Sample records for flux rates measured

  1. RATES OF PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FLUX CANCELLATION MEASURED WITH HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Soyoung; Chae, Jongchul [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747, Republic of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Litvinenko, Yuri E. [Department of Mathematics, University of Waikato, P.O. Box 3105, Hamilton (New Zealand)

    2009-10-10

    Photospheric magnetic flux cancellation on the Sun is generally believed to be caused by magnetic reconnection occurring in the low solar atmosphere. Individual canceling magnetic features are observationally characterized by the rate of flux cancellation. The specific cancellation rate, defined as the rate of flux cancellation divided by the interface length, gives an accurate estimate of the electric field in the reconnecting current sheet. We have determined the specific cancellation rate using the magnetograms taken by the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard the Hinode satellite. The specific rates determined with SOT turned out to be systematically higher than those based on the data taken by the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. The median value of the specific cancellation rate was found to be 8 x 10{sup 6} G cm s{sup -1}-a value four times that obtained from the MDI data. This big difference is mainly due to a higher angular resolution and better sensitivity of the SOT, resulting in magnetic fluxes up to five times larger than those obtained from the MDI. The higher rates of flux cancellation correspond to either faster inflows or stronger magnetic fields of the reconnection inflow region, which may have important consequences for the physics of photospheric magnetic reconnection.

  2. Heat generation rate measurement in a Li-ion cell at large C-rates through temperature and heat flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, S. J.; Martin, M.; Wetz, D. A.; Ostanek, J. K.; Miller, S. P.; Heinzel, J. M.; Jain, A.

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the rate of heat generation in a Li-ion cell is critical for safety and performance of Li-ion cells and systems. Cell performance, cycle life, and system safety all depend on temperature distribution in the cell, which, in turn, depends on heat generation rate within the cell and on heat removal rate at the cell surface. Despite the existence of a number of theoretical models to predict heat generation rate, there is not much literature on experimental measurement at high C-rates. This paper reports measurement of heat generation rate from a Li-ion cell at high discharge rates, up to 9.6C, using measurements of cell temperature and surface heat flux. As opposed to calorimetry-based approaches, this method can be applied in situ to yield measurements of heat generation rate in laboratory or field use provided that at least one a priori test is performed to measure the temperature gradient within a cell in the same ambient condition. This method is based on simultaneous determination of heat stored and heat lost from the cell through heat flux and temperature measurements. A novel method is established for measurement of the internal temperature of the cell. Heat generation measurements are shown to agree with well-established theoretical models. The effect of actively cooling the cell is briefly discussed.

  3. Eddy covariance N2O flux measurements at low flux rates: results from the InGOS campaign in a Danish willow field.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrom, Andreas; Brümmer, Christian; Hensen, Arjan; van Asperen, Hella; Carter, Mette S.; Gasche, Rainer; Famulari, Daniela; Kutsch, Werner; Pilegaard, Kim; Ambus, Per

    2014-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes from soils are characterised by their high spatial and temporal variability. The fluxes depend on the availability of the substrates for nitrification and denitrification and soil physical and chemical conditions that control the metabolic microbial activity. The sporadic nature of the fluxes and their high sensitivity to alterations of the soil climate put very high demands on measurement approaches. Laser spectroscopy enables accurate and fast response detection of atmospheric N2O concentrations and is used for eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements. Alternatively N2O fluxes can be measured with chambers together with high precision analysers. Differences in the measurement approaches and system designs are expected to have a considerable influence on the accuracy of the flux estimation. This study investigates how three different eddy covariance systems perform in a situation of low N2O fluxes from a flat surface. Chamber flux measurements with differing chamber and analyser designs are used for comparison. In April 2013, the EU research infrastructure project InGOS (http://www.ingos-infrastructure.eu/) organised a campaign of N2O flux measurements in a willow plantation close to the Risø Campus of the Technical University of Denmark. The willow field was harvested in February 2013 and received mineral fertiliser equivalent to 120 kg N ha-1 before the campaign started. Three different eddy covariance systems took part in the campaign: two Aerodyne quantum cascade laser (QCL) based systems and one Los Gatos Research off-axis integrated-cavity-output spectroscopy (ICOS) system for N2O and CO. The sonic anemometers were all installed at 2 m height above the bare ground. Gill R3 type sonic anemometers were used with QCL systems and a Gil HS-50 with the ICOS system. The 10 Hz raw data were analysed with group specific softwares and procedures. The local conditions in the exceptionally cold and dry spring 2013 did not lead to large N2O flux rates. All three EC systems showed 30 min. flux values varying around zero nmol m-2 s-1. This noise was considerably lower in the EC systems that used QCL analysers. The maximum daily averages of the uncorrected fluxes from two of the EC systems reached 0.26 (ICOS/HS50) and 0.28 (QCL/R3) nmol m-2 s-1.Spectral correction increased the flux estimates up to, e.g., 180% equivalent to 0.54 nmol m-2 s-1. The flux estimates from the soil chambers were with one exception higher than the flux estimates obtained from the EC systems with highest daily averages ranging from 0.1 up to 2 nmol m-2 s-1. These large differences were unexpected, because at least two of the EC systems were shown to accurately measure fluxes at such higher levels at another InGOS campaign in a fertilised Scottish grazed meadow. We use spectral analysis to examine the raw data for the effects of sensor noise on the flux estimates and discuss strategies on how to correct or account for it. Furthermore possible causes for the observed differences between the observed EC and chamber flux estimates will be discussed.

  4. Pulse flux measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Riggan, William C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    A device for measuring particle flux comprises first and second photodiode detectors for receiving flux from a source and first and second outputs for producing first and second signals representing the flux incident to the detectors. The device is capable of reducing the first output signal by a portion of the second output signal, thereby enhancing the accuracy of the device. Devices in accordance with the invention may measure distinct components of flux from a single source or fluxes from several sources.

  5. Measurement of surface emission flux rates for volatile organic compounds at Technical Area 54

    SciTech Connect

    Trujillo, V.; Morgenstern, M.; Krier, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Gilkeson, R. [Weirich and Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-06-01

    The survey described in this report was conducted to estimate the mass of volatile organic compounds venting to the atmosphere from active and inactive waste disposal sites at Technical Area 54. A large number of nonintrusive passive sample collection devices were placed on the ground surface for 72 hours to characterize an area of approximately 150 acres. Results provided an indication of the boundary location of the known volatile organic plume, plume constituents, and isolated high concentration areas. The data from this survey enhanced existing data from a limited number of monitor wells currently used for plume surveillance. Results indicate that the estimated mass emission to the atmosphere is orders of magnitude lower than what is considered a small flux rate at a spill site or a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act landfill and is far below the threshold limit established by the State of New Mexico as an air quality concern.

  6. Combined radiocarbon and CO2 flux measurements used to determine in situ chlorinated solvent mineralization rate.

    PubMed

    Boyd, T J; Montgomery, M T; Cuenca, R H; Hagimoto, Y

    2015-03-01

    A series of combined measurements was made at the Naval Air Station North Island (NASNI) Installation Restoration Site 5, Unit 2 during July and August 2013. Combined measurements included CO2 respiration rate, CO2 radiocarbon content to estimate chlorinated hydrocarbon (CH) mineralization and a zone of influence (ZOI) model. CO2 was collected continuously over 2 two-week periods by recirculating monitoring well headspace gas through NaOH traps. A series of 12 wells in the main CH plume zone and a background well with no known historical contamination were sampled. The background well CO2 was used to determine radiocarbon content derived from respired natural organic matter. A two end-member mixing model was then used to determine the amount of CH-derived carbon present in the CO2 collected from plume region wells. The ZOI model provided an estimate for the soil volume sampled at each well. CH mineralization rates were highest upgradient and at the plume fringe for areas of high historical contamination and ranged from 0.02 to 5.6 mg CH carbon per day. Using the ZOI model volume estimates, CH-carbon removal ranged from 0.2 to 32 mg CH-carbon m(-3) per day. Because the rate estimates were based on a limited sampling (temporally), they were not further extrapolated to long-term contaminant degradation estimates. However, if the site manager or regulators required them, estimates - subject to long-term variability uncertainties - could be made using volume and rate data determined over short timescales. A more comprehensive seasonal sampling is needed to constrain long-term remediation models for the entire impacted area and identify environmental conditions related to more rapid turnover times amongst the wells. PMID:25686305

  7. Heat flux measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Weikle, Donald H.

    1989-01-01

    A new automated, computer controlled heat flux measurement facility is described. Continuous transient and steady-state surface heat flux values varying from about 0.3 to 6 MW/sq m over a temperature range of 100 to 1200 K can be obtained in the facility. An application of this facility is the development of heat flux gauges for continuous fast transient surface heat flux measurement on turbine blades operating in space shuttle main engine turbopumps. The facility is useful for durability testing at fast temperature transients.

  8. MEASUREMENT OF GASEOUS EMISSION RATES FROM LAND SURFACES USING AN EMISSION ISOLATION FLUX CHAMBER. USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A promising method for monitoring ground emissions involves the use of an emission isolation flux chamber. The method is simple, easily available, and inexpensive. Applications would include RCRA and CERCLA facilities. To date, a uniform method operations does not exist. For this...

  9. Heat flux microsensor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrell, J. P.; Hager, J. M.; Onishi, S.; Diller, T. E.

    1992-12-01

    A thin-film heat flux sensor has been fabricated on a stainless steel substrate. The thermocouple elements of the heat flux sensor were nickel and nichrome, and the temperature resistance sensor was platinum. The completed heat flux microsensor was calibrated at the AEDC radiation facility. The gage output was linear with heat flux with no apparent temperature effect on sensitivity. The gage was used for heat flux measurements at the NASA Langley Vitiated Air Test Facility. Vitiated air was expanded to Mach 3.0 and hydrogen fuel was injected. Measurements were made on the wall of a diverging duct downstream of the injector during all stages of the hydrogen combustion tests. Because the wall and the gage were not actively cooled, the wall temperature reached over 1000 C (1900 F) during the most severe test.

  10. Heat flux microsensor measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrell, J. P.; Hager, J. M.; Onishi, S.; Diller, T. E.

    1992-01-01

    A thin-film heat flux sensor has been fabricated on a stainless steel substrate. The thermocouple elements of the heat flux sensor were nickel and nichrome, and the temperature resistance sensor was platinum. The completed heat flux microsensor was calibrated at the AEDC radiation facility. The gage output was linear with heat flux with no apparent temperature effect on sensitivity. The gage was used for heat flux measurements at the NASA Langley Vitiated Air Test Facility. Vitiated air was expanded to Mach 3.0 and hydrogen fuel was injected. Measurements were made on the wall of a diverging duct downstream of the injector during all stages of the hydrogen combustion tests. Because the wall and the gage were not actively cooled, the wall temperature reached over 1000 C (1900 F) during the most severe test.

  11. Validation of absolute axial neutron flux distribution calculations with MCNP with 197Au(n,?)198Au reaction rate distribution measurements at the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor.

    PubMed

    Radulovi?, Vladimir; Štancar, Žiga; Snoj, Luka; Trkov, Andrej

    2014-02-01

    The calculation of axial neutron flux distributions with the MCNP code at the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor has been validated with experimental measurements of the (197)Au(n,?)(198)Au reaction rate. The calculated absolute reaction rate values, scaled according to the reactor power and corrected for the flux redistribution effect, are in good agreement with the experimental results. The effect of different cross-section libraries on the calculations has been investigated and shown to be minor. PMID:24316530

  12. Quantifying Methane Oxidation Rates and Flux During the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill with Measurements of Methane Stable Isotopic Ratios and Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, M.; Kessler, J. D.; Sylva, S.

    2014-12-01

    Several independent techniques have been developed to measure the rate of methane oxidation and the source flux. However, none of these methods measure them concurrently. Here we present a stable isotope model incorporating measurements of methane stable isotopic ratios and concentrations, and current velocity, which can be used to determine methane oxidation rates, as well as the flux from the seafloor. This model was tested on 20 samples taken from 1 to 12 km from the wellhead from 11 June through 20 June 2010 during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Results suggest that rate of methane oxidation ranged from 22 to 844 nM d-1 in mid-June 2010 and that the flux from the seafloor was 8.4×107 moles d-1. Both estimated here are in agreement with previous estimates determined independently.

  13. Biogeochemical Fluxes of Carbon and Nitrogen in Surface Waters of the Cariaco Basin: A Combined Rate Measurement and Isotopic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller-Karger, F. E.; Sambrotto, R. N.

    2004-12-01

    As a tropical ocean margin influenced by seasonal upwelling, the plankton productivity of the Cariaco Basin varies greatly between some of the largest rates measured in ocean waters, to near oligotrophic conditions, over the course of a year. The fluxes of carbon and nitrogen associated with these biological variations also change significantly and will be analyzed in the context of a consistent time series of physical, chemical and biological data collected monthly over the last several years. New (nitrate) productivity increases in response to the upwelling of nutrients in winter and also to a secondary (although somewhat smaller) upwelling period in summer. There appears to be significant regenerated nutrients (such as ammonium and dissolved organic matter) to fuel production at other times of the year as well. As an additional dimension in the analysis of carbon and nitrogen flow, the isotopic signatures of the zooplankton collected in net hauls were examined over a two-year period. The C-13/C-12 ratio of the zooplankton pool was significantly heavier in the winter upwelling season, but showed little response to summer upwelling. The N-15/N-14 ratio, on the other hand, increased in both upwelling periods and also exhibited a two-year trend towards higher values. These variations are potentially a rich source of information on the dynamics of the epipelagic environment and likely reflect in part, the lower pCO2 levels and larger phytoplankton cells in the winter upwelling season, as well as the intrusion of nitrate from outside of the basin during both the winter and summer upwelling periods.

  14. Ionization chamber for measuring the exposure dose rate of intense pulsed fluxes of X rays and ?-radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. D. Villeval'de; N. N. Morozov; A. V. Oborin; B. M. Stepanov; V. I. Fominykh

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the exposure dose rate of powerful pulsed sources of bremsstrahlung xrays and y-radiation are very difficult because a standard of pulsed radiation is not available. The presently employed measuring means are based on scintillation, semiconductor, and pyroelectric devices [1-3] and are characterized by adequate resolution on the time scale and a satisfactory dynamic range, but cannot be successfully

  15. Experimental Measurement of the Local Energy Dissipation Rate and its Balance with the Local Heat Flux in Turbulent Thermal Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shi-Di; Ni, Rui; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2011-11-01

    The local energy dissipation rate ?u , c in Rayleigh- Bénard convection cell was measured experimentally using the particle tracking velocimetry method, with varying Rayleigh number Ra, Prandtl number Pr, and system size H. It is found that ?u , c / (?3H-4) = 1 . 05 ×10-4 Ra 1 . 55 +/- 0 . 02 Pr 1 . 15 +/- 0 . 38 . The Ra- and H-dependency of the measured result are found to be consistent with the assumption made for the bulk energy dissipation rate ?u , bulk in the Grossmann-Lohse model, while the Pr-dependency is not. A remarkable finding of the study is that ?u , c balances the directly measured local Nusselt number Nuc in the cell center, not only scaling-wise but also in magnitude. This work was supported by RGC of Hong Kong SAR (No. CUHK403807 and 404409).

  16. Measuring surface fluxes in CAPE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanemasu, E. T.; D-Shah, T.; Nie, Dalin

    1992-01-01

    Two stations (site 1612 and site 2008) were operated by the University of Georgia group from 6 July 1991 to 18 August 1991. The following data were collected continuously: surface energy fluxes (i.e., net radiation, soil heat fluxes, sensible heat flux and latent heat flux), air temperature, vapor pressure, soil temperature (at 1 cm depth), and precipitation. Canopy reflectance and light interception data were taken three times at each site between 6 July and 18 August. Soil moisture content was measured twice at each site.

  17. A process-based model to estimate gas exchange and monoterpene emission rates in the mediterranean maquis - comparisons between modelled and measured fluxes at different scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, M.; Matteucci, G.; Fares, S.; Davison, B.

    2009-02-01

    This paper concerns the application of a process-based model (MOCA, Modelling of Carbon Assessment) as an useful tool for estimating gas exchange, and integrating the empirical algorithms for calculation of monoterpene fluxes, in a Mediterranean maquis of central Italy (Castelporziano, Rome). Simulations were carried out for a range of hypothetical but realistic canopies of the evergreen Quercus ilex (holm oak), Arbutus unedo (strawberry tree) and Phillyrea latifolia. More, the dependence on total leaf area and leaf distribution of monoterpene fluxes at the canopy scale has been considered in the algorithms. Simulation of the gas exchange rates showed higher values for P. latifolia and A. unedo (2.39±0.30 and 3.12±0.27 gC m-2 d-1, respectively) with respect to Q. ilex (1.67±0.08 gC m-2 d-1) in the measuring campaign (May-June). Comparisons of the average Gross Primary Production (GPP) values with those measured by eddy covariance were well in accordance (7.98±0.20 and 6.00±1.46 gC m-2 d-1, respectively, in May-June), although some differences (of about 30%) were evident in a point-to-point comparison. These differences could be explained by considering the non uniformity of the measuring site where diurnal winds blown S-SW direction affecting thus calculations of CO2 and water fluxes. The introduction of some structural parameters in the algorithms for monoterpene calculation allowed to simulate monoterpene emission rates and fluxes which were in accord to those measured (6.50±2.25 vs. 9.39±4.5?g g-1DW h-1 for Q. ilex, and 0.63±0.207?g g-1DW h-1 vs. 0.98±0.30?g g-1DW h-1 for P. latifolia). Some constraints of the MOCA model are discussed, but it is demonstrated to be an useful tool to simulate physiological processes and BVOC fluxes in a very complicated plant distributions and environmental conditions, and necessitating also of a low number of input data.

  18. Beta ray flux measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Impink, Jr., Albert J. (Murrysville, PA); Goldstein, Norman P. (Murrysville, PA)

    1990-01-01

    A beta ray flux measuring device in an activated member in-core instrumentation system for pressurized water reactors. The device includes collector rings positioned about an axis in the reactor's pressure boundary. Activated members such as hydroballs are positioned within respective ones of the collector rings. A response characteristic such as the current from or charge on a collector ring indicates the beta ray flux from the corresponding hydroball and is therefore a measure of the relative nuclear power level in the region of the reactor core corresponding to the specific exposed hydroball within the collector ring.

  19. Latent heat in soil heat flux measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. L. Heitman; R. Horton; T. J. Sauer; T. S. Ren; X. Xiao

    2010-01-01

    The surface energy balance includes a term for soil heat flux. Soil heat flux is difficult to measure because it includes conduction and convection heat transfer processes. Accurate representation of soil heat flux is an important consideration in many modeling and measurement applications. Yet, there remains uncertainty about what comprises soil heat flux and how surface and subsurface heat fluxes

  20. Measuring and modeling C flux rates through the central metabolic pathways in microbial communities using position-specific 13C-labeled tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, P.; van Groenigen, K.; Hagerty, S.; Salpas, E.; Fairbanks, D. E.; Hungate, B. A.; KOCH, G. W.; Schwartz, E.

    2012-12-01

    The production of energy and metabolic precursors occurs in well-known processes such as glycolysis and Krebs cycle. We use position-specific 13C-labeled metabolic tracers, combined with models of microbial metabolic organization, to analyze the response of microbial community energy production, biosynthesis, and C use efficiency (CUE) in soils, decomposing litter, and aquatic communities. The method consists of adding position-specific 13C -labeled metabolic tracers to parallel soil incubations, in this case 1-13C and 2,3-13C pyruvate and 1-13C and U-13C glucose. The measurement of CO2 released from the labeled tracers is used to calculate the C flux rates through the various metabolic pathways. A simplified metabolic model consisting of 23 reactions is solved using results of the metabolic tracer experiments and assumptions of microbial precursor demand. This new method enables direct estimation of fundamental aspects of microbial energy production, CUE, and soil organic matter formation in relatively undisturbed microbial communities. We will present results showing the range of metabolic patterns observed in these communities and discuss results from testing metabolic models.

  1. Cosmic Ray Neutron Flux Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayananda, Mathes

    2009-11-01

    Cosmic rays are high-energetic particles originating from outer space that bombard the upper atmosphere of the Earth. Almost 90% of cosmic ray particles consist of protons, electrons and heavy ions. When these particles hit the Earth's atmosphere, cascade of secondary particles are formed. The most abundant particles reach to the surface of the Earth are muons, electrons and neutrons. In recent years many research groups are looking into potential applications of the effects of cosmic ray radiation at the surface of the Earth [1, 2]. At Georgia State University we are working on a long-term measurement of cosmic ray flux distribution. This study includes the simultaneous measurement of cosmic ray muons, neutrons and gamma particles at the Earth surface in downtown Atlanta. The initial effort is focusing on the correlation studies of the cosmic ray particle flux distribution and the atmospheric weather conditions. In this presentation, I will talk about the development of a cosmic ray detector using liquid scintillator and the preliminary results. [4pt] [1] K.Borozdin, G.Hogan, C.Morris, W.Priedhorsky, A.Saunders, L.Shultz, M.Teasdale, ``Radiographic imaging with cosmic-ray muons'', Nature, Vol.422, p.277, Mar.2003[0pt] [2] Svensmark Henrik, Physical Review 81, 3, (1998)

  2. Metabolic rate measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koester, K.; Crosier, W.

    1980-01-01

    The Metabolic Rate Measurement System (MRMS) is an uncomplicated and accurate apparatus for measuring oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production of a test subject. From this one can determine the subject's metabolic rate for a variety of conditions, such as resting or light exercise. MRMS utilizes an LSI/11-03 microcomputer to monitor and control the experimental apparatus.

  3. NEUTRON FLUX MEASUREMENT AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gray

    1960-01-01

    The problems of neutron flux measurements in hightemperature, low-flux ; (zero-energy) reactors are discussed. Because of the low flux, the detectors ; must operate closer to the core than in power reactors and hence must withstand ; higher temperatures for long periods of time. Gas ionization detectors are ; chosen as being the only type practicable under the acove conditions,

  4. Pyrolytic graphite gauge for measuring heat flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunker, Robert C. (Inventor); Ewing, Mark E. (Inventor); Shipley, John L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A gauge for measuring heat flux, especially heat flux encountered in a high temperature environment, is provided. The gauge includes at least one thermocouple and an anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body that covers at least part of, and optionally encases the thermocouple. Heat flux is incident on the anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body by arranging the gauge so that the gauge surface on which convective and radiative fluxes are incident is perpendicular to the basal planes of the pyrolytic graphite. The conductivity of the pyrolytic graphite permits energy, transferred into the pyrolytic graphite body in the form of heat flux on the incident (or facing) surface, to be quickly distributed through the entire pyrolytic graphite body, resulting in small substantially instantaneous temperature gradients. Temperature changes to the body can thereby be measured by the thermocouple, and reduced to quantify the heat flux incident to the body.

  5. Calving fluxes and basal melt rates of Antarctic ice shelves.

    PubMed

    Depoorter, M A; Bamber, J L; Griggs, J A; Lenaerts, J T M; Ligtenberg, S R M; van den Broeke, M R; Moholdt, G

    2013-10-01

    Iceberg calving has been assumed to be the dominant cause of mass loss for the Antarctic ice sheet, with previous estimates of the calving flux exceeding 2,000?gigatonnes per year. More recently, the importance of melting by the ocean has been demonstrated close to the grounding line and near the calving front. So far, however, no study has reliably quantified the calving flux and the basal mass balance (the balance between accretion and ablation at the ice-shelf base) for the whole of Antarctica. The distribution of fresh water in the Southern Ocean and its partitioning between the liquid and solid phases is therefore poorly constrained. Here we estimate the mass balance components for all ice shelves in Antarctica, using satellite measurements of calving flux and grounding-line flux, modelled ice-shelf snow accumulation rates and a regional scaling that accounts for unsurveyed areas. We obtain a total calving flux of 1,321?±?144?gigatonnes per year and a total basal mass balance of -1,454?±?174?gigatonnes per year. This means that about half of the ice-sheet surface mass gain is lost through oceanic erosion before reaching the ice front, and the calving flux is about 34 per cent less than previous estimates derived from iceberg tracking. In addition, the fraction of mass loss due to basal processes varies from about 10 to 90 per cent between ice shelves. We find a significant positive correlation between basal mass loss and surface elevation change for ice shelves experiencing surface lowering and enhanced discharge. We suggest that basal mass loss is a valuable metric for predicting future ice-shelf vulnerability to oceanic forcing. PMID:24037377

  6. Measuring fast calcium fluxes in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Golebiewska, Urszula; Scarlata, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes have multiple Ca(2+) fluxes of varying duration that work together to optimize function (1,2). Changes in Ca(2+) activity in response to extracellular agents is predominantly regulated by the phospholipase C?- G?(q;) pathway localized on the plasma membrane which is stimulated by agents such as acetylcholine (3,4). We have recently found that plasma membrane protein domains called caveolae(5,6) can entrap activated G?(q;)(7). This entrapment has the effect of stabilizing the activated state of G?(q;) and resulting in prolonged Ca(2+) signals in cardiomyocytes and other cell types(8). We uncovered this surprising result by measuring dynamic calcium responses on a fast scale in living cardiomyocytes. Briefly, cells are loaded with a fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator. In our studies, we used Ca(2+) Green (Invitrogen, Inc.) which exhibits an increase in fluorescence emission intensity upon binding of calcium ions. The fluorescence intensity is then recorded for using a line-scan mode of a laser scanning confocal microscope. This method allows rapid acquisition of the time course of fluorescence intensity in pixels along a selected line, producing several hundreds of time traces on the microsecond time scale. These very fast traces are transferred into excel and then into Sigmaplot for analysis, and are compared to traces obtained for electronic noise, free dye, and other controls. To dissect Ca(2+) responses of different flux rates, we performed a histogram analysis that binned pixel intensities with time. Binning allows us to group over 500 traces of scans and visualize the compiled results spatially and temporally on a single plot. Thus, the slow Ca(2+) waves that are difficult to discern when the scans are overlaid due to different peak placement and noise, can be readily seen in the binned histograms. Very fast fluxes in the time scale of the measurement show a narrow distribution of intensities in the very short time bins whereas longer Ca(2+) waves show binned data with a broad distribution over longer time bins. These different time distributions allow us to dissect the timing of Ca(2+)fluxes in the cells, and to determine their impact on various cellular events. PMID:22143396

  7. Measuring Fast Calcium Fluxes in Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Golebiewska, Urszula; Scarlata, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes have multiple Ca2+ fluxes of varying duration that work together to optimize function 1,2. Changes in Ca2+ activity in response to extracellular agents is predominantly regulated by the phospholipase C?- G?q pathway localized on the plasma membrane which is stimulated by agents such as acetylcholine 3,4. We have recently found that plasma membrane protein domains called caveolae5,6 can entrap activated G?q7. This entrapment has the effect of stabilizing the activated state of G?q and resulting in prolonged Ca2+ signals in cardiomyocytes and other cell types8. We uncovered this surprising result by measuring dynamic calcium responses on a fast scale in living cardiomyocytes. Briefly, cells are loaded with a fluorescent Ca2+ indicator. In our studies, we used Ca2+ Green (Invitrogen, Inc.) which exhibits an increase in fluorescence emission intensity upon binding of calcium ions. The fluorescence intensity is then recorded for using a line-scan mode of a laser scanning confocal microscope. This method allows rapid acquisition of the time course of fluorescence intensity in pixels along a selected line, producing several hundreds of time traces on the microsecond time scale. These very fast traces are transferred into excel and then into Sigmaplot for analysis, and are compared to traces obtained for electronic noise, free dye, and other controls. To dissect Ca2+ responses of different flux rates, we performed a histogram analysis that binned pixel intensities with time. Binning allows us to group over 500 traces of scans and visualize the compiled results spatially and temporally on a single plot. Thus, the slow Ca2+ waves that are difficult to discern when the scans are overlaid due to different peak placement and noise, can be readily seen in the binned histograms. Very fast fluxes in the time scale of the measurement show a narrow distribution of intensities in the very short time bins whereas longer Ca2+ waves show binned data with a broad distribution over longer time bins. These different time distributions allow us to dissect the timing of Ca2+fluxes in the cells, and to determine their impact on various cellular events. PMID:22143396

  8. Measurement of the solar nue flux with the Homestake 37Cl detector

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Cleveland; T. Daily; R. Davis; J. Distel; K. Lande; C. K. Lee; P. Wildenhain; J. Ullman

    1992-01-01

    From twenty years of measurements of the solar nue flux with the Homestake chlorine detector, the authors find the average solar nue detection rate is 2.2±0.3 SNU and that the nue flux appears to vary with the 11 year solar activity cycle. Higher nue fluxes are observed during solar quiet periods and lower nue fluxes during solar active periods. When

  9. Experimental Flux Measurements on a Network Scale

    PubMed Central

    Schwender, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic flux is a fundamental property of living organisms. In recent years, methods for measuring metabolic flux in plants on a network scale have evolved further. One major challenge in studying flux in plants is the complexity of the plant’s metabolism. In particular, in the presence of parallel pathways in multiple cellular compartments, the core of plant central metabolism constitutes a complex network. Hence, a common problem with the reliability of the contemporary results of 13C-Metabolic Flux Analysis in plants is the substantial reduction in complexity that must be included in the simulated networks; this omission partly is due to limitations in computational simulations. Here, I discuss recent emerging strategies that will better address these shortcomings. PMID:22639602

  10. Dual neutron flux/temperature measurement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Simpson, M.L.; McElhaney, S.A.

    1994-10-04

    Simultaneous measurement of neutron flux and temperature is provided by a single sensor which includes a phosphor mixture having two principal constituents. The first constituent is a neutron sensitive 6LiF and the second is a rare-earth activated Y203 thermophosphor. The mixture is coated on the end of a fiber optic, while the opposite end of the fiber optic is coupled to a light detector. The detected light scintillations are quantified for neutron flux determination, and the decay is measured for temperature determination. 3 figs.

  11. Dual neutron flux/temperature measurement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, John T. (Oak Ridge, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN); McElhaney, Stephanie A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous measurement of neutron flux and temperature is provided by a single sensor which includes a phosphor mixture having two principal constituents. The first constituent is a neutron sensitive 6LiF and the second is a rare-earth activated Y203 thermophosphor. The mixture is coated on the end of a fiber optic, while the opposite end of the fiber optic is coupled to a light detector. The detected light scintillations are quantified for neutron flux determination, and the decay is measured for temperature determination.

  12. How to Measure Magnetic Flux with a Single Position Measurement?

    E-print Network

    Yakir Aharonov; Eliahu Cohen

    2014-08-29

    Current methods for measuring magnetic flux are based on performing many measurements over a large ensemble of electrons. We propose a novel method for measuring the flux modulo hc/e using only a single electron. Furthermore, we show, for the first time, how to understand this result on geometric grounds when utilizing only the quantization of angular momentum. A transformation to a rotating frame of reference reveals the nonlocal effect of magnetic flux on the electron, without the need of solving the Schrodinger equation. This provides a new intuition for understanding the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect.

  13. Passive hyporheic flux meter - measuring nitrate flux to the reactive sites in the river bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Julia Vanessa; Borchardt, Dietrich; Rode, Michael; Annable, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Most European lowland rivers are afflicted by high nitrate loads, modified morphology and discharge regulations, resulting in restricted capacity to retain nitrate. In those nutrient saturated rivers, sediment bound denitrification is the only process by which nitrate is removed from the system. Despite the importance of the hyporheic zone in nutrient reduction we are lacking detailed information on the transport to and retention at those reactive sites. Passive flux meters have successfully been used to measure contaminant transport to aquifers (eg Cho and Annable 2007). Here we present how a modification of those samplers can be used to quantify nitrate flux to and intermediate storage patterns in the interstices of an agriculturally impacted river. Installed in the river bed sediments, water flux and nutrient quantities passing through the device are recorded. While the amount of water flux serves as an index for connectivity of the hyporheic zone (exchange surface-subsurface water) the nitrate flux through the device can be seen as the portion of nitrate subjected to denitrification. The generated data on solute behavior in hyporheic zones are the missing puzzle to in-stream nitrate dynamics. Complementing flume and tracer experiments our approach depicts how discharge, morphology and sediment characteristics control the denitrification rate via the connectivity of the hyporheic zone. Passive hyporheic flux meter are a novel method to directly asses the quantity of removed nitrate by an in situ experiment.

  14. Infrared Camera Diagnostic for Heat Flux Measurements on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    D. Mastrovito; R. Maingi; H.W. Kugel; A.L. Roquemore

    2003-03-25

    An infrared imaging system has been installed on NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to measure the surface temperatures on the lower divertor and center stack. The imaging system is based on an Indigo Alpha 160 x 128 microbolometer camera with 12 bits/pixel operating in the 7-13 {micro}m range with a 30 Hz frame rate and a dynamic temperature range of 0-700 degrees C. From these data and knowledge of graphite thermal properties, the heat flux is derived with a classic one-dimensional conduction model. Preliminary results of heat flux scaling are reported.

  15. Entropy, entropy flux and entropy rate of granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the entropy, entropy flux and entropy rate of granular materials within the frameworks of the Boltzmann equation and continuum thermodynamics. It is shown that the entropy inequality for a granular gas that follows from the Boltzmann equation differs from the one of a simple fluid due to the presence of a term which can be identified as the entropy density rate. From the knowledge of a non-equilibrium distribution function-valid for processes closed to equilibrium-it is obtained that the entropy density rate is proportional to the internal energy density rate divided by the temperature, while the entropy flux is equal to the heat flux vector divided by the temperature. A thermodynamic theory of a granular material is also developed whose objective is the determination of the basic fields of mass density, momentum density and internal energy density. The constitutive laws are restricted by the principle of material frame indifference and by the entropy principle. Through the exploitation of the entropy principle with Lagrange multipliers, it is shown that the results obtained from the kinetic theory for granular gases concerning the entropy density rate and entropy flux are valid in general for processes close to equilibrium of granular materials, where linearized constitutive equations hold.

  16. Magnetic flux transport in the Dungey cycle: A survey of dayside and nightside reconnection rates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. E. Milan; G. Provan; B. Hubert

    2007-01-01

    Changes in the open flux content of the ionospheric polar cap, estimated from auroral, radar, and low-Earth orbit particle measurements, are used to determine dayside and nightside reconnection rates during 73 hours of observation spread over nine intervals. We identify 25 episodes of nightside reconnection and examine statistically the rates and durations of reconnection, as well as possible triggers for

  17. Field Measured Infiltration Fluxes at the Onset of Ephemeral Streamflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, K. W.; Ferre, T. P.; Hoffmann, J. P.; Cordova, J. T.

    2003-12-01

    A variety of physical and chemical methods have been used to measure transmission losses and infiltration fluxes within large ephemeral streams in southern Arizona, USA. Often these methods are used to estimate a single infiltration flux for a streamflow event, typically measured during steady-state conditions. For long duration events this single estimate can be reasonable, but for short duration events (<24 hrs) typical of those in southern Arizona, infiltration fluxes at the onset of flow can differ substantially in magnitude from those throughout the duration of an event. Use of steady-state infiltration fluxes for short duration events can underestimate the true volume of infiltrated water if the magnitude of the fluxes at flow onset are larger than steady-state values and the duration of the initial transient period is long. For detailed water-budget analyses and hydrologic models dependent on accurate transmission-loss and infiltration-flux estimates, a more comprehensive event record that estimates these values throughout the duration of events is required. A two-dimensional array of water-content and temperature sensors was installed in Rillito Creek in Tucson, Arizona, for the purpose of measuring infiltration fluxes in situ during streamflow events. Infiltration fluxes measured at the onset of 25 streamflow events over a 3-year period ranged from 0.02 to 0.2 m/s in comparison to steady-state fluxes that ranged from 6x10-7 to 2x10-6 m/s. Fluctuations in antecedent soil-water content and fluid/sediment temperatures were examined as possible factors contributing to the observed range of onset fluxes. The average antecedent moisture content of the profiles for the 25 events varied from 0.16 to 0.33 m3/m3. Lower antecedent moisture contents were associated with higher onset infiltration fluxes. Average antecedent temperatures for the profiles ranged from 10oC to 30oC and were directly proportional to onset infiltration rates.

  18. Micrometeorological flux measurements at a coastal site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Guozheng; Meixner, Franz X.; Bruse, Michael; Mamtimin, Buhalqem

    2014-05-01

    The eddy covariance (EC) technique is the only direct measurement of the momentum, heat, and trace gas (e.g. water vapor, CO2 and ozone) fluxes. The measurements are expected to be most accurate over flat terrain where there is an extended homogenous surface upwind from the tower, and when the environmental conditions are steady. Additionally, the one dimensional approach assumes that vertical turbulent exchange is the dominant flux, whereas advective influences should be negligible. The application of EC method under non-ideal conditions, for example in complex terrain, has yet to be fully explored. To explore the possibilities and limitations of EC technique under non-ideal conditions, an EC system was set up at Selles beach, Crete, Greece (35.33°N, 25.71°E) in the beginning of July 2012. The dominant wind direction was west, parallel to the coast. The EC system consisted of a sonic anemometer (CSAT3 Campbell Scientific), an infrared open-path CO2/H2O gas analyzer (LI-7500, Li-COR Biosciences) and a fast chemiluminescence ozone analyzer (enviscope GmbH). All the signals of these fast response instruments were sampled at 10 Hz and the measurement height was 3 m. Besides, another gradient system was setup. Air temperature, relative humidity (HYGROMER MP 103 A), and wind speed (WMT700 Vaisala) were measured every 10 seconds at 3 heights (0.7, 1.45, 3 m). Air intakes were set up at 0.7m and 3m. A pump drew the air through a flow system and a telflon valve alternately switched between the two heights every 30 seconds. H2O, CO2 (LI-840A, Li-COR Biosciences) and ozone mixing ratio s (model 205, 2BTechnologies) were measured every 10 seconds. Momentum, heat, CO2 and ozone fluxes were evaluated by both EC and gradient technique. For the calculation of turbulent fluxes, TK3 algorithm (Department of Micrometeorology, University Bayreuth, Germany) was applied. We will present the measured fluxes of the two systems and assess the data quality under such non-ideal condition.

  19. Solar flux estimated from electron density and ion composition measurements in the lower thermosphere

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Chakrabarty; A. K. Saha; D. K. Chakrabarty

    1977-01-01

    Appropriate models of solar flux in X-rays and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) bands are presented in the light of the current status of ion chemistry in the region from 90 to 130 km and of reliable measurements of reaction rates, electron density, and ion composition. It is found that the EUV flux of Schmidtke (1976) and the X-ray flux of Manson

  20. Entropy, entropy flux and entropy rate of granular materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gilberto M. Kremer

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the entropy, entropy flux and entropy rate of granular materials within the frameworks of the Boltzmann equation and continuum thermodynamics. It is shown that the entropy inequality for a granular gas that follows from the Boltzmann equation differs from the one of a simple fluid due to the presence of a term

  1. ACCURACY OF SOIL HEAT FLUX MEASUREMENTS MADE WITH FLUX PLATES OF CONTRASTING PROPERTIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flux plate measurements of soil heat flux (G) may include significant errors unless the plates are carefully installed and known errors accounted for. The objective of this research was to quantify potential errors in G when using soil heat flux plates of contrasting designs. Five flux plates with...

  2. New H ? flux measurements in nearby dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaisin, S. S.; Karachentsev, I. D.

    2014-10-01

    We present the emission H ? line images for 40 galaxies of the Local Volume based on the observations at the 6-meter BTA telescope. Among them there are eight satellites of the Milky Way and Andromeda (M31) as well as two companions to M51. The measured H? fluxes of the galaxies are used to determine their integral (SFR) and specific (sSFR) star formation rates. The values of log sSFR for the observed galaxies lie in the range of (-9, -14) [yr-1]. A comparison of SFR estimates derived from the H? flux and from the ultraviolet FUV flux yields evidence that two blue compact galaxies MRK475 and LVJ1213+2957 turn out to be at a sharp peak of their star-burst activity.

  3. YEAST DYNAMIC METABOLIC FLUX MEASUREMENT IN NUTRIENT-RICH MEDIA BY HPLC AND ACCELERATOR MASS SPECTROMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Benjamin J.; Navid, Ali; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Bench, Graham

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic flux, the flow of metabolites through networks of enzymes, represents the dynamic productive output of cells. Improved understanding of intracellular metabolic fluxes will enable targeted manipulation of metabolic pathways of medical and industrial importance to a greater degree than is currently possible. Flux balance analysis (FBA) is a constraint-based approach to modeling metabolic fluxes, but its utility is limited by a lack of experimental measurements. Incorporation of experimentally measured fluxes as system constraints will significantly improve the overall accuracy of FBA. We applied a novel, two-tiered approach in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to measure nutrient consumption rates (extracellular fluxes) and a targeted intracellular flux using a 14C-labeled precursor with HPLC separation and flux quantitation by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The use of AMS to trace the intracellular fate of 14C-glutamine allowed the calculation of intracellular metabolic flux through this pathway, with glutathione as the metabolic endpoint. Measured flux values provided global constraints for the yeast FBA model which reduced model uncertainty by more than 20%, proving the importance of additional constraints in improving the accuracy of model predictions and demonstrating the use of AMS to measure intracellular metabolic fluxes. Our results highlight the need to use intracellular fluxes to constrain the models. We show that inclusion of just one such measurement alone can reduce the average variability of model predicted fluxes by 10%. PMID:21062031

  4. ERRORS IN SOIL HEAT FLUX MEASUREMENT: EFFECTS OF FLUX PLATE DESIGN AND VARYING SOIL THERMAL PROPERTIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The flux plate method is the most commonly employed method for measuring soil heat flux (G) in surface energy balance studies. Nonetheless, significant errors in G measured with flux plates can occur unless proper installation techniques are used and necessary corrections made. The objective of th...

  5. A Push-Pull Test to Measure Volatilization Fluxes of Organic Pollutants without Flux Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. C.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2011-12-01

    Volatilization of organic contaminants is a potentially significant removal mechanism from wetlands, but field measurements are scarce and the physiochemical controls on volatilization from wetland soils remain poorly understood. It has been established that volatilization rates of certain pollutants are enhanced by vegetation and are strongly correlated with evapotranspiration (ET). These observations rely on flux chambers measurements, which are characterized by significant uncertainty due the chamber's effects on the meteorological variables around the plant and consequent impact on the biophysical processes governing ET and plant uptake of soil contaminants. Here we present data from a mesocosm study using a modified single-well push-pull test to measure in-situ volatilization rates from inundated soils vegetated with the wetland macrophytes Scirpus acutus and Typha latifolia, as well as from unplanted soil. This new method uses a test solution containing the volatile tracers sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), helium (He), and dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12) to estimate first-order volatilization rates and examine the relationship between physiochemical properties and volatilization rates. The test also yields an estimate for the volume of subsurface gas bubbles, which is used to derive a retardation factor for the effect of interphase partitioning on the estimation of kinetic parameters. We evaluate models to partition observed fluxes into different pathways for plant-mediated volatilization: transpirational uptake and consequent volatilization, and gas-phase diffusion through porous root aerenchyma. Those models are then used to scale tracer-derived volatilization fluxes to priority organic pollutants including benzene, trichloroethylene, and vinyl chloride. We also discuss the implementation of this method at field scales to estimate volatilization as a component of phytoremediation applications.

  6. Multi-spectra Cosmic Ray Flux Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaochun; Dayananda, Mathes

    2010-02-01

    The Earth's upper atmosphere is constantly bombarded by rain of charged particles known as primary cosmic rays. These primary cosmic rays will collide with the atmospheric molecules and create extensive secondary particles which shower downward to the surface of the Earth. In recent years, a few studies have been done regarding to the applications of the cosmic ray measurements and the correlations between the Earth's climate conditions and the cosmic ray fluxes [1,2,3]. Most of the particles, which reach to the surface of the Earth, are muons together with a small percentage of electrons, gammas, neutrons, etc. At Georgia State University, multiple cosmic ray particle detectors have been constructed to measure the fluxes and energy distributions of the secondary cosmic ray particles. In this presentation, we will briefly describe these prototype detectors and show the preliminary test results. Reference: [1] K.Borozdin, G.Hogan, C.Morris, W.Priedhorsky, A.Saunders, L.Shultz, M.Teasdale, Nature, Vol.422, 277 (2003). [2] L.V. Egorova, V. Ya Vovk, O.A. Troshichev, Journal of Atmospheric and Terrestrial Physics 62, 955-966 (2000). [3] Henrik Svensmark, Phy. Rev. Lett. 81, 5027 (1998). )

  7. Entropy, entropy flux and entropy supply rate of granular fluids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gilberto M. Kremer

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the entropy, entropy flux and entropy\\u000asupply rate of granular fluids within the frameworks of the Boltzmann equation\\u000aand continuum thermodynamics. It is shown that the entropy inequality for a\\u000agranular gas that follows from the Boltzmann equation differs from the one of a\\u000asimple fluid due to the presence of a

  8. Marine snow: sinking rates and potential role in vertical flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanks, Alan L.; Trent, Jonathan D.

    1980-02-01

    The sinking rate of intact marine snow (macroscopic aggregates) was determined in settling chambers on seven occasions in Monterey Bay, California and in the northeastern Atlantic. Sinking rates ranged from 43 to 95 m day -1 (average 68 m day -1). The average calculated flux from the upper 20 m of the water column was 30.7 × 10 4 aggregates m -2 day -1. These calculations suggest that from 3 to 5% of the POC (particulate organic carbon) and 4% to 22% of the PON (particulate organic nitrogen) standing stocks were removed from the surface water each day by the sinking of marine snow.

  9. Flux measurements using the BATSE spectroscopic detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnamara, Bernard

    1993-01-01

    Among the Compton Gama-Ray Observatory instruments, the BATSE Spectroscopic Detectors (SD) have the distinction of being able to detect photons of energies less than about 20 keV. This is an interesting energy range for the examination of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB's). In fact, Sco X-1, the prototype LMXB, is easily seen even in the raw BATSE spectroscopic data. The all-sky coverage afforded by these detectors offers a unique opportunity to monitor this source over time periods never before possible. The aim of this investigation was to test a number of ways in which both continous and discrete flux measurements can be obtained using the BATSE spectroscopic datasets. A instrumental description of a SD can be found in the Compton Workshop of Apr. 1989, this report will deal only with methods which can be used to analyze its datasets. Many of the items discussed below, particularly in regard to the earth occultation technique, have been developed, refined, and applied by the BATSE team to the reduction of BATSE LAD data. Code written as part of this project utilizes portions of that work. The following discussions will first address issues related to the reduction of SD datasets using the earth occultation technique. It will then discuss methods for the recovery of the flux history of strong sources while they are above the earth's limb. The report will conclude with recommended reduction procedures.

  10. Radiative flux measurements in the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to determine how the stratospheric tropospheric exchange of water vapor is affected by the interaction of solar (visible) and planetary (infrared) radiation with tropical cumulonimbus anvils. This research involves field measurements from the ER-2 aircraft as well as radiative transfer modelling to determine heating and cooling rates and profiles that directly affect the exchange between the troposphere and the stratosphere.

  11. Study on the Effects of Heat Flux Levels on Heat Release Rate of Wood

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jingwei Ji; Liz-Hong Yang; Xiaojun Chen; Weicheng Fan

    2003-01-01

    The average heat release rate (AHRR) of some kinds of wood were measured using cone calorimeter under different heat flux intensities in this paper. The different heat release characteristics of these wood samples were analyzed theoretically. The temperature field of samples at the ignition time was also calculated. The complex structure, the chemical composition of wood (interior factors) and the

  12. Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zonca, F.; Cohen, S.A.; Bennett, T.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1993-08-24

    An apparatus is described for measuring momentum flux from an intense plasma stream, comprising: refractory target means oriented normal to the flow of said plasma stream for bombardment by said plasma stream where said bombardment by said plasma stream applies a pressure to said target means, pendulum means for communicating a translational displacement of said target to a force transducer where said translational displacement of said target is transferred to said force transducer by an elongated member coupled to said target, where said member is suspended by a pendulum configuration means and where said force transducer is responsive to said translational displacement of said member, and force transducer means for outputting a signal representing pressure data corresponding to said displacement.

  13. Sensor for Injection Rate Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Marcic, Milan

    2006-01-01

    A vast majority of the medium and high speed Diesel engines are equipped with multi-hole injection nozzles nowadays. Inaccuracies in workmanship and changing hydraulic conditions in the nozzles result in differences in injection rates between individual injection nozzle holes. The new deformational measuring method described in the paper allows injection rate measurement in each injection nozzle hole. The differences in injection rates lead to uneven thermal loads of Diesel engine combustion chambers. All today known measuring method, such as Bosch and Zeuch give accurate results of the injection rate in diesel single-hole nozzles. With multihole nozzles they tell us nothing about possible differences in injection rates between individual holes of the nozzle. At deformational measuring method, the criterion of the injected fuel is expressed by the deformation of membrane occurring due to the collision of the pressure wave against the membrane. The pressure wave is generated by the injection of the fuel into the measuring space. For each hole of the nozzle the measuring device must have a measuring space of its own into which fuel is injected as well as its measuring membrane and its own fuel outlet. During measurements procedure the measuring space must be filled with fuel to maintain an overpressure of 5 kPa. Fuel escaping from the measuring device is conducted into the graduated cylinders for measuring the volumetric flow through each hole of the nozzle.The membrane deformation is assessed by strain gauges. They are glued to the membrane and forming the full Wheatstone's bridge. We devoted special attention to the membrane shape and temperature compensation of the strain gauges.

  14. Flux Rope Acceleration and Enhanced Magnetic Reconnection Rate

    SciTech Connect

    C.Z. Cheng; Y. Ren; G.S. Choe; Y.-J. Moon

    2003-03-25

    A physical mechanism of flares, in particular for the flare rise phase, has emerged from our 2-1/2-dimensional resistive MHD simulations. The dynamical evolution of current-sheet formation and magnetic reconnection and flux-rope acceleration subject to continuous, slow increase of magnetic shear in the arcade are studied by employing a non-uniform anomalous resistivity in the reconnecting current sheet under gravity. The simulation results directly relate the flux rope's accelerated rising motion with an enhanced magnetic reconnection rate and thus an enhanced reconnection electric field in the current sheet during the flare rise phase. The simulation results provide good quantitative agreements with observations of the acceleration of flux rope, which manifests in the form of SXR ejecta or erupting filament or CMEs, in the low corona. Moreover, for the X-class flare events studied in this paper the peak reconnection electric field is about O(10{sup 2} V/m) or larger, enough to accelerate p articles to over 100 keV in a field-aligned distance of 10 km. Nonthermal electrons thus generated can produce hard X-rays, consistent with impulsive HXR emission observed during the flare rise phase.

  15. Wind tunnels vs. flux chambers: Area source emission measurements and the necessity for VOC and odour correction factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind tunnels and flux chambers have been used to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds (VOC), odour, and ammonia (NH3) with little regard to air velocity or sweep air flow rates. As a result, flux measurements have been highly variable and scientists have been in disagreement as to the better...

  16. Accuracy of the relaxed eddy-accumulation technique, evaluated using CO 2 flux measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Pattey; R. L. Desjardins; P. Rochette

    1993-01-01

    A system capable of measuring the fluxes of trace gases was developed. It is based on a simpler version of the eddy-accumulation technique (EA), known as the relaxed eddy-accumulation technique (REA). It accumulates air samples associated with updrafts and downdrafts at a constant flow rate in two containers for later analysis of the trace gas mean concentration. The flux integration

  17. Solar flux estimated from electron density and ion composition measurements in the lower thermosphere

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Chakrabarty; D. K. Chakrabarty; A. K. Saha

    1977-01-01

    Appropriate models of solar flux in X-rays and Extreme Ultra Violet (XEUV) bands are presented in the light of the present status of ion chemistry in the region 90 to 130 km and reliable measurements of reaction rates, electron density, and ion composition. It was found that the EUV-flux of Schmidtke (1976) and the X-ray flux of Manson (1976) give

  18. Novel dynamic flux chamber for measuring air-surface exchange of Hg(o) from soils.

    PubMed

    Lin, Che-Jen; Zhu, Wei; Li, Xianchang; Feng, Xinbin; Sommar, Jonas; Shang, Lihai

    2012-08-21

    Quantifying the air-surface exchange of Hg(o) from soils is critical to understanding the cycling of mercury in different environmental compartments. Dynamic flux chambers (DFCs) have been widely employed for Hg(o) flux measurement over soils. However, DFCs of different sizes, shapes, and sampling flow rates yield distinct measured fluxes for a soil substrate under identical environmental conditions. In this study, we performed an integrated modeling, laboratory and field study to design a DFC capable of producing a steady and uniform air flow over a flat surface. The new DFC was fabricated using polycarbonate sheets. The internal velocity field was experimentally verified against model predictions using both theoretical and computational fluid dynamics techniques, suggesting fully developed flow with velocity profiles in excellent agreement with model results. Laboratory flux measurements demonstrated that the new design improves data reproducibility as compared to a conventional DFC, and reproduces the model-predicted flux trend with increasing sampling flow. A mathematical relationship between the sampling flow rate and surface friction velocity, a variable commonly parametrized in atmospheric models, was developed for field application. For the first time, the internal shear property of a DFC can be precisely controlled using the sampling flow rate, and the flux under atmospheric condition can be inferred from the measured flux and surface shear property. The demonstrated methodology potentially bridges the gap in measured fluxes obtained by the DFC method and the micrometeorological methods. PMID:22823466

  19. Dual physiological rate measurement instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Tommy G. (inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The object of the invention is to provide an instrument for converting a physiological pulse rate into a corresponding linear output voltage. The instrument which accurately measures the rate of an unknown rectangular pulse wave over an extended range of values comprises a phase-locked loop including a phase comparator, a filtering network, and a voltage-controlled oscillator, arranged in cascade. The phase comparator has a first input responsive to the pulse wave and a second input responsive to the output signal of the voltage-controlled oscillator. The comparator provides a signal dependent on the difference in phase and frequency between the signals appearing on the first and second inputs. A high-input impedance amplifier accepts an output from the filtering network and provides an amplified output DC signal to a utilization device for providing a measurement of the rate of the pulse wave.

  20. Heat flux microsensor measurements and calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrell, James P.; Hager, Jon M.; Onishi, Shinzo; Diller, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    A new thin-film heat flux gage has been fabricated specifically for severe high temperature operation using platinum and platinum-10 percent rhodium for the thermocouple elements. Radiation calibrations of this gage were performed at the AEDC facility over the available heat flux range (approx. 1.0 - 1,000 W/cu cm). The gage output was linear with heat flux with a slight increase in sensitivity with increasing surface temperature. Survivability of gages was demonstrated in quench tests from 500 C into liquid nitrogen. Successful operation of gages to surface temperatures of 750 C has been achieved. No additional cooling of the gages is required because the gages are always at the same temperature as the substrate material. A video of oxyacetylene flame tests with real-time heat flux and temperature output is available.

  1. AmeriFlux Measurement Network: Science Team Research

    SciTech Connect

    Law, B E

    2012-12-12

    Research involves analysis and field direction of AmeriFlux operations, and the PI provides scientific leadership of the AmeriFlux network. Activities include the coordination and quality assurance of measurements across AmeriFlux network sites, synthesis of results across the network, organizing and supporting the annual Science Team Meeting, and communicating AmeriFlux results to the scientific community and other users. Objectives of measurement research include (i) coordination of flux and biometric measurement protocols (ii) timely data delivery to the Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center (CDIAC); and (iii) assurance of data quality of flux and ecosystem measurements contributed by AmeriFlux sites. Objectives of integration and synthesis activities include (i) integration of site data into network-wide synthesis products; and (ii) participation in the analysis, modeling and interpretation of network data products. Communications objectives include (i) organizing an annual meeting of AmeriFlux investigators for reporting annual flux measurements and exchanging scientific information on ecosystem carbon budgets; (ii) developing focused topics for analysis and publication; and (iii) developing data reporting protocols in support of AmeriFlux network goals.

  2. Heat flux measurements on ceramics with thin film thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, Raymond; Anderson, Robert C.; Liebert, Curt H.

    1993-01-01

    Two methods were devised to measure heat flux through a thick ceramic using thin film thermocouples. The thermocouples were deposited on the front and back face of a flat ceramic substrate. The heat flux was applied to the front surface of the ceramic using an arc lamp Heat Flux Calibration Facility. Silicon nitride and mullite ceramics were used; two thicknesses of each material was tested, with ceramic temperatures to 1500 C. Heat flux ranged from 0.05-2.5 MW/m2(sup 2). One method for heat flux determination used an approximation technique to calculate instantaneous values of heat flux vs time; the other method used an extrapolation technique to determine the steady state heat flux from a record of transient data. Neither method measures heat flux in real time but the techniques may easily be adapted for quasi-real time measurement. In cases where a significant portion of the transient heat flux data is available, the calculated transient heat flux is seen to approach the extrapolated steady state heat flux value as expected.

  3. MEASURING SOIL WATER FLUX BY THE HEAT PULSE RATIO METHOD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurately measuring water fluxes in the vadose zone is a formidable challenge. Heat pulse methods for measuring water flux may allow researchers to overcome this challenge in some settings. The heat pulse ratio method is a relatively simple approach that has been shown to be effective in saturated ...

  4. Field Measured Infiltration Fluxes at the Onset of Ephemeral Streamflow

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. W. Blasch; T. P. Ferre; J. P. Hoffmann; J. T. Cordova

    2003-01-01

    A variety of physical and chemical methods have been used to measure transmission losses and infiltration fluxes within large ephemeral streams in southern Arizona, USA. Often these methods are used to estimate a single infiltration flux for a streamflow event, typically measured during steady-state conditions. For long duration events this single estimate can be reasonable, but for short duration events

  5. Heat flux measurement in SSME turbine blade tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, Curt H.

    1990-11-01

    Surface heat flux values were measured in the turbine blade thermal cycling tester located at NASA-Marshall. This is the first time heat flux has been measured in a space shuttle main engine turbopump environment. Plots of transient and quasi-steady state heat flux data over a range of about 0 to 15 MW/sq m are presented. Data were obtained with a miniature heat flux gage device developed at NASA-Lewis. The results from these tests are being incorporated into turbine design models. Also, these gages are being considered for airfoil surface heat flux measurement on turbine vanes mounted in SSME turbopump test bed engine nozzles at Marshall. Heat flux effects that might be observed on degraded vanes are discussed.

  6. Heat flux measurement in SSME turbine blade tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, Curt H.

    Surface heat flux values were measured in the turbine blade thermal cycling tester located at NASA-Marshall. This is the first time heat flux has been measured in a space shuttle main engine turbopump environment. Plots of transient and quasi-steady state heat flux data over a range of about 0 to 15 MW/sq m are presented. Data were obtained with a miniature heat flux gage device developed at NASA-Lewis. The results from these tests are being incorporated into turbine design models. Also, these gages are being considered for airfoil surface heat flux measurement on turbine vanes mounted in SSME turbopump test bed engine nozzles at Marshall. Heat flux effects that might be observed on degraded vanes are discussed.

  7. Measuring biogenic carbon flux in the ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, P. [Univ. of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand)] [Univ. of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand); Newton, P. [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)] [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1997-01-24

    Richard B. Rivkin et al. propose that neither food-web structure nor new production can be used to predict the magnitude or patterns of downward export of biogenic organic carbon (BC) from the euphotic zone, at least for the duration of their study. These conclusions depend critically on the observations that while both food-web structure and new production estimates were different during and after the spring phytoplankton bloom, the BC flux-as estimated using shallow surface-tethered sediment traps-was similar for the two periods. The authors argue that the uncertainties associated with the trap-derived BC flux estimates are too large to support these conclusions, and they offer an alternative explanation for the apparent similarity of bloom and post-bloom export fluxes. The response of the authors of the original article is also given. 22 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Measuring nitrate fluxes to assess estuarine eutrophication

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Newton; A. Devol; W. Ruef

    2009-01-01

    Summary form only given.The availability of nitrate sensors has enabled integration of these instruments into real-time profiling buoys and, when coupled with current meters, allows for calculation of nitrate fluxes into and out of estuaries. As the United States' estuaries are increasingly experiencing eutrophication this technological development is timely. We report on the use of nitrate sensors on our profiling

  9. Measurements of the total ion flux from vacuum arc cathodespots

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Oks, Efim M.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu; Savkin,Konstantin P.; Brown, Ian G.; Nikolaev, Alexey G.

    2005-05-25

    The ion flux from vacuum arc cathode spots was measured in two vacuum arc systems. The first was a vacuum arc ion source which was modified allowing us to collect ions from arc plasma streaming through an anode mesh. The second discharge system essentially consisted of a cathode placed near the center of a spherically shaped mesh anode. In both systems, the ion current streaming through the mesh was measured by a biased collector. The mesh anodes had geometric transmittances of 60 percent and 72 percent, respectively, which were taken into account as correction factors. The ion current from different cathode materials was measured for 50-500 A of arc current. The ion current normalized by the arc current was found to depend on the cathode material, with values in the range from 5 percent to 19 percent. The normalized ion current is generally greater for elements of low cohesive energy. The ion erosion rates were determined from values of ion current and ion charge states, which were previously measured in the same ion source. The absolute ion erosion rates range from 16-173 mu g/C.

  10. High Sand Fluxes and Abrasion Rates on Mars Determined from HiRISE Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, N. T.; Ayoub, F.; Avouac, J.-P.; Leprince, S.; Lucas, A.; Mattson, S.

    2012-03-01

    We derive the reptation and saltation sand fluxes in Nili Patea, Mars. The dunes have unexpectedly high fluxes that are like those in Victoria Valley, Antarctica, implying that rates of landscape modification on Mars and Earth are similar.

  11. Sensitivity of shortwave radiative flux density, forcing, and heating rates to the aerosol vertical profile

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Hong; Schmid, Beat; Bucholtz, Anthony; Bergstrom, Robert

    2010-03-31

    The effect of the aerosol vertical distribution on the solar radiation profiles, for idealized and measured profiles of optical properties (extinction and single-scattering albedo (SSA)) during the May 2003 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerosol Intensive Observation Period (AIOP), has been investigated using the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model Shortwave (RRTM_SW) code. Calculated profiles of down-welling and up-welling solar fluxes during the AIOP have been compared with the data measured by up- and down-looking solar broadband radiometers aboard a profiling research aircraft. The measured profiles of aerosol extinction, SSA, and water vapor obtained from the same aircraft that carried the radiometers served as the inputs for the model calculations. It is noteworthy that for this study, the uplooking radiometers were mounted on a stabilized platform that kept the radiometers parallel with respect to the earth’s horizontal plane. The results indicate that the shape of the aerosol extinction profiles has very little impact on direct radiative forcings at the top of atmosphere and surface in a cloud-free sky. However, as long as the aerosol is not purely scattering, the shape of the extinction profiles is important for forcing profiles. Identical extinction profiles with different absorption profiles drastically influence the forcing and heating rate profiles. Using aircraft data from 19 AIOP profiles over the Southern Great Plains (SGP), we are able to achieve broadband down-welling solar flux closure within 0.8% (bias difference) or 1.8% (rms difference), well within the expected measurement uncertainty of 1 to 3%. The poorer agreement in up-welling flux (bias -3.7%, rms 10%) is attributed to the use of inaccurate surface albedo data. The sensitivity tests reveal the important role accurate, vertically resolved aerosol extinction data plays in tightening flux closure. This study also suggests that in the presence of a strongly absorbing substance, aircraft flux measurements from a stabilized platform have the potential to determine heating rate profiles. These measurement-based heating rate profiles provide useful data for heating rate closure studies and indirect estimates of single scattering albedo assumed in radiative transfer calculations.

  12. Calibration system for measuring the radon flux density.

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, A; Zhukovsky, M; Bastrikov, V

    2015-06-01

    The measurement of radon flux from soil surface is the useful tool for the assessment of radon-prone areas and monitoring of radon releases from uranium mining and milling residues. The accumulation chambers with hollow headspace and chambers with activated charcoal are the most used devices for these purposes. Systematic errors of the measurements strongly depend on the geometry of the chamber and diffusion coefficient of the radon in soil. The calibration system for the attestation of devices for radon flux measurements was constructed. The calibration measurements of accumulation chambers and chambers with activated charcoal were conducted. The good agreement between the results of 2D modelling of radon flux and measurements results was observed. It was demonstrated that reliable measurements of radon flux can be obtained by chambers with activated charcoal (equivalent volume ?75 l) or by accumulation chambers with hollow headspace of ?7-10 l and volume/surface ratio (height) of >15 cm. PMID:25977351

  13. Scaling in situ cosmogenic nuclide production rates using analytical approximations to atmospheric cosmic-ray fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifton, Nathaniel; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Dunai, Tibor J.

    2014-01-01

    Several models have been proposed for scaling in situ cosmogenic nuclide production rates from the relatively few sites where they have been measured to other sites of interest. Two main types of models are recognized: (1) those based on data from nuclear disintegrations in photographic emulsions combined with various neutron detectors, and (2) those based largely on neutron monitor data. However, stubborn discrepancies between these model types have led to frequent confusion when calculating surface exposure ages from production rates derived from the models. To help resolve these discrepancies and identify the sources of potential biases in each model, we have developed a new scaling model based on analytical approximations to modeled fluxes of the main atmospheric cosmic-ray particles responsible for in situ cosmogenic nuclide production. Both the analytical formulations and the Monte Carlo model fluxes on which they are based agree well with measured atmospheric fluxes of neutrons, protons, and muons, indicating they can serve as a robust estimate of the atmospheric cosmic-ray flux based on first principles. We are also using updated records for quantifying temporal and spatial variability in geomagnetic and solar modulation effects on the fluxes. A key advantage of this new model (herein termed LSD) over previous Monte Carlo models of cosmogenic nuclide production is that it allows for faster estimation of scaling factors based on time-varying geomagnetic and solar inputs. Comparing scaling predictions derived from the LSD model with those of previously published models suggest potential sources of bias in the latter can be largely attributed to two factors: different energy responses of the secondary neutron detectors used in developing the models, and different geomagnetic parameterizations. Given that the LSD model generates flux spectra for each cosmic-ray particle of interest, it is also relatively straightforward to generate nuclide-specific scaling factors based on recently updated neutron and proton excitation functions (probability of nuclide production in a given nuclear reaction as a function of energy) for commonly measured in situ cosmogenic nuclides. Such scaling factors reflect the influence of the energy distribution of the flux folded with the relevant excitation functions. Resulting scaling factors indicate 3He shows the strongest positive deviation from the flux-based scaling, while 14C exhibits a negative deviation. These results are consistent with a recent Monte Carlo-based study using a different cosmic-ray physics code package but the same excitation functions.

