Science.gov

Sample records for flux density measurements

  1. Measurement of Flux Density of Cas A at Low Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Ajinkya; Fisher, R.

    2012-01-01

    Cas A is used as a flux calibrator throughout the radio spectrum. Therefore it is important to know the spectral and secular variations in its flux density. Earlier observations by Scott et. al. (1969) and Baars et. al. (1972) suggested a secular decrease in flux density of Cas A at a rate of about 1% per year at all frequencies. However later observations by Erickson & Perley (1975) and Read (1977) indicated anomalously high flux from Cas A at 38 MHz. Also, these observations suggested that the original idea of faster decay of the flux density rate at low frequencies may be in error or that something more complex than simple decay is affecting the flux density at low frequencies. The source changes at 38 MHz still remains a mystery. We intend to present the results of follow up observations made from 1995 to 1998 with a three element interferometer in Green Bank operating in frequency range 30 to 120 MHz. We will discuss the problems at such low frequencies due to large beamwidth and unstable ionosphere. We will also discuss the strategies we have used so far to to find the flux density of Cas A by calculating the ratio of flux density of Cas A to that of Cyg A, assuming flux density of Cyg A to be constant. Above mentioned work was performed in summer student program sponsored by National Radio Astronomy Observatory.

  2. Calibration system for measuring the radon flux density.

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, A; Zhukovsky, M; Bastrikov, V

    2015-06-01

    The measurement of radon flux from soil surface is the useful tool for the assessment of radon-prone areas and monitoring of radon releases from uranium mining and milling residues. The accumulation chambers with hollow headspace and chambers with activated charcoal are the most used devices for these purposes. Systematic errors of the measurements strongly depend on the geometry of the chamber and diffusion coefficient of the radon in soil. The calibration system for the attestation of devices for radon flux measurements was constructed. The calibration measurements of accumulation chambers and chambers with activated charcoal were conducted. The good agreement between the results of 2D modelling of radon flux and measurements results was observed. It was demonstrated that reliable measurements of radon flux can be obtained by chambers with activated charcoal (equivalent volume ~75 l) or by accumulation chambers with hollow headspace of ~7-10 l and volume/surface ratio (height) of >15 cm. PMID:25977351

  3. 3D density imaging with muons flux measurements from underground galleries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesparre, Nolwenn; Cabrera, Justo; Marteau, Jacques

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric muons flux measurements provide information on sub-surface density distribution, giving insights on the medium structure. We measured the muons flux from the underground galleries of the Tournemire experimental platform to image the medium between the galleries and the surface. The experiment aimed at evaluating the capacity of the method to detect the presence of discontinuities produced either by secondary strike-slip faults that present small vertical displacements or by a karstic network may be present at the level of an upper aquifer. Measurements were performed from three different sites so the trajectories of detected muons paths intersect in the medium. Such a configuration provided complementary information on the density distribution, offering the possibility to seek density variations at different depths. A specific calibration method was applied in order to interpolate the data acquired at different times with the same muons sensor. Muons flux measurements variations were then processed through a non-linear inversion, producing a 3D image of the density together with an evaluation of the different distinguished targets reliability. The density distribution showed the presence of a very low density region at the level of the upper aquifer, suggesting the presence of a karstic network hosting locally cavities. The trace of secondary strike-slip faults did not appear clearly on the image as the density contrast they produce might be too low compared to the signal to noise ratio present in the muons flux data. We propose different strategies to improve the density image accuracy.

  4. Cluster electric current density measurements within a magnetic flux rope in the plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Lepping, R. P.; Gjerloev, J.; Goldstein, M. L.; Fairfield, D. H.; Acuna, M. H.; Balogh, A.; Dunlop, M.; Kivelson, M. G.; Khurana, K.

    2003-01-01

    On August 22, 2001 all 4 Cluster spacecraft nearly simultaneously penetrated a magnetic flux rope in the tail. The flux rope encounter took place in the central plasma sheet, Beta(sub i) approx. 1-2, near the leading edge of a bursty bulk flow. The "time-of-flight" of the flux rope across the 4 spacecraft yielded V(sub x) approx. 700 km/s and a diameter of approx.1 R(sub e). The speed at which the flux rope moved over the spacecraft is in close agreement with the Cluster plasma measurements. The magnetic field profiles measured at each spacecraft were first modeled separately using the Lepping-Burlaga force-free flux rope model. The results indicated that the center of the flux rope passed northward (above) s/c 3, but southward (below) of s/c 1, 2 and 4. The peak electric currents along the central axis of the flux rope predicted by these single-s/c models were approx.15-19 nA/sq m. The 4-spacecraft Cluster magnetic field measurements provide a second means to determine the electric current density without any assumption regarding flux rope structure. The current profile determined using the curlometer technique was qualitatively similar to those determined by modeling the individual spacecraft magnetic field observations and yielded a peak current density of 17 nA/m2 near the central axis of the rope. However, the curlometer results also showed that the flux rope was not force-free with the component of the current density perpendicular to the magnetic field exceeding the parallel component over the forward half of the rope, perhaps due to the pressure gradients generated by the collision of the BBF with the inner magnetosphere. Hence, while the single-spacecraft models are very successful in fitting flux rope magnetic field and current variations, they do not provide a stringent test of the force-free condition.

  5. MAGNETIC FLUX DENSITY MEASURED IN FAST AND SLOW SOLAR WIND STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Erdos, G.; Balogh, A.

    2012-07-10

    The radial component of the heliospheric magnetic field vector is used to estimate the open magnetic flux density of the Sun. This parameter has been calculated using observations from the Ulysses mission that covered heliolatitudes from 80 Degree-Sign S to 80 Degree-Sign N, from 1990 to 2009 and distances from 1 to 5.4 AU, the Advanced Composition Explorer mission at 1 AU from 1997 to 2010, the OMNI interplanetary database from 1971, and the Helios 1 and 2 missions that covered the distance range from 0.3 to 1 AU. The flux density was found to be much affected by fluctuations in the magnetic field which make its calculated value dependent on heliospheric location, type of solar wind (fast or slow), and the level of solar activity. However, fluctuations are distributed symmetrically perpendicular to the average Parker direction. Therefore, distributions of the field vector in the two-dimensional plane defined by the radial and azimuthal directions in heliospheric coordinates provide a way to reduce the effects of the fluctuations on the measurement of the flux density. This leads to a better defined flux density parameter; the distributions modified by removing the effects of fluctuations then allow a clearer assessment of the dependence of the flux density on heliospheric location, solar wind type, and solar activity. This assessment indicates that the flux density normalized to 1 AU is independent of location and solar wind type (fast or slow). However, there is a residual dependence on solar activity which can be studied using the modified flux density measurements.

  6. DETECTION AND FLUX DENSITY MEASUREMENTS OF THE MILLISECOND PULSAR J2145–0750 BELOW 100 MHz

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, J.; Taylor, G. B.; Craig, J.; Henning, P. A.; Schinzel, F.; Ray, P. S.; Blythe, J. N.; Clarke, T.; Helmboldt, J. F.; Ellingson, S. W.; Wolfe, C. N.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Stovall, K.

    2013-09-20

    We present flux density measurements and pulse profiles for the millisecond pulsar PSR J2145–0750 spanning 37 to 81 MHz using data obtained from the first station of the Long Wavelength Array. These measurements represent the lowest frequency detection of pulsed emission from a millisecond pulsar to date. We find that the pulse profile is similar to that observed at 102 MHz. We also find that the flux density spectrum between ≈40 MHz to 5 GHz is suggestive of a break and may be better fit by a model that includes spectral curvature with a rollover around 730 MHz rather than a single power law.

  7. Joint Measurements of Flare Flux Densities at 210 - 212 GHz by Two Different Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raulin, J.-P.; Trottet, G.; Giménez de Castro, G.; Lüthi, T.; Kaufmann, P.

    2014-04-01

    Multiple-beam observations of solar flares at submillimeter wavelengths need detection with at least four beams to derive the flux density of the emitting source, its size, and centroid position. When this condition is not fulfilled, the assumptions on the location and/or size of the emitting source have to be made in order to compute . Otherwise, only a flux density range can be estimated. We report on simultaneous flare observations at 212 and 210 GHz obtained by the Solar Submillimeter Telescope (SST) and the Bernese Multibeam Radiometer for Kosma (BEMRAK), respectively, during two solar events on 28 October 2003. For both events, BEMRAK utilized four beam information to calculate the source flux density F 210, its size and position. On the other hand, the SST observed the events with only one beam, at low solar elevation angles and during high atmospheric attenuation. Therefore, because of these poor observing conditions at 212 GHz, only a flux density range Δ F 212 could be estimated. The results show that Δ F 212 is within a factor of 2.5 of the flux density F 210. This factor can be significantly reduced ( e.g. 1.4 for one of the studied events) by an appropriate choice of the 212 GHz source position using flare observations at other wavelengths. By adopting the position and size of the 210 GHz source measured by BEMRAK, the flux density at 212 GHz, F 212b, is comparable to F 210 within the uncertainties, as expected. Therefore our findings indicate that even during poor observing conditions, the SST can provide an acceptable estimate of the flux density at 212 GHz. This is a remarkable fact since the SST and BEMRAK use quite different procedures for calibration and flux density determination. We also show that the necessary assumptions made on the size of the emitting source at 212 GHz in order to estimate its flux density are not critical, and therefore do not affect the conclusions of previous studies at this frequency.

  8. The Importance of the Spatial Density of Satellite Measurements for the Retrieval of Spatial Flux Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J.; Nuñez Ramirez, T. G.; Kiemle, C.; Butz, A.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Ehret, G.; Heimann, M.

    2014-12-01

    Initial results from GOSAT flux inversions of column-integrated carbon dioxide suggest a significant redistribution of surface fluxes compared to inversions using only surface-based inversions as an observational constraint. New evidence suggests that this redistribution of fluxes is a robust feature, and is related to the increased spatial density of the measurements made available by remote sensing. However GOSAT's rather large measurement footprint and sparse sampling still provide poor coverage over many areas of the globe, particularly regions characterized by consistent cloud cover, such as the tropics, and all passive near-infrared sensors suffer from a seasonal sampling bias due to limited sunlight during high latitude winter. As such, errors in the pattern of retrieved fluxes may still be significant. Active sensors based on lidar do not suffer from the same seasonal (or diurnal) sampling biases, and their exceptionally small instantaneous field of view (~150 m) promises to greatly improve the spatial coverage of the measurements over partially cloudy regions. Using the case of MERLIN, a planned joint French-German lidar mission designed to measure XCH4, the implications of this increased spatial coverage is considered in an inverse modelling framework, and compared to presently available measurement coverage from the surface-based network and GOSAT. The gain in knowledge about the absolute size of the regional methane fluxes, particularly in currently undersampled regions such as the Arctic permafrost zones and tropical wetlands, is quantified.

  9. Multiple-capillary measurement of RBC speed, flux, and density with optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jonghwan; Wu, Weicheng; Lesage, Frederic; Boas, David A

    2013-01-01

    As capillaries exhibit heterogeneous and fluctuating dynamics even during baseline, a technique measuring red blood cell (RBC) speed and flux over many capillaries at the same time is needed. Here, we report that optical coherence tomography can capture individual RBC passage simultaneously over many capillaries located at different depths. Further, we demonstrate the ability to quantify RBC speed, flux, and linear density. This technique will provide a means to monitor microvascular flow dynamics over many capillaries at different depths at the same time. PMID:24022621

  10. Double-cavity radiometer for high-flux density solar radiation measurements.

    PubMed

    Parretta, A; Antonini, A; Armani, M; Nenna, G; Flaminio, G; Pellegrino, M

    2007-04-20

    A radiometric method has been developed, suitable for both total power and flux density profile measurement of concentrated solar radiation. The high-flux density radiation is collected by a first optical cavity, integrated, and driven to a second optical cavity, where, attenuated, it is measured by a conventional radiometer operating under a stationary irradiation regime. The attenuation factor is regulated by properly selecting the aperture areas in the two cavities. The radiometer has been calibrated by a pulsed solar simulator at concentration levels of hundreds of suns. An optical model and a ray-tracing study have also been developed and validated, by which the potentialities of the radiometer have been largely explored. PMID:17415384

  11. A LOFAR census of non-recycled pulsars: average profiles, dispersion measures, flux densities, and spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilous, A. V.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; Keane, E. F.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Stappers, B. W.; Malofeev, V. M.; Sobey, C.; Breton, R. P.; Cooper, S.; Falcke, H.; Karastergiou, A.; Michilli, D.; Osłowski, S.; Sanidas, S.; ter Veen, S.; van Leeuwen, J.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Weltevrede, P.; Zarka, P.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Serylak, M.; Bell, M. E.; Broderick, J. W.; Eislöffel, J.; Markoff, S.; Rowlinson, A.

    2016-06-01

    We present first results from a LOFAR census of non-recycled pulsars. The census includes almost all such pulsars known (194 sources) at declinations Dec > 8° and Galactic latitudes |Gb| > 3°, regardless of their expected flux densities and scattering times. Each pulsar was observed for ≥20 min in the contiguous frequency range of 110-188 MHz. Full-Stokes data were recorded. We present the dispersion measures, flux densities, and calibrated total intensity profiles for the 158 pulsars detected in the sample. The median uncertainty in census dispersion measures (1.5 × 10-3 pc cm-3) is ten times smaller, on average, than in the ATNF pulsar catalogue. We combined census flux densities with those in the literature and fitted the resulting broadband spectra with single or broken power-law functions. For 48 census pulsars such fits are being published for the first time. Typically, thechoice between single and broken power-laws, as well as the location of the spectral break, were highly influenced by the spectral coverage of the available flux density measurements. In particular, the inclusion of measurements below 100 MHz appears essential for investigating the low-frequency turnover in the spectra for most of the census pulsars. For several pulsars, we compared the spectral indices from different works and found the typical spread of values to be within 0.5-1.5, suggesting a prevailing underestimation of spectral index errors in the literature. The census observations yielded some unexpected individual source results, as we describe in the paper. Lastly, we will provide this unique sample of wide-band, low-frequency pulse profiles via the European Pulsar Network Database. Tables B.1-B.4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/591/A134

  12. Estimation of localized current anomalies in polymer electrolyte fuel cells from magnetic flux density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nara, Takaaki; Koike, Masanori; Ando, Shigeru; Gotoh, Yuji; Izumi, Masaaki

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose novel inversion methods to estimate defects or localized current anomalies in membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). One method is an imaging approach with L1-norm regularization that is suitable for estimation of focal anomalies compared to Tikhonov regularization. The second is a complex analysis based method in which multiple pointwise current anomalies can be identified directly and algebraically from the measured magnetic flux density.

  13. A turnkey data logger program for field-scale energy flux density measurements using eddy covariance and surface renewal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Micrometeorological methods and ecosystem-scale energy and mass flux density measurements have become increasingly important in soil, agricultural, and environmental sciences. For many scientists without formal training in atmospheric science, these techniques are relatively inaccessible. Eddy cov...

  14. Influence of stem temperature changes on heat pulse sap flux density measurements.

    PubMed

    Vandegehuchte, Maurits W; Burgess, Stephen S O; Downey, Alec; Steppe, Kathy

    2015-04-01

    While natural spatial temperature gradients between measurement needles have been thoroughly investigated for continuous heat-based sap flow methods, little attention has been given to how natural changes in stem temperature impact heat pulse-based methods through temporal rather than spatial effects. By modelling the theoretical equation for both an ideal instantaneous pulse and a step pulse and applying a finite element model which included actual needle dimensions and wound effects, the influence of a varying stem temperature on heat pulse-based methods was investigated. It was shown that the heat ratio (HR) method was influenced, while for the compensation heat pulse and Tmax methods changes in stem temperatures of up to 0.002 °C s(-1) did not lead to significantly different results. For the HR method, rising stem temperatures during measurements led to lower heat pulse velocity values, while decreasing stem temperatures led to both higher and lower heat pulse velocities, and to imaginary results for high flows. These errors of up to 40% can easily be prevented by including a temperature correction in the data analysis procedure, calculating the slope of the natural temperature change based on the measured temperatures before application of the heat pulse. Results of a greenhouse and outdoor experiment on Pinus pinea L. show the influence of this correction on low and average sap flux densities. PMID:25145698

  15. A direct measurement of the energy flux density in plasma surface interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dussart, Remi; Thomann, Anne-Lise; Semmar, Nadjib; Pichon, Laurianne; Bedra, Larbi; Mathias, Jacky; Tessier, Yves; Lefaucheux, Philippe

    2008-10-01

    The energy flux transferred from a plasma to a surface is a key issue for materials processing (sputtering, etching). We present direct measurements made with a Heat Flux Microsensor (HFM) in an Ar plasma interacting with the surface of the sensor. The HFM is a thermopile of about one thousand metal couples mounted in parallel. An Inductively Coupled Plasma in Argon was used to make the experiments. Langmuir probe and tuneable laser diode absorption measurements were carried out to estimate the contribution of ions, neutrals (conduction) and metastables. In order to evaluate the ability of the HFM to measure the part due to chemical reactions, a Si surface in contact with the HFM was submitted to an SF6 plasma. The direct measurements are in good agreement with the estimation we made knowing the etch rate and the enthalpy of the reaction. Finally, tests were performed on a sputtering reactor. Additional energy flux provided by condensing atoms (Pt) was also measured.

  16. Measurement of the light flux density patterns from luminaires proposed as photon sources for photosynthesis during space travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Paul N.

    1989-01-01

    Two luminaires were evaluated to determine the light flux density pattern on a horizontal plane surface. NASA supplied both luminaires; one was made by NASA and the other is commercially available. Tests were made for three combinations of luminaire height and luminaire lens material using the NASA luminaire; only one configuration of the commercial luminaire was tested. Measurements were made using four sensors with different wavelength range capabilities. The data are presented in graphical and tabular formats.

  17. A new measurement method of magnetic flux density using magnetorheological fluid characteristics and a variable resistor circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwan-Choong; Han, Chulhee; Kim, Pyunghwa; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-08-01

    This work proposes a new approach with which to measure the magnetic flux density using the characteristics of magnetorheological fluid (MRF) that is integrated with a variable resistor. For convenience, it is called a magnetorheological fluid variable resistor (MRF-VR) system in this study. The mechanism of the MRF-VR is based on the interaction between ferromagnetic iron particles of the MRF due to an external magnetic field, which causes its electrical resistance to be field dependent. Using this salient principle, the proposed MRF-VR system is constructed with electrodes and MRF, and its performance is demonstrated by evaluating its electrical resistive characteristics such as dimensional influence, response time, hysteresis and frequency response. After evaluating the performance characteristics, a feedback control system with a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller is established, and resistance-trajectory control experiments are carried out. Based on this MRF-VR system, a magnetic field-sensing system is constructed using a Wheatstone bridge circuit, and a polynomial model for calculating the magnetic flux density is formulated from the measured voltage. Finally, the accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed sensing system associated with the empirical polynomial model is successfully verified by comparing the calculated values of magnetic flux density with those measured by a commercial tesla meter.

  18. BOREAS RSS-17 Xylem Flux Density Measurements at the SSA-OBS Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Reiner; Way, JoBea; McDonald, Kyle; Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    As part of its efforts to determine environmental and phenological states from radar imagery, the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Remote Sensing Science (RSS)-17 team collected in situ tree xylem flow measurements for one growing season on five Picea mariana (black spruce) trees. The data were collected to obtain information on the temporal and spatial variability in water uptake by trees in the Southern Study Area-Old Black Spruce (SSA-OBS) stand in the BOREAS SSA. Temporally, the data were collected in 30-minute intervals for 120 days from 31 May 1994 until 27 September 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The xylem flux data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  19. Secure Mass Measurements from Transit Timing: 10 Kepler Exoplanets between 3 and 8 M⊕ with Diverse Densities and Incident Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Ford, Eric B.; Rowe, Jason F.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Van Laerhoven, Christa; Agol, Eric; Deck, Katherine M.; Holczer, Tomer; Mazeh, Tsevi

    2016-03-01

    We infer dynamical masses in eight multiplanet systems using transit times measured from Kepler's complete data set, including short-cadence data where available. Of the 18 dynamical masses that we infer, 10 pass multiple tests for robustness. These are in systems Kepler-26 (KOI-250), Kepler-29 (KOI-738), Kepler-60 (KOI-2086), Kepler-105 (KOI-115), and Kepler-307 (KOI-1576). Kepler-105 c has a radius of 1.3 R⊕ and a density consistent with an Earth-like composition. Strong transit timing variation (TTV) signals were detected from additional planets, but their inferred masses were sensitive to outliers or consistent solutions could not be found with independently measured transit times, including planets orbiting Kepler-49 (KOI-248), Kepler-57 (KOI-1270), Kepler-105 (KOI-115), and Kepler-177 (KOI-523). Nonetheless, strong upper limits on the mass of Kepler-177 c imply an extremely low density of ˜0.1 g cm-3. In most cases, individual orbital eccentricities were poorly constrained owing to degeneracies in TTV inversion. For five planet pairs in our sample, strong secular interactions imply a moderate to high likelihood of apsidal alignment over a wide range of possible eccentricities. We also find solutions for the three planets known to orbit Kepler-60 in a Laplace-like resonance chain. However, nonlibrating solutions also match the transit timing data. For six systems, we calculate more precise stellar parameters than previously known, enabling useful constraints on planetary densities where we have secure mass measurements. Placing these exoplanets on the mass-radius diagram, we find that a wide range of densities is observed among sub-Neptune-mass planets and that the range in observed densities is anticorrelated with incident flux.

  20. Simulation study of geometric shape factor approach to estimating earth emitted flux densities from wide field-of-view radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, W. L.; Green, R. N.

    1980-01-01

    A study was performed on the use of geometric shape factors to estimate earth-emitted flux densities from radiation measurements with wide field-of-view flat-plate radiometers on satellites. Sets of simulated irradiance measurements were computed for unrestricted and restricted field-of-view detectors. In these simulations, the earth radiation field was modeled using data from Nimbus 2 and 3. Geometric shape factors were derived and applied to these data to estimate flux densities on global and zonal scales. For measurements at a satellite altitude of 600 km, estimates of zonal flux density were in error 1.0 to 1.2%, and global flux density errors were less than 0.2%. Estimates with unrestricted field-of-view detectors were about the same for Lambertian and non-Lambertian radiation models, but were affected by satellite altitude. The opposite was found for the restricted field-of-view detectors.

  1. A model of heat transfer in sapwood and implications for sap flux density measurements using thermal dissipation probes

    SciTech Connect

    Wullschleger, Stan D; Childs, Kenneth W; King, Anthony Wayne; Hanson, Paul J

    2011-01-01

    A variety of thermal approaches are used to estimate sap flux density in stems of woody plants. Models have proven valuable tools for interpreting the behavior of heat pulse, heat balance, and heat field deformation techniques, but have seldom been used to describe heat transfer dynamics for the heat dissipation method. Therefore, to better understand the behavior of heat dissipation probes, a model was developed that takes into account the thermal properties of wood, the physical dimensions and thermal characteristics of the probes, and the conductive and convective heat transfer that occurs due to water flow in the sapwood. Probes were simulated as aluminum tubes 20 mm in length and 2 mm in diameter, whereas sapwood, heartwood, and bark each had a density and water fraction that determined their thermal properties. Base simulations assumed a constant sap flux density with sapwood depth and no wounding or physical disruption of xylem beyond the 2 mm diameter hole drilled for probe installation. Simulations across a range of sap flux densities showed that the dimensionless quantity k defined as ( Tm T)/ T where Tm is the temperature differential ( T) between the heated and unheated probe under zero flow conditions was dependent on the thermal conductivity of the sapwood. The relationship between sap flux density and k was also sensitive to radial gradients in sap flux density and to xylem disruption near the probe. Monte Carlo analysis in which 1000 simulations were conducted while simultaneously varying thermal conductivity and wound diameter revealed that sap flux density and k showed considerable departure from the original calibration equation used with this technique. The departure was greatest for abrupt patterns of radial variation typical of ring-porous species. Depending on the specific combination of thermal conductivity and wound diameter, use of the original calibration equation resulted in an 81% under- to 48% over-estimation of sap flux density at

  2. 5 to 160 keV continuous-wave x-ray spectral energy distribution and energy flux density measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tallon, R.W.; Koller, D.C.; Pelzl, R.M.; Pugh, R.D.; Bellem, R.D. . Microelectronics and Photonics Research Branch)

    1994-12-01

    In 1991, the USAF Phillips Laboratory Microelectronics and Photonics Research Branch installed a low energy x-ray facility (LEXR) for use in microelectronics radiation-effects analysis and research. Techniques developed for measuring the x-ray spectral energy distribution (differential intensity) from a tungsten-target bremsstrahlung x-ray source are reported. Spectra with end-point energies ranging from 20 to 160 keV were recorded. A separate effort to calibrate the dosimetry for the Phillips Laboratory low-energy x-ray facility established a need to know the spectral energy distributions at some point within the facility (previous calibration efforts had relies on spectra obtained from computer simulations). It was discovered that the primary discrepancy between the simulated and measured spectra was in the L- K-line data. The associated intensity (energy flux density) of the measured distributions was found to be up to 30% higher. Based on the measured distributions, predicted device responses were within 10% of the measured response as compared to about 30% accuracy obtained with simulated distributions.

  3. Precise VLA positions and flux-density measurements of the Jupiter system

    SciTech Connect

    Muhleman, D.O.; Berge, G.L.; Rudy, D.; Niell, A.E.

    1986-12-01

    VLA C array configuration observations at 2 and 6 cm are presented for Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto at eastern and western elongations with respect to Jupiter, which allowed measurements in right ascension and declination of the satellites with an rms precision of about + or - 0.03 arcsec. The transfer of the mean offsets of Ganymede to Jupiter yields offsets of -0.185 + or - 0.03 arcsec and -0.06 + or - 0.03 arcsec, with respect to JPL-DE-200, at the mean epoch of April 28, 1983; the large offset in right ascension is a combination of the Jupiter ephemeris error and the error in the frame tie of the Jovian planets with the VLBI system of precise positions which was used as the absolute reference frame for the observations. A significant error is noted in the orbital position of Callisto with respect to Ganymede. 12 references.

  4. Heat-Flux-Measuring Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Weikle, Donald H.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus simulates conditions in turbine engines. Automated facility generates and measures transient and steady-state heat fluxes at flux densities from 0.3 to 6 MW/m(Sup2) and temperatures from 100 to 1,200 K. Positioning arm holds heat-flux gauge at focal point of arc lamp. Arm previously chilled gauge in liquid nitrogen in Dewar flask. Cooling water flows through lamp to heat exchanger. Used to develop heat-flux gauges for turbine blades and to test materials for durability under rapidly changing temperatures.

  5. Compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam probe system for measurement of two-dimensional electron density profile

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Y. Manabe, T.; Ohno, N.; Takagi, M.; Kajita, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Morisaki, T.

    2014-09-15

    A compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam source for two-dimensional measurement of electron density profiles has been developed. The thermal-lithium-beam oven is heated by a carbon heater. In this system, the maximum particle flux of the thermal lithium beam was ∼4 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −2} s{sup −1} when the temperature of the thermal-lithium-beam oven was 900 K. The electron density profile was evaluated in the small tokamak device HYBTOK-II. The electron density profile was reconstructed using the thermal-lithium-beam probe data and this profile was consistent with the electron density profile measured with a Langmuir electrostatic probe. We confirm that the developed thermal-lithium-beam probe can be used to measure the two-dimensional electron density profile with high time and spatial resolutions.

  6. Superfluid Density and Flux-Flow Resistivity Measurements of Multiple-Band Superconductor β-PdBi2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Tatsunori; Imai, Yoshinori; Maeda, Atsutaka

    β -PdBi2 (Tcmax = 5 . 4 K) is a newcomer of the multiple-band superconductors, revealed by the specific heat and the upper critical field measurements, and the angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. In addition, authors of ref. observed the spin-polarized band dispersion and proposed that β-PdBi2 is a candidate of topological superconductor. However, there is less information on superconducting properties so far. In order to clarify the superconducting gap function, we measured the temperature (T) and magnetic field (B) dependence of microwave complex conductivity of β-PdBi2 single crystals. We found that the superfluid density exhibits the thermally activated T dependence, manifesting the absence of nodes in the superconducting gaps. We also found that the flux-flow resistivity increased with B with downward-convex shape. Based on some theories, we considered that such a behavior originated from the backflow of supercurrents around vortices reflecting rather small Ginzburg-Landau parameter (κ ~= 5). This work was supported by the JSPS KAKENHI (Grant Numbers 15K17697 and 26-9315), and the JSPS Research Fellowship for Young Scientists.

  7. Heat flux measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Weikle, Donald H.

    1989-01-01

    A new automated, computer controlled heat flux measurement facility is described. Continuous transient and steady-state surface heat flux values varying from about 0.3 to 6 MW/sq m over a temperature range of 100 to 1200 K can be obtained in the facility. An application of this facility is the development of heat flux gauges for continuous fast transient surface heat flux measurement on turbine blades operating in space shuttle main engine turbopumps. The facility is useful for durability testing at fast temperature transients.

  8. Surface renewal: an advanced micrometeorological method for measuring and processing field-scale energy flux density data.

    PubMed

    McElrone, Andrew J; Shapland, Thomas M; Calderon, Arturo; Fitzmaurice, Li; Paw U, Kyaw Tha; Snyder, Richard L

    2013-01-01

    Advanced micrometeorological methods have become increasingly important in soil, crop, and environmental sciences. For many scientists without formal training in atmospheric science, these techniques are relatively inaccessible. Surface renewal and other flux measurement methods require an understanding of boundary layer meteorology and extensive training in instrumentation and multiple data management programs. To improve accessibility of these techniques, we describe the underlying theory of surface renewal measurements, demonstrate how to set up a field station for surface renewal with eddy covariance calibration, and utilize our open-source turnkey data logger program to perform flux data acquisition and processing. The new turnkey program returns to the user a simple data table with the corrected fluxes and quality control parameters, and eliminates the need for researchers to shuttle between multiple processing programs to obtain the final flux data. An example of data generated from these measurements demonstrates how crop water use is measured with this technique. The output information is useful to growers for making irrigation decisions in a variety of agricultural ecosystems. These stations are currently deployed in numerous field experiments by researchers in our group and the California Department of Water Resources in the following crops: rice, wine and raisin grape vineyards, alfalfa, almond, walnut, peach, lemon, avocado, and corn. PMID:24378712

  9. Surface Renewal: An Advanced Micrometeorological Method for Measuring and Processing Field-Scale Energy Flux Density Data

    PubMed Central

    McElrone, Andrew J.; Shapland, Thomas M.; Calderon, Arturo; Fitzmaurice, Li; Paw U, Kyaw Tha; Snyder, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced micrometeorological methods have become increasingly important in soil, crop, and environmental sciences. For many scientists without formal training in atmospheric science, these techniques are relatively inaccessible. Surface renewal and other flux measurement methods require an understanding of boundary layer meteorology and extensive training in instrumentation and multiple data management programs. To improve accessibility of these techniques, we describe the underlying theory of surface renewal measurements, demonstrate how to set up a field station for surface renewal with eddy covariance calibration, and utilize our open-source turnkey data logger program to perform flux data acquisition and processing. The new turnkey program returns to the user a simple data table with the corrected fluxes and quality control parameters, and eliminates the need for researchers to shuttle between multiple processing programs to obtain the final flux data. An example of data generated from these measurements demonstrates how crop water use is measured with this technique. The output information is useful to growers for making irrigation decisions in a variety of agricultural ecosystems. These stations are currently deployed in numerous field experiments by researchers in our group and the California Department of Water Resources in the following crops: rice, wine and raisin grape vineyards, alfalfa, almond, walnut, peach, lemon, avocado, and corn. PMID:24378712

  10. Development of a vector-tensor system to measure the absolute magnetic flux density and its gradient in magnetically shielded rooms

    SciTech Connect

    Voigt, J.; Knappe-Grüneberg, S.; Gutkelch, D.; Neuber, S.; Schnabel, A.; Burghoff, M.; Haueisen, J.

