Science.gov

Sample records for focal bacterial nephritis

  1. Caroli's disease and congenital hepatic fibrosis associated with polycystic kidney disease. A case presenting with acute focal bacterial nephritis.

    PubMed

    Sung, J M; Huang, J J; Lin, X Z; Ruaan, M K; Lin, C Y; Chang, T T; Shu, H F; Chow, N H

    1992-12-01

    Congenital cystic dilatation of the intrahepatic biliary ducts (Caroli's disease), until recently, has been infrequently recognized. It is often associated with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) and congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF). We hereby report a case with Caroli's disease, polycystic kidney disease (PKD), and CHF: This 24-year-old female patient initially presented with acute bacterial nephritis (ABN). Renal ultrasonography revealed bilateral enlarged kidneys with multiple cysts. Because her parents showed no renal cyst on ultrasonographic examination, she received further studies. Abdominal ultrasonography showed cystic dilatation of the biliary tree. Computed tomography (CT) with meglumine lotroxinate (biliscopin) infusion study and hepatobiliary scintigraphy confirmed the diagnosis of Caroli's disease. Liver biopsy revealed CHF: The radiographic and scintigraphic pictures are hereby illustrated and CT with biliscopin infusion study is emphasized. We conclude that if radiologic evidence of renal cystic lesions is absent in the parents of patients with PKD, the coexistence of Caroli's disease and CHF should be considered. The clinical pictures of ABN in this patient are also discussed. As far as we know, this is the first reported case of ABN in a patient with PKD and Caroli's disease, and it showed good response to antibiotic therapy. PMID:1468163

  2. Radionuclide scintigraphy of bacterial nephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, J.J.; Weiss, S.C.; Shkolnik, A.; Yogev, R.; Firlit, C.; Traisman, E.S.

    1984-01-01

    Pyelonephritis is a leading cause of renal failure and is expected to cost as much as three billion dollars in 1984. The diagnosis of urinary tract infection is usually not difficult. However, localization of the infection within the renal parenchyma as opposed to the collecting system is much more difficult. Flank pain, fever, bacteiuria and evidence of parenchymal involvement by intravenous urography may be absent or unrecognized particularly in the infant. Ultrasound and Nuclear Medicine are advocated as better methods to define parenchymal involvement. Such definition is important in the consideration of treatment since parenchymal involvement of the kidney carries a much more ominous potential outcome than infection restricted to within the collecting system. 38 children with a clinical diagnosis of urinary tract infection were studied. 26 of the patients demonstrated abnormal renal parenchymal findings with Gallium-67 Citrate or Tc-99m Glucoheptonate scintigraphy. Intravenous urography was notably ineffective with only 5 of the 20 interpreted as abnormal due to parenchymal disease or decreased function. 11 were entirely normal while only 5 demonstrated scars or hydronephrosis. Only 10 of 17 patients demonstrated intranvesicoureteral reflux on x-ray or nuclear cystography. Ultrasound depicted 6 of 20 patients as having parenchymal abnormalities. Seven were normal. Nonspecific findings such as dilitation of the renal pelvis or renal enlargement was noted in 11 of the 20 patients. Radionuclide Scintigraphy is the most efficacious modality to detect since acute bacterial nephritis.

  3. Focal Targeting of the Bacterial Envelope by Antimicrobial Peptides.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Rafi; Veleba, Mark; Kline, Kimberly A

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are utilized by both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. AMPs such as the human beta defensins, human neutrophil peptides, human cathelicidin, and many bacterial bacteriocins are cationic and capable of binding to anionic regions of the bacterial surface. Cationic AMPs (CAMPs) target anionic lipids [e.g., phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and cardiolipins (CL)] in the cell membrane and anionic components [e.g., lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA)] of the cell envelope. Bacteria have evolved mechanisms to modify these same targets in order to resist CAMP killing, e.g., lysinylation of PG to yield cationic lysyl-PG and alanylation of LTA. Since CAMPs offer a promising therapeutic alternative to conventional antibiotics, which are becoming less effective due to rapidly emerging antibiotic resistance, there is a strong need to improve our understanding about the AMP mechanism of action. Recent literature suggests that AMPs often interact with the bacterial cell envelope at discrete foci. Here we review recent AMP literature, with an emphasis on focal interactions with bacteria, including (1) CAMP disruption mechanisms, (2) delocalization of membrane proteins and lipids by CAMPs, and (3) CAMP sensing systems and resistance mechanisms. We conclude with new approaches for studying the bacterial membrane, e.g., lipidomics, high resolution imaging, and non-detergent-based membrane domain extraction. PMID:27376064

  4. Focal Targeting of the Bacterial Envelope by Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Rafi; Veleba, Mark; Kline, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are utilized by both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. AMPs such as the human beta defensins, human neutrophil peptides, human cathelicidin, and many bacterial bacteriocins are cationic and capable of binding to anionic regions of the bacterial surface. Cationic AMPs (CAMPs) target anionic lipids [e.g., phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and cardiolipins (CL)] in the cell membrane and anionic components [e.g., lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA)] of the cell envelope. Bacteria have evolved mechanisms to modify these same targets in order to resist CAMP killing, e.g., lysinylation of PG to yield cationic lysyl-PG and alanylation of LTA. Since CAMPs offer a promising therapeutic alternative to conventional antibiotics, which are becoming less effective due to rapidly emerging antibiotic resistance, there is a strong need to improve our understanding about the AMP mechanism of action. Recent literature suggests that AMPs often interact with the bacterial cell envelope at discrete foci. Here we review recent AMP literature, with an emphasis on focal interactions with bacteria, including (1) CAMP disruption mechanisms, (2) delocalization of membrane proteins and lipids by CAMPs, and (3) CAMP sensing systems and resistance mechanisms. We conclude with new approaches for studying the bacterial membrane, e.g., lipidomics, high resolution imaging, and non-detergent-based membrane domain extraction. PMID:27376064

  5. Lupus nephritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000481.htm Lupus nephritis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lupus nephritis is a kidney disorder which is a complication ...

  6. Interstitial Nephritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rye-tus) is a kidney disorder. The kidneys filter waste and extra fluid from the body. Interstitial nephritis reduces the kidneys’ ability to filter properly. Interstitial nephritis is a serious condition, but ...

  7. Lupus nephritis: an update.

    PubMed

    Imran, Tasnim F; Yick, Frederick; Verma, Suneet; Estiverne, Christopher; Ogbonnaya-Odor, Chinonye; Thiruvarudsothy, Srikanth; Reddi, Alluru S; Kothari, Neil

    2016-02-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is an inflammatory condition of the kidneys that encompasses various patterns of renal disease including glomerular and tubulointerstitial pathology. It is a major predictor of poor prognosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Genetic factors, including several predisposing loci, and environmental factors, such as EBV and ultraviolet light, have been implicated in the pathogenesis. It carries a high morbidity and mortality if left untreated. Renal biopsy findings are utilized to guide treatment. Optimizing risk factors such as proteinuria and hypertension with renin-angiotensin receptor blockade is crucial. Immunosuppressive therapy is recommended for patients with focal or diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis (Class III or IV) disease, and certain patients with membranous LN (Class V) disease. Over the past decade, immunosuppressive therapies have significantly improved long-term outcomes, but the optimal therapy for LN remains to be elucidated. Cyclophosphamide-based regimens, given concomitantly with corticosteroids, have improved survival significantly. Even though many patients achieve remission, the risk of relapse remains considerably high. Other treatments include hydroxychloroquine, mycofenolate mofetil, and biologic therapies such as Belimumab, Rituximab, and Abatacept. In this paper, we provide a review of LN, including pathogenesis, classification, and clinical manifestations. We will focus, though, on discussion of the established as well as emerging therapies for patients with proliferative and membranous lupus nephritis. PMID:26471017

  8. Escherichia coli alpha-haemolysin induces focal leaks in colonic epithelium: a novel mechanism of bacterial translocation.

    PubMed

    Troeger, Hanno; Richter, Jan F; Beutin, Lothar; Günzel, Dorothee; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Epple, Hans-Jörg; Gitter, Alfred H; Zeitz, Martin; Fromm, Michael; Schulzke, Jörg-Dieter

    2007-10-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) are usually harmless colonizer of the intestinal microflora. However, they are capable to translocate and cause life-threatening disease. Translocation of ExPEC isolates was quantified in colonic monolayers. Transepithelial resistance (R(t)) was monitored and local changes in conductivity analysed with conductance scanning. Confocal microscopy visualized the translocation route. Corroboratory experiments were performed on native rat colon. One translocating strain E. coli O4 was identified. This translocation process was associated with an R(t) decrease (36 +/- 1% of initial resistance) beginning only 2 h after inoculation. The sites of translocation were small defects in epithelial integrity (focal leaks) exhibiting highly increased local ion permeability. Translocation was enhanced by preincubation of monolayers with tumour necrosis factor-alpha or interleukin-13. Mutant strains lacking alpha-haemolysin lost the ability to induce focal leaks, while this effect could be restored by re-introducing the haemolysin determinant. Filtrate of a laboratory strain carrying the alpha-haemolysin operon was sufficient for focal leak induction. In native rat colon, E. coli O4 decreased R(t) and immunohistology demonstrated focal leaks resembling those in cell monolayers. E. coli alpha-haemolysin is able to induce focal leaks in colonic cell cultures as well as in native colon. This process represents a novel route of bacterial translocation facilitated by pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:17587334

  9. Radiation nephritis causing nephrotic syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Jennette, J.C.; Ordonez, N.G.

    1983-12-01

    Clinical symptoms of acute radiation nephritis with nephrotic syndrome developed in a fifty-six-year-old woman after abdominal radiation therapy for an astrocytoma of the spinal cord. The diagnosis of radiation nephritis was confirmed by renal biopsy. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of radiation nephritis associated with nephrotic syndrome.

  10. The mysterious nature of bacterial surface (gliding) motility: A focal adhesion-based mechanism in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Islam, Salim T; Mignot, Tâm

    2015-10-01

    Motility of bacterial cells promotes a range of important physiological phenomena such as nutrient detection, harm avoidance, biofilm formation, and pathogenesis. While much research has been devoted to the mechanism of bacterial swimming in liquid via rotation of flagellar filaments, the mechanisms of bacterial translocation across solid surfaces are poorly understood, particularly when cells lack external appendages such as rotary flagella and/or retractile type IV pili. Under such limitations, diverse bacteria at the single-cell level are still able to "glide" across solid surfaces, exhibiting smooth translocation of the cell along its long axis. Though multiple gliding mechanisms have evolved in different bacterial classes, most remain poorly characterized. One exception is the gliding motility mechanism used by the Gram-negative social predatory bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. The available body of research suggests that M. xanthus gliding motility is mediated by trafficked multi-protein (Glt) cell envelope complexes, powered by proton-driven flagellar stator homologues (Agl). Through coupling to the substratum via polysaccharide slime, Agl-Glt assemblies can become fixed relative to the substratum, forming a focal adhesion site. Continued directional transport of slime-associated substratum-fixed Agl-Glt complexes would result in smooth forward movement of the cell. In this review, we have provided a comprehensive synthesis of the latest mechanistic and structural data for focal adhesion-mediated gliding motility in M. xanthus, with emphasis on the role of each Agl and Glt protein. Finally, we have also highlighted the possible connection between the motility complex and a new type of spore coat assembly system, suggesting that gliding and cell envelope synthetic complexes are evolutionarily linked. PMID:26520023

  11. Karyomegalic Interstitial Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Isnard, Pierre; Rabant, Marion; Labaye, Jacques; Antignac, Corinne; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Zaidan, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Karyomegalic interstitial nephritis is a rare cause of hereditary chronic interstitial nephritis, described for the first time over 40 years ago. A 36-year-old woman, of Turkish origin, presented with chronic kidney disease and high blood pressure. She had a history of recurrent upper respiratory tract infections but no familial history of nephropathy. Physical examination was unremarkable. Laboratory tests showed serum creatinine at 2.3 mg/dL with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 26 mL/min/1.73m2, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and alkaline phosphatase at 3 and 1.5 times the upper normal limit. Urinalysis showed 0.8 g/day of nonselective proteinuria, microscopic hematuria, and aseptic leukocyturia. Immunological tests and tests for human immunodeficiency and hepatitis B and C viruses were negative. Complement level and serum proteins electrophoresis were normal. Analysis of the renal biopsy showed severe interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. Numerous tubular cells had nuclear enlargement with irregular outlines, hyperchromatic aspect, and prominent nucleoli. These findings were highly suggestive of karyomegalic interstitial nephritis, which was further confirmed by exome sequencing of FAN1 gene showing an identified homozygous frameshift mutation due to a one-base-pair deletion in exon 12 (c.2616delA). The present case illustrates a rare but severe cause of hereditary interstitial nephritis, sometimes accompanied by subtle extrarenal manifestations. Identification of mutations in FAN1 gene underscores recent insights linking inadequate DNA repair and susceptibility to chronic kidney disease. PMID:27196444

  12. Granulomatous interstitial nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shivani; Carter-Monroe, Naima; Atta, Mohamed G.

    2015-01-01

    Granulomatous interstitial nephritis (GIN) is a rare entity detected in ∼0.5–0.9% of all renal biopsies. GIN has been linked to several antibiotics such as cephalosporins, vancomycin, nitrofurantoin and ciprofloxacin. It is also associated with NSAIDs and granulomatous disorders such as sarcoidosis, tuberculosis, fungal infections, and granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Renal biopsy is critical in establishing this diagnosis, and the extent of tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis may aid in determining prognosis. Retrospective data and clinical experience suggest that removal of the offending agent in conjunction with corticosteroid therapy often results in improvement in renal function. We describe a patient with a history of multiple spinal surgeries complicated by wound infection who presented with confusion and rash with subsequent development of acute kidney injury. Urinalysis demonstrated pyuria and eosinophiluria, and renal biopsy revealed acute interstitial nephritis with granulomas. These findings were attributed to doxycycline treatment of his wound infection. This review explores the clinical associations, presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of this uncommon cause of acute kidney injury. PMID:26413275

  13. Granulomatous interstitial nephritis.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shivani; Carter-Monroe, Naima; Atta, Mohamed G

    2015-10-01

    Granulomatous interstitial nephritis (GIN) is a rare entity detected in ∼0.5-0.9% of all renal biopsies. GIN has been linked to several antibiotics such as cephalosporins, vancomycin, nitrofurantoin and ciprofloxacin. It is also associated with NSAIDs and granulomatous disorders such as sarcoidosis, tuberculosis, fungal infections, and granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Renal biopsy is critical in establishing this diagnosis, and the extent of tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis may aid in determining prognosis. Retrospective data and clinical experience suggest that removal of the offending agent in conjunction with corticosteroid therapy often results in improvement in renal function. We describe a patient with a history of multiple spinal surgeries complicated by wound infection who presented with confusion and rash with subsequent development of acute kidney injury. Urinalysis demonstrated pyuria and eosinophiluria, and renal biopsy revealed acute interstitial nephritis with granulomas. These findings were attributed to doxycycline treatment of his wound infection. This review explores the clinical associations, presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of this uncommon cause of acute kidney injury. PMID:26413275

  14. Role of Extracellular Matrix Renal Tubulo-interstitial Nephritis Antigen (TINag) in Cell Survival Utilizing Integrin αvβ3/Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK)/Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K)/Protein Kinase B-Serine/Threonine Kinase (AKT) Signaling Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ping; Kondeti, Vinay K.; Lin, Sun; Haruna, Yoshisuke; Raparia, Kirtee; Kanwar, Yashpal S.

    2011-01-01

    Tubulo-interstitial nephritis antigen (TINag) is an extracellular matrix protein expressed in tubular basement membranes. Combined mutations in TINag and nephrocystin-1 genes lead to nephronophthisis with reduced cell survival. Because certain extracellular matrix proteins are known to modulate cell survival, studies were initiated in Lewis rats lacking TINag to assess if they are more susceptible to cisplatin-induced injury. Cisplatin induced a higher degree of tubular cell damage and apoptosis in regions where TINag is expressed in a parental Wistar strain. This was accompanied by an accentuated increase in serum creatinine and Kim-1 RNA and renal expression of Bax, p53, and its nuclear accumulation, mtDNA fragmentation, and a decrease of Bcl-2. Cisplatin induced fulminant apoptosis of HK-2 cells with increased caspase3/7 activity, mtDNA fragmentation, and a reduced cell survival. These effects were partially reversed in cells maintained on TINag substratum. Far Western/solid phase assays established TINag binding with integrin αvβ3 comparable with vitronectin. Transfection of cells with αv-siRNA accentuated cisplatin-induced apoptosis, aberrant translocation of cytochrome c and Bax, and reduced cell survival. The αv-siRNA decreased expression of integrin-recruited focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and p-FAK, while increasing the expression of p53 and p-p53. Similarly, p-AKT was reduced although ILK was unaffected. Inhibition of PI3K had similar adverse cellular effects. These effects were ameliorated in cells on TINag substratum. In vivo, a higher degree of decrease in the expression of p-FAK and pAKT was observed in Lewis rats following cisplatin treatment. These in vivo and in vitro studies demonstrate an essential role of TINag in cellular survival to maintain proper tubular homeostasis utilizing integrin αvβ3 and downstream effectors. PMID:21795690

  15. Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis.

    PubMed

    Ulinski, Tim; Sellier-Leclerc, Anne-Laure; Tudorache, Elena; Bensman, Albert; Aoun, Bilal

    2012-07-01

    Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) is a frequent cause of acute renal failure, characterised by the presence of inflammatory cell infiltrate in the interstitium of the kidney. Immuno-allergic reaction to certain medications, mainly non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics are by far the most important etiology for TIN today, but other situations such as infections, toxins, and vasculitis are known to induce TIN. Incidence of TIN is increasing, probably due to prescription habits and NSAID overuse, representing 3-7% of acute kidney injury in biopsies in children. Avoidance of the causal substance and rapid steroid therapy are hallmarks for patient care, but spontaneous initial recovery is very frequent and the general prognosis seems satisfactory. However, development of chronic TIN, without response to steroid or other immunosuppressive treatment, is possible. As the largest part of TIN is secondary to certain drugs, clear indications in particular for NSAID or antibiotics should be respected to reduce the number of TIN cases. PMID:21638156

  16. Lupus nephritis management guidelines compared.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmus, Suzanne; Bajema, Ingeborg M; Bertsias, George K; Boumpas, Dimitrios T; Gordon, Caroline; Lightstone, Liz; Tesar, Vladimir; Jayne, David R

    2016-06-01

    In the past years, many (randomized) trials have been performed comparing the treatment strategies for lupus nephritis. In 2012, these data were incorporated in six different guidelines for treating lupus nephritis. These guidelines are European, American and internationally based, with one separate guideline for children. They offer information on different aspects of the management of lupus nephritis including induction and maintenance treatment of the different histological classes, adjunctive treatment, monitoring of the patient, definitions of response and relapse, indications for (repeat) renal biopsy, and additional challenges such as the presence of vascular complications, the pregnant SLE patient, treatment in children and adolescents and considerations about end-stage renal disease and transplantation. In this review, we summarize the guidelines, determine the common ground between them, highlight the differences and discuss recent literature. PMID:25920920

  17. Prognostic factors in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Mok, C C

    2005-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogeneous disorder and its renal manifestations are protean. The course and prognosis of lupus nephritis is dependent on a large number of demographic, histopathological, serological, racial, socioeconomic and time dependent factors. Moreover, the initial and maintenance therapeutic regimens may also influence the long term renal outcome. This article reviews the important prognostic factors that have been reported in literature. The management strategy of lupus nephritis should be individualized and based on a composite of these parameters. PMID:15732286

  18. Suspected ciprofloxacin-induced interstitial nephritis.

    PubMed

    Murray, K M; Wilson, M G

    1990-04-01

    Interstitial nephritis is a rare but serious adverse effect of many drugs and usually is diagnosed by clinical signs and symptoms of hematuria, proteinuria, eosinophilia, fever, azotemia, and rash. Ciprofloxacin is one drug that has been reported to cause interstitial nephritis. Renal toxicities have been reported in less than one percent of the patients receiving ciprofloxacin therapy. Limited documentation of this adverse effect exists in the literature. This article describes a patient with suspected ciprofloxacin-induced interstitial nephritis. PMID:2327115

  19. Pro: Cyclophosphamide in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Kallenberg, Cees G M

    2016-07-01

    Based on efficacy and toxicity considerations, both low-dose pulse cyclophosphamide as part of the Euro-Lupus Nephritis protocol and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) with corticosteroids may be considered for induction of remission in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis. The long-term follow-up data available for low-dose pulse cyclophosphamide, the fact that compliance is guaranteed with this regimen and economic issues all favour the Euro-Lupus regimen in this author's opinion. For maintenance treatment, either azathioprine (AZA) or MMF may be used; AZA is preferred in case pregnancy is planned, while MMF is preferred when the disease relapses during use of AZA and, possibly, after successful induction of remission with MMF. PMID:27190359

  20. Focal bacterial meningitis following ascending bite wound infection leading to paraparesis in a captive California sea lion (Zalophus californianus).

    PubMed

    Braun, Veronika; Eskens, Ulrich; Hartmann, Antje; Lang, Barbara; Kramer, Martin; Schmidt, Martin J

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was performed on a 15-yr-old captive female California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) with a 2-wk history of progressive paraparesis and a 9-mo history of exudative skin lesion on the left thoracic wall. Magnetic resonance images showed a well-defined muscle infiltrating lesion ventrolateral to the seventh cervical to the third thoracic vertebra on the left side, which extended through the left intervertebral foramina C7 to T3 into the vertebral canal, causing spinal cord compression and displacement as well as inflammation of the spinal cord and nerves. This lesion surprisingly caused no forelimb deficits. Differential diagnoses included abscess formation or neoplasia. Pathologic examination revealed chronic focal purulent meningitis associated with widespread paraspinal fistulous inflammation originating from a chronic dermal ulcer. Mainly Escherichia coli var. haemolytica and Clostridium perfringens were identified as the underlying agents. PMID:25831587

  1. Monocyte Trafficking to Hepatic Sites of Bacterial Infection Is Chemokine Independent and Directed by Focal Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chao; Velázquez, Peter; Hohl, Tobias M.; Leiner, Ingrid; Dustin, Michael L.; Pamer, Eric G.

    2010-01-01

    Recruitment of CCR2+Ly6Chigh monocytes to sites of infection is essential for efficient clearance of microbial pathogens. Although CCR2-mediated signals promote monocyte emigration from bone marrow, the contribution of CCR2 to later stages of monocyte recruitment remains unresolved. In this article, we show that CCR2 deficiency markedly worsens hepatic Listeria monocytogenes infection because Ly6Chigh monocytes are retained in the bone marrow. Intravenously transferred, CCR2-deficient Ly6Chigh monocytes traffic normally to hepatic foci of infection and contribute to bacterial clearance. Pertussis toxin treatment of adoptively transferred monocytes does not impair their intrahepatic trafficking, suggesting that chemokine signaling, once CCR2+ Ly6Chigh monocytes emigrate from the bone marrow, is not required for monocyte localization to sites of bacterial infection in the liver. Expression of ICAM-1 is induced in close proximity to foci of bacterial infection in the liver, including on CD31+ endothelial cells, and blockade of CD11b and CD44 diminishes monocyte localization to these hepatic foci. Our studies demonstrated that Ly6Chigh monocyte recruitment from the bloodstream to the L. monocytogenes-infected liver does not require chemokine receptor-mediated signals but instead is principally dependent on integrin- and extracellular matrix-mediated monocyte adhesion. PMID:20435926

  2. Polyomavirus-associated nephritis in 2 horses.

    PubMed

    Jennings, S H; Wise, A G; Nickeleit, V; Maes, R K; Cianciolo, R E; Del Piero, F; Law, J M; Kim, Y; McCalla, A C; Breuhaus, B A; Roberts, M C; Linder, K E

    2013-09-01

    Polyomaviruses produce latent and asymptomatic infections in many species, but productive and lytic infections are rare. In immunocompromised humans, polyomaviruses can cause tubulointerstitial nephritis, demyelination, or meningoencephalitis in the central nervous system and interstitial pneumonia. This report describes 2 Standardbred horses with tubular necrosis and tubulointerstitial nephritis associated with productive equine polyomavirus infection that resembles BK polyomavirus nephropathy in immunocompromised humans. PMID:23381926

  3. The small G-protein MglA connects to the MreB actin cytoskeleton at bacterial focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Treuner-Lange, Anke; Macia, Eric; Guzzo, Mathilde; Hot, Edina; Faure, Laura M.; Jakobczak, Beata; Espinosa, Leon; Alcor, Damien; Ducret, Adrien; Keilberg, Daniela; Castaing, Jean Philippe; Lacas Gervais, Sandra; Franco, Michel

    2015-01-01

    In Myxococcus xanthus the gliding motility machinery is assembled at the leading cell pole to form focal adhesions, translocated rearward to propel the cell, and disassembled at the lagging pole. We show that MglA, a Ras-like small G-protein, is an integral part of this machinery. In this function, MglA stimulates the assembly of the motility complex by directly connecting it to the MreB actin cytoskeleton. Because the nucleotide state of MglA is regulated spatially and MglA only binds MreB in the guanosine triphosphate–bound form, the motility complexes are assembled at the leading pole and dispersed at the lagging pole where the guanosine triphosphatase activating protein MglB disrupts the MglA–MreB interaction. Thus, MglA acts as a nucleotide-dependent molecular switch to regulate the motility machinery spatially. The function of MreB in motility is independent of its function in peptidoglycan synthesis, representing a coopted function. Our findings highlight a new function for the MreB cytoskeleton and suggest that G-protein–cytoskeleton interactions are a universally conserved feature. PMID:26169353

  4. The small G-protein MglA connects to the MreB actin cytoskeleton at bacterial focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Treuner-Lange, Anke; Macia, Eric; Guzzo, Mathilde; Hot, Edina; Faure, Laura M; Jakobczak, Beata; Espinosa, Leon; Alcor, Damien; Ducret, Adrien; Keilberg, Daniela; Castaing, Jean Philippe; Lacas Gervais, Sandra; Franco, Michel; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Mignot, Tâm

    2015-07-20

    In Myxococcus xanthus the gliding motility machinery is assembled at the leading cell pole to form focal adhesions, translocated rearward to propel the cell, and disassembled at the lagging pole. We show that MglA, a Ras-like small G-protein, is an integral part of this machinery. In this function, MglA stimulates the assembly of the motility complex by directly connecting it to the MreB actin cytoskeleton. Because the nucleotide state of MglA is regulated spatially and MglA only binds MreB in the guanosine triphosphate-bound form, the motility complexes are assembled at the leading pole and dispersed at the lagging pole where the guanosine triphosphatase activating protein MglB disrupts the MglA-MreB interaction. Thus, MglA acts as a nucleotide-dependent molecular switch to regulate the motility machinery spatially. The function of MreB in motility is independent of its function in peptidoglycan synthesis, representing a coopted function. Our findings highlight a new function for the MreB cytoskeleton and suggest that G-protein-cytoskeleton interactions are a universally conserved feature. PMID:26169353

  5. Rethinking biologics in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Venuturupalli, S

    2016-09-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a chronic and devastating complication of systemic lupus erythematosus. Despite advances in our understanding of LN and the availability of effective therapies, LN remains a difficult clinical problem, and progression to end stage renal disease remains a significant challenge. Though the advent of biologics has revolutionized the treatment of many rheumatological conditions, and several clinical trials of biologics have been conducted in LN, the promise of biologics remains unfulfilled. The experience gained from these initial clinical trials can help tailor approaches in future clinical trials, and the lessons learned can be applied to find a cure for this condition. PMID:27497255

  6. Immunologic Observations in Canine Interstitial Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Krohn, Kai; Mero, Matti; Oksanen, Aili; Sandholm, Markus

    1971-01-01

    Immunofluorescence studies in cases of chronic interstitial nephritis (CIN) in the dog demonstrated deposition of canine IgC and C'3 in the thickened capillary walls of the glomeruli and in the mesangium. Eluates obtained from the nephritic kidneys contained antibodies of IgG type and reacted with autologous or homologous nephritic kidneys but not with normal kidneys or with any normal canine tissue. The staining pattern of fluorescein-conjugated eluates was similar to that obtained with anti-canine IgG or anti-canine C'3. The eluates did not contain leptospiral antibodies. The findings indicate that complement-fixing immune complexes are deposited in the damaged glomeruli in CIN. The nature of the antigen involved in these complexes is unknown, but it does not seem to be a component of normal canine tissue and could thus be viral or bacterial. ImagesFig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 8Fig 13Fig 14Fig 15Fig 16Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11Fig 12Fig 1Fig 2Fig 3Fig 4 PMID:4106382

  7. Sildenafil Induced Acute Interstitial Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Burkhart, Ryan; Shah, Nina; Lewin, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is characterized by inflammation of the renal interstitium and usually occurs in a temporal relationship with the medication. We present a case of an Asian male who had nephrotic range proteinuria and presented with acute kidney injury. The patient reported an acute change in physical appearance and symptomatology after the ingestion of a single dose of sildenafil. Renal biopsy was notable for minimal change disease (MCD) with acute and chronic interstitial nephritis. Renal replacement and glucocorticoid therapy were initiated. Renal recovery within six weeks permitted discontinuation of dialysis. AIN superimposed on MCD is a known association of NSAID induced nephropathy. The temporal association and the absence of any new drugs suggest that the AIN was most likely due to the sildenafil. NSAIDs are less likely to have caused the AIN given their remote use. The ease of steroid responsiveness would also suggest another cause as NSAID induced AIN is often steroid resistant. The MCD was most likely idiopathic given the lack of temporal association with a secondary cause. As the number of sildenafil prescriptions increases, more cases of AIN may be identified and physician awareness for this potential drug disease association is necessary. PMID:26491581

  8. Granulomatous interstitial nephritis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, Sjoerd A M E G; Christiaans, Maarten H L; Abdul-Hamid, Myrurgia A; Stifft, Frank; Damoiseaux, Jan G M C; van Paassen, Pieter

    2016-08-01

    Granulomatous interstitial nephritis has been observed in <1% of native renal biopsies. Here, we describe two patients with granulomatous interstitial nephritis in relation to Crohn's disease. Circulating helper and cytotoxic T cells were highly activated, and both cell types predominated in the interstitial infiltrate, indicating a cellular autoimmune response. After immunosuppressive treatment, renal function either improved or stabilized in both patients. In conclusion, granulomatous interstitial nephritis is a genuine extraintestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease, the treatment of which should include immunosuppressive agents. PMID:27478596

  9. A novel in vitro bovine cartilage punch model for assessing the regeneration of focal cartilage defects with biocompatible bacterial nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Current therapies for articular cartilage defects fail to achieve qualitatively sufficient tissue regeneration, possibly because of a mismatch between the speed of cartilage rebuilding and the resorption of degradable implant polymers. The present study focused on the self-healing capacity of resident cartilage cells in conjunction with cell-free and biocompatible (but non-resorbable) bacterial nanocellulose (BNC). This was tested in a novel in vitro bovine cartilage punch model. Methods Standardized bovine cartilage discs with a central defect filled with BNC were cultured for up to eight weeks with/without stimulation with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1. Cartilage formation and integrity were analyzed by histology, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Content, release and neosynthesis of the matrix molecules proteoglycan/aggrecan, collagen II and collagen I were also quantified. Finally, gene expression of these molecules was profiled in resident chondrocytes and chondrocytes migrated onto the cartilage surface or the implant material. Results Non-stimulated and especially TGF-β1-stimulated cartilage discs displayed a preserved structural and functional integrity of the chondrocytes and surrounding matrix, remained vital in long-term culture (eight weeks) without signs of degeneration and showed substantial synthesis of cartilage-specific molecules at the protein and mRNA level. Whereas mobilization of chondrocytes from the matrix onto the surface of cartilage and implant was pivotal for successful seeding of cell-free BNC, chondrocytes did not immigrate into the central BNC area, possibly due to the relatively small diameter of its pores (2 to 5 μm). Chondrocytes on the BNC surface showed signs of successful redifferentiation over time, including increase of aggrecan/collagen type II mRNA, decrease of collagen type I mRNA and initial deposition of proteoglycan and collagen type II in long-term high-density pellet cultures

  10. 38 CFR 4.115 - Nephritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., however, absence of a kidney is the sole renal disability, even if removal was required because of nephritis, the absent kidney and any hypertension or heart disease will be separately rated. Also, in...

  11. 38 CFR 4.115 - Nephritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., however, absence of a kidney is the sole renal disability, even if removal was required because of nephritis, the absent kidney and any hypertension or heart disease will be separately rated. Also, in...

  12. 38 CFR 4.115 - Nephritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., however, absence of a kidney is the sole renal disability, even if removal was required because of nephritis, the absent kidney and any hypertension or heart disease will be separately rated. Also, in...

  13. 38 CFR 4.115 - Nephritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., however, absence of a kidney is the sole renal disability, even if removal was required because of nephritis, the absent kidney and any hypertension or heart disease will be separately rated. Also, in...

  14. 38 CFR 4.115 - Nephritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., however, absence of a kidney is the sole renal disability, even if removal was required because of nephritis, the absent kidney and any hypertension or heart disease will be separately rated. Also, in...

  15. Treatment of intractable lupus nephritis with total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Strober, S.; Field, E.; Hoppe, R.T.; Kotzin, B.L.; Shemesh, O.; Engleman, E.; Ross, J.C.; Myers, B.D.

    1985-04-01

    Ten patients with lupus nephritis and marked proteinuria (3.9 g or more/d) that did not respond adequately to treatment with prednisone alone or prednisone in combination with azathioprine were treated with total lymphoid irradiation in an uncontrolled feasibility study. Within 6 weeks after the start of total lymphoid irradiation, the serum albumin level rose in all patients in association with a reduction in the serum level of anti-DNA antibodies, an increase in the serum complement level, or both. Improvement in these variables persisted in eight patients followed for more than 1 year, with the stabilization or reduction of the serum creatinine level. Urinary leakage of albumin was substantially reduced in all patients. Side effects associated with radiotherapy included transient constitutional complaints in ten patients, transient blood element depressions in three, localized viral and bacterial infections in four, and ovarian failure in one. The results suggest that total lymphoid irradiation may provide an alternative to cytotoxic drugs in the treatment of lupus nephritis.