  14. Metabolic flux analysis using 13C peptide label measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) has become the experimental method of choice to investigate cellular metabolism. MFA has established flux maps of central metabolism for dozens of microbes, cell cultures, and plant seeds. Steady-state MFA utilizes isotopic labeling measurements of amino acids obtai...

  15. Spatially averaged heat flux and convergence measurements at the ARM regional flux experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Porch, W.; Barnes, F.; Buchwald, M.; Clements, W.; Cooper, D.; Hoard, D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Doran, C.; Hubbe, J.; Shaw, W. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Coulter, R.; Martin, T. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Kunkel, K. (Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Cloud formation and its relation to climate change is the greatest weakness in current numerical climate models. Surface heat flux in some cases causes clouds to form and in other to dissipate and the differences between these cases are subtle enough to make parameterization difficult in a numerical model. One of the goals of the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program is to make long term measurements at representative sites to improve radiation and cloud formation parameterization. This paper compares spatially averaged optical measurements of heat flux and convergence with a goal of determining how point measurements of heat fluxes scale up to the larger scale used for climate modeling. It was found that the various optical techniques used in this paper compared well with each other and with independent measurements. These results add confidence that spatially averaging optical techniques can be applied to transform point measurements to the larger scales needed for mesoscale and climate modeling. 10 refs., 6 figs. (MHB)

  16. Measurement of advective soil gas flux: Results of field and laboratory experiments with CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Amonette, James E.; Barr, Jonathan L.; Erikson, Rebecca L.; Dobeck, Laura M.; Barr, Jamie L.; Shaw, Joseph A.

    2013-10-01

    We modified our multi-channel, steady-state flow-through (SSFT), soil-CO2 flux monitoring system to include an array of inexpensive pyroelectric non-dispersive infrared detectors for full-range (0-100%) coverage of CO2 concentrations without dilution, and a larger-diameter vent tube. We then conducted field testing of this system from late July through mid-September 2010 at the Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT) project site located in Bozeman, MT, and subsequently, laboratory testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, WA using a flux bucket filled with dry sand. In the field, an array of twenty-five SSFT and three non-steady-state (NSS) flux chambers was installed in a 10x4 m area, the long boundary of which was directly above a shallow (2-m depth) horizontal injection well located 0.5 m below the water table. Two additional chambers (one SSFT and one NSS) were installed 10 m from the well for background measurements. Volumetric soil moisture sensors were installed at each SSFT chamber to measure mean levels in the top 0.15 m of soil. A total flux of 52 kg CO2 d-1 was injected into the well for 27 d and the efflux from the soil was monitored by the chambers before, during, and for 27 d after the injection. Overall, the results were consistent with those from previous years, showing a radial efflux pattern centered on a known “hot spot”, rapid responses to changes in injection rate and wind power, evidence for movement of the CO2 plume during the injection, and nominal flux levels from the SSFT chambers that were up to 6-fold higher than those measured by adjacent NSS chambers. Soil moisture levels varied during the experiment from moderate to near saturation with the highest levels occurring consistently at the hot spot. The effects of wind on measured flux were complex and decreased as soil moisture content increased. In the laboratory, flux bucket testing with the SSFT chamber showed large measured-flux enhancement due to the Venturi effect on the chamber vent, but an overall decrease in measured flux when wind also reached the sand surface. Flux-bucket tests at a high flux (comparable to that at the hot spot) also showed that the measured flux levels increase linearly with the chamber-flushing rate until the actual level is reached. At the SSFT chamber-flushing rate used in the field experiment the measured flux in the laboratory was only about a third of the actual flux. The ratio of measured to actual flux increased logarithmically as flux decreased, and reached parity at low levels typical of diffusive flux systems. Taken together, our results suggest that values for advective CO2 flux measured by SSFT and NSS chamber systems are likely to be significantly lower than the actual values due to back pressure developed in the chamber that diverts flux from entering the chamber. Chamber designs that counteract the back pressure and also avoid large Venturi effects associated with vent tubes, such as the SSFT with a narrow vent tube operated at a high chamber-flushing rate, are likely to yield flux measurements closer to the true values.

  17. The measurement and implications of short-term lava flux variability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. R. James; H. Pinkerton; S. Robson

    2007-01-01

    Lava effusion rate is a critical parameter for flow models, with particular control over the potential maximum flow length attainable. However, effusion rate (or volume flux) can be extremely difficult to measure accurately in the field and is known to vary over a wide range of timescales. Here, we describe the application of computer vision and oblique photogrammetric techniques to

  18. High rates of energy expenditure and water flux in free-ranging Point Reyes mountain beavers Aplodontia rufa phaea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crocker, D.E.; Kofahl, N.; Fellers, G.D.; Gates, N.B.; Houser, D.S.

    2007-01-01

    We measured water flux and energy expenditure in free-ranging Point Reyes mountain beavers Aplodontia rufa phaea by using the doubly labeled water method. Previous laboratory investigations have suggested weak urinary concentrating ability, high rates of water flux, and low basal metabolic rates in this species. However, free-ranging measurements from hygric mammals are rare, and it is not known how these features interact in the environment. Rates of water flux (210 ?? 32 mL d-1) and field metabolic rates (1,488 ?? 486 kJ d-1) were 159% and 265%, respectively, of values predicted by allometric equations for similar-sized herbivores. Mountain beavers can likely meet their water needs through metabolic water production and preformed water in food and thus remain in water balance without access to free water. Arginine-vasopressin levels were strongly correlated with rates of water flux and plasma urea : creatinine ratios, suggesting an important role for this hormone in regulating urinary water loss in mountain beavers. High field metabolic rates may result from cool burrow temperatures that are well below lower critical temperatures measured in previous laboratory studies and suggest that thermoregulation costs may strongly influence field energetics and water flux in semifossorial mammals. ?? 2007 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  19. A Preliminary Study of CO2 Flux Measurements by Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibert, Fabien; Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Hilton, T.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Andrews, Arlyn; Ismail, Syed; Singh, Upendra N.

    2008-01-01

    A mechanistic understanding of the global carbon cycle requires quantification of terrestrial ecosystem CO2 fluxes at regional scales. In this paper, we analyze the potential of a Doppler DIAL system to make flux measurements of atmospheric CO2 using the eddy-covariance and boundary layer budget methods and present results from a ground based experiment. The goal of this study is to put CO2 flux point measurements in a mesoscale context. In June 2007, a field experiment combining a 2-m Doppler Heterodyne Differential Absorption Lidar (HDIAL) and in-situ sensors of a 447-m tall tower (WLEF) took place in Wisconsin. The HDIAL measures simultaneously: 1) CO2 mixing ratio, 2) atmosphere structure via aerosol backscatter and 3) radial velocity. We demonstrate how to synthesize these data into regional flux estimates. Lidar-inferred fluxes are compared with eddy-covariance fluxes obtained in-situ at 396m AGL from the tower. In cases where the lidar was not yet able to measure the fluxes with acceptable precision, we discuss possible modifications to improve system performance.

  20. Absolute flux measurements in the rocket ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohlin, R. C.; Frimout, D.; Lillie, C. F.

    1974-01-01

    A two-channel spectrometer was calibrated in the wavelength region 1200-3400 A and flown on an Aerobee rocket to observe the stars alpha Lyr, eta UMa, and zeta Oph. Standard tungsten lamps provided the absolute calibration down to 2250 A, and a photodiode calibrated by the National Bureau of Standards was the reference at shorter wavelengths. The molecular branching-ratio technique of relative calibration using the gases CO, NO, and N2 was a check on the absolute calibration. The flux from eta UMa agrees with the prediction of a hydrogen line blanketed model atmosphere within 10% between 1700 and 3400 A and within 4% over most of this wavelength region.

  1. Convenient integrating sphere scanner for accurate luminous flux measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Winter; M. Lindemann; W. Jordan; U. Binder; M. Anokhin

    2009-01-01

    Measurement results and applications of a recently developed device for the measurement of the spatial uniformity of integrating spheres are presented. Due to the complexity of their implementation, sphere scanners are mainly used by national metrology institutes to increase the accuracy of relative and absolute luminous flux measurements (Ohno et al 1997 J. IES 26 107-14, Ohno and Daubach 2001

  2. Design of a differential radiometer for atmospheric radiative flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    LaDelfe, P.C.; Weber, P.G.; Rodriguez, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    The Hemispherical Optimized NEt Radiometer (HONER) is an instrument under development at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for deployment on an unmanned aerospace vehicle as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM/UAV) program. HONER is a differential radiometer which will measure the difference between the total upwelling and downwelling fluxes and is intended to provide a means of measuring the atmospheric radiative flux divergence. Unlike existing instruments which measure the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately, HONER will achieve an optical difference by chopping the two fluxes alternately onto a common pyroelectric detector. HONER will provide data resolved into two spectral bands; one covering the solar dominated region from less than 0.4 micrometer to approximately 4.5 micrometers and the other covering the region from approximately 4.5 micrometers to greater than 50 micrometers, dominated by thermal radiation. The means of separating the spectral regions guarantees seamless summation to calculate the total flux. The fields-of-view are near-hemispherical, upward and downward. The instrument can be converted, in flight, from the differential mode to absolute mode, measuring the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately and simultaneously. The instrument also features continuous calibration from on-board sources. We will describe the design and operation of the sensor head and the on-board reference sources as well as the means of deployment.

  3. Radiation measuring system using transistor flux sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josephson, V.; Greenberg, E. L.

    1986-02-01

    An ionizing radiation intensity dosimeter apparatus and method is based on carrier recombination saturation times for irradiated PN junction semiconductor devices following termination of a radiation pulse. Normally-on quiescent condition, moderate radiation doses at relatively high dose rates, and a read-out arrangement employing gated burst counting are included.

  4. A simple laboratory system for diffusive radon flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranrod, C.; Chanyotha, S.; Tonlublao, S.; Burnett, W. C.

    2015-05-01

    This study designed a simple, custom-made system to estimate the diffusive radon flux from solid materials (e.g., sediments, soils, building materials). Determination of the radon flux is based on the measurement of the radon activity in the air over time inside a closed loop system. For sediments, the system consists of wet sediment and water inside a gas-tight flask connected in a closed loop to a drying system and a radon analyzer (Durridge RAD7). The flux is determined based on an initial slope method in which the slope of radon activities vs. time plot during the first 12 h is evaluated. The slope is then multiplied by the total air volume and divided by the exposed sediment area to obtain the radon flux. The minimal thickness or mass of wet sediment should be about 4 cm or (equivalent to approximately 150 g of wet sediment) to obtain a reliable radon diffusive flux in this study.

  5. Using enhanced-mitophagy to measure autophagic flux

    PubMed Central

    Baudot, Alice D.; Haller, Martina; Mrschtik, Michaela; Tait, Stephen W.G.; Ryan, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter termed autophagy) is a cellular membrane-trafficking process that functions to deliver cytoplasmic constituents to lysosomes for degradation. Autophagy operates at basal levels to turn over damaged and misfolded proteins and it is the only process for the turnover of organelles. The process is therefore critically important for the preservation of cellular integrity and viability. Autophagy is also highly adaptable and the rate and cargoes of autophagy can be altered to bring about desired cellular responses to intracellular and environmental cues, disease states and a spectrum of pharmaceutical drugs. As a result, there is much interest in understanding the dynamics of autophagy in a variety of situations. To date, the majority of assays to monitor autophagy either measure changes in a parameter of the process at a set point in time or use markers/tracers to monitor flow of membrane-bound proteins from one point in the process to another. As such, these assays do not measure changes in endogenous cargo degradation which is the ultimate end-point of the autophagy process. We describe here an assay to measure autophagic cargo degradation by engineering cells to degrade mitochondria en masse. We show that this ‘enhanced-mitophagy’ assay can be used to measure differences in the rate of autophagy between different cells or in response to agents which are known to promote or inhibit autophagic flux. We consider therefore that this assay will prove to be a valuable resource for investigations in which autophagy is considered important and is believed to be modulated. PMID:25498004

  6. Fiber-optic sensor system for heat-flux measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yonghang; He, Jinglei; Zhao, Weizhong; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.; Pritchard, William D. N.

    2004-04-01

    Two different types of fiber-optic sensors were used in an experiment to measure the heat flux in a simulated refractory lining material. The results obtained with a sensor based on fluorescence lifetime detection and a sensor based on the peak wavelength shift of a fiber Bragg grating are presented and compared. Analysis of the results of the measurements taken indicates that these fiber-optic sensor systems are capable of performing multipoint temperature, and thus the heat flux, measurements. An approach is also presented for the measurement of the temperature dependence of the conductivity coefficient of the materials concerned, using the sensor systems detailed.

  7. Analysis of actinic flux profiles measured from an ozonesonde balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Allaart, M.; Knap, W. H.; Stammes, P.

    2015-04-01

    A green light sensor has been developed at KNMI to measure actinic flux profiles using an ozonesonde balloon. In total, 63 launches with ascending and descending profiles were performed between 2006 and 2010. The measured uncalibrated actinic flux profiles are analysed using the Doubling-Adding KNMI (DAK) radiative transfer model. Values of the cloud optical thickness (COT) along the flight track were taken from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) Cloud Physical Properties (CPP) product. The impact of clouds on the actinic flux profile is evaluated on the basis of the cloud modification factor (CMF) at the cloud top and cloud base, which is the ratio between the actinic fluxes for cloudy and clear-sky scenes. The impact of clouds on the actinic flux is clearly detected: the largest enhancement occurs at the cloud top due to multiple scattering. The actinic flux decreases almost linearly from cloud top to cloud base. Above the cloud top the actinic flux also increases compared to clear-sky scenes. We find that clouds can increase the actinic flux to 2.3 times the clear-sky value at cloud top and decrease it to about 0.05 at cloud base. The relationship between CMF and COT agrees well with DAK simulations, except for a few outliers. Good agreement is found between the DAK-simulated actinic flux profiles and the observations for single-layer clouds in fully overcast scenes. The instrument is suitable for operational balloon measurements because of its simplicity and low cost. It is worth further developing the instrument and launching it together with atmospheric chemistry composition sensors.

  8. Attenuation of Scalar Fluxes Measured with Spatially-displaced Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, T. W.; Lenschow, D. H.

    2009-02-01

    Observations from the Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (HATS) field program are used to examine the attenuation of measured scalar fluxes caused by spatial separation between the vertical velocity and scalar sensors. The HATS data show that flux attenuation for streamwise, crosswind, and vertical sensor displacements are each a function of a dimensionless, stability-dependent parameter n m multiplied by the ratio of sensor displacement to measurement height. The scalar flux decays more rapidly with crosswind displacements than for streamwise displacements and decays more rapidly for stable stratification than for unstable stratification. The cospectral flux attenuation model of Kristensen et al. agrees well with the HATS data for streamwise sensor displacements, although it is necessary to include a neglected quadrature spectrum term to explain the observation that flux attenuation is often less with the scalar sensor downwind of the anemometer than for the opposite configuration. A simpler exponential decay model provides good estimates for crosswind sensor displacements, as well as for streamwise sensor displacements with stable stratification. A model similar to that of Lee and Black correctly predicts flux attenuation for a combination of streamwise and crosswind displacements, i.e. as a function of wind direction relative to the sensor displacement. The HATS data for vertical sensor displacements extend the near-neutral results of Kristensen et al. to diabatic stratification and confirm their finding that flux attenuation is less with the scalar sensor located below the anemometer than if the scalar sensor is displaced an equal distance either horizontally or above the anemometer.

  9. Analysis of field measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, Shashi B.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of the field measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes is discussed. These data were examined in conjunction with reflectance obtained from helicopter mounted Modular Multiband Radiometer. These measurements are representative of the canopy scale (10 to 100 m)(exp 2) and provide a good basis for investigating the hypotheses/relationship potentially useful in remote sensing applications. All the micrometeorological data collected during FIFE-89 were processed and fluxes of CO2, water vapor, and sensible heat were calculated. Soil CO2 fluxes were also estimated. Employing these soil CO2 flux values, in conjunction with micrometeorological measurements, canopy photosynthesis is being estimated. A biochemical model of leaf photosynthesis was adapted to the prairie vegetation. The modeled leaf photosynthesis rates were scaled up to the canopy level. This model and a multiplicative stomatal conductance model are also used to calculate canopy conductance.

  10. Surface Catalysis and Oxidation on Stagnation Point Heat Flux Measurements in High Enthalpy Arc Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nawaz, Anuscheh; Driver, David M.; Terrazas-Salinas

    2013-01-01

    Heat flux sensors are routinely used in arc jet facilities to determine heat transfer rates from plasma plume. The goal of this study is to assess the impact of surface composition changes on these heat flux sensors. Surface compositions can change due to oxidation and material deposition from the arc jet. Systematic surface analyses of the sensors were conducted before and after exposure to plasma. Currently copper is commonly used as surface material. Other surface materials were studied including nickel, constantan gold, platinum and silicon dioxide. The surfaces were exposed to plasma between 0.3 seconds and 3 seconds. Surface changes due to oxidation as well as copper deposition from the arc jets were observed. Results from changes in measured heat flux as a function of surface catalycity is given, along with a first assessment of enthalpy for these measurements. The use of cupric oxide is recommended for future heat flux measurements, due to its consistent surface composition arc jets.

  11. Solar Model Parameters and Direct Measurements of Solar Neutrino Fluxes

    E-print Network

    Abhijit Bandyopadhyay; Sandhya Choubey; Srubabati Goswami; S. T. Petcov

    2006-08-30

    We explore a novel possibility of determining the solar model parameters, which serve as input in the calculations of the solar neutrino fluxes, by exploiting the data from direct measurements of the fluxes. More specifically, we use the rather precise value of the $^8B$ neutrino flux, $\\phi_B$ obtained from the global analysis of the solar neutrino and KamLAND data, to derive constraints on each of the solar model parameters on which $\\phi_B$ depends. We also use more precise values of $^7Be$ and $pp$ fluxes as can be obtained from future prospective data and discuss whether such measurements can help in reducing the uncertainties of one or more input parameters of the Standard Solar Model.

  12. Parameters and volt-ampere ratings of a synchronous motor drive for flux-weakening applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicola Bianchi; Silverio Bolognani

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with the selection of the motor parameters and the inverter power ratings for a permanent magnet (PM) synchronous motor drive in order to meet a given flux-weakening torque versus speed characteristic. Appropriate combinations of stator PM flux linkage, d- and q-axis inductances, and inverter current rating at a given voltage are derived, in normalized values, as functions

  13. The Airborne Measurements of Methane Fluxes (AIRMETH) Arctic Campaign (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafimovich, A.; Metzger, S.; Hartmann, J.; Kohnert, K.; Sachs, T.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most pressing questions with regard to climate feedback processes in a warming Arctic is the regional-scale methane release from Arctic permafrost areas. The Airborne Measurements of Methane Fluxes (AIRMETH) campaign is designed to quantitatively and spatially explicitly address this question. Ground-based eddy covariance (EC) measurements provide continuous in-situ observations of the surface-atmosphere exchange of methane. However, these observations are rare in the Arctic permafrost zone and site selection is bound by logistical constraints among others. Consequently, these observations cover only small areas that are not necessarily representative of the region of interest. Airborne measurements can overcome this limitation by covering distances of hundreds of kilometers over time periods of a few hours. Here, we present the potential of environmental response functions (ERFs) for quantitatively linking methane flux observations in the atmospheric surface layer to meteorological and biophysical drivers in the flux footprints. For this purpose thousands of kilometers of AIRMETH data across the Alaskan North Slope are utilized, with the aim to extrapolate the airborne EC methane flux observations to the entire North Slope. The data were collected aboard the research aircraft POLAR 5, using its turbulence nose boom and fast response methane and meteorological sensors. After thorough data pre-processing, Reynolds averaging is used to derive spatially integrated fluxes. To increase spatial resolution and to derive ERFs, we then use wavelet transforms of the original high-frequency data. This enables much improved spatial discretization of the flux observations, and the quantification of continuous and biophysically relevant land cover properties in the flux footprint of each observation. A machine learning technique is then employed to extract and quantify the functional relationships between the methane flux observations and the meteorological and biophysical drivers in the flux footprints. Lastly, the resulting ERFs are used to extrapolate the methane release over spatio-temporally explicit grids of the Alaskan North Slope. Metzger et al. (2013) have demonstrated the efficacy of this technique for regionalizing airborne EC heat flux observations to within an accuracy of ?18% and a precision of ?5%. Here, we show for the first time results from applying the ERF procedure to airborne methane EC measurements, and report its potential for spatio-temporally explicit inventories of the regional-scale methane exchange. References: Metzger, S., Junkermann, W., Mauder, M., Butterbach-Bahl, K., Trancón y Widemann, B., Neidl, F., Schäfer, K., Wieneke, S., Zheng, X. H., Schmid, H. P., and Foken, T.: Spatially explicit regionalization of airborne flux measurements using environmental response functions, Biogeosciences, 10, 2193-2217, doi:10.5194/bg-10-2193-2013, 2013.

  14. Regional carbon dioxide fluxes from aircraft measurements in southwest France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vellinga, O. S.; Hutjes, R. W. A.; Elbers, J. A.

    2009-04-01

    In 2007, the CarboEurope-IP Regional Component organised the second edition of the CERES measurement campaign in the southwest of France. This was a follow-up of the initial campaign in 2005. CERES'07 consisted of two intensive observational periods (IOPs), of which one in spring and the other one in summer. During both IOPs, ground stations, tall towers, radiosondes and a number of aircrafts were used, including our own environmental research aircraft (ERA). The ERA is a small aircraft flying at low altitudes and low air speeds, equipped to measure fluxes of carbon dioxide, latent heat and sensible heat using the eddy-correlation technique. In addition, instruments are on board for measuring ground temperature, net radiation and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Flux data obtained with the ERA during CERES'07 have been analyzed and will be presented here. In the data analysis, we present regional fluxes of carbon dioxide focussing at seasonal trends in relation to landscape elements. To achieve this, flight tracks were split into homogeneous segments based on land cover, topography and soil type. During both IOPs, weather conditions were constant. This gives us the possibility to average data in each segment across all flights, though the issue of diurnal variation in surface fluxes and radiation still remains. In short, the analysis strategy on our airborne flux data from CERES'07 will be addressed in this presentation together with its results focussing at drivers for these fluxes at landscape scale.

  15. Accuracy of quantum sensors measuring yield photon flux and photosynthetic photon flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, C.; Tibbitts, T.; Sager, J.; Deitzer, G.; Bubenheim, D.; Koerner, G.; Bugbee, B.; Knott, W. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Photosynthesis is fundamentally driven by photon flux rather than energy flux, but not all absorbed photons yield equal amounts of photosynthesis. Thus, two measures of photosynthetically active radiation have emerged: photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), which values all photons from 400 to 700 nm equally, and yield photon flux (YPF), which weights photons in the range from 360 to 760 nm according to plant photosynthetic response. We selected seven common radiation sources and measured YPF and PPF from each source with a spectroradiometer. We then compared these measurements with measurements from three quantum sensors designed to measure YPF, and from six quantum sensors designed to measure PPF. There were few differences among sensors within a group (usually <5%), but YPF values from sensors were consistently lower (3% to 20%) than YPF values calculated from spectroradiometric measurements. Quantum sensor measurements of PPF also were consistently lower than PPF values calculated from spectroradiometric measurements, but the differences were <7% for all sources, except red-light-emitting diodes. The sensors were most accurate for broad-band sources and least accurate for narrow-band sources. According to spectroradiometric measurements, YPF sensors were significantly less accurate (>9% difference) than PPF sensors under metal halide, high-pressure sodium, and low-pressure sodium lamps. Both sensor types were inaccurate (>18% error) under red-light-emitting diodes. Because both YPF and PPF sensors are imperfect integrators, and because spectroradiometers can measure photosynthetically active radiation much more accurately, researchers should consider developing calibration factors from spectroradiometric data for some specific radiation sources to improve the accuracy of integrating sensors.

  16. A comparison of estimated and directly measured turbulent heat fluxes in the lower stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heck, W.

    1977-01-01

    The contribution of small-scale motions to the vertical heat flux in the lower stratosphere is determined from wind and temperature fluctuation statistics obtained during the High Altitude Clear Air Turbulence investigation. Analysis of the cospectra suggests a horizontal wavelength of 3 km as the appropriate long-wave cutoff of small-scale motion. With this scale restriction, the measured vertical heat fluxes are in good agreement with the values of heat flux estimated by Lilly et al. (1974) from the kinetic energy dissipation rate. Hence, the hypothesis of Lilly et al. for estimating heat flux from the dissipation rate is considered to be reliable. It follows that, in the lower stratosphere, subsynoptic vertical transport is small compared to large-scale transport.

  17. Air-sea flux of bromoform: Controls, rates, and implications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Birgit Quack; D. W. R. Wallace

    2003-01-01

    Bromoform (CHBr3) is the largest single source of atmospheric organic bromine and therefore of importance as a source of reactive halogens to the troposphere and lower stratosphere. The sea-to-air flux, originating with macroalgal and planktonic sources, is the main source for atmospheric bromoform. We review bromoform's contribution to atmospheric chemistry, its atmospheric and oceanic distributions and its oceanic sources and

  18. A new benthic aqueous flux meter for very low to moderate discharge rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryon, Michael; Brown, Kevin; Dorman, LeRoy; Sauter, Allan

    2001-08-01

    Significant quantities of fluids and dissolved geochemical components are expelled through the sediment surface in ocean margin and sedimented ridge environments. Recently, significant interest has been generated in constraining hydrological processes in these environments, but direct measurement of fluid flow in the marine environment has proven to be difficult and many aspects of marine hydrogeology remain poorly understood. To address the need for a means to make a significant number of direct measurements in a wide range of low to moderate flow environments, we have developed a new type of benthic aqueous flux meter that is capable of measuring diffuse fluid flow through the sediment surface on the order of 0.1 mm yr -1-15 m yr -1 when the flow is through sediments with permeabilities of less than 10 -8 cm 2 (typical seafloor sediments). The instrument measures fluid flow by determining the degree of dilution of a chemical tracer that is injected by an osmotic pump at a known rate into the fluids venting into or out of a collection chamber situated on the sea bed. The pump also withdraws a subsample of this tracer/fluid mix into sample coils allowing a serial record of the flow rates to be determined. Both upward and downward flow can be measured and, when flux rates are high enough to effectively flush the collecting chamber, the instruments also act as geochemical samplers. Three years of laboratory testing and field use have constrained the effects of (1) temperature, pressure, and deployment duration on osmotic pump performance, (2) dispersion/diffusion in the sample coils, and (3) deflection of flow under a range of sediment permeabilities. Recent deployments on the Kodiak and Cascadia accretionary prisms document the range and capabilities of the instrument in the field.

  19. Measuring of rotating magnetic flux in an integrated environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sari, Z.; Ivanyi, A.

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes a measuring method and the establishment of a measuring environment for two-dimensional rotating magnetic fluxes and fields. The measuring method relies on measuring currents and voltages in coils attached to the magnetic specimen. For the processing and generating of measuring signals, a PC-based system running Lab View is applied extended with a NI ELVIS II board, and two high performance KIKUSUI bipolar power supplies. The measurement results are satisfactory and show that the measuring environment established is capable of non-destructively capture the two-dimensional magnetic characteristics of the specimen investigated.

  20. A review of flux considerations for in vivo neurochemical measurements.

    PubMed

    Paul, David W; Stenken, Julie A

    2015-05-18

    The mass transport or flux of neurochemicals in the brain and how this flux affects chemical measurements and their interpretation is reviewed. For all endogenous neurochemicals found in the brain, the flux of each of these neurochemicals exists between sources that produce them and the sites that consume them all within ?m distances. Principles of convective-diffusion are reviewed with a significant emphasis on the tortuous paths and discrete point sources and sinks. The fundamentals of the primary methods of detection, microelectrodes and microdialysis sampling of brain neurochemicals are included in the review. Special attention is paid to the change in the natural flux of the neurochemicals caused by implantation and consumption at microelectrodes and uptake by microdialysis. The detection of oxygen, nitric oxide, glucose, lactate, and glutamate, and catecholamines by both methods are examined and where possible the two techniques (electrochemical vs. microdialysis) are compared. Non-invasive imaging methods: magnetic resonance, isotopic fluorine MRI, electron paramagnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography are also used for different measurements of the above-mentioned solutes and these are briefly reviewed. Although more sophisticated, the imaging techniques are unable to track neurochemical flux on short time scales, and lack spatial resolution. Where possible, determinations of flux using imaging are compared to the more classical techniques of microdialysis and microelectrodes. PMID:25977941

  1. Denitrification Rates, Nitrous Oxide, and Methane Fluxes Along Soil Moisture Gradients In Stormwater Control Structures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettez, N. D.; Morse, J. L.; Groffman, P. M.

    2014-12-01

    Urbanization has significant impacts on the landscape resulting in increased volume and velocity of stormwater runoff following precipitation events. The primary method used to control stormwater discharge and prevent downstream erosion is the use of best management practices (BMP's) such as retention basins, detention basins and rain gardens. Although the BMP's were designed to mitigate hydrologic impacts associated with urban development they have the potential to remove nitrogen through denitrification. In this study we set up transects along moisture gradients in two BMP's in Baltimore MD, USA and measured denitrification rates using the Nitrogen Free Air Removal Method (N-FARM) method and monitored both soil conditions (oxygen, moisture and temperature measured hourly) and trace gas fluxes (methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrous oxide measured monthly) for 1 year.

  2. Maize Residue Decomposition Measurement Using Soil Surface Carbon Dioxide Fluxes and Natural Abundance of Carbon13

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philippe Rochette; Denis A. Angers; Lawrence B. Flanagan

    1999-01-01

    organic matter content and nutrient cycling. We hypothesized that mation obtained is mostly relevant to aboveground crop natural abundance 13 C analyses could be used with soil CO2 flux measurements to quantify the short-term decomposition rates of residues. The natural abundance of 13 C has also been maize (Zea mays L.) residues under undisturbed field conditions. For used to study

  3. Growth rates of atmospheric molecular clusters determined from cluster appearance times and collision-evaporation fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontkanen, Jenni; Olenius, Tinja; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Kulmala, Markku

    2015-04-01

    The probability of freshly formed particles to survive to climatically relevant sizes is determined by the competition between the coagulation loss rate and the particle growth rate. Therefore, various methods have been developed to deduce the growth rates from measured particle size distributions. Recently, the growth rates of sub-3nm clusters have been determined based on the appearance times of different cluster sizes. However, it is not clear to what extent these growth rates are consistent with the growth rates corresponding to molecular fluxes between clusters. In this work, we simulated the time evolution of a population of sub-3 nm molecular clusters and compared the growth rates determined (1) from the cluster appearance times and (2) from the collision-evaporation fluxes between different cluster sizes. We performed a number of simulations by varying the ambient conditions and the properties of the model substance. In the first simulation set, the Gibbs free energy of the formation of the clusters was assumed to have a single maximum and no minima, corresponding to a monotonically increasing stability as a function of cluster size. The saturation vapor pressure was selected so that the growth proceeded solely via monomer additions. The growth rates were determined separately for each cluster. However, to see the effect of finite size resolution, we also performed simulations where the clusters were grouped into size bins, for which we determined the growth rates. In the second simulation set, the saturation vapor pressure was lowered so that the collisions of small clusters significantly contributed to the growth. As the growth rate of a single cluster is ambiguous in this case, the growth rates were determined only for different size bins. We performed simulations using a similar free energy profile as in other simulations but we also used a free energy profile containing a local minimum, corresponding to small stable clusters. Our simulations show that there may be significant differences between the growth rates determined with the two approaches. The growth rates determined from the appearance times of clusters were generally higher than the flux-equivalent growth rates. The difference between the growth rates was largest for the smallest clusters but its magnitude varied depending on the properties of the model substance and on the ambient conditions, such as the external sink. The use of size bins increased the difference, especially if the width of the size bins was large. In the simulations where non-monomer collisions significantly contributed to the growth, the difference between the two growth rates was smallest in the conditions with high cluster concentrations. Furthermore, when the free energy profile had a minimum, the difference was generally smaller than in the simulations with no minima. While this work assesses the qualitative behavior of the size-dependent growth rates, and calls for caution in the interpretation of growth rates deduced from experiments, quantitative comparisons require information on the specific substance and conditions of interest.

  4. Measurement of emission fluxes from Technical Area 54, Area G and L. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Eklund, B. [Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-03-15

    The emission flux (mass/time-area) of tritiated water from TA-54 was measured to support the characterization of radioactive air emissions from waste sites for the Radioactive Air Emissions Management (RAEM) program and for the Area G Performance Assessment. Measurements were made at over 180 locations during the summers of 1993 and 1994, including randomly selected locations across Area G, three suspected areas of contamination at Area G, and the property surrounding TA-54. The emission fluxes of radon were measured at six locations and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at 30 locations. Monitoring was performed at each location over a several-hour period using the U.S. EPA flux chamber approach. Separate samples for tritiated water, radon, and VOCs were collected and analyzed in off-site laboratories. The measured tritiated water emission fluxes varied over several orders of magnitude, from background levels of about 3 pCi/m{sup 2}-min to 9.69 x 10{sup 6} pCi/m{sup 2}-min near a disposal shaft. Low levels of tritiated water were found to have migrated into Pajarito Canyon, directly south of Area G. The tritium flux data were used to generate an estimated annual emission rate of 14 Curies/yr for all of Area G, with the majority of this activity being emitted from relatively small areas adjacent to several disposal shafts. The estimated total annual release is less than 1% of the total tritium release from all LANL in 1992 and results in a negligible off-site dose. Based on the limited data available, the average emission flux of radon from Area G is estimated to be 8.1 pCi/m{sup 2}-min. The measured emission fluxes of VOCs were < 100 {mu}g/m{sup 2}-min, which is small compared with fluxes typically measured at hazardous waste landfills. The air quality impacts of these releases were evaluated in a separate report.

  5. Upward shower rates at neutrino telescopes directly determine the neutrino flux

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Marfatia, D.; McKay, D. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States)

    2008-05-15

    We show that the rate for upward showers from an isotropic cosmic neutrino flux at neutrino telescopes like IceCube is independent of the neutrino-nucleon cross section. For bins that span a relatively narrow range in energy, neither scaling the cross section, nor changing its power-law energy behavior affects the upward shower rate, which depends only on the flux. The neutrino flux can be completely known since its spectral shape can be determined by comparing the rates in neighboring bins. We also show that the downward shower rate varies linearly with cross section with a proportionality constant determined by the energy dependence of the cross section, independent of the power-law behavior of the flux. The normalization and energy dependence of the cross section can be found by comparing the downward rates in neighboring bins.

  6. Aerosol properties derived from spectral actinic flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, H.; Schmidt, K. S.; Pilewskie, P.; Cozic, J.; Wollny, A. G.; Brock, C. A.; Baynard, T.; Lack, D.; Parrish, D. D.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    2008-12-01

    Measurement of aerosol properties is very important for understanding climate change. Aerosol optical properties influence solar radiation throughout the troposphere. According to the Working Group I report of the intergovernmental panel for climate change [IPCC, 2007], aerosols have a direct radiative forcing of - 0.5±0.4 W/m2 with a medium to low level of scientific understanding. This relatively large uncertainty indicates the need for more frequent and precise measurements of aerosol properties. We will show how actinic flux measurements can be used to derive important optical aerosol parameters such as aerosol optical thickness and depth, surface albedo, angstrom exponent, radiative forcing by clouds and aerosols, aerosol extinction, and others. The instrument used for this study is a combination of two spectroradiometers measuring actinic flux in the ultraviolet and visible radiation range from 280 to 690 nm with a resolution of 1 nm. Actinic flux is measured as the radiation incident on a spherical surface with sensitivity independent of direction. In contrast, irradiance is measured as the radiation incident on a plane surface, which depends on the cosine of the incident angle. Our goal is to assess the capabilities of using spectral actinic flux measurements to derive various aerosol properties. Here we will compare 1) actinic flux measurements to irradiance measurements from the spectral solar flux radiometer (SSFR), 2) derived aerosol size distributions with measurements from a white light optical particle counter (WLOPC) and ultra high sensitivity aerosol size spectrometer (UHSAS), and 3) derived aerosol optical extinction with measurements from a cavity ringdown aerosol extinction spectrometer (CRD-AES). These comparisons will utilize data from three recent field campaigns over New England and the Atlantic Ocean (ICARTT 2004), Texas and the Gulf of Mexico during (TexAQS/GoMACCS 2006), and Alaska and the Arctic Ocean (ARCPAC 2008) when the instruments were installed on board the NOAA WP-3D aircraft. IPCC (2007), Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA.

  7. Parameters and volt-ampere ratings of a synchronous motor drive for flux-weakening applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, N.; Bolognani, S. [Univ. of Padova (Italy). Dept. of Electrical Engineering] [Univ. of Padova (Italy). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1997-09-01

    This paper deals with the selection of the motor parameters and the inverter power ratings for a permanent-magnet (PM) synchronous motor drive in order to meet a given flux-weakening torque versus speed characteristic. Appropriate combinations of stator PM flux linkage, d- and q-axis inductances, and inverter current rating at a given voltage are derived, in normalized values, as functions of the specified flux-weakening speed range and torque limits. By means of these sets of data, the drive designer can easily individuate and compare all the suitable synchronous motors (defined by the d- and q-axis inductances and flux linkage) and the related inverter volt-ampere ratings, for the desired flux-weakening performance. Therefore, this paper can be considered a synthesis work rather than an analysis one and can profitably be used for an optimal design of a synchronous motor drive.

  8. Measurement of the 8B solar neutrino flux with the KamLAND liquid scintillator detector

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Abe; K. Furuno; A. Gando; Y. Gando; K. Ichimura; H. Ikeda; K. Inoue; Y. Kibe; W. Kimura; Y. Kishimoto; M. Koga; Y. Minekawa; T. Mitsui; T. Morikawa; N. Nagai; K. Nakajima; K. Nakamura; M. Nakamura; K. Narita; I. Shimizu; Y. Shimizu; J. Shirai; F. Suekane; A. Suzuki; H. Takahashi; N. Takahashi; Y. Takemoto; K. Tamae; H. Watanabe; B. D. Xu; H. Yabumoto; E. Yonezawa; H. Yoshida; S. Yoshida; S. Enomoto; A. Kozlov; H. Murayama; C. Grant; G. Keefer; D. McKee; A. Piepke; T. I. Banks; T. Bloxham; J. A. Detwiler; S. J. Freedman; B. K. Fujikawa; K. Han; R. Kadel; T. O'Donnell; H. M. Steiner; L. A. Winslow; D. A. Dwyer; C. Mauger; R. D. McKeown; C. Zhang; B. E. Berger; J. Maricic; T. Miletic; M. Batygov; J. G. Learned; S. Matsuno; S. Pakvasa; M. Sakai; G. A. Horton-Smith; A. Tang; K. E. Downum; G. Gratta; K. Tolich; Y. Efremenko; Y. Kamyshkov; O. Perevozchikov; H. J. Karwowski; D. M. Markoff; W. Tornow; K. M. Heeger; F. Piquemal; J.-S. Ricol; M. P. Decowski

    2011-01-01

    We report a measurement of the neutrino-electron elastic scattering rate from 8B solar neutrinos based on a 123 kton-day exposure of KamLAND. The background-subtracted electron recoil rate, above a 5.5-MeV analysis threshold is 1.49 ± 0.14(stat) ± 0.17(syst) events per kton-day. Interpreted as due to a pure electron flavor flux with a 8B neutrino spectrum, this corresponds to a spectrum

  9. Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements

    E-print Network

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements Stephen T. Dye, and approved November 16, 2007 (received for review July 11, 2007) Uranium and thorium within the Earth produce of uranium and thorium concentrations in geological reservoirs relies largely on geochemi- cal model

  10. A PROBLEM WITH FLUX CHAMBER MEASUREMENTS OF BIOGENIC SULFUR EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Problems associated with identifying and quantifying factors that influence liquid-phase controlled evolution of hydrogen sulfide and organic sulfides through the air-water interface are briefly reviewed. It was found that at present flux chamber measurements of the release of th...

  11. Some Recent Secondary Production Measurements for Neutrino Flux Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Geoffrey B.

    2011-12-01

    Recent measurements of meson production in proton-nucleus interactions have made possible reliable neutrino flux determinations at modern neutrino experiments. This article discusses preliminary results from the HARP, MIP, and E910 are discussed along with some of their implications for the MINOS, K2K, and MiniBooNE neutrino experiments.

  12. Airborne flux measurements of Biogenic Isoprene over California

    SciTech Connect

    Misztal, P.; Karl, Thomas G.; Weber, Robin; Jonsson, H. H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2014-10-10

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a PTR-MS and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene, MVK+MAC, methanol, monoterpenes, and MBO over ~10,000-km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions of isoprene. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach was used to calculate fluxes over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The Continuous Wavelet Transformation (CWT) approach was used over the same transects to also calculate "instantaneous" fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Vertical flux divergence of isoprene is expected due to its relatively short lifetime and was measured directly using "racetrack" profiles at multiple altitudes. It was found to be linear and in the range 5% to 30% depending on the ratio of aircraft altitude to PBL height (z/zi). Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently 1 at 400 m ±50 m (a.g.l.) altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to Basal Emission Factor (BEF) landcover datasets used to drive biogenic VOC (BVOC) emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m-2 h-1) above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. While isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions, shrublands, and coniferous forests were extremely low, high concentrations of methanol and monoterpenes were found above some of these regions. These observations demonstrate the ability to measure fluxes from specific sources by eddy covariance from an aircraft, and suggest the utility of measurements using fast response chemical sensors to constrain emission inventories and map out source distributions for a much broader array of trace gases than was observed in this study. This paper reports the first regional direct eddy covariance fluxes of isoprene. The emissions of VOCs measured from aircraft with 2 km spatial resolution can quantify the distribution of major sources providing the observations required for testing statewide emission inventories of these important trace gases. These measurements will be used in a future study to assess BVOC emission models and their driving variable datasets.

  13. Automatic magnetic flux measurement of micro plastic-magnetic rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingdong; Lin, Mingxing; Song, Aiwei

    2015-07-01

    Micro plastic-magnetic rotors of various sizes and shapes are widely used in industry, their magnetic flux measurement is one of the most important links in the production process, and therefore some technologies should be adopted to improve the measurement precision and efficiency. In this paper, the automatic measurement principle of micro plastic-magnetic rotors is proposed and the integration time constant and the integrator drift’s suppression and compensation in the measurement circuit are analyzed. Two other factors influencing the measurement precision are also analyzed, including the relative angles between the rotor magnetic poles and the measurement coil, and the starting point of the rotors in the coil where the measurement begins. An instrument is designed to measure the magnetic flux of the rotors. Measurement results show that the measurement error is within??±1%, which meets the basic requirements in industry application, and the measurement efficiency is increased by 10 times, which can cut down labor cost and management cost when compared with manual measurement.

  14. Reliability of N flux rates estimated from 15N enrichment and dilution experiments in aquatic systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc Elskens; Willy Baeyens; Natacha Brion; Sandra De Galan; Leo Goeyens; Anouk de Brauwere

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the estimation behavior of six increasingly complex 15N models, for estimating flux rates between phytoplankton and dissolved N pools in aquatic ecosystems. The development of these models over the last 40 years reflects increasing realism in the pools and fluxes that constitute the N cycle. The purpose of this paper is to assess how the model results

  15. Radiative forcing of the Venus mesosphere. I - Solar fluxes and heating rates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Crisp

    1986-01-01

    Most of the solar energy absorbed by Venus is deposited in the atmosphere, at levels more than 60 km above the surface. This unusual flux distribution should have important consequences for the thermal structure and dynamical state of that atmosphere. A radiative transfer model was used to derive the structure and amplitude of the solar fluxes and heating rates in

  16. Advances in Air-Sea Flux Measurement by Eddy Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomquist, Byron W.; Huebert, Barry J.; Fairall, Christopher W.; Bariteau, Ludovic; Edson, James B.; Hare, Jeffrey E.; McGillis, Wade R.

    2014-09-01

    Eddy-correlation measurements of the oceanic flux are useful for the development and validation of air-sea gas exchange models and for analysis of the marine carbon cycle. Results from more than a decade of published work and from two recent field programs illustrate the principal interferences from water vapour and motion, demonstrating experimental approaches for improving measurement precision and accuracy. Water vapour cross-sensitivity is the greatest source of error for flux measurements using infrared gas analyzers, often leading to a ten-fold bias in the measured flux. Much of this error is not related to optical contamination, as previously supposed. While various correction schemes have been demonstrated, the use of an air dryer and closed-path analyzer is the most effective way to eliminate this interference. This approach also obviates density corrections described by Webb et al. (Q J R Meteorol 106:85-100, 1980). Signal lag and frequency response are a concern with closed-path systems, but periodic gas pulses at the inlet tip provide for precise determination of lag time and frequency attenuation. Flux attenuation corrections are shown to be 5 % for a cavity ring-down analyzer (CRDS) and dryer with a 60-m inlet line. The estimated flux detection limit for the CRDS analyzer and dryer is a factor of ten better than for IRGAs sampling moist air. While ship-motion interference is apparent with all analyzers tested in this study, decorrelation or regression methods are effective in removing most of this bias from IRGA measurements and may also be applicable to the CRDS.

  17. Balloon-borne measurement of energetic electron fluxes inside thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabshahi, Shahab; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Dwyer, Joseph; Rassoul, Hamid

    2014-05-01

    High-energy radiation is routinely produced by thunderclouds and lightning. This radiation is in the form of x-rays and gamma-rays with timescales ranging from sub-microsecond (x-rays associated with lightning leaders), to sub-millisecond (Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes), to minute long glows (Gamma-ray Glows from thunderclouds seen on the ground and in or near the cloud by aircrafts and balloons). It is generally accepted that these emissions originate from bremsstrahlung interactions of relativistic runaway electrons with air, which can be accelerated in the thundercloud/lightning electric fields and gain up to multi-MeV energies. However, the exact physical details of the mechanism that produces these runaway electrons are still unknown. In order to better understand the source of energetic radiation inside thunderclouds, we have begun a campaign of balloon-borne instruments to directly measure the flux of energetic electrons inside thunderclouds. In the current configuration, each balloon carries Geiger counters to record the energetic particles. Geiger counters are well suited for directly measuring energetic electrons and positrons and have the advantage of being lightweight and dependable. We transmit data at 900MHz, ISM band, with 115.2 kb/s transmission rate. This would provide us a high resolution radiation profile over a relatively large distance. Due to the nature of the thunderstorm environment, the campaign has many design, communication, and safety challenges. In this presentation we will report on the status of the campaign and some of the physical insights gained from the data collected by our instruments. This work was supported in part by the NASA grant NNX12A002H and by DARPA grant HR0011-1-10-1-0061.

  18. A Novel Detector for High Neutron Flux Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Singo, T. D.; Wyngaardt, S. M. [Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Papka, P. [Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Nuclear Physics group, iThemba labs, P. O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Dobson, R. T. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa)

    2010-01-05

    Measuring alpha particles from a neutron induced break-up reaction with a mass spectrometer can be an excellent tool for detecting neutrons in a high neutron flux environment. Break-up reactions of {sup 6}Li and {sup 12}C can be used in the detection of slow and fast neutrons, respectively. A high neutron flux detection system that integrates the neutron energy sensitive material and helium mass spectrometer has been developed. The description of the detector configuration is given and it is soon to be tested at iThemba LABS, South Africa.

  19. Measurements of EUV Coronal Holes and Open Magnetic Flux

    E-print Network

    Lowder, Chris; Leamon, Robert; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Coronal holes are regions on the Sun's surface that map the foot-prints of open magnetic field lines. We have developed an automated routine to detect and track boundaries of long-lived coronal holes using full-disk EUV images obtained by SoHO:EIT, SDO:AIA, and STEREO:EUVI. We measure coronal hole areas and magnetic flux in these holes, and compare the measurements with calculations by the PFSS model. It is shown that, from 1996 through 2010, the total area of coronal holes measured with EIT images varies between 5$\\%$ and 17$\\%$ of the total solar surface area, and the total unsigned open flux varies between $2-5 \\times 10^{22}$ Mx. The solar cycle dependence of these measurements are similar to the PFSS results, but the model yields larger hole areas and greater open flux than observed by EIT. The AIA/EUVI measurements from 2010-2013 show coronal hole area coverage of 5-10$\\%$ of the total surface area, with significant contribution from low latitudes, which is under-represented by EIT. AIA/EUVI have measur...

  20. ACTIVE: a program to calculate and plot reaction rates from ANISN calculated fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, J.L.

    1981-12-01

    The ACTIVE code calculates spatial heating rates, tritium production rates, neutron reaction rates, and energy spectra from particle fluxes calculated by ANISN. ACTIVE has a variety of input options including the capability to plot all calculated spatial distributions. The code was primarily designed for use with fusion first wall/blanket systems, but could be applied to any one-dimensional problem.

  1. High-Fidelity Measurements of Long-Lived Flux Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hover, David; Macklin, Chris; O'Brien, Kevin; Sears, Adam; Yoder, Jonilyn; Gudmundsen, Ted; Kerman, Jamie; Bolkhovsky, Vladimir; Tolpygo, Sergey; Fitch, George; Weir, Terry; Kamal, Archana; Gustavsson, Simon; Yan, Fei; Birenbaum, Jeff; Siddiqi, Irfan; Orlando, Terry; Clarke, John; Oliver, Will

    2015-03-01

    We report on high-fidelity dispersive measurements of a long-lived flux qubit using a Josephson superconducting traveling wave parametric amplifier (JTWPA). A capacitively shunted flux qubit that incorporates high-Q MBE aluminum will have longer relaxation and dephasing times when compared to a conventional flux qubit, while also maintaining the large anharmonicity necessary for complex gate operations. The JTWPA relies on a Josephson junction embedded transmission line to deliver broadband, nonreciprocal gain with large dynamic range. This research was funded in part by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA); and by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research & Engineering under Air Force Contract number FA8721-05-C-0002. All statements of fact, opinion or conclusions contained herein are those of the authors and should not be construed as representing the official views or policies of

  2. Measurement of Heat Flux at Metal-Mold Interface during Casting Solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    All previous studies on interfacial heat transfer coefficient have been based on indirect methods for estimating the heat flux that employed either inverse heat transfer analysis procedures or instrumentation arrangements to measure temperatures and displacements near the metal-mold interface. In this paper, the heat transfer at the metal-mold interfaces is investigated using a sensor for the direct measurement of heat flux. The heat flux sensor (HFS) was rated for 700oC and had a time response of less than 10 ms. Casting experiments were conducted using graphite molds for aluminum alloy A356. Several casting experiments were performed using a graphite coating and a boron nitride coating. The measurement errors were estimated. The temperature of the mold surface was provided by the HFS while the temperature of the casting surface was measured using a thermocouple. Results for the heat transfer coefficients were obtained based on measured heat flux and temperatures. Four stages were clearly identified for the variation in time of the heat flux. Values of the heat transfer coefficient were in good agreement with data from previous studies.

  3. Methane fluxes measured by eddy covariance at a temperate upland forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Murphy, J. G.; Winsborough, C. L.; Basiliko, N.; Geddes, J. A.; Thomas, S.

    2012-12-01

    Methane flux measurements were carried out at a temperate upland forest in Central Ontario, Haliburton Forest and Wildlife Reserve (45.28° N, 78.55° W) using the eddy covariance (EC) method. An off-axis integrated cavity output spectrometer (OA-ICOS) Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyzer (FGGA from Los Gatos Research, Inc.) operated at a sampling rate of 10 Hz allowed for simultaneous measurement of methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and water (H2O) over five months from June to October in 2011. Air was pulled from the top of a 32 m tower, 8 m above the forest canopy, to the bottom of the tower through 40 m of tubing to the instrument. A sonic anemometer and a LI-7500 open-path sensor were also used at the top of the tower to provide high frequency wind data and comparative open-path measurements of CO2 and H2O. A nearby soil station measured soil water content and soil temperature at 0, 3, and 10 cm below the surface. Observed methane fluxes showed net uptake of CH4 over the measurement period with an average uptake flux value (± standard deviation of the mean) of -2.7±0.13 nmol m-2 s-1. In early June when measurements commenced, the soil moisture was relatively high and CH4 flux values showed net emission. As the season advanced the soil became progressively drier, and there was an increasing trend in CH4 uptake, peaking in mid-September. There was also a diurnal trend in the CH4 flux, with increased uptake during the day, and decreased uptake between 0:00 and 08:00. The CH4 flux values correlated well with the horizontal wind speed measured within the forest canopy. We hypothesize that this may be due to a ventilation effect in which higher wind speed facilitates the introduction of CH4-rich air and removes CH4-depleted air near the methanotrophs in the soil. The measurements were made in an uneven-aged managed forest stand last harvested 15 years ago containing sandy and acidic soils (pH 4.0 - 5.0). Chamber flux measurements of CH4 were also performed at seven toposequences around the tower, every two weeks from June to October. These chamber flux values are qualitatively consistent with those measured by eddy covariance in terms of magnitude and seasonality. While the flux measurements indicate net uptake by soils, the diurnal cycle of mixing ratios often showed nighttime accumulation of methane, indicating that over the broader landscape around the tower, emissions may dominate.

  4. How are Rainfall Rates Measured?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    In this problem-based learning activity, students learn about weather forecasting and the role of the TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) satellite in data collection. Assuming the role of climatologists, students assist a reporter in determining the accuracy of weather predictions published in The Old Farmer's Almanac. The lesson requires a street map of the local community, acetate sheets to cover the map, materials needed to build a homemade rain gauge, and sample pages of the almanac. Teacher notes, student worksheet, glossary and an appendix introducing problem-based learning are included. This resource is the first of the 3-part learning module, Investigating the Climate System: Precipitation.

  5. Image migration: measured retrieval rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, Robert M.

    2007-03-01

    When the Indianapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center changed Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) vendors, we chose to use "on demand" image migration as the more cost effective solution. The legacy PACS stores the image data on optical disks in multi-platter jukeboxes. The estimated size of the legacy image data is about 5 terabytes containing studies from ~1997 to ~2003. Both the legacy and the new PACS support a manual DICOM query/retrieve. We implemented workflow rules to determine when to fetch the relevant priors from the legacy PACS. When a patient presents for a new radiology study, we used the following rules to initiate the manual DICOM query/retrieve. For general radiography we retrieved the two most recent prior examinations and for the modalities MR and CT we retrieved the clinically relevant prior examinations. We monitored the number of studies retrieved each week for about a 12 month period. For our facility which performs about 70,000 radiology examinations per year, we observed an essentially constant retrieval rate of slightly less than 50 studies per week. Some explanations for what may be considered an anomalous result maybe related to the fact that we are a tertiary care facility and a teaching hospital.

  6. Measurement of a surface heat flux and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. M.; Antoine, G. J.; Diller, T. E.; Wicks, A. L.

    1994-04-01

    The Heat Flux Microsensor is a new sensor which was recently patented by Virginia Tech and is just starting to be marketed by Vatell Corp. The sensor is made using the thin-film microfabrication techniques directly on the material that is to be measured. It consists of several thin-film layers forming a differential thermopile across a thermal resistance layer. The measured heat flux q is proportional to the temperature difference across the resistance layer q= k(sub g)/delta(sub g) x (t(sub 1) - T(sub 2)), where k(sub g) is the thermal conductivity and delta (sub g) is the thickness of the thermal resistance layer. Because the gages are sputter coated directly onto the surface, their total thickness is less than 2 micrometers, which is two orders of magnitude thinner than previous gages. The resulting temperature difference across the thermal resistance layer (delta is less than 1 micrometer) is very small even at high heat fluxes. To generate a measurable signal many thermocouple pairs are put in series to form a differential thermopile. The combination of series thermocouple junctions and thin-film design creates a gage with very attractive characteristics. It is not only physically non-intrusive to the flow, but also causes minimal disruption of the surface temperature. Because it is so thin, the response time is less than 20 microsec. Consequently, the frequency response is flat from 0 to over 50 kHz. Moreover, the signal of the Heat Flux Microsensor is directly proportional to the heat flux. Therefore, it can easily be used in both steady and transient flows, and it measures both the steady and unsteady components of the surface heat flux. A version of the Heat Flux Microsensor has been developed to meet the harsh demands of combustion environments. These gages use platinum and platinum-10 percent rhodium as the thermoelectric materials. The thermal resistance layer is silicon monoxide and a protective coating of Al2O3 is deposited on top of the sensor. The superimposed thin-film pattern of all six layers is presented. The large pads are for connection with pins used to bring the signal out the back of the ceramic. flux measurement, the surface temperature is measured with a platinum resistance layer (RTS). &The resistance of this layer increases with increasing temperature. Therefore, these gages simultaneously measure the surface temperature and heat flux. The demonstrated applications include rocket nozzles, SCRAM jet engines, gas turbine engines, boiling heat transfer, flame experiments, basic fluid heat transfer, hypersonic flight, and shock tube testing. *The laboratory involves using one of these sensors in a small combustion flame. -The sensor is made on a 2.5 cm diameter piece of aluminum nitride ceramic.

  7. Graduation Rates: Whose Success Do They Measure?

    E-print Network

    Ward, Karen

    Graduation Rates: Whose Success Do They Measure? Diana Natalicio, President The University of Texas of master's degrees awarded to Hispanics, UTEP's graduation rates are reported to be low (e.g., Tier 4 range of graduation rates. *Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, June 2005 #12;So, who is counted in calculating

  8. Measuring the equilibrium real interest rate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alejandro Justiniano; Giorgio E. Primiceri

    2010-01-01

    The equilibrium real interest rate represents the real rate of return required to keep the economy’s output equal to potential output. This article discusses how to measure the equilibrium real interest rate, using an empirical structural model of the economy.

  9. First measurement of the flux of solar neutrinos from the sun at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittich, Peter

    2000-12-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a second generation solar neutrino detector. SNO is the first experiment that is able to measure both the electron neutrino flux and a flavor-blind flux of all active neutrino types, allowing a model-independent determination if the deficit of solar neutrinos known as the solar neutrino problem is due to neutrino oscillation. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory started taking production data in November, 1999. A measurement of the charged current rate will be the first indication if SNO too sees a suppression of the solar neutrino signal relative to the theoretical predictions. Such a confirmation is the first step in SNO's ambitious science program. In this thesis, we present evidence that SNO is seeing solar neutrinos and a preliminary ratio of the measured vs predicted rate of electrons as induced by 8B neutrinos in the ?e, + d --> p + p + e charged-current (CC) reaction.

  10. Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements

    PubMed Central

    Dye, Stephen T.; Guillian, Eugene H.

    2008-01-01

    Uranium and thorium within the Earth produce a major portion of terrestrial heat along with a measurable flux of electron antineutrinos. These elements are key components in geophysical and geochemical models. Their quantity and distribution drive the dynamics, define the thermal history, and are a consequence of the differentiation of the Earth. Knowledge of uranium and thorium concentrations in geological reservoirs relies largely on geochemical model calculations. This article describes the methods and criteria to experimentally determine average concentrations of uranium and thorium in the continental crust and in the mantle by using site-specific measurements of the terrestrial antineutrino flux. Optimal, model-independent determinations involve significant exposures of antineutrino detectors remote from nuclear reactors at both a midcontinental and a midoceanic site. This would require major, new antineutrino detection projects. The results of such projects could yield a greatly improved understanding of the deep interior of the Earth. PMID:18172211

  11. Variable Pressure Ion Chamber For Relative And Absolute Flux Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, B. X.; Kirz, J.; McNulty, I.

    1986-08-01

    When an X-ray beam is not monochromatic, the transmitted flux through an absorber is not an exponential function of the absorber thickness. Instead, it may be a sum of two, three, or more exponential functions depending on whether the beam contains photons of two, three, or more different energies. This work shows that if the thickness of a gaseous absorber is continuously varied by adjusting the gas pressure, the relative strength of different harmonics in the monochromator output can be determined. This method also provides an accurate means to measure the absolute cross section of the gas molecules, and in conjunction with a modified Samson type ion chamber may also be used to measure the absolute photon flux as well.

  12. Absolute solar flux measurement shortward of 575 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogawa, H. S.; Judge, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    A rare-gas ionization chamber was used to obtain an accurate measurement of the absolute solar EUV flux in the 50- to 575-A region. The instrument, operating in total and near-total absorption, was flown on a solar-pointing sounding rocket on August 16, 1983. For the day of the flight, the solar activity indices were F sub 10.7 = 132.1 and R sub I = 80, and the integrated solar irradiance at the earth, corrected for atmospheric absorption, was found to be 4.31 + or - 0.31 x 10 to the 10th photons sq cm s. Almost exactly a year earlier (August 10, 1982) the same instrument measured an integrated solar flux of 5.71 + or - 0.42 x 10 to the 10th photons/sq cm s during a time of enhanced solar activity (F sub 10.7 = 209.5 and R sub I = 155).

  13. Eddy covariance and lysimeter measurements of moisture fluxes over supraglacial debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    Supraglacial debris covers have the potential to evaporate large quantities of water derived from either sub-debris ice melt or precipitation. Currently, knowledge of evaporation and condensation rates in supraglacial debris is limited due to the difficulty of making direct measurements. This paper presents eddy covariance and lysimeter measurements of moisture fluxes made over a 0.2 m debris layer at Miage debris covered glacier, Italian Alps, during the 2013 ablation season. The meteorological data are complimented by reflectometer measurements of volumetric water fraction in the saturated and vadose zones of the debris layer. The lysimeters were designed specifically to mimic the debris cover and were embedded within the debris matrix, level with the surface. Over the ablation season, the latent heat flux is dominated by evaporation, and the flux magnitude closely follows the daily cycle of daytime solar heating and night time radiative cooling of debris. Mean flux values are of the order of 1 kg m-2 day-1, but often higher for short periods following rainfall. Condensation rates are relatively small and restricted to night time and humid conditions when the debris-atmosphere vapour pressure gradient reverses due to relatively warm air overlying cold debris. The reflectometer measurements provide evidence of vertical water movement through capillary rise in the upper part of the fine-grained debris layer, just above the saturated horizon, and demonstrate how debris bulk water content increases after rainfall. The latent heat flux responds directly to changes in wind speed, indicating that atmospheric turbulence can penetrate porous upper debris layers to the saturated horizon. Hence, vertical sorting of debris sediments and antecedent rainfall are important in determining evaporation rates, in addition to current meteorological conditions. Comparison of lysimeter measurements with rainfall data provides an estimate that between 45% and 89% of rainfall is evaporated directly back to the atmosphere. Rainfall evaporation rates increase with debris impermeability and temperature, with highest rates occurring when a shower falls on hot debris. If these point measurements are representative of larger scales, evaporation rates of the order of 1000 tonnes km-2 day-1 are implied, with higher rates following rainfall. This has important implications for downstream runoff, sub-debris ice melt rates (due to consumption of evaporative latent heat energy) and, possibly, convective atmospheric processes.

  14. MARIE Dose and Flux Measurements in Mars Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, C.; Cleghorn, T.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Saganti, P.; Andersen, V.; Lee, K. T.; Pinsky, L. S.; Turner, R.; Atwell, W.

    2004-01-01

    We present results from the Martian Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE), aboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft in orbit around Mars. MARIE operated successfully from March 2002 through October 2003. At the time of this writing, the instrument is off due to a loss of communications during an extremely intense Solar Particle Event. Efforts to revive MARIE are planned for Spring 2004, when Odyssey's role as a communications relay for the MER rovers is completed. During the period of successful operation, MARIE returned the first detailed energetic charged particle data from Mars. Due to limitations of the instrument, normalizing MARIE data to flux or dose is not straightforward - several large corrections are needed. Thus normalized results (like dose or flux) have large uncertainties and/or significant model-dependence. The problems in normalization are mainly due to inefficiency in detecting high-energy protons (signal-to-noise problems force the trigger threshold to be higher than optimal), to the excessively high gains employed in the signal processing electronics (many ions deposit energy sufficient to saturate the electronics, and dE/dx information is lost), and to artifacts associated with the two trigger detectors (incomplete registration of dE/dx). Despite these problems, MARIE is efficient for detecting helium ions with kinetic energies above about 30 MeV/nucleon, and for detecting high-energy ions (energies above about 400 MeV/nucleon) with charges from 5 to 10. Fluxes of these heavier ions can be compared to fluxes obtained from the ACE/CRIS instrument, providing at least one area of direct comparison between data obtained at Earth and at Mars; this analysis will be presented as a work in progress. We will also present dose-rate data, with a detailed explanation of the many sources of uncertainty in normalization. The results for both flux and dose will be compared to predictions of the HZETRN model of the GCR.

  15. Directly measured net denitrification rates in offshore New England sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiss, Elise M.; Fields, Lindsey; Fulweiler, Robinson W.