    2015-05-15

    Several experiments in fundamental physics demand an environment of very low, homogeneous, and stable magnetic fields. For the magnetic characterization of such environments, we present a portable SQUID system that measures the absolute magnetic flux density vector and the gradient tensor. This vector-tensor system contains 13 integrated low-critical temperature (LTc) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) inside a small cylindrical liquid helium Dewar with a height of 31 cm and 37 cm in diameter. The achievable resolution depends on the flux density of the field under investigation and its temporal drift. Inside a seven-layer mu-metal shield, an accuracy better than ±23 pT for the components of the static magnetic field vector and ±2 pT/cm for each of the nine components of the gradient tensor is reached by using the shifting method.

  11. Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems (CO2Flux) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, M

    2005-01-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) carbon dioxide flux (CO2 flux) measurement systems provide half-hour average fluxes of CO2, H2O (latent heat), and sensible heat. The fluxes are obtained by the eddy covariance technique, which computes the flux as the mean product of the vertical wind component with CO2 and H2O densities, or estimated virtual temperature. A three-dimensional sonic anemometer is used to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the virtual (sonic) temperature. An infrared gas analyzer is used to obtain the CO2 and H2O densities. A separate sub-system also collects half-hour average measures of meteorological and soil variables from separate 4-m towers.

  12. Simulation study of a geometric shape factor technique for estimating earth-emitted radiant flux densities from wide-field-of-view radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, W. L.; Green, R. N.

    1980-01-01

    Geometric shape factors were computed and applied to satellite simulated irradiance measurements to estimate Earth emitted flux densities for global and zonal scales and for areas smaller than the detector field of view (FOV). Wide field of view flat plate detectors were emphasized, but spherical detectors were also studied. The radiation field was modeled after data from the Nimbus 2 and 3 satellites. At a satellite altitude of 600 km, zonal estimates were in error 1.0 to 1.2 percent and global estimates were in error less than 0.2 percent. Estimates with unrestricted field of view (UFOV) detectors were about the same for Lambertian and limb darkening radiation models. The opposite was found for restricted field of view detectors. The UFOV detectors are found to be poor estimators of flux density from the total FOV and are shown to be much better as estimators of flux density from a circle centered at the FOV with an area significantly smaller than that for the total FOV.

  13. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, DR

    2011-01-31

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

  14. Measuring surface fluxes in CAPE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanemasu, E. T.; D-Shah, T.; Nie, Dalin

    1992-01-01

    Two stations (site 1612 and site 2008) were operated by the University of Georgia group from 6 July 1991 to 18 August 1991. The following data were collected continuously: surface energy fluxes (i.e., net radiation, soil heat fluxes, sensible heat flux and latent heat flux), air temperature, vapor pressure, soil temperature (at 1 cm depth), and precipitation. Canopy reflectance and light interception data were taken three times at each site between 6 July and 18 August. Soil moisture content was measured twice at each site.

  15. Magnetic Flux Density in the Heliosphere through Several Solar Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdős, G.; Balogh, A.

    2014-01-01

    We studied the magnetic flux density carried by solar wind to various locations in the heliosphere, covering a heliospheric distance range of 0.3-5.4 AU and a heliolatitudinal range from 80° south to 80° north. Distributions of the radial component of the magnetic field, BR , were determined over long intervals from the Helios, ACE, STEREO, and Ulysses missions, as well as from using the 1 AU OMNI data set. We show that at larger distances from the Sun, the fluctuations of the magnetic field around the average Parker field line distort the distribution of BR to such an extent that the determination of the unsigned, open solar magnetic flux density from the average lang|BR |rang is no longer justified. We analyze in detail two methods for reducing the effect of fluctuations. The two methods are tested using magnetic field and plasma velocity measurements in the OMNI database and in the Ulysses observations, normalized to 1 AU. It is shown that without such corrections for the fluctuations, the magnetic flux density measured by Ulysses around the aphelion phase of the orbit is significantly overestimated. However, the matching between the in-ecliptic magnetic flux density at 1 AU (OMNI data) and the off-ecliptic, more distant, normalized flux density by Ulysses is remarkably good if corrections are made for the fluctuations using either method. The main finding of the analysis is that the magnetic flux density in the heliosphere is fairly uniform, with no significant variations having been observed either in heliocentric distance or heliographic latitude.

  16. Magnetic flux density in the heliosphere through several solar cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Erdős, G.; Balogh, A.

    2014-01-20

    We studied the magnetic flux density carried by solar wind to various locations in the heliosphere, covering a heliospheric distance range of 0.3-5.4 AU and a heliolatitudinal range from 80° south to 80° north. Distributions of the radial component of the magnetic field, B{sub R} , were determined over long intervals from the Helios, ACE, STEREO, and Ulysses missions, as well as from using the 1 AU OMNI data set. We show that at larger distances from the Sun, the fluctuations of the magnetic field around the average Parker field line distort the distribution of B{sub R} to such an extent that the determination of the unsigned, open solar magnetic flux density from the average (|B{sub R} |) is no longer justified. We analyze in detail two methods for reducing the effect of fluctuations. The two methods are tested using magnetic field and plasma velocity measurements in the OMNI database and in the Ulysses observations, normalized to 1 AU. It is shown that without such corrections for the fluctuations, the magnetic flux density measured by Ulysses around the aphelion phase of the orbit is significantly overestimated. However, the matching between the in-ecliptic magnetic flux density at 1 AU (OMNI data) and the off-ecliptic, more distant, normalized flux density by Ulysses is remarkably good if corrections are made for the fluctuations using either method. The main finding of the analysis is that the magnetic flux density in the heliosphere is fairly uniform, with no significant variations having been observed either in heliocentric distance or heliographic latitude.

  17. 47 CFR 25.208 - Power flux density limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Power flux density limits. 25.208 Section 25... COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.208 Power flux density limits. (a) In the band 3650-4200 MHz, the power flux density at the Earth's surface produced by emissions from a space station for all conditions...

  18. Internal wave pressure, velocity, and energy flux from density perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allshouse, Michael R.; Lee, Frank M.; Morrison, Philip J.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2016-05-01

    Determination of energy transport is crucial for understanding the energy budget and fluid circulation in density varying fluids such as the ocean and the atmosphere. However, it is rarely possible to determine the energy flux field J =p u , which requires simultaneous measurements of the pressure and velocity perturbation fields p and u , respectively. We present a method for obtaining the instantaneous J (x ,z ,t ) from density perturbations alone: A Green's function-based calculation yields p ; u is obtained by integrating the continuity equation and the incompressibility condition. We validate our method with results from Navier-Stokes simulations: The Green's function method is applied to the density perturbation field from the simulations and the result for J is found to agree typically to within 1% with J computed directly using p and u from the Navier-Stokes simulation. We also apply the Green's function method to density perturbation data from laboratory schlieren measurements of internal waves in a stratified fluid and the result for J agrees to within 6 % with results from Navier-Stokes simulations. Our method for determining the instantaneous velocity, pressure, and energy flux fields applies to any system described by a linear approximation of the density perturbation field, e.g., to small-amplitude lee waves and propagating vertical modes. The method can be applied using our matlab graphical user interface EnergyFlux.

  19. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration. The instruments used are: • a fast-response, three-dimensional (3D) wind sensor (sonic anemometer) to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the speed of sound (SOS) (used to derive the air temperature) • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain the water vapor density and the CO2 concentration, and • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain methane density and methane flux at one SGP EF and at the NSA CF. The ECOR systems are deployed at the locations where other methods for surface flux measurements (e.g., energy balance Bowen ratio [EBBR] systems) are difficult to employ, primarily at the north edge of a field of crops. A Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) has been installed collocated with each deployed ECOR system in SGP, NSA, Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), ARM Mobile Facility 1 (AMF1), and ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2). The surface energy balance system consists of upwelling and downwelling solar and infrared radiometers within one net radiometer, a wetness sensor, and soil measurements. The SEBS measurements allow the comparison of ECOR sensible and latent heat fluxes with the energy balance determined from the SEBS and provide information on wetting of the sensors for data quality purposes. The SEBS at one SGP and one NSA site also support upwelling and downwelling PAR measurements to qualify those two locations as Ameriflux sites.

  20. Radiative flux measurements in the troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, F. P. J.; Gore, W. J. Y.; Giver, L. P. M.

    1982-01-01

    A new airborne radiometric system with a time resolution as high as 60 msec has been designed for measuring radiative fluxes in the atmosphere. To verify the instrument performance, the solar constant at the top of the atmosphere has been calculated using the radiative flux densities measured in the troposphere, and the result obtained has been found to agree with the standard value to within 4%. Total heating rates of 0.175 and 0.377 K/h have been determined for hazy and foggy atmospheres, respectively, and aerosol heating rates of 0.065 and 0.235 K/h have been deduced from the total heating rates.

  1. Fundamentals of heat measurement. [heat flux transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerashchenko, O. A.

    1979-01-01

    Various methods and devices for obtaining experimental data on heat flux density over wide ranges of temperature and pressure are examined. Laboratory tests and device fabrication details are supplemented by theoretical analyses of heat-conduction and thermoelectric effects, providing design guidelines and information relevant to further research and development. A theory defining the measure of correspondence between transducer signal and the measured heat flux is established for individual (isolated) heat flux transducers subject to space and time-dependent loading. An analysis of the properties of stacked (series-connected) transducers of various types (sandwich-type, plane, and spiral) is used to derive a similarity theory providing general governing relationships. The transducers examined are used in 36 types of derivative devices involving direct heat loss measurements, heat conduction studies, radiation pyrometry, calorimetry in medicine and industry and nuclear reactor dosimetry.

  2. Flux density calibration in diffuse optical tomographic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Samir Kumar; Rajan, Kanhirodan; Vasu, Ram M.

    2013-02-01

    The solution of the forward equation that models the transport of light through a highly scattering tissue material in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) using the finite element method gives flux density (Φ) at the nodal points of the mesh. The experimentally measured flux (U) on the boundary over a finite surface area in a DOT system has to be corrected to account for the system transfer functions (R) of various building blocks of the measurement system. We present two methods to compensate for the perturbations caused by R and estimate true flux density (Φ) from Umeasuredcal. In the first approach, the measurement data with a homogeneous phantom (Umeasuredhomo) is used to calibrate the measurement system. The second scheme estimates the homogeneous phantom measurement using only the measurement from a heterogeneous phantom, thereby eliminating the necessity of a homogeneous phantom. This is done by statistically averaging the data (Umeasuredhetero) and redistributing it to the corresponding detector positions. The experiments carried out on tissue mimicking phantom with single and multiple inhomogeneities, human hand, and a pork tissue phantom demonstrate the robustness of the approach.

  3. 47 CFR 25.208 - Power flux density limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... citations affecting § 25.208, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Power flux density limits. 25.208 Section 25... COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.208 Power flux density limits. (a) In the band 3650-4200 MHz, the...

  4. 47 CFR 25.208 - Power flux density limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... propagation conditions. Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 25.208, see the List of CFR... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Power flux density limits. 25.208 Section 25... COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.208 Power flux density limits. (a) In the band 3650-4200 MHz, the...

  5. 47 CFR 25.208 - Power flux density limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... dBW/m2/MHz. Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 25.208, see the List of CFR... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Power flux density limits. 25.208 Section 25... COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.208 Power flux density limits. (a) In the band 3650-4200 MHz, the...

  6. 47 CFR 25.208 - Power flux density limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... dBW/m2/MHz. Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 25.208, see the List of CFR... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Power flux density limits. 25.208 Section 25... COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.208 Power flux density limits. (a) In the band 3650-4200 MHz, the...

  7. Correlation between -ray flux density and redshift for Fermi blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hu-Bing; Pei, Zhi-Yuan; Xie, Hong-Jing; Hao, Jing-Meng; Yang, Jiang-He; Yuan, Yu-Hai; Liu, Yi; Fan, Jun-Hui

    2015-09-01

    Blazars are strong -ray emitters, the -ray emissions are likely strongly beamed, therefore, one should use the intrinsic (de-beamed) emissions to investigate its emission nature. In this work, we compiled a sample of Fermi blazars with available beaming Doppler factors, , to investigate the correlation between -ray flux density, , and redshift, . The analysis shows that there is no correlation between and for the observed -ray flux density, but there is a clear strong correlation between the intrinsic flux densities, and . We also discussed the relationship of -ray luminosity and short time scale for the observed data and the intrinsic data. Our analysis suggests that the intrinsic -ray flux density obeys the flux density and redshift relation, and the jet in -rays maybe a continuous case. The intrinsic luminosity and the short time scales obey the Elliot and Shapiro relation and Abramowicz and Nobili relation as well.

  8. Refractive Interstellar Scintillation for Flux Density Variations of Two Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ai-Zhi; Wu, Xin-Ji; Esamdin, A.

    2003-08-01

    The flux density structure functions of PSRs B0525+21 and B2111+46 are calculated with the refractive interstellar scintillation (RISS) theory. The theoretical curves are in good agreement with observations [Astrophys. J. 539 (2000) 300] (hereafter S2000). The spectra of the electron density fluctuations both are of Kolmogorov spectra. We suggest that the flux density variations observed for these two pulsars are attributed to refractive interstellar scintillation, not to intrinsic variability.

  9. Latent Heat in Soil Heat Flux Measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The surface energy balance includes a term for soil heat flux. Soil heat flux is difficult to measure because it includes conduction and convection heat transfer processes. Accurate representation of soil heat flux is an important consideration in many modeling and measurement applications. Yet, the...

  10. Apparatus for measuring a flux of neutrons

    DOEpatents

    Stringer, James L.

    1977-01-01

    A flux of neutrons is measured by disposing a detector in the flux and applying electronic correlation techniques to discriminate between the electrical signals generated by the neutron detector and the unwanted interfering electrical signals generated by the incidence of a neutron flux upon the cables connecting the detector to the electronic measuring equipment at a remote location.

  11. AN ACCURATE FLUX DENSITY SCALE FROM 1 TO 50 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Perley, R. A.; Butler, B. J. E-mail: BButler@nrao.edu

    2013-02-15

    We develop an absolute flux density scale for centimeter-wavelength astronomy by combining accurate flux density ratios determined by the Very Large Array between the planet Mars and a set of potential calibrators with the Rudy thermophysical emission model of Mars, adjusted to the absolute scale established by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. The radio sources 3C123, 3C196, 3C286, and 3C295 are found to be varying at a level of less than {approx}5% per century at all frequencies between 1 and 50 GHz, and hence are suitable as flux density standards. We present polynomial expressions for their spectral flux densities, valid from 1 to 50 GHz, with absolute accuracy estimated at 1%-3% depending on frequency. Of the four sources, 3C286 is the most compact and has the flattest spectral index, making it the most suitable object on which to establish the spectral flux density scale. The sources 3C48, 3C138, 3C147, NGC 7027, NGC 6542, and MWC 349 show significant variability on various timescales. Polynomial coefficients for the spectral flux density are developed for 3C48, 3C138, and 3C147 for each of the 17 observation dates, spanning 1983-2012. The planets Venus, Uranus, and Neptune are included in our observations, and we derive their brightness temperatures over the same frequency range.

  12. Observational biases in flux magnification measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, H.

    2016-02-01

    Flux magnification is an interesting complement to shear-based lensing measurements, especially at high redshift where sources are harder to resolve. One measures either changes in the source density (magnification bias) or in the shape of the flux distribution (e.g. magnitude shift). The interpretation of these measurements relies on theoretical estimates of how the observables change under magnification. Here, we present simulations to create multiband photometric mock catalogues of Lyman-break galaxies in a CFHTLenS (Canada France Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey)-like survey that include several observational effects that can change these relations, making simple theoretical estimates unusable. In particular, we show how the magnification bias can be affected by photometric noise, colour selection, and dust extinction. We find that a simple measurement of the slope of the number-counts is not sufficient for the precise interpretation of virtually all observations of magnification bias. We also explore how sensitive the shift in the mean magnitude of a source sample in different photometric bands is to magnification including the same observational effects. Again we find significant deviations from simple analytical estimates. We also discover a wavelength-dependence of the magnitude-shift effect when applied to a colour-selected noisy source sample. Such an effect can mimic the reddening by dust in the lens. It has to be disentangled from the dust extinction before the magnitude shift/colour-excess can be used to measure the distribution of either dark matter or extragalactic dust. Using simulations like the ones presented here these observational effects can be studied and eventually removed from observations making precise measurements of flux magnification possible.

  13. Biases of CO2 Storage in Eddy Flux Measurements pertinent to Vertical Configurations of a Profile System and CO2 Density Averaging

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bai; Hanson, Paul J; Riggs, Jeffery S; Pallardy, Stephen G.; Hosman, K. P.; Meyers, T. P.; Wullschleger, Stan D; Gu, Lianhong; Heuer, Mark

    2007-01-01

    CO2 storage in a 30-minute period in a tall forest canopy often makes significant contributions to net ecosystem exchange (NEE) in the early morning and at night. When CO2 storage is properly measured and taken into account, underestimations of NEE on calm nights can be greatly reduced. Using CO2 data from a 12-level profile, we demonstrate that the lower canopy layer (below the thermal inversion) is a disproportional contributor to the total CO2 storage. This is because time derivative of CO2 density ( c/ t) generally shows increasing magnitude of mean and standard deviation with decreasing heights at night and from sunrise to 1000 hr in both growing and dormant seasons. Effects of resolution and configuration in a profiling system on the accuracy of CO2 storage estimation are evaluated by comparing subset profiles to the 12-level benchmark profile. It is demonstrated that the effectiveness of a profiling system in estimating CO2 storage is not only determined by its number of sampling levels but, more importantly, by its vertical configuration. To optimize a profile, one needs to balance the influence of two factors, c/ t and layer thickness, among all vertical sections within a forest. As a key contributor to the total CO2 storage, the lower canopy (with relatively large means and standard deviations of c/ t) requires a higher resolution in a profile system than the layers above. However, if the upper canopy is over-sparsely sampled relative to the lower canopy, the performance of a profile system might be degraded since, in such a situation, the influence of layer thickness dominates over that of c/ t. We also find that, because of different level of complexity in canopy structure, more sampling levels are necessary at our site in order to achieve the same level of accuracy as at a boreal aspen site. These results suggest that, in order to achieve an adequate accuracy in CO2 storage measurements, the number of sampling levels in a profile and its design should

  14. Electronic Flux Density beyond the Born-Oppenheimer Approximation.

    PubMed

    Schild, Axel; Agostini, Federica; Gross, E K U

    2016-05-19

    In the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, the electronic wave function is typically real-valued and hence the electronic flux density (current density) seems to vanish. This is unfortunate for chemistry, because it precludes the possibility to monitor the electronic motion associated with the nuclear motion during chemical rearrangements from a Born-Oppenheimer simulation of the process. We study an electronic flux density obtained from a correction to the electronic wave function. This correction is derived via nuclear velocity perturbation theory applied in the framework of the exact factorization of electrons and nuclei. To compute the correction, only the ground state potential energy surface and the electronic wave function are needed. For a model system, we demonstrate that this electronic flux density approximates the true one very well, for coherent tunneling dynamics as well as for over-the-barrier scattering, and already for mass ratios between electrons and nuclei that are much larger than the true mass ratios. PMID:26878256

  15. Correlated flux densities from VLBI observations with the DSN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, R. F.

    1992-01-01

    Correlated flux densities of extragalactic radio sources in the very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) astrometric catalog are required for the VLBI tracking of Galileo, Mars Observer, and future missions. A system to produce correlated and total flux density catalogs was developed to meet these requirements. A correlated flux density catalog of 274 sources, accurate to about 20 percent, was derived from more than 5000 DSN VLBI observations at 2.3 GHz (S-band) and 8.4 GHz (X-band) using 43 VLBI radio reference frame experiments during the period 1989-1992. Various consistency checks were carried out to ensure the accuracy of the correlated flux densities. All observations were made on the California-Spain and California-Australia DSN baselines using the Mark 3 wideband data acquisition system. A total flux density catalog, accurate to about 20 percent, with data on 150 sources, was also created. Together, these catalogs can be used to predict source strengths to assist in the scheduling of VLBI tracking passes. In addition, for those sources with sufficient observations, a rough estimate of source structure parameters can be made.

  16. Neutrino flux predictions for cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hartz, Mark

    2015-05-15

    Experiments that measure neutrino interaction cross sections using accelerator neutrino sources require a prediction of the neutrino flux to extract the interaction cross section from the measured neutrino interaction rate. This article summarizes methods of estimating the neutrino flux using in-situ and ex-situ measurements. The application of these methods by current and recent experiments is discussed.

  17. Measurement of thermal fluxes in power plant components

    SciTech Connect

    Stradomskii, M.V.; Fedorova, O.V.; Maksimov, E.A.

    1985-12-01

    The authors present a method of recovering the thermal flux acting on a sensing element with respect to measurements of sensing element signals. The solution of such problems is prompted by the need for information on the actual values of the energy density entering parts of various power plants. The dynamics of temperatures at the sensing element surfaces in a thermal flux data unit is shown during start up from cold of a power plant. The variation in time of the thermal flux density is also shown as calculated by the proposed method.

  18. The Reliability of Density Measurements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crothers, Charles

    1978-01-01

    Data from a land-use study of small- and medium-sized towns in New Zealand are used to ascertain the relationship between official and effective density measures. It was found that the reliability of official measures of density is very low overall, although reliability increases with community size. (Author/RLV)

  19. Changes in magnetic flux density around fatigue crack tips of carbon tool steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Takashi; Kida, Katsuyuki; Santos, Edson C.; Tanabe, Hirotaka

    2010-03-01

    Fatigue failure of steel occurs when small cracks form in a component and then continue to grow to a size large enough to cause failure. In order to understand the strength of steel components it is important to find the cracks which eventually grow to cause failures. However, at present, it is not easy to distinguish, in the early stages of growth, the cracks which will grow fast and cause failure. We hypothesized that it may be possible to distinguish them by comparing changes in the magnetic flux density around the tips of those cracks that grew large enough to cause failure. In order to measure these changes in magnetic flux density, we developed a scanning Hall probe microscope and observed the fatigue cracks growing from artificial slits in carbon tool steels (JIS SKS93). We also compared the changes in magnetic flux density around crack tips which grew under different loads and found that there is a strong correlation between the magnetic flux density, crack growth and stress intensity factors. In order to understand this relation, we measured the changes in the magnetic flux density and residual tensile stress by using an X-ray system, and found that the magnetic flux density changes not only in the plastic deformation area but also in the area of elastic stress field with increased stress.

  20. Changes in magnetic flux density around fatigue crack tips of carbon tool steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Takashi; Kida, Katsuyuki; Santos, Edson C.; Tanabe, Hirotaka

    2009-12-01

    Fatigue failure of steel occurs when small cracks form in a component and then continue to grow to a size large enough to cause failure. In order to understand the strength of steel components it is important to find the cracks which eventually grow to cause failures. However, at present, it is not easy to distinguish, in the early stages of growth, the cracks which will grow fast and cause failure. We hypothesized that it may be possible to distinguish them by comparing changes in the magnetic flux density around the tips of those cracks that grew large enough to cause failure. In order to measure these changes in magnetic flux density, we developed a scanning Hall probe microscope and observed the fatigue cracks growing from artificial slits in carbon tool steels (JIS SKS93). We also compared the changes in magnetic flux density around crack tips which grew under different loads and found that there is a strong correlation between the magnetic flux density, crack growth and stress intensity factors. In order to understand this relation, we measured the changes in the magnetic flux density and residual tensile stress by using an X-ray system, and found that the magnetic flux density changes not only in the plastic deformation area but also in the area of elastic stress field with increased stress.

  1. Pyrolytic graphite gauge for measuring heat flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunker, Robert C. (Inventor); Ewing, Mark E. (Inventor); Shipley, John L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A gauge for measuring heat flux, especially heat flux encountered in a high temperature environment, is provided. The gauge includes at least one thermocouple and an anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body that covers at least part of, and optionally encases the thermocouple. Heat flux is incident on the anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body by arranging the gauge so that the gauge surface on which convective and radiative fluxes are incident is perpendicular to the basal planes of the pyrolytic graphite. The conductivity of the pyrolytic graphite permits energy, transferred into the pyrolytic graphite body in the form of heat flux on the incident (or facing) surface, to be quickly distributed through the entire pyrolytic graphite body, resulting in small substantially instantaneous temperature gradients. Temperature changes to the body can thereby be measured by the thermocouple, and reduced to quantify the heat flux incident to the body.

  2. Identification of the monitoring point density needed to reliably estimate contaminant mass fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liedl, R.; Liu, S.; Fraser, M.; Barker, J.

    2005-12-01

    Plume monitoring frequently relies on the evaluation of point-scale measurements of concentration at observation wells which are located at control planes or `fences' perpendicular to groundwater flow. Depth-specific concentration values are used to estimate the total mass flux of individual contaminants through the fence. Results of this approach, which is based on spatial interpolation, obviously depend on the density of the measurement points. Our contribution relates the accurracy of mass flux estimation to the point density and, in particular, allows to identify a minimum point density needed to achieve a specified accurracy. In order to establish this relationship, concentration data from fences installed in the coal tar creosote plume at the Borden site are used. These fences are characterized by a rather high density of about 7 points/m2 and it is reasonable to assume that the true mass flux is obtained with this point density. This mass flux is then compared with results for less dense grids down to about 0.1points/m2. Mass flux estimates obtained for this range of point densities are analyzed by the moving window method in order to reduce purely random fluctuations. For each position of the moving window the mass flux is estimated and the coefficient of variation (CV) is calculated to quantify variablity of the results. Thus, the CV provides a relative measure of accurracy in the estimated fluxes. By applying this approach to the Borden naphthalene plume at different times, it is found that the point density changes from sufficient to insufficient due to the temporally decreasing mass flux. By comparing the results of naphthalene and phenol at the same fence and at the same time, we can see that the same grid density might be sufficient for one compound but not for another. If a rather strict CV criterion of 5% is used, a grid of 7 points/m2 is shown to allow for reliable estimates of the true mass fluxes only in the beginning of plume development when

  3. Diamagnetic flux measurement in Aditya tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sameer; Jha, Ratneshwar; Lal, Praveen; Hansaliya, Chandresh; Gopalkrishna, M. V.; Kulkarni, Sanjay; Mishra, Kishore

    2010-12-15

    Measurements of diamagnetic flux in Aditya tokamak for different discharge conditions are reported for the first time. The measured diamagnetic flux in a typical discharge is less than 0.6 mWb and therefore it has required careful compensation for various kinds of pick-ups. The hardware and software compensations employed in this measurement are described. We introduce compensation of a pick-up due to plasma current of less than 20 kA in short duration discharges, in which plasma pressure gradient is supposed to be negligible. The flux measurement during radio frequency heating is also presented in order to validate compensation.

  4. PHOTON FLUX DENSITY INFLUENCES GRASS RESPONSES TO EXTENDED PHOTOPERIOD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant sensitivity to extended photoperiod has been well documented, with little attention to the possibility that quantum flux density used to extend photoperiod has an influence on the expression of photoperiod response. This study was undertaken with 4 grass species under field conditions to exami...

  5. Footprint prediction of scalar fluxes - Reliability and implications for airborne flux measurements over the FIFE site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuepp, P. H.; Desjardins, R. L.; Macpherson, J. I.; Leclerc, M. Y.

    1990-01-01

    Estimates of the location and extension of the upwind ground area that affects flux observations most directly are examined to determine the reliability of airborne versus near-ground flux measurements. The theoretical issues regarding the 'footprint' are examined, and specific observations are analyzed by studying the data over a grid regarding sensible heat, latent heat, CO2, and greenness. The grid is footprint-corrected to correlate better with independently observed surface characteristics, and an optimized footprint is developed that satisfies the relationships between the observed variables. Optimized mapping of the surface flux is given which demonstrates the importance of considering local advection to correlate airborne and ground-based flux observations. The technique is particularly applicable to situations in which significant variations in the surface flux density exist.

  6. Instrumentation for bone density measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meharg, L. S.

    1968-01-01

    Measurement system evaluates the integrated bone density over a specific cross section of bone. A digital computer converts stored bone scan data to equivalent aluminum calibration wedge thickness, and bone density is then integrated along the scan by using the trapezoidal approximation integration formula.

  7. Densitometric tomography using the measurement of muon flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hivert, F.; Busto, J.; Brunner, J.; Salin, P.; Gaffet, S.

    2013-12-01

    The knowledge of the subsurface properties is essentially obtained by geophysical methods, e.g. seismic imaging, electric prospection or gravimetry. The present work develops a recent method to investigate the in situ density of rocks using atmospheric the muon flux measurement , its attenuation depending on the rock density and thickness. This new geophysical technique have been mainly applied in volcanology (Lesparre N., 2011) using scintillator detectors. The present project (T2DM2) aims to realize underground muons flux measurements in order to characterizing the rock massif density variations above the LSBB underground research facility in Rustrel (France). The muon flux will be measure with a new Muon telescope instrumentation using Micromegas detectors in Time Projection Chambers (TPC) configuration. The first step of the work presented considers the muon flux simulation using the Gaisser model, for the interactions between muons and atmospheric particles, and the MUSIC code (Kudryavtsev V. A., 2008) for the muons/rock interactions. The results show that the muon flux attenuation caused by density variations are enough significant to be observed until around 500 m depth and for period of time in the order of one month. Such a duration scale and depth of investigation is compatible with the duration of the water transfer processes involved within the Karst unsaturated zone where LSBB is located. Our work now concentrates on the optimization of the spatial distribution of detectors that will be deployed in future.

  8. Critical current density and flux pinning in an unconventional superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Kaul, S. N.; Rodríguez Fernández, J.; Fernández Barquín, L.

    2009-12-01

    The functional dependence of the critical current density on magnetic field, J(H), observed at fixed temperatures in the unconventional type-II superconductor, LaAgMn ( c=0.1,0.2,0.3) alloys, but not the relative magnitude of J in different alloy compositions at any given temperature and field, is adequately described by the exponential-decay critical state model. In accordance with the predictions of the Kramer's flux-pinning model, the peak value of the pinning force density FPmax∝( with the exponent 1.7⩽m⩽2.8 and F/FPmax scales with h=H/Hc_2, where Hc_2 is the upper critical field. Irrespective of sample composition and temperature in the superconducting state, the pinning of the flux line lattice (FLL) dominates over the plastic FLL shear.