  16. Development of tertiary lymphoid structures in the kidneys of pigs with chronic leptospiral nephritis.

    PubMed

    Pezzolato, M; Maina, E; Lonardi, S; Bozzetta, E; Grassi, F; Scanziani, E; Radaelli, E

    2012-01-15

    Tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs) are structures that are morphologically and functionally similar to secondary lymphoid organs. TLOs usually arise in a background of chronic inflammation. Several histological patterns of interstitial nephritis have been documented in porcine leptospirosis. Among them the lympho-follicular pattern is characterized by infiltrates of mononuclear cells organized in lymphoid follicle-like structures. Immunohistological analysis of 5 cases of porcine lympho-follicular nephritis associated with Leptospira Pomona infection demonstrated the presence of inflammatory cell populations, including B cells, T cells, macrophages and follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), which were compartmentalized as in TLOs. Immunohistochemistry for Leptospira Pomona revealed an intimate association between leptospiral antigen and FDCs. Overexpression of MHCII in different populations of both professional and non-professional antigen presenting cells was also demonstrated. FDCs play role during TLOs induction for their ability to retain non-self antigens in the form of immune complexes, thus causing persistent T cell activation, generation of a complex cytokine network and stimulation of humoral immunity. Sustained bacterial antigen presentation in the context of chronic leptospiral nephritis, may also lead to autoimmune mechanisms involved in the generation of TLOs. Whether lymphoid neogenesis and TLOs play a protective role in porcine leptospiral nephritis is still unclear. PMID:22227076

  17. The Role of Autophagy in Lupus Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linlin; Law, Helen Ka Wai

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease characterized by the generation of immune responses to self-antigens. Lupus nephritis is one of the most common and severe complications in SLE patients. Though the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis has been studied extensively, unresolved questions are still left and new therapeutic methods are needed for disease control. Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process through which cytoplasmic constituents can be degraded in lysosome and reused. Autophagy plays vital roles in maintaining cell homeostasis and is involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases. In particular, autophagy can affect almost all parts of the immune system and is involved in autoimmune diseases. Based on genetic analysis, cell biology, and mechanism studies of the classic and innovative therapeutic drugs, there are growing lines of evidence suggesting the relationship between autophagy and lupus nephritis. In the present review, we summarize the recent publications investigating the relationship between autophagy and lupus nephritis and provide a new perspective towards the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. PMID:26506346

  18. The Role of Autophagy in Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Linlin; Law, Helen Ka Wai

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease characterized by the generation of immune responses to self-antigens. Lupus nephritis is one of the most common and severe complications in SLE patients. Though the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis has been studied extensively, unresolved questions are still left and new therapeutic methods are needed for disease control. Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process through which cytoplasmic constituents can be degraded in lysosome and reused. Autophagy plays vital roles in maintaining cell homeostasis and is involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases. In particular, autophagy can affect almost all parts of the immune system and is involved in autoimmune diseases. Based on genetic analysis, cell biology, and mechanism studies of the classic and innovative therapeutic drugs, there are growing lines of evidence suggesting the relationship between autophagy and lupus nephritis. In the present review, we summarize the recent publications investigating the relationship between autophagy and lupus nephritis and provide a new perspective towards the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. PMID:26506346

  19. Natural history of "silent" lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, W M; Bardana, E J; Norman, D J; Houghton, D C

    1982-05-01

    Twenty patients with systemic lupus erythematosus but without evident renal involvement previously underwent percutaneous renal biopsy. Findings revealed almost universal pathologic evidence of nephritis. Included were three patients who had diffuse proliferative changes and five who had subendothelial electron dense deposits. Only four patients developed clinical renal disease during the follow-up period while no patient died or required dialysis. Using the Life Table Method, the cumulative percentage of patients free from any clinical renal disease was over 60% at 10 yr from the time of diagnosis of systemic lupus, and at 8 yr from the time of the original biopsy. It is concluded that silent lupus nephritis, regardless of histologic subtype, has a favorable prognosis. These data may not be applicable to patients with similar biopsies who have evidence of clinical lupus nephritis. PMID:7091151

  20. The persistent challenge of lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Valesini, Guido; Conti, Fabrizio

    2011-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus has long been considered the prototypic autoimmune disease. Although the etiology remains enigmatic, there has been vigorous definition of the clinical features and the natural history. In this issue, we review the persistent challenge of lupus nephritis and, in particular, features of diagnosis as well as treatment options. It is clear that major therapeutic advances have occurred but there is still a considerable unmet need in the population. This issue does not review all the clinical problems of lupus nephritis, but rather attempts to place the most recent data in perspective for the clinician. PMID:20811786

  1. Antiphospholipid Antibodies in Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Arnaud, Laurent; Gerhardsson, Jakob; Zickert, Agneta; Sundelin, Birgitta; Malmström, Vivianne; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Gunnarsson, Iva

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It remains unclear whether antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) alter the course of LN. We thus investigated the impact of aPL on short-term and long-term renal outcomes in patients with LN. We assessed levels of aPL cross-sectionally in SLE patients diagnosed with (n = 204) or without (n = 294) LN, and prospectively in 64 patients with active biopsy-proven LN (52 proliferative, 12 membranous), before and after induction treatment (short-term outcomes). Long-term renal outcome in the prospective LN cohort was determined by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) stage, after a median follow-up of 11.3 years (range: 3.3–18.8). Cross-sectional analysis revealed no association between LN and IgG/IgM anticardiolipin or anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies, or lupus anticoagulant. Both aPL positivity and levels were similar in patients with active LN and non-renal SLE. Following induction treatment for LN, serum IgG/IgM aPL levels decreased in responders (p<0.005 for all), but not in non-responders. Both at active LN and post-treatment, patients with IgG, but not IgM, aPL had higher creatinine levels compared with patients without IgG aPL. Neither aPL positivity nor levels were associated with changes in eGFR from either baseline or post-treatment through long-term follow-up. Moreover, aPL positivity and levels both at baseline and post-treatment were similar in patients with a CKD stage ≥3 versus 1–2 at the last follow-up. In conclusion, neither aPL positivity nor levels were found to be associated with the occurrence of LN in SLE patients. However, IgG aPL positivity in LN patients was associated with a short-term impairment of the renal function while no effect on long-term renal outcome was observed. Furthermore, IgG and IgM aPL levels decreased following induction treatment only in responders, indicating that aPL levels are affected by

  2. Antiphospholipid Antibodies in Lupus Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Parodis, Ioannis; Arnaud, Laurent; Gerhardsson, Jakob; Zickert, Agneta; Sundelin, Birgitta; Malmström, Vivianne; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Gunnarsson, Iva

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It remains unclear whether antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) alter the course of LN. We thus investigated the impact of aPL on short-term and long-term renal outcomes in patients with LN. We assessed levels of aPL cross-sectionally in SLE patients diagnosed with (n = 204) or without (n = 294) LN, and prospectively in 64 patients with active biopsy-proven LN (52 proliferative, 12 membranous), before and after induction treatment (short-term outcomes). Long-term renal outcome in the prospective LN cohort was determined by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) stage, after a median follow-up of 11.3 years (range: 3.3-18.8). Cross-sectional analysis revealed no association between LN and IgG/IgM anticardiolipin or anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies, or lupus anticoagulant. Both aPL positivity and levels were similar in patients with active LN and non-renal SLE. Following induction treatment for LN, serum IgG/IgM aPL levels decreased in responders (p<0.005 for all), but not in non-responders. Both at active LN and post-treatment, patients with IgG, but not IgM, aPL had higher creatinine levels compared with patients without IgG aPL. Neither aPL positivity nor levels were associated with changes in eGFR from either baseline or post-treatment through long-term follow-up. Moreover, aPL positivity and levels both at baseline and post-treatment were similar in patients with a CKD stage ≥3 versus 1-2 at the last follow-up. In conclusion, neither aPL positivity nor levels were found to be associated with the occurrence of LN in SLE patients. However, IgG aPL positivity in LN patients was associated with a short-term impairment of the renal function while no effect on long-term renal outcome was observed. Furthermore, IgG and IgM aPL levels decreased following induction treatment only in responders, indicating that aPL levels are affected by

  3. Radiation nephritis. Clinical manifestations and pathophysiologic mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Krochak, R.J.; Baker, D.G.

    1986-05-01

    Radiation nephritis is both volume and dose related. Clinical experience would indicate that a minimum of one third of the renal volume needs to be excluded from nephrotoxic doses which appears to have a threshold of 2,000 cGy. The site of damage leading to renal failure appears to be the microvasculature ultimately expressed as glomerulosclerosis. How much direct damage to the tubular system contributes to this process is unclear, but undoubtedly the resultant systemic physiologic effects potentiate the expression of damage in the irradiated kidney. The acute syndrome, with all the potential manifestations of renal failure, rarely presents sooner than six months and appears to have no clear prodrome, although it would seem reasonable that a subclinical syndrome consisting of abnormalities detectable by urinalysis may occur. Treatment of radiation-induced nephritis or hypertension is no different from treatment for nephritis from any other cause and should be aggressive with lifelong follow-up. Carcinogenesis is a rare late expression of radiation-induced kidney damage. 25 references.

  4. Moderator's view: Cyclophosphamide in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Tesar, Vladimir

    2016-07-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil was recently accepted as the effective induction treatment of lupus nephritis, with the potential to replace cyclophosphamide or at least expand our therapeutic armamentarium in patients with this lifelong disease often requiring repeated induction treatment of its relapses. Compared with cyclophosphamide, mycophenolate may be more effective in black patients, and the risk of gonadotoxicity may be significantly lower in mycophenolate-treated subjects. However, experience with mycophenolate in severe lupus nephritis is still limited and we also have insufficient data on the long-term outcome of mycophenolate-treated patients. Treatment with mycophenolate is more expensive than with cyclophosphamide, which may limit its use, especially in low- and middle-income countries. The efficacy of mycophenolate mofetil may be more dependent on the patient's compliance compared with intravenous cyclophosphamide pulses. Low-dose cyclophosphamide remains an effective and relatively safe induction treatment of active lupus nephritis, but to decrease its cumulative toxicity, repeated exposure to cyclophosphamide in relapsing patients should be (if possible) avoided. PMID:27190357

  5. Failure of Gallium-67 scintigraphy to identify reliably noninfectious interstitial nephritis: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, G.D.; Lundy, M.M.; Moreno, A.J.

    1983-07-01

    Gallium-67 scintigraphy has been reported to be useful in the diagnosis of noninfectious interstitial nephritis. We studied 12 patients with Ga-67 citrate that were diagnosed as having noninfectious interstitial nephritis on renal biopsy. Only seven of the twelve patients with interstitial nephritis on biopsy were scan-positive. Gallium-67 scintigraphy may not reliably identify noninfectious interstitial nephritis.

  6. Ofatumumab treatment in lupus nephritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Haarhaus, Malena Loberg; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Gunnarsson, Iva

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab is frequently used in systemic lupus erythematosus; however, side effects such as infusion-related reactions limit its use. In this case report, we describe, for the first time, treatment with ofatumumab in four patients with lupus nephritis. The treatment was well tolerated in three of the patients, and a reduction of proteinuria was seen in all cases. This emphasizes the importance of alternative B-cell-depleting therapies in patients with an initial good response to rituximab, but who develop side effects. PMID:27478595

  7. Tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis: an immunological disorder?

    PubMed

    Birnbacher, R; Balzar, E; Aufricht, C; Schmaldienst, S; Woloszczuk, W; Förster, E

    1995-04-01

    A 14-year-old boy with tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis (TINU syndrome) is described. Nephropathy improved without systemic cortisone treatment, whereas uveitis relapsed and was treated with topical steroids. Blood cell immunological analysis and serum analysis revealed signs of cytotoxic T-cell, macrophage and granulocyte activation, which declined as the clinical symptoms improved. This may be interpreted as an indication of their significance as markers in the pathogenesis of this syndrome or as part of a microbial-triggered immune response. PMID:7794717

  8. RECENT CLINICAL TRIALS IN LUPUS NEPHRITIS

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Recent clinical trials have provided evidence for the efficacy of low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide and mycophenolate mofetil as induction treatment for patients with proliferative lupus nephritis in comparative trials with standard-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide. Trials of maintenance treatments have had more variable results, but suggest that mycophenolate mofetil may be similar to quarterly standard-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide and somewhat more efficacious than azathioprine. Differential responses to mycophenolate mofetil based on ethnicity suggest that it may be more effective in black and Hispanic patients. Rituximab was not efficacious as an adjunct to induction treatment with mycophenolate mofetil. PMID:25034160

  9. Ofatumumab treatment in lupus nephritis patients.

    PubMed

    Haarhaus, Malena Loberg; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Gunnarsson, Iva

    2016-08-01

    Rituximab is frequently used in systemic lupus erythematosus; however, side effects such as infusion-related reactions limit its use. In this case report, we describe, for the first time, treatment with ofatumumab in four patients with lupus nephritis. The treatment was well tolerated in three of the patients, and a reduction of proteinuria was seen in all cases. This emphasizes the importance of alternative B-cell-depleting therapies in patients with an initial good response to rituximab, but who develop side effects. PMID:27478595

  10. Novel Autoantigens Associated with Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Sachiko; Adnan, Endy; Ishizaki, Jun; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Tanaka, Yuki; Matsumoto, Takuya; Suemori, Koichiro; Shudou, Masachika; Okura, Takafumi; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Yasukawa, Masaki; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by production of a variety of autoantibodies. Although anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibodies contribute to the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis (LN), they are not sufficient for diagnosis and evaluation of disease activity. To obtain other autoantibodies associated with LN, we screened autoantigens reacting with the sera of LN patients by using an N-terminal biotinylated protein library created from a wheat cell-free protein production system. We screened 17 proteins that showed higher positive signals in the active phase than in the inactive phase of SLE, and higher positive signals in the serum of SLE patient with nephritis than in that of patient without nephritis. Of these, two LN-associated autoantigens, ribosomal RNA-processing protein 8 (RRP8) and spermatid nuclear transition protein 1 (TNP1) were identified by immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence of renal tissues. Circulating anti-RRP8 and anti-TNP1 autoantibodies were recognized and deposited as an immune complex (IC) in glomeruli. IC was deposited preferentially in glomeruli rather than in other organs in C57BL/6 mice injected with RRP8 or TNP1. ELISA analysis of sera from patients with various rheumatic diseases demonstrated reactivity for RRP8 and TNP1 in 20% and 14.7% of SLE patients, respectively, whereas there was little or no reactivity in patients with other rheumatic diseases. Among SLE patients, 63.6% and 45.5% of those with LN were positive for anti-RRP8 and anti-TNP1 antibodies, compared with 12.5% and 9.4% of SLE patients without nephritis, respectively. Both proteins are cationic, and their respective antibodies did not cross-react with dsDNA. These proteins released from apoptotic cells form ICs with each autoantibody, and their ICs may become trapped at anionic sites in the glomerular basement membrane, leading to deposition in glomeruli. These autoantibodies may be useful for prediction of LN in subsets of SLE patients who

  11. A prospective multicentre study of mycophenolate mofetil combined with prednisolone as induction therapy in 213 patients with active lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    F, Lu; Y, Tu; X, Peng; L, Wang; H, Wang; Z, Sun; H, Zheng; Z, Hu

    2008-07-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) with prednisolone has been associated with high remission rates when used as induction treatment for lupus nephritis. This prospective, multicentre, cohort study investigates the efficacy and safety of this regimen over 24 weeks in 213 Chinese patients with active lupus nephritis (Classes III, IV, V or combination). Baseline activity index (AI) was 6.91+/-3.33 and chronicity index (CI) was 1.9+/-1.2. The remission rate was 82.6% at 24 weeks (complete remission, 34.3%; partial remission, 48.4%). There were significant (P<0.01) improvements in kidney function shown by reductions in proteinuria, serum albumin, serum creatinine and creatinine clearance, as well as in systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index (SLEDAI) scores. Independent risk factors influencing remission were pathological classification (including Class V and III or Class V and IV nephritis) and elevated serum creatinine at baseline (OR 2.967, 95% CI: 1.479-6.332, P=0.001 and OR 1.007, 95% CI: 1.002-1.011, P=0.001, respectively). Patients with concomitant membranous features on biopsy had a lower remission rate than those with Class III and IV nephritis (66.7% vs 87.3%, P=0.002). Renal biopsy was repeated in 25 patients following treatment. There was a transition to less severe pathological morphologies in majority of subjects. Infections were monitored throughout treatment: eight patients (3.8%) experienced bacterial infections, whereas herpes zoster occurred in seven patients. Nine patients (4.2%) suffered from gastrointestinal upset, which resolved without discontinuation of MMF. One patient became leucopenic, whereas another died from active disease unrelated to kidney symptoms. MMF combined with prednisolone is an effective and well-tolerated induction treatment for patients with active lupus nephritis and for controlling SLE systemic activity. PMID:18625634

  12. ABIN1 Dysfunction as a Genetic Basis for Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Caster, Dawn J.; Korte, Erik A.; Nanda, Sambit K.; McLeish, Kenneth R.; Oliver, Rebecca K.; G'Sell, Rachel T.; Sheehan, Ryan M.; Freeman, Darrell W.; Coventry, Susan C.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Guthridge, Joel M.; James, Judith A.; Sivils, Kathy L.; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.; Scofield, R. Hal; Adrianto, Indra; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Stevens, Anne M.; Freedman, Barry I.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Tsao, Betty P.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Kamen, Diane L.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Alarcon, Graciela S.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Martin, Javier; Merrill, Joan T.; Harley, John B.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Reveille, John D.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Vila, Luis M.; Petri, Michelle; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Boackle, Susan A.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Niewold, Timothy B.; Cohen, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The genetic factors underlying the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus are largely unknown, although animal studies indicate that nuclear factor (NF)-κB is involved. We reported previously that a knockin mouse expressing an inactive form of ABIN1 (ABIN1[D485N]) develops lupus-like autoimmune disease and demonstrates enhanced activation of NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases in immune cells after toll-like receptor stimulation. In the current study, we show that ABIN1[D485N] mice develop progressive GN similar to class III and IV lupus nephritis in humans. To investigate the clinical relevance of ABIN1 dysfunction, we genotyped five single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the gene encoding ABIN1, TNIP1, in samples from European-American, African American, Asian, Gullah, and Hispanic participants in the Large Lupus Association Study 2. Comparing cases of systemic lupus erythematosus with nephritis and cases of systemic lupus erythematosus without nephritis revealed strong associations with lupus nephritis at rs7708392 in European Americans and rs4958881 in African Americans. Comparing cases of systemic lupus erythematosus with nephritis and healthy controls revealed a stronger association at rs7708392 in European Americans but not at rs4958881 in African Americans. Our data suggest that variants in the TNIP1 gene are associated with the risk for lupus nephritis and could be mechanistically involved in disease development via aberrant regulation of NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase activity. PMID:23970121

  13. Treatment of young patients with lupus nephritis using calcineurin inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tsuruga, Kazushi; Aizawa-Yashiro, Tomomi; Watanabe, Shojiro; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in the management of lupus nephritis, together with earlier renal biopsy and selective use of aggressive immunosuppressive therapy, have contributed to a favorable outcome in children and adolescents with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Nevertheless, we believe that a more effective and less toxic treatment is needed to attain an optimal control of the activity of lupus nephritis. Recent published papers and our experiences regarding treatment of young patients with lupus nephritis using calcineurin inhibitors are reviewed. Although it has been reported that intermittent monthly pulses of intravenous cyclophosphamide (IVCY) are effective for preserving renal function in adult patients, CPA is a potent immunosuppressive agent that induces severe toxicity, including myelo- and gonadal toxicity, and increases the risk of secondary malignancy. Thus, treatment for controlling lupus nephritis activity, especially in children and adolescents, remains challenging. Cyclosporine A (CsA) and tacrolimus (Tac) are T-cell-specific calcineurin inhibitors that prevent the activation of helper T cells, thereby inhibiting the transcription of the early activation genes of interleukin (IL)-2 and suppressing T cell-induced activation of tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β and IL-6. Therefore, both drugs, which we believe may be less cytotoxic, are attractive therapeutic options for young patients with lupus nephritis. Recently, a multidrug regimen of prednisolone (PDN), Tac, and mycophenolate mofetile (MMF) has been found effective and relatively safe in adult lupus nephritis. Since the mechanisms of action of MMF and Tac are probably complementary, multidrug therapy for lupus nephritis may be useful. We propose as an alternative to IVCY, a multidrug therapy with mizoribine, which acts very similarly to MMF, and Tac, which has a different mode of action, combined with PDN for pediatric-onset lupus nephritis. We also believe that a multidrug therapy including CsA and

  14. Fatal suppurative nephritis caused by Pseudomonas in a chimpanzee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Migaki, G.; Asher, D.M.; Casey, H.W.; Locke, L.N.; Gibbs, C.J.; Gajdusek, C.

    1979-01-01

    Reports of nephritis in chimpanzees are relatively rare, compared with those in other nonhuman primates. McClure and Guilloud reported chronic pyelonephritis in a 35-year-old female chimpanzee; Schmidt and Butler reported glomerulonephritis in an 11-year-old female chimpanzee, and Kim reported on a 12-year-old male with subacute interstitial nephritis in a chimpanzee after the animal had recurrent hemolysis due to phenolic intoxication. The present report deals with supprative nephritis caused by Pseudomonas resulting in renal failure in a chimpanzee.

  15. A diagnostic dilemma: lupus nephritis or renal polyarteritis nodosa?

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Shashi; Abreo, Kenneth; Rodziewicz, Natalie; Gu, Xin; Singh, Neeraj

    2016-07-01

    Lupus nephritis and renal polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) are two distinct disorders that rarely overlap. Herein, we describe a patient who was initially diagnosed with lupus nephritis based on her clinical presentation, proteinuria, hematuria, positive anti-nuclear antibody, and a kidney biopsy. A month later, the patient presented with left flank pain and weakness. A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis showed a perinephric hematoma and the renal arteriogram revealed numerous microaneurysms within the kidney consistent with renal PAN. This case elucidates the diagnostic and management dilemmas that confront physicians taking care of patients with overlapping features of lupus nephritis and renal PAN and also points to the possible role of lupus nephritis in pathogenesis of renal PAN. PMID:27055352

  16. Intravenous Immunoglobulin in the Management of Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Wenderfer, Scott E.; Thacker, Trisha

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of nephritis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The pathogenesis of lupus nephritis is complex, involving innate and adaptive cellular and humoral immune responses. Autoantibodies in particular have been shown to be critical in the initiation and progression of renal injury, via interactions with both Fc-receptors and complement. One approach in the management of patients with lupus nephritis has been the use of intravenous immunoglobulin. This therapy has shown benefit in the setting of many forms of autoantibody-mediated injury; however, the mechanisms of efficacy are not fully understood. In this paper, the data supporting the use of immunoglobulin therapy in lupus nephritis will be evaluated. In addition, the potential mechanisms of action will be discussed with respect to the known involvement of complement and Fc-receptors in the kidney parenchyma. Results are provocative and warrant additional clinical trials. PMID:23056926

  17. Con: Cyclophosphamide for the treatment of lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Mok, Chi Chiu

    2016-07-01

    Kidney involvement is a major determinant for morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The treatment target of lupus renal disease is to induce and maintain remission and to minimize disease or treatment-related comorbidities. Cyclophosphamide (CYC), in conjunction with glucocorticoids, has conventionally been used for the initial treatment of lupus nephritis. However, the major concerns of CYC are its toxicities, such as infertility, urotoxicity and oncogenicity, which are particularly relevant in women of childbearing age. As a result, maintenance therapy of lupus nephritis with an extended course of CYC pulses has largely been replaced by other immunosuppressive agents such as mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and azathioprine. Recent randomized controlled trials have demonstrated non-inferiority of MMF to pulse CYC as induction therapy of lupus nephritis. Although MMF as induction-maintenance therapy has been increasingly used in lupus nephritis, its efficacy in the long-term preservation of renal function remains to be elucidated. MMF is not necessarily less toxic than CYC. Meta-analyses of clinical trials show similar incidence of infective complications and gastrointestinal adverse events in both MMF- and CYC-based regimens. However, considering the reduction in gonadal toxicity and the risk of oncogenicity, MMF may be used as first-line therapy of lupus nephritis. Tacrolimus (TAC) has recently been shown to be equivalent to either MMF or CYC for inducing remission of lupus nephritis and may be considered as another non-CYC alternative. Combined low-dose MMF and TAC appears to be more effective than CYC pulses in Chinese patients with lupus nephritis and has the potential to replace the more toxic CYC regimens in high-risk patients. Currently, CYC still plays an important role in the management of lupus nephritis patients with impaired or rapidly deteriorating renal function, crescentic glomerulonephritis or as salvage therapy for

  18. A Rare Presentation of Lupus Nephritis Flare up with Posterior Reversible Leucoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Mani, S Hima; Shivaprasad, S M; Umesh, L

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with various neurologic or psychiatric abnormalities and Posterior Reversible Leuco Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) is very rare neurological manifestation in SLE. PRES is associated with various clinical manifestations, like, seizures, visual loss, headaches, vomiting altered mental status and rarely focal neurological deficits. Other predisposing condition associated with PRES is eclampsia, accelerated hypertension, uraemia, transplantation, autoimmune diseases and/or use of immunosuppressive drugs. It is important to recognise PRES since it is a potentially reversible. We describe an unusual case of PRES caused by uraemia during lupus flare up in a patient with biopsy proven class IV lupus nephritis who presented with features of asymmetrical quadriparesis which completely reversed after haemodialysis sessions and treating lupus flare up. In our case she presented with quadriparesis which is a rare presentation and hypertensive encephalopathy was not present. PMID:26894110

  19. Lupus Nephritis: An Overview of Recent Findings

    PubMed Central

    de Zubiria Salgado, Alberto; Herrera-Diaz, Catalina

    2012-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is one of the most serious complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) since it is the major predictor of poor prognosis. In susceptible individuals suffering of SLE, in situ formation and deposit of immune complexes (ICs) from apoptotic bodies occur in the kidneys as a result of an amplified epitope immunological response. IC glomerular deposits generate release of proinflammatory cytokines and cell adhesion molecules causing inflammation. This leads to monocytes and polymorphonuclear cells chemotaxis. Subsequent release of proteases generates endothelial injury and mesangial proliferation. Presence of ICs promotes adaptive immune response and causes dendritic cells to release type I interferon. This induces maturation and activation of infiltrating T cells, and amplification of Th2, Th1 and Th17 lymphocytes. Each of them, amplify B cells and activates macrophages to release more proinflammatory molecules, generating effector cells that cannot be modulated promoting kidney epithelial proliferation and fibrosis. Herein immunopathological findings of LN are reviewed. PMID:22536486

  20. Lupus Nephritis: The Evolving Role of Novel Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Rovin, Brad H.; Parikh, Samir V.

    2014-01-01

    Immune complex accumulation in the kidney is the hallmark of lupus nephritis and triggers a series of events that result in kidney inflammation and injury. Cytotoxic agents and corticosteroids are standard of care for lupus nephritis treatment, but are associated with considerable morbidity and suboptimal outcomes. Recently, there has been interest in using novel biologic agents and small molecules to treat lupus nephritis. These therapies can be broadly categorized as anti-inflammatory (laquinamod, anti–tumor necrosis factor–like weak inducer of apotosis, anti-C5, and retinoids), antiautoimmunity (anti-CD20, anti–interferon α, and costimulatory blockers), or both (anti–interleukin 6 and proteasome inhibitors). Recent lupus nephritis clinical trials applied biologics or small molecules of any category to induction treatment, seeking short-term end points of complete renal response. These trials in general have not succeeded. When lupus nephritis comes to clinical attention during the inflammatory stage of the disease, the autoimmune stage leading to kidney inflammation will have been active for some time. The optimal approach for using novel therapies may be to initially target kidney inflammation to preserve renal parenchyma, followed by suppression of autoimmunity. In this review, we discuss novel lupus nephritis therapies and how they fit into a combinatorial treatment strategy based on the pathogenic stage. PMID:24411715

  1. Acute Interstitial Nephritis Following Multiple Asian Giant Hornet Stings

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang-Dong; Liu, Zheng; Zhai, Ying; Zhao, Ming; Shen, Hai-Yan; Li, Yi; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 42 Final Diagnosis: Acute interstitial nephritis Symptoms: Difficulty breathing • headache • numbness • oliguria Medication: Methylprednisolone Clinical Procedure: Plasma exchange Specialty: Nephrology Objective: Rare disease Background: The Asian giant hornet is the largest wasp species in the world. Its stings can cause acute interstitial nephritis and acute renal failure. From July to October, 2013, Asian giant hornet attacks have killed 42 people and injured 1675 people with their powerful venomous stings in Hanzhong, Ankang, and Shangluo, three cities in the southern part of Shaanxi Province, China. Case Report: We report here a case of a 42-year-old man with acute interstitial nephritis following multiple Asian giant hornet stings. On admission, the patient had difficulty breathing, headache, and numbness in both limbs (arm and leg). He was treated in the Emergency Department and Department of Nephrology with plasma exchange and dialysis within 24 hours after being stung. A kidney biopsy revealed acute interstitial nephritis with interstitial infiltrations of eosinophils and lymphocytes. After intensive treatment, his liver function recovered within 10 days. Along with oral methylprednisolone, his renal function recovered 1 month later. Conclusions: This case shows that acute interstitial nephritis happens several days after being stung. Since the number of deaths in southern Shaanxi province is much higher than other places, our report draws the attention of fellow clinicians to the acute interstitial nephritis following multiple Asian giant hornet stings. PMID:26076055

  2. Lupus Nephritis: Animal Modeling of a Complex Disease Syndrome Pathology

    PubMed Central

    McGaha, Tracy L; Madaio, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Nephritis as a result of autoimmunity is a common morbidity associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). There is substantial clinical and industry interest in medicinal intervention in the SLE nephritic process; however, clinical trials to specifically treat lupus nephritis have not resulted in complete and sustained remission in all patients. Multiple mouse models have been used to investigate the pathologic interactions between autoimmune reactivity and SLE pathology. While several models bear a remarkable similarity to SLE-driven nephritis, there are limitations for each that can make the task of choosing the appropriate model for a particular aspect of SLE pathology challenging. This is not surprising given the variable and diverse nature of human disease. In many respects, features among murine strains mimic some (but never all) of the autoimmune and pathologic features of lupus patients. Although the diversity often limits universal conclusions relevant to pathogenesis, they provide insights into the complex process that result in phenotypic manifestations of nephritis. Thus nephritis represents a microcosm of systemic disease, with variable lesions and clinical features. In this review, we discuss some of the most commonly used models of lupus nephritis (LN) and immune-mediated glomerular damage examining their relative strengths and weaknesses, which may provide insight in the human condition. PMID:25722732

  3. Suspected acute interstitial nephritis induced by colistin.

    PubMed

    Kallel, Hatem; Hamida, Chokri Ben; Ksibi, Hichem; Bahloul, Mabrouk; Hergafi, Leila; Chaari, Anis; Chelly, Hedi; Bouaziz, Mounir

    2005-01-01

    We describe a 35-year-old male admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). He developed ventilator-associated pneumonia caused by multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and was treated with imipenem and colistin without any renal toxicity. The patient was readmitted to the ICU for a 2nd and a 3rd exacerbation of COPD and was again treated with imipenem and colistin. In both episodes, he developed rapid worsening in renal function, which improved following colistin withdrawal. Use of the Naranjo ADR probability scale indicated a probable relationship between the renal failure and the colistin therapy. In addition, the time course of events suggested that colistin was the cause of acute interstitial nephritis in this patient. We conclude that our patient had a possible acute allergic reaction to colistin since the 1st introduction was not associated with any renal toxicity and renal failure was observed on the 1st day of the 2nd and the 3rd initiation of colistin therapy, respectively. PMID:16013023

  4. Acute interstitial nephritis - a reappraisal and update.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Rajeev; Eknoyan, Garabed

    2014-09-01

    Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is an under recognized and under diagnosed cause of acute kidney injury (AKI). It is estimated to account for 15 - 20% of cases of AKI; it is the reported diagnosis in 2.8% of all kidney biopsies, and 13.5% of biopsies done specifically for acute renal failure. Considerable evidence implicates antigen initiated cell-mediated injury in the pathogenesis of AIN. Drugs account for 70% of all cases, with over 150 different agents incriminated. The remaining cases are due to infections, autoimmune diseases, and rarely idiopathic. The central component of renal injury in AIN is altered tubular function, which usually precedes decrements in filtration rate. The key to early diagnosis is vigilance for the presence of tubular dysfunction in non-oliguric individuals, especially in patients with modest but gradual increments in creatinine level. The utility of urinary biomarkers to diagnose AIN in its early nascent and potentially reversible stage remains to be determined. Prompt recognition, elimination of the offending source of antigen, and use of a limited course of steroid therapy where indicated, will result in complete resolution in ~ 65% of cases, partial resolution in up to 20%, and irreversible damage in the rest. PMID:25079860

  5. [Age and the course of nephrotoxic nephritis in rats].