    2012-08-01

    Continental shelf sediments are important locations for denitrification in the marine environment. Here, we report a robust, directly measured set of sediment net denitrification rates from five sites off the coast of southern Rhode Island (USA). Using the N2/Ar technique, we sampled three of these sites at an almost bimonthly rate from October 2009 to January 2011, and two additional sites during July 2010. Net denitrification ranged from approximately 20 to 75 N2-N ?mol m-2 h-1 with a mean of 44±4 N2-N ?mol m-2 h-1. These values are similar to other studies that report direct-measurements of sediment net N2 fluxes located along the East coast of the United States. Net sediment denitrification rates were not significantly different between sites, nor did the rates change over the sampled temperature range (5-17 °C). Net denitrification rates were weakly correlated, but exhibited significant relationships with sediment oxygen demand. Positive and negative fluxes of nitrate along the sediment-water interface suggest that both direct and coupled denitrification are occurring. Sediment molar C:N ratios were consistent temporally and spatially, indicating that sediment organic matter quality may be responsible for the similar rates of net denitrification at our sites. If we apply our rates to the 360,000 km2 North East United States shelf area, we calculate that 0.14 Tmol of N per year are removed, accounting for just over 5% of the total N entering the North Atlantic shelf region. Additionally, we predict a historical denitrification rate based on primary production estimates, which indicate that denitrification rates may have been three times higher in the past than our current measurements. Thus, as seen in a nearby coastal system, the nitrogen cycle in offshore New England regions could have changed during the last century.

  16. Estimation of rainfall interception in grassland using eddy flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, A.; Miyazawa, Y.; Inoue, A.

    2014-12-01

    Rainfall interception plays an important role in the water cycle in natural ecosystems. Interception by the forest canopies have been widely observed or estimated over various ecosystems, such as tropical rainforest, evergreen forest and deciduous forest. However interception by the short canopies, e.g. shrubby plant, grassland and crop, has been rarely observed since it has been difficult to obtain reliable precipitation measurements under the canopy. In this study, we estimated monthly and annual rainfall interception in grassland using evapotranspiration data of eddy flux measurements. Experiments were conducted in grassland (Italian ryegrass) from 2010 to 2012 growing season in Kumamoto, Japan. Evapotranspiration (latent heat flux) were observed throughout the year based on the eddy covariance technique. A three dimensional sonic anemometer and an open path CO2/H2O analyzer were used to calculate 30 min flux. Other meteorological factors, such as air temperature, humidity and solar radiation, were also observed. Rainfall interception was estimated as follows. 1) Using evapotranspiration data during dry period, environmental response of surface conductance (gc) was inversely calculated based on the big-leaf model. 2) Evapotranspiration without interception during precipitation period was estimated using above model and environmental response of gc. 3) Assuming that evaporation of intercepted rainfall is equal to the difference in evapotranspiration between above estimation and actual measurements, rainfall interception was estimated over experimental period. The account of rainfall interception in grassland using this technique will be presented at the meeting.

  17. DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF HEAT FLUX FROM COOLING LAKE THERMAL IMAGERY

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, A; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E; Robert Kurzeja, R; Malcolm Pendergast, M; Timothy Brown, T; Saleem Salaymeh, S

    2007-12-19

    Laboratory experiments show a linear relationship between the total heat flux from a water surface to air and the standard deviation of the surface temperature field, {sigma}, derived from thermal images of the water surface over a range of heat fluxes from 400 to 1800 Wm{sup -2}. Thermal imagery and surface data were collected at two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the laboratory relationship between heat flux and {sigma} exists in large heated bodies of water. The heat fluxes computed from the cooling lake data range from 200 to 1400 Wm{sup -2}. The linear relationship between {sigma} and Q is evident in the cooling lake data, but it is necessary to apply band pass filtering to the thermal imagery to remove camera artifacts and non-convective thermal gradients. The correlation between {sigma} and Q is improved if a correction to the measured {sigma} is made that accounts for wind speed effects on the thermal convection. Based on more than a thousand cooling lake images, the correlation coefficients between {sigma} and Q ranged from about 0.8 to 0.9.

  18. Measurement of diffusive flux of ammonia from water.

    PubMed

    Genfa, Z; Uehara, T; Dasgupta, P K; Clarke, A D; Winiwarter, W

    1998-09-01

    An instrument was developed for the measurement of gaseous ammonia concentration, NH(3(sw,eq)), in equilibrium with surface waters, notably ocean water. The instrument measures the ammonia flux from a flowing water surface under defined conditions and allows the calculation of NH(3(sw,eq)) from the principles of Fickian diffusion. The flux collector resembles a wetted parallel plate denuder previously developed for air sampling. The sample under study runs on one plate of the device; the ammonia released from the sample is collected by a slow flow of a receptor liquid on the other plate. The NH(3) + NH(4)(+) (hereinafter called N(T)) in the effluent receptor liquid is preconcentrated on a silica gel column and subsequently measured by a fluorometric flow injection analysis (FIA) system. With a 6-min cycle (4-min load, 2-min inject), the analytical system can measure down to 0.3 nM N(T) in the receptor liquid. Coupled with the flux collector, it is sufficiently sensitive to measure the ammonia flux from seawater. The instrument design is such that it is little affected by ambient ammonia. In both laboratory (N(T) 0.2-50 ?M), and field investigations (N(T) 0.18-1.7 ?M) good linearity between the ammonia flux and the N(T) concentration in seawater (spiked, synthetic, natural) was observed, although aged seawater, with depleted N(T) content, behaves in an unusual fashion upon N(T) addition, showing the existence of an "ammonia demand". NH(3(sw,eq)) levels from ocean water measured in the Coconut Island Laboratory, HI, ranged from 6.6 to 33 nmol/m(3) with an average of 17.4 ± 6.9 nmol/m(3), in comparison to 2.8-21 nmol/m(3) (average 10 ± 7 nmol/m(3)) NH(3(sw,eq)) values previously reported for the Central Pacific Ocean (Quinn, P. K.; et al. J. Geophys. Res. 1990, 95, 16405-16416). PMID:21644712

  19. Spatial and temporal variations of methane flux measured by autochambers in a temperate ombrotrophic peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Derrick Y. F.; Moore, Tim R.; Roulet, Nigel T.

    2014-05-01

    We measured CH4 flux at high temporal resolution with triplicate autochambers from three different plant communities at the ombrotrophic Mer Bleue bog in Canada to investigate the spatial and temporal variations, and factors that related to the CH4 flux. Our results show that seasonal mean CH4 fluxes from the Eriophorum-dominated community were 1.4-2.2 and 3.7-5.5 times higher than those from Maianthemum/Ledum and Chamaedaphne communities, respectively. Significant interannual variations in CH4 flux were observed in Maianthemum/Ledum and Chamaedaphne communities, attributable to a 55-60% reduction of mean summer (July-September) CH4 flux in 2010 as a consequence of a 5.5-9.0 cm lower mean summer water table compared to 2009. The Eriophorum community showed a much larger rate of increase in CH4 flux with peat temperature in the early growing season than in midsummer, which might be caused by a concomitant increase in root exudation of labile carbon for methanogenesis. Temporal variability of log-transformed CH4 flux was correlated (r ? 0.4) with peat temperature only when water table was less than 20, 30, and 40 cm below the peat surface for Maianthemum/Ledum, Chamaedaphne, and Eriophorum communities, respectively. This difference in water table threshold among communities might partly be related to differences in rooting depth and hence the ability of plants to sustain CH4 flux in dry conditions. These results suggest that modeling of CH4 flux from ombrotrophic peatlands over time should take into account the role of different vegetation types, since the relationships between CH4 emissions and environmental factors vary among vascular plant communities.

  20. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; Holst, T.; Hörtnagl, L.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Neftel, A.; McKinney, K.; Munger, J. W.; Pallardy, S. G.; Schade, G. W.; Seco, R.; Schoon, N.

    2015-01-01

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model, and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land–atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on the production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, and stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem-level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; they are however neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow taking full advantage of the rich information content of micrometeorological flux measurements. PMID:25983744

  1. Momentum Flux Measuring Instrument for Neutral and Charged Particle Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavers, Greg; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Schafer, Charles F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An instrument to measure the momentum flux (total pressure) of plasma and neutral particle jets onto a surface has been developed. While this instrument was developed for magnetized plasmas, the concept works for non-magnetized plasmas as well. We have measured forces as small as 10(exp -4) Newtons on a surface immersed in the plasma where small forces are due to ionic and neutral particles with kinetic energies on the order of a few eV impacting the surface. This instrument, a force sensor, uses a target plate (surface) that is immersed in the plasma and connected to one end of an alumina rod while the opposite end of the alumina rod is mechanically connected to a titanium beam on which four strain gauges are mounted. The force on the target generates torque causing strain in the beam. The resulting strain measurements can be correlated to a force on the target plate. The alumina rod electrically and thermally isolates the target plate from the strain gauge beam and allows the strain gauges to be located out of the plasma flow while also serving as a moment arm of several inches to increase the strain in the beam at the strain gauge location. These force measurements correspond directly to momentum flux and may be used with known plasma conditions to place boundaries on the kinetic energies of the plasma and neutral particles. The force measurements may also be used to infer thrust produced by a plasma propulsive device. Stainless steel, titanium, molybdenum, and aluminum flat target plates have been used. Momentum flux measurements of H2, D2, He, and Ar plasmas produced in a magnetized plasma device have been performed.

  2. Development of a Passive Sensor for Measuring Water and Solute Mass Flux in the Hyporheic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annable, Michael D.; Layton, Leif; Hatfield, Kirk; Newman, Mark C.; Cho, Jaehyun; Klammler, Harald

    2014-05-01

    Measuring water, pollutant and nutrient exchange at the groundwater-surface water interface is challenging due to the dynamic nature of the hyporheic zone. Quantifying the exchange is critical to understanding mass balance across this interface. Technologies currently exist to identify groundwater discharge zones and infer estimates of contaminant mass flux based on total contaminant concentration in bulk sediment, though it is generally accepted that freely dissolved concentration in pore water is a better measure of potential exposure. Laboratory and preliminary field testing has been completed to demonstrate a new tool with potential to provide more accurate characterization of water, pollutant and nutrient flux at the groundwater-surface water interface through direct in-situ measurement. The sediment bed passive flux meter (SBPFM) was designed for passively and directly providing in-situ measurements of volumetric water flux and solute mass flux vertically through the upper surface sediment layer and into the overlying water column. The SBPFM consists of an internal permeable sorbent which is impregnated with one or more water soluble tracers (typically alcohols) and is contained in a dedicated drive-point with upper and lower screened openings for fluid intake and exhaust. This configuration generates water flow through the device proportional to the vertical gradient between the sediment bed and the water column. Once the SBPFM has been deployed, the tracers are displaced from the sorbent at rates proportional to the average vertical specific discharge. The mass loss of tracers during deployment can be used to calculate the cumulative water flux. Similarly, the cumulative mass of sorbed pollutants or nutrients provide a direct measurement of the vertical mass flux during deployment. The SBPFM prototype has been tested in controlled laboratory sediment interface models. The results show good agreement between the SBPFM calculated and the applied water and contaminant fluxes through the laboratory aquifer model. Flow reversals are anticipated for tidal sites and sorbent layers within the PFM are segmented and used to determine next flux magnitude and direction averaged over the deployment period. Preliminary field testing is underway focusing on an areas with chlorinated solvent contamination discharging to surface water. The SBPFM is deployed to quantify the net mass discharge of contaminants to a small stream over a short reach. The integrated mass discharge can be compared to concentrations and mass discharge observed in surface water. The SBPFM provides a new tool to assess water and solute flux at point locations and can provide spatial variability that can be integrated to support mass balance studies on segments of surface water reaches.

  3. Maximal Sum of Metabolic Exchange Fluxes Outperforms Biomass Yield as a Predictor of Growth Rate of

    E-print Network

    Ruppin, Eytan

    are common in that they link metabolic models to growth yield or to a global flux distribution, rather than (for growth on a single carbon source, for example, Growth rate = Substrate uptake rate * Yield that contribute most to SUMEX (those shown in Fig. 3) are H+ and several TCA-cycle intermediates, in addition

  4. Burning rate and flame heat flux for PMMA in a cone calorimeter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian T. Rhodes; James G. Quintiere

    1996-01-01

    Ignition and burning rate data are developed for thick (25 mm) black Polycast PMMA in a cone calorimeter heating assembly. The objective is to establish a testing protocol that will lead to the prediction of ignition and burning rate from cone data. This is done for a thermoplastic like PMMA. The incident flame heat flux, for irradiation levels of 0–75

  5. Method to Determine the Global Thermogenic Methane Seepage Rate from the Helium Flux of the Continents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornafius, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    Bottom-up assessments of the contribution of natural hydrocarbon seepage from the earth to the global methane budget have quantified the emissions from small areas and attempted to extrapolate those measurements to a cumulative global emission rate, resulting in estimates of 18-48 Tg/yr (3-9% of the global methane budget). An alternative top-down method using helium is proposed to estimate the total emission rate of methane from natural hydrocarbon seepage worldwide from the equation: Qseeps = 4J 4 f g-1 f b c m c T c a where Qseeps is the quantity of methane emitted to the atmosphere annually (in Tg yr-1). 4J is the average flux of 4He atoms from the surface of the continents (4.18 x 1010atoms m-2 s-1), 4 f g-1 is the inverse of the global average fraction of natural hydrocarbon gases comprised of 4He in the subsurface, expressed as CH 4 (vol) / 4He (vol). The other variable is the fraction of the continents that are covered by sedimentary basins (f b ~0.4), which reduces the helium flux to the fraction that migrates through hydrocarbon reservoirs on the way to the surface. The constants convert 4He atoms m-2 s-1into 4He mass flux per m2 per year (c m = 2.11 x 10-16), 4He grams into CH 4 Teragrams (c T = 4.0 x 10-12) and c a is the area of the continents (1.53 x 1014 m2). This approach assumes the 4He flux from the continents is the same from basement shield areas as from sedimentary basins, and that the average 4He content of natural hydrocarbon seeps is the same as the 4He content of natural gases in subsurface reservoirs exploited for hydrocarbons worldwide. An internally consistent estimate of the 4He content of these gases can be determined from the increase in the 4He content of the atmosphere in the past 30 years, because this would be attributable to the worldwide hydrocarbon production during that period. A most likely increase of 4 x 1010 4He mol yr-1 and a maximum increase of 1.3 x 1011 4He mol y-1 has been measured at the experimental limit from the change in 3He/4He in the atmosphere, which implies a 4He content of 300 ppm and an upper limit of <1000 ppm for produced natural gases, consistent with the observed 4He content of produced hydrocarbon gases along the continental margins. Using this estimate gives a value for 4 f g-1 of 1000 and 3333, which results in a calculated minimum natural thermogenic methane seepage rate for the earth of >2 Tg yr-1 and a most likely rate of ~6-8 Tg yr-1 (~1% of the global methane budget). The validity of this method could be tested by measuring the helium content of natural gas seeps in comparison with the helium content of the underlying natural gas reservoirs.

  6. Acoustic measurements of boundary layer flow and sediment flux.

    PubMed

    Thorne, P D; Taylor, J

    2000-10-01

    Results are reported on an assessment of the application of coherent Doppler and cross-correlation techniques to measure nearbed boundary layer flow. The approaches use acoustic backscattering from sediments entrained into the water column from the bed, to obtain high-resolution profiles of the nearbed hydrodynamics. Measurements are presented from a wave tunnel experiment in which sediment was entrained by unidirectional, oscillatory, and combined flows. The data collected have been used to evaluate the capability of the two flow techniques to measure boundary layer mean, turbulent, and intrawave velocity profiles. Further, the backscattered signal has been used to measure suspended sediment concentration profiles, which have been combined with the velocity profiles to obtain high-resolution measurements of boundary layer sediment flux. PMID:11051485

  7. Doppler lidar measurement of profiles of turbulence and momentum flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhard, Wynn L.; Cupp, Richard E.; Healy, Kathleen R.

    1989-01-01

    A short-pulse CO2 Doppler lidar with 150-m range resolution measured vertical profiles of turbulence and momentum flux. Example measurements are reported of a daytime mixed layer with strong mechanical mixing caused by a wind speed of 15 m/sec, which exceeded the speed above the capping inversion. The lidar adapted an azimuth scanning technique previously demonstrated by radar. Scans alternating between two elevation angles allow determination of mean U-squared, V-squared, and W-squared. Expressions were derived to estimate the uncertainty in the turbulence parameters. A new processing method, partial Fourier decomposition, has less uncertainty than the filtering used earlier.

  8. The abundance, vertical flux, and still-water and apparent sinking rates of marine snow in a shallow coastal water column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanks, Alan L.

    2002-09-01

    In Cape Lookout Bight, NC, measurements were made of marine snow (e.g., aggregates >0.5 mm in diameter) abundance and size, the vertical flux of material through the water column, the vertical flux of marine snow, and the measured still-water sinking rate of marine snow. The abundance and size of marine snow was determined from photographs taken by SCUBA divers. Sampled marine snow were used to determine aggregate dry weight. Marine snow flux and measured still-water sinking rate were made using a time-lapse camera that photographed a sediment trap mounted on a drogue. Flow over the drogue mounted sediment trap was <3 cm s -1. Knowing the flux of marine snow into the trap and the abundance of marine snow in the water column, the sinking rate of marine snow sinking freely in the water column (apparent marine snow sinking rate) was calculated. Throughout the study, marine snow was always present and usually abundant (average 125 l -1). The water-column particulate matter load ranged from 8 to 18 mg l -1. The vertical flux of particulate matter through the water column was large (average 74 g m -2 day -1). The average vertical flux was roughly equal to the sedimentation rate estimated from geochronology studies of sediment deposition in Cape Lookout Bight. More than 90% of the variation in the vertical flux of particulate matter through the water column was due to variations in the flux of marine snow. Variations in the vertical flux of marine snow were, however, not significantly correlated to the abundance of marine snow. Measured sinking rates ranged from around 10 to about 150 m day -1, increased with aggregate size, and varied little between days. The calculated apparent sinking rates of marine snow varied a great deal between days and were not similar to the measured sinking rates. The distribution and orientation of marine snow in the water column photographs appeared to delineate small (mm to cm diameter) eddies. Eddies in a random selection of water column photographs were measured. The upper limit to aggregate size appeared to have been set by the size of small turbulent eddies in the water column. The apparent sinking rate of marine snow, the total vertical flux and the flux of marine snow were all significantly correlated ( r>0.97) to the ratio of aggregate dry weight and eddy diameter. The data suggest that marine snow sinking rates were modified by turbulence in the water column.

  9. Imposing strong constraints on tropical terrestrial CO2 fluxes using passenger aircraft based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwa, Yosuke; Machida, Toshinobu; Sawa, Yousuke; Matsueda, Hidekazu; Schuck, Tanja J.; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A. M.; Imasu, Ryoichi; Satoh, Masaki

    2012-06-01

    Because very few measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) are available in the tropics, estimates of surface CO2 fluxes in tropical regions are beset with considerable uncertainties. To improve estimates of tropical terrestrial fluxes, atmospheric CO2 inversion was performed using passenger aircraft based measurements of the Comprehensive Observation Network for Trace gases by Airliner (CONTRAIL) project in addition to the surface measurement data set of GLOBALVIEW-CO2. Regional monthly fluxes at the earth's surface were estimated using the Bayesian synthesis approach focusing on the period 2006-2008 using the Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Atmospheric Model-based Transport Model (NICAM-TM). By adding the aircraft to the surface data, the posterior flux errors were greatly reduced; specifically, error reductions of up to 64% were found for tropical Asia regions. This strong impact is closely related to efficient vertical transport in the tropics. The optimized surface fluxes using the CONTRAIL data were evaluated by comparing the simulated atmospheric CO2 distributions with independent aircraft measurements of the Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container (CARIBIC) project. The inversion with the CONTRAIL data yields the global carbon sequestration rates of 2.22 ± 0.28 Pg C yr-1 for the terrestrial biosphere and 2.24 ± 0.27 Pg C yr-1 for the oceans (the both are adjusted by riverine input of CO2). For the first time the CONTRAIL CO2 measurements were used in an inversion system to identify the areas of greatest impact in terms of reducing flux uncertainties.

  10. SIERRA-Flux: Measuring Regional Surface Fluxes of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Water Vapor from an Unmanned Aircraft System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fladeland; Yates, Emma Louise; Bui, Thaopaul Van; Dean-Day, Jonathan; Kolyer, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The Eddy-Covariance Method for quantifying surface-atmosphere fluxes is a foundational technique for measuring net ecosystem exchange and validating regional-to-global carbon cycle models. While towers or ships are the most frequent platform for measuring surface-atmosphere exchange, experiments using aircraft for flux measurements have yielded contributions to several large-scale studies including BOREAS, SMACEX, RECAB by providing local-to-regional coverage beyond towers. The low-altitude flight requirements make airborne flux measurements particularly dangerous and well suited for unmanned aircraft.

  11. Measurement of the solar UV flux in the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mentall, James E.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of the direct solar flux from balloons at an altitude of 40 km are used to determine the effective cross sections of the Schumann-Runge bands. Transmission in these bands, which lie between 180 and 200 nm, allows the Sun's radiation in this region of the spectrum to penetrate into the lower mesosphere. Measurements by a high resolution scanning spectrometer (0.02 nm) are used to measure the transmission in the Schumann-Runge bands. Since ozone absorbs in this wavelength region, a low resolution scanning spectrometer (0.25 nm) measures the transmission between 220 and 260 nm, allowing the column ozone to be determined. Absorption due to ozone can then be calculated and the data corrected for this effect.

  12. Measuring Exchange Rate Misalignment in Turkey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ümit Özlale; Erinç Yeldan

    2002-01-01

    We propose a new methodology to measure exchange rate misalign- ment for Turkey, which has already undergone a severe economic cri- sis. We estimate the real exchange rate within a time varying parameter model, where a return-to-normality assumption about the parameters are assumed. Contrary to common belief, it is found that, except the initial four months of the stabilization program,

  13. Measuring Strength at Ultrahigh Strain Rates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tracy J. Vogler; Tracy John

    2010-01-01

    \\u000a The use of uniaxial strain ramp loading experiments to measure strength at extremely high strain rates is discussed. The technique\\u000a is outlined and issues associated with it are examined. Results for 6061-T6 aluminum are presented that differ from the conventional\\u000a view of strain rate sensitivity in aluminum alloys.

  14. Precision of NO2 photolysis rate measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, R. R.; Stedman, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    Gas-phase kinetic calculations indicate that actinometric measurements of the rate of solar photolysis of NO2 in nitrogen can be in error by +5 to -15% or more, unless odd oxygen N2O5 chemistry, and trace oxygen content are considered. A field experiment confirms that the effect of the quartz tube on the measured photolysis rate is less than 1.7%.

  15. Estimation of VOC emission factors from flux measurements using a receptor model and footprint analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kota, Sri Harsha; Park, Changhyoun; Hale, Martin C.; Werner, Nicholas D.; Schade, Gunnar W.; Ying, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Fluxes of 18 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) collected during May to July 2008 from a tower platform 60 m above the surface in an urban Houston residential area were analyzed using receptor-oriented statistical models and an analytical flux-footprint model to resolve daytime source specific emissions rates. The Multilinear Engine version 2 (ME-2) was used to determine that five sources were responsible for the measured flux at the tower: (i) vehicle exhaust, (ii) a foam plastics industrial source with significant pentane emissions, (iii) consumer and commercial solvent use emissions, (iv) a biogenic emissions source dominated by isoprene, and, (v) evaporative fuel emissions. The estimated median daytime (0700-1900 CST) hourly emission rate from the foam plastics industry was 15.7 ± 3.1 kg h-1, somewhat higher than its permitted hourly emission rates. The median daytime vehicle exhaust VOC emission rate of 14.5 ± 2 g h-1 vehicle-1, was slightly higher than our estimation using the Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) with a county-representative vehicle fleet of year 2008 (11.6 ± 0.2 g h-1 vehicle-1). The median daytime evaporative fuel VOCs emission rate from parked vehicles was 2.3 ± 1.0 g h-1 vehicle-1, which is higher than MOVES estimations and could not be explained by the age of the vehicle fleet, indicating either locally higher evaporative emission sources in the footprint or an underestimation of evaporative emissions by MOVES, or both.

  16. Are far-IR fluxes good measures of cloud mass?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagle, Gururaj; Ferland, G. J.; Troland, T. H.; Abel, N.

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that the Herschel far-IR fluxes are a measure of column density, hence, mass of interstellar clouds. The Polaris Flare, a high galactic latitude cirrus cloud, with several starless molecular cores, has been previously observed with the Herschel Space Telescope. We used Cloudy version 13.02 to model a molecular cloud MCLD 123.5+24.9, one of the denser regions of the Polaris Flare. These models include a detailed calculation of far-IR grain opacities, subject to various assumptions about grain composition, and predict far-IR fluxes. The models suggest that the observed fluxes reflect the incident stellar UV radiation field rather than the column density, if N(H) > a few times 1021 cm2 (AV > 1). For higher column densities, the models show that dust temperatures decline rapidly into the cloud. Therefore, the cloud interiors contribute very little additional far-IR flux, and column densities based upon far-IR fluxes can be significantly underestimated. The Polaris Flare, 150 pc distant, is well within the Galactic disc. There are no nearby hot stars. Therefore, the stellar UV radiation field incident on the cloud should be close to the mean interstellar radiation field (ISRF). In addition, the calculated grain opacities required to reproduce the far-IR fluxes in the Cloudy models are a few factors larger than that calculated for standard ISM graphite and silicate grains. This result suggests that the grains in dense regions are coated with water and ammonia ices, increasing their sizes and opacities. The Cloudy models also predict mm-wavelength CO line strengths for comparison with published observations at the IRAM 30-m telescope. In order to reproduce the observed CO line strengths for cores in MCLD 123.5+24.9, the models require that CO molecules be partially frozen out onto the grains. This result places age constraints upon the cores. We have also modeled CO emission from inter-core regions in MCLD 123.5+24.9. For these regions, the models significantly under predict the observed CO line strengths unless the molecular gas is clumped into high-density regions.

  17. The first geothermal heat flux measurement below the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A. T.; Mankoff, K. D.; Tulaczyk, S. M.; Foley, N.; Hossainzadeh, S.

    2014-12-01

    The geothermal heat flux is a critical thermal boundary condition that influences the melting, flow and mass balance of outlet glaciers and ice sheets. We measured directly the geothermal heat flux below the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), under Subglacial Lake Whillans (SLW), as part of the Whillans Ice Stream Subglacial Access Research Drilling (WISSARD) project. The one-dimensional, conductive heat flux is the product of thermal gradient and thermal conductivity. We developed and fielded a tool to determine the thermal gradient in lake sediments, after penetrating ~800 m of ice using a hot water drilling system. We used the needle-probe method to measure the thermal conductivity of sediments recovered from the bottom of the lake with a gravity-driven multi-corer. The thermal gradient was determined during two separate deployments of the geothermal tool, which penetrated ~1.1 m into the till below SLW, yielding essentially identical results: 0.21±0.07 °C/m. Fifteen sediment thermal conductivity measurements yield an average value of 1.36±0.12 W/m-K. The heat flux determined from these measurements is 285±85 W/m2. This value is somewhat higher than that estimated from the WAIS-Divide ice core site, 230 mW/m2, ~800 km away, and much higher than regional estimates based on magnetics and a global seismic model, generally ?100 mW/m2. Elevated heat flux in this area could result from thermal perturbations associated with rifting, crustal thinning, or volcanic activity. Heat flux of this magnitude is likely to cause basal melt rate of a few cm/year. If this value is representative of conditions below this part of the WAIS, it might help to explain the occurrence of active subglacial lakes and fast-moving ice streams and the ice dynamics of WAIS more broadly.

  18. Angular-Rate Estimation Using Quaternion Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, Ruth; Bar-Itzhack, Y.; Deutschmann, Julie K.; Harman, Richard R.

    1998-01-01

    In most spacecraft (SC) there is a need to know the SC angular rate. Precise angular rate is required for attitude determination, and a coarse rate is needed for attitude control damping. Classically, angular rate information is obtained from gyro measurements. These days, there is a tendency to build smaller, lighter and cheaper SC, therefore the inclination now is to do away with gyros and use other means and methods to determine the angular rate. The latter is also needed even in gyro equipped satellites when performing high rate maneuvers whose angular-rate is out of range of the on board gyros or in case of gyro failure. There are several ways to obtain the angular rate in a gyro-less SC. When the attitude is known, one can differentiate the attitude in whatever parameters it is given and use the kinematics equation that connects the derivative of the attitude with the satellite angular-rate and compute the latter. Since SC usually utilize vector measurements for attitude determination, the differentiation of the attitude introduces a considerable noise component in the computed angular-rate vector.

  19. Partitioning forest carbon fluxes with overstory and understory eddy-covariance measurements: A synthesis based

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Partitioning forest carbon fluxes with overstory and understory eddy-covariance measurements Ridge, TN, United States Abstract Forests are complex ecosystems characterized by several distinctive of forest type, structure and climate. We showed that eddy-covariance flux measurements made

  20. Design and measurement of improved capacitively-shunted flux qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Adam; Birenbaum, Jeffrey; Hover, David; Gudmundsen, Theodore; Kerman, Andrew; Welander, Paul; Yoder, Jonilyn L.; Gustavsson, Simon; Jin, Xiaoyue; Kamal, Archana; Clarke, John; Oliver, William

    2014-03-01

    The addition of a capacitive or inductive shunt across one of the junctions can alter the coherence properties of a classic flux or RF-SQUID qubit. We have studied the performance of capacitively shunted flux qubits fabricated with MBE aluminum, starting from a 2D coplanar waveguide geometry used in similar high-performance transmon qubits, and measured dispersively. We will detail the importance of design parameters that preserve the flux qubit's anharmonicity and discuss conclusions about materials quality based on calculations of the participation of junction, dielectric, and superconductor components. This research was funded in part by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA); and by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research & Engineering under Air Force Contract number FA8721-05-C-0002. All statements of fact, opinion or conclusions contained herein are those of the authors and should not be construed as representing the official views or policies of IARPA, the ODNI, or the U.S. Government Present address: SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA.

  1. Solid motor aft closure insulation erosion. [heat flux correlation for rate analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stampfl, E.; Landsbaum, E. M.

    1973-01-01

    The erosion rate of aft closure insulation in a number of large solid propellant motors was empirically analyzed by correlating the average ablation rate with a number of variables that had previously been demonstrated to affect heat flux. The main correlating parameter was a heat flux based on the simplified Bartz heat transfer coefficient corrected for two-dimensional effects. A multiplying group contained terms related to port-to-throat ratio, local wall angle, grain geometry and nozzle cant angle. The resulting equation gave a good correlation and is a useful design tool.

  2. Flux measurements of benzene and toluene from landfill cover soils.

    PubMed

    Tassi, Franco; Montegrossi, Giordano; Vaselli, Orlando; Morandi, Andrea; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Nisi, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Carbon dioxide and CH(4), C(6)H(6) and C(7)H(8) fluxes from the soil cover of Case Passerini landfill site (Florence, Italy) were measured using the accumulation and static closed chamber methods, respectively. Results show that the CH(4)/CO(2), CH(4)/C(6)H(6) and CH(4)/C(7)H(8) ratios of the flux values are relatively low when compared with those of the 'pristine' biogas produced by degradation processes acting on the solid waste material disposed in the landfill. This suggests that when biogas transits through the cover soil, CH(4) is affected by degradation processes activated by oxidizing bacteria at higher extent than both CO(2) and mono-aromatics. Among the investigated hydrocarbons, C(6)H(6) has shown the highest stability in a wide range of redox conditions. Toluene behaviour only partially resembles that of C(6)H(6), possibly because de-methylation processes require less energy than that necessary for the degradation of C(6)H(6), the latter likely occurring via benzoate at anaerobic conditions and/or through various aerobic metabolic pathways at relatively shallow depth in the cover soil where free oxygen is present. According to these considerations, aromatics are likely to play an important role in the environmental impact of biogas released into the atmosphere from such anthropogenic emission sites, usually only ascribed to CO(2) and CH(4). In this regard, flux measurements using accumulation and static closed chamber methods coupled with gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis may properly be used to obtain a dataset for the estimation of the amount of volatile organic compounds dispersed from landfills. PMID:21041416

  3. Particle and heat flux measurements in PDX edge plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.; Manos, D.

    1983-12-01

    This paper describes the use of novel combined Langmuir-calorimeter probes to measure edge plasma conditions near the midplane in PDX. The probes consisted of up to five Langmuir probes and up to two calorimeters. Single and double probe characteristics yield n/sub e/ and T/sub e/ which are compared with that derived from a triple probe analysis. The calorimeters measure heat flux in the electron and ion drift directions. This paper presents time-resolved radial profiles of n/sub e/, T/sub e/, V/sub F/ (floating potential), and P (heat flux) during high power neutral beam-heated, single-null discharges and circular scoop limiter discharges. The temporal dependence of these quantities displays the previous observed behavior with respect to gross discharge characteristics; however, an additional dependence on confinement mode has been observed. During the H-mode of energy confinement, a transient depression of n/sub e/, T/sub e/, and P occurs in the scrape-off plasma.

  4. Heat flux measurements for use in physiological and clothing research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermann, R.; Psikuta, A.; Rossi, R. M.

    2014-08-01

    Scientists use passive heat flow meters to measure body heat exchanges with the environment. In recent years, several such sensors have been developed and concerns about their proper calibration have been addressed. However, calibration methods have differed in the geometry of the heated device as well as in the heat transfer mechanism. Therefore, a comparison of calibration methods is needed in order to understand the obtained differences in calibration lines. We chose three commercially available heat flux sensors and placed them on four different heated devices: a hot plate, double hot plate, nude cylinder and a cylinder covered with a spacer material. We found differences between the calibration line of the manufacturer and our own measurements, especially when forced convection was involved as the main heat transfer mechanism. The results showed clearly that the calibration method should be chosen according to the intended purpose of use. In addition, we recommend use a thin, light heat flux sensor with good thermal conduction in human subject studies.

  5. Comparative soil CO2 flux measurements and geostatistical estimation methods on Masaya volcano, Nicaragua

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewicki, J.L.; Bergfeld, D.; Cardellini, C.; Chiodini, G.; Granieri, D.; Varley, N.; Werner, C.

    2005-01-01

    We present a comparative study of soil CO2 flux (FCO2) measured by five groups (Groups 1-5) at the IAVCEI-CCVG Eighth Workshop on Volcanic Gases on Masaya volcano, Nicaragua. Groups 1-5 measured (FCO2) using the accumulation chamber method at 5-m spacing within a 900 m2 grid during a morning (AM) period. These measurements were repeated by Groups 1-3 during an afternoon (PM) period. Measured (FCO2 ranged from 218 to 14,719 g m-2 day-1. The variability of the five measurements made at each grid point ranged from ??5 to 167%. However, the arithmetic means of fluxes measured over the entire grid and associated total CO2 emission rate estimates varied between groups by only ??22%. All three groups that made PM measurements reported an 8-19% increase in total emissions over the AM results. Based on a comparison of measurements made during AM and PM times, we argue that this change is due in large part to natural temporal variability of gas flow, rather than to measurement error. In order to estimate the mean and associated CO2 emission rate of one data set and to map the spatial FCO2 distribution, we compared six geostatistical methods: Arithmetic and minimum variance unbiased estimator means of uninterpolated data, and arithmetic means of data interpolated by the multiquadric radial basis function, ordinary kriging, multi-Gaussian kriging, and sequential Gaussian simulation methods. While the total CO2 emission rates estimated using the different techniques only varied by ??4.4%, the FCO2 maps showed important differences. We suggest that the sequential Gaussian simulation method yields the most realistic representation of the spatial distribution of FCO2, but a variety of geostatistical methods are appropriate to estimate the total CO2 emission rate from a study area, which is a primary goal in volcano monitoring research. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  6. Measurement of the 36Cl deposition flux in central Japan: natural background levels and seasonal variability.

    PubMed

    Tosaki, Yuki; Tase, Norio; Sasa, Kimikazu; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Nagashima, Yasuo

    2012-04-01

    Essential parameters for the applications of (36)Cl as a tracer in groundwater studies include the initial (36)Cl/Cl ratio, at the time of recharge, and/or the natural background deposition flux of (36)Cl in the recharge area. To facilitate the hydrological use of (36)Cl in central Japan, this study aimed to obtain a precise estimate of the long-term average local (36)Cl flux and to characterize its seasonal variability. The (36)Cl in precipitation was continuously monitored in Tsukuba, central Japan over a period of >5 years. The (36)Cl flux showed a clear seasonal variation with an annual peak during the spring, which was attributed to the seasonal variability of tropopause height. The long-term average (36)Cl flux (32±2atoms m(-2)s(-1)), estimated from the measured data, was consistent with the prediction from the (36)Cl latitudinal fallout model scaled using the global mean production rate of 20atoms m(-2)s(-1). The initial (36)Cl/Cl ratio was estimated to be (41±6)×10(-15), which is similar to that of pre-bomb groundwater in the Tsukuba Upland. An observation period covering an 11-year solar cycle would yield more accurate estimates of the values, given the increased (36)Cl flux during the solar minimum. PMID:22305003

  7. Comparing computational models of slug rise at Stromboli with UV camera measurements of SO2 flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pering, Tom D.; McGonigle, Andrew J. S.; James, Mike R.; Tamburello, Giancarlo; Aiuppa, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    Strombolian eruptions, particularly those at the archetypal Stromboli Volcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy) are generally accepted to be caused by the burst of gas slugs. Using computational fluid dynamic models implemented in Ansys Fluent®, with a range of conduit, magma and gas properties appropriate for current observations at Stromboli volcano, we simulate the rise of such gas slugs and demonstrate that during their ascent there is the potential for daughter bubble production from the slug base. These are bubbles which can detach from the influence of a slug to rise and burst at the surface independently. Within the models we can then estimate the amount and temporal pattern of gas released during and following individual slug burst events. This is achieved by integrating gas released near the magma surface. After correcting for atmospheric entrainment and diffusion we can then compare our modelled gas flux to our ultra-violet (UV) camera measurements of SO2 flux at Stromboli (i.e. UV measurement of gas flux is performed at least ? 50 m above point of slug rupture at the magma surface). The UV camera measurements identify a broad range of degassing patterns following bursts, typifying the dynamic nature and the complexities of the system at Stromboli, including a previously identified coda in gas flux spanning tens of seconds to minutes (e.g. Tamburello et al. 2012). Whilst our models only analyse a narrow range of events at Stromboli, they highlight the possibility that the production of daughter bubbles could contribute to the gas flux observed at Stromboli. In some instances, the gas flux created by bursting daughter bubbles following a burst event is of a similar time span and could explain the observed gas flux coda. It is also possible that well documented puffing events could be explained by the bursting of daughter bubbles. Indeed, the larger modelled daughter bubbles, which are apparent as well-defined peaks in gas flux within both the UV camera record and modelled flux, have a total mass of ? 0.3 - 2.8 kg, a similar range to previous observations. The described phenomena is of course not limited to Stromboli and could play a key role in gas release regimes at a variety of volcanic targets where the potential for and rate of daughter bubble production (i.e. the stability and turbulence of a bubble or slug wake) can be estimated using the inverse viscosity parameter Nf (e.g. Nogueira et al. 2006).

  8. Absolute measurement of the extreme UV solar flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Ogawa, H. S.; Judge, D. L.; Phillips, E.

    1984-01-01

    A windowless rare-gas ionization chamber has been developed to measure the absolute value of the solar extreme UV flux in the 50-575-A region. Successful results were obtained on a solar-pointing sounding rocket. The ionization chamber, operated in total absorption, is an inherently stable absolute detector of ionizing UV radiation and was designed to be independent of effects from secondary ionization and gas effusion. The net error of the measurement is + or - 7.3 percent, which is primarily due to residual outgassing in the instrument, other errors such as multiple ionization, photoelectron collection, and extrapolation to the zero atmospheric optical depth being small in comparison. For the day of the flight, Aug. 10, 1982, the solar irradiance (50-575 A), normalized to unit solar distance, was found to be 5.71 + or - 0.42 x 10 to the 10th photons per sq cm sec.

  9. Cosmic rays muon flux measurements at Belgrade shallow underground laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselinovi?, N.; Dragi?, A.; Maleti?, D.; Jokovi?, D.; Savi?, M.; Banjanac, R.; Udovi?i?, V.; Ani?in, I.

    2015-02-01

    The Belgrade underground laboratory is a shallow underground one, at 25 meters of water equivalent. It is dedicated to low-background spectroscopy and cosmic rays measurement. Its uniqueness is that it is composed of two parts, one above ground, the other bellow with identical sets of detectors and analyzing electronics thus creating opportunity to monitor simultaneously muon flux and ambient radiation. We investigate the possibility of utilizing measurements at the shallow depth for the study of muons, processes to which these muons are sensitive and processes induced by cosmic rays muons. For this purpose a series of simulations of muon generation and propagation is done, based on the CORSIKA air shower simulation package and GEANT4. Results show good agreement with other laboratories and cosmic rays stations.

  10. Just Breathe Green: Measuring Transpiration Rates

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-18

    Through multi-trial experiments, students are able to see and measure something that is otherwise invisible to them—seeing plants breathe. Student groups are given two small plants of native species and materials to enclose them after watering with colored water. After being enclosed for 5, 10 and 15 minutes, teams collect and measure the condensed water from the plants' "breathing," and then calculate the rates at which the plants breathe. A plant's breath is known as transpiration, which is the flow of water from the ground where it is taken up by roots (plant uptake) and then lost through the leaves. Students plot volume/time data for three different native plant species, determine and compare their transpiration rates to see which had the highest reaction rate and consider how a plant's unique characteristics (leaf surface area, transpiration rate) might figure into engineers' designs for neighborhood stormwater management plans.

  11. Effect of wind tunnel air velocity on VOC flux rates from CAFO manure and wastewater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind tunnels and flux chambers are often used to estimate volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from animal feeding operations (AFOs) without regard to air velocity or sweep air flow rates. Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of wind tunnel air velocity on VOC emission ...

  12. Author's personal copy How large is the subducted water flux? New constraints on mantle regassing rates

    E-print Network

    Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy

    cycling and the return flux of water to the deep Earth. Estimates of magma production rates and water Earth water cycle. The simulation is con- strained by reconstructions of Phanerozoic sea level change (Fig. 1). A quantitative assessment of the long-term water cycle is critical to our understanding

  13. Elemental weathering fluxes and saprolite production rate in a Central African lateritic terrain (Nsimi, South Cameroon)

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Elemental weathering fluxes and saprolite production rate in a Central African lateritic terrain elements and the res- idence time of the lateritic weathering cover. We focus on the hillside system composed of a thick lateritic weathering cover topped by a soil layer. This study is built on the recent

  14. Evidence for electron neutrino flavor change through measurement of the (8)B solar neutrino flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, Mark Stephen

    2001-11-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a water Cerenkov detector designed to study solar neutrinos. Using 1 kiloton of heavy water as the target and detection medium, SNO is able to separately determine the flux of electron neutrinos (?e) and the flux of all active neutrinos from the Sun by measuring the rate of charged current (CC) and neutral current (NC) interactions with deuterons. A comparison of these interaction rates allows for direct observation of solar neutrino oscillations. SNO can also search for oscillations by comparing the rate of CC and neutrino- electron elastic scattering (ES) events, since ES has both charged current and neutral current sensitivity. In this thesis, we present measurement of the 8B solar ? e flux of 1.78+0.13-0.14 (stat+syst) × 106cm-2s -1 (35% BP2000 SSM) through measurement of the CC rate over 169.3 days of livetime. We have also measured the 8B flux from the ES reaction to be 2.56+0.48-0.45 (stat+syst), consistent with measurements by previous water Cerenkov experiments. A flavor analysis comparing the CC measured flux with that determined through ES by SuperKamiokande yields a non- ?e active neutrino flux from 8B of 3.62+1.06-1.08 × 106cm-2s-1 , providing evidence for ?e --> ? ?,? oscillations as a solution to the solar neutrino problem. This result excludes pure solar ?e --> ? s oscillations at greater than the 99.7% C.I. The total active 8B neutrino flux has been measured to be 5.39+1.07-1.09 × 106cm-2s-1 , consistent with BP2000 SSM predictions. First analyses of the CC (NHit) spectrum and hep flux in SNO are presented. The CC spectrum is found to be a good fit to expectations from an undistorted 8B spectrum, and global best fit vacuum oscillation solutions are disfavored over the other solutions by the data. Through observations near the 8B endpoint with consideration of energy systematics, hep flux limits of 4.1 (90% C.I.) and 6.9 (99% C.I.) times SSM expectations are obtained. A statistical fit for the hep flux signal yields a 3? upper limit of 3.2 times the SSM expected flux.

  15. Chamber and Diffusive Based Carbon Flux Measurements in an Alaskan Arctic Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkman, E.; Oechel, W. C.; Zona, D.

    2013-12-01

    Eric Wilkman, Walter Oechel, Donatella Zona Comprising an area of more than 7 x 106 km2 and containing over 11% of the world's organic matter pool, Arctic terrestrial ecosystems are vitally important components of the global carbon cycle, yet their structure and functioning are sensitive to subtle changes in climate and many of these functional changes can have large effects on the atmosphere and future climate regimes (Callaghan & Maxwell 1995, Chapin et al. 2002). Historically these northern ecosystems have acted as strong C sinks, sequestering large stores of atmospheric C due to photosynthetic dominance in the short summer season and low rates of decomposition throughout the rest of the year as a consequence of cold, nutrient poor, and generally water-logged conditions. Currently, much of this previously stored carbon is at risk of loss to the atmosphere due to accelerated soil organic matter decomposition in warmer future climates (Grogan & Chapin 2000). Although there have been numerous studies on Arctic carbon dynamics, much of the previous soil flux work has been done at limited time intervals, due to both the harshness of the environment and labor and time constraints. Therefore, in June of 2013 an Ultraportable Greenhouse Gas Analyzer (UGGA - Los Gatos Research Inc.) was deployed in concert with the LI-8100A Automated Soil Flux System (LI-COR Biosciences) in Barrow, AK to gather high temporal frequency soil CO2 and CH4 fluxes from a wet sedge tundra ecosystem. An additional UGGA in combination with diffusive probes, installed in the same location, provides year-round soil and snow CO2 and CH4 concentrations. When used in combination with the recently purchased AlphaGUARD portable radon monitor (Saphymo GmbH), continuous soil and snow diffusivities and fluxes of CO2 and CH4 can be calculated (Lehmann & Lehmann 2000). Of particular note, measuring soil gas concentration over a diffusive gradient in this way allows one to separate both net production and consumption, whereas chamber and eddy covariance methodologies only document net production from the surface. Also, the capability to measure spring, summer and fall chamber fluxes, and to continuously determine year-round CO2 and CH4 fluxes under even the most extreme weather conditions, allows an unprecedented level of data continuity and local spatial coverage. Comparison to a nearby eddy covariance tower measuring CO2 and CH4 fluxes with an LGR Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyzer add additional power to this set of measurements. Thus, inter-comparison between diffusive, chamber, and tower-based carbon fluxes should lend much insight into the spatial and temporal controls on carbon cycling in this ecosystem.

  16. Local Heat Flux Measurements with Single Element Coaxial Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Gregg; Protz, Christopher; Bullard, Brad; Hulka, James

    2006-01-01

    To support the mission for the NASA Vision for Space Exploration, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a program in 2005 to improve the capability to predict local thermal compatibility and heat transfer in liquid propellant rocket engine combustion devices. The ultimate objective was to predict and hence reduce the local peak heat flux due to injector design, resulting in a significant improvement in overall engine reliability and durability. Such analyses are applicable to combustion devices in booster, upper stage, and in-space engines, as well as for small thrusters with few elements in the injector. In this program, single element and three-element injectors were hot-fire tested with liquid oxygen and ambient temperature gaseous hydrogen propellants at The Pennsylvania State University Cryogenic Combustor Laboratory from May to August 2005. Local heat fluxes were measured in a 1-inch internal diameter heat sink combustion chamber using Medtherm coaxial thermocouples and Gardon heat flux gauges. Injectors were tested with shear coaxial and swirl coaxial elements, including recessed, flush and scarfed oxidizer post configurations, and concentric and non-concentric fuel annuli. This paper includes general descriptions of the experimental hardware, instrumentation, and results of the hot-fire testing for three of the single element injectors - recessed-post shear coaxial with concentric fuel, flush-post swirl coaxial with concentric fuel, and scarfed-post swirl coaxial with concentric fuel. Detailed geometry and test results will be published elsewhere to provide well-defined data sets for injector development and model validatation.

  17. A time series of benthic flux measurements from Monterey Bay, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berelson, William; McManus, Jim; Coale, Kenneth; Johnson, Ken; Burdige, David; Kilgore, Tammy; Colodner, Debbie; Chavez, Francisco; Kudela, Rafael; Boucher, Joceline

    2003-03-01

    In situ incubation chamber measurements of benthic nutrient recycling rates were made on the Monterey Bay shelf at 100 m during various years and seasons. Variability in nutrient (Si, PO 42+, NH 3, NO 3-) and trace metal (Mn, Fe (II), Cu) fluxes correlate with variability in the amount of organic carbon oxidized on the sea floor. Patterns of primary productivity show a mid-year maxima, consistent with the timing of increased rates of benthic C org and opal recycling. High rates of C org rain to the shelf promote nitrate consumption at a rate that equals or exceeds ammonia efflux. Low rates of C org rain promote greater efflux of DIN; thus these margin sediments provide a negative feedback to local productivity cycles. The efflux of iron (II) from shelf sediments is sufficient to support >100% of new production, yet Fe flux is positively correlated with C org recycling which lags the maximum in new production. On account of this time lag, diagenetically recycled Fe is not likely a micro-nutrient trigger of new production, but could serve as a positive feedback. Bio-irrigation rates are seasonally variable by 30% but maximal during the maximum productivity months.

  18. Measurement of the Atmospheric ?e Flux in IceCube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Altmann, D.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; Bell, M.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; BenZvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohaichuk, S.; Bohm, C.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Brayeur, L.; Brown, A. M.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Buitink, S.; Carson, M.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clark, K.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Danninger, M.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; De Clercq, C.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dreyer, J.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Eberhardt, B.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engdegård, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Frantzen, K.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Goodman, J. A.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Groß, A.; Gurtner, M.; Ha, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Heereman, D.; Heimann, P.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jero, K.; Jlelati, O.; Kaminsky, B.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kiryluk, J.; Kislat, F.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krasberg, M.; Kroll, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Landsman, H.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leute, J.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Merck, M.; Mészáros, P.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke, A.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Olivo, M.; O'Murchadha, A.; Panknin, S.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pirk, N.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rädel, L.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Saba, S. M.; Salameh, T.; Sander, H.-G.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheel, M.; Scheriau, F.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitz, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönherr, L.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Schulz, O.; Seckel, D.; Seo, S. H.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Sheremata, C.; Smith, M. W. E.; Soiron, M.; Soldin, D.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Toscano, S.; Usner, M.; van der Drift, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Van Overloop, A.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Wallraff, M.; Wasserman, R.; Weaver, Ch.; Wellons, M.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, C.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Ziemann, J.; Zierke, S.; Zilles, A.; Zoll, M.

    2013-04-01

    We report the first measurement of the atmospheric electron neutrino flux in the energy range between approximately 80 GeV and 6 TeV, using data recorded during the first year of operation of IceCube’s DeepCore low-energy extension. Techniques to identify neutrinos interacting within the DeepCore volume and veto muons originating outside the detector are demonstrated. A sample of 1029 events is observed in 281 days of data, of which 496±66(stat)±88(syst) are estimated to be cascade events, including both electron neutrino and neutral current events. The rest of the sample includes residual backgrounds due to atmospheric muons and charged current interactions of atmospheric muon neutrinos. The flux of the atmospheric electron neutrinos is consistent with models of atmospheric neutrinos in this energy range. This constitutes the first observation of electron neutrinos and neutral current interactions in a very large volume neutrino telescope optimized for the TeV energy range.

  19. Measurement of the atmospheric ?e flux in IceCube.

    PubMed

    Aartsen, M G; Abbasi, R; Abdou, Y; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker Tjus, J; Becker, K-H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohaichuk, S; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clark, K; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Cruz Silva, A H; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dreyer, J; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Groß, A; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Haj Ismail, A; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heimann, P; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kelley, J L; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J-H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leute, J; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Pérez de los Heros, C; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pirk, N; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rädel, L; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H-G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönherr, L; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soiron, M; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Usner, M; van der Drift, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zilles, A; Zoll, M

    2013-04-12

    We report the first measurement of the atmospheric electron neutrino flux in the energy range between approximately 80 GeV and 6 TeV, using data recorded during the first year of operation of IceCube's DeepCore low-energy extension. Techniques to identify neutrinos interacting within the DeepCore volume and veto muons originating outside the detector are demonstrated. A sample of 1029 events is observed in 281 days of data, of which 496±66(stat)±88(syst) are estimated to be cascade events, including both electron neutrino and neutral current events. The rest of the sample includes residual backgrounds due to atmospheric muons and charged current interactions of atmospheric muon neutrinos. The flux of the atmospheric electron neutrinos is consistent with models of atmospheric neutrinos in this energy range. This constitutes the first observation of electron neutrinos and neutral current interactions in a very large volume neutrino telescope optimized for the TeV energy range. PMID:25167245

  20. Measurement of the Atmospheric $?_e$ flux in IceCube

    E-print Network

    IceCube Collaboration; M. G. Aartsen; R. Abbasi; Y. Abdou; M. Ackermann; J. Adams; J. A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; D. Altmann; K. Andeen; J. Auffenberg; X. Bai; M. Baker; S. W. Barwick; V. Baum; R. Bay; K. Beattie; J. J. Beatty; S. Bechet; J. Becker Tjus; K. -H. Becker; M. Bell; M. L. Benabderrahmane; S. BenZvi; J. Berdermann; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; D. Bertrand; D. Z. Besson; D. Bindig; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D. J. Boersma; S. Bohaichuk; C. Bohm; D. Bose1; S. Boser; O. Botner; L. Brayeur; A. M. Brown; R. Bruijn; J. Brunner; S. Buitink; M. Carson; J. Casey; M. Casier; D. Chirkin; B. Christy; K. Clark; F. Clevermann; S. Cohen; D. F. Cowen; A. H. Cruz Silva; M. Danninger; J. Daughhetee; J. C. Davis; C. De Clercq; S. De Ridder; F. Descamps; P. Desiati; G. de Vries-Uiterweerd; T. DeYoung; J. C. Diaz-Velez; J. Dreyer; J. P. Dumm; M. Dunkman; R. Eagan; B. Eberhardt; J. Eisch; R. W. Ellsworth; O. Engdegard; S. Euler; P. A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A. R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; J. Feintzeig; T. Feusels; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; T. Fischer-Wasels; S. Flis; A. Franckowiak; R. Franke; K. Frantzen; T. Fuchs; T. K. Gaisser; J. Gallagher; L. Gerhardt; L. Gladstone; T. Glusenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; G. Golup; J. A. Goodman; D. Gora; D. Grant; A. Gross; S. Grullon; M. Gurtner; C. Ha; A. Haj Ismail; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Hanson; D. Heereman; P. Heimann; D. Heinen; K. Helbing; R. Hellauer; S. Hickford; G. C. Hill; K. D. Hoffman; R. Hoffmann; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; W. Huelsnitz; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; S. Hussain; A. Ishihara; E. Jacobi; J. Jacobsen; G. S. Japaridze; O. Jlelati; A. Kappes; T. Karg; A. Karle; J. Kiryluk; F. Kislat; J. Klas; S. R. Klein; J. -H. Kohne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; L. Kopke; C. Kopper; S. Kopper; D. J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; M. Krasberg; G. Kroll; J. Kunnen; N. Kurahashi; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare; H. Landsman; M. J. Larson; R. Lauer; M. Lesiak-Bzdak; J. Lunemann; J. Madsen; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H. S. Matis; F. McNally; K. Meagher; M. Merck; P. Meszaros; T. Meures; S. Miarecki; E. Middell; N. Milke; J. Miller; L. Mohrmann; T. Montaruli; R. Morse; R. Nahnhauer; U. Naumann; S. C. Nowicki; D. R. Nygren; A. Obertacke; S. Odrowski; A. Olivas; M. Olivo; A. O'Murchadha; S. Panknin; L. Paul; J. A. Pepper; C. Perez de los Heros; D. Pieloth; N. Pirk; J. Posselt; P. B. Price; G. T. Przybylski; L. Radel; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Ribordy; M. Richman; B. Riedel; J. P. Rodrigues; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; S. M. Saba; T. Salameh; H. -G. Sander; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; M. Scheel; F. Scheriau; T. Schmidt; M. Schmitz; S. Schoenen; S. Schoneberg; L. Schonherr; A. Schonwald; A. Schukraft; L. Schulte; O. Schulz; D. Seckel; S. H. Seo; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine; C. Sheremata; M. W. E. Smith; M. Soiron; D. Soldin; G. M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; T. Stanev; A. Stasik; T. Stezelberger; R. G. Stokstad; A. Stoss; E. A. Strahler; R. Strom; G. W. Sullivan; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Tamburro; S. Ter-Antonyan; S. Tilav; P. A. Toale; S. Toscano; M. Usner; D. van der Drift; N. van Eijndhoven; A. Van Overloop; J. van Santen; M. Vehring; M. Voge1; M. Vraeghe; C. Walck; T. Waldenmaier; M. Wallraff; M. Walter; R. Wasserman; Ch. Weaver; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; N. Whitehorn; K. Wiebe; C. H. Wiebusch; D. R. Williams; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; T. R. Wood; K. Woschnagg; C. Xu; D. L. Xu; X. W. Xu; J. P. Yanez; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky; J. Ziemann; S. Zierke; A. Zilles; M. Zoll

    2013-03-22

    We report the first measurement of the atmospheric electron neutrino flux in the energy range between approximately 80 GeV and 6 TeV, using data recorded during the first year of operation of IceCube's DeepCore low energy extension. Techniques to identify neutrinos interacting within the DeepCore volume and veto muons originating outside the detector are demonstrated. A sample of 1029 events is observed in 281 days of data, of which 496 $\\pm$ 66(stat.) $\\pm$ 88(syst.) are estimated to be cascade events, including both electron neutrino and neutral current events. The rest of the sample includes residual backgrounds due to atmospheric muons and charged current interactions of atmospheric muon neutrinos. The flux of the atmospheric electron neutrinos is consistent with models of atmospheric neutrinos in this energy range. This constitutes the first observation of electron neutrinos and neutral current interactions in a very large volume neutrino telescope optimized for the TeV energy range.

  1. MAVEN Measurements of the Ion Escape Rate from Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brain, Dave; Dong, Yaxue; Fortier, Kier; Fang, Xiaohua; McFadden, James; Halekas, Jasper; Connerney, Jack; Eparvier, Frank; Dong, Chuanfei; Bougher, Stephen; Ma, Yingjuan; Modolo, Ronan; Lillis, Rob; Luhmann, Janet; Curry, Shannon; Seki, Kanako; Jakosky, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    The loss of atmospheric particles (neutral atoms, neutral molecules, ions) to space is thought to have played a role in the evolution of Martian climate over the past ~4 billion years. Due to the lack of a global magnetic field on Mars, the solar wind has direct access to the upper layers of the Martian atmosphere, and can drive non-thermal escape of charged particles (ions) from the atmosphere. Two spacecraft (Phobos 2 and Mars Express) have previously measured escaping ions at Mars. The recently arrived MAVEN spacecraft is equipped with instruments to measure escaping ions with high time cadence and high energy and mass resolution, as well as instruments to provide contextual information about what controls the variation in escape rates. We report on the total escape rate of heavy planetary ions from the Martian atmosphere measured by MAVEN. Heavy ions are identified in data from the SupraThermal And Thermal Ion Composition (STATIC) instrument. Rudimentary estimates of ion escape rate are obtained by summing the measured ion fluxes over a surface downstream from Mars with respect to the solar wind flow. This estimate can then be refined to account for the limited field of view of the instrument (investigation of measured particle distributions) and the limited spatial coverage of the spacecraft orbit trajectory. Variability in measured escape rates can also be grouped according to upstream conditions and the orientation of Mars (and its crustal magnetic fields) with respect to the solar wind. Important upstream drivers include the solar Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) flux, solar wind pressure, and the interplanetary magnetic field strength and direction. These drivers are measured directly by MAVEN's EUV, SWIA, and MAG instruments. We will provide an initial estimate of ion escape rates based on the first several months of MAVEN data. We will then report on progress to refine these estimates to correct for instrument field of view and spacecraft coverage effects, as well as the influence of external drivers. We will place these estimates in context with previously published ion escape rates, and address the implications for atmospheric loss over the history of the planet

  2. Optimization of magnetic flux density measurement using multiple RF receiver coils and multi-echo in MREIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Woo Chul; Chauhan, Munish; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Hyung Joong; Serša, Igor; In Kwon, Oh; Woo, Eung Je

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Tomography (MREIT) is an MRI method that enables mapping of internal conductivity and/or current density via measurements of magnetic flux density signals. The MREIT measures only the z-component of the induced magnetic flux density B = (Bx, By, Bz) by external current injection. The measured noise of Bz complicates recovery of magnetic flux density maps, resulting in lower quality conductivity and current-density maps. We present a new method for more accurate measurement of the spatial gradient of the magnetic flux density gradient (? Bz). The method relies on the use of multiple radio-frequency receiver coils and an interleaved multi-echo pulse sequence that acquires multiple sampling points within each repetition time. The noise level of the measured magnetic flux density Bz depends on the decay rate of the signal magnitude, the injection current duration, and the coil sensitivity map. The proposed method uses three key steps. The first step is to determine a representative magnetic flux density gradient from multiple receiver coils by using a weighted combination and by denoising the measured noisy data. The second step is to optimize the magnetic flux density gradient by using multi-echo magnetic flux densities at each pixel in order to reduce the noise level of ? Bz and the third step is to remove a random noise component from the recovered ? Bz by solving an elliptic partial differential equation in a region of interest. Numerical simulation experiments using a cylindrical phantom model with included regions of low MRI signal to noise (‘defects’) verified the proposed method. Experimental results using a real phantom experiment, that included three different kinds of anomalies, demonstrated that the proposed method reduced the noise level of the measured magnetic flux density. The quality of the recovered conductivity maps using denoised ? Bz data showed that the proposed method reduced the conductivity noise level up to 3-4 times at each anomaly region in comparison to the conventional method.

  3. Standardization of flux chambers and wind tunnels for area source emission measurements at animal feeding operations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers and practitioners have used many varied designs of wind tunnels and flux chambers to measure the flux of volatile organic compounds, odor, and ammonia from area sources at animal feeding operations. The measured fluxes are used to estimate emission factors or compare treatments. We sho...

  4. Careful Measurements and Energy Balance Closure - The Case of Soil Heat Flux

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An area of persistent concern in micrometeorological measurements is the failure to close the energy balance at surface flux stations. While most attention has focused on corrections associated with the eddy fluxes, none of the energy balance terms are measured without error. The flux plate method i...

  5. A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument for plasma thruster exhausts and diffusive plasmas.

    PubMed

    West, Michael D; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W

    2009-05-01

    A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument based on a compound pendulum has been developed for use with electric propulsion devices and radio frequency driven plasmas. A laser displacement system, which builds upon techniques used by the materials science community for surface stress measurements, is used to measure with high sensitivity the displacement of a target plate placed in a plasma thruster exhaust. The instrument has been installed inside a vacuum chamber and calibrated via two different methods and is able to measure forces in the range of 0.02-0.5 mN with a resolution of 15 microN. Measurements have been made of the force produced from the cold gas flow and with a discharge ignited using argon propellant. The plasma is generated using a Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype. The instrument target is placed about 1 mean free path for ion-neutral charge exchange collisions downstream of the thruster exit. At this position, the plasma consists of a low density ion beam (10%) and a much larger downstream component (90%). The results are in good agreement with those determined from the plasma parameters measured with diagnostic probes. Measurements at various flow rates show that variations in ion beam velocity and plasma density and the resulting momentum flux can be measured with this instrument. The instrument target is a simple, low cost device, and since the laser displacement system used is located outside the vacuum chamber, the measurement technique is free from radio frequency interference and thermal effects. It could be used to measure the thrust in the exhaust of other electric propulsion devices and the momentum flux of ion beams formed by expanding plasmas or fusion experiments. PMID:19485509

  6. A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument for plasma thruster exhausts and diffusive plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    West, Michael D.; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Group, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2009-05-15

    A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument based on a compound pendulum has been developed for use with electric propulsion devices and radio frequency driven plasmas. A laser displacement system, which builds upon techniques used by the materials science community for surface stress measurements, is used to measure with high sensitivity the displacement of a target plate placed in a plasma thruster exhaust. The instrument has been installed inside a vacuum chamber and calibrated via two different methods and is able to measure forces in the range of 0.02-0.5 mN with a resolution of 15 {mu}N. Measurements have been made of the force produced from the cold gas flow and with a discharge ignited using argon propellant. The plasma is generated using a Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype. The instrument target is placed about 1 mean free path for ion-neutral charge exchange collisions downstream of the thruster exit. At this position, the plasma consists of a low density ion beam (10%) and a much larger downstream component (90%). The results are in good agreement with those determined from the plasma parameters measured with diagnostic probes. Measurements at various flow rates show that variations in ion beam velocity and plasma density and the resulting momentum flux can be measured with this instrument. The instrument target is a simple, low cost device, and since the laser displacement system used is located outside the vacuum chamber, the measurement technique is free from radio frequency interference and thermal effects. It could be used to measure the thrust in the exhaust of other electric propulsion devices and the momentum flux of ion beams formed by expanding plasmas or fusion experiments.

