Science.gov

Sample records for flying test bench

  1. LISA Optical Bench Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tröbs, M.; d'Arcio, L.; Barke, S.; Bogenstahl, J.; Diekmann, C.; Fitzsimons, E. D.; Gerberding, O.; Hennig, J.; Hey, F. G.; Hogenhuis, H.; Killow, C. J.; Lieser, M.; Lucarelli, S.; Nikolov, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Pijnenburg, J.; Robertson, D. I.; Sohmer, A.; Taylor, A.; Ward, H.; Weise, D.; Heinzel, G.; Danzmann, K.

    2013-01-01

    Each LISA satellite carries optical benches, one for each test mass, that measure the distance to the local test mass and to the remote optical bench on the distant satellite. Currently, an elegant bread board of the optical bench is developed for the European Space Agency (ESA) by EADS Astrium, TNO Science and Technology, University of Glasgow and the Albert Einstein Institute. To test the optical bench the two interferometers mentioned above must be completed by an external simulator, the test mass and telescope simulator. We give an overview of the simulator layout and performance predictions.

  2. The VORTEX coronagraphic test bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, A.; Piron, P.; Huby, E.; Absil, O.; Delacroix, C.; Mawet, D.; Surdej, J.; Habraken, S.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we present the infrared coronagraphic test bench of the University of Liège named VODCA (Vortex Optical Demonstrator for Coronagraphic Applications). The goal of the bench is to assess the performances of the Annular Groove Phase Masks (AGPMs) at near- to mid-infrared wavelengths. The AGPM is a subwavelength grating vortex coronagraph of charge two (SGVC2) made out of diamond. The bench is designed to be completely achromatic and will be composed of a super continuum laser source emitting in the near to mid-infrared, several parabolas, diaphragms and an infrared camera. This way, we will be able to test the different AGPMs in the M, L, K and H bands. Eventually, the bench will also allow the computation of the incident wavefront aberrations on the coronagraph. A reflective Lyot stop will send most of the stellar light to a second camera to perform low-order wavefront sensing. This second system coupled with a deformable mirror will allow the correction of the wavefront aberrations. We also aim to test other pre- and/or post-coronagraphic concepts such as optimal apodization.

  3. An MCAO test bench for NFIRAOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turri, Paolo; Andersen, David R.; Véran, Jean-Pierre; Spanò, Paolo; Rosensteiner, Matthias; McVeigh, Eric A.

    2014-08-01

    At NRC Herzberg - Astronomy we are developing a closed-loop multi-conjugate adaptive optics bench to simulate a scaled-down version of NFIRAOS, the first light MCAO system on the Thirty Meter Telescope. The current bench consists of four laser guide stars, an evenly spaced array of natural guide stars, two magnetic deformable mirrors, a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a science camera at the focal plane for the evaluation of the performance and the tip-tilt measurements. Three phase screens conjugated at different altitudes simulate the atmospheric perturbation over the telescope. We can recreate the spot elongation on the SHWFS by defocusing the ground DM and at the same time modulating the intensity of the LGS spots in order to simulate the timevarying density profile of the sodium layer. The goals of this experiment are to compare the experimental performance on the bench with the predicted results of NFIRAOS models and to test the robustness of the tomographic reconstruction under conditions including the use of faint guide stars, non-uniform density profiles of the sodium layer and known non-common path aberrations. In this paper we present an update on the status of the bench and some first results.

  4. Test What You Fly?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolies, Don

    2002-01-01

    It was the first time on any NASA project I know of that all the instruments on an observatory came off for rework or calibration after the full range of environmental tests, and then were reintegrated at the launch center without the benefit of an observatory environmental retest. Perhaps you've heard the expression, 'Test what you fly, fly what you test'? In theory, it's hard to argue with that. In this case, I was willing to take the risk of not testing what I flew. As the project manager for the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) mission, I was the one who ultimately decided what risks to take, just as it was my responsibility to get buy-in from the stakeholders.

  5. Driving Torque Control for a Nacelle Test Bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassmann, Uwe; Reiter, Matthias; Abel, Dirk

    2014-06-01

    Recently wind industry paid a lot of attention to ground testing facilities in order to improve reliability of wind turbines by undergoing overall system tests at an early stage of development. Some experience has been gained during the last years with drive train test benches, that allow for pure mechanical and electrical tests of the turbine's components. Since the loads occurring inside a wind turbine significantly depend on its control strategy, the natural extension of drive train test benches are so-called nacelle test benches, which also include the wind turbine's controller. The worldwide first nacelle test bench was installed and launched at RWTH Aachen University in 2013. This nacelle test bench was set up as a demonstrator and has a rated power of 1 MW. For the demonstrator test bench a gearbox-based drive train concept, which does not intrinsically meet the high dynamic requirements of the real-time aerodynamics simulation, was chosen. In this paper the mechanical concept is reviewed from a control engineering point of view and a detailed control model is presented and validated using measurement data. In order to minimize the impact this mechanical limitations have and to achieve the dynamics and accuracy required, a driving torque controller is proposed. Due to the communication layout at the nacelle test bench, time delay in data transfer cannot be omitted for controller design. Experiments confirm that the driving torque controller allows to operate a wind turbine at the nacelle test bench and suppresses unrealistic, test bench-related torque dynamics.

  6. RHIC electron lens test bench diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Gassner, D.; Beebe, E.; Fischer, W.; Gu, X.; Hamdi, K.; Hock, J.; Liu, C.; Miller, T.; Pikin, A.; Thieberger, P.

    2011-05-16

    An Electron Lens (E-Lens) system will be installed in RHIC to increase luminosity by counteracting the head-on beam-beam interaction. The proton beam collisions at the RHIC experimental locations will introduce a tune spread due to a difference of tune shifts between small and large amplitude particles. A low energy electron beam will be used to improve luminosity and lifetime of the colliding beams by reducing the betatron tune shift and spread. In preparation for the Electron Lens installation next year, a test bench facility will be used to gain experience with many sub-systems. This paper will discuss the diagnostics related to measuring the electron beam parameters.

  7. BENCH TEST OF A RESIDUAL GAS IONIZATION PROFILE MONITOR (RGIPM)

    SciTech Connect

    W.C. SELLYEY; J.D. GILPATRICK; R. SENIOR

    2001-06-01

    An RGIPM has been designed, constructed and bench tested to verify that all components are functioning properly and that the desired resolution of about 50 {micro}m rms can be achieved. This paper will describe major considerations that went into the bench test and some results.

  8. Object oriented hardware-software test bench for OMTF diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drabik, Pawel; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Bunkowski, Karol; Zawistowski, Krystian; Byszuk, Adrian; Bluj, Michał; Doroba, Krzysztof; Górski, Maciej; Kalinowski, Artur; Kierzkowski, Krzysztof; Konecki, Marcin; Królikowski, Jan; Oklinski, Wojciech; Olszewski, Michał; Skala, Aleksander; Zabołotny, Wojciech M.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper the object oriented hardware-software model and its sample implementation of diagnostics for the Overlap Muon Track Finder trigger for the CMS experiment in CERN is described. It presents realization of test-bench for control and diagnosis class of multichannel, distributed measurement systems based on FPGA chips. The test-bench fulfills requirements for system's rapid changes, configurability and efficiency. This ability is very significant and desirable by expanded electronic systems. The solution described is a software model based on a method of address space management called the Component Internal Interface (CII). Establishment of stable link between hardware and software, as a purpose of designed and realized programming environment, is presented. The test-bench implementation and example of OMTF algorithm test is presented.

  9. Lab results from the GREGOR MCAO test bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Dirk; Berkefeld, Thomas; Heidecke, Frank

    2013-12-01

    We present the performance of the GREGOR MCAO system. This MCAO system, which actually is a tripple-conjugate adaptive optics, was set up in a laboratory test bench. GREGOR is the new German 1.5-meter solar telescope, and it is currently equipped with a 256-actuators classical adaptive optics system. On-sky tests of the MCAO system are planned for this observing season. A cooktop plate was used to generate turbulence in the test bench. We present measurements of residual agile image distortion, and of wavefront errors in the 19 guide directions.

  10. Virtual bench testing to study coronary bifurcation stenting.

    PubMed

    Migliavacca, Francesco; Chiastra, Claudio; Chatzizisis, Yiannis S; Dubini, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Virtual bench testing is a numerical methodology which has been applied to the study of coronary interventions. It exploits the amazing growth of computer performance for scientific calculation and makes it possible to simulate very different and complex multiphysics environments and processes, including coronary bifurcation stenting. The quality of prediction from any computer model is very sensitive to the quality of the input data and assumptions. This also holds true in stent virtual bench testing. This paper reviews the state of the art in the field of bifurcation stenting modelling and identifies the current advantages and limitations of this methodology. PMID:25983167

  11. Orbit attitude processor. STS-1 bench program verification test plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    A plan for the static verification of the STS-1 ATT PROC ORBIT software requirements is presented. The orbit version of the SAPIENS bench program is used to generate the verification data. A brief discussion of the simulation software and flight software modules is presented along with a description of the test cases.

  12. Questions of testing rate and flexibility of rocket test benches, discussed on the basis of the test benches of Nitrochemie GMBH in Aschau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LEGRAND

    1987-01-01

    The rocket test benches are used to study burnup behavior by various methods. In the first ten months of 1966, 1578 shots were performed to test propellants, and 920 to test 14 thrust and pressure measurement projects.

  13. Characterization of Flow Bench Engine Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voris, Alex; Riley, Lauren; Puzinauskas, Paul

    2015-11-01

    This project was an attempt at characterizing particle image velocimetry (PIV) and swirl-meter test procedures. The flow direction and PIV seeding were evaluated for in-cylinder steady state flow of a spark ignition engine. For PIV seeding, both wet and dry options were tested. The dry particles tested were baby powder, glass particulate, and titanium dioxide. The wet particles tested were fogs created with olive oil, vegetable oil, DEHS, and silicon oil. The seeding was evaluated at 0.1 and 0.25 Lift/Diameter and at cylinder pressures of 10, 25 and 40 inches of H2O. PIV results were evaluated through visual and fluid momentum comparisons. Seeding particles were also evaluated based on particle size and cost. It was found that baby powder and glass particulate were the most effective seeding options for the current setup. The oil fogs and titanium dioxide were found to deposit very quickly on the mock cylinder and obscure the motion of the particles. Based on initial calculations and flow measurements, the flow direction should have a negligible impact on PIV and swirl-meter results. The characterizations found in this project will be used in future engine research examining the effects of intake port geometry on in-cylinder fluid motion and exhaust gas recirculation tolerances. Thanks to NSF site grant #1358991.

  14. Liquid Metal Thermal Electric Converter bench test module

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens, L.L.; Andraka, C.E.; Moreno, J.B.

    1988-04-01

    This report describes the design, fabrication, and test of a Liquid Metal Thermal Electric Converter Bench Test Module. The work presented in this document was conducted as a part of Heat Engine Task of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Thermal Technology Program. The objective of this task is the development and evaluation of heat engine technologies applicable to distributed receiver systems, in particular, dish electric systems.

  15. Molecular Sieve Bench Testing and Computer Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohamadinejad, Habib; DaLee, Robert C.; Blackmon, James B.

    1995-01-01

    The design of an efficient four-bed molecular sieve (4BMS) CO2 removal system for the International Space Station depends on many mission parameters, such as duration, crew size, cost of power, volume, fluid interface properties, etc. A need for space vehicle CO2 removal system models capable of accurately performing extrapolated hardware predictions is inevitable due to the change of the parameters which influences the CO2 removal system capacity. The purpose is to investigate the mathematical techniques required for a model capable of accurate extrapolated performance predictions and to obtain test data required to estimate mass transfer coefficients and verify the computer model. Models have been developed to demonstrate that the finite difference technique can be successfully applied to sorbents and conditions used in spacecraft CO2 removal systems. The nonisothermal, axially dispersed, plug flow model with linear driving force for 5X sorbent and pore diffusion for silica gel are then applied to test data. A more complex model, a non-darcian model (two dimensional), has also been developed for simulation of the test data. This model takes into account the channeling effect on column breakthrough. Four FORTRAN computer programs are presented: a two-dimensional model of flow adsorption/desorption in a packed bed; a one-dimensional model of flow adsorption/desorption in a packed bed; a model of thermal vacuum desorption; and a model of a tri-sectional packed bed with two different sorbent materials. The programs are capable of simulating up to four gas constituents for each process, which can be increased with a few minor changes.

  16. Bench Scale Saltcake Dissolution Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    BECHTOLD, D.B.; PACQUET, E.A.

    2000-12-06

    A potential scenario for retrieving saltcake from single shell tanks is the ''Rainbird{reg_sign} sprinkler'' method. Water is distributed evenly across the surface of the saltcake and allowed to percolate by gravity through the waste. The salt dissolves in the water, forming a saturated solution. The saturated liquid is removed by a saltwell pump situated near the bottom of the tank. By this method, there is never a large inventory of liquid in the tank that could pose a threat of leakage. There are many variables or factors that can influence the hydrodynamics of this retrieval process. They include saltcake porosity; saltwell pumping rate; salt dissolution chemistry; factors that could promote flow channeling (e.g. tank walls, dry wells, inclusions or discontinuities in the saltcake); method of water distribution; plug formation due to crystal formations or accumulation of insoluble solids. A brief literature search indicates that very little experimental data exist on these aspects of saltcake dissolution (Wiersma 1996, 1997). The tests reported here were planned (Herting, 2000) to provide preliminary data and information for planning future, scaled-up tests of the sprinkler method.

  17. Design and Control Implementation of AC Electric Power Steering System Test Bench*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weidong; Ai, Yibo

    Using AC motor is an important development trend of electric power steering system, and in this paper, we proposed a design of AC electric power steering system test bench. The paper introduced the bench structure, working principle and main components selection first, and then given the implementation scheme of test bench's three functions: simulation of the road resistance, power assistant control and data acquisition. The test results showed the feasibility of the test bench.

  18. Bench Test of the Vibration Compensation Interferometer for EAST Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gongshun; Yang, Yao; Liu, Haiqing; Jie, Yinxian; Zou, Zhiyong; Wang, Zhengxing; Zeng, Long; Wei, Xuechao; Li, Weiming; Lan, Ting; Zhu, Xiang; Liu, Yukai; Gao, Xiang

    2016-02-01

    A visible laser-based vibration compensation interferometer has recently been designed for the EAST tokamak and the bench test has been finished. The system was optimized for its installation on EAST. The value of the final optical power before the detectors without plasma has been calculated from the component bench test result, which is quite close to the measured value. A nanometer level displacement (of the order of the laser's wavelength) has been clearly measured by a modulation of piezoelectric ceramic unit, proving the system's capability. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Program of China (Nos. 2014GB106002, 2014GB106003, 2014GB106004) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11105184, 11375237, 11505238)

  19. Design of a Test Bench for Intraocular Lens Optical Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alba-Bueno, Francisco; Vega, Fidel; Millán, María S.

    2011-01-01

    The crystalline lens is the responsible for focusing at different distances (accommodation) in the human eye. This organ grows throughout life increasing in size and rigidity. Moreover, due this growth it loses transparency through life, and becomes gradually opacified causing what is known as cataracts. Cataract is the most common cause of visual loss in the world. At present, this visual loss is recoverable by surgery in which the opacified lens is destroyed (phacoemulsification) and replaced by the implantation of an intraocular lens (IOL). If the IOL implanted is mono-focal the patient loses its natural capacity of accommodation, and as a consequence they would depend on an external optic correction to focus at different distances. In order to avoid this dependency, multifocal IOLs designs have been developed. The multi-focality can be achieved by using either, a refractive surface with different radii of curvature (refractive IOLs) or incorporating a diffractive surface (diffractive IOLs). To analyze the optical quality of IOLs it is necessary to test them in an optical bench that agrees with the ISO119679-2 1999 standard (Ophthalmic implants. Intraocular lenses. Part 2. Optical Properties and Test Methods). In addition to analyze the IOLs according to the ISO standard, we have designed an optical bench that allows us to simulate the conditions of a real human eye. To do that, we will use artificial corneas with different amounts of optical aberrations and several illumination sources with different spectral distributions. Moreover, the design of the test bench includes the possibility of testing the IOLs under off-axis conditions as well as in the presence of decentration and/or tilt. Finally, the optical imaging quality of the IOLs is assessed by using common metrics like the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), the Point Spread Function (PSF) and/or the Strehl ratio (SR), or via registration of the IOL's wavefront with a Hartmann-Shack sensor and its

  20. ORNL/IAT ARMATURE DIAGNOSTICS DEMONSTRATION TEST REPORT: PART TWO: BENCH DEMONSTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, Stephen W; Cates, Michael R; Goedeke, Shawn; Crawford, M. T.; Ferraro, S. B.; Surls, D.; Stewart, J.

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of the present effort was to demonstrate 'on the fly' temperature measurement of railgun armatures on a bench top railgun. The effort builds on the previous test that utilized a portable unit with armature speeds ranging from 50 to 90 m/s. The tests described here involved higher speeds, ranging from 300 to 500 m/s. The method to accomplish the measurement involves pulsed laser illumination of a phosphor-coated armature. The duration of the ensuing fluorescence indicates temperature. The measured temperatures, obtained both inside the muzzle and outside in free flight, ranged between 80 to 110 C. The required pulsed fluorescence was made possible by successfully sensing the position of the armature while traveling within the laser illumination and fluorescence sensing fields-of-view. A high-speed camera also captured images of the moving armatures after exiting the railgun. These images sometimes included the fluorescing region of the phosphor coating.

  1. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM0 Flight Hardware in Bench Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Engineering bench system hardware for the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is tested on a lab bench at the University of Colorado in Boulder. This is done in a horizontal arrangement to reduce pressure differences so the tests more closely resemble behavior in the microgravity of space. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder).

  2. Continuous bench-scale tests to assess METHOXYCOAL process performance

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory-scale research conducted at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) has shown that coal pyrolysis in the presence of CH{sub 4} and small quantities of O{sub 2} (the METHOXYCOAL process) can produce high yields of liquids and valuable chemicals compared to conventional pyrolysis. The addition of MgO, coal ash, and clays have been shown to further enhance coal conversion. The goal of this two-year project is to build upon that laboratory research by conducting continuous bench-scale tests at IGT. Tests are being conducted with IBC-101 coal under CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2} blends with and without added coal ash, MgO, and/or clays, at temperatures and pressures up to 1000{degrees}F and 200 psig. These tests will provide data to select preferred operating conditions for chemicals production from high-sulfur Illinois coals.

  3. Testing for Mutagens Using Fruit Flies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebl, Eric C.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a laboratory employed in undergraduate teaching that uses fruit flies to test student-selected compounds for their ability to cause mutations. Requires no prior experience with fruit flies, incorporates a student design component, and employs both rigorous controls and statistical analyses. (DDR)

  4. Pattern Generator for Bench Test of Digital Boards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkun, Andrew C.; Chu, Anhua J.

    2012-01-01

    All efforts to develop electronic equipment reach a stage where they need a board test station for each board. The SMAP digital system consists of three board types that interact with each other using interfaces with critical timing. Each board needs to be tested individually before combining into the integrated digital electronics system. Each board needs critical timing signals from the others to be able to operate. A bench test system was developed to support test of each board. The test system produces all the outputs of the control and timing unit, and is delivered much earlier than the timing unit. Timing signals are treated as data. A large file is generated containing the state of every timing signal at any instant. This file is streamed out to an IO card, which is wired directly to the device-under-test (DUT) input pins. This provides a flexible test environment that can be adapted to any of the boards required to test in a standalone configuration. The problem of generating the critical timing signals is then transferred from a hardware problem to a software problem where it is more easily dealt with.

  5. Design, fabrication, and bench testing of a solar chemical receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, W. A.; Pierre, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Solar thermal energy can be effectively collected, transported, stored, and utilized by means of a chemical storage and transport system employing the reversible SO2 oxidation reaction. A solar chemical receiver for SO3 thermal decomposition to SO2 and oxygen was analyzed. Bench tests of a ten foot section of a receiver module were conducted with dissociated sulfuric acid (SO3 and H2O) in an electrical furnace. Measured percent conversion of SO3 was 85% of the equilibrium value. Methods were developed to fabricate and assemble a complete receiver module. These methods included applying an aluminide coating to certain exposed surfaces, assembling concentric tubes with a wire spacer, applying a platinum catalyst to the tubing wall, and coiling the entire assembly into the desired configuration.

  6. Virtual Turbine Engine Test Bench Using MGET Test Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kho, Seonghee; Kong, Changduk; Ki, Jayoung

    2015-05-01

    Test device using virtual engine simulator can help reduce the number of engine tests through tests similar to the actual engine tests and repeat the test under the same condition, and thus reduce the engine maintenance and operating costs [1]. Also, as it is possible to easily implement extreme conditions in which it is hard to conduct actual tests, it can prevent engine damages that may happen during the actual engine test under such conditions. In this study, an upgraded MGET test device was developed that can conduct both real and virtual engine test by applying real-time engine model to the existing MGET test device that was developed and has been sold by the Company. This newly developed multi-purpose MGET test device is expected to be used for various educational and research purposes.

  7. Measure Twice, Build Once: Bench-Scale Testing to Evaluate Bioretention Media Design

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the utility of conducting bench-scale testing on selected bioretention media and media amendments to validate hydrologic properties before installing media and amendments in larger pilot- or full-scale rain garden installations. The bench-scale study conclude...

  8. 42 CFR 84.1153 - Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench..., fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters; minimum requirements. (a) Gas mask canisters containing filters for protection against dusts, fumes, mists, and...

  9. 42 CFR 84.1153 - Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench..., fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters; minimum requirements. (a) Gas mask canisters containing filters for protection against dusts, fumes, mists, and...

  10. 42 CFR 84.1153 - Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench..., fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters; minimum requirements. (a) Gas mask canisters containing filters for protection against dusts, fumes, mists, and...

  11. 42 CFR 84.1153 - Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench..., fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters; minimum requirements. (a) Gas mask canisters containing filters for protection against dusts, fumes, mists, and...

  12. The E-lens test bench for RHIC beam-beam compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Gu X.; Altinbas, F.Z.; Aronson, J.; Beebe, E. et al

    2012-05-20

    To compensate for the beam-beam effects from the proton-proton interactions at IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we are fabricating two electron lenses that we plan to install at RHIC IR10. Before installing the e-lenses, we are setting-up the e-lens test bench to test the electron gun, collector, GS1 coil, modulator, partial control system, some instrumentation, and the application software. Some e-lens power supplies, the electronics for current measurement will also be qualified on test bench. The test bench also was designed for measuring the properties of the cathode and the profile of the beam. In this paper, we introduce the layout and elements of the e-lens test bench; and we discuss its present status towards the end of this paper.

  13. Prototype of a test bench for applied research on Extracted beams of the nuclotron accelerator complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldin, A. A.; Berlev, A. I.; Bradnova, V.; Butenko, A. V.; Fedorov, A. N.; Kudashkin, I. V.

    2016-05-01

    The results of the development and testing of elements of a test bench for investigating the impact of accelerated particle beams on biological objects, electronics, and other targets are presented. The systems for beam monitoring and target positioning were tested on extracted argon beams in the framework of experiments on studying the radiation hardness of electronic components.

  14. Bench Scale Test of Absorption Slurry-ice Maker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasao, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Takashi

    Slurry ice system is desirable as cold heat source for air conditioning, because it requires less conveyance power or less pipe size. On the other hand, recently absorption refrigerator is reevaluated because it can utilize various types of waste heat and it does not use fluorocarbon refrigerant. But it had been regarded to be difficult to make ice by absorption refrigerator because the refrigerant is water. However making slurry ice is possible, of cource, if the slurry ice generated by partial freezing of water is continuously taken away from the evaporator. This method was certified experimentally with a bench scale model. For ice making continuously, ice had not to be frozen stiff at water surface or inside wall of the evaporator. Then refrigerant water in the evaporator was raised swirl flow. And inside wall of the evaporator was finished by water repellent coating, and heated from outside wall. This slurry ice was adaptable to hydraulic transportation, because ice was needle crystal with about 5 mm length and ice temperature was 0°C.

  15. A computer test bench for checking and adjusting the automatic regulators of generator excitation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dovganyuk, I. Ya.; Labunets, I. A.; Plotnikova, T. V.; Sokur, P. V.

    2008-05-15

    A computer test bench for testing and debugging natural samples of the automatic excitation regulation systems of generators, the protection units and the power part of the excitation system is described. The bench includes a personal computer with specialized input-output circuit boards for analog and digital signals, and enables the time and cost involved in developing and checking control systems to be reduced considerably. The program employed operates in real time and enables the automatic excitation regulators of synchronous generators and generators with longitudinal-transverse excitation in a specific power system to be adjusted.

  16. Test bench HEATREC for heat loss measurement on solar receiver tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez, José M.; López-Martín, Rafael; Valenzuela, Loreto; Zarza, Eduardo

    2016-05-01

    In Solar Thermal Electricity (STE) plants the thermal energy of solar radiation is absorbed by solar receiver tubes (HCEs) and it is transferred to a heat transfer fluid. Therefore, heat losses of receiver tubes have a direct influence on STE plants efficiency. A new test bench called HEATREC has been developed by Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA) in order to determinate the heat losses of receiver tubes under laboratory conditions. The innovation of this test bench consists in the possibility to determine heat losses under controlled vacuum.

  17. Test-bench system for a borehole azimuthal acoustic reflection imaging logging tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianping; Ju, Xiaodong; Qiao, Wenxiao; Lu, Junqiang; Men, Baiyong; Liu, Dong

    2016-06-01

    The borehole azimuthal acoustic reflection imaging logging tool (BAAR) is a new generation of imaging logging tool, which is able to investigate stratums in a relatively larger range of space around the borehole. The BAAR is designed based on the idea of modularization with a very complex structure, so it has become urgent for us to develop a dedicated test-bench system to debug each module of the BAAR. With the help of a test-bench system introduced in this paper, test and calibration of BAAR can be easily achieved. The test-bench system is designed based on the client/server model. The hardware system mainly consists of a host computer, an embedded controlling board, a bus interface board, a data acquisition board and a telemetry communication board. The host computer serves as the human machine interface and processes the uploaded data. The software running on the host computer is designed based on VC++. The embedded controlling board uses Advanced Reduced Instruction Set Machines 7 (ARM7) as the micro controller and communicates with the host computer via Ethernet. The software for the embedded controlling board is developed based on the operating system uClinux. The bus interface board, data acquisition board and telemetry communication board are designed based on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) and provide test interfaces for the logging tool. To examine the feasibility of the test-bench system, it was set up to perform a test on BAAR. By analyzing the test results, an unqualified channel of the electronic receiving cabin was discovered. It is suggested that the test-bench system can be used to quickly determine the working condition of sub modules of BAAR and it is of great significance in improving production efficiency and accelerating industrial production of the logging tool.

  18. 42 CFR 84.126 - Canister bench tests; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... tests, will be made on an apparatus that allows the test atmosphere at 50 ±5 percent relative humidity... Canister type Test condition Test atmosphere Gas or vapor Concentration (parts per million) Flow rate... indicated penetration. 2 Relative humidity of test atmosphere will be 95 ±3pct; temperature of...

  19. Measurement of wheelchair contact force with a low cost bench test.

    PubMed

    Silva, L C A; Dedini, F G; Corrêa, F C; Eckert, J J; Becker, M

    2016-02-01

    In mechanical engineering, it is well established that contact between the tire and the ground is a key parameter in characterizing the dynamic behavior of vehicles and an important factor in design control. Therefore, it is an important part of dynamic simulation models for vehicles, including wheelchairs. This work presents a bench test designed to experimentally monitor and measure the forces transmitted to the ground by a moving wheel. The test bench is composed of a table and a track with a fixed wheel structure and powertrain system. The table is an integrated structure that measures the longitudinal and lateral forces produced by tire contact. This table allows characterization of the tire and tests the tire under varying loads at different slip and camber angles. Additionally, the test bench can also be used to evaluate other tires, such as caster tires. The performances of the new device are illustrated, and the results show the differences between tires, which are related to the dynamic behaviors of wheelchair model. Finally, preliminary experiments performed using the test bench have shown that it is able to monitor and measure the forces generated by the contact between the tire and the ground. PMID:26732696

  20. Measure Twice, Build Once: Bench-Scale Testing to Evaluate Bioretention Media Design - slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    The oral presentation will be at the EWRI International LID Conference in San Francisco, on April 11-14, 2010. The slides discuss the utility of conducting bench-scale testing on selected bioretention media and media amendments to validate hydrologic properties before installing...

  1. REVIEW OF BENCH-, PILOT-, AND FULL-SCALE ORIMULSION (R) COMBUSTION TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a review of bench-, pilot-, and full-scale Orimulsion combustion tests. A fossil fuel marketed by its producer, Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A. (PdVSA), since the late 1980s as an alternative to coal and heavy fuel oil, Orimulsion is a bitumen-in-water em...

  2. Evaluating genomic tests from bench to bedside: a practical framework

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The development of genomic tests is one of the most significant technological advances in medical testing in recent decades. As these tests become increasingly available, so does the need for a pragmatic framework to evaluate the evidence base and evidence gaps in order to facilitate informed decision-making. In this article we describe such a framework that can provide a common language and benchmarks for different stakeholders of genomic testing. Each stakeholder can use this framework to specify their respective thresholds for decision-making, depending on their perspective and particular needs. This framework is applicable across a broad range of test applications and can be helpful in the application and communication of a regulatory science for genomic testing. Our framework builds upon existing work and incorporates principles familiar to researchers involved in medical testing (both diagnostic and prognostic) generally, as well as those involved in genomic testing. This framework is organized around six phases in the development of genomic tests beginning with marker identification and ending with population impact, and highlights the important knowledge gaps that need to be filled in establishing the clinical relevance of a test. Our framework focuses on the clinical appropriateness of the four main dimensions of test research questions (population/setting, intervention/index test, comparators/reference test, and outcomes) rather than prescribing a hierarchy of study designs that should be used to address each phase. PMID:23078403

  3. 42 CFR 84.126 - Canister bench tests; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... tests, will be made on an apparatus that allows the test atmosphere at 50 ±5 percent relative humidity... 85 percent relative humidity air through them at 64 liters per minute for 6 hours. (5) The... indicated penetration. 2 Relative humidity of test atmosphere will be 95 ±3pct; temperature of...

  4. 42 CFR 84.126 - Canister bench tests; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... tests, will be made on an apparatus that allows the test atmosphere at 50 ±5 percent relative humidity... 85 percent relative humidity air through them at 64 liters per minute for 6 hours. (5) The... indicated penetration. 2 Relative humidity of test atmosphere will be 95 ±3pct; temperature of...

  5. 42 CFR 84.126 - Canister bench tests; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... tests, will be made on an apparatus that allows the test atmosphere at 50 ±5 percent relative humidity... 85 percent relative humidity air through them at 64 liters per minute for 6 hours. (5) The... indicated penetration. 2 Relative humidity of test atmosphere will be 95 ±3pct; temperature of...

  6. Calibrating/testing meters in hot water test bench VM7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, E.; Stolt, K.; Lau, P.; Mattiasson, K.

    A Hot Water Test Bench, VM7, has been developed and constructed for the calibration and testing of volume and flowmeters, in a project at the National Volume Measurement Laboratory at the Swedish National Testing and Research Institute. The intended area of use includes use as a reference at audit measurements, e.g. for accredited laboratories, calibration of meters for the industry and for the testing of hot water meters. The objective of the project, which was initiated in 1989, was to design equipment with stable flow and with a minimal temperature drop even at very low flow rates. The principle of the design is a closed system with two pressure tanks at different pressures. The water is led from the high pressure tank through the test object and the volume standard, in the form of master meters or a piston prover alternatively, to the low pressure tank. Calibrations/tests are made comparing the indication of the test object to that of master meters covering the current flow rate. These are, in the same test cycle, calibrated to the piston prover. Alternatively, the test object can be calibrated directly to the piston prover.

  7. Vacuum test bench for high-voltage tests of storage chambers in the electric dipole moment spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasakov, M. S.; Polyushkin, A. O.; Serebrov, A. P.; Kolomenskii, E. A.; Pirozhkov, A. N.; Krasnoshchekova, I. A.

    2016-04-01

    We describe the structure of the high-voltage test bench for checking individual insulators and their assemblies with separate control of leakage currents in each insulator. The test bench is mainly intended for preparing the high-voltage block of the spectrometer for the search for the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron. The main part of the bench is the high-voltage source with controllable polarity and voltages up to 200 kV with complex control over parameters. An analogous converter is used in experiment on measuring the EDM of the neutron. We report on the results of testing the new design of the storage chambers of the EDM spectrometer operating with a high voltage; we also test the maximal potentialities of the converter under nearly working conditions; its optimization and calibration are performed.

  8. 42 CFR 84.126 - Canister bench tests; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... tests, will be made on an apparatus that allows the test atmosphere at 50 ±5 percent relative humidity... humidity air through them at 64 liters per minute for 6 hours. (4) Two canisters, other than those... 85 percent relative humidity air through them at 64 liters per minute for 6 hours. (5)...

  9. Setup of a photomultiplier tube test bench for LHAASO-KM2A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu; Zhang, Zhong-Quan; Tian, Ye; Du, Yan-Yan; Zhao, Xiao; Shen, Fu-Wang; Li, Chang-Yu; Sun, Yan-Sheng; Feng, Cun-Feng

    2016-08-01

    To fulfill the requirements for testing the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) of the electromagnetic detector at the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO), a multi-functional PMT test bench with a two-dimensional scanning system has been developed. With this 2D scanning system, 16 PMTs can be scanned simultaneously for characteristics tests, including uniformity, cathode transit time difference, single photo-electron spectrum, gain vs. high voltage, linear behavior and dark noise. The programmable hardware and intelligent software of the test bench make it convenient to use and provide reliable results. The test methods are described in detail and primary results are presented. Supported by NSFC (11075096) SDNFS (ZR2011AM007), China

  10. Tests of achromatic phase shifters performed on the SYNAPSE test bench: a progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, Pavel; Schuller, Peter A.; Chazelas, Bruno; Decaudin, Michel; Labèque, Alain; Duret, Philippe; Rabbia, Yves; Launhardt, Ralf; Gay, Jean; Sodnik, Zoran; Barillot, Marc; Brachet, Frank; Laurent, Thomas; Jacquinod, Sophie; Vandormael, Denis; Loicq, Jérôme; Mawet, Dimitri; Ollivier, Marc; Léger, Alain

    2008-07-01

    The achromatic phase shifter (APS) is a component of the Bracewell nulling interferometer studied in preparation for future space missions (viz. Darwin/TPF-I) focusing on spectroscopic study of Earth-like exo-planets. Several possible designs of such an optical subsystem exist. Four approaches were selected for further study. Thales Alenia Space developed a dielectric prism APS. A focus crossing APS prototype was developed by the OCA, Nice, France. A field reversal APS prototype was prepared by the MPIA in Heidelberg, Germany. Centre Spatial de Liege develops a concept based on Fresnel's rhombs. This paper presents a progress report on the current work aiming at evaluating these prototypes on the Synapse test bench at the Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale in Orsay, France.

  11. 100 Area soil washing bench-scale test procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, H.D.; Gerber, M.A.; Mattigod, S.V.; Serne, R.J.

    1993-03-01

    This document describes methodologies and procedures for conducting soil washing treatability tests in accordance with the 100 Area Soil Washing Treatability Test Plan (DOE-RL 1992, Draft A). The objective of this treatability study is to evaluate the use of physical separation systems and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating chemically and radioactively contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. These data will be primarily used for determining feasibility of the individual unit operations and defining the requirements for a system, or systems, for pilot-scale testing.

  12. A vibration monitoring acquisition and diagnostic system for helicopter drive train bench tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dousis, Dimitri A.

    An automated drive train test stand vibration monitoring system called VMADS has been developed by Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc., and has been installed at Bell's transmission bench test facility. VMADS provides the operator with warning and alarm indications for preselected degraded conditions, and acquires vibration data to be used by engineers to improve the diagnostics for better fault detection and fault isolation. VMADS is used as a test bed for new monitoring and diagnostic algorithm evaluation and validation, a necessary step to ensure development of accurate, reliable integrated health usage monitoring systems for the Bell rotorcraft fleet. This paper highlights the VMADS features for helicopter and tiltrotor aircraft drive train bench test monitoring and diagnostics and discusses supportive ongoing health and usage monitoring activities at BHTI, both military and commercial for enhanced safety and reduced maintenance costs. Bell is translating VMADS developed capability to airborne applications, while simultaneously enhancing the original VMADS capabilities.

  13. 42 CFR 84.1153 - Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters; minimum requirements. 84.1153 Section 84.1153 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL...

  14. Goethite Bench-scale and Large-scale Preparation Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Josephson, Gary B.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-10-23

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is the keystone for cleanup of high-level radioactive waste from our nation's nuclear defense program. The WTP will process high-level waste from the Hanford tanks and produce immobilized high-level waste glass for disposal at a national repository, low activity waste (LAW) glass, and liquid effluent from the vitrification off-gas scrubbers. The liquid effluent will be stabilized into a secondary waste form (e.g. grout-like material) and disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) along with the low-activity waste glass. The major long-term environmental impact at Hanford results from technetium that volatilizes from the WTP melters and finally resides in the secondary waste. Laboratory studies have indicated that pertechnetate ({sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) can be reduced and captured into a solid solution of {alpha}-FeOOH, goethite (Um 2010). Goethite is a stable mineral and can significantly retard the release of technetium to the environment from the IDF. The laboratory studies were conducted using reaction times of many days, which is typical of environmental subsurface reactions that were the genesis of this new process. This study was the first step in considering adaptation of the slow laboratory steps to a larger-scale and faster process that could be conducted either within the WTP or within the effluent treatment facility (ETF). Two levels of scale-up tests were conducted (25x and 400x). The largest scale-up produced slurries of Fe-rich precipitates that contained rhenium as a nonradioactive surrogate for {sup 99}Tc. The slurries were used in melter tests at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) to determine whether captured rhenium was less volatile in the vitrification process than rhenium in an unmodified feed. A critical step in the technetium immobilization process is to chemically reduce Tc(VII) in the pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) to Tc(Iv)by reaction with the ferrous

  15. Data Acquisition System for Electric Vehicle's Driving Motor Test Bench Based on VC++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Song; Chenguang, Lv

    In order to solve such problems as great labor intensity, high cost, low efficiency and accuracy during the performance experiment for driving motor system of electric vehicles, and realize data acquisition automatically and synchronously, a data acquisition system for driving motor test bench based on visual instruments is designed. This data acquisition system can be used to obtain the driving motor's parameters of currents and voltages at the same time. This system's hardware is based on electric vehicle's motor test bench in Beijing Institute of Technology, and combined with PXI2010 data acquisition card from ADLINK Company. Visual c++ software is adopted as development tool. In this paper, the design and realization of the hardware and software are presented. Experiment results show that this system improves the efficiency and quality of testing task with high utility. And experiment data can be obtained accurately.

  16. [The Chemiklaven 7000/8000 on the test bench].

    PubMed

    Guggenheim, B

    1995-01-01

    Sterilization of metal instruments in Chemiclaves is undoubtedly the most protective mode of sterilization, because corrosion and formation of spots is minimal. In the past sterilization with Chemiclaves was criticised, because of the emission of formaldehyde by older models and the questionable efficacy of formaldehyde sterilization for wrapped instruments. In the present investigation the capability of the newest Chemiclaves (7000/8000) to sterilize dental instruments was investigated. To monitor sterilization efficacy filter paper strips loaded with spores of Bacillus stearothermophilus or dental instruments directly contaminated with these spores were used as biological indicators. The performance of the Chemiclaves was assessed with and without a full load of instruments; after running half of the program cycle, the spore strips in the chamber being either unpacked or packed into paper bags. In addition it was investigated, whether it was feasible to use a formaldehyde free sterilization solution (Steri-Vap) with these sterilizers. The daily performance of the Chemiclaves in a dental practice and the emission of formaldehyde were tested in a room < 10 m3, in which both apparatus were operated at the same time. The Chemiclaves 7000/8000 sterilized reliably under the set test condition, however, the formaldehyde-free sterilization solution did not lead to an acceptable efficacy of sterilization. The new Chemiclaves efficiently adsorbed formaldehyde vapours. Harvey sterilizers require a meticulous observation of the producer's instruction, because in comparison to saturated steam the chemical vapours have a lower heat capacity. The Chemiclaves 7000/8000 are recommended for the sterilization of well cleaned, dry instruments wrapped in original MDT paper bags. PMID:7754333

  17. Optical test-benches for multiple source wavefront propagation and spatiotemporal point-spread function emulation.

    PubMed

    Weddell, Stephen J; Lambert, Andrew J

    2014-12-10

    Precise measurement of aberrations within an optical system is essential to mitigate combined effects of user-generated aberrations for the study of anisoplanatic imaging using optical test benches. The optical system point spread function (PSF) is first defined, and methods to minimize the effects of the optical system are discussed. User-derived aberrations, in the form of low-order Zernike ensembles, are introduced using a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM), and dynamic phase maps are used to study the spatiotemporal PSF. A versatile optical test bench is described, where the Shack Hartmann and curvature wavefront sensors are used to emulate the effects of wavefront propagation over time from two independent sources. PMID:25608061

  18. High power continuous wave microwave test bench at 4.6 GHz for experimental advanced superconducting tokamak.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wendong; Hu, Huaichuan; Shan, Jiafang; Xu, Handong; Wang, Mao; Wu, Zege; Zhu, Liang

    2013-01-01

    The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) is an effective approach for auxiliary heating and non-inductive current drive in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak. The 6 MW/4.6 GHz LHCD system is being designed and installed with twenty-four 250 KW/4.6 GHz high power klystron amplifiers. The test bench operating at 250 KW/4.6 GHz in continuous wave mode has been set up, which can test and train microwave components for the 6 MW/4.6 GHz LHCD system. In this paper, the system architecture and software of the microwave test bench are presented. Moreover, the test results of these klystrons and microwave units are described here in detail. The long term operation of the test bench and improved performance of all microwave component samples indicated that the related technologies on test bench can be applied in the large scale LHCD systems. PMID:23387646

  19. Fabrication, assembly, bench and drilling tests of two prototype downhole pneumatic turbine motors: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bookwalter, R.; Duettra, P.D.; Johnson, P.; Lyons, W.C.; Miska, S.

    1987-04-01

    The first and second prototype downhole pneumatic turbine motors have been fabricated, assembled and tested. All bench tests showed that the motor will produce horsepower and bit speeds approximating the predicted values. Specifically, the downhole pneumatic turbine motor produced approximately 50 horsepower at 100 rpm, while being supplied with about 3600 SCFM of compressed air. The first prototype was used in a drilling test from a depth of 389 feet to a depth of 789 feet in the Kirtland formation. This first prototype motor drilled at a rate exceeding 180 ft/hr, utilizing only 3000 SCFM of compressed air. High temperature tests (at approximately 460/sup 0/F) were carried out on the thrust assembly and the gearboxes for the two prototypes. These components operated successfully at these temperatures. Although the bench and drilling tests were successful, the tests revealed design changes that should be made before drilling tests are carried out in geothermal boreholes at the Geysers area, near Santa Rosa, California.

  20. Test bench for studying the outlook for industrial applications of an oxygen-iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Adamenkov, A A; Bakshin, V V; Bogachev, A V; Buryak, E V; Vdovkin, L A; Velikanov, S D; Vyskubenko, B A; Garanin, Sergey G; Gorbacheva, E V; Grigorovich, Sergei V; Il'in, S P; Il'kaev, R I; Ilyushin, Yurii N; Kalashnik, A M; Kolobyanin, Yu V; Leonov, M L; Svischev, V V; Troshkin, M V

    2007-07-31

    We report the development and tests of a chemical oxygen-iodine laser test bench based on a twisted-aerosol-flow singlet-oxygen generator and a supersonic laser model for studying the outlook for industrial applications of this laser. The maximal output power of the laser is {approx}65 kW (the average power is {approx}50 kW), corresponding to a specific output power of {approx}110 W cm{sup -2}. The maximal chemical efficiency is {approx}34%. (letters)

  1. Theoretical Rationale of Heating Block for Testing Bench of Aerospace Crafts Thermal Protection Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Anna A.; Reznik, Sergey V.

    2016-02-01

    The theoretical rationale for the structural layout of a testing bench with zirconium dioxide heating elements on the basis of modelling radiative-conductive heat transfer are presented. The numerical simulation of radiative-conductive heat transfer for the two-dimensional scaled model of the testing segment with the finite-element analysis software package Ansys 15.0 are performed. The simulation results showed that for the selected layout of the heaters the temperature non-uniformity along the length of the sample over time will not exceed 3 % even at a temperature of 2000 K.

  2. Development of a pyramidal wavefront sensor test-bench at INO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turbide, Simon; Wang, Min; Gauvin, Jonny; Martin, Olivier; Savard, Maxime; Bourqui, Pascal; Veran, Jean-Pierre; Deschenes, William; Anctil, Genevieve; Chateauneuf, François

    2013-12-01

    The key technical element of the adaptive optics in astronomy is the wavefront sensing (WFS). One of the advantages of the pyramid wavefront sensor (P-WFS) over the widely used Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor seems to be the increased sensitivity in closed-loop applications. A high-sensitivity and large dynamic-range WFS, such as P-WFS technology, still needs to be further investigated for proper justification in future Extremely Large Telescopes application. At INO, we have recently carried out the optical design, testing and performance evaluation of a P-WFS bench setup. The optical design of the bench setup mainly consists of the super-LED fiber source, source collimator, spatial light modulator (SLM), relay lenses, tip-tilt mirror, Fourier-transforming lens, and a four-faceted glass pyramid with a large vertex angle as well as pupil re-imaged optics. The phase-only SLM has been introduced in the bench setup to generate atmospheric turbulence with a maximum phase shift of more than 2π at each pixel (256 grey levels). Like a modified Foucault knife-edge test, the refractive pyramid element is used to produce four images of the entrance pupil on a CCD camera. The Fourier-transforming lens, which is used before the pyramid prism, is designed for telecentric output to allow dynamic modulation (rotation of the beam around the pyramid-prism center) from a tip-tilt mirror. Furthermore, a P-WFS diffraction-based model has been developed. This model includes most of the system limitations such as the SLM discrete voltage steps and the CCD pixel pitch. The pyramid effects (edges and tip) are considered as well. The modal wavefront reconstruction algorithm relies on the construction of an interaction matrix (one for each modulation's amplitude). Each column of the interaction matrix represents the combination of the four pupil images for a given wavefront aberration. The nice agreement between the data and the model suggest that the limitation of the system is not the P

  3. Sensory feedback in prosthetics: a standardized test bench for closed-loop control.

    PubMed

    Dosen, Strahinja; Markovic, Marko; Hartmann, Cornelia; Farina, Dario

    2015-03-01

    Closing the control loop by providing sensory feedback to the user of a prosthesis is an important challenge, with major impact on the future of prosthetics. Developing and comparing closed-loop systems is a difficult task, since there are many different methods and technologies that can be used to implement each component of the system. Here, we present a test bench developed in Matlab Simulink for configuring and testing the closed-loop human control system in standardized settings. The framework comprises a set of connected generic blocks with normalized inputs and outputs, which can be customized by selecting specific implementations from a library of predefined components. The framework is modular and extensible and it can be used to configure, compare and test different closed-loop system prototypes, thereby guiding the development towards an optimal system configuration. The use of the test bench was demonstrated by investigating two important aspects of closed-loop control: performance of different electrotactile feedback interfaces (spatial versus intensity coding) during a pendulum stabilization task and feedforward methods (joystick versus myocontrol) for force control. The first experiment demonstrated that in the case of trained subjects the intensity coding might be superior to spatial coding. In the second experiment, the control of force was rather poor even with a stable and precise control interface (joystick), demonstrating that inherent characteristics of the prosthesis can be an important limiting factor when considering the overall effectiveness of the closed-loop control. The presented test bench is an important instrument for investigating different aspects of human manual control with sensory feedback. PMID:25420268

  4. Performance study of protective clothing against hot water splashes: from bench scale test to instrumented manikin test.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yehu; Song, Guowen; Wang, Faming

    2015-03-01

    Hot liquid hazards existing in work environments are shown to be a considerable risk for industrial workers. In this study, the predicted protection from fabric was assessed by a modified hot liquid splash tester. In these tests, conditions with and without an air spacer were applied. The protective performance of a garment exposed to hot water spray was investigated by a spray manikin evaluation system. Three-dimensional body scanning technique was used to characterize the air gap size between the protective clothing and the manikin skin. The relationship between bench scale test and manikin test was discussed and the regression model was established to predict the overall percentage of skin burn while wearing protective clothing. The results demonstrated strong correlations between bench scale test and manikin test. Based on these studies, the overall performance of protective clothing against hot water spray can be estimated on the basis of the results of the bench scale hot water splashes test and the information of air gap size entrapped in clothing. The findings provide effective guides for the design and material selection while developing high performance protective clothing. PMID:25349371

  5. Construction and Bench Testing of a Rotatable Collimator for the LHC Collimation Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Keller, Lewis; Lundgren, Steven; Markiewicz, Thomas; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    The Phase II upgrade to the LHC collimation system calls for complementing the 30 high robust Phase I graphite secondary collimators with 30 high Z Phase II collimators. The Phase II collimators must be robust in various operating conditions and accident scenarios. This paper reports on the final construction and testing of the prototype collimator to be installed in the SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) at CERN. Bench-top measurements will demonstrate that the device is fully operational and has the mechanical and vacuum characteristics acceptable for installation in the SPS.

  6. Method, apparatus and system for managing queue operations of a test bench environment

    DOEpatents

    Ostler, Farrell Lynn

    2016-07-19

    Techniques and mechanisms for performing dequeue operations for agents of a test bench environment. In an embodiment, a first group of agents are each allocated a respective ripe reservation and a second set of agents are each allocated a respective unripe reservation. Over time, queue management logic allocates respective reservations to agents and variously changes one or more such reservations from unripe to ripe. In another embodiment, an order of servicing agents allocated unripe reservations is based on relative priorities of the unripe reservations with respect to one another. An order of servicing agents allocated ripe reservations is on a first come, first served basis.

  7. Project of electro-cyclotron resonance ion source test-bench for material investigation.

    PubMed

    Kulevoy, T V; Chalykh, B B; Kuibeda, R P; Kropachev, G N; Ziiatdinova, A V

    2014-02-01

    Development of new materials for future energy facilities with higher operating efficiency is a challenging and crucial task. However, full-scale testing of radiation hardness for reactor materials is quite sophisticated and difficult as it requires long session of reactor irradiation; moreover, induced radioactivity considerably complicates further investigation. Ion beam irradiation does not have such a drawback; on the contrary, it has certain advantages. One of them is high speed of defect formation. Therefore, it provides a useful tool for modeling of different radiation damages. Improved understanding of material behavior under high dose irradiation will probably allow to simulate reactor irradiation close to real conditions and to make an adequate estimation of material radiation hardness. Since 2008 in Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, the ion beam irradiation experiments are under development at the heavy ion radio frequency quadrupole linac and very important results are obtained already [T. V. Kulevoy et al., in Proceedings of the International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Research Applications and Utilization of Accelerators, IAEA Vienna, Austria, 2009, http://www.pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/P1433_CD/darasets/papers/ap_p5_07.pdf]. Nevertheless, the new test bench based on electro-cyclotron resonance ion source and high voltage platform is developed. The project of the test bench is presented and discussed. PMID:24593489

  8. Project of electro-cyclotron resonance ion source test-bench for material investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulevoy, T. V.; Chalykh, B. B.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Kropachev, G. N.; Ziiatdinova, A. V.

    2014-02-01

    Development of new materials for future energy facilities with higher operating efficiency is a challenging and crucial task. However, full-scale testing of radiation hardness for reactor materials is quite sophisticated and difficult as it requires long session of reactor irradiation; moreover, induced radioactivity considerably complicates further investigation. Ion beam irradiation does not have such a drawback; on the contrary, it has certain advantages. One of them is high speed of defect formation. Therefore, it provides a useful tool for modeling of different radiation damages. Improved understanding of material behavior under high dose irradiation will probably allow to simulate reactor irradiation close to real conditions and to make an adequate estimation of material radiation hardness. Since 2008 in Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, the ion beam irradiation experiments are under development at the heavy ion radio frequency quadrupole linac and very important results are obtained already [T. V. Kulevoy et al., in Proceedings of the International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Research Applications and Utilization of Accelerators, IAEA Vienna, Austria, 2009, http://www.pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/P1433_CD/darasets/papers/ap_p5_07.pdf]. Nevertheless, the new test bench based on electro-cyclotron resonance ion source and high voltage platform is developed. The project of the test bench is presented and discussed.

  9. Evaluation of malodor for automobile air conditioner evaporator by using laboratory-scale test cooling bench.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Sun Hwa; Jung, Young Rim; Kim, Man Goo

    2008-09-12

    As one of the measures to improve the environment in an automobile, malodor caused by the automobile air-conditioning system evaporator was evaluated and analyzed using laboratory-scale test cooling bench. The odor was simulated with an evaporator test cooling bench equipped with an airflow controller, air temperature and relative humidity controller. To simulate the same odor characteristics that occur from automobiles, one previously used automobile air conditioner evaporator associated with unpleasant odors was selected. The odor was evaluated by trained panels and collected with aluminum polyester bags. Collected samples were analyzed by thermal desorption into a cryotrap and subsequent gas chromatographic separation, followed by simultaneous olfactometry, flame ionization detector and identified by atomic emission detection and mass spectrometry. Compounds such as alcohols, aldehydes, and organic acids were identified as responsible odor-active compounds. Gas chromatography/flame ionization detection/olfactometry combined sensory method with instrumental analysis was very effective as an odor evaluation method in an automobile air-conditioning system evaporator. PMID:18701113

  10. Bench-scale testing of on-line control of column flotation using a novel analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-22

    This document contains the first quarterly technical progress report for PTI's Bench-Scale Testing Project of a circuit integrating PTI's KEN-FLOTETM Column Flotation Technology and PTI's On-Line Quality Monitor Control System. The twelve-month project will involve installation of a 300 lb/hr. bench-scale testing circuit at PETC's Coal Preparation Process Research Facility (CPPRF) and testing of two bituminous coals (Upper Freeport and Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam Raw Coals). Figure 1 contains the project plan as well as the approach to completing the major tasks within the twelvemonth project. The project is broken down into three phases, which include: Phase I - Preparation: The preparation phase was performed principally at PTI's Calumet offices from October through December, 1992. It involved building of the equipment and circuitry, as well as some preliminary design and equipment testing. Phase II - ET Circuit Installation and Testing: This installation and testing phase of the project will be performed at PETC's CPPRF from January through May, 1993, and will be the major focus of the project. It will involve testing of the continuous 300 lb/hr. circuit. Phase II - Project Finalization: The project finalization phase will occur from June through September, 1993, at PTI's Calumet offices and will involve finalizing analytical work and data evaluation, as well as final project reporting. This quarterly progress report principally summarizes the results from the Phase I preparation work and the plan for the early portions of the Phase 11 installation and commissioning, which will occur in January and the first week of February, 1993.

  11. Bench-Scale Filtration Testing in Support of the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP)

    SciTech Connect

    Billing, Justin M.; Daniel, Richard C.; Kurath, Dean E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2009-09-28

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.” The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP testing program specifies that bench-scale testing is to be performed in support of specific operations, including filtration, caustic leaching, and oxidative leaching.

  12. Conception of a test bench to generate known and controlled conditions of refrigerant mass flow.

    PubMed

    Martins, Erick F; Flesch, Carlos A; Flesch, Rodolfo C C; Borges, Maikon R

    2011-07-01

    Refrigerant compressor performance tests play an important role in the evaluation of the energy characteristics of the compressor, enabling an increase in the quality, reliability, and efficiency of these products. Due to the nonexistence of a refrigerating capacity standard, it is common to use previously conditioned compressors for the intercomparison and evaluation of the temporal drift of compressor performance test panels. However, there are some limitations regarding the use of these specific compressors as standards. This study proposes the development of a refrigerating capacity standard which consists of a mass flow meter and a variable-capacity compressor, whose speed is set based on the mass flow rate measured by the meter. From the results obtained in the tests carried out on a bench specifically developed for this purpose, it was possible to validate the concept of a capacity standard. PMID:21334618

  13. Bench-scale testing of a micronized magnetite, fine-coal cleaning process

    SciTech Connect

    Suardini, P.J.

    1995-11-01

    Custom Coals, International has installed and is presently testing a 500 lb/hr. micronized-magnetite, fine-coal cleaning circuit at PETC`s Process Research Facility (PRF). The cost-shared project was awarded as part of the Coal Preparation Program`s, High Efficiency Preparation Subprogram. The project includes design, construction, testing, and decommissioning of a fully-integrated, bench-scale circuit, complete with feed coal classification to remove the minus 30 micron slimes, dense medium cycloning of the 300 by 30 micron feed coal using a nominal minus 10 micron size magnetite medium, and medium recovery using drain and rinse screens and various stages and types of magnetic separators. This paper describes the project circuit and goals, including a description of the current project status and the sources of coal and magnetite which are being tested.

  14. Development of circumferential seal for helicopter transmissions: Results of bench and flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strom, T. N.; Ludwig, L. P.

    1975-01-01

    A modified circumferential segmented ring seal was designed for direct replacement of a helicopter transmission elastomeric lip seal operating on a shaft diameter of 13.91 centimeters (5.481 in.) at sliding velocities to 52.48 m/sec (10 330 ft/min). The modifications involved the garter spring tension, shaft roundness, seal housing flatness, and pumping grooves to inhibit leakage. Operation of the seals in bench tests under simulated helicopter transmission conditions revealed that the seal leakage rate was within acceptable limits and that the wear rate was negligible. The low leakage and wear rates were confirmed in flight tests of 600 and 175 hours (sliding speed, 48.11 m/sec (9470 ft/min)). An additional 200 hours of air worthiness qualification testing (aircraft tie down) demonstrated that the seal can operate at the advanced sliding conditions of 52.48 m/sec (10 330 ft/min).