    PubMed

    Samoĭlova, Z T; Kliukina, S S

    1978-12-01

    In experiments on two groups of mongrel rats (4 weeks old and 4 months old) with induced nephrotoxic nephritis it was revealed that in comparison with adult rats the course of nephritis in ratlings was characterized by lesser proteinuria, selective in nature, by lesser reducticn of endogenous creatinine clearance and diuresis. The acido- and ammo-niogenesis decreased in ratlings and adult rats to the same extent. Morphological changes in the kidneys of ratlings were less pronounced than in adult animals, and were mostly localized in the convoluted tubules. The level of DNA-synthetic activity of the epithelial nuclei of the glomeruli prevailed over this index of the convoluted tubules epithelium. The weight index of the kidneys increased less in ratlings with nephritis than in adult rats. beta-lipoproteinemia in ratlings increased 8 times. Normalization of the urine and blood indices occurred more rapidly in ratlings than in adult rats. PMID:31956

  6. Acute lobar nephritis in children: Not so easy to recognize and manage

    PubMed Central

    Bibalo, Cristina; Apicella, Andrea; Guastalla, Veronica; Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Zennaro, Floriana; Tringali, Carmela; Taddio, Andrea; Germani, Claudio; Barbi, Egidio

    2016-01-01

    Acute lobar nephritis (ALN) is a localized non-liquefactive inflammatory renal bacterial infection, which typically involves one or more lobes. ALN is considered to be a midpoint in the spectrum of upper urinary tract infection, a spectrum ranging from uncomplicated pyelonephritis to intrarenal abscess. This condition may be difficult to recognize due to the lack of specific symptoms and laboratory findings. Therefore the disease is probably underdiagnosed. Computed tomography scanning represents the diagnostic gold standard for ALN, but magnetic resonance imagine could be considered in order to limit irradiation. The diagnosis is relevant since initial intravenous antibiotic therapy and overall length of treatment should not be shorter than 3 wk. We review the literature and analyze the ALN clinical presentation starting from four cases with the aim to give to the clinicians the elements to suspect and recognize the ALN in children. PMID:26862513

  7. Acute lobar nephritis in children: Not so easy to recognize and manage.

    PubMed

    Bibalo, Cristina; Apicella, Andrea; Guastalla, Veronica; Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Zennaro, Floriana; Tringali, Carmela; Taddio, Andrea; Germani, Claudio; Barbi, Egidio

    2016-02-01

    Acute lobar nephritis (ALN) is a localized non-liquefactive inflammatory renal bacterial infection, which typically involves one or more lobes. ALN is considered to be a midpoint in the spectrum of upper urinary tract infection, a spectrum ranging from uncomplicated pyelonephritis to intrarenal abscess. This condition may be difficult to recognize due to the lack of specific symptoms and laboratory findings. Therefore the disease is probably underdiagnosed. Computed tomography scanning represents the diagnostic gold standard for ALN, but magnetic resonance imagine could be considered in order to limit irradiation. The diagnosis is relevant since initial intravenous antibiotic therapy and overall length of treatment should not be shorter than 3 wk. We review the literature and analyze the ALN clinical presentation starting from four cases with the aim to give to the clinicians the elements to suspect and recognize the ALN in children. PMID:26862513

  8. Do we still need renal biopsy in lupus nephritis?

    PubMed Central

    Cervera, Ricard

    2016-01-01

    The natural course of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by periods of disease activity and remissions. Prolonged disease activity results in cumulative organ damage. Lupus nephritis is one of the most common and devastating manifestations of SLE. In the era of changing therapy to less toxic regimens, some authors have stated that if mycophenolate mofetil can be used for the induction and maintenance treatment in all histological classes of lupus nephritis, renal biopsy can be omitted. This article aims to answer the question of what brings the bigger risk: renal biopsy or its abandonment. PMID:27407281

  9. Acute interstitial nephritis following kudzu root juice ingestion.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae Myun; Kwon, Soon Hyo; Noh, Hyunjin; Han, Dong Cheol; Jeon, Jin Seok; Jin, So Young

    2013-10-01

    Recently, the use of herbal remedies and complementary and alternative medicine has increased globally. Kudzu root (Pueraria lobata) is a plant commonly used in traditional medicine to promote health. A middle-aged woman consumed kudzu root juice to promote health and well-being for 10 days. Subsequently, she developed anorexia, epigastric discomfort and azotemia. These symptoms improved rapidly within several days after discontinuation of the suspected offending agent and conservative treatment. Acute interstitial nephritis was diagnosed by renal biopsy. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing acute interstitial nephritis following the ingestion of kudzu root juice. PMID:24060140

  10. Renal failure due to granulomatous interstitial nephritis in native and allograft renal biopsies: experience from a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pallav; Rana, D S; Bhalla, A K; Gupta, Ashwini; Malik, Manish; Gupta, Anurag; Bhargava, Vinant

    2014-10-01

    Granulomatous interstitial nephritis is a rare cause of renal failure in both native and allograft renal biopsies. Drugs and sarcoidosis are the commonest causes of granulomatous interstitial nephritis as reported in Western countries. Unlike the west, tuberculosis is the commonest cause of granulomatous interstitial nephritis in Indian subcontinent. The etiological factors, clinical course, glomerular and tubulointerstitial changes associated with granulomatous interstitial nephritis have been analyzed in the present study along with the outcome in patients with granulomatous interstitial nephritis. PMID:25155448

  11. Mortality from nephritis and nephrosis in the fibreglass manufacturing industry

    PubMed Central

    Chiazze, L.; Watkins, D. K.; Fryar, C.; Fayerweather, W.; Bender, J. R.; Chiazze, M.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the question of whether there is an association between exposure to silica or respirable glass fibre and mortality from nephritis or nephrosis among workers in fibrous glass wool manufacturing facilities. METHODS: A case-control study with cases and controls derived from the Owens Corning mortality surveillance system. Two case-control analyses were carried out, one where the cases are defined with nephritis or nephrosis as the underlying cause of death and one where cases are defined as those where nephritis or nephrosis is either the underlying or a contributing cause of death. RESULTS: There is no consistent relation between respirable fibres or respirable silica and nephritis or nephrosis when the analysis is based either on underlying cause only or on underlying plus contributing cause of death. None of the sociodemographic variables considered suggests an increased risk when considering both underlying and contributing cause of death. CONCLUSIONS: These data would seem to support the contention that the most accurate picture of renal disease will be gained from the use of all information on the death certificate and not only the underlying cause. For these data, all odds ratios (ORs) for respirable fibres and silica based on both underlying and contributing cause of death are < 1 with the exception of the highest exposure to silica which is slightly > 1 (OR = 1.04). Although these results do not prove that there is no association between nephritis and nephrosis and exposure to fibreglass or silica in the fibreglass manufacturing environment, they do not support the assertion that such an association exists.   PMID:10448324

  12. Beamlet focal plane diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Caird, J.A.; Nielsen, N.D.; Patton, H.G.; Seppala, L.G.; Thompson, C.E.; Wegner, P.J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes the major optical and mechanical design features of the Beamlet Focal Plane Diagnostic system as well as measurements of the system performance, and typical data obtained to date. We also discuss the NIF requirements on the focal spot that we are interested in measuring, and some of our plans for future work using this system.

  13. Interstitial nephritis induced by protein-overload proteinuria.

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, A. A.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental nephrotic syndrome induced by several immunologic and biochemical methods is associated with the development of tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN). To investigate the hypothesis that severe sustained proteinuria plays a role in the pathogenesis of TIN, the renal interstitium in a model of protein-overload proteinuria was studied. After uninephrectomy, rats received daily injections of 1.0 g of bovine serum albumin (BSA) or saline (controls) until killing at 1, 2, 4, or 7 weeks. Sections of frozen renal cortex were stained with a panel of monoclonal antibodies reactive with subsets of rat lymphohemopoietic cells, and positive tubulointerstitial cells (TIC) were quantitated by epifluorescence microscopy. BSA rats developed proteinuria, with mean rat urinary albumin excretion rates at 1, 2, 3, and 6 weeks of 35.6 +/- 21.8, 97.2 +/- 46.1, 63.6 +/- 40.8, and 58.6 +/- 24.4 mg/24 hours, respectively (controls, 0.17 +/- 0.16 mg/24 hours). BSA was detectable in the plasma of experimental animals at all periods, with mean values of 26.8 +/- 3.8, 27.8 +/- 2.7, 20.3 +/- 6.2, and 7.0 +/- 1.1 mg/ml (controls, 0.03 +/- 0.04 mg/ml) at 1, 2, 4, and 7 weeks, respectively, whereas plasma anti-BSA antibodies were never detected. A significant mononuclear cell infiltrate was present in the interstitium of experimental animals at all periods. At 1 week, an influx of macrophages was evident that was identified by surface markers OX42 (75+/1000 TIC) (P less than 0.01) and Ia (58+/1000 TIC) (P less than 0.01). Macrophages dominated the infiltrate at all periods. By 2 weeks, a significant population of lymphocytes was also present that was identified by the surface marker OX19 (54+/1000 TIC) (P less than 0.01). This early lymphocytic infiltrate was a mixed lesion of T helper and T cytotoxic cells. However, at 4 and 7 weeks, most lymphocytes expressed the OX8 cytotoxic T cell marker. The proximal tubules of proteinuric rats expressed vimentin intermediate filaments, a marker of

  14. Interstitial nephritis caused by HIV infection by itself: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Asako; Iwata, Kentaro; Hara, Shigeo; Imai, Yukihiro; Hasuike, Toshikazu; Nishioka, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial nephritis is a common cause of renal dysfunction. It is primarily caused by drugs, infections, or autoimmune disorders. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection can develop interstitial nephritis, although it typically occurs because of the aforementioned etiologies and not as a direct consequence of HIV infection. Interstitial lesions may occur in patients with HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). However, interstitial nephritis without the glomerular injuries characteristic of HIVAN, and without the risk factors described earlier, is very rare. Here, we describe a rare case of interstitial nephritis that was likely caused directly by HIV infection and not by other etiologies. PMID:27621665

  15. A pathophysiology-based approach to the diagnosis and treatment of lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Anders, Hans-Joachim; Rovin, Brad

    2016-09-01

    Lupus is no longer an unknown chameleon of medicine. Significant progress has been made on unraveling the pathogenesis of lupus and lupus nephritis, and how to treat the disease. Here we provide an update on the pathophysiology of lupus and its related kidney disease, consider areas of controversy in disease management, and discuss the unmet needs of lupus nephritis and how to address these needs. We focus on rethinking how innovative therapies for lupus nephritis should be evaluated and evolving strategies to more efficiently mitigate irreversible nephron loss in patients with lupus nephritis. PMID:27378475

  16. Interstitial nephritis caused by HIV infection by itself: a case report.

    PubMed

    Doi, Asako; Iwata, Kentaro; Hara, Shigeo; Imai, Yukihiro; Hasuike, Toshikazu; Nishioka, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial nephritis is a common cause of renal dysfunction. It is primarily caused by drugs, infections, or autoimmune disorders. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection can develop interstitial nephritis, although it typically occurs because of the aforementioned etiologies and not as a direct consequence of HIV infection. Interstitial lesions may occur in patients with HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). However, interstitial nephritis without the glomerular injuries characteristic of HIVAN, and without the risk factors described earlier, is very rare. Here, we describe a rare case of interstitial nephritis that was likely caused directly by HIV infection and not by other etiologies. PMID:27621665

  17. An Animal Model Using Metallic Ions to Produce Autoimmune Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Sandoval, Roxana; Luévano-Rodríguez, Nayeli; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mayra; Pérez-Pérez, María Elena; Saldívar-Elias, Sergio; Gurrola-Carlos, Reinaldo; Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza; Bollain-y-Goytia, Juan José; Herrera-Esparza, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune nephritis triggered by metallic ions was assessed in a Long-Evans rat model. The parameters evaluated included antinuclear autoantibody production, kidney damage mediated by immune complexes detected by immunofluorescence, and renal function tested by retention of nitrogen waste products and proteinuria. To accomplish our goal, the animals were treated with the following ionic metals: HgCl2, CuSO4, AgNO3, and Pb(NO3)2. A group without ionic metals was used as the control. The results of the present investigation demonstrated that metallic ions triggered antinuclear antibody production in 60% of animals, some of them with anti-DNA specificity. Furthermore, all animals treated with heavy metals developed toxic glomerulonephritis with immune complex deposition along the mesangium and membranes. These phenomena were accompanied by proteinuria and increased concentrations of urea. Based on these results, we conclude that metallic ions may induce experimental autoimmune nephritis. PMID:26064998

  18. An Animal Model Using Metallic Ions to Produce Autoimmune Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Sandoval, Roxana; Luévano-Rodríguez, Nayeli; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mayra; Pérez-Pérez, María Elena; Saldívar-Elias, Sergio; Gurrola-Carlos, Reinaldo; Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza; Bollain-y-Goytia, Juan José

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune nephritis triggered by metallic ions was assessed in a Long-Evans rat model. The parameters evaluated included antinuclear autoantibody production, kidney damage mediated by immune complexes detected by immunofluorescence, and renal function tested by retention of nitrogen waste products and proteinuria. To accomplish our goal, the animals were treated with the following ionic metals: HgCl2, CuSO4, AgNO3, and Pb(NO3)2. A group without ionic metals was used as the control. The results of the present investigation demonstrated that metallic ions triggered antinuclear antibody production in 60% of animals, some of them with anti-DNA specificity. Furthermore, all animals treated with heavy metals developed toxic glomerulonephritis with immune complex deposition along the mesangium and membranes. These phenomena were accompanied by proteinuria and increased concentrations of urea. Based on these results, we conclude that metallic ions may induce experimental autoimmune nephritis. PMID:26064998

  19. Lupus nephritis: clinicopathological study of 162 cases in Thailand.

    PubMed Central

    Parichatikanond, P; Francis, N D; Malasit, P; Laohapand, T; Nimmannit, S; Singchoovong, L; Nilwarangkur, S; Chrirawong, P; Vanichakarn, S

    1986-01-01

    One hundred and sixty two cases of lupus nephritis biopsied over three years in Thailand were studied. A pattern of clinical and histological renal disease very similar to that seen in the United States or Europe emerged. The predominant histological type was World Health Organisation class IV (diffuse proliferative; 58.6%). Patients with renal insufficiency (creatinine greater than or equal to 2 mg/100 ml) or hypertension at the time of biopsy had a considerably worse three year survival. Certain features such as sclerotic glomeruli, tubular atrophy, and an interstitial mononuclear cell infiltrate were significantly associated with a worse outcome (0.05 greater than p greater than 0.01), and patients who died with poor renal function had significantly higher chronicity scores than those in other groups (p less than 0.05). These findings emphasise the importance of chronic renal damage in the morbidity and mortality of patients with lupus nephritis. PMID:3485117

  20. Immunologic findings, thrombocytopenia and disease activity in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, W. F.; Linton, A. L.; Cordy, P. E.; Keown, P. E.; Lohmann, R. C.; Lindsay, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty patients with nephritis due to systemic lupus erythematosus were followed up for a mean of 34 months after renal biopsy with serial determinations of total serum complement and C3 and C4 concentrations, binding of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), antinuclear antibody pattern and platelet count. There were 25 episodes of nonhematologic observed disease activity in 16 of the 20 patients; elevated DNA binding and thrombocytopenia correlated well with these episodes. The mean platelet count during episodes of observed disease activity was 96 +/- 42 X 10(9)/L, which was significantly different from the mean count of 248 +/- 90 X 10(9)/L during disease quiescence. The proportion of false-positive results with the immunologic tests varied from 25% to 67% and with platelet counts it was 11%. It is suggested that thrombocytopenia may be a simple and accurate index of disease activity in lupus nephritis. PMID:350367

  1. Ergotamine-induced acute tubulo-interstitial nephritis.

    PubMed

    Pakfetrat, Maryam; Rasekhi, Akbar; Eftekhari, Fatemeh; Hashemi, Nahid; Roozbeh, Jamshid; Torabineghad, Simin; Malekmakan, Leila

    2013-09-01

    Ergotamine has been used for the treatment of migraine for many years, and its use in adults is considered to be safe and effective. In this report, we present a 22-year-old female patient, a known case of migraine, who was on ergotamine tartrate and presented with hypertension and renal failure. Renal biopsy indicated features of acute tubulo-interstitital nephritis. PMID:24029265

  2. Macrophage depletion ameliorates nephritis induced by pathogenic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Samantha A; Chitu, Violeta; Herlitz, Leal C; Sahu, Ranjit; Stanley, E Richard; Putterman, Chaim

    2015-02-01

    Kidney involvement affects 40-60% of patients with lupus, and is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Using depletion approaches, several studies have suggested that macrophages may play a key role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. However, "off target" effects of macrophage depletion, such as altered hematopoiesis or enhanced autoantibody production, impeded the determination of a conclusive relationship. In this study, we investigated the role of macrophages in mice receiving rabbit anti-glomerular antibodies, or nephrotoxic serum (NTS), an experimental model which closely mimics the immune complex mediated disease seen in murine and human lupus nephritis. GW2580, a selective inhibitor of the colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) receptor kinase, was used for macrophage depletion. We found that GW2580-treated, NTS challenged mice did not develop the increased levels of proteinuria, serum creatinine, and BUN seen in control-treated, NTS challenged mice. NTS challenged mice exhibited significantly increased kidney expression of inflammatory cytokines including RANTES, IP-10, VCAM-1 and iNOS, whereas GW2580-treated mice were protected from the robust expression of these inflammatory cytokines that are associated with lupus nephritis. Quantification of macrophage related gene expression, flow cytometry analysis of kidney single cell suspensions, and immunofluorescence staining confirmed the depletion of macrophages in GW2580-treated mice, specifically within renal glomeruli. Our results strongly implicate a specific and necessary role for macrophages in the development of immune glomerulonephritis mediated by pathogenic antibodies, and support the development of macrophage targeting approaches for the treatment of lupus nephritis. PMID:25554644

  3. Rifampin-associated tubulointersititial nephritis and Fanconi syndrome presenting as hypokalemic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rifampin is one of the most important drugs in first-line therapies for tuberculosis. The renal toxicity of rifampin has been reported sporadically and acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (ATIN) is a frequent histological finding. We describe for the first time a case of ATIN and Fanconi syndrome presenting as hypokalemic paralysis, associated with the use of rifampin. Case presentation A 42-year-old man was admitted with sudden-onset lower extremity paralysis and mild renal insufficiency. He had been treated for pulmonary tuberculosis with isoniazid, rifampin, and ethambutol for 2 months. Laboratory tests revealed proteinuria, profound hypokalemia, hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis with a normal anion gap, positive urine anion gap, hypophosphatemia with hyperphosphaturia, hypouricemia with hyperuricosuria, glycosuria with normal serum glucose level, generalized aminoaciduria, and β2-microglobulinuria. A kidney biopsy revealed findings typical of ATIN and focal granular deposits of immunoglubulin A and complement 3 in the glomeruli and tubules. Electron microscopy showed epithelial foot process effacement and electron-dense deposits in the subendothelial and mesangial spaces. Cessation of rifampin resolved the patient’s clinical presentation of Fanconi syndrome, and improved his renal function and proteinuria. Conclusion This case demonstrates that rifampin therapy can be associated with Fanconi syndrome presenting as hypokalemic paralysis, which is a manifestation of ATIN. Kidney function and the markers of proximal tubular injury should be carefully monitored in patients receiving rifampin. PMID:23320835

  4. Appraisal of lupus nephritis by renal imaging with gallium-67

    SciTech Connect

    Bakir, A.A.; Lopez-Majano, V.; Hryhorczuk, D.O.; Rhee, H.L.; Dunea, G.

    1985-08-01

    To assess the activity of lupus nephritis, 43 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were studied by gallium imaging. Delayed renal visualization 48 hours after the gallium injection, a positive result, was noted in 25 of 48 scans. Active renal disease was defined by the presence of hematuria, pyuria (10 or more red blood cells or white blood cells per high-power field), proteinuria (1 g or more per 24 hours), a rising serum creatinine level, or a recent biopsy specimen showing proliferative and/or necrotizing lesions involving more than 20 percent of glomeruli. Renal disease was active in 18 instances, inactive in 23, and undetermined in seven (a total of 48 scans). Sixteen of the 18 scans (89 percent) in patients with active renal disease showed positive findings, as compared with only four of 23 scans (17 percent) in patients with inactive renal disease (p less than 0.001). Patients with positive scanning results had a higher rate of hypertension (p = 0.02), nephrotic proteinuria (p = 0.01), and progressive renal failure (p = 0.02). Mild mesangial nephritis (World Health Organization classes I and II) was noted only in the patients with negative scanning results (p = 0.02) who, however, showed a higher incidence of severe extrarenal SLE (p = 0.04). It is concluded that gallium imaging is a useful tool in evaluating the activity of lupus nephritis.

  5. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  6. Focal vibration in neurorehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Murillo, N; Valls-Sole, J; Vidal, J; Opisso, E; Medina, J; Kumru, H

    2014-04-01

    During the last decade, many studies have been carried out to understand the effects of focal vibratory stimuli at various levels of the central nervous system and to study pathophysiological mechanisms of neurological disorders as well as the therapeutic effects of focal vibration in neurorehabilitation. This review aimed to describe the effects of focal vibratory stimuli in neurorehabilitation including the neurological diseases or disorders like stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's' disease and dystonia. In conclusion, focal vibration stimulation is well tolerated, effective and easy to use, and it could be used to reduce spasticity, to promote motor activity and motor learning within a functional activity, even in gait training, independent from etiology of neurological pathology. Further studies are needed in the future well-designed trials with bigger sample size to determine the most effective frequency, amplitude and duration of vibration application in the neurorehabilitation. PMID:24842220

  7. Focal neurological deficits

    MedlinePlus

    A focal neurologic deficit is a problem with nerve, spinal cord, or brain function. It affects a specific ... of the back, neck, or head Electromyogram (EMG)/ nerve conduction velocities (NCV) MRI of the back, neck, or head Spinal tap

  8. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff RB, ... 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 67. ...

  9. Collapsing focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Hassan; Rafiq, Arsalan; Franchin, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of a 36-year-old female from Ghana who presented with atypical chest pain and shortness of breath and was found to have bilateral transudative pleural effusion and trivial pericardial effusion. Further work-up revealed serological markers consistent with active lupus and negative HIV. She developed rapid deterioration of her renal function requiring dialysis. Her renal biopsy showed collapsing focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with diffuse mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis, consistent with lupus nephritis class II along with tubular degenerative changes. She was started on high dose steroids and later on mycophenolate mofetil. Her renal function slowly recovered to baseline. PMID:25180039

  10. SNAP focal plane

    SciTech Connect

    Lampton, Michael L.; Kim, A.; Akerlof, C.W.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Berkovitz, J.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers Jr., W.C.; Commins, E.D.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.E.; DiGennaro,R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.S.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.E.; Harvey, P.R.; Heetderks, H.D.; Holland, S.E.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.S.; Linder,E.V.; Loken, S.C.; Malina, R.; Massey, R.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.P.; Miquel, R.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto, E.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch,A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-29

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square-degree field sensitive in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. We describe the requirements for the instrument suite and the evolution of the focal plane design to the present concept in which all the instrumentation--visible and near-infrared imagers, spectrograph, and star guiders--share one common focal plane.

  11. Macrophage depletion ameliorates nephritis induced by pathogenic antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Samantha A.; Chitu, Violeta; Herlitz, Leal C.; Sahu, Ranjit; Stanley, E. Richard; Putterman, Chaim

    2014-01-01

    Objective Kidney involvement affects 40–60% of patients with lupus and is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Using depletion approaches, several studies have suggested that macrophages may play a key role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. However, “off target” effects of macrophage depletion, such as altered hematopoiesis or enhanced autoantibody production, impeded the determination of a conclusive relationship. Methods In this study, we investigated the role of macrophages in mice receiving rabbit anti-glomerular antibodies, or nephrotoxic serum (NTS), an experimental model which closely mimics the immune complex mediated disease seen in murine and human lupus nephritis. GW2580, a selective inhibitor of the colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) receptor kinase, was used for macrophage depletion. Results We found that GW2580-treated, NTS challenged mice did not develop the increased levels of proteinuria, serum creatinine, or serum urea seen in control-treated, NTS challenged mice. NTS challenged mice exhibited significantly increased kidney expression of inflammatory cytokines including RANTES, IP-10, VCAM-1 and iNOS, whereas GW2580-treated mice were protected from the robust expression of these inflammatory cytokines that are associated with LN. Quantification of macrophage related gene expression, flow cytometry analysis of kidney single cell suspensions, and immunofluorescence staining confirmed the depletion of macrophages in GW2580-treated mice, specifically within renal glomeruli. Conclusions Our results strongly implicate a specific and necessary role for macrophages in the development of immune glomerulonephritis mediated by pathogenic antibodies, and support the development of macrophage targeting approaches for the treatment of lupus nephritis. PMID:25554644

  12. Granulomatous Interstitial Nephritis Presenting as Hypercalcemia and Nephrolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Sharmeen, Saika; Kalkan, Esra; Yi, Chunhui; Smith, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of acute kidney injury as the initial manifestation of sarcoidosis. A 55-year-old male was sent from his primary care physician's office with incidental lab findings significant for hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury with past medical history significant for nephrolithiasis. Initial treatment with intravenous hydration did not improve his condition. The renal biopsy subsequently revealed granulomatous interstitial nephritis (GIN). Treatment with the appropriate dose of glucocorticoids improved both the hypercalcemia and renal function. Our case demonstrates that renal limited GIN due to sarcoidosis, although a rare entity, can cause severe acute kidney injury and progressive renal failure unless promptly diagnosed and treated. PMID:26904327

  13. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in the Development of Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease with damage to multiple organs. Leukocyte recruitment into the inflamed kidney is a critical step to promote LN progression, and the chemokine/chemokine receptor system is necessary for leukocyte recruitment. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the roles of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of LN and discuss the potential and hurdles of developing novel, chemokine-based drugs to treat LN. PMID:27403037

  14. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in the Development of Lupus Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiaofeng; Pirapakaran, Tharshikha; Luo, Xin M

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease with damage to multiple organs. Leukocyte recruitment into the inflamed kidney is a critical step to promote LN progression, and the chemokine/chemokine receptor system is necessary for leukocyte recruitment. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the roles of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of LN and discuss the potential and hurdles of developing novel, chemokine-based drugs to treat LN. PMID:27403037

  15. Idiopathic granulomatous interstitial nephritis responsive to mycophenolate mofetil therapy.

    PubMed

    Leeaphorn, Napat; Stokes, Michael B; Ungprasert, Patompong; Lecates, William

    2014-04-01

    Granulomatous interstitial nephritis (GIN) is a rare histologic disease. Various causes have been reported in the literature, including drugs, sarcoidosis, and infections. Other incidents have no discernible cause and are identified as idiopathic. We report a 68-year-old white man who presented with acute kidney injury and was given a diagnosis of idiopathic GIN. Mycophenolate mofetil treatment was elected because of steroid toxicity. He responded well to mycophenolate mofetil and has been in remission for more than 3 years. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful treatment with mycophenolate mofetil of an adult patient with idiopathic GIN. PMID:24315767

  16. Levetiracetam-induced severe acute granulomatous interstitial nephritis.

    PubMed

    Chau, Katrina; Yong, Jim; Ismail, Kasim; Griffith, Neil; Liu, Michael; Makris, Angela

    2012-06-01

    Granulomatous interstitial nephritis (GIN) is an uncommon cause of renal failure, which may be caused by drugs. Levetiracetam is an increasingly used anti-epileptic medication that is not known to cause renal toxicity in adults. To our knowledge, levetiracetam has not previously been reported as a cause of GIN. We report the case of a 69-year-old woman who developed haemodialysis-requiring acute renal failure after commencement of treatment with levetiracetam, which was shown to be GIN by renal biopsy. She made a complete recovery with cessation of levetiracetam and treatment with steroids. PMID:26069773

  17. A brief contextualization on IgG4 tubulointerstitial nephritis based on a case report in south Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pêgas, Karla Lais; Cambruzzi, Eduardo; Lobato, Gisele

    2016-06-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4RD) is a recent inflammatory process of supposed autoimmune etiology, which is characterized by elevated serum IgG4 levels, dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration rich in IgG4-positive plasma cells and storiform fibrosis. Tubulointerstitial nephritis is the most common renal manifestation, with different degrees of kidney dysfunction and variable clinical findings. Herein, the authors describe a new case of IgG4 tubulointerstitial nephritis (IgG4TN), and discuss clinic and pathologic criteria. Male patient, 72 years-old, was admitted on hospital service with clinical complaint of asthenia, loss of strength, emaciation, and anosmia. Previous history included type 2 diabetes mellitus. Laboratorial data included normochromic anemia, proteinuria, and creatinine elevation. Bilateral kidney ultrassonography/computed tomography revealed a heterogenous parenchyma, with diffuse irregular dense zones, areas of fibrosis on upper poles, and hydronephrosys. Kidney biopsy showed a dense interstitial lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, with more than 50 plasma cell per high power field, irregular areas of fibroblastic and collagenous fibrosis, focal tubulitis, and normal glomeruli. Immunofluorescence revealed mild granular deposition of C3c and IgG in the tubular basement membrane. Immunohistochemestry was positive for CD138, lambda and Kappa light chains, and IgG4 (around forty five IgG4 positive plasma cells per high power field). IgG4 serum level was increased. The diagnosis of IgG4TN was then established. The patient received corticotherapy and strict control of glycemia with insulin, with marked improvement of symptoms and creatinine levels. PMID:27438982

  18. Expression of major histocompatibility complex class II antigens in porcine leptospiral nephritis.

    PubMed

    Radaelli, E; Del Piero, F; Aresu, L; Sciarrone, F; Vicari, N; Mattiello, S; Tagliabue, S; Fabbi, M; Scanziani, E

    2009-09-01

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHCII) is required for the presentation of antigens to CD4 helper T cells. During nephritis, not only primary antigen presenting cells such as histiocytes and lymphocytes, but also cytokine-stimulated tubular epithelial cells express MHCII. Leptospirosis in fattening pigs is characterized by several degrees of nephritis, from absence of lesions to severe multifocal tubulo-interstitial inflammation. Renal tissue from 20 8-month-old pigs with spontaneous nephritis and 6 control pigs without renal lesions were investigated for leptospirosis by indirect immunohistochemistry (IHC) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). IHC for MHCII also was performed on renal samples. Serum samples were tested for different serovars of Leptospira interrogans. Control pigs were free of interstitial nephritis and negative for leptospirosis by all tests. In pigs with nephritis, serology was positive for serovar Pomona in 19/20 pigs. In 16 of these 19 pigs, leptospiral renal infection was confirmed by PCR and/or indirect IHC. Nephritic lesions were classified histologically into perivascular lymphocytic (4 pigs), lymphofollicular (6 pigs), lymphohistiocytic (8 pigs), and neutrophilic (2 pigs) pattern. MHCII expression by histiocytes and lymphocytes was observed in all lesions. Prominent MHCII expression in regenerating tubular epithelium was observed in lymphofollicular and lymphohistiocytic nephritis. No tubular colocalization between leptospiral and MHCII antigen was observed. Results suggest that during leptospiral nephritis, MHCII contributes to the intensity of the inflammatory response. Furthermore de novo MHCII expression in regenerating tubules may play a role in the defence mechanism against leptospiral tubular colonization. PMID:19179617

  19. Association of STAT4 Polymorphism with Severe Renal Insufficiency in Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Bolin, Karin; Sandling, Johanna K.; Zickert, Agneta; Jönsen, Andreas; Sjöwall, Christopher; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Bengtsson, Anders A.; Eloranta, Maija-Leena; Rönnblom, Lars; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Gunnarsson, Iva; Nordmark, Gunnel

    2013-01-01

    Lupus nephritis is a cause of significant morbidity in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its genetic background has not been completely clarified. The aim of this investigation was to analyze single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for association with lupus nephritis, its severe form proliferative nephritis and renal outcome, in two Swedish cohorts. Cohort I (n = 567 SLE cases, n =  512 controls) was previously genotyped for 5676 SNPs and cohort II (n = 145 SLE cases, n = 619 controls) was genotyped for SNPs in STAT4, IRF5, TNIP1 and BLK. Case-control and case-only association analyses for patients with lupus nephritis, proliferative nephritis and severe renal insufficiency were performed. In the case-control analysis of cohort I, four highly linked SNPs in STAT4 were associated with lupus nephritis with genome wide significance with p = 3.7×10−9, OR 2.20 for the best SNP rs11889341. Strong signals of association between IRF5 and an HLA-DR3 SNP marker were also detected in the lupus nephritis case versus healthy control analysis (p <0.0001). An additional six genes showed an association with lupus nephritis with p <0.001 (PMS2, TNIP1, CARD11, ITGAM, BLK and IRAK1). In the case-only meta-analysis of the two cohorts, the STAT4 SNP rs7582694 was associated with severe renal insufficiency with p  = 1.6×10−3 and OR 2.22. We conclude that genetic variations in STAT4 predispose to lupus nephritis and a worse outcome with severe renal insufficiency. PMID:24386384

  20. Remission and withdrawal of therapy in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Moroni, Gabriella; Raffiotta, Francesca; Ponticelli, Claudio

    2016-08-01

    There is agreement that early diagnosis and aggressive treatment of lupus nephritis exacerbations are of paramount importance to achieve remission and prevent the development of irreversible lesions. There is less agreement about the optimal duration of maintenance treatment. Instead, the prolonged exposure to corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressive drugs can cause invalidating or even life-threatening complications. It is still unclear if these drugs can be safely withdrawn in lupus patients. We were able to completely withdraw therapy in around 1/3 of our patients after a follow-up of 5 years or more; 60 % of them never had to start therapy again. Based on our own experience, discontinuation of therapy should be applied only in selected cases, i.e. patients who received maintenance therapy for at least 5 years and are in complete renal remission for at least 3 years. Antimalarial agents are helpful in maintaining the remission after withdrawal of therapy. However, to achieve these goals, drugs should be tapered off very slowly and under strict surveillance. If all these prerequisites are satisfied, the withdrawal of therapy in patients with lupus nephritis may be considered safe, may improve the patients' quality of life and may reduce the damage accrual. PMID:27146861

  1. Allergic Interstitial Nephritis Manifesting as a Striated Nephrogram

    PubMed Central

    Moinuddin, Irfan; Bracamonte, Erika; Thajudeen, Bijin; Sussman, Amy; Madhrira, Machaiah; Costello, James

    2015-01-01

    Allergic interstitial nephritis (AIN) is an underdiagnosed cause of acute kidney injury (AKI). Guidelines suggest that AIN should be suspected in a patient who presents with an elevated serum creatinine and a urinalysis that shows white cells, white cell casts, or eosinophiluria. Drug-induced AIN is suspected if AKI is temporally related to the initiation of a new drug. However, patients with bland sediment and normal urinalysis can also have AIN. Currently, a definitive diagnosis of AIN is made by renal biopsy which is invasive and fraught with risks such as bleeding, infection, and hematoma. Additionally, it is frequently unclear when a kidney biopsy should be undertaken. We describe a biopsy proven case of allergic interstitial nephritis which manifested on contrast enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) as a striated nephrogram. Newer and more stable macrocyclic gadolinium contrast agents have a well-demonstrated safety profile. Additionally, in the presentation of AKI, gadolinium contrast agents are safe to administer in patients who demonstrate good urine output and a downtrending creatinine. We propose that the differential for a striated nephrogram may include AIN. In cases in which the suspicion for AIN is high, this diagnostic consideration may be further characterized by contrast enhanced MRI. PMID:26664405

  2. Tubulointerstitial Nephritis and Uveitis Syndrome: Are Drugs Offenders or Bystanders?

    PubMed Central

    Kawamata, Mutsumi; Akimoto, Tetsu; Sugase, Taro; Otani-Takei, Naoko; Miki, Takuya; Masuda, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Takahisa; Takeda, Shin-ichi; Muto, Shigeaki; Nagata, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    A 16-year-old female patient was admitted to our hospital due to progressive renal dysfunction with an increased serum creatinine (sCr) level of 1.7 mg/dL. Her clinical course without any ocular manifestations and results of drug-induced, lymphocyte-stimulating tests, in addition to a renal histological assessment, initially encouraged us to ascribe the patient’s renal abnormalities to drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis (AIN). Four months later, she started to complain about reduced visual acuity when she was found to have anterior bilateral uveitis despite the recovered renal function with almost constant sCr levels around 0.7 mg/dL. Thus, a diagnosis of tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis (TINU) syndrome was finally made. Our case illustrates the difficulties in distinguishing late-onset uveitis TINU syndrome from drug-induced AIN at the time of the renal biopsy, thereby suggesting the importance of a longitudinal follow-up to overcome the potential underdiagnosis of the disease. Several diagnostic conundrums that emerged in this case are also discussed. PMID:26997878

  3. Clearing the complexity: immune complexes and their treatment in lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Toong, Catherine; Adelstein, Stephen; Phan, Tri Giang

    2011-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a classic antibody-mediated systemic autoimmune disease characterised by the development of autoantibodies to ubiquitous self-antigens (such as antinuclear antibodies and antidouble-stranded DNA antibodies) and widespread deposition of immune complexes in affected tissues. Deposition of immune complexes in the kidney results in glomerular damage and occurs in all forms of lupus nephritis. The development of nephritis carries a poor prognosis and high risk of developing end-stage renal failure despite recent therapeutic advances. Here we review the role of DNA-anti-DNA immune complexes in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis and possible new treatment strategies aimed at their control. PMID:21694945

  4. Severe nephrotoxic nephritis following conditional and kidney-specific knockdown of stanniocalcin-1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inflammation is the hallmark of nephrotoxic nephritis. Stanniocalcin-1 (STC1), a pro-survival factor, inhibits macrophages, stabilizes endothelial barrier function, and diminishes trans-endothelial migration of leukocytes; consistently, transgenic (Tg) overexpression of STC1 protects from nephrotoxi...

