Science.gov

Sample records for fly ash solvent

  1. Solvent extraction separation of copper and zinc from MSWI fly ash leachates.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jinfeng; Steenari, Britt-Marie

    2015-10-01

    Fly ash from combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW) contains significant amounts of metals, some of which are valuable and some of which are potentially toxic. This type of ash is most often stabilized and landfilled which means that the metals will be difficult to reclaim at a later stage. In recent years efforts have been made to develop feasible methods to recover selected metals, such as Zn, from MSW fly ash. If this would be possible, a significant amount of valuable metals could be re-inserted in the industrial material loops. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a process for recovery of Cu and Zn from MSW combustion fly ash based on hydrochloric acid leaching followed by two solvent extraction processes, one for each metal. The separation of Cu from the acid leachate was done using an aldoxime extractant, LIX860N-I, in kerosene and a mixture of phosphine oxides, Cyanex 923, also in kerosene, was used for extraction of Zn from the Cu-depleted aqueous phase. The extraction of Cu was selective, but a significant amount of other metals, such as Fe and Pb, were co-extracted together with Zn. It was shown that it is possible to decrease the contamination of Fe by using a suitable concentration of nitric acid solution for stripping or by removing the contaminating metals through cementation. The suggested process was tested for two MSW combustion fly ashes in laboratory scale experiments and gave Cu yields of 69-87% and Zn yields of 75-80% based on the contents in the ash. PMID:26227183

  2. Interaction of planar and nonplanar organic contaminants with coal fly ash: Effects of polar and nonpolar solvent solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, R.M.; Ryba, S.A.; Cantwell, M.G.; Gundersen, J.L.; Tien, R.; Perron, M.M.

    2006-08-15

    Coal fly ash has a very high sorption capacity for a variety of anthropogenic contaminants and has been used to cleanse wastewater of pollutants for approximately 40 years. Like other black carbons, the planar structure of the residual carbon in fly ash results in elevated affinities for planar organic contaminants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and some polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The present study was performed to understand better the mechanisms affecting the strong interaction between planar contaminants and coal fly ash. The removal of 10 PCBs and 10 PAHs by several fly ashes and other sorbents was evaluated under different experimental conditions to highlight the intermolecular forces influencing adsorption. Varying fly ash concentration and solvent system composition indicated that dispersive interactions were most prevalent. For the PCBs, empirical results also were compared to molecular modeling estimates of the energy necessary for the PCB molecule to assume a planar conformation (PCe). The PCe levels ranged from 8 to 25 kcal/mol, depending on the degree of ortho-substituted chlorination of the PCB. A significant correlation between PCe and PCB removal from solution was observed for the fly ashes and activated carbon, whereas the nonplanar sorbent octadecyl (C{sub 18}) indicated no relationship. These findings demonstrate the strong interaction between black carbon fly ash and planar organic contaminants. Furthermore, as exemplified by the PCBs, these results show how this interaction is a function of a contaminant's ability to assume a planar conformation.

  3. Vanadium recovery from oil fly ash by leaching, precipitation and solvent extraction processes.

    PubMed

    Navarro, R; Guzman, J; Saucedo, I; Revilla, J; Guibal, E

    2007-01-01

    In order to reduce the environmental impact due to land disposal of oil fly ash from power plants and to valorize this waste material, the removal of vanadium was investigated using leaching processes (acidic and alkaline treatments), followed by a second step of metal recovery from leachates involving either solvent extraction or selective precipitation. Despite a lower leaching efficiency (compared to sulfuric acid), sodium hydroxide was selected for vanadium leaching since it is more selective for vanadium (versus other transition metals). Precipitation was preferred to solvent extraction for the second step in the treatment since: (a) it is more selective; enabling complete recovery of vanadate from the leachate in the form of pure ammonium vanadate; and (b) stripping of the loaded organic phase (in the solvent extraction process) was not efficient. Precipitation was performed in a two-step procedure: (a) aluminum was first precipitated at pH 8; (b) then ammonium chloride was added at pH 5 to bring about vanadium precipitation. PMID:16563726

  4. Fly ash carbon passivation

    DOEpatents

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  5. Activation of fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Corbin, David R.; Velenyi, Louis J.; Pepera, Marc A.; Dolhyj, Serge R.

    1986-01-01

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  6. Activation of fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Corbin, D.R.; Velenyi, L.J.; Pepera, M.A.; Dolhyj, S.R.

    1986-08-19

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  7. INTERACTION OF PLANAR AND NONPLANAR ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS WITH COAL FLY ASH: EFFECTS OF POLAR AND NONPOLAR SOLVENT SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coal fly ash has several uses but much of the material is treated as waste and disposed of in various ways including land filling. Coal fly ash also has a very high sorption capacity for a variety of anthropogenic contaminants and has been used to cleanse wastewater of such poll...

  8. Fly-ash utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Lockerby, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    The over 200 references in this bibliography cover some of the uses found for fly-ash, which range from the manufacture of bricks and as a new type of concrete to the recovery of aluminum and other valuable ores from the ash. The entries are grouped under seven headings: General, Agriculture, Brickmaking, Cement/Concrete, Land Reclamation, Resource Recovery, and Other.

  9. Ameliorative effect of fly ashes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhumbla, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    Agronomic effectiveness and environmental impact of fly ashes used to reclaim pyritic acid mine spoils were investigated in the laboratory and field. Mine spoils at two abandoned sites were amended with three rates of fly ash, three rates of rock phosphate, and seeded with alfalfa and wheat. Application of fly ash decreased bulk density and increased moisture retention capacity of spoils. Fly ash application reduced cation exchange capacity, acidity, toxic levels of Al, Fe, and Mn in soils by buffering soil pH at 6.5, and retarded pyrite oxidation. The reduction in cation exchange capacity was compensated by release of plant nutrients through diffusion and dissolution of plerospheres in fly ash. Improvement of spoil physical, chemical and microbial properties resulted in higher yield, more nitrogen fixation, and utilization of P from rock phosphate by alfalfa. Laboratory investigations demonstrated that neutralization potential and the amounts of amorphous oxides of iron were more important for classifying fly ashes than the total elemental analysis presently used in a taxonomic classification system. Contamination of the food chain through plant removal of Mo and As in fly ash treated mine spoils was observed only for Mo and only for the first year of cropping. Plant available As and Mo decreased with time. Laboratory leaching and adsorption studies and a field experiment showed that trace metals do not leach from fly ashes at near neutral pH and more oxyanions will leach from fly ashes with low neutralization potential and low amounts of amorphous oxides of iron.

  10. Fly ash quality and utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Barta, L.E.; Lachner, L.; Wenzel, G.B.; Beer, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    The quality of fly ash is of considerable importance to fly ash utilizers. The fly ash puzzolanic activity is one of the most important properties that determines the role of fly ash as a binding agent in the cementing process. The puzzolanic activity, however is a function of fly ash particle size and chemical composition. These parameters are closely related to the process of fly ash formation in pulverized coal fired furnaces. In turn, it is essential to understand the transformation of mineral matter during coal combustion. Due to the particle-to-particle variation of coal properties and the random coalescence of mineral particles, the properties of fly ash particles e.g. size, SiO{sub 2} content, viscosity can change considerably from particle to particle. These variations can be described by the use of the probability theory. Since the mean values of these randomly changing parameters are not sufficient to describe the behavior of individual fly ash particles during the formation of concrete, therefore it is necessary to investigate the distribution of these variables. Examples of these variations were examined by the Computer Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM) for particle size and chemical composition for Texas lignite and Eagel Butte mineral matter and fly ash. The effect of combustion on the variations of these properties for both the fly ash and mineral matter were studied by using a laminar flow reactor. It is shown in our paper, that there are significant variations (about 40-50% around the mean values) of the above-listed properties for both coal samples. By comparing the particle size and chemical composition distributions of the mineral matter and fly ash, it was possible to conclude that for the Texas lignite mineral matter, the combustion did not effect significantly the distribution of these properties, however, for the Eagel Butte coal the combustion had a major impact on these mineral matter parameters.

  11. Sorptivity of fly ash concretes

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalan, M.K.

    1996-08-01

    A factorial experiment was designed to measure the sorptivity of cement and fly ash concretes in order to compare the durability of fly ash concrete against the cement concrete. Sorptivity measurements based on the capillary movement of water was made on three grades of cement concrete and six grades of fly ash mixes. The effect of curing was also studied by treating the samples in two curving conditions. A functional relationship of sorptivity against the strength, curing condition and fly ash content has been presented. The results were useful to analyze the factors influencing the durability of cement and fly ash concretes and to explain why some of the previously reported findings were contradictory. Curing conditions have been found to be the most important factor that affected the durability properties of fly ash concrete. When proper curing was provided, a mix with 40% fly ash was found to reduce the sorptivity by 37%. Under inadequate curing the sorptivity was found to increase by 60%. The influence of curing on cement concrete was found to be of much less importance.

  12. BIOAVAILABILITY OF 2,3,7,8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN FROM MUNICIPAL INCINERATOR FLY ASH TO FRESHWATER FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bioavailability of 2,3,7,8-TCDD from municipal incinerator fly ash to freshwater fish was determined. It was observed that carp exposed to fly ash containing all 22 TCDD isomers, or the solvent extract of the fly ash, retain only 2,3,7,8-TCDD. Exposures with fly ash appears t...

  13. Fly ash chemical classification based on lime

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.

    2007-07-01

    Typically, total lime content (CaO) of fly ash is shown in fly ash reports, but its significance is not addressed in US specifications. For certain applications a low lime ash is preferred. When a class C fly ash must be cementitious, lime content above 20% is required. A ternary S-A-C phase diagram pilot is given showing the location of fly ash compositions by coal rank and source in North America. Fly ashes from subbituminous coal from the Powder River Basin usually contain sufficient lime to be cementitious but blending with other coals may result in calcium being present in phases other than tricalcium aluminate. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Utilization of fly ash in metallic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, P.K.; Guo, R.Q.; Golden, D.M.

    1996-10-01

    Fly ash particles have been successfully dispersed into aluminum alloy to make aluminum alloy-fly ash composites (Ashalloy) at University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Additions of solid and hollow particles of fly ash reduce the cost and density of aluminum castings while increasing their performance. Ashalloy represents a candidate material for high value added use of fly ash, while reducing the disposal volumes of fly ash for the electric utility industry and making the US foundries more competitive. The fly ash particle distribution in the matrix aluminum alloy and the microstructure of aluminum-fly ash composite was determined. Selected properties of cast aluminum-fly ash composites are also presented in this paper. Mechanical properties of aluminum-fly ash composites show that the composite possesses higher hardness and higher elastic modulus compared to the matrix alloy. The flow behavior of molten aluminum-fly ash slurries along with the components cast in aluminum-fly ash composites will be presented. Fly ash containing metal components have potential applications in covers, shrouds, casings, manifolds, valve covers, garden furniture, engine blocks in automotive, small engine and electromechanical industry sector.

  15. Petrographic characterization of economizer fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Valentim, B.; Hower, J.C.; Soares, S.; Guedes, A.; Garcia, C.; Flores, D.; Oliveira, A.

    2009-11-15

    Policies for reducing NOx emissions have led power plants to restrict O{sub 2}, resulting in high-carbon fly ash production. Therefore, some potentially useful fly ash, such as the economizer fly ash, is discarded without a thorough knowledge of its composition. In order to characterize this type of fly ash, samples were collected from the economizer Portuguese power plant burning two low-sulfur bituminous coals. Characterization was also performed on economizer fly ash subsamples after wet sieving, density and magnetic separation. Analysis included atomic absorption spectroscopy, loss-on-ignition, scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy.

  16. Identifying glass compositions in fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aughenbaugh, Katherine; Stutzman, Paul; Juenger, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In this study, four Class F fly ashes were studied with a scanning electron microscope; the glassy phases were identified and their compositions quantified using point compositional analysis with k-means clustering and multispectral image analysis. The results showed that while the bulk oxide contents of the fly ashes were different, the four fly ashes had somewhat similar glassy phase compositions. Aluminosilicate glasses (AS), calcium aluminosilicate glasses (CAS), a mixed glass, and, in one case, a high iron glass were identified in the fly ashes. Quartz and iron crystalline phases were identified in each fly ash as well. The compositions of the three main glasses identified, AS, CAS, and mixed glass, were relatively similar in each ash. The amounts of each glass were varied by fly ash, with the highest calcium fly ash containing the most of calcium-containing glass. Some of the glasses were identified as intermixed in individual particles, particularly the calcium-containing glasses. Finally, the smallest particles in the fly ashes, with the most surface area available to react in alkaline solution, such as when mixed with portland cement or in alkali-activated fly ash, were not different in composition than the large particles, with each of the glasses represented. The method used in the study may be applied to a fly ash of interest for use as a cementing material in order to understand its potential for reactivity.

  17. MSW fly ash stabilized with coal ash for geotechnical application.

    PubMed

    Kamon, M; Katsumi, T; Sano, Y

    2000-09-15

    The solidification and stabilization of municipal solid waste (MSW) fly ash for the purpose of minimizing the geo-environmental impact caused by toxic heavy metals as well as ensuring engineering safety (strength and soaking durability) are experimentally evaluated. The mixtures of MSW fly ash stabilized with cement and fluidized bed combustion coal fly ash (FCA) were used for unconfined compressive strength tests, leachate tests, and soaking tests. The behavior of soluble salts contained in the MSW fly ash significantly affects strength development, soaking durability, and the hardening reaction of the stabilized MSW fly ash mixtures. The cement stabilization of the MSW fly ash does not have enough effect on strength development and soaking durability. The addition of cement only contributes to the containment of heavy metals due to the high level of alkalinity. When using FCA as a stabilizing agent for MSW fly ash, the mixture exhibits high strength and durability. However, the Cd leachate cannot be prevented in the early stages of curing. Using a combination of cement and FCA as a MSW fly ash stabilizer can attain high strength, high soaking durability, and the containment of heavy metals. The stabilized MSW fly ash with cement and FCA can be practically applied to embankments. PMID:10936538

  18. ACAA fly ash basics: quick reference card

    SciTech Connect

    2006-07-01

    Fly ash is a fine powdery material created when coal is burned to generate electricity. Before escaping into the environment via the utility stacks, the ash is collected and may be stored for beneficial uses or disposed of, if necessary. The use of fly ash provides environmental benefits, such as the conservation of natural resources, the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and eliminating the needed for ash disposal in landfills. It is also a valuable mineral resource that is used in construction and manufacturing. Fly ash is used in the production of Portland cement, concrete, mortars and stuccos, manufactured aggregates along with various agricultural applications. As mineral filler, fly ash can be used for paints, shingles, carpet backing, plastics, metal castings and other purposes. This quick reference card is intended to provide the reader basic source, identification and composition, information specifically related to fly ash.

  19. Heavy metals leaching in Indian fly ash.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Bably; Mondal, Kajal Kumar

    2008-04-01

    Fly ash is an industrial waste generated from thermal power plants. Fly ash constitutes 80-85% of the total ash produced. A small part of fly ash is utilised in some sectors such as construction materials, building engineering, road, back fill, agriculture, selective engineering and processing useful materials. A large part of fly ash produced is disposed of with very high environmental risk. In the present paper, laboratory leaching test has been used to determine the potential mobility of Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu, Zn, Fe, Mn and Ni in fly ash samples, collected from Chandrapura Thermal Power Plant, Jharkhand and Ramagundam Super Thermal Power Plant, Andhra Pradesh, in order to assess their leachability when these wastes are disposed of. A cascade-leaching test was used at liquid-to-solid ratio (L/S) ranging between 20 and 100. Both fly ash samples exhibited neutral reactions, as indicated by pH values <11.75 and >7.0 at L/S=10 and contact time of 10 minutes. The percentage of leached amounts found to follow the trend Zn>Fe>Mn>Cr>Pb>Cu>Ni>Cd for fly ash from Chandrapura and Fe>Zn>Cu>Mn>Cr>Ni>Pb>Cd for fly ash from Ramagundam. Effect of pH on metals released from ash surface in aqueous solution followed a predictable pattern of decreasing release with increasing pH. PMID:19295096

  20. FATE OF INHALED FLY ASH IN HAMSTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine pulmonary deposition, translocation, and clearance of inhaled fly ash, hamsters received a single 95-min nose-only exposure to neutron-activated fly ash. Over a period of 99 days postexposure, the hamsters were sacrificed in groups of six animals. Lungs, liver, kidne...

  1. Effects of fly ash particle size on strength of Portland cement fly ash mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Erdogdu, K.; Tuerker, P.

    1998-09-01

    Fly ashes do not have the same properties for different size fractions. It can be accepted that the effect of a fly ash on mortar strength is a combined effect of its size fractions. Therefore, it was concluded that by separating the size fractions and replacing cement with them, the combined bulk effect of a fly ash on strength can be better analyzed. In this study, different size fractions of fly ash were used to replace cement partially in standard compressive strength mortars. The authors attempted to interpret the strength of Portland cement-fly ash mortars in terms of the chemical, mineralogical, morphological, and physical properties of different fly ash size fractions used. Strengths of the mortars were compared at 2, 7, 28, and 90 days. Also strength of mortars with all-in ash (original ash containing all the fractions) were estimated by using strength of mortars with size fractions and the suitability of this estimation was discussed.

  2. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Boxley, Chett

    2012-05-15

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with a quantity of spray dryer ash (SDA) and water to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and form a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 40%, and in some cases less than 20%, of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. An optional alkaline activator may be mixed with the fly ash and SDA to facilitate the geopolymerization reaction. The alkaline activator may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  3. Construction procedures using self hardening fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, S. I.; Parker, D. G.

    1980-07-01

    Fly ash produced in Arkansas from burning Wyoming low sulfur coal is self-hardening and can be effective as a soil stabilizing agent for clays and sands. The strength of soil-self hardening fly ash develops rapidly when compacted immediately after mixing. Seven day unconfined compressive strengths up to 1800 psi were obtained from 20% fly ash and 80% sand mixtures. A time delay between mixing the fly ash with the soil and compaction of the mixture reduced the strength. With two hours delay, over a third of the strength was lost and with four hours delay, the loss was over half. Gypsum and some commercial concrete retarders were effective in reducing the detrimental effect of delayed compaction. Adequate mixing of the soil and fly ash and rapid compaction of the mixtures were found to be important parameters in field construction of stabilized bases.

  4. Adsorption of phenolic compounds on fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Akgerman, A.; Zardkoohi, M.

    1996-03-01

    Adsorption isotherms for adsorption of phenol, 3-chlorophenol, and 2,4-dichlorophenol from water onto fly ash were determined. These isotherms were modeled by the Freundlich isotherm. The fly ash adsorbed 67, 20, and 22 mg/g for phenol, chlorophenol, and 2,4-dichlorophenol, respectively, for the highest water phase concentrations used. The affinity of phenolic compounds for fly ash is above the expected amount corresponding to a monolayer coverage considering that the surface area of fly ash is only 1.87 m{sup 2}/g. The isotherms for contaminants studied were unfavorable, indicating that adsorption becomes progressively easier as more solutes are taken up. Phenol displayed a much higher affinity for fly ash than 3-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol.

  5. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Boxley, Chett; Akash, Akash; Zhao, Qiang

    2013-01-08

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  6. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Boxley, Chett; Akash, Akash; Zhao, Qiang

    2012-05-08

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  7. Kohonen's feature maps for fly ash categorization.

    PubMed

    Nataraja, M C; Jayaram, M A; Ravikumar, C N

    2006-12-01

    Fly ash is a common admixture used in concrete and may constitute up to 50% by weight of the total binder material. Incorporation of fly ash in Portland-cement concrete is highly desirable due to technological, economic, and environmental benefits. This article demonstrates the use of artificial intelligence neural networks for the classification of fly ashes in to different groups. Kohonen's Self Organizing Feature Maps is used for the purpose. As chemical composition of fly ash is crucial in the performance of concrete, eight chemical attributes of fly ashes have been considered. The application of simple Kohonen's one-dimensional feature maps permitted to differentiate three main groups of fly ashes. Three one-dimensional feature maps of topology 8-16, 8-24 and 8-32 were explored. The overall classification result of 8-16 topology was found to be significant and encouraging. The data pertaining to 80 fly ash samples were collected from standard published works. The categorization was found to be excellent and compares well with Canadian Standard Association's [CSA A 3000] classification scheme. PMID:17285691

  8. Erodibility of fly ash-treated minesoils

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, J.M.; Sencindiver, J.C.; Singh, R.N.

    1997-12-31

    Fly ash, a by-product of coal-fired power plants, has been used successfully in reclaiming adverse mine sites such as abandoned mine lands by improving minesoil chemical and physical properties. But, the fine sand-silt particle size of fly ash may make it more susceptible to detachment and transport by erosive processes. Furthermore, the high content of silt-size particles in fly ash may make it more susceptable to surface crust formation resulting in reduced infiltration and increased surface runoff and erosion. In the summer of 1989, fly ash/wood waste mixtures were surface applied on two separate mine sites, one with 10% slope and the other 20% slope, in central Preston County, West Virginia. Erosion rates were measured directly using the Linear Erosion/Elevation Measuring Instrument (LEMI). Erosion measurements were taken during the first two growing seasons on both sites. Erosion values were up to five times greater on the fly ash-treated minesoil than on the minesoil without fly ash cover. Mulching with wood chips reduced fly ash erosion to about one-half the loss of the unmulched plots. Erosion was related to both the amount and type of ground cover. Increased vegetative ground cover resulted in reduced erosion. Mosses and fungi appeared to provide better erosion protection than grass-legume cover.

  9. Leaching characteristics of lead from melting furnace fly ash generated by melting of incineration fly ash.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi; Tomikawa, Hiroki

    2012-11-15

    This study investigated the effect of the chemical composition of incineration fly ash on the leaching characteristics of Pb from melting furnace fly ash generated by melting incineration fly ash. Melting furnace fly ash from both a real-scale melting process and lab-scale melting experiments was analyzed. In addition, the theoretical behavior of Cl that affects the leaching characteristics of Pb was simulated by a thermodynamic equilibrium calculation. Proportions of water-soluble Pb in the melting furnace fly ash were correlated with equivalent ratios of total Pb in the ash and Cl transferred to gas. The amount of Cl in the gas increased with an increase in the molar ratio of Cl to Na and K in the incineration fly ash. The thermodynamic calculation predicted that HCl generation is promoted by the increase in the molar ratio, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated a possible presence of PbCl(2) in the melting furnace fly ash. These results implied that the formation of water-soluble PbCl(2) with HCl was affected by the relationships among the amounts of Na, K, and Cl in the incineration fly ash. This is highly significant in determining the leaching characteristics of Pb from the melting furnace fly ash. PMID:22789656

  10. Fly Ash Amendments Catalyze Soil Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Amonette, James E.; Kim, Jungbae; Russell, Colleen K.; Palumbo, A. V.; Daniels, William L.

    2003-09-15

    We tested the effects of four alkaline fly ashes {Class C (sub-bituminous), Class F (bituminous), Class F [bituminous with flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) products], and Class F (lignitic)} on a reaction that simulates the enzyme-mediated formation of humic materials in soils. The presence of FGD products completely halted the reaction, and the bituminous ash showed no benefit over an ash-free control. The sub-bituminous and lignitic fly ashes, however, increased the amount of polymer formed by several-fold. The strong synergetic effect of these ashes when enzyme is present apparently arises from the combined effects of metal oxide co-oxidation (Fe and Mn oxides), alkaline pH, and physical stabilization of the enzyme (porous silica cenospheres).

  11. Extraction of trace metals from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Blander, M.; Wai, C.M.; Nagy, Z.

    1983-08-15

    A process is described for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous. The fly ash has a silicate base and contains surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like. The process is carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl/sub 3/ in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl/sub 3/ to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

  12. Size dependent cytotoxicity of fly ash particles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.K.; Tam, J.S.K.; Wong, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    Fly ash samples were collected from the electrostatic precipitator of a coal-fired power plant in Hong Kong. The particles of the respirable range (smaller than 10 {mu}m) were divided into 4 groups according to their particle size (mass median aerodynamic diameters). The surface morphology and the metal contents (Fe, Mn, Al and Zn) of fly ash particles were examined by a scanning electron microscopy and an inductively coupled plasma spectrophotometer, respectively. The particles were very heterogeneous in size and shape as well as the concentration of metals. The cytotoxicity of these four groups of fly ash particles were evaluated using an in vitro rat alveolar macrophages culture assay. The viability of alveolar macrophages was lower when incubated with smaller size particles. This relationship was also reflected by the damage of the surface morphology of the cells and the release of cytoplasmic (lactate dehydrogenase) and lysosomal (acid phosphatase and {beta}-glucuronidase) marker enzymes into the culture media.

  13. Extraction of trace metals from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Blander, Milton; Wai, Chien M.; Nagy, Zoltan

    1984-01-01

    A process for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous, the fly ash having a silicate base and containing surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like, with the process being carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl.sub.3 in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl.sub.3 to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

  14. Fly ash system technology improves opacity

    SciTech Connect

    2007-06-15

    Unit 3 of the Dave Johnston Power Plant east of Glenrock, WY, USA had problems staying at or below the opacity limits set by the state. The unit makes use of a Lodge Cottrell precipitator. When the plant changed to burning Power River Basin coal, ash buildup became a significant issue as the fly ash control system was unable to properly evacuate hoppers on the unit. To overcome the problem, the PLC on the unit was replaced with a software optimization package called SmartAsh for the precipitator fly ash control system, at a cost of $500,000. After the upgrade, there have been no plugged hoppers and the opacity has been reduced from around 20% to 3-5%. 2 figs.

  15. Using fly ash to mitigate explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Taulbee, D.

    2008-07-01

    In 2005 the University of Kentucky's Center for Applied Energy Research was given funding to evaluate the use of coal combustion by-products (CCBs) to reduce the explosive potential of ammonium nitrate (AN) fertilizers. Fly ash C (FAC), fly ash F (FAF) and flue gas desulfurization by-product (FGD) were evaluated. It was found that applying a CCB coating to the AN particles at concentrations of 5 wt% or greater prevented the AN explosion from propagating. The article reports on results so far and outlines further work to be done. 6 figs.

  16. Fly Ash Characteristics and Carbon Sequestration Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Anthony V.; Amonette, James E.; Tarver, Jana R.; Fagan, Lisa A.; McNeilly, Meghan S.; Daniels, William L.

    2007-07-20

    Concerns for the effects of global warming have lead to an interest in the potential for inexpensive methods to sequester carbon dioxide (CO2). One of the proposed methods is the sequestration of carbon in soil though the growth of crops or forests.4,6 If there is an economic value placed on sequestration of carbon dioxide in soil there may be an an opportunity and funding to utilize fly ash in the reclamation of mine soils and other degraded lands. However, concerns associated with the use of fly ash must be addressed before this practice can be widely adopted. There is a vast extent of degraded lands across the world that has some degree of potential for use in carbon sequestration. Degraded lands comprise nearly 2 X 109 ha of land throughout the world.7 Although the potential is obviously smaller in the United States, there are still approximately 4 X 106 ha of degraded lands that previously resulted from mining operations14 and an additional 1.4 X 108 ha of poorly managed lands. Thus, according to Lal and others the potential is to sequester approximately 11 Pg of carbon over the next 50 years.1,10 The realization of this potential will likely be dependent on economic incentives and the use of soil amendments such as fly ash. There are many potential benefits documented for the use of fly ash as a soil amendment. For example, fly ash has been shown to increase porosity, water-holding capacity, pH, conductivity, and dissolved SO42-, CO32-, HCO3-, Cl- and basic cations, although some effects are notably decreased in high-clay soils.8,13,9 The potential is that these effects will promote increased growth of plants (either trees or grasses) and result in greater carbon accumulation in the soil than in untreated degraded soils. This paper addresses the potential for carbon sequestration in soils amended with fly ash and examines some of the issues that should be considered in planning this option. We describe retrospective studies of soil carbon accumulation on

  17. Changeing of fly ash leachability after grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakatos, J.; Szabo, R.; Racz, A.; Banhidi, O.; Mucsi, G.

    2016-04-01

    Effect of grinding on the reactivity of fly ash used for geopolymer production was tested. Extraction technique using different alkaline and acidic solutions were used for detect the change of the solubility of elements due to the physical and mechano-chemical transformation of minerals in function of grinding time. Both the extraction with alkaline and acidic solution have detected improvement in solubility in function of grinding time. The enhancement in alkaline solution was approx. 100% in case of Si and Al. The acidic medium able to dissolve the fly ash higher manner than the alkaline, therefore the effect of grinding was found less pronounced.

  18. Pulmonary response to cadmium and nickel coated fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Bajpai, R.; Waseem, M.; Kaw, J.L.

    1994-12-31

    Pulmonary reaction to fly ash coated with cadmium (Cd) or nickel (Ni) and to native fly ash was studied in rats after intratracheal inoculation of dust suspensions. The histopathological alterations and changes in biochemical and cellular constituents of the bronchoalveolar lavage were correlated with the metal content in lungs and kidneys. More Ni was adsorbed than Cd on fly ash particulates. Metal-coated fly ash was more toxic than uncoated fly ash. Cd-coated fly ash produced significantly more histopathological and biochemical changes than Ni-coated fly ash. A high concentration of Cd was detected in the kidneys of rats exposed to Cd-coated fly ash. 32 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Eco-friendly fly ash utilization: potential for land application

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, A.; Thapliyal, A.

    2009-07-01

    The increase in demand for power in domestic, agricultural, and industrial sectors has increased the pressure on coal combustion and aggravated the problem of fly ash generation/disposal. Consequently the research targeting effective utilization of fly ash has also gained momentum. Fly ash has proved to be an economical substitute for expensive adsorbents as well as a suitable raw material for brick manufacturing, zeolite synthesis, etc. Fly ash is a reservoir of essential minerals but is deficient in nitrogen and phosphorus. By amending fly ash with soil and/or various organic materials (sewage sludge, bioprocess materials) as well as microbial inoculants like mycorrhizae, enhanced plant growth can be realized. Based on the sound results of large scale studies, fly ash utilization has grown into prominent discipline supported by various internationally renowned organizations. This paper reviews attempts directed toward various utilization of fly ash, with an emphasis on land application of organic/microbial inoculants amended fly ash.

  20. Potential products from North Dakota lignite fly ash. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G R

    1980-06-01

    Four major areas where fly ash can be used are explored. Concrete building blocks with fly ash replacing 50% of the portland cement have proven to be successful using current ASTM standards. Results in the ceramics area show that a ceramic-like product using fly ash and crushed glass with a small amount of clay as a green binder. Some preliminary results using sulfur ash in building materials are reported and with results of making wallboard from ash. (MHR)

  1. Alkali ash material: a novel fly ash-based cement.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Hossein; Brendley, William

    2003-08-01

    The United States generates 110 million t of coal ash annually. Approximately 70 million t of this coal ash is fly ash, of which 27% is recycled and the remaining 73% is landfilled. Disposal of such a huge quantity of ash poses a significant environmental problem. A new cementitious material has been developed, called alkali ash material (AAM), which is used to produce concrete for construction. AAM can be used to create a variety of concrete strengths and could revolutionize the concrete product manufacturing industry due to its economic advantage. AAM contains 40-95% Class F fly ash and is used as cement to bind sand, stone, and fibers creating concrete. AAM concrete has been tested for strength, durability, mechanical properties, and, most importantly, economic viability. AAM concrete is economically and technically viable for many construction applications. Some properties include rapid strength gain (90% of ultimate in 1 d), high ultimate strengths (110 MPa or 16,000 psi in 1 d), excellent acid resistance, and freeze-thaw durability. AAM's resistance to chemical attack, such as sulfuric (H2SO4), nitric (HNO3), hydrochloric (HCl), and organic acids, is far better than portland cement concrete. AAM is resistant to freeze-thaw attack based on ASTM C-666 specifications. Potential immediate applications of AAM are blocks, pipe, median barriers, sound barriers, and overlaying materials. Eventual markets are high strength construction products, bridge beams, prestressed members, concrete tanks, highway appurtenances, and other concrete products. PMID:12966995

  2. AUTOMATION OF THE RESISTIVITY MEASUREMENT FOR FLY ASH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article describes the automation of the resistivity measurement for fly ash. Fly ash resistivity is an important consideration in the operation of particulate control devices based on electrostatic principles (the higher the resistivity of the fly ash, the more difficult it i...

  3. Insulation formed of precipitated silica and fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Barito, R.W.; Downs, K.L.

    1987-07-21

    This patent describes a slab of board-like material for use as a thermal insulation comprising: a. a precipitated silica and a fly ash material, between 30% and 70% based upon the total weight of the precipitated silica and fly ash material; and b. a gas and water light envelope containing the mixture of precipitated silica and fly ash material.

  4. Mutagenicity of fly ash particles in Paramecium

    SciTech Connect

    Smith-Sonneborn, J.; Palizzi, R.A.; Herr, C.; Fisher, G.L.

    1981-01-09

    Paramecium, a protozoan that ingests nonnutritive particulate matter, was used to determine the mutagenicity of fly ash. Heat treatment inactivated mutagens that require metabolic conversion to their active form but did not destroy all mutagenicity. Extraction of particles with hydrochloric acid, but not dimethyl sulfoxide, removed detectable mutagenic activity.

  5. FLY ASH RECYCLE IN DRY SCRUBBING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes the effects of fly ash recycle in dry scrubbing. (Previous workers have shown that the recycle of product solids improves the utilization of slaked lime--Ca(OH)2--for sulfur dioxide (SO2) removal by spray dryers with bag filters.) In laboratory-scale experimen...

  6. Hydrothermal reaction of fly ash. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.W.

    1994-12-31

    The reactions which occur when fly ash is treated under hydrothermal conditions were investigated. This was done for the following primary reasons. The first of these is to determine the nature of the phases that form to assess the stabilities of these phases in the ambient environment and, finally, to assess whether these phases are capable of sequestering hazardous species. The second reason for undertaking this study was whether, depending on the composition of the ash and the presence of selected additives, it would be possible under hydrothermal conditions to form compounds which have cementitious properties. Formation of four classes of compounds, which bracket likely fly ash compositional ranges, were selected for study. The classes are calcium silicate hydrates, calcium selenates, and calcium aluminosulfates, and silicate-based glasses. Specific compounds synthesized were determined and their stability regions assessed. As part of stability assessment, the extent to which selected hazardous species are sequestered was determined. Finally, the cementing properties of these compounds were established. The results obtained in this program have demonstrated that mild hydrothermal conditions can be employed to improve the reactivity of fly ash. Such improvements in reactivity can result in the formation of monolithic forms which may exhibit suitable mechanical properties for selected applications as building materials. If the ashes involved are considered hazardous, the mechanical properties exhibited indicated the forms could be handled in a manner which facilitates their disposal.

  7. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum and fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The Cumberland Fossil Plant (CUF) is located in Stewart County, Tennessee, and began commercial operation in 1972. This is the Tennessee Valley Authority`s newest fossil (coal-burning) steam electric generating plant. Under current operating conditions, the plant burns approximately seven million tons of coal annually. By-products from the combustion of coal are fly ash, approximately 428,000 tons annually, and bottom ash, approximately 115,000 tons annually. Based on historical load and projected ash production rates, a study was initially undertaken to identify feasible alternatives for marketing, utilization and disposal of ash by-products. The preferred alternative to ensure that facilities are planned for all by-products which will potentially be generated at CUF is to plan facilities to handle wet FGD gypsum and dry fly ash. A number of different sites were evaluated for their suitability for development as FGD gypsum and ash storage facilities. LAW Engineering was contracted to conduct onsite explorations of sites to develop information on the general mature of subsurface soil, rock and groundwater conditions in the site areas. Surveys were also conducted on each site to assess the presence of endangered and threatened species, wetlands and floodplains, archaeological and cultural resources, prime farmland and other site characteristics which must be considered from an environmental perspective.

  8. Determination of trace elements in fly ash samples by FAAS after applying different digestion procedure.

    PubMed

    Bingöl, D; Akçay, M

    2005-04-30

    The fly ash samples obtained from Kangal Power Plant were prepared for FAAS analysis by a new approach. The trace elements of the fly ash samples were leached with appropriate solvents under suitable conditions. The leaching method is known as an effective technique for substances dissolving very hard and refractory materials. The leaching effects of solvents and their mixtures were investigated on fly ash samples that are used largely in analysis of soil and sediment samples. The fly ashes mainly consist of glassy aluminosilicates. The major components of the samples are SiO(2), Al(2)O(3), CaO and Fe(2)O(3). Therefore, decomposition of the silicate lattice of the fly ash is required for liberation of trace elements. The dissolution process can be completed by using a mineral acid such as concentrated HCl. This technique has an advantage that the fly ash can be dissolved without any oxidation at room temperature. Maximum element recoveries were obtained by the procedure of 37% HCl leaching after the samples were treated with 2.0ml of concentrated HF. It was also observed that maximum mass loss occurred in this procedure. The effect of the four leaching reagents, which are HCl, HNO(3), HClO(4) and HNO(3)+HClO(4,) were investigated on fly ash samples that were treated with concentrated HF. An optimum leaching method was determined based on the confidence of analytical results and element recovery rates. PMID:18970026

  9. Synthesis of hydroxy sodalite from coal fly ash using waste industrial brine solution.

    PubMed

    Musyoka, Nicholas M; Petrik, Leslie F; Balfour, Gillian; Gitari, Wilson M; Hums, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The effect of using industrial waste brine solution instead of ultra pure water was investigated during the synthesis of zeolites using three South African coal fly ashes as Si feedstock. The high halide brine was obtained from the retentate effluent of a reverse osmosis mine water treatment plant. Synthesis conditions applied were; ageing of fly ash was at 47 ° C for 48 hours, and while the hydrothermal treatment temperature was set at 140 ° C for 48 hours. The use of brine as a solvent resulted in the formation of hydroxy sodalite zeolite although unconverted mullite and hematite from the fly ash feedstock was also found in the synthesis product. PMID:22175873

  10. Increasing bioavailability of phosphorus from fly ash through vermicomposting.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, S S; Chattopadhyay, G N

    2002-01-01

    Due to the environmental problems created by large-scale fly ash generation throughout the world, efforts are being made to recycle these materials. An important component of the recycling effort is using fly ash to improve low-fertility soils. Because availability of many nutrients is very low in fly ash, available ranges of such nutrients must be improved to increase the effectiveness of fly ash as a soil amendment. In the present study, we assessed the possibility of increasing P bioavailability in fly ash through vermicomposting in a yard experiment. Fly ash was mixed with organic matter in the form of cow (Bos taurus) dung at 1:3, 1:1, and 3:1 ratios and incubated with and without epigeic earthworm (Eisenia fetida) for 50 d. The concentration of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) was found to increase many fold in the earthworm-treated series of fly ash and organic matter combinations compared with the series without earthworm. This helped to transform considerable amounts of insoluble P from fly ash into more soluble forms and thus resulted in increased bioavailability of the nutrients in the vermicomposted series. Among different combinations of fly ash and organic matter, P availability in fly ash due to vermicomposting was significantly higher in the 1:1 fly ash to cow dung treatment compared with the other treatments. PMID:12469864

  11. Possibilities of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash utilisation.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Silvie; Koval, Lukáš; Škrobánková, Hana; Matýsek, Dalibor; Winter, Franz; Purgar, Amon

    2015-08-01

    Properties of the waste treatment residual fly ash generated from municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash were investigated in this study. Six different mortar blends with the addition of the municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash were evaluated. The Portland cement replacement levels of the municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash used were 25%, 30% and 50%. Both, raw and washed municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash samples were examined. According to the mineralogical composition measurements, a 22.6% increase in the pozzolanic/hydraulic properties was observed for the washed municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash sample. The maximum replacement level of 25% for the washed municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash in mortar blends was established in order to preserve the compressive strength properties. Moreover, the leaching characteristics of the crushed mortar blend was analysed in order to examine the immobilisation of its hazardous contents. PMID:26060198

  12. 46 CFR 148.225 - Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... be disposed of as prescribed in 33 CFR parts 151.55 through 151.77. ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash). 148.225 Section... § 148.225 Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash). (a) This part does not apply to the shipment...

  13. 46 CFR 148.225 - Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... be disposed of as prescribed in 33 CFR parts 151.55 through 151.77. ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash). 148.225 Section... § 148.225 Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash). (a) This part does not apply to the shipment...

  14. 46 CFR 148.225 - Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... be disposed of as prescribed in 33 CFR parts 151.55 through 151.77. ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash). 148.225 Section... § 148.225 Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash). (a) This part does not apply to the shipment...

  15. 46 CFR 148.225 - Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... be disposed of as prescribed in 33 CFR parts 151.55 through 151.77. ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash). 148.225 Section... § 148.225 Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash). (a) This part does not apply to the shipment...

  16. Fly ash of mineral coal as ceramic tiles raw material.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, A; Bergmann, C P

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the use of mineral coal fly ash as a raw material in the production of ceramic tiles. The samples of fly ash came from Capivari de Baixo, a city situated in the Brazilian Federal State of Santa Catarina. The fly ash and the raw materials were characterized regarding their physical chemical properties, and, based on these results; batches containing fly ash and typical raw materials for ceramic tiles were prepared. The fly ash content in the batches varied between 20 and 80 wt%. Specimens were molded using a uniaxial hydraulic press and were fired. All batches containing ash up to 60 wt% present adequate properties to be classified as several kinds of products in the ISO 13006 standard () regarding its different absorption groups (pressed). The results obtained indicate that fly ash, when mixed with traditional raw materials, has the necessary requirements to be used as a raw material for production of ceramic tiles. PMID:16540298

  17. Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Hnat, J.G.; Mathur, A.; Simpson, J.C.

    1999-08-10

    The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants. 6 figs.

  18. Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Hnat, James G.; Mathur, Akshay; Simpson, James C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants.

  19. Prevention of lead leaching from fly ashes by mechanochemical treatment.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Y; Fujiwara, K; Terada, A; Nakai, S; Hosomi, M

    2010-07-01

    Fly ashes from a municipal solid waste incinerator were subjected to mechanochemical (MC) treatment in a planetary ball mill, and the treated fly ashes were cemented with a binder. The leachability of lead (Pb) from the treated fly ashes and from the cement product were investigated, and the speciation of lead in the treated and untreated ashes was determined by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis. MC treatment of the fly ashes and subsequent cementation prevented Pb leaching by 99.9%, whereas MC treatment alone prevented Pb leaching by 92.8%. Analysis of the X-ray absorption near-edge spectrum of the untreated fly ashes revealed that the predominant Pb species in the ashes was PbCl(2). In contrast, the counterpart in the treated fly ashes was Pb(3)O(4) insoluble in water. The formation of a species of Pb with a lower solubility in water than that of PbCl(2) was confirmed by MC treatment of PbCl(2)-spiked fly ashes for 48h, indicating the reduction of PbCl(2) in the spiked fly ashes to Pb via Pb(3)O(4) during MC treatment. Our results indicate that such reduction to an insoluble species prevented Pb from leaching and that MC treatment followed by cementation is a feasible method for the recycling of fly ashes. PMID:20022740

  20. General nature and using potentiality of fly ash in China

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, J.; Wang, Z.; Shao, X.; Zhi, X.; Wang, G.

    1998-12-31

    China is the largest fly ash producer of the world. Currently, it produces at least 100 million tons of fly ash each year. Since the different coal types, different coal forming conditions, and different burners are used around the country, the nature of fly ash produced in different plants varies. The characteristics of fly ash influence their utilization. In this paper, numerous data about the characteristics of fly ash in China are collected and analyzed, such as the main chemical components of fly ash (SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, K{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}O, CaO, MgO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), LOI (C content), and some trace elements and radioactive elements, grain size distribution, phase compositions including types, shapes and contents of glassy bodies, types of inorganic minerals, specific gravity, specific surface, ratio of water requirement, ratio of water content, 28-day compressive strength, etc. Based upon these parameters, methods of fly ash utilization are analyzed systematically. The methods of utilization incorporated with the nature of fly ash can improve the level of fly ash utilization. Fly ash in China is primarily used in road construction, production of building materials (cement, concrete, bricks, tiles, ceramsites and mortar), backfilling, construction engineering, agriculture, and materials recovery of useful components.

  1. MEASURE OF FLY ASH RESISTIVITY USING SIMULATED FLUE GAS ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report, describing the apparatus and laboratory procedures used to determine resistivity for a number of fly ashes under a variety of test conditions, supports research to develop a technique for predicting fly ash resistivity from chemical analyses of coal and coal ash. This...

  2. Fly ash and concrete: a study determines whether biomass, or coal co-firing fly ash, can be used in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuangzhen; Baxter, Larry

    2006-08-01

    Current US national standards for using fly ash in concrete (ASTM C618) state that fly ash must come from coal combustion, thus precluding biomass-coal co-firing fly ash. The co-fired ash comes from a large and increasing fraction of US power plants due to rapid increases in co-firing opportunity fuels with coal. The fly ashes include coal fly ash, wood fly ash from pure wood combustion, biomass and coal co-fired fly ash SW1 and SW2. Also wood fly ash is blended with Class C or Class F to produce Wood C and Wood E. Concrete samples were prepared with fly ash replacing cement by 25%. All fly ash mixes except wood have a lower water demand than the pure cement mix. Fly ashes, either from coal or non coal combustion, increase the required air entraining agent (AEA) to meet the design specification of the mixes. If AEA is added arbitrarily without considering the amount or existence of fly ash results could lead to air content in concrete that is either too low or too high. Biomass fly ash does not impact concrete setting behaviour disproportionately. Switch grass-coal co-fired fly ash and blended wood fly ash generally lie within the range of pure coal fly ash strength. The 56 day flexure strength of all the fly ash mixes is comparable to that of the pure cement mix. The flexure strength from the coal-biomass co-fired fly ash does not differ much from pure coal fly ash. All fly ash concrete mixes exhibit lower chloride permeability than the pure cement mixes. In conclusion biomass coal co-fired fly ash perform similarly to coal fly ash in fresh and hardened concrete. As a result, there is no reason to exclude biomass-coal co-fired fly ash in concrete.

  3. Fly ash as a liming material for cotton.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Gene; Dunn, David

    2004-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to determine the effect of fly ash from a coal combustion electric power facility on soil acidity in a cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) field. Fresh fly ash was applied to a Bosket fine sandy loam (fine-loamy, mixed, thermic Mollic Hapludalf) soil with an initial soil pH(salt) of 4.8. The fly ash was equivalent to 42 g kg(-1) calcium carbonate with 97% passing through a 60 mesh (U.S. standard) sieve. Fly ash was applied one day before cotton planting in 1999 at 0, 3.4, 6.7, and 10.1 Mg ha(-1). No fly ash was applied in 2000. Within 60 d of fly ash application in 1999, all rates of fly ash significantly increased soil pH above 6.0. Manganese levels in cotton petioles were reduced significantly by 6.7 and 10.1 Mg ha(-1) of fly ash. Soil boron (B) and sodium (Na) concentrations were significantly increased with fly ash. In 1999, B in cotton leaves ranged from 72 to 84 mg kg(-1) in plots with fly ash applications. However, no visual symptoms of B toxicity in plants were observed. In 1999, cotton lint yield decreased on average 12 kg ha(-1) for each Mg of fly ash applied. In 2000, cotton yields were significantly greater for the residual 3.4 and 6.7 Mg fly ash ha(-1) plots than the untreated check. Due to the adverse yield effects measured in the first year following application, fly ash would not be a suitable soil amendment for cotton on this soil at this time. PMID:14964389

  4. Stabilizing soft fine-grained soils with fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Edil, T.B.; Acosta, H.A.; Benson, C.H.

    2006-03-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of self-cementing fly ashes derived from combustion of subbituminous coal at electric power plants for stabilization of soft fine-grained soils. California bearing ratio (CBR) and resilient modulus (M{sub r}) tests were conducted on mixtures prepared with seven soft fine-grained soils (six inorganic soils and one organic soil) and four fly ashes. The soils were selected to represent a relatively broad range of plasticity, with plasticity indices ranging between 15 and 38. Two of the fly ashes are high quality Class C ashes (per ASTM C 618) that are normally used in Portland cement concrete. The other ashes are off-specification ashes, meaning they do not meet the Class C or Class F criteria in ASTM C 618. Tests were conducted on soils and soil-fly ash mixtures prepared at optimum water content (a standardized condition), 7% wet of optimum water content (representative of the typical in situ condition in Wisconsin), and 9-18% wet of optimum water content (representative of a very wet in situ condition). Addition of fly ash resulted in appreciable increases in the CBR and M{sub r} of the inorganic soils. For water contents 7% wet of optimum, CBRs of the soils alone ranged between 1 and 5. Addition of 10% fly ash resulted in CBRs ranging between 8 and 17, and 18% fly ash resulted in CBRs between 15 and 31. Similarly, M{sub r} of the soil alone ranged between 3 and 15 MPa at 7% wet of optimum, whereas addition of 10% fly ash resulted in M{sub r} between 12 and 60 MPa and 18% fly ash resulted in M{sub r} between 51 and 106 MPa. In contrast, except for one fly ash, addition of fly ash generally had little effect on CBR or M{sub r} of the organic soil.

  5. Market opportunities for fly ash fillers in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, C.; Harris, T.; Gledhill, J. )

    1990-11-01

    Direct Acid Leaching (DAL) processed fly ash is derived from treating raw and beneficiated coal fly ash with hydrochloric acid. The DAL process allows for the production of fly ash with greater chemical purity and consistency than raw fly ash alone. In addition, DAL fly ash is similar to various minerals used in a wide range of applications that require filler minerals. This project investigates the feasibility of using three grades of DAL fly ash ranging from 10 microns to 30 microns in diameter as an alternative filler material to mineral fillers. Six major applications in North America, requiring large volumes of filler minerals were investigated by region including: (1) asphalt roofing shingles (2) carpet backing (3) joint compound and wallboard (4) industrial coatings (5) plastics (6) vinyl flooring. It is determined that calcium carbonate was the primary mineral filler DAL fly ash would be competing with in the applications investigated. Calcium carbonate is used in all applications investigated. The application which demonstrated the greatest potential for using DAL fly ash is asphalt shingles. Asphalt shingles were the largest calcium carbonate consuming application identified, consuming 4.8 million tons in 1988, and is the least sensitive to the dark color of the DAL fly ash. Although the DAL fly ash typically has a smaller particle size, in comparison to calcium carbonate, the asphalt shingle manufacturers felt it would be a good substitute. Other promising applications for DAL fly ash were industrial coatings and plastics where the calcium carbonate particle size requirements of 3 to 6 microns very closely matches the particle size of the DAL fly ash considered in this project. 17 figs., 36 tabs.

  6. Recovery of aluminum and other metal values from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, W.J.; Seeley, F.G.

    1979-11-01

    The invention relates to a method for improving the acid leachability of aluminum and other metal values found in fly ash which comprises sintering the fly ash, prior to acid leaching, with a calcium sulfate-containing composition at a temperature at which the calcium sulfate is retained in said composition during sintering and for a time sufficient to quantitatively convert the aluminum in said fly ash into an acid-leachable form.

  7. Recovery of aluminum and other metal values from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, William J.; Seeley, Forest G.

    1981-01-01

    The invention described herein relates to a method for improving the acid leachability of aluminum and other metal values found in fly ash which comprises sintering the fly ash, prior to acid leaching, with a calcium sulfate-containing composition at a temperature at which the calcium sulfate is retained in said composition during sintering and for a time sufficient to quantitatively convert the aluminum in said fly ash into an acid-leachable form.

  8. Sorbate characteristics of fly ash. Volume I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Grow, J.; Sheih, M.; Trattner, R.; Kohut, J.; Zwillenberg, M.

    1983-08-01

    The objective of this investigation is to correlate the sorbate and leaching characteristics of fly ash with coal properties and monitored combustion conditions in order to design a system for the inexpensive treatment of industrial wastes and leachate from industrial landfills using mixtures of fly ash as inexpensive sorbents. Such a low-cost treatment system could also treat ash pond effluent for water reuse by powerplants as cooling tower makeup. Twelve unblended coals from 10 different mines were burned under monitored conditions in three different types of coal fired boilers in order to determine the influence of coal composition, ash fusion temperatures, boiler additives, combustion conditions and co-firing of natural gas or oil with the coal, on the leaching and sorbate characteristics of the fly ash produced. This included the determination of: (1) SiO/sub 2/, Al/sup 2/O/sub 3/, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, CaO, K/sub 2/O, Na/sub 2/O, MgO, sulfur, ash fusion temperatures Ti, Cd, Sn, Ni, Pb, Mo, Cu, Cr, n, Mn, Ba and V in the coals and their respective fly ashes and bottom ashes; (2) Moessbauer spectra of a number of coals and their fly ashes; and (3) surface analysis of the fly ashes using ESCA. The leaching exhibited by the fly ashes with regard to pH, Cd, B, Sn, Ni, Pb, Mo, Cu, Cr, Mn and Fe was examined. In addition, the removal of Cd, B, Sn, Ni, Pb, Mo, Cu, Cr, Fe, As and organics by fly ash was evaluated, using from actual ash pond samples to model realistic inlet concentrations. The results show that fly ash can be used for the treatment of Cadmium, Boron, Tin, Molybdenum, Nickel, Lead, Copper, Chromium, Zinc, Manganese, Iron, Arsenic and organics in actual ash pond effluents. 18 references, 64 figures, 60 tables.

  9. Kinetics of beneficiated fly ash by carbon burnout

    SciTech Connect

    Okoh, J.M.; Dodoo, J.N.D.; Diaz, A.; Ferguson, W.; Udinskey, J.R. Jr.; Christiana, G.A.

    1997-12-31

    The presence of carbon in fly ash requires an increase in the dosage of the air-entraining admixture for concrete mix, and may cause the admixture to lose efficiency. Specifying authorities for the concrete producers have set maximum allowable levels of residual carbon. These levels are the so called Loss On Ignition (LOI). The concrete producers` day-to-day purchasing decisions sets the LOI at 4%. The objective of the project is to investigate the kinetics of oxidation of residual carbon present in coal fly ash as a possible first step toward producing low-carbon fly ash from high-carbon, low quality fly ash.

  10. Sulfate resistance of high calcium fly ash concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhole, Rajaram

    Sulfate attack is one of the mechanisms which can cause deterioration of concrete. In general, Class C fly ash mixtures are reported to provide poor sulfate resistance. Fly ashes, mainly those belonging to the Class C, were tested as per the ASTM C 1012 procedure to evaluate chemical sulfate resistance. Overall the Class C fly ashes showed poor resistance in the sulfate environment. Different strategies were used in this research work to improve the sulfate resistance of Class C fly ash mixes. The study revealed that some of the strategies such as use of low W/CM (water to cementing materials by mass ratio), silica fume or ultra fine fly ash, high volumes of fly ash and, ternary or quaternary mixes with suitable supplementary cementing materials, can successfully improve the sulfate resistance of the Class C fly ash mixes. Combined sulfate attack, involving physical and chemical action, was studied using sodium sulfate and calcium sulfate solutions. The specimens were subjected to wetting-drying cycles and temperature changes. These conditions were found to accelerate the rate of degradation of concrete placed in a sodium sulfate environment. W/CM was found to be the main governing factor in providing sulfate resistance to mixes. Calcium sulfate did not reveal damage as a result of mainly physical action. Characterization of the selected fly ashes was undertaken by using SEM, XRD and the Rietveld analysis techniques, to determine the relation between the composition of fly ashes and resistance to sulfate attack. The chemical composition of glass represented on the ternary diagram was the main factor which had a significant influence on the sulfate resistance of fly ash mixtures. Mixes prepared with fly ashes containing significant amounts of vulnerable crystalline phases offered poor sulfate resistance. Comparatively, fly ash mixes containing inert crystalline phases such as quartz, mullite and hematite offered good sulfate resistance. The analysis of hydrated lime-fly

  11. Retention of elemental mercury in fly ashes in different atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Lopez-Anton; M. Diaz-Somoano; M.R. Martinez-Tarazona

    2007-01-15

    Mercury is an extremely volatile element, which is emitted from coal combustion to the environment mostly in the vapor phase. To avoid the environmental problems that the toxic species of this element may cause, control technologies for the removal of mercury are necessary. Recent research has shown that certain fly ash materials have an affinity for mercury. Moreover, it has been observed that fly ashes may catalyze the oxidation of elemental mercury and facilitate its capture. However, the exact nature of Hg-fly ash interactions is still unknown, and mercury oxidation through fly ash needs to be investigated more thoroughly. In this work, the influence of a gas atmosphere on the retention of elemental mercury on fly ashes of different characteristics was evaluated. The retention capacity was estimated comparatively in inert and two gas atmospheres containing species present in coal gasification and coal combustion. Fly ashes produced in two pulverized coal combustion (PCC) plants, produced from coals of different rank (CTA and CTSR), and a fly ash (CTP) produced in a fluidized bed combustion (FBC) plant were used as raw materials. The mercury retention capacity of these fly ashes was compared to the retention obtained in different activated carbons. Although the capture of mercury is very similar in the gasification atmosphere and N{sub 2}, it is much more efficient in a coal combustion retention, being greater in fly ashes from PCC than those from FBC plants. 22 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Chemical constraints on fly ash glass compositions

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Brindle; Michael J. McCarthy

    2006-12-15

    The major oxide content and mineralogy of 75 European fly ashes were examined, and the major element composition of the glass phase was obtained for each. Correlation of compositional trends with the glass content of the ash was explored. Alkali content was deduced to have a major influence on glass formation, and this in turn could be related to the probable chemistry of clay minerals in the source coals. Maximal glass content corresponded to high aluminum content in the glass, and this is in accordance with the theoretical mechanism of formation of aluminosilicate glasses, in which network-modifying oxides are required to promote tetrahedral coordination of aluminum in glass chain structures. Iron oxide was found to substitute for alkali oxides where the latter were deficient, and some indications of preferred eutectic compositions were found. The work suggests that the proportion of the glass phase in the ash can be predicted from the coal mineralogy and that the utility of a given ash for processing into geopolymers or zeolites is determined by its source. 23 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Investigation on the fly ash thermal treatment on the performance of Lithium Ferriphosphate (LiFePO4) battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Febiolita, Bella; Khoirunnissak, Dewi; Purwanto, Agus

    2016-02-01

    Addition of the fly ash can be used to improve the capacity of LiFePO4 battery. Fly ash was added in Acethylene Black (AB) as 2% of the total weight of Acetylene Black (AB). The effects of temperature variation and fly ash characteristics were analyzed. Fly ash was prepared by heating at 50, 100, 150, and 250°C in muffle furnace for 5 hours and passed in 200 mesh screen prior to mixing it with other compounds. Lithium Ferriphospat (LiFePO4), fly ash, Acethylene Black (AB), Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) as a binder and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) as a solvent were mixed to be slurry. The slurry were coated, dried and hot pressed to make a cathode film. The performance of battery lithium was examined by eight channel battery analyzer. The composition of the fly ash was examined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) and Fourier Tansform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The excellent performance was shown in the fly ash addition which were treated by heating at 150°C. The capacity of fly ash added LiFePO4 battery is 94.373 mAh/g, which is higher than that of without fly ash addition, i.e. 67.998 mAh/g.

  14. A comparison between sludge ash and fly ash on the improvement in soft soil

    SciTech Connect

    Deng-Fong Lin; Kae-Long Lin; Huan-Lin Luo

    2007-01-15

    In this study, the strength of soft cohesive subgrade soil was improved by applying sewage sludge ash as a soil stabilizer. Test results obtained were compared with earlier tests conducted on soil samples treated with fly ash. Five different proportions of sludge ash and fly ash were mixed with soft cohesive soil, and tests such as pH value, compaction, California bearing ratio, unconfined compressive strength (UCS), and triaxial compression were performed to understand soil strength improvement because of the addition of both ashes. Results indicate that pH values increase with extending curing age for soil with sludge ash added. The UCS of sludge ash/soil were 1.4 2 times better than untreated soil. However, compressive strength of sludge ash/soil was 20 30 kPa less than fly ash/soil. The bearing capacities for both fly ash/soil and sludge ash/soil were five to six times and four times, respectively, higher than the original capacity. Moreover, the cohesive parameter of shear strength rose with increased amounts of either ash added. Friction angle, however, decreased with increased amounts of either ash. Consequently, results show that sewage sludge ash can potentially replace fly ash in the improvement of the soft cohesive soil. 9 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Biologic effects of oil fly ash.

    PubMed Central

    Ghio, Andrew J; Silbajoris, Robert; Carson, Johnny L; Samet, James M

    2002-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated increased human morbidity and mortality with elevations in the concentration of ambient air particulate matter (PM). Fugitive fly ash from the combustion of oil and residual fuel oil significantly contributes to the ambient air particle burden. Residual oil fly ash (ROFA) is remarkable in the capacity to provoke injury in experimental systems. The unique composition of this emission source particle makes it particularly useful as a surrogate for ambient air PM in studies of biologic effects testing the hypothesis that metals mediate the biologic effects of air pollution particles. A majority of the in vitro and animal model investigations support the postulate that transition metals present in ROFA (especially vanadium) participate in Fenton-like chemical reactions to produce reactive oxygen species. This is associated with tyrosine phosphorylation, nuclear factor kappa B and other transcription factor activation, induction of inflammatory mediator expression, and inflammatory lung injury. It is also evident that vanadium accounts for a significant portion of the biologic activity of ROFA. The extrapolation of this body of investigation on ROFA to the field of ambient air PM is difficult, as particles in numerous environments have such small amounts of vanadium. PMID:11834466

  16. Properties of solid waste incinerator fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Poran, C.J. ); Ahtchi-Ali, F. )

    1989-08-01

    Since the late 1950s solid waste incinerators have become widely used in the United States. The incineration of solid waste produces large quantities of bottom and fly ash, which has been disposed of primarily by landfilling. However, as landfills become undesirable other disposal methods are being sought. An experimental research program is conducted to determine engineering properties of solid waste incinerator fly ash (SWIF) in order to evaluate the feasibility of using the material for compacted fill and road and subbase construction. Moisture-density relationship, permeability, shear strength, and California bearing ratio (CBR) are investigated. The effects of densification on these engineering properties are also examined. In addition, the effectiveness of cement and lime stabilization is investigated using two common mix ratios. Test results of stabilized mixes are compared to the unstabilized material. Cement stabilization is found to be very effective in reducing permeability, and increasing shear strength and CBR values of the material. The results indicate that SWIF with cement stabilization may be used effectively for compacted fill and road subbase construction. Finally, some environmental aspects related to these applications are examined.