  15. Manufacturing, integration, and test results of the MATISSE cold optics bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettonvil, Felix C. M.; Kroes, G.; Agoćs, T.; van Duin, A.; Elswijk, E.; de Haan, M.; ter Horst, R.; Kragt, J.; Kuindersma, J.; Navarro, R.; Roelfsema, R.; Schuil, M.; Tromp, T.; Venema, L.; van Kessel, F.; Jaskó, A.

    2014-07-01

    MATISSE is the second-generation mid-infrared interferometric spectrograph and imager for ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). NOVA-ASTRON is responsible for the Cold Optics Bench (COB), representing the last part of the optics train where the four beams are re-arranged, spectrally dispersed and combined. The COB consist of two sister units, one for the LM-band, one for the N-band, which were successively completed at NOVA-ASTRON in autumn 2013 and spring 2014. The LM-band COB is under cryogenic test in its cryostat at MPIA/Heidelberg; the N-band COB finished cryogenic tests and has been installed at OCA/Nice for integration together with the Warm Optics. This paper focuses on the manufacturing, integration and test results of the COBs, and gives an overview of the current status.

  16. Bench-scale screening tests for a boiling sodium-potassium alloy solar receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, J. B.; Moss, T. A.

    1993-06-01

    Bench-scale tests were carried out in support of the design of a second-generation 75-kW(sub t) reflux pool-boiler solar receiver. The receiver will be made from Haynes Alloy 230 and will contain the sodium-potassium alloy NaK-78. The bench-scale tests used quartz lamp heated boilers to screen candidate boiling stabilization materials and methods at temperatures up to 750 degree C. Candidates that provided stable boiling were tested for hot-restart behavior. Poor stability was obtained with single 1/4-inch diameter patches of powdered metal hot press sintered onto the wetted side of the heat-input area. Laser-drilled and electric discharge machined cavities in the heated surface also performed poorly. Small additions of xenon, and heated-surface tilt out of the vertical, dramatically improved poor boiling stability; additions of helium or oxygen did not. The most stable boiling was obtained when the entire heat-input area was covered by a powdered-metal coating. The effect of heated-area size was assessed for one coating: at low incident fluxes, when even this coating performed poorly, increasing the heated-area size markedly improved boiling stability. Good hot-restart behavior was not observed with any candidate, although results were significantly better with added xenon in a boiler shortened from 3 to 2 feet. In addition to the screening tests, flash-radiography imaging of metal-vapor bubbles during boiling was attempted. Contrary to the Cole-Rohsenow correlation, these bubble-size estimates did not vary with pressure; instead they were constant, consistent with the only other alkali metal measurements, but about 1/2 their size.

  17. Bench-scale screening tests for a boiling sodium-potassium alloy solar receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.

    1993-06-01

    Bench-scale tests were carried out in support of the design of a second-generation 75-kW{sub t} reflux pool-boiler solar receiver. The receiver will be made from Haynes Alloy 230 and will contain the sodium-potassium alloy NaK-78. The bench-scale tests used quartz-lamp-heated boilers to screen candidate boiling-stabilization materials and methods at temperatures up to 750{degree}C. Candidates that provided stable boiling were tested for hot-restart behavior. Poor stability was obtained with single 1/4-inch diameter patches of powdered metal hot-press-sintered onto the wetted side of the heat-input area. Laser-drilled and electric-discharge-machined cavities in the heated surface also performed poorly. Small additions of xenon, and heated-surface tilt out of the vertical dramatically improved poor boiling stability; additions of helium or oxygen did not. The most stable boiling was obtained when the entire heat-input area was covered by a powdered-metal coating. The effect of heated-area size was assessed for one coating: at low incident fluxes, when even this coating performed poorly, increasing the heated-area size markedly improved boiling stability. Good hot-restart behavior was not observed with any candidate, although results were significantly better with added xenon in a boiler shortened from 3 to 2 feet. In addition to the screening tests, flash-radiography imaging of metal-vapor bubbles during boiling was attempted. Contrary to the Cole-Rohsenow correlation, these bubble-size estimates did not vary with pressure; instead they were constant, consistent with the only other alkali metal measurements, but about 1/2 their size.

  18. FLIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flies constitute a major group of nuisance species world wide in rural and urban situations. The public and health care officials can become more aware of the potential risks from flies and other urban pests by compiling the available information into an easily readable book form. Scientists from ...

  19. Evaluation of induced seismicity forecast models in the Induced Seismicity Test Bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Király, Eszter; Gischig, Valentin; Zechar, Jeremy; Doetsch, Joseph; Karvounis, Dimitrios; Wiemer, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Induced earthquakes often accompany fluid injection, and the seismic hazard they pose threatens various underground engineering projects. Models to monitor and control induced seismic hazard with traffic light systems should be probabilistic, forward-looking, and updated as new data arrive. Here, we propose an Induced Seismicity Test Bench to test and rank such models. We apply the test bench to data from the Basel 2006 and Soultz-sous-Forêts 2004 geothermal stimulation projects, and we assess forecasts from two models that incorporate a different mix of physical understanding and stochastic representation of the induced sequences: Shapiro in Space (SiS) and Hydraulics and Seismics (HySei). SiS is based on three pillars: the seismicity rate is computed with help of the seismogenic index and a simple exponential decay of the seismicity; the magnitude distribution follows the Gutenberg-Richter relation; and seismicity is distributed in space based on smoothing seismicity during the learning period with 3D Gaussian kernels. The HySei model describes seismicity triggered by pressure diffusion with irreversible permeability enhancement. Our results show that neither model is fully superior to the other. HySei forecasts the seismicity rate well, but is only mediocre at forecasting the spatial distribution. On the other hand, SiS forecasts the spatial distribution well but not the seismicity rate. The shut-in phase is a difficult moment for both models in both reservoirs: the models tend to underpredict the seismicity rate around, and shortly after, shut-in. Ensemble models that combine HySei's rate forecast with SiS's spatial forecast outperform each individual model.

  20. Bench-Scale Trace Contaminant Testing of SA9T at Ambient and Reduced Pressure Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broerman, Craig; Sweterlitsch, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    A principal concern for air revitalization technology in a closed loop system is the capability to control carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity (H2O). An amine based sorbent technology, SA9T, has been evaluated for use in this application and several programs are evaluating it for use in both cabin and space suit applications. While the CO2 and H2O performance of the sorbent has been tested extensively, the question of how trace contaminants impact performance requires further evaluation. This paper presents experimental results of bench-scale SA9T testing that was performed under a variety of test conditions and with several different trace contaminants. Tests were conducted to determine if the capacity of the SA9T media to sufficiently remove CO2 and H2O is compromised after exposure to a fully saturated trace contaminant at ambient conditions. Tests also were conducted to evaluate the performance of SA9T at ambient conditions in a continuous 30-day test with a mixed trace contaminant stream. In addition, testing also evaluated the impact of CO2 and H2O removal performance at suit loop pressures (29.6 KPa/4.3 psia) during cyclic operation with a constant inlet contaminant load.

  1. Test bench for front end electronic of the GCT camera for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Franco, A.; Cotter, G.

    2016-02-01

    The Gamma Cherenkov Telescope (GCT) is a design proposed to be part of the Small Sized Telescope (SST) array of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The GCT camera is designed to record the flashes of atmospheric Cherenkov light from gamma and cosmic ray initiated cascades, which last only a few tens of nanoseconds. The camera thus needs very fast and compact electronics, addressed by the TARGET modules, based on homonymous ASICs which provide digitation at 1 GSample/s and the first level of trigger on the analog output of the photosensors. In this paper we describe a test bench lab set up to evaluate the performance and functionality of the camera' s front end electronics with an added educational value.

  2. Test bench to commission a third ion source beam line and a newly designed extraction system

    SciTech Connect

    Winkelmann, T.; Cee, R.; Haberer, T.; Naas, B.; Peters, A.

    2012-02-15

    The HIT (Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center) is the first hospital-based treatment facility in Europe where patients can be irradiated with protons and carbon ions. Since the commissioning starting in 2006 two 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are routinely used to produce a variety of ion beams from protons up to oxygen. In the future a helium beam for regular patient treatment is requested, therefore a third ion source (Supernanogan source from PANTECHNIK S.A.) will be integrated. This third ECR source with a newly designed extraction system and a spectrometer line is installed at a test bench at HIT to commission and validate this section. Measurements with different extraction system setups will be presented to show the improvement of beam quality for helium, proton, and carbon beams. An outlook to the possible integration scheme of the new ion source into the production facility will be discussed.

  3. Test bench to commission a third ion source beam line and a newly designed extraction system.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, T; Cee, R; Haberer, T; Naas, B; Peters, A

    2012-02-01

    The HIT (Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center) is the first hospital-based treatment facility in Europe where patients can be irradiated with protons and carbon ions. Since the commissioning starting in 2006 two 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are routinely used to produce a variety of ion beams from protons up to oxygen. In the future a helium beam for regular patient treatment is requested, therefore a third ion source (Supernanogan source from PANTECHNIK S.A.) will be integrated. This third ECR source with a newly designed extraction system and a spectrometer line is installed at a test bench at HIT to commission and validate this section. Measurements with different extraction system setups will be presented to show the improvement of beam quality for helium, proton, and carbon beams. An outlook to the possible integration scheme of the new ion source into the production facility will be discussed. PMID:22380336

  4. Extension and application of the "enzyme test bench" for oxygen consuming enzyme reactions.

    PubMed

    Rachinskiy, Kirill; Kunze, Martin; Graf, Careen; Schultze, Hergen; Boy, Matthias; Büchs, Jochen

    2014-02-01

    Within industrial process development, powerful screening techniques are required to select the optimal biocatalyst regarding such process characteristics as cost effectiveness, turnover number or space time yield. Conventional measurement of the initial enzyme activity, which is the established high throughput screening technique, disregards the long-term stability of an enzyme. A new model based technique called "enzyme test bench" was recently presented before by our group which addresses this issue. It combines the high throughput screening approach with an extensive enzyme characterization, focusing especially on the long-term stability. The technique is based on modeling enzyme activation and deactivation as temperature dependent reactions in accordance with the Arrhenius law. Controlling these reactions by tailor made temperature profiles, the slow long-term deactivation effects are accelerated and characterizing models are parameterized. Thus, the process properties of an enzyme can be predicted and included into the screening procedure. Moreover, the optimum process temperature as function of the envisaged operation time can be found by these means. In this work, the technique is extended to the important class of oxygen consuming reactions. For this aim, a suitable assay and a defined oxygen supply were established. This extended technique was applied to characterize and to optimize a complex, multi-stage laccase-mediator system (LMS). For the variation and optimization of the enzyme to mediator to substrate ratio, experiments in microtiter plates were performed. Predictions from this high throughput characterization were compared to long-term experiments in a RAMOS device (Respiration Activity Monitoring System), a technique for on-line monitoring of the oxygen transfer rate in shake flasks. Within the limits of the model validity, the enzyme test bench predictions are in good agreement with the long-term experiments. PMID:23928872

  5. Fly-by-light aircraft closed loop test program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halski, Don J.; Kessler, Bradley L.; Mattes, Robert E.; Wanamaker, Michael F.; Baumbick, Robert J.

    1995-05-01

    The Fly-by-Light Aircraft Closed-Loop Test (FACT) program is a flight test program sponsored by NASA-Lewis Research Center. The objectives of the FACT program are to demonstrate optical closed-loop control of flight critical and non-flight critical control surfaces and to demonstrate installation and maintenance aspects of fiber optics for application to commercial aircraft. This paper summarizes the FACT program optical maintenance, test architecture, and hardware developments to be flight tested on the NASA-Dryden F/A-18 Systems Research Aircraft (SRA). The modifications include replacing Fly-By-Wire (FBW) main ram feedback LVDT's with optic position sensors and an electro-optic decoder, and using electrical to optic converters and reverse for commands. The performance and handling qualities will be validated by laboratory, ground, and flight tests. The goal is to demonstrate system performance equivalent to the production system.

  6. Small-Scale Drone Forward Fly Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    Mobile phone footage from an indoor “forward flight” test of a forty percent scale model drone. During the summer of 2015, a group of pre-professional researchers representing multiple disciplines ...

  7. Synthetic lightweight aggregate from cool water slag: Bench-scale confirmation tests

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhry, V.; Hadley, S.R. )

    1990-05-01

    This report analyzes the potential for production of synthetic lightweight aggregate (SLA) from a Texaco coal gasification solid residue. The objective of the project was to develop a replacement for conventional lightweight aggregates typically derived from expanded clays and shales or natural lightweight aggregates. The sequence of tests performed to develop SLA from slag began with the crushing of samples of slag, followed by either extrusion or pelletization. The level of clay binder required for sufficient aggregate strength was evaluated. Using a tube furnace, expansion characteristics were studied as a function of temperature and residence time. Next, a large batch of SLA was produced in a muffle furnace and used to form concrete test cylinders. The unit weight of the resultant concrete was 105 lb/ft{sup 3}, with a compressive strength of 3100 psi, which meets the requirements specified in ASTM C 330 for lightweight aggregate of a comparable density. When the same sequence of tests was performed using a slag from which the bulk of the char had been removed, the concrete test cylinders showed an improved relationship between strength and density. Based on the results of bench-scale tests and the similarity to conventional LWA production, the conceptual design of an SLA processing plant was formulated. A comparative estimate of operating costs was prepared by analyzing data from plants using clays and shales to produce lightweight aggregates. 24 refs., 15 figs., 17 tabs.

  8. Plate coil thermal test bench for the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) carousel cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, LeEllen; Murga, Gaizka; Montijo, Guillermo; Hauth, David

    2014-08-01

    Analyses have shown that even a white-painted enclosure requires active exterior skin-cooling systems to mitigate dome seeing which is driven by thermal nonuniformities that change the refractive index of the air. For the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) Enclosure, this active surface temperature control will take the form of a system of water cooled plate coils integrated into the enclosure cladding system. The main objective of this system is to maintain the surface temperature of the enclosure as close as possible to, but always below, local ambient temperature in order to mitigate this effect. The results of analyses using a multi-layer cladding temperature model were applied to predict the behavior of the plate coil cladding system and ultimately, with safety margins incorporated into the resulting design thermal loads, the detailed designs. Construction drawings and specifications have been produced. Based on these designs and prior to procurement of the system components, a test system was constructed in order to measure actual system behavior. The data collected during seasonal test runs at the DKIST construction site on Haleakalā are used to validate and/or refine the design models and construction documents as appropriate. The test fixture was also used to compare competing hardware, software, components, control strategies, and configurations. This paper outlines the design, construction, test protocols, and results obtained of the plate coil thermal test bench for the DKIST carousel cooling system.

  9. Optical test bench for high precision metrology and alignment of zoom sub-assembly components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leprêtre, F.; Levillain, E.; Wattellier, B.; Delage, P.; Brahmi, D.; Gascon, A.

    2013-09-01

    Thales Angénieux (TAGX) designs and manufactures zoom lens assemblies for cinema applications. These objectives are made of mobile lens assemblies. These need to be precisely characterized to detect alignment, polishing or glass index homogeneity errors, which amplitude may range to a few hundreds of nanometers. However these assemblies are highly aberrated with mainly spherical aberration (>30 μm PV). PHASICS and TAGX developed a solution based on the use of a PHASICS SID4HR wave front sensor. This is based on quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometry, a technology known for its high dynamic range. A 100-mm diameter He:Ne source illuminates the lens assembly entrance pupil. The transmitted wave front is then directly measured by the SID4- HR. The measured wave front (WFmeas) is then compared to a simulation from the lens sub-assembly optical design (WFdesign). We obtain a residual wave front error (WFmanufactured), which reveals lens imperfections due to its manufacturing. WFmeas=WFdesign+(WFEradius+WFEglass+WFEpolish)=WF design + WFmanufactured The optical test bench was designed so that this residual wave front is measured with a precision below 100 nm PV. The measurement of fast F-Number lenses (F/2) with aberrations up to 30 μm, with a precision of 100 nm PV was demonstrated. This bench detects mismatches in sub-assemblies before the final integration step in the zoom. Pre-alignment is also performed in order to overpass the mechanical tolerances. This facilitates the completed zoom alignment. In final, productivity gains are expected due to alignment and mounting time savings.

  10. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY REPORT: BENCH-SCALE TESTING OF PHOTOLYSIS, CHEMICAL OXIDATION AND BIODEGRADATION OF PCB CONTAMINATED SOILS AND PHOTOLYSIS OF TCDD CONTAMINATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of bench-scale testing on degradation of 2,3,7,8-TCDD using W photolysis, and PCB degradation using UV photolysis, chemical oxidation and biological treatment. Bench-scale tests were conducted to investigate the feasibility of a two-phase detoxifi...

  11. Continuous bench-scale slurry catalyst testing direct coal liquefaction rawhide sub-bituminous coal

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, R.F.; Coless, L.A.; Davis, S.M.

    1995-12-31

    In 1992, the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored research to demonstrate a dispersed catalyst system using a combination of molybdenum and iron precursors for direct coal liquefaction. This dispersed catalyst system was successfully demonstrated using Black Thunder sub-bituminous coal at Wilsonville, Alabama by Southern Electric International, Inc. The DOE sponsored research continues at Exxon Research and Development Laboratories (ERDL). A six month continuous bench-scale program using ERDL`s Recycle Coal Liquefaction Unit (RCLU) is planned, three months in 1994 and three months in 1995. The initial conditions in RCLU reflect experience gained from the Wilsonville facility in their Test Run 263. Rawhide sub-bituminous coal which is similar to the Black Thunder coal tested at Wilsonville was used as the feed coal. A slate of five dispersed catalysts for direct coal liquefaction of Rawhide sub-bituminous coal has been tested. Throughout the experiments, the molybdenum addition rate was held constant at 100 wppm while the iron oxide addition rate was varied from 0.25 to 1.0 weight percent (dry coal basis). This report covers the 1994 operations and accomplishments.

  12. Special report, cross calibration of JHU test equipment with GSFC vacuum optical bench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fastie, W. G.

    1972-01-01

    Tests were conducted to confirm the validity of the absolute calibrations which have been performed with the Apollo 17 ultraviolet spectrometer (UVS) in the calibration test equipment (CTE) which were constructed for that purpose. To accomplish this the prototype UV spectrometer SN/01 was retrofitted to be substantially identical to the qualification unit and to the two flight units. It was renamed the cross calibration unit (CCU). The instrument was first calibrated in the JHU calibration test equipment (CTE), then installed in the vacuum optical bench (VOB) at Goddard Space Flight Center and calibrated. The following day a second CTE calibration was conducted which provided substantially the same calibration values as were obtained on the first CTE calibration, and showed remarkably close agreement with the VOB calibration values at two of the wavelengths which were studied. The VOB results at the third wavelength (1216 A) indicate the CTE calibration at 1216 A is 15% too low. This apparent discrepancy is discussed and presents a very important result of the cross calibration effort.

  13. Conceptual design of a cryogenic test bench system for millimeter wavelength detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, S.; Ferrusca, D.; Ibarra-Medel, E.

    2014-07-01

    We present the design of a cryogenic system for testing different technologies of millimeter wavelength detectors. The proposed design is developed at the Astronomical Instrumentation Laboratory for Millimeter Wavelength at the National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics, in México. The cryogenic system is integrated by a closed cycle pulse tube cooler with a 4 Kelvin 12 inches cold plate and a He-4/He-3 fridge and would be able to characterize KIDs (Kinetic Inductor Detectors), TES (Transition Edge Sensors) or semiconductor bolometers using a thermal link to a 250 mK stage. Readout electronics will be installed at the 4 Kelvin cold plate along with connectors and cables for the thermometry. In this paper we present a preliminary 3D model design which its main goal is to use efficiently the limited space in the cryostat with emphasis on the interchangeability for installing each time any of the three different detector technologies in the same cold plate; results for the thermal calculations and finite-element modeling are also shown. The system would allow, with some minor changes, to replace the He-4/He-3 fridge by a dilution fridge in order to reach temperatures about 100 mK to have more flexibility in the detector testing. The importance of the cryogenic test bench relies in the need for an easier and quicker characterization of detectors arrays as part of the research for the development of instruments for millimeter telescopes.

  14. 100 Area soil washing: Bench scale tests on 116-F-4 pluto crib soil

    SciTech Connect

    Field, J.G.

    1994-06-10

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a bench-scale treatability study on a pluto crib soil sample from 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of physical separation (wet sieving), treatment processes (attrition scrubbing, and autogenous surface grinding), and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating radioactively-contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. The soil washing treatability study was conducted on a soil sample from the 116-F-4 Pluto Crib that had been dug up as part of an excavation treatability study. Trace element analyses of this soil showed no elevated concentrations above typically uncontaminated soil background levels. Data on the distribution of radionuclide in various size fractions indicated that the soil-washing tests should be focused on the gravel and sand fractions of the 116-F-4 soil. The radionuclide data also showed that {sup 137}Cs was the only contaminant in this soil that exceeded the test performance goal (TPG). Therefore, the effectiveness of subsequent soil-washing tests for 116-F-4 soil was evaluated on the basis of activity attenuation of {sup 137}Cs in the gravel- and sand-size fractions.

  15. 'Enzyme Test Bench': A biochemical application of the multi-rate modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachinskiy, K.; Schultze, H.; Boy, M.; Büchs, J.

    2008-11-01

    In the expanding field of 'white biotechnology' enzymes are frequently applied to catalyze the biochemical reaction from a resource material to a valuable product. Evolutionary designed to catalyze the metabolism in any life form, they selectively accelerate complex reactions under physiological conditions. Modern techniques, such as directed evolution, have been developed to satisfy the increasing demand on enzymes. Applying these techniques together with rational protein design, we aim at improving of enzymes' activity, selectivity and stability. To tap the full potential of these techniques, it is essential to combine them with adequate screening methods. Nowadays a great number of high throughput colorimetric and fluorescent enzyme assays are applied to measure the initial enzyme activity with high throughput. However, the prediction of enzyme long term stability within short experiments is still a challenge. A new high throughput technique for enzyme characterization with specific attention to the long term stability, called 'Enzyme Test Bench', is presented. The concept of the Enzyme Test Bench consists of short term enzyme tests conducted under partly extreme conditions to predict the enzyme long term stability under moderate conditions. The technique is based on the mathematical modeling of temperature dependent enzyme activation and deactivation. Adapting the temperature profiles in sequential experiments by optimum non-linear experimental design, the long term deactivation effects can be purposefully accelerated and detected within hours. During the experiment the enzyme activity is measured online to estimate the model parameters from the obtained data. Thus, the enzyme activity and long term stability can be calculated as a function of temperature. The results of the characterization, based on micro liter format experiments of hours, are in good agreement with the results of long term experiments in 1L format. Thus, the new technique allows for both

  16. Environmental test bench for reliability studies: influence of the temperature on rf switches with metallic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafontan, Xavier; Le Touze, Christophe; Wenk, Beatrice; Kolesnik, Inna; Pressecq, Francis; Perez, Guy; Nicot, Jean-Marc; Dardalhon, Muriel; Rigo, Sebastien

    2002-04-01

    RF switches are believed to replace PIN diodes and MESFETs in numerous future RF applications. But most of the actual applications require high reliability and long lifetimes for their devices. As MEMS is a new technology, aging tests and qualification procedures have yet to be demonstrated. MEMSCAP and CNES are developing an environmental test bench for the study of RF switch failure modes. This paper focuses, in particular, on the influence of the temperature in metallic RF switches/ Actually, architectures, such as the metallic air bridge, the membrane switch and the dielectric switch, display good RF performances. We will show in this paper that most of today's switches are sensitive to buckling. In particular, a few tens of degrees Celsius are enough to create a deformation that drives the air bridge switch (in ON or OFF position) to fatal failure. The influence of tensile pre-stress is also studied since it increases the buckling critical temperature. However, the required pre-stress range will degrade significantly the actuation voltage. Finally, stress relaxation structures are believed to decrease the sensitivity to high temperature while keeping a reasonable actuation voltage.

  17. Accuracy improvement in a calibration test bench for accelerometers by a vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Emilia, Giulio; Di Gasbarro, David; Gaspari, Antonella; Natale, Emanuela

    2016-06-01

    A procedure is described in this paper for the accuracy improvement of calibration of low-cost accelerometers in a prototype rotary test bench, driven by a brushless servo-motor and operating in a low frequency range of vibrations (0 to 5 Hz). Vibration measurements by a vision system based on a low frequency camera have been carried out, in order to reduce the uncertainty of the real acceleration evaluation at the installation point of the sensor to be calibrated. A preliminary test device has been realized and operated in order to evaluate the metrological performances of the vision system, showing a satisfactory behavior if the uncertainty measurement is taken into account. A combination of suitable settings of the control parameters of the motion control system and of the information gained by the vision system allowed to fit the information about the reference acceleration at the installation point to the needs of the procedure for static and dynamic calibration of three-axis accelerometers.

  18. Bench-scale testing of the multi-gravity separator in combination with microcel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Luttrell, G.H.; Venkatraman, P.; Phillips, D.I.; Yoon, Roe-Hoan

    1995-03-01

    It was the purpose of this investigation to test a new fine coal cleaning system, in which a coal is cleaned first by column flotation to remove primarily ash-forming minerals and then by an enhanced gravity separation technique to remove the pyrite remaining in the flotation product. Of the various column flotation technologies developed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy, the Microcel{sup TM} flotation column was chosen because it is being used commercially in the US coal industry, particularly by low-sulfur coal producers. Of the various enhanced gravity separation technologies used in minerals industry, Multi-Gravity Separator (MGS) was chosen because it shows promise for pyrite rejection from fine coal streams containing a wide range of particle sizes. The bench-scale tests were conducted using three different circuit configurations, i.e.; Microcel{sup TM} column alone; MGS alone; and Microcel{sup Tm} and MGS in series. In general, high ash-rejections were achieved using Microcel{sup TM} column and an MGS unit in series, both the ash and pyritic sulfur rejections exceeded what can be achieved using either the Microcel{sup TM} column or the MGS unit alone, demonstrating a synergistic effect.

  19. Design and optimization of an experimental test bench for the study of impulsive fluid-structure interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, S.; Krastev, V. K.; Jannelli, E.; Falcucci, G.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, the design and the optimization of an experimental test bench for the experimental characterization of impulsive water-entry problems are presented. Currently, the majority of the experimental apparatus allow impact test only in specific conditions. Our test bench allows for testing of rigid and compliant bodies and allows performing experiments on floating or sinking structures, in free-fall, or under dynamic motion control. The experimental apparatus is characterized by the adoption of accelerometers, encoders, position sensors and, above all, FBG (fiber Bragg grating) sensors that, together with a high speed camera, provide accurate and fast data acquisitions for the dissection of structural deformations and hydrodynamic loadings under a broad set of experimental conditions.

  20. Bench-scale reactor tests of low temperature, catalytic gasification of wet industrial wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Elliot, D.C.; Baker, E.G.; Butner, R.S.; Sealock, L.J. Jr. )

    1993-02-01

    Bench-scale reactor tests are under way at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop a low temperature, catalytic gasification system. The system, licensed under the trade name Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES[reg sign]), is designed for to a wide variety of feedstocks ranging from dilute organics in water to waste sludges from food processing. The current research program is focused on the use of a continuous feed, tubular reactor. The catalyst is nickel metal on an inert support. Typical results show that feedstocks such as solutions of 2 percent para-cresol or 5 percent and 10 percent lactose in water or cheese whey can be processed to [gt] 99 percent reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD) at a rate of up to 2 L/hr. The estimated residence lime is less than 5 min at 360C and 3,000 psig, not including 1 to 2 min required in the preheating zone of the reactor. The liquid hourly space velocity has been varied from 1.8 to 2.9 L feedstock/L catalyst/hr depending on the feedstock. The product fuel gas contains 40 percent to 55 percent methane, 35 percent to 50 percent carbon dioxide, and 5 percent to 10 percent hydrogen with as much as 2 percent ethane, but less than 0.1 percent ethylene or carbon monoxide, and small amounts of higher hydrocarbons. The byproduct water stream carries residual organics amounting to less than 500 mg/L COD.

  1. LEKIDs as mm-Wave Polarisation Analysers: Fabrication, Test Bench and Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartari, A.; Bélier, B.; Bleurvacq, N.; Calvo, M.; Cammilleri, D.; Decourcelle, T.; Monfardini, A.; Moric, I.; Piat, M.; Prêle, D.; Smoot, G. F.

    2016-07-01

    We have demonstrated in an earlier paper that LEKIDs can be used in a polarisation selective way in a filled array configuration. A polarised response can be achieved by means of thick Nb polarising grids lithographed on the rear side of a 300 microns silicon wafer, on which Al resonators have been previously patterned. In the most interesting scheme that we have investigated, a unit cell formed by 4 pixels (2 by 2) responds simultaneously to two orthogonal (cartesian) polarisation states. To assess the effectiveness of this detection scheme, we have fabricated a first generation of devices (9 small arrays, 20-25 pixels each, on a 4^' ' } Silicon wafer) by using a double-sided mask aligner suitable for a precise positioning of the individual grids in correspondence of each resonator's meander, for the different LEKID geometries. We describe here the realisation of these first devices. The construction of a dedicated polarimetric test bench is also described in this contribution, together with the first characterisation results. We consider this activity as a first and necessary step to evaluate the polarisation purity attainable with polarisation-sensitive pixels whose size is comparable to the wavelength. This is a fundamental information to drive further studies.

  2. Ultimate test bench for pediatric biventricular assist device based on artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Muradbegovic, Mirza; Taub, Steven; Rizzo, Elena; von Segesser, Ludwig K; Tozzi, Piergiorgio

    2011-01-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VADs) are used in treatment for terminal heart failure or as a bridge to transplantation. We created biVAD using the artificial muscles (AMs) that supports both ventricles at the same time. We developed the test bench (TB) as the in vitro evaluating system to enable the measurement of performance. The biVAD exerts different pressure between left and right ventricle like the heart physiologically does. The heart model based on child's heart was constructed in silicone. This model was fitted with the biVAD. Two pipettes containing water with an ultrasonic sensor placed on top of each and attached to ventricles reproduced the preload and the after load of each ventricle by the real-time measurement of the fluid height variation proportionally to the exerted pressure. The LabVIEW software extrapolated the displaced volume and the pressure generated by each side of our biVAD. The development of a standardized protocol permitted the validation of the TB for in vitro evaluation, measurement of the performances of the AM biVAD herein, and reproducibility of data. PMID:21229806

  3. Bench-scale reactor tests of low-temperature, catalytic gasification of wet, industrial wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, D.C.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Baker, E.G.; Butner, R.S.; Sealock, L.J.

    1990-04-01

    Bench-scale reactor tests are under way at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop a low-temperature, catalytic gasification system. The system, licensed under the trade name Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}), is designed for to a wide variety of feedstocks ranging from dilute organics in water to waste sludges from food processing. The current research program is focused on the use of a continuous-feed, tubular reactor. The catalyst is nickel metal on an inert support. Typical results show that feedstocks such as solutions of 2% para-cresol or 5% and 10% lactose in water or cheese whey can be processed to >99% reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD) at a rate of up to 2 L/hr. The estimated residence time is less than 5 min at 360{degree}C and 3000 psig, not including 1 to 2 min required in the preheating zone of the reactor. The liquid hourly space velocity has been varied from 1.8 to 2.9 L feedstock/L catalyst/hr depending on the feedstock. The product fuel gas contains 40% to 55% methane, 35% to 50% carbon dioxide, and 5% to 10% hydrogen with as much as 2% ethane, but less than 0.1% ethylene or carbon monoxide, and small amounts of higher hydrocarbons. The byproduct water stream carries residual organics amounting to less than 500 mg/L COD. 9 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  4. Characterization of the dimensional stability of advanced metallic materials using an optical test bench structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Cheng; O'Donnell, Timothy P.

    1991-01-01

    The dimensional stability of low-density high specific-strength metal-matrix composites (including 30 vol pct SiC(p)/SXA 24-T6 Al, 25 vol pct SiC(p)/6061-T6 Al, 40 vol pct graphite P100 fiber/6061 Al, 50 vol pct graphite P100 fiber/6061 Al, and 40 vol pct P100 graphite fiber/AZ91D Mg composites) and an Al-Li-Mg metal alloy was evaluated using a specially designed five-strut optical test bench structure. The structure had 30 thermocouple locations, one retroreflector, one linear interferometer multilayer insulation, and various strip heaters. It was placed in a 10 exp -7 torr capability vacuum chamber with a laser head positioned at a window port, and a laser interferometer system for collecting dimensional change data. It was found that composite materials have greater 40-C temporal dimensional stability than the AL-Li-Mg alloy. Aluminum-based composites demonstrated better 40-C temporal stability than Mg-based composites.

  5. DRAGON, the Durham real-time, tomographic adaptive optics test bench: progress and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Andrew P.; Myers, Richard M.; Morris, Timothy J.; Basden, Alastair G.; Bharmal, Nazim A.; Rolt, Stephen; Bramall, David G.; Dipper, Nigel A.; Younger, Edward J.

    2014-08-01

    DRAGON is a real-time, tomographic Adaptive Optics test bench currently under development at Durham University. Optical and mechanical design work for DRAGON is now complete, and the system is close to becoming fully operational. DRAGON emulates current 4.2 m and 8 m telescopes, and can also be used to investigate ELT scale issues. The full system features 4 Laser Guide Star (LGS) Wavefront Sensors (WFS), 3 Natural Guide Star (NGS) WFSs and one Truth Sensor, all of which are 31 × 31 sub-aperture Shack-Hartmann WFS. Two Deformable Mirrors (DMs), a Boston MEMS Kilo DM and a Xinetics 97 actuator DM, correct for turbulence induced aberrations and these can be configured to be either open or closed loop of the WFS. A novel method of LGS emulation is implemented which includes the effects of uplink turbulence and elongation in real-time. The atmosphere is emulated by 4 rotating phase screens which can be translated in real-time to replicate altitude evolution of turbulent layers. DRAGON will be used to extensively study tomographic AO algorithms, such as those required for Multi-Object AO. As DRAGON has been designed to be compatible with CANARY, the MOAO demonstrator, results can be compared to those from the CANARY MOAO demonstrator on the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope. We present here an overview of the current status of DRAGON and some early results, including investigations into the validity of the LGS emulation method.

  6. LEKIDs as mm-Wave Polarisation Analysers: Fabrication, Test Bench and Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartari, A.; Bélier, B.; Bleurvacq, N.; Calvo, M.; Cammilleri, D.; Decourcelle, T.; Monfardini, A.; Moric, I.; Piat, M.; Prêle, D.; Smoot, G. F.

    2015-12-01

    We have demonstrated in an earlier paper that LEKIDs can be used in a polarisation selective way in a filled array configuration. A polarised response can be achieved by means of thick Nb polarising grids lithographed on the rear side of a 300 microns silicon wafer, on which Al resonators have been previously patterned. In the most interesting scheme that we have investigated, a unit cell formed by 4 pixels (2 by 2) responds simultaneously to two orthogonal (cartesian) polarisation states. To assess the effectiveness of this detection scheme, we have fabricated a first generation of devices (9 small arrays, 20-25 pixels each, on a 4^' ' } Silicon wafer) by using a double-sided mask aligner suitable for a precise positioning of the individual grids in correspondence of each resonator's meander, for the different LEKID geometries. We describe here the realisation of these first devices. The construction of a dedicated polarimetric test bench is also described in this contribution, together with the first characterisation results. We consider this activity as a first and necessary step to evaluate the polarisation purity attainable with polarisation-sensitive pixels whose size is comparable to the wavelength. This is a fundamental information to drive further studies.

  7. Results of bench-scale plasma system testing in support of the Plasma Hearth Process

    SciTech Connect

    Leatherman, G.L.; Cornelison, C.; Frank, S.

    1996-10-01

    The Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) is a high-temperature process that destroys hazardous organic components and stabilizes the radioactive components and hazardous metals in a leach-resistant vitreous slag waste form. The PHP technology development program is targeted at mixed waste that cannot be easily treated by conventional means. For example, heterogeneous debris, which may contain hazardous organics, toxic metals, and radionuclides, is difficult to characterize and cannot be treated with conventional thermal, chemical, or physical treatment methods. A major advantage of the PHP over other plasma processes is its ability to separate nonradioactive, non-hazardous metals from the non-metallic and radioactive components which are contained in the vitreous slag. The overall PHP program involves the design, fabrication, and operation of test hardware to demonstrate and certify that the PHP concept is viable for DOE waste treatment. The program involves bench-scale testing of PHP equipment in radioactive service, as well as pilot-scale demonstration of the PHP concept using nonradioactive, surrogate test materials. The fate of secondary waste streams is an important consideration for any technology considered for processing mixed waste. The main secondary waste stream generated by the PHP is flyash captured by the fabric- filter baghouse. The PHP concept is that flyash generated by the process can, to a large extent, be treated by processing this secondary waste stream in the PHP. Prior to the work presented in the paper, however, the PHP project has not quantitatively demonstrated the ability to treat PHP generated flyash. A major consideration is the quantity of radionuclides and RCRA-regulated metals in the flyash that can be retained the resultant waste form.

  8. Real-time control for the high order, wide field DRAGON AO test bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, Alastair; Bharmal, Nazim A.; Bitenc, Urban; Dipper, Nigel; Morris, Tim; Myers, Richard; Reeves, Andrew; Younger, Eddy

    2014-07-01

    DRAGON is a high order, wide field AO test-bench at Durham. A key feature of DRAGON is the ability to be operated at real-time rates, i.e. frame rates of up to 1kHz, with low latency to maintain AO performance. Here, we will present the real-time control architecture for DRAGON, which includes two deformable mirrors, eight wavefront sensors and thousands of Shack-Hartmann sub-apertures. A novel approach has been taken to allow access to the wavefront sensor pixel stream, reducing latency and peak computational load, and this technique can be implemented for other similar wavefront sensor cameras with no hardware costs. We report on experience with an ELT-suitable wavefront sensor camera. DRAGON will form the basis for investigations into hardware acceleration architectures for AO real-time control, and recent work on GPU and many-core systems (including the Xeon Phi) will be reported. Additionally, the modular structure of DRAGON, its remote control capabilities, distribution of AO telemetry data, and the software concepts and architecture will be reported. Techniques used in DRAGON for pixel processing, slope calculation and wavefront reconstruction will be presented. This will include methods to handle changes in CN2 profile and sodium layer profile, both of which can be modelled in DRAGON. DRAGON software simulation techniques linking hardware-in-the-loop computer models to the DRAGON real-time system and control software will also be discussed. This tool allows testing of the DRAGON system without requiring physical hardware and serves as a test-bed for ELT integration and verification techniques.

  9. ExoGeoLab Test Bench for Landers, Rovers and Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, B. H.

    2009-04-01

    In the frame of ESTEC technology and research pilot project, we have started a small pilot facility with a ExoGeoLab and a mini-Habitat, supported by two design and control offices in the European Space Incubator (ESI), as well as infrastructure support and manpower. We have in addition to contribution on external instruments and manpower from partner institutes. From this test bench and kit of ExoGeoLab instruments, we plan to operate comprehensive instruments packages that could help in the technical research and science preparation of lander/rover missions studied in the frame of Cosmic Vision or the Exploration programme. The ExoGeoLab research incubator project includes a sequence of activities: - Data analysis and interpretation of remote sensing data (MEX, SMART-1, VEX, Cassini-Huygens) and in-situ (Huygens, MER) , and merging of multi-scale data sets - Procurement and integration of geophysical, geochemical and astrobiological breadboard instruments in an surface station and rover (ExoGeoLab) - Research operations and exploitation of ExoGeoLab test bench for various conceptual configurations (Moon, Mars, NEO, Titan) - Contribution to the exploitation of surface lander results (MER, Phenix, MSL, preparation Exomars) - Scientific simulation of planetary surfaces using laboratory and modelling tools - Support research for definition and design of science surface packages on the Moon, Mars, NEO, Titan - Research support to community preparation of payload for surface lander opportunities Specific goals and methods of ESTEC ExoGeoLab: we have started to integrate instruments in an ExoGeoLab crossing various techniques. The methodic steps for this hands-on research are: 1) We have procured and adapted instruments to equip a mid-size ExoGeoRover (made available in collaboration with ESTEC robotics section), and a small surface station. 2) This terrestrial payload (instruments, sensors, data handling) will be deployed, operated and used as collaborative research

  10. The RISQ network as an R and D catalyst and test bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauzon, Jocelyn

    2005-09-01

    The RISQ (Réseau d'Informations Scientifiques du Québec) research and education network has been a trail-blazer in the development of privately owned fiber networks, by implementing an optical fiber owner model. This model allows RISQ to have a gracefully upgradable network that is at the forefront of the large bandwidth optical communications technology. It also allows RISQ to offer a parallel network that can be used as a test equipment for the R&D community, in universities, research institutions or the industry; a real in-the-field fiber optic network test bench. RISQ is in a privileged situation to influence optical communications R&D work. It is aware of the real needs of the telecommunications industry. It is also aware of the technological needs of the next-generation networks. RISQ suggests that telecommunications R&D should be focused on increasing network reliability and decrease network operations and capital expanses, rather than on increasing their capacity. A key to decreasing expanses would be to avoid SONET network management on long-haul trunks, without affecting the transmission quality of service. IP over optics should thus be reinstalled as a priority in the telecom R&D world. RISQ thinks optical 3R might be the solution that will allow IP over optics. As for the next-generation networks: flexibility, reconfigurability, in order to offer lightpaths of adjustable bandwidth to the user; while wasting a minimum of the valuable network bandwidth, is where we believe efforts should be concentrated on.

  11. Theoretical Analysis and Bench Tests of a Control-Surface Booster Employing a Variable Displacement Hydraulic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, Charles W.; Kleckner, Harold F.

    1947-01-01

    The NACA is conducting a general investigation of servo-mechanisms for use in powering aircraft control surfaces. This paper presents a theoretical analysis and the results of bench tests of a control-booster system which employs a variable displacement hydraulic pump. The booster is intended for use in a flight investigation to determine the effects of various booster parameters on the handling qualities of airplanes. Such a flight investigation would aid in formulating specific requirements concerning the design of control boosters in general. Results of the theoretical analysis and the bench tests indicate that the subject booster is representative of types which show promise of satisfactory performance. The bench tests showed that the following desirable features were inherent in this booster system: (1) No lost motion or play in any part of the system; (2) no detectable lag between motion of the contra1 stick and control surface; and (3) Good agreement between control displacements and stick-force variations with no hysteresis in the stick-force characteristics. The final design configuration of this booster system showed no tendency to oscillate, overshoot, or have other undesirable transient characteristics common to boosters.

  12. A Lego Mindstorms NXT based test bench for multiagent exploratory systems and distributed network partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Riya Raghuvir

    Networks of communicating agents require distributed algorithms for a variety of tasks in the field of network analysis and control. For applications such as swarms of autonomous vehicles, ad hoc and wireless sensor networks, and such military and civilian applications as exploring and patrolling a robust autonomous system that uses a distributed algorithm for selfpartitioning can be significantly helpful. A single team of autonomous vehicles in a field may need to self-dissemble into multiple teams, conducive to completing multiple control tasks. Moreover, because communicating agents are subject to changes, namely, addition or failure of an agent or link, a distributed or decentralized algorithm is favorable over having a central agent. A framework to help with the study of self-partitioning of such multi agent systems that have most basic mobility model not only saves our time in conception but also gives us a cost effective prototype without negotiating the physical realization of the proposed idea. In this thesis I present my work on the implementation of a flexible and distributed stochastic partitioning algorithm on the LegoRTM Mindstorms' NXT on a graphical programming platform using National Instruments' LabVIEW(TM) forming a team of communicating agents via NXT-Bee radio module. We single out mobility, communication and self-partition as the core elements of the work. The goal is to randomly explore a precinct for reference sites. Agents who have discovered the reference sites announce their target acquisition to form a network formed based upon the distance of each agent with the other wherein the self-partitioning begins to find an optimal partition. Further, to illustrate the work, an experimental test-bench of five Lego NXT robots is presented.

  13. Computational Bench Testing to Evaluate the Short-Term Mechanical Performance of a Polymeric Stent.

    PubMed

    Bobel, A C; Petisco, S; Sarasua, J R; Wang, W; McHugh, P E

    2015-12-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a significant volume of research focussed on the utilization of biodegradable polymers such as poly-L-lactide-acid (PLLA) for applications associated with cardiovascular disease. More specifically, there has been an emphasis on upgrading current clinical shortfalls experienced with conventional bare metal stents and drug eluting stents. One such approach, the adaption of fully formed polymeric stents has led to a small number of products being commercialized. Unfortunately, these products are still in their market infancy, meaning there is a clear non-occurrence of long term data which can support their mechanical performance in vivo. Moreover, the load carry capacity and other mechanical properties essential to a fully optimized polymeric stent are difficult, timely and costly to establish. With the aim of compiling rapid and representative performance data for specific stent geometries, materials and designs, in addition to reducing experimental timeframes, Computational bench testing via finite element analysis (FEA) offers itself as a very powerful tool. On this basis, the research presented in this paper is concentrated on the finite element simulation of the mechanical performance of PLLA, which is a fully biodegradable polymer, in the stent application, using a non-linear viscous material model. Three physical stent geometries, typically used for fully polymeric stents, are selected, and a comparative study is performed in relation to their short-term mechanical performance, with the aid of experimental data. From the simulated output results, an informed understanding can be established in relation to radial strength, flexibility and longitudinal resistance, that can be compared with conventional permanent metal stent functionality, and the results show that it is indeed possible to generate a PLLA stent with comparable and sufficient mechanical performance. The paper also demonstrates the attractiveness of FEA as a tool

  14. Accuracy and Linearity of Positive Airway Pressure Devices: A Technical Bench Testing Study

    PubMed Central

    Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; López-Escárcega, Elodia; Carrillo-Alduenda, José Luis; Arredondo-del-Bosque, Fernando; Reyes-Zúñiga, Margarita; Castorena-Maldonado, Armando

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: To analyze the accuracy and linearity of different CPAP devices outside of the manufacturers' own quality control environment. Methods: Accuracy (how well readings agree with the gold standard) and linearity were evaluated by comparing programmed pressure to measured CPAP pressure using an instrument established as the gold standard. Comparisons were made centimeter-by-centimeter (linearity) throughout the entire programming spectrum of each device (from 4 to 20 cm H2O). Results: A total of 108 CPAP devices were tested (1836 measurements); mean use of the devices was 956 hours. Twenty-two of them were new. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) decreased from 0.97 at pressures programmed between 4 and 10 cm H2O, to 0.84 at pressures of 16 to 20 cm H2O. Despite this high ICC, the 95% agreement limit oscillated between −1 and 1 cm H2O. This same behavior was observed in relation to hours of use: the ICC for readings taken on devices with < 2,000 hours of use was 0.99, while that of the 50 measurements made on devices with > 6,000 hours was 0.97 (the agreement limit oscillated between −1.3 and 2.5 cm H2O). “Adequate adjustments” were documented in 97% of measurements when the definition was ± 1 cm H2O of the programmed pressure, but this index of adequate adjustment readings decreased to 85% when the ± 0.5 cm H2O criterion was applied. Conclusions: In general, the CPAP devices were accurate and linear throughout the spectrum of programmable pressures; however, strategies to assure short- and long-term equipment reliability are required in conditions of routine use. Citation: Torre-Bouscoulet L; López-Escárcega E; Carrillo-Alduenda JL; Arredondo-del-Bosque F; Reyes-Zúñiga M; Castorena-Maldonado A. Accuracy and linearity of positive airway pressure devices: a technical bench testing study. J Clin Sleep Med 2010;6(4):369-373. PMID:20726286

  15. Filthy Flies? Experiments to Test Flies as Vectors of Bacterial Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, Julie J.; Warner, Kasey Jo; Hoback, W. Wyatt

    2007-01-01

    For more than 75 years, flies and other insects have been known to serve as mechanical vectors of infectious disease (Hegner, 1926). Flies have been shown to harbor over 100 different species of potentially pathogenic microorganisms and are known to transmit more than 65 infectious diseases (Greenberg, 1965). This laboratory exercise is a simple…

  16. Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA): Development of a Flow Model for Bovine Livers for Extensive Bench Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Lubienski, Andreas Bitsch, Rudi G.; Lubienski, Katrin; Kauffmann, Guenter; Duex, Markus

    2006-12-15

    Purpose. To develop a flow model for bovine livers for extensive bench testing of technical improvements or procedure-related developments of radiofrequency ablation excluding animal experiments. Methods. The perfusion of bovine livers directly from the slaughterhouse was simulated in a liver perfusion tank developed for the experimental work. The liver perfusion medium used was a Tyrode solution prepared in accordance with physiologic criteria (as for liver transplants) which was oxygenated by an oxygenator and heated to 36.5 deg. C. Portal vein circulation was regulated via a flow- and pressure-controlled pump and arterial circulation using a dialysis machine. Flow rate and pressure were adjusted as for the physiology of a human liver converted to bovine liver conditions. The fluid discharged from the liver was returned into the perfusion system through the vena cava. Extendable precision swivel arms with the radiofrequency probe attached were mounted on the liver perfusion tank. RFA was conducted with the RF3000 generator and a 2 cm LeVeen needle (Boston Scientific, Ratingen, Germany) in a three-dimensional grid for precise localization of the generated thermolesions. Results. Four bovine livers weighing 8.4 {+-} 0.4 kg each were prepared, connected to the perfusion system, and consecutively perfused for the experiments. Mean arterial flow was 569 {+-} 43 ml/min, arterial pressure 120 mmHg, portovenous flow 1440 {+-} 305 ml/min, and portal pressure 10 mmHg. Macroscopic evaluation after the experiments revealed no thrombi within the hepatic vessels. A total of 136 RF thermolesions were generated with an average number of 34 per liver. Mean RF duration was 2:59 {+-} 2:01 min:sec with an average baseline impedance of 28.2 {+-} 3.4 ohms. The mean diameter of the thermolesions along the puncture channel was 22.98 {+-} 4.34 mm and perpendicular to the channel was 23.27 {+-} 4.82 mm. Conclusion. Extracorporeal perfusion of bovine livers with consecutive standardized RF

  17. Steam Reforming, 6-in. Bench-Scale Design and Testing Project -- Technical and Functional Requirements Description

    SciTech Connect

    Losinski, Sylvester John; Marshall, Douglas William

    2002-08-01

    Feasibility studies and technology development work are currently being performed on several processes to treat radioactive liquids and solids currently stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), located within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies and development work will be used to select a treatment process for treatment of the radioactive liquids and solids to meet treatment milestones of the Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One process under consideration for treating the radioactive liquids and solids, specifically Sodium-Bearing Waste (SBW) and tank heel solids, is fluid bed steam reforming (FBSR). To support both feasibility and development studies a bench-scale FBSR is being designed and constructed. This report presents the technical and functional requirements, experimental objectives, process flow sheets, and equipment specifications for the bench-scale FBSR.

  18. SUMMARY PLAN FOR BENCH-SCALE REFORMER AND PRODUCT TESTING TREATABILITY STUDIES USING HANFORD TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB

    2010-08-19

    ) was found to be comparable to immobilized low-activity waste glass waste form in the initial supplemental LAW treatment technology risk assessment (Mann 2003). To confirm this hypothesis, DOE is funding a treatability study where three actual Hanford tank waste samples (containing both {sup 99}Tc and {sup 125}I) will be processed in Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) to form the mineral product, similar to the granular NAS waste form, that will then be subject to a number of waste form qualification tests. In previous tests, SRNL have demonstrated that the BSR product is chemically and physically equivalent to the FBSR product (Janzen 2005). The objective of this paper is to describe the sample selection, sample preparation, and environmental and regulatory considerations for treatability studies of the FBSR process using Hanford tank waste samples at the SNRL. The SNRL will process samples in its BSR. These samples will be decontaminated in the 222-S Laboratory to remove undissolved solids and selected radioisotopes to comply with Department of Transportation (DOT) shipping regulations and to ensure worker safety by limiting radiation exposure to As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). These decontamination levels will also meet the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) definition of low activity waste (LAW). After the SNRL has processed the tank samples to a granular mineral form, SRNL and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will conduct waste form testing on both the granular material and monoliths prepared from the granular material. The tests being performed are outlined in Appendix A.

  19. Study on Dynamical Simulation of Railway Vehicle Bogie Parameters Test-bench Electro-hydraulic Servo System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Zhikun; Su, Jian; Xu, Guan; Cao, Xiaoning

    Dynamical mathematical model was established for accurately positioning, fast response and real-time tracing of electro-hydraulic servo control system in railway vehicle bog ie parameters test system with elastic load. The model could precisely control the output of position and force of the hydraulic cylinders. Induction method was proposed in the paper. Dynamical simulation verified the mathematical model by SIMULINK software. Meanwhile the key factors affecting the dynamical characteristics of the system were discussed in detail. Through the simulation results, high precision is obtained in application and the need of real-time control on the railway vehicle bogie parameters test-bench is realized.

  20. Development of model-based fault diagnosis algorithms for MASCOTTE cryogenic test bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannetti, A.; Marzat, J.; Piet-Lahanier, H.; Ordonneau, G.; Vingert, L.

    2014-12-01

    This article describes the on-going results of a fault diagnosis benchmark for a cryogenic rocket engine demonstrator. The benchmark consists in the use of classical model- based fault diagnosis methods to monitor the status of the cooling circuit of the MASCOTTE cryogenic bench. The algorithms developed are validated on real data from the last 2014 firing campaign (ATAC campaign). The objective of this demonstration is to find practical diagnosis alternatives to classical redline providing more flexible means of data exploitation in real time and for post processing.

  1. DESIGN, FABRICATION, ASSEMBLY AND BENCH TESTING OF A TEXACO INFRARED RATIO PYROMETER SYSTEM FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF REACTION CHAMBER TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Leininger

    2001-03-31

    Reliable measurement of gasifier reaction chamber temperature is important for the proper operation of slagging, entrained-flow gasification processes. Historically, thermocouples have been used as the main measurement technique, with the temperature inferred from syngas methane concentration being used as a backup measurement. While these have been sufficient for plant operation in many cases, both techniques suffer from limitations. The response time of methane measurements is too slow to detect rapid upset conditions, and thermocouples are subject to long-term drift, as well as slag attack, which eventually leads to failure of the thermocouple. Texaco's Montebello Technology Center (MTC) has developed an infrared ratio pyrometer system for measuring gasifier reaction chamber temperature. This system has a faster response time than both methane and thermocouples, and has been demonstrated to provide reliable temperature measurements for longer periods of time when compared to thermocouples installed in the same MTC gasifier. In addition, the system can be applied to commercial gasifiers without any significant scale-up issues. The major equipment items, the purge system, and the safety shutdown system in a commercial plant are essentially identical to the prototypes at MTC. The desired result of this DOE program is ''a bench-scale prototype, either assembled or with critical components (laboratory) tested in a convincing manner.'' The prototype of the pyrometer system (including gasifier optical access port) that was designed, assembled and tested for this program, has had previous prototypes that have been built and successfully tested under actual coal and coke gasification conditions in three pilot units at MTC. It was the intent of the work performed under the auspices of this program to review and update the existing design, and to fabricate and bench test an updated system that can be field tested in one or more commercial gasifiers during a follow on phase

  2. Continuous bench-scale tests to assess METHOXYCOAL process performance. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.A.

    1991-12-31

    Laboratory-scale research conducted at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) has shown that coal pyrolysis in the presence of CH{sub 4} and small quantities of O{sub 2} (the METHOXYCOAL process) can produce high yields of liquids and valuable chemicals compared to conventional pyrolysis. The addition of MgO, coal ash, and clays have been shown to further enhance coal conversion. The goal of this two-year project is to build upon that laboratory research by conducting continuous bench-scale tests at IGT. Tests are being conducted with IBC-101 coal under CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2} blends with and without added coal ash, MgO, and/or clays, at temperatures and pressures up to 1000{degrees}F and 200 psig. These tests will provide data to select preferred operating conditions for chemicals production from high-sulfur Illinois coals.

  3. Detection of Blood in Stable Flies (Diptera: Muscidae) with Hemoccult® Test Strips

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hemoccult® test kits were used to detect the remnants of blood meals in stable flies. The strips were able to detect remnants of blood meals in > 90% of the stable flies up to 8 days after blood feeding. This can be compared with detecting blood in the gut visually which was possible in less than 5%...

  4. Design of a new front-end electronics test-bench for the upgraded ATLAS detector's Tile Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kureba, C. O.; Govender, M.; Hofsajer, I.; Ruan, X.; Sandrock, C.; Spoor, M.

    2015-10-01

    The year 2022 has been scheduled to see an upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), in order to increase its instantaneous luminosity. The High Luminosity LHC, also referred to as the upgrade Phase-II, means an inevitable complete re-design of the read-out electronics in the Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) of the A Toroidal LHC Apparatus (ATLAS) detector. Here, the new read-out architecture is expected to have the front-end electronics transmit fully digitized information of the detector to the back-end electronics system. Fully digitized signals will allow more sophisticated reconstruction algorithms which will contribute to the required improved triggers at high pile-up. In Phase II, the current Mobile Drawer Integrity ChecKing (MobiDICK) test-bench will be replaced by the next generation test-bench for the TileCal superdrawers, the new Prometeo (A Portable ReadOut ModulE for Tilecal ElectrOnics). Prometeo is a portable, high-throughput electronic system for full certification of the front-end electronics of the ATLAS TileCal. It is designed to interface to the fast links and perform a series of tests on the data to assess the certification of the electronics. The Prometeo's prototype is being assembled by the University of the Witwatersrand and installed at CERN for further developing, tuning and tests. This article describes the overall design of the new Prometeo, and how it fits into the TileCal electronics upgrade.

