Science.gov

Sample records for flux science

  1. AmeriFlux Measurement Network: Science Team Research

    SciTech Connect

    Law, B E

    2012-12-12

    Research involves analysis and field direction of AmeriFlux operations, and the PI provides scientific leadership of the AmeriFlux network. Activities include the coordination and quality assurance of measurements across AmeriFlux network sites, synthesis of results across the network, organizing and supporting the annual Science Team Meeting, and communicating AmeriFlux results to the scientific community and other users. Objectives of measurement research include (i) coordination of flux and biometric measurement protocols (ii) timely data delivery to the Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center (CDIAC); and (iii) assurance of data quality of flux and ecosystem measurements contributed by AmeriFlux sites. Objectives of integration and synthesis activities include (i) integration of site data into network-wide synthesis products; and (ii) participation in the analysis, modeling and interpretation of network data products. Communications objectives include (i) organizing an annual meeting of AmeriFlux investigators for reporting annual flux measurements and exchanging scientific information on ecosystem carbon budgets; (ii) developing focused topics for analysis and publication; and (iii) developing data reporting protocols in support of AmeriFlux network goals.

  2. Panel session: Part 1, In flux -- Science Policy and the social structure of Big Laboratories, 1964--1979

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, C. ||

    1993-09-01

    This report discusses the in flux of science policy and the social structure of big laboratories during the period of 1964 to 1979 and some sociological consequences of high energy physicists` development of the standard model during the same period.

  3. Science in Flux: NASA's Nuclear Program at Plum Brook Station 1955-2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Mark D.

    2006-01-01

    Science in Flux traces the history of one of the most powerful nuclear test reactors in the United States and the only nuclear facility ever built by NASA. In the late 1950's NASA constructed Plum Brook Station on a vast tract of undeveloped land near Sandusky, Ohio. Once fully operational in 1963, it supported basic research for NASA's nuclear rocket program (NERVA). Plum Brook represents a significant, if largely forgotten, story of nuclear research, political change, and the professional culture of the scientists and engineers who devoted their lives to construct and operate the facility. In 1973, after only a decade of research, the government shut Plum Brook down before many of its experiments could be completed. Even the valiant attempt to redefine the reactor as an environmental analysis tool failed, and the facility went silent. The reactors lay in costly, but quiet standby for nearly a quarter-century before the Nuclear Regulatory Commission decided to decommission the reactors and clean up the site. The history of Plum Brook reveals the perils and potentials of that nuclear technology. As NASA, Congress, and space enthusiasts all begin looking once again at the nuclear option for sending humans to Mars, the echoes of Plum Brook's past will resonate with current policy and space initiatives.

  4. The flux and reflux of science: The study of the tides and the organization of early Victorian science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidy, Michael Sean

    2000-07-01

    For a fortnight in June, 1835, nine countries observed simultaneously the oceanic tides bordering their countries and their possessions. Over 650 tidal stations participated. This multi-national venture, which William Whewell affirmed to include the most ``multiplied and extensive observations yet encountered in science,'' was prototypical of what Susan Faye Cannon has termed ``Humboldtian science.'' This dissertation demonstrates how the beginnings of the politics of imperialism, the economics of a worldwide export trade, and the extensive diffusion of science to the middle and working classes laid the foundation for the increasing expansiveness Humboldtian research and the fruitful connection between science and government. The social matrix and internal mechanisms of this tidal research demonstrates that Humboldtian initiatives relied on a broad base of support and activity. This included significant contributions from Missionary Societies, the British Association, and especially the British Admiralty, from the Preventive Coast Guard to the Duke of Wellington, then Foreign Secretary. I also stress the essential contribution of the working-classes, a group previous historiography often described as mere data collectors. I uncover their roles in not only gathering data, but in initiating research topics, building self- registering instruments, reducing observational data, and advancing mathematical methods of analysis. Whewell's twenty-year research project helped him formulate what it was to do science and placed him at the forefront of the emerging profession of science in the early Victorian era. His approach to tidology was culled from a study of its history and philosophy and followed two major lines of research. The first entailed finding the phenomenological laws of the tides through long-term observations. His second approach entailed short-term but simultaneous observations along the entire coast of Great Britain, and eventually Europe and America

  5. Advances in Support of the CMAQ Bidirectional Science Option for the Estimation of Ammonia Flux from Agricultural cropland

    EPA Science Inventory

    Proposed Session: Emissions Inventories, Models and processes: Last year a new CMAQ bidirectional option for the estimation of ammonia flux (emission and deposition) was released. This option essentially replaces NEI crop ammonia emissions with emissions calculated dynamically...

  6. The Solar Wind - Magnetosphere Energy Coupling Function and Open Magnetic Flux Estimation: Two Science Aspects of the SMILE Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Dai, L.; Sun, T.; Han, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer (SMILE) is a novel self-standing mission to observe solar wind - magnetosphere coupling via simultaneous in situ solar wind /magnetosheath plasma and magnetic field measurements, X-ray images of the magnetosphere, and UV images of global auroral distribution defining system - level consequences. The SMILE mission is jointly supported by ESA and CSA, and the launch date is expected to be in 2021. SMILE will address several key outstanding questions concerning how the solar wind interacts with the magnetospheres on a global level. Quantitatively estimating the energy input from the solar wind into the magnetosphere on a global scale is still an observational challenge. Using global MHD simulations, we derive a new solar wind - magnetosphere energy coupling function. The X-ray images of the magnetosphere from the SMILE mission will help estimate the energy transfer from the solar wind into the magnetosphere. A second aspect SMILE can address is the open magnetic flux, which is closely related to magnetic reconnections in the dayside magnetopause and magnetotail. In a similar way, we find that the open magnetic flux can be estimated through a combined parameter f, which is a function of the solar wind velocity, number density, the southern interplanetary magnetic field strength, and the ionospheric Pederson conductance. The UV auroral images from SMILE will be used to determine the open magnetic flux, which may serve as a key space weather forecast element in the future.

  7. How can bottom-up greenhouse gas flux quantification in urban systems be relevant to both carbon science and policy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurney, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    Scientific research on spatially-resolved, bottom-up quantification of urban greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at urban scales has advanced considerably in the last decade. It has been primarily focused on contributing prior information to top-down approaches aimed at GHG emissions validation via atmospheric monitoring of GHG mixing ratios. However, bottom-up quantification has a number of other contributions to both scientific and policy topics. In order to do so, however, it must expand beyond current capabilities. Among these are the need to quantify both consumption- and production-based data products, utilization of remote-sensing, prognostic capabilities, expansion outside of the US, and uncertainty quantification. Such advances will allow it to make significant contributions to scientific research on urban science and energy analysis. In the arena of climate change policy, spatially-resolved, bottom-up quantification efforts can baseline and guide urban emissions mitigation, educate and engage the public, and offer a much more consistent and comprehensive means to compare cities across national and international domains. It can also find inconsistencies in existing reported regulatory data such as recent bottom-up research on examining US power plant CO2 emissions. I will review the current bottom-up GHG emissions quantification and review the opportunities and challenges associated with satisfying both climate change science and policy needs.

  8. Relative Fluxes of Primary Particles in B-C-N-O Group from the ATIC Experiment (Science Flight)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panov, A. D.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Chang, J.; Christl, M.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Gunashingha, R. M.; Guzik, T. G.; Isbert, J.; Kim, K. C.; Kouznetsov, E. N.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Seo, E. S.; Sokolskaya, N. V.; Watts, John W.; Wefel, J. P.; Wu, J.; Zatsepin, V. I.

    2007-01-01

    The ATIC balloon-born experiment measures the energy spectra of elements from H to Fe in primary cosmic rays from about 100 GeV to 100 TeV. ATIC is comprised of a fully active bismuth germinate calorimeter, a carbon target with embedded scintillator hodoscopes, and a silicon matrix that is used as a main charge detector. The silicon matrix produces good charge resolution for the protons and helium but only a partial resolution for heavier nuclei. In the present paper a charge resolution of ATIC device was improved and backgrounds were reduced in the region from Be to Si by means of the upper layer of the scintillator hodoscope that was used as charge detector together with silicon matrix. Relative fluxes of nuclei B, C, N, O in the energy region from about 20 GeV/nucleon to 200 GeV/nucleon that were obtained from new high-resolution and high-quality charge spectra of nuclei are presented.

  9. Monte Carlo simulations for high-rate fast neutron flux measurements made at the RAON neutron science facility by using MICROMEGAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Dae Hee; Hong, Ser Gi; Kim, Jae Cheon; Kim, Gi Dong; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2015-10-01

    RAON is a Korean heavy-ion accelerator complex that is planned to be built by 2021. Deuterons (53 MeV) and protons (88 MeV) accelerated by using a low-energy driver linac (SCL1) are delivered to the neutron production target in the Neutron Science Facility (NSF) to produce high-energy neutrons in the interval from 1 to 88 MeV with high fluxes of the order of 1012 n/cm2-sec. The repetition rate of the neutron beam ranges from 1 kHz to 1 MHz, and the maximum beam current is ~12 μA at 1 MHz. The beam width is 1 ~ 2 ns. The high-energy and high-rate fast neutrons are used to estimate accurate neutron-induced cross sections for various nuclides at the NSF. A MICROMEGAS (MICRO Mesh Gaseous Structure), which is a gaseous detector initially developed for tracking in high-rate, high-energy physics experiments, is tentatively being considered as a neutron beam monitor. It can be used to measure both the energy distribution and the flux of the neutron beam. In this study, a MICROMEGAS detector for installation at the NSF was designed and investigated. 6Li, 10B, 235U and 238U targets are being considered as neutron/charged particle converters. For the low-energy region, 6Li(n,α)t and 10B(n,α)7Li are used in the energy range from thermal to 1 MeV. 235U(n,f) and 238U(n,f) reactions are used for high-energy region up to 90 MeV. All calculations are performed by using the GEANT4 toolkit.

  10. Multi-Scale Science Framework for Attributing and Tracking Greenhouse Gas Fluxes at LANL's Four Corners New Mexico Test Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costigan, K. R.; Dubey, M. K.; Chylek, P.; Love, S. P.; Henderson, B. G.; Flowers, B. A.; Reisner, J. M.; Rahn, T.; Quick, C. R.

    2010-12-01

    Agreements to limit greenhouse gas emissions require scientifically valid methods for monitoring and validating anthropogenic emissions. However, the task of monitoring CO2 emissions is difficult because relatively small increases need to be detected against CO2’s variable and large background concentrations. To ensure fair compliance, remotely sensed measurements and an understanding of the atmospheric transport of CO2 from the sources are required. We hypothesize that CO2 from various natural and anthropogenic sources can be distinguished and tracked by monitoring co-emitted gases (e.g. NO2, SO2, and CO) and isotopomers (e.g.13CO2). The ratio of a co-emitted species to CO2 depends on fuel composition and combustion process and thus varies by energy sector. These ratios provide an independent method to quantify CO2 emissions. Their low backgrounds, their large perturbations from energy activities, and our ability to measure them precisely make them sensitive probes to attribute sources, especially when emission ratios of multiple species are used concurrently. This strategy of observing emission ratios of co-emitted species to derive regional and source-specific baselines and CO2 fluxes is being tested in the Four Corners region of northwestern New Mexico. The semi-arid ecology in the region has a weak natural carbon cycle, facilitating our goal of dissection of anthropogenic sector-specific sources. The net Four Corners and San Juan power plant emissions are the largest point source of CO2 and NOx in North America. The Four Corners plant produces much more NOx than the San Juan power plant, while their energy and CO2 outputs, and coal used, are similar. This difference offers us a unique opportunity to test discrimination methods. While their CO2 signals remain elusive for current satellites, their NO2 plumes have recently been resolved from space. The region also experiences dispersed CO2 urban emissions as well as emissions and leaks from thousands of oil

  11. Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Linda E., Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on science instruction and technology: "A 3-D Journey in Space: A New Visual Cognitive Adventure" (Yoav Yair, Rachel Mintz, and Shai Litvak); "Using Collaborative Inquiry and Interactive Technologies in an Environmental Science Project for Middle School Teachers: A Description and Analysis" (Patricia…

  12. KoFlux: Korean Regional Flux Network in AsiaFlux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.

    2002-12-01

    AsiaFlux, the Asian arm of FLUXNET, held the Second International Workshop on Advanced Flux Network and Flux Evaluation in Jeju Island, Korea on 9-11 January 2002. In order to facilitate comprehensive Asia-wide studies of ecosystem fluxes, the meeting launched KoFlux, a new Korean regional network of long-term micrometeorological flux sites. For a successful assessment of carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere, an accurate measurement of surface fluxes of energy and water is one of the prerequisites. During the 7th Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Asian Monsoon Experiment (GAME) held in Nagoya, Japan on 1-2 October 2001, the Implementation Committee of the Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period (CEOP) was established. One of the immediate tasks of CEOP was and is to identify the reference sites to monitor energy and water fluxes over the Asian continent. Subsequently, to advance the regional and global network of these reference sites in the context of both FLUXNET and CEOP, the Korean flux community has re-organized the available resources to establish a new regional network, KoFlux. We have built up domestic network sites (equipped with wind profiler and radiosonde measurements) over deciduous and coniferous forests, urban and rural rice paddies and coastal farmland. As an outreach through collaborations with research groups in Japan, China and Thailand, we also proposed international flux sites at ecologically and climatologically important locations such as a prairie on the Tibetan plateau, tropical forest with mixed and rapid land use change in northern Thailand. Several sites in KoFlux already begun to accumulate interesting data and some highlights are presented at the meeting. The sciences generated by flux networks in other continents have proven the worthiness of a global array of micrometeorological flux towers. It is our intent that the launch of KoFlux would encourage other scientists to initiate and

  13. GEWEX Radiative Flux Assessment Available Data

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-31

    ... GEWEX-SRBGLW_Ed021 GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget Global Longwave GEWEX-SRBGLW_Ed021.zip 48M ... GEWEX Radiative Flux Assessment data were obtained from the NASA Langley Research Center Atmospheric Science Data Center. " In addition, ...

  14. Fast flux locked loop

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2002-09-10

    A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

  15. Magnetic-flux pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.; Elleman, D. D.; Whitmore, F. C. (Inventor)

    1966-01-01

    A magnetic flux pump is described for increasing the intensity of a magnetic field by transferring flux from one location to the magnetic field. The device includes a pair of communicating cavities formed in a block of superconducting material, and a piston for displacing the trapped magnetic flux into the secondary cavity producing a field having an intense flux density.

  16. Return flux experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tveekrem, June L.

    1992-01-01

    All spacecraft emit molecules via outgassing, thruster plumes, vents, etc. The return flux is the portion of those molecules that scatter from the ambient atmosphere and return to the spacecraft. Return flux allows critical spacecraft surfaces to become contaminated even when there is no direct line of sight between the contamination source and the critical surface. Data from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) show that contamination of LDEF surfaces could not have come entirely from direct flux. The data suggest significant return flux. Several computer models have been developed to simulate return flux, but the predictions have never been verified in orbit. Large uncertainties in predictions lead to overly conservative spacecraft designs. The purpose of the REturn FLux EXperiment (REFLEX) is to fly a controlled experiment that can be directly compared with predictions from several models.

  17. Heat flux measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Weikle, Donald H.

    1989-01-01

    A new automated, computer controlled heat flux measurement facility is described. Continuous transient and steady-state surface heat flux values varying from about 0.3 to 6 MW/sq m over a temperature range of 100 to 1200 K can be obtained in the facility. An application of this facility is the development of heat flux gauges for continuous fast transient surface heat flux measurement on turbine blades operating in space shuttle main engine turbopumps. The facility is useful for durability testing at fast temperature transients.

  18. Aspects of flux compactification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao

    In this thesis, we study three main aspects of flux compactifications: (1) classify supergravity solutions from flux compactification; (2) construct flux-deformed geometry and 4D low-energy theory to describe these flux vacua; and (3) study 4D particle phenomenology and cosmology of flux vacua. In the first part, we review G-structure, the basic tool to study supersymmetric flux solutions, and some typical solutions obtained in heterotic, type IIA and type IIB string theories. Then we present a comprehensive classification of supersymmetric vacua of M-theory compactification on 7D manifolds with general four-form fluxes. We analyze the cases where the resulting four-dimensional vacua have N = 1, 2, 3, 4 supersymmetry and the internal space allows for SU(2)-, SU(3)- or G 2-structures. In particular, we find for N = 2 supersymmetry, that the external space-time is Minkowski and the base manifold of the internal space is conformally Kahler for SU(2) structures, while for SU(3) structures the internal space has to be Einstein-Sasaki and no internal fluxes are allowed. Moreover, we provide a new vacuum with N = 1 supersymmetry and SU(3) structure, where all fluxes are non-zero and the first order differential equations are solved. In the second part, we simply review the methods used to construct one subclass of fluxed-deformed geometry or the so-called "twisted manifold", and the associated 4D effective theory describing these flux vacua. Then by employing (generalized) Scherk-Schwarz reduction, we construct the geometric twisting for Calabi-Yau manifolds of Voisin-Borcea type (K 3 x T2)/ Z2 and study the superpotential in a type IIA orientifold based on this geometry. The twists modify the direct product by fibering the K 3 over T2 while preserving the Z2 involution. As an important application, the Voisin-Borcea class contains T6/( Z2 x Z2 ), the usual setting for intersecting D6 brane model building. Past work in this context considered only those twists inherited

  19. Video Meteor Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell-Brown, M. D.; Braid, D.

    2011-01-01

    The flux of meteoroids, or number of meteoroids per unit area per unit time, is critical for calibrating models of meteoroid stream formation and for estimating the hazard to spacecraft from shower and sporadic meteors. Although observations of meteors in the millimetre to centimetre size range are common, flux measurements (particularly for sporadic meteors, which make up the majority of meteoroid flux) are less so. It is necessary to know the collecting area and collection time for a given set of observations, and to correct for observing biases and the sensitivity of the system. Previous measurements of sporadic fluxes are summarized in Figure 1; the values are given as a total number of meteoroids striking the earth in one year to a given limiting mass. The Gr n et al. (1985) flux model is included in the figure for reference. Fluxes for sporadic meteoroids impacting the Earth have been calculated for objects in the centimeter size range using Super-Schmidt observations (Hawkins & Upton, 1958); this study used about 300 meteors, and used only the physical area of overlap of the cameras at 90 km to calculate the flux, corrected for angular speed of meteors, since a large angular speed reduces the maximum brightness of the meteor on the film, and radiant elevation, which takes into account the geometric reduction in flux when the meteors are not perpendicular to the horizontal. They bring up corrections for both partial trails (which tends to increase the collecting area) and incomplete overlap at heights other than 90 km (which tends to decrease it) as effects that will affect the flux, but estimated that the two effects cancelled one another. Halliday et al. (1984) calculated the flux of meteorite-dropping fireballs with fragment masses greater than 50 g, over the physical area of sky accessible to the MORP fireball cameras, counting only observations in clear weather. In the micron size range, LDEF measurements of small craters on spacecraft have been used to

  20. LCLS Spectral Flux Viewer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-10-25

    This application (FluxViewer) is a tool for displaying spectral flux data for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). This tool allows the user to view sliced spatial and energy distributions of the photons selected for specific energies and positions transverse to the beam axis.

  1. Directed flux motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A directed flux motor described utilizes the directed magnetic flux of at least one magnet through ferrous material to drive different planetary gear sets to achieve capabilities in six actuated shafts that are grouped three to a side of the motor. The flux motor also utilizes an interwoven magnet configuration which reduces the overall size of the motor. The motor allows for simple changes to modify the torque to speed ratio of the gearing contained within the motor as well as simple configurations for any number of output shafts up to six. The changes allow for improved manufacturability and reliability within the design.

  2. Heat Flux Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A heat flux microsensor developed under a NASP Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) has a wide range of potential commercial applications. Vatell Corporation originally designed microsensors for use in very high temperatures. The company then used the technology to develop heat flux sensors to measure the rate of heat energy flowing in and out of a surface as well as readings on the surface temperature. Additional major advantages include response to heat flux in less than 10 microseconds and the ability to withstand temperatures up to 1,200 degrees centigrade. Commercial applications are used in high speed aerodynamics, supersonic combustion, blade cooling, and mass flow measurements, etc.

  3. Acid soldering flux poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    The harmful substances in soldering fluxes are called hydrocarbons. They include: Ammonium chloride Rosin Hydrochloric acid Zinc ... Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ... Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ...

  4. Cryogenic flux-concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, B. M.; Brechna, H.; Hill, D. A.

    1969-01-01

    Flux concentrator has high primary to secondary coupling efficiency enabling it to produce high magnetic fields. The device provides versatility in pulse duration, magnetic field strengths and power sources.

  5. SAMOS Surface Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Shawn; Bourassa, Mark

    2014-05-01

    The development of a new surface flux dataset based on underway meteorological observations from research vessels will be presented. The research vessel data center at the Florida State University routinely acquires, quality controls, and distributes underway surface meteorological and oceanographic observations from over 30 oceanographic vessels. These activities are coordinated by the Shipboard Automated Meteorological and Oceanographic System (SAMOS) initiative in partnership with the Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) project. Recently, the SAMOS data center has used these underway observations to produce bulk flux estimates for each vessel along individual cruise tracks. A description of this new flux product, along with the underlying data quality control procedures applied to SAMOS observations, will be provided. Research vessels provide underway observations at high-temporal frequency (1 min. sampling interval) that include navigational (position, course, heading, and speed), meteorological (air temperature, humidity, wind, surface pressure, radiation, rainfall), and oceanographic (surface sea temperature and salinity) samples. Vessels recruited to the SAMOS initiative collect a high concentration of data within the U.S. continental shelf and also frequently operate well outside routine shipping lanes, capturing observations in extreme ocean environments (Southern, Arctic, South Atlantic, and South Pacific oceans). These observations are atypical for their spatial and temporal sampling, making them very useful for many applications including validation of numerical models and satellite retrievals, as well as local assessments of natural variability. Individual SAMOS observations undergo routine automated quality control and select vessels receive detailed visual data quality inspection. The result is a quality-flagged data set that is ideal for calculating turbulent flux estimates. We will describe the bulk flux algorithms that have been applied to the

  6. Algebraic Flux Correction II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, Dmitri; Möller, Matthias; Gurris, Marcel

    Flux limiting for hyperbolic systems requires a careful generalization of the design principles and algorithms introduced in the context of scalar conservation laws. In this chapter, we develop FCT-like algebraic flux correction schemes for the Euler equations of gas dynamics. In particular, we discuss the construction of artificial viscosity operators, the choice of variables to be limited, and the transformation of antidiffusive fluxes. An a posteriori control mechanism is implemented to make the limiter failsafe. The numerical treatment of initial and boundary conditions is discussed in some detail. The initialization is performed using an FCT-constrained L 2 projection. The characteristic boundary conditions are imposed in a weak sense, and an approximate Riemann solver is used to evaluate the fluxes on the boundary. We also present an unconditionally stable semi-implicit time-stepping scheme and an iterative solver for the fully discrete problem. The results of a numerical study indicate that the nonlinearity and non-differentiability of the flux limiter do not inhibit steady state convergence even in the case of strongly varying Mach numbers. Moreover, the convergence rates improve as the pseudo-time step is increased.

  7. Magnetic flux tube tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlburg, R.B.; Antiochos, S.K.; Norton, D.

    1997-08-01

    We present numerical simulations of the collision and subsequent interaction of {ital orthogonal} magnetic flux tubes. The simulations were carried out using a parallelized spectral algorithm for compressible magnetohydrodynamics. It is found that, under a wide range of conditions, the flux tubes can {open_quotes}tunnel{close_quotes} through each other, a behavior not previously seen in studies of either vortex tube or magnetic flux tube interactions. Two conditions must be satisfied for tunneling to occur: the magnetic field must be highly twisted with a field line pitch {gt}1, and the Lundquist number must be somewhat large, {ge}2880. An examination of magnetic field lines suggests that tunneling is due to a double-reconnection mechanism. Initially orthogonal field lines reconnect at two specific locations, exchange interacting sections, and {open_quotes}pass{close_quotes} through each other. The implications of these results for solar and space plasmas are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Superradiance and flux conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Ngampitipan, Tritos; Visser, Matt

    2014-09-01

    The theoretical foundations of the phenomenon known as superradiance still continue to attract considerable attention. Despite many valiant attempts at pedagogically clear presentations, the effect nevertheless still continues to generate some significant confusion. Part of the confusion arises from the fact that superradiance in a quantum field theory context is not the same as superradiance (superfluorescence) in some condensed matter contexts; part of the confusion arises from traditional but sometimes awkward normalization conventions, and part is due to sometimes unnecessary confusion between fluxes and probabilities. We shall argue that the key point underlying the effect is flux conservation (and, in the presence of dissipation, a controlled amount of flux nonconservation), and that attempting to phrase things in terms of reflection and transmission probabilities only works in the absence of superradiance. To help clarify the situation we present a simple exactly solvable toy model exhibiting both superradiance and damping.

  9. Magnetic flux tube tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Antiochos, S. K.; Norton, D.

    1997-08-01

    We present numerical simulations of the collision and subsequent interaction of orthogonal magnetic flux tubes. The simulations were carried out using a parallelized spectral algorithm for compressible magnetohydrodynamics. It is found that, under a wide range of conditions, the flux tubes can ``tunnel'' through each other, a behavior not previously seen in studies of either vortex tube or magnetic flux tube interactions. Two conditions must be satisfied for tunneling to occur: the magnetic field must be highly twisted with a field line pitch >>1, and the Lundquist number must be somewhat large, >=2880. An examination of magnetic field lines suggests that tunneling is due to a double-reconnection mechanism. Initially orthogonal field lines reconnect at two specific locations, exchange interacting sections, and ``pass'' through each other. The implications of these results for solar and space plasmas are discussed.

  10. Protected Flux Pairing Qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Matthew; Zhang, Wenyuan; Ioffe, Lev; Gershenson, Michael

    2014-03-01

    We have studied the coherent flux tunneling in a qubit containing two submicron Josephson junctions shunted by a superinductor (a dissipationless inductor with an impedance much greater than the resistance quantum). The two low energy quantum states of this device, 0 and 1, are represented by even and odd number of fluxes in the loop, respectively. This device is dual to the charge pairing Josephson rhombi qubit. The spectrum of the device, studied by microwave spectroscopy, reflects the interference between coherent quantum phase slips in the two junctions (the Aharonov-Casher effect). The time domain measurements demonstrate the suppression of the qubit's energy relaxation in the protected regime, which illustrates the potential of this flux pairing device as a protected quantum circuit. Templeton Foundation, NSF, and ARO.

  11. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MacArthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  12. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MacArthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic phosphors. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  13. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MaCarthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  14. Science in Science Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allday, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Offers some suggestions as to how science fiction, especially television science fiction programs such as "Star Trek" and "Star Wars", can be drawn into physics lessons to illuminate some interesting issues. (Author/KHR)

  15. Muon and neutrino fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, P. G.; Protheroe, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The result of a new calculation of the atmospheric muon and neutrino fluxes and the energy spectrum of muon-neutrinos produced in individual extensive air showers (EAS) initiated by proton and gamma-ray primaries is reported. Also explained is the possibility of detecting atmospheric nu sub mu's due to gamma-rays from these sources.

  16. Electrostatic heat flux instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, P. J.; Ionson, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    The electrostatic cyclotron and ion acoustic instabilities in a plasma driven by a combined heat flux and current were investigated. The minimum critical heat conduction speed (above which the plasma is unstable) is given as a function of the ratio of electron to ion temperatures.

  17. Radiative Flux Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Long, Chuck [NOAA

    2008-05-14

    The Radiative Flux Analysis is a technique for using surface broadband radiation measurements for detecting periods of clear (i.e. cloudless) skies, and using the detected clear-sky data to fit functions which are then used to produce continuous clear-sky estimates. The clear-sky estimates and measurements are then used in various ways to infer cloud macrophysical properties.

  18. Characterization of seismic hazard and structural response by energy flux

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Afak, E.

    2000-01-01

    Seismic safety of structures depends on the structure's ability to absorb the seismic energy that is transmitted from ground to structure. One parameter that can be used to characterize seismic energy is the energy flux. Energy flux is defined as the amount of energy transmitted per unit time through a cross-section of a medium, and is equal to kinetic energy multiplied by the propagation velocity of seismic waves. The peak or the integral of energy flux can be used to characterize ground motions. By definition, energy flux automatically accounts for site amplification. Energy flux in a structure can be studied by formulating the problem as a wave propagation problem. For buildings founded on layered soil media and subjected to vertically incident plane shear waves, energy flux equations are derived by modeling the buildings as an extension of the layered soil medium, and considering each story as another layer. The propagation of energy flux in the layers is described in terms of the upgoing and downgoing energy flux in each layer, and the energy reflection and transmission coefficients at each interface. The formulation results in a pair of simple finite-difference equations for each layer, which can be solved recursively starting from the bedrock. The upgoing and downgoing energy flux in the layers allows calculation of the energy demand and energy dissipation in each layer. The methodology is applicable to linear, as well as nonlinear structures. ?? 2000 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  19. A turnkey data logger program for field-scale energy flux density measurements using eddy covariance and surface renewal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Micrometeorological methods and ecosystem-scale energy and mass flux density measurements have become increasingly important in soil, agricultural, and environmental sciences. For many scientists without formal training in atmospheric science, these techniques are relatively inaccessible. Eddy cov...

  20. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MacArthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

    1991-04-09

    A heat flux gauge is disclosed comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. 9 figures.

  1. Atmospheric lepton fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaisser, Thomas K.

    2015-08-01

    This review of atmospheric muons and neutrinos emphasizes the high energy range relevant for backgrounds to high-energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin. After a brief historical introduction, the main distinguishing features of atmospheric νμ and νe are discussed, along with the implications of the muon charge ratio for the νµ / ν̅µ ratio. Methods to account for effects of the knee in the primary cosmic-ray spectrum and the energy-dependence of hadronic interactions on the neutrino fluxes are discussed and illustrated in the context of recent results from IceCube. A simple numerical/analytic method is proposed for systematic investigation of uncertainties in neutrino fluxes arising from uncertainties in the primary cosmic-ray spectrum/composition and hadronic interactions.

  2. Collapse of flux tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilets, L.; Puff, R. D.

    1995-01-01

    The dynamics of an idealized, infinite, MIT-type flux tube is followed in time as the interior evolves from a pure gluon field to a q¯q plasma. We work in color U(1). q¯q pair formation is evaluated according to the Schwinger mechanism using the results of Brink and Pavel. The motion of the quarks toward the tube end caps is calculated by a Boltzmann equation including collisions. The tube undergoes damped radial oscillations until the electric field settles down to zero. The electric field stabilizes the tube against pinch instabilities; when the field vanishes, the tube disintegrates into mesons. There is only one free parameter in the problem, namely the initial flux tube radius, to which the results are very sensitive. Among various quantities calculated is the mean energy of the emitted pions.

  3. NEUTRON FLUX INTENSITY DETECTION

    DOEpatents

    Russell, J.T.

    1964-04-21

    A method of measuring the instantaneous intensity of neutron flux in the core of a nuclear reactor is described. A target gas capable of being transmuted by neutron bombardment to a product having a resonance absorption line nt a particular microwave frequency is passed through the core of the reactor. Frequency-modulated microwave energy is passed through the target gas and the attenuation of the energy due to the formation of the transmuted product is measured. (AEC)

  4. Reconnecting Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, Walter; van Compernolle, Bart

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic flux ropes are due to helical currents and form a dense carpet of arches on the surface of the sun. Occasionally one tears loose as a coronal mass ejection and its rope structure is detected by satellites close to the earth. Current sheets can tear into filaments and these are nothing other than flux ropes. Ropes are not static, they exert mutual JxB forces causing them to twist about each other and merge. Kink instabilities cause them to violently smash into each other and reconnect at the point of contact. We report on experiments done in the large plasma device (LAPD) at UCLA (L=17m,dia=60cm,0.3<=B0z<=2.5kG,n˜2x10^12cm-3)on three dimensional flux ropes. Two, three or more magnetic flux ropes are generated from initially adjacent pulsed current channels in a background magnetized plasma. The currents and magnetic fields form exotic shapes with no ignorable direction and no magnetic nulls. Volumetric space-time data show multiple reconnection sites with time-dependent locations. The concept of a quasi-separatrix layer (QSL), a tool to understand 3D reconnection without null points. In our experiment the QSL is a narrow ribbon-like region(s) that twists between field lines. Within the QSL(s) field lines that start close to one another rapidly diverge as they pass through one or more reconnection regions. When the field lines are tracked they are observed to slip along the QSL when reconnection occurs. The Heating and other co-existing waves will be presented.

  5. Heat Flux Sensor Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the following objectives: Developing secondary calibration capabilities for MSFC's (Marshall Space Flight Center) Hot Gas Facility (HGF), a Mach 4 Aerothermal Wind Tunnel; Evaluating ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) slug/ thinskin calorimeters against current HGF heat flux sensors; Providing verification of baselined AEDC (Arnold Engineering Development Center) / Medtherm gage calibrations; Addressing future calibration issues involving NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) certified radiant gages.

  6. Exact Vlasov Solutions of Kinetic Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    Small-scale magnetic flux ropes have been observed to form within the diffusion region in three-dimensional (3D) kinetic simulations of magnetic reconnection. Such 3D structures and the 2D version of them (plasmoids, secondary islands) could have important dynamical effects on the reconnection physics itself. Small-scale flux ropes have also been observed within the interplanetary space. We have found exact time-steady solutions of kinetic flux ropes by generalizing exact solutions of 2D Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal (BGK) modes in a magnetized plasma with finite magnetic field strength [Ng, Bhattacharjee, and Skiff, Phys. Plasmas 13, 055903 (2006)] to cases with azimuthal magnetic fields so that these structures carry electric current as well as steady electric and magnetic fields. Such fully nonlinear solutions now satisfy exactly the Vlasov-Poisson-Ampere system of equations. Solutions like these could describe small-scale flux ropes observed in reconnection diffusion regions or in the interplanetary space. They are also exact nonlinear solutions that can be used to validate numerical schemes for kinetic simulations. This work is supported by a National Science Foundation grant PHY-1004357.

  7. Transmantle flux tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, V. J.; Dolginov, A. Z.; Baker, V. R.

    1993-01-01

    Venus, Earth, and Mars have surfaces that display topographic domes and depressions with quasi-circular planimetric shapes, relief of 0 to several km, and large spatial scales (10(exp 2) to 10(exp 4) km). Our morphostructural mapping reveals hierarchical arrangements of these features. They are explained by a model of long-acting mantle convection, as a particular case of convection in a stratified and random inhomogeneous medium, which develops the form of a hierarchy of different convective pattern scales, each arising from different levels in the mantle. The hypothesis of transmantle flux tectonics parsimoniously explains a diversity of seemingly unrelated terrestrial planetary phenomena, including Earth megaplumes, global resurfacing epochs on Venus, and cyclic ocean formation and global climate change for Mars. All these phenomenon are hypothesized to be parsimoniously explained by a process of transmantle flux tectonics in which long-acting mantle convection generates stresses in blocks of planetary lithosphere to produce distinctive quasi-circular global-hierarchical morphostructure (QGM) patterns. Transmantle flux tectonics differs from plume tectonics in that individual plumes are not considered in isolation. Rather, a wholly interactive process is envisioned in which various spatial and temporal scales of convection operate contemporaneously and hierarchically within other scales. This process of continual change by hierarchical convective cells affects the surface at varying temporal and spatial scales, and its effects are discernable through their relic geological manifestations, the QGM patterns.

  8. Science and Science Fiction

    ScienceCinema

    Scherrer, Robert [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, United States

    2009-09-01

    I will explore the similarities and differences between the process of writing science fiction and the process of 'producing' science, specifically theoretical physics. What are the ground rules for introducing unproven new ideas in science fiction, and how do they differ from the corresponding rules in physics? How predictive is science fiction? (For that matter, how predictive is theoretical physics?) I will also contrast the way in which information is presented in science fiction, as opposed to its presentation in scientific papers, and I will examine the relative importance of ideas (as opposed to the importance of the way in which these ideas are presented). Finally, I will discuss whether a background as a research scientist provides any advantage in writing science fiction.

  9. Enhancing the precision and accuracy within and among AmeriFlux site measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Bev

    2013-11-25

    This is the final report for AmeriFlux QA/QC at Oregon State University. The major objective of this project is to contribute to the AmeriFlux network by continuing to build consistency in AmeriFlux measurements by addressing objectives stated in the AmeriFlux strategic plan and self evaluation, the North American Carbon Program, and the US Carbon Cycle Science Program. The project directly contributes to NACP and CCSP goals to establish an integrated, near-real time network of observations to inform climate change science.

  10. PHELIX for flux compression studies

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, Peter J; Rousculp, Christopher L; Reinovsky, Robert E; Reass, William A; Griego, Jeffrey R; Oro, David M; Merrill, Frank E

    2010-06-28

    PHELIX (Precision High Energy-density Liner Implosion eXperiment) is a concept for studying electromagnetic implosions using proton radiography. This approach requires a portable pulsed power and liner implosion apparatus that can be operated in conjunction with an 800 MeV proton beam at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The high resolution (< 100 micron) provided by proton radiography combined with similar precision of liner implosions driven electromagnetically can permit close comparisons of multi-frame experimental data and numerical simulations within a single dynamic event. To achieve a portable implosion system for use at high energy-density in a proton laboratory area requires sub-megajoule energies applied to implosions only a few cms in radial and axial dimension. The associated inductance changes are therefore relatively modest, so a current step-up transformer arrangement is employed to avoid excessive loss to parasitic inductances that are relatively large for low-energy banks comprising only several capacitors and switches. We describe the design, construction and operation of the PHELIX system and discuss application to liner-driven, magnetic flux compression experiments. For the latter, the ability of strong magnetic fields to deflect the proton beam may offer a novel technique for measurement of field distributions near perturbed surfaces.

  11. Stabilization of moduli by fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Behrndt, Klaus

    2004-12-10

    In order to fix the moduli, non-trivial fluxes might the essential input. We summarize different aspects of compactifications in the presence of fluxes, as there is the relation to generalized Scherk-Schwarz reductions and gauged supergravity but also the description of flux-deformed geometries in terms of G-structures and intrinsic torsion.

  12. Science in science fiction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allday, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Science fiction, from Star Trek to Star Wars, is hugely popular and pupils will surely have encountered good and bad physics there, but do they really notice? Discussing the science implied in books and movies, such as in the use of transporters, can be a good way of getting students interested in physics.

  13. Thermal flux transfer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freggens, R. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A thermal flux transfer system for use in maintaining the thrust chamber of an operative reaction motor at given temperatures is described. The system is characterized by an hermetically sealed chamber surrounding a thrust chamber to be cooled, with a plurality of parallel, longitudinally spaced, disk-shaped wick members formed of a metallic mesh and employed in delivering a working fluid, in its liquid state, radially toward the thrust chamber and delivering the working fluid, in its vapor state, away from the nozzle for effecting a cooling of the nozzle, in accordance with known principles of an operating heat pipe.

  14. High flux reactor

    DOEpatents

    Lake, James A.; Heath, Russell L.; Liebenthal, John L.; DeBoisblanc, Deslonde R.; Leyse, Carl F.; Parsons, Kent; Ryskamp, John M.; Wadkins, Robert P.; Harker, Yale D.; Fillmore, Gary N.; Oh, Chang H.

    1988-01-01

    A high flux reactor is comprised of a core which is divided into two symetric segments housed in a pressure vessel. The core segments include at least one radial fuel plate. The spacing between the plates functions as a coolant flow channel. The core segments are spaced axially apart such that a coolant mixing plenum is formed between them. A channel is provided such that a portion of the coolant bypasses the first core section and goes directly into the mixing plenum. The outlet coolant from the first core segment is mixed with the bypass coolant resulting in a lower inlet temperature to the lower core segment.

  15. Electroslag remelting with used fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, N.F.; Sokha, Yu.S.; Oleinik, Yu.S.; Prokhorov, A.N.; Ol'shanskaya, T.V.

    1988-05-01

    The Ukranian Scientific-Research Institute of Specialty Steel collaborated with plants engaged in the production of quality metals to introduce a low-waste electroslag remelting (ESR) technology employing used fluxes. It was established that the fluoride (type ANF-1) and fluoride-oxide (type ANF-6) fluxes which are widely used in ESR still have a high content of calcium fluoride and alumina and a low impurity content after 8-10 h of ESR. In the ESR of steels with used fluxes, the content of monitored components in the final slags changes negligibly, while the content of most impurities decreases. The used flux is also characterized by a low concentration of phosphorus and sulfur. It was found that flux can be used 3-5 times when it makes up 50% of the flux mixture in the charge. The savings realized from the use of spent flux in ESR amounts to 4-9 rubles/ton steel.

  16. Computing the Flux Footprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. D.

    2015-07-01

    We address the flux footprint for measurement heights in the atmospheric surface layer, comparing eddy diffusion solutions with those furnished by the first-order Lagrangian stochastic (or "generalized Langevin") paradigm. The footprint given by Langevin models differs distinctly from that given by the random displacement model (i.e. zeroth-order Lagrangian stochastic model) corresponding to its "diffusion limit," which implies that a well-founded theory of the flux footprint must incorporate the turbulent velocity autocovariance. But irrespective of the choice of the eddy diffusion or Langevin class of model as basis for the footprint, tuning relative to observations is ultimately necessary. Some earlier treatments assume Monin-Obukhov profiles for the mean wind and eddy diffusivity and that the effective Schmidt number (ratio of eddy viscosity to the tracer eddy diffusivity) in the neutral limit , while others calibrate the model to the Project Prairie Grass dispersion trials. Because there remains uncertainty as to the optimal specification of (or a related parameter in alternative theories, e.g. the Kolmogorov coefficient in Langevin models) it is recommended that footprint models should be explicit in this regard.

  17. PromptNuFlux: Prompt atmospheric neutrino flux calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottoli, Luca

    2015-11-01

    PromptNuFlux computes the prompt atmospheric neutrino flux E3Φ(GeV2/(cm2ssr)), including the total associated theory uncertainty, for a range of energies between E=103 GeV and E=107.5 GeV. Results are available for five different parametrizations of the input cosmic ray flux: BPL, H3P, H3A, H14a, H14b.

  18. California's Future Carbon Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Pyles, R. D.; Paw U, K.; Gertz, M.

    2008-12-01

    The diversity of the climate and vegetation systems in the state of California provides a unique opportunity to study carton dioxide exchange between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere. In order to accurately calculate the carbon flux, this study couples the sophisticated analytical surface layer model ACASA (Advance Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm, developed in the University of California, Davis) with the newest version of mesoscale model WRF (the Weather Research & Forecasting Model, developed by NCAR and several other agencies). As a multilayer, steady state model, ACASA incorporates higher-order representations of vertical temperature variations, CO2 concentration, radiation, wind speed, turbulent statistics, and plant physiology. The WRF-ACASA coupling is designed to identify how multiple environmental factors, in particularly climate variability, population density, and vegetation distribution, impact on future carbon cycle prediction across a wide geographical range such as in California.

  19. Quantitative Flux Ecoregions for AmeriFlux Using MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, F. M.; Hargrove, W. W.

    2004-12-01

    Multivariate Geographic Clustering was used with maps of climate, soils, and physiography and MODIS remotely sensed data products to statistically produce a series of the 90 most-different homogeneous flux-relevant ecoregions in the conterminous United States using a parallel supercomputer. Nine separate sets of flux ecoregions were produced; only two will be discussed here. Both the IB and IIIB maps were quantitatively constructed from subsets of the input data integrated during the local growing season (frost-free period) in every 1 km cell. Each map is shown two ways --- once with the 90 flux ecoregions colored randomly, and once using color combinations derived statistically from the first three Principal Component Axes. Although the underlying flux ecoregion polygons are the same in both cases, the statistically derived colors show the similarity of conditions within each flux ecoregion. Coloring the same map in this way shows the continuous gradient of changing flux environments across the US. The IB map, since it considers only abiotic environmental factors, represents flux-ecoregions based on potential vegetation. The IIIB map, since it contains remotely sensed MODIS information about existing vegetation, includes the effects of natural and anthropogenic disturbance, and represents actual or realized flux ecoregions. Thus, differences between the maps are attributable to human activity and natural disturbances. The addition of information on existing vegetation exerts a unifying effect on abiotic-only flux ecoregions. The Mississippi Valley and Corn Belt areas show large differences between the two maps. Map IIIB shows a mosaic of ``speckles'' in areas of intense human land use, ostensibly from disturbances like agriculture, irrigation, fertilization, and clearing. Such ``speckles'' are absent from areas devoid of intense human land use. Major cities are also evident in the IIIB map. We will use the quantitative similarity of the suite of flux

  20. Quantum transport in coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum transport properties are instrumental to understanding quantum coherent transport processes. Potential applications of quantum transport are widespread, in areas ranging from quantum information science to quantum engineering, and not restricted to quantum state transfer, control and manipulation. Here, we study light transport in a ring array of coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic flux. The ring configuration, with an arbitrary number of resonators embedded, forms a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer. The influence of magnetic flux on light transport is investigated. Tuning the magnetic flux can lead to resonant transmission, while half-integer magnetic flux quantum leads to completely destructive interference and transmission zeros in an interferometer with two equal arms.

  1. Rotating reverse osmosis: a dynamic model for flux and rejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S.; Lueptow, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) is a compact process for the removal of ionic and organic pollutants from contaminated water. However, flux decline and rejection deterioration due to concentration polarization and membrane fouling hinders the application of RO technology. In this study, a rotating cylindrical RO membrane is theoretically investigated as a novel method to reduce polarization and fouling. A dynamic model based on RO membrane transport incorporating concentration polarization is used to predict the performance of rotating RO system. Operating parameters such as rotational speed and transmembrane pressure play an important role in determining the flux and rejection in rotating RO. For a given geometry, a rotational speed sufficient to generate Taylor vortices in the annulus is essential to maintain high flux as well as high rejection. The flux and rejection were calculated for wide range of operating pressures and rotational speeds. c 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Why different gas flux velocity parameterizations result in so similar flux results in the North Atlantic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskozub, Jacek; Wróbel, Iwona

    2016-04-01

    The North Atlantic is a crucial region for both ocean circulation and the carbon cycle. Most of ocean deep waters are produced in the basin making it a large CO2 sink. The region, close to the major oceanographic centres has been well covered with cruises. This is why we have performed a study of net CO2 flux dependence upon the choice of gas transfer velocity k parameterization for this very region: the North Atlantic including European Arctic Seas. The study has been a part of a ESA funded OceanFlux GHG Evolution project and, at the same time, a PhD thesis (of I.W) funded by Centre of Polar Studies "POLAR-KNOW" (a project of the Polish Ministry of Science). Early results have been presented last year at EGU 2015 as a PICO presentation EGU2015-11206-1. We have used FluxEngine, a tool created within an earlier ESA funded project (OceanFlux Greenhouse Gases) to calculate the North Atlantic and global fluxes with different gas transfer velocity formulas. During the processing of the data, we have noticed that the North Atlantic results for different k formulas are more similar (in the sense of relative error) that global ones. This was true both for parameterizations using the same power of wind speed and when comparing wind squared and wind cubed parameterizations. This result was interesting because North Atlantic winds are stronger than the global average ones. Was the flux result similarity caused by the fact that the parameterizations were tuned to the North Atlantic area where many of the early cruises measuring CO2 fugacities were performed? A closer look at the parameterizations and their history showed that not all of them were based on North Atlantic data. Some of them were tuned to the South Ocean with even stronger winds while some were based on global budgets of 14C. However we have found two reasons, not reported before in the literature, for North Atlantic fluxes being more similar than global ones for different gas transfer velocity parametrizations

  3. Statistics of Plasmaspheric Hiss Poynting Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletzing, C.; Christopher, I.; Santolik, O.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Bounds, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    The measured wave properties of plasmaspheric hiss are important to constrain modelsof the generation of hiss as well as its propagation and amplification. For example,the generation mechanism for plasmaspheric hiss has been suggestedto come from one of three possible mechanisms: 1) local generationand amplification, 2) whistlers from lightning, and 3) chorus emissions which have refracted into the plasmasphere. The latter two mechanismsare external sources which produce an incoherent hiss signature as the original waves mix in a stochastic manner, propagating in both directions along the background magnetic field. In contrast, local generation of plasmaspheric hiss within the plasmasphere should produce a signatureof waves propagating away from the source region. For all three mechanismsscattering of energetic particles into the loss cone transfers some energyfrom the particles to the waves. By examining the statistical characteristics of the Poynting flux of plasmaspheric hiss, we can determine the propertiesof wave energy flow in the plasmasphere. We report on the statistics of observations from the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) Waves instrument on the Van Allen Probes for periods when the spacecraft is inside the plasmasphere. We find that the Poynting flux associated with plasmaspheric hiss has distinct and unexpectedstructure in the Poynting flux which shows significant, organized variation in the properties of these waves as a function of position and and frequency.