  17. Environmental hazard of oil shale combustion fly ash.

    PubMed

    Blinova, Irina; Bityukova, Liidia; Kasemets, Kaja; Ivask, Angela; Käkinen, Aleksandr; Kurvet, Imbi; Bondarenko, Olesja; Kanarbik, Liina; Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Aruoja, Villem; Schvede, Hedi; Kahru, Anne

    2012-08-30

    The combined chemical and ecotoxicological characterization of oil shale combustion fly ash was performed. Ash was sampled from the most distant point of the ash-separation systems of the Balti and Eesti Thermal Power Plants in North-Eastern Estonia. The fly ash proved potentially hazardous for tested aquatic organisms and high alkalinity of the leachates (pH>10) is apparently the key factor determining its toxicity. The leachates were not genotoxic in the Ames assay. Also, the analysis showed that despite long-term intensive oil-shale combustion accompanied by considerable fly ash emissions has not led to significant soil contamination by hazardous trace elements in North-Eastern Estonia. Comparative study of the fly ash originating from the 'new' circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustion technology and the 'old' pulverized-fired (PF) one showed that CFB fly ash was less toxic than PF fly ash. Thus, complete transfer to the 'new' technology will reduce (i) atmospheric emission of hazardous trace elements and (ii) fly ash toxicity to aquatic organisms as compared with the 'old' technology. PMID:22717068

  18. The recycling of the coal fly ash in glass production

    SciTech Connect

    Erol, M.M.; Kucukbayrak, S.; Ersoy-Mericboyu, A.

    2006-09-15

    The recycling of fly ash obtained from the combustion of coal in thermal power plant has been studied. Coal fly ash was vitrified by melting at 1773 K for 5 hours without any additives. The properties of glasses produced from coal fly ash were investigated by means of Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) techniques. DTA study indicated that there was only one endothermic peak at 1003 K corresponding to the glass transition temperature. XRD analysis showed the amorphous state of the glass sample produced from coal fly ash. SEM investigations revealed that the coal fly ash based glass sample had smooth surface. The mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the glass sample were also determined. Recycling of coal fly ash by using vitrification technique resulted to a glass material that had good mechanical, physical and chemical properties. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results showed that the heavy metals of Pb, Cr, Zn and Mn were successfully immobilized into the glass. It can be said that glass sample obtained by the recycling of coal fly ash can be taken as a non-hazardous material. Overall, results indicated that the vitrification technique is an effective way for the stabilization and recycling of coal fly ash.

  19. Multinuclear NMR approach to coal fly ash characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, D.A.

    1991-09-01

    This report describes the application of various nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to study the hydration kinetics and mechanisms, the structural properties, and the adsorption characteristics of coal fly ash. Coal fly ash samples were obtained from the Dave Johnston and Laramie River electric power generating plants in Wyoming. Hydrogen NMR relaxation times were measured as a function of time to observe the kinetics of hydration for the two coal fly ashes at different temperatures and water-to-cement ration. The kinetic data for the hydrated coal fly ashes were compared to the hydration of portland cement. The mechanism used to describe the kinetic data for the hydration of portland cement was applied, with reservation, to describe the hydration of the coal fly ashes. The results showed that the coal fly ashes differ kinetically from that of portland cement and from each other. Consequently, both coal fly ashes were judged to be poorer cementitious materials than portland cement. Carbon-13 NMR CP/MAS spectra were obtained for the anhydrous coal fly ashes in an effort to determine the type of organic species that may be present, either adsorbed on the surface or entrained.

  20. Optimizing the use of fly ash in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, M.

    2007-07-01

    The optimum amount of fly ash varies not only with the application, but also with composition and proportions of all the materials in the concrete mixture (especially the fly ash), the conditions during placing (especially temperature), construction practices (for example, finishing and curing) and the exposure conditions. This document discusses issues related to using low to very high levels of fly ash in concrete and provides guidance for the use of fly ash without compromising the construction process or the quality of the finished product. The nature of fly ashes including their physical, mineralogical and chemical properties is covered in detail, as well as fly ash variability due to coal composition and plant operating conditions. A discussion on the effects of fly ash characteristics on fresh and hardened concrete properties includes; workability, bleeding, air entrainment, setting time, heat of hydration, compressive strength development, creep, drying shrinkage, abrasion resistance, permeability, resistance to chlorides, alkali-silica reaction (ASR), sulfate resistance, carbonation, and resistance to freezing and thawing and deicer salt scaling. Case studies were selected as examples of some of the more demanding applications of fly ash concrete for ASR mitigation, chloride resistance, and green building.

  1. Fly ash and coal mineral matter surface transformations during heating

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, D R; Smith, R D

    1982-05-01

    A study is reported of surface segregation phenomena for fly ash and aluminosilicates representative of coal mineral matter during heating. The materials studied included a 20-..mu..m average diameter fly ash powder, a glass prepared from the fly ash, and Ca- and K-rich aluminosilicate minerals. The samples were heated both in air and under vacuum for extended periods at temperatures up to 1100/sup 0/C. XPS, Auger and SIMS methods were used to obtain relative surface elemental concentrations for major and minor components and depth profiles for some of the samples. Major differences were noted between samples heated in air (oxidizing) and those heated in vacuum (reducing) environments. For the fly ash glass heated in air Fe, Ti and Mg become enriched on the surfaces while heating in vacuum leads to Si surface segregation. Different trends upon heating were also observed for the Ca- and K-rich aluminosilicates. The results indicate two levels of surface enrichment upon the fly ash glass; a thin (< 500 A) layer and a thicker (1- to 2-..mu..m) layer most evident for heating in air where an Fe-rich layer is formed. The present results indicate that the rates of surface segregation may not be sufficiently fast on the time scale of fly ash formation to result in equilibrium surface segregation. It is concluded that condensation processes during fly ash formation probably play a major role in the observed fly ash surface enrichments.

  2. Process for the recovery of alumina from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Murtha, M.J.

    1983-08-09

    An improvement in the lime-sinter process for recovering alumina from pulverized coal fly ash is disclosed. The addition of from 2 to 10 weight percent carbon and sulfur to the fly ash-calcium carbonate mixture increase alumina recovery at lower sintering temperatures.

  3. Managing metolachlor and atrazine leaching losses using lignite fly ash.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rakesh Kumar; Singh, Neera

    2012-10-01

    Application of low cost amendment for pesticide retention in soil is an important area of research in environmental sciences. The present study reports the potential of coal fly ash (Inderprastha and Badarpur), a waste from thermal power stations, for retaining soil applied metolachlor and atrazine within the application zone. Both the fly ashes were highly effective in reducing the leaching losses of metolachlor and atrazine and at 2% and 5% fly ash amendment levels the herbicides were retained in the top 15 cm profile of the column. However, fly ashes varied in their capacity in reducing the downward mobility of herbicides, as the Inderprastha fly ash was more effective than the Badarpur fly ash. Although fly ash contained heavy metals like Cr, Cu or Pb, but they were not detected in the leachate. Also, concentration of other metals like Zn, Mn and Fe in leachate decreased after fly ash amendment. Results of this study have implications in reducing the leaching losses of these herbicides in agricultural soils. PMID:22854744

  4. Fundamental Study of Low NOx Combustion Fly Ash Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    E. M. Suubert; I. Kuloats; K. Smith; N. Sabanegh; R.H. Hurt; W. D. Lilly; Y. M. Gao

    1997-05-01

    This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over forty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives.

  5. FUNDAMENTAL STUDY OF LOW-NOx COMBUSTION FLY ASH UTILIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    ERIC M. SUUBERG; ROBERT H. HURT

    1998-10-19

    This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over fifty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives.

  6. Fundamental Study of Low-Nox Combustion Fly Ash Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    E. M. Suuberg; I. Kuloats; K. Smith; N. Sabanegh; R. H. Hurt; W. D. Lilly; Y. M. Gao

    1997-11-01

    This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over forty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives.

  7. Scale-Up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Ozonation Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Rui Afonso; R. Hurt; I. Kulaots

    2006-03-01

    The disposal of fly ash from the combustion of coal has become increasingly important. When the fly ash does not meet the required specification for the product or market intended, it is necessary to beneficiate it to achieve the desired quality. This project, conducted at PPL's Montour SES, is the first near full-scale ({approx}10 ton/day), demonstration of ash ozonation technology. Bituminous and sub bituminous ashes, including two ash samples that contained activated carbon, were treated during the project. Results from the tests were very promising. The ashes were successfully treated with ozone, yielding concrete-suitable ash quality. Preliminary process cost estimates indicate that capital and operating costs to treat unburned carbon are competitive with other commercial ash beneficiation technologies at a fraction of the cost of lost sales and/or ash disposal costs. This is the final technical report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730.

  8. Optical properties of fly ash. Volume 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Self, S.A.

    1994-12-01

    Research performed under this contract was divided into four tasks under the following headings: Task 1, Characterization of fly ash; Task 2, Measurements of the optical constants of slags; Task 3, Calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions; and Task 4, Measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. Tasks 1 and 4 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Sarbajit Ghosal, while Tasks 2 and 3 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Jon Ebert. Together their doctoral dissertations give a complete account of the work performed. This final report, issued in two volumes consists of an executive summary of the whole program followed by the dissertation of Ghosal. Volume 1 contains the dissertation of Ghosal which covers the characterization of fly ash and the measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. A list of publications and conference presentations resulting from the work is also included.

  9. Characterization of metals released from coal fly ash during dredging at the Kingston ash recovery project.

    PubMed

    Bednar, A J; Averett, D E; Seiter, J M; Lafferty, B; Jones, W T; Hayes, C A; Chappell, M A; Clarke, J U; Steevens, J A

    2013-09-01

    A storage-pond dike failure occurred on December 22, 2008 at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant resulting in the release of over 4million cubic meters (5million cubic yards) of fly ash. Approximately half of the released ash was deposited in the main channel of the Emory River, Tennessee, USA. Remediation efforts of the Emory River focused on hydraulic dredging, as well as mechanical excavation in targeted areas. However, agitation of the submerged fly ash during hydraulic dredging introduces river water into the fly ash material, which could promote dissolution and desorption of metals from the solid fly ash material. Furthermore, aeration of the dredge slurry could alter the redox state of metals in the fly ash material and thereby change their sorption, mobility, and toxicity properties. The research presented here focuses on the concentrations and speciation of metals during the fly ash recovery from the Emory River. Our results indicate that arsenite [As(III)] released from the fly ash material during dredging was slowly oxidized to arsenate [As(V)] in the slurry recovery system with subsequent removal through precipitation or sorption reactions with suspended fly ash material. Concentrations of other dissolved metals, including iron and manganese, also generally decreased in the ash recovery system prior to water discharge back to the river. PMID:23706374

  10. Extraction of vanadium from athabasca tar sands fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Bueno, C. O.; Spink, D. R.; Rempel, G. L.

    1981-06-01

    The production of refinery grade oil from the Alberta tar sands deposits as currently practiced by Suncor (formally Great Canadian Oil Sands Ltd.—GCOS) generates a substantial amount of petroleum coke fly ash which contains appreciable amounts of valuable metals such as vanadium, nickel and titanium. Although the recovery of vanadium from petroleum ash is a well established commercial practice, it is shown in the present work that such processes are not suitable for recovery of vanadium from the GCOS fly ash. The fact that the GCOS fly ash behaves so differently when compared to other petroleum fly ash is attributed to its high silicon and aluminum contents which tie up the metal values in a silica-alumina matrix. Results of experiments carried out in this investigation indicate that such matrices can be broken down by application of a sodium chloride/water roast of the carbon-free fly ash. Based on results from a series of preliminary studies, a detailed investigation was undertaken in order to define optimum conditions for a vanadium extraction process. The process developed involves a high temperature (875 to 950 °C) roasting of the fly ash in the presence of sodium chloride and water vapor carried out in a rotary screw kiln, followed by dilute sodium hydroxide atmosphereic leaching (98 °C) to solublize about 85 pet of the vanadium originally present in the fly ash. It was found that the salt roasting operation, besides enhancing vanadium recovery, also inhibits silicon dissolution during the subsequent leaching step. The salt roasting treatment is found to improve vanadium recovery significantly when the fly ash is fully oxidized. This is easily achieved by burning off the carbon present in the “as received” fly ash under excess air. The basic leaching used in the new process selectively dissolves vanadium from the roasted ash, leaving nickel and titanium untouched.

  11. Electrodialytic removal of Cd from biomass combustion fly ash suspensions.

    PubMed

    Kirkelund, Gunvor M; Damoe, Anne J; Ottosen, Lisbeth M

    2013-04-15

    Due to relatively high concentrations of Cd, biomass combustion fly ashes often fail to meet Danish legislative requirements for recycling as fertilizer. In this study, the potential of using electrodialytic remediation for removal of Cd from four different biomass combustion fly ashes was investigated with the aim of enabling reuse of the ashes. The ashes originated from combustion of straw (two ashes), wood chips, and co-firing of wood pellets and fuel oil, respectively. A series of laboratory scale electrodialytic remediation experiments were conducted with each ash. The initial Cd concentration in the ashes varied between 8.8 mg Cd/kg (co-firing ash) and 64 mg Cd/kg (pre-washed straw ash), and pH varied from 3.7 (co-firing ash) to 13.3 (wood ash). In spite of such large variations between the ashes, the electrodialytic method showed to be sufficiently robust to treat the ashes so the final Cd concentration was below 2.0mg Cd/kg DM in at least one experiment done with each ash. This was obtained within 2 weeks of remediation and at liquid to solid (L/S) ratios of L/S 16 for the pre-washed straw ash and L/S 8 for the straw, co-firing and wood ash. PMID:23454460

  12. Feasibility study on solidification of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash with circulating fluidized bed combustion coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenshi; Hou, Haobo; Zhang, Chuhao; Zhang, Dajie

    2009-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of solidification of municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash with circulation fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) fly ash, which is unsuitable as a cement replacement due to its high amounts of carbon, lime and anhydrite. The solidification process was conducted on samples prepared from MSWI fly ash, binders (cement clinkers and CFBC fly ash were mixed at two replacement ratios) and water (water/solid weight ratio = 0.4), among which the MSWI fly ash replaced each binder at the ratio of 0, 20, 40, 60 and 80% by dry weight. The samples were subjected to compressive strength tests and Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure and the results showed that all solidified MSWI fly ash can meet the landfill standard imposed by US EPA after 28 days of curing. Micro-analysis (X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry) revealed that the main hydrate products were C-S-H gel and ettringite, which have a positive effect on heavy metals retention. Therefore, this method provides a possibility to achieve a cheap and effective solution for MSWI fly ash management and use for CFBC fly ash. PMID:19423575

  13. Sorbate characteristics of fly ash. Semi annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Liskowitz, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    This one year investigation is concerned with relating the sorbent characteristics of fly ash produced from test coal obtained from 19 mines located in Virginia, West Virginia and Pennsylvania. Six of the test coals and their respective fly ashes have been sampled and boiler conditions monitored in P.S.E. and G. coal fired boilers operated under minimum, intermediate and full power. Major, minor and trace elemental analysis as well as Mossbauer spectra of three of the coals and their respective ashes have been completed. The atom composition of the surface of these fly ashes has also been determined by ESCA. The pH and concentration of the major, minor and trace elements that leach out of the fly ash initially have been determined on the fly ashes produced from the Militant, Deep Hollow and Wellmore Cactus coals. All leachate samples to date exhibited an acidic pH. This leaching essentially ceases as the pH approached neutral conditions. This was found to occur after 4 liters of water was passed through each fly ash sample in a lysimeter. The lysimeter studies to define the sorbent characteristics of the fly ashes have not been completed yet.

  14. Fly ash in landfill top covers - a review.

    PubMed

    Brännvall, E; Kumpiene, J

    2016-01-01

    Increase of energy recovery from municipal solid waste by incineration results in the increased amounts of incineration residues, such as fly ash, that have to be taken care of. Material properties should define whether fly ash is a waste or a viable resource to be used for various applications. Here, two areas of potential fly ash application are reviewed: the use of fly ash in a landfill top cover either as a liner material or as a soil amendment in vegetation layer. Fly ashes from incineration of three types of fuel are considered: refuse derived fuel (RDF), municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) and biofuel. Based on the observations, RDF and MSWI fly ash is considered as suitable materials to be used in a landfill top cover liner. Whereas MSWI and biofuel fly ashes based on element availability for plant studies, could be considered suitable for the vegetation layer of the top cover. Responsible application of MSWI ashes is, however, warranted in order to avoid element accumulation in soil and elevation of background values over time. PMID:26701627

  15. Vitrification of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash using biomass ash as additives.

    PubMed

    Alhadj-Mallah, Moussa-Mallaye; Huang, Qunxing; Cai, Xu; Chi, Yong; Yan, JianHua

    2015-01-01

    Thermal melting is an energy-costing solution for stabilizing toxic fly ash discharged from the air pollution control system in the municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) plant. In this paper, two different types of biomass ashes are used as additives to co-melt with the MSWI fly ash for reducing the melting temperature and energy cost. The effects of biomass ashes on the MSWI fly ash melting characteristics are investigated. A new mathematical model has been proposed to estimate the melting heat reduction based on the mass ratios of major ash components and measured melting temperature. Experimental and calculation results show that the melting temperatures for samples mixed with biomass ash are lower than those of the original MSWI fly ash and when the mass ratio of wood ash reaches 50%, the deformation temperature (DT), the softening, hemisphere temperature (HT) and fluid temperature (FT) are, respectively, reduced by 189°C, 207°C, 229°C, and 247°C. The melting heat of mixed ash samples ranges between 1650 and 2650 kJ/kg. When 50% wood ash is mixed, the melting heat is reduced by more than 700 kJ/kg for the samples studied in this paper. Therefore, for the vitrification treatment of the fly ash from MSW or other waste incineration plants, wood ash is a potential fluxing assistant. PMID:25220259

  16. Assessing fly ash treatment: remediation and stabilization of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Lima, A T; Ottosen, Lisbeth M; Ribeiro, Alexandra B

    2012-03-01

    Fly ashes from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), straw (ST) and co-combustion of wood (CW) are here analyzed with the intent of reusing them. Two techniques are assessed, a remediation technique and a solidification/stabilization one. The removal of heavy metals from fly ashes through the electrodialytic process (EDR) has been tried out before. The goal of removing heavy metals has always been the reuse of fly ash, for instance in agricultural fields (BEK). The best removal rates are here summarized and some new results have been added. MSW fly ashes are still too hazardous after treatment to even consider application to the soil. ST ash is the only residue that gets concentrations low enough to be reused, but its fertilizing value might be questioned. An alternative reuse for the three ashes is here preliminary tested, the combination of fly ash with mortar. Fly ashes have been substituted by cement fraction or aggregate fraction. Surprisingly, better compressive strengths were obtained by replacing the aggregate fraction. CW ashes presented promising results for the substitution of aggregate in mortar and possibly in concrete. PMID:21167631

  17. Vegetation establishment on soil-amended weathered fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Semalulu, O.; Barnhisel, R.I.; Witt, S.

    1998-12-31

    A field study was conducted with the following objectives in mind: (1) to study the effect of soil addition to weathered fly ash on the establishment and survival of different grasses and legumes, (2) to identify suitable grasses and/or legume species for vegetation of fly ash, (3) to study the fertilizer N and P requirements for successful vegetation establishment on fly ash and ash-soil mixtures, (4) to examine the nutrient composition of the plant species tested, and (5) to study the plant availability of P from fly ash and ash-soil mixtures. Three rooting media were used: weathered fly ash, and 33% or 50% soil blended with the ash. Four experiments were established on each of these media to evaluate warm season grasses in pure stands, warm season grasses inter-seeded with legumes, cool season grasses, and cool season grasses inter-seeded with legumes. Soil used in this study was more acidic than the fly ash. Only the results from characterization of the rooting media, ground cover, and yield will be presented here.

  18. Development of Classified Fly Ash as a Pozzolanic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rukzon, Sumrerng; Chindaprasirt, Prinya

    This research studies the potential for using classified fly ash from Mae Moh power plant in Thailand as a pozzolanic material. Three different fly ash finenesses viz., coarse Original Fly Ash (OFA), Medium Fly Ash (MFA) and Fine Fly Ash (FFA) were used for the study. Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) was partially replaced with fly ash at 20 and 40% by weight of binder. The water to binder ratio was kept constant at 0.5 and the flow of mortar was maintained at 110±5% with the aid of superplasticizer (SP). Compressive strength, carbonation depth and porosity test of mortars were determined. FFA has a high potential to be used as a good pozzolanic material. The use of FFA produces mortars with good strength and low porosity. The resistance to carbonation of mortar improves with partial replacement of FFA in comparison with the normal coarse fly ash. The use of FFA results in a strong and dense mortar which is due to better dispersion and filling effect as well as an increase in the pozzolanic reaction.

  19. The use of coal fly ash for soil stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T.H.; Brown, M.A.; Sorini, S.S.; Huntington, G.

    1991-12-01

    The objective of this work was to examine the potential use of Wyoming subbituminous coal fly ash materials for cementation of soil materials. Specimens made from Laramie River (LR) fly ash had higher unconfined compression strength and more brittleness than the Specimens made with Dave Johnston (DJ) fly ash. However, soil/DJ fly ash mixtures that were cured for 28 days had relatively good strengths without the brittleness that the LR specimens developed. These characteristics of the DJ fly ash may be important attributes for road stabilization applications. The detailed mineralogical evaluation provides some insight into which minerals may enhance development of strength in these materials. In general, selective dissolution of the soil/fly ash mixtures shows that many of the potentially toxic elements (e.g., B, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb) are associated with the sulfide phase (HNO{sub 3} extractable) and with the residual material. In this study, the dynamics of elemental release from the element pools did not result in toxic conditions. The formation of colloidal material capable of mobilizing potentially toxic elements was not found in the soil/fly ash mixtures. Apparently, the high pH of the materials enhanced immobilization of the high molecular weight material.

  20. Water holding capacities of fly ashes: Effect of size fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, A.; Rano, R.

    2007-07-01

    Water holding capacities of fly ashes from different thermal power plants in Eastern India have been compared. Moreover, the effect of size fractionation (sieving) on the water holding capacities has also been determined. The desorption rate of water held by the fly ash fractions at ambient temperature (25-30{sup o}C) has been investigated. The effect of mixing various size fractions of fly ash in increasing the water holding capacities of fly ash has been studied. It is observed that the fly ash obtained from a thermal power plant working on stoker-fired combustor has the highest water holding capacity, followed by the one that works on pulverized fuel combustor. Fly ash collected from super thermal power plant has the least water holding capacity (40.7%). The coarser size fractions of fly ashes in general have higher water holding capacities than the finer ones. An attempt has been made to correlate the results obtained, with the potential use in agriculture.

  1. Impacts of fly-ash on soil and plant responses.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Dharmendra K; Rai, Upendra N; Tripathi, Rudra D; Inouhe, Masahiro

    2002-12-01

    Coal combustion produces carbon dioxides, SO x, NO x and a variety of byproducts, including fly-ash, flue gas and scrubber sludge. Fly-ash consists of minute glass-like particles and its deposition on leaves inhibits the normal transpiration and photosynthesis of plants. Fly-ash also affects the physicochemical characteristics of soil because it is generally very basic, rich in various essential and non-essential elements, but poor in both nitrogen and available phosphorus. The massive fly-ash materials have been a potential resource for the agricultural activities as well as the other industrial purposes. Practical value of fly-ash in agriculture as an 'effective and safe' fertiliser or soil amendment can be established after repeated field experiments. Here remains to be disclosed the biological processes and interactions due to 'lack and excess' of the fly-ash exposures along with abiotic and biotic factors. These may involve the symbiotic fixation of nitrogen and the biological extraction of metals following immobilisation of toxic heavy metal ions, as well as other neutralisation and equilibration processes during weathering. Nitrogen-fixing plants with an apparent heavy metal-tolerance can be helpful as the early colonisers of fly-ash dumps and nearby areas. PMID:12579443

  2. Transformation of nitrogen during vermicomposting of fly ash.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Satya S; Chattopadhyay, Gunindra N

    2004-12-01

    In view of environmental problems generated by large-scale production of fly ash, increasing attention is now being paid to the recycling fly ash as a source of plant nutrients in agriculture. However, the low amount of nitrogen in such materials forms a major constraint for such application. In the present study, the possibility of improving the N status in mixtures of fly ash and organic matter was investigated by adopting vermicomposting technology. Different combinations of fly ash and cow (Bos taurus) dung; namely fly ash alone, cow dung alone and fly ash + cow dung at 1:1, 1:3 and 3:1 ratios were incubated with and without epigeic earthworms (Eisenia fetida) for 50 days. The occurrence of N in different bio-available forms; namely easily mineralizable, NH4+ and NO3- tended to increase considerably in the series treated with earthworms. This behaviour was attributed primarily to increased microbiological activity in the vermicomposted samples and also to a considerable rise in the concentration of nitrogen-fixing bacteria in this series. Among the three combinations of vermicomposted fly ash and cow dung, the 1:1 mixture appeared to exhibit the highest availability of nitrogen. PMID:15666451

  3. Leaching for recovery of copper from municipal solid waste incineration fly ash: influence of ash properties and metal speciation.

    PubMed

    Lassesson, Henric; Fedje, Karin Karlfeldt; Steenari, Britt-Marie

    2014-08-01

    Recovery of metals occurring in significant amounts in municipal solid waste incineration fly ash, such as copper, could offer several advantages: a decreased amount of potentially mobile metal compounds going to landfill, saving of natural resources and a monetary value. A combination of leaching and solvent extraction may constitute a feasible recovery path for metals from municipal solid waste incineration fly ash. However, it has been shown that the initial dissolution and leaching is a limiting step in such a recovery process. The work described in this article was focused on elucidating physical and chemical differences between two ash samples with the aim of explaining the differences in copper release from these samples in two leaching methods. The results showed that the chemical speciation is an important factor affecting the release of copper. The occurrence of copper as phosphate or silicate will hinder leaching, while sulphate and chloride will facilitate leaching. PMID:25106538

  4. The leaching characteristics of selenium from coal fly ashes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.; Wang, J.; Burken, J.G.; Ban, H.; Ladwig, K.

    2007-11-15

    The leaching characteristics of selenium from several bituminous and subbituminous coal fly ashes under different pH conditions were investigated using batch methods. Results indicated that pH had a significant effect on selenium leaching from bituminous coal ash. The minimum selenium leaching occurred in the pH range between 3 and 4, while the maximum selenium leaching occurred at pH 12. The release of selenium from subbituminous coal ashes was very low for the entire experimental pH range, possibly due to the high content of calcium which can form hydration or precipitation products as a sink for selenium. The adsorption results for different selenium species indicated that Se(VI) was hardly adsorbable on either bituminous coal ashes or subbitumminous coal ashes at any pH. However, Se(I) was highly adsorbed by bituminous coal ashes under acidic pH conditions and was mostly removed by subbitumminous coal ashes across the entire pH range. This result suggests that the majority of selenium released from the tested fly ashes was Se(IV). A speciation-based model was developed to simulate the adsorption of Se(IV) on bituminous coal fly ash, and the pH-independent adsorption constants of HSeO{sup 3-} and SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-} were determined. The modeling approach is useful for understanding and predicting the release process of selenium from fly ash.

  5. Investigation on Leaching Behaviour of Fly Ash and Bottom Ash Replacement in Self-Compacting Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Ikhmal Haqeem Hassan, Mohd; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al

    2016-06-01

    Fly ash and bottom ash are some of the waste generated by coal-fired power plants, which contains large quantities of toxic and heavy metals. In recent years, many researchers have been interested in studying on the properties of self-compacting concrete incorporated with fly ash and bottom ash but there was very limited research from the combination of fly ash and bottom ash towards the environmental needs. Therefore, this research was focused on investigating the leachability of heavy metals of SCC incorporated with fly ash and bottom ash by using Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure, Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure and Static Leaching Test. The samples obtained from the coal-fired power plant located at Peninsula, Malaysia. In this study, the potential heavy metals leached out from SCC that is produced with fly ash as a replacement for Ordinary Portland Cement and bottom ash as a substitute for sand with the ratios from 10% to 30% respectively were designated and cast. There are eight heavy metals of concern such as As, Cr, Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni, Mn and Fe. The results indicated that most of the heavy metals leached below the permissible limits from the United States Environmental Protection Agency and World Health Organization limit for drinking water. As a conclusion, the minimum leaching of the heavy metals from the incorporation of fly ash and bottom ash in self-compacting concrete was found in 20% of fly ash and 20% of bottom ash replacement. The results also indicate that this incorporation could minimize the potential of environmental problems.

  6. Increasing Class C fly ash reduces alkali silica reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, J.K.

    2007-07-01

    Contrary to earlier studies, it has been found that incremental additions of Class C fly ash do reduce alkali silica reactivity (ASR), in highly reactive, high alkali concrete mixes. AST can be further reduced by substituting 5% metakaolin or silica fume for the aggregate in concrete mixes with high (more than 30%) Class C fly ash substitution. The paper reports results of studies using Class C fly ash from the Labadie Station plant in Missouri which typically has between 1.3 and 1.45% available alkalis by ASTM C311. 7 figs.

  7. Recovery of iron oxide from coal fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Dobbins, Michael S.; Murtha, Marlyn J.

    1983-05-31

    A high quality iron oxide concentrate, suitable as a feed for blast and electric reduction furnaces is recovered from pulverized coal fly ash. The magnetic portion of the fly ash is separated and treated with a hot strong alkali solution which dissolves most of the silica and alumina in the fly ash, leaving a solid residue and forming a precipitate which is an acid soluble salt of aluminosilicate hydrate. The residue and precipitate are then treated with a strong mineral acid to dissolve the precipitate leaving a solid residue containing at least 90 weight percent iron oxide.

  8. Usage of fly ash as a coal desulphurization reagent

    SciTech Connect

    Yaman, S.; Kuecuekbayrak, S.

    1996-12-31

    This paper covers the direct usage of fly ash to remove sulphur from coal. Experiments were carried out on a high sulphur Turkish lignite. 5 g of fly ash was extracted in 200 ml of water under pressure and the dilute solution containing water extractable parts of fly ash was used as desulphurization reagent. Oxygen pressure was created over desulphurization medium during the extraction period by which dissolved oxygen was concentrated in the solution. Effects of temperature, partial pressure of oxygen, and time were investigated in the ranges of 403--498 K, 0.0--1.5 MPa and 15--90 min, respectively.

  9. Biotoxicity evaluation of fly ash and bottom ash from different municipal solid waste incinerators.

    PubMed

    Chou, Jing-Dong; Wey, Ming-Yen; Liang, Hsiu-Hao; Chang, Shih-Hsien

    2009-08-30

    Different types of municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly and bottom ash were extracted by TCLP and PBET procedures. The biotoxicity of the leachate of fly ash and bottom ash was evaluated by Vibrio fischeri light inhibition test. The results indicate the following: (1) The optimal solid/liquid ratio was 1:100 for PBET extraction because it had the highest Pb and Cu extractable mass from MSWI fly ash. (2) The extractable metal mass from both fly ash and bottom ash by PBET procedure was significantly higher than that by TCLP procedure. (3) The metal concentrations of fly ash leachate from a fluidized bed incinerator was lower than that from mass-burning and mass-burning combined with rotary kiln incinerator. (4) The TCLP and PBET leachate from all MSWI fly ash samples showed biotoxicity. Even though bottom ash is regarded as a non-hazardous material, its TCLP and PBET leachate also showed biotoxicity. The pH significantly influenced the biotoxicity of leachate. PMID:19264394

  10. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1998-12-29

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  11. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1997-04-29

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  12. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  13. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  14. Optical properties of fly ash. Volume 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Self, S.A.

    1994-12-01

    Research performed under this contract was divided into four tasks under the following headings: Task 1, Characterization of fly ash; Task 2, Measurements of the optical constants of slags; Task 3, Calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions; and Task 4, Measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. Tasks 1 and 4 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Sarbajit Ghosal, while Tasks 2 and 3 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Jon Ebert. Together their doctoral dissertations give a complete account of the work performed. This final report, issued in two volumes consists of an executive summary of the whole program followed by the dissertation of Ghosal and Ebert. Volume 2 contains the dissertation of Ebert which covers the measurements of the optical constants of slags, and calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. A list of publications and conference presentations resulting from the work is also included.

  15. COMPOUND FORMS OF FOSSIL FUEL FLY ASH EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A methodology for identifying inorganic compounds in particulate emissions from fossil fuel combustion processes is described. Samples collected from power plants burning coal and oil fuels of different compositions provided a typical range of fly ashes for the investigations. El...

  16. Fly ash based zeolitic pigments for application in anticorrosive paints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Ruchi; Tiwari, Sangeeta

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the utilization of waste fly ash in anticorrosive paints. Zeolite NaY was synthesized from waste fly ash and subsequently modified by exchanging its nominal cation Na+ with Mg2+ and Ca2+ ions. The metal ion exchanged zeolite was then used as anticorrosive zeolitic pigments in paints. The prepared zeolite NaY was characterized using X-Ray diffraction technique and Scanning electron microscopy. The size, shape and density of the prepared fly ash based pigments were determined by various techniques. The paints were prepared by using fly ash based zeolitic pigments in epoxy resin and the percentages of pigments used in paints were 2% and 5%. These paints were applied to the mild steel panels and the anticorrosive properties of the pigments were assessed by the electrochemical spectroscopy technique (EIS).

  17. Utilization of CFB fly ash for construction applications

    SciTech Connect

    Conn, R.E.; Sellakumar, K.; Bland, A.E.

    1999-07-01

    Disposal in landfills has been the most common means of handling ash in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler power plants. Recently, larger CFB boilers with generating capacities up to 300 MWe are currently being planned, resulting in increased volumes and disposal cost of ash by-product. Studies have shown that CFB ashes do not pose environmental concerns that should significantly limit their potential utilization. Many uses of CFB ash are being investigated by Foster Wheeler, which can provide more cost-effective ash management. Construction applications have been identified as one of the major uses for CFB ashes. Typically, CFB ash cannot be used as a cement replacement in concrete due to its unacceptably high sulfur content. However, CFB ashes can be used for other construction applications that require less stringent specifications including soil stabilization, road base, structural fill, and synthetic aggregate. In this study, potential construction applications were identified for fly ashes from several CFB boilers firing diverse fuels such as petroleum coke, refuse derived fuel (RDF) and coal. The compressive strength of hydrated fly ashes was measured in order to screen their potential for use in various construction applications. Based on the results of this work, the effects of both ash chemistry and carbon content on utilization potential were ascertained. Actual beneficial uses of ashes evaluated in this study are also discussed.

  18. Column oil agglomeration of fly ash with ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, M.L.; Champagne, K.J.; Soong, Y.; Finseth, D.H.

    1999-07-01

    A promising oil agglomeration process has been developed for the beneficiation of fly ash using a six-foot agglomeration column. Carbon concentrates have been separated from fly ash with yields greater than 60 % and purities of 55 to 74 %. The parameters examined in the study include ultrasonic exposure, pulse rate, frequency, agitation speed, and blade configuration. The effects of the experimental variables on the quality of separation are discussed.

  19. KINETICS OF FLY ASH BENEFICIATION BY CARBON BURNOUT

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Joseph N.D. Dodoo; Dr. Joseph M. Okoh

    2000-11-01

    Surface area analyses performed on fly ash samples reveal that the surface area is controlled by carbon content. The higher surface areas found in large particles are due to the presence of highly porous carbonaceous particles. Adsorption-desorption isotherms and t-plots of fly ash samples indicate that fly ash is porous. BJH Adsorption/Desorption pore size analysis reveal that pore diameters are independent of sieve size. They appear to be dependent only on the nature of the material which confers porosity. Based on the results of Brown and Dykstra (41) it is reasonable to assume that calculations of reaction rates at temperatures above 550 C were confounded by weight losses from processes other than carbon oxidation and, therefore, are not useful in determination of the temperature dependence of carbon oxidation in fly ash. The results of the present study indicate that temperatures below 550 C should be used for future studies in order to satisfactorily assess the temperature dependence of carbon oxidation in fly ash. Furthermore, it is also advisable that percent carbon determinations be performed on fly ash samples after the oxidation reactions to determine whether all carbon present in fly ash is oxidized. This will ensure that reaction rates are representative of the complete oxidation of carbon. An inverse relationship was determined between reaction rates and oxygen concentration for this study. As discussed, this may be due to volatilization of volatiles from fly ash and ease of transport of products away from the reaction sites by the action of the vacuum applied to the samples. A more accurate determination of oxygen dependence of carbon oxidation can be accomplished by the use of specialty gases containing different concentrations of oxygen which could eliminate the need to apply vacuum to the samples.

  20. Plasma torch burns bright for fly-ash vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Tardy, P.; Labrot, M.; Pineau, D.

    1994-12-01

    Municipal solid waste incineration generates two main kinds of residues--bottom ash and fly ash. Bottom ash usually is nontoxic and can be disposed in nontoxic waste landfills or, as in France, used as road aggregates after passing toxicity characteristic leaching procedures tests. Fly ash consists of fine particles separated from exhaust gases in incinerator-gas cleaning systems. Fly ash generally contains heavy metals (such as lead, cadmium and mercury) and semivolatile organic compounds. These toxics are readily leachable and will pollute groundwater if carelessly disposed in landfills. Fly-ash storage regulations in Europe have become increasingly restrictive. For example, since December 1992, fly ash in France must be landfilled in special ''final waste storage centers.'' These new regulations and difficulties associated with opening new storage centers have resulted in a sharp rise in dumping costs. In this context, new treatment processes are being developed that eventually will enhance the value of the end-product. Vitrification yields the best results of all processing methods, because the end-product is chemically inert.

  1. Mutagenicity and genotoxicity of coal fly ash water leachate

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, R.; Mukherjee, A.

    2009-03-15

    Fly ash is a by-product of coal-fired electricity generation plants. The prevalent practice of disposal is as slurry of ash and water to storage or ash ponds located near power stations. This has lain to waste thousands of hectares of land all over the world. Since leaching is often the cause of off-site contamination and pathway of introduction into the human environment, a study on the genotoxic effects of fly ash leachate is essential. Leachate prepared from the fly ash sample was analyzed for metal content, and tested for mutagenicity and genotoxicity. Analyses of metals show predominance of the metals - sodium, silicon, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, manganese, zinc, and sulphate. The Ames Salmonella mutagenicity assay, a short-term bacterial reverse mutation assay, was conducted on two-tester strains of Salmonella typhimurium strains TA97a and TA102. For genotoxicity, the alkaline version of comet assay on fly ash leachate was carried in vitro on human blood cells and in vivo on Nicotiana plants. The leachate was directly mutagenic and induced significantconcentration-dependent increases in DNA damage in whole blood cells, lymphocytes, and in Nicotiana plants. The comet parameters show increases in tail DNA percentage (%), tail length (mu m), and olive tail moment (arbitrary units). Our results indicate that leachate from fly ash dumpsites has the genotoxic potential and may lead to adverse effects on vegetation and on the health of exposed human populations.

  2. [Study on mercury re-emissions during fly ash utilization].

    PubMed

    Meng, Yang; Wang, Shu-Xiao

    2012-09-01

    The amount of fly ash produced during coal combustion is around 400 million tons per year in China. About 65%-68% of fly ash is used in building material production, road construction, architecture and agriculture. Some of these utilization processes include high temperature procedures, which may lead to mercury re-emissions. In this study, experiments were designed to simulate the key process in cement production and steam-cured brick production. A temperature programmed desorption (TPD) method was used to study the mercury transformation in the major utilization processes. Mercury re-emission during the fly ash utilization in China was estimated based on the experimental results. It was found that mercury existed as HgCl2 (Hg2 Cl2), HgS and HgO in the fly ash. During the cement production process, more than 98% of the mercury in fly ash was re-emitted. In the steam-curing brick manufacturing process, the average mercury re-emission percentage was about 28%, which was dominated by the percentage of HgCl2 (Hg2 Cl2). It is estimated that the mercury re-emission during the fly ash utilization have increased from 4.07 t in 2002 to 9.18 t in 2008, of which cement industry contributes about 96.6%. PMID:23243850

  3. Properties and Leachability of Self-Compacting Concrete Incorporated with Fly Ash and Bottom Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Ikhmal Haqeem Hassan, Mohd; Jamaluddin, Norwati; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al

    2016-06-01

    The process of combustion in coal-fired power plant generates ashes, namely fly ash and bottom ash. Besides, coal ash produced from coal combustion contains heavy metals within their compositions. These metals are toxic to the environment as well as to human health. Fortunately, treatment methods are available for these ashes, and the use of fly ash and bottom ash in the concrete mix is one of the few. Therefore, an experimental program was carried out to study the properties and determine the leachability of selfcompacting concrete incorporated with fly ash and bottom ash. For experimental study, self-compacting concrete was produced with fly ash as a replacement for Ordinary Portland Cement and bottom ash as a replacement for sand with the ratios of 10%, 20%, and 30% respectively. The fresh properties tests conducted were slump flow, t500, sieve segregation and J-ring. Meanwhile for the hardened properties, density, compressive strength and water absorption test were performed. The samples were then crushed to be extracted using Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure and heavy metals content within the samples were identified accordingly using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. The results demonstrated that both fresh and hardened properties were qualified to categorize as self-compacting concrete. Improvements in compressive strength were observed, and densities for all the samples were identified as a normal weight concrete with ranges between 2000 kg/m3 to 2600 kg/m3. Other than that, it was found that incorporation up to 30% of the ashes was safe as the leached heavy metals concentration did not exceed the regulatory levels, except for arsenic. In conclusion, this study will serve as a reference which suggests that fly ash and bottom ash are widely applicable in concrete technology, and its incorporation in self-compacting concrete constitutes a potential means of adding value to appropriate mix and design.

  4. Ceramic glass from flying-ash

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, J.F.; Xu, You-Wu; Chen, Pinzhen

    1996-10-01

    A ceramic glass composition compromises of mainly SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO and with small percent of CaO, TiO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FeO, K{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}O, and P{sub 2}O{sub 5} has been produced. A convenient source of raw materials is a mixture of flying-ash from power plant, borax manufacturing plant waste, and titanium pigment waste. The ceramic glass is formed from an intermediate ceramic mixture which is subjected to heat treatment. The solid is annealed at another temperature for several hours, and then is reduced to a lower temperature at a rate of 20-30{degrees}C/hour. The final product, the ceramic glass possesses many useful mechanical and chemical properties, such as high compressive strength, high bending strength, high hardness, high impact resistance, acid and alkaline resistance, etc. The ceramic glass can be used as laboratory counter-top, reaction still, manufacture of fluid transfer tubing, sandpaper/grit, and many other industrial applications.

  5. Fly Ash Disposal in Ash Ponds: A Threat to Ground Water Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. K.; Gupta, N. C.; Guha, B. K.

    2016-07-01

    Ground water contamination due to deposition of fly ash in ash ponds was assessed by simulating the disposal site conditions using batch leaching test with fly ash samples from three thermal power plants. The periodic analysis of leachates was performed for selected elements, Fe, Cu, Ni, Cr, Pb and Cd in three different extraction solutions to determine the maximum amount that can be leached from fly ash. It was observed that at low pH value, maximum metals are released from the surface of the ash into leachate. The average concentration of these elements found in ground water samples from the nearby area of ash ponds shows that almost all the metals except `Cr' are crossing the prescribed limits of drinking water. The concentration of these elements at this level can endanger public health and environment.

  6. Multitechnique multielemental analysis of coal and fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Nadkarni, R.A.

    1980-05-01

    The coal sample is first ashed with high temperature ashing or with RF plasma low temperature ashing. The coal ash or fly ash can be analyzed for major ash elements by fusing with lithium tetraborate in an automatic fusion device, the Claisse Fluxer. The ash samples are also dissolved in a Parr bomb in a mixture of aqua regia and HF. Subsequently, the solutions are analyzed for eight major (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, Si, and Ti) and 20 trace elements (As, B, Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Se, Sr, U, V, and Zn) by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy. Mercury in coal and fly ash is determined on a separate aliquot by the cold vapor atomic absorption technique. Fluorine and chlorine in the samples are determined by fusing with Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ and Eschka mixture, respectively, and then measuring the two ions in solution with specific ion electrodes. Oxygen in the samples can be determined rapidly and nondestructively by 14-MeV neutron activation analysis. These methods have been tested by analyzing several NBS coal and fly ash standards with good accuracy and reproducibility. 10 tables.

  7. Reduction of metal leaching in brown coal fly ash using geopolymers.

    PubMed

    Bankowski, P; Zou, L; Hodges, R

    2004-10-18

    Current regulations classify fly ash as a prescribed waste and prohibit its disposal in regular landfill. Treatment of the fly ash can reduce the leach rate of metals, and allow it to be disposed in less prescribed landfill. A geopolymer matrix was investigated as a potential stabilisation method for brown coal fly ash. Precipitator fly ash was obtained from electrostatic precipitators and leached fly ash was collected from ash disposal ponds, and leaching tests were conducted on both types of geopolymer stabilised fly ashes. The ratio of fly ash to geopolymer was varied to determine the effects of different compositions on leaching rates. Fourteen metals and heavy metals were targeted during the leaching tests and the results indicate that a geopolymer is effective at reducing the leach rates of many metals from the fly ash, such as calcium, arsenic, selenium, strontium and barium. The major element leachate concentrations obtained from leached fly ash were in general lower than that of precipitator fly ash. Conversely, heavy metal leachate concentrations were lower in precipitator fly ash than leached pond fly ash. The maximum addition of fly ash to this geopolymer was found to be 60wt% for fly ash obtained from the electrostatic precipitators and 70wt% for fly ash obtained from ash disposal ponds. The formation of geopolymer in the presence of fly ash was studied using 29Si MAS-NMR and showed that a geopolymer matrix was formed. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging showed the interaction of the fly ash with the geopolymer, which was related to the leachate data and also the maximum percentage fly ash addition. PMID:15511575

  8. Characterization of mutagenic coal fly ash and extracts.

    PubMed

    Griest, W H; Caton, J E; Rao, T K; Harmon, S H; Yeatts, L B; Henderson, G M

    1982-11-01

    Post-electrostatic precipitator (ESP) fly ash samples were collected from a coal-fired electric power generation plant under three modes of plant operation: normal operation, a low NOx-emission mode of combustion, and operation with the ESP shorted-out. Results of chemical and physical characterization of the ashes were compared with bacterial mutagenicity bioassay to determine parameters or compounds correlating with bioactivity. The general physical properties, ultimate composition, and trace elemental and radiochemical species determined did not correlate with the mutagenicity. Only the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons and chemically derivatizable polar organic compounds appeared to be associated with mutagenicity of the fly ash. PMID:6757160

  9. Chemically activated fly ash (CAFA): A new type of fly ash based cement

    SciTech Connect

    Rostami, H.; Silverstrim, T.

    1996-12-31

    A new cementitious material has been developed, called Chemically Activated Fly Ash (CAFA), which is used to produce concrete for construction. CAFA can be used to create a variety of concrete strengths and could revolutionize the concrete product manufacturing industry due to its economy. CAFA contains 80--95% Class F fly ash and is used as cement to bind sand, stone, and fibers creating concrete. CAFA concrete has been tested for strength, durability, mechanical properties and, most importantly, economic viability. CAFA concrete is economically and technically viable for many construction applications. Some properties include rapid strength gain (90% of Ultimate in 1 day), high ultimate strengths (16,000 psi in 1 day), excellent acid resistance, and freeze thaw durability. CAFA`s resistance to chemical attack, such as, sulfuric (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), nitric (HNO{sub 3}), hydrochloric (HCl), and organic acids, is far better than portland cement concrete. CAFA is resistant to freeze thaw attack based on ASTM C-666 specification. Near term applications of CAFA material are, blocks, pipe, burial vaults, median barriers, sound barriers, and overlaying materials. Eventual markets are high strength construction products, bridge beams, prestressed members, concrete tanks, highway appurtenances, and other concrete products.

  10. Beneficiating value-added products from combustion fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Soong, Y.; McMahan, L.; Gray, D.; Fauth, T.A.; Link, K.; Champagne, J.; Schoffstall, M.R.

    1999-07-01

    Two separation techniques, a dry triboelectrostatic and a wet agglomeration column technique, were developed for beneficiating value-added products from combustion fly ashes. The dry triboelectrostatic separation of fly ash derived from both coal combustion and the combustion of coal mixed with 10 wt.% biomass were conducted. Two different types of triboelectrostatic separators - parallel plate and louvered plate separators - were used for this study. It was found that the quality of separation was dependent upon the nature of fly ash and the configuration of the separator utilized. The development of an oil agglomeration process for the recovery of unburned carbon from fly ash required the optimization of the process. The beneficiation was performed using the six-foot agglomeration column under batch mode conditions. A systematic study on the effects of agglomerant, agitation speeds, air flows, feed rates and agglomerant/ash ratios on the quality of beneficiation was conducted. Preliminary results indicate that the unburned carbon products with the purity of 66 to 71% and the yields of 55 to 57% could be obtained under the optimum conditions studied. Selected applications (i.e., activated carbon, molecular sieves and catalytic application) from the fly ash derived products were explored.

  11. Fly ash reinforced thermoplastic vulcanizates obtained from waste tire powder.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, V; Xiu, Zhang Zhen; Xu, Deng; Lee, Sung Hyo; Kim, Jin Kuk; Kang, Dong Jin; Bang, Dae-Suk

    2009-03-01

    Novel thermoplastic composites made from two major industrial and consumer wastes, fly ash and waste tire powder, have been developed. The effect of increasing fly ash loadings on performance characteristics such as tensile strength, thermal, dynamic mechanical and magnetic properties has been investigated. The morphology of the blends shows that fly ash particles have more affinity and adhesion towards the rubbery phase when compared to the plastic phase. The fracture surface of the composites shows extensive debonding of fly ash particles. Thermal analysis of the composites shows a progressive increase in activation energy with increase in fly ash loadings. Additionally, morphological studies of the ash residue after 90% thermal degradation shows extensive changes occurring in both the polymer and filler phases. The processing ability of the thermoplastics has been carried out in a Monsanto processability testing machine as a function of shear rate and temperature. Shear thinning behavior, typical of particulate polymer systems, has been observed irrespective of the testing temperatures. Magnetic properties and percolation behavior of the composites have also been evaluated. PMID:18838261

  12. Frost susceptibility properties of Soma-B fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Cokca, E.

    1997-04-01

    This paper assesses the effect of freeze-thaw properties of compacted fly ash specimens likely to affect its use as fill material, on the basis of laboratory investigations conducted on Soma-B Thermal Power Plant ashes in western Turkey. Test specimens were subjected to compaction. Changes in strength with curing time and freeze-thaw cycles are measured using unconfined compression tests, and increases in strength with curing time and the number of freeze-thaw cycles were observed. The findings suggest that compacted Soma-B fly ash could serve as fill material, particularly over weak subgrades with no negative environmental effects, provided that the degree of saturation of the compacted fly ash embankment is at a specific value.

  13. Illinois basin coal fly ashes. 1. Chemical characterization and solubility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roy, W.R.; Griffin, R.A.; Dickerson, D.R.; Schuller, R.M.; Martin, S.M.C.

    1984-01-01

    Twelve precipitator-collected fly ash samples (nine derived from high-sulfur Illinois Basin coals and three from Western U.S. coals) were found to contain a variety of paraffins, aryl esters, phenols, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons including phenanthrene, pyrene, and chrysene but all at very low concentrations. Less than 1% of the organic carbon in the samples was extractable into benzene. Solubility studies with a short-term (24-h) extraction procedure and a long-term (20-week) procedure indicate that the inorganic chemical composition of some types of fly ash effluent is time dependent and may be most toxic to aquatic ecosystems when initially mixed with water and pumped to disposal ponds. Some acidic, high-Cd fly ashes would be classified as hazardous wastes if coal ash was included in this waste category by future RCRA revisions. ?? 1984 American Chemical Society.

  14. Belgian MSWI fly ashes and APC residues: a characterisation study.

    PubMed

    De Boom, Aurore; Degrez, Marc

    2012-06-01

    Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) produces different sorts of residues, bottom ash, fly ashes and Air Pollution Control (APC) residues. Generally, fly ashes and APC residues are mixed at the MSWI plant and manage as a sole residue. In this study, fly ashes and APC residues have been sampled separately at different Belgian MSWI plant and analysed by X-ray fluorescence in order to highlight the composition differences that may appear between the solids. Ca and Cl are found to be the major elements in most of the samples. Lithophilic elements, such as Al and Si, are richer in furnace and boiler ashes, as can be expected. Leaching tests also show differences between the residues; leachates from furnace and boiler ashes are alkaline while those from bag filter residues present a pH value of 6, which impacts the leaching of heavy metals (Pb and Zn). The results suggest that it could be advantageous to manage fly ashes and APC residues separately by adjusting the treatment to their specificities. PMID:22244614

  15. Leaching of Mixtures of Biochar and Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Porat, Iris; Phillips, Jana Randolph; Amonette, J. E.; Drake, Meghan M; Brown, Steven D; Schadt, Christopher Warren

    2009-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, especially CO2, and their effects on global temperature have led to interest in the possibility of carbon storage in terrestrial environments.2, 5, 6 Both the residual char from biomass pyrolysis7-9, 12 (biochar) and fly ash from coal combustion1, 13, 14 have the potential to significantly expand terrestrial sequestration options. Both biochar and fly ash also have potentially beneficial effects on soil properties. Fly ash has been shown to increase porosity, water-holding capacity, pH, conductivity, and dissolved SO42-, CO32-, Cl- and basic cations.10, 11, 16 Adding biochar to soil generally raises pH, increases total nitrogen and total phosphorous, encourages greater root development, improves cation exchange capacity and reduces available aluminum.3, 17 Combinations of these benefits likely lead to the observed increased yields for crops including corn and sugarcane.17 with biochar addition to soil. In addition, it has been found that soils with added biochar emit lower amounts of other greenhouse gases (methane and nitrous oxide) 8, 17 than do unammended soils. Biochar and fly ash amendments may be useful in promoting terrestrial carbon sequestration on currently underutilized and degraded lands. For example, about 1% of the US surface lands consist of previously mined lands or highway rights-of-way.18 Poorly managed lands could count for another 15% of US area. Biochar and fly ash amendments could increase productivity of these lands and increase carbon storage in the soil Previous results showed minimal leaching of organic carbon and metals from a variety of fly ashes.15 Here, we are examining the properties of mixtures of biochar, fly ash, and soil and evaluating leaching of organic carbon and metals from the mixtures.

  16. Fly ash: Perspective resource for geo-polymer materials production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargin, Aleksey; Baev, Vladimir; Mashkin, Nikolay; Uglyanica, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    The present paper presents the information about the chemical and mineralogical composition of the ash and slag and their amounts at the dumps of the thermoelectric plants located in the city of Kemerovo. It is known that about 85% of ash and slag from the thermoelectric plants in Russia are removed by means of the hydraulic sluicing systems and only about 15% - by the systems of pneumatic ash handling. Currently, however, the transition from the "wet" ash removal systems to the "dry" ones is outlined. This process is quite logical since the fly ash has the higher reactivity compared with the hydraulic sluicing ash and therefore it is of the great interest for recycling and use. On the other hand, the recent trend is the increased use of fly ash in the production of geo-polymers due to their availability, workability and the increased life of the final product. The analysis is carried out to check the possibility of using the fly ash from various Kemerovo thermoelectric plants as a raw material for the production of the alkali-activated binder.

  17. Effect of ash circulation in gasification melting system on concentration and leachability of lead in melting furnace fly ash.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi; Suzuki, Masaru

    2013-11-30

    In some gasification-melting plants, generated melting furnace fly ash is returned back to the melting furnace for converting the ash to slag. This study investigated the effect of such ash circulation in the gasification-melting system on the concentration and leachability of lead in the melting furnace fly ash. The ash circulation in the melting process was simulated by a thermodynamic calculation, and an elemental analysis and leaching tests were performed on a melting furnace fly ash sample collected from the gasification-melting plant with the ash circulation. It was found that by the ash circulation in the gasification-melting, lead was highly concentrated in the melting furnace fly ash to the level equal to the fly ash from the ash-melting process. The thermodynamic calculation predicted that the lead volatilization by the chlorination is promoted by the ash circulation resulting in the high lead concentration. In addition, the lead extraction from the melting furnace fly ash into a NaOH solution was also enhanced by the ash circulation, and over 90% of lead in the fly ash was extracted in 5 min when using 0.5 mol l(-1) NaOH solution with L/S ratio of 10 at 100 °C. Based on the results, a combination of the gasification-melting with the ash circulation and the NaOH leaching method is proposed for the high efficient lead recovery. PMID:24121545

  18. Hierarchical zeolites from class F coal fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitta, Pallavi

    Fly ash, a coal combustion byproduct is classified as types class C and class F. Class C fly ash is traditionally recycled for concrete applications and Class F fly ash often disposed in landfills. Class F poses an environmental hazard due to disposal and leaching of heavy metals into ground water and is important to be recycled in order to mitigate the environmental challenges. A major recycling option is to reuse the fly ash as a low-cost raw material for the production of crystalline zeolites, which serve as catalysts, detergents and adsorbents in the chemical industry. Most of the prior literature of fly ash conversion to zeolites does not focus on creating high zeolite surface area zeolites specifically with hierarchical pore structure, which are very important properties in developing a heterogeneous catalyst for catalysis applications. This research work aids in the development of an economical process for the synthesis of high surface area hierarchical zeolites from class F coal fly ash. In this work, synthesis of zeolites from fly ash using classic hydrothermal treatment approach and fusion pretreatment approach were examined. The fusion pretreatment method led to higher extent of dissolution of silica from quartz and mullite phases, which in turn led to higher surface area and pore size of the zeolite. A qualitative kinetic model developed here attributes the difference in silica content to Si/Al ratio of the beginning fraction of fly ash. At near ambient crystallization temperatures and longer crystallization times, the zeolite formed is a hierarchical faujasite with high surface area of at least 360 m2/g. This work enables the large scale recycling of class F coal fly ash to produce zeolites and mitigate environmental concerns. Design of experiments was used to predict surface area and pore sizes of zeolites - thus obviating the need for intense experimentation. The hierarchical zeolite catalyst supports tested for CO2 conversion, yielded hydrocarbons

  19. Fly ash as a liming material for corn production

    SciTech Connect

    Tarkalson, D.D.; Hergert, G.W.; Stevens, W.B.; McCallister, D.L.; Kackman, S.D.

    2005-05-01

    Fly ash produced as a by-product of subbituminous coal combustion can potentially serve as an alternative liming material without negatively affecting corn (Zea mays L.) production in areas where use of conventional liming materials can be uneconomical due to transportation costs. A study was conducted to determine if fly ash produced from the Nebraska Public Power District Gerald Gentleman Power Station located in Sutherland, NE could be used as an alternative liming material. Combinations of dry fly ash (DFA), wet fly ash (WFA), beet lime (by-product of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) processing) (BL), and agricultural lime (AGL) were applied at rates ranging from 0.43 to 1.62 times the recommended lime rate to plots on four acidic soils (Anselmo fine sandy loam, Hord fine sandy loam, Holdrege sandy loam, and Valentine fine sand). Soil samples were collected to a depth of 0.2 m from plots and analyzed for pH before lime applications and twice periodically after lime application. The Hord and Valentine soils were analyzed for exchangeable Ca, Mg, K, Na,and Al for determination of percent Al saturation on selected treatments and sampling dates. Corn grain yields were determined annually. It is concluded that the fly ash utilized in this study and applied at rates in this study, increases soil pH comparable to agricultural lime and is an appropriate alternative liming material.

  20. Chloride chemical form in various types of fly ash.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fenfen; Takaoka, Masaki; Shiota, Kenji; Oshita, Kazuyuki; Kitajima, Yoshinori

    2008-06-01

    Chloride content is a critical problem for the reuse of fly ash as a raw material in cement, and the method used by recyclers to reduce the fly ash chloride content depends on the chemical form of the chlorides. However, limited information is available on the quantitative distribution of chlorides and the identity of some chlorides such as Friedel's salt. We examined chloride forms and percentages using X-ray absorption near edge structure and X-ray diffraction analyses, as well as corresponding washing experiments. Approximately 15% of the chlorine in raw fly ash was estimated to be in the form of NaCI, 10% in KCl, 50% in CaCl2, and the remainder in the form of Friedel's salt. Fly ash collected in a bag filter with the injection of calcium hydroxide for acid gas removal (CaFA) contained 35% chlorine as NaCl, 11% as KCI, 37% as CaCl2, 13% as Friedel's salt, and the remaining 4% as CaClOH. In fly ash collected in a bag filter with the injection of sodium bicarbonate for acid gas removal (NaFA), approximately 79% of chlorine was in NaCl, 12% was in KCl, and 9% was in Friedel's salt. PMID:18589947

  1. Chloride chemical form in various types of fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Fenfen Zhu; Masaki Takaoka; Kenji Shiota; Kazuyuki Oshita; Yoshinori Kitajima

    2008-06-01

    Chloride content is a critical problem for the reuse of fly ash as a raw material in cement, and the method used by recyclers to reduce the fly ash chloride content depends on the chemical form of the chlorides. However, limited information is available on the quantitative distribution of chlorides and the identity of some chlorides such as Friedel's salt. We examined chloride forms and percentages using X-ray absorption near edge structure and X-ray diffraction analyses, as well as corresponding washing experiments. Approximately 15% of the chlorine in raw fly ash was estimated to be in the form of NaCl, 10% in KCl, 50% in CaCl{sub 2}, and the remainder in the form of Friedel's salt. Fly ash collected in a bag filter with the injection of calcium hydroxide for acid gas removal (CaFA) contained 35% chlorine as NaCl, 11% as KCl, 37% as CaCl{sub 2}, 13% as Friedel's salt, and the remaining 4% as CaClOH. In fly ash collected in a bag filter with the injection of sodium bicarbonate for acid gas removal (NaFA), approximately 79% of chlorine was in NaCl, 12% was in KCl, and 9% was in Friedel's salt. 25 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. The influence of fly ash on obtaining quality plastic and hardened properties of portland cement concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamad, A.B.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental test burn was done substituting coal with Refuse-Derived-Fuel(RDF) consisting mainly of waste paper and plastic with heating value of 6000 to 8000 BTU/lb. Twelve test burn days were run with 4 days of 5% RDF and 8 days of 10% RDF. The effect of RDF on the chemical and physical properties of fly ash and the effect of coal-RDF fly ash on the properties of plastic and hardened concrete were investigated. Coal fly ash from Merrimack Power Station was classified as an ASTM class F complying to the chemical and physical properties of ASTM C-618 specifications. Coal-RDF fly ash produced during the test burn showed chemical and physical properties comparable to coal fly ash. The average chemical and physical properties of coal-RDF fly ash complied to ASTM C-618 specifications. Concrete made with coal fly ash and coal-RDF fly ash showed increased slump in high paste mixes and decreased slump in low paste mixes. Air content decreased with increased fly ash at a constant dosage of air entrainment. Compressive strength the fly ash concrete at and beyond 28 days were comparable to ordinary portland cement concrete. Heavy metals were not leached from coal fly ash and coal-RDF fly ash concrete during a column test using a synthetic acid rain of pH 4.5 even though small quantities of cadmium and lead were found to leach from coal fly ash and coal-RDF fly ash during the beginning of the test. The volume of the acid rain was approximately equivalent to 7 years of precipitation, assuming 36 inches of rain per year. A microscopic investigation comparing the structure of pastes made with coal fly ash, coal-RDF fly ash, incinerator fly ash and incinerator bottom ash was conducted.