  7. First UAV Measurements of Entrainment Layer Fluxes with Coupled Cloud Property Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. M.; Praveen, P. S.; Wilcox, E. M.; Pistone, K.; Bender, F.; Ramanathan, V.

    2012-12-01

    This study details entrainment flux measurements made from a lightweight unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) containing turbulent water vapor flux instrumentation (Thomas et al., 2012). The system was flown for 26 flights during the Cloud, Aerosol, Radiative forcing, Dynamics EXperiment (CARDEX) in the Maldives in March 2012 to study interrelationships between entrainment, aerosols, water budget, cloud microphysics and radiative fluxes in a trade wind cumulus cloud regime. A major advantage of using this lightweight, precision autopiloted UAV system with scientific telemetry is the ability to target small-scale features in the boundary layer, such as an entrainment layer, with minimal aircraft induced disruption. Results are presented from two UAVs flown in stacked formation: one UAV situated in-cloud measuring cloud-droplet size distribution spectra and liquid water content, and another co-located 100m above measuring turbulent properties and entrainment latent heat flux (?EE). We also show latent heat flux and turbulence measurements routinely made at the entrainment layer base and altitudes from the surface up to 4kft. Ratios of ?EE to corresponding surface tower values (?ES) display a bimodal frequency distribution with ranges 0.22-0.53 and 0.79-1.5, with occasional events >7. Reasons for this distribution are discussed drawing upon boundary layer and free tropospheric dynamics and meteorology, turbulence length scales, surface conditions, and cloud interactions. Latent heat flux profiles are combined with in-cloud UAV Liquid Water Content (LWC) data and surface based Liquid Water Path (LWP) and Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) measurements to produce observationally constrained vertical water budgets, providing insights into diurnal coupling of ?EE and ?ES. Observed ?EE, ?ES, water budgets, and cloud microphysical responses to entrainment are then contextualized with respect to measured aerosol loading profiles and airmass history.

  8. Measuring the Mass Accretion Rate in LMXBS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernard McNamara

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this project is to determine whether the Johson B magnitude can be used to measure the mass accretion rate in LMXBs. Newly collected RXTE data will be combined with simultaneously obtained ground based B magnitudes. The X-ray data will be used to construct Z- diagrams for Cyg X-2 and Sco X-1, and positions in these diagrams will

  9. Dynamic heart rate measurements from video sequences.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yong-Poh; Raveendran, P; Lim, Chern-Loon

    2015-07-01

    This paper shows how dynamic heart rate measurements that are typically obtained from sensors mounted near to the heart can also be obtained from video sequences. In this study, two experiments are carried out where a video camera captures the facial images of the seven subjects. The first experiment involves the measurement of subjects' increasing heart rates (79 to 150 beats per minute (BPM)) while cycling whereas the second involves falling heart beats (153 to 88 BPM). In this study, independent component analysis (ICA) is combined with mutual information to ensure accuracy is not compromised in the use of short video duration. While both experiments are going on measures of heartbeat using the Polar heart rate monitor is also taken to compare with the findings of the proposed method. Overall experimental results show the proposed method can be used to measure dynamic heart rates where the root mean square error (RMSE) and the correlation coefficient are 1.88 BPM and 0.99 respectively. PMID:26203374

  10. Vacuum test fixture improves leakage rate measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maier, H.; Marx, H.

    1966-01-01

    Cylindrical chamber, consisting of two matching halves, forms a vacuum test fixture for measuring leakage rates of individual connections, brazed joints, and entrance ports used in closed fluid flow line systems. Once the chamber has been sufficiently evacuated, atmospheric pressure holds the two halves together.

  11. Effect on Autochamber Flux Measurements in an Ombrotrophic Peatland from Atmospheric Turbulence and Deployment Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, D.; Roulet, N. T.; Dalva, M.; Humphreys, E. R.; Moore, T. R.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate quantification of soil-atmosphere gas exchange is essential for understanding the magnitude and controls of soil respiration as well as modelling the effects of various perturbations on soil carbon dynamics. We investigated the influence of atmospheric turbulence and chamber deployment time on CO2 and CH4 fluxes measured by closed, dynamic automatic chambers in the ombrotrophic Mer Bleue peatland near Ottawa, Canada. With a short deployment time of 2.5 minutes, autochamber CH4 flux exhibited a strong diurnal pattern that was highly and negatively correlated with friction velocity. We also found a significant, negative relationship between friction velocity and CO2 concentration gradient in the top 20 cm surface peat. This demonstrated a mass flow of gas from peat pore space to the atmosphere under highly turbulent conditions. Consequently, it is hypothesized that the transient low gas fluxes obtained could be due to insufficient time allowed for re-establishment of a diffusive concentration gradient with short duration deployment. On the other hand, the high CO2 and CH4 effluxes measured under calm conditions were possibly artefacts of chamber closure and headspace mixing by fans that enhanced near surface gas emissions when concentration gradients were large. Results of a test with a 30-minute deployment time showed that CO2 and CH4 efflux rates reached a constant rate after about 13 minutes of chamber closure. Methane fluxes calculated using the headspace concentration after this duration had no significant relationship with friction velocity and exhibited little diurnal variation. The above results suggest there is considerable potential bias in chamber flux measurements under both high and low turbulence conditions when sampling porous soils with a short deployment time. This bias is expected to be of particular concern in ecosystems with highly porous and aerated soils like those at Mer Bleue which has a relatively low water table (30 cm or more) and a peat soil with a porosity of more than 94% in the top 30 cm though we suspect it also exists to a lesser extent in other less porous soils. In these situations, the time required to reach a steady rate of increase in headspace concentration should be determined for each site to minimize bias in calculated fluxes.

  12. Automatic solar image motion measurements. [electronic disk flux monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colgate, S. A.; Moore, E. P.

    1975-01-01

    The solar seeing image motion has been monitored electronically and absolutely with a 25 cm telescope at three sites along the ridge at the southern end of the Magdalena Mountains west of Socorro, New Mexico. The uncorrelated component of the variations of the optical flux from two points at opposite limbs of the solar disk was continually monitored in 3 frequencies centered at 0.3, 3 and 30 Hz. The frequency band of maximum signal centered at 3 Hz showed the average absolute value of image motion to be somewhat less than 2sec. The observer estimates of combined blurring and image motion were well correlated with electronically measured image motion, but the observer estimates gave a factor 2 larger value.

  13. Reentrant albedo proton fluxes measured by the PAMELA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; Donato, C. De; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Di Felice, V.; Formato, V.; Galper, A. M.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobskiy, S.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A. G.; Menn, W.; Mergé, M.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.

    2015-05-01

    We present a precise measurement of downward going albedo proton fluxes for kinetic energy above ˜70 MeV performed by the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) experiment at an altitude between 350 and 610 km. On the basis of a trajectory tracing simulation, the analyzed protons were classified into quasi-trapped, concentrating in the magnetic equatorial region, and untrapped spreading over all latitudes, including both short-lived (precipitating) and long-lived (pseudotrapped) components. In addition, features of the penumbra region around the geomagnetic cutoff were investigated in detail. PAMELA results significantly improve the characterization of the high-energy albedo proton populations at low-Earth orbits.

  14. Controls on Flux Rates of Dissolved Gaseous Mercury Emitted from an Estuarine Water Column to the Atmosphere in Eastern New Jersey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, S.; Wollenberg, J.

    2006-12-01

    The emission rate of mercury from a water surface is influenced by a matrix of water quality parameters, including dissolved organic material (DOM), incident radiation, pH, salinity, and dissolved oxygen. As part of a larger project examining the total flux of dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) from water, land, and plant surfaces, this work attempts to characterize the variables that control the emission of mercury from a estuarine water surface. The project's principal field site is a long recognized site of historic mercury contamination, the Ventron/Velsicol Superfund site located near the headwaters of Berry's Creek in eastern New Jersey. A number of field sites were selected longitudinally along a gradient of aqueous mercury concentration, DOM concentration, and salinity. Mercury fluxes at one site were measured over a continuous 55-hour period using flux chambers and field portable mercury analyzers, including those that measure absorbance (Mercury Instruments UT-3000) and those that measure fluorescence (Tekran). Here we report on fluxes of mercury from the water column as a function of water quality parameters. Measured mercury flux rates from the water surface ranged from near zero to almost 70 ng/m2/h. During the daytime, flux rates covaried positively with incoming solar radiation, with best fits approximated by a logarithmic relationship. Surprisingly, the highest mercury flux rates were observed at night. Nighttime fluxes appear to occur after a transition from daytime dissolved oxygen oversaturated conditions due to algal photosynthesis, to lower dissolved oxygen at nighttime. Clear relations between mercury flux rate and turbidity, pH, temperature, and salinity were not observed. Regionally elevated mercury concentrations may be sourced from this site, as the atmospheric mercury concentration measured 2m above the water surface varied inversely with windspeed. Maximum flux rates decreased with distance downstream, from near 70 ng/m2/h adjacent to the Superfund site to ~30-40 ng/m2/h approximately 3 km downstream. The comparison of fluorescence and absorbance analytical techniques was favorable, with a correlation coefficient greater than 0.90 on parallel simultaneous measurements.

  15. Energetic ion diagnostics using neutron flux measurements during pellet injection

    SciTech Connect

    Heidbrink, W.W.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron measurements during injection of deuterium pellets into deuterium plasmas on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) indicate that the fractional increase in neutron emission about 0.5 msec after pellet injection is proportional to the fraction of beam-plasma reactions to total fusion reactions in the unperturbed plasma. These observations suggest three diagnostic applications of neutron measurements during pellet injection: (1) measurement of the beam-plasma reaction rate in deuterium plasmas for use in determining the fusion Q in an equivalent deuterium-tritium plasma, (2) measurement of the radial profile of energetic beam ions by varying the pellet size and velocity, and (3) measurement of the ''temperature'' of ions accelerated during wave heating. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Determination of radon flux rates in a uranium mine, Cluff Lake, Saskatchewan. Report No. INFO-0347

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    In 1986, the Atomic Energy Control Board completed a project in which a computer model (VENTRAD) was developed to model underground mine ventilation systems. The accuracy of the radon/radon daughter concentration predictions by the computer model depend on the input parameters describing the radon source term. At present, there is a lack of reliable data on radon sources in general and in uranium mines in particular. This study determined the flux of radon emitted per unit surface area in selected locations of Amok Ltd.'s underground Cluff Lake uranium mine; measured parameters that can have an influence on radon flux; tested the VENTRAD computer program using the input parameters measured in the mine; and determined the total flux of radon per unit surface area from the total amount of radon exhausted from the mine and the total surface area of the mine openings.

  17. Current measurement system utilizing cryogenic techniques for the absolute measurement of the magnetic flux quantum

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, T.; Murayama, Y.; Sakamoto, Y.; Sakuraba, T. (Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki (JP)); Shiota, F. (National Research Lab. of Metrology, 1-1-4 Umezono, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305 (JP))

    1989-04-01

    A series of systems composed of cryogenic devices such as a Josephson potentiometer and a cryogenic current comparator has been proposed and developed to precisely measure a current with any value up to 1 A. These systems will be used to measure the injected electrical energy with an uncertainty of the order of 0.01 ppm or less in the absolute measurement of the magnetic flux quantum by superconducting magnetic levitation. Some preliminary experiments are described.

  18. The effect of cumulus cloud field anisotropy on solar radiative fluxes and atmospheric heating rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkelman, Laura M.

    The effect of fair-weather cumulus cloud field anisotropy on domain average surface fluxes and atmospheric heating profiles was studied. Causes of anisotropy were investigated using a large-eddy simulation (LES) model. Cloud formation under a variety of environmental conditions was simulated and the degree of anisotropy in the output fields was calculated. Wind shear was found to be the single greatest factor in the development of both vertically tilted and horizontally stretched cloud structures. A stochastic field generation algorithm was used to produce twenty three-dimensional liquid water content fields based on the statistical properties of the LES cloud scenes. Progressively greater degrees of tilt and stretching were imposed on each of these scenes, so that an ensemble of scenes were produced for each level of distortion. The resulting scenes were used as input to a three-dimensional Monte Carlo model. Domain-average transmission, reflection, and absorption of broadband solar radiation were computed for each scene along with the average heating rate profile. Both tilt and horizontal stretching were found to significantly affect calculated fluxes, with the amount and sign of flux differences depending strongly on sun position relative to cloud distortion geometry. For nearly all solar geometries, domain-averaged fluxes and atmospheric heating rate profiles calculated using the Independent Pixel Approximation differed substantially from the corresponding three-dimensional Monte Carlo results.

  19. SIERRA-Flux: measuring regional surface fluxes of carbon dioxide, methane, and water vapor from an unmanned aircraft system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fladeland, M. M.; Yates, E. L.; Bui, T. P.; Dean-Day, J. M.; Kolyer, R.; Schiro, K.; Berthold, R.; Iraci, L. T.; Loewenstein, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Eddy-Covariance Method for quantifying surface-atmosphere fluxes is a foundational technique for measuring net ecosystem exchange and validating regional-to-global carbon cycle models. While towers or ships are the more frequent platform for measuring surface-atmosphere exchange, experiments using aircraft for flux measurements have yielded contributions to several large-scale studies including BOREAS, SMACEX, RECAB by providing local-to-regional coverage beyond towers. The low-altitude flight requirements make airborne flux measurements particularly dangerous and well suited for unmanned aircraft. In a series of flights in June of 2011, the NASA SIERRA carried a payload consisting of the NASA Ames Meteorological Measurement System (MMS) and a fast response (10Hz) CO2, CH4, and H2O vapor analyzer in order to demonstrate the feasibility of measuring fluxes from unmanned aircraft and to characterize accuracy and precision based upon ground measurements. The flights were conducted in Railroad Valley, NV in order to provide a simple model for understanding biases and uncertainties. This paper describes the system specifications, provides preliminary data compared against coincident ground measurements, and discusses future applications of the system.

  20. Convective heat transfer in a disk-receiver of a solar concentrated radiative flux measuring system

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada, C.A.; Cervantes, J.G. [UNAM, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico). Solar Energy Research Lab.

    1995-12-31

    A parametric study to simulate the thermal performance under various conditions of a disk-type receiver of a concentrated radiative flux measuring system, is presented. The system is currently under construction at the Solar Energy Research Laboratory of the National University of Mexico. One of the proposed heat exchangers to be used in the receiver consists of two parallel, circular disks with an aspect ratio (diameter-to-separation) of 10. An incompressible viscous fluid (a thermal oil) enters at a center hole of one disk, moves radially between both plates, and is heated by means of concentrated solar energy impinging at the outer most plate. Temperature distributions, as a function of space coordinates, are presented for various flow conditions and radiation flux distributions. Plots of the average and maximum fluid temperatures as a function of mass flow rates for different solar concentrations, are also presented. These results, together with other alternatives, are being used for designing purposes of the receiver.

  1. A highly portable, rapidly deployable system for eddy covariance measurements of CO2 fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Billesbach, David P.; Fischer, Marc L.; Torn, Margaret S.; Berry, Joe A.

    2001-09-19

    To facilitate the study of flux heterogeneity within a region, the authors have designed, built, and field-tested a highly portable, rapidly deployable, eddy covariance CO{sub 2} flux measurement system. The system is built from off-the-shelf parts and was assembled at a minimal cost. The unique combination of features of this system allow for a very rapid deployment with a minimal number of field personnel. The system is capable of making high precision, unattended measurements of turbulent CO{sub 2} fluxes, latent heat (LE) fluxes, sensible heat fluxes (H), and momentum transfer fluxes. In addition, many of the meteorological and ecosystem variables necessary for quality control of the fluxes and for running ecosystem models are measured. A side-by-side field comparison of the system at a pair of established AmeriFlux sites has verified that, for single measurements, the system is capable of CO{sub 2} flux accuracy of about {+-} 1.2 {micro}mole/m{sup 2}/sec, LE flux accuracy of about {+-} 15 Watts/m{sup 2}, H flux accuracy of about {+-} 7 Watts/m{sup 2}, and momentum transfer flux accuracy of about {+-} 11 gm-m/sec/sec. System deployment time is between 2 and 4 hours by a single person. The system was measured to draw between 30 and 35 Watts of power and may be run from available line power, storage batteries, or solar panels.

  2. Carbon fluxes of surfaces vs. ecosystems: advantages of measuring eddy covariance and soil respiration simultaneously in dry grassland ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Z.; Pintér, K.; Pavelka, M.; Darenová, E.; Balogh, J.

    2011-09-01

    An automated open system for measurement of soil CO2 efflux (Rsc) was developed and calibrated against known fluxes. The system was tested in the field, while estimating soil respiration simultaneously by the gradient method (Rsg) at a dry, sandy grassland site (Bugac, Hungary). Ecosystem respiration (Rego) was measured using the eddy covariance technique. The small chamber size (5 cm in diameter) made it possible to use the chambers in vegetation gaps, thereby avoiding the necessity of removing shoots and disturbing the spatial structure of vegetation and the upper soil layer. Low air flow rates associated with small chamber volume and chamber design allowed the overpressure range to stabilize between 0.05-0.12 Pa. The correlation between ecosystem and soil CO2 efflux rates as measured by the independent methods was significant, Reco rates were similar or even lower than Rsc in the low flux (up to 2 ?mol CO2 m-2 s-1) range but the differences were within the uncertainty limits for the two fluxes. Rsc from trenched and non-trenched plots amounted to 16 % and 44 % of Reco, respectively. The gradient method showed both up and downward CO2 fluxes originating from the main rooting zone after rains. Diffusive retardation played a smaller role than CO2 production considering the soil air CO2 concentration increase after rains in a given layer. Downward fluxes within the soil profile amounted to 15 % of the simultaneous upward fluxes and to ~7.6 % of the total (upward) effluxes during the 3-month study. The upper 5 cm soil layer contributed to ~50 % of the total soil CO2 efflux. Downward fluxes are expected to seriously affect (1) the Reco vs. temperature response functions and (2) the net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) vs. photon flux density response functions, therefore potentially affecting the gap filling procedures and to lead to a situation (3) when the measured surface and the real time ecosystem fluxes will necessarily differ in the short term. Simultaneous measurements of Reco and soil CO2 effluxes may reveal the timing and magnitude of the decoupling, thereby contributing to decreasing uncertainty associated with eddy flux measurements over flat terrains. While the correlations between CO2 effluxes measured by independent systems are strong, Rsg was generally larger than Rsc or Reco, mainly due to overestimation of effective diffusivity in the soil.

  3. Erosion rates for polymers measured on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.

    1992-01-01

    The summary and viewgraphs of work presented at the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) materials workshop are given. Experimental data for erosion depths and rates for polymers measured on LDEF are given. In general, agreement is reasonably good between erosion rates from the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) LDEF experiment and prior data obtained at much lower mission fluences. Agreement is particularly satisfying in the case of Kapton where the prior data base is large. In spite of the known presence of silicaceous contamination on LDEF surfaces, the erosion rates of the highly erodible materials are hardly affected, if at all. Graphs showing changes in optical properties (reflectance and transmittance) of metal films are included.

  4. Measurement of Tree Stems O2 and CO2 Fluxes -New Approach in Tree Respiration B. Hilman* and A. Angert

    E-print Network

    Simon, Emmanuel

    Measurement of Tree Stems O2 and CO2 Fluxes - New Approach in Tree Respiration B. Hilman* and A. Angert The Institute of Earth Sciences, Environmental science *boaz.hilman@mail.huji.ac.il Trees 50% of the annual gross photosynthesis rate1 . Therefore, tree respiration has an important global

  5. Measuring radiative capture rates at DRAGON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, U.; Davids, B.; Fallis, J.; Greife, U.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Rojas, A.; Ruiz, C.

    2013-04-01

    The DRAGON recoil separator facility is located at the ISAC facility at TRIUMF, Vancouver. It is designed to measure radiative alpha and proton capture reactions of astrophysical importance in inverse kinematics. The Supernanogan ion source at ISAC provides stable beams of high intensities. The DRAGON collaboration has taken advantage of this over the last years by measuring several reactions requiring high-intensity stable oxygen beams. In particular,the ^17O(p,?) and ^16O(?,?) reaction rates were recently measured. The former reaction is part of the hot CNO cycle, and strongly influences the abundance of ^18F in classical novae. Because of its relatively long lifetime, ^18F is a possible target for satellite-based gamma-ray spectroscopy. The ^16O(?,?) reaction plays a role in steady-state helium burning in massive stars, where it follows the ^12C(?,?) reaction. At astrophysically relevant energies, the reaction proceeds exclusively via direct capture, resulting in a low rate. In both cases, the unique capabilities of DRAGON enabled determination not only of the total reaction rates, but also of decay branching ratios. Results from both experiments will be presented.

  6. Ultrasonic rate measurement of multiphase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dannert, D.A.; Horne, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    On of the most important tools in production logging and well testing is the downhole flowmeter. Unfortunately, existing tools are inaccurate outside of an idealized single phase flow, regime. Spinner tools are inaccurate at extremely high or low, flow rates and when the flow rate is variable. Radioactive tracer tools have similar inaccuracies and are extremely sensitive to the flow regime. Both tools completely fail in the presence of multiphase flow, whether gas/ oil, gas/water or fluid/solid. Downhole flowmetering is important for locating producing zones and thief zones and monitoring production and injection rates. The effects of stimulation can also be determined. This goal of this project is the investigation of accurate downhole flowmetering techniques for all single phase flow regimes and multiphase flows. The measurement method investigated in this report is the use of ultrasound. There are two ways to use ultrasound for fluid velocity measurement. The first method, examined in Chapter 2, is the contrapropagation, or transit-time, method which compares travel times with and against fluid flow. Chapter 3 details the second method which measures the Doppler frequency shift of a reflected sound wave in the moving fluid. Both of these technologies need to be incorporated in order to build a true multiphase flowmeter. Chapter 4 describes the proposed downhole multiphase flowmeter. It has many advantages besides the ones previously mentioned and is in full in that chapter.

  7. Time and rate measures in choice transitions.

    PubMed Central

    Cerutti, D T; Staddon, J E R

    2004-01-01

    Three experiments with pigeons studied the relation between time and rate measures of behavior under conditions of changing preference. Experiment 1 studied a concurrent chain schedule with random-interval initial links and fixed-interval terminal links; Experiment 2 studied a multiple chained random-interval fixed-interval schedule; and Experiment 3 studied simple concurrent random-interval random-interval schedules. In Experiment 1, and to a lesser extent in the other two experiments, session-average initial-link wait-time differences were linearly related to session-average response-rate differences. In Experiment 1, and to a lesser extent in Experiment 3, ratios of session-average initial-link wait times and response rates were related by a power function. The weaker relations between wait and response measures in Experiment 2 appear to be due to the absence of competition between responses. In Experiments 1 and 2, initial-link changes lagged behind terminal-link changes. These findings may have implications for the relations between fixed- and variable-interval procedures and suggest that more attention should be paid to temporal measures in studies of free-operant choice. PMID:15239489

  8. Tall tower landscape scale N2O flux measurements in a Danish agricultural and urban, coastal area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrom, Andreas; Lequy, Émeline; Loubet, Benjamin; Pilegaard, Kim; Ambus, Per

    2015-04-01

    Both technical and natural processes emit the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) into the atmosphere. The abundant use of nitrogen (N) as fertiliser increases the concentration of reactive nitrogen (Nr) in the atmosphere, the hydrosphere and in the biosphere, i.e. in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Surplus Nr is distributed across linkages to other spheres until most of it is emitted to the atmosphere as NO, N2O or N2. A complete estimate of the effects from human activities on N2O emissions must therefore include all emissions, the direct emissions and the indirect emissions that happen in interlinked spheres. For this it is necessary to assess the fluxes at least at the landscape scale. The episodic nature and the large spatial variability make it difficult to estimate the direct and indirect emissions in a landscape. Modelling requires not only to include the highly variable microbial processes in the ecosystems that produce N2O but as well the accurate simulation of lateral Nr fluxes and their effects on N2O fluxes in places remote from the primary Nr sources. In this context tall tower N2O flux measurements are particularly useful as they integrate over larger areas and can be run, continuously without disturbing the fluxes. On the other hand these measurements can be difficult to interpret due to difficulties to measure the small concentration fluctuations in the atmosphere at small flux rates and to accurately attribute the measured flux at the tower to the area that generates the flux, i.e. the source area. The Technical University of Denmark (DTU) has established eddy covariance N2O flux measurements on a 125 m tall tower at its Risø Campus as part of the EU research infrastructure project the 'Integrated non-CO2 Greenhouse gas Observing System' (InGOS). The eddy covariance system consisted of a N2O/CO quantum cascade laser, Los Gatos, Mountain View, CA, USA and a 3D sonic anemometer (USA-1), Metek, Elmshorn, Germany. The Risø peninsula lies at the eastern coastline of the Roskilde fjord on the Danish island Zealand. The tower is surrounded by the fjord, by agricultural area, forests and, in the South by the urban area of the City of Roskilde. The City of Roskilde operates a waste incinerator and a waste water treatment plant, which drains treated waste water into the fjord. The level of the measured flux values was generally relatively low. Based on the clear definition of the lag time between N2O concentrations and the vertical wind speed, fluxes were measureable over larger periods. The fluxes showed clear directional relationships indicating their large spatial and temporal variability in the landscape. Footprint calculations were performed to attribute source areas to the measured fluxes ...(Kormann and Meixner, 2001; Neftel et al., 2008). The footprint of the flux measurement included areas between 200 m and several kilometres distance from the tower. A preliminary approach was developed to generate monthly maps of N2O fluxes around the tower. Here we present the results from the first seven months of flux measurements. Based on these results we discuss the potential and the limitations of tall tower eddy covariance measurements to estimate maps of N2O fluxes and the integral value of the landscape N2O flux. Acknowledgements: This work was funded by the EU-FP7 InGOS project. We thank Ebba Dellwik (Technical University of Denmark) for providing sonic anemometer data. References: Kormann, R. and Meixner, F.X., 2001. An Analytical Footprint Model For Non-Neutral Stratification. Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 99(2): 207-224. Neftel, A., Spirig, C. and Ammann, C., 2008. Application and test of a simple tool for operational footprint evaluations. Environmental Pollution, 152(3): 644-652.

  9. Soft defect printability: correlation to optical flux-area measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Darren; Fiekowsky, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Soft defects on photomasks have, historically, been difficult to measure, and predict how the measured size of a soft defect will correlate to what prints, if at all. Over the past few years KLA-Tencor STARlight surface inspection has become the inspection of choice for soft defects. Though the capture rate of this tool is exceptional, the defect sizing capability has lacked in accuracy. Customer specifications have traditionally been built around defect size and transmission. If a given defect cannot be accurately sized then it cannot be accurately dispositioned. In this study we are attempting to show a correlation between the AVI defect measurement tool sizing and what actually prints on the wafer. We will show defect sizing both from the KLA-Tencor STARlight and pattern tools, the AVI tool, AIMS and VSS printability data.

  10. Snow, Shrubs, Grasses, and Footprint Theory: Measuring Moisture and Energy Fluxes in Patchy Landscapes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E. Strack; G. E. Liston; C. A. Hiemstra; R. A. Pielke

    2004-01-01

    When measuring sensible and latent heat flux from a tower within a heterogeneous landscape, one must consider which part of the landscape influences the flux sampled by the instruments. This variable landscape fraction, known as a footprint, is dependent upon wind direction, wind speed and atmospheric stability (thermal and mechanical). From 1 December 2002 - 31 March 2003, the FLuxes

  11. Long-term measurements of CO2 flux and evapotranspiration in a Chihuahuan desert grassland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We measured CO2 and evapotranspiration (ET) fluxes above a Chihuahuan desert grassland from 1996 through 2001. Averaged across six years, this ecosystem was a source (positive flux)of CO2 in every month. Over that period, sustained periods of carbon uptake (negative flux)were rare. Averaged across a...

  12. A scintillating fission detector for neutron flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esch, Ernst I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burgett, Eric A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; May, Iain [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muenchausen, Ross E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taw, Felicia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tovesson, Fredrik K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Neutron flux monitors are commonly used for a variety of nuclear physics applications. A scintillating neutron detector, consisting of a liquid scintillator loaded with fissionable material, has been developed, characterized, and tested in the beam line at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and shows a significant improvement in neutron sensitivity compared with a conventional fission chamber. Recent research on nanocomposite-based scintillators for gamma-ray detection indicates that this approach can be extended to load nanoparticles of fissionable material into a scintillating matrix, with up to three orders of magnitude higher loading than typical fission chambers. This will result in a rugged, cost-efficient detector with high efficiency, a short signal rise time, and the ability to be used in low neutron-flux environments. Initial efforts to utilize the luminescence of uranyl oxide to eliminate the need for wavelength-shifting dyes were unsuccessful. Excitation of uranyl compounds has been reported at wavelengths ranging from 266 nm to 532 nm. However, neither the 300 nm emission of toluene, nor the 350 nm emission of PPO, nor the 410 nm emission of POPOP resulted in significant excitation of and emission by uranyl oxide. As indicated by UV/visible spectroscopy, light emitted at these wavelengths was absorbed by the colored solution. {sup 235}U remains the most attractive candidate for a fissionable scintillator, due to its high fission cross-section and lack of a threshold fission energy, but all solutions containing molecular uranium compounds will be colored, most more highly than the U{sup 6+} compounds used here. Research is therefore continuing toward the fabrication of uranium nanoparticles, in which, due to Rayleigh scattering, the coloration should be less pronounced. The characterization of the thorium-loaded liquid scintillator and the fabrication of the 100 mL detectors for use at LANSCE demonstrated the feasibility of loading fissionable material into a liquid scintillator. Analysis of beam line experiments using the thorium-loaded scintillator is underway to determine the fission event rate in the detector, for comparison with a conventional fission chamber as well as with an unloaded liquid scintillator.

  13. Compact Instruments Measure Helium-Leak Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, Stephen; Immer, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Compact, lightweight instruments have been developed for measuring small flows of helium and/or detecting helium leaks in solenoid valves when the valves are nominally closed. These instruments do not impede the flows when the valves are nominally open. They can be integrated into newly fabricated valves or retrofitted to previously fabricated valves. Each instrument includes an upstream and a downstream thermistor separated by a heater, plus associated analog and digital heater-control, signal- conditioning, and data-processing circuits. The thermistors and heater are off-the-shelf surface mount components mounted on a circuit board in the flow path. The operation of the instrument is based on a well-established thermal mass-flow-measurement technique: Convection by the flow that one seeks to measure gives rise to transfer of heat from the heater to the downstream thermistor. The temperature difference measured by the thermistors is directly related to the rate of flow. The calibration curve from temperature gradient to helium flow is closely approximated via fifth-order polynomial. A microprocessor that is part of the electronic circuitry implements the calibration curve to compute the flow rate from the thermistor readings.

  14. Influence of thermal and resonance neutron on fast neutron flux measurement by Pu-239 fission chamber

    E-print Network

    Lina zeng; Qiang Wang; Lingli Song; Chun Zheng

    2014-03-19

    The Pu-239 fission chambers are widely used to measure fission spectrum neutron flux due to a flat response to fast neutrons. However, in the mean time the resonance and thermal neutrons can cause a significant influence on the measurement if they are moderated, which could be eliminated by using B and Cd covers. At a column enriched uranium fast neutron critical assembly, the fission reaction rates of Pu-239 are measured as 1.791*10-16,2.350*10-16 and 1.385*10-15 per second for 15mm thick B cover, 0.5mm thick Cd cover, and no cover respectively. While the fission reaction rate of Pu-239 is rapidly increased to 2.569*10-14 for a 20mm thick polythene covering fission chamber. The average Pu-239 fission cross-section of thermal and resonance neutrons is calculated to be 500b and 24.95b with the assumption of 1/v and 1/E spectra respectively, then thermal, resonance and fast neutron flux are achieved to be 2.30*106,2.24*106 and 1.04*108cm-2s-1.

  15. Influence of thermal and resonance neutron on fast neutron flux measurement by Pu-239 fission chamber

    E-print Network

    zeng, Lina; Song, Lingli; Zheng, Chun

    2014-01-01

    The Pu-239 fission chambers are widely used to measure fission spectrum neutron flux due to a flat response to fast neutrons. However, in the mean time the resonance and thermal neutrons can cause a significant influence on the measurement if they are moderated, which could be eliminated by using B and Cd covers. At a column enriched uranium fast neutron critical assembly, the fission reaction rates of Pu-239 are measured as 1.791*10-16,2.350*10-16 and 1.385*10-15 per second for 15mm thick B cover, 0.5mm thick Cd cover, and no cover respectively. While the fission reaction rate of Pu-239 is rapidly increased to 2.569*10-14 for a 20mm thick polythene covering fission chamber. The average Pu-239 fission cross-section of thermal and resonance neutrons is calculated to be 500b and 24.95b with the assumption of 1/v and 1/E spectra respectively, then thermal, resonance and fast neutron flux are achieved to be 2.30*106,2.24*106 and 1.04*108cm-2s-1.

  16. An unmanned aircraft vehicle system for boundary-layer flux measurements over forest canopies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason M. Daida; P. B. Russell; Timothy L. Crawford; J. F. Vesecky

    1994-01-01

    Describes a system design of an unmanned aircraft vehicle (UAV) system for boundary-layer measurements of carbon dioxide fluxes, particularly of those fluxes over forest canopies. The system is aircraft-based, which permits measurements that are difficult to obtain by ground-based line-of-sight instruments (e.g., lidar). The system is unmanned, which permits flux measurements to as low as 5 m above a forest

  17. MEASURED AND PREDICTED FLUXES OF BIOGENIC SILICA IN LAKE MICHIGAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diatom production in the offshore waters of Lake Michigan is limited by silica supplies in late summer and can be predicted from the seasonal disappearance of silica from the trophogenic zone. Biogenic silica fluxes obtained from sediment trap collections were compared with fluxe...

  18. New Measurements of Inner Belt Proton Flux Gradients From the Van Allen Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, J. E.; O'Brien, T. P.; Looper, M. D.; George, J. S.; Blake, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    Prior studies of 10's of MeV inner belt protons in low Earth orbit have established that the atmospheric density gradient produces a proton flux gradient because of losses to the atmosphere and the comparable sizes of the proton qyroradius and atmosphere scale height. The observable is an east-west asymmetry in the proton flux that has been reported using many low-Earth orbit missions going back to the first nuclear emulsion flights in 1963. We will revisit this low-altitude east-west effect as well as higher-altitude gradients with new measurements from the Relativistic Proton Spectrometer (RPS) on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft. RPS is a particle spectrometer designed to measure the flux, angular distribution, and energy spectrum of protons from ~60 MeV to ~2000 MeV with good rejection of penetrating backgrounds by requiring a 10-fold coincidence in its stack of silicon detectors. The Van Allen Probes orbit allows for a survey of proton gradients not only at low altitudes but also as high as the outer trapping limit at McIlwain L shell L~3 corresponding to ~13,000 km altitude. The 60 MeV proton gyroradius varies from ~50 to 700 km in this altitude range. The 1-second sampling of RPS and the nominal 5 rpm rotation rate of the Van Allen Probes yields a sensitive measure of proton gradients. This is the first time that a single mission can address the gradients and trapping of high-energy protons throughout the inner belt. We will report on preliminary flux gradients of >61 MeV protons observed during the first year of the mission using RPS and ancillary geophysical data.

  19. Bayesian calibration of reactor neutron flux spectrum using activation detectors measurements: Application to CALIBAN reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cartier, J. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Casoli, P. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives CEA, DAM, Valduc, F-21120 Is sur Tille (France); Chappert, F. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we present calibration methods in order to estimate reactor neutron flux spectrum and its uncertainties by using integral activation measurements. These techniques are performed using Bayesian and MCMC framework. These methods are applied to integral activation experiments in the cavity of the CALIBAN reactor. We estimate the neutron flux and its related uncertainties. The originality of this work is that these uncertainties take into account measurements uncertainties, cross-sections uncertainties and model error. In particular, our results give a very good approximation of the total flux and indicate that neutron flux from MCNP simulation for energies above about 5 MeV seems to overestimate the 'real flux'. (authors)

  20. Measurement of total ion flux in vacuum Arc discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Oks, Efim M.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Brown, Ian G.

    2004-04-12

    A vacuum arc ion source was modified allowing us to collections from arc plasma streaming through an anode mesh. The mesh had ageometric transmittance of 60 percent, which was taken into account as acorrection factor. The ion current from twenty-two cathode materials wasmeasured at an arc current of 100 A. The ion current normalized by thearc current was found to depend on the cathode material, with valuesinthe range from 5 percent to 11 percent. The normalized ion current isgenerally greater for light elements than for heavy elements. The ionerosion rates were determined fromvalues of ion currentand ion chargestates, which were previously measured in the same experimental system.The ion erosion rates range from 12-94 mu g/C.

  1. Wide Range Neutron Flux Measuring Channel for Aerospace Application

    SciTech Connect

    Cibils, R. M.; Busto, A.; Gonella, J. L.; Martinez, R.; Chielens, A. J.; Otero, J. M.; Nunez, M. [INVAP S.E., Moreno 1089, 8400 Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Tropea, S. E. [INTI, Av. Gral. Paz 5445, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2008-01-21

    The use of classical techniques for neutron flux measurements in nuclear reactors involves the switching between several detection chains as the power grows up to 10 decades. In space applications where mass and size constraints are of key significance, such volume of hardware represents a clear disadvantage. Instead of requiring different instruments for each reactor operating range (start-up, ramping-up, and nominal power), a single instrument chain should be desirable. A Wide Range Neutron Detector (WRND) system, combining a classic pulse Counting Channel with a Campbell's theorem based Fluctuation Channel can be implemented for the monitoring and control of a space nuclear reactor. Such an instrument will allow for a reduction in the complexity of space-based nuclear instrumentation and control systems. In this presentation we will discuss the criteria and tradeoffs involved in the development of such a system. We will focus particularly on the characteristics of the System On Chip (SOC) and the DSP board used to implement this instrument.

  2. Decoupled cantilever arms for highly versatile and sensitive temperature and heat flux measurements

    E-print Network

    Burg, Brian R.

    Microfabricated cantilever beams have been used in microelectromechanical systems for a variety of sensor and actuator applications. Bimorph cantilevers accurately measure temperature change and heat flux with resolutions ...

  3. Solids flow rate measurement in dense slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Porges, K.G.; Doss, E.D.

    1993-09-01

    Accurate and rapid flow rate measurement of solids in dense slurries remains an unsolved technical problem, with important industrial applications in chemical processing plants and long-distance solids conveyance. In a hostile two-phase medium, such a measurement calls for two independent parameter determinations, both by non-intrusive means. Typically, dense slurries tend to flow in laminar, non-Newtonian mode, eliminating most conventional means that usually rely on calibration (which becomes more difficult and costly for high pressure and temperature media). These issues are reviewed, and specific solutions are recommended in this report. Detailed calculations that lead to improved measuring device designs are presented for both bulk density and average velocity measurements. Cross-correlation, chosen here for the latter task, has long been too inaccurate for practical applications. The cause and the cure of this deficiency are discussed using theory-supported modeling. Fluid Mechanics are used to develop the velocity profiles of laminar non-Newtonian flow in a rectangular duct. This geometry uniquely allows the design of highly accurate `capacitive` devices and also lends itself to gamma transmission densitometry on an absolute basis. An absolute readout, though of less accuracy, is also available from a capacitive densitometer and a pair of capacitive sensors yields signals suitable for cross-correlation velocity measurement.

  4. Measurement of Neutron and Muon Fluxes 100 m Underground with the SciBath Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, Lance M.

    The SciBath detector is an 80 liter liquid scintillator detector read out by a three dimensional grid of 768 wavelength-shifting fibers. Initially conceived as a fine-grained charged particle detector for neutrino studies that could image charged particle tracks in all directions, it is also sensitive to fast neutrons (15-200 MeV). In fall of 2011 the apparatus performed a three month run to measure cosmic-induced muons and neutrons 100 meters underground in the FNAL MINOS near-detector area. Data from this run has been analyzed and resulted in measurements of the cosmic muon flux as 0.80 +/- 0.04 m-2s-1, the cosmogenic fast neutron flux as (1.5 +/- 1.4) x 10-2 m-2 s-1, and the neutron production rate from muon spallation in liquid scintillator as (3.8 +/- 3.2) x 10-4 n/mu (g/cm2)-1. Additionally, the cosmic muon angular distribution and neutron energy distribution have been measured. These results can be extrapolated to future measurements of fast-neutron backgrounds at other underground facilities. This thesis presents a summary of the physics relevant to underground muons and fast neutrons, the SciBath detector, the analysis methodology that was used for the results presented, and comparisons between our results and those of other experiments and simulations.

  5. Galileo Probe Measurements of Thermal and Solar Radiation Fluxes in the Jovian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sromovsky, L. A.; Collard, A. D.; Fry, P. M.; Orton, G. S.; Lemmon, M. T.; Tomasko, M. G.; Freedman, R. S.

    1998-01-01

    The Galileo probe net flux radiometer (NFR) measured radiation fluxes in Jupiter's atmosphere from about 0.44 to 14 bars, using five spectral channels to separate solar and thermal components. Onboard calibration results confirm that the NFR responded to radiation approximately as expected. NFR channels also responded to a superimposed thermal perturbation, which can be approximately removed using blind channel measurements and physical constraints. Evidence for the expected NH3 cloud was seen in the spectral character of spin-induced modulations of the direct solar beam signals. These results are consistent with an overlying cloud of small NH3 ice particles (0.5-0.75 microns in radius) of optical depth 1.5-2 at 0.5 microns. Such a cloud would have so little effect on thermal fluxes that NFR thermal channels provide no additional constraints on its properties. However, evidence for heating near 0.45 bar in the NFR thermal channels would seem to require either an additional opacity source beyond this small-particle cloud, implying a heterogeneous cloud structure to avoid conflicts with solar modulation results, or a change in temperature lapse rate just above the probe measurements. The large thermal flux levels imply water vapor mixing ratios that are only 6% of solar at 10 bars, but possibly increasing with depth, and significantly subsaturated ammonia at pressures less than 3 bars. If deep NH3 mixing ratios at the probe entry site are 3-4 times ground-based inferences, as suggested by probe radio signal attenuation, then only half as much water is needed to match NFR observations. No evidence of a water cloud was seen near the 5-bar level. The 5-microns thermal channel detected the presumed NH4SH cloud base near 1.35 bars. Effects of this cloud were also seen in the solar channel upflux measurements but not in the solar net fluxes, implying that the cloud is a conservative scatterer of sunlight. The minor thermal signature of this cloud is compatible with particle radii near 3 gm, but it cannot rule out smaller particles. Deeper than about 3 bars, solar channels indicate unexpectedly large absorption of sunlight at wavelengths longer than 0.6 microns, which might be due to unaccounted-for absorption by NH3 between 0.65 and 1.5 microns.

  6. Galileo Probe Measurements of Thermal and Solar Radiation Fluxes in the Jovian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sromovsky, L. A.; Collard, A. D.; Fry, P. M.; Orton, G. S.; Lemmon, M. T.; Tomasko, M. G.; Freedman, R. S.

    1998-01-01

    The Galileo probe net flux radiometer (NFR) measured radiation fluxes in Jupiter's atmosphere from about 0.44 to 14 bars, using five spectral channels to separate solar and thermal components. Onboard calibration results confirm that the NFR responded to radiation approximately as expected. NFR channels also responded to a superimposed thermal perturbation, which can be approximately removed using blind channel measurements and physical constraints. Evidence for the expected NH3 cloud was seen in the spectral character of spin-induced modulations of the direct solar beam signals. These results are consistent with an overlying cloud of small NH3 ice particles (0.5-0.75 microns in radius) of optical depth 1.5-2 at 0.5 microns. Such a cloud would have so little effect on thermal fluxes that NFR thermal channels provide no additional constraints on its properties. However, evidence for heating near 0.45 bar in the NFR thermal channels would seem to require either an additional opacity source beyond this small-particle cloud, implying a heterogeneous-cloud structure to avoid conflicts with solar modulation results, or a change in temperature lapse rate just above the probe measurements. The large thermal flux levels imply water vapor mixing ratios that are only 6% of solar at 10 bars, but possibly increasing with depth, and significantly subsaturated ammonia at pressures less than 3 bars. If deep NH3 mixing ratios at the probe entry site are 3-4 times ground-based inferences, as suggested by probe radio signal attenuation, then only half as much water is needed to match NFR observations. No evidence of a water cloud was seen near the 5-bar level. The 5 microns thermal channel detected the presumed NH4SH cloud base near 1.35 bars. Effects of this cloud were also seen in the solar channel upflux measurements but not in the solar net fluxes, implying that the cloud is a conservative scatterer of sunlight. The minor thermal signature of this cloud is compatible with particle radii near 3 microns, but it cannot rule out smaller particles. Deeper than about 3 bars, solar channels indicate unexpectedly large absorption of sunlight at wavelengths longer than 0.6 microns, which might be due to unaccounted-for absorption by NH3 between 0.65 and 1.5 microns.

  7. Eddy covariance flux measurements of gaseous elemental mercury using cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Ashley M; Moore, Christopher W; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Hörtnagl, Lukas; Kljun, Natascha; Obrist, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    A newly developed pulsed cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system for measuring atmospheric gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) concentrations at high temporal resolution (25 Hz) was used to successfully conduct the first eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements of GEM. GEM is the main gaseous atmospheric form, and quantification of bidirectional exchange between the Earth's surface and the atmosphere is important because gas exchange is important on a global scale. For example, surface GEM emissions from natural sources, legacy emissions, and re-emission of previously deposited anthropogenic pollution may exceed direct primary anthropogenic emissions. Using the EC technique for flux measurements requires subsecond measurements, which so far has not been feasible because of the slow time response of available instrumentation. The CRDS system measured GEM fluxes, which were compared to fluxes measured with the modified Bowen ratio (MBR) and a dynamic flux chamber (DFC). Measurements took place near Reno, NV, in September and October 2012 encompassing natural, low-mercury (Hg) background soils and Hg-enriched soils. During nine days of measurements with deployment of Hg-enriched soil in boxes within 60 m upwind of the EC tower, the covariance of GEM concentration and vertical wind speed was measured, showing that EC fluxes over an Hg-enriched area were detectable. During three separate days of flux measurements over background soils (without Hg-enriched soils), no covariance was detected, indicating fluxes below the detection limit. When fluxes were measurable, they strongly correlated with wind direction; the highest fluxes occurred when winds originated from the Hg-enriched area. Comparisons among the three methods showed good agreement in direction (e.g., emission or deposition) and magnitude, especially when measured fluxes originated within the Hg-enriched soil area. EC fluxes averaged 849 ng m(-2) h(-1), compared to DFC fluxes of 1105 ng m(-2) h(-1) and MBR fluxes of 1309 ng m(-2) h(-1). This study demonstrated that a CRDS system can be used to measure GEM fluxes over Hg-enriched areas, with a conservative detection limit estimate of 32 ng m(-2) h(-1). PMID:25608027

  8. Anaphase A Chromosome Movement and Poleward Spindle Microtubule Flux Occur At Similar Rates in Xenopus Extract Spindles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arshad Desai; Paul S. Maddox; Timothy J. Mitchison; E. D. Salmon

    1998-01-01

    We have used local fluorescence photoacti- vation to mark the lattice of spindle microtubules dur- ing anaphase A in Xenopus extract spindles. We find that both poleward spindle microtubule flux and anaphase A chromosome movement occur at similar rates ( z 2 m m\\/min). This result suggests that poleward microtubule flux, coupled to microtubule depolymer- ization near the spindle poles,

  9. Applying thermodynamics constraints to the model achieves higher growth rates and flux efficiency while still adhering to

    E-print Network

    Barthelat, Francois

    -added biomateri- als from wastewater (bioplastics and biofuels) Genome-scale metabolic model of Rhodococcus jostii· Applying thermodynamics constraints to the model achieves higher growth rates and flux efficiencyGill University SIGNIFICANCE RESULTS (Normalized fluxes) CONCLUSION METHODOLOGY Metabolic Model (Stoichiometric

  10. How to characterize soft magnetic materials by measuring magnetic flux density in a rotating field apparatus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Azzouz; A. Mouillet

    2002-01-01

    This paper deals with the characterization of the magnetic permeability of soft magnetic materials under a rotating magnetic field. The paper reviews the principle of the rotating-flux-density device used for measurement of flux density, then describes the mathematical method used to calculate permeability from the measurements. The method combines direct and inverse solutions and is based on a functional minimization

  11. SIX YEARS OF CO2 FLUX MEASUREMENTS FOR A GRAZED MIXED-GRASS PRAIRIE.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbon dioxide fluxes were measured over a moderately grazed mixed-grass prairie site using the CO2 Bowen ratio/energy balance technique. Fluxes were measured from 24 April to 26 October from 1996 through 2001 at Mandan, ND. The site is mostly cool season grass species with a complement of warm se...

  12. Double-cavity radiometer for high-flux density solar radiation measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Parretta; A. Antonini; M. Armani; G. Nenna; G. Flaminio; M. Pellegrino

    2007-01-01

    A radiometric method has been developed, suitable for both total power and flux density profile measurement of concentrated solar radiation. The high-flux density radiation is collected by a first optical cavity, integrated, and driven to a second optical cavity, where, attenuated, it is measured by a conventional radiometer operating under a stationary irradiation regime. The attenuation factor is regulated by

  13. Eddy correlation measurements of the air\\/sea flux of dimethylsulfide over the North Pacific Ocean

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. A. Marandino; W. J. De Bruyn; S. D. Miller; E. S. Saltzman

    2007-01-01

    Shipboard measurements of air\\/sea fluxes and sea surface concentrations of dimethylsulfide (DMS) were made over the tropical and midlatitude North Pacific Ocean. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry was used to measure DMS levels in ambient air and in air equilibrated with surface seawater drawn from a depth of 5 m. Air\\/sea fluxes were obtained using eddy covariance. Corrections and

  14. LEAF, BRANCH, STAND & LANDSCAPE SCALE MEASUREMENTS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND FLUXES FROM U.S. WOODLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural volatile organic compounds (VOC) fluxes were measured in three U.S. woodlands in summer 1993. Fluxes from individual leaves and branches were estimated with enclosure techniques and used to initialize and evaluate VOC emission model estimates. Ambient measurements were us...

  15. Calculating the detection limits of chamber-based greenhouse gas flux measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chamber-based measurement of greenhouse gas emissions from soil is a common technique. However, when changes in chamber headspace gas concentrations are small over time, determination of the flux can be problematic. Several factors contribute to the reliability of measured fluxes, including: samplin...

  16. A fast response atmospheric CO2 sensor for eddy correlation flux measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. P. Jones; T. V. Ward; H. H. Zwick

    1978-01-01

    The direct measurement of carbon dioxide fluxes in the atmospheric boundary layer is of considerable importance in studies of ocean atmosphere exchange and in productivity of crops and forests. A promising technique for measuring CO2 fluxes, the eddy correlation method, requires a sensitive fast response sensor. We describe the sensor requirements and present a design which has proved successful in

  17. Solid He: Progress, Status, and Outlook for Mass Flux Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallock, R. B.

    2015-07-01

    After a brief introduction, what is provided there is brief summary of work with solid He done at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and an outlook for future work. What is presented here is based on a presentation made at the Quantum Gases Fluids and Solids Workshop in Sao Paulo, Brazil in August of 2014. Our work with solid He is aimed at the question: Can a sample cell filled with solid He support a mass flux through the cell? The answer, as will be shown here, is yes. Evidence for this from several types of experiments will be reviewed. There will be an emphasis on more recent work, work that explores how the flux observed depends on temperature and on the He impurity level. The behavior observed suggests that solid He may be an example of a material that demonstrates Bosonic Luttinger liquid behavior. The normalized He flux has a universal temperature dependence. The presence of He at different impurity levels shows that the He blocks the flux at a characteristic temperature. The behavior appears to be consistent with the cores of dislocations as the entity that carries the flux, but it is clear that more work needs to be done to fully understand solid He.

  18. Evaluation and gap-filling of soil NO flux dataset measured at a Hungarian semi-arid grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Laszlo; Hidy, Dora; Weidinger, Tamas

    2015-04-01

    An Integrated Project ÉCLAIRE (http://www.eclaire-fp7.eu/) started in 2011 among others to study the effect of climate change on air pollution impacts. One of the main measurement tasks of this project was the continuous monitoring of soil NO emission at different kinds of lands (forest, arable, grass). Among the tree grass stations Bugacpuszta (central part of Hungary between the Danube and the Tisza) was selected to monitor and report soil NO fluxes continuously for 17 months on hourly basis. The climate is semi-arid temperate continental, the mean annual temperature is 10.7 ° C, and the average annual precipitation is around 550 mm. Nitric oxide soil emission flux was measured by 2-2 parallel manual and auto dynamic chambers on hourly basis above a semi-arid, sandy grassland between August 2012 and January 2014. Each chamber was sampled for 10 minutes at a flow rate of 2 L min-1 in sequence each hour all together for 40 minutes; in the remaining 20 minutes concentration gradients were measured by a mast at two heights. Soil temperature and moisture were measured a few meters apart from the chambers. A computer controlled valve system was switched the different channels in turn. The output concentrations of nitric oxide and ozone were measured by HORIBA gas monitors through Teflon tubing. Micrometeorological measurements (energy budget components, CO2 and O3 fluxes) were also provided. The initial NO flux datasets covered 43-85% of time period depending on chambers. Measured flux data ranges within 0-6 nmol m-2 s-1. We applied a gap-filling method based on multivariable analysis (Sigma Plot) combined with maximum likelihood method using the soil temperature and moisture data. Trend of gap-filled flux dataset shows large peaks mostly in summer and early fall. When soil parameters are far from the optimum (dry, warm conditions) the fluxes are negligible. Application of manual chambers closed for longer period results in substantial positive bias in flux estimation compared to auto chambers a consequence of measurement setup, different temperature and drier soil conditions below the chamber. Mean fluxes applying permanently closed dynamic chambers are approximately three times higher compared with auto chambers, 0.176 ±0.489 nmol m-2 s-1 and 0.058 ±0.130 nmol m-2 s-1 respectively from the all measured and gap filled data.

  19. Rn-222 tracing and stable isotope measurements of biogenic gas fluxes from methane saturated sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, Christopher S.; Green, C. D.; Blair, Neal; Chanton, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    Transport of reduced biogenic gases from anoxic sediments and soils to the atmosphere can be quantitatively studied through measurement of radon-222/radium-226 disequilibrium. In previous work, seasonal variations in biogenic gas transport mechanisms, net fluxes and overall composition were documented. Now presented are direct field measurements of radon-222 activity in gases exiting organic rich sediments which show their usefulness for tracing of the stripping of dissolved biogenic gases from within the sediment column and transport via bubble ebullition. Methane is depleted in deuterium during the summer as compared with winter months and is in general lighter than in most marine sediments signaling the probable importance of acetate as an important precursor molecule. The significant seasonal isotopic variations observed illustrate the importance of understanding mechanisms and rates of biogenic gas production in order to interpret observed tropospheric isotopic data.

  20. Investigation of Flux Linkage Profile Measurement Methods for Switched Reluctance Motors and Permanent Magnet

    E-print Network

    Lu, Kaiyuan

    - 1 - Investigation of Flux Linkage Profile Measurement Methods for Switched Reluctance Motors for switched reluctance motors (SRM's) and permanent magnet motors (PMM's). Various measurement methods have reluctance motors, permanent magnet motors. I. INTRODUCTION Switched Reluctance Motors (SRM's) have very

  1. Measuring the energy flux at the substrate position during magnetron sputter deposition processes

    SciTech Connect

    Cormier, P.-A.; Thomann, A.-L.; Dussart, R.; Semmar, N.; Mathias, J. [GREMI, Universite d'Orleans, 14 rue d'Issoudun, B.P. 6744, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Balhamri, A. [Laboratoire de Chimie des Interactions Plasma-Surface, Universite de Mons, 23 Place du Parc, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Laboratoire Rayonnement and Matiere: Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee et Transfert d'Energie (LOPATE), Faculte des Sciences et Techniques de Settat, Universite Hassan 1, B.P. 461 Settat (Morocco); Snyders, R. [Laboratoire de Chimie des Interactions Plasma-Surface, Universite de Mons, 23 Place du Parc, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Materia Nova R and D Center, Avenue Copernic 1, Mons (Belgium); Konstantinidis, S. [Laboratoire de Chimie des Interactions Plasma-Surface, Universite de Mons, 23 Place du Parc, 7000 Mons (Belgium)

    2013-01-07

    In this work, the energetic conditions at the substrate were investigated in dc magnetron sputtering (DCMS), pulsed dc magnetron sputtering (pDCMS), and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharges by means of an energy flux diagnostic based on a thermopile sensor, the probe being set at the substrate position. Measurements were performed in front of a titanium target for a highly unbalanced magnetic field configuration. The average power was always kept to 400 W and the probe was at the floating potential. Variation of the energy flux against the pulse peak power in HiPIMS was first investigated. It was demonstrated that the energy per deposited titanium atom is the highest for short pulses (5 {mu}s) high pulse peak power (39 kW), as in this case, the ion production is efficient and the deposition rate is reduced by self-sputtering. As the argon pressure is increased, the energy deposition is reduced as the probability of scattering in the gas phase is increased. In the case of the HiPIMS discharge run at moderate peak power density (10 kW), the energy per deposited atom was found to be lower than the one measured for DCMS and pDCMS discharges. In these conditions, the HiPIMS discharge could be characterized as soft and close to a pulsed DCMS discharge run at very low duty cycle. For the sake of comparison, measurements were also carried out in DCMS mode with a balanced magnetron cathode, in the same working conditions of pressure and power. The energy flux at the substrate is significantly increased as the discharge is generated in an unbalanced field.

  2. Evaluation of a closed tunnel for field scale measurements of N2O fluxes at the soil-atmosphere interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, K.; Böttcher, J.; Weymann, D.; von der Heide, C.; Duijnisveld, W.

    2011-12-01

    Measuring N2O emissions from soils is challenging as they are notoriously variable in space and time. A vast majority of measurements to quantify N2O emissions are conducted using chamber techniques. Since chambers usually cover a rather small surface area (<1 m2), the method has its limitations, particularly in tackling the spatial variability of N2O emissions with reasonable effort. Alternatively, micrometeorological methods like flux-gradient and eddy covariance (EC) techniques are increasingly applied to measure N2O fluxes at an ecosystem level. However, uncertainties remain since those methods are affected by the stability of the atmosphere and limited to detect small emission rates precisely. Therefore, we tested and evaluated the applicability of a closed measuring tunnel to upscale N2O fluxes from a fallow field applying open-path FTIR spectroscopy for N2O concentration measurements. The tunnel covered an area of about 500 m2 and is particularly appropriate for stable atmospheric conditions. Hence, we hypothesized that the tunnel is a potentially gap-filling method between chamber and micrometeorological techniques, since it provides the possibility to integrate N2O fluxes over the field scale but also enables reliable measurements during calm meteorological conditions. The N2O fluxes obtained by the tunnel were compared with simultaneous closed chamber based measurements at the same plot where each chamber covered an area of 0.045 m2. To calculate N2O fluxes from the change of N2O concentrations during deployment, we used three non-linear approaches and compared as well as assessed their suitability for our measuring devices. Two of these approaches, the recently published NDFE (Livingston et al., 2006) and HMR (Pedersen et al., 2010), were only shown to be suitable for classical closed chambers. Hence, we further aimed to calculate N2O fluxes by inverse modelling which takes into account the specific geometry of the measuring tunnel and the static conditions in the tunnel atmosphere during deployment. Among the three approaches, the inverse modelling approach was shown to be most appropriate for the calculation of N2O fluxes at the soil-atmosphere interface. Consequently, we concluded that an up-scaling of N2O fluxes using a measuring tunnel provides reliable results. During a two-year campaign the chamber measurements showed a tremendous spatial and temporal variation of N2O emissions including an uptake of N2O. This finding is in agreement with a huge number of studies on N2O emissions from soils. On the other hand, the simultaneous field scale tunnel measurements were substantially less variable in time. No N2O uptake was measured, and the tunnel N2O fluxes were considerably lower than small scale chamber fluxes. Obviously, sporadic very high N2O fluxes at hot spots caused the overestimation of N2O fluxes up-scaled from the chamber measurements.

  3. Soil erosion rates (particulate and dissolved fluxes) variations in a temperate river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdan, Olivier; Gay, Aurore; Négrel, Philippe; Pételet-Giraud, Emmanuelle; Salvador Blanes, Sébastien; Degan, Francesca

    2015-04-01

    Soil erosion is one of the major drivers of landscape evolution in Western Europe. However, depending on the land use characteristics and on the geological and topographical settings, miscellaneous forms of erosion may lead to a very diverse morphological evolution. To understand these landscape evolutions different scientific questions remain to be answered or quantified. The main difficulty arises from the nonlinear interactions between different erosional processes that act at different temporal and spatial scales. This study proposes to investigate different datasets describing particulate and dissolved sediment fluxes within a French River basin (The Loire River) at different spatial scales and at temporal scales ranging from the flood event to several decades. The particulate sediment load values at the outlet of the catchments range from 2.5 102 to 8.6 105 t yr-1, and the sediment yield values range from 2.9 to 32.4 t km 2 yr-1. Sediment exports from the Loire and Brittany river basins are low compared with mountainous regions and European exports. However, a strong spatial variability within this territory exists. The expected results on the sediment yield spatial pattern distribution and the correlation between SY values and basin sizes are not observed. An analysis of the sediment yield values at different time steps shows a strong effect of the seasonal availability of detached particles to be transported. High concentrations of suspended sediments during the winter and lower values during the summer and autumn are observed. Inter-annual variations are also observed, with export values varying by a factor 2 to 10 between years for one catchment. The influence of rainfall on the sediment exports is predominant, but investigations on physical characteristics of each catchment (e.g., lithology, slope, land use) are required to better understand the production and transfer processes within a drainage basin. These inter-annual variations imply that long-term data are required to provide mean SY values representative of the catchment functioning. From our calculations, 18 complete years of data are required to obtain a mean sediment yield value with less than 10% of variation on average around the mean. The specific dissolved fluxes vary from 13.7 to 199.9 t.km-2. t yr-1. Contrary to particulate matters, the impact of the lithology is illustrated by higher total dissolved solid fluxes on limestone catchments compared with graniteous or schisteous catchments. Nitrates and ammonium are indicators of anthropogenic perturbation and their fluxes vary respectively from 0.4 to 31.4 t.km-2. yr-1 and from 7.8*10-3 to 7.7 t.km-2. yr-1 and evolve differently according to land uses: nitrates fluxes are lower in the upstream Loire and higher downstream in the region where agricultural pressure is higher. The analysis of these datasets at different spatial and temporal scales permits to identify some of the dominant processes, and also to distinguish natural from anthropogenic influences. Concerning upland physical soil surface erosion rates, we find that the average travel distance of eroded particles may be limited, implying a strong decrease in physical erosion rates when moving from the local scale (m²) to the river basin scale (> 103 km²). Chemical erosion rates are less sensitive to scale and can either decrease or increase with increasing area in function of lithology, land management and topography. The results also highlight the predominant role of surface connectivity to characterize the fraction of sediment exported out of river drainage areas by physical soil surface erosion. For the export of dissolved sediment originating from weathering processes, the catchment physiography and connectivity does no longer play the dominant role. A direct link between soil production rates and exported dissolved fluxes tends to show that, contrary to the suspended particles, which are transport-limited, the dissolved matter seems to be supply-limited.

  4. Direct measurements of sensible and latent fluxes in the hurricane boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drennan, W.; Zhang, J.; French, J.; Black, P.

    2006-12-01

    One of the goals of the recent CBLAST-hurricane experiment was to measure turbulent fluxes in the high wind conditions of the hurricane boundary layer. During the experiment 6 low level flights into hurricanes Fabian and Isabel were made with NOAA's P3 Hurricane Hunter aircraft. While the momentum and latent heat flux results have been reported elsewhere, here we present the results for sensible heat flux. Up to the highest 10m winds measured (30m/s), the Stanton number remains constant, and in the range of previous lower wind estimates. The impact of this on hurricane enthalpy flux calculations is discussed.

  5. Integral equations of the photon fluence rate and flux based on a generalized Delta-Eddington phase function

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Wenxiang; Shen, Haiou; Cong, Alexander X.; Wang, Ge

    2009-01-01

    We present a generalized Delta-Eddington phase function to simplify the radiative transfer equation to integral equations with respect to both photon fluence rate and flux vector. The photon fluence rate and flux can be solved from the system of integral equations. By comparing to the Monte Carlo simulation results, the solutions of the system of integral equations accurately model the photon propagation in biological tissue over a wide range of optical parameters. PMID:18465979

  6. Identifying and Managing Data Validity Challenges with Automated Data Checks in the AmeriFlux Flux Measurement Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, C.; Pastorello, G.; Papale, D.; Trotta, C.; Ribeca, A.; Canfora, E.; Faybishenko, B.; Samak, T.; Gunter, D.; Hollowgrass, R.; Agarwal, D.