  4. Astronomical Flux Standards: Getting to 1%

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deustua, Susana; Cikota, Aleksandar; Hines, Dean C.; Bohlin, Ralph; Gordon, Karl

    2015-08-01

    The objective for pursuing sub-1% absolute photometric accuracies, and, establishing the Absolute Physical Flux of ever fainter standard stars, is motivated by the requirements of Dark Energy science with JWST and other facilities. Even with the best data available, the current determination of absolute physical flux is is plagued by the reliance on the Vega photometric system, which is known to be problematic primarily due to the fact that Vega is a pole-on rapid rotator with an infrared excess from its circumstellar disk! which makes it difficult to model. Vega is also far too bright for large aperture telescopes. In an effort to remedy these difficulties, teams from e.g. the National Institute of Standards (NIST), University of New Mexico, Johns Hopkins University and STScI have begun to develop a catalog of stars that have spectral energy distributions that are tied directly to SI (diode) standards with very precisely determined physical characteristics. A key element in this pursuit has been the efforts at STScI to measure the spectra of many of these objects with STIS. We discuss our program to extend this effort into the near-IR which is crucial to reliably extend the SEDs to longer wavelengths, including the mid IR. We describe results from our effort towards 1% absolute color calibration in the UV-VIS-NIR with Hubble Space Telescope's WFC3/IR observations of 15 carefully selected stars with the immediate objective of establishing their absolute flux.

  5. Vorticity flux from active dimples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeon, Beverley; Sherwin, Spencer; Morrison, Jonathan

    2004-11-01

    The effect of surface depressions, or dimples, in reducing drag on golf balls is well-known. Here this concept is extended to using ``active" dimples to manipulate vorticity flux at the wall. Surface vorticity flux is governed by surface accelerations, pressure and shear stress gradients, and surface curvature. ``Active" (or vibrating) dimples may generate vorticity flux by each of these terms, making them an excellent candidate for a basic study of flux manipulation, by which flow control may be achieved. Flow over an active dimple in fully-developed laminar channel flow is simulated with velocity boundary conditions developed from a linearized perturbation method imposed at the wall. This simple model cannot capture flow separation, but gives insight into the most straightforward means of flux generation from the concave surface. Vorticity flux due to dimple geometry and motion is quantified, and enhancements of two to three orders of magnitude in peak vorticity over the static dimple case are observed.

  6. Heat-Flux-Measuring Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Weikle, Donald H.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus simulates conditions in turbine engines. Automated facility generates and measures transient and steady-state heat fluxes at flux densities from 0.3 to 6 MW/m(Sup2) and temperatures from 100 to 1,200 K. Positioning arm holds heat-flux gauge at focal point of arc lamp. Arm previously chilled gauge in liquid nitrogen in Dewar flask. Cooling water flows through lamp to heat exchanger. Used to develop heat-flux gauges for turbine blades and to test materials for durability under rapidly changing temperatures.

  7. Measuring surface fluxes in CAPE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanemasu, E. T.; D-Shah, T.; Nie, Dalin

    1992-01-01

    Two stations (site 1612 and site 2008) were operated by the University of Georgia group from 6 July 1991 to 18 August 1991. The following data were collected continuously: surface energy fluxes (i.e., net radiation, soil heat fluxes, sensible heat flux and latent heat flux), air temperature, vapor pressure, soil temperature (at 1 cm depth), and precipitation. Canopy reflectance and light interception data were taken three times at each site between 6 July and 18 August. Soil moisture content was measured twice at each site.

  8. South Atlantic meridional fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzoli, Silvia L.; Baringer, Molly O.; Dong, Shenfu; Perez, Renellys C.; Yao, Qi

    2013-01-01

    The properties of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) and associated meridional heat transport (MHT) and salt fluxes are analyzed in the South Atlantic. The oceanographic data used for the study consist of Expendable bathythermograph (XBT) data collected along 27 sections at nominally 35°S for the period of time 2002-2011, and Argo profile data collected in the region. Previous estimates obtained with a shorter record are improved and extended, using new oceanographic sections and wind fields. Different wind products are analyzed to determine the uncertainty in the Ekman component of the MHT derived from their use. Results of the analysis provide a 9-year time series of MHT, and volume transport in the upper layer of the MOC. Salt fluxes at 35°S are estimated using a parameter introduced by numerical studies, the Mov that represents the salt flux and helps determine the basin scale salt feedback associated with the MOC. Volume and heat transport by the western and eastern boundary currents are estimated, and their covariablity is examined. Analysis of the data shows that the South Atlantic is responsible for a northward MHT with a mean value of 0.54±0.14 PW. The MHT exhibits no significant trend from 2002 to 2011. The MOC varies from 14.4 to 22.7 Sv with a mean value of 18.1±2.3 Sv and the maximum overturning transport is found at a mean depth of 1250 m. Statistical analysis suggests that an increase of 1 Sv in the MOC leads to an increase of the MHT of 0.04±0.02 PW. Estimates of the Mov from data collected from three different kinds of observations, contrary to those obtained from models, feature a positive salt advection feedback (Mov<0) suggesting that freshwater perturbations will be amplified and that the MOC is bistable. In other words, the MOC might collapse with a large enough freshwater perturbation. Observations indicate that the mean value of the Brazil Current is -8.6±4.1 Sv at 24°S and -19.4±4.3 Sv at 35°S, increasing towards the

  9. Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems (CO2Flux) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, M

    2005-01-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) carbon dioxide flux (CO2 flux) measurement systems provide half-hour average fluxes of CO2, H2O (latent heat), and sensible heat. The fluxes are obtained by the eddy covariance technique, which computes the flux as the mean product of the vertical wind component with CO2 and H2O densities, or estimated virtual temperature. A three-dimensional sonic anemometer is used to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the virtual (sonic) temperature. An infrared gas analyzer is used to obtain the CO2 and H2O densities. A separate sub-system also collects half-hour average measures of meteorological and soil variables from separate 4-m towers.

  10. Flux Compression Magnetic Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In pulsed fusion propulsion schemes in which the fusion energy creates a radially expanding plasma, a magnetic nozzle is required to redirect the radially diverging flow of the expanding fusion plasma into a rearward axial flow, thereby producing a forward axial impulse to the vehicle. In a highly electrically conducting plasma, the presence of a magnetic field B in the plasma creates a pressure B(exp 2)/2(mu) in the plasma, the magnetic pressure. A gradient in the magnetic pressure can be used to decelerate the plasma traveling in the direction of increasing magnetic field, or to accelerate a plasma from rest in the direction of decreasing magnetic pressure. In principle, ignoring dissipative processes, it is possible to design magnetic configurations to produce an 'elastic' deflection of a plasma beam. In particular, it is conceivable that, by an appropriate arrangement of a set of coils, a good approximation to a parabolic 'magnetic mirror' may be formed, such that a beam of charged particles emanating from the focal point of the parabolic mirror would be reflected by the mirror to travel axially away from the mirror. The degree to which this may be accomplished depends on the degree of control one has over the flux surface of the magnetic field, which changes as a result of its interaction with a moving plasma.

  11. Automated calculation of surface energy fluxes with high-frequency lake buoy data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woolway, R Iestyn; Jones, Ian D; Hamilton, David P.; Maberly, Stephen C; Muroaka, Kohji; Read, Jordan S.; Smyth, Robyn L; Winslow, Luke A.

    2015-01-01

    Lake Heat Flux Analyzer is a program used for calculating the surface energy fluxes in lakes according to established literature methodologies. The program was developed in MATLAB for the rapid analysis of high-frequency data from instrumented lake buoys in support of the emerging field of aquatic sensor network science. To calculate the surface energy fluxes, the program requires a number of input variables, such as air and water temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and short-wave radiation. Available outputs for Lake Heat Flux Analyzer include the surface fluxes of momentum, sensible heat and latent heat and their corresponding transfer coefficients, incoming and outgoing long-wave radiation. Lake Heat Flux Analyzer is open source and can be used to process data from multiple lakes rapidly. It provides a means of calculating the surface fluxes using a consistent method, thereby facilitating global comparisons of high-frequency data from lake buoys.

  12. Science Anxiety and Science Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallow, Jeffrey V.; Greenburg, Sharon L.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses origins and nature of science anxiety and describes the Science Anxiety Clinic, outlining techniques used at the clinic. Techniques include science skills training and psychological interventions. Comments on the connection between science anxiety and cognitive processes in science learning. (Author/JN)

  13. Neoclassical Angular Momentum Flux Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S. K.; Chan, V. S.

    2004-11-01

    The toroidal angular momentum flux in neoclassical transport theory of small rotations depends on the second order (in ion poloidal gyroradius over plasma scale length) ion distribution function. Owing to the complexity of the calculation, the result obtained a long time ago for circular cross-section tokamak plasmas in the banana regime [M.N. Rosenbluth, et al., Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research (IAEA, Vienna, 1971), Vol. 1, p. 495] has never been reproduced. Using a representation of the angular momentum flux based on the solution of an adjoint equation to the usual linearized drift kinetic equation, and performing systematically a large-aspect-ratio expansion, we have obtained the flux for flux surfaces of arbitrary shape. We have found the same analytic form for the temperature gradient driven part of the flux, but the overall numerical multiplier is different and has the opposite sign. Implications for rotations in discharges with no apparent momentum input will be discussed.

  14. Designing with null flux coils

    SciTech Connect

    Davey, K.R.

    1997-09-01

    Null flux were suggested by Danby and Powell in the late 1960`s as a useful means for realizing induced lift with little drag. As an array of alternating magnets is translated past a set of null flux coils, the currents induced in these coils act to vertically center the magnets on those coils. At present, one Japanese MAGLEV system company and two American-based companies are employing either null flux or flux eliminating coils in their design for high speed magnetically levitated transportation. The principle question addressed in paper is: what is the proper choice of coil length to magnet length in a null flux system? A generic analysis in the time and frequency domain is laid out with the intent of showing the optimal design specification in terms of coil parameters.

  15. Flux growth utilizing the reaction between flux and crucible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, J.-Q.

    2015-04-01

    Flux growth involves dissolving the components of the target compound in an appropriate flux at high temperatures and then crystallizing under supersaturation controlled by cooling or evaporating the flux. A refractory crucible is generally used to contain the high temperature melt. The reaction between the melt and crucible materials can modify the composition of the melt, which typically results in growth failure, or contaminates the crystals. Thus one principle in designing a flux growth is to select suitable flux and crucible materials thus to avoid any reaction between them. In this paper, we review two cases of flux growth in which the reaction between flux and Al2O3 crucible tunes the oxygen content in the melt and helps the crystallization of desired compositions. For the case of La5Pb3O, the Al2O3 crucible oxidizes La to form a passivating La2O3 layer which not only prevents further oxidization of La in the melt but also provides [O] to the melt. For the case of La0.4Na0.6Fe2As2, it is believed that the Al2O3 crucible reacts with NaAsO2 and the reaction consumes oxygen in the melt thus maintaining an oxygen-free environment.

  16. PHLUX: Photographic Flux Tools for Solar Glare and Flux

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-12-02

    A web-based tool to a) analytically and empirically quantify glare from reflected light and determine the potential impact (e.g., temporary flash blindness, retinal burn), and b) produce flux maps for central receivers. The tool accepts RAW digital photographs of the glare source (for hazard assessment) or the receiver (for flux mapping), as well as a photograph of the sun for intensity and size scaling. For glare hazard assessment, the tool determines the retinal irradiance (W/cm2)more » and subtended source angle for an observer and plots the glare source on a hazard spectrum (i.e., low-potential for flash blindness impact, potential for flash blindness impact, retinal burn). For flux mapping, the tool provides a colored map of the receiver scaled by incident solar flux (W/m2) and unwraps the physical dimensions of the receiver while accounting for the perspective of the photographer (e.g., for a flux map of a cylindrical receiver, the horizontal axis denotes receiver angle in degrees and the vertical axis denotes vertical position in meters; for a flat panel receiver, the horizontal axis denotes horizontal position in meters and the vertical axis denotes vertical position in meters). The flux mapping capability also allows the user to specify transects along which the program plots incident solar flux on the receiver.« less

  17. Flux growth utilizing the reaction between flux and crucible

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yan, J. -Q.

    2015-01-22

    Flux growth involves dissolving the components of the target compound in an appropriate flux at high temperatures and then crystallizing under supersaturation controlled by cooling or evaporating the flux. A refractory crucible is generally used to contain the high temperature melt. Moreover, the reaction between the melt and crucible materials can modify the composition of the melt, which typically results in growth failure, or contaminates the crystals. Thus one principle in designing a flux growth is to select suitable flux and crucible materials thus to avoid any reaction between them. In this paper, we review two cases of flux growthmore » in which the reaction between flux and Al2O3 crucible tunes the oxygen content in the melt and helps the crystallization of desired compositions. For the case of La5Pb3O, the Al2O3 crucible oxidizes La to form a passivating La2O3 layer which not only prevents further oxidization of La in the melt but also provides [O] to the melt. Finally, in the case of La0.4Na0.6Fe2As2, it is believed that the Al2O3 crucible reacts with NaAsO2 and the reaction consumes oxygen in the melt thus maintaining an oxygen-free environment.« less

  18. PHLUX: Photographic Flux Tools for Solar Glare and Flux

    SciTech Connect

    2010-12-02

    A web-based tool to a) analytically and empirically quantify glare from reflected light and determine the potential impact (e.g., temporary flash blindness, retinal burn), and b) produce flux maps for central receivers. The tool accepts RAW digital photographs of the glare source (for hazard assessment) or the receiver (for flux mapping), as well as a photograph of the sun for intensity and size scaling. For glare hazard assessment, the tool determines the retinal irradiance (W/cm2) and subtended source angle for an observer and plots the glare source on a hazard spectrum (i.e., low-potential for flash blindness impact, potential for flash blindness impact, retinal burn). For flux mapping, the tool provides a colored map of the receiver scaled by incident solar flux (W/m2) and unwraps the physical dimensions of the receiver while accounting for the perspective of the photographer (e.g., for a flux map of a cylindrical receiver, the horizontal axis denotes receiver angle in degrees and the vertical axis denotes vertical position in meters; for a flat panel receiver, the horizontal axis denotes horizontal position in meters and the vertical axis denotes vertical position in meters). The flux mapping capability also allows the user to specify transects along which the program plots incident solar flux on the receiver.

  19. Soapy Science. Teaching Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes a science and math activity that involves bubbles, shapes, colors, and solid geometry. Students build geometric shapes with soda straws and submerge the shapes in soapy water, allowing them to review basic geometry concepts, test hypotheses, and learn about other concepts such as diffraction, interference colors, and evaporation. (TJQ)

  20. Communicating Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Nicholas

    2009-10-01

    Introduction: what this book is about and why you might want to read it; Prologue: three orphans share a common paternity: professional science communication, popular journalism, and literary fiction are not as separate as they seem; Part I. Professional Science Communication: 1. Spreading the word: the endless struggle to publish professional science; 2. Walk like an Egyptian: the alien feeling of professional science writing; 3. The future's bright? Professional science communication in the age of the internet; 4. Counting the horse's teeth: professional standards in science's barter economy; 5. Separating the wheat from the chaff: peer review on trial; Part II. Science for the Public: What Science Do People Need and How Might They Get It?: 6. The Public Understanding of Science (PUS) movement and its problems; 7. Public engagement with science and technology (PEST): fine principle, difficult practice; 8. Citizen scientists? Democratic input into science policy; 9. Teaching and learning science in schools: implications for popular science communication; Part III. Popular Science Communication: The Press and Broadcasting: 10. What every scientist should know about mass media; 11. What every scientist should know about journalists; 12. The influence of new media; 13. How the media represents science; 14. How should science journalists behave?; Part IV. The Origins of Science in Cultural Context: Five Historic Dramas: 15. A terrible storm in Wittenberg: natural knowledge through sorcery and evil; 16. A terrible storm in the Mediterranean: controlling nature with white magic and religion; 17. Thieving magpies: the subtle art of false projecting; 18. Foolish virtuosi: natural philosophy emerges as a distinct discipline but many cannot take it seriously; 19. Is scientific knowledge 'true' or should it just be 'truthfully' deployed?; Part V. Science in Literature: 20. Science and the Gothic: the three big nineteenth-century monster stories; 21. Science fiction: serious

  1. Monte Carlo surface flux tallies

    SciTech Connect

    Favorite, Jeffrey A

    2010-11-19

    Particle fluxes on surfaces are difficult to calculate with Monte Carlo codes because the score requires a division by the surface-crossing angle cosine, and grazing angles lead to inaccuracies. We revisit the standard practice of dividing by half of a cosine 'cutoff' for particles whose surface-crossing cosines are below the cutoff. The theory behind this approximation is sound, but the application of the theory to all possible situations does not account for two implicit assumptions: (1) the grazing band must be symmetric about 0, and (2) a single linear expansion for the angular flux must be applied in the entire grazing band. These assumptions are violated in common circumstances; for example, for separate in-going and out-going flux tallies on internal surfaces, and for out-going flux tallies on external surfaces. In some situations, dividing by two-thirds of the cosine cutoff is more appropriate. If users were able to control both the cosine cutoff and the substitute value, they could use these parameters to make accurate surface flux tallies. The procedure is demonstrated in a test problem in which Monte Carlo surface fluxes in cosine bins are converted to angular fluxes and compared with the results of a discrete ordinates calculation.

  2. Magnetospheric-ionospheric Poynting flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thayer, Jeffrey P.

    1994-01-01

    Over the past three years of funding SRI, in collaboration with the University of Texas at Dallas, has been involved in determining the total electromagnetic energy flux into the upper atmosphere from DE-B electric and magnetic field measurements and modeling the electromagnetic energy flux at high latitudes, taking into account the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere system. This effort has been very successful in establishing the DC Poynting flux as a fundamental quantity in describing the coupling of electromagnetic energy between the magnetosphere and ionosphere. The DE-B satellite electric and magnetic field measurements were carefully scrutinized to provide, for the first time, a large data set of DC, field-aligned, Poynting flux measurement. Investigations describing the field-aligned Poynting flux observations from DE-B orbits under specific geomagnetic conditions and from many orbits were conducted to provide a statistical average of the Poynting flux distribution over the polar cap. The theoretical modeling effort has provided insight into the observations by formulating the connection between Poynting's theorem and the electromagnetic energy conversion processes that occur in the ionosphere. Modeling and evaluation of these processes has helped interpret the satellite observations of the DC Poynting flux and improved our understanding of the coupling between the ionosphere and magnetosphere.

  3. Characteristic Dynamics of a Non-Linear Flux Rope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehaas, Timothy; Gekelman, Walter; van Compernolle, Bart

    2015-11-01

    A magnetic flux rope is a tube-like, current carrying plasma embedded in an external magnetic field. Commonly observed on the solar surface extending into the solar atmosphere, flux ropes are naturally occurring and have been observed by satellites in the near earth and often recreated in laboratory environments. In a series of experiments, a single flux rope of varying cross-section and length was formed in the cylindrical, magnetized plasma of the Large Plasma Device (LaPD, L = 2200 cm, r = 30 cm, no = 1012 cm-3, Te = 4 eV, He). The flux rope was generated via a DC discharge between a cathode and anode with a fixed-free boundary condition. Upon the initiation of the kink instability (IKink > πr2Bzc/2L), the displacement of the flux rope saturates, commencing complex motion. The flux ropes exhibit two types of motion, common to all cases of varying Alfven speeds, injection currents, lengths, and cross-sections. The first motion is characterized by a circular path in the transverse plane, whose displacement depends on the input power and whose frequency varies with injection current. The second motion is characterized by random Lorentzian pulses in the magnetic signals. The polarity of these pulses align with the transverse magnetic field and manifest with greater frequency with increases in magnetic field and injection current. This work is supported by LANL-UC research grant and done at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, which is funded by DOE and NSF.

  4. Global Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brophy, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Approaches taken by a school science department to implement a global science curriculum using a range of available resources are outlined. Problems with current curriculum approaches, alternatives to an ethnocentric curriculum, advantages of global science, and possible strategies for implementing a global science policy are discussed. (27…

  5. Food Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkman, Susan J.

    1996-01-01

    Presents food science experiments designed for high school science classes that aim at getting students excited about science and providing them with real-life applications. Enables students to see the application of chemistry, microbiology, engineering, and other basic and applied sciences to the production, processing, preservation, evaluation,…

  6. Science Sacks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freudenberg, Kimberlee

    2012-01-01

    With the emphasis placed on standardized testing, science education has been squeezed out. As a physics teacher, the author knows the importance of building children's interest in science early in their school career and of providing practice in basic science skills and inquiry. In order to make more time for science at her sons' elementary…

  7. Science Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odell, Bill

    2005-01-01

    The spaces and structures used for undergraduate science often work against new teaching methods and fail to provide environments that attract the brightest students to science. The undergraduate science building often offers little to inspire the imaginations of young minds. The typical undergraduate science building also tends to work against…

  8. Biopolitical science.

    PubMed

    Arnhart, Larry

    2010-03-01

    This article develops a theoretical framework for biopolitical science as a science of political animals. This science moves through three levels of deep political history: the universal political history of the species, the cultural political history of the group, and the individual political history of animals in the group. To illustrate the particular application of biopolitical science, this essay shows how this science would help us to understand Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation of January 1, 1863. PMID:20812796

  9. Coronal Heating and the Magnetic Flux Content of the Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. L.; Falconer, D. A.; Porter, J. G.; Hathaway, D. H.

    2003-05-01

    We investigate the heating of the quiet corona by measuring the increase of coronal luminosity with the amount of magnetic flux in the underlying network at solar minimum when there were no active regions on the face of the Sun. The coronal luminosity is measured from Fe IX/X-Fe XII pairs of coronal images from SOHO/EIT. The network magnetic flux content is measured from SOHO/MDI magnetograms. We find that the luminosity of the corona in our quiet regions increases roughly in proportion to the square root of the magnetic flux content of the network and roughly in proportion to the length of the perimeter of the network magnetic flux clumps. From (1) this result, (2) other observations of many fine-scale explosive events at the edges of network flux clumps, and (3) a demonstration that it is energetically feasible for the heating of the corona in quiet regions to be driven by explosions of granule-sized sheared-core magnetic bipoles embedded in the edges of network flux clumps, we infer that in quiet regions that are not influenced by active regions the corona is mainly heated by such magnetic activity in the edges of the network flux clumps. Our observational results together with our feasibility analysis allow us to predict that (1) at the edges of the network flux clumps there are many transient sheared-core bipoles of the size and lifetime of granules and having transverse field strengths > 100 G, (2) 30 of these bipoles are present per supergranule, and (3) most spicules are produced by explosions of these bipoles. This work was supported by NASA's Office of Space Science through its Solar and Heliospheric Physics Supporting Research and Technology Program and its Sun-Earth Connection Guest Investigator Program.

  10. Solar flux and its variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. V. P.; Gottlieb, D. M.

    1975-01-01

    Data are presented on the solar irradiance as derived from a number of sources. An attempt was made to bring these data onto a uniform scale. Summation of fluxes at all wavelengths yields a figure of 1357.826 for the solar constant. Estimates are made of the solar flux variations due to flares, active regions (slowly varying component), 27-day period, and the 11-yr cycle. Solar activity does not produce a significant variation in the value of the solar constant. Variations in the X-ray and EUV portions of the solar flux may be several orders of magnitude during solar activity, especially at times of major flares. It is established that these short wavelength flux enhancements cause significant changes in the terrestrial ionosphere.

  11. Distribution and flux of micrometeoroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D. A.; Zinner, E.

    1977-01-01

    The mass distribution, flux, and distribution in space of the micrometeoroid complex at 1 AU are estimated on the basis of data from Apollo 17 rocks and recent calibrations of solar-flare track-production rates. It is found that the size frequency distribution of microcraters on lunar rocks suggests a bimodal mass distribution of micrometeoroids, but the precise form of the curve requires further definition, particularly insofar as the degree of depletion of particles producing craters 10 to 100 microns in diameter is concerned. Variations in slope with crater-diameter or particle-mass increments are shown to indicate that different processes affect one or more particle populations. Fluxes corresponding to varied lunar surface orientation and residence time are calculated, but no striking difference is observed between the flux of submicron-diameter particles with orbits in the plane of the ecliptic and fluxes of particles with orbits normal to the plane in the solar apex direction.

  12. Conical electromagnetic radiation flux concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Concentrator provides method of concentrating a beam of electromagnetic radiation into a smaller beam, presenting a higher flux density. Smaller beam may be made larger by sending radiation through the device in the reverse direction.

  13. Plasmoids as magnetic flux ropes

    SciTech Connect

    Moldwin, M.B.; Hughes, W.J. )

    1991-08-01

    Observational constraints on the magnetic topology and orientation of plasmoids is examined using a magnetic field model. The authors develop a magnetic flux rope model to examine whether principal axis analysis (PAA) of magnetometer signatures from a single satellite pass is sufficient to determine the magnetic topology of plasmoids and if plasmoid observations are best explained by the flux rope, closed loop, or large-amplitude wave picture. Satellite data are simulated by extracting the magnetic field along a path through the model of a magnetic flux rope. They then examine the results using PAA. They find that the principal axis directions (and therefore the interpretation of structure orientation) is highly dependent on several parameters including the satellite trajectory through the structure. Because of this they conclude that PAA of magnetometer data from a single satellite pass is insufficient to differentiate between magnetic closed loop and flux rope models. They also compare the model results to ISEE 3 magnetometer data of plasmoid events in various coordinate frames including principal axis and geocentric solar magnetospheric. They find that previously identified plasmoid events that have been explained as closed loop structures can also be modeled as flux ropes. They also searched the literature for previously reported flux rope and closed loop plasmoid events to examine if these structures had any similarities and/or differences. The results of the modeling efforts and examination of both flux rope and plasmoid events lead them to favor the flux rope model of plasmoid formation, as it is better able to unify the observations of various magnetic structures observed by ISEE 3.

  14. Science Fiction and Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanaugh, Terence

    2002-01-01

    Uses science fiction films such as "Jurassic Park" or "Anaconda" to teach science concepts while fostering student interest. Advocates science fiction as a teaching tool to improve learning and motivation. Describes how to use science fiction in the classroom with the sample activity Twister. (YDS)

  15. Flux tubes at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cea, Paolo; Cosmai, Leonardo; Cuteri, Francesca; Papa, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    The chromoelectric field generated by a static quark-antiquark pair, with its peculiar tube-like shape, can be nicely described, at zero temperature, within the dual superconductor scenario for the QCD confining vacuum. In this work we investigate, by lattice Monte Carlo simulations of the SU (3) pure gauge theory, the fate of chromoelectric flux tubes across the deconfinement transition. We find that, if the distance between the static sources is kept fixed at about 0.76 fm˜eq 1.6/√{σ } and the temperature is increased towards and above the deconfinement temperature T c , the amplitude of the field inside the flux tube gets smaller, while the shape of the flux tube does not vary appreciably across deconfinement. This scenario with flux-tube "evaporation" above T c has no correspondence in ordinary (type-II) superconductivity, where instead the transition to the phase with normal conductivity is characterized by a divergent fattening of flux tubes as the transition temperature is approached from below. We present also some evidence about the existence of flux-tube structures in the magnetic sector of the theory in the deconfined phase.

  16. Methane flux from Minnesota peatlands

    SciTech Connect

    Crill, P.M.; Bartlett, K.B.; Harriss, R.C.; Gorham, E.; Verry, E.S. )

    1988-12-01

    Northern (> 40 deg N) wetlands have been suggested as the largest natural source of methane (CH{sub 4}) to the troposphere. To refine the authors estimates of source strengths from this region and to investigate climatic controls on the process, fluxes were measured from a variety of Minnesota peatlands during May, June, and August 1986. Late spring and summer fluxes ranged from 11 to 866 mg CH{sub 4}/sq/m/day, averaging 207 mg CH{sub 4} sq/m/day overall. At Marcell Forest, forested bogs and fen sites had lower fluxes than open bogs. In the Red Lake peatland, circumneutral fens, with standing water above the peat surface, produced more methane than acid bog sites in which the water table was beneath the moss surface. Peat temperature was an important control. Methane flux increased in response to increasing soil temperature. It is estimated that the methane flux from all peatlands north of 40 deg may be on the order of 70 to 90 Tg/yr though estimates of this sort are plagued by uncertainties in the areal extent of peatlands, length of the CH{sub 4} producing season, and the spatial and temporal variability of the flux. 60 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Flux growth utilizing the reaction between flux and crucible

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, J. -Q.

    2015-01-22

    Flux growth involves dissolving the components of the target compound in an appropriate flux at high temperatures and then crystallizing under supersaturation controlled by cooling or evaporating the flux. A refractory crucible is generally used to contain the high temperature melt. Moreover, the reaction between the melt and crucible materials can modify the composition of the melt, which typically results in growth failure, or contaminates the crystals. Thus one principle in designing a flux growth is to select suitable flux and crucible materials thus to avoid any reaction between them. In this paper, we review two cases of flux growth in which the reaction between flux and Al2O3 crucible tunes the oxygen content in the melt and helps the crystallization of desired compositions. For the case of La5Pb3O, the Al2O3 crucible oxidizes La to form a passivating La2O3 layer which not only prevents further oxidization of La in the melt but also provides [O] to the melt. Finally, in the case of La0.4Na0.6Fe2As2, it is believed that the Al2O3 crucible reacts with NaAsO2 and the reaction consumes oxygen in the melt thus maintaining an oxygen-free environment.

  18. Correction to ``Forest disturbance and North American carbon flux''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goward, Samuel N.; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Cohen, Warren; Moisen, Gretchen; Collatz, G. James; Healey, Sean; Houghton, R. A.; Huang, Chengquan; Kennedy, Robert; Law, Beverly; Powell, Scott; Turner, David; Wulder, Michael A.

    2008-07-01

    In the article ``Forest disturbance and North American carbon flux,'' published in the 11 March 2008 issue of Eos (89(11)), several author affiliations were incorrect. The corrected affiliations are as follows: Sean Healey, Rocky Mountain Research Station, U.S. Forest Service, Ogden, Utah; R. A. Houghton, Woods Hole Research Center, Woods Hole, Mass; and David Turner, Department of Forest Science, Oregon State University, Corvallis. The authors would also like to acknowledge the NASA Terrestrial Ecosystems and Applied Sciences Programs for providing support for the NAFD and LEDAPS projects discussed in the article.

  19. Improved Prediction of Momentum and Scalar Fluxes Using MODIS Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crago, Richard D.; Jasinski, Michael F.

    2003-01-01

    There are remote sensing and science objectives. The remote sensing objectives are: To develop and test a theoretical method for estimating local momentum aerodynamic roughness length, z(sub 0m), using satellite multispectral imagery. To adapt the method to the MODIS imagery. To develop a high-resolution (approx. 1km) gridded dataset of local momentum roughness for the continental United States and southern Canada, using MODIS imagery and other MODIS derived products. The science objective is: To determine the sensitivity of improved satellite-derived (MODIS-) estimates of surface roughness on the momentum and scalar fluxes, within the context of 3-D atmospheric modeling.

  20. Scientific Visualization to Study Flux Transfer Events at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastatter, Lutz; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Sibeck, David G.; Berrios, David H.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present results of modeling of reconnection at the dayside magnetopause with subsequent development of flux transfer event signatures. The tools used include new methods that have been added to the suite of visualization methods that are used at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC). Flux transfer events result from localized reconnection that connect magnetosheath magnetic field and plasma with magnetospheric fields and plasma and results in flux rope structures that span the dayside magnetopause. The onset of flux rope formation and the three-dimensional structure of flux ropes are studied as they have been modeled by high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the dayside magnetosphere of the Earth. We show that flux transfer events are complex three-dimensional structures that require modern visualization and analysis techniques. Two suites of visualization methods are presented and we demonstrate the usefulness of those methods through the CCMC web site to the general science user.

  1. Slip Running Reconnection in Magnetic Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, W. N.; Van Compernolle, B.; Vincena, S. T.; De Hass, T.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic flux ropes are due to helical currents and form a dense carpet of arches on the surface of the sun. Occasionally one tears loose as a coronal mass ejection and its rope structure can be detected by satellites close to the earth. Current sheets can tear into filaments and these are nothing other than flux ropes. Ropes are not static, they exert mutual ěc{J}×ěc{B} forces causing them to twist about each other and eventually merge. Kink instabilities cause them to violently smash into each other and reconnect at the point of contact. We report on experiments on two adjacent ropes done in the large plasma device (LAPD) at UCLA ( ne ˜ 1012, Te ˜ 6 eV, B0z=330G, Brope}\\cong{10G,trep=1 Hz). The currents and magnetic fields form exotic shapes with no ignorable direction and no magnetic nulls. Volumetric space-time data (70,600 spatial locations) show multiple reconnection sites with time-dependent locations. The concept of a quasi-separatrix layer (QSL), a tool to understand and visualize 3D magnetic field lines reconnection without null points is introduced. Three-dimensional measurements of the QSL derived from magnetic field data are presented. Within the QSL field lines that start close to one another rapidly diverge as they pass through one or more reconnection regions. The motion of magnetic field lines are traced as reconnection proceeds and they are observed to slip through the regions of space where the QSL is largest. As the interaction proceeds we double the current in the ropes. This accompanied by intense heating as observed in uv light and plasma flows measured by Mach probes. The interaction of the ropes is clearly seen by vislaulizng magnetic field data , as well as in images from a fast framing camera. Work supported by the Dept. of Energy and The National Science Foundation, done at the Basic Plasma Science Facility at UCLA.Magnetic Field lines (measured) of three flux ropes and the plasma currents associated with them

  2. Flux flow and flux dynamics in high-Tc superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, L. H.; Turchinskaya, M.; Swartzendruber, L. J.; Roitburd, A.; Lundy, D.; Ritter, J.; Kaiser, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    Because high temperature superconductors, including BYCO and BSSCO, are type 2 superconductors with relatively low H(sub c 1) values and high H(sub c 2) values, they will be in a critical state for many of their applications. In the critical state, with the applied field between H(sub c 1) and H(sub c 2), flux lines have penetrated the material and can form a flux lattice and can be pinned by structural defects, chemical inhomogeneities, and impurities. A detailed knowledge of how flux penetrates the material and its behavior under the influence of applied fields and current flow, and the effect of material processing on these properties, is required in order to apply, and to improve the properties of these superconductors. When the applied field is changed rapidly, the time dependence of flux change can be divided into three regions, an initial region which occurs very rapidly, a second region in which the magnetization has a 1n(t) behavior, and a saturation region at very long times. A critical field is defined for depinning, H(sub c,p) as that field at which the hysteresis loop changes from irreversible to reversible. As a function of temperature, it is found that H(sub c,p) is well described by a power law with an exponent between 1.5 and 2.5. The behavior of H(sub c,p) for various materials and its relationship to flux flow and flux dynamics are discussed.

  3. Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Presented are 29 science activities for secondary school science instruction. Topic areas include botany, genetics, biochemistry, anatomy, entomology, molecular structure, spreadsheets, chemistry, mechanics, astronomy, relativity, aeronautics, instrumentation, electrostatics, quantum mechanics, and laboratory interfacing. (CW)

  4. Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Presented are 27 science activities for secondary school science instruction. Topic areas include microbiology, botany, biochemistry, genetics, safety, earthquakes, problem solving, electricity, heat, solutions, mechanics, quantum mechanics, flame tests, and molecular structure. (CW)

  5. Science Scope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Richard, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses an education project launched by the National Academy of Sciences and the Pentagon to turn laid-off aerospace engineers into science teachers at Los Angeles middle schools and high schools. (MKR)

  6. Science Sleuths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilly, Sherril L.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a two-day forensic science course that is offered to eighth grade students enrolled in Science, Mathematics, and Technology Magnet Schools. Provides sample student activity sheets for the course. (Author/RT)

  7. Forensic Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Keith O.; Nigh, W. G.

    1973-01-01

    A course is described, which was given during an interim, with an enrollment of 41 students. The course involved an in-depth study of forensic science, involving students with the methodology of science. (DF)

  8. Real-time soil flux measurements and calculations with CRDS + Soil Flux Processor: comparison among flux algorithms and derivation of whole system error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alstad, K. P.; Venterea, R. T.; Tan, S. M.; Saad, N.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding chamber-based soil flux model fitting and measurement error is key to scaling soils GHG emissions and resolving the primary uncertainties in climate and management feedbacks at regional scales. One key challenge is the selection of the correct empirical model applied to soil flux rate analysis in chamber-based experiments. Another challenge is the characterization of error in the chamber measurement. Traditionally, most chamber-based N2O and CH4 measurements and model derivations have used discrete sampling for GC analysis, and have been conducted using extended chamber deployment periods (DP) which are expected to result in substantial alteration of the pre-deployment flux. The development of high-precision, high-frequency CRDS analyzers has advanced the science of soil flux analysis by facilitating much shorter DP and, in theory, less chamber-induced suppression of the soil-atmosphere diffusion gradient. As well, a new software tool developed by Picarro (the "Soil Flux Processor" or "SFP") links the power of Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) technology with an easy-to-use interface that features flexible sample-ID and run-schemes, and provides real-time monitoring of chamber accumulations and environmental conditions. The SFP also includes a sophisticated flux analysis interface which offers a user-defined model selection, including three predominant fit algorithms as default, and an open-code interface for user-composed algorithms. The SFP is designed to couple with the Picarro G2508 system, an analyzer which simplifies soils flux studies by simultaneously measuring primary GHG species -- N2O, CH4, CO2 and H2O. In this study, Picarro partners with the ARS USDA Soil & Water Management Research Unit (R. Venterea, St. Paul), to examine the degree to which the high-precision, high-frequency Picarro analyzer allows for much shorter DPs periods in chamber-based flux analysis, and, in theory, less chamber-induced suppression of the soil

  9. Impact of Sea Spray on Air-Sea Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron, Fabrice; Mueller, James

    2013-11-01

    The contributions of sea spray drops to the total air-sea exchanges of momentum, heat, and mass remain an open question. A number of factors obscure any simple quantification of their contribution: the number of drops formed at the ocean surface and the per-drop contribution to the fluxes. To estimate these per-droplet fluxes, we present results from a large number of drop trajectories, which are simulated with a recently developed Lagrangian Stochastic model adapted for the heavy drop transport and evaporation within the marine boundary layer. Then, using commonly accepted spray generation functions we present estimates of spray fluxes which account for the mediating feedback effects from the droplets on the atmosphere. The results suggest that common simplifications in previous sea spray models, such as the residence time in the marine boundary layer, may not be appropriate. We further show that the spray fluxes may be especially sensitive to the size distribution of the drops. The total effective air-sea fluxes lead to drag and enthalpy coefficients that increase modestly with wind speed. The rate of increase for the drag coefficient is greatest at moderate wind speeds, while the rate of increase for the enthalpy coefficient is greatest at higher wind speeds. Funded by grants OCE-0850663 and OCE-0748767 from the National Science Foundation.

  10. Hotspots of nitrous oxide and methane flux in urban watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groffman, P. M.; Bettez, N. D.; Duncan, J. M.; Band, L. E.

    2012-12-01

    Urban and suburban watersheds have spatially and temporally dynamic soil, vegetation and hydrologic conditions that create a marked "hotspot" distribution of trace gas fluxes. In the Baltimore Ecosystem Study, one of two urban long-term ecological research (LTER) projects funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation, we have established long-term study plots in forests, grasslands (lawns), wetlands and riparian zones and have made monthly in situ measurements of carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide and methane flux since 1998. These long-term observations have produced several interesting results. First, there is marked variation in methane flux, with rural forest having higher uptake than urban forests and lawns having no uptake. Nitrous oxide fluxes are lower than expected given high rates of atmospheric deposition to forests and fertilization of lawns. However, key landscape features such as degraded riparian zones, stormwater detention basin wetlands and natural hummock and hollow riparian wetlands are hotspots of nitrous oxide and/or methane production. These features can be detected and quantified using new geographic characterization techniques (LiDAR, topographic index) and then modeled using ecohydrological models (RHESSys). Combining long-term biogeochemical measurements with these new geographic and modeling tools can improve our understanding and quantification of trace gas fluxes from urban ecosystems.

  11. Dramatic Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Debbie; Precious, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    The setting: the science classroom. The characters: you and your students. The scene: Your students acting out scientific discoveries, modeling a frog's life cycle, mimicking the transition from liquid to solid. This is "dramatic science", a teaching approach that uses acting techniques to explore and develop young children's ideas about science.…

  12. Sublime Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girod, Mark

    2007-01-01

    One of the shortcomings in most efforts to integrate art and science is that many people have a shallow understanding of art, which inevitably leads to shallow connections between art and science. Coloring drawings of planets, building sculptures of volcanoes, and decorating scientific diagrams are fine activities, but they do not link science and…

  13. Science First.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strycker, Jan Adkins

    1995-01-01

    Describes a teacher's efforts to put science first in the classroom. Discusses changing the place of science on the schedule and presents an activity to engage student interest. Concludes that a difference in teacher attitude towards science motivates students to learn. (NB)

  14. Safer Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Ken

    2011-01-01

    This column provides best safety practices for the science classroom and laboratory. In this month's issue, pregnancy policy in the laboratory is discussed. One can't ignore the fact that student and faculty pregnancies--and the resulting potential hazards in the science laboratory--exist at the high school level. Science teachers need to be…

  15. Science Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butin, Dan W.; Biehle, James T.; Motz, LaMoine L.; West, Sandra S.

    2009-01-01

    The National Research Council's "National Science Education Standards" call for science education to be "developmentally appropriate, interesting, and relevant to students' lives, emphasize student understanding through inquiry, and be connected with other school subjects." This description captures the three major trends in science education…

  16. Rosetta Radio Science Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patzold, M.; Neubauer, F. M.; Wennmacher, A.; Aksnes, K.; Anderson, J. D.; Asmar, S. W.; Tinto, M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Yeomans, D. K.; Barriot, J. -P.; Bird, M. K.; Boehnhardt, H.; Gill, E.; Montenbruck, O.; Grun, E.; Hausler, B.; Ip, W. H.; Thomas, N.; Marouf, E. A.; Rickman, H.; Wallis, M. K.; Wickramasinghe, N. C.

    1996-01-01

    The Rosetta Radio Science Investigations (RSI) experiment was selected by the European Space Agency to be included in the International Rosetta Mission to comet P/Wirtanen (launch in 2003, arrival and operational phase at the comet 2011-2013). The RSI science objectives address fundamental aspects of cometary physics such as the mass and bulk density of the nucleus, the gravity field, non-gravitational forces, the size and shape, the internal structure, the composition and roughness of the nucleus surface, the abundance of large dust grains and the plasma content in the coma and the combined dust and gas mass flux on the orbiter. RSI will make use of the radio system of the Rosetta spacecraft.

  17. Overview of NASA's Carbon Monitoring System Flux-Pilot Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawson, Steven; Gunson, Michael R.; Jucks, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    NASA's space-based observations of physical, chemical and biological parameters in the Earth System along with state-of-the-art modeling capabilities provide unique capabilities for analyses of the carbon cycle. The Carbon Monitoring System is developing an exploratory framework for detecting carbon in the environment and its changes, with a view towards contributing to national and international monitoring activities. The Flux-Pilot Project aims to provide a unified view of land-atmosphere and ocean-atmosphere carbon exchange, using observation-constrained models. Central to the project is the application of NASA's satellite observations (especially MODIS), the ACOS retrievals of the JAXA-GOSAT observations, and the "MERRA" meteorological reanalysis produced with GEOS-S. With a primary objective of estimating uncertainty in computed fluxes, two land- and two ocean-systems are run for 2009-2010 and compared with existing flux estimates. An transport model is used to evaluate simulated CO2 concentrations with in-situ and space-based observations, in order to assess the realism of the fluxes and how uncertainties in fluxes propagate into atmospheric concentrations that can be more readily evaluated. Finally, the atmospheric partial CO2 columns observed from space are inverted to give new estimates of surface fluxes, which are evaluated using the bottom-up estimates and independent datasets. The focus of this presentation will be on the science goals and current achievements of the pilot project, with emphasis on how policy-relevant questions help focus the scientific direction. Examples include the issue of what spatio-temporal resolution of fluxes can be detected from polar-orbiting satellites and whether it is possible to use space-based observations to separate contributions to atmospheric concentrations of (say) fossil-fuel and biological activity

  18. Anthropogenic heat flux estimation from space: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysoulakis, Nektarios; Heldens, Wieke; Gastellu-Etchegorry, Jean-Philippe; Grimmond, Sue; Feigenwinter, Christian; Lindberg, Fredrik; Del Frate, Fabio; Klostermann, Judith; Mitraka, Zina; Esch, Thomas; Albitar, Ahmad; Gabey, Andrew; Parlow, Eberhard; Olofson, Frans

    2016-04-01

    While Earth Observation (EO) has made significant advances in the study of urban areas, there are several unanswered science and policy questions to which it could contribute. To this aim the recently launched Horizon 2020 project URBANFLUXES (URBan ANthrpogenic heat FLUX from Earth observation Satellites) investigates the potential of EO to retrieve anthropogenic heat flux, as a key component in the urban energy budget. The anthropogenic heat flux is the heat flux resulting from vehicular emissions, space heating and cooling of buildings, industrial processing and the metabolic heat release by people. Optical, thermal and SAR data from existing satellite sensors are used to improve the accuracy of the radiation balance spatial distribution calculation, using also in-situ reflectance measurements of urban materials are for calibration. EO-based methods are developed for estimating turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes, as well as urban heat storage flux and anthropogenic heat flux spatial patterns at city scale and local scale by employing an energy budget closure approach. Independent methods and models are engaged to evaluate the derived products and statistical analyses provide uncertainty measures as well. Ultimate goal of the URBANFLUXES is to develop a highly automated method for estimating urban energy budget components to use with Copernicus Sentinel data, enabling its integration into applications and operational services. Thus, URBANFLUXES prepares the ground for further innovative exploitation of European space data in scientific activities (i.e. Earth system modelling and climate change studies in cities) and future and emerging applications (i.e. sustainable urban planning) by exploiting the improved data quality, coverage and revisit times of the Copernicus data. The URBANFLUXES products will therefore have the potential to support both sustainable planning strategies to improve the quality of life in cities, as well as Earth system models to

  19. Eddy covariance for quantifying trace gas fluxes from soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugster, W.; Merbold, L.

    2015-02-01

    Soils are highly complex physical and biological systems, and hence measuring soil gas exchange fluxes with high accuracy and adequate spatial representativity remains a challenge. A technique which has become increasingly popular is the eddy covariance (EC) method. This method takes advantage of the fact that surface fluxes are mixed into the near-surface atmosphere via turbulence. As a consequence, measurements with an EC system can be done at some distance above the surface, providing accurate and spatially integrated flux density estimates. In this paper we provide a basic overview targeting scientists who are not familiar with the EC method. This review gives examples of successful deployments from a wide variety of ecosystems. The primary focus is on the three major greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O). Several limitations to the application of EC systems exist, requiring a careful experimental design, which we discuss in detail. Thereby we group these experiments into two main classes: (1) manipulative experiments, and (2) survey-type experiments. Recommendations and examples of successful studies using various approaches are given, including the combination of EC flux measurements with online measurements of stable isotopes. We conclude that EC should not be considered a substitute to traditional (e.g., chamber based) flux measurements but instead an addition to them. The greatest strength of EC measurements in soil science are (1) their uninterrupted continuous measurement of gas concentrations and fluxes that can also capture short-term bursts of fluxes that easily could be missed by other methods and (2) the spatial integration covering the ecosystem scale (several square meters to hectares), thereby integrating over small-scale heterogeneity in the soil.

  20. Eddy covariance for quantifying trace gas fluxes from soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugster, W.; Merbold, L.

    2014-10-01

    Soils are highly complex physical and biological systems, and hence measuring soil gas exchange fluxes with high accuracy and adequate spatial representativity remains a challenge. A technique which has become increasingly popular is the eddy covariance (EC) method. This method takes advantage of the fact that surface fluxes are mixed into the near-surface atmosphere via turbulence. As a consequence, measurement with an EC system can be done at some distance above the surface, providing accurate and spatially integrated flux density estimates. In this paper we provide a basic overview targeting at scientists who are not familiar with the EC method. This reviews gives examples of successful deployments from a wide variety of ecosystems. The primary focus is on the three major greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O). Several limitations to the application of EC systems exist, requiring a careful experimental design, which we discuss in detail. Thereby we group these experiments into two main classes: (1) manipulative experiments, and (2) survey-type experiments. Recommendations and examples of successful studies using various approaches, including the combination of EC flux measurements with online measurements of stable isotopes are given. We conclude that EC should not be considered a substitution of traditional flux measurements, but an addition to the latter. The greatest strength of EC measurements in soil science are (1) their uninterrupted continuous measurement of gas concentrations and fluxes that also can capture short-term bursts of fluxes that easily could be missed by other methods; and (2) the spatial integration covering the ecosystem scale (several m2 to ha), thereby integrating over small-scale heterogeneity in the soil.