  5. Interstitial nephritis in rats produced by E. coli in adjuvant: immunological findings.

    PubMed Central

    Sherlock, J E

    1977-01-01

    An increased incidence and severity of interstitial nephritis was produced in F344/fmai rats immunized with E. coli 022 in pertussis vaccine for 12-15 months. Migration of peritoneal exudate cells from immunized animals was inhibited by syngeneic kidney antigens. One out of twenty-eight immunized animals developed anti-TBM antibodies. In this model, interstitial nephritis develops in association with cell-mediated immunity to kidney tissue. PMID:342152

  6. Development of FET-type albumin sensor for diagnosing nephritis.

    PubMed

    Park, Keun-Yong; Sohn, Young-Soo; Kim, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Hong-Seok; Bae, Young-Seuk; Choi, Sie-Young

    2008-07-15

    An albumin biosensor based on a potentiometric measurement using Biofield-effect-transistor (BioFET) has been designed and fabricated, and its characteristics were investigated. The BioFET was fabricated using semiconductor integrated circuit (IC) technology. The gate surface of the BioFET was chemically modified by newly developed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) synthesized by a thiazole benzo crown ether ethylamine (TBCEA)-thioctic acid to immobilize anti-albumin. SAM formation, antibody immobilization, and antigen-antibody interaction were verified using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The output voltage changes of the BioFET with respect to various albumin concentrations were obtained. Quasi-reference electrode (QRE) and reference FET (ReFET) has been integrated with the BioFET, and its output characteristic was investigated. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the BioFET as the albumin sensor for diagnosing nephritis. PMID:18440216

  7. Focal adhesions in osteoneogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, M.J.P; Dalby, M.J

    2010-01-01

    As materials technology and the field of tissue engineering advances, the role of cellular adhesive mechanisms, in particular the interactions with implantable devices, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. A key tenet of medical device technology is to use the exquisite ability of biological systems to respond to the material surface or chemical stimuli in order to help develop next-generation biomaterials. The focus of this review is on recent studies and developments concerning focal adhesion formation in osteoneogenesis, with an emphasis on the influence of synthetic constructs on integrin mediated cellular adhesion and function. PMID:21287830

  8. High-mobility Group Box-1 Protein Promotes Granulomatous Nephritis in Adenine-induced nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Oyama, Yoko; Hashiguchi, Teruto; Taniguchi, Noboru; Tancharoen, Salunya; Uchimura, Tomonori; Biswas, Kamal K.; Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Nitanda, Takao; Umekita, Yoshihisa; Lotz, Martin; Maruyama, Ikuro

    2011-01-01

    Granulomatous nephritis can be triggered by diverse factors and results in kidney failure. However, despite accumulating data about granulomatous inflammation, pathogenetic mechanisms in nephritis remain unclear. The DNA-binding high-mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) initiates and propagates inflammation when released by activated macrophages, functions as an “alarm cytokine” signaling tissue damage. In this study, we demonstrated elevated HMGB1 expression in renal granulomas in rats with crystal-induced granulomatous nephritis caused by feeding an adenine-rich diet. HMGB1 levels were also raised in urine and serum, as well as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a mediator of granulomatous inflammation. Injection of HMGB1 worsened renal function and upregulated MCP-1 in rats with crystal-induced granulomatous nephritis. HMGB1 also induced MCP-1 secretion through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) pathways in rat renal tubular epithelial cells in vitro. Hmgb1+/− mice with crystal-induced nephritis displayed reduced MCP-1 expression in the kidneys and in urine and the number of macrophages in the kidneys was significantly decreased. We conclude that HMGB1 is a new mediator involved in crystal-induced nephritis that amplifies granulomatous inflammation in a cycle where MCP-1 attracts activated macrophages, resulting in excessive and sustained HMGB1 release. HMGB1 could be a novel target for inhibiting chronic granulomatous diseases. PMID:20231821

  9. Renal flare prediction and prognosis in lupus nephritis Hispanic patients.

    PubMed

    Mejía-Vilet, J M; Córdova-Sánchez, B M; Arreola-Guerra, J M; Morales-Buenrostro, L E; Uribe-Uribe, N O; Correa-Rotter, R

    2016-03-01

    We performed a retrospective cohort analysis focusing on lupus nephritis renal flare incidence and outcome predictors. One hundred and eighteen patients with biopsy-proven lupus nephritis were segregated by induction/maintenance regimes. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients experiencing renal flare. Secondary assessment included doubling of serum creatinine and development of end-stage renal disease. After a median follow-up of 31 months (interquartile range 21-46) from the date of response to induction therapy, 47 patients (39.8%) developed a renal flare. Azathioprine-maintained patients had a higher risk of renal flare compared with mycophenolate mofetil-maintained patients (hazard ratio 2.53, 95% confidence interval 1.39-4.59, p < 0.01). Age (hazard ratio 0.96, 0.92-0.99, p = 0.03), serum creatinine at presentation (hazard ratio 1.76, 1.13-2.76, p = 0.01), complete remission after induction therapy (hazard ratio 0.28, 0.14-0.56, p < 0.001) and azathioprine maintenance therapy (hazard ratio 4.78, 2.16-10.6, p < 0.001) were associated with renal flare on multivariate analysis. Ten patients progressed to end-stage renal disease (8.5%) by a median 32.5 months. Age (hazard ratio 0.88, 0.77-0.99, p = 0.05), complete remission after induction therapy (hazard ratio 0.08, 0.01-0.94, p = 0.04) and severe nephritic flare (hazard ratio 13.6, 1.72-107.7, p = 0.01) were associated with end-stage renal disease development. Azathioprine maintenance therapy is associated with a higher incidence of relapse in the Mexican-mestizo population. Younger age and nephritic flares predict development of end-stage renal disease. PMID:26405028

  10. Lupus nephritis in Egyptian children: a 16-year experience.

    PubMed

    Elmougy, Atef; Sarhan, Amr; Hammad, Ayman; El-Refaey, Ahmed; Zedan, Mohammed; Eid, Riham; Laimon, Wafaa; Limon, Wafaa; Elrahman, Ashraf Abd; Elhussieni, Fatma; El-Sherbeny, Enas; Bakr, Ashraf

    2015-10-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the clinical features, histo-pathological patterns, treatment modalities, and outcome of children and adolescents with lupus nephritis (LN), followed-up in Lupus Clinic, Pediatric Nephrology Unit, Mansoura University Children's Hospital between January 1997 and December 2012. Out of 194 patients diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), LN was reported in 136 (70 %) patient, they were 27 males (20 %) and 109 females (80 %). The mean age at presentation was 12.5 ± 2.9 years, the mean duration of follow up was 4.1 years (range 2 months-12 years). Hematuria was present in 79 patients (58 %), proteinuria in 126 (92.6 %), 38 of them were in nephrotic range, while renal impairment was documented in 20 patients (15 %). Renal biopsy was done in 132 patients; diagnosis of class II, III, IV, V were 23, 25, 39, and 2 % respectively. Second renal biopsy was indicated in 58 patients (insufficient first biopsy 2, follow up in 45, lupus flare in 8, no response to therapy in 3 patients), while the third one was needed in only eight patients. Steroids were the commonest initial medications; used in 128 patients (63 alone and 65 with others) and cyclophosphamide was used in 64 patients. At the last follow-up visit; 19 % of patients lost follow-up, 45 % had complete remission, 21 % still had active disease, 1 % had end-stage renal disease, and 11 % died. In conclusion, in Egypt, childhood SLE is associated with frequent and severe nephritis at presentation, and this may be attributed to genetic, ethnic, or environmental factors. PMID:25491938

  11. Insights into the epidemiology and management of lupus nephritis from the US rheumatologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Paul J; Costenbader, Karen H

    2016-09-01

    Lupus nephritis is a common and severe manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus that disproportionately affects nonwhites and those in lower socioeconomic groups. This review discusses recent data on the incidence, prevalence, and outcomes of patients with lupus nephritis with a focus on low-income US Medicaid patients. We also review recent guidelines on diagnosis, treatment, and screening for new onset and relapses of lupus nephritis. Finally, we discuss the management of lupus nephritis from a rheumatologist's perspective, including vigilance for the common adverse events related to disease and treatment, and we review prevention and new treatment strategies. PMID:27344205

  12. Long-term outcomes of end-stage kidney disease for patients with lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Lee, Gavin; Liu, Xusheng; Pascoe, Elaine M; Badve, Sunil V; Boudville, Neil C; Clayton, Philip A; Hawley, Carmel M; Kanellis, John; McDonald, Stephen P; Peh, Chen Au; Polkinghorne, Kevan R; Johnson, David W

    2016-06-01

    Patient outcomes in end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) secondary to lupus nephritis have not been well described. To help define this we compared dialysis and transplant outcomes of patients with ESKD due to lupus nephritis to all other causes. All patients diagnosed with ESKD who commenced renal replacement therapy in Australia and New Zealand (1963-2012) were included. Clinical outcomes were evaluated in both a contemporary cohort (1998-2012) and the entire 50-year cohort. Of 64,160 included patients, 744 had lupus nephritis as the primary renal disease. For the contemporary cohort of 425 patients with lupus nephritis, the 5-year dialysis patient survival rate was 69%. Of 176 contemporary patients with lupus nephritis who received their first renal allograft, the 5-year patient, overall renal allograft, and death-censored renal allograft survival rates were 95%, 88%, and 93%, respectively. Patients with lupus nephritis had worse dialysis patient survival (adjusted hazard ratio 1.33, 95% confidence interval 1.12-1.58) and renal transplant patient survival (adjusted hazard ratio 1.87, 95% confidence interval 1.18-2.98), but comparable overall renal allograft survival (adjusted hazard ratio 1.19, 95% confidence interval 0.84-1.68) and death-censored renal allograft survival (adjusted hazard ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval 0.68-1.62) compared with ESKD controls. Similar results were found in the entire cohort and when using competing-risks analysis. Thus, the ESKD of lupus nephritis was associated with worse dialysis and transplant patient survival but comparable renal allograft survival compared with other causes of ESKD. PMID:27165824

  13. Opportunistic bacterial infections in breeding colonies of the NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ (NSG) mouse strain

    PubMed Central

    foreman, Oded; Kavirayani, Anoop M; Griffey, Stephen M; Reader, Rachel; Shultz, Leonard D

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous morbidity primarily affecting female breeders in three independent breeding colonies of NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ (NSG) mice prompted an investigation to uncover the cause of disease. Necropsies were performed on 264 (157 female and 107 male) spontaneously sick, experimentally unmanipulated NSG mice. 42 (15.9%) of the mice had acute or chronic renal inflammatory lesions. 12 of the mice with nephritis had concurrent histologic evidence of an ascending urinary tract infection. From 94 kidneys cultured for bacterial organisms, 23 (24.4%) grew Enterococcus species and 19 (20%) grew Klebsiella Oxytoca. Female mice were twice more likely to present with nephritis than males. These findings indicate that bacterial nephritis is a major contributor to morbidity in the NSG strain. PMID:20817888

  14. Mechanisms of Kidney Injury in Lupus Nephritis – the Role of Anti-dsDNA Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Susan; Chan, Tak Mao

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by a breakdown of self-tolerance, production of auto-antibodies and immune-mediated injury, resulting in damage accrual in multiple organs. Kidney involvement, termed lupus nephritis, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality that affects over half of the SLE population during the course of disease. The etiology of lupus nephritis is multifactorial and remains to be fully elucidated. Accumulating evidence suggests that in addition to forming immune complexes and triggering complement activation, anti-dsDNA antibodies contribute to the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis through binding, either directly or indirectly, to cross-reactive antigens or chromatin materials, respectively, to resident renal cells and/or extracellular matrix components, thereby triggering downstream cellular activation and proliferation as well as inflammatory and fibrotic processes. Several cross-reactive antigens that mediate anti-dsDNA antibody binding have been identified, such as annexin II and alpha-actinin. This review discusses the mechanisms through which anti-dsDNA antibodies contribute to immunopathogenesis in lupus nephritis. Corticosteroids combined with either mycophenolic acid (MPA) or cyclophosphamide is the current standard of care immunosuppressive therapy for severe lupus nephritis. This review also discusses recent data showing distinct effects of MPA and cyclophosphamide on inflammatory and fibrotic processes in resident renal cells. PMID:26441980

  15. Efficacy of novel monoclonal antibody belimumab in the treatment of lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Frieri, Marianne; Heuser, William; Bliss, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Recently introduced into the market, belimumab (Benlysta) is a monoclonal antibody that has potential clinically efficacious applications for the treatment of lupus nephritis. Lupus nephritis is a major complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) that can lead to significant illness or even death without proper intervention and treatment. With vast implications through a novel mechanism, belimumab offers a new standard of treatment for physicians in the complications associated with SLE, specifically lupus nephritis. By targeting B cell signaling and maturation, belimumab is able to mitigate the underlying pathological complications surrounding SLE. Phase 3 clinical trials with belimumab have depicted clinically efficacious applications, suggesting belimumab as a revolutionary breakthrough in the treatment armamentarium for practicing clinicians. This article explains the precise mechanism of action of belimumab on the soluble protein BlyS that plays a major role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. In addition, the extensive pharmacokinetics and clinical implications are exemplified in this review with belimumab's comparison with standard therapeutic guidelines for the treatment of lupus nephritis. PMID:25969652

  16. The prevalence of interstitial nephritis and leptospirosis in 283 raccoons (Procyon lotor) from 5 different sites in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Hamir, A N; Hanlon, C A; Niezgoda, M; Rupprecht, C E

    2001-01-01

    A retrospective histopathological study was carried out on tissues of 283 raccoons from 5 different geographical locations for presence of interstitial nephritis and renal leptospirosis. Results of this study indicate that although interstitial nephritis was common in raccoons from all locations, the presence of renal leptospiral spirochetes was not. PMID:11708206

  17. Mosaic Focal Plane Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, David L.; Horner, Scott D.; Aamodt, Earl K.

    2002-12-01

    Advances in systems engineering, applied sciences, and manufacturing technologies have enabled the development of large ground based and spaced based astronomical instruments having a large Field of View (FOV) to capture a large portion of the universe in a single image. A larger FOV can be accomplished using light weighted optical elements, improved support structures, and the development of mosaic Focal Plane Assemblies (mFPA). A mFPA designed for astronomy can use multiple Charged Coupled Devices (CCD) mounted onto a single camera baseplate integrated at the instrument plane of focus. Examples of current, or proposed, missions utilizing mFPA technology include FAME, GEST, Kepler, GAIA, LSST, and SNAP. The development of a mFPA mandates tighter control on the design trades, component development, CCD characterization, component integration, and performance verification testing. This paper addresses the capability Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company's (LMSSC) Advanced Technology Center (ATC) has developed to perform CCD characterization, mFPA assembly and alignment, and mFPA system level testing.

  18. Mosaic Focal Plane Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, D.; Horner, S.; Aamodt, E.

    Advances in manufacturing and applied sciences have enabled the development of large ground and spaced based astronomical instruments having a Field of View (FOV) large enough to capture a large portion of the universe in a single image. A large FOV can be accomplished using light weighted optics, improved structures, and the development of mosaic Focal Plane Assemblies (mFPAs). A mFPA comprises multiple Charged Coupled Devices (CCD) mounted onto a single baseplate integrated at the focus plane of the instrument. Examples of current, or proposed, missions utilizing mFPA technology include FAME, GEST, Kepler, GAIA, LSST, and SNAP. The development of a mFPA mandates tight control on the design trades of component development, CCD definition and characterization, component integration, and performance verification testing. This paper addresses the results of the Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC), Advanced Technology Center (ATC) developed mFPA. The design trades and performance characterization are services provided by the LMSSC ATC but not detailed in this paper.

  19. Intracranial hypertension: A rare presentation of lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Praveen; Nair, Anishkumar; Cherian, Ajith; Sibi, N. S.; Kumar, Ashwini

    2010-01-01

    A 14-year-old male presented with bilateral papilledema, growth retardation and absent secondary sexual characters. He had a past history of fever, headache and fatigue of 6 months duration. The diagnosis of intracranial hypertension (IH) was confirmed by an increased intracranial pressure and normal neuroimaging studies of the brain, except for partial empty sella, prominent perioptic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces and buckling of optic nerves. Evaluation showed erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) of 150 mm/hr, positive antinuclear antibody (ANA), anti dsDNA and anti ribosomal P protein. Renal biopsy revealed diffuse segmental proliferative lupus nephritis (LN) class IV S (A) confirming the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Treatment of LN with intravenous pulse methyl prednisolone and cyclophosphamide was effective in normalizing the CSF pressure, resulting in express and dramatic resolution of symptomatology. In a case of IH, SLE must be considered. IH, growth retardation and absence of sexual characters may be presenting manifestations of a chronic systemic inflammatory disease like SLE. These manifestations may act as a pointer to associated advanced grades of LN, which can be totally asymptomatic and missed without a renal biopsy. PMID:21559160

  20. Acute interstitial nephritis – a reappraisal and update

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Rajeev; Eknoyan, Garabed

    2014-01-01

    Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is an under recognized and under diagnosed cause of acute kidney injury (AKI). It is estimated to account for 15 – 20% of cases of AKI; it is the reported diagnosis in 2.8% of all kidney biopsies, and 13.5% of biopsies done specifically for acute renal failure. Considerable evidence implicates antigen initiated cell-mediated injury in the pathogenesis of AIN. Drugs account for 70% of all cases, with over 150 different agents incriminated. The remaining cases are due to infections, autoimmune diseases, and rarely idiopathic. The central component of renal injury in AIN is altered tubular function, which usually precedes decrements in filtration rate. The key to early diagnosis is vigilance for the presence of tubular dysfunction in non-oliguric individuals, especially in patients with modest but gradual increments in creatinine level. The utility of urinary biomarkers to diagnose AIN in its early nascent and potentially reversible stage remains to be determined. Prompt recognition, elimination of the offending source of antigen, and use of a limited course of steroid therapy where indicated, will result in complete resolution in ~ 65% of cases, partial resolution in up to 20%, and irreversible damage in the rest. PMID:25079860

  1. Obstetric nephrology: lupus and lupus nephritis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Stanhope, Todd J; White, Wendy M; Moder, Kevin G; Smyth, Andrew; Garovic, Vesna D

    2012-12-01

    SLE is a multi-organ autoimmune disease that affects women of childbearing age. Renal involvement in the form of either active lupus nephritis (LN) at the time of conception, or a LN new onset or flare during pregnancy increases the risks of preterm delivery, pre-eclampsia, maternal mortality, fetal/neonatal demise, and intrauterine growth restriction. Consequently, current recommendations advise that the affected woman achieve a stable remission of her renal disease for at least 6 months before conception. Hormonal and immune system changes in pregnancy may affect disease activity and progression, and published evidence suggests that there is an increased risk for a LN flare during pregnancy. The major goal of immunosuppressive therapy in pregnancy is control of disease activity with medications that are relatively safe for a growing fetus. Therefore, the use of mycophenolate mofetil, due to increasing evidence supporting its teratogenicity, is contraindicated during pregnancy. Worsening proteinuria, which commonly occurs in proteinuric renal diseases toward the end of pregnancy, should be differentiated from a LN flare and/or pre-eclampsia, a pregnancy-specific condition clinically characterized by hypertension and proteinuria. These considerations present challenges that underscore the importance of a multidisciplinary team approach when caring for these patients, including a nephrologist, rheumatologist, and obstetrician who have experience with these pregnancy-related complications. This review discusses the pathogenesis, maternal and fetal risks, and management pertinent to SLE patients with new onset or a history of LN predating pregnancy. PMID:22879437

  2. Outcome of the acute glomerular injury in proliferative lupus nephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Chagnac, A.; Kiberd, B.A.; Farinas, M.C.; Strober, S.; Sibley, R.K.; Hoppe, R.; Myers, B.D. )

    1989-09-01

    Treatment with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and corticosteroids markedly reduced activity of systemic lupus erythematosis in 10 patients with diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis (DPLN) complicated by a nephrotic syndrome. Physiologic and morphometric techniques were used serially before, and 12 and 36 mo post-TLI to characterize the course of glomerular injury. Judged by a progressive reduction in the density of glomerular cells and immune deposits, glomerular inflammation subsided. A sustained reduction in the fractional clearance of albumin, IgG and uncharged dextrans of radius greater than 50 A, pointed to a parallel improvement in glomerular barrier size-selectivity. Corresponding changes in GFR were modest, however. A trend towards higher GFR at 12 mo was associated with a marked increase in the fraction of glomerular tuft area occupied by patent capillary loops as inflammatory changes receded. A late trend toward declining GFR beyond 12 mo was associated with progressive glomerulosclerosis, which affected 57% of all glomeruli globally by 36 mo post-TLI. Judged by a parallel increase in volume by 59%, remaining, patent glomeruli had undergone a process of adaptive enlargement. We propose that an increasing fraction of glomeruli continues to undergo progressive sclerosis after DPLN has become quiescent, and that the prevailing GFR depends on the extent to which hypertrophied remnant glomeruli can compensate for the ensuing loss of filtration surface area.

  3. MicroRNAs Implicated in the Immunopathogenesis of Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Chafin, Cristen B.; Reilly, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the deposition of immune complexes due to widespread loss of immune tolerance to nuclear self-antigens. Deposition in the renal glomeruli results in the development of lupus nephritis (LN), the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in SLE. In addition to the well-recognized genetic susceptibility to SLE, disease pathogenesis is influenced by epigenetic regulators such as microRNAs (miRNAs). miRNAs are small, noncoding RNAs that bind to the 3′ untranslated region of target mRNAs resulting in posttranscriptional gene modulation. miRNAs play an important and dynamic role in the activation of innate immune cells and are critical in regulating the adaptive immune response. Immune stimulation and the resulting cytokine milieu alter miRNA expression while miRNAs themselves modify cellular responses to stimulation. Here we examine dysregulated miRNAs implicated in LN pathogenesis from human SLE patients and murine lupus models. The effects of LN-associated miRNAs in the kidney, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, macrophages, mesangial cells, dendritic cells, and splenocytes are discussed. As the role of miRNAs in immunopathogenesis becomes delineated, it is likely that specific miRNAs may serve as targets for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of LN and other pathologies. PMID:23983769

  4. Phenazopyridine associated acute interstitial nephritis and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manisha; Shailesh, Fnu; Tiwari, Upasana; Sharma, Shree G; Malik, Bilal

    2014-06-01

    Phenazopyridine is a urinary analgesic; commonly seen side-effects of this drug include, orange discoloration of urine, methemoglobinemia, yellowish skin discoloration, hepatitis and acute renal failure. Various case reports with phenazopyridine associated acute renal failure secondary to acute tubular necrosis have been reported in the literature. Acute kidney injury in these patients is caused by either direct injury to renal tubular epithelial cells or secondary to pigment induced nephropathy from hemolytic anemia. Hypoxic injury from phenazopyridine-induced methemoglobinemia has been well documented. We report a case of biopsy proven acute interstitial nephritis, associated with therapeutic doses of phenazopyridine without any evidence of methemoglobinemia or other mechanism of renal injury. Clinicians should be aware of the toxicity of this commonly used drug and should look closely for signs of renal insufficiency. Identifying and stopping the offending medication stays as the first step, but recent studies indicate that early steroid administration improves renal recovery, as well as decreasing the risk of progression to chronic kidney disease with fibrosis and consequent permanent renal damage. PMID:24575779

  5. [Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis following adenovirus and respiratory syncytial virus infection].

    PubMed

    de Suremain, A; Somrani, R; Bourdat-Michel, G; Pinel, N; Morel-Baccard, C; Payen, V

    2015-05-01

    Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) is responsible for nearly 10% of acute renal failure (ARF) cases in children. It is mostly drug-induced, but in a few cases viruses are involved, probably by an indirect mechanism. An immune-competent 13-month-old boy was admitted to the intensive care unit for severe ARF with anuria in a context of fever, cough, and rhinorrhea lasting 1 week. The kidney biopsy performed early brought out tubulointerstitial damage with mild infiltrate of lymphocytes, without any signs of necrosis. There were no virus inclusion bodies, no interstitial hemorrhage, and no glomerular or vascular damage. Other causes of TIN were excluded: there was no biological argument for an immunological, immune, or drug-induced cause. Adenovirus (ADV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) were positive in respiratory multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in nasal aspirate but not in blood, urine, and renal tissue. The patient underwent dialysis for 10 days but the response to corticosteroid therapy was quickly observed within 48 h. The mechanism of TIN associated with virus infection is unknown. However, it may be immune-mediated to be able to link severe renal dysfunction and ADV and/or RSV invasion of the respiratory tract. PMID:25842199

  6. Kallikrein genes are associated with lupus and glomerular basement membrane-specific antibody-induced nephritis in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kui; Li, Quan-Zhen; Delgado-Vega, Angelica M; Abelson, Anna-Karin; Sánchez, Elena; Kelly, Jennifer A; Li, Li; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jinchun; Yan, Mei; Ye, Qiu; Liu, Shenxi; Xie, Chun; Zhou, Xin J; Chung, Sharon A; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Witte, Torsten; de Ramón, Enrique; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Barizzone, Nadia; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Merrill, Joan T; Gregersen, Peter K; Gilkeson, Gary G; Kimberly, Robert P; Vyse, Timothy J; Kim, Il; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Martin, Javier; Harley, John B; Criswell, Lindsey A; Wakeland, Edward K; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Mohan, Chandra

    2009-04-01

    Immune-mediated nephritis contributes to disease in systemic lupus erythematosus, Goodpasture syndrome (caused by antibodies specific for glomerular basement membrane [anti-GBM antibodies]), and spontaneous lupus nephritis. Inbred mouse strains differ in susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody-induced and spontaneous lupus nephritis. This study sought to clarify the genetic and molecular factors that maybe responsible for enhanced immune-mediated renal disease in these models. When the kidneys of 3 mouse strains sensitive to anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis were compared with those of 2 control strains using microarray analysis, one-fifth of the underexpressed genes belonged to the kallikrein gene family,which encodes serine esterases. Mouse strains that upregulated renal and urinary kallikreins exhibited less evidence of disease. Antagonizing the kallikrein pathway augmented disease, while agonists dampened the severity of anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis. In addition, nephritis-sensitive mouse strains had kallikrein haplotypes that were distinct from those of control strains, including several regulatory polymorphisms,some of which were associated with functional consequences. Indeed, increased susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis and spontaneous lupus nephritis was achieved by breeding mice with a genetic interval harboring the kallikrein genes onto a disease-resistant background. Finally, both human SLE and spontaneous lupus nephritis were found to be associated with kallikrein genes, particularly KLK1 and the KLK3 promoter, when DNA SNPs from independent cohorts of SLE patients and controls were compared. Collectively, these studies suggest that kallikreins are protective disease-associated genes in anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis and lupus. PMID:19307730

  7. Kallikrein genes are associated with lupus and glomerular basement membrane–specific antibody–induced nephritis in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kui; Li, Quan-Zhen; Delgado-Vega, Angelica M.; Abelson, Anna-Karin; Sánchez, Elena; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Li, Li; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jinchun; Yan, Mei; Ye, Qiu; Liu, Shenxi; Xie, Chun; Zhou, Xin J.; Chung, Sharon A.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Witte, Torsten; de Ramón, Enrique; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Barizzone, Nadia; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Merrill, Joan T.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Gilkeson, Gary G.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Kim, Il; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Martin, Javier; Harley, John B.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Wakeland, Edward K.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Mohan, Chandra

    2009-01-01

    Immune-mediated nephritis contributes to disease in systemic lupus erythematosus, Goodpasture syndrome (caused by antibodies specific for glomerular basement membrane [anti-GBM antibodies]), and spontaneous lupus nephritis. Inbred mouse strains differ in susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody–induced and spontaneous lupus nephritis. This study sought to clarify the genetic and molecular factors that may be responsible for enhanced immune-mediated renal disease in these models. When the kidneys of 3 mouse strains sensitive to anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis were compared with those of 2 control strains using microarray analysis, one-fifth of the underexpressed genes belonged to the kallikrein gene family, which encodes serine esterases. Mouse strains that upregulated renal and urinary kallikreins exhibited less evidence of disease. Antagonizing the kallikrein pathway augmented disease, while agonists dampened the severity of anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis. In addition, nephritis-sensitive mouse strains had kallikrein haplotypes that were distinct from those of control strains, including several regulatory polymorphisms, some of which were associated with functional consequences. Indeed, increased susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis and spontaneous lupus nephritis was achieved by breeding mice with a genetic interval harboring the kallikrein genes onto a disease-resistant background. Finally, both human SLE and spontaneous lupus nephritis were found to be associated with kallikrein genes, particularly KLK1 and the KLK3 promoter, when DNA SNPs from independent cohorts of SLE patients and controls were compared. Collectively, these studies suggest that kallikreins are protective disease-associated genes in anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis and lupus. PMID:19307730

  8. Identification of unique microRNA signature associated with lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Te, Jeannie L; Dozmorov, Igor M; Guthridge, Joel M; Nguyen, Kim L; Cavett, Joshua W; Kelly, Jennifer A; Bruner, Gail R; Harley, John B; Ojwang, Joshua O

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) have emerged as an important new class of modulators of gene expression. In this study we investigated miRNA that are differentially expressed in lupus nephritis. Microarray technology was used to investigate differentially expressed miRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-transformed cell lines obtained from lupus nephritis affected patients and unaffected controls. TaqMan-based stem-loop real-time polymerase chain reaction was used for validation. Microarray analysis of miRNA expressed in both African American (AA) and European American (EA) derived lupus nephritis samples revealed 29 and 50 differentially expressed miRNA, respectively, of 850 tested. There were 18 miRNA that were differentially expressed in both racial groups. When samples from both racial groups and different specimen types were considered, there were 5 primary miRNA that were differentially expressed. We have identified 5 miRNA; hsa-miR-371-5P, hsa-miR-423-5P, hsa-miR-638, hsa-miR-1224-3P and hsa-miR-663 that were differentially expressed in lupus nephritis across different racial groups and all specimen types tested. Hsa-miR-371-5P, hsa-miR-1224-3P and hsa-miR-423-5P, are reported here for the first time to be associated with lupus nephritis. Our work establishes EBV-transformed B cell lines as a useful model for the discovery of miRNA as biomarkers for SLE. Based on these findings, we postulate that these differentially expressed miRNA may be potential novel biomarkers for SLE as well as help elucidate pathogenic mechanisms of lupus nephritis. The investigation of miRNA profiles in SLE may lead to the discovery and development of novel methods to diagnosis, treat and prevent SLE. PMID:20485490

  9. Rituximab for the Treatment of IgG4-Related Tubulointerstitial Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Blaithin A.; Novick, Tessa; Scheel, Paul J.; Bagnasco, Serena; Atta, Mohamed G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Immunoglobulin type gamma 4 (IgG4)-related disease is a relatively newly described clinical entity characterized by a distinctive histopathological appearance, increased numbers of IgG4 positive plasma cells and often, but not always, elevated serum IgG4 concentrations. The most common renal manifestation of IgG4-related disease is tubulointerstitial nephritis marked with proteinuria, hematuria, decreased kidney function, hypocomplementemia, and radiologic abnormalities. Renal biopsy characteristics include dense lymphoplasmacytic tubulointerstitial nephritis that stains for IgG4, storiform fibrosis, and immune complex deposition in the interstitium and along tubule basement membranes. Treatment traditionally consists of prolonged glucocorticoids but cases refractory to glucocorticoids have been reported. We report a case of a 58-year-old Caucasian man who presented with fatigue, 50 pound weight loss, dyspnea, lymphadenopathy, and nephromegaly. The patient was first misdiagnosed as chronic interstitial nephritis secondary to renal sarcoid and was treated with repeated doses of prednisone. On his third relapse, he underwent a repeat renal biopsy and a diagnosis of IgG4-tubulointerstitial nephritis was confirmed. He was refractory to treatment with prednisone. The patient received Rituximab and had prompt sustained improvement in renal function. At 1 year post Rituximab treatment, his serum creatinine remains at baseline and imaging study revealed reduction in his kidney size. This is the first case report using Rituximab as a steroid sparing option for refractory IgG4-tubulointerstitial nephritis. More information is needed on the long-term effects of using of B-cell depleting agents for glucocorticoid resistant IgG4-tubulointerstitial nephritis. PMID:26266393

  10. A case of anaphylactoid purpura nephritis accompanied by pulmonary hemorrhage and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    REN, XIANQING; ZHANG, WENJUAN; DANG, WEILI; ZHAI, WENSHENG; GUO, QINGYIN; DING, YIN; YANG, XIAOQING

    2013-01-01

    Cases of Henoch-Schönlein purpura and purpura nephritis accompanied by pulmonary hemorrhage are rare. Mild cases are easily ignored due to a lack of evident bleeding, and severe cases may be fatal. We have only treated one patient with Henoch-Schönlein nephritis (HSPN), a female child. The clinical manifestations were not evident, however, the imaging manifestations were clear. Finally, the patient was definitively diagnosed with HSPN accompanied by pulmonary hemorrhage. Following treatment with antiinflammatory and steroidal agents, tripterygium glycosides and traditional Chinese medicine, the patient recovered. In the present study, we report the diagnosis and treatment of this disease, with a review of the literature. PMID:23737885

  11. BK Nephritis and Venous Thrombosis in Renal Transplant Recipient Detected by 111In Leukocyte Imaging.

    PubMed

    Pucar, Darko; Klein, Kandace; Corley, James; Williams, Hadyn T

    2015-07-01

    Three months after deceased donor kidney transplant, a patient who presented with proteinuric renal dysfunction and fever of undetermined origin was found to have BK viruria by quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. An ¹¹¹In leukocyte scan showed increased renal transplant uptake consistent with nephritis and linear uptake in the knee. Venous duplex ultrasound revealed acute occlusive thrombosis in the superficial right lesser saphenous vein in the area of increased radiolabeled leukocyte uptake. This ¹¹¹In leukocyte scan performed for fever of undetermined origin demonstrated findings of BK nephritis in a renal transplant patient and associated acute venous thrombosis related to leukocyte colonization. PMID:26018698

  12. Severe Hyponatremia and Immune Nephritis Following an Initial Infusion of Nivolumab.

    PubMed

    Vandiver, Jeremy W; Singer, Zachary; Harshberger, Cara

    2016-08-01

    Anti-programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) antibodies pembrolizumab and nivolumab are becoming increasingly important in the treatment of melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer. These agents are known to induce many immune-related adverse events, but rapid-onset nephritis and immune-related hyponatremia have not been described to date. We describe the case of an adult patient who developed severe hyponatremia and rapid-onset nephritis following the first infusion of nivolumab for metastatic melanoma. PMID:26940583

  13. Synthetic Cannabinoid Induced acute Tubulointerstitial Nephritis and Uveitis Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Vedat; Kockar, Alev; Ecder, Tevfik

    2016-01-01

    Tubulointerstitial Nephritis with Uveitis (TINU) syndrome is a rarely seen syndrome. The interstitial nephritis may be with the concurrent uveitis and can also develop before or after uveitis. The syndrome can resolve after elimination of the culprit destructive factors, such as drugs, toxins and immune reaction. Synthetic cannabinoids have emerged as drugs of abuse with increasing popularity among young adults. Recent literature has documented reports of acute kidney injury in association with the use of synthetic cannabinoids; however, there is no report of TINU syndrome development secondary to using of synthetic cannabinoids. Herein, we report a 42-year-old male with TINU syndrome associated with smoking synthetic cannabinoid. PMID:27437289

  14. Streptococcal Infection-related Nephritis (SIRN) Manifesting Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis Type I.