  9. Measuring Ionization at Extreme Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Dominik; Doeppner, Tilo; Kritcher, Andrea; Bachmann, Benjamin; Fletcher, Luke; Falcone, Roger; Gericke, Dirk; Glenzer, Siegfried; Masters, Nathan; Nora, Ryan; Boehm, Kurt; Divol, Laurent; Landen, Otto; Yi, Austin; Kline, John; Redmer, Ronald; Neumayer, Paul

    2015-11-01

    A precise knowledge of ionization at given temperature and density is crucial in order to properly model compressibility and heat capacity of ICF ablator materials for efficient implosions producing energy gain. Here, we present a new experimental platform to perform spectrally resolved x-ray scattering measurements of ionization, density and temperature in imploding CH or beryllium capsules on the National Ignition Facility. Recording scattered x-rays at 9 keV from a zinc He-alpha plasma source at a scattering angle of 120 degrees, first experiments show strong sensitivity to k-shell ionization, while at the same time constraining density and temperature. This platform will allow for x-ray Thomson scattering studies of dense plasmas with free electron densities up to 1025 cm-3, giving the possibility to investigate effects of continuum lowering and Pauli blocking on the ablator ionization state right before stagnation of the implosion.

  10. Experimental flux measurements on a network scale

    SciTech Connect

    Schwender, J.

    2011-10-11

    Metabolic flux is a fundamental property of living organisms. In recent years, methods for measuring metabolic flux in plants on a network scale have evolved further. One major challenge in studying flux in plants is the complexity of the plant's metabolism. In particular, in the presence of parallel pathways in multiple cellular compartments, the core of plant central metabolism constitutes a complex network. Hence, a common problem with the reliability of the contemporary results of {sup 13}C-Metabolic Flux Analysis in plants is the substantial reduction in complexity that must be included in the simulated networks; this omission partly is due to limitations in computational simulations. Here, I discuss recent emerging strategies that will better address these shortcomings.

  11. Evaluation of soil heat flux density as a function of soil management practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moratiel Yugueros, R.; García Moreno, R.

    2012-04-01

    Soil energy is an important parameter in order to understand the flux of energy between the plant and the soil. This parameter could determine the potential for future production of soil. Pattern of surface energy flux varies depending on several factors, mainly on coverage. Also, this behaviour is strongly conditioned by the physical condition of soil. In order to evaluate the trend and behaviour of soil energy depending on soil coverage the aim of the present study was to evaluate soil heat flux density (G) in three different soil conditions depending on seasonal weather temperatures. Therefore, the authors monitored soil energy every half hour from soil located on bare soil, on soil covered by crops at root level and in between crop rows. The selected crop was corn. Soil heat flux density was measured with a heat flux plate sensor buried at a depth of 0.05 m in experimental sites. The change in heat storage in the soil layer above the heat flux plates was measured by inserting temperature sensors at an angle from near the bottom to near the top of the soil layer (above the plate sensor). The results indicated that the soil energy flux depends mainly on radiation and soil conditions. Although net radiation (Rn) was the same for all the sites, the evolution for G is different. Greater G fluctuation is produced in bared soils and decreases as soil is covered by the crops, especially at root level.

  12. Acoustic measurements of gas density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakkottai, P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Back, L. H.

    1990-01-01

    Sound transmission through gases in an enclosure is considered. Analytical results are given in terms of geometrical parameters, wave numbers, and source type for simple model problems, and are compared with data obtained by Haran (1983). It is concluded that density measurements can be made in a gas contained in an enclosure by measuring the sound pressure level at a receiver located near a dipole source driven at a constant velocity amplitude at low frequencies.

  13. Dual neutron flux/temperature measurement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, John T.; Simpson, Marc L.; McElhaney, Stephanie A.

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous measurement of neutron flux and temperature is provided by a single sensor which includes a phosphor mixture having two principal constituents. The first constituent is a neutron sensitive 6LiF and the second is a rare-earth activated Y203 thermophosphor. The mixture is coated on the end of a fiber optic, while the opposite end of the fiber optic is coupled to a light detector. The detected light scintillations are quantified for neutron flux determination, and the decay is measured for temperature determination.

  14. Method for determining transport critical current densities and flux penetration depth in bulk superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelsson, Ulf E. (Inventor); Strayer, Donald M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A contact-less method for determining transport critical current density and flux penetration depth in bulk superconductor material. A compressor having a hollow interior and a plunger for selectively reducing the free space area for distribution of the magnetic flux therein are formed of superconductor material. Analytical relationships, based upon the critical state model, Maxwell's equations and geometrical relationships define transport critical current density and flux penetration depth in terms of the initial trapped magnetic flux density and the ratio between initial and final magnetic flux densities whereby data may be reliably determined by means of the simple test apparatus for evaluating the current density and flux penetration depth.

  15. Airborne flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds over California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misztal, P. K.; Karl, T.; Weber, R.; Jonsson, H. H.; Guenther, A. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-03-01

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a PTR-MS and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene, MVK + MAC, methanol, monoterpenes, and MBO over ∼10 000 km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions of isoprene. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach was used to calculate fluxes over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The Continuous Wavelet Transformation (CWT) approach was used over the same transects to also calculate "instantaneous" fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Vertical flux divergence of isoprene is expected due to its relatively short lifetime and was measured directly using "racetrack" profiles at multiple altitudes. It was found to be linear and in the range 5% to 30% depending on the ratio of aircraft altitude to PBL height (z / zi). Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently at 400 ± 50 m (a.g.l.) altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to Basal Emission Factor (BEF) landcover datasets used to drive biogenic VOC (BVOC) emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m-2 h-1) above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. While isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions, shrublands, and

  16. Instruments for measuring radiant thermal fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerashenko, O. A.; Sazhina, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    An absolute two-sided radiometer, designed on the principle of replacing absorbed radiant energy with electrical energy, is described. The sensitive element of the detector is a thermoelectric transducer of thermal flux. The fabrication technology, methods of measurement, technical characteristics, and general operation of the instrument are presented.

  17. Cassini INMS measurements of Enceladus plume density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, M. E.; Teolis, B. D.; Hurley, D. M.; Magee, B. A.; Waite, J. H.; Brockwell, T. G.; Perryman, R. S.; McNutt, R. L.

    2015-09-01

    During six encounters between 2008 and 2013, the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) made in situ measurements deep within the Enceladus plumes. Throughout each encounter, those measurements contained density variations that reflected the nature of the source, particularly of the high-velocity jets. Since the dominant constituent of the vapor, H2O, interacted with the walls of the INMS inlet, we track changes in the external vapor density by using more-volatile species that responded promptly to those changes. However, the most-abundant volatiles, at 28 u and 44 u, behaved differently from each other in the plume. At least a portion of their differences may be attributed to mass-dependent thermal velocity that affects Mach number in the high-velocity jets. Variations between volatiles place an emphasis on modeling as a means to construct overall plume density from the volatile densities and to investigate the velocity, gas temperature, and location of the jets. Ice grains, entering the INMS aperture add complexity and uncertainty to the physical interpretation of the data because the grains modified the INMS measurements. A comparison of data from the last three encounters, E14, E17, and E18, are consistent with the VIMS observation of variability in jet production and a slower, more diffuse gas flux from the four sulci or tiger stripes. We provide and describe the INMS data, its processing, and its uncertainty.

  18. Interplanetary magnetic flux - Measurement and balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomas, D. J.; Gosling, J. T.; Phillips, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    A new method for determining the approximate amount of magnetic flux in various solar wind structures in the ecliptic (and solar rotation) plane is developed using single-spacecraft measurements in interplanetary space and making certain simplifying assumptions. The method removes the effect of solar wind velocity variations and can be applied to specific, limited-extent solar wind structures as well as to long-term variations. Over the 18-month interval studied, the ecliptic plane flux of coronal mass ejections was determined to be about 4 times greater than that of HFDs.

  19. Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements

    DOEpatents

    Zonca, Fulvio; Cohen, Samuel A.; Bennett, Timothy; Timberlake, John R.

    1993-01-01

    Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer--a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10.sup.-5 to 10.sup.3 N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in a intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

  20. Spillage and flux density on a receiver aperture lip. [of solar thermal collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L. D.

    1985-01-01

    In a dish-type point-focusing solar thermal collector, the spillage and the flux density on the receiver aperture lip are related in a very simple way, if the aperture is circular and centered on the optical axis. Specifically, the flux density on the lip is equal to the spillage times the peak flux density in the plane of the lip.

  1. Spatial and temporal variations in sap flux density in Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) trees, central Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Han; Chiu, Chen-Wei; Wey, Tsong-Huei; Kume, Tomonori

    2013-04-01

    Sap flow measurement method is a technique widely used for measuring forest transpiration. However, variations in sap flow distribution can make accurately estimating individual tree-scale transpiration difficult. Significant spatial variations in sap flow across the sapwood within tree have been reported in many studies. In contrast, few studies have discussed azimuthal variations in sap flow, and even fewer have examined their seasonal change characteristics. This study was undertaken to clarify within-tree special and temporal variations in sap flow, and to propose an appropriate design for individual-tree scale transpiration estimates for Japanese cedar trees. The measurement was conducted in a Japanese cedar plantation located in Central Taiwan. Spatial distribution of sap flux density through the sapwood cross-section was measured using Granier's thermal dissipation technique. Sensors were installed at 1.3 m high on the east, west, north and south sides of the stem at 0-2 cm in 8 trees, and at 2-4 cm in the 6 larger trees. We found, in radial profile analysis, that sap flux densities measured at the depth of 2-4 cm were 50 % in average of those measured at depth of 0-2 cm. In azimuthal profile analysis, we found significant azimuthal variations in sap flux density. In one individual tree, the ratio of sap flux density on one aspect to another could be approximately 40-190 %, with no dependency on directions. Both radial and azimuthal profiles in most sample trees were fairly consistent throughout the measurement period. We concluded that radial and azimuthal variations in sap flow across sapwood might introduce significant errors in individual tree-scale transpiration estimations based on single point sap flow measurement, and seasonal change of within-tree spatial variations in sap flow could have insignificant impacts on accuracy of long-term individual tree-scale transpiration estimates. Keywords: transpiration, sap flow measurement, scaling up, sap flow

  2. Multiple-Point Mass Flux Measurement System Using Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Clem, Michelle M.

    2009-01-01

    A multiple-point Rayleigh scattering diagnostic is being developed to provide mass flux measurements in gas flows. Spectroscopic Rayleigh scattering is an established flow diagnostic that has the ability to provide simultaneous density, temperature, and velocity measurements. Rayleigh scattered light from a focused 18 Watt continuous-wave laser beam is directly imaged through a solid Fabry-Perot etalon onto a CCD detector which permits spectral analysis of the light. The spatial resolution of the measurements is governed by the locations of interference fringes, which can be changed by altering the etalon characteristics. A prototype system has been used to acquire data in a Mach 0.56 flow to demonstrate feasibility of using this system to provide mass flux measurements. Estimates of measurement uncertainty and recommendations for system improvements are presented

  3. Absolute Calibration of the Radio Astronomy Flux Density Scale at 22 to 43 GHz Using Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, B.; López-Caniego, M.; Perley, R. A.; Stevens, J.; Butler, B. J.; Rocha, G.; Walter, B.; Zacchei, A.

    2016-04-01

    The Planck mission detected thousands of extragalactic radio sources at frequencies from 28 to 857 GHz. Planck's calibration is absolute (in the sense that it is based on the satellite’s annual motion around the Sun and the temperature of the cosmic microwave background), and its beams are well characterized at sub-percent levels. Thus, Planck's flux density measurements of compact sources are absolute in the same sense. We have made coordinated Very Large Array (VLA) and Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) observations of 65 strong, unresolved Planck sources in order to transfer Planck's calibration to ground-based instruments at 22, 28, and 43 GHz. The results are compared to microwave flux density scales currently based on planetary observations. Despite the scatter introduced by the variability of many of the sources, the flux density scales are determined to 1%–2% accuracy. At 28 GHz, the flux density scale used by the VLA runs 2%–3% ± 1.0% below Planck values with an uncertainty of +/- 1.0%; at 43 GHz, the discrepancy increases to 5%–6% ± 1.4% for both ATCA and the VLA.

  4. Micrometeorological flux measurements at a coastal site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Guozheng; Meixner, Franz X.; Bruse, Michael; Mamtimin, Buhalqem

    2014-05-01

    The eddy covariance (EC) technique is the only direct measurement of the momentum, heat, and trace gas (e.g. water vapor, CO2 and ozone) fluxes. The measurements are expected to be most accurate over flat terrain where there is an extended homogenous surface upwind from the tower, and when the environmental conditions are steady. Additionally, the one dimensional approach assumes that vertical turbulent exchange is the dominant flux, whereas advective influences should be negligible. The application of EC method under non-ideal conditions, for example in complex terrain, has yet to be fully explored. To explore the possibilities and limitations of EC technique under non-ideal conditions, an EC system was set up at Selles beach, Crete, Greece (35.33°N, 25.71°E) in the beginning of July 2012. The dominant wind direction was west, parallel to the coast. The EC system consisted of a sonic anemometer (CSAT3 Campbell Scientific), an infrared open-path CO2/H2O gas analyzer (LI-7500, Li-COR Biosciences) and a fast chemiluminescence ozone analyzer (enviscope GmbH). All the signals of these fast response instruments were sampled at 10 Hz and the measurement height was 3 m. Besides, another gradient system was setup. Air temperature, relative humidity (HYGROMER MP 103 A), and wind speed (WMT700 Vaisala) were measured every 10 seconds at 3 heights (0.7, 1.45, 3 m). Air intakes were set up at 0.7m and 3m. A pump drew the air through a flow system and a telflon valve alternately switched between the two heights every 30 seconds. H2O, CO2 (LI-840A, Li-COR Biosciences) and ozone mixing ratio s (model 205, 2BTechnologies) were measured every 10 seconds. Momentum, heat, CO2 and ozone fluxes were evaluated by both EC and gradient technique. For the calculation of turbulent fluxes, TK3 algorithm (Department of Micrometeorology, University Bayreuth, Germany) was applied. We will present the measured fluxes of the two systems and assess the data quality under such non-ideal condition.

  5. Electromagnetic potentials basis for energy density and power flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthoff, H. E.

    2016-09-01

    In rounding out the education of students in advanced courses in applied electromagnetics it is incumbent on us as mentors to raise issues that encourage appreciation of certain subtle aspects that are often overlooked during first exposure to the field. One of these has to do with the interplay between fields and potentials, with the latter often seen as just a convenient mathematical artifice useful in solving Maxwell’s equations. Nonetheless, to those practiced in application it is well understood that various alternatives in the use of fields and potentials are available within electromagnetic (EM) theory for the definitions of energy density, momentum transfer, EM stress–energy tensor, and so forth. Although the various options are all compatible with the basic equations of electrodynamics (e.g., Maxwell’s equations, Lorentz force law, gauge invariance), nonetheless certain alternative formulations lend themselves to being seen as preferable to others with regard to the transparency of their application to physical problems of interest. Here we argue for the transparency of an energy density/power flux option based on the EM potentials alone.

  6. Optimization of multiply acquired magnetic flux density Bz using ICNE-Multiecho train in MREIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Hyun Soo; In Kwon, Oh

    2010-05-01

    The aim of magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is to visualize the electrical properties, conductivity or current density of an object by injection of current. Recently, the prolonged data acquisition time when using the injected current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) method has been advantageous for measurement of magnetic flux density data, Bz, for MREIT in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, the ICNE method results in undesirable side artifacts, such as blurring, chemical shift and phase artifacts, due to the long data acquisition under an inhomogeneous static field. In this paper, we apply the ICNE method to a gradient and spin echo (GRASE) multi-echo train pulse sequence in order to provide the multiple k-space lines during a single RF pulse period. We analyze the SNR of the measured multiple Bz data using the proposed ICNE-Multiecho MR pulse sequence. By determining a weighting factor for Bz data in each of the echoes, an optimized inversion formula for the magnetic flux density data is proposed for the ICNE-Multiecho MR sequence. Using the ICNE-Multiecho method, the quality of the measured magnetic flux density is considerably increased by the injection of a long current through the echo train length and by optimization of the voxel-by-voxel noise level of the Bz value. Agarose-gel phantom experiments have demonstrated fewer artifacts and a better SNR using the ICNE-Multiecho method. Experimenting with the brain of an anesthetized dog, we collected valuable echoes by taking into account the noise level of each of the echoes and determined Bz data by determining optimized weighting factors for the multiply acquired magnetic flux density data.

  7. The altitude variation of the ionospheric photoelectron flux A comparison of theory and measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, P. G.; Torr, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    The 145 to 300-km altitude variation of the measured photoelectron flux in the 13 to 18 eV, 28 to 34 eV, and 50 to 55 eV energy regions are compared with the variations expected from theory. There is a strong linear relationship between the measured photoelectron flux and the attenuation of the solar EUV flux at these energies. Therefore, the photoelectron flux is sensitive to changes in the solar zenith angle, neutral density scale height, and total neutral density. However, contrary to previous assertions, the photoelectron flux at most energies is not sensitive to the relative densities of the neutral constituents. In addition, good agreement between theory and measurement is obtained. By using the concept of photoelectron production frequencies, the usually complex evaluation of the local equilibrium photoelectron flux is reduced to a trivial calculation so that the steps in the calculation can be readily verified.

  8. The brightness temperature of Venus and the absolute flux-density scale at 608 MHz.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhleman, D. O.; Berge, G. L.; Orton, G. S.

    1973-01-01

    The disk temperature of Venus was measured at 608 MHz near the inferior conjunction of 1972, and a value of 498 plus or minus 33 K was obtained using a nominal CKL flux-density scale. The result is consistent with earlier measurements, but has a much smaller uncertainty. Our theoretical model prediction is larger by a factor of 1.21 plus or minus 0.09. This discrepancy has been noticed previously for frequencies below 1400 MHz, but was generally disregarded because of the large observational uncertainties. No way could be found to change the model to produce agreement without causing a conflict with well-established properties of Venus. Thus it is suggested that the flux-density scale may require an upward revision, at least near this frequency, in excess of what has previously been considered likely.

  9. ACCURACY OF SOIL HEAT FLUX MEASUREMENTS MADE WITH FLUX PLATES OF CONTRASTING PROPERTIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flux plate measurements of soil heat flux (G) may include significant errors unless the plates are carefully installed and known errors accounted for. The objective of this research was to quantify potential errors in G when using soil heat flux plates of contrasting designs. Five flux plates with...

  10. Progress on a Rayleigh Scattering Mass Flux Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke-Fagan, Amy F.; Clem, Michelle M.; Elam, Kristie A.; Hirt, Stefanie M.

    2010-01-01

    A Rayleigh scattering diagnostic has been developed to provide mass flux measurements in wind tunnel flows. Spectroscopic molecular Rayleigh scattering is an established flow diagnostic tool that has the ability to provide simultaneous density and velocity measurements in gaseous flows. Rayleigh scattered light from a focused 10 Watt continuous-wave laser beam is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to a solid Fabry-Perot etalon for spectral analysis. The circular interference pattern that contains the spectral information that is needed to determine the flow properties is imaged onto a CCD detector. Baseline measurements of density and velocity in the test section of the 15 cm x 15 cm Supersonic Wind Tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center are presented as well as velocity measurements within a supersonic combustion ramjet engine isolator model installed in the tunnel test section.

  11. Determination of solar proton fluxes and energies at high solar latitudes by UV radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, N.; Blum, P. W.; Ajello, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The latitudinal variation of the solar proton flux and energy causes a density increase at high solar latitudes of the neutral gas penetrating the heliosphere. Measurements of the neutral density by UV resonance radiation observations from interplanetary spacecraft thus permit deductions on the dependence of the solar proton flux on heliographic latitude. Using both the results of Mariner 10 measurements and of other off-ecliptic solar wind observations, the values of the solar proton fluxes and energies at polar heliographic latitudes are determined for several cases of interest. The Mariner 10 analysis, together with IPS results, indicate a significant decrease of the solar proton flux at polar latitudes.

  12. Untangling Autophagy Measurements: All Fluxed Up

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Roberta A.; Andres, Allen M.; Sin, Jon; Taylor, David

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an important physiological process in the heart, and alterations in autophagic activity can exacerbate or mitigate injury during various pathological processes. Methods to assess autophagy have changed rapidly as the field of research has expanded. As with any new field, methods and standards for data analysis and interpretation evolve as investigators acquire experience and insight. The purpose of this review is to summarize current methods to measure autophagy, selective mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy), and autophagic flux. We will examine several published studies where confusion arose in in data interpretation, in order to illustrate the challenges. Finally we will discuss methods to assess autophagy in vivo and in patients. PMID:25634973

  13. Are far-IR fluxes good measures of cloud mass?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagle, Gururaj; Ferland, G. J.; Troland, T. H.; Abel, N.

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that the Herschel far-IR fluxes are a measure of column density, hence, mass of interstellar clouds. The Polaris Flare, a high galactic latitude cirrus cloud, with several starless molecular cores, has been previously observed with the Herschel Space Telescope. We used Cloudy version 13.02 to model a molecular cloud MCLD 123.5+24.9, one of the denser regions of the Polaris Flare. These models include a detailed calculation of far-IR grain opacities, subject to various assumptions about grain composition, and predict far-IR fluxes. The models suggest that the observed fluxes reflect the incident stellar UV radiation field rather than the column density, if N(H) > a few times 1021 cm2 (AV > 1). For higher column densities, the models show that dust temperatures decline rapidly into the cloud. Therefore, the cloud interiors contribute very little additional far-IR flux, and column densities based upon far-IR fluxes can be significantly underestimated. The Polaris Flare, 150 pc distant, is well within the Galactic disc. There are no nearby hot stars. Therefore, the stellar UV radiation field incident on the cloud should be close to the mean interstellar radiation field (ISRF). In addition, the calculated grain opacities required to reproduce the far-IR fluxes in the Cloudy models are a few factors larger than that calculated for standard ISM graphite and silicate grains. This result suggests that the grains in dense regions are coated with water and ammonia ices, increasing their sizes and opacities. The Cloudy models also predict mm-wavelength CO line strengths for comparison with published observations at the IRAM 30-m telescope. In order to reproduce the observed CO line strengths for cores in MCLD 123.5+24.9, the models require that CO molecules be partially frozen out onto the grains. This result places age constraints upon the cores. We have also modeled CO emission from inter-core regions in MCLD 123.5+24.9. For these regions, the models

  14. Measuring fast calcium fluxes in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Golebiewska, Urszula; Scarlata, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes have multiple Ca(2+) fluxes of varying duration that work together to optimize function (1,2). Changes in Ca(2+) activity in response to extracellular agents is predominantly regulated by the phospholipase Cβ- Gα(q;) pathway localized on the plasma membrane which is stimulated by agents such as acetylcholine (3,4). We have recently found that plasma membrane protein domains called caveolae(5,6) can entrap activated Gα(q;)(7). This entrapment has the effect of stabilizing the activated state of Gα(q;) and resulting in prolonged Ca(2+) signals in cardiomyocytes and other cell types(8). We uncovered this surprising result by measuring dynamic calcium responses on a fast scale in living cardiomyocytes. Briefly, cells are loaded with a fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator. In our studies, we used Ca(2+) Green (Invitrogen, Inc.) which exhibits an increase in fluorescence emission intensity upon binding of calcium ions. The fluorescence intensity is then recorded for using a line-scan mode of a laser scanning confocal microscope. This method allows rapid acquisition of the time course of fluorescence intensity in pixels along a selected line, producing several hundreds of time traces on the microsecond time scale. These very fast traces are transferred into excel and then into Sigmaplot for analysis, and are compared to traces obtained for electronic noise, free dye, and other controls. To dissect Ca(2+) responses of different flux rates, we performed a histogram analysis that binned pixel intensities with time. Binning allows us to group over 500 traces of scans and visualize the compiled results spatially and temporally on a single plot. Thus, the slow Ca(2+) waves that are difficult to discern when the scans are overlaid due to different peak placement and noise, can be readily seen in the binned histograms. Very fast fluxes in the time scale of the measurement show a narrow distribution of intensities in the very short time bins whereas longer Ca(2+) waves

  15. Airborne flux measurements of Biogenic Isoprene over California

    SciTech Connect

    Misztal, P.; Karl, Thomas G.; Weber, Robin; Jonsson, H. H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2014-10-10

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a PTR-MS and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene, MVK+MAC, methanol, monoterpenes, and MBO over ~10,000-km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions of isoprene. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach was used to calculate fluxes over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The Continuous Wavelet Transformation (CWT) approach was used over the same transects to also calculate "instantaneous" fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Vertical flux divergence of isoprene is expected due to its relatively short lifetime and was measured directly using "racetrack" profiles at multiple altitudes. It was found to be linear and in the range 5% to 30% depending on the ratio of aircraft altitude to PBL height (z/zi). Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently 1 at 400 m ±50 m (a.g.l.) altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to Basal Emission Factor (BEF) landcover datasets used to drive biogenic VOC (BVOC) emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m-2 h-1) above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. While isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions, shrublands, and

  16. Flux measurements using the BATSE spectroscopic detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnamara, Bernard

    1993-01-01

    Among the Compton Gama-Ray Observatory instruments, the BATSE Spectroscopic Detectors (SD) have the distinction of being able to detect photons of energies less than about 20 keV. This is an interesting energy range for the examination of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB's). In fact, Sco X-1, the prototype LMXB, is easily seen even in the raw BATSE spectroscopic data. The all-sky coverage afforded by these detectors offers a unique opportunity to monitor this source over time periods never before possible. The aim of this investigation was to test a number of ways in which both continous and discrete flux measurements can be obtained using the BATSE spectroscopic datasets. A instrumental description of a SD can be found in the Compton Workshop of Apr. 1989, this report will deal only with methods which can be used to analyze its datasets. Many of the items discussed below, particularly in regard to the earth occultation technique, have been developed, refined, and applied by the BATSE team to the reduction of BATSE LAD data. Code written as part of this project utilizes portions of that work. The following discussions will first address issues related to the reduction of SD datasets using the earth occultation technique. It will then discuss methods for the recovery of the flux history of strong sources while they are above the earth's limb. The report will conclude with recommended reduction procedures.

  17. Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements

    DOEpatents

    Zonca, F.; Cohen, S.A.; Bennett, T.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1993-08-24

    An apparatus is described for measuring momentum flux from an intense plasma stream, comprising: refractory target means oriented normal to the flow of said plasma stream for bombardment by said plasma stream where said bombardment by said plasma stream applies a pressure to said target means, pendulum means for communicating a translational displacement of said target to a force transducer where said translational displacement of said target is transferred to said force transducer by an elongated member coupled to said target, where said member is suspended by a pendulum configuration means and where said force transducer is responsive to said translational displacement of said member, and force transducer means for outputting a signal representing pressure data corresponding to said displacement.

  18. Uncertainty and Sensitivity of Alternative Rn-222 Flux Density Models Used in Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Greg J. Shott, Vefa Yucel, Lloyd Desotell Non-Nstec Authors: G. Pyles and Jon Carilli

    2007-06-01

    Performance assessments for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site have used three different mathematical models to estimate Rn-222 flux density. This study describes the performance, uncertainty, and sensitivity of the three models which include the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 3.64 analytical method and two numerical methods. The uncertainty of each model was determined by Monte Carlo simulation using Latin hypercube sampling. The global sensitivity was investigated using Morris one-at-time screening method, sample-based correlation and regression methods, the variance-based extended Fourier amplitude sensitivity test, and Sobol's sensitivity indices. The models were found to produce similar estimates of the mean and median flux density, but to have different uncertainties and sensitivities. When the Rn-222 effective diffusion coefficient was estimated using five different published predictive models, the radon flux density models were found to be most sensitive to the effective diffusion coefficient model selected, the emanation coefficient, and the radionuclide inventory. Using a site-specific measured effective diffusion coefficient significantly reduced the output uncertainty. When a site-specific effective-diffusion coefficient was used, the models were most sensitive to the emanation coefficient and the radionuclide inventory.

  19. Large Area Lunar Dust Flux Measurement Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corsaro, R.; Giovane, F.; Liou, Jer-Chyi; Burchell, M.; Stansbery, Eugene; Lagakos, N.

    2009-01-01

    The instrument under development is designed to characterize the flux and size distribution of the lunar micrometeoroid and secondary ejecta environment. When deployed on the lunar surface, the data collected will benefit fundamental lunar science as well as enabling more reliable impact risk assessments for human lunar exploration activities. To perform this task, the instrument requirements are demanding. It must have as large a surface area as possible to sample the very sparse population of the larger potentially damage-inducing micrometeorites. It must also have very high sensitivity to enable it to measure the flux of small (<10 micron) micrometeorite and secondary ejecta dust particles. To be delivered to the lunar surface, it must also be very low mass, rugged and stow compactly. The instrument designed to meet these requirements is called FOMIS. It is a large-area thin film under tension (i.e. a drum) with multiple fiber optic displacement (FOD) sensors to monitor displacements of the film. This sensor was chosen since it can measure displacements over a wide dynamic range: 1 cm to sub-Angstrom. A prototype system was successfully demonstrated using the hypervelocity impact test facility at the University of Kent (Canterbury, UK). Based on these results, the prototype system can detect hypervelocity (approx.5 km/s) impacts by particles as small as 2 microns diameter. Additional tests using slow speeds find that it can detect secondary ejecta particles (which do not penetrate the film) with momentums as small as 15 pico-gram 100m/s, or nominally 5 microns diameter at 100 m/s.

  20. Density effect on critical current density and flux pinning properties of polycrystalline SmFeAsO1 - xFx superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Y.; Sun, Y.; Zhuang, J. C.; Cui, L. J.; Shi, Z. X.; Sumption, M. D.; Majoros, M.; Susner, M. A.; Kovacs, C. J.; Li, G. Z.; Collings, E. W.; Ren, Z. A.

    2011-12-01

    A series of polycrystalline SmFeAs1 - xOx bulks was prepared to systematically investigate the influence of sample density on flux pinning properties. Different sample densities were achieved by controlling the pelletizing pressure. The superconducting volume fraction, the critical current densities Jcm and the flux pinning force densities Fp were estimated from the magnetization measurements. Experimental results show that: (1) the superconducting volume fraction increases with the increasing of sample density; (2) the Jcm values have a similar trend except for the sample with very high density due to different connectivity and pinning mechanisms, moreover, the Jcm(B) curve develops a peak effect at approximately the same field at which the high density sample shows a kink; (3) the Fp(B) curve of the high density sample shows a low-field peak and a high-field peak at several temperatures, which can be explained by improved intergranular current, while only one peak can be observed in Fp(B) of the low density samples. Based on the scaling behaviour of flux pinning force densities, the main intragranular pinning is normal point pinning.