  1. Surface flux evolution constraints for flux transport dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, R. H.; Schmitt, D.; Jiang, J.; Işık, E.

    2012-06-01

    The surface flux transport (SFT) model of solar magnetic fields involves empirically well-constrained velocity and magnetic fields. The basic evolution of the Sun's large-scale surface magnetic field is well described by this model. The azimuthally averaged evolution of the SFT model can be compared to the surface evolution of the flux transport dynamo (FTD), and the evolution of the SFT model can be used to constrain several near-surface properties of the FTD model. We compared the results of the FTD model with different upper boundary conditions and diffusivity profiles against the results of the SFT model. Among the ingredients of the FTD model, downward pumping of magnetic flux, related to a positive diffusivity gradient, has a significant effect in slowing down the diffusive radial transport of magnetic flux through the solar surface. Provided the pumping was strong enough to give rise to a downflow of a magnetic Reynolds number of 5 in the near-surface boundary layer, the FTD using a vertical boundary condition matches the SFT model based on the average velocities above the boundary layer. The FTD model with a potential field was unable to match the SFT results.

  2. Flux attenuation at NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Carl E.; Scholl, Kent L.; Lewandowski, Allan A.

    1994-10-01

    The High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has a faceted primary concentrator and a long focal-length-to-diameter ratio (due to its off-axis design). Each primary facet can be aimed individually to produce different flux distributions at the target plane. Two different types of attenuators are used depending on the flux distribution. A sliding-plate attenuator is used primarily when the facets are aimed at the same target point. The alternate attenuator resembles a venetian blind. Both attenuators are located between the concentrator and the focal point. The venetian-blind attenuator is primarily used to control the levels of sunlight failing on a target when the primary concentrators are not focused to a single point. This paper will demonstrate the problem of using the sliding-plate attenuator with a faceted concentrator when the facets are not aimed at the same target point. We will show that although the alternate attenuator necessarily blocks a certain amount of incoming sunlight, even when fully open, it provides a more even attenuation of the flux for alternate aiming strategies.

  3. Simulations of Magnetic Flux Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Robert; Nordlund, Aake

    Magnetic flux emerges from the solar surface on a wide range of scales. We review recent simulations of both large and small scale flux emergence. In our own simulations, we represent the magnetic flux produced by the global dynamo as uniform, untwisted, horizontal field advected into the simulation domain by supergranule scale inflows at the bottom. Our computational domain extends from the temperature minimum (half a megameter above the visible surface) to 20 Mm below the surface, which is 10% of the depth of the convection zone, but contains 2/3 of its scale heights. We investigate how magnetic flux rises through the upper solar convection zone and emerges through the surface. Convective up-flows and magnetic buoyancy bring field toward the surface. Convective down-flows pin down field and prevent its rise. Most of the field gets pumped downward by the convection, but some field rises to the surface. The convective motions both confine the flux concentrations (without the need for twist) and shred them. This process creates a hierarchy of magnetic loops with smaller loops riding "piggy-back", in a serpentine pattern, on larger loops. As a result, magnetic flux emerges in a mixed polarity, "pepper and salt" pattern. The small loops appear as horizontal field over granules with their vertical legs in the bounding intergranular lanes. The fields are quickly swept into the intergranular lanes. As the larger, parent, flux concentrations reach the surface with their legs rooted in the the downflow boundaries of the underlying, supergranule-scale, convective cells near the bottom of the simulation domain, the surface field counter-streams into separate, opposite polarity concentrations, creating pores and spots. The subsurface magnetic field lines of the pores and spots formed by the magneto-convection (without being imposed as an initial condition) are braided, some tightly, some loosely and they connect in complicated ways to the surrounding field at large depths

  4. Modeling Coronal Jets with FLUX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmeler, L. A.; Pariat, E.; Antiochos, S. K.; Deforest, C. E.

    2008-05-01

    We report on a comparative study of coronal jet formation with and without reconnection using two different simulation strategies. Coronal jets are features on the solar surface that appear to have some properties in common with coronal mass ejections, but are less energetic, massive, and broad. Magnetic free energy is built up over time and then suddenly released, which accelerates plasma outward in the form of a coronal jet. We compare results from the ARMS adaptive mesh and FLUX reconnection-less codes to study the role of reconnection in this system. This is the first direct comparison between FLUX and a numerical model with a 3D spatial grid.

  5. High flux solar energy transformation

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland; Gleckman, Philip L.; O'Gallagher, Joseph J.

    1991-04-09

    Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

  6. High flux solar energy transformation

    DOEpatents

    Winston, R.; Gleckman, P.L.; O'Gallagher, J.J.

    1991-04-09

    Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes. 7 figures.

  7. Conversion from solvent rinsable fluxes to aqueous rinsable fluxes for hot oil solder leveling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-03-01

    A water rinsable flux was evaluated for hot oil solder leveling of printed wiring boards. The previously used rosin-activated flux required a solvent containing a chlorinated hydrocarbon for removing the flux residues after soldering. The water rinsable flux requires hot water or a solution of hot detergent for removing flux residues after smoldering. The water rinsable flux produced an acceptable soldered surface. Flux residues were removed by either hot water (120 F) or a solution of hot detergent (120 F).

  8. Science Squared: Teaching Science Visually.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paradis, Olga; Savage, Karen; Judice, Michelle

    This paper describes a collection of novel ideas for bulletin board displays that would be useful in supplementing science classroom instruction. Information on women and minorities in science; science concepts in everyday activities such as nutrition, baseball, and ice cream-making; and various holidays and celebratory events is included. Each…

  9. Science Teaching in Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Brendan E.; Dopico, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Reading the interesting article "Discerning selective traditions in science education" by Per Sund, which is published in this issue of "CSSE," allows us to open the discussion on procedures for teaching science today. Clearly there is overlap between the teaching of science and other areas of knowledge. However, we must…

  10. High flux compact neutron generators

    SciTech Connect

    Reijonen, J.; Lou, T.-P.; Tolmachoff, B.; Leung, K.-N.; Verbeke, J.; Vujic, J.

    2001-06-15

    Compact high flux neutron generators are developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The neutron production is based on D-D or D-T reaction. The deuterium or tritium ions are produced from plasma using either a 2 MHz or 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) discharge. RF-discharge yields high fraction of atomic species in the beam which enables higher neutron output. In the first tube design, the ion beam is formed using a multiple hole accelerator column. The beam is accelerated to energy of 80 keV by means of a three-electrode extraction system. The ion beam then impinges on a titanium target where either the 2.4 MeV D-D or 14 MeV D-T neutrons are generated. The MCNP computation code has predicted a neutron flux of {approximately}10{sup 11} n/s for the D-D reaction at beam intensity of 1.5 A at 150 kV. The neutron flux measurements of this tube design will be presented. Recently new compact high flux tubes are being developed which can be used for various applications. These tubes also utilize RF-discharge for plasma generation. The design of these tubes and the first measurements will be discussed in this presentation.

  11. Superconducting flux flow digital circuits

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1995-02-14

    A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs) are disclosed. Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics. 8 figs.

  12. Superconducting flux flow digital circuits

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, Vincent M.; Martens, Jon S.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs). Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics.

  13. Flux Compression in HTS Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheenko, P.; Colclough, M. S.; Chakalov, R.; Kawano, K.; Muirhead, C. M.

    We report on experimental investigation of the effect of flux compression in superconducting YBa2Cu3Ox (YBCO) films and YBCO/CMR (Colossal Magnetoresistive) multilayers. The flux compression produces positive magnetic moment (m) upon the cooling in a field from above to below the critical temperature. We found effect of compression in all measured films and multilayers. In accordance with theoretical calculations, m is proportional to applied magnetic field. The amplitude of the effect depends on the cooling rate, which suggests the inhomogeneous cooling as its origin. The positive moment is always very small, a fraction of a percent of the ideal diamagnetic response. A CMR layer in contact with HTS decreases the amplitude of the effect. The flux compression weakly depends on sample size, but sensitive to its form and topology. The positive magnetic moment does not appear in bulk samples at low rates of the cooling. Our results show that the main features of the flux compression are very different from those in Paramagnetic Meissner effect observed in bulk high temperature superconductors and Nb disks.

  14. Effects of high altitude clouds on the earth's infrared radiation flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.-C.; Kaplan, L. D.

    1983-01-01

    Attention is given to the results of a study of cirrus cloud properties which employed the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences' general circulation model and concentrated on the effects of the nonblackness of high clouds on the IR radiation flux. Although the thermal radiation flux is very sensitive to the treatment of cirrus optical properties in the IR, a more realistic assessment will depend on better parameterizations for cirrus cloud formation, persistence, and dissipation.

  15. Large Area Lunar Dust Flux Measurement Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corsaro, R.; Giovane, F.; Liou, Jer-Chyi; Burchell, M.; Stansbery, Eugene; Lagakos, N.

    2009-01-01

    The instrument under development is designed to characterize the flux and size distribution of the lunar micrometeoroid and secondary ejecta environment. When deployed on the lunar surface, the data collected will benefit fundamental lunar science as well as enabling more reliable impact risk assessments for human lunar exploration activities. To perform this task, the instrument requirements are demanding. It must have as large a surface area as possible to sample the very sparse population of the larger potentially damage-inducing micrometeorites. It must also have very high sensitivity to enable it to measure the flux of small (<10 micron) micrometeorite and secondary ejecta dust particles. To be delivered to the lunar surface, it must also be very low mass, rugged and stow compactly. The instrument designed to meet these requirements is called FOMIS. It is a large-area thin film under tension (i.e. a drum) with multiple fiber optic displacement (FOD) sensors to monitor displacements of the film. This sensor was chosen since it can measure displacements over a wide dynamic range: 1 cm to sub-Angstrom. A prototype system was successfully demonstrated using the hypervelocity impact test facility at the University of Kent (Canterbury, UK). Based on these results, the prototype system can detect hypervelocity (approx.5 km/s) impacts by particles as small as 2 microns diameter. Additional tests using slow speeds find that it can detect secondary ejecta particles (which do not penetrate the film) with momentums as small as 15 pico-gram 100m/s, or nominally 5 microns diameter at 100 m/s.

  16. Deconstructing science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonas, Peter Pericles

    2012-12-01

    In this paper I expand on the premises of Jesse Bazzul's thesis in his paper, Neoliberal ideology, global capitalism, and science education: engaging the question of subjectivity, exploring the implications of the ideologies within the culturally emerging logic of science exposes the incommensurability of intents and purposes in its methods and epistemology. I argue that science needs to acknowledge the subjectivity at its core to make space for non-absolute agents and new fields of study.

  17. Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Contains 31 activities and experiments from the biological and physical sciences. Addresses such areas as reproduction, biotechnology, ecology, proteins, nitrates, aerosols, metal crystallinity, circuit boards, and photoswitching. (ML)

  18. Fluxes across a thermohaline interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, M.; Lueck, R. G.

    1991-07-01

    Measurements of velocity and temperature microstructure and hydrography were made with a towed vehicle moving in and around a single interface in a double-diffusive staircase. The interface was traversed 222 times in a saw-tooth pattern over a track 35 km long. The salinity and potential temperature and density in the mixed layers adjacent to the interface were spatially uniform except for one 8 km long anomaly. The rate of dissipation of kinetic energy was uniformly low in the interface and in the mixed layers, except for one section 600 m long where a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability generated turbulence. For the non-turbulent section of the interface, the mean rate of dissipation was 30.2 × 10 -10 W kg -1 in the mixed layers and 9.5 × 10 -10 W kg -1 in the interface. The non-dimensional dissipation rate, ɛ/vN 2, was almost always less than 16 in the interface and therfore, there was no turblent buoyancy flux according to ROHRet al. (1988, Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 195, 77-111). The average double-diffusive flux of buoyancy by heat was 3.6 × 10 -10 W kg -1. Under certain assumptions the ratio of the flux of buoyancy by heat and salt can be estimated to be 0.53 ± 0.10, in good agreement with laboratory and theoretical estimates for salt fingers. The average Cox number was about 8 in the interface, consistent with the theories of STERN (1975, Ocean circulation physics, Academic Press) and KUNZE (1987, Journal of Marine Research, 45 533-556), but displayed an inverse dependence on the vertical temperature gradient which was not predicted. As a result, the flux of buoyancy, as well as the individual contributions by heat and salt, were independent of the local mean vertical temperature gradient and the buoyancy frequency. The length of the turbulent section of the interface was only 1.7% of the total length observed. However, the turbulence was intense—the mean rate of dissipation was 2.5 × 10 -8 W kg -1—and may have sufficiently enhanced the flux of heat to

  19. FluxSuite: a New Scientific Tool for Advanced Network Management and Cross-Sharing of Next-Generation Flux Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, G. G.; Johnson, D.; Velgersdyk, M.; Beaty, K.; Forgione, A.; Begashaw, I.; Allyn, D.

    2015-12-01

    different actual networks This presentation provides detailed examples of FluxSuite currently utilized by two large flux networks in China (National Academy of Sciences & Agricultural Academy of Sciences), and smaller networks with stations in the USA, Germany, Ireland, Malaysia and other locations around the globe.

  20. Progress in Modeling Global Atmospheric CO2 Fluxes and Transport: Results from Simulations with Diurnal Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collatz, G. James; Kawa, R.

    2007-01-01

    Progress in better determining CO2 sources and sinks will almost certainly rely on utilization of more extensive and intensive CO2 and related observations including those from satellite remote sensing. Use of advanced data requires improved modeling and analysis capability. Under NASA Carbon Cycle Science support we seek to develop and integrate improved formulations for 1) atmospheric transport, 2) terrestrial uptake and release, 3) biomass and 4) fossil fuel burning, and 5) observational data analysis including inverse calculations. The transport modeling is based on meteorological data assimilation analysis from the Goddard Modeling and Assimilation Office. Use of assimilated met data enables model comparison to CO2 and other observations across a wide range of scales of variability. In this presentation we focus on the short end of the temporal variability spectrum: hourly to synoptic to seasonal. Using CO2 fluxes at varying temporal resolution from the SIB 2 and CASA biosphere models, we examine the model's ability to simulate CO2 variability in comparison to observations at different times, locations, and altitudes. We find that the model can resolve much of the variability in the observations, although there are limits imposed by vertical resolution of boundary layer processes. The influence of key process representations is inferred. The high degree of fidelity in these simulations leads us to anticipate incorporation of realtime, highly resolved observations into a multiscale carbon cycle analysis system that will begin to bridge the gap between top-down and bottom-up flux estimation, which is a primary focus of NACP.

  1. Heisenberg groups and noncommutative fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, Daniel S. . E-mail: dafr@math.utexas.edu; Moore, Gregory W.; Segal, Graeme

    2007-01-15

    We develop a group-theoretical approach to the formulation of generalized abelian gauge theories, such as those appearing in string theory and M-theory. We explore several applications of this approach. First, we show that there is an uncertainty relation which obstructs simultaneous measurement of electric and magnetic flux when torsion fluxes are included. Next, we show how to define the Hilbert space of a self-dual field. The Hilbert space is Z{sub 2}-graded and we show that, in general, self-dual theories (including the RR fields of string theory) have fermionic sectors. We indicate how rational conformal field theories associated to the two-dimensional Gaussian model generalize to (4k+2)-dimensional conformal field theories. When our ideas are applied to the RR fields of string theory we learn that it is impossible to measure the K-theory class of a RR field. Only the reduction modulo torsion can be measured.

  2. Heisenberg groups and noncommutative fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Daniel S.; Moore, Gregory W.; Segal, Graeme

    2007-01-01

    We develop a group-theoretical approach to the formulation of generalized abelian gauge theories, such as those appearing in string theory and M-theory. We explore several applications of this approach. First, we show that there is an uncertainty relation which obstructs simultaneous measurement of electric and magnetic flux when torsion fluxes are included. Next, we show how to define the Hilbert space of a self-dual field. The Hilbert space is Z2-graded and we show that, in general, self-dual theories (including the RR fields of string theory) have fermionic sectors. We indicate how rational conformal field theories associated to the two-dimensional Gaussian model generalize to (4 k + 2)-dimensional conformal field theories. When our ideas are applied to the RR fields of string theory we learn that it is impossible to measure the K-theory class of a RR field. Only the reduction modulo torsion can be measured.

  3. Science Fairs for Science Literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    Science literacy is imperative for well informed civic and personal decision making, yet only a quarter of American adults are proficient enough in science to understand science stories reported in the popular press. Hands-on research increases confidence in and understanding of science. When guiding students in designing and conducting science fair projects, mentors can foster science literacy by helping students focus on three goals: (1) articulating hypotheses or questions, (2) designing feasible projects, and (3) learning to make and interpret graphs. These objectives introduce students to the methodological nature of scientific research and give them the tools to interpret scientific facts and data in order to make informed decisions for themselves and society.

  4. Latest developments in advanced network management and cross-sharing of next-generation flux stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, George; Johnson, Dave; Velgersdyk, Michael; Begashaw, Israel; Allyn, Douglas

    2016-04-01

    be merged into a single quality-control file (v) Multiple flux stations can be linked into an automated time-synchronized network (vi) Flux network managers, or PI's, can see all stations in real-time, including fluxes, supporting data, automated reports, and email alerts (vii) PI's can assign rights, allow or restrict access to stations and data: selected stations can be shared via rights-managed access internally or with external institutions (viii) Researchers without stations could form "virtual networks" for specific projects by collaborating with PIs from different actual networks This presentation provides detailed examples of FluxSuite currently utilized to manage two large flux networks in China (National Academy of Sciences and Agricultural Academy of Sciences), and smaller networks with stations in the USA, Germany, Ireland, Malaysia and other locations around the globe. Very latest 2016 developments and expanded functionality are also discussed.

  5. SQUID With Integral Flux Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Palmer N.; Sisk, Robert C.

    1989-01-01

    In improved superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), change in size and shape of superconducting ring improves coupling to external signal coil and eases coil-positioning tolerances. More rugged and easier to manufacture than conventional SQUID's with comparable electrical characteristics. Thin-film superconducting flux concentrator utilizes Meissner effect to deflect magnetic field of signal coil into central hole of SQUID. Used in magnetometers, ammeters, analog-to-digital converters, and related electronic applications in which high signal-to-noise ratios required.

  6. The science in social science

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, H. Russell

    2012-01-01

    A recent poll showed that most people think of science as technology and engineering—life-saving drugs, computers, space exploration, and so on. This was, in fact, the promise of the founders of modern science in the 17th century. It is less commonly understood that social and behavioral sciences have also produced technologies and engineering that dominate our everyday lives. These include polling, marketing, management, insurance, and public health programs. PMID:23213222

  7. Reconnection Between Twisted Flux Tubes - Implications for Coronal Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knizhnik, K. J.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Wyper, P. F.

    2015-12-01

    The nature of the heating of the Sun's corona has been a long-standing unanswered problem in solar physics. Beginning with the work of Parker (1972), many authors have argued that the corona is continuously heated through numerous small-scale reconnection events known as nanoflares. In these nanoflare models, stressing of magnetic flux tubes by photospheric motions causes the field to become misaligned, producing current sheets in the corona. These current sheets then reconnect, converting the free energy stored in the magnetic field into heat. In this work, we use the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS) to perform 3D MHD simulations that dynamically resolve regions of strong current to study the reconnection between twisted flux tubes in a plane-parallel Parker configuration. We investigate the energetics of the process, and show that the flux tubes accumulate stress gradually before undergoing impulsive reconnection. We study the motion of the individual field lines during reconnection, and demonstrate that the connectivity of the configuration becomes extremely complex, with multiple current sheets being formed, which could lead to enhanced heating. In addition, we show that there is considerable interaction between the twisted flux tubes and the surrounding untwisted field, which contributes further to the formation of current sheets. The implications for observations will be discussed. This work was funded by a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship, and by the NASA TR&T Program.

  8. Sediment flux and the Anthropocene.

    PubMed

    Syvitski, James P M; Kettner, Albert

    2011-03-13

    Data and computer simulations are reviewed to help better define the timing and magnitude of human influence on sediment flux--the Anthropocene epoch. Impacts on the Earth surface processes are not spatially or temporally homogeneous. Human influences on this sediment flux have a secondary effect on floodplain and delta-plain functions and sediment dispersal into the coastal ocean. Human impact on sediment production began 3000 years ago but accelerated more widely 1000 years ago. By the sixteenth century, societies were already engineering their environment. Early twentieth century mechanization has led to global signals of increased sediment flux in most large rivers. By the 1950s, this sediment disturbance signal reversed for many rivers owing to the proliferation of dams, and sediment load reduction below pristine conditions is the dominant signal today. A delta subsidence signal began in the 1930s and is now a dominant signal in terms of sea level for many coastal environments, overwhelming even the global warming imprint on sea level. Humans have engineered how most water and sediment are discharged into the coastal ocean. Hyperpycnal flow events have become more common for some rivers, and less common for other rivers. Bottom trawling is now widespread, suggesting that even continental shelves have received a significant but as yet quantified Anthropocene impact. The Anthropocene attains the level of a geological climate event, such as that seen in the transition between the Pleistocene and the Holocene. PMID:21282156

  9. The sciences of science communication

    PubMed Central

    Fischhoff, Baruch

    2013-01-01

    The May 2012 Sackler Colloquium on “The Science of Science Communication” brought together scientists with research to communicate and scientists whose research could facilitate that communication. The latter include decision scientists who can identify the scientific results that an audience needs to know, from among all of the scientific results that it would be nice to know; behavioral scientists who can design ways to convey those results and then evaluate the success of those attempts; and social scientists who can create the channels needed for trustworthy communications. This overview offers an introduction to these communication sciences and their roles in science-based communication programs. PMID:23942125

  10. Integrated Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainey, Larry; Miller, Roxanne Greitz

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Integrated Science program that integrates biology, earth/space science, chemistry, and physics over a three-year, spiraling sequence arranged around broad themes such as cycles, changes, patterns, and waves. Includes weekly telecasts via public television and satellite, teacher manuals, student handbooks, e-mail connections, staff…

  11. Why Science?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Primary Science Review, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This article presents people from many walks of life, including some well-known names, who share their views about science. Adam Hart-Davis, who studied chemistry at university and is now an author, photographer, historian and broadcaster, explains why science cannot start too soon. Lis Nairn, Manager, Stratigraphy, with Fugro Robertson Ltd (Oil…

  12. Shrinking Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goates, Wayne

    2002-01-01

    Describes an activity based on shrinkable thermoplastics in which students explore the percentage of shrinkage of a plastic ruler when it is heated. Includes science content knowledge behind the shrink, national science education standards related to this activity, and a complete guide. (KHR)

  13. Personalizing Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danielowich, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Science teachers are aware of many social issues that intersect with science. These socio-scientific issues (SSIs) are "open-ended problems without clear-cut solutions [that] can be informed by scientific principles, theories, and data, but…cannot be fully determined by [them]" (Sadler 2011, p. 4). This article describes the SSI lessons…

  14. "Children's Science"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milne, Ian

    2007-01-01

    The revamped New Zealand curriculum emphasises "scientific literacy for all students" and provides teachers with an opportunity to promote science as an integral element of the primary school curriculum. Exploring and explaining the natural world in primary science can provide authentic contexts for the development of knowledge, skills, and…

  15. Learning Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapointe, Archie E.; And Others

    This publication reports the results of the second International Assessment of Educational Progress for science. Twenty countries assessed the mathematics and science achievement of 13-year-old students and 14 countries assessed 9-year-old students in these same subjects. In some cases, participants assessed virtually all age-eligible children in…

  16. Talking Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shwartz, Yael; Weizman, Ayelet; Fortus, David; Sutherland, LeeAnn; Merrit, Joi; Krajcik, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Science is a social process--one that involves particular ways of talking, reasoning, observing, analyzing, and writing, which often have meaning only when shared within the scientific community. Discussions are one of the best ways to help students learn to "talk science" and construct understanding in a social context. Since inquiry is an…

  17. Soundsational Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrier, Sarah J.; Scott, Catherine Marie; Hall, Debra T.

    2012-01-01

    The science of sound helps students learn that sound is energy traveling in waves as vibrations transfer the energy through various media: solids, liquids, and gases. In addition to learning about the physical science of sound, students can learn about the sounds of different animal species: how sounds contribute to animals' survival, and how…

  18. Deconstructing Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trifonas, Peter Pericles

    2012-01-01

    In this paper I expand on the premises of Jesse Bazzul's thesis in his paper, "Neoliberal ideology, global capitalism, and science education: engaging the question of subjectivity," exploring the implications of the ideologies within the culturally emerging logic of science exposes the incommensurability of intents and purposes in its methods and…

  19. Legendary Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Keefe, William A.; Joe, Jimson

    1998-01-01

    Spiders and insects are studied in both Navajo Studies and science classes at a middle school in New Mexico. In Navajo Studies, students learn the names of ground-dwelling insects and the connection between those names and traditional Navajo stories. In science class, students study arthropods to illustrate taxonomy of life, trophic and biological…

  20. Life sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Day, L.

    1991-04-01

    This document is the 1989--1990 Annual Report for the Life Sciences Divisions of the University of California/Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Specific progress reports are included for the Cell and Molecular Biology Division, the Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Division (including the Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center), and the Chemical Biodynamics Division. 450 refs., 46 figs. (MHB)

  1. Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, A. J. S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents 31 science activities for use with high school or college science classes. Topics included are: chromatography, ecology, invertebrates, enzymes, genetics, botany, creep, crystals, diffusion, computer interfaces, acid rain, teaching techniques, chemical reactions, waves, electric fields, rainbows, electricity, magnetic fields, and a Pitot…

  2. Modulating the Neutron Flux from a Mirror Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D D

    2011-09-01

    A 14-MeV neutron source based on a Gas-Dynamic Trap will provide a high flux of 14 MeV neutrons for fusion materials and sub-component testing. In addition to its main goal, the source has potential applications in condensed matter physics and biophysics. In this report, the author considers adding one more capability to the GDT-based neutron source, the modulation of the neutron flux with a desired frequency. The modulation may be an enabling tool for the assessment of the role of non-steady-state effects in fusion devices as well as for high-precision, low-signal basic science experiments favoring the use of the synchronous detection technique. A conclusion is drawn that modulation frequency of up to 1 kHz and modulation amplitude of a few percent is achievable. Limitations on the amplitude of modulations at higher frequencies are discussed.

  3. Center vortices as composites of monopole fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deldar, S.; Nejad, S. M. Hosseini

    2016-01-01

    We study the relation between the flux of a center vortex obtained from the center vortex model and the flux formed between monopoles from the Abelian gauge fixing method. Motivated by the Monte Carlo simulations which have shown that almost all monopoles are sitting on the top of vortices, we construct the fluxes of center vortices for SU (2) and SU (3) gauge groups using fractional fluxes of monopoles. Then, we compute the potentials in the fundamental representation induced by center vortices and fractional fluxes of monopoles. We show that by combining the fractional fluxes of monopoles one can produce the center vortex fluxes for SU (3) gauge group in a "center vortex model". Comparing the potentials, we conclude that the fractional fluxes of monopoles attract each other.

  4. Energetic particle characteristics of magnetotail flux ropes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Galvin, A. B.

    1985-01-01

    During the recent ISEE-3 Geotail Mission three events have been identified from the magnetometer data which are consistent with a spacecraft crossing of a magnetotail flux rope. Energetic electron and proton observations obtained by the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland sensor system during two of the possible flux rope events are presented. During one event remote sensing of the flux rope with energetic protons reveals that the flux rope is crossed by the spacecraft from south to north. This allows determination of the bandedness of the magnetic field twist and of the flux rope velocity relative to the spacecraft. A minimal flux rope radius of 3 earth radii is derived. Energetic proton intensity is highest just inside of the flux rope and decreases towards the core. Energetic electrons are streaming tailward near the outer boundary, indicating openness of the field lines, and are isotropic through the inner part of the flux rope.

  5. Science teaching in science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Brendan E.; Dopico, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    Reading the interesting article Discerning selective traditions in science education by Per Sund, which is published in this issue of CSSE, allows us to open the discussion on procedures for teaching science today. Clearly there is overlap between the teaching of science and other areas of knowledge. However, we must constantly develop new methods to teach and differentiate between science education and teaching science in response to the changing needs of our students, and we must analyze what role teachers and teacher educators play in both. We must continually examine the methods and concepts involved in developing pedagogical content knowledge in science teachers. Otherwise, the possibility that these routines, based on subjective traditions, prevent emerging processes of educational innovation. Modern science is an enormous field of knowledge in its own right, which is made more expansive when examined within the context of its place in society. We propose the need to design educative interactions around situations that involve science and society. Science education must provide students with all four dimensions of the cognitive process: factual knowledge, conceptual knowledge, procedural knowledge, and metacognitive knowledge. We can observe in classrooms at all levels of education that students understand the concepts better when they have the opportunity to apply the scientific knowledge in a personally relevant way. When students find value in practical exercises and they are provided opportunities to reinterpret their experiences, greater learning gains are achieved. In this sense, a key aspect of educational innovation is the change in teaching methodology. We need new tools to respond to new problems. A shift in teacher education is needed to realize the rewards of situating science questions in a societal context and opening classroom doors to active methodologies in science education to promote meaningful learning through meaningful teaching.

  6. Science teaching in science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Brendan E.; Dopico, Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    Reading the interesting article Discerning selective traditions in science education by Per Sund , which is published in this issue of CSSE, allows us to open the discussion on procedures for teaching science today. Clearly there is overlap between the teaching of science and other areas of knowledge. However, we must constantly develop new methods to teach and differentiate between science education and teaching science in response to the changing needs of our students, and we must analyze what role teachers and teacher educators play in both. We must continually examine the methods and concepts involved in developing pedagogical content knowledge in science teachers. Otherwise, the possibility that these routines, based on subjective traditions, prevent emerging processes of educational innovation. Modern science is an enormous field of knowledge in its own right, which is made more expansive when examined within the context of its place in society. We propose the need to design educative interactions around situations that involve science and society. Science education must provide students with all four dimensions of the cognitive process: factual knowledge, conceptual knowledge, procedural knowledge, and metacognitive knowledge. We can observe in classrooms at all levels of education that students understand the concepts better when they have the opportunity to apply the scientific knowledge in a personally relevant way. When students find value in practical exercises and they are provided opportunities to reinterpret their experiences, greater learning gains are achieved. In this sense, a key aspect of educational innovation is the change in teaching methodology. We need new tools to respond to new problems. A shift in teacher education is needed to realize the rewards of situating science questions in a societal context and opening classroom doors to active methodologies in science education to promote meaningful learning through meaningful teaching.

  7. High-flux solar photon processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lorents, D C; Narang, S; Huestis, D C; Mooney, J L; Mill, T; Song, H K; Ventura, S

    1992-06-01

    This study was commissioned by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the purpose of identifying high-flux photoprocesses that would lead to beneficial national and commercial applications. The specific focus on high-flux photoprocesses is based on the recent development by NREL of solar concentrator technology capable of delivering record flux levels. We examined photolytic and photocatalytic chemical processes as well as photothermal processes in the search for processes where concentrated solar flux would offer a unique advantage. 37 refs.

  8. Force sensor using changes in magnetic flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickens, Herman L. (Inventor); Richard, James A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A force sensor includes a magnetostrictive material and a magnetic field generator positioned in proximity thereto. A magnetic field is induced in and surrounding the magnetostrictive material such that lines of magnetic flux pass through the magnetostrictive material. A sensor positioned in the vicinity of the magnetostrictive material measures changes in one of flux angle and flux density when the magnetostrictive material experiences an applied force that is aligned with the lines of magnetic flux.

  9. Science Indicators and Science Priorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Harvey

    1982-01-01

    Discusses science/society interface and difficulties involved in developing realistic science indicators. Topics include: intrinsic vs. extrinsic indicators; four problems society faces as a result of technological activities (toxic chemicals, radioactive wastes, auto safety, cancer); research and development (R&D) priorities; international…

  10. Science packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-01-01

    Primary science teachers in Scotland have a new updating method at their disposal with the launch of a package of CDi (Compact Discs Interactive) materials developed by the BBC and the Scottish Office. These were a response to the claim that many primary teachers felt they had been inadequately trained in science and lacked the confidence to teach it properly. Consequently they felt the need for more in-service training to equip them with the personal understanding required. The pack contains five disks and a printed user's guide divided up as follows: disk 1 Investigations; disk 2 Developing understanding; disks 3,4,5 Primary Science staff development videos. It was produced by the Scottish Interactive Technology Centre (Moray House Institute) and is available from BBC Education at £149.99 including VAT. Free Internet distribution of science education materials has also begun as part of the Global Schoolhouse (GSH) scheme. The US National Science Teachers' Association (NSTA) and Microsoft Corporation are making available field-tested comprehensive curriculum material including 'Micro-units' on more than 80 topics in biology, chemistry, earth and space science and physics. The latter are the work of the Scope, Sequence and Coordination of High School Science project, which can be found at http://www.gsh.org/NSTA_SSandC/. More information on NSTA can be obtained from its Web site at http://www.nsta.org.

  11. Revolutionary Science

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ferric C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT On rare occasions in the history of science, remarkable discoveries transform human society and forever alter mankind’s view of the world. Examples of such discoveries include the heliocentric theory, Newtonian physics, the germ theory of disease, quantum theory, plate tectonics and the discovery that DNA carries genetic information. The science philosopher Thomas Kuhn famously described science as long periods of normality punctuated by times of crisis, when anomalous observations culminate in revolutionary changes that replace one paradigm with another. This essay examines several transformative discoveries in the light of Kuhn’s formulation. We find that each scientific revolution is unique, with disparate origins that may include puzzle solving, serendipity, inspiration, or a convergence of disparate observations. The causes of revolutionary science are varied and lack an obvious common structure. Moreover, it can be difficult to draw a clear distinction between so-called normal and revolutionary science. Revolutionary discoveries often emerge from basic science and are critically dependent on nonrevolutionary research. Revolutionary discoveries may be conceptual or technological in nature, lead to the creation of new fields, and have a lasting impact on many fields in addition to the field from which they emerge. In contrast to political revolutions, scientific revolutions do not necessarily require the destruction of the previous order. For humanity to continue to benefit from revolutionary discoveries, a broad palette of scientific inquiry with a particular emphasis on basic science should be supported. PMID:26933052

  12. Revolutionary Science.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Arturo; Fang, Ferric C

    2016-01-01

    On rare occasions in the history of science, remarkable discoveries transform human society and forever alter mankind's view of the world. Examples of such discoveries include the heliocentric theory, Newtonian physics, the germ theory of disease, quantum theory, plate tectonics and the discovery that DNA carries genetic information. The science philosopher Thomas Kuhn famously described science as long periods of normality punctuated by times of crisis, when anomalous observations culminate in revolutionary changes that replace one paradigm with another. This essay examines several transformative discoveries in the light of Kuhn's formulation. We find that each scientific revolution is unique, with disparate origins that may include puzzle solving, serendipity, inspiration, or a convergence of disparate observations. The causes of revolutionary science are varied and lack an obvious common structure. Moreover, it can be difficult to draw a clear distinction between so-called normal and revolutionary science. Revolutionary discoveries often emerge from basic science and are critically dependent on nonrevolutionary research. Revolutionary discoveries may be conceptual or technological in nature, lead to the creation of new fields, and have a lasting impact on many fields in addition to the field from which they emerge. In contrast to political revolutions, scientific revolutions do not necessarily require the destruction of the previous order. For humanity to continue to benefit from revolutionary discoveries, a broad palette of scientific inquiry with a particular emphasis on basic science should be supported. PMID:26933052

  13. Latent Heat in Soil Heat Flux Measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The surface energy balance includes a term for soil heat flux. Soil heat flux is difficult to measure because it includes conduction and convection heat transfer processes. Accurate representation of soil heat flux is an important consideration in many modeling and measurement applications. Yet, the...

  14. Apparatus for measuring a flux of neutrons

    DOEpatents

    Stringer, James L.

    1977-01-01

    A flux of neutrons is measured by disposing a detector in the flux and applying electronic correlation techniques to discriminate between the electrical signals generated by the neutron detector and the unwanted interfering electrical signals generated by the incidence of a neutron flux upon the cables connecting the detector to the electronic measuring equipment at a remote location.

  15. Flux-limited diffusion with relativistic corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Pomraning, G.C.

    1983-03-15

    A recently reported flux-limited diffusion theory is extended to include relativistic terms, correct to first order in the fluid velocity. We show that this diffusion theory is fully flux limited, and yields the correct result for the radiative flux in the classical diffusion limit, namely a Fick's law component plus a v/c convective term.

  16. Advanced high temperature heat flux sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, W.; Hobart, H. F.; Strange, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    To fully characterize advanced high temperature heat flux sensors, calibration and testing is required at full engine temperature. This required the development of unique high temperature heat flux test facilities. These facilities were developed, are in place, and are being used for advanced heat flux sensor development.

  17. Science Instructors' Views of Science and Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karakas, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study examined how college science faculty who teach introductory level undergraduate science courses including the fields of chemistry, biology, physics, and earth science, understand and define science and nature of science (NOS). Participants were seventeen science instructors from five different institutions in the…

  18. Evaluation of various LandFlux evapotranspiration algorithms using the LandFlux-EVAL synthesis benchmark products and observational data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Dominik; Hirschi, Martin; Jimenez, Carlos; McCabe, Mathew; Miralles, Diego; Wood, Eric; Seneviratne, Sonia

    2014-05-01

    ., Wood, E. F., Zhang, Y., and Seneviratne, S. I. (2013). Benchmark products for land evapotranspiration: LandFlux-EVAL multi-data set synthesis. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 17(10): 3707-3720.

  19. Flux distributions in jointed ? tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koblischka, M. R.; Johansen, T. H.; Bratsberg, H.; Vase, P.

    1998-06-01

    Superconducting joints between monofilamentary, Ag-sheathed 0953-2048/11/6/005/img8 tapes were investigated by means of magneto-optic imaging. Two types of joint were studied; one joint with direct contact between the tape cores, and the other one with an Ag layer between them. The local flux distributions directly reveal the obstacles hindering the current flow through the joints. The direct contact of the tape cores provides joints which can carry about 80% of the current of the original tape, whereas the joints with the Ag layer are considerably worse. This difference becomes even more drastic in applied magnetic fields.

  20. Methane Fluxes from Subtropical Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLucia, N.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.; Bernacchi, C.

    2013-12-01

    It is well documented that green house gas concentrations have risen at unequivocal rates since the industrial revolution but the disparity between anthropogenic sources and natural sources is uncertain. Wetlands are one example of a natural ecosystem that can be a substantial source or sink for methane (CH4) depending on climate conditions. Due to strict anaerobic conditions required for CH4-generating microorganisms, natural wetlands are one of the main sources for biogenic CH4. Although wetlands occupy less than 5% of total land surface area, they contribute approximately 20% of total CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. The processes regulating CH4 emissions are sensitive to land use and management practices of areas surrounding wetlands. Variation in adjacent vegetation or grazing intensity by livestock can, for example, alter CH4 fluxes from wetland soils by altering nutrient balance, carbon inputs and hydrology. Therefore, understanding how these changes will affect wetland source strength is essential to understand the impact of wetland management practices on the global climate system. In this study we quantify wetland methane fluxes from subtropical wetlands on a working cattle ranch in central Florida near Okeechobee Lake (27o10'52.04'N, 81o21'8.56'W). To determine differences in CH4 fluxes associated with land use and management, a replicated (n = 4) full factorial experiment was designed for wetlands where the surrounding vegetation was (1) grazed or un-grazed and (2) composed of native vegetation or improved pasture. Net exchange of CH4 and CO2 between the land surface and the atmosphere were sampled with a LICOR Li-7700 open path CH4 analyzer and Li-7500A open path CO2/H20 analyzer mounted in a 1-m3 static gas-exchange chamber. Our results showed and verified that CH4 emissions from subtropical wetlands were larger when high soil moisture was coupled with high temperatures. The presence of cattle only amplified these results. These results help quantify

  1. Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-two activities are presented. Topics include: acid rain, microcomputers, fish farming, school-industry research projects, enzymes, equilibrium, assessment, science equipment, logic, Archimedes principle, electronics, optics, and statistics. (CW)

  2. Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Included are 30 science activities that include computer monitoring, fieldwork, enzyme activity, pH, drugs, calorimeters, Raoult's Law, food content, solubility, electrochemistry, titration, physical properties of materials, gel filtration, energy, concepts in physics, and electricity. (KR)

  3. Saturday Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shugart, Cecil G.

    1976-01-01

    Describes the organization of demonstration oriented seminars in which the physics of toys, music, sports and other topics are investigated. Reports that this university based service has increased high school physics and science fair enrollments. (CP)

  4. Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurman, Shirley; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes 36 science activities. Topics include: osmosis, fermentation, anhydrobiotic organisms, breathing monitors, trypsin, weeds, amyloplasts, electrolysis, polarimeters, ethene ripening of fruit, colorimetry, diffusion, redox reactions, equilibria, acid-base relationships, electricity, power, resonance, measurement, parallax, amplifiers,…

  5. Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Describes 20 teaching activities and experiments appropriate for use with various secondary school science classes. Instructional activities include the study of catalase, raising bees, a game about equilibrium, spectrometers, lead iodide, resonance, graphing, and electromagnetic waves. (TW)

  6. Communicating Science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farris, Gaye S.

    2005-01-01

    For science to have an impact, it must be communicated and easily accessible. The USGS National Wetlands Research Center communicates its research findings through several ways: publishing, the Web, the library, and education and outreach.

  7. Dismal Science

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    “No prediction, no science.” By this standard, the past year has not been kind to the pretensions of “economic science,” Nobel prizes notwithstanding. The issue is more than semantic. As Neil Postman (1992) pointed out, sciences study natural processes that repeat themselves under constant conditions. The social disciplines study practices of human communities that are embedded in history. There are no constant conditions; it is impossible to step into the same river twice (Heraclitus). “Physics envy” has led mainstream economic theorists to attempt to understand their discipline through methods and models borrowed from the natural sciences. (By unfortunate coincidence, these have reinforced a certain class of ideological preconceptions and associated economic interests.) Today the results of this methodological mismatch speak for themselves. PMID:20436803

  8. Science Weekly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Reviews the space classroom that would have been conducted by Christa McAuliffe during the space shuttle flight. Includes lab activities, word puzzles, vocabulary lists, and graph reading exercises for elementary science students. (ML)

  9. Appliance Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGhee, James

    1984-01-01

    Ordinary household appliances can be used in the classroom to inspire unusual research, artwork, and problem solving. Suggestions on how to organize and collect materials to develop an appliance science unit are offered. (DF)

  10. Forensic Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, P. G. W.

    1973-01-01

    Summarizes the type of work carried out by forensic chemists and the minimum qualification needed for appointment. Indicates that there are eight Home Office regional forensic science laboratories in addition to the Central Research Establishment at Aldermaston. (CC)

  11. Forensic Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brettell, T. A.; Saferstein, R.

    1989-01-01

    Presents a review of articles appealing to forensic practitioners. Topics include: drugs and poisons, forensic biochemistry, and trace evidence. Lists noteworthy books published on forensic science topics since 1986. (MVL)

  12. Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents 23 experiments, activities, field projects and computer programs in the biological and physical sciences. Instructional procedures, experimental designs, materials, and background information are suggested. Topics include fluid mechanics, electricity, crystals, arthropods, limpets, acid neutralization, and software evaluation. (ML)

  13. Overnight Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nancy N.; Stahl, Robert J.

    1981-01-01

    Outlines objectives for an elementary science camping program and summarizes general operational procedures. Campsite activities related to such topics as microorganisms, eye and sight, nature trails, bees, carpentry, and astronomy are described. (DS)

  14. Scuba Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glickstein, Neil

    2000-01-01

    Introduces an integrated unit on scuba science. Studies oxygen in kinetic theory, Boyle's law, Charles's law, Dalton's law, human circulatory and respiratory systems, and diving dangers such as decompression sickness. (YDS)

  15. Geometrical correction factors for heat flux meters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Papell, S. S.

    1974-01-01

    General formulas are derived for determining gage averaging errors of strip-type heat flux meters used in the measurement of one-dimensional heat flux distributions. The local averaging error e(x) is defined as the difference between the measured value of the heat flux and the local value which occurs at the center of the gage. In terms of e(x), a correction procedure is presented which allows a better estimate for the true value of the local heat flux. For many practical problems, it is possible to use relatively large gages to obtain acceptable heat flux measurements.

  16. ACCURACY OF SOIL HEAT FLUX MEASUREMENTS MADE WITH FLUX PLATES OF CONTRASTING PROPERTIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flux plate measurements of soil heat flux (G) may include significant errors unless the plates are carefully installed and known errors accounted for. The objective of this research was to quantify potential errors in G when using soil heat flux plates of contrasting designs. Five flux plates with...

  17. Updated Absolute Flux Calibration of the COS FUV Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, D.; Ely, J.; Osten, R.; Penton, S.; Aloisi, A.; Bostroem, A.; Roman-Duval, J.; Proffitt, C.

    2014-03-01

    We present newly derived point source absolute flux calibrations for the COS FUV modes at both the original and second lifetime positions. The analysis includes observa- tions through the Primary Science Aperture (PSA) of the standard stars WD0308-565, GD71, WD1057+729 and WD0947+857 obtained as part of two calibration programs. Data were were obtained for all of the gratings at all of the original CENWAVE settings at both the original and second lifetime positions and for the G130M CENWAVE = 1222 at the second lifetime position. Data were also obtained with the FUVB segment for the G130M CENWAVE = 1055 and 1096 setting at the second lifetime position. We also present the derivation of L-flats that were used in processing the data and show that the internal consistency of the primary standards is 1%. The accuracy of the absolute flux calibrations over the UV are estimated to be 1-2% for the medium resolution gratings, and 2-3% over most of the wavelength range of the G140L grating, although the uncertainty can be as large as 5% or more at some G140L wavelengths. We note that these errors are all relative to the optical flux near the V band and small additional errors may be present due to inaccuracies in the V band calibration. In addition, these error estimates are for the time at which the flux calibration data were obtained; the accuracy of the flux calibration at other times can be affected by errors in the time dependent sensitivity (TDS) correction.

  18. Flux Sampling Errors for Aircraft and Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahrt, Larry

    1998-01-01

    Various errors and influences leading to differences between tower- and aircraft-measured fluxes are surveyed. This survey is motivated by reports in the literature that aircraft fluxes are sometimes smaller than tower-measured fluxes. Both tower and aircraft flux errors are larger with surface heterogeneity due to several independent effects. Surface heterogeneity may cause tower flux errors to increase with decreasing wind speed. Techniques to assess flux sampling error are reviewed. Such error estimates suffer various degrees of inapplicability in real geophysical time series due to nonstationarity of tower time series (or inhomogeneity of aircraft data). A new measure for nonstationarity is developed that eliminates assumptions on the form of the nonstationarity inherent in previous methods. When this nonstationarity measure becomes large, the surface energy imbalance increases sharply. Finally, strategies for obtaining adequate flux sampling using repeated aircraft passes and grid patterns are outlined.

  19. Automated Heat-Flux-Calibration Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Weikle, Donald H.

    1989-01-01

    Computer control speeds operation of equipment and processing of measurements. New heat-flux-calibration facility developed at Lewis Research Center. Used for fast-transient heat-transfer testing, durability testing, and calibration of heat-flux gauges. Calibrations performed at constant or transient heat fluxes ranging from 1 to 6 MW/m2 and at temperatures ranging from 80 K to melting temperatures of most materials. Facility developed because there is need to build and calibrate very-small heat-flux gauges for Space Shuttle main engine (SSME).Includes lamp head attached to side of service module, an argon-gas-recirculation module, reflector, heat exchanger, and high-speed positioning system. This type of automated heat-flux calibration facility installed in industrial plants for onsite calibration of heat-flux gauges measuring fluxes of heat in advanced gas-turbine and rocket engines.

  20. Energetic consequences of flux emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarr, Lucas Adrian

    When magnetic field in the solar convection zone buoyantly rises to pierce the visible solar surface (photosphere), the atmosphere (corona) above this surface must respond in some way. One response of the coronal field to photospheric forcing is the creation of stress in the magnetic field, generating large currents and storing magnetic free energy. Using a topological model of the coronal magnetic field we will quantify this free energy. We find the free energy just prior to major flares in active regions to be between 30% and 50% of the potential field energy. In a second way, the coronal field may topologically restructure to form new magnetic connections with newly emerged fields. We use our topological model to quantify the rapid restructuring in the case of solar flare and coronal mass ejections, finding that between 1% and 10% of total active region flux is exchanged. Finally, we use observational data to quantify the slow, quiescent reconnection with preexisting field, and find that for small active regions between 20% and 40% of the total emerged flux may have reconnected at any given time.

  1. Atmospheric discharges and particle fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, A.; Chilingaryan, S.; Reymers, A.