  5. Characterization of the Stabilized Test Bench of Nulling Interferometry PERSÉE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozi, Julien; Ollivier, M.; Cassaing, F.; Le Duigou, J.; CNES; Onera/Dota/HRA; IAS; LESIA; OCA; TAS

    2013-01-01

    There are two problems with the observation of exoplanets: the contrast between the planet and the star and their very low separation. One technique solving these problems is nulling interferometry: two pupils are recombined to make a destructive interference on the star, and their base is adjusted to create a constructive interference on the planet. However, to ensure a sufficient extinction of the star, the optical path difference between the beams must be around the nanometer, and the pointing must be better than one hundredth of Airy disk, despite the external disturbances.To validate the critical points of such a space mission, a laboratory demonstrator, PERSÉE, was defined by a consortium led by the french space agency CNES, including IAS, LESIA, ONERA, OCA and Thales Alenia Space and integrated in Paris Observatory. This bench simulates the entire space mission (interferometer and nanometric cophasing system). Its goal is to deliver and maintain an extinction of 10^-4 stable at better than 10^-5 over a few hours in the presence of typical injected disturbances.My thesis work consisted in integrating the bench in successive stages and to develop calibration procedures. This helped me to characterize the critical elements separately before grouping them. After having implemented the control loops of the cophasing system, their precise analysis helped me to reduce down to 0.3 nm rms the residual OPD, and 0.4 % of the Airy disk the residual tip/tilt, despite disturbances of tens of nanometers, consisting of several tens of vibrational frequencies between 1 and 100 Hz. This has been achieved by the implementation of a linear quadratic Gaussian controller, parameterized by the preliminary measurement of the disturbance to minimize. Thanks to these excellent results, I obtained on the band [1.65 - 2.45] µm a record null rate of 8.8x10^-6 stabilized at 9x10^-7 over a few hours, a decade better than the original specifications. An extrapolation of these results to

  6. Crucible melts and bench-scale ISV (in situ vitrification) tests on simulated wastes in INEL (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory) soils

    SciTech Connect

    Farnsworth, R.K.; Oma, K.H.; Reimus, M.A.H.

    1990-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of eight crucible melt tests and three bench-scale in situ vitrification (ISV) test that were performed on simulated metals/soils mixtures containing actual site soils from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The crucible melt and bench-scale ISV tests are a part of efforts by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to assist the INEL in conducting a treatability study on ISV for application to the mixed waste buried at the INEL subsurface disposal area (SDA). The crucible melt tests were performed to evaluate the effect of various chemical additives and metal oxidation techniques on soil melting temperatures, melt viscosities, metals versus electrode oxidation potentials, and metals incorporation in the glass. The bench-scale ISV tests were performed to supplement the existing ISV data base with information on certain hazardous materials that have not been adequately evaluated in previous ISV tests. These materials included five EP toxicity metals, various volatile organic materials fixed in a cementitious matrix (including carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}), trichloroethylene (TCE), and tetrachloroethylene (PCE)), and asbestos. In addition, the bench-scale test were used to evaluated the effect of the proposed chemical additive on ISV processing performance and product quality. 8 refs., 24 figs., 19 tabs.

  7. Evaluation of the 8310-N-S manufactured by Sutron–Results of bench, temperature, and field deployment testing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kunkle, Gerald A.

    2016-01-01

    The Sutron 8310-N-S (8310) data collection platform (DCP) manufactured by Sutron Corporation was evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility (HIF) for conformance to the manufacturer’s specifications for recording and transmitting data. The 8310-N-S is a National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA)-enclosed DCP with a built-in Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite transmitter that operates over a temperature range of −40 to 60 degrees Celsius (°C). The evaluation procedures followed and the results obtained are described in this report for bench, temperature chamber, and outdoor deployment testing. The three units tested met the manufacturer’s stated specifications for the tested conditions, but two of the units had transmission errors either during temperature chamber or deployment testing. During outdoor deployment testing, 6.72 percent of transmissions by serial number 1206109 contained errors, resulting in missing data. Transmission errors were also observed during temperature chamber testing with serial number 1208283, at an error rate of 3.22 percent. Overall, the 8310 has good logging capabilities, but the transmission errors are a concern for users who require reliable telemetered data.

  8. Continuous bench-scale tests to assess METHOXYCOAL process performance. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.A.; Carty, R.H.

    1992-10-01

    Laboratory-scale research conducted at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) has shown that coal pyrolysis in the presence of CH{sub 4} and small quantities of O{sub 2} (the METHOXYCOAL process) can produce higher yields of liquids and valuable chemicals than conventional pyrolysis. The addition of MgO, coal ash, and clays have been reported to further enhance coal conversion. The goal of this two-year project is to build upon that laboratory research by conducting continuous bench-scale tests at ICT. Tests are being conducted with IBC-101 coal under GH{sub 4}/O{sub 2} blends with and without added coal ash, MgO, and/or clays, at temperatures and pressures up to 1000{degrees}F and 200 psig. These tests will provide data to select operating conditions for maximum production of PCX (phenol, cresols, and xylenols) from high-sulfur Illinois coals. During the third quarter, data from IGT and SIUC have been analyzed and compared, and these data suggest that increased coal conversion to liquids and to PCX requires a longer residence time of volatile precursors in contact with hot char than can be obtained in the fluidized bed. Consequently, we have decided to operate future tests in a moving-bed reactor.

  9. Leachate concentrations from water leach and column leach tests on fly ash-stabilized soils

    SciTech Connect

    Bin-Shafique, S.; Benson, C.H.; Edil, T.B.; Hwang, K.

    2006-01-15

    Batch water leaching tests (WLTs) and column leaching tests (CLTs) were conducted on coal-combustion fly ashes, soil, and soil-fly ash mixtures to characterize leaching of Cd, Cr, Se, and Ag. The concentrations of these metals were also measured in the field at two sites where soft fine-grained soils were mechanically stabilized with fly ash. Concentrations in leachate from the WLTs on soil-fly ash mixtures are different from those on fly ash alone and cannot be accurately estimated based on linear dilution calculations using concentrations from WLTs on fly ash alone. The concentration varies nonlinearly with fly ash content due to the variation in pH with fly ash content. Leachate concentrations are low when the pH of the leachate or the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the soil is high. Initial concentrations from CLTs are higher than concentrations from WLTs due to differences in solid-liquid ratio, pH, and solid-liquid contact. However, both exhibit similar trends with fly ash content, leachate pH, and soil properties. Scaling factors can be applied to WLT concentrations (50 for Ag and Cd, 10 for Cr and Se) to estimate initial concentrations for CLTs. Concentrations in leachate collected from the field sites were generally similar or slightly lower than concentrations measured in CLTs on the same materials. Thus, CLTs appear to provide a good indication of conditions that occur in the field provided that the test conditions mimic the field conditions. In addition, initial concentrations in the field can be conservatively estimated from WLT concentrations using the aforementioned scaling factors provided that the pH of the infiltrating water is near neutral.

  10. Design of a leaching test framework for coal fly ash accounting for environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Zandi, Mohammad; Russell, Nigel V

    2007-08-01

    Fly ash from coal combustion contains trace elements which, on disposal or utilisation, may leach out, and therefore be a potential environmental hazard. Environmental conditions have a great impact on the mobility of fly ash constituents as well as the physical and chemical properties of the fly ash. Existing standard leaching methods have been shown to be inadequate by not representing possible disposal or utilisation scenarios. These tests are often criticised on the grounds that the results estimated are not reliable as they are not able to be extrapolated to the application scenario. In order to simulate leaching behaviour of fly ash in different environmental conditions and to reduce deviation between measurements in the fields and the laboratories, it is vital to study sensitivity of the fly ash constituents of interest to major factors controlling leachability. pH, liquid-to-solid ratio, leaching time, leachant type and redox potential are parameters affecting stability of elements in the fly ash. Sensitivity of trace elements to pH and liquid to solid ratio (as two major overriding factors) has been examined. Elements have been classified on the basis of their leaching behaviour under different conditions. Results from this study have been used to identify leaching mechanisms. Also the fly ash has been examined under different standard batch leaching tests in order to evaluate and to compare these tests. A Leaching Test Framework has been devised for assessing the stability of trace elements from fly ashes in different environments. This Framework assists in designing more realistic batch leaching tests appropriate to field conditions and can support the development of regulations and protocols for the management and disposal of coal combustion by-products or other solid wastes of environmental concern. PMID:17171257

  11. Use of Strain Measurements from Acoustic Bench Tests of the Battleship Flowliner Test Articles To Link Analytical Model Results to In-Service Resonant Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Greg; Smaolloey, Kurt; LaVerde, Bruce; Bishop, Jim

    2004-01-01

    The paper will discuss practical and analytical findings of a test program conducted to assist engineers in determining which analytical strain fields are most appropriate to describe the crack initiating and crack propagating stresses in thin walled cylindrical hardware that serves as part of the Space Shuttle Main Engine's fuel system. In service the hardware is excited by fluctuating dynamic pressures in a cryogenic fuel that arise from turbulent flow/pump cavitation. A bench test using a simplified system was conducted using acoustic energy in air to excite the test articles. Strain measurements were used to reveal response characteristics of two Flowliner test articles that are assembled as a pair when installed in the engine feed system.

  12. Pilot- and bench-scale testing of faecal indicator bacteria survival in marine beach sand near point sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mika, K.B.; Imamura, G.; Chang, C.; Conway, V.; Fernandez, G.; Griffith, J.F.; Kampalath, R.A.; Lee, C.M.; Lin, C.-C.; Moreno, R.; Thompson, S.; Whitman, R.L.; Jay, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Factors affecting faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and pathogen survival/persistence in sand remain largely unstudied. This work elucidates how biological and physical factors affect die-off in beach sand following sewage spills. Methods and Results: Solar disinfection with mechanical mixing was pilot-tested as a disinfection procedure after a large sewage spill in Los Angeles. Effects of solar exposure, mechanical mixing, predation and/or competition, season, and moisture were tested at bench scale. First-order decay constants for Escherichia coli ranged between -0??23 and -1??02 per day, and for enterococci between -0??5 and -1??0 per day. Desiccation was a dominant factor for E. coli but not enterococci inactivation. Effects of season were investigated through a comparison of experimental results from winter, spring, and fall. Conclusions: Moisture was the dominant factor controlling E. coli inactivation kinetics. Initial microbial community and sand temperature were also important factors. Mechanical mixing, common in beach grooming, did not consistently reduce bacterial levels. Significance and Impact of the Study: Inactivation rates are mainly dependent on moisture and high sand temperature. Chlorination was an effective disinfection treatment in sand microcosms inoculated with raw influent. ?? 2009 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Pilot- and bench-scale testing of faecal indicator bacteria survival in marine beach sand near point sources

    PubMed Central

    Mika, K.B.; Imamura, G.; Chang, C.; Conway, V.; Fernandez, G.; Griffith, J.F.; Kampalath, R.A.; Lee, C.M.; Lin, C.-C.; Moreno, R.; Thompson, S.; Whitman, R.L.; Jay, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Factors affecting faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and pathogen survival/persistence in sand remain largely unstudied. This work elucidates how biological and physical factors affect die-off in beach sand following sewage spills. Methods and Results Solar disinfection with mechanical mixing was pilot-tested as a disinfection procedure after a large sewage spill in Los Angeles. Effects of solar exposure, mechanical mixing, predation and/or competition, season, and moisture were tested at bench scale. First-order decay constants for Escherichia coli ranged between −0·23 and −·102 per day, and for enterococci between −0·5 and −1·0 per day. Desiccation was a dominant factor for E. coli but not enterococci inactivation. Effects of season were investigated through a comparison of experimental results from winter, spring, and fall. Conclusions Moisture was the dominant factor controlling E. coli inactivation kinetics. Initial microbial community and sand temperature were also important factors. Mechanical mixing, common in beach grooming, did not consistently reduce bacterial levels. Significance and Impact of the Study Inactivation rates are mainly dependent on moisture and high sand temperature. Chlorination was an effective disinfection treatment in sand microcosms inoculated with raw influent. PMID:19302327

  14. DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES FOR SELECTING WASTE SAMPLES FOR THE BENCH STEAM REFORMER TEST

    SciTech Connect

    BANNING DL

    2010-08-03

    This document describes the data quality objectives to select archived samples located at the 222-S Laboratory for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing. The type, quantity and quality of the data required to select the samples for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing are discussed. In order to maximize the efficiency and minimize the time to treat Hanford tank waste in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, additional treatment processes may be required. One of the potential treatment processes is the fluid bed steam reformer (FBSR). A determination of the adequacy of the FBSR process to treat Hanford tank waste is required. The initial step in determining the adequacy of the FBSR process is to select archived waste samples from the 222-S Laboratory that will be used to test the FBSR process. Analyses of the selected samples will be required to confirm the samples meet the testing criteria.

  15. Initial flight test of a ground deployed system for flying qualities assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, Mary F.; Koehler, Ruthard; Wilson, Edward M.; Levy, David R.

    1989-01-01

    In order to provide a safe, repeatable, precise, high-gain flying qualities task a ground deployed system was developed and tested at the NASA Ames Research Center's Dryden Flight Research Facility. This system, the adaptable target lighting array system (ATLAS), is based on the German Aerospace Research Establishment's ground attack test equipment (GRATE). These systems provide a flying-qualities task, emulating the ground-attack task with ground deployed lighted targets. These targets light in an unpredictable sequence and the pilot has to aim the aircraft at whichever target is lighted. Two flight-test programs were used to assess the suitability of ATLAS. The first program used the United States Air Force (USAF) NT-33A variability stability aircraft to establish that ATLAS provided a task suitable for use in flying qualities research. A head-up display (HUD) tracking task was used for comparison. The second program used the X-29A forward-swept wing aircraft to demonstrate that the ATLAS task was suitable for assessing the flying qualities of a specific experimental aircraft. In this program, the ground-attack task was used for comparison. All pilots who used ATLAS found it be highly satisfactory and thought it to be superior to the other tasks used in flying qualities evaluations. It was recommended that ATLAS become a standard for flying qualities evaluations.

  16. Strength prediction of fly ash concretes by accelerated testing

    SciTech Connect

    Tokyay, M.

    1999-11-01

    Relationships between standard compressive strength at 7, 28, and 90 days and early strength attained by (1) autogeneous curing, (2) warm water curing, and (3) boiling water curing were obtained and a regression expression to predict the strength of concretes containing high-lime and low-lime fly ashes as partial cement replacement are proposed. The control concretes were designed for 28-day characteristic compressive strengths, f{sub ck28} = 40, 60, 65, and 70 MPa. All concretes were proportioned to keep the slump at 80--100 mm. The curing methods used were in accordance with the relevant ASTM and Turkish standards.

  17. Tank tests of a model of a flying-boat hull with a fluted bottom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, John R

    1935-01-01

    A 1/5-scale model of a flying-boat hull having flutes in the bottom both forward and aft of the step (NACA model 19) was tested to determine its water performance. The model was also tested after the successive removal of the flutes on the afterbody and forebody. The results from these tests are compared with those from tests of a model of the hull of the Navy PN-8 flying boat and it is concluded that the fluted-bottom model and its modifications are inferior to the model of the PN-8.

  18. Small-scale field tests of attract-and-kill stations for pest Tephritid fruit flies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field tests were conducted at UF-TREC, Homestead to test efficacy of wax-matrix bait stations and mass trapping for control of the Caribbean fruit fly in a 5 by 30 tree guava planting. Results of the study and the ability to document control using small-scale field tests will be discussed....

  19. Bench-scale testing of on-line control of column flotation using a novel analyzer. Second quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-16

    This document contains the second quarterly technical progress report for PTI`s Bench-Scale Testing Project of a circuit integrating PTI`s KEN-FLOTE{trademark} Column Flotation Technology and PTI`s On-Line Quality Monitor and Control System. The twelve-month project involves installation and testing of a 200--300 lb/hr. bench-scale testing circuit at PETC`s Coal Preparation Process Research Facility (CPPRF) for two bituminous coals (Upper Freeport and Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam Raw Coals). The project schedule timeline by task series for the twelve month project, as it was laid out in the initial Project Work Plan. At the present time, all tasks are progressing according to schedule with the exception of the Task 800 Circuit Testing and Sample Prep and Task 1000 Circuit Decommissioning, which have slipped approximately five weeks due to delays incurred within in the project.

  20. Concept Through Preliminary Bench Testing of a Powered Lower Limb Prosthetic Device

    PubMed Central

    Bergelin, Bryan J.; Mattos, Javier O.; Wells, Joseph G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines the design and testing of a powered ankle prosthesis, which utilizes a four-bar mechanism in conjunction with a spring and motor that mimics nonamputee (normal) ankle moments. This approach would enable transtibial (below the knee) amputees to walk at a normal speed with minimal energy input. The design takes into account the energy supplied by the wearer required to achieve many of the desired characteristics of a normal gait. A proof-of-concept prototype prosthesis was designed, optimized, fabricated, and tested with the purpose of demonstrating its ability to match crucial ankle moments during the stance phase of gait. Testing of this prosthesis proved crucial in determining the prosthesis’ capabilities and in evaluating this approach. PMID:21760965

  1. Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Task 7, Evaluation of bench-scale and component tests

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This report presents the Task 7 findings of the project entitled Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration'' to develop selective agglomeration technology to a commercially acceptable level by 1992. The objectives of this report are to summarize the work completed as a part of Task 7, which includes engineering analysis of process deficiencies, analysis of all project test results, and evaluation and selection of an agglomeration process for further development in Phase II. Other objectives of this task included evaluation of the selective agglomeration technology and analysis of all the major deficiencies remaining at the conclusion of Phase I of the project. An overview of the agglomeration processes that were under consideration is presented, along with a discussion of the various test parameters that were found to be important during project testing. This report includes a comprehensive evaluation of all test data and a summary of the major findings; it also provides characterization data for all the project coals and presents the agglomeration process selected for Phase II along with a discussion of the criteria and rationale for the selection.

  2. Alignment and integration of ASSIST: a test bench for VLT adaptive optics facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deep, Atul; Arsenault, Robin; Boland, Wilfried; Delabre, Bernard; Hubin, Norbert; La Penna, Paolo; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Molster, Frank; Stuik, Remko; Tordo, Sebastien; Wiegers, Emiel

    2010-08-01

    ASSIST, The Adaptive Secondary Setup and Instrument STimulator, is being developed to provide a testing facility for the ESO Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF). It will allow the off-telescope testing of three elements of the VLT AOF; the Deformable Secondary Mirror (DSM) and the AO systems for MUSE and HAWK-I (GALACSI and GRAAL). The core of ASSIST consists of a 2-mirror setup (AM1-AM2) allowing the on-axis test of the DSM in interferometric mode. However, during the initial stages of ASSIST integration, DSM would not be present. This makes the task of aligning AM1-AM2 to within an accuracy of 0.05mm/1 arcmin rather challenging. A novel technique known as Shack-Hartmann method has been developed and tested in the lab for this purpose. A Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor will be used to measure the mis-alignment between AM1-AM2 by recording the coma and astigmatism in the presence of large spherical aberration introduced because of tilt/decenter of AM2 with respect to AM1. Thereafter, 20 optical components including lenses, flat mirrors and beam-splitter cubes divided into five sub-assemblies should be aligned to AM1-AM2- DSM axis which ultimately passes through the mechanical axis of large AMOS rotator.

  3. Integrated low emissions cleanup system for coal fueled turbines Phase III bench-scale testing and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1995-08-01

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of coal-fired turbine technologies such as Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC), coal Gasification Combined Cycles (GCC), and Direct Coal-Fired Turbines (DCFT). A major technical development challenge remaining for coal-fired turbine systems is high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental emissions standards, as well as to ensure acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, has evaluated an Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concept that has been configured to meet this technical challenge. This ceramic hot gas filter (HGF), ILEC concept controls particulate emissions, while simultaneously contributing to the control of sulfur and alkali vapor contaminants in high-temperature, high-pressure, fuel gases or combustion gases. This document reports on the results of Phase III of the ILEC evaluation program, the final phase of the program. In Phase III, a bench-scale ILEC facility has been tested to (1) confirm the feasibility of the ILEC concept, and (2) to resolve some major filter cake behavior issues identified in PFBC, HGF applications.

  4. Bench-scale testing of the multi-gravity separator in combination with Microcel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-29

    The primary objective of the proposed work is to design, install and operate an advanced fine coal processing circuit combining Microcel and MGS technologies. Both of these processes have specific advantages as stand-alone units. For example, the Microcel column is effective in removing ash-bearing mineral matter, while the MGS is capable of efficiently removing coal-pyrite composites. Therefore, by combining both of these unit operations into a single processing circuit, synergistic advantages can be gained. As a result, this circuit arrangement has the potential of improving coal quality beyond that which could be achieved using either one of the technologies individually. In addition to the primary objective, secondary objectives of the proposed test program will include: (1) Circuit Optimization: The performance of each unit operation, individually and combined, will be optimized by conducting parametric studies as a function of key operating variables. The goal of this work will be to maximize the rejections of pyritic sulfur and ash while maintaining a high energy recovery; and (2) Process Variability: The steady-state performance of the optimized processing circuit will be studied (i) by conducting several long-duration test runs over a period of several days and (ii) by testing coal samples from other sources specified by the participating coal companies.

  5. Bench-scale testing of the multi-gravity separator in combination with Microcel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-30

    Work this quarter focused on the development of the engineering design specifications for the ET Test Circuit. Process flowsheets and detailed equipment specifications were finalized. Based on this information, bid packages were assembled and purchase orders were issued for all of the necessary process equipment. The design and procurement information is summarized in the ET Circuit Design Report submitted to the DOE's COR this quarter. Final drafts of the ET Circuit - System Safety Analysis, Nuclear Density Gauge - System Safety Analysis and Operating Manual/SOP were also completed and submitted to the COR this quarter. Preliminary characterization studies were also initiated this quarter. Tests were conducted to determine the grinding conditions required to achieve the desired particle size distributions for the characterization work. Flotation release analysis tests were conducted on both the Pittsburgh [number sign]8 and Illinois [number sign]6 seam coals as a function of grind size. The primary objective of the proposed work is to design, install, and operate an advanced fine coal processing circuit combining the Microcel and Multi-Gravity-Separator (MGS) technologies. Both of these processes have specific advantages as stand-alone units. For example, the Microcel column effectively removes ash-bearing mineral matter, while the MGS efficiently removes coal-pyrite composites. By combining both unit operations into a single processing circuit, synergistic advantages can be gained. As a result, this circuit arrangement has the potential to improve coal quality beyond that achieved using the individual technologies.

  6. Design of the 15 GHz BPM test bench for the CLIC test facility to perform precise stretched-wire RF measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorzetti, Silvia; Fanucci, Luca; Galindo Muñoz, Natalia; Wendt, Manfred

    2015-09-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) requires a low emittance beam transport and preservation, thus a precise control of the beam orbit along up to 50 km of the accelerator components in the sub-μm regime is required. Within the PACMAN3 (Particle Accelerator Components Metrology and Alignment to the Nanometer Scale) PhD training action a study with the objective of pre-aligning the electrical centre of a 15 GHz cavity beam position monitor (BPM) to the magnetic centre of the main beam quadrupole is initiated. Of particular importance is the design of a specific test bench to study the stretched-wire setup for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) BPM, focusing on the aspects of microwave signal excitation, transmission and impedance-matching, as well as the mechanical setup and reproducibility of the measurement method.

  7. Phenomena associated with bench and thermal-vacuum testing of super conductors - Heat pipes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshburn, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Test failures of heat pipes occur when the functional performance is unable to match the expected design limits or when the power applied to the heat pipe (in the form of heat) is distributed unevenly through the system, yielding a large thermal gradient. When a thermal gradient larger than expected is measured, it normally occurs in the evaporator or condenser sections of the pipe. Common causes include evaporator overheating, condenser dropout, noncondensable gas formation, surge and partial recovery of evaporator temperatures, masking of thermal profiles, and simple malfunctions due to leaks and mechanical failures or flaws. Examples of each of these phenomena are described along with corresponding failure analyses and corrective measures.

  8. Bench Scale Development and Testing of a Novel Adsorption Process for Post-Combustion CO₂ Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Ravi

    2015-09-01

    A physical sorption process to produce dry CO₂ at high purity (>98%) and high recovery (>90%) from the flue gas taken before or after the FGD was demonstrated both in the lab and in the field (one ton per day scale). A CO₂ recovery of over 94% and a CO₂ purity of over 99% were obtained in the field tests. The process has a moisture, SOX, and Hg removal stage followed by a CO₂ adsorption stage. Evaluations based on field testing, process simulation and detailed engineering studies indicate that the process has the potential for more than 40% reduction in the capital and more than 40% reduction in parasitic power for CO₂ capture compared to MEA. The process has the potential to provide CO₂ at a cost (<$40/tonne) and quality (<1 ppm H₂O, <1 ppm SOX, <10 ppm O₂) suitable for EOR applications which can make CO₂ capture profitable even in the absence of climate legislation. The process is applicable to power plants without SOX, Hg and NOX removal equipment.

  9. Development and bench testing of a multi-spectral imaging technology built on a smartphone platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, Frank J.; Weiser, Reuven; Kass, Alex J.; Rose, Donny; Safir, Amit; Levitz, David

    2016-03-01

    Cervical cancer screening presents a great challenge for clinicians across the developing world. In many countries, cervical cancer screening is done by visualization with the naked eye. Simple brightfield white light imaging with photo documentation has been shown to make a significant impact on cervical cancer care. Adoption of smartphone based cervical imaging devices is increasing across Africa. However, advanced imaging technologies such as multispectral imaging systems, are seldom deployed in low resource settings, where they are needed most. To address this challenge, the optical system of a smartphone-based mobile colposcopy imaging system was refined, integrating components required for low cost, portable multi-spectral imaging of the cervix. This paper describes the refinement of the mobile colposcope to enable it to acquire images of the cervix at multiple illumination wavelengths, including modeling and laboratory testing. Wavelengths were selected to enable quantifying the main absorbers in tissue (oxyand deoxy-hemoglobin, and water), as well as scattering parameters that describe the size distribution of scatterers. The necessary hardware and software modifications are reviewed. Initial testing suggests the multi-spectral mobile device holds promise for use in low-resource settings.

  10. Integration and bench testing for the GRAVITY Coudé IR adaptive optics (CIAO) wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deen, C.; Yang, P.; Huber, A.; Suarez-Valles, M.; Hippler, S.; Brandner, W.; Gendron, E.; Clénet, Y.; Kendrew, S.; Glauser, A.; Klein, R.; Laun, W.; Lenzen, R.; Neumann, U.; Panduro, J.; Ramos, J.; Rohloff, R.-R.; Salzinger, A.; Zimmerman, N.; Henning, T.; Perraut, K.; Perrin, G.; Straubmeier, C.; Amorim, A.; Eisenhauer, F.

    2014-08-01

    GRAVITY, a second generation instrument for the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI), will provide an astrometric precision of order 10 micro-arcseconds, an imaging resolution of 4 milli-arcseconds, and low/medium resolution spectro-interferometry. These improvements to the VLTI represent a major upgrade to its current infrared interferometric capabilities, allowing detailed study of obscured environments (e.g. the Galactic Center, young dusty planet-forming disks, dense stellar cores, AGN, etc...). Crucial to the final performance of GRAVITY, the Coudé IR Adaptive Optics (CIAO) system will correct for the effects of the atmosphere at each of the VLT Unit Telescopes. CIAO consists of four new infrared Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors (WFS) and associated real-time computers/software which will provide infrared wavefront sensing from 1.45-2.45 microns, allowing AO corrections even in regions where optically bright reference sources are scarce. We present here the latest progress on the GRAVITY wavefront sensors. We describe the adaptation and testing of a light-weight version of the ESO Standard Platform for Adaptive optics Real Time Applications (SPARTA-Light) software architecture to the needs of GRAVITY. We also describe the latest integration and test milestones for construction of the initial wave front sensor.

  11. Baseline and optional bench-scale testing of a chemical candle filter safeguard device

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.P.; Swanson, M.L.

    2000-11-01

    This project was undertaken by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to design, construct, and test the feasibility of a hot-gas filter safeguard device (SGD) to prevent the release of dust in the event of candle filter failure under both pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) (oxidizing) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) (reducing) operating conditions. The SGD must use existing filter system seals, gaskets, fixtures, and assemblies as much as possible. It must also activate quickly when a candle filter has failed, preferably preventing dust concentrations downstream of the SGD from exceeding 1 ppmw. In addition, the SGD must be able to operate in an inactive mode with minimal pressure drop, and its operation cannot be affected by repeated backpulse cleaning events of up to 3 psia and 1/2 second in duration.

  12. Bench-scale testing of novel high-temperature desulfurization sorbents: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; Harkins, S.M.; Stogner, J.M.; Woods, M.C.; Rogers, T.N.

    1988-12-01

    Extrudates of regenerable mixed-metal oxide sorbents including zinc ferrite, copper-modified zinc ferrite, zinc titanate, copper aluminate, copper-iron aluminate, and copper manganate were prepared and tested for their potential to remove hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) from coal gasifier gas in a high-temperature high-pressure (HTHP) fixed-bed reactor. The zinc containing sorbents were found to be more promising than those containing combinations of copper, aluminum, iron, and manganese. Reductions in H/sub 2/S concentration were achieved depending on sorbent, reactor temperature, and steam concentration. The copper-modified zinc ferrite sorbent reduced the H/sub 2/S concentration to less than 1 ppmv at up to 1100/degree/F with 20 volume % steam in the gas. The zinc ferrite sorbent showed no apparent loss in capacity over 15 sulfidation-regeneration cycles but underwent significant strength reduction in a coal-derived gas with 15% or less steam due to soot formation. Zinc titanate exhibited excellent strength and capacity retention at steam levels as low as 5% and temperatures as high as 1350/degree/F. 13 refs., 64 figs., 75 tabs.

  13. From bench to bedside: research and testing of Internet resources and connections in community hospital libraries.

    PubMed Central

    Rambo, N.; Fuller, S.

    1993-01-01

    Access to information becomes more valuable with the continuing proliferation of medical knowledge and the increasing economic pressure being experienced by health care organizations. This is particularly so for community hospitals in rural or isolated areas, where the economic pressures are at least as great as in urban areas and where access to information is often inadequate. These conditions have implications for the quality of patient care and for economic viability. In response to this, the National Library of Medicine, the University of Washington, and seven community hospitals in five Pacific Northwest states have joined forces in a broad-scale technology diffusion project to facilitate the application of research work to clinical care. There are three components to the project: 1) a pilot connections component to extend Internet access to the community hospitals, 2) a research component to test the performance of a client/server model for network access to anatomical text and images, and 3) a clinical component to develop a registry of DNA diagnostic laboratories facilitating the provision of genetic information to clinicians. The pilot connections component is described and preliminary findings are reported. PMID:8130534

  14. Geochemical investigations of metals release from submerged coal fly ash using extended elutriate tests.

    PubMed

    Bednar, A J; Chappell, M A; Seiter, J M; Stanley, J K; Averett, D E; Jones, W T; Pettway, B A; Kennedy, A J; Hendrix, S H; Steevens, J A

    2010-12-01

    A storage pond dike failure occurred at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant that resulted in the release of over 3.8 million cubic meters (5 million cubic yards) of fly ash. Approximately half of this material deposited in the main channel of the Emory River, 3.5 km upstream of the confluence of the Emory and Clinch Rivers, Tennessee, USA. Remediation efforts to date have focused on targeted removal of material from the channel through hydraulic dredging, as well as mechanical excavation in some areas. The agitation of the submerged fly ash during hydraulic dredging introduces river water into the fly ash material, which could alter the redox state of metals present in the fly ash and thereby change their sorption and mobility properties. A series of extended elutriate tests were used to determine the concentration and speciation of metals released from fly ash. Results indicated that arsenic and selenium species released from the fly ash materials during elutriate preparation were redox stable over the course of 10d, with dissolved arsenic being present as arsenate, and dissolved selenium being present as selenite. Concentrations of certain metals, such as arsenic, selenium, vanadium, and barium, increased in the elutriate waters over the 10d study, whereas manganese concentrations decreased, likely due to oxidation and precipitation reactions. PMID:20943255

  15. The repellency of lemongrass oil against stable flies, tested using video tracking

    PubMed Central

    Baldacchino, Frédéric; Tramut, Coline; Salem, Ali; Liénard, Emmanuel; Delétré, Emilie; Franc, Michel; Martin, Thibaud; Duvallet, Gérard; Jay-Robert, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Lemongrass oil (Cymbopogon citratus) is an effective repellent against mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) and house flies (Diptera: Muscidae). In this study, its effectiveness was assessed on stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae) in laboratory conditions. First, we demonstrated that lemongrass oil is an active substance for antennal olfactory receptor cells of Stomoxys calcitrans as indicated by a significant increase in the electroantennogram responses to increasing doses of lemongrass oil. Feeding-choice tests in a flight cage with stable flies having access to two blood-soaked sanitary pads, one of which was treated with lemongrass oil, showed that stable flies (n = 24) spent significantly more time in the untreated zone (median value = 218.4 s) than in the treated zone (median value = 63.7 s). No stable flies fed on the treated pad, whereas nine fed on the untreated pad. These results suggest that lemongrass oil could be used as an effective repellent against stable flies. Additional studies to confirm its spatial repellent and feeding deterrent effects are warranted. PMID:23759542

  16. The repellency of lemongrass oil against stable flies, tested using video tracking.

    PubMed

    Baldacchino, Frédéric; Tramut, Coline; Salem, Ali; Liénard, Emmanuel; Delétré, Emilie; Franc, Michel; Martin, Thibaud; Duvallet, Gérard; Jay-Robert, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Lemongrass oil (Cymbopogon citratus) is an effective repellent against mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) and house flies (Diptera: Muscidae). In this study, its effectiveness was assessed on stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae) in laboratory conditions. First, we demonstrated that lemongrass oil is an active substance for antennal olfactory receptor cells of Stomoxys calcitrans as indicated by a significant increase in the electroantennogram responses to increasing doses of lemongrass oil. Feeding-choice tests in a flight cage with stable flies having access to two blood-soaked sanitary pads, one of which was treated with lemongrass oil, showed that stable flies (n = 24) spent significantly more time in the untreated zone (median value = 218.4 s) than in the treated zone (median value = 63.7 s). No stable flies fed on the treated pad, whereas nine fed on the untreated pad. These results suggest that lemongrass oil could be used as an effective repellent against stable flies. Additional studies to confirm its spatial repellent and feeding deterrent effects are warranted. PMID:23759542

  17. Efficacy of the National Football League-225 Test to Track Changes in One Repetition Maximum Bench Press After Training in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division IA Football Players.

    PubMed

    Mann, J Bryan; Ivey, Pat A; Stoner, Josh D; Mayhew, Jerry L; Brechue, William F

    2015-11-01

    Numerous investigations have attested to the efficacy of the National Football League (NFL)-225 test to estimate one repetition maximum (1RM) bench press. However, no studies have assessed the efficacy of the test to track changes in strength across a training program. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of the NFL-225 test for determining the change in 1RM bench press in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division IA college football players after training. Over a 4-year period, players (n = 203) were assessed before and after a 6-week off-season resistance program for 1RM bench press and repetitions completed with 102.3 kg (225 lbs). Test sessions typically occurred within 1 week of each other. Players significantly increased 1RM by 4.2 ± 8.6 kg and NFL-225 repetitions by 0.9 ± 2.3, although the effect size (ES) for each was trivial (ES = 0.03 and 0.07, respectively). National Football League 225 prediction equations had higher correlations with 1RM before training (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.95) than after training (ICC = 0.75). The correlation between the change in NFL-225 repetitions and change in 1RM was low and negative (r = -0.22, p < 0.02). Short-term heavy resistance training may alter the association between muscular strength and muscular endurance in college football players and render the NFL-225 test less effective in predicting the change in 1RM bench press strength after short-term training. PMID:25574610

  18. Characterization of InGaAs-based cameras for astronomical applications using a new VIS-NIR-SWIR detector test bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Karsten; Wolf, Jürgen; Krabbe, Alfred

    2014-07-01

    A new test bench for detector and camera characterization in the visible and near-infrared spectral range between 350 -2500 nm has been setup at the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS). The detector under study is illuminated by an integrating sphere that is fed by a Czerny-Turner monochromator with quasi-monochromatic light. A quartz tungsten halogen lamp is used as a light source for the monochromator. Si- and InGaAs-based photodiodes have been calibrated against secondary reference standards at PTB (Germany), NPL (UK) and NRC (Canada) for precise spectral flux measurements. The test bench allows measurements of fundamental detector properties such as linearity of response, conversion gain, full well capacity, quantum efficiency (QE), fixed pattern noise and pixel response non-uniformity. The article will focus on the commissioning of the test bench and subsequent performance evaluation and characterization of a commercial camera system with a 640 x 480 InGaAs-detector, sensitive between 900 to 1650 nm. The study aimed at the potential use of InGaAs cameras in ground-based and airborne astronomical observations or as target acquisition and tracking cameras in the NIR supporting infrared observations at longer wavelengths, e.g. on SOFIA. An intended future application of the test bench in combination with an appropriate test dewar is the characterization of focal plane assemblies for imaging spectrometers on spacecraft missions, such as the VIS-SWIR channel of MAJIS, the Moons and Jupiter Imaging Spectrometer aboard JUICE (Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer).

  19. Flight test experience with the F-8 digital fly-by-wire system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szalai, K. J.

    1975-01-01

    Flight test results of the F-8 digital fly-by-wire (DFBW) control system are presented and the implications for application to active control technology (ACT) are discussed. The F-8 DFBW system has several of the attributes of proposed ACT systems, so the flight test experience is helpful in assessing the capabilities of those systems. Topics of discussion include the predicted and actual flight performance of the control system, assessments of aircraft flying qualities and other piloting factors, software management and control, and operational experience.

  20. Flight test experience with the F-8 digital fly-by-wire system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szalai, K. J.

    1976-01-01

    Flight test results of the F-8 digital fly by wire control system are presented and the implications for application to active control technology are discussed. The F-8 DFBW system has several of the attributes of proposed ACT systems, so the flight test experience is helpful in assessing the capabilities of those systems. Topics of discussion include the predicted and actual flight performance of the control system, assessments of aircraft flying qualities and other piloting factors, software management and control, and operational experience.

  1. Study of ignition, combustion, and production of harmful substances upon burning solid organic fuel at a test bench with a vortex chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdukov, A. P.; Chernetskiy, M. Yu.; Dekterev, A. A.; Anufriev, I. S.; Strizhak, P. A.; Greben'kov, P. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Results of investigation of furnace processes upon burning of pulverized fuel at a test bench with a power of 5 MW are presented. The test bench consists of two stages with tangential air and pulverized coal feed, and it is equipped by a vibrocentrifugal mill and a disintegrator. Such milling devices have an intensive mechanical impact on solid organic fuel, which, in a number of cases, increases the reactivity of ground material. The processes of ignition and stable combustion of a mixture of gas coal and sludge (wastes of concentration plant), as well as Ekibastus coal, ground in the disintegrator, were studied at the test bench. The results of experimental burning demonstrated that preliminary fuel grinding in the disintegrator provides autothermal combustion mode even for hardly inflammable organic fuels. Experimental combustion of biomass, wheat straw with different lignin content (18, 30, 60%) after grinding in the disintegrator, was performed at the test bench in order to determine the possibility of supporting stable autothermal burning. Stable biofuel combustion mode without lighting by highly reactive fuel was achieved in the experiments. The influence of the additive GTS-Powder (L.O.M. Leaders Co., Ltd., Republic of Korea) in the solid and liquid state on reducing sulfur oxide production upon burning Mugun coal was studied. The results of experimental combustion testify that, for an additive concentration from 1 to 15% of the total mass of the burned mixture, the maximum SO2 concentration reduction in ejected gases was not more than 18% with respect to the amount for the case of burning pure coal.

  2. High-temperature, high-pressure testing of zinc titanate in a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor for 100 cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.P.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1993-06-01

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants are being advanced worldwide to produce electricity from coal owing to their potential for superior environmental performance, economics, and efficiency in comparison to conventional coal-based power plants. A key component of these plants is a hot-gas desulfurization system employing efficient regenerable mixed-metal oxide sorbents. Leading sorbent candidates include zinc ferrite and zinc titanate. These sorbents can remove hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in the fuel gas down to very low levels (typically <20 ppmv) at 500 to 750{degree}C and can be readily regenerated for multicycle operation with air. To this end, the Research Triangle Institute (RTI) has formulated and tested a series of zinc titanate sorbents in a high-temperature, high- pressure HTHP fluidized-bed bench-scale reactor. Multicycle HTHP bench-scale testing of these sorbents under a variety of conditions culminated in the development of a ZT-4 sorbent that exhibited the best overall performance in terms of chemical reactivity, sulfur capacity, regenerability, structural properties, and attrition resistance. Following this parametric study, a life-cycle test consisting of 100 sulfidation-regeneration cycles was carried out with ZT-4 in the bench unit.

  3. Development, testing, and demonstration of an optimal fine coal cleaning circuit. Task 5: Evaluation of bench-scale test results and equipment selection for in-plant pilot tests

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-14

    The overall objective of this research effort is to improve the efficiency of fine coal flotation in preparation plants above that of currently used conventional cells. In addition to evaluating single-stage operation of four selected advanced flotation devices, the project will also evaluate them in two-stage configurations. The project is being implemented in two phases. Phase 1 comprises bench-scale testing of the flotation units, and Phase 2 comprises in-plant, proof-of-concept (POC), pilot-scale testing of selected configurations at the Cyprus Emerald preparation plant. The Task 5 report presents the findings of the Phase 1 bench-scale test results and provides the basis for equipment selection for Phase 2. Four advanced flotation technologies selected for bench-scale testing are: Jameson cell; Outokumpu HG tank cell; packed column; and open column. In addition to testing all four of the cells in single-stage operation, the Jameson and Outokumpu cells were tested as candidate first-stage cells because of their propensity for rapid attachment of coal particles with air bubbles and low capital and operating costs. The column cells were selected as candidate second-stage cells because of their high-efficiency separation of low-ash products from high-ash feed coals. 32 figs., 72 tabs.

  4. LISA Optical Bench Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieser, M.; d'Arcio, L.; Barke, S.; Bogenstahl, J.; Diekmann, C.; Diepholz, I.; Fitzsimons, E. D.; Gerberding, O.; Henning, J.-S.; Hewitson, M.; Hey, F. G.; Hogenhuis, H.; Killow, C. J.; Lucarelli, S.; Nikolov, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Pijnenburg, J.; Robertson, D. I.; Sohmer, A.; Taylor, A.; Tröbs, M.; Ward, H.; Weise, D.; Heinzel, G.; Danzmann, K.

    2013-01-01

    The optical bench (OB) is a part of the LISA spacecraft, situated between the telescope and the testmass. For measuring the inter-spacecraft distances there are several interferometers on the OB. The elegant breadboard of the OB for LISA is developed for the European Space Agency (ESA) by EADS Astrium, TNO Science & Industry, University of Glasgow and the Albert Einstein Intitute (AEI), the performance tests then will be done at the AEI. Here we present the testbed that will be used for the performance tests with the focus on the thermal environment and the laser infrastructure.

  5. Mobility of olive fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) late third instars and teneral adults in test arenas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mobility of olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae (Rossi), late third instars before pupation, teneral adults before flight, and mature adults restricted from flight was studied under mulches in greenhouse cage tests, in horizontal pipes, vertical bottles and pipes filled with sand, and by observati...

  6. Hardware-In-The-Loop Testing of Continuous Control Algorithms for a Precision Formation Flying Demonstration Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naasz, Bo J.; Burns, Richard D.; Gaylor, David; Higinbotham, John

    2004-01-01

    A sample mission sequence is defined for a low earth orbit demonstration of Precision Formation Flying (PFF). Various guidance navigation and control strategies are discussed for use in the PFF experiment phases. A sample PFF experiment is implemented and tested in a realistic Hardware-in-the-Loop (HWIL) simulation using the Formation Flying Test Bed (FFTB) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center.

  7. NaK pool-boiler bench-scale receiver durability test: Test results and materials analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Andraka, C.E.; Goods, S.H.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Jones, S.A.

    1994-06-01

    Pool-boiler reflux receivers have been considered as an alternative to heat pipes for the input of concentrated solar energy to Stirling-cycle engines in dish-Stirling electric generation systems. Pool boilers offer simplicity in design and fabrication. The operation of a full-scale pool-boiler receiver has been demonstrated for short periods of time. However, to generate cost-effective electricity, the receiver must operate Without significant maintenance for the entire system life, as much as 20 to 30 years. Long-term liquid-metal boiling stability and materials compatibility with refluxing NaK-78 is not known and must be determined for the pool boiler receiver. No boiling system has been demonstrated for a significant duration with the current porous boiling enhancement surface and materials. Therefore, it is necessary to simulate the full-scale pool boiler design as much as possible, including flux levels, materials, and operating cycles. On-sun testing is impractical because of the limited test time available. A test vessel was constructed with a porous boiling enhancement surface. The boiling surface consisted of a brazed stainless steel powder with about 50% porosity. The vessel was heated with a quartz lamp array providing about go W/CM2 peak incident thermal flux. The vessel was charged with NaK-78. This allows the elimination of costly electric preheating, both on this test and on fullscale receivers. The vessel was fabricated from Haynes 230 alloy. The vessel operated at 750{degrees}C around the clock, with a 1/2-hour shutdown cycle to ambient every 8 hours. The test completed 7500 hours of lamp-on operation time, and over 1000 startups from ambient. The test was terminated when a small leak in an Inconel 600 thermowell was detected. The test design and data are presented here. Metallurgical analysis of virgin and tested materials has begun, and initial results are also presented.

  8. NaK pool-boiler bench-scale receiver durability test: Test design and initial results

    SciTech Connect

    Andraka, C.E.; Jones, S.A.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.

    1993-06-01

    Pool-boiler reflux receivers have been considered as an alternative to heat pipes for the input of concentrated solar energy to Stirling-cycle engines in dish-Stirling electric generation systems. Fool boilers offer simplicity in desip and fabrication. Pool-boiler solar receiver operation has been demonstrated for short periods of time. However, in order to generate cost-effective electricity, the receiver must operate without significant maintenance for the entire system life. At least one theory explaining incipient-boiling behavior of alkali metals indicates that favorable start-up behavior should deteriorate over time. Many factors affect the stability and startup behavior of the boiling system. Therefore, it is necessary to simulate the full-scale design in every detail as much as possible, including flux levels materials, and operating cycles. On-sun testing is impractical due to the limited test time available. No boiling system has been demonstrated with the current porous boiling enhancement surface and materials for a significant period of time. A test vessel was constructed with a Friction Coatings Inc. porous boiling enhancement surface. The vessel is heated with a quartz lamp array providing about 92 W/Cm{sup 2} peak incident thermal flux. The vessel is charged with NaK-78, which is liquid at room temperature. This allows the elimination of costly electric preheating, both on this test and on full-scale receivers. The vessel is fabricated from Haynes 230 alloy, selected for its high temperature strength and oxidation resistance. The vessel operates at 750{degrees}C around the clock, with a 1/2-hour shutdown cycle to ambient every 8 hours. Temperature data is continually collected. The test design and initial (first 2500 hours and 300 start-ups) test data are presented here. The test is designed to operate for 10,000 hours, and will be complete in the spring of 1994.

  9. NaK pool-boiler bench-scale receiver durability test: Test design and initial results

    SciTech Connect

    Andraka, C.E.; Jones, S.A.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.

    1993-01-01

    Pool-boiler reflux receivers have been considered as an alternative to heat pipes for the input of concentrated solar energy to Stirling-cycle engines in dish-Stirling electric generation systems. Fool boilers offer simplicity in desip and fabrication. Pool-boiler solar receiver operation has been demonstrated for short periods of time. However, in order to generate cost-effective electricity, the receiver must operate without significant maintenance for the entire system life. At least one theory explaining incipient-boiling behavior of alkali metals indicates that favorable start-up behavior should deteriorate over time. Many factors affect the stability and startup behavior of the boiling system. Therefore, it is necessary to simulate the full-scale design in every detail as much as possible, including flux levels materials, and operating cycles. On-sun testing is impractical due to the limited test time available. No boiling system has been demonstrated with the current porous boiling enhancement surface and materials for a significant period of time. A test vessel was constructed with a Friction Coatings Inc. porous boiling enhancement surface. The vessel is heated with a quartz lamp array providing about 92 W/Cm[sup 2] peak incident thermal flux. The vessel is charged with NaK-78, which is liquid at room temperature. This allows the elimination of costly electric preheating, both on this test and on full-scale receivers. The vessel is fabricated from Haynes 230 alloy, selected for its high temperature strength and oxidation resistance. The vessel operates at 750[degrees]C around the clock, with a 1/2-hour shutdown cycle to ambient every 8 hours. Temperature data is continually collected. The test design and initial (first 2500 hours and 300 start-ups) test data are presented here. The test is designed to operate for 10,000 hours, and will be complete in the spring of 1994.

  10. Field tests of environmentally friendly malathion replacements to suppress wild Mediterranean fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) populations.

    PubMed

    Peck, S L; McQuate, G T

    2000-04-01

    This article reports a large-scale field test of two environmentally friendly malathion replacements on wild populations of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratatis capitata (Wiedemann): spinosad, a bacteria-derived toxin, and phloxine B, a red dye with phototoxic properties. The comparison test was conducted on 11 coffee fields infested with wild populations of Mediterranean fruit fly on the Hawaiian island of Kauai with 8-wk protein bait sprays with and without toxicants. To assess effectiveness, adults were trapped and larval infestation levels were evaluated with fruit collections. Malathion was found to be the most effective treatment. However, the two replacements gave significant levels of control, and because they are environmentally safer, should be considered for eradicating incipient populations of this invasive species of fruit fly. Cage tests were also conducted to ensure that the wild flies consumed the bait and to assess how long the bait-toxicant combination remained effective in the field. Although spinosad and phloxine B were found to be effective up to 1 wk, malathion remained effective at least 2 wk. PMID:10826173

  11. Test Before You Fly - High Fidelity Planetary Environment Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craven, Paul; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd; Nehls, Mary

    2012-01-01

    The lunar surface environment will present many challenges to the survivability of systems developed for long duration lunar habitation and exploration of the lunar, or any other planetary, surface. Obstacles will include issues pertaining especially to the radiation environment (solar plasma and electromagnetic radiation) and lunar regolith dust. The Planetary Environments Chamber is one piece of the MSFC capability in Space Environmental Effects Test and Analysis. Comprised of many unique test systems, MSFC has the most complete set of SEE test capabilities in one location allowing examination of combined space environmental effects without transporting already degraded, potentially fragile samples over long distances between tests. With this system, the individual and combined effects of the lunar radiation and regolith environment on materials, sub-systems, and small systems developed for the lunar return can be investigated. This combined environments facility represents a unique capability to NASA, in which tests can be tailored to any one aspect of the lunar environment (radiation, temperature, vacuum, regolith) or to several of them combined in a single test.

  12. Permeable Reactive Biobarriers for In Situ Cr(VI) Reduction: Bench Scale Tests Using Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6

    SciTech Connect

    Sridhar Viamajala; Brent M. Peyton; Robin Gerlach; Vaideeswaran; William A. Apel; James N. Petersen

    2008-12-01

    Chromate (Cr(VI)) reduction studies were performed in bench scale flow columns using the fermentative subsurface isolate Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6. In these tests, columns packed with either quartz sand or hydrous ferric oxide (HFO)-coated quartz sand, were inoculated with strain ES6 and fed nutrients to stimulate growth before nutrient-free Cr(VI) solutions were injected. Results show that in columns containing quartz sand, a continuous inflow of 2 mg/L Cr(VI) was reduced to below detection limits in the effluent for durations of up to 5.7 residence times after nutrient injection was discontinued proving the ability of strain ES6 to reduce chromate in the absence of an external electron donor. In the HFO-containing columns, Cr(VI) reduction was significantly prolonged and effluent Cr(VI) concentrations remained below detectable levels for periods of up to 66 residence times after nutrient injection was discontinued. Fe was detected in the effluent of the HFO-containing columns throughout the period of Cr(VI) removal indicating that the insoluble Fe(III) bearing solids were being continuously reduced to form soluble Fe(II) resulting in prolonged abiotic Cr(VI) reduction. Thus, growth of Cellulomonas within the soil columns resulted in formation of permeable reactive barriers that could reduce Cr(VI) and Fe(III) for extended periods even in the absence of external electron donors. Other bioremediation systems employing Fe(II)-mediated reactions require a continuous presence of external nutrients to regenerate Fe(II). After depletion of nutrients, contaminant removal within these systems occurs by reaction with surface-associated Fe(II) that can rapidly become inaccessible due to formation of crystalline Fe-minerals or other precipitates. The ability of fermentative organisms like Cellulomonas to reduce metals without continuous nutrient supply in the subsurface offers a viable and economical alternative technology for in situ remediation of Cr

  13. Permeable reactive biobarriers for in situ Cr(VI) reduction: bench scale tests using Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6.

    PubMed

    Viamajala, Sridhar; Peyton, Brent M; Gerlach, Robin; Sivaswamy, Vaideeswaran; Apel, William A; Petersen, James N

    2008-12-15

    Chromate (Cr(VI)) reduction studies were performed in bench scale flow columns using the fermentative subsurface isolate Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6. In these tests, columns packed with either quartz sand or hydrous ferric oxide (HFO)-coated quartz sand, were inoculated with strain ES6 and fed nutrients to stimulate growth before nutrient-free Cr(VI) solutions were injected. Results show that in columns containing quartz sand, a continuous inflow of 2 mg/L Cr(VI) was reduced to below detection limits in the effluent for durations of up to 5.7 residence times after nutrient injection was discontinued proving the ability of strain ES6 to reduce chromate in the absence of an external electron donor. In the HFO-containing columns, Cr(VI) reduction was significantly prolonged and effluent Cr(VI) concentrations remained below detectable levels for periods of up to 66 residence times after nutrient injection was discontinued. Fe was detected in the effluent of the HFO-containing columns throughout the period of Cr(VI) removal indicating that the insoluble Fe(III) bearing solids were being continuously reduced to form soluble Fe(II) resulting in prolonged abiotic Cr(VI) reduction. Thus, growth of Cellulomonas within the soil columns resulted in formation of permeable reactive barriers that could reduce Cr(VI) and Fe(III) for extended periods even in the absence of external electron donors. Other bioremediation systems employing Fe(II)-mediated reactions require a continuous presence of external nutrients to regenerate Fe(II). After depletion of nutrients, contaminant removal within these systems occurs by reaction with surface-associated Fe(II) that can rapidly become inaccessible due to formation of crystalline Fe-minerals or other precipitates. The ability of fermentative organisms like Cellulomonas to reduce metals without continuous nutrient supply in the subsurface offers a viable and economical alternative technology for in situ remediation of Cr

  14. Statistical fault diagnosis based on vibration analysis for gear test-bench under non-stationary conditions of speed and load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, Luisa F.; Reñones, Aníbal; Perán, Jose R.; de Miguel, Luis J.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper the authors are dealing with the detection of different mechanical faults (unbalance and misalignment) under a wide range of working conditions of speed and load. The conditions tested in a test bench are similar to the ones that can be found in different kinds of machines like for example wind turbines. The authors demonstrate how to take advantage of the information on vibrations from the mechanical system under study in a wide range of load and speed conditions. Using such information the prognosis and detection of faults is faster and more reliable than the one obtained from an analysis over a restricted range of working conditions (e.g. nominal).

  15. Flight-Test Validation and Flying Qualities Evaluation of a Rotorcraft UAV Flight Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, Bernard; Tuschler, Mark B.; Kanade, Takeo

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a process of design and flight-test validation and flying qualities evaluation of a flight control system for a rotorcraft-based unmanned aerial vehicle (RUAV). The keystone of this process is an accurate flight-dynamic model of the aircraft, derived by using system identification modeling. The model captures the most relevant dynamic features of our unmanned rotorcraft, and explicitly accounts for the presence of a stabilizer bar. Using the identified model we were able to determine the performance margins of our original control system and identify limiting factors. The performance limitations were addressed and the attitude control system was 0ptimize.d for different three performance levels: slow, medium, fast. The optimized control laws will be implemented in our RUAV. We will first determine the validity of our control design approach by flight test validating our optimized controllers. Subsequently, we will fly a series of maneuvers with the three optimized controllers to determine the level of flying qualities that can be attained. The outcome enable us to draw important conclusions on the flying qualities requirements for small-scale RUAVs.

  16. Field testing of a prototype acoustic device for detection of Mediterranean fruit flies flying into a trap

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Worldwide, hundreds of thousands of traps are used seasonally in surveillance and mass trapping programs against the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann). An automated system for remotely detecting and identifying trapped insects would have considerable potential for reducing the ...

  17. Single Event Testing on Complex Devices: Test Like You Fly Versus Test-Specific Design Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Melanie D.; Label, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    We present a mechanism for evaluating complex digital systems targeted for harsh radiation environments such as space. Focus is limited to analyzing the single event upset (SEU) susceptibility of designs implemented inside Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices. Tradeoffs are provided between application-specific versus test-specific test structures.

  18. Design, assembly, and optical bench testing of a high-numerical-aperture miniature injection-molded objective for fiber-optic confocal reflectance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidley, Matthew D.; Carlson, Kristen D.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca R.; Descour, Michael R.