  1. Latent heat sink in soil heat flux measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The surface energy balance includes a term for soil heat flux. Soil heat flux is difficult to measure because it includes conduction and convection heat transfer processes. Accurate representation of soil heat flux is an important consideration in many modeling and measurement applications. Yet, the...

  2. Increasing fluxes of S5 1044+71 measured with RATAN-600 radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushkin, S. T.; Mingaliev, M. G.; Sotnikova, Yu. V.; Erkenov, A.; Udovitskij, R. Yu.; Mufakharov, T. V.

    2014-02-01

    We report about the growing fluxes of the quasar S5 1044+71, identified with the FERMI source 2FGL J1048.3+714, since detection of the high state in the rest of January 2014 (ATEL #5792). We continue measurements and again detect the increase of the flux densities at frequencies 8.2-21.7 GHz in February.

  3. Enhanced magnetic flux density mapping using coherent steady state equilibrium signal in MREIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Woo Chul; Lee, Mun Bae; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2016-03-01

    Measuring the z-component of magnetic flux density B = (Bx, By, Bz) induced by transversally injected current, magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) aims to visualize electrical property (current density and/or conductivity distribution) in a three-dimensional imaging object. For practical implementations of MREIT technique, it is critical to reduce injection of current pulse within safety requirements. With the goal of minimizing the noise level in measured Bz data, we propose a new method to enhance the measure Bz data using steady-state coherent gradient multi-echo (SSC-GME) MR pulse sequence combining with injection current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) method in MREIT, where the ICNE technique injects current during a readout gradient to maximize the signal intensity of phase signal including Bz. The total phase offset in SSC-GME includes additional magnetic flux density due to the injected current, which is different from the phase signal for the conventional spoiled MR pulse sequence. We decompose the magnetization precession phase from the total phase offset including Bz and optimize Bz data using the steady-state equilibrium signal. Results from a real phantom experiment including different kinds of anomalies demonstrated that the proposed method enhanced Bz comparing to a conventional spoiled pulse sequence.

  4. Measurement of local high-level, transient surface heat flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.

    1988-01-01

    This study is part of a continuing investigation to develop methods for measuring local transient surface heat flux. A method is presented for simultaneous measurements of dual heat fluxes at a surface location by considering the heat flux as a separate function of heat stored and heat conducted within a heat flux gage. Surface heat flux information is obtained from transient temperature measurements taken at points within the gage. Heat flux was determined over a range of 4 to 22 MW/sq m. It was concluded that the method is feasible. Possible applications are for heat flux measurements on the turbine blade surfaces of space shuttle main engine turbopumps and on the component surfaces of rocket and advanced gas turbine engines and for testing sensors in heat flux gage calibrators.

  5. AmeriFlux Measurement Component (AMC) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Reichl, K.; Biraud, S. C.

    2016-01-01

    An AMC system was installed at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s North Slope Alaska (NSA) Barrow site, also known as NSA C1 at the ARM Data Archive, in August 2012. A second AMC system was installed at the third ARM Mobile Facility deployment at Oliktok Point, also known as NSA M1. This in situ system consists of 12 combination soil temperature and volumetric water content (VWC) reflectometers and one set of upwelling and downwelling PAR sensors, all deployed within the fetch of the Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System. Soil temperature and VWC sensors placed at two depths (10 and 30 cm below the vegetation layer) at six locations (or microsites) allow soil property inhomogeneity to be monitored across a landscape. The soil VWC and temperature sensors used at NSA C1 are the Campbell Scientific CS650L and the sensors at NSA M1 use the Campbell Scientific CS655. The two sensors are nearly identical in function, and vendor specifications are based on the CS650 unless otherwise stated.

  6. Airborne flux measurements of biogenic isoprene over California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misztal, P. K.; Karl, T.; Weber, R.; Jonsson, H. H.; Guenther, A. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-10-01

    Biogenic isoprene fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene over 7400 km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions. The fast Fourier transform (FFT) approach was used to calculate fluxes of isoprene over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The continuous wavelet transformation (CWT) approach was used over the same transects to also calculate instantaneous isoprene fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently at 400 m ± 50 m (a.g.l.) altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence determined in the racetrack-stacked profiles. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to basal emission factor (BEF) land-cover data sets used to drive BVOC emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m-2 h-1) above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. Even though the isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions, shrublands, and coniferous forests were extremely low, observations at the Walnut Grove tower south of Sacramento demonstrate that isoprene oxidation products from the high emitting regions in the surrounding oak woodlands accumulate at night in

  7. Measurement of Integrated Low Frequency Flux Noise in Superconducting Flux/Phase Qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Mao Bo; Qiu Wei; Han Siyuan

    2008-11-07

    We measured the integrated low frequency flux noise ({approx}1 m{phi}{sub 0}) of an rf SQUID as a flux qubit by fitting the resonant peaks from photon assistant tunneling (PAT). The energy relaxation time Tl between the ground and first excited states in the same potential well, measured directly in time domain, is 3 ns. From these results we identified low frequency flux noise as the dominant source of decoherence. In addition, we found that the measured values of integrated flux noise in three qubits of various sizes differ more than an order of magnitude.

  8. A comparison of new measurements of total monoterpene flux with improved measurements of speciated monoterpene flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, A.; Schade, G. W.; Holzinger, R.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2005-02-01

    Many monoterpenes have been identified in forest emissions using gas chromatography (GC). Until now, it has been impossible to determine whether all monoterpenes are appropriately measured using GC techniques. We used a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) coupled with the eddy covariance (EC) technique to measure mixing ratios and fluxes of total monoterpenes above a ponderosa pine plantation. We compared PTR-MS-EC results with simultaneous measurements of eight speciated monoterpenes, β-pinene, α-pinene, 3-carene, d-limonene, β-phellandrene, α-terpinene, camphene, and terpinolene, made with an automated, in situ gas chromatograph with flame ionization detectors (GC-FID), coupled to a relaxed eddy accumulation system (REA). Monoterpene mixing ratios and fluxes measured by PTR-MS averaged 30±2.3% and 31±9.2% larger than by GC-FID, with larger mixing ratio discrepancies between the two techniques at night than during the day. Two unidentified peaks that correlated with β-pinene were resolved in the chromatograms and completely accounted for the daytime difference and reduced the nighttime mixing ratio difference to 20±2.9%. Measurements of total monoterpenes by PTR-MS-EC indicated that GC-FID-REA measured the common, longer-lived monoterpenes well, but that additional terpenes were emitted from the ecosystem that represented an important contribution to the total mixing ratio above the forest at night.

  9. A comparison of new measurements of total monoterpene flux with improved measurements of speciated monoterpene flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, A.; Schade, G. W.; Holzinger, R.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2004-12-01

    Many monoterpenes have been identified in forest emissions using gas chromatography (GC). Until now, it has been impossible to determine whether all monoterpenes are appropriately measured using GC techniques. We used a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) coupled with the eddy covariance (EC) technique to measure mixing ratios and fluxes of total monoterpenes above a ponderosa pine plantation. We compared PTR-MS-EC results with simultaneous measurements of eight speciated monoterpenes, β-pinene, α-pinene, 3-carene, d-limonene, β-phellandrene, α-terpinene, camphene, and terpinolene, made with an automated, in situ gas chromatograph with flame ionization detectors (GC-FID), coupled to a relaxed eddy accumulation system (REA). Monoterpene mixing ratios and fluxes measured by PTR-MS averaged 30±2.3% and 31±9.2% larger than by GC-FID, with larger differences at night than during the day. Four unidentified peaks that correlated with β-pinene were resolved in the chromatograms and completely accounted for the daytime difference and reduced the nighttime difference to 19±3.4%. Measurements of total monoterpenes by PTR-MS-EC indicated that GC-FID-REA measured the common, longer-lived monoterpenes well, but that additional monoterpenes were emitted from the ecosystem that represented an important contribution to the total mixing ratio above the forest at night, and that must have been oxidized during the day before they escaped the forest canopy.

  10. The effect of an on-orbit near encounter on the number flux density of micron sized particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maag, Carl R.; Tanner, William G.; Stevenson, Tim J.; Borg, Janet; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Alexander, W. Merle; Maag, Andrew J.

    1993-01-01

    Many materials and techniques have been developed by the authors to sample the flux of particles in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), and through regular insitu sampling of the flux in LEO, the materials and techniques have produced data which complement the data now being amassed by the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) research activities. Recent flight experiments on STS-32, STS-44, STS-46, and STS-52 have been conducted to develop an understanding of the spatial density as a function of size (mass) for particle sizes 1x10(exp -6) cm and larger. In addition to the enumeration of particle impacts, it was also the intent of these experiments that hypervelocity particles be captured and returned intact. Measurements were performed post-flight to determine the flux density, diameters, and subsequent effects on various optical, thermal control, and structural materials. During the course of the STS-44 mission, the Space Shuttle corrected its altitude by 26 km to evade a spent upper stage. The results of this near encounter suggests that a cloud of micron sized particles exist in the vicinity of the object. Data also suggest that the flux density is nearly two (2) orders of magnitude higher than background flux. A comparison of the number flux density along with microphotographs of the captured particles will be presented for the referenced shuttle flights.

  11. Heat flux microsensor measurements and calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrell, James P.; Hager, Jon M.; Onishi, Shinzo; Diller, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    A new thin-film heat flux gage has been fabricated specifically for severe high temperature operation using platinum and platinum-10 percent rhodium for the thermocouple elements. Radiation calibrations of this gage were performed at the AEDC facility over the available heat flux range (approx. 1.0 - 1,000 W/cu cm). The gage output was linear with heat flux with a slight increase in sensitivity with increasing surface temperature. Survivability of gages was demonstrated in quench tests from 500 C into liquid nitrogen. Successful operation of gages to surface temperatures of 750 C has been achieved. No additional cooling of the gages is required because the gages are always at the same temperature as the substrate material. A video of oxyacetylene flame tests with real-time heat flux and temperature output is available.

  12. Laser Spectroscopic Measurement Of Temperature And Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Robert L.; Laufer, Gabriel

    1991-01-01

    Report discusses research on use of laser-induced fluorescence in oxygen and Raman scattering in air for simultaneous measurement of temperature and density of air. Major application of laser spectroscopic techniques, measurement of fluctuations of temperature and density in hypersonic flows in wind tunnels.

  13. Soil Flux Chamber Measurements with Five Species CRDS and New Realtime Chamber Flux Processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, N.; Alstad, K. P.; Arata, C.; Franz, P.

    2014-12-01

    Continuous soil flux chamber measurements remains a key tool for determining production and sequestration of direct and indirect greenhouse gases. The Picarro G2508 Cavity Ring-down Spectrometer has radically simplified soil flux studies by providing simultaneous measurements of five gases: CO2, CH4, N2O, NH3, and H2O, and by lending itself to field deployment. Successful use of the Picarro G2508 for continuous soil flux measurements in a variety of ecosystem types has already been demonstrated. Most recently, Picarro is developing a real-time processing software to simplify chamber measurements of soil flux with the G2508 CRDS. The new Realtime Chamber Flux Processor is designed to work with all chamber types and sizes, and provides real-time flux values of N2O, CO2 & CH4. The software features include chamber sequence table, flexible data tagging feature, ceiling concentration measurement shut-off parameter, user-defined run-time interval, temperature/pressure input for field monitoring and volumetric conversion, and manual flux measurement start/stop override. Realtime Chamber Flux Processor GUI interface is presented, and results from a variety of sampling designs are demonstrated to emphasize program flexibility and field capability.

  14. AmeriFlux Measurement Network: Science Team Research

    SciTech Connect

    Law, B E

    2012-12-12

    Research involves analysis and field direction of AmeriFlux operations, and the PI provides scientific leadership of the AmeriFlux network. Activities include the coordination and quality assurance of measurements across AmeriFlux network sites, synthesis of results across the network, organizing and supporting the annual Science Team Meeting, and communicating AmeriFlux results to the scientific community and other users. Objectives of measurement research include (i) coordination of flux and biometric measurement protocols (ii) timely data delivery to the Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center (CDIAC); and (iii) assurance of data quality of flux and ecosystem measurements contributed by AmeriFlux sites. Objectives of integration and synthesis activities include (i) integration of site data into network-wide synthesis products; and (ii) participation in the analysis, modeling and interpretation of network data products. Communications objectives include (i) organizing an annual meeting of AmeriFlux investigators for reporting annual flux measurements and exchanging scientific information on ecosystem carbon budgets; (ii) developing focused topics for analysis and publication; and (iii) developing data reporting protocols in support of AmeriFlux network goals.

  15. Heat flux measurements on ceramics with thin film thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, Raymond; Anderson, Robert C.; Liebert, Curt H.

    1993-01-01

    Two methods were devised to measure heat flux through a thick ceramic using thin film thermocouples. The thermocouples were deposited on the front and back face of a flat ceramic substrate. The heat flux was applied to the front surface of the ceramic using an arc lamp Heat Flux Calibration Facility. Silicon nitride and mullite ceramics were used; two thicknesses of each material was tested, with ceramic temperatures to 1500 C. Heat flux ranged from 0.05-2.5 MW/m2(sup 2). One method for heat flux determination used an approximation technique to calculate instantaneous values of heat flux vs time; the other method used an extrapolation technique to determine the steady state heat flux from a record of transient data. Neither method measures heat flux in real time but the techniques may easily be adapted for quasi-real time measurement. In cases where a significant portion of the transient heat flux data is available, the calculated transient heat flux is seen to approach the extrapolated steady state heat flux value as expected.

  16. Multispecies Density and Temperature Gradient Dependence of Quasilinear Particle and Energy Fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rewoldt; R.V. Budny; W.M. Tang

    2004-08-09

    The variations of the normalized quasilinear particle and energy fluxes with artificial changes in the density and temperature gradients, as well as the variations of the linear growth rates and real frequencies, for ion temperature gradient and trapped-electron modes, are calculated. The quasilinear fluxes are normalized to the total energy flux, summed over all species. Here, realistic cases for tokamaks and spherical torii are considered which have two impurity species. For situations where there are substantial changes in the normalized fluxes, the ''diffusive approximation,'' in which the normalized fluxes are taken to be linear in the gradients, is seen to be inaccurate. Even in the case of small artificial changes in density or temperature gradients, changes in the fluxes of different species (''off-diagonal'') generally are significant, or even dominant, compared to those for the same species (''diagonal'').

  17. Modeling of Fluctuating Mass Flux in Variable Density Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Mongia, H. C.; Nikjooy, M.

    1983-01-01

    The approach solves for both Reynolds and Favre averaged quantities and calculates the scalar pdf. Turbulent models used to close the governing equations are formulated to account for complex mixing and variable density effects. In addition, turbulent mass diffusivities are not assumed to be in constant proportion to turbulent momentum diffusivities. The governing equations are solved by a combination of finite-difference technique and Monte-Carlo simulation. Some preliminary results on simple variable density shear flows are presented. The differences between these results and those obtained using conventional models are discussed.

  18. Electron density measurement by differential interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Deng, B. H.; Yates, T.

    2006-10-15

    A novel differential interferometer is being developed to measure the electron density gradient and its fluctuations. Two separate laser beams with slight spatial offset and frequency difference are coupled into a single mixer making a heterodyne measurement of the phase difference which is <1% of the total phase change experienced by each beam separately. This measure of the differential phase is made at multiple spatial points and can be inverted directly to provide the local density distribution.

  19. The revised electromagnetic fields directive and worker exposure in environments with high magnetic flux densities.

    PubMed

    Stam, Rianne

    2014-06-01

    Some of the strongest electromagnetic fields (EMF) are found in the workplace. A European Directive sets limits to workers' exposure to EMF. This review summarizes its origin and contents and compares magnetic field exposure levels in high-risk workplaces with the limits set in the revised Directive. Pubmed, Scopus, grey literature databases, and websites of organizations involved in occupational exposure measurements were searched. The focus was on EMF with frequencies up to 10 MHz, which can cause stimulation of the nervous system. Selected studies had to provide individual maximum exposure levels at the workplace, either in terms of the external magnetic field strength or flux density or as induced electric field strength or current density. Indicative action levels and the corresponding exposure limit values for magnetic fields in the revised European Directive will be higher than those in the previous version. Nevertheless, magnetic flux densities in excess of the action levels for peripheral nerve stimulation are reported for workers involved in welding, induction heating, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The corresponding health effects exposure limit values for the electric fields in the worker's body can be exceeded for welding and MRI, but calculations for induction heating and transcranial magnetic stimulation are lacking. Since the revised European Directive conditionally exempts MRI-related activities from the exposure limits, measures to reduce exposure may be necessary for welding, induction heating, and transcranial nerve stimulation. Since such measures can be complicated, there is a clear need for exposure databases for different workplace scenarios with significant EMF exposure and guidance on good practices. PMID:24557933

  20. The Revised Electromagnetic Fields Directive and Worker Exposure in Environments With High Magnetic Flux Densities

    PubMed Central

    Stam, Rianne

    2014-01-01

    Some of the strongest electromagnetic fields (EMF) are found in the workplace. A European Directive sets limits to workers’ exposure to EMF. This review summarizes its origin and contents and compares magnetic field exposure levels in high-risk workplaces with the limits set in the revised Directive. Pubmed, Scopus, grey literature databases, and websites of organizations involved in occupational exposure measurements were searched. The focus was on EMF with frequencies up to 10 MHz, which can cause stimulation of the nervous system. Selected studies had to provide individual maximum exposure levels at the workplace, either in terms of the external magnetic field strength or flux density or as induced electric field strength or current density. Indicative action levels and the corresponding exposure limit values for magnetic fields in the revised European Directive will be higher than those in the previous version. Nevertheless, magnetic flux densities in excess of the action levels for peripheral nerve stimulation are reported for workers involved in welding, induction heating, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The corresponding health effects exposure limit values for the electric fields in the worker’s body can be exceeded for welding and MRI, but calculations for induction heating and transcranial magnetic stimulation are lacking. Since the revised European Directive conditionally exempts MRI-related activities from the exposure limits, measures to reduce exposure may be necessary for welding, induction heating, and transcranial nerve stimulation. Since such measures can be complicated, there is a clear need for exposure databases for different workplace scenarios with significant EMF exposure and guidance on good practices. PMID:24557933

  1. Heat flux measurement in SSME turbine blade tester

    SciTech Connect

    Liebert, C.H.

    1990-11-01

    Surface heat flux values were measured in the turbine blade thermal cycling tester located at NASA-Marshall. This is the first time heat flux has been measured in a space shuttle main engine turbopump environment. Plots of transient and quasi-steady state heat flux data over a range of about 0 to 15 MW/sq m are presented. Data were obtained with a miniature heat flux gage device developed at NASA-Lewis. The results from these tests are being incorporated into turbine design models. Also, these gages are being considered for airfoil surface heat flux measurement on turbine vanes mounted in SSME turbopump test bed engine nozzles at Marshall. Heat flux effects that might be observed on degraded vanes are discussed.

  2. Gas Flux and Density Surrounding a Cylindrical Aperture in the Free Molecular Flow Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    2011-01-01

    The equations for rigorously calculating the particle flux and density surrounding a cylindrical aperture in the free molecular flow regime are developed and presented. The fundamental equations for particle flux and density from a reservoir and a diffusely reflecting surface will initially be developed. Assumptions will include a Maxwell-Boltzmann speed distribution, equal particle and wall temperatures, and a linear flux distribution along the cylindrical aperture walls. With this information, the equations for axial flux and density surrounding a cylindrical aperture will be developed. The cylindrical aperture will be divided into multiple volumes and regions to rigorously determine the surrounding axial flux and density, and appropriate limits of integration will be determined. The results of these equations will then be evaluated. The linear wall flux distribution assumption will be assessed. The axial flux and density surrounding a cylindrical aperture with a thickness-to-radius ratio of 1.25 will be presented. Finally, the equations determined in this study will be verified using multiple methods.

  3. Abnormal changes in the density of thermal neutron flux in biocenoses near the earth surface.

    PubMed

    Plotnikova, N V; Smirnov, A N; Kolesnikov, M V; Semenov, D S; Frolov, V A; Lapshin, V B; Syroeshkin, A V

    2007-04-01

    We revealed an increase in the density of thermal neutron flux in forest biocenoses, which was not associated with astrogeophysical events. The maximum spike of this parameter in the biocenosis reached 10,000 n/(sec x m2). Diurnal pattern of the density of thermal neutron flux depended only on the type of biocenosis. The effects of biomodulation of corpuscular radiation for balneology are discussed. PMID:18214289

  4. Extension of the absolute flux density scale to 22.285 GHz. [radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janssen, M. A.; Golden, L. M.; Welch, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    Extending the absolute flux density scale at microwave wavelengths, the absolute flux densities at 22.285 GHz of several standard sources were determined using the absolute calibrations of the 6.1 meter antenna of the Hat Creek Observatory. Interpolation formulas for each nonthermal standard source have been derived by combining these data with those determined at lower frequencies. The suitability of employing the standard sources for calibrating other antennas is discussed.

  5. Rapid millimeter and centimeter band flux density increase in the gamma-ray blazar BL Lacertae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovatta, Talvikki; Richards, Joseph L.; Max-Moerbeck, Walter; Pearson, Timothy J.; Readhead, Anthony C. S.

    2012-11-01

    We have observed a rapid flux density increase of BL Lacertae (2200+420) at 15 GHz (2 cm) and 95 GHz (3 mm) following the report on highest millimeter flux density ever observed at the SMA (ATel #4557). Since 2009, BL Lacertae has been observed approximately twice per week at 15 GHz with the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) 40m Telescope as part of our gamma-ray blazar monitoring program (Richards et al....

  6. Inverse method for simultaneous determination of soil water flux density and thermal properties with a penta-needle heat pulse probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Changbing; Sakai, Masaru; Jones, Scott B.

    2013-09-01

    An accurate method for determination of in situ soil water flux density continues to be the most sought after and yet elusive hydrologic measurement. The penta-needle heat pulse probe (PHPP) employs a central heater needle surrounded by an orthogonal arrangement of four thermistor needles for two-component water flux density estimation. An analytical solution and inverse fitting method are presented for simultaneous estimation of thermal properties and soil water flux density using PHPP measurements. The approach yields estimates of both components of the flux in a plane normal to the axis of the PHPP needles. The method was evaluated using data measured by PHPPs in a laboratory experiment using a wide range of saturated water fluxes ranging from 1.2 to 33,200 cm d-1. Improved water flux density determination was achieved from zero-flux adjusted estimates of the apparent heater-thermistor radii, radj, which were used in the inverse analysis. Thermal diffusivity and conductivity were estimated with coefficients of variation less than 1.35%, indicating that the inverse problem is well posed and yields unique parameter estimates when water flux is less than 2000 cm d-1. Estimates of the x and y components of water flux density agreed well with measured water fluxes up to 7000 cm d-1 exhibiting R2 values greater than 0.976. Estimation of water flow direction based on 2-D water flux density was in good agreement with installation angle for water fluxes ranging from 10 to 7000 cm d-1.

  7. Non-contact heat flux measurement using a transparent sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel; Spuckler, Charles M.

    1993-01-01

    A working non-contact heat flux sensor was demonstrated using a transparent material (sapphire) and a multiwavelength pyrometer. The pyrometer is used to measure the temperatures of the two surfaces of the sensor from the spectrum of radiation originating from them. The heat conducted through the material is determined from the temperature difference of the two surfaces and the thermal conductivity of the material. The measured heat flux is equal to the incident heat flux within experimental error indicating that no calibration would be necessary. A steady state heat flux of 100 kW/sq m was easily achieved.

  8. QUENCHING STAR FORMATION AT INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFTS: DOWNSIZING OF THE MASS FLUX DENSITY IN THE GREEN VALLEY

    SciTech Connect

    Goncalves, Thiago S.; Menendez-Delmestre, Karin; Martin, D. Christopher; Wyder, Ted K.; Koekemoer, Anton

    2012-11-01

    The bimodality in galaxy properties has been observed at low and high redshifts, with a clear distinction between star-forming galaxies in the blue cloud and passively evolving objects in the red sequence; the absence of galaxies with intermediate properties indicates that the quenching of star formation and subsequent transition between populations must happen rapidly. In this paper, we present a study of over 100 transiting galaxies in the so-called green valley at intermediate redshifts (z {approx} 0.8). By using very deep spectroscopy with the DEIMOS instrument at the Keck telescope we are able to infer the star formation histories of these objects and measure the stellar mass flux density transiting from the blue cloud to the red sequence when the universe was half its current age. Our results indicate that the process happened more rapidly and for more massive galaxies in the past, suggesting a top-down scenario in which the massive end of the red sequence is forming first. This represents another aspect of downsizing, with the mass flux density moving toward smaller galaxies in recent times.

  9. Fast response densitometer for measuring liquid density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Densitometer was developed which produces linear voltage proportional to changes in density of flowing liquid hydrogen. Unit has fast response time and good system stability, statistical variation, and thermal equilibrium. System accuracy is 2 percent of total density span. Basic design may be altered to include measurement of other flowing materials.

  10. Spacetime Average Density (SAD) cosmological measures

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Don N.

    2014-11-01

    The measure problem of cosmology is how to obtain normalized probabilities of observations from the quantum state of the universe. This is particularly a problem when eternal inflation leads to a universe of unbounded size so that there are apparently infinitely many realizations or occurrences of observations of each of many different kinds or types, making the ratios ambiguous. There is also the danger of domination by Boltzmann Brains. Here two new Spacetime Average Density (SAD) measures are proposed, Maximal Average Density (MAD) and Biased Average Density (BAD), for getting a finite number of observation occurrences by using properties of the Spacetime Average Density (SAD) of observation occurrences to restrict to finite regions of spacetimes that have a preferred beginning or bounce hypersurface. These measures avoid Boltzmann brain domination and appear to give results consistent with other observations that are problematic for other widely used measures, such as the observation of a positive cosmological constant.

  11. The measurement of surface heat flux using the Peltier effect

    SciTech Connect

    Shewen, E.C. ); Hollands, K.G.T., Raithby, G.D. )

    1989-08-01

    Calorimetric methods for measuring surface heat flux use Joulean heating to keep the surface isothermal. This limits them to measuring the heat flux of surfaces that are hotter than their surroundings. Presented in this paper is a method whereby reversible Peltier effect heat transfer is used to maintain this isothermality, making it suitable for surfaces that are either hotter or colder than the surroundings. The paper outlines the theory for the method and describes physical models that have been constructed, calibrated, and tested. The tested physical models were found capable of measuring heat fluxes with an absolute accuracy of 1 percent over a wide range of temperature (5-50C) and heat flux (15-500 W/m{sup 2}), while maintaining isothermality to within 0.03 K. A drawback of the method is that it appears to be suited only for measuring the heat flux from thick metallic plates.

  12. Measurement of Urban fluxes of CO2 and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimmond, S.; Crawford, B.; Offerle, B.; Hom, J.

    2006-05-01

    Measurements of surface-atmosphere fluxes of carbon dioxide (FCO2) and latent heat in urban environments are rare even though cities are a major source of atmospheric CO2 and users of water. In this paper, an overview of urban FCO2 measurements will be presented to illustrate how and where such measurements are being conducted and emerging results to date. Most of these studies have been conducted over short periods of time; few studies have considered annual sources/sinks. More investigations have been conducted, and are planned, in European cities than elsewhere, most commonly in areas of medium density urban development. The most dense urban sites are significant net sources of carbon. However, in areas where there is large amounts of vegetation present, there is a net sink of carbon during the summertime. In the second part of the presentation, more detailed attention will be directed to an ongoing measurement program in Baltimore, MD (part of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study). Eddy covariance instrumentation mounted on a tall-tower at 41.2 m has continuously measured local-scale fluxes of carbon dioxide from a suburban environment since 2001. Several features make this particular study unique: 1) for an urban area, the study site is extensively vegetated, 2) the period of record (2001-2005) is among the longest available for urban FCO2 measurements, 3) both closed-path and open-path infrared gas analyzers are used for observations, and 4) several unique data quality control and gap-filling methods have been developed for use in an urban environment. Additionally, detailed surface datasets and GIS software are used to perform flux source area analysis. Results from Baltimore indicate that FCO2 is very dependent on source area land-cover characteristics, particularly the proportion of vegetated and built surfaces. Over the course of a year, the urban surface is a strong net source of CO2, though there is considerable inter-annual variability depending on

  13. Real-time diamagnetic flux measurements on ASDEX Upgrade.

    PubMed

    Giannone, L; Geiger, B; Bilato, R; Maraschek, M; Odstrčil, T; Fischer, R; Fuchs, J C; McCarthy, P J; Mertens, V; Schuhbeck, K H

    2016-05-01

    Real-time diamagnetic flux measurements are now available on ASDEX Upgrade. In contrast to the majority of diamagnetic flux measurements on other tokamaks, no analog summation of signals is necessary for measuring the change in toroidal flux or for removing contributions arising from unwanted coupling to the plasma and poloidal field coil currents. To achieve the highest possible sensitivity, the diamagnetic measurement and compensation coil integrators are triggered shortly before plasma initiation when the toroidal field coil current is close to its maximum. In this way, the integration time can be chosen to measure only the small changes in flux due to the presence of plasma. Two identical plasma discharges with positive and negative magnetic field have shown that the alignment error with respect to the plasma current is negligible. The measured diamagnetic flux is compared to that predicted by TRANSP simulations. The poloidal beta inferred from the diamagnetic flux measurement is compared to the values calculated from magnetic equilibrium reconstruction codes. The diamagnetic flux measurement and TRANSP simulation can be used together to estimate the coupled power in discharges with dominant ion cyclotron resonance heating. PMID:27250425

  14. BOOK REVIEW: Practical Density Measurement and Hydrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S. V.

    2003-01-01

    Density determinations are very important not only for science and production but also in everyday life, since very often a product is sold by mass but the content of the package is measured by volume (or vice versa) so that the density is needed to convert the values. In production processes the density serves as a measure of mixing ratios and other properties. In science, the determination of Avogadro's constant using silicon single crystals and the potential replacement of the kilogram prototype boost density determination to an extremely low relative uncertainty of 10-7 or less. The book by S V Gupta explains in detail the foundations of any density measurement, namely the volume determination of solid artefacts in terms of the SI base unit of length and the density of water and mercury. Both the history and the actual state of science are reported. For practical density measurements, these chapters contain very useful formulae and tables. Water is treated in detail since it is most widely used as a standard not only for density determination but also to gravimetrically calibrate the capacity of volumetric glassware. Two thirds of the book are devoted to the practical density measurement of solids and liquids, mainly using classical instruments like pycnometers and hydrometers. Methods using free flotation of samples in a liquid without suspension are especially useful for small samples. Also, density determinations of powders and granular or porous samples are explained. Unfortunately, modern density meters of the oscillation type are dealt with in only a few pages. The book is clearly written and easy to understand. It contains a lot of evaluations of formulae that for practical measurements are represented in detailed tables. Methods and measurement procedures are described in detail, including also the calculation of uncertainty. Listings of the advantages and disadvantages of the different methods are very helpful. S V Gupta has written a book that will be

  15. Quantifying the "chamber effect" in CO2 flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vihermaa, Leena; Childs, Amy; Long, Hazel; Waldron, Susan

    2014-05-01

    The significance of aquatic CO2 emissions has received attention in recent years. For example annual aquatic emissions in the Amazon basin have been estimated as 500 Mt of carbon1. Methods for determining the flux rates include eddy covariance flux tower measurements, flux estimates calculated from partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in water and the use floating flux chambers connected to an infra-red gas analyser. The flux chamber method is often used because it is portable, cheaper and allows smaller scale measurements. It is also a direct method and hence avoids problems related to the estimation of the gas transfer coefficient that is required when fluxes are calculated from pCO2. However, the use of a floating chamber may influence the flux measurements obtained. The chamber shields the water underneath from effects of wind which could lead to lower flux estimates. Wind increases the flux rate by i) causing waves which increase the surface area for efflux, and ii) removing CO2 build up above the water surface, hence maintaining a higher concentration gradient. Many floating chambers have an underwater extension of the chamber below the float to ensure better seal to water surface and to prevent any ingress of atmospheric air when waves rock the chamber. This extension may cause additional turbulence in flowing water and hence lead to overestimation of flux rates. Some groups have also used a small fan in the chamber headspace to ensure thorough mixing of air in the chamber. This may create turbulence inside the chamber which could increase the flux rate. Here we present results on the effects of different chamber designs on the detected flux rates. 1Richey et al. 2002. Outgassing from Amazonian rivers and wetlands as a large tropical source of atmospheric CO2. Nature 416: 617-620.