    2015-07-01

    Fluxes of the electrons, gamma rays, and neutrons observed by particle detectors located on the Earth's surface during thunderstorms originate so-called Thunderstorm Ground Enhancements (TGEs). The relativistic runaway electron avalanches giving rise to TGEs originate in the thundercloud's lower dipole between the main negatively charged region in the middle of the thundercloud and transient lower positively charged region. Acceleration of electrons in the upper dipole between main negative and main positive charge regions leads to initiation of the terrestrial gamma flashes (TGFs) intensive researched during the last two decades by orbiting gamma ray observatories. TGFs are exceptionally intense, submillisecond bursts of electromagnetic radiation directed to the open space from the thunderstorm atmosphere. Unlike visible lightning, TGF beams do not create a hot plasma channel and optical flash; hence, in the literature they got name "dark lightning." We investigate the TGEs development in 1 min and 1 s time series of particle detector count rates. Synchronized time series of the near-surface electric field and lightning occurrences allows interconnecting two atmospheric phenomena. Registration of the Extensive Air Showers allows approaching problems of relation of the lightning occurrences and particle fluxes.

  2. Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mori, Matteo; Hwa, Terence; Martin, Olivier C; De Martino, Andrea; Marinari, Enzo

    2016-06-01

    New experimental results on bacterial growth inspire a novel top-down approach to study cell metabolism, combining mass balance and proteomic constraints to extend and complement Flux Balance Analysis. We introduce here Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis, CAFBA, in which the biosynthetic costs associated to growth are accounted for in an effective way through a single additional genome-wide constraint. Its roots lie in the experimentally observed pattern of proteome allocation for metabolic functions, allowing to bridge regulation and metabolism in a transparent way under the principle of growth-rate maximization. We provide a simple method to solve CAFBA efficiently and propose an "ensemble averaging" procedure to account for unknown protein costs. Applying this approach to modeling E. coli metabolism, we find that, as the growth rate increases, CAFBA solutions cross over from respiratory, growth-yield maximizing states (preferred at slow growth) to fermentative states with carbon overflow (preferred at fast growth). In addition, CAFBA allows for quantitatively accurate predictions on the rate of acetate excretion and growth yield based on only 3 parameters determined by empirical growth laws. PMID:27355325

  3. Flux of Millimetric Space Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, R. M.; Goldstein, S. J., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    In 21.4 hr of zenith radar observations on 4 days at 8510 MHz, we found 831 particles with altitudes between 177 and 1662 km. From the duration of the echoes and the angular size (0.030 deg) of the antenna beam 157 particles were identified as passing through the side lobes and not through the main beam. Our analysis is based on the 674 particles that did not broaden the beam. On the assumptions that these particles went through the main beam, their radar cross sections vary between 0.02 and 260 sq mm , and their radial velocities vary between +/- 700 m/s. If they are conducting spheres, their diameters lie between 2 and 18 mm. If not, they must be larger. The flux of these particles, that is the number per sq km day, was determined in 100 km intervals. The maximum flux, 3.3 particles per sq km day, occurs at 950 km altitude. The small and large particles are not well mixed. The largest particles occur beyond 1000 km and middle-sized particles are missing below 300 km. If the earth's atmosphere caused the smallest particles to lose energy from initial orbits identical to those of the large particles, the orbits would have lower eccentricity at low altitudes. We find a larger eccentricity for the inner particles, and conclude that two or more populations are present.

  4. Flux focusing eddy current probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, John W. (Inventor); Clendenin, C. Gerald (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Todhunter, Ronald G. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Nath, Shridhar C. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A flux-focusing electromagnetic sensor which uses a ferromagnetic flux-focusing lens simplifies inspections and increases detectability of fatigue cracks and material loss in high conductivity material. The unique feature of the device is the ferrous shield isolating a high-turn pick-up coil from an excitation coil. The use of the magnetic shield is shown to produce a null voltage output across the receiving coil in the presence of an unflawed sample. A redistribution of the current flow in the sample caused by the presence of flaws, however, eliminates the shielding condition and a large output voltage is produced, yielding a clear unambiguous flaw signal. The maximum sensor output is obtained when positioned symmetrically above the crack. Hence, by obtaining the position of the maximum sensor output, it is possible to track the fault and locate the area surrounding its tip. The accuracy of tip location is enhanced by two unique features of the sensor; a very high signal-to-noise ratio of the probe's output which results in an extremely smooth signal peak across the fault, and a rapidly decaying sensor output outside a small area surrounding the crack tip which enables the region for searching to be clearly defined. Under low frequency operation, material thinning due to corrosion damage causes an incomplete shielding of the pick-up coil. The low frequency output voltage of the probe is therefore a direct indicator of the thickness of the test sample.

  5. Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Matteo; Hwa, Terence; Martin, Olivier C.

    2016-01-01

    New experimental results on bacterial growth inspire a novel top-down approach to study cell metabolism, combining mass balance and proteomic constraints to extend and complement Flux Balance Analysis. We introduce here Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis, CAFBA, in which the biosynthetic costs associated to growth are accounted for in an effective way through a single additional genome-wide constraint. Its roots lie in the experimentally observed pattern of proteome allocation for metabolic functions, allowing to bridge regulation and metabolism in a transparent way under the principle of growth-rate maximization. We provide a simple method to solve CAFBA efficiently and propose an “ensemble averaging” procedure to account for unknown protein costs. Applying this approach to modeling E. coli metabolism, we find that, as the growth rate increases, CAFBA solutions cross over from respiratory, growth-yield maximizing states (preferred at slow growth) to fermentative states with carbon overflow (preferred at fast growth). In addition, CAFBA allows for quantitatively accurate predictions on the rate of acetate excretion and growth yield based on only 3 parameters determined by empirical growth laws. PMID:27355325

  6. Flux Concept in Learning about Light: A Critique of the Present Situation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galili, Igal; Lavrik, Valentina

    1998-01-01

    Investigates high school students' knowledge of natural phenomena related to the concept of light flux as it applies to the seasons and illumination after they studied optics. Discusses didactic, cognitive, and ontological perspectives in relation to specific changes in the science curriculum. Contains 71 references. (DDR)

  7. Science Education. Oryx Science Bibliographies, Volume 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Eileen E., Comp.; Tyckoson, David A., Ed.

    This bibliography provides 337 annotated references covering: science teaching at the preschool, kindergarten, elementary, and high school levels; science education as it relates to various science disciplines; science education for special populations; sexual stereotyping in science education; teacher education for science teachers; and how…

  8. Science Fiction Aids Science Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubeck, Leroy W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Cited are the experiences of the authors with a college-level course which used science fiction films to teach scientific principles. Included is a set of sample scientific concepts explored using the film "Forbidden Planet." (CW)

  9. Flux change in viscous laminar flow under oscillating boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, R.; Mikada, H.; Goto, T.; Takekawa, J.

    2012-12-01

    The behavior of interstitial fluid is one of major interest in earth sciences in terms of the exploitation of water resources, the initiation of earthquakes, enhanced oil recovery (EOR), etc. Seismic waves are often known to increase the flux of interstitial fluid but the relationship between the flux and propagating seismic waves have not been well investigated in the past, although seismic stimulation has been applied in the oil industry for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Many observations indicated that seismic waves could stimulate the oil production due to lowering of apparent viscosity coefficient, to the coalescence and/or the dispersion of droplets of a phase in multiphase fluids. However, the detailed mechanism of seismic stimulation has not been fully understood, either. In this study, We attempt to understand the mechanism of the flux change in viscous laminar flow under oscillating boundary condition for the simulation of interstitial flow. Here, we analyze a monophase flow in a pore throat. We first assume a Hagen-Poiseuille flow of incompressible fluid through a pore-throat in a porous medium. We adopt the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) in which the motion of fluid is simulated through the variation of velocity distribution function representing the distribution of discrete particle velocities. We use an improved incompressible LBKG model (d2q9i) proposed in Zou et. al. (1995) to accurately accommodate the boundary conditions of pressure and velocity in the Hagen-Poiseuille flow. We also use an half-way bounce back boundary condition as the velocity boundary condition. Also, we assume a uniform pressure (density) difference between inlet and outlet flow, and the density difference could initiate the flow in our simulation. The oscillating boundary condition is given by the body force acting on fluid particles. In this simulation, we found that the flux change is negligible under small amplitude of oscillation in both horizontal and vertical directions

  10. Science Fairs for Science Literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Katherine; Culbertson, Timothy

    2014-03-01

    Scientific discovery, technological revolutions, and complex global challenges are commonplace in the modern era. People are bombarded with news about climate change, pandemics, and genetically modified organisms, and scientific literacy has never been more important than in the present day. Yet only 29% of American adults have sufficient understanding to be able to read science stories reported in the popular press [Miller, 2010], and American students consistently rank below other nations in math and science [National Center for Education Statistics, 2012].

  11. Isotopic Compositions of Evaporative Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Lauder, A. M.; Kopec, B. G.; Dade, W. B.; Virginia, R. A.; Posmentier, E. S.

    2013-12-01

    The isotopic fluxes of evaporation from a water surface are typically computed using a one-dimensional model, originally conceptualized by Craig and Gordon (1965) and further developed and adapted to different natural settings (such as transpiration, open surface evaporation, etc.) by various investigators. These models have two distinguishing characteristics. First, there exists a laminar layer where molecular diffusion away from the water-air interface causes kinetic isotopic fractionation. The magnitude of this fractionation is controlled by the diffusion/transport coefficient of each vapor isotopologue in air and their concentration gradients, the latter being controlled by relative humidity, isotopic ratios of ambient air, and turbulent conditions (such as wind and surface roughness). Second, the horizontal variations are ignored. In particular, the effect of horizontal advection on isotopic variations in the ambient air is not considered. The research reported here addresses the effects of relinquishing the simplifying assumptions in both of these areas. We developed a model, in which the simplification of a purely laminar layer is dropped. Instead, we express the vertical transport coefficient as the sum of the molecular diffusivity, that differs for each water isotopologue, and the turbulent diffusivity that increases linearly with height but does not vary among water isotopologues. With this model, the kinetic isotopic effect reduces with height in the vicinity of the water surface, and the net isotopic fractionation through the boundary layer can be integrated. The advantage of this conceptualization is that the magnitude of kinetic isotopic fractionation can be assessed directly with changing environmental conditions, such as humidity and wind speed, rather than approximated by discontinuous empirical functions of the environmental conditions, as in the conventional models mentioned above. To address the effect of lateral heterogeneity, we expanded the

  12. Eddy fluxes in baroclinic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Andrew F.

    The eddy heat flux generated by the statistically equilibrated baroclinic instability of a uniform, horizontal temperature gradient is studied using a two-mode quasigeostrophic model. An overview of the dependence of the eddy diffusivity of heat Dtau on the planetary potential vorticity gradient beta, the bottom friction kappa, the deformation radius lambda, the vertical shear of the large-scale flow 2U and the domain size L is provided at 70 numerical simulations with beta = 0 (f-plane) and 110 simulations with beta ≠ 0 (beta-plane). Strong, axisymmetric, well-separated baroclinic vortices dominate the equilibrated barotropic vorticity and temperature fields of f-plane turbulence. The heat flux arises from a systematic northward (southward) migration of anti-cyclonic (cyclonic) eddies with warm (cold) fluid trapped in the cores. Zonal jets form spontaneously on the beta-plane, and stationary, isotropic, jet-scale eddies align within the strong eastward-flowing regions of the jets. In both studies, the vortices and jets give rise to a strong anti-correlation between the barotropic vorticity zeta and the temperature field tau. The baroclinic mode is also an important contributor to dissipation by bottom friction and energizes the barotropic mode at scales larger than lambda. This in part explains why previous parameterizations for the eddy heat flux based on Kolmogorovian cascade theories are found to be unreliable. In a separate study, temperature and salinity profiles obtained with expendable conductivity, temperature and depth (XCTD) probes within Drake Passage, Southern Ocean are used to analyze the turbulent diapycnal eddy diffusivity kappa rho to a depth of 1000 meters. The Polar Front separates two dynamically different regions with strong, surface-intensified mixing north of the Front. South of the Polar Front mixing is weaker and peaks at a depth of approximately 500 m, near the local temperature maximum. Peak values of kapparho are found to exceed 10-3 m

  13. Photometric Analysis in the Kepler Science Operations Center Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twicken, Joseph D.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Wu, Hayley; Jenkins, Jon M.; Girouard, Forrest; Klaus, Todd C.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the Photometric Analysis (PA) software component and its context in the Kepler Science Operations Center (SOC) pipeline. The primary tasks of this module are to compute the photometric flux and photocenters (centroids) for over 160,000 long cadence (thirty minute) and 512 short cadence (one minute) stellar targets from the calibrated pixels in their respective apertures. We discuss the science algorithms for long and short cadence PA: cosmic ray cleaning; background estimation and removal; aperture photometry; and flux-weighted centroiding. We discuss the end-to-end propagation of uncertainties for the science algorithms. Finally, we present examples of photometric apertures, raw flux light curves, and centroid time series from Kepler flight data. PA light curves, centroid time series, and barycentric timestamp corrections are exported to the Multi-mission Archive at Space Telescope [Science Institute] (MAST) and are made available to the general public in accordance with the NASA/Kepler data release policy.

  14. Regulation of the interplanetary magnetic flux

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D.J.; Gosling, J.T.; Phillips, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    In this study we use a recently developed technique for measuring the 2-D magnetic flux in the ecliptic plane to examine (1) the long term variation of the magnetic flux in interplanetary space and (2) the apparent rate at which coronal mass ejections (CMEs) may be opening new flux from the Sun. Since there is a substantial variation ({approximately}50%) of the flux in the ecliptic plane over the solar cycle, we conclude that there must be some means whereby new flux can be opened from the Sun and previously open magnetic flux can be closed off. We briefly describe recently discovered coronal disconnections events which could serve to close off previously open magnetic flux. CMEs appear to retain at least partial magnetic connection to the Sun and hence open new flux, while disconnections appear to be likely signatures of the process that returns closed flux to the Sun; the combination of these processes could regulate the amount of open magnetic flux in interplanetary space. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  15. How the Saturnian Magnetosphere Conserves Magnetic Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, R. L.; Wei, H.; Russell, C. T.; Arridge, C. S.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2012-12-01

    The magnetospheric dynamics at Saturn are driven by the centrifugal force of near co-rotating water group ions released at a rate of hundreds of kilograms per second by Saturn's moon Enceladus. The plasma is accelerated up to co-rotation speed by the magnetospheric magnetic field coupled to the Saturnian ionosphere. The plasma is lost ultimately through the process of magnetic reconnection in the tail. Conservation of magnetic flux requires that plasma-depleted, "empty" flux tubes return magnetic flux to the inner magnetosphere. After completion of the initial inrush of the reconnected and largely emptied flux tubes inward of the reconnection point, the flux tubes face the outflowing plasma and must move inward against the flow. Observations of such flux tubes have been identified in the eight years of Cassini magnetometer data. The occurrence of these tubes is observed at all local times indicating slow inward transport of the tubes relative to the co-rotation speed. Depleted flux tubes observed in the equatorial region appear as an enhancement in the magnitude of the magnetic field, whereas the same flux tubes observed at higher latitudes appear as decreased field strength. The difference in appearance of the low latitude and the high latitude tubes is due to the plasma environment just outside the tube. Warm low-density plasma fills the inside of the flux tube at all latitudes. This flux tube thus will expand in the less dense regions away from the magnetic equator and will be observed as a decrease in the magnitude of the magnetic field from the background. These flux tubes near the equator, where the plasma density outside of the flux tube is much greater, will be observed as an enhancement in the magnitude of the magnetic field. Cassini magnetometer and CAPS data are examined to understand the properties of these flux tubes and their radial and latitudinal evolution throughout the Saturnian magnetospheric environment.

  16. Insects, infestations and nutrient fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalzik, B.

    2012-04-01

    Forest ecosystems are characterized by a high temporal and spatial variability in the vertical transfer of energy and matter within the canopy and the soil compartment. The mechanisms and controlling factors behind canopy processes and system-internal transfer dynamics are imperfectly understood at the moment. Seasonal flux diversities and inhomogeneities in throughfall composition have been reported from coniferous and deciduous forests, and in most cases leaf leaching has been considered as principle driver for differences in the amount and quality of nutrients and organic compounds (Tukey and Morgan 1963). Since herbivorous insects and the processes they initiate received less attention in past times, ecologists now emphasize the need for linking biological processes occurring in different ecosystem strata to explain rates and variability of nutrient cycling (Bardgett et al. 1998, Wardle et al. 2004). Consequently, herbivore insects in the canopies of forests are increasingly identified to play an important role for the (re)cycling and availability of nutrients, or, more generally, for the functioning of ecosystems not only in outbreak situations but also at endemic (non-outbreak) density levels (Stadler et al. 2001, Hunter et al. 2003). Before, little attention was paid to insect herbivores when quantifying element and energy fluxes through ecosystems, although the numerous and different functions insects fulfill in ecosystems (e.g. as pollinators, herbivores or detritivores) were unanimously recognized (Schowalter 2000). Amongst the reasons for this restraint was the argument that the total biomass of insects tends to be relatively low compared to the biomass of trees or the pool of soil organic matter (Ohmart et al. 1983). A second argument which was put forward to justify the inferior role of insects in nutrient cycling were the supposed low defoliation losses between 5-10% of the annual leaf biomass, or net primary production, due to insect herbivory under

  17. Annihilation of Quantum Magnetic Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, W. D.

    After introducing the concepts associated with the Aharonov and Bohm effect and with the existence of a quantum of magnetic flux (QMF), we briefly discuss the Ginzburg-Landau theory that explains its origin and fundamental consequences. Also relevant observations of QMFs obtained in the laboratory using superconducting systems (vortices) are mentioned. Next, we describe processes related with the interaction of QMFs with opposite directions in terms of the gauge field geometry related to the vector potential. Then, we discuss the use of a Lagrangian density for a scalar field theory involving radiation in order to describe the annihilation of QMFs, claimed to be responsible for the emission of photons with energies corresponding to that of the annihilated magnetic fields. Finally, a possible application of these concepts to the observed variable dynamics of neutron stars is briefly mentioned.

  18. Hypercharge flux in heterotic compactifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Lara B.; Constantin, Andrei; Lee, Seung-Joo; Lukas, Andre

    2015-02-01

    We study heterotic Calabi-Yau models with hypercharge flux breaking, where the visible E8 gauge group is directly broken to the standard model group by a nonflat gauge bundle, rather than by a two-step process involving an intermediate grand unified theory and a Wilson line. It is shown that the required alternative E8 embeddings of hypercharge, normalized as required for gauge unification, can be found and we classify these possibilities. However, for all but one of these embeddings we prove a general no-go theorem which asserts that no suitable geometry and vector bundle leading to a standard model spectrum can be found. Intuitively, this happens due to the large number of index conditions which have to be imposed in order to obtain a correct physical spectrum in the absence of an underlying grand unified theory.

  19. Observations of flux transfer events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Southwood, D. J.; Cowley, S. W. H.

    A decade of research on flux transfer events (FTEs) has supported their interpretation as signatures of reconnection between the solar and terrestrial magnetic fields. Some of the observational evidence is reviewed. Another observational signature of reconnection has been studied in the literature: high speed plasma flows satisfying approximately stress balance calculations. A well-documented crossing of the magnetopause is revisited to show how these signatures, which are prima facie so diverse and which have hitherto been studied in isolation, can be understood in terms of unsteady Petschek reconnection occurring at the magnetopause. A review of some works on FTEs using data from the AMPTE spacecraft highlights the advances made possible by that mission.

  20. Chaos in Magnetic Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, Walter; DeHaas, T.; Van Compernolle, B.; Vincena, S.

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic Flux Ropes Immersed in a uniform magnetoplasma are observed to twist about themselves, writhe about each other and rotate about a central axis. They are kink unstable and smash into one another as they move. Each collision results in magnetic field line generation and the generation of a quasi-seperatrix layer. Three dimensional magnetic field lines are computed by conditionally averaging the data using correlation techniques. When the currents associated with the ropes are large,this is possible for only a number of rotation cycles as the field line motion becomes chaotic. The permutation entropy1 can be calculated from the the time series of the magnetic field data (this is also done with flows) and used to calculate the positions of the data on a Jensen Shannon complexity map2. The power spectra of much of the magnetic and flow data is exponential and Lorentzian structures in the time domain are embedded in them. The location of data on this map indicates if the magnetic fields are stochastic, or fall into regions of minimal or maximal complexity. The complexity is a function of space and time. The complexity map, and analysis will be explained in the course of the talk. Other types of chaotic dynamical models such as the Lorentz or Gissinger process also fall on the map and can give a clue to the nature of the flux rope turbulence. The ropes fall in the region of the C-H plane where chaotic systems lie. 1 C. Bandt, B. Pompe, Phys. Rev. Lett., 88,174102 (2007) 2 O. Russo et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 99, 154102 (2007), J. Maggs, G.Morales, “Permutation Entropy analysis of temperature fluctuations from a basic electron heat transport experiment”,submitted PPCF (2013)

  1. On The Solenoidal Heat Flux in Quasi-Ballistic Thermal Conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramu, Ashok; Bowers, John

    The Boltzmann transport equation for phonons is recast directly in terms of the heat-flux by means of iteration followed by truncation at the second order in the spherical harmonic expansion of the distribution function. This procedure displays the heat-flux in an explicitly coordinate-invariant form, and leads to a natural decomposition into two components, namely the solenoidal component in addition to the usual irrotational component. The solenoidal heat-flux is explicitly shown to arise in a right-circular cylinder when the transport is in the quasi-ballistic regime. These findings are important in the context of phonon resonators that utilize the strong quasi-ballistic thermal transport reported recently in silicon membranes at room temperature. Effects due to circulating heat fluxes are noted in the effective thermal conductivity of silicon discs. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation, USA under Project Number CMMI-1363207.

  2. Science exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Dwindling scientific and technical exchange between the United States and the Soviet Union and prospects for enhancing such exchanges were discussed at an August 2 hearing by the Foreign Affairs Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives. The committee also heard overviews on the United States' approach to international exchange of science and technology. The hearing was the first in a series on current and future international science and technology programs.Four of eight science and technology agreements with the USSR that have expired in the last 15 months, including one on space, have not been renewed. The remaining four agreements have been extended into 1987 and 1988. Two others, including one on oceanography, are scheduled to run out in 1984.

  3. Scaling Relationships for ELM Diverter Heat Flux on DIII D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, E. A.; Makowski, M. A.; Leonard, A. W.

    2015-11-01

    Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) are periodic plasma instabilities that occur during H-mode operation in tokamaks. Left unmitigated, these instabilities result in concentrated particle and heat fluxes at the divertor and stand to cause serious damage to the plasma facing components of tokamaks. The purpose of this research is to find scaling relationships that predict divertor heat flux due to ELMs based on plasma parameters at the time of instability. This will be accomplished by correlating characteristic ELM parameters with corresponding plasma measurements and analyzing the data for trends. One early assessment is the effect of the heat transmission coefficient ? on the in/out asymmetry of the calculated ELM heat fluxes. Using IR camera data, further assessments in this study will continue to emphasize in/out asymmetry in ELMs, as this has important implications for ITER operation. Work supported in part by the US DOE, DE-AC52-07NA27344, DE-FC02-04ER54698, Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships Program (SULI).

  4. Predicting ICME Magnetic Fields with a Numerical Flux Rope Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchester, W.; van der Holst, B.; Sokolov, I.

    2014-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are a dramatic manifestation of solar activity that release vast amounts of plasma into the heliosphere, and have many effects on the interplanetary medium and on planetary atmospheres, and are the major driver of space weather. CMEs occur with the formation and expulsion of large-scale flux ropes from the solar corona, which are routinely observed in interplanetary space. Simulating and predicting the structure and dynamics of these ICME magnetic fields is essential to the progress of heliospheric science and space weather prediction. We combine observations made by different observing techniques of CME events to develop a numerical model capable of predicting the magnetic field of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMES). Photospheric magnetic field measurements from SOHO/MDI and SDO/HMI are used to specify a coronal magnetic flux rope that drives the CMEs. We examine halo CMEs events that produced clearly observed magnetic clouds at Earth and present our model predictions of these events with an emphasis placed on the z component of the magnetic field. Comparison of the MHD model predictions with coronagraph observations and in-situ data allow us to robustly determine the parameters that define the initial state of the driving flux rope, thus providing a predictive model.

  5. Literacy, science, and science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McVittie, Janet Elizabeth

    In examining the connections between literacy, science and science education, I laid out a number of questions. For example, what sorts of literate tools might facilitate writing to learn, and do children who are just becoming literate use these tools? I then examined the writing of children in science class in an attempt to determine if their writing can indeed facilitate their learning. The results of this research could help teachers make decisions about the use of writing in the learning of science. The kinds of literate tools I identified as being potentially helpful were transitionals---those words or grammatical devices which demonstrate how ideas are connected. Also, I suggested that data tables, sentences and paragraphs were also useful for students to learn. I found that grade 5/6 students used a wide range of literate tools, but that they were much more competent with those tools which were both oral and literate than those which could only be used for writing (punctuation, sentences, paragraphs, and data tables). When I attempted to determine if the children used their writing to learn, I found very little evidence that this was certainly so. However, there was some evidence that paragraphs had the potential to create a "dialogue" between student writing and thinking, so the students could make more explicit connections between science ideas. Lastly, I noticed certain gender difference in the classroom. Because of this, I contrasted the writing of the girls with the writing of the boys. I learned the girls were generally much more capable writers than the boys. More interesting, however, was that the girls generally attempted to explain their science concepts in different ways than did the boys. The girls were more likely to rely on their own reasoning, whereas the boys were more likely to persist in using culturally created science explanations. The research findings have important implications for analyzing students' learning and for finding ways to

  6. Flux-Level Transit Injection Experiments with NASA Pleiades Supercomputer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Burke, Christopher J.; Catanzarite, Joseph; Seader, Shawn; Haas, Michael R.; Batalha, Natalie; Henze, Christopher; Christiansen, Jessie; Kepler Project, NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division

    2016-06-01

    Flux-Level Transit Injection (FLTI) experiments are executed with NASA's Pleiades supercomputer for the Kepler Mission. The latest release (9.3, January 2016) of the Kepler Science Operations Center Pipeline is used in the FLTI experiments. Their purpose is to validate the Analytic Completeness Model (ACM), which can be computed for all Kepler target stars, thereby enabling exoplanet occurrence rate studies. Pleiades, a facility of NASA's Advanced Supercomputing Division, is one of the world's most powerful supercomputers and represents NASA's state-of-the-art technology. We discuss the details of implementing the FLTI experiments on the Pleiades supercomputer. For example, taking into account that ~16 injections are generated by one core of the Pleiades processors in an hour, the “shallow” FLTI experiment, in which ~2000 injections are required per target star, can be done for 16% of all Kepler target stars in about 200 hours. Stripping down the transit search to bare bones, i.e. only searching adjacent high/low periods at high/low pulse durations, makes the computationally intensive FLTI experiments affordable. The design of the FLTI experiments and the analysis of the resulting data are presented in “Validating an Analytic Completeness Model for Kepler Target Stars Based on Flux-level Transit Injection Experiments” by Catanzarite et al. (#2494058).Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for the Kepler Mission has been provided by the NASA Science Mission Directorate.

  7. Science employment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robb, David W.

    1984-04-01

    Rapid growth in private sector high-technology companies coupled with the expected unprecedented U.S. peacetime defense buildup paint an optimistic picture for future employment in scientific and engineering fields, according to forecasts by the National Science Foundation (NSF). Between 1982 and 1987, up to nearly 750,000 new positions will be created in scientific, engineering, or technical fields, a new NSF report states. By 1987 these occupations will account for 4 million jobs, or 3.5% of the total U.S. work force. New positions in the earth sciences are predicted to increase about 2% per year.

  8. Pyrolytic graphite gauge for measuring heat flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunker, Robert C. (Inventor); Ewing, Mark E. (Inventor); Shipley, John L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A gauge for measuring heat flux, especially heat flux encountered in a high temperature environment, is provided. The gauge includes at least one thermocouple and an anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body that covers at least part of, and optionally encases the thermocouple. Heat flux is incident on the anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body by arranging the gauge so that the gauge surface on which convective and radiative fluxes are incident is perpendicular to the basal planes of the pyrolytic graphite. The conductivity of the pyrolytic graphite permits energy, transferred into the pyrolytic graphite body in the form of heat flux on the incident (or facing) surface, to be quickly distributed through the entire pyrolytic graphite body, resulting in small substantially instantaneous temperature gradients. Temperature changes to the body can thereby be measured by the thermocouple, and reduced to quantify the heat flux incident to the body.

  9. The Flux Calibration of Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancino, E.

    2016-05-01

    The Gaia mission is described, along with its scientific potential and its updated science perfomances. Although it is often described as a self-calibrated mission, Gaia still needs to tie part of its measurements to external scales (or to convert them in physical units). A detailed decription of the Gaia spectro-photometric standard stars survey is provided, along with a short description of the Gaia calibration model. The model requires a grid of approximately 200 stars, calibrated to a few percent with respect to Vega, and covering different spectral types.

  10. Closing the North American Carbon Budget: Continental Margin Fluxes Matter!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najjar, R.; Benway, H. M.; Siedlecki, S. A.; Boyer, E. W.; Cai, W. J.; Coble, P. G.; Cross, J. N.; Friedrichs, M. A.; Goni, M. A.; Griffith, P. C.; Herrmann, M.; Lohrenz, S. E.; Mathis, J. T.; McKinley, G. A.; Pilskaln, C. H.; Smith, R. A.; Alin, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Despite their relatively small surface area, continental margins are regions of intense carbon and nutrient processing, export and exchange, and thus have a significant impact on global biogeochemical cycles. In response to recommendations for regional synthesis and carbon budget estimation for North America put forth in the North American Continental Margins workshop report (Hales et al., 2008), the Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry (OCB) Program and North American Carbon Program (NACP) began coordinating a series of collaborative, interdisciplinary Coastal CARbon Synthesis (CCARS) research activities in five coastal regions of North America (Atlantic Coast, Pacific Coast, Gulf of Mexico, Arctic, Laurentian Great Lakes) to improve quantitative assessments of the North American carbon budget. CCARS workshops and collaborative research activities have resulted in the development of regional coastal carbon budgets based on recent literature- and model-based estimates of major carbon fluxes with estimated uncertainties. Numerous peer-reviewed papers and presentations by involved researchers have highlighted these findings and provided more in-depth analyses of processes underlying key carbon fluxes in continental margin systems. As a culminating outcome of these synthesis efforts, a comprehensive science plan highlights key knowledge gaps identified during this synthesis and provides explicit guidance on future research and observing priorities in continental margin systems to help inform future agency investments in continental margins research. This presentation will provide an overview of regional and flux-based (terrestrial inputs, biological transformations, sedimentary processes, atmospheric exchanges, lateral carbon transport) synthesis findings and key recommendations in the science plan, as well as a set of overarching priorities and recommendations on observations and modeling approaches for continental margin systems.

  11. The truth is out there: measured, calculated and modelled benthic fluxes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhomova, Svetlana; Protsenko, Elizaveta

    2016-04-01

    In a modern Earth science there is a great importance of understanding the processes, forming the benthic fluxes as one of element sources or sinks to or from the water body, which affects the elements balance in the water system. There are several ways to assess benthic fluxes and here we try to compare the results obtained by chamber experiments, calculated from porewater distributions and simulated with model. Benthic fluxes of dissolved elements (oxygen, nitrogen species, phosphate, silicate, alkalinity, iron and manganese species) were studied in the Baltic and Black Seas from 2000 to 2005. Fluxes were measured in situ using chamber incubations (Jch) and at the same time sediment cores were collected to assess the porewater distribution at different depths to calculate diffusive fluxes (Jpw). Model study was carried out with benthic-pelagic biogeochemical model BROM (O-N-P-Si-C-S-Mn-Fe redox model). It was applied to simulate biogeochemical structure of the water column and upper sediment and to assess the vertical fluxes (Jmd). By the behaviour at the water-sediment interface all studied elements can be divided into three groups: (1) elements which benthic fluxes are determined by the concentrations gradient only (Si, Mn), (2) elements which fluxes depend on redox conditions in the bottom water (Fe, PO4, NH4), and (3) elements which fluxes are strongly connected with organic matter fate (O2, Alk, NH4). For the first group it was found that measured fluxes are always higher than calculated diffusive fluxes (1.5flux. In this case bioturbation, bioirrigation and advection should be taken into account. For the second group measured fluxes can be both much lower (practically absent) and much higher than calculated diffusive fluxes (0.01

  12. Chloride flux out of Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Daniel R.; Friedman, Irving

    1985-12-01

    Monitoring of the chloride concentration, electrical conductivity, and discharge was carried out for the four major rivers of Yellowstone National Park from September 1982 to January 1984. Chloride flux out of the Park was determined from the measured values of chloride concentration and discharge. The annual chloride flux from the Park was 5.86 × 10 10 g. Of this amount 45% was from the Madison River drainage basin, 32% from the Yellowstone River basin, 12% from the Snake River basin, and 11% from the Falls River basin. Of the annual chloride flux from the Yellowstone River drainage basin 36% was attributed to the Yellowstone Lake drainage basin. The geothermal contribution to the chloride flux was determined by subtracting the chloride contribution from rock weathering and atmospheric precipitation and is 94% of the total chloride flux. Calculations of the geothermal chloride flux for each river are given and the implications of an additional chloride flux out of the western Park boundary discussed. An anomalous increase in chloride flux out of the Park was observed for several weeks prior to the Mt. Borah earthquake in Central Idaho on October 28, 1983, reaching a peak value shortly thereafter. It is suggested that the rise in flux was a precursor of the earthquake. The information in this paper provides baseline data against which future changes in the hydrothermal systems can be measured. It also provides measurements related to the thermal contributions from the different drainage basins of the Park.

  13. Parity-time symmetry under magnetic flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.; Song, Z.

    2016-06-01

    We study a parity-time-(PT -) symmetric ring lattice, with one pair of balanced gain and loss located at opposite positions. The system remains PT -symmetric when threaded by a magnetic flux; however, the PT symmetry is sensitive to the magnetic flux in the presence of a large balanced gain and loss, or in a large system. We find a threshold gain or loss above which any nontrivial magnetic flux breaks the PT symmetry. We obtain the maximally tolerable magnetic flux for the exact PT -symmetric phase, which is approximately linearly dependent on a weak gain or loss.

  14. Fluxing agent for metal cast joining

    DOEpatents

    Gunkel, Ronald W.; Podey, Larry L.; Meyer, Thomas N.

    2002-11-05

    A method of joining an aluminum cast member to an aluminum component. The method includes the steps of coating a surface of an aluminum component with flux comprising cesium fluoride, placing the flux coated component in a mold, filling the mold with molten aluminum alloy, and allowing the molten aluminum alloy to solidify thereby joining a cast member to the aluminum component. The flux preferably includes aluminum fluoride and alumina. A particularly preferred flux includes about 60 wt. % CsF, about 30 wt. % AlF.sub.3, and about 10 wt. % Al.sub.2 O.sub.3.

  15. Charm contribution to the atmospheric neutrino flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halzen, Francis; Wille, Logan

    2016-07-01

    We revisit the estimate of the charm particle contribution to the atmospheric neutrino flux that is expected to dominate at high energies because long-lived high-energy pions and kaons interact in the atmosphere before decaying into neutrinos. We focus on the production of forward charm particles which carry a large fraction of the momentum of the incident proton. In the case of strange particles, such a component is familiar from the abundant production of K+Λ pairs. These forward charm particles can dominate the high-energy atmospheric neutrino flux in underground experiments. Modern collider experiments have no coverage in the very large rapidity region where charm forward pair production dominates. Using archival accelerator data as well as IceCube measurements of atmospheric electron and muon neutrino fluxes, we obtain an upper limit on forward D¯0Λc pair production and on the associated flux of high-energy atmospheric neutrinos. We conclude that the prompt flux may dominate the much-studied central component and represent a significant contribution to the TeV atmospheric neutrino flux. Importantly, it cannot accommodate the PeV flux of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, or the excess of events observed by IceCube in the 30-200 TeV energy range indicating either structure in the flux of cosmic accelerators, or a presence of more than one component in the cosmic flux observed.

  16. Chloride flux out of Yellowstone National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norton, D.R.; Friedman, I.

    1985-01-01

    Monitoring of the chloride concentration, electrical conductivity, and discharge was carried out for the four major rivers of Yellowstone National Park from September 1982 to January 1984. Chloride flux out of the Park was determined from the measured values of chloride concentration and discharge. The annual chloride flux from the Park was 5.86 ?? 1010 g. Of this amount 45% was from the Madison River drainage basin, 32% from the Yellowstone River basin, 12% from the Snake River basin, and 11% from the Falls River basin. Of the annual chloride flux from the Yellowstone River drainage basin 36% was attributed to the Yellowstone Lake drainage basin. The geothermal contribution to the chloride flux was determined by subtracting the chloride contribution from rock weathering and atmospheric precipitation and is 94% of the total chloride flux. Calculations of the geothermal chloride flux for each river are given and the implications of an additional chloride flux out of the western Park boundary discussed. An anomalous increase in chloride flux out of the Park was observed for several weeks prior to the Mt. Borah earthquake in Central Idaho on October 28, 1983, reaching a peak value shortly thereafter. It is suggested that the rise in flux was a precursor of the earthquake. The information in this paper provides baseline data against which future changes in the hydrothermal systems can be measured. It also provides measurements related to the thermal contributions from the different drainage basins of the Park. ?? 1985.

  17. Helical flux ropes in solar prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, P. C. H.; Van Ballegooijen, A. A.

    1990-01-01

    The present numerical method for the computation of force-free, cancelling magnetic structures shows that flux cancellation at the neutral line in a sheared magnetic arcade generates helical field lines that can support a prominence's plasma. With increasing flux cancellation, the axis of the helical fields moves to greater heights; this is suggestive of a prominence eruption. Two alternative scenarios are proposed for the formation of polar crown prominences which yield the correct axial magnetic field sign. Both models are noted to retain the formation of helical flux tubes through flux cancellation as their key feature.

  18. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, John H.

    1988-01-01

    The paper considers steady siphon flows in isolated thin magnetic flux tubes surrounded by field-free gas, with plasma beta greater than or equal to 1, appropriate for conditions in the solar photosphere. The cross-sectional area of the flux tube varies along the tube in response to pressure changes induced by the siphon flow. Consideration is also given to steady isothermal siphon flows in arched magnetic flux tubes in a stratified atmosphere. Applications of the results to intense magnetic flux tubes in the solar photosphere and to the photospheric Evershed flow in a sunspot penumbra are addressed.

  19. Presearch Data Conditioning in the Kepler Science Operations Center Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twicken, Joseph D.; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Jenkins, Jon M.; Gunter, Jay P.; Girouard, Forrest; Klaus, Todd C.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the Presearch Data Conditioning (PDC) software component and its context in the Kepler Science Operations Center (SOC) pipeline. The primary tasks of this component are to correct systematic and other errors, remove excess flux due to aperture crowding, and condition the raw flux light curves for over 160,000 long cadence (thirty minute) and 512 short cadence (one minute) targets across the focal plane array. Long cadence corrected flux light curves are subjected to a transiting planet search in a subsequent pipeline module. We discuss the science algorithms for long and short cadence PDC: identification and correction of unexplained (i.e., unrelated to known anomalies) discontinuities; systematic error correction; and excess flux removal. We discuss the propagation of uncertainties from raw to corrected flux. Finally, we present examples of raw and corrected flux time series for flight data to illustrate PDC performance. Corrected flux light curves produced by PDC are exported to the Multi-mission Archive at Space Telescope [Science Institute] (MAST) and will be made available to the general public in accordance with the NASA/Kepler data release policy.

  20. Talking Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eley, Alison

    2011-01-01

    The Talking Science project initially involved three secondary schools and eight of their feeder primary schools in the London Borough of Richmond Upon Thames. The project created, trialled and evaluated a set of key stage 2/3 transition materials for children moving from primary to secondary school, using argument as a teaching and learning…

  1. Cognitive Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soni, P. Sarita, Ed.; Carmichael, Ann G., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This theme issue features five articles profiling Indiana University faculty whose work on various campuses continues to broaden and advance knowledge about cognitive science. The articles in the journal are: "A Matter of Time" (Karen Grooms) which discusses the work of Robert F. Port; "Perceiving as a Complex System" (Tom Tierney) which profiles…

  2. Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Chris; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Twenty science experiments are presented. Topics include recombinant DNA, physiology, nucleophiles, reactivity series, molar volume of gases, spreadsheets in chemistry, hydrogen bonding, composite materials, radioactive decay, magnetism, speed, charged particles, compression waves, heat transfer, Ursa Major, balloons, current, and expansion of…

  3. Polymer Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Curtis W.

    1979-01-01

    Described is a series of four graduate level courses in polymer science, offered or currently in preparation, at Stanford University. Course descriptions and a list of required and recommended texts are included. Detailed course outlines for two of the courses are presented. (BT)

  4. Samara Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyche, Steven E.

    1985-01-01

    Samara (winged seeds from maple and ash trees) can be used for open-ended inquiry or a series of directed science activities. Attributes, observations/inferences, drawing, motion, floating, seed structure, creative design, and measurement are some of the suggestions for classroom use of these seeds. (DH)

  5. Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Presented are 25 science activities on colorations of prey, evolution, blood, physiology, nutrition, enzyme kinetics, leaf pigments, analytical chemistry, milk, proteins, fermentation, surface effects of liquids, magnetism, drug synthesis, solvents, wintergreen synthesis, chemical reactions, multicore cables, diffraction, air resistance,…

  6. Pathological Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Sheldon

    2001-09-01

    I discuss examples of what Dr. Irving Langmuir, a Nobel prize winner in Chemistry, called "the science of things that aren't so." Some of his examples are reviewed and others from High Energy Physics are added. It is hoped that discussing these incidents will help us develop an understanding of some potential pitfalls.

  7. Literary Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Megan R.

    2000-01-01

    Explains the use of literacy in science education. Uses "Silent Spring", a book on environmental issues, to encourage students to think about the role of water in balancing the earth's system and possible actions against environmental concerns. Creates an environment for students to discuss their knowledge on the use of the pesticide DDT. (YDS)

  8. Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Describes 26 different activities, experiments, demonstrations, and computer simulations in various topics in science. Includes instructional activities dealing with mural ecology, surface area/volume ratios, energy transfer in ecosystems, electrochemical simulations, alternating and direct current, terminal velocity, measuring the size of the…

  9. Organizational Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beriwal, Madhu; Clegg, Stewart; Collopy, Fred; McDaniel, Reuben, Jr.; Morgan, Gareth; Sutcliffe, Kathleen; Kaufman, Roger; Marker, Anthony; Selwyn, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of organizational science, broadly defined as including many fields--organizational behavior and development, management, workplace performance, and so on--were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might…

  10. Science Alliance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, Lorrie; Ribeiro, Mary

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Science Alliance project, a teacher-scientist collaboration where each teacher is given five non-consecutive days of professional development time to meet with a participating scientist, technician, engineer, mathematician, or environmentalist to develop a module of lesson plans that introduce the real world of industry into the…

  11. Redirecting science

    SciTech Connect

    Aaserud, F.

    1990-01-01

    This book contains the following chapters. Science policy and fund-raising up to 1934; The Copenhagen spirit at work, late 1920's to mid-1930s; The refugee problem, 1933 to 1935; Experimental biology, late 1920s to 1935; and Consolidation of the transition, 1935 to 1940.

  12. Cognitive Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cocking, Rodney R.; Mestre, Jose P.

    The focus of this paper is on cognitive science as a model for understanding the application of human skills toward effective problem-solving. Sections include: (1) "Introduction" (discussing information processing framework, expert-novice distinctions, schema theory, and learning process); (2) "Application: The Expert-Novice Paradigm as a Means…

  13. Brewing Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelter, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Following the brewing process from grain to glass, this course uses the biological and chemical principles of brewing to teach science to the nonscience major. Discussion of the scientific aspects of malting, mashing, fermentation, and the making of different beer styles is complemented by laboratory exercises that use scientific methods to…

  14. Systems Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christakis, Alexander; Hammond, Debora; Jackson, Michael; Laszlo, Alexander; Mitroff, Ian; Snowden, Dave; Troncale, Len; Carr-Chellman, Alison; Spector, J. Michael; Wilson, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of systems science were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Alexander Christakis, Debora Hammond, Michael Jackson, Alexander Laszlo, Ian Mitroff, Dave…

  15. Boundless Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilhaus, F.

    2009-04-01

    Our science is critical to understanding the future prospects for life. The laboratory for natural sciences encompasses our planet and reaches into the solar system. The forces of nature respect no boundaries. But, we who try to understand these forces are handicapped by national, political, language, religious, and other concocted barriers. These barriers limit both our effectiveness as scientists and our ability to reach those outside our community who need to know what we have uncovered about our environment. An unencumbered worldwide scientific community has been an objective with limited successes for too long. Action began in earnest after the first world war with the formation of the various scientific Unions and ICSU. Fifty years later Keith Runcorn initiated another approach, when he proposed what quickly became EGS and which has grown and evolved with the merger with EUG. To be truly effective we need to communicate and share comfortably with colleagues worldwide. Personal relationships and trust are required. We count on a high level of ethical behavior within our community. We individually must also be constantly vigilant for the encroachment of the manmade barriers that have held back science through time immemorial. Our scientific organizations cannot achieve this alone. They will facilitate, however, the onus is on each of us to reach out and form interlocking informal communities, which will bring our whole planet-wide community together at many overlapping levels. When we achieve this community, our science will more bountiful and better address the needs of human society.