    2014-12-01

    AmeriFlux is a network of sites managed by independent investigators measuring carbon, water and heat fluxes. Individual investigators perform many data validity checks. Network-level data validity checks are also being applied to increase network-wide data consistency. A number of different types or errors occur in flux data, and while corrections have been developed to address some types of errors, other error types can be difficult to detect. To identify errors rapidly and consistently, we have developed automated data validity checks that rely on theoretical limits or relationships for specific measured variables. We present an example of a data validity check that is being developed for the friction velocity u*. The friction velocity is a crucial variable used to identify when low turbulent mixing in the atmospheric boundary layer invalidates eddy covariance measurements of fluxes. It is measured via sonic anemometer and is related to the wind speed WS, the measurement height relative to the canopy height, and the surface roughness, through the log law. Comparing independent measurements of WS and u* can help identify issues related to the sensor but doesn't take into consideration changes in the canopy (e.g. due to leaf emergence). The u* data check proposed relies on recent work comparing multiple methods for determining the aerodynamic roughness length z0 and zero plane displacement d (Graf, A., A. van de Boer, A. Moene & H. Vereecken, 2014, Boundary-Layer Meteorol., 151, 373-387). These methods, each of which is most robust across a different atmospheric stability range, yield multiple estimates for z0 and d at daily resolution. We use these multiple estimates for z0 and d, as well as half-hourly wind speeds and Obukhov length scales and their uncertainties to generate a predicted u* and a tolerance around this predicted value. In testing, this check correctly identified as invalid u* data known to be erroneous but did not flag data that could look anomalous but instead reflect real changes in the vegetation canopy. This and other validity checks both manual and automated are serving to increase accuracy and inter-comparability of all data within the AmeriFlux and FLUXNET networks preceding the upcoming release of a new global data set of fluxes.

  7. Hydroacoustic and spatial analysis of sediment fluxes and accumulation rates in two Virginia reservoirs, USA.

    PubMed

    Clark, E V; Odhiambo, B K; Yoon, S; Pilati, L

    2015-06-01

    Watershed sediment fluxes and reservoir sediment accumulation rates were analyzed in two contrasting reservoir systems in central and western Virginia. Lake Pelham, located in the Piedmont geologic province, is a human-impacted reservoir with a watershed dominated by agricultural, residential and industrial land uses. Conversely, Lake Moomaw has a largely undeveloped watershed characterized by very steep slopes and forested land use located in the Valley and Ridge province. The Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) and sediment delivery ratios (SDRs) were used to estimate soil losses in the two watersheds. Bathymetric and sediment accumulation surveys of the two reservoirs were also conducted using a multi-frequency hydroacoustic surveying system. The RUSLE/SDR erosion model estimates 2150 kg ha(-1) year(-1) for Lake Pelham and 2720 kg ha(-1) year(-1) for Lake Moomaw, a 410 and 13 % increase from assumed pristine (100 % forested) land use for the respective basins. Mean sediment accumulation rates of 1.51 and 0.60 cm year(-1) were estimated from the hydroacoustic survey of Lake Pelham and Lake Moomaw, respectively. Overall, Lake Moomaw has relatively low sediment accumulation rates; however, the reservoir is vulnerable to increases in sediment fluxes with further human development due to the steep slopes and highly erodible colluvial soils that characterize the basin. Higher erosion and sediment accumulation rates in Lake Pelham are most likely reflecting the impact of human development on sedimentation processes, where the loss of vegetal buffers and increase in impervious surfaces exacerbates both the surficial soil losses as well as intrinsic stream sediment production leading to the current annual reservoir capacity loss of 0.4 %. PMID:25563837

  8. A scintillating fission detector for neutron flux measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sy Stange; Ernst I Esch; Eric A Burgett; Iain May; Ross E Muenchausen; Felicia Taw; Fredrik K Tovesson

    2010-01-01

    Neutron flux monitors are commonly used for a variety of nuclear physics applications. A scintillating neutron detector, consisting of a liquid scintillator loaded with fissionable material, has been developed, characterized, and tested in the beam line at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and shows a significant improvement in neutron sensitivity compared with a conventional fission chamber. Recent research on

  9. Quantitative method for measuring heat flux emitted from a cryogenic object

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, R.V.

    1993-03-16

    The present invention is a quantitative method for measuring the total heat flux, and of deriving the total power dissipation, of a heat-fluxing object which includes the steps of placing an electrical noise-emitting heat-fluxing object in a liquid helium bath and measuring the superfluid transition temperature of the bath. The temperature of the liquid helium bath is thereafter reduced until some measurable parameter, such as the electrical noise, exhibited by the heat-fluxing object or a temperature-dependent resistive thin film in intimate contact with the heat-fluxing object, becomes greatly reduced. The temperature of the liquid helum bath is measured at this point. The difference between the superfluid transition temperature of the liquid helium bath surrounding the heat-fluxing object, and the temperature of the liquid helium bath when the electrical noise emitted by the heat-fluxing object becomes greatly reduced, is determined. The total heat flux from the heat-fluxing object is determined as a function of this difference between these temperatures. In certain applications, the technique can be used to optimize thermal design parameters of cryogenic electronics, for example, Josephson junction and infrared sensing devices.

  10. Quantitative method for measuring heat flux emitted from a cryogenic object

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, Robert V. (Tijeras, NM)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a quantitative method for measuring the total heat flux, and of deriving the total power dissipation, of a heat-fluxing object which includes the steps of placing an electrical noise-emitting heat-fluxing object in a liquid helium bath and measuring the superfluid transition temperature of the bath. The temperature of the liquid helium bath is thereafter reduced until some measurable parameter, such as the electrical noise, exhibited by the heat-fluxing object or a temperature-dependent resistive thin film in intimate contact with the heat-fluxing object, becomes greatly reduced. The temperature of the liquid helum bath is measured at this point. The difference between the superfluid transition temperature of the liquid helium bath surrounding the heat-fluxing object, and the temperature of the liquid helium bath when the electrical noise emitted by the heat-fluxing object becomes greatly reduced, is determined. The total heat flux from the heat-fluxing object is determined as a function of this difference between these temperatures. In certain applications, the technique can be used to optimize thermal design parameters of cryogenic electronics, for example, Josephson junction and infra-red sensing devices.

  11. Combined FTIR-micrometeorological techniques for long term measurements of greenhouse gas fluxes from agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, A. K.; Griffith, D.; Harvey, M.; Naylor, T.; Smith, M.

    2009-04-01

    The exchange of trace gases between the biosphere and the atmosphere affects the atmospheric concentrations of gases such as methane, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, ammonia, volatile organic compounds, nitrogen dioxide and others. The quantification of the exchange between a biogenic system and the atmosphere is necessary for the evaluation of the impact of these interactions. This is of special interest for agricultural systems which can be sources or sinks of trace gases, and the measurement of the fluxes is necessary when evaluating both the environmental impact of agricultural activities and the impact of atmospheric pollution on agricultural production and sustainability. With the exception of CO2, micrometeorological measurements of the fluxes of greenhouse gases from agricultural activities are still mostly possible only in campaign mode due to the complexity and logistical requirements of the existing measurement techniques. This limitation precludes studies of fluxes which run for longer periods, for example over full seasonal or growing cycles for both animal- and crop-based agriculture. We have developed an instrument system for long-term flux measurements through a combination of micrometeorological flux measurement techniques such as Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) and Flux-Gradient (FG) with the high precision multi-species detection capabilities of FTIR spectroscopy. The combined technique is capable of simultaneous flux measurements of N2O, CH4 and CO2 at paddock to regional scales continuously, over longer terms (months, seasonal cycles, years). The system was tested on a 3 weeks field campaign in NSW, Australia on a flat, homogeneous circular grass paddock with grazing cattle. The flux of the atmospheric trace gas CO2 was measured with three different micrometeorological techniques: Relaxed Eddy Accumulation, Flux-Gradient, and Eddy Correlation. Simultaneously, fluxes of CH4 and N2O were measured by REA and FG technique.

  12. Optimization of magnetic flux density measurement using multiple RF receiver coils and multi-echo in MREIT.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Woo Chul; Chauhan, Munish; Sajib, Saurav Z K; Kim, Hyung Joong; Serša, Igor; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Tomography (MREIT) is an MRI method that enables mapping of internal conductivity and/or current density via measurements of magnetic flux density signals. The MREIT measures only the z-component of the induced magnetic flux density B = (Bx, By, Bz) by external current injection. The measured noise of Bz complicates recovery of magnetic flux density maps, resulting in lower quality conductivity and current-density maps. We present a new method for more accurate measurement of the spatial gradient of the magnetic flux density gradient (? Bz). The method relies on the use of multiple radio-frequency receiver coils and an interleaved multi-echo pulse sequence that acquires multiple sampling points within each repetition time. The noise level of the measured magnetic flux density Bz depends on the decay rate of the signal magnitude, the injection current duration, and the coil sensitivity map. The proposed method uses three key steps. The first step is to determine a representative magnetic flux density gradient from multiple receiver coils by using a weighted combination and by denoising the measured noisy data. The second step is to optimize the magnetic flux density gradient by using multi-echo magnetic flux densities at each pixel in order to reduce the noise level of ? Bz and the third step is to remove a random noise component from the recovered ? Bz by solving an elliptic partial differential equation in a region of interest. Numerical simulation experiments using a cylindrical phantom model with included regions of low MRI signal to noise ('defects') verified the proposed method. Experimental results using a real phantom experiment, that included three different kinds of anomalies, demonstrated that the proposed method reduced the noise level of the measured magnetic flux density. The quality of the recovered conductivity maps using denoised ? Bz data showed that the proposed method reduced the conductivity noise level up to 3-4 times at each anomaly region in comparison to the conventional method. PMID:25097180

  13. Soil Greenhouse Gas Flux Measurements in a Pacific Northwestern Douglas-fir Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawthorne, I.; Johnson, M. S.; Jassal, R.; Black, T. A.; Webster, C.

    2012-04-01

    Forests and forest soils are dynamic sources and sinks for greenhouse gases (GHG). Climate and management practices can impact the GHG balance of a forest. Motivated by the contemporary scientific understanding of climate change, carbon (C) cycle studies to date have largely been concerned with carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes. Methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are less abundant trace gases, but with large greenhouse warming potentials and differing lifetimes in the atmosphere, CH4 and N2O are also significant global warming contributors, warranting careful consideration when trying to determine complete GHG balances. Soil fluxes of CO2, CH4 and N2O were measured at a Pacific Northwestern Douglas-fir forest on Vancouver Island, BC, Canada (49o 52' N, 125o 20' W). Samples were syringe collected (0, 3, 10, 20, 30 min) and transferred to pre-evacuated 12-ml vials (Exetainers, Labco Limited, Buckinghamshire, UK) once a month (Oct-Dec, 2011) from each of 16 closed-chambers in order to determine soil GHG flux rates. Samples were analysed using an Agilent 7890A Gas Chromatography (GC) system for CO2 and CH4 using a Flame Ionisation Detector (FID) with methanizer, and for N2O using an Electron Capture Detector (ECD). Resulting data were analysed using the HMR package implemented with the R language for statistical computing to determine the best fit for flux estimation considering linear and non-linear Hutchinson and Mosier models. The presence of outliers and questionable features in the data resulted in the need for careful data screening. Initial results suggest that the CH4sink strength of these soils decrease during the cooling and increasingly wet autumn to winter months (3.6-2.6 ?mol m-2hr-1). Low concentrations of N2O made it difficult to quantify any emissions (0.15-0.05 ?mol m-2hr-1), while CO2 was emitted to the atmosphere (2.05-0.75 ?mol m-2s-1). Monthly results for Jan-Mar 2012 will be included. Results of CO2 fluxes measured by GC using the closed-chambers compared with a portable flow-through (4 L min-1) chamber with a LI-COR Inc LI 840 infrared gas analyzer using collars installed in close proximity will be presented. Developments made on a flow-through chamber design for CH4 will be discussed.

  14. Measurement of the Crab Flux above 60 GeV with the CELESTE Cerenkov Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Naurois, M.; Holder, J.; Bazer-Bachi, R.; Bergeret, H.; Bruel, P.; Cordier, A.; Debiais, G.; Dezalay, J.-P.; Dumora, D.; Durand, E.; Eschstruth, P.; Espigat, P.; Fabre, B.; Fleury, P.; Hérault, N.; Hrabovsky, M.; Incerti, S.; Le Gallou, R.; Münz, F.; Musquère, A.; Olive, J.-F.; Paré, E.; Québert, J.; Rannot, R. C.; Reposeur, T.; Rob, L.; Roy, P.; Sako, T.; Schovanek, P.; Smith, D. A.; Snabre, P.; Volte, A.

    2002-02-01

    We have converted the former solar electrical plant THEMIS (French Pyrenees) into an atmospheric Cerenkov detector called CELESTE, which records gamma rays above 30 GeV (7×1024 Hz). Here we present the first sub-100 GeV detection by a ground-based telescope of a gamma-ray source, the Crab Nebula, in the energy region between satellite measurements and imaging atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes. At our analysis threshold energy of 60+/-20 GeV we measure a gamma-ray rate of 6.1+/-0.8 minute-1. Allowing for 30% systematic uncertainties and a 30% error on the energy scale yields an integral gamma-ray flux of I(E>60GeV)=6.2+5.3-2.3×10-6 photons m-2 s-1. The analysis methods used to obtain the gamma-ray signal from the raw data are detailed. In addition, we determine the upper limit for pulsed emission to be less than 12% of the Crab flux at the 99% confidence level, in the same energy range. Our result indicates that if the power law observed by EGRET is attenuated by a cutoff of form e-E/E0, then E0<26 GeV. This is the lowest energy probed by a Cerenkov detector and leaves only a narrow range unexplored beyond the energy range studied by EGRET.

  15. Long-term isoprene flux measurements above a northern hardwood forest

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shelley Pressley; Brian Lamb; Hal Westberg; Julia Flaherty; Jack Chen; Christoph Vogel

    2005-01-01

    We report continuous whole canopy isoprene emission fluxes from a northern hardwood forest in Michigan for the 1999–2002 growing seasons. The eddy covariance fluxes of isoprene, CO2, latent heat, and sensible heat are presented along with an analysis of the seasonal and year-to-year variations. Measurements were made in collaboration with the AmeriFlux site located at the University of Michigan Biological

  16. Remote Measurement of Heat Flux from Power Plant Cooling Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, A.; Kurzeja, R.; Villa-Aleman, E.; Bollinger, J.

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have demonstrated a correlation between the rate of heat loss q? from an experimental fluid to the air above and the standard deviation ? of the thermal variability in images of the fluid surface. These experimental results imply that q? can be derived directly from thermal imagery by computing ?. This paper analyses thermal imagery collected over two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the same relationship exists. Turbulent boundary layer theory predicts a linear relationship between q? and ? when both forced (wind driven) and free (buoyancy driven) convection are present. Datasets derived from ground- and helicopter-based imagery collections had correlation coefficients between ? and q? of 0.45 and 0.76, respectively. Values of q? computed from a function of ? and friction velocity u* derived from turbulent boundary layer theory had higher correlations with measured values of q? (0.84 and 0.89). This research may be applicable to the problem of calculating losses of heat from the ocean to the atmosphere during high-latitude cold-air outbreaks because it does not require the information typically needed to compute sensible, evaporative, and thermal radiation energy losses to the atmosphere.

  17. Measurement of the Cosmic Ray and Neutrino-Induced Muon Flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-print Network

    SNO Collaboration

    2009-02-16

    Results are reported on the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino-induced muon flux at a depth of 2 kilometers below the Earth's surface from 1229 days of operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By measuring the flux of through-going muons as a function of zenith angle, the SNO experiment can distinguish between the oscillated and un-oscillated portion of the neutrino flux. A total of 514 muon-like events are measured between $-1 \\le \\cos{\\theta}_{\\rm zenith} \\le 0.4$ in a total exposure of 2.30\\times 10^{14}$ cm$^{2}$ s. The measured flux normalization is $1.22 \\pm 0.09$ times the Bartol three-dimensional flux prediction. This is the first measurement of the neutrino-induced flux where neutrino oscillations are minimized. The zenith distribution is consistent with previously measured atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters. The cosmic ray muon flux at SNO with zenith angle $\\cos{\\theta}_{\\rm zenith} > 0.4$ is measured to be $(3.31 \\pm 0.01 {\\rm (stat.)} \\pm 0.09 {\\rm (sys.)}) \\times 10^{-10}~\\mu$/s/cm$^{2}$.

  18. Novel Surface Thermocouple Probes for Divertor Heat Flux Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangadhara, S.; Labombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; Pierce, N.

    1996-11-01

    An array of novel surface thermocouple probes have been installed and tested in the outer divertor of Alcator C-Mod. These sensors can, in principle, record divertor surface temperatures with fast time response (? >= 10 ? sec), allowing a direct estimate of the plasma heat flux to be inferred. The design is an adaptation of a commercially available device(``The Self-Renewing Thermocouple,'' Nanmac Corp., Framingham, MA), employing a coaxial-like geometry with a single tungsten-rhenium ribbon wire embedded inside a 6.35 mm diameter molybdenum rod. Various prototypes were tested, including probes with flush and 5^circ angles with respect to the divertor surface, and probes with and without protective surface coatings. Typical surface temperature rises are ~ 300-700 ^circC, corresponding to signals of ~ 3-9 mV. RC filters with 10 ms time constants are used to reduce noise introduced by the plasma environment. The surface temperature corresponding to typical RMS noise levels is ~ 25 ^circC. Using a one-dimensional, semi-infinite slab model, parallel heat fluxes in the range of 50-500 MW/m^2 are estimated. A comparison with heat flux estimates from Langmuir probes located adjacent to the thermocouple array will be presented. Supported by U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-78ET51013

  19. A comparison of six methods for measuring soil-surface carbon dioxide fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, J. M.; Kucharik, C. J.; Gower, S. T.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Crill, P. M.; Rayment, M.; Savage, K.; Striegl, R. G.

    1997-12-01

    Measurements of soil-surface CO2 fluxes are important for characterizing the carbon budget of boreal forests because these fluxes can be the second largest component of the budget. Several methods for measuring soil-surface CO2 fluxes are available: (1) closed-dynamic-chamber systems, (2) closed-static-chamber systems, (3) open-chamber systems, and (4) eddy covariance systems. This paper presents a field comparison of six individual systems for measuring soil-surface CO2 fluxes with each of the four basic system types represented. A single system is used as a reference and compared to each of the other systems individually in black spruce (Picea mariana), jack pine (Pinus banksiana), or aspen (Populus tremuloides) forests. Fluxes vary from 1 to 10 ?mol CO2 m-2 s-1. Adjustment factors to bring all of the systems into agreement vary from 0.93 to 1.45 with an uncertainty of about 10-15%.

  20. Tropical Controls on the CO2 Atmospheric Growth Rate 2010-2011 from the NASA Carbon Monitoring System Flux (CMS-Flux) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, K. W.; Liu, J.; Parazoo, N.; Lee, M.; Menemenlis, D.; Gierach, M. M.; Brix, H.; Gurney, K. R.; Collatz, G. J.; Bousserez, N.; Henze, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    Interannual variations in the atmospheric growth rate of CO2 have been attributed to the tropical regions and the controls are correlated with temperature anomalies. We investigate the spatial drivers of the atmospheric growth rate and the processes controlling them over the exceptional period of 2010-2011. This period was marked by a marked shift from an El Nino to La Nina period resulting in historically high sea surface temperature anomalies in the tropical Atlantic leading to serious droughts in the Amazon. However, in 2011, unusual precipitation in Australia was linked to gross primary productivity anomalies in semi-arid regions. We use satellite observations of CO2, CO, and solar induced fluorescence assimilated into the NASA Carbon Monitoring System Project (CMS-Flux) to attribute the atmospheric growth rate to global, spatially resolved fluxes. This system is based upon observationally-constrained "bottom-up" estimates from the Fossil Fuel Data Assimilation System (FFDAS), the ECCO2­-Darwin physical and biogeochemical adjoint ocean state estimation system, and CASA-GFED3 land-surface biogeochemical model. The system is used to compute regional tropical and extra-tropical fluxes and quantify the role of biomass burning and gross primary productivity in controlling those fluxes.

  1. Strain Rate Measurements in Vertical and Oblique Impact Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, J. M.; Schultz, P. H.

    2000-01-01

    Strain rate trends measured from projectile impact stress profiles differ from those in plate impact experiments. For oblique impacts, strain rates downrange are a factor of 2 higher than strain rates uprange at the same peak stress.

  2. Balloon-borne measurements of the ultraviolet flux in the Arctic stratosphere during winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Cornelius; Mueller, Martin; Klein, Erich; Schmidt, Ulrich; Roeth, Ernst-Peter

    1994-01-01

    Filter radiometers sensitive from 280 to 320 nm and from 280 to 400 nm, respectively, were used for measurements of the actinic flux in the stratosphere. Since the instruments are calibrated for absolute spectral sensitivity the data can be compared with model calculations of the actinic flux. Data were obtained during seven balloon flights during the European Arctic Stratospheric Ozone Experiment (EASOE).

  3. An intercomparison of surface energy flux measurement systems used during FIFE 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, D.; Kanemasu, E.T.; Fritschen, L.J.; Weaver, H.L.; Smith, E.A.; Verma, S.B.; Field, R.T.; Kustas, W.P.; Stewart, J.B. (Georgia Univ., Griffin (United States) Washington Univ., Seattle (United States) USGS, Denver, CO (United States) Florida State Univ., Tallahassee (United States) Nebraska Univ., Lincoln (United States) Delaware Univ., Newark (United States) USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD (United States) NERC, Inst. of Hydrology, Wallingford (United Kingdom))

    1992-11-01

    During FIFE 1987, surface energy fluxes were measured at 22 flux sites by nine groups of scientists using different measuring systems. A rover Bowen ratio station was taken to 20 of the flux stations to serve as a reference for estimating the instrument-related differences. The rover system was installed within a few meters from the host instrument of a site. Using linear regression analysis, net radiation, Bowen ratio, and latent heat fluxes were compared between the rover measurements and the host measurements. The average differences in net radiation, Bowen ratio, and latent heat flux from different types of instruments can be up to 10, 30, and 20 percent, respectively. The Didcot net radiometer gave higher net radiation while the Swissteco type showed lower values, as compared to the corrected radiation energy balance system (REBS) model. The four-way components method and the Thornthwaite type give similar values to the REBS. The surface energy radiation balance systems type Bowen ratio systems exhibit slightly lower Bowen ratios and thus higher latent heat fluxes, compared to the arid zone evapotranspiration systems. Eddy correlation systems showed slightly lower latent heat flux in comparison to the Bowen ratio systems. It is recommended that users of the flux data take these differences into account. 11 refs.

  4. An assessment of corrections for eddy covariance measured turbulent fluxes over snow in mountain environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Snow-covered complex terrain is an extremely important runoff generating landscape in high altitude and latitude environments, yet is often considered non-viable for eddy covariance measurements of turbulent fluxes. Turbulent flux data are useful for evaluating the coupled snow cover mass and energ...

  5. Interplanetary dust detection by radio antennas: Mass calibration and fluxes measured by STEREO/WAVES

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Interplanetary dust detection by radio antennas: Mass calibration and fluxes measured by STEREO/WAVES radio instrument onboard the two STEREO spacecraft near 1 A.U. during the period 2007­2010. The impact detection area compared to conventional dust detectors provides flux data with a better statistics. We show

  6. An Approximate Footprint Model for Flux Measurements in the Convective Boundary Layer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Weiguo Wang; Kenneth J. Davis; Daniel M. Ricciuto; Martha P. Butler

    2006-01-01

    An explicit footprint model for flux measurements of passive scalars in the lower part of the convective boundary layer (CBL) is introduced. A simple footprint model is derived analytically in an idealized CBL. The simple model can simulate the overall characteristics of the flux footprint. Then a method is proposed to adjust the analytical solutions to those from a Lagrangian

  7. Measurements of Formaldehyde Fluxes in Houston, Texas Formaldehyde (HCHO) is a chemical compound that has

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    Measurements of Formaldehyde Fluxes in Houston, Texas Formaldehyde (HCHO) is a chemical compound - May 31, 2009. ·To determine the HCHO fluxes in Texas City from industrial sources ·To understand the production of HCHO in the area ·To contribute to models of the effects these industrial emissions have

  8. A Heat Flux Instrument for Measuring Venus Surface Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauken, M.; Smrekar, S.

    2015-04-01

    An instrument has been developed to measure the surface heat flow on Venus. Heat flow measurement would provide a better understanding of the evolutionary development of Venus. The instrument uses a semiconductor thermopile to measure heat flow.

  9. Development of integrated high temperature sensor for simultaneous measurement of wall heat flux and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Wang, Jing; Fan, Xuejun

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, an integrated water-cooled sensor has been developed to simultaneously measure the heat flux and temperature at the wall of a scramjet combustor. The upgrade sensor was designed based on the principle of Gardon heat-flux gauge with many improvements. The sensor was well calibrated by both conductive heating sources and blackbody cavity device. The effects of structural material and dimensions on the sensor's responses were examined. Both the experimental measurements and numerical simulation were conducted and showed that the new sensor has the maximum measure ability of heat flux of 400 W/cm2 and stagnation temperatures up to 1920 K along with satisfactory response time.

  10. Absolute beam flux measurement at NDCX-I using gold-melting calorimetry technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, P.A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Lidia, S.M.; Welch, J.

    2011-04-01

    We report on an alternative way to measure the absolute beam flux at the NDCX-I, LBNL linear accelerator. Up to date, the beam flux is determined from the analysis of the beam-induced optical emission from a ceramic scintilator (Al-Si). The new approach is based on calorimetric technique, where energy flux is deduced from the melting dynamics of a gold foil. We estimate an average 260 kW/cm2 beam flux over 5 {micro}s, which is consistent with values provided by the other methods. Described technique can be applied to various ion species and energies.

  11. Enhancing the precision and accuracy within and among AmeriFlux site measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Bev

    2013-11-25

    This is the final report for AmeriFlux QA/QC at Oregon State University. The major objective of this project is to contribute to the AmeriFlux network by continuing to build consistency in AmeriFlux measurements by addressing objectives stated in the AmeriFlux strategic plan and self evaluation, the North American Carbon Program, and the US Carbon Cycle Science Program. The project directly contributes to NACP and CCSP goals to establish an integrated, near-real time network of observations to inform climate change science.

  12. Incorporating spatial heterogeneity into the measurement of methane and carbon dioxide fluxes from a restored wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatala, J.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Kljun, N.; O'Connell, J.; Knox, S.; Verfaillie, J. G.

    2012-12-01

    Using eddy covariance data to interpret mechanistic controls on ecosystem fluxes from spatially heterogeneous land surfaces is challenging since the measured flux is the net result of multiple sources and/or sinks. This challenge is especially profound when measuring CH4 fluxes, which can vary by orders of magnitude on small spatial scales. In wetlands, plants couple ecosystem CO2 and CH4 fluxes both biologically and physically, so spatially heterogeneous vegetation patterns can exert strong controls on the production and release of CH4. We assessed the impact of spatial heterogeneity on CO2 and CH4 fluxes at a restored wetland in the California Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta by combining a 2-D flux footprint model, repeat satellite imagery, and eddy covariance measurements of CO2 and CH4 fluxes from two towers (one mobile and one stationary). Using imagery from the high-resolution WorldView-2 satellite from May 2011 - September 2012, we characterized spatial changes in plant distribution and open water extent as vegetation expanded following restoration. By combing the satellite data and the 2-D flux footprint model, we assessed the impact of vegetation pattern and abundance on measured CO2 and CH4 fluxes. We then determined the CH4 flux contribution from areas covered by plants compared and areas of open water by using a spatial mixture model with simultaneous data collected at the two towers. This analysis demonstrates that remote sensing-eddy covariance data synthesis with multiple towers is a powerful tool for understanding landscape-scale CH4 fluxes in spatially heterogeneous ecosystems.

  13. Mapping methane sources and emissions over California from direct airborne flux and VOC source tracer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, A.; Misztal, P. K.; Peischl, J.; Karl, T.; Jonsson, H. H.; Woods, R. K.; Ryerson, T. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying the contributions of methane (CH4) emissions from anthropogenic sources in the Central Valley of California is important for validation of the statewide greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory and subsequent AB32 law implementation. The state GHG inventory is largely based on activity data and emission factor based estimates. The 'bottom-up' emission factors for CH4 have large uncertainties and there is a lack of adequate 'top-down' measurements to characterize emission rates. Emissions from non-CO2 GHG sources display spatial heterogeneity and temporal variability, and are thus, often, poorly characterized. The Central Valley of California is an agricultural and industry intensive region with large concentration of dairies and livestock operations, active oil and gas fields and refining operations, as well as rice cultivation all of which are known CH4 sources. In order to gain a better perspective of the spatial distribution of major CH4 sources in California, airborne measurements were conducted aboard a Twin Otter aircraft for the CABERNET (California Airborne BVOC Emissions Research in Natural Ecosystems Transects) campaign, where the driving research goal was to understand the spatial distribution of biogenic VOC emissions. The campaign took place in June 2011 and encompassed over forty hours of low-altitude and mixed layer airborne CH4 and CO2 measurements alongside coincident VOC measurements. Transects during eight unique flights covered much of the Central Valley and its eastern edge, the Sacramento-San Joaquin delta and the coastal range. We report direct quantification of CH4 fluxes using real-time airborne Eddy Covariance measurements. CH4 and CO2 were measured at 1-Hz data rate using an instrument based on Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) along with specific VOCs (like isoprene, methanol, acetone etc.) measured at 10-Hz using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer - Eddy Covariance (PTRMS-EC) flux system. Spatially resolved eddy covariance fluxes were obtained using the virtual disjunct eddy covariance method and from Wavelet Analysis along flight tracks flown in the mixed layer. Preliminary analysis of mixing ratio measurements indicate that high concentrations of CH4 occur consistently while flying above the Central Valley that are correlated to large enhancements of methanol which is an important dairy and livestock emissions tracer. The elevated CH4 mixing ratios along the eastern edge of the San Joaquin Valley highlight the contribution of topography and emissions transport to local ambient levels of CH4. Large enhancements of CH4, benzene and toluene are also observed while flying over the oil production facilities in western part of Kern county (state's top oil producing county, 10% of US production) suggesting the likelihood of fugitive emissions in the region. VOC tracer analysis is used to evaluate the source of high CH4 emissions encountered along the eastern edge of the central Sacramento valley where fugitive emissions from natural gas fields and cultivation of rice are likely sources. Plumes from biomass burning, landfills and refineries encountered during different flights are also investigated. Eddy covariance based CH4 flux estimates are derived for various sources and compared with ';bottom-up' inventory estimates to verify/validate the CA methane inventory for major sources.

  14. Relation of measured basal temperatures and the spatial distribution of the geothermal heat flux for the Greenland ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, Ralf

    The thermomechanical, three-dimensional ice-sheet model SICOPOLIS is applied to the Greenland ice sheet. Simulations over two glacial-interglacial cycles are carried out, driven by a climatic forcing interpolated between present conditions and Last Glacial Maximum anomalies. Based on the global heat-flow representation by Pollack and others (1993), we attempt to constrain the spatial pattern of the geothermal heat flux by comparing simulation results to direct measurements of basal temperatures at the GRIP, NorthGRIP, Camp Century and Dye 3 ice-core locations. The obtained heat-flux map shows an increasing trend from west to east, a high-heat-flux anomaly around NorthGRIP with values up to 135 mW m-2 and a low-heat-flux anomaly around Dye 3 with values down to 20 mW m-2. Validation is provided by the generally good fit between observed and measured ice thicknesses. Residual discrepancies are most likely due to deficiencies of the input precipitation rate and further variability of the geothermal heat flux not captured here.

  15. Eddy-covariance methane flux measurements over a European beech forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentsch, Lydia; Siebicke, Lukas; Knohl, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The role of forests in global methane (CH4) turnover is currently not well constrained, partially because of the lack of spatially integrative forest-scale measurements of CH4 fluxes. Soil chamber measurements imply that temperate forests generally act as CH4 sinks. Upscaling of chamber observations to the forest scale is however problematic, if the upscaling is not constrained by concurrent 'top-down' measurements, such as of the eddy-covariance type, which provide sufficient integration of spatial variations and of further potential CH4 flux components within forest ecosystems. Ongoing development of laser absorption-based optical instruments, resulting in enhanced measurement stability, precision and sampling speed, has recently improved the prospects for meaningful eddy-covariance measurements at sites with presumably low CH4 fluxes, hence prone to reach the flux detection limit. At present, we are launching eddy-covariance CH4 measurements at a long-running ICOS flux tower site (Hainich National Park, Germany), located in a semi natural, unmanaged, beech dominated forest. Eddy-covariance measurements will be conducted with a laser spectrometer for parallel CH4, H2Ov and CO2 measurements (FGGA, Los Gatos Research, USA). Independent observations of the CO2 flux by the FGGA and a standard Infrared Gas Analyser (LI-7200, LI-COR, USA) will allow to evaluate data quality of measured CH4 fluxes. Here, we want to present first results with a focus on uncertainties of the calculated CH4 fluxes with regard to instrument precision, data processing and site conditions. In future, we plan to compare eddy-covariance flux estimates to side-by-side turbulent flux observations from a novel eddy accumulation system. Furthermore, soil CH4 fluxes will be measured with four automated chambers situated within the tower footprint. Based on a previous soil chamber study at the same site, we expect the Hainich forest site to act as a CH4 sink. However, we hypothesize that our measurements might also reveal short CH4 emission periods when soils become water-saturated. Nonetheless, CH4 emissions by plants could also result in a close to neutral net CH4 flux.

  16. Modern Perspectives on Measuring and Interpreting Seafloor Heat Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Robert N.; Fisher, Andrew; Ruppel, Carolyn; Martinez, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    The Future of Marine Heat Flow: Defining Scientific Goals and Experimental Needs for the 21st Century; Salt Lake City, Utah, 6-7 September 2007; There has been a resurgence of interest in marine heat flow in the past 10-15 years, coinciding with fundamental achievements in understanding the Earth's thermal state and quantifying the dynamics and impacts of material and energy fluxes within and between the lithosphere and hydrosphere. At the same time, technical capabilities have dwindled to the point that no U.S. academic institution currently operates a seagoing heat flow capacity.

  17. Very narrow band model calculations of atmospheric fluxes and cooling rates

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, L.S.; Berk, A.; Acharya, P.K.; Robertson, D.C. [Spectral Sciences, Inc., Burlington, MA (United States)] [and others] [Spectral Sciences, Inc., Burlington, MA (United States); and others

    1996-10-15

    A new very narrow band model (VNBM) approach has been developed and incorporated into the MODTRAN atmospheric transmittance-radiance code. The VNBM includes a computational spectral resolution of 1 cm{sup {minus}1}, a single-line Voigt equivalent width formalism that is based on the Rodgers-Williams approximation and accounts for the finite spectral width of the interval, explicit consideration of line tails, a statistical line overlap correction, a new sublayer integration approach that treats the effect of the sublayer temperature gradient on the path radiance, and the Curtis-Godson (CG) approximation for inhomogeneous paths. A modified procedure for determining the line density parameter 1/d is introduced, which reduces its magnitude. This results in a partial correction of the VNBM tendency to overestimate the interval equivalent widths. The standard two parameter CG approximation is used for H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}, while the Goody three parameter CG approximation is used for O{sub 3}. Atmospheric flux and cooling rate predictions using a research version of MODTRAN, MODR, are presented for H{sub 2}O (with and without the continuum), CO{sub 2}, and O{sub 3} for several model atmospheres. The effect of doubling the CO{sub 2} concentration is also considered. These calculations are compared to line-by-line (LBL) model calculations using the AER, GLA, GFDL, and GISS codes. The MODR predictions fall within the spread of the LBL results. The effects of decreasing the band model spectral resolution are illustrated using CO{sub 2} cooling rate and flux calculations. 36 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Measurement of LNAPL flux using single-well intermittent mixing tracer dilution tests.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tim; Sale, Tom; Lyverse, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The stability of subsurface Light Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (LNAPLs) is a key factor driving expectations for remedial measures at LNAPL sites. The conventional approach to resolving LNAPL stability has been to apply Darcy's Equation. This paper explores an alternative approach wherein single-well tracer dilution tests with intermittent mixing are used to resolve LNAPL stability. As a first step, an implicit solution for single-well intermittent mixing tracer dilution tests is derived. This includes key assumptions and limits on the allowable time between intermittent mixing events. Second, single-well tracer dilution tests with intermittent mixing are conducted under conditions of known LNAPL flux. This includes a laboratory sand tank study and two field tests at active LNAPL recovery wells. Results from the sand tank studies indicate that LNAPL fluxes in wells can be transformed into formation fluxes using corrections for (1) LNAPL thicknesses in the well and formation and (2) convergence of flow to the well. Using the apparent convergence factor from the sand tank experiment, the average error between the known and measured LNAPL fluxes is 4%. Results from the field studies show nearly identical known and measured LNAPL fluxes at one well. At the second well the measured fluxes appear to exceed the known value by a factor of two. Agreement between the known and measured LNAPL fluxes, within a factor of two, indicates that single-well tracer dilution tests with intermittent mixing can be a viable means of resolving LNAPL stability. PMID:22489832

  19. Evapotranspiration components determined by eddy covariance and sap flux measurements in oil palm plantations in Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijide, Ana; Röll, Alexander; Niu, Furong; June, Tania; Hölscher, Dirk; Knohl, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The expansion of oil palm cultivation fueled by the increasing global demand for palm oil is leading to massive land transformations in tropical areas, particularly in South-East Asia. Conversions of forest land to oil palm plantations likely affect ecosystem water fluxes. However, there is a lack of information on water fluxes from oil palm plantations as well as on the partitioning of these fluxes into its different components such as transpiration and evaporation. It is expected that water fluxes from oil palm plantations vary temporally, both long-term, i.e. between different age-classes of plantations, and short-term, i.e. from day to day within a certain plantation (e.g. during or after periods of rainfall). A proper evaluation of water fluxes from oil palm plantations thus requires an experimental design encompassing these types of variability. To assess evapotranspiration (ET) rates, an eddy covariance tower was installed in a 2-year-old oil palm plantation in the lowlands of Jambi, Sumatra; it was subsequently moved to a 12-year-old oil palm plantation located in the same region. In parallel to the ET, sap flux density was measured on 16 leaf petioles on four oil palms; stand transpiration rates were derived from these measurements with stand inventory data. The parallel measurements ran for several weeks in both plantations. Preliminary results for our period of study show that the average ET rate of the 2-year-old oil palm plantation was 5.2 mm day-1; values up to 7.0 mm day-1 were observed on dry, sunny days with non-limiting soil moisture. Stand transpiration (T) by the young oil palms was very low, 0.3 mm day-1on average, and only showed a small variation between days. Under optimal environmental conditions, the ratio of T to total ET was up to 0.08 in the young plantation, while in the mature, 12-year-old plantation, it was significantly higher and reached 0.5. Transpiration rates in the mature oil palm plantation were about six- to seven-fold higher than in the young plantation and again showed very small fluctuations between days (1.8-2.2 mm day-1). Regardless of the age class, evapotranspiration followed changes in environmental conditions more closely than transpiration. This uncoupling of the oil palm transpiration response from environmental drivers may have severe effects on both the magnitude and the spatial and temporal variability of ecosystem water fluxes and needs to be investigated further.

  20. Photoabsorption cross section of CH3CN - Photodissociation rates by solar flux and interstellar radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masako Suto; L. C. Lee

    1985-01-01

    The photoabsorption cross section of CH2CN vapor was measured in the 106-180 nm region using synchrotron radiation as a light source. The cross section and the quantum yield for the production of CN (A, B-X) fluorescence were measured and were used to infer the photodissociation cross section of CH3CN. The cross sections were used to calculate the photodissociation rates of

  1. A high-frequency response relaxed eddy accumulation flux measurement system for sampling short-lived biogenic volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnts, Robert R.; Mowry, Fred L.; Hampton, Gary A.

    2013-05-01

    second-generation relaxed eddy accumulation system was built and tested with the capability to measure vertical biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) fluxes at levels as low as 10 µg C m-2 hr-1. The system features a continuous, integrated gas-phase ozone removal procedure to allow for the measurement of highly reactive species such as ?-caryophyllene and polar terpenoids such as linalool. A two-component internal standard continuously added to the accumulators was used to correct for switching-induced volumetric errors and as a check on VOC losses exceeding accumulator tube adsorption limits. In addition, the internal standards were used to demonstrate that accumulators quickly return to target flow rates at segregation valve switching frequencies up to at least 0.8 Hz. The system was able to measure daytime hourly fluxes of individual biogenic VOC including oxygenated terpenoids, monoterpenes, and sesquiterpenes.

  2. Description of heat flux measurement methods used in hydrocarbon and propellant fuel fires at Sandia.

    SciTech Connect

    Nakos, James Thomas

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the methods commonly used to measure heat flux in fire applications at Sandia National Laboratories in both hydrocarbon (JP-8 jet fuel, diesel fuel, etc.) and propellant fires. Because these environments are very severe, many commercially available heat flux gauges do not survive the test, so alternative methods had to be developed. Specially built sensors include 'calorimeters' that use a temperature measurement to infer heat flux by use of a model (heat balance on the sensing surface) or by using an inverse heat conduction method. These specialty-built sensors are made rugged so they will survive the environment, so are not optimally designed for ease of use or accuracy. Other methods include radiometers, co-axial thermocouples, directional flame thermometers (DFTs), Sandia 'heat flux gauges', transpiration radiometers, and transverse Seebeck coefficient heat flux gauges. Typical applications are described and pros and cons of each method are listed.

  3. The Thermal Conductivity Measurements of Solid Samples by Heat Flux Differantial Scanning Calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kök, M.; Aydo?du, Y.

    2007-04-01

    The thermal conductivity of polyvinylchloride (PVC), polysytrene (PS) and polypropylene (PP) were measured by heat flux DSC. Our results are in good agreement with the results observed by different methods.

  4. Terrestrial Antineutrino Flux Measurements S.T. Dye,1,2

    E-print Network

    Learned, John

    Terrestrial Antineutrino Flux Measurements S.T. Dye,1,2 E.H. Guillian,3 and C. Lan3 1 Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822, USA 2 College of Natural

  5. Eddy covariance flux measurements of pollutant gases in urban Mexico City

    E-print Network

    Velasco, Erik

    Eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements of the atmosphere/surface exchange of gases over an urban area are a direct way to improve and evaluate emissions inventories, and, in turn, to better understand urban atmospheric ...

  6. Flux Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds from an Urban Tower Platform 

    E-print Network

    Park, Chang Hyoun

    2011-08-08

    combined with a dual-channel gas chromatography - flame ionization detection used for volatile organic compound (VOC) flux measurements in the urban area, focusing on the results of selected anthropogenic VOCs, including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene...

  7. Automated modeling of ecosystem CO2 fluxes based on closed chamber measurements: A standardized conceptual and practical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Mathias; Jurisch, Nicole; Albiac Borraz, Elisa; Hagemann, Ulrike; Sommer, Michael; Augustin, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Closed chamber measurements are widely used for determining the CO2 exchange of small-scale or heterogeneous ecosystems. Among the chamber design and operational handling, the data processing procedure is a considerable source of uncertainty of obtained results. We developed a standardized automatic data processing algorithm, based on the language and statistical computing environment R© to (i) calculate measured CO2 flux rates, (ii) parameterize ecosystem respiration (Reco) and gross primary production (GPP) models, (iii) optionally compute an adaptive temperature model, (iv) model Reco, GPP and net ecosystem exchange (NEE), and (v) evaluate model uncertainty (calibration, validation and uncertainty prediction). The algorithm was tested for different manual and automatic chamber measurement systems (such as e.g. automated NEE-chambers and the LI-8100A soil CO2 Flux system) and ecosystems. Our study shows that even minor changes within the modelling approach may result in considerable differences of calculated flux rates, derived photosynthetic active radiation and temperature dependencies and subsequently modeled Reco, GPP and NEE balance of up to 25%. Thus, certain modeling implications will be given, since automated and standardized data processing procedures, based on clearly defined criteria, such as statistical parameters and thresholds are a prerequisite and highly desirable to guarantee the reproducibility, traceability of modelling results and encourage a better comparability between closed chamber based CO2 measurements.

  8. On Using CO2 Concentration Measurements at Mountain top and Valley Locations in Regional Flux Studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wekker, S. F.; Song, G.; Stephens, B. B.

    2007-12-01

    Data from the Regional Atmospheric Continuous CO2 Network in the Rocky Mountains (Rocky RACCOON) are used to investigate atmospheric controls on temporal and spatial variability of CO2 in mountainous terrain and the usefulness of mountain top and valley measurement for the estimation of regional CO2 fluxes. Rocky RACCOON consists of four sites installed in fall of 2005 and spring of 2006: Niwot Ridge, near Ward, Colorado; Storm Peak Laboratory near Steamboat Springs, Colorado; Fraser Experimental Forest, near Fraser Colorado; and Hidden Peak, near Snowbird, Utah. The network uses the NCAR-developed Autonomous Inexpensive Robust CO2 Analyzer. These units measure CO2 concentrations at three levels on a tower, producing individual measurements every 2.5 minutes precise to 0.1 ppm CO2 and closely tied to the WMO CO2 scale. Three of the sites are located on a mountain top while one site is located in a valley. Initial analyses show interesting relationships between CO2 concentration and atmospheric parameters, such as wind speed and direction, temperature, and incoming solar radiation. The nature of these relationships is further investigated with an atmospheric mesoscale model. Idealized and realistic simulations are able to capture the observed behavior of spatial and temporal CO2 variability and reveal the responsible physical processes. The implications of the results and the value of the measurements for providing information on local to regional scale respiration and photosynthesis rates in the Rockies are discussed.

  9. Measuring planetary neutron albedo fluxes by remote gamma-ray sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, E. L.; Metzger, A. E.

    1984-01-01

    In order to measure the planetary neutron albedo fluxes, a neutron-absorbing shield which emits gamma rays of characteristic energy and serves as a neutron detector, is added to a gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS). The gamma rays representing the neutron flux are observed against interference consisting of cosmic gamma rays, planetary continuum and line emission, and gamma rays arising from the interaction of cosmic rays with the GRS and the spacecraft. The uncertainty and minimum detection limits in neutron albedo fluxes are calculated for two missions, a lunar orbiter and a comet nucleus rendezvous. A GRS on a lunar orbiter at 100 km altitude detects a thermal neutron albedo flux as low as 0.002/sq cm/s and an expected flux of about 0.6/sq cm/s is measured with an uncertainty of 0.001/sq cm/s, for a 100 h observation period. For the comet nucleus, again in a 100 h observing period, a thermal neutron albedo flux is detected at a level of 0.006/sq cm/s and an expected flux of about 0.4/sq cm/s is measured with an uncertainty of 0.004/sq cm/s. The expanded geological capabilities made possible by this technique include improvements in H sensitivity, spatial resolution, and measurement depth; and an improved model of induced gamma-ray emission.

  10. Nightside electron flux measurements at Mars by the Phobos-2 HARP instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shutte, N.; Gringauz, K.; Kiraly, P.; Kotova, G.; Nagy, A. F.; Rosenbauer, H.; Szego, K.; Verigin, M.

    1995-01-01

    All the available nightside electron data obtained during circular orbits at Mars from the Phobos-2 Hyperbolic Retarded Potential Analyzer (HARP) instrument have been examined in detail and are summarized in this paper. An electron flux component with energies exceeding that of the unperturbed solar wind was observed inside the magnetosheath, indicating the presence of acceleration mechanism(s). The character of the electron fluxes measured in the magnetotail cannot be classified in any simple manner, however, there is a correlation between the electron fluxes measured well inside this region and the unperturbed solar wind ram pressure.

  11. Estimating regional methane surface fluxes: the relative importance of surface and GOSAT mole fraction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, A.; Palmer, P. I.; Feng, L.; Boesch, H.; Cogan, A.; Parker, R.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Fraser, P. J.; Krummel, P. B.; Langenfelds, R. L.; O'Doherty, S.; Prinn, R. G.; Steele, L. P.; van der Schoot, M.; Weiss, R. F.

    2013-06-01

    We use an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF), together with the GEOS-Chem chemistry transport model, to estimate regional monthly methane (CH4) fluxes for the period June 2009-December 2010 using proxy dry-air column-averaged mole fractions of methane (XCH4) from GOSAT (Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite) and/or NOAA ESRL (Earth System Research Laboratory) and CSIRO GASLAB (Global Atmospheric Sampling Laboratory) CH4 surface mole fraction measurements. Global posterior estimates using GOSAT and/or surface measurements are between 510-516 Tg yr-1, which is less than, though within the uncertainty of, the prior global flux of 529 ± 25 Tg yr-1. We find larger differences between regional prior and posterior fluxes, with the largest changes in monthly emissions (75 Tg yr-1) occurring in Temperate Eurasia. In non-boreal regions the error reductions for inversions using the GOSAT data are at least three times larger (up to 45%) than if only surface data are assimilated, a reflection of the greater spatial coverage of GOSAT, with the two exceptions of latitudes >60° associated with a data filter and over Europe where the surface network adequately describes fluxes on our model spatial and temporal grid. We use CarbonTracker and GEOS-Chem XCO2 model output to investigate model error on quantifying proxy GOSAT XCH4 (involving model XCO2) and inferring methane flux estimates from surface mole fraction data and show similar resulting fluxes, with differences reflecting initial differences in the proxy value. Using a series of observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) we characterize the posterior flux error introduced by non-uniform atmospheric sampling by GOSAT. We show that clear-sky measurements can theoretically reproduce fluxes within 10% of true values, with the exception of tropical regions where, due to a large seasonal cycle in the number of measurements because of clouds and aerosols, fluxes are within 15% of true fluxes. We evaluate our posterior methane fluxes by incorporating them into GEOS-Chem and sampling the model at the location and time of surface CH4 measurements from the AGAGE (Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment) network and column XCH4 measurements from TCCON (Total Carbon Column Observing Network). The posterior fluxes modestly improve the model agreement with AGAGE and TCCON data relative to prior fluxes, with the correlation coefficients (r2) increasing by a mean of 0.04 (range: -0.17 to 0.23) and the biases decreasing by a mean of 0.4 ppb (range: -8.9 to 8.4 ppb).

  12. Effects of trapped proton flux anisotropy on dose rates in low Earth orbit.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; Kushin, V V; Akatov YuA; Myltseva, V A

    1999-06-01

    Trapped protons in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) have a rather narrow pitch angle distribution and exhibit east-west anisotropy. In low Earth orbits, the E-W effect results in different amounts of radiation dose received by different sections of the spacecraft. This effect is best studied on missions in which the spacecraft flies in a fixed orientation. The magnitude of the effect depends on the particle energy and altitude through the SAA. In this paper, we describe a clear example of this effect from measurements of radiation dose rates and linear energy transfer spectra made on Space Shuttle flight STS-94 (28.5 degree inclination x 296 km altitude). The ratio of dose rates from the two directions at this location in the mid-deck was 2.7. As expected from model calculations, the spectra from the two directions are different, that is the ratio is energy dependent. The data can be used to distinguish the anisotropy models. The flight carried an active tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC), and passive thermoluminscent detectors (TLDs), and two types of nuclear emulsions. Using nuclear emulsions, charged particles and secondary neutron energy spectra were measured. The combined galactic cosmic radiation+trapped charged particle lineal energy spectra measured by the TEPC and the linear energy transfer spectrum measured by nuclear emulsions are in good agreement. The charged particle absorbed dose rates varied from 112 to 175 microGy/day, and dose equivalent rates from 264.3 to 413 microSv/day. Neutrons in the 1-10 MeV contributed a dose rate of 3.7 microGy/day and dose equivalent rate of 30.8 microSv/day, respectively. PMID:11543145

  13. Simulated Airborne Flux Measurements in a LES generated Convective Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröter, M.; Bange, J.; Raasch, S.

    One aim of past boundary-layer experiments with aircraft was the determination of areally averaged heat fluxes. In spite ofsophisticated instrumentation the measured fluxes extrapolated to the ground differed significantly from fluxes measured directly at ground stations. This studypresents simulated sensible heat flux measurements with aircraft flightsthrough a synthetic convective boundary layer created by a401 × 401 × 42 cubic-grid large eddy simulation (LES) with agrid spacing of 50 m. After some considerations with respect to necessary measurement lengths using results ofLenschow and Stankov (1986 - J. Atmos. Sci. 43, 1198-1209), simulated measurementcampaigns were carried out in three modelruns. During each model run five sets ofmeasurement runs were carried out successively.During each set of runs 10 aircraftflew at 10 altitudes with a ground speedof 100 m s-1 simultaneously throughtime and space. In total, 150 legs were carried out, 15 at each flight level. The resulting`measured' heat fluxes were compared withthose of the `true' flux profiles obtaineddirectly from the ensemble-averagedLES-generated data. No significant systematic error between `measured' and `true' profiles was observed. Furthermore, the comparison of the resulting relative error with the theory ofLenschow and Stankov showed a good agreement at allmeasurement levels.

  14. VOC flux measurements using a novel Relaxed Eddy Accumulation GC-FID system in urban Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C.; Schade, G.; Boedeker, I.

    2008-12-01

    Houston experiences higher ozone production rates than most other major cities in the US, which is related to high anthropogenic VOC emissions from both area/mobile sources (car traffic) and a large number of petrochemical facilities. The EPA forecasts that Houston is likely to still violate the new 8-h NAAQS in 2020. To monitor neighborhood scale pollutant fluxes, we established a tall flux tower installation a few kilometers north of downtown Houston. We measure energy and trace gas fluxes, including VOCs from both anthropogenic and biogenic emission sources in the urban surface layer using eddy covariance and related techniques. Here, we describe a Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) system combined with a dual-channel GC-FID used for VOC flux measurements, including first results. Ambient air is sampled at approximately 15 L min-1 through a 9.5 mm OD PFA line from 60 m above ground next to a sonic anemometer. Subsamples of this air stream are extracted through an ozone scrubber and pushed into two Teflon bag reservoirs, from which they are transferred to the GC pre-concentration units consisting of carbon-based adsorption traps encapsulated in heater blocks for thermal desorption. We discuss the performance of our system and selected measurement results from the 2008 spring and summer seasons in Houston. We present diurnal variations of the fluxes of the traffic tracers benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) during different study periods. Typical BTEX fluxes ranged from -0.36 to 3.10 mg m-2 h-1 for benzene, and -0.47 to 5.04 mg m-2 h-1 for toluene, and exhibited diurnal cycles with two dominant peaks related to rush-hour traffic. A footprint analysis overlaid onto a geographic information system (GIS) will be presented to reveal the dominant emission sources and patterns in the study area.

  15. Rates of insulin secretion in INS-1 cells are enhanced by coupling to anaplerosis and Kreb's cycle flux independent of ATP synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, Gary W., E-mail: gary.cline@yale.edu [The Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Pongratz, Rebecca L.; Zhao, Xiaojian [The Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)] [The Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Papas, Klearchos K. [Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)] [Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied media effects on mechanisms of insulin secretion of INS-1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin secretion was higher in DMEM than KRB despite identical ATP synthesis rates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin secretion rates correlated with rates of anaplerosis and TCA cycle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitochondria metabolism and substrate cycles augment secretion signal of ATP. -- Abstract: Mechanistic models of glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) established in minimal media in vitro, may not accurately describe the complexity of coupling metabolism with insulin secretion that occurs in vivo. As a first approximation, we have evaluated metabolic pathways in a typical growth media, DMEM as a surrogate in vivo medium, for comparison to metabolic fluxes observed under the typical experimental conditions using the simple salt-buffer of KRB. Changes in metabolism in response to glucose and amino acids and coupling to insulin secretion were measured in INS-1 832/13 cells. Media effects on mitochondrial function and the coupling efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation were determined by fluorometrically measured oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) combined with {sup 31}P NMR measured rates of ATP synthesis. Substrate preferences and pathways into the TCA cycle, and the synthesis of mitochondrial 2nd messengers by anaplerosis were determined by {sup 13}C NMR isotopomer analysis of the fate of [U-{sup 13}C] glucose metabolism. Despite similar incremental increases in insulin secretion, the changes of OCR in response to increasing glucose from 2.5 to 15 mM were blunted in DMEM relative to KRB. Basal and stimulated rates of insulin secretion rates were consistently higher in DMEM, while ATP synthesis rates were identical in both DMEM and KRB, suggesting greater mitochondrial uncoupling in DMEM. The relative rates of anaplerosis, and hence synthesis and export of 2nd messengers from the mitochondria were found to be similar in DMEM to those in KRB. And, the correlation of total PC flux with insulin secretion rates in DMEM was found to be congruous with the correlation in KRB. Together, these results suggest that signaling mechanisms associated with both TCA cycle flux and with anaplerotic flux, but not ATP production, may be responsible for the enhanced rates of insulin secretion in more complex, and physiologically-relevant media.

  16. Modeling thermal behavior and work flux in finite-rate systems with radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stanislaw Sieniutycz; Piotr Kuran

    2006-01-01

    We apply thermodynamic analysis in modeling, simulation and optimization of radiation engines as non-linear energy converters. We also perform critical analysis of available data for photon flux and photon density that leads to exact numerical value of photon flux constant. Basic thermodynamic principles lead to expressions for converter’s efficiency and generated work in terms of driving energy flux in the

  17. Local Energy Dissipation Rate Balances Local Heat Flux in the Center of Turbulent Thermal Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Rui; Huang, Shi-Di; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2011-10-01

    The local kinetic energy dissipation rate ?u,c in Rayleigh-Bénard convection cell was measured experimentally using the particle tracking velocimetry method, with varying Rayleigh number Ra, Prandtl number Pr, and cell height H. It is found that ?u,c/(?3H-4)=1.05×10-4Ra1.55±0.02Pr1.15±0.38. The Ra and H dependencies of the measured results are found to be consistent with the assumption made for the bulk energy dissipation rate ?u,bulk in the Grossmann-Lohse model. A remarkable finding of the study is that ?u,c balances the directly measured local Nusselt number Nuc in the cell center, not only scalingwise but also in magnitude.

  18. Local energy dissipation rate balances local heat flux in the center of turbulent thermal convection.

    PubMed

    Ni, Rui; Huang, Shi-Di; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2011-10-21

    The local kinetic energy dissipation rate ?(u,c) in Rayleigh-Bénard convection cell was measured experimentally using the particle tracking velocimetry method, with varying Rayleigh number Ra, Prandtl number Pr, and cell height H. It is found that ?(u,c)/(?(3)H(-4))=1.05×10(-4)Ra(1.55±0.02)Pr(1.15±0.38). The Ra and H dependencies of the measured results are found to be consistent with the assumption made for the bulk energy dissipation rate ?(u,bulk) in the Grossmann-Lohse model. A remarkable finding of the study is that ?(u,c) balances the directly measured local Nusselt number Nu(c) in the cell center, not only scalingwise but also in magnitude. PMID:22107524

  19. Application of an energy balance correction method for turbulent flux measurements based on buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babel, Wolfgang; Charuchittipan, Doojdao; Zhao, Peng; Biermann, Tobias; Gatzsche, Kathrin; Foken, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The energy imbalance in flux measurements between the atmosphere and the surface is a well-known problem, but unsolved due to the complexity of possible reasons and potential error sources. In order to provide unbiased budgets, however, eddy-covariance measurements of sensible and latent heat flux should be corrected according to the closure gap. Recent studies utilising turbulent flux data and LES models suggest that the transport of the missing turbulent flux is triggered by meso-scale circulations, not detected by eddy-covariance measurements within typical averaging intervals of 30 minutes. These motions on longer timescales are driven by buoyancy, suggesting that the missing turbulent flux is a missing buoyancy flux. Based on this assumption we present an energy balance closure correction method according to the buoyancy flux. The effects are compared with the results obtained by the commonly used correction according to the Bowen ratio (Twine et al., Agr. Forest Meteorol., 2000). We show that in general both correction methods could be applied to daytime fluxes and conditions with positive Bowen ratios. Finally the corrected turbulent fluxes are compared with different simulations of SVAT-type models for Tibetan grassland sites and a central European spruce forest site. The model performance with respect to the used data correction method is linked to the different mechanism of closing the energy balance within the model. Model validation requires energy balance closure correction in case the model relies on the energy balance equation. We conclude that mechanistic model development of turbulent flux parameterisations should recognize the recent hypotheses concerning the energy balance closure rather than fitting just to the uncorrected eddy-covariance data.

  20. A flux-gradient system for simultaneous measurement of the CH4, CO2, and H2O fluxes at a lake-air interface.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wei; Liu, Shoudong; Li, Hanchao; Xiao, Qitao; Wang, Wei; Hu, Zhenghua; Hu, Cheng; Gao, Yunqiu; Shen, Jing; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Mi; Lee, Xuhui

    2014-12-16

    Inland lakes play important roles in water and greenhouse gas cycling in the environment. This study aims to test the performance of a flux-gradient system for simultaneous measurement of the fluxes of water vapor, CO2, and CH4 at a lake-air interface. The concentration gradients over the water surface were measured with an analyzer based on the wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy technology, and the eddy diffusivity was measured with a sonic anemometer. Results of a zero-gradient test indicate a flux measurement precision of 4.8 W m(-2) for water vapor, 0.010 mg m(-2) s(-1) for CO2, and 0.029 ?g m(-2) s(-1) for CH4. During the 620 day measurement period, 97%, 69%, and 67% of H2O, CO2, and CH4 hourly fluxes were higher in magnitude than the measurement precision, which confirms that the flux-gradient system had adequate precision for the measurement of the lake-air exchanges. This study illustrates four strengths of the flux-gradient method: (1) the ability to simultaneously measure the flux of H2O, CO2, and CH4; (2) negligibly small density corrections; (3) the ability to resolve small CH4 gradient and flux; and (4) continuous and noninvasive operation. The annual mean CH4 flux (1.8 g CH4 m(-2) year(-1)) at this hypereutrophic lake was close to the median value for inland lakes in the world (1.6 g CH4 m(-2) year(-1)). The system has adequate precision for CH4 flux for broad applications but requires further improvement to resolve small CO2 flux in many lakes. PMID:25377990

  1. Comparison of two chamber methods and eddy covariance measurements for N2O for low flux conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutsch, Werner Leo; Brümmer, Christian; Lyshede, Bjarne; Fuß, Roland; Smith, Jeremy; Delorme, Jean-Pierre

    2013-04-01

    Chamber measurements of N2O based on flask sampling and subsequent GC analysis in the laboratory reveal high uncertainties in particular at low flux rates. We compared automated measurements with this method to chamber measurements with a Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL, type: CW-QC-TILDAS-76-CS, Aerodyne Research Inc., Billerica, MA, USA) installed in the field and to eddy covariance (EC) measurements with a similar QCL. The comparison was conducted over a grassland located at the research farm of the Thünen Institute, Braunschweig, Germany. The QCL increased the accuracy of the chamber measurements by about factor 10. Furthermore it was possible to reduce the time of chamber closure to less than 10 minutes, allowing a relatively high number of parallel chambers with hourly repetitions. At low emissions, EC measurements were highly uncertain due to relatively high noise. Implications for long-term measurements (e. g. in the framework of research infrastructures) are discussed.

  2. Flux measurements of CA II H and K emission. [from stellar chromospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, A. H.; Preston, G. W.; Wilson, O. C.

    1978-01-01

    A four-channel photon-counting spectrophotometer (designated HKP-2) is described which is designed for measuring stellar chromospheric calcium emission. The HKP-2 is calibrated, and its performance and accuracy evaluated, by observing 63 of Wilson's (1968) program stars on the same nights with both the HKP-2 and a coude scanner designated HKP-1. The results of the observations are discussed in terms of the calibration of mean H-K flux indices, variations in individual stellar fluxes, the flux ratio for H and K, and the instrument color index. It is shown that the HKP-2 provides satisfactory performance in the measurement of stellar chromospheric emission in a manner closely analogous to the method of Wilson and that a single observation yields a color index as well as flux indices for H and K that can be calibrated and transferred unambiguously to Wilson's system of measurement.

  3. Sounding rocket measurement of the absolute solar EUV flux utilizing a silicon photodiode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogawa, H. S.; Mcmullin, D.; Judge, D. L.; Canfield, L. R.

    1990-01-01

    A newly developed stable and high quantum efficiency silicon photodiode was used to obtain an accurate measurement of the integrated absolute magnitude of the solar extreme UV photon flux in the spectral region between 50 and 800 A. The adjusted daily 10.7-cm solar radio flux and sunspot number were 168.4 and 121, respectively. The unattenuated absolute value of the solar EUV flux at 1 AU in the specified wavelength region was 6.81 x 10 to the 10th photons/sq cm per s. Based on a nominal probable error of 7 percent for National Institute of Standards and Technology detector efficiency measurements in the 50- to 500-A region (5 percent on longer wavelength measurements between 500 and 1216 A), and based on experimental errors associated with the present rocket instrumentation and analysis, a conservative total error estimate of about 14 percent is assigned to the absolute integral solar flux obtained.

  4. Comparison of measured and modeled radiation, heat and water vapor fluxes: FIFE pilot study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blad, Blaine L.; Verma, Shashi B.; Hubbard, Kenneth G.; Starks, Patrick; Hays, Cynthia; Norman, John M.; Waltershea, Elizabeth

    1988-01-01

    The primary objectives of the 1985 study were to test the feasibility of using radio frequency receivers to collect data from automated weather stations and to evaluate the use of the data collected by the automated weather stations for modeling the fluxes of latent heat, sensible heat, and radiation over wheat. The model Cupid was used to calculate these fluxes which were compared with fluxes of these entities measured using micrometeorological techniques. The primary objectives of the 1986 study were to measure and model reflected and emitted radiation streams at a few locations within the First International Satellite Land-Surface Climatology Project Field Experiment (FIFE) site and to compare modeled and measured latent heat and sensible heat fluxes from the prairie vegetation.