  3. Comparative study on the characteristics of fly ash and bottom ash geopolymers.

    PubMed

    Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Chalee, Wichian; Rattanasak, Ubolluk

    2009-02-01

    This research was conducted to compare geopolymers made from fly ash and ground bottom ash. Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium silicate (Na(2)SiO(3)) solutions were used as activators. A mass ratio of 1.5 Na(2)SiO(3)/NaOH and three concentrations of NaOH (5, 10, and 15M) were used; the geopolymers were cured at 65 degrees C for 48 h. A Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used on the geopolymer pastes. Geopolymer mortars were also prepared in order to investigate compressive strength. The results show that both fly ash and bottom ash can be utilized as source materials for the production of geopolymers. The properties of the geopolymers are dependent on source materials and the NaOH concentration. Fly ash is more reactive and produces a higher degree of geopolymerization in comparison with bottom ash. The moderate NaOH concentration of 10 M is found to be suitable and gives fly ash and bottom ash geopolymer mortars with compressive strengths of 35 and 18 MPa. PMID:18715775

  4. Comparative study on the characteristics of fly ash and bottom ash geopolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Chalee, Wichian; Rattanasak, Ubolluk

    2009-02-15

    This research was conducted to compare geopolymers made from fly ash and ground bottom ash. Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium silicate (Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}) solutions were used as activators. A mass ratio of 1.5 Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}/NaOH and three concentrations of NaOH (5, 10, and 15 M) were used; the geopolymers were cured at 65 deg. C for 48 h. A Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used on the geopolymer pastes. Geopolymer mortars were also prepared in order to investigate compressive strength. The results show that both fly ash and bottom ash can be utilized as source materials for the production of geopolymers. The properties of the geopolymers are dependent on source materials and the NaOH concentration. Fly ash is more reactive and produces a higher degree of geopolymerization in comparison with bottom ash. The moderate NaOH concentration of 10 M is found to be suitable and gives fly ash and bottom ash geopolymer mortars with compressive strengths of 35 and 18 MPa.

  5. CO2 capture using fly ash from coal fired power plant and applications of CO2-captured fly ash as a mineral admixture for concrete.

    PubMed

    Siriruang, Chaichan; Toochinda, Pisanu; Julnipitawong, Parnthep; Tangtermsirikul, Somnuk

    2016-04-01

    The utilization of fly ash as a solid sorbent material for CO2 capture via surface adsorption and carbonation reaction was evaluated as an economically feasible CO2 reduction technique. The results show that fly ash from a coal fired power plant can capture CO2 up to 304.7 μmol/g fly ash, consisting of 2.9 and 301.8 μmol/g fly ash via adsorption and carbonation, respectively. The CO2 adsorption conditions (temperature, pressure, and moisture) can affect CO2 capture performance of fly ash. The carbonation of CO2 with free CaO in fly ashes was evaluated and the results indicated that the reaction consumed most of free CaO in fly ash. The fly ashes after CO2 capture were further used for application as a mineral admixture for concrete. Properties such as water requirement, compressive strength, autoclave expansion, and carbonation depth of mortar and paste specimens using fly ash before and after CO2 capture were tested and compared with material standards. The results show that the expansion of mortar specimens using fly ash after CO2 capture was greatly reduced due to the reduction of free CaO content in the fly ash compared to the expansion of specimens using fresh fly ash. There were no significant differences in the water requirement and compressive strength of specimens using fly ash, before and after CO2 capture process. The results from this study can lead to an alternative CO2 capture technique with doubtless utilization of fly ash after CO2 capture as a mineral admixture for concrete. PMID:26803257

  6. Edaphological characteristics of unweathered and weathered fly ashes from Gondwana and lignite coal.

    PubMed

    Khandkar, U R; Gangwar, M S; Srivastava, P C; Singh, M

    1993-01-01

    Naturally weathered and unweathered samples of fly ashes produced from Gondwana and lignite coals were characterized for their edaphological properties. The particle size distribution in these fly ashes varied widely, and the percentage of [Formula: see text] size particles governed their water holding capacity. All fly ashes were noncoherent in the dry state and had lower particle density than quartz and mulite. The fly ashes were low in available N, but were sufficient in available P, K, Ca, Mg, S, Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn and B. Among the fly ashes, unweathered lignite fly ash was the richest source of K, Ca, Mg, S and Fe, while weathered lignite fly ash had the highest amounts of Mn, Zn and B. The pH of the fly ashes was closely related to the ratio of exchangeable Ca to exchangeable Al. The fly ashes were high in soluble salt, but were poor in cation exchange capacity. As an amendment to correct soil pH, the fly ashes had a poor buffering capacity. Weathering decreased the total Fe, available S and exchangeable Na percentages, but increased the organic C content of the fly ashes. Invariably, an excess of soluble salts and exchangeable Na could limit plant growth on fly ash dumps. Toxic levels of B and Al existed in only some fly ashes. PMID:15091893

  7. Dielectric properties of epoxy resin fly ash composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattanaik, A.; Bhuyan, S. K.; Samal, S. K.; Behera, A.; Mishra, S. C.

    2016-02-01

    Epoxy resin is widely used as an insulating material in high voltage applications. Ceramic fillers are always added to the polymer matrix to enhance its mechanical properties. But at the same time, filler materials decreases the electrical properties. So while making the fly ash epoxy composite, it is obvious to detect the effect of fly ash reinforcement on the dielectric nature of the material. In the present research work, fly ash is added to four different weight percentages compositions and post-curing has been done in the atmospheric condition, normal oven and micro oven. Tests were carried out on the developed polymer composite to measure its dielectric permittivity and tan delta value in a frequency range of 1 Hz - 1 MHz. The space charge behaviours were also observed by using the pulse electroacoustic (PEA) technique. The dielectric strength and losses are compared for different conditions.

  8. Elastic properties of fly ash-stabilized mixes.

    PubMed

    Dimter, Sanja; Rukavina, Tatjana; Minažek, Krunoslav

    2015-12-01

    Stabilized mixes are used in the construction of bearing layers in asphalt and concrete pavement structures. Two nondestructive methods: resonant frequency method and ultrasonic pulse velocity method, were used for estimation of elastic properties of fly ash-stabilized mixes. Stabilized mixes were designed containing sand from the river Drava and binder composed of different share of cement and fly ash. The aim of the research was to analyze the relationship between the dynamic modulus of elasticity determined by different nondestructive methods. Data showed that average value of elasticity modulus obtained by the ultrasound velocity method is lower than the values of elasticity modulus obtained by resonant frequency method. For further analysis and enhanced discussion of elastic properties of fly ash stabilized mixes, see Dimter et al. [1]. PMID:26702415

  9. Role of aluminous component of fly ash on the durability of Portland cement-fly ash pastes in marine environment.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Ma P; Goñi, S; Guerrero, A

    2003-01-01

    The durability, of mixtures of two kinds of Spanish fly ashes from coal combustion (ASTM class F) with 0, 15 and 35% replacement of Portland cement by fly ash, in a simulated marine environment (Na(2)SO(4)+NaCl solution of equivalent concentration to that of sea water: 0.03 and 0.45 M for sulphate and chloride, respectively), has been studied for a period of 90 days. The resistance of the different mixtures to the attack was evaluated by means of the Koch-Steinegger test. The results showed that all the mixtures were resistant, in spite of the great amount of Al(2)O(3) content of the fly ash. The diffusion of SO(4)(2-), Na+ and Cl- ions through the pore solution activated the pozzolanic reactivity of the fly ashes causing the corresponding microstructure changes, which were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). As a result, the flexural strength of the mixtures increased, principally for the fly ash of a lower particle size and 35% of addition. PMID:14522197

  10. Role of aluminous component of fly ash on the durability of Portland cement-fly ash pastes in marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzo, MaP.; Goni, S.; Guerrero, A

    2003-07-01

    The durability, of mixtures of two kinds of Spanish fly ashes from coal combustion (ASTM class F) with 0, 15 and 35% replacement of Portland cement by fly ash, in a simulated marine environment (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}+NaCl solution of equivalent concentration to that of sea water: 0.03 and 0.45 M for sulphate and chloride, respectively), has been studied for a period of 90 days. The resistance of the different mixtures to the attack was evaluated by means of the Koch-Steinegger test. The results showed that all the mixtures were resistant, in spite of the great amount of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content of the fly ash. The diffusion of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, Na{sup +} and Cl{sup -} ions through the pore solution activated the pozzolanic reactivity of the fly ashes causing the corresponding microstructure changes, which were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). As a result, the flexural strength of the mixtures increased, principally for the fly ash of a lower particle size and 35% of addition.

  11. Mercury capture by selected Bulgarian fly ashes: Influence of coal rank and fly ash carbon pore structure on capture efficiency

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kostova, I.J.; Hower, J.C.; Mastalerz, Maria; Vassilev, S.V.

    2011-01-01

    Mercury capture by fly ash C was investigated at five lignite- and subbituminous-coal-burning Bulgarian power plants (Republika, Bobov Dol, Maritza East 2, Maritza East 3, and Sliven). Although the C content of the ashes is low, never exceeding 1.6%, the Hg capture on a unit C basis demonstrates that the low-rank-coal-derived fly ash carbons are more efficient in capturing Hg than fly ash carbons from bituminous-fired power plants. While some low-C and low-Hg fly ashes do not reveal any trends of Hg versus C, the 2nd and, in particular, the 3rd electrostatic precipitator (ESP) rows at the Republika power plant do have sufficient fly ash C range and experience flue gas sufficiently cool to capture measurable amounts of Hg. The Republika 3rd ESP row exhibits an increase in Hg with increasing C, as observed in other power plants, for example, in Kentucky power plants burning Appalachian-sourced bituminous coals. Mercury/C decreases with an increase in fly ash C, suggesting that some of the C is isolated from the flue gas stream and does not contribute to Hg capture. Mercury capture increases with an increase in Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and micropore surface area. The differences in Hg capture between the Bulgarian plants burning low-rank coal and high volatile bituminous-fed Kentucky power plants suggests that the variations in C forms resulting from the combustion of the different ranks also influence the efficiency of Hg capture. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Improving lithium-ion battery performances by adding fly ash from coal combustion on cathode film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyartanti, Endah Retno; Jumari, Arif; Nur, Adrian; Purwanto, Agus

    2016-02-01

    A lithium battery is composed of anode, cathode and a separator. The performance of lithium battery is also influenced by the conductive material of cathode film. In this research, the use of fly ash from coal combustion as conductive enhancer for increasing the performances of lithium battery was investigated. Lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) was used as the active material of cathode. The dry fly ash passed through 200 mesh screen, LiFePO4 and acethylene black (AB), polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as a binder and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) as a solvent were mixed to form slurry. The slurry was then coated, dried and hot pressed to obtain the cathode film. The ratio of fly ash and AB were varied at the values of 1%, 2%, 3%, 4% and 5% while the other components were at constant. The anode film was casted with certain thickness and composition. The performance of battery lithium was examined by Eight Channel Battery Analyzer, the composition of the cathode film was examined by XRD (X-Ray Diffraction), and the structure and morphology of the anode film was analyzed by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope). The composition, structure and morphology of cathode film was only different when fly ash added was 4% of AB or more. The addition of 2% of AB on cathode film gave the best performance of 81.712 mAh/g on charging and 79.412 mAh/g on discharging.

  13. Factors affecting the shrinkage of fly ash geopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridtirud, Charoenchai; Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Pimraksa, Kedsarin

    2011-02-01

    The shrinkage of fly ash geopolymers was studied in the present study. Fly ash was used as the source material for making the geopolymers. The effects of the concentration of NaOH, sodium silicate-to-NaOH ratio, liquid-to-ash ratio, curing temperature, and curing time on shrinkage were investigated. The geopolymers were cured at 25, 40, and 60°C, respectively. The results indicate that the shrinkage of geopolymers is strongly dependent on curing temperature and liquid-to-ash ratio. The increase in shrinkage is associated with the low strength development of geopolymers. It is also found that NaOH concentration and sodium silicate-to-NaOH ratio also affect the shrinkage of geopolymers but to a lesser extent.

  14. Temporal and spatial variations in fly ash quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hower, J.C.; Trimble, A.S.; Eble, C.F.

    2001-01-01

    Fly ash quality, both as the amount of petrographically distinguishable carbons and in chemistry, varies in both time and space. Temporal variations are a function of a number of variables. Variables can include variations in the coal blend organic petrography, mineralogy, and chemistry; variations in the pulverization of the coal, both as a function of the coal's Hardgrove grindability index and as a function of the maintenance and settings of the pulverizers; and variations in the operating conditions of the boiler, including changes in the pollution control system. Spatial variation, as an instantaneous measure of fly ash characteristics, should not involve changes in the first two sets of variables listed above. Spatial variations are a function of the gas flow within the boiler and ducts, certain flow conditions leading to a tendency for segregation of the less-dense carbons in one portion of the gas stream. Caution must be applied in sampling fly ash. Samples from a single bin, or series of bins, m ay not be representative of the whole fly ash, providing a biased view of the nature of the material. Further, it is generally not possible to be certain about variation until the analysis of the ash is complete. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Release of Ammonium and Mercury from NOx Controlled Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, K.T.; Cardone, C.R.; Kim, A.G

    2007-07-01

    One of the goals of the Department of Energy is to increase the reuse of coal utilization byproducts (CUB) to 50% by 2010. This will require both developing new markets and maintaining traditional ones such as the use of fly ash in concrete. However, the addition of pollution control devices can introduce side-effects that affect the marketability of the CUB. Such can be the case when NOx control is achieved using selective catalytic or non-catalytic reduction (SCR or SNCR). Depending on site-specific details, the ammonia slip can cause elevated levels of NH3 in the fly ash. Disposal of ammoniated fly ash can present environmental concerns related to the amount of ammonia that might be released, the amount of water that might become contaminated, and the extent to which metals might be mobilized by the presence of the ammonia. Ammonia retained in fly ash appears to be present as either an ammonium salt or as a chemisorbed species. Mercury in the leachates correlated to neither the amount of leachable ammonium nor to the total amount of Hg in the ash. The strongest correlation was between the decreases in the amount of Hg leached with increased LOI.

  16. Vitrification of fly ash by swirling-flow furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Tadashi

    1996-12-31

    According to the amendment of the Waste Disposal and Public Cleansing Law of 1992, fly ash is regulated as Specially controlled waste and wide attention is now being paid to the melting and vitrification treatment of fly ash, which can reduce overall volume, detoxify and recover sources. Kobe Steel has demonstrated its operation using a swirling-flow furnace and has perfected a vitrification technique. The demonstration test has confirmed stable melting, high decomposition ratio of dioxins and the soundness of the slag. Kobe Steel has successfully developed a new technique for heightening the quality of slag and a new process for the heavy metals recovery from collected dust.

  17. Bronchiolitis obliterans from exposure to incinerator fly ash.

    PubMed

    Boswell, R T; McCunney, R J

    1995-07-01

    Inhalation of toxic substances in the workplace can result in a variety of respiratory disorders. One relatively rare sequela of the inhalation of toxic fumes is bronchiolitis obliterans, a condition characterized by fibrosis and narrowing of the small airways. Several substances have been reported to cause bronchiolitis obliterans, including ammonia, chlorine, hydrogen fluoride, hydrogen sulfide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, phosgene, and other irritant fumes. Little has been reported on the pulmonary effects of fly ash produced by the incineration of coal and oil. We report a case of bronchiolitis obliterans with a component of partially reversible airway obstruction in a 39-year-old male occupationally exposed to incinerator fly ash. PMID:7552470

  18. Continuous air agglomeration method for high carbon fly ash beneficiation

    DOEpatents

    Gray, McMahon L.; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Finseth, Dennis H.

    2000-01-01

    The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carboree mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

  19. Continuous air Agglomeration Method for high Carbon fly ash Beneficiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, McMahan L.; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Finseth, Dennis H.

    1998-09-29

    The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carbon-free mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

  20. High-performance, high-volume fly ash concrete

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-15

    This booklet offers the construction professional an in-depth description of the use of high-volume fly ash in concrete. Emphasis is placed on the need for increased utilization of coal-fired power plant byproducts in lieu of Portland cement materials to eliminate increased CO{sub 2} emissions during the production of cement. Also addressed is the dramatic increase in concrete performance with the use of 50+ percent fly ash volume. The booklet contains numerous color and black and white photos, charts of test results, mixtures and comparisons, and several HVFA case studies.

  1. Production of inorganic pellet binders from fly-ash. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

    1995-12-31

    Fly-ash is produced by all coal-fired utilities, and it must be removed from the plant exhaust gases, collected, and disposed of. While much work has been done in the past to utilize fly-ash rather than disposing of it, we nevertheless do not find widespread examples of successful industrial utilization. This is because past work has tended to find uses only for high-quality, easily-utilized fly-ashes, which account for less than 25% of the fly-ash that is produced. The main factor which makes fly-ashes unusable is a high unburned carbon content. In this project, physical separation technologies are being used to remove this carbon, and to convert these unusable fly-ashes into usable products. The main application being studied for the processed fly-ash is as a binder for inorganic materials, such as iron-ore pellets. In the second quarter, additional fly-ash samples were collected from the E. D. Edwards station (Bartonville, IL). Experimentation was begun to study the removal of carbon from these fly-ashes by froth flotation, and make and test pellets that use fly-ash as binder. During the current quarter, flotation experiments were continued on the fly- ashes. Three types of ashes were studied: 1. Ash from the disposal pond (``wet`` ash); 2. Dry fly-ash collected directly from the standard burners (``low-carbon`` ash); 3. Dry fly-ash collected from the low-NOx burners (``high-carbon`` ash). Each of these was chemically analyzed, and conventional flotation experiments were carried out to determine the optimum reagent dosages for carbon removal. Decarbonized ashes were then made from each ash type, in sufficient quantity to be used in pelletization experiments.

  2. Speciation and mobility of cadmium in straw and wood combustion fly ash.

    PubMed

    Hansen, H K; Pedersen, A J; Ottosen, L M; Villumsen, A

    2001-10-01

    Two fly ashes from biomass combustion have been analysed regarding cadmium speciation and mobility. A fly ash from straw combustion contained 10 mg Cd/kg dry matter, and around 50% of the cadmium was leachable in water. The possible main speciation of cadmium in this fly ash was CdCl2. When adding this fly ash to agricultural soil a threat for groundwater contamination and plant uptake is existing. A fly ash from wood chip combustion had 28.6 mg Cd/kg dry matter. In this fly ash, the cadmium was bound more heavily, with only small amounts of cadmium leached in mild extractants. A possible speciation of cadmium in this fly ash was as oxide or as CdSiO3. Long-term effects and accumulation of cadmium could be a problem when adding this fly ash to agricultural or forest soils. PMID:11572586

  3. Enhancing performance and durability of slag made from incinerator bottom ash and fly ash.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Ing-Jia; Wang, Kuen-Sheng; Tsai, Chen-Chiu

    2009-02-01

    This work presents a method capable of melting the incinerator bottom ash and fly ash in a plasma furnace. The performance of slag and the strategies for recycling of bottom ash and fly ash are improved by adjusting chemical components of bottom ash and fly ash. Ashes are separated by a magnetic process to improve the performance of slag. Analytical results indicate that the air-cooled slag (ACS) and magnetic-separated slag (MSS) have hardness levels below 590 MPa, indicating fragility. Additionally, the hardness of crystallized slag (RTS) is between 655 and 686 MPa, indicating toughness. The leached concentrations of heavy metals for these three slags are all below the regulatory limits. ACS appears to have better chemical stability than MSS, and is not significantly different from RTS. In the potential alkali-silica reactivity of slag, MSS falls on the border between the harmless zone and the potentially harmful zone. ACS and RTS fall in the harmless zone. Hence, the magnetic separation procedure of ashes does not significantly improve the quality of slag. However, RTS appears to improve its quality. PMID:18544471

  4. Hydrothermal reactions of fly ash. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.W.

    1995-12-31

    The emphasis of the work done has been to determine the reactivities of two ashes believed to be representative of those generated. A bituminous ash and a lignitic ash have been investigated. The reactions of these ashes undergo when subjected to mild hydrothermal conditions were explored. The nature of the reactions which the ashes undergo when alkaline activators, calcium hydroxide and calcium sulfate are present was also investigated. It was determined that calcium silicate hydrate, calcium aluminate hydrate, and the calcium sulfoaluminate hydrate ettringite form under these conditions. It appears 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}3CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}32H{sub 2}O (ettringite) formation needs to be considered in ashes which contain significant amounts of sulfate. Therefore the stability region for ettringite was established. It was also determined that calcium silicate hydrate, exhibiting a high internal surface area, will readily form with hydrothermal treatment between 50{degrees} and 100{degrees}C. This phase is likely to have a significant capacity to take up heavy metals and oxyanions and this ability is being explored.

  5. Phenolic acids as bioindicators of fly ash deposit revegetation

    SciTech Connect

    L. Djurdjevic; M. Mitrovic; P. Pavlovic; G. Gajic; O. Kostic

    2006-05-15

    The floristic composition, the abundance, and the cover of pioneer plant species of spontaneously formed plant communities and the content of total phenolics and phenolic acids, as humus constituents, of an ash deposit after 7 years of recultivation were studied. The restoration of both the soil and the vegetation on the ash deposits of the 'Nikola Tesla-A' thermoelectric power plant in Obrenovac (Serbia) is an extremely slow process. Unfavorable physical and chemical characteristics, the toxicity of fly ash, and extreme microclimatic conditions prevented the development of compact plant cover. The abundance and cover of plants increased from the central part of the deposit towards its edges. Festuca rubra L., Crepis setosa Hall., Erigeron canadensis L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Calamagrostis epigeios (L.) Roth., and Tamarix gallica L. were the most abundant species, thus giving the highest cover. Humus generated during the decomposition process of plant remains represents a completely new product absent in the ash as the starting material. The amount of total phenolics and phenolic acids in fly ash increased from the center of the deposit towards its edges in correlation with the increase in plant abundance and cover. The presence of phenolic acids indicates the ongoing process of humus formation in the ash, in which the most abundant pioneer plants of spontaneously formed plant communities play the main role. Phenolic compounds can serve as reliable bioindicators in an assessment of the success of the recultivation process of thermoelectric power plants' ash deposits.

  6. Effect of fly ash on sorption behavior of metribuzin in agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neera; Raunaq; Singh, Shashi B

    2012-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to determine the effect of two different fly ashes [Kota and Inderprastha (IP)] amendment on the sorption behavior of metribuzin in three Indian soil types. The IP fly ash was very effective in increasing the metribuzin sorption in the soils. The sorption with IP amendment was increased by 15-92%, whereas with the Kota fly ash an increase in sorption by 13-38% was noted. The adsorption isotherms fitted very well to the Freundlich adsorption equation and, in general, slope (1/n) values less then unity were observed. Although both the fly ashes significantly decreased metribuzin desorption, the IP fly ash was comparatively more effective in retaining metribuzin in the soils. Metribuzin sorption in the IP fly ash-amended soils showed strong correlation with the fly ash content and compared to K(f)/K(d) values, K(FA) values (sorption normalized to fly ash content) showed less variation. Metribuzin sorption-desorption did not correlate to the organic carbon content of the soil-fly ash mixture. The study demonstrates that all coal fly ashes may not be effective in enhancing the sorption of metribuzin in soils to the same extent. However, among the fly ashes used in this study, the IP fly ash was observed to be significantly effective in enhancing the sorption of metribuzin in soils. This may play an important role in reducing the run off and leaching losses of the herbicide by retaining it in the soil. PMID:22251208

  7. BIOAVAILABILITY OF 1-NITROPYRENE FROM MODEL COAL FLY ASH AND ITS UPTAKE BY ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alveolar macrophage cultures exposed to coal fly ash vapor-coated with 1-nitropyrene were used as a model system to study the bioavailability and the uptake of a nitroaromatic hydrocarbon from coal combustion emissions. Initially, 1-nitropyrene-coated fly ash and uncoated fly ash...

  8. PREFERENTIAL PARTITIONING OF PAHS AND PCBS TO COAL FLY ASH

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has long been known that fly ash has a significant capacity for the adsorption of several classes of anthropogenic pollutants, including toxic metals, nutrients and organic compounds. This adsorption capacity has been utilized by wastewater treatment plants for the removal of ...

  9. Synthesis of multiwalled carbon nanotubes on fly ash derived catalysts.

    PubMed

    Dunens, Oscar M; MacKenzie, Kieran J; Harris, Andrew T

    2009-10-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an allotrope of carbon with unique properties that make them potentially useful in a vast range of applications. However, CNTs are predominantly produced using expensive and/or nonrecyclable catalyst supports, e.g., mesoporous silica and alumina. In this work, coal combustion fly ash, a bulk waste product with limited uses, was impregnated with iron nitrate and successfully used as a substrate to produce industrial grade multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition. CNTs were analyzed using thermogravimetric analysis, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The most successful catalyst trialed at 650 degrees C using ethylene as a carbon source was a 5 wt % Fe fly ash catalyst, which produced a CNT yield in respect to metal loading of approximately 82.5%. The MWNTs had outer diameters of between 12 and 20 nm with a reasonable degree of wall graphitization (I(G)/I(D) of 1.17). Advantages of utilizing fly ash as a catalyst support are its availability at low cost at the megaton scale, its high thermal stability, and suitability for use in industrial fluidized bed reactors. Potential applications for the fly ash produced CNTs include use in composite materials. PMID:19921910

  10. Phytoremediation of metals from fly ash through bacterial augmentation.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Babita; Singh, S N

    2011-01-01

    Different combinations of four bacterial strains isolated from fly ash were used by us to study their impact on phytoextraction of metals from fly ash by Brassica juncea grown in fly ash amended with farm yard manure (50:50 w/w). Out of 11 bacterial consortia, a combination of two strains i.e. Paenibacillus macerans NBRFT5 + Bacillus pumilus NBRFT9 (C7) inoculated in the rhizosphere was found to enhance Pb accumulation maximally by 278%, Mn by 75%, Zn by 163%, Cr by 226% and Ni by 414% compared to control. It is possible that these bacteria, known for N(2) fixation, solubilization of phosphorus and uptake of micronutrient, could promote the plant growth resulting in higher accumulation of metals. However, a combination of four bacteria, namely Micrococcus roseus NBRFT2 + Bacillus endophyticus NBRFT4 + Paenibacillus macerans NBRFT5 + Bacillus pumilus NBRFT9 (C4) was able to increase Cd uptake maximally by 237%. Further, the translocation of metal was invariably more from root to stem than from stem to leaf which was regulated by plant transport mechanism and metal mobility. Bacteria are known to excrete protons, organic acids, enzymes and siderophores to enhance the mobilization of metals which boosted the phytoextraction of metals from fly ash. PMID:21080221

  11. Ultrasonic studies of fly ash/polyurea composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Jing; Amirkhizi, Alireza V.; Nemat-Nasser, Sia; Wu, Gaohui

    2013-04-01

    Due to its excellent thermo-mechanical properties, polyurea is attracting more and more attention in blast-mitigating applications. In order to enhance its capability of blast-induced stress-wave management, we seek to develop polyurea-based composites in this work. Fly ash which consists of hollow particles with porous shell and low apparent density was chosen as filler and a series of fly ash/polyurea composites with various fly ash volume fractions were fabricated. The dynamic mechanical behavior of the composites was determined by a personal computer (PC) based ultrasonic system in the 0.5-2MHz frequency range between -60°C to 30°C temperatures. Velocity and attenuation of both longitudinal and shear ultrasonic waves were measured. The complex longitudinal and shear moduli were then computed from these measurements. Combining these results provided an estimate of the complex bulk and Young's moduli of the fly ash/polyurea composites at high frequencies. These results will be presented and compared with those of pure polyurea elastomer.

  12. MERCURY CAPTURE ON COAL COMBUSTION FLY ASH. (R827649)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was performed at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to test the hypotheses that (1) different carbon types contained in coal combustion fly ash have variable sorption capabilities relative to mercury and (2) the inorganic fraction of coal combustion fl...

  13. Fly Ash as a Liming Material for Corn Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fly ash produced as a by-product of sub-bituminous coal combustion can potentially serve as an alternative liming material without negatively affecting corn (Zea mays L.) production in areas where use of conventional liming materials can be uneconomical due to transportation costs. A study was cond...

  14. Electrical conductivity and dielectric property of fly ash geopolymer pastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanjitsuwan, Sakonwan; Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Pimraksa, Kedsarin

    2011-02-01

    The electrical conductivity and dielectric property of fly ash geopolymer pastes in a frequency range of 100 Hz-10 MHz were studied. The effects of the liquid alkali solution to ash ratios (L/A) were analyzed. The mineralogical compositions and microstructures of fly ash geopolymer materials were also investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The 10 mol sodium hydroxide solution and sodium silicate solution at a sodium silicate-to-sodium hydroxide ratio of 1.0 were used in making geopolymer pastes. The pastes were cured at 40°C. It is found that the electrical conductivity and dielectric constant are dependent on the frequency range and L/A ratios. The conductivity increases but the dielectric constant decreases with increasing frequency.

  15. Elastic properties of fly ash-stabilized mixes

    PubMed Central

    Dimter, Sanja; Rukavina, Tatjana; Minažek, Krunoslav

    2015-01-01

    Stabilized mixes are used in the construction of bearing layers in asphalt and concrete pavement structures. Two nondestructive methods: resonant frequency method and ultrasonic pulse velocity method, were used for estimation of elastic properties of fly ash–stabilized mixes. Stabilized mixes were designed containing sand from the river Drava and binder composed of different share of cement and fly ash. The aim of the research was to analyze the relationship between the dynamic modulus of elasticity determined by different nondestructive methods. Data showed that average value of elasticity modulus obtained by the ultrasound velocity method is lower than the values of elasticity modulus obtained by resonant frequency method. For further analysis and enhanced discussion of elastic properties of fly ash stabilized mixes, see Dimter et al. [1]. PMID:26702415

  16. Plant nutrient availability from mixtures of fly ashes and biosolids

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, A.W.; Summer, M.E.

    1999-10-01

    Nutrient imbalances, both deficiencies and excesses, are one reason for the poor acceptance of waste materials as fertilizer substitutes. Two greenhouse experiments were established using 24 different fly ashes with sewage sludge and poultry manure to estimate nutrient availability and imbalances to maize (Zea mays L.). The maximum maize growth attained with fly ash amendment of 80 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} was significantly less (50%) than a fertilized control treatment. The additional growth improvements obtained from mixtures with sewage sludge or poultry manure ranged from 30 to 49% and 30 to 71%, respectively. Organic materials applied alone achieved only 54 and 62% of the maximum potential, while growth on poultry manure mixtures was up to 94% of the best performing fertilized treatment. Results of foliage and soil analyses suggest that P and K were the main nutrient deficiencies, while B phytotoxicity and an imbalance in the K/Ca/Mg ratio also were likely causes of plant growth reduction. Fly ashes did not contribute significant P or K to correct soil and plant deficiencies, but more often exacerbated the imbalances by precipitation or adsorption of soil P. Sewage sludge mixed at 26% and poultry manure at 13% (DM) with fly ash had negligible effect on availability of phytotoxic fly ash B, but were good sources of P (both) and K (poultry manure). Good agreement between plant nutrition in pot experiments and previous laboratory extraction studies implies that chemical analysis, efficient formulation and optimized application rates may overcome nutrient limitations for use of wastes as fertilizer substitutes.

  17. Clay formation and metal fixation during weathering of coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Zevenbergen, C.; Bradley, J.P.; Reeuwijk, L.P. Van; Shyam, A.K.; Hjelmar, O.; Comans, R.N.J.

    1999-10-01

    The enormous and worldwide production of coal fly ash cannot be durably isolated from the weathering cycle, and the weathering characteristics of fly ash must be known to understand the long-term environmental impact. The authors studied the weathering of two coal fly ashes and compared them with published data from weathered volcanic ash, it's closest natural analogue. Both types of ash contain abundant aluminosilicate glass, which alters to noncrystalline clay. However, this study reveals that the kinetics of coal fly ash weathering are more rapid than those of volcanic ash because the higher pH of fresh coal fly ash promotes rapid dissolution of the glass. After about 10 years of weathering, the noncrystalline clay content of coal fly ash is higher than that of 250-year-old volcanic ash. The observed rapid clay formation together with heavy metal fixation imply that the long-term environmental impact of coal fly ash disposal may be less severe and the benefits more pronounced than predicted from previous studies on unweathered ash. Their findings suggest that isolating coal fly ash from the weathering cycle may be counterproductive because, in the long-term under conditions of free drainage, fly ash is converted into fertile soil capable of supporting agriculture.

  18. Characterization of ash cenospheres in fly ash from Australian power stations

    SciTech Connect

    Ling-ngee Ngu; Hongwei Wu; Dong-ke Zhang

    2007-12-15

    Ash cenospheres in fly ashes from five Australian power stations have been characterized. The experimental data show that ash cenosphere yield varies across the power stations. Ash partitioning occurred in the process of ash cenosphere formation during combustion. Contradictory to conclusions from the literature, iron does not seem to be essential to ash cenosphere formation in the cases examined in the present work. Further investigation was also undertaken on a series of size-fractioned ash cenosphere samples from Tarong power station. It is found that about 70 wt% of ash cenospheres in the bulk sample have sizes between 45 and 150 {mu}m. There are two different ash cenosphere structures, that is, single-ring structure and network structure. The percentage of ash cenospheres of a network structure increases with increasing ash cenosphere size. Small ash cenospheres (in the size fractions {lt}150 {mu}m) have a high SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio, and the majority of the ash cenospheres are spherical and of a single-ring structure. Large ash cenosphere particles (in the size fractions of 150-250 {mu}m and {gt}250 {mu}m) have a low SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio, and a high proportion of the ash cenospheres are nonspherical and of a network structure. A novel quantitative technique has been developed to measure the diameter and wall thickness of ash cenospheres on a particle-to-particle basis. A monolayer of size-fractioned ash cenospheres was dispersed on a pellet, which was then polished carefully before being examined using a scanning electron microscope and image analysis. The ash cenosphere wall thickness broadly increases with increasing ash cenosphere size. The ratios between wall thickness and diameter of ash cenospheres are limited between an upper bound of about 10.5% and a lower bound of about 2.5%, irrespective of the ash cenosphere size. 52 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Mössbauer characterization of feed coal, ash and fly ash from a thermal power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes Caballero, F.; Martínez Ovalle, S. A.; Moreno Gutiérrez, M.

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this work was apply 57Fe Transmission Mössbauer Spectroscopy at room temperature in order to study the occurrence of iron-containing mineral phases in: 1) feed coal; 2) coal ash, obtained in different stages of the ASTM D3174 standard method; and 3) fly ash, produced when coal is burned in the TERMOPAIPA IV thermal power plant localized in Boyacá, Colombia. According to obtained results, we can conclude the occurrence of pyrite and jarosite in the feed coal; Fe2+ and Fe3+ crystalline paramagnetic phases, superparamagnetic hematite and hematite in coal ash; Fe2+ and Fe3+ noncrystalline and crystalline phases, magnetite and hematite in fly ash. Precisely, for a basic understanding, this work discusses some the possible transformations that take place during coal combustion.

  20. Fly ash zeolite catalyst support for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campen, Adam

    This dissertation research aimed at evaluating a fly ash zeolite (FAZ) catalyst support for use in heterogeneous catalytic processes. Gas phase Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) over a fixed-bed of the prepared catalyst/FAZ support was identified as an appropriate process for evaluation, by comparison with commercial catalyst supports (silica, alumina, and 13X). Fly ash, obtained from the Wabash River Generating Station, was first characterized using XRD, SEM/EDS, particle size, and nitrogen sorption techniques. Then, a parametric study of a two-step alkali fusion/hydrothermal treatment process for converting fly ash to zeolite frameworks was performed by varying the alkali fusion agent, agent:flyash ratio, fusion temperature, fused ash/water solution, aging time, and crystallization time. The optimal conditions for each were determined to be NaOH, 1.4 g NaOH: 1 g fly ash, 550 °C, 200 g/L, 12 hours, and 48 hours. This robust process was applied to the fly ash to obtain a faujasitic zeolite structure with increased crystallinity (40 %) and surface area (434 m2/g). Following the modification of fly ash to FAZ, ion exchange of H+ for Na+ and cobalt incipient wetness impregnation were used to prepare a FTS catalyst. FTS was performed on the catalysts at 250--300 °C, 300 psi, and with a syngas ratio H2:CO = 2. The HFAZ catalyst support loaded with 11 wt% cobalt resulted in a 75 % carbon selectivity for C5 -- C18 hydrocarbons, while methane and carbon dioxide were limited to 13 and 1 %, respectively. Catalyst characterization was performed by XRD, N2 sorption, TPR, and oxygen pulse titration to provide insight to the behavior of each catalyst. Overall, the HFAZ compared well with silica and 13X supports, and far exceeded the performance of the alumina support under the tested conditions. The successful completion of this research could add value to an underutilized waste product of coal combustion, in the form of catalyst supports in heterogeneous catalytic processes.

  1. Kiln dust-fly ash systems for highway bases and subbases

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effectiveness of substituting kiln dusts for hydrated lime in lime-fly ash-aggregate road base systems. A total of 45 kiln dust samples, including 33 cement dusts and 12 lime dusts, were obtained in accordance with a standard sampling procedure. In addition, 18 fly ashes (including 5 Class C ash samples) and 6 aggregates were included in the sampling program. Kiln dust and fly ash samples were characterized by Trow, Ltd. to determine physical properties and chemical, as well as mineralogical, composition. Optimum kiln dust-fly ash ratios were developed for 66 mix combinations. Kiln dust-fly ash-aggregate compressive strength tests were performed. Engineering properties (durability, volume stability, etc.) of optimum mix combinations were tested and compared with conventional lime-fly ash-aggregate mixtures. Most kiln dust-fly ash-aggregate mixes were comparable to, and in many cases demonstrated higher early strength development than, lime-fly ash-aggregate mixes. Optimum mix strengths for kiln dust-fly ash-aggregate compositions were generally attained at kiln dust-fly ash ratios of 2:1 using cement kiln dust and 1:1 using lime kiln dust. By contrast, most lime-fly ash-aggregate mixes have lime-fly ash ratios of 1:3 or 1:4. Therefore, higher concentrations of kiln dust are required compared to commercial lime. Mixes containing Class C fly ash developed higher strengths than comparable mixes with Class F fly ash.

  2. Phenolic acids as bioindicators of fly ash deposit revegetation.

    PubMed

    Djurdjević, L; Mitrović, M; Pavlović, P; Gajić, G; Kostić, O

    2006-05-01

    The floristic composition, the abundance, and the cover of pioneer plant species of spontaneously formed plant communities and the content of total phenolics and phenolic acids, as humus constituents, of an ash deposit after 7 years of recultivation were studied. The restoration of both the soil and the vegetation on the ash deposits of the "Nikola Tesla-A" thermoelectric power plant in Obrenovac (Serbia) is an extremely slow process. Unfavorable physical and chemical characteristics, the toxicity of fly ash, and extreme microclimatic conditions prevented the development of compact plant cover. The abundance and cover of plants increased from the central part of the deposit towards its edges (ranging from 1-80%). Festuca rubra L., Crepis setosa Hall., Erigeron canadensis L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Calamagrostis epigeios (L.) Roth., and Tamarix gallica L. were the most abundant species, thus giving the highest cover. Humus generated during the decomposition process of plant remains represents a completely new product absent in the ash as the starting material. The amount of total phenolics and phenolic acids (38.07-185.16 microg/g of total phenolics and 4.12-27.28 microg/g of phenolic acids) in fly ash increased from the center of the deposit towards its edges in correlation with the increase in plant abundance and cover. Ash samples contained high amounts of ferulic, vanillic, and p-coumaric acid, while the content of both p-hydroxybenzoic and syringic acid was relatively low. The presence of phenolic acids indicates the ongoing process of humus formation in the ash, in which the most abundant pioneer plants of spontaneously formed plant communities play the main role. Phenolic compounds can serve as reliable bioindicators in an assessment of the success of the recultivation process of thermoelectric power plants' ash deposits. PMID:16418890

  3. Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points.

  4. Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1997-10-28

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points. 2 figs.

  5. Glass-ceramics from municipal incinerator fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Boccaccini, A.R.; Petitmermet, M.; Wintermantel, E.

    1997-11-01

    In countries where the population density is high and the availability of space for landfilling is limited, such as the west-European countries and Japan, the significance of municipal solid waste incineration, as part of the waste management strategy, is continuously increasing. In Germany and Switzerland, for example, more than {approximately}40% of unrecycled waste is being or will be incinerated. Also, in other countries, including the US, the importance of waste incineration will increase in the next few years. Although incineration reduces the volume of the waste by {approximately} 90%, it leaves considerable amounts of solid residues, such as bottom and boiler ashes, and filter fly ashes. Consequently, new technological options for the decontamination and/or inertization of incinerator filter fly ash are being developed with the objective of rendering a product that can be reused or, at least, be deposited in standard landfill sites with no risk. The proposed alternatives include immobilization by cement-based techniques, wet chemical treatments and thermal treatments of vitrification. Of these, vitrification is the most promising solution, because, if residues are melted at temperatures > 1,300 C, a relatively inert glass is produced. In the present investigation, glass-ceramics were obtained by a controlled crystallization heat treatment of vitrified incinerator filter fly ashes. The mechanical and other technical properties of the products were measured with special emphasis on assessing their in vitro toxic potential.

  6. Leaching of mixtures of biochar and fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Anthony V.; Porat, Iris; Phillips, Jana R.; Amonette, James E.; Drake, Meghan M.; Brown, Steven D.; Schadt, Christopher W.

    2009-06-22

    Increasing atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, especially CO2, and their effects on global temperature have led to interest in the possibility of carbon storage in terrestrial environments. Both the residual char from biomass pyrolysis (biochar) and fly ash from coal combustion have the potential to significantly expand terrestrial sequestration options. Both biochar and fly ash also have potentially beneficial effects on soil properties. Fly ash has been shown to increase porosity, water-holding capacity, pH, conductivity, and dissolved SO42-, CO32-, Cl- and basic cations. Adding biochar to soil generally raises pH, increases total nitrogen and total phosphorous, encourages greater root development, improves cation exchange capacity and decreases available aluminum. A combination of these benefits likely is responsible for observed increases in yields for crops such as corn and sugarcane. In addition, it has been found that soils with added biochar emit lower amounts of other greenhouse gases (methane and nitrous oxide) than do unamended soils. Biochar and fly ash amendments may be useful in promoting terrestrial carbon sequestration on currently underutilized and degraded lands. For example, about 1% of the US surface lands consist of previously mined lands or highway rights-of-way. Poorly managed lands could count for another 15% of US area. Biochar and fly ash amendments could increase productivity of these lands and increase carbon storage in the soil. Previous results showed minimal leaching of organic carbon and metals from a variety of fly ashes. In the present study, we examined the properties of mixtures of biochar, fly ash, and soil and evaluated the leaching of organic carbon and metals from these mixtures. The carbon sorption experiments showed release of carbon from biochar, rather than sorption, except at the highest concentrations in the Biochar HW sample. Similar results were obtained by others for oxidative leaching of bituminous coal, in

  7. Utilization options for fly ash, bottom ash, and slag in Eastern Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, O.E.

    1995-12-01

    Since 1967, at least six ash utilization symposiums have been held in the United States, with papers presented by several European authors on the utilization of coal by-products in Eastern Europe. There is currently over 80,000 megawatts of installed coal-fired capacity available in that region. Unfortunately, of the 117,778,000 tonnes of fly ash, bottom ash, and slag produced in Eastern Europe in 1989, only 13% was utilized. This paper outlines the research and levels and kinds of coal by-product utilization taking place in Eastern Europe since the late 1960s.

  8. MSWI boiler fly ashes: magnetic separation for material recovery.

    PubMed

    De Boom, Aurore; Degrez, Marc; Hubaux, Paul; Lucion, Christian

    2011-07-01

    Nowadays, ferrous materials are usually recovered from Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) bottom ash by magnetic separation. To our knowledge, such a physical technique has not been applied so far to other MSWI residues. This study focuses thus on the applicability of magnetic separation on boiler fly ashes (BFA). Different types of magnet are used to extract the magnetic particles. We investigate the magnetic particle composition, as well as their leaching behaviour (EN 12457-1 leaching test). The magnetic particles present higher Cr, Fe, Mn and Ni concentration than the non-magnetic (NM) fraction. Magnetic separation does not improve the leachability of the NM fraction. To approximate industrial conditions, magnetic separation is also applied to BFA mixed with water by using a pilot. BFA magnetic separation is economically evaluated. This study globally shows that it is possible to extract some magnetic particles from MSWI boiler fly ashes. However, the magnetic particles only represent from 23 to 120 g/kg of the BFA and, though they are enriched in Fe, are composed of similar elements to the raw ashes. The industrial application of magnetic separation would only be profitable if large amounts of ashes were treated (more than 15 kt/y), and the process should be ideally completed by other recovery methods or advanced treatments. PMID:21306886

  9. Fly Ash as a Time Marker for Anthropocene Alluvial Sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettis, E. A., III; Grimley, D. A.; Anders, A. M.; Bates, B.; Hannan, E.

    2014-12-01

    Human land use has transformed the landscapes, ecosystems and hydrology of the North American Midcontinent. One widespread impact of this transformation is increased runoff and accelerated soil erosion, which, along with direct human channel modifications and artificial drainage, have dramatically altered hydrologic and ecological conditions in streams and rivers with far-reaching results. A legacy of this change in streams and rivers is preserved on floodplains throughout the region in sediment known as post-settlement alluvium (PSA). Documenting the spatial and temporal pattern of historic floodplain sedimentation in the drainage network is part of a larger effort to understand decadal and century-scale sediment routing through the drainage system and the role of floodplain sedimentation in carbon sequestration. Fly ash, a product of high-temperature coal combustion, began to accumulate on the landscape in the early historic period (c.a.1840-1850 in Iowa and Illinois) as coal-burning technology such as steam engines came into use after 1850; prior to which no source of fly ash was present. Release of fly ash from coal burning in power plants and steam locomotives likely peaked in the early-mid 20th century. Fly ash particles (~ 1 to 10 % magnetic) are identified by their spheroidal shape and range in size from coarse clay to silt (~1-63µ). By identifying the percentage of fly ash spheroids in the magnetic separate (10 - 60µ size range) of a soil or sediment profile, the pre-fly ash Historic surface could be discerned. Application of this technique in selected localities in eastern Iowa (Clear Creek drainage) and central Illinois (Sangamon River drainage) resulted in successful demarcation of the PSA contact in areas where the boundary was physically evident. Bolstered by this success we were able to confidently demark the PSA contact in other settings where the boundary was not as physically evident. This relatively easy to implement, inexpensive tool will

  10. Determination of anisotropy and multimorphology in fly ash based geopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. Irfan; Azizli, Khairun; Sufian, Suriati; Man, Zakaria; Siyal, Ahmer Ali; Ullah, Hafeez

    2015-07-01

    In this study, Malaysian coal fly ash-based geopolymers were investigated for its morphology and chemical composition using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-rays (SEM-EDX). Geopolymer was synthesized using sodium hydroxide as activator. SEM studies revealed multiphasous structure of the material, composed of geopolymeric gel, partially reacted fly ashparticles and selectively leached particles. EDX analysis confirmed the chemical composition of different regions. Infra red spectroscopic studies supported the SEM-EDX analysis by confirming presence of unreacted quartzite and mullite in geopolymers. It is concluded that geopolymers possese a non uniform chemistry through out the structure.

  11. Determination of anisotropy and multimorphology in fly ash based geopolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, M. Irfan Azizli, Khairun Sufian, Suriati Man, Zakaria Siyal, Ahmer Ali Ullah, Hafeez

    2015-07-22

    In this study, Malaysian coal fly ash-based geopolymers were investigated for its morphology and chemical composition using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-rays (SEM-EDX). Geopolymer was synthesized using sodium hydroxide as activator. SEM studies revealed multiphasous structure of the material, composed of geopolymeric gel, partially reacted fly ashparticles and selectively leached particles. EDX analysis confirmed the chemical composition of different regions. Infra red spectroscopic studies supported the SEM-EDX analysis by confirming presence of unreacted quartzite and mullite in geopolymers. It is concluded that geopolymers possese a non uniform chemistry through out the structure.

  12. Fly Ash and Mercury Oxidation/Chlorination Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sukh Sidhu; Patanjali Varanasi

    2008-12-31

    Mercury is a known pollutant that has detrimental effect on human health and environment. The anthropogenic emissions of mercury account for 10 to 30% of worldwide mercury emissions. There is a need to control/reduce anthropogenic mercury emissions. Many mercury control technologies are available but their effectiveness is dependent on the chemical form of mercury, because different chemical forms of mercury have different physical and chemical properties. Mercury leaves the boiler in its elemental form but goes through various transformations in the post-combustion zone. There is a need to understand how fly ash and flue gas composition affect speciation, partitioning, and reactions of mercury under the full range of post-combustion zone conditions. This knowledge can then be used to predict the chemical transformation of mercury (elemental, oxidized or particulate) in the post combustion zone and thus help with the control of mercury emissions from coal-burning power plants. To accomplish this goal present study was conducted using five coal fly ashes. These ashes were characterized and their catalytic activity was compared under selected reaction conditions in a fixed bed reactor. Based on the results from these fly ash experiments, three key components (carbon, iron oxide and calcium oxide) were chosen. These three components were then used to prepare model fly ashes. Silica/alumina was used as a base for these model fly ashes. One, two or three component model fly ashes were then prepared to investigate mercury transformation reactions. The third set of experiments was performed with CuO and CuCl2 catalysts to further understand the mercury oxidation process. Based on the results of these three studies the key components were predicted for different fly ash compositions under variety of flue gas conditions. A fixed bed reactor system was used to conduct this study. In all the experiments, the inlet concentration of Hg0(g) was maintained at 35 {micro}g/m3 using

  13. Heavy metal and radionuclide concentrations in fly ash material

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, J.D.; Phagan, C.J.; Gray, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    A study was completed to characterize the concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides and their mobility in two fly ash covered parking lots at the US Department of Energy`s Pantex Plant. Six composite samples collected from the parking areas were analyzed by an offsite contract laboratory for arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, silver, uranium 234, and uranium 238. All metal and radionuclide concentrations except mercury and silver exceeded the applicable comparison standards for typical Pantex Plant soil; however, concentrations of mercury and silver were significantly below the Texas Risk Reduction Standards. In view of these results, it was strongly recommended that fly ash not be used for future projects at the Pantex Plant unless specialized engineering controls are used.

  14. Trapping behavior of gaseous cesium by fly ash filters.

    PubMed

    Shin, J M; Park, J J; Song, K C; Kim, J H

    2009-01-01

    The high volatility of a gaseous form and its high chemical reactivity make a cesium emission control very difficult work. In this study, fly ash filters were tested for the removal of gaseous cesium from a hot flue gas under air and hydrogen conditions at 700-1000 degrees C. Tests were performed by using a simulated gaseous cesium volatilized from Cs(2)SiO(3) in a two-zone furnace. Fly ash filter was found to be the most promising filter for trapping the gaseous cesium. The results of the trapping tests are presented, along with the effects of the temperature, superficial gas velocity, and carrier gas on the cesium trapping quantity. PMID:19375925

  15. Utilization of blended fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ash in geopolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Rattanasak, Ubolluk

    2010-04-15

    In this paper, synthesis of geopolymer from fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ash was studied in order to effectively utilize both ashes. FBC-fly ash and bottom ash were inter-ground to three different finenesses. The ashes were mixed with as-received PCC-fly ash in various proportions and used as source material for synthesis of geopolymer. Sodium silicate (Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}) and 10 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions at mass ratio of Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}/NaOH of 1.5 and curing temperature of 65 deg. C for 48 h were used for making geopolymer. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), degree of reaction, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were performed on the geopolymer pastes. Compressive strength was also tested on geopolymer mortars. The results show that high strength geopolymer mortars of 35.0-44.0 MPa can be produced using mixture of ground FBC ash and as-received PCC-fly ash. Fine FBC ash is more reactive and results in higher degree of reaction and higher strength geopolymer as compared to the use of coarser FBC ash. Grinding increases reactivity of ash by means of increasing surface area and the amount of reactive phase of the ash. In addition, the packing effect due to fine particles also contributed to increase in strength of geopolymers.

  16. Utilization of blended fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ash in geopolymer.

    PubMed

    Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Rattanasak, Ubolluk

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, synthesis of geopolymer from fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ash was studied in order to effectively utilize both ashes. FBC-fly ash and bottom ash were inter-ground to three different finenesses. The ashes were mixed with as-received PCC-fly ash in various proportions and used as source material for synthesis of geopolymer. Sodium silicate (Na(2)SiO(3)) and 10M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions at mass ratio of Na(2)SiO(3)/NaOH of 1.5 and curing temperature of 65 degrees C for 48h were used for making geopolymer. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), degree of reaction, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were performed on the geopolymer pastes. Compressive strength was also tested on geopolymer mortars. The results show that high strength geopolymer mortars of 35.0-44.0MPa can be produced using mixture of ground FBC ash and as-received PCC-fly ash. Fine FBC ash is more reactive and results in higher degree of reaction and higher strength geopolymer as compared to the use of coarser FBC ash. Grinding increases reactivity of ash by means of increasing surface area and the amount of reactive phase of the ash. In addition, the packing effect due to fine particles also contributed to increase in strength of geopolymers. PMID:19854038

  17. Sorption and chemical transformation of PAH`s on coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Mamantov, G.; Wehry, E.L.

    1995-05-09

    The major objective of this work was to characterize the interactions of coal fly ash with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) and their derivatives, and to attempt to understand the influence of the surface properties of coal ash (and other atmospheric particles) on the chemical transformations of polycyclic aromatic compounds. Our studies have concentrated on the photochemical behavior of PAHs sorbed form the vapor phase on coal fly ashes, and compositional subfractions obtained therefrom. The PAHs are deposited onto the fly ash substrates from the vapor phase, using apparatus and techniques developed in this laboratory in order to simulate, as closely as possible under laboratory conditions, the processes by which PAHs deposit onto fly ash particles in the atmosphere. In this report phototransformation of pyrene sorbed on fly ash fractions, and phototransformations of 1-nitropyrene sorbed on fly ash fractions are discussed.

  18. Soil stabilization and pavement recycling with self-cementing coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-15

    This manual provides design information for self-cementing coal fly ash as the sole stabilizing agent for a wide range of engineering applications. As in any process, the application of sound engineering practices, appropriate testing, and evaluation of fly ash quality and characteristics will lend themselves to successful projects using the guidelines in this manual. Topics discussed include: self-cementing coal fly ash characteristics; laboratory mix design; stabilization of clay soils; stabilisation of granular materials; construction considerations; high sulfate ash; environmental considerations for fly ash stabilization; design considerations; state specification/guidelines/standards; and a sample of a typical stabilization specification.

  19. Geotechnical properties of fly and bottom ash mixtures for use in highway embankments

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.; Prezzi, M.; Salgado, R.

    2005-07-01

    Class F fly ash and bottom ash are the solid residue byproducts produced by coal-burning electric utilities. They are usually disposed of together as a waste in utility disposal sites with a typical disposal rate of 80% fly ash and 20% bottom ash. Direct use of these materials in construction projects consuming large volumes of materials, such as highway embankment construction, not only provides a promising solution to the disposal problem, but also an economic alternative to the use of traditional materials. Representative samples of class F fly and bottom ash were collected from two utility power plants in Indiana and tested for their mechanical properties (compaction, permeability, strength, stiffness, and compressibility). Three mixtures of fly and bottom ash with different mixture ratios (i.e., 50, 75, and 100% fly ash content by weight) were prepared for testing. Test results indicated that ash mixtures compare favorably with conventional granular materials.

  20. Coal fly ash as a resource for rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Franus, Wojciech; Wiatros-Motyka, Małgorzata M; Wdowin, Magdalena

    2015-06-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) have been recognised as critical raw materials, crucial for many clean technologies. As the gap between their global demand and supply increases, the search for their alternative resources becomes more and more important, especially for the countries which depend highly on their import. Coal fly ash (CFA), which when not utilised is considered waste, has been regarded as the possible source of many elements, including REE. Due to the increase in the energy demand, CFA production is expected to grow, making research into the use of this material a necessity. As Poland is the second biggest coal consumer in the European Union, the authors have studied different coal fly ashes from ten Polish power plants for their rare earth element content. All the fly ashes have a broadly similar distribution of rear earth elements, with light REE being dominant. Most of the samples have REE content relatively high and according to Seredin and Dai (Int J Coal Geol 94: 67-93, 2012) classification can be considered promising REE raw materials. PMID:25613802

  1. Effects of pulverized coal fly-ash addition as a wet-end filler in papermaking

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, A.S.K.

    2008-09-15

    This experimental study is based on the innovative idea of using pulverized coal fly ash as a wet-end filler in papermaking. This is the first evaluation of the possible use of fly ash in the paper industry. Coal-based thermal power plants throughout the world are generating fly ash as a solid waste product. The constituents of fly ash can be used effectively in papermaking. Fly ash has a wide variation in particle size, which ranges from a few micrometers to one hundred micrometers. Fly ash acts as an inert material in acidic, neutral, and alkaline papermaking processes. Its physical properties such as bulk density (800-980 kg/m{sup 3}), porosity (45%-57%), and surface area (0.138-2.3076 m{sup 2}/g) make it suitable for use as a paper filler. Fly ash obtained from thermal power plants using pulverized coal was fractionated by a vibratory-sieve stack. The fine fraction with a particle size below 38 micrometers was used to study its effect on the important mechanical-strength and optical properties of paper. The effects of fly-ash addition on these properties were compared with those of kaolin clay. Paper opacity was found to be much higher with fly ash as a filler, whereas brightness decreased as the filler percentage increased Mechanical strength properties of the paper samples with fly ash as filler were superior to those with kaolin clay.

  2. A study on high strength concrete prepared with large volumes of low calcium fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Poon, C.S.; Lam, L.; Wong, Y.L.

    2000-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a laboratory study on high strength concrete prepared with large volumes of low calcium fly ash. The parameters studied included compressive strength, heat of hydration, chloride diffusivity, degree of hydration, and pore structures of fly ash/cement concrete and corresponding pastes. The experimental results showed that concrete with a 28-day compressive strength of 80 MPA could be obtained with a water-to-binder (w/b) ratio of 0.24, with a fly ash content of 45%. Such concrete has lower heat of hydration and chloride diffusivity than the equivalent plain cement concrete or concrete prepared with lower fly ash contents. The test results showed that at lower w/b ratios, the contribution to strength by the fly ash was higher than in the mixes prepared with higher w/b ratios. The study also quantified the reaction rates of cement and fly ash in the cementitious materials. The results demonstrated the dual effects of fly ash in concrete: (1) act as a micro-aggregate and (2) being a pozzolana. It was also noted that the strength contribution of fly ash in concrete was better than in the equivalent cement/fly ash pastes suggesting the fly ash had improved the interfacial bond between the past and the aggregates in the concrete. Such an improvement was also reflected in the results of the mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) test.

  3. Utilization of coal fly ash in solidification of liquid radioactive waste from research reactor.

    PubMed

    Osmanlioglu, Ahmet Erdal

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the potential utilization of fly ash was investigated as an additive in solidification process of radioactive waste sludge from research reactor. Coal formations include various percentages of natural radioactive elements; therefore, coal fly ash includes various levels of radioactivity. For this reason, fly ashes have to be evaluated for potential environmental implications in case of further usage in any construction material. But for use in solidification of radioactive sludge, the radiological effects of fly ash are in the range of radioactive waste management limits. The results show that fly ash has a strong fixing capacity for radioactive isotopes. Specimens with addition of 5-15% fly ash to concrete was observed to be sufficient to achieve the target compressive strength of 20 MPa required for near-surface disposal. An optimum mixture comprising 15% fly ash, 35% cement, and 50% radioactive waste sludge could provide the solidification required for long-term storage and disposal. The codisposal of radioactive fly ash with radioactive sludge by solidification decreases the usage of cement in solidification process. By this method, radioactive fly ash can become a valuable additive instead of industrial waste. This study supports the utilization of fly ash in industry and the solidification of radioactive waste in the nuclear industry. PMID:24638274

  4. Bioavailability of 1-nitropyrene from model coal fly ash and its uptake by alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Mumford, J.L.; Tedjad, S.B.; Jackson, M.; Lewtas, J.

    1986-08-01

    Alveolar macrophage cultures exposed to coal fly ash vapor-coated with 1-nitropyrene were used as a model system to study the bioavailability and the uptake of a nitroaromatic hydrocarbon from coal combustion emissions. Initially, 1-nitropyrene-coated fly ash and uncoated fly ash were examined for cytotoxicity using rabbit alveolar macrophages and for mutagenicity in the Salmonella typhimurium plate incorporation assay. The distribution and recovery of 1-nitropyrene from macrophage cultures treated with coated fly ash were determined by using a reverse-hase high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence method. 1-Nitropyrene alone was not very toxic, nor did vapor deposition of 1-nitropyrene onto coal fly ash significantly affect the toxicity of the fly ash. Most toxicity resulted from the original, uncoated fly ash particles. 1-Nitropyren after being coated onto the particles was bioavailable in agar and aqueous culture medium. The coated fly ash showed mutagenic activity when the particles were tested directly; the uncoated fly ash did not show mutagenic activity. 1-Nitropyrene recovery from alveolar macrophage cultures exposed to the coated fly ash diminished as cell number increased. The rate of 1-nitropyrene loss was 2.7 ng/10/sup 6/ macrophages for medium and 4.1 ng/10/sup 6/ macrophages for the whole culture. The mutagenic activity recovered from these macrophage cultures also decreased with increasing cell number.

  5. Bioavailability of 1-nitropyrene from model coal fly ash and its uptake by alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Mumford, J.L.; Tejada, S.B.; Jackson, M.; Lewtas, J.

    1986-01-01

    Alveolar macrophage cultures exposed to coal fly ash vapor-coated with 1-nitropyrene were used as a model system to study the bioavailability and the uptake of a nitroaromatic hydrocarbon from coal-combustion emissions. Initially, 1-nitropyrene-coated fly ash and uncoated fly ash were examined for cytotoxicity using rabbit alveolar macrophages and for mutagenicity in the Salmonella typhimurium plate incorporation assay. The results were compared to determine the effects of vapor deposition. The distribution and recovery of 1-nitropyrene from macrophage cultures treated with coated fly ash were determined by using a reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence method. 1-Nitropyrene alone was not very toxic, nor did vapor deposition of 1-nitropyrene onto coal fly ash significantly affect the toxicity of the fly ash. Most toxicity resulted from the original, uncoated, fly ash particles, 1-Nitropyrene after being coated onto the particles was bioavailable in agar and aqueous culture medium. The coated fly ash showed mutagenic activity when the particles were tested directly; the uncoated fly ash did not show mutagenic activity. 1-Nitropyrene recovery from alveolar macrophage cultures exposed to the coated fly ash diminished as cell number increased. The rate of 1-nitropyrene loss was 2.7 ng/.000001 macrophages for medium and 4.1 ng/.000001 macrophages for the whole culture. The mutagenic activity recovered from these macrophage cultures also decreased with increasing cell number.