  16. Measuring liquid density using Archimedes' principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Stephen W.

    2006-09-01

    A simple technique is described for measuring absolute and relative liquid density based on Archimedes' principle. The technique involves placing a container of the liquid under test on an electronic balance and suspending a probe (e.g. a glass marble) attached to a length of line beneath the surface of the liquid. If the volume of the probe is known, the density of liquid is given by the difference between the balance reading before and after immersion of the probe divided by the volume of the probe. A test showed that the density of water at room temperature could be measured to an accuracy and precision of 0.01 ± 0.1%. The probe technique was also used to measure the relative density of milk, Coca-Cola, fruit juice, olive oil and vinegar.

  17. Sensible heat bias in open-path eddy covariance carbon dioxide flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnentag, O.; Helbig, M.; Karoline, W.; Humphreys, E.; Quinton, W. L.; Bogoev, I.

    2015-12-01

    The widely observed differences between net carbon dioxide (CO2) flux estimates derived from eddy covariance systems deploying open- and closed-path infrared gas analyzers (IRGAs) pose a major challenge for site intercomparison studies. Our limited knowledge about potential systematic biases in the derivation of CO2 flux estimates by these two types of systems hampers our ability to detect significant differences in CO2 flux measurements made at contrasting ecosystems. Here we explore potential systematic biases in CO2 fluxes measured with two open-path IRGAs. Comparison of fluxes from open- (EC150 & IRGASON, Campbell Scientific Inc.) and (en)closed-path IRGAs (LI7000 & LI7200, LI-COR Biosciences) at a northern peatland and a northern boreal forest site revealed consistent differences in CO2 flux estimates across a wide range of environmental conditions. These differences directly scaled with the magnitude of the sensible heat flux indicating a selectively systematic bias in open-path CO2 flux measurements due to the temperature sensitivity of the CO2 density measurements. We present two empirical correction procedures: the "direct" approach requires data from a limited period of concurrent CO2 flux measurements by open- and closed-path IRGA-based eddy covariance systems, whereas the second approach only requires wintertime CO2 flux data from the open-path IRGA. The "direct" approach effectively removes the bias in the open-path CO2 flux measurements and results in remaining differences with the closed-path CO2 fluxes smaller than 0.5 µmol m-2 s-1. In contrast, the "wintertime" approach seems to overcompensate for the sensible heat effects with differences remaining between 0.9 µmol m-2 s-1 and 1.8 µmol m-2 s-1. When a high-frequency air temperature is used to compensate for the temperature sensitivity of the CO2 density measurements, open- and closed-path CO2 flux agree within ±0.5 µmol m-2 s-1, similar to the "direct" post-processing correction. These

  18. FLUX MEASUREMENTS FROM A TALL TOWER IN A COMPLEX LANDSCAPE

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.; Weber, A.; Chiswell, S.; Parker, M.

    2010-07-22

    The accuracy and representativeness of flux measurements from a tall tower in a complex landscape was assessed by examining the vertical and sector variability of the ratio of wind speed to momentum flux and the ratio of vertical advective to eddy flux of heat. The 30-60 m ratios were consistent with theoretical predictions which indicate well mixed flux footprints. Some variation with sector was observed that were consistent with upstream roughness. Vertical advection was negligible compared with vertical flux except for a few sectors at night. This implies minor influence from internal boundary layers. Flux accuracy is a function of sector and stability but 30-60 m fluxes were found to be generally representative of the surrounding landscape. This paper will study flux data from a 300 m tower, with 4 levels of instruments, in a complex landscape. The surrounding landscape will be characterized in terms of the variation in the ratio of mean wind speed to momentum flux as a function of height and wind direction. The importance of local advection will be assessed by comparing vertical advection with eddy fluxes for momentum and heat.

  19. A Summary of Mass Flux Measurements in Solid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallock, R. B.; Ray, M. W.; Vekhov, Y.

    2012-11-01

    Here we provide a summary and brief review of some of the work done with solid 4He at the University of Massachusetts Amherst below a sample pressure of 28 bar. The motivation for the work has been to attempt to pass 4He atoms through solid 4He without directly applying mechanical pressure to the solid itself. The specific technique chosen is limited to pressures near the melting curve and was initially designed to provide a yes/no answer to the question of whether or not it might be possible to observe such a mass flux. The thermo-mechanical effect and direct mass injection have been separately used to create chemical potential differences between two reservoirs of superfluid 4He connected to each other through superfluid-filled Vycor rods in series with solid 4He, which is in the hcp region of the phase diagram. The thermo-mechanical effect is a more versatile approach. And, in a particular symmetric application it is designed to provide a mass flux with little or no net increase in the density of the solid. Our observations, off but near the melting curve, have included: (1) the presence of an increasing DC flux of atoms through the solid-filled cell with decreasing temperature below ≈650 mK and no flux above this temperature; (2) the presence of a flux minimum and flux instability in the vicinity of 75-80 mK, with a flux increase at lower temperatures; (3) the temperature dependence of the flux above 100 mK and the dependence of the flux on the net driving chemical potential difference provide interesting insights on the possible mechanism that leads to the flux above 100 mK. The most recent data suggest that whatever is responsible for the flux in solid 4He, at least for T>100 mK, may be an example of a Bosonic Luttinger liquid.

  20. Spatially averaged heat flux and convergence measurements at the ARM regional flux experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Porch, W.; Barnes, F.; Buchwald, M.; Clements, W.; Cooper, D.; Hoard, D. ); Doran, C.; Hubbe, J.; Shaw, W. ); Coulter, R.; Martin, T. ); Kunkel, K. )

    1991-01-01

    Cloud formation and its relation to climate change is the greatest weakness in current numerical climate models. Surface heat flux in some cases causes clouds to form and in other to dissipate and the differences between these cases are subtle enough to make parameterization difficult in a numerical model. One of the goals of the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program is to make long term measurements at representative sites to improve radiation and cloud formation parameterization. This paper compares spatially averaged optical measurements of heat flux and convergence with a goal of determining how point measurements of heat fluxes scale up to the larger scale used for climate modeling. It was found that the various optical techniques used in this paper compared well with each other and with independent measurements. These results add confidence that spatially averaging optical techniques can be applied to transform point measurements to the larger scales needed for mesoscale and climate modeling. 10 refs., 6 figs. (MHB)

  1. Validating CERES Radiative Fluxes in the Arctic with Airborne Radiative Flux Measurements from the ARISE Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, J.; Bucholtz, A.; Kato, S.; Rose, F. G.; Smith, W. L., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments on board NASA's Terra, Aqua, and Soumi-NPP satellites provide the only measurements of reflected solar shortwave and emitted longwave radiative flux over the Arctic. Various methods have shown the uncertainty of CERES fluxes over sea ice to be higher than other scene types. However validation against an independent radiative flux measurement has never been attempted. We present here an attempt to better quantify the uncertainty of time-and-space averaged CERES flux measurements using airborne measurements from the Arctic Radiation - IceBridge Sea Ice Experiment (ARISE). The ARISE campaign took place during September of 2014 based out of Fairbanks, Alaska, with most of the measurements taken in the vicinity of the sea ice edge between 125°W and 150°W, and 71°N to 77°N. For six of the flights, measurements were taken in a lawnmower type pattern over either 100 x 200 km box regions at a constant altitude of >6 km, or 100 x 100 km box regions at an altitude of between 200 m to 500 m. They were designed to resemble the CERES Level 3 spatial averaging grids, and were located and timed to coincide with a high number of CERES overpasses. On board the aircraft were a set of upward and downward facing shortwave and longwave broadband radiometers (BBR), along with other instruments measuring meteorological conditions and cloud properties. We have compared the broadband radiative fluxes from BBR with those from CERES for the three days where the aircraft was flying the high altitude pattern. We use the Fu-Liou radiative transfer model to account for differences in the measurement altitude between BBR and CERES. We will present results of the comparisons between the computed fluxes and the measured longwave and shortwave radiative fluxes.

  2. Water Use Patterns of Four Tropical Bamboo Species Assessed with Sap Flux Measurements.

    PubMed

    Mei, Tingting; Fang, Dongming; Röll, Alexander; Niu, Furong; Hendrayanto; Hölscher, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Bamboos are grasses (Poaceae) that are widespread in tropical and subtropical regions. We aimed at exploring water use patterns of four tropical bamboo species (Bambusa vulgaris, Dendrocalamus asper, Gigantochloa atroviolacea, and G. apus) with sap flux measurement techniques. Our approach included three experimental steps: (1) a pot experiment with a comparison of thermal dissipation probes (TDPs), the stem heat balance (SHB) method and gravimetric readings using potted B. vulgaris culms, (2) an in situ calibration of TDPs with the SHB method for the four bamboo species, and (3) field monitoring of sap flux of the four bamboo species along with three tropical tree species (Gmelina arborea, Shorea leprosula, and Hevea brasiliensis) during a dry and a wet period. In the pot experiment, it was confirmed that the SHB method is well suited for bamboos but that TDPs need to be calibrated. In situ, species-specific parameters for such calibration formulas were derived. During field monitoring we found that some bamboo species reached high maximum sap flux densities. Across bamboo species, maximal sap flux density increased with decreasing culm diameter. In the diurnal course, sap flux densities in bamboos peaked much earlier than radiation and vapor pressure deficit (VPD), and also much earlier than sap flux densities in trees. There was a pronounced hysteresis between sap flux density and VPD in bamboos, which was less pronounced in trees. Three of the four bamboo species showed reduced sap flux densities at high VPD values during the dry period, which was associated with a decrease in soil moisture content. Possible roles of internal water storage, root pressure and stomatal sensitivity are discussed. PMID:26779233

  3. Water Use Patterns of Four Tropical Bamboo Species Assessed with Sap Flux Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Tingting; Fang, Dongming; Röll, Alexander; Niu, Furong; Hendrayanto; Hölscher, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Bamboos are grasses (Poaceae) that are widespread in tropical and subtropical regions. We aimed at exploring water use patterns of four tropical bamboo species (Bambusa vulgaris, Dendrocalamus asper, Gigantochloa atroviolacea, and G. apus) with sap flux measurement techniques. Our approach included three experimental steps: (1) a pot experiment with a comparison of thermal dissipation probes (TDPs), the stem heat balance (SHB) method and gravimetric readings using potted B. vulgaris culms, (2) an in situ calibration of TDPs with the SHB method for the four bamboo species, and (3) field monitoring of sap flux of the four bamboo species along with three tropical tree species (Gmelina arborea, Shorea leprosula, and Hevea brasiliensis) during a dry and a wet period. In the pot experiment, it was confirmed that the SHB method is well suited for bamboos but that TDPs need to be calibrated. In situ, species-specific parameters for such calibration formulas were derived. During field monitoring we found that some bamboo species reached high maximum sap flux densities. Across bamboo species, maximal sap flux density increased with decreasing culm diameter. In the diurnal course, sap flux densities in bamboos peaked much earlier than radiation and vapor pressure deficit (VPD), and also much earlier than sap flux densities in trees. There was a pronounced hysteresis between sap flux density and VPD in bamboos, which was less pronounced in trees. Three of the four bamboo species showed reduced sap flux densities at high VPD values during the dry period, which was associated with a decrease in soil moisture content. Possible roles of internal water storage, root pressure and stomatal sensitivity are discussed. PMID:26779233

  4. Flux Density Variations in the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiewak, Renée; Shannon, Ryan; Hobbs, George; Kerr, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Precise timing of an ensemble of pulsars spread across the sky (a pulsar timing array, PTA) can be used to search for gravitational waves. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array project (PPTA) currently observes 23 pulsars with the Parkes Radio Telescope, largely in the southern sky, with the primary goal of searching for gravitational waves. The pulsars in the sample show large variations in flux density due to refractive scintillation in the interstellar medium (ISM). These flux variations cause timing uncertainty to vary by more than an order of magnitude. A better understanding of flux-density variations associated with the interstellar medium (ISM) is crucial for optimizing observing strategy and increase the sensitivity of the PPTA to gravitational waves. Flux-density variations can also potentially be caused by magnetospheric state changes. We use flux density time series and structure functions to examine both the properties of the ISM and search for intrinsic flux variation in these pulsars. We present intriguing features of the datasets and general implications of the results.

  5. Instrument continuously measures density of flowing fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, R. B.; Macinko, J.; Miller, C. E.

    1967-01-01

    Electromechanical densitometer continuously measures the densities of either single-phase or two-phase flowing cryogenic fluids. Measurement is made on actual flow. The instrument operates on the principle that the mass of any vibrating system is a primary factor in determining the dynamic characteristics of the system.

  6. Measurements of EUV coronal holes and open magnetic flux

    SciTech Connect

    Lowder, C.; Qiu, J.; Leamon, R.; Liu, Y.

    2014-03-10

    Coronal holes are regions on the Sun's surface that map the footprints of open magnetic field lines. We have developed an automated routine to detect and track boundaries of long-lived coronal holes using full-disk extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images obtained by SOHO/EIT, SDO/AIA, and STEREO/EUVI. We measure coronal hole areas and magnetic flux in these holes, and compare the measurements with calculations by the potential field source surface (PFSS) model. It is shown that, from 1996 through 2010, the total area of coronal holes measured with EIT images varies between 5% and 17% of the total solar surface area, and the total unsigned open flux varies between (2-5)× 10{sup 22} Mx. The solar cycle dependence of these measurements is similar to the PFSS results, but the model yields larger hole areas and greater open flux than observed by EIT. The AIA/EUVI measurements from 2010-2013 show coronal hole area coverage of 5%-10% of the total surface area, with significant contribution from low latitudes, which is under-represented by EIT. AIA/EUVI have measured much enhanced open magnetic flux in the range of (2-4)× 10{sup 22} Mx, which is about twice the flux measured by EIT, and matches with the PFSS calculated open flux, with discrepancies in the location and strength of coronal holes. A detailed comparison between the three measurements (by EIT, AIA-EUVI, and PFSS) indicates that coronal holes in low latitudes contribute significantly to the total open magnetic flux. These low-latitude coronal holes are not well measured with either the He I 10830 line in previous studies, or EIT EUV images; neither are they well captured by the static PFSS model. The enhanced observations from AIA/EUVI allow a more accurate measure of these low-latitude coronal holes and their contribution to open magnetic flux.

  7. Design of a differential radiometer for atmospheric radiative flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaDelfe, Peter C.; Weber, Paul G.; Rodriguez, C. William

    1995-02-01

    The hemispherical optimized net radiometer (HONER) is an instrument under development at the Los Alamos National Laboratory as part of the Atmospheric Radiation measurements/Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (ARM/UAV) program. HONER is a radiometer which will either measure directly the difference between the total upwelling and downwelling fluxes or the individual fluxes and will provide a means of measuring the atmospheric radiative flux divergence. Unlike existing instruments which only measure the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately, HONER will achieve an optical difference by chopping the two fluxes alternately onto a common pyroelectric detector. HONER will provide data resolved into the two relevant spectral bands; one covering the solar dominated region from less than 0.4 micrometer to approximately 4 micrometers and the other covering the region from approximately 4 micrometers to greater than 50 micrometers, dominated by thermal radiation. The means of separating the spectral regions guarantees seamless summation to calculate the total flux. The fields-of-view are near-hemispherical, upward and downward. The instrument can be converted, in flight, from the differential mode to absolute mode, measuring the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately and simultaneously. The instrument also features continuous calibration from on-board sources. We describe the basic design and operation of the sensor head and the on-board reference sources as well as the means of the initial deployment on a UAV. This instrument can also be used in ground-based, space, or other airborne applications.

  8. Absolute Measurement of Electron Cloud Density

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, M K; Molvik, A W; Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Seidl, P A; Logan, G; Bieniosek, F; Baca, D; Vay, J; Orlando, E; Vujic, J L

    2007-06-21

    Beam interaction with background gas and walls produces ubiquitous clouds of stray electrons that frequently limit the performance of particle accelerator and storage rings. Counterintuitively we obtained the electron cloud accumulation by measuring the expelled ions that are originated from the beam-background gas interaction, rather than by measuring electrons that reach the walls. The kinetic ion energy measured with a retarding field analyzer (RFA) maps the depressed beam space-charge potential and provides the dynamic electron cloud density. Clearing electrode current measurements give the static electron cloud background that complements and corroborates with the RFA measurements, providing an absolute measurement of electron cloud density during a 5 {micro}s duration beam pulse in a drift region of the magnetic transport section of the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL.

  9. Electron density measurements in highly electronegative plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafalskyi, D.; Lafleur, T.; Aanesland, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we present experimental measurements of the electron density in very electronegative ‘ion–ion’ Ar–SF6 plasmas where previous investigations using Langmuir probes have observed electronegativities of up to 5000. The electron density is measured using a short matched dipole probe technique that provides a tolerance better than  ±2 · 1013 m‑3. The results demonstrate that the electron density in the low pressure plasma source (which contains a magnetic filter) can be reduced to around 2.7 · 1013 m‑3 with a corresponding plasma electronegativity of about 4000; close to that from fluid simulation predictions. The highest electronegativity, and lowest electron density, is achieved with a pure SF6 plasma, while adding only 6% SF6 to Ar allows the electronegativity to be increased from 0 to a few hundred with a corresponding decrease in the electron density by more than a thousand. The impedance probe based on a short matched dipole appears to be a practical diagnostic that can be used for independent measurements of the electron density in very electronegative plasmas, and opens up the possibility to further investigate and optimize electronegative plasma sources.

  10. A Preliminary Study of CO2 Flux Measurements by Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibert, Fabien; Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Hilton, T.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Andrews, Arlyn; Ismail, Syed; Singh, Upendra N.

    2008-01-01

    A mechanistic understanding of the global carbon cycle requires quantification of terrestrial ecosystem CO2 fluxes at regional scales. In this paper, we analyze the potential of a Doppler DIAL system to make flux measurements of atmospheric CO2 using the eddy-covariance and boundary layer budget methods and present results from a ground based experiment. The goal of this study is to put CO2 flux point measurements in a mesoscale context. In June 2007, a field experiment combining a 2-m Doppler Heterodyne Differential Absorption Lidar (HDIAL) and in-situ sensors of a 447-m tall tower (WLEF) took place in Wisconsin. The HDIAL measures simultaneously: 1) CO2 mixing ratio, 2) atmosphere structure via aerosol backscatter and 3) radial velocity. We demonstrate how to synthesize these data into regional flux estimates. Lidar-inferred fluxes are compared with eddy-covariance fluxes obtained in-situ at 396m AGL from the tower. In cases where the lidar was not yet able to measure the fluxes with acceptable precision, we discuss possible modifications to improve system performance.

  11. Determining Maximum Glycolytic Capacity Using Extracellular Flux Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Mookerjee, Shona A.; Nicholls, David G.; Brand, Martin D.

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of glycolytic rate and maximum glycolytic capacity using extracellular flux analysis can give crucial information about cell status and phenotype during normal operation, development of pathology, differentiation, and malignant transformation. They are also of great use when assessing the effects of chemical or drug treatments. Here, we experimentally define maximum glycolytic capacity, demonstrate how it differs from glycolytic rate, and provide a protocol for determining the basal glycolytic rate and maximum glycolytic capacity in cells using extracellular flux measurements. The results illustrate the power of extracellular flux analysis to describe the energetics of adherent cells in culture in a fully quantitative way. PMID:27031845

  12. Measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Yates, T. Y.

    2008-10-15

    Magnetic field fluctuation-induced particle transport has been directly measured in the high-temperature core of the MST reversed field pinch plasma. Measurement of radial particle transport is achieved by combining various interferometry techniques, including Faraday rotation, conventional interferometry, and differential interferometry. It is observed that electron convective particle flux and its divergence exhibit a significant increase during a sawtooth crash. In this paper, we describe the basic techniques employed to determine the particle flux.

  13. Density of Gadolinium Nitrate Solutions for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Paul Allen; Lee, Denise L

    2009-05-01

    In late 1992, the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was planning to switch the solution contained in the poison injection tank from cadmium nitrate to gadolinium nitrate. The poison injection system is an emergency system used to shut down the reactor by adding a neutron poison to the cooling water. This system must be able to supply a minimum of 69 pounds of gadolinium to the reactor coolant system in order to guarantee that the reactor would become subcritical. A graph of the density of gadolinium nitrate solutions over a concentration range of 5 to 30 wt% and a temperature range of 15 to 40{sup o}C was prepared. Routine density measurements of the solution in the poison injection tank are made by HFIR personnel, and an adaptation of the original graph is used to determine the gadolinium nitrate concentration. In late 2008, HFIR personnel decided that the heat tracing that was present on the piping for the poison injection system could be removed without any danger of freezing the solution; however, the gadolinium nitrate solution might get as cold as 5{sup o}C. This was outside the range of the current density-concentration correlation, so the range needed to be expanded. This report supplies a new density-concentration correlation that covers the extended temperature range. The correlation is given in new units, which greatly simplifies the calculation that is required to determine the pounds of gadolinium in the tank solution. The procedure for calculating the amount of gadolinium in the HFIR poison injection system is as follows: (1) Calculate the usable volume in the system; (2) Measure the density of the solution; (3) Calculate the gadolinium concentration using the following equation: Gd(lb/ft{sup 3}) = measured density (g/mL) x 34.681 - 34.785; (4) Calculate the amount of gadolinium in the system using the following equation: Amount of Gd(lb) = Gd concentration (lb/ft{sup 3}) x usable volume (ft{sup 3}). The equation in step 3 is exact for a temperature of

  14. Concerning factors which determine whether flux-lattice shear or pin breaking limits the critical current density of superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D.O.

    1992-10-01

    An elementary model is presented which illustrates the conditions under which flux-lattice shear, rather than pin breaking, limits the critical current density. An expression for the shear strength of the flux-lattice, based on the plasticity of metals and alloys, is used to derive the critical current density, including the effect of thermal activation in the flux creep regime.

  15. Concerning factors which determine whether flux-lattice shear or pin breaking limits the critical current density of superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D.O.

    1992-01-01

    An elementary model is presented which illustrates the conditions under which flux-lattice shear, rather than pin breaking, limits the critical current density. An expression for the shear strength of the flux-lattice, based on the plasticity of metals and alloys, is used to derive the critical current density, including the effect of thermal activation in the flux creep regime.

  16. Effect of the Heat Flux Density on the Evaporation Rate of a Distilled Water Drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, Konstantin; Orlova, Evgeniya; Feoktistov, Dmitry

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the experimental dependence of the evaporation rate of a nondeaerated distilled water drop from the heat flux density on the surfaces of non-ferrous metals (copper and brass). A drop was placed on a heated substrate by electronic dosing device. To obtain drop profile we use a shadow optical system; drop symmetry was controlled by a high-speed video camera. It was found that the evaporation rate of a drop on a copper substrate is greater than on a brass. The evaporation rate increases intensively with raising volume of a drop. Calculated values of the heat flux density and the corresponding evaporation rates are presented in this work. The evaporation rate is found to increase intensively on the brass substrate with raising the heat flux density.

  17. Measuring Regional CO2 Fluxes Using a Lagrangian Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, D. K.; Sweeney, C.; Stirm, B. H.; Shepson, P. B.

    2008-12-01

    The difficulty of measuring regional fluxes of CO2 has limited our understanding of the global carbon budget and the processes controlling carbon exchange across politically relevant spatial scales. A Lagrangian experiment was conducted over Iowa on June 19, 2007 as part of the North American Carbon Program's Mid-Continent Intensive using a light-weight, cost-effective aircraft to measure a net drawdown of CO2 concentration within the boundary layer. The drawdown is related to photosynthetic uptake when emission footprints are considered using a combination of emission inventories from the Vulcan project and HYSPLIT source contributions. Entrainment through the top of the boundary layer is measured directly using turbulence measurements from an onboard probe capable of measuring winds in 3-dimensions. Results show a total average CO2 flux of -5.3±0.7 μmol m-2 s-1. The average flux from fossil fuels over the measurement area is 2.8±0.4 μmol m-2 s-1. Thus, the CO2 flux attributable to the vegetation is -8.1±0.8 μmol m-2 s-1. The magnitude of the vegetative flux is comparable to other studies using the Lagrangian approach, but it is smaller than tower- based eddy covariance fluxes over the same period and measurement area. Sensitivities to analysis procedures and discrepancies between aircraft and tower-based measurements are discussed. We describe an aircraft Lagrangian experiment that offers direct, reliable, and cost-effective means for measuring CO2 fluxes at regional scales that can be used to compare to ecosystem models or to satellite measurements.

  18. Error Evaluation of Methyl Bromide Aerodynamic Flux Measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Majewski, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    Methyl bromide volatilization fluxes were calculated for a tarped and a nontarped field using 2 and 4 hour sampling periods. These field measurements were averaged in 8, 12, and 24 hour increments to simulate longer sampling periods. The daily flux profiles were progressively smoothed and the cumulative volatility losses increased by 20 to 30% with each longer sampling period. Error associated with the original flux measurements was determined from linear regressions of measured wind speed and air concentration as a function of height, and averaged approximately 50%. The high errors resulted from long application times, which resulted in a nonuniform source strength; and variable tarp permeability, which is influenced by temperature, moisture, and thickness. The increase in cumulative volatilization losses that resulted from longer sampling periods were within the experimental error of the flux determination method.

  19. A simple laboratory system for diffusive radon flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranrod, C.; Chanyotha, S.; Tonlublao, S.; Burnett, W. C.

    2015-05-01

    This study designed a simple, custom-made system to estimate the diffusive radon flux from solid materials (e.g., sediments, soils, building materials). Determination of the radon flux is based on the measurement of the radon activity in the air over time inside a closed loop system. For sediments, the system consists of wet sediment and water inside a gas-tight flask connected in a closed loop to a drying system and a radon analyzer (Durridge RAD7). The flux is determined based on an initial slope method in which the slope of radon activities vs. time plot during the first 12 h is evaluated. The slope is then multiplied by the total air volume and divided by the exposed sediment area to obtain the radon flux. The minimal thickness or mass of wet sediment should be about 4 cm or (equivalent to approximately 150 g of wet sediment) to obtain a reliable radon diffusive flux in this study.

  20. Contaminant discharge and uncertainty estimates from passive flux meter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klammler, Harald; Hatfield, Kirk; GuimarãEs da Luz, Joana AngéLica; Annable, Michael D.; Newman, Mark; Cho, Jaehyun; Peacock, Aaron; Stucker, Valerie; Ranville, James; Cabaniss, Steven A.; Rao, P. S. C.

    2012-02-01

    The passive flux meter (PFM) measures local cumulative water and contaminant fluxes at an observation well. Conditional stochastic simulation accounting for both spatial correlation and data skewness is introduced to interpret passive flux meter observations in terms of probability distributions of discharges across control planes (transects) of wells. An estimator of the effective number of independent data is defined and applied in the development of two significantly simpler approximate methods for estimating discharge distributions. One method uses a transformation of the t statistic to account for data skewness and the other method is closely related to the classic bootstrap. The approaches are demonstrated with passive flux meter data from two field sites (a trichloroethylene [TCE] plume at Ft. Lewis, WA, and a uranium plume at Rifle, CO). All methods require that the flux heterogeneity is sufficiently represented by the data and maximum differences in discharge quantile estimates between methods are ˜7%.

  1. Design of a differential radiometer for atmospheric radiative flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    LaDelfe, P.C.; Weber, P.G.; Rodriguez, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    The Hemispherical Optimized NEt Radiometer (HONER) is an instrument under development at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for deployment on an unmanned aerospace vehicle as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM/UAV) program. HONER is a differential radiometer which will measure the difference between the total upwelling and downwelling fluxes and is intended to provide a means of measuring the atmospheric radiative flux divergence. Unlike existing instruments which measure the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately, HONER will achieve an optical difference by chopping the two fluxes alternately onto a common pyroelectric detector. HONER will provide data resolved into two spectral bands; one covering the solar dominated region from less than 0.4 micrometer to approximately 4.5 micrometers and the other covering the region from approximately 4.5 micrometers to greater than 50 micrometers, dominated by thermal radiation. The means of separating the spectral regions guarantees seamless summation to calculate the total flux. The fields-of-view are near-hemispherical, upward and downward. The instrument can be converted, in flight, from the differential mode to absolute mode, measuring the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately and simultaneously. The instrument also features continuous calibration from on-board sources. We will describe the design and operation of the sensor head and the on-board reference sources as well as the means of deployment.

  2. Design of a differential radiometer for atmospheric radiative flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladelfe, P. C.; Weber, P. G.; Rodriguez, C. W.

    The Hemispherical Optimized NEt Radiometer (HONER) is an instrument under development at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for deployment on an unmanned aerospace vehicle as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM/UAV) program. HONER is a differential radiometer which will measure the difference between the total upwelling and downwelling fluxes and is intended to provide a means of measuring the atmospheric radiative flux divergence. Unlike existing instruments which measure the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately, HONER will achieve an optical difference by chopping the two fluxes alternately onto a common pyroelectric detector. HONER will provide data resolved into two spectral bands; one covering the solar dominated region from less than 0.4 micrometer to approximately 4.5 micrometers and the other covering the region from approximately 4.5 micrometers to greater than 50 micrometers, dominated by thermal radiation. The means of separating the spectral regions guarantees seamless summation to calculate the total flux. The fields-of-view are near-hemispherical, upward and downward. The instrument can be converted, in flight, from the differential mode to absolute mode, measuring the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately and simultaneously. The instrument also features continuous calibration from on-board sources. We will describe the design and operation of the sensor head and the on-board reference sources as well as the means of deployment.