  5. Measurement of the vertical cosmic muon flux in a region of large rigidity cutoff

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pham Ngoc Dinh; Nguyen Tien Dung; Bui Duc Hieu; Nguyen Phuc; Pham Trung Phuong; Pierre Darriulat; Dang Quang Thieu; Vo Van Thuan

    2002-01-01

    The vertical cosmic muon flux has been measured in Hanoi using a segmented scintillator hodoscope. It is the first measurement performed at VATLY, a cosmic ray laboratory recently created in Vietnam and installed in the premises of the Institute for Nuclear Sciences and Techniques. The measurement, performed at sea level in a region where the geomagnetic rigidity cutoff reaches 17 GV,

  6. Bioequivalence: Performance of Several Measures of Rate of Absorption

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frédéric Y. Bois; Thomas N. Tozer; Walter W. Hauck; Mei-Ling Chen; Rabindra Patnaik; Roger L. Williams

    1994-01-01

    The highest point of the plasma concentration-time profile, Cmax , is currently used by regulatory agencies to assess the rate of drug absorption after single dose administration of oral products. It is, however, quite insensitive, and a number of new measures of rate have been proposed. Using simulations, several approaches toward measuring rate were tested. A set of model scenarios

  7. Field intercomparison of four methane gas analyzers suitable for eddy covariance flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltola, O.; Mammarella, I.; Haapanala, S.; Burba, G.; Vesala, T.

    2013-06-01

    Performances of four methane gas analyzers suitable for eddy covariance measurements are assessed. The assessment and comparison was performed by analyzing eddy covariance data obtained during summer 2010 (1 April to 26 October) at a pristine fen, Siikaneva, Southern Finland. High methane fluxes with pronounced seasonality have been measured at this fen. The four participating methane gas analyzers are commercially available closed-path units TGA-100A (Campbell Scientific Inc., USA), RMT-200 (Los Gatos Research, USA), G1301-f (Picarro Inc., USA) and an early prototype open-path unit Prototype-7700 (LI-COR Biosciences, USA). The RMT-200 functioned most reliably throughout the measurement campaign, during low and high flux periods. Methane fluxes from RMT-200 and G1301-f had the smallest random errors and the fluxes agree remarkably well throughout the measurement campaign. Cospectra and power spectra calculated from RMT-200 and G1301-f data agree well with corresponding temperature spectra during a high flux period. None of the gas analyzers showed statistically significant diurnal variation for methane flux. Prototype-7700 functioned only for a short period of time, over one month, in the beginning of the measurement campaign during low flux period, and thus, its overall accuracy and season-long performance were not assessed. The open-path gas analyzer is a practical choice for measurement sites in remote locations due to its low power demand, whereas for G1301-f methane measurements interference from water vapor is straightforward to correct since the instrument measures both gases simultaneously. In any case, if only the performance in this intercomparison is considered, RMT-200 performed the best and is the recommended choice if a new fast response methane gas analyzer is needed.

  8. Measuring Change with the Rating Scale Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludlow, Larry H.; And Others

    The Rehabilitation Research and Development Laboratory at the United States Veterans Administration Hines Hospital is engaged in a long-term evaluation of blind rehabilitation. One aspect of the evaluation project focuses on the measurement of attitudes toward blindness. Our aim is to measure changes in attitudes toward blindness from…

  9. Measurement characteristics of the ultrasound heart rate monitor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Noguchi; H. Mamune; S. Sugimoto; J. Yoshida; H. Sasa; H. Kobayashi; M. Kobayashi

    1994-01-01

    It was reported that the measurement error of the fetal heart rate variability (FHRV), which was obtained by a ultrasound heart rate monitor with the Doppler signal, was large even if the auto-correlation technique was used. Nevertheless, fetal heart rate monitoring by the ultrasound heart rate monitor is necessary to determine the status of the fetus because an invasive test

  10. Wood Welded Connections: Energy Release Rate Measurement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Ganne-Chédeville; G. Duchanois; A. Pizzi; F. Pichelin; M. Properzi; J.-M. Leban

    2008-01-01

    The energy release rates of beech specimens bonded by linear friction welding were determined using double cantilever beam (DCB) tests. The analysis of the results was carried out with the experimental compliance method, which is based on the linear-elastic fracture mechanics. The compliance relation was approximated to a third-order polynomial equation for smoothing and followed by calculation of least squares.

  11. Measuring Rates of Sexual Development in Female

    E-print Network

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    , we have shown that age at vaginal introitus predicts adult patterns of reproductive, maternal the relationship in gerbils between age at vaginal patency and three other indices of rate of female sexual development: ovarian weight, occurrence of vaginal estrus, and onset of attractiveness to males. We found

  12. Gemini Range and Range Rate Measuring System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin G. Woolfson

    1963-01-01

    To complete the terminal phase of a space rendezvous mission, it is essential that accurate indications of target vehicle range and relative range rate be presented to the astronauts commanding the chaser vehicle. The indicator characteristics and the method of data presentation assume prime importance in compliance with the above. Therefore, a discussion is given of the logical development and

  13. Leak rate measurements for large vacuum chambers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    HE Nuss; I Streuff

    1995-01-01

    For large vacuum chambers of volume between 50 and 500 m3, which are required for space simulation and thermal vacuum testing of spacecraft systems and subsystems, a specific method for the determination of the vacuum chamber leak rate is described. The main characteristics of the facility including irradiation, thermal shroud, motion and vacuum subsystem are presented. The outgassing and desorption

  14. Measuring and modeling near surface reflected and emitted radiation fluxes at the FIFE site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blad, Blaine L.; Norman, John M.; Walter-Shea, Elizabeth; Starks, Patrick; Vining, Roel; Hays, Cynthia

    1988-01-01

    Research was conducted during the four Intensive Field Campaigns (IFC) of the FIFE project in 1987. The research was done on a tall grass prairie with specific measurement sites on and near the Konza Prairie in Kansas. Measurements were made to help meet the following objectives: determination of the variability in reflected and emitted radiation fluxes in selected spectral wavebands as a function of topography and vegetative community; development of techniques to account for slope and sun angle effects on the radiation fluxes; estimation of shortwave albedo and net radiation fluxes using the reflected and emitted spectral measurements described; estimation of leaf and canopy spectral properties from calculated normalized differences coupled with off-nadir measurements using inversion techniques; estimation of plant water status at several locations with indices utilizing plant temperature and other environmental parameters; and determination of relationships between estimated plant water status and measured soil water content. Results are discussed.

  15. ELF-magnetic flux densities measured in a city environment in summer and winter.

    PubMed

    Straume, Aksel; Johnsson, Anders; Oftedal, Gunnhild

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have indicated a connection between extremely low frequency magnetic flux densities above 0.4 microT (time weighted average) and childhood leukemia risks. This conclusion is based mainly on indoor exposure measurements. We therefore regarded it important to map outdoor magnetic flux densities in public areas in Trondheim, Norway. Because of seasonal power consumption variations, the fields were measured during both summer and winter. Magnetic flux density was mapped 1.0 m above the ground along 17 km of pavements in downtown Trondheim. The spectrum was measured at some spots and the magnetic flux density emanated mainly from the power frequency of 50 Hz. In summer less than 4% of the streets showed values exceeding 0.4 microT, increasing to 29% and 34% on cold and on snowy winter days, respectively. The average levels were 0.13 microT (summer), 0.85 microT (winter, cold), and 0.90 microT (winter, snow), with the highest recorded value of 37 microT. High spot measurements were usually encountered above underground transformer substations. In winter electric heating of pavements also gave rise to relatively high flux densities. There was no indication that the ICNIRP basic restriction was exceeded. It would be of interest to map the flux density situation in other cities and towns with a cold climate. PMID:17786926

  16. Heat and mass flux measurement from thermal infrared imagery: Example of the Soufrière Volcano (Guadeloupe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudin, D.; Beauducel, F.; Finizola, A.; Allemand, P.; Delacourt, C.; Richon, P.; Coutant, O.; de Chabalier, J.

    2012-12-01

    The estimation of mass and heat emissions is crucial for volcano monitoring. These fluxes may be diffuse or concentrated on precise zones of the volcano : gas fumaroles, thermal anomalies, hot springs. The total flux evolution is good indicator of the volcanic activity global behavior, while local flux at focused zones may help to characterize the hydrothermal system. However, large-scale surveys using classical methods are difficult to carry on, since field conditions may prevent permanent instrument installation. Thermal infrared pictures (7.5 - 14 ?m) can be used to map temperatures of surfaces and gases. In this study, we investigated relationships between temperature anomalies and heat flux, in order to evaluate the potential of thermal imagery for volcano monitoring. Two surveys have been achieved in 2010 and 2012 on la Soufrière Volcano (Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles), both by airborne and handled thermal cameras. We first calibrate the uncooled microbolometers cameras, then we correct images from atmospheric absorption according to sensor elevation and atmospheric humidity, pressure and temperature. To correct effects of surface reflexion, we estimate surface emissivity and incoming flux at surface. Finally, the absolute precision of measurements is 2 K while the relative sensitivity is about 0.2 K. In order to estimate the total heat flux, we map thermal anomalies on the volcano edifice by overlapping infrared airborne images on visible orthorectified images. Active zones are clearly identified at the top (actives and potential fumaroles) and on the slopes (former active fumaroles and hot springs). At the summit active fumaroles, we estimate the mass flux of gas by measuring the panache dilution into the atmosphere. Indeed, it is shown that temperature profile along the plume is a function of the wind velocity, distance and mass flux at the source vent. Measured fluxes of 30 m3/s for the South Crater and 5 m3/s for the Tarissan Pit are estimated, and compared to other methods results. At the Ty Fault thermal anomaly (low flux fumarolian zone), we conducted an experiment to estimate the heat flux from thermal gradient anomaly at surface. This implies the measurement of external parameters describing the atmosphere dynamics (surface roughness, wind velocity, rainfall, etc.). We validate our interpretative model of surface flux with in situ vertical temperature gradient measurements. The surface flux is integrated over all spatial areas to provide the total flux of the zone. Our measurements on La Soufrière Volcano show that the fluxes emitted in hot springs and in sub-fumarolian zones (1.5 MW for the Ty Fault zone) represents a few percents of the total budget of heat (50 MW). However, the evolution of the localization and of the power of different heat sources shows a clear evolution from 2010 to 2012, with an increase of the summit activity and a decrease of the peripheral sub-fumarolian heat flux. These observations are in good agreement with the seismic, tectonic and geochemical observations, showing a pressurization of the volcano since 1997. Finally, thermal infrared imaging enables a precise mapping of mass and heat fluxes. It has a great potential in volcano monitoring, because of its ease of use, and the large variety of measurements which can be achieved from a single image.

  17. Analysis of actinic flux profiles measured from an ozone sonde balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Allaart, M.; Knap, W. H.; Stammes, P.

    2014-12-01

    A green light sensor has been developed at KNMI to measure actinic flux profiles using an ozone sonde balloon. In total, 63 launches with ascending and descending profiles were performed between 2006 and 2010. The measured uncalibrated actinic flux profiles are analyzed using the Doubling Adding KNMI (DAK) radiative transfer model. Values of the cloud optical thickness (COT) along the flight track were taken from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) Cloud Physical Properties (CPP) product. The impact of clouds on the actinic flux profile is evaluated on the basis of the cloud modification factor (CMF) at the cloud top and cloud base, which is the ratio between the actinic fluxes for cloudy and clear-sky scenes. The impact of clouds on the actinic flux is clearly detected: the largest enhancement occurs at the cloud top due to multiple scattering. The actinic flux decreases almost linearly from cloud top to cloud base. Above the cloud top the actinic flux also increases compared to clear-sky scenes. We find that clouds can increase the actinic flux to 2.3 times of the clear-sky value at cloud top and decrease it to about 0.05 at cloud base. The relationship between CMF and COT agrees well with DAK simulations, except for a few outliers. Good agreement is found between the DAK simulated actinic flux profiles and the observations for single layer clouds in fully overcast scenes. The instrument is suitable for operational balloon measurements because of its simplicity and low cost. It is worth to further develop the instrument and launch it together with atmospheric chemistry composition sensors.

  18. Can CO2 Turbulent Flux Be Measured by Lidar? A Preliminary Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Fabien; Koch, Grady; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Hilton, Timothy W.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Andrews, Arlyn; Flamant, Pierre H.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2011-01-01

    The vertical profiling ofCO2 turbulent fluxes in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is investigated using a coherent differential absorption lidar (CDIAL) operated nearby a tall tower in Wisconsin during June 2007. A CDIAL can perform simultaneous range-resolved CO2 DIAL and velocity measurements. The lidar eddy covariance technique is presented. The aims of the study are (i) an assessment of performance and current limitation of available CDIAL for CO2 turbulent fluxes and (ii) the derivation of instrument specifications to build a future CDIAL to perform accurate range-resolved CO2 fluxes. Experimental lidar CO2 mixing ratio and vertical velocity profiles are successfully compared with in situ sensors measurements. Time and space integral scales of turbulence in the ABL are addressed that result in limitation for time averaging and range accumulation. A first attempt to infer CO2 fluxes using an eddy covariance technique with currently available 2-mm CDIAL dataset is reported.

  19. Improved Eddy Flux Measurements by Open-Path Gas Analyzer and Sonic Anemometer Co-Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoev, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    A novel instrument design combines the sensing paths of an open-path gas analyzer and a 3-D sonic anemometer and integrates the sensors in a single aerodynamic body. Common electronics provide fast-response, synchronized measurements of wind vector, sonic temperature, CO2 and H2O densities, and atmospheric pressure. An instantaneous CO2 mixing ratio, relative to dry air, is computed in real time. The synergy of combined sensors offers an alternative to the traditional density-based flux calculation method historically used for standalone open-path analyzers. A simple method is described for a direct, in-situ, mixing-ratio-based flux calculation. The method consists of: (i) correcting sonically derived air temperature for humidity effects using instantaneous water vapor density and atmospheric pressure measurements, (ii) computing water vapor pressure based on water-vapor density and humidity-corrected sonic temperature, (iii) computing fast-response CO2 mixing ratio based on CO2 density, sonic temperature, water vapor, and atmospheric pressures, and (iv) computing CO2 flux from the covariance of the vertical wind speed and the CO2 mixing ratio. Since CO2 mixing ratio is a conserved quantity, the proposed method simplifies the calculations and eliminates the need for corrections in post-processing by accounting for temperature, water-vapor, and pressure-fluctuation effects on the CO2 density. A field experiment was conducted using the integrated sensor to verify performance of the mixing-ratio method and to quantify the differences with density-derived CO2 flux corrected for sensible and latent-heat fluxes. The pressure term of the density corrections was also included in the comparison. Results suggest that the integrated sensor with co-located sonic and gas sensing paths and the mixing-ratio-based method minimize or eliminate the following uncertainties in the measured CO2 flux: (i) correcting for frequency-response losses due to spatial separation of measured quantities, (ii) correcting sonically-derived, sensible-heat flux for humidity, (iii) correcting latent-heat flux for sensible-heat flux and water-vapor self-dilution, (iv) correcting CO2 flux for sensible- and latent-heat fluxes, (v) correcting CO2 flux for pressure-induced density fluctuations.

  20. Pool size measurements facilitate the determination of fluxes at branching points in non-stationary metabolic flux analysis: the case of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Heise, Robert; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Stitt, Mark; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Pool size measurements are important for the estimation of absolute intracellular fluxes in particular scenarios based on data from heavy carbon isotope experiments. Recently, steady-state fluxes estimates were obtained for central carbon metabolism in an intact illuminated rosette of Arabidopsis thaliana grown photoautotrophically (Szecowka et al., 2013; Heise et al., 2014). Fluxes were estimated therein by integrating mass-spectrometric data of the dynamics of the unlabeled metabolic fraction, data on metabolic pool sizes, partitioning of metabolic pools between cellular compartments and estimates of photosynthetically inactive pools, with a simplified model of plant central carbon metabolism. However, the fluxes were determined by treating the pool sizes as fixed parameters. Here we investigated whether and, if so, to what extent the treatment of pool sizes as parameters to be optimized in three scenarios may affect the flux estimates. The results are discussed in terms of benchmark values for canonical pathways and reactions, including starch and sucrose synthesis as well as the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation and oxygenation reactions. In addition, we discuss pathways emerging from a divergent branch point for which pool sizes are required for flux estimation, irrespective of the computational approach used for the simulation of the observable labeling pattern. Therefore, our findings indicate the necessity for development of techniques for accurate pool size measurements to improve the quality of flux estimates from non-stationary flux estimates in intact plant cells in the absence of alternative flux measurements.

  1. Pool size measurements facilitate the determination of fluxes at branching points in non-stationary metabolic flux analysis: the case of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Heise, Robert; Fernie, Alisdair R; Stitt, Mark; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Pool size measurements are important for the estimation of absolute intracellular fluxes in particular scenarios based on data from heavy carbon isotope experiments. Recently, steady-state fluxes estimates were obtained for central carbon metabolism in an intact illuminated rosette of Arabidopsis thaliana grown photoautotrophically (Szecowka et al., 2013; Heise et al., 2014). Fluxes were estimated therein by integrating mass-spectrometric data of the dynamics of the unlabeled metabolic fraction, data on metabolic pool sizes, partitioning of metabolic pools between cellular compartments and estimates of photosynthetically inactive pools, with a simplified model of plant central carbon metabolism. However, the fluxes were determined by treating the pool sizes as fixed parameters. Here we investigated whether and, if so, to what extent the treatment of pool sizes as parameters to be optimized in three scenarios may affect the flux estimates. The results are discussed in terms of benchmark values for canonical pathways and reactions, including starch and sucrose synthesis as well as the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation and oxygenation reactions. In addition, we discuss pathways emerging from a divergent branch point for which pool sizes are required for flux estimation, irrespective of the computational approach used for the simulation of the observable labeling pattern. Therefore, our findings indicate the necessity for development of techniques for accurate pool size measurements to improve the quality of flux estimates from non-stationary flux estimates in intact plant cells in the absence of alternative flux measurements. PMID:26082786

  2. Solar flare neutron fluxes derived from interplanetary charged particle measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Evenson; R. Kroeger; P. Meyer; D. Muller

    1983-01-01

    The first observation of interplanetary protons produced by the decay of solar neutrons made by Evenson et al. (1983) after a solar flare which occurred on June 3, 1982, is expanded, extending the measurement of the spectrum of the decay protons to higher energy. The spectrum of the decay protons for the June 21, 1980, neutron event observed by Chupp

  3. Lidar Based Particulate Flux Measurements of Agricultural Field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-wavelength portable scanning lidar system was developed to derive information on particulate spatial aerosol distribution over remote distances. The lidar system and retrieval approach has been tested during several field campaigns measuring agricultural emissions from a swine feeding operat...

  4. Combining meteorology, eddy fluxes, isotope measurements, and modeling to understand

    E-print Network

    Ehleringer, Jim

    * *Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA, wDepartment of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA, USA, zLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Earth Sciences Division factors (i.e. vapor pressure deficit) and simulated dR as measured in ecosystem surveys of dR. Therefore

  5. A Local Heat Flux Measurement Technique for Inclined Heat Exchanger Tubes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Wu; K. Vierow

    2006-01-01

    This article presents the design, fabrication, and calibration of thermocouple pairs for local heat flux measurement. The intended application of the thermocouple pairs is on the tubes of phase-change heat exchangers experiencing heat fluxes on the order of 10 W\\/m. Particular advantages of this technique are that it is accurate even for thin-wall tubes, there are no restrictions on the

  6. Spatially explicit regionalization of airborne flux measurements using environmental response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Junkermann, W.; Mauder, M.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Trancón y Widemann, B.; Neidl, F.; Schäfer, K.; Wieneke, S.; Zheng, X. H.; Schmid, H. P.; Foken, T.

    2013-04-01

    The goal of this study is to characterize the sensible (H) and latent (LE) heat exchange for different land covers in the heterogeneous steppe landscape of the Xilin River catchment, Inner Mongolia, China. Eddy-covariance flux measurements at 50-100 m above ground were conducted in July 2009 using a weight-shift microlight aircraft. Wavelet decomposition of the turbulence data enables a spatial discretization of 90 m of the flux measurements. For a total of 8446 flux observations during 12 flights, MODIS land surface temperature (LST) and enhanced vegetation index (EVI) in each flux footprint are determined. Boosted regression trees are then used to infer an environmental response function (ERF) between all flux observations (H, LE) and biophysical (LST, EVI) and meteorological drivers. Numerical tests show that ERF predictions covering the entire Xilin River catchment (?3670 km2) are accurate to ?18% (1 ?). The predictions are then summarized for each land cover type, providing individual estimates of source strength (36 W m-2 < H < 364 W m-2, 46 W m-2 < LE < 425 W m-2) and spatial variability (11 W m-2 < ?H < 169 W m-2, 14 W m-2 < ?LE < 152 W m-2) to a precision of ?5%. Lastly, ERF predictions of land cover specific Bowen ratios are compared between subsequent flights at different locations in the Xilin River catchment. Agreement of the land cover specific Bowen ratios to within 12 ± 9% emphasizes the robustness of the presented approach. This study indicates the potential of ERFs for (i) extending airborne flux measurements to the catchment scale, (ii) assessing the spatial representativeness of long-term tower flux measurements, and (iii) designing, constraining and evaluating flux algorithms for remote sensing and numerical modelling applications.

  7. Spatial resolution and regionalization of airborne flux measurements using environmental response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Junkermann, W.; Mauder, M.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Trancón y Widemann, B.; Neidl, F.; Schäfer, K.; Wieneke, S.; Zheng, X. H.; Schmid, H. P.; Foken, T.

    2012-11-01

    The goal of this study is to characterize the sensible (H) and latent (LE) heat exchange for different land covers in the heterogeneous steppe landscape of the Xilin River Catchment, Inner Mongolia, China. Eddy-covariance flux measurements at 50-100 m above ground were conducted in July 2009 using a weight-shift microlight aircraft. Wavelet decomposition of the turbulence data enables a spatial discretization of 90 m of the flux measurements. For a total of 8446 flux observations during 12 flights, MODIS land surface temperature (LST) and enhanced vegetation index (EVI) in each flux footprint are determined. Boosted regression trees are then used to infer an environmental response function (ERF) between all flux observations (H, LE) and biophysical- (LST, EVI) and meteorological drivers. Numerical tests show that ERF predictions covering the entire Xilin River Catchment (? 3670 km2) are accurate to ? 18%. The predictions are then summarized for each land cover type, providing individual estimates of source strength (36 W m-2 < H < 364 W m-2, 46 W m-2 < LE < 425 W m-2) and spatial variability (11 W m-2 < ?H < 169 W m-2, 14 W m-2 < ?LE < 152 W m-2) to a precision of ? 5%. Lastly, ERF predictions of land cover specific Bowen ratios are compared between subsequent flights at different locations in the Xilin River Catchment. Agreement of the land cover specific Bowen ratios to within 12 ± 9% emphasizes the robustness of the presented approach. This study indicates the potential of ERFs for (i) extending airborne flux measurements to the catchment scale, (ii) assessing the spatial representativeness of long-term tower flux measurements, and (iii) designing, constraining and evaluating flux algorithms for remote sensing and numerical modelling applications.

  8. Automated gas chromatographic analysis system for micrometeorological measurements of trace gas fluxes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. M. Arah; I. J. Crichton; K. A. Smith; H. Clayton; U. Skiba

    1994-01-01

    High-resolution analytical techniques are required for micrometeorological measurement of trace gas fluxes. By adding to a standard gas chromatograph (GC), a programmable autoinjector built in the laboratory at a total material cost of about $8k, we were able to attain the precision necessary to detect N2O and CH4 fluxes of the order of 2 nmol\\/sq m\\/s. Ten to fifteen repeated

  9. Measuring impatience: Elicited discount rates and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kendra N. McLeish; Robert J. Oxoby

    2007-01-01

    We explore the extent to which elicited discount rates and self-reported impulsivity measure the same behavioral characteristic. We elicit discount rates using monetary rewards and a self-reported measure of impulsiveness (the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, BIS-11). Although researchers have utilized these measures to infer aspects of intertemporal preferences, we find no significant correlation between discount rates and the BIS-11 except when

  10. Field intercomparison of four methane gas analysers suitable for eddy covariance flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltola, O.; Mammarella, I.; Haapanala, S.; Burba, G.; Vesala, T.

    2012-12-01

    Performances of four methane gas analyzers suitable for eddy covariance measurements are assessed. The assessment and comparison was performed by analyzing eddy covariance data obtained during summer 2010 (1 April to 26 October) at a pristine fen, Siikaneva, Southern Finland. High methane fluxes with pronounced seasonality have been measured at this fen. The four participating methane gas analyzers are commercially available closed-path units TGA-100A (Campbell Scientific Inc., USA), RMT-200 (Los Gatos Research, USA), G1301-f (Picarro Inc., USA) and an early prototype open-path unit Prototype-7700 (LI-COR Biosciences, USA). The RMT-200 functioned most reliably throughout the measurement campaign, during low and high flux periods. Methane fluxes from RMT-200 and G1301-f had the smallest random errors and the fluxes agree remarkably well throughout the measurement campaign. Cospectra and power spectra calculated from RMT-200 and G1301-f data agree well with corresponding temperature spectra during a high flux period. None of the gas analysers showed statistically significant diurnal variation for methane flux. Prototype-7700 functioned only for a short period of time, over one month, in the beginning of the measurement campaign during low flux period, and thus, its overall accuracy and long-term performance were not assessed. Prototype-7700 is a practical choice for measurement sites in remote locations due to its low power demand, however if only the performance in this intercomparison is considered, RMT-200 performed the best and is the recommended choice if a new fast response methane gas analyser is needed.

  11. Flux Creep Measurements in BISMUTH(2) STRONTIUM(2) Calcium Copper OXYGEN(8) Granular Superconductors Using AN Electron Spin Resonance Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pencarinha, Michael Thomas

    We report the first measurements of flux creep in a high-temperature superconductor using electron spin resonance (ESR). Flux creep and susceptibility in a Bi _2Sr_2CaCu _2O_8 polycrystalline sample were measured using an ESR probing technique. The sample was decorated with two tiny free radical probes, the signals of which superimposed at an applied field B _{r} for T > T_{c}. For T < T_{c} the signals split: one shifted up-field relative to B_{r} and occurred in an applied field B_{a1} > B_{ r}. The other shifted down-field and occurred in an applied field B_{ a2} < B_ {r}. The susceptibility was shown to be given by B_{a1 }/B_{a2} - 1 for all ellipsoidal samples. As flux crept into or out of the sample, the shifts of the probe signals changed accordingly. By monitoring the shift of the probe signals as a function of temperature after the sample was zero-field cooled and then subjected to an applied field of 330 mT the susceptibility, {bfchi}, was found to be described by two linear equations: eqalignno {chi &~-0.015(1 - 0.026T) for 18 K<= T<= 31 K cr noalign{hbox{and}} chi &~-0.005(1 + 0.11T) for 31 K<= T<=90 K.cr }The abrupt change in the susceptibility at 31 K is attributed to the onset of significant intergranular current. By monitoring the shift of one of the signals in time, the time dependence of the flux creep was revealed. The normalized logarithmic creep rate, s, which is dimensionless, peaked at a value of 0.077 at 21 K. The Bean model and the Anderson flux creep theory were used to describe the temperature dependence of the probe shifts, but this approach failed to describe the temperature dependence of the creep rate. The zero-kelvin intergranular critical current density, estimated from the Bean model and shift data, was 3.2 times 10^3 A/cm^2 for T <= 31 K. The pinning potential was approximately constant (0.08 eV) between 18 K and 36 K. The flux creep rates and the value for the pinning potential agree with results obtained by others using SQUID magnetometers and other conventional measuring techniques.

  12. Measurement uncertainties in quantifying aeolian mass flux: evidence from wind tunnel and field site data.

    PubMed

    Poortinga, Ate; Keijsers, Joep G S; Maroulis, Jerry; Visser, Saskia M

    2014-01-01

    Aeolian sediment traps are widely used to estimate the total volume of wind-driven sediment transport, but also to study the vertical mass distribution of a saltating sand cloud. The reliability of sediment flux estimations from such measurements are dependent upon the specific configuration of the measurement compartments and the analysis approach used. In this study, we analyse the uncertainty of these measurements by investigating the vertical cumulative distribution and relative sediment flux derived from both wind tunnel and field studies. Vertical flux data was examined using existing data in combination with a newly acquired dataset; comprising meteorological data and sediment fluxes from six different events, using three customized catchers at Ameland beaches in northern Netherlands. Fast-temporal data collected in a wind tunnel shows that the median transport height has a scattered pattern between impact and fluid threshold, that increases linearly with shear velocities above the fluid threshold. For finer sediment, a larger proportion was transported closer to the surface compared to coarser sediment fractions. It was also shown that errors originating from the distribution of sampling compartments, specifically the location of the lowest sediment trap relative to the surface, can be identified using the relative sediment flux. In the field, surface conditions such as surface moisture, surface crusts or frozen surfaces have a more pronounced but localized effect than shear velocity. Uncertainty in aeolian mass flux estimates can be reduced by placing multiple compartments in closer proximity to the surface. PMID:25071984

  13. Wind Tunnel Measurement of Turbulent and Advective Scalar Fluxes: A Case Study on Intersection Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Kuka?ka, Libor; Nosek, Št?pán; Kellnerová, Radka; Jur?áková, Klára; Ja?our, Zbyn?k

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine processes of pollution ventilation in the X-shaped street intersection in an idealized symmetric urban area for the changing approach flow direction. A unique experimental setup for simultaneous wind tunnel measurement of the flow velocity and the tracer gas concentration in a high temporal resolution is assembled. Advective horizontal and vertical scalar fluxes are computed from averaged measured velocity and concentration data within the street intersection. Vertical advective and turbulent scalar fluxes are computed from synchronized velocity and concentration signals measured in the plane above the intersection. All the results are obtained for five approach flow directions. The influence of the approach flow on the advective and turbulent fluxes is determined. The contribution of the advective and turbulent flux to the ventilation is discussed. Wind direction with the best dispersive conditions in the area is found. The quadrant analysis is applied to the synchronized signals of velocity and concentration fluctuation to determine events with the dominant contribution to the momentum flux and turbulent scalar flux. PMID:22649290

  14. Measurement of KL0 flux at the J-PARC neutral-kaon beam line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiomi, K.; Baek, K. Y.; Comfort, J.; Iwai, E.; Kawasaki, N.; Ko, J. W.; Komatsubara, T. K.; Lee, J. W.; Lim, G. Y.; Maeda, Y.; Masuda, T.; Naito, D.; Nakaya, Y.; Nanjo, H.; Nomura, T.; Sasaki, M.; Sasao, N.; Sato, K.; Shimogawa, T.; Sugiyama, Y.; Tajima, Y.; Takahashi, G.; Togawa, M.; Watanabe, H.; Yamanaka, T.; Yanagida, Y.; Yoshida, H. Y.

    2012-02-01

    We describe the KL0 flux measurements performed at the J-PARC neutral-kaon beam line. This beam line was constructed for an experiment aiming to observe the CP-violating rare decay KL0??0??¯. The primary proton energy was 30 GeV and the KL0 production angle was 16°. Prior to the physics run, the KL0 flux and spectrum were measured by counting KL0??+?-?0 decays with a simple setup, which was composed of an electromagnetic calorimeter and a hodoscope system. Results from these measurements are presented and compared with various hadron-interaction simulations.

  15. A novel method for measurement of crystal growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do Yeon; Yang, Dae Ryook

    2013-06-01

    A new method for measurement of crystal growth rate is proposed, in an attempt to make the measuring of growth rate more convenient than the existing methods. In this newly proposed method, the point of nucleation under a constant cooling rate condition was measured as changing the amount of seeds. The growth kinetics parameters were then estimated using the experimental data to match the points of nucleation. Experiments were performed with potash alum in the water system and growth kinetic parameters were estimated. Compared with existing results, the proposed method showed tolerable discrepancy in the growth kinetic parameters. The proposed method can be an alternative technique for measurement of growth rate.

  16. Standardization of flux chamber and wind tunnel flux measurements for quantifying volatile organic compound and ammonia emissions from area sources at animal feeding operations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variety of wind tunnels and flux chambers have been used to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and ammonia (NH3) at animal feeding operations (AFO). However, there has been little regard to the extreme variation and potential inaccuracies caused by inappropriate air velocity or sw...

  17. Validation of the doubly labeled water method under low and high humidity to estimate metabolic rate and water flux

    E-print Network

    Williams, Jos. B.

    Validation of the doubly labeled water method under low and high humidity to estimate metabolic and high humidity to estimate metabolic rate and water flux in a tropical snake (Boiga irregularis). J Appl uses in- direct calorimetry to assess the effects of humidity on the accuracy of the doubly labeled

  18. RADON FLUX MONITOR FOR IN SITU MEASUREMENT OF GRANITE AND CONCRETE SURFACES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fredrick Stieff; Daniel J. Steck

    Recent interest in radon (222Rn) emanation from building materials like granite and concrete has sparked the development of a measurement device that is suitable for field or home measurements. Based on test with discrete component flux monitors, a large volume (960 ml) hemispherical electret ion chamber (EIC) was modified to integrate the accumulator and detector, into a single device. The

  19. Methodology for direct field measurements of ozone flux to foliage with shoot chambers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nuria Altimir; Timo Vesala; Petri Keronen; Markku Kulmala; Pertti Hari

    2002-01-01

    Values of ozone (O3) flux measured on the shoot scale by enclosure techniques can provide detailed information about the partition and seasonality of the removal pathways on the foliage. However, O3 reactivity makes such measurements potentially inaccurate, particularly in field conditions where ambient concentration is low. Special consideration should be given to the losses on the chamber wall material, which

  20. Potential and Limitations of an Electrical Low Pressure Impactor in Disjunct Eddy Covariance Aerosol Flux Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, A.; Niessner, R.; Bosveld, F.; Klemm, O.

    2006-12-01

    A micrometeorological application of an electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI) is proposed for the measurement of size-resolved particle fluxes between the surface and the atmosphere. This extends flux measurement capabilities to cover submicron particles in several size classes simultaneously. The disjunct eddy covariance system combines a sonic anemometer, an ELPI and a valve-controlled particle sampling unit. Depending on the valve setting, ambient air or filtered particle-free air is sampled and introduced into the impactor. For disjunct eddy covariance measurements, ambient air is sampled only during a very short sampling interval (~ 0.1 s) in measurement intervals of several seconds. The integrated ELPI signal is representative for the particle size distribution during the short sampling interval. This information may be correlated with fast measurements of the vertical wind speed to obtain turbulent fluxes of submicron particles simultaneously in several size classes. A prototype system has been tested in lab and field experiments in order to evaluate the technical limitations of this approach. Tests show that different valve switch cycles do not affect the concentration measurements. However, longitudinal diffusion processes within the sampling lines lead to signal dilatation. In addition, reliable measurements require a minimum number of charged particles impacting on each stage. This leads to the exclusion of some size bins in typical field applications. Nevertheless, the system showed its potential for size-resolved flux measurements under favorable conditions. Travel support by the ACCENT Access to Infrastructures program is gratefully acknowledged.

  1. Measurement and modeling of atmospheric flux of ammonia from dairy milking cow housing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian Rumburg; George H. Mount; Jenny Filipy; Brian Lamb; Hal Westberg; David Yonge; Ron Kincaid; Kristen Johnson

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric ammonia (NH3) measurements are needed to better understand the impacts of NH3 emissions on aerosol formation and concentrations and anthropogenic changes to the N cycle. This paper describes concentration measurements of NH3 using differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), tracer ratio flux experiments, and development of a NH3 emissions model from a dairy milking cow free stall house with concrete

  2. Ammonia fluxes for beech forest in the leaf fall transition period - measurements and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, K.; Sørensen, L.; Hertel, O.; Geels, C.; Skjøth, C. A.; Jensen, B.; Boegh, E.

    2012-12-01

    Deposition of atmospheric reactive nitrogen represents uncertainties for the prediction of future greenhouse gas exchange between land surfaces and the atmosphere. This is because the mechanisms describing nutritional effects are not well developed in climate and ecosystems models. Improving the understanding of biochemical feed-back mechanisms in the climate system and quantifying the magnitude of the NH3 flux in the biosphere-atmosphere system is therefore essential. In particular, more knowledge of the bi-directional ammonia (NH3) exchange between natural ecosystems and the atmosphere is needed. We investigated the NH3 exchange for deciduous forests in relation to leaf fall by studying the atmospheric NH3 fluxes throughout a 25 days period during autumn 2010 (21 October - 14 November) for the Danish beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest, Lille Bøgeskov. Vegetation status was observed using plant area index (PAI) and leaf area index (LAI). The atmospheric NH3 fluxes were measured using the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method and compared to NH3 denuder measurements. Model calculations were obtained using the Danish Ammonia MOdelling System (DAMOS). We found that 57.7% of the fluxes measured showed emission and 19.5% deposition. The mean NH3 flux was 0.087±0.19 ?g NH3-N m-2 s-1. Measurements indicate a clear tendency of the flux going from negative (deposition) to positive (emission) fluxes of up to 0.96±0.40 ?g NH3-N m-2 s-1 throughout the measurement period. In the leaf fall period (23 October - 8 November) the measured atmospheric NH3 concentration was increasing in relation to the increasing forest NH3 flux. The mean NH3 concentration was well simulated in DAMOS before leaf fall, but was underestimated following leaf fall. The results indicate that there is a missing contribution to atmospheric NH3 concentration from vegetative surfaces related to leaf fall of a relatively large magnitude in the model. This points to the need for representing forest leaf fall and associated NH3 emissions in chemical transport models when the focus is N-deposition to forest ecosystems. Despite the large uncertainties associated with the results obtained in this study due to the assessment techniques as well as the limited dataset, the results must be considered as a good start for a better understanding of the processes related to natural emissions of NH3 and for quantifying the NH3 emission flux and the total biosphere-atmosphere net flux.

  3. Development of a benthic-flux chamber for measurement of ground-water seepage and water sampling for mercury analysis at the sediment-water interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Menheer, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    A benthic-flux chamber was constructed to collect data to determine the relation between ground- and surface-water interaction and mercury concentrations in water at the sediment- water interface. The benthic-flux chamber was successfully used to measure the rate of ground water seeping to surface water or surface water seeping to ground water, and to collect water samples for mercury analysis from the sedimentwater interface in a lake setting. The benthic-flux chamber was designed to be deployed in relatively calm fresh water lakes, in areas of water less than 2 meters deep. The groundwater seepage rate data were comparable to data from an in-line flow meter in a calibration tank and with data from two 55-gallon drum seepage meters concurrently deployed in two different lakes. The benthic-flux chamber was used to collect possible water samples for analysis of total mercury and methylmercury concentrations.

  4. Measurement of seedling growth rate by machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, M. Scott; Stanwood, Phillip C.

    1993-05-01

    Seed vigor and germination tests have traditionally been used to determine deterioration of seed samples. Vigor tests describe the seed potential to emerge and produce a mature crop under certain field conditions and one measure is seedling growth rate. A machine vision system was developed to measure root growth rate over the entire germination period. The machine vision measurement technique was compared to the manual growth rate technique. The vision system provided similar growth rate measurements as compared to the manual growth rate technique. The average error between the system and a manual measurement was -0.13 for the lettuce test and -0.07 for the sorghum test. This technique also provided an accurate representation of the growth rate as well as percent germination.

  5. Measuring Transpiration to Regulate Winter Irrigation Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelson, Lisa [Auburn University] [Auburn University

    2006-11-08

    Periodic transpiration (monthly sums) in a young loblolly pine plantation between ages 3 and 6 was measured using thermal dissipation probes. Fertilization and fertilization with irrigation were better than irrigation alone in increasing transpiration of young loblolly pines during winter months, apparently because of increased leaf area in fertilized trees. Irrigation alone did not significantly increase transpiration compared with the non-fertilized and non-irrigated control plots.

  6. Heart Rate Variability: Measures and Models

    E-print Network

    Malvin C. Teich; Steven B. Lowen; Bradley M. Jost; Karin Vibe-Rheymer; Conor Heneghan

    2000-08-07

    We focus on various measures of the fluctuations of the sequence of intervals between beats of the human heart, and how such fluctuations can be used to assess the presence or likelihood of cardiovascular disease. We examine sixteen such measures and their suitability for correctly classifying heartbeat records of various lengths as normal or revealing the presence of cardiac dysfunction, particularly congestive heart failure. Using receiver-operating-characteristic analysis we demonstrate that scale-dependent measures prove substantially superior to scale-independent ones. The wavelet-transform standard deviation at a scale near 32 heartbeat intervals, and its spectral counterpart near 1/32 cycles/interval, turn out to provide reliable results using heartbeat records just minutes long. We further establish for all subjects that the human heartbeat has an underlying stochastic origin rather than arising from a chaotic attractor. Finally, we develop a mathematical point process that emulates the human heartbeat time series for both normal subjects and heart-failure patients.

  7. Carbon and nitrogen metabolism by Monochrysis lutheri: Measurement of growth-rate-dependent respiration rates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Laws; J. Caperon

    1976-01-01

    Dark respiration rates were measured and carbon-excretion rates calculated for a nitrate-limited population of the marine chrysophyte Monochrysis lutheri grown in continuous culture at 20°C on a 12 h light-12 h dark cycle of illumination and over a series of 4 growth rates. A significant (Pr=0.994) with growth rate, and at a given growth rate were consistently higher than nitrogen

  8. Partitioning modes and rates of sediment flux derived from terrace-channel coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higson, J. L.; Singer, M. B.

    2012-12-01

    Sediment supply to channels from failed banks/terraces is a geomorphic problem that has received scant treatment in the literature, especially with respect to the partitioning of such laterally eroded sediment into bedload v. suspended load and the resultant channel grain size distribution. Such coupling between terraces/banks and channels is an important component for understanding the exhaustion of the legacy sediments in disturbed watersheds, especially where terraces are contaminated by past mining activities. More than 4x106 kg of mercury (Hg) was lost during the 19th Century hydraulic mining process in the Sierra Nevada foothills of California and documented levels of total Hg concentration in legacy terraces all along the Yuba River are up to 3 orders of magnitude higher than background values. Thus, the ongoing erosion of legacy terraces from the mining period poses important risks to sensitive and ecologically productive lowlands downstream. The problem of bank/terrace erosion in river corridors is generally treated either using a channel centerline (toe cutting) approach or by infinite slope stability at a cross section, but the interaction of failed sediment with the channel is an important and missing component for fully assessing downstream risks of failing contaminated terraces. We have developed a new physically based model that can be used to quantify the extent and caliber of episodic erosion of legacy terrace sediments. The model combines analysis of bank/terrace failure in response to variable fluvial hydrology with a representation of local cross section evolution of grain size distribution and sediment routing. Terrace stability is calculated through an infinite slope stability model, driven by a Dupuit-Forchheimer groundwater model to assess soil moisture contributing to failure. The grain size distribution (GSD) in the channel bed is evolved based on calculation of sediment transport, which also yields net flux of fine material that is known to harbor the Hg. We present results from an analysis of this model at one cross section with very high Hg contamination in the bounding terrace, where suitable hydrology, geometry, and grain size data were available. We modeled three separate years of observed hydrology on the Yuba, (1986, 1997 and 2006), each of which contains one of the largest floods of the last several decades. We assess under what conditions the terraces fail and identify their contribution to fine sediment/contaminant loads. We also provide a sensitivity analysis to initial terrace/channel GSD, porosity, permeability and antecedent moisture in the bank/terrace. We find that the largest first-order variable is antecedent moisture, particularly visible in the 1986 hydrograph containing two flood events. This double peak creates a lag in the response of ground water levels to the fluctuation of the river stage. Our coupled model allows for analysis of: the relative contribution of riverine sediment flux sourced from failed terraces; the existence of thresholds of failure; the importance of hydrograph shape; and the influence of bank/terrace failure on sediment flux rates and grain size distributions.

  9. DIRECTIONAL FLUX DENSITIES AND MIRROR-POINT DISTRIBUTIONS OF TRAPPED PARTICLES FROM SATELLITE 1958\\/epsilon\\/ MEASUREMENTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. A. Lundquist; R. J. Naumann; A. H. Weber

    1962-01-01

    Satellite 1958 epsilon (Explorer 4) contained a directional plastic ; scintillation counter, prepared by Van allen and associates, mounted with its ; axis perpendicular to the long symmetry axis of the satellite. Count-rate data ; from this detector have been analyzed to yield directional flux densities ; (particles per centimeter² second steradian) of geomagnetically trapped ; charged particles as a

  10. Natural Gas Seepage Along the Edge of the Aquitaine Shelf (France): Origin and Flux Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffine, L.; Donval, J. P.; Battani, A.; Bignon, L.; Croguennec, C.; Caprais, J. C.; Birot, D.; Bayon, G.; Lantéri, N.; Levaché, D.; Dupré, S.

    2014-12-01

    A newly discovered and highly active seepage area has been acoustically mapped at the western edge of the Aquitaine Shelf in the Bay of Biscay [Dupré et al., 2014]. Three selected seeping sites have been investigated with a Remotely Operated Vehicle. All sites were characterized by vigorous gas emissions, and the occurrence of massive carbonate crusts and bacterial mats at the seafloor. Nine seeps have been sampled with the PEGAZ sampler. The latter allowed gas-bubble sampling and preservation at in situpressure, together with gas-flux measurement through its graduated transparent cone. The C2+ fraction of the gas samples accounts for less than 0.06 %-mol of the total composition. Both the abundance of methane and dD and d13C isotopic analyses of the hydrocarbons indicate a biogenic source generated by microbial reduction of carbon dioxide [Whiticar et al., 1986]. The analyses of the associated noble gases also provide further support for a shallow-depth generation. While sharing the same origin, the collected samples are different in other respects, such as the measured d13C values for carbon dioxide and the hydrocarbons. This is the case in particular for methane, with displays values in between -66.1 and -72.7 ‰. We hypothesized that such variations are the result of multiple gas-transport processes along with the occurrence of hydrocarbon oxidation at different rates within the sedimentary column. The measured gas fluxes are extremely heterogeneous from one seep to another, ranging from 18 to 193 m3.yr-1. These values will be discussed in detail by comparing them with values obtained from different measurement techniques at other gas-seeping sites. The GAZCOGNE study is co-funded by TOTAL and IFREMER as part of the PAMELA (Passive Margin Exploration Laboratories) scientific project. References:Dupré, S., L. Berger, N. Le Bouffant, C. Scalabrin, and J. F. Bourillet (2014), Fluid emissions at the Aquitaine Shelf (Bay of Biscay, France): a biogenic origin or the expression of hydrocarbon leakage?, Continental Shelf Research, doi:10.1016/j.csr.2014.07.004. Whiticar, M. J., E. Faber, and M. Schoell (1986), Biogenic methane formation in marine and freshwater environments: CO2 reduction vs. acetate fermentation--Isotope evidence, Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 50(5), 693-709.

  11. The exchange of acetaldehyde between plants and the atmosphere: Stable carbon isotope and flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, Kolby Jeremiah

    The exchange of acetaldehyde between plant canopies and the atmosphere may significantly influence regional atmospheric chemistry and plant metabolism. While plants are known to both produce and consume acetaldehyde, the exchange of this compound with forested ecosystems is complicated by physical, biological, and chemical processes that range from being poorly understood to completely unknown. This precludes a quantitative understanding of acetaldehyde exchange rates between the atmosphere and the biosphere. In this study, the processes controlling the exchange of acetaldehyde with plant canopies was investigated using concentration, flux, and natural abundance 13C measurements of gas phase acetaldehyde from individual plants, soils, and entire ecosystems. Although previously only considered important in anoxic tissues, it was discovered that acetaldehyde is produced and consumed in leaves through ethanolic fermentation coupled to the pyruvate dehydrogenase bypass system under normal aerobic conditions. These coupled pathways determine the acetaldehyde compensation point, a major factor controlling its exchange with the atmosphere. Carbon isotope analysis suggests a new pathway for acetaldehyde production from plants under stress involving the peroxidation of membrane fatty acids. This pathway may be a major source of acetaldehyde to the atmosphere from plants under biotic and abiotic stresses. Plant stomata were found to be the dominant pathway for the exchange of acetaldehyde with the atmosphere with stomatal conductance influencing both emission and uptake fluxes. In addition, increasing temperature and solar radiation was found to increase the compensation point by increasing the rates of acetaldehyde production relative to consumption. Under ambient conditions, bare soil was neutral to the exchange of acetaldehyde while senescing and decaying leaves were found to be strong source of acetaldehyde to the atmosphere due to increased decomposition processes and the loss of biological sink(s). Vertical concentration profiles and within-canopy turbulence characterization allowed for the estimation of fine scale source/sink profiles of acetaldehyde in forested ecosystems in Michigan, California, and North Carolina. The different vertical and temporal acetaldehyde exchange patterns between the sites were well described using a simple canopy exchange model based on the results from the process based branch studies. We find that net ecosystem acetaldehyde emission rates are inversely related to foliage density by influencing the extinction of sunlight in a plant canopy. While high foliage density canopies can effectively mitigate regional air pollution by behaving as a net sink of atmospheric acetaldehyde, lower density canopies may aggravate it by acting as a net source.

  12. Flux measurements of energy and trace gases in urban Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boedeker, I.; Schade, G. W.; Adams, S.; Park, C.

    2008-12-01

    We describe the setup and some first year results of a new flux measurements tower in an urban area. An existing radio communications tower 4 km north of downtown Houston was equipped with micrometeorological instrumentation and trace gas sampling lines in spring 2007. Wind speed, temperature and relative humidity are recorded at five levels between 12 and 60 m above ground; 3-D wind speed measurements, solar and net radiances, and trace gas sampling are established from the 60 m level. A closed path IRGA is used for CO2 and water vapor fluxes, and independent instrumentation for criteria pollutant and VOC fluxes. Two CSI data loggers and software control the measurements, and EdiRe software is used to analyze turbulence data and compute fluxes. A project description is provided at http://atmo.tamu.edu/yellowcabtower. Surface properties as calculated from the gradient measurements show the site to be surprisingly uniform, with displacement heights between 5 and 9 m and roughness lengths between 0.4 and 0.7 m, despite urban heterogeneity. The latter is investigated through visible/near IR orthoimagery and LIDAR data, which are incorporated into a local GIS. Net radiation was also only marginally affected by surface heterogeneity. At this urban location it is balanced by roughly equal amounts of sensible heat, latent heat, and storage fluxes. Latent heat flux, however, is smaller outside the growing season, with an equivalent increase in winter storage fluxes, as expected. Significant differences are also observed with direction during summer, showing decreased Bowen ratios and lower CO2 emissions from sectors with a larger urban tree canopy cover in the footprint. The largely mature, dominantly oak urban canopy cover alleviates approximately 100 W m- 2 during typical summer days. On the other hand, anthropogenic CO2 emissions dominate over photosynthetic uptake all year round. Measured carbon fluxes peak during morning rush-hour traffic, especially when increasing stretches of the main commuter road fall into the footprint. Outside the rush hour, daytime carbon fluxes typically ranged from 0.4 to 1.6 g C m-2 h-1. A seasonal comparison shows that up to 75% of midday anthropogenic carbon flux is removed via photosynthesis in the dominant wind sector, S, which bears typical tree canopy covers of 25-50% on pervious surfaces.

  13. Uncertainty analysis of steady state incident heat flux measurements in hydrocarbon fuel fires.

    SciTech Connect

    Nakos, James Thomas

    2005-12-01

    The objective of this report is to develop uncertainty estimates for three heat flux measurement techniques used for the measurement of incident heat flux in a combined radiative and convective environment. This is related to the measurement of heat flux to objects placed inside hydrocarbon fuel (diesel, JP-8 jet fuel) fires, which is very difficult to make accurately (e.g., less than 10%). Three methods will be discussed: a Schmidt-Boelter heat flux gage; a calorimeter and inverse heat conduction method; and a thin plate and energy balance method. Steady state uncertainties were estimated for two types of fires (i.e., calm wind and high winds) at three times (early in the fire, late in the fire, and at an intermediate time). Results showed a large uncertainty for all three methods. Typical uncertainties for a Schmidt-Boelter gage ranged from {+-}23% for high wind fires to {+-}39% for low wind fires. For the calorimeter/inverse method the uncertainties were {+-}25% to {+-}40%. The thin plate/energy balance method the uncertainties ranged from {+-}21% to {+-}42%. The 23-39% uncertainties for the Schmidt-Boelter gage are much larger than the quoted uncertainty for a radiative only environment (i.e ., {+-}3%). This large difference is due to the convective contribution and because the gage sensitivities to radiative and convective environments are not equal. All these values are larger than desired, which suggests the need for improvements in heat flux measurements in fires.

  14. Development of integrated high temperature sensor for simultaneous measurement of wall heat flux and temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Long; Wang, Jing; Fan, Xuejun

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, an integrated water-cooled sensor has been developed to simultaneously measure the heat flux and temperature at the wall of a scramjet combustor. The upgrade sensor was designed based on the principle of Gardon heat-flux gauge with many improvements. The sensor was well calibrated by both conductive heating sources and blackbody cavity device. The effects of structural material and dimensions on the sensor's responses were examined. Both the experimental measurements and numerical simulation were conducted and showed that the new sensor has the maximum measure ability of heat flux of 400 W/cm(2) and stagnation temperatures up to 1920 K along with satisfactory response time. PMID:22852712

  15. Accurate periodicity measurement of superconducting quantum interference device magnetic flux response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Masakazu

    2010-09-01

    It is theoretically explained that a response of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is periodically dependent on total magnetic flux coupling to the SQUID ring (?) and its period is a flux quantum (?o=h/2e, where h and e, respectively, express Planck's constant and elementary charge). For example, the voltage of an electromagnetically oscillated rf-SQUID or a current biased dc-SQUID is thought to be periodically dependent on ? with a period of ?o. In this paper, we propose an accurate method to check the periodicity of a SQUID response by using a set of sensing coils covered with a superconducting sheath. As a demonstration, we measured periodicity of a commercially available thin-film type rf-SQUID response in magnetic flux ranging up to approximately 4300?o. Its flux dependence was periodic below about 3400?o.

  16. Flux penetration measurements and the harmonic magnetic response of hot isostatically pressed ,,Pb,Gd...Mo6S8

    E-print Network

    Hampshire, Damian

    Flux penetration measurements and the harmonic magnetic response of hot isostatically pressed ,,Pb penetration measurements and the harmonic magnetic response have been measured from 4.2 K up to the critical In this article, we present detailed flux penetration measurements made in high magnetic fields and investigate

  17. Device accurately measures and records low gas-flow rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branum, L. W.

    1966-01-01

    Free-floating piston in a vertical column accurately measures and records low gas-flow rates. The system may be calibrated, using an adjustable flow-rate gas supply, a low pressure gage, and a sequence recorder. From the calibration rates, a nomograph may be made for easy reduction. Temperature correction may be added for further accuracy.

  18. Development of airborne eddy-correlation flux measurement capabilities for reactive oxides of nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, John (Principal Investigator); Zheng, Xiaonan; Sandholm, Scott T.

    1996-01-01

    This research is aimed at producing a fundamental new research tool for characterizing the source strength of the most important compound controlling the hemispheric and global scale distribution of tropospheric ozone. Specifically, this effort seeks to demonstrate the proof-of-concept of a new general purpose laser-induced fluorescence based spectrometer for making airborne eddy-correlation flux measurements of nitric oxide (NO) and other reactive nitrogen compounds. The new all solid-state laser technology being used in this advanced sensor will produce a forerunner of the type of sensor technology that should eventually result in highly compact operational systems. The proof-of-concept sensor being developed will have over two orders-of-magnitude greater sensitivity than present-day instruments. In addition, this sensor will offer the possibility of eventual extension to airborne eddy-correlation flux measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and possibly other compounds, such as ammonia (NH3), peroxyradicals (HO2), nitrateradicals (NO3) and several iodine compounds (e.g., I and IO). Demonstration of the new sensor's ability to measure NO fluxes will occur through a series of laboratory and field tests. This proof-of-concept demonstration will show that not only can airborne fluxes of important ultra-trace compounds be made at the few parts-per-trillion level, but that the high accuracy/precision measurements currently needed for predictive models can also. These measurement capabilities will greatly enhance our current ability to quantify the fluxes of reactive nitrogen into the troposphere and significantly impact upon the accuracy of predictive capabilities to model O3's distribution within the remote troposphere. This development effort also offers a timely approach for producing the reactive nitrogen flux measurement capabilities that will be needed by future research programs such as NASA's planned 1999 Amazon Biogeochemistry and Atmospheric Chemistry Experimental portion of LBA.

  19. Measuring MPI Latency and Communication Rates for Small Messages

    E-print Network

    Luecke, Glenn R.

    1 Measuring MPI Latency and Communication Rates for Small Messages by Glenn R. Luecke, Jim Coyle March 4, 2009 Abstract. The authors present a method for measuring MPI latency and communication rates, most scientific programs written for distributed memory parallel computers use the MPI message

  20. Fundamental Diagram Estimation Through Passing Rate Measurements in Congestion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicolas Chiabaut; Christine Buisson; Ludovic Leclercq

    2009-01-01

    Classically, fundamental diagrams are estimated from aggregated data at a specific location. Such a measurement method may lead to inconsistency, which mainly explains the current controversy about their shape. This paper proposes a new estimation method based on passing rate measurements along moving observer paths. Under specific assumptions, it can be proved that in congestion, the passing rate is independent

  1. High Pressure Burn Rate Measurements on an Ammonium Perchlorate Propellant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E A Glascoe; N Tan

    2010-01-01

    High pressure deflagration rate measurements of a unique ammonium perchlorate (AP) based propellant are required to design the base burn motor for a Raytheon weapon system. The results of these deflagration rate measurements will be key in assessing safety and performance of the system. In particular, the system may experience transient pressures on the order of 100's of MPa (10's

  2. Validation of the doubly-labeled water (H/sup 3/H/sup 18/O) method for measuring water flux and energy metabolism in tenebrionid beetles

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.D.

    1981-01-01

    Doubly-labeled water (H/sup 3/H/sup 18/O) has been used to determine water flux and energy metabolism in a variety of vertebrates. This study examines the applicability of this technique to arthropods. The theory of the technique depends upon the assumption that doubly-labeled water introduced into the animal's body water equilibrates with water and carbon dioxide by the action of carbonic anhydrase. Tritium (/sup 3/H) is lost from the animal only with water while oxygen-18 is lost with both water and carbon dioxide. The difference bwtween the rates of loss of the two isotopes is proportional to CO/sub 2/ loss rate. Validation of the use of tritiated water for measuring water flux was accomplished by comparing gravimetric measurements of water gain with flux rates determined by loss of tritiated water. At room humidity, an overestimate for influx calculated from labeled water calculations was found, averaging 12 mg H/sub 2/O (g.d)/sup -1/. Comparison of CO/sub 2/ loss rate determined isotopically with rates of CO/sub 2/ loss determined by standard metabolic rates also yielded overestimates for the isotopic technique, overestimates ranging between 20 and 30%. The relevance of this for studies using labeled water for studying water fluxes and free metabolism of free-ranging arthropods is discussed.

  3. pyMCZ: Oxygen abundances calculations and uncertainties from strong-line flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Federica B.; Modjaz, Maryam; Oh, Seung Man; Fierroz, David; Liu, Yuqian; Kewley, Lisa; Graur, Or

    2015-05-01

    pyMCZ calculates metallicity according to a number of strong line metallicity diagnostics from spectroscopy line measurements and obtain uncertainties from the line flux errors in a Monte Carlo framework. Given line flux measurements and their uncertainties, pyMCZ produces synthetic distributions for the oxygen abundance in up to 13 metallicity scales simultaneously, as well as for E(B-V), and estimates their median values and their 66% confidence regions. The code can output the full MC distributions and their kernel density estimates.

  4. Environmental response functions - relating eddy-covariance flux measurements to ecosystem drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junkermann, W.; Metzger, S. R.; Mauder, M.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Trancon y Widemann, B.; Taylor, J. R.; Loescher, H.; Zheng, X.; Schmid, H. E.; Foken, T.

    2012-12-01

    Ground-based eddy-covariance (EC) measurements are suited to continuously monitor the water and heat exchange above selected sites. However, these results may only represent small areas surrounding the immediate measurement locations. On the other hand, aircraft-based EC measurements can provide flux information on regional scales, but are restricted to short time intervals. It is desirable to integrate both approaches in an effort to provide suitable datasets for the design, constraint, and evaluation of flux algorithms for remote sensing and numerical modeling applications. The objective of this study is to develop environmental response functions (ERF), which enable the integration of ground-based and airborne EC flux measurements. The idea behind ERF is to explicitly relate flux observations (responses) to meteorological forcing and biophysical surface properties (drivers). Thus far ERF have built upon (i) low spatial discretization and binning of airborne flux observations, (ii) discrete land cover representations, and (iii) parametric relationships. Here, we present an approach that advances the scalability of ERFs, and enables the rigorous quantification of uncertainty. This approach consists of; (i) wavelet decomposition of airborne EC high-frequency data, which enables high resolution flux observations, (ii) quantification of continuous and biophysically relevant land cover properties in the flux footprint of each observation, and (iii) boosted regression trees, that enable detecting highly non-linear ERFs according to the information in the data. The resulting ERFs can then be used to extrapolate the water and heat exchange, e.g. across a watershed. We apply the present approach to airborne EC flux measurements that were conducted in July 2009 at ?50 m above the heterogeneous steppe landscape of the Xilin River Watershed, Inner Mongolia, P.R. China. The wavelet decomposition of the turbulence data results in 8446 flux observations during 12 flights. Using footprint modeling, the MODIS land surface temperature (LST) and enhanced vegetation index (EVI) in the source area of each observation are determined. Boosted regression trees are then used to infer ERFs between all observations of the sensible- and latent heat flux (H, LE) and biophysical- (LST, EVI) and meteorological drivers. Numerical tests show that ERF extrapolations covering the entire Xilin River Watershed (? 3670 km2) are accurate to ? 18%. The extrapolations are then summarized for each land cover type, providing individual estimates of source strength (40 W m-2 < H < 359 W m-2, 68 W m-2 < LE < 300 W m-2) and spatial variability (17 W m-2 < ?H < 129 W m-2, 35 W m-2 < ?LE < 134 W m-2) to a precision of ? 5%. This study demonstrates the potential of ERFs for 'mining' the information content of EC flux observations and extracting quantitative relationships with environmental drivers. In doing so, ERFs can aid bridging observational scales by, e.g., isolating and quantifying relevant land-atmosphere exchange processes, extending flux measurements to the watershed scale, assessing the spatial representativeness of EC flux measurements etc. Deriving analogous ERFs from ground-based EC measurements could aid, e.g., constraining local to regional water budgets, distinguishing anthropogenic and natural sources/sinks in urban environments, and substantiating process-studies.

  5. Aerodynamic Temperature Derived from Flux-Profile Measurements and Two-Source Model Predictions over a Cotton Row Crop in an Advective Environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The surface aerodynamic temperature (SAT) is related to the atmospheric forcing conditions (radiation, wind speed and air temperature) and surface conditions. SAT is required in the bulk surface resistance equation to calculate the rate of sensible heat flux exchange. SAT cannot be measured directly...

  6. Insights into rapid explosive volcanic processes from ground- and space-based intraday SO2 flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merucci, L.; Burton, M.; Corradini, S.; Salerno, G. G.

    2010-12-01

    Observations of volcanic degassing yield insights into the sub-surface magmatic processes which control volcanic activity during both quiescent and eruptive phases. By combining information on volcanic gas flux with constraints on original dissolved volatile contents the volume of degassing magma can be determined. Comparisons between the volume of degassing magma, erupted volume, and ground deformation allow mass balance calculations to be performed, providing insight into the shallow volcanic plumbing system dynamics. For these reasons there is great interest in improving the quality and frequency of volcanic gas flux measurements. Ultraviolet and infrared remote sensing techniques allow determination of SO2 column amounts within volcanic plumes. By calculating SO2 column amounts in a profile orthogonal to the plume-wind direction and multiplying the integrated SO2 cross section by the wind speed the SO2 emission rate can be retrieved. There are currently three main approaches for determining volcanic SO2 fluxes; (i) ground-based mini-DOAS systems, (ii) ground-based SO2 imaging cameras, and (iii) satellite-based infrared and ultraviolet imaging. Here we examine SO2 fluxes obtained by the Flux Automatic Measurement (FLAME) network of scanning mini-DOAS instruments installed at Mt. Etna and by the MODIS instrument aboard the NASA EOS satellite AQUA during the 2006 eruption of Mt. Etna, Sicily, Italy. Mt. Etna produced a highly variable eruptive activity from the South-East crater, characterised by explosive sequences, which could be either ash-rich or ash-poor, lava effusion, partial flank collapse and periods of quiescence. We examined intraday variations in SO2 flux measured with FLAME and MODIS during both ash-rich and ash-poor explosive phases. In general, good agreement was found between the datasets. Of particular interest was the successful recalculation and validation of temporal variations in SO2 flux recorded in a single image from MODIS. By examining the temporal evolution of gas emissions our results provide insight in the eruption mechanism driving the explosive activity.

  7. Measuring forest floor CO 2 fluxes in a Douglas-fir forest

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. B Drewitt; T. A Black; Z Nesic; E. R Humphreys; E. M Jork; R Swanson; G. J Ethier; T Griffis; K Morgenstern

    2002-01-01

    CO2 exchange was measured on the forest floor of a coastal temperate Douglas-fir forest located near Campbell River, British Columbia, Canada. Continuous measurements were obtained at six locations using an automated chamber system between April and December, 2000. Fluxes were measured every half hour by circulating chamber headspace air through a sampling manifold assembly and a closed-path infrared gas analyzer.