  6. Comparison of leaching characteristics of heavy metals from bottom and fly ashes in Korea and Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Young-Sook; Rhee, Seung-Whee; Lee, Woo-Keun . E-mail: woklee@kangwon.ac.kr

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this research was to compare the leaching characteristics of heavy metals such as cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, lead, etc., in Korean and Japanese municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) ash. The rate of leaching of heavy metal was measured by KSLT and JTL-13, and the amount of heavy metals leached was compared with the metal content in each waste component. Finally, bio-availability testing was performed to assess the risks associated with heavy metals leached from bottom ash and fly ash. From the results, the value of neutralization ability in Japanese fly ash was four times higher than that in Korean fly ash. The reason was the difference in the content of Ca(OH){sub 2} in fly ash. The amount of lead leached exceeded the regulatory level in both Japanese and Korean fly ash. The rate of leaching was relatively low in ash with a pH in the range of 6-10. The bio-availability test in fly ash demonstrated that the amount of heavy metals leached was Pb > Cd > Cr, but the order was changed to Pb > Cr > Cd in the bottom ash. The leaching concentration of lead exceeded the Japanese risk level in all fly ashes from the two countries, but the leaching concentration of cadmium exceeded the regulatory level in Korean fly ash only.

  7. Brick manufacture with fly ash from Illinois coals. Technical report, March 1, 1995--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.E.; Dreher, G.; Moore, D.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Fiocchi, T.; Swartz, D.

    1995-12-31

    This investigation seeks to utilize fly ash in fired-clay products such as building and patio bricks, ceramic blocks, field and sewer tile, and flower pots. This goal is accomplished by 1) one or more plant-scale, 5000-brick tests of fly ash mixed with brick clays at the 20% or higher level; 2) a laboratory-scale study to measure the firing reactions of a range of compositions of clay and fly ash mixtures; 3) a preliminary study to evaluate the potential environmental and economic benefits of brick manufacture with fly ash. Bricks and feed materials will be tested for compliance with market specifications and for leachability of pollutants derived from fly ash. The laboratory study will combine ISGS databases, ICCI-supported characterization methods, and published information to improve predictions of the firing characteristics of Illinois fly ash and brick clay mixtures. Because identical methods are used to test clay firing and coal ash fusion, and because melting mechanisms are the same, improved coal ash fusion predictions are and additional expected result of this research. During this quarter we completed a manufacturing run at Colonial Brick Co. and began laboratory testing of samples from that run: clays, fly ash (from Illinois Power Company`s Wood River plant), and green and fired bricks, with and without fly ash. Bricks with 20% fly ash ``scummed`` during firing, and the fly ash failed to increase oxidation rate or water absorption, which were both expected. We obtained chemical and mineralogical analyses of the fireclays and shales at Colonial and Marseilles Brick Companies and began a series of selective dissolution analyses to more accurately determine the composition of the principal clay minerals in brick clays and the components in fly ash. We began related work of calculating normative mineralogical analyses for all clays and fly ashes that we sample.

  8. Magnetic separation of coal fly ash from Bulgarian power plants.

    PubMed

    Shoumkova, Annie S

    2011-10-01

    Fly ash from three coal-burning power plants in Bulgaria: 'Maritza 3', 'Republika' and 'Rousse East' were subjected to wet low-intensity magnetic separation. The tests were performed at different combinations of magnetic field intensity, flow velocity and diameter of matrix elements. It was found that all parameters investigated affected the separation efficiency, but their influence was interlinked and was determined by the properties of the material and the combination of other conditions. Among the fly ash characteristics, the most important parameters, determining the magnetic separation applicability, were mineralogical composition and distribution of minerals in particles. The main factors limiting the process were the presence of paramagnetic Fe-containing mineral and amorphous matter, and the existence of poly-mineral particles and aggregates of magnetic and non-magnetic particles. It was demonstrated that the negative effect of both factors could be considerably limited by the selection of a proper set of separation conditions. The dependences between concentration of ferromagnetic iron in the ash, their magnetic properties and magnetic fraction yields were studied. It was experimentally proved that, for a certain set of separation conditions, the yields of magnetic fractions were directly proportional to the saturation magnetization of the ferromagnetic components of the ash. The main properties of typical magnetic and non-magnetic fractions were studied. PMID:20699291

  9. Direct utilization - recovery of minerals from coal fly ash. Technical progress report, October 1, 1982-December 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Burnet, G.; Murtha, M.J.; Seaverson, L.M.

    1983-02-01

    Research included an examination of the adsorbed water on coal fly ash, the utilization of phosgene as a chlorination agent, the physical adsorption and chemisorption of phosgene on fly ash particles, and the aqueous separation of chlorination products. Results of an investigation of coal fly ash powder samples using photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy showed almost complete removal of adsorbed water after drying for 30 hours at 700/sup 0/C. A thermodynamic computer simulation of the chlorination of an SiO/sub 2/ and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ mixture of 2:1 molar ratio with a stoichiometric amount of carbon present revealed that silica is the preferred reactant at lower temperature, but that alumina chlorination is preferred at 800/sup 0/C. Experiments using phosgene to chlorinate acid-leached Texas lignite fly ash gave information about the kinetic rate dependence of the reaction involved. Work to determine the amount of chemisorption and physical adsorption of phosgene on pellets of the leached Texas lignite ash was initiated to permit the calculation of surface reaction rates. Separation of FeCl/sub 3/ by solvent extraction improved as the chloride ion concentration of the aqueous phase increased, regardless of whether the associated cation was hydrogen or aluminum. A static equilibrium cell/furnace arrangement with ultraviolet spectroscopy capability has been confirmed to be suitable for measurement of the absorbance of vapor species. A Harper 6 in. dia rotary kiln was used to continuously sinter a limestone-soda ash-fly ash mixture in the form of 1/8 in. dia pellets. Extraction of sintered material with dilute aqueous soda ash solution gave aluminate recoveries comparable to those obtained when small samples were sintered in a benchscale tube furnace. Results are presented which show that x-ray diffraction data can be used to calculate the amounts of individual compounds in sintered samples.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of zeolites prepared from industrial fly ash.

    PubMed

    Franus, Wojciech; Wdowin, Magdalena; Franus, Małgorzata

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present the possibility of using fly ash to produce synthetic zeolites. The synthesis class F fly ash from the Stalowa Wola SA heat and power plant was subjected to 24 h hydrothermal reaction with sodium hydroxide. Depending on the reaction conditions, three types of synthetic zeolites were formed: Na-X (20 g fly ash, 0.5 dm(3) of 3 mol · dm(-3) NaOH, 75 °C), Na-P1 (20 g fly ash, 0.5 dm(3) of 3 mol · dm(-3) NaOH, 95 °C), and sodalite (20 g fly ash, 0.8 dm(3) of 5 mol · dm(-3) NaOH + 0.4 dm(3) of 3 mol · dm(-3) NaCl, 95 °C). As synthesized materials were characterized to obtain mineral composition (X-ray diffractometry, Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectrometry), adsorption properties (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area, N2 isotherm adsorption/desorption), and ion exchange capacity. The most effective reaction for zeolite preparation was when sodalite was formed and the quantitative content of zeolite from X-ray diffractometry was 90 wt%, compared with 70 wt% for the Na-X and 75 wt% for the Na-P1. Residues from each synthesis reaction were the following: mullite, quartz, and the remains of amorphous aluminosilicate glass. The best zeolitic material as characterized by highest specific surface area was Na-X at almost 166 m(2) · g(-1), while for the Na-P1 and sodalite it was 71 and 33 m(2) · g(-1), respectively. The ion exchange capacity decreased in the following order: Na-X at 1.8 meq · g(-1), Na-P1 at 0.72 meq · g(-1), and sodalite at 0.56 meq · g(-1). The resulting zeolites are competitive for commercially available materials and are used as ion exchangers in industrial wastewater and soil decontamination. PMID:24838802

  11. A review of physical, chemical, and biological properties of fly ash and effects on agricultural ecosystems.

    PubMed

    el-Mogazi, D; Lisk, D J; Weinstein, L H

    1988-08-01

    Fly ash is the solid material which is carried away from the power plant boiler in the flue gas during coal combustion. The properties of fly ash may vary considerably according to several factors such as the geographical origin of the source coal, conditions during combustion, and sampling position within the power plant. A typical aggregate of fly ash from the combustion of eastern U.S. coals consists of spherical particles embedded in an amorphous matrix. Most fly ash particles are in the silt-sized range of 2-50 microns. The three major mineralogical matrices identified in fly ash are glass, mullite-quartz, and magnetic spinel. The major elemental constituents of fly ash are Si, Al, Fe, Ca, C, Mg, K, Na, S, Ti, P, and Mn. Nearly all naturally occurring elements can be found in fly ash in trace quantities. Certain trace elements, including As, Mo, Se, Cd, and Zn, are primarily associated with particle surfaces. The solubility of fly ash has been extensively investigated. Results of these investigations are largely dependent on factors specific to the extraction procedure. The most abundant species in fly ash extracts are inorganic ions derived from Ca, Na, Mg, K, Fe, S, and C. Boron is much more soluble than other trace elements in fly ash. The forms of some elements in fly ash extracts have been determined, but the species of most trace elements remain unidentified. Long-term leaching studies predict that fly ash will lose substantial amounts of soluble salts over time, but simulation models predict that the loss of trace elements from fly ash deposits through leaching will be very slow. The constituents of coal fly ash include small amounts of radioisotopes which do not appear to be hazardous. A complex mixture of organic compounds is also associated with fly ash particles. The organic compounds identified in fly ash extracts include known mutagens and carcinogens. Better methods for the extraction of organic compounds from fly ash particles must be developed

  12. Illinois basin coal fly ashes. 2. Equilibria relationships and qualitative modeling of ash-water reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roy, W.R.; Griffin, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Alkaline and acidic Illinois Basin coal fly ash samples were each mixed with deionized water and equilibrated for about 140 days to simulate ash ponding environments. Common to both equilibrated solutions, anhydrite solubility dominated Ca2+ activities, and Al3+ activities were in equilibrium with both matrix mullite and insoluble aluminum hydroxide phases. Aqueous silica activities were controlled by both mullite and matrix silicates. The pH of the extract of the acidic fly ash was 4.1 after 24 h but increased to a pH value of 6.4 as the H2SO4, assumed to be adsorbed to the particle surfaces, was exhausted by the dissolution of matrix iron oxides and aluminosilicates. The activities of aqueous Al3+ and iron, initially at high levels during the early stages of equilibration, decreased to below analytical detection limits as the result of the formation of insoluble Fe and Al hydroxide phases. The pH of the extract of the alkaline fly ash remained above a pH value of 10 during the entire equilibration interval as a result of the hydrolysis of matrix oxides. As with the acidic system, Al3+ activities were controlled by amorphous aluminum hydroxide phases that began to form after about 7 days of equilibration. The proposed mechanisms and their interrelations are discussed in addition to the solubility diagrams used to deduce these relationships. ?? 1984 American Chemical Society.

  13. Differences in gasification behaviors and related properties between entrained gasifier fly ash and coal char

    SciTech Connect

    Jing Gu; Shiyong Wu; Youqing Wu; Ye Li; Jinsheng Gao

    2008-11-15

    In the study, two fly ash samples from Texaco gasifiers were compared to coal char and the physical and chemical properties and reactivity of samples were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SEM-energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption method, and isothermal thermogravimetric analysis. The main results were obtained. The carbon content of gasified fly ashes exhibited 31-37%, which was less than the carbon content of 58-59% in the feed coal. The fly ashes exhibited higher Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, richer meso- and micropores, more disordered carbon crystalline structure, and better CO{sub 2} gasification reactivity than coal char. Ashes in fly ashes occurred to agglomerate into larger spherical grains, while those in coal char do not agglomerate. The minerals in fly ashes, especial alkali and alkaline-earth metals, had a catalytic effect on gasification reactivity of fly ash carbon. In the low-temperature range, the gasification process of fly ashes is mainly in chemical control, while in the high-temperature range, it is mainly in gas diffusion control, which was similar to coal char. In addition, the carbon in fly ashes was partially gasified and activated by water vapor and exhibited higher BET surface area and better gasification activity. Consequently, the fact that these carbons in fly ashes from entrained flow gasifiers are reclaimed and reused will be considered to be feasible. 15 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Biological responses of agricultural soils to fly-ash amendment.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajeev Pratap; Sharma, Bhavisha; Sarkar, Abhijit; Sengupta, Chandan; Singh, Pooja; Ibrahim, Mahamad Hakimi

    2014-01-01

    The volume of solid waste produced in the world is increasing annually, and disposing of such wastes is a growing problem. Fly ash (FA) is a form of solid waste that is derived from the combustion of coal. Research has shown that fly ash may be disposed of by using it to amend agricultural soils. This review addresses the feasibility of amending agricultural field soils with fly ash for the purpose of improvings oil health and enhancing the production of agricultural crops. The current annual production of major coal combustion residues (CCRs) is estimated to be -600 million worldwide, of which about 500 million t (70-80%) is FA (Ahmaruzzaman 2010). More than 112 million t of FA is generated annually in India alone, and projections show that the production (including both FA and bottom ash) may exceed 170 million t per annum by 2015 (Pandey et al. 2009; Pandey and Singh 20 I 0). Managing this industrial by-product is a big challenge, because more is produced each year, and disposal poses a growing environmental problem.Studies on FA clearly shows that its application as an amendment to agricultural soils can significantly improve soil quality, and produce higher soil fertility. What FA application method is best and what level of application is appropriate for any one soil depends on the following factors: type of soil treated, crop grown, the prevailing agro climatic condition and the character of the FA used. Although utilizing FA in agricultural soils may help address solid waste disposal problems and may enhance agricultural production, its use has potential adverse effects also. In particular, using it in agriculture may enhance amounts of radionuclides and heavy metals that reach soils, and may therefore increase organism exposures in some instances. PMID:24984834

  15. Comparative performance of geopolymers made with metakaolin and fly ash after exposure to elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Daniel L.Y.; Sanjayan, Jay G. Sagoe-Crentsil, Kwesi

    2007-12-15

    This paper presents the results of a study on the effect of elevated temperatures on geopolymers manufactured using metakaolin and fly ash of various mixture proportions. Both types of geopolymers (metakaolin and fly ash) were synthesized with sodium silicate and potassium hydroxide solutions. The strength of the fly ash-based geopolymer increased after exposure to elevated temperatures (800 deg. C). However, the strength of the corresponding metakaolin-based geopolymer decreased after similar exposure. Both types of geopolymers were subjected to thermogravimetric, scanning electron microscopy and mercury intrusion porosimetry tests. The paper concludes that the fly ash-based geopolymers have large numbers of small pores which facilitate the escape of moisture when heated, thus causing minimal damage to the geopolymer matrix. On the other hand, metakaolin geopolymers do not possess such pore distribution structures. The strength increase in fly ash geopolymers is also partly attributed to the sintering reactions of un-reacted fly ash particles.

  16. The use of fly ash-stabilized sand mixtures as capping materials for landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Taha, R.A.; Pradeep, M.R.

    1997-12-31

    An investigation was made to study the suitability of using coal fly ash-stabilized sand mixtures as capping materials for sanitary landfills. Sand mixtures stabilized with 15 and 20% Class C fly ash were investigated. Compaction, permeability, unconfined compressive strength, freeze-thaw, and wet-dry tests were conducted on both mixtures. Results indicate that fly ash-stabilized sand blends can be used as capping materials in areas where fine-grained soils are not available. Data indicate that the 20% fly ash-stabilized sand mixture will yield a better performance than sand mixtures stabilized with 15% fly ash. Increased strength, reduced permeability, and increased resistance to freeze-thaw and wet-dry cycles are some of the benefits obtained by using the high fly ash content.

  17. Study on Type C Coal Fly ash as an Additive to Molding Sand for Steel Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniappan, Jayanthi

    2016-05-01

    Study of physio-chemical properties studies such as granulometric analysis, moisture, X ray fluorescence etc. were performed with Type C coal—combustion fly ash to investigate their potential as a distinct option for molding sand in foundry, thereby reducing the dependency on latter. Technological properties study such as compressive strength, tensile strength, permeability and compaction of various compositions of fly ash molding sand (10, 20 and 30 % fly ash substitute to chemically bonded sand) were performed and compared with silica molding sand. Steel casting production using this fly ash molding sand was done and the casting surface finish and typical casting parameters were assessed. It was noted that a good quality steel casting could be produced using type C fly ash molding sand, which effectively replaced 20 % of traditional molding sand and binders thereby providing greater financial profits to the foundry and an effective way of fly ash utilization (waste management).

  18. Effect of fly ash preliminary calcination on the properties of geopolymer.

    PubMed

    Temuujin, J; van Riessen, A

    2009-05-30

    The influence of preliminary calcination of fly ashes on the geopolymerisation process has been studied. Preliminary calcination at 500 and 800 degrees C causes decarbonation of the fly ash while it also leads to a decrease of the amorphous content of the fly ashes from 60 to 57%. Geopolymer prepared using raw fly ash exhibited a compressive strength 55.7(9.2)MPa, while for 500 and 800 degrees C calcined samples it reduced to 54(5.8) and 44.4(5.4)MPa, respectively. The decrease in compressive strength of the geopolymers is discussed in terms of partial surface crystallisation of the fly ash particles. Reactivity of the fly ash also has been correlated with the shrinkage rate and presence of efflorescence on the surface of geopolymers. PMID:18824295

  19. Characterisation and use of biomass fly ash in cement-based materials.

    PubMed

    Rajamma, Rejini; Ball, Richard J; Tarelho, Luís A C; Allen, Geoff C; Labrincha, João A; Ferreira, Victor M

    2009-12-30

    This paper presents results about the characterisation of the biomass fly ashes sourced from a thermal power plant and from a co-generation power plant located in Portugal, and the study of new cement formulations incorporated with the biomass fly ashes. The study includes a comparative analysis of the phase formation, setting and mechanical behaviour of the new cement-fly ash formulations based on these biomass fly ashes. Techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF), thermal gravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and environmental scanning electron spectroscopy (ESEM) were used to determine the structure and composition of the formulations. Fly ash F1 from the thermal power plant contained levels of SiO(2), Al(2)O(3) and Fe(2)O(3) indicating the possibility of exhibiting pozzolanic properties. Fly ash F2 from the co-generation plant contained a higher quantity of CaO ( approximately 25%). The fly ashes are similar to class C fly ashes according to EN 450 on the basis of chemical composition. The hydration rate and phase formation are greatly dependant on the samples' alkali content and water to binder (w/b) ratio. In cement based mortar with 10% fly ash the basic strength was maintained, however, when 20% fly ash was added the mechanical strength was around 75% of the reference cement mortar. The fly ashes contained significant levels of chloride and sulphate and it is suggested that the performance of fly ash-cement binders could be improved by the removal or control of these chemical species. PMID:19699034

  20. Direct Quantitative Analysis of Arsenic in Coal Fly Ash

    PubMed Central

    Hartuti, Sri; Kambara, Shinji; Takeyama, Akihiro; Kumabe, Kazuhiro; Moritomi, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    A rapid, simple method based on graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry is described for the direct determination of arsenic in coal fly ash. Solid samples were directly introduced into the atomizer without preliminary treatment. The direct analysis method was not always free of spectral matrix interference, but the stabilization of arsenic by adding palladium nitrate (chemical modifier) and the optimization of the parameters in the furnace program (temperature, rate of temperature increase, hold time, and argon gas flow) gave good results for the total arsenic determination. The optimal furnace program was determined by analyzing different concentrations of a reference material (NIST1633b), which showed the best linearity for calibration. The optimized parameters for the furnace programs for the ashing and atomization steps were as follows: temperatures of 500–1200 and 2150°C, heating rates of 100 and 500°C s−1, hold times of 90 and 7 s, and medium then maximum and medium argon gas flows, respectively. The calibration plots were linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9699. This method was validated using arsenic-containing raw coal samples in accordance with the requirements of the mass balance calculation; the distribution rate of As in the fly ashes ranged from 101 to 119%. PMID:23251836

  1. Effect of fly ash calcination in geopolymer synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samadhi, Tjokorde Walmiki; Jatiningrum, Mirna; Arisiani, Gresia

    2015-12-01

    Geopolymer, a largely amorphous class of inorganic polymer consisting of aluminosilicate repeat units, is an environmentally attractive engineering material due to its ability to consume aluminosilicate waste as raw materials. This work studies the effect of the calcination temperature of a coal fly ash generated by a low-efficiency boiler on the mechanical strength of geopolymer mortar synthesized using a mixture of the fly ash, potassium hydroxide as the alkali activator, and locally available sand as the filler aggregate. The calcination temperature is varied between 500-700 °C, with a calcination period of 2 hours in an electric furnace. Two sand samples with different particle size distributions are used. The key response variable is the compressive strength at room temperature, measured after curing at 80 °C for 7 and 14 days. Uncalcined ash, with a carbon content of approximately 31.0%, is not amenable for geopolymer synthesis. Analysis of experimental data using the ANOVA method for general factorial design identifies significant main effects for all three experimental variables. Two-way interactions are significant, except that between sand type and curing period. Higher calcination temperature significantly improves the strength of the mortar. However, the strength of the obtained geopolymer mortars are still significantly lower than that of ordinary Portland cement mortar.

  2. Investigation of the coal fly ashes using IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mozgawa, W; Król, M; Dyczek, J; Deja, J

    2014-11-11

    The results of FT-IR spectroscopic studies of coal fly ashes, originated from various polish power plants are reported. The results of MIR investigations were compared to the X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements and chemical analyses. They are mainly composed of silica, alumina and lime. The infrared spectrum in the middle range can be used to describe both the structure of phases present in the fly ash and to identify the characteristic elements of the individual components of ash. The results indicate that the amount of aluminosilicate and its Si/Al ratio induce a shift in the T-O stretching band appearing at 950-1100 cm(-1). Moreover, FWHM of these bands indicates the participation of the crystalline phase relative to amorphous. The presence of carbonate phases generates substantial changes in the 1450-1400 cm(-1) area of the spectra. The presence of such phases as anhydrite, mullite or illite has also been established on the basis of IR spectra. PMID:24935825

  3. Micromorphology use for visualization of fly-ash distribution in sandy material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodesova, R.; Kapicka, A.

    2009-04-01

    Fly-ash migration in three sands of various particle size distributions and consequently various porosities, was studied in the laboratory. The fly-ash was applied on the top of all sands packed in plastic cylinders followed by pulse infiltrations. Water regime was monitored using the soil water content sensors and tensiometers. Kappameter SM400 (Petrovský at al., 2004) was used to monitor migration of ferrimagnetic particles-tracers presented in the fly-ash. Undisturbed samples of sands polluted by fly-ash were taken at the end of the experiments to study final fly-ash distribution in thin sections. Images showed that while fly-ash migrates freely thought the course sandy material, in the other two sands fly-ash is accumulated in few bottle neck pores. However, fly-ash mobility was documented in both cases. Information about image porosities and pore blocking will be used as input data for numerical simulation of observed fly-ash transport. Acknowledgement: Authors acknowledge the financial support of the Grant Agency of Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic grant No. A300120701, and the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports grant No. MSM 6046070901.

  4. Chemical and engineering properties of fired bricks containing 50 weight percent of class F fly ash

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Patel, V.; Laird, C.J.; Ho, K.K.

    2001-01-01

    The generation of fly ash during coal combustion represents a considerable solid waste disposal problem in the state of Illinois and nationwide. In fact, the majority of the three million tons of fly ash produced from burning Illinois bituminous coals is disposed of in landfills. The purpose of this study was to obtain a preliminary assessment of the technical feasibility of mitigating this solid waste problem by making fired bricks with the large volume of fly ash generated from burning Illinois coals. Test bricks were produced by the extrusion method with increasing amounts (20-50% by weight) of fly ash as a replacement for conventional raw materials. The chemical characteristics and engineering properties of the test bricks produced with and without 50 wt% of fly ash substitutions were analyzed and compared. The properties of the test bricks containing fly ash were at least comparable to, if not better than, those of standard test bricks made without fly ash and met the commercial specifications for fired bricks. The positive results of this study suggest that further study on test bricks with fly ash substitutions of greater than 50wt% is warranted. Successful results could have an important impact in reducing the waste disposal problem related to class F fly ash while providing the brick industry with a new low cost raw material. Copyright ?? 2001 Taylor & Francis.

  5. Production of fired construction brick from high sulfate-containing fly ash with boric acid addition.

    PubMed

    Başpinar, M Serhat; Kahraman, Erhan; Görhan, Gökhan; Demir, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    The increase of power plant capacity has led to the production of an increasing amount of fly ash that causes high environmental impact in Turkey. Some of the fly ash is utilized within the fired brick industry but high sulfate-containing fly ash creates severe problems during sintering of the fired brick. This study attempted to investigate the potential for converting high sulfate-containing fly ash into useful material for the construction industry by the addition of boric acid. The chemical and mineralogical composition of fly ash and clay were investigated. Boric acid (H(3)BO(3)) was added to fly ash-clay mixtures with up to 5 wt.%. Six different series of test samples were produced by uniaxial pressing. The samples were fired at the industrial clay-brick firing temperatures of 800, 900 and 1000 degrees C. The microstructures of the fired samples were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and some physical and mechanical properties were measured. It was concluded that the firing at conventional brick firing temperature of high sulfate fly ash without any addition of boric acid resulted in very weak strength bricks. The addition of boric acid and clay simultaneously to the high sulfate- containing fly ash brick dramatically increased the compressive strength of the samples at a firing temperature of 1000 degrees C by modifying the sintering behaviour of high sulfate fly ash. PMID:19423597

  6. Characteristics of boron accumulation by fly ash application in paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seul Bi; Lee, Yong Bok; Lee, Chang Hoon; Hong, Chang Oh; Kim, Pil Joo; Yu, Chan

    2008-09-01

    Fly ash has a high content of plant available silicate which is strongly needed for rice cultivation in Korea. One concern for plants grown on soils amended with fly ash is boron (B) toxicity because most of the fresh fly ash contains considerable B. This study was conducted in paddy soil to determine B uptake by rice and characteristics of B accumulation in soil after fly ash application (0, 40, 80, and 120 Mg fly ash ha(-1)). In all fly ash treatments, B content in rice leaves and available B in soil at all growing stage were higher than those of control, but were not exceeded a toxicity levels. Boron occluded in amorphous Fe and Al oxides comprised ca. 20-39% of total B and was not affected by fly ash application. Most of the B was accumulated by fly ash application as a residual B which is plant-unavailable form, comprised >60% of the total B in soil. Thus, fly ash can be a good soil amendment for rice production without B toxicity. PMID:18194862

  7. Experimental and numerical analysis of metal leaching from fly ash-amended highway bases

    SciTech Connect

    Cetin, Bora; Aydilek, Ahmet H.; Li, Lin

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study is the evaluation of leaching potential of fly ash-lime mixed soils. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This objective is met with experimental and numerical analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zn leaching decreases with increase in fly ash content while Ba, B, Cu increases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decrease in lime content promoted leaching of Ba, B and Cu while Zn increases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Numerical analysis predicted lower field metal concentrations. - Abstract: A study was conducted to evaluate the leaching potential of unpaved road materials (URM) mixed with lime activated high carbon fly ashes and to evaluate groundwater impacts of barium, boron, copper, and zinc leaching. This objective was met by a combination of batch water leach tests, column leach tests, and computer modeling. The laboratory tests were conducted on soil alone, fly ash alone, and URM-fly ash-lime kiln dust mixtures. The results indicated that an increase in fly ash and lime content has significant effects on leaching behavior of heavy metals from URM-fly ash mixture. An increase in fly ash content and a decrease in lime content promoted leaching of Ba, B and Cu whereas Zn leaching was primarily affected by the fly ash content. Numerically predicted field metal concentrations were significantly lower than the peak metal concentrations obtained in laboratory column leach tests, and field concentrations decreased with time and distance due to dispersion in soil vadose zone.

  8. CO₂ carbonation under aqueous conditions using petroleum coke combustion fly ash.

    PubMed

    González, A; Moreno, N; Navia, R

    2014-12-01

    Fly ash from petroleum coke combustion was evaluated for CO2 capture in aqueous medium. Moreover the carbonation efficiency based on different methodologies and the kinetic parameters of the process were determined. The results show that petroleum coke fly ash achieved a CO2 capture yield of 21% at the experimental conditions of 12 g L(-1), 363°K without stirring. The carbonation efficiency by petroleum coke fly ash based on reactive calcium species was within carbonation efficiencies reported by several authors. In addition, carbonation by petroleum coke fly ash follows a pseudo-second order kinetic model. PMID:25000300

  9. Immobilization of Harmful Elements in Fly Ash from Direct Combustion of Automobile Shredder Residue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Ryo; Ariyama, Tatsuro

    A direct combustion method of automobile shredder residue at high temperature is considered to be an effective process, because the volume of residue can be reduced and many valuable metals can be recovered. However, the fly ash containing large amounts of heavy metals and fluorine are generated inevitably by this process. Therefore, the treatment for detoxification of this fly ash is significantly important. It is found in the present research that cement is effective on the immobilization of harmful elements in the fly ash. The hydrothermal treatment of the solidified mixture of fly ash, cement and water is also superior in the immobilization effect.

  10. Removal of hazardous metals from MSW fly ash--an evaluation of ash leaching methods.

    PubMed

    Fedje, Karin Karlfeldt; Ekberg, Christian; Skarnemark, Gunnar; Steenari, Britt-Marie

    2010-01-15

    Incineration is a commonly applied management method for municipal solid waste (MSW). However, significant amounts of potentially hazardous metal species are present in the resulting ash, and these may be leached into the environment. A common idea for cleaning the ash is to use enhanced leaching with strong mineral acids. However, due to the alkalinity of the ash, large amounts of acid are needed and this is a drawback. Therefore, this work was undertaken in order to investigate some alternative leaching media (EDTA, ammonium nitrate, ammonium chloride and a number of organic acids) and to compare them with the usual mineral acids and water. All leaching methods gave a significant increase in ash specific surface area due to removal of soluble bulk (matrix) compounds, such as CaCO(3) and alkali metal chlorides. The use of mineral acids and EDTA mobilised many elements, especially Cu, Zn and Pb, whereas the organic acids generally were not very effective as leaching agents for metals. Leaching using NH(4)NO(3) was especially effective for the release of Cu. The results show that washing of MSW filter ash with alternative leaching agents is a possible way to remove hazardous metals from MSW fly ash. PMID:19744790

  11. Genotoxic effects of fly ash in bacteria, mammalian cells and animals

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, D.L.; Connor, T.H.; Harper, J.B.; Ward, J.B. Jr.; Legator, M.S. )

    1989-01-01

    The increasing use of fossil fuels has raised concerns about possible deleterious health effects of the final combustion product, fly ash. Seven ash samples from coal sources obtained from Battelle Columbus Laboratories were evaluated in the Salmonella/mammalian microsome mutagenicity assay to determine their mutagenic potential. While dimethyl sulfoxide extracts of five samples showed no mutagenicity, sample 102 caused an increase in the number of revertants per plate over controls in TA100 and TA98 with activation by liver homogenate (2-fold and 2.4-fold, respectively), and without (2-fold and 6-fold). This ash was thus evaluated in whole animal studies. Animals treated by inhalation or oral gavage were assayed for the presence of mutagens in the urine, micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes, and chromosomal aberrations in metaphase bone marrow cells. Those animals treated by inhalation were also examined for local damage in the lung. The assay for mutagens in the urine was negative as shown by the Ames assay with TA100 and TA98 and there was no increase in micronuclei or in metaphase aberrations. Histological sections from the animals treated by inhalation did not show the presence of particles, macrophage infiltrations and generalized lung damage. We tested the same fly ash with an in vitro cell transformation assay with the cell line Balb/c 3T3 subclone A31-1-13. Although there was not an increase in Type III foci, there was a dose-dependent increase of Type II foci in the treated cells over the controls. In one assay, there was approximately a 14-fold increase in Type II foci in the highest dose (2 mg/ml) compared to the solvent control. One other ash sample induced cell transformation without being markedly cytotoxic, while a third sample was highly toxic but did not induce transformation.

  12. Strength prediction of fly ash concretes by accelerated testing

    SciTech Connect

    Tokyay, M.

    1999-11-01

    Relationships between standard compressive strength at 7, 28, and 90 days and early strength attained by (1) autogeneous curing, (2) warm water curing, and (3) boiling water curing were obtained and a regression expression to predict the strength of concretes containing high-lime and low-lime fly ashes as partial cement replacement are proposed. The control concretes were designed for 28-day characteristic compressive strengths, f{sub ck28} = 40, 60, 65, and 70 MPa. All concretes were proportioned to keep the slump at 80--100 mm. The curing methods used were in accordance with the relevant ASTM and Turkish standards.

  13. Combined glassification of EAF dust and incinerator fly ash.

    PubMed

    Cheng, T W

    2003-01-01

    Stainless steelmaking dust contains large amount of heavy metals, such as Cr and Ni. If these hazardous materials are not treated properly, they will cause detrimental secondary contamination. Preliminary study on recycling stainless steelmaking dust employed the thermal molten technology. Glass-ceramics were formed by combination stainless steel dust and incinerator fly ash with the ratio of 1:9. The major phases were Augite, Akermanite, and Donathite. It was found that the glass-ceramics shows the best characteristic at 900 degrees C after 5 h of heat treatment. This product can be used as building materials or refractory materials. PMID:12656228

  14. Development and certification of a coal fly ash certified reference material for selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Cao, X; Xu, X; Cui, W; Xi, Z

    2001-08-01

    The development and certification of a coal fly ash certified reference material (CRM) for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) is described; this is the first natural matrix CRM for organic environmental analysis in China. The homogeneity and stability of this material have been tested by HPLC. The concentrations of several PAH were determined by use of two independent, different methods--solvent extraction-HPLC analysis with UV detection coupled with fluorescence detection (FLD) and solvent extraction, isolation with a silica column, and GC analysis with flame ionization detection (FID). Five certified values were determined: phenanthrene 7.1 +/- 2.6 microg g(-1), anthracene 2.0 +/- 0.8 microg g(-1), fluoranthene 7.4 +/- 1.9 microg g(-1), pyrene 7 +/- 2 microg g(-1), and benzo[a]pyrene 1.3 +/- 0.3 microg g(-1). Reference values for several other PAH are also suggested. PMID:11583083

  15. Toxicity mitigation and solidification of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash using alkaline activated coal ash

    SciTech Connect

    Ivan Diaz-Loya, E.; Allouche, Erez N.; Eklund, Sven; Joshi, Anupam R.; Kupwade-Patil, Kunal

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incinerator fly ash (IFA) is added to an alkali activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Means of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in construction applications. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was chemically characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmentally friendly solution to IFA disposal by reducing its toxicity levels. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration is a common and effective practice to reduce the volume of solid waste in urban areas. However, the byproduct of this process is a fly ash (IFA), which contains large quantities of toxic contaminants. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the chemical, physical and mechanical behaviors resulting from the gradual introduction of IFA to an alkaline activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix, as a mean of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in industrial construction applications, where human exposure potential is limited. IFA and CFA were analyzed via X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Inductive coupled plasma (ICP) to obtain a full chemical analysis of the samples, its crystallographic characteristics and a detailed count of the eight heavy metals contemplated in US Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR). The particle size distribution of IFA and CFA was also recorded. EPA's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was followed to monitor the leachability of the contaminants before and after the activation. Also images obtained via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), before and after the activation, are presented. Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was subjected to a full mechanical characterization; tests include compressive strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and setting time. The leachable heavy metal contents (except for Se) were below the maximum allowable limits and in many cases

  16. On the removal of hexavalent chromium from a Class F fly ash.

    PubMed

    Huggins, F E; Rezaee, M; Honaker, R Q; Hower, J C

    2016-05-01

    Coarse and fine samples of a Class F fly ash obtained from commercial combustion of Illinois bituminous coal have been exposed to two long-term leaching tests designed to simulate conditions in waste impoundments. ICP-AES analysis indicated that the coarse and fine fly ash samples contained 135 and 171mg/kg Cr, respectively. Measurements by XAFS spectroscopy showed that the ash samples originally contained 5 and 8% of the chromium, respectively, in the hexavalent oxidation state, Cr(VI). After exposure to water for more than four months, the percentage of chromium as Cr(VI) in the fly-ash decreased significantly for the coarse and fine fly-ash in both tests. Combining the XAFS data with ICP-AES data on the concentration of chromium in the leachates indicated that, after the nineteen-week-long, more aggressive, kinetic test on the coarse fly ash, approximately 60% of the Cr(VI) had been leached, 20% had been reduced to Cr(III) and retained in the ash, and 20% remained as Cr(VI) in the ash. In contrast, during the six-month-long baseline test, very little Cr was actually leached from either the coarse or the fine fly-ash (<0.1mg/kg); rather, about 66% and 20%, respectively, of the original Cr(VI) in the coarse and fine fly-ash was retained in the ash in that form, while the remainder, 34% and 80%, respectively, was reduced and retained in the ash as Cr(III). The results are interpreted as indicating that Cr(VI) present in Class F fly-ash can be reduced to Cr(III) when in contact with water and that such chemical reduction can compete with physical removal of Cr(VI) from the ash by aqueous leaching. PMID:26951722

  17. Effects of chemical composition of fly ash on efficiency of metal separation in ash-melting of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi; Tomikawa, Hiroki

    2013-03-01

    In the process of metal separation by ash-melting, Fe and Cu in the incineration residue remain in the melting furnace as molten metal, whereas Pb and Zn in the residue are volatilized. This study investigated the effects of the chemical composition of incineration fly ash on the metal-separation efficiency of the ash-melting process. Incineration fly ash with different chemical compositions was melted with bottom ash in a lab-scale reactor, and the efficiency with which Pb and Zn were volatilized preventing the volatilization of Fe and Cu was evaluated. In addition, the behavior of these metals was simulated by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. Depending on the exhaust gas treatment system used in the incinerator, the relationships among Na, K, and Cl concentrations in the incineration fly ash differed, which affected the efficiency of the metal separation. The amounts of Fe and Cu volatilized decreased by the decrease in the molar ratio of Cl to Na and K in the ash, promoting metal separation. The thermodynamic simulation predicted that the chlorination volatilization of Fe and Cu was prevented by the decrease in the molar ratio, as mentioned before. By melting incineration fly ash with the low molar ratio in a non-oxidative atmosphere, most of the Pb and Zn in the ash were volatilized leaving behind Fe and Cu. PMID:22981781

  18. EFFECTS OF FLY ASH ON MERCURY OXIDATION DURING POST COMBUSTION CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn A. Norton; Hongqun Yang; Robert C. Brown; Dennis L. Laudal; Grant E. Dunham; John Erjavec; Joseph M. Okoh

    2002-01-31

    Tests were performed in simulated flue gas streams using fly ash from the electrostatic precipitators of two full-scale utility boilers. One fly ash was from a Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, while the other was from Blacksville coal. Elemental Hg was injected upstream from samples of fly ash loaded onto filters housed in an oven at 120 or 180 C. Concentrations of oxidized and elemental Hg downstream from the filters were determined using the Ontario Hydro method. The gas stream composition and whether or not ash was present in the gas stream were the two most important variables affecting Hg oxidation. The presence of HCl, NO, NO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 2} were all important with respect to Hg oxidation, with NO{sub 2} and HCl being the most important. The presence of NO suppressed Hg oxidation in these tests. Although the two fly ashes were chemically and mineralogically diverse, there were generally no large differences in catalytic potential (for oxidizing Hg) between them. Similarly, no ash fraction appeared to be highly catalytic relative to other ash fractions. This includes fractions enriched in unburned carbon and fractions enriched in iron oxides. Although some differences of lesser magnitude were observed in the amount of oxidized Hg formed, levels of oxidized Hg generally tracked well with the surface areas of the different ashes and ash fractions. Therefore, although the Blacksville fly ash tended to show slightly more catalytic activity than the PRB fly ash, this could be due to the relatively high surface area of that ash. Similarly, for Blacksville fly ash, using nonmagnetic ash resulted in more Hg oxidation than using magnetic ash, but this again tracked well with the relative surface areas of the two ash fractions. Test results suggest that the gas matrix may be more important in Hg oxidation chemistry than the fly ash composition. Combustion tests were performed in which Blacksville and PRB fly ashes were injected into filtered (via a baghouse with

  19. Dioxin and fly ash free incineration by ash pelletization and reburning.

    PubMed

    Kobylecki, R P; Ohira, K; Ito, I; Fujiwara, N; Horio, M

    2001-11-01

    Dioxins (DXNs) in municipal waste incinerator fly ash were effectively reduced by pelletizing the mixture of ash, cement, and sodium phosphate and reburning the pellets in a laboratory scale bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) furnace. Three types of pellets--A, B and C, of various sizes and compositions were used in the experiments. The efficiency of DXN reduction in the pellet matrix was proportional to the incineration time, temperature, and degree of pellet incineration. At 700 degrees C and incineration time sufficient for a complete burnout, the efficiency of DXN reduction in the pellets of type A and C was found to be 99.9% and 99.7%, respectively. Correspondingly, the DXN concentration in the pellets decreased from 862 ng TEQ/kg to 0.9 ng TEQ/kg for pellets A and 2.2 ng TEQ/kg for pellets C. The residual concentration of coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (coplanar PCBs) was below 0.2 ng TEQ/kg and 0.4 ng TEQ/kg, respectively. Assuming a tortuosity factor of tau = 3 and the reaction rate constants of 0.013 m/s (at 700 degrees C) and 0.025 m/s (at 800 degrees C), the experimental pellet incineration times were reasonably predicted by using the shrinking core model. Possible DXN evaporation from the pellets was also studied. The amount of DXNs in the flue gas captured by an impinger trap was less than 3% when the reactor was operated at 700 and 800 degrees C. The described method of fly ash pelletization and reburning seems to be a relatively easy and inexpensive way to reduce both the emission of DXNs and the amount of fly ash. PMID:11718348

  20. Formation of dioxins from combustion micropollutants over MSWI fly ash.

    PubMed

    Cieplik, Mariusz K; De Jong, Vincent; Bozovic, Jelena; Liljelind, Per; Marklund, Stellan; Louw, Robert

    2006-02-15

    Formation of polychlorinated dibenzofurans and dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD/Fs) from a model mixture of products of incomplete combustion (PICs) representative of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) flue gases, over a fixed bed of MSWI fly ash has been investigated. For comparison, a single model compound (chlorobenzene) was also briefly studied. A newly developed lab-scale system enabled the application of (very) low and stable concentrations of organic substances--of 10(-6) M or less-to approach realistic conditions. Samples taken at several time intervals allowed the observation of changes in rates and patterns due to depletion of the carbon in fly ash. The model flue gas continuously produced PCDDs and PCDFs after the de novo reaction had ceased to occur. Dioxin output levels are comparable to those of "old" MSW incinerators. Replacing the PIC trace constituent phenol by its fully 13C-labeled analogue led to, e.g., PCDD with one labeled ring as prominent product, meaning that the formation is about first order in phenol, contrary to earlier assumptions. The meaning of the results for the formation of dioxins in the MSWI boiler is discussed. PMID:16572785

  1. Characterization of Slag, Fly Ash and Portland Cement for Saltstone

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J

    2006-02-01

    Batch-to-batch variability in the chemical and physical properties of the fly ash, slag and portland cement (binders) will be an ongoing concern over the many years that salt waste from Tank 50 will be processed into grout at the Saltstone Processing Facility. This batch-to-batch variability in the properties of the binder materials translates to variability in the fresh and cured properties of Saltstone. Therefore, it is important to quantify the batch-to-batch variability of the binder materials and the resultant variation in grout properties. This report is the starting point for that process by providing the baseline (reference point) binder properties to which future batches of binder materials can be compared. For this characterization effort, properties of fly ash, slag and portland cement were obtained and documented in this report. These properties included particle size distribution by laser light scattering and dry sieving, particle size and morphology by scanning electron microscopy, true, aerated and tapped densities, chemical composition, rheological properties of the water based slurries made from individual binder material, and volatility through thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis. The properties presented in this report also provide a baseline data set to assist in problem solving efforts when or if unanticipated and/or unwanted processing events occur at the Saltstone Processing Facility.

  2. Experimental Study of Functionally Graded Beam with Fly Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, K.; Shrivastava, Y.; Dhoke, P.

    2013-11-01

    Generally, concrete used in the field suffers from lack of durability and homogeneity. As cement is the only binding material in concrete and due to hike in its price, researchers have been looking for apt substitutes. For the sake of economy, strength and anti-corrosion functionally graded beam (FGB) has developed having one layer of normal concrete and another of high volume fly-ash concrete (HVFAC). The flexural behavior FGB has analyzed experimentally in this work with variation in interface as 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 from bottom. In this study, HVFAC has prepared with replacement of cement by 20, 35 and 55 % with fly ash for M20 and M30 grade of concrete. It has seemed that there is 12.86 and 3.56 % increase in compressive and flexural strength of FGB. The bond strength FGM cube is optimum at 50 mm depth. As FGM is economical, having more durability and strength, so its adoption enables more sustainability in concrete industry.

  3. Quantification of the degree of reaction of fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Haha, M.; De Weerdt, K.; Lothenbach, B.

    2010-11-15

    The quantification of the fly ash (FA) in FA blended cements is an important parameter to understand the effect of the fly ash on the hydration of OPC and on the microstructural development. The FA reaction in two different blended OPC-FA systems was studied using a selective dissolution technique based on EDTA/NaOH, diluted NaOH solution, the portlandite content and by backscattered electron image analysis. The amount of FA determined by selective dissolution using EDTA/NaOH is found to be associated with a significant possible error as different assumptions lead to large differences in the estimate of FA reacted. In addition, at longer hydration times, the reaction of the FA is underestimated by this method due to the presence of non-dissolved hydrates and MgO rich particles. The dissolution of FA in diluted NaOH solution agreed during the first days well with the dissolution as observed by image analysis. At 28 days and longer, the formation of hydrates in the diluted solutions leads to an underestimation. Image analysis appears to give consistent results and to be most reliable technique studied.

  4. Speciation of Selenium, Arsenic, and Zinc in Class C Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Yun; Giammar, Daniel E.; Huhmann, Brittany L.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2011-11-17

    A major environmental concern associated with coal fly ash is the mobilization of trace elements that may contaminate water. To better evaluate proper use of fly ash, determine appropriate disposal methods, and monitor postdisposal conditions, it is important to understand the speciation of trace elements in fly ash and their possible environmental impact. The speciation of selenium, arsenic, and zinc was determined in five representative Class C fly ash samples from combustion of sub-bituminous Powder River Basin coal using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy to provide an improved understanding of the mechanisms of trace element association with the fly ash. Selenium in all fly ash samples occurs predominantly as Se(IV), with the exception of one sample, in which there was a minor amount of Se(0). Se(0) is likely associated with the high content of unburned coal in the sample. Arsenic exists in the fly ash as a single phase most consistent with calcium pyroarsenate. In contrast, zinc occurs as two distinct species in the silicate glass matrix of the fly ash. This work demonstrates that residual carbon in fly ash may reduce potential Se mobility in the environment by retaining it as less soluble elemental Se instead of Se(IV). Further, this work suggests that As and Zn in Class C fly ash will display substantially different release and mobilization behaviors in aquatic environments. While As release will primarily depend upon the dissolution and hydrolysis of calcium pyroarsenate, Zn release will be controlled by the dissolution of alkaline aluminosilicate glass in the ash.

  5. Kinetics of fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout. [Quarterly report], October 1, 1995--January 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Dodoo, J.N.; Okoh, J.M.; Yilmaz, E.

    1996-09-01

    The objective is to investigate the kinetics of beneficiation of fly ash by carbon burnout. The three year project that was proposed is a joint venture between Delmarva Power, a power generating company on the eastern shore of Maryland, and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The studies have focused on the beneficiation of fly ash by carbon burnout. The increasing use of coal fly ash as pozzolanic material in Portland cement concrete means that there is the highest economic potential in marketability of large volumes of fly ash. For the concrete industry to consider large scale use the fly ash must be of the highest quality. This means that the residual carbon content of the fly ash must have an acceptable loss on ignition (LOI) value, usually between 7--2% residual carbon. The economic gains to be had from low-carbon ash is a fact that is generally accepted by the electricity generating companies. However, since the cost of producing low-carbon in large quantities, based on present technology, far outweighs any financial gains, no electrical power company using coal as its fuel at present considers the effort worthwhile. The concrete industry would use fly ash in cement concrete mix if it can be assured of its LOI value. At present no utility company would give such assurance. Hence with several million tons of fly ash produced by a single power plant per year all that can be done is to dump the fly ash in landfills. The kinetics of fly ash beneficiation have been investigated in the zone II kinetic regime, using a Cahn TG 121 microbalance in the temperature 550--750{degrees}C. The P{sub 02} and total surface area dependence of the reaction kinetics were determined using a vacuum accessory attached to the microbalance and a surface area analyzer (ASAP 2010), respectively.

  6. Adsorption-desorption of metolachlor and atrazine in Indian soils: effect of fly ash amendment.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rakesh K; Singh, Neera

    2013-02-01

    The effect of two fly ashes as soil amendment on the adsorption-desorption of metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylphenyl)] and atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine) was studied in alluvial and laterite soils. The adsorption data for both the herbicides fitted well the Freundlich equation, and Freundlich adsorption coefficient (K (f)) increased with an increase of fly ash amount. Both the fly ashes differed in their extent to increase herbicide sorption, and the effect was different in different soils. Atrazine was sorbed more in the soils/soils + fly ash mixtures than the metolachlor. The K (f) values showed significant correlation with the amount of fly ash amendment (correlation coefficient, R > 0.982). The desorption isotherms also fitted the Freundlich equation, and desorption showed hysteresis which increased with an increase in the content of fly ash amendment. The free energy change (ΔG) indicated that the sorption process is exothermic, spontaneous, and physical in nature. The study has shown that fly ash as soil amendment significantly increased the sorption of metolachlor and atrazine, but the effect is soil- and fly ash-specific. PMID:22572800

  7. SPECIATION OF MERCURY IN THE PRESENCE OF COAL AND WASTE COMBUSTION FLY ASHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study that focused on the oxidation of elemental mercury (Hgo) in the presence of both complex, four-component, model fly ashes, and actual coal combustion fly ashes collected from a pilot plant. Steady-state oxidation of Hgo promoted by the four-com...

  8. Strength and microstructural characteristics of chemically activated fly ash-cement systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.Y.; Lee, H.K.; Lee, K.M

    2003-03-01

    The use of fly ash as a cement replacement material increases the long-term strength and durability of concrete. Despite these great benefits, the use of fly ash is limited due to the low early strength of fly ash concrete. To eliminate this problem, many studies have been conducted on accelerating the pozzolanic properties of fly ash. The study reported below investigated the strength and microstructural characteristics of fly ash-cement systems containing three kinds of activators--Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, and triethanolamine--to accelerate the early strength of fly ash mortars. Through the use of thermal gravity analysis, it was demonstrated that the activators not only decreased or maintained the amount of Ca(OH){sub 2} products, but also increased the production of ettringite at early ages. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microcopy, and mercury intrusion porosimetry also confirmed that in the early curing stages of fly ash-cement pastes containing activators, large amounts of ettringite were formed, resulting in a reduction in the pore size ranging from 0.01 to 5 {mu}m. The research results support the supposition that the addition of small amounts of activators is a viable solution for increasing the early-age compressive strength of fly ash concrete.

  9. EFFECTS OF FLY ASH AND ITS CONSTITUENTS ON SENSORY IRRITATION IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sensory irritation caused by fly ash from oil-fired (OF), fluidized bed coal (FB) combustion and conventional coal (CC) combustion power plants, and from Mt. St. Helens volcano (VA) was studied in mice. The irritating sensation due to contact with fly ash or its constituents was ...

  10. Experimental study on durability improvement of fly ash concrete with durability improving admixture.

    PubMed

    Quan, Hong-zhu; Kasami, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the durability of fly ash concrete, a series of experimental studies are carried out, where durability improving admixture is used to reduce drying shrinkage and improve freezing-thawing resistance. The effects of durability improving admixture, air content, water-binder ratio, and fly ash replacement ratio on the performance of fly ash concrete are discussed in this paper. The results show that by using durability improving admixture in nonair-entraining fly ash concrete, the compressive strength of fly ash concrete can be improved by 10%-20%, and the drying shrinkage is reduced by 60%. Carbonation resistance of concrete is roughly proportional to water-cement ratio regardless of water-binder ratio and fly ash replacement ratio. For the specimens cured in air for 2 weeks, the freezing-thawing resistance is improved. In addition, by making use of durability improving admixture, it is easier to control the air content and make fly ash concrete into nonair-entraining one. The quality of fly ash concrete is thereby optimized. PMID:25013870

  11. Influence Of Trace Metal Distribution On Its Leachability From Coal Fly Ash

    EPA Science Inventory

    The risks associated with the reuse of coal fly ash in natural environmental settings in terms of their mobility and ecotoxicological significance is largely determined by: (1) the physicochemical conditions the fly ash is placed under; (2) the total leachable metal content in fl...

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF WESTERN COAL COMBUSTION. PART IV. CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF COAL FLY ASH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coal fly ashes from different sources were extensively studied. Fly ash consists of as many as 12 different particle types, made up mainly of Si, Al, Ca, K, Na, and Fe. Many p potentially volatile trace elements (As, Se, Ga, In, Pb, Cd) are always preferentially associated with m...

  13. Experimental Study on Durability Improvement of Fly Ash Concrete with Durability Improving Admixture

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Hong-zhu; Kasami, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the durability of fly ash concrete, a series of experimental studies are carried out, where durability improving admixture is used to reduce drying shrinkage and improve freezing-thawing resistance. The effects of durability improving admixture, air content, water-binder ratio, and fly ash replacement ratio on the performance of fly ash concrete are discussed in this paper. The results show that by using durability improving admixture in nonair-entraining fly ash concrete, the compressive strength of fly ash concrete can be improved by 10%–20%, and the drying shrinkage is reduced by 60%. Carbonation resistance of concrete is roughly proportional to water-cement ratio regardless of water-binder ratio and fly ash replacement ratio. For the specimens cured in air for 2 weeks, the freezing-thawing resistance is improved. In addition, by making use of durability improving admixture, it is easier to control the air content and make fly ash concrete into nonair-entraining one. The quality of fly ash concrete is thereby optimized. PMID:25013870

  14. SAMPLE COLLECTION AND PREPARATION METHODS AFFECTING MUTAGENICITY AND CYTOTOXICITY OF COAL FLY ASH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reports by several investigators describing the biological activity of coal fly ash have presented a variety of results which in some cases are conflicting. The biological activity of coal fly ash may differ because of one or more of the following factors: (1) the samples studied...

  15. PATHOLOGIC CHANGES INDUCED BY COAL-FIRED FLY ASH IN HAMSTER TRACHEAL GRAFTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity of fly ash from a coal-fired power plant for respiratory tract epithelium was studied in heterotropic tracheal grafts. Hamster tracheal grafts were continuously exposed to beeswax-cholesterol pellets containing 100, 1000 and 5000 micrograms fly ash and evaluated at 1...

  16. California bearing ratio behavior of soil-stabilized class F fly ash systems

    SciTech Connect

    Leelavathamma, B.; Mini, K.M.; Pandian, N.S.

    2005-11-01

    Fly ash is a finely divided mineral residue resulting from the combustion of coal in power plants that occupies large extents of land and also causes environmental problems. Hence, concerted attempts are being made to effectively use fly ash in an environmentally friendly way instead of dumping. Several studies have been carried out for its bulk utilization, such as its addition to improve the California bearing ratio (CBR) of soil in roads and embankments. But a thorough mixing of fly ash with soil may not be possible in the field. Hence a study has been carried out on the CBR behavior of black cotton soil and Raichur fly ash (which is class F) in layers and compared with the same in mixes. The results show that the CBR values of soil-fly ash mixes are better than layers, as expected. To improve the strength of layers, cement is used as an additive to fly ash. The results show that black cotton soil can be improved with stabilized fly ash, solving its strength problem as well as the disposal problem of fly ash.

  17. Stabilization of Oklahoma expensive soils using lime and class C fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Buhler, R.L.; Cerato, A.B.

    2007-01-15

    This study uses lime and class C fly ash, an industrial byproduct of electric power production produced from burning lignite and subbituminous coal, to study the plasticity reduction in highly expensive natural clays from Idabel, Oklahoma. This study is important, especially in Oklahoma, because most of the native soils are expansive and cause seasonal damage to roadways and structures. The addition of lime or fly ash helps to arrest the shrinkage and swelling behavior of soil. Four soil samples with the same AASHTO classification were used in this study to show shrinkage variability within a soil group with the addition of lime and class C fly ash. The plasticity reduction in this study was quantified using the linear shrinkage test. It was found that soils classified within the same AASHTO group had varying shrinkage characteristics. It was also found that both lime and fly ash reduced the lienar shrinkage, however, the addition of lime reduced the linear shrinkage to a greater degree than the same percentage of class C fly ash. Even though it takes much less lime than fly ash to reduce the plasticity of a highly expansive soil, it may be less expensive to utilize fly ash, which is a waste product of electric power production. Lime also has a lower unit weight than fly ash so weight percentage results may be misleading.

  18. Studies in the developments of fly ash bricks -- an approach for cleaner environment. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, S.K.; Palit, A.

    1995-09-01

    This work is on the coal ash of National Thermal Power Corporation (NTPC)-Ramagundam super thermal power station (installed capacity 2,100 MW) located in the southern part of India, where many parameters of coal, fly ash and bottom ash, in addition to the many operating parameters are different from earlier at the power station. It was mentioned before that fly ash generated from all coal based thermal power stations has been a nuisance for environment. One of the many avenues for achieving a cleaner environment is the utilization of ash for manufacture of bricks. Thus fly ash and pond ash or lagoon ash, were characterized for their chemical and physical properties. The results of fly ash and pond ash for LOI have been found as 0.45% and 5.57%, the lime content as 4.83% and 4.06%; and lime reactivity 64 and 20 Kg/Cm{sup 2} respectively. Obviously, these characteristics have an important role to play. A brief review of the process technology developed for the manufacture of fly ash bricks is also covered.

  19. Effects of chemical composition of fly ash on efficiency of metal separation in ash-melting of municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Takashi; Tomikawa, Hiroki

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Separation of Pb and Zn from Fe and Cu in ash-melting of municipal solid waste. ► Molar ratio of Cl to Na and K in fly ash affected the metal-separation efficiency. ► The low molar ratio and a non-oxidative atmosphere were better for the separation. - Abstract: In the process of metal separation by ash-melting, Fe and Cu in the incineration residue remain in the melting furnace as molten metal, whereas Pb and Zn in the residue are volatilized. This study investigated the effects of the chemical composition of incineration fly ash on the metal-separation efficiency of the ash-melting process. Incineration fly ash with different chemical compositions was melted with bottom ash in a lab-scale reactor, and the efficiency with which Pb and Zn were volatilized preventing the volatilization of Fe and Cu was evaluated. In addition, the behavior of these metals was simulated by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. Depending on the exhaust gas treatment system used in the incinerator, the relationships among Na, K, and Cl concentrations in the incineration fly ash differed, which affected the efficiency of the metal separation. The amounts of Fe and Cu volatilized decreased by the decrease in the molar ratio of Cl to Na and K in the ash, promoting metal separation. The thermodynamic simulation predicted that the chlorination volatilization of Fe and Cu was prevented by the decrease in the molar ratio, as mentioned before. By melting incineration fly ash with the low molar ratio in a non-oxidative atmosphere, most of the Pb and Zn in the ash were volatilized leaving behind Fe and Cu.

  20. Use of rubber and bentonite added fly ash as a liner material.

    PubMed

    Cokca, Erdal; Yilmaz, Zeka

    2004-01-01

    In many countries regulations require all hazardous waste disposal facilities to be lined with suitable impermeable barriers to protect against contamination. In this study, a series of laboratory tests on rubber and bentonite added fly ash were conducted. The aim of the tests was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing fly ash, rubber and bentonite as a low hydraulic conductivity liner material. Type C fly ash was obtained from Soma thermal power plant in Turkey; rubber in pulverized form was waste from the retreading industry. To investigate the properties of rubber and bentonite added fly ash, hydraulic conductivity, leachate analysis, unconfined compression, split tensile strength, one-dimensional consolidation, swell and freeze/thaw cycle tests were performed. The overall evaluation of results have revealed that rubber and bentonite added fly ash showed good promise and a candidate for construction of a liner. PMID:14761754

  1. Compound stabilization/solidification of MSWI fly ash with trimercapto-s-triazine and cement.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qiang; Li, Jiangshan; Hu, Zhuyun

    2012-01-01

    A new treatment technology of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash is presented in this paper. Feasibility of solidification/stabilization treatment of MSWI by successively adding trimercapto-s-triazine and cement, and the effect of addition, fly ash size and curing time were studied by batch tests. The results showed that MSWI posed a huge environmental risk, the partial distribution showed normal distribution approximately. Treatment of fly ash with trimercapto-s-triazine and cement showed a good effect, the leaching toxicity of treated fly ash solidified blocks with 2% trimercapto-s-triazine and 20% cement could meet the standard for pollution control on the landfill site of MSW in China after curing for 7 days, and the flexural strength of solidified blocks could reach 2.4 MPa. Ground fly ash had a positive effect on both leaching toxicity and strength. PMID:22744703

  2. Composite Ni-Co-fly ash coatings on 5083 aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagopoulos, C. N.; Georgiou, E. P.; Tsopani, A.; Piperi, L.

    2011-03-01

    Ni-Co-fly ash coatings were deposited on zincate treated 5083 wrought aluminium alloy substrates with the aid of the electrodeposition technique. Structural and chemical characterization of the produced composite coatings was performed with the aid of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS) techniques. The Ni-Co-fly ash coatings were found to consist of a crystalline Ni-Co solid solution with dispersed fly ash particles. In addition, chemical analysis of the Ni-Co matrix showed that it consisted of 80 wt.% Ni and 20 wt.% Co. The co-deposition of fly ash particles leads to a significant increase of the microhardness of the coating. The corrosion behaviour of the Ni-Co-fly ash/zincate coated aluminium alloy, in a 0.3 M NaCl solution (pH = 3.5), was studied by means of potentiodynamic corrosion experiments.

  3. Process for making ferrite spherical particulate toner core from raw fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrich, R.G.; Earl, G.H.; Trunko, D.W.