    PubMed

    Iseri, Ken; Iyoda, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Yasutaka; Kobayashi, Naoto; Oda, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Yutaka; Shibata, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the case of an 18-year-old boy who developed nephrotic syndrome and hypertension after upper airway inflammation. Post-streptococcal acute glomerulonephritis was diagnosed on the basis of a high antistreptolysin O titer, hypocomplementemia, proteinuria, and microscopic hematuria. A renal biopsy was performed due to persistent proteinuria, and the pathological diagnosis was membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) type I. Glomeruli showed positive staining for nephritis-associated plasmin receptor (NAPlr), a nephritogenic group A streptococcal antigen, and plasmin activity was found in a similar distribution as NAPlr deposition. This rare case of streptococcal infection-related nephritis (SIRN) manifesting MPGN type I supports the histological diversity of SIRN. PMID:26984084

  15. Statistical Earthquake Focal Mechanism Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Y. Y.; Jackson, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    The new whole Earth focal mechanism forecast, based on the GCMT catalog, has been created. In the present forecast, the sum of normalized seismic moment tensors within 1000 km radius is calculated and the P- and T-axes for the focal mechanism are evaluated on the basis of the sum. Simultaneously we calculate an average rotation angle between the forecasted mechanism and all the surrounding mechanisms. This average angle shows tectonic complexity of a region and indicates the accuracy of the prediction. The method was originally proposed by Kagan and Jackson (1994, JGR). Recent interest by CSEP and GEM has motivated some improvements, particularly to extend the previous forecast to polar and near-polar regions. The major problem in extending the forecast is the focal mechanism calculation on a spherical surface. In the previous forecast as our average focal mechanism was computed, it was assumed that longitude lines are approximately parallel within 1000 km radius. This is largely accurate in the equatorial and near-equatorial areas. However, when one approaches the 75 degree latitude, the longitude lines are no longer parallel: the bearing (azimuthal) difference at points separated by 1000 km reach about 35 degrees. In most situations a forecast point where we calculate an average focal mechanism is surrounded by earthquakes, so a bias should not be strong due to the difference effect cancellation. But if we move into polar regions, the bearing difference could approach 180 degrees. In a modified program focal mechanisms have been projected on a plane tangent to a sphere at a forecast point. New longitude axes which are parallel in the tangent plane are corrected for the bearing difference. A comparison with the old 75S-75N forecast shows that in equatorial regions the forecasted focal mechanisms are almost the same, and the difference in the forecasted focal mechanisms rotation angle is close to zero. However, though the forecasted focal mechanisms are similar

  16. Genomics and disease progression in IgA nephritis.

    PubMed

    Woo, Keng Thye; Lau, Yeow Kok; Choong, Hui Lin; Tan, Han Khim; Foo, Marjorie Wy; Lee, Evan Jc; Anantharaman, Vathsala; Lee, Grace Sl; Yap, Hui Kim; Yi, Zhao; Fook-Chong, Stephanie; Wong, Kok Seng; Chan, Choong Meng

    2013-12-01

    Apart from clinical, histological and biochemical indices, genomics are now being employed to unravel the pathogenetic mechanisms in the disease progression of IgA nephritis (IgAN). The results of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphism have been controversial. Those patients with the DD genotype seem to have a poorer prognosis. However, with high dose angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) therapy, the ACE gene polymorphism status of a patient may no longer be a matter for concern as those with the DD genotype would also respond favourably to high dose ARB therapy. Association studies with gene sequencing and haplotypes have suggested that multiple genes are involved in the pathogenesis of IgAN. Some workers have reported a synergistic effect in the combined analysis of AGT-M235T and ACE I/D polymorphism. With the use of deoxyribo nucleic acid (DNA) microarray, tens of thousands of gene expressions genome-wide can be examined together simultaneously. A locus of familial IgAN has been described with strong evidence of linkage to IgAN1 on chromosome 6q22-23. Two other loci were reported at 4q26-31 and 17q12-22. DNA microarray techniques could also help in the identification of specific pathogenic genes that are up- or down-regulated and this may allow genome wide analyses of these genes and their role in the pathogenesis and progression of IgAN. Recently, using genome-wide association studies (GWAS) more loci for disease susceptibility for IgAN have been identified at 17p13, 8p23, 22q12, 1q32 and 6p21. PMID:24463829

  17. Genetic contributions of nonautoimmune SWR mice toward lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Xie, S; Chang, S; Yang, P; Jacob, C; Kaliyaperumal, A; Datta, S K; Mohan, C

    2001-12-15

    (SWR x New Zealand Black (NZB))F(1) (or SNF(1)) mice succumb to lupus nephritis. Although several NZB lupus susceptibility loci have been identified in other crosses, the potential genetic contributions of SWR to lupus remain unknown. To ascertain this, a panel of 86 NZB x F(1) backcross mice was immunophenotyped and genome scanned. Linkage analysis revealed four dominant SWR susceptibility loci (H2, Swrl-1, Swrl-2, and Swrl-3) and a recessive NZB locus, Nba1. Early mortality was most strongly linked to the H2 locus on chromosome (Chr) 17 (log likelihood of the odds (LOD) = 4.59 - 5.38). Susceptibility to glomerulonephritis was linked to H2 (Chr 17, LOD = 2.37 - 2.70), Swrl-2 (Chr 14, 36 cM, LOD = 2.48 - 2.71), and Nba1 (Chr 4, 75 cM, LOD = 2.15 - 2.23). IgG antinuclear autoantibody development was linked to H2 (Chr 17, LOD = 4.92 - 5.48), Swrl-1 (Chr 1, 86 cM, colocalizing with Sle1 and Nba2, LOD = 2.89 - 2.91), and Swrl-3 (Chr 18, 14 cM, LOD = 2.07 - 2.13). For each phenotype, epistatic interaction of two to three susceptibility loci was required to attain the high penetrance levels seen in the SNF(1) strain. Although the SWR contributions H2, Swrl-1, and Swrl-2 map to loci previously mapped in other strains, often linked to very similar phenotypes, Swrl-3 appears to be a novel locus. In conclusion, lupus in the SNF(1) strain is truly polygenic, with at least four dominant contributions from the SWR strain. The immunological functions and molecular identities of these loci await elucidation. PMID:11739537

  18. Long-term follow-up of the MAINTAIN Nephritis Trial, comparing azathioprine and mycophenolate mofetil as maintenance therapy of lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Tamirou, Farah; D'Cruz, David; Sangle, Shirish; Remy, Philippe; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Fiehn, Christoph; Ayala Guttierez, Maria del Mar; Gilboe, Inge-Magrethe; Tektonidou, Maria; Blockmans, Daniel; Ravelingien, Isabelle; le Guern, Véronique; Depresseux, Geneviève; Guillevin, Loïc; Cervera, Ricard; Houssiau, Frédéric A

    2016-01-01

    Objective To report the 10-year follow-up of the MAINTAIN Nephritis Trial comparing azathioprine (AZA) and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as maintenance therapy of proliferative lupus nephritis, and to test different definitions of early response as predictors of long-term renal outcome. Methods In 2014, data on survival, kidney function, 24 h proteinuria, renal flares and other outcomes were collected for the 105 patients randomised between 2002 and 2006, except in 13 lost to follow-up. Results Death (2 and 3 in the AZA and MMF groups, respectively) and end-stage renal disease (1 and 3, respectively) were rare events. Time to renal flare (22 and 19 flares in AZA and MMF groups, respectively) did not differ between AZA and MMF patients. Patients with good long-term renal outcome had a much more stringent early decrease of 24 h proteinuria compared with patients with poor outcome. The positive predictive value of a 24 h proteinuria <0.5 g/day at 3 months, 6 months and 12 months for a good long-term renal outcome was excellent (between 89% and 92%). Inclusion of renal function and urinalysis in the early response criteria did not impact the value of early proteinuria decrease as long-term prognostic marker. Conclusions The long-term follow-up data of the MAINTAIN Nephritis Trial do not indicate that MMF is superior to AZA as maintenance therapy in a Caucasian population suffering from proliferative lupus nephritis. Moreover, we confirm the excellent positive predictive value of an early proteinuria decrease for long-term renal outcome. Trial registration number NCT00204022. PMID:25757867

  19. Blockade of CD354 (TREM-1) Ameliorates Anti-GBM-Induced Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Du, Yong; Wu, Tianfu; Zhou, Xin J; Davis, Laurie S; Mohan, Chandra

    2016-06-01

    CD354, Triggering Receptor of Myeloid Cells-1 (TREM-1), is a potent amplifier of myeloid immune responses. Our goal was to determine the expression and function of TREM-1 in immune-mediated nephritis. An anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody (anti-GBM)-induced nephritis model was employed, where mice were sensitized with rabbit IgG followed by anti-GBM serum to induce disease. Anti-GBM-treated 129x1/svJ mice developed severe nephritis whereas C57BL/6 (B6) mice were resistant to disease. Anti-GBM disease resulted in elevated renal TREM-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels and increased urine TREM-1 levels in 129x1/svJ. TREM-1 blockade with an inhibitory peptide, LP17, inhibited proteinuria and renal disease as measured by glomerulonephritis class, severity of tubulointerstitial disease, crescent formation, and inflammatory cell infiltrates. In sum, TREM-1 is upregulated in renal inflammation and plays a vital role in driving disease. Thus, TREM-1 blockade emerges as a potential therapeutic avenue for immune-mediated renal diseases such as lupus nephritis. PMID:27083877

  20. 77 FR 38305 - Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Developing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... a notice published in the Federal Register of June 22, 2010 (75 FR 35492), FDA announced the... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Medical Products for Treatment; Withdrawal of Guidance AGENCY: Food...

  1. Karyomegalic Interstitial Nephritis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Isnard, Pierre; Rabant, Marion; Labaye, Jacques; Antignac, Corinne; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Zaidan, Mohamad

    2016-05-01

    Karyomegalic interstitial nephritis is a rare cause of hereditary chronic interstitial nephritis, described for the first time over 40 years ago.A 36-year-old woman, of Turkish origin, presented with chronic kidney disease and high blood pressure. She had a history of recurrent upper respiratory tract infections but no familial history of nephropathy. Physical examination was unremarkable. Laboratory tests showed serum creatinine at 2.3 mg/dL with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 26 mL/min/1.73m, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and alkaline phosphatase at 3 and 1.5 times the upper normal limit. Urinalysis showed 0.8 g/day of nonselective proteinuria, microscopic hematuria, and aseptic leukocyturia. Immunological tests and tests for human immunodeficiency and hepatitis B and C viruses were negative. Complement level and serum proteins electrophoresis were normal. Analysis of the renal biopsy showed severe interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. Numerous tubular cells had nuclear enlargement with irregular outlines, hyperchromatic aspect, and prominent nucleoli. These findings were highly suggestive of karyomegalic interstitial nephritis, which was further confirmed by exome sequencing of FAN1 gene showing an identified homozygous frameshift mutation due to a one-base-pair deletion in exon 12 (c.2616delA).The present case illustrates a rare but severe cause of hereditary interstitial nephritis, sometimes accompanied by subtle extrarenal manifestations. Identification of mutations in FAN1 gene underscores recent insights linking inadequate DNA repair and susceptibility to chronic kidney disease. PMID:27196444

  2. Herpes virus infection associated with interstitial nephritis in a beaked whale (Mesoplodon densirostris)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The capacity for herpesvirus to cause disease in cetaceans is unclear and may be varied depending on the different conditions of individuals and between different species. Kidney pathology and intralesional virus-associated infection have been rarely reported in cetaceans. Result On April 2004, an old adult male Blainville’s beaked whale (Mesoplodon densirostris) 420 cm long with a poor body condition was stranded on Tenerife Island. During necropsy, no gross lesions were observed in the kidneys. However, membranous glomerulonephritis, multifocal interstitial lymphoplasmacytic nephritis and acute multifocal necrotizing tubulointerstitial nephritis with intranuclear inclusion bodies was diagnosed by histological analysis. Tissue samples were submitted for bacteriological analysis and molecular viral screening. Conclusion A novel alpha herpesvirus associated with interstitial nephritis was identified in an old adult male Blainville's beaked whale (M. densirostris) with a poor body condition stranded in the Canary Islands. This report suggests that identification of herpesvirus infection could be used as a differential diagnosis for interstitial nephritis in cetaceans. PMID:23237059

  3. Precise Measurement of Effective Focal Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, T. D.; Young, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    Computerized instrument measures effective focal lengths to 0.01 percent accuracy. Laser interferometers measure mirror angle and stage coordinate y in instrument for accurate measurment of focal properties of optical systems. Operates under computer control to measure effective focal length, focal surface shape, modulation transfer function, and astigmatism.

  4. Mycophenolate mofetil versus azathioprine for maintenance treatment of lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Kaballo, Babikir G; Ahmed, Ahmed Elias; Nur, Musa Mohammed; Khalid, Ismail Osman; Abu-Aisha, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) with that of azathioprine (AZA) drugs in the maintenance therapy of lupus nephritis (LN) patients, we studied 81 Sudanese patients with LN (32 in Class III, 34 in Class IV, and 15 in combined Class V + IV of the ISN/RPS 2003 Classification). All patients received induction therapy consisting of monthly intravenous pulse doses of cyclophosphamide (CYC) (500 mg/m 2 of body-surface area) for six months, plus three consecutive pulses of intravenous methylprednisolone 15 mg/kg/day of body weight (maximum 500 mg). Subsequently, 41 (50.6%) patients were randomized into a group that received oral MMF (22 mg/kg/day), and 40 (49.4%) patients randomized to a group that received oral AZA (2 mg/kg/day). All patients initially received oral prednisone (1 mg/kg of body weight daily) for four weeks. The baseline characteristics of the two groups were similar. Total remission rate was 75.3% (80.5% in MMF and 70% in AZA), complete remission rate of 54.3% (56.1% with MMF and 52.5% with AZA), and a partial remission rate of 21% (24.4% with MMF and 17.5% with AZA) over 29 months. During maintenance therapy, six patients died (four in the AZA group and two in the MMF group), and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) developed in five patients (three in the AZA group and two in the MMF group). During the 36-months of the study, both groups had comparable event-free survival rate for the composite end point of death or ESRD and rate of relapse-free survival. Furthermore, both groups had no significant differences in terms of frequency of hospitalization, amenorrhea, infection, nausea, and vomiting. We conclude that our study showed that short-term therapy with intravenous CYC followed by maintenance therapy with oral MMF or AZA had similar efficacy and safety for the treatment of patients with moderate to severe LN. PMID:27424688

  5. Severe Nephrotoxic Nephritis following Conditional and Kidney-Specific Knockdown of Stanniocalcin-1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Luping; Lou, Yahuan; Ju, Huiming; Zhang, Lin; Pan, Jenny Szu-Chin; Ross, April; Sun, Yuxiang; Truong, Luan D.; Sheikh-Hamad, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation is the hallmark of nephrotoxic nephritis. Stanniocalcin-1 (STC1), a pro-survival factor, inhibits macrophages, stabilizes endothelial barrier function, and diminishes trans-endothelial migration of leukocytes; consistently, transgenic (Tg) overexpression of STC1 protects from nephrotoxic nephritis. Herein, we sought to determine the phenotype of nephrotoxic nephritis after conditional and kidney-specific knockdown of STC1. Methods We used Tg mice that, express either STC1 shRNA (70% knockdown of STC1 within 4d) or scrambled shRNA (control) upon delivery of Cre-expressing plasmid to the kidney using ultrasound microbubble technique. Sheep anti-mouse GBM antibody was administered 4d after shRNA activation; and mice were euthanized 10 days later for analysis. Results Serum creatinine, proteinuria, albuminuria and urine output were similar 10 days after anti-GBM delivery in both groups; however, anti-GBM antibody delivery to mice with kidney-specific knockdown of STC1 produced severe nephrotoxic nephritis, characterized by severe tubular necrosis, glomerular hyalinosis/necrosis and massive cast formation, while control mice manifested mild tubular injury and crescentic glomerulonephritis. Surprisingly, the expression of cytokines/chemokines and infiltration with T-cells and macrophages were also diminished in STC1 knockdown kidneys. Staining for sheep anti-mouse GBM antibody, deposition of mouse C3 and IgG in the kidney, and antibody response to sheep IgG were equal. Conclusions nephrotoxic nephritis after kidney-specific knockdown of STC1 is characterized by severe tubular and glomerular necrosis, possibly due to loss of STC1-mediated pro-survival factors, and we attribute the paucity of inflammation to diminished release of cytokines/chemokines/growth factors from the necrotic epithelium. PMID:26393521

  6. IL10 in Lupus Nephritis: Detection and relationship with disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Zeid, Sameh Abou; Khalifa, Ghada; Nabil, Malak

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Glomerulonephritis is a major determinant of the course and prognosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and is evident in 40%–85% of patients. IL10, a cytokine produced by monocytes and-to a lesser extent-lymphocytes, has pleiotropic effects in immune regulation and inflammation. It enhances B cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and antibody production; these effects play a role in autoimmune diseases. Among identified polymorphisms in the IL10 promoter, three linked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of −1082 G/A, 819 T/C, and −592 A/C have been shown to influence the IL10 gene expression. Compared with the −592 C allele, the 592 A is associated with lower IL10 production in vitro. The objectives of this study were to investigate the −592 A/C polymorphism in patients with and without lupus nephritis and to assess its influence on IL10 secretion in vivo and its role in pathogenesis and clinicopathological characteristics of lupus nephritis. Methods This case control study was conducted on 40 SLE patients recruited for the study from those attending the nephrology department of the Theodor Bilharz Research Institute (outpatient clinic and inpatient ward) in 2013. Patients were divided into two groups, group I (SLE patients without evidence of nephritis) and group II (SLE patients with lupus nephritis). Data were analyzed using SPSS (version 12), a t-test, Chi square, ANOVA, and the Pearson product–moment correlation coefficient. Results Our study found an increase in IL10 serum in lupus nephritis patients compared to those without renal involvement (without statistical significance). No significant differences emerged in the level of IL10 serum among different pathological classes. Conclusion The IL10 gene (−592 A/C) polymorphism, though not associated with lupus nephritis’s susceptibility in the present study, does play a role. PMID:26816594

  7. Association of the osteopontin rs1126616 polymorphism and a higher serum osteopontin level with lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    SALIMI, SAEEDEH; NOORA, MEHRANGIZ; NABIZADEH, SIMA; REZAEI, MAHNAZ; SHAHRAKI, HOSSAIN; MILAD, MOHAMMADOO-KHORASSANI; NAGHAVI, ANOOSH; FARAJIAN-MASHHADI, FARZANEH; ZAKERI, ZAHRA; SANDOUGHI, MAHNAZ

    2016-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a chemokine-like glycoprotein that has a prominent role in regulating inflammation and immunity. OPN polymorphisms and elevated OPN levels are associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in several populations. The aim of present study was to evaluate the association between the OPN rs1126616 polymorphism and OPN level with SLE susceptibility. A total of 163 SLE patients and 180 age-, gender- and ethnically matched controls were genotyped for the rs1126616 polymorphism by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Serum OPN levels were assayed by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. There was no association between the OPN rs1126616 C/T polymorphism and SLE. The frequency of the OPN rs1126616 CT genotype was significantly higher in SLE patients with nephritis compared to SLE patients without nephritis and controls. Additionally, the frequency of TT genotypes was higher in SLE patients with nephritis compared to controls. The serum OPN levels were significantly higher in SLE patients compared to controls (50.6±22 vs. 35.6±15.8 ng/ml, P<0.001). Increased serum OPN levels were observed in SLE patients with lupus nephritis and joint symptoms. There was no correlation between OPN levels and the OPN rs1126616 polymorphism. The present data suggest that the CT and TT genotypes of the OPN rs1126616 polymorphism could be a risk factor for lupus nephritis. The OPN level is associated with SLE and certain SLE manifestations. However, there was no association between the OPN rs1126616 C/T polymorphism and SLE susceptibility. PMID:26998275

  8. Continuously variable focal length lens

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Bernhard W; Chollet, Matthieu C

    2013-12-17

    A material preferably in crystal form having a low atomic number such as beryllium (Z=4) provides for the focusing of x-rays in a continuously variable manner. The material is provided with plural spaced curvilinear, optically matched slots and/or recesses through which an x-ray beam is directed. The focal length of the material may be decreased or increased by increasing or decreasing, respectively, the number of slots (or recesses) through which the x-ray beam is directed, while fine tuning of the focal length is accomplished by rotation of the material so as to change the path length of the x-ray beam through the aligned cylindrical slows. X-ray analysis of a fixed point in a solid material may be performed by scanning the energy of the x-ray beam while rotating the material to maintain the beam's focal point at a fixed point in the specimen undergoing analysis.

  9. Sex prevalence of focal dystonias.

    PubMed Central

    Soland, V L; Bhatia, K P; Marsden, C D

    1996-01-01

    The sex prevalence of idiopathic focal dystonia is reported from a data base review of all patients seen at the National Hospital of Neurology, Queen Square and King's College, London up to 1993. There was a higher prevalence of females to males in all categories of focal dystonia involving the craniocervical region. The female to male ratio for cranial dystonia was 1.92:1 (P < 0.01) and 1.6:1 (P < 0.001) for spasmodic torticollis. On the other hand, twice as many men than women had writer's cramp (M:F = 2.0:1, P < 0.01). At present, there is no clear explanation to account for this differences in the sex prevalence of different types of focal dystonia. PMID:8708656

  10. [Clinical guideline for the treatment of lupus nephritis and single-centre results of mycofenolate mofetil among patients with lupus nephritis in the National Institute of Rheumatology and Physiotherapy, Budapest].

    PubMed

    Szabó, Melinda Zsuzsanna; Kiss, Emese

    2016-08-01

    The authors present the latest guideline for the treatment of lupus nephritis and their own single-centre results with mycofenolate mofetil treated lupus nephritis. Lupus nephritis and mainly its proliferative form is a frequent and potentially life-threatening manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus that can lead to end-stage renal disease. The treatment of lupus nephritis greatly improved in the last decades; mycofenolate mofetil has become an alternative of cyclophosphamide both in remission induction and as a maintenance regimen as well in the treatment of Class III and IV glomerulonephritis. The authors ordered mycofenolate mofetil for 25 patients with lupus nephritis so far. Histologically most of them had Class III (A/C) or IV (A) glomerulonephritis (30-30%), and only 16% of the patients had renal impairment at that time. Mycofenolate mofetil given after glucocorticoid and cyclophosphamide induction therapy reduced the daily proteinuria from 3.18 grs to 1.06 grs. Complete remission could be achieved in 24% and partial remission in 48% of the patients. The authors conclude that mycofenolate mofetil is effective in the therapy of lupus nephritis. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(35), 1385-1393. PMID:27569461

  11. LAPping up dead cells to prevent lupus nephritis: a novel role for noncanonical autophagy in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Jeremy S; Ross, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying the development of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis remain poorly understood. A recent study demonstrates that deficiencies in the immune system's ability to degrade scavenged dead cells via noncanonical autophagy is sufficient to break immune tolerance and produce features commonly seen in lupus, including circulating autoantibodies, inflammatory cytokines, and nephritis. This work provides a possible mechanism for the association of polymorphisms in autophagy genes with the risk of lupus. PMID:27418084

  12. Focal weakness following herpes zoster.

    PubMed Central

    Cockerell, O C; Ormerod, I E

    1993-01-01

    Three patients presented with focal weakness of an arm which followed segmental herpes zoster affecting the same limb. Neurophysiological investigations suggest that the site of the lesion lay at the root, plexus, or peripheral nerve level. This reflects the various ways in which the virus may affect the peripheral nervous system. PMID:8410022

  13. Inhibition of the alternative complement pathway by antisense oligonucleotides targeting complement factor B improves lupus nephritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Tamar R; Hettrick, Lisa A; Johnson, Robert B; Hung, Gene; Peralta, Raechel; Watt, Andrew; Henry, Scott P; Adamson, Peter; Monia, Brett P; McCaleb, Michael L

    2016-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease that manifests in widespread complement activation and deposition of complement fragments in the kidney. The complement pathway is believed to play a significant role in the pathogenesis and in the development of lupus nephritis. Complement factor B is an important activator of the alternative complement pathway and increasing evidence supports reducing factor B as a potential novel therapy to lupus nephritis. Here we investigated whether pharmacological reduction of factor B expression using antisense oligonucleotides could be an effective approach for the treatment of lupus nephritis. We identified potent and well tolerated factor B antisense oligonucleotides that resulted in significant reductions in hepatic and plasma factor B levels when administered to normal mice. To test the effects of factor B antisense oligonucleotides on lupus nephritis, we used two different mouse models, NZB/W F1 and MRL/lpr mice, that exhibit lupus nephritis like renal pathology. Antisense oligonucleotides mediated reductions in circulating factor B levels were associated with significant improvements in renal pathology, reduced glomerular C3 deposition and proteinuria, and improved survival. These data support the strategy of using factor B antisense oligonucleotides for treatment of lupus nephritis in humans. PMID:26307001

  14. Statistical earthquake focal mechanism forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Yan Y.; Jackson, David D.

    2014-04-01

    Forecasts of the focal mechanisms of future shallow (depth 0-70 km) earthquakes are important for seismic hazard estimates and Coulomb stress, and other models of earthquake occurrence. Here we report on a high-resolution global forecast of earthquake rate density as a function of location, magnitude and focal mechanism. In previous publications we reported forecasts of 0.5° spatial resolution, covering the latitude range from -75° to +75°, based on the Global Central Moment Tensor earthquake catalogue. In the new forecasts we have improved the spatial resolution to 0.1° and the latitude range from pole to pole. Our focal mechanism estimates require distance-weighted combinations of observed focal mechanisms within 1000 km of each gridpoint. Simultaneously, we calculate an average rotation angle between the forecasted mechanism and all the surrounding mechanisms, using the method of Kagan & Jackson proposed in 1994. This average angle reveals the level of tectonic complexity of a region and indicates the accuracy of the prediction. The procedure becomes problematical where longitude lines are not approximately parallel, and where shallow earthquakes are so sparse that an adequate sample spans very large distances. North or south of 75°, the azimuths of points 1000 km away may vary by about 35°. We solved this problem by calculating focal mechanisms on a plane tangent to the Earth's surface at each forecast point, correcting for the rotation of the longitude lines at the locations of earthquakes included in the averaging. The corrections are negligible between -30° and +30° latitude, but outside that band uncorrected rotations can be significantly off. Improved forecasts at 0.5° and 0.1° resolution are posted at http://eq.ess.ucla.edu/kagan/glob_gcmt_index.html.

  15. Reducing progression of experimental lupus nephritis via inhibition of the B7/CD28 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Kong, Yong; Wang, Jing; Sun, Jie; Shi, Qin; Qiu, Yu-Hua

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of the B7/cluster of differentiation (CD)28 signaling pathway on experimental lupus nephritis and examine the molecular mechanism involved by inhibiting the B7/CD28 signaling pathway. A lupus nephritis model in C57BL/6 J mice was induced via intraperitoneal injection of pristane. A recombinant B7‑1 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) lentivirus vector was constructed by synthesis and splicing. A neutralizing mouse anti‑human B7‑1 antibody termed 4E5 was also prepared. The mouse model of lupus nephritis was treated with B7‑1 shRNA and 4E5 via injection through the tail vein. The silencing effects of B7‑1 shRNA lentiviral infection on target molecules were evaluated using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. The levels of protein in the urine were detected using Albustix test paper each month over 10 months. The concentration of interleukin (IL)‑4 and interferon‑γ in the serum was determined using an ELISA. The immune complex (IC) deposits in the kidney were analyzed using direct immunofluorescence. The results demonstrated that the C57BL/6 J mouse lupus nephritis model was successfully constructed with immune cells activated in the spleen of the mice, increases in the concentration of anti‑nuclear antibody (ANA) and anti‑double stranded DNA antibodies as well as positive IC formation. Following B7‑1 shRNA lentivirus or 4E5 treatment, CD11b+B7‑1+, CD11c+B7‑1+ and CD21+B7‑1+ cells in the spleen of the mice were significantly reduced. The concentration of ANA and IL‑4 in the serum was also decreased. The concentration of urine protein was reduced and it was at its lowest level in the 4E5 early intervention group. It was also revealed that the immunofluorescence intensity of the IC deposits was weak in the 4E5 early intervention group. In conclusion, inhibiting the B7‑1/CD28 signaling pathway is able to alleviate experimental lupus nephritis and provides an experimental basis for the

  16. Reducing progression of experimental lupus nephritis via inhibition of the B7/CD28 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, LI; KONG, YONG; WANG, JING; SUN, JIE; SHI, QIN; QIU, YU-HUA

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of the B7/cluster of differentiation (CD)28 signaling pathway on experimental lupus nephritis and examine the molecular mechanism involved by inhibiting the B7/CD28 signaling pathway. A lupus nephritis model in C57BL/6 J mice was induced via intraperitoneal injection of pristane. A recombinant B7-1 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) lentivirus vector was constructed by synthesis and splicing. A neutralizing mouse anti-human B7-1 antibody termed 4E5 was also prepared. The mouse model of lupus nephritis was treated with B7-1 shRNA and 4E5 via injection through the tail vein. The silencing effects of B7-1 shRNA lentiviral infection on target molecules were evaluated using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. The levels of protein in the urine were detected using Albustix test paper each month over 10 months. The concentration of interleukin (IL)-4 and interferon-γ in the serum was determined using an ELISA. The immune complex (IC) deposits in the kidney were analyzed using direct immunofluorescence. The results demonstrated that the C57BL/6 J mouse lupus nephritis model was successfully constructed with immune cells activated in the spleen of the mice, increases in the concentration of anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) and anti-double stranded DNA antibodies as well as positive IC formation. Following B7-1 shRNA lentivirus or 4E5 treatment, CD11b+B7-1+, CD11c+B7-1+ and CD21+B7-1+ cells in the spleen of the mice were significantly reduced. The concentration of ANA and IL-4 in the serum was also decreased. The concentration of urine protein was reduced and it was at its lowest level in the 4E5 early intervention group. It was also revealed that the immunofluorescence intensity of the IC deposits was weak in the 4E5 early intervention group. In conclusion, inhibiting the B7-1/CD28 signaling pathway is able to alleviate experimental lupus nephritis and provides an experimental basis for the therapeutic use of blocking the B7

  17. Mutations in genes encoding complement inhibitors CD46 and CFH affect the age at nephritis onset in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Inherited deficiencies of several complement components strongly predispose to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) while deficiencies of complement inhibitors are found in kidney diseases such as atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS). Methods The exons of complement inhibitor genes CD46 and CFH (factor H) were fully sequenced using the Sanger method in SLE patients with nephritis originating from two cohorts from southern and mid Sweden (n = 196). All identified mutations and polymorphisms were then analyzed in SLE patients without nephritis (n = 326) and in healthy controls (n = 523). Results We found nonsynonymous, heterozygous mutations in CFH in 6.1% patients with nephritis, in comparison with 4.0% and 5.4% in patients without nephritis and controls, respectively. No associations of SLE or nephritis with common variants in CFH (V62I/Y402H/E936D) were found. Furthermore, we found two nonsynonymous heterozygous mutations in CD46 in SLE patients but not in controls. The A353V polymorphism, known to affect function of CD46, was found in 6.6% of nephritis patients versus 4.9% and 6.1% of the non-nephritis SLE patients and controls. The presence of mutations in CD46 and CFH did not predispose to SLE or nephritis but was associated with earlier onset of nephritis. Furthermore, we found weak indications that there is one protective and one risk haplotype predisposing to nephritis composed of several polymorphisms in noncoding regions of CD46, which were previously implicated in aHUS. Conclusions SLE nephritis is not associated with frequent mutations in CFH and CD46 as found in aHUS but these may be modifying factors causing earlier onset of nephritis. PMID:22171659

  18. Severe acute interstitial nephritis after combination immune-checkpoint inhibitor therapy for metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Naoka; Borges, Thiago J; Yamashita, Michifumi; Riella, Leonardo V

    2016-06-01

    Immune-checkpoint inhibitors are emerging as revolutionary drugs for certain malignancies. However, blocking the co-inhibitory signals may lead to immune-related adverse events, mainly in the spectrum of autoimmune diseases including colitis, endocrinopathies and nephritis. Here, we report a case of a 75-year-old man with metastatic malignant melanoma treated with a combination of nivolumab (anti-PD1-antibody) and ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4 antibody) who developed systemic rash along with severe acute tubulointerstitial nephritis after two doses of combination therapy. Kidney biopsy and peripheral blood immune profile revealed highly proliferative and cytotoxic T cell features. Herein, we discuss the pathophysiology and management of immune checkpoint blockade-related adverse events. PMID:27274826

  19. Long-term efficacy of anti-CD20 antibodies in refractory lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Arce-Salinas, C Alejandro; Rodríguez-García, Felipe; Gómez-Vargas, J Iván

    2012-05-01

    Eight patients with refractory lupus nephritis received rituximab after failing standard sequential therapy and were followed for 104 weeks after the infusion. One patient died secondary to a complicated pregnancy but had stable renal function. Three patients received a re-infusion of rituximab approximately 12 months apart due to a renal flare; during the second year of follow-up, those patients progressed toward ESRD. The four remaining patients demonstrated improvements in SLEDAI score, CrCl, and proteinuria with maintenance of their standard immunosuppressive therapy and did not require a re-infusion of rituximab. Although rituximab as induction therapy for refractory lupus nephritis has been shown to have a good response, its efficacy in long-term assessments demonstrates disappointing results. PMID:21258801

  20. Severe acute interstitial nephritis after combination immune-checkpoint inhibitor therapy for metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Naoka; Borges, Thiago J.; Yamashita, Michifumi; Riella, Leonardo V.

