health outcomes remain poorly understood. This may be due to several factors including the crude measures used to estimate adiposity, the striking heterogeneity between adipose tissue depots, and the influence of fat accumulation in multiple organs. In order to advance our understanding of fat stores and associated co-morbidities in humans, it will be necessary to image adiposity throughout the body and ultimately also assess its functionality. Large clinical studies are demonstrating the prognostic importance of adipose tissue imaging. Newer techniques capable of imaging fat metabolism and other functions of adipose tissue may provide additional prognostic utility and may be useful in guiding therapeutic interventions. PMID:25147343

  16. Diagnostic imaging techniques in thyroid cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.; Toriumi, D.M.; Mafee, M.F.

    1988-02-01

    With the refinement of fine-needle aspiration, the specific applications of thyroid imaging techniques need to be reevaluated for efficiency and cost containment. No thyroid imaging test should be routinely obtained. Radionuclide scanning is most beneficial in evaluating the functional status of thyroid nodules when fine-needle aspiration is inadequate, the findings are benign, or when there is no discrete nodule that is palpated in an enlarged gland. When fine-needle aspiration is unavailable or unreliable, radionuclide scanning becomes a first-line diagnostic tool. Ultrasonography should be used primarily for identifying a solid component of a cystic nodule, determining the size of nodules on thyroxine suppression that are not easily palpable, or for performing guided fine-needle aspiration. Computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging both have a definite role in the evaluation of thyroid tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging is superior to computerized tomography for the evaluation of metastatic, retrotracheal, or mediastinal involvement of large thyroid tumors or goiters. Careful selection of the diagnostic techniques will ensure more accurate diagnosis and reduce unnecessary patient costs in the treatment of thyroid cancer.

  17. Optical replication techniques for image slicers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmoll, J.; Robertson, D. J.; Dubbeldam, C. M.; Bortoletto, F.; Pina, L.; Hudec, R.; Prieto, E.; Norrie, C.; Ramsay-Howat, S.

    2006-06-01

    The smart focal planes (SmartFP) activity is an European Joint Research Activity funded to develop novel optical technologies for future large telescope instrumentation [Cunningham C.R., et al., 2004. SPIE 5382, 718-726]. In this paper, we will discuss the image slicer developments being carried out as part of this initiative. Image slicing techniques have many applications in the plans for instrumentation on extremely large telescopes and will be central to the delivery of the science case. A study of a virtual multi-object multi-ifu spectrograph and imager (MOMSI) for a hypothetical OWL-class telescope reveals the need for focal plane splitting, deployable imagers and very small beam steering elements like deployable IFUs. The image slicer workpackage, lead from Durham University in collaboration with LFM Bremen, TNO Delft, UKATC Edinburgh, CRAL Lyon, LAM Marseille, Padua University and REFLEX Prague, is evaluating technologies for manufacturing micro optics in large numbers to enable multi-object integral field spectroscopy.

  18. Order of magnitude reduction of fluoroscopic x-ray dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, Abhinav; Robert, Normand; Machan, Lindsay; Deutsch, Meir; Kisselgoff, David; Babyn, Paul; Rowlands, John A.

    2012-03-01

    The role of fluoroscopic imaging is critical for diagnostic and image guided therapy. However, fluoroscopic imaging can require significant radiation leading to increased cancer risk and non-stochastic effects such as radiation burns. Our purpose is to reduce the exposure and dose to the patient by an order of magnitude in these procedures by use of the region of interest method. Method and Materials: Region of interest fluoroscopy (ROIF) uses a partial attenuator. The central region of the image has full exposure while the image periphery, there to provide context only, has a reduced exposure rate. ROIF using a static partial attenuator has been shown in our previous studies to reduce the dose area product (DAP) to the patient by at least 2.5 times. Significantly greater reductions in DAP would require improvements in flat panel detectors performance at low x-ray exposures or a different x-ray attenuation strategy. Thus we have investigated a second, dynamic, approach. We have constructed an x-ray shutter system allowing a normal x-ray exposure in the region of interest while reducing the number of x-ray exposures in the periphery through the rapid introduction, positioning and removal of an x-ray attenuating shutter to block radiation only for selected frames. This dynamic approach eliminates the DQE(0) loss associated with the use of static partial attenuator applied to every frame thus permitting a greater reduction in DAP. Results: We have compared the two methods by modeling and determined their fundamental limits.

  19. Spatio-Temporal Multiscale Denoising of Fluoroscopic Sequence.

    PubMed

    Amiot, Carole; Girard, Catherine; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Pescatore, Jeremie; Desvignes, Michel

    2016-06-01

    In the past 20 years, a wide range of complex fluoroscopically guided procedures have shown considerable growth. Biologic effects of the exposure (radiation induced burn, cancer) lead to reduce the dose during the intervention, for the safety of patients and medical staff. However, when the dose is reduced, image quality decreases, with a high level of noise and a very low contrast. Efficient restoration and denoising algorithms should overcome this drawback. We propose a spatio-temporal filter operating in a multi-scales space. This filter relies on a first order, motion compensated, recursive temporal denoising. Temporal high frequency content is first detected and then matched over time to allow for a strong denoising in the temporal axis. We study this filter in the curvelet domain and in the dual-tree complex wavelet domain, and compare those results to state of the art methods. Quantitative and qualitative analysis on both synthetic and real fluoroscopic sequences demonstrate that the proposed filter allows a great dose reduction. PMID:26812705

  20. Robustness of speckle imaging techniques applied to horizontal imaging scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Jeremy P.

    Atmospheric turbulence near the ground severely limits the quality of imagery acquired over long horizontal paths. In defense, surveillance, and border security applications, there is interest in deploying man-portable, embedded systems incorporating image reconstruction to improve the quality of imagery available to operators. To be effective, these systems must operate over significant variations in turbulence conditions while also subject to other variations due to operation by novice users. Systems that meet these requirements and are otherwise designed to be immune to the factors that cause variation in performance are considered robust. In addition to robustness in design, the portable nature of these systems implies a preference for systems with a minimum level of computational complexity. Speckle imaging methods are one of a variety of methods recently been proposed for use in man-portable horizontal imagers. In this work, the robustness of speckle imaging methods is established by identifying a subset of design parameters that provide immunity to the expected variations in operating conditions while minimizing the computation time necessary for image recovery. This performance evaluation is made possible using a novel technique for simulating anisoplanatic image formation. I find that incorporate as few as 15 image frames and 4 estimates of the object phase per reconstructed frame provide an average reduction of 45% reduction in Mean Squared Error (MSE) and 68% reduction in deviation in MSE. In addition, the Knox-Thompson phase recovery method is demonstrated to produce images in half the time required by the bispectrum. Finally, it is shown that certain blind image quality metrics can be used in place of the MSE to evaluate reconstruction quality in field scenarios. Using blind metrics rather depending on user estimates allows for reconstruction quality that differs from the minimum MSE by as little as 1%, significantly reducing the deviation in

  1. Special feature on imaging systems and techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wuqiang; Giakos, George

    2013-07-01

    The IEEE International Conference on Imaging Systems and Techniques (IST'2012) was held in Manchester, UK, on 16-17 July 2012. The participants came from 26 countries or regions: Austria, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, India, Iran, Iraq, Italy, Japan, Korea, Latvia, Malaysia, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Tunisia, UAE, UK and USA. The technical program of the conference consisted of a series of scientific and technical sessions, exploring physical principles, engineering and applications of new imaging systems and techniques, as reflected by the diversity of the submitted papers. Following a rigorous review process, a total of 123 papers were accepted, and they were organized into 30 oral presentation sessions and a poster session. In addition, six invited keynotes were arranged. The conference not only provided the participants with a unique opportunity to exchange ideas and disseminate research outcomes but also paved a way to establish global collaboration. Following the IST'2012, a total of 55 papers, which were technically extended substantially from their versions in the conference proceeding, were submitted as regular papers to this special feature of Measurement Science and Technology . Following a rigorous reviewing process, 25 papers have been finally accepted for publication in this special feature and they are organized into three categories: (1) industrial tomography, (2) imaging systems and techniques and (3) image processing. These papers not only present the latest developments in the field of imaging systems and techniques but also offer potential solutions to existing problems. We hope that this special feature provides a good reference for researchers who are active in the field and will serve as a catalyst to trigger further research. It has been our great pleasure to be the guest editors of this special feature. We would like to thank the authors for their contributions, without which it would

  2. Imaging Techniques in Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Pérez del Villar, Candelas; Yotti, Raquel; Bermejo, Javier

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, imaging techniques have revolutionized the diagnosis of heart failure. In patients with a clinical picture of acute decompensation, prognosis is largely determined by early implementation of general measures and treatment of the underlying cause. Given its diagnostic yield and portability, ultrasound has become an essential tool in the setting of acute heart failure, and is currently found in all medical departments involved in the care of the critically ill patient. Cardiac magnetic resonance and computed tomography allow detailed characterization of multiple aspects of cardiac structure and function that were previously unavailable. This helps guide and monitor many of the treatment decisions in the acute heart failure population in an entirely noninvasive way. This article aims to review the usefulness of the imaging techniques that are clinically relevant in the context of an episode of acute heart failure. We discuss the indications and limitations of these techniques in detail and describe the general principles for the appropriate interpretation of results. PMID:26002273

  3. Multiresolution segmentation technique for spine MRI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haiyun; Yan, Chye H.; Ong, Sim Heng; Chui, Cheekong K.; Teoh, Swee H.