  16. Nuclear Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, Harrisburg. Bureau of Curriculum Services.

    This document is a report on a course in nuclear science for the high school curriculum. The course is designed to provide a basic but comprehensive understanding of the atom in the light of modern knowledge, and to show how people attempt to harness the tremendous energy liberated through fission and fusion reactions. The course crosses what are…

  17. Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, G. W.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Provides a reading list for A- and S-level biology. Contains several experiments and demonstrations with topics on: the intestine, bullock corneal cells, valences, the science of tea, automated hydrolysis, electronics characteristics, bromine diffusion, enthalpy of vaporization determination, thermometers, pendulums, hovercraft, Bernoulli fluid…

  18. Science insights.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Kazuyuki

    2015-06-01

    "Below is an essay by Prof. Tanabe originally written in Japanese. It gives an insight to Prof. Tanabe's inquiring mind and his approach to science. He also seek, as always, to inspire and nudge the young to scientific discovery". PMID:25463310

  19. Science Journalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polman, Joseph; Newman, Alan; Farrar, Cathy; Saul, E. Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Much of the National Science Education Standards (NRC 1996), aside from the inquiry and teaching sections, focus on content. The authors' call is instead to build standards that focus on what students need to be scientifically literate in 10 or 15 years. Although a basic understanding of important scientific concepts and an understanding of how…

  20. Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Describes activities, games, experiments, demonstrations, and computer-oriented exercises in all science areas. Topics include energy flow through a marine ecosystem, using 2,4-dichlorophenoxyethanoic acid to demonstrate translocation in plants, use of the dichotomous key, use of leaf yeasts to monitor atmospheric pollution, and others. (JN)

  1. Animal Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanCleave, Janice

    2001-01-01

    Presents a set of hands-on, outdoor science experiments designed to teach elementary school students about animal adaptation. The experiments focus on: how color camouflage affects an insect population; how spiderlings find a home; and how chameleons camouflage themselves by changing color. (SM)

  2. Science First

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comstock, Diane

    2005-01-01

    At the elementary level, when children learn best through hands-on activities, when is the best time to use literacy and make that connection to enhance learning? For teachers involved in Colorado Springs, Colorado, Science Teacher Enhancement Program Unifying the Pikes Peak Region, STEP-uP professional development program for teachers, it is…

  3. Skeptical Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Alan J.; Barnhart, Carolyn M.; Parejko, Ken S.; Schultz, Forrest S.; Schultz, Steven E.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the legitimacy of teaching about astrology, extrasensory perception, UFOs, touch therapy, cloning dinosaurs, or any other unusual claims in the classroom. Suggests that bringing unusual claims to the science classroom is an opportunity to motivate students in the principles of scientific thought. (SAH)

  4. Environmental Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eads, Ewin A.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses implementation of an interdisciplinary bachelor of science degree program in Lamar University, Beaumont, with emphases upon the training of pollution and environmental quality control. Indicates that graduates' job opportunities are created by the enactment of recent laws for cleaner air and water. (CC)

  5. Kaleidoscope Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janes, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    Presents a collection of science activities that have elementary students investigate how color can trick the eye and the brain. The activities involve working with contrasting colors, creating a rainbow, and exploring the connection between colors and words. An instructor reproducible features two color activities. (SM)

  6. Self-organization in magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, Vyacheslav S.

    2014-06-01

    This cross-disciplinary special issue on 'Self-organization in magnetic flux ropes' follows in the footsteps of another collection of manuscripts dedicated to the subject of magnetic flux ropes, a volume on 'Physics of magnetic flux ropes' published in the American Geophysical Union's Geophysical Monograph Series in 1990 [1]. Twenty-four years later, this special issue, composed of invited original contributions highlighting ongoing research on the physics of magnetic flux ropes in astrophysical, space and laboratory plasmas, can be considered an update on our state of understanding of this fundamental constituent of any magnetized plasma. Furthermore, by inviting contributions from research groups focused on the study of the origins and properties of magnetic flux ropes in a variety of different environments, we have attempted to underline both the diversity of and the commonalities among magnetic flux ropes throughout the solar system and, indeed, the universe. So, what is a magnetic flux rope? The answer will undoubtedly depend on whom you ask. A flux rope can be as narrow as a few Larmor radii and as wide as the Sun (see, e.g., the contributions by Heli Hietala et al and by Angelous Vourlidas). As described below by Ward Manchester IV et al , they can stretch from the Sun to the Earth in the form of interplanetary coronal mass ejections. Or, as in the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment described by David Schaffner et al , they can fit into a meter-long laboratory device tended by college students. They can be helical and line-tied (see, e.g., Walter Gekelman et al or J Sears et al ), or toroidal and periodic (see, e.g., John O'Bryan et al or Philippa Browning et al ). They can form in the low plasma beta environment of the solar corona (Tibor Török et al ), the order unity beta plasmas of the solar wind (Stefan Eriksson et al ) and the plasma pressure dominated stellar convection zones (Nicholas Nelson and Mark Miesch). In this special issue, Setthivoine You

  7. Aerosol properties derived from spectral actinic flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, H.; Schmidt, K. S.; Pilewskie, P.; Cozic, J.; Wollny, A. G.; Brock, C. A.; Baynard, T.; Lack, D.; Parrish, D. D.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    2008-12-01

    Measurement of aerosol properties is very important for understanding climate change. Aerosol optical properties influence solar radiation throughout the troposphere. According to the Working Group I report of the intergovernmental panel for climate change [IPCC, 2007], aerosols have a direct radiative forcing of - 0.5±0.4 W/m2 with a medium to low level of scientific understanding. This relatively large uncertainty indicates the need for more frequent and precise measurements of aerosol properties. We will show how actinic flux measurements can be used to derive important optical aerosol parameters such as aerosol optical thickness and depth, surface albedo, angstrom exponent, radiative forcing by clouds and aerosols, aerosol extinction, and others. The instrument used for this study is a combination of two spectroradiometers measuring actinic flux in the ultraviolet and visible radiation range from 280 to 690 nm with a resolution of 1 nm. Actinic flux is measured as the radiation incident on a spherical surface with sensitivity independent of direction. In contrast, irradiance is measured as the radiation incident on a plane surface, which depends on the cosine of the incident angle. Our goal is to assess the capabilities of using spectral actinic flux measurements to derive various aerosol properties. Here we will compare 1) actinic flux measurements to irradiance measurements from the spectral solar flux radiometer (SSFR), 2) derived aerosol size distributions with measurements from a white light optical particle counter (WLOPC) and ultra high sensitivity aerosol size spectrometer (UHSAS), and 3) derived aerosol optical extinction with measurements from a cavity ringdown aerosol extinction spectrometer (CRD-AES). These comparisons will utilize data from three recent field campaigns over New England and the Atlantic Ocean (ICARTT 2004), Texas and the Gulf of Mexico during (TexAQS/GoMACCS 2006), and Alaska and the Arctic Ocean (ARCPAC 2008) when the instruments

  8. Comparison of the high temperature heat flux sensor to traditional heat flux gages under high heat flux conditions.

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchat, Thomas K.; Hanks, Charles R.

    2013-04-01

    Four types of heat flux gages (Gardon, Schmidt-Boelter, Directional Flame Temperature, and High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor) were assessed and compared under flux conditions ranging between 100-1000 kW/m2, such as those seen in hydrocarbon fire or propellant fire conditions. Short duration step and pulse boundary conditions were imposed using a six-panel cylindrical array of high-temperature tungsten lamps. Overall, agreement between all gages was acceptable for the pulse tests and also for the step tests. However, repeated tests with the HTHFS with relatively long durations at temperatures approaching 1000%C2%B0C showed a substantial decrease (10-25%) in heat flux subsequent to the initial test, likely due to the mounting technique. New HTHFS gages have been ordered to allow additional tests to determine the cause of the flux reduction.

  9. Portraying Real Science in Science Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Dijk, Esther M.

    2011-01-01

    In both formal and informal settings, not only science but also views on the nature of science are communicated. Although there probably is no singular nature shared by all fields of science, in the field of science education it is commonly assumed that on a certain level of generality there is a consensus on many features of science. In this…

  10. Science Literacy Circles: Big Ideas about Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devick-Fry, Jane; LeSage, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Science literacy circles incorporate the organization of both science notebooks and literature circles to help K-8 students internalize big ideas about science. Using science literacy circles gives students opportunities to engage in critical thinking as they inductively develop understanding about science concepts. (Contains 1 table and 7…

  11. Science News and the Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Using "Science News" as a teaching tool promotes writing about science, talking about science, and broadening students' views about what science is. This article describes an ongoing assignment in which students choose one article from "Science News" each week and write a brief summary and explanation of why they picked that article. (Contains 1…

  12. Dual active surface heat flux gage probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1995-02-01

    A unique plug-type heat flux gage probe was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 2x9 turbulent flow duct facility. The probe was fabricated by welding a miniature dual active surface heat flux gage body to the end of a hollow metal cylindrical bolt containing a metal inner tube. Cooling air flows through the inner tube, impinges onto the back of the gage body and then flows out through the annulus formed between the inner tube and the hollow bolt wall. Heat flux was generated in the duct facility with a Huels arc heater. The duct had a rectangular cross section and one wall was fabricated from 2.54 centimeter thick thermal insulation rigid surface material mounted onto an aluminum plate. To measure heat flux, the probe was inserted through the plate and insulating materials with the from of the gage located flush with the hot gas-side insulation surface. Absorbed heat fluxes measured with the probe were compared with absorbed heat fluxes measured with six water-cooled reference calorimeters. These calorimeters were located in a water-cooled metal duct wall which was located across from the probe position. Correspondence of transient and steady heat fluxes measured with the reference calorimeters and heat flux gage probe was generally within a satisfactory plus or minus 10 percent. This good correspondence was achieved even though the much cooler probe caused a large surface temperature disruption of 1000K between the metal gage and the insulation. However, this temperature disruption did not seriously effect the accuracy of the heat flux measurement. A current application for dual active surface heat flux gages is for transient and steady absorbed heat flux, surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the surface of an oxidizer turbine inlet deflector operating in a space shuttle test bed engine.

  13. Extraterrestrial high energy neutrino fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    Using the most recent cosmic ray spectra up to 2x10 to the 20th power eV, production spectra of high energy neutrinos from cosmic ray interactions with interstellar gas and extragalactic interactions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays with 3K universal background photons are presented and discussed. Estimates of the fluxes from cosmic diffuse sources and the nearby quasar 3C273 are made using the generic relationship between secondary neutrinos and gammas and using recent gamma ray satellite data. These gamma ray data provide important upper limits on cosmological neutrinos. Quantitative estimates of the observability of high energy neutrinos from the inner galaxy and 3C273 above atmospheric background for a DUMAND type detector are discussed in the context of the Weinberg-Salam model with sq sin theta omega = 0.2 and including the atmospheric background from the decay of charmed mesons. Constraints on cosmological high energy neutrino production models are also discussed. It appears that important high energy neutrino astronomy may be possible with DUMAND, but very long observing times are required.

  14. Chaos in magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, Walter; Van Compernolle, Bart; DeHaas, Tim; Vincena, Stephen

    2014-06-01

    Magnetic flux ropes immersed in a uniform magnetoplasma are observed to twist about themselves, writhe about each other and rotate about a central axis. They are kink unstable and smash into one another as they move. Each collision results in magnetic field line reconnection and the generation of a quasi-separatrix layer. Three-dimensional magnetic field lines are computed by conditionally averaging the data using correlation techniques. Conditional averaging is possible for only a number of rotation cycles as the field line motion becomes chaotic. The permutation entropy can be calculated from the time series of the magnetic field data (this is also done with flows) and is used to calculate the positions of the data on a Jensen-Shannon complexity map. The location of data on this map indicates if the magnetic fields are stochastic, or fall into regions of minimal or maximal complexity. The complexity is a function of space and time. The Lyapunov and Hurst exponents are calculated and the complexity and permutation entropy of the flows and field components are shown throughout the volume.

  15. Heliophysics Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, M.; Schrjver, K.; Siscoe, G. L.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Longcope, D. W.; Sojka, J. J.; Guhathakurta, M.

    2009-12-01

    HELIOPHYSICS SUMMER SCHOOLS: NASA Living With a Star and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Visiting Scientist Programs sponsor the Heliophysics Summer Schools to build this new field of science. The series of summer schools, started in 2007, help graduate students and scientists learn and develop the science of heliophysics as a broad, coherent discipline that reaches in space from the Earth's troposphere to the depths of the Sun, and in time from the formation of the solar system to the distant future. The first three years of the school will result in three textbooks for use at universities worldwide. Subsequent years will both teach other generations of students and develop the complementary materials that support teaching of heliophysics at both graduate and undergraduate levels. Heliophysics is a developing scientific discipline integrating studies of the Sun’s variability, the surrounding heliosphere, and climatic environments. Over the past few centuries, our understanding of how the Sun drives space weather and climate on the Earth and other planets has advanced at an ever-increasing rate. The first textbook, (Heliophysics I Plasma Physics of the Local Cosmos, edited by Carolus J. Schrijver, Lockheed Martin and George L. Siscoe, Boston University) integrates such diverse topics for the first time as a coherent intellectual discipline. It emphasizes the physical processes coupling the Sun and Earth, allowing insights into the interaction of the solar wind and radiation with the Earth’s magnetic field, atmosphere and climate system. It provides a core resource for advanced undergraduates and graduates, and also constitutes a foundational reference for researchers in heliophysics, astrophysics, plasma physics, space physics, solar physics, aeronomy, space weather, planetary science and climate science. HELIOPHYSICS POSTDOCTORAL PROGRAM: Hosts and applicants are invited to apply to a new postdoctoral fellowship program designed to train

  16. Science Centres and Science Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rennie, Leonie J.; McClafferty, Terence P.

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the interactive science center and its history over the last four decades. Traces the original idea to Francis Bacon. Recommends the use of cross-site studies to develop a model of learning in this setting. Contains 141 references. (DDR)

  17. The Science in Science Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholls, Peter, Ed.

    This 12-chapter book discusses the scientific facts behind the ideas included in the novels of Robert Heinlein, Isaac Asimov, Frederik Pohl, Arthur C. Clark and other science fiction writers. Areas explored in the first 11 chapters include: exploration of deep space; energy and exotic power sources; likelihood of extra-terrestrial life and the…

  18. Science Shorts: "Sounds" Like Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnone, Kathryn; Morris, Bethany

    2014-01-01

    It seems each new school year brings its own opportunities to grow as an educator. As teachers in a STEM focused school that serves primarily at-risk students, the authors face a new challenge in rethinking their instruction to align with the "Next Generation Science Standards". This involves changing the focus of units previously taught…

  19. AmeriFlux US-Dia Diablo

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Dia Diablo. Site Description - The site is on land owned by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Site 300) and has no grazing or management history since the 1950's except for summer-time burning of selected acres for fire management (not included in the tower footprint).

  20. The minimum flux corona; theory or concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, J. H.; Antiochos, S. K.

    1980-01-01

    The reply to the criticisms of the minimum flux theory is discussed. These criticisms are correct in substance, as well as in detail. Counter arguments that the minimum flux corona theory is untenable, because of errors in its formulation, are presented.

  1. Crossed Flux Tubes Magnetic Reconnection Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Zachary; Bellan, Paul

    2012-10-01

    The dynamics of arched, plasma-filled flux tubes have been studied in experiments at Caltech. These flux tubes expand, undergo kink instabilities, magnetically reconnect, and are subject to magnetohydrodynamic forces. An upgraded experiment will arrange for two of these flux tubes to cross over each other. It is expected then that the flux tubes will undergo magnetic reconnection at the crossover point, forming one long flux tube and one short flux tube. This reconnection should also result in a half-twist in the flux tubes at the crossover point, which will propagate along each tube as Alfv'en waves. The control circuitry requires two independent floating high energy capacitor power supplies to power the plasma loops, which will be put in series when the plasma loops reconnect. Coordinating these two power supplies requires the building of new systems for controlling plasma generation. Unlike with previous designs, all timing functions are contained on a single printed circuit board, allowing the design to be easily replicated for use with each independent capacitor involved. The control circuit sequencing has been tested successfully in generating a single flux tube. The plasma gun is currently under construction, with its installation pending completion of prior experiments.

  2. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-05-15

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a “heat flux viscosity,” is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  3. Fast flux module detection using matroid theory.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Arne C; Bruggeman, Frank J; Olivier, Brett G; Stougie, Leen

    2015-05-01

    Flux balance analysis (FBA) is one of the most often applied methods on genome-scale metabolic networks. Although FBA uniquely determines the optimal yield, the pathway that achieves this is usually not unique. The analysis of the optimal-yield flux space has been an open challenge. Flux variability analysis is only capturing some properties of the flux space, while elementary mode analysis is intractable due to the enormous number of elementary modes. However, it has been found by Kelk et al. (2012) that the space of optimal-yield fluxes decomposes into flux modules. These decompositions allow a much easier but still comprehensive analysis of the optimal-yield flux space. Using the mathematical definition of module introduced by Müller and Bockmayr (2013b), we discovered useful connections to matroid theory, through which efficient algorithms enable us to compute the decomposition into modules in a few seconds for genome-scale networks. Using that every module can be represented by one reaction that represents its function, in this article, we also present a method that uses this decomposition to visualize the interplay of modules. We expect the new method to replace flux variability analysis in the pipelines for metabolic networks. PMID:25565150

  4. AmeriFlux US-Brw Barrow

    SciTech Connect

    Oechel, Walt; Zona, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Brw Barrow. Site Description - The local landscape surrounding the Barrow site has a history absent of any disturbances. The terrain was not heavily glaciated during the last period of glaciation. The vegetation is mature in an unmanaged and undisturbed Arctic tundra.

  5. AmeriFlux US-Atq Atqasuk

    SciTech Connect

    Oechel, Walt; Zona, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Atq Atqasuk. Site Description - This site is 100 km south of Barrow, Alaska, Variety of moist-wet coastal sedge tundra, and moist-tussock tundra surfaces in the more well-drained upland.

  6. AmeriFlux US-Ivo Ivotuk

    SciTech Connect

    Oechel, Walter; Zona, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ivo Ivotuk. Site Description - This site is 300 km south of Barrow and is located at the foothill of the Brooks Range and is classified as tussock sedge, dwarf-shrub, moss tundra.

  7. Micrometeorological methods for assessing greenhouse gas flux

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Micrometeorological methods for measuring carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide provide an opportunity for large-scale, long-term monitoring of greenhouse gas flux without the limitations imposed by chamber methods. Flux gradient and eddy covariance methods have been used for several decades to monitor g...

  8. Neutrino flux predictions for cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hartz, Mark

    2015-05-15

    Experiments that measure neutrino interaction cross sections using accelerator neutrino sources require a prediction of the neutrino flux to extract the interaction cross section from the measured neutrino interaction rate. This article summarizes methods of estimating the neutrino flux using in-situ and ex-situ measurements. The application of these methods by current and recent experiments is discussed.

  9. Investigating the Dynamics of Canonical Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Linden, Jens; Carroll, Evan; Kamikawa, Yu; Lavine, Eric; Vereen, Keon; You, Setthivoine

    2013-10-01

    Canonical flux tubes are defined by tracing areas of constant magnetic and fluid vorticity flux. This poster will present the theory for canonical flux tubes and current progress in the construction of an experiment designed to observe their evolution. In the zero flow limit, canonical flux tubes are magnetic flux tubes, but in full form, present the distinct advantage of reconciling two-fluid plasma dynamics with familiar concepts of helicity, twists and linkages. The experiment and the DCON code will be used to investigate a new MHD stability criterion for sausage and kink modes in screw pinches that has been generalized to magnetic flux tubes with skin and core currents. Camera images and a 3D array of ˙ B probes will measure tube aspect-ratio and ratio of current-to-magnetic flux, respectively, to trace these flux tube parameters in a stability space. The experiment's triple electrode planar gun is designed to generate azimuthal and axial flows. These diagnostics together with a 3D vector tomographic reconstruction of ion Doppler spectroscopy will be used to verify the theory of canonical helicity transport. This work was sponsored in part by the US DOE Grant DE-SC0010340.

  10. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-05-01

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a "heat flux viscosity," is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  11. PORTABLE METHANE FLUX METER - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Phase I project will investigate achieving a low power, portable system for measuring methane concentrations and fluxes. The system will combine diode laser-based trace gas concentration measurements with rapid wind speed measurements to determine fluxes using eddy cor...

  12. METHOD AND FLUX COMPOSITION FOR TREATING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Foote, F.

    1958-08-23

    ABS>A flux composition is described fer use with molten uranium or uranium alloys. The flux consists of about 46 weight per cent calcium fiuoride, 46 weight per cent magnesium fluoride and about 8 weight per cent of uranium tetrafiuoride.

  13. Surface Flux Modeling for Air Quality Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    For many gasses and aerosols, dry deposition is an important sink of atmospheric mass. Dry deposition fluxes are also important sources of pollutants to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The surface fluxes of some gases, such as ammonia, mercury, and certain volatile organic c...

  14. Theoretical models of flux pinning and flux motion in high-{Tc} superconducting oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D.O.

    1991-12-31

    Various issues involved in the development of phenomenological models of flux pinning and motion in high-{Tc} oxides are discussed. A simplified model is presented for the critical current density and is used to examine the question of whether flux flow results from an instability due to plasticity of the flux-line array or from pin breaking.

  15. Theoretical models of flux pinning and flux motion in high- Tc superconducting oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D.O.

    1991-01-01

    Various issues involved in the development of phenomenological models of flux pinning and motion in high-{Tc} oxides are discussed. A simplified model is presented for the critical current density and is used to examine the question of whether flux flow results from an instability due to plasticity of the flux-line array or from pin breaking.

  16. Novel Sensor for the In Situ Measurement of Uranium Fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Hatfield, Kirk

    2015-02-10

    controlled field conditions. In the third and fourth year a suite of larger field studies were conducted. For these studies, the uranium flux sensor was used with uranium speciation measurements and molecular-biological tools to characterize microbial community and active biomass at synonymous wells distributed in a large grid. These field efforts quantified spatial changes in uranium flux and field-scale rates of uranium attenuation (ambient and stimulated), uranium stability, and quantitatively assessed how fluxes and effective reaction rates were coupled to spatial variations in microbial community and active biomass. Analyses of data from these field experiments were used to generate estimates of Monod kinetic parameters that are ‘effective’ in nature and optimal for modeling uranium fate and transport at the field-scale. This project provided the opportunity to develop the first sensor that provides direct measures of both uranium (VI) and groundwater flux. A multidisciplinary team was assembled to include two geochemists, a microbiologist, and two quantitative contaminant hydrologists. Now that the project is complete, the sensor can be deployed at DOE sites to evaluate field-scale uranium attenuation, source behavior, the efficacy of remediation, and off-site risk. Because the sensor requires no power, it can be deployed at remote sites for periods of days to months. The fundamental science derived from this project can be used to advance the development of predictive models for various transport and attenuation processes in aquifers. Proper development of these models is critical for long-term stewardship of contaminated sites in the context of predicting uranium source behavior, remediation performance, and off-site risk.

  17. Composing Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, Leslie

    2015-03-01

    The course Scientific Inquiry at California State University was developed by faculty in biology, physics and English to meet ``writing proficiency'' requirements for non-science majors. Drawing from previous work in composition studies, the position that we take in this course is that we should be engaging students in writing that replicates the work that writing does in science, rather than replicating the particular structural conventions characteristic of scientific writing. That is, scientists use writing to have, remember, share, vet, challenge, and stabilize ideas, and our course requires students use writing to achieve those aims, rather than produce writing that obeys particular conventions of scientific writing. This talk will describe how we have integrated findings from composition studies with a course on scientific inquiry, and provide examples of how scientific communication has resulted from this dialogue. Funding by NSF #1140860.

  18. Computer sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Paul H.

    1988-01-01

    The Computer Science Program provides advanced concepts, techniques, system architectures, algorithms, and software for both space and aeronautics information sciences and computer systems. The overall goal is to provide the technical foundation within NASA for the advancement of computing technology in aerospace applications. The research program is improving the state of knowledge of fundamental aerospace computing principles and advancing computing technology in space applications such as software engineering and information extraction from data collected by scientific instruments in space. The program includes the development of special algorithms and techniques to exploit the computing power provided by high performance parallel processors and special purpose architectures. Research is being conducted in the fundamentals of data base logic and improvement techniques for producing reliable computing systems.

  19. School Science and Public Understanding of Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fensham, Peter J.; Harlen, Wynne

    1999-01-01

    Traces how the idea of measuring the connection between school science and public awareness of science has emerged. Describes the Program for International Student Achievement (PISA) project's indicators of educational progress in science. Contains 28 references. (Author/WRM)

  20. Emerging flux in active regions. [of sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liggett, M.; Zirin, H.

    1985-01-01

    The rates at which flux emerges in active and quiet solar regions within the sunspot belts are compared. The emerging flux regions (EFRs) were identified by the appearance of arch filament structures in H-alpha. All EFRs in high resolution films of active regions made at Big Bear in 1978 were counted. The comparable rate of flux emergence in quiet regions was obtained from SGD data and independently from EFRs detected outside the active region perimeter on the same films. The rate of flux emergence is 10 times higher in active regions than in quiet regions. A sample of all active regions in 31 days of 1983 gave a ratio of 7.5. Possible mechanisms which might funnel new magnetic flux to regions of strong magnetic field are discussed.

  1. Spacecraft-produced neutron fluxes on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quist, T. C.; Furst, M.; Burnett, D. S.; Baum, J. H.; Peacock, C. L., Jr.; Perry, D. G.

    1977-01-01

    Estimates of neutron fluxes in different energy ranges are reported for the Skylab spacecraft. Detectors composed of uranium, thorium, and bismuth foils with mica as a fission track recorder, as well as boron foils with cellulose acetate as an alpha-particle recorder, were deployed at different positions in the Orbital Workshop. It was found that the Skylab neutron flux was dominated by high energy (greater than 1 MeV) contributions and that there was no significant time variation in the fluxes. Firm upper limits of 7-15 neutrons/sq cm-sec, depending on the detector location in the spacecraft, were established for fluxes above 1 MeV. Below 1 MeV, the neutron fluxes were about an order of magnitude lower. The neutrons are interpreted as originating from the interactions of leakage protons from the radiation belt with the spacecraft.

  2. Large scale surface heat fluxes. [through oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarachik, E. S.

    1984-01-01

    The heat flux through the ocean surface, Q, is the sum of the net radiation at the surface, the latent heat flux into the atmosphere, and the sensible heat flux into the atmosphere (all fluxes positive upwards). A review is presented of the geographical distribution of Q and its constituents, and the current accuracy of measuring Q by ground based measurements (both directly and by 'bulk formulae') is assessed. The relation of Q to changes of oceanic heat content, heat flux, and SST is examined and for each of these processes, the accuracy needed for Q is discussed. The needed accuracy for Q varies from process to process, varies geographically, and varies with the time and space scale considered.

  3. Space science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A fact sheet on the NASA space science program is presented. Some of the subjects considered include the following: (1) the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory, (2) the Orbiting Solar Observatory, (3) the Small Astronomy Satellite, (4) lunar programs, (5) planetary programs using the Mariner, Pioneer 10, and Viking space probes, and (6) the Scout, Thor-Delta, and Atlas-Centaur launch vehicles. For each program there is a description of the effort, the schedule, management, program officials, and funding aspects in outline form.

  4. Fictitious Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foladori, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Science and Technology (S&T), like Research and Development (R&D), has become a case of capital investment like any other economic sector. This has distanced R&D from social needs, to the extent that part of R&D ends up actually being fictitious, in the sense that it acquires a price on the market but never becomes part of material…

  5. Specialized Science

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ferric C.

    2014-01-01

    As the body of scientific knowledge in a discipline increases, there is pressure for specialization. Fields spawn subfields that then become entities in themselves that promote further specialization. The process by which scientists join specialized groups has remarkable similarities to the guild system of the middle ages. The advantages of specialization of science include efficiency, the establishment of normative standards, and the potential for greater rigor in experimental research. However, specialization also carries risks of monopoly, monotony, and isolation. The current tendency to judge scientific work by the impact factor of the journal in which it is published may have roots in overspecialization, as scientists are less able to critically evaluate work outside their field than before. Scientists in particular define themselves through group identity and adopt practices that conform to the expectations and dynamics of such groups. As part of our continuing analysis of issues confronting contemporary science, we analyze the emergence and consequences of specialization in science, with a particular emphasis on microbiology, a field highly vulnerable to balkanization along microbial phylogenetic boundaries, and suggest that specialization carries significant costs. We propose measures to mitigate the detrimental effects of scientific specialism. PMID:24421049

  6. Preservice Science Teachers' Science Teaching Orientations and Beliefs about Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kind, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    This paper offers clarification of science teacher orientations as a potential component of pedagogical content knowledge. Science teaching orientations and beliefs about science held by 237 preservice science teachers were gathered via content-specific vignettes and questionnaire, respectively, prior to participation in a UK-based teacher…

  7. Nitrogen Gas Fluxes in Northeastern Temperate Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafave, S.; Groffman, P. M.; Venterea, R. T.; Lovett, G. M.

    2002-12-01

    Nitrogen gas fluxes are a poorly quantified component of the nitrogen (N) cycle of forest ecosystems and are important to water quality, atmospheric chemistry and forest health. We measured fluxes of nitric oxide (NO), nitrous oxide (N2O) and dinitrogen (N2) in oak and maple stands in the Catskill mountains of New York State. Fluxes of NO and N2O were measured using in situ chambers and N2 flux was measured in intact cores incubated in a helium-oxygen atmosphere closed recirculation system in the laboratory. Fluxes of NO and N2O were higher in maple than in oak stands, which is consistent with previous work showing higher rates of N cycling under maple than oak. NO fluxes averaged 1.7 mg N m-2 d-1 in maple and 0.2 in oak. N2O fluxes averaged 0.10 mg N m-2 d-1 in maple and 0.004 in oak. However, N2 fluxes were higher in oak (2.3 mg N m-2 d-1) than maple (0.15), a surprising result that was supported by independent measurements of denitrification potential. There was marked variability in fluxes between replicate plots that was linked to the presence of understory vegetation and physical characteristics of the forest floor. Results suggest that N gas fluxes in northeastern temperate forests may be more important than previously thought and may be an important regulator of export of N to coastal waters, N-related atmospheric chemistry and forest N saturation.

  8. Comparison of debris flux models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sdunnus, H.; Beltrami, P.; Klinkrad, H.; Matney, M.; Nazarenko, A.; Wegener, P.

    The availability of models to estimate the impact risk from the man-made space debris and the natural meteoroid environment is essential for both, manned and unmanned satellite missions. Various independent tools based on different approaches have been developed in the past years. Due to an increased knowledge of the debris environment and its sources e.g. from improved measurement capabilities, these models could be updated regularly, providing more detailed and more reliable simulations. This paper addresses an in-depth, quantitative comparison of widely distributed debris flux models which were recently updated, namely ESA's MASTER 2001 model, NASA's ORDEM 2000 and the Russian SDPA 2000 model. The comparison was performed in the frame of the work of the 20t h Interagency Debris Coordination (IADC) meeting held in Surrey, UK. ORDEM 2000ORDEM 2000 uses careful empirical estimates of the orbit populations based onthree primary data sources - the US Space Command Catalog, the H ystackaRadar, and the Long Duration Exposure Facility spacecraft returned surfaces.Further data (e.g. HAX and Goldstone radars, impacts on Shuttle windows andradiators, and others) were used to adjust these populations for regions in time,size, and space not covered by the primary data sets. Some interpolation andextrapolation to regions with no data (such as projections into the future) wasprovided by the EVOLVE model. MASTER 2001The ESA MASTER model offers a full three dimensional description of theterrestrial debris distribution reaching from LEO up to the GEO region. Fluxresults relative to an orbiting target or to an inertial volume can be resolved intosource terms, impactor characteristics and orbit, as well as impact velocity anddirection. All relevant debris source terms are considered by the MASTERmodel. For each simulated source, a corresponding debris generation model interms of mass/diameter distribution, additional velocities, and directionalspreading has been developed. A

  9. AmeriFlux US-Ho2 Howland Forest (west tower)

    SciTech Connect

    Hollinger, David; Hollinger, David

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ho2 Howland Forest (west tower). Site Description - Closed conifer forest, minimal disturbance. References: Fernandez et al. (1993), Canadian Journal of Soil Science 73 317-328. Hollinger et al. (1999), Global Change Biology 5: 891-902. Savage KE, Davidson EA (2001), Global Biogeochemical Cycles 15 337-350. Scott et al. (2004), Environmental Management, Vol. 33, Supplement 1, pp. S9-S22. Hollinger et al. (2004), Global Change Biology 10: 1689-1706.

  10. AmeriFlux US-Ho3 Howland Forest (harvest site)

    SciTech Connect

    Hollinger, David; Hollinger, David

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ho3 Howland Forest (harvest site). Site Description - Closed conifer forest, minimal disturbance. References: Fernandez et al. (1993), Canadian Journal of Soil Science 73 317-328. Hollinger et al. (1999), Global Change Biology 5: 891-902. Savage KE, Davidson EA (2001), Global Biogeochemical Cycles 15 337-350. Scott et al. (2004), Environmental Management, Vol. 33, Supplement 1, pp. S9-S22. Hollinger et al. (2004), Global Change Biology 10: 1689-1706.

  11. AmeriFlux US-Ho1 Howland Forest (main tower)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hollinger, David [USDA Forest Service; Hollinger, David [USDA Forest Service

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ho1 Howland Forest (main tower). Site Description - Closed conifer forest, minimal disturbance. References: Fernandez et al. (1993), Canadian Journal of Soil Science 73 317-328. Hollinger et al. (1999), Global Change Biology 5: 891-902. Savage KE, Davidson EA (2001), Global Biogeochemical Cycles 15 337-350. Scott et al. (2004), Environmental Management, Vol. 33, Supplement 1, pp. S9-S22. Hollinger et al. (2004), Global Change Biology 10: 1689-1706.

  12. Communicating Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, G. J.; McCaffrey, M. S.; Kiehl, J. T.; Schmidt, C.

    2010-12-01

    We are in an era of rapidly changing communication media, which is driving a major evolution in the modes of communicating science. In the past, a mainstay of scientific communication in popular media was through science “translators”; science journalists and presenters. These have now nearly disappeared and are being replaced by widespread dissemination through, e.g., the internet, blogs, YouTube and journalists who often have little scientific background and sharp deadlines. Thus, scientists are required to assume increasing responsibility for translating their scientific findings and calibrating their communications to non-technical audiences, a task for which they are often ill prepared, especially when it comes to controversial societal issues such as tobacco, evolution, and most recently climate change (Oreskes and Conway 2010). Such issues have been politicized and hi-jacked by ideological belief systems to such an extent that constructive dialogue is often impossible. Many scientists are excellent communicators, to their peers. But this requires careful attention to detail and logical explanation, open acknowledgement of uncertainties, and dispassionate delivery. These qualities become liabilities when communicating to a non-scientific audience where entertainment, attention grabbing, 15 second sound bites, and self assuredness reign (e.g. Olson 2009). Here we report on a program initiated by NCAR and UCAR to develop new approaches to science communication and to equip present and future scientists with the requisite skills. If we start from a sound scientific finding with general scientific consensus, such as the warming of the planet by greenhouse gases, then the primary emphasis moves from the “science” to the “art” of communication. The art cannot have free reign, however, as there remains a strong requirement for objectivity, honesty, consistency, and above all a resistance to advocating particular policy positions. Targeting audience

  13. Developing a High-Flux Isolated Attosecond Pulse Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamalov, Andrei; Ware, Matthew; Bucksbaum, Philip; Cryan, James

    2016-05-01

    High harmonic based light sources have proven to be valuable experimental tools that facilitate studies of electron dynamics at their natural timescale, the attosecond regime. The nature of driving laser sources used in high harmonic generation make it difficult to attain attosecond pulses that are both isolated in time and of a high intensity. We present our progress in commissioning a beamline designed to produce high-flux isolated attosecond pulses. A multistep amplification process provides us with 30 mJ, 25 fs pulses centered around 800 nm with 100 Hz repetition rate. These pulses are spatially split and focused into a gas cell. A non-collinear optical gating scheme is used to produce a lighthouse source of high harmonic radiation wherein each beamlet is an isolated attosecond pulse. A variable-depth grazing-incidence stepped mirror is fabricated to extend the optical path length of the older beamlets and thus overlap the beamlets in time. The combined beam is tightly focused and ensuing mechanics will be studied with an electron spectrometer as well as a xuv photon spectrometer. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division.

  14. Flux Calibration and Spectral Typing of the SPLASH Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Caroline; Vemuri, Nikita; Hamren, Katherine; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2015-01-01

    We present the spectroscopic identification of M-stars in the disk of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) and revised spectral types for the M-stars in the X-Shooter Library (XSL). Our dataset consists of optical spectra taken with the DEIMOS spectrograph on the Keck II 10-m telescope as part of the Spectroscopic Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo (SPLASH) survey. We use stars from the MILES and X-Shooter Libraries to perform a first order flux calibration of these spectra, then use TiO-based indices from Fluks et al. 1994 to determine the probable M spectral subtype. While testing this procedure on the M-stars of the XSL, we find that the spectral subtypes derived from the spectra themselves are different from the spectral subtypes obtained from the literature and that XSL includes several spectra with subtypes seemingly later than M10. We suggest that this is due to stellar variability. We also identify ~2000 M-stars in the SPLASH sample. We present the distribution of subtypes here.This research was funded by grants from the National Science Foundation and the Space Telescope Science Institute. Some of the research presented here was conducted by high-school students under the auspices of the University of California Santa Cruz's Science Internship Program.

  15. Materials Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Materials Science Program is structured so that NASA s headquarters is responsible for the program content and selection, through the Enterprise Scientist, and MSFC provides for implementation of ground and flight programs with a Discipline Scientist and Discipline Manager. The Discipline Working Group of eminent scientists from outside of NASA acts in an advisory capacity and writes the Discipline Document from which the NRA content is derived. The program is reviewed approximately every three years by groups such as the Committee on Microgravity Research, the National Materials Advisory Board, and the OBPR Maximization and Prioritization (ReMaP) Task Force. The flight program has had as many as twenty-six principal investigators (PIs) in flight or flight definition stage, with the numbers of PIs in the future dependent on the results of the ReMaP Task Force and internal reviews. Each project has a NASA-appointed Project Scientist, considered a half-time job, who assists the PI in understanding and preparing for internal reviews such as the Science Concept Review and Requirements Definition Review. The Project Scientist also insures that the PI gets the maximum science support from MSFC, represents the PI to the MSFC community, and collaborates with the Project Manager to insure the project is well-supported and remains vital. Currently available flight equipment includes the Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR-1) and Microgravity Science Glovebox. Ground based projects fall into one or more of several categories. Intellectual Underpinning of Flight Program projects include theoretical studies backed by modeling and computer simulations; bring to maturity new research, often by young researchers, and may include preliminary short duration low gravity experiments in the KC-135 aircraft or drop tube; enable characterization of data sets from previous flights; and provide thermophysical property determinations to aid PIs. Radiation Shielding and preliminary In

  16. Planning a Science Fair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebert, Jim

    1976-01-01

    Presented are views, on planning science fairs and science fair projects, of a fair coordinator, a science teacher, and students. Also included are 25 questions which might result in science fair projects. (SL)

  17. Science and Religion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Numbers, Ronald L.

    1985-01-01

    Reviews the history of science and religion in the United States, examining: (1) science and religion in the colonies; (2) science and scripture in the early republic; (3) the Darwinian debates; and (4) science and religion in modern America. (JN)

  18. Life sciences and environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The DOE laboratories play a unique role in bringing multidisciplinary talents -- in biology, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, and engineering -- to bear on major problems in the life and environmental sciences. Specifically, the laboratories utilize these talents to fulfill OHER's mission of exploring and mitigating the health and environmental effects of energy use, and of developing health and medical applications of nuclear energy-related phenomena. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) support of this mission is evident across the spectrum of OHER-sponsored research, especially in the broad areas of genomics, structural biology, basic cell and molecular biology, carcinogenesis, energy and environment, applications to biotechnology, and molecular, nuclear and radiation medicine. These research areas are briefly described.

  19. Life sciences and environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The DOE laboratories play a unique role in bringing multidisciplinary talents -- in biology, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, and engineering -- to bear on major problems in the life and environmental sciences. Specifically, the laboratories utilize these talents to fulfill OHER`s mission of exploring and mitigating the health and environmental effects of energy use, and of developing health and medical applications of nuclear energy-related phenomena. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) support of this mission is evident across the spectrum of OHER-sponsored research, especially in the broad areas of genomics, structural biology, basic cell and molecular biology, carcinogenesis, energy and environment, applications to biotechnology, and molecular, nuclear and radiation medicine. These research areas are briefly described.

  20. High-Flux and Low-Flux Membranes: Efficacy in Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Oshvandi, Khodayar; Kavyannejad, Rasol; Borzuo, Sayed Reza; Gholyaf, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Inadequacy of dialysis is one of the main causes of death in hemodialysis patients. Some studies have suggested that high‐flux membrane improves the removal of moderate-sized molecules while other studies indicate no significant effect on them. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the dialysis efficacy of low-flux versus high-flux membranes in hemodialysis patients. Patients and Methods: Forty hemodialysis patients participated in this cross-over clinical trial. Two sessions of low-flux and high-flux membrane dialysis were performed consecutively, in the first and second stage of the trial. In both stages, blood samples before and after the dialysis were taken and sent to the laboratory for assessment. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), KT/V and the urea reduction ratio (URR) indexes were used to determine dialysis efficacy. Data were analyzed using t test and paired t test. Results: The mean KT/V was 1.27 ± 0.28 in high-flux and 1.10 ± 0.32 in low-flux membrane which, these differences were statistically significant (P = 0.017). The mean of URR was 0.65 ± 0.09 in high-flux and 0.61 ± 0.14 in low-flux membrane, which these differences were not statistically significant (P = 0.221). Conclusions: The high-flux membrane had better dialysis adequacy, so we suggest using high-flux membrane in hemodialysis centers. PMID:25699283

  1. Topology of magnetic flux ropes and formation of fossil flux transfer events and boundary layer plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.; Ma, Z. W.; Fu, Z. F.; Otto, A.

    1993-01-01

    A mechanism for the formation of fossil flux transfer events and the low-level boundary layer within the framework of multiple X-line reconnection is proposed. Attention is given to conditions for which the bulk of magnetic flux in a flux rope of finite extent has a simple magnetic topology, where the four possible connections of magnetic field lines are: IMF to MSP, MSP to IMF, IMF to IMF, and MSP to MSP. For a sufficient relative shift of the X lines, magnetic flux may enter a flux rope from the magnetosphere and exit into the magnetosphere. This process leads to the formation of magnetic flux ropes which contain a considerable amount of magnetosheath plasma on closed magnetospheric field lines. This process is discussed as a possible explanation for the formation of fossil flux transfer events in the magnetosphere and the formation of the low-latitude boundary layer.

  2. Benthic fluxes in San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammond, Douglas E.; Fuller, C.; Harmon, D.; Hartman, Blayne; Korosec, M.; Miller, L.G.; Rea, R.; Warren, S.; Berelson, W.; Hager, S.W.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of benthic fluxes have been made on four occasions between February 1980 and February 1981 at a channel station and a shoal station in South San Francisco Bay, using in situ flux chambers. On each occasion replicate measurements of easily measured substances such as radon, oxygen, ammonia, and silica showed a variability (??1??) of 30% or more over distances of a few meters to tens of meters, presumably due to spatial heterogeneity in the benthic community. Fluxes of radon were greater at the shoal station than at the channel station because of greater macrofaunal irrigation at the former, but showed little seasonal variability at either station. At both stations fluxes of oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and silica were largest following the spring bloom. Fluxes measured during different seasons ranged over factors of 2-3, 3, 4-5, and 3-10 (respectively), due to variations in phytoplankton productivity and temperature. Fluxes of oxygen and carbon dioxide were greater at the shoal station than at the channel station because the net phytoplankton productivity is greater there and the organic matter produced must be rapidly incorporated in the sediment column. Fluxes of silica were greater at the shoal station, probably because of the greater irrigation rates there. N + N (nitrate + nitrite) fluxes were variable in magnitude and in sign. Phosphate fluxes were too small to measure accurately. Alkalinity fluxes were similar at the two stations and are attributed primarily to carbonate dissolution at the shoal station and to sulfate reduction at the channel station. The estimated average fluxes into South Bay, based on results from these two stations over the course of a year, are (in mmol m-2 d-1): O2 = -27 ?? 6; TCO2 = 23 ?? 6; Alkalinity = 9 ?? 2; N + N = -0.3 ?? 0.5; NH3 = 1.4 ?? 0.2; PO4 = 0.1 ?? 0.4; Si = 5.6 ?? 1.1. These fluxes are comparable in magnitude to those in other temperate estuaries with similar productivity, although the seasonal

  3. Plasma flux-dependent lipid A deactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hung-Wen; Hsu, Cheng-Che; Ahmed, Musahid; Liu, Suet Yi; Fang, Yigang; Seog, Joonil; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.; Graves, David B.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports the influence of gas plasma flux on endotoxin lipid A film deactivation. To study the effect of the flux magnitude of reactive species, a modified low-pressure inductively coupled plasma (ICP) with O radical flux ˜1016 cm-2 s-1 was used. After ICP exposures, it was observed that while the Fourier transform infrared absorbance of fatty chains responsible for the toxicity drops by 80% through the film, no obvious film endotoxin deactivation is seen. This is in contrast to that previously observed under low flux exposure conducted in a vacuum beam system: near-surface only loss of fatty chains led to significant film deactivation. Secondary ion mass spectrometry characterization of changes at the film surface did not appear to correlate with the degree of deactivation. Lipid A films need to be nearly completely removed in order to detect significant deactivation under high flux conditions. Additional high reactive species flux experiments were conducted using an atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet and a UV/ozone device. Exposure of lipid A films to reactive species with these devices showed similar deactivation behaviour. The causes for the difference between low and high flux exposures may be due to the nature of near-surface structural modifications as a function of the rate of film removal.

  4. INFLAME: In-situ net flux within the atmosphere of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, M. G.; Johnson, D. G.

    2006-12-01

    The In-situ Net FLux within the AtMosphere of the Earth (INFLAME) instrument is designed to make direct measurements of the net radiative flux within the Earth's atmosphere. Deployed on an uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) the INFLAME instruments will record vertical profiles of net radiative flux separately for the visible and infrared streams of radiation within the atmosphere. Upon differentiation of these vertical profiles the divergence of the net flux is obtained, which combined with the atmospheric density yields the rate of radiative heating (Kelvin per day) within the atmosphere. INFLAME offers the advantage of using a Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) to directly measure the net flux, thereby avoiding potentially large errors in the derived heating rate associated with differencing separate measurements of the upwelling and downwelling fluxes of radiation. INFLAME is a new project in NASA's Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). We will describe the science motivating the measurements, the historical background to the measurements, and the INFLAME instrument now under development at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  5. PHOTOSPHERIC FLUX CANCELLATION AND THE BUILD-UP OF SIGMOIDAL FLUX ROPES ON THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Savcheva, A. S.; Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; DeLuca, E. E.; Green, L. M.

    2012-11-10

    In this study we explore the scenario of photospheric flux cancellation being the primary formation mechanism of sigmoidal flux ropes in decaying active regions. We analyze magnetogram and X-ray observations together with data-driven non-linear force-free field (NLFFF) models of observed sigmoidal regions to test this idea. We measure the total and canceled fluxes in the regions from MDI magnetograms, as well as the axial and poloidal flux content of the modeled NLFFF flux ropes for three sigmoids-2007 February, 2007 December, and 2010 February. We infer that the sum of the poloidal and axial flux in the flux ropes for most models amounts to about 60%-70% of the canceled flux and 30%-50% of the total flux in the regions. The flux measurements and the analysis of the magnetic field structure show that the sigmoids first develop a strong axial field manifested as a sheared arcade and then, as flux cancellation proceeds, form long S-shaped field lines that contribute to the poloidal flux. In addition, the dips in the S-shaped field lines are located at the sites of flux cancellation that have been identified from the MDI magnetograms. We find that the line-of-sight-integrated free energy is also concentrated at these locations for all three regions, which can be liberated in the process of eruption. Flare-associated brightenings and flare loops coincide with the location of the X-line topology that develops at the site of most vigorous flux cancellation.

  6. Towards Improved Estimates of Ocean Heat Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentamy, Abderrahim; Hollman, Rainer; Kent, Elisabeth; Haines, Keith

    2014-05-01

    Recommendations and priorities for ocean heat flux research are for instance outlined in recent CLIVAR and WCRP reports, eg. Yu et al (2013). Among these is the need for improving the accuracy, the consistency, and the spatial and temporal resolution of air-sea fluxes over global as well as at region scales. To meet the main air-sea flux requirements, this study is aimed at obtaining and analyzing all the heat flux components (latent, sensible and radiative) at the ocean surface over global oceans using multiple satellite sensor observations in combination with in-situ measurements and numerical model analyses. The fluxes will be generated daily and monthly for the 20-year (1992-2011) period, between 80N and 80S and at 0.25deg resolution. Simultaneous estimates of all surface heat flux terms have not yet been calculated at such large scale and long time period. Such an effort requires a wide range of expertise and data sources that only recently are becoming available. Needed are methods for integrating many data sources to calculate energy fluxes (short-wave, long wave, sensible and latent heat) across the air-sea interface. We have access to all the relevant, recently available satellite data to perform such computations. Yu, L., K. Haines, M. Bourassa, M. Cronin, S. Gulev, S. Josey, S. Kato, A. Kumar, T. Lee, D. Roemmich: Towards achieving global closure of ocean heat and freshwater budgets: Recommendations for advancing research in air-sea fluxes through collaborative activities. INTERNATIONAL CLIVAR PROJECT OFFICE, 2013: International CLIVAR Publication Series No 189. http://www.clivar.org/sites/default/files/ICPO189_WHOI_fluxes_workshop.pdf

  7. On calculating the potential vorticity flux

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Pei-Chun; Diamond, P. H.

    2015-03-15

    We discuss and compare different approaches to calculating the dynamics of anisotropic flow structure formation in quasi two-dimensional turbulence based on potential vorticity (PV) transport in real space. The general structure of the PV flux in the relaxation processes is deduced non-perturbatively. The transport coefficients of the PV flux are then systematically calculated using perturbation theory. We develop two non-perturbative relaxation models: the first is a mean field theory for the dynamics of minimum enstrophy relaxation based on the requirement that the mean flux of PV dissipates total potential enstrophy but conserves total fluid kinetic energy. The results show that the structure of PV flux has the form of a sum of a positive definite hyper-viscous and a negative or positive viscous flux of PV. Turbulence spreading is shown to be related to PV mixing via the link of turbulence energy flux to PV flux. In the relaxed state, the ratio of the PV gradient to zonal flow velocity is homogenized. This homogenized quantity sets a constraint on the amplitudes of PV and zonal flow in the relaxed state. The second relaxation model is derived from symmetry principles alone. The form of PV flux contains a nonlinear convective term in addition to viscous and hyper-viscous terms. For both cases, the transport coefficients are calculated using perturbation theory. For a broad turbulence spectrum, a modulational calculation of the PV flux gives both a negative viscosity and a positive hyper-viscosity. For a narrow turbulence spectrum, the result of a parametric instability analysis shows that PV transport is also convective. In both relaxation and perturbative analyses, it is shown that turbulent PV transport is sensitive to flow structure, and the transport coefficients are nonlinear functions of flow shear.