    2016-01-01

    Immune-checkpoint inhibitors are emerging as revolutionary drugs for certain malignancies. However, blocking the co-inhibitory signals may lead to immune-related adverse events, mainly in the spectrum of autoimmune diseases including colitis, endocrinopathies and nephritis. Here, we report a case of a 75-year-old man with metastatic malignant melanoma treated with a combination of nivolumab (anti-PD1-antibody) and ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4 antibody) who developed systemic rash along with severe acute tubulointerstitial nephritis after two doses of combination therapy. Kidney biopsy and peripheral blood immune profile revealed highly proliferative and cytotoxic T cell features. Herein, we discuss the pathophysiology and management of immune checkpoint blockade-related adverse events. PMID:27274826

  1. MRI of Focal Liver Lesions.

    PubMed

    Albiin, Nils

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging, MRI has more advantages than ultrasound, computed tomography, CT, positron emission tomography, PET, or any other imaging modality in diagnosing focal hepatic masses. With a combination of basic T1 and T2 weighted sequences, diffusion weighted imaging, DWI, and hepatobiliary gadolinium contrast agents, that is gadobenate dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA) and gadoxetic acid (Gd-EOB), most liver lesions can be adequately diagnosed. Benign lesions, as cyst, hemangioma, focal nodular hyperplasia, FNH or adenoma, can be distinguished from malignant lesions. In a non-cirrhotic liver, the most common malignant lesions are metastases which may be hypovascular or hypervascular. In the cirrhotic liver hepatocellular carcinoma, HCC, is of considerable importance. Besides, intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and other less common malignancies has to be assessed. In this review, the techniques and typical MRI features are presented as well as the new algorithm issued by American Association for the Study of the Liver Diseases (AASLD). PMID:23049491

  2. Variable focal length deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Headley, Daniel; Ramsey, Marc; Schwarz, Jens

    2007-06-12

    A variable focal length deformable mirror has an inner ring and an outer ring that simply support and push axially on opposite sides of a mirror plate. The resulting variable clamping force deforms the mirror plate to provide a parabolic mirror shape. The rings are parallel planar sections of a single paraboloid and can provide an on-axis focus, if the rings are circular, or an off-axis focus, if the rings are elliptical. The focal length of the deformable mirror can be varied by changing the variable clamping force. The deformable mirror can generally be used in any application requiring the focusing or defocusing of light, including with both coherent and incoherent light sources.

  3. Treatment of lupus nephritis with total lymphoid irradiation. Observations during a 12-79-month followup

    SciTech Connect

    Strober, S.; Farinas, M.C.; Field, E.H.; Solovera, J.J.; Kiberd, B.A.; Myers, B.D.; Hoppe, R.T.

    1988-07-01

    Seventeen patients with intractable lupus nephritis and nephrotic syndrome were treated with total lymphoid irradiation. Statistically significant improvement in mean renal disease and serologic activity parameters occurred within 3 months and persisted for at least 3 years. Although there was a marked reduction of T helper cell numbers and function after total lymphoid irradiation, recovery of these parameters was not associated with a return of disease activity. Risks of sterility, severe infections, and hematologic malignancy appeared to be lower than with alkylating agents.

  4. The SLAM family member CD48 (Slamf2) protects lupus-prone mice from autoimmune nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Anna E.; Njoroge, Sarah W.; Feliu, Marianela; Cook, Alexis; Selig, Martin K.; Latchman, Yvette E.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Colvin, Robert B.; Paul, Elahna

    2011-01-01

    Polymorphisms in the SLAM family of leukocyte cell surface regulatory molecules have been associated with lupus-like phenotypes in both humans and mice. The murine Slamf gene cluster lies within the lupus-associated Sle1b region of mouse chromosome 1. Non-autoreactive C57BL/6 (B6) mice that have had this region replaced by syntenic segments from other mouse strains (i.e. 129, NZB and NZW) are B6 congenic strains that spontaneously produce non-nephritogenic lupus-like autoantibodies. We have recently reported that genetic ablation of the SLAM family member CD48 (Slamf2) drives full-blown autoimmune disease with severe proliferative glomerulonephritis (CD48GN) in B6 mice carrying 129 sequences of the Sle1b region (B6.129CD48-/-). We also discovered that BALB/c mice with the same 129-derived CD48-null allele (BALB.129CD48-/-) have neither nephritis nor anti-DNA autoantibodies, indicating that strain specific background genes modulate the effects of CD48 deficiency. Here we further examine this novel model of lupus nephritis in which CD48 deficiency transforms benign autoreactivity into fatal nephritis. CD48GN is characterized by glomerular hypertrophy with mesangial expansion, proliferation and leukocytic infiltration. Immune complexes deposit in mesangium and in sub-endothelial, sub-epithelial and intramembranous sites along the glomerular basement membrane. Afflicted mice have low grade proteinuria, intermittent hematuria and their progressive renal injury manifests with elevated urine NGAL levels and with uremia. In contrast to the lupus-like B6.129CD48-/- animals, neither BALB.129CD48-/- mice nor B6 × BALB/c F1.129CD48-/- progeny have autoimmune traits, indicating that B6-specific background genes modulate the effect of CD48 on lupus nephritis in a recessive manner. PMID:21561736

  5. [Focal liver lesion, incidental finding].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, C F; Jenssen, C

    2012-10-01

    The differential diagnosis of incidentally found Focal Liver Lesions (FLL) is complex. Screening procedures so far are only defined for patients with liver cirrhosis. Characterization of a FLL begins as soon as it is detected. Taking patients history and thorough clinical examination are essential. An imaging procedure that is used to detect liver masses should also allow the examiner to determine whether the lesion is benign or malignant. Conventional B-mode US and colour Doppler imaging are effective at detecting and characterizing typical liver cysts and calcifications. Laboratory data, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and imaging guided liver biopsy are complementary methods.Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) is a well established diagnostic imaging technique for a variety of indications and applications. One of the most important applications is in the liver where it is frequently a first-line technique for the detection and diagnosis (characterization) of focal liver lesions (FLL). In this setting the accurate differentiation of benign from malignant lesions is critical to ensure the patient undergoes the appropriate therapeutic option. This has been documented in recently published guidelines, in particular in terms of the enhancement patterns of the most common FLL hemangioma, focal nodular hyperplasia hepatocellular adenoma and their differentiation from malignant lesions. In this article the role of CEUS in the characterization of incidentally found FLL is described. PMID:23033169

  6. Persistent Focal Behavior and Physical Activity Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erfle, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the proclivity and performance attributes of focal students across time and activities using data from 9,345 students. Three systematic focal behavior partitions are examined: Across activities, across time, and across activities and time. A student's performance is focal if it ends in 0 or 5 for push-ups and 0 for…

  7. Renal Interstitial Arteriosclerotic Lesions in Lupus Nephritis Patients: A Cohort Study from China

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Dan-dan; Wu, Li-hua; Song, Yan; Yu, Feng; Wang, Su-xia; Liu, Gang; Zhao, Ming-hui

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate renal arteriosclerotic lesions in patients with lupus nephritis and investigate their associations with clinical and pathological characteristics, especially cardio-vascular features. Design A retrospective cohort study. Participants Seventy-nine patients with renal biopsy-proven lupus nephritis, diagnosed between January 2000 and June 2008 from Peking University First Hospital. Results In clinico-pathological data, patients with arteriosclerosis had higher ratio of hypertension and more severe renal injury indices compared with patients with no renal vascular lesions. More importantly, patients with renal arteriosclerosis had worse cardiac structure and function under transthoracic echocardiographic examination. Patients with renal arteriosclerosis tend to have higher ratios of combined endpoints compared with those of no renal vascular lesions, although the difference didn’t reach statistical meanings (P = 0.104). Conclusion Renal arteriosclerotic lesion was common and associated with vascular immune complex deposits in lupus nephritis. It might have a certain degree of association with poor outcomes and cardiovascular events, which needs further explorations. PMID:26544865

  8. Serum Thiols as a Biomarker of Disease Activity in Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Lalwani, Pritesh; de Souza, Giselle Katiane Bonfim Bacelar; de Lima, Domingos Savio Nunes; Passos, Luiz Fernando Souza; Boechat, Antonio Luiz; Lima, Emerson Silva

    2015-01-01

    Lupus Nephritis (LN) develops in more than half of the Systemic Lupus Erythematous (SLE) patients. However, lack of reliable, specific biomarkers for LN hampers clinical management of patients and impedes development of new therapeutics. The goal of this study was to investigate whether oxidative stress biomarkers in patients with SLE is predictive of renal pathology. Serum biochemical and oxidative stress markers were measured in patients with inactive lupus, active lupus with and without nephritis and compared to healthy control group. To assess the predictive performance of biomarkers, Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed and cut-offs were used to identify SLE patients with nephritis. We observed an increased oxidative stress response in all SLE patients compared to healthy controls. Among the several biomarkers tested, serum thiols had a significant inverse association with SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). Interestingly, thiols were able too aptly differentiate between SLE patients with and without renal pathology, and serum thiol levels were not affected by immunosuppressive drug therapy. The decreased thiols in SLE correlated significantly with serum creatinine and serum C3 levels. Further retrospective evaluation using serum creatinine or C3 levels in combination with thiol’s cutoff values from ROC analysis, we could positively predict chronicity of renal pathology in SLE patients. In summary, serum thiols emerge as an inexpensive and reliable indicator of LN, which may not only help in early identification of renal pathology but also aid in the therapeutic management of the disease, in developing countries with resource poor settings. PMID:25799079

  9. Case report: successful treatment of membranous lupus nephritis with belimumab in an African female immigrant.

    PubMed

    De Scheerder, Marie-Angélique; Boey, O; Mahieu, E; Vanuytsel, J; Bogaert, Anne-Marie

    2016-06-01

    We describe the case of a 26-year-old African female who was treated successfully with belimumab in a case of severe membranous lupus nephritis and retinal vasculitis, resistant to first line therapy. She presented initially with chronic dacryoadenitis and screening showed nephrotic-range proteinuria. Biopsy of the kidney confirmed the diagnosis of membranous lupus nephritis. Clinical features (joint pain, dacryoadenitis, retinal vasculitis and lupus nephritis) in combination with serology (positive anti-double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) antibodies, hypocomplementemia) confirmed the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Treatment was immediately initiated with glucocorticosteroids (GCS), mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and hydroxychloroquine sulphate (Plaquenil®). Tacrolimus was associated but no effect was observed with the proteinuria remaining in the nephrotic range and secondary effects of the glucocorticosteroids becoming a real concern. The patient was started on add-on belimumab with quasi-immediate effect on the proteinuria, making it possible to decrease the dosage of the other immunosuppressants and gradually stop them, even the GCS. The patient is currently in complete remission after 3 years of treatment with belimumab. We were able to stop immunosuppressive treatment but will keep her on antimalarial treatment as the most recent guidelines in treatment of SLE recommend. PMID:26712500

  10. Bacterial Sialidase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Data shows that elevated sialidase in bacterial vaginosis patients correlates to premature births in women. Bacterial sialidase also plays a significant role in the unusual colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients. Crystals of Salmonella sialidase have been reproduced and are used for studying the inhibitor-enzyme complexes. These inhibitors may also be used to inhibit a trans-sialidase of Trypanosome cruzi, a very similar enzyme to bacterial sialidase, therefore preventing T. cruzi infection, the causitive agent of Chagas' disease. The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography suggests that inhibitors of bacterial sialidases can be used as prophylactic drugs to prevent bacterial infections in these critical cases.

  11. SNAP Satellite Focal Plane Development

    SciTech Connect

    Bebek, C.; Akerlof, C.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bercovitz, J.; Bergstrom, L.; Berstein, G.P.; Bester, M.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.; Emmett, W.; Eriksson, M.; Fouchez,D.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Heetderks, H.; Holland, S.; Huterer, D.; Johnson, W.; Kadel, R.; Karcher,A.; Kim, A.; Kolbe, W.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureaux, J.; Lampton, M.; Lefevre, O.; Levi, M.; Levin, D.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Malina, R.; Mazure, A.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.; Miquel, R.; Morgan, N.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Roe, N.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Prieto, E.; Rabinowitz,D.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Schubnell, M.; Sholl, M.; Smadja, G.; Smith, R.; Smoot, G.; Snyder, J.; Spadafora, A.; Szymkowiak, A.; Tarle,G.; Taylor, K.; Tilquin, A.; Tomasch, A.; Vincent, D.; von der Lippe, H.; Walder, J-P.; Wang, G.

    2003-07-07

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square degree field in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. The requirements for the instrument suite and the present configuration of the focal plane concept are presented. A two year R&D phase, largely supported by the Department of Energy, is just beginning. We describe the development activities that are taking place to advance our preparedness for mission proposal in the areas of detectors and electronics.

  12. Hemodynamics of focal choroidal excavations.

    PubMed

    Soma, Ryoko; Moriyama, Muka; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hemodynamics of focal choroidal excavations (FCEs). Four eyes of four patients with a FCE were studied. Indocyanine green angiography (ICGA), laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG), optical coherence tomography (OCT), and multi-focal electroretinography (mfERG) were performed to investigate the choroidal hemodynamics and the morphological and functional changes. The mean depth of the FCE determined by OCT was 222.5 ± 49.5 μm with a range of 164-272 μm. In one case, subretinal fluid was observed in the excavation, and in three cases, subretinal fluid was not observed. ICGA showed hypofluorescence, and laser flowgraphy (LSFG) showed decreased choroidal blood flow at the excavation in all cases. Three cases were symptomatic, and the amplitudes of the mfERGs were reduced. FCEs cause a decrease of choroidal blood flow. In three of four cases, the mfERGs were depressed over the FCEs leading to symptoms. PMID:25626897

  13. Rewritable photochromic focal plane masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Emilio; Bertarelli, Chiara; Bianco, Andrea; Bortoletto, Fabio; Conconi, Paolo; Crimi, Giuseppe; Gallazzi, Maria C.; Giro, Enrico; Lucotti, Andrea; Pernechele, Claudio; Zerbi, Filippo M.; Zerbi, Giuseppe

    2003-02-01

    The application of organic photochromic materials in astronomy is opening new possibilities which we are investigating in order to design innovative devices for future instrumentation. The photochromic property of transparent/opaque transition (although in a limited wavelength range) and the changes in intrinsic refractive index have led our studies to application in astronomic spectrographs, both as focal plane mask (for MOS application) and as dispersive elements (volume phase holographic gratings, VPHG), respectively. In both cases the possibility to write and erase devices with suitable irradiation has revealed a new perspective for non-disposable and fully customizable items for spectroscopy. Pursuing this goal we have synthesized a series of novel photochromic materials belonging to the diarylethenes. They fulfill the requirements of thermal stability and fatigue resistance necessary to build functional devices. Prototypes of high contrast focal plane mask working in the H-alpha spectral region have been manufactured and characterized both in laboratory and with the AFOSC camera at Asiago telescope (1.8 m). A custom writing robot (ARATRO) which, taking imaging frames and with the aid of interactive mask design software and ad hoc control electronics, is able to write MOS masks, has been constructed. The design of the MOS masks allow the fitting in the AFOSC slit wheel. The overall set-up is ready for the sky tests.

  14. Bacterial Proteasomes

    PubMed Central

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-01-01

    Interest in bacterial proteasomes was sparked by the discovery that proteasomal degradation is required for the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, one of the world's deadliest pathogens. Although bacterial proteasomes are structurally similar to their eukaryotic and archaeal homologs, there are key differences in their mechanisms of assembly, activation, and substrate targeting for degradation. In this article, we compare and contrast bacterial proteasomes with their archaeal and eukaryotic counterparts, and we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how bacterial proteasomes function to influence microbial physiology. PMID:26488274

  15. Focal axis resolver for offset reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Method and apparatus for determining the focal axis of an asymmetrical antenna such as an offset paraboloid reflector whose physical rim is not coincident with the boundary of the electrical aperture but whose focal point is known is provided. A transmitting feed horn array consisting of at least two feed horn elements is positioned asymmetrically on either side of an estimated focal axis which is generally inclined with respect to the boresight axis of the antenna. The feed horn array is aligned with the estimated focal axis so that the phase centers (CP sub 1, CP sub 2) of the two feed horn elements are located on a common line running through the focal point (F) orthogonally with respect to the estimated focal axis.

  16. Rituximab for the Treatment of IgG4-Related Tubulointerstitial Nephritis: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Blaithin A; Novick, Tessa; Scheel, Paul J; Bagnasco, Serena; Atta, Mohamed G

    2015-08-01

    Immunoglobulin type gamma 4 (IgG4)-related disease is a relatively newly described clinical entity characterized by a distinctive histopathological appearance, increased numbers of IgG4 positive plasma cells and often, but not always, elevated serum IgG4 concentrations. The most common renal manifestation of IgG4-related disease is tubulointerstitial nephritis marked with proteinuria, hematuria, decreased kidney function, hypocomplementemia, and radiologic abnormalities. Renal biopsy characteristics include dense lymphoplasmacytic tubulointerstitial nephritis that stains for IgG4, storiform fibrosis, and immune complex deposition in the interstitium and along tubule basement membranes. Treatment traditionally consists of prolonged glucocorticoids but cases refractory to glucocorticoids have been reported.We report a case of a 58-year-old Caucasian man who presented with fatigue, 50 pound weight loss, dyspnea, lymphadenopathy, and nephromegaly. The patient was first misdiagnosed as chronic interstitial nephritis secondary to renal sarcoid and was treated with repeated doses of prednisone. On his third relapse, he underwent a repeat renal biopsy and a diagnosis of IgG4-tubulointerstitial nephritis was confirmed. He was refractory to treatment with prednisone. The patient received Rituximab and had prompt sustained improvement in renal function. At 1 year post Rituximab treatment, his serum creatinine remains at baseline and imaging study revealed reduction in his kidney size.This is the first case report using Rituximab as a steroid sparing option for refractory IgG4-tubulointerstitial nephritis. More information is needed on the long-term effects of using of B-cell depleting agents for glucocorticoid resistant IgG4-tubulointerstitial nephritis. PMID:26266393

  17. Digital scanner infrared focal plane technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, M. A.; Malone, N. R.; Harris, M.; Shin, J.; Byers, S.; Price, D.; Vampola, J.

    2011-09-01

    Advancements in finer geometry and technology advancements in circuit design now allow placement of digital architecture on cryogenic focal planes while using less power than heritage analog designs. These advances in technology reduce the size, weight, and power of modern focal planes. In addition, the interface to the focal plane is significantly simplified and is more immune to Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). The cost of the customer's instrument after integration with the digital scanning Focal Plane Array (FPA) has been significantly reduced by placing digital architecture such as Analog to digital convertors and Low Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS) Inputs and Outputs (I/O) on the Read Out Integrated Circuit (ROIC).

  18. Focal axis resolver for offset reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    Described are electrical means for determining the focal axis of an offset reflector antenna whose physical rim is not coincident with the boundary of the electrical aperture. Even and odd sensing functions are employed in the focal region, leading to both amplitude and phase criteria for resolving a focal axis generally inclined with respect to the system axis. The analytical aspects of the problem are discussed, and an example related to a 4-meter Large-Antenna Multiple-Frequency Microwave Radiometer (LAMMR) is included. The technique is useful for focal axis determination in mathematical simulations and in the physical world.

  19. Cyclosporine A or intravenous cyclophosphamide for lupus nephritis: the Cyclofa-Lune study.

    PubMed

    Zavada, J; Pesickova, Ss; Rysava, R; Olejarova, M; Horák, P; Hrncír, Z; Rychlík, I; Havrda, M; Vítova, J; Lukác, J; Rovensky, J; Tegzova, D; Böhmova, J; Zadrazil, J; Hána, J; Dostál, C; Tesar, V

    2010-10-01

    Intravenous cyclophosphamide is considered to be the standard of care for the treatment of proliferative lupus nephritis. However, its use is limited by potentially severe toxic effects. Cyclosporine A has been suggested to be an efficient and safe treatment alternative to cyclophosphamide. Forty patients with clinically active proliferative lupus nephritis were randomly assigned to one of two sequential induction and maintenance treatment regimens based either on cyclophosphamide or Cyclosporine A. The primary outcomes were remission (defined as normal urinary sediment, proteinuria <0.3 g/24 h, and stable s-creatinine) and response to therapy (defined as stable s-creatinine, 50% reduction in proteinuria, and either normalization of urinary sediment or significant improvement in C3) at the end of induction and maintenance phase. Secondary outcomes were incidence of adverse events, and relapse-free survival. At the end of the induction phase, 24% of the 21 patients treated by cyclophosphamide achieved remission, and 52% achieved response, as compared with 26% and 43%, respectively of the 19 patients treated by the Cyclosporine A. At the end of the maintenance phase, 14% of patients in cyclophosphamide group, and 37% in Cyclosporine A group had remission, and 38% and 58% respectively response. Treatment with Cyclosporine A was associated with transient increase in blood pressure and reversible decrease in glomerular filtration rate. There was no significant difference in median relapse-free survival. In conclusion, Cyclosporine A was as effective as cyclophosphamide in the trial of sequential induction and maintenance treatment in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis and preserved renal function.(ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00976300) PMID:20605876

  20. The prevalence of leptospirosis and its association with multifocal interstitial nephritis in swine at slaughter.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, T F; McEwen, S A; Prescott, J F; Meek, A H

    1989-01-01

    An abattoir survey was undertaken to determine the prevalence of leptospirosis and its association with lesions of multifocal interstitial nephritis (so-called "white spotted kidneys") in swine at slaughter. Both cross-sectional and case-control study designs were used. Of 197 kidneys from hogs randomly selected at slaughter, 11 (5.6%) had generalized grey-white foci typical of multifocal interstitial nephritis (MFIN). Antibody titers greater than or equal to 1:80 against Leptospira pomona were detected in nine (4.6%) hogs and against L. bratislava in 63 (32%) of these hogs. Leptospira pomona (kennewicki) was detected by immunofluorescence in 5/197 (2.5%) of randomly selected hogs. Leptospires identified as genotype kennewicki were isolated from six (9.8%) of 61 kidneys cultured. Leptospira bratislava was not detected by immunofluorescence or culture. There was a highly significant (p = 0.00) and strong association (odds ratio (OR) = 195) between high L. pomona titer (greater than or equal to 1:80) and the presence of leptospires in the kidneys, as detected by culture. There was also a significant (p = 0.046) and strong (OR = 8.10) association between multifocal interstitial nephritis and the presence of renal leptospires as detected by culture. The association between leptospiral titer and MFIN lesions in the prevalence survey group of animals was statistically significant (p = 0.031), but this association was not significant in the case-control study group (p = 0.071) The failure to identify L. bratislava despite serological evidence of infection suggests that some of these seropositive animals may have been transiently infected at an early age, that serological findings were falsely positive, or that immunofluorescence and isolation attempts failed to detect L. bratislava if they were indeed present in the kidneys.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2766150

  1. Role of interleukin-1 in mesangial cell proliferation and matrix deposition in experimental mesangioproliferative nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Tesch, G. H.; Lan, H. Y.; Atkins, R. C.; Nikolic-Paterson, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    We examined the functional role of interleukin (IL)-1 in mesangial cell proliferation during rat anti-Thy-1 nephritis by blocking its action with IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra). Anti-Thy-1 nephritis was induced by intravenous injection of 5 mg/kg OX-7 IgG (day 0) into inbred Wistar rats. Groups of animals (n = 9) were implanted with a micro-osmotic pump on day -1, which delivered 25 micrograms/hour human recombinant IL-1ra or saline continuously until the rats were killed at day 6, the peak of mesangial cell proliferation. Immunostaining showed that IL-1 was expressed by mesangial cells during disease. IL-1ra treatment did not affect the mild, but significant, proteinuria seen after OX-7 injection. Compared with saline treatment, IL-1ra treatment reduced mesangial cell proliferation (decreases 24% P < 0.05), glomerular hypercellularity (decreases 29%; P < 0.05), and glomerular macrophage accumulation (decreases 20%; P < 0.05). However, IL-1ra treatment had no effect on glomerular IL-1 beta mRNA expression and caused only a small reduction in the high levels of glomerular expression of platelet-derived growth factor-beta protein (decreases 6%; P < 0.05). IL-1ra caused a modest reduction in the marked up-regulation of glomerular transforming growth factor-beta 1 mRNA expression on day 6 (decreases 26%; P < 0.05), although urinary excretion of this factor was unaffected. Interestingly, IL-1ra treatment had relatively little effect upon glomerular deposition of laminin, fibronectin, and collagen type IV seen in this acute disease. In conclusion, this study has 1) demonstrated that IL-1 is expressed by mesangial cells in vivo, 2) demonstrated that IL-1 is a mesangial cell growth factor in experimental mesangioproliferative nephritis, and 3) suggests that IL-1 has little or no fibrogenic activity in mesangial matrix deposition. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 PMID:9212740

  2. Plasmapheresis Is Associated With Better Renal Outcomes in Lupus Nephritis Patients With Thrombotic Microangiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiu-Yu; Yu, Feng; Zhou, Fu-De; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of plasmapheresis in patients with lupus nephritis-combined thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) in a Chinese cohort. Clinical and therapeutic data of patients with lupus nephritis–combined TMA were collected retrospectively. A comparison between those with and without plasmapheresis was performed. Seventy patients with renal biopsy-proven TMA in lupus nephritis were treated with conventional combined corticosteroid and immunosuppressive agents as induction therapy, 9 of the 70 patients received additional plasmapheresis. The plasmapheresis group presented with more severe SLE and renal activity indices, including a significant higher ratio of neurologic disorder (P = 0.025), lower level of platelet count (P = 0.009), higher value of serum creatinine (P = 0.038), higher percentage of anti-cardiolipin antibodies positive (P = 0.001), and higher Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index scores (P = 0.012), than that of the nonplasmapheresis group. However, the plasmapheresis group had a significant higher rate of remission and a lower ratio of treatment failure than that of the nonplasmapheresis group (P = 0.03). As the baseline data were significantly different between the 2 groups, the propensity score match was further designed to avoid retrospective bias. After re-analysis, the plasmapheresis group still had a significant higher rate of remission and a lower ratio of treatment failure than that of the nonplasmapheresis group (P = 0.018). More importantly, the plasmapheresis group had significant less composite endpoints than that of the nonplasmapheresis group (P = 0.005). Our study suggested that additional plasmapheresis on conventional induction therapy may benefit patients with lupus nephritis-combined TMA, which warrants further explorations. PMID:27149490

  3. Multi-antibody composition in lupus nephritis: isotype and antigen specificity make the difference.

    PubMed

    Bonanni, Alice; Vaglio, Augusto; Bruschi, Maurizio; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Cavagna, Lorenzo; Moroni, Gabriella; Franceschini, Franco; Allegri, Landino; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Candiano, Giovanni; Pesce, Giampaola; Ravelli, Angelo; Puppo, Francesco; Martini, Alberto; Tincani, Angela; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2015-08-01

    Research on autoimmune processes involved in glomerulonephritis has been for years based on experimental models. Recent progress in proteomics has radically modified perspectives: laser microdissection and proteomics were crucial for an in vivo analysis of autoantibodies eluted from human biopsies. Lupus nephritis has been the subject of recent independent researches. Main topics have been the definition of renal autoimmune components in human lupus biopsies; methods were laser capture of glomeruli and/or of single cells (CD38+ or Ki-67+) from tubulointerstitial areas as starting step followed by elution and characterization of renal antibodies by proteomics. The innovative approach highlighted different panels of autoantibodies deposited in glomeruli and in tubulo-interstitial areas that actually represented the unique autoimmune components in these patients. IgG2 was the major isotype; new podocyte proteins (αenolase, annexin AI) and already known implanted molecules (DNA, histone 3, C1q) were their target antigens in glomeruli. Vimentin was the antigen in tubulo-interstitial areas. Matching renal autoantibodies with serum allowed the definition of a typical autoantibody serum map that included the same anti-αenolase, anti-annexin AI, anti-DNA, and anti-histone 3 IgG2 already detected in renal tissue. Serum levels of specific autoantibodies were tenfold increased in patients with lupus nephritis allowing a clear differentiation from both rheumatoid arthritis and other glomerulonephritis. In all cases, targeted antigens were characterized as components of lupus NETosis. Matching renal/serum autoantibody composition in vivo furnishes new insights on human lupus nephritis and allows to refine composition of circulating antibodies in patients with lupus. A thoughtful passage from bench to bedside of new knowledge would expand our clinical and therapeutic opportunities. PMID:25888464

  4. Tacrolimus use in lupus nephritis: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Jennifer; Casian, Alina; D'Cruz, David

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in the role of tacrolimus as a potential therapeutic agent in SLE. This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluates the evidence for tacrolimus use in the management of lupus nephritis. Thirteen controlled studies were identified (9 suitable for inclusion), using Cochrane database, SCOPUS, Web of Science and OVID (MEDLINE and EMBASE). Data on complete and partial remission rates, proteinuria reduction and adverse events was extracted and analysed using RevMan software. The meta-analysis showed that overall tacrolimus is more effective at inducing complete renal remission than IVCYC (p=0.004), but there is no significant difference compared to MMF (p=0.87). Multi-target TAC+MMF therapy is more effective than IVCYC only when partial remission is included (p=0.0006). Frequency of key adverse effects seems comparable to other agents used in the management of lupus nephritis with fewer gastrointestinal side effects, leukopenia, menstrual disorders, infections and episodes of liver dysfunction reported, but more new onset hypertension and hyperglycaemia. Mortality was lower in the tacrolimus groups, but this was not statistically significant (p=0.15). Tacrolimus may be more effective at reducing proteinuria, but again this was not statistically significant. There are no controlled trials looking at use in pregnancy or juvenile patients, however case reports suggest potential efficacy and safety. In conclusion, in moderately severe lupus nephritis, there is some evidence supporting efficacy of tacrolimus or multi-target TAC+MMF over IVCYC, but no evidence supporting tacrolimus over MMF. Tacrolimus may be more effective at reducing proteinuria, having potential implications for long-term outcome. Key limitations of this study are the lack of long-term outcome data and the lack of high quality, large, blinded controlled trials in multi-ethnic groups. PMID:26427983

  5. Reactivity in ELISA with DNA-loaded nucleosomes in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Dieker, Jürgen; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; McHugh, Neil; Hamann, Philip; van der Vlag, Johan; Berden, Jo H

    2015-11-01

    Autoantibodies against nucleosomes are considered a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We compared in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis the diagnostic usefulness of a dsDNA-loaded nucleosome ELISA (anti-dsDNA-NcX) with ELISAs in which dsDNA or nucleosomes alone were coated. First, we analysed whether DNA loading on nucleosomes led to masking of epitopes by using defined monoclonal anti-DNA, anti-histone and nucleosome-specific autoantibodies to evaluate the accessibility of nucleosomal epitopes in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA. Second, autoantibody levels were measured in these 3 ELISAs in 100 patients with proliferative lupus nephritis (LN) before immunosuppressive treatment and in 128 non-SLE disease controls. In patients with LN inter-assay comparisons and associations with clinical and serological parameters were analysed. The panel of monoclonal antibodies revealed that all epitopes were equally accessible in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA as in the two other ELISAs. Patients with proliferative lupus nephritis were positive with dsDNA-loaded nucleosomes in 86%, with DNA in 66% and with nucleosomes in 85%. In the non-lupus disease control group these frequencies were 1.6% (2 out of 128) for both the anti-dsDNA-NcX and the anti-dsDNA ELISA and 0% in the anti-nucleosome ELISA. The levels in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA were high in a group of patients with LN that showed absent reactivity in the anti-DNA or low levels in the anti-nucleosome ELISA. Anti-dsDNA-NcX positivity was associated with higher SLEDAI scores within this group. Within nucleosome-based ELISAs, we propose the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA as the preferred test system. PMID:26597199

  6. Optimal focal-plane restoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichenbach, Stephen E.; Park, Stephen K.

    1989-01-01

    Image restoration can be implemented efficiently by calculating the convolution of the digital image and a small kernel during image acquisition. Processing the image in the focal-plane in this way requires less computation than traditional Fourier-transform-based techniques such as the Wiener filter and constrained least-squares filter. Here, the values of the convolution kernel that yield the restoration with minimum expected mean-square error are determined using a frequency analysis of the end-to-end imaging system. This development accounts for constraints on the size and shape of the spatial kernel and all the components of the imaging system. Simulation results indicate the technique is effective and efficient.