  8. Solar cycle variation of trapped proton fluxes measured by LEO satellites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, Natalia; Kuznetsov, Nikolay; Panasyuk, Michail

    Now days there are few models of the Earth radiation belts proton fluxes that are used for prediction of the fluxes at the different orbits of the spacecrafts. Discrepancies in their predictions are wellknown. The AP8 model of trapped proton fluxes is based on the satellite data that were measured 1960th and 1970th during the anomalous weak 20th (in comparison with the 21st and 22d ) solar cycle and solar cycle variation is taken into account only by specifying two different models for solar maximum and solar minimum. The TPM-1 model calculates the proton fluxes for any year of solar activity and contains sub-models for quiet and active states of magnetosphere. Solar cycle variation of trapped protons measured during the 23rd solar cycle on board low orbital polar satellites Coronas-F (500 km altitude) and NPOES-15, -17 (800 km altitude) in 2001 - 2007 is considered in this report. The experimental proton fluxes measured for the drift sells L=1.14-1.2 were compared with the predictions of AP8 model for solar maximum and minimum as well as with the prediction of TPM-1 model.

  9. Modeling magnetic fields measured by surface probes embedded in a cylindrical flux conserver.

    PubMed

    Golingo, R P

    2007-03-01

    Calculating magnetic fields at the surface of a flux conserver, perfect conductor, for displaced plasma currents is useful for understanding modes of a Z-pinch. The magnetic fields measured at the flux conserver are a sum of the magnetic fields from the plasma current and the eddy currents which form in the walls to keep the flux constant. While the magnetic field at the wall from the plasma current alone is easily calculated using the Biot-Savart law, finding the eddy currents in the flux conserver which satisfy the boundary conditions can be a tedious process. A simple method of calculating the surface magnetic field for a given Z-pinch displacement off-axis is derived for a cylindrical flux conserver. This relationship does not require the explicit calculation of the eddy currents, saving time when analyzing surface magnetic probe measurements. Analytic expressions can be used to describe the surface magnetic field which increase the understanding of the magnetic probe measurements. PMID:17411182

  10. Assessing and correcting spatial representativeness of tower eddy-covariance flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Xu, K.; Desai, A. R.; Taylor, J. R.; Kljun, N.; Blanken, P.; Burns, S. P.; Scott, R. L.

    2014-12-01

    Estimating the landscape-scale exchange of ecologically relevant trace gas and energy fluxes from tower eddy-covariance (EC) measurements is often complicated by surface heterogeneity. For example, a tower EC measurement may represent less than 1% of a grid cell resolved by mechanistic models (order 100-1000 km2). In particular for data assimilation or comparison with large-scale observations, it is hence critical to assess and correct the spatial representativeness of tower EC measurements. We present a procedure that determines from a single EC tower the spatio-temporally explicit flux field of its surrounding. The underlying principle is to extract the relationship between biophysical drivers and ecological responses from measurements under varying environmental conditions. For this purpose, high-frequency EC flux processing and source area calculations (?60 h?1) are combined with remote sensing retrievals of land surface properties and subsequent machine learning. Methodological details are provided in our companion presentation "Towards the spatial rectification of tower-based eddy-covariance flux observations". We apply the procedure to one year of data from each of four AmeriFlux sites under different climate and ecological environments: Lost Creek shrub fen wetland, Niwot Ridge subalpine conifer, Park Falls mixed forest, and Santa Rita mesquite savanna. We find that heat fluxes from the Park Falls 122-m-high EC measurement and from a surrounding 100 km2 target area differ up to 100 W m?2, or 65%. Moreover, 85% and 24% of the EC flux observations are adequate surrogates of the mean surface-atmosphere exchange and its spatial variability across a 900 km2 target area, respectively, at 5% significance and 80% representativeness levels. Alternatively, the resulting flux grids can be summarized as probability density functions, and used to inform mechanistic models directly with the mean flux value and its spatial variability across a model grid cell. Lastly, for each site we evaluate the applicability of the procedure based on a full bottom-up uncertainty budget.

  11. Eddy covariance CO2 flux measurements in nocturnal conditions: an analysis of the problem.

    PubMed

    Aubinet, Marc

    2008-09-01

    A detailed analysis of the various processes at work in stable boundary layers was made. It pointed out that two main mechanisms may affect eddy covariance measurements in stable conditions and that their impacts were different. On one hand, intermittent turbulence produces strongly nonstationary events during which the validity of turbulent transport and storage measurements is uncertain. On the other hand, during breeze and drainage flow events, significant advection takes place and competes with turbulent flux and storage. Intermittent turbulence questions both the ability of eddy covariance systems to adequately capture turbulent flux and storage and the representativeness of the measurements. Ability of the systems to capture the fluxes could be improved by adapting the averaging time period or the high pass filtering characteristics. However, beyond this, the question of representativeness of the flux remains open as the flux measured during an intermittent turbulence event represents not only the source term, but also the removal of CO2 that built up in the control volume and that cannot be simply related to the source term. In these conditions, the u* discrimination is likely to be insufficient and should be completed with a stationarity criterion. Further research should allow determining better selection criteria. Advection occurs mainly in presence of flows associated with topographical slopes (drainage flows) or with land use changes (breezes). Direct advection measurements were performed at several sites, but the results were shown to be strongly site dependent. A classification based on the general flow pattern and on the source intensity evolution along streamlines was proposed here. Five different patterns were identified that helped to classify the different observations. The classification was found to be a fairly good fit for the observations. This could serve as a tool to better understand and quantify the fluxes at sites subjected to repeatable patterns. PMID:18767616

  12. Eddy covariance flux measurements of ammonia by high temperature chemical ionisation mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sintermann, J.; Spirig, C.; Jordan, A.; Kuhn, U.; Ammann, C.; Neftel, A.

    2011-03-01

    A system for fast ammonia (NH3) measurements with chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (CIMS) based on a commercial Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) is presented. It uses electron transfer reaction as ionisation pathway and features a drift tube of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and silica-coated steel. Heating the instrumental inlet and the drift tube to 180 °C enabled an effective time resolution of ~1 s and made it possible to apply the instrument for eddy covariance (EC) measurements. EC fluxes of NH3 were measured over two agricultural fields in Oensingen, Switzerland, following fertilisations with cattle slurry. Air was aspirated close to a sonic anemometer at a flow of 100 STP L min-1 and was directed through a 23 m long 1/2" PFA tube heated to 150 °C to an air-conditioned trailer where the gas was sub-sampled from the large bypass stream. This setup minimised damping of fast NH3 concentration changes between the sampling point and the actual measurement. High-frequency attenuation loss of the NH3 fluxes of 20 to 40% was quantified and corrected for using an empirical ogive method. The instrumental NH3 background signal showed a minor interference with H2O which was characterised in the laboratory. The resulting correction of the NH3 flux after slurry spreading was less than 1‰. The flux detection limit of the EC system was about 5 ng m-2 s-1 while the accuracy of individual flux measurements was estimated 16% for the high-flux regime during these experiments. The NH3 emissions after broad spreading of the slurry showed an initial maximum of 150 ?g m-2 s-1 with a fast decline in the following hours.

  13. Nano-engineering the boiling surface for optimal heat transfer rate and critical heat flux

    E-print Network

    Phillips, Bren Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The effects on pool boiling characteristics such as critical heat flux and the heat transfer coefficient of different surface characteristics such as surface wettability, roughness, morphology, and porosity are not well ...

  14. Marine particle dynamics : sinking velocities, size distributions, fluxes, and microbial degradation rates

    E-print Network

    McDonnell, Andrew M. P

    2011-01-01

    The sinking flux of particulate matter into the ocean interior is an oceanographic phenomenon that fuels much of the metabolic demand of the subsurface ocean and affects the distribution of carbon and other elements ...

  15. Oil palm water use: calibration of a sap flux method and a field measurement scheme.

    PubMed

    Niu, Furong; Röll, Alexander; Hardanto, Afik; Meijide, Ana; Köhler, Michael; Hendrayanto; Hölscher, Dirk

    2015-05-01

    Oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) water use was assessed by sap flux density measurements with the aim to establish the method and derive water-use characteristics. Thermal dissipation probes were inserted into leaf petioles of mature oil palms. In the laboratory, we tested our set-up against gravimetric measurements and derived new parameters for the original calibration equation that are specific to oil palm petioles. In the lowlands of Jambi, Indonesia, in a 12-year-old monoculture plantation, 56 leaves on 10 palms were equipped with one sensor per leaf. A 10-fold variation in individual leaf water use among leaves was observed, but we did not find significant correlations to the variables trunk height and diameter, leaf azimuthal orientation, leaf inclination or estimated horizontal leaf shading. We thus took an un-stratified approach to determine an appropriate sampling design to estimate stand transpiration (Es, mm?day(-1)) rates of oil palm. We used the relative standard error of the mean (SEn, %) as a measure for the potential estimation error of Es associated with sample size. It was 14% for a sample size of 13 leaves to determine the average leaf water use and four palms to determine the average number of leaves per palm. Increasing these sample sizes only led to minor further decreases of the SEn of Es. The observed 90-day average of Es was 1.1?mm?day(-1) (error margin?±?0.2?mm?day(-1)), which seems relatively low, but does not contradict Penman-Monteith-derived estimates of evapotranspiration. Examining the environmental drivers of Es on an intra-daily scale indicates an early, pre-noon maximum of Es rates (11 am) due to a very sensitive reaction of Es to increasing vapor pressure deficit in the morning. This early peak is followed by a steady decline of Es rates for the rest of the day, despite further rising levels of vapor pressure deficit and radiation; this results in pronounced hysteresis, particularly between Es and vapor pressure deficit. PMID:25787332

  16. Zero-point cooling and heating-rate measurements of a single Sr+88 ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letchumanan, V.; Wilpers, G.; Brownnutt, M.; Gill, P.; Sinclair, A. G.

    2007-06-01

    A single Sr+88 ion has been cooled to the zero point of its axial motion in a radio frequency endcap trap. A ground-state occupation probability of 98.6(8)% was achieved using resolved sideband laser cooling on the 674nm S1/22-D5/22 quadrupole transition. The ion’s heating rate was measured to be 0.054(4) quanta/ms, implying a spectral density of electric field noise comparable to the other reported values, summarized in the paper by Deslauriers [Phys. Rev. A 70, 043048 (2004)]. Low heating rates were only observed using a trap that had minimal exposure to atomic flux.

  17. Potentials and challenges associated with automated closed dynamic chamber measurements of soil CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görres, Carolyn-Monika; Kammann, Claudia; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2015-04-01

    Soil respiration fluxes are influenced by natural factors such as climate and soil type, but also by anthropogenic activities in managed ecosystems. As a result, soil CO2 fluxes show a large intra- and interannual as well as intra- and intersite variability. Most of the available soil CO2 flux data giving insights into this variability have been measured with manually closed static chambers, but technological advances in the past 15 years have also led to an increased use of automated closed chamber systems. The great advantage of automated chambers in comparison to manually operated chambers is the higher temporal resolution of the flux data. This is especially important if we want to better understand the effects of short-term events, e.g. fertilization or heavy rainfall, on soil CO2 flux variability. However, the chamber method is an invasive measurement method which can potentially alter soil CO2 fluxes and lead to biased measurement results. In the peer-reviewed literature, many papers compare the field performance and results of different closed static chamber designs, or compare manual chambers with automated chamber systems, to identify potential biases in CO2 flux measurements, and thus help to reduce uncertainties in the flux data. However, inter-comparisons of different automated closed dynamic chamber systems are still lacking. Here we are going to present a field comparison of the most-cited automated chamber system, the LI-8100A Automated Soil Flux System, with the also commercially available Greenhouse Gas Monitoring System AGPS. Both measurement systems were installed side by side at a recently harvested poplar bioenergy plantation (POPFULL, http://uahost.uantwerpen.be/popfull/) from April 2014 until August 2014. The plantation provided optimal comparison conditions with a bare field situation after the harvest and a regrowing canopy resulting in a broad variety of microclimates. Furthermore, the plantation was planted in a double-row system with the row width alternating between 1.50 m and 0.75 m, creating spatial differences in e.g. dry bulk density and soil organic carbon content. The soil CO2 flux data sets were split into four subsets each characterized by different environmental conditions, thus presenting different challenges for the measurement equipment, namely 1) daytime, calm conditions, 2) daytime, windy conditions, 3) nighttime, calm conditions, and 4) nighttime, windy conditions. In parallel to the chamber measurements, soil CO2 concentrations were manually measured in the topsoil. Soil CO2 fluxes calculated from this dataset were used as a reference range of soil CO2 fluxes at the field site. Funding support: ERC Advanced Grant agreement (# 233366) POPFULL under the EC 7th Framework Program (FP7/2007-2013), Flemish Hercules Foundation as Infrastructure contract # ZW09-06, and the Methusalem Program of the Flemish Government.

  18. Experiments for the Measurement of LNG Mass Burning Rates

    E-print Network

    Herrera Gomez, Lady Carolina

    2012-07-16

    on the radiometers used inside the pit area after the tests ...................................................... 56#1; Figure 27. Comparison of the measured and calculated radiative heat flux received at the pool surface... of this cryogenic fluid. ? Flash fire: occurs when flammable vapors are not ignited immediately after the release, but instead, a vapor cloud forms, ignites, and burns back to the leak source. This type of combustion does not create significant overpressure...

  19. Experimental study on measurement and calculation of heat flux in supersonic combustor of scramjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cong; Yao, Zhanli; Qin, Jiang; Bao, Wen

    2015-06-01

    An experimental measurement and calculation method which consist of thermal response model, convergence criteria and control algorithms, is proposed in this paper for the determination of heat flux in a scramjet combustor. Numerical simulations are done to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed method, and experiments are made in the direct-connect hydrocarbon fueled scramjet combustor of Mach-6 flight for different equivalence ratios. The distribution of heat flux along the axial and circumferential directions can be obtained using the proposed method. The distribution of heat flux is uneven which is caused by the aerodynamic heating, combustion heat release and changes of section area, and the peak heat flux can be more than 2MW/m2 during the experiments. Heat flux increases with the increase in equivalence ratio for the same Mach number. And axial distribution of heat flux is uniform for different equivalence ratios. In addition, the combustion heat release area of the combustion chamber can therefore be concluded which is useful for guiding the structural design of the thermal protection system.

  20. Open-path tunable diode laser absorption for eddy correlation flux measurements of atmospheric trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Stuart M.; Zahniser, Mark S.

    1991-01-01

    Biogenic emissions from and dry deposition to terrestrial surfaces are important processes determining the trace gas composition of the atmosphere. An instrument has been developed for flux measurements of gases such as CH4, N2O, and O3 based on the eddy correlation technique which combines trace gas fluctuation measurements with simultaneous windfield measurements. The instrument combines a tunable diode laser infrared light source with an open-path multipass absorption cell in order to provide the fast time response and short base pathlength required for the eddy correlation method. Initial field tests using the instrument to measure methane emissions from a local wetland demonstrate the capability for high precision eddy correlation flux measurements.

  1. High CO2 emissions through porous media: Transport mechanisms and implications for flux measurement and fractionation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, William C.; Sorey, M.L.; Kennedy, B.M.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Rogie, J.D.; Shuster, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    Diffuse emissions of CO2 are known to be large around some volcanoes and hydrothermal areas. Accumulation-chamber measurements of CO2 flux are increasingly used to estimate the total magmatic or metamorphic CO2 released from such areas. To assess the performance of accumulation chamber systems at fluxes one to three orders of magnitude higher than normally encountered in soil respiration studies, a test system was constructed in the laboratory where known fluxes could be maintained through dry sand. Steady-state gas concentration profiles and fractionation effects observed in the 30-cm sand column nearly match those predicted by the Stefan-Maxwell equations, indicating that the test system was functioning successfully as a uniform porous medium. Eight groups of investigators tested their accumulation chamber equipment, all configured with continuous infrared gas analyzers (IRGA), in this system. Over a flux range of ~ 200-12,000 g m-2 day-1, 90% of their 203 flux measurements were 0-25% lower than the imposed flux with a mean difference of - 12.5%. Although this difference would seem to be within the range of acceptability for many geologic investigations, some potential sources for larger errors were discovered. A steady-state pressure gradient of -20 Pa/m was measured in the sand column at a flux of 11,200 g m-2 day-1. The derived permeability (50 darcies) was used in the dusty-gas model (DGM) of transport to quantify various diffusive and viscous flux components. These calculations were used to demonstrate that accumulation chambers, in addition to reducing the underlying diffusive gradient, severely disrupt the steady-state pressure gradient. The resultant diversion of the net gas flow is probably responsible for the systematically low flux measurements. It was also shown that the fractionating effects of a viscous CO2 efflux against a diffusive influx of air will have a major impact on some important geochemical indicators, such as N2/Ar, ??15N-N2, and 4He/22Ne. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  2. Remotely sensed dune sand flux measurements in the dustiest place on Earth (Bodélé, Chad)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, P.

    2009-12-01

    The Bodélé Depression of northern Chad is the dustiest place on Earth, thanks to a unique combination of two factors. First, the Bodélé is located downwind of a narrow gap between the Tibesti and Ennedi mountain ranges, which act as a funnel creating the strong winds of the Bodélé Low Level Jet. Second, the depression forms the deepest part of palaeo-lake Megachad, which once rivaled the Caspian Sea in size. When the lake dried out during the Holocene, it left behind thick deposits of diatomite, which currently provide an abundant and readily available source of dust. Previous work has shown that dust is primarily produced by eddies near the horns of barchan dunes. Using a new remote sensing technique called COSI-Corr, these barchans were shown to be not only the largest, but also the fastest on Earth, featuring the highest sand fluxes. Quantifying sand flux with field measurements is an expensive and time-consuming process. COSI-Corr -which stands for 'Co-registration of Optically Sensed Images and Correlation' and was originally developed for the purpose of detecting surface deformation caused by earthquakes- offers an alternative approach to measuring sand flux, using remote sensing. From pairs of ASTER imagery, dune migration in the Bodélé depression was successfully measured over time intervals of one month to 6.5 years. The displacement maps produced by COSI-Corr can be used to automatically distinguish dunes from interdunes, which is a crucial step towards calculating sand flux. Dune heights and volumes were obtained by interpolating a surface between the interdune areas and subtracting it from a digital elevation model. Multiplying height with celerity yields a pixel-by-pixel estimate of the sand flux. Applying this method to large diatomite dunes in the Bodélé confirms that these are some of the world’s fastest moving barchans. Plotting dune height against inverse celerity reveals sand flux at the dune crest of >200 m3/m/yr. Average dune sand flux values for the eastern and western Bodélé are 76 and 99 m3/m/yr, respectively. The contribution of the dunes to the total area-averaged sand flux is 24-29 m3/m/yr, which is ~10% of the saltation flux determined by previously published field measurements. The displacement field of quartz dunes in the northeastern Bodélé displayed as a vector field.

  3. Benthic remineralisation rates in southern North Sea - from point measurements to areal estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Andreas; Friedrich, Jana; van Beusekom, Justus; Naderipour, Céline

    2015-04-01

    The southern North Sea is enclosed by densely populated hinterland with intensive use by agriculture and industry and thus substantially affected by anthropogenic influences. As a coastal subsystem, this applies especially to the German Wadden Sea, a system of back-barrier tidal flats along the whole German Bight. Ongoing efforts to implement environmental protection policies during the last decades changed the significance of various pollutants such as reactive nitrogen or phosphate, which raises the desire for constant monitoring of the coastal ecosystem to assess the efficiency of the employed environmental protection measures. Environmental monitoring is limited to point measurements which thus have to be interpolated with appropriate models. However, existing models to estimate various sediment characteristics for the interpolation of point measurements appear insufficient when compared with actual field measurements in the southern North Sea. We therefore seek to improve these models by identifying and quantifying key variables of benthic solute fluxes by comprehensive measurements which cover the complete spatial and seasonal variability. We employ in-situ measurements with the eddy-correlation technique and flux chambers in combination with ex-situ incubations of sediment cores to establish benthic fluxes of oxygen and nutrients. Additional ex-situ measurements determine basic sediment characteristics such as permeability, volumetric reaction rates, and substrate concentration. With our first results we mapped the distribution of measured sediment permeability, which suggest that areas with water depth greater than 30 m are impervious whereas sediment in shallower water at the Dogger Bank and along the coast is substantially permeable with permeability between 10-12 m2 and 10-10 m2. This implies that benthic fluxes can be estimated with simple diffusion-type models for water depths >30 m, whereas estimates especially for coastal sediments require percolation modelling. We are further able to estimate sediment permeability and volumetric oxygen consumption rate on the basis of grain size distribution. Since grain size distribution is already mapped with high spatial resolution, we now have the prerequisites to interpolate two key variables for benthic consumption and influx of oxygen. With our next step we intend to assess model-based estimates of benthic oxygen and nutrient fluxes with our in-situ measurements as references to refine the underlying models. Our field measurements contribute to the NOAH project (North Sea; Observation and Assessment of Habitats), the established methods for routine monitoring contribute to the WiMO project (Wissenschaftliches Monitoring / Scientific Monitoring).

  4. An Optimal Inverse Method Using Doppler Lidar Measurements to Estimate the Surface Sensible Heat Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, T. M.; Barlow, J. F.; Belcher, S. E.

    2014-01-01

    Inverse methods are widely used in various fields of atmospheric science. However, such methods are not commonly used within the boundary-layer community, where robust observations of surface fluxes are a particular concern. We present a new technique for deriving surface sensible heat fluxes from boundary-layer turbulence observations using an inverse method. Doppler lidar observations of vertical velocity variance are combined with two well-known mixed-layer scaling forward models for a convective boundary layer (CBL). The inverse method is validated using large-eddy simulations of a CBL with increasing wind speed. The majority of the estimated heat fluxes agree within error with the proscribed heat flux, across all wind speeds tested. The method is then applied to Doppler lidar data from the Chilbolton Observatory, UK. Heat fluxes are compared with those from a mast-mounted sonic anemometer. Errors in estimated heat fluxes are on average 18 %, an improvement on previous techniques. However, a significant negative bias is observed (on average ) that is more pronounced in the morning. Results are improved for the fully-developed CBL later in the day, which suggests that the bias is largely related to the choice of forward model, which is kept deliberately simple for this study. Overall, the inverse method provided reasonable flux estimates for the simple case of a CBL. Results shown here demonstrate that this method has promise in utilizing ground-based remote sensing to derive surface fluxes. Extension of the method is relatively straight-forward, and could include more complex forward models, or other measurements.

  5. Comparison of CO2 fluxes from eddy covariance and soil chambers measurements in a vineyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vendrame, Nadia; Tezza, Luca; Meggio, Franco; Pitacco, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    In order to study the processes involved in the carbon balance of a vineyard, we set up a long-term monitoring station of CO2, water vapour and energyfluxes. The experimental site is located in an extensive flat vineyard in the north-east of Italy. We measure the net ecosystem exchange with the eddy covariance (EC) technique using a Campbell Scientific closed-path IRGA and sonic anemometer, and the soil CO2 flux using a Li-Cor multiplexed system connected with six automatic dynamic chambers. Ancillary meteorological and soil variables are also measured. The vineyard is planted with north-south oriented rows spaced 2.2 m apart. Floor is grass covered, and a strip 0.6 m wide on the rows is chemically treated. To represent the different soil conditions existing in the EC footprint and to study the components of the CO2 soil flux, we placed dark soil chambers both on the vineyard rows and in the inter-row space. A well-known limit of the EC technique is the underestimation of fluxes during calm wind periods, mainly occurring at night. In the autumn/winter vine dormancy period, the EC and soil chambers CO2 fluxes should be similar. We compared the CO2 fluxes measured using the two methods to evaluate the reliability of EC measurements at different atmospheric turbulent mixing conditions and stability. The EC technique underestimates the ecosystem respiration during night time periods with friction velocity lower than 0.1 m/s. The present comparison could enable the assessment of a friction velocity threshold, representing the limit above which the EC fluxes can be considered representative of the vegetation-atmosphere exchanges at our specific site.

  6. Gas flow meter and method for measuring gas flow rate

    DOEpatents

    Robertson, Eric P.

    2006-08-01

    A gas flow rate meter includes an upstream line and two chambers having substantially equal, fixed volumes. An adjustable valve may direct the gas flow through the upstream line to either of the two chambers. A pressure monitoring device may be configured to prompt valve adjustments, directing the gas flow to an alternate chamber each time a pre-set pressure in the upstream line is reached. A method of measuring the gas flow rate measures the time required for the pressure in the upstream line to reach the pre-set pressure. The volume of the chamber and upstream line are known and fixed, thus the time required for the increase in pressure may be used to determine the flow rate of the gas. Another method of measuring the gas flow rate uses two pressure measurements of a fixed volume, taken at different times, to determine the flow rate of the gas.

  7. Supersonic Mass Flux Measurements via Tunable Diode Laser Absorption and Non-Uniform Flow Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Leyen S.; Strand, Christopher L.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Gaffney, Richard L.; Capriotti, Diego P.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of mass flux are obtained in a vitiated supersonic ground test facility using a sensor based on line-of-sight (LOS) diode laser absorption of water vapor. Mass flux is determined from the product of measured velocity and density. The relative Doppler shift of an absorption transition for beams directed upstream and downstream in the flow is used to measure velocity. Temperature is determined from the ratio of absorption signals of two transitions (lambda(sub 1)=1349 nm and lambda(sub 2)=1341.5 nm) and is coupled with a facility pressure measurement to obtain density. The sensor exploits wavelength-modulation spectroscopy with second-harmonic detection (WMS-2f) for large signal-to-noise ratios and normalization with the 1f signal for rejection of non-absorption related transmission fluctuations. The sensor line-of-sight is translated both vertically and horizontally across the test section for spatially-resolved measurements. Time-resolved measurements of mass flux are used to assess the stability of flow conditions produced by the facility. Measurements of mass flux are within 1.5% of the value obtained using a facility predictive code. The distortion of the WMS lineshape caused by boundary layers along the laser line-of-sight is examined and the subsequent effect on the measured velocity is discussed. A method for correcting measured velocities for flow non-uniformities is introduced and application of this correction brings measured velocities within 4 m/s of the predicted value in a 1630 m/s flow.

  8. Gas flux measurements of episodic bimodal eruptive activity at Karymsky volcano (Kamchatka, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arellano, S.; Galle, B.; Melnikov, D.

    2012-04-01

    Volcanoes of intermediate magmatic composition commonly exhibit episodes of intermittent gas and ash emission of variable duration. Due to the multiple conditions present at each system, different mechanisms have been proposed to account for the observed activity, and without key measurements at hand, a definite understanding of the situation might not be singled out. Karymsky, the most active volcano of Central Kamchatka, has presented a remarkably stable pattern of bimodal eruption since a few weeks after its violent reactivation in 1996. Periods of quasi-periodic explosive emissions with typical recurrence intervals of 3-10 min are alternated with episodes of semi-continuous discharge which intensity has a typical modulation at a frequency of 1 Hz. Geophysical studies at Karymsky have identified the main visual, seismic and acoustic features of these two eruption modalities. From these observations, the time scales of the processes have been defined and relevant models have been formulated, according to which the two modes are controlled by the rheological properties of an intruding gas-saturated magma batch and a shallow gas-depleted magma plug. Explosions are explained as the consequence of the formation of temporary sealing, overpressure buildup and vent clearance. Clearly, direct measurements of the gas emission rate are the key parameter to test such models. In this work, we report on the results of a field campaign for SO2 gas measurements carried out at Karymsky during 10-14 September 2011. We deployed 2 NOVAC-type, scanning DOAS systems as well as 1 rapid wide-Field of View mini-DOAS plume tracker. With this setup, we derived time-resolved SO2 flux, plume height, direction and speed, and detected pulses of increasing emission with high temporal resolution. We observed phases of explosive and quiescent degassing with variable amounts of ash emission and detected intensity changes of the associated acoustic signals. The repose time intervals between these phases was variable, ranging from minutes to hours. Typical emission columns rose to altitudes not higher than 1 km above the volcano summit and were dispersed to the SE during the observation period. A typical SO2 gas emission rate for this volcano was in the order of 5 kg/s. Our measurements corroborated the permanency of the activity of Karymsky both in terms of intensity and magnitude of SO2 degassing and extended the record of gas observations conducted more than one decade ago.

  9. Measuring denitrification after grassland renewal and grassland conversion to cropland by using the 15N gas-flux method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchen, Caroline; Eschenbach, Wolfram; Flessa, Heinz; Giesemann, Anette; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Well, Reinhard

    2015-04-01

    Denitrification, the reduction of oxidized forms of inorganic N to N2O and N2 is an important pathway of gaseous nitrogen losses. Measuring denitrification, especially the reduction of N2O to N2, expressed in the product ratio (N2O/(N2O + N2)), is rather difficult and hence rarely performed under field conditions. But using the 15N gas-flux method allows determining N transformation processes in their natural environment. In order to develop effective climate mitigation strategies understanding the N2O source is essential. We used the 15N gas-flux method to determine N2O and N2 emissions following grassland renewal and conversion techniques. Therefore we selected three different treatments: control (C), mechanical grassland renovation (GR) (autumn 2013) and grassland conversion to maize (GM) (spring 2014) from field plot trials on two different sites (Histic Gleysoil and Plaggic Anthrosol) near Oldenburg, Lower Saxony, Germany. We applied 15N labeled KNO3- (60 atom. % 15N) at a rate equivalent to common farming practices (150 kg N*ha-1) using needle injection of fertilizer solution in three different depths (10 cm, 15 cm, 20 cm) for homogeneous soil labeling up to 30 cm in microplots. During the first 10 days after application (May 2014) gas flux measurements from closed chambers were performed every second day and then weekly following a period of 8 weeks. Gas samples were analyzed for ?15N of N2 and N2O by IRMS according to Lewicka-Szczebak et al. (2013). Concentration and 15N enrichment of NO3- in soil water was determined on weekly samples using the SPIN-MAS technique (Stange et al. 2007). Fluxes of N2 and N2O evolved from the 15N labeled soil nitrogen pool were calculated using the equations of Spott et al. (2006). Peak events of N2 and N2O emissions occurred during the first 10 days of measurement, showing differences in soil types, as well as treatment variations. N2 fluxes up to 178 g*ha-1*day-1 and N2O fluxes up to 280 g*ha-1*day-1 were measured on the Plaggic Anthrosol in the GR treatment, while on the Histic Gleysoil, the GM treatment showed highest fluxes with N2 fluxes up to 1260 g*ha-1*day-1 and N2O fluxes up to 747 g*ha-1*day-1. Alike the product ratio of initial fluxes was higher on the Plaggic Anthrosol and lower on the Histic Gleysoil. Data analysis is still in progress and further results will be provided. References: Lewicka-Szczebak, D., R. Well, A. Giesemann, L. Rohe and U. Wolf (2013). "An enhanced technique for automated determination of 15N signatures of N2, (N2+N2O) and N2O in gas samples." Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry 27(13): 1548-1558. Spott, O., R. Russow, B. Apelt and C. F. Stange (2006). "A 15N-aided artificial atmosphere gas flow technique for online determination of soil N2 release using the zeolite Köstrolith SX6®." Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry 20(22): 3267-3274. Stange, F., O. Spott, B. Apelt and R. W. Russow (2007). "Automated and rapid online determination of 15N abundance and concentration of ammonium, nitrite, or nitrate in aqueous samples by the SPINMAS technique." Isotopes in Environmental and Health Studies 43(3): 227-236.

  10. A comparison between spectrally derived vegetation indices and CO2 fluxes measured over a hardwood forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrity, S. R.; Vierling, L. A.; Turnipseed, A.; Vogel, C. S.; Martins, D. K.; Shepson, P. B.

    2006-12-01

    A dual channel, narrow-band spectroradiometer was mounted at 34 m (1.6 x canopy ht) on the University of Michigan Biological Station AmeriFlux tower over the course of 10 days during the period of rapid leaf expansion in late May and early June 2006. Spectral scans of various locations of the plant canopy surrounding the flux tower were collected at one minute intervals during daylight hours within the sampling period. These spectral data were processed to obtain reflectance values from which a scaled Photochemical Reflectance Index (sPRI) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) were calculated using reflectance values at 531nm and 570nm, and 670nm and 800nm respectively. The sPRI corresponds with xanthophyll cycle activity and thus radiation use efficiency, whereas the NDVI corresponds with absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (APAR). Midday measures of NDVI and sPRI were combined and compared with daily summed CO2 flux measurements from the eddy covariance system associated with the UMBS flux tower for the 10 day sampling period. Correlations between the combined NDVI/sPRI values and daily summed CO2 fluxes were found to vary with species, with r-square values ranging from 0.69 (p <0.1) for birch (Betula papyrifera) dominated pixels to 0.45 (p <0.1) for red pine (Pinus resinosa) dominated pixels.

  11. Eddy covariance methane flux measurements over a grazed pasture: effect of cows as moving point sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felber, R.; Münger, A.; Neftel, A.; Ammann, C.

    2015-06-01

    Methane (CH4) from ruminants contributes one-third of global agricultural greenhouse gas emissions. Eddy covariance (EC) technique has been extensively used at various flux sites to investigate carbon dioxide exchange of ecosystems. Since the development of fast CH4 analyzers, the instrumentation at many flux sites has been amended for these gases. However, the application of EC over pastures is challenging due to the spatially and temporally uneven distribution of CH4 point sources induced by the grazing animals. We applied EC measurements during one grazing season over a pasture with 20 dairy cows (mean milk yield: 22.7 kg d-1) managed in a rotational grazing system. Individual cow positions were recorded by GPS trackers to attribute fluxes to animal emissions using a footprint model. Methane fluxes with cows in the footprint were up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than ecosystem fluxes without cows. Mean cow emissions of 423 ± 24 g CH4 head-1 d-1 (best estimate from this study) correspond well to animal respiration chamber measurements reported in the literature. However, a systematic effect of the distance between source and EC tower on cow emissions was found, which is attributed to the analytical footprint model used. We show that the EC method allows one to determine CH4 emissions of cows on a pasture if the data evaluation is adjusted for this purpose and if some cow distribution information is available.

  12. Neutron spatial flux profile measurement in compact subcritical system using miniature neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Mayank; Desai, Shraddha S.; Roy, Tushar; Kashyap, Yogesh; Ray, Nirmal; Bajpai, Shefali; Patel, Tarun; Sinha, Amar

    2015-02-01

    A zero power multiplying assembly in subcritical regime serves as a benchmark for validating subcritical reactor physics. The utilization of a subcritical assembly for the determination of nuclear parameters in a multiplying medium requires a well-defined neutron flux to carry out the experiments. For this it is necessary to know the neutron flux profile inside a subcritical system. A compact subcritical assembly BRAHMMA has been developed in India. The experimental channels in this assembly are typically less than 8 mm diameter. This requires use of miniature detectors that can be mounted in these experimental channels. In this article we present the thermal neutron flux profile measurement in a compact subcritical system using indigenously developed miniature gas filled neutron detectors. These detectors were specially designed and fabricated considering the restrictive dimensional requirements of the subcritical core. Detectors of non-standard size with various sensitivities, from 0.4 to 0.001 cps/nv were used for neutron flux of interest ranging from 103 to 107 n-cm-2 s-1. A comparison of measured neutron flux using these detectors and simulated Monte Carlo calculations are also presented in this article.

  13. Eddy covariance methane flux measurements over a grazed pasture: effect of cows as moving point sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felber, R.; Münger, A.; Neftel, A.; Ammann, C.

    2015-02-01

    Methane (CH4) from ruminants contributes one third to global agricultural greenhouse gas emissions. Eddy covariance (EC) technique has been extensively used at various flux sites to investigate carbon dioxide exchange of ecosystems. Since the development of fast CH4 analysers the instrumentation at many flux sites have been amended for these gases. However the application of EC over pastures is challenging due to the spatial and temporal uneven distribution of CH4 point sources induced by the grazing animals. We applied EC measurements during one grazing season over a pasture with 20 dairy cows (mean milk yield: 22.7 kg d-1) managed in a rotational grazing system. Individual cow positions were recorded by GPS trackers to attribute fluxes to animal emissions using a footprint model. Methane fluxes with cows in the footprint were up to two orders of magnitude higher than ecosystem fluxes without cows. Mean cow emissions of 423 ± 24 g CH4 head-1 d-1 (best guess of this study) correspond well to animal respiration chamber measurements reported in the literature. However a systematic effect of the distance between source and EC tower on cow emissions was found which is attributed to the analytical footprint model used. We show that the EC method allows to determine CH4 emissions of grazing cows if the data evaluation is adjusted for this purpose and if some cow distribution information is available.

  14. Seasonal variability in gaseous mercury fluxes measured in a high-elevation meadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Converse, A. D.; Riscassi, A. L.; Scanlon, T. M.

    2010-06-01

    Seasonal patterns of atmospheric mercury (Hg) fluxes measured over vegetated terrestrial systems can provide insight into the underlying process controlling emission and deposition of Hg to vegetated surfaces. Gaseous elemental Hg fluxes were measured for week-long periods in each season (spring, summer, fall, and winter) over an uncontaminated high-elevation wetland meadow in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia using micrometeorological methods. Mean net deposition was observed in the spring (-4.8 ng m -2 h -1), emission in the summer (2.5 ng m -2 h -1), near zero flux in the fall (0.3 ng m -2 h -1), and emission in the winter (4.1 ng m -2 h -1). Nighttime deposition (when stomata are closed) and the poor correlation between Hg fluxes and canopy conductance during periods of active vegetation growth suggest that stomatal processes are not the dominant mechanism for ecosystem-level GEM exchange at this site. The strong springtime deposition relative to summer implies that young vegetation is better at scavenging Hg, with the highest deposition occurring at night possibly via a cuticular pathway. These results suggest that spring is a period of GEM deposition while other seasons exhibit net emission, emphasizing the importance of capturing GEM flux seasonality when determining total Hg budgets.

  15. The effect of atmospheric turbulence and chamber deployment period on autochamber CO2 and CH4 flux measurements in an ombrotrophic peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, D. Y. F.; Roulet, N. T.; Humphreys, E. R.; Moore, T. R.; Dalva, M.

    2012-02-01

    Accurate quantification of soil-atmosphere gas exchange is essential for understanding the magnitude and controls of greenhouse gas emissions. We used an automatic closed dynamic chamber system to measure the fluxes of CO2 and CH4 for several years at the ombrotrophic Mer Bleue peatland near Ottawa, Canada and found that atmospheric turbulence and chamber deployment period had a considerable influence on the observed flux rates. With a short deployment period of 2.5 min, CH4 flux exhibited strong diel patterns and both CH4 and nighttime CO2 effluxes were highly and negatively correlated with friction velocity as were the CO2 concentration gradients in the top 20 cm of peat. This suggests winds were flushing the very porous and relatively dry near surface peat layers, altering the concentration gradient and resulting in a 9 to 57% underestimate of CH4 flux at any time of day and a 13 to 21% underestimate of nighttime CO2 fluxes in highly turbulent conditions. Conversely, there was evidence of an overestimation of ~100% of CH4 and nighttime CO2 effluxes in calm atmospheric conditions possibly due to enhanced near-surface gas concentration gradient by mixing of chamber headspace air by fans. These problems were resolved by extending the deployment period to 30 min. After 13 min of chamber closure, the flux rate of CH4 and nighttime CO2 became constant and were not affected by turbulence thereafter, yielding a reliable estimate of the net biological fluxes. The measurement biases we observed likely exist to some extent in all chamber flux measurements made on porous and aerated substrate, such as peatlands, organic soils in tundra and forests, and snow-covered surfaces, but would be difficult to detect unless high frequency, semi-continuous observations are made.

  16. Supersaturated dissolved oxygen measured by the phosphorescence decay rate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yongxia Zhang; Duane Johnson

    2003-01-01

    Unsaturated dissolved oxygen (DO) can be measured easily using oxygen probes based on electrochemistry. However, large concentrations of supersaturated dissolved oxygen are difficult to measure by traditional methods. We will introduce a new technique to measure supersaturated dissolved oxygen concentrations using the phosphorescence decay rate of a caged lumophore. The results are in good agreement with the Stern–Volmer equation, where

  17. Productivity and carbon dioxide exchange of the leguminous crops: Estimates from flux tower measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Net CO2 exchange data on legume crops at 17 flux tower sites in North America and 3 sites in Europe representing 29 site-years of measurements were partitioned into gross photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration using a light-response function method, resulting in new estimates of ecosystem-scale ec...

  18. EVALUATION OF THE FLUX CHAMBER METHOD FOR MEASURING VOLATILE ORGANIC EMISSIONS FROM SURFACE IMPOUNDMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research deals with the validation of the flux chamber method for measuring volatile organic emissions from liquid surfaces in treatment, storage and disposal facilities (TSDF). A simulated surface impoundment was constructed so that method precision and accuracy could be de...

  19. MEASUREMENT OF BI-DIRECTIONAL AMMONIA FLUXES OVER SOYBEAN USING MODIFIED BOWEN-RATIO TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements of bi-directional ammonia exchange over a fertilized soybean canopy are presented for an 8-week period during the summer of 2002. The modified Bowne-ratio approach was used to determine fluxes from vertical NH3 and temperature gradients in combination with eddy covar...

  20. FLUX AND CROSS-SECTION MEASUREMENTS WITH FAST FISSION NEUTRONS IN BEPO AND DIDO

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. E. Mellish; J. A. Payne; R. L. Otlet

    1958-01-01

    The neutrons emitted in the fission of U²³⁵ by thermal neutrons ; vary in energy from about 15 Mev to zero. This means that the problem of ; measuring fast flux and fast neutron reaction cross sections by a simple ; activation method is inherently complicatsd by the fact that the activity ; produced in a sample can be influenced

  1. Single-cell, real-time measurements of extracellular oxygen and proton fluxes from Spirogyra grevilleana

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. M. Porterfield; P. J. S. Smith

    2000-01-01

    Summary We have adapted the self-referencing microelectrode technique to allow sensitive and noninvasive measurement of oxygen fluxes around single cells. The self-referencing technique is based on the translational movement of a selective microelectrode through the gradient next to the cell wall or membrane. The electrode is moved at a known frequency and between known points. The differential electrode output values

  2. Three-Dimensional Force Measurement and Control of a Flux-Path Control Magnetic Suspension

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Munehiro Furutachi; Shunsuke Inaba; Yuji Ishino; Masaya Takasaki; Takeshi Mizuno

    2008-01-01

    In the flux-path control magnetic suspension system, the force acting on a floator is controlled by moving a control plate made of ferromagnetic material, which is located between the permanent magnet and the floator. In this paper, the three-dimensional attractive forces acting on the floator were measured with a manufactured force sensor. The force actuating in the vertical direction is

  3. A NOVEL MICROMEGAS DETECTOR FOR IN-CORE NUCLEAR REACTOR NEUTRON FLUX MEASUREMENTS

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 A NOVEL MICROMEGAS DETECTOR FOR IN-CORE NUCLEAR REACTOR NEUTRON FLUX MEASUREMENTS S. ANDRIAMONJE Talence Cedex, France Future fast nuclear reactors designed for energy production and transmutation to neutron detection inside nuclear reactor is given. The advantage of this detector over conventional

  4. Measuring Fast-Temporal Sediment Fluxes with an Analogue Acoustic Sensor: A Wind Tunnel Study

    PubMed Central

    Poortinga, Ate; van Minnen, Jan; Keijsers, Joep; Riksen, Michel; Goossens, Dirk; Seeger, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    In aeolian research, field measurements are important for studying complex wind-driven processes for land management evaluation and model validation. Consequently, there have been many devices developed, tested, and applied to investigate a range of aeolian-based phenomena. However, determining the most effective application and data analysis techniques is widely debated in the literature. Here we investigate the effectiveness of two different sediment traps (the BEST trap and the MWAC catcher) in measuring vertical sediment flux. The study was performed in a wind tunnel with sediment fluxes characterized using saltiphones. Contrary to most studies, we used the analogue output of five saltiphones mounted on top of each other to determine the total kinetic energy, which was then used to calculate aeolian sediment budgets. Absolute sediment losses during the experiments were determined using a balance located beneath the test tray. Test runs were conducted with different sand sizes and at different wind speeds. The efficiency of the two traps did not vary with the wind speed or sediment size but was affected by both the experimental setup (position of the lowest trap above the surface and number of traps in the saltation layer) and the technique used to calculate the sediment flux. Despite this, good agreement was found between sediment losses calculated from the saltiphone and those measured using the balance. The results of this study provide a framework for measuring sediment fluxes at small time resolution (seconds to milliseconds) in the field. PMID:24058512

  5. Improved measurement with 2-D rotating fluxes considering the effect of internal field

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jin Jiang Zhong; Jian Guo Zhu; You Guang Guo; Zhi Wei Lin

    2005-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effect of the internal field on the measurement with two-dimensional (2-D) rotating fluxes. It is demonstrated that due to the effect of the internal field, the misalignment of H sensing coils, causing the asymmetry of H loci and the discrepancy of the rotational core losses between two opposite rotating directions cannot be corrected completely. A numerical

  6. Reconciling Measured and Modeled Distributed Snowpack Temperatures and Subsurface Heat Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huwald, H.; Higgins, C. W.; Diebold, M.; Lehning, M.; Williams, S. R.; Selker, J. S.; Parlange, M. B.

    2014-12-01

    While many common snow cover models allow for spatially distributed representation of the snow pack, most in-situ measurement techniques determining snow properties and state variables are invasive, destructive, and in most cases single point measurements. Fiber optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) provides a way to obtain hundreds of data points in the snow at a time in various problem-adapted configurations with cable lengths of several hundred meters. We present several experiments employing different geometrical FO cable arrangements in the snow in an attempt to obtain small-scale statistical information on snow temperature distribution and variability and the resulting subsurface (conductive) heat fluxes. The spatially distributed conductive heat fluxes are computed based on the Fourier heat equation using snow temperature and snow depth data, and an effective snow thermal conductivity derived from collocated density measurements. The temperature measurements and the simple heat flux calculations are then compared to corresponding results from the detailed SNOWPACK model. These comparisons investigate the closure of the local energy balance and show the relation between DTS temperatures and model estimations of snow thermal conductivity and conductive heat fluxes.

  7. FIELD MEASUREMENTS OF CONTAMINANT FLUX BY INTEGRAL PUMPING TESTS (SAN FRANCISCO, CA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current remedial techniques are unable to completely eliminate all dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) from source zone areas and conflicting views on the benefits of partial DNAPL source zone remediation exist in the literature. A comparison of flux measurements before and af...

  8. Shipboard Measurements and Estimations of AirSea Fluxes in the Western Tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-print Network

    California at Irvine, University of

    Ship­board Measurements and Estimations of Air­Sea Fluxes in the Western Tropical Pacific Ocean E dur­ ing the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Coupled Ocean and Atmospheric Response of the surface­layer turbulence properties are compared with those from previous land and ocean results. Momentum

  9. Orbital debris clouds and fluxes measured during the EUROMIR 95 mission

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. R. Maag; S. P. Deshpande; T. J. Stevenson; W. G. Tanner; D. Mulholland

    1997-01-01

    A new European Space Agency (ESA) flight instrument attached to the exterior of the MIR Space Station is providing a better understanding of the effects of the space environment. The instrument was designed to measure, real time, the impacts and trajectory of hypervelocity particles, the atomic oxygen flux and contamination deposition\\/effects during the course of the mission. The ESA mission,

  10. Emissions of volatile organic compounds inferred from airborne flux measurements over a megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, T.; Apel, E.; Hodzic, A.; Riemer, D. D.; Blake, D. R.; Wiedinmyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    Toluene and benzene are used for assessing the ability to measure disjunct eddy covariance (DEC) fluxes of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) on aircraft. Statistically significant correlation between vertical wind speed and mixing ratios suggests that airborne VOC eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements using PTR-MS are feasible. City-median midday toluene and benzene fluxes are calculated to be on the order of 14.1±4.0 mg/m2/h and 4.7±2.3 mg/m2/h, respectively. For comparison the adjusted CAM2004 emission inventory estimates toluene fluxes of 10 mg/m2/h along the footprint of the flight-track. Wavelet analysis of instantaneous toluene and benzene measurements during city overpasses is tested as a tool to assess surface emission heterogeneity. High toluene to benzene flux ratios above an industrial district (e.g. 10-15 g/g) including the International airport (e.g. 3-5 g/g) and a mean flux (concentration) ratio of 3.2±0.5 g/g (3.9±0.3 g/g) across Mexico City indicate that evaporative fuel and industrial emissions play an important role for the prevalence of aromatic compounds. Based on a tracer model, which was constrained by BTEX (BTEX- Benzene/Toluene/Ethylbenzene/m, p, o-Xylenes) compound concentration ratios, the fuel marker methyl-tertiary-butyl-ether (MTBE) and the biomass burning marker acetonitrile (CH3CN), we show that a combination of industrial, evaporative fuel, and exhaust emissions account for >87% of all BTEX sources. Our observations suggest that biomass burning emissions play a minor role for the abundance of BTEX compounds in the MCMA (2-13%).

  11. Thermal parameters determination of battery cells by local heat flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashko, K. A.; Mityakov, A. V.; Pyrhönen, J.; Mityakov, V. Y.; Sapozhnikov, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    A new approach to define of the thermal parameters, such as heat capacity and through-plane thermal conductivity, of pouch-type cells is introduced. Application of local heat flux measurement with a gradient heat flux sensor (GHFS) allows determination of the cell thermal parameters in different surface points of the cell. The suggested method is not cell destructive as it does not require deep discharge of the cell or application of any charge/discharge cycles during the measurements of the thermal parameters of the cell. The complete procedure is demonstrated on a high-power lithium-ion (Li-ion) pouch cell, and it is verified on a sample with well-known thermal parameters. A comparison of the experimental results with conventional thermal characterization methods shows an acceptably low error. The dependence of the cell thermal parameters on the state of charge (SoC) and measurement points on the surface was studied by the proposed measurement approach.

  12. Measurement of the zenith angle distribution of the cosmic muon flux in Hanoi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Pham Ngoc; Dung, Nguyen Tien; Hieu, Bui Duc; Phuong, Pham Trung; Darriulat, Pierre; Thao, Nguyen Thi; Thieu, Dang Quang; Thuan, Vo Van

    2003-06-01

    The zenith angle distribution of the cosmic muon flux has been measured in Hanoi, where the geomagnetic rigidity cutoff reaches the very high value of 17 GV, using an orientable scintillator telescope. The measurement is of interest for the understanding of the development of cosmic ray showers in the earth atmosphere. The dependence of the cosmic muon flux (integrated over charges and momenta) on zenith angle /? is measured to be of the approximate form (?0-asin2?)×cos2? with ?0=72.0+/-1.6 m-2sr-1s-1 and a=7.8+/-0.8 m-2sr-1s-1. This result is consistent with an earlier Hanoi measurement and is in excellent agreement with the prediction of a model widely used in the analysis of atmospheric neutrino data.

  13. A method for obtaining distributed surface flux measurements in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, M. H.; Pardyjak, E.; Nadeau, D. F.; Barrenetxea, G.; Brutsaert, W. H.; Parlange, M. B.

    2011-12-01

    Sonic anemometers and gas analyzers can be used to measure fluxes of momentum, heat, and moisture over flat terrain, and with the proper corrections, over sloping terrain as well. While this method of obtaining fluxes is currently the most accurate available, the instruments themselves are costly, making installation of many stations impossible for most campaign budgets. Small, commercial automatic weather stations (Sensorscope) are available at a fraction of the cost of sonic anemometers or gas analyzers. Sensorscope stations use slow-response instruments to measure standard meteorological variables, including wind speed and direction, air temperature, humidity, surface skin temperature, and incoming solar radiation. The method presented here makes use of one sonic anemometer and one gas analyzer along with a dozen Sensorscope stations installed throughout the Val Ferret catchment in southern Switzerland in the summers of 2009, 2010 and 2011. Daytime fluxes are calculated using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory in conjunction with the surface energy balance at each Sensorscope station as well as at the location of the sonic anemometer and gas analyzer, where a suite of additional slow-response instruments were co-located. Corrections related to slope angle were made for wind speeds and incoming shortwave radiation measured by the horizontally-mounted cup anemometers and incoming solar radiation sensors respectively. A temperature correction was also applied to account for daytime heating inside the radiation shield on the slow-response temperature/humidity sensors. With these corrections, we find a correlation coefficient of 0.77 between u* derived using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory and that of the sonic anemometer. Calculated versus measured heat fluxes also compare well and local patterns of latent heat flux and measured surface soil moisture are correlated.

  14. Results you can rely on Insights into NSZD Rate Measurements

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Leik, and Keith Wooburne/TRC Scott MacDonald/BNSF Railway University of Illinois, Urbana ­ Champaign;Results you can rely on Kennett MO ­ Q1 Results Sample Location CO2 Flux Rate (GPAY) TRC-CO2-05 MW-17 819 TRC-CO2-01 MW-18 1,220 TRC-CO2-02 MW-12 738 TRC-CO2-03 480 TRC-CO2-04 NW of MW-12 2,083 Average

  15. Measurement of the differential neutron flux inside a lead shielding in a cryogenic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coron, N.; Cuesta, C.; García, E.; Ginestra, C.; Gironnet, J.; de Marcillac, P.; Martínez, M.; Ortigoza, Y.; Pobes, C.; Puimedón, J.; Redon, T.; Rolón, T.; Sarsa, M. L.; Torres, L.; Villar, J. A.

    2012-07-01

    The ROSEBUD collaboration measured the differential flux of fast neutrons inside a shielding of lead irradiated with a source of 252Cf using two scintillating bolometers of LiF and Al2O3 at 20 mK. We compare an unfolding method using a three parameter model for the fast component of the neutron flux with a multigroup method in which the energy interval of interest is divided into groups. Some issues regarding the neutron monitoring with LiF or Al2O3 in a cryogenic experiment searching for dark matter WIMPs are discussed.

  16. Measurements of x-ray spectral flux and intensity distribution of APS/CHESS undulator radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ilinski, P.; Yun, W.; Lai, B.; Gluskin, E.; Cai, Z.

    1994-09-01

    Absolute radiation flux and polarization measurements of the APS undulators may have to be made under high thermal loading conditions. A method that may circumvent the high-heat-load problem was tested during a recent APS/CHESS undulator run. The technique makes use of a Si(Li) energy-dispersive detector to measure 5--35 keV x-rays scattered from a well-defined He gas volume at controlled pressure.

  17. The measurement of absolute thermal neutron flux using liquid scintillation counting techniques

    E-print Network

    Walker, Jack Vernon

    1960-01-01

    THE MEASUREMENT OF ABSOLUTE THERMAL NEUTRON FLUX USING LIQUID SClNTILLATION COUNTING TECHNIQUES A Thesis By Jack Vernon Halker Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1960 Major Subject Nuclear Engineering THE MEASUREMENT OP ABSOLUTE THERMAL NEUTRON PLUX US ING LIQUID SCINTILLATION COUNTING TECHNIQUES A Thesi. s By Jack Vernon Walker Approved as to style...

  18. Fission rate measurements in fuel plate type assembly reactor cores

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    The methods, materials and equipment have been developed to allow extensive and precise measurement of fission rate distributions in water moderated, U-Al fuel plate assembly type reactor cores. Fission rate monitors are accurately positioned in the reactor core, the reactor is operated at a low power for a short time, the fission rate monitors are counted with detectors incorporating automated sample changers and the measurements are converted to fission rate distributions. These measured fission rate distributions have been successfully used as baseline information related to the operation of test and experimental reactors with respect to fission power and distribution, fuel loading and fission experiments for approximately twenty years at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). 7 refs., 8 figs.

  19. High frequency SO2 flux measurements at Semeru volcano, Indonesia, using the SO2 camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smekens, J.; Burton, M. R.; Clarke, A. B.; Harijoko, A.; Wibowo, H.; Sawyer, G.

    2013-12-01

    SO2 monitoring is a common technique at many volcanic centers. Recently, automated networks of scanning spectrometers have led to great improvement in frequency and accuracy of measurements. Simultaneously a new instrument has been proposed to acquire 2D images of volcanic plumes in the UV spectrum. This imaging technique (hereafter referred to as the SO2 camera) provides additional contextual information, as well as a quantitative way of determining plume velocity from a single remote location, without relying on weather reports. These advantages are to be balanced against a loss of spectroscopic information associated with using band-pass filters that reduce precision in the measurements. We have developed a custom-built acquisition and processing software to be used with the SO2 camera developed by INGV-Pisa for monitoring of Etna and Stromboli, which consists of two Quantum Scientific Imaging CCD cameras equipped with UV filters and a USB2000+ spectrometer. We have tested the instrument at two power plants in Arizona, USA. We were able to successfully measure SO2 fluxes as low as 1-2 tons/day. We also validated our method by comparing the SO2 camera measurements against high-frequency in-situ measurements (1 data point every minute) obtained from chemical sensors within the stacks. We have also used the SO2 camera during a field campaign at Semeru volcano, Indonesia, in May and June of 2013. Semeru is a persistently active explosive volcano, whose latest eruption began in 1967. Its eruptive behavior can be characterized by cyclic dome growth and collapse in the active crater and frequent small magnitude explosions occurring at periods of minutes to hours. We found that the majority of SO2 at Semeru is released during the explosive phases (instantaneous peaks of up to 40 kg/s), with passive emission levels between explosions fluctuating from 0-5 kg/s. After the initial explosive release, emission returns to background levels following an exponential decline over a period of 10-15 mins, often punctuated by several secondary gas-release pulses. Based on the eruptive freqeuency we observed at the time of measurement (1 explosion every 30-60 mins), we estimate the average SO2 flux from Semeru to be 300-400 tons/day, depending on the magnitude of individual explosions. To interpret the data in terms of magma ascent we also used DOMEFLOW, a 1.5D transient isothermal numerical model. Petrologic observations from tephra and ballistic samples collected at the summit help us constrain the initial conditions of the system, including the volatile content. Preliminary model runs produced periodic lava extrusion and pulses of gas release at the vent, with a cycle period on the order of hours, even though a steady magma supply rate was prescribed at the bottom of the conduit. Enhanced shallow permeability creates a dense plug in the shallow subsurface, which in turn plays a critical role in creating and controlling the observed periodic behavior.

  20. Dendritic flux avalanches and the accompanied thermal strain in type-II superconducting films: effect of magnetic field ramp rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ze; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, You-He

    2015-07-01

    Dendritic flux avalanches and the accompanying thermal stress and strain in type-II superconducting thin films under transverse magnetic fields are numerically simulated in this paper. The influence of the magnetic field ramp rate, edge defects, and the temperature of the surrounding coolant are considered. Maxwell's equations and the highly nonlinear E–J power-law characteristics of superconductors, coupled with the heat diffusion equation, are adopted to formulate these phenomena. The fast Fourier transform-based iteration scheme is used to track the evolution of the magnetic flux and the temperature in the superconducting film. The finite element method is used to analyze the thermal stress and strain induced in the superconducting film. It is found that the ramp rate has a significant effect on the flux avalanche process. The avalanches nucleate more easily for a film under a large magnetic field ramp rate than for a film under a small one. In addition, the avalanches always initiate from edge defects or areas that experience larger magnetic fields. The superconducting films experience large thermal strain induced by the large temperature gradient during the avalanche process, which may even lead to the failure of the sample.

  1. Measurements of OVOC fluxes by eddy covariance using a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer - method development at a coastal site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Beale, R.; Smyth, T.; Blomquist, B.

    2013-07-01

    We present here vertical fluxes of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) measured with eddy covariance (EC) during the period of March to July 2012 near the southwest coast of the United Kingdom. The performance of the proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) for flux measurement is characterized, with additional considerations given to the homogeneity and stationarity assumptions required by EC. Observed mixing ratios and fluxes of OVOCs (specifically methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone) vary significantly with time of day and wind direction. Higher mixing ratios and fluxes of acetaldehyde and acetone are found in the daytime and from the direction of a forested park, most likely due to light-driven emissions from terrestrial plants. Methanol mixing ratio and flux do not demonstrate consistent diel variability, suggesting sources in addition to plants. We estimate air-sea exchange and photochemical rates of these compounds, which are compared to measured vertical fluxes. For acetaldehyde, the mean (1?) mixing ratio of 0.13 (0.02) ppb at night may be maintained by oceanic emission, while photochemical destruction outpaces production during the day. Air-sea exchange and photochemistry are probably net sinks of methanol and acetone in this region. Their nighttime mixing ratios of 0.46 (0.20) and 0.39 (0.08) ppb appear to be affected more by terrestrial emissions and long-distance transport, respectively.

  2. Flux density measurements of GPS candidate pulsars at 610 MHz using interferometric imaging technique

    E-print Network

    Dembska, M; Kijak, J; Lewandowski, W

    2015-01-01

    We conducted radio interferometric observations of six pulsars at 610 MHz using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). All these objects were claimed or suspected to be the gigahertz-peaked spectra (GPS) pulsars. For a half of the sources in our sample the interferometric imaging provides the only means to estimate their flux at 610 MHz due to a strong pulse scatter-broadening. In our case, these pulsars have very high dispersion measure values and we present their spectra containing for the first time low-frequency measurements. The remaining three pulsars were observed at low frequencies using the conventional pulsar flux measurement method. The interferometric imaging technique allowed us to re-examine their fluxes at 610 MHz. We were able to confirm the GPS feature in the PSR B1823$-$13 spectrum and select a GPS candidate pulsar. These results clearly demonstrate that the interferometric imaging technique can be successfully applied to estimate flux density of pulsars even in the presence of strong s...

  3. Sounding rocket measurement of the absolute solar EUV flux utilizing a silicon photodiode

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, H.S.; McMullin, D.; Judge, D.L. (Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)); Canfield, L.R. (National Inst. of Standards and Tech., Gaithersburg, MD (United States))

    1990-04-01

    A newly developed stable and high quantum efficiency silicon photodiode was used to obtain an accurate measurement of the integrated absolute magnitude of the solar extreme ultraviolet photon flux in the spectral region between 50 and 800 {angstrom}. The detector was flown aboard a solar point sounding rocket launched from White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico on October 24, 1988. The adjusted daily 10.7-cm solar radio flux and sunspot number were 168.4 and 121, respectively. The unattenuated absolute value of the solar EUV flux at 1 AU in the specified wavelength region was 6.81 {times} 10{sup 10} photons cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. Based on a nominal probable error of 7% for National Institute of Standards and Technology detector efficiency measurements in the 50- to 500-{angstrom} region (5% on longer wavelength measurements between 500 and 1216 {angstrom}), and based on experimental errors associated with their rocket instrumentation and analysis, a conservative total error estimate of {approximately}14% is assigned to the absolute integral solar flux obtained.

  4. An instrument for measuring the momentum flux from atomic and charged particle jets

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.A.; Zonca, F.; Timberlake, J.; Bennett, T.; Cuthbertson, J.; Langer, W.; Motley, R.

    1990-07-01

    We have developed an instrument to measure the momentum flux from an intense plasma stream for which the standard techniques used for low pressure gases (<10 Torr) at room temperature are unsuitable. This device, a Plasma Momentum Meter, can measure forces of 10{sup {minus}5} {minus} 10{sup {minus}3} Newtons with a response time of <50 ms onto surfaces of different materials immersed in dense plasmas (n > 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3}). Such forces are transmitted predominantly by ionic and neutral species, with 10's of eV's of kinetic energy, are accompanied by high heat fluxes, and are pulsed. The momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer, a capacitance-type pressure gauge. This protects the transducer from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering. An absolute force calibration of the PMM to 1% accuracy has been made is described. A flat carbon target has been used in measurements of the momentum flux of He, Ne, Ar, and Kr, plasmas produced in a magnetized linear plasma device. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Acoustic measurement of the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well flow rate

    E-print Network

    Camilli, Richard

    On May 31, 2010, a direct acoustic measurement method was used to quantify fluid leakage rate from the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well prior to removal of its broken riser. This method utilized an acoustic imaging sonar and ...

  6. Using Google Earth to measure seacliff erosion rates

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Alfred Hochstaedter

    This lab uses Google Earth to measure the rate of seacliff retreat. It touches upon coastal processes, natural hazards, and coastal management issues. The central focus of the lab is in the Monterey Bay area.

  7. A review of micrometeoroid flux measurements and models for low orbital altitudes of the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susko, M.

    1984-01-01

    A review of meteoroid flux measurements and models for low orbital altitudes of the Space Station has been made in order to provide information that may be useful in design studies and laboratory hypervelocity impact tests which simulate micrometeoroids in space for design of the main wall of the Space Station. This report deals with the meteoroid flux mass model, the defocusing and shielding factors that affect the model, the probability of meteoroid penetration of the main wall of a Space Station. Whipple (1947) suggested a meteoroid bumper, a thin shield around the spacecraft at some distance from the wall, as an effective device for reducing penetration, which has been discussed in this report. The equations of the probability of meteoroid penetration, the average annual cumulative total flux, and the equations for the thickness of the main wall and the bumper are presented in this report.

  8. Upholstered Furniture Heat Release Rates: Measurements and Estimation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vytenis Babrauskas

    1983-01-01

    A new instrument, termed a furniture calorimeter, has been constructed and placed into operation for measuring furniture heat release rates based on oxygen consumption. Using the furniture calorimeter, burning rate information has been obtained on a series of 13 chairs, loveseats, and sofas, most of them specially built to permit direct comparisons of construction features. A quantitative assessment is made

  9. STATISTICAL MODEL OF LABORATORY DEATH RATE MEASUREMENTS FOR AIRBORNE BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    From 270 published laboratory airborne death rate measurements, two regression models relating the death rate constant for 15 bacterial species to aerosol age in the dark, Gram reaction, temperature, and an evaporation factor which is a function of RH and temperature were obtaine...