    2006-04-01

    The design, analysis, assembly methods, and optical-bench test results for a miniature injection-molded plastic objective lens used in a fiber-optic confocal reflectance microscope are presented. The five-lens plastic objective was tested as a stand-alone optical system before its integration into a confocal microscope for in vivo imaging of cells and tissue. Changing the spacing and rotation of the individual optical elements can compensate for fabrication inaccuracies and improve performance. The system performance of the miniature objective lens is measured by use of an industry-accepted slanted-edge modulation transfer function (MTF) metric. An estimated Strehl ratio of 0.61 and a MTF value of 0.66 at the fiber-optic bundle Nyquist frequency have been obtained. The optical bench testing system is configured to permit interactive optical alignment during testing to optimize performance. These results are part of an effort to demonstrate the manufacturability of low-cost, high-performance biomedical optics for high-resolution in vivo imaging. Disposable endoscopic microscope objectives could help in vivo confocal microscopy technology mature to permit wide-scale clinical screening and detection of early cancers and precancerous lesions.

  19. Flying Boresight for Advanced Testing and Calibration of Tracking Antennas and Flight Path Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, D.

    2015-09-01

    The application of ground-based boresight sources for calibration and testing of tracking antennas usually entails various difficulties, mostly due to unwanted ground effects. To avoid this problem, DLR MORABA developed a small, lightweight, frequency-adjustable S-band boresight source, mounted on a small remote-controlled multirotor aircraft. Highly accurate GPS-supported, position and altitude control functions allow both, very steady positioning of the aircraft in mid-air, and precise waypoint-based, semi-autonomous flights. In contrast to fixed near-ground boresight sources this flying setup enables to avoid obstructions in the Fresnel zone between source and antenna. Further, it minimizes ground reflections and other multipath effects which can affect antenna calibration. In addition, the large operating range of a flying boresight simplifies measurements in the far field of the antenna and permits undisturbed antenna pattern tests. A unique application is the realistic simulation of sophisticated flight paths, including overhead tracking and demanding trajectories of fast objects such as sounding rockets. Likewise, dynamic tracking tests are feasible which provide crucial information about the antenna pedestal performance — particularly at high elevations — and reveal weaknesses in the autotrack control loop of tracking antenna systems. During acceptance tests of MORABA's new tracking antennas, a manned aircraft was never used, since the Flying Boresight surpassed all expectations regarding usability, efficiency, and precision. Hence, it became an integral part of MORABA's standard antenna setup and calibration procedures.

  20. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Volume 1, Bench-scale testing and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

    1989-05-02

    AMAX Research & Development Center (AMAX R&D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  1. Analysis of wind-tunnel stability and control tests in terms of flying qualities of full-scale airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayten, Gerald G

    1945-01-01

    The analysis of results of wind-tunnel stability and control tests of powered airplane models in terms of the flying qualities of full-scale airplanes is advocated. In order to indicated the topics upon which comments are considered desirable in the report of a wind-tunnel stability and control investigation and to demonstrate the nature of the suggested analysis, the present NACA flying-qualities requirements are discussed in relation to wind-tunnel tests. General procedures for the estimation of flying qualities from wind-tunnel tests are outlined.

  2. Application of leaching tests for toxicity evaluation of coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiridis, V.; Samaras, P.; Kungolos, A.; Sakellaropoullos, G.P.

    2006-08-15

    The toxic properties of coal fly ash samples obtained from various coal combustion power plants were evaluated in this work using physicochemical analyses and bioassays. Physicochemical analyses showed that heavy metals present in solid samples included Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn. The results of the chemical analysis of eluates deduced by the application of standard leaching tests according to EN 12457-2 and Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) methods indicated that the compounds contained in fly ashes could potentially be transferred to the liquid phase depending upon the leaching method used. Heavy metal concentrations were higher in TCLP eluates, indicating that the initial pH value of the leaching medium significantly affected the transfer of these elements to the liquid phase. Tests conducted with the photobacterium Vibrio fischeri (Microtox test), the crustacean Daphnia magna, and the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus were used to assess toxicity of eluates obtained by both leaching tests. Daphnia magna was the most sensitive test organism. The EN 12457-2 method proved to be more reliable for toxicity evaluation of eluates. In contrast, the TCLP method showed some interference owing to acetic acid toxicity, and precipitation occurred after pH adjustment of eluates from acid to neutral range. The toxicity of both fly ashes and the corresponding solid leaching residues of EN 12457-2 and TCLP leaching tests was also measured using the Microtox Basic Solid phase Test. The results generated with this bioassay indicated that toxicity was greatly influenced by the pH status of the solid samples.

  3. Bench-scale testing of on-line control of column flotation using a novel analyzer. Third quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-24

    This document contains the third quarterly technical progress report for PTI`s Bench-Scale Testing Project of a circuit integrating PTI`s KEN-FLOTETM Column Flotation Technology and PTI`s On-Line Quality Monitor and Control System. The twelve-month project involves installation and testing of a 200--300 lb/hr. bench-scale flotation circuit at PETC`s Coal Preparation Process Research Facility (CPPRF) for two bituminous coals (Upper Freeport and Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam Raw Coals). Figure 1 contains the project plan, as well as the approach to completing the major tasks within the twelve-month project schedule. The project is broken down into three phases, which include: Phase I -- Preparation: The preparation phase was performed principally at PTI`s Calumet offices from October through December, 1992. It involved building of the equipment and circuitry, as well as some preliminary design and equipment testing; Phase II -- ET Circuit Installation and Testing: This installation and testing phase of the project was performed at PETC`s CPPRF from January through June, 1993, and was the major focus of the project. It involved testing of the continuous 200--300 lb/hr. circuit; and Phase III -- Project Finalization: The project finalization phase is occurring from July through September, 1993, at PTI`s Calumet offices and involves finalizing analytical work and data evaluation, as well as final project reporting. This Third Quarterly Technical Progress Report principally summarizes the results from the benchscale testing with the second coal (Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam Coal), which occurred in April through June, 1993. It also contains preliminary economic evaluations that will go into the Final Report, as well as the plan for the final reporting task.

  4. Bench-scale testing of on-line control of column flotation using a novel analyzer. Quarterly technical progress report, September 21, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-22

    This document contains the first quarterly technical progress report for PTI`s Bench-Scale Testing Project of a circuit integrating PTI`s KEN-FLOTETM Column Flotation Technology and PTI`s On-Line Quality Monitor Control System. The twelve-month project will involve installation of a 300 lb/hr. bench-scale testing circuit at PETC`s Coal Preparation Process Research Facility (CPPRF) and testing of two bituminous coals (Upper Freeport and Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam Raw Coals). Figure 1 contains the project plan as well as the approach to completing the major tasks within the twelvemonth project. The project is broken down into three phases, which include: Phase I - Preparation: The preparation phase was performed principally at PTI`s Calumet offices from October through December, 1992. It involved building of the equipment and circuitry, as well as some preliminary design and equipment testing. Phase II - ET Circuit Installation and Testing: This installation and testing phase of the project will be performed at PETC`s CPPRF from January through May, 1993, and will be the major focus of the project. It will involve testing of the continuous 300 lb/hr. circuit. Phase II - Project Finalization: The project finalization phase will occur from June through September, 1993, at PTI`s Calumet offices and will involve finalizing analytical work and data evaluation, as well as final project reporting. This quarterly progress report principally summarizes the results from the Phase I preparation work and the plan for the early portions of the Phase 11 installation and commissioning, which will occur in January and the first week of February, 1993.

  5. Design and test experience with a triply redundant digital fly-by-wire control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szalai, K. J.; Felleman, P. G.; Gera, J.; Glover, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    A triplex digital fly-by-wire flight control system was developed and then installed in a NASA F-8C aircraft to provide fail-operative, full authority control. Hardware and software redundancy management techniques were designed to detect and identify failures in the system. Control functions typical of those projected for future actively controlled vehicles were implemented. This paper describes the principal design features of the system, the implementation of computer, sensor, and actuator redundancy management, and the ground test results. An automated test program to verify sensor redundancy management software is also described.

  6. Aeroservoelastic Testing of Free Flying Wind Tunnel Models Part 2: A Centerline Supported Fullspan Model Tested for Gust Load Alleviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Robert C.; Vetter, Travis K.; Penning, Kevin B.; Coulson, David A.; Heeg, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This is part 2 of a two part document. Part 1 is titled: "Aeroservoelastic Testing of Free Flying Wind Tunnel Models Part 1: A Sidewall Supported Semispan Model Tested for Gust Load Alleviation and Flutter Suppression." A team comprised of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Boeing, and the NASA Langley Research Center conducted three aeroservoelastic wind tunnel tests in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to demonstrate active control technologies relevant to large, flexible vehicles. In the first of these three tests, a full-span, aeroelastically scaled, wind tunnel model of a joined wing SensorCraft vehicle was mounted to a force balance to acquire a basic aerodynamic data set. In the second and third tests, the same wind tunnel model was mated to a new, two degree of freedom, beam mount. This mount allowed the full-span model to translate vertically and pitch. Trimmed flight at10 percent static margin and gust load alleviation were successfully demonstrated. The rigid body degrees of freedom required that the model be flown in the wind tunnel using an active control system. This risky mode of testing necessitated that a model arrestment system be integrated into the new mount. The safe and successful completion of these free-flying tests required the development and integration of custom hardware and software. This paper describes the many systems, software, and procedures that were developed as part of this effort. The balance and free flying wind tunnel tests will be summarized. The design of the trim and gust load alleviation control laws along with the associated results will also be discussed.

  7. DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

    2009-03-31

    Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a

  8. Laboratory/bench-scale testing and evaluation of A. P. T. dry-plate scrubber. 10th quarterly progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Markel, K.

    1982-09-17

    The A.P.T. Dry Plate Scrubber uses a shallow, dense mobile bed of solid collector granules which move across a perforated plate. The gas stream containing fine particles and vapors is moved upward through the perforations to form high velocity gas jets. The fine particles are removed by inertial deposition onto the collector granules or by direct interception. Electrostatic forces also can be used to improve the collection efficiency and increase the adhesive forces between the particles and collectors. The DPS column consists of a series of collection stages (perforated plates) with the collectors either passing sequentially over each stage or being fed separately to each stage. The stages can be designed so as to promote the collection of large particles on the lower stages and the collection of fine particles and alkali vapors on the upper stages. The objective of this project is to conduct a bench scale experimental evaluation of the DPS at high temperature and pressure to determine its potential for controlling particulate and alkali vapor emissions from PFBC processes. The project is divided into two phases and seven major tasks as listed.

  9. Proceedings from the 2nd International Symposium on Formation Flying Missions and Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    -Ray Distributed Telescope; GNC System for the Deployment and Fine Control of the DARWIN Free-Flying Interferometer; Formation Algorithm and Simulation Testbed; and PLATFORM: A Formation Flying, RvD and Robotic Validation Test-bench.

  10. Monitoring of leachate at a test road using treated fly ash from municipal solid waste incinerator.

    PubMed

    François, D; Criado, C

    2007-01-31

    A treatment process for municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash has been jointly developed by the Université Libre in Brussels and the Solvay company. This experimental process has led to an experimental project with a multi-disciplinary team from Solvay along with several companies and organisations, plus support from the ADEME agency. After a laboratory assessment of the treated fly ash (TFA), its environmental properties and the optimal fields of application in road construction, as part of the Revasol project, a full-scale analysis was organised for both environmental and mechanical purposes. A test section using TFA was designed in order to collect percolation water; TFA was used as a road base component (a cement-bound graded aggregate containing 12% TFA). A reference section with the same structure was also built using natural materials. After a description of the treatment process and the test road design, the main TFA characteristics are presented. Then, the environmental behaviour of both sections over a 1-year period following construction is detailed: infiltration, leachate quality, cumulative release. This monitoring effort highlights not only the evolution in TFA behaviour, but also the general permeability of the road structure to various external influences. PMID:16621275

  11. Can leek interfere with bean plant-bean fly interaction? Test of ecological pest management in mixed cropping.

    PubMed

    Bandara, K A N P; Kumar, V; Ninkovic, V; Ahmed, E; Pettersson, J; Glinwood, R

    2009-06-01

    Effects of volatile odors from leek, Allium porum L., on the behavior of bean fly, Ophiomyia phaseoli (Tryon) (Diptera: Agromyzidae), were tested in laboratory olfactometer bioassays. Aqueous and solvent extracts (dichloromethane and methanol) of leek were repellent to adult flies. Whole leek plants were repellent and prevented attraction to the host plant, beans. Beans that had been exposed to volatiles from living leek plants for 7 d became repellent to the fly. Leek and several other crops were tested in field experiments to identify candidate crops for a mixed cropping system to minimize bean fly attack in beans, Phaseolus vulgaris L. In a wet season field experiment, mixed cropping of bean with leek or three other vegetable crops did not significantly reduce bean fly infestation or infection with Fusarium oxysporum Schltdl. compared with a mono crop, but significantly reduced plant death caused by both agents combined. In two dry season field experiments, mixed cropping of beans with leek significantly reduced adult bean fly settling, emergence, and death of bean plants compared with a mono crop. Bean yield per row was approximately 150% higher for the mixed crop, and economic returns were approximately Sri Lankan Rs. 180,000/ha, higher than for the mono crop. For the mono crop, the farmer had a monetary loss, which would become a small profit only if the costs of family labor are excluded. The study is an example of the first steps toward development of sustainable plant protection in a subsistence system. PMID:19610413

  12. CESIUM REMOVAL FROM TANKS 241-AN-103 & 241-SX-105 & 241-AZ-101 & 241AZ-102 COMPOSITE FOR TESTING IN BENCH SCALE STEAM REFORMER

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB; HUBER HJ

    2011-04-21

    This report documents the preparation of three actual Hanford tank waste samples for shipment to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Two of the samples were dissolved saltcakes from tank 241-AN-103 (hereafter AN-103) and tank 241-SX-105 (hereafter SX-105); one sample was a supernate composite from tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 (hereafter AZ-101/102). The preparation of the samples was executed following the test plans LAB-PLAN-10-00006, Test Plan for the Preparation of Samples from Hanford Tanks 241-SX-105, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-107, and LAB-PLN-l0-00014, Test Plan for the Preparation of a Composite Sample from Hanford Tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 for Steam Reformer Testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory. All procedural steps were recorded in laboratory notebook HNF-N-274 3. Sample breakdown diagrams for AN-103 and SX-105 are presented in Appendix A. The tank samples were prepared in support of a series of treatability studies of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process using a Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) at SRNL. Tests with simulants have shown that the FBSR mineralized waste form is comparable to low-activity waste glass with respect to environmental durability (WSRC-STI-2008-00268, Mineralization of Radioactive Wastes by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR): Comparisons to Vitreous Waste Forms and Pertinent Durability Testing). However, a rigorous assessment requires long-term performance data from FBSR product formed from actual Hanford tank waste. Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has initiated a Waste Form Qualification Program (WP-5.2.1-2010-001, Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-level Waste Form Qualification) to gather the data required to demonstrate that an adequate FBSR mineralized waste form can be produced. The documentation of the selection process of the three tank samples has been separately reported in RPP-48824, Sample Selection Process for Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using

  13. CESIUM REMOVAL FROM TANKS 241-AN-103 & 241-SX-105 & 241-AZ-101/102 COMPOSITE FOR TESTING IN BENCH SCALE STEAM REFORMER

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB; HUBER HJ

    2011-06-08

    This report documents the preparation of three actual Hanford tank waste samples for shipment to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Two of the samples were dissolved saltcakes from tank 241-AN-103 (hereafter AN-103) and tank 241-SX-105 (hereafter SX-105); one sample was a supernate composite from tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 (hereafter AZ-101/102). The preparation of the samples was executed following the test plans LAB-PLAN-10-00006, Test Plan for the Preparation of Samples from Hanford Tanks 241-SX-105, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-107, and LAB-PLN-10-00014, Test Plan for the Preparation of a Composite Sample from Hanford Tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 for Steam Reformer Testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory. All procedural steps were recorded in laboratory notebook HNF-N-274 3. Sample breakdown diagrams for AN-103 and SX-105 are presented in Appendix A. The tank samples were prepared in support of a series of treatability studies of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process using a Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) at SRNL. Tests with simulants have shown that the FBSR mineralized waste form is comparable to low-activity waste glass with respect to environmental durability (WSRC-STI-2008-00268, Mineralization of Radioactive Wastes by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR): Comparisons to Vitreous Waste Forms and Pertinent Durability Testing). However, a rigorous assessment requires long-term performance data from FB SR product formed from actual Hanford tank waste. Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has initiated a Waste Form Qualification Program (WP-S.2.1-20 1 0-00 1, Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-level Waste Form Qualification) to gather the data required to demonstrate that an adequate FBSR mineralized waste form can be produced. The documentation of the selection process of the three tank samples has been separately reported in RPP-48824, 'Sample Selection Process for Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using

  14. Metabolic cost of aerobic dance bench stepping at varying cadences and bench heights.

    PubMed

    Grier, Tamara D; Lloyd, Lisa K; Walker, John L; Murray, Tinker D

    2002-05-01

    To determine the metabolic and cardiovascular responses of aerobic dance bench stepping (ADBS) at commonly used cadences and bench heights, 30 women (19-47 years of age) performed a graded maximal treadmill test and four 8-minute submaximal ADBS routines. Subjects followed identical videotape sequences of basic ADBS movements at cadences of 125 and 130 beats.min(-1) at bench heights of 6 and 8 in. Physiological measurements were taken during each minute of each test. Mean values calculated from the last 3 minutes were used for data analysis. Although there were no physiological differences between ADBS at the 2 cadences, there were significant physiological differences between ADBS at the 2 bench heights. On average, a 2-in. increase in bench height, increased heart rate, VO2, and rating of perceived exertion by 10 beats.min(-1), 3.09 ml.kg(-1) min(-1), and 1.53, respectively. In conclusion, it appears that bench height is more of a factor than cadence in increasing metabolic cost of ADBS. Results from this study provide information about the energy cost of ADBS at the common bench heights and cadences used in this study and, therefore, may be used to help aerobic participants select the proper bench height and cadence combination to control body weight and develop cardiorespiratory fitness safely and effectively. PMID:11991777

  15. Copper and organisms in the Fly River: Linking laboratory testing and field responses to copper

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.W.; Ahsanullah, M.

    1995-12-31

    The Ok Tedi copper mine has operated in the headwaters of the Fly River system in Papua New Guinea since 1984, and has discharged both tailings and waste rock into the river system. ANCOVA modelling of total catches of fish by standardized effort indicated that the suspended particulate copper concentration was negatively correlated with fish catches, but that the concentrations of suspended solids and dissolved copper were not significantly related to fish catches. Multivariate analyses of fish catch compositions have indicated that the effects caused by dissolved and particulate copper have differed, and that the observed changes in fish catch composition have trended in a direction similar to the particulate copper vectors. The types of catch composition changes do not match the natural assemblages found to be associated with high uncontaminated suspended solids concentrations. Laboratory toxicity testing of native fish, prawns, cladocerans, mayflies, algae and higher plants has demonstrated that the dissolved copper concentrations in the Fly River system ({approximately}up to 20 pg/L) have low bioavailability and would not be expected to cause acute toxicity. Provided the dissolved copper concentration is in this range, particulate copper, as derived from mine wastes, has low acute and chronic toxicity at concentrations up to 8.5 times observed levels. Hypotheses put forward to explain the apparent paradox include: total particulate copper is a better measure of the toxic fraction of dissolved copper than is the concentration of copper passing a 0.45 {micro}m filter; or that fish are able to avoid particulate copper when the associated dissolved copper concentrations are less than the detectable threshold. Behavioral toxicity testing is being used to test these hypotheses.

  16. Catching fly balls in virtual reality: a critical test of the outfielder problem

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Philip W.; Foo, Patrick S.; Warren, William H.

    2013-01-01

    How does a baseball outfielder know where to run to catch a fly ball? The “outfielder problem” remains unresolved, and its solution would provide a window into the visual control of action. It may seem obvious that human action is based on an internal model of the physical world, such that the fielder predicts the landing point based on a mental model of the ball’s trajectory (TP). But two alternative theories, Optical Acceleration Cancellation (OAC) and Linear Optical Trajectory (LOT), propose that fielders are led to the right place at the right time by coupling their movements to visual information in a continuous “online” manner. All three theories predict successful catches and similar running paths. We provide a critical test by using virtual reality to perturb the vertical motion of the ball in mid-flight. The results confirm the predictions of OAC, but are at odds with LOT and TP. PMID:20055547

  17. Aeroservoelastic Testing of a Sidewall Mounted Free Flying Wind-Tunnel Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Robert C.; Vetter, Travis K.; Penning, Kevin B.; Coulson, David A.; Heeg, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    A team comprised of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Northrop Grumman, Lockheed Martin, and the NASA Langley Research Center conducted three j wind-tunnel tests in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to demonstrate active control technologies relevant to large, exible vehicles. In the rst of these three tests, a semispan, aeroelastically scaled, wind-tunnel model of a ying wing SensorCraft vehi- cle was mounted to a force balance to demonstrate gust load alleviation. In the second and third tests, the same wing was mated to a new, multi-degree-of-freedom, sidewall mount. This mount allowed the half-span model to translate vertically and pitch at the wing root, allowing better simulation of the full span vehicle's rigid-body modes. Gust Load Alleviation (GLA) and Body Freedom Flutter (BFF) suppression were successfully demonstrated. The rigid body degrees-of-freedom required that the model be own in the wind tunnel using an active control system. This risky mode of testing necessitated that a model arrestment system be integrated into the new mount. The safe and successful completion of these free-flying tests required the development and integration of custom hardware and software. This paper describes the many systems, software, and procedures that were developed as part of this effort.

  18. Description and Flight Test Results of the NASA F-8 Digital Fly-by-Wire Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A NASA program to develop digital fly-by-wire (DFBW) technology for aircraft applications is discussed. Phase I of the program demonstrated the feasibility of using a digital fly-by-wire system for aircraft control through developing and flight testing a single channel system, which used Apollo hardware, in an F-8C airplane. The objective of Phase II of the program is to establish a technology base for designing practical DFBW systems. It will involve developing and flight testing a triplex digital fly-by-wire system using state-of-the-art airborne computers, system hardware, software, and redundancy concepts. The papers included in this report describe the Phase I system and its development and present results from the flight program. Man-rated flight software and the effects of lightning on digital flight control systems are also discussed.

  19. Bench-scale testing of the micronized magnetite process. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-10

    The main accomplishments of Custom Coals and the project subcontractors, during this period, included: continued purchase of small equipment and supplies for the circuit; completed the circuit commissioning task; procured one lot of PennMag Grade-K and one lot Grade-L magnetite; completed work on analytical investigations; completed Classifying Circuit Component Testing on Pittsburgh No. 8 coal; completed the final Heavy-Media cyclone component testing on the Pittsburgh No. 8 seam using Grade-K and Grade-L magnetites; continued QA/QC tests on wet screening, wet splitting, Marcy Balance, and reproducibility checks on component tests and component test samples; and completed the magnetite recovery circuit component testing with and without screens using the Grade-K magnetite and the Pittsburgh No. 8 coal seam. This report contains a short discussion of the project description, objectives, budget, schedule, and teaming arrangement. It also includes a detailed discussion of the above mentioned project accomplishments and plans, organized by the various task series within the project work plan. The final section contains an outline of the specific project goals for the next quarterly reporting period.

  20. Tank Tests of NACA Model 40 Series of Hulls for Small Flying Boats and Amphibians

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, John B; Dawson, John R

    1937-01-01

    The NACA model 40 series of flying-boat hull models consists of 2 forebodies and 3 afterbodies combined to provide several forms suitable for use in small marine aircraft. One forebody is the usual form with hollow bow sections and the other has a bottom surface that is completely developable from bow to step. The afterbodies include a short pointed afterbody with an extension for the tail surfaces, a long afterbody similar to that of a seaplane float but long enough to carry the tail surfaces, and a third obtained by fitting a second step in the latter afterbody. The various combinations were tested in the NACA Tank by the general method over a suitable range of loadings. Fixed-trim tests were made for all speeds likely to be used and free-to-trim tests were made at low speeds to slightly beyond the hump speed. The characteristics of the hulls at best trim angles have been deduced from the data of the tests at fixed trim angles and are given in the form of nondimensional coefficients applicable to any size hull.

  1. Continuous bench-scale tests to assess METHOXYCOAL process performance. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.A.; Carty, R.H.

    1992-08-01

    Laboratory-scale research conducted at Southern Illinois University of Carbondale (SIUC) has shown that coal pyrolysis in the presence of CH{sub 4} and small quantities of O{sub 2} (the METHOXYCOAL process) can produce high yields of liquids and valuable chemicals compared to conventional pyrolysis. The addition of MgO, coal ash, and clays have been shown to further enhance coal conversion. The goal of this two-year project is to build upon that laboratory research by conducting continuous benchscale tests at IGT. Tests are being conducted with IBC-101 coal under CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2} blends with and without added coal ash, MgO, and/or clays, at temperatures and pressures up to 1000{degrees}F and 200 psig. These tests will provide data to select preferred operating conditions for production of targeted chemicals (phenol, cresols, naphthalene, C{sub 1}-naphthalenes) from high-sulfur Illinois coals.

  2. Bench-scale testing of the micronized magnetite process. Fifth quarterly technical progress report, July 1995--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-11

    The major focus of the project, which is scheduled to occur through January 1996, will be to install and test a 500{number_sign}/hr. fine coal-cleaning circuit at DOE`s Process Research Facility (PRF), located at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). The circuit will utilize an extremely fine, micron-sized magnetite media and small diameter cyclones to make efficient density separations on minus-28-Mesh coal. The main accomplishments of Custom Coals and the project subcontractors, during this period, included: continued purchasing small equipment and supplies for the circuit; procured a 46-ton sample of Lower Kittanning ``B`` Seam coal; completed eight primary integrated tests (PIT {number_sign}1--{number_sign}8) using the Pittsburgh No. 8 seam and the Grade-K and Grade-L magnetites; completed classifying cyclone tests using the Pittsburgh No. 8 and Lower Kittanning seams using a larger (0.5 inch) apex; completed data analysis on the four Grade-K magnetite ``closed-loop`` heavy-media cyclone tests; obtained a finer third grade of magnetite (Grade-M) with a MVD of approximately 3 microns; presented paper on the Micro- Mag project at the Coal Preparation, Utilization and Environmental Control Contractors Conference and a Poster Board Paper on the Micro- Mag Project at the Pittsburgh Coal Conference; and developed a method to modify all 5 Micro-Mag magnetic separators to approximately one third of their present size to better approximate commercial operation.

  3. Whole Genome Sequencing as a Genetic Test for Autism Spectrum Disorder: From Bench to Bedside and then Back Again

    PubMed Central

    Szego, Michael J.; Zawati, Ma’n H.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by repetitive patterns of behaviour and impairments in social interactions and communication abilities. Although ASD is a heterogeneous disorder, it is a highly genetic condition for which genetic testing is routinely performed. Microarray analysis is currently the standard of care genetic test for ASD, however whole genome sequencing offers several key advantages and will likely replace microarrays as a frontline genetic test in the near future. The 2nd Consultation on Translation of Genomic Advances into Health Applications took place in the spring of 2014 to broadly explore the current and potential impacts of genomic advances in supporting personalized and family-centered care for autism and related developmental conditions. In anticipation of WGS becoming a standard of care test, we examine the policy landscape and highlight the lack of consistency among guidelines regarding what genomic information should be returned to patients and their families. We also discuss the need to create the infrastructure to share clinical WGS data with researchers in a systematic and ethically defensible manner. PMID:27274747

  4. Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Task 7, Evaluation of bench-scale and component tests. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This report presents the Task 7 findings of the project entitled ``Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration`` to develop selective agglomeration technology to a commercially acceptable level by 1992. The objectives of this report are to summarize the work completed as a part of Task 7, which includes engineering analysis of process deficiencies, analysis of all project test results, and evaluation and selection of an agglomeration process for further development in Phase II. Other objectives of this task included evaluation of the selective agglomeration technology and analysis of all the major deficiencies remaining at the conclusion of Phase I of the project. An overview of the agglomeration processes that were under consideration is presented, along with a discussion of the various test parameters that were found to be important during project testing. This report includes a comprehensive evaluation of all test data and a summary of the major findings; it also provides characterization data for all the project coals and presents the agglomeration process selected for Phase II along with a discussion of the criteria and rationale for the selection.

  5. Bench-level characterization of a CMOS standard-cell D-latch using alpha-particle sensitive test circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Blaes, B.R.; Soli, G.A.; Buehler, M.G. )

    1991-12-01

    This paper describes a methodology for predicting the SEU susceptibility of a standard-cell D-latch using an alpha-particle sensitive SRAM, SPICE critical charge simulation results, and alpha-particle interaction physics. Measurements were made on a 1.6-{mu}m n-well CMOS 4k-bit test SRAM irradiated with an Am-241 alpha-particle source. A collection depth of 6.09 {mu}m was determined using these results and TRIM computer code. Using this collection depth and SPICE derived critical charge results on the latch design, an LET threshold of 34 Mev cm{sup 2}/mg was predicted. Heavy ion tests were then performed on the latch and an LET threshold of 41 MeV cm{sup 2}/mg was determined.

  6. Bench-level characterization of a CMOS standard-cell D-latch using alpha-particle sensitive test circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaes, B. R.; Soli, G. A.; Buehler, M. G.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is described for predicting the SEU susceptibility of a standard-cell D-latch using an alpha-particle sensitive SRAM, SPICE critical charge simulation results, and alpha-particle interaction physics. Measurements were made on a 1.6-micron n-well CMOS 4-kb test SRAM irradiated with an Am-241 alpha-particle source. A collection depth of 6.09 micron was determined using these results and TRIM computer code. Using this collection depth and SPICE derived critical charge results on the latch design, an LET threshold of 34 MeV sq cm/mg was predicted. Heavy ion tests were then performed on the latch and an LET threshold of 41 MeV sq cm/mg was determined.

  7. Quality Testing of Three Species of Tephritid Fruit Flies After Embryo Cryopreservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluates characteristics commonly used to define insect quality or fitness by using a complement of three species of tephritid fruit flies obtained from cryopreserved embryos. The Mexican, Anastrepah ludens, Caribbean, A. suspense, and Mediterranean, Certatitis capitata, fruit flies were...

  8. Bench-top validation testing of selected immunological and molecular Renibacterium salmoninarum diagnostic assays by comparison with quantitative bacteriological culture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, D.G.; Applegate, L.J.; Murray, A.L.; Purcell, M.K.; McKibben, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    No gold standard assay exhibiting error-free classification of results has been identified for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Validation of diagnostic assays for R. salmoninarum has been hindered by its unique characteristics and biology, and difficulties in locating suitable populations of reference test animals. Infection status of fish in test populations is often unknown, and it is commonly assumed that the assay yielding the most positive results has the highest diagnostic accuracy, without consideration of misclassification of results. In this research, quantification of R. salmoninarum in samples by bacteriological culture provided a standardized measure of viable bacteria to evaluate analytical performance characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and repeatability) of non-culture assays in three matrices (phosphate-buffered saline, ovarian fluid and kidney tissue). Non-culture assays included polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), direct smear fluorescent antibody technique (FAT), membrane-filtration FAT, nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and three real-time quantitative PCR assays. Injection challenge of specific pathogen-free Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), with R. salmoninarum was used to estimate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Results did not identify a single assay demonstrating the highest analytical and diagnostic performance characteristics, but revealed strengths and weaknesses of each test.

  9. Bench-top validation testing of selected immunological and molecular Renibacterium salmoninarum diagnostic assays by comparison with quantitative bacteriological culture.

    PubMed

    Elliott, D G; Applegate, L J; Murray, A L; Purcell, M K; McKibben, C L

    2013-09-01

    No gold standard assay exhibiting error-free classification of results has been identified for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Validation of diagnostic assays for R. salmoninarum has been hindered by its unique characteristics and biology, and difficulties in locating suitable populations of reference test animals. Infection status of fish in test populations is often unknown, and it is commonly assumed that the assay yielding the most positive results has the highest diagnostic accuracy, without consideration of misclassification of results. In this research, quantification of R. salmoninarum in samples by bacteriological culture provided a standardized measure of viable bacteria to evaluate analytical performance characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and repeatability) of non-culture assays in three matrices (phosphate-buffered saline, ovarian fluid and kidney tissue). Non-culture assays included polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), direct smear fluorescent antibody technique (FAT), membrane-filtration FAT, nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and three real-time quantitative PCR assays. Injection challenge of specific pathogen-free Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), with R. salmoninarum was used to estimate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Results did not identify a single assay demonstrating the highest analytical and diagnostic performance characteristics, but revealed strengths and weaknesses of each test. PMID:23346868

  10. High-temperature-staged fluidized-bed combustion (HITS), bench scale experimental test program conducted during 1980. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R E; Jassowski, D M; Newton, R A; Rudnicki, M L

    1981-04-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the process feasibility of the first stage of the HITS two-stage coal combustion system. Tests were run in a small (12-in. ID) fluidized bed facility at the Energy Engineering Laboratory, Aerojet Energy Conversion Company, Sacramento, California. The first stage reactor was run with low (0.70%) and high (4.06%) sulfur coals with ash fusion temperatures of 2450/sup 0/ and 2220/sup 0/F, respectively. Limestone was used to scavenge the sulfur. The produced low-Btu gas was burned in a combustor. Bed temperature and inlet gas percent oxygen were varied in the course of testing. Key results are summarized as follows: the process was stable and readily controllable, and generated a free-flowing char product using coals with low (2220/sup 0/F) and high (2450/sup 0/F) ash fusion temperatures at bed temperatures of at least 1700/sup 0/ and 1800/sup 0/F, respectively; the gaseous product was found to have a total heating value of about 120 Btu/SCF at 1350/sup 0/F, and the practicality of cleaning the hot product gas and delivering it to the combustor was demonstrated; sulfur capture efficiencies above 80% were demonstrated for both low and high sulfur coals with a calcium/sulfur mole ratio of approximately two; gasification rates of about 5,000 SCF/ft/sup 2/-hr were obtained for coal input rates ranging from 40 to 135 lbm/hr, as required to maintain the desired bed temperatures; and the gaseous product yielded combustion temperatures in excess of 3000/sup 0/F when burned with preheated (900/sup 0/F) air. The above test results support the promise of the HITS system to provide a practical means of converting high sulfur coal to a clean gas for industrial applications. Sulfur capture, gas heating value, and gas production rate are all in the range required for an effective system. Planning is underway for additional testing of the system in the 12-in. fluid bed facility, including demonstration of the second stage char burnup

  11. Bench-scale testing of the micronized magnetite process. Third quarterly technical progress report, January 1995--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-29

    The major focus of the project, which is scheduled to occur through December 1995, will be to install and test a 500{number_sign}/hr. fine-coal cleaning circuit at DOE`s Process Research Facility (PRF), located at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). The circuit will utilize an extremely fine, micron-sized magnetite media and small diameter cyclones to make efficient density separations on minus-28-Mesh coal. The overall objectives of the project are to: Determine the effects of operating time on the characteristics of the recirculating medium in a continuous integrated processing circuit, and subsequently, the sensitivity of cyclone separation performance to the quality of the recirculating medium; and determine the technical and economic feasibility of various unit operations and systems in optimizing the separation and recovery of the micronized magnetite from the coal products. This report contains a short discussion of the project description, objectives, budget, schedule, and teaming arrangement. The final section contains an outline of the specific project goals for the next quarterly reporting period.

  12. Monte-Carlo Simulation and Automated Test Bench for Developing a Multichannel NIR-Based Vital-Signs Monitor.

    PubMed

    Bruser, Christoph; Strutz, Nils; Winter, Stefan; Leonhardt, Steffen; Walter, Marian

    2015-06-01

    Unobtrusive, long-term monitoring of cardiac (and respiratory) rhythms using only non-invasive vibration sensors mounted in beds promises to unlock new applications in home and low acuity monitoring. This paper presents a novel concept for such a system based on an array of near infrared (NIR) sensors placed underneath a regular bed mattress. We focus on modeling and analyzing the underlying technical measurement principle with the help of a 2D model of a polyurethane foam mattress and Monte-Carlo simulations of the opto-mechanical interaction responsible for signal genesis. Furthermore, a test rig to automatically and repeatably impress mechanical vibrations onto a mattress is introduced and used to identify the properties of a prototype implementation of the proposed measurement principle. Results show that NIR-based sensing is capable of registering miniscule deformations of the mattress with a high spatial specificity. As a final outlook, proof-of-concept measurements with the sensor array are presented which demonstrate that cardiorespiratory movements of the body can be detected and that automatic heart rate estimation at competitive error levels is feasible with the proposed approach. PMID:25203992

  13. EVALUATING THE EFFECTS OF FLY ASH EXPOSURE ON FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES: FATHEAD MINNOW EMBRYO-LARVAL TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen; Elmore, Logan R; McCracken, Kitty

    2012-05-01

    On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash in an 84-acre complex of the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Steam Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits extended as far as 4 miles upstream (Emory River mile 6) of the Plant, and some ash was carried as far downstream as Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}4 miles downstream of the Tennessee River confluence with the Clinch River). A byproduct of coal burning power plants, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be toxic to biological systems. The effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to be the effects of specific ash constituents, especially selenium, on fish early life stages. Uptake by adult female fish of fly ash constituents through the food chain and subsequent maternal transfer of contaminants to the developing eggs is thought to be the primary route of selenium exposure to larval fish (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Lemly 1999, Moscatello and others 2006), but direct contact of the fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash constituents in river water and sediments is also a potential risk factor (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Jezierska and others 2009). To address the risk of fly ash from the Kingston spill to the reproductive health of downstream fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA including: (1) a field study of the bioaccumulation of fly ash constituents in fish ovaries and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill; (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (reported in the current

  14. Mobility of olive fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) late third instars and teneral adults in test arenas.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Victoria Y

    2012-10-01

    The mobility of olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae (Rossi), late third instars before pupation, teneral adults before flight, and mature adults restricted from flight were studied under mulches in greenhouse cage tests, in horizontal pipes, vertical bottles and pipes filled with sand, and by observation on smooth laboratory surfaces. Percentage adults emerging from pupae and percentage adult females that escaped soil, fabric, and paper mulches over a soil or sand substrate ranged from 63 to 83, and 40-53%, respectively. Percentage adults emerging from pupae and percentage adult females that walked through the open interior of 1.52-6.10-m horizontal pipes of 1.5-2.0-cm inner diameter ranged from 57 to 81, and 27-61%, respectively. Percentage adults emerging from pupae that escaped through sand depths of 2.5-10.2, and 12.7-20.3 cm, ranged from 68 to 87, and 12-88%; and percentage adult females that escaped ranged from 46 to 58, and 38-70%, respectively. In 15.4-cm-inner-diameter pipes filled with different heights of sand, the highest percentage of the total number of adults that emerged in the control were found from 0 to 20.3 cm, and ranged from 37 to 71%. Ten to 47% of adults were found from 20.3 cm to below the surface, and 6-21% escaped to the top of 20.3-50.8 cm high sand columns. In column heights of 55.9 and 61 cm, pressures at the bottom caused by the weight of the sand above were 91.4 and 99.7 g/cm(2), respectively, and a mean of <1 adult escaped to the top. Before pupation, the late third instars were found to travel continuously for 6.9 h over 23.9 m at a speed of 6.0 cm per min, when placed on a smooth surface, at 22.2°C. Teneral females and males that could not fly, made ≍7 stops totaling 11-13 min, walked at a speed of 57-62 cm per min, and began a rest period of 83-84 min duration, at 85-89 min before flight. Males walked a distance of 13.1 m in 22 min, which was greater than females that walked for 9.6 m in 17 min, at 20-22°C and 35% RH. The

  15. Tank tests of two models of flying-boat hulls to determine the effect of ventilating the step

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, John R

    1937-01-01

    The results of tests made in the N.A.C.A. tank on two models of flying-boat hulls to determine the effect of ventilating the step are given graphically. The step of N.A.C.A. model 11-C was ventilated in several different ways and it was found that the resistance of the normal form is not appreciably affected by artificial ventilation in any of the forms tried. Further tests made with the depth of the step of model 11-C reduced likewise show no appreciable effect on the resistance from ventilation of the step. Tests were made on a model of the hull of the Navy P3M-1 flying-boat hull both with and without ventilation of the step. It was found that the discontinuity which is obtained in the resistance curves of this model is eliminated by ventilating the step.

  16. A Lightweight, Precision-Deployable, Optical Bench for High Energy Astrophysics Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danner, Rolf; Dailey, D.; Lillie, C.

    2011-09-01

    The small angle of total reflection for X-rays, forcing grazing incidence optics with large collecting areas to long focal lengths, has been a fundamental barrier to the advancement of high-energy astrophysics. Design teams around the world have long recognized that a significant increase in effective area beyond Chandra and XMM-Newton requires either a deployable optical bench or separate X-ray optics and instrument module on formation flying spacecraft. Here, we show that we have in hand the components for a lightweight, precision-deployable optical bench that, through its inherent design features, is the affordable path to the next generation of imaging high-energy astrophysics missions. We present our plans for a full-scale engineering model of a deployable optical bench for Explorer-class missions. We intend to use this test article to raise the technology readiness level (TRL) of the tensegrity truss for a lightweight, precision-deployable optical bench for high-energy astrophysics missions from TRL 3 to TRL 5 through a set of four well-defined technology milestones. The milestones cover the architecture's ability to deploy and control the focal point, characterize the deployed dynamics, determine long-term stability, and verify the stowed load capability. Our plan is based on detailed design and analysis work and the construction of a first prototype by our team. Building on our prior analysis and the high TRL of the architecture components we are ready to move on to the next step. The key elements to do this affordably are two existing, fully characterized, flight-quality, deployable booms. After integrating them into the test article, we will demonstrate that our architecture meets the deployment accuracy, adjustability, and stability requirements. The same test article can be used to further raise the TRL in the future.

  17. 40 CFR 89.315 - Analyzer bench checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analyzer bench checks. 89.315 Section 89.315 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 89.315 Analyzer bench checks....

  18. 40 CFR 90.323 - Analyzer bench checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analyzer bench checks. 90.323 Section 90.323 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.323 Analyzer bench...

  19. 40 CFR 89.315 - Analyzer bench checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Analyzer bench checks. 89.315 Section 89.315 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 89.315 Analyzer bench checks....

  20. 40 CFR 90.323 - Analyzer bench checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Analyzer bench checks. 90.323 Section 90.323 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.323 Analyzer bench...

  1. 40 CFR 91.323 - Analyzer bench checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Analyzer bench checks. 91.323 Section 91.323 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 91.323 Analyzer bench checks. (a) Prior to initial...

  2. JV TASK 45-MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR ELECTRIC UTILITIES BURNING LIGNITE COAL, PHASE I BENCH-AND PILOT-SCALE TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Pavlish; Michael J. Holmes; Steven A. Benson; Charlene R. Crocker; Edwin S. Olson; Kevin C. Galbreath; Ye Zhuang; Brandon M. Pavlish

    2003-10-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center has completed the first phase of a 3-year, two-phase consortium project to develop and demonstrate mercury control technologies for utilities that burn lignite coal. The overall project goal is to maintain the viability of lignite-based energy production by providing utilities with low-cost options for meeting future mercury regulations. Phase I objectives are to develop a better understanding of mercury interactions with flue gas constituents, test a range of sorbent-based technologies targeted at removing elemental mercury (Hg{sup o}) from flue gases, and demonstrate the effectiveness of the most promising technologies at the pilot scale. The Phase II objectives are to demonstrate and quantify sorbent technology effectiveness, performance, and cost at a sponsor-owned and operated power plant. Phase I results are presented in this report along with a brief overview of the Phase II plans. Bench-scale testing provided information on mercury interactions with flue gas constituents and relative performances of the various sorbents. Activated carbons were prepared from relatively high-sodium lignites by carbonization at 400 C (752 F), followed by steam activation at 750 C (1382 F) and 800 C (1472 F). Luscar char was also steam-activated at these conditions. These lignite-based activated carbons, along with commercially available DARCO FGD and an oxidized calcium silicate, were tested in a thin-film, fixed-bed, bench-scale reactor using a simulated lignitic flue gas consisting of 10 {micro}g/Nm{sup 3} Hg{sup 0}, 6% O{sub 2}, 12% CO{sub 2}, 15% H{sub 2}O, 580 ppm SO{sub 2}, 120 ppm NO, 6 ppm NO{sub 2}, and 1 ppm HCl in N{sub 2}. All of the lignite-based activated (750 C, 1382 F) carbons required a 30-45-minute conditioning period in the simulated lignite flue gas before they exhibited good mercury sorption capacities. The unactivated Luscar char and oxidized calcium silicate were ineffective in capturing mercury. Lignite

  3. Aeroservoelastic Testing of Free Flying Wind Tunnel Models Part 1: A Sidewall Supported Semispan Model Tested for Gust Load Alleviation and Flutter Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Robert C.; Vetter, Travis K.; Penning, Kevin B.; Coulson, David A.; Heeg, Jennifer.

    2013-01-01

    of a two part document. Part 2 is titled: "Aeroservoelastic Testing of Free Flying Wind Tunnel Models, Part 2: A Centerline Supported Fullspan Model Tested for Gust Load Alleviation." A team comprised of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Northrop Grumman, Lockheed Martin, and the NASA Langley Research Center conducted three aeroservoelastic wind tunnel tests in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to demonstrate active control technologies relevant to large, flexible vehicles. In the first of these three tests, a semispan, aeroelastically scaled, wind tunnel model of a flying wing SensorCraft vehicle was mounted to a force balance to demonstrate gust load alleviation. In the second and third tests, the same wing was mated to a new, multi-degree of freedom, sidewall mount. This mount allowed the half-span model to translate vertically and pitch at the wing root, allowing better simulation of the full span vehicle's rigid body modes. Gust load alleviation (GLA) and Body freedom flutter (BFF) suppression were successfully demonstrated. The rigid body degrees-of-freedom required that the model be flown in the wind tunnel using an active control system. This risky mode of testing necessitated that a model arrestment system be integrated into the new mount. The safe and successful completion of these free flying tests required the development and integration of custom hardware and software. This paper describes the many systems, software, and procedures that were developed as part of this effort.

  4. Evaluation of municipal waste incinerator fly ash toxicity and the role of cadmium by two aquatic toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Hidehiro

    1996-12-31

    Fly ash from a municipal solid waste incinerator in Japan is regulated under the hazardous waste regulation Waste under Special Control, according to the Amendment of the Waste Disposal and Public Cleansing Law, because it contains high concentrations of heavy metals which are available for leaching. To evaluate the toxicity of fly ash, a fly ash leachate was prepared according to the Japanese standard leaching procedure. The chemical analysis of the leachate showed that possibly one of the most toxic substances was cadmium. The toxicity of the leachate and the cadmium was determined by algal assay and a Daphnia acute toxicity test. The results showed that the leachate was about seven times more toxic to the growth of algae and 20 to 30 times more toxic to the survival of Daphnia than expected from its cadmium concentration. The toxicity interaction between cadmium and the other constituents in the leachate was also examined. The toxicity of cadmium showed an additive effect with the other constituents in the leachate in algal assay. In the Daphnia test, however, cadmium showed an antagonistic effect.

  5. A collection of the collapsed results of general tank tests of miscellaneous flying-boat-hull models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, F W S , Jr

    1947-01-01

    Presented here are the summary charts of the collapsed results of general tank tests of about 100 flying boat hull models. These summary charts are intended to be used as an engineering tool to enable a flying boat designer to grasp more quickly the significance of various hull form parameters as they influence his particular airplane. The form in which the charts are prepared is discussed in some detail in order to make them clearer to the designer. This is a data report, and no attempt has been made to produce conclusions or correlations of the usual sort. However, some generalizations are put forward on the various methods in which summary charts may be used.

  6. Emerging technology report: Bench-scale testing of photolysis, chemical oxidation, and biodegradation of PCB contaminated soils, and photolysis of TCDD contaminated soils. Report for August 1991-June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Alperin, E.; Root, D.K.

    1994-10-01

    Bench-scale tests were conducted to investigate the feasibility of a two phase detoxification process that would have application to the treatment of soils contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) abd 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). The first of the process was to degrade the contaminants by using Ultraviolet (UV) radiation facilitated by the addition of a surfactant to mobilize contaminants. Biological degradation, the second step, was then used to further detoxify the soil. Results from UV testing indicated that there was no apparent destruction of the dioxin on the soil. PCB reductions ranged from less than 15% to 69%.

  7. Testing the FLI in the region of the Pallas asteroid family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorović, N.; Novaković, B.

    2015-08-01

    Computation of the fast Lyapunov indicator (FLI) is one of the most efficient numerical ways to characterize dynamical nature of motion and to detect phase-space structures in a large variety of dynamical models. Despite its effectiveness, FLI was mainly used for symplectic maps or simple Hamiltonians, but it has never been used to study dynamics of asteroids to a greater extent. This research shows that FLI could also be successfully applied to real (Solar system) dynamics. For this purpose, we focus on the main belt region where the Pallas asteroid family is located. By using the full Solar system model, different sets of initial conditions and different integration times, we managed not only to visualize a large multiplet of resonances located in the region, but also their structures, chaotic boundaries, stability islands therein and the positions of their mutual interaction. In the end, we have identified some of the most dominant resonances present in the region and established a link between these resonances and chaotic areas visible in our maps. We have illustrated that FLI once again has shown its efficiency to detect dynamical structures in the main belt, e.g. in the Pallas asteroid family, with a surprisingly good clarity.

  8. A Test of Transitive Inferences in Free-Flying Honeybees: Unsuccessful Performance Due to Memory Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benard, Julie; Giurfa, Martin

    2004-01-01

    We asked whether honeybees, "Apis mellifera," could solve a transitive inference problem. Individual free-flying bees were conditioned with four overlapping premise pairs of five visual patterns in a multiple discrimination task (A+ vs. B-, B+ vs. C-, C+ vs. D-, D+ vs. E-, where + and - indicate sucrose reward or absence of it, respectively). They…

  9. Fly ash leachate generation and qualitative trends at Ohio test sites

    SciTech Connect

    Solc, J.; Foster, H.J.; Butler, R.D.

    1995-12-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy, the environmental impact and potential contamination from landfilled fly ash (coal conversion solid residues - CCSRs) have been studied at field sites in Ohio. The progressive increase of moisture content within pilot cells over depth and time facilitated intensive chemical processes and generation of highly alkaline (pH of 10 to 12) leachate. Chemistry of pore water from lysimeters and ASTM leachate from fly ash and soil cores indicate the leachate potential to migrate out of deposit and impact the pore water quality of surrounding soils. Na, SO{sub 4} and, particularly, K, Cl, pH, and EC appeared to be valuable indicator parameters for tracking potential leachate transport both within the cells and below the ash/soil interface.

  10. Flying wings / flying fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    2001-01-01

    The present paper has documented the historical relationships between various classes of all lifting vehicles, which includes the flying wing, all wing, tailless, lifting body, and lifting fuselage. The diversity in vehicle focus was to ensure that all vehicle types that map have contributed to or been influenced by the development of the classical flying wing concept was investigated. The paper has provided context and perspective for present and future aircraft design studies that may employ the all lifting vehicle concept. The paper also demonstrated the benefit of developing an understanding of the past in order to obtain the required knowledge to create future concepts with significantly improved aerodynamic performance.

  11. Astrophysics on the Lab Bench

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    In this article some basic laboratory bench experiments are described that are useful for teaching high school students some of the basic principles of stellar astrophysics. For example, in one experiment, students slam a plastic water-filled bottle down onto a bench, ejecting water towards the ceiling, illustrating the physics associated with a…

  12. The Apennine Bench Formation revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spudis, P. D.; Hawke, B. R.

    1985-01-01

    The Apennine Bench Formation consists of pre-mare light plains materials that crop out south of the crater Archimedes, inside the Imbrium basin. This material was ascribed to either impact or volcanic origins. The characteristics of Apollo 15 KREEP basalts and the Apennine Bench Formation are reviewed to determine whether their characteristics are compatible with a volcanic origin.

  13. A discussion of certain problems connected with the design of hulls of flying boats and the use of general test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, Walter S

    1938-01-01

    Report presents the results of a survey of problems encountered in applying general test data to the design of flying-boat hulls. It is shown how basic design features may be readily determined from special plots of test data. A study of the effect of the size of a flying boat on the probable limits to be covered by the general test data is included and recommendations for special tests and new methods of presenting test data for direct use in design are given.

  14. BENCH SCALE SALTSTONE PROCESS DEVELOPMENT MIXING STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A.; Hansen, E.

    2011-08-03

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to develop a bench scale test facility, using a mixer, transfer pump, and transfer line to determine the impact of conveying the grout through the transfer lines to the vault on grout properties. Bench scale testing focused on the effect the transfer line has on the rheological property of the grout as it was processed through the transfer line. Rheological and other physical properties of grout samples were obtained prior to and after pumping through a transfer line. The Bench Scale Mixing Rig (BSMR) consisted of two mixing tanks, grout feed tank, transfer pump and transfer hose. The mixing tanks were used to batch the grout which was then transferred into the grout feed tank. The contents of the feed tank were then pumped through the transfer line (hose) using a progressive cavity pump. The grout flow rate and pump discharge pressure were monitored. Four sampling stations were located along the length of the transfer line at the 5, 105 and 205 feet past the transfer pump and at 305 feet, the discharge of the hose. Scaling between the full scale piping at Saltstone to bench scale testing at SRNL was performed by maintaining the same shear rate and total shear at the wall of the transfer line. The results of scaling down resulted in a shorter transfer line, a lower average velocity, the same transfer time and similar pressure drops. The condition of flow in the bench scale transfer line is laminar. The flow in the full scale pipe is in the transition region, but is more laminar than turbulent. The resulting plug in laminar flow in the bench scale results in a region of no-mixing. Hence mixing, or shearing, at the bench scale should be less than that observed in the full scale, where this plug is non existent due to the turbulent flow. The bench scale tests should be considered to be conservative due to the highly laminar condition of flow that exists. Two BSMR runs were performed. In both cases, wall

  15. Tribological bench and engine dynamometer tests of a low viscosity SAE 0W-16 engine oil using a combination of ionic liquid and ZDDP as anti-wear additives

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, William C.; Gao, Hong; Kheireddin, Bassem; Papke, Brian L.; Luo, Huimin; West, Brian H.; Qu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported an oil-miscible phosphonium-organophosphate ionic liquid (IL) with an effective anti-wear (AW) functionality when added to a base oil by itself or combined with a conventional zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) for a synergistic effect. In this research, we investigated whether this synergy manifests in formulated engine oils. An experimental SAE 0W-16 engine oil was generated containing a combination of IL and ZDDP with equal phosphorus contribution. The prototype engine oil was first evaluated using tribological bench tests: AW performance in boundary lubrication (BL) and friction behavior (Stribeck curves) in elastohydrodynamic, mixed, and BL. In addition, the forthcoming standard Sequence VIE engine dynamometer test was then conducted to demonstrate improved fuel economy. Results were benchmarked against those of another experimental engine oil with almost the same formulation except using ZDDP only without the IL (similar total phosphorus content). The IL-ZDDP formulation consistently outperforms the ZDDP-only formulation in friction reduction and wear protection, and results from the bench and engine tests are well correlated.

  16. Tribological bench and engine dynamometer tests of a low viscosity SAE 0W-16 engine oil using a combination of ionic liquid and ZDDP as anti-wear additives

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barnhill, William C.; Gao, Hong; Kheireddin, Bassem; Papke, Brian L.; Luo, Huimin; West, Brian H.; Qu, Jun

    2015-09-29

    We have previously reported an oil-miscible phosphonium-organophosphate ionic liquid (IL) with an effective anti-wear (AW) functionality when added to a base oil by itself or combined with a conventional zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) for a synergistic effect. In this research, we investigated whether this synergy manifests in formulated engine oils. An experimental SAE 0W-16 engine oil was generated containing a combination of IL and ZDDP with equal phosphorus contribution. The prototype engine oil was first evaluated using tribological bench tests: AW performance in boundary lubrication (BL) and friction behavior (Stribeck curves) in elastohydrodynamic, mixed, and BL. In addition, the forthcoming standardmore » Sequence VIE engine dynamometer test was then conducted to demonstrate improved fuel economy. Results were benchmarked against those of another experimental engine oil with almost the same formulation except using ZDDP only without the IL (similar total phosphorus content). The IL-ZDDP formulation consistently outperforms the ZDDP-only formulation in friction reduction and wear protection, and results from the bench and engine tests are well correlated.« less

  17. Tribological bench and engine dynamometer tests of a low viscosity SAE 0W-16 engine oil using a combination of ionic liquid and ZDDP as anti-wear additives

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, William C.; Gao, Hong; Kheireddin, Bassem; Papke, Brian L.; Luo, Huimin; West, Brian H.; Qu, Jun

    2015-09-29

    We have previously reported an oil-miscible phosphonium-organophosphate ionic liquid (IL) with an effective anti-wear (AW) functionality when added to a base oil by itself or combined with a conventional zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) for a synergistic effect. In this research, we investigated whether this synergy manifests in formulated engine oils. An experimental SAE 0W-16 engine oil was generated containing a combination of IL and ZDDP with equal phosphorus contribution. The prototype engine oil was first evaluated using tribological bench tests: AW performance in boundary lubrication (BL) and friction behavior (Stribeck curves) in elastohydrodynamic, mixed, and BL. In addition, the forthcoming standard Sequence VIE engine dynamometer test was then conducted to demonstrate improved fuel economy. Results were benchmarked against those of another experimental engine oil with almost the same formulation except using ZDDP only without the IL (similar total phosphorus content). The IL-ZDDP formulation consistently outperforms the ZDDP-only formulation in friction reduction and wear protection, and results from the bench and engine tests are well correlated.