    1987-10-06

    This patent describes a process for making a ferrite spherical particulate toner carrier core from raw fly ash obtained from burning coal comprising (a) recovering the magnetic particles from the non-magnetic particles of the raw fly ash; (b) selecting a desired size for the particles of the raw fly ash and screening the fly ash to obtain the desired sized particles; and (c) purifying the raw fly ash treated according to steps (a) and (b) to obtain a ferrite composition having a particle size from 20-300 microns, in which the particles are essentially spherical, having an apparent density of at least 1.8 g/cm/sup 3/; a saturation magnetization of 43-70 emu/g; a remanence of 5 emu/g or less; a Hall Flow of 20 sec. or greater/50 g.

  4. Process for making ferrite spherical particulate toner core from raw fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrich, R.G.; Earl, G.H.; Trunko, D.W.

    1991-09-10

    This patent describes a process for making a ferrite spherical particulate toner carrier core from raw fly ash obtained from burning coal. It comprises recovering the magnetic particles from the non-magnetic particles of the raw fly ash: selecting a desired size for the particles of the raw fly ash and screening the fly ash to obtain the desired sized particles; and purifying the raw fly ash treated to obtain a ferrite composition having a particle size from 20-300 microns, in which the particles are essentially spherical, having an apparent density of at least 1.8 g/cm{sup 3}; a saturation magnetization of 43-70 emu/g; a remanence of 5 emu/g or less; a Hall Flow of 20 sec. or greater/50 g.

  5. Use of rubber and bentonite added fly ash as a liner material

    SciTech Connect

    Cokca, Erdal; Yilmaz, Zeka

    2004-07-01

    In many countries regulations require all hazardous waste disposal facilities to be lined with suitable impermeable barriers to protect against contamination. In this study, a series of laboratory tests on rubber and bentonite added fly ash were conducted. The aim of the tests was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing fly ash, rubber and bentonite as a low hydraulic conductivity liner material. Type C fly ash was obtained from Soma thermal power plant in Turkey; rubber in pulverized form was waste from the retreading industry. To investigate the properties of rubber and bentonite added fly ash, hydraulic conductivity, leachate analysis, unconfined compression, split tensile strength, one-dimensional consolidation, swell and freeze/thaw cycle tests were performed. The overall evaluation of results have revealed that rubber and bentonite added fly ash showed good promise and a candidate for construction of a liner.

  6. Multielement residues in tissues of guinea pigs fed sweet clover grown on fly ash.

    PubMed

    Furr, K; Stoewsand, G S; Bache, C A; Gutenmann, W A

    1975-05-01

    Yellow sweet clover (Melilotus officinalis) was harvested from fly ash dumped in a landfill site at Lansing, NY. This clover was chopped, dried, and formulated at 45% into an otherwise purified diet and fed to six guinea pigs for 90 days. Control sweet clover was harvested from gravelly subsoil and processed and fed to another group of guinea pigs for the same period. Samples of fly ash, gravelly subsoil, sweet clover, liver, kidneys, and left-rear gastrocnemius muscle of all guinea pigs were freeze-dried and analyzed for 35 elements by neutron activation analysis. The fly ash contained 28 elements at higher levels than the gravelly subsoil, while the clover harvested from fly ash contained 19 elements in increased amounts over those in the clover harvested from the gravel soil. Growth rate of both groups of guinea pigs was similar. Rubidium and selenium were present at higher levels in the tissues of guinea pigs fed the fly ash clover. PMID:1130838

  7. Chemical and toxicological properties of coal fly ash. Environmental geology notes

    SciTech Connect

    Suloway, J.J.; Roy, W.R.; Skelly, T.M.; Dickerson, D.R.; Schuller, R.M.

    1983-07-01

    Nine fly ash samples generated from Illinois Basin coals and three samples from western coals were characterized in terms of their physicochemical properties, solubility and toxicity to fathead minnow fry. Organic compounds identified in the fly ashes were only slightly soluble in the aqueous extracts. Five extracts were selected for toxicity testing on the basis of the diversity of pH values. All five extracts were acutely toxic to fathead minnow fry. Physicochemical components probably responsible for the acute toxicity of the fly ash extracts to fish were pH, Al, ironic strength, and Zn. The fathead minnows and green sunfish accumulated similar elements from the fly ash extracts; the six chemical constituents most commonly accumulated from fly ash extracts were Al, B, Cd, Mn, Mo, and Ni.

  8. Fly ash application in nutrient poor agriculture soils: impact on methanotrophs population dynamics and paddy yields.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jay Shankar; Pandey, Vimal Chandra

    2013-03-01

    There are reports that the application of fly ash, compost and press mud or a combination thereof, improves plant growth, soil microbial communities etc. Also, fly ash in combination with farmyard manure or other organic amendments improves soil physico-chemical characteristics, rice yield and microbial processes in paddy fields. However, the knowledge about the impact of fly ash inputs alone or in combination with other organic amendments on soil methanotrophs number in paddy soils is almost lacking. We hypothesized that fly ash application at lower doses in paddy agriculture soil could be a potential amendment to elevate the paddy yields and methanotrophs number. Here we demonstrate the impact of fly ash and press mud inputs on number of methanotrophs, antioxidants, antioxidative enzymatic activities and paddy yields at agriculture farm. The impact of amendments was significant for methanotrophs number, heavy metal concentration, antioxidant contents, antioxidant enzymatic activities and paddy yields. A negative correlation was existed between higher doses of fly ash-treatments and methanotrophs number (R(2)=0.833). The content of antioxidants and enzymatic activities in leaves of higher doses fly ash-treated rice plants increased in response to stresses due to heavy metal toxicity, which was negatively correlated with rice grain yield (R(2)=0.944) and paddy straw yield (R(2)=0.934). A positive correlation was noted between heavy metals concentrations and different antioxidant and enzymatic activities across different fly ash treated plots.The data of this study indicate that heavy metal toxicity of fly ash may cause oxidative stress in the paddy crop and the antioxidants and related enzymes could play a defensive role against phytotoxic damages. We concluded that fly ash at lower doses with press mud seems to offer the potential amendments to improving soil methanotrophs population and paddy crop yields for the nutrient poor agriculture soils. PMID:23260239

  9. Effect of fly ash amendment on metolachlor and atrazine degradation and microbial activity in two soils.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rakesh Kumar; Singh, Neera; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2016-08-01

    The study reports the effect of Inderprastha (IP) and Badarpur (BP) fly ashes on degradation of metolachlor and atrazine in Inceptisol and Alfisol soils. Metolachlor dissipated at faster rate in Alfisol (t1/2 8.2-8.6 days) than in Inceptisol (t1/2 13.2-14.3 days). The fly ashes enhanced the persistence of metolachlor in both the soils; however, the extent of effect was more in Inceptisol (t1/2 16.6-33.8 days) than Alfisol (t1/2 8.4-12 days) and effect increased with fly ash dose. 2-Ethyl-6-methylacetanilide was detected as the only metabolite of metolachlor. Atrazine was more persistent in flooded soils (t1/2 10.8-20.3 days) than nonflooded soils (t1/2 3.7-12.6 days) and fly ash increased its persistence, but effect was more pronounced in the flooded Inceptisol (t1/2 23.7-31 days) and nonflooded Alfisol (t1/2 6.3-10.1 days). Increased herbicide sorption in the fly ash-amended soils might have contributed to the increased pesticide persistence. The IP fly ash inhibited microbial biomass carbon at 5 % amendment levels in both the soils, while BP fly ash slightly increased microbial biomass carbon (MBC) content. Dehydrogenase activity was inhibited by both fly ashes in both the soils with maximum inhibition observed in the IP fly ash-amended Alfisol. No significant effect of fly ash amendment was observed on the fluorescein diacetate activity. PMID:27456695

  10. Characterization of fly ash from a circulating fluidized bed incinerator of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Su, Xiaowen; Zhang, Zhixuan; Liu, Siming; Xiao, Yuxin; Sun, Mingming; Su, Jixin

    2014-11-01

    Treatment and disposal of fly ash in China are becoming increasingly difficult, since its production has steadily risen and its features are uncertain. The excess pollutant components of fly ash are the key factor affecting its treatment and resource utilization. In this study, fly ash samples collected from a power plant with circulating fluidized incinerators of municipal solid waste (MSW) located in Shandong Province (eastern China) were studied. The results showed that there were no obvious seasonal differences in properties of fly ash. The content of total salt, Zn, and pH exceeded the national standards and low-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) and dibenzofurans (Fs) were the main organic components of fly ash for this power plant, which posed great threats to the surrounding environment. The amount of Zn of fly ash was higher than other heavy metals, which should be due to alkaline batteries of MSW. The leachate of fly ash had low concentrations of heavy metals and the main soluble components were sulfates and chlorides. The major mineral crystals of fly ash were SiO2, CaSO4, and Fe2O3. The main organic pollutants were low-ring PAHs, polychlorinated PCDDs, and low-chlorinated PCDFs, and concentrations were lower than the limiting values of the national regulations. Additionally, the distribution of PCDD/Fs had either a positive or a negative linear correlation with fly ash and flue gas, which was associated with the chlorinated degree of PCDD/Fs. The analysis was conducted to fully understand the properties of fly ash and to take appropriate methods for further comprehensive utilization. PMID:24969433

  11. Use of fly ash in diets of cage and floor broilers

    SciTech Connect

    Pharr, C.L.; Andrews, L.D.

    1980-09-01

    Three experiments were conducted to compare limestone to fly ash from a coal-fired generator station as a calcium source for broilers. In experiment 1, 5 male and 5 female broiler chicks were placed in each of 32 cages. Sixteen cages of birds were fed a ration with limestone supplying 30% of the total calcium and 16 cages were fed a ration with 30% of the total calcium supplied by fly ash. The total calcium and phosphorus levels of the rations were 1.0% and .5%, respectively. In this experiment no significant difference was found for 8-week body weight between diets where the added calcium was from limestone or fly ash. In experiment 2 a group of 40 male and 40 female cage reared broilers and 40 male and 40 female floor reared broilers were fed a basal diet of limestone providing 33% of the total calcium. Three diets with increasing fly ash levels were fed to three cage groups of 40 male and 40 female broilers providing 33, 46, and 45% of the total calcium of .9, 1.1, and 1.8%, respectively. Broilers fed the highest fly ash level weighed significantly less at 8 weeks than the caged controls but did not differ from the other treatments. Bone breaking strength as measured by the Allo Kramer Shear Press was similar between the basal and low level fly ash group and increased with higher fly ash levels. In experiment 3 four groups of 40 male broilers in cages were fed limestone diets with graded levels of limestone for the calcium source. Another four groups of 40 caged male broilers were fed fly ash diets with equivalent graded levels of fly ash for the calcium source. Both limestone and fly ash diets provided .17, .34, .51, and .68% calcium of a total calcium content of .28, .45, .62, and .79%, respectively.

  12. Gypsum treated fly ash as a liner for waste disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Sivapullaiah, Puvvadi V.; Baig, M. Arif Ali

    2011-02-15

    Fly ash has potential application in the construction of base liners for waste containment facilities. While most of the fly ashes improve in the strength with curing, the ranges of permeabilities they attain may often not meet the basic requirement of a liner material. An attempt has been made in the present context to reduce the hydraulic conductivity by adding lime content up to 10% to two selected samples of class F fly ashes. The use of gypsum, which is known to accelerate the unconfined compressive strength by increasing the lime reactivity, has been investigated in further improving the hydraulic conductivity. Hydraulic conductivities of the compacted specimens have been determined in the laboratory using the falling head method. It has been observed that the addition of gypsum reduces the hydraulic conductivity of the lime treated fly ashes. The reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of the samples containing gypsum is significantly more for samples with high amounts of lime contents (as high as 1000 times) than those fly ashes with lower amounts of lime. However there is a relatively more increase in the strengths of the samples with the inclusion of gypsum to the fly ashes at lower lime contents. This is due to the fact that excess lime added to fly ash is not effectively converted into pozzolanic compounds. Even the presence of gypsum is observed not to activate these reactions with excess lime. On the other hand the higher amount of lime in the presence of sulphate is observed to produce more cementitious compounds which block the pores in the fly ash. The consequent reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of fly ash would be beneficial in reducing the leachability of trace elements present in the fly ash when used as a base liner.

  13. Trends in the Rare Earth Element Content of U.S.-Based Coal Combustion Fly Ashes.

    PubMed

    Taggart, Ross K; Hower, James C; Dwyer, Gary S; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2016-06-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are critical and strategic materials in the defense, energy, electronics, and automotive industries. The reclamation of REEs from coal combustion fly ash has been proposed as a way to supplement REE mining. However, the typical REE contents in coal fly ash, particularly in the United States, have not been comprehensively documented or compared among the major types of coal feedstocks that determine fly ash composition. The objective of this study was to characterize a broad selection of U.S. fly ashes of varied geological origin in order to rank their potential for REE recovery. The total and nitric acid-extractable REE content for more than 100 ash samples were correlated with characteristics such as the major element content and coal basin to elucidate trends in REE enrichment. Average total REE content (defined as the sum of the lanthanides, yttrium, and scandium) for ashes derived from Appalachian sources was 591 mg kg(-1) and significantly greater than in ashes from Illinois and Powder River basin coals (403 and 337 mg kg(-1), respectively). The fraction of critical REEs (Nd, Eu, Tb, Dy, Y, and Er) in the fly ashes was 34-38% of the total and considerably higher than in conventional ores (typically less than 15%). Powder River Basin ashes had the highest extractable REE content, with 70% of the total REE recovered by heated nitric acid digestion. This is likely due to the higher calcium content of Powder River Basin ashes, which enhances their solubility in nitric acid. Sc, Nd, and Dy were the major contributors to the total REE value in fly ash, based on their contents and recent market prices. Overall, this study shows that coal fly ash production could provide a substantial domestic supply of REEs, but the feasibility of recovery depends on the development of extraction technologies that could be tailored to the major mineral content and origins of the feed coal for the ash. PMID:27228215

  14. The Occurrence of Quartz in Coal Fly Ash Particles.

    PubMed

    Meij, R; Nagengast, S; Te Winkel, H

    2000-01-01

    In spite of the presence of quartz, coal fly ash can be considered as a nuisance or inert dust. Respirable crystalline silica (e.g., quartz) is notorious for the induction of, for example, progressive massive fibrosis (PMF); besides, in 1997 the IARC stated that crystalline silica in the form of quartz or cristobalite from occupational sources is carcinogenic to humans. Quartz is present in both coal and residual ash. Ash originates from combustion of pulverised coal and, once removed from the flue gases by electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), it is called pulverized fuel ash (PFA). Thus, occupational exposure to PFA could also include exposure to silica. However, epidemiological studies did not show evidence of progressive massive fibrosis (PMF). In vitro tests demonstrated that PFA is less toxic than silica, and in vivo data of PFA did not support the importance of silica content for toxicity. Commissioned by the Dutch coal-fired power plants, KEMA has started a research project to determine the quartz content in coal and the corresponding PFA. It appears that on average 50% of the a-quartz in coal is found again in the total fraction of PFA (D50(ae) 31 µm, where Dsotae) is the aerodynamically mass median diameter), whereas 16% is found in an even finer fraction (D50(ae) 10 µm). The remaining part of the quartz is embedded in a glass phase. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with x-ray microanalyses (XMA) of cross-sections of 11,130 ash particles showed that quartz in PFA is present as unmelted sand particles. These quartz particles are angularly shaped. However, two types are to be distinguished: free coarse angular quartz particles (not respirable) and small angular quartz particles within the PFA particles. From the SEM/XMA results, it has to be concluded that the quartz in the respirable fraction is predominantly present within the original molten PFA particle. Since the effects of quartz are surface related, this elucidates the negative results of quartz

  15. Evaluation of the effects of coal fly ash amendments on the toxicity of a contaminated marine sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, R.M.; Perron, M.M.; Friedman, C.L.; Suuberg, E.M.; Pennell, K.G.; Cantwell, M.G.; Pelletier, M.C.; Ho, K.T.; Serbst, J.R.; Ryba, S.A.

    2009-01-15

    Approaches for cleaning up contaminated sediments range from dredging to in situ treatment. In this study, we discuss the effects of amending reference and contaminated sediments with coal fly ash to reduce the bioavailability and toxicity of a field sediment contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Six fly ashes and a coconut charcoal were evaluated in 7-d whole sediment toxicity tests with a marine amphipod (Ampelisca abdita) and mysid (Americamysis bahia). Fly ashes with high carbon content and the coconut charcoal showed proficiency at reducing toxicity. Some of the fly ashes demonstrated toxicity in the reference treatments. It is suspected that some of this toxicity is related to the presence of ammonia associated with fly ashes as a result of postoxidation treatment to reduce nitrous oxide emissions. Relatively simple methods exist to remove ammonia from fly ash before use, and fly ashes with low ammonia content are available. Fly ashes were also shown to effectively reduce overlying water concentrations of several PAHs. No evidence was seen of the release of the metals cadmium, copper, nickel, or lead from the fly ashes. A preliminary 28-d polychaete bioaccumulation study with one of the high-carbon fly ashes and a reference sediment was also performed. Although preliminary, no evidence was seen of adverse effects to worm growth or lipid content or of accumulation of PAHs or mercury from exposure to the fly ash. These data show fly ashes with high carbon content could represent viable remedial materials for reducing the bioavailability of organic contaminants in sediments.

  16. Investigation on the utilization of coal fly ash as amendment to compost for vegetation in acid soil

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, M.P.

    1990-04-16

    The use of fly ash as amendment to compost is presented. Plant growth/yields of corn collard greens, mustard greens, and sorgum is described. The treatment parameters such as fly ash to compost ratio, fly ash-amended compost to soil ratio, type of compost used for treatment etc. are discussed. 2 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs. (CBS)

  17. Characterization of Fly Ash from Coal-Fired Power Plant and Their Properties of Mercury Retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ping; Jiang, Xiumin; Wu, Jiang; Pan, Weiguo; Ren, Jianxing

    2015-12-01

    Recent research has shown that fly ash may catalyze the oxidation of elemental mercury and facilitate its removal. However, the nature of mercury-fly ash interaction is still unknown, and the mechanism of mercury retention in fly ash needs to be investigated more thoroughly. In this work, a fly ash from a coal-fired power plant is used to characterize the inorganic and organic constituents and then evaluate its mercury retention capacities. The as-received fly ash sample is mechanically sieved to obtain five size fractions. Their characteristics are examined by loss on ignition (LOI), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman spectra. The results show that the unburned carbon (UBC) content and UBC structural ordering decrease with a decreasing particle size for the five ashes. The morphologies of different size fractions of as-received fly ash change from the glass microspheres to irregular shapes as the particle size increases, but there is no correlation between particle size and mineralogical compositions in each size fraction. The adsorption experimental studies show that the mercury-retention capacity of fly ash depends on the particle size, UBC, and the type of inorganic constituents. Mercury retention of the types of sp2 carbon is similar to that of sp3 carbon.

  18. Site-specific study on stabilization of acid-generating mine tailings using coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, J.Q.; Wang, H.L.; Kovac, V.; Fyfe, J.

    2006-03-15

    A site-specific study on stabilizing acid-generating mine tailings from Sudbury Mine using a coal fly ash from Nanticoke Generating Station is presented in this paper. The objective of the study is to evaluate the feasibility of codisposal of the fly ash and mine tailings to reduce environmental impacts of Sudbury tailings disposal sites. The study includes three phases, i.e., characterization of the mine tailings, and coal fly ash, oxidation tests on the mine tailings and kinetic column permeation tests. The results of the experiments indicate that when permeated with acid mine drainage, the hydraulic conductivity of Nanticoke coal fly ash decreased more than three orders of magnitude (from 1 x 10{sup -6} to 1 x 10{sup -9} cm/s), mainly due to chemical reactions between the ash solids and acid mine drainage. Furthermore, the hydraulic gradient required for acid mine drainage to break through the coal fly ash is increased up to ten times (from 17 to 150) as compared with that for water. The results also show that the leachate from coal fly ash neutralizes the acidic pore fluid of mine tailings. The concentrations of trace elements in effluents from all kinetic column permeation tests indicated that coplacement of coal fly ash with mine tailings has the benefit of immobilizing trace elements, especially heavy metals. All regulated element concentrations from effluent during testing are well below the leachate quality criteria set by the local regulatory authority.

  19. Sorption and chemical transformation of PAHs on coal fly ash. Technical progress report No. 8

    SciTech Connect

    Mamantov, G.; Wehry, E.L.

    1993-12-01

    The objective of this work is to characterize the interactions of coal fly ash with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their derivatives, and to understand the influence of the surface properties of coal ash (and other atmospheric particles) on the chemical transformations of polycyclic aromatic compounds. Specific investigations directed toward this overall objective include: (a) Fractionation of heterogeneous coal fly ash samples into different particle types varying in size and chemical composition (carbonaceous, mineral-magnetic, and mineral nonmagnetic); (b) Measurement of the rates of chemical transformation of PAHs and PAH derivatives (especially nitro-PAHs) and the manner in which the rates of such processes are influenced by the chemical and physical properties of coal fly ash particles; (c) Chromatographic and spectroscopic studies of the nature of the interactions of coal fly ash particles with PAHs and PAH derivatives; (d) Characterization of the fractal nature of fly ash particles (via surface area measurements) and the relationships of {open_quotes}surface roughness{close_quotes} of fly ash particles to the chemical behavior of PAHs sorbed on coal ash particles. PAHs are deposited, under controlled laboratory conditions, onto coal ash surfaces from the vapor phase, in order to mimic the processes by which PAHs are deposited onto particulate matter in the atmosphere.

  20. Metal release from fly ash upon leaching with sulfuric acid or acid mine drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Skousen, J.; Bhumbla, D.K.

    1998-12-31

    Generation of electricity by coal-fired power plants produces large quantities of bottom ash and fly ash. New power plants commonly use fluidized bed combustion (FBC) boilers, which create ashes with high neutralization potential (NP). These ashes, due to their alkaline nature, are often used in surface mine reclamation to neutralize acidity and reduce hydraulic conductivity of disturbed overburdens. Conventional fly ashes from older power plants exhibit a range of pH and NP, with some ashes having neutral or acidic pH and low NP values, and may not be good candidates for supplying alkalinity in reclamation projects. In this study, the authors used two acidic solutions to leach a low NP fly ash (LNP ash) and two FBC ashes (FBC1 and FBC2). After passing 78 pore volumes of sulfuric acid and 129 pore volumes of acid mine drainage (AMD) through these ash materials several trace elements were found at high levels in the leachates. LNP fly ash leachates had high arsenic and selenium concentrations with sulfuric acid leaching, but showed low arsenic and selenium concentrations after leaching with AMD. Leaching with AMD caused the iron and aluminum inherent in AMD to complex these elements and make them unavailable for leaching. Lead, cadmium, and barium concentrations in fly ash leachates were not high enough to cause water pollution problems with either leaching solution. For both leaching solutions, manganese was released from LNP ash at a constant level, FBC1 ash did not release manganese, and FBC2 ash released manganese only after the NP had been exhausted by >60 pore volumes of leaching.

  1. Kinetics of fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout. Quarterly report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Dodoo, J.N.; Okoh, J.M.; Yilmaz, E.

    1996-09-01

    The three year project that was proposed is a joint venture between Delmarva Power, a power generating company on the eastern shore of Maryland, and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The studies have focused on the benefication of fly ash by carbon burnout. The increasing use of coal fly ash as pozzolanic material in Portland cement concrete means that there is the highest economic potential in marketability of large volumes of fly ash. For the concrete industry to consider large scale use the fly ash must be of the highest quality. This means that the residual carbon content of the fly ash must have an acceptable loss on ignition (LOI) value, usually between 7-2% residual carbon. The economic gains to be had from low-carbon ash is a fact that is generally accepted by the electricity generating companies. However, since the cost of producing low-carbon in large quantities, based on present technology, far outweighs any financial gains, no electrical power company using coal as its fuel at present considers the effort worthwhile. The concrete industry would use fly ash in cement concrete mix if it can be assured of its LOI value. At present no utility company would give such assurance. Hence with several million tons of fly ash produced by a single power plant per year all that can be done is to dump the fly ash in landfills. The kinetics of fly ash benefication have been investigated in the zone II kinetic regime, using a Cahn TG 121 microbalance in the temperature 550-750{degrees}C. The P{sub O{sub 2}} and total surface area dependence of the reaction kinetics were determined using a vacuum accessory attached to the microbalance and a surface area analyzer (ASAP 2010), respectively. 16 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Hydrometallurgical recovery of germanium from coal gasification fly ash: pilot plant scale evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Arroyo, F.; Fernandez-Pereira, C.; Olivares, J.; Coca, P.

    2009-04-15

    In this article, a hydrometallurgical method for the selective recovery of germanium from fly ash (FA) has been tested at pilot plant scale. The pilot plant flowsheet comprised a first stage of water leaching of FA, and a subsequent selective recovery of the germanium from the leachate by solvent extraction method. The solvent extraction method was based on Ge complexation with catechol in an aqueous solution followed by the extraction of the Ge-catechol complex (Ge(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}O{sub 2}){sub 3}{sup 2-}) with an extracting organic reagent (trioctylamine) diluted in an organic solvent (kerosene), followed by the subsequent stripping of the organic extract. The process has been tested on a FA generated in an integrated gasification with combined cycle (IGCC) process. The paper describes the designed 5 kg/h pilot plant and the tests performed on it. Under the operational conditions tested, approximately 50% of germanium could be recovered from FA after a water extraction at room temperature. Regarding the solvent extraction method, the best operational conditions for obtaining a concentrated germanium-bearing solution practically free of impurities were as follows: extraction time equal to 20 min; aqueous phase/organic phase volumetric ratio equal to 5; stripping with 1 M NaOH, stripping time equal to 30 min, and stripping phase/organic phase volumetric ratio equal to 5. 95% of germanium were recovered from water leachates using those conditions.

  3. Development and application of short-term mutagenicity and cytotoxicity bioassays for integrated health assessment studies of coal fly ash emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Mumford, J.S.L.

    1982-01-01

    Two respirable coal fly ash samples (less than or equal to3 ..mu..m) one from a pressurized fluidized-bed combustion miniplant (sample A) and one from a conventional combustion power plant (sample B), were investigated for physical properties, chemical composition and biological activity. Electron microscopy illustrated irregularity in sample A and sphericity in sample B. Elemental analysis of these samples showed differences in trace elements. Both samples were toxic in rabbit alveolar macrophage and Chinese hamster ovary cell systems in vitro. The macrophages were more sensitive to toxicity than the ovary cells. Intact particles of sample A showed mutagenicity only in strains TA98 and TA1538 without metabolic activation in the Ames Salmonella assay. Solvent extraction yielded more mass from sample A than from sample B. The extracts of sample A showed higher mutagenic activity than those of sample B. Fly ash samples collected from the same fluidized-bed source at various temperatures were compared for particle size, toxicity, and mutagenicity. Results demonstrated that the biological activity and coal fly ash was affected by the collection site, device, and temperature. Coal fly ash vapor-coated with 1-nitropyrene was developed as a model system to study the bioavailability and recovery of nitroaromatic compounds in fly ash. The nitropyrene coating did not significantly alter the ash's cytotoxicity. Nitropyrene was bioavailable in the biological media, and a significant percentage was not recovered after the coated fly ash was cultured with alveolar macrophages. 1-Nitropyrene loss increased as the number of macrophages was increased, suggesting that the macrophages are capable of metabolizing or binding 1-nitropyrene present in coal fly ash.

  4. Preferential removal and immobilization of stable and radioactive cesium in contaminated fly ash with nanometallic Ca/CaO methanol suspension.

    PubMed

    Mallampati, Srinivasa Reddy; Mitoma, Yoshiharu; Okuda, Tetsuji; Sakita, Shogo; Simion, Cristian

    2014-08-30

    In this work, the capability of nanometallic Ca/CaO methanol suspension in removing and/or immobilizing stable ((133)Cs) and radioactive cesium species ((134)Cs and (137)Cs) in contaminated fly ash was investigated. After a first methanol and second water washing yielded only 45% of (133)Cs removal. While, after a first methanol washing, the second solvent with nanometallic Ca/CaO methanol suspension yielded simultaneous enhanced removal and immobilization about 99% of (133)Cs. SEM-EDS analysis revealed that the mass percent of detectable (133)Cs on the fly ash surface recorded a 100% decrease. When real radioactive cesium contaminated fly ash (containing an initial 14,040Bqkg(-1)(134)Cs and (137)Cs cumulated concentration) obtained from burning wastes from Fukushima were reduced to 3583Bqkg(-1) after treatment with nanometallic Ca/CaO methanol suspension. Elution test conducted on the treated fly ash gave 100BqL(-1) total (134)Cs and (137)Cs concentrations in eluted solution. Furthermore, both ash content and eluted solution concentrations of (134)Cs and (137)Cs were much lower than the Japanese Ministry of the Environment regulatory limit of 8000Bqkg(-1) and 150BqL(-1) respectively. The results of this study suggest that the nanometallic Ca/CaO methanol suspension is a highly potential amendment for the remediation of radioactive cesium-contaminated fly ash. PMID:25038573

  5. Dilithium dialuminium trisilicate Crystalline Phase Prepared from Coal Fly Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhitong; Xia, Meisheng; Ye, Ying

    2012-06-01

    The dilithium dialuminium trisilicate phase Li2Al2Si3O10 was prepared using coal fly ash and lithium hydroxide monohydrate LiOH·H2O as precursors. The influences of various preparation conditions on Li2Al2Si3O10 forming were investigated. The results showed that the optimum additive amount of LiOH·H2O was about 20%. The onset of calcining temperature and time was identified as 980 °C and 1 h, respectively. XRD analysis indicated that the content of Li2Al2Si3O10 phase increased at the expense of quartz and mullite, with calcining temperatures increasing and time extending. SEM observation revealed that the calcined samples were drastically interlocked together with the prolonging of time. The obtained Li2Al2Si3O10 phase was well crystallized and with small grain size.

  6. The significance of improvements in fly ash quality

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, G.R.; Coombs, R.

    1996-12-31

    The long history of research into the properties of and uses for fly ash began in the United Kingdom in the late 1940s. Since this time the Electricity Supply Industry and others have continued to research the subject. Dissemination of project work benefiting from this research was generally through publication by the industry of Technical Bulletins. Political, economic and environmental attitudes now demand that all aspects of and potential for a greater use of the material are considered. A review of these Technical Bulletins suggests that a number of constructions and processes, somewhat unusual at the time, should be revisited. This paper considers how the earlier research, constructions and processes developed the increasingly beneficial and more widespread use of the material. It suggests that those areas that should be reconsidered as potential avenues for development.

  7. Electroless Ag coating of fly ash cenospheres using polyaniline activator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Qin; Li, Ying; Xu, Hui; Zhai, Jianping

    2009-11-01

    The electroless Ag coating of fly ash cenospheres employing polyaniline activator was investigated after polyaniline activator was coated on the surfaces of the cenosphere particles by in situ chemical polymerization. The composites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results indicate that a small amount of polyaniline activator was deposited in a discontinuous way on the surfaces of the cenosphere particles. Due to the activation of polyaniline, relatively compact and continuous Ag layer with a thickness of about 4 µm was obtained under the given electroless plating condition. The possible interaction between polyaniline and silver ions and the mechanism of Ag deposition were also investigated by the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique.

  8. Possible applications for municipal solid waste fly ash.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, C; Ribeiro, A; Ottosen, L

    2003-01-31

    The present study focuses on existing practices related to the reuse of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) fly ash and identifies new potential uses. Nine possible applications were identified and grouped into four main categories: construction materials (cement, concrete, ceramics, glass and glass-ceramics); geotechnical applications (road pavement, embankments); "agriculture" (soil amendment); and, miscellaneous (sorbent, sludge conditioning). Each application is analysed in detail, including final-product technical characteristics, with a special emphasis on environmental impacts. A comparative analysis of the different options is performed, stressing the advantages but also the weaknesses of each option. This information is systemized in order to provide a framework for the selection of best technology and final products. The results presented here show new possibilities for this waste reuse in a short-term, in a wide range of fields, resulting in great advantages in waste minimization as well as resources conservation. PMID:12493209

  9. Floating cultivation of marine cyanobacteria using coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, M; Yoshida, E; Takeyama, H; Matsunaga, T

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop improved methodologies for bulk culturing of biotechnologically useful marine cyanobacteria in the open ocean. We have investigated the viability of using coal fly ash (CFA) blocks as the support medium in a novel floating culture system for marine micro-algae. The marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. NKBG 040607 was found to adhere to floating CFA blocks in liquid culture medium. Maximum density of attached cells of 2.0 x 10(8) cells/cm2 was achieved using seawater. The marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. NKBG 042902 weakly adhered to floating CFA blocks in BG-11 medium. Increasing the concentration of calcium ion in the culture medium enhanced adherence to CFA blocks. PMID:10849778

  10. Chemical composition and physical properties of filter fly ashes from eight grate-fired biomass combustion plants.

    PubMed

    Lanzerstorfer, Christof

    2015-04-01

    For the handling, treatment and utilization of fly ash from biomass combustion its chemical composition and physical properties are important. In this study eight filter fly ashes from different grate-fired biomass combustion plants were investigated. In fly ash from straw combustion high concentrations of (K) were found, whereas in the fly ash from wood combustion the concentrations of Ca and Mg were higher. The average concentration of PO4(3-) was similar in both types of fly ashes. In all wood fly ashes some measured heavy metal concentrations were above the limits for utilization. The straw fly ashes were much less contaminated and can be utilized. For wood fly ash most parameters showed little variation, except from one fly ash where the dust pre-separator is in poor condition. The average values were: mass median diameter 4.3±0.8 μm, spread of particle size distribution 19±11, particle density 2620±80 kg/m3 and angle of repose 50°±1°. The density of the straw fly ashes is lower (2260±80 kg/m3) and the spread of the size distribution is higher (72±24). For one straw combustion fly ash the values of the mass median diameter and the angle of repose were similar to the values of wood combustion fly ash, for the other straw fly ash the values differed considerably. While the particle size of this fly ash was much smaller, surprisingly the angle of repose was also lower. This can be attributed to the formation of small agglomerates in this fly ash, which were not disintegrated without a certain stress. PMID:25872727

  11. Leaching behavior of lime-fly ash mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, J.L.; Das, G.P.

    2006-01-15

    As part of a larger investigation that included numerical and field-based components, the use of lime to reduce the leachability of a coal combustion fly ash was evaluated in the laboratory. The focus of this paper is on the experimental assessment of lime-fly ash leachability through sequential leach (SL), freeze-thaw (FT), and wet-dry (WD) leaching as well as multileachant sequential extraction (SE) tests. The results suggest that lime addition reduces the leachability for Cd, Se, and to some extent As. They also suggest that Cr is rendered more leachable with increasing lime content, for the conditions and low levels tested. It appears that there is a threshold lime content ({gt} 1.0%) that must be exceeded prior to reducing the leachability of As and Se. In particular, this threshold likely corresponds to the level at which appreciable cementitious reactions have developed. For example, in the case of As after the first cycle of leaching, the concentration was below the reporting limit (10 {mu} g/L) for 0% lime. However, at 0.5% lime amendment, the leached concentration increased to nearly 50 {mu} g/L. Subsequent lime additions reduced this concentration. No such threshold was observed for Cd leachability as was expected as a direct consequence of hydroxide precipitation, which is well established under the measured pH conditions. As such, Cd mobility is insensitive to the extent to which cementitious reactions are initiated. Overall, the results suggest that while lime stabilization may be effective for reducing leachability, sufficient amounts must be added; otherwise, the leachability of some constituents can actually be exacerbated.

  12. Technical note: Vetiver can grow on coal fly ash without DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Rajarshi; Mukherjee, Anita

    2011-02-01

    Fly ash is a by-product of coal-fired electricity generation plants. The prevalent practice of disposal is as slurry of ash and water to open lands or ash ponds located near power plants and this has lain to waste thousands of hectares all over the world. Wind and leaching are often the causes of off-site contamination from fly ash dumpsites. Vetiver (Vetiveria zizanioides) grown on fly ash for three months showed massive, mesh-like growth of roots which could have a phytostabilizing effect. The plant achieved this without any damage to its nuclear DNA as shown by comet assay done on the root nuclei, which implies the long-term survival of the plant on the remediation site. Also, when Vetiver is used for phytoremediation of coal fly ash, its shoots can be safely grazed by animals as very little of heavy metals in fly ash were found to be translocated to the shoots. These features make planting of Vetiver a practical and environmentally compatible method for restoration of fly ash dumpsites. Lack of DNA damage in Vetiver has been compared to that in a sensitive plant i.e. Allium cepa. Our results suggested that apart from traditional end-points viz. growth parameters like root length, shoot length and dry weight, comet assay could also be included in a battery of tests for initial, rapid and effective selection of plants for restoration and phytoremediation of polluted sites. PMID:21598787

  13. Suppression of phosphate liberation from eutrophic lake sediment by using fly ash and ordinary portland cement.

    PubMed

    Ye, Heng-Peng; Chen, Fan-Zhong; Sheng, Yan-Qing; Sheng, Guo-Ying; Fu, Jia-Mo

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the effect of suppression on phosphate liberation from eutrophic lake sediment by using fly ash and ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was investigated by small scale experiment. A system including sediment, lake water, and several kinds of capping materials was designed to clarify the suppression of phosphate liberation from sediment under the anaerobic condition. The suppression efficiencies of fly ash, OPC and glass bead used as control material were also determined, and these effects were discussed. The suppression efficiency of glass bead was 44.4%, and those of fly ash and OPC were 84.4%, 94.9%, respectively. The suppression by fly ash and OPC was mainly carried out by the adsorption effect, in addition to the covering effect. The suppression efficiency depended on the amounts of the material used, and about 90% of liberated phosphate was suppressed by fly ash of 10.0 Kg m(-2), and OPC of 6.0 Kg m(-2). The concentrations of heavy metals, such as mercury, cadmium, lead, copper, zinc, chromium, silver, arsenic and nickel, in fly ash and OPC were lower than those in the environmental materials. And it was considered that the concentrations of heavy metals in fly ash and OPC were too low to influence the ecosystem in natural water region. PMID:16835118

  14. Suppression of phosphate liberation from eutrophic lake sediment by using fly ash and ordinary Portland cement

    SciTech Connect

    Heng-Peng Ye; Fan-Zhong Chen; Yan-Qing Sheng; Guo-Ying Sheng; Jia-Mo Fu

    2006-08-15

    In this study, the effect of suppression on phosphate liberation from eutrophic lake sediment by using fly ash and ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was investigated by small scale experiment. A system including sediment, lake water, and several kinds of capping materials was designed to clarify the suppression of phosphate liberation from sediment under the anaerobic condition. The suppression efficiencies of fly ash, OPC and glass bead used as control material were also determined, and these effects were discussed. The suppression efficiency of glass bead was 44.4%, and those of fly ash and OPC were 84.4%, 94.9%, respectively. The suppression by fly ash and OPC was mainly carried out by the adsorption effect, in addition to the covering effect. The suppression efficiency depended on the amounts of the material used, and about 90% of liberated phosphate was suppressed by fly ash of 10.0 Kg m{sup -2}, and OPC of 6.0 Kg m{sup -2}. The concentrations of heavy metals, such as mercury, cadmium, lead, copper, zinc, chromium, silver, arsenic and nickel, in fly ash and OPC were lower than those in the environmental materials. And it was considered that the concentrations of heavy metals in fly ash and OPC were too low to influence the ecosystem in natural water region.

  15. Evaluation of the mechanical properties of class-F fly ash.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bumjoo; Prezzi, Monica

    2008-01-01

    Coal-burning power plants in the United States (US) generate more than 70 million tons of fly ash as a by-product annually. Recycling large volumes of fly ash in geotechnical applications may offer an attractive alternative to the disposal problem as most of it is currently dumped in ponds or landfills. Class-F fly ash, resulting from burning of bituminous or anthracite coals, is the most common type of fly ash in the US. In the present study, the mechanical characteristics (compaction response, compressibility, and shear strength) of class-F fly ash were investigated by performing various laboratory tests (compaction test, one-dimensional compression test, direct shear test and consolidated-drained triaxial compression test) on fly ash samples collected from three power plants in the state of Indiana (US). Test results have shown that despite some morphological differences, class-F fly ash exhibits mechanical properties that are, in general, comparable to those observed in natural sandy soils. PMID:17588739

  16. Evaluation of the role of a cationic surfactant on the flow characteristics of fly ash slurry.

    PubMed

    Naik, H K; Mishra, M K; Rao Karanam, U M; Deb, D

    2009-09-30

    Transportation of fly ash is a major problem in its efficient disposal. The main problem associated with fly ash transportation is that the particles settle down sooner than desired. The primary objective of this research is that not only the fly ash particles should remain floated till it reaches the end but also settle down after that. In this investigation the role of a drag-reducing cationic surfactant and a counter-ion has been evaluated to achieve the objectives. The experimental results show encouraging trends of surfactant helping fly ash particles to remain water-borne. The material exhibited Newtonian behavior. This paper describes these in term of shear rates, shear stress, temperature, concentration and viscosity. Rheological tests were conducted using Advanced Computerized Rheometer. Zeta potential was measured to test the stability of the colloidal fly ash particles using Malvern Zeta Sizer instrument. Surface tension was also measured to know the drag reduction behavior of the fly ash slurry by using Surface Tensiometer. The test results and flow diagrams were generated using Rheoplus software and are presented in this paper. Surfactant concentration of 0%, 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.3%, 0.4% and 0.5% by weight was mixed with equal amount of counter-ion and the slurry was prepared by adding fly ash with ordinary tap water to achieve the desired solid concentration of 20% (by weight). PMID:19345482

  17. Experimental and numerical analysis of metal leaching from fly ash-amended highway bases.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Bora; Aydilek, Ahmet H; Li, Lin

    2012-05-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the leaching potential of unpaved road materials (URM) mixed with lime activated high carbon fly ashes and to evaluate groundwater impacts of barium, boron, copper, and zinc leaching. This objective was met by a combination of batch water leach tests, column leach tests, and computer modeling. The laboratory tests were conducted on soil alone, fly ash alone, and URM-fly ash-lime kiln dust mixtures. The results indicated that an increase in fly ash and lime content has significant effects on leaching behavior of heavy metals from URM-fly ash mixture. An increase in fly ash content and a decrease in lime content promoted leaching of Ba, B and Cu whereas Zn leaching was primarily affected by the fly ash content. Numerically predicted field metal concentrations were significantly lower than the peak metal concentrations obtained in laboratory column leach tests, and field concentrations decreased with time and distance due to dispersion in soil vadose zone. PMID:22257699

  18. Increase of available phosphorus by fly-ash application in paddy soils

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.H.; Lee, H.; Lee, Y.B.; Chang, H.H.; Ali, M.A.; Min, W.; Kim, S.; Kim, P.J.

    2007-07-01

    Fly ash from the coal- burning industry may be a potential inorganic soil amendment to increase rice productivity and to restore the soil nutrient balance in paddy soil. In this study, fly ash was applied at rates of 0, 40, 80, and 120 Mg ha{sup -1} in two paddy soils (silt loam in Yehari and loamy sand in Daegok). During rice cultivation, available phosphorus (P) increased significantly with fly ash application, as there was high content of P (786 mg kg{sup -1}) in the applied fly ash. In addition, high content of silicon (Si) and high pH of fly ash contributed to increased available-P content by ion competition between phosphate and silicate and by neutralization of soil acidity, respectively. With fly-ash application, water-soluble P (W-P) content increased significantly together with increasing aluminum- bound P (Al- P) and calcium- bound P (Ca- P) fractions. By contrast, iron- bound P (Fe- P) decreased significantly because of reduction of iron under the flooded paddy soil during rice cultivation. The present experiment indicated that addition of fly ash had a positive benefit on increasing the P availability.

  19. Application of fly ash as an adsorbent for Estradiol in animal waste.

    PubMed

    Norris, Pauline; Hagan, Stephanie; Cohron, Martin; Zhao, Houying; Pan, Wei-Ping; Li, Kawang

    2015-09-15

    The contamination of agricultural ground with estrogen compounds through application of animal wastes is a present concern. At the same time, current uses for waste fly ash having high carbon content are limited. To help mitigate these problems, we examine using waste fly ash as a useful adsorbent for Estradiol in pig waste digests. In this study, Estradiol was added to vials containing water and fly ash from several different power plants. After an extraction process, the amount of Estradiol in the water was measured. Commercial activated carbon was also used for comparison purposes. Vials containing varying concentrations of Estradiol and no trapping material were used as a control. The results from this study indicate that fly ash can be used as a trapping material for Estradiol in water, but that commercially available activated carbon can trap about an order of magnitude more Estradiol than the fly ash and that the effects of the fly ash matrix can both inhibit and promote the solvation of Estradiol into water depending possibly upon pH and cation concentration effects. In addition, preliminary extraction studies using pig waste digest indicate that fly ash can be used as adsorbent for Estradiol present in pig waste. PMID:26150373

  20. Use of fly-ash for sealing a radioactive waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Ollagnier, M.; Tauziede, C.; Olivier, J.

    1993-12-31

    The mining industry currently uses fly-ash from coal-fired power-plants to close access shafts in abandoned mines, in sedimentary formations. The technique consists of installing a plug of fly-ash, about fifty meters high, at the base of the shaft-lining. In this study, fly-ash is considered as a possible sealant for radioactive repositories in sedimentary formations, as well as in hard rock. Specific studies have been conducted in order to assess the feasibility of this technique, and to improve the long-term performance of the fly-ash seals. The hydraulic and mechanical characteristics of fly-ash, taken from the plug of an abandoned shaft, as well as from dumps of various ages, were measured. Laboratory tests showed that it is possible to reduce the hydraulic conductivity of fly-ash by a factor of thousand, with the addition of ten percent bentonite. Moreover, it seems possible to block fine fissures in the surrounding damaged rock by injecting grouts made of cement and fly-ash having maximum diameters of twenty micrometers.

  1. Effects of fly ash and Helminthosporium oryzae on growth and yield of three cultivars of rice.

    PubMed

    Singh, Lamabam P; Siddiqui, Zaki A

    2003-01-01

    A 120-day greenhouse experiment was conducted to study the effects of various fly ash concentrations (0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100% vol/vol) with normal field soil and Helminthosporium oryzae on the growth and yield of three cultivars (Pusa Basmati, Pant-4 and Pant-10) of rice, Oryza sativa L. Application of 20% and 40% fly ash with soil caused a significant increase in plant growth and yield of all the three cultivars. Forty percent fly ash caused a higher increase in growth and yield than did 20%. Sixty percent, 80% and 100% fly ash had an adverse effect on growth and yield of all the three cultivars, the maximum being with 100% fly ash. Inoculation of H. oryzae had an adverse effect on the growth and yield, Pant-10 suffered higher damage by H. oryzae than Pusa Basmati and Pant-4. Pant-10 also exhibited higher infected leaf area and greater disease symptoms of H. oryzae than did Pusa Basmati and Pant-4. Plants grown in 100% fly ash suffered higher reductions in growth and yield with H. oryzae than plants grown in pure soil or in 20% or 40% fly ash. In general, plant growth was best in Pusa Basmati followed by Pant-4 and Pant-10, while yield was higher in Pant-4 followed by Pant-10 and Pusa Basmati. PMID:12421012

  2. Fly ash effect on improving soil properties and rice productivity in Korean paddy soils.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyup; Ha, Ho Sung; Lee, Chang Hoon; Lee, Yong Bok; Kim, Pil Joo

    2006-09-01

    Paddy soils in Korea generally require the addition of Si to enhance rice productivity. Coal combustion fly ash, which has a high available Si content and alkaline pH, was selected as a potential source of Si in this study. Two field experiments were carried out to evaluate rice (Oryza sativa) productivity in silt loam and loamy sand soils to which 0, 40, 80, and 120 Mg ha(-1) of fly ash were added with 2 Mg ha(-1) Si as a control. Fly ash increased the soil pH and available Si and P contents of both soils. The amount of available B increased to a maximum of 2.57 mg kg(-1), and the B content of the rice plants increased to a maximum of 52-53 mg kg(-1) following the addition of 120 Mg ha(-1) fly ash. The rice plants did not show toxicity effects. The highest rice yields were achieved following the addition of around 90 Mg ha(-1) fly ash. The application of fly ash increased Si, P and K uptake by the rice plants, but did not result in an excessive uptake of heavy metals in the submerged paddy soil. In conclusion, fly ash could be a good supplement to other inorganic soil amendments to improve the nutrient balance in paddy soils. PMID:16153826

  3. Fly ash as a soil ameliorant for improving crop production--a review.

    PubMed

    Jala, Sudha; Goyal, Dinesh

    2006-06-01

    Fly ash, a resultant of combustion of coal at high temperature, has been regarded as a problematic solid waste all over the world. Many possible beneficial applications of fly ash are being evaluated to minimize waste, decrease cost of disposal and provide value-added products. The conventional disposal methods for fly ash lead to degradation of arable land and contamination of the ground water. However fly ash is a useful ameliorant that may improve the physical, chemical and biological properties of problem soils and is a source of readily available plant macro and micronutrients. In conjunction with organic manure and microbial inoculants, fly ash can enhance plant biomass production from degraded soils. Detailed studies on the nature and composition of fly ash, conducted during the latter half of the 20th century have helped in repeatedly confirming the various useful applications of this hitherto neglected industrial waste. The purpose of this paper is to review the available information on various attributes of fly ash and explore the possibility of exploiting them for agronomic advantage. PMID:16551534

  4. Toxicity and toxic potential of fly ash from municipal incinerators assessed by means of a fish early life stage test

    SciTech Connect

    Helder, T.; Stutterheim, E.; Olie, K.

    1982-01-01

    The toxicity and toxic potential of fly ash were assessed, using rainbow trout yolk sac fry. In contrast to fly ash itself, extracts of fly ash were extremely toxic, producing typical toxicopathological features fo TCDD-intoxication. By comparison with earlier experiments using pure 2,3,7,8-TCDD, the toxic potential of fly ash was roughly estimated to be 75-125 ng.g/sup -1/ toxic aequivalents TCDD. Obviously, this toxic potential is attributed for a minor part to 2,3,7,8-TCDD and for the greater part to the other chlorinated dioxin congeners and the dibenzofurans, present in fly ash.

  5. Increasing carbon content of fly ash: Consequences and recovery of lost value

    SciTech Connect

    Willauer, C.S.; Gasiorowski, S.A.

    1999-07-01

    In response to Phase 2 of the Clean Air Act of 1990, US electric utilities operating coal fired power plants are currently installing low NO {sub x} equipment to meet new air emissions requirements. As these plants begin to operate under the lower NO{sub x} requirements, more carbon remains in the plant's fly ash (a by-product of coal combustion) often exceeding the maximum allowable carbon content of 6% for use in concrete. The carbon content of the fly ash can be further elevated by alternate fuel strategies. As utilities continue to seek improvements in fuel economies by purchase of foreign coals and alternate fuels such as petroleum coke, the resulting carbon level of the fly ash can increase dramatically due to the combustion characteristics of these materials. While considerable reduction in fuel costs are possible, the variable, high-carbon fly ash must be disposed in landfills or used in low value, non-concrete applications. For utilities that have become accustomed to marketing the majority of their coal combustion products (CCPs) land filling is a highly unsatisfactory alternative. Recently, the American Coal Ash Association conducted a survey of electric-utilities to determine the impact of NOx reduction strategies on the marketability of rendered unusable for concrete markets. Shortage of fly ash, particularly fly ashes derived from eastern bituminous coals (Class F-ash) have occurred in the eastern US. This fact combined with the increased demand for cement in the same region has pushed prices higher for concrete grade, high-quality fly ash. Renewed interest has thus developed in processes to restore the value of the high-LOI fly ash.

  6. Leachate concentrations from water leach and column leach tests on fly ash-stabilized soils

    SciTech Connect

    Bin-Shafique, S.; Benson, C.H.; Edil, T.B.; Hwang, K.

    2006-01-15

    Batch water leaching tests (WLTs) and column leaching tests (CLTs) were conducted on coal-combustion fly ashes, soil, and soil-fly ash mixtures to characterize leaching of Cd, Cr, Se, and Ag. The concentrations of these metals were also measured in the field at two sites where soft fine-grained soils were mechanically stabilized with fly ash. Concentrations in leachate from the WLTs on soil-fly ash mixtures are different from those on fly ash alone and cannot be accurately estimated based on linear dilution calculations using concentrations from WLTs on fly ash alone. The concentration varies nonlinearly with fly ash content due to the variation in pH with fly ash content. Leachate concentrations are low when the pH of the leachate or the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the soil is high. Initial concentrations from CLTs are higher than concentrations from WLTs due to differences in solid-liquid ratio, pH, and solid-liquid contact. However, both exhibit similar trends with fly ash content, leachate pH, and soil properties. Scaling factors can be applied to WLT concentrations (50 for Ag and Cd, 10 for Cr and Se) to estimate initial concentrations for CLTs. Concentrations in leachate collected from the field sites were generally similar or slightly lower than concentrations measured in CLTs on the same materials. Thus, CLTs appear to provide a good indication of conditions that occur in the field provided that the test conditions mimic the field conditions. In addition, initial concentrations in the field can be conservatively estimated from WLT concentrations using the aforementioned scaling factors provided that the pH of the infiltrating water is near neutral.

  7. Growth and elemental accumulation by canola on soil amended with coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Yunusa, I A M; Manoharan, V; DeSilva, D L; Eamus, D; Murray, B R; Nissanka, S P

    2008-01-01

    To explore the agronomic potential of an Australian coal fly ash, we conducted two glasshouse experiments in which we measured chlorophyll fluorescence, CO2 assimilation (A), transpiration, stomatal conductance, biomass accumulation, seed yield, and elemental uptake for canola (Brassica napus) grown on soil amended with an alkaline fly ash. In Experiment 1, application of up to 25 Mg/ha of fly ash increased A and plant weight early in the season before flowering and seed yield by up to 21%. However, at larger rates of ash application A, plant growth, chlorophyll concentration, and yield were all reduced. Increases in early vigor and seed yield were associated with enhanced uptake of phosphorus (P) by the plants treated with fly ash. Fly ash application did not influence accumulation of B, Cu, Mo, or Zn in the stems at any stage of plant growth or in the seed at harvest, except Mo concentration, which was elevated in the seed. Accumulation of these elements was mostly in the leaves, where concentrations of Cu and Mo increased with any amount of ash applied while that of B occurred only with ash applied at 625 Mg/ha. In Experiment 2, fly ash applied at 500 Mg/ha and mixed into the whole 30 cm soil core was detrimental to growth and yield of canola, compared with restricting mixing to 5 or 15 cm depth. In contrast, application of ash at 250 Mg/ha with increasing depth of mixing increased A and seed yield. We concluded that fly ash applied at not more than 25 Mg/ha and mixed into the top 10 to 15 cm of soil is sufficient to obtain yield benefits. PMID:18453446

  8. Growth and elemental accumulation by canola on soil amended with coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Yunusa, I.A.M.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Murray, B.R.; Nissanka, S.P.

    2008-05-15

    To explore the agronomic potential of an Australian coal fly ash, we conducted two glasshouse experiments in which we measured chlorophyll fluorescence, CO{sub 2} assimilation (A), transpiration, stomatal conductance, biomass accumulation, seed yield, and elemental uptake for canola (Brassica napus) grown on soil amended with an alkaline fly ash. In Experiment 1, application of up to 25 Mg/ha of fly ash increased A and plant weight early in the season before flowering and seed yield by up to 21%. However, at larger rates of ash application A, plant growth, chlorophyll concentration, and yield were all reduced. Increases in early vigor and seed yield were associated with enhanced uptake of phosphorus (P) by the plants treated with fly ash. Fly ash application did not influence accumulation of B, Cu, Mo, or Zn in the stems at any stage of plant growth or in the seed at harvest, except Mo concentration, which was elevated in the seed. Accumulation of these elements was mostly in the leaves, where concentrations of Cu and Mo increased with any amount of ash applied while that of B occurred only with ash applied at 625 Mg/ha. In Experiment 2, fly ash applied at 500 Mg/ha and mixed into the whole 30 cm soil core was detrimental to growth and yield of canola, compared with restricting mixing to 5 or 15 cm depth. In contrast, application of ash at 250 Mg/ha with increasing depth of mixing increased A and seed yield. We concluded that fly ash applied at not more than 25 Mg/ha and mixed into the top 10 to 15 cm of soil is sufficient to obtain yield benefits.

  9. Construction of an embankment with a fly and bottom ash mixture: field performance study

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, S.; Balunaini, U.; Yildirim, I.Z.; Prezzi, M.; Siddiki, N.Z.

    2009-06-15

    Fly ash and bottom ash are coal combustion by-products (CCBPs) that are generated in large quantities throughout the world. It is often economical to dispose ash as mixtures rather than separately; that notwithstanding, only a few studies have been performed to investigate the behavior of fly and bottom ash mixtures, particularly those with high contents of fly ash. Also, there is very limited data available in the literature on the field performance of structures constructed using ash mixtures. This paper describes the construction and the instrumentation of a demonstration embankment built with an ash mixture (60:40 by weight of fly ash:bottom ash) on State Road 641, Terre Haute, Ind. Monitoring of the demonstration embankment was conducted for a period of 1 year from the start of construction of the embankment. The settlement of the embankment stabilized approximately 5 months after the end of its construction. According to horizontal inclinometer readings, the differential settlement at the top of the embankment is about 5 mm. Results from field quality control tests performed during construction of the demonstration embankment and monitoring data from vertical and horizontal inclinometers and settlement plates indicate that the ash mixture investigated can be considered an acceptable embankment construction material.

  10. Salt-soda sinter process for recovering aluminum from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, William J.; Seeley, Forest G.

    1981-01-01

    A method for recovering aluminum values from fly ash comprises sintering the fly ash with a mixture of NaCl and Na.sub.2 CO.sub.3 to a temperature in the range 700.degree.-900.degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to convert greater than 90% of the aluminum content of the fly ash into an acid-soluble fraction and then contacting the thus-treated fraction with an aqueous solution of nitric or sulfuric acid to effect dissolution of aluminum and other metal values in said solution.

  11. Salt-soda sinter process for recovering aluminum from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, W.J.; Seeley, F.G.

    A method for recovering aluminum values from fly ash comprises sintering the fly ash with a mixture of NaCl and Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ to a temperature in the range 700/sup 0/ to 900/sup 0/C for a period of time sufficient to convert greater than 90% of the aluminum content of the fly ash into an acidsoluble fraction and then contacting the thus-treated fraction with an aqueous solution of nitric or sulfuric acid to effect dissolution of aluminum and other metal values in said solution.

  12. The influence of fly ash and shell-fish on physical property of concrete cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, Nurlaela; Hasruddin, M.

    2012-06-01

    The waste fly ash and shell fish are added to base material of cement (clinker, gypsum, trash and lime stone), for environmental reason. The ratio fly ash and shell fish was varied respectively 375:125; 250:250; 125:375, in grams weight for 2500 grams of total material. The chemical composition of raw material was determined by using x-rays fluorescence (XRF). Physical properties of sample match with Standar Nasional Indonesia (SNI). The physical properties of the best sample is made from composition of fly ash and shell fish as a substitution material on cement was 10% in weight, with ratio 250:250 in grams weight.

  13. Aggregate material formulated with MSWI bottom ash and APC fly ash for use as secondary building material

    SciTech Connect

    Valle-Zermeño, R. del; Formosa, J.; Chimenos, J.M.; Martínez, M.; Fernández, A.I.

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► A concrete formulation was optimized using Bottom Ash and APC ash. ► 10% of APC ash achieves good compromise between economic and performance aspects. ► The crushed concrete was evaluated as secondary building granular material. ► The environmental behavior allows its use as secondary material. ► The abrasion resistance is not good enough for its use as a road sub-base material. - Abstract: The main goal of this paper is to obtain a granular material formulated with Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) bottom ash (BA) and air pollution control (APC) fly ash to be used as secondary building material. Previously, an optimum concrete mixture using both MSWI residues as aggregates was formulated. A compromise between the environmental behavior whilst maximizing the reuse of APC fly ash was considered and assessed. Unconfined compressive strength and abrasion resistance values were measured in order to evaluate the mechanical properties. From these results, the granular mixture was not suited for certain applications owing to the high BA/APC fly ash content and low cement percentages used to reduce the costs of the final product. Nevertheless, the leaching test performed showed that the concentrations of all heavy metals were below the limits established by the current Catalan legislation for their reutilization. Therefore, the material studied might be mainly used in embankments, where high mechanical properties are not needed and environmental safety is assured.

  14. The effect of fly ash on plant growth and yield of tomato.

    PubMed

    Khan, M R; Khan, M W

    1996-01-01

    A gradual increase in fly ash concentrations in the normal field soil (0, 10, 20...100% volume/volume) increased the porosity, water holding capacity, pH, conductivity, C.E.C., sulphate, carbonate, bicarbonate, chloride, P, K, Ca, Mg, Mn, Cu, Zn and B. Fly ash additions to soil caused significant reductions in nitrogen content, it being almost nil in 90 and 100%. Tomato plants grown in the ash-soil mixture showed luxuriant growth with bigger and greener leaves. Plant growth, yield, (flowering, fruiting, fruit weight/plant, mean fruit weight), carotenoids and chlorophylls were mostly enhanced in the treatments with 40-80% fly ash, being optimal at 50 or 60%. From 60 or 70% onwards, the measured parameters tended to reduce. At 100% fly ash, yield (weight of fruits/plant) was considerably reduced. The boron content of tomato leaves displayed a gradual increase with fly ash addition from 20% onwards, while response of foliar nitrogen was just the opposite. The most economic level of fly ash incorporation was 40%, which improved the yield and market value of tomato fruits (mean weight) by 81 and 30%, respectively. PMID:15091390

  15. Power-plant fly-ash utilization: a chemical processing perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Burnet, G.; Murtha, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    The 1976 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) deals with the management of solid and hazardous wastes, and encourages energy and resource recovery. Recent research has indicated that solid wastes from coal combustion, including fly ash, could be classified as hazardous under present EPA definitions. The seriousness of this possibility has been recognized and new rules for coal ash waste disposal are being considered. Ames Laboratory research on fly ash utilization as an alternative to disposal includes extraction of metals from the ash and discovery of uses for the process residues. Recovery of alumina and iron oxides by physical and chemical processing would permit large scale utilization of fly ash and help reduce dependency on imports. One of the processes investigated uses a lime-soda sinter method to form soluble aluminate compounds from mixtures of fly ash, limestone, and soda ash. The aluminates are extracted, treated to remove silicates, and precipitated: the precipitate is calcined to metallurgical grade alumina. The extract residue shows promise as a raw material for the production of Portland cement. Process economics are presented, and the effects of alumina and silica contents of the fly ash, sintering temperatures and time, and sales credits for by-products are discussed.

  16. INVESTIGATION OF FLY ASH AND ACTIVATED CARBON OBTAINED FROM PULVERIZED COAL BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Edward K. Levy; Christopher Kiely

    2004-11-01

    One of the techniques for Hg capture in coal-fired boilers involves injection of activated carbon (AC) into the boiler downstream of the air preheater. Hg is adsorbed onto the AC particles and fly ash, which are then both removed in an electrostatic precipitator or baghouse. This project addresses the issues of Hg on activated carbon and on fly ash from a materials re-use point of view. It also addresses the possible connection between SCR reactors, fly ash properties and Hg capture. The project is determining the feasibility of separating AC from fly ash in a fluidized bed and of regenerating the separated AC by heating the AC to elevated temperatures in a fluidized bed. The temperatures needed to drive off the Hg from the ash in a fluidized bed are also being determined. Finally, samples of fly ash from power plants with SCR reactors for NO{sub x} control, are being analyzed to determine the effect of SCR on the ash. These analyses will also determine the properties of ash which are important for Hg capture.

  17. A MANUAL FOR THE USE OF ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATORS TO COLLECT FLY ASH PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report incorporates the results of many studies into a manual oriented toward the collection of fly ash particles (produced by the combustion of pulverized coal) by electrostatic precipitation (ESP). It presents concepts, measurement techniques, factors influencing ESP perfor...

  18. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF OIL FLY ASH AND RELEVANCE TO AMBIENT AIR PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated increased human morbidity and mortality with elevations in the concentration of ambient air particulate matter (PM). Fugitive fly ash from the combustion of oil and residual fuel oil significantly contributes to the ambient air particle bur...

  19. The geochemistry and bioreactivity of fly-ash from coal-burning power stations.

    PubMed

    Jones, Timothy; Wlodarczyk, Anna; Koshy, Lata; Brown, Patrick; Shao, Longyi; BéruBé, Kelly

    2009-07-01

    Fly-ash is a byproduct of the combustion of coal in power stations for the generation of electricity. The fly-ash forms from the melting of incombustible minerals found naturally in the coal. The very high coal combustion temperatures result in the formation of microscopic glass particles from which minerals such as quartz, haematite and mullite can later recrystallize. In addition to these minerals, the glassy fly-ash contains a number of leachable metals. Mullite is a well-known material in the ceramics industry and a known respiratory hazard. Macroscopically mullite can be found in a large range of morphologies; however microscopic crystals appear to favour a fibrous habit. Fly-ash is a recognized bioreactive material in rat lung, generating hydroxyl radicals, releasing iron, and causing DNA damage. However, the mechanisms of the bioreactivity are still unclear and the relative contributions of the minerals and leachable metals to that toxicity are not well known. PMID:19604058

  20. Research on carbon content in fly ash from circulating fluidized bed boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Xianbin Xiao; Hairui Yang; Hai Zhang; Junfu Lu; Guangxi Yue

    2005-08-01

    The carbon content in the fly ash from most Chinese circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers is much higher than expected, which directly influences the combustion efficiency. In the present paper, carbon burnout was investigated in both field tests and laboratory experiments. The effect of coal property, operation condition, gas-solid mixing, char deactivation, residence time, and cyclone performance are analyzed seriatim based on a large amount of experimental results. A coal index is proposed to describe the coal rank, having a strong effect on the char burnout. Bad gas-solid mixing in the furnace is another important reason of the higher carbon content in the fly ash. Some chars in the fly ash are deactivated during combustion of large coal particles and have very low carbon reactivity. Several suggestions are made about design, operation, and modification to reduce the carbon content in the fly ash. 14 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Effects of coal fly ash-amended composts on the yield and elemental uptake by plants

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, M.P.; Ghuman, G.S.; James, J.; Chandra, K. )

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of coal fly ash-amended composts for use as an alternate manure for agricultural crops. Home-made organic composts was mixed in various proportions with fine fly ash collected from Savannah River Site, and allowed to decompose for two weeks while the mixture was kept wet. Water extracts from the amended composts were analyzed for selected major and trace elements. These amended composts were mixed with sifted sandy loam soil in a predetermined optimum ratio of 1:3 and used to grow corn and sorghum plants. It was shown that fly ash additions to home-made compost facilitated efficient plant utilization of nutrients when 20-40% fly ash in compost was applied to the soil. The maximum dry shoot yields correlated with the higher concentrations of K, Ca and N and lower concentrations of B in the amended compost treatment.

  2. Induction of hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes by coal fly ash in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, P.K.; Singh, Y.; Tyagi, S.R.; Misra, U.K.

    1987-12-01

    The effect of intratracheal administration of fly ash, its benzene-extracted residue and the benzene extract has been studied on the activities of hepatic mixed-function oxidases in the rat. Fly ash and its fractions significantly increased the levels of cytochrome P-450, cytochrome b/sub 5/, cytochrome b/sub 5/ reductase, NADPH-cytochrome c reductase, aminopyrine N-demethylase, aniline hydroxylase, and glutathione S-transferase in a dose-dependent manner. Phenobarbital or 3-methylcholanthrene treatment along with the administration of fly ash or its fractions showed an additive effect on the activities of the mixed-function oxidases. The observed effects were due to chemical component, i.e., organic and inorganic fractions of fly ash, and not due to its particulate nature. This was shown by the administration of glass beads, which did not cause any alteration in the activities of hepatic mixed-function oxidases.

  3. Liquidus (Ca+Mg)-rich exsolution phases in low-sulfur fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, J.T.; Meeker, G.M.

    1999-07-01

    Ca- and Mg-rich fly ash samples from an electric power plant burning low-sulfur Powder River Coal were analyzed using optical petrographic microscope (OPM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron microprobe analyzer (EMPA), and Gandolfi and bulk-powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Abundant Ca and Mg in the fly ash, probably originating from dispersed authigenic and residual minerals in the coal feed stock, flux the molten fly ash, effectively allowing many crystalline phases to achieve ordering, to separate from each other, and to grow to appreciable size (>10{micro}m) in the brief time (<20 sec) they spend at high temperature. Phases identified from the (Ca+Mg)-rich fly ash are listed in a table and shown in figures.

  4. Kinetics of fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout. Quarterly report, October 1996--December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Dodoo, J.N.; Okoh, J.M.; Diaz, A.

    1997-06-01

    The presence of carbon in fly ash requires an increase in the dosage of the air-entraining admixture for concrete mix, and may cause the admixture to lose efficiency. Specifying authorities for the concrete producers have set maximum allowable levels of residual carbon. These levels are the so called {open_quotes}Loss On Ignition{close_quotes} (LOI). The concrete producer`s day-to-day purchasing decisions sets the LOI at 4%. The objective of the project is to investigate the kinetics of oxidation of residual carbon present in coal fly ash as a possible first step toward producing low-carbon fly ash from high-carbon, low quality fly ash.

  5. Utilizing fly ash particles to produce low-cost metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Withers, G.

    2008-07-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are a blend of fine ceramic particles mixed with metals such as aluminium or magnesium. Fly ash is considerably cheaper than ceramics; aluminium-fly ash composites cost less than 60% of conventional aluminium-SiC composites making them attractive to automakers striving for lower weight and cheaper materials for brake rotors or brake drums. Ultalite.com has consulted with US researchers to to find the optimum requirements of the fly ash needed to make MMCs. Particle size 20-40 microns, low calcium oxide content and spherical particles were identified. The desired particles once extracted are stirred into molten aluminum and the resulting composite is into ingots for shipment to a casting facility. Dynamometer testing has shown that aluminium-fly ash composite brake drums have better performance and wear than cast iron drums. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Comprehensive phase characterization of crystalline and amorphous phases of a Class F fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Chancey, Ryan T.; Stutzman, Paul; Juenger, Maria C.G.; Fowler, David W.

    2010-01-15

    A comprehensive approach to qualitative and quantitative characterization of crystalline and amorphous constituent phases of a largely heterogeneous Class F fly ash is presented. Traditionally, fly ash composition is expressed as bulk elemental oxide content, generally determined by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. However, such analysis does not discern between relatively inert crystalline phases and highly reactive amorphous phases of similar elemental composition. X-ray diffraction was used to identify the crystalline phases present in the fly ash, and the Rietveld quantitative phase analysis method was applied to determine the relative proportion of each of these phases. A synergistic method of X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and multispectral image analysis was developed to identify and quantify the amorphous phases present in the fly ash.

  7. Cesium trapping characteristics on fly ash filter according to different carrier gases

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jin-Myeong; Park, Jang-Jin; Song, Kee-Chan

    2007-07-01

    Fly ash, which is a kind of waste from a coal fired power plant, has been used as a trapping material because it contains silica and alumina suitable for forming pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}). Fly ash is sintered in order to fabricate it into a self-standing filter. The effect of a carrier gas on a cesium trapping quantity is investigated to analyze the cesium trapping characteristics by the fly ash filter in a lab-scale experimental apparatus. The chemical form of the cesium trapped on the filter after trapping cesium is identified to be a pollucite phase regardless of the type of carrier gas. The trapping efficiency of cesium by the fly ash filter under the air and NO{sub x}/air conditions is up to 99.0 %. However, the trapping efficiency of the cesium under the SO{sub x} condition was decreased to 80.0 %. (authors)

  8. Notes on the efficacy of wet versus dry screening of fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Valentim, B.; Hower, J.C.; Flores, D.; Guedes, A.

    2008-08-15

    The methodology used to obtain fly ash subsamples of different sizes is generally based on wet or dry sieving methods. However, the worth of such methods is not certain if the methodology applied is not mentioned in the analytical procedure. After performing a fly ash mechanical dry, sieving, the authors compared those results with the ones obtained by laser diffraction on the same samples and found unacceptable discrepancies. A preliminary, study of a wet sieving analysis carried out on an economizer fly ash sample showed that this method was more effective than the dry sieving. The importance of standardizing the way samples are handled, pretreated and presented to the instrument of analysis are suggested and interlaboratory reproducibility trials are needed to create a common standard methodology to obtain large amounts of fly ash size fraction subsamples.

  9. Investigation of air-entraining admixture dosage in fly ash concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Ley, M.T.; Harris, N.J.; Folliard, K.J.; Hover, K.C.

    2008-09-15

    The amount of air-entraining admixture (AEA) needed to achieve a target air content in fresh concrete can vary significantly with differences in the fly ash used in the concrete. The work presented in this paper evaluates the ability to predict the AEA dosage on the basis of tests on the fly ash alone. All results were compared with the dosage of AEA required to produce an air content of 6% in fresh concrete. Fly ash was sampled from six separate sources. For four of these sources, samples were obtained both before and after the introduction of 'low-NOx burners'. Lack of definitive data about the coal itself or the specifics of the burning processes prevents the ability to draw specific conclusions about the impact of low-NOx burners on AEA demand. Nevertheless, the data suggest that modification of the burning process to meet environmental quality standards may affect the fly ash-AEA interaction.

  10. Potential of fly ash for neutralisation of acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Asif; Jia, Yu; Maurice, Christian; Öhlander, Björn

    2016-09-01

    Lignite (PK), bituminous (FI) and biomass (SE) fly ashes (FAs) were mineralogically and geochemically characterised, and their element leachability was studied with batch leaching tests. The potential for acid neutralisation (ANP) was quantified by their buffering capacity, reflecting their potential for neutralisation of acid mine drainage. Quartz was the common mineral in FAs detected by XRD with iron oxide, anhydrite, and magnesioferrite in PK, mullite and lime in FI, and calcite and anorthite in SE. All the FAs had high contents of major elements such as Fe, Si, Al and Ca. The Ca content in SE was six and eight times higher compared to PK and FI, respectively. Sulphur content in PK and SE was one magnitude higher than FI. Iron concentrations were higher in PK. The trace element concentrations varied between the FAs. SE had the highest ANP (corresponding to 275 kg CaCO3 tonne(-1)) which was 15 and 10 times higher than PK and FI, respectively. The concentrations of Ca(2+), SO4 (2-), Na(+) and Cl(-) in the leachates were much higher compared to other elements from all FA samples. Iron, Cu and Hg were not detected in any of the FA leachates because of their mild to strong alkaline nature with pH ranging from 9 to 13. Potassium leached in much higher quantity from SE than from the other ashes. Arsenic, Mn and Ni leached from PK only, while Co and Pb from SE only. The concentrations of Zn were higher in the leachates from SE. The FAs used in this study have strong potential for the neutralisation of AMD due to their alkaline nature. However, on the other hand, FAs must be further investigated, with scaled-up experiments before full-scale application, because they might leach pronounced concentrations of elements of concern with decreasing pH while neutralising AMD. PMID:27209637

  11. Coal fly ash as an amendment to container substrate for Spathiphyllum production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianjun; Li, Yuncong

    2006-10-01

    Coal fly ash, possessing alkalinity and containing some essential mineral elements, could be an alternative to lime amendment and a nutrient source of container substrates for ornamental plant growth. This study examined physiochemical properties of three fly ashes collected from Florida, Michigan, and North Carolina and container substrates formulated by incorporating commercial dolomite and the three fly ashes, respectively into a soilless basal substrate. The basal, dolomite- and fly ash-amended substrates were used to grow peace lily (Spathiphyllum Schott 'Ty's Pride'), a popular ornamental foliage plant, in 15-cm diameter containers in a shaded greenhouse. Electrical conductivities and pH of the substrates were monitored monthly. Plant canopy heights and widths, shoot fresh and dry weights were recorded five months after transplanting, and tissue nutrient contents were measured. Three fly ashes and the commercial dolomite were able to raise pH of the basal substrate from 3.8 to about 6.8. Canopy heights and widths as well as shoot fresh and dry weights of plants produced from fly ash-amended substrates were comparable to those produced from dolomite-amended substrate but significantly different from those produced from the basal substrate. On an average, five necrotic leaves appeared from plants produced in the basal substrate; however, less than one necrotic leaf occurred on plants produced in either dolomite- or fly ash-amended substrates. As a result, the quality grade of plants grown in the basal substrate was low, and plants were not marketable. Additionally, electrical conductivities of fly ash-amended substrates were consistently higher during the course of plant growth, suggesting that, in addition to neutralizing pH, the amended fly ashes provide nutrients for peace lily growth, which was confirmed by high nutrient contents in plant shoots. This study demonstrates that the three fly ashes can be alternatives to commercial dolomites used as amendments

  12. Leaching characteristics of arsenic and selenium from coal fly ash: role of calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Wang; Jianmin Wang; Yulin Tang; Honglan Shi; Ken Ladwig

    2009-05-15

    Understanding the leaching behavior of arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) in coal fly ash is important in evaluating the potential environmental impact of coal fly ash. Batch experiments were employed to systematically investigate the leaching behavior of As and Se in two major types of coal fly ashes, bituminous coal ash and sub-bituminous coal ash, and to determine the underlying processes that control As and Se leaching. The effects of pH, solid/liquid (S/L) ratio, calcium addition, and leaching time on the release of As and Se were studied. Overall, bituminous coal ash leached significantly more As and Se than sub-bituminous coal ash, and Se was more readily leachable, in both absolute concentration and relative fraction, than As for both types of fly ashes. Adsorption/desorption played a major role on As and Se leaching from bituminous coal ashes. However, calcium precipitation played the most important role in reducing As and Se leaching from sub-bituminous coal ashes in the entire experimental pH range. The leaching of As and Se from bituminous coal ashes generally increased with increases in the S/L ratio and leaching time. However, for sub-bituminous coal ashes, the leaching of As was not detected under most experimental conditions, while the leaching of Se increased with increases in the S/L ratio and leaching time. As{sup V} and Se{sup IV} were found to be the major species in all ash leachates in this study. 46 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Determination of benzo[a]pyrene and dibenzopyrenes in a Chinese coal fly ash certified reference material.

    PubMed

    Masala, Silvia; Bergvall, Christoffer; Westerholm, Roger

    2012-08-15

    Air pollution from coal combustion is of great concern in China because coal is the country's principal source of energy and it has been estimated that coal combustion is one of the main sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions in the nation. This study reports the concentrations of 15 PAHs including benzo[a]pyrene, dibenzo[a,l]pyrene, dibenzo[a,e]pyrene, dibenzo[a,i]pyrene and dibenzo[a,h]pyrene in a coal fly ash certified reference material (CRM) from China. To the best of our knowledge, dibenzo[a,l]pyrene, dibenzo[a,i]pyrene and dibenzo[a,h]pyrene concentrations in coal fly ash particles have not previously been reported. Benzo[a]pyrene is the only one of the studied hydrocarbons whose concentration in the coal fly ash CRM had previously been certified. The concentration of this species measured in this present work was twice the certified value. This is probably because of the exhaustive accelerated solvent extraction method employed. Consecutive extractions indicated an extraction recovery in excess of 95% for benzo[a]pyrene. For the other determined PAHs, repeat extractions indicated recoveries above 90%. PMID:22728296

  14. Use of a massive volume air sampler to collect fly ash for biological characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Y.S.

    1984-06-01

    A massive volume air sampler (MVAS) with a flow rate of some 17/SUP/3/min and designed to collect ambient aerosols was modified for the collection of fly ash emissions from the stack mouth of an experimental fluidised bed combustor for physicochemical and biological characterisation. The sampler consisted of 2 impactor stages and an electrostatic precipitator section. High volume filter fly ash samples and laboratory size cascade impactor samples were obtained simultaneously to verify the operation of the MVAS.

  15. The reaction of acid mine drainage with fly ash from coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, A.G.

    1999-07-01

    The placement of alkaline fly ash in abandoned, reclaimed or active surface coal mines is intended to reduce the amount of acid mine drainage (AMD) produced at such sites by neutralization, inhibition of acid forming bacteria, encapsulation of the pyrite or water diversion. A continuing concern with this application is the potential release of trace elements from the fly ash when it is placed in contact with AMD. To investigate the possible release of antimony, arsenic, barium, boron, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, nickel, selenium, and zinc from fly ash, a series of column leaching tests were conducted. A one kg fly ash sample, placed in a 5-cm by 1 m acrylic columns, was leached at a nominal rate of 250 mL/d for between 30 and 60 days. The leachant solutions were deionized water, and dilute solutions of sulfuric acid and ferric chloride. Leaching tests have been completed on 28 fly ash samples. leachate data, analyzed as the mass extracted with respect to the concentration in the solid, indicate that the release of trace elements is variable, with only barium and zinc extracted at greater than 50 pct of the amount present in the original sample. As a comparison, water quality changes have been monitored at three sites where fly ash grout was injected after reclamation to control AMD. When compared before and after grouting, small increases in pH and decreases in acidity at discharge points were observed. Concentrations of trace metals were found to be comparable in treated and untreated areas. When grouted and ungrouted areas were compared, the effect of the fly ash was shown to be localized in the areas of injection. These studies indicated that when fly ash is used as a reagent to control of AMD, the release of trace elements is relatively small.

  16. Geochemical modeling and assessment of leaching from carbonated municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Chen, Qi; Jamro, Imtiaz Ali; Li, Rundong; Li, Yanlong; Li, Shaobai; Luan, Jingde

    2016-06-01

    Municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ashes are characterized by high calcium oxide (CaO) content. Carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorption by MSWI fly ash was discussed based on thermogravimetry (TG)/differential thermal analysis (DTA), minerology analysis, and adapting the Stenoir equation. TG/DTA analysis showed that the weight gain of the fly ash below 440 °C was as high as 5.70 %. An adapted Stenoir equation for MSWI fly ash was discussed. The chloride in MSWI fly ash has a major impact on CO2 adsorption by MSWI fly ash or air pollution control (APC) residues. Geochemical modeling of the critical trace elements copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), and antimony (Sb) before and after carbonation was performed using a thermodynamic equilibrium model for solubility and a surface complexation model for metal sorption. Leaching of critical trace elements was generally found to be strongly dependent on the degree of carbonation attained, and their solubility appeared to be controlled by several minerals. Adsorption on ferrum (Fe) and aluminum (Al) colloids was also responsible for removal of the trace elements Cd, Pb, and Sb. We used Hakanson's potential ecological risk index (HPERI) to evaluate the risk of trace element leaching in general. The results demonstrate that the ecological risk showed a V-shaped dependency on pH; the optimum pH of the carbonated fly ash was found to be 10.3-11, resulting from the optimum carbonation (liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio = 0.25, carbonation duration = ∼30-48 h). The dataset and modeling results presented here provide a contribution to assessing the leaching behavior of MSWI fly ash under a wide range of conditions. PMID:26965281

  17. Design of a leaching test framework for coal fly ash accounting for environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Zandi, Mohammad; Russell, Nigel V

    2007-08-01

    Fly ash from coal combustion contains trace elements which, on disposal or utilisation, may leach out, and therefore be a potential environmental hazard. Environmental conditions have a great impact on the mobility of fly ash constituents as well as the physical and chemical properties of the fly ash. Existing standard leaching methods have been shown to be inadequate by not representing possible disposal or utilisation scenarios. These tests are often criticised on the grounds that the results estimated are not reliable as they are not able to be extrapolated to the application scenario. In order to simulate leaching behaviour of fly ash in different environmental conditions and to reduce deviation between measurements in the fields and the laboratories, it is vital to study sensitivity of the fly ash constituents of interest to major factors controlling leachability. pH, liquid-to-solid ratio, leaching time, leachant type and redox potential are parameters affecting stability of elements in the fly ash. Sensitivity of trace elements to pH and liquid to solid ratio (as two major overriding factors) has been examined. Elements have been classified on the basis of their leaching behaviour under different conditions. Results from this study have been used to identify leaching mechanisms. Also the fly ash has been examined under different standard batch leaching tests in order to evaluate and to compare these tests. A Leaching Test Framework has been devised for assessing the stability of trace elements from fly ashes in different environments. This Framework assists in designing more realistic batch leaching tests appropriate to field conditions and can support the development of regulations and protocols for the management and disposal of coal combustion by-products or other solid wastes of environmental concern. PMID:17171257

  18. Evaluating the Effects of the Kingston Fly Ash Release on Fish Reproduction: Spring 2009 - 2010 Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen; Adams, Marshall; McCracken, Kitty

    2012-05-01

    On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits from the spill extended 4 miles upstream of the facility to Emory River mile 6 and downstream to Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}8.5 miles downstream of the confluence of the Emory River with the Clinch River, and {approx}4 miles downstream of the confluence of the Clinch River with the Tennessee River). A byproduct of coal combustion, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be harmful to biological systems. The ecological effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to come from elevated levels of certain metals in the ash, particularly selenium, on fish reproduction and fish early life stages (Lemly 1993; Besser and others 1996). The ovaries of adult female fish in a lake contaminated by coal ash were reported to have an increased frequency of atretic oocytes (dead or damaged immature eggs) and reductions in the overall numbers of developing oocytes (Sorensen 1988) associated with elevated body burdens of selenium. Larval fish exposed to selenium through maternal transfer of contaminants to developing eggs in either contaminated bodies of water (Lemly 1999) or in experimental laboratory exposures (Woock and others 1987, Jezierska and others 2009) have significantly increased incidences of developmental abnormalities. Contact of fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash in water and sediments may also pose an additional risk to the early life stages of exposed fish populations through direct uptake of metals and other ash constituents (Jezierska and others 2009). The establishment and maintenance of fish populations is intimately associated with

  19. The effect of fly ash and coconut fibre ash as cement replacement materials on cement paste strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayuaji, R.; Kurniawan, R. W.; Yasin, A. K.; Fatoni, H. AT; Lutfi, F. M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Concrete is the backbone material in the construction field. The main concept of the concrete material is composed of a binder and filler. Cement, concrete main binder highlighted by environmentalists as one of the industry are not environmentally friendly because of the burning of cement raw materials in the kiln requires energy up to a temperature of 1450° C and the output air waste CO2. On the other hand, the compound content of cement that can be utilized in innovation is Calcium Hydroxide (CaOH), this compound will react with pozzolan material and produces additional strength and durability of concrete, Calcium Silicate Hydrates (CSH). The objective of this research is to explore coconut fibers ash and fly ash. This material was used as cement replacement materials on cement paste. Experimental method was used in this study. SNI-03-1974-1990 is standard used to clarify the compressive strength of cement paste at the age of 7 days. The result of this study that the optimum composition of coconut fiber ash and fly ash to substitute 30% of cement with 25% and 5% for coconut fibers ash and fly ash with similar strength if to be compared normal cement paste.

  20. Investigation of Fly Ash and Activated Carbon Obtained from Pulverized Coal Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Edward K. Levy; Christopher Kiely; Zheng Yao

    2006-08-31

    One of the techniques for Hg capture in coal-fired boilers involves injection of activated carbon (AC) into the boiler downstream of the air preheater. Hg is adsorbed onto the AC particles and fly ash, which are then both removed in an electrostatic precipitator or baghouse. This project addressed the issues of Hg on activated carbon and on fly ash from a materials re-use point of view. It also addressed the possible connection between SCR reactors, fly ash properties and Hg capture. The project has determined the feasibility of separating AC from fly ash in a fluidized bed and of regenerating the separated AC by heating the AC to elevated temperatures in a fluidized bed. The temperatures needed to drive off the Hg from the ash in a fluidized bed have also been determined. Finally, samples of fly ash from power plants with SCR reactors for NO{sub x} control have been analyzed in an effort to determine the effects of SCR on the ash.

  1. INVESTIGATION OF FLY ASH AND ACTIVATED CARBON OBTAINED FROM PULVERIZED COAL BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Edward K. Levy; Christopher Kiely

    2005-11-01

    One of the techniques for Hg capture in coal-fired boilers involves injection of activated carbon (AC) into the boiler downstream of the air preheater. Hg is adsorbed onto the AC particles and fly ash, which are then both removed in an electrostatic precipitator or baghouse. This project addresses the issues of Hg on activated carbon and on fly ash from a materials re-use point of view. It also addresses the possible connection between SCR reactors, fly ash properties and Hg capture. The project is determining the feasibility of separating AC from fly ash in a fluidized bed and of regenerating the separated AC by heating the AC to elevated temperatures in a fluidized bed. The temperatures needed to drive off the Hg from the ash in a fluidized bed are also being determined. Finally, samples of fly ash from power plants with SCR reactors for NO{sub x} control, are being analyzed to determine the effect of SCR on the ash.

  2. Investigation of high-volume fly ash concrete systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, E.E.; Hemmings, R.T.; Zhang, M.H.; Malhotra, V.M.; Bilodeau, A.; Carette, G.G.

    1993-10-01

    This report presents the findings of an extensive scientific and engineering investigation of the properties of high-volume fly ash (HVFA) concretes prepared from a broad range of portland cement and fly ash materials from sources throughout the United States. The purpose of the project was to support commercialization of HVFA concretes, and hence enhance the beneficial use of fly ash in value-added products. A total of sixteen HVFA concrete mixtures incorporating 8 widely different fly ashes and 2 cements of high and low alkali content were investigated. The proportion of fly ash in all the concrete mixtures was 58% by weight of the cementitious materials, with a water-to-binder (cement + fly ash) ratio of 0.33 for all the mixtures, and a high degree of workability maintained by use of a superplasticizer. All test concretes were air entrained. A broad range of engineering properties was evaluated including compressive strength, Young`s modulus of elasticity, flexural strength, splitting-tensile strength, abrasion resistance, drying shrinkage, creep, air-void parameters of the hardened concrete, resistance to freezing and thawing cycling, de-icing salt scaling resistance, resistance to chloride-ion penetration, water permeability, and sulphate resistance.

  3. Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Electroplating Industrial Effluents by Using Hydrothermally Treated Fly Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram Mohan Rao, S.; Basava Rao, V. V.

    Chromium in the wastewater coming out from tanneries and electroplating industries is to be treated because of exposure to it may produce effects on the liver, kidney, gastrointestinal and immune systems. On the other hand, fly ash produced from coal fired power plants is having disposal problem and it has to be properly utilized. In this study, the fly ash, subjected to hydrothermal treatment is used as adsorbent to remove Cr (VI) from synthetic samples. The effect of initial stock solution, contact time, adsorbent dose and pH were studied in a batch experiment. Results are compared with powdered activated carbon, granular activated carbon and untreated fly ash. The capacity of adsorption was found to be increased in the case of treated fly ash and it follows the order of powdered activated carbon >granular activated carbon >treated fly ash >untreated fly ash. The adsorption isotherms of Langmuir constants and Freundlich constants for all the adsorbents were determined. The Langmuir adsorption isotherm was recommended.

  4. Effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement blended with siliceous fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Deschner, Florian; Lothenbach, Barbara; Winnefeld, Frank; Neubauer, Jürgen

    2013-10-15

    The effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement pastes blended with 50 wt.% of siliceous fly ash is investigated within a temperature range of 7 to 80 °C. The elevation of temperature accelerates both the hydration of OPC and fly ash. Due to the enhanced pozzolanic reaction of the fly ash, the change of the composition of the C–S–H and the pore solution towards lower Ca and higher Al and Si concentrations is shifted towards earlier hydration times. Above 50 °C, the reaction of fly ash also contributes to the formation of siliceous hydrogarnet. At 80 °C, ettringite and AFm are destabilised and the released sulphate is partially incorporated into the C–S–H. The observed changes of the phase assemblage in dependence of the temperature are confirmed by thermodynamic modelling. The increasingly heterogeneous microstructure at elevated temperatures shows an increased density of the C–S–H and a higher coarse porosity. -- Highlights: •The reaction of quartz powder at 80 °C strongly enhances the compressive strength. •Almost no strength increase of fly ash blended OPC at 80 °C was found after 2 days. •Siliceous hydrogarnet is formed upon the reaction of fly ash at high temperatures. •Temperature dependent change of the system was simulated by thermodynamic modelling. •Destabilisation of ettringite above 50 °C correlates with sulphate content of C–S–H.

  5. Thermal and hydrometallurgical recovery methods of heavy metals from municipal solid waste fly ash.

    PubMed

    Kuboňová, L; Langová, Š; Nowak, B; Winter, F

    2013-11-01

    Heavy metals in fly ash from municipal solid waste incinerators are present in high concentrations. Therefore fly ash must be treated as a hazardous material. On the other hand, it may be a potential source of heavy metals. Zinc, lead, cadmium, and copper can be relatively easily removed during the thermal treatment of fly ash, e.g. in the form of chlorides. In return, wet extraction methods could provide promising results for these elements including chromium and nickel. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare thermal and hydrometallurgical treatment of municipal solid waste fly ash. Thermal treatment of fly ash was performed in a rotary reactor at temperatures between 950 and 1050°C and in a muffle oven at temperatures from 500 to 1200°C. The removal more than 90% was reached by easy volatile heavy metals such as cadmium and lead and also by copper, however at higher temperature in the muffle oven. The alkaline (sodium hydroxide) and acid (sulphuric acid) leaching of the fly ash was carried out while the influence of temperature, time, concentration, and liquid/solid ratio were investigated. The combination of alkaline-acidic leaching enhanced the removal of, namely, zinc, chromium and nickel. PMID:23809619

  6. Destruction of inorganic municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash in a DC arc plasma furnace.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Ni, Guohua; Jiang, Yiman; Chen, Longwei; Chen, Mingzhou; Meng, Yuedong

    2010-09-15

    Due to the toxicity of dioxins, furans and heavy metals, there is a growing environmental concern on municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash in China. The purpose of this study is directed towards the volume-reduction of fly ash without any additive by thermal plasma and recycling of vitrified slag. This process uses extremely high-temperature in an oxygen-starved environment to completely decompose complex waste into very simple molecules. For developing the proper plasma processes to treat MSWI fly ash, a new crucible-type plasma furnace was built. The melting process metamorphosed fly ash to granulated slag that was less than 1/3 of the volume of the fly ash, and about 64% of the weight of the fly ash. The safety of the vitrified slag was tested. The properties of the slag were affected by the differences in the cooling methods. Water-cooled and composite-cooled slag showed more excellent resistance against the leaching of heavy metals and can be utilized as building material without toxicity problems. PMID:20542633

  7. Thermal treatment of the fly ash from municipal solid waste incinerator with rotary kiln.

    PubMed

    Wey, Ming-Yen; Liu, Kuang-Yu; Tsai, Tsung-Hsun; Chou, Jing-Tong

    2006-09-21

    Reuse of the fly ash from the municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) is a policy of Taiwan EPA. However, the fly ash is often classified as a hazardous waste and cannot be reused directly because the concentrations of heavy metals exceed the TCLP regulations. The main objective of this study is to investigate the continuous sintering behavior of fly ash with a rotary kiln and seek a solution to reduce the concentrations of heavy metal to an acceptable value. The partitions of the heavy metals in the process are also considered. The results of TCLP showed that among the metals of Cr, Cd, Cu and Pb, only the concentrations of Pb in raw fly ash exceeded the regulation. At sintering temperatures of 700, 800 and 900 degrees C, the concentration of Pb decreased in sintering products, however, the concentration of Pb still exceeded the limitation at 700 and 800 degrees C. Additionally, the water-washing was used to pre-treat the fly ash before sintering process. The washing treatment effectively reduced the leaching concentrations of Pb to agree the regulations. Therefore, water-washing followed by a sintering treatment is an available process for detoxifying the fly ash of MSWI. PMID:16647203

  8. Geochemical investigations of metals release from submerged coal fly ash using extended elutriate tests.

    PubMed

    Bednar, A J; Chappell, M A; Seiter, J M; Stanley, J K; Averett, D E; Jones, W T; Pettway, B A; Kennedy, A J; Hendrix, S H; Steevens, J A

    2010-12-01

    A storage pond dike failure occurred at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant that resulted in the release of over 3.8 million cubic meters (5 million cubic yards) of fly ash. Approximately half of this material deposited in the main channel of the Emory River, 3.5 km upstream of the confluence of the Emory and Clinch Rivers, Tennessee, USA. Remediation efforts to date have focused on targeted removal of material from the channel through hydraulic dredging, as well as mechanical excavation in some areas. The agitation of the submerged fly ash during hydraulic dredging introduces river water into the fly ash material, which could alter the redox state of metals present in the fly ash and thereby change their sorption and mobility properties. A series of extended elutriate tests were used to determine the concentration and speciation of metals released from fly ash. Results indicated that arsenic and selenium species released from the fly ash materials during elutriate preparation were redox stable over the course of 10d, with dissolved arsenic being present as arsenate, and dissolved selenium being present as selenite. Concentrations of certain metals, such as arsenic, selenium, vanadium, and barium, increased in the elutriate waters over the 10d study, whereas manganese concentrations decreased, likely due to oxidation and precipitation reactions. PMID:20943255

  9. The compositions, surface texture, absorption, and binding properties of fly ash in China

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, B.; Qi, M.; Peng, J.; Li, Z.

    1999-05-01

    The compositions, particle distribution, and surface textures of fly ashes from various sources in China were investigated by means of a laser scanning particles distribution meter, a nitrogen absorption meter, scanning electronic microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry, and x-ray diffraction tests. Based on the test results, the absorption and binding mechanism of fly ash on Ca{sup 2+}, Na{sup +}, OH{sup {minus}}, Cl{sup {minus}}, and Cr{sup 3+} ions were studied. The study showed that particle distribution of fly ash depends on the type of coal and its combustion conditions. The fly ashes investigated in the present investigation are formed of amorphous or glassy structures. Fly ashes also have large specific surface and special texture, and have fairly good absorption and binding capability on Ca{sup 2+}, Na{sup +}, OH{sup {minus}}, Cl{sup {minus}}, and Cr{sup 3+} ions. This conclusion is important to wide application of fly ash in the future.

  10. The gamma-ray and neutron shielding factors of fly-ash brick materials.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vishwanath P; Badiger, N M

    2014-03-01

    A comprehensive study of gamma-ray exposure build-up factors (EBFs) of fly-ash brick materials has been carried out for photon energies of 0.015-15 MeV up to a penetration depth of 40 mfp (mean free path) by a geometrical progression (GP) fitting method. The EBF values of the fly-ash brick materials were found to be dependent upon the photon energy, penetration depth and chemical composition, and were found to be higher than the values for mud bricks and common bricks. Above a photon energy of 3 MeV for large penetration depths (>10 mfp), the EBF becomes directly proportional to Zeq. EBFs of fly-ashes were found to be less than or equal to those of concrete for low penetration depths (<10 mfp) for intermediate photon energies up to 1.5 MeV. The EBF values of fly-ash materials were found to be almost independent of Si concentration. The fast neutron removal cross sections of the fly-ash brick materials, mud bricks and common bricks were also calculated to understand their shielding effectiveness. The shielding effectiveness of the fly-ash materials against gamma-ray radiation was lower than that of common and mud bricks. PMID:24270465

  11. Formation of reactive oxygen species in rat epithelial cells upon stimulation with fly ash.

    PubMed

    Voelkel, K; Krug, H F; Diabaté, S

    2003-02-01

    Fly ash was used as a model for ambient particulate matter which is under suspicion to cause adverse pulmonary health effects. The fly ash was pre-sized and contained only particles < 20 microm including an ultrafine fraction (< 100 nm) that contributed 31% to the particle number. In our study, we investigated the influence of fly ash on the promotion of early inflammatory reactions like the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rat lung epithelial cells (RLE-6TN). Furthermore, we determined the formation of nitric oxide (NO). The cells show a clear dose-response relationship concerning the formation of ROS with regard to the mass of particles applied. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) added as a co-stimulus did not increase the formation of ROS induced by fly ash. Furthermore, in LPS (0.1 microg/ml) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha; 1 ng/ml) pre-treated cells no increase in reactive oxygen species comparable to fly ash alone is observable. In presence of the metal chelator, desferrioxamine (DFO), ROS formation can be significantly reduced. Neither fly ash nor LPS induced a significant NO release in RLE-6TN cells. PMID:12682424

  12. Leaching behavior of heavy metals from municipal solid wastes incineration (MSWI) fly ash used in concrete.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hui-Sheng; Kan, Li-Li

    2009-05-30

    The characteristics of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash, surface leaching toxicity and successive leaching concentration of heavy metals from MSWI fly ash-cement hardened pastes were studied. And, the relationships between leaching concentrations of heavy metals and leaching time were also discussed. Experimental results showed that immobilization effect of cement on MSWI fly ash is good. Even if MSWI fly ash-cement hardened pastes were damaged, the leaching toxicity is still in a safety range. In early leaching stage, the surface leaching rate is relatively a little high, up to 10(-5)-10(-4)cmd(-1) order of magnitude, in the later time of leaching, its rate rapidly declined, down to 10(-7). Most of leached heavy metals are produced at early ages. The leaching concentration of heavy metals and leaching time has strong positive relationships. In factual utilizing circumstances, heavy metals' leaching from MSWI fly ash-cement hardened pastes is a very slow and gradually diluting process. The leaching toxicity of heavy metals is far lower than that of the National Standard of China, and minimum harmful matters can be contained and released in the environment. Reusing of MSWI fly ash as partial replacement for cement in concrete mixes is potentially feasible. PMID:18838222

  13. Coal fly ash disposal in the ocean: an alternative worth considering

    SciTech Connect

    Crecelius, E.A.

    1981-10-01

    Chemical and biological experiments measured the solubility of 16 elements in coal fly ash and the short-term toxicity of coal fly ash to clams and phytoplankton. Of the elements studied, 10 to 60% of the As, Br, Cr, Sb, Se, Ni, Pb, and Sr dissolved within a 24-hour period. Elements which were less than 10% soluble in 24-hours included Cu, Zn, Na, La, Sc, Fe, Co and Eu. Littleneck clams (Protothaca staminea) were exposed to coal fly ash in flowing seawater for a 25-day period. At the end of the exposure Cu concentration in gills was 15 ..mu..g g/sup -1/ dry wt compared to 6 ..mu..g g/sup -1/ in control clams. Elements that were not elevated in the exposed clams were Mn, Fe, Ni, Zn, Se and As. The effects of the soluble fraction of coal fly ash on primary production was measured by /sup 14/C uptake rate on coastal phytoplankton. The addition of soluble coal fly ash material had no effect on the /sup 14/C uptake rate of phytoplankton. These measurements were made in the productive Washington shelf water during August. The literature indicates coal fly ash has a relatively low toxicity to plants and animals. Disposal methods could be designed so EPA water quality criteria levels would not be exceeded except in the immediate vicinity of the dumpsite.

  14. Erodiblity of fly ash used as a topsoil substitute in mineland reclamation

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, J.M.; Sencindiver, J.C.; Horvath, D.J.; Singh, R.N.; Keefer, R.F.

    2000-06-01

    Fly ash, a by-product of coal-fired power plants, has been used successfully in reclaiming abandoned mine lands by improving minesoil chemical and physical properties. However, the fine sand-silt particle size of fly ash may make it more susceptible than natural soils to detachment and transport by erosive processes. Furthermore, the high content of silt-size particles in fly ash may make it more susceptible to surface crust formation, resulting in reduced infiltration and increased surface runoff and erosion. In the summer of 1989, fly ash-wood waste mixtures, used as a topsoil substitute, were surface applied on two separate mine sites in Preston County, WV, one with 10% slope and the other 20% slope. Erosion rates were measured directly using the Linear Erosion/Elevation Measuring Instrument (LEMI). Erosion measurements were taken during the first two growing seasons on both sites. Erosion values were up to five times greater on the fly ash-treated minesoil than on the untreated minesoil. Mulching with wood chips reduced fly ash erosion to about one-half the loss of the unmulched plots. Erosion was related to both the amount and type of ground cover. Increased vegetative ground cover resulted in reduced erosion. Mosses and fungi appeared to provide better erosion protection than grass-legume cover.

  15. Alkaline bioleaching of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash by autochthonous extremophiles.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Thulasya; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2016-10-01

    The increasing demand for energy and the generation of solid waste have caused an alarming rise in fly ash production globally. Since heavy metals continue to be in demand for the production of materials, resource recovery from the recycling of these wastes has the potential to delay the depletion of natural ores. The use of microorganisms for the leaching of metals, in a process called bioleaching, is an eco-friendly and economical way to treat the metal-laden wastes. Bioleaching of fly ash is challenging due largely to the alkaline nature and toxic levels of heavy metals which are detrimental to microbial growth and bioleaching activity. The present work reports the isolation of indigenous bacteria from a local fly ash landfill site and their bioleaching performance. 38 autochthonous strains of bacteria were isolated from eight samples collected and plated on five different media. 18 of the isolates showed bioleaching potential, with significant alkaline pH or fly ash tolerance. Genetic characterization of the strains revealed a dominance of Firmicutes, with Alkalibacterium sp. TRTYP6 showing highest fly ash tolerance of up to 20% w/v fly ash, and growth over a pH range 8-12.5. The organism selectively recovered about 52% Cu from the waste. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time a study on bioleaching with extreme alkaliphiles is reported. PMID:27362528

  16. Humic acid adsorption on fly ash and its derived unburned carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaobin; Zhu, Z H

    2007-11-01

    Fly ash is solid waste from combustion process, containing oxide minerals and unburned carbon. In this investigation, fly ash has been separated into metal oxide mineral section and unburned carbon. The fly ash with different contents of unburned carbon was employed for humic acid adsorption to investigate the influence of unburned carbon on adsorption. It is found that metal oxides and unburned carbon in fly ash exhibit significant difference in humic acid adsorption. The unburned carbon plays the major role in adsorption. Higher content of unburned carbon in fly ash results in higher surface area and thus higher humic acid adsorption. Fly ash and unburned carbon exhibit adsorption capacity of humic acid of 11 and 72 mg/g, respectively, at 30 degrees C, pH 7. Humic acid adsorption is also affected by ion strength, pH, and temperature. The thermodynamic calculations indicate that the adsorption is endothermic nature with DeltaH(0) and DeltaS(0) as 5.79 kJ/mol and 16.0 J/K mol, respectively. PMID:17628583

  17. Selenium And Arsenic Speciation in Fly Ash From Full-Scale Coal-Burning Utility Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, F.E.; Senior, C.L.; Chu, P.; Ladwig, K.; Huffman, G.P.; /Kentucky U. /Reaction Engin. Int. /Elect. Power Res. Inst., Palo Alto

    2007-07-09

    X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy has been used to determine directly the oxidation states and speciation of selenium and arsenic in 10 fly ash samples collected from full-scale utility plants. Such information is needed to assess the health risk posed by these elements in fly ash and to understand their behavior during combustion and in fly ash disposal options, such as sequestration in tailings ponds. Selenium is found predominantly as Se(IV) in selenite (SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-}) species, whereas arsenic is found predominantly as As(V) in arsenate (AsO{sub 4}{sup 3-}) species. Two distinct types of selenite and arsenate spectra were observed depending upon whether the fly ash was derived from eastern U.S. bituminous (Fe-rich) coals or from western subbituminous or lignite (Ca-rich) coals. Similar spectral details were observed for both arsenic and selenium in the two different types of fly ash, suggesting that the post-combustion behavior and capture of both of these elements are likely controlled by the same dominant element or phase in each type of fly ash.

  18. Industrial properties of lignitic and lignocellulosic fly ashes from Turkish sources

    SciTech Connect

    Demirbas, A.; Cetin, S.

    2006-01-21

    Fly ash is an inorganic matter from combustion of the carbonaceous solid fuels. More than half the electricity in Turkey is produced from lignite-fired power plants. This energy production has resulted in the formation of more than 13 million tons of fly ash waste annually. The presence of carbon in fly ash inducing common faults include adding unwanted black color and adsorbing process or product materials such as water and chemicals. One of the reasons for not using fly ash directly is its carbon content. For some uses carbon must be lower than 3%. Fly ash has been used for partial replacement of cement, aggregate, or both for nearly 70 years, and it is still used on a very limited scale in Turkey. The heavy metal content of industrial wastewaters is an important source of environmental pollution. Each of the three major oxides (SiO{sub 2} + Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in fly ash can be ideal as a metal adsorbent.

  19. Geopolymeric adsorbents from fly ash for dye removal from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L.; Wang, S.B.; Zhu, Z.H.

    2006-08-01

    Adsorbents from coal fly ash treated by a solid-state fusion method using NaOH were prepared. It was found that amorphous aluminosilicate, geopolymers would be formed. These fly ash-derived inorganic polymers were assessed as potential adsorbents for removal of some basic dyes, methylene blue and crystal violet, from aqueous solution. It was found that the adsorption capacity of the synthesised adsorbents depends on the preparation conditions such as NaOH:fly-ash ratio and fusion temperature with the optimal conditions being at 1.2:1 weight ratio of Na:fly-ash at 250-350{sup o}C. The synthesised materials exhibit much higher adsorption capacity than fly ash itself and natural zeolite. The adsorption isotherm can be fitted by Langmuir and Freundlich models while the two-site Langmuir model produced the best results. It was also found that the fly ash derived geopolymeric adsorbents show higher adsorption capacity for crystal violet than methylene blue and the adsorption temperature influences the adsorption capacity. Kinetic studies show that the adsorption process follows the pseudo second-order kinetics.

  20. Acidification-neutralization processes in a lignite mine spoil amended with fly ash or limestone.

    PubMed

    Seoane, S; Leirós, M C

    2001-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to investigate the longterm effects of amending sulfide-rich lignite mine spoil with fly ash (originating from a coal-fired power station and largely comprised of aluminosilicates) and/or agricultural limestone. The experiment was carried out with soil moisture maintained at field capacity or alternate cycles of wetting and drying. Results obtained suggest that the principal acidification processes were oxidation of sulfide and formation of hydroxysulfate (FeOHSO4), whereas the main neutralization processes were weathering of aluminosilicates in fly ash-treated samples and dissolution of calcium carbonate in limestone-treated samples. The highest dose of limestone rapidly raised the pH of the spoil, but this increase was not maintained throughout the one-year experiment. In contrast, fly ash-treated samples showed a more sustained increase in pH, attributable to the gradual weathering of aluminosilicates. The best results (i.e., good short- and long-term neutralization) were obtained in samples treated with both fly ash and limestone. The low liming capacity of the fly ash (47.85 cmol kg(-1)) means that it must be used in large quantities, an advantage in achieving the further aim of disposing of the fly ash. PMID:11476521

  1. Properties of High Volume Fraction Fly Ash/Al Alloy Composites Produced by Infiltration Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kountouras, D. T.; Stergioudi, F.; Tsouknidas, A.; Vogiatzis, C. A.; Skolianos, S. M.

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, pressure infiltration is employed to synthesize aluminum alloy 7075-fly ash composites. The microstructure and chemical composition of the fly ash and the produced composite material was examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy, as well as x-ray diffraction. Several properties of the produced composite material were examined and evaluated including macro-hardness, wear, thermal expansion, and corrosion behavior. The wear characteristics of the composite, in the as-cast conditions, were studied by dry sliding wear tests. The corrosion behavior of composite material was evaluated by means of potentiodynamic corrosion experiments in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The composite specimens exhibit a homogeneous distribution of fly ash particles and present enhanced hardness values, compared to the matrix material. The high volume fraction of the fly ash reinforcement (>40%) in the composite material led to increased wear rates, attributed to the fragmentation of the fly ash particles. However, the presence of fly ash particles in the Al alloy matrix considerably decreased the coefficiency of thermal expansion, while resulting in an altered corrosion mechanism of the composite material with respect to the matrix alloy.

  2. Comparison of heterogeneous photolytic reduction of Hg(II) in the coal fly ashes and synthetic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yindong; Eichhorst, Terry; Olson, Michael R.; Rutter, Andrew P.; Shafer, Martin M.; Wang, Xuejun; Schauer, James J.

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we examined the heterogeneous reduction of Hg(II) on the coal fly ash samples and synthetic aerosols under different light conditions in a controlled laboratory reactor. Three types of coal fly ashes were studied: a high carbon fly ash from a stoker boiler, a low carbon/low sulfate fly ash from a pulverized coal combustor burning low sulfur coal, and a high sulfate fly ash from a pulverized coal combustor burning high sulfur coal. The rate of Hg(II) reduction on the three diverse fly ash samples was found to be relatively fast with an average half-life of 1.6 h under clear sky atmospheric conditions (under the irradiance of 1000 W/m2). The reduction rate in the low sulfate/low carbon fly ash was approximately 1.5 times faster than with the other coal fly ash samples. Synthetic aerosols made of carbon black and levoglucosan produced Hg(II) reduction rates similar to coal fly ashes. However, aerosols composed of adipic acid resulted in reduction rates that were 3-5 times faster. The sensitivity of adipic acid reduction to light source wavelength was found to be greater than for the coal fly ash and other synthetic aerosols. Aerosols made from the water extracts of coal fly ash samples produced reduction rates equal to or slightly higher than with the native fly ash suggesting that the soluble components of fly ash play a significant role in the reduction mechanism. The measured reduction rates are likely important in the chemical processing of mercury in power plant plumes and potentially in the atmosphere and should be considered for incorporation in atmospheric transport models that are used to understand the fate of atmospheric mercury.

  3. PILOT-SCALE INVESTIGATION OF CLOSED-LOOP FLY ASH SLUICING. VOLUME 2. APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a pilot-scale demonstration of the technical feasibility of closed-loop operation of fly ash sluicing systems. Chemical species leached from the ash increase the dissolved solids concentration of recycled sluice water to a point where equipment scaling...

  4. PILOT-SCALE INVESTIGATION OF CLOSED-LOOP FLY ASH SLUICING. VOLUME 1. FINAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a pilot-scale demonstration of the technical feasibility of closed-loop operation of fly ash sluicing systems. Chemical species leached from the ash increase the dissolved solids concentration of recycled sluice water to a point where equipment scaling...

  5. RELATIONSHIP OF FLY ASH COMPOSITION, REFRACTIVE INDEX, AND DENSITY TO IN-STACK OPACITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an investigation of the refractive index, density, and composition of fly ash from coal-fired boilers, aimed at determining: (1) the interrelationship of refractive index and composition, and (2) the significance of ash properties on in-stack plume opa...

  6. Sorption and chemical transformation of PAHs on coal fly ash. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Mamantov, G.; Wehry, E.L.

    1995-02-01

    The objectives of this work were to characterize the interactions of coal fly ash with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH`s) and their derivatives, and to attempt to understand the influence of surface properties of coal ash in the chemical transformations of PAH`s.

  7. Hydration studies of calcium sulfoaluminate cements blended with fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    García-Maté, M.; De la Torre, A.G.; León-Reina, L.; Aranda, M.A.G.; Santacruz, I.

    2013-12-15

    The main objective of this work is to study the hydration and properties of calcium sulfoaluminate cement pastes blended with fly ash (FA) and the corresponding mortars at different hydration ages. Laboratory X-ray powder diffraction, rheological studies, thermal analysis, porosimetry and compressive strength measurements were performed. The analysis of the diffraction data by Rietveld method allowed quantifying crystalline phases and overall amorphous contents. The studied parameters were: i) FA content, 0, 15 and 30 wt.%; and ii) water addition, water-to-CSA mass ratio (w/CSA = 0.50 and 0.65), and water-to-binder mass ratio (w/b = 0.50). Finally, compressive strengths after 6 months of 0 and 15 wt.% FA [w/CSA = 0.50] mortars were similar: 73 ± 2 and 72 ± 3 MPa, respectively. This is justified by the filler effect of the FA as no strong evidences of reactivity of FA with CSA were observed. These results support the partial substitution of CSA cements with FA with the economic and environmental benefits.

  8. Phosphorus recovery from municipal solid waste incineration fly ash.

    PubMed

    Kalmykova, Yuliya; Fedje, K Karlfeldt

    2013-06-01

    The potential of phosphorus (P) recycling from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) residue is investigated. Vast and ever increasing amounts of incineration residues are produced worldwide; these are an environmental burden, but also a resource, as they are a major sink for the material flows of society. Due to strict environmental regulations, in combination with decreasing landfilling space, the disposal of the MSWI residues is problematic. At the same time, resource scarcity is recognized as a global challenge for the modern world, and even more so for future generations. This paper reports on the methods and efficiency of P extraction from MSWI fly ash by acid and base leaching and precipitation procedures. Phosphorus extracted from the MSWI residues generated each year could meet 30% of the annual demand for mineral phosphorus fertiliser in Sweden, given a recovery rate of 70% achieved in this initial test. The phosphorus content of the obtained product is slightly higher than in sewage sludge, but due to the trace metal content it is not acceptable for application to agricultural land in Sweden, whereas application in the rest of the EU would be possible. However, it would be preferable to use the product as a raw material to replace rock phosphate in fertilizer production. Further development is currently underway in relation to procedure optimization, purification of the phosphorus product, and the simultaneous recovery of other resources. PMID:23490361

  9. Zeolite formation from coal fly ash and its adsorption potential

    SciTech Connect

    Duangkamol Ruen-ngam; Doungmanee Rungsuk; Ronbanchob Apiratikul; Prasert Pavasant

    2009-10-15

    The possibility in converting coal fly ash (CFA) to zeolite was evaluated. CFA samples from the local power plant in Prachinburi province, Thailand, were collected during a 3-month time span to account for the inconsistency of the CFA quality, and it was evident that the deviation of the quality of the raw material did not have significant effects on the synthesis. The zeolite product was found to be type X. The most suitable weight ratio of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to CFA was approximately 2.25, because this gave reasonably high zeolite yield with good cation exchange capacity (CEC). The silica (Si)-to-aluminum (Al) molar ratio of 4.06 yielded the highest crystallinity level for zeolite X at 79% with a CEC of 240 meq/100 g and a surface area of 325 m{sup 2}/g. Optimal crystallization temperature and time were 90{sup o}C and 4 hr, respectively, which gave the highest CEC of approximately 305 meq/100 g. Yields obtained from all experiments were in the range of 50-72%. 29 refs., 5 tabs., 7 figs.

  10. Fly ash adsorbents for multi-cation wastewater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visa, Maria; Isac, Luminita; Duta, Anca

    2012-06-01

    Class "F" fly ash (FA), collected from the Central Heat and Power (CHP) Plant Brasov (Romania), with oxides composition SiO2/Al2O3 over 2.4 proved good adsorbent properties, and was further used for obtaining a new substrate with good adsorption capacity for heavy metals from multi-cation wastewater treatment. Firstly, the new adsorbent was characterized by AFM, XRD, DSC, FTIR and the surface energy was evaluated by contact angle measurements. The experimental data suggested that the new type of substrate is predominant crystalline with highly polar surface. The substrate was used for removing the Pb2+, Cd2+ and Zn2+ cations from mixed solutions. The results show high efficiency and selective adsorption the Pb2+ and Zn2+ cations. The optimized adsorption parameters were further used in thermodynamic and kinetic studies of the adsorption processes. The Langmuir and Freundlich models were used to describe the processes. The pseudo-second order kinetics could well model all the processes, indicating a surface concentration of the adsorption sites with the same order of magnitude as the cation concentrations.

  11. THE ROLE OF FLY ASH IN CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF S(IV) SLURRIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Sidney; Chang, Shih-Ger; Markowitz, Samuel S.; Novakov, Tihomir

    1980-11-01

    The rate of catalytic oxidation of S(IV) in aqueous fly ash slurries has been examined by monitoring loss of SO{sub 3}{sup 2-} and O{sub 2}, and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} formation. Evidence from both filtering and extraction studies indicates that dissolved iron which has been leached from the ash is the chief catalyst. This homogeneous reaction dominates any catalytic effect of the ash surface.

  12. Integrated acid mine drainage management using fly ash.

    PubMed

    Vadapalli, Viswanath R K; Gitari, Mugera W; Petrik, Leslie F; Etchebers, Olivier; Ellendt, Annabelle

    2012-01-01

    Fly Ash (FA) from a power station in South Africa was investigated to neutralise and remove contaminants from Acid Mine Drainage (AMD). After this primary treatment the insoluble FA residue namely solid residue (SR) was investigated as a suitable mine backfill material by means of strength testing. Moreover, SR was used to synthesise zeolite-P using a two-step synthesis procedure. Furthermore, the zeolite-P was investigated to polish process water from the primary FA-AMD reaction. The main objective of this series of investigations is to achieve zero waste and to propose an integrated AMD management using FA. Fly Ash was mixed with AMD at various predetermined FA-AMD ratios until the mixtures achieved circumneutral pH or higher. The supernatants were then analyzed using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) and Ion Chromatography (IC) for cations and anions respectively. The physical strength testing of SR was carried out by mixing it with 3% Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) and curing for 410 days. Synthesis of zeolite-P using SR was carried out by two step synthesis procedure: ageing for 24 hours followed by a mild hydrothermal synthesis at 100°C for 4 days. The polishing of process water from primary AMD treatment using FA was ascertained by mixing the process water with zeolite at a liquid to solid ratio of 100:1 for 1 hour. The results indicated that FA can be successfully used to ameliorate AMD. High removal of major AMD contaminants Fe, Al, Mg, Mn and sulphate was achieved with the ash treatment and trace elements such as Zn, Ni, Cu and Pb were also removed by the FA. Strength testing over 410 days indicated that the material gained strength over the testing period. The maximum unconfined compressive strength and elastic modulus was observed to be approximately 0.3 MPa and 150 Mpa respectively. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the synthesized product indicated that SR was successfully converted into zeolite-P with some mullite phase

  13. Amelioration of soil PAH and heavy metals by combined application of fly ash and biochar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masto, Reginald; George, Joshy; Ansari, Md; Ram, Lal

    2016-04-01

    Generation of electricity through coal combustion produces huge quantities of fly ash. Sustainable disposal and utilization of these fly ash is a major challenge. Fly ash along with other amendments like biochar could be used for amelioration of soil. In this study, fly ash and biochar were used together for amelioration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated soil. Field experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of fly ash and biochar on the amelioration of soil PAH, and the yield of Zea mays. The treatments were control, biochar (4 t/ha), fly ash (4 t/ha), ash + biochar ( 2 + 2 t/ha). Soil samples were collected after the harvest of maize crop and analysed for chemical and biological parameters. Thirteen PAHs were analysed in the postharvest soil samples. Soil PAHs were extracted in a microwave oven at 120 °C using hexane : acetone (1:1) mixture. The extracted solutions were concentrated, cleaned and the 13 PAHs [Acenaphthene (Ace), fluorene (Flr), phenanthrene (Phn), anthracene(Ant), pyrene(Pyr), benz(a)anthracene (BaA), chrysene (Chy), benzo(b)fluoranthene (BbF), benzo(k)fluoranthene (BkF), benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(g,h,i)perylene (BghiP), dibenzo(a,h)anthracene, and indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene)(Inp)] were analysed using GC-MS. The mean pH increased from 6.09 in control to 6.64 and 6.58 at biochar and fly ash treated soils, respectively. N content was not affected, whereas addition of biochar alone and in combination with fly ash, has significantly increased the soil organic carbon content. P content was almost double in combined (9.06 mg/kg) treatment as compared to control (4.32 mg/kg). The increase in K due to biochar was 118%, whereas char + ash increased soil K by 64%. Soil heavy metals were decreased: Zn (‑48.4%), Ni (‑41.4%), Co (‑36.9%), Cu (‑35.7%), Mn (‑34.3%), Cd (‑33.2%), and Pb (‑30.4%). Soil dehydrogenase activity was significantly increased by ash and biochar treatments and the maximum activity was observed for the

  14. Toxicity mitigation and solidification of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash using alkaline activated coal ash.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Loya, E Ivan; Allouche, Erez N; Eklund, Sven; Joshi, Anupam R; Kupwade-Patil, Kunal

    2012-08-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration is a common and effective practice to reduce the volume of solid waste in urban areas. However, the byproduct of this process is a fly ash (IFA), which contains large quantities of toxic contaminants. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the chemical, physical and mechanical behaviors resulting from the gradual introduction of IFA to an alkaline activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix, as a mean of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in industrial construction applications, where human exposure potential is limited. IFA and CFA were analyzed via X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Inductive coupled plasma (ICP) to obtain a full chemical analysis of the samples, its crystallographic characteristics and a detailed count of the eight heavy metals contemplated in US Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR). The particle size distribution of IFA and CFA was also recorded. EPA's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was followed to monitor the leachability of the contaminants before and after the activation. Also images obtained via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), before and after the activation, are presented. Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was subjected to a full mechanical characterization; tests include compressive strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and setting time. The leachable heavy metal contents (except for Se) were below the maximum allowable limits and in many cases even below the reporting limit. The leachable Chromium was reduced from 0.153 down to 0.0045 mg/L, Arsenic from 0.256 down to 0.132 mg/L, Selenium from 1.05 down to 0.29 mg/L, Silver from 0.011 down to .001 mg/L, Barium from 2.06 down to 0.314 mg/L and Mercury from 0.007 down to 0.001 mg/L. Although the leachable Cd exhibited an increase from 0.49 up to 0.805 mg/L and Pd from 0.002 up to 0.029 mg/L, these were well below the maximum limits of 1.00 and 5

  15. Alkaline disinfection of urban wastewater and landfill leachate by wood fly ash.

    PubMed

    Ivanković, Tomislav; Hrenović, Jasna; Itskos, Grigorios; Koukouzas, Nikolaos; Kovačević, Davor; Milenković, Jelena

    2014-12-01

    Wood fly ash is an industrial by-product of the combustion of different wood materials and is mostly disposed of as waste on landfills. In our preliminary experiments, wood ash exhibited antibacterial activity against urban wastewater bacteria and we focused on wood fly ash as a potential substrate for wastewater disinfection. The addition of ash at a concentration of 10 g L⁻¹ (1%) caused an instant increase of pH in urban wastewater and landfill leachate. High pH (10.1-12.7) inactivated bacterial populations in the wastewater and the removal of faecal coliforms and intestinal enterococci after 6 h of contact was 100% (below the detection limit; <1 CFU per mL) with the most efficient ash sample (ash from combustion of beech) both in urban wastewater and landfill leachate. Properly chosen wood fly ash, i.e. one that tends to increase the pH to the greatest extent, proved to be a very effective disinfection substrate. Considering that water treated with wood ash has a high pH and needs to be neutralised before discharge, ash would be suitable for disinfection of leachates when smaller volumes are treated. PMID:25720024

  16. Chemical Fixation of Trace Elements in Coal Fly Ash using Ferrous Sulfate Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Donahoe, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    Coal fired electric power plants produce 50% of the electricity consumed in the US and generate large volumes of fly ash and other coal combustion by-products (CCBs). The majority of the CCB materials are disposed of in surface impoundments and landfills located throughout the US. Fly ash contains trace elements such as As, B, Cr, Mo, Ni, Se, Sr and V which can have a negative impact on the environment due to leaching by acid rain and groundwater with time. The potential release of these toxic trace elements into the environment is a big concern for the US power industry due to the high cost involved in lining the old and existing ash disposal sites. As a result, simple and effective treatment techniques are needed to stabilize the coal combustion by-products produced by power plants in the ash disposal sites and also to increase the use of coal fly ash for beneficial purposes. This paper reports the results of batch experiments designed to chemically treat coal fly ash with ferrous sulfate solution by promoting the formation of insoluble iron oxy- hydroxide phases that immobilize the toxic trace elements. Four fly ash samples, three acidic (HA, HB and MA) and one alkaline (PD), were treated with a ferrous sulfate (FS) solution (322 ppm Fe) and a ferrous sulfate + calcium carbonate (FS+CC) solution (322 ppm Fe and 28 ppm CaCO3) at solid:liquid ratios of 1:3 and 1:30. The effectiveness of this treatment technique was evaluated by the batch sequential leaching of treated and untreated coal fly ash samples using a synthetic acid rain (SAR) solution (USEPA Method 1312B) and also by a 7-step sequential chemical extraction procedure (SCEP) to understand the mechanism of treatment. The unbuffered FS solution at the 1:30 ratio was highly successful in reducing the mobility of the oxyanionic trace elements As (24-91%), Cr (82-97%), Mo (79-100%), Se (41-87%) and V (55-100%). However, the unbuffered FS treatment failed to reduce the mobility of B, Ni and Sr for the acidic fly

  17. Levels and patterns of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in coal-fired power plant bottom ash and fly ash from Huainan, China.