  3. Data-Model Comparison Investigations of Thermospheric Density and Composition Influences on High-Altitude Photoelectron Fluxes at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Liemohn, M. W.; Bougher, S. W.; Mitchell, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from a superthermal electron transport code adapted for the Mars environment to study the controlling factors of high-altitude/escaped photoelectron fluxes at this planet. In addition to numerical checks of the code, we investigate the influences of the following effects: magnetic field configuration, solar EUV flux input, and atmospheric density/temperature profiles. In particular, we explore the causes of the extremely high photoelectron fluxes, resulting into two linear dependent trends on solar EUV proxy, measured by the Mars Global Surveyor MAGnetometer/Electron Reflector (MGS MAG/ER) in late 2001-early 2002 (Mars year 25). Studies have shown the relation between these high fluxes and the global dust storm that occurred in the same time period. This modeling work further explores the physical explanations of this relation. Our preliminary results suggest that an increase in CO2 density in the upper thermosphere (150-300 km altitude) is necessary to match the observed changes in photoelectron flux at the MGS altitude of ~400 km.

  4. Spectrum and density of neutron flux in the irradiation beam line no. 3 of the IBR-2 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabalin, E. P.; Verkhoglyadov, A. E.; Bulavin, M. V.; Rogov, A. D.; Kulagin, E. N.; Kulikov, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    Methodology and results of measuring the differential density of the neutron flux in irradiation beam line no. 3 of the IBR-2 reactor using neutron activation analysis (NAA) are presented in the paper. The results are compared to the calculation performed on the basis of the 3D MCNP model. The data that are obtained are required to determine the integrated radiation dose of the studied samples at various distances from the reactor.

  5. Radiative flux measurements in the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to determine how the stratospheric tropospheric exchange of water vapor is affected by the interaction of solar (visible) and planetary (infrared) radiation with tropical cumulonimbus anvils. This research involves field measurements from the ER-2 aircraft as well as radiative transfer modelling to determine heating and cooling rates and profiles that directly affect the exchange between the troposphere and the stratosphere.

  6. Measuring Air Density in the Introductory Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calza, G.; Gratton, L. M.; Lopez-Arias, T.; Oss, S.

    2010-01-01

    The measurement of the mass, or the density, of air can easily be done with very simple materials and offers many interesting phenomena for discussion--buoyancy and its effects being the most obvious but not the only one. Many interesting considerations can be done regarding the behavior of gases, the effect of the external conditions in the…

  7. A flux-gradient system for simultaneous measurement of the CH4, CO2, and H2O fluxes at a lake-air interface.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wei; Liu, Shoudong; Li, Hanchao; Xiao, Qitao; Wang, Wei; Hu, Zhenghua; Hu, Cheng; Gao, Yunqiu; Shen, Jing; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Mi; Lee, Xuhui

    2014-12-16

    Inland lakes play important roles in water and greenhouse gas cycling in the environment. This study aims to test the performance of a flux-gradient system for simultaneous measurement of the fluxes of water vapor, CO2, and CH4 at a lake-air interface. The concentration gradients over the water surface were measured with an analyzer based on the wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy technology, and the eddy diffusivity was measured with a sonic anemometer. Results of a zero-gradient test indicate a flux measurement precision of 4.8 W m(-2) for water vapor, 0.010 mg m(-2) s(-1) for CO2, and 0.029 μg m(-2) s(-1) for CH4. During the 620 day measurement period, 97%, 69%, and 67% of H2O, CO2, and CH4 hourly fluxes were higher in magnitude than the measurement precision, which confirms that the flux-gradient system had adequate precision for the measurement of the lake-air exchanges. This study illustrates four strengths of the flux-gradient method: (1) the ability to simultaneously measure the flux of H2O, CO2, and CH4; (2) negligibly small density corrections; (3) the ability to resolve small CH4 gradient and flux; and (4) continuous and noninvasive operation. The annual mean CH4 flux (1.8 g CH4 m(-2) year(-1)) at this hypereutrophic lake was close to the median value for inland lakes in the world (1.6 g CH4 m(-2) year(-1)). The system has adequate precision for CH4 flux for broad applications but requires further improvement to resolve small CO2 flux in many lakes. PMID:25377990

  8. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe. PMID:27320418

  9. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe.

  10. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs.

    PubMed

    Beck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe. PMID:27320418

  11. Cosmic muon flux measurements at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalousis, L. N.; Guarnaccia, E.; Link, J. M.; Mariani, C.; Pelkey, R.

    2014-08-01

    In this article, the results from a series of muon flux measurements conducted at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF), Virginia, United States, are presented. The detector employed for these investigations, is made of plastic scintillator bars readout by wavelength shifting fibers and multianode photomultiplier tubes. Data was taken at several locations inside KURF, spanning rock overburden values from ~ 200 to 1450 m.w.e. From the extracted muon rates an empirical formula was devised, that estimates the muon flux inside the mine as a function of the overburden. The results are in good agreement with muon flux calculations based on analytical models and MUSIC.

  12. Passive hyporheic flux meter - measuring nitrate flux to the reactive sites in the river bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Julia Vanessa; Borchardt, Dietrich; Rode, Michael; Annable, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Most European lowland rivers are afflicted by high nitrate loads, modified morphology and discharge regulations, resulting in restricted capacity to retain nitrate. In those nutrient saturated rivers, sediment bound denitrification is the only process by which nitrate is removed from the system. Despite the importance of the hyporheic zone in nutrient reduction we are lacking detailed information on the transport to and retention at those reactive sites. Passive flux meters have successfully been used to measure contaminant transport to aquifers (eg Cho and Annable 2007). Here we present how a modification of those samplers can be used to quantify nitrate flux to and intermediate storage patterns in the interstices of an agriculturally impacted river. Installed in the river bed sediments, water flux and nutrient quantities passing through the device are recorded. While the amount of water flux serves as an index for connectivity of the hyporheic zone (exchange surface-subsurface water) the nitrate flux through the device can be seen as the portion of nitrate subjected to denitrification. The generated data on solute behavior in hyporheic zones are the missing puzzle to in-stream nitrate dynamics. Complementing flume and tracer experiments our approach depicts how discharge, morphology and sediment characteristics control the denitrification rate via the connectivity of the hyporheic zone. Passive hyporheic flux meter are a novel method to directly asses the quantity of removed nitrate by an in situ experiment.

  13. Distributed Sensible Heat Flux Measurements for Wireless Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huwald, H.; Brauchli, T.; Lehning, M.; Higgins, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    The sensible heat flux component of the surface energy balance is typically computed using eddy covariance or two point profile measurements while alternative approaches such as the flux variance method based on convective scaling has been much less explored and applied. Flux variance (FV) certainly has a few limitations and constraints but may be an interesting and competitive method in low-cost and power limited wireless sensor networks (WSN) with the advantage of providing spatio-temporal sensible heat flux over the domain of the network. In a first step, parameters such as sampling frequency, sensor response time, and averaging interval are investigated. Then we explore the applicability and the potential of the FV method for use in WSN in a field experiment. Low-cost sensor systems are tested and compared against reference instruments (3D sonic anemometers) to evaluate the performance and limitations of the sensors as well as the method with respect to the standard calculations. Comparison experiments were carried out at several sites to gauge the flux measurements over different surface types (gravel, grass, water) from the low-cost systems. This study should also serve as an example of spatially distributed sensible heat flux measurements.

  14. Flux measurement and modeling in a typical mediterranean vineyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marras, Serena; Bellucco, Veronica; Pyles, David R.; Falk, Matthias; Sirca, Costantino; Duce, Pierpaolo; Snyder, Richard L.; Tha Paw U, Kyaw; Spano, Donatella

    2014-05-01

    Vineyard ecosystems are typical in the Mediterranean area, since wine is one of the most important economic sectors. Nevertheless, only a few studies have been conducted to investigate the interactions between this kind of vegetation and the atmosphere. These information are important both to understand the behaviour of such ecosystems in different environmental conditions, and are crucial to parameterize crop and flux simulation models. Combining direct measurements and modelling can obtain reliable estimates of surface fluxes and crop evapotranspiration. This study would contribute both to (1) directly measure energy fluxes and evapotranspiration in a typical Mediterranean vineyard, located in the South of Sardinia (Italy), through the application of the Eddy Covariance micrometeorological technique and to (2) evaluate the land surface model ACASA (Advanced-Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm) in simulating energy fluxes and evapotranspiration over vineyard. Independent datasets of direct measurements were used to calibrate and validate model results during the growing period. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate model performance and accuracy in predicting surface fluxes. Results will be showed as well as the model capability to be used for future studies to predict energy fluxes and crop water requirements under actual and future climate.

  15. Accuracy of quantum sensors measuring yield photon flux and photosynthetic photon flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, C.; Tibbitts, T.; Sager, J.; Deitzer, G.; Bubenheim, D.; Koerner, G.; Bugbee, B.; Knott, W. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Photosynthesis is fundamentally driven by photon flux rather than energy flux, but not all absorbed photons yield equal amounts of photosynthesis. Thus, two measures of photosynthetically active radiation have emerged: photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), which values all photons from 400 to 700 nm equally, and yield photon flux (YPF), which weights photons in the range from 360 to 760 nm according to plant photosynthetic response. We selected seven common radiation sources and measured YPF and PPF from each source with a spectroradiometer. We then compared these measurements with measurements from three quantum sensors designed to measure YPF, and from six quantum sensors designed to measure PPF. There were few differences among sensors within a group (usually <5%), but YPF values from sensors were consistently lower (3% to 20%) than YPF values calculated from spectroradiometric measurements. Quantum sensor measurements of PPF also were consistently lower than PPF values calculated from spectroradiometric measurements, but the differences were <7% for all sources, except red-light-emitting diodes. The sensors were most accurate for broad-band sources and least accurate for narrow-band sources. According to spectroradiometric measurements, YPF sensors were significantly less accurate (>9% difference) than PPF sensors under metal halide, high-pressure sodium, and low-pressure sodium lamps. Both sensor types were inaccurate (>18% error) under red-light-emitting diodes. Because both YPF and PPF sensors are imperfect integrators, and because spectroradiometers can measure photosynthetically active radiation much more accurately, researchers should consider developing calibration factors from spectroradiometric data for some specific radiation sources to improve the accuracy of integrating sensors.

  16. Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Haddad, G. N.

    1974-01-01

    Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet have extended to short wavelengths by use of rare-gas ionization chambers. The technique involves the measurement of the ion current as a function of the gas pressure in the ion chamber. The true value of the ion current, and hence the absolute photon flux, is obtained by extrapolating the ion current to zero gas pressure. Examples are given at 162 and 266 A. The short-wavelength limit is determined only by the sensitivity of the current-measuring apparatus and by present knowledge of the photoionization processes that occur in the rate gases.

  17. Auroral Energy and Energy Flux Measurements using GUVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holley, K. E.; McHarg, M. G.; Paxton, L.; Zhang, Y.; Morrison, D.

    2003-12-01

    We present estimates of the average characteristic energy and energy flux of energetic precipitating auroral particles. These estimates are derived from irradiance data measured on the Global Ultraviolet Imager (GUVI) flying on the TIMED satellite. We will present both the average and standard deviation of global maps of the energy and energy flux during the first year of GUVI data. We will compare results of the GUVI derived measurements to previous estimates of Hardy who used in-situ particle measurements from the Defense Meteorological Support Satellite (DMSP) program.

  18. Acoustic levitation methods for density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Hsu, C. J.

    1986-12-01

    The capability of ultrasonic levitators operating in air to perform density measurements has been demonstrated. The remote determination of the density of ordinary liquids as well as low density solid metals can be carried out using levitated samples with size on the order of a few millimeters and at a frequency of 20 kHz. Two basic methods may be used. The first one is derived from a previously known technique developed for acoustic levitation in liquid media, and is based on the static equilibrium position of levitated samples in the earth's gravitational field. The second approach relies on the dynamic interaction between a levitated sample and the acoustic field. The first technique appears more accurate (1 percent uncertainty), but the latter method is directly applicable to a near gravity-free environment such as that found in space.

  19. Acoustic levitation methods for density measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Hsu, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    The capability of ultrasonic levitators operating in air to perform density measurements has been demonstrated. The remote determination of the density of ordinary liquids as well as low density solid metals can be carried out using levitated samples with size on the order of a few millimeters and at a frequency of 20 kHz. Two basic methods may be used. The first one is derived from a previously known technique developed for acoustic levitation in liquid media, and is based on the static equilibrium position of levitated samples in the earth's gravitational field. The second approach relies on the dynamic interaction between a levitated sample and the acoustic field. The first technique appears more accurate (1 percent uncertainty), but the latter method is directly applicable to a near gravity-free environment such as that found in space.

  20. Measuring the transverse spin density of light.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Martin; Bauer, Thomas; Aiello, Andrea; Banzer, Peter

    2015-02-13

    We generate tightly focused optical vector beams whose electric fields spin around an axis transverse to the beams' propagation direction. We experimentally investigate these fields by exploiting the directional near-field interference of a dipolelike plasmonic field probe placed adjacent to a dielectric interface. This directionality depends on the transverse electric spin density of the excitation field. Near- to far-field conversion mediated by the dielectric interface enables us to detect the directionality of the emitted light in the far field and, therefore, to measure the transverse electric spin density with nanoscopic resolution. Finally, we determine the longitudinal electric component of Belinfante's elusive spin momentum density, a solenoidal field quantity often referred to as "virtual." PMID:25723220

  1. Dynamics of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) and estimates in coastal northern California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The seasonal trends and diurnal patterns of Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) were investigated in the San Francisco Bay Area of Northern California from March through August in 2007 and 2008. During these periods, the daily values of PAR flux density (PFD), energy loading with PAR (PARE), a...

  2. Accurate Relations Between the Neutron Current Densities and the Neutron Fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Ronen, Yigal

    2004-02-15

    Accurate relations between neutron current densities and neutron flux are obtained using the integral transport equation. Using these relations and Fick's Law, diffusion constants can be calculated. These diffusion constants are better than those usually used for the cases in which {sigma}{sub a}/{sigma}{sub s} is not small.

  3. Three-dimensional observations of magnetic flux density around fatigue crack tips of bearing steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kida, Katsuyuki; Santos, Edson C.; Honda, Takashi; Tanabe, Hirotaka

    2009-12-01

    Fatigue failure of steel occurs when small cracks form in a component and then continue to grow to a size large enough to cause failure. In order to understand the strength of steel components it is important to find these cracks. However, at present, it is not easy to distinguish the cracks that will grow fast and cause failure. We developed a three-dimensional scanning Hall probe microscope (3D-SHPM) and observed fatigue cracks at room temperature while they were growing. Four-point-bending fatigue tests were carried out using pre-cracked specimens (JIS-SUJ2, bearing steel). We observed the two-dimensional magnetic flux density distributions around the crack tips and found that there is a strong correlation between the changes in the magnetic flux densities and the crack growth. In order to understand this, we looked into all the three components of the magnetic flux densities, and found that they shape an arched bridge around a crack. We also found that the magnetic flux density moves in front of the crack tip along the crack growth direction.

  4. Three-dimensional observations of magnetic flux density around fatigue crack tips of bearing steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kida, Katsuyuki; Santos, Edson C.; Honda, Takashi; Tanabe, Hirotaka

    2010-03-01

    Fatigue failure of steel occurs when small cracks form in a component and then continue to grow to a size large enough to cause failure. In order to understand the strength of steel components it is important to find these cracks. However, at present, it is not easy to distinguish the cracks that will grow fast and cause failure. We developed a three-dimensional scanning Hall probe microscope (3D-SHPM) and observed fatigue cracks at room temperature while they were growing. Four-point-bending fatigue tests were carried out using pre-cracked specimens (JIS-SUJ2, bearing steel). We observed the two-dimensional magnetic flux density distributions around the crack tips and found that there is a strong correlation between the changes in the magnetic flux densities and the crack growth. In order to understand this, we looked into all the three components of the magnetic flux densities, and found that they shape an arched bridge around a crack. We also found that the magnetic flux density moves in front of the crack tip along the crack growth direction.

  5. An investigation into the torque density capabilities of flux-focusing magnetic gearboxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uppalapati, Krishna Kiran

    Wind and many rotary based ocean energy conversion devices rely on a mechanical gearbox to increase their speed so as to match the requirements of the electromagnetic generator. However, mechanical gearboxes have a number of disadvantages such as the need for gear lubrication, no overload protection and the creation of acoustic noise. Frequently direct-drive generators are employed to overcome these issues, wherein the gearbox is removed and the shaft of the turbine is directly connected to the synchronous generator, either with an electrically excited or permanent magnet rotor. If the input speed to the generator is very low the torque must be very high in order to generate the necessary power. However, as the electrical loading of a synchronous generator is thermally limited, the size of the generator will become excessively large at high power levels. An alternative to these technologies is to consider replacing the mechanical gearbox with a magnetic gear. A magnetic gear can create speed change without any physical contact. It has inherent overload protection, and its non-contact operation offers the potential for high reliability. Despite significant progress, existing magnetic gear designs do not achieve torque densities that are competitive with mechanical gearboxes. This research has focused on designing a coaxial magnetic gear that can operate at a volumetric torque density that is comparable to a mechanical gearbox. A flux-focusing rotor topology also called spoke-type rotor magnet arrangement was adopted to improve the air-gap magnetic flux density which in turn improves the torque transferred between the rotors. Finite element analysis was utilized to conduct a parameter sweep analysis of the different geometric parameters of the magnetic gear. A sub-scale magnetic gear with a diameter of 110 mm and a scaled-up magnetic gear with a diameter of 228 mm was designed, constructed and experimentally evaluated. The torque and torque density of sub

  6. Radiance Measurement for Low Density Mars Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.

    2012-01-01

    We report measurements of radiance behind a shock wave in Martian simulant (96% CO2, 4% N2) atmosphere at conditions relevant for aerodynamic decelerators. Shock waves are generated in the NASA Ames Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility at velocities from 6-8 km/s and freestream densities from 1.2-5.9 x 10(exp -4) kilograms per cubic meter (0.05-0.25 Torr, corresponding to 35-50 km altitude). Absolute radiance is measured as a function of wavelength and position in the shock. Radiance measurements extend from the vacuum ultraviolet to near infrared (120-1650 nm). As at higher density/velocity, radiation is dominate by CO 4th positive radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet, though CN contribution is also significant. At most low density conditions, the shock does not relax to equilibrium over several centimeters. A small number of measurements in the mid-infrared were performed to quantify radiation from the fundamental vibrational transition in CO, and this is found to be a minor contributor to the overall radiance at these speeds. Efforts to extend test time and reliability in the 60 cm (24) shock tube will be discussed in the full paper.

  7. Uncertainties Associated with Flux Measurements Due to Heterogeneous Contaminant Distributions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass flux and mass discharge measurements at contaminated sites have been applied to assist with remedial management, and can be divided into two broad categories: point-scale measurement techniques and pumping methods. Extrapolation across un-sampled space is necessary when usi...

  8. Monitoring of MNSR operation by measuring subcritical photoneutron flux.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Kh; Alsomel, N

    2011-03-01

    Passive nondestructive assay methods are used to monitor the reactor's operation. It is required for nuclear regulatory, calculation validation and safeguards purposes. So, it plays a vital role in the safety and security of the nuclear plants. The possibility of MNSR operation monitoring by measuring the subcritical state photoneutron flux were investigated in this work. The photoneutron flux is induced by the fuels hard gamma radiation in the beryllium reflector. Theoretical formulation and experimental tests were performed. The results show that within a specified cooling time range, the photoneutron flux is induced by a single dominant hard gamma emitter such as (117)Cd (activation product) and (140)Ba ((140)La fission product). This phenomenon was utilized to monitor the cooling time and the operation neutron flux during the last campaign. Thus a passive nondestructive assay method is proposed with regard to the reactor operation's monitoring. PMID:21168337

  9. Direct measurements of CO2 flux in the Greenland Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauvset, Siv K.; McGillis, Wade R.; Bariteau, Ludovic; Fairall, C. W.; Johannessen, Truls; Olsen, Are; Zappa, Christopher J.

    2011-06-01

    During summer 2006 eddy correlation CO2 fluxes were measured in the Greenland Sea using a novel system set-up with two shrouded LICOR-7500 detectors. One detector was used exclusively to determine, and allow the removal of, the bias on CO2 fluxes due to sensor motion. A recently published correction method for the CO2-H2O cross-correlation was applied to the data set. We show that even with shrouded sensors the data require significant correction due to this cross-correlation. This correction adjusts the average CO2 flux by an order of magnitude from -6.7 × 10-2 mol m-2 day-1 to -0.61 × 10-2 mol m-2 day-1, making the corrected fluxes comparable to those calculated using established parameterizations for transfer velocity.

  10. Intercomparison of gas analyzers for methane flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haapanala, S.; Rinne, J.; Vesala, T.

    2010-12-01

    Four gas analyzers, capable of measuring methane concentration at a response time necessary for eddy covariance flux measurements, were operated in parallel for about six months between March and August 2010. Their reliability, need of maintenance, user friendliness, data coverage, and data quality were evaluated. The primary aim of this campaign was to provide an instrumentation suggestion for the European Research Infrastructure ICOS (Integrated Carbon Observation System). The instruments used were TGA100A (Campbell Scientific Inc.), RMT-200 (Los Gatos Research Inc.) , G1301-f (Picarro Inc.), and LI-7700 (Li-Cor Inc.). The last one, LI-7700, was a prototype of a later commercialized open path analyzer. The other instruments were closed path analyzers. The measurement site is an oligotrophic open fen Siikaneva, located in southern Finland. The site provides spatially quite uniform methane flux within the footprint. The methane flux rises in the spring, peaks in early August and falls down during the autumn. This provides excellent opportunity to study the performance of the analyzers at different CH4 flux levels from near zero up to about 5 mg m-2 h-1. The preliminary results show great similarity among the instruments in both concentrations and fluxes. Detailed numbers of the measurement characteristics will be provided later. The reliability and need of maintenance are difficult to evaluate quantitatively during that short period.

  11. Observations of Poynting fluxes, ion temperatures and neutral densities during the March 2015 magnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Su, Y. J.; Huang, C. Y.; Hairston, M. R.; Sutton, E. K.

    2015-12-01

    We will present various observations regarding the geomagnetic energy input and the response of Ionosphere-Thermosphere (IT) system during the March 17, 2015 storm, the largest one in solar cycle 24. The Poynting fluxes measured by Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites (F16, F17 and F18) show significant enhancements in the auroral oval and at high latitudes poleward of the auroral oval. Moreover, the ion temperatures observed by DMSP satellites (F16, F17 and F19) at magnetic latitudes greater than 80° are higher than those in the auroral oval, and the their averaged increases are 316K in the northern hemisphere and 248 K in the southern hemisphere, respectively. In addition, the neutral density residuals measured by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite indicate the largest values at the highest orbital latitudes. The wave-like perturbations originating at high latitudes move equatorward with decreasing amplitudes along GRACE orbits, implying a source region for Traveling Atmospheric Disturbances (TADs) at polar latitudes.

  12. Seasonality of Overstory and Understory Fluxes in a Semi-Arid Oak Savanna: What can be Learned from Comparing Measured and Modeled Fluxes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raz-Yaseef, N.; Sonnentag, O.; Kobayashi, H.; Chen, J. M.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Ma, S.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    Semi-arid climates experience large seasonal and inter-annual variability in radiation and precipitation, creating natural conditions adequate to study how year-to-year changes affect atmosphere-biosphere fluxes. Especially, savanna ecosystems, that combine tree and below-canopy components, create a unique environment in which phenology dramatically changes between seasons. We used a 10-year flux database in order to define seasonal and interannual variability of climatic inputs and fluxes, and evaluate model capability to reproduce observed variability. This is based on the perception that model capability to construct the deviation, and not the average, is important in order to correctly predict ecosystem sensitivity to climate change. Our research site is a low density and low LAI (0.8) semi-arid savanna, located at Tonzi Ranch, Northern California. In this system, trees are active during the warm season (Mar - Oct), and grasses are active during the wet season (Dec - May). Measurements of carbon and water fluxes above and below the tree canopy using eddy covariance and supplementary measurements have been made since 2001. Fluxes were simulated using bio-meteorological process-oriented ecosystem models: BEPS and 3D-CAONAK. Models were partly capable of reproducing fluxes on daily scales (R2=0.66). We then compared model outputs for different ecosystem components and seasons, and found distinct seasons with high correlations while other seasons were purely represented. Comparison was much higher for ET than for GPP. The understory was better simulated than the overstory. CANOAK overestimated spring understory fluxes, probably due to the capability to directly calculated 3D radiative transfer. BEPS underestimated spring understory fluxes, following the pre-description of grass die-off. Both models underestimated peak spring overstory fluxes. During winter tree dormant, modeled fluxes were null, but occasional high fluxes of both ET and GPP were measured following

  13. Effect of Thermospheric Neutral Density upon Inner Trapped-belt Proton Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Lodhi, M. A. K.; Diaz, Abel B.

    2007-01-01

    We wish to point out that a secular change in the Earth's atmospheric neutral density alters charged-particle lifetime in the inner trapped radiation belts, in addition to the changes recently reported as produced by greenhouse gases. Heretofore, changes in neutral density have been of interest primarily because of their effect on the orbital drag of satellites. We extend this to include the orbital lifetime of charged particles in the lower radiation belts. It is known that the charged-belt population is coupled to the neutral density of the atmosphere through changes induced by solar activity, an effect produced by multiple scattering off neutral and ionized atoms along with ionization loss in the thermosphere where charged and neutral populations interact. It will be shown here that trapped-belt flux J is bivariant in energy E and thermospheric neutral density , as J(E,rho). One can conclude that proton lifetimes in these belts are also directly affected by secular changes in the neutral species populating the Earth s thermosphere. This result is a consequence of an intrinsic property of charged-particle flux, that flux is not merely a function of E but is dependent upon density rho when a background of neutrals is present.

  14. Dynamics of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) and estimates in coastal northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Shaokui; Smith, Richard G.; Jacovides, Constantinos P.; Kramer, Marc G.; Carruthers, Raymond I.

    2011-08-01

    Plants require solar radiation for photosynthesis and their growth is directly related to the amount received, assuming that other environmental parameters are not limiting. Therefore, precise estimation of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) is necessary to enhance overall accuracies of plant growth models. This study aimed to explore the PAR radiant flux in the San Francisco Bay Area of northern California. During the growing season (March through August) for 2 years 2007-2008, the on-site magnitudes of photosynthetic photon flux densities (PPFD) were investigated and then processed at both the hourly and daily time scales. Combined with global solar radiation ( R S) and simulated extraterrestrial solar radiation, five PAR-related values were developed, i.e., flux density-based PAR (PPFD), energy-based PAR (PARE), from-flux-to-energy conversion efficiency (fFEC), and the fraction of PAR energy in the global solar radiation (fE), and a new developed indicator—lost PARE percentages (LPR)—when solar radiation penetrates from the extraterrestrial system to the ground. These PAR-related values indicated significant diurnal variation, high values occurring at midday, with the low values occurring in the morning and afternoon hours. During the entire experimental season, the overall mean hourly value of fFEC was found to be 2.17 μmol J-1, while the respective fE value was 0.49. The monthly averages of hourly fFEC and fE at the solar noon time ranged from 2.15 in March to 2.39 μmol J-1 in August and from 0.47 in March to 0.52 in July, respectively. However, the monthly average daily values were relatively constant, and they exhibited a weak seasonal variation, ranging from 2.02 mol MJ-1 and 0.45 (March) to 2.19 mol MJ-1 and 0.48 (June). The mean daily values of fFEC and fE at the solar noon were 2.16 mol MJ-1 and 0.47 across the entire growing season, respectively. Both PPFD and the ever first reported LPR showed strong diurnal patterns. However, they had

  15. Long-term flux density variations of pulsars: Theoretical structure functions and comparisons with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, A. Z.; Wu, X. J.; Esamdin, A.

    2003-06-01

    By means of the refractive interstellar scintillation theory (RISS), the flux density structure functions of PSRs B1642-03, B0736-40, B0740-28 and B0329+54 are calculated and compared with the observations at 610 MHz by Stinebring et al. (\\cite{Stinebring00}, hereafter S2000). The theoretical results are in good agreement with observations and the spectra of the electron density fluctuation are all consistent with the Kolmogorov spectra. The theoretical modulation indices m are comparatively less sensitive to the distance H from the observer to the scattering screen but critically depend on the scattering strength line CN2. The structure function does not change remarkably with the variation of H if the scattering screen is closer to the pulsar than to the observer. The results in this paper indicate that the flux density variations observed for these four pulsars are due to a propagation effect (refractive scintillation), not to the intrinsic variability.

  16. Radiation counting technique allows density measurement of metals in high-pressure/ high-temperature environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillion, I. G.; Nelson, P. A.; Swanson, B. S.

    1967-01-01

    Radioactive tracers induced by neutron irradiation provide a gamma ray flux proportional to the density of a metal, allowing density measurement of these metals in extreme high-temperature and high-pressure environments. This concept is applicable to most metals, as well as other substances.

  17. Continuous Measurement Of Mass Density Of Yarn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Marchello, Joseph M.; Johnston, John D.

    1993-01-01

    Prototype instrument provides measurement data from which one computes mass density of strand of yarn. Includes fixtures placing known length of yarn under known tension across fixed and movable support. Transverse vibrations induced in yarn by moving movable support up and down. Source of light illuminates photodetector at midlength of yarn, and photodetector senses repeated shadowing caused by vibration of yarn through light, thereby measuring vibrations. Also used for continuous real-time monitoring of such yarn-manufacturing processes as coating or impregnation.

  18. Flux correction for closed-path laser spectrometers without internal water vapor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, R. V.; Zellweger, C.; Knohl, A.; Eugster, W.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, instruments became available on the market that provide the possibility to perform eddy covariance flux measurements of CH4 and many other trace gases, including the traditional CO2 and H2O. Most of these instruments employ laser spectroscopy, where a cross-sensitivity to H2O is frequently observed leading to an increased dilution effect. Additionally, sorption processes at the intake tube walls modify and delay the observed H2O signal in closed-path systems more strongly than the signal of the sampled trace gas. Thereby, a phase shift between the trace gas and H2O fluctuations is introduced that dampens the H2O flux observed in the sampling cell. For instruments that do not provide direct H2O measurement in the sampling cell, transfer functions from externally measured H2O fluxes are needed to estimate the effect of H2O on trace gas flux measurements. The effects of cross-sensitivity and the damping are shown for an eddy covariance setup with the Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyzer (FGGA, Los Gatos Research Inc.) that measures CO2, CH4, and H2O fluxes. This instrument is technically identical with the Fast Methane Analyzer (FMA, Los Gatos Research Inc.) that does not measure H2O concentrations. Hence, we used measurements from a FGGA to derive a modified correction for the FMA accounting for dilution as well as phase shift effects in our instrumental setup. With our specific setup for eddy covariance flux measurements, the cross-sensitivity counteracts the damping effects, which compensate each other. Hence, the new correction only deviates very slightly from the traditional Webb, Pearman, and Leuning density correction, which is calculated from separate measurements of the atmospheric water vapor flux.