  8. Magnetic Flux Cancellation and Formation of Prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George; Kim, Mun Song; Chon Nam, Sok; Kim, Kyong Chol

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic flux cancellation appears to be closely related to various kinds of solar activities such as flares, microflares/surges/jets, X-ray bright points, erupting mini-filaments, transition region explosive events, filament formation, filament activation and eruption, and coronal mass ejections. It is commonly believed that magnetic reconnections in the low atmosphere are responsible for canceling magnetic features, and magnetic fragments are observed to originate as bipoles. According to the Sweet-Parker type reconnection model, the inflow speed closely corresponds to the converging speed of each pole in a canceling magnetic feature and the rate of flux cancellation must be explained by the observed converging speed. As distinct from the corona, the efficiency of photospheric magnetic reconnection may be due to the small Cowling conductivity, instead of the Spitzer, of weakly ionized and magnetized plasma in the low atmosphere of the sun. Using the VAL-C atmospheric model and Cowling conductivity, we have computed the parameters describing Sweet-Parker type reconnecting current sheets in the plasma of the solar photosphere and chromosphere, and particularly for the phenomena of magnetic flux cancellation and dark filament formation which occurred on July 2, 1994 we have estimated the rate of flux cancellation, the inflow speed(the converging speed) and the upward mass flux to compare with the observation. The results show that when taking account of the Cowling conductivity in the low atmosphere, large flux cancellation rates(>1019Mxhr-1) in solar active regions are better explained than by the Spitzer conductivity-considered reconnection model. Particularly for the flux cancellation event on July 2, 1994, the inflow speed(0.26kms-1)is almost similar to the converging speed(0.22kms-1)and the upward mass flux(3.3X1012gs-1) in the model is sufficient for the large dark filament formation in a time of several hours through magnetic flux cancellation process.

  9. Do Gender-Science Stereotypes Predict Science Identification and Science Career Aspirations among Undergraduate Science Majors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cundiff, Jessica L.; Vescio, Theresa K.; Loken, Eric; Lo, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    The present research examined whether gender-science stereotypes were associated with science identification and, in turn, science career aspirations among women and men undergraduate science majors. More than 1,700 students enrolled in introductory science courses completed measures of gender-science stereotypes (implicit associations and…

  10. Science toys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    "I have a low boredom threshold," Tim Rowett explains, ushering in my son Alex and me. Rowett is a jovial, professorishlooking man with wire-rimmed glasses and a short, white beard. Alex and I have gone to his flat in Twickenham, on the edge of London, to see his collection of fun stuff - jokes, games, puzzles and other toys related to science. When I ask what they have in common, Rowett has a ready, if not illuminating, answer: "They're just things that make people go 'Wow!'."

  11. Flux Emergence in a Magnetized Convection Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, R. F.; Brun, A. S.

    2013-07-01

    We study the influence of a dynamo magnetic field on the buoyant rise and emergence of twisted magnetic flux ropes and their influence on the global external magnetic field. We ran three-dimensional MHD numerical simulations using the ASH code (anelastic spherical harmonics) and analyzed the dynamical evolution of such buoyant flux ropes from the bottom of the convection zone until the post-emergence phases. The global nature of this model can only very crudely and inaccurately represent the local dynamics of the buoyant rise of the implanted magnetic structure, but nonetheless allows us to study the influence of global effects, such as self-consistently generated differential rotation and meridional circulation, and of Coriolis forces. Although motivated by the solar context, this model cannot be thought of as a realistic model of the rise of magnetic structures and their emergence in the Sun, where the local dynamics are completely different. The properties of initial phases of the buoyant rise are determined essentially by the flux-rope's properties and the convective flows and consequently are in good agreement with previous studies. However, the effects of the interaction of the background dynamo field become increasingly strong as the flux ropes evolve. During the buoyant rise across the convection zone, the flux-rope's magnetic field strength scales as Bvpropρα, with α <~ 1. An increase of radial velocity, density, and current density is observed to precede flux emergence at all longitudes. The geometry, latitude, and relative orientation of the flux ropes with respect to the background magnetic field influences the resulting rise speeds, zonal flow amplitudes (which develop within the flux ropes), and the corresponding surface signatures. This influences the morphology, duration and amplitude of the surface shearing, and the Poynting flux associated with magnetic flux-rope emergence. The emerged magnetic flux influences the system's global polarity

  12. Magnetic flux amplification by Lenz lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenmaker, J.; Pirota, K. R.; Teixeira, J. C.

    2013-08-01

    Tailoring magnetic flux distribution is highly desirable in a wide range of applications such as magnetic sensors and biomedicine. In this paper we study the manipulation of induced currents in passive devices in order to engineer the distribution of magnetic flux intensity in a given region. We propose two different approaches, one based on especially designed wire loops (Lenz law) and the other based on solid conductive pieces (eddy currents). The gain of such devices is mainly determined by geometry giving perspective of high amplification. We consistently modeled, simulated, and executed the proposed devices. Doubled magnetic flux intensity is demonstrated experimentally for a moderate aspect ratio.

  13. Nitrous oxide flux following tropical land clearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luizao, Flavio; Luizao, Regina; Matson, Pamela; Livingston, Gerald; Vitousek, Peter

    1989-01-01

    The importance of seasonal cycles of N2O flux from tropical ecosystems and the possibility that tropical deforestation could contribute to the ongoing global increase in N2O concentrations were assessed by measuring N2O flux from forest, cleared land, and pasture over an annual cycle in the central Amazon. A pasture that had been converted from tropical forest had threefold greater annual N2O flux than a paired forest site; similar results were obtained in spot measurements in other pastures. If these results are general, such tropical pastures represent a globally significant source of increased N2O.

  14. FLUX EMERGENCE IN A MAGNETIZED CONVECTION ZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, R. F.; Brun, A. S.

    2013-07-20

    We study the influence of a dynamo magnetic field on the buoyant rise and emergence of twisted magnetic flux ropes and their influence on the global external magnetic field. We ran three-dimensional MHD numerical simulations using the ASH code (anelastic spherical harmonics) and analyzed the dynamical evolution of such buoyant flux ropes from the bottom of the convection zone until the post-emergence phases. The global nature of this model can only very crudely and inaccurately represent the local dynamics of the buoyant rise of the implanted magnetic structure, but nonetheless allows us to study the influence of global effects, such as self-consistently generated differential rotation and meridional circulation, and of Coriolis forces. Although motivated by the solar context, this model cannot be thought of as a realistic model of the rise of magnetic structures and their emergence in the Sun, where the local dynamics are completely different. The properties of initial phases of the buoyant rise are determined essentially by the flux-rope's properties and the convective flows and consequently are in good agreement with previous studies. However, the effects of the interaction of the background dynamo field become increasingly strong as the flux ropes evolve. During the buoyant rise across the convection zone, the flux-rope's magnetic field strength scales as B{proportional_to}{rho}{sup {alpha}}, with {alpha} {approx}< 1. An increase of radial velocity, density, and current density is observed to precede flux emergence at all longitudes. The geometry, latitude, and relative orientation of the flux ropes with respect to the background magnetic field influences the resulting rise speeds, zonal flow amplitudes (which develop within the flux ropes), and the corresponding surface signatures. This influences the morphology, duration and amplitude of the surface shearing, and the Poynting flux associated with magnetic flux-rope emergence. The emerged magnetic flux

  15. Extending quantum coherence of superconducting flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fei; Kamal, Archana; Orlando, Terry; Gustavsson, Simon; Oliver, William; Engineering Quantum Systems, MIT Team

    We present the design of a superconducting qubit with multiple Josephson junctions. The design starts with a capacitively shunted flux qubit, and it incorporates particular junction parameter choices for the purpose of simultaneously optimizing over transition frequency, anharmonicity, flux- and charge-noise sensitivity around flux degeneracy. By studying the scaling properties with design parameters, we identify directions to extend coherence substantially. This research was funded by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) via MIT Lincoln Laboratory under Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002.

  16. Magnetic refrigeration using flux compression in superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelsson, U. E.; Strayer, D. M.; Jackson, H. W.; Petrac, D.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of using flux compression in high-temperature superconductors to produce the large time-varying magnetic fields required in a field cycled magnetic refrigerator operating between 20 K and 4 K is presently investigated. This paper describes the refrigerator concept and lists limitations and advantages in comparison with conventional refrigeration techniques. The maximum fields obtainable by flux compression in high-temperature supercoductor materials, as presently prepared, are too low to serve in such a refrigerator. However, reports exist of critical current values that are near usable levels for flux pumps in refrigerator applications.

  17. A time-varying magnetic flux concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibret, B.; Premaratne, M.; Lewis, P. M.; Thomson, R.; Fitzgerald, P. B.

    2016-08-01

    It is known that diverse technological applications require the use of focused magnetic fields. This has driven the quest for controlling the magnetic field. Recently, the principles in transformation optics and metamaterials have allowed the realization of practical static magnetic flux concentrators. Extending such progress, here, we propose a time-varying magnetic flux concentrator cylindrical shell that uses electric conductors and ferromagnetic materials to guide magnetic flux to its center. Its performance is discussed based on finite-element simulation results. Our proposed design has potential applications in magnetic sensors, medical devices, wireless power transfer, and near-field wireless communications.

  18. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, DR

    2011-01-31

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

  19. The separation velocity of emerging magnetic flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Dean-Yi; Wang, Haimin

    1987-01-01

    The separation velocities and magnetic fluxes of 24 emerging bipoles on the sun are measured in order to provide data on the emerging mechanism. Velocities are shown to range from about 0.2-1 km/s, bipole fluxes to range over more than two orders of magnitude, and the mean field strength and the sizes to range over one order of magnitude. No correlation is noted between measured separation velocities and either the flux or the mean field strength of the bipole. Predicted separation velocities are found be about one order of magnitude greater than measured values.

  20. Diamagnetic flux measurement in Aditya tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sameer; Jha, Ratneshwar; Lal, Praveen; Hansaliya, Chandresh; Gopalkrishna, M. V.; Kulkarni, Sanjay; Mishra, Kishore

    2010-12-15

    Measurements of diamagnetic flux in Aditya tokamak for different discharge conditions are reported for the first time. The measured diamagnetic flux in a typical discharge is less than 0.6 mWb and therefore it has required careful compensation for various kinds of pick-ups. The hardware and software compensations employed in this measurement are described. We introduce compensation of a pick-up due to plasma current of less than 20 kA in short duration discharges, in which plasma pressure gradient is supposed to be negligible. The flux measurement during radio frequency heating is also presented in order to validate compensation.

  1. Discovering indigenous science: Implications for science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snively, Gloria; Corsiglia, John

    2001-01-01

    Indigenous science relates to both the science knowledge of long-resident, usually oral culture peoples, as well as the science knowledge of all peoples who as participants in culture are affected by the worldview and relativist interests of their home communities. This article explores aspects of multicultural science and pedagogy and describes a rich and well-documented branch of indigenous science known to biologists and ecologists as traditional ecological knowledge (TEK). Although TEK has been generally inaccessible, educators can now use a burgeoning science-based TEK literature that documents numerous examples of time-proven, ecologically relevant, and cost effective indigenous science. Disputes regarding the universality of the standard scientific account are of critical importance for science educators because the definition of science is a de facto gatekeeping device for determining what can be included in a school science curriculum and what cannot. When Western modern science (WMS) is defined as universal it does displace revelation-based knowledge (i.e., creation science); however, it also displaces pragmatic local indigenous knowledge that does not conform with formal aspects of the standard account. Thus, in most science classrooms around the globe, Western modern science has been taught at the expense of indigenous knowledge. However, because WMS has been implicated in many of the world's ecological disasters, and because the traditional wisdom component of TEK is particularly rich in time-tested approaches that foster sustainability and environmental integrity, it is possible that the universalist gatekeeper can be seen as increasingly problematic and even counter productive. This paper describes many examples from Canada and around the world of indigenous people's contributions to science, environmental understanding, and sustainability. The authors argue the view that Western or modern science is just one of many sciences that need to be

  2. Big Science and Big Big Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Steve

    2012-01-01

    In his introduction to the science shows feature in "Primary Science" 115, Ian B. Dunne asks the question "Why have science shows?" He lists a host of very sound reasons, starting with because "science is fun" so why not engage and entertain, inspire, grab attention and encourage them to learn? He goes onto to state that: "Even in today's…

  3. Science as Entertainment and Entertainment Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wassersug, Richard

    2002-01-01

    For many, doing science is entertaining, and engaging in a science activity for its entertainment value is a credible rationale. Drawing parallels between science and various forms of entertainment from sports to opera, highlights the value of "infotainment". Also mentions the risks associated with entertaining the public with science. (DLH)

  4. Towards a Science of Science Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    This article is a contribution to the search for evidence-based models of learning to improve science education. The author believes that modern teachers should look to the sciences of cognitive psychology and neuroscience to build a science of science teaching. Understanding the relationships between learning and the brain's structure and…

  5. Learning Science with Science Fiction Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanaugh, Terence; Cavanaugh, Catherine

    This paper is an excerpt from a book on learning science using science fiction. The focus is on the use of science fiction films to engage students and encourage greater enthusiasm and interest in science. "Jurassic Park" is used as an example that can provide educators with countless lesson opportunities. This approach recommends the use of fun…

  6. Science Advising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannenbaum, Benn

    2004-05-01

    The need for competent physical scientists in public policy is often overlooked. Science and technology play an ever-growing role in our lives, but the people setting the policies governing their use too often lack the skills and knowledge needed to make well-informed decisions. Making the transition from academia to public policy is not as difficult as one might imagine and can lead to a challenging, rewarding career. Dr. Tannenbaum recently completed a 2002-2003 AAAS Science and Technology Fellowship sponsored by the American Physical Society during which he worked in the office of U.S. Representative Edward J. Markey (D-MA) on nuclear nonproliferation issues. His work in Congressman Markey's office focused on issues including US nuclear weapons policy, missile defense, the nuclear program in Iran, prevention of the transfer of U.S. nuclear technology to North Korea, and the security of nuclear sites in Iraq. Dr. Tannenbaum will discuss this experience and observations concerning "underinformed and uninformed" decision-making in Congress and the role of scientists in that process. He will also discuss his current position at the Federation of American Scientists.

  7. Implementation Science

    PubMed Central

    Demiris, George

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a general introduction to implementation science—the discipline that studies the implementation process of research evidence—in the context of hospice and palliative care. By discussing how implementation science principles and frameworks can inform the design and implementation of intervention research, we aim to highlight how this approach can maximize the likelihood for translation and long-term adoption in clinical practice settings. We present 2 ongoing clinical trials in hospice that incorporate considerations for translation in their design and implementation as case studies for the implications of implementation science. This domain helps us better understand why established programs may lose their effectiveness over time or when transferred to other settings, why well-tested programs may exhibit unintended effects when introduced in new settings, or how an intervention can maximize cost-effectiveness with strategies for effective adoption. All these challenges are of significance to hospice and palliative care, where we seek to provide effective and efficient tools to improve care services. The emergence of this discipline calls for researchers and practitioners to carefully examine how to refine current and design new and innovative strategies to improve quality of care. PMID:23558847

  8. Groundwater Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Sean A.

    A good introductory groundwater textbook must strike a delicate balance in presenting the basics of the physical, chemical, geological, mathematical, and engineering aspects of the groundwater field without being too lengthy or overly detailed. Charles Fitts states that his motivation for writing Groundwater Science was to be able to “…teach concepts and quantitative analyses with a clear, lean, but thorough book.” He has succeeded in striking this balance of having just the right amount of information, and has met his goals of producing a concise book that can be used to teach the concepts and analyses necessary for the study of groundwater.Overall, Groundwater Science would serve well as the text for an introductory groundwater course at the college senior or first-year graduate level. The author and the publisher have made excellent use of two-color, gray and blue-scale images throughout the book. The graphics are crisp and explanatory. Data sets needed to work some of the problems in the book are available as text files from its Web site (http://www.academicpress.com/groundwater). I found these files to be complete and easy to understand. The references are up to date and point the reader to additional information across a wide range of groundwater issues, and also provide a number of examples to illustrate different points made in the book.

  9. Science kitsch and pop science: A reconnaissance.

    PubMed

    Kaeser, Eduard

    2013-07-01

    Science kitsch? The combination of these two words rings like an oxymoron. Science - as the common saying has it - exposes, discovers, tells the truth; kitsch conceals, covers, lies. I think, this "shadow" of science deserves a specific scrutiny, not only because it reflects the altered place and role of science in contemporary "knowledge" society but also because it pinpoints the task of relocating science in the "multicultural" context of postmodernism, with its different epistemic claims. The genre of science kitsch may help to regain credit by working as a probe to detect false pretensions, explanatory exuberance and exaggerations in science. PMID:23833170

  10. Mapping carbon flux uncertainty and selecting optimal locations for future flux towers in the Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gu, Y.; Howard, D.M.; Wylie, B.K.; Zhang, L.

    2012-01-01

    Flux tower networks (e. g., AmeriFlux, Agriflux) provide continuous observations of ecosystem exchanges of carbon (e. g., net ecosystem exchange), water vapor (e. g., evapotranspiration), and energy between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The long-term time series of flux tower data are essential for studying and understanding terrestrial carbon cycles, ecosystem services, and climate changes. Currently, there are 13 flux towers located within the Great Plains (GP). The towers are sparsely distributed and do not adequately represent the varieties of vegetation cover types, climate conditions, and geophysical and biophysical conditions in the GP. This study assessed how well the available flux towers represent the environmental conditions or "ecological envelopes" across the GP and identified optimal locations for future flux towers in the GP. Regression-based remote sensing and weather-driven net ecosystem production (NEP) models derived from different extrapolation ranges (10 and 50%) were used to identify areas where ecological conditions were poorly represented by the flux tower sites and years previously used for mapping grassland fluxes. The optimal lands suitable for future flux towers within the GP were mapped. Results from this study provide information to optimize the usefulness of future flux towers in the GP and serve as a proxy for the uncertainty of the NEP map.

  11. Neutron diffraction facilities at the high flux reactor, Petten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohms, C.; Youtsos, A. G.; Bontenbal, A.; Mulder, F. M.

    2000-03-01

    The High Flux Reactor in Petten is equipped with twelve beam tubes for the extraction of thermal neutrons for applications in materials and medical science. Beam tubes HB4 and HB5 are equipped with diffractometers for residual stress and powder investigations. Recently at HB4 the Large Component Neutron Diffraction Facility has been installed. It is a unique facility with respect to its capability of handling heavy components up to 1000 kg in residual stress testing. Its basic features are described and the first applications on thick piping welds are shown. The diffractometer at HB5 can be set up for powder and stress measurements. Recent applications include temperature dependent measurements on phase transitions in intermetallic compounds and on Li ion energy storage materials.

  12. Constraining the climatology of CO2 ocean surface flux for North Atlantic and the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, Iwona; Piskozub, Jacek

    2015-04-01

    The ocean sink is an important part of the anthropogenic CO2 budget. Because the terrestrial biosphere is usually treated as a residual, constraining the net flux into the ocean sink is crucial for understanding the global carbon cycle. The air-sea interface flux is calculated from millions of measurements of CO2 partial pressures. However the regional and temporal means depend on parametrization of gas transfer velocity as well as on the wind/waves fields used for calculations. A recently developed tool, FluxEngine, created within the ESA funded (SOLAS related) OceanFlux Greenhouse Gases project, creates an opportunity to create an ensemble of regional CO2 flux climatologies for the North Atlantic and Arctic waters using multiple combinations of forcing fields and gas transfer velocity parameterizations. The aim of the study is to provide constraints on the regional monthly averages for the chosen area for the whole "climatology ensemble". This approach is similar to the one used by IPCC for the whole model ensemble used for modeling of the climate. Doing a regional study provides an additional test of the parameterizations because the local flux averages may differ even for parameterizations giving similar global averages. We present the methodology and CO2 flux climatology constrains for selected regions and seasons, the preliminary results of a study which aim is to cover the whole North Atlantic and ice-free areas of Arctic Ocean. The study is done within the new ESA funded OceanFlux Evolution project we are part of and at the same time is part of a PhD thesis funded by Centre of Polar Studies "POLAR-KNOW" (a project of the Polish Ministry of Science).

  13. Heat flux microsensor measurements and calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrell, James P.; Hager, Jon M.; Onishi, Shinzo; Diller, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    A new thin-film heat flux gage has been fabricated specifically for severe high temperature operation using platinum and platinum-10 percent rhodium for the thermocouple elements. Radiation calibrations of this gage were performed at the AEDC facility over the available heat flux range (approx. 1.0 - 1,000 W/cu cm). The gage output was linear with heat flux with a slight increase in sensitivity with increasing surface temperature. Survivability of gages was demonstrated in quench tests from 500 C into liquid nitrogen. Successful operation of gages to surface temperatures of 750 C has been achieved. No additional cooling of the gages is required because the gages are always at the same temperature as the substrate material. A video of oxyacetylene flame tests with real-time heat flux and temperature output is available.

  14. Pulse power applications of flux compression generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, C. M.; Caird, R. S.; Erickson, D. J.; Freeman, B. L.

    Characteristics are presented for two different types of explosive driven flux compression generators and a megavolt pulse transformer. Status reports are given for rail gun and plasma focus programs for which the generators serve as power sources.

  15. Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes

    DOEpatents

    McCray, Scott B.

    1989-01-01

    Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

  16. Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes

    DOEpatents

    McCray, S.B.

    1989-10-24

    Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

  17. Flux transfer events: Reconnection without separators. [magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, M.; Birn, J.; Schindler, K.

    1989-01-01

    A topological analysis of a simple model magnetic field of a perturbation at the magnetopause modeling an apparent flux transfer event is presented. It is shown that a localized perturbation at the magnetopause can in principle open a closed magnetosphere by establishing magnetic connections across the magnetopause. Although the model field exhibits neutral points, these are not involved in the magnetic connection of the flux tubes. The topological substructure of a localized perturbation is analyzed in a simpler configuration. The presence of both signs of the magnetic field component normal to the magnetopause leads to a linkage of topologically different flux tubes, described as a flux knot, and a filamentary substructure of field lines of different topological types which becomes increasingly complicated for decreasing magnetic shear at the magnetopause.

  18. Chesapeake Bay sediment flux model. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Di Toro, D.M.; Fitzpatrick, J.J.

    1993-06-01

    Formulation and application of a predictive diagenetic sediment model are described in this report. The model considers two benthic sediment layers: a thin aerobic layer in contact with the water column and a thicker anaerobic layer. Processes represented include diagenesis, diffusion, particle mixing, and burial. Deposition of organic matter, water column concentrations, and temperature are treated as independent variables that influence sediment-water fluxes. Sediment oxygen demand and sediment-water fluxes of sulfide, ammonium, nitrate, phosphate, and silica are predicted. The model was calibrated using sediment-water flux observations collected in Chesapeake Bay 1985-1988. When independent variables were specified based on observations, the model correctly represented the time series of sediment-water fluxes observed at eight stations in the Bay and tributaries.... Chesapeake Bay, Models, Sediments, Dissolved oxygen, Nitrogen Eutrophication, Phosphorus.

  19. Experimental flux measurements on a network scale

    SciTech Connect

    Schwender, J.

    2011-10-11

    Metabolic flux is a fundamental property of living organisms. In recent years, methods for measuring metabolic flux in plants on a network scale have evolved further. One major challenge in studying flux in plants is the complexity of the plant's metabolism. In particular, in the presence of parallel pathways in multiple cellular compartments, the core of plant central metabolism constitutes a complex network. Hence, a common problem with the reliability of the contemporary results of {sup 13}C-Metabolic Flux Analysis in plants is the substantial reduction in complexity that must be included in the simulated networks; this omission partly is due to limitations in computational simulations. Here, I discuss recent emerging strategies that will better address these shortcomings.

  20. On the Taxonomy of Flux Vacua

    SciTech Connect

    Giryavets, Alexander

    2004-04-25

    We investigate several predictions about the properties of IIB flux vacua on Calabi-Yau orientifolds, by constructing and characterizing a very large set of vacua in a specific example, an orientifold of the Calabi-Yau hypersurface in WP{sub 1,1,1,1,4}{sup 4}. We find support for the prediction of Ashok and Douglas that the density of vacua on moduli space is governed by det(-R-{omega}) where R and {omega} are curvature and Kaehler forms on the moduli space. The conifold point {psi} = 1 on moduli space therefore serves as an attractor, with a significant fraction of the flux vacua contained in a small neighborhood surrounding {psi} = 1. We also study the functional dependence of the number of flux vacua on the D3 charge in the fluxes, finding simple power law growth.

  1. Cool and hot flux ropes, their helicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nindos, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    We will review recent indirect and direct evidence for the existence of magnetic flux ropes in the solar atmosphere. Magnetic flux ropes may appear as S-shaped or reverse S-shaped (sigmoidal) structures in regions that are likely to erupt, and may also show in nonlinear force-free field extrapolations that use data from photospheric vector magnetograms as boundary condition. The availability of high sensitivity data recorded with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution in hot EUV wavelengths by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) has revealed the existence of coherent structures identified as hot flux ropes. In this presentation, we will review the properties of both cool and hot flux ropes with an emphasis on the frequency of their occurrence in large flares and on their magnetic helicity content.

  2. The Coupling of Solute Fluxes in Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Galey, William R.; Van Bruggen, J. T.

    1970-01-01

    Our previous description of solute drag on a synthetic membrane has been extended to include the solutes mannitol, sucrose, raffinose, inulin, and dextran. Labeled and nonlabeled forms of these solutes were used in pairs to quantitate solute flux interaction. Three membranes with pore sizes of 350, 80, and 20 A, respectively, have been utilized. It is shown that solute flux interaction occurs with all the solutes and that the extent of interaction is related directly to solute permeability, concentration, and molecular size. The magnitude of solute interaction is reciprocally related to the radii of the membrane pores, greater interaction occurring with small pored membranes. Solute drag is seen as an increased flux of tracer solute in the direction of the diffusion gradient of a second solute as well as a decreased tracer flux into the diffusion gradient. Values are given for self-diffusion and interaction coefficients as well as for a new coefficient, the "effectiveness coefficient." PMID:5413079

  3. Electron Flux of Radiation Belts Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows meridional (from north-south) plane projections of the REPT-A and REPT-B electron flux values. The animation first shows the expected two-belt Van Allen zone structure; from Se...

  4. Regulation of autophagic flux by CHIP.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dongkai; Ying, Zheng; Wang, Hongfeng; Chen, Dong; Gao, Feng; Ren, Haigang; Wang, Guanghui

    2015-08-01

    Autophagy is a major degradation system which processes substrates through the steps of autophagosome formation, autophagosome-lysosome fusion, and substrate degradation. Aberrant autophagic flux is present in many pathological conditions including neurodegeneration and tumors. CHIP/STUB1, an E3 ligase, plays an important role in neurodegeneration. In this study, we identified the regulation of autophagic flux by CHIP (carboxy-terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein). Knockdown of CHIP induced autophagosome formation through increasing the PTEN protein level and decreasing the AKT/mTOR activity as well as decreasing phosphorylation of ULK1 on Ser757. However, degradation of the autophagic substrate p62 was disturbed by knockdown of CHIP, suggesting an abnormality of autophagic flux. Furthermore, knockdown of CHIP increased the susceptibility of cells to autophagic cell death induced by bafilomycin A1. Thus, our data suggest that CHIP plays roles in the regulation of autophagic flux. PMID:26219223

  5. [Mutagenic effects of ionized plasma light flux].

    PubMed

    Stupin, I V; Dombrovskiĭ, A M; Novokshonov, A I; Belova, L L; Belous, G G

    1990-10-01

    The effect of ion plasma light flux on the genomes of auxotrophic Escherichia coli strain and Drosophilla melanogaster has been examined. Essentially no mutagenic effect was found in doses close to therapeutic ones. PMID:2126213

  6. Direct computation of the sensible heat flux.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, K.

    1980-01-01

    An algorithm to determine the sensible heat flux from simple field measurements (wind speed, air and ground temperatures) has been developed. It provides a direct solution, in parametric form, which can be displayed graphically or tabularly. -from Author

  7. Rotating flux compressor for energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhuri, P.; Linton, T.W.; Phillips, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    The rotating flux compressor (RFC) converts rotational kinetic energy into an electrical output pulse which would have higher energy than the electrical energy initially stored in the compressor. An RFC has been designed in which wedge-shaped rotor blades pass through the air gaps between successive turns of a solenoid, the stator. Magnetic flux is generated by pulsing the stator solenoids when the inductance is a maximum, i.e., when the flux fills the stator-solenoid volume. Connecting the solenoid across a load conserves the flux which is compressed within the small volume surrounding the stator periphery when the rotor blades cut into the free space between the stator plates, creating a minimum-inductance condition. The unique features of this design are: (1) no electrical connections (brushes) to the rotor; (2) no conventional windings; and (3) no maintenance. The device has been tested up to 5000 rpm of rotor speed.

  8. Hydrodynamic focusing of a particle flux

    SciTech Connect

    Makhviladze, G.M.; Melikhov, O.I.; Nikolova, I.P.

    1995-12-01

    Based on numerical integration of the equations of mechanics of multiphase media, an effect of focusing of a particle flux generated by a source located on the upper wall of a closed vessel has been revealed and investigated.

  9. Interspecific Variation in SO2 Flux 1

    PubMed Central

    Olszyk, David M.; Tingey, David T.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this study was to clarify the relationships among stomatal, residual, and epidermal conductances in determining the flux of SO2 air pollution to leaves. Variations in leaf SO2 and H2O vapor fluxes were determined using four plant species: Pisum sativum L. (garden pea), Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. flacca (mutant of tomato), Geranium carolinianum L. (wild geranium), and Diplacus aurantiacus (Curtis) Jeps. (a native California shrub). Fluxes were measured using the mass-balance approach during exposure to 4.56 micromoles per cubic meter (0.11 microliters per liter) SO2 for 2 hours in a controlled environmental chamber. Flux through adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces with closed stomata ranged from 1.9 to 9.4 nanomoles per square meter per second for SO2, and 0.3 to 1.3 millimoles per square meter per second for H2O vapor. Flux of SO2 into leaves through stomata ranged from ∼0 to 8.5 (dark) and 3.8 to 16.0 (light) millimoles per square meter per second. Flux of H2O vapor from leaves through stomata ranged from ∼0 to 0.6 (dark) to 0.4 to 0.9 (light) millimole per square meter per second. Lycopersicon had internal flux rates for both SO2 and H2O vapor over twice as high as for the other species. Stomatal conductance based on H2O vapor flux averaged from 0.07 to 0.13 mole per square meter per second among the four species. Internal conductance of SO2 as calculated from SO2 flux was from 0.04 mole per square meter per second lower to 0.06 mole per square meter per second higher than stomatal conductance. For Pisum, Geranium, and Diplacus stomatal conductance was the same or slightly higher than internal conductance, indicating that, in general, SO2 flux could be predicted from stomatal conductance for H2O vapor. However, for the Lycopersicon mutant, internal leaf conductance was much higher than stomatal conductance, indicating that factors inside leaves can play a significant role in determining SO2 flux. PMID:16664551

  10. Brownian simulations and unidirectional flux in diffusion.

    PubMed

    Singer, A; Schuss, Z

    2005-02-01

    The prediction of ionic currents in protein channels of biological membranes is one of the central problems of computational molecular biophysics. Existing continuum descriptions of ionic permeation fail to capture the rich phenomenology of the permeation process, so it is therefore necessary to resort to particle simulations. Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations require the connection of a small discrete simulation volume to large baths that are maintained at fixed concentrations and voltages. The continuum baths are connected to the simulation through interfaces, located in the baths sufficiently far from the channel. Average boundary concentrations have to be maintained at their values in the baths by injecting and removing particles at the interfaces. The particles injected into the simulation volume represent a unidirectional diffusion flux, while the outgoing particles represent the unidirectional flux in the opposite direction. The classical diffusion equation defines net diffusion flux, but not unidirectional fluxes. The stochastic formulation of classical diffusion in terms of the Wiener process leads to a Wiener path integral, which can split the net flux into unidirectional fluxes. These unidirectional fluxes are infinite, though the net flux is finite and agrees with classical theory. We find that the infinite unidirectional flux is an artifact caused by replacing the Langevin dynamics with its Smoluchowski approximation, which is classical diffusion. The Smoluchowski approximation fails on time scales shorter than the relaxation time 1/gamma of the Langevin equation. We find that the probability of Brownian trajectories that cross an interface in one direction in unit time Deltat equals that of the probability of the corresponding Langevin trajectories if gammaDeltat=2 . That is, we find the unidirectional flux (source strength) needed to maintain average boundary concentrations in a manner consistent with the physics of Brownian particles. This

  11. Flux Partitioning by Isotopic Eddy Covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehr, R.; Munger, J. W.; Nelson, D. D.; McManus, J. B.; Zahniser, M. S.; Wofsy, S. C.; Saleska, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    Net ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of CO2 is routinely measured by eddy covariance at sites around the world, but studies of ecosystem processes are more interested in the gross photosynthetic and respiratory fluxes that comprise the net flux. The standard method of partitioning the net flux into these components has been to extrapolate nighttime respiration into daytime based on a relationship between nighttime respiration, temperature, and sometimes moisture. However, such relationships generally account for only a small portion of the variation in nighttime respiration, and the assumption that they can predict respiration throughout the day is dubious. A promising alternate method, known as isotopic flux partitioning, works by identifying the stable isotopic signatures of photosynthesis and respiration in the CO2 flux. We have used this method to partition the net flux at Harvard Forest, MA, based on eddy covariance measurements of the net 12CO2 and 13CO2 fluxes (as well as measurements of the sensible and latent heat fluxes and other meteorological variables). The CO2 isotopologues were measured at 4 Hz by an Aerodyne quantum cascade laser spectrometer with a δ13C precision of 0.4 % in 0.25 sec and 0.02 % in 100 sec. In the absence of such high-frequency, high-precision isotopic measurements, past attempts at isotopic flux partitioning have combined isotopic flask measurements with high-frequency (total) CO2 measurements to estimate the isoflux (the EC/flask approach). Others have used a conditional flask sampling approach called hyperbolic relaxed eddy accumulation (HREA). We 'sampled' our data according to each of these approaches, for comparison, and found disagreement in the calculated fluxes of ~10% for the EC/flask approach, and ~30% for HREA, at midday. To our knowledge, this is the first example of flux partitioning by isotopic eddy covariance. Wider use of this method, enabled by a new generation of laser spectrometers, promises to open a new window

  12. Data Science: The Revolution in Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borne, K. D.

    2011-12-01

    I will describe the data science undergraduate and graduate programs at George Mason University, within the context of the ongoing revolution in data-intensive science. Both general and specific recommendations regarding science education will also be presented, extending from graduate training, to undergraduate science majors, and to undergraduate general education students. Examples of professional opportunities for data scientists in the key informatics (data science) research areas will be highlighted.

  13. Stochastic flux analysis of chemical reaction networks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chemical reaction networks provide an abstraction scheme for a broad range of models in biology and ecology. The two common means for simulating these networks are the deterministic and the stochastic approaches. The traditional deterministic approach, based on differential equations, enjoys a rich set of analysis techniques, including a treatment of reaction fluxes. However, the discrete stochastic simulations, which provide advantages in some cases, lack a quantitative treatment of network fluxes. Results We describe a method for flux analysis of chemical reaction networks, where flux is given by the flow of species between reactions in stochastic simulations of the network. Extending discrete event simulation algorithms, our method constructs several data structures, and thereby reveals a variety of statistics about resource creation and consumption during the simulation. We use these structures to quantify the causal interdependence and relative importance of the reactions at arbitrary time intervals with respect to the network fluxes. This allows us to construct reduced networks that have the same flux-behavior, and compare these networks, also with respect to their time series. We demonstrate our approach on an extended example based on a published ODE model of the same network, that is, Rho GTP-binding proteins, and on other models from biology and ecology. Conclusions We provide a fully stochastic treatment of flux analysis. As in deterministic analysis, our method delivers the network behavior in terms of species transformations. Moreover, our stochastic analysis can be applied, not only at steady state, but at arbitrary time intervals, and used to identify the flow of specific species between specific reactions. Our cases study of Rho GTP-binding proteins reveals the role played by the cyclic reverse fluxes in tuning the behavior of this network. PMID:24314153

  14. Effective string description of confining flux tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Bastian B.; Meineri, Marco

    2016-08-01

    We review the current knowledge about the theoretical foundations of the effective string theory for confining flux tubes and the comparison of the predictions to pure gauge lattice data. A concise presentation of the effective string theory is provided, incorporating recent developments. We summarize the predictions for the spectrum and the profile/width of the flux tube and their comparison to lattice data. The review closes with a short summary of open questions for future research.

  15. Splitting of inviscid fluxes for real gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Vanleer, Bram; Shuen, Jian-Shun

    1988-01-01

    Flux-vector and flux-difference splittings for the inviscid terms of the compressible flow equations are derived under the assumption of a general equation of state for a real gas in equilibrium. No necessary assumptions, approximations or auxiliary quantities are introduced. The formulas derived include several particular cases known for ideal gases and readily apply to curvilinear coordinates. Applications of the formulas in a TVD algorithm to one-dimensional shock-tube and nozzle problems show their quality and robustness.

  16. Recurrence Analysis of Eddy Covariance Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Holger; Flach, Milan; Foken, Thomas; Hauhs, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The eddy covariance (EC) method is one key method to quantify fluxes in biogeochemical cycles in general, and carbon and energy transport across the vegetation-atmosphere boundary layer in particular. EC data from the worldwide net of flux towers (Fluxnet) have also been used to validate biogeochemical models. The high resolution data are usually obtained at 20 Hz sampling rate but are affected by missing values and other restrictions. In this contribution, we investigate the nonlinear dynamics of EC fluxes using Recurrence Analysis (RA). High resolution data from the site DE-Bay (Waldstein-Weidenbrunnen) and fluxes calculated at half-hourly resolution from eight locations (part of the La Thuile dataset) provide a set of very long time series to analyze. After careful quality assessment and Fluxnet standard gapfilling pretreatment, we calculate properties and indicators of the recurrent structure based both on Recurrence Plots as well as Recurrence Networks. Time series of RA measures obtained from windows moving along the time axis are presented. Their interpretation is guided by three different questions: (1) Is RA able to discern periods where the (atmospheric) conditions are particularly suitable to obtain reliable EC fluxes? (2) Is RA capable to detect dynamical transitions (different behavior) beyond those obvious from visual inspection? (3) Does RA contribute to an understanding of the nonlinear synchronization between EC fluxes and atmospheric parameters, which is crucial for both improving carbon flux models as well for reliable interpolation of gaps? (4) Is RA able to recommend an optimal time resolution for measuring EC data and for analyzing EC fluxes? (5) Is it possible to detect non-trivial periodicities with a global RA? We will demonstrate that the answers to all five questions is affirmative, and that RA provides insights into EC dynamics not easily obtained otherwise.

  17. AmeriFlux US-Bkg Brookings

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, Tilden

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Bkg Brookings. Site Description - The Brookings site is located in a private pasture, consisting of a mixture of C3 and C4 species actively used for grazing. Belonging to the Northern Great Plains Rangelands, the grassland is representative of many in the north central United States, with seasonal winter conditions and a wet growing season.

  18. Micromorphic Balances and Source-flux Duality

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, J. D.

    2011-11-29

    This is a further note on the (Gauss-Maxwell) force-flux construct proposed previously (Goddard, J. D., A note on Eringen's moment balances, Int. J. Eng. Sci., in the press, 2011). Motivated in part by its promise as a homogenization technique for constructing micromorphic continua, the present work is focused rather on some additional representations and on novel applications, such as the derivation of dissipative thermodynamic potentials from force-flux relations.

  19. Dynamics of flux tubes in accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vishniac, E. T.; Duncan, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    The study of magnetized plasmas in astrophysics is complicated by a number of factors, not the least of which is that in considering magnetic fields in stars or accretion disks, we are considering plasmas with densities well above those we can study in the laboratory. In particular, whereas laboratory plasmas are dominated by the confining magnetic field pressure, stars, and probably accretion disks, have magnetic fields whose beta (ratio of gas pressure to magnetic field pressure) is much greater than 1. Observations of the Sun suggest that under such circumstances the magnetic field breaks apart into discrete flux tubes with a small filling factor. On the other hand, theoretical treatments of MHD turbulence in high-beta plasmas tend to assume that the field is more or less homogeneously distributed throughout the plasma. Here we consider a simple model for the distribution of magnetic flux tubes in a turbulent medium. We discuss the mechanism by which small inhomogeneities evolve into discrete flux tubes and the size and distribution of such flux tubes. We then apply the model to accretion disks. We find that the fibrilation of the magnetic field does not enhance magnetic buoyancy. We also note that the evolution of an initially diffuse field in a turbulent medium, e.g., any uniform field in a shearing flow, will initially show exponential growth as the flux tubes form. This growth saturates when the flux tube formation is complete and cannot be used as the basis for a self-sustaining dynamo effect. Since the typical state of the magnetic field is a collection of intense flux tubes, this effect is of limited interest. However, it may be important early in the evolution of the galactic magnetic field, and it will play a large role in numerical simulations. Finally, we note that the formation of flux tubes is an essential ingredient in any successful dynamo model for stars or accretion disks.

  20. Galileo Net Flux Radiometer Report 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomasko, Martin G.

    1997-01-01

    On 7 December 1995, the Galileo probe entered Jupiter's atmosphere. The Net Flux Radiometer (NFR) on board the probe, measured upward and downward fluxes in the visible and infrared. At the University of Arizona, we have analyzed the data from the two visible-light channels, as well as the solar contributions to the thermal channels. The results are being prepared for submission to JGR in early September.

  1. Shear fragmentation of unstable flux flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunchur, Milind N.; Ivlev, Boris I.; Knight, James M.

    2002-08-01

    When free flux flow is pushed beyond its instability, the homogeneous flow becomes spatially distorted leading to a new class of dynamic phases with steps in resistivity. At high-flux densities B, the relatively incompressible vortex matter fragments into domains of constant shear curvature, leading to a horizontal-sawtooth-shaped current-voltage characteristic. Measurements on Y1Ba2Cu3O7-δ films confirm this behavior and are quantitatively consistent with the model, which has no adjustable parameters.

  2. Designing CNR, a very high thermal neutron flux facility

    SciTech Connect

    Difilippo, F.C.

    1986-01-01

    According to a recent study (Eastman-Seitz Committee, National Academy of Science) there is a need for a new generation of steady neutron sources with a thermal neutron flux peak between 5 to 10 times 10/sup 15//cm/sup 2/ sec. Ideally the neutron source would have to operate continuously for several days (two weeks at least) with minimum time (2 to 3 days) for refueling and/or maintenance and it would also be used to irradiate materials and produce isotopes. This paper describes the preliminary design of the nuclear reactor for the proposed Center for Neutron Research (CNR). A duplication of existing designs (HFIR, (ORNL), ILL (Grenoble, France)) would imply high total power and small core life; the necessity of higher efficiencies (in terms of peak-flux-per-unit source or power) then becomes apparent. We have found analytical expressions for the efficiency in terms of a few parameters such as the volume of the source and the Fermi age and diffusion length of thermal neutrons in both the source and reflector regions. A single analytical expression can then be used for scoping the design and to intercompare radically different designs. Higher efficiencies can be achieved by reducing the volume and the moderation of a core immersed in a very low absorbing reflector; on the contrary a very long core life has a negative effect on the efficiency at beginning of life. Consequently, and after detailed calculations, we have found a candidate design with the following characteristics: core, U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/, 93% enriched, 18.1-kg /sup 235/U, metal fraction 50%, Al cladding, and 35-L volume; reflector and moderator, D/sub 2/O; efficiency at end of life (EOL) with respect to the ILL reactor, 1.29; flux at EOL, 10 x 10/sup 15//cm/sup 2/ sec (power in core 270. MW); core life, 14 days; burnup 28.4%.

  3. Flux and brightness calculations for various synchrotron radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, J.M.; Hulbert, S.L.

    1991-11-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) storage rings are powerful scientific and technological tools. The first generation of storage rings in the US., e.g., SURF (Washington, D.C.), Tantalus (Wisconsin), SSRL (Stanford), and CHESS (Cornell), revolutionized VUV, soft X-ray, and hard X-ray science. The second (present) generation of storage rings, e.g. the NSLS VUV and XRAY rings and Aladdin (Wisconsin), have sustained the revolution by providing higher stored currents and up to a factor of ten smaller electron beam sizes than the first generation sources. This has made possible a large number of experiments that could not performed using first generation sources. In addition, the NSLS XRAY ring design optimizes the performance of wigglers (high field periodic magnetic insertion devices). The third generation storage rings, e.g. ALS (Berkeley) and APS (Argonne), are being designed to optimize the performance of undulators (low field periodic magnetic insertion devices). These extremely high brightness sources will further revolutionize x-ray science by providing diffraction-limited x-ray beams. The output of undulators and wigglers is distinct from that of bending magnets in magnitude, spectral shape, and in spatial and angular size. Using published equations, we have developed computer programs to calculate the flux, central intensity, and brightness output bending magnets and selected wigglers and undulators of the NSLS VUV and XRAY rings, the Advanced Light Source (ALS), and the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Following is a summary of the equations used, the graphs and data produced, and the computer codes written. These codes, written in the C programming language, can be used to calculate the flux, central intensity, and brightness curves for bending magnets and insertion devices on any storage ring.

  4. Flux noise due to magnetic impurities in superconducting circuits: Optimal spin texture and role of phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sousa, Rogério

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) and other superconducting circuits are limited by intrinsic flux noise with spectral density 1 /fα with α < 1 whose origin is believed to be due to spin impurities. We present a theory of flux noise in the presence of phase transitions and arbitrary spin textures in the impurity spin system. At higher temperatures we find that the spin-spin correlation length scale (describing, e.g., the average size of ferromagnetic spin clusters) greatly impacts the scaling of flux noise with wire geometry. At lower temperatures we find that flux noise is quite sensitive to the particular spin texture realized by the spin system ground state. Remarkably, we show that flux-noise is exactly equal to zero when the spins form a poloidal texture. Flux noise is nonzero for other spin textures, but gets reduced in the presence of correlated ferromagnetic fluctuations between the top and bottom wire surfaces, where the flux vectors are antiparallel. This demonstrates the idea of engineering spin textures and/or intersurface correlation as a method to reduce flux noise in superconducting circuits. This research was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (RGPIN/342982-2010, EGP/429649-2012) through its Discovery and Engage programs.

  5. Flux-driven algebraic damping of m = 1 diocotron mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chim, Chi Yung; O'Neil, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Recent experiments with pure electron plasmas in a Malmberg-Penning trap have observed the algebraic damping of m = 1 diocotron modes. Transport due to small field asymmetries produce a low density halo of electrons moving radially outward from the plasma core, and the mode damping begins when the halo reaches the resonant radius rres, where f = mfE × B (rres) . The damping rate is proportional to the flux of halo particles through the resonant layer. The damping is related to, but distinct from spatial Landau damping, in which a linear wave-particle resonance produces exponential damping. This poster explains with analytic theory and simulations the new algebraic damping due to both mobility and diffusive fluxes. As electrons are swept around the ``cat's eye'' orbits of resonant wave-particle interaction, they form a dipole (m = 1) density distribution, and the electric field from this distribution produces an E × B drift of the core back to the axis, i.e. damps the m = 1 mode. Supported by National Science Foundation Grant PHY-1414570.

  6. Enacting science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Anthony Leo

    My study examines the development of forms of knowing that arise when students engage in open-ended explorations involving self-directed design and building involving simple materials. It is grounded in an enactivist theoretical perspective on cognition which holds that the creation of action-thought processes for engaging the world is interwoven with the meanings that are constructed for these experiences. A dynamic conception of persons-acting-in-a-setting is fundamental to an enactivist view of cognition. How is understanding enacted in building activity? How does the shape of a problem emerge? How do students enact meaning and understanding when they experience a high degree of physical engagement in building things? What are some characteristics of an enactive learning/teaching environment? My research settings comprise a range of individual, group and classroom engagements of varying lengths over a three and one-half year period. The first research episode involved two grade eight students in an investigation of Paper Towels. The second four month engagement was in a grade nine science class that culminated in the building of a Solar House. The third grade ten episode involved a one month project to build a Mousetrap Powered Car. A fourth Invent a Machine project was conducted in two grade eight science classes taught by the teacher who participated in the Solar House project. Two students were present in three of the four projects. I interviewed one of these students upon completion of his high school physics courses. I found that building is a form of thinking which develops competency in managing complex practical tasks. A triadic relationship of exploration, planning and acting is present. Practical and procedural understandings emerge as students enter and re-enter self-directed problem settings. Thinking patterns depend on the kinds of materials chosen, the ways they are used, and on how students contextualize the problem. Classroom assessment

  7. Implicit Flux Feedback Control for Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, Frederick Joseph

    Design and implementation of a dynamic system that includes magnetic bearings is dependent on knowledge of the relationship between the command input to the magnetic actuator and the force that the bearing actually applies to the rotor (or other structure) being controlled. Traditional designs relate the bearing coil current to the developed bearing force; unfortunately, the current-to-force relationship is not invariant to magnetic hysteresis, magnetic saturation, eddy current effects, or changes in the bearing air gap length. To overcome these limitations, an approach known as implicit flux feedback is explored. Since the gap force in a magnetic circuit is directly related to the flux in that gap, measuring the gap flux and employing it as a feedback state results in a bearing with an improved command -to-force relation which is less subject to the error sources mentioned above. Confirmation of the flux-to-force relationship is accomplished via experiments on a test apparatus specifically designed to allow simultaneous force and flux measurements on a single-axis magnetic bearing (using both laminated and solid magnetic components). Successful implementation of the flux feedback algorithm simplifies the control system design of magnetic bearing systems by providing a more accurate, well characterized actuator model, and, by overcoming such effects as hysteresis, saturation, eddy currents and gap dependence, this approach provides magnetic bearings which exhibit significantly improved dynamic performance.