  10. Confidence bands for measured economically optimal nitrogen rates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While numerous researchers have computed economically optimal N rate (EONR) values from measured yield – N rate data, nearly all have neglected to compute or estimate the statistical reliability of these EONR values. In this study, a simple method for computing EONR and its confidence bands is descr...

  11. Comparison of four composite landfill liner systems considering leakage rate and mass flux

    E-print Network

    , Seoul, Republic of Korea ABSTRACT: Performance of four different municipal solid waste landfill liner to evaluate the performance of municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill liner systems. A liner system that allows system is estimated and compared with the flux from the other liner systems to evaluate the relative

  12. Assessing the Deepwater Horizon spill rate using chemical measurements from aircraft (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryerson, T. B.; Aikin, K.; Angevine, W. M.; Atlas, E. L.; Bahreini, R.; Blake, D. R.; Brock, C. A.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Gao, R.; de Gouw, J. A.; Fahey, D. W.; Holloway, J. S.; Lack, D. A.; Langridge, J. M.; Meagher, J. F.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Murphy, D. M.; Neuman, J.; Nowak, J. B.; Parrish, D. D.; Peischl, J.; Perring, A.; Pollack, I. B.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Roberts, J. M.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, J. R.; Stark, H.; Trainer, M.; Warneke, C.

    2010-12-01

    Analysis of airborne atmospheric chemical measurements downwind of the Deepwater Horizon marine oil spill provides a detailed picture of oil carbon partitioning between the water and air. The atmospheric data are used to quantify the fractions of methane, light alkanes, and light aromatics that dissolve during transit of oil to the surface. Emissions from the three major pathways to the atmosphere - evaporation of surface oil, flaring of recovered natural gas, and deliberate burns of surface oil - are described. A subset of insoluble, volatile hydrocarbon species is transported quantitatively to the surface and evaporates completely within hours. We calculate atmospheric fluxes of these species, and include Macondo reservoir composition information to derive a steady-state leak rate for the fluid (oil and condensed gas) escaping into the water from the wellhead. We separately calculate the flux of CO2 produced by the Enterprise natural gas flare, and thereby derive the rate of reservoir fluid recovery to the surface vessels from the wellhead. The sum of escaped and recovered fluxes provides a robust lower limit to the total flow rate of reservoir fluid emerging from the leaking Macondo well.

  13. The Annual Cycle of Arctic Ice and Ocean Heat and Freshwater Fluxes, Measured and Modelled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, S.; Aksenov, Y.; Tsubouchi, T.

    2014-12-01

    Paucity of measurements means that quantifying and evaluating the Arctic thermal and hydrological cycles is problematic. For example: atmospheric reanalyses are not well constrained by observations; for river runoff measurements, there are un-gauged flows to consider; and until the relatively recent advent of autonomous measurement systems, ocean measurements outside the summer melt season were rare. We have assembled a complete and continuous Arctic Ocean boundary measurement array from moored installations in four ocean gateways: Fram, Davis and Bering Straits, and the Barents Sea Opening. Occasionally "patching" with coupled ice-ocean general circulation model (GCM) output is required; if so, the output water properties are validated and calibrated against climatology. This approach enables application of inverse modeling methods through the use of conservation constraints, and consequent generation of a set of 12 monthly-mean ocean (including sea ice) fluxes of freshwater and heat spanning a full calendar year. We will present results from a single annual cycle (2005-6). We have also transferred the design of the Arctic Ocean Boundary Array to the GCM environment, where we have calculated the mean annual cycles (from ca. 30-year model runs) both of net surface fluxes (atmosphere-ocean and land-ocean, including sea ice) and equivalent ice and ocean boundary fluxes of freshwater and heat, at two model resolutions (1/4 degree and 1/12 degree global mean) and for two different surface forcing data sets. We will show the resulting comparisons of the mean annual cycles of measured and modeled Arctic freshwater and heat fluxes, and also show the modeled mean annual cycle of heat and freshwater storage. We believe that the integral boundary array formed by sustained measurements in the four named ocean gateways should be a cornerstone of any Arctic environmental monitoring system.

  14. Using sonic anemometer temperature to measure sensible heat flux in strong winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, S. P.; Horst, T. W.; Jacobsen, L.; Blanken, P. D.; Monson, R. K.

    2012-09-01

    Sonic anemometers simultaneously measure the turbulent fluctuations of vertical wind (w') and sonic temperature (Ts'), and are commonly used to measure sensible heat flux (H). Our study examines 30-min heat fluxes measured with a Campbell Scientific CSAT3 sonic anemometer above a subalpine forest. We compared H calculated with Ts to H calculated with a co-located thermocouple and found that, for horizontal wind speed (U) less than 8 m s-1, the agreement was around ±30 W m-2. However, for U ? 8 m s-1, the CSAT H had a generally positive deviation from H calculated with the thermocouple, reaching a maximum difference of ?250 W m-2 at U ? 18 m s-1. With version 4 of the CSAT firmware, we found significant underestimation of the speed of sound and thus Ts in high winds (due to a delayed detection of the sonic pulse), which resulted in the large CSAT heat flux errors. Although this Ts error is qualitatively similar to the well-known fundamental correction for the crosswind component, it is quantitatively different and directly related to the firmware estimation of the pulse arrival time. For a CSAT running version 3 of the firmware, there does not appear to be a significant underestimation of Ts; however, a Ts error similar to that of version 4 may occur if the CSAT is sufficiently out of calibration. An empirical correction to the CSAT heat flux that is consistent with our conceptual understanding of the Ts error is presented. Within a broader context, the surface energy balance is used to evaluate the heat flux measurements, and the usefulness of side-by-side instrument comparisons is discussed.

  15. Gas exchange and COâ flux in the tropical Atlantic Ocean determined from ²²²Rn and pCOâ measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William M. Smethie; Taro Takahashi; D. W. Chipman; J. R. Ledwell

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of ²²²Rn vertical profiles and pCOâ in the surface water and the atmosphere were made simultaneously in the tropical Atlantic Ocean as part of the TTO\\/TAS program. The gas exchange rate or piston velocity was determined from the ²²²Rn profiles, and the ..delta..pCOâ between the surface ocean and the atmosphere was determined from the pCOâ measurements. The net flux

  16. Measurements of microparticle fluxes on orbital stations in 1978-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Lev; Baranov, Dmitrii; Dergachev, Valentin; Gagarin, Yurii; Samokhina, Maria S.; Bednyakov, Sergey A.

    The important task of ISO WG4/SC14 activity is the development of standards for the micrometeoroids/space debris environment. To develop such standards it is necessary to have a large amount of experimental data. This paper presents results of flight experiments for measuring fluxes of hard particles with sizes of 1-500 mum, that were carried out on “Salut-6” (1978-1979), “Salut-7” (1984-1985) and “Mir” (1988-1997) orbital space stations, and on ISS (1998-2011). Particle fluxes were determined by analyzing holes in thermal protective shields of plastic track detectors for heavy nuclei of cosmic rays, that were used in PLATAN experiment on “Salut” and “Mir” stations, and on ISS (2002-2004), and by studying craters in polished metal samples and at the surface of a specimen cartridge of KOMPLAST experiment on ISS (1998-2011). Differential and integral dependences of particle fluxes on their diameter were obtained for various assumptions about the correlation between diameters of craters/holes and of incident particles. The elemental composition analysis of remainders in craters, carried out with an electron microprobe, enabled to distinguish craters created by micrometeoroids from the ones made by space debris particles. The data obtained on particle fluxes are compared with existing models of natural and artificial particle fluxes. KOMPLAST results for particles with size of 5-50 mum exceed corresponding values of ORDEM2000 model for the ISS orbit.

  17. Integral measurements of neutron and gamma-ray leakage fluxes from the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1984-03-01

    This report presents integral measurements of neutron and gamma-ray leakage fluxes from a critical mockup of the Hiroshima bomb Little Boy at Los Alamos National Laobratory with detector systems developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Bonner ball detectors were used to map the neutron fluxes in the horizontal midplane at various distances from the mockup and for selected polar angles, keeping the source-detector separation constant. Gamma-ray energy deposition measurements were made with thermoluminescent detectors at several locations on the iron shell of the source mockup. The measurements were performed as part of a larger progam to provide benchmark data for testing the methods used to calculate the radiation released from the Little Boy bomb over Hiroshima. 3 references, 10 figures.

  18. Measurement of the Neutron Flux in the 1 MW Pb-Bi Liquid Target of the MEGAPIE Project

    SciTech Connect

    Marie, F.; Chabod, S.; Foucher, Y.; Letourneau, A.; Ridikas, D. [CEA/DSM/DAPNIA/SPhN (France); Beauvais, Ph.; Lotrus, P.; Molinie, F.; Toussaint, J.Ch. [CEA/DSM/DAPNIA/SIS (France); Blandin, Ch.; Breaud, S. [CEA/DEN/DER/SPeX (France); Chattier, F. [CEA/DEN/DPC/SECR (France)

    2005-05-24

    We propose to measure the neutron flux in the liquid Pb-Bi 1 MW MEGAPIE target at PSI. Micro fission-chambers will be placed inside the central rod of the target to measure both thermal and non-thermal components of the neutron flux. In principle, both time- and space-dependent variations of the flux will be on line monitored with a precision better than 5%.

  19. Convective Heat Transfer Scaling of Ignition Delay and Burning Rate with Heat Flux and Stretch Rate in the Equivalent Low Stretch Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    To better evaluate the buoyant contributions to the convective cooling (or heating) inherent in normal-gravity material flammability test methods, we derive a convective heat transfer correlation that can be used to account for the forced convective stretch effects on the net radiant heat flux for both ignition delay time and burning rate. The Equivalent Low Stretch Apparatus (ELSA) uses an inverted cone heater to minimize buoyant effects while at the same time providing a forced stagnation flow on the sample, which ignites and burns as a ceiling fire. Ignition delay and burning rate data is correlated with incident heat flux and convective heat transfer and compared to results from other test methods and fuel geometries using similarity to determine the equivalent stretch rates and thus convective cooling (or heating) rates for those geometries. With this correlation methodology, buoyant effects inherent in normal gravity material flammability test methods can be estimated, to better apply the test results to low stretch environments relevant to spacecraft material selection.

  20. An iterative procedure for estimating areally averaged heat flux using planetary boundary layer mixed layer height and locally measured heat flux

    SciTech Connect

    Coulter, R. L.; Gao, W.; Lesht, B. M.

    2000-04-04

    Measurements at the central facility of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) are intended to verify, improve, and develop parameterizations in radiative flux models that are subsequently used in General Circulation Models (GCMs). The reliability of this approach depends upon the representativeness of the local measurements at the central facility for the site as a whole or on how these measurements can be interpreted so as to accurately represent increasingly large scales. The variation of surface energy budget terms over the SGP CART site is extremely large. Surface layer measurements of the sensible heat flux (H) often vary by a factor of 2 or more at the CART site (Coulter et al. 1996). The Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) effectively integrates the local inputs across large scales; because the mixed layer height (h) is principally driven by H, it can, in principal, be used for estimates of surface heat flux over scales on the order of tens of kilometers. By combining measurements of h from radiosondes or radar wind profiles with a one-dimensional model of mixed layer height, they are investigating the ability of diagnosing large-scale heat fluxes. The authors have developed a procedure using the model described by Boers et al. (1984) to investigate the effect of changes in surface sensible heat flux on the mixed layer height. The objective of the study is to invert the sense of the model.

  1. Estimating Rain Rates from Tipping-Bucket Rain Gauge Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jianxin; Fisher, Brad L.; Wolff, David B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the cubic spline based operational system for the generation of the TRMM one-minute rain rate product 2A-56 from Tipping Bucket (TB) gauge measurements. Methodological issues associated with applying the cubic spline to the TB gauge rain rate estimation are closely examined. A simulated TB gauge from a Joss-Waldvogel (JW) disdrometer is employed to evaluate effects of time scales and rain event definitions on errors of the rain rate estimation. The comparison between rain rates measured from the JW disdrometer and those estimated from the simulated TB gauge shows good overall agreement; however, the TB gauge suffers sampling problems, resulting in errors in the rain rate estimation. These errors are very sensitive to the time scale of rain rates. One-minute rain rates suffer substantial errors, especially at low rain rates. When one minute rain rates are averaged to 4-7 minute or longer time scales, the errors dramatically reduce. The rain event duration is very sensitive to the event definition but the event rain total is rather insensitive, provided that the events with less than 1 millimeter rain totals are excluded. Estimated lower rain rates are sensitive to the event definition whereas the higher rates are not. The median relative absolute errors are about 22% and 32% for 1-minute TB rain rates higher and lower than 3 mm per hour, respectively. These errors decrease to 5% and 14% when TB rain rates are used at 7-minute scale. The radar reflectivity-rainrate (Ze-R) distributions drawn from large amount of 7-minute TB rain rates and radar reflectivity data are mostly insensitive to the event definition.

  2. Versatile radar measurement of the electron loss rate in air

    SciTech Connect

    Dogariu, Arthur; Shneider, Mikhail N.; Miles, Richard B. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)] [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2013-11-25

    We present an experimental method that makes possible in-situ measurements of the electron loss rate in arbitrary gas mixtures. A weakly ionized plasma is induced via resonant multiphoton ionization of trace amounts of nitric oxide seeded into the gas, and homodyne microwave scattering detection is used to study the dynamics of the electron loss mechanisms. Using this approach, the attachment rate for electrons to molecular oxygen in room temperature, atmospheric pressure air is determined. The measured 0.76 × 10{sup 8} s{sup ?1} attachment rate is in very good agreement with predictions based on literature data.

  3. Versatile radar measurement of the electron loss rate in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogariu, Arthur; Shneider, Mikhail N.; Miles, Richard B.

    2013-11-01

    We present an experimental method that makes possible in-situ measurements of the electron loss rate in arbitrary gas mixtures. A weakly ionized plasma is induced via resonant multiphoton ionization of trace amounts of nitric oxide seeded into the gas, and homodyne microwave scattering detection is used to study the dynamics of the electron loss mechanisms. Using this approach, the attachment rate for electrons to molecular oxygen in room temperature, atmospheric pressure air is determined. The measured 0.76 × 108 s-1 attachment rate is in very good agreement with predictions based on literature data.

  4. A site-level comparison of lysimeter and eddy-covariance flux measurements of evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschi, Martin; Michel, Dominik; Lehner, Irene; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2015-04-01

    Accurate measurements of evapotranspiration are required for many meteorological, climatological, ecological and hydrological research applications and developments. Here we examine and compare two widely used methods to measure evapotranspiration at the site level: lysimeter-based measurements (EL) and eddy-covariance (EC) flux measurements (EEC). The analyses are based on parallel measurements at the research catchment Rietholzbach in northeastern Switzerland and focuses on the period June 2009 to December 2013. The measurements are compared on the yearly, monthly, daily, and hourly time scales, and with respect to an over 35-year lysimeter evapotranspiration time series. Overall, the two measurement techniques agree well, especially on the annual time scale. They also agree well with an independent catchment water-balance estimate of evapotranspiration. The good agreement of these independent methods emphasizes the representativeness of the lysimeter and EC measurements for the entire catchment despite their comparatively small source areas. The study also discusses different possibilities to close the energy balance of the EC flux measurements. From the comparison of EL and EEC, the closure of the energy balance according to the Bowen ratio is found to be reasonable.

  5. Rotation Rate of Saturn's Magnetosphere using CAPS Plasma Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, E.; Cooper, J.; Simpson, D.; Paterson, W.

    2012-01-01

    We present the present status of an investigation of the rotation rate of Saturn 's magnetosphere using a 3D velocity moment technique being developed at Goddard which is similar to the 2D version used by Sittler et al. (2005) [1] for SOI and similar to that used by Thomsen et al. (2010). This technique allows one to nearly cover the full energy range of the CAPS IMS from 1 V less than or equal to E/Q less than 50 kV. Since our technique maps the observations into a local inertial frame, it does work during roll manoeuvres. We have made comparisons with Wilson et al. (2008) [2] (2005-358 and 2005-284) who performs a bi-Maxwellian fit to the ion singles data and our results are nearly identical. We will also make comparisons with results by Thomsen et al. (2010) [3]. Our analysis uses ion composition data to weight the non-compositional data, referred to as singles data, to separate H+, H2+ and water group ions (W+) from each other. The ion data set is especially valuable for measuring flow velocities for protons, which are more difficult to derive using singles data within the inner magnetosphere, where the signal is dominated by heavy ions (i.e., proton peak merges with W+ peak as low energy shoulder). Our technique uses a flux function, which is zero in the proper plasma flow frame, to estimate fluid parameter uncertainties. The comparisons investigate the experimental errors and potential for systematic errors in the analyses, including ours. The rolls provide the best data set when it comes to getting 4PI coverage of the plasma but are more susceptible to time aliasing effects. Since our analysis is a velocity moments technique it will work within the inner magnetosphere where pickup ions are important and velocity distributions are non-Maxwellian. So, we will present results inside Enceladus' L shell and determine if mass loading is important. In the future we plan to make comparisons with magnetic field observations, use Saturn ionosphere conductivities as presently known and the field aligned currents necessary for the planet to enforce corotation of the rotating plasma.

  6. Flux measurements in the surface Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer over the Aegean Sea, Greece.

    PubMed

    Kostopoulos, V E; Helmis, C G

    2014-10-01

    Micro-meteorological measurements within the surface Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer took place at the shoreline of two islands at northern and south-eastern Aegean Sea of Greece. The primary goal of these experimental campaigns was to study the momentum, heat and humidity fluxes over this part of the north-eastern Mediterranean Sea, characterized by limited spatial and temporal scales which could affect these exchanges at the air-sea interface. The great majority of the obtained records from both sites gave higher values up to factor of two, compared with the estimations from the most widely used parametric formulas that came mostly from measurements over open seas and oceans. Friction velocity values from both campaigns varied within the same range and presented strong correlation with the wind speed at 10 m height while the calculated drag coefficient values at the same height for both sites were found to be constant in relation with the wind speed. Using eddy correlation analysis, the heat flux values were calculated (virtual heat fluxes varied from -60 to 40 W/m(2)) and it was found that they are affected by the limited spatial and temporal scales of the responding air-sea interaction mechanism. Similarly, the humidity fluxes appeared to be strongly influenced by the observed intense spatial heterogeneity of the sea surface temperature. PMID:25046608

  7. Emissions of volatile organic compounds inferred from airborne flux measurements over a megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, T.; Apel, E.; Hodzic, A.; Riemer, D.; Blake, D.; Wiedinmyer, C.

    2008-07-01

    Toluene and benzene are used for assessing the ability to measure disjunct eddy covariance (DEC) fluxes of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) on aircraft. Statistically significant correlation between vertical wind speed and mixing ratios suggests that airborne VOC eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements using PTR-MS are feasible. City-average midday toluene and benzene fluxes are calculated to be on the order of 15.5±4.0 mg/m2/h and 4.7±2.3 mg/m2/h respectively. These values argue for an underestimation of toluene and benzene emissions in current inventories used for the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). Wavelet analysis of instantaneous toluene and benzene measurements during city overpasses is tested as a tool to assess surface emission heterogeneity. High toluene to benzene flux ratios above an industrial district (e.g. 10 15) including the International airport (e.g. 3 5) and a mean flux (concentration) ratio of 3.2±0.5 (3.9±0.3) across Mexico City indicate that evaporative fuel and industrial emissions play an important role for the prevalence of aromatic compounds. Based on a tracer model, which was constrained by BTEX (Benzene/Toluene/Ethylbenzene/m,p,o-Xylenes) compound concentration ratios, the fuel marker methyl-tertiary-butyl-ether (MTBE) and the biomass burning marker acetonitrile (CH3CN), we show that a combination of industrial, evaporative fuel, and exhaust emissions account for >90% of all BTEX sources. Our observations suggest that biomass burning emissions play a minor role for the abundance of BTEX compounds (0 10%) in the MCMA.

  8. Scalar dissipation rate measurements in a starting jet

    E-print Network

    Soulopoulos, N; Taylor, A M K P

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the scalar dissipation rate are performed in an impulsively started gas jet, using planar laser induced fluorescence. The measurements are well resolved spatially. The deteriorating effect of experimental noise on this experiment is treated with a Wiener filter, which is shown to be applicable to this large-scale inhomogeneous flow. The accuracy of the scalar dissipation rate is within $20\\%$, as determined from an explicit calculation of the filtering errors. The residual fields that remain after the filtering are analysed in detail and their statistical properties show that these resemble white noise to a good approximation. The level of corrections is minimal for the scalar field but it is of the order of $40\\%$ for the scalar dissipation rate. An examination of the filtering operation using modeled spectra and the measured spatial resolution shows that the Wiener filter produces errors in the estimate of the scalar dissipation rate $\\sim30\\%$, for Taylor-scale Reynolds number up to 1000. T...

  9. Pictorial versus Verbal Rating Scales in Music Preference Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBlanc, Albert; Jin, Young Chang; Simpson, Charles S.; Stamou, Lelouda; McCrary, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Compares pictorial and verbal rating scales as measures of music preference opinions. Examines internal consistency and test-retest reliability of each type of scale, the overall preference scores generated through the use of each to measure preference for the same music stimuli, and student preferences for each type after using them. (DSK)

  10. Enclosure 2 DOE's Position on Dose Rate "Measurement Uncertainty"

    E-print Network

    Enclosure 2 DOE's Position on Dose Rate "Measurement Uncertainty" The basis for EPA's measurement uncertainty concerns, as cited in their Technical Support Document (TSD), "Review of DOE Planned Change up to the DOE, under their responsibility for determining nuclear safety for defense generated TRU

  11. Energy flux measurement from the dissipated energy in capillary wave turbulence Luc Deike, Michael Berhanu, and Eric Falcon

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Energy flux measurement from the dissipated energy in capillary wave turbulence Luc Deike, Michael the dissipation is increased. The energy dissipated by capillary waves is also measured and found to increase with the frequency and the newly defined mean energy flux are in good agreement with wave turbulence theory

  12. Nationwide measurements of cosmic-ray dose rates throughout Japan.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, K; Hiraide, I; Sato, K; Nakamura, T

    2008-01-01

    Cosmic-ray dose rates on the ground were measured throughout Japan. Neutron dose rates were measured as ambient dose equivalent rates (H*(10)) at 240 points using high-sensitivity neutron REM counters. In addition, cosmic rays directly ionising plus photon components were measured with an ionisation chamber. Time variation due to solar modulation during this study was corrected based on the results of sequential measurements. The effects of altitude, geomagnetic latitude, rainfall and snowfall on the neutron dose rate were inferred from the measured results. The mean value of the neutron dose rates (H*(10)) measured at 47 points of prefectural capitals in Japan was 4.0 nSv h(-1). The value corrected for the energy response of the REM counter was 6.4 nSv h(-1), corresponding to 4.8 nSv h(-1) as an effective dose (ISO). The mean value of the cosmic ray directly ionising plus photon components as an effective dose was 31 nSv h(-1). PMID:19151128

  13. In situ methods for measuring thermal properties and heat flux on planetary bodies.

    PubMed

    Kömle, Norbert I; Hütter, Erika S; Macher, Wolfgang; Kaufmann, Erika; Kargl, Günter; Knollenberg, Jörg; Grott, Matthias; Spohn, Tilman; Wawrzaszek, Roman; Banaszkiewicz, Marek; Seweryn, Karoly; Hagermann, Axel

    2011-06-01

    The thermo-mechanical properties of planetary surface and subsurface layers control to a high extent in which way a body interacts with its environment, in particular how it responds to solar irradiation and how it interacts with a potentially existing atmosphere. Furthermore, if the natural temperature profile over a certain depth can be measured in situ, this gives important information about the heat flux from the interior and thus about the thermal evolution of the body. Therefore, in most of the recent and planned planetary lander missions experiment packages for determining thermo-mechanical properties are part of the payload. Examples are the experiment MUPUS on Rosetta's comet lander Philae, the TECP instrument aboard NASA's Mars polar lander Phoenix, and the mole-type instrument HP(3) currently developed for use on upcoming lunar and Mars missions. In this review we describe several methods applied for measuring thermal conductivity and heat flux and discuss the particular difficulties faced when these properties have to be measured in a low pressure and low temperature environment. We point out the abilities and disadvantages of the different instruments and outline the evaluation procedures necessary to extract reliable thermal conductivity and heat flux data from in situ measurements. PMID:21760643

  14. Multi-object filtering with Poisson arrival-rate measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Daniel; Nagappa, Sharad

    2011-06-01

    Recent interest in multi-object filtering has focussed on the problem of discrete-time filtering, where sets of measurements are collected at regular intervals from the sensor. Many sensors do not provide multiple measurements at regular intervals but instead provide single-measurement reports at irregular time-steps. In this paper we study the multi-object filtering problem for estimation from measurements where the target and clutter processes provide measurements with Poisson arrival rates. In particular, we show that the Probability Hypothesis Density (PHD) filter can be adapted to Poisson arrival rate measurements by modelling the probability of detection with an exponential distribution. We demonstrate the approach in simulated scenarios.

  15. Measurement of the vertical cosmic muon flux in a region of large rigidity cutoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Pham Ngoc; Dung, Nguyen Tien; Hieu, Bui Duc; Phuc, Nguyen; Phuong, Pham Trung; Darriulat, Pierre; Thieu, Dang Quang; Thuan, Vo Van

    2002-04-01

    The vertical cosmic muon flux has been measured in Hanoi using a segmented scintillator hodoscope. It is the first measurement performed at VATLY, a cosmic ray laboratory recently created in Vietnam and installed in the premises of the Institute for Nuclear Sciences and Techniques. The measurement, performed at sea level in a region where the geomagnetic rigidity cutoff reaches 17 GV, is of interest for the understanding of the development of cosmic ray showers in the earth atmosphere. The result is compared with the prediction of a model widely used in the analysis of atmospheric neutrino data.

  16. Micrometeoroid Flux in the Earth-Venus Region Measured by the IKAROS-ALADDIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Hajime

    2012-07-01

    The ALADDIN (Arrayed Large-Area Dust Detectors in INterplanetary space) made of 0.54 ^{m2} PVDF sensors was deployed on the anti-Sun face of the thin polyimide sail membrane of the deep space solar sail spacecraft "IKAROS (Interplanetary Kitecraft Accelerated by the Radiation Of the Sun)". It has measured micrometeoroid flux between the Earth's orbit and Venus' orbit (i.e., 1.0~0.7 AU of heliocentric distance) for 1.5 revolutions from June 2010 until October 2011. The ALADDIN dust detector is arrayed by 8 channels of 9-20 micron-thick PVDF sensors, which are capable of detecting hypervelocity impacts of micrometeoroids at >~10 ^{-12 }g, according to ground calibration impact experiments. The sensors filter electronic, thermal and vibration noises and can record time, peak hold value above its threshold, and relaxation duration of each impact signal. In total, its cruising measurements counted more than 3000 dust impacts after screening noise signals. The ALADDIN flux in the 2010-2011 epoch was compared with fluxes at similar mass range of micrometeoroids and in similar heliocentric distances measured by Helios in 1970's and Galileo in 1990's, both composed of much less number of impact data. Then, it suggested enhancement of dust flux in the trailing edge of circumsolar orbits of the Earth and Venus, which are consistent with previous reports of larger dust grain enhancements observed by infrared telescopes. This also implies that the temporal flux enhancement of large micrometeoroids in the blob may have caused a cascading effect to produce smaller dust by collisions with sporadic meteoroids. Also it is apparent that the micrometeoroid flux increases by approximately one order of magnitude from 1 AU to 0.7 AU during the 2010-2011 epoch. The temporal variance of the Helios flux data in 1976-80 in the same region of 1 AU may be associated with difference of averaged solar activities during both epochs. Since the solar activity in the years 2010-2011 was around the minimum of the solar cycle, smaller micrometeoroids, which are more affected by solar radiation pressure than larger ones, may have survived longer than those in the Helios epoch, which covered from the minimum to the maximum of the solar cycle in late 1970's.

  17. Nearest-neighbor based wavelet entropy rate measures for intrapartum fetal heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Spilka, J; Roux, S G; Garnier, N B; Abry, P; Goncalves, P; Doret, M

    2014-01-01

    The interpretation and analysis of intrapartum fetal heart rate (FHR), enabling early detection of fetal acidosis, remains a challenging signal processing task. The ability of entropy rate measures, amongst other tools, to characterize temporal dynamics of FHR variability and to discriminate non-healthy fetuses has already been massively investigated. The present contribution aims first at illustrating that a k-nearest neighbor procedure yields estimates for entropy rates that are robust and well-suited to FHR variability (compared to the more commonly used correlation-integral algorithm). Second, it investigates how entropy rates measured on multiresolution wavelet and approximation coefficients permit to improve classification performance. To that end, a supervised learning procedure is used, that selects the time scales at which entropy rates contribute to discrimination. Significant conclusions are obtained from a high quality scalp electrode database of nearly two thousands subjects collected in a French public university hospital. PMID:25570576

  18. Export POC flux calculated from 234Th measurements, sediment traps and O2 supersaturation in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskell, W. Z.; Berelson, W.; Hammond, D. E.; Prokopenko, M. G.; Yeung, L. Y.; Capone, D. G.

    2010-12-01

    The disequilibrium between the particle reactive 234Th (t1/2= 24.1 days) and its soluble parent 238U (t1/2= 4.5 by) is used to quantify removal rates of 234Th on sinking particles. During February 2010, seven 234Th profiles were measured from the surface to 300m in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific, in a region bounded by 10°S - 20°S and 80°W - 100°W. Horizontal transport of 234Th was determined using geostrophic current vectors and found to be negligible, thus only vertical transport should be significant. Depth-integrated Thorium deficiencies (DITD) and measured ratios of particulate organic carbon (POC) to 234Th obtained from sediment trap samples were used in a steady state, one-dimensional model to determine POC export from the upper ocean. Based on analyses thus far (four of the seven stations), 234Th flux ranged from 390 to 2900 dpm/m2-d, and calculated POC export flux at 200m ranged from 1.1 to 22.8 mmolC/m2-d. At each location, drifting sediment traps were deployed for 23-65 hours at 200m to measure 234Th and POC flux directly. The flux of 234Th into the traps ranged from 48 to 750 dpm/m2-d, which was very low (1-35%) compared to the flux calculated using the Thorium deficiency (DITD). However, at one station, the integrated deficiency and trap results differed by only 5%. The trap-measured flux of POC was also very low, ranging between 0.2 and 2.2 mmolC/m2-d, only 4-14% of the 234Th based (DITD) calculation. Net community production (in the mixed layer only), calculated from O2 supersaturation and estimates of piston velocity at each station, was found to predict an upper limit for POC fluxes between 0.3 to 11.1 mmolC/m2-d. This range is more consistent with trap POC fluxes than with the DITD results. However, the order of magnitude of the DITD results is consistent with the results of previous Pacific studies further north and west. All three estimates of POC export may suffer biases and artifacts, and certainly a 24-hour trap deployment may not be representative of export integrated over the time-scale of the 234Th tracer or of oxygen production and gas exchange. We are exploring other possible explanations for the observed differences including: grazing of zooplankton swimmers on trap material, hydrodynamic effects, the vertical transport by swimmers past the trap depth, remineralization of POC and 234Th above the trap depth, and non-steady-state conditions.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNIQUES FOR EDDY-CORRELATION MEASUREMENTS OF NON-METHANE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND FLUXED IN THE ATMOSPHERE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical technique for the measurement of the exchange (flux) of trace gases between the earth's surface and the atmosphere will be developed. Measurements will rely on the eddy correlation method (ECM). Target compounds are biogenically and anthropogenically emitted v...

  20. Large-scale variability of wind erosion mass flux rates at Owens Lake 1. Vertical profiles of horizontal mass fluxes of wind-eroded particles with diameter greater than 50 ?m

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillette, Dale A.; Fryrear, D.W.; Xiao, Jing Bing; Stockton, Paul; Ono, Duane; Helm, Paula J.; Gill, Thomas E; Ley, Trevor

    1997-01-01

    A field experiment at Owens (dry) Lake, California, tested whether and how the relative profiles of airborne horizontal mass fluxes for >50-?m wind-eroded particles changed with friction velocity. The horizontal mass flux at almost all measured heights increased proportionally to the cube of friction velocity above an apparent threshold friction velocity for all sediment tested and increased with height except at one coarse-sand site where the relative horizontal mass flux profile did not change with friction velocity. Size distributions for long-time-averaged horizontal mass flux samples showed a saltation layer from the surface to a height between 30 and 50 cm, above which suspended particles dominate. Measurements from a large dust source area on a line parallel to the wind showed that even though the saltation flux reached equilibrium ?650 m downwind of the starting point of erosion, weakly suspended particles were still input into the atmosphere 1567 m downwind of the starting point; thus the saltating fraction of the total mass flux decreased after 650 m. The scale length difference and ratio of 70/30 suspended mass flux to saltation mass flux at the farthest down wind sampling site confirm that suspended particles are very important for mass budgets in large source areas and that saltation mass flux can be a variable fraction of total horizontal mass flux for soils with a substantial fraction of <100-?m particles.

  1. A study of turbulent fluxes and their measurement errors for different wind regimes over the tropical Zongo glacier (16° S) during the dry season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litt, M.; Sicart, J.-E.; Helgason, W.

    2015-01-01

    Over glaciers in the outer tropics, during the dry winter season, turbulent fluxes are an important sink of melt energy due to high sublimation rates, but measurements in stable surface layers, in remote and complex terrains remain challenging. Eddy-covariance (EC) and bulk-aerodynamic (BA) methods were used to estimate surface turbulent heat fluxes of sensible (H) and latent heat (LE) in the ablation zone of the tropical Zongo glacier, Bolivia (16° S, 5080 m a.s.l.), from 22 July to 1 September 2007. We studied the turbulent fluxes and their associated random and systematic measurement errors under the three most frequent wind regimes. For nightly, density-driven katabatic flows, and for strong downslope flows related to large-scale forcing, H generally heats the surface (i.e., is positive), while LE cools it down (i.e., is negative). On average, both fluxes exhibit similar magnitudes and cancel each other out. Most energy losses through turbulence occur for daytime upslope flows, when H is weak due to small temperature gradients and LE is strongly negative due to very dry air. Mean random errors of the BA method (6% on net H + LE fluxes) originated mainly from large uncertainties in roughness lengths. For EC fluxes, mean random errors were due mainly to poor statistical sampling of large-scale outer-layer eddies (12%). The BA method is highly sensitive to the method used to derive surface temperature from long-wave radiation measurements and underestimates fluxes due to vertical flux divergence at low heights and nonstationarity of turbulent flow. The EC method also probably underestimates the fluxes, but to a lesser extent, due to underestimation of vertical wind speed and to vertical flux divergence. For both methods, when H and LE compensate each other in downslope fluxes, biases tend to cancel each other out or remain small. When the net turbulent fluxes (H + LE) are the largest in upslope flows, nonstationarity effects and underestimations of the vertical wind speed do not compensate, and surface temperature errors are important, so that large biases on H + LE are expected when using both the EC and the BA method.

  2. A novel method for measuring trace gas fluxes from tall vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, James; Phil, Ineson

    2014-05-01

    The nature of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) as greenhouse gases (GHGs) means that accurate measurement of their net ecosystem exchange (NEE) is extremely important to our ability to manage climate change. Manual static chambers are commonly used to measure soil fluxes of these trace gases, with landscape values extrapolated from point measurements of typically less than 1m2, at a weekly or monthly frequency. Moreover, due to the reliance upon manual sampling, data are typically biased towards day-time measurements, and use of opaque chambers halts photosynthesis. Automation of chambers, such as the Licor Li-8100 (Lincoln, NE) system, allows for measurement of soil respiration at a near-constant frequency, but does not solve the problem of measuring CH4 and N2O, neither does it allow measurements to be taken from over tall (more than 20 cm) vegetation. Eddy covariance (EC) techniques allow for high frequency measurements of CO2 and CH4 to be made at the landscape scale, and are increasingly available for N2O. However, the inability of EC to resolve to the plot scale hinders its use for manipulative experiments, and replication is rare. Additionally, stratification of the boundary layer creates difficulty in measuring night-time fluxes and it is common to discard large parts of data sets due to unsuitable wind direction or other meteorological conditions. Here we present a new technique for measuring trace gas fluxes from over tall vegetation. The system is capable of simultaneously delivering NEE of CO2, CH4 and N2O, automatically measuring at high temporal resolution (circa hourly) from replicated plots. We show the effect of green compost addition on trace gas fluxes from Miscanthus x giganteus, an important crop for bioenergy production. The ability to quantify NEE of GHGs from such crops forms an essential part of the lifecycle analysis of energy produced from biomass, which may play an important role in future mitigation of climate change.

  3. Early results from the development of a miniature tunable diode laser gas cell for measuring CO2 isotopologue fluxes in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osuna, J. L.; Bora, M.; Bond, T.; Wharton, S.

    2014-12-01

    In order to accurately predict how ecosystems will respond to climate change, it is necessary to separate the response of respiration and photosynthetic uptake individually to environmental conditions. Currently, the net ecosystem exchange of CO2 is measured continuously at various ecosystems around the world. Net CO­2 flux can be partitioned into the primary components using either models or measurements of 13C/12C in the CO2 flux. We introduce recent technological developments toward in situ, rapid, continuous measurements of fluxes of 13CO2 and 12CO2. We describe a unique approach to achieving 10Hz measurements of CO2 using tunable diode laser gas absorption spectroscopy in a multi-pass White cell capable of being deployed directly to a canopy. We will first discuss proof-of-concept characterization of the technique using wave modulation spectroscopy with a laser tuned to detect 12CO2 fluxes. We show the sensitivity of the 2w component of a wave-modulated signal to CO2 concentration, the precision, and the accuracy of the sensor as well as the stability of the sensor under normal ranges of ambient temperature and humidity in an environmental chamber. We then show preliminary results of sensor performance with a laser tuned to measure 13CO2 and 12CO2 fluxes. We discuss our approach to reliably measuring multiple peaks of gas absorption while maintaining the rapid sampling rates necessary for flux calculations. We will also discuss considerations for extending the sensor from the lab to being directly deployed into a canopy for in situ measurements. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS- 658355

  4. The Effect of Cumulus Cloud Field Anisotropy on Domain-Averaged Solar Fluxes and Atmospheric Heating Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkelman, Laura M.; Evans, K. Franklin; Clothiaux, Eugene E.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Cumulus clouds can become tilted or elongated in the presence of wind shear. Nevertheless, most studies of the interaction of cumulus clouds and radiation have assumed these clouds to be isotropic. This paper describes an investigation of the effect of fair-weather cumulus cloud field anisotropy on domain-averaged solar fluxes and atmospheric heating rate profiles. A stochastic field generation algorithm was used to produce twenty three-dimensional liquid water content fields based on the statistical properties of cloud scenes from a large eddy simulation. Progressively greater degrees of x-z plane tilting and horizontal stretching were imposed on each of these scenes, so that an ensemble of scenes was produced for each level of distortion. The resulting scenes were used as input to a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer model. Domain-average transmission, reflection, and absorption of broadband solar radiation were computed for each scene along with the average heating rate profile. Both tilt and horizontal stretching were found to significantly affect calculated fluxes, with the amount and sign of flux differences depending strongly on sun position relative to cloud distortion geometry. The mechanisms by which anisotropy interacts with solar fluxes were investigated by comparisons to independent pixel approximation and tilted independent pixel approximation computations for the same scenes. Cumulus anisotropy was found to most strongly impact solar radiative transfer by changing the effective cloud fraction, i.e., the cloud fraction when the field is projected on a surface perpendicular to the direction of the incident solar beam.

  5. Improved measurements of Na+ fluxes in plants using calixarene-based microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Jayakannan, Maheswari; Babourina, Olga; Rengel, Zed

    2011-07-01

    Ion-selective microelectrodes are a powerful tool in studying adaptive responses of plant cells and tissues to various abiotic stresses. However, application of this technique in Na(+) flux measurements was limited due to poor selectivity for Na(+) ions of commercially available Na(+) cocktails. Often, these cocktails cannot discriminate between Na(+) and other interfering ions such as K(+) and Ca(2+), leading to inaccurate measurements of Na(+) concentration and, consequently, inaccurate Na(+) flux calculations. To overcome this problem, three Na(+)-selective cocktail mixtures were prepared using tetramethoxyethyl ester derivative of p-t-butyl calix[4]arene. These cocktail mixtures were compared with commercially available ETH 227-based Na(+) cocktail for selectivity for Na(+) ions over other ions (particularly K(+) and Ca(2+)). Among the three calixarene-based Na(+) cocktails tested, cocktail 2 [in % w/w: Na(+) ionophore (4-tert-butylcalix[4]arene-tetra acetic acid tetraethyl ester) 3.5, the plasticizer (2-nitrophenyl octyl ether) 95.9 and lipophilic anion (potassium tetrakis (4-chlorophenyl) borate) 0.6] showed the best selectivity for Na(+) ions over K(+) and Ca(2+) ions and was highly stable over time (up to 10h). Na(+) flux measurements under a wide range of NaCl concentrations (25-150 mM) using Na(+) cocktail 2 established a clear dose-response relationship between severity of salt stress and magnitude of Na(+) influx at the distal elongation and mature zones of Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Furthermore, Na(+) cocktail 2 was compared with commercially available ETH 227-based Na(+) cocktail by measuring Na(+) fluxes at the two Arabidopsis root zones in response to 100mM NaCl treatment. With calixarene-based Na(+) cocktail 2, a large decreasing Na(+) influx (0-15 min) followed by small Na(+) influx (15-45 min) was measured, whereas with ETH-based Na(+) cocktail Na(+) influx was short-lived (1-3 min) and was followed by Na(+) efflux (3-45 min) that might have been due to K(+) and Ca(2+) efflux measured together with Na(+) influx. In conclusion, Na(+)-selective calixarene-based microelectrodes have excellent potential to be used in real-time Na(+) flux measurements in plants. PMID:21256620

  6. Radiant heat flux measurements from Nyiragongo lava lake by ground-based and satellite thermal imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvari, Sonia; Spampinato, Letizia; Ganci, Gaetana; Hernandez, Pedro; Calvo, David; Tedesco, Dario; Perez, Nemesio; Del Negro, Ciro; Yalire, Mathieu

    2013-04-01

    Here we report the first combined radiant heat flux measurements at the Nyiragongo lava lake by ground-based and satellite thermal imagery recorded in March 2012. This is the very first time in which the two kinds of data have been compared at this volcano. Peak temperatures recorded at the molten lava were of ~1180 K, whereas the lake skin remained always below ~734 K in areas far from the upwelling zone and below ~843 K in those proximal to the source region. Ground-based imagery yielded mean radiant heat fluxes between ~0.80 and 1.10 GW. Consistently, satellite observations showed similar mean values of 1.10 GW. Overall the thermal activity of the lava lake was quite variable along the three days of field measurements at both daily and intra-daily scale. SEVIRI radiant heat fluxes retrieved for the January-June 2012 period revealed fluctuations within the same variability range suggesting that no significant changes of the lava lake area had occurred over the six months. Comparison with previous radiant heat flux estimates showed that our data well agree with the general increasing trend recorded since the reappearance of the lava lake after the last flank eruption in 2002. Considering the danger posed by Nyiragongo to the dense population living on the flanks of the volcano, and taking into account that the two historical effusive eruptions were preceded by increasing radiant heat flux values, we believe that our results represent a valuable contribution to the surveillance of this remote volcano eruptive activity.

  7. Measurement of Extracellular Ion Fluxes Using the Ion-selective Self-referencing Microelectrode Technique.

    PubMed

    Luxardi, Guillaume; Reid, Brian; Ferreira, Fernando; Maillard, Pauline; Zhao, Min

    2015-01-01

    Cells from animals, plants and single cells are enclosed by a barrier called the cell membrane that separates the cytoplasm from the outside. Cell layers such as epithelia also form a barrier that separates the inside from the outside or different compartments of multicellular organisms. A key feature of these barriers is the differential distribution of ions across cell membranes or cell layers. Two properties allow this distribution: 1) membranes and epithelia display selective permeability to specific ions; 2) ions are transported through pumps across cell membranes and cell layers. These properties play crucial roles in maintaining tissue physiology and act as signaling cues after damage, during repair, or under pathological condition. The ion-selective self-referencing microelectrode allows measurements of specific fluxes of ions such as calcium, potassium or sodium at single cell and tissue levels. The microelectrode contains an ionophore cocktail which is selectively permeable to a specific ion. The internal filling solution contains a set concentration of the ion of interest. The electric potential of the microelectrode is determined by the outside concentration of the ion. As the ion concentration varies, the potential of the microelectrode changes as a function of the log of the ion activity. When moved back and forth near a source or sink of the ion (i.e. in a concentration gradient due to ion flux) the microelectrode potential fluctuates at an amplitude proportional to the ion flux/gradient. The amplifier amplifies the microelectrode signal and the output is recorded on computer. The ion flux can then be calculated by Fick's law of diffusion using the electrode potential fluctuation, the excursion of microelectrode, and other parameters such as the specific ion mobility. In this paper, we describe in detail the methodology to measure extracellular ion fluxes using the ion-selective self-referencing microelectrode and present some representative results. PMID:25993490

  8. Stable water isotope and surface heat flux simulation using ISOLSM: Evaluation against in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Mick Y.; Wang, Lixin; Parkes, Stephen D.; Strauss, Josiah; McCabe, Matthew F.; Evans, Jason P.; Griffiths, Alan D.

    2015-04-01

    The stable isotopes of water are useful tracers of water sources and hydrological processes. Stable water isotope-enabled land surface modeling is a relatively new approach for characterizing the hydrological cycle, providing spatial and temporal variability for a number of hydrological processes. At the land surface, the integration of stable water isotopes with other meteorological measurements can assist in constraining surface heat flux estimates and discriminate between evaporation (E) and transpiration (T). However, research in this area has traditionally been limited by a lack of continuous in-situ isotopic observations. Here, the National Centre for Atmospheric Research stable isotope-enabled Land Surface Model (ISOLSM) is used to simulate the water and energy fluxes and stable water isotope variations. The model was run for a period of one month with meteorological data collected from a coastal sub-tropical site near Sydney, Australia. The modeled energy fluxes (latent heat and sensible heat) agreed reasonably well with eddy covariance observations, indicating that ISOLSM has the capacity to reproduce observed flux behavior. Comparison of modeled isotopic compositions of evapotranspiration (ET) against in-situ Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measured bulk water vapor isotopic data (10 m above the ground), however, showed differences in magnitude and temporal patterns. The disparity is due to a small contribution from local ET fluxes to atmospheric boundary layer water vapor (?1% based on calculations using ideal gas law) relative to that advected from the ocean for this particular site. Using ISOLSM simulation, the ET was partitioned into E and T with 70% being T. We also identified that soil water from different soil layers affected T and E differently based on the simulated soil isotopic patterns, which reflects the internal working of ISOLSM. These results highlighted the capacity of using the isotope-enabled models to discriminate between different hydrological components and add insight into expected hydrological behavior.

  9. Angular-Rate Estimation using Star Tracker Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, R.; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.; Deutschmann, Julie K.; Harman, Richard R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents algorithms for estimating the angular-rate vector of satellites using quaternion measurements. Two approaches are compared, one that uses differentiated quaternion measurements to yield coarse rate measurements which are then fed into two different estimators. In the other approach the raw quaternion measurements themselves are fed directly into the two estimators. The two estimators rely on the ability to decompose the non-linear rate dependent part of the rotational dynamics equation of a rigid body into a product of an angular-rate dependent matrix and the angular-rate vector itself. This decomposition, which is not unique, enables the treatment of the nonlinear spacecraft dynamics model as a linear one and, consequently, the application of a Pseudo-Linear Kalman Filter (PSELIKA). It also enables the application of a special Kalman filter which is based on the use of the solution of the State Dependent Algebraic Riccati Equation (SDARE) in order to compute the Kalman gain matrix and thus eliminates the need to propagate and update the filter covariance matrix. The replacement of the elaborate rotational dynamics by a simple first order Markov model is also examined. In this paper a special consideration is given to the problem of delayed quaternion measurements. Two solutions to this problem are suggested and tested. Real Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data is used to test these algorithms, and results of these tests are presented.

  10. Angular-Rate Estimation Using Star Tracker Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, R.; Bar-Itzhack, I.; Deutschmann, Julie K.; Harman, Richard R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents algorithms for estimating the angular-rate vector of satellites using quaternion measurements. Two approaches are compared, one that uses differentiated quatemion measurements to yield coarse rate measurements which are then fed into two different estimators. In the other approach the raw quatemion measurements themselves are fed directly into the two estimators. The two estimators rely on the ability to decompose the non-linear rate dependent part of the rotational dynamics equation of a rigid body into a product of an angular-rate dependent matrix and the angular-rate vector itself This decomposition, which is not unique, enables the treatment of the nonlinear spacecraft dynamics model as a linear one and, consequently, the application of a Pseudo-Linear Kalman Filter (PSELIKA). It also enables the application of a special Kalman filter which is based on the use of the solution of the State Dependent Algebraic Riccati Equation (SDARE) in order to compute the Kalman gain matrix and thus eliminates the need to propagate and update the filter covariance matrix. The replacement of the elaborate rotational dynamics by a simple first order Markov model is also examined. In this paper a special consideration is given to the problem of delayed quatemion measurements. Two solutions to this problem are suggested and tested. Real Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data is used to test these algorithms, and results of these tests are presented.

  11. Flux measurements of reactive nitrogen compounds using a chemiluminescence analyser with different converter types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammann, Christof; Wolff, Veronika

    2015-04-01

    The availability of reactive nitrogen (Nr) is a key limiting factors for the productivity and the competition success of individual species. On the other hand, certain nitrogenous compounds can also be emitted from natural or managed ecosystems. Thus the quantification of the Nr exchange can be essential for the interpretation of ecosystem behavior. For the observation of Nr dry deposition and emission the eddy covariance (EC) method is preferable since it does not modify the environmental conditions of the ecosystem, is less prone to wall effects than chamber methods, and is less affected by gas phase chemical reactions than gradient methods. Since the various Nr compounds can undergo fast chemical reactions and have differing chemical and physical characteristics, a variety of detection techniques is usually necessary that often cannot meet the fast response requirements of the EC technique. Here we show applications of a fast response 2-channel NO analyzer suitable for EC measurements. In combination with different inlet converters (photolytic converter, gold catalyst converter, and high-temperature steel converter), the system could alternatively be used for flux measurements of NO2, NOy, and total Nr. The quantification of By combining the 2-channel analyzer with the NOy and total Nr converter simultaneously, the NH3 flux could be determined from the difference between the two channels. Concentration and flux measurements of the system were verified by inter-comparison with other methods. Potential problems include the damping of high-frequency fluctuations in the inlet system. It is therefore important to place the converter close to the sampling inlet and to quantify and correct the damping effects. Moreover, like most other flux measurement techniques, the system is susceptible to non-stationary trace gas concentrations that often occur near pollution sources.

  12. Experimental measurement of Au M-band flux in indirectly-driven double-shell implosions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. F. Robey; T. S. Perry; H.-S. Park; P. A. Amendt; S. M. Compton; C. M. Sorce; J. P. Knauer

    2004-01-01

    Indirectly-driven double-shell implosions are being investigated as a possible non-cryogenic path to ignition on the NIF. In recent double-shell implosions, the inner shell trajectory was shown to exhibit a strong sensitivity to the temporal history of the M-band (2-5 keV) radiation emitted from the Au hohlraum wall. A large time-dependent discrepancy was observed between measurement and simulation of the flux

  13. Measurement of atmospheric NO 2 column density with kitt peak solar flux atlas as a reference

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jian Guo Niu; Yasushi Sakurada; Hiroaki Kuze; Nobuo Takeuchi

    1997-01-01

    The vertical column abundance of NO2 is measured using direct sunlight. The solar spectra in the wavelength region of 430–450 nm observed from the earth’s surface\\u000a are ratioed with a reference spectrum taken from the Kitt Peak Solar Flux Atlas. The large Fraunhofer features (20–40%) are\\u000a eliminated by wavelength correction, resolution matching and ratioing of observed spectra to the reference.

  14. Post processing of CO2 flux measurements from an urban landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzer, O.; Meiring, W.; Kyriakidis, P. C.; McFadden, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Tower based measurements of CO2 fluxes by the eddy covariance method are subject to random error, systematic error, and missing data (gaps). In homogeneous ecosystems such as forests and grasslands, the post processing methods to address these problems are relatively well established. In the urban environment, however, the assumptions of most such methods are violated due to spatial heterogeneity in the tower footprint and localized CO2 sources such as traffic emission. For this reason, work is needed to develop and test methods appropriate to the urban setting. Here, we report comparisons of post processing methods for >3 years of flux measurements from the KUOM tall tower in a suburban neighborhood of Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. Machine learning regression approaches including Artificial Neural Networks and Gaussian Processes were used to integrate observations from remote sensing, traffic and weather stations, and to extract complex underlying functional relationships, in order to improve gap-filling and minimize uncertainties. Specifically, we tested the sensitivity of the measurements to vehicle emissions by incorporating traffic counts from nearby roads and highways. Also, the selection of the friction velocity (u*) threshold was found to be sensitive to the wind direction but consistent between years. We calculated carbon flux sums for both residential and recreational land use types in the tower footprint, and assessed the random and systematic uncertainties caused by gap-filling and u*-filtering. While these post processing methods are essential for interpreting CO2 flux measurements in urban environments, they may also be useful for other inhomogeneous sites such as logged forests or ecosystems under disturbance from fire or pests.

  15. Application of continuous measurements of FerryBoxes to oxygen fluxes in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, Michael; Petersen, Wilhelm

    2013-04-01

    The monitoring of marine environments in coastal seas is still a challenge when continuous and reliable observations are needed. The use of ships of opportunity (SoO) is cost-effective and can provide continuous and reliable measurements of near-surface parameters. They are protected from damage by waves and biofouling can be easier handled. So they serve as a valuable tool for further research on coastal seas. In context of acidification and eutrophication of the oceans, research is needed for the evaluation of quantitative values regarding the cycles of oxygen and carbon. In this study we present data analyses of FerryBox transects in the North Sea covering a time period of several years. Onboard the FerryBox systems, oxygen optodes provide continuous measurements of dissolved oxygen concentrations. Together with temperature and salinity observations as well as wind field information, the air-sea exchange of oxygen has been calculated. Only the FerryBox systems on ships of opportunity provide continuous measurements over a longer timescale along transects in coastal oceans. Depending on the ship routes, the time interval at one point is about 1-2 days, so weekly differences are usable for the estimation of oxygen fluxes. Going further, the oxygen flux serves as a proxy of net primary production, so also carbon fluxes can be estimated. Details of the analyses procedure as well as results will be presented. However, this kind of analysis needs precise dissolved oxygen measurements as changes in oxygen concentration are small. So calibration of oxygen optodes is crucial and the errors concerning the estimated oxygen fluxes will be discussed.

  16. On drag coefficient parameterization with post processed direct fluxes measurements over the ocean

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hyun-Mi Oh; Kyung-Ja Ha; Ki-Young Heo; Kyung-Eak Kim; Sang-Jong Park; Jae-Seol Shim; Larry Mahrt

    2010-01-01

    This study presents an evaluation of the atmospheric factors influencing the post-processing for fast-response data of horizontal\\u000a momentum, vertical wind component, temperature, and water vapor to measure turbulent fluxes. They are observed at the Ieodo\\u000a ocean research station over the Yellow Sea during the period of October 2004 to February 2008. The post process methods employed\\u000a here are composed of

  17. Using ²¹?Pb measurements to estimate sedimentation rates on river floodplains.

    PubMed

    Du, P; Walling, D E

    2012-01-01

    Growing interest in the dynamics of floodplain evolution and the important role of overbank sedimentation on river floodplains as a sediment sink has focused attention on the need to document contemporary and recent rates of overbank sedimentation. The potential for using the fallout radionuclides ¹³?Cs and excess ²¹?Pb to estimate medium-term (10-10² years) sedimentation rates on river floodplains has attracted increasing attention. Most studies that have successfully used fallout radionuclides for this purpose have focused on the use of ¹³?Cs. However, the use of excess ²¹?Pb potentially offers a number of advantages over ¹³?Cs measurements. Most existing investigations that have used excess ²¹?Pb measurements to document sedimentation rates have, however, focused on lakes rather than floodplains and the transfer of the approach, and particularly the models used to estimate the sedimentation rate, to river floodplains involves a number of uncertainties, which require further attention. This contribution reports the results of an investigation of overbank sedimentation rates on the floodplains of several UK rivers. Sediment cores were collected from seven floodplain sites representative of different environmental conditions and located in different areas of England and Wales. Measurements of excess ²¹?Pb and ¹³?Cs were made on these cores. The ²¹?Pb measurements have been used to estimate sedimentation rates and the results obtained by using different models have been compared. The ¹³?Cs measurements have also been used to provide an essentially independent time marker for validation purposes. In using the ²¹?Pb measurements, particular attention was directed to the problem of obtaining reliable estimates of the supported and excess or unsupported components of the total ²¹?Pb activity of sediment samples. Although there was a reasonable degree of consistency between the estimates of sedimentation rate provided by the ¹³?Cs and excess ²¹?Pb measurements, some differences existed and the various models used to interpret excess ²¹?Pb measurements could produce different results. By using the ¹³?Cs measurements to provide independent validation of the estimates of sedimentation rate provided by the different models used with the excess ²¹?Pb measurement it was shown that the CICCS and Composite CRS models appeared to generally provide the best results. PMID:22036160

  18. Comprehensive measurement of respiratory activity in permeabilized cells using extracellular flux analysis

    PubMed Central

    Salabei, Joshua K.; Gibb, Andrew A.; Hill, Bradford G.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular flux (XF) analysis has become a mainstream method to measure bioenergetic function in cells and tissues. While this technique is commonly used to measure energetics in intact cells, we outline here a detailed XF protocol for measuring respiration in permeabilized cells. Cells are permeabilized using saponin, digitonin, or recombinant perfringolysin O (XF PMP reagent) and provided with specific substrates to measure complex I- or II-mediated respiratory activity, Complex III+IV respiratory activity, or Complex IV activity. Medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines or glutamine may also be provided for measuring fatty acid oxidation or glutamine oxidation, respectively. This protocol allows for such measurements using a minimal number of cells compared with other protocols, without the need for mitochondrial isolation. The results are highly reproducible, and mitochondria remain well coupled. Collectively, this protocol provides comprehensive and detailed information regarding mitochondrial activity and efficiency, and, following preparative steps, takes approximately 6 hours to complete. PMID:24457333

  19. Impact of new water vapor continuum coefficients in the far infrared on atmospheric fluxes and cooling rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiello, G.; Serio, C.; Esposito, F.; Di Girolamo, P.; Palchetti, L.

    2009-03-01

    The paper illustrates the impact of new water vapor continuum coefficients in the far infrared on spectral cooling rates and integrated atmospheric fluxes. The analysis has been based on data and results obtained within the ECOWAR project (Earth Cooling by Water vapor Radiation). A novel methodology has been developed, implemented and used to retrieve foreign-broadened water vapor continuum absorption coefficients from atmospheric emitted spectral radiance observations in the spectral range 240 to 590 cm?1. The impact of these new coefficients on spectral cooling rates has been assessed. The new coefficients show that the lower troposphere tends to cool down at a rate larger than that predicted by the state-of-art Mlawer, Tobin-Clough, Kneizys, Davies (MT_CKD) continuum.

  20. Low-flux measurements with Cornell's LCLS integrating pixel array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, Hugh T.; Tate, Mark W.; Gruner, Sol M.

    2011-11-01

    Next generation light sources are revolutionizing x-ray science by delivering ultra-intense, hard x-ray pulses many orders of magnitude brighter and shorter in duration than previously achievable. Maximizing the scientific potential of these light sources requires the development of suitable detectors. Experiments such as coherent x-ray imaging of single particles require detectors that can record extremely high instantaneous flux rates produced by femtosecond x-ray pulses (i.e. thousands of photons incident on a single pixel of an area detector in a few femtoseconds) while also being able to accurately distinguish single photon events so that many thousands of frames of data can be used to reconstruct extremely low flux information (e.g. less than 1/1000 photons per pixel per frame). This paper presents data from an integrating pixel array detector (PAD) possessing the ability to record high- and low-flux x-ray data at an X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL). Methods are presented to process extremely low-flux data (less than 1/10000 8-keV x-rays per pixel per frame) to accurately recover diffraction patterns from thousands of frames. The data were collected using a detector developed by Cornell for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC National Lab. A copy of this detector was delivered to SLAC in the middle of 2008. The ASIC developed for this detector was used by SLAC as the basis for the CS-PAD (Cornell SLAC-PAD) being used on the Coherent X-ray Imaging beamline at the LCLS. These methods extend beyond XFEL applications because they allow for the suppression of dark accumulation noise which typically limits the low-flux capability of integrating detectors on conventional x-ray sources.

  1. Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, M.; Aisa, D.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bigongiari, G.; Bindi, V.; Bizzaglia, S.; Bizzarri, M.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Borsini, S.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Cascioli, V.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, H.; Cheng, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chikanian, A.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Coste, B.; Cui, Z.; Dai, M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Di Masso, L.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Du, W. J.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Eline, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Eronen, T.; Fan, Y. Y.; Farnesini, L.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Gillard, W.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guandalini, C.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Kossakowski, R.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; Kunz, S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Li, H. L.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, M. J.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, F.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Malinin, A.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Müller, M.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Obermeier, A.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Papi, A.; Pedreschi, E.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Pilo, F.; Piluso, A.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Postaci, E.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Sbarra, C.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; Schuckardt, D.; von Dratzig, A. Schulz; Schwering, G.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shan, Y. H.; Shi, J. Y.; Shi, X. Y.; Shi, Y. M.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spada, F.; Spinella, F.; Sun, W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, C. P.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türko?lu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vaurynovich, S.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, R. S.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z. X.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Wu, H.; Xia, X.; Xie, M.; Xie, S.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xin, G. M.; Xu, N. S.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Ye, Q. H.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, M. T.; Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; Zurbach, C.; AMS Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ˜30 GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  2. High Pressure Burn Rate Measurements on an Ammonium Perchlorate Propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Glascoe, E A; Tan, N

    2010-04-21

    High pressure deflagration rate measurements of a unique ammonium perchlorate (AP) based propellant are required to design the base burn motor for a Raytheon weapon system. The results of these deflagration rate measurements will be key in assessing safety and performance of the system. In particular, the system may experience transient pressures on the order of 100's of MPa (10's kPSI). Previous studies on similar AP based materials demonstrate that low pressure (e.g. P < 10 MPa or 1500 PSI) burn rates can be quite different than the elevated pressure deflagration rate measurements (see References and HPP results discussed herein), hence elevated pressure measurements are necessary in order understand the deflagration behavior under relevant conditions. Previous work on explosives have shown that at 100's of MPa some explosives will transition from a laminar burn mechanism to a convective burn mechanism in a process termed deconsolidative burning. The resulting burn rates that are orders-of-magnitude faster than the laminar burn rates. Materials that transition to the deconsolidative-convective burn mechanism at elevated pressures have been shown to be considerably more violent in confined heating experiments (i.e. cook-off scenarios). The mechanisms of propellant and explosive deflagration are extremely complex and include both chemical, and mechanical processes, hence predicting the behavior and rate of a novel material or formulation is difficult if not impossible. In this work, the AP/HTPB based material, TAL-1503 (B-2049), was burned in a constant volume apparatus in argon up to 300 MPa (ca. 44 kPSI). The burn rate and pressure were measured in-situ and used to calculate a pressure dependent burn rate. In general, the material appears to burn in a laminar fashion at these elevated pressures. The experiment was reproduced multiple times and the burn rate law using the best data is B = (0.6 {+-} 0.1) x P{sup (1.05{+-}0.02)} where B is the burn rate in mm/s and P is the pressure in units of MPa. Details of the experimental method, results and data analysis are discussed herein and briefly compared to other AP based materials that have been measured in this apparatus.

  3. Low-Power Dispersive Measurements of High-Coherence Flux Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hover, David; Sears, A. P.; Gudmundsen, T.; Kerman, A. J.; Welander, P. B.; Yoder, J. L.; Kamal, A.; Gustavsson, S.; Jin, X. Y.; Birenbaum, J.; Clarke, J.; Oliver, W. D.

    2014-03-01

    We report on progress towards nondestructive dispersive measurements of a high-coherence flux qubit. A capacitively shunted flux qubit that incorporates high-Q MBE aluminum will have longer relaxation and dephasing times when compared to a conventional flux qubit, while also maintaining the large anharmonicity necessary for complex gate operations. We numerically investigate the expected measurement fidelity of the improved qubit and present measurements that explore the boundary between destructive and nondestructive dispersive readout. This research was funded in part by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA); and by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research & Engineering under Air Force Contract number FA8721-05-C-0002. All statements of fact, opinion or conclusions contained herein are those of the authors and should not be construed as representing the official views or policies of IARPA, the ODNI, or the U.S. Government Present address: SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA.

  4. Actinic flux measurements and photolysis frequencies enhancements near clouds during DC3 and TORERO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, S. R.; Ullmann, K.; Schmidt, S.; Kindel, B. C.; Hair, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    Spectrally resolved up and down-welling actinic flux was measured from aircraft during the Deep Convective Clouds & Chemistry Experiment (DC3) and Tropical Ocean Troposphere Exchange of reactive halogen species and oxygenated VOC (TORERO) field campaigns. The measurements were made on the NASA DC-8 and NSF/NCAR G-V aircraft with the Charged coupled device Actinic Flux Spectroradiometer (CAFS)and the HIAPER Airborne Radiation Package (HARP), respectively. Improvements in this instrumentation and the data analysis provide for fast, accurate