  7. Neurocysticercosis presenting as focal hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Azharuddin Mohammed; Shamim, Md Dilawez; Ahmad, Mehtab; Abdali, Nasar

    2014-01-01

    A 40-year-old man presented with a 2-month history of headache, nausea and vomiting, with generalised seizures for the past 15 days. On examination he had bilateral papilloedema, visual acuity was 6/6 in both eyes but perimetry showed right homonymous inferior quadrantanopia. His MRI showed numerous small cystic lesions with eccentric nodules, diffusely distributed in bilateral cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres. There was also focal hydrocephalus involving occipital and temporal horns of the left lateral ventricle leading to its selective dilation. Stool examination showed ova of Taenia solium. He was treated with albendazole, prednisone and sustained release sodium valproate for 1 month. His headache resolved and he is free of seizures. Repeat perimetry at 1 month also showed resolution of visual field defect. PMID:24962486

  8. Rare allergic reaction of the kidney: sitagliptin-induced acute tubulointerstitial nephritis.

    PubMed

    Alsaad, Ali A; Dhannoon, Sarah M; Pantin, Sally-Ann L; Porter, Ivan E

    2016-01-01

    A 56-year-old man with a history of diabetes mellitus type-2 and stage-2 chronic kidney disease secondary to diabetic nephropathy presented with an acute deterioration of kidney function. Non-invasive work-up failed to reveal the underlying aetiology for the acute kidney failure. Kidney biopsy revealed acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (ATIN) which was attributed to sitagliptin use. Only few case reports have shown this correlation. Our aim is to alert physicians and other providers of the potential effect of sitagliptin to cause ATIN with this biopsy-proven case. PMID:27436034

  9. Molecular Architecture of the Goodpasture Autoantigen in Anti-GBM Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Pedchenko, Vadim; Bondar, Olga; Fogo, Agnes B.; Vanacore, Roberto; Voziyan, Paul; Kitching, A. Richard; Wieslander, Jörgen; Kashtan, Clifford; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Neilson, Eric G.; Wilson, Curtis B.; Hudson, Billy G.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND In Goodpasture’s disease, circulating autoantibodies bind to the noncollagenous-1 (NC1) domain of type IV collagen in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). The specificity and molecular architecture of epitopes of tissue-bound autoantibodies are unknown. Alport’s post-transplantation nephritis, which is mediated by alloantibodies against the GBM, occurs after kidney transplantation in some patients with Alport’s syndrome. We compared the conformations of the antibody epitopes in Goodpasture’s disease and Alport’s post-transplantation nephritis with the intention of finding clues to the pathogenesis of anti-GBM glomerulonephritis. METHODS We used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to determine the specificity of circulating autoantibodies and kidney-bound antibodies to NC1 domains. Circulating antibodies were analyzed in 57 patients with Goodpasture’s disease, and kidney-bound antibodies were analyzed in 14 patients with Goodpasture’s disease and 2 patients with Alport’s post-transplantation nephritis. The molecular architecture of key epitope regions was deduced with the use of chimeric molecules and a three-dimensional model of the α345NC1 hexamer. RESULTS In patients with Goodpasture’s disease, both autoantibodies to the α3NC1 monomer and antibodies to the α5NC1 monomer (and fewer to the α4NC1 monomer) were bound in the kidneys and lungs, indicating roles for the α3NC1 and α5NC1 monomers as autoantigens. High antibody titers at diagnosis of anti-GBM disease were associated with ultimate loss of renal function. The antibodies bound to distinct epitopes encompassing region EA in the α5NC1 monomer and regions EA and EB in the α3NC1 monomer, but they did not bind to the native cross-linked α345NC1 hexamer. In contrast, in patients with Alport’s post-transplantation nephritis, alloantibodies bound to the EA region of the α5NC1 subunit in the intact hexamer, and binding decreased on dissociation. CONCLUSIONS The development

  10. Unmet medical needs in lupus nephritis: solutions through evidence-based, personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Anders, Hans-Joachim; Weidenbusch, Marc; Rovin, Brad

    2015-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) remains a kidney disease with significant unmet medical needs despite extensive clinical and translational research over the past decade. These include the need to (i) predict the individual risk for LN in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus, (ii) identify the best therapeutic option for an individual patient, (iii) distinguish chronic kidney damage from active immunologic kidney injury, (iv) develop efficient treatments with acceptable or no side effects and improve the design of randomized clinical trials so that effective drugs demonstrate efficacy. This review discusses the underlying reasons for these unmet medical needs and options of how to overcome them in the future. PMID:26413272

  11. Unmet medical needs in lupus nephritis: solutions through evidence-based, personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Anders, Hans-Joachim; Weidenbusch, Marc; Rovin, Brad

    2015-10-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) remains a kidney disease with significant unmet medical needs despite extensive clinical and translational research over the past decade. These include the need to (i) predict the individual risk for LN in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus, (ii) identify the best therapeutic option for an individual patient, (iii) distinguish chronic kidney damage from active immunologic kidney injury, (iv) develop efficient treatments with acceptable or no side effects and improve the design of randomized clinical trials so that effective drugs demonstrate efficacy. This review discusses the underlying reasons for these unmet medical needs and options of how to overcome them in the future. PMID:26413272

  12. GABAergic networks jump-start focal seizures.

    PubMed

    de Curtis, Marco; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    Abnormally enhanced glutamatergic excitation is commonly believed to mark the onset of a focal seizure. This notion, however, is not supported by firm evidence, and it will be challenged here. A general reduction of unit firing has been indeed observed in association with low-voltage fast activity at the onset of seizures recorded during presurgical intracranial monitoring in patients with focal, drug-resistant epilepsies. Moreover, focal seizures in animal models start with increased γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneuronal activity that silences principal cells. In vitro studies have shown that synchronous activation of GABAA receptors occurs at seizure onset and causes sizeable elevations in extracellular potassium, thus facilitating neuronal recruitment and seizure progression. A paradoxical involvement of GABAergic networks is required for the initiation of focal seizures characterized by low-voltage fast activity, which represents the most common seizure-onset pattern in focal epilepsies. PMID:27061793

  13. Early-onset neutropenia induced by rituximab in a patient with lupus nephritis and hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Ávila, Mariangelí; Fred-Jiménez, Ruth M; Vilá, Luis M

    2015-01-01

    Rituximab is an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that has been used to treat several complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) including nephritis, cerebritis, and hematological disorders. Neutropenia is among the adverse events associated with rituximab; this usually occurs several weeks after therapy. However, early-onset neutropenia has been reported only in a few cases. Herein, we describe a 36-year-old Hispanic SLE woman who developed severe early-onset neutropenia (0.3 × 10(9)/L) after the second weekly rituximab infusion (375 mg/m(2) weekly × 4) given for nephritis and hemolytic anemia. She also had early-onset thrombocytopenia after rituximab therapy. Both hematological disorders resolved 12 days after the fourth and final dose. This case, together with few others, suggests that early-onset neutropenia may occur during rituximab therapy. Even though rituximab-induced neutropenia seems to be transient, it may predispose SLE patients to severe complications such as infections. PMID:25767732

  14. Early-Onset Neutropenia Induced by Rituximab in a Patient with Lupus Nephritis and Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo-Ávila, Mariangelí; Fred-Jiménez, Ruth M.; Vilá, Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    Rituximab is an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that has been used to treat several complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) including nephritis, cerebritis, and hematological disorders. Neutropenia is among the adverse events associated with rituximab; this usually occurs several weeks after therapy. However, early-onset neutropenia has been reported only in a few cases. Herein, we describe a 36-year-old Hispanic SLE woman who developed severe early-onset neutropenia (0.3 × 109/L) after the second weekly rituximab infusion (375 mg/m2 weekly × 4) given for nephritis and hemolytic anemia. She also had early-onset thrombocytopenia after rituximab therapy. Both hematological disorders resolved 12 days after the fourth and final dose. This case, together with few others, suggests that early-onset neutropenia may occur during rituximab therapy. Even though rituximab-induced neutropenia seems to be transient, it may predispose SLE patients to severe complications such as infections. PMID:25767732

  15. Clinicopathologic correlations of renal microthrombosis and inflammatory markers in proliferative lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Microthrombosis is often observed in lupus nephritis (LN) lesions, but its clinical significance is unknown. We evaluated the clinicopathologic correlations of renal microthrombosis and inflammatory markers in LN. Methods Kidney biopsies from 58 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) proliferative nephritis were analyzed with immunohistochemistry (IHC) for intravascular platelet aggregates (CD61), macrophagic infiltration (CD68), and activated complement deposition (C4d). Clinical data at the time of kidney biopsy and follow-up were analyzed with regard to pathologic IHC data. Results Microthrombosis was present in 52% of the tissues. It was significantly more prevalent in patients with antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) (62% versus 42%). The presence of microthrombosis significantly correlated with higher macrophagic infiltration. Macrophagic infiltration but not microthrombosis was significantly correlated with C4d deposition. Only macrophagic infiltration showed a correlation with SLE and renal activity (proteinuria and active sediment), whereas neither the presence of CD61+ microthrombi nor the extent of C4d deposition correlated with LN severity or outcome. Conclusions Microthrombosis is associated with higher macrophagic infiltration in LN but does not seem to increase independently the severity of renal damage. Macrophagic infiltration was the best marker of SLE and renal activity in this LN series. PMID:22640796

  16. Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein-4 as a Marker of Chronic Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jie; Ye, Yujin; Singh, Sandeep; Zhou, Jinchun; Li, Yajuan; Ding, Huihua; Li, Quan-zhen; Zhou, Xin; Putterman, Chaim; Saxena, Ramesh; Mohan, Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Kidney biopsy remains the mainstay of Lupus Nephritis (LN) diagnosis and prognostication. The objective of this study is to identify non-invasive biomarkers that closely parallel renal pathology in LN. Previous reports have demonstrated that serum Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4) was increased in diabetic nephropathy in both animal models and patients. We proceeded to assess if IGFBP4 could be associated with LN. We performed ELISA using the serum of 86 patients with LN. Normal healthy adults (N = 23) and patients with other glomerular diseases (N = 20) served as controls. Compared to the healthy controls or other glomerular disease controls, serum IGFBP-4 levels were significantly higher in the patients with LN. Serum IGFBP-4 did not correlate well with systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index (SLEDAI), renal SLEDAI or proteinuria, but it did correlate with estimated glomerular filtration rate (R = 0.609, P < 0.0001). Interestingly, in 18 patients with proliferative LN whose blood samples were obtained at the time of renal biopsy, serum IGFBP-4 levels correlated strongly with the chronicity index of renal pathology (R = 0.713, P < 0.001). IGFBP-4 emerges a potential marker of lupus nephritis, reflective of renal pathology chronicity changes. PMID:27019456

  17. CCR1 inhibition ameliorates the progression of lupus nephritis in NZB/W mice.

    PubMed

    Bignon, Alexandre; Gaudin, Françoise; Hémon, Patrice; Tharinger, Hugo; Mayol, Katia; Walzer, Thierry; Loetscher, Pius; Peuchmaur, Michel; Berrebi, Dominique; Balabanian, Karl

    2014-02-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease, the development of which is characterized by a progressive loss of renal function. Such dysfunction is associated with leukocyte infiltration in the glomerular and tubulointerstitial compartments in both human and experimental lupus nephritis. In this study, we investigated the role of the Ccr1 chemokine receptor in this infiltration process during the progression of nephritis in the lupus-prone New Zealand Black/New Zealand White (NZB/W) mouse model. We found that peripheral T cells, mononuclear phagocytes, and neutrophils, but not B cells, from nephritic NZB/W mice were more responsive to Ccr1 ligands than the leukocytes from younger prenephritic NZB/W mice. Short-term treatment of nephritic NZB/W mice with the orally available Ccr1 antagonist BL5923 decreased renal infiltration by T cells and macrophages. Longer Ccr1 blockade decreased kidney accumulation of effector/memory CD4(+) T cells, Ly6C(+) monocytes, and both M1 and M2 macrophages; reduced tubulointerstitial and glomerular injuries; delayed fatal proteinuria; and prolonged animal lifespan. In contrast, renal humoral immunity was unaffected in BL5923-treated mice, which reflected the unchanged numbers of infiltrated B cells in the kidneys. Altogether, these findings define a pivotal role for Ccr1 in the recruitment of T and mononuclear phagocyte cells to inflamed kidneys of NZB/W mice, which in turn contribute to the progression of renal injury. PMID:24367031

  18. Resistin as a potential marker of renal disease in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Hutcheson, J; Ye, Y; Han, J; Arriens, C; Saxena, R; Li, Q-Z; Mohan, C; Wu, T

    2015-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis (LN) have strong concomitance with cardiovascular disease that cannot be explained fully by typical risk factors. We examined the possibility that serum or urine expression of adipokines may act as biomarkers for LN, as these proteins have been associated previously with cardiovascular disease as well as SLE. Antibody arrays were performed on serum and urine from lupus patients and matched controls using a cross-sectional study design. From the initial array-based screening data of 15 adipokines, adiponectin, leptin and resistin were selected for validation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Correlations were determined between adipokine expression levels and measures of disease activity or lupus nephritis. The expression of adiponectin and resistin was increased in both sera and urine from LN patients, while leptin was increased in LN patient sera, compared to matched controls. Serum resistin, but not urine resistin, was correlated with measures of renal dysfunction in LN. Serum resistin expression may be useful as a marker of renal dysfunction in patients with LN, although longitudinal studies are warranted. Further studies are necessary to determine if resistin has functional consequences in LN. PMID:25345756

  19. Reactive oxygen products in heterologous anti-glomerular basement membrane nephritis in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Birtwistle, R. J.; Michael, J.; Howie, A. J.; Adu, D.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of 'scavengers' of reactive oxygen products (ROPs) was studied in the heterologous phase of anti-glomerular basement (anti-GBM) nephritis induced in rats. Glomerulonephritis was induced by the intravenous administration of sheep anti-GBM antibody (5 mg/100 g) to rats on day 0. The intraperitoneal administration of superoxide dismutase (SOD) 30 mg/kg/day or 150 mg/kg/day leads to a significant reduction in proteinuria on day 1 and also on day 3 in animals given SOD 30 mg/kg/day. Proteinuria was not significantly reduced by the intraperitoneal administration of inactivated SOD (150 mg/kg/day). In rats given polyethylene glycol coupled catalase (PEG-catalase) intraperitoneally at a dose of 10,000 iu/kg/day and 100,000 iu/kg/day proteinuria was lower than in rats with unmodified anti-GBM nephritis. These differences were significant on day 1 (P less than 0.05) in rats given PEG-catalase 100,000 iu/kg/day and on days 3 and 5 in rats treated with either dose of PEG-catalase (P less than 0.01). These data suggest a role for superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide, or a product of their interaction such as hydroxyl radical, in glomerular injury induced by anti-GBM antibody. PMID:2786425

  20. Successful treatment of severe hantavirus nephritis with corticosteroids: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Martinuč Bergoč, Maja; Lindič, Jelka; Kovač, Damjan; Ferluga, Dušan; Pajek, Jernej

    2013-08-01

    Hantaviruses can be associated with severe form of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome although there are only a few cases reporting chronic kidney disease after hantavirus infection. We report a severe nonresolving chronic renal failure after protracted Dobrava hantavirus infection successfully treated with corticosteroids. Ten days after working in a basement a 33-year-old man fell seriously ill, with high fever, chills, diffuse myalgia, headache and abdominal pain. After hospital admission a diagnosis of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome caused by Dobrava hantavirus was made. Acute oliguric kidney injury developed in the first 3 days after admission, in a few days diuresis restored and he became polyuric. Nevertheless renal failure persisted and he needed hemodialysis. Because of nonresolving kidney failure, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and renoparenchymal arterial hypertension persisting 2 months after onset of symptoms, a kidney biopsy was performed, showing severe necrotizing tubulointerstitial nephritis. High dose methylprednisolone therapy was started and his renal function significantly improved. Two months later a second renal biopsy showed persisting elements of active necrotizing tubulointerstitial nephritis. We decided to stop corticosteroid treatment and introduced aldosterone antagonist eplerenon as anti-fibrotic agent, and his renal function further improved and remained stable. Nine months later his serum creatinine concentration was 227 μmol/L, proteinuria 0.156 g/day and well controlled nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. PMID:23931879

  1. IgA myeloma presenting as Henoch-Schönlein purpura with nephritis.

    PubMed

    Zickerman, A M; Allen, A C; Talwar, V; Olczak, S A; Brownlee, A; Holland, M; Furness, P N; Brunskill, N J; Feehally, J

    2000-09-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) are both characterized by IgA-mediated tissue injury, including mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis. Abnormalities of IgA1 glycosylation are described in IgA nephropathy and HSP nephritis. IgA-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) have been inconsistently described in the serum of patients with HSP. In IgA myeloma, the paraprotein-mediated renal lesion is typically cast nephropathy; IgAN or HSP have only rarely been reported in myeloma even when an IgA paraprotein is circulating in large concentrations. We report the case of a 50-year-old man with IgA myeloma who presented with HSP including nephritis and rapidly progressive renal failure. His IgA1 had altered O-glycosylation in the pattern seen in IgAN and also contained an IgA-ANCA. This case adds further weight to the evidence that IgA1 O-glycosylation abnormalities predispose to mesangial IgA deposition and also that IgA-ANCA may have a pathogenic role in the development of HSP. PMID:10977812

  2. Resistin as a potential marker of renal disease in lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Hutcheson, J; Ye, Y; Han, J; Arriens, C; Saxena, R; Li, Q-Z; Mohan, C; Wu, T

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis (LN) have strong concomitance with cardiovascular disease that cannot be explained fully by typical risk factors. We examined the possibility that serum or urine expression of adipokines may act as biomarkers for LN, as these proteins have been associated previously with cardiovascular disease as well as SLE. Antibody arrays were performed on serum and urine from lupus patients and matched controls using a cross-sectional study design. From the initial array-based screening data of 15 adipokines, adiponectin, leptin and resistin were selected for validation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Correlations were determined between adipokine expression levels and measures of disease activity or lupus nephritis. The expression of adiponectin and resistin was increased in both sera and urine from LN patients, while leptin was increased in LN patient sera, compared to matched controls. Serum resistin, but not urine resistin, was correlated with measures of renal dysfunction in LN. Serum resistin expression may be useful as a marker of renal dysfunction in patients with LN, although longitudinal studies are warranted. Further studies are necessary to determine if resistin has functional consequences in LN. PMID:25345756

  3. Analysis of the effectiveness and safety of rituximab in patients with refractory lupus nephritis: a chart review.

    PubMed

    Contis, Anne; Vanquaethem, Helene; Truchetet, Marie-Elise; Couzi, Lionel; Rigothier, Claire; Richez, Christophe; Lazaro, Estibaliz; Duffau, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Lupus nephritis is a life-threatening complication of systemic lupus erythematosus. The standard treatment for this condition, including corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide, results in a 70 % remission rate at 12 months, but it is also associated with significant morbidity. Rituximab, a chimeric anti-CD20 antibody, could be useful, given the central role of B cells in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Case reports and retrospective series have reported that rituximab is effective for refractory lupus nephritis. However, the double-blind, placebo-controlled LUNAR trial failed to meet its end point. We studied clinical, biological, and immunological data on 17 patients who received rituximab as an induction treatment for refractory lupus nephritis at the University Hospital Center of Bordeaux. A complete treatment response was defined as a normal serum creatinine with inactive urinary sediment and 24-h urinary albumin <0.5 g and a partial response (PR) as a >50 % improvement in all of the renal parameters that were abnormal at baseline, with no deterioration in any parameter. Seventeen patients received rituximab as induction treatment for lupus nephritis refractory to standard treatment by cyclophosphamide. After a follow-up of 12 months, complete or partial renal remission was achieved in 53 % patients. Rituximab therapy resulted in a significant improvement in proteinuria and steroid dose tapering in all patients. Rituximab should be considered as a treatment option for refractory lupus glomerulonephritis. PMID:26762196

  4. Early vision and focal attention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julesz, Bela

    1991-07-01

    At the thirty-year anniversary of the introduction of the technique of computer-generated random-dot stereograms and random-dot cinematograms into psychology, the impact of the technique on brain research and on the study of artificial intelligence is reviewed. The main finding-that stereoscopic depth perception (stereopsis), motion perception, and preattentive texture discrimination are basically bottom-up processes, which occur without the help of the top-down processes of cognition and semantic memory-greatly simplifies the study of these processes of early vision and permits the linking of human perception with monkey neurophysiology. Particularly interesting are the unexpected findings that stereopsis (assumed to be local) is a global process, while texture discrimination (assumed to be a global process, governed by statistics) is local, based on some conspicuous local features (textons). It is shown that the top-down process of "shape (depth) from shading" does not affect stereopsis, and some of the models of machine vision are evaluated. The asymmetry effect of human texture discrimination is discussed, together with recent nonlinear spatial filter models and a novel extension of the texton theory that can cope with the asymmetry problem. This didactic review attempts to introduce the physicist to the field of psychobiology and its problems-including metascientific problems of brain research, problems of scientific creativity, the state of artificial intelligence research (including connectionist neural networks) aimed at modeling brain activity, and the fundamental role of focal attention in mental events.

  5. Report on SEQUAL/FOCAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, E. J.; Philander, S. G. H.; Richardson, P. L.

    In Eos (April 6, 1982), United States plans for a program to study the dynamic response of the equatorial Atlantic to seasonally varying surface winds were described. Now, 6 years later, we report on progress toward our goal “to describe accurately, and to model correctly” the changes in the currents and density field of the upper equatorial Atlantic Ocean during a 2-year period. A major effort toward this goal was the field phase of SEQUAL (Seasonal Response of the Equatorial Atlantic) and the closely coordinated French program FOCAL (Français Océan et Climat dans l'Atlantique Equatorial).Between February 1983 and September 1984 changes in the surface winds and in oceanic conditions in the equatorial Atlantic were monitored continuously with a variety of instruments. Figure 1 shows key deployments and sections. The resulting data include six current meter moorings, 15 inverted echo sounders and island tide gauges, 57 near-surface drifters, and 18 French and five U.S. cruises that made 1200 hydrographic stations and 800 current profiles. All these data, as well as nearly 10,000 expendable bathythermographs (XBTs) (from the cruises, from air-dropped expendable bathythermograph (AXBT) programs, and from repeated ship of opportunity lines run between 1980 and 1985) were combined and documented by George Heimerdinger, of the National Oceanographic Data Center, and are available from NODC on request.

  6. Focal liver lesions found incidentally

    PubMed Central

    Algarni, Abdullah A; Alshuhri, Abdullah H; Alonazi, Majed M; Mourad, Moustafa Mabrouk; Bramhall, Simon R

    2016-01-01

    Incidentally found focal liver lesions are a common finding and a reason for referral to hepatobiliary service. They are often discovered in patients with history of liver cirrhosis, colorectal cancer, incidentally during work up for abdominal pain or in a trauma setting. Specific points should considered during history taking such as risk factors of liver cirrhosis; hepatitis, alcohol consumption, substance exposure or use of oral contraceptive pills and metabolic syndromes. Full blood count, liver function test and tumor markers can act as a guide to minimize the differential diagnosis and to categorize the degree of liver disease. Imaging should start with B-mode ultrasound. If available, contrast enhanced ultrasound is a feasible, safe, cost effective option and increases the ability to reach a diagnosis. Contrast enhanced computed tomography should be considered next. It is more accurate in diagnosis and better to study anatomy for possible operation. Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance is the gold standard with the highest sensitivity. If doubt still remains, the options are biopsy or surgical excision. PMID:27028805

  7. Bacterial Keratitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... very quickly, and if left untreated, can cause blindness. The bacteria usually responsible for this type of ... to intense ultraviolet radiation exposure, e.g. snow blindness or welder's arc eye). Next Bacterial Keratitis Symptoms ...

  8. Pentraxin 3 Is Closely Associated With Tubulointerstitial Injury in Lupus Nephritis: A Large Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yun; Tan, Ying; Li, Yongzhe; Zhang, Jianchun; Guo, Yongbing; Guo, Zhiling; Zhang, Chengying; Yu, Feng; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis always elicits immune inflammatory tissue damages in kidney. Pentraxin 3 (PTX3), mainly produced at inflammatory sites, is known to be involved in the regulation of the innate immunity system. The aim of this study was to investigate the serum and urine levels of PTX3, and the expression of PTX3 in renal tissues in lupus nephritis patients from a large Chinese cohort.The study used cross-sectional survey and 288 active lupus nephritis patients, including discovery cohort and validation cohort, 115 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients without clinical renal involvement and 46 healthy controls were enrolled. Serum and urine PTX3 were screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The renal deposition of PTX3 was detected by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence.The average level of serum PTX3 in the discovery cohort of lupus nephritis was significantly higher than that in nonrenal involvement SLE group and normal controls (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, respectively), which was confirmed by the validation cohort. Serum PTX3 levels of 15 lupus nephritis patients in remission decreased significantly compared with that in active phase. Serum PTX3 levels were significantly higher in patients with hematuria (P = 0.014), leucocyturia (P = 0.002), acute renal failure (P = 0.001), and nephrotic syndrome (P = 0.036). There were significant correlations between serum PTX3 levels and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) scores, serum creatinine value, renal pathological activity indices, and serum complement 3 (C3) in active lupus nephritis patients. The urinary PTX3 levels were significantly higher in active lupus nephritis patients compared with patients in remission and normal controls (P = 0.011, P = 0.008, respectively). There were significant associations between urinary PTX3 levels and multiple indices of tubulointerstitial lesions, including urinary KIM-1 (r = 0.368, P = 0

  9. Anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm antibodies, and the lupus anticoagulant: significant factors associated with lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Alba, P; Bento, L; Cuadrado, M; Karim, Y; Tungekar, M; Abbs, I; Khamashta, M; D'Cruz, D; Hughes, G

    2003-01-01

    Background: Lupus nephritis (LN) is a common manifestation in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Autoantibodies and ethnicity have been associated with LN, but the results are controversial. Objective: To study the immunological and demographic factors associated with the development of LN. Patients and methods: A retrospective case-control study of 127 patients with biopsy-proven LN, and 206 randomly selected patients with SLE without nephritis as controls was designed. All patients had attended our lupus unit during the past 12 years. Standard methods were used for laboratory testing. Results: Patients with LN were significantly younger than the controls at the time of SLE diagnosis (mean (SD) 25.6 (8.8) years v 33.7 (12.5) years; p<0.0001). The proportion of patients of black ethnic origin was significantly higher in the group with nephritis (p=0.02). There were no differences in sex distribution or duration of follow up. A higher proportion of anti-dsDNA, anti-RNP, anti-Sm, and lupus anticoagulant (LA) was seen in the group with nephritis (p=0.002; p=0.005; p=0.0001; p=0.01, respectively). In univariate, but not in multivariate, analysis male sex and absence of anti-dsDNA were associated with earlier onset of renal disease (p=0.03; p=0.008). In multivariate analysis the only factors associated with nephritis were younger age at diagnosis of SLE, black race, presence of anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm, and LA. No demographic or immunological associations were seen with WHO histological classes. Conclusions: Young, black patients with anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm antibodies, and positive LA, appear to have a higher risk of renal involvement. These patients should be carefully monitored for the development of LN. PMID:12759294

  10. Comparative Transcriptional Profiling of 3 Murine Models of SLE Nephritis Reveals Both Unique and Shared Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weijia; Kretzler, Matthias; Davidson, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Objective To define shared and unique features of SLE nephritis in mouse models of proliferative and glomerulosclerotic renal disease. Methods Perfused kidneys from NZB/W F1, NZW/BXSB and NZM2410 mice were harvested before and after nephritis onset. Affymetrix based gene expression profiles of kidney RNA were analyzed using Genomatix Pathway Systems and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software. Gene expression patterns were confirmed using real-time PCR. Results 955, 1168 and 755 genes were regulated in the kidneys of nephritic NZB/W F1, NZM2410 and NZW/BXSB mice respectively. 263 genes were regulated concordantly in all three strains reflecting immune cell infiltration, endothelial cell activation, complement activation, cytokine signaling, tissue remodeling and hypoxia. STAT3 was the top associated transcription factor, having a binding site in the gene promoter of 60/263 regulated genes. The two strains with proliferative nephritis shared a macrophage/DC infiltration and activation signature. NZB/W and NZM2410 mice shared a mitochondrial dysfunction signature. Dominant T cell and plasma cell signatures in NZB/W mice reflected lymphoid aggregates; this was the only strain with regulatory T cell infiltrates. NZW/BXSB mice manifested tubular regeneration and NZM2410 mice had the most metabolic stress and manifested loss of nephrin, indicating podocyte loss. Conclusions These findings identify shared inflammatory mechanisms of SLE nephritis that can be therapeutically targeted. Nevertheless, the heterogeneity of effector mechanisms suggests that individualized therapy might need to be based on biopsy findings. Some common mechanisms are shared with non-immune–mediated renal diseases, suggesting that strategies to prevent tissue hypoxia and remodeling may be useful in SLE nephritis. PMID:24167575

  11. Unilateral Isolated Proximal Femoral Focal Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Doğer, Emek; Köpük, Şule Y.; Çakıroğlu, Yiğit; Çakır, Özgür; Yücesoy, Gülseren

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To discuss a patient with a prenatal diagnosis of unilateral isolated femoral focal deficiency. Case. Antenatal diagnosis of unilateral isolated femoral focal deficiency was made at 20 weeks of gestation. The length of left femur was shorter than the right, and fetal femur length was below the fifth percentile. Proximal femoral focal deficiency was diagnosed. After delivery, the diagnosis was confirmed with skeletal radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging. In prenatal ultrasonographic examination, the early recognition and exclusion of skeletal dysplasias is important; moreover, treatment plans should be initiated, and valuable information should be provided to the family. PMID:23984135

  12. Significance of mast cell renal infiltration in patients with anti-GBM nephritis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Mei; Zhang, Yi-Yan; Zhang, Ming-Chao; Zhang, Li-Hua; Zeng, Cai-Hong; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Tang, Zheng

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the role of mast cells (MCs) renal infiltration in the progression of human anti-GBM nephritis, 38 patients diagnosed with anti-GBM nephritis were enrolled. Renal biopsies were performed. Immunohistochemistry was conducted to detect MCs in renal tissues. Patients were divided into group 1 (MCs <50 mm(-2), n = 18) and group 2 (MCs ≥50 mm(-2), n = 20) according to the infiltrating renal MC count. The clinical-pathological indices were compared. And, correlation between MCs and the clinical-pathological indices was analyzed. Patients of group 2 had more severe renal dysfunctions, expressed as higher levels of serum creatinine (SCr 8.95 ± 3.66 vs. 4.75 ± 2.73 mg/dL, p < 0.001), urine retinol-binding protein (RBP 29.8 ± 13.9 vs. 15.7 ± 11.5 mg/dL, p = 0.005), and lower urinary osmotic pressure. Pathologically, patients of group 2 had a higher percentage of fibrous/fibrocellular crescents (66.7 ± 21.9 vs. 47.0 ± 33.6%, p = 0.037) but a lower percentage of cellular crescents. More CD8 (268 mm(-2) vs. 180 mm(-2), p = 0.045) and CD68 (268 mm(-2) vs. 180 mm(-2), p = 0.045) positive cells infiltrating the interstitium were observed in group 2. Furthermore, renal MCs correlated significantly with the total number of crescents and the tubular interstitial CD8 and CD68 positive cells. And, the number of MCs was associated with the histological types. The renal function was significantly different between the two groups at presentation. However, at 3 and 6 month follow-up, the patient outcome was associated with the histological types. Our study showed that MC infiltrations were associated with chronic lesions in anti-GBM nephritis and may be involved in the loss of renal function with pathological changes. PMID:27095326

  13. Comparison of Renal Response Parameters for Juvenile Membranous Plus Proliferative Lupus Nephritis Versus Isolated Proliferative Lupus Nephritis: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of the CARRA Registry

    PubMed Central

    Boneparth, Alexis; Ilowite, Norman T.

    2014-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) affects many patients with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and is a significant cause of disease morbidity. Membraneous plus proliferative LN (M+PLN) may represent a more difficult to treat subtype of juvenile LN, compared to isolated proliferative LN (PLN.) In this retrospective observational study, we utilized data from the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatism Research Alliance (CARRA) registry to compare response rates for pediatric M+PLN versus PLN. Response was assessed at the most recent CARRA registry visit gathered ≥ 6 months after diagnostic kidney biopsy. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) less than 90 ml/min/1.73m2, indicating renal insufficiency, was found in 16.1% of patients with M+PLN and 6.1% of patients with PLN (P=0.071). We found no significant difference in achievement of response in either hematuria or proteinuria between PLN and M+PLN groups or between subgroups determined by presence of class III vs. class IV proliferative disease. Exposure rates to mycophenolate, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab were similar between groups. Future studies will be necessary to correlate pediatric LN renal histology data with treatment response as well as other disease outcome measures. PMID:24729278

  14. Comparison of renal response parameters for juvenile membranous plus proliferative lupus nephritis versus isolated proliferative lupus nephritis: a cross-sectional analysis of the CARRA Registry.

    PubMed

    Boneparth, A; Ilowite, N T

    2014-08-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) affects many patients with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and is a significant cause of disease morbidity. Membranous plus proliferative LN (M + PLN) may represent a more difficult to treat subtype of juvenile LN, compared to isolated proliferative LN (PLN). In this retrospective observational study, we utilized data from the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatism Research Alliance (CARRA) registry to compare response rates for pediatric M + PLN versus PLN. Response was assessed at the most recent CARRA registry visit gathered ≥6 months after diagnostic kidney biopsy. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) less than 90 ml/min/1.73 m(2), indicating renal insufficiency, was found in 16.1% of patients with M + PLN and 6.1% of patients with PLN (P = 0.071). We found no significant difference in achievement of response in either hematuria or proteinuria between PLN and M + PLN groups or between subgroups determined by presence of class III vs. class IV proliferative disease. Exposure rates to mycophenolate, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab were similar between groups. Future studies will be necessary to correlate pediatric LN renal histology data with treatment response as well as other disease outcome measures. PMID:24729278

  15. Clinical outcomes of kidney transplants on patients with end-stage renal disease secondary to lupus nephritis, polycystic kidney disease and diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Ríos, John Fredy; Builes-Rodriguez, Sheila Alexandra; Restrepo-Correa, Ricardo Cesar; Aristizabal-Alzate, Arbey; Ocampo-Kohn, Catalina; Serna-Campuzano, Angélica; Cardona-Díaz, Natalia; Giraldo-Ramirez, Nelson Darío; Zuluaga-Valencia, Gustavo Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with lupus nephritis could progress to end-stage renal disease (10-22%); hence, kidney transplants should be considered as the treatment of choice for these patients. Objective: To evaluate the clinical outcomes after kidney transplants in patients with chronic kidney diseases secondary to lupus nephritis, polycystic kidney disease and diabetes nephropathy at Pablo Tobon Uribe Hospital. Methods: A descriptive and retrospective study performed at one kidney transplant center between 2005 and 2013. Results: A total of 136 patients, 27 with lupus nephritis (19.9%), 31 with polycystic kidney disease (22.8%) and 78 with diabetes nephropathy (57.4%), were included in the study. The graft survivals after one, three and five years were 96.3%, 82.5% and 82.5% for lupus nephritis; 90%, 86% and 76.5% for polycystic kidney disease and 91.7%, 80.3% and 67.9% for diabetes nephropathy, respectively, with no significant differences (p= 0.488); the rate of lupus nephritis recurrence was 0.94%/person-year. The etiology of lupus vs diabetes vs polycystic disease was not a risk factor for a decreased time of graft survival (Hazard ratio: 1.43; 95% CI: 0.52-3.93). Conclusion: Kidney transplant patients with end stage renal disease secondary to lupus nephritis has similar graft and patient survival success rates to patients with other kidney diseases. The complication rate and risk of recurrence for lupus nephritis are low. Kidney transplants should be considered as the treatment of choice for patients with end stage renal disease secondary to lupus nephritis. PMID:27226665

  16. Dentistry and internal medicine: from the focal infection theory to the periodontal medicine concept.

    PubMed

    Pizzo, Giuseppe; Guiglia, Rosario; Lo Russo, Lucio; Campisi, Giuseppina

    2010-12-01

    During past decades the relationship between dentistry and internal medicine and especially the concept of the so-called focal infection theory have long been a matter of debate. The pathogenesis of focal diseases has been classically attributed to dental pulp pathologies and periapical infections. Nonetheless, in recent years, their role is being dismissed while increasing interest is being devoted to the possible associations between periodontal infection and systemic diseases. In fact, periodontal pathogens and their products, as well as inflammatory mediators produced in periodontal tissues, might enter the bloodstream, causing systemic effects and/or contributing to systemic diseases. On the basis of this mechanism, chronic periodontitis has been suggested as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases associated with atherosclerosis, bacterial endocarditis, diabetes mellitus, respiratory disease, preterm delivery, rheumatoid arthritis, and, recently, osteoporosis, pancreatic cancer, metabolic syndrome, renal diseases and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Various hypotheses, including common susceptibility, systemic inflammation, direct bacterial infection and cross-reactivity, or molecular mimicry, between bacterial antigens and self-antigens, have been postulated to explain these relationships. In this scenario, the association of periodontal disease with systemic diseases has set the stage for introducing the concept of periodontal medicine. This narrative review summarizes the evolution of focal infection theory up to the current pathophysiology of periodontal disease, and presents an update on the relationships between chronic periodontitis and systemic diseases. PMID:21111933

  17. Concurrent feline immune-complex nephritis. Tubular antigen-positive and renal amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Saegusa, S; Shimizu, F; Nagase, M; Kasegawa, A

    1979-08-01

    We describe tubular antigen-positive immune-complex nephritis in a case of feline renal amyloidosis. Amyloid deposition was observed in mesangial area, and thickening of capillary walls was shown in the majority of the glomeruli. This case was also characterized with typical fluorescent granular depositions of cat IgG and C3 along the glomerular capillary walls as seen in human membranous glomerulonephritis. The fluorescent pattern of tubular antigen was identical with that of IgG and C3. Electron micrograph showed the thickening and irregularity of glomerular basement membranes, fusion of foot processes, and deposits of electron-dense or sometimes translucent materials, mostly in the intramembranous location. The causal sequence of the coincidental deposition of amyloid and immune complexes is discussed. PMID:157110

  18. Association of Acute Interstitial Nephritis With Programmed Cell Death 1 Inhibitor Therapy in Lung Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Shirali, Anushree C; Perazella, Mark A; Gettinger, Scott