  18. Response of olive fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) to an attract-and-kill trap in greenhouse cage tests.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Victoria Y

    2014-01-01

    A novel attract-and-kill trap for olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) (Diptera: Tephritidae), was constructed with yellow corrugated plastic in an inverted cylindrical pan shape formed from a disk and collar. The trap components were tested under three greenhouse temperatures and humidities of warm, hot, and very hot for attractiveness to caged young or older adults. A greater proportion of adults regardless of age were found underneath the devices including disks, cylindrical pans, and pans with pheromone lures and test units of cylindrical pans sprayed with water, insecticidal bait spray, and with lures. The effect was related to lower temperatures on the underside compared with the top and the intolerance of the pest to heat. A circular collar added to the perimeter of the disk that formed the top of the inverted cylinder made the attract-and-kill trap more attractive to adults than the disk alone. Pheromone lures or bait sprays did not increase adult attraction, so were not needed for efficacy. The cylindrical pan was especially attractive to adults when temperatures were high by providing shelter from the heat. At very high temperatures, the pan became unattractive, possibly due to heating of the construction materials. Cylindrical pans sprayed with water on the underside attracted the highest number of adults especially at high temperatures. Greenhouse tests showed that the inverted cylindrical pan design has potential as an attract-and-kill device for olive fruit fly control. PMID:25368094

  19. Test-methods on the test-bench: a comparison of complete exhaust and exhaust particle extracts for genotoxicity/mutagenicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Sandro; Heeb, Norbert V; Czerwinski, Jan; Comte, Pierre; Mayer, Andreas; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara

    2014-05-01

    With the growing number of new exhaust after-treatment systems, fuels and fuel additives for internal combustion engines, efficient and reliable methods for detecting exhaust genotoxicity and mutagenicity are needed to avoid the widespread application of technologies with undesirable effects toward public health. In a commonly used approach, organic extracts of particulates rather than complete exhaust is used for genotoxicity/mutagenicity assessment, which may reduce the reliability of the results. In the present study, we assessed the mutagenicity and the genotoxicity of complete diesel exhaust compared to an organic exhaust particle extract from the same diesel exhaust in a bacterial and a eukaryotic system, that is, a complex human lung cell model. Both, complete exhaust and organic extract were found to act mutagenic/genotoxic, but the amplitudes of the effects differed considerably. Furthermore, our data indicate that the nature of the mutagenicity may not be identical for complete exhaust and particle extracts. Because in addition, differences between the responses of the different biological systems were found, we suggest that a comprehensive assessment of exhaust toxicity is preferably performed with complete exhaust and with biological systems representative for the organisms and organs of interest (i.e., human lungs) and not only with the Ames test. PMID:24697289

  20. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Second topical report, Results of bench-scale screening of additives

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.D.

    1993-08-13

    ADA Technologies, Inc. (ADA) has completed the bench-scale testing phase of a program to evaluate additives that will improve the collection of fine particles in electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). A bench-scale ESP was installed at the Consolidation Coal Company (CONSOL) combustion research and development facility in Library, PA in order to conduct the evaluation. During a two-week test, four candidate additives were injected into the flue gas ahead of a 100 acfm ESP to determine the effect on fly ash collectability. Two additives were found to reduce the emissions from the ESP. Additives ``C`` and ``D`` performed better than initially anticipated -- reducing emissions initially by 17%. Emissions were reduced by 27% after the ESP was modified by the installation of baffles to minimize sneakage. In addition to the measured improvements in performance, no detrimental effects (i.e., electrode fouling) were observed in the operation of the ESP during the testing. The measures of success identified for the bench-scale phase of the program have been surpassed. Since the additives will affect only non-rapping reentrainment particle losses, it is expected that an even greater improvement in particle collection will be observed in larger-scale ESPs. Therefore, positive results are anticipated during the pilot-scale phase of the program and during a future full-scale demonstration test. A preliminary economic analysis was performed to evaluate the cost of the additive process and to compare its costs against alternative means for reducing emissions from ESPs. The results show that conditioning with additive C at a rate of 0.05% (wt. additive to wt. fly ash) is much less expensive than adding new ESP capacity, and more cost competitive than existing chemical conditioning processes. Preliminary chemical analysis of conditioned fly ash shows that it passes the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure criteria.

  1. Using modified fruit fly optimisation algorithm to perform the function test and case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wen-Tsao

    2013-06-01

    Evolutionary computation is a computing mode established by practically simulating natural evolutionary processes based on the concept of Darwinian Theory, and it is a common research method. The main contribution of this paper was to reinforce the function of searching for the optimised solution using the fruit fly optimization algorithm (FOA), in order to avoid the acquisition of local extremum solutions. The evolutionary computation has grown to include the concepts of animal foraging behaviour and group behaviour. This study discussed three common evolutionary computation methods and compared them with the modified fruit fly optimization algorithm (MFOA). It further investigated the ability of the three mathematical functions in computing extreme values, as well as the algorithm execution speed and the forecast ability of the forecasting model built using the optimised general regression neural network (GRNN) parameters. The findings indicated that there was no obvious difference between particle swarm optimization and the MFOA in regards to the ability to compute extreme values; however, they were both better than the artificial fish swarm algorithm and FOA. In addition, the MFOA performed better than the particle swarm optimization in regards to the algorithm execution speed, and the forecast ability of the forecasting model built using the MFOA's GRNN parameters was better than that of the other three forecasting models.

  2. Foaming phenomenon in bench-scale anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Siebels, Amanda M; Long, Sharon C

    2013-04-01

    The Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District (The District) in Madison, Wisconsin has been experiencing seasonal foaming in their anaerobic biosolids digesters, which has occurred from mid-November to late June for the past few years. The exact cause(s) of foaming is unknown. Previous research findings are unclear as to whether applications of advanced anaerobic digestion processes reduce the foaming potential of digesters. The object of this study was to investigate how configurations of thermophilic and acid phase-thermophilic anaerobic digestion would affect foaming at the bench-scale level compared to single stage mesophilic digestion for The District. Bench-scale anaerobic digesters were fed with a 4 to 4.5% by dry weight of solids content blend of waste activated sludge (WAS) and primary sludge from The District. Foaming potential was monitored using Alka-Seltzer and aeration foaming tests. The bench-scale acid phase-thermophilic digester had a higher foaming potential than the bench-scale mesophilic digester. These results indicate that higher temperatures increase the foaming potential of the bench-scale anaerobic digesters. The bench-scale acid phase-thermophilic digesters had a greater percent (approximately 5 to 10%) volatile solids destruction and a greater percent (approximately 5 to 10%) total solids destruction when compared to the bench-scale mesophilic digester. Overall, for the full-scale foaming experienced by The District, it appears that adding an acid phase or switching to thermophilic digestion would not alleviate The District's foaming issues. PMID:23697241

  3. Toxicity and toxic potential of fly ash from municipal incinerators assessed by means of a fish early life stage test

    SciTech Connect

    Helder, T.; Stutterheim, E.; Olie, K.

    1982-01-01

    The toxicity and toxic potential of fly ash were assessed, using rainbow trout yolk sac fry. In contrast to fly ash itself, extracts of fly ash were extremely toxic, producing typical toxicopathological features fo TCDD-intoxication. By comparison with earlier experiments using pure 2,3,7,8-TCDD, the toxic potential of fly ash was roughly estimated to be 75-125 ng.g/sup -1/ toxic aequivalents TCDD. Obviously, this toxic potential is attributed for a minor part to 2,3,7,8-TCDD and for the greater part to the other chlorinated dioxin congeners and the dibenzofurans, present in fly ash.

  4. Preliminary tests of a possible outdoor light adaptation solution for a fly inspired visual sensor: a biomimetic solution - biomed 2011.

    PubMed

    Dean, Brian K; Wright, Cameron H G; Barrett, Steven F

    2011-01-01

    Two previous papers, presented at RMBS in 2009 and 2010, introduced a fly inspired vision sensor that could adapt to indoor light conditions by mimicking the light adaptation process of the commonhousefly, Muscadomestica. A new system has been designed that should allow the sensor to adapt to outdoor light conditions which will enable the sensor’s use inapplications such as: unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) obstacle avoidance, UAV landing support, target tracking, wheelchair guidance, large structure monitoring, and many other outdoor applications. A sensor of this type is especially suited for these applications due to features of hyperacuity (or an ability to achieve movement resolution beyond the theoretical limit), extreme sensitivity to motion, and (through software simulation) image edge extraction, motion detection, and orientation and location of a line.Many of these qualities are beyond the ability of traditional computervision sensors such as charge coupled device (CCD) arrays.To achieve outdoor light adaptation, a variety of design obstacles have to be overcome such as infrared interference, dynamic range expansion, and light saturation. The newly designed system overcomes the latter two design obstacles by mimicking the fly’s solution of logarithmic compression followed by removal of the average background light intensity. This paper presents the new design and the preliminary tests that were conducted to determine its effectiveness. PMID:21525612

  5. Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) technique: A test case of the Mars Express Phobos fly-by

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duev, D. A.; Pogrebenko, S. V.; Cimò, G.; Molera Calvés, G.; Bocanegra Bahamón, T. M.; Gurvits, L. I.; Kettenis, M. M.; Kania, J.; Tudose, V.; Rosenblatt, P.; Marty, J.-C.; Lainey, V.; de Vicente, P.; Quick, J.; Nickola, M.; Neidhardt, A.; Kronschnabl, G.; Ploetz, C.; Haas, R.; Lindqvist, M.; Orlati, A.; Ipatov, A. V.; Kharinov, M. A.; Mikhailov, A. G.; Lovell, J. E. J.; McCallum, J. N.; Stevens, J.; Gulyaev, S. A.; Natush, T.; Weston, S.; Wang, W. H.; Xia, B.; Yang, W. J.; Hao, L.-F.; Kallunki, J.; Witasse, O.

    2016-09-01

    Context. The closest ever fly-by of the Martian moon Phobos, performed by the European Space Agency's Mars Express spacecraft, gives a unique opportunity to sharpen and test the Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiments (PRIDE) technique in the interest of studying planet-satellite systems. Aims: The aim of this work is to demonstrate a technique of providing high precision positional and Doppler measurements of planetary spacecraft using the Mars Express spacecraft. The technique will be used in the framework of Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiments in various planetary missions, in particular in fly-by mode. Methods: We advanced a novel approach to spacecraft data processing using the techniques of Doppler and phase-referenced very long baseline interferometry spacecraft tracking. Results: We achieved, on average, mHz precision (30 μm/s at a 10 s integration time) for radial three-way Doppler estimates and sub-nanoradian precision for lateral position measurements, which in a linear measure (at a distance of 1.4 AU) corresponds to ~50 m.

  6. The lateral flying qualities of the Bell XP-77 airplane as estimated from full-scale tunnel tests, 16 June 1944

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donlan, C. J.; Czarnecki, K. R.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for tests made of the full scale model of the airplane in the NACA full scale tunnel. These tests were planned so as to cover as completely as possible the lateral flying quality requirements for pursuit-type airplanes contracted for by the United States Army Air Forces.

  7. Standardized laboratory tests with 21 species of temperate and tropical sepsid flies confirm their suitability as bioassays of pharmaceutical residues (ivermectin) in cattle dung.

    PubMed

    Blanckenhorn, Wolf U; Puniamoorthy, Nalini; Schäfer, Martin A; Scheffczyk, Adam; Römbke, Jörg

    2013-03-01

    Veterinary pharmaceuticals excreted in the dung of treated livestock can have strong non-target effects on the dung organism community. We report results of ecotoxicological tests with ivermectin for 21 species of temperate (Europe, North America) and tropical (Asia, Central America) black scavenger flies (Diptera: Sepsidae), using standardized methods developed previously for the yellow dung fly and the face fly. Our study documents great variation in ivermectin sensitivity of more than two orders of magnitude among species and even populations within species: estimated lethal effect concentrations LC(50) (at which 50% of the flies died) ranged from 0.05 to 18.55 μg/kg dung fresh weight (equivalent to 0.33-132.22 μg/kg dung dry weight). We also show that controlled laboratory tests can--within reasonable limits-be extended to the field or to laboratory settings without climate control, as obtained LC(50) were roughly similar. In addition to lethal effects, our study revealed relevant sub-lethal effects at lower ivermectin concentrations in terms of prolonged development, smaller body size and reduced juvenile growth rate. Finally, oviposition choice experiments showed that females generally do not discriminate against dung containing ivermectin residues. We conclude that sepsid flies are well suited test organisms for pharmaceutical residues in the dung of livestock due to their ease and speed of rearing and handling, particularly in the tropics, where high-tech laboratory equipment is often not available. PMID:23260241

  8. Algal toxins and reverse osmosis desalination operations: laboratory bench testing and field monitoring of domoic acid, saxitoxin, brevetoxin and okadaic acid.

    PubMed

    Seubert, Erica L; Trussell, Shane; Eagleton, John; Schnetzer, Astrid; Cetinić, Ivona; Lauri, Phil; Jones, Burton H; Caron, David A

    2012-12-01

    The occurrence and intensity of harmful algal blooms (HABs) have been increasing globally during the past few decades. The impact of these events on seawater desalination facilities has become an important topic in recent years due to enhanced societal interest and reliance on this technology for augmenting world water supplies. A variety of harmful bloom-forming species of microalgae occur in southern California, as well as many other locations throughout the world, and several of these species are known to produce potent neurotoxins. These algal toxins can cause a myriad of human health issues, including death, when ingested via contaminated seafood. This study was designed to investigate the impact that algal toxin presence may have on both the intake and reverse osmosis (RO) desalination process; most importantly, whether or not the naturally occurring algal toxins can pass through the RO membrane and into the desalination product. Bench-scale RO experiments were conducted to explore the potential of extracellular algal toxins contaminating the RO product. Concentrations exceeding maximal values previously reported during natural blooms were used in the laboratory experiments, with treatments comprised of 50 μg/L of domoic acid (DA), 2 μg/L of saxitoxin (STX) and 20 μg/L of brevetoxin (PbTx). None of the algal toxins used in the bench-scale experiments were detectable in the desalinated product water. Monitoring for intracellular and extracellular concentrations of DA, STX, PbTx and okadaic acid (OA) within the intake and desalinated water from a pilot RO desalination plant in El Segundo, CA, was conducted from 2005 to 2009. During the five-year monitoring period, DA and STX were detected sporadically in the intake waters but never in the desalinated water. PbTx and OA were not detected in either the intake or desalinated water. The results of this study demonstrate the potential for HAB toxins to be inducted into coastal RO intake facilities, and the

  9. Laterality and flight: concurrent tests of side-bias and optimality in flying tree swallows.

    PubMed

    Mandel, James T; Ratcliffe, John M; Cerasale, David J; Winkler, David W

    2008-01-01

    Behavioural side-bias occurs in many vertebrates, including birds as a result of hemispheric specialization and can be advantageous by improving response times to sudden stimuli and efficiency in multi-tasking. However, behavioural side-bias can lead to morphological asymmetries resulting in reduced performance for specific activities. For flying animals, wing asymmetry is particularly costly and it is unclear if behavioural side-biases will be expressed in flight; the benefits of quick response time afforded by side-biases must be balanced against the costs of less efficient flight due to the morphological asymmetry side-biases may incur. Thus, competing constraints could lead to context-dependent expression or suppression of side-bias in flight. In repeated flight trials through an outdoor tunnel with obstacles, tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) preferred larger openings, but we did not detect either individual or population-level side-biases. Thus, while observed behavioural side-biases during substrate-foraging and copulation are common in birds, we did not see such side-bias expressed in obstacle avoidance behaviour in flight. This finding highlights the importance of behavioural context for investigations of side-bias and hemispheric laterality and suggests both proximate and ultimate trade-offs between species-specific cognitive ecology and flight biomechanics. PMID:18335028

  10. ELT oriented adaptive optics demonstration bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeRoux, B.; NDiaye, M.; El Hadi, K.

    2011-09-01

    We are developing an Adaptive Optics bench designed to validate experimentally new instrumental concepts dedicated to Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs). Our AO bench is being developed with three main objectives. The first one concerns the experimental study of control solutions for two levels of correction systems, such as woofer-tweeter systems. Indeed, the use of two consecutive deformable mirrors (DM), necessary for most of AO insruments on E-ELT, rises correction and command problems to be optimized. Our two mirrors (a 140 actuators DM and a Phase Modulator LCoS mirror) are being fully characterized before closing the AO loop. The second goal is the experimental validation of the Pyramid Wave Front Sensor (PWFS) in ELTs conditions with a Laser Guide Star (LGS). The design of our PWFS is undergoing and the LGS tests will take place by the end of 2013. All these studies are led in collaboration with University of Bologna, ONERA and L2TI. The third and longer term application is the experimental validation of an optimized control law dedicated to the large number of degrees of freedom, based on Kalman filtering and studied at LAM. We present the optical design of the bench, the calibrations of the elements and the first experimental results.

  11. Efficacy of the repellent N,N-diethyl-3-methyl-benzamide (DEET) against tabanid flies on horses evaluated in a field test in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Herholz, C; Kopp, C; Wenger, M; Mathis, A; Wägeli, S; Roth, N

    2016-05-15

    Female tabanid flies (Diptera: Tabanidae) can be a serious nuisance for horses because of their painful bites during blood feeding. They also play a primary role in mechanical transmission of a lentivirus causing Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA), a virus that has spread within Europe in recent years. According to the European law for products intended for use as a repellent on horses (recreational and sport horses), a field test is mandatory to demonstrate sufficient repellency of such a substance against the specific target fly species, but currently no agreed protocols are available for testing of potential repellents. The aim of the present study was to establish a protocol for a field test to investigate the efficacy of N,N-diethyl-3-methyl-benzamide (DEET, Brum®, Huebeli-Stud Horse Care AG) in a 15-17% oil-water emulsion against tabanid flies on horses up to four hours. Between July and August 2015, four horses on three farms each were tested on two consecutive days in a cross-over design. The four horses on Farm A were used in the pre-test as well as in the main test. Two and a half hours after repellent application the horses were lunged until sweating. Tabanid fly infestations were both photographed and directly counted during five minutes 3 and 4h after repellent application on the right side of the horses in the area from the head to the flank, belly and first third of the foreleg. Without repellent application, up to 29 tabanid flies were counted on a horse, whereas the maximum for the repellent treated horses was four. In 50% of the horses treated with DEET there were no Tabanids observed (efficacy 100%), and in all horses the tabanid fly counts were lower than in the control horses with one exemption at 4h. The efficacy of the DEET repellent was at least 80% and 71% respectively, three or four hours after application (with a confidence level of 89%). A fly trap (Horse Pal) revealed the presence of the tabanid species Tabanus brominus and Haematopota

  12. Astrophysics on the lab bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Stephen W.

    2010-05-01

    In this article some basic laboratory bench experiments are described that are useful for teaching high school students some of the basic principles of stellar astrophysics. For example, in one experiment, students slam a plastic water-filled bottle down onto a bench, ejecting water towards the ceiling, illustrating the physics associated with a type II supernova explosion. In another experiment, students roll marbles up and down a double ramp in an attempt to get a marble to enter a tube halfway up the slope, which illustrates quantum tunnelling in stellar cores. The experiments are reasonably low cost to either purchase or manufacture.

  13. A space stable optical bench structure for the space telescope wide field and planetary camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and verification tests of two optical bench structures fabricated under contract to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are discussed. It is noted that graphite-epoxy and invar have been selected as the structural materials for the bench. The ability to manufacture a precise graphite-epoxy optical system platform has been demonstrated. It is noted that the 19 channel laser interferometer was used to measure the CTE of the bench structure graphite-epoxy components and the two invar bulkheads.

  14. Implementation and testing of the on-the-fly thermal scattering Monte Carlo sampling method for graphite and light water in MCNP6

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pavlou, Andrew T.; Ji, Wei; Brown, Forrest B.

    2016-01-23

    Here, a proper treatment of thermal neutron scattering requires accounting for chemical binding through a scattering law S(α,β,T). Monte Carlo codes sample the secondary neutron energy and angle after a thermal scattering event from probability tables generated from S(α,β,T) tables at discrete temperatures, requiring a large amount of data for multiscale and multiphysics problems with detailed temperature gradients. We have previously developed a method to handle this temperature dependence on-the-fly during the Monte Carlo random walk using polynomial expansions in 1/T to directly sample the secondary energy and angle. In this paper, the on-the-fly method is implemented into MCNP6 andmore » tested in both graphite-moderated and light water-moderated systems. The on-the-fly method is compared with the thermal ACE libraries that come standard with MCNP6, yielding good agreement with integral reactor quantities like k-eigenvalue and differential quantities like single-scatter secondary energy and angle distributions. The simulation runtimes are comparable between the two methods (on the order of 5–15% difference for the problems tested) and the on-the-fly fit coefficients only require 5–15 MB of total data storage.« less

  15. Ground tests for vision based determination and control of formation flying spacecraft trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasbarri, P.; Sabatini, M.; Palmerini, G. B.

    2014-09-01

    The advances in the computational capabilities and in the robustness of the dedicated algorithms are suggesting vision based techniques as a fundamental asset in performing space operations such as rendezvous, docking and on-orbit servicing. This paper discusses a vision based technique in a scenario where the chaser satellite must identify a non-cooperative target, and use visual information to estimate the relative kinematic state. A hardware-in-the-loop experiment is performed to test the possibility to perform a space rendezvous using the camera as a standalone sensor. This is accomplished using a dedicated test bed constituted by a dark room hosting a robotic manipulator. The camera is mounted on the end effector that moves replicating the satellite formation dynamics, including the control actions, which depend at each time step by the state estimation based on the visual algorithm, thus realizing a closed GNC loop.

  16. Autonomous Flying Controls Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motter, Mark A.

    2005-01-01

    The Flying Controls Testbed (FLiC) is a relatively small and inexpensive unmanned aerial vehicle developed specifically to test highly experimental flight control approaches. The most recent version of the FLiC is configured with 16 independent aileron segments, supports the implementation of C-coded experimental controllers, and is capable of fully autonomous flight from takeoff roll to landing, including flight test maneuvers. The test vehicle is basically a modified Army target drone, AN/FQM-117B, developed as part of a collaboration between the Aviation Applied Technology Directorate (AATD) at Fort Eustis,Virginia and NASA Langley Research Center. Several vehicles have been constructed and collectively have flown over 600 successful test flights.

  17. Development of a high data-throughput ADC board for the PROMETEO portable test-bench for the upgraded front-end electronics of the ATLAS TileCal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoor, Matthew; Kureba, Oscar; Sandrock, Charles

    2015-10-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is preparing for a major Phase-II upgrade scheduled for 2022 [1]. The upgrade will require a complete redesign of both on- and off-detector electronics systems in the ATLAS Tile hadron Calorimeter (TileCal) [2]. The PROMETEO (A Portable ReadOut ModulE for Tilecal ElectrOnics) stand-alone test-bench system is currently in development and will be used for the certification and quality checks of the new front- end electronics. The Prometeo is designed to read in digitized samples from 12 channels simultaneously at the bunch crossing frequency while accessing quality of information in realtime. The main board used for the design is a Xilinx VC707 evaluation board with a dual QSFP+ FMC (FPGA Mezzanine Card) module for read-out and control of the front-end electronics. All other functions are provided by a HV board, LED board and a 16 channel ADC daughter board. The paper relates to the development and testing of the ADC board that will be used in the new Prometeo system.

  18. Generalized Test Plan for the Vitrification of Simulated High-Level -Waste Calcine in the Idaho National Laboratory‘s Bench -Scale Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Vince Maio

    2011-08-01

    This Preliminary Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Test Plan outlines the chronological steps required to initially evaluate the validity of vitrifying INL surrogate (cold) High-Level-Waste (HLW) solid particulate calcine in INL's Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). Its documentation and publication satisfies interim milestone WP-413-INL-01 of the DOE-EM (via the Office of River Protection) sponsored work package, WP 4.1.3, entitled 'Improved Vitrification' The primary goal of the proposed CCIM testing is to initiate efforts to identify an efficient and effective back-up and risk adverse technology for treating the actual HLW calcine stored at the INL. The calcine's treatment must be completed by 2035 as dictated by a State of Idaho Consent Order. A final report on this surrogate/calcine test in the CCIM will be issued in May 2012-pending next fiscal year funding In particular the plan provides; (1) distinct test objectives, (2) a description of the purpose and scope of planned university contracted pre-screening tests required to optimize the CCIM glass/surrogate calcine formulation, (3) a listing of necessary CCIM equipment modifications and corresponding work control document changes necessary to feed a solid particulate to the CCIM, (4) a description of the class of calcine that will be represented by the surrogate, and (5) a tentative tabulation of the anticipated CCIM testing conditions, testing parameters, sampling requirements and analytical tests. Key FY -11 milestones associated with this CCIM testing effort are also provided. The CCIM test run is scheduled to be conducted in February of 2012 and will involve testing with a surrogate HLW calcine representative of only 13% of the 4,000 m3 of 'hot' calcine residing in 6 INL Bin Sets. The remaining classes of calcine will have to be eventually tested in the CCIM if an operational scale CCIM is to be a feasible option for the actual INL HLW calcine. This remaining calcine's make-up is HLW containing

  19. Bench-scale feasibility testing of pulsed-air technology for in-tank mixing of dry cementitious solids with tank liquids and settled solids

    SciTech Connect

    Whyatt, G.A.; Hymas, C.R.

    1997-09-01

    This report documents the results of testing performed to determine the feasibility of using a pulsed-air mixing technology (equipment developed by Pulsair Systems, Inc., Bellevue, WA) to mix cementitious dry solids with supernatant and settled solids within a horizontal tank. The mixing technology is being considered to provide in situ stabilization of the {open_quotes}V{close_quotes} tanks at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The testing was performed in a vessel roughly 1/6 the scale of the INEEL tanks. The tests used a fine soil to simulate settled solids and water to simulate tank supernatants. The cementitious dry materials consisted of Portland cement and Aquaset-2H (a product of Fluid Tech Inc. consisting of clay and Portland cement). Two scoping tests were conducted to allow suitable mixing parameters to be selected. The scoping tests used only visual observations during grout disassembly to assess mixing performance. After the scoping tests indicated the approach may be feasible, an additional two mixing tests were conducted. In addition to visual observations during disassembly of the solidified grout, these tests included addition of chemical tracers and chemical analysis of samples to determine the degree of mixing uniformity achieved. The final two mixing tests demonstrated that the pulsed-air mixing technique is capable of producing slurries containing substantially more cementitious dry solids than indicated by the formulations suggested by INEEL staff. Including additional cement in the formulation may have benefits in terms of increasing mobilization of solids, reducing water separation during curing, and increasing the strength of the solidified product. During addition to the tank, the cementitious solids had a tendency to form clumps which broke down with continued mixing.

  20. Hydrodynamic Tests of a 1/10-size Model of the Hull of the Latecoere 521 Flying Boat : NACA Model 83

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Roland E; Lina, Lindsay J

    1941-01-01

    A 1/10-size model of the hull of the French flying boat Latecoere 521 was tested in the NACA tank. This model is one of a series of models of the hulls of actual flying boats of both foreign and domestic type that are being tested in the NACA tank to provide information regarding the water characteristics of a variety of forms of hull and to illustrate the development of present-day types of flying boat. The lines and the offsets of the hull were obtained from the manufacturer through the Paris office of the NACA. The form of the stub-wing stabilizers was not furnished and, therefore, the model was tested without them. The model was tested free to trim at the design initial load (initial load coefficient of 0.428) and by the general method at load coefficients from 0.025 to 0.6. The spray characteristics of the model are good. The form of the bow would be particularly desirable for rough water use. The interference of the afterbody and the tail extension is excessive, causing very high resistance at high speeds. A violent vertical instability is present at trims of 4 degrees and 6 degrees with light loads and high speeds.

  1. Flying Cars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crow, Steven

    1996-01-01

    Flying cars have nearly mythical appeal to nonpilots, a group that includes almost the whole human race. The appeal resides in the perceived utility of flying cars, vehicles that offer portal-to-portal transportation, yet break the bonds of road and traffic and travel freely through the sky at the drivers will. Part of the appeal is an assumption that flying cars can be as easy to fly as to drive. Flying cars have been part of the dream of aviation since the dawn of powered flight. Glenn Curtiss built, displayed, and maybe even flew a flying car in 1917, the Curtiss Autoplane. Many roadable airplanes were built in the 1930's, like the Waterman Arrowbile and the Fulton Airphibian. Two flying cars came close to production in the early 1950's. Ted Hall built a series of flying cars culminating in the Convaircar, sponsored by Consolidated Vultee, General Motors, and Hertz. Molt Taylor built and certified his Aerocar, and Ford came close to producing them. Three Aerocars are still flyable, two in museums in Seattle and Oshkosh, and the third owned and flown by Ed Sweeny. Flying cars do have problems, which so far have prevented commercial success. An obvious problem is complexity of the vehicle, the infrastructure, or both. Another is the difficulty of matching low power for normal driving with high power in flight. An automobile uses only about 20 hp at traffic speeds, while a personal airplane needs about 160 hp at speeds typical of flight. Many automobile engines can deliver 160 hp, but not for very long. A more subtle issue involves the drag of automobiles and airplanes. A good personal airplane can fly 30 miles per gallon of fuel at 200 mph. A good sports car would need 660 hp at the same speed and would travel only 3 miles per gallon. The difference is drag area, about 4.5 sq ft for the automobile and 1.4 sq ft for the airplane. A flying car better have the drag area of the airplane, not the car!

  2. Continuous bench-scale slurry catalyst testing: Direct coal liquification of Rawhide sub-bituminous coal. Technical report, July 1995--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Coless, L.A.; Poole, M.C.; Wen, M.Y.

    1996-05-24

    In 1994 extensive tests were conducted in the Exxon Research and Engineering Recycle Coal Liquefaction Unit (RCLU) in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The work conducted in 1994 explored a variety of dispersed iron molybdenum promoted catalyst systems for direct coal liquefaction of Rawhide subbituminus coal. The goal was to identify the preferred iron system. We learned that among the catalysts tested, all were effective; however, none showed a large process advantage over the others. In 1995, we tested dispersed molybdenum catalysts systems for direct coal liquefaction on a second subbituminous coal, Black Thunder. Catalyst properties are shown in Table 1. We also checked a molybdenum promoted iron case, as well as the impact of process variables, such as sulfur type, hydrogen treat rate, and catalyst addition rate, as shown in Table 2. In 1995, we ran 18 material balances over a 7 week period, covering 7 conditions. This report covers the 1995 operations and results.

  3. Continuous bench-scale slurry catalyst testing: Direct coal liquefaction of rawhide sub-bituminous coal. Final topical report, June 1994--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Coless, L.A.; Poole, M.C.; Wen, M.Y.

    1995-11-21

    Supported catalysts, either in fixed bed or ebullating bed reactors, are subject to deactivation with time, especially if the feed contains deactivating species, such as metals and coke precursors. Dispersed catalyst systems avoid significant catalyst deactivation because there are no catalyst pores to plug, hence no pore mouth plugging, and hopefully, no relevant decline of catalyst surface area or pore volume. The tests carried out in 1994, at the Exxon Research and Development Laboratories (ERDL) for DOE covered a slate of 5 dispersed catalysts for direct coal liquefaction of Rawhide sub-bituminous coal, which is similar to the Black Thunder coal tested earlier at Wilsonville. The catalysts included three iron and two molybdenum types. The Bailey iron oxide and the two molybdenum catalysts have previously been tested in DOE-sponsored research. These known catalysts will be used to help provide a base line and tie-in to previous work. The two new catalysts, Bayferrox PK 5210 and Mach-1`s Nanocat are very finely divided iron oxides. The iron oxide addition rate was varied from 1.0 to 0.25 wt % (dry coal basis) but the molybdenum addition rate remained constant at 100 wppm throughout the experiments. The effect of changing recycle rate, sulfur and iron oxide addition rates, first stage reactor temperature, mass velocity and catalyst type were tested in the 1994 operations of ERDL`s recycle coal liquefaction unit (RCLU). DOE will use these results to update economics and plan future work. The test program will resume in mid 1995, with another 2-3 months of pilot plant testing.

  4. Evaluation of the Storm 3 data logger manufactured by WaterLOG/Xylem Incorporated—Results of bench, temperature, and field deployment testing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kunkle, Gerald A.

    2016-01-01

    The procedures followed and the results obtained from the testing are described in this publication. The device met most of the manufacturer’s stated specifications. An exception was power consumption, which was about 10 percent above the manufacturer’s specifications. It was also observed that enabling WiFi doubles the Storm 3’s power consumption. In addition, several logging errors were made by two units during deployment testing, but it could not be determined whether these errors were the fault of the Storm or of an attached sensor.

  5. Calibration of the MCAO Canopus Bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea; Rigaut, François; Bec, Matthieu; Boccas, Maxime; Galvez, Ramon; Gausachs, Gaston; Gratadour, Damien; Neichel, Benoit

    The final phase of implementation of all optical components, as well as their integration and tests on the Canopus MCAO bench is currently underway. We present here a detailed description of the LGS and NGS WFS calibration sequences implemented through MYST (MCAO Yorick Smart Tool), a yorick+python+glade software package developed in-house which allows multiple users to control and monitor the bench remotely over the network using EPICS commands. A fine tuning of the optical setup and a better understanding of the flexure/temperature dependencies is being carried out and will allow us to build the many look-up tables to be eventually used by the system (e.g. telescope primary and secondary mirrors). Preliminary work on non-common path aberrations to account for the static aberrations in the central 60 arcsec science field of view (FoV) has been done iteratively using a science focal plane wavefront sensor and has shown good results both in individual directions as well as simultaneously over the entire FoV, the latter using the tomographic approach (presented in another paper in this conference).

  6. Manganese removal during bench-scale biofiltration.

    PubMed

    Burger, Mark S; Mercer, Stephen S; Shupe, Gordon D; Gagnon, Graham A

    2008-12-01

    As biological manganese (Mn) removal becomes a more popular water treatment technology, there is still a large gap in understanding the key mechanisms and range of operational characteristics. This research aimed to expand on previous bench-scale experiments by directly comparing small filtration columns inoculated with indigenous biofilms from a Mn filtration plant and filtration columns inoculated with a liquid suspension of Leptothrix discophora SP-6. Batch tests found that in the absence of manganese oxidizing bacteria Mn was not removed by air alone, whereas a mixed population and Leptothrix strain achieved greater than 90% removal of Mn. The bench-scale biofiltration experiments found that biological filters can be inoculated with a pure culture of L. discophora SP-6 and achieve a similar removal of indigenous biofilm. While Mn oxidizing bacteria (MOB) seem to be necessary for the auto-catalytic nature of these biological filters, Mn removal is achieved with a combination of adsorption to Mn oxides and biological oxidation. Additionally, it was demonstrated that biological Mn removal is possible over a broader "field of activity" (e.g., Mn removal occurred at a pH level as low as 6.5) than has previously been reported. The ability of this treatment technology to work over a broader range of influent conditions allows for more communities to consider biological treatment as an option to remove Mn from their drinking water. PMID:18809196

  7. Thermal motion of the STIS optical bench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Taylor, Mary Jane; Shaw, Richard; Robinson, Richard; Hill, Robert S.

    1997-01-01

    Various tests have been done of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) using internal wavecals to measure thermal motion of the spectral format on the detectors. In most cases, the spectral format moves less than the specification not to exceed 0.2 pixels per hour. Primary causes of the motion are (1) changes to the thermal design dictated by the warmer Aft Shroud environment and (2) on-orbit power cycling of Multi-Anode Microchannel Arrays (MAMA) electronics to minimize the effects of radiation hits on the MAMA detectors. The rear portion of the STIS optical bench is too warm to be held at a constant temperature by internal heaters. Electronics swing in temperature with an orbital and daily frequency. The thermal drift of the optical formats is not negligible, but is well behaved in most circumstances. The observer is advised to examine the trade-off between the most accurate wavelengths with best spectral/spatial resolutions versus increased overheads that directly affect the observing times. A long term concern is that the Aft Shroud thermal environment is predicted to heat up as much as one Centigrade degree per year. Progressively more of the bench would move out of thermal control. Thus the external cooler for STIS, being considered for the Third Servicing Mission is of major importance to the long term operation of STIS.

  8. 40 CFR 91.323 - Analyzer bench checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Analyzer bench checks. 91.323 Section 91.323 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test Equipment Provisions §...

  9. Transcriptional Profiles of Mating-Responsive Genes from Testes and Male Accessory Glands of the Mediterranean Fruit Fly, Ceratitis capitata

    PubMed Central

    Scolari, Francesca; Gomulski, Ludvik M.; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Siciliano, Paolo; Meraldi, Alice; Falchetto, Marco; Bonomi, Angelica; Manni, Mosè; Gabrieli, Paolo; Malovini, Alberto; Bellazzi, Riccardo; Aksoy, Serap; Gasperi, Giuliano; Malacrida, Anna R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Insect seminal fluid is a complex mixture of proteins, carbohydrates and lipids, produced in the male reproductive tract. This seminal fluid is transferred together with the spermatozoa during mating and induces post-mating changes in the female. Molecular characterization of seminal fluid proteins in the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata, is limited, although studies suggest that some of these proteins are biologically active. Methodology/Principal Findings We report on the functional annotation of 5914 high quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from the testes and male accessory glands, to identify transcripts encoding putative secreted peptides that might elicit post-mating responses in females. The ESTs were assembled into 3344 contigs, of which over 33% produced no hits against the nr database, and thus may represent novel or rapidly evolving sequences. Extraction of the coding sequences resulted in a total of 3371 putative peptides. The annotated dataset is available as a hyperlinked spreadsheet. Four hundred peptides were identified with putative secretory activity, including odorant binding proteins, protease inhibitor domain-containing peptides, antigen 5 proteins, mucins, and immunity-related sequences. Quantitative RT-PCR-based analyses of a subset of putative secretory protein-encoding transcripts from accessory glands indicated changes in their abundance after one or more copulations when compared to virgin males of the same age. These changes in abundance, particularly evident after the third mating, may be related to the requirement to replenish proteins to be transferred to the female. Conclusions/Significance We have developed the first large-scale dataset for novel studies on functions and processes associated with the reproductive biology of Ceratitis capitata. The identified genes may help study genome evolution, in light of the high adaptive potential of the medfly. In addition, studies of male recovery dynamics in terms

  10. Half of the European fruit fly species barcoded (Diptera, Tephritidae); a feasibility test for molecular identification

    PubMed Central

    Smit, John; Reijnen, Bastian; Stokvis, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A feasibility test of molecular identification of European fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) based on COI barcode sequences has been executed. A dataset containing 555 sequences of 135 ingroup species from three subfamilies and 42 genera and one single outgroup species has been analysed. 73.3% of all included species could be identified based on their COI barcode gene, based on similarity and distances. The low success rate is caused by singletons as well as some problematic groups: several species groups within the genus Terellia and especially the genus Urophora. With slightly more than 100 sequences – almost 20% of the total – this genus alone constitutes the larger part of the failure for molecular identification for this dataset. Deleting the singletons and Urophora results in a success-rate of 87.1% of all queries and 93.23% of the not discarded queries as correctly identified. Urophora is of special interest due to its economic importance as beneficial species for weed control, therefore it is desirable to have alternative markers for molecular identification. We demonstrate that the success of DNA barcoding for identification purposes strongly depends on the contents of the database used to BLAST against. Especially the necessity of including multiple specimens per species of geographically distinct populations and different ecologies for the understanding of the intra- versus interspecific variation is demonstrated. Furthermore thresholds and the distinction between true and false positives and negatives should not only be used to increase the reliability of the success of molecular identification but also to point out problematic groups, which should then be flagged in the reference database suggesting alternative methods for identification. PMID:24453563

  11. Bench-scale testing of the multi-gravity separator in combination with Microcel. First quarterly report, September 29, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-29

    The primary objective of the proposed work is to design, install and operate an advanced fine coal processing circuit combining Microcel and MGS technologies. Both of these processes have specific advantages as stand-alone units. For example, the Microcel column is effective in removing ash-bearing mineral matter, while the MGS is capable of efficiently removing coal-pyrite composites. Therefore, by combining both of these unit operations into a single processing circuit, synergistic advantages can be gained. As a result, this circuit arrangement has the potential of improving coal quality beyond that which could be achieved using either one of the technologies individually. In addition to the primary objective, secondary objectives of the proposed test program will include: (1) Circuit Optimization: The performance of each unit operation, individually and combined, will be optimized by conducting parametric studies as a function of key operating variables. The goal of this work will be to maximize the rejections of pyritic sulfur and ash while maintaining a high energy recovery; and (2) Process Variability: The steady-state performance of the optimized processing circuit will be studied (i) by conducting several long-duration test runs over a period of several days and (ii) by testing coal samples from other sources specified by the participating coal companies.

  12. Bench-scale testing of the multi-gravity separator in combination with Microcel. Second Quarterly report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-30

    Work this quarter focused on the development of the engineering design specifications for the ET Test Circuit. Process flowsheets and detailed equipment specifications were finalized. Based on this information, bid packages were assembled and purchase orders were issued for all of the necessary process equipment. The design and procurement information is summarized in the ET Circuit Design Report submitted to the DOE`s COR this quarter. Final drafts of the ET Circuit - System Safety Analysis, Nuclear Density Gauge - System Safety Analysis and Operating Manual/SOP were also completed and submitted to the COR this quarter. Preliminary characterization studies were also initiated this quarter. Tests were conducted to determine the grinding conditions required to achieve the desired particle size distributions for the characterization work. Flotation release analysis tests were conducted on both the Pittsburgh {number_sign}8 and Illinois {number_sign}6 seam coals as a function of grind size. The primary objective of the proposed work is to design, install, and operate an advanced fine coal processing circuit combining the Microcel and Multi-Gravity-Separator (MGS) technologies. Both of these processes have specific advantages as stand-alone units. For example, the Microcel column effectively removes ash-bearing mineral matter, while the MGS efficiently removes coal-pyrite composites. By combining both unit operations into a single processing circuit, synergistic advantages can be gained. As a result, this circuit arrangement has the potential to improve coal quality beyond that achieved using the individual technologies.

  13. Tank Tests of a Model of One Hull of the Savoia S-55-X Flying Boat N.A.C.A. Model 46

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, John M

    1938-01-01

    A model of one of the twin hulls of the Italian Savoia S-55-X flying boat (N.A.C.A. Model 46) was tested in the N.A.C.A. tank according to the general method. The data obtained from these tests cover a broad range of speeds, loads, and trims and are given in nondimensional form to facilitate their use in applying this form of hull to any other flying boat or comparing it's performance with the performance of any other hulls. The results show that the resistance characteristics at best trim of this model are excellent throughout the speed range. In order to compare the performance of the S-55-X hull with that of the 35, a pointed-step hull developed at the N.A.C.A. tank, the data are used in the computations of take-off example of a twin-hull, 23,500-pound flying boat. The calculations show that the S-55-X hull has better take-off performance.

  14. Status and test report on the LANL-Boeing APLE/HPO flying-wire beam-profile monitor. Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke, M.; Barlow, D.; Fortgang, C.; Gilpatrick, J.; Meyer, R.; Rendon, A.; Warren, D.; Greegor, R.

    1994-07-01

    The High-Power Oscillator (HPO) demonstration of the Average Power Laser Experiment (APLE) is a collaboration by Los Alamos National Laboratory and Boeing to demonstrate a 10 kW average power, 10 {mu}m free electron laser (FEL). As part of the collaboration, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is responsible for many of the electron beam diagnostics in the linac, transport, and laser sections. Because of the high duty factor and power of the electron beam, special diagnostics are required. This report describes the flying wire diagnostic required to monitor the beam profile during high-power, high-duty operation. The authors describe the diagnostic and prototype tests on the Los Alamos APLE Prototype Experiment (APEX) FEL. They also describe the current status of the flying wires being built for APLE.

  15. Rationale, bench testing and in vivo evaluation of a novel 5 mm laparoscopic vessel sealing device with homogeneous pressure distribution in long instrument jaws

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In 1998, an electrothermal bipolar vessel sealing (EBVS) system was introduced and quickly became an integral component of the surgical armamentarium in various surgical specialties. Currently available EBVS instruments use a scissor-like jaw configuration and closing mechanism, which causes decreasing compression pressure from the proximal to the distal end of the jaws. A new EBVS system is described here which utilizes a different instrument jaw configuration and closing mechanism to enable a more homogeneous pressure distribution despite longer instrument jaws. Methods Results of jaw pressure distribution measurements as well as sealing experiments with subsequent burst pressure measurements ex vivo on bovine uterine arteries are demonstrated. Furthermore, an in vivo evaluation of the new EBVS system in a canine and porcine model including histological examination is presented. Results The device revealed an even pressure distribution throughout the whole jaw length. The ex vivo burst pressure measurements revealed high average burst pressures, above 300 mmHg, independent of the outer diameter (1 to 7 mm) of the tested vessels. Histological evaluation of sealed vessels 21 days postoperatively demonstrated sealed and fused vessels without adjacent tissue damage. Conclusions The even pressure distribution leading to a sufficient tissue sealing in combination with the novel closing mechanism and extended jaw length differentiates the novel device from other available EBVS systems. This might offer a reduction of the overall procedure time, which should be further evaluated in a clinical study. PMID:24325831

  16. Bench Test for the Detection of Bacterial Contamination in Platelet Concentrates Using Rapid and Cultural Detection Methods with a Standardized Proficiency Panel

    PubMed Central

    Vollmer, Tanja; Knabbe, Cornelius; Geilenkeuser, Wolf-Jochen; Schmidt, Michael; Dreier, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The most frequent infectious complication in transfusion therapy in developed countries is related to the bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates (PCs). Rapid and cultural screening methods for bacterial detection in platelets are available, but external performance evaluation, especially of rapid methods, has been difficult to realize so far. Here we summarize the results of three individual collaborative trials using an external quality assessment program (EQAP) for the application of current rapid and cultural screening methods. Methods Three different modules were available for the detection of bacterial contamination: module 1: rapid methods, module 2: culture methods, module 3: bacterial identification methods. The sample set-up included up to six different bacterial strains, 1-2 negative samples and 4-6 positive samples with stabilized bacterial cell counts (approximately 103/104/105 CFU/ml). Time schedule for testing was limited (module 1: 6 h, module 2 and 3: 7 days). Results Samples of module 1 were analyzed with two different rapid methods (BactiFlow, NAT). The results of the three individual collaborative trials showed that all participants detected the negative samples with both assays correctly. Samples spiked with 104 to 105 CFU/ml of bacteria obtained positive results with both rapid screening methods, whereas samples spiked with only 103 CFU/ml disclosed a lower number of correctly identified positive results by NAT (86.6-93.8% sensitivity) compared to BactiFlow (100% sensitivity). The results for modules 2 and 3 revealed a 100% diagnostic sensitivity and specificity in all three collaborative trials. Conclusion This proficiency panel facilitates the verification of the analytical sensitivity of rapid and cultural bacterial detection systems under controlled routine conditions. The concept of samples provided in this EQAP has three main advantages: i) samples can be examined by both rapid and culture methods, ii) the

  17. Attenuation of trace elements in coal fly ash leachates by surfactant-modified zeolite.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Ghanashyam; Donahoe, Rona J

    2012-08-30

    Potential leaching of trace elements from older, unlined fly ash disposal facilities is a serious threat to groundwater and surface water contamination. Therefore, effective methods for containing the pollutant elements within the unlined coal combustion products (CCPs) disposal facilities are required to minimize any potential impact of leachate emanating from such facilities into the nearby environment. Because surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has the potential to sequester both cationic and anionic trace elements from aqueous solutions, bench-scale batch and column experiments were performed to test its ability to remediate trace elements in leachates generated from both alkaline and acidic fly ash samples. Fly ash leachate treatment results showed the potential application of SMZ as an effective permeable reactive barrier (PRB) material to control the dispersion of heavy metals and metalloids from ash disposal sites. Quantitative comparison of the elemental composition of SMZ-treated and untreated leachates indicated that SMZ was effective in decreasing the concentrations of trace elements in fly ash leachates. Similarly, SMZ treatment column experiments showed the delayed peak leaching events and overall reductions in leachate concentrations of trace elements. The effectiveness of SMZ column treatments, however, decreased with time potentially due to the saturation of sorption sites. PMID:22721834

  18. House fly oviposition inhibition by larvae ofHermetia illucens, the black soldier fly.

    PubMed

    Bradley, S W; Sheppard, D C

    1984-06-01

    Wild populations of house flies were inhibited from ovipositing into poultry manure containing larvae of the black soldier fly,Hermetia illucens (L.). A laboratory strain of house fly responded differently, readily ovipositing into manure with lower densities of soldier fly larvae, but avoiding the higher densities tested. The amount of timeH. illucens larvae occupy the manure prior to an oviposition test influences ovipositional responses of house flies. Manure conditioned byH. illucens larvae for 4-5 days did not significantly inhibit house fly oviposition. We suggest that some type of interspecific chemical communication (allomone) is present. PMID:24318779

  19. EVALUATION OF A BENCH-SCALE DRY FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEM FOR SCREENING POTENTIAL REAGENTS AND OPERATING CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses two series of bench-scale dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) laboratory tests, the primary objective of which was to evaluate the ability of a bench-scale dry FGD system to screen potential reagents and operating conditions in support of testing at larger pilo...

  20. BENCH-SCALE RECOVERY OF LEAD USING AND ELECTRO- MEMBRANE/CHELATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of a bench-scale treatability test to investigate key process parameters influencing an innovative chelation electrodeposition process for recovery of lead from contaminated sons. thylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriamine penta...

  1. A comparison of force curve profiles between the bench press and ballistic bench throws.

    PubMed

    Clark, Ross A; Bryant, Adam L; Humphries, Brendan

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the peak force and force curve characteristics during a traditional bench press (BP) and a ballistic bench throw (BT). Eight (age = 21.0 +/- 2.3 years, height = 182.3 +/- 7.4 cm, body mass = 85.9 +/- 5.5 kg) semi-professional rugby league players with resistance and power training experience performed both BP and BT exercises at loads of 55 and 80% of their predicted one-repetition maximum. The force curves for each test were then divided into three intensity levels, set at low to moderate (0-75%), high (75-95%), and near-maximal force (95-100%). These values were obtained by determining the percentage of the range of motion (ROM) in which the force produced during each test was within these thresholds. The BT exercise produced significantly (p < 0.05) higher peak force than BP under both loading conditions. A significantly greater portion of the ROM during the 80% BT was at a high intensity in comparison with the BP. No significant differences were found between force intensity conditions at 55% loads. It can be concluded that performing the BT exercise results in a greater peak force output when compared with the traditional BP movement under both resistance training and maximal power loading conditions. Furthermore, performing the BT exercise with heavy loads results in a more efficient training method for maintaining high force levels throughout the ROM. PMID:18978630

  2. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Boxley, Chett; Akash, Akash; Zhao, Qiang

    2013-01-08

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  3. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Boxley, Chett; Akash, Akash; Zhao, Qiang

    2012-05-08

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  4. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Boxley, Chett

    2012-05-15

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with a quantity of spray dryer ash (SDA) and water to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and form a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 40%, and in some cases less than 20%, of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. An optional alkaline activator may be mixed with the fly ash and SDA to facilitate the geopolymerization reaction. The alkaline activator may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  5. Imaging Neuroinflammation – from Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Pulli, Benjamin; Chen, John W

    2014-01-01

    Neuroinflammation plays a central role in a variety of neurological diseases, including stroke, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, and malignant CNS neoplasms, among many other. Different cell types and molecular mediators participate in a cascade of events in the brain that is ultimately aimed at control, regeneration and repair, but leads to damage of brain tissue under pathological conditions. Non-invasive molecular imaging of key players in the inflammation cascade holds promise for identification and quantification of the disease process before it is too late for effective therapeutic intervention. In this review, we focus on molecular imaging techniques that target inflammatory cells and molecules that are of interest in neuroinflammation, especially those with high translational potential. Over the past decade, a plethora of molecular imaging agents have been developed and tested in animal models of (neuro)inflammation, and a few have been translated from bench to bedside. The most promising imaging techniques to visualize neuroinflammation include MRI, positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and optical imaging methods. These techniques enable us to image adhesion molecules to visualize endothelial cell activation, assess leukocyte functions such as oxidative stress, granule release, and phagocytosis, and label a variety of inflammatory cells for cell tracking experiments. In addition, several cell types and their activation can be specifically targeted in vivo, and consequences of neuroinflammation such as neuronal death and demyelination can be quantified. As we continue to make progress in utilizing molecular imaging technology to study and understand neuroinflammation, increasing efforts and investment should be made to bring more of these novel imaging agents from the “bench to bedside.” PMID:25525560

  6. Aerodynamic and Hydrodynamic Tests of a Family of Models of Flying Hulls Derived from a Streamline Body -- NACA Model 84 Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, John B; Olson, Roland E; Draley, Eugene C; Luoma, Arvo A

    1943-01-01

    A series of related forms of flying-boat hulls representing various degrees of compromise between aerodynamic and hydrodynamic requirements was tested in Langley Tank No. 1 and in the Langley 8-foot high-speed tunnel. The purpose of the investigation was to provide information regarding the penalties in water performance resulting from further aerodynamic refinement and, as a corollary, to provide information regarding the penalties in range or payload resulting from the retention of certain desirable hydrodynamic characteristics. The information should form a basis for over-all improvements in hull form.

  7. Contextual interference effects on the acquisition of skill and strength of the bench press.

    PubMed

    Naimo, Marshall A; Zourdos, Michael C; Wilson, Jacob M; Kim, Jeong-Su; Ward, Emery G; Eccles, David W; Panton, Lynn B

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate contextual interference effects on skill acquisition and strength gains during the learning of the bench press movement. Twenty-four healthy, college-aged males and females were stratified to control, high contextual interference (HCI), and low contextual interference (LCI) groups. Treatment groups were provided with written and visual instruction on proper bench press form and practiced the bench press and dart throwing for four weeks. Within each session, LCI performed all bench press sets before undertaking dart-throws. HCI undertook dart-throws immediately following each set of bench press. Control only did testing. Measurements, including one repetition maximum (1RM), checklist scores based on video recordings of participants' 1RM's, and dart-throw test scores were taken at pre-test, 1 week, 2 week, post-test, and retention test. Results were consistent with the basic premise of the contextual interference effect. LCI had significant improvements in percent 1RM and checklist scores during training, but were mostly absent after training (post-test and retention test). HCI had significant improvements in percent 1RM and checklist scores both during and after training. Thus, HCI may augment strength and movement skill on the bench press since proper technique is an important component of resistance exercise movements. PMID:23726036

  8. Radiation-induced changes in melanization and phenoloxidase in Caribbean fruit fly larvae (diptera:tephritidae) as the basis for a simple test of irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nation, J.L.; Milne, K.; Smittle, B.J.

    1995-03-01

    First instars of the Caribbean fruit fly, Anastrepha suspensa (Loew), were irradiated with 0, 5, 10, 20, 50, 75, 100, and 150 Gy doses from a Cs-137 source, and observed for whole body melanization as late third instars. Control larvae rapidly melanized, whereas larvae irradiated at {ge}20 Gy failed to show typical melanization after freezing and thawing. Assays of phenoloxidase in control and irradiated larvae showed greatly decreased enzyme activity at {ge}20 Gy and substantial reduction at lower doses. Larvae were also irradiated on the 1st d of each instar, and phenoloxidase activity was determined when they became late third instars. Larvae irradiated on the 1st d of the first instar and on 1st d of the second instar has {approx}90% or greater reduction in phenoloxidase activity as late third instars. Larvae irradiated on the 1st d of the instar had {approx}50% reduction in phenoloxidase activity at the time they became late third instars leaving the food to pupate. A simple spot test for phenoloxidase was developed that produced a red color with a crushed control larvae and no color with a larva irradiated at {ge}25 Gy. The radiation induced changes in melanization and phenoloxidase activity, and a simple spot test may serve as tests for irradiation treatment of Caribbean fruit fly larvae. 10 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Bench scale demonstration and conceptual engineering for DETOX{sup SM} catalyzed wet oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Moslander, J.; Bell, R.; Robertson, D.; Dhooge, P.; Goldblatt, S.

    1994-06-01

    Laboratory and bench scale studies of the DETOX{sup SM} catalyzed wet oxidation process have been performed with the object of developing the process for treatment of hazardous and mixed wastes. Reaction orders, apparent rates, and activation energies have been determined for a range of organic waste surrogates. Reaction intermediates and products have been analyzed. Metals` fates have been determined. Bench scale units have been designed, fabricated, and tested with solid and liquid organic waste surrogates. Results from the laboratory and bench scale studies have been used to develop conceptual designs for application of the process to hazardous and mixed wastes.

  10. Flying Saucer? Aliens?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    No, it's not a flying saucer, it is the domed top to a 70 foot long vacuum tank at the Lewis Research Center's Electric Propulsion Laboratory, Cleveland, Ohio. The three technicians shown here in protective clothing had just emerged from within the tank where they had been cleaning in the toxic mercury atmosphere, left after ion engine testing in the tank. Lewis has since been renamed the John H. Glenn Research Center.

  11. Using dynamic N-mixture models to test cavity limitation on northern flying squirrel demographic parameters using experimental nest box supplementation.