    2002-05-01

    In this paper, we describe a hybrid method for segmentation of spinal magnetic resonance imaging that has been developed based on the natural phenomenon of stones appearing as water recedes. The candidate segmentation region corresponds to the stones with characteristics similar to that of intensity extrema, edges, intensity ridge and grey-level blobs. The segmentation method is implemented based on a combination of wavelet multiresolution decomposition and fuzzy clustering. First thresholding is performed dynamically according to local characteristic to detect possible target areas, We then use fuzzy c-means clustering in concert with wavelet multiscale edge detection to identify the maximum likelihood anatomical and functional target areas. Fuzzy C-Means uses iterative optimization of an objective function based on a weighted similarity measure between the pixels in the image and each of c cluster centers. Local extrema of this objective function are indicative of an optimal clustering of the input data. The multiscale edges can be detected and characterized from local maxima of the modulus of the wavelet transform while the noise can be reduced to some extent by enacting thresholds. The method provides an efficient and robust algorithm for spinal image segmentation. Examples are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the technique on some spinal MRI images.

  4. Atherosclerosis staging: imaging using FLIM technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicchieri, Leticia B.; Barioni, Marina Berardi; Silva, Mônica Nascimento; Monteiro, Andrea Moreira; Figueiredo Neto, Antonio Martins; Ito, Amando S.; Courrol, Lilia C.

    2014-03-01

    In this work it was used fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) to analyze biochemical composition of atherosclerotic plaque. For this purpose an animal experimentation was done with New Zealand rabbits divided into two groups: a control group of 4 rabbits that received a regular diet for 0, 20, 40 and 60 days; and an experimental group of 9 rabbits, divided in 3 subgroups, that were fed with 1% cholesterol diet for 20, 40 and 60 days respectively. The aortas slices stained with europium chlortetracycline were analyzed by FLIM exciting samples at 440 nm. The results shown an increase in the lifetime imaging of rabbits fed with cholesterol. It was observed that is possible to detect the metabolic changes associated with atherosclerosis at an early stage using FLIM technique exciting the tissue around 440 nm and observing autofluorescence lifetime. Lifetimes longer than 1.75 ns suggest the presence of porphyrins in the tissue and consequently, inflammation and the presence of macrophages.

  5. Novel imaging techniques for diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Lobo, C; Bernardes, R; Faria de Abreu, J R; Cunha-Vaz, J G

    1999-01-01

    Retinal edema should be defined as any increase of water of the retinal tissue resulting in an increase in its volume. It may be of cytotoxic or vasogenic origin. Development of vasogenic macular edema is dependent on a series of factors such as blood pressure, blood-retinal barrier permeability, retinal cell damage, retinal tissue osmotic pressure and retinal tissue compliance. Objective measurements of retinal thickness are now possible using the Retinal Thickness Analyser. Localised measurements of blood-retinal barrier permeability may also be obtained using the Retinal Leakage Analyser, a modified confocal scanning laser fluorometer, while obtaining simultaneously angiographic images of the choroid and retina. These new imaging techniques show that cytotoxic and vasogenic retinal edema may occur independently in the early stages of diabetic retinopathy. These findings offer new perspectives for designing novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:10896349

  6. [Radiation exposure from shoe-fitting fluoroscopes].

    PubMed

    Busch, Uwe

    2015-03-01

    It is 40 years ago that a very popular X-ray device disappeared in German shoe shops: the shoe-fitting fluoroscope or Pedoskop. Since the 1930s, these X-ray machines were an integral part of any good shoe business. Following the entry into force X-Ray Regulation (RöV 1973) the use of these devices was prohibited in Germany. PMID:25023417

  7. Managing uncertainty in complex interventional fluoroscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Leuenberger, Ronald; Meade, Jason A

    2014-11-01

    There was a concern for potential patient skin burns indicated by air kerma as recorded by fluoroscopy equipment during two interventional fluoroscopic procedures. Two sentinel events as defined by The Joint Commission were indicated. Dose reconstruction based on measurements of machine output showed the air kerma readings were high by approximately a factor of four and no patient injury or sentinel event occurred. The radiation safety program in effect at the time of the incidents allowed discovery of equipment problems before a serious patient injury occurred, but additional controls have been implemented as a result, including quality control checks performed by cardiology, additional training, a database for tracking equipment maintenance, and mandatory entry of patient dose into electronic health records with follow-up orders automatically generated by the electronic health records. Most unexpected injuries are a result of multiple failures, but there are also multiple opportunities to prevent the injury. This paper provides a comprehensive look at patient safety concerns during two interventional cardiology fluoroscopic procedures and offers ways to further reduce risks to patients. It focuses on lessons learned and a systems-based approach to improving and promoting radiation safety during complex interventional fluoroscopic procedures. PMID:25272028

  8. Fast Imaging Technique for fMRI: Consecutive Multishot Echo Planar Imaging Accelerated with GRAPPA Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Daehun; Sung, Yul-Wan; Kang, Chang-Ki

    2015-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the proposed consecutive multishot echo planar imaging (cmsEPI) combined with a parallel imaging technique in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and acceleration for a functional imaging study. We developed cmsEPI sequence using both consecutively acquired multishot EPI segments and variable flip angles to minimize the delay between segments and to maximize the SNR, respectively. We also combined cmsEPI with the generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions (GRAPPA) method. Temporal SNRs were measured at different acceleration factors and number of segments for functional sensitivity evaluation. We also examined the geometric distortions, which inherently occurred in EPI sequence. The practical acceleration factors, R = 2 or R = 3, of the proposed technique improved the temporal SNR by maximally 18% in phantom test and by averagely 8.2% in in vivo experiment, compared to cmsEPI without parallel imaging. The data collection time was decreased in inverse proportion to the acceleration factor as well. The improved temporal SNR resulted in better statistical power when evaluated on the functional response of the brain. In this study, we demonstrated that the combination of cmsEPI with the parallel imaging technique could provide the improved functional sensitivity for functional imaging study, compensating for the lower SNR by cmsEPI. PMID:26413518

  9. Assessment of regularization techniques for electrocardiographic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Milanič, Matija; Jazbinšek, Vojko; MacLeod, Robert S.; Brooks, Dana H.; Hren, Rok

    2014-01-01

    A widely used approach to solving the inverse problem in electrocardiography involves computing potentials on the epicardium from measured electrocardiograms (ECGs) on the torso surface. The main challenge of solving this electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) problem lies in its intrinsic ill-posedness. While many regularization techniques have been developed to control wild oscillations of the solution, the choice of proper regularization methods for obtaining clinically acceptable solutions is still a subject of ongoing research. However there has been little rigorous comparison across methods proposed by different groups. This study systematically compared various regularization techniques for solving the ECGI problem under a unified simulation framework, consisting of both 1) progressively more complex idealized source models (from single dipole to triplet of dipoles), and 2) an electrolytic human torso tank containing a live canine heart, with the cardiac source being modeled by potentials measured on a cylindrical cage placed around the heart. We tested 13 different regularization techniques to solve the inverse problem of recovering epicardial potentials, and found that non-quadratic methods (total variation algorithms) and first-order and second-order Tikhonov regularizations outperformed other methodologies and resulted in similar average reconstruction errors. PMID:24369741

  10. Lung tumor tracking in fluoroscopic video based on optical flow

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Qianyi; Hamilton, Russell J.; Schowengerdt, Robert A.; Alexander, Brian; Jiang, Steve B.

    2008-12-15

    Respiratory gating and tumor tracking for dynamic multileaf collimator delivery require accurate and real-time localization of the lung tumor position during treatment. Deriving tumor position from external surrogates such as abdominal surface motion may have large uncertainties due to the intra- and interfraction variations of the correlation between the external surrogates and internal tumor motion. Implanted fiducial markers can be used to track tumors fluoroscopically in real time with sufficient accuracy. However, it may not be a practical procedure when implanting fiducials bronchoscopically. In this work, a method is presented to track the lung tumor mass or relevant anatomic features projected in fluoroscopic images without implanted fiducial markers based on an optical flow algorithm. The algorithm generates the centroid position of the tracked target and ignores shape changes of the tumor mass shadow. The tracking starts with a segmented tumor projection in an initial image frame. Then, the optical flow between this and all incoming frames acquired during treatment delivery is computed as initial estimations of tumor centroid displacements. The tumor contour in the initial frame is transferred to the incoming frames based on the average of the motion vectors, and its positions in the incoming frames are determined by fine-tuning the contour positions using a template matching algorithm with a small search range. The tracking results were validated by comparing with clinician determined contours on each frame. The position difference in 95% of the frames was found to be less than 1.4 pixels ({approx}0.7 mm) in the best case and 2.8 pixels ({approx}1.4 mm) in the worst case for the five patients studied.

  11. Techniques calm fear of imaging machine

    SciTech Connect

    Van Pelt, D.

    1990-04-02

    Magnetic resonance imaging has become a valuable tool in diagnosing diseases, and the imaging devices are now used as often as 2 million times a year in the United States. But as many as 10 percent of patients advised to undergo the procedure cannot because they become overwhelmed with claustrophobialike fear triggered by having to lie motionless in the machine's tunnel-like cylinder for about 45 minutes. To counteract this fear, several hospitals now practice various techniques to help reduce the feelings of confinement. One popular method is to give a patient special eyeglasses that allow him to look beyond his feet and see the tunnel opening. Other glasses use mirrors to direct the patient's vision out the back of the unit to large wilderness photographs or murals that simulate a sense of spaciousness. Even a basic item like a set of headphones that plays music can often distract a patient, and technicians frequently hold a patient's hand or foot during the procedure. Another trick is to invite family members and friends to remain with the patient during the scan to provide company and reassurance.