    2016-08-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors that target the programmed death 1 (PD-1) signaling pathway have recently been approved for use in advanced pretreated non-small cell lung cancer and melanoma. Clinical trial data suggest that these drugs may have adverse effects on the kidney, but these effects have not been well described. We present 6 cases of acute kidney injury in patients with lung cancer who received anti-PD-1 antibodies, with each case displaying evidence of acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) on kidney biopsy. All patients were also treated with other drugs (proton pump inhibitors and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) linked to AIN, but in most cases, use of these drugs long preceded PD-1 inhibitor therapy. The association of AIN with these drugs in our patients raises the possibility that PD-1 inhibitor therapy may release suppression of T-cell immunity that normally permits renal tolerance of drugs known to be associated with AIN. PMID:27113507

  19. Psychotic Symptoms in a Child with Long Standing SLE Nephritis: Neuropsychiatric Manifestation or Sequelae to Lupus?

    PubMed Central

    Mahapatra, Ananya; Sharma, Pawan; Sagar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a prototypic autoimmune disease of unknown etiology, which affects multiple organ systems including the central nervous system (CNS). Though not common, childhood onset SLE is a known and established entity. Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in childhood onset SLE. Of these, psychosis and behavioural symptoms are relatively rare, and there is no consensus on the proper treatment of such cases. We report a case of 13-year-old boy, diagnosed with lupus nephritis, and presented with psychosis and behavioural symptoms. The highlight of this case is that the psychiatric symptoms were present despite the primary illness being quiescent. Thus, the patient was treated with Olanzapine and lorazepam, while continuing immunosuppressive therapy as previously. Also, MRI brain revealed vasculitic changes in the right hemisphere, which might be one of the etiological factors playing role in the development of these neuropsychiatric symptoms. PMID:27274749

  20. Glomerular Autoimmune Multicomponents of Human Lupus Nephritis In Vivo (2): Planted Antigens.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Galetti, Maricla; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Moroni, Gabriella; Bonanni, Alice; Radice, Antonella; Tincani, Angela; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Murtas, Corrado; Franceschini, Franco; Trezzi, Barbara; Brunini, Francesca; Gatti, Rita; Tardanico, Regina; Barbano, Giancarlo; Piaggio, Giorgio; Messa, Piergiorgio; Ravani, Pietro; Scolari, Francesco; Candiano, Giovanni; Martini, Alberto; Allegri, Landino; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2015-08-01

    Glomerular planted antigens (histones, DNA, and C1q) are potential targets of autoimmunity in lupus nephritis (LN). However, the characterization of these antigens in human glomeruli in vivo remains inconsistent. We eluted glomerular autoantibodies recognizing planted antigens from laser-microdissected renal biopsy samples of 20 patients with LN. Prevalent antibody isotypes were defined, levels were determined, and glomerular colocalization was investigated. Renal and circulating antibodies were matched, and serum levels were compared in 104 patients with LN, 84 patients with SLE without LN, and 50 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Autoantibodies against podocyte antigens (anti-α-enolase/antiannexin AI) were also investigated. IgG2 autoantibodies against DNA, histones (H2A, H3, and H4), and C1q were detected in 50%, 55%, and 70% of biopsy samples, respectively. Anti-DNA IgG3 was the unique non-IgG2 anti-DNA deposit, and anti-C1q IgG4 was mainly detected in subepithelial membranous deposits. Anti-H3, anti-DNA, and anti-C1q IgG2 autoantibodies were also prevalent in LN serum, which also contained IgG3 against the antigen panel and anti-C1q IgG4. Serum and glomerular levels of autoantibodies were not strictly associated. High serum levels of all autoantibodies detected, including anti-α-enolase and antiannexin AI, identified LN versus SLE and RA. Anti-H3 and anti-α-enolase IgG2 levels had the most remarkable increase in LN serum and represented a discriminating feature of LN in principal component analysis. The highest levels of these two autoantibodies were also associated with proteinuria>3.5 g/24 hours and creatinine>1.2 mg/dl. Our findings suggest that timely autoantibody characterization might allow outcome prediction and targeted therapies for patients with nephritis. PMID:25398787

  1. Remission of proteinuria indicates good prognosis in patients with diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Koo, H S; Kim, S; Chin, H J

    2016-01-01

    Proteinuria is a well-known risk factor for the progression of renal dysfunction in chronic kidney disease; however, its importance for estimating the prognosis of lupus nephritis requires verification. Korean adult patients with renal biopsy-diagnosed diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis who had undergone three or more consecutive urine protein to creatinine ratio or urine dipstick tests within six months after renal biopsy were enrolled. The cumulative risks, predictors, and outcomes of proteinuric remission and flare were evaluated. This study included 26 men and 167 women with a mean age at renal biopsy of 31.2 ± 9.8 years. Eighty-two (42.5%) patients experienced proteinuric remission during the follow-up period. During a mean follow-up of 157.9 ± 69.5 months, among patients who achieved proteinuric remission, one died, one developed end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and two had composite outcomes; among patients without remission, nine died, 24 developed ESRD, and 30 had composite outcomes. Patients who achieved proteinuric remission had a 0.089-fold risk (95% CI: 0.011-0.736) of mortality, 0.110-fold risk (95% CI: 0.013-0.904) of incident ESRD, and 0.210-fold risk (95% CI: 0.048-0.920) of a composite outcome compared to patients without remission. Among the 82 patients who achieved proteinuric remission, 59 (72.0%) experienced at least one proteinuria flare; however, relapse did not correlate with the incidence of outcomes. In conclusion, proteinuric remission is an independent predictive prognostic marker of good renal survival and mortality, regardless of the interval from biopsy to remission, recurrence of proteinuria after remission, renal function status at remission, or hematuria remission. PMID:26159540

  2. Adjuvant treatments for Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis in children: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Zaffanello, Marco; Brugnara, Milena; Franchini, Massimo; Fanos, Vassilios

    2009-01-01

    Background: The management of Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis (HSPN) in childhood is controversial. Adjuvant therapies such as immunoglobulin, anticoagulants, and vitamins have been used with conventional treatments despite a lack of evidence of their efficacy. Objective: The aim of this study was to review the scientific literature regarding adjuvant treatments administered with conventional drugs in the treatment of childhood HSPN. Methods: Published articles were identified from the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases (1988–December 2008; key words: Henoch-Schönlein nephritis and Henoch-Schönlein purpura). The search was limited to published English-language studies on therapeutic options for HSPN in children. Results: A total of 12 studies were identified and included in this review; most (n = 8) were case series or retrospective studies. Studies of conventional therapy combined with adjuvant treatment should be interpreted with caution. In particular, factor XIII administration was reported to improve kidney symptoms in 1 study. Based on the results from 9 studies, no convincing evidence on intravenous immunoglobu-lin, urokinase, or anticoagulants was identified. No substantial information was available on the benefit of antiplatelet agents or heparin in treating HSPN. Integrating treatment with vitamin E was not recommended based on the results from 1 randomized controlled trial. Fish oil was reported to be effective in 1 case series. Conclusions: Studies concerning the treatment of HSPN in children with adjuvant therapies were retrospective and recommendations were drawn from level IV evidence. One randomized controlled trial on the use of tocopherol as adjuvant treatment was identified; however, no clinical utility was reported. At present, there is no strong evidence supporting benefits with the use of adjuvant treatments. PMID:24683235

  3. Quaternary Epitopes of α345(IV) Collagen Initiate Alport Post-Transplant Anti-GBM Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Olaru, Florina; Luo, Wentian; Wang, Xu-Ping; Ge, Linna; Hertz, Jens Michael; Kashtan, Clifford E.; Sado, Yoshikazu; Segal, Yoav; Hudson, Billy G.

    2013-01-01

    Alport post-transplant nephritis (APTN) is an aggressive form of anti-glomerular basement membrane disease that targets the allograft in transplanted patients with X-linked Alport syndrome. Alloantibodies develop against the NC1 domain of α5(IV) collagen, which occurs in normal kidneys, including renal allografts, forming distinct α345(IV) and α1256(IV) networks. Here, we studied the roles of these networks as antigens inciting alloimmunity and as targets of nephritogenic alloantibodies in APTN. We found that patients with APTN, but not those without nephritis, produce two kinds of alloantibodies against allogeneic collagen IV. Some alloantibodies targeted alloepitopes within α5NC1 monomers, shared by α345NC1 and α1256NC1 hexamers. Other alloantibodies specifically targeted alloepitopes that depended on the quaternary structure of α345NC1 hexamers. In Col4a5-null mice, immunization with native forms of allogeneic collagen IV exclusively elicited antibodies to quaternary α345NC1 alloepitopes, whereas alloimmunogens lacking native quaternary structure elicited antibodies to shared α5NC1 alloepitopes. These results imply that quaternary epitopes within α345NC1 hexamers may initiate alloimmune responses after transplant in X-linked Alport patients. Thus, α345NC1 hexamers are the culprit alloantigen and primary target of all alloantibodies mediating APTN, whereas α1256NC1 hexamers become secondary targets of anti-α5NC1 alloantibodies. Reliable detection of alloantibodies by immunoassays using α345NC1 hexamers may improve outcomes by facilitating early, accurate diagnosis. PMID:23620401

  4. Quaternary epitopes of α345(IV) collagen initiate Alport post-transplant anti-GBM nephritis.

    PubMed

    Olaru, Florina; Luo, Wentian; Wang, Xu-Ping; Ge, Linna; Hertz, Jens Michael; Kashtan, Clifford E; Sado, Yoshikazu; Segal, Yoav; Hudson, Billy G; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2013-05-01

    Alport post-transplant nephritis (APTN) is an aggressive form of anti-glomerular basement membrane disease that targets the allograft in transplanted patients with X-linked Alport syndrome. Alloantibodies develop against the NC1 domain of α5(IV) collagen, which occurs in normal kidneys, including renal allografts, forming distinct α345(IV) and α1256(IV) networks. Here, we studied the roles of these networks as antigens inciting alloimmunity and as targets of nephritogenic alloantibodies in APTN. We found that patients with APTN, but not those without nephritis, produce two kinds of alloantibodies against allogeneic collagen IV. Some alloantibodies targeted alloepitopes within α5NC1 monomers, shared by α345NC1 and α1256NC1 hexamers. Other alloantibodies specifically targeted alloepitopes that depended on the quaternary structure of α345NC1 hexamers. In Col4a5-null mice, immunization with native forms of allogeneic collagen IV exclusively elicited antibodies to quaternary α345NC1 alloepitopes, whereas alloimmunogens lacking native quaternary structure elicited antibodies to shared α5NC1 alloepitopes. These results imply that quaternary epitopes within α345NC1 hexamers may initiate alloimmune responses after transplant in X-linked Alport patients. Thus, α345NC1 hexamers are the culprit alloantigen and primary target of all alloantibodies mediating APTN, whereas α1256NC1 hexamers become secondary targets of anti-α5NC1 alloantibodies. Reliable detection of alloantibodies by immunoassays using α345NC1 hexamers may improve outcomes by facilitating early, accurate diagnosis. PMID:23620401

  5. Glomerular Autoimmune Multicomponents of Human Lupus Nephritis In Vivo (2): Planted Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Galetti, Maricla; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Moroni, Gabriella; Bonanni, Alice; Radice, Antonella; Tincani, Angela; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Murtas, Corrado; Franceschini, Franco; Trezzi, Barbara; Brunini, Francesca; Gatti, Rita; Tardanico, Regina; Barbano, Giancarlo; Piaggio, Giorgio; Messa, Piergiorgio; Ravani, Pietro; Scolari, Francesco; Candiano, Giovanni; Martini, Alberto; Allegri, Landino

    2015-01-01

    Glomerular planted antigens (histones, DNA, and C1q) are potential targets of autoimmunity in lupus nephritis (LN). However, the characterization of these antigens in human glomeruli in vivo remains inconsistent. We eluted glomerular autoantibodies recognizing planted antigens from laser-microdissected renal biopsy samples of 20 patients with LN. Prevalent antibody isotypes were defined, levels were determined, and glomerular colocalization was investigated. Renal and circulating antibodies were matched, and serum levels were compared in 104 patients with LN, 84 patients with SLE without LN, and 50 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Autoantibodies against podocyte antigens (anti–α-enolase/antiannexin AI) were also investigated. IgG2 autoantibodies against DNA, histones (H2A, H3, and H4), and C1q were detected in 50%, 55%, and 70% of biopsy samples, respectively. Anti-DNA IgG3 was the unique non-IgG2 anti-DNA deposit, and anti-C1q IgG4 was mainly detected in subepithelial membranous deposits. Anti-H3, anti-DNA, and anti-C1q IgG2 autoantibodies were also prevalent in LN serum, which also contained IgG3 against the antigen panel and anti-C1q IgG4. Serum and glomerular levels of autoantibodies were not strictly associated. High serum levels of all autoantibodies detected, including anti–α-enolase and antiannexin AI, identified LN versus SLE and RA. Anti-H3 and anti–α-enolase IgG2 levels had the most remarkable increase in LN serum and represented a discriminating feature of LN in principal component analysis. The highest levels of these two autoantibodies were also associated with proteinuria>3.5 g/24 hours and creatinine>1.2 mg/dl. Our findings suggest that timely autoantibody characterization might allow outcome prediction and targeted therapies for patients with nephritis. PMID:25398787

  6. Anti-Proliferative Actions of T-Type Calcium Channel Inhibition in Thy1 Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Cove-Smith, Andrea; Mulgrew, Christopher J.; Rudyk, Olena; Dutt, Neelanjana; McLatchie, Linda M.; Shattock, Michael J.; Hendry, Bruce M.

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant proliferation of mesangial cells (MCs) is a key finding in progressive glomerular disease. TH1177 is a small molecule that has been shown to inhibit low-voltage activated T-type Ca2+ channels (TCCs). The current study investigates the effect of TH1177 on MC proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The effect of Ca2+ channel inhibition on primary rat MC proliferation in vitro was studied using the microculture tetrazolium assay and by measuring bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. In vivo, rats with Thy1 nephritis were treated with TH1177 or vehicle. Glomerular injury and average glomerular cell number were determined in a blinded fashion. Immunostaining for Ki-67 and phosphorylated ERK were also performed. The expression of TCC isoforms in healthy and diseased tissue was investigated using quantitative real-time PCR. TCC blockade caused a significant reduction in rat MC proliferation in vitro, whereas L-type inhibition had no effect. Treatment of Thy1 nephritis with TH1177 significantly reduced glomerular injury (P < 0.005) and caused a 49% reduction in glomerular cell number (P < 0.005) compared to the placebo. TH1177 also reduced Ki-67-positive and pERK-positive cells per glomerulus by 52% (P < 0.01 and P < 0.005, respectively). These results demonstrate that TH1177 inhibits MC proliferation in vitro and in vivo, supporting the hypothesis that TCC inhibition may be a useful strategy for studying and modifying MC proliferative responses to injury. PMID:23746655

  7. Comparison of Outcomes between Individuals with Pure and Mixed Lupus Nephritis: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ilori, Titilayo O.; Enofe, Nosayaba; Oommen, Anju; Cobb, Jason; Navarrete, Jose; Adedinsewo, Demilade A.; Oshikoya, Oluwatobiloba; Fevrier, Helene; Farris, Alton B.; Plantinga, Laura; Ojo, Akinlolu O.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lupus nephritis (LN) is a serious organ manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus. Histologic overlap is relatively common in the six pathologic classes (I to VI) of LN. For example, mixed proliferative LN (MPLN) often includes features of classes III & V or classes IV & V combined. We performed a comparative evaluation of renal outcomes in patients with MPLN to patients with pure proliferative LN (PPLN) against pre-specified renal outcomes, and we also identified predictor of clinical outcomes among those with PPLN and MPLN. Hypothesis Individuals with MPLN will have worse short-term renal outcomes compared to those with PPLN. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 278 adult LN patients (≥18 years old) identified from an Emory University Hospital registry of native renal biopsies performed between January 2000 and December 2011. The final analytic sample consisted of individuals with a diagnosis of PPLN (n = 60) and MPLN (n = 96). We analyzed differences in clinical and laboratory characteristics at baseline. We also assessed associations between LN category and renal outcomes (complete remission and time to ESRD) with logistic and Cox proportional hazards models within two years of baseline. Results The study population was predominantly female (83.97%) and African American (71.8%) with a mean age of 33.4 years at baseline. Over a median follow up of 1.02 years, we did not find any statistically significant associations between MPLN and the development of ESRD or remission when compared to patients with PPLN (adjusted HR = 0.30, 95% CI = 0.07, 1.26). Conclusion There was no association between mixed or pure histopathologic features of LN at presentation and rate of complete or partial remission but higher baseline eGFR was associated with a lower probability of complete remission among patients with lupus nephritis. PMID:27304068

  8. Sighting optics including an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length

    DOEpatents

    Crandall, David Lynn

    2011-08-01

    One embodiment of sighting optics according to the teachings provided herein may include a front sight and a rear sight positioned in spaced-apart relation. The rear sight includes an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length. The first focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a distance separating the optical element and the front sight and the second focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a target distance. The optical element thus brings into simultaneous focus, for a user, images of the front sight and the target.

  9. Bacterial Immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variety of bacterial agents reside in and around the environment that can cause illness and death in a poultry flock. Many cause disseminated disease while others exert more local effects such as the respiratory or gastrointestinal tract. The host, for our current purposes the laying hen, has de...

  10. Lupus Nephritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Griffin Rodgers, Director of the NIDDK Clinical Trials Current research studies and how you can volunteer Community Outreach and Health Fairs Science-based information and tips for planning an outreach effort or community event For Health Care Professionals Patient and provider resources ...

  11. Interstitial nephritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... a short time. Corticosteroids or stronger anti-inflammatory medicines such as cyclophosphamide can sometimes be helpful. ... disorder can lead to acute or chronic kidney failure or end-stage kidney disease .

  12. Lupus Nephritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lab for analysis. For the test, a nurse or technician places a strip of chemically treated ... slowing the progression of kidney disease. Many people require two or more medications to control their blood ...

  13. Interstitial nephritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... kidney damage in older people. Possible Complications Metabolic acidosis can occur because the kidneys aren't able ... stage kidney disease Injury - kidney and ureter Metabolic acidosis Renal Urine output - decreased Update Date 9/22/ ...

  14. Focal Mechanism determination of local M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vales, Dina; Custório, Susana; Carrilho, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    We determine the focal mechanisms of local small (ML<3.9) earthquakes that occurred between 2013 and 2014 in mainland Portugal. These low magnitude events were recorded by several stations that provide first-motion polarity solutions. However, only few stations are located near the epicenter and record a waveform with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) high enough to allow full waveform modelling. To overcome this limitation, we used a new approach called cyclic scanning of the polarity solutions (CSPS) (Fojtíková and Zahradnik, 2014), which performs a joint inversion of full waveform and first motion polarities to retrieve the focal mechanism. This methodology has the advantage of yielding reliable focal mechanism solutions, even when high SNR waveforms are available from only a few near field stations (or in the limiting case, only with one single station). To apply the CSPS method one needs to: i) run the the FOCal MEChanism (FOCMEC) code (Snoke, 2003) to obtain a suite of the DC solutions corresponding to the first motion polarities, and then ii) perform the waveform modelling in order to decrease the uncertainty. The ISOLated Asperities (ISOLA) software (Sokos and Zahradník, 2008, 2013) is used in this second step. We applied this method to weak events recorded by a network of 30 broadband seismic stations that transmit data in real-time to Instituto Português do Mar e da Atmosfera (IPMA), the institution responsible for seismic monitoring in Portugal. We interpret the obtained fault plane solutions in light of active faults and regional tectonics, and in comparison with focal mechanisms previously inferred for events in the region. The focal mechanisms obtained for small earthquakes allow us to significantly expand the database of available focal mechanisms in mainland Portugal, contributing to the understanding of active deformation in the region.

  15. NMDA receptor binding in focal epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    McGinnity, C J; Koepp, M J; Hammers, A; Riaño Barros, D A; Pressler, R M; Luthra, S; Jones, P A; Trigg, W; Micallef, C; Symms, M R; Brooks, D J; Duncan, J S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate altered N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor availability in patients with focal epilepsies using positron emission tomography (PET) and [18F]GE-179, a ligand that selectively binds to the open NMDA receptor ion channel, which is thought to be overactive in epilepsy. Methods Eleven patients (median age 33 years, 6 males) with known frequent interictal epileptiform discharges had an [18F]GE-179 PET scan, in a cross-sectional study. MRI showed a focal lesion but discordant EEG changes in two, was non-localising with multifocal EEG abnormalities in two, and was normal in the remaining seven patients who all had multifocal EEG changes. Individual patient [18F]GE-179 volume-of-distribution (VT) images were compared between individual patients and a group of 10 healthy controls (47 years, 7 males) using Statistical Parametric Mapping. Results Individual analyses revealed a single cluster of focal VT increase in four patients; one with a single and one with multifocal MRI lesions, and two with normal MRIs. Post hoc analysis revealed that, relative to controls, patients not taking antidepressants had globally increased [18F]GE-179 VT (+28%; p<0.002), and the three patients taking an antidepressant drug had globally reduced [18F]GE-179 VT (−29%; p<0.002). There were no focal abnormalities common to the epilepsy group. Conclusions In patients with focal epilepsies, we detected primarily global increases of [18F]GE-179 VT consistent with increased NMDA channel activation, but reduced availability in those taking antidepressant drugs, consistent with a possible mode of action of this class of drugs. [18F]GE-179 PET showed focal accentuations of NMDA binding in 4 out of 11 patients, with difficult to localise and treat focal epilepsy. PMID:25991402

  16. Differential Contribution of IL-4 and STAT6 vs STAT4 to the Development of Lupus Nephritis1

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ram Raj; Saxena, Vijay; Zang, Song; Li, Lily; Finkelman, Fred D.; Witte, David P.; Jacob, Chaim O.

    2008-01-01

    Mechanisms that initiate lupus nephritis and cause progression to end-stage renal disease remain poorly understood. In this study, we show that lupus-prone New Zealand Mixed 2410 mice that develop a severe glomerulosclerosis and rapidly progressive renal disease overexpress IL-4 in vivo. In these mice, STAT6 deficiency or anti-IL-4 Ab treatment decreases type 2 cytokine responses and ameliorates kidney disease, particularly glomerulosclerosis, despite the presence of high levels of IgG anti-dsDNA Abs. STAT4 deficiency, however, decreases type 1 and increases type 2 cytokine responses, and accelerates nephritis, in the absence of high levels of IgG anti-dsDNA Abs. Thus, STAT6 and IL-4 may selectively contribute to the development of glomerulosclerosis, whereas STAT4 may play a role in autoantibody production. PMID:12707364

  17. Co-existing autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and nephrotic syndrome in a Nigerian patient with lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Akinbodewa, A A; Adejumo, O A; Ogunsemoyin, A O; Osasan, S A; Adefolalu, O A

    2016-01-01

    A little over 30 cases on co-existing nephrotic syndrome and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) have been reported from different regions of the world since 1957. We present a case report on co-existence of nephrotic syndrome (secondary to lupus nephritis) with ADPKD in a 24-year-old woman from Nigeria. She was positive for anti-double stranded DNA. Renal histology showed International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society Class II lupus nephritis. The co-existence of nephrotic syndrome and ADPKD may have been overlooked in Africa in the past. There is a need to screen for nephrotic syndrome in patients with ADPKD among clinicians in the African setting. PMID:27044732

  18. Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis-uveitis (TINU) syndrome developed secondary to paracetamol and codeine phosphate use: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Alaygut, Demet; Torun Bayram, Meral; Ünlü, Mehtat; Soylu, Alper; Türkmen, Mehmet; Kavukçu, Salih

    2014-01-01

    Tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) refers to a group of heterogeneous diseases affecting the interstitial compartment of the kidney. It might be primary or can develop secondary to many urinary systemic diseases. Primary TIN develops mainly following drug usage, exposure to toxins, and also infections and humoral and cell-mediated immune reactions. In some patients, signs of systemic inflammatory reactions can be the first presenting symptoms. Histopathological evaluation reveals mononuclear cells and lymphocytes in the interstitium and tubuli. Acute and chronic TIN can resolve after elimination of the culprit destructive factors, as drugs, toxins and immune reaction. Combination of tubulointerstitial inflammation and uveitis is termed as tubulointerstitial nephritis-uveitis (TINU) syndrome. Uveitis might occur before, after, and also concomitantly with TIN. Herein, two adolescent cases of TIN and TINU, seemingly developed secondary to paracetamol and codeine phosphate use, are presented. PMID:24827955

  19. Focal Plane Metrology for the LSST Camera

    SciTech Connect

    A Rasmussen, Andrew P.; Hale, Layton; Kim, Peter; Lee, Eric; Perl, Martin; Schindler, Rafe; Takacs, Peter; Thurston, Timothy; /SLAC

    2007-01-10

    Meeting the science goals for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) translates into a demanding set of imaging performance requirements for the optical system over a wide (3.5{sup o}) field of view. In turn, meeting those imaging requirements necessitates maintaining precise control of the focal plane surface (10 {micro}m P-V) over the entire field of view (640 mm diameter) at the operating temperature (T {approx} -100 C) and over the operational elevation angle range. We briefly describe the hierarchical design approach for the LSST Camera focal plane and the baseline design for assembling the flat focal plane at room temperature. Preliminary results of gravity load and thermal distortion calculations are provided, and early metrological verification of candidate materials under cold thermal conditions are presented. A detailed, generalized method for stitching together sparse metrology data originating from differential, non-contact metrological data acquisition spanning multiple (non-continuous) sensor surfaces making up the focal plane, is described and demonstrated. Finally, we describe some in situ alignment verification alternatives, some of which may be integrated into the camera's focal plane.

  20. Treatment with Anti-HMGB1 Monoclonal Antibody Does Not Affect Lupus Nephritis in MRL/lpr Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schaper, Fleur; van Timmeren, Mirjan M; Petersen, Arjen; Horst, Gerda; Bijl, Marc; Limburg, Pieter C; Westra, Johanna; Heeringa, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear DNA binding protein that acts as an alarmin when secreted. HMGB1 is increased in systemic lupus erythematosus and might represent a potential therapeutic target. We investigated whether treatment with an anti-HMGB1 antibody affects the development of lupus nephritis in MRL/lpr mice. Seven-week-old MRL/lpr mice were injected intraperitoneally twice weekly for 10 wks with 50 μg monoclonal anti-HMGB1 (2G7, mouse IgG2b) (n = 12) or control antibody (n = 11). Control MRL/MPJ mice (n = 10) were left untreated. Every 2 wks, blood was drawn and urine was collected at wk 7, 11 and 17. Mice were sacrificed at 17 wks for complete disease evaluation. Plasma HMGB1 and anti-HMGB1 levels were increased in MRL/lpr mice compared with control MRL/MPJ mice. There were no differences in albuminuria, urine HMGB1 and plasma levels of complement C3, anti-dsDNA and proinflammatory cytokines between untreated and treated mice at any time point. Lupus nephritis of mice treated with anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) was classified as class III (n = 3) and class IV (n = 9), while mice treated with control mAb were classified as class II (n = 4), class III (n = 2) and class IV (n = 5). IgG and C3 deposits in kidneys were similar in mice treated with anti-HMGB1 mAb or control mAb. In conclusion, treatment with monoclonal anti–HMGB-1 antibody 2G7 does not affect development of lupus nephritis, disease progression or proinflammatory cytokine levels in MRL/lpr mice. This result indicates that blocking of HMGB1 by this neutralizing antibody does not affect lupus nephritis in MRL/lpr mice. PMID:26837069

  1. Plasmapheresis Is Associated With Better Renal Outcomes in Lupus Nephritis Patients With Thrombotic Microangiopathy: A Case Series Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiu-Yu; Yu, Feng; Zhou, Fu-De; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of plasmapheresis in patients with lupus nephritis-combined thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) in a Chinese cohort.Clinical and therapeutic data of patients with lupus nephritis-combined TMA were collected retrospectively. A comparison between those with and without plasmapheresis was performed.Seventy patients with renal biopsy-proven TMA in lupus nephritis were treated with conventional combined corticosteroid and immunosuppressive agents as induction therapy, 9 of the 70 patients received additional plasmapheresis. The plasmapheresis group presented with more severe SLE and renal activity indices, including a significant higher ratio of neurologic disorder (P = 0.025), lower level of platelet count (P = 0.009), higher value of serum creatinine (P = 0.038), higher percentage of anti-cardiolipin antibodies positive (P = 0.001), and higher Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index scores (P = 0.012), than that of the nonplasmapheresis group. However, the plasmapheresis group had a significant higher rate of remission and a lower ratio of treatment failure than that of the nonplasmapheresis group (P = 0.03). As the baseline data were significantly different between the 2 groups, the propensity score match was further designed to avoid retrospective bias. After re-analysis, the plasmapheresis group still had a significant higher rate of remission and a lower ratio of treatment failure than that of the nonplasmapheresis group (P = 0.018). More importantly, the plasmapheresis group had significant less composite endpoints than that of the nonplasmapheresis group (P = 0.005).Our study suggested that additional plasmapheresis on conventional induction therapy may benefit patients with lupus nephritis-combined TMA, which warrants further explorations. PMID:27149490

  2. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    PubMed

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists. PMID:27474242

  3. Renal interstitial mast cell count is significantly higher in membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis than in class IV lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk, Karolina; Musiał, Jacek; Soja, Jerzy; Kuźniewski, Marek; Gala-Błądzińska, Agnieszka; Białas, Magdalena; Okoń, Krzysztof

    2015-06-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a severe manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus; in LN class IV morphologic lesions may be similar to the lesions in primary membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN). The aim of the study was to compare the counts of tryptase-positive and chymase-positive mast cells between LN class IV and MPGN. The material consisted of 61 renal biopsies: 32 with lupus nephritis class IV, and 29 with membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. Chymase- and tryptase-positive cells were stained by immunohistochemistry and subsequently counted. The mean count of chymase-positive mast cells was 21.94 for the whole group, 12.66 for LN class IV and 32.18 for MPGN. The mean count of tryptase-positive cells was 34.94 hpf for the entire group, 22.98 for LN class IV and 48. 13 for MPGN. The differences between lupus nephritis and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis were significant both for chymase- and tryptase-positive cells. Both chymase-positive MC counts and tryptase-positive MC counts correlated with relative interstitial volume (RIV) (R=0.35 and R=0.28, respectively) and with creatinine level (R=0.35 and R=0.43, respectively). There was also a significant correlation between age, creatinine level and RIV (R=0.28 and R=0.26, respectively). PMID:26247528

  4. Solid-state curved focal plane arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael (Inventor); Jones, Todd (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to curved focal plane arrays. More specifically, the present invention relates to a system and method for making solid-state curved focal plane arrays from standard and high-purity devices that may be matched to a given optical system. There are two ways to make a curved focal plane arrays starting with the fully fabricated device. One way, is to thin the device and conform it to a curvature. A second way, is to back-illuminate a thick device without making a thinned membrane. The thick device is a special class of devices; for example devices fabricated with high purity silicon. One surface of the device (the non VLSI fabricated surface, also referred to as the back surface) can be polished to form a curved surface.

  5. Measuring microfocus focal spots using digital radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, David A

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of microfocus spot size can be important for several reasons: (1) Quality assurance during manufacture of microfocus tubes; (2) Tracking performance and stability of microfocus tubes; (3) Determining magnification (especially important for digital radiography where the native spatial resolution of the digital system is not adequate for the application); (4) Knowledge of unsharpness from the focal spot alone. The European Standard EN 12543-5 is based on a simple geometrical method of calculating focal spot size from unsharpness of high magnification film radiographs. When determining microfocus focal spot dimensions using unsharpness measurements both signal-to-noise (SNR) and magnification can be important. There is a maximum accuracy that is a function of SNR and therefore an optimal magnification. Greater than optimal magnification can be used but it will not increase accuracy.

  6. Hybrid Extrinsic Silicon Focal Plane Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommerrenig, D. H.; Meinhardt, T.; Lowe, J.

    1981-02-01

    Large-area focal planes require mechanical assembly techniques which must be compatible with optical alignment, minimum deadspace, and cryogenic requirements in order to achieve optimum performance. Hybrid extrinsic silicon has been found particularly suitable for such an application. It will be shown that by choosing a large-area extrinsic silicon detector array which is hybrid-mated to a multiplicity of multiplexers a very cost-effective and high-density focal plane module can be assembled. Other advantages of this approach are inherent optical alignment and excellent performance.

  7. Actinic Granuloma with Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Phasukthaworn, Ruedee; Chanprapaph, Kumutnart; Vachiramon, Vasanop

    2016-01-01

    Actinic granuloma is an uncommon granulomatous disease, characterized by annular erythematous plaque with central clearing predominately located on sun-damaged skin. The pathogenesis is not well understood, ultraviolet radiation is recognized as precipitating factor. We report a case of a 52-year-old woman who presented with asymptomatic annular erythematous plaques on the forehead and both cheeks persisting for 2 years. The clinical presentation and histopathologic findings support the diagnosis of actinic granuloma. During that period of time, she also developed focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. The association between actinic granuloma and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis needs to be clarified by further studies. PMID:27293392

  8. Ambroxol-induced focal epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Lapenta, Leonardo; Morano, Alessandra; Fattouch, Jinane; Casciato, Sara; Fanella, Martina; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that in epileptic patients some compounds and different drugs used for the treatment of comorbidities can facilitate or provoke seizures, this evidence regarding a wide spectrum of pharmacological categories. The potential facilitating factors usually include direct toxic effects or pharmacological interactions of either active ingredients or excipients. We report the case of a patient with drug-resistant epilepsy who experienced focal epileptic seizures, easily and constantly reproducible, after each administration of a cough syrup. This is, to our knowledge, the first electroencephalogram-documented case of focal epileptic seizures induced by cough syrup containing ambroxol as active ingredient. PMID:24824664

  9. [Liver ultrasound: focal lesions and diffuse diseases].

    PubMed

    Segura Grau, A; Valero López, I; Díaz Rodríguez, N; Segura Cabral, J M

    2016-01-01

    Liver ultrasound is frequently used as a first-line technique for the detection and characterization of the most common liver lesions, especially those incidentally found focal liver lesions, and for monitoring of chronic liver diseases. Ultrasound is not only used in the Bmode, but also with Doppler and, more recently, contrast-enhanced ultrasound. It is mainly used in the diagnosis of diffuse liver diseases, such as steatosis or cirrhosis. This article presents a practical approach for diagnosis workup, in which the different characteristics of the main focal liver lesions and diffuse liver diseases are reviewed. PMID:25523277

  10. Focal dermal hypoplasia: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Sahana M; Hiremagalore, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz syndrome) is a rare genetic multisystem disorder primarily involving the skin, skeletal system, eyes, and face. We report the case of an eight-month-old female child who presented with multiple hypopigmented atrophic macules along the lines of blaschko, skeletal anomalies, umbilical hernia, developmental delay, hypoplastic nails, syndactyly, and lobster claw deformity characteristic of Goltz syndrome. PMID:25657436