    PubMed

    Priol, Pauline; Mazerolle, Marc J; Imbeau, Louis; Drapeau, Pierre; Trudeau, Caroline; Ramière, Jessica

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic N-mixture models have been recently developed to estimate demographic parameters of unmarked individuals while accounting for imperfect detection. We propose an application of the Dail and Madsen (2011: Biometrics, 67, 577-587) dynamic N-mixture model in a manipulative experiment using a before-after control-impact design (BACI). Specifically, we tested the hypothesis of cavity limitation of a cavity specialist species, the northern flying squirrel, using nest box supplementation on half of 56 trapping sites. Our main purpose was to evaluate the impact of an increase in cavity availability on flying squirrel population dynamics in deciduous stands in northwestern Québec with the dynamic N-mixture model. We compared abundance estimates from this recent approach with those from classic capture-mark-recapture models and generalized linear models. We compared apparent survival estimates with those from Cormack-Jolly-Seber (CJS) models. Average recruitment rate was 6 individuals per site after 4 years. Nevertheless, we found no effect of cavity supplementation on apparent survival and recruitment rates of flying squirrels. Contrary to our expectations, initial abundance was not affected by conifer basal area (food availability) and was negatively affected by snag basal area (cavity availability). Northern flying squirrel population dynamics are not influenced by cavity availability at our deciduous sites. Consequently, we suggest that this species should not be considered an indicator of old forest attributes in our study area, especially in view of apparent wide population fluctuations across years. Abundance estimates from N-mixture models were similar to those from capture-mark-recapture models, although the latter had greater precision. Generalized linear mixed models produced lower abundance estimates, but revealed the same relationship between abundance and snag basal area. Apparent survival estimates from N-mixture models were higher and less precise

  12. Using dynamic N-mixture models to test cavity limitation on northern flying squirrel demographic parameters using experimental nest box supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Priol, Pauline; Mazerolle, Marc J; Imbeau, Louis; Drapeau, Pierre; Trudeau, Caroline; Ramière, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic N-mixture models have been recently developed to estimate demographic parameters of unmarked individuals while accounting for imperfect detection. We propose an application of the Dail and Madsen (2011: Biometrics, 67, 577–587) dynamic N-mixture model in a manipulative experiment using a before-after control-impact design (BACI). Specifically, we tested the hypothesis of cavity limitation of a cavity specialist species, the northern flying squirrel, using nest box supplementation on half of 56 trapping sites. Our main purpose was to evaluate the impact of an increase in cavity availability on flying squirrel population dynamics in deciduous stands in northwestern Québec with the dynamic N-mixture model. We compared abundance estimates from this recent approach with those from classic capture–mark–recapture models and generalized linear models. We compared apparent survival estimates with those from Cormack–Jolly–Seber (CJS) models. Average recruitment rate was 6 individuals per site after 4 years. Nevertheless, we found no effect of cavity supplementation on apparent survival and recruitment rates of flying squirrels. Contrary to our expectations, initial abundance was not affected by conifer basal area (food availability) and was negatively affected by snag basal area (cavity availability). Northern flying squirrel population dynamics are not influenced by cavity availability at our deciduous sites. Consequently, we suggest that this species should not be considered an indicator of old forest attributes in our study area, especially in view of apparent wide population fluctuations across years. Abundance estimates from N-mixture models were similar to those from capture–mark–recapture models, although the latter had greater precision. Generalized linear mixed models produced lower abundance estimates, but revealed the same relationship between abundance and snag basal area. Apparent survival estimates from N-mixture models were higher and

  13. Flight-test evaluation of STOL control and flight director concepts in a powered-lift aircraft flying curved decelerating approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindson, W. S.; Hardy, G. H.; Innis, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    Flight tests were carried out to assess the feasibility of piloted steep curved, and decelerating approach profiles in powered lift STOL aircraft. Several STOL control concepts representative of a variety of aircraft were evaluated in conjunction with suitably designed flight directions. The tests were carried out in a real navigation environment, employed special electronic cockpit displays, and included the development of the performance achieved and the control utilization involved in flying 180 deg turning, descending, and decelerating approach profiles to landing. The results suggest that such moderately complex piloted instrument approaches may indeed be feasible from a pilot acceptance point of view, given an acceptable navigation environment. Systems with the capability of those used in this experiment can provide the potential of achieving instrument operations on curved, descending, and decelerating landing approaches to weather minima corresponding to CTOL Category 2 criteria, while also providing a means of realizing more efficient operations during visual flight conditions.

  14. Tank tests of three models of flying-boat hulls of the pointed-step type with different angles of dead rise - NACA model 35 series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, John R

    1936-01-01

    The results of tank tests of three models of flying-boat hulls of the pointed-step type with different angles of dead rise are given in charts and are compared with results from tests of more conventional hulls. Increasing the angle of dead rise from 15 to 25 degrees: had little effect on the hump resistance; increased the resistance throughout the planning range; increased the best trim angle; reduced the maximum positive trimming moment required to obtain best trim angle; and had but a slight effect on the spray characteristics. For approximately the same angles of dead rise the resistance of the pointed-step hulls were considerably lower at high speeds than those of the more conventional hulls.

  15. 27 CFR 9.233 - Kelsey Bench-Lake County.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Kelsey Bench-Lake County... Kelsey Bench-Lake County. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Kelsey Bench-Lake County”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Kelsey Bench-Lake County,”...

  16. Using bench press load to predict upper body exercise loads in physically active individuals.

    PubMed

    Wong, Del P; Ngo, Kwan-Lung; Tse, Michael A; Smith, Andrew W

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether loads for assistance exercises of the upper body can be predicted from the loads of the bench press exercise. Twenty-nine physically active collegiate students (age: 22.6 ± 2.5; weight training experience: 2.9 ± 2.1 years; estimated 1RM bench press: 54.31 ± 14.60 kg; 1RM: body weight ratio: 0.80 ± 0.22; BMI: 22.7 ± 2.1 kg·m(-2)) were recruited. The 6RM loads for bench press, barbell bicep curl, overhead dumbbell triceps extension, hammer curl and dumbbell shoulder press were measured. Test-retest reliability for the 5 exercises as determined by Pearson product moment correlation coefficient was very high to nearly perfect (0.82-0.98, p < 0.01). The bench press load was significantly correlated with the loads of the 4 assistance exercises (r ranged from 0.80 to 0.93, p < 0.01). Linear regression revealed that the bench press load was a significant (R(2) range from 0.64 to 0.86, p < 0.01) predictor for the loads of the 4 assistance exercises. The following 6RM prediction equations were determined: (a) Hammer curl = Bench press load (0.28) + 6.30 kg, (b) Barbell biceps curl = Bench press load (0.33) + 6.20 kg, (c) Overhead triceps extension = Bench press load (0.33) - 0.60 kg, and (d) Dumbbell shoulder press = Bench press load (0.42) + 5.84 kg. The difference between the actual load and the predicted load using the four equations ranged between 6.52% and 8.54%, such difference was not significant. Fitness professionals can use the 6RM bench press load as a time effective and accurate method to predict training loads for upper body assistance exercises. Key pointsThe bench press load was significantly correlated with the loads of the 4 assistance exercises.No significant differences were found between the actual load and the predicted load in the four equations.6RM bench press load can be a time effective and accurate method to predict training loads for upper body assistance exercises. PMID:24149723

  17. Aeroservoelastic Wind-Tunnel Tests of a Free-Flying, Joined-Wing SensorCraft Model for Gust Load Alleviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Robert C.; Castelluccio, Mark A.; Coulson, David A.; Heeg, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    A team comprised of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Boeing, and the NASA Langley Research Center conducted three aeroservoelastic wind-tunnel tests in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to demonstrate active control technologies relevant to large, exible vehicles. In the first of these three tests, a full-span, aeroelastically scaled, wind-tunnel model of a joined-wing SensorCraft vehicle was mounted to a force balance to acquire a basic aerodynamic data set. In the second and third tests, the same wind-tunnel model was mated to a new, two-degree-of-freedom, beam mount. This mount allowed the full-span model to translate vertically and pitch. Trimmed flight at -10% static margin and gust load alleviation were successfully demonstrated. The rigid body degrees of freedom required that the model be own in the wind tunnel using an active control system. This risky mode of testing necessitated that a model arrestment system be integrated into the new mount. The safe and successful completion of these free-flying tests required the development and integration of custom hardware and software. This paper describes the many systems, software, and procedures that were developed as part of this effort. The balance and free ying wind-tunnel tests will be summarized. The design of the trim and gust load alleviation control laws along with the associated results will also be discussed.

  18. DIRECT LIQUEFACTION PROOF-OF-CONCEPT PROGRAM - BENCH RUN PB-10 (HTI 227-109)

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1999-12-30

    This report presents the results of the bench-scale test, PB-10, performed at HTI's facilities under DOE contract (HTI Run No. 227-109). This bench test continues the work that was started in PDU testing 260-007. Previous bench test (PB-09, HTI 227-106) was performed on different seams of Chinese coal (Shenhua Ningtiaota Coal No.2 and No.3). Since another coal, Shangwan coal was selected for the liquefaction plant, PB-10 was made as approved by DOE/COR. The objective of this test was to evaluate the liquefaction performance of Shangwan coal utilizing various backend processing and recycle schemes. Additionally, this test was to collect available process data to allow for the best scale-up process design possible from this particular unit.

  19. Technology test results from an intelligent, free-flying robot for crew and equipment retrieval in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Jon D.; Goode, R.; Grimm, K. A.; Hess, Clifford W.; Norsworthy, Robert S.; Anderson, Greg D.; Merkel, L.; Phinney, Dale E.

    1992-03-01

    The ground-based demonstrations of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Retriever, a voice- supervised, intelligent, free-flying robot, are designed to evaluate the capability to retrieve objects (astronauts, equipment, and tools) which have accidentally separated from the space station. The EVA Retriever software is required to autonomously plan and execute a target rendezvous, grapple, and return to base while avoiding stationary and moving obstacles with subsequent object handover. The software architecture incorporates a hierarchical decomposition of the control system that is horizontally partitioned into five major functional subsystems: sensing, perception, world model, reasoning, and acting. The design provides for supervised autonomy as the primary mode of operation. It is intended to be an evolutionary system improving in capability over time and as it earns crew trust through reliable and safe operation. This paper gives an overview of the hardware, a focus on software, and a summary of results achieved recently from both computer simulations and air bearing floor demonstrations. Limitations of the technology used are evaluated. Plans for the next phase, during which moving targets and obstacles drive realtime behavior requirements, are discussed.

  20. Technology test results from an intelligent, free-flying robot for crew and equipment retrieval in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, J.; Goode, R.; Grimm, K.; Hess, C.; Norsworthy, R.; Anderson, G.; Merkel, L.; Phinney, D.

    1992-01-01

    The ground-based demonstrations of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Retriever, a voice-supervised, intelligent, free-flying robot, are designed to evaluate the capability to retrieve objects (astronauts, equipment, and tools) which have accidentally separated from the Space Station. The EVA Retriever software is required to autonomously plan and execute a target rendezvous, grapple, and return to base while avoiding stationary and moving obstacles with subsequent object handover. The software architecture incorporates a heirarchical decomposition of the control system that is horizontally partitioned into five major functional subsystems: sensing, perception, world model, reasoning, and acting. The design provides for supervised autonomy as the primary mode of operation. It is intended to be an evolutionary system improving in capability over time and as it earns crew trust through reliable and safe operation. This paper gives an overview of the hardware, a focus on software, and a summary of results achieved recently from both computer simulations and air bearing floor demonstrations. Limitations of the technology used are evaluated. Plans for the next phase, during which moving targets and obstacles drive realtime behavior requirements, are discussed.

  1. A Comparison of the Results from General Tank Tests of 1/6- and 1/12-full-size Models of the British Singapore IIC Flying Boat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truscott, Starr; Dawson, John R

    1942-01-01

    A 1/6-full-size model of the hull of the British Singapore IIC flying boat was tested in the NACA tank. The results are given in the form of charts and are compared with the results of previous tests made in the NACA tank of a 1/12-full-size model, published in NACA T.N. No. 580, and with the results of tests made in the British R.A.E. tank of another 1/6-full-size model of the same hull. When the data from the tests of the 1/6- and 1/12-full-size models were compared on the basis of Froude's law of comparison, differences were found. This fact supported the belief that the small scale of the model and the use of a model that was too small to suit the equipment of the NACA tank had caused the results of the tests of the 1/12-full-size model to be less reliable than the results of the tests of the 1/6-full-size model. The results of the tests of the two models agreed sufficiently well to show that test of a small model, if made meticulously and with suitable equipment, may give useable results, but that a larger model should be used whenever feasible. The results of the NACA tests of the 1/6-full-size model were found to be in good agreement with the R.A.E. tests of a model of the same size.

  2. Process Document, Joint Verification Protocol, and Joint Test Plan for Verification of HACH-LANGE GmbH LUMIStox 300 Bench Top Luminometer and ECLOX Handheld Luminometer for Luminescent Bacteria Test for use in Wastewater

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Danish Environmental Technology Verification program (DANETV) Water Test Centre operated by DHI, is supported by the Danish Ministry for Science, Technology and Innovation. DANETV, the United States Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Technology Verification Progra...

  3. A do-it-yourself optical bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořák, Leoš

    2011-10-01

    When teaching geometrical optics, especially the parts concerning lenses, there are many experiments that can be done just by holding the lenses in your (or your pupils') hands. But if you want to measure something, for example focal lengths, or combine two lenses to demonstrate the principle of a telescope, then something that can fix the lenses is needed. Of course, we can do such demonstrations and measurements using a commercially available optical bench. But a classical optical bench is usually a large and heavy construction that is not easy to transport. Often only one (or even none) may be available per classroom. In many school experiments something less robust, simpler, and less expensive would perhaps suit the needs better. Here we describe a simple and flexible optical bench that may be constructed by students themselves. Apart from the price of the lenses, the construction is also very cheap. So, if you have some spare lenses available, you can build a small optical bench for 10 or less. Each group of students can then use their own optical bench to do experiments.

  4. Bench-Scale Co-Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Piasecki, C.A.; Gatsis, J.G.; Fullerton, H.E.

    1993-11-08

    This topical report is the first for the UOP Bench-Scale Co-processing contract. The objective of this contract is to extend and optimize the UOP single-stage, slurry-catalyzed co-processing scheme. UOP co-processing uses a single-stage, slurry-catalyzed scheme in which petroleum vacuum resid and coal are simultaneously upgraded to a high-quality synthetic oil. A highly active, well-dispersed catalyst permits operations at moderate- and high-severity reaction conditions with minimum detrimental thermal reactions. In this process, finely ground coal, petroleum resid, and catalyst are mixed, combined with hydrogen, and then directed to a single-stage reactor, where the simultaneous upgrading of the petroleum resid and coal occurs. The reactor effluent is directed to a series of separators, where a hydrogen-rich gas is recovered and recycled back to the reactor inlet. The balance of the material is sent to a series of separators, where the light gasses, light oil, vacuum gas on (VGO), catalyst, unconverted coal, ash, and residues are recovered. The catalyst is recycled back to the reactor. The UOP co-processing scheme is designed to be integrated into a conventional petroleum refinery. the hydrocarbon products from the co-processing unit will be sent to the refinery for final upgrading to finished products. A major focus of this contract is to investigate ways to reduce the catalyst and catalyst recovery costs and improve the overall economics of the process. This report documents the work completed under Task 2.0, Laboratory Support. The overall objective of Task 2.0 was to obtain and characterize the feedstocks for the contract and to provide a screening mechanism to test new catalyst systems prior to testing in the continuous pilot plant. The main elements of the experimental program for task 2.0 include: Feedstock procurement and analysis; catalyst improvements; and catalyst recycle screening.

  5. Flying qualities research challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliwa, Steven M.; George, Frank L.

    1987-01-01

    Traditional flying qualities requirements for airplane dynamics are based on airplane modal response characteristics derived from linear small-perturbation analysis. These requirements are supported by a large experimental data base. The challenge to the flying qualities community is to demonstrate how flying qualities, the control system and aircraft configuration are still closely linked. This is evident in the definition of flying qualities and, as far as pilots are concerned, that flying qualities are still the measure of overall design success.

  6. Bench-scale co-processing

    SciTech Connect

    Nafis, D.A.; Gatsis, J.G.; Lea, C.; Miller, M.A.

    1990-03-07

    The objective of this current is to extend and optimize UOP's single-stage slurry-catalyzed co-processing scheme, which has developed under previous Contract AC22-84PC70002. Particular emphasis is given to defining and improving catalyst utilization and costs, evaluating alternative and disposable slurry-catalyst systems, and improving catalyst recycle and recovery techniques. The work during this quarter involved a series of bench-scale runs using a new Mo-based slurry catalyst. The results of bench-scale Runs 24 and 25 are discussed in the following report. 7 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Results of a laboratory experiment that tests rotating unbalanced-mass devices for scanning gimbaled payloads and free-flying spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, D. C.; Polites, M. E.

    1994-01-01

    Rotating unbalanced-mass (RUM) devices are a new way to scan space-based, balloon-borne, and ground-based gimbaled payloads, like x-ray and gamma-ray telescopes. They can also be used to scan free-flying spacecraft. Circular scans, linear scans, and raster scans can be generated. A pair of RUM devices generates the basic scan motion and an auxiliary control system using torque motors, control moment gyros, or reaction wheels keeps the scan centered on the target and produces some complementary motion for raster scanning. Previous analyses and simulation results show that this approach offers significant power savings compared to scanning only with the auxiliary control system, especially with large payloads and high scan frequencies. However, these claims have never been proven until now. This paper describes a laboratory experiment which tests the concept of scanning a gimbaled payload with RUM devices. A description of the experiment is given and test results that prove the concept are presented. The test results are compared with those from a computer simulation model of the experiment and the differences are discussed.

  8. Assembly States of FliM and FliG within the Flagellar Switch Complex

    PubMed Central

    Sircar, Ria; Borbat, Peter P.; Lynch, Michael J.; Bhatnagar, Jaya; Beyersdorf, Matthew S.; Halkides, Christopher J.; Freed, Jack H.; Crane, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    At the base of the bacterial flagella a cytoplasmic rotor (the C-ring) generates torque and reverses rotation sense in response to stimuli. The bulk of the C-ring forms from many copies of the proteins FliG, FliM, and FliN, which together constitute the switch complex. To help resolve outstanding issues regarding C-ring architecture, interactions between FliM and FliG from Thermotoga maritima have been investigated with x-ray crystallography and pulsed dipolar electron spin resonance spectroscopy (PDS). A new crystal structure of an 11-unit FliG:FliM complex produces a large arc with a curvature consistent with the dimensions of the C-ring. Previously determined structures along with this new structure provided a basis to test switch complex assembly models. PDS combined with mutational studies and targeted cross-linking reveal that FliM and FliG interact through their middle domains to form both parallel and antiparallel arrangements in solution. Residue substitutions at predicted interfaces disrupt higher-order complexes that are primarily mediated by contacts between the C-terminal domain of FliG and the middle domain of a neighboring FliG molecule. Spin separations among multi-labeled component proteins fit to a self-consistent model that agrees well with electron microscopy images of the C-ring. An activated form of the response regulator CheY destabilizes the parallel arrangement of FliM molecules to perturb FliG alignment in a process that may reflect the onset of rotation switching. This data suggest a model of C-ring assembly in which intermolecular contacts among FliG domains provide a template for FliM assembly and cooperative transitions. PMID:25536293

  9. Hot-bench simulation of the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buttrill, Carey S.; Houck, Jacob A.

    1990-01-01

    Two simulations, one batch and one real-time, of an aeroelastically-scaled wind-tunnel model were developed. The wind-tunnel model was a full-span, free-to-roll model of an advanced fighter concept. The batch simulation was used to generate and verify the real-time simulation and to test candidate control laws prior to implementation. The real-time simulation supported hot-bench testing of a digital controller, which was developed to actively control the elastic deformation of the wind-tunnel model. Time scaling was required for hot-bench testing. The wind-tunnel model, the mathematical models for the simulations, the techniques employed to reduce the hot-bench time-scale factors, and the verification procedures are described.

  10. Bench-scale treatability studies for simulated incinerator scrubber blowdown containing radioactive cesium and strontium

    SciTech Connect

    Coroneos, A.C.; Taylor, P.A.; Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Bostick, D.A.; Perona, J.J.

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the results of bench-scale testing completed to remove {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr from the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator blowdown at the K-25 Site Central Neutralization Facility, a wastewater treatment facility designed to remove heavy metals and uranium from various wastewaters. The report presents results of bench-scale testing using chabazite and clinoptilolite zeolites to remove cesium and strontium; using potassium cobalt ferrocyanide (KCCF) to remove cesium; and using strontium chloride coprecipitation, sodium phosphate coprecipitation, and calcium sulfate coprecipitation to remove strontium. Low-range, average-range, and high-range concentration blowdown surrogates were used to complete the bench-scale testing.

  11. Configurational testing of electron beam ionization for coal fly ash precipitators. Quarterly report No. 2, November 5, 1983-February 4, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    The energy-geometry matching condition reported in Quarterly Report No. 1 has been incorporated in the design of a Mark II precharger and construction is underway. By matching the energy and geometry, monopolar charging is assured by providing a charging zone outside the ionization zone. Particle charges greater than the Pauthenier limit were observed using a bi-electrode geometry. Either or both free electron charging or space-charge enhancement of the electric field may be responsible for the increase in charge above the theoretical limit for the average electric field. A separate experiment on free electron charging proceeded during this quarter and the progress is reported. To date the exhaustive experiments on resistance modification by simple electron beam irradiation have not provided evidence to support practical utilization. However, preliminary experiments do suggest that the presence of small amounts of SO/sub 2/ and the subsequent conversion of SO/sub 2/ by electron beam treatment may conductively coat high resistivity fly ash particles with a resultant reduction in resistivity. The status of the laboratory precipitator test system is reported along with the preparations for tests of the new Mark II precharger module. During this quarter a patent disclosure on a device to enhance radiation dose was submitted to the US Department of Energy. 13 figures.

  12. Evaluation of a Bench Top Mechanical Delinter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This presentation will report on current research associated with a new mechancial delinter being developed at the Cotton Production and Processing Research Unit in conjunction with Cotton Inc. A bench-top version of the new mechanical delinter was built and evaluated to determine operational speeds...

  13. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: BENGART AND MEMEL (BENCH-SCALE), GULFPORT (BENCH AND PILOT-SCALE), MONTANA POLE (BENCH-SCALE), AND WESTERN PROCESSING (BENCH-SCALE) TREATABILITY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document presents summary data on the results of various treatability studies (bench and pilot scale), conducted at three different sites where soils were contaminated with dioxins or PCBs. The synopsis is meant to show rough performance levels under a variety of differen...

  14. Mathematical Lens: How Much Can You Bench?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolognese, Chris A.

    2013-01-01

    "How Much Can You Bench?" appears in the "Mathematical Lens" section of "Mathematics Teacher." "Mathematical Lens" uses photographs as a springboard for mathematical inquiry and appears in every issue of "Mathematics Teacher." This month the mathematics behind the photograph includes finding areas…

  15. MERCURY SPECIATION IN COMBUSTION SYSTEMS: STUDIES WITH SIMULATED FLUE GASES AND MODEL FLY ASHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a bench-scale study of the effects of flue gas and fly ash parameters on the oxidation of elemental mercury in simulated flue gases containing hydrogen chloride (HCl), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and water vapor (H2O...

  16. Design guidelines for high dimensional stability of CFRP optical bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desnoyers, Nichola; Boucher, Marc-André; Goyette, Philippe

    2013-09-01

    In carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) optomechanical structures, particularly when embodying reflective optics, angular stability is critical. Angular stability or warping stability is greatly affected by moisture absorption and thermal gradients. Unfortunately, it is impossible to achieve the perfect laminate and there will always be manufacturing errors in trying to reach a quasi-iso laminate. Some errors, such as those related to the angular position of each ply and the facesheet parallelism (for a bench) can be easily monitored in order to control the stability more adequately. This paper presents warping experiments and finite-element analyses (FEA) obtained from typical optomechanical sandwich structures. Experiments were done using a thermal vacuum chamber to cycle the structures from -40°C to 50°C. Moisture desorption tests were also performed for a number of specific configurations. The selected composite material for the study is the unidirectional prepreg from Tencate M55J/TC410. M55J is a high modulus fiber and TC410 is a new-generation cyanate ester designed for dimensionally stable optical benches. In the studied cases, the main contributors were found to be: the ply angular errors, laminate in-plane parallelism (between 0° ply direction of both facesheets), fiber volume fraction tolerance and joints. Final results show that some tested configurations demonstrated good warping stability. FEA and measurements are in good agreement despite the fact that some defects or fabrication errors remain unpredictable. Design guidelines to maximize the warping stability by taking into account the main dimensional stability contributors, the bench geometry and the optical mount interface are then proposed.

  17. ETR, TRA642. BENCH MARK AND ELEVATION LOCATIONS, FLOOR LOADING DATA, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR, TRA-642. BENCH MARK AND ELEVATION LOCATIONS, FLOOR LOADING DATA, CRANE WORKING AREAS. PHILLIPS PETROLEUM COMPANY ETR-D-1584, 5/1959. INL INDEX NO. 532-0642-00-706-020323, REV. 3. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. 14. SOUTHWEST TO PUMP REPAIR WORK BENCH, WITH ELECTRIC PIPE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. SOUTHWEST TO PUMP REPAIR WORK BENCH, WITH ELECTRIC PIPE THREADER AT RIGHT END OF BENCH. WOODEN BINS BENEATH THE BENCH CONTAIN THREADED PIPE, JOINTS, AND TOOLS. THE SOUTH FRONT OF THE FACTORY IS VISIBLE IN THE BACKGROUND. - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  19. Bench-scale Analysis of Surrogates for Anaerobic Digestion Processes.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Zachary S; Long, Sharon C

    2016-05-01

    Frequent monitoring of anaerobic digestion processes for pathogen destruction is both cost and time prohibitive. The use of surrogates to supplement regulatory monitoring may be one solution. To evaluate surrogates, a semi-batch bench-scale anaerobic digester design was tested. Bench-scale reactors were operated under mesophilic (36 °C) and thermophilic (53-55 °C) conditions, with a 15 day solids retention time. Biosolids from different facilities and during different seasons were examined. USEPA regulated pathogens and surrogate organisms were enumerated at different times throughout each experiment. The surrogate organisms included fecal coliforms, E. coli, enterococci, male-specific and somatic coliphages, Clostridium perfringens, and bacterial spores. Male-specific coliphages tested well as a potential surrogate organism for virus inactivation. None of the tested surrogate organisms correlated well with helminth inactivation under the conditions studied. There were statistically significant differences in the inactivation rates between the facilities in this study, but not between seasons. PMID:27131309

  20. Bench-scale Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Blythe; John Currie; David DeBerry

    2008-03-31

    This document is the final report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42314, 'Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors'. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory and EPRI. The objective of the project has been to determine the mechanisms and kinetics of the aqueous reactions of mercury absorbed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, and develop a kinetics model to predict mercury reactions in wet FGD systems. The model may be used to determine optimum wet FGD design and operating conditions to maximize mercury capture in wet FGD systems. Initially, a series of bench-top, liquid-phase reactor tests were conducted and mercury species concentrations were measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy to determine reactant and byproduct concentrations over time. Other measurement methods, such as atomic absorption, were used to measure concentrations of vapor-phase elemental mercury, that cannot be measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy. Next, a series of bench-scale wet FGD simulation tests were conducted. Because of the significant effects of sulfite concentration on mercury re-emission rates, new methods were developed for operating and controlling the bench-scale FGD experiments. Approximately 140 bench-scale wet FGD tests were conducted and several unusual and pertinent effects of process chemistry on mercury re-emissions were identified and characterized. These data have been used to develop an empirically adjusted, theoretically based kinetics model to predict mercury species reactions in wet FGD systems. The model has been verified in tests conducted with the bench-scale wet FGD system, where both gas-phase and liquid-phase mercury concentrations were measured to determine if the model accurately predicts the tendency for mercury re-emissions. This report presents and discusses results from the initial laboratory kinetics measurements, the bench-scale wet FGD tests, and the kinetics modeling efforts.

  1. Comparative Performance of Rear Facing Child Restraint Systems on the CMVSS 213 Bench and Vehicle Seats

    PubMed Central

    Tylko, Suzanne; Locey, Caitlin M.; Garcia-Espana, J. Felipe; Arbogast, Kristy B.; Maltese, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dynamic response of rear-facing child restraint systems (RFCRS) installed on the CMVSS 213 sled bench and a selection of vehicle seats. Thirty-six sled tests were conducted: three models of rear facing CRS with an anthropomorphic test device (ATD) representing a 12 month old child (CRABI) were affixed via lower anchors (LATCH), 3 point belt without CRS base, and 3 point belt with CRS base to one of three vehicle seats or the CMVSS 213 bench seat. All CRS were subjected to an identical sled acceleration pulse. Two types of matched pair analysis: “bench-to-vehicle” and “method of attachment” were conducted. Statistically significant differences were observed in the kinematic responses of the ATD and the CRS. This is the first study to quantify differences between the regulatory bench and vehicle seats on a system level and evaluate the influence of attachment method. Our results show that the difference in RFCRS forward excursion between 3-point belt with base and LATCH installations was between 1 and 7 percent on the bench and 22 to 76 percent on the vehicle seats. When evaluating the dynamic performance of RFCRS, the use of real vehicle seats from vehicles that commonly carry children may provide valuable insight. The findings would require further confirmation using a broader selection of RFCRS and vehicle seats, before generalizable conclusions can be drawn. PMID:24406967

  2. Gyroscopic Instruments for Instrument Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brombacher, W G; Trent, W C

    1938-01-01

    The gyroscopic instruments commonly used in instrument flying in the United States are the turn indicator, the directional gyro, the gyromagnetic compass, the gyroscopic horizon, and the automatic pilot. These instruments are described. Performance data and the method of testing in the laboratory are given for the turn indicator, the directional gyro, and the gyroscopic horizon. Apparatus for driving the instruments is discussed.

  3. Stable Fly Research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adult stable flies feed on the blood of humans, pets and livestock, inflicting painful bites. Stable flies need one and sometimes two bloodmeals each day to develop their eggs. Unlike mosquitoes where only the females bloodfeed, both male and female stable flies require blood to reproduce. Stable fl...

  4. Resistance Tests of a 1/16 Size Model of the Hughes-kaiser Flying Boat, NACA Model 183

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posner, Jack; Woodward, David R.; Olson, Roland E.

    1944-01-01

    Tank tests were made of a hull model of the Hughes-Kaiser cargo airplane for estimates of take-off performance and maximum gross load for take-off. At hump speeds, with the model free to trim, the trim and resistance were high, which resulted in a load-resistance ratio of approximately 4.0 for a gross load coefficient of 0.75. With a 4000,000-lb load, the full size craft may take off in 69 sec over a distance of 5600 ft.

  5. Photometer dewar system for NASA C141 airborne telescope (Kuiper Flying Observatory). [design analysis/performance tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ney, E. P.

    1974-01-01

    The design, calibration, and testing of a photometer to be used in an airborne telescope is described. A description of the cryogenics of the photometer is given, and photographs and blueprints of the photometer are included. The photometer is designed with a focal plane beam switching system so that the airplane telescope can be used in a normal optical mode at the bent Cassegrain focus and with the photometer operating in the pressurized cabin of the airplane. The concept was to produce a system which could be used in almost the same manner as ground based infrared photometers and dewars of the O'Brien Observatory at the University of Minnesota.

  6. Preliminary flight test results of a fly-by-throttle emergency flight control system on an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Maine, Trindel A.; Fullerton, C. G.; Wells, Edward A.

    1993-01-01

    A multi-engine aircraft, with some or all of the flight control system inoperative, may use engine thrust for control. NASA Dryden has conducted a study of the capability and techniques for this emergency flight control method for the F-15 airplane. With an augmented control system, engine thrust, along with appropriate feedback parameters, is used to control flightpath and bank angle. Extensive simulation studies have been followed by flight tests. This paper discusses the principles of throttles-only control, the F-15 airplane, the augmented system, and the flight results including landing approaches with throttles-only control to within 10 ft of the ground.

  7. Heavy metals leaching in Indian fly ash.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Bably; Mondal, Kajal Kumar

    2008-04-01

    Fly ash is an industrial waste generated from thermal power plants. Fly ash constitutes 80-85% of the total ash produced. A small part of fly ash is utilised in some sectors such as construction materials, building engineering, road, back fill, agriculture, selective engineering and processing useful materials. A large part of fly ash produced is disposed of with very high environmental risk. In the present paper, laboratory leaching test has been used to determine the potential mobility of Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu, Zn, Fe, Mn and Ni in fly ash samples, collected from Chandrapura Thermal Power Plant, Jharkhand and Ramagundam Super Thermal Power Plant, Andhra Pradesh, in order to assess their leachability when these wastes are disposed of. A cascade-leaching test was used at liquid-to-solid ratio (L/S) ranging between 20 and 100. Both fly ash samples exhibited neutral reactions, as indicated by pH values <11.75 and >7.0 at L/S=10 and contact time of 10 minutes. The percentage of leached amounts found to follow the trend Zn>Fe>Mn>Cr>Pb>Cu>Ni>Cd for fly ash from Chandrapura and Fe>Zn>Cu>Mn>Cr>Ni>Pb>Cd for fly ash from Ramagundam. Effect of pH on metals released from ash surface in aqueous solution followed a predictable pattern of decreasing release with increasing pH. PMID:19295096

  8. A laser guide star wavefront sensor bench demonstrator for TMT.

    PubMed

    Lardiere, Olivier; Conan, Rodolphe; Bradley, Colin; Jackson, Kate; Herriot, Glen

    2008-04-14

    Sodium laser guide stars (LGSs) allow, in theory, Adaptive Optics (AO) systems to reach a full sky coverage, but they have their own limitations. The artificial star is elongated due to the sodium layer thickness, and the temporal and spatial variability of the sodium atom density induces changing errors on wavefront measurements, especially with Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) for which the LGS elongation is larger. In the framework of the Thirty-Meter-Telescope project (TMT), the AO-Lab of the University of Victoria (UVic) has built an LGS-simulator test bed in order to assess the performance of new centroiding algorithms for LGS Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors (SH-WFS). The design of the LGS-bench is presented, as well as laboratory SH-WFS images featuring 29x29 radially elongated spots, simulated for a 30-m pupil. The errors induced by the LGS variations, such as focus and spherical aberrations, are characterized and discussed. This bench is not limited to SH-WFS and can serve as an LGS-simulator test bed to any other LGS-AO projects for which sodium layer fluctuations are an issue. PMID:18542656

  9. Evaluation of commercial and field-expedient baited traps for house flies, Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A comparison of 9 commercial baited fly traps on Florida dairy farms demonstrated that Terminator traps collected significantly more (13,323/trap) house flies (Musca domestica L.) than the others tested; Final Flight, Fly Magnet and FliesBeGone traps collected intermediate numbers of flies (834-2,16...

  10. X-48B: How Does it Fly?

    NASA Video Gallery

    Gary Cosentino, lead flight operations engineer at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, talks about what it's like to fly the remotely piloted test vehicle -- X-48B -- a new kind of aircraft that ...

  11. MULTICOMPONENT AEROSOL DYNAMICS OF THE PB-O2 SYSTEM IN A BENCH SCALE FLAME INCINERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was carried out to understand the formation and growth of lead particles in a flame incinerator. A bench scale flame incinerator was used to perform controlled experiments with lead acetate as a test compound. A dilution probe in conjunction with real-time aerosol instrum...

  12. EVALUATING BENCH-SCALE NANOFILTRATION STUDIES FOR PREDICTING FULL-SCALE PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Information Collection Rule (ICR) requires water utilities of a certain size and water quality to conduct bench or pilot testing of either granular activated carbon or membranes for the control of disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursors. his paper evaluates the effectiveness ...

  13. STS-26 crewmembers participate in bench review at offsite Boeing Bldg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers participate in bench review at the offsite Boeing Building. Mission Specialist (MS) David C. Hilmers tests an electric razor while MS George D. Nelson reviews clipboard checklist and looks over hygiene supplies (razors, deodorants, tooth paste, etc.). Photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

  14. Bench-Scale Evaluation Of Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramic Technology To Stabilize Mercury Waste Mixtures

    EPA Science Inventory

    This bench-scale study was conducted to evaluate the stabilization of mercury (Hg) and mercuric chloride-containing surrogate test materials by the chemically bonded phosphate ceramics technology. This study was performed as part of a U.S. EPA program to evaluate treatment and d...

  15. BENCH-SCALE EVALUATION OF CALCIUM SORBENTS FOR ACID GAS EMISSION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Calcium sorbents for acid gas emission control were evaluated for effectiveness in removing SO2/HCl and SO2/NO from simulated incinerator and boiler flue gases. All tests were conducted in a bench-scale reactor (fixed-bed) simulating fabric filter conditions in an acid gas remova...

  16. Fly ash carbon passivation

    DOEpatents

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  17. Ground and flight test experience with a triple redundant digital fly by wire control system. [installed in F-8C aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarvis, C. R.; Szalai, K. J.

    1981-01-01

    A triplex digital fly by wire flight control system was developed and installed in an F-8C aircraft to provide fail operative, full authority control. Hardware and software redundancy management techniques were designed to detect and identify failures in the system. Control functions typical of those projected for future actively controlled vehicles were implemented.

  18. Efficacy of three attractant blends tested in combination with carbon dioxide against natural populations of mosquitoes and biting flies at the lower suwannee wildlife refuge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synthetic blends composed of chemicals identified previously as emanations from human skin were evaluated against natural populations of mosquitoes and biting flies at the Lower Suwannee Wildlife Refuge located near Cedar Key, FL. Mosquito Magnet™-Experimental (MM-X) traps were baited with one of t...

  19. Development and testing of advanced redundancy management methods for the F-8 DFBW aircraft. [failure detection for Digital Fly By Wire systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyst, J.; Deckert, J.; Desai, M.; Willsky, A.

    1977-01-01

    A reliable aircraft sensor failure detection and identification (FDI) technique is presented. The technique exploits the kinematic and dynamic relationships that exist between variables measured by dissimilar sensors to identify failures in the sensors. The method is applied to management of dual redundant sensors on the NASA F-8 digital fly-by-wire (DFBW) research aircraft.

  20. Additional tests on the efficacy of ginger root oil in enhacing the mating competitiveness of sterile males of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies have shown that exposure to the aroma of ginger root oil (Zingiber officinale Roscoe; termed GRO hereafter) increases the mating competitiveness of males of the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly), Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann). This result suggests that pre-release exposure of sterile ...

  1. Releases of Psyttalia fletcheri (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) and sterile flies to suppress melon fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Roger I; Long, Jay; Miller, Neil W; Delate, Kathleen; Jackson, Charles G; Uchida, Grant K; Bautista, Renato C; Harris, Ernie J

    2004-10-01

    Ivy gourd, Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt, patches throughout Kailua-Kona, Hawaii Island, HI, were identified as persistent sources of melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett). These patches had a low incidence of Psyttalia fletcheri (Silvestri), its major braconid parasitoid natural enemy in Hawaii, and were used to evaluate augmentative releases of P. fletcheri against melon fly. In field cage studies of releases, numbers of melon flies emerging from ivy gourd fruit placed inside treatment cages were reduced up to 21-fold, and numbers of parasitoids were increased 11-fold. In open field releases of P. fletcheri into ivy gourd patches, parasitization rates were increased 4.7 times in release plots compared with those in control plots. However, there was no significant reduction in emergence of melon flies from fruit. In subsequent cage tests with sterile melon flies and P. fletcheri, combinations of sterile flies and P. fletcheri produced the greatest reduction (9-fold) in melon fly emergence from zucchini, Cucurbita pepo L. Reductions obtained with sterile flies alone or in combination with parasitoids were significantly greater than those in the control, whereas those for parasitoids alone were not. Although these results suggest that the effects of sterile flies were greater than those for parasitoids, from a multitactic melon fly management strategy, sterile flies would complement the effects of P. fletcheri. Cost and sustainability of these nonchemical approaches will be examined further in an ongoing areawide pest management program for melon fly in Hawaii. PMID:15568340

  2. Sound radiation around a flying fly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueur, Jérôme; Tuck, Elizabeth J.; Robert, Daniel

    2005-07-01

    Many insects produce sounds during flight. These acoustic emissions result from the oscillation of the wings in air. To date, most studies have measured the frequency characteristics of flight sounds, leaving other acoustic characteristics-and their possible biological functions-unexplored. Here, using close-range acoustic recording, we describe both the directional radiation pattern and the detailed frequency composition of the sound produced by a tethered flying (Lucilia sericata). The flapping wings produce a sound wave consisting of a series of harmonics, the first harmonic occurring around 190 Hz. In the horizontal plane of the fly, the first harmonic shows a dipolelike amplitude distribution whereas the second harmonic shows a monopolelike radiation pattern. The first frequency component is dominant in front of the fly while the second harmonic is dominant at the sides. Sound with a broad frequency content, typical of that produced by wind, is also recorded at the back of the fly. This sound qualifies as pseudo-sound and results from the vortices generated during wing kinematics. Frequency and amplitude features may be used by flies in different behavioral contexts such as sexual communication, competitive communication, or navigation within the environment.

  3. Multiple-bench architecture and interpretations of original mire phases - Examples from the Middle Pennyslvanian of the Central Appalachian Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greb, S.F.; Eble, C.F.; Hower, J.C.; Andrews, W.M.

    2002-01-01

    Coal seams often exhibit lateral and vertical variability in composition. When sampled as a whole seam this variability is masked. But if a seam is subdivided into correlateable components, this variability can be tested and better understood. Herein, an architectural approach is used to divide seams into intra-seam components. Clastic splits and mineral partings, as well as persistent fusain and durain layers, can be used as intra-seam bounding units to subdivide a seam into subdivisions called benches. Regional examination of Lower and Middle Pennsylvanian-age coal seams shows that many contain laterally persistent bounding surfaces that can be used to define multiple benches of coal within each seam. Inter-bench analyses from some of the most extensively mined seams in the central Appalachian Basin show that individual benches often have different spatial and quality trends. Hence, some component of whole-seam variability is a function of changes in the relative contribution of these different benches to the seam as a whole. Many coal benches also exhibit intra-bench variation in coal parameters. Intra-bench variation can be analyzed in terms of parameters such as sulfur content and ash yield in order to address changes in coal quality for regional resource evaluation. Intra-bench variation can also be analyzed in terms of a combination of palynologic, petrographic, and geochemical parameters, termed compositional groups, in order to better understand the development of the original mire systems. Compositional groups are defined by ranges of multiple criteria, which are inferred to owe their origin to the mire type in which they formed. Vertical changes in compositional groups within coal benches can be used to infer paleo-edaphic conditions during peat accumulation. If seam thickness is a product of bench configuration, and trends in compositional groups occur in benches, then trends in quality can be marginally predicted based upon seam thickness and inferred

  4. 40 CFR Appendix Vii to Part 86 - Standard Bench Cycle (SBC)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... VII Appendix VII to Part 86—Standard Bench Cycle (SBC) 1. The standard bench aging durability procedures consist of aging a catalyst-oxygen-sensor system on an aging bench which follows the standard bench cycle (SBC) described in this appendix. 2. The SBC requires use of an aging bench with an...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix Vii to Part 86 - Standard Bench Cycle (SBC)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... VII to Part 86—Standard Bench Cycle (SBC) 1. The standard bench aging durability procedures consist of aging a catalyst-oxygen-sensor system on an aging bench which follows the standard bench cycle (SBC) described in this appendix. 2. The SBC requires use of an aging bench with an engine as the source of...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix Vii to Part 86 - Standard Bench Cycle (SBC)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... VII Appendix VII to Part 86—Standard Bench Cycle (SBC) 1. The standard bench aging durability procedures consist of aging a catalyst-oxygen-sensor system on an aging bench which follows the standard bench cycle (SBC) described in this appendix. 2. The SBC requires use of an aging bench with an...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix Vii to Part 86 - Standard Bench Cycle (SBC)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... VII Appendix VII to Part 86—Standard Bench Cycle (SBC) 1. The standard bench aging durability procedures consist of aging a catalyst-oxygen-sensor system on an aging bench which follows the standard bench cycle (SBC) described in this appendix. 2. The SBC requires use of an aging bench with an...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix Vii to Part 86 - Standard Bench Cycle (SBC)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... VII Appendix VII to Part 86—Standard Bench Cycle (SBC) 1. The standard bench aging durability procedures consist of aging a catalyst-oxygen-sensor system on an aging bench which follows the standard bench cycle (SBC) described in this appendix. 2. The SBC requires use of an aging bench with an...

  9. Ever Fly a Tetrahedron?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    Few things capture the spirit of spring like flying a kite. Watching a kite dance and sail across a cloud spotted sky is not only a visually appealing experience it also provides a foundation for studies in science and mathematics. Put simply, a kite is an airfoil surface that flies when the forces of lift and thrust are greater than the forces of…

  10. Activation of fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Corbin, David R.; Velenyi, Louis J.; Pepera, Marc A.; Dolhyj, Serge R.

    1986-01-01

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  11. Activation of fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Corbin, D.R.; Velenyi, L.J.; Pepera, M.A.; Dolhyj, S.R.

    1986-08-19

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  12. A Flying Summer Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercurio, Frank X.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a five-day summer camp which provided 12 children, ages 9-14, with a complete flying experience. The training consisted of ground school and one hour actual flying time, including the basics of aircraft control and a flight prepared and executed by the students. (MLH)

  13. 100 Area groundwater biodenitrification bench-scale treatability study procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Peyton, B.M.; Martin, K.R.

    1993-05-01

    This document describes the methodologies and procedures for conducting the bench-scale biodenitrification treatability tests at Pacific Northwest Laboratory{sup a} (PNL). Biodenitrification is the biological conversion of nitrate and nitrite to gaseous nitrogen. The tests will use statistically designed batch studies to determine if biodenitrification can reduce residual nitrate concentrations to 45 mg/L, the current maximum contaminant level (MCL). These tests will be carried out in anaerobic flasks with a carbon source added to demonstrate nitrate removal. At the pilot scale, an incremental amount of additional carbon will be required to remove the small amount of oxygen present in the incoming groundwater. These tests will be conducted under the guidance of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Treatability Test Plan (DOE/RL-92-73) and the Treatability Study Program Plan (DOE/RL-92-48) using groundwater from 100-HR-3. In addition to the procedures, requirements for safety, quality assurance, reporting, and schedule are given. Appendices include analytical procedures, a Quality Assurance Project Plan, a Health and Safety Plan, and Applicable Material Data Safety Sheets. The procedures contained herein are designed specifically for the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Treatability Test Plan, and while the author believes that the methods described herein are scientifically valid, the procedures should not be construed or mistaken to be generally applicable to any other treatability study.

  14. Development of a novel walk-through fly trap for the control of horn flies and other pests on pastured dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Denning, S S; Washburn, S P; Watson, D W

    2014-07-01

    A prototype walk-through fly vacuum system, designed to remove horn flies Haematobia irritans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae) from cattle, was developed and tested for efficacy. The study was conducted during 4 fly seasons over 17 consecutive weeks each year within the months of May through September at 1 dairy research herd in the coastal plain of North Carolina. Additional data on horn flies, as well as face flies (Musca autumnalis) and stable flies (Stomoxys calcitrans), were collected during 1 yr from 7 commercial pasture-based and organic dairy farms in the piedmont region of North Carolina. The number of flies observed on animals in the pasture was compared with the number of flies collected in the trap. Studies were initiated after horn fly densities had met or exceeded a threshold of 200 flies per animal. The vacuum trap removed between 1.3 and 2.5 million flies annually from the research station cattle. Most fly removal occurred during the first few weeks of operation and maintained densities below threshold thereafter. Cattle using the fly trap at the research farm had only about 28% the number of horn flies as untreated cattle, and reductions ranged from 67.5 to 74.5% across the 4-yr study. In addition to large numbers of horn flies, traps placed on commercial dairies during 1 yr collected stable flies, face flies, and house flies, all species with differing behavior and larger in size than horn flies. The estimated cost of running the trap is $72 per season at commercial rates of $0.12 per hour and an expected 4h of daily operation during the time of milking. Use of a vacuum system as described herein has potential as a cost-effective method in reducing populations of parasitic flies in pasture-based dairy production systems without the use of insecticides. PMID:24792800

  15. 27. August 1974. BENCH SHOP, VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST, SHOWING THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. August 1974. BENCH SHOP, VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST, SHOWING THE L. POWERS & CO. JOINTER AND ITS BELT CHASE, THE PATTERNS, THE GRUBER-BUILT WHEEL BARROW, AND JACOB H. GRUBER'S WHEELWRIGHT BENCH. - Gruber Wagon Works, Pennsylvania Route 183 & State Hill Road at Red Bridge Park, Bernville, Berks County, PA

  16. 69. (Credit JTL) View beneath marble meter bench showing hydraulic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. (Credit JTL) View beneath marble meter bench showing hydraulic lines leading to water valve hydraulic control cylinders from control handles in bench; strings and pulleys activate meters. - McNeil Street Pumping Station, McNeil Street & Cross Bayou, Shreveport, Caddo Parish, LA

  17. 40 CFR 90.323 - Analyzer bench checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Analyzer bench checks. 90.323 Section 90.323 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Provisions § 90.323 Analyzer bench checks. (a) Prior to initial use and after major repairs, verify that...

  18. Characterization benches for neutrino telescope Optical Modules at the APC laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avgitas, Theodore; Creusot, Alexandre; Kouchner, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    As has been demonstrated by the first generation of neutrino telescopes Antares and IceCube, precise knowledge of the photon detection efficiency of optical modules is of fundamental importance for the understanding of the instrument and accurate event reconstruction. Dedicated test benches have been developed to measure all related quantities for the Digital Optical Modules of the KM3NeT neutrino telescope being currently deployed in the Mediterranean sea. The first bench is a black box with robotic arms equipped with a calibrated single photon source or laser which enable a precise mapping of the detection efficiency at arbitrary incident angles as well as precise measurements of the time delays induced by the photodetection chain. These measurement can be incorporated and compared to full GEANT MonteCarlo simulations of the optical modules. The second bench is a 2 m×2 m ×2 m water tank equipped with muon hodoscopes on top and bottom. It enables to study and measure the angular dependence of the DOM's detection efficiency of the Cherenkov light produced in water by relativistic muons, thus reproducing in situ detection conditions. We describe these two benches and present their first results and status.

  19. Alternative Bench Standards: Sample Production Report

    SciTech Connect

    N. R. Mann; T. P. Houghton; M. G. Watrous; J. G. Eisenmenger; R. K. Hague

    2012-09-01

    The INL has prepared four standards representing krypton concentrations of 1.1X, 1.54X, 10X and 100X the reported atmospheric value of 70 dpm 85Kr per cubic centimeter of Kr gas at 25 degrees C (ie. 1.1X is 1.1 x 70, or 77 dpm 85Kr per cubic centimeter of Kr gas at 25 degrees C). A t-zero date and time of January 1, 2012 at 1200 Zulu was used for all standards. The Alternative Bench Standards (ABS) of 1.1X, 1.54X, 10X and 100X, are designated by titles of ABS-A, ABS-B, ABS C and ABS-D, respectively. The concentration of Kr in air is 1.14 ppm.

  20. Neuropathic pain therapy: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Backonja, Miroslav Misha

    2012-07-01

    Neuropathic pain is a result of complex interactions between peripheral and central mechanisms with multiple potential therapeutic targets. However, the complexity of these mechanisms and relative youth of translational pain research, which is in its infancy, have prevented translation of successful basic bench research to human therapy. Most of the clinically available neuropathic pain treatments are borrowed from other therapeutic areas, such as antidepressants and antiepileptics, or involve application of older therapy, such as opioids. Exceptions are ziconotide, tapentadol, and the high-concentration capsaicin patch. Similar to all other analgesic agents, these provide only partial pain relief in subsets of patients. The standard of care for patients with chronic neuropathic pain is multimodal and multidisciplinary. For most patients to achieve and maintain satisfactory pain relief a combination of therapeutic agents is necessary, providing the empiric basis for rational polypharmacy, which has become a standard approach as well. PMID:23117951

  1. Bench-scale co-processing

    SciTech Connect

    Piasecki, C.A.; Gatsis, J.G.

    1992-02-19

    The objective of this contract is to extend and optimize UOP's single-stage, slurry-catalyzed co-processing scheme. The particular emphasis is one evaluating alternative and disposable slurry-catalyst systems. During the current quarter, Lloydminster vacuum resid was processed without the presence of coal. The objective of this study was to evaluate the manner in which the resid is upgraded at high-severity conditions to help understand the function of the resid during co-processing. This report coves Bench-Scale Runs 30 to 34. In Runs 30 to 34, Lloydminster vacuum resid was processed without the presence of coal using a 0.05 wt % molybdenum-based catalyst at 465{degrees}C.

  2. Malignant pleural effusion: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Psallidas, Ioannis; Kalomenidis, Ioannis; Porcel, Jose M; Robinson, Bruce W; Stathopoulos, Georgios T

    2016-06-01

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is a common but serious condition that is related with poor quality of life, morbidity and mortality. Its incidence and associated healthcare costs are rising and its management remains palliative, with median survival ranging from 3 to 12 months. During the last decade there has been significant progress in unravelling the pathophysiology of MPE, as well as its diagnostics, imaging, and management. Nowadays, formerly bed-ridden patients are genotyped, phenotyped, and treated on an ambulatory basis. This article attempts to provide a comprehensive overview of current advances in MPE from bench to bedside. In addition, it highlights unanswered questions in current clinical practice and suggests future directions for basic and clinical research in the field. PMID:27246596

  3. Bench-scale treatability testing of biological, UV oxidation, distillation, and ion-exchange treatment of trench water from a low-level radioactive waste disposal area at West Valley, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Sundquist, J.A.; Gillings, J.C.; Sonntag, T.L.; Denault, R.P.

    1993-03-01

    Ecology and Environment, Inc. (E and E), under subcontract to Pacific Nuclear Services (PNS), conducted for the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) treatability tests to support the selection and design of a treatment system for leachate from Trench 14 of the West Valley State-Licensed, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Area (SDA). In this paper E and E presents and discusses the treatability test results and provides recommendations for the design of the full-scale treatment system.

  4. Comparison of muscle force production using the Smith machine and free weights for bench press and squat exercises.

    PubMed

    Cotterman, Michael L; Darby, Lynn A; Skelly, William A

    2005-02-01

    The Smith machine (SM) (vertical motion of bar on fixed path; fixed-form exercise) and free weights (FWs) (free-form path) are commonly used strength training modes. Exercisers may need to alternate between types of equipment, depending on testing, training, rehabilitation, and/or the exercisers' goals. The purposes of this study were to compare muscle force production for SM and FWs using a 1 repetition maximum (1RM) for the parallel back squat and supine bench press exercises and to predict the 1RM for one mode from 1RM on the other mode. Men (n = 16) and women (n = 16) alternately completed 1RM testing for squat and bench press using SM and FWs. Analyses of variance (type of equipment x sex) and linear regression models were calculated. A significant difference was found between bench press and squat 1RMs for each mode of equipment for all participants. The squat 1RM was greater for the SM than the FWs; conversely, the bench 1RM was greater for FWs than the SM. When sex was considered, bench 1RM for FWs was greater than SM for men and women. The squat 1RM was greater for SM than FWs for women only. The 1RM on one mode of equipment was the best predictor of 1RM for the other mode. For both sexes, the equation SM bench 1RM (in kilograms) = -6.76 + 0.95 (FW bench 1RM) can be used. For women only, SM squat 1RM (in kilograms) = 28.3 + 0.73 (FW squat 1RM). These findings provide equations for converting between SM and FW equipment for training. PMID:15705030

  5. Binocular interactions underlying the classic optomotor responses of flying flies.

    PubMed

    Duistermars, Brian J; Care, Rachel A; Frye, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    In response to imposed course deviations, the optomotor reactions of animals reduce motion blur and facilitate the maintenance of stable body posture. In flies, many anatomical and electrophysiological studies suggest that disparate motion cues stimulating the left and right eyes are not processed in isolation but rather are integrated in the brain to produce a cohesive panoramic percept. To investigate the strength of such inter-ocular interactions and their role in compensatory sensory-motor transformations, we utilize a virtual reality flight simulator to record wing and head optomotor reactions by tethered flying flies in response to imposed binocular rotation and monocular front-to-back and back-to-front motion. Within a narrow range of stimulus parameters that generates large contrast insensitive optomotor responses to binocular rotation, we find that responses to monocular front-to-back motion are larger than those to panoramic rotation, but are contrast sensitive. Conversely, responses to monocular back-to-front motion are slower than those to rotation and peak at the lowest tested contrast. Together our results suggest that optomotor responses to binocular rotation result from the influence of non-additive contralateral inhibitory as well as excitatory circuit interactions that serve to confer contrast insensitivity to flight behaviors influenced by rotatory optic flow. PMID:22375108

  6. Binocular Interactions Underlying the Classic Optomotor Responses of Flying Flies

    PubMed Central

    Duistermars, Brian J.; Care, Rachel A.; Frye, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    In response to imposed course deviations, the optomotor reactions of animals reduce motion blur and facilitate the maintenance of stable body posture. In flies, many anatomical and electrophysiological studies suggest that disparate motion cues stimulating the left and right eyes are not processed in isolation but rather are integrated in the brain to produce a cohesive panoramic percept. To investigate the strength of such inter-ocular interactions and their role in compensatory sensory–motor transformations, we utilize a virtual reality flight simulator to record wing and head optomotor reactions by tethered flying flies in response to imposed binocular rotation and monocular front-to-back and back-to-front motion. Within a narrow range of stimulus parameters that generates large contrast insensitive optomotor responses to binocular rotation, we find that responses to monocular front-to-back motion are larger than those to panoramic rotation, but are contrast sensitive. Conversely, responses to monocular back-to-front motion are slower than those to rotation and peak at the lowest tested contrast. Together our results suggest that optomotor responses to binocular rotation result from the influence of non-additive contralateral inhibitory as well as excitatory circuit interactions that serve to confer contrast insensitivity to flight behaviors influenced by rotatory optic flow. PMID:22375108

  7. Rapid bench identification of methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A multicenter comparative evaluation of Alere PBP2a Culture Colony Test (Alere) Versus Slidex MRSA detection (bioMérieux).