  12. Simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique based on guided image filtering.

    PubMed

    Ji, Dongjiang; Qu, Gangrong; Liu, Baodong

    2016-07-11

    The challenge of computed tomography is to reconstruct high-quality images from few-view projections. Using a prior guidance image, guided image filtering smoothes images while preserving edge features. The prior guidance image can be incorporated into the image reconstruction process to improve image quality. We propose a new simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique based on guided image filtering. Specifically, the prior guidance image is updated in the image reconstruction process, merging information iteratively. To validate the algorithm practicality and efficiency, experiments were performed with numerical phantom projection data and real projection data. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective and efficient for nondestructive testing and rock mechanics. PMID:27410859

  13. A Literature Review on Image Encryption Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Majid; Shah, Tariq

    2014-12-01

    Image encryption plays a paramount part to guarantee classified transmission and capacity of image over web. Then again, a real-time image encryption confronts a more noteworthy test because of vast measure of information included. This paper exhibits an audit on image encryption in spatial, frequency and hybrid domains with both full encryption and selective encryption strategy.

  14. The capability of fluoroscopic systems to determine differential Roentgen-ray absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.; Crepeau, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    A clinical fluoroscopic unit used in conjunction with a TV image digitization system was investigated to determine its capability to evaluate differential absorption between two areas in the same field. Fractional contrasts and minimum detectability for air, several concentrations of Renografin-60, and aluminum were studied using phantoms of various thicknesses. Results showed that the videometric response, when treated as contrast, shows a linear response with absorber thickness up to considerable thicknesses.

  15. Progress in the Development of a new Angiography Suite including the High Resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF), a Control, Acquisition, Processing, and Image Display System (CAPIDS), and a New Detector Changer Integrated into a Commercial C-Arm Angiography Unit to Enable Clinical Use.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiyuan; Ionita, Ciprian N; Keleshis, Christos; Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel; Rudin, Stephen

    2010-03-23

    Due to the high-resolution needs of angiographic and interventional vascular imaging, a Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector with a Control, Acquisition, Processing, and Image Display System (CAPIDS) was installed on a detector changer which was attached to the C-arm of a clinical angiographic unit. The MAF detector provides high-resolution, high-sensitivity, and real-time imaging capabilities and consists of a 300 μm-thick CsI phosphor, a dual stage micro-channel plate light image intensifier (LII) coupled to a fiber optic taper (FOT), and a scientific grade frame-transfer CCD camera, providing an image matrix of 1024×1024 35 μm square pixels with 12 bit depth. The Solid-State X-Ray Image Intensifier (SSXII) is an EMCCD (Electron Multiplying charge-coupled device) based detector which provides an image matrix of 1k×1k 32 μm square pixels with 12 bit depth. The changer allows the MAF or a SSXII region-of-interest (ROI) detector to be inserted in front of the standard flat-panel detector (FPD) when higher resolution is needed during angiographic or interventional vascular imaging procedures. The CAPIDS was developed and implemented using LabVIEW software and provides a user-friendly interface that enables control of several clinical radiographic imaging modes of the MAF or SSXII including: fluoroscopy, roadmapping, radiography, and digital-subtraction-angiography (DSA). The total system has been used for image guidance during endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGI) using prototype self-expanding asymmetric vascular stents (SAVS) in over 10 rabbit aneurysm creation and treatment experiments which have demonstrated the system's potential benefits for future clinical use. PMID:21243037

  16. Progress in the development of a new angiography suite including the high resolution micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF): a control, acquisition, processing, and image display system (CAPIDS), and a new detector changer integrated into a commercial C-arm angiography unit to enable clinical use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiyuan; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Keleshis, Christos; Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel; Rudin, Stephen

    2010-04-01

    Due to the high-resolution needs of angiographic and interventional vascular imaging, a Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector with a Control, Acquisition, Processing, and Image Display System (CAPIDS) was installed on a detector changer which was attached to the C-arm of a clinical angiographic unit. The MAF detector provides high-resolution, high-sensitivity, and real-time imaging capabilities and consists of a 300 μm-thick CsI phosphor, a dual stage micro-channel plate light image intensifier (LII) coupled to a fiber optic taper (FOT), and a scientific grade frame-transfer CCD camera, providing an image matrix of 1024×1024 35 μm square pixels with 12 bit depth. The Solid-State X-Ray Image Intensifier (SSXII) is an EMCCD (Electron Multiplying charge-coupled device) based detector which provides an image matrix of 1k×1k 32 μm square pixels with 12 bit depth. The changer allows the MAF or a SSXII region-of-interest (ROI) detector to be inserted in front of the standard flat-panel detector (FPD) when higher resolution is needed during angiographic or interventional vascular imaging procedures. The CAPIDS was developed and implemented using LabVIEW software and provides a user-friendly interface that enables control of several clinical radiographic imaging modes of the MAF or SSXII including: fluoroscopy, roadmapping, radiography, and digital-subtraction-angiography (DSA). The total system has been used for image guidance during endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGI) using prototype self-expanding asymmetric vascular stents (SAVS) in over 10 rabbit aneurysm creation and treatment experiments which have demonstrated the system's potential benefits for future clinical use.

  17. Progress in the Development of a new Angiography Suite including the High Resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF), a Control, Acquisition, Processing, and Image Display System (CAPIDS), and a New Detector Changer Integrated into a Commercial C-Arm Angiography Unit to Enable Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiyuan; Ionita, Ciprian N; Keleshis, Christos; Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel; Rudin, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Due to the high-resolution needs of angiographic and interventional vascular imaging, a Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector with a Control, Acquisition, Processing, and Image Display System (CAPIDS) was installed on a detector changer which was attached to the C-arm of a clinical angiographic unit. The MAF detector provides high-resolution, high-sensitivity, and real-time imaging capabilities and consists of a 300 μm-thick CsI phosphor, a dual stage micro-channel plate light image intensifier (LII) coupled to a fiber optic taper (FOT), and a scientific grade frame-transfer CCD camera, providing an image matrix of 1024×1024 35 μm square pixels with 12 bit depth. The Solid-State X-Ray Image Intensifier (SSXII) is an EMCCD (Electron Multiplying charge-coupled device) based detector which provides an image matrix of 1k×1k 32 μm square pixels with 12 bit depth. The changer allows the MAF or a SSXII region-of-interest (ROI) detector to be inserted in front of the standard flat-panel detector (FPD) when higher resolution is needed during angiographic or interventional vascular imaging procedures. The CAPIDS was developed and implemented using LabVIEW software and provides a user-friendly interface that enables control of several clinical radiographic imaging modes of the MAF or SSXII including: fluoroscopy, roadmapping, radiography, and digital-subtraction-angiography (DSA). The total system has been used for image guidance during endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGI) using prototype self-expanding asymmetric vascular stents (SAVS) in over 10 rabbit aneurysm creation and treatment experiments which have demonstrated the system's potential benefits for future clinical use. PMID:21243037

  18. A Review of Imaging Techniques for Plant Phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Qin; Huang, Danfeng

    2014-01-01

    Given the rapid development of plant genomic technologies, a lack of access to plant phenotyping capabilities limits our ability to dissect the genetics of quantitative traits. Effective, high-throughput phenotyping platforms have recently been developed to solve this problem. In high-throughput phenotyping platforms, a variety of imaging methodologies are being used to collect data for quantitative studies of complex traits related to the growth, yield and adaptation to biotic or abiotic stress (disease, insects, drought and salinity). These imaging techniques include visible imaging (machine vision), imaging spectroscopy (multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing), thermal infrared imaging, fluorescence imaging, 3D imaging and tomographic imaging (MRT, PET and CT). This paper presents a brief review on these imaging techniques and their applications in plant phenotyping. The features used to apply these imaging techniques to plant phenotyping are described and discussed in this review. PMID:25347588

  19. A review of imaging techniques for plant phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Qin; Huang, Danfeng

    2014-01-01

    Given the rapid development of plant genomic technologies, a lack of access to plant phenotyping capabilities limits our ability to dissect the genetics of quantitative traits. Effective, high-throughput phenotyping platforms have recently been developed to solve this problem. In high-throughput phenotyping platforms, a variety of imaging methodologies are being used to collect data for quantitative studies of complex traits related to the growth, yield and adaptation to biotic or abiotic stress (disease, insects, drought and salinity). These imaging techniques include visible imaging (machine vision), imaging spectroscopy (multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing), thermal infrared imaging, fluorescence imaging, 3D imaging and tomographic imaging (MRT, PET and CT). This paper presents a brief review on these imaging techniques and their applications in plant phenotyping. The features used to apply these imaging techniques to plant phenotyping are described and discussed in this review. PMID:25347588

  20. Endoscopic necrosectomy under fluoroscopic guidance – a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Smoczyński, Marian; Jabłońska, Anna; Adrych, Krystian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Our report presents a technique of necrotic tissue removal during transmural drainage of walled-off pancreatic necrosis (WOPN) that is an alternative to the one that has already been described in the literature. Aim To assess the effectiveness and safety of endoscopic necrosectomy performed during transmural drainage of symptomatic WOPN. Material and methods Within the years 2012–2013, 64 patients underwent endoscopic treatment of symptomatic WOPN in our center. Eight patients underwent endoscopic necrosectomy during transmural drainage. Fragments of necrotic tissues were removed from the collection's cavity under fluoroscopic guidance using a Dormia basket. The results and complications of treatment were compared retrospectively. Results Sixty-four patients with WOPN underwent transmural drainage under endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) guidance. Eight patients (12.5%, 5 women and 3 men, mean age 57.25 years) were qualified for endoscopic necrosectomy. Transmural transgastric access was made in 7 patients and transduodenal access in 1 patient. Additional percutaneous drainage was used in 2 patients. Active drainage was continued for 24 days (11–44 days). The mean number of endoscopic procedures was 4.75 (3–9). The average number of necrosectomy procedures during drainage was 1.75 (1–4). Complications of endotherapy occurred in 2/8 (25%) patients, and they were not directly connected with necrosectomy. Therapeutic success after the end of active drainage was achieved in all patients. During a 6-month follow-up no recurrence of the collection was observed. Conclusions Endoscopic necrosectomy under fluoroscopic guidance is an effective and safe method of minimally invasive treatment in a selected group of patients with symptomatic WOPN. PMID:26240624