    PubMed

    Ruwei, Wang; Jiamei, Zhang; Jingjing, Liu; Liu, Guijian

    2013-08-01

    Fly ash and bottom ash samples were collected from a coal-fired power plant located in Anhui province, China. Mineral phases and morphologies of the samples were determined by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Sixteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH; 16 compounds specified in United States Environmental Protection Agency Method 610) properties in ash samples were investigated. In fly ashes, ∑16PAH (total amount of 16 PAHs) and ∑CPAH (total amount of 8 carcinogenic PAHs) levels varied from 0.93 to 2.08 μg/g and from 0.26 to 0.87 μg/g, respectively. In bottom ashes, ∑16PAH and ∑CPAH levels varied from 2.83 to 5.32 and 1.76 to 3.76 μg/g, respectively. Fly ashes were dominated by medium molecular-weight PAHs and low molecular-weight PAHs, whereas bottom ashes were abundant in 5- and 6-ring PAH species. The CPAHs levels of some ashes, especially bottom ashes, are greater than the limits regulated by several countries, indicating that this type of coal combustion product requires special treatment before landfill. PAH levels and patterns in fly ash were evidently affected by particle size, and total organic content had a closer correlation with PAH content than particle size in bottom and fly ash, which may be due to unburned carbon existing in bottom ash. PMID:23591765

  18. EFFECTS OF FLY ASH ON MERCURY OXIDATION DURING POST COMBUSTION CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn A. Norton

    1999-10-01

    Tests were performed in simulated flue gas streams using two fly ash samples from the electrostatic precipitators of two full-scale utility boilers. One fly ash was derived from a Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, while the other was derived from Blacksville coal (Pittsburgh No. 8 seam). The tests were performed at temperatures of 120 and 180 C under different gas compositions. Elemental mercury (Hg) streams were injected into the simulated flue gas and passed over filters (housed in a convection oven) loaded with fly ash. The Ontario Hydro method was used to determine the total amount of Hg passing through the filter as well as the percentages of elemental and oxidized Hg collected. Results indicated that substantial amounts of Hg oxidation did not occur with either fly ash, regardless of the temperature used for testing. When oxidation was observed, the magnitude of the oxidation was comparable between the two fly ashes. These results suggest that the gas matrix may be more important than the ash components with respect to the distribution of Hg species observed in gaseous effluents at coal-fired power plants.

  19. Stabilization and separation of heavy metals in incineration fly ash during the hydrothermal treatment process.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuyan; Zhang, Pengfei; Li, Jianping; Chen, Dezhen

    2015-12-15

    In the paper, hydrothermal treatment (HT) of MSWI fly ashes was performed to stabilize and separate heavy metals. Influences of pre-treatment, types of ferric and/or ferrous additives, and subsequent heavy metal stabilization procedure by adding phosphate were investigated. The chemical stability of hydrothermal products was examined by solid waste extraction procedure with acetic acid buffer solution. Mineralogical investigation of selected hydrothermal product was carried out by XRD. FEGE SEM- -EDX was used to study the morphology and surface compositions of the ash particles. Experimental results revealed that HT process facilitated heavy metal exposure to leaching solution. FEGE SEM-EDX images revealed that fly ash particles were re-organized during hydrothermal process and that the minerals with special shapes and containing high levels of heavy metals were formed. A mild acid washing treatment with final pH around 6.20 could remove soluble heavy metals. Therefore, it may be a proper pre- or post-treatment method for fly ash particles for the purpose of reducing heavy metal contents. For the purpose of stabilizing heavy metals, the addition of ferric/ferrous salts in the HT process or phosphate stabilization after HT is recommended. The HT process may be applied to realize the environmentally sound management of MSWI fly ash or to recover and utilize MSWI fly ash. PMID:26100935

  20. Comparing Metal Leaching and Toxicity from High pH, Low pH, and High Ammonia Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Phillips, Jana Randolph; Fagan, Lisa Anne; Drake, Meghan M; Ruther, Rose Emily; Fisher, L. Suzanne; Amonette, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    Previous work with both class F and class C fly ash indicated minimal leaching from most fly ashes tested. However, the addition of NOx removal equipment might result in higher levels of ammonia in the fly ash. We have recently been testing fly ash with a wide range of pH (3.7-12.4) originating from systems with NOx removal equipment. Leaching experiments were done using dilute CaCl2 solutions in batch and columns and a batch nitric acid method. All methods indicated that the leaching of heavy metals was different in the highest ammonia sample tested and the high pH sample. However, toxicity testing with the Microtox system has indicated little potential toxicity in leachates except for the fly ash at the highest pH (12.4). When the leachate from the high pH fly ash was neutralized, toxicity was eliminated.

  1. Comparing metal leaching and toxicity from high pH, low pH, and high ammonia fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Anthony V.; Tarver, Jana R.; Fagan, Lisa A.; McNeilly, Meghan S.; Ruther, Rose; Fisher, L. S.; Amonette, James E.

    2007-07-01

    Previous work with both class F and class C fly ash indicated minimal leaching from most fly ashes tested. However, the addition of NOx removal equipment might result in higher levels of ammonia in the fly ash. We have recently been testing fly ash with a wide range of pH (3.7–12.4) originating from systems with NOx removal equipment. Leaching experiments were done using dilute CaCl2 solutions in batch and columns and a batch nitric acid method. All methods indicated that the leaching of heavy metals was different in the highest ammonia sample tested and the high pH sample. However, toxicity testing with the Microtox* system has indicated little potential toxicity in leachates except for the fly ash at the highest pH (12.4). When the leachate from the high pH fly ash was neutralized, toxicity was eliminated.

  2. Radiological and instrumental neutron activation analysis determined characteristics of size-fractionated fly ash.

    PubMed

    Peppas, T K; Karfopoulos, K L; Karangelos, D J; Rouni, P K; Anagnostakis, M J; Simopoulos, S E

    2010-09-15

    The concentration of trace elements and radionuclides in fly ash particles of different size can exhibit significant variation, due to the various processes taking place during combustion inside a coal-fired power plant. An investigation of this effect has been performed by analyzing samples of fly ash originating in two different coal-fired power plants, after separation into size fractions by sieving. The samples were analyzed by gamma-ray spectrometry, including low-energy techniques, radon exhalation measurement and instrumental neutron activation analysis for the determination of Al, As, Ga, K, La, Na, Mn, Mg, Sr, Sc, and V. Variations are observed in the results of various samples analyzed, while the activity balances calculated from the results of individual size fractions are consistent with those of the raw ash samples. Correlations among the radionuclides examined are also observed, while individual nuclide behavior varies between the two types of fly ash examined. PMID:20605322

  3. Automated system for removal and pneumatic transport of fly ash from electric precipitator hoppers

    SciTech Connect

    V.K. Konovalov; O.V. Yashkin; V.V. Ermakov

    2008-03-15

    A system for removal and pneumatic transport of fly ash is examined, in which air pulses act on batches (pistons) of ash formed in a duct. Studies are made of the effect of several physical parameters on the force required to displace a piston of ash and these serve as a basis for choosing a system for removal and pneumatic transport of ash simultaneously from several hoppers of an electric precipitator. This makes it possible to separate the ash particles according to size without introducing additional components. Formulas are given for calculating the structural and dynamic parameters of this system and measurements of indirect dynamic parameters are used to calculate the input-output characteristics of the system. In order to optimize the system, configurations for summing several ducts into a single transport duct for pneumatic ash transport are proposed. Some variants of dry ash utilization and the advantages of producing of size-separated particles are considered.

  4. Chemical evaluation of nutrient supply from fly ash-biosolids mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, A.W.; Sumner, M.E.

    2000-02-01

    Prediction of plant nutrient supply from fly ash and biosolids (sewage sludge and poultry manure) may enhance their agricultural use as crop fertilizer. Two mild extraction methods (42-d equilibration with ion-exchange resins; 2-d equilibration with pH 4.8 buffered nutrient solution) and analysis of nutrient data by the Diagnosis and Recommendation Integrated System (DRIS) were tested with 29 fly ash samples, four biosolids samples, and their mixtures. The resin method was useful for major nutrient (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S) extraction from fly ashes and organic materials, particularly where mineralizable fractions of N and P under aerobic conditions are required. However, resins were inefficient in extracting P from high-Fe sewage sludges because organic waste samples caused premature failure of semipermeable membranes and fouling of resins. Extraction of fly ash with dilute buffered nutrient solution was more successful because micronutrient recovery was improved, major nutrients were correlated to the resin method, both addition and removal of nutrients were recorded. DRIS analysis was possible, and equilibration was rapid (2 d). The overall nutrient supply from these extremely variable fly ashes was: Cu = Fe {approx} B {approx} Mo > Ca > S > Zn >> Mn > N > Mg > P > K (high micronutrient, low major nutrient supply). For biosolids, the major nutrients ranked: P > N {approx} Ca > S > Mg > K (sewage sludges), and N > Ca {approx} K > P > Mg > S (poultry manures). In mixtures of fly ash with 26% sewage sludge the order was: Ca > S > N > Mg > P > K, while in mixtures of fly ash and 13% poultry manure, the nutrients ranked: Ca > K {approx} N {approx} S > Mg > P. Optimal plant nutrition (especially N-P-K balancing) should be possible by mixing these three waste materials.

  5. Thermal and hydrometallurgical recovery methods of heavy metals from municipal solid waste fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Kuboňová, L.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • MSW fly ash was thermally and hydrometallurgically treated to remove heavy metals. • More than 90% of easy volatile heavy metals (Cd and Pb) were removed thermally. • More than 90% of Cd, Cr, Cu an Zn were removed by alkaline – acid leaching. • The best results were obtained for the solution of 3 M NaOH and 2 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. - Abstract: Heavy metals in fly ash from municipal solid waste incinerators are present in high concentrations. Therefore fly ash must be treated as a hazardous material. On the other hand, it may be a potential source of heavy metals. Zinc, lead, cadmium, and copper can be relatively easily removed during the thermal treatment of fly ash, e.g. in the form of chlorides. In return, wet extraction methods could provide promising results for these elements including chromium and nickel. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare thermal and hydrometallurgical treatment of municipal solid waste fly ash. Thermal treatment of fly ash was performed in a rotary reactor at temperatures between 950 and 1050 °C and in a muffle oven at temperatures from 500 to 1200 °C. The removal more than 90% was reached by easy volatile heavy metals such as cadmium and lead and also by copper, however at higher temperature in the muffle oven. The alkaline (sodium hydroxide) and acid (sulphuric acid) leaching of the fly ash was carried out while the influence of temperature, time, concentration, and liquid/solid ratio were investigated. The combination of alkaline-acidic leaching enhanced the removal of, namely, zinc, chromium and nickel.

  6. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF COAL FLY ASH AMENDMENTS ON THE TOXICITY OF A CONTAMINATED MARINE SEDIMENT

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Robert M.; Perron, Monique M.; Friedman, Carey L.; Suuberg, Eric M.; Pennell, Kelly G.; Cantwell, Mark G.; Pelletier, Marguerite C.; Ho, Kay T.; Serbst, Jonathan R.; Ryba, Stephan A.

    2013-01-01

    Approaches for cleaning-up contaminated sediments range from dredging to in situ treatment. In the present report, we discuss the effects of amending reference and contaminated sediments with coal fly ash to reduce the bioavailability and toxicity of a field sediment contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Six fly ashes and a coconut charcoal were evaluated in 7 d whole sediment toxicity tests with a marine amphipod (Ampelisca abdita) and mysid (Americamysis bahia). Fly ashes with high carbon content and the coconut charcoal showed proficiency at reducing toxicity. Some of the fly ashes demonstrated toxicity in the reference treatments. It is suspected that some of this toxicity is related to the presence of ammonia associated with fly ashes as a result of post-oxidation treatment to reduce nitrous oxides emissions. Relatively simple methods exist to remove ammonia from fly ash prior to use and fly ashes with low ammonia content are available. Fly ashes were also shown to effectively reduce overlying water concentrations of several PAHs. There was no evidence of the release of the metals cadmium, copper, nickel or lead from the fly ashes. A preliminary 28 d polychaete bioaccumulation study with one of the high carbon fly ashes and a reference sediment was also performed. Although preliminary, there was no evidence of adverse effects to worm growth or lipid content, or the accumulation of PAHs or mercury from exposure to the fly ash. These data show fly ashes with high carbon contents may represent viable remedial materials for reducing the bioavailability of organic contaminants in sediments. PMID:18717615

  7. Fly Ash-based Geopolymer Lightweight Concrete Using Foaming Agent

    PubMed Central

    Al Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa; Hussin, Kamarudin; Bnhussain, Mohamed; Ismail, Khairul Nizar; Yahya, Zarina; Razak, Rafiza Abdul

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report the results of our investigation on the possibility of producing foam concrete by using a geopolymer system. Class C fly ash was mixed with an alkaline activator solution (a mixture of sodium silicate and NaOH), and foam was added to the geopolymeric mixture to produce lightweight concrete. The NaOH solution was prepared by dilute NaOH pellets with distilled water. The reactives were mixed to produce a homogeneous mixture, which was placed into a 50 mm mold and cured at two different curing temperatures (60 °C and room temperature), for 24 hours. After the curing process, the strengths of the samples were tested on days 1, 7, and 28. The water absorption, porosity, chemical composition, microstructure, XRD and FTIR analyses were studied. The results showed that the sample which was cured at 60 °C (LW2) produced the maximum compressive strength for all tests, (11.03 MPa, 17.59 MPa, and 18.19 MPa) for days 1, 7, and 28, respectively. Also, the water absorption and porosity of LW2 were reduced by 6.78% and 1.22% after 28 days, respectively. The SEM showed that the LW2 sample had a denser matrix than LW1. This was because LW2 was heat cured, which caused the geopolymerization rate to increase, producing a denser matrix. However for LW1, microcracks were present on the surface, which reduced the compressive strength and increased water absorption and porosity. PMID:22837687

  8. Fly ash-based geopolymer lightweight concrete using foaming agent.

    PubMed

    Al Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa; Hussin, Kamarudin; Bnhussain, Mohamed; Ismail, Khairul Nizar; Yahya, Zarina; Razak, Rafiza Abdul

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report the results of our investigation on the possibility of producing foam concrete by using a geopolymer system. Class C fly ash was mixed with an alkaline activator solution (a mixture of sodium silicate and NaOH), and foam was added to the geopolymeric mixture to produce lightweight concrete. The NaOH solution was prepared by dilute NaOH pellets with distilled water. The reactives were mixed to produce a homogeneous mixture, which was placed into a 50 mm mold and cured at two different curing temperatures (60 °C and room temperature), for 24 hours. After the curing process, the strengths of the samples were tested on days 1, 7, and 28. The water absorption, porosity, chemical composition, microstructure, XRD and FTIR analyses were studied. The results showed that the sample which was cured at 60 °C (LW2) produced the maximum compressive strength for all tests, (11.03 MPa, 17.59 MPa, and 18.19 MPa) for days 1, 7, and 28, respectively. Also, the water absorption and porosity of LW2 were reduced by 6.78% and 1.22% after 28 days, respectively. The SEM showed that the LW2 sample had a denser matrix than LW1. This was because LW2 was heat cured, which caused the geopolymerization rate to increase, producing a denser matrix. However for LW1, microcracks were present on the surface, which reduced the compressive strength and increased water absorption and porosity. PMID:22837687

  9. Flocculation of cyanobacterial cells using coal fly ash modified chitosan.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuting; Zhang, Honggang; Pan, Gang

    2016-06-15

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) have increasingly occurred worldwide and pose serious threats to water environment safety. In this study, a compound flocculant (CFAL-Chitosan) was developed for HABs mitigation where chitosan was modified by coal fly ash leachate (CFAL). When using optimized dosage of CFAL-Chitosan flocculant, the zeta potential of Microcystis aeruginosa (M.A.) flocs stayed close to zero and algal removal efficiency plateaued over 90% in a wide dosage range from 3 to 6 mg L(-1). For chitosan without CFAL, removal efficiency peaked at 3 mg L(-1) with a maximum removal efficiency of 81%, which quickly decreased as the dosage increased (>3 mg L(-1)) due to the fast reversal of zeta potential. This indicated that CFAL-Chitosan could maintain a better removal efficiency over a wide dosage range as a result of improved charge neutralization compared with the chitosan only treatment. The flocs of CFAL-Chitosan were larger and denser than produced in the presence of chitosan without CFAL. However, excessive CFAL beyond the optimized dose inhibited M.A. removal due to hydrolysis and declining molecular weight of chitosan that weakened the bridging-netting properties, where surface charge reversal happened within a narrow dosage range and the removal-dosage curve became parabolic. The pH and metal residuals that were assumed to pose a threat to the aquatic environment were not significantly affected by adding optimized dosage of CFAL-Chitosan. The study provides a HABs control method using a cheap material of CFA. Further studies are needed to check the potential influence of leachable metals and persistent organic pollutants in CFA under a wide range of environmental condition. PMID:26723521

  10. Effect of fly ash on the optimum sulfate of Portland Cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemuth, Mark D.

    Calcium sulfate is typically added to ordinary portland cement (OPC) clinker during grinding to prevent flash set and to improve early-age strength development without causing volume instabilities. Recent changes to ASTM C150, Standard Specification for Portland Cement, have enabled greater flexibility in determining optimum sulfate levels in portland cement by not requiring ASTM C563, Approximation of Optimum SO3 in Hydraulic Cement Using Compressive Strength, to be used in setting sulfate target levels. ASTM C563 requires strength testing using only the hydraulic cement, which is not always indicative of the optimum sulfate for field use, since supplementary materials (e.g., fly ash) may be used by the concrete producer. Adding additional sulfate to account for the sulfate demand of fly ashes can enable an improvement in the early age strength for cement-fly ash systems and decrease in problems that may be attributed to OPC-admixture-fly ash incompatibility such as abnormal setting and slow strength gain. This thesis provides experimental data on the strength development and heat release during early hydration for cement-fly ash systems with different sulfate levels. The thesis focused on high calcium fly ashes, but low calcium fly ash was also tested. It is demonstrated that some fly ashes have their own sulfate demand and when these ashes are used in cement-fly ash blends there is effectively an increase in the optimal sulfate level that could be used for the OPC. It is also shown that optimum sulfate determined by heat of hydration measured with isothermal calorimetry is similar to the optimum sulfate determined by compressive strength at 1 day. Using isothermal calorimetry can result in substantial time and cost savings at plants for determining the optimal sulfate content. Theories for the mechanisms that drive the differences in sulfate demand in OPC are reviewed. These theories are adapted for OPC-fly ash blends and are outlined, tested and discussed. The

  11. Brick manufacture with fly ash from Illinois coals. Quarterly technical report, September 1, 1994--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.E.; Dreher, G.; Frost, J.; Moore, D.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Fiocchi, T.; Swartz, D.

    1995-03-01

    This investigation seeks to utilize fly ash in fired-clay products such as building and patio bricks, ceramic blocks, field and sewer tile, and flower pots. This goal is accomplished by (1) one or more plant-scale, 5000-brick tests with fly ash mixed with brick clays at the 20% or higher level; (2) a laboratory-scale study to measure the firing reactions of a range of compositions of clay and fly ash mixtures; (3) a technical and economic study to evaluate the potential environmental and economic benefits of brick manufacture with fly ash. Bricks and feed materials will be tested for compliance with market specifications and for leachability of pollutants derived from fly ash. The laboratory study will combine ISGS databases, ICCI-supported characterization methods, and published information to improve predictions of the firing characteristics of Illinois fly ash and brick clay mixtures. Because identical methods are used to test clay firing and coal ash fusion, and because melting mechanisms are the same, improved coal ash fusion predictions are an expected result of this research. If successful, this project should convert an environmental problem (fly ash) into valuable products - bricks. During this quarter, the authors set up the manufacturing run at Colonial Brick Co., provided an expanded NEPA questionnaire for DOE, made preliminary arrangements for a larger brick manufacturing run at Marseilles Brick Co., revised laboratory procedures for selective dissolution analysis, and began characterization of brick clays that could be mixed with fly ash for fired-clay products.

  12. Intra- and inter-unit variation in fly ash petrography and mercury adsorption: Examples from a western Kentucky power station

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hower, J.C.; Finkelman, R.B.; Rathbone, R.F.; Goodman, J.

    2000-01-01

    Fly ash was collected from eight mechanical and 10 baghouse hoppers at each of the twin 150-MW wall-fired units in a western Kentucky power station. The fuel burned at that time was a blend of many low-sulfur, high-volatile bituminous Central Appalachian coals. The baghouse ash showed less variation between units than the mechanical hoppers. The mechanical fly ash, coarser than the baghouse ash, showed significant differences in the amount of total carbon and in the ratio of isotropic coke to both total carbon and total coke - the latter excluding inertinite and other unburned, uncoked coal. There was no significant variation in proportions of inorganic fly ash constituents. The inter-unit differences in the amount and forms of mechanical fly ash carbon appear to be related to differences in pulverizer efficiency, leading to greater amounts of coarse coal, therefore unburned carbon, in one of the units. Mercury capture is a function of both the total carbon content and the gas temperature at the point of fly ash separation, mercury content increasing with an increase in carbon for a specific collection system. Mercury adsorption on fly ash carbon increases at lower flue-gas temperatures. Baghouse fly ash, collected at a lower temperature than the higher-carbon mechanically separated fly ash, contains a significantly greater amount of Hg.

  13. The use of fly ash the thermal power plants in the construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fediuk, R. S.; Yushin, A. M.

    2015-10-01

    The problems of ecological and radiation safety of the construction of man-made waste like fly ash thermal power plants were researched. The chemical composition of TPPs ashes of Primorsky Territory was studied, defined their specific effective activity of natural radionuclides. The most modern research methods were used - differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetry, X-ray analysis. It was revealed that the ash of the Primorskaya TPP and Partizanskaya TPP has exceed the permissible parameters of radioactivity, so not suitable for use in construction. Ashes of Vladivostok TPP-2 and Artem TPP of Primorsky Region on parameters radioactivity and chemical composition have suitable for use as a filler in the concrete.

  14. Enhancement of Rhodamine B removal by low-cost fly ash sorption with Fenton pre-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shih-Hsien; Wang, Kai-Sung; Li, Heng-Ching; Wey, Ming-Yen; Chou, Jing-Dong

    2009-12-30

    The removal of a basic dye, Rhodamine B (RhB), by fly ash adsorption, Fenton oxidation, and combined Fenton oxidation-fly ash adsorption were evaluated. Even though fly ash is a low cost absorbent, a high dose of fly ash was needed to remove RhB. Only 54% of RhB was removed by 80 g L(-1) fly ash. Solution pH did not significantly affect the RhB sorption by fly ash after 8h. Fenton reagents at H(2)O(2) dose of 6 x 10(-3)M and pH 3 rapidly decolorized 97% of RhB within 2 min, and 72% of COD removal was obtained at 30min reaction time. Spectrum analysis result showed that a large area of UV spectrum at 200-400 nm remained after Fenton reaction. The addition of 1gL(-1) fly ash effectively removed COD from Fenton-treated solution, and the UV absorption spectrum at 220-400 nm totally vanished within 2h. COD removal of RhB by the combined Fenton oxidation and fly ash sorption process was 98%. The COD removal capacity of fly ash for Fenton-treated RhB solution was 41.6 times higher than that for untreated RhB solution. The results indicated that the combined process is a potential technique for RhB removal. PMID:19695774

  15. Production of inorganic pellet binders from fly-ash. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

    1995-12-31

    Fly-ash is produced by all coal-fired utilities, and it must be removed from the plant exhaust gases, collected, and disposed of. While much work has been done in the past to utilize fly-ash rather than disposing of it, we nevertheless do not find widespread examples of successful industrial utilization. This is because past work has tended to find uses only for high-quality, easily-utilized fly-ashes, which account for less than 25% of the fly-ash that is produced. The main factor which makes fly-ashes unusable is a high unburned carbon content. In this project, physical separation technologies are being used to remove this carbon, and to convert these unusable fly-ashes into usable products. The main application being studied for the processed fly-ash is as a binder for inorganic materials, such as iron-ore pellets. Work in the first quarter concentrated on obtaining samples of all of the materials to be used (fly-ash, and magnetite ore), training of personnel on pelletization procedures, obtaining and setting up pelletization apparatus in the MTU laboratories, and running pelletization experiments with bentonite binder to establish a baseline for comparison with the fly-ash binders to be made.

  16. Geochemically structural characteristics of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash particles and mineralogical surface conversions by chelate treatment.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Hiroki; Sawada, Takaya; Shimaoka, Takayuki; Takahashi, Fumitake

    2016-01-01

    Leaching behaviors of heavy metals contained in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash have been studied well. However, micro-characteristics of MSWI fly ash particles are still uncertain and might be non-negligible to describe their leaching behaviors. Therefore, this study investigated micro-characteristics of MSWI fly ash particles, especially their structural properties and impacts of chelate treatment on surface characteristics. According to SEM observations, raw fly ash particles could be categorized into four types based on their shapes. Because chelate treatment changed the surface of fly ash particles dramatically owing to secondary mineral formations like ettringite, two more types could be categorized for chelate-treated fly ash particles. Acid extraction experiments suggest that fly ash particles, tested in this study, consist of Si-base insoluble core structure, Al/Ca/Si-base semi-soluble matrices inside the body, and KCl/NaCl-base soluble aggregates on the surface. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations of the same fly ash particles during twice moistening treatments showed that KCl/NaCl moved under wet condition and concentrated at different places on the particle surface. However, element mobility depended on secondary mineral formations. When insoluble mineral like gypsum was generated and covered the particle surface, it inhibited element transfer under wet condition. Surface characteristics including secondary mineral formation of MSWI fly ash particles are likely non-negligible to describe trace element leaching behaviors. PMID:26336844

  17. Reclamation and revegetation of fly ash disposal sites - Challenges and research needs.

    PubMed

    Haynes, R J

    2009-01-01

    Coal-fired power generation is a principal energy source throughout the world. Approximately, 70-75% of coal combustion residues are fly ash and its utilization worldwide is only slightly above 30%. The remainder is disposed of in landfills and fly ash basins. It is desirable to revegetate these sites for aesthetic purposes, to stabilize the surface ash against wind and water erosion and to reduce the quantity of water leaching through the deposit. Limitations to plant establishment and growth in fly ash can include a high pH (and consequent deficiencies of Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn and P), high soluble salts, toxic levels of elements such as B, pozzalanic properties of ash resulting in cemented/compacted layers and lack of microbial activity. An integrated organic/biotechnological approach to revegetation seems appropriate and should be investigated further. This would include incorporation of organic matter into the surface layer of ash, mycorrhizal inoculation of establishing vegetation and use of inoculated legumes to add N. Leaching losses from ash disposal sites are likely to be site-specific but a sparse number of studies have revealed enriched concentrations of elements such as Ca, Fe, Cd, Pb, and Sb in surrounding groundwater. This aspect deserves further study particularly in the longer-term. In addition, during weathering of the ash and deposition of organic matter during plant growth, a soil will form with properties vastly different to that of the parent ash. In turn, this will influence the effect that the disposal site has on the surrounding environment. Nevertheless, the effects of ash weathering and organic matter accumulation over time on the chemical, physical and biological properties of the developing ash-derived soil are not well understood and require further study. PMID:18706753

  18. Characterization of fly ash from a hazardous waste incinerator in Medellin, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Martha; Gálvez, Araceli; Conesa, Juan A; Montes de Correa, Consuelo

    2009-09-15

    Bag filter (BF) fly ash from a hazardous waste incinerator located in Medellín, Colombia was characterized. Particle size distribution, chemical composition, metal loading, surface area, morphology, and chemical environment were assessed before and after fly ash extraction with toluene. Fly ash consists of low surface area platelets of SiO(2) smaller than 0.5 microm agglomerated in spheres between 20 and 100 microm. High concentration of sodium chloride, carbon, and heavy metals such as Cu, Fe, Pb, Hg, Cd, Co and Mn are deposited over the fly ash surface. The carbon is oxidized and forms different structures such as amorphous carbon black, nano balls and more crystalline fullerenes like nano onions. The high concentration of dioxins, furans and dioxin-like PCBs (superior to 185 ng WHO-TEQ/g) is favored by oxidized carbon, chlorine and metals such as Cu and Fe on the shell of the particles. Before and after toluene extraction, fly ash samples presented similar morphology. However, after extraction their particle size increased while their surface area decreased by 35% and the carbon and metal contents decreased by 35% and 50%, respectively. PMID:19372003

  19. Investigation of MSWI fly ash melting characteristic by DSC-DTA

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Rundong Wang, Lei; Yang, Tianhua; Raninger, Bernhard

    2007-07-01

    The melting process of MSWI (Municipal Solid Waste Incineration) fly ash has been studied by high-temperature DSC-DTA experiments. The experiments were performed at a temperature range of 20-1450 deg. C, and the considerable variables included atmosphere (O{sub 2} and N{sub 2}), heating rates (5 deg. C/min, 10 deg. C/min, 20 deg. C/min) and CaO addition. Three main transitions were observed during the melting process of fly ash: dehydration, polymorphic transition and fusion, occurring in the temperature range of 100-200 deg. C, 480-670 deg. C and 1101-1244 deg. C, respectively. The apparent heat capacity and heat requirement for melting of MSWI fly ash were obtained by DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimeter). A thermodynamic modeling to predict the heat requirements for melting process has been presented, and it agrees well with the experimental data. Finally, a zero-order kinetic model of fly ash melting transition was established. The apparent activation energy of MSWI fly ash melting transition was obtained.

  20. A new method for municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash inertization, based on colloidal silica.

    PubMed

    Bontempi, E; Zacco, A; Borgese, L; Gianoncelli, A; Ardesi, R; Depero, L E

    2010-11-01

    Municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) is a straightforward way to manage waste, however the disposal of process byproducts, mainly bottom and fly ash, is still a problem, because of their hazardous contents. Fly ash is a byproduct of many other processes that involve combustion to produce energy. In this paper we present and discuss a new method for MSWI fly ash inertization, mainly based on the use of colloidal silica as a stabilization agent for metals. In the patented procedure, fly ash of different provenance can be used to produce an inert and non-hazardous material, that can be reused. In fact to make the recovery process more efficient, landfilling should be totally avoided. For this reason, to enhance the possibility of reuse, a washing process, for salts recovery, is proposed as a final step of the inertization procedure. The obtained inert material is called COSMOS (COlloidal Silica Medium to Obtain Safe inert), and it is composed of calcium carbonate, calcium sulfate, silicon oxide and a wide quantity of non-soluble amorphous compounds. COSMOS does not contain any corrosive salts. This makes it extremely interesting for cement industry applications with several other advantages, and environmental benefits. The new proposed inertization procedure appears very promising, because it allows MSWI fly ash to be considered a valuable resource. Thanks to the obtained results, a demonstration project, in the frame of LIFE+, has been funded by the European Commission (LIFE+ 2008 project ENV/IT/000434, ). PMID:20959931

  1. Sample collection and preparation methods affecting mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Mumford, J.; Lewtas, J.

    1983-07-01

    Reports by several investigators describing the biological activity of coal fly ash have presented a variety of results which in some cases are conflicting. The biological activity of coal fly ash may differ because of one or more of the following factors: (1) the samples studied were from different sources; (2) the samples were prepared for bioassay differently; (3) the sampling method differed, and, therefore, collected samples were different in chemical or physical properties which affect the biological activity. Several variables involved in coal fly ash studies -- source, sample collection land preparation methods, bioassay method -- are undoubtedly responsible for the diversity of biological effects observed. The objectives of this study were to examine the sample preparation and collection factors which may affect the observed biological activity caused by coal fly ash and to evaluate the mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) fly ash from experimental and commercial units. The bioassays used in this study were the Ames Salmonella plate incorporation test for mutagenicity and the rabbit alveolar macrophage (RAM) system for cytotoxicity.

  2. Tailoring fly ash activated with bentonite as adsorbent for complex wastewater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visa, Maria

    2012-12-01

    Used as adsorbent, alkali fly ash represents a low cost solution for advanced wastewater treatment. The alkali treatment raises sustainability issues therefore, in this research we aim to replace alkali fly ash with washed fly ash (FAw). For improving the adsorption capacity of washed fly ash, bentonite powder (B) was added, as a natural adsorbent with a composition almost identical to the fly ash. The new adsorbent was characterized by AFM, XRD, FTIR, SEM, EDS and the surface energy was evaluated by contact angle measurements. For understanding the complex adsorption process on this mixed substrate, preliminary tests were developed on synthetic wastewaters containing a single pollutant system (heavy metal), binary (two-heavy metals) and ternary (dye and two heavy metals) systems. Experiments were done on synthetic wastewaters containing methylene blue, cadmium and copper, using FAw, B and their powder mixtures. The pseudo-second order kinetics could well model all the processes, indicating a good adsorbent material which can be used for the pollutants removal from wastewater. After adsorption the substrates loaded with pollutants, annealed at 500 °C can be reused for padding in stone blocks.

  3. Mercury removal from coal combustion flue gas by modified fly ash.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenqing; Wang, Hairui; Zhu, Tingyu; Kuang, Junyan; Jing, Pengfei

    2013-02-01

    Fly ash is a potential alternative to activated carbon for mercury adsorption. The effects of physicochemical properties on the mercury adsorption performance of three fly ash samples were investigated. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and other methods were used to characterize the samples. Results indicate that mercury adsorption on fly ash is primarily physisorption and chemisorption. High specific surface areas and small pore diameters are beneficial to efficient mercury removal. Incompletely burned carbon is also an important factor for the improvement of mercury removal efficiency, in particular. The C-M bond, which is formed by the reaction of C and Ti, Si and other elements, may improve mercury oxidation. The samples modified with CuBr2, CuCl2 and FeCl3 showed excellent performance for Hg removal, because the chlorine in metal chlorides acts as an oxidant that promotes the conversion of elemental mercury (Hg0) into its oxidized form (Hg2+). Cu2+ and Fe3+ can also promote Hg0 oxidation as catalysts. HCl and O2 promote the adsorption of Hg by modified fly ash, whereas SO2 inhibits the Hg adsorption because of competitive adsorption for active sites. Fly ash samples modified with CuBr2, CuCl2 and FeCl3 are therefore promising materials for controlling mercury emissions. PMID:23596961

  4. Coal Fly Ash as a Source of Iron in Atmospheric Dust

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Haihan; Laskin, Alexander; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Gorski, Christopher A.; Scherer, Michelle; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2012-01-18

    Anthropogenic coal fly ash aerosols may represent a significant source of bioavailable iron in the open ocean. Few measurements have been made to compare the solubility of atmospheric iron from anthropogenic aerosols and other sources. We report an investigation of the iron dissolution of three fly ash samples in acidic aqueous solutions and compare the solubilities with that of Arizona test dust, a reference material of mineral dust. The effects of pH, cloud processing, and solar irradiation on Fe solubility were explored. Similar to previously reported results on mineral dust, iron in aluminosilicate phases provide predominant dissolved iron compared with iron in oxides. Iron solubility of fly ash is higher than Arizona test dust, especially at the higher pH conditions investigated. Simulated atmospheric processing elevates iron solubility due to significant changes in the morphology aluminosilicate glass, a dominantly material in fly ash particle. Iron continuously releases into the aqueous solution as fly ash particles break up into smaller fragments. The assessment of dissolved atmospheric iron deposition fluxes, and their effect on the biogeochemistry at ocean surface should be constrained by taking into account the source, environment pH, Fe speciation, and solar radiation.

  5. Thermo-mechanical properties and microfabric of fly ash-stabilized gold tailings.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Kyu; Shang, Julie Q; Jeong, Sangseom

    2014-07-15

    This paper studies the changes in thermal conductivity, temperature, and unconfined compressive strength of gold tailings and fly ash mixtures during the curing period of 5 days. The microfabric of the cured mixtures was investigated with mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). The mixture samples were prepared at their maximum dry unit weight and optimum moisture content. Effect of adding fly ash to gold tailings (i.e., 0, 20, and 40% of the dry weight of tailings) was examined, and a comparison was made on samples prepared at the same fly ash content by replacing gold tailings with humic acid (i.e., gold tailings and humic acid ratios of 100:0, 90:10, and 80:20 by weight) or by varying pore fluid chemistry (i.e., water and salt solutions of 1M NaCl and CaCl2). The results show that the initial thermal conductivity of the samples is sensitive to the mixture proportion and a declination in the thermal conductivity is observed due to hydration of fly ash and evaporation. Inclusion of fly ash and salts into gold tailings improves the unconfined compressive strength but the presence of humic acid in samples leads to the decrease of the strength. MIP results reveal the pore structure changes associated with the packing states of the samples that reflect the influential factors considered. PMID:24910909

  6. Barley seedling growth in soils amended with fly ash or agricultural lime followed by acidification

    SciTech Connect

    Renken, R.R.; McCallister, D.L.; Tarkalson, D.D.; Hergert, G.W.; Marx, D.B.

    2006-05-15

    Calcium-rich coal combustion fly ash can be used as an amendment to neutralize soil acidity because of its oxides and carbonate content, but its aluminum content could inhibit plant growth if soil pH values fall below optimal agronomic levels. This study measured root and shoot growth of an acid-sensitive barley (Hordeum vulgare L. 'Kearney') grown in the greenhouse on three naturally acid soils. The soils were either untreated or amended with various liming materials (dry fly ash, wet fly ash, and agricultural lime) at application rates of 0, .5, 1, and 1.5 times the recommended lime requirement, then treated with dilute acid solutions to simulate management-induced acidification. Plant growth indexes were measured at 30 days after planting. Root mass per plant and root length per plant were greater for the limed treatments than in the acidified check. Root growth in the limed treatments did not differ from root growth in the original nonacidified soils. Top mass per plant in all limed soils was either larger than or not different from that in the original nonacidified soils. Based on top mass per plant, no liming material or application rate was clearly superior. Both fly ash and agricultural lime reduced the impact of subsequent acidification on young barley plants. Detrimental effects of aluminum release on plant growth were not observed. Calcium-rich fly ash at agronomic rates is an acceptable acid-neutralizing material with no apparent negative effects.

  7. Role of fly ash in the removal of organic pollutants from wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ahmaruzzaman

    2009-03-15

    Fly ash, a relatively abundant and inexpensive material, is currently being investigated as an adsorbent for the removal of various organic pollutants from wastewater. The wastewater contains various types of phenolic compounds, such as chloro, nitro, amino, and other substituted compounds. Various types of pesticides, such as lindane, malathion, carbofuran, etc., and dyes, such as, methylene blue, crystal violet, malachite green, etc., are also present in the wastewater. These contaminants pollute the water stream. These organic pollutants, such as phenolic compounds, pesticides, and dyes, etc., can be removed very effectively using fly ash as adsorbent. This article presents a detailed review on the role of fly ash in the removal of organic pollutants from wastewater. Adsorption of various pollutants using fly ash has been reviewed. The adsorption mechanism and other influencing factors, favorable conditions, and competitive ions, etc., on the adsorption process have also been discussed in this paper. It is evident from the review that fly ash has demonstrated good removal capabilities for various organic compounds. 171 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Combining sieving and washing, a way to treat MSWI boiler fly ash.

    PubMed

    De Boom, Aurore; Degrez, Marc

    2015-05-01

    Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) fly ashes contain some compounds that could be extracted and valorised. A process based on wet sieving and washing steps has been developed aiming to reach this objective. Such unique combination in MSWI fly ash treatment led to a non-hazardous fraction from incineration fly ashes. More specifically, MSWI Boiler Fly Ash (BFA) was separately sampled and treated. The BFA finer particles (13wt%) were found to be more contaminated in Pb and Zn than the coarser fractions. After three washing steps, the coarser fractions presented leaching concentrations acceptable to landfill for non-hazardous materials so that an eventual subsequent valorisation may be foreseen. At the contrary, too much Pb leached from the finest particles and this fraction should be further treated. Wet sieving and washing permit thus to reduce the leachability of MSWI BFA and to concentrate the Pb and Zn contamination in a small (in particle size and volume) fraction. Such combination would therefore constitute a straightforward and efficient basis to valorise coarse particles from MSWI fly ashes. PMID:25736808

  9. Effect of chemical admixtures on properties of high-calcium fly ash geopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rattanasak, Ubolluk; Pankhet, Kanokwan; Chindaprasirt, Prinya

    2011-06-01

    Owing to the high viscosity of sodium silicate solution, fly ash geopolymer has the problems of low workability and rapid setting time. Therefore, the effect of chemical admixtures on the properties of fly ash geopolymer was studied to overcome the rapid set of the geopolymer in this paper. High-calcium fly ash and alkaline solution were used as starting materials to synthesize the geopolymer. Calcium chloride, calcium sulfate, sodium sulfate, and sucrose at dosages of 1wt% and 2wt% of fly ash were selected as admixtures based on concrete knowledge to improve the properties of the geopolymer. The setting time, compressive strength, and degree of reaction were recorded, and the microstructure was examined. The results show that calcium chloride significantly shortens both the initial and final setting times of the geopolymer paste. In addition, sucrose also delays the final setting time significantly. The degrees of reaction of fly ash in the geopolymer paste with the admixtures are all higher than those of the control paste. This contributes to the obvious increases in compressive strength.

  10. Effect of particle size and volume fraction on tensile properties of fly ash/polyurea composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Jing; Schaaf, Kristin; Amirkhizi, Alireza V.; Nemat-Nasser, Siavouche

    2010-04-01

    Fly ash, which consists of hollow particles with porous shells, was introduced into polyurea elastomer. A one-step method was chosen to fabricate pure polyurea and the polyurea matrix for the composites based on Isonate® 2143L (diisocyanate) and Versalink® P-1000 (diamine). Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the fracture surfaces of the composites. Particle size and volume fraction were varied to study their effects on the tensile properties of the composites. The tensile properties of the pure polyurea and fly ash/polyurea (FA/PU) composites were tested using an Instron load frame with a 1 kN Interface model 1500ASK-200 load cell. Results showed that fly ash particles were distributed homogeneously in the polyurea matrix, and all of the composites displayed rubber-like tensile behavior similar to that of pure polyurea. The tensile strength of the composites was influenced by both the fly ash size and the volume fraction. Compared to the largest particle size or the highest volume fraction, an increase in tensile strength was achieved by reducing particle size and/or volume fraction. The strain at break of the composites also increased by using fine particles. In addition, the composites filled with 20% fly ash became softer. These samples showed lower plateau strength and larger strain at break than the other composites.

  11. Heavy metal migration during electroremediation of fly ash from different wastes--modelling.

    PubMed

    Lima, A T; Rodrigues, P C; Mexia, J T

    2010-03-15

    Fly ash is an airborne material which is considered hazardous waste due to its enrichment on heavy metals. Depending on the waste from which they are originated, fly ash may be further valorised, e.g. as soil amendment or concrete and ceramics adjuvant, or landfilled, when defined as hazardous material. In any case, heavy metal content has to be decreased either for fly ash valorisation or for complying with landfill criteria. The electrodialytic (EDR) process is a remediation technique based on the principle of electrokinetics and dialysis, having the aim to remove heavy metals from contaminated solid media. EDR was here applied to fly ashes from the combustion of straw (ST), from the incineration of municipal solid waste (DK and PT) and from the co-combustion of wood (CW). A statistical study, using F tests, Bonferroni multiple comparison method and a categorical regression, was carried out to determine which variables ("Ash type", "Duration", "Initial pH", "Final pH", "Acidification" and "Dissolution") were the most significant for EDR efficiency. After establishing these, the selected variables were then used to characterize some kinetic parameters, from metals migration during EDR, using a biregressional design. Cd, Cr, Cu, Ca and Zn migration velocity and acceleration to the electrodes (anode and cathode) were then considered. Cd and Cu migration to the cathode were found to be significantly influenced by "Ash type", "Duration", "Final pH" and "Dissolution". PMID:19883974

  12. Reburning Characteristics of Residual Carbon in Fly Ash from CFB Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. H.; Luo, H. H.; Chen, H. P.; Yang, H. P.; Wang, X. H.

    The content of residual carbon in fly ash of CFB boilers is a litter high especially when low-grade coal, such as lean coal, anthracite coal, gangue, etc. is in service, which greatly influences the efficiency of boilers and fly ash further disposal. Reburn of fly ash through collection, recirculation in CFB furnace or external combustor is a possibly effective strategy to decrease the carbon content, mainly depending on the residual carbon reactivity. In this work, the combustion properties of residual carbon in fly ash and corresponding original coal from large commercial CFB boilers (Kaifeng (440t/h), and Fenyi (410t/h), all in china) are comparably investigated through experiments. The residual carbon involved was firstly extracted and enriched from fly ash by means of floating elutriation to mitigate the influence of ash and minerals on the combustion behavior of residual carbon. Then, the combustion characteristic of two residual carbons and the original coal particles was analyzed with thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA, STA409C from Nestch, Germany). It was observed that the ignition temperature of the residual carbon is much higher than that of original coal sample, and the combustion reactivity of residual carbon is not only dependent on the original coal property, but also the operating conditions. The influence of oxygen content and heating rate was also studied in TGA. The O2 concentration is set as 20%, 30%, 40% and 70% respectively in O2/N2 gas mixture with the flow rate of 100ml/min. It was found that higher oxygen content is favor for decreasing ignition temperature, accelerating the combustion rate of residual carbon. And about 40% of oxygen concentration is experimentally suggested as an optimal value when oxygen-enriched combustion is put into practice for decreasing residual carbon content of fly ash in CFB boilers.

  13. Aggregate material formulated with MSWI bottom ash and APC fly ash for use as secondary building material.

    PubMed

    del Valle-Zermeño, R; Formosa, J; Chimenos, J M; Martínez, M; Fernández, A I

    2013-03-01

    The main goal of this paper is to obtain a granular material formulated with Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) bottom ash (BA) and air pollution control (APC) fly ash to be used as secondary building material. Previously, an optimum concrete mixture using both MSWI residues as aggregates was formulated. A compromise between the environmental behavior whilst maximizing the reuse of APC fly ash was considered and assessed. Unconfined compressive strength and abrasion resistance values were measured in order to evaluate the mechanical properties. From these results, the granular mixture was not suited for certain applications owing to the high BA/APC fly ash content and low cement percentages used to reduce the costs of the final product. Nevertheless, the leaching test performed showed that the concentrations of all heavy metals were below the limits established by the current Catalan legislation for their reutilization. Therefore, the material studied might be mainly used in embankments, where high mechanical properties are not needed and environmental safety is assured. PMID:23102641

  14. Stabilize ash using Clemson`s sintering process (Part 1 -- Phase 1 results): Mixed waste fly ash stabilization. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1998-12-01

    Incineration of applicable Department of Energy (DOE) mixed wastes has produced a secondary waste stream of radioactive and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous fly ash that also requires treatment before land disposal. Unlike bottom ash, fly ash usually contains constituents making efficient stabilization difficult. For example, fly ash from the DOE Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) incinerator at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) contains volatile metals, metal salts, high concentrations of zinc, and unburned organic residues. All of these constituents can effect the stabilization process. The Department of Energy, and in particular the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) of EM-50, has stated the need for improved stabilization methods would accept a higher ash waste loading while meeting waste form disposal criteria. These alternative stabilization technologies should include delivery systems to minimize worker exposure and minimize secondary waste generation, while maximizing operational flexibility and radionuclide containment. Currently, the standard practice for stabilizing ash is mixing with Portland cement at room temperature. This standard practice produces a significant increase of waste material volume or has difficulty in adequately stabilizing the components in the fly ash to ensure regulatory requirements are consistently satisfied. To address these fly ash stabilization shortcomings, the MWFA, a DOE/EM-50 program, invested in the development of several fly ash stabilization alternatives, including the Clemson University sintering method.

  15. Fundamental study of low-NOx combustion fly ash utilization. Semiannual report, May 1, 1998--October 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, R.H.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1999-10-20

    The objective of the current work was to investigate the oxidation reactivity of fly ash carbons, using thermogravimetric analysis techniques. Good measures of the oxidation reactivity of fly ash carbon were the critical temperature (T{sub cr}) and the late burnout temperature (T{sub late}). The lower the critical temperature of the fly ash carbon, the more reactive the sample. By contrast, the higher T{sub late}, the less reactive the fly ash carbon. The difference between T{sub cr} and T{sub late} provided information about the reactivity distribution and was mainly dependent on fly ash carbon content (Loss-On-Ignition (LOI)). Fly ash carbons having different origins, some from lower rank coals and some from higher rank coals had slightly different reactivities. Class C fly ash carbons from low rank coals were more reactive than the typical class F fly ash carbons from higher rank coals. The reactivity parameters did not, however, provide any additional ability to predict the suitability of a given ash for use in concrete.

  16. Mössbauer Studies of Thermal Power Plant Coal and Fly Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taneja, S. P.

    Iron-57 Mössbauer spectroscopic studies were carried out at room temperature on samples of coal, slag (bottom ash) and mechanical ash collected from Bhatinda (India) thermal power plant. Hyperfine parameters such as isomer shift, quadrupole splitting and total internal magnetic field of 57Fe nuclei were used to characterize various iron-bearing minerals. The observed parameters indicate the presence of pyrite, siderite and ankerite in coal sample while magnetic fractions of mechanical ash and slag samples show the formation of hematite and Al-substituted magnesio-ferrite. The non-magnetic fraction of slag ash shows the dominance of Fe2+ phases while that of mechanical ash demonstrates the formation of both Fe2+ and Fe3+ phases. These findings are compared with Mössbauer and magnetic susceptibility studies on fly ash samples of Panipat (India) thermal power plant reported earlier.

  17. Brick manufacture with fly ash from Illinois coals. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.E.; Dreher, G.; Frost, J.; Moore, D.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Fiocchi, T.; Swartz, D.

    1995-12-31

    This investigation seeks to utilize fly ash in fired-clay products such as building and patio bricks, ceramic blocks, field and sewer tile, and flower pots. This goal is accomplished by (1) one or more plant-scale, 5000-brick tests with fly ash mixed with brick clays at the 20% or higher level; (2) a laboratory-scale study to measure the firing reactions of a range of compositions of clay and fly ash mixtures; (3) a preliminary study to evaluate the potential environmental and economic benefits of brick manufacture with fly ash. Bricks and feed materials will be tested for compliance with market specifications and for leachability of pollutants derived from fly ash. The laboratory study will combine ISGS databases, ICCI-supported characterization methods, and published information to improve predictions of the firing characteristics of Illinois fly ash and brick clay mixtures. Because identical methods are used to test clay firing and coal ash fusion, and because melting mechanisms are the same, improved coal ash fusion predictions are an additional expected result of this research. If successful, this project should convert a disposal problem (fly ash) into valuable products-bricks. During this quarter we set up the manufacturing run at Colonial Brick Co., finalized arrangements for a larger brick manufacturing run at Marseilles Brick Co. in YR2, revised our laboratory procedures for selective dissolution analysis, obtained information to select three standard fly ashes, and continued our characterization of brick clays that could be mixed with fly ash for fired-clay products. Due to delays in other areas, we began construction of the optimization program for year 2. We discovered recently that fly ash dust will be an unanticipated problem at the brick plant.

  18. Leaching characteristics of toxic constituents from coal fly ash mixed soils under the influence of pH.

    PubMed

    Komonweeraket, Kanokwan; Cetin, Bora; Benson, Craig H; Aydilek, Ahmet H; Edil, Tuncer B

    2015-04-01

    Leaching behaviors of Arsenic (As), Barium (Ba), Calcium (Ca), Cadmium (Cd), Magnesium (Mg), Selenium (Se), and Strontium (Sr) from soil alone, coal fly ash alone, and soil-coal fly ash mixtures, were studied at a pH range of 2-14 via pH-dependent leaching tests. Seven different types of soils and coal fly ashes were tested. Results of this study indicated that Ca, Cd, Mg, and Sr showed cationic leaching pattern while As and Se generally follows an oxyanionic leaching pattern. On the other hand, leaching of Ba presented amphoteric-like leaching pattern but less pH-dependent. In spite of different types and composition of soil and coal fly ash investigated, the study reveals the similarity in leaching behavior as a function of pH for a given element from soil, coal fly ash, and soil-coal fly ash mixtures. The similarity is most likely due to similar controlling mechanisms (e.g., solubility, sorption, and solid-solution formation) and similar controlling factors (e.g., leachate pH and redox conditions). This offers the opportunity to transfer knowledge of coal fly ash that has been extensively characterized and studied to soil stabilized with coal fly ash. It is speculated that unburned carbon in off-specification coal fly ashes may provide sorption sites for Cd resulting in a reduction in concentration of these elements in leachate from soil-coal fly ash mixture. Class C fly ash provides sufficient CaO to initiate the pozzolanic reaction yielding hydrated cement products that oxyanions, including As and Se, can be incorporated into. PMID:25555664

  19. Oxidation of arsenic bearing fly ash as pretreatment before solidification.

    PubMed

    Dutré, V; Vandecasteele, C; Opdenakker, S

    1999-09-10

    When a waste fly ash, containing large amounts of As(2)O(3), is solidified using cement and lime, the arsenic concentration in the leachate (extraction test DIN 38 414 S4) is determined by the solubility of CaHAsO(3) and can be lowered to a value of ca. 5 mg/l, in a saturated solution of Ca(OH)(2). One of the criteria for landfilling of hazardous waste is, however, that the arsenic concentration in the leachate must be lower than 1 mg/l. In this paper, it is shown that oxidation of the waste before solidification, whereby As(III) is oxidised to As(V) using H(2)O(2), lowers the leaching of arsenic, and other contaminants, from the solidified product. With the speciation program MINTEQA2, it is calculated that the solubility of As(V) in the presence of a pure Ca(3)(AsO(4))(2) precipitate is lower than the solubility of As(III) in the presence of a pure CaHAsO(3) precipitate. The arsenic concentration in the presence of both a Ca(OH)(2) and a Ca(3)(AsO(4))(2) precipitate can even be lowered to 0.47 mg/l (pH 12.5). The As concentration in the leachate of the extraction test on an oxidised S/S sample was indeed lowered to ca. 0.5 mg/l, which is a reduction by a factor of 10 compared to the concentration of ca. 5 mg/l, obtained in the leachate of the extraction test on a non-oxidised S/S sample. This is in very good agreement with the calculated value of 0.47 mg/l. Also, the pretreatment decreased the cumulative fraction of arsenic released over the entire test period of a semi-dynamic leach test by a factor of 7. At all times during the test, the As concentration did not exceed the norm of 1 mg/l. PMID:10550711

  20. Behavior study of trace elements in pulverized lignite, bottom ash, and fly ash of Amyntaio power station, Greece.

    PubMed

    Megalovasilis, Pavlos; Papastergios, Georgios; Filippidis, Anestis

    2013-07-01

    The Kozani-Ptolemais-Amyntaio basin constitutes the principal coal field of Greece. Approximately 50% of the total power production of Greece is generated by five power stations operating in the area. Lignite samples, together with the corresponding fly ash and bottom ash were collected, over a period of 3 months, from the power plant of Amyntaio and analyzed for their content in 16 trace elements. The results indicate that Y, Nb, U, Rb, Zr, Ni, Pb, Ba, Zn, Sr, Cu, and Th demonstrate an organic affinity during the combustion of lignite, while V has an inorganic affinity. Three elements (Co, Cr, and Sc) show an intermediate affinity. PMID:23188071

  1. Influence of combustion conditions and coal properties on physical properties of fly ash generated from pulverized coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Hiromi Shirai; Hirofumi Tsuji; Michitaka Ikeda; Toshinobu Kotsuji

    2009-07-15

    To develop combustion technology for upgrading the quality of fly ash, the influences of the coal properties, such as the size of pulverized coal particles and the two-stage combustion ratio during the combustion, on the fly ash properties were investigated using our test furnace. The particle size, density, specific surface area (obtained by the Blaine method), and shape of fly ash particles of seven types of coal were measured. It was confirmed that the size of pulverized coal particles affects the size of the ash particles. Regarding the coal properties, the fuel ratio affected the ash particle size distribution. The density and shape of the ash particles strongly depended on their ash size. Our results indicated that the shape of the ash particles and the concentration of unburned carbon affected the specific surface area. The influence of the two-stage combustion ratio was limited. 8 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Fly Ash Porous Material using Geopolymerization Process for High Temperature Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Jamaludin, Liyana; Hussin, Kamarudin; Bnhussain, Mohamed; Ghazali, Che Mohd Ruzaidi; Ahmad, Mohd Izzat

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on the effect of temperature on geopolymers manufactured using pozzolanic materials (fly ash). In this paper, we report on our investigation of the performance of porous geopolymers made with fly ash after exposure to temperatures from 600 °C up to 1000 °C. The research methodology consisted of pozzolanic materials (fly ash) synthesized with a mixture of sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate solution as an alkaline activator. Foaming agent solution was added to geopolymer paste. The geopolymer paste samples were cured at 60 °C for one day and the geopolymers samples were sintered from 600 °C to 1000 °C to evaluate strength loss due to thermal damage. We also studied their phase formation and microstructure. The heated geopolymers samples were tested by compressive strength after three days. The results showed that the porous geopolymers exhibited strength increases after temperature exposure. PMID:22605984

  3. Fly-ash induced synthesis of phytochelatins in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) plants.

    PubMed

    Gupta, D K; Rai, U N; Tripathi, R D; Sinha, S; Rai, P; Inouhe, M

    2005-07-01

    Phytochelatins and related metabolites (cysteine and GSH) were found to be induced in the shoots of two varieties of Cicer arietinum viz., CSG-8962 and C-235 grown under different amendments of fly-ash with garden soil and press mud. Cysteine, GSH, PCs and its speciation were found in higher concentrations in amended fly-ash than in the control 100% soil. Two species of metal binding peptides i.e., PC2 and PC4 were found in both varieties and in amendments, however, their concentration varied depending upon the fly-ash concentrations in both amendments. Further, var. CSG-8962 was found more tolerant than var. C-235 because of higher concentrations of PCs and related metabolites. PMID:16334294

  4. Methyl-orange and cadmium simultaneous removal using fly ash and photo-Fenton systems.

    PubMed

    Visa, Maria; Duta, Anca

    2013-01-15

    Wastewaters resulting from the textile and dye finishing industries need complex treatment for efficient removal of colour and other compounds existent in the dyeing and rising baths (heavy metals, surfactants, equalizers, etc.). Modified fly ash (FA) mixed with TiO(2) photocatalyst represent a viable option for simultaneous removal of dyes and heavy metals, and the optimized conditions are discussed in this paper for synthetic wastewaters containing methyl-orange (MO) and cadmium. For a cost-effective dye removal process, further tests were done, replacing the photocatalyst with a (photo)Fenton system. The optimized technological parameters (contact time, amount of fly ash and amount of Fe(2+)/H(2)O(2)) allow to reach removal efficiencies up to 88% for the heavy metal and up to 70% for the dye. The adsorption mechanisms and the process kinetic are discussed, also considering the possibility of in situ generation of the Fenton system, due to the fly ash composition. PMID:23200622

  5. Hydration mechanisms of ternary Portland cements containing limestone powder and fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    De Weerdt, K.; Haha, M. Ben; Le Saout, G.; Kjellsen, K.O.; Justnes, H.; Lothenbach, B.

    2011-03-15

    The effect of minor additions of limestone powder on the properties of fly ash blended cements was investigated in this study using isothermal calorimetry, thermogravimetry (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques, and pore solution analysis. The presence of limestone powder led to the formation of hemi- and monocarbonate and to a stabilisation of ettringite compared to the limestone-free cements, where a part of the ettringite converted to monosulphate. Thus, the presence of 5% of limestone led to an increase of the volume of the hydrates, as visible in the increase in chemical shrinkage, and an increase in compressive strength. This effect was amplified for the fly ash/limestone blended cements due to the additional alumina provided by the fly ash reaction.

  6. Optimization of fly ash as sand replacement materials (SRM) in cement composites containing coconut fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadzri, N. I. M.; Jamaludin, S. B.; Mazlee, M. N.; Jamal, Z. A. Z.

    2016-07-01

    The need of utilizing industrial and agricultural wastes is very important to maintain sustainability. These wastes are often incorporated with cement composites to improve performances in term of physical and mechanical properties. This study presents the results of the investigation of the response of cement composites containing coconut fiber as reinforcement and fly ash use as substitution of sand at different hardening days. Hardening periods of time (7, 14 and 28 days) were selected to study the properties of cement composites. Optimization result showed that 20 wt. % of fly ash (FA) is a suitable material for sand replacement (SRM). Meanwhile 14 days of hardening period gave highest compressive strength (70.12 MPa) from the cement composite containing 9 wt. % of coconut fiber and fly ash. This strength was comparable with the cement without coconut fiber (74.19 MPa) after 28 days of curing.