    PubMed

    Tasse, Jason; Dupieux, Céline; Caillon, Jocelyne; Lanotte, Philippe; Lamy, Brigitte; Aissa, Nejla; Bemer, Pascale; Mereghetti, Laurent; Michon, Anne-Laure; Lozniewski, Alain; Bes, Michèle; Trouillet-Assant, Sophie; Laurent, Frédéric

    2016-08-01

    Using 30 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus representative of the most prevalent clones circulating in France, the performance of the Alere™ PBP2a Culture Colony Test (CCT) and the Slidex(®) MRSA detection kit (SMD) were compared in 5 different labs. CCT demonstrated better performance and was easier to conduct in routine. PMID:27216499

  8. BENCH-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    The Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) is a one- or two-stage catalytic reduction process for efficiently converting to elemental sulfur up to 98 percent or more of the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) contained in the regeneration offgas streams produced in advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power systems. The DSRP reacts the regeneration offgas with a small slipstream of coal gas to effect the desired reduction. In this project the DSRP was demonstrated with actual coal gas (as opposed to the simulated laboratory mixtures used in previous studies) in a 75-mm, 1-L size fixed-bed reactor. Integrated with this testing, a US Department of Energy/Research Triangle Institute (DOE/RTI) patented zinc titanate-based fluidizable sorbent formulation was tested in a 75-mm (3-in.) diameter fluidized-bed reactor, and the regeneration offgas from that test was treated with the bench-unit DSRP. The testing was conducted at the DOE Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC)-Morgantown in conjunction with test campaigns of the pilot-scale gasifier there. The test apparatus was housed in a mobile laboratory built in a specially equipped office trailer that facilitated moving the equipment from RTI in North Carolina to the West Virginia test site. A long duration test of the DSRP using actual coal gas and simulated regeneration offgas showed no degradation in efficiency of conversion to elemental sulfur after 160 h of catalyst exposure. An additional exposure (200 h) of that same catalyst charge at the General Electric pilot gasifier showed only a small decline in performance. That problem is believed to have been caused by tar and soot deposits on the catalyst, which were caused by the high tar content of the atypical fixed-bed gasifier gas. A six-fold larger, single-stage skid-mounted DSRP apparatus was fabricated for additional, larger-scale slipstream testing.

  9. MSW fly ash stabilized with coal ash for geotechnical application.

    PubMed

    Kamon, M; Katsumi, T; Sano, Y

    2000-09-15

    The solidification and stabilization of municipal solid waste (MSW) fly ash for the purpose of minimizing the geo-environmental impact caused by toxic heavy metals as well as ensuring engineering safety (strength and soaking durability) are experimentally evaluated. The mixtures of MSW fly ash stabilized with cement and fluidized bed combustion coal fly ash (FCA) were used for unconfined compressive strength tests, leachate tests, and soaking tests. The behavior of soluble salts contained in the MSW fly ash significantly affects strength development, soaking durability, and the hardening reaction of the stabilized MSW fly ash mixtures. The cement stabilization of the MSW fly ash does not have enough effect on strength development and soaking durability. The addition of cement only contributes to the containment of heavy metals due to the high level of alkalinity. When using FCA as a stabilizing agent for MSW fly ash, the mixture exhibits high strength and durability. However, the Cd leachate cannot be prevented in the early stages of curing. Using a combination of cement and FCA as a MSW fly ash stabilizer can attain high strength, high soaking durability, and the containment of heavy metals. The stabilized MSW fly ash with cement and FCA can be practically applied to embankments. PMID:10936538

  10. Bench-scale testing of DOE/PETC`s GranuFlow Process for fine coal dewatering and handling. 1: Results using a high-gravity solid-bowl centrifuge

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, W.W.; Killmeyer, R.P.; Lowman, R.H.; Elstrodt, R.

    1995-12-31

    Most advanced fine-coal cleaning processes involve the use of water. Utility companies are concerned not only with the lower Btu content of the resulting wet, cleaned coal, but more importantly with its handleability problems. Solutions to these problems would enhance the utilization of fine-coal cleaning processes in the utility industry. This paper describes testing of the GranuFlow Process, developed and patented by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) of the US Department of Energy, using a high-gravity solid bowl centrifuge for dewatering and reconstitution of fine-cleaned-coal slurry at 300 lb per hour in PETC`s Coal Preparation Process Research Facility. Fine-cleaned-coal slurry was treated with a bitumen emulsion before dewatering in a high-gravity solid-bowl centrifuge. The treated products appeared to be dry and in a free-flowing granular form, while the untreated products were wet, lumpy, sticky, and difficult to handle. Specifically, test results indicated that the moisture content, handleability, and dust reduction of the dewatered coal product improved as the addition of emulsion increased from 2% to 8%. The improvement in handleability was most visible for the 200 mesh (75 micron) x 0 coal, when compared with 150 mesh (106 micron) x 0, 65 mesh (212 micron) x 0 or 28 mesh (600 micron) x 0 coals. Test results also showed that the moisture content was dramatically reduced (26--37% reduction) for the four different sizes of coals at 6 or 8% emulsion addition. Because of the moisture reduction and the granular form of the product, the freezing problem was also alleviated.

  11. Use of insecticide-impregnated ear tags for the control of face flies and horn-flies on pastured cattle.

    PubMed

    Williams, R E; Westby, E J; Hendrix, K S; Lemenager, R P

    1981-11-01

    Three studies were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of insecticide-impregnated ear tags in controlling face flies, Musca autumnalis DeGeer, and horn flies, Haematobia irritans (Linn.), on pastured beef cattle. In one 16-week trial, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) ear tags treated with stirofos (Rabon) insecticide reduced horn fly numbers by 79% (P less than .05) and face fly numbers by 30% (P less than .05). Coumaphos (Co-Ral) insecticide dust bags used in a separate herd produced an 86% (P less than .05) reduction in horn flies and an 18% (P less than .05) reduction in face flies. In the second study, 5 and 10% permethrin (Atroban), PVC-treated ear tags in a one-piece design were tested. In this 11 week trial, horn fly control averaged 95% (P less than .05) with the 10% tag and 77% (P less than .05) with the 5% tag. Face fly control averaged 49% (P less than .05) for 8 weeks with the 10% permethrin tag. No significant face fly control was achieved with the 5% permethrin tag. In a herd treated with coumaphos dust bags, horn fly control averaged 93% (P less than .05) and face fly control averaged 34% (P less than .05). The third study tested 5 and 10% permethrin, PVC-treated ear tags in a two-piece design and two-piece 5% permethrin-treated ear tags in a polyurethane matrix. Fourteen-week horn fly control averaged 88% (P less than .05) with the 10% PVC-treated tag, 83% (P less than .05) with the 5% PVC-treated tag, 71% (P less than .05) with the 5% polyurethane-treated tag and 74% (P less than .05) with coumaphos dust bags. Face fly control averaged less than 50% (P greater than .05) throughout the trial with all treatments. PMID:7319964

  12. DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES FOR SELECTING WASTE SAMPLES FOR BENCH-SCALE REFORMER TREATABILITY STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    BANNING DL

    2011-02-11

    This document describes the data quality objectives to select archived samples located at the 222-S Laboratory for Bench-Scale Reforming testing. The type, quantity, and quality of the data required to select the samples for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing are discussed. In order to maximize the efficiency and minimize the time to treat Hanford tank waste in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, additional treatment processes may be required. One of the potential treatment processes is the fluidized bed steam reformer. A determination of the adequacy of the fluidized bed steam reformer process to treat Hanford tank waste is required. The initial step in determining the adequacy of the fluidized bed steam reformer process is to select archived waste samples from the 222-S Laboratory that will be used in a bench scale tests. Analyses of the selected samples will be required to confirm the samples meet the shipping requirements and for comparison to the bench scale reformer (BSR) test sample selection requirements.

  13. A bench-scale biotreatability methodology to evaluate field bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Saberiyan, A.G.; MacPherson, J.R. Jr.; Moore, R.; Pruess, A.J.; Andrilenas, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    A bench-scale biotreatability methodology was designed to assess field bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soil samples. This methodology was performed successfully on soil samples from more than 40 sites. The methodology is composed of two phases, characterization and experimentation. The first phase is physical, chemical, and biological characterization of the contaminated soil sample. This phase determines soil parameters, contaminant type, presence of indigenous contaminant-degrading bacteria, and bacterial population size. The second phase, experimentation, consists of a respirometry test to measure the growth of microbes indirectly (via generation of CO{sub 2}) and the consumption of their food source directly (via contaminant loss). Based on a Monod kinetic analysis, the half-life of a contaminant can be calculated. Abiotic losses are accounted for based on a control test. The contaminant molecular structure is used to generate a stoichiometric equation. The stoichiometric equation yields a theoretical ratio for mg of contaminant degraded per mg of CO{sub 2} produced. Data collected from the respirometry test are compared to theoretical values to evaluate bioremediation feasibility.

  14. The influence of fly ash on obtaining quality plastic and hardened properties of portland cement concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamad, A.B.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental test burn was done substituting coal with Refuse-Derived-Fuel(RDF) consisting mainly of waste paper and plastic with heating value of 6000 to 8000 BTU/lb. Twelve test burn days were run with 4 days of 5% RDF and 8 days of 10% RDF. The effect of RDF on the chemical and physical properties of fly ash and the effect of coal-RDF fly ash on the properties of plastic and hardened concrete were investigated. Coal fly ash from Merrimack Power Station was classified as an ASTM class F complying to the chemical and physical properties of ASTM C-618 specifications. Coal-RDF fly ash produced during the test burn showed chemical and physical properties comparable to coal fly ash. The average chemical and physical properties of coal-RDF fly ash complied to ASTM C-618 specifications. Concrete made with coal fly ash and coal-RDF fly ash showed increased slump in high paste mixes and decreased slump in low paste mixes. Air content decreased with increased fly ash at a constant dosage of air entrainment. Compressive strength the fly ash concrete at and beyond 28 days were comparable to ordinary portland cement concrete. Heavy metals were not leached from coal fly ash and coal-RDF fly ash concrete during a column test using a synthetic acid rain of pH 4.5 even though small quantities of cadmium and lead were found to leach from coal fly ash and coal-RDF fly ash during the beginning of the test. The volume of the acid rain was approximately equivalent to 7 years of precipitation, assuming 36 inches of rain per year. A microscopic investigation comparing the structure of pastes made with coal fly ash, coal-RDF fly ash, incinerator fly ash and incinerator bottom ash was conducted.

  15. Development of a bench scale biomass torrefier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Ja'afar, M. N.; Abd Rahman, A.; Shamsuddin, A. H.

    2013-06-01

    Cofiring biomass with coal has become very popular with power utilities to reduce fossil fuel carbon dioxide (CO2) emission. It is relatively easy to implement on most common pulverised coal plants. However, raw biomass is difficult to utilise and requires upgrading to a higher quality fuel to substitute coal. Upgrading by torrefaction can improve the properties of biomass close to low rank coals suitable for cofiring. In this study, a bench scale torrefier was developed to produce torrefied biomass samples for further studies of its properties and combustion behaviour. The torrefier was developed from a domestic 1600W electric oven. Biomass pellets was then torrefied at 250 °C for 1 hour using this torrefier. Proximate analysis and gross calorific value (GCV) of the torrefied biomass were carried out. The results showed that GCV of the torrefied biomass had increased when compared to raw. The moisture content and volatile matter had decreased, and ash content and fixed carbon had increased as expected.

  16. Optical bench elements (petals) for IXO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, Dirk; Erhard, Markus; Bavdaz, Marcos; Wallace, Kotska; Gondoin, Philippe; Collon, Maximilien J.

    2009-08-01

    X-rays at various energies can be focussed with reflective optics at grazing incidence with a well-known reflectivity achieving a high effective area by means of various designs. On XMM the high collecting area was achieved by means of thin mirror shells which were made by nickel replication combining the parabola and hyperbola sections according to the WOLTER I design in a single element. 58 of these "elements" were combined to build a mirror assembly with an effective area of 1450 cm2 @1.5 keV per mirror assembly. In order to achieve a higher effective area for IXO the density needs to be reduced. This could be achieved by pore optics elements integrated into a set of 8 petals made of Cesic as an optical bench. This design is fitting into the fairing of Ariane with a diameter of 4.2 m and achieves an effective area of 3.36 m2. It will withstand the high launch loads of up to 60 g and provide a negligible degradation to the optical performance due to thermal loads and gravitational relaxation. The design, including the interfaces to the telescope and to the pore optics, will be presented.

  17. Keep Up the Good (Bench) Work!

    PubMed

    Moreno, S N J

    2016-08-01

    Professor Silvia Moreno studies toxoplasmosis, one of the most common parasitic infections in the world, caused by Toxoplasma gondii. About one-third of the human population is chronically infected with T. gondii cysts, the dormant form of the parasite. Although most immunocompetent infected individuals remain asymptomatic throughout life, serious complications such as loss of vision, mother-to-fetus transmission, and fatal cases can occur. The drugs currently available to treat toxoplasmosis are unable to clear the cyst form of the parasite and have severe side effects like bone marrow suppression and liver toxicity. Silvia has studied parasite metabolism for more than 20 years and has been at the University of Georgia since 2005. Her goal is to uncover unique aspects of parasite metabolism that can be targeted for designing more effective, less toxic drugs against T. gondii. In this short interview, Silvia highlights the importance of staying true to one's identity and of learning to say 'no', and advises young researchers to not stay away from the bench. PMID:27133187

  18. From Bench-Top to Bedside: A Prospective In Vitro Antibiotic Combination Testing (iACT) Service to Guide the Selection of Rationally Optimized Antimicrobial Combinations against Extensively Drug Resistant (XDR) Gram Negative Bacteria (GNB)

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Tze-Peng; Teo, Jocelyn Qi-Min; Lee, Winnie; Kurup, Asok; Koh, Tse-Hsien; Tan, Thuan-Tong; Kwa, Andrea L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Combination therapy is increasingly utilized against extensively-drug resistant (XDR) Gram negative bacteria (GNB). However, choosing a combination can be problematic as effective combinations are often strain-specific. An in vitro antibiotic combination testing (iACT) service, aimed to guide the selection of individualized and rationally optimized combination regimens within 48 hours, was developed. We described the role and feasibility of the iACT service in guiding individualized antibiotic combination selection in patients with XDR-GNB infections. Methods A retrospective case review was performed in two Singapore hospitals from April 2009–June 2014. All patients with XDR-GNB and antibiotic regimen guided by iACT for clinical management were included. The feasibility and role of the prospective iACT service was evaluated. The following patient outcomes were described: (i) 30-day in-hospital all-cause and infection-related mortality, (ii) clinical response, and (iii) microbiological eradication in patients with bloodstream infections. Results From 2009–2014, the iACT service was requested by Infectious Disease physicians for 39 cases (20 P. aeruginosa, 13 A. baumannii and 6 K. pneumoniae). Bloodstream infection was the predominant infection (36%), followed by pneumonia (31%). All iACT recommendations were provided within 48h from request for the service. Prior to iACT-guided therapy, most cases were prescribed combination antibiotics empirically (90%). Changes in the empiric antibiotic regimens were recommended in 21 (54%) cases; in 14 (36%) cases, changes were recommended as the empiric regimens were found to be non-bactericidal in vitro. In 7 (18%) cases, the number of antibiotics used in combination empirically was reduced by the iACT service. Overall, low 30-day infection-related mortality (15%) and high clinical response (82%) were observed. Microbiological eradication was observed in 79% of all bloodstream infections. Conclusions The i

  19. MEASURE OF FLY ASH RESISTIVITY USING SIMULATED FLUE GAS ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report, describing the apparatus and laboratory procedures used to determine resistivity for a number of fly ashes under a variety of test conditions, supports research to develop a technique for predicting fly ash resistivity from chemical analyses of coal and coal ash. This...

  20. 125. BENCH SHOP, LOOKING SOUTHEAST AT CENTER OF ROOM SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    125. BENCH SHOP, LOOKING SOUTHEAST AT CENTER OF ROOM SHOWING TOOL SHARPENER ON RIGHT AND ELECTRIC TABLE SAW AT CENTER. - Gruber Wagon Works, Pennsylvania Route 183 & State Hill Road at Red Bridge Park, Bernville, Berks County, PA

  1. 118. BENCH SHOP, NORTHWEST CORNER SHOWING ENTRANCE TO ROOM FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    118. BENCH SHOP, NORTHWEST CORNER SHOWING ENTRANCE TO ROOM FROM OUTSIDE. OFFICE SAFE AT CENTER. - Gruber Wagon Works, Pennsylvania Route 183 & State Hill Road at Red Bridge Park, Bernville, Berks County, PA

  2. 107. BASEMENT, DRIVE SHAFT THAT RUNS JOINTER IN BENCH SHOP. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    107. BASEMENT, DRIVE SHAFT THAT RUNS JOINTER IN BENCH SHOP. BELT ON RIGHT CONNECTS TO MAIN DRIVE SHAFT. - Gruber Wagon Works, Pennsylvania Route 183 & State Hill Road at Red Bridge Park, Bernville, Berks County, PA

  3. Room 113, chemistry laboratory with benches perpendicular to the long ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Room 113, chemistry laboratory with benches perpendicular to the long axis of the room. A view to the southwest. - San Bernardino Valley College, Life Science Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  4. 13. Interior view of individual work benches along west wall ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Interior view of individual work benches along west wall of north 1922 section of Building 59. Camera pointed NW. - Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Pattern Shop, Farragut Avenue, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  5. Detail of a storage and work bench on the north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of a storage and work bench on the north wall at the east end of Motor Room - Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation System, Pumping Plant No. 1, Bounded by Gila River & Union Pacific Railroad, Wellton, Yuma County, AZ

  6. Room 106, A laboratory with longitudinal arrangement of benches. View ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Room 106, A laboratory with longitudinal arrangement of benches. View to west. - San Bernardino Valley College, Life Science Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  7. Bench seating in northwest corner of the building Fitzsimons ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bench seating in northwest corner of the building - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Golf Course Waiting Shelter, Southwest area of Golf Course, 700 feet Northeast of intersection of West Harlow Avenue & Peoria Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  8. 24. July 1974. BENCH SHOP, VIEW OF THE SOUTHEAST CORNER. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. July 1974. BENCH SHOP, VIEW OF THE SOUTHEAST CORNER. NOTE VARIOUS METHODS OF STORING TOOLS AND THE ELECTRICAL SYSTEM. - Gruber Wagon Works, Pennsylvania Route 183 & State Hill Road at Red Bridge Park, Bernville, Berks County, PA

  9. 7. INTERIOR VIEW, PATTERN MAKING WORK BENCH AREA WEST WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. INTERIOR VIEW, PATTERN MAKING WORK BENCH AREA WEST WALL LOOKING WEST LATHE ON LEFT DELTA BAND SAW LEFT, DELTA 6' JOINTS AND DELTA TABLE SAW ON RIGHT. - Knight Foundry, 13 Eureka Street, Sutter Creek, Amador County, CA

  10. 13. SOUTHEAST TO SUCKER ROD WORK BENCH AND WOODEN SUCKER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. SOUTHEAST TO SUCKER ROD WORK BENCH AND WOODEN SUCKER ROD STORAGE RACKS ALONG EAST WALL OF FACTORY INTERIOR. AT THIS BENCH WORKERS RIVETED THREADED WROUGHT IRON CONNECTORS TO THE ENDS OF 20' LONG WOODEN SUCKER RODS (THE RODS WHICH EXTEND DOWNWARD IN THE WELL FROM THE GROUND SURFACE TO PISTON DISPLACEMENT PUMPS WHICH ACTUALLY ELEVATE WATER TO THE SURFACE). ROZNOR HEATER AT THE FAR RIGHT WAS ADDED CIRCA 1960. - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  11. Biological control of house flies Musca domestica and stable flies Stomoxys calcitrans(Diptera: Muscidae) by means of inundative releases of Spalangia cameroni(Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

    PubMed

    Skovgård, H; Nachman, G

    2004-12-01

    The efficacy of the pupal parasitoid Spalangia cameroni Perkins as a biological control agent was tested against house flies Musca domestica Linnaeus and stable flies Stomoxys calcitrans (Linnaeus) in one dairy cattle and two pig installations in Denmark. Weekly releases of S. cameroni from April through to September-October 1999 and 2000 resulted in significant suppressions of house fly populations to below nuisance level, whereas no effect on stable flies was found. Parasitism was significantly higher in the release years compared to the control years, but was below 25% averaged over the fly season for each farm. A statistical model based on a functional relationship between the innate capacity of increase of the two fly species and three explanatory variables (air temperature, fly density and parasitism) provided a fairly good fit to data with the abundances of house flies and stable flies explained mostly by temperature, but intra- and interspecific competition, and parasitism had a significant effect as well. Overall, the model was capable of explaining 14% and 6.6% of the total variation in data for house fly and stable fly, respectively. Spalangia cameroni was the predominant parasitoid to emerge from exposed house fly pupae, but from mid summer onwards Muscidifurax raptor Girault & Sanders (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) was also quite common. The study indicated that biological control of house flies can be an efficient alternative to chemical control. PMID:15541194

  12. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 86 - Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures.... VIII Appendix VIII to Part 86—Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures This appendix provides specifications for standard aging bench equipment and aging procedures which may be used to conduct bench...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 86 - Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures.... 86, App. VIII Appendix VIII to Part 86—Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures This appendix provides specifications for standard aging bench equipment and aging procedures which may be used to conduct bench...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 86 - Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures.... 86, App. VIII Appendix VIII to Part 86—Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures This appendix provides specifications for standard aging bench equipment and aging procedures which may be used to conduct bench...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 86 - Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures.... 86, App. VIII Appendix VIII to Part 86—Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures This appendix provides specifications for standard aging bench equipment and aging procedures which may be used to conduct bench...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 86 - Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures.... 86, App. VIII Appendix VIII to Part 86—Aging Bench Equipment and Procedures This appendix provides specifications for standard aging bench equipment and aging procedures which may be used to conduct bench...

  17. Reduction of metal leaching in brown coal fly ash using geopolymers.

    PubMed

    Bankowski, P; Zou, L; Hodges, R

    2004-10-18

    Current regulations classify fly ash as a prescribed waste and prohibit its disposal in regular landfill. Treatment of the fly ash can reduce the leach rate of metals, and allow it to be disposed in less prescribed landfill. A geopolymer matrix was investigated as a potential stabilisation method for brown coal fly ash. Precipitator fly ash was obtained from electrostatic precipitators and leached fly ash was collected from ash disposal ponds, and leaching tests were conducted on both types of geopolymer stabilised fly ashes. The ratio of fly ash to geopolymer was varied to determine the effects of different compositions on leaching rates. Fourteen metals and heavy metals were targeted during the leaching tests and the results indicate that a geopolymer is effective at reducing the leach rates of many metals from the fly ash, such as calcium, arsenic, selenium, strontium and barium. The major element leachate concentrations obtained from leached fly ash were in general lower than that of precipitator fly ash. Conversely, heavy metal leachate concentrations were lower in precipitator fly ash than leached pond fly ash. The maximum addition of fly ash to this geopolymer was found to be 60wt% for fly ash obtained from the electrostatic precipitators and 70wt% for fly ash obtained from ash disposal ponds. The formation of geopolymer in the presence of fly ash was studied using 29Si MAS-NMR and showed that a geopolymer matrix was formed. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging showed the interaction of the fly ash with the geopolymer, which was related to the leachate data and also the maximum percentage fly ash addition. PMID:15511575

  18. Modeling and simulation research on automobile ABS bench detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Ruru; Zhao, Xiangmo; Hao, Dingkun; Zhou, Zhou

    2014-10-01

    Modeling and simulation research on automobile ABS bench detection is conducted in this paper. First, the vehicle model, wheel model, braking force model, and tire-road model on the bench are established according to the ABS bench detection scheme. Then, the Matlab/Simulink simulation model of a single wheel vehicle is built through combining the sub-models described above. Finally, simulation experiments on a variety of simulated road conditions are carried out. And the comparative analysis between the ABS bench detection and ABS road experiments is accomplished. The contrast results show that the simulation curves of bench detection and those of road experiment have high similarity, which verified the correctness and feasibility of the proposed bench detection scheme. At the request of the authors this article is being retracted. It was inadvertently published in AIP Conf. Proc. 1618: The authors intended to publish a different article, but the wrong one was submitted for publication. The article is retracted from the scientific record with effect from 8 July 2015.

  19. ComprehensiveBench: a Benchmark for the Extensive Evaluation of Global Scheduling Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilla, Laércio L.; Bozzetti, Tiago C.; Castro, Márcio; Navaux, Philippe O. A.; Méhaut, Jean-François

    2015-10-01

    Parallel applications that present tasks with imbalanced loads or complex communication behavior usually do not exploit the underlying resources of parallel platforms to their full potential. In order to mitigate this issue, global scheduling algorithms are employed. As finding the optimal task distribution is an NP-Hard problem, identifying the most suitable algorithm for a specific scenario and comparing algorithms are not trivial tasks. In this context, this paper presents ComprehensiveBench, a benchmark for global scheduling algorithms that enables the variation of a vast range of parameters that affect performance. ComprehensiveBench can be used to assist in the development and evaluation of new scheduling algorithms, to help choose a specific algorithm for an arbitrary application, to emulate other applications, and to enable statistical tests. We illustrate its use in this paper with an evaluation of Charm++ periodic load balancers that stresses their characteristics.

  20. Bench-scale studies of in-duct mercury capture using cupric chloride-impregnated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Sang-Sup Lee; Joo-Youp Lee; Tim C. Keener

    2009-04-15

    A brominated activated carbon (Darco Hg-LH) and cupric chloride-impregnated activated carbon (CuCl{sub 2}-ACs) sorbent have been tested in a bench-scale entrained-flow reactor system which was developed for simulating in-flight mercury capture in ducts upstream of particulate matter control devices. The bench-scale experimental system has been operated with the conditions of a residence time of 0.75 s and a gas temperature of 140{sup o}C to simulate typical conditions in the duct of coal-fired exhaust gas. In addition, sorbent deposition on walls which can occur in a laboratory-scale system more than in a full-scale system was significantly reduced so that additional mercury capture by the deposited sorbent was minimized. In the entrained-flow system, CuCl{sub 2}-ACs demonstrated similar performance in Hg adsorption and better performance in Hg{sup 0} oxidation than Darco Hg-LH. In addition, the carbon content of those sorbents was found to determine their Hg adsorption capability in the entrained-flow system. The bench-scale entrained-flow system was able to demonstrate the important Hg adsorption and oxidation characteristics of the tested sorbents. 18 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Peritoneal dialysis: from bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Krediet, Raymond T.

    2013-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis was first employed in patients with acute renal failure in the 1940s and since the 1960s for those with end-stage renal disease. Its popularity increased enormously after the introduction of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis in the end of 1970s. This stimulated both clinical and basic research. In an ideal situation, this should lead to cross-fertilization between the two. The present review describes two examples of interactions: one where it worked out very well and another where basic science missed the link with clinical findings. Those on fluid transport are examples of how old physiological findings on absorption of saline and glucose solutions were adopted in peritoneal dialysis by the use of glucose as an osmotic agent. The mechanism behind this in patients was first solved mathematically by the assumption of ultrasmall intracellular pores allowing water transport only. At the same time, basic science discovered the water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP-1), and a few years later, studies in transgenic mice confirmed that AQP-1 was the ultrasmall pore. In clinical medicine, this led to its assessment in patients and the notion of its impairment. Drugs for treatment have been developed. Research on biocompatibility is not a success story. Basic science has focussed on dialysis solutions with a low pH and lactate, and effects of glucose degradation products, although the first is irrelevant in patients and effects of continuous exposure to high glucose concentrations were largely neglected. Industry believed the bench more than the bedside, resulting in ‘biocompatible’ dialysis solutions. These solutions have some beneficial effects, but are evidently not the final answer. PMID:26120456

  2. Sulfate resistance of high calcium fly ash concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhole, Rajaram

    Sulfate attack is one of the mechanisms which can cause deterioration of concrete. In general, Class C fly ash mixtures are reported to provide poor sulfate resistance. Fly ashes, mainly those belonging to the Class C, were tested as per the ASTM C 1012 procedure to evaluate chemical sulfate resistance. Overall the Class C fly ashes showed poor resistance in the sulfate environment. Different strategies were used in this research work to improve the sulfate resistance of Class C fly ash mixes. The study revealed that some of the strategies such as use of low W/CM (water to cementing materials by mass ratio), silica fume or ultra fine fly ash, high volumes of fly ash and, ternary or quaternary mixes with suitable supplementary cementing materials, can successfully improve the sulfate resistance of the Class C fly ash mixes. Combined sulfate attack, involving physical and chemical action, was studied using sodium sulfate and calcium sulfate solutions. The specimens were subjected to wetting-drying cycles and temperature changes. These conditions were found to accelerate the rate of degradation of concrete placed in a sodium sulfate environment. W/CM was found to be the main governing factor in providing sulfate resistance to mixes. Calcium sulfate did not reveal damage as a result of mainly physical action. Characterization of the selected fly ashes was undertaken by using SEM, XRD and the Rietveld analysis techniques, to determine the relation between the composition of fly ashes and resistance to sulfate attack. The chemical composition of glass represented on the ternary diagram was the main factor which had a significant influence on the sulfate resistance of fly ash mixtures. Mixes prepared with fly ashes containing significant amounts of vulnerable crystalline phases offered poor sulfate resistance. Comparatively, fly ash mixes containing inert crystalline phases such as quartz, mullite and hematite offered good sulfate resistance. The analysis of hydrated lime-fly

  3. Complexity and Fly Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cates, Grant; Murray, Joelle

    Complexity is the study of phenomena that emerge from a collection of interacting objects and arises in many systems throughout physics, biology, finance, economics and more. Certain kinds of complex systems can be described by self-organized criticality (SOC). An SOC system is one that is internally driven towards some critical state. Recent experimental work suggests scaling behavior of fly swarms-one of the hallmarks of an SOC system. Our goal is to look for SOC behavior in computational models of fly swarms.

  4. Teaching in Kosovo: Communication Skills on the Test Bench

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pichler, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Kosovo is a region in the heart of the Balkans with a predominantly ethnic Albanian population. In the area of higher education, Kosovo has seen a proliferation of private universities that follow an American education model; even English as the language of instruction is commonplace (not least because of a high number of foreign instructors).…

  5. Bench-Scale Testing of Attrition Resistant Moving Bed Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Swisher, J.H.; Gupta, R.P.

    1996-12-31

    Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems with cold-gas cleanup have now reached the early stages of commercialization. The foundation for this was successful completion of the Cool Water Coal Gasification Program several years ago. Destec Energy, Inc., a subsidiary of Dow Chemical Company, has a plant in operation in Louisiana, and the 2 Wabash River Plant in Indiana is now starting up. A similar plant based on the Shell gasification technology is operating in the Netherlands. In two new plants now under construction, the Tampa Electric Plant in Florida and the Sierra Pacific Power Plant in Nevada, incorporating hot-gas cleanup technology is desirable. Unfortunately, some nagging problems remain with both sulfur sorbent and particle filter technology that may result in the use of cold-gas, rather than hot-gas, cleanup in these plants. With sulfur sorbents, the main problems are with mechanical property degradation and/or loss of sulfur capacity over many sulfidation-regeneration cycles. The sorbents receiving the most attention are all zinc based. They include various zinc titanate formulations and proprietary materials developed by the U.S. Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) staff and the Phillips Petroleum Company. The investigators on this project are now completing their third year of effort on a superstrong zinc titanate sorbent. Prior to this year, various formulations were prepared and evaluated for their potential use in fixed- and fluidized-bed hot-gas desulfurization systems. A unique feature, the reason for the high strength, is that the zinc titanate is contained in a matrix of titanium dioxide. Its crush strength is more than 6 times that prior investigators achieved.

  6. The RLC system: An invaluable test bench for students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cafarelli, Pierre; Champeaux, Jean-Philippe; Sence, Martine; Roy, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    Future scientists and engineers must master fundamental notions of instrumentation. A lab session milestone based on the classical RLC circuit is proposed to check students' theoretical and practical knowledge. Topics include impedance, signal and linear system analysis in the time and frequency domains, as well as the fundamental relations connecting them. The numerical implementation of the Fourier transform and its related pathologies (aliasing and leakage) are also discussed. Practical skills are evaluated through the intensive use of instruments and by presenting and solving potential problems that could alter the accuracy of measurement.

  7. Evaluation of yeast products in fruit fly adult diet and liquid larval diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several yeasts and yeast products were tested as components of adult diet for Medfly, Ceratitis capitata, Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, and Melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae and larval liquid diet for Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis in mass rearing process. Three hydrolyzed yeasts ...

  8. Improving optical bench radius measurements using stage error motion data

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Tony L.; Gardner, Neil; Vaughn, Matthew; Medicus, Kate; Davies, Angela

    2008-12-20

    We describe the application of a vector-based radius approach to optical bench radius measurements in the presence of imperfect stage motions. In this approach, the radius is defined using a vector equation and homogeneous transformation matrix formulism. This is in contrast to the typical technique, where the displacement between the confocal and cat's eye null positions alone is used to determine the test optic radius. An important aspect of the vector-based radius definition is the intrinsic correction for measurement biases, such as straightness errors in the stage motion and cosine misalignment between the stage and displacement gauge axis, which lead to an artificially small radius value if the traditional approach is employed. Measurement techniques and results are provided for the stage error motions, which are then combined with the setup geometry through the analysis to determine the radius of curvature for a spherical artifact. Comparisons are shown between the new vector-based radius calculation, traditional radius computation, and a low uncertainty mechanical measurement. Additionally, the measurement uncertainty for the vector-based approach is determined using Monte Carlo simulation and compared to experimental results.

  9. Changeing of fly ash leachability after grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakatos, J.; Szabo, R.; Racz, A.; Banhidi, O.; Mucsi, G.

    2016-04-01

    Effect of grinding on the reactivity of fly ash used for geopolymer production was tested. Extraction technique using different alkaline and acidic solutions were used for detect the change of the solubility of elements due to the physical and mechano-chemical transformation of minerals in function of grinding time. Both the extraction with alkaline and acidic solution have detected improvement in solubility in function of grinding time. The enhancement in alkaline solution was approx. 100% in case of Si and Al. The acidic medium able to dissolve the fly ash higher manner than the alkaline, therefore the effect of grinding was found less pronounced.

  10. Reconstructing the behavior of walking fruit flies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Gordon; Bialek, William; Shaevitz, Joshua

    2010-03-01

    Over the past century, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has arisen as almost a lingua franca in the study of animal behavior, having been utilized to study questions in fields as diverse as sleep deprivation, aging, and drug abuse, amongst many others. Accordingly, much is known about what can be done to manipulate these organisms genetically, behaviorally, and physiologically. Most of the behavioral work on this system to this point has been experiments where the flies in question have been given a choice between some discrete set of pre-defined behaviors. Our aim, however, is simply to spend some time with a cadre of flies, using techniques from nonlinear dynamics, statistical physics, and machine learning in an attempt to reconstruct and gain understanding into their behavior. More specifically, we use a multi-camera set-up combined with a motion tracking stage in order to obtain long time-series of walking fruit flies moving about a glass plate. This experimental system serves as a test-bed for analytical, statistical, and computational techniques for studying animal behavior. In particular, we attempt to reconstruct the natural modes of behavior for a fruit fly through a data-driven approach in a manner inspired by recent work in C. elegans and cockroaches.

  11. Stabilizing soft fine-grained soils with fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Edil, T.B.; Acosta, H.A.; Benson, C.H.

    2006-03-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of self-cementing fly ashes derived from combustion of subbituminous coal at electric power plants for stabilization of soft fine-grained soils. California bearing ratio (CBR) and resilient modulus (M{sub r}) tests were conducted on mixtures prepared with seven soft fine-grained soils (six inorganic soils and one organic soil) and four fly ashes. The soils were selected to represent a relatively broad range of plasticity, with plasticity indices ranging between 15 and 38. Two of the fly ashes are high quality Class C ashes (per ASTM C 618) that are normally used in Portland cement concrete. The other ashes are off-specification ashes, meaning they do not meet the Class C or Class F criteria in ASTM C 618. Tests were conducted on soils and soil-fly ash mixtures prepared at optimum water content (a standardized condition), 7% wet of optimum water content (representative of the typical in situ condition in Wisconsin), and 9-18% wet of optimum water content (representative of a very wet in situ condition). Addition of fly ash resulted in appreciable increases in the CBR and M{sub r} of the inorganic soils. For water contents 7% wet of optimum, CBRs of the soils alone ranged between 1 and 5. Addition of 10% fly ash resulted in CBRs ranging between 8 and 17, and 18% fly ash resulted in CBRs between 15 and 31. Similarly, M{sub r} of the soil alone ranged between 3 and 15 MPa at 7% wet of optimum, whereas addition of 10% fly ash resulted in M{sub r} between 12 and 60 MPa and 18% fly ash resulted in M{sub r} between 51 and 106 MPa. In contrast, except for one fly ash, addition of fly ash generally had little effect on CBR or M{sub r} of the organic soil.

  12. Economic Impact of Stable Flies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A dynamic model was created to estimate the economic impact of stable flies on livestock production. Based upon a nationwide average of 10 stable flies per animal for 3 months per year, the model estimates the impact of stable flies to be $543 million to the dairy industry, $1.34 billion to pasture ...

  13. Flying High with Spring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Carolyn Lang

    2000-01-01

    Presents an art activity for first grade that uses multicolor scratch paper. Explains that students make scratch-drawings of bird nests, then, as a class, discuss types of birds and bird positions (such as sitting or flying), and finally each creates a bird to add to the nest. (CMK)

  14. Fly on the Wall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Dave; Korpan, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a peer observation program at the University of Victoria called the Lecture Club. The observers are not interactive during the class--they are the proverbial flies on the wall. The paper identifies the program as self-developmental, discussing the attributes of this learning-to-teach and peer-sharing…

  15. Learning to Fly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weil, Patricia E.

    1983-01-01

    Presents information on where to learn to fly, which aircraft is best for this purpose, and approximate costs. Includes additional information on certificates, licenses, and ratings, and a description of the two phases of the General Aviation Manufacturers Association flight training program. (JN)

  16. Go Fly a Kite

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klopack, Ken

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an "art kite" activity. The idea is to construct and decorate a non-flying kite that they could display for an art exhibit. Through the activity, students learn to give and take suggestions from one another, improve the quality of their work and set a wonderful atmosphere of collaboration. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  17. Fly-ash utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Lockerby, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    The over 200 references in this bibliography cover some of the uses found for fly-ash, which range from the manufacture of bricks and as a new type of concrete to the recovery of aluminum and other valuable ores from the ash. The entries are grouped under seven headings: General, Agriculture, Brickmaking, Cement/Concrete, Land Reclamation, Resource Recovery, and Other.

  18. Wisdom from the fly.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Leila E; Larschan, Erica N

    2014-11-01

    Arguably, almost all research in Drosophila can be considered basic research, yet many of the most essential and fundamental concepts of human genetics were first decoded in the fly. Although the fly genome, which is organized into only four chromosomes, is approximately one-twentieth the size of the human genome, it contains roughly the same number of genes, and up to 75% of human disease-related genes have Drosophila homologues [1]. The fly was prized for its simplicity and utility even before such compelling homology with humans was apparent. Since Thomas Hunt Morgan began his seminal experiments over a century ago (Table 1), the Drosophila system has revealed countless key mechanisms by which cells function, including the factors that maintain chromatin and the signaling pathways that control cell fate determination and organism development. More recently, the fly has emerged as a critical neurobiological tool and disease model for a range of genetic disorders. In this review, we present a brief retrospective of Drosophila as an indispensable genetic system and discuss some of the many contributions, past and present, of this facile system to human genetics. PMID:25161083

  19. Removal of unburned carbon from coal fly ash using a pneumatic triboelectrostatic separator.

    PubMed

    Kim, J K; Cho, H C; Kim, S C

    2001-01-01

    A pneumatic triboelectrostatic beneficiation system of fly ash was studied using a continuous, bench-scale electroseparator composed of two vertical electrode plates and an ejector-tribocharger. Tests were conducted to evaluate the charge density and the separation efficiency at various operating conditions. It was found that the higher charge densities were obtained at (1) the air flow rate of 1.75 m3/min. (2) the feed rate of less than 50 kg/h. and (3) the relative humidity of less than 30% with use of a stainless ejector tribocharger. With these optimum conditions, the clean ash of less than LOI 3% was recovered with a yield over 75% when operated at the diffuser slit gap of 4mm, the diffuser outlet velocity of 16.1-18.6 m/s, and the distance of 15 cm between diffuser slit and splitter. The optimum feed rate was found to be 740 kg/h per m2 of electrode surface area, which can be used as a scale-up factor of electroseparator. PMID:11688685

  20. Thermal inactivation of Bacillus anthracis surrogate spores in a bench-scale enclosed landfill gas flare.

    PubMed

    Tufts, Jenia A McBrian; Rosati, Jacky A

    2012-02-01

    A bench-scale landfill flare system was designed and built to test the potential for landfilled biological spores that migrate from the waste into the landfill gas to pass through the flare and exit into the environment as viable. The residence times and temperatures of the flare were characterized and compared to full-scale systems. Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Bacillus atrophaeus, nonpathogenic spores that may serve as surrogates for Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent for anthrax, were investigated to determine whether these organisms would be inactivated or remain viable after passing through a simulated landfill flare. High concentration spore solutions were aerosolized, dried, and sent through a bench-scale system to simulate the fate of biological weapon (BW)-grade spores in a landfill gas flare. Sampling was conducted downstream of the flare using a bioaerosol collection device containing sterile white mineral oil. The samples were cultured, incubated for seven days, and assessed for viability. Results showed that the bench-scale system exhibited good similarity to the real-world conditions of an enclosed standard combustor flare stack with a single orifice, forced-draft diffusion burner. All spores of G. stearothermophilus and B. atrophaeus were inactivated in the flare, indicating that spores that become re-entrained in landfill gas may not escape the landfill as viable, apparently becoming completely inactivated as they exit through a landfill flare. PMID:22442931

  1. Bench Models for Assessing the Mechanics of Mitral Valve Repair and Percutaneous Surgery.

    PubMed

    Siefert, Andrew W; Siskey, Ryan L

    2015-06-01

    Rapid preclinical evaluations of mitral valve (MV) mechanics are currently best facilitated by bench models of the left ventricle (LV). This review aims to provide a comprehensive assessment of these models to aid interpretation of their resulting data, inform future experimental evaluations, and further the translation of results to procedure and device development. For this review, two types of experimental bench models were evaluated. Rigid LV models were characterized as fluid-mechanical systems capable of testing explanted MVs under static and or pulsatile left heart hemodynamics. Passive LV models were characterized as explanted hearts whose left side is placed in series with a static or pulsatile flow-loop. In both systems, MV function and mechanics can be quantitatively evaluated. Rigid and passive LV models were characterized and evaluated. The materials and methods involved in their construction, function, quantitative capabilities, and disease modeling were described. The advantages and disadvantages of each model are compared to aid the interpretation of their resulting data and inform future experimental evaluations. Repair and percutaneous studies completed in these models were additionally summarized with perspective on future advances discussed. Bench models of the LV provide excellent platforms for quantifying MV repair mechanics and function. While exceptional work has been reported, more research and development is necessary to improve techniques and devices for repair and percutaneous surgery. Continuing efforts in this field will significantly contribute to the further development of procedures and devices, predictions of long-term performance, and patient safety. PMID:26577235

  2. Embedded Sensors and Controls to Improve Component Performance and Reliability -- Bench-scale Testbed Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Melin, Alexander M.; Kisner, Roger A.; Drira, Anis; Reed, Frederick K.

    2015-09-01

    Embedded instrumentation and control systems that can operate in extreme environments are challenging due to restrictions on sensors and materials. As a part of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Enabling Technology cross-cutting technology development programs Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation topic, this report details the design of a bench-scale embedded instrumentation and control testbed. The design goal of the bench-scale testbed is to build a re-configurable system that can rapidly deploy and test advanced control algorithms in a hardware in the loop setup. The bench-scale testbed will be designed as a fluid pump analog that uses active magnetic bearings to support the shaft. The testbed represents an application that would improve the efficiency and performance of high temperature (700 C) pumps for liquid salt reactors that operate in an extreme environment and provide many engineering challenges that can be overcome with embedded instrumentation and control. This report will give details of the mechanical design, electromagnetic design, geometry optimization, power electronics design, and initial control system design.

  3. Effects of 5 Weeks of Bench Press Training on Muscle Synergies: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, Mathias; Samani, Afshin; Madeleine, Pascal; Hansen, Ernst A

    2016-07-01

    Kristiansen, M, Samani, A, Madeleine, P, and Hansen, EA. Effects of 5 weeks of bench press training on muscle synergies: A randomized controlled study. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1948-1959, 2016-The ability to perform forceful muscle contractions has important implications in sports performance and in activities of daily living. However, there is a lack of knowledge on adaptations in intermuscular coordination after strength training. The purpose of this study was therefore to assess muscle synergies before and after 5 weeks of bench press training. Thirty untrained male subjects were randomly allocated to a training group (TRA) or a control group (CON). After the pretest, TRA completed 5 weeks of bench press training, before completing a posttest, whereas subjects in CON continued their normal life. During test sessions, surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded from 13 different muscles. Muscle synergies were extracted from EMG data using nonnegative matrix factorization. To evaluate differences between pretest and posttest, we performed a cross-correlation analysis and a cross-validation analysis, in which the synergy components extracted in the pretest session were recomputed, using the fixed synergy components from the posttest session. Two muscle synergies accounted for 90% of the total variance and reflected the concentric and eccentric phase, respectively. TRA significantly increased 3 repetition maximum in bench press with 19.0% (25th; 75th percentile, 10.3%; 21.7%) (p < 0.001), whereas no change occurred in CON. No significant differences were observed in synergy components between groups. However, decreases in correlation values for intragroup comparisons in TRA may suggest that the synergy components changed, whereas this was not the case in CON. Strength and conditioning professionals may consider monitoring changes in muscle synergies in training and rehabilitation programs as a way to benchmark changes in intermuscular coordination. PMID:26645673

  4. Precision-Deployable, Stable, Optical Benches for Cost-Effective Space Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danner, Rolf; Pellegrino, S.; Dailey, D.; Marks, G.; Bookbinder, J.

    2012-05-01

    To explore the universe at the arcsecond resolution of Chandra, while increasing collecting area by at least an order of magnitude and maintaining affordability, we will need to make creative use of existing and new technology. Precision-deployable, stable, optical benches that fit inside smaller, lower-cost launch vehicles are a prime example of a technology well within current reach that will yield breakthrough benefits for future astrophysics missions. Deployable optical benches for astrophysical applications have a reputation for complexity; however, we are offering an approach, based on techniques used in space for decades, that reduces overall mission cost. Currently, deployable structures are implemented on JAXA’s Astro-H and NASA’s NuStar high-energy astrophysics missions. We believe it is now time to evolve these structures into precision, stable optical benches that are stiff, lightweight, and suitable for space telescopes with focal lengths of 20 meters or more. Such optical benches are required for advanced observatory class missions and can be scaled to Explorer and medium-class missions. To this end, we have formed a partnership between Space Structures Laboratory (SSL) at the California Institute of Technology, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS), Northrop Grumman Astro Aerospace (Astro), and Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO). Combining the expertise and tools from academia and industry is the most effective approach to take this concept to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6. We plan to perform small sub-scale demonstrations, functional tests, and analytical modeling in the academic environment. Using results from SSL, larger prototypes will be developed at facilities at NGAS in Redondo Beach and Carpinteria, CA.

  5. An annotated checklist of the horse flies, deer flies, and yellow flies (Diptera: Tabanidae) of Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The family Tabanidae includes the horse flies, deer flies, and yellow flies and is considered a significant pest of livestock throughout the United States, including Florida. Tabanids can easily become a major pest of man, especially salt marsh species which are known to readily feed on humans and o...

  6. Laboratory evaluation of novaluron for controlling larval horn flies, house flies, and stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A granular formulation of novaluron (Novaluron 0.2G, 0.2% AI), a newer benzoylphenyl urea insecticide, was evaluated for its efficacy in controlling the larval stage of horn flies, Haematobia irritans (Linnaeus), house flies, Musca domestica Linnaeus, and stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (Linnaeus)...

  7. A Single-fly Assay for Foraging Behavior in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zaninovich, Orel A.; Kim, Susy M.; Root, Cory R.; Green, David S.; Ko, Kang I.; Wang, Jing W.

    2013-01-01

    For many animals, hunger promotes changes in the olfactory system in a manner that facilitates the search for appropriate food sources. In this video article, we describe an automated assay to measure the effect of hunger or satiety on olfactory dependent food search behavior in the adult fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. In a light-tight box illuminated by red light that is invisible to fruit flies, a camera linked to custom data acquisition software monitors the position of six flies simultaneously. Each fly is confined to walk in individual arenas containing a food odor at the center. The testing arenas rest on a porous floor that functions to prevent odor accumulation. Latency to locate the odor source, a metric that reflects olfactory sensitivity under different physiological states, is determined by software analysis. Here, we discuss the critical mechanics of running this behavioral paradigm and cover specific issues regarding fly loading, odor contamination, assay temperature, data quality, and statistical analysis. PMID:24299900

  8. The impact of flying qualities on helicopter operational agility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padfield, Gareth D.; Lappos, Nick; Hodgkinson, John

    1993-01-01

    Flying qualities standards are formally set to ensure safe flight and therefore reflect minimum, rather than optimum, requirements. Agility is a flying quality but relates to operations at high, if not maximum, performance. While the quality metrics and test procedures for flying, as covered for example in ADS33C, may provide an adequate structure to encompass agility, they do not currently address flight at high performance. This is also true in the fixed-wing world and a current concern in both communities is the absence of substantiated agility criteria and possible conflicts between flying qualities and high performance. AGARD is sponsoring a working group (WG19) title 'Operational Agility' that deals with these and a range of related issues. This paper is condensed from contributions by the three authors to WG19, relating to flying qualities. Novel perspectives on the subject are presented including the agility factor, that quantifies performance margins in flying qualities terms; a new parameter, based on maneuver acceleration is introduced as a potential candidate for defining upper limits to flying qualities. Finally, a probabilistic analysis of pilot handling qualities ratings is presented that suggests a powerful relationship between inherent airframe flying qualities and operational agility.

  9. Fly-scan ptychography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huang, Xiaojing; Lauer, Kenneth; Clark, Jesse N.; Xu, Weihe; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian K.; Chu, Yong S.

    2015-03-13

    We report an experimental ptychography measurement performed in fly-scan mode. With a visible-light laser source, we demonstrate a 5-fold reduction of data acquisition time. By including multiple mutually incoherent modes into the incident illumination, high quality images were successfully reconstructed from blurry diffraction patterns. This approach significantly increases the throughput of ptychography, especially for three-dimensional applications and the visualization of dynamic systems.

  10. Fly-scan ptychography

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaojing; Lauer, Kenneth; Clark, Jesse N.; Xu, Weihe; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian K.; Chu, Yong S.

    2015-01-01

    We report an experimental ptychography measurement performed in fly-scan mode. With a visible-light laser source, we demonstrate a 5-fold reduction of data acquisition time. By including multiple mutually incoherent modes into the incident illumination, high quality images were successfully reconstructed from blurry diffraction patterns. This approach significantly increases the throughput of ptychography, especially for three-dimensional applications and the visualization of dynamic systems. PMID:25766519

  11. System design study to reduce capital and operating costs and bench-scale testing of a circulating-bed AFB [atmospheric pressure fluidized bed] advanced concept: Phase 1, Design, cost estimate, and cost comparison for MWK circulating fluid bed combustor and oil-fired boilers: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sadhukhan, P.; Lin, Y.Y.; Hsiao, K.H.; Richards, S.R.; Wagner, C.; Settle, W.H.; Bryant, J.; Gorman, W.A.; Newlin, T.; Shires, P.J.; James, J.L.

    1986-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) issued an RFP for a "System Design Study to Reduce Capital and Operating Cost and Bench Scale Testing of a Circulating-Bed AFB Advanced Concept." The design and cost study of a 150,000 pounds per hour steam boiler comprised Phase-I of the RFP. The objective was to produce a design with improved performance and reduced capital and operating costs compared with conventional atmospheric pressure fluidized bed (AFB) boilers. The final result was a significant reduction of capital cost - 36% below the lowest AFB plant cost. The steam cost was 24% below the corresponding cost for the AFB process. In June 1985, DOE issued a Change Order (C001) to the Phase-I study in order for MWK to design and estimate the cost for a scaled-down coal-fired (Illinois No. 6, 3% S) CFBC plant producing low pressure and low temperature steam (75,000lbs/hr, 200 psig, 387{degree}F), and to compare the costs -capital and steam costs -with those for a packaged high sulfur (3%) fuel oil-fired boiler, which is of the same capacity and requires SO{sub 2} removal. An additional objective was to estimate the cost for a No. 2 fuel oil-fired boiler that does not need any SO{sub 2} scrubber. An evaluation of the sensitivity of the steam cost to the oil-fired boiler capital cost and to fuel prices was also to be undertaken. The cost of steam produced by the No. 6 fuel oil boiler is 52% higher than the cost for CFBC, and the corresponding cost for the No. 2 fuel oil plant is 43% higher. Again, a large advantage for the CFBC comes from the low price of coal relative to that of oil. The large cost advantage of steam calculated for the MWK CFBC using coal as a fuel over the oil-fired boilers would remain even in the worst case scenario of a declining oil price accompanied by a steady coal price. 7 refs., 25 figs., 34 tabs.

  12. An Estimation of the Flying Qualities of the Kaiser Fleetwing All-Wing Airplane from Tests of a 1/7-Scale Model, TED No. NACA 2340

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Gerald W.

    1946-01-01

    An investigation of a 1/7-scale powered model of the Kaiser Fleetwing all-wing airplane was made in the Langley full-scale tunnel to provide data for an estimation of the flying qualities of the airplane. The analysis of the stability and control characteristics of the airplane has been made as closely as possible in accordance with the requirements of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department's specifications, and a summary of the more significant conclusions is presented as follows. With the normal center of gravity located at 20 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord, the airplane will have adequate static longitudinal stability, elevator fixed, for all flight conditions except for low-power operation at low speeds where the stability will be about neutral. There will not be sufficient down-elevator deflection available for trim above speeds of about 130 miles per hour. It is probable that the reduction in the up-elevator deflections required for trim will be accompanied by reduced elevator hinge moments for low-power operation at low flight speeds. The static directional stability for this airplane will be low for all rudder-fixed or rudder-free flight conditions. The maximum rudder deflection of 30 deg will trim only about 15 deg yaw for most flight conditions and only 10 deg yaw for the condition with low power at low speeds. Also, at low powers and low speeds, it is estimated that the rudders will not trim the total adverse yaw resulting from an abrupt aileron roll using maximum aileron deflection. The airplane will meet the requirements for stability and control for asymmetric power operation with one outboard engine inoperative. The airplane would have no tendency for directional divergence but would probably be spirally unstable, with rudders fixed. The static lateral stability of the airplane will probably be about neutral for the high-speed flight conditions and will be only slightly increased for the low-power operation in low-speed flight. The

  13. A low-frequency vibration insensitive pendulum bench based on translation-tilt compensation in measuring the performances of inertial sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Ye, X.; Wu, S. C.; Bai, Y. Z.; Zhou, Z. B.

    2015-10-01

    The performance test of precision space inertial sensors on the ground is inevitably affected by seismic noise. A traditional vibration isolation platform, generally with a resonance frequency of several Hz, cannot satisfy the requirements for testing an inertial sensor at low frequencies. In this paper, we present a pendulum bench for inertial sensor testing based on translation-tilt compensation. A theoretical analysis indicates that the seismic noise effect on inertial sensors located on this bench can be attenuated by more than 40 dB below 0.1 Hz, which is very significant for investigating the performance of high-precision inertial sensors. We demonstrate this attenuation with a dedicated experiment.

  14. Feasibility study on solidification of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash with circulating fluidized bed combustion coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenshi; Hou, Haobo; Zhang, Chuhao; Zhang, Dajie

    2009-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of solidification of municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash with circulation fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) fly ash, which is unsuitable as a cement replacement due to its high amounts of carbon, lime and anhydrite. The solidification process was conducted on samples prepared from MSWI fly ash, binders (cement clinkers and CFBC fly ash were mixed at two replacement ratios) and water (water/solid weight ratio = 0.4), among which the MSWI fly ash replaced each binder at the ratio of 0, 20, 40, 60 and 80% by dry weight. The samples were subjected to compressive strength tests and Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure and the results showed that all solidified MSWI fly ash can meet the landfill standard imposed by US EPA after 28 days of curing. Micro-analysis (X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry) revealed that the main hydrate products were C-S-H gel and ettringite, which have a positive effect on heavy metals retention. Therefore, this method provides a possibility to achieve a cheap and effective solution for MSWI fly ash management and use for CFBC fly ash. PMID:19423575

  15. Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL) process bench studies with bituminous coal. Final report, [October 1, 1988--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

    1993-03-01

    Reported herein are the details and results of Laboratory and Bench-Scale experiments using bituminous coal concluded at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., under DOE contract during the period October 1, 1988 to December 31, 1992. The work described is primarily concerned with the application of coal cleaning methods and solids separation methods to the Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL) Process. Additionally a predispersed catalyst was evaluated in a thermal/catalytic configuration, and an alternative nickel molybdenum catalyst was evaluated for the CTSL process. Three coals were evaluated in this program: Bituminous Illinois No. 6 Burning Star and Sub-bituminous Wyoming Black Thunder and New Mexico McKinley Mine seams. The results from a total of 16 bench-scale runs are reported and analyzed in detail. The tests involving the Illinois coal are reported herein, and the tests involving the Wyoming and New Mexico coals are described in Topical Report No. 1. On the laboratory scale, microautoclave tests evaluating coal, start-up oils, catalysts, thermal treatment, CO{sub 2} addition and sulfur compound effects are reported in Topical Report No. 3. Other microautoclave tests, such as tests on rejuvenated catalyst, coker liquids, and cleaned coals, are described in the Bench Run sections to which they refer. The microautoclave tests conducted for modelling the CTSL process are described in the CTSL Modelling section of Topical Report No. 3 under this contract.