  1. A machine learning approach for deformable guide-wire tracking in fluoroscopic sequences.

    PubMed

    Pauly, Olivier; Heibel, Hauke; Navab, Nassir

    2010-01-01

    Deformable guide-wire tracking in fluoroscopic sequences is a challenging task due to the low signal to noise ratio of the images and the apparent complex motion of the object of interest. Common tracking methods are based on data terms that do not differentiate well between medical tools and anatomic background such as ribs and vertebrae. A data term learned directly from fluoroscopic sequences would be more adapted to the image characteristics and could help to improve tracking. In this work, our contribution is to learn the relationship between features extracted from the original image and the tracking error. By randomly deforming a guide-wire model around its ground truth position in one single reference frame, we explore the space spanned by these features. Therefore, a guide-wire motion distribution model is learned to reduce the intrisic dimensionality of this feature space. Random deformations and the corresponding features can be then automatically generated. In a regression approach, the function mapping this space to the tracking error is learned. The resulting data term is integrated into a tracking framework based on a second-order MAP-MRF formulation which is optimized by QPBO moves yielding high-quality tracking results. Experiments conducted on two fluoroscopic sequences show that our approach is a promising alternative for deformable tracking of guide-wires. PMID:20879418

  2. Spectral OCT techniques in eye imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczyk, Andrzej; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2002-02-01

    This contribution presents examples of images of eye in vitro obtained by spectral optical tomography (OCT). Particular interest was focused on obtaining clear images of the corneo-scleral angle and images of fundus which are both essential for diagnosing and planning of a treatment of glaucoma.

  3. Dilemmas in imaging for peri-acetabular osteotomy: the influence of patient position and imaging technique on the radiological features of hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Kosuge, D; Cordier, T; Solomon, L B; Howie, D W

    2014-09-01

    Peri-acetabular osteotomy is an established surgical treatment for symptomatic acetabular dysplasia in young adults. An anteroposterior radiograph of the pelvis is commonly used to assess the extent of dysplasia as well as to assess post-operative correction. Radiological prognostic factors include the lateral centre-edge angle, acetabular index, extrusion index and the acetabular version. Standing causes a change in the pelvis tilt which can alter certain radiological measurements relative to the supine position. This article discusses the radiological indices used to assess dysplasia and reviews the effects of patient positioning on these indices with a focus on assessment for a peri-acetabular osteotomy. Intra-operatively, fluoroscopy is commonly used and the implications of using fluoroscopy as a modality to assess the various radiological indices along with the effects of using an anteroposterior or posteroanterior fluoroscopic view are examined. Each of these techniques gives rise to a slightly different image of the pelvis as the final image is sensitive to the position of the pelvis and the projection of the x-ray beam. PMID:25183583

  4. New impedance and electrochemical image techniques for biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, N. J.

    2010-03-01

    A method to image local surface impedance and electrochemical current optically is developed for biological applications. The principle of the impedance imaging is based on sensitive dependence of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) on local surface charge density. The technique can image local surface impedance and charge while providing simultaneously a conventional surface plasmon resonance (SPR) image. By applying a potential modulation to a sensor surface, it is possible to obtain an image of the DC component, and the amplitude and phase images of the AC component. The DC image provides local molecular binding, as found in the conventional SPR imaging technique. The AC images are directly related to the local impedance of the surface. This imaging capability may be used as a new detection platform for DNA and protein microarrays, a new method for analyzing local molecular binding and interfacial processes and a new tool for imaging cells and tissues.

  5. Functional Imaging and Related Techniques: An Introduction for Rehabilitation Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Crosson, Bruce; Ford, Anastasia; McGregor, Keith M.; Meinzer, Marcus; Cheshkov, Sergey; Li, Xiufeng; Walker-Batson, Delaina; Briggs, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging and related neuroimaging techniques are becoming important tools for rehabilitation research. Functional neuroimaging techniques can be used to determine the effects of brain injury or disease on brain systems related to cognition and behavior and to determine how rehabilitation changes brain systems. These techniques include: functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), positron emission tomography (PET), electroencephalography (EEG), magnetoencephalography (MEG), near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Related diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging techniques (DWI), including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI), can quantify white matter integrity. With the proliferation of these imaging techniques in rehabilitation research, it is critical that rehabilitation researchers, as well as consumers of rehabilitation research, become familiar with neuroimaging techniques, what they can offer, and their strengths and weaknesses The purpose to this review is to provide such an introduction to these neuroimaging techniques. PMID:20593321

  6. Improved accuracy of markerless motion tracking on bone suppression images: preliminary study for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Sakuta, Keita; Kawashima, Hiroki

    2015-05-01

    The bone suppression technique based on advanced image processing can suppress the conspicuity of bones on chest radiographs, creating soft tissue images obtained by the dual-energy subtraction technique. This study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of bone suppression image processing in image-guided radiation therapy. We demonstrated the improved accuracy of markerless motion tracking on bone suppression images. Chest fluoroscopic images of nine patients with lung nodules during respiration were obtained using a flat-panel detector system (120 kV, 0.1 mAs/pulse, 5 fps). Commercial bone suppression image processing software was applied to the fluoroscopic images to create corresponding bone suppression images. Regions of interest were manually located on lung nodules and automatic target tracking was conducted based on the template matching technique. To evaluate the accuracy of target tracking, the maximum tracking error in the resulting images was compared with that of conventional fluoroscopic images. The tracking errors were decreased by half in eight of nine cases. The average maximum tracking errors in bone suppression and conventional fluoroscopic images were 1.3   ±   1.0 and 3.3   ±   3.3 mm, respectively. The bone suppression technique was especially effective in the lower lung area where pulmonary vessels, bronchi, and ribs showed complex movements. The bone suppression technique improved tracking accuracy without special equipment and implantation of fiducial markers, and with only additional small dose to the patient. Bone suppression fluoroscopy is a potential measure for respiratory displacement of the target. This paper was presented at RSNA 2013 and was carried out at Kanazawa University, JAPAN.

  7. Imaging fault zones using 3D seismic image processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacopini, David; Butler, Rob; Purves, Steve

    2013-04-01

    Significant advances in structural analysis of deep water structure, salt tectonic and extensional rift basin come from the descriptions of fault system geometries imaged in 3D seismic data. However, even where seismic data are excellent, in most cases the trajectory of thrust faults is highly conjectural and still significant uncertainty exists as to the patterns of deformation that develop between the main faults segments, and even of the fault architectures themselves. Moreover structural interpretations that conventionally define faults by breaks and apparent offsets of seismic reflectors are commonly conditioned by a narrow range of theoretical models of fault behavior. For example, almost all interpretations of thrust geometries on seismic data rely on theoretical "end-member" behaviors where concepts as strain localization or multilayer mechanics are simply avoided. Yet analogue outcrop studies confirm that such descriptions are commonly unsatisfactory and incomplete. In order to fill these gaps and improve the 3D visualization of deformation in the subsurface, seismic attribute methods are developed here in conjunction with conventional mapping of reflector amplitudes (Marfurt & Chopra, 2007)). These signal processing techniques recently developed and applied especially by the oil industry use variations in the amplitude and phase of the seismic wavelet. These seismic attributes improve the signal interpretation and are calculated and applied to the entire 3D seismic dataset. In this contribution we will show 3D seismic examples of fault structures from gravity-driven deep-water thrust structures and extensional basin systems to indicate how 3D seismic image processing methods can not only build better the geometrical interpretations of the faults but also begin to map both strain and damage through amplitude/phase properties of the seismic signal. This is done by quantifying and delineating the short-range anomalies on the intensity of reflector amplitudes

  8. Imaging techniques in signal transduction IHC.

    PubMed

    Sedgewick, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Augmentation of digital images is almost always a necessity in order to obtain a reproduction that matches the appearance of the original. However, that augmentation can mislead if it is done incorrectly and not within reasonable limits. When procedures are in place for ensuring that originals are archived, and image manipulation steps are reported, scientists not only follow good laboratory practices, but also avoid ethical issues associated with postprocessing and protect their labs from any future allegations of scientific misconduct. Also, when procedures are in place for correct acquisition of images, the extent of postprocessing is minimized or eliminated. These procedures include color balancing (for brighfield images), keeping tonal values within the dynamic range of the detector, frame averaging to eliminate noise (typically in fluorescence imaging), use of the highest bit depth when a choice is available, flatfield correction, and archiving of the image in a nonlossy format (not JPEG).When postprocessing is necessary, the commonly used applications for correction include Photoshop, and ImageJ, but a free program (GIMP) can also be used. Corrections to images include scaling the bit depth to higher and lower ranges, removing color casts from brightfield images, setting brightness and contrast, reducing color noise, reducing "grainy" noise, conversion of pure colors to grayscale, conversion of grayscale to colors typically used in fluorescence imaging, correction of uneven illumination and flatfield correction, blending color images (fluorescence), and extending the depth of focus. These corrections are explained in step-by-step procedures in the chapter that follows. PMID:21370028

  9. A content-based image retrieval method for optical colonoscopy images based on image recognition techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosato, Hirokazu; Sakanashi, Hidenori; Takahashi, Eiichi; Murakawa, Masahiro

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes a content-based image retrieval method for optical colonoscopy images that can find images similar to ones being diagnosed. Optical colonoscopy is a method of direct observation for colons and rectums to diagnose bowel diseases. It is the most common procedure for screening, surveillance and treatment. However, diagnostic accuracy for intractable inflammatory bowel diseases, such as ulcerative colitis (UC), is highly dependent on the experience and knowledge of the medical doctor, because there is considerable variety in the appearances of colonic mucosa within inflammations with UC. In order to solve this issue, this paper proposes a content-based image retrieval method based on image recognition techniques. The proposed retrieval method can find similar images from a database of images diagnosed as UC, and can potentially furnish the medical records associated with the retrieved images to assist the UC diagnosis. Within the proposed method, color histogram features and higher order local auto-correlation (HLAC) features are adopted to represent the color information and geometrical information of optical colonoscopy images, respectively. Moreover, considering various characteristics of UC colonoscopy images, such as vascular patterns and the roughness of the colonic mucosa, we also propose an image enhancement method to highlight the appearances of colonic mucosa in UC. In an experiment using 161 UC images from 32 patients, we demonstrate that our method improves the accuracy of retrieving similar UC images.

  10. NEW TECHNIQUES FOR IMAGING AND ANALYZING LUNG TISSUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recent technological revolution in the field of imaging techniques has provided pathologists and toxicologists with an expanding repertoire of analytical techniques for studying the interaction between the lung and the various exogenous materials to which it is exposed. Analy...

  11. Application of digital image processing techniques to astronomical imagery 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorre, J. J.; Lynn, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Nine specific techniques of combination of techniques developed for applying digital image processing technology to existing astronomical imagery are described. Photoproducts are included to illustrate the results of each of these investigations.

  12. An image compression technique for use on token ring networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorjala, B.; Sayood, Khalid; Meempat, G.

    1992-01-01

    A low complexity technique for compression of images for transmission over local area networks is presented. The technique uses the synchronous traffic as a side channel for improving the performance of an adaptive differential pulse code modulation (ADPCM) based coder.

  13. Bayesian technique for image classifying registration.

    PubMed

    Hachama, Mohamed; Desolneux, Agnès; Richard, Frédéric J P

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we address a complex image registration issue arising while the dependencies between intensities of images to be registered are not spatially homogeneous. Such a situation is frequently encountered in medical imaging when a pathology present in one of the images modifies locally intensity dependencies observed on normal tissues. Usual image registration models, which are based on a single global intensity similarity criterion, fail to register such images, as they are blind to local deviations of intensity dependencies. Such a limitation is also encountered in contrast-enhanced images where there exist multiple pixel classes having different properties of contrast agent absorption. In this paper, we propose a new model in which the similarity criterion is adapted locally to images by classification of image intensity dependencies. Defined in a Bayesian framework, the similarity criterion is a mixture of probability distributions describing dependencies on two classes. The model also includes a class map which locates pixels of the two classes and weighs the two mixture components. The registration problem is formulated both as an energy minimization problem and as a maximum a posteriori estimation problem. It is solved using a gradient descent algorithm. In the problem formulation and resolution, the image deformation and the class map are estimated simultaneously, leading to an original combination of registration and classification that we call image classifying registration. Whenever sufficient information about class location is available in applications, the registration can also be performed on its own by fixing a given class map. Finally, we illustrate the interest of our model on two real applications from medical imaging: template-based segmentation of contrast-enhanced images and lesion detection in mammograms. We also conduct an evaluation of our model on simulated medical data and show its ability to take into account spatial variations

  14. Selective document image data compression technique

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Chi-Yung; Petrich, Loren I.

    1998-01-01

    A method of storing information from filled-in form-documents comprises extracting the unique user information in the foreground from the document form information in the background. The contrast of the pixels is enhanced by a gamma correction on an image array, and then the color value of each of pixel is enhanced. The color pixels lying on edges of an image are converted to black and an adjacent pixel is converted to white. The distance between black pixels and other pixels in the array is determined, and a filled-edge array of pixels is created. User information is then converted to a two-color format by creating a first two-color image of the scanned image by converting all pixels darker than a threshold color value to black. All the pixels that are lighter than the threshold color value to white. Then a second two-color image of the filled-edge file is generated by converting all pixels darker than a second threshold value to black and all pixels lighter than the second threshold color value to white. The first two-color image and the second two-color image are then combined and filtered to smooth the edges of the image. The image may be compressed with a unique Huffman coding table for that image. The image file is also decimated to create a decimated-image file which can later be interpolated back to produce a reconstructed image file using a bilinear interpolation kernel.--(235 words)

  15. Selective document image data compression technique

    DOEpatents

    Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

    1998-05-19

    A method of storing information from filled-in form-documents comprises extracting the unique user information in the foreground from the document form information in the background. The contrast of the pixels is enhanced by a gamma correction on an image array, and then the color value of each of pixel is enhanced. The color pixels lying on edges of an image are converted to black and an adjacent pixel is converted to white. The distance between black pixels and other pixels in the array is determined, and a filled-edge array of pixels is created. User information is then converted to a two-color format by creating a first two-color image of the scanned image by converting all pixels darker than a threshold color value to black. All the pixels that are lighter than the threshold color value to white. Then a second two-color image of the filled-edge file is generated by converting all pixels darker than a second threshold value to black and all pixels lighter than the second threshold color value to white. The first two-color image and the second two-color image are then combined and filtered to smooth the edges of the image. The image may be compressed with a unique Huffman coding table for that image. The image file is also decimated to create a decimated-image file which can later be interpolated back to produce a reconstructed image file using a bilinear interpolation kernel. 10 figs.

  16. A small, battery-operated fluoroscopic system - Lixiscope with X-ray generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L. I.; Trombka, J. I.; Ruitberg, A. P.; Seltzer, S. M.

    1983-01-01

    A small, battery-operated X-ray generator has been developed to be used as part of a small-format fluoroscopic system, the Lixiscope (Low Intensity X-ray Imaging Scope). The X-ray generator consists of a grounded rod-anode X-ray tube with a 0.2 mm focal spot and a specially designed, battery-operated, 0 to -80 kV high-voltge supply. Total power consumption is about 10 W. The fine focal spot, in conjunction with the continuously variable X-ray intensity and spectral distribution, helps to extend both the versatility and the performance of the Lixiscope toward a much wider range of terrestrial and spacecraft applications. The complete fluoroscopic system is described, and some examples of possible applications are shown.

  17. Robust image modeling techniques with an image restoration application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, Rangasami L.; Eom, Kie-Bum

    1988-08-01

    A robust parameter-estimation algorithm for a nonsymmetric half-plane (NSHP) autoregressive model, where the driving noise is a mixture of a Gaussian and an outlier process, is presented. The convergence of the estimation algorithm is proved. An algorithm to estimate parameters and original image intensity simultaneously from the impulse-noise-corrupted image, where the model governing the image is not available, is also presented. The robustness of the parameter estimates is demonstrated by simulation. Finally, an algorithm to restore realistic images is presented. The entire image generally does not obey a simple image model, but a small portion (e.g., 8 x 8) of the image is assumed to obey an NSHP model. The original image is divided into windows and the robust estimation algorithm is applied for each window. The restoration algorithm is tested by comparing it to traditional methods on several different images.

  18. Various diffusion magnetic resonance imaging techniques for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Meng-Yue; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Chen, Tian-Wu; Huang, Xiao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors and remains a treatment-refractory cancer with a poor prognosis. Currently, the diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasm depends mainly on imaging and which methods are conducive to detecting small lesions. Compared to the other techniques, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has irreplaceable advantages and can provide valuable information unattainable with other noninvasive or minimally invasive imaging techniques. Advances in MR hardware and pulse sequence design have particularly improved the quality and robustness of MRI of the pancreas. Diffusion MR imaging serves as one of the common functional MRI techniques and is the only technique that can be used to reflect the diffusion movement of water molecules in vivo. It is generally known that diffusion properties depend on the characterization of intrinsic features of tissue microdynamics and microstructure. With the improvement of the diffusion models, diffusion MR imaging techniques are increasingly varied, from the simplest and most commonly used technique to the more complex. In this review, the various diffusion MRI techniques for pancreatic cancer are discussed, including conventional diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), multi-b DWI based on intra-voxel incoherent motion theory, diffusion tensor imaging and diffusion kurtosis imaging. The principles, main parameters, advantages and limitations of these techniques, as well as future directions for pancreatic diffusion imaging are also discussed. PMID:26753059

  19. A technique for image encryption using digital signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Aloka; Singh, Kehar

    2003-04-01

    We propose a new technique to encrypt an image for secure image transmission. The digital signature of the original image is added to the encoded version of the original image. The encoding of the image is done using an appropriate error control code, such as a Bose-Chaudhuri Hochquenghem (BCH) code. At the receiver end, after the decryption of the image, the digital signature can be used to verify the authenticity of the image. Detailed simulations have been carried out to test the encryption technique. An optical correlator, in either the JTC or the VanderLugt geometry, or a digital correlation technique, can be used to verify the authenticity of the decrypted image.

  20. Robust Fluoroscopic Tracking of Fiducial Markers: Exploiting the Spatial Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Sharp, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Two new fluoroscopic fiducial tracking methods that exploit the spatial relationship among the multiple implanted fiducial to achieve fast, accurate and robust tracking are proposed in this paper. The spatial relationship between multiple implanted markers are modeled as Gaussian distributions of their pairwise distances over time. The means and standard deviations of these distances are learned from training sequences, and pairwise distances that deviate from these learned distributions are assigned a low spatial matching score. The spatial constraints are incorporated in two different algorithms: a stochastic tracking method and a detection based method. In the stochastic method, hypotheses of the “true” fiducial position are sampled from a pre-trained respiration motion model. Each hypothesis is assigned an importance value based on image matching score and spatial matching score. Learning the parameters of the motion model is needed in addition to the learning the distribution parameters of the pairwise distances in the proposed stochastic tracking approach. In the detection based method, a set of possible marker locations are identified by using a template matching based fiducial detector. The best location is obtained by optimizing the image matching score and spatial matching score through non-serial dynamic programming. In this detection based approach, there is no need to learn the respiration motion model. The two proposed algorithms are compared with a recent work using multiple hypothesis tracking algorithm which is denoted by MHT[19]. Phantom experiments were performed using fluoroscopic videos captured with known motion relative to an anthropomorphic phantom. The patient experiments were performed using a retrospective study of 16 fluoroscopic videos of liver cancer patients with implanted fiducials. For the motion phantom data sets, the detection based approach has the smallest tracking error (μerr: 0.78 – 1.74 mm, σerr: 0.39 – 1.16 mm) for

  1. Robust fluoroscopic tracking of fiducial markers: exploiting the spatial constraints.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Sharp, Gregory

    2013-03-21

    Two new fluoroscopic fiducial tracking methods that exploit the spatial relationship among the multiple implanted fiducial to achieve fast, accurate and robust tracking are proposed in this paper. The spatial relationship between multiple implanted markers are modeled as Gaussian distributions of their pairwise distances over time. The means and standard deviations of these distances are learned from training sequences, and pairwise distances that deviate from these learned distributions are assigned a low spatial matching score. The spatial constraints are incorporated in two different algorithms: a stochastic tracking method and a detection based method. In the stochastic method, hypotheses of the 'true' fiducial position are sampled from a pre-trained respiration motion model. Each hypothesis is assigned an importance value based on image matching score and spatial matching score. Learning the parameters of the motion model is needed in addition to learning the distribution parameters of the pairwise distances in the proposed stochastic tracking approach. In the detection based method, a set of possible marker locations are identified by using a template matching based fiducial detector. The best location is obtained by optimizing the image matching score and spatial matching score through non-serial dynamic programming. In this detection based approach, there is no need to learn the respiration motion model. The two proposed algorithms are compared with a recent work using a multiple hypothesis tracking (MHT) algorithm which is denoted by MHT, Tang et al (2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 4081-98). Phantom experiments were performed using fluoroscopic videos captured with known motion relative to an anthropomorphic phantom. The patient experiments were performed using a retrospective study of 16 fluoroscopic videos of liver cancer patients with implanted fiducials. For the motion phantom data sets, the detection based approach has the smallest tracking error (μerr: 0

  2. Robust fluoroscopic tracking of fiducial markers: exploiting the spatial constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Sharp, Gregory

    2013-03-01

    Two new fluoroscopic fiducial tracking methods that exploit the spatial relationship among the multiple implanted fiducial to achieve fast, accurate and robust tracking are proposed in this paper. The spatial relationship between multiple implanted markers are modeled as Gaussian distributions of their pairwise distances over time. The means and standard deviations of these distances are learned from training sequences, and pairwise distances that deviate from these learned distributions are assigned a low spatial matching score. The spatial constraints are incorporated in two different algorithms: a stochastic tracking method and a detection based method. In the stochastic method, hypotheses of the ‘true’ fiducial position are sampled from a pre-trained respiration motion model. Each hypothesis is assigned an importance value based on image matching score and spatial matching score. Learning the parameters of the motion model is needed in addition to learning the distribution parameters of the pairwise distances in the proposed stochastic tracking approach. In the detection based method, a set of possible marker locations are identified by using a template matching based fiducial detector. The best location is obtained by optimizing the image matching score and spatial matching score through non-serial dynamic programming. In this detection based approach, there is no need to learn the respiration motion model. The two proposed algorithms are compared with a recent work using a multiple hypothesis tracking (MHT) algorithm which is denoted by MHT, Tang et al (2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 4081-98). Phantom experiments were performed using fluoroscopic videos captured with known motion relative to an anthropomorphic phantom. The patient experiments were performed using a retrospective study of 16 fluoroscopic videos of liver cancer patients with implanted fiducials. For the motion phantom data sets, the detection based approach has the smallest tracking error (

  3. Analysis of a proposed Compton backscatter imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, James M.; Jacoby, Barry A.

    1994-03-01

    One-sided imaging techniques are currently being used in nondestructive evaluation of surfaces and shallow subsurface structures. In this work we present both analytical calculations and detailed Monte Carlo simulations aimed at assessing the capability of a proposed Compton backscattering imaging technique designed to detect and characterize voids located several centimeters below the surface of a solid.

  4. Unconventional techniques of fundus imaging: A review.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Mahesh P; Mishra, Divyansh Kailash Chandra; Rajesh, R; Madhukumar, R

    2015-07-01

    The methods of fundus examination include direct and indirect ophthalmoscopy and imaging with a fundus camera are an essential part of ophthalmic practice. The usage of unconventional equipment such as a hand-held video camera, smartphone, and a nasal endoscope allows one to image the fundus with advantages and some disadvantages. The advantages of these instruments are the cost-effectiveness, ultra portability and ability to obtain images in a remote setting and share the same electronically. These instruments, however, are unlikely to replace the fundus camera but then would always be an additional arsenal in an ophthalmologist's armamentarium. PMID:26458475

  5. Unconventional techniques of fundus imaging: A review

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Mahesh P; Mishra, Divyansh Kailash Chandra; Rajesh, R; Madhukumar, R

    2015-01-01

    The methods of fundus examination include direct and indirect ophthalmoscopy and imaging with a fundus camera are an essential part of ophthalmic practice. The usage of unconventional equipment such as a hand-held video camera, smartphone, and a nasal endoscope allows one to image the fundus with advantages and some disadvantages. The advantages of these instruments are the cost-effectiveness, ultra portability and ability to obtain images in a remote setting and share the same electronically. These instruments, however, are unlikely to replace the fundus camera but then would always be an additional arsenal in an ophthalmologist's armamentarium. PMID:26458475

  6. Holographic Radar Imaging Privacy Techniques Utilizing Dual-Frequency Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.; Sheen, David M.

    2008-04-18

    Over the last 15 years, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has performed significant research and development activities to enhance the state of the art of holographic radar imaging systems to be used at security checkpoints for screening people for concealed threats hidden under their garments. These enhancement activities included improvements to privacy techniques to remove human features and providing automatic detection of body-worn concealed threats. The enhanced privacy and detection methods used both physical and software imaging techniques. The physical imaging techniques included polarization-diversity illumination and reception, dual-frequency implementation, and high-frequency imaging at 60 GHz. Software imaging techniques to enhance the privacy of the person under surveillance included extracting concealed threat artifacts from the imagery to automatically detect the threat. This paper will focus on physical privacy techniques using dual-frequency implementation.

  7. Imaging radar techniques for remote sensing applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelenka, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    The basic concepts of fine-resolution, imaging radar systems are reviewed. Both side-looking and hologram (downward-looking) radars are described and compared. Several examples of microwave imagery obtained with these two types of systems are shown.

  8. Combined neutron imaging techniques for cultural heritage purpose

    SciTech Connect

    Materna, T.

    2009-01-28

    This article presents the different new neutron techniques developed by the Ancient Charm collaboration to image objects of cultural heritage importance: Prompt-gamma-ray activation imaging (PGAI) coupled to cold/thermal neutron transmission tomography, Neutron Resonance Capture Imaging (NRCI) and Neutron Resonance Tomography.

  9. Contemporary retinal imaging techniques in diabetic retinopathy: a review.

    PubMed

    Cole, Emily Dawn; Novais, Eduardo Amorim; Louzada, Ricardo Noguera; Waheed, Nadia K

    2016-05-01

    Over the last decade, there has been an expansion of imaging modalities available to clinicians to diagnose and monitor the treatment and progression of diabetic retinopathy. Recently, advances in image technologies related to OCT and OCT angiography have enabled improved visualization and understanding of this disease. In this review, we will describe the use of imaging techniques such as colour fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence, fluorescein angiography, infrared reflectance imaging, OCT, OCT-Angiography and techniques in adaptive optics and hyperspectral imaging in the diagnosis and management of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26841250

  10. Three-dimensional imaging techniques: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Karatas, Orhan Hakki; Toy, Ebubekir

    2014-01-01

    Imaging is one of the most important tools for orthodontists to evaluate and record size and form of craniofacial structures. Orthodontists routinely use 2-dimensional (2D) static imaging techniques, but deepness of structures cannot be obtained and localized with 2D imaging. Three-dimensional (3D) imaging has been developed in the early of 1990's and has gained a precious place in dentistry, especially in orthodontics. The aims of this literature review are to summarize the current state of the 3D imaging techniques and to evaluate the applications in orthodontics. PMID:24966761

  11. Technique for identifying, tracing, or tracking objects in image data

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert J.; Rothganger, Fredrick

    2012-08-28

    A technique for computer vision uses a polygon contour to trace an object. The technique includes rendering a polygon contour superimposed over a first frame of image data. The polygon contour is iteratively refined to more accurately trace the object within the first frame after each iteration. The refinement includes computing image energies along lengths of contour lines of the polygon contour and adjusting positions of the contour lines based at least in part on the image energies.

  12. Towards fluoroscopic respiratory gating for lung tumours without radiopaque markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berbeco, Ross I.; Mostafavi, Hassan; Sharp, Gregory C.; Jiang, Steve B.

    2005-10-01

    Due to the risk of pneumothorax, many clinicians are reluctant to implant radiopaque markers within patients' lungs for the purpose of radiographic or fluoroscopic tumour localization. We propose a method of gated therapy using fluoroscopic information without the implantation of radiopaque markers. The method presented here does not rely on any external motion signal either. Breathing phase information is found by analysing the fluoroscopic intensity fluctuations in the lung. As the lungs fill/empty, the radiological pathlength through them shortens/lengthens, giving brighter/darker fluoroscopic intensities. The phase information is combined with motion-enhanced template matching to turn the beam on when the tumour is in the desired location. A study based on patient data is presented to demonstrate the feasibility of this procedure. The resulting beam-on pattern is similar to that produced by an external gating system. The only discrepancies occur briefly and at the gate edges.

  13. Image processing technique based on image understanding architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvychko, Igor

    2000-12-01

    Effectiveness of image applications is directly based on its abilities to resolve ambiguity and uncertainty in the real images. That requires tight integration of low-level image processing with high-level knowledge-based reasoning, which is the solution of the image understanding problem. This article presents a generic computational framework necessary for the solution of image understanding problem -- Spatial Turing Machine. Instead of tape of symbols, it works with hierarchical networks dually represented as discrete and continuous structures. Dual representation provides natural transformation of the continuous image information into the discrete structures, making it available for analysis. Such structures are data and algorithms at the same time and able to perform graph and diagrammatic operations being the basis of intelligence. They can create derivative structures that play role of context, or 'measurement device,' giving the ability to analyze, and run top-bottom algorithms. Symbols naturally emerge there, and symbolic operations work in combination with new simplified methods of computational intelligence. That makes images and scenes self-describing, and provides flexible ways of resolving uncertainty. Classification of images truly invariant to any transformation could be done via matching their derivative structures. New proposed architecture does not require supercomputers, opening ways to the new image technologies.

  14. Real-time optical image processing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1988-01-01

    Nonlinear real-time optical processing on spatial pulse frequency modulation has been pursued through the analysis, design, and fabrication of pulse frequency modulated halftone screens and the modification of micro-channel spatial light modulators (MSLMs). Micro-channel spatial light modulators are modified via the Fabry-Perot method to achieve the high gamma operation required for non-linear operation. Real-time nonlinear processing was performed using the halftone screen and MSLM. The experiments showed the effectiveness of the thresholding and also showed the needs of higher SBP for image processing. The Hughes LCLV has been characterized and found to yield high gamma (about 1.7) when operated in low frequency and low bias mode. Cascading of two LCLVs should also provide enough gamma for nonlinear processing. In this case, the SBP of the LCLV is sufficient but the uniformity of the LCLV needs improvement. These include image correlation, computer generation of holograms, pseudo-color image encoding for image enhancement, and associative-retrieval in neural processing. The discovery of the only known optical method for dynamic range compression of an input image in real-time by using GaAs photorefractive crystals is reported. Finally, a new architecture for non-linear multiple sensory, neural processing has been suggested.

  15. Scintigraphic techniques for hepatic imaging. Update for 2000.

    PubMed

    Drane, W E

    1998-03-01

    Nuclear medicine continues to evolve from a generic imaging approach to a collection of imaging techniques that are disease-specific. In-111 octreotide SPECT scan has quickly become the method of choice to image gastrinoma. A number of other agents have a role in other tumor models. FDG imaging of the liver is in its infancy, but has potential to outperform anatomic methods (CT scan, MR imaging), particularly in the detection of colorectal cancer metastases. The imaging of FDG in nuclear medicine involves rapidly evolving technology and has the potential to diffuse to the community level practice. To further face the controversial areas head on, another problem for nuclear medicine's role in hepatic imaging remains its somewhat separate existence from radiology. Frequently, the abdominal imager or the general radiologist is in the best position to recommend a scintigraphic liver study. A broad knowledge of these techniques by all radiologists is essential for their ultimate success. PMID:9520984

  16. A spatio-temporal detective quantum efficiency and its application to fluoroscopic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, S. N.; Cunningham, I. A.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Fluoroscopic x-ray imaging systems are used extensively in spatio-temporal detection tasks and require a spatio-temporal description of system performance. No accepted metric exists that describes spatio-temporal fluoroscopic performance. The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is a metric widely used in radiography to quantify system performance and as a surrogate measure of patient ''dose efficiency.'' It has been applied previously to fluoroscopic systems with the introduction of a temporal correction factor. However, the use of a temporally-corrected DQE does not provide system temporal information and it is only valid under specific conditions, many of which are not likely to be satisfied by suboptimal systems. The authors propose a spatio-temporal DQE that describes performance in both space and time and is applicable to all spatio-temporal quantum-based imaging systems. Methods: The authors define a spatio-temporal DQE (two spatial-frequency axes and one temporal-frequency axis) in terms of a small-signal spatio-temporal modulation transfer function (MTF) and spatio-temporal noise power spectrum (NPS). Measurements were made on an x-ray image intensifier-based bench-top system using continuous fluoroscopy with an RQA-5 beam at 3.9 {mu}R/frame and hardened 50 kVp beam (0.8 mm Cu filtration added) at 1.9 {mu}R/frame. Results: A zero-frequency DQE value of 0.64 was measured under both conditions. Nonideal performance was noted at both larger spatial and temporal frequencies; DQE values decreased by {approx}50% at the cutoff temporal frequency of 15 Hz. Conclusions: The spatio-temporal DQE enables measurements of decreased temporal system performance at larger temporal frequencies analogous to previous measurements of decreased (spatial) performance. This marks the first time that system performance and dose efficiency in both space and time have been measured on a fluoroscopic system using DQE and is the first step toward the generalized use of DQE on

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of a prototypical patient dosimetry system for fluoroscopic procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goertz, Lukas; Tsiamas, Panagiotis; Karellas, Andrew; Sajo, Erno; Zygmanski, Piotr

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate feasibility of a novel real-time dosimetry method for fluoroscopically guided interventions utilizing thin-film detector arrays in several potential locations with respect to the patient and x-ray equipment. We employed Monte Carlo (MC) simulation to establish the fluoroscopic beam model to determine dosimetric quantities directly from measured doses in thin-film detector arrays at three positions: A—attached to the x-ray source, B—on the couch under the patient and C—attached to the fluoroscopic imager. Next, we developed a calibration method to determine skin dose at the entry of the beam ({{D}\\text{entr}} ) as well as the dose distribution along each ray of the beam in a water-equivalent patient model. We utilized the concept of water-equivalent thickness to determine the dose inside the patient based on doses measured outside of the patient by the thin-film detector array layers: (a) A, (b) B, or (c) B and C. In the process of calibration we determined a correction factor that characterizes the material-specific response of the detector, backscatter factor and attenuation factor for slab water phantoms of various thicknesses. Application of this method to an anthropomorphic phantom showed accuracy of about 1% for {{D}\\text{entr}} and up to about 10% for integral dose along the beam path when compared to a direct simulation of dose by MC.

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of a prototypical patient dosimetry system for fluoroscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Goertz, Lukas; Tsiamas, Panagiotis; Karellas, Andrew; Sajo, Erno; Zygmanski, Piotr

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate feasibility of a novel real-time dosimetry method for fluoroscopically guided interventions utilizing thin-film detector arrays in several potential locations with respect to the patient and x-ray equipment. We employed Monte Carlo (MC) simulation to establish the fluoroscopic beam model to determine dosimetric quantities directly from measured doses in thin-film detector arrays at three positions: A-attached to the x-ray source, B-on the couch under the patient and C-attached to the fluoroscopic imager. Next, we developed a calibration method to determine skin dose at the entry of the beam ([Formula: see text]) as well as the dose distribution along each ray of the beam in a water-equivalent patient model. We utilized the concept of water-equivalent thickness to determine the dose inside the patient based on doses measured outside of the patient by the thin-film detector array layers: (a) A, (b) B, or (c) B and C. In the process of calibration we determined a correction factor that characterizes the material-specific response of the detector, backscatter factor and attenuation factor for slab water phantoms of various thicknesses. Application of this method to an anthropomorphic phantom showed accuracy of about 1% for [Formula: see text] and up to about 10% for integral dose along the beam path when compared to a direct simulation of dose by MC. PMID:26184743

  19. Externally triggered imaging technique for microbolometer-type terahertz imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Naoki; Sudou, Takayuki; Ishi, Tsutomu; Okubo, Syuichi; Isoyama, Goro; Irizawa, Akinori; Kawase, Keigo; Kato, Ryukou

    2016-04-01

    The authors developed terahertz (THz) imager which incorporates 320x240 focal plane array (FPA) with enhanced sensitivity in sub-THz region (ca. 0.5 THz). The imager includes functions such as external-trigger imaging, lock-in imaging, beam profiling and so on. The function of the external-trigger imaging is mainly described in this paper, which was verified in combination of the THz imager with the pulsed THz free electron laser (THz-FEL) developed by Osaka University. The THz-FEL emits THz radiation in a wavelength range of 25 - 150 μm at repetition rates of 2.5, 3.3, 5.0 and 10 pulses per second. The external trigger pulse for the THz imager was generated with a pulse generator, using brightening pulse for THz-FEL. A series of pulses emitted by the THz-FEL at 86 μm were introduced to the THz imager and Joule meter via beam splitter, so that the output signal of THz imager was normalized with the output of the Joule meter and the stability of the THz radiation from FEL was also monitored. The normalized output signals of THz imager (digits/μJ) obtained at the repetition rates mentioned above were found consistent with one another. The timing-relation of the external trigger pulse to the brightening pulse was varied and the influence of the timing-relation on beam pattern is presented. These experimental results verify that the external trigger imaging function operates correctly.