  19. Measurement of Decoherence Time in a Flux Qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrabi, K.; Yoshihara, F.; Nakamura, Y.; Tsai, J. S.

    2006-09-01

    We present a measurement of the relaxation and the dephasing times in a flux qubit. In order to improve coherence of the qubit, two external parameters were optimized: the applied flux through the qubit loop and the bias current of the SQUID which serves as a readout device of the qubit state. At the optimal point the dephasing time measured with spin-echo technique was twice longer than the energy relaxation time. By changing one of the two bias parameters while keeping the other at the optimal value, one can separate the contribution of the noise in each parameter to the decoherence of the qubit.

  20. Calorimeter probes for measuring high thermal flux. [in arc jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, L. D.

    1979-01-01

    Expendable, slug-type calorimeter probes were developed for measuring high heat-flux levels of 10-30 kW/sq cm in electric-arc jet facilities. The probes were constructed with thin tungsten caps mounted on Teflon bodies. The temperature of the back surface of the tungsten cap is measured, and its time rate of change gives the steady-state absorbed heat flux as the calorimeter probe heats to destruction when inserted into the arc jet. Design, construction, test, and performance data are presented.

  1. High heat flux measurements and experimental calibrations/characterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidd, Carl T.

    1992-01-01

    Recent progress in techniques employed in the measurement of very high heat-transfer rates in reentry-type facilities at the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) is described. These advances include thermal analyses applied to transducer concepts used to make these measurements; improved heat-flux sensor fabrication methods, equipment, and procedures for determining the experimental time response of individual sensors; performance of absolute heat-flux calibrations at levels above 2,000 Btu/cu ft-sec (2.27 kW/cu cm); and innovative methods of performing in-situ run-to-run characterizations of heat-flux probes installed in the test facility. Graphical illustrations of the results of extensive thermal analyses of the null-point calorimeter and coaxial surface thermocouple concepts with application to measurements in aerothermal test environments are presented. Results of time response experiments and absolute calibrations of null-point calorimeters and coaxial thermocouples performed in the laboratory at intermediate to high heat-flux levels are shown. Typical AEDC high-enthalpy arc heater heat-flux data recently obtained with a Calspan-fabricated null-point probe model are included.

  2. Measuring diffuse neutrino fluxes with IceCube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Marek

    2005-05-01

    In this paper the sensitivity of a future kilometre-sized neutrino detector to detect and measure the diffuse flux of high energy neutrinos is evaluated. Event rates in established detection channels, such as muon events from charged current νμ interactions or cascade events from νe and ντ interaction, are calculated using a detailed Monte Carlo simulation. Neutrino fluxes as expected from prompt charm decay in the atmosphere or from astrophysical sources such as Active Galactic Nuclei are modelled assuming power laws. The ability to measure the normalization and slope of these spectra is then analysed. It is found that the cascade channel generally has a high sensitivity for the detection and characterization of the diffuse flux, when compared to what is expected for the upgoing- and downgoing-muon channels. A flux at the level of the Waxman Bahcall upper bound should be detectable in all channels separately while a combination of the information of the different channels will allow detection of a flux more than one order of magnitude lower. Neutrinos from the prompt decay of charmed mesons in the atmosphere should be detectable in future measurements for all but the lowest predictions.

  3. Aerosol flux measurements above a mixed forest at Borden, Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, M.; Staebler, R. M.; Liggio, J.; Vlasenko, A.; Li, S.-M.; Hayden, K.

    2010-10-01

    Aerosol fluxes were measured above a mixed forest by Eddy Covariance (EC) with a Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) at the Borden Forest Research Station in Ontario, Canada between 13 July and 12 August 2009. The FMPS, mounted at a height of 33 m (approximately 10 m above the canopy top) and housed in a temperature controlled enclosure, measured size-resolved particle concentrations for 3 to 410 nm at a rate of 1 Hz. For the size range 20fluxes were upward. The exchange velocity is between -0.5 and 2.0 mm s-1, with median values near 0.5 mm s-1 for all sizes between 24 and 280 nm. The net production rate of particles is highest for 75 nm particles and is near 0.4×106 m-2 s-1. Results indicate a decoupling of the above and below canopy spaces, whereby particles are stored in the canopy space at night, and are then diluted with cleaner air above during the day. Chemically speciated flux measurements from a previous study at the same location using a Quadrupole Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Q-AMS) demonstrate a tendency towards downward fluxes, which may be due to an organic particle component which can not be resolved by the flux mode of the Q-AMS.

  4. Measurement of neutrino flux from neutrino-electron elastic scattering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Park, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; et al

    2016-06-10

    In muon-neutrino elastic scattering on electrons is an observable neutrino process whose cross section is precisely known. Consequently a measurement of this process in an accelerator-based νμ beam can improve the knowledge of the absolute neutrino flux impinging upon the detector; typically this knowledge is limited to ~10% due to uncertainties in hadron production and focusing. We also isolated a sample of 135±17 neutrino-electron elastic scattering candidates in the segmented scintillator detector of MINERvA, after subtracting backgrounds and correcting for efficiency. We show how this sample can be used to reduce the total uncertainty on the NuMI νμ flux frommore » 9% to 6%. Finally, our measurement provides a flux constraint that is useful to other experiments using the NuMI beam, and this technique is applicable to future neutrino beams operating at multi-GeV energies.« less

  5. Measurement of neutrino flux from neutrino-electron elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Miner ν A Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Muon-neutrino elastic scattering on electrons is an observable neutrino process whose cross section is precisely known. Consequently a measurement of this process in an accelerator-based νμ beam can improve the knowledge of the absolute neutrino flux impinging upon the detector; typically this knowledge is limited to ˜10 % due to uncertainties in hadron production and focusing. We have isolated a sample of 135 ±17 neutrino-electron elastic scattering candidates in the segmented scintillator detector of MINERvA, after subtracting backgrounds and correcting for efficiency. We show how this sample can be used to reduce the total uncertainty on the NuMI νμ flux from 9% to 6%. Our measurement provides a flux constraint that is useful to other experiments using the NuMI beam, and this technique is applicable to future neutrino beams operating at multi-GeV energies.

  6. Comparison between elementary flux modes analysis and 13C-metabolic fluxes measured in bacterial and plant cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background 13C metabolic flux analysis is one of the pertinent ways to compare two or more physiological states. From a more theoretical standpoint, the structural properties of metabolic networks can be analysed to explore feasible metabolic behaviours and to define the boundaries of steady state flux distributions. Elementary flux mode analysis is one of the most efficient methods for performing this analysis. In this context, recent approaches have tended to compare experimental flux measurements with topological network analysis. Results Metabolic networks describing the main pathways of central carbon metabolism were set up for a bacteria species (Corynebacterium glutamicum) and a plant species (Brassica napus) for which experimental flux maps were available. The structural properties of each network were then studied using the concept of elementary flux modes. To do this, coefficients of flux efficiency were calculated for each reaction within the networks by using selected sets of elementary flux modes. Then the relative differences - reflecting the change of substrate i.e. a sugar source for C. glutamicum and a nitrogen source for B. napus - of both flux efficiency and flux measured experimentally were compared. For both organisms, there is a clear relationship between these parameters, thus indicating that the network structure described by the elementary flux modes had captured a significant part of the metabolic activity in both biological systems. In B. napus, the extension of the elementary flux mode analysis to an enlarged metabolic network still resulted in a clear relationship between the change in the coefficients and that of the measured fluxes. Nevertheless, the limitations of the method to fit some particular fluxes are discussed. Conclusion This consistency between EFM analysis and experimental flux measurements, validated on two metabolic systems allows us to conclude that elementary flux mode analysis could be a useful tool to complement 13C

  7. Measuring Air Density in the Introductory Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzà, G.; Gratton, L. M.; López-Arias, T.; Oss, S.

    2010-03-01

    The measurement of the mass, or the density, of air can easily be done with very simple materials and offers many interesting phenomena for discussion—buoyancy and its effects being the most obvious but not the only one. Many interesting considerations can be done regarding the behavior of gases, the effect of the external conditions in the measurement, and the reason for the choice of the procedure, among others. One of the most widespread approaches makes use of rubber balloons. Such an approach can be misleading if attention is not paid to the effect of the buoyant force on the balloon, exerted by the surrounding air. Air is weightless in an environment full of it. While this fact can usually be neglected in daily, nontechnical weight measurements, it is not the case when we are interested in the weight of air itself. A sketch such as the one depicted in Fig. 1 is often presented in elementary science textbooks, as a demonstration that air has weight. A search of the Internet will reveal that this misleading approach is often presented as the simplest one for this kind of measurement at an elementary level and represents one among other common misconceptions that can be found in K-6 science textbooks as discussed, for instance, in Ref. 2. For a more detailed description of the flaws inherent to the measurement of air's weight with a rubber balloon, see Ref. 3. In this paper we will describe two procedures to measure the density of air: weighing a PET bottle and a vacuum rigid container. There are other interesting ways to estimate the weight of air; see, for instance, the experiment of Zhu and Se-yuen using carbon dioxide and Archimedes' principle.4 We emphasize the experimental implications and the physical reasons for the accuracy and conceptual correctness of each method. It is important not to undervalue the importance of both simplicity and reliability for any experimental measurement made in a didactic context.

  8. Low Permafrost Methane Emissions from Arctic Airborne Flux Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachs, T.; Serafimovich, A.; Metzger, S.; Kohnert, K.; Hartmann, J.

    2014-12-01

    One of the most pressing questions with regard to climate feedback processes in a warming Arctic is the regional-scale greenhouse gas release from Arctic permafrost areas. Ground-based eddy covariance (EC) measurements provide continuous in-situ observations of the surface-atmosphere exchange of energy and matter. However, these observations are rare in the Arctic permafrost zone and site selection is bound by logistical constraints among others. Consequently, these observations cover only small areas that are not necessarily representative of the region of interest. Airborne measurements can overcome this limitation by covering distances of hundreds of kilometers over time periods of a few hours. The Airborne Measurements of Methane Fluxes (AIRMETH) campaigns are designed to quantitatively and spatially explicitly address this question. During the AIRMETH-2012 and AIRMETH-2013 campaigns aboard the research aircraft POLAR 5 we measured turbulent exchange of energy, methane, and (in 2013) carbon dioxide along thousands of kilometers covering the North Slope of Alaska and the Mackenzie Delta, Canada. Time-frequency (wavelet) analysis, footprint modeling, and machine learning techniques are used to (i) determine spatially resolved turbulence statistics, fluxes, and contributions of biophysical surface properties, and (ii) extract regionally valid functional relationships between environmental drivers and the observed fluxes. These environmental response functions (ERF) are used to explain spatial flux patterns and - if drivers are available in temporal resolution - allow for spatio-temporal scaling of the observations. This presentation will focus on 2012 methane fluxes on the North Slope of Alaska and the relevant processes on the regional scale and provide an updated 100 m resolution methane flux map of the North Slope of Alaska.

  9. Eddy correlation measurements of NO, NO{sub 2}, and O{sub 3} fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, W.; Wesely, M.L.; Cook, D.R.; martin, T.J.

    1996-06-01

    The micrometeorological technique of eddy correlation was used to measure the vertical fluxes of NO, NO{sub 2}, and ozone in rural North Carolian during spring 1995 as part of the Natural emission of Oxidant precurssors-Validation of techniques and Assessment (NOVA) field experiment. Net flux densities were measured at heights 5 and 10 m above an agricultural field with short corn plants and large amount of exposed bare soil between the rows. Large upward eddy fluxes of NO{sub 2} were seen, and strong NO emissions from the soil were measured by collaborators using environmental enclosures on the soil surface. Data indicate that about 50% of the nitrogen emitted from the soil as NO was converted into NO{sub 2} at 5 m. Rest of the emitted nitrogen may remain as NO flux and be returned back to the vegetation and soil by deposition. Divergence of the NO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} fluxes were detected between 5 and 10 m. This is consistent with likely net NO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} destruction rates. The data will be used to help develop parameterizations of the flux of nitrogen oxides into the lower troposphere.

  10. Fluxpro As a Realtime Monitoring and Surveillance System for Eddy Covariance Flux Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.

    2014-12-01

    To understand how terrestrial ecosystems respond to global climate change, colleagues have globally measured the energy, water and carbon dioxide flux densities (F) over various vegetations by the eddy covariance (EC) method. However, the process of F calculation and the method of quality control and quality assurance (QCQA) are complex and site specific. Moreover, instantly maintaining remote EC flux measurement sites against instrumentation problems and administrative difficulties is laborious. To overcome these issues, particularly those of realtime F monitoring and prompt site management, FluxPro was created. FluxPro is consisted of three functional systems: 1) gathering system that transports EC measurements from various sites to the FluxPro management server; 2) cooking system that computes F and its frictional uncertainty (ɛ) together with micrometeorological variables (V); and 3) serving system that presents the above two results as charts to be distributed over the internet in realtime. Consequently, FluxPro could become an appropriate system in realtime-multi-site management, since it not only to automatically monitors F with ɛ and V but also continuously surveils EC sites, providing copious information and an email alert system.

  11. Aerosol properties derived from spectral actinic flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, H.; Schmidt, K. S.; Pilewskie, P.; Cozic, J.; Wollny, A. G.; Brock, C. A.; Baynard, T.; Lack, D.; Parrish, D. D.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    2008-12-01

    Measurement of aerosol properties is very important for understanding climate change. Aerosol optical properties influence solar radiation throughout the troposphere. According to the Working Group I report of the intergovernmental panel for climate change [IPCC, 2007], aerosols have a direct radiative forcing of - 0.5±0.4 W/m2 with a medium to low level of scientific understanding. This relatively large uncertainty indicates the need for more frequent and precise measurements of aerosol properties. We will show how actinic flux measurements can be used to derive important optical aerosol parameters such as aerosol optical thickness and depth, surface albedo, angstrom exponent, radiative forcing by clouds and aerosols, aerosol extinction, and others. The instrument used for this study is a combination of two spectroradiometers measuring actinic flux in the ultraviolet and visible radiation range from 280 to 690 nm with a resolution of 1 nm. Actinic flux is measured as the radiation incident on a spherical surface with sensitivity independent of direction. In contrast, irradiance is measured as the radiation incident on a plane surface, which depends on the cosine of the incident angle. Our goal is to assess the capabilities of using spectral actinic flux measurements to derive various aerosol properties. Here we will compare 1) actinic flux measurements to irradiance measurements from the spectral solar flux radiometer (SSFR), 2) derived aerosol size distributions with measurements from a white light optical particle counter (WLOPC) and ultra high sensitivity aerosol size spectrometer (UHSAS), and 3) derived aerosol optical extinction with measurements from a cavity ringdown aerosol extinction spectrometer (CRD-AES). These comparisons will utilize data from three recent field campaigns over New England and the Atlantic Ocean (ICARTT 2004), Texas and the Gulf of Mexico during (TexAQS/GoMACCS 2006), and Alaska and the Arctic Ocean (ARCPAC 2008) when the instruments

  12. IMPROVING EMISSION INVENTORIES USING DIRECT FLUX MEASUREMENTS AND MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project uses a novel approach to measure real-world pollutant fluxes on an extended spatial and temporal scale, and to infer from those the source-specific pollutant emissions needed for a comparison to and an improvement of current emissions inventories. Air pollutants a...

  13. Some Recent Secondary Production Measurements for Neutrino Flux Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Geoffrey B.

    2011-12-01

    Recent measurements of meson production in proton-nucleus interactions have made possible reliable neutrino flux determinations at modern neutrino experiments. This article discusses preliminary results from the HARP, MIP, and E910 are discussed along with some of their implications for the MINOS, K2K, and MiniBooNE neutrino experiments.

  14. Evapotranspiration: Mass balance measurements compared with flux estimation methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evapotranspiration (ET) may be measured by mass balance methods and estimated by flux sensing methods. The mass balance methods are typically restricted in terms of the area that can be represented (e.g., surface area of weighing lysimeter (LYS) or equivalent representative area of neutron probe (NP...

  15. Excessive magnetic field flux density distribution from overhead isolated powerline conductors due to neutral line current.

    PubMed

    Netzer, Moshe

    2013-06-01

    Overhead isolated powerline conductors (hereinafter: "OIPLC") are the most compact form for distributing low voltage currents. From the known physics of magnetic field emission from 3-phase power lines, it is expected that excellent symmetry of the 120° shifted phase currents and where compact configuration of the 3-phase+neutral line exist, the phase current vectorial summation of the magnetic field flux density (MFFD) is expected to be extremely low. However, despite this estimation, an unexpectedly very high MFFD was found in at least three towns in Israel. This paper explains the reasons leading to high MFFD emissions from compact OIPLC and the proper technique to fix it. Analysis and measurement results had led to the failure hypothsis of neutral line poor connection design and poor grounding design of the HV-LV utility transformers. The paper elaborates on the low MFFD exposure level setup by the Israeli Environmental Protection Office which adopted a rather conservative precaution principal exposure level (2 mG averaged over 24 h). PMID:23675630

  16. Leaf photosynthetic and solar-tracking responses of mallow, Malva parviflora, to photon flux density.

    PubMed

    Greer, Dennis H; Thorpe, Michael R

    2009-10-01

    Malva parviflora L. (mallow) is a species that occupies high-light habitats as a weedy invader in orchards and vineyards. Species of the Malvaceae are known to solar track and anecdotal evidence suggests this species may also. How M. parviflora responds physiologically to light in comparison with other species within the Malvaceae remains unknown. Tracking and photosynthetic responses to photon flux density (PFD) were evaluated on plants grown in greenhouse conditions. Tracking ability was assessed in the growth conditions and by exposing leaves to specific light intensities and measuring changes in the angle of the leaf plane. Light responses were also determined by photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence. Leaves followed a heliotropic response which was highly PFD-dependent, with tracking rates increasing in a curvilinear pattern. Maximum tracking rates were up to 20 degrees h(-1) and saturated for light above 1,300 micromol (photons) m(-2) s(-1). This high-light saturation, both for tracking (much higher than the other species), and for photosynthesis, confirmed mallow as a high-light demanding species. Further, because there was no photoinhibition, the leaves could capture the potential of an increased carbon gain in higher irradiance by resorting to solar tracking. Modelling suggested the tracking response could increase the annual carbon gain by as much as 25% compared with leaves that do not track the sun. The various leaf attributes associated with solar tracking, therefore, help to account for the success of this species as a weed in many locations worldwide. PMID:19576789

  17. Analysis of the relationship between photosynthetic photon flux density and natural Taxus baccata seedlings occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iszkuło, Grzegorz; Boratyński, Adam

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to analyse the relationship of seedlings and saplings of Taxus baccata to the photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) reaching the forest floor under natural conditions. Two permanent plots, subdivided into 1 × 1 m square plots, were established in a naturally regenerating population of T. baccata formed during last decades in the Kórnik Arboretum, Poland. All seedlings in every 1 × 1 m plots were counted. Relative PPFD was measured for every plot at the canopy height of the yew seedlings. The dependence of seedling density upon PPFD was examined. We found, that the frequency of the smallest seedlings (to 6.0 cm tall) was highest in the most shaded plots and decreased in plots with increasing PPFD. Thus, the youngest yew seedlings can germinate and grow in very shady conditions. However, the older seedlings (6.1-25.0 and 25.1-100.0 classes) were observed most frequently in 2-7% PPFD. The small numbers of older, taller seedlings in deep shade likely indicate a higher mortality rate of seedlings less than 6 cm in height without promotion to the next height class. Probably the low value of PPFD under the canopy of the stand significantly reduces the competition of other plants with the youngest yew seedlings. At higher light levels they may not be able to compete with more light-demanding plants, such as herbs and seedlings of broad-leaved trees. The seedlings of the second (6.1-25.0 cm) and third (25.1-100.0 cm) height classes were observed most frequently in the plots with 2-7% PPFD ( Fig. 1b and c).

  18. The 3D heat flux density distribution on a novel parabolic trough wavy absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demagh, Yassine; Kabar, Yassine; Bordja, Lyes; Noui, Samira

    2016-05-01

    The non-uniform concentrated solar flux distribution on the outer surface of the absorber pipe can lead to large circumferential gradient temperature and high concentrated temperature of the absorber pipe wall, which is one of the primary causes of parabolic trough solar receiver breakdown. In this study, a novel shape of the parabolic trough absorber pipe is proposed as a solution to well homogenize the solar flux distribution, as well as, the temperature in the absorber wall. The conventional straight absorber located along the focal line of the parabola is replaced by wavy one (invention patent by Y. Demagh [1]) for which the heat flux density distribution on the outer surface varies in both axial and azimuthal directions (3D) while it varies only in the azimuthal direction on the former (2D). As far as we know, there is not previous study which has used a longitudinally wavy pipe as an absorber into the parabolic trough collector unit.

  19. A new low-power, open-path instrument for measuring methane flux by eddy covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermitt, D.; Burba, G.; Xu, L.; Anderson, T.; Komissarov, A.; Riensche, B.; Schedlbauer, J.; Starr, G.; Zona, D.; Oechel, W.; Oberbauer, S.; Hastings, S.

    2011-02-01

    This paper describes a new low-power instrument for measuring methane flux by eddy covariance method at sites without grid power. Design and field performance of the LI-7700 Methane Analyzer (LI-COR Biosciences) are examined in this study. The instrument uses 8 W of power in steady-state operation and employs a tunable diode laser in an open Herriott cell configuration with 0.47 m base path and 30 m optical path length. Methane number density is measured using wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) with 2f detection. Typical signal noise is <5 ppb rms at 10 Hz. Corrections for variations in temperature, pressure and water vapor are described. Data losses due to mirror contamination and condensation are minimized by a radiation shield and automatic mirror cleaning system and are shown to be small. Measured spectra and co-spectra are shown to follow the Kaimal model at deployment sites meeting classical criteria, and to follow sensible heat flux co-spectra from the sonic anemometer in most other cases, including difficult ones. Measured fluxes are similar in magnitude to those expected from the literature, and zero flux was measured during both summer and winter at a site known to have fluxes at or very near zero.

  20. CO2, CH4 and particles flux measurements in Florence, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioli, Beniamino; Toscano, Piero; Zaldei, Alessandro; Fratini, Gerardo; Miglietta, Franco

    2013-04-01

    We report a synthesis of seven years of eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements in the city of Florence, Italy. The measurement site is located in a densely urbanized area in the central city area, where fluxes are governed by anthropogenic emissions, considering the lack of green-space in the flux footprint. EC flux measurements of CO2 are made long-term since seven years, while short-term campaigns have been aimed at measuring CH4 and particles fluxes. CO2 and CH4 densities are measured with fast open-path sensors, while particles in the range 0.32 - 7.00 µm optical diameter are measured with a custom-built optical counter. CO2 long-term fluxes are always a net source, with a small inter-annual variability associated with a high seasonality, ranging from 39 to 172% of the mean annual value in summer and winter respectively. CH4 fluxes to the atmosphere are relevant, representing about 8% of CO2-equivalent emissions, and do not exhibit any significant seasonality. Relative contributions of road traffic and domestic heating to observed emissions has been estimated through multi-variate analysis combined with inventorial data and emission proxies such as traffic counters and gas network flow rates, revealing that domestic heating accounts for more than 80% of observed CO2 fluxes. Heating and road traffic are instead responsible for only 14% of observed CH4 fluxes, while the major residual part is likely dominated by gas network leakages. Particles flux data show a smaller seasonal trend and a pronounced weekend decrease, highlighting that the contribution of heating to particle emissions is relatively small compared to road traffic. Dynamics at hourly time scales during week and week-end days allows the analysis of the coupled role of emission strength and atmospheric processes such as advection and entrainment in regulating atmospheric concentrations. This set of observations highlights the potential of urban EC flux measurements as a validation tool for

  1. Infrared Camera Diagnostic for Heat Flux Measurements on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    D. Mastrovito; R. Maingi; H.W. Kugel; A.L. Roquemore

    2003-03-25

    An infrared imaging system has been installed on NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to measure the surface temperatures on the lower divertor and center stack. The imaging system is based on an Indigo Alpha 160 x 128 microbolometer camera with 12 bits/pixel operating in the 7-13 {micro}m range with a 30 Hz frame rate and a dynamic temperature range of 0-700 degrees C. From these data and knowledge of graphite thermal properties, the heat flux is derived with a classic one-dimensional conduction model. Preliminary results of heat flux scaling are reported.

  2. Simplified Solar Modulation Model of Inner Trapped Belt Proton Flux As a Function of Atmospheric Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Lodhi, M. A. K.; Diaz, Abel B.

    2005-01-01

    No simple algorithm seems to exist for calculating proton fluxes and lifetimes in the Earth's inner, trapped radiation belt throughout the solar cycle. Most models of the inner trapped belt in use depend upon AP8 which only describes the radiation environment at solar maximum and solar minimum in Cycle 20. One exception is NOAAPRO which incorporates flight data from the TIROS/NOAA polar orbiting spacecraft. The present study discloses yet another, simple formulation for approximating proton fluxes at any time in a given solar cycle, in particular between solar maximum and solar minimum. It is derived from AP8 using a regression algorithm technique from nuclear physics. From flux and its time integral fluence, one can then approximate dose rate and its time integral dose. It has already been published in this journal that the absorbed dose rate, D, in the trapped belts exhibits a power law relationship, D = A(rho)(sup -n), where A is a constant, rho is the atmospheric density, and the index n is weakly dependent upon shielding. However, that method does not work for flux and fluence. Instead, we extend this idea by showing that the power law approximation for flux J is actually bivariant in energy E as well as density rho. The resulting relation is J(E,rho)approx.(sum of)A(E(sup n))rho(sup -n), with A itself a power law in E. This provides another method for calculating approximate proton flux and lifetime at any time in the solar cycle. These in turn can be used to predict the associated dose and dose rate.

  3. Measuring Entanglement Spectrum via Density Matrix Exponentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guanyu; Seif, Alireza; Pichler, Hannes; Zoller, Peter; Hafezi, Mohammad

    Entanglement spectrum (ES), the eigenvalues of the reduced density matrix of a subsystem, serves as a powerful theoretical tool to study many-body systems. For example, the gap and degeneracies of the entanglement spectrum have been used to identify various topological phases. However, the usefulness of such a concept in real experiments has been debated, since it is believed that obtaining the ES requires full state tomography, at a cost which exponentially grows with the systems size. Inspired by a recent density matrix exponentiation technique, we propose a scheme to measure ES by evolving the system with a Hamiltonian that is the subsystem's own reduced density matrix. Such a time evolution can be induced by an ancilla photon that is coupled to multiple qubits at the same time. The phase associated with the time evolution can be detected and converted into ES through either a digital or an analogue scheme. The digital scheme involves a modified quantum phase estimation algorithm based on random time evolution, while the analogue scheme is in the spirit of Ramsey interferometry. Both schemes are not limited by the size of the system, and are especially sensitive to the gap and degeneracies. We also discuss the implementation in cavity/circuit-QED and ion trap systems.

  4. Ultra High Precision Laser Monitor for Oxygen Eddy Flux Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, David; Herndon, Scott; McManus, Barry; Roscioli, Rob; Jervis, Dylan; Zahniser, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric oxygen provides one of the most powerful tracers to study the carbon cycle through its close interaction with carbon dioxide. Keeling and co-workers demonstrated this at the global scale by using small variations in atmospheric oxygen content to disentangle oceanic and terrestrial carbon sinks. It would be very exciting to apply similar ideas at the ecosystem level to improve our understanding of biosphere-atmosphere exchange and our ability to predict the response of the biosphere and atmosphere to climate change. The eddy covariance technique is perhaps the most effective approach available to quantify the exchange of gases between these spheres. Therefore, eddy covariance flux measurements of oxygen would be extremely valuable. However, this requires a fast response (0.1 seconds), high relative precision (0.001% or 10 per meg) oxygen sensor. We report recent progress in developing such a sensor using a high resolution visible laser to probe the oxygen A-band electronic transition. We have demonstrated precision of 1 ppmv or 5 per meg for a 100 second measurement duration. This sensor will enable oxygen flux measurements using eddy covariance. In addition, we will incorporate a second laser in this instrument to simultaneously determine the fluxes of oxygen, carbon dioxide and water vapor within the same sampling cell. This will provide a direct, real time measurement of the ratio of the flux of oxygen to that of carbon dioxide. This ratio is expected to vary on short time scales and small spatial scales due to the differing stoichiometry of processes producing and consuming carbon dioxide. Thus measuring the variations in the ratio of oxygen and carbon dioxide fluxes will provide mechanistic information to improve our understanding of the crucial exchange of carbon between the atmosphere and biosphere.

  5. Rapid measurement of charged particle beam profiles using a current flux grating

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Samit; Chowdhury, Abhishek; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2015-02-15

    The principle and physics issues of charged particle beam diagnostics using a current flux grating are presented. Unidirectional array of conducting channels with interstitial insulating layers of spacing d is placed in the beam path to capture flux of charge and electronically reproduce an exact beam current profile with density variation. The role of secondary electrons due to the impinging particle beam (both electron and ion) on the probe is addressed and a correction factor is introduced. A 2-dimensional profile of the electron beam is obtained by rotating the probe about the beam axis. Finally, a comparison of measured beam profile with a Gaussian is presented.

  6. Automatic magnetic flux measurement of micro plastic-magnetic rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingdong; Lin, Mingxing; Song, Aiwei

    2015-07-01

    Micro plastic-magnetic rotors of various sizes and shapes are widely used in industry, their magnetic flux measurement is one of the most important links in the production process, and therefore some technologies should be adopted to improve the measurement precision and efficiency. In this paper, the automatic measurement principle of micro plastic-magnetic rotors is proposed and the integration time constant and the integrator drift’s suppression and compensation in the measurement circuit are analyzed. Two other factors influencing the measurement precision are also analyzed, including the relative angles between the rotor magnetic poles and the measurement coil, and the starting point of the rotors in the coil where the measurement begins. An instrument is designed to measure the magnetic flux of the rotors. Measurement results show that the measurement error is within  ±1%, which meets the basic requirements in industry application, and the measurement efficiency is increased by 10 times, which can cut down labor cost and management cost when compared with manual measurement.

  7. CO2-flux measurements above the Baltic Sea at two heights: flux gradients in the surface layer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammert, A.; Ament, F.

    2015-11-01

    The estimation of CO2 exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere is essential to understand the global carbon cycle. The eddy-covariance technique offers a very direct approach to observe these fluxes. The turbulent CO2 flux is measured, as well as the sensible and latent heat flux and the momentum flux, a few meters above the ocean in the atmosphere. Assuming a constant-flux layer in the near-surface part of the atmospheric boundary layer, this flux equals the exchange flux between ocean and atmosphere. The purpose of this paper is the comparison of long-term flux measurements at two different heights above the Baltic Sea to investigate this assumption. The results are based on a 1.5-year record of quality-controlled eddy-covariance measurements. Concerning the flux of momentum and of sensible and latent heat, the constant-flux layer theory can be confirmed because flux differences between the two heights are insignificantly small more than 95 % of the time. In contrast, significant differences, which are larger than the measurement error, occur in the CO2 flux about 35 % of the time. Data used for this paper are published at http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.808714.

  8. Measuring Response Of Propellant To Oscillatory Heat Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strand, Leon D.; Schwartz, Ken; Burns, Shawn P.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for research in combustion of solid propellants measures oscillatory response of rate of burning to oscillating thermal radiation from modulated CO2 laser. Determines response to rate of burning to equivalent oscillation in pressure. Rod of propellant mounted in burner assembly including waveguide at one end and infrared window at other end. Microwave Doppler velocimeter measures motion of combustion front. Microwave, laser-current, and heat-flux signals processed into and recorded in forms useful in determining desired response of propellent.

  9. Thermal Accommodation Coefficients Based on Heat-Flux Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallis, Michael A.; Trott, Wayne M.; Torczynski, John R.; Rader, Daniel J.

    2006-11-01

    A new method to determine the thermal accommodation coefficient of gases on solid surfaces based on heat-flux measurements is presented. An experimental chamber and supporting diagnostics have been developed that allow accurate heat-flux measurements between two parallel plates. The heat flux is inferred from temperature-difference measurements across the plates using precision thermistors, where the plate temperatures are set with two carefully controlled thermal baths. The resulting heat flux is used in a recently derived semi-empirical formula to determine the thermal accommodation coefficient. This formula has the advantage of eliminating the ˜8% discrepancy between molecular simulations and the predictions of the more approximate Sherman-Lees formula used in most studies. Nitrogen, argon, and helium on stainless steel with various finishes and on other silicon-based surfaces are examined. The thermal accommodation coefficients thus determined indicate that the Maxwell gas-surface interaction model can adequately represent all of the experimental observations. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. High-Fidelity Measurements of Long-Lived Flux Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hover, David; Macklin, Chris; O'Brien, Kevin; Sears, Adam; Yoder, Jonilyn; Gudmundsen, Ted; Kerman, Jamie; Bolkhovsky, Vladimir; Tolpygo, Sergey; Fitch, George; Weir, Terry; Kamal, Archana; Gustavsson, Simon; Yan, Fei; Birenbaum, Jeff; Siddiqi, Irfan; Orlando, Terry; Clarke, John; Oliver, Will

    2015-03-01

    We report on high-fidelity dispersive measurements of a long-lived flux qubit using a Josephson superconducting traveling wave parametric amplifier (JTWPA). A capacitively shunted flux qubit that incorporates high-Q MBE aluminum will have longer relaxation and dephasing times when compared to a conventional flux qubit, while also maintaining the large anharmonicity necessary for complex gate operations. The JTWPA relies on a Josephson junction embedded transmission line to deliver broadband, nonreciprocal gain with large dynamic range. This research was funded in part by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA); and by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research & Engineering under Air Force Contract number FA8721-05-C-0002. All statements of fact, opinion or conclusions contained herein are those of the authors and should not be construed as representing the official views or policies of

  11. Symmetry measures of the electron density.

    PubMed

    Casanova, David; Alemany, Pere; Alvarez, Santiago

    2010-10-01

    In this communication we define electronic symmetry operation and symmetry group measures, eSOM and eSGM, respectively, develop the basic algorithms to obtain them, and give some examples of the possible applications of these new computational tools. These new symmetry measures based on the electron density have been tested in an analysis of (a) the inversion symmetry for heteronuclear diatomic molecules, for the eclipsed and staggered conformations of ethane and tetrafluoroethane, and for a series of octahedral sulfur halides; (b) the reflection symmetry of three different conformers of tetrafluoroethene; and (c) the loss of C(6) symmetry along the B(2u) distortion mode of benzene and an analysis of rotational symmetry for different six-member ring heterocycles. PMID:20652983

  12. Reducing measurement scale mismatch to improve surface energy flux estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwema, Joost; Rosolem, Rafael; Rahman, Mostaquimur; Blyth, Eleanor; Wagener, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture importantly controls land surface processes such as energy and water partitioning. A good understanding of these controls is needed especially when recognizing the challenges in providing accurate hyper-resolution hydrometeorological simulations at sub-kilometre scales. Soil moisture controlling factors can, however, differ at distinct scales. In addition, some parameters in land surface models are still often prescribed based on observations obtained at another scale not necessarily employed by such models (e.g., soil properties obtained from lab samples used in regional simulations). To minimize such effects, parameters can be constrained with local data from Eddy-Covariance (EC) towers (i.e., latent and sensible heat fluxes) and Point Scale (PS) soil moisture observations (e.g., TDR). However, measurement scales represented by EC and PS still differ substantially. Here we use the fact that Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensors (CRNS) estimate soil moisture at horizontal footprint similar to that of EC fluxes to help answer the following question: Does reduced observation scale mismatch yield better soil moisture - surface fluxes representation in land surface models? To answer this question we analysed soil moisture and surface fluxes measurements from twelve COSMOS-Ameriflux sites in the USA characterized by distinct climate, soils and vegetation types. We calibrated model parameters of the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) against PS and CRNS soil moisture data, respectively. We analysed the improvement in soil moisture estimation compared to uncalibrated model simulations and then evaluated the degree of improvement in surface fluxes before and after calibration experiments. Preliminary results suggest that a more accurate representation of soil moisture dynamics is achieved when calibrating against observed soil moisture and further improvement obtained with CRNS relative to PS. However, our results also suggest that a more accurate

  13. Flux threshold measurements of He-ion beam induced nanofuzz formation on hot tungsten surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, F. W.; Hijazi, H.; Bannister, M. E.; Unocic, K. A.; Garrison, L. M.; Parish, C. M.

    2016-02-01

    We report measurements of the energy dependence of flux thresholds and incubation fluences for He-ion induced nano-fuzz formation on hot tungsten surfaces at UHV conditions over a wide energy range using real-time sample imaging of tungsten target emissivity change to monitor the spatial extent of nano-fuzz growth, corroborated by ex situ SEM and FIB/SEM analysis, in conjunction with accurate ion-flux profile measurements. The measurements were carried out at the multicharged ion research facility (MIRF) at energies from 218 eV to 8.5 keV, using a high-flux deceleration module and beam flux monitor for optimizing the decel optics on the low energy MIRF beamline. The measurements suggest that nano-fuzz formation proceeds only if a critical rate of change of trapped He density in the W target is exceeded. To understand the energy dependence of the observed flux thresholds, the energy dependence of three contributing factors: ion reflection, ion range and target damage creation, were determined using the SRIM simulation code. The observed energy dependence can be well reproduced by the combined energy dependences of these three factors. The incubation fluences deduced from first visual appearance of surface emissivity change were (2-4) × 1023 m-2 at 218 eV, and roughly a factor of 10 less at the higher energies, which were all at or above the displacement energy threshold. The role of trapping at C impurity sites is discussed.

  14. Comparison of Uniform and Non-uniform Water Flux Density Approaches Applied on a Mathematical Model of Heat Transfer and Solidification for a Continuous Casting of Round Billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assuncao, Charles Sostenes; Tavares, Roberto Parreiras; Oliveira, Guilherme; Pereira, Luiz Carlos

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, the water flux densities of nozzles with flat jet and full cone jet were experimentally measured using an apparatus in industrial scale that reproduces the secondary cooling of the continuous casting of round billets of Vallourec Tubos do Brasil. A mathematical function was defined to express the water flux density in both longitudinal and angular directions of the strand. A mathematical model for heat transfer and solidification for the continuous casting of round billets was developed applying the experimental water flux density profile, establishing a non-uniform water distribution approach. The mathematical model was validated by experimental measurements of the billet superficial temperature, performed at the industrial plant. The results of the mathematical model using both uniform and non-uniform water flux density approaches were compared. The non-uniform water distribution approach enabled to identify important variations of the heat transfer coefficients and the billet temperatures, especially in the first cooling zones where the steel temperature is higher, and to assess more accurately the local effects of the water distribution on the thermal behavior of the strand. The non-uniform water flux density approach applied to the mathematical model was a useful and more accurate tool to improve the comprehension of the thermal behavior of the steel along the secondary cooling.

  15. A mobile detector for measurements of the atmospheric muon flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrica, B.; Brancus, I. M.; Margineanu, R.; Petcu, M.; Dima, M.; Sima, O.; Haungs, A.; Rebel, H.; Petre, M.; Toma, G.; Saftoiu, A.; Apostu, A.

    2011-04-01

    Measurements of the underground atmospheric muon flux are important in order to determine accurately the overburden in mwe (meter water equivalent) of an underground laboratory for appreciating which kind of experiments are feasible for that location. Slanic- Prohava is one of the 7 possible locations for the European large underground experiment LAGUNA (Large Apparatus studying Grand Unification and Neutrino Astrophysics). A mobile device consisting of 2 scintillator plates (≍0.9 m2, each) one above the other and measuring in coincidence, was set-up for determining the muon flux. The detector it is installed on a van which facilitates measurements on different positions at the surface or in the underground and it is in operation since autumn 2009. The measurements of muon fluxes presented in this contribution have been performed in the underground salt mine Slanic-Prahova, Romania, where IFIN-HH has built a low radiation level laboratory, and at the surface on different sites of Romania, at different elevations from 0 m a.s.l up to 655 m a.s.l. Based on our measurements we can say that Slanic site is a feasible location for LAGUNA in Unirea salt mine at a water equivalent depth of 600 mwe. The results have been compared with Monte-Carlo simulations performed with the simulation codes CORSIKA and MUSIC.

  16. Luminous-flux measurements by an absolute integrating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastello, Maria Luisa; Miraldi, Elio; Pisoni, Paolo

    1996-08-01

    We present an original implementation of the absolute-sphere method recently proposed by Ohno. The luminous-flux unit, the lumen, is realized by means of an integrating sphere with an opening calibrated by a luminous-intensity standard placed outside. The adapted experimental setup permits one to measure luminous-flux values between 5 and 2500 lm with a significant improvement with respect to the simulated performances reported in the literature. Traditionally, the luminous-flux unit, the lumen, is realized by goniophotometric techniques in which the luminous-intensity distribution is measured and integrated over the whole solid angle. Thus sphere results are compared with those obtained with the Istituto Elettrotecnico Nazionale goniophotometer. In particular, a set of standards, characterized by luminous-flux values of approximately 2000 lm, has been calibrated with both techniques. We highlight some of the problems encountered. Experimental results show that the agreement between the two methods is within the estimated uncertainty and suggest promising areas for future research.

  17. Time and Space Resolved Heat Flux Measurements During Nucleate Boiling with Constant Heat Flux Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yerramilli, Vamsee K.; Myers, Jerry G.; Hussey, Sam W.; Yee, Glenda F.; Kim, Jungho

    2005-01-01

    The lack of temporally and spatially resolved measurements under nucleate bubbles has complicated efforts to fully explain pool-boiling phenomena. The objective of this current work was to acquire time and space resolved temperature distributions under nucleating bubbles on a constant heat flux surface using a microheater array with 100x 100 square microns resolution, then numerically determine the wall to liquid heat flux. This data was then correlated with high speed (greater than l000Hz) visual recordings of The bubble growth and departure from the heater surface acquired from below and from the side of the heater. The data indicate that microlayer evaporation and contact line heat transfer are not major heat transfer mechanisms for bubble growth. The dominant heat transfer mechanism appears to be transient conduction into the liquid as the liquid rewets the wall during the bubble departure process.

  18. Supersonic Mass Flux Measurements via Tunable Diode Laser Absorption and Non-Uniform Flow Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Leyen S.; Strand, Christopher L.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Gaffney, Richard L.; Capriotti, Diego P.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of mass flux are obtained in a vitiated supersonic ground test facility using a sensor based on line-of-sight (LOS) diode laser absorption of water vapor. Mass flux is determined from the product of measured velocity and density. The relative Doppler shift of an absorption transition for beams directed upstream and downstream in the flow is used to measure velocity. Temperature is determined from the ratio of absorption signals of two transitions (lambda(sub 1)=1349 nm and lambda(sub 2)=1341.5 nm) and is coupled with a facility pressure measurement to obtain density. The sensor exploits wavelength-modulation spectroscopy with second-harmonic detection (WMS-2f) for large signal-to-noise ratios and normalization with the 1f signal for rejection of non-absorption related transmission fluctuations. The sensor line-of-sight is translated both vertically and horizontally across the test section for spatially-resolved measurements. Time-resolved measurements of mass flux are used to assess the stability of flow conditions produced by the facility. Measurements of mass flux are within 1.5% of the value obtained using a facility predictive code. The distortion of the WMS lineshape caused by boundary layers along the laser line-of-sight is examined and the subsequent effect on the measured velocity is discussed. A method for correcting measured velocities for flow non-uniformities is introduced and application of this correction brings measured velocities within 4 m/s of the predicted value in a 1630 m/s flow.

  19. Measurement of a surface heat flux and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. M.; Antoine, G. J.; Diller, T. E.; Wicks, A. L.

    1994-04-01

    The Heat Flux Microsensor is a new sensor which was recently patented by Virginia Tech and is just starting to be marketed by Vatell Corp. The sensor is made using the thin-film microfabrication techniques directly on the material that is to be measured. It consists of several thin-film layers forming a differential thermopile across a thermal resistance layer. The measured heat flux q is proportional to the temperature difference across the resistance layer q= k(sub g)/delta(sub g) x (t(sub 1) - T(sub 2)), where k(sub g) is the thermal conductivity and delta (sub g) is the thickness of the thermal resistance layer. Because the gages are sputter coated directly onto the surface, their total thickness is less than 2 micrometers, which is two orders of magnitude thinner than previous gages. The resulting temperature difference across the thermal resistance layer (delta is less than 1 micrometer) is very small even at high heat fluxes. To generate a measurable signal many thermocouple pairs are put in series to form a differential thermopile. The combination of series thermocouple junctions and thin-film design creates a gage with very attractive characteristics. It is not only physically non-intrusive to the flow, but also causes minimal disruption of the surface temperature. Because it is so thin, the response time is less than 20 microsec. Consequently, the frequency response is flat from 0 to over 50 kHz. Moreover, the signal of the Heat Flux Microsensor is directly proportional to the heat flux. Therefore, it can easily be used in both steady and transient flows, and it measures both the steady and unsteady components of the surface heat flux. A version of the Heat Flux Microsensor has been developed to meet the harsh demands of combustion environments. These gages use platinum and platinum-10 percent rhodium as the thermoelectric materials. The thermal resistance layer is silicon monoxide and a protective coating of Al2O3 is deposited on top of the sensor. The

  20. Measurement of a surface heat flux and temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. M.; Antoine, G. J.; Diller, T. E.; Wicks, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Heat Flux Microsensor is a new sensor which was recently patented by Virginia Tech and is just starting to be marketed by Vatell Corp. The sensor is made using the thin-film microfabrication techniques directly on the material that is to be measured. It consists of several thin-film layers forming a differential thermopile across a thermal resistance layer. The measured heat flux q is proportional to the temperature difference across the resistance layer q= k(sub g)/delta(sub g) x (t(sub 1) - T(sub 2)), where k(sub g) is the thermal conductivity and delta (sub g) is the thickness of the thermal resistance layer. Because the gages are sputter coated directly onto the surface, their total thickness is less than 2 micrometers, which is two orders of magnitude thinner than previous gages. The resulting temperature difference across the thermal resistance layer (delta is less than 1 micrometer) is very small even at high heat fluxes. To generate a measurable signal many thermocouple pairs are put in series to form a differential thermopile. The combination of series thermocouple junctions and thin-film design creates a gage with very attractive characteristics. It is not only physically non-intrusive to the flow, but also causes minimal disruption of the surface temperature. Because it is so thin, the response time is less than 20 microsec. Consequently, the frequency response is flat from 0 to over 50 kHz. Moreover, the signal of the Heat Flux Microsensor is directly proportional to the heat flux. Therefore, it can easily be used in both steady and transient flows, and it measures both the steady and unsteady components of the surface heat flux. A version of the Heat Flux Microsensor has been developed to meet the harsh demands of combustion environments. These gages use platinum and platinum-10 percent rhodium as the thermoelectric materials. The thermal resistance layer is silicon monoxide and a protective coating of Al2O3 is deposited on top of the sensor. The

  1. Novel Sensor for the In Situ Measurement of Uranium Fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Hatfield, Kirk

    2015-02-10

    The goal of this project was to develop a sensor that incorporates the field-tested concepts of the passive flux meter to provide direct in situ measures of flux for uranium and groundwater in porous media. Measurable contaminant fluxes [J] are essentially the product of concentration [C] and groundwater flux or specific discharge [q ]. The sensor measures [J] and [q] by changes in contaminant and tracer amounts respectively on a sorbent. By using measurement rather than inference from static parameters, the sensor can directly advance conceptual and computational models for field scale simulations. The sensor was deployed in conjunction with DOE in obtaining field-scale quantification of subsurface processes affecting uranium transport (e.g., advection) and transformation (e.g., uranium attenuation) at the Rifle IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado. Project results have expanded our current understanding of how field-scale spatial variations in fluxes of uranium, groundwater and salient electron donor/acceptors are coupled to spatial variations in measured microbial biomass/community composition, effective field-scale uranium mass balances, attenuation, and stability. The coupling between uranium, various nutrients and micro flora can be used to estimate field-scale rates of uranium attenuation and field-scale transitions in microbial communities. This research focuses on uranium (VI), but the sensor principles and design are applicable to field-scale fate and transport of other radionuclides. Laboratory studies focused on sorbent selection and calibration, along with sensor development and validation under controlled conditions. Field studies were conducted at the Rifle IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado. These studies were closely coordinated with existing SBR (formerly ERSP) projects to complement data collection. Small field tests were conducted during the first two years that focused on evaluating field-scale deployment procedures and validating sensor performance under

  2. Electron density measurements for plasma adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiswander, Brian W.

    Over the past 40 years, there has been growing interest in both laser communications and directed energy weapons that operate from moving aircraft. As a laser beam propagates from an aircraft in flight, it passes through boundary layers, turbulence, and shear layers in the near-region of the aircraft. These fluid instabilities cause strong density gradients which adversely affect the transmission of laser energy to a target. Adaptive optics provides corrective measures for this problem but current technology cannot respond quickly enough to be useful for high speed flight conditions. This research investigated the use of plasma as a medium for adaptive optics for aero-optics applications. When a laser beam passes through plasma, its phase is shifted proportionally to the electron density and gas heating within the plasma. As a result, plasma can be utilized as a dynamically controllable optical medium. Experiments were carried out using a cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma chamber which generated a sub-atmospheric pressure, low-temperature plasma. An electrostatic model of this design was developed and revealed an important design constraint relating to the geometry of the chamber. Optical diagnostic techniques were used to characterize the plasma discharge. Single-wavelength interferometric experiments were performed and demonstrated up to 1.5 microns of optical path difference (OPD) in a 633 nm laser beam. Dual-wavelength interferometry was used to obtain time-resolved profiles of the plasma electron density and gas heating inside the plasma chamber. Furthermore, a new multi-wavelength infrared diagnostic technique was developed and proof-of-concept simulations were conducted to demonstrate the system's capabilities.

  3. High radio fluxes of PKS2023-07 measured with RATAN-600

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushkin, S. A.; Nizhelskij, N. A.; Tsybulev, P. G.

    2016-04-01

    After the AGILE detection the gamma-ray flare from the quasar PSK2023-07 (correctly PKS B2022-077) by Piano et al, ATel #8879 we carried out its observations with the RATAN-600 radio telescope SAO RAS. The measured flux densities are equal to 1.50, 1.96, 2.54 Jy at 4.8, 11.2, 21.7 GHz respectively on 1 Apr 2016.

  4. Automation of soil flux chamber measurements: potentials and pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görres, Carolyn-Monika; Kammann, Claudia; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2016-03-01

    Recent technological advances have enabled the wider application of automated chambers for soil greenhouse gas (GHG) flux measurements, several of them commercially available. However, few studies addressed the challenges associated with operating these systems. In this contribution we compared two commercial soil GHG chamber systems - the LI-8100A Automated Soil CO2 Flux System and the greenhouse gas monitoring system AGPS. From April until August 2014, the two systems monitored in parallel soil respiration (SR) fluxes at a recently harvested poplar (Populus) plantation, which provided a bare field situation directly after the harvest as well as a closed canopy later on. For the bare field situation (15 April-30 June 2014), the cumulated average SR obtained from the unfiltered data sets of the LI-8100A and the AGPS were 520 and 433 g CO2 m-2 respectively. For the closed canopy phase (1 July-31 August 2014), which was characterized by a higher soil moisture content, the cumulated average SR estimates were not significantly different with 507 and 501 g CO2 m-2 for the AGPS and the LI-8100A respectively. Flux quality control and filtering did not significantly alter the results obtained by the LI-8100A, whereas the AGPS SR estimates were reduced by at least 20 %. The main reasons for the observed differences in the performance of the two systems were (i) a lower data coverage provided by the AGPS due to technical problems; (ii) incomplete headspace mixing in the AGPS chambers; (iii) lateral soil CO2 diffusion below the collars during AGPS chamber measurements; and (iv) a possible overestimation of nighttime SR fluxes by the LI-8100A. Additionally, increased root growth was observed within the LI-8100A collars but not within the AGPS collars, which might have also contributed to the observed differences. In contrast to the LI-8100A, the AGPS had the gas sample inlets installed inside the collars and not the chambers. This unique design feature enabled for the first

  5. Automation of soil flux chamber measurements: potentials and pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görres, C.-M.; Kammann, C.; Ceulemans, R.

    2015-09-01

    Recent technological advances have enabled the wider application of automated chambers for soil greenhouse gas (GHG) flux measurements, several of them commercially available. However, only few studies addressed the difficulties and challenges associated with operating these systems. In this contribution we compared two commercial soil GHG chamber systems-the LI-8100A Automated Soil CO2 Flux System and the Greenhouse Gas Monitoring System AGPS. From April 2014 until August 2014, the two systems monitored in parallel soil respiration (SR) fluxes at a recently harvested poplar plantation, which provided a bare field situation directly after the harvest as well as a closed canopy later on. For the bare field situation (15 April-30 June 2014), the cumulated average SR obtained from the unfiltered datasets of the LI-8100A and the AGPS were 520 and 433 g CO2 m-2, respectively. For the closed canopy phase (01 July-31 August 2014), which was characterized by a higher soil moisture content, the cumulated average SR estimates were not significantly different with 507 and 501 g CO2 m-2 for the AGPS and the LI-8100A, respectively. Flux quality control and filtering did not significantly alter the results obtained by the LI-8100A, whereas the AGPS SR estimates were reduced by at least 20 %. The main reasons for the observed differences in the performance of the two systems were (i) a lower data coverage provided by the AGPS due to technical problems; (ii) incomplete headspace mixing in the AGPS chambers; (iii) lateral soil CO2 diffusion below the collars during AGPS chamber measurements; (iv) increased root growth within the LI-8100A collars; and (v) a possible overestimation of nighttime SR fluxes by the LI-8100A. In contrast to the LI-8100A, the AGPS had the gas sample inlets installed inside the collars and not the chambers. This unique design feature enabled for the first time the detection of disturbed chamber measurements during nights with a stratified atmosphere

  6. Aerosol flux measurements above a mixed forest at Borden, Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, M.; Staebler, R. M.; Liggio, J.; Vlasenko, A.; Li, S.-M.; Hayden, K.

    2011-07-01

    Aerosol fluxes were measured above a mixed forest by Eddy Covariance (EC) with a Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) at the Borden Forest Research Station in Ontario, Canada between 13 July and 12 August 2009. Chemically speciated flux measurements were made at a height of 29 m at the same location between 19 July and 2 August, 2006 using a Quadrupole Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Q-AMS). The Q-AMS measured an average sulphate deposition velocity of 0.3 mm s-1 and an average nitrate deposition velocity of 4.8 mm s-1. The FMPS, mounted at a height of 33 m (approximately 10 m above the canopy top) and housed in a temperature controlled enclosure, measured size-resolved particle concentrations from 3 to 410 nm diameter at a rate of 1 Hz. For the size range 18 < D < 452 nm, 60 % of fluxes were upward. The exchange velocity was between -0.5 and 2.0 mm s-1, with median values near 0.5 mm s-1 for all sizes between 22 and 310 nm. The size distribution of the apparent production rate of particles at 33 m peaked at a diameter of 75 nm. Results indicate a decoupling of the above and below canopy spaces, whereby particles are stored in the canopy space at night, and are then diluted with cleaner air above during the day.

  7. Accurate Measurement of Bone Density with QCT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleek, Tammy M.; Beaupre, Gary S.; Matsubara, Miki; Whalen, Robert T.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy of bone density measurement with a new OCT technology. A phantom was fabricated using two materials, a water-equivalent compound and hydroxyapatite (HA), combined in precise proportions (QRM GrnbH, Germany). The phantom was designed to have the approximate physical size and range in bone density as a human calcaneus, with regions of 0, 50, 100, 200, 400, and 800 mg/cc HA. The phantom was scanned at 80, 120 and 140 KVp with a GE CT/i HiSpeed Advantage scanner. A ring of highly attenuating material (polyvinyl chloride or teflon) was slipped over the phantom to alter the image by introducing non-axi-symmetric beam hardening. Images were corrected with a new OCT technology using an estimate of the effective X-ray beam spectrum to eliminate beam hardening artifacts. The algorithm computes the volume fraction of HA and water-equivalent matrix in each voxel. We found excellent agreement between expected and computed HA volume fractions. Results were insensitive to beam hardening ring material, HA concentration, and scan voltage settings. Data from all 3 voltages with a best fit linear regression are displays.

  8. Coupled-channels quantum theory of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic processes: fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Diestler, D J

    2012-03-22

    The Born-Oppenheimer (BO) description of electronically adiabatic molecular processes predicts a vanishing electronic flux density (j(e)), =1/2∫dR[Δ(b) (x;R) - Δ(a) (x;R)] even though the electrons certainly move in response to the movement of the nuclei. This article, the first of a pair, proposes a quantum-mechanical "coupled-channels" (CC) theory that allows the approximate extraction of j(e) from the electronically adiabatic BO wave function . The CC theory is detailed for H(2)(+), in which case j(e) can be resolved into components associated with two channels α (=a,b), each of which corresponds to the "collision" of an "internal" atom α (proton a or b plus electron) with the other nucleus β (proton b or a). The dynamical role of the electron, which accommodates itself instantaneously to the motion of the nuclei, is submerged in effective electronic probability (population) densities, Δ(α), associated with each channel (α). The Δ(α) densities are determined by the (time-independent) BO electronic energy eigenfunction, which depends parametrically on the configuration of the nuclei, the motion of which is governed by the usual BO nuclear Schrödinger equation. Intuitively appealing formal expressions for the electronic flux density are derived for H(2)(+). PMID:22103768

  9. Influence of clouds on the spectral actinic flux density in the lower troposphere (INSPECTRO): overview of the field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, S.; Ammannato, L.; Bais, A.; Bandy, B.; Blumthaler, M.; Bohn, B.; Engelsen, O.; Gobbi, G. P.; Gröbner, J.; Jäkel, E.; Junkermann, W.; Kazadzis, S.; Kift, R.; Kjeldstad, B.; Kouremeti, N.; Kylling, A.; Mayer, B.; Monks, P. S.; Reeves, C. E.; Schallhart, B.; Scheirer, R.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, R.; Schreder, J.; Silbernagl, R.; Topaloglou, C.; Thorseth, T. M.; Webb, A. R.; Wendisch, M.; Werle, P.

    2008-03-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is the key factor driving tropospheric photochemistry. It is strongly modulated by clouds and aerosols. A quantitative understanding of the radiation field and its effect on photochemistry is thus only possible with a detailed knowledge of the interaction between clouds and radiation. The overall objective of the project INSPECTRO was the characterization of the three-dimensional actinic radiation field under cloudy conditions. This was achieved during two measurement campaigns in Norfolk (East Anglia, UK) and Lower Bavaria (Germany) combining space-based, aircraft and ground-based measurements as well as simulations with the one-dimensional radiation transfer model UVSPEC and the three-dimensional radiation transfer model MYSTIC. During both campaigns the spectral actinic flux density was measured at several locations at ground level and in the air by up to four different aircraft. This allows the comparison of measured and simulated actinic radiation profiles. In addition satellite data were used to complete the information of the three dimensional input data set for the simulation. A three-dimensional simulation of actinic flux density data under cloudy sky conditions requires a realistic simulation of the cloud field to be used as an input for the 3-D radiation transfer model calculations. Two different approaches were applied, to derive high- and low-resolution data sets, with a grid resolution of about 100 m and 1 km, respectively. The results of the measured and simulated radiation profiles as well as the results of the ground based measurements are presented in terms of photolysis rate profiles for ozone and nitrogen dioxide. During both campaigns all spectroradiometer systems agreed within ±10% if mandatory corrections e.g. stray light correction were applied. Stability changes of the systems were below 5% over the 4 week campaign periods and negligible over a few days. The J(O1D) data of the single monochromator systems can be

  10. Influence of clouds on the spectral actinic flux density in the lower troposphere (INSPECTRO): overview of the field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, S.; Ammannato, L.; Bais, A.; Bandy, B.; Blumthaler, M.; Bohn, B.; Engelsen, O.; Gobbi, G. P.; Gröbner, J.; Jäkel, E.; Junkermann, W.; Kazadzis, S.; Kift, R.; Kjeldstad, B.; Kouremeti, N.; Kylling, A.; Mayer, B.; Monks, P. S.; Reeves, C. E.; Schallhart, B.; Scheirer, R.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, R.; Schreder, J.; Silbernagl, R.; Topaloglou, C.; Thorseth, T. M.; Webb, A. R.; Wendisch, M.; Werle, P.

    2007-09-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is the key factor driving tropospheric photochemistry. It is strongly modulated by clouds and aerosols. A quantitative understanding of the radiation field and its effect on photochemistry is thus only possible with a detailed knowledge of the interaction between clouds and radiation. The overall objective of the project INSPECTRO was the characterization of the three-dimensional actinic radiation field under cloudy conditions. This was achieved during two measurement campaigns in Norfolk (East Anglia, UK) and Lower Bavaria (Germany) combining space-based, aircraft and ground-based measurements as well as simulations with the one-dimensional radiation transfer model UVSPEC and the three-dimensional radiation transfer model MYSTIC. During both campaigns the spectral actinic flux density was measured at several locations at ground level and in the air by up to four different aircraft. This allows the comparison of measured and simulated actinic radiation profiles. In addition satellite data were used to complete the information of the three dimensional input data set for the simulation. A three-dimensional simulation of actinic flux density data under cloudy sky conditions requires a realistic simulation of the cloud field to be used as an input for the 3-D radiation transfer model calculations. Two different approaches were applied, to derive high- and low-resolution data sets, with a grid resolution of about 100 m and 1 km, respectively. The results of the measured and simulated radiation profiles as well as the results of the ground based measurements are presented in terms of photolysis rate profiles for ozone and nitrogen dioxide. During both campaigns all spectroradiometer systems agreed within ±10% if mandatory corrections e.g. stray light correction were applied. Stability changes of the systems were below 5% over the 4 week campaign periods and negligible over a few days. The J(O1D) data of the single monochromator systems can be