  8. Aeolian particle flux profiles and transport unsteadiness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Bernard O.; Davidson-Arnott, Robin G. D.

    2014-07-01

    Vertical profiles of aeolian sediment flux are commonly modeled as an exponential decay of particle (mass) transport with height above the surface. Data from field and wind-tunnel studies provide empirical support for this parameterization, although a large degree of variation in the precise shape of the vertical flux profile has been reported. This paper explores the potential influence of wind unsteadiness and time-varying intensity of transport on the geometry (slope, curvature) of aeolian particle flux profiles. Field evidence from a complex foredune environment demonstrates that (i) the time series of wind and sediment particle flux are often extremely variable with periods of intense transport (referred to herein as sediment "flurries") separated by periods of weak or no transport; (ii) sediment flurries contribute the majority of transport in a minority of the time; (iii) the structure of a flurry includes a "ramp-up" phase lasting a few seconds, a "core" phase lasting a few seconds to many tens of seconds, and a "ramp-down" phase lasting a few seconds during which the system relaxes to a background, low-intensity transport state; and (iv) conditional averaging of flux profiles for flurry and nonflurry periods reveals differences between the geometry of the mean profiles and hence the transport states that produce them. These results caution against the indiscriminate reliance on regression statistics derived from time-averaged sediment flux profiles, especially those with significant flurry and nonflurry periods, when calibrating or assessing the validity of steady state models of aeolian saltation.

  9. Cosmic string formation by flux trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Olum, Ken D.; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2007-11-15

    We study the formation of cosmic strings by confining a stochastic magnetic field into flux tubes in a numerical simulation. We use overdamped evolution in a potential that is minimized when the flux through each face in the simulation lattice is a multiple of the fundamental flux quantum. When the typical number of flux quanta through a correlation-length-sized region is initially about 1, we find a string network similar to that generated by the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. With larger initial flux, the loop distribution and the Brownian shape of the infinite strings remain unchanged, but the fraction of length in infinite strings is increased. A 2D slice of the network exhibits bundles of strings pointing in the same direction, as in earlier 2D simulations. We find, however, that strings belonging to the same bundle do not stay together in 3D for much longer than the correlation length. As the initial flux per correlation length is decreased, there is a point at which infinite strings disappear, as in the Hagedorn transition.

  10. Fabrication of Thin Film Heat Flux Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, Herbert A.

    1992-01-01

    Prototype thin film heat flux sensors have been constructed and tested. The sensors can be applied to propulsion system materials and components. The sensors can provide steady state and fast transient heat flux information. Fabrication of the sensor does not require any matching of the mounting surface. Heat flux is proportional to the temperature difference across the upper and lower surfaces of an insulation material. The sensor consists of an array of thermocouples on the upper and lower surfaces of a thin insulating layer. The thermocouples for the sensor are connected in a thermopile arrangement. A 100 thermocouple pair heat flux sensor has been fabricated on silicon wafers. The sensor produced an output voltage of 200-400 microvolts when exposed to a hot air heat gun. A 20 element thermocouple pair heat flux sensor has been fabricated on aluminum oxide sheet. Thermocouples are Pt-Pt/Rh with silicon dioxide as the insulating material. This sensor produced an output of 28 microvolts when exposed to the radiation of a furnace operating at 1000 C. Work is also underway to put this type of heat flux sensor on metal surfaces.

  11. Quantifying sources and sinks of reactive gases in the lower atmosphere using airborne flux observations

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, Glenn; Hanisco, T. F.; Atkinson, H. L.; Bui, Thaopaul; Crounse, J. D.; Dean-Day, J.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Hall, S. R.; Huey, L. G.; Jacob, D.; Karl, T.; Kim, P. S.; Liu, X.; Marvin, M. R.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Misztal, Pawel K.; Nguyen, Tran B.; Peischl, Jeff; Pollack, Ilana; Ryerson, T. B.; St Clair, J. M.; Teng, A. P.; Travis, Katherine; Ullmann, K.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wisthaler, Armin

    2015-10-16

    Atmospheric composition is governed by the interplay of emissions, chemistry, deposition, and transport. Substantial questions surround each of these processes, especially in forested environments with strong biogenic emissions. Utilizing aircraft observations acquired over a forest in the southeast U.S., we calculate eddy covariance fluxes for a suite of reactive gases and apply the synergistic information derived from this analysis to quantify emission and deposition fluxes, oxidant concentrations, aerosol uptake coefficients, and other key parameters. Evaluation of results against state-of-the-science models and parameterizations provides insight into our current understanding of this system and frames future observational priorities. As a near-direct measurement of fundamental process rates, airborne fluxes offer a new tool to improve biogenic and anthropogenic emissions inventories, photochemical mechanisms, and deposition parameterizations.

  12. Quantifying Sources and Sinks of Reactive Gases in the Lower Atmosphere Using Airborne Flux Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, G. M.; Hanisco, T. F.; Arkinson, H. L.; Bui, T. P.; Crounse, J. D.; Dean-Day, J.; Goldstein, A.; Guenther, A.; Hall, S. R.; Huey, G.; Jacob, D. J.; Karl, T.; Kim, P. S.; Liu, X.; Marvin, M. R.; Mikoviny, T.; Misztal, P. K.; Nguyen, T. B.; Peischl, J.; Pollack, I.; Ryerson, T.; St. Clair, J. M.; Teng, A.; Travis, K. R.; Ullmann, K.; Wennberg, P.O.; Wisthaler, A.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric composition is governed by the interplay of emissions, chemistry, deposition, and transport. Substantial questions surround each of these processes, especially in forested environments with strong biogenic emissions. Utilizing aircraft observations acquired over a forest in the southeast U.S., we calculate eddy covariance fluxes for a suite of reactive gases and apply the synergistic information derived from this analysis to quantify emission and deposition fluxes, oxidant concentrations, aerosol uptake coefficients, and other key parameters. Evaluation of results against state-of-the-science models and parameterizations provides insight into our current understanding of this system and frames future observational priorities. As a near-direct measurement of fundamental process rates, airborne fluxes offer a new tool to improve biogenic and anthropogenic emissions inventories, photochemical mechanisms, and deposition parameterizations.

  13. Partitioning Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor Fluxes Using Correlation Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Partitioning of eddy covariance flux measurements is routinely done to quantify the contributions of separate processes to the overall fluxes. Measurements of carbon dioxide fluxes represent the difference between gross ecosystem photosynthesis and total respiration, while measurements of water vapo...

  14. FOREWORD Nanomaterials science Nanomaterials science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrer, Heinrich

    2010-10-01

    The nanometer regime covers the transition from condensed matter behavior to atomic and molecular properties and thus is a very rich but also very demanding area in materials science. Close to the condensed matter side, properties and functions might still very well be scalable, whereas close to the atomic and molecular side, the scalability is mostly lost. Properties and functions change qualitatively or quantitatively by orders of magnitude when the dimensions become smaller than a critical size in the nanometer range. Examples are the ballistic regime for electron or spin transport at dimensions below the mean free path, near-field effects in scanning near-field optical microscopy and quantum wells when the dimensions are below an appropriate wavelength, novel electronic, mechanical, and chemical properties when the number of bulk atoms becomes smaller than that of surface atoms, quantum conduction, and Coulomb blockade. Thus, by going below a certain size, an abundance of novel properties and functions are at one's disposal, or, in other words, we can functionalize materials simply by reducing their size to the nanoscale. The key to the future lies in the functions that we give to materials, not just in finding 'novel functional materials'. This catch expression in many materials science programs and initiatives of the past two decades sounds great, but it is not what really counts. All materials are functional in one way or another and, therefore, all new materials are 'novel functional materials'. Certainly, finding new materials is always an important part of progress, but we should also focus on the much larger domain of novel functions that we can give to existing or modified materials. A good example is semiconductors: they are fifty or more years old and their properties are very well known, but they were not of widespread interest and use until the transistor changed their destiny into being the central material in the information technology revolution

  15. Upward- directed charged particle flux detection in the MSL/RAD instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, Jan Kristoffer; Zeitlin, Cary; Koehler, Jan; Hassler, Donald M.; Rafkin, Scot; Guo, Jingnan; Ehresmann, Bent; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Matthiä, Daniel; Lohf, Henning

    2016-07-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity, operating on the surface of Mars, is exposed to radiation fluxes from above and below. Galactic Cosmic Rays travel through the Martian atmosphere, producing a modified spectrum consisting of both primary and secondary particles at ground level. These particles produce an upward- directed secondary particle spectrum as they interact with the Martian soil.These upward- directed particles then pass through the rover and enter the Radiation Assessment Detector onboard the rover from below. Here, we characterize the upward- and downward- directed spectra measured by the detector through a combination of GEANT4 and Planetocosmics simulations. We develop and demonstrate a method to discriminate between upward- and downward- directed particle fluxes during the MSL cruise phase to Mars and the surface science phase. This method enables us to extend the energy range and directionality of RAD beyond its design limits.

  16. Scientific and Technical Support for the Galileo Net Flux Radiometer Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sromovsky, Lawrence A.

    1994-01-01

    Tasks required during the post launch period are briefly as follows: attend Project Science Group meetings; support in-flight checkouts; maintain and keep safe the spare instrument and ground support equipment (GSE); organize and maintain documentation; finish calibration measurements, documentation, and analysis; characterize and diagnose instrument anomalies; develop descent data analysis tools; and science data analysis and publication. This report provides background information on the net flux radiometer (NFR) instrument as well as being a complete progress report on the support for the Galileo NFR. experiment.

  17. SMAP Science Data System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuddy, D.; Gluck, S.; Hua, H.; Weiss, B.; Wong, C.; Kwoun, O.; Cruz, J.

    2012-12-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will retrieve global surface soil moisture and freeze/thaw state based on measurements acquired by remote sensing instruments that fly on an Earth orbiting satellite. The SMAP observatory will launch no earlier than October 2014 into a near-polar, sun-synchronous orbit. The SMAP instrument suite includes a radiometer and a synthetic aperture radar. This paper will describe the Science Data System (SDS) that will process the SMAP raw data into higher-level products. SMAP data products will provide calibrated radar backscatter and radiometer brightness temperatures, derived geophysical parameters in the form of soil moisture and freeze/thaw states, daily maps of these geophysical parameters, as well as modeled analyses of global soil moisture and carbon flux in Boreal regions. The SDS is a fully automated system that will process the incoming raw data from the instruments, incorporate spacecraft and instrument engineering data, and use both dynamic and static ancillary products from the scientific community. The SDS will use the Object Oriented Data Technology (OODT) from Apache Software Foundation to control the 13 standard data product processors and additional 15 preprocessors. The standard data products will appear in Hierarchical Data Format-5 (HDF5) format. The products will contain metadata that conform to the ISO 19115 standard. The Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) will host and distribute SMAP Radar data, while the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) will host and distribute all other SMAP products.

  18. Characterizing In Situ Uranium and Groundwater Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, J.; Newman, M. A.; Stucker, V.; Peacock, A.; Ranville, J.; Cabaniss, S.; Hatfield, K.; Annable, M. D.; Klammler, H.; Perminova, I. V.

    2010-12-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a new sensor that incorporates the field-tested concepts of the passive flux meter to provide direct in situ measures of uranium and groundwater fluxes. The sensor uses two sorbents and resident tracers to measure uranium flux and specific discharge directly; but, sensor principles and design should also apply to fluxes of other radionuclides. Flux measurements will assist with obtaining field-scale quantification of subsurface processes affecting uranium transport (e.g., advection) and transformation (e.g., uranium attenuation) and further advance conceptual and computational models for field scale simulations. Project efforts will expand our current understanding of how field-scale spatial variations in uranium fluxes and those for salient electron donor/acceptors, and groundwater are coupled to spatial variations in measured microbial biomass/community composition, effective field-scale uranium mass balances, attenuation, and stability. The new sensor uses an anion exchange resin to measure uranium fluxes and activated carbon with resident tracers to measure water fluxes. Several anion-exchange resins including Dowex 21K and 21K XLT, Purolite A500, and Lewatit S6328 were tested as sorbents for capturing uranium on the sensor and Lewatit S6328 was determined to be the most effective over the widest pH range. Four branched alcohols proved useful as resident tracers for measuring groundwater flows using activated carbon for both laboratory and field conditions. The flux sensor was redesigned to prevent the discharge of tracers to the environment, and the new design was tested in laboratory box aquifers and the field. Geochemical modeling of equilibrium speciation using Visual Minteq and an up-to-date thermodynamic data base suggested Ca-tricarbonato-uranyl complexes predominate under field conditions, while calculated uranyl ion activities were sensitive to changes in pH, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and alkaline earth

  19. Turbulent fluxes by "Conditional Eddy Sampling"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebicke, Lukas

    2015-04-01

    Turbulent flux measurements are key to understanding ecosystem scale energy and matter exchange, including atmospheric trace gases. While the eddy covariance approach has evolved as an invaluable tool to quantify fluxes of e.g. CO2 and H2O continuously, it is limited to very few atmospheric constituents for which sufficiently fast analyzers exist. High instrument cost, lack of field-readiness or high power consumption (e.g. many recent laser-based systems requiring strong vacuum) further impair application to other tracers. Alternative micrometeorological approaches such as conditional sampling might overcome major limitations. Although the idea of eddy accumulation has already been proposed by Desjardin in 1972 (Desjardin, 1977), at the time it could not be realized for trace gases. Major simplifications by Businger and Oncley (1990) lead to it's widespread application as 'Relaxed Eddy Accumulation' (REA). However, those simplifications (flux gradient similarity with constant flow rate sampling irrespective of vertical wind velocity and introduction of a deadband around zero vertical wind velocity) have degraded eddy accumulation to an indirect method, introducing issues of scalar similarity and often lack of suitable scalar flux proxies. Here we present a real implementation of a true eddy accumulation system according to the original concept. Key to our approach, which we call 'Conditional Eddy Sampling' (CES), is the mathematical formulation of conditional sampling in it's true form of a direct eddy flux measurement paired with a performant real implementation. Dedicated hardware controlled by near-real-time software allows full signal recovery at 10 or 20 Hz, very fast valve switching, instant vertical wind velocity proportional flow rate control, virtually no deadband and adaptive power management. Demonstrated system performance often exceeds requirements for flux measurements by orders of magnitude. The system's exceptionally low power consumption is ideal

  20. Comparing momentum and mass (aerosol source function) fluxes for the North Atlantic and the European Arctic using different parameterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, Iwona; Piskozub, Jacek

    2016-04-01

    Wind speed has a disproportionate role in the forming of the climate as well it is important part in calculate of the air-sea interaction thanks which we can study climate change. It influences on mass, momentum and energy fluxes and the standard way of parametrizing those fluxes is use this variable. However, the very functions used to calculate fluxes from winds have evolved over time and still have large differences (especially in the case of aerosol sources function). As we have shown last year at the EGU conference (PICO presentation EGU2015-11206-1) and in recent public article (OSD 12,C1262-C1264,2015) there is a lot of uncertainties in the case of air-sea CO2 fluxes. In this study we calculated regional and global mass and momentum fluxes based on several wind speed climatologies. To do this we use wind speed from satellite data in FluxEngine software created within OceanFlux GHG Evolution project. Our main area of interest is European Arctic because of the interesting air-sea interaction physics (six-monthly cycle, strong wind and ice cover) but because of better data coverage we have chosen the North Atlantic as a study region to make it possible to compare the calculated fluxes to measured ones. An additional reason was the importance of the area for the North Hemisphere climate, and especially for Europe. The study is related to an ESA funded OceanFlux GHG Evolution project and is meant to be part of a PhD thesis (of I.W) funded by Centre of Polar Studies "POLAR-KNOW" (a project of the Polish Ministry of Science). We have used a modified version FluxEngine, a tool created within an earlier ESA funded project (OceanFlux Greenhouse Gases) for calculating trace gas fluxes to derive two purely wind driven (at least in the simplified form used in their parameterizations) fluxes. The modifications included removing gas transfer velocity formula from the toolset and replacing it with the respective formulas for momentum transfer and mass (aerosol production

  1. Transition region fluxes in A-F Dwarfs: Basal fluxes and dynamo activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Frederick M.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Boyd, William

    1988-01-01

    The transition region spectra of 87 late A and early F dwarfs and subgiants were analyzed. The emission line fluxes are uniformly strong in the early F stars, and drop off rapidly among the late A stars. The basal flux level in the F stars is consistent with an extrapolation of that observed among the G stars, while the magnetic component displays the same flux-flux relations seen among solar-like stars. Despite the steep decrease in transition region emission flux for B-V less than 0.28, C II emission is detected in alpha Aql (B-V = 0.22). The dropoff in emission is inconsistent with models of the mechanically generated acoustic flux available. It is concluded that, although the nonmagnetic basal heating is an increasingly important source of atmospheric heating among the early F stars, magnetic heating occurs in any star which has a sufficiently thick convective zone to generate acoustic heating.

  2. Citizen Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Memarsadeghi, Nargess

    2015-01-01

    Scientists and engineers constantly face new challenges, despite myriad advances in computing. More sets of data are collected today from earth and sky than there is time or resources available to carefully analyze them. Some problems either don't have fast algorithms to solve them or have solutions that must be found among millions of options, a situation akin to finding a needle in a haystack. But all hope is not lost: advances in technology and the Internet have empowered the general public to participate in the scientific process via individual computational resources and brain cognition, which isn't matched by any machine. Citizen scientists are volunteers who perform scientific work by making observations, collecting and disseminating data, making measurements, and analyzing or interpreting data without necessarily having any scientific training. In so doing, individuals from all over the world can contribute to science in ways that wouldn't have been otherwise possible.

  3. Monitoring method for neutron flux for a spallation target in an accelerator driven sub-critical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiang, He, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Xue-Ying; Cui, Wen-Juan; Chen, Zhi-Qiang; Xu, Hu-Shan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we study a monitoring method for neutron flux for the spallation target used in an accelerator driven sub-critical (ADS) system, where a spallation target located vertically at the centre of a sub-critical core is bombarded vertically by high-energy protons from an accelerator. First, by considering the characteristics in the spatial variation of neutron flux from the spallation target, we propose a multi-point measurement technique, i.e. the spallation neutron flux should be measured at multiple vertical locations. To explain why the flux should be measured at multiple locations, we have studied neutron production from a tungsten target bombarded by a 250 MeV-proton beam with Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations. The simulation results indicate that the neutron flux at the central location is up to three orders of magnitude higher than the flux at lower locations. Secondly, we have developed an effective technique in order to measure the spallation neutron flux with a fission chamber (FC), by establishing the relation between the fission rate measured by FC and the spallation neutron flux. Since this relation is linear for a FC, a constant calibration factor is used to derive the neutron flux from the measured fission rate. This calibration factor can be extracted from the energy spectra of spallation neutrons. Finally, we have evaluated the proposed calibration method for a FC in the environment of an ADS system. The results indicate that the proposed method functions very well. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA03010000 and XDA03030000) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China(91426301).

  4. Science Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruning, Claus; Ko, Malcolm; Lee, David; Miake-Lye, Richard

    2006-01-01

    This report presents an overview of the latest scientific consensus understanding of the effect of aviation emissions on the atmosphere for both local air quality and climate change in order to provide a contextual framework for raising future questions to help assess the environmental benefits of technology goals. The questions may take the form of what are the environmental benefits that would result if goals are achieved, what are the consequences for other aviation pollutants, and whether tools exist to evaluate the trade-off. In addition to this documents, presentations will be made at the meeting to illustrate current developing views on these subjects. To facilitate studies on trade-offs among environmental impacts from aviation, one must start with scientific investigations that quantify the impacts. A second step is to select representative metrics with policy relevance so that diverse impacts can be put on the same common scale. The IPCC Special Report on Aviation (IPCC, 1999) serves as an excellent example of the first step. The report was produced by IPCC's Working Group 1, whose mandate is to provide the assessment of the scientific aspects of the climate system and climate change. An example of the second step is Witt et al. (2005), a study commissioned by the Environment DG of the European Commission. Within the context of CAEP, step 1 is aligned with the responsibilities of the Research Focal Points, while step 2 is more related to activities of FESG. These steps are likely to be iterative as proposed policy options will raise new science questions, and new science will expand or limit policy options. Past experiences show that clearly defined policy-related scientific needs will help focus the scientific community to marshal their intellects to provide the needed answers.

  5. Numerical Simulations of a Flux Rope Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, P.; Mackay, D. H.; Poedts, S.

    2015-03-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most violent phenomena observed on the Sun. One of the most successful models to explain CMEs is the flux rope ejection model, where a magnetic flux rope is expelled from the solar corona after a long phase along which the flux rope stays in equilibrium while magnetic energy is being accumulated. However, still many questions are outstanding on the detailed mechanism of the ejection and observations continuously provide new data to interpret and put in the context. Currently, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) are providing new insights into the early phase of CME evolution. In particular, observations show the ejection of magnetic flux ropes from the solar corona and how they evolve into CMEs. However, these observations are difficult to interpret in terms of basic physical mechanisms and quantities, thus, we need to compare equivalent quantities to test and improve our models. In our work, we intend to bridge the gap between models and observations with our model of flux rope ejection where we consistently describe the full life span of a flux rope from its formation to ejection. This is done by coupling the global non-linear force-free model (GNLFFF) built to describe the slow low- β formation phase, with a full MHD simulation run with the software MPI-AMRVAC, suitable to describe the fast MHD evolution of the flux rope ejection that happens in a heterogeneous β regime. We also explore the parameter space to identify the conditions upon which the ejection is favoured (gravity stratification and magnetic field intensity) and we produce synthesised AIA observations (171 Å and 211 Å). To carry this out, we run 3D MHD simulation in spherical coordinates where we include the role of thermal conduction and radiative losses, both of which are important for determining the temperature distribution of the solar corona during a CME. Our model of

  6. Translation of IBEX-measured ENA fluxes to the outer heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crew, G. B.; Bzowski, M.; Demajistre, R.; Funsten, H. O.; Fuselier, S. A.; Gruntman, M.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Lee, M. A.; McComas, D. J.; Moebius, E.; Roelof, E. C.; Schwadron, N. A.; Vanderspek, R.

    2009-12-01

    The flux of ENAs observed by IBEX [McComas et al. 2009 and other papers in the IBEX special issue of Science] is modulated by their transit through the heliosphere. Aside from the transformation between inertial and s/c frames, the two principal effects are a reduction in flux due to photoionization and charge-exchange and a distortion of the energetic neutral atom (ENA) trajectories due to the interplay of gravity and solar radiation pressure. This bending of trajectories also modifies the flux through focusing/defocusing. With some simplifying assumptions, it is possible to derive an analytic mapping for the trajectories. This can then be used to discuss the fluxes launched at the inside of the heliosheath, and to make some comparisons with more detailed numerical models. Reference: McComas, D.J., F. Allegrini, P. Bochsler, M. Bzowski, E.R. Christian, G.B. Crew, R. DeMajistre, H. Fahr, H. Fichtner, P.C. Frisch, H.O. Funsten, S. A. Fuselier, G. Gloeckler, M. Gruntman, J. Heerikhuisen, V. Izmodenov, P. Janzen, P. Knappenberger, S. Krimigis, H. Kucharek, M. Lee, G. Livadiotis, S. Livi, R.J. MacDowall, D. Mitchell, E. Möbius, T. Moore, N.V. Pogorelov, D. Reisenfeld, E. Roelof, L. Saul, N.A. Schwadron, P.W. Valek, R. Vanderspek, P. Wurz, G.P. Zank, First Global Observations of the Interstellar Interaction from the Interstellar Boundary Explorer, submitted to Science, 2009.

  7. Signal photon flux generated by high-frequency relic gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Wang, Sai; Wen, Hao

    2016-08-01

    The power spectrum of primordial tensor perturbations increases rapidly in the high frequency region if the spectral index n t > 0. It is shown that the amplitude of relic gravitational waves h t(5 × 109 Hz) varies from 10‑36 to 10‑25 while n t varies from ‑6.25 × 10‑3 to 0.87. A high frequency gravitational wave detector proposed by F.-Y. Li detects gravitational waves through observing the perturbed photon flux that is generated by interaction between relic gravitational waves and electromagnetic field. It is shown that the perturbative photon flux (5 × 109 Hz) varies from 1.40 × 10‑4 s‑1 to 2.85 × 107 s‑1 while n t varies from ‑6.25 × 10‑3 to 0.87. Correspondingly, the ratio of the transverse perturbative photon flux to the background photon flux varies from 10‑28 to 10‑16. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11305181,11322545,11335012) and Open Project Program of State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China (Y5KF181CJ1)

  8. Fractionalizing the vortex lattice in multiband superconductors in the flux flow region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shi-Zeng

    2014-03-01

    Because of the discovery of MgB2 and iron-based superconductors, multiband superconductors have attracted considerable attention recently. Multiband superconductors are not always straightforward extensions of the single-band counterpart, and novel features may arise. In multiband superconductors, electrons in different bands form distinct superfluid condensates, which are coupled to the same gauge field. Each condensate thus supports vortex excitation with fractional flux quantum. However the energy of a fractional vortex diverges logarithmically in the thermodynamic limit. In the ground state vortices in different bands are bounded and their normal cores are locked together to form a composite vortex with the standard integer quantum flux. It is interesting to ask whether the vortices in different condensates can decouple under certain conditions. In this talk, I will discuss the dissociation of the composite vortex lattice in the flux flow region when the disparity of superfluid density and coherence length between different bands is large. The fractional vortex lattice in different bands move with different velocities after the dissociation transition, and the dissociation transition shows up as an increase of flux flow resistivity. In the dissociated phase, the Shapiro steps are developed when an ac current is superimposed with a dc current. We also propose to stabilize the fractional vortices by periodic pinning arrays. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering.

  9. Measurement of Integrated Low Frequency Flux Noise in Superconducting Flux/Phase Qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Mao Bo; Qiu Wei; Han Siyuan

    2008-11-07

    We measured the integrated low frequency flux noise ({approx}1 m{phi}{sub 0}) of an rf SQUID as a flux qubit by fitting the resonant peaks from photon assistant tunneling (PAT). The energy relaxation time Tl between the ground and first excited states in the same potential well, measured directly in time domain, is 3 ns. From these results we identified low frequency flux noise as the dominant source of decoherence. In addition, we found that the measured values of integrated flux noise in three qubits of various sizes differ more than an order of magnitude.

  10. The SeaFlux Turbulent Flux Dataset Version 1.0 Documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayson, Carol Anne; Roberts, J. Brent; Bogdanoff, Alec S.

    2012-01-01

    Under the auspices of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Global Energy and Water cycle EXperiment (GEWEX) Data and Assessment Panel (GDAP), the SeaFlux Project was created to investigate producing a high-resolution satellite-based dataset of surface turbulent fluxes over the global oceans. The most current release of the SeaFlux product is Version 1.0; this represents the initial release of turbulent surface heat fluxes, associated near-surface variables including a diurnally varying sea surface temperature.

  11. Production flux of sea spray aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    de Leeuw, G.; Lewis, E.; Andreas, E. L.; Anguelova, M. D.; Fairall, C. W.; O’Dowd, C.; Schulz, M.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2011-05-07

    Knowledge of the size- and composition-dependent production flux of primary sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles and its dependence on environmental variables is required for modeling cloud microphysical properties and aerosol radiative influences, interpreting measurements of particulate matter in coastal areas and its relation to air quality, and evaluating rates of uptake and reactions of gases in sea spray drops. This review examines recent research pertinent to SSA production flux, which deals mainly with production of particles with r{sub 80} (equilibrium radius at 80% relative humidity) less than 1 {micro}m and as small as 0.01 {micro}m. Production of sea spray particles and its dependence on controlling factors has been investigated in laboratory studies that have examined the dependences on water temperature, salinity, and the presence of organics and in field measurements with micrometeorological techniques that use newly developed fast optical particle sizers. Extensive measurements show that water-insoluble organic matter contributes substantially to the composition of SSA particles with r{sub 80} < 0.25 {micro}m and, in locations with high biological activity, can be the dominant constituent. Order-of-magnitude variation remains in estimates of the size-dependent production flux per white area, the quantity central to formulations of the production flux based on the whitecap method. This variation indicates that the production flux may depend on quantities such as the volume flux of air bubbles to the surface that are not accounted for in current models. Variation in estimates of the whitecap fraction as a function of wind speed contributes additional, comparable uncertainty to production flux estimates.

  12. NUTRIENT FLUX AT THE SEDIMENT-WATER INTERFACE IN ESCAMBIA BAY, FL, A NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO ESTUARY INVITED SEMINAR

    EPA Science Inventory

    (Abstract). Presented at the University of Texas Marine Science Institute, 30 April 2001, Port Aransas, TX. 1 p. (ERL,GB R841).

    Nutrient flux at the sediment-water interface is an integral component of estuarine dynamics, and the benthos may represent a significant source ...

  13. Science Fairs and Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Shirley L., Ed.

    This collection of 20 articles from "The Science Teacher" and "Science and Children" is provided to assist teachers, students, and parents in preparing for science fairs. Four major questions about science fairs are addressed in the articles. They are: (1) Who should participate in a science fair? (2) How should a fair be organized? (3) What makes…

  14. Super Science Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Janice, Ed.

    This manual was developed to help K-3 teachers incorporate science and science activities as an integral part of their curricula. It integrates hands-on science activities with other curricular areas, particularly the language arts. The activities include science background information, science process skills, classroom management suggestions,…

  15. Challenges in Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staples, Greg; And Others

    This publication is a collection of science activities designed to enrich elementary or junior high science curricula. These activities encourage students to investigate facets of life sciences, physical sciences, and earth sciences either with a teacher or independently. The 70 activities have been classified into 10 subareas under these three…

  16. Salvaging Science Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinstein, Noah

    2011-01-01

    There is little evidence that the prevailing strategies of science education have an impact on the use and interpretation of science in daily life. Most science educators and science education researchers nonetheless believe that science education is intrinsically useful for students who do not go on to scientific or technical careers. This essay…

  17. People behind the Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruse, Jerrid; Borzo, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    In addition to meeting National Science Education Standards (NSES) related to the history and nature of science (NOS), reading or hearing about real scientists helps students connect with science emotionally. The authors have even noticed increased student interest in science concepts during history of science discussions. Toward these efforts,…

  18. Science for Real Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammerman, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    State and national standards identify what students should know and be able to do, including what it means to "do" science, the historical significance of science achievement and its ethical underpinnings, and science from the human perspective. Middle level science programs that address the full range of science standards and connect learning to…

  19. Team science for science communication

    PubMed Central

    Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Strauss, Benjamin H.

    2014-01-01

    Natural scientists from Climate Central and social scientists from Carnegie Mellon University collaborated to develop science communications aimed at presenting personalized coastal flood risk information to the public. We encountered four main challenges: agreeing on goals; balancing complexity and simplicity; relying on data, not intuition; and negotiating external pressures. Each challenge demanded its own approach. We navigated agreement on goals through intensive internal communication early on in the project. We balanced complexity and simplicity through evaluation of communication materials for user understanding and scientific content. Early user test results that overturned some of our intuitions strengthened our commitment to testing communication elements whenever possible. Finally, we did our best to negotiate external pressures through regular internal communication and willingness to compromise. PMID:25225381

  20. Team science for science communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Strauss, Benjamin H.

    2014-09-01

    Natural scientists from Climate Central and social scientists from Carnegie Mellon University collaborated to develop science communications aimed at presenting personalized coastal flood risk information to the public. We encountered four main challenges: agreeing on goals; balancing complexity and simplicity; relying on data, not intuition; and negotiating external pressures. Each challenge demanded its own approach. We navigated agreement on goals through intensive internal communication early on in the project. We balanced complexity and simplicity through evaluation of communication materials for user understanding and scientific content. Early user test results that overturned some of our intuitions strengthened our commitment to testing communication elements whenever possible. Finally, we did our best to negotiate external pressures through regular internal communication and willingness to compromise.

  1. Exponential flux-controlled memristor model and its floating emulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Fa-Qiang; Ma, Xi-Kui

    2015-11-01

    As commercial memristors are still unavailable in the market, mathematic models and emulators which can imitate the features of the memristor are meaningful for further research. In this paper, based on the analyses of characteristics of the q-φ curve, an exponential flux-controlled model, which has the quality that its memductance (memristance) will keep monotonically increasing or decreasing unless the voltage’s polarity reverses (if not approach the boundaries), is constructed. A new approach to designing the floating emulator of the memristor is also proposed. This floating structure can flexibly meet various demands for the current through the memristor (especially the demand for a larger current). The simulations and experiments are presented to confirm the effectiveness of this model and its floating emulator. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51377124 and 51221005), the Foundation for the Author of National Excellent Doctoral Dissertation of China (Grant No. 201337), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University of China (Grant No. NCET-13-0457), and the Natural Science Basic Research Plan in Shaanxi Province of China (Grant No. 2012JQ7026).

  2. Determining Charged Particle Flux Direction in MSL/RAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, J. K.; Kohler, J.; Guo, J.; Ehresmann, B.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Hassler, D.; Rafkin, S. C.; Boehm, E.; Böttcher, S. I.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Brinza, D. E.; Weigle, E.; Lohf, H.; Burmeister, S.; Reitz, G.; Matthiae, D.; Posner, A.; Martín-Torres, J.; Zorzano, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) is an instrument onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity, currently characterizing the radiation environment on the surface of Mars. The radiation entering the instrument from above consists mostly of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) modulated by the Martian atmosphere. From below, the instrument is exposed to secondary radiation produced by the interactions of the GCR with the soil. This secondary radiation gets further modulated going through the rover body before entering RAD. We developed a method of determining the direction of the charged particles measured by RAD. This method also extends the energy range possible for measurements with RAD beyond the intruments design limit. Using a combination of GEANT4 and Planetocosmics simulations, we reconstructed the expected charged particle spectra and intensities for upward and downward directed radiation which can be compared with observations. With the developed method, we are able to, for the first time, measure the upward charged particle flux with RAD both during the cruise phase and the surface science phase. Comparing the results of the simulations with the instrument data sets enables us to evaluate the simulation tools used to predict the Martian radiation envronment.

  3. Estimating surface fluxes using eddy covariance and numerical ogive optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sievers, J.; Papakyriakou, T.; Larsen, S. E.; Jammet, M. M.; Rysgaard, S.; Sejr, M. K.; Sørensen, L. L.

    2015-02-01

    Estimating representative surface fluxes using eddy covariance leads invariably to questions concerning inclusion or exclusion of low-frequency flux contributions. For studies where fluxes are linked to local physical parameters and up-scaled through numerical modelling efforts, low-frequency contributions interfere with our ability to isolate local biogeochemical processes of interest, as represented by turbulent fluxes. No method currently exists to disentangle low-frequency contributions on flux estimates. Here, we present a novel comprehensive numerical scheme to identify and separate out low-frequency contributions to vertical turbulent surface fluxes. For high flux rates (|Sensible heat flux| > 40 Wm-2, |latent heat flux|> 20 Wm-2 and |CO2 flux|> 100 mmol m-2 d-1 we found that the average relative difference between fluxes estimated by ogive optimization and the conventional method was low (5-20%) suggesting negligible low-frequency influence and that both methods capture the turbulent fluxes equally well. For flux rates below these thresholds, however, the average relative difference between flux estimates was found to be very high (23-98%) suggesting non-negligible low-frequency influence and that the conventional method fails in separating low-frequency influences from the turbulent fluxes. Hence, the ogive optimization method is an appropriate method of flux analysis, particularly in low-flux environments.

  4. Freshwater fluxes through the Western Fram Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Michael; Heywood, Karen; Dennis, Paul; Goldson, Laura; White, Rowan; Fahrbach, Eberhard; Schauer, Ursula; Østerhus, Svein

    Two hydrographic and δ18O transects across Fram Strait (Aug-Sept 1997, 1998) are used to examine freshwater contributions to the East Greenland Current (EGC). The EGC featured up to ˜16% meteoric water in both years, but was made comparatively more saline through the formation of up to ˜11 m of sea ice. We derive meteoric water fluxes of ˜3680 km³yr-1 in Aug-Sept 1997, and ˜2000 km³yr-1 in Aug-Sept 1998. The 1997 and 1998 data show a long-term mean sea ice flux through Fram Strait around half the long-term mean meteoric water flux. A 1991 δ18O section [Bauch et al., 1995] yielded a very similar ratio. Our 1998 section reveals fresh, low-δ18O water on the East Greenland shelf whose comparatively large volume constitutes a potentially significant contribution to the total freshwater flux through Fram Strait. Such fluxes are important to the regional and global thermohaline circulation; we suggest that efforts towards monitoring both the EGC and East Greenland shelf waters are thus required.

  5. Revisiting Ribbon Fluxes and CME Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, Brian; Kazachenko, Maria D.; Hencheck, Michael

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) remain poorly understood. A previous study found that the final speeds of CMEs were strongly correlated with the amount of photospheric magnetic flux swept out by flare ribbons. The latter quantity, which we refer to as the ribbon flux, is thought to be directly related to the amount of coronal magnetic flux that reconnects during an eruption. The prior study, however, analyzed flare ribbons associated with a small sample (N=13) of relatively fast CMEs (all > 600 km/s, mean speed > 1300 km/s). With the launch of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) in 2010, automated co-registration of ribbon images observed in UV by its Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) with line-of-sight magnetograms observed by its Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) enabled compilation of a relatively large database of ribbon fluxes. Here, we characterize relationships between ribbon fluxes and the speeds (and other properties) of manually-associated CMEs in a sample of several dozen events.

  6. Metabolic fluxes in an illuminated Arabidopsis rosette.

    PubMed

    Szecowka, Marek; Heise, Robert; Tohge, Takayuki; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Vosloh, Daniel; Huege, Jan; Feil, Regina; Lunn, John; Nikoloski, Zoran; Stitt, Mark; Fernie, Alisdair R; Arrivault, Stéphanie

    2013-02-01

    Photosynthesis is the basis for life, and its optimization is a key biotechnological aim given the problems of population explosion and environmental deterioration. We describe a method to resolve intracellular fluxes in intact Arabidopsis thaliana rosettes based on time-dependent labeling patterns in the metabolome. Plants photosynthesizing under limiting irradiance and ambient CO2 in a custom-built chamber were transferred into a (13)CO2-enriched environment. The isotope labeling patterns of 40 metabolites were obtained using liquid or gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Labeling kinetics revealed striking differences between metabolites. At a qualitative level, they matched expectations in terms of pathway topology and stoichiometry, but some unexpected features point to the complexity of subcellular and cellular compartmentation. To achieve quantitative insights, the data set was used for estimating fluxes in the framework of kinetic flux profiling. We benchmarked flux estimates to four classically determined flux signatures of photosynthesis and assessed the robustness of the estimates with respect to different features of the underlying metabolic model and the time-resolved data set. PMID:23444331

  7. Evaluation of momentum flux with radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggin, Dennis M.; Tsuda, Toshitaka; Shinbori, Atsuki

    2016-05-01

    The statistics of gravity wave momentum flux estimation are investigated using data from the MU radar at Shigariki, Japan (136°E, 35°N). The radar has been operating during campaign periods since 1986. The first part of the paper focuses on a multi-day campaign during October 13-31, 1986. The second part of the paper investigates data after 2006 when the radar was operated in a meteor scatter mode. Momentum fluxes are derived from both the turbulent scatter and the meteor scatter measurements, but the techniques are quite different. Probability Distribution Functions are formed using turbulent scatter data. These show that wave packets sometimes have momentum flux magnitudes in excess of 100 m2 s-2. The technique for meteor radars, introduced by Hocking (2005), has been widely adopted by the radar community in recent years. The momentum flux estimated using this technique is found to be anti-correlated with the background tidal winds. A validation investigation is carried out for periods with a high meteor echo data rate. The conclusion was that the method can be used to calculate the sign of momentum flux, but does not accurately specify the magnitude.

  8. A flux capacitor for moth pheromones.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Shannon B; Hansson, Bill S

    2012-05-01

    In this issue of Chemical Senses, Baker et al. propose a provocative and intriguing explanation for a commonly observed phenomenon in moth chemocommunication. Sex pheromones in moths typically consist of mixtures of long-chain unsaturated compounds in specific ratios. These ratios are correspondingly detected by male moths using separate olfactory sensory neurons for each pheromone component housed singly or multiply in long trichoid sensilla on the antennal surface. These neurons are often present in different proportions, typically with the neuron responding to the highest ratio component present in greatest abundance or with the largest dendritic diameter. In their article, Baker et al. postulate that these physical differences in neuron magnitudes arise to compensate for the higher molecular flux present with the most abundant pheromone components. Such a suggestion raises several questions concerning the physiological and behavioral nature of pheromone communication. Specifically, is the flux in a natural pheromone plume high enough to warrant increased flux detection for the most abundant components? Second, how can changes in neuronal number or size lead to increased flux detection? And finally, how would this increased flux detection be accomplished at molecular, cellular, and ultimately network scales? We address each of these questions and propose future experiments that could offer insight into the stimulating proposition raised by Baker et al. PMID:22334600

  9. Z p charged branes in flux compactifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berasaluce-González, M.; Cámara, P. G.; Marchesano, F.; Uranga, A. M.

    2013-04-01

    We consider 4d string compactifications in the presence of fluxes, and classify particles, strings and domain walls arising from wrapped branes which have charges conserved modulo an integer p, and whose annihilation is catalized by fluxes, through the Freed-Witten anomaly or its dual versions. The Z p -valued strings and particles are associated to Z p discrete gauge symmetries, which we show are realized as discrete subgroups of 4d U(1) symmetries broken by their Chern-Simons couplings to the background fluxes. We also describe examples where the discrete gauge symmetry group is actually non-Abelian. The Z p -valued domain walls separate vacua which have different flux quanta, yet are actually equivalent by an integer shift of axion fields (or further string duality symmetries). We argue that certain examples are related by T-duality to the realization of discrete gauge symmetries and Z p charges from torsion (co)homology. At a formal level, the groups classifying these discrete charges should correspond to a generalization of K-theory in the presence of general fluxes (and including fundamental strings and NS5-branes).

  10. Voodoo Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Robert

    2011-03-01

    A remarkable scientific result that appears to violate natural law may portend a revolutionary advance in human knowledge. It is, however, more likely an experimental screw up. Error is normal; it can be reduced by repeating measurements and better design of controls, but the success and credibility of science is anchored in a culture of openness. Ideas and observations are freely exposed to independent testing and evaluation by others. What emerges is the book of nature. On its pages we find, if not a simple world, at least an orderly world, in which everything from the birth of stars to falling in love is governed by the same natural laws. These laws cannot be circumvented by any amount of piety or cleverness, they can be understood - with the possible exception of String Theory. For those who elect to work outside the scientific community, errors may go unrecognized. We will examine examples of this, including claims of perpetual motion and cancer caused by cell-phone radiation.

  11. Life sciences.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Gregory K

    2002-12-01

    Space life sciences research activities are reviewed for the year. Highlights of animal studies were the first long-term flight of an animal enclosure module and an avian development facility on STS-108. Plant research efforts focused on a biomass production system for eventual use on the International Space Station (ISS), the PESTO experiment on ISS, and screening of several salad crop varieties for potential use in space. Health-related studies included the Martian Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE) on the Mars Odyssey mission, presentation of results from NASA's Biomolecular Physics and Chemistry Program, and research related to human liver cell function in space through an agreement with StelSys. In industry and academia, a memorandum of understanding was signed between NASA and the biotechnology industry to enhance communication between NASA and the industry, expand commercial biotechnology space research and development, and expand formal and informal education of industry and the public regarding biotechnology and space research. NASA selected Purdue University to lead an NSCORT for advanced life support research to develop technologies to enable long-duration planetary mission and sustain human space colonies. PMID:12506925

  12. Dust Flux Monitor Instrument for the Stardust mission to comet Wild 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuzzolino, A. J.; Economou, T. E.; McKibben, R. B.; Simpson, J. A.; McDonnell, J. A. M.; Burchell, M. J.; Vaughan, B. A. M.; Tsou, P.; Hanner, M. S.; Clark, B. C.; Brownlee, D. E.

    2003-10-01

    The Dust Flux Monitor Instrument (DFMI) is part of the Stardust instrument payload. The prime goal of the DFMI is to measure the particle flux, intensity profile, and mass distribution during passage through the coma of comet Wild 2 in January 2004. This information is valuable for assessment of spacecraft risk and health and also for interpretation of the laboratory analysis of dust captured by the Aerogel dust collectors and returned to Earth. At the encounter speed of 6.1 km/s, the DFMI measurements will extend over the particle mass range of 8 decades, from 10-11 to >10-3 g. A secondary science goal is to measure the particle flux and mass distribution during the ~7 year interplanetary portions of the mission, where, in addition to measurements of the background interplanetary dust over the radial range 0.98 AU to 2.7 AU, multiple opportunities exist for possible detection by the DFMI of interplanetary meteor-stream particles and interstellar dust. The DFMI consists of two different dust detector systems: a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) Dust Sensor Unit (SU), which measures particles with mass <~10-4 g, and a Dual Acoustic Sensor System (DASS), which utilizes two quartz piezoelectric accelerometers mounted on the first two layers of the spacecraft Whipple dust shield to measure the flux of particles with mass >10-4 g. The large Whipple shield structures provide the large effective sensitive area required for detection of the expected low flux of high-mass particles.

  13. Science and the Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA’s newest Mars rover is, the Mars Science Laboratory or Curiosity. It is ready to roam the Red Planet with the biggest and most advanced set of science instruments ever! Follow the curious ro...

  14. Science Graduates' Understanding of Science Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iqbal, Hafiz Muhammad

    1998-01-01

    Argues that the nature of science has not been emphasized effectively in the professional training of scientists in Pakistan. Describes how the development of science-process skills, an inquiry approach, and constructive learning is delayed. (DDR)

  15. Security Science as an Applied Science?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Clifton

    2001-01-01

    Describes the development of a security science degree as the emerging applied science of the protection of individuals and assets. Proposes the themes of physical, electronic, information security and facility management as scientific applications for the course. (Author/MM)

  16. Fast Flux Watch: A mechanism for online detection of fast flux networks

    PubMed Central

    Al-Duwairi, Basheer N.; Al-Hammouri, Ahmad T.

    2014-01-01

    Fast flux networks represent a special type of botnets that are used to provide highly available web services to a backend server, which usually hosts malicious content. Detection of fast flux networks continues to be a challenging issue because of the similar behavior between these networks and other legitimate infrastructures, such as CDNs and server farms. This paper proposes Fast Flux Watch (FF-Watch), a mechanism for online detection of fast flux agents. FF-Watch is envisioned to exist as a software agent at leaf routers that connect stub networks to the Internet. The core mechanism of FF-Watch is based on the inherent feature of fast flux networks: flux agents within stub networks take the role of relaying client requests to point-of-sale websites of spam campaigns. The main idea of FF-Watch is to correlate incoming TCP connection requests to flux agents within a stub network with outgoing TCP connection requests from the same agents to the point-of-sale website. Theoretical and traffic trace driven analysis shows that the proposed mechanism can be utilized to efficiently detect fast flux agents within a stub network. PMID:25685515

  17. Fast Flux Watch: A mechanism for online detection of fast flux networks.

    PubMed

    Al-Duwairi, Basheer N; Al-Hammouri, Ahmad T

    2014-07-01

    Fast flux networks represent a special type of botnets that are used to provide highly available web services to a backend server, which usually hosts malicious content. Detection of fast flux networks continues to be a challenging issue because of the similar behavior between these networks and other legitimate infrastructures, such as CDNs and server farms. This paper proposes Fast Flux Watch (FF-Watch), a mechanism for online detection of fast flux agents. FF-Watch is envisioned to exist as a software agent at leaf routers that connect stub networks to the Internet. The core mechanism of FF-Watch is based on the inherent feature of fast flux networks: flux agents within stub networks take the role of relaying client requests to point-of-sale websites of spam campaigns. The main idea of FF-Watch is to correlate incoming TCP connection requests to flux agents within a stub network with outgoing TCP connection requests from the same agents to the point-of-sale website. Theoretical and traffic trace driven analysis shows that the proposed mechanism can be utilized to efficiently detect fast flux agents within a stub network. PMID:25685515

  18. Measurement of particulate matter emission fluxes from a beef cattle feedlot using Flux-gradient technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data on air emissions from open-lot beef cattle feedlots are limited. This research was conducted to determine PM10 emission fluxes from a commercial beef cattle feedlot in Kansas using the flux-gradient technique, a widely-used micrometeorological method for gaseous emissions from open sources. V...