  7. Coal fly ash-slag-based geopolymers: microstructure and metal leaching.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Maria; Querol, Xavier; Davidovits, Joseph; Antenucci, Diano; Nugteren, Henk; Fernández-Pereira, Constantino

    2009-07-15

    This study deals with the use of fly ash as a starting material for geopolymeric matrices. The leachable concentrations of geopolymers were compared with those of the starting fly ash to evaluate the retention of potentially harmful elements within the geopolymer matrix. Geopolymer matrices give rise to a leaching scenario characterised by a highly alkaline environment, which inhibits the leaching of heavy metals but may enhance the mobilization of certain oxyanionic species. Thus, fly ash-based geopolymers were found to immobilize a number of trace pollutants such as Be, Bi, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Nb, Ni, Pb, Sn, Th, U, Y, Zr and rare earth elements. However, the leachable levels of elements occurring in their oxyanionic form such as As, B, Mo, Se, V and W were increased after geopolymerization. This suggests that an optimal dosage, synthesis and curing conditions are essential in order to obtain a long-term stable final product that ensures an efficient physical encapsulation. PMID:19118943

  8. Fly ash porous material using geopolymerization process for high temperature exposure.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Jamaludin, Liyana; Hussin, Kamarudin; Bnhussain, Mohamed; Ghazali, Che Mohd Ruzaidi; Ahmad, Mohd Izzat

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on the effect of temperature on geopolymers manufactured using pozzolanic materials (fly ash). In this paper, we report on our investigation of the performance of porous geopolymers made with fly ash after exposure to temperatures from 600 °C up to 1000 °C. The research methodology consisted of pozzolanic materials (fly ash) synthesized with a mixture of sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate solution as an alkaline activator. Foaming agent solution was added to geopolymer paste. The geopolymer paste samples were cured at 60 °C for one day and the geopolymers samples were sintered from 600 °C to 1000 °C to evaluate strength loss due to thermal damage. We also studied their phase formation and microstructure. The heated geopolymers samples were tested by compressive strength after three days. The results showed that the porous geopolymers exhibited strength increases after temperature exposure. PMID:22605984

  9. Influence of calcium compounds on the mechanical properties of fly ash geopolymer pastes.

    PubMed

    Temuujin, J; van Riessen, A; Williams, R

    2009-08-15

    The influence of calcium compounds (CaO and Ca(OH)(2)) on the mechanical properties of fly ash based geopolymers has been studied. Calcium compounds were substituted in fly ash at 1, 2 and 3 wt%, respectively. Curing of the geopolymers was performed at ambient temperature (20 degrees C) and 70 degrees C. Addition of calcium compounds as a fly ash substitute improved mechanical properties for the ambient temperature cured samples while decreasing properties for the 70 degrees C cured samples. Seven days compressive strength of the ambient temperature cured samples increased from 11.8 (2.9) to 22.8 (3.8)MPa and 29.2 (1.1)MPa for 3% CaO and 3% Ca(OH)(2) additions, respectively. PMID:19201089

  10. Solid-state conversion of fly ash to effective adsorbents for Cu removal from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaobin; Li, Lin; Zhu, Z H

    2007-01-10

    Solid-state conversion of fly ash to an amorphous aluminosilicate adsorbent (geopolymer) has been investigated under different conditions and the synthesised material has been tested for Cu2+ removal from aqueous solution. It has been found that higher reaction temperature and Na:FA ratio will make the adsorbents achieving higher removal efficiency. The adsorbent loading and Cu2+ initial concentration will also affect the removal efficiency while the adsorption capacity exhibits similarly at 30-40 degrees C. The adsorption capacity of the synthesised adsorbent shows much higher value than fly ash and natural zeolite. The capacity is 0.1, 3.5 and 92 mg/g, for fly ash, natural zeolite, and FA derived adsorbent, respectively. The kinetic studies indicate that the adsorption can be fitted by the second-order kinetic model. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms also can fit to the adsorption isotherm. PMID:16839666

  11. Heavy metal removal from municipal solid waste fly ash by chlorination and thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Nowak, B; Pessl, A; Aschenbrenner, P; Szentannai, P; Mattenberger, H; Rechberger, H; Hermann, L; Winter, F

    2010-07-15

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) fly ash is classified as a hazardous material because it contains high amounts of heavy metals. For decontamination, MSW fly ash is first mixed with alkali or alkaline earth metal chlorides (e.g. calcium chloride) and water, and then the mixture is pelletized and treated in a rotary reactor at about 1000 degrees C. Volatile heavy metal compounds are formed and evaporate. In this paper, the effect of calcium chloride addition, gas velocity, temperature and residence time on the separation of heavy metals are studied. The fly ash was sampled at the waste-to-energy plant Fernwärme Wien/Spittelau (Vienna, Austria). The results were obtained from batch tests performed in an indirectly heated laboratory-scale rotary reactor. More than 90% of Cd and Pb and about 60% of Cu and 80% of Zn could be removed in the experiments. PMID:20356672

  12. Synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline silver coating of fly ash cenosphere particles by electroless process.

    PubMed

    Shukla, S; Seal, S; Schwarz, S; Zhou, D

    2001-12-01

    Electroless nanocrystalline Ag coating of fly ash cenosphere particles utilizing a Sn-Pd catalyst system is demonstrated in this article. The deposition of pure metallic nanocrystalline Ag on the fly ash cenosphere particle surface is confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Under the described conditions of electroless coating, average nanocrystalline Ag-coating thickness is observed to be approximately 220 nm, using a focused ion beam technique, which is less than that observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) (260-360 nm). TEM observation further reveals that the Ag-coating is made up of 50 nm Ag nanocrystallites, which is comparable with the size of approximately 37 nm obtained from the XRD data. The mechanism of the electroless Ag-coating process is discussed. Ag-coated fly ash particles find applications in manufacturing conducting polymers for electromagnetic interference shielding applications. PMID:12914083

  13. Characteristics of fly ash from the dry flue gas desulfurization system for iron ore sintering plants.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Guanghong; Huang, Peng; Mou, Yaqin; Zhou, Chenhui

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics of fly ash from the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system are important for its reuse and are mainly depend on the desulfurization process. The physical and chemical properties of DSF ash, which refers to fly ash from the dry FGD system for the iron ore sintering process, were investigated. Its mineralogical contents were determined by X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetry analysis, and its micro-morphology was studied by scanning electric micrograph analysis. The results show that DSF ash has a higher CaO and SO3 content, and the main sulfur form is sulfite, with only a part of it oxidized to sulfate. The major minerals present in DSF ash are hannebachite, anhydrite, calcite and portlandite; a minor constituent is calcium chloride. The particles of DSF ash are irregular, fragmentary and small, and hannebachite grows on their surfaces. Particle size is affected by the FGD process, and the ash size from the maximized emission reduction of the sintering-FGD process is lower than that from the circulating fluidized bed-FGD process. The particle size distribution of DSF ash follows the Rosin--Rammler-Bennet equation. PMID:22720407

  14. Removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same by adsorption on coal fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Scheitlin, Frank M.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a process for the removal of radium from acidic aqueous solutions. In one aspect, the invention is a process for removing radium from an inorganic-acid solution. The process comprises contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple, comparatively inexpensive, and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities throughout the United States. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of .sup.226 Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings.

  15. Risk ranking of bioaccessible metals from fly ash dissolved in simulated lung and gut fluids

    SciTech Connect

    John Twining; Peter McGlinn; Elaine Loi; Kath Smith; Reto Giere

    2005-10-01

    Power plant fly ash from two fuels, coal and a mixture of coal and shredded tires were evaluated for trace metal solubility in simulated human lung and gut fluids (SLF and SGF, respectively) to estimate bioaccessibility. The proportion of bioaccessible to total metal ranged from zero (V) to 80% (Zn) for coal-derived ash in SLF and from 2 (Th) to 100% (Cu) for tire-derived fly ash in SGF. The tire-derived ash contained much more Zn. However, Zn ranked only 5th of the various toxic metals in SGF compared with international regulations for ingestion. On the basis of total concentrations, the metals closest to exceeding limits based on international regulations for inhalation were Cr, Pb, and Al. On dissolution in SLF, the most limiting metals were Pb, Cu, and Zn. For metals exposed to SGF there was no relative change in the top metal, Al, before and after dissolution but the second-ranked metal shifted from Pb to Ni. In most cases only a proportion of the total metal concentrations in either fly ash was soluble, and hence bioaccessible, in either biofluid. When considering the regulatory limits for inhalation of particulates, none of the metal concentrations measured were as hazardous as the fly ash particulates themselves. However, on the basis of the international ingestion regulations for Al, the maximum mass of fly ash that could be ingested is only 1 mg per day (10 mg based on bioaccessibility). It is possible that such a small mass could be consumed by exposed individuals or groups. 39 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  16. Contribution of aluminas and aluminosilicates to the formation of PCDD/Fs on fly ashes.

    PubMed

    Potter, Phillip M; Dellinger, Barry; Lomnicki, Slawomir M

    2016-02-01

    Chlorinated aromatics undergo surface-mediated reactions with metal oxides to form Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals (EPFRs) which can further react to produce polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). Previous work using laboratory-made fly ash surrogates composed of transition metal oxides deposited on silica powder has confirmed their ability to mimic fly ash in the production of PCDD/Fs. However, little is known about the propensity of aluminas and aluminosilicates, other components of fly ash, to form PCDD/Fs. A fly ash sample containing both alumina and mullite, an aluminosilicate, was tested for PCDD/F formation ability and compared to PCDD/F yields from the thermal degradation of 2-monochlorophenol (2-MCP) precursor over γ-alumina, α-alumina, and mullite. A packed-bed flow reactor was used to investigate the thermal degradation of 2-MCP over the various catalysts at 200-600 °C. Fly ash gave similar PCDD/F yields to surrogates made with similar transition metal content. γ-alumina, which is thermodynamically unfavorable, was very catalytically active and gave low PCDD/F yields despite a high destruction of 2-MCP. Mullite and α-alumina, the thermodynamically favorable form of alumina, yielded higher concentrations of dioxins and products with a higher degree of chlorine substitution than γ-alumina. The data suggest that certain aluminas and aluminosilicates, commonly found in fly ash, are active catalytic surfaces in the formation of PCDD/Fs in the post-flame cool zones of combustion systems and should be considered as additional catalytic surfaces active in the process. PMID:26615490

  17. Melting of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash by waste-derived thermite reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kuen-Sheng; Lin, Kae-Long; Lee, Ching-Hwa

    2009-02-15

    This work describes a novel approach for melting municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash, based on self-propagating reactions, by using energy-efficient simulated waste-derived thermite. The self-propagating characteristics, the properties of the recycled alloy and slag and the partitioning of heavy metals during the process are also studied. Experimental results demonstrate that the mix ratio of fly ash to the starting mixture of less than 30% supports the development of the self-propagating reaction with a melting temperature of 1350-2200 degrees C. Furthermore, metallic iron (or alloy) and the slag were retrieved after activation of the thermite reactions among the starting mixtures. It was noted that more than 91wt.% of iron was retrieved as alloy and the rest of non-reductive oxides as slag. During the thermite reactions, the partition of heavy metals to the SFA and flue gas varied with the characteristics of the target metals: Cd was mainly partitioned to flue gas (75-82%), and partition slightly increased with the increasing fly ash ratio; Pb and Zn, were mainly partitioned to the SFA, and the partition increased with increasing fly ash ratio; Cu was partitioned to the SFA (18-31%) and was not found in the flue gas; and moreover stable Cr and Ni were not identified in both the SFA and flue gas. On the other hand, the determined TCLP leaching concentrations were all well within the current regulatory thresholds, despite the various FA ratios. This suggests that the vitrified fly ash samples were environmental safe in heavy metal leaching. The results of this study suggested that melting of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash by waste-derived thermite reactions was a feasible approach not only energy-beneficial but also environmental-safe. PMID:18573610

  18. Heavy metal leaching from coal fly ash amended container substrates during Syngonium production

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Q.S.; Chen, J.J.; Li, Y.C.

    2008-02-15

    Coal fly ash has been proposed to be an alternative to lime amendment and a nutrient source of container substrates for ornamental plant production. A great concern over this proposed beneficial use, however, is the potential contamination of surface and ground water by heavy metals. In this study, three fly ashes collected from Florida, Michigan, and North Carolina and a commercial dolomite were amended in a basal substrate. The formulated substrates were used to produce Syngonium podophyllum Schott 'Berry Allusion' in 15-cm diameter containers in a shaded greenhouse. Leachates from the containers were collected during the entire six months of plant production and analyzed for heavy metal concentrations. There were no detectable As, Cr, Hg, Pb, and Se in the leachates; Cd and Mo were only detected in few leachate samples. The metals constantly detected were Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn. The total amounts of Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn leached during the six-month production period were 95, 210, 44, and 337 {mu} g per container, indicating that such amounts in leachates may contribute little to contamination of surface and ground water. In addition, plant growth indices and fresh and dry weights of S. podophyllum 'Berry Allusion' produced from fly ash and dolomite-amended substrates were comparable except for the plants produced from the substrate amended with fly ash collected from Michigan which had reduced growth indices and fresh and dry weights. Thus, selected fly ashes can be alternatives to commercial dolomites as amendments to container substrates for ornamental plant production. The use of fly ashes as container substrate amendments should represent a new market for the beneficial use of this coal combustion byproduct.

  19. Heavy metal leaching from coal fly ash amended container substrates during Syngonium production.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiansheng; Chen, Jianjun; Li, Yuncong

    2008-02-01

    Coal fly ash has been proposed to be an alternative to lime amendment and a nutrient source of container substrates for ornamental plant production. A great concern over this proposed beneficial use, however, is the potential contamination of surface and ground water by heavy metals. In this study, three fly ashes collected from Florida, Michigan, and North Carolina and a commercial dolomite were amended in a basal substrate. The formulated substrates were used to produce Syngonium podophyllum Schott 'Berry Allusion' in 15-cm diameter containers in a shaded greenhouse. Leachates from the containers were collected during the entire six months of plant production and analyzed for heavy metal concentrations. There were no detectable As, Cr, Hg, Pb, and Se in the leachates; Cd and Mo were only detected in few leachate samples. The metals constantly detected were Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn. The total amounts of Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn leached during the six-month production period were 95, 210, 44, and 337 microg per container, indicating that such amounts in leachates may contribute little to contamination of surface and ground water. In addition, plant growth indices and fresh and dry weights of S. podophyllum 'Berry Allusion' produced from fly ash and dolomite-amended substrates were comparable except for the plants produced from the substrate amended with fly ash collected from Michigan which had reduced growth indices and fresh and dry weights. Thus, selected fly ashes can be alternatives to commercial dolomites as amendments to container substrates for ornamental plant production. The use of fly ashes as container substrate amendments should represent a new market for the beneficial use of this coal combustion byproduct. PMID:18246510

  20. An assessment of Mercury immobilisation in alkali activated fly ash (AAFA) cements.

    PubMed

    Donatello, Shane; Fernández-Jiménez, Ana; Palomo, Angel

    2012-04-30

    This paper presents total and soluble Mercury contents for three coal fly ashes and alkali-activated fly ash (AAFA) cements consisting of 100% fly ash as starting material. To evaluate the potential of the AAFA cement matrix to immobilise Hg from an external source, another batch of cements, doped with 5000 mg/kg Hg as highly soluble HgCl(2), was prepared. The ashes and control AAFA cements complied with Mercury leaching criteria for non-hazardous wastes according to both TCLP and EN 12457 tests. Fly ash activated cements doped with 5000 mg/kg Hg and aged for 2 days immobilised 98.8-99.6% and 97.3-98.8% of Hg according to TCLP and EN 12457 tests respectively. Evidence from SEM-EDX suggests that Hg was immobilised by precipitation as highly insoluble HgS or Hg(2)S, although partial precipitation as less insoluble HgO or Hg silicates could not be entirely ruled out based on data presented. The results for Hg-doped cements contribute to the growing body of evidence that shows AAFA cement as a useful material for immobilizing elevated concentrations of toxic and hazardous elements. PMID:22341491

  1. Fourth international conference on fly ash, silica fume, slag, and natural pozzolans in concrete: Supplemental proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, E.E.; Hemmings, R.T.; Zhang, M.H. ); Malhotra, V.M. )

    1992-03-01

    This report consists of four papers presented at a special session on high volume fly ash (HVFA) concrete. These four papers summarize an EPRI research project currently in progress that is investigating HVFA concretes. This objective of this research is to commercialize the HVFA concrete technology through: (1) an extensive measurement of basic engineering and durability properties; (2) an examination of the binder microstructure and cementation hydration reactions; and (3) technology transfer to industry and the construction community. Overall the data from the project that are summarized in these papers, show that commercial quality structural grade concrete (up to 50 MPa compressive strength at 90 days) can be made from a wide range of fly ashes and cements available throughout the USA. It has been shown in this project that fly ash is a reactive participant with the Portland cement in the cementing process, and also serves as a microaggregate in a multiphase composite binder formed during curing. The properties of the binder were found to significantly influence strength development, elastic modulus, and the stress-strain behavior of HVFA concrete. Overall, the data presented show that regardless of the type of fly ash (from the nine US ashes evaluated) and the two cements used, that air-entrained HVFA concrete exhibits excellent durability in all respects except under application of deicing salts where some surface scaling has been observed in the laboratory.

  2. Attenuation of trace elements in coal fly ash leachates by surfactant-modified zeolite.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Ghanashyam; Donahoe, Rona J

    2012-08-30

    Potential leaching of trace elements from older, unlined fly ash disposal facilities is a serious threat to groundwater and surface water contamination. Therefore, effective methods for containing the pollutant elements within the unlined coal combustion products (CCPs) disposal facilities are required to minimize any potential impact of leachate emanating from such facilities into the nearby environment. Because surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has the potential to sequester both cationic and anionic trace elements from aqueous solutions, bench-scale batch and column experiments were performed to test its ability to remediate trace elements in leachates generated from both alkaline and acidic fly ash samples. Fly ash leachate treatment results showed the potential application of SMZ as an effective permeable reactive barrier (PRB) material to control the dispersion of heavy metals and metalloids from ash disposal sites. Quantitative comparison of the elemental composition of SMZ-treated and untreated leachates indicated that SMZ was effective in decreasing the concentrations of trace elements in fly ash leachates. Similarly, SMZ treatment column experiments showed the delayed peak leaching events and overall reductions in leachate concentrations of trace elements. The effectiveness of SMZ column treatments, however, decreased with time potentially due to the saturation of sorption sites. PMID:22721834

  3. Application of Anova on Fly Ash Leaching Kinetics for Value Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Ranjita; Mohapatro, Rudra Narayana; Bhima Rao, Raghupatruni

    2016-04-01

    Fly ash is a major problem in power plant sectors as it is dumped at the plant site. Fly ash generation increases day to day due to rapid growth of steel industries. Ceramic/refractory industries are growing rapidly because of more number of steel industries. The natural resources of the ceramic/refractory raw materials are depleting with time due to its consumption. In view of this, fly ash from thermal power plant has been identified for use in the ceramic/refractory industries after suitable beneficiation. In this paper, sample was collected from the ash pond of Vedanta. Particle size (d80 passing size) of the sample is around 150 micron. The chemical analysis of the sample shows that 3.9 % of Fe2O3 and CaO is more than 10 %. XRD patterns show that the fly ash samples consist predominantly of the crystalline phases of quartz, hematite and magnetite in a matrix of aluminosilicate glass. Leaching of iron oxide is 98.3 % at 3 M HCl concentration at 90 °C for 270 min of leaching time. Kinetic study on leaching experiment was carried out. ANOVA software is utilized for curve fitting and the process is optimized using MATLAB 7.1. The detailed study of properties for ceramic material is compared with the standard ceramic materials. The product contains 0.3 % of iron. The other properties of the product have established the fact that the product obtained can be a raw material for ceramic industries.

  4. Post-treatment of fly ash by ozone in a fixed bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim Hougaard Pedersen; Merc Casanovas Meli; Anker Degn Jensen; Kim Dam-Johansen

    2009-01-15

    The residual carbon in fly ash produced from pulverized coal combustion can adsorb the air-entraining admixtures (AEAs) added to enhance air entrainment in concrete. This behavior of the ash can be suppressed by exposing the fly ash to oxidizing species, which oxidizes the carbon surface and thus prevents the AEA to be adsorbed. In the present work, two fly ashes have been ozonated in a fixed bed reactor and the results showed that ozonation is a potential post-treatment method that can lower the AEA requirements of a fly ash up to 6 times. The kinetics of the carbon oxidation by ozone was found to be fast. A kinetic model has been formulated, describing the passivation of carbon, and it includes the stoichiometry of the ozone consumption (0.8 mol of O{sub 3}/kg of C) and an ineffective ozone loss caused by catalytic decomposition. The simulated results correlated well with the experimental data. 28 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Mechanical properties, pore size distribution, and pore solution of fly ash-belite cement mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, A.; Goni, S.; Macias, A.; Luxan, M.P.

    1999-11-01

    The mechanical properties, pore size distribution, and extracted pore solution of fly ash-belite cement (FABC) mortars were studied for a period of 200 days. The influence of the calcination temperature, which ranged from 700 to 900 C, of the fly ash-belite cement was discussed. The evolution with hydration time of the pore size distribution was followed by mercury intrusion porosimetry, and the results correlated with those of flexural and compressive strength. The pore solution was expressed and analyzed at different times of hydration.

  6. Mutagenicity of coal fly ash: a new bioassay for mutagenic potential in a particle feeding ciliate

    SciTech Connect

    Smith-Sonneborn, J.; Fisher, G.L.; Palizzi, R.A.; Herr, C.

    1981-01-01

    The use of the established mutagenesis assay in Paramecium as a prescreen for hazardous environmental particles is described. Since these protozoans ingest particles of the size respired by animals and man, the biological effects of the respirable fraction of fly ash particles were monitored in particle-feeding eukaryotic cells. Fly ash from coal combustion was utilized for these studies and was found to be mutagenic. The effects of physical and chemical treatment of the particle mutagenicity provided evidence for both heat-stable, heat-labile and acid extractable mutagenic agents.

  7. Leach-resistant solid bodies from fly ash and heavy metal sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Styron, R.W.

    1980-10-07

    Solid, leach-resistant bodies are formed from aqueous heavy metal sludge and fly ash formed in the combustion of subbituminous coal from the Power River basin by slurrying the sludge with an amount of fly ash equivalent to between about 20 wt. % and about 70 wt. % based on the weight of the slurry, wherein the initial liquid content of the slurry is such that the slurry will harden into a body having a 7-day compressive strength of at least about 250 psi, and allowing the slurry to harden.

  8. The occurrence of gold in fly ash derived from high-Ge coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seredin, Vladimir V.; Dai, Shifeng

    2014-01-01

    We present the first data on the mode of occurrence of Au in fly ashes from the Wulantuga and Lincang power plants in China, which burn high-Ge coal. Gold occurs as fine-grained drop-like particles with a size of n*0.01-0.2 μm on the surface of the glass globules. These features of the Au particles are proof for Au condensation from the gas phase and deposition on the surface of fly ash in the cooler zone of the electrostatic precipitator and baghouse filter.

  9. Alkali-Activated Fly ash-slag Cement based nuclear waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, W.; Wu, X.; Roy, D.M.

    1993-12-31

    This paper is based on the results of an in-progress research project on Alkali-Activated Cement System at MRL. The objective of this research is to establish the potential for large volume use of fly ash and slag as main components of the cement system. Alkali-activated Fly ash-slag Cement (AFC) was studied as a matrix for immobilization of nuclear waste. AFC is characterized by high early strength, high ultimate strength, low porosity, lower solubilities of the hydrates, and high resistance to chemical corrosion as well as to freezing and thawing. All these advanced properties are particularly favorable to the immobilization the nuclear wastes.

  10. ISOMER DEPENDENT BIOAVAILABILITY OF POLYCHLORINATED DIBENZO-P-DIOXINS AND DIBENZOFURANS FROM MUNICIPAL INCINERATOR FLY ASH TO CARP

    EPA Science Inventory

    The isomer dependent bioavailability of Polychlorinated Dibenzo-p-dioxins and Dibenzofurans (PCDDs and PCDFs) from municipal incinerator fly ash to freshwater fish was determined. It was observed that carp exposed to fly ash in a continuous flow exposure readily accumulated selec...

  11. KINETIC STUDY OF ADSORPTION AND TRANSFORMATION OF MERCURY ON FLY ASH PARTICLES IN AN ENTRAINED FLOW REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experimental studies were performed to investigate the interactions of elemental mercury vapor with entrained fly ash particles from coal combustion in a flow reactor. The rate of transformation of elemental mercury on fly ash particles was evauated over the temperature range fro...

  12. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Fly Ash Particulate Reinforced in LM6 for Energy Enhancement in Automotive Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervina Efzan, M. N.; Siti Syazwani, N.; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al

    2016-06-01

    Fly ash has gathered widespread attention as a potential reinforcement for aluminium matrix composites (AMCs) to enhance the properties and reduce the cost of production. Aluminium alloy LM6 reinforced with three different amounts (0, 4, 5 and 6 wt. %) of fly ash particle that were prepared by compo-casting method. The fly ash particles were incorporated into semi-solid state of LM6 melt. In this study, the microstructure of prepared AMCs with the homogenous distribution of fly ash was analysed using optical microscope. The microstructure having refinement of structure with the decreasing of Si-needle structure and increasing the area of eutectic a-Al matrix as shown in figure. Besides, as the increasing amount of fly ash incorporated, there are more petal-like dark structure existed in the microstructure. The density of the AMCs decreased as the incorporation of fly ash increased. While the hardness and ultimate tensile strength of the AMCs increased with the incorporation of fly ash. The addition of fly ash particles improved the physical and mechanical properties of the AMCs. Thus lead to improve the energy consumption in automotive parts.

  13. [Influence of fly ash concentrations on the growth of Aspergillus niger and the bioleaching efficiency of heavy metals].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Wang, Qun-Hui; Wang, Qi; Xue, Jun; Tian, Shu-Lei

    2008-03-01

    The bioleaching of municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash for metals extraction by Aspergillus niger was investigated. The influence of fly ash concentrations on the biomass concentration, the pH of suspension, the kinds of bio-produced organic acids and the metals extraction yield during the bioleaching process were studied and the leaching toxicities of fly ash before and after bioleaching were compared. The results showed that the decrease of pH was due to generated organic acids by Aspergillus niger during bioleaching, which resulted in the metals extraction from the fly ash. The alkaline and the heavy metals toxicities of fly ash inhibited the Aspergillus niger growth, which was shown as the "lag phase". When fly ash concentration was 20 g/L, the maximum biomass was 28.61 g/L (after bioleaching 192 h), and the minimum pH was 3.85 (after finished bioleaching). The bioleaching efficiency was the highest (i.e., 93.06% for Cd, around 70% for Mn, Pb and Zn, 22%, 33% and 47% for Fe, Cr and Cu, respectively). The TCLP results of the fly ash after bioleaching indicated that the leaching toxicities of the treated fly ash were far lower than the regulated levels of China. PMID:18649552

  14. Use of Fly Ash as a Liming Material for Corn and Soybean Production on an Acidic Sandy Soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fly ash (FA) produced from subbituminous coal combustion can potentially serve as a lime material for crop production in acidic soils in areas. A five-year study was conducted to determine if FA can be used as a liming material in an acid sandy soil under corn and soybean grain production. Fly ash...

  15. Mobility and speciation of arsenic in the coal fly ashes collected from the Savannah River Site (SRS).

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong; Hernandez, Damaris; Schrlau, Jill; Allen, Marshall

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic (As) leaching from coal fly ash stockpiled at waste disposal sites is a source of environmental concern. An array of techniques including batch extraction and column leaching tests, in combination with speciation analysis of chemically specific As species, was employed to evaluate the mobility of As in fly ashes collected from the U.S. DOE Savannah River Site. The results obtained using the U.S. EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), a two-step sequential extraction technique, and continuous column leaching experiments suggest that only a small portion of total As in the fly ashes was mobile, but mobilizable As could be a considerable fraction (3.1-43%), varying inversely with alkalinity of fly ash. Speciation analysis by using phosphate extraction suggests that arsenate (As(V)) was the major extractable species in the fly ash samples. During the column leaching experiment, however, it was observed that arsenite (As(III)) was an important species leached out of the fly ashes, indicating species conversion during the leaching process. The matrix-bound As(V) within the fly ash, once being released from the solid matrix, could be converted to As(III) during its transport inside the column. The pHs of leachates and fly ashes (both acidic in column leaching experiments here) could be related to the dominance of As(III) in the effluents. PMID:26933905

  16. Development of Fly Ash Derived Sorbents to Capture CO2 from Flue Gas of Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; John M. Andresen; Yinzhi Zhang; Zhe Lu

    2003-12-31

    This research program focused on the development of fly ash derived sorbents to capture CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas emissions. The fly ash derived sorbents developed represent an affordable alternative to existing methods using specialized activated carbons and molecular sieves, that tend to be very expensive and hinder the viability of the CO{sub 2} sorption process due to economic constraints. Under Task 1 'Procurement and characterization of a suite of fly ashes', 10 fly ash samples, named FAS-1 to -10, were collected from different combustors with different feedstocks, including bituminous coal, PRB coal and biomass. These samples presented a wide range of LOI value from 0.66-84.0%, and different burn-off profiles. The samples also spanned a wide range of total specific surface area and pore volume. These variations reflect the difference in the feedstock, types of combustors, collection hopper, and the beneficiation technologies the different fly ashes underwent. Under Task 2 'Preparation of fly ash derived sorbents', the fly ash samples were activated by steam. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were used to characterize the resultant activated samples. The cost-saving one-step activation process applied was successfully used to increase the surface area and pore volume of all the fly ash samples. The activated samples present very different surface areas and pore volumes due to the range in physical and chemical properties of their precursors. Furthermore, one activated fly ash sample, FAS-4, was loaded with amine-containing chemicals (MEA, DEA, AMP, and MDEA). The impregnation significantly decreased the surface area and pore volume of the parent activated fly ash sample. Under Task 3 'Capture of CO{sub 2} by fly ash derived sorbents', sample FAS-10 and its deashed counterpart before and after impregnation of chemical PEI were used for the CO{sub 2} adsorption at different temperatures. The sample FAS-10 exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 17

  17. Sequestration of carbon dioxide by indirect mineralization using Victorian brown coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong; Parikh, Vinay; Zhang, Lian

    2012-03-30

    The use of an industry waste, brown coal fly ash collected from the Latrobe Valley, Victoria, Australia, has been tested for the post-combustion CO(2) capture through indirect minersalization in acetic acid leachate. Upon the initial leaching, the majority of calcium and magnesium in fly ash were dissolved into solution, the carbonation potential of which was investigated subsequently through the use of a continuously stirred high-pressure autoclave reactor and the characterization of carbonation precipitates by various facilities. A large CO(2) capture capacity of fly ash under mild conditions has been confirmed. The CO(2) was fixed in both carbonate precipitates and water-soluble bicarbonate, and the conversion between these two species was achievable at approximately 60°C and a CO(2) partial pressure above 3 bar. The kinetic analysis confirmed a fast reaction rate for the carbonation of the brown coal ash-derived leachate at a global activation energy of 12.7 kJ/mol. It is much lower than that for natural minerals and is also very close to the potassium carbonate/piperazine system. The CO(2) capture capacity of this system has also proven to reach maximum 264 kg CO(2)/ton fly ash which is comparable to the natural minerals tested in the literature. As the fly ash is a valueless waste and requires no comminution prior to use, the technology developed here is highly efficient and energy-saving, the resulting carbonate products of which are invaluable for the use as additive to cement and in the paper and pulp industry. PMID:22326240

  18. Comparative Study on Synergetic Degradation of a Reactive Dye Using Different Types of Fly Ash in Combined Adsorption and Photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri Babu, P. V. S.; Swaminathan, G.

    2016-07-01

    A comprehensive study was carried out on four different fly ashes used as a catalyst for the degradation of Acid Red 1 using ultraviolet rays. These fly ashes are collected from different thermal power stations located at various places in India and having different chemical compositions. Three fly ashes are from lignite-based thermal power plants, and one is from the coal-based power plant. One fly ash is classified as Class F, two fly ashes are classified as Class C and remaining one is not conforming to ASTM C618 classification. X-Ray Fluorescence analysis was used to identify the chemical composition of fly ashes and SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, Fe2O3 and TiO2 were found to be the major elements present in different proportions. Various analysis were carried out on all the fly ashes like Scanning Electron Microscopy to identify the microphysical properties, Energy Dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy to quantify the elements present in the catalyst and X-Ray Diffraction to identify the catalyst phase analysis. The radical generated during the reaction was identified by Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The parameters such as initial pH of the dye solution, catalyst dosage and initial dye concentration which influence the dye degradation efficiency were studied and optimised. In 60 min duration, the dye degradation efficiency at optimum parametric values of pH 2.5, initial dye concentration of 10 mg/L and catalyst dosage of 1.0 g/L using various fly ashes, i.e., Salam Power Plant, Barmer Lignite Power Plant, Kutch Lignite Power Plant and Neyveli Lignite Thermal Power plant (NLTP) were found to be 40, 60, 67 and 95 % respectively. The contribution of adsorption alone was 18 % at the above mentioned optimum parametric values. Among the above four fly ash NLTP fly ashes proved to be most efficient.

  19. Bioaccumulation of nutrient elements from fly ash-amended soil in Jatropha curcas L.: a biofuel crop.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Doongar R; Ghosh, Arup

    2013-08-01

    Fly ash (FA) from coal-burning industries may be a potential inorganic soil amendment; the insight of its nutrient release and supply to soil may enhance their agricultural use. The study was conducted to assess the ability of fly ash (a coal fired thermal plant waste) to reduce soil fertility depletion and to study bioaccumulation of mineral nutrients in Jatropha curcas grown on soils amended with fly ash. Fly ash was amended to field soil at six rates (0, 5, 10, 20, 40, and 70 % w/w) on which J. curcas was grown. After 8 months of growth, the height of jatropha plants was significantly increased at 5 and 10 % FA-amended soil, whereas, biomass significantly increased at 5, 10, and 20 % FA-amended soil compared to control soil (0 % FA). Leaf nutrients uptake, followed by stems and roots uptake were highly affected by fly ash amendment to soil. Most of nutrients accumulation were increased up to 20 % fly ash and decreased thereafter. The results of available nutrient analysis of soil revealed that availability of nitrogen, potassium, sulfur, copper, iron, mangnese, and zinc declined significantly at higher levels of fly ash amendments, whereas, availability of phosphorus increased at these levels. However, pH, organic carbon, and available boron were not influenced significantly by fly ash amendment to soil. Microbial biomass C, N, and ratio of microbial-C to organic C were significantly reduced at 20 % fly ash and higher amounts. This study revealed that J. curcas plants could gainfully utilize the nutrients available in fly ash by subsequently amending soil. PMID:23318887

  20. Characterization of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash before and after electrodialytic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, A. J.; Gardner, K. H.

    2003-05-01

    A MSWI fly ash was characterized with respect to leaching properties (pH-static leaching, availability test), mineralogy (X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD)), and morphology and element distribution (scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX)) before and after electrodialytic treatment to study possible changes in the ash characteristics due to the treatment. It was shown that although a significant amount of the initially present heavy metals had been removed from the ash during the electrodialytic treatment, the leachability of several of the residual metals had actually increased, presumably due to mineral dissolution and chelating of metals by residual citrate in the ash. Ammonium citrate had been added to the ash before and during electrodialytic treatment to increase the heavy metal desorption. The morphology and mineralogy of the ash was also altered as a result of the treatment. XRPD examinations showed that a depletion of CI, Na and K in the treated ash was due to wash-out of the highly soluble minerals sylvite (KCI) and halite (NaCI). Indications of formation of secondary minerals (Ca-sulphates, ettringite) and precipitation of Ca-citrate in the treated ash were also seen. SEM investigations confirmed a changed morphology in the treated ash; probably due to the formation of secondary minerals.

  1. INVESTIGATION OF AMMONIA ADSORPTION ON FLY ASH DUE TO INSTALLATION OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    G.F. Brendel; J.E. Bonetti; R.F. Rathbone; R.N. Frey Jr.

    2000-11-01

    This report summarizes an investigation of the potential impacts associated with the utilization of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems at coal-fired power plants. The study was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Emission Control By-Products Consortium, Dominion Generation, the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and GAI Consultants, Inc. SCR systems are effective in reducing nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions as required by the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments. However, there may be potential consequences associated with ammonia contamination of stack emissions and combustion by-products from these systems. Costs for air quality, landfill and pond environmental compliance may increase significantly and the marketability of ash may be seriously reduced, which, in turn, may also lead to increased disposal costs. The potential impacts to air, surface water, groundwater, ash disposal, ash utilization, health and safety, and environmental compliance can not be easily quantified based on the information presently available. The investigation included: (1) a review of information and data available from published and unpublished sources; (2) baseline ash characterization testing of ash samples produced from several central Appalachian high-volatile bituminous coals from plants that do not currently employ SCR systems in order to characterize the ash prior to ammonia exposure; (3) an investigation of ammonia release from fly ash, including leaching and thermal studies; and (4) an evaluation of the potential impacts on plant equipment, air quality, water quality, ash disposal operations, and ash marketing.

  2. Predicting Water Quality Problems Associated with Coal Fly Ash Disposal Facilities Using a Trace Element Partitioning Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Donahoe, R. J.; Graham, E. Y.

    2006-12-01

    For much of the U.S., coal-fired power plants are the most important source of electricity for domestic and industrial use. Large quantities of fly ash and other coal combustion by-products are produced every year, the majority of which is impounded in lagoons and landfills located throughout the country. Many older fly ash disposal facilities are unlined and have been closed for decades. Fly ash often contains high concentrations of toxic trace elements such as arsenic, boron, chromium, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, lead, strontium and vanadium. Trace elements present in coal fly ash are of potential concern due to their toxicity, high mobility in the environment and low drinking water MCL values. Concern about the potential release of these toxic elements into the environment due to leaching of fly ash by acid rain, groundwater or acid mine drainage has prompted the EPA to develop national standards under the subtitle D of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) to regulate ash disposal in landfills and surface impoundments. An attempt is made to predict the leaching of toxic elements into the environment by studying trace element partitioning in coal fly ash. A seven step sequential chemical extraction procedure (SCEP) modified from Filgueiras et al. (2002) is used to determine the trace element partitioning in seven coal fly ash samples collected directly from electric power plants. Five fly ash samples were derived from Eastern Bituminous coal, one derived from Western Sub-bituminous coal and the other derived from Northern Lignite. The sequential chemical extraction procedure gives valuable information on the association of trace elements: 1) soluble fraction, 2) exchangeable fraction, 3) acid soluble fraction, 4) easily reducible fraction, 5) moderately reducible fraction, 6) poorly reducible fraction and 7) oxidizable organics/sulfide fraction. The trace element partitioning varies with the composition of coal fly ash which is influenced by the

  3. Comparison of two types of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ashes with different alkaline reagents in washing experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fenfen; Takaoka, Masaki; Oshita, Kazuyuki; Takeda, Nobuo

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we propose a "washing-calcination-conversion of washed fly ash into cement material with bottom ash" (WCCB) system to reduce the amount of fly ash that must be specially treated so it can be used as raw cement material. Calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) is widely used in air-pollution control devices of incinerators while sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) is not. We conducted single-, double-, and triple-washing experiments to compare the washing characteristics of two types of fly ash. Unlike NaHCO3 fly ash, Ca(OH)2 fly ash has almost twice as much washed residue and almost 2.5 times more chlorine after the same washing procedure. After washing once, the washing frequency is also important for NaHCO3 fly ash, while the mixing time and liquid/solid ratio are more critical for Ca(OH)2 fly ash. The use of NaHCO3 is more suitable for the WCCB system. PMID:18539449

  4. Water washing effects on metals emission reduction during municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash melting process.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Kung-Yuh; Hu, Yu-Hsin

    2010-05-01

    This study investigated that water washing effects on the metals emission reduction in melting of municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash. Experimental conditions were conducted at liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio 10, 20, and 100 for water-washing process and its subsequent melting treatment at 1450 degrees C for 2h. The simple water-washing process as a pre-treatment for MSWI fly ash can remove most of the chlorides, leachable salts, and amphoteric heavy metals from the MSWI fly ash, resulting in the washed ash having lowered chlorine content. MSWI fly ashes washed by L/S ratio 10 and above that were melted at 1450 degrees C produced slag containing relatively high vitrificaton ratio of Cu and Pb. Besides, the vitrification ratios of Na, K, Ca, and Mg in washed MSWI fly ash were also higher than that of MSWI fly ash. The results indicated that washed MSWI fly ash can reduce the emission of metallic chlorides during its subsequent melting treatment. PMID:20079621

  5. Behaviour of heavy metals immobilized by co-melting treatment of sewage sludge ash and municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kae-Long; Huang, Wu-Jang; Chen, Kuan-Chung; Chow, Jing-Dong; Chen, His-Jien

    2009-10-01

    This study elucidates the behaviour of heavy metals in slag produced from four different sewage sludge ashes mixed with municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash and then co-melted. Experimental results indicate that sewage sludge ashes consisted of SiO(2), CaO, and Al(2)O(3). Fly ash consisted of CaO, Na(2)O and SO(3). The speciation of sewage sludge ashes indicates that the ashes contained quartz and AlPO(4). The speciation in fly ash consisted of anhydrite, microcline, calcium chloride, sylvite and halite. The leaching behaviours of sewage sludge ashes met the Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration's regulatory standards. The fly ash had high concentrations of Zn and Pb; however, the leaching of these metals was low. The major components of synthetic slags were SiO(2) (33.5-54.0%), CaO (21.4-36.7%), and Al(2)O(3) (8.1-15.7%). The X-ray diffraction patterns of co-melted slags demonstrate that the slags contained significant amounts of glass. Most heavy metals can be fixed in a net-like structure; thus, they can not be extracted easily. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) leaching concentrations for target metals in all slags met the Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration's regulatory standards. PMID:19470538

  6. Effects of coal fly ash on tree swallow reproduction in Watts Bar Reservoir, Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Walls, Suzanne J; Meyer, Carolyn B; Iannuzzi, Jacqueline; Schlekat, Tamar H

    2015-01-01

    Coal-fly ash was released in unprecedented amounts (4.1 × 10(6) m(3) ) into the Emory River from the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant on Watts Bar Reservoir in Tennessee. Tree swallows were exposed to ash-related constituents at the ash release via their diet of emergent aquatic insects, whose larval forms can accumulate constituents from submerged river sediments. Reproduction of tree swallow colonies was assessed over a 2-year period by evaluating whether 1) ash constituent concentrations were elevated in egg, eggshell, and nestling tissues at colonies near ash-impacted river reaches compared to reference colonies, 2) production of fledglings per nesting female was significantly lower in ash-impacted colonies versus reference colonies, and 3) ash constituent concentrations or diet concentrations were correlated with nest productivity measures (clutch size, hatching success, and nestling survival, and fledglings produced per nest). Of the 26 ash constituents evaluated, 4 (Se, Sr, Cu, and Hg) were significantly elevated in tissues potentially from the ash, and 3 (Se, Sr, and Cu) in tissues or in swallow diet items were weakly correlated to at least one nest-productivity measure or egg weight. Tree swallow hatching success was significantly reduced by 12%, but fledgling production per nest was unaffected due to larger clutch sizes in the impacted than reference colonies. Bioconcentration from the ash to insects in the diet to tree swallow eggs appears to be low. Overall, adverse impacts of the ash on tree swallow reproduction were not observed, but monitoring is continuing to further ensure Se from the residual ash does not adversely affect tree swallow reproduction over time. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2015;11:56-66. © 2014 SETAC. PMID:25345977

  7. Mercury capture by native fly ash carbons in coal-fired power plants

    PubMed Central

    Hower, James C.; Senior, Constance L.; Suuberg, Eric M.; Hurt, Robert H.; Wilcox, Jennifer L.; Olson, Edwin S.

    2013-01-01

    The control of mercury in the air emissions from coal-fired power plants is an on-going challenge. The native unburned carbons in fly ash can capture varying amounts of Hg depending upon the temperature and composition of the flue gas at the air pollution control device, with Hg capture increasing with a decrease in temperature; the amount of carbon in the fly ash, with Hg capture increasing with an increase in carbon; and the form of the carbon and the consequent surface area of the carbon, with Hg capture increasing with an increase in surface area. The latter is influenced by the rank of the feed coal, with carbons derived from the combustion of low-rank coals having a greater surface area than carbons from bituminous- and anthracite-rank coals. The chemistry of the feed coal and the resulting composition of the flue gas enhances Hg capture by fly ash carbons. This is particularly evident in the correlation of feed coal Cl content to Hg oxidation to HgCl2, enhancing Hg capture. Acid gases, including HCl and H2SO4 and the combination of HCl and NO2, in the flue gas can enhance the oxidation of Hg. In this presentation, we discuss the transport of Hg through the boiler and pollution control systems, the mechanisms of Hg oxidation, and the parameters controlling Hg capture by coal-derived fly ash carbons. PMID:24223466

  8. [Preparation of a composite coagulant from fly ash and its application in domestic wastewater treatment].

    PubMed

    Li, Ya-Qiang; Hu, Kai; Zhao, Qing-Liang; Tang, Feng; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Cui, Fu-Yi

    2007-11-01

    Fly ash was investigated as a raw material for the preparation of a composite coagulant with sulfuric acid. Types of acid solution, H2SO4 concentration, ratio of H2SO4 to fly ash and stirring time were respectively examined as factors that influenced the efficiency of converting the iron and aluminum components into a composite coagulant and coagulation performance on domestic wastewater. The coagulant was attained at the condition of H2SO4-fly ash ratio of 5 mL/g, H2SO4 of 2 mol/L, stirring time of 4h and stabling time of 30 min, and contained Fe3+ of 0.010 8 mol/L with conversion efficiency of 11.4% and Al3+ of 0.035 4 mol/L with conversion efficiency of 4.3%. Removal efficiencies of COD and SS by this type of coagulant reached 70.4% and 91.9% respectively when treating domestic wastewater. This study provides a promising means to utilize fly ash for coagulation, which possibly makes wastewater treatment more economical and more sustainable. PMID:18290474

  9. Evidence of Coal-Fly-Ash Toxic Chemical Geoengineering in the Troposphere: Consequences for Public Health.

    PubMed

    Herndon, J Marvin

    2015-08-01

    The widespread, intentional and increasingly frequent chemical emplacement in the troposphere has gone unidentified and unremarked in the scientific literature for years. The author presents evidence that toxic coal combustion fly ash is the most likely aerosolized particulate sprayed by tanker-jets for geoengineering, weather-modification and climate-modification purposes and describes some of the multifold consequences on public health. Two methods are employed: (1) Comparison of 8 elements analyzed in rainwater, leached from aerosolized particulates, with corresponding elements leached into water from coal fly ash in published laboratory experiments, and (2) Comparison of 14 elements analyzed in dust collected outdoors on a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter with corresponding elements analyzed in un-leached coal fly ash material. The results show: (1) the assemblage of elements in rainwater and in the corresponding experimental leachate are essentially identical. At a 99% confidence interval, they have identical means (T-test) and identical variances (F-test); and (2) the assemblage of elements in the HEPA dust and in the corresponding average un-leached coal fly ash are likewise essentially identical. The consequences on public health are profound, including exposure to a variety of toxic heavy metals, radioactive elements, and neurologically-implicated chemically mobile aluminum released by body moisture in situ after inhalation or through transdermal induction. PMID:26270671

  10. Proteomics study revealed altered proteome of Dichogaster curgensis upon exposure to fly ash.

    PubMed

    Markad, Vijaykumar L; Adav, Sunil S; Ghole, Vikram S; Sze, Siu Kwan; Kodam, Kisan M

    2016-10-01

    Fly ash is toxic and its escalating use as a soil amendment and disposal by dumping into environment is receiving alarming attention due to its impact on environment. Proteomics technology is being used for environmental studies since proteins respond rapidly when an organism is exposed to a toxicant, and hence soil engineers such as earthworms are used as model organisms to assess the toxic effects of soil toxicants. This study adopted proteomics technology and profiled proteome of earthworm Dichogaster curgensis that was exposed to fly ash, with main aim to elucidate fly ash effects on cellular and metabolic pathways. The functional classification of identified proteins revealed carbohydrate metabolism (14.36%), genetic information processing (15.02%), folding, sorting and degradation (10.83%), replication and repair (3.95%); environmental information processing (2.19%), signal transduction (9.61%), transport and catabolism (17.27%), energy metabolism (6.69%), etc. in the proteome. Proteomics data and functional assays revealed that the exposure of earthworm to fly ash induced protein synthesis, up-regulation of gluconeogenesis, disturbed energy metabolism, oxidative and cellular stress, and mis-folding of proteins. The regulation of ubiquitination, proteasome and modified alkaline comet assay in earthworm coelomocytes suggested DNA-protein cross link affecting chromatin remodeling and protein folding. PMID:27371791

  11. THE USE OF FLY ASH IN THE PRODUCTION OF SIALON BASED STRUCTURAL CERAMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA GRANT NUMBER: X832541C004
    Title: The Use of Fly Ash in the Production of SiAlON based Structural Ceramics
    Investigator: James R. Varner
    Institution: Alfred University
    EPA Project Officer: S. Bala Krishnan
    Project Perio...

  12. Effect of coal fly ash-amended organic compost as a manure for agricultural crops

    SciTech Connect

    Ghuman, G.S.; Menon, M.P.; James, J.; Chandra, K.; Sajwan, K. )

    1991-04-01

    Coal-fired electric power plants generate large quantities of fly ash as a byproduct. In continuation of previous studies on the utilization of fly ash as an amendment to organic compost for use as a manure for agricultural crops, the authors have now determined the effects of this manure on the yield and uptake of selected elements by several plants including collard green, corn, mustard green, bell pepper, egg plant, and climbing beans. An amended compost containing 30-40% fly ash with a compost:soil ratio of 1:3 was found to be most effective to enhance the yield and nutrient uptake of most of the plants. At 20% fly ash level, no increase in yield of any of the above crops was observed. The uptake of K, Mg, Mn, and P was increased in most plants. Boron which is known to be detrimental to the growth of plants above certain level was also found to be increased in plants nourished with the manure.

  13. MERCURY SPECIATION IN COMBUSTION SYSTEMS: STUDIES WITH SIMULATED FLUE GASES AND MODEL FLY ASHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a bench-scale study of the effects of flue gas and fly ash parameters on the oxidation of elemental mercury in simulated flue gases containing hydrogen chloride (HCl), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and water vapor (H2O...

  14. ALTERATION OF CARDIAC ELECTRICAL ACTIVITY BY WATER-LEACHABLE COMPONENTS OF RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH (ROFA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alteration of cardiac electrical activity by water-leachable components
    of residual oil fly ash (ROFA)

    Desuo Wang, Yuh-Chin T. Huang*, An Xie, Ting Wang

    *Human Studies Division, NHEERL, US EPA
    104 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill, NC 27599
    Department of Basic ...

  15. Evaluation of leaching and ecotoxicological properties of sewage sludge-fly ash mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    C.A. Papadimitriou; I. Haritou; P. Samaras; A.I. Zouboulis

    2008-03-15

    The objectives of this work were the evaluation of sewage sludge stabilization by mixing with fly ash, the examination of the physicochemical properties of the produced materials and their leachates and the assessment of their environmental impact by the evaluation of the ecotoxic characteristics. Different ratios of fly ash and sewage sludge (1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 1:6, and 1:9) were mixed for 48 and 72 h. After mixing, the liquid phase of the produced materials was analyzed for total coliforms and Escherichia coli, while the solid residue was dried and tested for the leaching characteristics by the application of TCLP and EN 12457-2 standard leaching methods. Furthermore, the produced leachates were analyzed for their content of specific metals, while their ecotoxicological characteristics were determined by the use of toxicity bioassays, using the marine photobacterium Vibrio fischeri and the crustacean Daphnia magna. The phytotoxicity of sewage sludge-fly ash mixtures was also determined by utilizing seeds of three higher plants (one monocotyl and two dicotyls). The mixtures exhibited low metal leaching in all cases, while the ecotoxic properties increased with the increase of fly ash/sewage sludge ratio. The phytotoxicity testing showed increased root length growth inhibition.

  16. NONPHOTOCHEMICAL DECOMPOSITION OF FLUORENE VAPOR-ADSORBED ON COAL FLY ASH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fluorene is representative of a group of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that have been shown to exhibit oxidation in the absence of light when adsorbed on fly ash. The present study examines this process for fluorene in detail. Fluorene has been adsorbed on several different fl...

  17. CYTOTOXITY TO ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES OF METAL OXIDES ADSORBED ON FLY ASH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fly-ash particles fractionated into three size ranges (<2, 2 to 5, and 5 to 8 micrometers) and coated with various metal oxides were used to determine whether particle size and surface area are contributing factors to the in vitro toxicity of trace metals for alveolar macrophages...

  18. PCDD/F FORMATION RATES FROM FLY ASH AND METHANE COMBUSTION CARBON SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The abstract discusses polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDD,F) from fly ash and methane combustion carbon sources. (NOTE: PCDD,Fs are formed in trace quantities in combustion processes via two primary mechanisms: de novo synthesis in which they ...

  19. Adsorption of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid from an Aqueous Solution on Fly Ash.

    PubMed

    Kuśmierek, Krzysztof; Świątkowski, Andrzej

    2016-03-01

    The adsorption of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) on fly ash was studied. The effects of adsorbent dose, contact time, pH, ionic strength, and temperature on the adsorption were investigated. Adsorption kinetic data were analyzed using pseudo-first and pseudo-second order models, and results showed that adsorption kinetics were better represented by the pseudo-second order model. Adsorption isotherms of 2,4-D on fly ash were analyzed using the Freundlich and Langmuir models. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔG°, ΔH°, and ΔS°) indicated that the adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic. The negative values of ΔG° and the positive value of ΔH° indicate the spontaneous nature of 2,4-D adsorption on fly ash, and that the adsorption process was endothermic. Results showed that fly ash is an efficient, low-cost adsorbent for removal of 2,4-D from water. PMID:26931534

  20. Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Matrix Composite Reinforced by Carbothermally Reduced of Fly Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamasri, Wildan, M. W.; Sulardjaka, Kusnanto

    2011-01-01

    The addition of fly ash into aluminum as reinforcement can potentially reduce the production cost and density of aluminum. However, mechanical properties of aluminum matrix composite reinforced by fly ash (MMC ALFA) have some limitations due to the characteristic of fly ash. In this study, a carbothermal reduction process of fly ash and activated carbon powder with particle size <32 μm was performed prior to produce MMC ALFA. The process was carried out in a furnace at 1300° C in vacuum condition under argon flow. Synthesis product was analyzed by XRD with Cu-Kα radiation. From XRD analysis, it shows that the synthesis process can produce SiC powder. The synthesis product was subsequently used as reinforcement particle. Aluminum powder was mixed with 5, 10 and 15% of the synthesized powder, and then uni-axially compacted at pressure of 300 MPa. The compacted product was sintered for 2 hours in argon atmosphere at temperature variation of 550 and 600° C. Flexural strength, hardness and density of MMC ALFA's product were respectively evaluated using a four point bending test method based on ASTM C1161 standard, Brinell hardness scale and Archimedes method. The result of this study shows that the increase of weight of reinforcement can significantly increase the hardness and flexural strength of MMCs. The highest hardness and flexural strength of the MMC product are 300 kg/mm2 and 107.5 MPa, respectively.

  1. Designing of Multiphase Fly Ash/MWCNT/PU Composite Sheet Against Electromagnetic Environmental Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gujral, Parth; Varshney, Swati; Dhawan, S. K.

    2016-03-01

    Fly ash and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) reinforced multiphase polyurethane (PU) composite sheets have been fabricated by using a solution casting technique. Utilization of fly ash was the prime objective in order to reduce environmental pollution and to enhance the shielding properties of PU polymer. Our study proves that fly ash particles with MWCNTs in a PU matrix leads to novel hybrid high performance electromagnetic shielding interference material. Scanning electron microscopy confirms the existence of fly ash particles along with MWCNTs in a PU matrix. This multiphase composite shows total shielding effectiveness of 35.8 dB (>99.99% attenuation) in the Ku-band (12.4-18 GHz) frequency range. This is attributed to high dielectric losses of reinforcement present in the polymers matrix. The Nicolson-Ross-Weir algorithm has been applied to calculate the electromagnetic attributes and dielectric parameters of the PU samples by using scattering parameters (S 11, S 22, S 12, S 21). The synthesized multiphase composites were further characterized by using x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermo gravimetric analysis.

  2. CONTINUED ASSESSMENT OF A HIGH-VELOCITY FABRIC FILTRATION SYSTEM USED TO CONTROL FLY ASH EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a full-scale investigation of the performance of a variety of filter media, to provide technical and economic information under high-velocity conditions (high gas/cloth ratio). The fly ash emission studies demonstrated that woven fiberglass fabrics and...

  3. Leaching heavy metals in municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash with chelator/biosurfactant mixed solution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Chen, Yu

    2015-07-01

    The chelator [S,S]-ethylene diamine disuccinic acid, citric acid, and biosurfactant saponin are selected as leaching agents. In this study, the leaching effect of saponin mixed with either ethylene diamine disuccinic acid or citric acid on the levels of copper, zinc, lead, and cadmium in municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash is investigated. Results indicate that saponin separately mixed with ethylene diamine disuccinic acid and citric acid exhibits a synergistic solubilisation effect on copper, zinc, lead, and cadmium leaching from fly ash. However, saponin and ethylene diamine disuccinic acid mixed solution exhibits a synergistic solubilisation effect that is superior to that of a saponin and citric acid mixed solution. The extraction rate of heavy metal in fly ash leached with a saponin and chelator mixed solution is related to the pH of the leaching solution, and the optimal range of the pH is suggested to be approximately neutral. After leaching with a saponin and chelator mixed solution, copper, zinc, lead, and cadmium contents significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in the extractable or acid-soluble and reducible fractions. By adopting the proposed approach, the leaching concentrations of copper, zinc, lead, and cadmium in treated fly ash are in accordance with Standard for Pollution Control on the Security Landfill Site for Hazardous Wastes GB18598-2001. PMID:26185165

  4. Sustainable asphalt pavement: Application of slaughterhouse waste oil and fly ash in asphalt binder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Ramos, Jorge Luis

    Increasing energy costs, lack of sufficient natural resources and the overwhelming demand for petroleum has stimulated the development of alternative binders to modify or replace petroleum-based asphalt binders. In the United States, the petroleum-based asphalt binder is mainly used to produce the Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA). There are approximately 4000 asphalt plants that make 500 million tons of asphalt binder valued at roughly 3 billion/year. The instability of the world's oil market has pushed oil prices to more than 80 per barrel in 2012, which increased the cost of asphalt binder up to $570 per ton. Therefore, there is a timely need to find alternative sustainable resources to the asphalt binder. This paper investigates the possibility of the partial replacement of the asphalt binder with slaughterhouse waste and/or fly ash. In order to achieve this objective, the asphalt binder is mixed with different percentages of waste oil and/or fly ash. In order to investigate the effect of these additives to the performance of the asphalt binder, a complete performance grade test performed on multiple samples. The results of the performance grade tests are compared with a control sample to observe how the addition of the waste oil and/or fly ash affects the sample. Considering the increasing cost and demand of asphalt, the use of slaughterhouse waste oil and/or fly ash as a partial replacement may result in environmental and monetary improvements in the transportation sector.

  5. Hydrothermally modified fly ash for heavy metals and dyes removal in advanced wastewater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visa, Maria; Chelaru, Andreea-Maria

    2014-06-01

    Fly ash resulted from coal burning is a waste that can be used in wastewater treatment for removal of dyes and heavy metals by adsorption. Class “F” fly ash (FA), collected from the Central Heat and Power (CHP) Plant Brasov (Romania), with oxides composition SiO2/Al2O3 over 2.4 was used for obtaining a new substrate with good adsorption capacity for dyes and heavy metals from wastewater. A new material was obtained from modified fly ash with NaOH and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HTAB) a cationic surfactant. Contact time, optimum amount of substrate and the pH corresponding to 50 mL solution of pollutants were the parameters optimized for obtaining the maximum efficiency in the adsorption process. The optimized adsorption parameters were further used in thermodynamic and kinetic studies of the adsorption processes. The adsorption kinetic mechanisms, and the substrate capacities are further discussed correlated with the surface structure (XRD), composition (EDS, FTIR), and morphology (SEM, AFM). The results indicate that the novel nano-substrate composite with fly ash modified can be used as an efficient and low cost adsorbent for simultaneous removal of dyes and heavy metals, the resulted water respects the discharge regulations.

  6. POLISHING INDUSTRIAL WASTE STREAM EFFLUENTS USING FLY ASH - NATURAL CLAY SORBENT COMBINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory evaluation of the use of acidic and basic fly ashes, bentonite, bauxite, illite, kaolinite, zeolite, vermiculite, and activated alumina is presented for polishing a 3.8 x 10 to the 6th power liters per day waste stream from the feldspar mining and processing industry...

  7. Products from laboratory chlorination of fly ash from a municipal incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Eiceman, G.A.; Rghei, H.O.

    1982-01-01

    Fly ash samples from a municipal incinerator were treated at 200 and 300 /sup 0/C with chlorine gas for 1 h. Changes in composition of organic compounds in the samples were determined by using GC and GC/MS analysis of benzene extracts. Chlorination of fly ash produced a series of highly chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons including hexachlorobenzene, decachlorobiphenyl, and nonachlorobiphenyl. Tentative identifications are also listed for other compounds with the following proposed molecular formulas: C/sub 7/HOCl/sub 5/, C/sub 6/H/sub 3/O/sub 2/Cl/sub 3/, C/sub 8/Cl/sub 8/, and C/sub 12/H/sub 4/O/sub 3/Cl/sub 6/ (or C/sub 13/H/sub 8/O/sub 2/Cl/sub 6/). Production of some of these compounds is dependent upon chlorination of benzene-soluble-nonvolatile precursor which was present naturally in this fly ash. These results show that fly ash from municipal incinerators may undergo gas phase-particulate reactions under conditions of high temperature with a source of chlorine and that such reactions lead to the production of chlorinated organic compounds at trace concentration levels.

  8. Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Matrix Composite Reinforced by Carbothermally Reduced of Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect

    Jamasri; Wildan, M. W.; Sulardjaka; Kusnanto

    2011-01-17

    The addition of fly ash into aluminum as reinforcement can potentially reduce the production cost and density of aluminum. However, mechanical properties of aluminum matrix composite reinforced by fly ash (MMC ALFA) have some limitations due to the characteristic of fly ash. In this