  20. Infrared Imaging Data Reduction Software and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbey, C. N.; McMahon, R. G.; Lewis, J. R.; Irwin, M. J.

    Developed to satisfy certain design requirements not met in existing packages (e.g., full weight map handling) and to optimize the software for large data sets (non-interactive tasks that are CPU and disk efficient), the InfraRed Data Reduction software package is a small ANSI C library of fast image processing routines for automated pipeline reduction of infrared (dithered) observations. The software includes stand-alone C programs for tasks such as running sky frame subtraction with object masking, image registration and co-addition with weight maps, dither offset measurement using cross-correlation, and object mask dilation. Although currently used for near-IR mosaic images, the modular software is concise and readily adaptable for reuse in other work. IRDR, available via anonymous ftp at ftp.ast.cam.ac.uk in pub/sabbey

  1. Modulation transfer function measurement technique for image sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hui; Jiang, Huilin; Zhang, XiaoHui

    2010-08-01

    A new technique is demonstrated for measurement of modulation transfer function (MTF) on image sensor arrays. Fourier analysis of a low frequency bar target pattern is used to extract MTF at odd harmonics of a target pattern frequency up to and beyond Nyquist. The technique is particularly useful for linear image arrays (either conventional linescan or time-delay- integration devices) where conventional slanted-edge technique is not always applicable. The technique is well suited to simple implementation and can provide live presentation of the MTF curve, which helps to ensure optimal alignment conditions are achieved. Detailed analysis of the technique and demonstration of experimental results are presented.

  2. Measuring radiation dose to patients undergoing fluoroscopically-guided interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubis, L. E.; Badawy, M. K.

    2016-03-01

    The increasing prevalence and complexity of fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) raises concern regarding radiation dose to patients subjected to the procedure. Despite current evidence showing the risk to patients from the deterministic effects of radiation (e.g. skin burns), radiation induced injuries remain commonplace. This review aims to increase the awareness surrounding radiation dose measurement for patients undergoing FGI. A review of the literature was conducted alongside previous researches from the authors’ department. Studies pertaining to patient dose measurement, its formalism along with current advances and present challenges were reviewed. Current patient monitoring techniques (using available radiation dosimeters), as well as the inadequacy of accepting displayed dose as patient radiation dose is discussed. Furthermore, advances in real-time patient radiation dose estimation during FGI are considered. Patient dosimetry in FGI, particularly in real time, remains an ongoing challenge. The increasing occurrence and sophistication of these procedures calls for further advances in the field of patient radiation dose monitoring. Improved measuring techniques will aid clinicians in better predicting and managing radiation induced injury following FGI, thus improving patient care.

  3. Fluoroscopically Guided Balloon Dilation for Postintubation Tracheal Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Woong Hee; Kim, Jin Hyoung Park, Jung-Hun

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Little was known about the safety and long-term efficacy of fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation for postintubation tracheal stenosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and long-term efficacy of fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation in patients with postintubation tracheal stenosis. Methods: From February 2000 to November 2010, 14 patients underwent fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation for postintubation tracheal stenosis. Technical success, clinical success, and complications were evaluated. Patients were followed up for recurrent symptoms. Results: In all patients, fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation was technically and clinically successful with no major complications. Following the initial procedure, six patients (43 %) remained asymptomatic during a follow-up period. Obstructive symptoms recurred in eight patients (57 %) within 6 months (mean, 1.7 months), who were treated with repeat balloon dilation (n = 4) and other therapies. Of the four patients who underwent repeat balloon dilation, three became asymptomatic. One patient became asymptomatic after a third balloon dilation. On long-term (mean, 74 months) follow-up, 71 % of patients experienced relief of symptoms following fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation. Conclusions: Fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation may be safe, is easy to perform, and resulted in effective treatment in patients with postintubation tracheal stenosis.

  4. Technique for improving solid state mosaic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saboe, J. M.

    1969-01-01

    Method identifies and corrects mosaic image faults in solid state visual displays and opto-electronic presentation systems. Composite video signals containing faults due to defective sensing elements are corrected by a memory unit that contains the stored fault pattern and supplies the appropriate fault word to the blanking circuit.

  5. Towards Automatic Image Segmentation Using Optimised Region Growing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alazab, Mamoun; Islam, Mofakharul; Venkatraman, Sitalakshmi

    Image analysis is being adopted extensively in many applications such as digital forensics, medical treatment, industrial inspection, etc. primarily for diagnostic purposes. Hence, there is a growing interest among researches in developing new segmentation techniques to aid the diagnosis process. Manual segmentation of images is labour intensive, extremely time consuming and prone to human errors and hence an automated real-time technique is warranted in such applications. There is no universally applicable automated segmentation technique that will work for all images as the image segmentation is quite complex and unique depending upon the domain application. Hence, to fill the gap, this paper presents an efficient segmentation algorithm that can segment a digital image of interest into a more meaningful arrangement of regions and objects. Our algorithm combines region growing approach with optimised elimination of false boundaries to arrive at more meaningful segments automatically. We demonstrate this using X-ray teeth images that were taken for real-life dental diagnosis.

  6. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Drainage without Fluoroscopic Guidance for Extraluminal Complicated Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Hyeong Seok; Kim, Hyung Wook; Kang, Dae Hwan; Choi, Cheol Woong; Park, Su Bum; Kim, Su Jin; Ryu, Dae Gon; Jeon, Joon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background. Endoscopic ultrasound- (EUS-) guided drainage is generally performed under fluoroscopic guidance. However, improvements in endoscopic and EUS techniques and experience have led to questions regarding the usefulness of fluoroscopy. This study aimed to retrospectively evaluate the safety and efficacy of EUS-guided drainage of extraluminal complicated cysts without fluoroscopic guidance. Methods. Patients who had undergone nonfluoroscopic EUS-guided drainage of extraluminal complicated cysts were enrolled. Drainage was performed via a transgastric, transduodenal, or transrectal approach. Single or double 7 Fr double pigtail stents were inserted. Results. Seventeen procedures were performed in 15 patients in peripancreatic fluid collections (n = 13) and pelvic abscesses (n = 4). The median lesion size was 7.1 cm (range: 2.8–13.0 cm), and the mean time spent per procedure was 26.2 ± 9.8 minutes (range: 16–50 minutes). Endoscopic drainage was successful in 16 of 17 (94.1%) procedures. There were no complications. All patients experienced symptomatic improvement and revealed partial to complete resolution according to follow-up computed tomography findings. Two patients developed recurrent cysts that were drained during repeat procedures, with eventual complete resolution. Conclusion. EUS-guided drainage without fluoroscopic guidance is a technically feasible, safe, and effective procedure for the treatment of extraluminal complicated cysts. PMID:27313606

  7. Cylindrical millimeter-wave imaging technique and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2006-05-01

    The wideband microwave or millimeter-wave cylindrical imaging technique has been developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for several applications including concealed weapon detection and automated body measurement for apparel fitting. This technique forms a fully-focused, diffraction-limited, three-dimensional image of the person or imaging target by scanning an inward-directed vertical array around the person or imaging target. The array is switched electronically to sequence across the array at high-speed, so that a full 360 degree mechanical scan over the cylindrical aperture can occur in 2-10 seconds. Wideband, coherent reflection data from each antenna position are recorded in a computer and subsequently reconstructed using an FFT-based image reconstruction algorithm developed at PNNL. The cylindrical scanning configuration is designed to optimize the illumination of the target and minimize non-returns due to specular reflection of the illumination away from the array. In this paper, simulated modeling data are used to explore imaging issues that affect the cylindrical imaging technique. Physical optics scattering simulations are used to model realistic returns from curved surfaces to determine the extent to which specular reflection affects the signal return and subsequent image reconstruction from these surfaces. This is a particularly important issue for the body measurement application. Also, an artifact in the imaging technique, referred to as "circular convolution aliasing" is discussed including methods to reduce or eliminate it. Numerous simulated and laboratory measured imaging results are presented.

  8. Automated thermal mapping techniques using chromatic image analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.

    1989-01-01

    Thermal imaging techniques are introduced using a chromatic image analysis system and temperature sensitive coatings. These techniques are used for thermal mapping and surface heat transfer measurements on aerothermodynamic test models in hypersonic wind tunnels. Measurements are made on complex vehicle configurations in a timely manner and at minimal expense. The image analysis system uses separate wavelength filtered images to analyze surface spectral intensity data. The system was initially developed for quantitative surface temperature mapping using two-color thermographic phosphors but was found useful in interpreting phase change paint and liquid crystal data as well.

  9. Reconstruction Techniques for Sparse Multistatic Linear Array Microwave Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2014-06-09

    Sequentially-switched linear arrays are an enabling technology for a number of near-field microwave imaging applications. Electronically sequencing along the array axis followed by mechanical scanning along an orthogonal axis allows dense sampling of a two-dimensional aperture in near real-time. In this paper, a sparse multi-static array technique will be described along with associated Fourier-Transform-based and back-projection-based image reconstruction algorithms. Simulated and measured imaging results are presented that show the effectiveness of the sparse array technique along with the merits and weaknesses of each image reconstruction approach.

  10. The application of image enhancement techniques to remote manipulator operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    Methods of image enhancement which can be used by an operator who is not experienced with the mechanisms of enhancement to obtain satisfactory results were designed and implemented. Investigation of transformations which operate directly on the image domain resulted in a new technique of contrast enhancement. Transformations on the Fourier transform of the original image, including such techniques as homomorphic filtering, were also investigated. The methods of communication between the enhancement system and the computer operator were analyzed, and a language was developed for use in image enhancement. A working enhancement system was then created, and is included.