  19. Soil Flux Chamber Measurements with Five Species CRDS and New Realtime Chamber Flux Processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, N.; Alstad, K. P.; Arata, C.; Franz, P.

    2014-12-01

    Continuous soil flux chamber measurements remains a key tool for determining production and sequestration of direct and indirect greenhouse gases. The Picarro G2508 Cavity Ring-down Spectrometer has radically simplified soil flux studies by providing simultaneous measurements of five gases: CO2, CH4, N2O, NH3, and H2O, and by lending itself to field deployment. Successful use of the Picarro G2508 for continuous soil flux measurements in a variety of ecosystem types has already been demonstrated. Most recently, Picarro is developing a real-time processing software to simplify chamber measurements of soil flux with the G2508 CRDS. The new Realtime Chamber Flux Processor is designed to work with all chamber types and sizes, and provides real-time flux values of N2O, CO2 & CH4. The software features include chamber sequence table, flexible data tagging feature, ceiling concentration measurement shut-off parameter, user-defined run-time interval, temperature/pressure input for field monitoring and volumetric conversion, and manual flux measurement start/stop override. Realtime Chamber Flux Processor GUI interface is presented, and results from a variety of sampling designs are demonstrated to emphasize program flexibility and field capability.

  20. INTERSPECFIC VARIATION IN SO2 FLUX - LEAF SURFACE 'VERSUS' INTERNAL FLUX, AND COMPONENTS OF LEAF CONDUCTANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The object of the study was to clarify the relationships among stomatal, residual, and epidermal conductances in determining the flux of SO2 air pollution to leaves. Variations in leaf SO2 and H2O vapor fluxes were determined using four plant species: Pisum sativum L. (garden pea...

  1. About Merging Threshold and Critical Flux Concepts into a Single One: The Boundary Flux

    PubMed Central

    Stoller, Marco; Ochando-Pulido, Javier M.

    2014-01-01

    In the last decades much effort was put in understanding fouling phenomena on membranes. One successful approach to describe fouling issues on membranes is the critical flux theory. The possibility to measure a maximum value of the permeate flux for a given system without incurring in fouling issues was a breakthrough in membrane process design. However, in many cases critical fluxes were found to be very low, lower than the economic feasibility of the process. The knowledge of the critical flux value must be therefore considered as a good starting point for process design. In the last years, a new concept was introduced, the threshold flux, which defines the maximum permeate flow rate characterized by a low constant fouling rate regime. This concept, more than the critical flux, is a new practical tool for membrane process designers. In this paper a brief review on critical and threshold flux will be reported and analyzed. And since the concepts share many common aspects, merged into a new concept, called the boundary flux, the validation will occur by the analysis of previously collected data by the authors, during the treatment of olive vegetation wastewater by ultrafiltration and nanofiltration membranes. PMID:24592177

  2. Event-Based Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    1992-01-01

    Suggests that an event-based science curriculum can provide the framework for deciding what to retain in an overloaded science curriculum. Provides examples of current events and the science concepts explored related to the event. (MDH)

  3. Science: Pure or Applied?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Peter

    1980-01-01

    Through a description of some of the activities which take place in his science classroom, the author makes a strong case for the inclusion of technology, or applied science, rather than pure science in the primary curriculum. (KC)

  4. Institute for Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, G.

    1974-01-01

    The functions of the Institute for Science Education (IPN) at Kiel, West Germany, are described. The main activities of the IPN focus on development of curricula for science education and investigation of special problems arising in science teaching. (PEB)

  5. Girls in Science Rule!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Jan E.

    2003-01-01

    Describes a camping experience and its activities created for girls entering 6th grade who wanted to learn science and explore science-related fields. Indicates that the camping experience for girls promoted positive attitudes toward science learning. (KHR)

  6. Nitrous oxide fluxes from cultivated areas and rangeland: U.S. High Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weeks, E.P.; McMahon, P.B.

    2007-01-01

    Concentration profiles of N2O, a greenhouse gas, and the conservative trace gases SF6 and the chlorofluorocarbons CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, and were measured periodically through thick vadose zones at nine sites in the U.S. High Plains. The CFC and SF6 measurements were used to calibrate a one-dimensional gas diffusion model, using the parameter identification program UCODE. The calibrated model was used with N2O measurements to estimate average annual N2O flux from both the root zone and the deep vadose zone to the atmosphere. Estimates of root-zone N 2O fluxes from three rangeland sites ranged from near 0 to about 0.2 kg N2O-N ha-1 yr-1, values near the low end of the ranges determined for native grass from other studies. Estimates of root-zone N2O fluxes from two fields planted to corn (Zea mays L.) of about 2 to 6 kg N2O-N ha-1 yr-1 are similar to those determined for corn in other studies. Estimates of N2O flux from Conservation Reserve grassland converted from irrigated corn indicate that production of N2O is substantially reduced following conversion from cropland. Small N2O fluxes from the water table or from deep in the vadose zone occurred at three sites, ranging from 0.004 to 0.02 kg N 2O-N ha-1 yr-1. Our estimates of N2O flux represent space- and time-averaged values that should be useful to more fully evaluate the significance of instantaneous point flux measurements. ?? Soil Science Society of America.

  7. Icebase: A suborbital survey to map geothermal heat flux under an ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purucker, Michael E.; Connerney, John E. P.; Blakely, Richard J.; Bracken, Robert E.; Nowicki, Sophie; Le, Guan; Sabaka, Terence J.; Bonalsky, Todd M.; Kuang, Weijia; Ravat, Dhananjay; Ritz, Catherine; Vaughan, Alan P. M.; Gaina, Carmen; McEnroe, Suzanne; Lesur, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    NASA will solicit suborbital missions as part of its Earth Venture program element in the coming year. These missions are designed as complete PI-led investigations to conduct innovative hypothesis or scientific question-driven approaches to pressing questions in Earth System science. We propose to carry out a suborbital magnetic survey of Greenland using NASA's Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle to produce the first-ever map of the geothermal heat flux under an ice sheet. Better constraints on geothermal heat flux will reduce the uncertainty in future sea level rise, in turn allowing a more informed assessment of its impact on society. The geothermal heat flux depends on conditions such as mantle heat flux, and the tectonic history and heat production of the crust, all of which vary spatially. Underneath ice sheets, the geothermal heat flux influences the basal ice. Therefore heat flux is an important boundary condition in ice sheet modeling. Using magnetic data to constrain heat flux is possible because the magnetic properties of rocks are temperature dependent until they reach the Curie temperature. The technique has applications to understanding the response of Greenland ice sheet to climate forcing because the basal heat flux provides one of the boundary conditions. The technique also helps to locate the oldest ice. The oldest ice in Greenland should be found in areas of very low heat flux, and the identification of those areas is provided by this technique. Ice cores from the areas of oldest ice help to decipher past temperatures and CO2 contents. Our latest model of the geothermal heat flux under the Greenland ice sheet (http://websrv.cs.umt.edu/isis/index.php/Greenland_Basal_Heat_Flux) is based on low- resolution satellite observations collected by the CHAMP satellite between 2000 and 2010. Those observations will be enhanced by the upcoming Swarm gradient satellite mission, but the resolution will improve by less than a factor of two, from 400 km

  8. Fundamentals of heat measurement. [heat flux transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerashchenko, O. A.

    1979-01-01

    Various methods and devices for obtaining experimental data on heat flux density over wide ranges of temperature and pressure are examined. Laboratory tests and device fabrication details are supplemented by theoretical analyses of heat-conduction and thermoelectric effects, providing design guidelines and information relevant to further research and development. A theory defining the measure of correspondence between transducer signal and the measured heat flux is established for individual (isolated) heat flux transducers subject to space and time-dependent loading. An analysis of the properties of stacked (series-connected) transducers of various types (sandwich-type, plane, and spiral) is used to derive a similarity theory providing general governing relationships. The transducers examined are used in 36 types of derivative devices involving direct heat loss measurements, heat conduction studies, radiation pyrometry, calorimetry in medicine and industry and nuclear reactor dosimetry.

  9. Flux-Feedback Magnetic-Suspension Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.

    1990-01-01

    Flux-feedback magnetic-suspension actuator provides magnetic suspension and control forces having linear transfer characteristics between force command and force output over large range of gaps. Hall-effect devices used as sensors for electronic feedback circuit controlling currents flowing in electromagnetic windings to maintain flux linking suspended element at substantially constant value independent of changes in length of gap. Technique provides effective method for maintenance of constant flux density in gap and simpler than previous methods. Applications include magnetic actuators for control of shapes and figures of antennas and of precise segmented reflectors, magnetic suspensions in devices for storage of angular momentum and/or kinetic energy, and systems for control, pointing, and isolation of instruments.

  10. Synthetic magnetic fluxes on the honeycomb lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Gorecka, Agnieszka; Gremaud, Benoit; Miniatura, Christian

    2011-08-15

    We devise experimental schemes that are able to mimic uniform and staggered magnetic fluxes acting on ultracold two-electron atoms, such as ytterbium atoms, propagating in a honeycomb lattice. The atoms are first trapped into two independent state-selective triangular lattices and then further exposed to a suitable configuration of resonant Raman laser beams. These beams induce hops between the two triangular lattices and make atoms move in a honeycomb lattice. Atoms traveling around each unit cell of this honeycomb lattice pick up a nonzero phase. In the uniform case, the artificial magnetic flux sustained by each cell can reach about two flux quanta, thereby realizing a cold-atom analog of the Harper model with its notorious Hofstadter's butterfly structure. Different condensed-matter phenomena such as the relativistic integer and fractional quantum Hall effects, as observed in graphene samples, could be targeted with this scheme.

  11. Eclipse and noneclipse differential photoelectron flux.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudsen, W. C.; Sharp, G. W.

    1972-01-01

    Differential photoelectron flux in the energy range of 3 to 50 eV has been measured in the lower ionosphere both during the March 7, 1970, solar eclipse and during a period 24 hours earlier. The two measurements were made with identical retarding potential analyzers carried on Nike-Apache rocket flights to a peak altitude of approximately 180 km. The differential electron flux spectrum within totality on the eclipse flight had the same shape but was a factor of 10 smaller in magnitude than that measured on the control day at altitudes between 120 and 180 km, an expected result for an eclipse function decreasing to 1/10 at totality. The differential flux spectrum measured in full sun has the same general energy dependence as that reported by Doering et al. (1970) but is larger by a factor of 2 to 10, depending on altitude.

  12. Comic ray flux anisotropies caused by astrospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, K.; Strauss, R. D.; Ferreira, S. E. S.; Fichtner, H.

    2016-09-01

    Huge astrospheres or stellar wind bubbles influence the propagation of cosmic rays at energies up to the TeV range and can act as small-scale sinks decreasing the cosmic ray flux. We model such a sink (in 2D) by a sphere of radius 10 pc embedded within a sphere of a radius of 1 kpc. The cosmic ray flux is calculated by means of backward stochastic differential equations from an observer, which is located at r0, to the outer boundary. It turns out that such small-scale sinks can influence the cosmic ray flux at the observer's location by a few permille (i.e. a few 0.1%), which is in the range of the observations by IceCube, Milagro and other large area telescopes.

  13. Magnetic Flux Quantization of the Landau Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianhua; Li, Kang; Long, Shuming; Yuan, Yi

    2014-08-01

    Landau problem has a very important application in modern physics, in which two-dimensional electron gas system and quantum Hall effect are outstanding. In this paper, first we review the solution of the Pauli equation, then using the single electron wave function, we calculate moving area expectations of the ideal 2-dimensional electron gas system and the per unit area's degeneracy of the electron gas system. As a result, how to calculate the magnetic flux of the electron gas system is given. It shows that the magnetic flux of 2-dimensional electron gas system in magnetic field is quantized, and magnetic flux quantization results from the quantization of the moving area expectations of electron gas system.

  14. Strongly magnetized accretion discs require poloidal flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg; Armitage, Philip J.; Simon, Jacob B.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by indirect observational evidence for strongly magnetized accretion discs around black holes, and the novel theoretical properties of such solutions, we investigate how a strong magnetization state can develop and persist. To this end, we perform local simulations of accretion discs with an initially purely toroidal magnetic field of equipartition strength. We demonstrate that discs with zero net vertical magnetic flux and realistic boundary conditions cannot sustain a strong toroidal field. However, a magnetic pressure-dominated disc can form from an initial configuration with a sufficient amount of net vertical flux and realistic boundary conditions. Our results suggest that poloidal flux is a necessary prerequisite for the sustainability of strongly magnetized accretion discs.

  15. Real Time Flux Control in PM Motors

    SciTech Connect

    Otaduy, P.J.

    2005-09-27

    Significant research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) is being conducted to develop ways to increase (1) torque, (2) speed range, and (3) efficiency of traction electric motors for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) within existing current and voltage bounds. Current is limited by the inverter semiconductor devices' capability and voltage is limited by the stator wire insulation's ability to withstand the maximum back-electromotive force (emf), which occurs at the upper end of the speed range. One research track has been to explore ways to control the path and magnitude of magnetic flux while the motor is operating. The phrase, real time flux control (RTFC), refers to this mode of operation in which system parameters are changed while the motor is operating to improve its performance and speed range. RTFC has potential to meet an increased torque demand by introducing additional flux through the main air gap from an external source. It can augment the speed range by diverting flux away from the main air gap to reduce back-emf at high speeds. Conventional RTFC technology is known as vector control [1]. Vector control decomposes the stator current into two components; one that produces torque and a second that opposes (weakens) the magnetic field generated by the rotor, thereby requiring more overall stator current and reducing the efficiency. Efficiency can be improved by selecting a RTFC method that reduces the back-emf without increasing the average current. This favors methods that use pulse currents or very low currents to achieve field weakening. Foremost in ORNL's effort to develop flux control is the work of J. S. Hsu. Early research [2,3] introduced direct control of air-gap flux in permanent magnet (PM) machines and demonstrated it with a flux-controlled generator. The configuration eliminates the problem of demagnetization because it diverts all the flux from the magnets instead of

  16. The ionospheric signature of flux transfer events

    SciTech Connect

    Southwood, D.J. )

    1987-04-01

    The author examines the motion of an isolated flux tube connecting the interplanetary and terrestrial magnetic field that has been created by reconnection at the dayside magnetopause. Such tubes should create a distinct localized flow pattern at their feet in the ionosphere. Observational effects are discussed. It is argued that the delay time of the order of a minute or more corresponding to the time for propagation of information from the reconnection site to the ionosphere is important and could control the creation of flux transfer events. It is predicted that magnetic pulsations in the Pc 5 frequency band are likely to be set up on closed flux tubes immediately neighboring the newly connected tubes.

  17. Heat-Flux Gage thermophosphor system

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, K.W.

    1991-08-01

    This document describes the installation, hardware requirements, and application of the Heat-Flux Gage (Version 1.0) software package developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Applied Technology Division. The developed software is a single component of a thermographic phosphor-based temperature and heat-flux measurement system. The heat-flux transducer was developed by EG G Energy Measurements Systems and consists of a 1- by 1-in. polymethylpentene sheet coated on the front and back with a repeating thermographic phosphor pattern. The phosphor chosen for this application is gadolinium oxysulphide doped with terbium. This compound has a sensitive temperature response from 10 to 65.6{degree}C (50--150{degree}F) for the 415- and 490-nm spectral emission lines. 3 refs., 17 figs.

  18. Vector Magnetic Field in Emerging Flux Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, B.; Pariat, E.

    A crucial phase in magnetic flux emergence is the rise of magnetic flux tubes through the solar photosphere, which represents a severe transition between the very different environments of the solar interior and corona. Multi-wavelength observations with Flare Genesis, TRACE, SoHO, and more recently with the vector magnetographs at THEMIS and Hida (DST) led to the following conclusions. The fragmented magnetic field in the emergence region - with dipped field lines or bald patches - is directly related with Ellerman bombs, arch filament systems, and overlying coronal loops. Measurements of vector magnetic fields have given evidence that undulating "serpentine" fields are present while magnetic flux tubes cross the photosphere. See the sketch below, and for more detail see Pariat et al. (2004, 2007); Watanabe et al. (2008):

  19. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  20. Strongly magnetized accretion discs require poloidal flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg; Armitage, Philip J.; Simon, Jacob B.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by indirect observational evidence for strongly magnetized accretion discs around black holes, and the novel theoretical properties of such solutions, we investigate how a strong magnetization state can develop and persist. To this end, we perform local simulations of accretion discs with an initially purely toroidal magnetic field of equipartition strength. We demonstrate that discs with zero net vertical magnetic flux and realistic boundary conditions cannot sustain a strong toroidal field. However, a magnetic pressure-dominated disc can form from an initial configuration with a sufficient amount of net vertical flux and realistic boundary conditions. Our results suggest that poloidal flux is a necessary prerequisite for the sustainability of strongly magnetized accretion discs.

  1. Radio flux variation of young supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V.P.; Bubukin, I.T.; Stankevich, K.S.

    1982-01-01

    The 31.5-cm radio flux density of Cas A, the Crab Nebula, and the remnant of the 1572 supernova relative to that of the radio galaxies Cyg A and Vir A was measured in 1981. Comparison with similar observations in 1964 and 1972 shows that over the past decade the decline of the Cas A flux has slowed by a factor 2.2 and now amounts to (0.413 +- 0.08)%/yr. The Crab flux was (3.5 +- 1.0)% weaker in 1981 than in 1964 and 1972; it probably dropped abruptly between 1972 and 1977. For the 1572 SNR the annual mean decline over the 17-yr period is (0.5 +- 0.15)%/yr.

  2. Achieving Zero Current for Polar Wind Outflow on Open Flux Tubes Subjected to Large Photoelectron Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, G. R.; Khazanov, G.; Horwitz, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    In this study we investigate how the condition of zero current on open flux tubes with polar wind outflow, subjected to large photoelectron fluxes, can be achieved. We employ a steady state collisionless semikinetic model to determine the density profiles of O(+), H(+), thermal electrons and photoelectrons coming from the ionosphere along with H(+), ions and electrons coming from the magnetosphere. The model solution attains a potential distribution which both satisfies the condition of charge neutrality and zero current. For the range of parameters considered in this study we find that a 45-60 volt discontinuous potential drop may develop to reflect most of the photoelectrons back toward the ionosphere. This develops because the downward flux of electrons from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere on typical open flux tubes (e.g. the polar rain) appears to be insufficient to balance the photoelectron flux from the ionosphere.

  3. Footprint prediction of scalar fluxes - Reliability and implications for airborne flux measurements over the FIFE site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuepp, P. H.; Desjardins, R. L.; Macpherson, J. I.; Leclerc, M. Y.

    1990-01-01

    Estimates of the location and extension of the upwind ground area that affects flux observations most directly are examined to determine the reliability of airborne versus near-ground flux measurements. The theoretical issues regarding the 'footprint' are examined, and specific observations are analyzed by studying the data over a grid regarding sensible heat, latent heat, CO2, and greenness. The grid is footprint-corrected to correlate better with independently observed surface characteristics, and an optimized footprint is developed that satisfies the relationships between the observed variables. Optimized mapping of the surface flux is given which demonstrates the importance of considering local advection to correlate airborne and ground-based flux observations. The technique is particularly applicable to situations in which significant variations in the surface flux density exist.

  4. Science Grade 9, Science Curriculum Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochester City School District, NY.

    This curriculum guide is the third in a series of general science guides modified from the New York State Experimental Syllabus, Science 7-8-9 to meet the needs of students whose interests are in areas other than science. The guide is laboratory-oriented and contains many open ended, pupil activities in five activity blocks: orientation, forces at…

  5. Common Earth Science Misconceptions in Science Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Chris

    2012-01-01

    A survey of the Earth science content of science textbooks found a wide range of misconceptions. These are discussed in this article with reference to the published literature on Earth science misconceptions. Most misconceptions occurred in the "sedimentary rocks and processes" and "Earth's structure and plate tectonics" categories; the most…

  6. Newspaper Science, School Science: Friends or Enemies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellington, J.

    1991-01-01

    Asserts that scientific details presented informally in newspapers can be of educational value within school science instruction when used carefully and critically. Suggests that one of the aims of the science curriculum should be the development of students' willingness and ability to study newspaper science with understanding and healthy…

  7. Promoting science through science fiction and pseudoscience.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslund, C.

    1986-11-01

    A great deal of physics can be learned from reading good science fiction. Many writers of this genre have shown great talent in explaining the laws of physics in language that is both lucid and accessible. Their writings can readily be used by the science teacher to enhance and to stimulate student understanding of physics and science.

  8. Science and Religion: Implications for Science Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiss, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    A religious perspective on life shapes how and what those with such a perspective learn in science; for some students a religious perspective can hinder learning in science. For such reasons Staver's article is to be welcomed as it proposes a new way of resolving the widely perceived discord between science and religion. Staver notes that Western…

  9. Citizen Science: Getting More Involved with Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeder, Poppy

    2014-01-01

    One of the things that this author enjoys most about working at the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) is the science that she finds out about and the researchers she meets. Having loved science throughout school and then on into university, the author is always keen to learn more. The increase in citizen science projects over the last…

  10. Hands-On Science. Journals of Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1998-01-01

    Describes how to use journal writing in elementary science classes. Writing lets children communicate observations and ideas while reinforcing understanding of key science concepts. Journal ideas include using notebooks to respond to teacher prompts or write about what students are studying; sharing a classroom science journal; and keeping a…

  11. The mesoscale and regional freshwater flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, A. L.; Giulivi, C. F.

    2012-12-01

    The closer we look at the ocean, with improved instrumentation and models, the less it looks like the familiar 'textbook' view of overly smoothed maps of SST and SSS, with ocean scale circulation gyres, and more of a jumble of a westward parade of mesoscale features. The question arises: what role does the mesoscale play in compensating the air-sea flux of heat and freshwater? Here we focus on the freshwater balance within the salty North Atlantic subtropics regime, where the annual evaporation minus precipitation (E-P) is over 1 m/year. A traditional view is that the required quasi-steady state ocean freshwater inflow is derived from the wind-driven circulation and the associated shallow meridional overturning circulation. Here we evaluate if the mesoscale 'eddy' field, may stir into the subtropical regime a significant share of the needed freshwater. The Voluntary Observing Ships (VOS) data provide an overview of the SSS seasonal cycle of the Atlantic subtropical regime. While E-P is always positive, greater in January-July, minimum in October, the SSS displays a maximum in October, minimum occurs in April. It is hypothesized that the lower SSS of the winter/spring period marks increased winter freshwater flux by meso-scale activity. While the eddy freshwater flux can be estimated from the Rapid thermohaline and velocity data sections near 24.5°N, it is the meridional convergence of the eddy freshwater flux that compensates the regional E-P. We use the SODA output, which assimilates the VOS and Rapid data, to estimate the eddy freshwater flux convergence. Our preliminary assessment is that the eddy flux convergence does play a major role in closing the seasonal freshwater cycle of the North Atlantic surface layer.

  12. Diffusive flux of methane from warm wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, T.R.; Burke, R.A.; Sackett, W.M. )

    1988-12-01

    Diffusion of methane across the air-water interface from several wetland environments in south Florida was estimated from measured surface water concentrations using an empirically derived gas exchange model. The flux from the Everglades sawgrass marsh system varied widely, ranging from 0.18 + or{minus}0.21 mol CH{sub 4}/sq m/yr for densely vegetated regions to 2.01 + or{minus}0.88 for sparsely vegetated, calcitic mud areas. Despite brackish salinities, a strong methane flux, 1.87 + or{minus}0.63 mol CH{sub 4}/sq m/yr, was estimated for an organic-rich mangrove pond near Florida Bay. The diffusive flux accounted for 23, 36, and 13% of the total amount of CH{sub 4} emitted to the atmosphere from these environments, respectively. The average dissolved methane concentration for an organic-rich forested swamp was the highest of any site at 12.6 microM; however, the calculated diffusive flux from this location, 2.57 + or{minus}1.88 mol CH{sub 4}/sq m/yr, was diminished by an extensive plant canopy that sheltered the air-water interface from the wind. The mean diffusive flux from four freshwater lakes, 0.77 + or{minus}0.73 mol CH{sub 4}/sq m/yr, demonstrated little temperature dependence. The mean diffusive flux for an urbanized, subtropical estuary was 0.06 + or{minus}0.05 mol CH{sub 4}/sq m/yr.

  13. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration. The instruments used are: • a fast-response, three-dimensional (3D) wind sensor (sonic anemometer) to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the speed of sound (SOS) (used to derive the air temperature) • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain the water vapor density and the CO2 concentration, and • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain methane density and methane flux at one SGP EF and at the NSA CF. The ECOR systems are deployed at the locations where other methods for surface flux measurements (e.g., energy balance Bowen ratio [EBBR] systems) are difficult to employ, primarily at the north edge of a field of crops. A Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) has been installed collocated with each deployed ECOR system in SGP, NSA, Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), ARM Mobile Facility 1 (AMF1), and ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2). The surface energy balance system consists of upwelling and downwelling solar and infrared radiometers within one net radiometer, a wetness sensor, and soil measurements. The SEBS measurements allow the comparison of ECOR sensible and latent heat fluxes with the energy balance determined from the SEBS and provide information on wetting of the sensors for data quality purposes. The SEBS at one SGP and one NSA site also support upwelling and downwelling PAR measurements to qualify those two locations as Ameriflux sites.

  14. CURRENT BUILDUP IN EMERGING SERPENTINE FLUX TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Pariat, E.; Masson, S.; Aulanier, G.

    2009-08-20

    The increase of magnetic flux in the solar atmosphere during active-region formation involves the transport of the magnetic field from the solar convection zone through the lowest layers of the solar atmosphere, through which the plasma {beta} changes from >1 to <1 with altitude. The crossing of this magnetic transition zone requires the magnetic field to adopt a serpentine shape also known as the sea-serpent topology. In the frame of the resistive flux-emergence model, the rising of the magnetic flux is believed to be dynamically driven by a succession of magnetic reconnections which are commonly observed in emerging flux regions as Ellerman bombs. Using a data-driven, three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulation of flux emergence occurring in active region 10191 on 2002 November 16-17, we study the development of 3D electric current sheets. We show that these currents buildup along the 3D serpentine magnetic-field structure as a result of photospheric diverging horizontal line-tied motions that emulate the observed photospheric evolution. We observe that reconnection can not only develop following a pinching evolution of the serpentine field line, as usually assumed in two-dimensional geometry, but can also result from 3D shearing deformation of the magnetic structure. In addition, we report for the first time on the observation in the UV domain with the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) of extremely transient loop-like features, appearing within the emerging flux domain, which link several Ellermam bombs with one another. We argue that these loop transients can be explained as a consequence of the currents that build up along the serpentine magnetic field.

  15. Software applications for flux balance analysis.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Meiyappan; Koh, Geoffrey; Chung, Bevan K S; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2014-01-01

    Flux balance analysis (FBA) is a widely used computational method for characterizing and engineering intrinsic cellular metabolism. The increasing number of its successful applications and growing popularity are possibly attributable to the availability of specific software tools for FBA. Each tool has its unique features and limitations with respect to operational environment, user-interface and supported analysis algorithms. Presented herein is an in-depth evaluation of currently available FBA applications, focusing mainly on usability, functionality, graphical representation and inter-operability. Overall, most of the applications are able to perform basic features of model creation and FBA simulation. COBRA toolbox, OptFlux and FASIMU are versatile to support advanced in silico algorithms to identify environmental and genetic targets for strain design. SurreyFBA, WEbcoli, Acorn, FAME, GEMSiRV and MetaFluxNet are the distinct tools which provide the user friendly interfaces in model handling. In terms of software architecture, FBA-SimVis and OptFlux have the flexible environments as they enable the plug-in/add-on feature to aid prospective functional extensions. Notably, an increasing trend towards the implementation of more tailored e-services such as central model repository and assistance to collaborative efforts was observed among the web-based applications with the help of advanced web-technologies. Furthermore, most recent applications such as the Model SEED, FAME, MetaFlux and MicrobesFlux have even included several routines to facilitate the reconstruction of genome-scale metabolic models. Finally, a brief discussion on the future directions of FBA applications was made for the benefit of potential tool developers. PMID:23131418

  16. Automated Science Processing for GLAST LAT Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, James

    2007-07-12

    Automated Science Processing (ASP) will be performed by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) on data from the satellite as soon as the Level 1 data are available in the ground processing pipeline. ASP will consist of time-critical science analyses that will facilitate follow-up and multi-wavelength observations of transient sources. These analyses include refinement of gamma-ray burst (GRB) positions, timing, flux and spectral properties, off-line searches for untriggered GRBs and gamma-ray afterglows, longer time scale monitoring of a standard set of sources (AGNs, X-ray binaries), and searches for previously unknown flaring sources in the LAT band. We describe the design of ASP and its scientific products; and we show results of a prototype implementation, driven by the standard LAT data processing pipeline, as applied to simulated LAT and GBM data.

  17. Automated Science Processing for GLAST LAT Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, James; Carson, Jennifer; Focke, Warren; /SLAC

    2007-10-15

    Automated Science Processing (ASP) will be performed by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) on data from the satellite as soon as the Level 1 data are available in the ground processing pipeline. ASP will consist of time-critical science analyses that will facilitate follow-up and multi-wavelength observations of transient sources. These analyses include refinement of gamma-ray burst (GRB) positions, timing, flux and spectral properties, off-line searches for untriggered GRBs and gamma-ray afterglows, longer time scale monitoring of a standard set of sources (AGNs, X-ray binaries), and searches for previously unknown flaring sources in the LAT band. We describe the design of ASP and its scientific products; and we show results of a prototype implementation, driven by the standard LAT data processing pipeline, as applied to simulated LAT and GBM data.

  18. On LBNE neutrino flux systematic uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrun, Paul L. G.; Hylen, James; Marchionni, Alberto; Fields, Laura; Bashyal, Amit; Park, Seongtae; Watson, Blake

    2015-10-01

    The systematic uncertainties in the neutrino flux of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment, due to alignment uncertanties and tolerances of the neutrino beamline components, are estimated. In particular residual systematics are evaluated in the determination of the neutrino flux at the far detector, assuming that the experiment will be equipped with a near detector with the same target material of the far detector, thereby canceling most of the uncertainties from hadroproduction and neutrino cross sections. This calculation is based on a detailed Geant4-based model of the neutrino beam line that includes the target, two focusing horns, the decay pipe and ancillary items, such as shielding.

  19. The dynamics of magnetic flux rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deluca, E. E.; Fisher, G. H.; Patten, B. M.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of magnetic fields in the presence of turbulent convection is examined using results of numerical simulations of closed magnetic flux tubes embedded in a steady 'ABC' flow field, which approximate some of the important characteristics of a turbulent convecting flow field. Three different evolutionary scenarios were found: expansion to a steady deformed ring; collapse to a compact fat flux ring, separated from the expansion type of behavior by a critical length scale; and, occasionally, evolution toward an advecting, oscillatory state. The work suggests that small-scale flows will not have a strong effect on large-scale, strong fields.

  20. Magnetic merging in colliding flux tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweibel, Ellen G.; Rhoads, James E.

    1995-01-01

    We develop an analytical theory of reconnection between colliding, twisted magnetic flux tubes. Our analysis is restricted to direct collisions between parallel tubes and is based on the collision dynamics worked out by Bogdan (1984). We show that there is a range of collision velocities for which neutral point reconnection of the Parker-Sweet type can occur, and a smaller range for which reconnection leads to coalescence. Mean velocities within the solar convection zone are probably significantly greater than the upper limit for coalescence. This suggests that the majority of flux tube collisions do not result in merging, unless the frictional coupling of the tubes to the background flow is extremely strong.

  1. High heat flux loop heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, Mark T.; Sarraf, David B.; Rosenfeld, John H.; Maidanik, Yuri F.; Vershinin, Sergey

    1997-01-01

    Loop heat pipes (LHPs) can transport very large thermal power loads over long distances, through flexible, small diameter tubes against gravitational heads. In order to overcome the evaporator limit of LHPs, which is of about 0.07 MW/sq m, work was carried out to improve the efficiency by threefold to tenfold. The vapor passage geometry for the high heat flux conditions is shown. A bidisperse wick material within the circumferential vapor passages was used. Along with heat flux enhancement, several underlying issues were demonstrated, including the fabrication of bidisperse powder with controlled properties and the fabrication of a device geometry capable of replacing vapor passages with bidisperse powder.

  2. Interplanetary magnetic flux - Measurement and balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomas, D. J.; Gosling, J. T.; Phillips, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    A new method for determining the approximate amount of magnetic flux in various solar wind structures in the ecliptic (and solar rotation) plane is developed using single-spacecraft measurements in interplanetary space and making certain simplifying assumptions. The method removes the effect of solar wind velocity variations and can be applied to specific, limited-extent solar wind structures as well as to long-term variations. Over the 18-month interval studied, the ecliptic plane flux of coronal mass ejections was determined to be about 4 times greater than that of HFDs.

  3. Radiative flux measurements in the troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, F. P. J.; Gore, W. J. Y.; Giver, L. P. M.

    1982-01-01

    A new airborne radiometric system with a time resolution as high as 60 msec has been designed for measuring radiative fluxes in the atmosphere. To verify the instrument performance, the solar constant at the top of the atmosphere has been calculated using the radiative flux densities measured in the troposphere, and the result obtained has been found to agree with the standard value to within 4%. Total heating rates of 0.175 and 0.377 K/h have been determined for hazy and foggy atmospheres, respectively, and aerosol heating rates of 0.065 and 0.235 K/h have been deduced from the total heating rates.

  4. On the topology of flux transfer events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Birn, Joachim; Schindler, Karl

    1990-01-01

    A topological analysis is made of a simple model magnetic field of a perturbation at the magnetopause that shares magnetic properties with flux transfer events. The aim is to clarify a number of topological aspects that arise in the case of fully three-dimensional magnetic fields. It is shown that a localized perturbation at the magnetopause can in principle open a closed magnetosphere by establishing magnetic connections across the magnetopause by the formation of a ropelike magnetic field structure. For this purpose a global topological model of a closed magnetosphere is considered as the unperturbed state. The topological substructure of the model flux rope is discussed in detail.

  5. Dual neutron flux/temperature measurement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, John T.; Simpson, Marc L.; McElhaney, Stephanie A.

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous measurement of neutron flux and temperature is provided by a single sensor which includes a phosphor mixture having two principal constituents. The first constituent is a neutron sensitive 6LiF and the second is a rare-earth activated Y203 thermophosphor. The mixture is coated on the end of a fiber optic, while the opposite end of the fiber optic is coupled to a light detector. The detected light scintillations are quantified for neutron flux determination, and the decay is measured for temperature determination.

  6. Digital flux-gate magnetometer structural analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korepanov, Valery; Berkman, Rikhard

    1999-08-01

    Analogue and digital structures of the flux-gate magnetometer are compared. The main disturbing factors in digital circuit were singled out and the additional errors associated with the digital structure are estimated. The reader's attention is drawn to some specific problems associated with digital circuits - the special influence of the unbalanced voltage amplitude at the flux-gate-sensor output and ADC-DAC switching-time instabilities. The given analytical results could be useful for the designer when it is necessary to make a choice of the structural type of magnetometer.

  7. High flux source of cold rubidium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slowe, Christopher; Vernac, Laurent; Hau, Lene Vestergaard

    2005-10-01

    We report on the production of a continuous, slow, and cold beam of Rb87 atoms with an extremely high flux of 3.2×1012atoms/s, a transverse temperature of 3mK, and a longitudinal temperature of 90mK. We describe the apparatus created to generate the atom beam. Hot atoms are emitted from a rubidium candlestick atomic beam source and transversely cooled and collimated by a 20cm long atomic collimator section, boosting overall beam flux by a factor of 50. The Rb atomic beam is then decelerated and longitudinally cooled by a 1m long Zeeman slower.

  8. Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements

    DOEpatents

    Zonca, Fulvio; Cohen, Samuel A.; Bennett, Timothy; Timberlake, John R.

    1993-01-01

    Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer--a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10.sup.-5 to 10.sup.3 N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in a intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

  9. AmeriFlux US-Akn Aiken

    DOE Data Explorer

    Leclerc, Monique [University of Georgia

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Akn Aiken. Site Description - The Aiken site is located within the Atlantic Coastal Plain Providence on a U.S. Department of Energy reservation (806 sq km) at Savannah River National Laboratory. Areas of the site not used for industrial purposes were planted with forests starting in the early 1950s, including the site of the Aiken tower. The site measurements are representative of the southeastern US within a mixed agricultural, residential, and industrial zone.

  10. Topological A-type models with flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojevic, Vid

    2008-05-01

    We study deformations of the A-model in the presence of fluxes, by which we mean rank-three tensors with antisymmetrized upper/lower indices, using the AKSZ construction. There are two natural deformations of the A-model in the AKSZ language: 1) the Zucchini model, which can be defined on a generalized complex manifold and reduces to the A-model when the generalized complex structure comes from a symplectic structure, and 2) a topological membrane model, which naturally accommodates fluxes, and reduces to the Zucchini model on the boundary of the membrane when the fluxes are turned off. We show that the fluxes are related to deformations of the Courant bracket which generalize the twist by a closed 3-from H, in the sense that satisfying the AKSZ master equation implies precisely the integrability conditions for an almost generalized complex structure with respect to the deformed Courant bracket. In addition, the master equation imposes conditions on the fluxes that generalize dH = 0. The membrane model can be defined on a large class of U(m)- and U(m) × U(m)-structure manifolds relevant for string theory, including geometries inspired by (1, 1) supersymmetric σ-models with additional supersymmetries due to almost complex (but not necessarily complex) structures in the target space. In addition we show that the model can be defined on three particular half-flat manifolds related to the Iwasawa manifold. When only the closed 3-form flux is turned on it is possible to obtain a topological string model, which we do for the case of a Calabi-Yau. We argue that deformations from the standard A-model are due to the choice of gauge fixing fermion, rather than a flux deformation of the AKSZ action. The particularly interesting cases arise when the fermion depends on auxiliary fields, the simplest possibility being due to the (2, 0)+(0, 2) component of a non-trivial b-field. The model is generically no longer evaluated on holomorphic maps and defines new topological

  11. 'Wave' analysis of Venus ionospheric flux ropes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.

    1990-01-01

    The behavior of the general field fluctuations observed by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter magnetometer in the Venusian ionosphere is approached via the application of wave-analysis techniques to their compressional amplitude, ellipticity, and polarization. The most marked change in these properties occurs within about 15 deg of the terminator; ellipticity and compressional power plummet, implying that flux ropes either drastically change in character there or are confined to the dayside hemisphere, within about 75 percent of the subsolar point. Attention is given to a heuristic model which attempts to unify dayside flux-rope and 'terminator wave' interpretations.

  12. On LBNE neutrino flux systematic uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Lebrun, Paul L. G.; Hylen, James; Marchionni, Alberto; Fields, Laura; Bashyal, Amit; Park, Seongtae; Watson, Blake

    2015-10-15

    The systematic uncertainties in the neutrino flux of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment, due to alignment uncertanties and tolerances of the neutrino beamline components, are estimated. In particular residual systematics are evaluated in the determination of the neutrino flux at the far detector, assuming that the experiment will be equipped with a near detector with the same target material of the far detector, thereby canceling most of the uncertainties from hadroproduction and neutrino cross sections. This calculation is based on a detailed Geant4-based model of the neutrino beam line that includes the target, two focusing horns, the decay pipe and ancillary items, such as shielding.

  13. REGULAR VERSUS DIFFUSIVE PHOTOSPHERIC FLUX CANCELLATION

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.

    2011-04-20

    Observations of photospheric flux cancellation on the Sun imply that cancellation can be a diffusive rather than regular process. A criterion is derived, which quantifies the parameter range in which diffusive photospheric cancellation should occur. Numerical estimates show that regular cancellation models should be expected to give a quantitatively accurate description of photospheric cancellation. The estimates rely on a recently suggested scaling for a turbulent magnetic diffusivity, which is consistent with the diffusivity measurements on spatial scales varying by almost two orders of magnitude. Application of the turbulent diffusivity to large-scale dispersal of the photospheric magnetic flux is discussed.

  14. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes. 3: The equilibrium path of the flux tube arch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, John H.; Montesinis, Benjamin

    1989-01-01

    The arched equilibrium path of a thin magnetic flux tube in a plane-stratified, nonmagnetic atmosphere is calculated for cases in which the flux tube contains a steady siphon flow. The large scale mechanical equilibrium of the flux tube involves a balance among the magnetic buoyancy force, the net magnetic tension force due to the curvature of the flux tube axis, and the inertial (centrifugal) force due to the siphon flow along curved streamlines. The ends of the flux tube are assumed to be pinned down by some other external force. Both isothermal and adiabatic siphon flows are considered for flux tubes in an isothermal external atmosphere. For the isothermal case, in the absence of a siphon flow the equilibrium path reduces to the static arch calculated by Parker (1975, 1979). The presence of a siphon flow causes the flux tube arch to bend more sharply, so that magnetic tension can overcome the additional straightening effect of the inertial force, and reduces the maximum width of the arch. The curvature of the arch increases as the siphon flow speed increases. For a critical siphon flow, with supercritical flow in the downstream leg, the arch is asymmetric, with greater curvature in the downstream leg of the arch. Adiabatic flow have qualitatively similar effects, except that adiabatic cooling reduces the buoyancy of the flux tube and thus leads to significantly wider arches. In some cases the cooling is strong enough to create negative buoyancy along sections of the flux tube, requiring upward curvature of the flux tube path along these sections and sometimes leading to unusual equilibrium paths of periodic, sinusoidal form.

  15. AmeriFlux US-Los Lost Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Ankur

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Los Lost Creek. Site Description - Shrub wetland site, chosen to be representative of the wetlands within the WLEF tall tower flux footprint. This is a deciduous shrub wetland. Coniferous and grassy stands also exist within the WLEF flux footprint. Solar power. The site has excellent micrometeorological characteristics.

  16. Flux and seasonality of planktonic foraminifera in the Xisha Trough, South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, R.; Chen, M.; Wang, D.; Chen, Z.; Yan, W.

    2013-12-01

    The modern correlation between planktonic foraminiferal community dynamics and environmental conditions may provide a basis for establishing paleoclimatic proxies. We studied planktic foraminiferal shell fluxes and assemblages in samples collected in a time-series sediment trap deployments in the Xisha Trough, South China Sea (SCS), from June 2009 to August 2011. The general flux shows a unimodal pattern, with high planktonic foraminiferal flux (900-1000 tests m-2 day-1) occurs during the period from late September/October to February, and low flux (200-300 tests m-2 day-1)during the rest period of the year. This flux pattern is contrast to the bimodal pattern of planktonic foraminiferal flux obtained from the central and southern SCS. Ten species, Globigeroides sacculifer, Globigerinoides ruber, Pulleniatina obliquiloculata, Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, Globigerina calida, Globigerinella aequilateralis, Globigerina bulloides, Globigerinita glutinata, Orbulina univera and Globorotalia menardii, contributed about 96% of the total flux in each year. Among them, the monsoonal driven seasonality is most prominent for P. obliquiloculata, N. dutertrei and G. bulloides, with more than 70% of their species-specific total fluxes (93% for G. bulloides) occur from late September/October to February. This suggests G. bulloides can be used as a winter proxy-species. On the contrary, Globigeroides conglobatus, mostly appeared during June to August. G. sacculifer, G. ruber and G. aequilateralis generally follow the trend of the total flux of planktonic foraminifer, with about 50-60% of their total fluxes occur from late September/October to February. We also compared the size distribution of the dominant foraminiferal species in the > 250 micrometer fraction and 250-154 micrometer fraction, we found that most shells of G. aequilateralis, O. univera and G. menardii, and G. conglobatus mainly occur in the >250 micrometer fraction, and about 40% of G. sacculifer, 35% of P

  17. Science, Rationality, and the Creation/Evolution Dispute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelkin, Dorothy

    1982-01-01

    Examines the creation/evolution controversy and suggests reasons why creationist demands have won public support. For those distressed by the flux and uncertainty inherent in science and basic to the theory of evolution, creationism provides a model of order, a distinct and coherent logical system that fully explains an uncertain world. (AM)

  18. Carbon and energy fluxes of the understory vegetation of the black spruce ecosystem in interior Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikawa, H.; Nakai, T.; Kim, Y.; Busey, R.; Suzuki, R.; Hinzman, L. D.

    2013-12-01

    Underlain by permafrost, understory vegetation in the boreal forest of the high northern latitudes is likely sensitive to climate change. This study investigated the contribution of the understory vegetation of the black spruce forest (Picea mariana) to net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and vertical energy fluxes at the supersite (65deg 07' 24' N, 147deg 29' 15' W) of the JAMSTEC-IARC Collaboration Study (JICS) located within the property of the Poker Flat Research Range of the University of Alaska Fairbanks in interior Alaska [Sugiura et al., 2011; Nakai et al., 2013]. The understory is dominated by a 0 - 20 cm thick layer of peat moss (Sphagnum fuscum) and feather moss (Hylocomium splendens). Eddy covariance measurements were made at 11 m over the canopy and 1.9 m above the ground in summer 2013. The measurement shows that the peak sink of CO2 from understory during the day typically accounted for 80% of the total NEE of (~ 3 μmol m-2s-1) observed over the canopy. Sensible heat flux was nearly identical between the two heights and latent heat flux observed at 1.9m was slightly higher than that observed at 11m. Higher latent heat flux from understory than the total latent heat flux over the canopy is most likely due to the difference in the footprint of the two measurements, and it is necessary to further evaluate the spatial representativeness of the understory fluxes. Nonetheless, these high flux values from the understory suggest an importance of the understory vegetation in evaluating ecosystem flux of the black spruce forest. Acknowledgement This study is funded by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) References Nakai, T., Y. Kim, R. C. Busey, R. Suzuki, S. Nagai, H. Kobayashi, H. Park, K. Sugiura, and A. Ito (2013), Characteristics of evapotranspiration from a permafrost black spruce forest in interior Alaska, Polar Science, 7(2), 136-148, doi:10.1016/j.polar.2013.03.003. Sugiura, K

  19. Energy balance and non-turbulent fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moderow, Uta; Feigenwinter, Christian; Bernhofer, Christian

    2010-05-01

    Often, the sum of the turbulent fluxes of sensible heat and latent heat from eddy covariance (EC) measurements does not match the available energy (sum of net radiation, ground heat flux and storage changes). This is referred to as energy balance closure gap. The reported imbalances vary between 0% and 50% (Laubach 1996). In various publications, it has been shown that the uncertainty of the available energy itself does not explain the gap (Vogt et al. 1996; Moderow et al. 2009). Among other reasons, the underestimation is attributed to an underestimation of turbulent fluxes and undetected non-turbulent transport processes, i.e. advection (e.g. Foken et al. 2006). The imbalance is typically larger during nighttime than during daytime as the EC method fails to capture non-turbulent transports that can be significant during night (e.g. Aubinet 2008). Results for the budget of CO2 showed that including non-turbulent fluxes can change the budgets considerably. Hence, it is interesting to see how the budget of energy is changed. Here, the consequences of including advective fluxes of sensible heat and latent heat in the energy balance are explored with focus on nighttime conditions. Non-turbulent fluxes will be inspected critically regarding their plausibility. Following Bernhofer et al. (2003), a ratio similar to Bowen's ratio of the turbulent fluxes are defined for the non-turbulent fluxes and compared to each other. This might have implications for the partitioning of the available energy into sensible heat and latent heat. Data of the ADVEX-campaigns (Feigenwinter et al. 2008) of three different sites across Europe are used and selected periods are inspected. References Aubinet M (2008) Eddy covariance CO2-flux measurements in nocturnal conditions: An analysis of the problem. Ecol Appl 18: 1368-1378 Bernhofer C, Grünwald T, Schwiebus A, Vogt R (2003) Exploring the consequences of non-zero energy balance closure for total surface flux. In: Bernhofer C (ed

  20. Role of surface heat fluxes underneath cold pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentine, Pierre; Garelli, Alix; Park, Seung-Bu; Nie, Ji; Torri, Giuseppe; Kuang, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    The role of surface heat fluxes underneath cold pools is investigated using cloud-resolving simulations with either interactive or horizontally homogenous surface heat fluxes over an ocean and a simplified land surface. Over the ocean, there are limited changes in the distribution of the cold pool temperature, humidity, and gust front velocity, yet interactive heat fluxes induce more cold pools, which are smaller, and convection is then less organized. Correspondingly, the updraft mass flux and lateral entrainment are modified. Over the land surface, the heat fluxes underneath cold pools drastically impact the cold pool characteristics with more numerous and smaller pools, which are warmer and more humid and accompanied by smaller gust front velocities. The interactive fluxes also modify the updraft mass flux and reduce convective organization. These results emphasize the importance of interactive surface fluxes instead of prescribed flux boundary conditions, as well as the formulation of surface heat fluxes, when studying convection.