  16. Sorbate characteristics of fly ash. Semi annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Liskowitz, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    This one year investigation is concerned with relating the sorbent characteristics of fly ash produced from test coal obtained from 19 mines located in Virginia, West Virginia and Pennsylvania. Six of the test coals and their respective fly ashes have been sampled and boiler conditions monitored in P.S.E. and G. coal fired boilers operated under minimum, intermediate and full power. Major, minor and trace elemental analysis as well as Mossbauer spectra of three of the coals and their respective ashes have been completed. The atom composition of the surface of these fly ashes has also been determined by ESCA. The pH and concentration of the major, minor and trace elements that leach out of the fly ash initially have been determined on the fly ashes produced from the Militant, Deep Hollow and Wellmore Cactus coals. All leachate samples to date exhibited an acidic pH. This leaching essentially ceases as the pH approached neutral conditions. This was found to occur after 4 liters of water was passed through each fly ash sample in a lysimeter. The lysimeter studies to define the sorbent characteristics of the fly ashes have not been completed yet.

  17. Auditory system of fruit flies.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Yuki; Kamikouchi, Azusa

    2016-08-01

    The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is an invaluable model for auditory research. Advantages of using the fruit fly include its stereotyped behavior in response to a particular sound, and the availability of molecular-genetic tools to manipulate gene expression and cellular activity. Although the receiver type in fruit flies differs from that in mammals, the auditory systems of mammals and fruit flies are strikingly similar with regard to the level of development, transduction mechanism, mechanical amplification, and central projections. These similarities strongly support the use of the fruit fly to study the general principles of acoustic information processing. In this review, we introduce acoustic communication and discuss recent advances in our understanding on hearing in fruit flies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled . PMID:26560238

  18. Pest Control on the "Fly"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    FlyCracker(R), a non-toxic and environmentally safe pesticide, can be used to treat and control fly problems in closed environments such as milking sheds, cattle barns and hutches, equine stables, swine pens, poultry plants, food-packing plants, and even restaurants, as well as in some outdoor animal husbandry environments. The product can be applied safely in the presence of animals and humans, and was recently permitted for use on organic farms as livestock production aids. FlyCracker's carbohydrate technology kills fly larvae within 24 hours. By killing larvae before they reach the adult stages, FlyCracker eradicates another potential breeding population. Because the process is physical-not chemical-flies and other insects never develop resistance to the treatment, giving way to unlimited use of product, while still keeping the same powerful effect.

  19. 50. BELTDRIVEN LATHE AND WORK BENCH, SHOWING TOOL STORAGE BOARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. BELT-DRIVEN LATHE AND WORK BENCH, SHOWING TOOL STORAGE BOARD BEHIND. EEC print no. N-C-01-00043, no date. Photograph by Benjamin F. Pearson. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-1 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  20. 26. July 1974. BENCH SHOP, VIEW LOOKING SOUTH, SHOWING THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. July 1974. BENCH SHOP, VIEW LOOKING SOUTH, SHOWING THE BORING MACHINE PURCHASED IN 1885. THE BIT MAY BE LOWERED BY THE HANGING LINKAGE OR THE TABLE RAISED BY THE FOOT PEDAL. NOTICE THE CHASE FOR THE BELTS, BUILT NO LESS CAREFULLY THAN THE MACHINE ITSELF. - Gruber Wagon Works, Pennsylvania Route 183 & State Hill Road at Red Bridge Park, Bernville, Berks County, PA

  1. 40 CFR 86.320-79 - Analyzer bench check.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Analyzer bench check. 86.320-79 Section 86.320-79 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Emission Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled...

  2. 40 CFR 91.323 - Analyzer bench checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analyzer bench checks. 91.323 Section 91.323 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... NO converter is used, condition all new or replacement converters. The conditioning consists...

  3. 33. BENCH CORE STATION, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM WHERE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. BENCH CORE STATION, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM WHERE CORE MOLDS WERE HAND FILLED AND OFTEN PNEUMATICALLY COMPRESSED WITH A HAND-HELD RAMMER BEFORE THEY WERE BAKED. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  4. Bench vise adapter grips tubing securely and safely

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howland, B. T.; Jones, A. S., Jr.

    1966-01-01

    Plastic self-compressing adapter with grooves, attached to the jaws of a bench vise, secures thin-wall tubing vertically or horizontally during cutting and flaring operations without marring or damaging it. Magnets incorporated in both sections of the adapter prevent detachment from the jaws when the vise is opened.

  5. Optimising Microbial Growth with a Bench-Top Bioreactor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, A. M. R.; Borin, S. L.; Chooi, K. P.; Huang, S. S.; Newgas, A. J. S.; Sodagar, D.; Ziegler, C. A.; Chan, G. H. T.; Walsh, K. A. P.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of impeller size, agitation and aeration on the rate of yeast growth were investigated using bench-top bioreactors. This exercise, carried out over a six-month period, served as an effective demonstration of the importance of different operating parameters on cell growth and provided a means of determining the optimisation conditions…

  6. Bench wear and single-cylinder engine evaluations of high-temperature lubricants for US Army ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, Paul I.; Frame, Edwin A.; Yost, Douglas M.

    1994-09-01

    High-temperature lubricant (HTL) requirements for future U.S. Army ground vehicles were investigated. A single-cylinder diesel engine (SCE-903) was successfully modified to operate at increased cylinder liner temperatures and to serve as an evaluation tool for HTL's. Oil D, one of six lubricants evaluated, completed 200 test hours at an average cylinder wall temperature of 247 deg C and an oil sump temperature of 166 deg C with only minor oil degradation. However, improved piston cleanliness is desired. A wide range of bench scale wear techniques have been developed to highlight different lubricant performance characteristics, with particular emphasis on high-temperature operation and oxidation. Based on the bench tests, Oil D would be expected to have inadequate high-temperature, long-term wear protection. Oil D passed the Allison C-4 graphite clutch friction test.

  7. CSI L2 - Reconstructing Herschel/Planck, Anomalies on the Avionics Bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacchetta, Andrea; Cocito, Andrea; Oort, Marc; Procopio, Dorico

    2010-08-01

    One year after the launch of Herschel and Planck it is time to show the issues which occurred in-flight that have required dedicated analyses. In particular, the role played by the Avionics Test Bench in investigating the anomalies involving the Attitude Control is presented. This verification set-up has been used extensively initially for reproducing the observed behavior and then to validate the various solutions that have been identified and implemented. Different entities, from the equipment suppliers up to the final customer, have been involved in this process and their role is presented.

  8. Blood feeding behavior of the stable fly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable fly is a fly that looks similar to a house fly but both sexes are blood feeders. Blood is required for successful fertilization and development of eggs. Bites are painful but there is usually no pain after the fly stops feeding. The stable fly is a persistent feeder and will continue trying t...

  9. The FlyBar: Administering Alcohol to Flies

    PubMed Central

    van der Linde, Kim; Fumagalli, Emiliano; Roman, Gregg; Lyons, Lisa C.

    2014-01-01

    Fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) are an established model for both alcohol research and circadian biology. Recently, we showed that the circadian clock modulates alcohol sensitivity, but not the formation of tolerance. Here, we describe our protocol in detail. Alcohol is administered to the flies using the FlyBar. In this setup, saturated alcohol vapor is mixed with humidified air in set proportions, and administered to the flies in four tubes simultaneously. Flies are reared under standardized conditions in order to minimize variation between the replicates. Three-day old flies of different genotypes or treatments are used for the experiments, preferably by matching flies of two different time points (e.g., CT 5 and CT 17) making direct comparisons possible. During the experiment, flies are exposed for 1 hr to the pre-determined percentage of alcohol vapor and the number of flies that exhibit the Loss of Righting reflex (LoRR) or sedation are counted every 5 min. The data can be analyzed using three different statistical approaches. The first is to determine the time at which 50% of the flies have lost their righting reflex and use an Analysis of the Variance (ANOVA) to determine whether significant differences exist between time points. The second is to determine the percentage flies that show LoRR after a specified number of minutes, followed by an ANOVA analysis. The last method is to analyze the whole times series using multivariate statistics. The protocol can also be used for non-circadian experiments or comparisons between genotypes. PMID:24895004

  10. LISA Pathfinder ground testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Felipe; LISA Pathfinder Team

    2010-01-01

    The space-based gravitational wave observatory LISA is a joint NASA-ESA mission that requires challenging technology to ensure pure geodetic trajectories of test masses and the interferometric measurement of distance variations between them. The LISA Pathfinder mission is an ESA-launched technology demonstrator of key LISA subsystems such as spacecraft control with micronewton thrusters, test mass drag-free control, and precision laser interferometry between free-flying test masses. Ground testing of pre-flight hardware of the Gravitational Reference Sensor and Optical Metrology subsystems is currently ongoing. Studies have been carried out on very sensitive torsion pendulums that effectively reproduce a free-fall condition for the test mass within a horizontal plane in the lab, down to frequencies < 0.1 mHz. Thermal gradient induced effects, impact of gas molecules, noisy charging, surface charge patches, and other effects have been investigated and their physical models consolidated. A final upper limit on non-modeled disturbances has also been obtained within one order of magnitude of LISA requirements at 1 mHz. The interferometry system has also been extensively studied to identify noise sources and develop approaches to mitigate them. Engineering models of the optical bench, laser head and laser modulators have been interconnected and tested for functionality and noise level in closed-loop operation, demonstrating the required optical metrology sensitivity to test mass displacement. This poster presents the current status in the development and implementation of LISA Pathfinder pre-flight systems and latest results of the ongoing ground testing efforts.

  11. Ameliorative effect of fly ashes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhumbla, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    Agronomic effectiveness and environmental impact of fly ashes used to reclaim pyritic acid mine spoils were investigated in the laboratory and field. Mine spoils at two abandoned sites were amended with three rates of fly ash, three rates of rock phosphate, and seeded with alfalfa and wheat. Application of fly ash decreased bulk density and increased moisture retention capacity of spoils. Fly ash application reduced cation exchange capacity, acidity, toxic levels of Al, Fe, and Mn in soils by buffering soil pH at 6.5, and retarded pyrite oxidation. The reduction in cation exchange capacity was compensated by release of plant nutrients through diffusion and dissolution of plerospheres in fly ash. Improvement of spoil physical, chemical and microbial properties resulted in higher yield, more nitrogen fixation, and utilization of P from rock phosphate by alfalfa. Laboratory investigations demonstrated that neutralization potential and the amounts of amorphous oxides of iron were more important for classifying fly ashes than the total elemental analysis presently used in a taxonomic classification system. Contamination of the food chain through plant removal of Mo and As in fly ash treated mine spoils was observed only for Mo and only for the first year of cropping. Plant available As and Mo decreased with time. Laboratory leaching and adsorption studies and a field experiment showed that trace metals do not leach from fly ashes at near neutral pH and more oxyanions will leach from fly ashes with low neutralization potential and low amounts of amorphous oxides of iron.

  12. A Complete Tank Test of a Model of a Flying-Boat Hull - N.A.C.A. Model No.11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, James M.; Parkinson, John B.

    1933-01-01

    This note discusses the limitations of the conventional tank test of a seaplane model. The advantages of a complete test, giving the characteristics of the model at all speeds, loads, and trim angles in the useful range are pointed out. The data on N.A.C.A. Model No.11, obtained from a complete test, are presented and discussed. The results are analyzed to determine the best trim angle for each speed and load. The data for the best angles are reduced to non-dimensional form for ease of comparison and application. A practical problem using the characteristics of model no.11 is presented to show the method of calculating the take-off time and run of a seaplane from these data.

  13. A complete tank test of a model of a flying-boat hull-N.A.C.A. Model No.11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, James M; Parkinson, John B

    1933-01-01

    This note discusses the limitations of the conventional tank test of a seaplane model. The advantages of a complete test, giving the characteristics of the model at all speeds, loads, and trim angles in the useful range are pointed out. The data on N.A.C.A. Model No.11, obtained from a complete test, are presented and discussed. The results are analyzed to determine the best trim angle for each speed and load. The data for the best angles are reduced to non-dimensional form for ease of comparison and application. A practical problem using the characteristics of model no.11 is presented to show the method of calculating the take-off time and run of a seaplane from these data.

  14. NAVTOLAND and flying qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momiyama, T. S.

    1977-01-01

    The V/STOL operational capability is reviewed with emphasis on pilot workload and all-weather landing guidance systems. A research and development program to correlate and integrate the development of all systems and techniques involved in enabling the pilot to fly V/STOL aircraft onto ships and tactical sites is described. Aircraft design parameters that affect its control in the vertical takeoff and landing flight regimes are emphasized. Topics considered include: (1) integrated flight controls and displays; (2) low speed sensor; (3) air traffic control appraoch and landing guidance systems; (4) visual landing aids; (5) ground effect induced thrust variation problems; and (6) handling qualities.

  15. Flying wires at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Gannon, J.; Crawford, C.; Finley, D.; Flora, R.; Groves, T.; MacPherson, M.

    1989-03-01

    Transverse beam profile measurement systems called ''Flying Wires'' have been installed and made operational in the Fermilab Main Ring and Tevatron accelerators. These devices are used routinely to measure the emittance of both protons and antiprotons throughout the fill process, and for emittance growth measurements during stores. In the Tevatron, the individual transverse profiles of six proton and six antiproton bunches are obtained simultaneously, with a single pass of the wire through the beam. Essential features of the hardware, software, and system operation are explained in the rest of the paper. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  16. [Otorhinolaryngologic diseases and flying].

    PubMed

    Moser, M

    2002-01-01

    Physiological and pathological aspects of pressure changes, noise, acceleration, variation of temperature, low humidity, stress and time differences in flight passengers and aircrew are discussed. Typical ear, nose, and throat clinic (ENT)-cases such as tubal function disturbances, barotrauma, hypacusis, sudden hearing loss, tinnitus, acute and chronic middle ear diseases, post ear surgery conditions, hearing aids, vertigo and motion sickness are described. The influence on flying of acute and chronic affections of the paranasal sinuses, nasal septal deviation and allergy are listed. The problem of transport of ENT-incapacitated passengers in commercial aircrafts and ambulance jets are dealt with. PMID:12385068

  17. Flying over decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeller, Judith; Issler, Mena; Imamoglu, Atac

    Levy flights haven been extensively used in the past three decades to describe non-Brownian motion of particles. In this presentation I give an overview on how Levy flights have been used across several disciplines, ranging from biology to finance to physics. In our publication we describe how a single electron spin 'flies' when captured in quantum dot using the central spin model. At last I motivate the use of Levy flights for the description of anomalous diffusion in modern experiments, concretely to describe the lifetimes of quasi-particles in Josephson junctions. Finished PhD at ETH in Spring 2015.

  18. Flying by Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelletier, Frederic J.; Antreasian, Peter G.; Ardalan, Shadan M.; Criddle, Kevin E.; Ionasescu, Rodica; Jacobson, Robert A.; Jones, Jeremy B.; Parcher, Daniel W.; Roth, Duane C.; Thompson, Paul F.; Vaughan, Andrew T.

    2008-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft encounters the massive Titan about once every month. These encounters are essential to the mission as Titan is the only satellite of Saturn that can provide enough gravity assist to shape the orbit tour and allow outstanding science for many years. From a navigation point of view, these encounters provide many challenges, in particular those that fly close enough to the surface for the atmospheric drag to perturb the orbit. This paper discusses the dynamics models developed to successfully navigate Cassini and determine its trajectory. This includes the moon's gravity pull with its second degree zonal harmonics J2, the attitude thrust control perturbations and the acceleration of drag.

  19. CO2 capture using fly ash from coal fired power plant and applications of CO2-captured fly ash as a mineral admixture for concrete.

    PubMed

    Siriruang, Chaichan; Toochinda, Pisanu; Julnipitawong, Parnthep; Tangtermsirikul, Somnuk

    2016-04-01

    The utilization of fly ash as a solid sorbent material for CO2 capture via surface adsorption and carbonation reaction was evaluated as an economically feasible CO2 reduction technique. The results show that fly ash from a coal fired power plant can capture CO2 up to 304.7 μmol/g fly ash, consisting of 2.9 and 301.8 μmol/g fly ash via adsorption and carbonation, respectively. The CO2 adsorption conditions (temperature, pressure, and moisture) can affect CO2 capture performance of fly ash. The carbonation of CO2 with free CaO in fly ashes was evaluated and the results indicated that the reaction consumed most of free CaO in fly ash. The fly ashes after CO2 capture were further used for application as a mineral admixture for concrete. Properties such as water requirement, compressive strength, autoclave expansion, and carbonation depth of mortar and paste specimens using fly ash before and after CO2 capture were tested and compared with material standards. The results show that the expansion of mortar specimens using fly ash after CO2 capture was greatly reduced due to the reduction of free CaO content in the fly ash compared to the expansion of specimens using fresh fly ash. There were no significant differences in the water requirement and compressive strength of specimens using fly ash, before and after CO2 capture process. The results from this study can lead to an alternative CO2 capture technique with doubtless utilization of fly ash after CO2 capture as a mineral admixture for concrete. PMID:26803257

  20. Nipah virus in Lyle's flying foxes, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Reynes, Jean-Marc; Counor, Dorian; Ong, Sivuth; Faure, Caroline; Seng, Vansay; Molia, Sophie; Walston, Joe; Georges-Courbot, Marie Claude; Deubel, Vincent; Sarthou, Jean-Louis

    2005-07-01

    We conducted a survey in Cambodia in 2000 on henipavirus infection among several bat species, including flying foxes, and persons exposed to these animals. Among 1,072 bat serum samples tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, antibodies reactive to Nipah virus (NiV) antigen were detected only in Pteropus lylei species; Cynopterus sphinx, Hipposideros larvatus, Scotophilus kuhlii, Chaerephon plicata, Taphozous melanopogon, and T. theobaldi species were negative. Seroneutralization applied on a subset of 156 serum samples confirmed these results. None of the 8 human serum samples was NiV seropositive with the seroneutralization test. One virus isolate exhibiting cytopathic effect with syncytia was obtained from 769 urine samples collected at roosts of P. lylei specimens. Partial molecular characterization of this isolate demonstrated that it was closely related to NiV. These results strengthen the hypothesis that flying foxes could be the natural host of NiV. Surveillance of human cases should be implemented. PMID:16022778

  1. Effect of Different Interrepetition Rest Periods on Barbell Velocity Loss During the Ballistic Bench Press Exercise.

    PubMed

    García-Ramos, Amador; Padial, Paulino; Haff, G Gregory; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; García-Ramos, Miguel; Conde-Pipó, Javier; Feriche, Belén

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of introducing different interrepetition rest (IRR) periods on the ability to sustain maximum bench press throw velocity with a range of loads commonly used to develop upper-body power. Thirty-four physically active collegiate men (age: 21.5 ± 2.8 years; body mass: 75.2 ± 7.2 kg; height: 176.9 ± 4.9 cm) were tested during 2 consecutive weeks. During the first week, the maximum dynamic strength (repetition maximum [RM]) in bench press exercise was determined (RM = 76.7 ± 13.2 kg). The following week, 3 testing sessions were conducted with 48 hours apart in random order. In each day of evaluation, only 1 load (30%RM, 40%RM, or 50%RM) was assessed in the bench press throw exercise. With each load, subjects performed 3 single sets of 15 repetitions (15-minute interset rest) with 3 different sets configurations: continuous repetitions (CR), 6 seconds of IRR (IRR6), and 12 seconds of IRR (IRR12). The decrease of peak velocity (PV) was significantly lower for IRR12 compared with CR and IRR6 at least since the repetition 4. No differences between CR and IRR6 protocols were found until the repetition 7 at 30%RM and 40%RM and until the repetition 5 at 50%RM. The decrease of PV during the CR protocol was virtually linear for the 3 loads analyzed (r > 0.99); however, this linear relationship became weaker for IRR6 (r = 0.79-0.95) and IRR12 (r = 0.35-0.87). These results demonstrate that IRR periods allow increasing the number of repetitions before the onset of significant velocity losses. PMID:26308827

  2. Flying in, Flying out: Offshore Teaching in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seah, Wee Tiong; Edwards, Julie

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the relatively new phenomenon of university education faculties offering offshore education. The analogy, "flying in, flying out" captures the intensity of such offshore experiences for visiting academics, and contrasts their professional experiences against expatriate academics. This paper reports on case studies of two…

  3. Fly ash quality and utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Barta, L.E.; Lachner, L.; Wenzel, G.B.; Beer, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    The quality of fly ash is of considerable importance to fly ash utilizers. The fly ash puzzolanic activity is one of the most important properties that determines the role of fly ash as a binding agent in the cementing process. The puzzolanic activity, however is a function of fly ash particle size and chemical composition. These parameters are closely related to the process of fly ash formation in pulverized coal fired furnaces. In turn, it is essential to understand the transformation of mineral matter during coal combustion. Due to the particle-to-particle variation of coal properties and the random coalescence of mineral particles, the properties of fly ash particles e.g. size, SiO{sub 2} content, viscosity can change considerably from particle to particle. These variations can be described by the use of the probability theory. Since the mean values of these randomly changing parameters are not sufficient to describe the behavior of individual fly ash particles during the formation of concrete, therefore it is necessary to investigate the distribution of these variables. Examples of these variations were examined by the Computer Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM) for particle size and chemical composition for Texas lignite and Eagel Butte mineral matter and fly ash. The effect of combustion on the variations of these properties for both the fly ash and mineral matter were studied by using a laminar flow reactor. It is shown in our paper, that there are significant variations (about 40-50% around the mean values) of the above-listed properties for both coal samples. By comparing the particle size and chemical composition distributions of the mineral matter and fly ash, it was possible to conclude that for the Texas lignite mineral matter, the combustion did not effect significantly the distribution of these properties, however, for the Eagel Butte coal the combustion had a major impact on these mineral matter parameters.

  4. Flies remember the time of day.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, Nitin S; Wolf, Reinhard; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte; Heisenberg, Martin

    2015-06-15

    The circadian clock enables organisms to anticipate daily environmental cycles and drives corresponding changes in behavior [1, 2]. Such endogenous oscillators also enable animals to display time-specific memory [1, 3-5]. For instance, mice and honeybees associate the location of a stimulus (like food or mate) with a certain time of day (time-place learning) [6, 7]. However, the mechanism underlying time-related learning and memory is not known. In the present study, we investigate time-specific odor learning. We use a genetically tractable animal, the fly Drosophila melanogaster. Starved flies are trained in the morning and afternoon to associate distinct odors with sucrose reward. The training is repeated the next day, and their time-dependent odor preference is tested on the third day. Our results indicate that Drosophila can express appetitive memory at the relevant time of day if the two conditioning events are separated by more than 4 hr. Flies can form time-odor associations in constant darkness (DD) as well as in a daily light-dark (LD) cycle, but not when kept under constant light (LL) conditions. Circadian clock mutants, period(01) (per(01)) and clock(AR) (clk(AR)), learned to associate sucrose reward with a certain odor but were unable to form time-odor associations. Our findings show that flies can utilize temporal information as an additional cue in appetitive learning. Time-odor learning in flies depends on a per- and clk-dependent endogenous mechanism that is independent of environmental light cues. PMID:26028434

  5. The Flying University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesen, Catherine

    The Flying University is solo theater performance framed as an academic lecture about Marie Curie and her discovery of radium, delivered to a group of women who have gathered in secret to further their education. As the lecture proceeds, the professor brings in her own research based on a study of Esther Horsch (1905-1991) who lived on a farm in central Illinois. She introduces data from Esther's journals, personal memories, and dreams about Esther's life. The professor's investigation of radium plays at the intersections of magical and mundane, decay and the transformation of life, and the place of ambition in these two women's lives. The intention of this piece is to explore these themes, which are full of mystery, through the traces of the daily lives of Mme. Curie and Esther. Their words and photos are used as roots from which to imagine the things that echo beyond their familiar work; elemental and also fantastically radiant. The Flying University was written and performed by Catherine Friesen April 27-29, 2012 in the Center for Performance Experiment at Hamilton College as part of the University of South Carolina MFA Acting Class of 2013 showcase, Pieces of Eight.

  6. Flies, clocks and evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Rosato, E; Kyriacou, C P

    2001-01-01

    The negative feedback model for gene regulation of the circadian mechanism is described for the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster. The conservation of function of clock molecules is illustrated by comparison with the mammalian circadian system, and the apparent swapping of roles between various canonical clock gene components is highlighted. The role of clock gene duplications and divergence of function is introduced via the timeless gene. The impressive similarities in clock gene regulation between flies and mammals could suggest that variation between more closely related species within insects might be minimal. However, this is not borne out because the expression of clock molecules in the brain of the giant silk moth, Antheraea pernyi, is not easy to reconcile with the negative feedback roles of the period and timeless genes. Variation in clock gene sequences between and within fly species is examined and the role of co-evolution between and within clock molecules is described, particularly with reference to adaptive functions of the circadian phenotype. PMID:11710984

  7. Physics of flying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrone, Jim

    2015-05-01

    Column editor's note: As the school year comes to a close, it is important to start thinking about next year. One area that you want to consider is field trips. Many institutions require that teachers plan for a field trip well in advance. Keeping that in mind, I asked Jim Vetrone to write an article about the fantastic field trip he takes his AP Physics students on. I had the awesome opportunity to attend a professional development day that Jim arranged at iFLY in the Chicago suburbs. The experience of "flying" in a wind tunnel was fabulous. Equally fun was watching the other physics teachers come up with experiments to have the professional "flyers" perform in the tube. I could envision my students being similarly excited about the experience and about the development of their own experiments. After I returned to school, I immediately began the process of trying to get this field trip approved for the 2015-16 school year. I suggest that you start your process as well if you hope to try a new field trip next year. The key to getting the approval, in my experience, is submitting a proposal early that includes supporting documentation from sources. Often I use NGSS or state standards as justifications for my field trips. I have also quoted College Board expectations for AP Physics 1 and 2 in my documents when requesting an unusual field trip.

  8. Flight tests of three-dimensional path-redefinition algorithms for transition from Radio Navigation (RNAV) to Microwave Landing System (MLS) navigation when flying an aircraft on autopilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueschen, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    This report contains results of flight tests for three path update algorithms designed to provide smooth transition for an aircraft guidance system from DME, VORTAC, and barometric navaids to the more precise MLS by modifying the desired 3-D flight path. The first algorithm, called Zero Cross Track, eliminates the discontinuity in cross-track and altitude error at transition by designating the first valid MLS aircraft position as the desired first waypoint, while retaining all subsequent waypoints. The discontinuity in track angle is left unaltered. The second, called Tangent Path, also eliminates the discontinuity in cross-track and altitude errors and chooses a new desired heading to be tangent to the next oncoming circular arc turn. The third, called Continued Track, eliminates the discontinuity in cross-track, altitude, and track angle errors by accepting the current MLS position and track angle as the desired ones and recomputes the location of the next waypoint. The flight tests were conducted on the Transportation Systems Research Vehicle, a small twin-jet transport aircraft modified for research under the Advanced Transport Operating Systems program at Langley Research Center. The flight tests showed that the algorithms provided a smooth transition to MLS.

  9. Development of Classified Fly Ash as a Pozzolanic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rukzon, Sumrerng; Chindaprasirt, Prinya

    This research studies the potential for using classified fly ash from Mae Moh power plant in Thailand as a pozzolanic material. Three different fly ash finenesses viz., coarse Original Fly Ash (OFA), Medium Fly Ash (MFA) and Fine Fly Ash (FFA) were used for the study. Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) was partially replaced with fly ash at 20 and 40% by weight of binder. The water to binder ratio was kept constant at 0.5 and the flow of mortar was maintained at 110±5% with the aid of superplasticizer (SP). Compressive strength, carbonation depth and porosity test of mortars were determined. FFA has a high potential to be used as a good pozzolanic material. The use of FFA produces mortars with good strength and low porosity. The resistance to carbonation of mortar improves with partial replacement of FFA in comparison with the normal coarse fly ash. The use of FFA results in a strong and dense mortar which is due to better dispersion and filling effect as well as an increase in the pozzolanic reaction.

  10. Environmental hazard of oil shale combustion fly ash.

    PubMed

    Blinova, Irina; Bityukova, Liidia; Kasemets, Kaja; Ivask, Angela; Käkinen, Aleksandr; Kurvet, Imbi; Bondarenko, Olesja; Kanarbik, Liina; Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Aruoja, Villem; Schvede, Hedi; Kahru, Anne

    2012-08-30

    The combined chemical and ecotoxicological characterization of oil shale combustion fly ash was performed. Ash was sampled from the most distant point of the ash-separation systems of the Balti and Eesti Thermal Power Plants in North-Eastern Estonia. The fly ash proved potentially hazardous for tested aquatic organisms and high alkalinity of the leachates (pH>10) is apparently the key factor determining its toxicity. The leachates were not genotoxic in the Ames assay. Also, the analysis showed that despite long-term intensive oil-shale combustion accompanied by considerable fly ash emissions has not led to significant soil contamination by hazardous trace elements in North-Eastern Estonia. Comparative study of the fly ash originating from the 'new' circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustion technology and the 'old' pulverized-fired (PF) one showed that CFB fly ash was less toxic than PF fly ash. Thus, complete transfer to the 'new' technology will reduce (i) atmospheric emission of hazardous trace elements and (ii) fly ash toxicity to aquatic organisms as compared with the 'old' technology. PMID:22717068

  11. Evaluation of yeasts and yeast products in larval and adult diets for the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, and adult diets for the medfly, Ceratitis capitata, and the melon fly, Bactrocera curcurbitae.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several yeasts and yeast products were tested as components of adult diet for Medfly, Ceratitis capitata, Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, and Melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae and larval liquid diet for Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis in mass rearing process. Three hydrolyzed yeasts...

  12. Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points.

  13. Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1997-10-28

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points. 2 figs.

  14. Behavioural responses of stable flies to cattle manure slurry associated odourants.

    PubMed

    Tangtrakulwanich, K; Albuquerque, T A; Brewer, G J; Baxendale, F P; Zurek, L; Miller, D N; Taylor, D B; Friesen, K A; Zhu, J J

    2015-03-01

    Stable flies (Stomoxys calcitrans [Diptera: Muscidae] L.) are blood-feeding synanthropic pests, which cause significant economic losses in livestock. Stable fly antennae contain olfactory sensilla responsive to host and host environment-associated odours. Field observation indicated that the abundance of stable flies increased significantly in grasslands or crop fields when cattle manure slurry was applied. Major volatile compounds emanating from manure slurry were collected and identified. Behavioural responses of stable flies to those compounds were investigated in laboratory bioassays and field-trapping studies. Results from olfactometer assays revealed that phenol, p-cresol and m-cresol were attractive to adult stable flies. When tested individually, attraction was higher with lower dosages. Stable flies were most attracted to blends of phenol and m-cresol or p-cresol. Traps with binary blend lures caught more stable flies in field trials as well. PMID:25557192

  15. Direct liquefaction Proof-of-Concept Program, Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc., Lawrenceville, New Jersey. Final topical report, Bench Run 02 (227-91)

    SciTech Connect

    Comolli, A.G.; Pradhan, V.R.; Lee, T.L.K.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Popper, G.

    1996-09-01

    This report presents the results of Bench Run PB-02, conducted under the DOE Proof of Concept - Bench Option Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. Bench Run PB-02 was the second of the nine runs planned in the POC Bench Option Contract between the U.S. DOE and Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. The primary goal of this bench run was to evaluate the hybrid catalyst system, consisting of a dispersed slurry catalyst in one of the hydroconversion reactors and conventional supported extrudate catalyst in the other hydroconversion reactor, in a high-low two-stage temperature sequence, similar to the one operated at Wilsonville. This hybrid mode of operation with the high-low temperature sequence was studied during direct liquefaction of coal and in coprocessing of coal with Hondo resid and/or waste plastics under high space velocity operating conditions. Another important objective of Bench Run PB-02 was to investigate the novel {open_quotes}interstage internal recycle{close_quotes} of the second stage reactor slurry back to the first stage reactor. Other features of PB-02 included the use of an interstage separator and an in-line fixed bed hydrotreater. In general, it was found during Bench Run PB-02 that the {open_quote}hybrid type{close_quote} catalyst system was not effective for obtaining high levels of process performance as the {open_quote}all dispersed{close_quote} catalyst system, tested earlier, especially at high coal space velocities. The interstage internal recycle of second stage reactor slurry to the first stage reactor feed line was found to improve cracking of liquefaction products. The addition of small amounts of mixed plastics was found to improve the hydrogen utilization in both coal conversion and heavy oil hydrocracking reactions, i.e., plastics resulted in improving the overall distillate yield while at the same time reducing the light gas make and chemical hydrogen consumption.

  16. Environmental data from laboratory- and bench-scale Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting of Eastern oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Mensinger, M.C.; Rue, D.M.; Roberts, M.J.

    1991-12-31

    As part of a 3-year program to develop the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting (PFH) Process for Eastern oil shales, IGT conducted tests in laboratory-scale batch and continuous units as well as a 45-kg/h bench-scale unit to generate a data base for 6 Eastern shales. Data were collected during PFH processing of raw Alabama and Indiana shales and a beneficiated Indiana shale for environmental mitigation analyses. The data generated include trace element analyses of the raw feeds and spent shales, product oils, and sour waters. The sulfur compounds present in the product gas and trace components in the sour water were also determined. In addition, the leaching characteristics of the feed and residue solids were determined. The data obtained were used to evaluate the environmental impact of a shale processing plant based on the PFH process. This paper presents the environmental data obtained from bench-scale tests conducted during the program.

  17. Environmental data from laboratory- and bench-scale Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting of Eastern oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Mensinger, M.C.; Rue, D.M.; Roberts, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    As part of a 3-year program to develop the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting (PFH) Process for Eastern oil shales, IGT conducted tests in laboratory-scale batch and continuous units as well as a 45-kg/h bench-scale unit to generate a data base for 6 Eastern shales. Data were collected during PFH processing of raw Alabama and Indiana shales and a beneficiated Indiana shale for environmental mitigation analyses. The data generated include trace element analyses of the raw feeds and spent shales, product oils, and sour waters. The sulfur compounds present in the product gas and trace components in the sour water were also determined. In addition, the leaching characteristics of the feed and residue solids were determined. The data obtained were used to evaluate the environmental impact of a shale processing plant based on the PFH process. This paper presents the environmental data obtained from bench-scale tests conducted during the program.

  18. Why flies are good vectors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It was around 1900 when house flies were implicated in disease transmission. Flies with white powder on their feet were seen landing on food in US Army chow halls. This white powder was lime that had been sprinkled over the human excrement in open latrines not too far from the eating establishments....

  19. Passive Baited Sequential Fly Trap

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sampling fly populations associated with human populations is needed to understand diel behavior and to monitor population densities before and after control operations. Population control measures are dependent on the results of monitoring efforts as they may provide insight into the fly behavior ...

  20. Evaluation of different insecticides and fabric types for development of treated targets for stable fly (Diptera: Muscidae) control.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cloth targets, visually attractive to blood-feeding flies and treated with insecticides to kill flies when they land, were adapted for use against stable flies in rangeland situations in the U.S. Five candidate fabrics were tested and trigger fabric (polyester/cotton) best maintained pesticide resi...

  1. Assessment of attractiveness of plants as roosting sites for the melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae, and oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    PubMed

    McQuate, Grant T; Vargas, Roger I

    2007-01-01

    The use of toxic protein bait sprays to suppress melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett) (Diptera: Tephritidae), populations typically involves application to vegetation bordering agricultural host areas where the adults seek shelter ("roost"). Although bait spray applications for suppression of oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), populations have traditionally been applied to the host crop, rather than to crop borders, roosting by oriental fruit flies in borders of some crop species, such as papaya, Carica papaya L. (Brassicales: Caricaceae), suggests that bait spray applications to crop borders could also help in suppression of B. dorsalis populations. In order to develop improved recommendations for application of bait sprays to border plants for suppression of melon fly and oriental fruit fly populations, the relative attractiveness of a range of plant species, in a vegetative (non-flowering) stage, was tested to wild melon fly and oriental fruit fly populations established in a papaya orchard in Hawaii. A total of 20 plant species were evaluated, divided into four categories: 1) border plants, including corn, Zea mays L. (Poales: Poaceae), windbreaks and broad-leaved ornamentals, 7 species; 2) weed plants commonly found in agricultural fields in Hawaii, 6 species; 3) host crop plants, 1 species- zucchini, Cucurbita pepo L. (Violales: Curcurbitaceae), and 4) locally grown fruit trees, 6 species. Plants were established in pots and placed in an open field, in clusters encircling protein bait traps, 20 m away from the papaya orchard. Castor bean, Ricinus communis L. (Euphorbiales: Euphorbiaceae), panax, Polyscias guilfoylei (Bull) Bailey (Apiales: Araliaceae), tiger's claw, Erythnna variegata L. (Fabales: Fabaceae), and guava, Psidium guajava L. (Myrtales: Myrtaceae) were identified as preferred roosting hosts for the melon fly, and tiger's claw, panax, castor bean, Canada cocklebur, Xanthium strumarium L. (Asterales: Asteraceae), Brazilian

  2. Assessment of Attractiveness of Plants as Roosting Sites for the Melon Fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae, and Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis

    PubMed Central

    McQuate, Grant T.; Vargas, Roger I.

    2007-01-01

    The use of toxic protein bait sprays to suppress melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett) (Diptera: Tephritidae), populations typically involves application to vegetation bordering agricultural host areas where the adults seek shelter (“roost”). Although bait spray applications for suppression of oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), populations have traditionally been applied to the host crop, rather than to crop borders, roosting by oriental fruit flies in borders of some crop species, such as papaya, Carica papaya L. (Brassicales: Caricaceae), suggests that bait spray applications to crop borders could also help in suppression of B. dorsalis populations. In order to develop improved recommendations for application of bait sprays to border plants for suppression of melon fly and oriental fruit fly populations, the relative attractiveness of a range of plant species, in a vegetative (non-flowering) stage, was tested to wild melon fly and oriental fruit fly populations established in a papaya orchard in Hawaii. A total of 20 plant species were evaluated, divided into four categories: 1) border plants, including corn, Zea mays L. (Poales: Poaceae), windbreaks and broad-leaved ornamentals, 7 species; 2) weed plants commonly found in agricultural fields in Hawaii, 6 species; 3) host crop plants, 1 species- zucchini, Cucurbita pepo L. (Violales: Curcurbitaceae), and 4) locally grown fruit trees, 6 species. Plants were established in pots and placed in an open field, in clusters encircling protein bait traps, 20 m away from the papaya orchard. Castor bean, Ricinus communis L. (Euphorbiales: Euphorbiaceae), panax, Polyscias guilfoylei (Bull) Bailey (Apiales: Araliaceae), tiger's claw, Erythnna variegata L. (Fabales: Fabaceae), and guava, Psidium guajava L. (Myrtales: Myrtaceae) were identified as preferred roosting hosts for the melon fly, and tiger's claw, panax, castor bean, Canada cocklebur, Xanthium strumarium L. (Asterales: Asteraceae

  3. Kiln dust-fly ash systems for highway bases and subbases

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effectiveness of substituting kiln dusts for hydrated lime in lime-fly ash-aggregate road base systems. A total of 45 kiln dust samples, including 33 cement dusts and 12 lime dusts, were obtained in accordance with a standard sampling procedure. In addition, 18 fly ashes (including 5 Class C ash samples) and 6 aggregates were included in the sampling program. Kiln dust and fly ash samples were characterized by Trow, Ltd. to determine physical properties and chemical, as well as mineralogical, composition. Optimum kiln dust-fly ash ratios were developed for 66 mix combinations. Kiln dust-fly ash-aggregate compressive strength tests were performed. Engineering properties (durability, volume stability, etc.) of optimum mix combinations were tested and compared with conventional lime-fly ash-aggregate mixtures. Most kiln dust-fly ash-aggregate mixes were comparable to, and in many cases demonstrated higher early strength development than, lime-fly ash-aggregate mixes. Optimum mix strengths for kiln dust-fly ash-aggregate compositions were generally attained at kiln dust-fly ash ratios of 2:1 using cement kiln dust and 1:1 using lime kiln dust. By contrast, most lime-fly ash-aggregate mixes have lime-fly ash ratios of 1:3 or 1:4. Therefore, higher concentrations of kiln dust are required compared to commercial lime. Mixes containing Class C fly ash developed higher strengths than comparable mixes with Class F fly ash.

  4. Boiling behavior of sodium-potassium alloy in a bench-scale solar receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.B.; Andraka, C.E.; Moss, T.A.

    1992-07-01

    During 1989-90, a 75-kW{sub t} sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver was successfully demonstrated at Sandia National Laboratories. Significant features of this receiver include (1) boiling sodium as the heat transfer medium and (2) electric-discharge-machined (EDM) cavities as artificial nucleation sites to stabilize boiling. Since this first demonstration, design of a second-generation pool-boiler receiver that will bring the concept closer to commercialization has begun. For long life, the new receiver uses Haynes Alloy 230. For increased safety factors against film boiling and flooding, it has a refined shape and somewhat larger dimensions. To eliminate the need for trace heating, the receiver will boil the sodium-potassium alloy NaK-78 instead of sodium. To reduce manufacturing costs, it will use one of a number of alternatives to EDM cavities for stabilization of boiling. To control incipient-boiling superheats, especially during hot restarts, it will contain a small amount of inert gas. Before the new receiver design could be finalized, bench-scale tests of some of the proposed changes were necessary. A series of bench-scale pool boilers were built from Haynes Alloy 230 and filled with NaK-78. Various boiling-stabilizer candidates were incorporated into them, including laser-drilled cavities and a number of different sintered-powder-metal coatings. These bench-scale pool boilers have been operated at temperatures up to 750{degree}C, heated by quartz lamps with incident radiant fluxes up to 95 W/cm{sup 2}. The effects of various orientations and added gases have been studied. results of these studies are presented. 15 refs.

  5. Boiling behavior of sodium-potassium alloy in a bench-scale solar receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.B.; Andraka, C.E.; Moss, T.A.

    1992-01-01

    During 1989-90, a 75-kW{sub t} sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver was successfully demonstrated at Sandia National Laboratories. Significant features of this receiver include (1) boiling sodium as the heat transfer medium and (2) electric-discharge-machined (EDM) cavities as artificial nucleation sites to stabilize boiling. Since this first demonstration, design of a second-generation pool-boiler receiver that will bring the concept closer to commercialization has begun. For long life, the new receiver uses Haynes Alloy 230. For increased safety factors against film boiling and flooding, it has a refined shape and somewhat larger dimensions. To eliminate the need for trace heating, the receiver will boil the sodium-potassium alloy NaK-78 instead of sodium. To reduce manufacturing costs, it will use one of a number of alternatives to EDM cavities for stabilization of boiling. To control incipient-boiling superheats, especially during hot restarts, it will contain a small amount of inert gas. Before the new receiver design could be finalized, bench-scale tests of some of the proposed changes were necessary. A series of bench-scale pool boilers were built from Haynes Alloy 230 and filled with NaK-78. Various boiling-stabilizer candidates were incorporated into them, including laser-drilled cavities and a number of different sintered-powder-metal coatings. These bench-scale pool boilers have been operated at temperatures up to 750{degree}C, heated by quartz lamps with incident radiant fluxes up to 95 W/cm{sup 2}. The effects of various orientations and added gases have been studied. results of these studies are presented. 15 refs.

  6. Automated full-field range OPD and MTF measurement bench for automotive objective benchmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, W.; Yonnet, M.; Brahmi, D.; Gascon, A.; Deprez, M.; Wattellier, B.; Lavergne, O.

    2015-10-01

    We present a metrology bench used to benchmark the optical quality of lenses used in automotive applications. These lenses have a wide field of view, typically larger than 180° and fast numerical apertures (F/2). Lenses are compared in terms of OPD and MTF. For this aim, interferometric solutions would require double-passing the lens. Between two field positions, it would be necessary to realign the reference sphere. This is not compatible with the requested high measurement throughput. Therefore wave front sensing is the best solution to this problem because it is able to characterize lenses in single pass configurations. We chose to measure the transmitted wave front with a QuadriWave Lateral Shearing Inferferometer wave front sensor placed directly after the focal plane. This technology is best suited in this case because it has the unique ability to measure fast diverging beams with high accuracy. It can also accept the large tilt angles due to the lens non telecentricity. Because the information needed for lens comparison is the OPD in the exit pupil, the wave front is then back-propagated to it thanks to an innovative ray-trace algorithm. This algorithm is also able to deduce the aperture transmission to take into account vignetting effects that appear at the field edges. Finally the MTF is simulated from the OPD and the pupil function. This bench is fully automated to rapidly benchmark a large number of lenses in their complete field of view. We characterized the bench according to the ISO 5725 standard. Its precision was tested with commercial lenses whereas trueness was assessed with calibrated lenses. The accuracy on MTF was found to be below 1% over the whole field of view.

  7. An Integration of Geophysical Methods to Explore Buried Structures on the Bench and in the Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booterbaugh, A. P.; Lachhab, A.

    2011-12-01

    In the following study, an integration of geophysical methods and devices were implemented on the bench and in the field to accurately identify buried structures. Electrical resistivity and ground penetrating radar methods, including both a fabricated electrical resistivity apparatus and an electrical resistivity device were all used in this study. The primary goal of the study was to test the accuracy and reliability of the apparatus which costs a fraction of the price of a commercially sold resistivity instrument. The apparatus consists of four electrodes, two multimeters, a 12-volt battery, a DC to AC inverter and wires. Using this apparatus, an electrical current, is injected into earth material through the outer electrodes and the potential voltage is measured across the inner electrodes using a multimeter. The recorded potential and the intensity of the current can then be used to calculate the apparent resistivity of a given material. In this study the Wenner array, which consists of four equally spaced electrodes, was used due to its higher accuracy and greater resolution when investigating lateral variations of resistivity in shallow depths. In addition, the apparatus was used with an electrical resistivity device and a ground penetrating radar unit to explore the buried building foundation of Gustavus Adolphus Hall located on Susquehanna University Campus, Selinsgrove, PA. The apparatus successfully produced consistent results on the bench level revealing the location of small bricks buried under a soil material. In the summer of 2010, seventeen electrical resistivity transects were conducted on the Gustavus Adolphus site where and revealed remnants of the foundation. In the summer of 2011, a ground penetrating radar survey and an electrical resistivity tomography survey were conducted to further explore the site. Together these methods identified the location of the foundation and proved that the apparatus was a reliable tool for regular use on the bench

  8. Boiling behavior of sodium-potassium alloy in a bench-scale solar receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, J. B.; Andraka, C. E.; Moss, T. A.

    During 1989-90, a 75-kW(sub t) sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver was successfully demonstrated at Sandia National Laboratories. Significant features of this receiver include the following: (1) boiling sodium as the heat transfer medium, and (2) electric-discharge-machined (EDM) cavities as artificial nucleation sites to stabilize boiling. Since this first demonstration, design of a second-generation pool-boiler receiver that will bring the concept closer to commercialization has begun. For long life, the new receiver uses Haynes Alloy 230. For increased safety factors against film boiling and flooding, it has a refined shape and somewhat larger dimensions. To eliminate the need for trace heating, the receiver will boil the sodium-potassium alloy NaK-78 instead of sodium. To reduce manufacturing costs, it will use one of a number of alternatives to EDM cavities for stabilization of boiling. To control incipient-boiling superheats, especially during hot restarts, it will contain a small amount of inert gas. Before the new receiver design could be finalized, bench-scale tests of some of the proposed changes were necessary. A series of bench-scale pool boilers were built from Haynes Alloy 230 and filled with NaK-78. Various boiling-stabilizer candidates were incorporated into them, including laser-drilled cavities and a number of different sintered-powder-metal coatings. These bench-scale pool boilers have been operated at temperatures up to 750 C, heated by quartz lamps with incident radiant fluxes up to 95 W/sq cm. The effects of various orientations and added gases have been studied. Results of these studies are presented.

  9. Thermal Design, Tvac Testing, and Lessons Learned for Critical GSE of ATLAS and the ICESat-2 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, Heather

    2016-01-01

    This presentation describes the thermal design of the three main of optical components which comprise the Bench Checkout Equipment (BCE) for the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) instrument, which is flying on the ICESat-2 mission. Thermal vacuum testing of these components is also described in this presentation, as well as a few lessons learned. These BCE components serve as critical GSE for the mission; their purpose is to verify ATLAS is performing well. It has been said that, in one light, the BCE is the most important part of ATLAS, since, without it, ATLAS cannot be aligned properly or its performance verified before flight. Therefore, careful attention was paid to the BCEs thermal design, development, and component-level Tvac testing prior to its use in instrument-level and spacecraft-level Tvac tests with ATLAS. This presentation describes that thermal design, development, and testing, as well as a few lessons learned.

  10. Chemical and engineering properties of fired bricks containing 50 weight percent of class F fly ash

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Patel, V.; Laird, C.J.; Ho, K.K.

    2001-01-01

    The generation of fly ash during coal combustion represents a considerable solid waste disposal problem in the state of Illinois and nationwide. In fact, the majority of the three million tons of fly ash produced from burning Illinois bituminous coals is disposed of in landfills. The purpose of this study was to obtain a preliminary assessment of the technical feasibility of mitigating this solid waste problem by making fired bricks with the large volume of fly ash generated from burning Illinois coals. Test bricks were produced by the extrusion method with increasing amounts (20-50% by weight) of fly ash as a replacement for conventional raw materials. The chemical characteristics and engineering properties of the test bricks produced with and without 50 wt% of fly ash substitutions were analyzed and compared. The properties of the test bricks containing fly ash were at least comparable to, if not better than, those of standard test bricks made without fly ash and met the commercial specifications for fired bricks. The positive results of this study suggest that further study on test bricks with fly ash substitutions of greater than 50wt% is warranted. Successful results could have an important impact in reducing the waste disposal problem related to class F fly ash while providing the brick industry with a new low cost raw material. Copyright ?? 2001 Taylor & Francis.

  11. The flying radiation case

    SciTech Connect

    Brownell, J.H.; Bowers, R.L.

    1997-04-01

    The Los Alamos foil implosion program has the goal of producing an intense, high-energy density x-ray source by converting the energy of a magnetically imploded plasma into radiation and material energy. One of the methods for converting the plasma energy into thermal energy and radiation and utilizing it for experiments is called the flying radiation case (FRC). In this paper the authors shall model the FRC and provide a physical description of the processes involved. An analytic model of a planar FRC in the hydrodynamic approximation is used to describe the assembly and shock heating of a central cushion by a conducting liner driver. The results are also used to benchmark a hydrodynamics code for modeling an FRC. They then use a radiation-hydrodynamics computational model to explore the effects of radiation production and transport when a gold plasma assembles on a CH cushion. Results are presented for the structure and evolution of the radiation hohlraum.

  12. Bench to beside: motivation for university industry partnership.

    PubMed

    Thakor, Nitish V

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the motivation for entrepreneurship in academia and for forging a relationship between an academic laboratory and a startup. University based personnel, faculty and students, priorities basic bench research. On the other side, industry, particularly startups, prioritize technology development for clinical and commercial translation. The paper presents personal experience as a case study. University based researchers, faculty and students, might participate in and benefit from such an entrepreneurial activity. A University spin off would facilitate translational of bench research ideas and results to technologies for bedside use. Attention to issues such as conflict of interest and concern and ethics of working with human subjects need to be managed by the investigators and the institution. While entrepreneurial activity is not for everyone, it does provide the benefit and satisfaction to see research reach practice. PMID:19963705

  13. Preliminary Investigation of the Flying Qualities of Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soule, H A

    1940-01-01

    The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics is undertaking an investigation of the flying qualities of airplanes. The work consists in the determination of the significant qualities susceptible of measurement, the development of the instruments required to make the measurements, and the accumulation of data on the flying qualities of existing airplanes, which data are to serve as a basis for quantitative specifications for the flying qualities of future designs. A tentative schedule of measurable flying qualities has been prepared and the instruments needed for their measurements have been assembled. A trial of the schedule and the instruments has been made using the Stinson SR-8e airplane. The results showed that, although the original schedule and instruments are basically satisfactory some further development is required to eliminate nonessential items and to expedite flight testing. The report describes and discusses the work done with this airplane.

  14. Fly Ash Amendments Catalyze Soil Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Amonette, James E.; Kim, Jungbae; Russell, Colleen K.; Palumbo, A. V.; Daniels, William L.

    2003-09-15

    We tested the effects of four alkaline fly ashes {Class C (sub-bituminous), Class F (bituminous), Class F [bituminous with flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) products], and Class F (lignitic)} on a reaction that simulates the enzyme-mediated formation of humic materials in soils. The presence of FGD products completely halted the reaction, and the bituminous ash showed no benefit over an ash-free control. The sub-bituminous and lignitic fly ashes, however, increased the amount of polymer formed by several-fold. The strong synergetic effect of these ashes when enzyme is present apparently arises from the combined effects of metal oxide co-oxidation (Fe and Mn oxides), alkaline pH, and physical stabilization of the enzyme (porous silica cenospheres).

  15. Configurational testing of electron beam ionization for coal fly ash precipitators. Quarterly report No. 1, December 2, 1980-March 1, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    Work on machine shop drawings for the electrostatic precipitator test system continued throughout this quarter in consultation with both government-supported and industrial laboratories. The blower fan and the filter were ordered. Specification of the components of the microcomputer data handling system was completed with special attention given to interface compatibility. Familiarity was gained with the cascade impactors in preparation for an in-stack monitor workshop in March and orders were placed for the optical particle counter and gas condition monitors. Experiments were restricted to those required to round out previous work in preparation for the Third Symposium on the Transfer and Utilization of Particulate Control Technology. Two analyses are summarized here: a calculation of zero energy loss electric field and a preliminary calculation of precharger transmission for a simple geometry. One publication was prepared for the Conference on Atomic and Nuclear Methods in Fossil Energy Research held in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico in December and this paper will appear in the proceedings.

  16. Detecting the Presence of Nora Virus in "Drosophila" Utilizing Single Fly RT-PCR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munn, Bethany; Ericson, Brad; Carlson, Darby J.; Carlson, Kimberly A.

    2015-01-01

    A single fly RT-PCR protocol has recently been developed to detect the presence of the persistent, horizontally transmitted Nora virus in "Drosophila." Wild-caught flies from Ohio were tested for the presence of the virus, with nearly one-fifth testing positive. The investigation presented can serve as an ideal project for biology…

  17. Bench-to-bedside pharmacology of adrenomedullin.

    PubMed

    Kato, Johji; Kitamura, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    The bioactive peptide adrenomedullin (AM) exerts pleiotropic actions in various organs and tissues. In the heart, AM has an inhibitory effect on ventricular remodeling, suppressing cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and the proliferation of cardiac fibroblasts. This pharmacological property was shown not only in rat models of acute myocardial infarction, but also clinically in patients with this cardiac disease. An originally characterized feature of AM was a potent vasodilatory effect, but this peptide was found to be important for vascular integrity and angiogenesis. AM-induced angiogenesis is involved in tumor growth, while AM inhibits apoptosis of some types of tumor cell. A unique pharmacological property is anti-inflammatory activity, which has been characterized in sepsis and inflammatory bowel diseases; thus, there is an ongoing clinical trial to test the efficacy of AM for patients with intractable ulcerative colitis. These activities are assumed to be mediated via the specific receptor formed by calcitonin receptor-like receptor and receptor activity-modifying protein 2 or 3, while some questions remain to be answered about the molecular mechanisms of this signal transduction system. Taking these findings together, AM is a bioactive peptide with pleiotropic effects, with potential as a therapeutic tool for a wide range of human diseases from myocardial infarction to malignant tumors or inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:26144371

  18. Sorptivity of fly ash concretes

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalan, M.K.

    1996-08-01

    A factorial experiment was designed to measure the sorptivity of cement and fly ash concretes in order to compare the durability of fly ash concrete against the cement concrete. Sorptivity measurements based on the capillary movement of water was made on three grades of cement concrete and six grades of fly ash mixes. The effect of curing was also studied by treating the samples in two curving conditions. A functional relationship of sorptivity against the strength, curing condition and fly ash content has been presented. The results were useful to analyze the factors influencing the durability of cement and fly ash concretes and to explain why some of the previously reported findings were contradictory. Curing conditions have been found to be the most important factor that affected the durability properties of fly ash concrete. When proper curing was provided, a mix with 40% fly ash was found to reduce the sorptivity by 37%. Under inadequate curing the sorptivity was found to increase by 60%. The influence of curing on cement concrete was found to be of much less importance.

  19. A study on high strength concrete prepared with large volumes of low calcium fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Poon, C.S.; Lam, L.; Wong, Y.L.

    2000-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a laboratory study on high strength concrete prepared with large volumes of low calcium fly ash. The parameters studied included compressive strength, heat of hydration, chloride diffusivity, degree of hydration, and pore structures of fly ash/cement concrete and corresponding pastes. The experimental results showed that concrete with a 28-day compressive strength of 80 MPA could be obtained with a water-to-binder (w/b) ratio of 0.24, with a fly ash content of 45%. Such concrete has lower heat of hydration and chloride diffusivity than the equivalent plain cement concrete or concrete prepared with lower fly ash contents. The test results showed that at lower w/b ratios, the contribution to strength by the fly ash was higher than in the mixes prepared with higher w/b ratios. The study also quantified the reaction rates of cement and fly ash in the cementitious materials. The results demonstrated the dual effects of fly ash in concrete: (1) act as a micro-aggregate and (2) being a pozzolana. It was also noted that the strength contribution of fly ash in concrete was better than in the equivalent cement/fly ash pastes suggesting the fly ash had improved the interfacial bond between the past and the aggregates in the concrete. Such an improvement was also reflected in the results of the mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) test.

  20. Hot Water Immersion Quarantine Treatment Against Mediterranean Fruit Fly and Oriental Fruit Fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) Eggs and Larvae in Litchi and Longan Fruits Exported from Hawaii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immersion of litchi fruit in 49ºC water for 20 min followed by hydrocooling in ambient (24 ± 4ºC) temperature water for 20 min was tested as a quarantine treatment against potential infestations of Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann); and oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (...