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Sample records for focal organizing pneumonia

  1. Organizing pneumonia: chest HRCT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Igor Murad; Zanetti, Gláucia; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Araujo-Neto, Cesar Augusto; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of HRCT findings and their distribution in the lung parenchyma of patients with organizing pneumonia. METHODS: This was a retrospective review of the HRCT scans of 36 adult patients (26 females and 10 males) with biopsy-proven organizing pneumonia. The patients were between 19 and 82 years of age (mean age, 56.2 years). The HRCT images were evaluated by two independent observers, discordant interpretations being resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The most common HRCT finding was that of ground-glass opacities, which were seen in 88.9% of the cases. The second most common finding was consolidation (in 83.3% of cases), followed by peribronchovascular opacities (in 52.8%), reticulation (in 38.9%), bronchiectasis (in 33.3%), interstitial nodules (in 27.8%), interlobular septal thickening (in 27.8%), perilobular pattern (in 22.2%), the reversed halo sign (in 16.7%), airspace nodules (in 11.1%), and the halo sign (in 8.3%). The lesions were predominantly bilateral, the middle and lower lung fields being the areas most commonly affected. CONCLUSIONS: Ground-glass opacities and consolidation were the most common findings, with a predominantly random distribution, although they were more common in the middle and lower thirds of the lungs. PMID:26176521

  2. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Pneumonia KidsHealth > For Teens > Pneumonia Print A A A ... having to go to the hospital. What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia (pronounced: noo-MOW-nyuh) is an infection ...

  3. Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia: A rare form of nonbacterial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Prashant; Kumar, Kuldeep; Mittal, Sarita; Goyal, Nidhi; Trikha, Sahil; Vashisth, Arti

    2016-04-01

    Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) is a rare disease characterized by bilateral basilar infiltrates and histological findings of organizing pneumonia and intra-alveolar fibrin in the form of "fibrin balls." Here, we report a 43-year-old female with complaints of fever, dry cough, and shortness of breath with hypoxemia. High-resolution computed tomography thorax revealed diffuse confluent consolidation in bilateral lung zones. Bronchoscopy and transbronchial biopsy revealed features of AFOP. With prednisolone treatment, there was an improvement in her condition. AFOP is a rare disease and should be taken into consideration and differential diagnosis of severe acute pneumonias with no significant comorbidities. PMID:27303141

  4. Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia: A rare form of nonbacterial pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Prashant; Kumar, Kuldeep; Mittal, Sarita; Goyal, Nidhi; Trikha, Sahil; Vashisth, Arti

    2016-01-01

    Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) is a rare disease characterized by bilateral basilar infiltrates and histological findings of organizing pneumonia and intra-alveolar fibrin in the form of “fibrin balls.” Here, we report a 43-year-old female with complaints of fever, dry cough, and shortness of breath with hypoxemia. High-resolution computed tomography thorax revealed diffuse confluent consolidation in bilateral lung zones. Bronchoscopy and transbronchial biopsy revealed features of AFOP. With prednisolone treatment, there was an improvement in her condition. AFOP is a rare disease and should be taken into consideration and differential diagnosis of severe acute pneumonias with no significant comorbidities. PMID:27303141

  5. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pommepuy, I; Farny, M; Billey, T; Olivier, P; Lassoued, S

    1998-01-01

    A 75-year old man with rheumatoid arthritis developed bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP), which responded to treatment with prednisolone (1 mg/kg/d) and cyclophosphamide (100 mg/d). PMID:9523389

  6. Influenza B/Streptococcal co-infection complicated by organizing pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Wang C; Lam, Sonia H Y; Wong, Maria P; Ip, Mary S M; Lam, David C L

    2016-09-01

    Organizing pneumonia is a rare complication of influenza infection that has substantial morbidity. We report the first case of organizing pneumonia associated with influenza B and Streptococcus pneumoniae coinfection that had significant improvement with corticosteroid treatment. The clinical and radiological features of organizing pneumonia associated with this coinfection are similar to those after influenza A infection. Timely use of systemic glucocorticosteroids would be of benefit in promoting resolution for influenza-associated organizing pneumonia. PMID:27516886

  7. Organized Pneumonia Secondary to Increasing Doses of Temozolomide

    PubMed Central

    Consuegra Vanegas, Angélica; Matachana Martínez, María; Cordero Lorenzana, Lourdes; Vidal García, Iria; Montero Martínez, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Surgery, radiotherapy (RT), and chemotherapy have a role in the control of tumor growth, progression, and recurrence in high-grade gliomas. Temozolomide has been incorporated as the main chemotherapy agent for managing these tumors. Here, we present a case of a patient who developed a severe organizing pneumonia after increasing doses of temozolomide for a high-grade glioma. PMID:26487994

  8. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia and Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Matteson, E L; Ike, R W

    1990-05-01

    A 52-year-old man developed a systemic illness with fever, malaise, cough, dry eyes and mouth. Investigation revealed bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia associated with retinal vasculitis, hepatic and renal involvement, lymphocytic sialoadenitis and symptoms of the sicca complex. High dose steroid treatment resulted in resolution of his symptoms and prolonged remission. PMID:2359080

  9. Organizing Pneumonia in a Patient with Quiescent Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ozeki, Keiji; Katano, Takahito; Shimura, Takaya; Mori, Yoshinori; Joh, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old man with Crohn's disease (CD) was admitted to our hospital due to moderate risk of pneumonia while receiving scheduled adalimumab maintenance therapy. Symptoms remained virtually unchanged following administration of antibiotics. A final diagnosis of organizing pneumonia (OP) was made based on findings of intra-alveolar buds of granulation tissue and fibrous thickening of the alveolar walls on pathological examination and patchy consolidations and ground glass opacities on computed tomography. Immediate administration of prednisolone provided rapid, sustained improvement. Although a rare complication, OP is a pulmonary manifestation that requires attention in CD patients. PMID:27413560

  10. Cryptococcus neoformans as a cause of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Alexander T; Al Kharrat, Tamim; Kourtis, Athena P

    2010-06-01

    The most frequent manifestations of Cryptococcus neoformans (CN) disease are systemic infections in immunocompromised patients and localized pulmonary disease in immunocompetent individuals. Such pulmonary cryptococcosis can range from asymptomatic infection to frank pneumonia that can be severe. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) is a rare severe form of pneumonitis caused by a variety of infectious and toxic agents or connective tissue diseases. BOOP due to Cryptococcus neoformans has very rarely been reported; there have been only five such case reports, mostly in immunocompromised patients. We report herein on a case of CN-associated BOOP in an immunocompetent individual and discuss the diagnosis and treatment of this entity. PMID:20169387

  11. Nonspecific interstitial pneumonia overlaps organizing pneumonia in lung-dominant connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Ren; Peng, Shou-Chun; Wei, Lu-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Here, we reported two cases of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia overlap organizing pneumonia (NSIP/OP) with lung-dominant connective tissue disease (LD-ILD). The first case is a patient with hands of chapped skin, right-sided pleuritic chest discomfort, weakness, positive ANA and antibodies to Ro/SS-A (+++) and Ro-52 (++). In the second case, there were Reynaud's disease, and nucleolus-ANA increased (1:800). Chest high resolution CT scan in both cases showed ground-glass opacifications, predominantly in basal and subpleural region and the pathologic manifestation were correlated with NSIP/OP, which were previously discovered in Sjogren syndrome, PM/DM and other rheumatic diseases. The two cases of NSIP/OP with LD-CTD we reported expand disease spectrum of NSIP/OP pathological types in ILD. However, it is necessary to process large-scale studies. PMID:26617847

  12. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... en español Neumonía You're out in the rain, jumping around in puddles, and somebody yells, "Get ... you really catch it from playing in the rain? What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia (say: noo-MOW-nyuh) ...

  13. [Bronchiolitis obliterans with organized pneumonia: apropos 2 new cases].

    PubMed

    Fernández Vázquez, E; Zamarrón Sanz, C; Palacios Bartolomé, A; Valle Vázquez, J M; Alvarez Dobaño, J M; Tumbeiro Novoa, M

    1992-12-01

    We present two cases of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) with different clinical and radiological characteristics. In one case, the chest X-ray demonstrated bilateral migrating infiltrates. The pathology showed bronchiolar and intra-alveolar occupation by granulation tissue in both cases. It should be noted that both patients responded well to treatment with prednisone although alterations in gas exchange persisted in one case. PMID:1486169

  14. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the flu Your doctor will use your medical history, a physical exam, and lab tests to diagnose pneumonia. Treatment depends on what kind you have. If bacteria are the cause, antibiotics should help. If you ...

  15. [CT pathologic correlative study of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Nishimura, K; Kitaichi, M; Izumi, T; Kanaoka, M; Itoh, H

    1989-01-01

    Though bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) was proposed as a new infiltrative lung disease in 1985, we think it has two radiologic problems. First, in spite of interstitial pneumonia, about half of chest radiographs of BOOP has been reported to show alveolar opacities. Second, because radiologic features of both some cases of BOOP and of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) show reticular shadows on chest radiographs, it is sometimes difficult to differentiate between two diseases. We correlated CT images with open lung biopsy specimens and evaluated CT's ability to differentiate BOOP from UIP. CT findings of all cases of BOOP were: (1) markedly increased dense infiltrates of various sizes which demarcated sharply from normal lung field. Air bronchogram was always present. (2) less dense images were seen which also stood out against the normal lung field. The former corresponded to air space consolidation formed by organized exudates and inflammatory cells within alveolar ducts and alveoli, while the latter indicated luminal and mural alveolitis. Both findings were sharply delineated from each other probably because of intervening interlobular septa. Conglomerated small cystic shadows and air bronchography within areas of intense lung density were seen in CT images of most of 28 patients with UIP. Those findings proved to correspond to macroscopic or microscopic honey combing which were not seen in our cases of BOOP. These radiologic and pathologic features of UIP were different. PMID:2724593

  16. [A case of Legionella pneumonia with multiple organ failure].

    PubMed

    Li, Jiali; Wen, Rui; Deng, Hong; Li, Qian

    2016-06-28

    Legionella pneumonia (LP) is a rare systemic infectious disease, which is often misdiagnosed by clinicians due to the atypical symptoms. A middle-aged man who suffered from fever and dyspnea was diagnosed as community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in Changsha Central Hospital in March 2015. The treatment was unsatisfied firstly. The patients showed further symptoms of rhabdomyolysis, acute liver and renal failure, and impaired neural functions, who was diagnosed as LP with multiple organ failure based on a positive test for Legionella antibody. The patient was recovered after treated with moxifloxacin combined with azithromycin and continuous renal replacement therapy. LP should be paid attention when patient was diagnosed as CAP and failed to be treated. The satisfied outcome is achieved after application of macrolide, quinolones and comprehensive treatments. PMID:27374453

  17. A Case of Organizing Pneumonia (OP) Associated with Pembrolizumab

    PubMed Central

    Fragkou, Paraskevi; Souli, Maria; Theochari, Maria; Kontopoulou, Christina; Loukides, Stelios; Koumarianou, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, chemotherapy for metastatic melanoma had disappointing results. The identification of immune checkpoints such as CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1 has led to the development of an array of monoclonal antibodies (Mabs). These immunologic approaches against tumoral cells come with a novel kind of side effects that the clinician needs to be familiarized with. Herein, we report for the first time a case of organizing pneumonia, based on imaging and cytological analyses of bronchoalveolar lavage, possibly associated with the use of pembrolizumab, an anti-PD-1 Mab recently approved for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. PMID:27257369

  18. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia due to gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Rong; Xu, Xue-Feng; Zhou, Chun-Ju; Yang, Hai-Ming; Zhao, Shun-Ying

    2015-06-01

    The most common causes of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) are connective tissue diseases, organ transplantation, drug reaction, and infections. Although rare, BOOP due to gastroesophageal reflux (GER) has been reported in adults but not to date in pediatric patients. This study describes 2 pediatric patients who developed GER and BOOP. One patient had superior mesenteric artery syndrome and Helicobacter pylori infection, and the other had a gastroduodenal ulcer with reflux esophagitis. Respiratory symptoms occurred concurrently or after gastrointestinal symptoms. Monitoring of esophageal pH for 24 hours revealed pathologic acid reflux. Lung biopsy findings confirmed BOOP. No other causes of BOOP were observed in these 2 patients. Both patients were cured with antireflux therapy and corticosteroids. To our knowledge, this is the first case report to implicate GER as a reversible cause of BOOP in children. PMID:25986021

  19. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia associated with achalasia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Malek, Farhad; Nobakhat, Hossein; Hemmati, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    There is little mention in the literature about achalasia as an etiologic factor of Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP). In this study, a case of BOOP, which appeared to be secondary to achalasia is reported. A 35 years old man present with nonproductive cough, chills and fever from two month ago. Due to permanent consolidation in mid zone of right lung and unresponsive to antibiotics, transthoracic needle biopsy was done that showed BOOP. Due to esophageal dilatation in chest computerized tomography (CT) scan, endoscopy and esophagogram was done that showed achalasia. After surgery and a course of corticosteroid the patient condition became well. This report demonstrates that achalasia may be associated with BOOP. PMID:27408784

  20. Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Urinary Tract Infection following Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Sandra S.; Cober, Eric D.; van Duin, David

    2014-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) is an emerging pathogen with a devastating impact on organ transplant recipients (OTRs). Data describing urinary tract infections (UTIs) due to CRKP, compared to extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing and susceptible K. pneumoniae, are lacking. We conducted a retrospective cohort study comparing OTRs with a first episode of UTI due to CRKP, ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae, or susceptible K. pneumoniae. We identified 108 individuals; 22 (20%) had UTIs due to CRKP, 22 (20%) due to ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae, and 64 (60%) due to susceptible K. pneumoniae. Compared to susceptible K. pneumoniae (27%), patients with UTIs due to CRKP or ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae were more likely to have a ≥24-hour stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) before or after development of the UTI (64% and 77%, respectively; P < 0.001). Among 105/108 hospitalized patients (97%), the median lengths of stay prior to UTI with CRKP or ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae (7 and 8 days, respectively) were significantly longer than that for susceptible K. pneumoniae (1 day; P < 0.001). Clinical failure was observed for 8 patients (36%) with CRKP, 4 (18%) with ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae, and 9 (14%) with susceptible K. pneumoniae (P = 0.073). Microbiological failure was seen for 10 patients (45%) with CRKP, compared with 2 (9%) with ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae and 2 (3%) with susceptible K. pneumoniae (P < 0.001). In multivariable logistic regression analyses, CRKP was associated with greater odds of microbiological failure (versus ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae: odds ratio [OR], 9.36, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.94 to 72.1; versus susceptible K. pneumoniae: OR, 31.4, 95% CI, 5.91 to 264). In conclusion, CRKP is associated with ICU admission, long length of stay, and microbiological failure among OTRs with UTIs. Greater numbers are needed to determine risk factors for infection and differences in meaningful endpoints associated with carbapenem

  1. Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae urinary tract infection following solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Brizendine, Kyle D; Richter, Sandra S; Cober, Eric D; van Duin, David

    2015-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) is an emerging pathogen with a devastating impact on organ transplant recipients (OTRs). Data describing urinary tract infections (UTIs) due to CRKP, compared to extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing and susceptible K. pneumoniae, are lacking. We conducted a retrospective cohort study comparing OTRs with a first episode of UTI due to CRKP, ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae, or susceptible K. pneumoniae. We identified 108 individuals; 22 (20%) had UTIs due to CRKP, 22 (20%) due to ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae, and 64 (60%) due to susceptible K. pneumoniae. Compared to susceptible K. pneumoniae (27%), patients with UTIs due to CRKP or ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae were more likely to have a ≥ 24-hour stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) before or after development of the UTI (64% and 77%, respectively; P < 0.001). Among 105/108 hospitalized patients (97%), the median lengths of stay prior to UTI with CRKP or ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae (7 and 8 days, respectively) were significantly longer than that for susceptible K. pneumoniae (1 day; P < 0.001). Clinical failure was observed for 8 patients (36%) with CRKP, 4 (18%) with ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae, and 9 (14%) with susceptible K. pneumoniae (P = 0.073). Microbiological failure was seen for 10 patients (45%) with CRKP, compared with 2 (9%) with ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae and 2 (3%) with susceptible K. pneumoniae (P < 0.001). In multivariable logistic regression analyses, CRKP was associated with greater odds of microbiological failure (versus ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae: odds ratio [OR], 9.36, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.94 to 72.1; versus susceptible K. pneumoniae: OR, 31.4, 95% CI, 5.91 to 264). In conclusion, CRKP is associated with ICU admission, long length of stay, and microbiological failure among OTRs with UTIs. Greater numbers are needed to determine risk factors for infection and differences in meaningful endpoints associated with carbapenem

  2. Pneumonia (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumonia is an inflammation of the lungs caused by an infection. Many different organisms can cause it, including bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Pneumonia is a common illness that affects millions of ...

  3. Acute respiratory failure caused by organizing pneumonia secondary to antineoplastic therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Adriell Ramalho; Amorim, Fábio Ferreira; Soares, Paulo Henrique Alves; de Moura, Edmilson Bastos; Maia, Marcelo de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases belong to a group of diseases that typically exhibit a subacute or chronic progression but that may cause acute respiratory failure. The male patient, who was 37 years of age and undergoing therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, was admitted with cough, fever, dyspnea and acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Mechanical ventilation and antibiotic therapy were initiated but were associated with unfavorable progression. Thoracic computed tomography showed bilateral pulmonary "ground glass" opacities. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy was initiated with satisfactory response because the patient had used three drugs related to organizing pneumonia (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and rituximab), and the clinical and radiological symptoms were suggestive. Organizing pneumonia may be idiopathic or linked to collagen diseases, drugs and cancer and usually responds to corticosteroid therapy. The diagnosis was anatomopathological, but the patient's clinical condition precluded performing a lung biopsy. Organizing pneumonia should be a differential diagnosis in patients with apparent pneumonia and a progression that is unfavorable to antimicrobial treatment. PMID:23917942

  4. Elective preterm delivery as a management option in cryptogenic organizing pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Holder, Kelly L; Scardo, James A; Laye, M Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia, now termed as cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), is a fibrotic lung disease of the small airways with the potential to progress to end-stage lung disease. COP in pregnancy carries a high risk of maternal and neonatal complications and only two prior cases have been reported. This is the first case of pre-existing COP in pregnancy. We report a 16-year-old primigravid with COP who elected inpatient management and preterm delivery as a successful management option.

  5. Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia associated with influenza A/H1N1 pneumonia after lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Immunocompromised patients, particularly after lung transplantation, are at high risk to develop atypical forms of pulmonary infections including influenza A/H1N1. Acute Fibrinous and Organizing Pneumonia (AFOP) is a special histological pattern in acute respiratory failure with high mortality. Case presentation We describe a 66-year-old woman with double lung transplantation in August 2009 due to end stage pulmonary fibrosis. After prolonged weaning and subsequent promising course, she developed atypical pneumonia with diffuse pulmonary infiltrates in both lungs in January 2010. Infection with influenza A/H1N1 virus was verified. The patient rapidly suffered from respiratory insufficiency and died eight days after this diagnosis. The post-mortem revealed especially in the lower parts of the lungs the classical histological pattern of pure AFOP. Molecular analyses of lung tissue were positive for influenza A/H1N1. Conclusion To our knowledge we present the first case of AFOP triggered by viral infection, here proven to be influenza virus A/H1N1. Thus, also in the setting of viral infection the highly deadly differential diagnosis of AFOP must be considered. PMID:23683442

  6. Nivolumab-induced organizing pneumonia in a melanoma patient.

    PubMed

    Sano, Tasuku; Uhara, Hisashi; Mikoshiba, Yasutomo; Kobayashi, Aya; Uchiyama, Ryuhei; Tateishi, Kazunari; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Okuyama, Ryuhei

    2016-03-01

    We report the case of a 70-year-old woman with vaginal melanoma and multiple metastases in the lung. After the third dose of nivolumab, decreased room-air resting arterial oxygen saturation with bilateral basal fine crackles on auscultation developed despite the absence of respiratory symptoms. Computed tomography showed ground-glass opacities with airspace consolidations scattered with a peculiar distribution, and most were observed around the existing metastatic tumors in the lung. From the 42nd day to the 56th day after the last administration of nivolumab, she received dexamethasone 1-2 mg/body for the prevention of adverse events after stereotactic radiation for brain metastasis. At 3 months after the last administration of nivolumab, a computed tomography scan revealed improvement of the pneumonia and a decreased size and number of metastatic lesions in the lung, although some lesions showed enlargement. Further examination is needed to clarify the relationship between the pattern of pneumonia after Nivo therapy and clinical effects. PMID:26759348

  7. Cryptogenic organizing pneumonia due to amiodarone: long-term follow-up after corticosteroid treatment.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Katja; Schima, Wolfgang; Kaliman, Josef F

    2010-08-01

    Cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (formerly known as bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia) is a clinicopathological entity with characteristical radiographic findings such as bilateral, asymmetrical, sometimes migrating, patchy infiltrates in chest radiograph and ground-glass opacities in computed tomography. The disease has been observed in the context of gastrointestinal disorders, certain lung infections, autoimmune-mediated diseases (such as Wegener granulomatosis), inhalation of toxic fumes, bone marrow transplantation and administration of drugs. The benzofuran amiodarone, a commonly used antiarrythmic drug for atrial fibrillation, can exhibit several pulmonary adverse effects, amongst them cryptogenic organizing pneumonia as a rarely diagnosed and published one. We report a case of cryptogenic organizing pneumonia secondary to amiodarone treatment, its clinical course with significant improvement of clinical symptoms within a few days after discontinuation of amiodarone treatment and administration of corticosteroids. Also the infiltrations found in chest X-ray and computed tomography responded well and showed remarkable resolution tendency quickly. During 5 months of corticoid therapy pulmonary abnormalities gradually resolved almost completely and remained equal during the 8 months follow-up after corticoid termination. PMID:20668958

  8. [Bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia associated with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura].

    PubMed

    Presas, J L; Piriz, J; Serra, S L; Paz, E D; Allievi, A; Kartin, D; Olmedo, G

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of a 35 year-old woman with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) who, under treatment with immunosuppressive drugs, developed bilateral interstitial pulmonary disease. Previously she had been splenectomized and treated with corticosteroids and cyclosporin. During the clinical course, the patient developed alterations of the hepatogram and presented a positive serology for Epstein-Barr virus. The lung biopsy showed the histologic pattern of obliterative bronchiolitis, interstitial inflammatory infiltration and intraalveolar pneumonia (BOOP). We could not find in the literature a previous report in which ITP was associated with BOOP. Of interest was the spontaneous remission of the pulmonary disease after suppression of cyclosporin and positive serology for Epstein-Barr virus. PMID:9674210

  9. Acute Fibrinous and Organizing Pneumonia Associated With Allogenic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Successfully Treated With Corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Lam-Phuong; Ahdoot, Stella; Sriratanaviriyakul, Narin; Zhang, Yanhong; Stollenwerk, Nicholas; Schivo, Michael; Harper, Richart

    2016-01-01

    Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) is an extremely rare, relatively new, and distinct histological pattern of acute lung injury characterized predominately by the presence of intra-alveolar fibrin and associated organizing pneumonia. AFOP may be idiopathic or associated with a wide spectrum of clinical conditions. It has a variable clinical presentation from mild respiratory symptoms to that similar to the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Currently there is no consensus on treatment, and corticosteroids previously were of unclear benefit. To date, there are less than 40 cases of AFOP reported in the literature and only one has been linked to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Here we report the first case series of 2 patients who developed AFOP following allogenic stem cell transplant that were successfully treated with high-dose corticosteroids. PMID:27152316

  10. Invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma mimicking organizing pneumonia associated with Mycobacterium fortuitum infection.

    PubMed

    Morichika, Daisuke; Miyahara, Nobuaki; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiko; Minami, Daisuke; Irie, Masahiro; Tanimoto, Yasushi; Kanehiro, Arihiko; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2014-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 68-year-old man diagnosed with invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma of the lungs. Chest computed tomography showed subpleural ground-glass opacity and small nodules with cavitation. A culture of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid resulted in the detection of Mycobacterium fortuitum. The patient's lung consolidation rapidly progressed; however, repeated bronchoscopy showed no atypical cells, thus suggesting a diagnosis of organizing pneumonia associated with M. fortuitum infection. However, the surgical biopsy specimen was diagnostic for adenocarcinoma, with no mycobacterial infection. Invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma should not be excluded in the differential diagnosis of patients with clinical features of organizing pneumonia and nontuberculous mycobacterium infection, even if a transbronchial biopsy confirms the absence of malignancy. PMID:25500441

  11. Atypical pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... that cause typical pneumonia. These include Legionella pneumophila , Mycoplasma pneumoniae , and Chlamydophila pneumoniae . Atypical pneumonia also tends to have milder symptoms than typical pneumonia. Causes Mycoplasma pneumonia is a type of atypical pneumonia. It ...

  12. Pneumonias – a dynamic relationship between the human organism and the etiologic agent

    PubMed Central

    Chiotan, R; Chiotan, M

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Pneumonias are usually acute infectious processes of the pulmonary parenchyma, being the result of the overcome of the natural defence mechanisms of the human organism, which lead to the penetration, persistence and multiplication of a biologic agent (which has become a pathogen agent) within the lungs. This is a phenomena which generates local manifestations (inflammation) and systemic manifestations, their variable dimension (which is conditioned by the state of the host and/or the virulence of the pathogen agent) explaining the clinical, paraclinical and biological dimensions of the phenomena. The current material deals on one hand with the phenomena which takes part in the formation of the heterogeneous spectrum of the pneumonias and, on the other hand, we will demonstrate the manner in which the expansion and the severity of the infectious phenomena depend on the virulence of the etiologic agent, on the manner in which the defence mechanisms have been overcome, and also on the biological state of the invaded organism. Abbreviations: PN – pneumonia, O2 – oxygen, CO2 – carbon dioxide PMID:25408724

  13. Acute Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Hammad; Fasanya, Adebayo; Cheema, Tariq; Singh, Anil C

    2016-01-01

    Acute pneumonia is an active infection of the lungs that results when an individual at risk gets exposed to a particular microbiological pathogen. Acute pneumonia is the leading cause of death in the United States that is attributable to an infection. The risk factors, pathogenesis, and microbiological organisms involved differ if the pneumonia develops in the community versus health care-associated environment. The development of concise and comprehensive guidelines has led to an improvement in the management of the problem. However, the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms and the increase in the percentage of elderly population keep mortality risk very substantial. PMID:26919676

  14. Brain Network Organization in Focal Epilepsy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Floor E.; Stam, Cornelis J.; Braun, Kees P. J.; Otte, Willem M.

    2014-01-01

    segregation, on whole brain interictal network organization, which may relate to the co-morbid cognitive and behavioral impairments often reported in patients with focal epilepsy. PMID:25493432

  15. Ultrastructural evidence of alveolar epithelial injury in idiopathic bronchiolitis obliterans-organizing pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, J. L.; Katzenstein, A. L.

    1988-01-01

    The ultrastructural features of idiopathic bronchiolitis obliterans-organizing pneumonia (BOOP) were studied in 9 patients. As expected, the characteristic air space fibrosis was composed of spindled fibroblasts and myofibroblasts arranged concentrically within an electron-lucent stroma. In 6 patients there was evidence of incorporation of air space fibrosis into the interstitium. A surprising finding in all patients was the presence of extensive epithelial damage involving peribronchiolar alveolar septa. Necrosis and sloughing of alveolar lining cells resulted in denuding of epithelial basal laminae. Complex infoldings and deep invaginations of the denuded basal laminae into alveolar septa were common. These ultrastructural changes involving the interstitium are similar to those occurring in the interstitial pneumonias, and suggest that BOOP also results from acute epithelial injury. The different clinical manifestations and prognosis of these entities may relate to the peribronchiolar localization of the epithelial damage in BOOP compared with more diffuse involvement of distal lung in the interstitial pneumonias. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:3394793

  16. MyMpn: a database for the systems biology model organism Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Wodke, Judith A H; Alibés, Andreu; Cozzuto, Luca; Hermoso, Antonio; Yus, Eva; Lluch-Senar, Maria; Serrano, Luis; Roma, Guglielmo

    2015-01-01

    MyMpn (http://mympn.crg.eu) is an online resource devoted to studying the human pathogen Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a minimal bacterium causing lower respiratory tract infections. Due to its small size, its ability to grow in vitro, and the amount of data produced over the past decades, M. pneumoniae is an interesting model organisms for the development of systems biology approaches for unicellular organisms. Our database hosts a wealth of omics-scale datasets generated by hundreds of experimental and computational analyses. These include data obtained from gene expression profiling experiments, gene essentiality studies, protein abundance profiling, protein complex analysis, metabolic reactions and network modeling, cell growth experiments, comparative genomics and 3D tomography. In addition, the intuitive web interface provides access to several visualization and analysis tools as well as to different data search options. The availability and--even more relevant--the accessibility of properly structured and organized data are of up-most importance when aiming to understand the biology of an organism on a global scale. Therefore, MyMpn constitutes a unique and valuable new resource for the large systems biology and microbiology community. PMID:25378328

  17. Molecular mechanism of vinculin activation and nano-scale spatial organization in focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Case, Lindsay B.; Baird, Michelle A.; Shtengel, Gleb; Campbell, Sharon L.; Hess, Harald F.; Davidson, Michael W.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) link the extracellular matrix (ECM) to the actin cytoskeleton to mediate cell adhesion, migration, mechanosensing and signaling. FAs have conserved nanoscale protein organization, suggesting that the position of proteins within FAs regulates their activity and function. Vinculin binds different FA proteins to mediate distinct cellular functions, but how vinculin’s interactions are spatiotemporally organized within FA is unknown. Using interferometric photo-activation localization (iPALM) super-resolution microscopy to assay vinculin nanoscale localization and a FRET biosensor to assay vinculin conformation, we found that upward repositioning within the FA during FA maturation facilitates vinculin activation and mechanical reinforcement of FA. Inactive vinculin localizes to the lower integrin signaling layer in FA by binding to phospho-paxillin. Talin binding activates vinculin and targets active vinculin higher in FA where vinculin can engage retrograde actin flow. Thus, specific protein interactions are spatially segregated within FA at the nano-scale to regulate vinculin activation and function. PMID:26053221

  18. Cytomegalovirus Colitis in a Critically Ill Patient Following Severe Legionella Pneumonia with Multiple Organ Failure.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Kei; Aoshima, Masahiro; Suzuki, Fumi; Watanabe, Junko; Otsuka, Yoshihito

    2016-01-01

    A 68-year-old man visited an emergency department complaining of dyspnea. He was diagnosed to have Legionella pneumonia with multiple organ failure. Although his multiple organ failure improved, he suffered from persistent abdominal pain and diarrhea with continuous minor bleeding. Colonoscopy revealed a longitudinal ulcer of the rectum, below the peritoneal reflection. He was diagnosed with cytomegalovirus (CMV) colitis. Antiviral therapy with ganciclovir was initiated. He finally underwent a colostomy after a bowel stricture caused an intestinal outlet obstruction, which made oral intake impossible. Based on the present case, we believe that CMV colitis must be considered as one of the differential diagnoses when critically ill patients develop continuous diarrhea and abdominal pain. PMID:26935377

  19. Trends in Pneumonia Mortality Rates and Hospitalizations by Organism, United States, 2002–20111

    PubMed Central

    Wuerth, Brandon A.; Bonnewell, John P.; Wiemken, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    Because the epidemiology of pneumonia is changing, we performed an updated, population-based analysis of hospitalization and case-fatality rates for pneumonia patients in the United States. From 2002 to 2011, hospitalization rates decreased significantly for pneumonia caused by pneumococcus and Haemophilus influenzae but increased significantly for Pseudomonas spp., Staphylococcus aureus, and influenza virus. PMID:27532154

  20. Trends in Pneumonia Mortality Rates and Hospitalizations by Organism, United States, 2002-2011(1).

    PubMed

    Wuerth, Brandon A; Bonnewell, John P; Wiemken, Timothy L; Arnold, Forest W

    2016-09-01

    Because the epidemiology of pneumonia is changing, we performed an updated, population-based analysis of hospitalization and case-fatality rates for pneumonia patients in the United States. From 2002 to 2011, hospitalization rates decreased significantly for pneumonia caused by pneumococcus and Haemophilus influenzae but increased significantly for Pseudomonas spp., Staphylococcus aureus, and influenza virus. PMID:27532154

  1. Supramolecular Organization of the Repetitive Backbone Unit of the Streptococcus pneumoniae Pilus

    PubMed Central

    Spraggon, Glen; Koesema, Eric; Scarselli, Maria; Malito, Enrico; Biagini, Massimiliano; Norais, Nathalie; Emolo, Carla; Barocchi, Michèle Anne; Giusti, Fabiola; Hilleringmann, Markus; Rappuoli, Rino; Lesley, Scott; Covacci, Antonello; Masignani, Vega; Ferlenghi, Ilaria

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, like many other Gram-positive bacteria, assembles long filamentous pili on their surface through which they adhere to host cells. Pneumococcal pili are formed by a backbone, consisting of the repetition of the major component RrgB, and two accessory proteins (RrgA and RrgC). Here we reconstruct by transmission electron microscopy and single particle image reconstruction method the three dimensional arrangement of two neighbouring RrgB molecules, which represent the minimal repetitive structural domain of the native pilus. The crystal structure of the D2-D4 domains of RrgB was solved at 1.6 Å resolution. Rigid-body fitting of the X-ray coordinates into the electron density map enabled us to define the arrangement of the backbone subunits into the S. pneumoniae native pilus. The quantitative fitting provide evidence that the pneumococcal pilus consists uniquely of RrgB monomers assembled in a head-to-tail organization. The presence of short intra-subunit linker regions connecting neighbouring domains provides the molecular basis for the intrinsic pilus flexibility. PMID:20559564

  2. Simultaneous diagnosis of cryptogenic organizing pneumonia and HIV in a 45 year old man

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Israr A.; Saadia, Naseem; Sheikh, Naveed; Culpepper-Morgan, Joan A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP) is a small airways disease characterized by intraluminal polyps of myxoid connective tissue which follows a subclinical course and is associated with infectious as well as non infectious processes The concomitant occurrence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and COP has rarely been reported. We describe a unique case in which COP was a presenting feature in a patient with newly diagnosed HIV Infection. Case Report: A 45 year-old man with chronic active smoking presented to the ER with 15 months history of cough productive of minimal whitish sputum without frank or streaks of blood, low grade fever, anorexia and 4–6 lbs weight loss in past 6 months. He had three life time sexual partners. PPD status were unknown. He was extensively worked up as the Chest X ray showed cystic lesions all of which came back normal. Patient also received HIV test which was positive with CD 4 count of 546. He received bronchoscopy which revealed cryptogenic organising pneumonia. He was placed on steroids tapering course which helped in relieving the symptoms. Conclusions: HIV infection with CD 4 count above 500 has seldom been reported having COP with this case being the second in literature but this entity should be kept in mind during management of these patients. PMID:23569519

  3. Spontaneous resolution of cryptogenic organizing pneumonia in pediatrics: A case report.

    PubMed

    Abi-Khalil, S; Fadel, N; Menassa-Moussa, L; Torbey, P H; Haddad-Zebouni, S

    2016-05-01

    Cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP) is a rare entity in childhood, particularly in previously healthy children. Moreover, the spontaneous remission of the disease is exceptional. We report on the case of a previously healthy 10-year-old girl who consulted her doctor for a 2-month history of mild pyrexia, fatigue, weight loss, and exertional dyspnea with no response to amoxicillin. A chest CT revealed bilateral, asymmetrical peribronchovascular consolidation areas predominating in the lower lobes and imaging features of COP. The bronchoalveolar lavage and the biological findings were negative. On follow-up, the girl showed clinical and radiological remission of the disease with no treatment. Our report describes an extremely rare case of spontaneously resolving COP in a child, the diagnosis being made based on the imaging pattern. PMID:27021808

  4. A case of acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia during early postoperative period after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Alici, I O; Yekeler, E; Yazicioglu, A; Turan, S; Tezer-Tekce, Y; Demirag, F; Karaoglanoglu, N

    2015-04-01

    Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) is a distinct histologic pattern usually classified under the term chronic lung allograft dysfunction. We present a 48-year-old female patient who experienced AFOP during the 2nd week of double lung transplantation for pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis and secondary pulmonary hypertension. During the 8th day after transplantation, fever and neutrophilia developed together with bilateral consolidation. Infection markers were elevated. Despite coverage of a full antimicrobial spectrum, the situation progressed. The patient was diagnosed with AFOP with transbronchial biopsy. The infiltration resolved and the patient improved dramatically with the initiation of pulse corticosteroid treatment. AFOP should be suspected when there is a pulmonary consolidation after lung transplantation, even in the very early post-transplantation period. Several causes, such as alveolar damage and drug reactions, should be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:25891742

  5. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia following a jalapeño grease fire.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, Brian T; West, Natalie E; Illei, Peter B; Terry, Peter B

    2015-02-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) is an inflammatory lung disease characterized by granulation tissue in the respiratory bronchioles, alveolar ducts and alveoli. BOOP can be caused by a number of etiologies including infection, toxic inhalation, medications, radiation, and collagen vascular disease, or it can be idiopathic. We report here a case of BOOP following inhalational exposure to a jalapeño grease fire. Capsaicin and other jalapeño-derived compounds are known causes of epithelial damage and airway inflammation but to our knowledge have never been implicated in the development of BOOP. This case adds to the growing list of exposures associated with BOOP and highlights the importance of taking a thorough exposure history in patients with lung injury of unknown etiology. PMID:25644912

  6. [Idiopathic bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia complicated by transitory cystic lesion in the healing stage].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, T; Hachisuka, H; Akusawa, H; Chin, T; Kayama, Y; Nomura, Y; Horie, T

    1999-11-01

    A 21-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because chest X-ray films disclosed infiltrative shadows indicative of Mycoplasma pneumonia. He experienced fever and dry cough for 2 weeks. Chest X-ray findings showed ground-glass shadows in the lower fields of both lungs. The patient was not responsive to antibiotic therapy (PAPM/BP 1 g/day and CLDM 1,200 mg/day); dyspnea advanced rapidly and spikes of fever persisted. On hospital day 5, chest computed tomographic (CT) films disclosed interstitial shadows in all lower lung fields with dense infiltration. A transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) was performed on day 7, and TBLB specimens demonstrated infiltration of mononuclear cells in alveolar septa and organizing exudate in alveolar ducts with polypoid granulation tissue. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid findings revealed an increase in the total cell count and the percentage of lymphocytes. The CD 4/CD 8 ratio was normal. The findings of other laboratory tests ruled out drug-induced lung disease, infectious disease, and collagen disease. Idiopathic bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia (BOOP) was diagnosed. Corticosteroid therapy (methyl prednisolone: 500 mg/day) was started. After 2 weeks of treatment (prednisolone: 30 mg/day), the dyspnea and fever disappeared. Chest CT films showed that the interstitial shadows had largely resolved, but that a large cystic lesion had formed rapidly in the right lower lung field (right S 6). To the best of our knowledge, no cases of BOOP complicated by cystic lesions in the healing stage have been reported to date. We speculated that polypoid granulation in a bronchiole had given rise to a check-valve mechanism. After 2 months of treatment (prednisolone: 15 mg/day), the cystic lesion disappeared. We concluded that the bronchiolar lesion of polypoid granulation had resolved in response to therapy, thus facilitating air-way communication and the release of air from the cyst. PMID:18217316

  7. Meningococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Vossen, Matthias; Mitteregger, Dieter; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-08-17

    Neisseria meningitidis remains the most important cause of bacterial meningitis worldwide, particularly in children and young adults. The second most common and a potentially severe end-organ manifestation of invasive meningococcal disease (excluding systemic sepsis) is meningococcal pneumonia. It occurs in between 5% and 15% of all patients with invasive meningococcal disease and is thus the second most common non-systemic end-organ manifestation. To establish the diagnosis requires a high level of clinical awareness - the incidence is therefore very likely underreported and underestimated. This review of 344 meningococcal pneumonia cases reported in the Americas, Europe, Australia, and Asia between 1906 and 2015 presents risk factors, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnostic approaches, treatment, and prognosis of meningococcal pneumonia. PMID:27443594

  8. Intermediate risk of multidrug-resistant organisms in patients who admitted intensive care unit with healthcare-associated pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hongyeul; Park, Ji Young; Lee, Taehoon; Lee, Yeon Joo; Lim, Hyo-Jeong; Park, Jong Sun; Yoon, Ho Il; Lee, Jae-Ho; Lee, Choon-Taek; Cho, Young-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) was proposed asa new pneumonia category in 2005, and treatment recommendations includebroad-spectrum antibiotics directed at multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens.However, this concept continues to be controversial, and microbiological data arelacking for HCAP patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). This study was conductedto determine the rate and type of antibiotic-resistant organisms and theclinical outcomes in patients with HCAP in the ICU, compared to patients withcommunity-acquired pneumonia (CAP) or hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP). Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of patients with pneumonia(n = 195) who admitted to medical ICU in tertiary teaching hospital fromMarch 2011 to February 2013. Clinical characteristics, microbiological distributions,treatment outcomes, and prognosis of HCAP (n = 74) were compared tothose of CAP (n = 75) and HAP (n = 46). Results: MDR pathogens were significantly higher in HCAP patients (39.1%) thanin CAP (13.5%) and lower than in HAP (79.3%, p < 0.001). The initial use of inappropriateantibiotic treatment occurred more frequently in the HCAP (32.6%) andHAP (51.7%) groups than in the CAP group (11.8%, p = 0.006). There were no differencesin clinical outcomes. The significant prognostic factors were pneumoniaseverity and treatment response. Conclusions: MDR pathogens were isolated in HCAP patients requiring ICU admissionat intermediate rates between those of CAP and HAP. PMID:26968189

  9. Proliferative re-modeling of the spatial organization of human superficial chondrocytes distant to focal early osteoarthritis (OA)

    PubMed Central

    Rolauffs, Bernd; Williams, James M.; Aurich, Matthias; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Kuettner, Klaus E.; Cole, Ada A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Human superficial chondrocytes show distinct spatial organizations whereas they commonly aggregate near osteoarthritic (OA) fissures. It is not known whether remodeling or destruction of the spatial chondrocyte organization may occur distant to focal (early) OA lesions. Methods The intact cartilages (condyles, patellofemoral groove, proximal tibia) distant to focal OA lesions of human grade 2 joints were compared to location-matched non-degenerative (grade 0–1) cartilages. Chondrocyte nuclei were stained with propidium iodide and recorded by fluorescence-microscopy in a top-down view. Chondrocyte arrangements were tested for randomness or significant grouping via point pattern analyses (Clark and Evans Aggregation Index), and were correlated with OA grade and surface cell densities. Results In grade 2 cartilages, superficial chondrocytes were situated in horizontal patterns such as strings, cluster, pairs and singles comparable to non-degenerative cartilage. In the intact cartilages of grade 2 joints, the spatial organization included a novel pattern, consisting of chondrocytes that were aligned in two parallel lines building double strings. These double strings correlated with an increased number of chondrocytes per group (p<0.05), increased corresponding superficial zone cell density (p<0.001), and were observed in all grade 2 condyles (p<0.001), some grade 2 tibiae (p<0.05) but never in grade 0–1 cartilage (p<0.001). Conclusion The present study is the first to identify a distinct spatial re-organization of human superficial chondrocytes in response to distant early OA lesions and suggests that proliferation had occurred distant to focal early OA. This spatial re-organization may serve to recruit metabolically active units as attempt to repair focal damage. PMID:20112377

  10. Aspiration pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic pneumonia; Aspiration of vomitus; Necrotizing pneumonia; Aspiration pneumonitis ... The type of bacteria that caused the pneumonia depends on: Your ... facility, for example) Whether you were recently hospitalized ...

  11. Organization and post-transcriptional processing of focal adhesion kinase gene

    PubMed Central

    Corsi, Jean-Marc; Rouer, Evelyne; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Enslen, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Background Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase critical for processes ranging from embryo development to cancer progression. Although isoforms with specific molecular and functional properties have been characterized in rodents and chicken, the organization of FAK gene throughout phylogeny and its potential to generate multiple isoforms are not well understood. Here, we study the phylogeny of FAK, the organization of its gene, and its post-transcriptional processing in rodents and human. Results A single orthologue of FAK and the related PYK2 was found in non-vertebrate species. Gene duplication probably occurred in deuterostomes after the echinoderma embranchment, leading to the evolution of PYK2 with distinct properties. The amino acid sequence of FAK and PYK2 is conserved in their functional domains but not in their linker regions, with the absence of autophosphorylation site in C. elegans. Comparison of mouse and human FAK genes revealed the existence of multiple combinations of conserved and non-conserved 5'-untranslated exons in FAK transcripts suggesting a complex regulation of their expression. Four alternatively spliced coding exons (13, 14, 16, and 31), previously described in rodents, are highly conserved in vertebrates. Cis-regulatory elements known to regulate alternative splicing were found in conserved alternative exons of FAK or in the flanking introns. In contrast, other reported human variant exons were restricted to Homo sapiens, and, in some cases, other primates. Several of these non-conserved exons may correspond to transposable elements. The inclusion of conserved alternative exons was examined by RT-PCR in mouse and human brain during development. Inclusion of exons 14 and 16 peaked at the end of embryonic life, whereas inclusion of exon 13 increased steadily until adulthood. Study of various tissues showed that inclusion of these exons also occurred, independently from each other, in a tissue-specific fashion

  12. CMV pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... help prevent CMV pneumonia in certain people: Using organ transplant donors who don't have CMV Using CMV-negative blood products for transfusion Using CMV-immune globulin in certain ... that can occur in people who have a weakened immune system.

  13. Analysis of volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath to diagnose ventilator-associated pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Schnabel, Ronny; Fijten, Rianne; Smolinska, Agnieszka; Dallinga, Jan; Boumans, Marie-Louise; Stobberingh, Ellen; Boots, Agnes; Roekaerts, Paul; Bergmans, Dennis; van Schooten, Frederik Jan

    2015-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a nosocomial infection occurring in the intensive care unit (ICU). The diagnostic standard is based on clinical criteria and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Exhaled breath analysis is a promising non-invasive method for rapid diagnosis of diseases and contains volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that can differentiate diseased from healthy individuals. The aim of this study was to determine whether analysis of VOCs in exhaled breath can be used as a non-invasive monitoring tool for VAP. One hundred critically ill patients with clinical suspicion of VAP underwent BAL. Before BAL, exhaled air samples were collected and analysed by gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-tof-MS). The clinical suspicion of VAP was confirmed by BAL diagnostic criteria in 32 patients [VAP(+)] and rejected in 68 patients [VAP(−)]. Multivariate statistical comparison of VOC profiles between VAP(+) and VAP(−) revealed a subset of 12 VOCs that correctly discriminated between those two patient groups with a sensitivity and specificity of 75.8% ± 13.5% and 73.0% ± 11.8%, respectively. These results suggest that detection of VAP in ICU patients is possible by examining exhaled breath, enabling a simple, safe and non-invasive approach that could diminish diagnostic burden of VAP. PMID:26608483

  14. The Spectrum of Presentations of Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia in High Resolution Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mehrian, Payam; Shahnazi, Makhtoom; Dahaj, Ali Ahmadi; Bizhanzadeh, Sorour; Karimi, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Various radiologic patterns of cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP) in X-rays have been reported for more than 20 years, and later, in computed tomography scans. The aim of the present study was to describe the spectrum of radiologic findings on high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scans in patients with COP. Material/Methods HRCT scans of 31 sequential patients (mean age: 54.3±11 years; 55% male) with biopsy-proven COP in a tertiary lung center between 2009 and 2012 were reviewed by two experienced pulmonary radiologists with almost perfect interobserver agreement (kappa=0.83). Chest HRCTs from the lung apex to the base were performed using a 16-slice multi-detector CT scanner. Results The most common HRCT presentation of COP was ground-glass opacity (GGO) in 83.9% of cases, followed by consolidation in 71%. Both findings were mostly asymmetric bilateral and multifocal. Other common findings were the reverse halo (48.4%), parenchymal bands (54.8%) and subpleural bands (32.3%). Pulmonary nodules were found in about one-third of patients and were frequently smaller than 5 mm in diameter. Both GGOs and consolidations were revealed more often in the lower lobes. Conclusions The main presentations of COP on HRCT include bilateral GGOs and consolidations in the lower lobes together with the reverse halo sign. PMID:25493105

  15. Systematic Review of Postradiotherapy Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia in Women With Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Eileen M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Radiation therapy for breast cancer has been implicated in the development of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP). This inflammatory lung disorder was first noted in 1983, and there have been numerous reports of BOOP occurring in women who have had radiation therapy for breast cancer since 1995. This study was undertaken to perform a systematic review of postradiotherapy BOOP to determine the occurrence, presentation, treatment, and outcome. Materials and Methods. A systematic literature review was conducted according to the guidelines provided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses report. Results. The literature search yielded 10 Japanese epidemiological reports with 129 women, 4 case series reports with 36 women, and 24 case reports with 34 women. Common symptoms included fever, cough, and shortness of breath. Most patients received corticosteroid therapy, and duration of treatment ranged from 6 months to 1 year, although some patients received steroids for longer than 1 year because of relapse, which occurred in approximately one half of patients. No deaths have been reported. Conclusion. BOOP is a rare but significant complication from radiation therapy for breast cancer. Chest radiographic studies for women who report new respiratory symptoms during the postradiation period can be beneficial for early diagnosis and for guiding appropriate management. PMID:25361622

  16. Acetoin catabolic system of Klebsiella pneumoniae CG43: sequence, expression, and organization of the aco operon.

    PubMed Central

    Deng, W L; Chang, H Y; Peng, H L

    1994-01-01

    A cosmid clone which was capable of depleting acetoin in vivo was isolated from a library of Klebsiella pneumoniae CG43 cosmids. The smallest functional subclone contained a 3.9-kb DNA fragment of the cosmid clone. Sequencing of the DNA fragment revealed three open reading frames (ORFs A, B, and C) encoding polypeptides of 34, 36, and 52 kDa, respectively. The presence of these proteins was demonstrated by expression of the recombinant DNA clone in Escherichia coli. Considerable similarities between the deduced amino acid sequences of the ORFs and those of the following enzymes were found: acetoin dissimilation enzymes, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex, and branched-chain 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complex of various origins. Activities of these enzymes, including acetoin-dependent dichlorophenolin-dohenol oxidoreductase and dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase, were detected in the extracts of E. coli harboring the genes encoding products of the three ORFs. Although not required for acetoin depletion in vivo, a possible fourth ORF (ORF D), located 39 nucleotides downstream of ORF C, was also identified. The deduced N-terminal sequence of the ORF D product was highly homologous to the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases of several organisms. Primer extension analysis identified the transcriptional start of the operon as an A residue 72 nucleotides upstream of ORF A. Images PMID:8206829

  17. Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia in Swine Associated with Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ching-Chang; Lee, Yen-Feng; Lin, Nai-Nu; Wu, Chieh-Liang; Tung, Kwong-Chung; Chiu, Yung-Tsung

    2011-01-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) is a chronic respiratory disease. Although the pathogenesis of BOOP is still incompletely understood, BOOP is responsive to steroids and has a good prognosis. In our five pigs with chronic postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), typical BOOP lesions were revealed. All five porcine lungs showed typical intraluminal plugs, and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) was identified. They also exhibited similar pathologic findings such as proliferation of type II pneumocytes and myofibroblasts (MFBs), extracellular collagen matrix (ECM) deposition, and fragmentation of elastic fibers. MFBs migration correlative molecules, for instance, gelatinase A, B and osteopontin, appeared strongly in the progressing marginal area of polypoid intraluminal plugs of fibrotic lesion. These molecules colocalized with the active MFBs. Both gelatinase activity and intercellular level of active MFBs were significantly increased (P < .05). Porcine chronic bronchopneumonia leads to BOOP and it is associated with PCV2 persistent infection. Swine BOOP demonstrates similar cellular constituents with human BOOP. Perhaps their molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis operate in a similar way. Thus we infer that the swine BOOP can be considered as a potential animal model for human BOOP associated with natural viral infection. Moreover, it is more convenient to obtain samples. PMID:20976305

  18. Organizing Pneumonia in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: A Case-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Shunsuke; Koga, Yukinori; Sugimoto, Mineharu

    2015-01-01

    We treated 21 patients with organizing pneumonia (OP) associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or related to biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) at our institution between 2006 and 2014. Among these cases, 3 (14.3%) preceded articular symptoms of RA, 4 (19.0%) developed simultaneously with RA onset, and 14 (66.7%) occurred during follow-up periods for RA. In the case of OP preceding RA, increased levels of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies and rheumatoid factor were observed at the OP onset. RA disease activity was related to the development of OP in the simultaneous cases. In the cases of OP developing after RA diagnosis, 10 of 14 patients had maintained low disease activity with biological DMARD therapy at the OP onset, and among them, 6 patients developed OP within the first year of this therapy. In the remaining four patients, RA activity was not controlled at the OP onset. All patients responded well to systemic steroid therapy, but two patients suffered from relapses of articular and pulmonary symptoms upon steroid tapering. In most of the RA patients, DMARD therapy was introduced or restarted during the steroid tapering. We successfully restarted a biological DMARD that had not been previously used for patients whose RA would otherwise have been difficult to control. In this study, we also perform a review of the literature on RA-associated or biological DMARD-related OP and discuss the pathogenesis and management of OP occurring in RA patients. PMID:26543387

  19. Selection of focal earthworm species as non-target soil organisms for environmental risk assessment of genetically modified plants.

    PubMed

    van Capelle, Christine; Schrader, Stefan; Arpaia, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    By means of a literature survey, earthworm species of significant relevance for soil functions in different biogeographical regions of Europe (Atlantic, Boreal, Mediterranean) were identified. These focal earthworm species, defined here according to the EFSA Guidance Document on the environmental risk assessment (ERA) of genetically modified plants, are typical for arable soils under crop rotations with maize and/or potatoes within the three regions represented by Ireland, Sweden and Spain, respectively. Focal earthworm species were selected following a matrix of four steps: Identification of functional groups, categorization of non-target species, ranking species on ecological criteria, and final selection of focal species. They are recommended as appropriate non-target organisms to assess environmental risks of genetically modified (GM) crops; in this case maize and potatoes. In total, 44 literature sources on earthworms in arable cropping systems including maize or potato from Ireland, Sweden and Spain were collected, which present information on species diversity, individual density and specific relevance for soil functions. By means of condensed literature data, those species were identified which (i) play an important functional role in respective soil systems, (ii) are well adapted to the biogeographical regions, (iii) are expected to occur in high abundances under cultivation of maize or potato and (iv) fulfill the requirements for an ERA test system based on life-history traits. First, primary and secondary decomposers were identified as functional groups being exposed to the GM crops. In a second step, anecic and endogeic species were categorized as potential species. In step three, eight anecic and endogeic earthworm species belonging to the family Lumbricidae were ranked as relevant species: Aporrectodea caliginosa, Aporrectodea rosea, Aporrectodea longa, Allolobophora chlorotica, Lumbricus terrestris, Lumbricus friendi, Octodrilus complanatus and

  20. Radiation-induced organizing pneumonia after stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung tumor

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Satoru; Nomoto, Yoshihito; Yamashita, Yasufumi; Murashima, Shuuichi; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Kurobe, Yusuke; Toyomasu, Yutaka; Kawamura, Tomoko; Takada, Akinori; II, Noriko

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate characteristics of organizing pneumonia (OP) after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumor. Between September 2010 and June 2014, patients who were diagnosed as Stage I lung cancer and treated with SBRT at our institution were included in this study. A total of 78 patients (47 males with a median age of 80 years) were analyzed. The median follow-up period was 23 months. Five patients (6.4%) developed OP at 6–18 months after SBRT. The cumulative incidence of OP was 4.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–11.0) and 8.2% (95% CI, 2.9–17.0) at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Tumor location (superior and middle lobe vs inferior lobe) was shown to be a borderline significant factor for the occurrence of OP (P = 0.069). In the subgroup analysis of patients with a radiographic follow-up period at least 6 months, or who died within 6 months after SBRT, 7 of 72 patients (9.7%) developed Grade 2 or 3 radiation pneumonitis (G2/3 RP) at 2–4 months after SBRT. A statistically significant association between G2/3 RP in the subacute phase and OP was shown (P = 0.040). In two of the five patients who developed OP, the symptoms and radiographic change were improved rapidly by corticosteroid administration. One patient had relapsed OP after suspending the treatment and re-administration was required. Three patients with minor symptoms were managed without corticosteroid administration and OP resolved without any relapse. The radiation-induced OP should be considered as one of the late lung injuries after SBRT for lung tumors. PMID:26338993

  1. Rattus model utilizing selective pulmonary ischemia induces bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Densmore, John C; Jeziorczak, Paul M; Clough, Anne V; Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Cummens, Breana; Medhora, Meetha; Rao, Arjun; Jacobs, Elizabeth R

    2013-03-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP), a morbid condition when associated with lung transplant and chronic lung disease, is believed to be a complication of ischemia. Our goal was to develop a simple and reliable model of lung ischemia in the Sprague-Dawley rat that would produce BOOP. Unilateral ischemia without airway occlusion was produced by an occlusive slipknot placed around the left main pulmonary artery. Studies were performed 7 days later. Relative pulmonary and systemic flow to each lung was measured by injection of technetium Tc 99m macroaggregated albumin. Histological sections were examined for structure and necrosis and scored for BOOP. Apoptosis was detected by immunohistochemistry with an antibody against cleaved caspase 3. Pulmonary artery blood flow to left lungs was less than 0.1% of the cardiac output, and bronchial artery circulation was ∼2% of aortic artery flow. Histological sections from ischemic left lungs consistently showed Masson bodies, inflammation, and young fibroblasts filling the distal airways and alveoli, consistent with BOOP. In quantitative evaluation of BOOP using epithelial changes, inflammation and fibrosis were higher in ischemic left lungs than right or sham-operated left lungs. Apoptosis was increased in areas exhibiting histological BOOP, but there was no histological evidence of necrosis. Toll-like receptor 4 expression was increased in ischemic left lungs over right. An occlusive slipknot around the main left pulmonary artery in rats produces BOOP, providing direct evidence that ischemia without immunomodulation or coinfection is sufficient to initiate this injury. It also affords an excellent model to study signaling and genetic mechanisms underlying BOOP. PMID:23364425

  2. Pneumonia - weakened immune system

    MedlinePlus

    ... immunocompromised host." Related conditions include: Hospital-acquired pneumonia Pneumocystis jirovecii (previously called Pneumocystis carinii) pneumonia Pneumonia - cytomegalovirus Pneumonia ...

  3. [Chest radiograph of atypical pneumonia: comparison among Chlamydia pneumoniae. Pneumonia, ornithosis, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Itoh, I; Ishida, T; Hashimoto, T; Arita, M; Osawa, M; Tachibana, H; Nishiyama, H; Takakura, S; Bando, K; Nishizawa, Y; Amitani, R; Onishi, H; Taguchi, Y

    2000-11-01

    No report has been found comparing Chlamydia pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae) pneumonia radiographically with other atypical pneumonias, Chlamydia psittaci (C. psittaci) pneumonia and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) pneumonia. We described the chest radiographs of three kinds of pneumonia cases: 46 cases of C. pneumoniae pneumonia, 39 cases of C. psittaci pneumonia, and 131 cases of M. pneumoniae pneumonia. Radiographic shadows were categorized into main shadows and sub-shadows. The main shadows are classified from the viewpoint of the characteristics; air space consolidation(AS), ground-glass opacity(GG), reticular shadow(RS), bronchopneumonia(BP), and small nodular shadows (SN). The size, the site, and the number of the main shadows were also analyzed. In comparison among the three pneumonias, BP was the most frequent in M. pneumoniae pneumonia (0.40/case). AS predominated in C. pneumoniae pneumonia (0.67/case), and GG in C. psittaci pneumonia (0.62/case). The number of main shadows was equal, about 1.4/case in three pneumonias. Large shadows were less frequent in M. pneumoniae pneumonia than C. pneumoniae pneumonia (p = 0.02) and C. psittaci pneumonia (p = 0.01). Main shadows were more frequent in the outer zone in M. pneumoniae pneumonia than C. psittaci pneumonia (p = 0.01), and in the middle zone in C. psittaci pneumonia than in M. pneumoniae pneumonia (p = 0.02). Cases with bilateral main shadows were less common in M. pneumoniae pneumonia (9%) than C. pneumoniae pneumonia(33%, p = 0.001) and C. psittaci pneumonia(30%, p = 0.005). Thickening of bronchovascular bundles as a sub-shadow was most frequently noted in M. pneumoniae pneumonia. Some differences among the three atypical pneumonias were seen in the chest radiograph. However, no specific findings of C. pneumoniae pneumonia were shown radiographically in this study. PMID:11140079

  4. [Nosocomial pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Díaz, Emili; Martín-Loeches, Ignacio; Vallés, Jordi

    2013-12-01

    The hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP) is one of the most common infections acquired among hospitalised patients. Within the HAP, the ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common nosocomial infection complication among patients with acute respiratory failure. The VAP and HAP are associated with increased mortality and increased hospital costs. The rise in HAP due to antibiotic-resistant bacteria also causes an increase in the incidence of inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy, with an associated increased risk of hospital mortality. It is very important to know the most common organisms responsible for these infections in each hospital and each Intensive Care Unit, as well as their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, in order to reduce the incidence of inappropriate antibiotic therapy and improve the prognosis of patients. Additionally, clinical strategies aimed at the prevention of HAP and VAP should be employed in hospital settings caring for patients at risk for these infections. PMID:23827827

  5. Molecular Identification of Tritrichomonas foetus-Like Organisms as Coinfecting Agents of Human Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Duboucher, Christophe; Caby, Stéphanie; Dufernez, Fabienne; Chabé, Magali; Gantois, Nausicaa; Delgado-Viscogliosi, Pilar; Billy, Christophe; Barré, Eric; Torabi, Edith; Capron, Monique; Pierce, Raymond J.; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Viscogliosi, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Trichomonads closely related to the bovid parasite Tritrichomonas foetus were identified in the bronchoalveolar lavage sample from a patient with AIDS in association with Pneumocystis pneumonia. This human case of T. foetus-like infection emphasizes the zoonotic potential of trichomonads, although the existence of a human-host-adapted T. foetus strain cannot be excluded. PMID:16517921

  6. Vimentin contributes to epithelial-mesenchymal transition cancer cell mechanics by mediating cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion maturation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ching-Yi; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Tang, Ming-Jer; Wang, Yang-Kao

    2015-01-01

    Modulations of cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion turnover correlate to tumorigenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), the latter process accompanied by the loss of epithelial markers and the gain of mesenchymal markers (e.g., vimentin). Clinical microarray results demonstrated that increased levels of vimentin mRNA after chemotherapy correlated to a poor prognosis of breast cancer patients. We hypothesized that vimentin mediated the reorganization of cytoskeletons to maintain the mechanical integrity in EMT cancer cells. By using knockdown strategy, the results showed reduced cell proliferation, impaired wound healing, loss of directional migration, and increased large membrane extension in MDA-MB 231 cells. Vimentin depletion also induced reorganization of cytoskeletons and reduced focal adhesions, which resulted in impaired mechanical strength because of reduced cell stiffness and contractile force. In addition, overexpressing vimentin in MCF7 cells increased cell stiffness, elevated cell motility and directional migration, reoriented microtubule polarity, and increased EMT phenotypes due to the increased β1-integrin and the loss of junction protein E-cadherin. The EMT-related transcription factor slug was also mediated by vimentin. The current study demonstrated that vimentin serves as a regulator to maintain intracellular mechanical homeostasis by mediating cytoskeleton architecture and the balance of cell force generation in EMT cancer cells. PMID:25965826

  7. Pneumonia in the immunocompetent patient

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, J H; Mcdonald, G; Alton, H; Gordon, S B

    2010-01-01

    Pneumonia is an acute inflammation of the lower respiratory tract. Lower respiratory tract infection is a major cause of mortality worldwide. Pneumonia is most common at the extremes of life. Predisposing factors in children include an under-developed immune system together with other factors, such as malnutrition and over-crowding. In adults, tobacco smoking is the single most important preventable risk factor. The commonest infecting organisms in children are respiratory viruses and Streptoccocus pneumoniae. In adults, pneumonia can be broadly classified, on the basis of chest radiographic appearance, into lobar pneumonia, bronchopneumonia and pneumonia producing an interstitial pattern. Lobar pneumonia is most commonly associated with community acquired pneumonia, bronchopneumonia with hospital acquired infection and an interstitial pattern with the so called atypical pneumonias, which can be caused by viruses or organisms such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Most cases of pneumonia can be managed with chest radiographs as the only form of imaging, but CT can detect pneumonia not visible on the chest radiograph and may be of value, particularly in the hospital setting. Complications of pneumonia include pleural effusion, empyema and lung abscess. The chest radiograph may initially indicate an effusion but ultrasound is more sensitive, allows characterisation in some cases and can guide catheter placement for drainage. CT can also be used to characterise and estimate the extent of pleural disease. Most lung abscesses respond to medical therapy, with surgery and image guided catheter drainage serving as options for those cases who do not respond. PMID:21088086

  8. Pneumonia in the immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, J H; McDonald, G; Alton, H; Gordon, S B

    2010-12-01

    Pneumonia is an acute inflammation of the lower respiratory tract. Lower respiratory tract infection is a major cause of mortality worldwide. Pneumonia is most common at the extremes of life. Predisposing factors in children include an under-developed immune system together with other factors, such as malnutrition and over-crowding. In adults, tobacco smoking is the single most important preventable risk factor. The commonest infecting organisms in children are respiratory viruses and Streptoccocus pneumoniae. In adults, pneumonia can be broadly classified, on the basis of chest radiographic appearance, into lobar pneumonia, bronchopneumonia and pneumonia producing an interstitial pattern. Lobar pneumonia is most commonly associated with community acquired pneumonia, bronchopneumonia with hospital acquired infection and an interstitial pattern with the so called atypical pneumonias, which can be caused by viruses or organisms such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Most cases of pneumonia can be managed with chest radiographs as the only form of imaging, but CT can detect pneumonia not visible on the chest radiograph and may be of value, particularly in the hospital setting. Complications of pneumonia include pleural effusion, empyema and lung abscess. The chest radiograph may initially indicate an effusion but ultrasound is more sensitive, allows characterisation in some cases and can guide catheter placement for drainage. CT can also be used to characterise and estimate the extent of pleural disease. Most lung abscesses respond to medical therapy, with surgery and image guided catheter drainage serving as options for those cases who do not respond. PMID:21088086

  9. Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Infections of Adults and Children

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, James D.; Welliver, Robert C.

    1976-01-01

    Although the hallmark of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection is pneumonia, the organism is also responsible for a protean array of other symptoms. With an increased awareness of the board clinical spectrum of M. pneumoniae disease and the ready availability of the cold agglutinin and M. pneumoniae complement-fixation tests, interested clinicians will note additional clinical-mycoplasmal associations in their patients. PMID:782043

  10. Comparative organization of nitrogen fixation-specific genes from Azotobacter vinelandii and Klebsiella pneumoniae: DNA sequence of the nifUSV genes.

    PubMed Central

    Beynon, J; Ally, A; Cannon, M; Cannon, F; Jacobson, M; Cash, V; Dean, D

    1987-01-01

    In the facultative anaerobe Klebsiella pneumoniae 17 nitrogen fixation-specific genes (nif genes) have been identified. Homologs to 12 of these genes have now been isolated from the aerobic diazotroph Azotobacter vinelandii. Comparative studies have indicated that these diverse microorganisms share striking similarities in the genetic organization of their nif genes and in the primary structure of their individual nif gene products. In this study the complete nucleotide sequence of the nifUSV gene clusters from both K. pneumoniae and A. vinelandii were determined. These genes are identically organized on their respective genomes, and the individual genes and their products exhibit a high degree of interspecies sequence homology. PMID:3040672

  11. Rothia mucilaginosa Pneumonia Diagnosed by Quantitative Cultures and Intracellular Organisms of Bronchoalveolar Lavage in a Lymphoma Patient

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun-Jung; Sung, Heungsup; Park, Sook-Ja; Lee, Sang-Oh

    2013-01-01

    Rothia mucilaginosa is a gram-positive coccus of the family Micrococcaceae. R. mucilaginosa is considered a part of the normal flora of the human oropharynx and upper respiratory tract and lower respiratory tract infections attributable to R. mucilaginosa are not frequent. We present a case of pneumonia, in which the R. mucilaginosa infection was diagnosed by quantitative cultures of a bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimen. A 46-yr-old woman with B lymphoblastic lymphoma was admitted to the hospital for scheduled chemotherapy. Her chest computed tomography (CT) scan revealed bilateral multifocal nodular and patchy consolidation in both lungs. Investigation of the BAL specimen revealed that 7% of leukocytes had intracellular gram-positive cocci. The quantitative cultures of the BAL specimen grew mucoid, non-hemolytic, and grayish convex colonies on blood agar at a count of approximately 200,000 colony-forming units/mL. The colonies were identified as R. mucilaginosa. The patient was empirically treated with levofloxacin for 7 days, after which findings on the chest radiograph and CT scan improved. She was discharged with improvement on hospital day 46. To our knowledge, this is the first report of R. mucilaginosa pneumonia diagnosed in Korea. Quantitative culture of BAL specimen and examination of intracellular organisms are crucial for assessing the clinical significance of R. mucilaginosa recovered from the lower respiratory tract. PMID:23483615

  12. Mycoplasma pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000082.htm Mycoplasma pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Mycoplasma pneumonia is an infection of the lungs by the ...

  13. Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia as an Initial Presentation of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Rare Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hung-Ping; Chen, Chun-Ming; Chen, Yih-Yuan; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) remains controversial. While it has been reportedly associated with several connective tissue disorders, there are only rare reports of BOOP associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Herein, we report a 56-year-old female patient who presented with dyspnea on exertion, cough, fever, and joint pain of her left wrist and fingers as initial symptoms. Laboratory tests revealed positivity for anti-nuclear antibody, anti-Ro, and anti-double strand DNA antibody. In this case, the patient with SLE had respiratory illness as the initial symptom due to BOOP in the absence of clear etiology. The diagnosis of BOOP was confirmed by thoracic surgery biopsy. Her respiratory symptoms and radiologic findings significantly improved following prednisolone treatment. PMID:27200095

  14. Implementation of World Health Organization Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses (IMCI) Guidelines for the Assessment of Pneumonia in the Under 5s in Rural Malawi.

    PubMed

    Kalu, Ngozi; Lufesi, Norman; Havens, Deborah; Mortimer, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The Cooking and Pneumonia Study (CAPS) is a pragmatic cluster-level randomized controlled trial of the effect of an advanced cookstove intervention on pneumonia in children under the age of 5 years (under 5s) in Malawi (www.capstudy.org). The primary outcome of the trial is the incidence of pneumonia during a two-year follow-up period, as diagnosed by healthcare providers who are using the World Health Organization (WHO) integrated management of childhood illnesses (IMCI) pneumonia assessment protocol and who are blinded to the trial arms. We evaluated the quality of pneumonia assessment in under 5s in this setting via a cross-sectional study of provider-patient encounters at nine outpatient clinics located within the catchment area of 150 village-level clusters enrolled in the trial across the two study locations of Chikhwawa and Karonga, Malawi, between May and June 2015 using the IMCI guidelines as a benchmark. Data were collected using a key equipment checklist, an IMCI pneumonia knowledge test, and a clinical evaluation checklist. The median number of key equipment items available was 6 (range 4 to 7) out of a possible 7. The median score on the IMCI pneumonia knowledge test among 23 clinicians was 75% (range 60% to 89%). Among a total of 176 consultations performed by 15 clinicians, a median of 9 (range 3 to 13) out of 13 clinical evaluation tasks were performed. Overall, the clinicians were adequately equipped for the assessment of sick children, had good knowledge of the IMCI guidelines, and conducted largely thorough clinical evaluations. We recommend the simple pragmatic approach to quality assurance described herein for similar studies conducted in challenging research settings. PMID:27187773

  15. Implementation of World Health Organization Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses (IMCI) Guidelines for the Assessment of Pneumonia in the Under 5s in Rural Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Kalu, Ngozi; Lufesi, Norman; Havens, Deborah; Mortimer, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The Cooking and Pneumonia Study (CAPS) is a pragmatic cluster-level randomized controlled trial of the effect of an advanced cookstove intervention on pneumonia in children under the age of 5 years (under 5s) in Malawi (www.capstudy.org). The primary outcome of the trial is the incidence of pneumonia during a two-year follow-up period, as diagnosed by healthcare providers who are using the World Health Organization (WHO) integrated management of childhood illnesses (IMCI) pneumonia assessment protocol and who are blinded to the trial arms. We evaluated the quality of pneumonia assessment in under 5s in this setting via a cross-sectional study of provider-patient encounters at nine outpatient clinics located within the catchment area of 150 village-level clusters enrolled in the trial across the two study locations of Chikhwawa and Karonga, Malawi, between May and June 2015 using the IMCI guidelines as a benchmark. Data were collected using a key equipment checklist, an IMCI pneumonia knowledge test, and a clinical evaluation checklist. The median number of key equipment items available was 6 (range 4 to 7) out of a possible 7. The median score on the IMCI pneumonia knowledge test among 23 clinicians was 75% (range 60% to 89%). Among a total of 176 consultations performed by 15 clinicians, a median of 9 (range 3 to 13) out of 13 clinical evaluation tasks were performed. Overall, the clinicians were adequately equipped for the assessment of sick children, had good knowledge of the IMCI guidelines, and conducted largely thorough clinical evaluations. We recommend the simple pragmatic approach to quality assurance described herein for similar studies conducted in challenging research settings. PMID:27187773

  16. Expression and organization of basement membranes and focal adhesion proteins in pregnant myometrium is regulated by uterine stretch.

    PubMed

    Shynlova, Oksana; Chow, Michelle; Lye, Stephen J

    2009-10-01

    The mechanisms underlying the preparation of the uterus for labor are not fully understood. We have previously found a significant increase in the expression of messenger RNA (mRNAs) encoding extracellular basement membrane (BM) proteins of the smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in late pregnant rat myometrium. At term, the myometrium is stretched by growing fetuses and these mechanical signals are transmitted from extracellular matrix into SMCs through focal adhesions (FA). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of gravidity on the expression and spatiotemporal distribution of major BM proteins, laminin-gamma2 and collagen IV, as well as typical FA constituents, vinculin and paxillin, in the myometrium during gestation and parturition, using a unilaterally pregnant rat model. We found that the expression of laminin-gamma2 and collagen IV proteins increased significantly with gestational age (P < .05) and was dependent on gravidity whereas vinculin and paxillin proteins were not affected. Near term, BM proteins from gravid horn myometrium demonstrated increased extracellular immunostaining and major rearrangement from sporadic protein distribution to organized, continuous, and regular structures surrounding the plasma membrane of each myocyte. Examination of FA proteins revealed that paxillin was translocated from the cytoplasm to the cell periphery, while vinculin was sequestered specifically to FAs. At labor, BM and FA proteins, organized in similar bead-like structures, were localized on opposing sides of SMC plasma membrane into 2 different compartments. We suggest that these stretch-induced changes facilitate formation of stable cell-matrix adhesions and provide the molecular basis for optimal force transduction during labor contractions. PMID:19602722

  17. The D,D-carboxypeptidase PBP3 organizes the division process of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Morlot, Cécile; Noirclerc-Savoye, Marjolaine; Zapun, André; Dideberg, Otto; Vernet, Thierry

    2004-03-01

    Bacterial division requires the co-ordination of membrane invagination, driven by the constriction of the FtsZ-ring, and concomitant cell wall synthesis, performed by the high-molecular-weight penicillin-binding proteins (HMW PBPs). Using immunofluorescence techniques, we show in Streptococcus pneumoniae that this co-ordination requires PBP3, a D,D-carboxypeptidase that degrades the substrate of the HMW PBPs. In a mutant deprived of PBP3, the apparent rings of HMW PBPs and that of FtsZ are no longer co-localized. In wild-type cells, PBP3 is absent at the future division site and present over the rest of the cell surface, implying that the localization of the HMW PBPs at mid-cell depends on the availability of their substrate. FtsW, a putative translocase of the substrate of the PBPs, forms an apparent ring that is co-localized with the septal HMW PBPs throughout the cell cycle of wild-type cells. In particular, the constriction of the FtsW-ring occurs after that of the FtsZ-ring, with the same delay as the constriction of the septal PBP-rings. However, in the absence of PBP3, FtsW remains co-localized with FtsZ in contrast to the HMW PBPs. Our work reveals an unexpected complexity in the relationships between the division proteins. The consequences of the absence of PBP3 indicate that the peptidoglycan composition is central to the co-ordination of the division process. PMID:15009891

  18. Viral pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Pneumonia - viral; "Walking pneumonia" - viral Images Lungs Respiratory system References Lee FE, Treanor J. Viral infections. In: Mason RJ, VC Broaddus, Martin TR, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel’s Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2010: ...

  19. Risk factors of Pneumocystis pneumonia in solid organ recipients in the era of the common use of posttransplantation prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Iriart, X; Challan Belval, T; Fillaux, J; Esposito, L; Lavergne, R-A; Cardeau-Desangles, I; Roques, O; Del Bello, A; Cointault, O; Lavayssière, L; Chauvin, P; Menard, S; Magnaval, J-F; Cassaing, S; Rostaing, L; Kamar, N; Berry, A

    2015-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients becomes rare in the immediate posttransplantation period thanks to generalized prophylaxis. We aimed to identify the predictive factors for PCP in the era of universal prophylaxis and to propose a strategy for preventing PCP beyond the first year after transplantation. In a retrospective case-control study, 33 SOT cases with PCP diagnosed between 2004 and 2010 were matched with two controls each to identify risk factors for PCP by uni- and multivariate analysis. All the patients benefited from 6 months of posttransplantation trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis. Most PCP in SOT patients occurred during the second year posttransplantation (33%). By univariate analysis, age, nonuse of tacrolimus, total and CD4 lymphocyte counts, gamma-globulin concentration and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection appeared to be PCP risk factors. In the final multivariate analysis, age (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 3.7, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.3-10.4), CMV infection (OR: 5.2, 95% CI: 1.8-14.7) and total lymphocyte count (OR: 3.9, 95% CI: 1.4-10.7) were found to be independently associated with PCP. The second year posttransplantation appeared to be the new period of highest risk of PCP. Age, CMV viremia and lymphocytes were the most pertinent predictive criteria to evaluate the risk of PCP in clinical practice. PMID:25496195

  20. Chlamydia pneumoniae (TWAR).

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, C C; Jackson, L A; Campbell, L A; Grayston, J T

    1995-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (TWAR) is a recently recognized third species of the genus Chlamydia that causes acute respiratory disease. It is distinct from the other two chlamydial species that infect humans, C. trachomatis and C. psittaci, in elementary body morphology and shares less than 10% of the DNA homology with those species. The organism has a global distribution, with infection most common among children between the ages of 5 and 14 years. In children, TWAR infection is usually mild or asymptomatic, but it may be more severe in adults. Pneumonia and bronchitis are the most common clinical manifestations of infection, and TWAR is responsible for approximately 10% of cases of pneumonia and 5% of cases of bronchitis in the United States. The microimmunofluorescence serologic assay is specific for TWAR and can distinguish between recent and past infections. The organism can be isolated in cell culture; however, PCR techniques have recently facilitated its detection in tissues and clinical specimens. PMID:8665464

  1. Hydrocarbon pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumonia - hydrocarbon ... Coughing Fever Shortness of breath Smell of a hydrocarbon product on the breath Stupor (decreased level of ... Most children who drink or inhale hydrocarbon products and develop ... hydrocarbons may lead to rapid respiratory failure and death.

  2. Viral pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    More serious infections can result in respiratory failure, liver failure, and heart failure. Sometimes, bacterial infections occur during or just after viral pneumonia, which may lead to more serious forms ...

  3. Analysis of Factors Associated With Radiation-Induced Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia Syndrome After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Norihisa Sato, Shuhei; Katsui, Kuniaki; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Tsuda, Toshihide; Yoshida, Atsushi; Morito, Tsuneharu; Nakagawa, Tomio; Mizuta, Akifumi; Waki, Takahiro; Niiya, Harutaka; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate factors associated with radiation-induced bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) syndrome after breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 702 women with breast cancer who received radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery at seven institutions between July 1995 and December 2006 were analyzed. In all patients, the whole breast was irradiated with two tangential photon beams. The criteria used for the diagnosis of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome were as follows: (1) radiotherapy to the breast within 12 months, (2) general and/or respiratory symptoms lasting for {>=}2 weeks, (3) radiographs showing lung infiltration outside the radiation port, and (4) no evidence of a specific cause. Results: Radiation-induced BOOP syndrome was seen in 16 patients (2.3%). Eleven patients (68.8%) were administered steroids. The duration of steroid administration ranged from 1 week to 3.7 years (median, 1.1 years). Multivariate analysis revealed that age ({>=}50 years; odds ratio [OR] 8.88; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.16-67.76; p = 0.04) and concurrent endocrine therapy (OR 3.05; 95% CI 1.09-8.54; p = 0.03) were significantly associated with BOOP syndrome. Of the 161 patients whose age was {>=}50 years and who received concurrent endocrine therapy, 10 (6.2%) developed BOOP syndrome. Conclusions: Age ({>=}50 years) and concurrent endocrine therapy can promote the development of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome after breast-conserving therapy. Physicians should carefully follow patients who received breast-conserving therapy, especially those who are older than 50 years and received concurrent endocrine therapy during radiotherapy.

  4. A Survey of Radiation-Induced Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia Syndrome After Breast-Conserving Therapy in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Ogo, Etsuyo Komaki, Ritsuko; Fujimoto, Kiminori; Uchida, Masafumi; Abe, Toshi; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Mitsumori, Michihide; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: We observed a rare and unique occurrence of radiation-induced pulmonary injury outside the tangential field for early breast cancer treatment. The findings appeared to be idiopathic and were called radiation-induced bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) syndrome. We surveyed major hospitals in Japan to review their findings of radiation-induced BOOP, in particular the clinical and pictorial characteristics of the entity. Methods and Materials: We reviewed surveys completed and returned by 20 institutions. The survey responses were based on a total of 37 cases of BOOP syndrome. We also reviewed X-ray and computed tomography scans provided by these institutions. We discussed the information derived from the questionnaire and analyzed patients' characteristics, methods used in the treatment of BOOP syndrome, and prognosis. Results: The incidence of the radiation-induced BOOP syndrome was about 1.8% (37 of 2,056). We did not find a relationship between the characteristics of patients and the occurrence of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome. The pulmonary findings were classified into four patterns on chest computed tomography scans. Progression of the pulmonary lesions observed on chest X-ray was classified into three patterns. Pneumonitis appeared within 6 months after radiotherapy was completed and disappeared within 6-12 months after its onset. At 5-year follow-up, 2 patients had died, 1 of breast cancer and the other of interstitial pneumonitis, which seemed to be idiopathic and unrelated to the radiation-induced BOOP syndrome. Conclusions: Although the incidence of BOOP syndrome and its associated prognosis are not significant, the patients' clinical condition must be carefully followed.

  5. [A case of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia: diagnostic utility of bronchoalveolar lavage and CT scan].

    PubMed

    Hyakudo, T; Yoshii, C; Nikaido, Y; Yokosaki, Y; Nagata, N; Nakata, H; Kido, M

    1994-08-01

    A 54-year-old female was admitted to our hospital because of abnormal shadows on chest X-ray at annual checkup. She complained of dyspnea on exertion. Chest X-ray findings showed an increase in density at the bilateral lower lung fields and unclearness of the silhouette of the heart and the diaphragm. CT scan findings revealed irregular opacities of various density with many small cystic changes and air bronchograms and air bronchiolograms. The pulmonary function test showed restrictive ventilatory disturbance and reduced diffusing capacity. BALF findings revealed an increase in the total cell count, an increase in the percentage of lymphocytes and a decrease in the OKT4+/OKT8+ ratio. TBLB specimen showed infiltration of mononuclear cells in alveolar septa and organizing exudate in alveolar ducts. These findings suggested a diagnosis of BOOP rather than IPF, and an open lung biopsy was performed. Open lung biopsy specimen showed obstructive bronchiolitis with polypoid granulation tissue and thickening of alveolar septa with infiltration of mononuclear cells, and she was diagnosed as having BOOP. She responded well to corticosteroid and is free from any abnormalities on chest X-ray, CT scan and pulmonary function test at present. Analysis of BALF and CT scan findings are useful for the differential diagnosis of BOOP and IPF. PMID:7807756

  6. How Is Pneumonia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pneumonia Treated? Treatment for pneumonia depends on the type ... can go back to their normal routines. Bacterial Pneumonia Bacterial pneumonia is treated with medicines called antibiotics. ...

  7. Carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Deresinski, Stan

    2014-01-01

    The continuing emergence of infections due to multidrug resistant bacteria is a serious public health problem. Klebsiella pneumoniae, which commonly acquires resistance encoded on mobile genetic elements, including ones that encode carbapenemases, is a prime example. K. pneumoniae carrying such genetic material, including both blaKPC and genes encoding metallo-β-lactamases, have spread globally. Many carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae are resistant to multiple antibiotic classes beyond β-lactams, including tetracyclines, aminoglycosides, and fluoroquinolones. The optimal treatment, if any, for infections due to these organisms is unclear but, paradoxically, appears to often require the inclusion of an optimally administered carbapenem. PMID:25343037

  8. [Aspiration pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Almirall, Jordi; Cabré, Mateu; Clavé, Pere

    2007-09-29

    The incidence and the prevalence of aspiration pneumonia (AP) in the community is poorly defined. It increases in direct relation with age and underlying diseases. The pathogenesis of AP presumes the contribution of risk factors that alter swallowing funtion and predispose the orofaringe and gastric region to bacterial colonization. The microbial etiology of AP involves Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae for community-acquired aspiration pneumonia and Gram-negative aerobic bacilli in nosocomial pneumonia. It is worth bearing in mind the relative unimportance of anaerobic bacterias in AP. When we choose the empirical antibiotic treatmentant we have to consider some pathogens identified in orofaríngea flora. Empirical treatment with antianaerobics should only be used in certain patients. Videofluoroscopic swallowing studies should be used to determine the nature and extent of any swallow disorder and to rule out silent aspiration. Assessment of swallowing disorders is cost-effective and results in a significant reduction in overall morbidity and mortality. PMID:17927938

  9. Fungal diagnostics in pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lease, Erika D; Alexander, Barbara D

    2011-12-01

    Fungal pneumonia is increasingly common, particularly in highly immunosuppressed patients, such as solid organ or hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, and the diagnosis is evolving. Although standard techniques such as microscopy and culture remain the mainstays of diagnosis, relatively recent advances in serological and molecular testing are important additions to the field. This article reviews the laboratory tools used to diagnose fungal respiratory disease. PMID:22167394

  10. Fungal Diagnostics in Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Lease, Erika D.; Alexander, Barbara D.

    2014-01-01

    Fungal pneumonia is increasingly common, particularly in highly immunosuppressed patients, such as solid organ or hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, and the diagnosis is evolving. While standard techniques such as microscopy and culture remain the mainstay of diagnosis, relatively recent advances in serologic and molecular testing are important additions to the field. This chapter will review the laboratory tools used to diagnose fungal respiratory disease. PMID:22167394

  11. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Gram-negative organisms isolated from patients hospitalised with pneumonia in US and European hospitals: results from the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program, 2009-2012.

    PubMed

    Sader, Helio S; Farrell, David J; Flamm, Robert K; Jones, Ronald N

    2014-04-01

    Here we evaluated the frequency of occurrence and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Gram-negative bacteria isolated from patients hospitalised with pneumonia in medical centres in the USA (n=28) and Europe and the Mediterranean region (EMR) (n=25) in 2009-2012. Susceptibility testing was performed by reference broth microdilution methods. Overall, 12851 isolates were collected (6873/5978 in USA/EMR). The same top 11 organisms were observed in both geographic regions, but in different rank orders, and Gram-negative organisms represented 61.5/76.1% of strains in USA/EMR. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most frequently isolated Gram-negative organism in both regions (20.9/20.9% of cases in USA/EMR) and showed reduced susceptibility to most antimicrobials tested, including ceftazidime (79.6/68.7% susceptibility in USA/EMR), meropenem (76.3/65.8%) and piperacillin/tazobactam (72.9/63.9%). Klebsiella spp. was isolated from 9.7/11.6% of cases and showed extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) phenotype rates of 19.5/35.1% in USA/EMR. Meropenem and amikacin were active against 62.3/78.7% and 60.8/85.2% of ESBL phenotype Klebsiella spp. from USA/EMR, respectively. Enterobacter spp. ranked fourth in the USA (5.9%) and sixth in EMR (5.5%), whereas Escherichia coli ranked fifth in the USA (5.5%) and third in EMR (11.8%). Acinetobacter spp. and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia combined were isolated from 8.0/10.7% of cases in USA/EMR. A significant increase in P. aeruginosa susceptibility to meropenem and a significant decrease in gentamicin susceptibility among Klebsiella spp. were noted in EMR. These results confirm that very few agents remain broadly active against the most frequently isolated Gram-negative organisms from patients with pneumonia in US and EMR medical centres. PMID:24630306

  12. Photometabolic production of hydrogen from organic substrates by free and immobilized mixed cultures of rhodospirillum rubrum and klebsiella pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Weetall, H.H.; Sharma, B.P.; Detar, C.C.

    1981-03-01

    A culture of R. rubrum cells apparently contaminated with K. pneumoniae were immobilized by entrapment in agar. This system was used as a model for hydrogen production by photometabolic means. Observed results indicated that the contaminant exerted a major influence on the observed results. This preparation, when immobilized and used in a specifically designed reactor with glucose substrate, showed operational half-lives of approximately 1000 hr. The feasibility of using this ''mixed'' culture for producing hydrogen from acid hydrolyzed cellulose and wood sawdust was also examined. 5 refs.

  13. Pathology of Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias

    PubMed Central

    Hashisako, Mikiko; Fukuoka, Junya

    2015-01-01

    The updated classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) in 2013 by American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society included several important revisions to the categories described in the 2002 classification. In the updated classification, lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP) was moved from major to rare IIPs, pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (PPFE) was newly included in the rare IIPs, acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) and interstitial pneumonias with a bronchiolocentric distribution are recognized as rare histologic patterns, and unclassifiable IIP (UCIP) was classified as an IIP. However, recent reports indicate the areas of concern that may require further evaluation. Here, we describe the histopathologic features of the updated IIPs and their rare histologic patterns and also point out some of the issues to be considered in this context. PMID:26949346

  14. How Is Pneumonia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pneumonia Diagnosed? Pneumonia can be hard to diagnose because it may ... than these other conditions. Your doctor will diagnose pneumonia based on your medical history, a physical exam, ...

  15. What Is Pneumonia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia (nu-MO-ne-ah) is an infection in ... such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi—can cause pneumonia. The infection inflames your lungs' air sacs, which ...

  16. Pneumonia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... kids under 6 years old. Take your child's temperature at least once each morning and each evening, ... Respiratory System Croup Fever and Taking Your Child's Temperature Influenza (Flu) Walking Pneumonia Word! Pneumonia Pneumonia Hib ...

  17. Klebsiella pneumoniae Flocculation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, T. L.; Taylor, K. A.; Thompson, A. P.; Younger, J. G.

    2011-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae is a cause of community- and hospital-acquired lung, urinary tract, and blood stream infections. A common contaminant of indwelling catheters, it is theorized that a common infection pathway for this organism is via shedding of aggregates off of biofilm colonies. In an effort to better understand bacterial proliferation in the host bloodstream, we develop a PDE model for the flocculation dynamics of Klebsiella pneumoniae in suspension. Existence and uniqueness results are provided, as well as a brief description of the numerical approximation scheme. We generate artificial data and illustrate the requirements to accurately identify proliferation, aggregation, and fragmentation of flocs in the experimental domain of interest. PMID:18071828

  18. [THREE CASES OF DRUG-INDUCED PNEUMONIA CAUSED BY MESALAZINE].

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Norimichi; Yokomura, Koshi; Nozue, Tsuyoshi; Abe, Takefumi; Matsui, Takashi; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-12-01

    We report three cases of drug-induced pneumonia caused by mesalazine. They were all diagnosed as ulcerative colitis and treated with mesalazine orally. Our three cases and literature review revealed that mesalazine-induced pneumonia resemble like eosinophilic pneumonia or organizing pneumonia and that have good prognosis with drug cessation or administration of corticosteroid. The patient of ulcerative colitis is increasing every year and it is anticipated that the patient with mesalazine-induced pneumonia may also increase. In the treatment of ulcerative colitis with mesalazine, we should pay attention with patient's cough or fever for early detection of drug-induced pneumonia. PMID:26727138

  19. Healthcare-associated Pneumonia and Aspiration Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Komiya, Kosaku; Ishii, Hiroshi; Kadota, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) is a new concept of pneumonia proposed by the American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America in 2005. This category is located between community-acquired pneumonia and hospital-acquired pneumonia with respect to the characteristics of the causative pathogens and mortality, and primarily targets elderly patients in healthcare facilities. Aspiration among such patients is recognized to be a primary mechanism for the development of pneumonia, particularly since the HCAP guidelines were published. However, it is difficult to manage patients with aspiration pneumonia because the definition of the condition is unclear, and the treatment is associated with ethical aspects. This review focused on the definition, prevalence and role of aspiration pneumonia as a prognostic factor in published studies of HCAP and attempted to identify problems associated with the concept of aspiration pneumonia. PMID:25657850

  20. Standard method for detecting upper respiratory carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae: updated recommendations from the World Health Organization Pneumococcal Carriage Working Group.

    PubMed

    Satzke, Catherine; Turner, Paul; Virolainen-Julkunen, Anni; Adrian, Peter V; Antonio, Martin; Hare, Kim M; Henao-Restrepo, Ana Maria; Leach, Amanda J; Klugman, Keith P; Porter, Barbara D; Sá-Leão, Raquel; Scott, J Anthony; Nohynek, Hanna; O'Brien, Katherine L

    2013-12-17

    In 2003 the World Health Organization (WHO) convened a working group and published a set of standard methods for studies measuring nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus). The working group recently reconvened under the auspices of the WHO and updated the consensus standard methods. These methods describe the collection, transport and storage of nasopharyngeal samples, as well as provide recommendations for the identification and serotyping of pneumococci using culture and non-culture based approaches. We outline the consensus position of the working group, the evidence supporting this position, areas worthy of future research, and the epidemiological role of carriage studies. Adherence to these methods will reduce variability in the conduct of pneumococcal carriage studies undertaken in the context of pneumococcal vaccine trials, implementation studies, and epidemiology studies more generally so variability in methodology does not confound the interpretation of study findings. PMID:24331112

  1. sup 111 In-labeled nonspecific immunoglobulin scanning in the detection of focal infection

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, R.H.; Fischman, A.J.; Callahan, R.J.; Khaw, B.A.; Keech, F.; Ahmad, M.; Wilkinson, R.; Strauss, H.W. )

    1989-10-05

    We performed radionuclide scanning after the intravenous injection of human IgG labeled with indium-111 in 128 patients with suspected focal sites of inflammation. Localization of 111In-labeled IgG correlated with clinical findings in 51 infected patients (21 with abdominal or pelvic infections, 11 with intravascular infections, 7 with pulmonary infections, and 12 with skeletal infections). Infecting organisms included gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, Pneumocystis carinii, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Candida albicans. No focal localization of 111In-labeled IgG was observed in 63 patients without infection. There were five false negative results, and nine results were unusable. Serial scans were carried out in eight patients: continued localization correctly predicted relapse in six, and the absence of localization indicated resolution in two. To determine whether 111In-labeled IgG localization was specific for inflammation, we studied 16 patients with cancer. Focal localization occurred in 13 of these patients (5 with melanomas, 5 with gynecologic cancers, and 1 each with lymphoma, prostate cancer, and malignant fibrous histiocytoma). No localization was seen in patients with renal or colon cancer or metastatic medullary carcinoma of the thyroid. We conclude that 111In-labeled IgG imaging is effective for the detection of focal infection and that serial scans may be useful in assessing therapeutic efficacy. This technique may also be helpful in the evaluation of certain cancers.

  2. Risk factors for clinical mastitis, ketosis, and pneumonia in dairy cattle on organic and small conventional farms in the United States.

    PubMed

    Richert, R M; Cicconi, K M; Gamroth, M J; Schukken, Y H; Stiglbauer, K E; Ruegg, P L

    2013-07-01

    The US regulations for production of organic milk include a strict prohibition against the use of antimicrobials and other synthetic substances. The effect of these regulations on dairy animal health has not been previously reported. The objective of this study was to characterize disease detection and identify risk factors for selected diseases on organic (ORG) and similarly sized conventional (CON) farms. Dairy herds (n=292) were enrolled across 3 states (New York, Oregon, Wisconsin) with CON herds matched to ORG herds based on location and herd size. During a single herd visit, information was collected about herd management practices and animal disease occurring in the previous 60 d, and paperwork was left for recording disease occurrences during 60 d after the visit. For analysis, CON herds were further divided into grazing and nongrazing. Poisson regression models were used to assess risk factors for rate of farmer-identified and recorded cases of clinical mastitis, ketosis, and pneumonia. An increased rate of farmer-identified and recorded cases of clinical mastitis was associated with use of CON management, use of forestripping, presence of contagious pathogens in the bulk tank culture, proactive detection of mastitis in postpartum cows, and stall barn housing. An increased rate of farmer-identified and recorded cases of ketosis was associated with having a more sensitive definition of ketosis, using stall barn housing, and feeding a greater amount of concentrates. An increased rate of farmer-identified and recorded cases of pneumonia was associated with a lack of grazing, small or medium herd size, and Jersey as the predominant breed. Overall, disease definitions and perceptions were similar among grazing systems and were associated with the rate of farmer-identified and recorded cases of disease. PMID:23684015

  3. Coxiella burnetii pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Marrie, T J

    2003-04-01

    This report reviews the pulmonary and extrapulmonary manifestation of infections due to Coxiella burnetii. Q fever, a zoonosis, is due to infection with C. burnetii. This spore-forming microorganism is a small gram-negative coccobacillus that is an obligate intracellular parasite. The most common animal reservoirs are goats, cattle, sheep, cats, and occasionally dogs. The organism reaches high concentrations in the placenta of infected animals. Aerosolisation occurs at the time of parturition and infection follows inhalation of this aerosol. There are three distinct clinical syndromes of the acute form of the illness: nonspecific febrile illness, pneumonia, and hepatitis. The chronic form of Q fever is almost always endocarditis, but occasionally it is manifest as hepatitis, osteomyelitis or endovascular infection. The pneumonic form of the illness can range from very mild-to-severe pneumonia requiring assisted ventilation. Multiple round opacities are a common finding on chest radiography. Treatment with doxycycline or a fluoroquinolone is preferred. Susceptibility to macrolides is variable. In conclusion, Coxiella burnetii pneumonia should be considered when there is a suitable exposure history and when outbreaks of a pneumonic illness are being investigated. PMID:12762362

  4. Bronchoscopic diagnosis of pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Baselski, V S; Wunderink, R G

    1994-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections are characterized by significant morbidity and mortality but also by a relative inability to establish a specific etiologic agent on clinical grounds alone. With the recognized shortcomings of expectorated or aspirated secretions toward establishing an etiologic diagnosis, clinicians have increasingly used bronchoscopy to obtain diagnostic samples. A variety of specimen types may be obtained, including bronchial washes or brushes, protected specimen brushings, bronchoalveolar lavage, and transbronchial biopsies. Bronchoscopy has been applied in three primary clinical settings, including the immunocompromised host, especially human immunodeficiency virus-infected and organ transplant patients; ventilator-associated pneumonia; and severe, nonresolving community- or hospital-acquired pneumonia in nonventilated patients. In each clinical setting, and for each specimen type, specific laboratory protocols are required to provide maximal information. These protocols should provide for the use of a variety of rapid microscopic and quantitative culture techniques and the use of a variety of specific stains and selective culture to detect unusual organism groups. PMID:7834604

  5. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia induce distinct host responses

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Kevin W.; McDunn, Jonathan E.; Clark, Andrew T.; Dunne, W. Michael; Dixon, David J.; Turnbull, Isaiah R.; DiPasco, Peter J.; Osberghaus, William F.; Sherman, Benjamin; Martin, James R.; Walter, Michael J.; Cobb, J. Perren; Buchman, Timothy G.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Pathogens that cause pneumonia may be treated in a targeted fashion by antibiotics, but if this therapy fails, treatment involves only non-specific supportive measures, independent of the inciting infection. The purpose of this study was to determine whether host response is similar following disparate infections with similar mortalities. Design Prospective, randomized controlled study. Setting Animal laboratory in a university medical center. Interventions Pneumonia was induced in FVB/N mice by either Streptococcus pneumoniae or two different concentrations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from septic animals was assayed by a microarray immunoassay measuring 18 inflammatory mediators at multiple timepoints. Measurements and Main Results The host response was dependent upon the causative organism as well as kinetics of mortality, but the pro- and anti- inflammatory response was independent of inoculum concentration or degree of bacteremia. Pneumonia caused by different concentrations of the same bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, also yielded distinct inflammatory responses; however, inflammatory mediator expression did not directly track the severity of infection. For all infections, the host response was compartmentalized, with markedly different concentrations of inflammatory mediators in the systemic circulation and the lungs. Hierarchical clustering analysis resulted in the identification of 5 distinct clusters of the host response to bacterial infection. Principal components analysis correlated pulmonary MIP-2 and IL-10 with progression of infection while elevated plasma TNFsr2 and MCP-1 were indicative of fulminant disease with >90% mortality within 48 hours. Conclusions Septic mice have distinct local and systemic responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Targeting specific host inflammatory responses induced by distinct bacterial infections could represent a potential therapeutic

  6. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumocystis pneumonia can be life threatening, causing respiratory failure that can lead to death. People with this condition need early and effective treatment. For moderate to severe pneumocystis pneumonia in people with ...

  7. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000146.htm Hospital-acquired pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hospital-acquired pneumonia is an infection of the lungs ...

  8. Pneumonia - weakened immune system

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000093.htm Pneumonia - weakened immune system To use the sharing features on this page, ... fighting off infection because of problems with the immune system. This type of disease is called "pneumonia in ...

  9. Pneumonia - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    You have pneumonia, which is an infection in your lungs. In the hospital, your doctors and nurses helped you breathe better. ... body get rid of the germs that cause pneumonia. They also made sure you got enough liquids ...

  10. Pneumonia - children - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000011.htm Pneumonia in children - discharge To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Your child has pneumonia, which is an infection in the lungs. In ...

  11. Pneumonia - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000017.htm Pneumonia in adults - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You have pneumonia, which is an infection in your lungs. In ...

  12. Studies of an outbreak of Corynebacterium equi pneumonia in foals.

    PubMed

    Smith, B P; Robinson, R C

    1981-10-01

    Five out of 6 foals between 2 and 4 months old, on a ranch in northern California, developed pneumonia within a 3 week period in June and July 1978. Corynebacterium equi was recovered from each of the 5 foals by transtracheal aspiration. Clinical signs were variable but included increased respiratory rate, fever, cough, nasal discharge, harsh airway sounds over middle sized airways and wheezing over small airways. Cyanosis was present in the most severely affected foal. Radiographic findings included diffusely increased interstitial and peribronchial densities, areas of consolidation and, in 3 cases, dense focal areas indicating abscessation. Foals were treated with several different antimicrobial agents. Most were treated with penicillin and gentamicin. Four of the 5 affected foals recovered within 2 to 3 weeks but the first foal to be affected died 2 days after first receiving veterinary attention. At postmortem examination, pulmonary changes considered typical of C equi pneumonia were found, including wet, heavy dark red lungs which failed to collapse and numerous 1 to 7 cm thin-walled abscesses throughout the parenchyma, containing inspissated exudate. C equi was cultured from the exudate. Samples of soil and dust from 9 of 20 areas inhabited by infected foals yielded C equi of the same serological group as found in the foals. Eight paddocks in which foals had not been kept were negative for C equi. The organism was recovered from cobwebs in the stalls occupied by infected foals. Aerosol infection via dust was considered to be the route of infection. Pharyngeal, vaginal and faecal cultures from the dams of 3 affected foals were negative for C equi. Early diagnosis by transtracheal aspiration and appropriate therapy are considered to be extremely important in the successful treatment of C equi pneumonia. Preventive therapy should include control of environmental dust. PMID:7318800

  13. Beamlet focal plane diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Caird, J.A.; Nielsen, N.D.; Patton, H.G.; Seppala, L.G.; Thompson, C.E.; Wegner, P.J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes the major optical and mechanical design features of the Beamlet Focal Plane Diagnostic system as well as measurements of the system performance, and typical data obtained to date. We also discuss the NIF requirements on the focal spot that we are interested in measuring, and some of our plans for future work using this system.

  14. Ultrasound in Rheumatologic Interstitial Lung Disease: A Case Report of Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Laria, A; Lurati, A; Scarpellini, M

    2015-01-01

    According to the American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society consensus classification, idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) include several clinic-radiologic-pathologic entities: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, acute interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated ILD, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and lymphoid interstitial pneumonia. Ultrasound Lung Comets (ULCs) are an echographic chest-sonography hallmark of pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. We describe the ultrasound (US) findings in the follow-up of a NSIP's case in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). PMID:26240772

  15. Pneumocystis Pneumonia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Pneumocystis Pneumonia KidsHealth > For Parents > Pneumocystis Pneumonia Print A A A Text Size What's in ... article? About PCP Diagnosing PCP Treating PCP Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) is an infection caused by Pneumocystis jiroveci , ...

  16. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Serves a Protective Role during Klebsiella pneumoniae - Induced Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Achouiti, Ahmed; de Vos, Alex F; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Florquin, Sandrine; Tanck, Michael W; Nawroth, Peter P; Bierhaus, Angelika; van der Poll, Tom; van Zoelen, Marieke A D

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella species is the second most commonly isolated gram-negative organism in sepsis and a frequent causative pathogen in pneumonia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is expressed on different cell types and plays a key role in diverse inflammatory responses. We here aimed to investigate the role of RAGE in the host response to Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae pneumonia and intransally inoculated rage gene deficient (RAGE-/-) and normal wild-type (Wt) mice with K. pneumoniae. Klebsiella pneumonia resulted in an increased pulmonary expression of RAGE. Furthermore, the high-affinity RAGE ligand high mobility group box-1 was upregulated during K. pneumoniae pneumonia. RAGE deficiency impaired host defense as reflected by a worsened survival, increased bacterial outgrowth and dissemination in RAGE-/- mice. RAGE-/- neutrophils showed a diminished phagocytosing capacity of live K. pneumoniae in vitro. Relative to Wt mice, RAGE-/- mice demonstrated similar lung inflammation, and slightly elevated-if any-cytokine and chemokine levels and unchanged hepatocellular injury. In addition, RAGE-/- mice displayed an unaltered response to intranasally instilled Klebsiella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with respect to pulmonary cell recruitment and local release of cytokines and chemokines. These data suggest that (endogenous) RAGE protects against K. pneumoniae pneumonia. Also, they demonstrate that RAGE contributes to an effective antibacterial defense during K. pneumoniae pneumonia, at least partly via its participation in the phagocytic properties of professional granulocytes. Additionally, our results indicate that RAGE is not essential for the induction of a local and systemic inflammatory response to either intact Klebsiella or Klebsiella LPS. PMID:26824892

  17. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Serves a Protective Role during Klebsiella pneumoniae - Induced Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Achouiti, Ahmed; de Vos, Alex F.; van ‘t Veer, Cornelis; Florquin, Sandrine; Tanck, Michael W.; Nawroth, Peter P.; Bierhaus, Angelika; van der Poll, Tom; van Zoelen, Marieke A. D.

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella species is the second most commonly isolated gram-negative organism in sepsis and a frequent causative pathogen in pneumonia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is expressed on different cell types and plays a key role in diverse inflammatory responses. We here aimed to investigate the role of RAGE in the host response to Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae pneumonia and intransally inoculated rage gene deficient (RAGE-/-) and normal wild-type (Wt) mice with K. pneumoniae. Klebsiella pneumonia resulted in an increased pulmonary expression of RAGE. Furthermore, the high-affinity RAGE ligand high mobility group box-1 was upregulated during K. pneumoniae pneumonia. RAGE deficiency impaired host defense as reflected by a worsened survival, increased bacterial outgrowth and dissemination in RAGE-/- mice. RAGE-/- neutrophils showed a diminished phagocytosing capacity of live K. pneumoniae in vitro. Relative to Wt mice, RAGE-/- mice demonstrated similar lung inflammation, and slightly elevated—if any—cytokine and chemokine levels and unchanged hepatocellular injury. In addition, RAGE-/- mice displayed an unaltered response to intranasally instilled Klebsiella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with respect to pulmonary cell recruitment and local release of cytokines and chemokines. These data suggest that (endogenous) RAGE protects against K. pneumoniae pneumonia. Also, they demonstrate that RAGE contributes to an effective antibacterial defense during K. pneumoniae pneumonia, at least partly via its participation in the phagocytic properties of professional granulocytes. Additionally, our results indicate that RAGE is not essential for the induction of a local and systemic inflammatory response to either intact Klebsiella or Klebsiella LPS. PMID:26824892

  18. Chitinases in Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Leah R.; Kottom, Theodore J.

    2014-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia remains an important complication of immune suppression. The cell wall of Pneumocystis has been demonstrated to potently stimulate host inflammatory responses, with most studies focusing on β-glucan components of the Pneumocystis cell wall. In the current study, we have elaborated the potential role of chitins and chitinases in Pneumocystis pneumonia. We demonstrated differential host mammalian chitinase expression during Pneumocystis pneumonia. We further characterized a chitin synthase gene in Pneumocystis carinii termed Pcchs5, a gene with considerable homolog to the fungal chitin biosynthesis protein Chs5. We also observed the impact of chitinase digestion on Pneumocystis-induced host inflammatory responses by measuring TNFα release and mammalian chitinase expression by cultured lung epithelial and macrophage cells stimulated with Pneumocystis cell wall isolates in the presence and absence of exogenous chitinase digestion. These findings provide evidence supporting a chitin biosynthetic pathway in Pneumocystis organisms and that chitinases modulate inflammatory responses in lung cells. We further demonstrate lung expression of chitinase molecules during Pneumocystis pneumonia. PMID:22535444

  19. Focal neurological deficits

    MedlinePlus

    A focal neurologic deficit is a problem with nerve, spinal cord, or brain function. It affects a specific ... of the back, neck, or head Electromyogram (EMG)/ nerve conduction velocities (NCV) MRI of the back, neck, or head Spinal tap

  20. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff RB, ... 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 67. ...

  1. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  2. Focal vibration in neurorehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Murillo, N; Valls-Sole, J; Vidal, J; Opisso, E; Medina, J; Kumru, H

    2014-04-01

    During the last decade, many studies have been carried out to understand the effects of focal vibratory stimuli at various levels of the central nervous system and to study pathophysiological mechanisms of neurological disorders as well as the therapeutic effects of focal vibration in neurorehabilitation. This review aimed to describe the effects of focal vibratory stimuli in neurorehabilitation including the neurological diseases or disorders like stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's' disease and dystonia. In conclusion, focal vibration stimulation is well tolerated, effective and easy to use, and it could be used to reduce spasticity, to promote motor activity and motor learning within a functional activity, even in gait training, independent from etiology of neurological pathology. Further studies are needed in the future well-designed trials with bigger sample size to determine the most effective frequency, amplitude and duration of vibration application in the neurorehabilitation. PMID:24842220

  3. Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia: IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TGF- β1 Serum Concentrations and Response to Clarithromycin Treatment.

    PubMed

    Radzikowska, E; Roży, A; Jaguś, P; Wiatr, E; Gawryluk, D; Chorostowska-Wynimko, J; Roszkowski-Śliż, K

    2016-01-01

    Cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP) is a distinct clinicopathological entity with unknown etiology. Inflammatory cytokines play a role in the development of the disease. The present study was performed to assess the correlation between concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TGF-β1 in the serum with response to clarithromycin (CAM) treatment in patients with COP. A total of 39 patients with COP were enrolled in to this study. An oral dose of 500 mg CAM was administered to all of the patients twice daily for 3 months. A complete response was noticed in 31 (80 %) of patients, and 8 (20 %) patients failed to respond to treatment. The concentration of cytokines were assessed by ELISAs before and after treatment. CAM treatment was associated with decreases in serum IL-6 (3.8 pg/mL [IQR 0.9-11.8] vs. 1.1 pg/mL [IQR 0.2-3.1]; p = 0.004), IL-8 (13.6 pg/mL [IQR 9.8-17.5] vs. 8.1 pg/mL [IQR 6.2-13.2]; p = 0.004), and TGF-β1 (37.1 ng/mL [IQR 31.7-46.2] vs. 25.7 ng/mL [IQR 22-41.7];p = 0.0001), which was particularly notable in the responders. We conclude that IL-6, IL-8, and TGF-β1 may play a role in the pathogenesis of COP, as their decreased concentrations were associated with a positive response to CAM treatment. PMID:26987326

  4. Predictors of hospital surface contamination with Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae: patient and organism factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of the hospital environment in transmission of ESBL-Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL-KP) and ESBL-Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC) is poorly defined. Recent data however suggest that in the hospital setting, ESBL-KP is more transmissible than ESBL-EC. We sought therefore to measure the difference in hospital contamination rates between the two species and to identify key risk factors for contamination of the hospital environment with these organisms. Methods We systematically sampled 8 surfaces in the rooms and bathrooms of adult patients colonized or infected with ESBL-EC or ESBL-KP throughout their hospital stay. Data were collected on factors potentially affecting contamination rates. Environmental contamination was defined as recovery of an ESBL-producing organism matching the source patient’s isolate. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed at the level of the patient visit using generalized estimating equations to identify independent predictors of environmental contamination. Results 24 patients (11 with ESBL-KP, 11 ESBL-EC and 2 with both organisms) had 1104 swabs collected during 138 visits. The overall contamination rate was 3.4% (38/1104) and was significantly higher for ESBL-KP than ESBL-EC (5.4% versus 0.4%; p < 0.0001). After multivariate analysis, environmental contamination was found to be negatively associated with carbapenem exposure (OR 0.06 [95% CI 0.01-0.61]; p = 0.017) and positively associated with the presence of an indwelling urinary catheter (OR 6.12 [95% CI 1.23-30.37]; p = 0.027) and ESBL-KP in the source patient (OR 26.23 [95% CI 2.70-254.67]; p = 0.005). Conclusions Contamination of the hospital environment with ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) is inversely associated with carbapenem exposure. Predictors of hospital contamination with ESBL-E include: indwelling urinary catheters and ESBL-KP. Rooms of patients with ESBL-KP have substantially higher contamination rates than those with

  5. Pathogenesis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae: An update.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, R; Ghosh, A; Chandolia, A

    2016-01-01

    Genus Mycoplasma, belonging to the class Mollicutes, encompasses unique lifeforms comprising of a small genome of 8,00,000 base pairs and the inability to produce a cell wall under any circumstances. Mycoplasma pneumoniae is the most common pathogenic species infecting humans. It is an atypical respiratory bacteria causing community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children and adults of all ages. Although atypical pneumonia caused by M. pneumoniae can be managed in outpatient settings, complications affecting multiple organ systems can lead to hospitalization in vulnerable population. M. pneumoniae infection has also been associated with chronic lung disease and bronchial asthma. With the advent of molecular methods of diagnosis and genetic, immunological and ultrastructural assays that study infectious disease pathogenesis at subcellular level, newer virulence factors of M. pneumoniae have been recognized by researchers. Structure of the attachment organelle of the organism, that mediates the crucial initial step of cytadherence to respiratory tract epithelium through complex interaction between different adhesins and accessory adhesion proteins, has been decoded. Several subsequent virulence mechanisms like intracellular localization, direct cytotoxicity and activation of the inflammatory cascade through toll-like receptors (TLRs) leading to inflammatory cytokine mediated tissue injury, have also been demonstrated to play an essential role in pathogenesis. The most significant update in the knowledge of pathogenesis has been the discovery of Community-Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome toxin (CARDS toxin) of M. pneumoniae and its ability of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) ribosylation and inflammosome activation, thus initiating airway inflammation. Advances have also been made in terms of the different pathways behind the genesis of extrapulmonary complications. This article aims to comprehensively review the recent advances in the knowledge of pathogenesis of this

  6. Annexin A6 contributes to the invasiveness of breast carcinoma cells by influencing the organization and localization of functional focal adhesions

    SciTech Connect

    Sakwe, Amos M.; Koumangoye, Rainelli; Guillory, Bobby; Ochieng, Josiah

    2011-04-01

    The interaction of annexin A6 (AnxA6) with membrane phospholipids and either specific extracellular matrix (ECM) components or F-actin suggests that it may influence cellular processes associated with rapid plasma membrane reorganization such as cell adhesion and motility. Here, we examined the putative roles of AnxA6 in adhesion-related cellular processes that contribute to breast cancer progression. We show that breast cancer cells secrete annexins via the exosomal pathway and that the secreted annexins are predominantly cell surface-associated. Depletion of AnxA6 in the invasive BT-549 breast cancer cells is accompanied by enhanced anchorage-independent cell growth but cell-cell cohesion, cell adhesion/spreading onto collagen type IV or fetuin-A, cell motility and invasiveness were strongly inhibited. To explain the loss in adhesion/motility, we show that vinculin-based focal adhesions in the AnxA6-depleted BT-549 cells are elongated and randomly distributed. These focal contacts are also functionally defective because the activation of focal adhesion kinase and the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt pathway were strongly inhibited while the MAP kinase pathway remained constitutively active. Compared with normal human breast tissues, reduced AnxA6 expression in breast carcinoma tissues correlates with enhanced cell proliferation. Together this suggests that reduced AnxA6 expression contributes to breast cancer progression by promoting the loss of functional cell-cell and/or cell-ECM contacts and anchorage-independent cell proliferation.

  7. The History of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Saraya, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    In the United States in the 1930s, although the pathogen was not known, atypical pneumonia was clinically distinguished from pneumococcal pneumonia by its resistance to sulfonamides. Reimann (1938) reported seven patients with an unusual form of tracheo bronchopneumonia and severe constitutional symptoms. He believed the clinical picture of this disease differed from that of the disease caused by influenza viruses or known bacteria and instead suspected “primary atypical pneumonia.” For many years, the responsible infectious agent was tentatively classified as a filterable virus that could pass through a Seitz filter to remove bacteria and was reported to be a psittacosis-like or new virus. After that, Eaton et al. (1942, 1944, 1945) identified an agent that was the principal cause of primary atypical pneumonia using cotton rats, hamsters, and chick embryos. Eaton et al. (1942, 1944, 1945) did not perform an inoculation study in human volunteers. During the 1940s, there were three groups engaged in discovering the etiology of the primary atypical pneumonia. (1) Commission on Acute Respiratory Diseases Diseases directed by John Dingle, (2) Dr. Monroe Eaton’s group, the Virus Research Laboratory of the California State Public Health Department, (3) The Hospital of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research directed by Horsfall. During 1940s, the members of the Commission on Acute Respiratory Diseases concluded that the bacteria-free filtrates obtained from the patients, presumably containing a virus, could induce primary atypical pneumonia in human volunteers via Pinehurst trials. During 1950s, serological approaches for identification of the Eaton agent developed such as Fluorescent-Stainable Antibody, and at the beginning of the1960s, the Eaton agent successfully grew in media, and finally accepted as a cause of primary atypical pneumonia. Thus, technical difficulties with visualizing the agent and failure to recognize the full significance of the

  8. The History of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Saraya, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    In the United States in the 1930s, although the pathogen was not known, atypical pneumonia was clinically distinguished from pneumococcal pneumonia by its resistance to sulfonamides. Reimann (1938) reported seven patients with an unusual form of tracheo bronchopneumonia and severe constitutional symptoms. He believed the clinical picture of this disease differed from that of the disease caused by influenza viruses or known bacteria and instead suspected "primary atypical pneumonia." For many years, the responsible infectious agent was tentatively classified as a filterable virus that could pass through a Seitz filter to remove bacteria and was reported to be a psittacosis-like or new virus. After that, Eaton et al. (1942, 1944, 1945) identified an agent that was the principal cause of primary atypical pneumonia using cotton rats, hamsters, and chick embryos. Eaton et al. (1942, 1944, 1945) did not perform an inoculation study in human volunteers. During the 1940s, there were three groups engaged in discovering the etiology of the primary atypical pneumonia. (1) Commission on Acute Respiratory Diseases Diseases directed by John Dingle, (2) Dr. Monroe Eaton's group, the Virus Research Laboratory of the California State Public Health Department, (3) The Hospital of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research directed by Horsfall. During 1940s, the members of the Commission on Acute Respiratory Diseases concluded that the bacteria-free filtrates obtained from the patients, presumably containing a virus, could induce primary atypical pneumonia in human volunteers via Pinehurst trials. During 1950s, serological approaches for identification of the Eaton agent developed such as Fluorescent-Stainable Antibody, and at the beginning of the1960s, the Eaton agent successfully grew in media, and finally accepted as a cause of primary atypical pneumonia. Thus, technical difficulties with visualizing the agent and failure to recognize the full significance of the Pinehurst

  9. How Can Pneumonia Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Pneumonia Be Prevented? Pneumonia can be very serious and ... t last as long Fewer serious complications Pneumococcal Pneumonia Vaccine A vaccine is available to prevent pneumococcal ...

  10. HIV Associated Opportunistic Pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Ismail, T; Lee, C

    2011-03-01

    Opportunistic pneumonias are major causes of morbidity and mortality in HIV infected individuals. The majority of new HIV infections in Malaysia are adults aged 20 to 39 years old and many are unaware of their HIV status until they present with an opportunistic infection. HIV associated opportunistic pneumonias can progress rapidly without appropriate therapy. Therefore a proper diagnostic evaluation is vital and prompt empiric treatment of the suspected diagnosis should be commenced while waiting for the results of the diagnostic studies. Tuberculosis, Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) and recurrent bacterial pneumonias are common causes of AIDS-defining diseases and are discussed in this article. PMID:23765154

  11. Persistent Pneumonia in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Kristen; Logan, Latania; Codispoti, Christopher; Jones, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    A 4-month-old boy with past medical history of eczema presented with fever and cough; a chest radiograph showed lung consolidation, and he was initially treated with amoxicillin for presumed community-acquired pneumonia. After several days, his fever persisted. He was also profoundly anemic. Antibiotic coverage was broadened because of the concern for resistant organisms; he began to improve and was discharged from the hospital. However, at 5 months of age, his fever returned, and he continued to demonstrate lung consolidation on chest radiograph. Additionally, he had lost weight and continued to be anemic. Splenic cysts were noted on abdominal ultrasound. He was diagnosed with an unusual etiology for his pneumonia and improved with the appropriate therapy. An underlying immunodeficiency was suspected, but initial testing was nondiagnostic. At 12 months of age, he presented with another infection, and the final diagnosis was made. PMID:26122810

  12. SNAP focal plane

    SciTech Connect

    Lampton, Michael L.; Kim, A.; Akerlof, C.W.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Berkovitz, J.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers Jr., W.C.; Commins, E.D.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.E.; DiGennaro,R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.S.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.E.; Harvey, P.R.; Heetderks, H.D.; Holland, S.E.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.S.; Linder,E.V.; Loken, S.C.; Malina, R.; Massey, R.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.P.; Miquel, R.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto, E.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch,A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-29

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square-degree field sensitive in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. We describe the requirements for the instrument suite and the evolution of the focal plane design to the present concept in which all the instrumentation--visible and near-infrared imagers, spectrograph, and star guiders--share one common focal plane.

  13. Pneumonia in the neutropenic cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Scott E.; Ost, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Pneumonia is the leading cause of death among neutropenic cancer patients, particularly those with acute leukemia. Even with empiric therapy, case fatality rates of neutropenic pneumonias remain unacceptably high. However, recent advances in the management of neutropenic pneumonia offer hope for improved outcomes in the cancer setting. This review summarizes recent literature regarding the clinical presentation, microbiologic trends, diagnostic advances and therapeutic recommendations for cancer-related neutropenic pneumonia. Recent findings While neutropenic patients acquire pathogens both in community or nosocomial settings, patients’ obligate healthcare exposures result in the frequent identification of multidrug resistant bacterial organisms on conventional culture-based assessment of respiratory secretions. Modern molecular techniques, including expanded use of galactomannan testing, have further facilitated identification of fungal pathogens, allowing for aggressive interventions that appear to improve patient outcomes. Multiple interested societies have issued updated guidelines for antibiotic therapy of suspected neutropenic pneumonia. The benefit of antibiotic medications may be further enhanced by agents that promote host responses to infection. Summary Neutropenic cancer patients have numerous potential causes for pulmonary infiltrates and clinical deterioration, with lower respiratory tract infections among the most deadly. Early clinical suspicion, diagnosis and intervention for neutropenic pneumonia provide cancer patients’ best hope for survival. PMID:25784246

  14. Acute and subacute idiopathic interstitial pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Kondoh, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) may have an acute or subacute presentation, or acute exacerbation may occur in a previously subclinical or unrecognized chronic IIP. Acute or subacute IIPs include acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (AE-IPF) and AE-NSIP. Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) including connective tissue disease (CTD) associated ILD, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, drug-induced lung disease and diffuse alveolar haemorrhage need to be differentiated from acute and subacute IIPs. Despite the severe lack of randomized controlled trials for the treatment of acute and subacute IIPs, the mainstream treatment remains corticosteroid therapy. Other potential therapies reported in the literature include corticosteroids and immunosuppression, antibiotics, anticoagulants, neutrophil elastase inhibitor, autoantibody-targeted treatment, antifibrotics and hemoperfusion therapy. With regard to mechanical ventilation, patients in recent studies with acute and subacute IIPs have shown better survival than those in previous studies. Therefore, a careful value-laden decision about the indications for endotracheal intubation should be made for each patient. Noninvasive ventilation may be beneficial to reduce ventilator associated pneumonia. PMID:27123874

  15. [Features of morbidity community-acquired pneumonia among young recruits].

    PubMed

    Serdukov, D U; Gordienko, A V; Kozlov, M S; Mikhailov, A A; Davydov, P A

    2015-10-01

    Were examined 3338 military personnel of the combined training center. 183 of them diagnosed community-acquired pneumonia, in 3155 focal and infiltrative changes in lung tissue were not identified. The analisys of prevalence been made among young recruits of the acute respiratory illness before arriving in part and at the assembly point, foci of chronic infection, smoking, low body weight. 511 military personnel arrived at the training center in the disease state with symptoms of acute respiratory illness. Examined the relationship these risk factor to the development of community-acquired pneumonia in this category of servicemen. PMID:26827502

  16. Diagnosis of nosocomial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Bamberger, D M

    1988-06-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia occurs in 0.6% of hospitalized patients. The usual causative agents are gram-negative bacilli, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and anaerobic bacteria. In immunocompromised hosts, the differential diagnosis also includes fungi, mycobacteria, viruses, Nocardia, and Pneumocystis carinii. Important risk factors for the development of nosocomial pneumonia include prolonged mechanical ventilation, thoracic or upper abdominal surgery, altered mental status, underlying immunosuppression, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and the use of antacids or histamine type 2 blockers. Colonization of the oropharynx and tracheal secretions with gram-negative aerobic bacteria is common in hospitalized patients with or without pneumonia. The diagnosis of nosocomial pneumonia is usually based on the clinical features of dyspnea, cough, fever, purulent sputum production, new pulmonary infiltrates, hypoxemia, and leukocytosis. However, the clinician must recognize that the presence of these features is neither sensitive nor specific in the diagnosis of nosocomial pneumonia. Microbiologic diagnosis is also difficult because blood cultures are usually negative, and cultures of tracheal secretions, although usually sensitive, are not specific. Invasive procedures may prove useful, but most have yet to be studied in large groups of patients with nosocomial pneumonia. PMID:3041515

  17. Ventilator associated pneumonia in major paediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Alan David; Deal, Cailin; Argent, Andrew Charles; Hudson, Donald Anthony; Rode, Heinz

    2014-09-01

    More than three-quarters of deaths related to major burns are a consequence of infection, which is frequently ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP). A retrospective study was performed, over a five-year period, of ventilated children with major burns. 92 patients were included in the study; their mean age was 3.5 years and their mean total body surface area burn was 30%. 62% of the patients sustained flame burns, and 31% scalds. The mean ICU stay was 10.6 days (range 2-61 days) and the mean ventilation time was 8.4 days (range 2-45 days). There were 59 documented episodes of pneumonia in 52 patients with a rate of 30 infections per 1000 ventilator days. Length of ventilation and the presence of inhalational injury correlate with the incidence of VAP. 17.4% of the patients died (n=16); half of these deaths may be attributed directly to pneumonia. Streptococcus pneumonia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumanii and Staphylococcus aureus were the most prominent aetiological organisms. Broncho-alveolar lavage was found to be more specific and sensitive at identifying the organism than other methods. This study highlights the importance of implementing strictly enforced strategies for the prevention, detection and management of pneumonia in the presence of major burns. PMID:24468505

  18. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach. PMID:26186969

  19. Rewritable photochromic focal plane masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Emilio; Bertarelli, Chiara; Bianco, Andrea; Bortoletto, Fabio; Conconi, Paolo; Crimi, Giuseppe; Gallazzi, Maria C.; Giro, Enrico; Lucotti, Andrea; Pernechele, Claudio; Zerbi, Filippo M.; Zerbi, Giuseppe

    2003-02-01

    The application of organic photochromic materials in astronomy is opening new possibilities which we are investigating in order to design innovative devices for future instrumentation. The photochromic property of transparent/opaque transition (although in a limited wavelength range) and the changes in intrinsic refractive index have led our studies to application in astronomic spectrographs, both as focal plane mask (for MOS application) and as dispersive elements (volume phase holographic gratings, VPHG), respectively. In both cases the possibility to write and erase devices with suitable irradiation has revealed a new perspective for non-disposable and fully customizable items for spectroscopy. Pursuing this goal we have synthesized a series of novel photochromic materials belonging to the diarylethenes. They fulfill the requirements of thermal stability and fatigue resistance necessary to build functional devices. Prototypes of high contrast focal plane mask working in the H-alpha spectral region have been manufactured and characterized both in laboratory and with the AFOSC camera at Asiago telescope (1.8 m). A custom writing robot (ARATRO) which, taking imaging frames and with the aid of interactive mask design software and ad hoc control electronics, is able to write MOS masks, has been constructed. The design of the MOS masks allow the fitting in the AFOSC slit wheel. The overall set-up is ready for the sky tests.

  20. Pneumonia - adults (community acquired)

    MedlinePlus

    Ellison RT, Donowitz GR. Acute pneumonia. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015: ...

  1. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... tends to be more serious than other lung infections because: People in the hospital are often very sick and cannot fight off ... prevent pneumonia. Most hospitals have programs to prevent hospital-acquired infections.

  2. Pneumonia - adults (community acquired)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fever , which may be mild or high Shaking chills Shortness of breath (may only occur when you ... or unexplained weight loss Shortness of breath, shaking chills, or persistent fevers Signs of pneumonia and a ...

  3. Escherichia fergusonii Associated with Pneumonia in a Beef Cow

    PubMed Central

    Rimoldi, Guillermo M.; Moeller, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    An adult Angus cow developed hyperthermia, prostration, and respiratory distress, dying 36 hours after the onset of clinical signs. The main finding during postmortem examination was a severe focally extensive pneumonia. Icterus and a chronic mastitis were also noticed. Histologic examination of the lungs detected fibrinonecrotic pneumonia, with large number of oat cells and intralesional Gram-negative bacterial colonies. Samples from lung lesions were collected, and a pure growth of Escherichia fergusonii was obtained. E. fergusonii is a member of Enterobacteriaceae, related to Escherichia coli and Salmonella sp. In veterinary medicine, E. fergusonii has been reported in calves and sheep with clinical cases suggestive of salmonellosis; in a horse and a goat with enteritis and septicemia; and in ostriches with fibrinonecrotic typhlitis. To our knowledge, this report represents the first description of E. fergusonii associated with an acute pneumonia in cattle. PMID:26464912

  4. Escherichia fergusonii Associated with Pneumonia in a Beef Cow.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Guillermo M; Moeller, Robert B

    2013-01-01

    An adult Angus cow developed hyperthermia, prostration, and respiratory distress, dying 36 hours after the onset of clinical signs. The main finding during postmortem examination was a severe focally extensive pneumonia. Icterus and a chronic mastitis were also noticed. Histologic examination of the lungs detected fibrinonecrotic pneumonia, with large number of oat cells and intralesional Gram-negative bacterial colonies. Samples from lung lesions were collected, and a pure growth of Escherichia fergusonii was obtained. E. fergusonii is a member of Enterobacteriaceae, related to Escherichia coli and Salmonella sp. In veterinary medicine, E. fergusonii has been reported in calves and sheep with clinical cases suggestive of salmonellosis; in a horse and a goat with enteritis and septicemia; and in ostriches with fibrinonecrotic typhlitis. To our knowledge, this report represents the first description of E. fergusonii associated with an acute pneumonia in cattle. PMID:26464912

  5. Chronic Klebsiella pneumonia: a rare manifestation of Klebsiella pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Thungtitigul, Poungrat; Suwatanapongched, Thitiporn

    2015-01-01

    K. pneumoniae can present as two forms of community-acquired pneumonia, acute and chronic. Although acute pneumonia may turn into necrotizing pneumonia, which results in a prolonged clinical course, it often has a rapidly progressive clinical course. In contrast, chronic Klebsiella pneumonia runs a protracted indolent course that mimics other chronic pulmonary infections and malignancies. Herein, we present two cases of chronic Klebsiella pneumonia. The diagnosis was made by microorganism identification, as well as absence of other potential causes. Clinical and radiographic findings improved after a prolonged course of antibiotic therapy. PMID:26543615

  6. Fatal pneumonia due to Serratia proteamaculans subsp. quinovora.

    PubMed Central

    Bollet, C; Grimont, P; Gainnier, M; Geissler, A; Sainty, J M; De Micco, P

    1993-01-01

    Serratia proteamaculans subsp. quinovora was isolated from several samples (blood cultures, tracheal aspirates, pleural effusion) from a patient with pneumonia. This is the first clinical isolate and the first documented human infection caused by this organism. PMID:8432835

  7. Focal adhesions in osteoneogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, M.J.P; Dalby, M.J

    2010-01-01

    As materials technology and the field of tissue engineering advances, the role of cellular adhesive mechanisms, in particular the interactions with implantable devices, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. A key tenet of medical device technology is to use the exquisite ability of biological systems to respond to the material surface or chemical stimuli in order to help develop next-generation biomaterials. The focus of this review is on recent studies and developments concerning focal adhesion formation in osteoneogenesis, with an emphasis on the influence of synthetic constructs on integrin mediated cellular adhesion and function. PMID:21287830

  8. Chest CT findings of influenza virus‐associated pneumonia in 12 adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Jiro; Bandoh, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Higa, Futoshi; Tateyama, Masao

    2008-01-01

    Objective  In this study, we describe the chest computed tomography findings of influenza virus‐associated pneumonia in adult patients. Methods  Our retrospective study included 12 adult patients who had proven influenza virus ‐ associated pneumonia. Results  Out of 12 patients, six were diagnosed as having pure influenza virus pneumonia, five as having bronchopneumonia caused by bacteria associated with influenza A infection, and one as having a cryptogenic organizing pneumonia associated with influenza A infection. Conclusion  Radiographic findings of influenza virus pneumonia in adult patients consist of ground‐glass attenuation. Localized patchy consolidations were observed in cases of bronchopneumonia. PMID:19453425

  9. [Healthcare associated pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Ceccato, Adrián; González, Alejandra; Heres, Marcela; Peluffo, Graciela; Monteverde, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare associated pneumonia (HCAP) is a different entity from community-acquired pneumonia and nosocomial pneumonia. There exist several risk factors that lead to it. Different features, severity and pathogens are described and there is controversy about the initial empirical treatment. The aim of this work was to analyze the etiology, clinical characteristics and evolution of the HCAP. It is a prospective and observational study that includes 60 patients; 32 had previous hospitalization during the last 90 days, 9 were under hemodialysis, 12 residents in nursing homes and 7 received outpatient intravenous therapy. The mean age was 63 years and the severity index was high. The most frequent comorbidities were cardiac. The radiological compromise was more than one lobe in 42% of cases and 18% had pleural effusion. Germ isolation was obtained in 30% of patients where the most isolated germ was Streptococcus pneumoniae (9 cases). There was only one case of multidrug-resistance. The mean length hospital stay was 11 days, six patients had complications and mortality was 5%. Complications but not mortality were significantly higher in the group of patients on hemodialysis (p value = 0.011 and 0.056 respectively). The antibiotic-resistance found do not justify a change in the antibiotic treatment commonly used for community acquired pneumonia. PMID:24561835

  10. A Compendium for Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Gretchen L; Kinjo, Takeshi; Fujita, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Historically, atypical pneumonia was a term used to describe an unusual presentation of pneumonia. Currently, it is used to describe the multitude of symptoms juxtaposing the classic symptoms found in cases of pneumococcal pneumonia. Specifically, atypical pneumonia is a syndrome resulting from a relatively common group of pathogens including Chlamydophila sp., and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The incidence of M. pneumoniae pneumonia in adults is less than the burden experienced by children. Transmission rates among families indicate children may act as a reservoir and maintain contagiousness over a long period of time ranging from months to years. In adults, M. pneumoniae typically produces a mild, "walking" pneumonia and is considered to be one of the causes of persistent cough in patients. M. pneumoniae has also been shown to trigger the exacerbation of other lung diseases. It has been repeatedly detected in patients with bronchitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and cystic fibrosis. Recent advances in technology allow for the rapid diagnosis of M. pneumoniae through the use of polymerase chain reaction or rapid antigen tests. With this, more effort has been afforded to identify the causative etiologic agent in all cases of pneumonia. However, previous practices, including the overprescribing of macrolide treatment in China and Japan, have created increased incidence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae. Reports from these countries indicate that >85% of M. pneumoniae pneumonia pediatric cases are macrolide-resistant. Despite its extensively studied past, the smallest bacterial species still inspires some of the largest questions. The developments in microbiology, diagnostic features and techniques, epidemiology, treatment and vaccines, and upper respiratory conditions associated with M. pneumoniae in adult populations are included within this review. PMID:27148202

  11. A Compendium for Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Parrott, Gretchen L.; Kinjo, Takeshi; Fujita, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Historically, atypical pneumonia was a term used to describe an unusual presentation of pneumonia. Currently, it is used to describe the multitude of symptoms juxtaposing the classic symptoms found in cases of pneumococcal pneumonia. Specifically, atypical pneumonia is a syndrome resulting from a relatively common group of pathogens including Chlamydophila sp., and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The incidence of M. pneumoniae pneumonia in adults is less than the burden experienced by children. Transmission rates among families indicate children may act as a reservoir and maintain contagiousness over a long period of time ranging from months to years. In adults, M. pneumoniae typically produces a mild, “walking” pneumonia and is considered to be one of the causes of persistent cough in patients. M. pneumoniae has also been shown to trigger the exacerbation of other lung diseases. It has been repeatedly detected in patients with bronchitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and cystic fibrosis. Recent advances in technology allow for the rapid diagnosis of M. pneumoniae through the use of polymerase chain reaction or rapid antigen tests. With this, more effort has been afforded to identify the causative etiologic agent in all cases of pneumonia. However, previous practices, including the overprescribing of macrolide treatment in China and Japan, have created increased incidence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae. Reports from these countries indicate that >85% of M. pneumoniae pneumonia pediatric cases are macrolide-resistant. Despite its extensively studied past, the smallest bacterial species still inspires some of the largest questions. The developments in microbiology, diagnostic features and techniques, epidemiology, treatment and vaccines, and upper respiratory conditions associated with M. pneumoniae in adult populations are included within this review. PMID:27148202

  12. Lung dendritic cells facilitate extrapulmonary bacterial dissemination during pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Rosendahl, Alva; Bergmann, Simone; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Goldmann, Oliver; Medina, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of bacterial pneumonia worldwide. Given the critical role of dendritic cells (DCs) in regulating and modulating the immune response to pathogens, we investigated here the role of DCs in S. pneumoniae lung infections. Using a well-established transgenic mouse line which allows the conditional transient depletion of DCs, we showed that ablation of DCs resulted in enhanced resistance to intranasal challenge with S. pneumoniae. DCs-depleted mice exhibited delayed bacterial systemic dissemination, significantly reduced bacterial loads in the infected organs and lower levels of serum inflammatory mediators than non-depleted animals. The increased resistance of DCs-depleted mice to S. pneumoniae was associated with a better capacity to restrict pneumococci extrapulmonary dissemination. Furthermore, we demonstrated that S. pneumoniae disseminated from the lungs into the regional lymph nodes in a cell-independent manner and that this direct way of dissemination was much more efficient in the presence of DCs. We also provide evidence that S. pneumoniae induces expression and activation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in cultured bone marrow-derived DCs. MMP-9 is a protease involved in the breakdown of extracellular matrix proteins and is critical for DC trafficking across extracellular matrix and basement membranes during the migration from the periphery to the lymph nodes. MMP-9 was also significantly up-regulated in the lungs of mice after intranasal infection with S. pneumoniae. Notably, the expression levels of MMP-9 in the infected lungs were significantly decreased after depletion of DCs suggesting the involvement of DCs in MMP-9 production during pneumococcal pneumonia. Thus, we propose that S. pneumoniae can exploit the DC-derived proteolysis to open tissue barriers thereby facilitating its own dissemination from the local site of infection. PMID:23802100

  13. Vaccinating welders against pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Keith T; Cosgrove, Martin P

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2011 the Department of Health in England recommended that welders should each receive a single dose of the 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PPV23). This review assesses the evidence behind the advice and its practical implications. Method The review was informed by a systematic search in Medline, which related pneumonia to welding and/or exposure to metal fume, and was supplemented using the personal libraries of the authors. Findings There is consistent evidence that welders die more often of pneumonia, especially lobar pneumonia, are hospitalised more often with lobar and pneumococcal pneumonia, and more often develop invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). It is estimated that one case of IPD may be prevented over a 10-year period by vaccinating 588 welders against pneumococcal infection. Conclusions A good case exists that employers should offer PPV23 vaccination to welders and other employees exposed to metal fume. Additionally, reasonable measures must be taken to minimise exposure to welding fume and welders should be encouraged not to smoke. PMID:22764269

  14. Lipoid pneumonia: an overview.

    PubMed

    Hadda, Vijay; Khilnani, Gopi C

    2010-12-01

    Lipoid pneumonia is an uncommon disease caused by the presence of lipid in the alveoli. It is classified into two major groups, depending on whether the lipid/oil in the respiratory tract is from an exogenous (exogenous lipoid pneumonia) or endogenous/idiopathic (endogenous lipoid pneumonia) source. The usual presentation occurs with insidious onset and nonspecific respiratory symptoms such as dyspnea and/or cough. The main radiological findings include airspace consolidations, ground-glass attenuation, airspace nodules and 'crazy-paving' pattern. However, the radiological appearance of the disorder can mimic many other lung diseases, including carcinoma. Owing to the nonspecific clinical presentation and radiological features, the diagnosis is often missed or delayed. Pathologically, lipoid pneumonia is a chronic foreign body reaction to fat, characterized by lipid-laden macrophages. Diagnosis of this disease requires a high index of suspicion and can be confirmed by demonstration of lipid-laden macrophages in respiratory samples such as sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or fine-needle aspiration cytology/biopsy from lung lesions. Treatment protocols for this illness are poorly defined. PMID:21128754

  15. Pathophysiology of pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Alcón, Amalia; Fàbregas, Neus; Torres, Antoni

    2005-03-01

    The development of pneumonia requires that a pathogen reach the alveoli and that the host defenses are overwhelmed by microorganism virulence or by the inoculum size. The endogenous sources of microorganisms are nasal carriers, sinusitis, oropharynx, gastric, or tracheal colonization, and hematogenous spread. Other external sources of contamination, such as intensive care unit workers, aerosols, or fibrobronchoscopy, must be considered as accidental. PMID:15802164

  16. Pneumonia - children - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... have some symptoms of pneumonia after leaving the hospital. Coughing will slowly get better over 7 to 14 days. Sleeping and eating may take up to a week to return to normal. You may need to take time off work to care for your child.

  17. Mosaic Focal Plane Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, David L.; Horner, Scott D.; Aamodt, Earl K.

    2002-12-01

    Advances in systems engineering, applied sciences, and manufacturing technologies have enabled the development of large ground based and spaced based astronomical instruments having a large Field of View (FOV) to capture a large portion of the universe in a single image. A larger FOV can be accomplished using light weighted optical elements, improved support structures, and the development of mosaic Focal Plane Assemblies (mFPA). A mFPA designed for astronomy can use multiple Charged Coupled Devices (CCD) mounted onto a single camera baseplate integrated at the instrument plane of focus. Examples of current, or proposed, missions utilizing mFPA technology include FAME, GEST, Kepler, GAIA, LSST, and SNAP. The development of a mFPA mandates tighter control on the design trades, component development, CCD characterization, component integration, and performance verification testing. This paper addresses the capability Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company's (LMSSC) Advanced Technology Center (ATC) has developed to perform CCD characterization, mFPA assembly and alignment, and mFPA system level testing.

  18. Mosaic Focal Plane Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, D.; Horner, S.; Aamodt, E.

    Advances in manufacturing and applied sciences have enabled the development of large ground and spaced based astronomical instruments having a Field of View (FOV) large enough to capture a large portion of the universe in a single image. A large FOV can be accomplished using light weighted optics, improved structures, and the development of mosaic Focal Plane Assemblies (mFPAs). A mFPA comprises multiple Charged Coupled Devices (CCD) mounted onto a single baseplate integrated at the focus plane of the instrument. Examples of current, or proposed, missions utilizing mFPA technology include FAME, GEST, Kepler, GAIA, LSST, and SNAP. The development of a mFPA mandates tight control on the design trades of component development, CCD definition and characterization, component integration, and performance verification testing. This paper addresses the results of the Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC), Advanced Technology Center (ATC) developed mFPA. The design trades and performance characterization are services provided by the LMSSC ATC but not detailed in this paper.

  19. Klebsiella pneumoniae Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Girometti, Nicolò; Lewis, Russell E.; Giannella, Maddalena; Ambretti, Simone; Bartoletti, Michele; Tedeschi, Sara; Tumietto, Fabio; Cristini, Francesco; Trapani, Filippo; Gaibani, Paolo; Viale, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Multidrug resistance associated with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) among K. pneumoniae is endemic in southern Europe. We retrospectively analyzed the impact of resistance on the appropriateness of empirical therapy and treatment outcomes of K. pneumoniae bloodstream infections (BSIs) during a 2-year period at a 1420-bed tertiary-care teaching hospital in northern Italy. We identified 217 unique patient BSIs, including 92 (42%) KPC-positive, 49 (23%) ESBL-positive, and 1 (0.5%) metallo-beta-lactamase-positive isolates. Adequate empirical therapy was administered in 74% of infections caused by non-ESBL non-KPC strains, versus 33% of ESBL and 23% of KPC cases (p < 0.0001). To clarify the impact of resistance on BSI treatment outcomes, we compared several different models comprised of non-antibiotic treatment-related factors predictive of patients’ 30-day survival status. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score determined at the time of positive blood culture was superior to other investigated models, correctly predicting survival status in 83% of the study cohort. In multivariate analysis accounting for APACHE II, receipt of inadequate empirical therapy was associated with nearly a twofold higher rate of death (adjusted hazard ratio 1.9, 95% confidence interval 1.1–3.4; p = 0.02). Multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae accounted for two-thirds of all K. pneumoniae BSIs, high rates of inappropriate empirical therapy, and twofold higher rates of patient death irrespective of underlying illness. PMID:25398065

  20. The burden of pneumonia in children: an Asian perspective.

    PubMed

    Singh, Varinder

    2005-06-01

    Pneumonia results in two million deaths each year among children worldwide (20% of all child deaths), 70% of them in Africa and South-east Asia. Most countries in Africa and Asia record 2-10 times more children with pneumonia (7-40/100 annually) than in the USA. Apart from resource constraints and an overburdened health system, there is lack of uniformity in defining pneumonia. Most nations employ a WHO standard case management protocol using age-specific cut-offs for increased respiratory rates and chest in-drawing for a clinical definition of pneumonia. The limited data available on the causative organisms have identified Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and viruses such as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza, para influenza and adenoviruses as the major pathogens. Measles infection increases pneumonia morbidity and mortality. Low birth weight, under-nutrition, hypovitaminosis A, zinc deficiency, lack of breastfeeding, air pollution (including environmental tobacco smoke) and over-crowding increase the risk for pneumonias in children. Standard case management protocols used for acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in these countries have brought down the disease burden but an improvement in the diagnostic algorithm is needed to appropriately recognise those with associated wheeze. Research is needed to find effective and affordable preventive strategies. PMID:15911453

  1. Pneumonia in the nursing home.

    PubMed

    Drinka, Paul J; Crnich, Christopher J

    2005-01-01

    Pneumonia syndromes may be caused by infection or the aspiration of food, acid, or particulate material. Antibiotic-resistant organisms or recurrent aspiration should be considered if the response to treatment is poor. Clinicians should consider discontinuing antibiotics if the resident's status rapidly returns to baseline after a noninfectious macro-aspiration event. The natural history of this process, however, is not well characterized. Diagnostic procedures including sputum gram stain, culture, and urinary antigen testing should be pursued to diagnose pathogens not covered by empiric therapy or to focus therapy with narrow spectrum agents. Sources of aspiration, including pharyngeal dysphagia, periodontal disease, and gastric regurgitation, should be identified and treated in hopes of preventing recurrence. PMID:16165077

  2. Focal colors are universal after all

    PubMed Central

    Regier, Terry; Kay, Paul; Cook, Richard S.

    2005-01-01

    It is widely held that named color categories in the world's languages are organized around universal focal colors and that these focal colors tend to be chosen as the best examples of color terms across languages. However, this notion has been supported primarily by data from languages of industrialized societies. In contrast, recent research on a language from a nonindustrialized society has called this idea into question. We examine color-naming data from languages of 110 nonindustrialized societies and show that (i) best-example choices for color terms in these languages cluster near the prototypes for English white, black, red, green, yellow, and blue, and (ii) best-example choices cluster more tightly across languages than do the centers of category extensions, suggesting that universal best examples (foci) may be the source of universal tendencies in color naming. PMID:15923257

  3. mPneumonia: Development of an Innovative mHealth Application for Diagnosing and Treating Childhood Pneumonia and Other Childhood Illnesses in Low-Resource Settings

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, Amy Sarah; Delarosa, Jaclyn; Brunette, Waylon; Levari, Shahar; Sundt, Mitch; Larson, Clarice; Tawiah Agyemang, Charlotte; Newton, Sam; Borriello, Gaetano; Anderson, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is the leading infectious cause of death in children worldwide. Each year, pneumonia kills an estimated 935,000 children under five years of age, with most of these deaths occurring in developing countries. The current approach for pneumonia diagnosis in low-resource settings—using the World Health Organization Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) paper-based protocols and relying on a health care provider’s ability to manually count respiratory rate—has proven inadequate. Furthermore, hypoxemia—a diagnostic indicator of the presence and severity of pneumonia often associated with an increased risk of death—is not assessed because pulse oximetry is frequently not available in low-resource settings. In an effort to address childhood pneumonia mortality and improve frontline health care providers’ ability to diagnose, classify, and manage pneumonia and other childhood illnesses, PATH collaborated with the University of Washington to develop “mPneumonia,” an innovative mobile health application using an Android tablet. mPneumonia integrates a digital version of the IMCI algorithm with a software-based breath counter and a pediatric pulse oximeter. We conducted a design-stage usability field test of mPneumonia in Ghana, with the goal of creating a user-friendly diagnostic and management tool for childhood pneumonia and other childhood illnesses that would improve diagnostic accuracy and facilitate adherence by health care providers to established guidelines in low-resource settings. The results of the field test provided valuable information for understanding the usability and acceptability of mPneumonia among health care providers, and identifying approaches to iterate and improve. This critical feedback helped ascertain the common failure modes related to the user interface design, navigation, and accessibility of mPneumonia and the modifications required to improve user experience and create a tool aimed at decreasing mortality

  4. mPneumonia: Development of an Innovative mHealth Application for Diagnosing and Treating Childhood Pneumonia and Other Childhood Illnesses in Low-Resource Settings.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Amy Sarah; Delarosa, Jaclyn; Brunette, Waylon; Levari, Shahar; Sundt, Mitch; Larson, Clarice; Tawiah Agyemang, Charlotte; Newton, Sam; Borriello, Gaetano; Anderson, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is the leading infectious cause of death in children worldwide. Each year, pneumonia kills an estimated 935,000 children under five years of age, with most of these deaths occurring in developing countries. The current approach for pneumonia diagnosis in low-resource settings--using the World Health Organization Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) paper-based protocols and relying on a health care provider's ability to manually count respiratory rate--has proven inadequate. Furthermore, hypoxemia--a diagnostic indicator of the presence and severity of pneumonia often associated with an increased risk of death--is not assessed because pulse oximetry is frequently not available in low-resource settings. In an effort to address childhood pneumonia mortality and improve frontline health care providers' ability to diagnose, classify, and manage pneumonia and other childhood illnesses, PATH collaborated with the University of Washington to develop "mPneumonia," an innovative mobile health application using an Android tablet. mPneumonia integrates a digital version of the IMCI algorithm with a software-based breath counter and a pediatric pulse oximeter. We conducted a design-stage usability field test of mPneumonia in Ghana, with the goal of creating a user-friendly diagnostic and management tool for childhood pneumonia and other childhood illnesses that would improve diagnostic accuracy and facilitate adherence by health care providers to established guidelines in low-resource settings. The results of the field test provided valuable information for understanding the usability and acceptability of mPneumonia among health care providers, and identifying approaches to iterate and improve. This critical feedback helped ascertain the common failure modes related to the user interface design, navigation, and accessibility of mPneumonia and the modifications required to improve user experience and create a tool aimed at decreasing mortality from

  5. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Polverino, E; Torres Marti, A

    2011-02-01

    Despite the remarkable advances in antibiotic therapies, diagnostic tools, prevention campaigns and intensive care, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is still among the primary causes of death worldwide, and there have been no significant changes in mortality in the last decades. The clinical and economic burden of CAP makes it a major public health problem, particularly for children and the elderly. This issue provides a clinical overview of CAP, focusing on epidemiology, economic burden, diagnosis, risk stratification, treatment, clinical management, and prevention. Particular attention is given to some aspects related to the clinical management of CAP, such as the microbial etiology and the available tools to achieve it, the usefulness of new and old biomarkers, and antimicrobial and other non-antibiotic adjunctive therapies. Possible scenarios in which pneumonia does not respond to treatment are also analyzed to improve clinical outcomes of CAP. PMID:21242952

  6. Acinetobacter Pneumonia: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hartzell, Joshua D.; Kim, Andrew S.; Kortepeter, Mark G.; Moran, Kimberly A.

    2007-01-01

    Acinetobacter species are becoming a major cause of nosocomial infections, including hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated pneumonia. Acinetobacter species have become increasingly resistant to antibiotics over the past several years and currently present a significant challenge in treating these infections. Physicians now rely on older agents, such as polymyxins (colistin), for treatment. This paper reviews the epidemiology, treatment, and prevention of this emerging pathogen. PMID:18092011

  7. Statistical Earthquake Focal Mechanism Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Y. Y.; Jackson, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    The new whole Earth focal mechanism forecast, based on the GCMT catalog, has been created. In the present forecast, the sum of normalized seismic moment tensors within 1000 km radius is calculated and the P- and T-axes for the focal mechanism are evaluated on the basis of the sum. Simultaneously we calculate an average rotation angle between the forecasted mechanism and all the surrounding mechanisms. This average angle shows tectonic complexity of a region and indicates the accuracy of the prediction. The method was originally proposed by Kagan and Jackson (1994, JGR). Recent interest by CSEP and GEM has motivated some improvements, particularly to extend the previous forecast to polar and near-polar regions. The major problem in extending the forecast is the focal mechanism calculation on a spherical surface. In the previous forecast as our average focal mechanism was computed, it was assumed that longitude lines are approximately parallel within 1000 km radius. This is largely accurate in the equatorial and near-equatorial areas. However, when one approaches the 75 degree latitude, the longitude lines are no longer parallel: the bearing (azimuthal) difference at points separated by 1000 km reach about 35 degrees. In most situations a forecast point where we calculate an average focal mechanism is surrounded by earthquakes, so a bias should not be strong due to the difference effect cancellation. But if we move into polar regions, the bearing difference could approach 180 degrees. In a modified program focal mechanisms have been projected on a plane tangent to a sphere at a forecast point. New longitude axes which are parallel in the tangent plane are corrected for the bearing difference. A comparison with the old 75S-75N forecast shows that in equatorial regions the forecasted focal mechanisms are almost the same, and the difference in the forecasted focal mechanisms rotation angle is close to zero. However, though the forecasted focal mechanisms are similar

  8. Septic shock, necrotizing pneumonitis, and meningoencephalitis caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae in a child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Barreira, Eliane R; Souza, Daniela C; Góes, Patricia F; Bousso, Albert

    2009-04-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an important causative agent of respiratory infection in childhood. Although the infection caused by M. pneumoniae is classically described as benign, severe and life-threatening pulmonary and extrapulmonary complications can occur. This study describes the first case of septic shock related to M. pneumoniae in a child with necrotizing pneumonitis, severe encephalitis, and multiple organs involvement, with a favorable outcome after lobectomy and systemic corticosteroids. PMID:19023109

  9. Motility of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Radestock, U; Bredt, W

    1977-01-01

    Cell of Mycoplasma pneumoniae FH gliding on a glass surface in liquid medium were examined by microscopic observation and quantitatively by microcinematography (30 frames per min). Comparisons were made only within the individual experiments. The cells moved in an irregular pattern with numerous narrow bends and circles. They never changed their leading end. The average speed (without pauses) was relatively constant between o.2 and 0.5 mum/s. The maximum speed was about 1.5 to 2.0 mum/s. The movements were interrupted by resting periods of different lengths and frequency. Temperature, viscosity, pH, and the presence of yeast extract in the medium influenced the motility significantly; changes in glucose, calcium ions, and serum content were less effective. The movements were affected by iodoacetate, p-mercuribenzoate, and mitomycin C at inhibitory or subinhibitory concentrations. Sodium fluoride, sodium cyanide, dinitrophenol, chloramphenicol, puromycin, cholchicin, and cytochalasin B at minimal inhibitory concentrations did not affect motility. The movements were effectively inhibited by anti-M. pneumoniae antiserum. Studies with absorbed antiserum suggested that the surface components involved in motility are heat labile. The gliding of M. pneumoniae cells required an intact energy metabolism and the proteins involved seemed to have a low turnover. Images PMID:14925

  10. Hypervirulent (hypermucoviscous) Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Shon, Alyssa S.; Bajwa, Rajinder P.S.; Russo, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    A new hypervirulent (hypermucoviscous) variant of Klebsiella pneumoniae has emerged. First described in the Asian Pacific Rim, it now increasingly recognized in Western countries. Defining clinical features are the ability to cause serious, life-threatening community-acquired infection in younger healthy hosts, including liver abscess, pneumonia, meningitis and endophthalmitis and the ability to metastatically spread, an unusual feature for enteric Gram-negative bacilli in the non-immunocompromised. Despite infecting a healthier population, significant morbidity and mortality occurs. Although epidemiologic features are still being defined, colonization, particularly intestinal colonization, appears to be a critical step leading to infection. However the route of entry remains unclear. The majority of cases described to date are in Asians, raising the issue of a genetic predisposition vs. geospecific strain acquisition. The traits that enhance its virulence when compared with “classical” K. pneumoniae are the ability to more efficiently acquire iron and perhaps an increase in capsule production, which confers the hypermucoviscous phenotype. An objective diagnostic test suitable for routine use in the clinical microbiology laboratory is needed. If/when these strains become increasingly resistant to antimicrobials, we will be faced with a frightening clinical scenario. PMID:23302790

  11. [Travel-associated pneumonias].

    PubMed

    Geerdes-Fenge, H F

    2014-10-01

    Respiratory infections are responsible for up to 11% of febrile infections in travellers or immigrants from tropical and subtropical regions. The main pathogens are the same as in temperate climate zones: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, influenza viruses, Legionella pneumophila. However, some pulmonary diseases can be attributed to bacterial, parasitic, viral or fungal pathogens that are endemic in tropical and subtropical regions. The most commonly imported infections are malaria, dengue, and tuberculosis. Pulmonary symptoms and eosinophilia in returning travellers and migrants may be caused by several parasitic infections such as Katayama syndrome, Loeffler syndrome, tropical pulmonary eosinophilia, amebiasis, paragonimiasis, echinococcosis, and toxocariasis. In Asia, Tsutsugamushi fever is transmitted by chiggers, spotted fever rickettsiae are transmitted by ticks. Transmission of zoonotic diseases occurs mainly via contact with infected animals or their excretions, human-to-human transmission is generally rare: MERS-CoA (dromedary camels), pulmonary hantavirus infection (rodents), tularemia (rabbits and hares), leptospirosis (rats), Q-fever (sheep and goats), very rarely anthrax (hides of ruminants) and pest (infected rats and wildlife). Inhalation of contaminated dust can cause infections with dimorphic fungi: histoplasmosis (bat guano) and coccidioidomycosis in America and parts of Africa, blastomycosis in America. Some infections can cause symptoms years after a stay in tropical or subtropical regions (melioidosis, tuberculosis, histoplasmosis, schistosomiasis-associated pulmonary hypertension). Noninfectious respiratory diseases caused by inhalation of high amounts of air pollution or toxic dusts may also be considered. PMID:25290923

  12. Burden of Severe Pneumonia, Pneumococcal Pneumonia and Pneumonia Deaths in Indian States: Modelling Based Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Farooqui, Habib; Jit, Mark; Heymann, David L.; Zodpey, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The burden of severe pneumonia in terms of morbidity and mortality is unknown in India especially at sub-national level. In this context, we aimed to estimate the number of severe pneumonia episodes, pneumococcal pneumonia episodes and pneumonia deaths in children younger than 5 years in 2010. We adapted and parameterized a mathematical model based on the epidemiological concept of potential impact fraction developed CHERG for this analysis. The key parameters that determine the distribution of severe pneumonia episode across Indian states were state-specific under-5 population, state-specific prevalence of selected definite pneumonia risk factors and meta-estimates of relative risks for each of these risk factors. We applied the incidence estimates and attributable fraction of risk factors to population estimates for 2010 of each Indian state. We then estimated the number of pneumococcal pneumonia cases by applying the vaccine probe methodology to an existing trial. We estimated mortality due to severe pneumonia and pneumococcal pneumonia by combining incidence estimates with case fatality ratios from multi-centric hospital-based studies. Our results suggest that in 2010, 3.6 million (3.3–3.9 million) episodes of severe pneumonia and 0.35 million (0.31–0.40 million) all cause pneumonia deaths occurred in children younger than 5 years in India. The states that merit special mention include Uttar Pradesh where 18.1% children reside but contribute 24% of pneumonia cases and 26% pneumonia deaths, Bihar (11.3% children, 16% cases, 22% deaths) Madhya Pradesh (6.6% children, 9% cases, 12% deaths), and Rajasthan (6.6% children, 8% cases, 11% deaths). Further, we estimated that 0.56 million (0.49–0.64 million) severe episodes of pneumococcal pneumonia and 105 thousand (92–119 thousand) pneumococcal deaths occurred in India. The top contributors to India’s pneumococcal pneumonia burden were Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh and Rajasthan in that order. Our

  13. Pneumonia and empyema: causal, casual or unknown

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Parapneumonic effusions complicating pneumonia are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Along with increased mortality, complicated parapneumonic effusion and empyema often necessitate prolonged treatment, longer hospital stay and interventions. Parapneumonic effusions arise from inflammation in the lungs and pleural space from direct invasion of bacteria, cascade of inflammatory events and bacteriologic virulence features. Patient factors and comorbidities also contribute to the pathophysiology of parapneumonic effusion development. The evolution of parapneumonic effusion can be divided into three progressive stages: (I) exudative stage; (II) fibrinopurulent stage; and (III) organizing stage with pleural peel formation. These stages can help categorize effusions into groups in order to evaluate the risk of a complicated course requiring intervention. We recommend that clinical data be evaluated and a stepwise approach be taken in management of these patients. This review article discusses current understanding of the development and relationship of parapneumonic effusions with pneumonia. PMID:26150912

  14. Mycobacterium fortuitum lipoid pneumonia in a dog.

    PubMed

    Leissinger, M K; Garber, J B; Fowlkes, N; Grooters, A M; Royal, A B; Gaunt, S D

    2015-03-01

    A 1-year old female spayed German Shepherd dog was evaluated for acute onset of dyspnea. Pyogranulomatous inflammation and green globoid structures were present on aspirates of the affected lung. Impression smears and histopathology confirmed pyogranulomatous pneumonia, with large amounts of lipid corresponding to the green structures noted cytologically, and identified poorly staining bacterial rods within lipid vacuoles. Special stains confirmed the presence of acid-fast bacterial rods, and polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing identified the organism as Mycobacterium fortuitum. M. fortuitum pneumonia is well described in humans and has previously been reported in 4 dogs and 1 cat. Lipid was a prominent cytologic and histologic feature, as is often described in humans and in the single feline case report. Additionally, this case highlights the variable cytologic appearance of lipid, as well as Mycobacterium spp, which are classically nonstaining with Wright-Giemsa. PMID:24788402

  15. Rothia mucilaginosa pneumonia in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Baeza Martínez, Carlos; Zamora Molina, Lucia; García Sevila, Raquel; Gil Carbonell, Joan; Ramos Rincon, José Manuel; Martín Serrano, Concepción

    2014-11-01

    Rothia mucilaginosa is a gram-postive coccus that occurs as part of the normal flora of the oropharynx and upper respiratory tract. Lower respiratory tract infections caused by this organism are rare and usually occur in immunocompromised patients. This is the case of an immunocompetent 47-year-old woman with right upper lobe pneumonia in which R.mucilaginosa was isolated in sputum and bronchial aspirate. Infections caused by this agent in the last four years in our hospital were reviewed. The most common predisposing factor was COPD with bronchiectasis. R.mucilaginosa was identified as the causative agent for pneumonia in only two cases, of which one was our case and the other was a patient with lung cancer. PMID:24568756

  16. Understanding, preventing and eradicating Klebsiella pneumoniae biofilms.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Suzana Meira; Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; Cândido, Elizabete de Souza; Franco, Octávio Luiz

    2016-04-01

    The ability of pathogenic bacteria to aggregate and form biofilm represents a great problem for public health, since they present extracellular components that encase these micro-organisms, making them more resistant to antibiotics and host immune attack. This may become worse when antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains form biofilms. However, antibiofilm screens with different compounds may reveal potential therapies to prevent/treat biofilm infections. Here, we focused on Klebsiella pneumoniae, an opportunistic bacterium that causes different types of infections, including in the bloodstream, meninges, lungs, urinary system and at surgical sites. We also highlight aspects involved in the formation and maintenance of K. pneumoniae biofilms, as well as resistance and the emergence of new trends to combat this health challenge. PMID:27064296

  17. Pneumonia caused by Pittsburgh pneumonia agent: radiologic manifestations

    SciTech Connect

    Muder, R.R.; Reddy, S.C.; Yu, V.L.; Kroboth, F.J.

    1984-03-01

    Using an objective scoring system, chest radiographs were reviewed in 23 cases of pneumonia due to the Pittsburgh pneumonia agent (PPA, Tatlockia micdadei, Legionella micdadei), including six cases of pneumonia with simultaneous isolation of PPA and L pneumophila (Legionnaires' disease). Infiltrates were typically segmental to lobar; nodular infiltrates were noted in three cases. Spread to additional lobes after presentation occurred in four of 17 PPA infections. Pneumonia caused by both PPA and L pneumophila was unusually severe, with involvement of all lobes occurring in four of six cases, compared with one of 17 cases of PPA infection (p>0.02). Radiographic severity did not correlate with underlying disease, immune status, or outcome. The majority of patients receiving erythromycin demonstrated objective radiologic improvement. In a patients, population that included nonimmunosuppressed patient, nodule formation and rapid radiologic progression were not found to be characteristic of PPA pneumonia.

  18. Precise Measurement of Effective Focal Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, T. D.; Young, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    Computerized instrument measures effective focal lengths to 0.01 percent accuracy. Laser interferometers measure mirror angle and stage coordinate y in instrument for accurate measurment of focal properties of optical systems. Operates under computer control to measure effective focal length, focal surface shape, modulation transfer function, and astigmatism.

  19. [A case of bettolepsy in acute pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Valenkevich, L N; Markelova, N N

    1992-03-01

    Literature lists more than 300 case reports of bettolepsy developing mainly in chronic diseases of the respiratory organs (chronic bronchitis, bronchial asthma, pulmonary emphysema, cor pulmonale) as well as in patients with epilepsy and organic brain diseases. The authors describe a case of bettolepsy in a patient with acute (croupous) pneumonia without respiratory diseases in the anamnesis and without a burdened neurological status. The role of nicotin and alcohol in the development of bettolepsy is shown. The problems of pathogenesis, clinical picture, differential diagnosis and treatment of bettolepsy are discussed. PMID:1413706

  20. Role of Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-Containing (NOD) 2 in Host Defense during Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Hommes, Tijmen J.; van Lieshout, Miriam H.; van ‘t Veer, Cornelis; Florquin, Sandrine; Bootsma, Hester J.; Hermans, Peter W.; de Vos, Alex F.; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing (NOD) 2 is a pattern recognition receptor located in the cytosol of myeloid cells that is able to detect peptidoglycan fragments of S. pneumoniae. We here aimed to investigate the role of NOD2 in the host response during pneumococcal pneumonia. Phagocytosis of S. pneumoniae was studied in NOD2 deficient (Nod2-/-) and wild-type (Wt) alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in vitro. In subsequent in vivo experiments Nod2-/- and Wt mice were inoculated with serotype 2 S. pneumoniae (D39), an isogenic capsule locus deletion mutant (D39Δcps) or serotype 3 S. pneumoniae (6303) via the airways, and bacterial growth and dissemination and the lung inflammatory response were evaluated. Nod2-/- alveolar macrophages and blood neutrophils displayed a reduced capacity to internalize pneumococci in vitro. During pneumonia caused by S. pneumoniae D39 Nod2-/- mice were indistinguishable from Wt mice with regard to bacterial loads in lungs and distant organs, lung pathology and neutrophil recruitment. While Nod2-/- and Wt mice also had similar bacterial loads after infection with the more virulent S. pneumoniae 6303 strain, Nod2-/- mice displayed a reduced bacterial clearance of the normally avirulent unencapsulated D39Δcps strain. These results suggest that NOD2 does not contribute to host defense during pneumococcal pneumonia and that the pneumococcal capsule impairs recognition of S. pneumoniae by NOD2. PMID:26673231

  1. Enteral Tube Feeding and Pneumonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, David Sheridan; Kimmel, David

    2006-01-01

    To determine the effects of enteral tube feeding on the incidence of pneumonia, we performed a retrospective review of all clients at our institution who had gastrostomy or jejunostomy tubes placed over a 10-year period. Ninety-three subjects had a history of pneumonia before feeding tube insertion. Eighty had gastrostomy and 13, jejunostomy…

  2. Lymphocytic Interstitial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Panchabhai, Tanmay S; Farver, Carol; Highland, Kristin B

    2016-09-01

    Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP) is a rare lung disease on the spectrum of benign pulmonary lymphoproliferative disorders. LIP is frequently associated with connective tissue diseases or infections. Idiopathic LIP is rare; every attempt must be made to diagnose underlying conditions when LIP is diagnosed. Computed tomography of the chest in patients with LIP may reveal ground-glass opacities, centrilobular and subpleural nodules, and randomly distributed thin-walled cysts. Demonstrating polyclonality with immunohistochemistry is the key to differentiating LIP from lymphoma. The 5-year mortality remains between 33% and 50% and is likely to vary based on the underlying disease process. PMID:27514593

  3. Feedlot Acute Interstitial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Woolums, Amelia R

    2015-11-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) of feedlot cattle is a sporadically occurring respiratory condition that is often fatal. Affected cattle have a sudden onset of labored breathing. There is no confirmed effective treatment of feedlot AIP; however, administration of antibiotics effective against common bacterial respiratory pathogens and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, especially aspirin, has been recommended. Protective strategies are not well defined, but efforts to limit dust exposure and heat stress; to ensure consistent formulation, mixing, and delivery of feed; and to identify and treat infectious respiratory disease in a timely manner may decrease rates of feedlot AIP. PMID:26253266

  4. [National consensus for management of community acquired pneumonia in adults].

    PubMed

    Saldías P, Fernando; Pérez C, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an acute respiratory infection that affects pulmonary parenchyma, and is caused by community acquired microorganisms. In Chile, pneumonia represents the main cause of death due to infectious diseases and is the third specific cause of mortality in adults. In 1999, an experts committee in representation of "Sociedad Chilena de Enfermedades Respiratorias", presented the first National Guidelines for the Treatment of Adult Community Acquired Pneumonia, mainly based in foreign experience and documents, and adapted it to our National Health System Organization. During the last decade, impressive epidemiological and technological changes have occurred, making the update of guidelines for treatment of NAC by several international scientific societies, necessary. These changes include: new respiratory pathogens that are being identified in CAP and affect adult patients (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila); the increasing senescent adult population that carries multiple co-morbidities; the emergence of antimicrobial resistance among respiratory pathogens associated to massive antibiotic prescription; the development by the pharmaceutical industry of new drugs that are effective for pneumonia treatment (macrolides, ketolides and respiratory fluorquinolones); and the development of new diagnostic techniques for detection of antigens, antibodies, and bacterial DNA by molecular biology, useful in respiratory infections. Based on these antecedents, an Advisory Committee of "Sociedad Chilena de Enfermedades Respiratorias" and "Sociedad Chilena de Infectología" has reviewed the national and international evidence about CAP management in adults in order to update clinical recommendations for our country. PMID:16163422

  5. Diagnosis of Pneumonia in Children with Dehydrating Diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Ronan, Anne; Khan, Wasif Ali; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for diagnosis of pneumonia are based on the history of cough or difficult breathing and age-adjusted respiration rates. Metabolic acidosis associated with dehydrating diarrhoea also influences the respiration rate. Two hundred and four children, aged 2 to 59 months, with dehydrating diarrhoea and a history of cough and/or fast breathing, were enrolled in a prospective study. Pneumonia diagnoses were made on enrollment and again 6 hours post-enrollment (after initial rehydration), using the WHO guidelines. These were compared with investigators’ clinical diagnosis based on history and findings of physical examination and a chest x-ray at the same time points. Using the WHO guidelines, 149/152 (98%) infants in the 2-11 months age-group and 38/40 (95%) children in the 12-59 months age-group were diagnosed to have pneumonia on enrollment, which dropped to 107 (70%) and 30 (75%) respectively at 6 hours post-enrollment. The specificity of the WHO guidelines for diagnosis of pneumonia was very low (6.9%) at enrollment but increased to 65.5% at 6 hours post-enrollment, after initial rehydration. The specificity of the WHO guidelines for diagnosis of pneumonia in young children is significantly reduced in dehydrating diarrhoea. For young children with dehydrating diarrhoea, rehydration, clinical and radiological assessments are useful in identifying those with true pneumonia. PMID:24847588

  6. Fatal pneumonia and empyema thoracis caused by imipenem-resistant Nocardia abscessus in a cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chih-Cheng; Tsai, Hsih-Yeh; Ruan, Sheng-Yuan; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2015-12-01

    We describe a case of pneumonia and empyema thoracis caused by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-susceptible, but imipenem-resistant Nocardia abscessus in a cancer patient. The isolate was confirmed to the species level by 16S rRNA sequencing analysis. The patient did not respond to antibiotic therapy, including ceftriaxone and imipenem, and died of progressing pneumonia and multiple organ failure. PMID:23523047

  7. Sex prevalence of focal dystonias.

    PubMed Central

    Soland, V L; Bhatia, K P; Marsden, C D

    1996-01-01

    The sex prevalence of idiopathic focal dystonia is reported from a data base review of all patients seen at the National Hospital of Neurology, Queen Square and King's College, London up to 1993. There was a higher prevalence of females to males in all categories of focal dystonia involving the craniocervical region. The female to male ratio for cranial dystonia was 1.92:1 (P < 0.01) and 1.6:1 (P < 0.001) for spasmodic torticollis. On the other hand, twice as many men than women had writer's cramp (M:F = 2.0:1, P < 0.01). At present, there is no clear explanation to account for this differences in the sex prevalence of different types of focal dystonia. PMID:8708656

  8. Continuously variable focal length lens

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Bernhard W; Chollet, Matthieu C

    2013-12-17

    A material preferably in crystal form having a low atomic number such as beryllium (Z=4) provides for the focusing of x-rays in a continuously variable manner. The material is provided with plural spaced curvilinear, optically matched slots and/or recesses through which an x-ray beam is directed. The focal length of the material may be decreased or increased by increasing or decreasing, respectively, the number of slots (or recesses) through which the x-ray beam is directed, while fine tuning of the focal length is accomplished by rotation of the material so as to change the path length of the x-ray beam through the aligned cylindrical slows. X-ray analysis of a fixed point in a solid material may be performed by scanning the energy of the x-ray beam while rotating the material to maintain the beam's focal point at a fixed point in the specimen undergoing analysis.

  9. Animal models of polymicrobial pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Hraiech, Sami; Papazian, Laurent; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Bregeon, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is one of the leading causes of severe and occasionally life-threatening infections. The physiopathology of pneumonia has been extensively studied, providing information for the development of new treatments for this condition. In addition to in vitro research, animal models have been largely used in the field of pneumonia. Several models have been described and have provided a better understanding of pneumonia under different settings and with various pathogens. However, the concept of one pathogen leading to one infection has been challenged, and recent flu epidemics suggest that some pathogens exhibit highly virulent potential. Although “two hits” animal models have been used to study infectious diseases, few of these models have been described in pneumonia. Therefore the aims of this review were to provide an overview of the available literature in this field, to describe well-studied and uncommon pathogen associations, and to summarize the major insights obtained from this information. PMID:26170617

  10. Granzyme A impairs host defense during Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    van den Boogaard, Florry E; van Gisbergen, Klaas P J M; Vernooy, Juanita H; Medema, Jan P; Roelofs, Joris J T H; van Zoelen, Marieke A D; Endeman, Henrik; Biesma, Douwe H; Boon, Louis; Van't Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Granzyme A (GzmA) is a serine protease produced by a variety of cell types involved in the immune response. We sought to determine the role of GzmA on the host response during pneumococcal pneumonia. GzmA was measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) harvested from CAP patients from the infected and contralateral uninfected side and in lung tissue slides from CAP patients and controls. In CAP patients, GzmA levels were increased in BALF obtained from the infected lung. Human lungs showed constitutive GzmA expression by both parenchymal and nonparenchymal cells. In an experimental setting, pneumonia was induced in wild-type (WT) and GzmA-deficient (GzmA(-/-)) mice by intranasal inoculation of S. pneumoniae In separate experiments, WT and GzmA(-/-) mice were treated with natural killer (NK) cell depleting antibodies. Upon infection with S. pneumoniae, GzmA(-/-) mice showed a better survival and lower bacterial counts in BALF and distant body sites compared with WT mice. Although NK cells showed strong GzmA expression, NK cell depletion did not influence bacterial loads in either WT or GzmA(-/-) mice. These results implicate that GzmA plays an unfavorable role in host defense during pneumococcal pneumonia by a mechanism that does not depend on NK cells. PMID:27343190

  11. Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, B; Seed, W A

    1980-01-01

    We described three cases of eosinophilic pneumonia of unknown aetiology investigated clinically and by lung biopsy. The illnesses lasted between six and 20 weeks and consisted of cough, dyspnoea, malaise, and in two cases prolonged pyrexia. All had blood eosinophilia and chest radiographs showing widespread bilateral shadowing; in two cases this had a characteristic peripheral distribution. One patient recovered spontaneously and the other two responded to steroids, with disappearance of pyrexia within 12 hours and radiological clearing within 14 days. Lung function tests during the acute illness showed volume restriction or gas transfer defects or both in two cases. After remission all three showed abnormalities if small airways function. Lung biopsies performed during the acute illness were examined histologically and by transmission electron microscopy, and in two cases by immunofluorescence. There was both intra-alveolar and interstitial eosinophilic pneumonia with bronchiolitis obliterans, microgranulomata, and a vasculitis. Electron microscopy showed numerous eosinophils, many degranulated, and macrophages with phagocytosed eosinophilic granules and intracytoplasmic inclusions. In one case IgM, IgG, and IgA were demonstrated in the bronchial walls and interstitium. No IgE or complement was present. We believe that eosinophil granules are responsible for the tissue damage and fever and suggest mechanisms for this and for the response to steroid therapy. Images PMID:7003796

  12. [Exogenous lipoid pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Ramos, S A; Ramos-Solano, F

    1989-09-01

    We report 30 patients with exogenous lipoid pneumonia due to vegetal oil. This was employed in most of the cases during the first month of life for digestive tube symptomatology; clinical manifestations began three months following administrations, as a pneumonia or bronchopneumonia with a respiratory distress syndrome of variable severity. 60% of the thorax x-ray studies were abnormal, the main finding was opacity. One patient has alterations of the mechanics of deglutition; seven had gastroesophageal reflux. Arterial gasometry showed hypoxaemia and increase of alveolo-arterial gradient of oxygen in all. Ten patients died and all the survivors were reevaluated in september, 1988; 18 had normal physical findings. Thorax x-ray studies in 13 patients had right reticulate infiltration and 6 right apical opacity; ECG showed right ventricular hypertrophy in 3. Perfusion pulmonary gamagram with technetium 99 was abnormal in 5. Gastroesophageal reflux was evident in 2. Five were under treatment for several causes. Diagnosis and treatment is discussed. PMID:2604874

  13. Ultrastructural Analysis of Chlamydia Pneumoniae in the Alzheimer's Brain

    PubMed Central

    Arking, E. James; Appelt, Denah M.; Abrams, J. Todd; Kolbe, Sonya; Hudson, Alan P.; Balin, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    We recently reported identification of the bacterium Chlamydia pneumoniae in affected brain regions of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) (Balin et al., 1998). In this report, we extend those initial observations to demonstrate that, in addition to the frequently described, standard morphological forms of the organism, pleiomorphic forms are also present in the AD brain. All AD and control brain tissues examined were verified to be PCR-positive and negative, respectively, for the organism. DNA sequence determination of PCR products so derived from total DNA of infected AD brains, as well as from total DNA of cell lines infected with the organism following isolation from these same patient samples, confirmed the presence of organism in relevant samples. Various morphologic forms of C. pneumoniae were identified in PCR-positive tissues and these were characterized based on membrane structure, core density, size, and immunolabeling profiles. Structures identified include the typical pear-shaped elementary body, as well as larger, spherical and oblong reticulate bodies. Intact C. pneumoniae were found both intracellularly and extracellularly in the sampled autopsy brains. Intracellular organisms were located principally within microglia, astroglia, and presumptive pericytes. These results suggest that C. pneumoniae found in cells indigenous to the AD brain do not conform universally to the classical morphology observed in other infected cell types. This pleiomorphism may reflect an adaptive response and/or persistent state of infection for these organisms in Alzheimer's Disease. PMID:20671799

  14. Parallel Evolution in Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Churton, Nicholas W. V.; Misra, Raju V.; Howlin, Robert P.; Allan, Raymond N.; Jefferies, Johanna; Faust, Saul N.; Gharbia, Saheer E.; Edwards, Richard J.; Clarke, Stuart C.; Webb, Jeremy S.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a commensal human pathogen and the causative agent of various invasive and noninvasive diseases. Carriage of the pneumococcus in the nasopharynx is thought to be mediated by biofilm formation, an environment where isogenic populations frequently give rise to morphological colony variants, including small colony variant (SCV) phenotypes. We employed metabolic characterization and whole-genome sequencing of biofilm-derived S. pneumoniae serotype 22F pneumococcal SCVs to investigate diversification during biofilm formation. Phenotypic profiling revealed that SCVs exhibit reduced growth rates, reduced capsule expression, altered metabolic profiles, and increased biofilm formation compared to the ancestral strain. Whole-genome sequencing of 12 SCVs from independent biofilm experiments revealed that all SCVs studied had mutations within the DNA-directed RNA polymerase delta subunit (RpoE). Mutations included four large-scale deletions ranging from 51 to 264 bp, one insertion resulting in a coding frameshift, and seven nonsense single-nucleotide substitutions that result in a truncated gene product. This work links mutations in the rpoE gene to SCV formation and enhanced biofilm development in S. pneumoniae and therefore may have important implications for colonization, carriage, and persistence of the organism. Furthermore, recurrent mutation of the pneumococcal rpoE gene presents an unprecedented level of parallel evolution in pneumococcal biofilm development. PMID:27190203

  15. Parallel Evolution in Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Churton, Nicholas W V; Misra, Raju V; Howlin, Robert P; Allan, Raymond N; Jefferies, Johanna; Faust, Saul N; Gharbia, Saheer E; Edwards, Richard J; Clarke, Stuart C; Webb, Jeremy S

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a commensal human pathogen and the causative agent of various invasive and noninvasive diseases. Carriage of the pneumococcus in the nasopharynx is thought to be mediated by biofilm formation, an environment where isogenic populations frequently give rise to morphological colony variants, including small colony variant (SCV) phenotypes. We employed metabolic characterization and whole-genome sequencing of biofilm-derived S. pneumoniae serotype 22F pneumococcal SCVs to investigate diversification during biofilm formation. Phenotypic profiling revealed that SCVs exhibit reduced growth rates, reduced capsule expression, altered metabolic profiles, and increased biofilm formation compared to the ancestral strain. Whole-genome sequencing of 12 SCVs from independent biofilm experiments revealed that all SCVs studied had mutations within the DNA-directed RNA polymerase delta subunit (RpoE). Mutations included four large-scale deletions ranging from 51 to 264 bp, one insertion resulting in a coding frameshift, and seven nonsense single-nucleotide substitutions that result in a truncated gene product. This work links mutations in the rpoE gene to SCV formation and enhanced biofilm development in S. pneumoniae and therefore may have important implications for colonization, carriage, and persistence of the organism. Furthermore, recurrent mutation of the pneumococcal rpoE gene presents an unprecedented level of parallel evolution in pneumococcal biofilm development. PMID:27190203

  16. Fatal Outcomes in Family Transmission of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, T. R.; Hardy, R. D.; Coalson, J. J.; Cavuoti, D. C.; Siegel, J. D.; Cagle, M.; Musatovova, O.; Herrera, C.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Mycoplasma pneumoniae continues to be a significant cause of community-acquired pneumonia and, on rare occasions, manifests as fulminant disease that leads to mortality, even in healthy individuals. Methods. We conducted a retrospective study on members of a family who were quarantined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2002 for respiratory failure and death of a 15-year-old brother (sibling 1) and a 13-year-old sister (sibling 2). Collected airway, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and serum samples from both deceased siblings and serum samples from both parents and the remaining 3 ill siblings (sibling 3–5) were tested using a range of diagnostic assays. Autopsy lung tissue samples from sibling 2 were also assessed using immunohistochemical and immunoelectron microscopic methods. Results. Autopsy evaluation of sibling 1 revealed cerebral edema consistent with hypoxic ischemic encepatholopathy and pulmonary findings of bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia (BOOP). Postmortem lung examination of sibling 2 revealed lymphoplasmacytic bronchiolitis with intraluminal purulent exudate, BOOP, and pulmonary edema. Results of diagnostic assays implicated the household transmission of M. pneumoniae among all 5 siblings and both parents. Further analysis of lung tissue from sibling 2 demonstrated the presence of M. pneumoniae organisms and community-acquired respiratory distress syndrome toxin. M. pneumoniae was cultured directly from sibling 2 autopsy lung tissue. Conclusion. Evidence is provided that M. pneumoniae was readily transmitted to all members of the household and that the resulting infections led to a spectrum of individual responses with variation in disease progression, including lymphoplasmacytic bronchiolitis, BOOP, and death. PMID:22052890

  17. Focal weakness following herpes zoster.

    PubMed Central

    Cockerell, O C; Ormerod, I E

    1993-01-01

    Three patients presented with focal weakness of an arm which followed segmental herpes zoster affecting the same limb. Neurophysiological investigations suggest that the site of the lesion lay at the root, plexus, or peripheral nerve level. This reflects the various ways in which the virus may affect the peripheral nervous system. PMID:8410022

  18. [Lipoid pneumonia - an underestimated syndrome].

    PubMed

    Schwaiblmair, M; Berghaus, T; Haeckel, T; Wagner, T; Scheidt, W von

    2010-01-01

    Lipoid pneumonia, first described by Laughlen 1925 may be classified as endogenous or exogenous. The endogenous form is seen when fat is deposited into the lung tissue. It is usually associated with proximal obstructive lesions, necrotic tissue after radio- or chemotherapy, with lipid storage disease or hyperlipidemia . Exogenous lipoid pneumonia results from inhaling or aspirating animal, vegetable or mineral oil. There are usually some underlying neurological defects or esophageal abnormalities. Patients may present with cough, sputum, hemoptysis and chest pain or may be asymptomatic. There is no classic chest film appearance: it may appear as diffuse airspace infiltration or localized consolidation simulating tumour. Computed tomography is diagnostically helpful and shows hypodense areas measuring from -100 to - 30 Hounsfield units. Bronchoscopic biopsies are mandatory for histological confirmation of the diagnosis. Treatment of exogenous lipoid pneumonia has always been conservative by discontinuing the use of oil, correction of underlying defects that may favor aspiration and treatment of intercurrent pneumonia. Other measures, for example corticosteroid therapy, are of uncertain benefit. Complications of lipoid pneumonia that worsen prognosis are recurrent bacterial pneumonias including nontuberculous mycobacteria or aspergillus, or lung cancer that has developed in areas of pre-existing exogenous lipoid pneumonia. PMID:20024881

  19. Statistical earthquake focal mechanism forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Yan Y.; Jackson, David D.

    2014-04-01

    Forecasts of the focal mechanisms of future shallow (depth 0-70 km) earthquakes are important for seismic hazard estimates and Coulomb stress, and other models of earthquake occurrence. Here we report on a high-resolution global forecast of earthquake rate density as a function of location, magnitude and focal mechanism. In previous publications we reported forecasts of 0.5° spatial resolution, covering the latitude range from -75° to +75°, based on the Global Central Moment Tensor earthquake catalogue. In the new forecasts we have improved the spatial resolution to 0.1° and the latitude range from pole to pole. Our focal mechanism estimates require distance-weighted combinations of observed focal mechanisms within 1000 km of each gridpoint. Simultaneously, we calculate an average rotation angle between the forecasted mechanism and all the surrounding mechanisms, using the method of Kagan & Jackson proposed in 1994. This average angle reveals the level of tectonic complexity of a region and indicates the accuracy of the prediction. The procedure becomes problematical where longitude lines are not approximately parallel, and where shallow earthquakes are so sparse that an adequate sample spans very large distances. North or south of 75°, the azimuths of points 1000 km away may vary by about 35°. We solved this problem by calculating focal mechanisms on a plane tangent to the Earth's surface at each forecast point, correcting for the rotation of the longitude lines at the locations of earthquakes included in the averaging. The corrections are negligible between -30° and +30° latitude, but outside that band uncorrected rotations can be significantly off. Improved forecasts at 0.5° and 0.1° resolution are posted at http://eq.ess.ucla.edu/kagan/glob_gcmt_index.html.

  20. Susceptibility of ponies to infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae (capsular type 3)

    PubMed

    Blunden, A S; Hannant, D; Livesay, G; Mumford, J A

    1994-01-01

    Welsh Mountain ponies were inoculated with an isolate of Streptococcus pneumoniae, SPE 1618 (capsular type 3) recovered from the equine respiratory tract: 10 ml of a suspension of 10(8) or 10(9) cfu/ml were instilled intratracheally. Fever was observed after either dose but the greater concentration also produced coughing, ocular and nasal discharge, depression and enlargement of submandibular lymph nodes. Cytological evidence of infection was also observed in tracheal washings during the first week after inoculation and corresponded with isolation of S. pneumoniae from the washes. Morbid anatomical and histopathological examinations of selected animals revealed focal pneumonia affecting the ventral lung, especially the cardiac area and accessory lobe, with a propensity to affect the right lung. S. pneumoniae was isolated directly in pure culture from these lesions or was demonstrable by immunostaining of macrophages bearing specific capsular type 3 antigen. By 10 days after inoculation, the ponies were healthy and had developed antibodies to S. pneumoniae. S. pneumoniae was therefore a primary pathogen in the horse under the conditions of the challenge. PMID:8143658

  1. Epidemiology, aetiology and management of childhood acute community-acquired pneumonia in developing countries--a review.

    PubMed

    Falade, A G; Ayede, A I

    2011-12-01

    Childhood acute community-acquired pneumonia is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. In children who have not received prior antibiotic therapy, the main bacterial causes of clinical pneumonia in developing countries are Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), and the main viral cause is respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), but estimates of their relative importance vary in different settings. The only vaccines for the prevention of bacterial pneumonia (excluding vaccines for pertussis and measles) are Hib and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV). In children with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, bacterial infection remains a major cause of pneumonia mortality; however, Pneumocystis jirovecii and Mycobacterium tuberculosis are important causes of pneumonia in them. Studies of bacterial aetiology of acute pneumonia in severely malnourished children have implicated Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, S. pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and H. influenzae, with very few data on the role of respiratory viruses and tuberculosis. Studies of neonatal sepsis suggest that Gram-negative enteric organisms, particularly Klebsiella spp., and Gram-positive organisms, mainly pneumococcus, group b Streptococcus and S. aureus are causes of neonatal pneumonia. Many of the developing countries that ranked high in pneumonia mortality are preparing to introduce new pneumonia vaccines with support from Global Alliance for Vaccine and Immunization (GAVI Alliance), plan for the expansion of community-based case management and have ambitious plans for strengthening health systems. Assurance that these plans are implemented will require funding and continued public attention to pneumonia, which will help contribute to a substantial decline in childhood pneumonia deaths. PMID:22783679

  2. Rare idiopathic interstitial pneumonias: LIP and PPFE and rare histologic patterns of interstitial pneumonias: AFOP and BPIP.

    PubMed

    Kokosi, Maria A; Nicholson, Andrew G; Hansell, David M; Wells, Athol U

    2016-05-01

    In the 2013 reclassification of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs), two rare IIPs (idiopathic lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP), idiopathic pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (IPPFE)) and two rare histologic patterns (acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP), bronchiolocentric pattern of interstitial pneumonia (BPIP)) are described. All these entities are rare with small series published to date, mostly containing primary and secondary forms of disease. LIP is histologically characterized by diffuse polyclonal lymphoid cell infiltrate surrounding the airways and expanding the interstitium. Thin-walled cysts and diffuse ground glass are considered the typical radiologic features. The clinical course is highly variable with corticosteroid responsiveness evident in approximately half of cases. IPPFE is defined histologically by coexisting upper lobe pleural and intra-alveolar fibrosis with elastosis. Dense subpleural irregular fibrosis and consolidation are the cardinal radiologic features. A history of recurrent lower respiratory tract infection is frequent. Responses to immunomodulation have not been reported and the rate of progression appears to be highly variable. AFOP is a rare histologic pattern lying within the spectrum of acute/subacute lung injury, characterized by organizing pneumonia and intra-alveolar fibrin deposition without hyaline membranes. BPIP is characterized histologically by fibrosis and/or inflammation confined to the alveolar interstitium around bronchovascular bundles, overlapping with peribronchial metaplasia and fibrosis in some series. Currently, AFOP and BPIP are both best viewed as histological entities rather than true clinical disorders, in the absence of characteristic associated imaging patterns and clinical features. PMID:26627191

  3. Clinical Features of Severe or Fatal Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Izumikawa, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is one of the most common causes of community-acquired pneumonia in children and young adults. The incidence of fulminant M. pneumoniae pneumonia (MPP) is relatively rare despite the high prevalence of M. pneumoniae infection. This literature review highlights the clinical features of fulminant MPP by examining the most recent data in epidemiology, clinical presentation, pathogenesis, and treatment. Fulminant MPP accounts for 0.5–2% of all MPP cases and primarily affects young adults with no underlying disease. Key clinical findings include a cough, fever, and dyspnea along with diffuse abnormal findings in radiological examinations. Levels of inflammatory markers such as white blood cells and C-reactive protein are elevated, as well as levels of lactate dehydrogenase, IL-18, aspartate transaminase, and alanine transaminase. The exact pathogenesis of fulminant MPP remains unclear, but theories include a delayed hypersensitivity reaction to M. pneumoniae and the contribution of delayed antibiotic administration to disease progression. Treatment options involve pairing the appropriate anti-mycoplasma agent with a corticosteroid that will downregulate the hypersensitivity response, and mortality rates are quite low in this treatment group. Further research is necessary to determine the exact pathogenesis of severe and fulminant types of MPP. PMID:27313568

  4. Spectrum of PORCN mutations in Focal Dermal Hypoplasia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Focal Dermal Hypoplasia (FDH), also known as Goltz syndrome (OMIM 305600), is a genetic disorder that affects multiple organ systems early in development. Features of FDH include skin abnormalities, (hypoplasia, atrophy, linear pigmentation, and herniation of fat through dermal defects); papillomas...

  5. Pasteurella multocida pneumonia complicated by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Martyn, V; Swift, D

    1984-02-01

    A 71-year-old woman presented with acute non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema. She proved to have a Pasteurella multocida pneumonia, with blood stream invasion by the organism, and required positive pressure ventilation for 53 days. Penicillin G., the drug of choice for this infection, failed to reverse the steady decline in her arterial oxygen-tension, and it was only after treatment with chloramphenicol and prednisolone that she began to improve. Serological tests strongly indicated the presence of a Staphylococcus aureus infection and the delay in giving antibiotics appropriate to this second pathogen may have been the reason for the patient's initial downhill course. PMID:6709548

  6. Role of α1 and α2 chains of type IV collagen in early fibrotic lesions of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias and migration of lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Urushiyama, Hirokazu; Terasaki, Yasuhiro; Nagasaka, Shinya; Terasaki, Mika; Kunugi, Shinobu; Nagase, Takahide; Fukuda, Yuh; Shimizu, Akira

    2015-08-01

    Early fibrotic lesions are thought to be the initial findings of fibrogenesis in idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, but little is known about their properties. Type IV collagen comprises six gene products, α1-α6, and although it is known as a major basement membrane component, its abnormal deposition is seen in fibrotic lesions of certain organs. We studied the expression of type I and III collagen and all α chains of type IV collagen in lung specimens from patients with usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) or organizing pneumonia (OP) via immunohistochemistry. With cultured lung fibroblasts, we analyzed the expression and function of all α chains of type IV collagen via immunohistochemistry, western blotting, real-time quantitative PCR, and a Boyden chamber migration assay after the knockdown of α1 and α2 chains. Although we observed type I and III collagens in early fibrotic lesions of both UIP and OP, we found type IV collagen, especially α1 and α2 chains, in early fibrotic lesions of UIP but not OP. Fibroblasts enhanced the expression of α1 and α2 chains of type IV collagen after transforming growth factor-β1 stimulation. Small interfering RNA against α1 and α2 chains increased fibroblast migration, with upregulated phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and adding medium containing fibroblast-produced α1 and α2 chains reduced the increased levels of fibroblast migration and phosphorylation of FAK. Fibroblasts in OP were positive for phosphorylated FAK but fibroblasts in UIP were not. These results suggest that fibroblasts in UIP with type IV collagen deposition, especially α1 and α2 chains, have less ability to migrate from early fibrotic lesions than fibroblasts in OP without type IV collagen deposition. Thus, type IV collagen deposition in early fibrotic lesions of UIP may be implicated in refractory pathophysiology including migration of lesion fibroblasts via a FAK pathway. PMID:26006016

  7. Imaging of community-acquired pneumonia: Roles of imaging examinations, imaging diagnosis of specific pathogens and discrimination from noninfectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nambu, Atsushi; Ozawa, Katsura; Kobayashi, Noriko; Tago, Masao

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews roles of imaging examinations in the management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), imaging diagnosis of specific CAP and discrimination between CAP and noninfectious diseases. Chest radiography is usually enough to confirm the diagnosis of CAP, whereas computed tomography is required to suggest specific pathogens and to discriminate from noninfectious diseases. Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia, tuberculosis, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia and some cases of viral pneumonia sometimes show specific imaging findings. Peribronchial nodules, especially tree-in-bud appearance, are fairly specific for infection. Evidences of organization, such as concavity of the opacities, traction bronchiectasis, visualization of air bronchograms over the entire length of the bronchi, or mild parenchymal distortion are suggestive of organizing pneumonia. We will introduce tips to effectively make use of imaging examinations in the management of CAP. PMID:25349662

  8. Electron microscopy of Mycoplasma pneumoniae microcolonies grown on solid surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, C K; Pfister, R M; Somerson, N L

    1977-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae sprain CL-8 was studied by using various surfaces for adherence and growth. Cells grown on Epon 812, Formvar, carbon, and glass were of similar morphology. Thin Epon pieces were good material for culturing the organisms and examining thin-sectioned microcolonies by transmission electron microscopy. Images PMID:931378

  9. MRI of Focal Liver Lesions.

    PubMed

    Albiin, Nils

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging, MRI has more advantages than ultrasound, computed tomography, CT, positron emission tomography, PET, or any other imaging modality in diagnosing focal hepatic masses. With a combination of basic T1 and T2 weighted sequences, diffusion weighted imaging, DWI, and hepatobiliary gadolinium contrast agents, that is gadobenate dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA) and gadoxetic acid (Gd-EOB), most liver lesions can be adequately diagnosed. Benign lesions, as cyst, hemangioma, focal nodular hyperplasia, FNH or adenoma, can be distinguished from malignant lesions. In a non-cirrhotic liver, the most common malignant lesions are metastases which may be hypovascular or hypervascular. In the cirrhotic liver hepatocellular carcinoma, HCC, is of considerable importance. Besides, intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and other less common malignancies has to be assessed. In this review, the techniques and typical MRI features are presented as well as the new algorithm issued by American Association for the Study of the Liver Diseases (AASLD). PMID:23049491

  10. Variable focal length deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Headley, Daniel; Ramsey, Marc; Schwarz, Jens

    2007-06-12

    A variable focal length deformable mirror has an inner ring and an outer ring that simply support and push axially on opposite sides of a mirror plate. The resulting variable clamping force deforms the mirror plate to provide a parabolic mirror shape. The rings are parallel planar sections of a single paraboloid and can provide an on-axis focus, if the rings are circular, or an off-axis focus, if the rings are elliptical. The focal length of the deformable mirror can be varied by changing the variable clamping force. The deformable mirror can generally be used in any application requiring the focusing or defocusing of light, including with both coherent and incoherent light sources.

  11. Ultrasound elastographic techniques in focal liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Clara Benedetta; Cavalcoli, Federica; Fraquelli, Mirella; Conte, Dario; Massironi, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Elastographic techniques are new ultrasound-based imaging techniques developed to estimate tissue deformability/stiffness. Several ultrasound elastographic approaches have been developed, such as static elastography, transient elastography and acoustic radiation force imaging methods, which include point shear wave and shear wave imaging elastography. The application of these methods in clinical practice aims at estimating the mechanical tissues properties. One of the main settings for the application of these tools has been liver stiffness assessment in chronic liver disease, which has been studied mainly using transient elastography. Another field of application for these techniques is the assessment of focal lesions, detected by ultrasound in organs such as pancreas, prostate, breast, thyroid, lymph nodes. Considering the frequency and importance of the detection of focal liver lesions through routine ultrasound, some studies have also aimed to assess the role that elestography can play in studying the stiffness of different types of liver lesions, in order to predict their nature and thus offer valuable non-invasive methods for the diagnosis of liver masses. PMID:26973405

  12. [Focal liver lesion, incidental finding].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, C F; Jenssen, C

    2012-10-01

    The differential diagnosis of incidentally found Focal Liver Lesions (FLL) is complex. Screening procedures so far are only defined for patients with liver cirrhosis. Characterization of a FLL begins as soon as it is detected. Taking patients history and thorough clinical examination are essential. An imaging procedure that is used to detect liver masses should also allow the examiner to determine whether the lesion is benign or malignant. Conventional B-mode US and colour Doppler imaging are effective at detecting and characterizing typical liver cysts and calcifications. Laboratory data, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and imaging guided liver biopsy are complementary methods.Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) is a well established diagnostic imaging technique for a variety of indications and applications. One of the most important applications is in the liver where it is frequently a first-line technique for the detection and diagnosis (characterization) of focal liver lesions (FLL). In this setting the accurate differentiation of benign from malignant lesions is critical to ensure the patient undergoes the appropriate therapeutic option. This has been documented in recently published guidelines, in particular in terms of the enhancement patterns of the most common FLL hemangioma, focal nodular hyperplasia hepatocellular adenoma and their differentiation from malignant lesions. In this article the role of CEUS in the characterization of incidentally found FLL is described. PMID:23033169

  13. Persistent Focal Behavior and Physical Activity Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erfle, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the proclivity and performance attributes of focal students across time and activities using data from 9,345 students. Three systematic focal behavior partitions are examined: Across activities, across time, and across activities and time. A student's performance is focal if it ends in 0 or 5 for push-ups and 0 for…

  14. SUSCEPTIBILITY OF CHEMOSTAT-GROWN 'YERSINIA ENTEROCOLITICA' AND 'KLEBSIELLA PNEUMONIAE' TO CHLORINE DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The resistance of bacteria to antimicrobial agents could be influenced by growth environment. The susceptibility of two enteric bacteria, Yersinia enterocolitica and Klebsiella pneumoniae, to chlorine dioxide was investigated. These organisms were grown in a defined medium in a c...

  15. Atherosclerosis Induced by Chlamydophila pneumoniae: A Controversial Theory.

    PubMed

    Honarmand, Hamidreza

    2013-01-01

    More than a century ago, inflammation and infection were considered to have atherogenic effects. The old idea that coronary heart disease (CHD) possibly has an infectious etiology has only reemerged in recent years. Atherosclerosis is the main pathological process involved in CHD and is, logically, the first place to look for infectious etiology. The process of atherosclerosis itself provides the first hints of potential infectious cause. Smooth muscle proliferation, with subsequent intimal thickening, luminal narrowing, and endothelial degeneration, constitutes the natural history of atherosclerosis, being with the severity and speed of these changes. Both viral and bacterial pathogens have been proposed to be associated with the inflammatory changes found in atherosclerosis. Recently, Chlamydophila pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae) has been implicated as a possible etiologic agent of coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis. New evidence which supports a role for C. pneumoniae in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis has emerged. C. pneumoniae has been detected in atherosclerotic arteries by several techniques, and the organism has been isolated from both coronary and carotid atheromas. Recent animal models have suggested that C. pneumoniae is capable of inducing atherosclerosis in both rabbit and mouse models of atherosclerosis. Furthermore, human clinical treatment studies which examined the use of antichlamydial macrolide antibiotics in patients with coronary atherosclerosis have been carried out. The causal relationship has not yet been proven, but ongoing large intervention trials and research on pathogenetic mechanisms may lead to the use of antimicrobial agents in the treatment of CHD in the future. PMID:23956742

  16. Isolation, Characterization, and Immunogenicity of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, J. Dennis; Somerson, Norman L.; Senterfit, Laurence B.

    1970-01-01

    Membrane and soluble fractions of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, M. pulmonis, and M. laidlawii B were prepared by hypotonic lysis of whole cells. The membranes of M. pneumoniae and M. laidlawii B contained, as percentage of dry weight: 34 to 37% protein, 59 to 61% lipid, 3 to 4% carbohydrate as hexose, and 0.2% ribonucleic acid as ribose. NADH2 and NADPH2 oxidase activities were localized in the soluble fractions of M. pneumoniae and in the membrane fraction of M. laidlawii B. NADH2 oxidase activity was localized in the soluble fraction of M. pulmonis. The lipids of M. pneumoniae were labeled when the organism was grown in the presence of either radioactive palmitic acid, oleic acid, cholesterol, or glycerol. The lipids were not labeled when grown in the presence of radioactive acetate. Palmitic acid radio-activity was found in neutral lipid, glycolipid, and phosphatide fractions. Immunodiffusion analyses of whole cells and membrane fractions demonstrated three reactive antigens. Two immunodiffusion antigens were localized in the membrane fraction. One of these apparently contains lipid. A third antigen, also considered lipoidal, was found in whole cells. Membrane and soluble fractions of M. pneumoniae were immunogenic. The immunogens eliciting metabolic-inhibiting antibodies were localized in the membrane. The membrane preparation also induced the formation of antibodies which fixed complement with an antigen extracted with lipid solvent. The soluble fraction contained a distinct immunogen which induces antibodies reactive in complement fixation with an antigen prepared by phenol extraction. Images PMID:16557840

  17. Dynamics of lung defense in pneumonia: resistance, resilience, and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Quinton, Lee J; Mizgerd, Joseph P

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is initiated by microbes in the lung, but physiological processes integrating responses across diverse cell types and organ systems dictate the outcome of respiratory infection. Resistance, or actions of the host to eradicate living microbes, in the lungs involves a combination of innate and adaptive immune responses triggered by air-space infection. Resilience, or the ability of the host tissues to withstand the physiologically damaging effects of microbial and immune activities, is equally complex, precisely regulated, and determinative. Both immune resistance and tissue resilience are dynamic and change throughout the lifetime, but we are only beginning to understand such remodeling and how it contributes to the incidence of severe pneumonias, which diminishes as childhood progresses and then increases again among the elderly. Here, we review the concepts of resistance, resilience, and remodeling as they apply to pneumonia, highlighting recent advances and current significant knowledge gaps. PMID:25148693

  18. Dynamics of Lung Defense in Pneumonia: Resistance, Resilience, and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Quinton, Lee J.; Mizgerd, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is initiated by microbes in the lung, but physiological processes integrating responses across diverse cell types and organ systems dictate the outcome of respiratory infection. Resistance, or actions of the host to eradicate living microbes, in the lungs involves a combination of innate and adaptive immune responses triggered by air-space infection. Resilience, or the ability of the host tissues to withstand the physiologically damaging effects of microbial and immune activities, is equally complex, precisely regulated, and determinative. Both immune resistance and tissue resilience are dynamic and change throughout the lifetime, but we are only beginning to understand such remodeling and how it contributes to the incidence of severe pneumonias, which diminishes as childhood progresses and then increases again among the elderly. Here, we review the concepts of resistance, resilience, and remodeling as they apply to pneumonia, highlighting recent advances and current significant knowledge gaps. PMID:25148693

  19. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Pneumonia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Pneumonia? The signs and symptoms of pneumonia vary from ... have sudden changes in mental awareness. Complications of Pneumonia Often, people who have pneumonia can be successfully ...

  20. Atypical pathogens and challenges in community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Kristopher P; Viera, Anthony J

    2004-04-01

    Atypical organisms such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and Legionella pneumophila are implicated in up to 40 percent of cases of community-acquired pneumonia. Antibiotic treatment is empiric and includes coverage for both typical and atypical organisms. Doxycycline, a fluoroquinolone with enhanced activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae, or a macrolide is appropriate for outpatient treatment of immunocompetent adult patients. Hospitalized adults should be treated with cefotaxime or ceftriaxone plus a macrolide, or with a fluoroquinolone alone. The same agents can be used in adult patients in intensive care units, although fluoroquinolone monotherapy is not recommended; ampicillin-sulbactam or piperacillin-tazobactam can be used instead of cefotaxime or ceftriaxone. Outpatient treatment of children two months to five years of age consists of high-dose amoxicillin given for seven to 10 days. A single dose of ceftriaxone can be used in infants when the first dose of antibiotic is likely to be delayed or not absorbed. Older children can be treated with a macrolide. Hospitalized children should be treated with a macrolide plus a beta-lactam inhibitor. In a bioterrorist attack, pulmonary illness may result from the organisms that cause anthrax, plague, or tularemia. Sudden acute respiratory syndrome begins with a flu-like illness, followed two to seven days later by cough, dyspnea and, in some instances, acute respiratory distress. PMID:15086042

  1. Inflammation-inducing Factors of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae, which causes mycoplasmal pneumonia in human, mainly causes pneumonia in children, although it occasionally causes disease in infants and geriatrics. Some pathogenic factors produced by M. pneumoniae, such as hydrogen peroxide and Community-Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome (CARDS) toxin have been well studied. However, these factors alone cannot explain this predilection. The low incidence rate of mycoplasmal pneumonia in infants and geriatrics implies that the strong inflammatory responses induced by M. pneumoniae coordinate with the pathogenic factors to induce pneumonia. However, M. pneumoniae lacks a cell wall and does not possess an inflammation-inducing endotoxin, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In M. pneumoniae, lipoproteins were identified as an inflammation-inducing factor. Lipoproteins induce inflammatory responses through Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2. Because Mycoplasma species lack a cell wall and lipoproteins anchored in the membrane are exposed, lipoproteins and TLR2 have been thought to be important for the pathogenesis of M. pneumoniae. However, recent reports suggest that M. pneumoniae also induces inflammatory responses also in a TLR2-independent manner. TLR4 and autophagy are involved in this TLR2-independent inflammation. In addition, the CARDS toxin or M. pneumoniae cytadherence induces inflammatory responses through an intracellular receptor protein complex called the inflammasome. In this review, the inflammation-inducing factors of M. pneumoniae are summarized. PMID:27065977

  2. [Guidelines for treatment of pneumonia in intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Emmi, V

    2005-01-01

    Patients affected by pneumonia can be admitted in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) independently by the setting where the infection has been acquired (community, hospital, long-term care facilities); even more frequently pneumonia can develop in patients already hospitalized in ICU especially in those requiring mechanical ventilation for different reasons. Within the severe community acquired pneumonia requiring admission in ICU, the most frequently responsible micro-organisms are mainly represented by Streptococcus pneumoniae, but also by Legionella and Haemophilus. Pseudomonas aeruginona, anyway, cannot be excluded. The most recent Canadian and American guidelines for treatment of the above mentioned infections suggest the use of a combination therapy with beta-lactams (ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, ampicillin/sulbactam, piperacillin/tazobactam) and a new generation macrolide or respiratory fluoroquinolone. In case of allergy to beta-lactams, the association fluoroquinolone-clindamycin should be preferred. Whenever a Pseudomonas etiology is suspected because of the presence of risk factors such as COPD, cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, previous and/or frequent therapies with antibiotics and/or steroids, the same guidelines suggest the use of an anti-pseudomonas beta-lactam (such as piperacillin/tazobactam, carbapenems, cefepime) associated with an anti-pseudomonas fluoroquinolone (high doses ciprofloxacin). An anti-pseudomonas beta-lactam plus an aminoglycoside or aminoglicosyde plus fluoroquinolone can be an alternative. Early onset Hospital Acquired Pneumonia (HAP) and early onset Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP) in patients without risk factors for multi-resistant etiological agents are generally sustained by S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, methicillin-susceptible Staphylocccus aureus e Gram negative enteric rods. These infections can be treated with one of the following antibiotics: ceftriaxone or fluoroquinolones (moxifloxacin or ciprofloxacin or levofloxacin) or

  3. A retrospective study of health care-associated pneumonia patients at Aichi Medical University hospital.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Yuka; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2011-12-01

    Health care-associated pneumonia (HCAP) was defined in the American Thoracic Society/Infectious Disease Society of America guidelines on hospital-acquired pneumonia in 2005. However, little is known about the occurrence of HCAP in Japan. A retrospective review of background characteristics, pathological conditions, causative organisms, initial treatments, and risk factors for HCAP was conducted to determine the relationship of HCAP to community-acquired pneumonia and hospital-acquired pneumonia. Thirty-five patients who were admitted to our hospital for pneumonia acquired outside our hospital were included and were stratified by disease severity according to the Japanese Respiratory Society risk stratification guidelines (A-DROP [age, dehydration, respiratory failure, orientation disturbance, and shock blood pressure] criteria). All patients had an underlying disease. A total of 70 microbial strains (25 gram-positive, 37 gram-negative, 6 anaerobic, and 2 causative of atypical pneumonia) were isolated from sputum cultures, showing high isolation frequencies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus and extremely low isolation frequencies of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. "History of hospitalization within 90 days before the onset of pneumonia" was the most common risk factor, and most of the patients had two or three risk factors. Initially, monotherapy [mainly tazobactam/piperacillin (TAZ/PIPC), sulbactam/ampicillin (SBT/ABPC), ceftriaxone (CTRX), cefepime (CPFM), carbapenems, or fluoroquinolones] or combination therapy (beta-lactam and fluoroquinolone) were administered and gave clinical effects in 63% (22/35) of cases. Bacteriological effects were seen in most strains (57%; 40/70). Since the causative organisms of HCAP were closely related to those of hospital-acquired pneumonia and not to community-acquired pneumonia, we believe that aggressive chemotherapy using broad-spectrum antimicrobials is needed in the initial treatment

  4. Butterfly Wings Are Three-Dimensional: Pupal Cuticle Focal Spots and Their Associated Structures in Junonia Butterflies

    PubMed Central

    Taira, Wataru; Otaki, Joji M.

    2016-01-01

    Butterfly wing color patterns often contain eyespots, which are developmentally determined at the late larval and early pupal stages by organizing activities of focal cells that can later form eyespot foci. In the pupal stage, the focal position of a future eyespot is often marked by a focal spot, one of the pupal cuticle spots, on the pupal surface. Here, we examined the possible relationships of the pupal focal spots with the underneath pupal wing tissues and with the adult wing eyespots using Junonia butterflies. Large pupal focal spots were found in two species with large adult eyespots, J. orithya and J. almana, whereas only small pupal focal spots were found in a species with small adult eyespots, J. hedonia. The size of five pupal focal spots on a single wing was correlated with the size of the corresponding adult eyespots in J. orithya. A pupal focal spot was a three-dimensional bulge of cuticle surface, and the underside of the major pupal focal spot exhibited a hollowed cuticle in a pupal case. Cross sections of a pupal wing revealed that the cuticle layer shows a curvature at a focal spot, and a positional correlation was observed between the cuticle layer thickness and its corresponding cell layer thickness. Adult major eyespots of J. orithya and J. almana exhibited surface elevations and depressions that approximately correspond to the coloration within an eyespot. Our results suggest that a pupal focal spot is produced by the organizing activity of focal cells underneath the focal spot. Probably because the focal cell layer immediately underneath a focal spot is thicker than that of its surrounding areas, eyespots of adult butterfly wings are three-dimensionally constructed. The color-height relationship in adult eyespots might have an implication in the developmental signaling for determining the eyespot color patterns. PMID:26731532

  5. Butterfly Wings Are Three-Dimensional: Pupal Cuticle Focal Spots and Their Associated Structures in Junonia Butterflies.

    PubMed

    Taira, Wataru; Otaki, Joji M

    2016-01-01

    Butterfly wing color patterns often contain eyespots, which are developmentally determined at the late larval and early pupal stages by organizing activities of focal cells that can later form eyespot foci. In the pupal stage, the focal position of a future eyespot is often marked by a focal spot, one of the pupal cuticle spots, on the pupal surface. Here, we examined the possible relationships of the pupal focal spots with the underneath pupal wing tissues and with the adult wing eyespots using Junonia butterflies. Large pupal focal spots were found in two species with large adult eyespots, J. orithya and J. almana, whereas only small pupal focal spots were found in a species with small adult eyespots, J. hedonia. The size of five pupal focal spots on a single wing was correlated with the size of the corresponding adult eyespots in J. orithya. A pupal focal spot was a three-dimensional bulge of cuticle surface, and the underside of the major pupal focal spot exhibited a hollowed cuticle in a pupal case. Cross sections of a pupal wing revealed that the cuticle layer shows a curvature at a focal spot, and a positional correlation was observed between the cuticle layer thickness and its corresponding cell layer thickness. Adult major eyespots of J. orithya and J. almana exhibited surface elevations and depressions that approximately correspond to the coloration within an eyespot. Our results suggest that a pupal focal spot is produced by the organizing activity of focal cells underneath the focal spot. Probably because the focal cell layer immediately underneath a focal spot is thicker than that of its surrounding areas, eyespots of adult butterfly wings are three-dimensionally constructed. The color-height relationship in adult eyespots might have an implication in the developmental signaling for determining the eyespot color patterns. PMID:26731532

  6. Analysis of clinical value of CT in the diagnosis of pediatric pneumonia and mycoplasma pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    GONG, LIANG; ZHANG, CHONG-LIN; ZHEN, QING

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia is an infectious disease of the lung causing mortality. Mycoplasma pneumonia (MP) is an atypical bacterial pneumonia that damages several organs. Lung computed tomography (CT) has been utilized in its identification. The aim of the present study was to examine the value of computed tomography diagnosis for pediatric MP. The present study prospectively analyzed the clinical and imaging data of 1,280 cases of pediatric MP in the out- and inpatient departments from March, 2010 to March, 2014; analyzed the morphology and distribution of the pneumonic lesion in the lungs; and summarized the value of CT diagnosis for pediatric MP. In the included children, there were 688 cases of lesions in the unilateral lobe, 592 cases of lesions in the bilateral lobes, 1,101 cases of extensive patchy opacity, 496 cases of mottled opacity, 432 cases of increased lung marking, 256 cases of streak opacity, 192 cases of ground-glass opacity, 992 cases of thickened bronchial wall in the lesions, 128 cases of lymphadenopathy in the hilar lymph nodes and mediastinal lymph nodes, and the lung CT showed 32 cases of pulmonary cavity and 144 cases of pleural effusion. In conclusion, the CT signals of pediatric MP had several types with some children exhibiting complicated changes. The child's clinical manifestation and symptoms should thus be considered in the diagnosis to improve the diagnostic rate. PMID:27073435

  7. Microbial etiologies of hospital-acquired bacterial pneumonia and ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N

    2010-08-01

    Hospital-acquired bacterial pneumonia (HABP) and ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia (VABP) can be caused by a wide variety of bacteria that originate from the patient flora or the health care environment. We review the medical and microbiology literature and the results of the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program (1997-2008) to establish the pathogens most likely to cause HABP or VABP. In all studies, a consistent 6 organisms (Staphylococcus aureus [28.0%], Pseudomonas aeruginosa [21.8%], Klebsiella species [9.8%], Escherichia coli [6.9%], Acinetobacter species [6.8%], and Enterobacter species [6.3%]) caused approximately 80% of episodes, with lower prevalences of Serratia species, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and community-acquired pathogens, such as pneumococci and Haemophilus influenzae. Slight changes in the pathogen order were noted among geographic regions; Latin America had an increased incidence of nonfermentative gram-negative bacilli. In addition, VABP isolates of the same species had a mean of 5%-10% less susceptibility to frequently used extended-spectrum antimicrobials, and the rate of drug resistance among HABP and VABP pathogens has been increasing by 1% per year (2004-2008). In conclusion, the empirical treatment of HABP and VABP due to prevailing bacterial causes and emerging drug resistance has become more challenging and requires use of multidrug empirical treatment regimens for routine clinical practice. These facts have profound impact on the choices of comparison therapies to be applied in contemporary new drug clinical trials for pneumonia. PMID:20597676

  8. SNAP Satellite Focal Plane Development

    SciTech Connect

    Bebek, C.; Akerlof, C.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bercovitz, J.; Bergstrom, L.; Berstein, G.P.; Bester, M.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.; Emmett, W.; Eriksson, M.; Fouchez,D.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Heetderks, H.; Holland, S.; Huterer, D.; Johnson, W.; Kadel, R.; Karcher,A.; Kim, A.; Kolbe, W.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureaux, J.; Lampton, M.; Lefevre, O.; Levi, M.; Levin, D.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Malina, R.; Mazure, A.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.; Miquel, R.; Morgan, N.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Roe, N.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Prieto, E.; Rabinowitz,D.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Schubnell, M.; Sholl, M.; Smadja, G.; Smith, R.; Smoot, G.; Snyder, J.; Spadafora, A.; Szymkowiak, A.; Tarle,G.; Taylor, K.; Tilquin, A.; Tomasch, A.; Vincent, D.; von der Lippe, H.; Walder, J-P.; Wang, G.

    2003-07-07

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square degree field in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. The requirements for the instrument suite and the present configuration of the focal plane concept are presented. A two year R&D phase, largely supported by the Department of Energy, is just beginning. We describe the development activities that are taking place to advance our preparedness for mission proposal in the areas of detectors and electronics.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase-Producing K. pneumoniae Myophage Miro

    PubMed Central

    Mijalis, Eleni M.; Lessor, Lauren E.; Cahill, Jesse L.; Rasche, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative pathogen frequently associated with antibiotic-resistant nosocomial infections. Bacteriophage therapy against K. pneumoniae may be possible to combat these infections. The following describes the complete genome sequence and key features of the pseudo-T-even K. pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae myophage Miro. PMID:26430050

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase-Producing K. pneumoniae Myophage Miro.

    PubMed

    Mijalis, Eleni M; Lessor, Lauren E; Cahill, Jesse L; Rasche, Eric S; Kuty Everett, Gabriel F

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative pathogen frequently associated with antibiotic-resistant nosocomial infections. Bacteriophage therapy against K. pneumoniae may be possible to combat these infections. The following describes the complete genome sequence and key features of the pseudo-T-even K. pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae myophage Miro. PMID:26430050

  11. Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia Associated With Methemoglobinemia and Anemia: An Overlooked Association?

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Tawfik; Abu Rmeileh, Ayman; Kornspan, Jonathan David; Abel, Roy; Mizrahi, Meir; Nir-Paz, Ran

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of acute methemoglobinemia and anemia in a patient with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia. We suggest that M. pneumoniae secretes a putative protein that can induce methemoglobin in red blood cells. Thus, Mycoplasma pneumoniae may induce methemoglobinemia in patients who have low oxygen saturation and anemia. PMID:26034771

  12. Pneumonia - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Japanese) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Pneumonia in Children 小児肺炎 - 日本語 (Japanese) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Korean (한국어) Pneumonia 폐렴 - ...

  13. Hemodynamics of focal choroidal excavations.

    PubMed

    Soma, Ryoko; Moriyama, Muka; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hemodynamics of focal choroidal excavations (FCEs). Four eyes of four patients with a FCE were studied. Indocyanine green angiography (ICGA), laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG), optical coherence tomography (OCT), and multi-focal electroretinography (mfERG) were performed to investigate the choroidal hemodynamics and the morphological and functional changes. The mean depth of the FCE determined by OCT was 222.5 ± 49.5 μm with a range of 164-272 μm. In one case, subretinal fluid was observed in the excavation, and in three cases, subretinal fluid was not observed. ICGA showed hypofluorescence, and laser flowgraphy (LSFG) showed decreased choroidal blood flow at the excavation in all cases. Three cases were symptomatic, and the amplitudes of the mfERGs were reduced. FCEs cause a decrease of choroidal blood flow. In three of four cases, the mfERGs were depressed over the FCEs leading to symptoms. PMID:25626897

  14. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a weakened immune system due to AIDS, cancer, transplantation, or corticosteroid use, call your provider if ... transplant recipients Organ transplant recipients People who take long-term, high- ...

  15. Focal axis resolver for offset reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Method and apparatus for determining the focal axis of an asymmetrical antenna such as an offset paraboloid reflector whose physical rim is not coincident with the boundary of the electrical aperture but whose focal point is known is provided. A transmitting feed horn array consisting of at least two feed horn elements is positioned asymmetrically on either side of an estimated focal axis which is generally inclined with respect to the boresight axis of the antenna. The feed horn array is aligned with the estimated focal axis so that the phase centers (CP sub 1, CP sub 2) of the two feed horn elements are located on a common line running through the focal point (F) orthogonally with respect to the estimated focal axis.

  16. Cytomegalovirus pneumonia in transplant patients: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Eun-Young Kang; Patz, E.F. Jr.; Mueller, N.L.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the CT findings of cytomegalovirus (CMV) pneumonia in transplant patients. The study included 10 transplant patients who had chest CT scan and pathologically proven isolated pulmonary CMV infection. Five patients had bone marrow transplant and five had solid organ transplant. The CT scans were retrospectively reviewed for pattern and distribution of disease and the CT findings compared with the findings on open lung biopsy (n = 9) and autopsy (n = 1). Nine of 10 patients had parenchymal abnormalities apparent at CT and I had normal CT scans. The findings in the nine patients included small nodules (n = 6), consolidation (n = 4), ground-glass attenuation (n = 4), and irregular lines (n = 1). The nodules had a bilateral and symmetric distribution and involved all lung zones. The consolidation was most marked in the lower lung zones. The CT findings of CMV pneumonia in transplant patients are heterogeneous. The most common patterns include small nodules and areas of consolidation. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Etiology of community acquired pneumonia among children in India: prospective, cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Joseph L.; Singhi, Sunit; Ray, Pallab; Hagel, Eva; Saghafian–Hedengren, Shanie; Bansal, Arun; Ygberg, Sofia; Sodhi, Kushaljit Singh; Kumar, B V Ravi; Nilsson, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background Childhood community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a significant problem in developing countries, and confirmation of microbial etiology is important for individual, as well as public health. However, there is paucity of data from a large cohort, examining multiple biological specimens for diverse pathogens (bacteria and viruses). The Community Acquired Pneumonia Etiology Study (CAPES) was designed to address this knowledge gap. Methods We enrolled children with CAP (based on WHO IMCI criteria of tachypnea with cough or breathing difficulty) over 24 consecutive months, and recorded presenting symptoms, risk factors, clinical signs, and chest radiography. We performed blood and nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) bacterial cultures, and serology (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae). We also performed multiplex PCR for 25 bacterial/viral species in a subgroup representing 20% of the cohort. Children requiring endotracheal intubation underwent culture and PCR of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens. Findings We enrolled 2345 children. NPA and blood cultures yielded bacteria in only 322 (13.7%) and 49 (2.1%) children respectively. In NPA, Streptococcus pneumoniae (79.1%) predominated, followed by Haemophilus influenzae (9.6%) and Staphylococcus aureus (6.8%). In blood, S. aureus (30.6%) dominated, followed by S. pneumoniae (20.4%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (12.2%). M. pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae serology were positive in 4.3% and 1.1% respectively. Multiplex PCR in 428 NPA specimens identified organisms in 422 (98.6%); of these 352 (82.2%) had multiple organisms and only 70 (16.4%) had a single organism viz. S. pneumoniae: 35 (50%), Cytomegalovirus (CMV): 13 (18.6%), Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV): 9 (12.9%), other viruses: 6 (8.7%), S. aureus: 5 (7.1%), and H. influenzae: 2 (2.9%). BAL PCR (n = 30) identified single pathogens in 10 (S. pneumoniae–3, CMV–3, S. aureus–2, H. influenzae–2) and multiple pathogens in 18 children. There were

  18. Focal axis resolver for offset reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    Described are electrical means for determining the focal axis of an offset reflector antenna whose physical rim is not coincident with the boundary of the electrical aperture. Even and odd sensing functions are employed in the focal region, leading to both amplitude and phase criteria for resolving a focal axis generally inclined with respect to the system axis. The analytical aspects of the problem are discussed, and an example related to a 4-meter Large-Antenna Multiple-Frequency Microwave Radiometer (LAMMR) is included. The technique is useful for focal axis determination in mathematical simulations and in the physical world.

  19. Digital scanner infrared focal plane technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, M. A.; Malone, N. R.; Harris, M.; Shin, J.; Byers, S.; Price, D.; Vampola, J.

    2011-09-01

    Advancements in finer geometry and technology advancements in circuit design now allow placement of digital architecture on cryogenic focal planes while using less power than heritage analog designs. These advances in technology reduce the size, weight, and power of modern focal planes. In addition, the interface to the focal plane is significantly simplified and is more immune to Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). The cost of the customer's instrument after integration with the digital scanning Focal Plane Array (FPA) has been significantly reduced by placing digital architecture such as Analog to digital convertors and Low Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS) Inputs and Outputs (I/O) on the Read Out Integrated Circuit (ROIC).

  20. Neurocysticercosis presenting as focal hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Azharuddin Mohammed; Shamim, Md Dilawez; Ahmad, Mehtab; Abdali, Nasar

    2014-01-01

    A 40-year-old man presented with a 2-month history of headache, nausea and vomiting, with generalised seizures for the past 15 days. On examination he had bilateral papilloedema, visual acuity was 6/6 in both eyes but perimetry showed right homonymous inferior quadrantanopia. His MRI showed numerous small cystic lesions with eccentric nodules, diffusely distributed in bilateral cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres. There was also focal hydrocephalus involving occipital and temporal horns of the left lateral ventricle leading to its selective dilation. Stool examination showed ova of Taenia solium. He was treated with albendazole, prednisone and sustained release sodium valproate for 1 month. His headache resolved and he is free of seizures. Repeat perimetry at 1 month also showed resolution of visual field defect. PMID:24962486

  1. Optimal focal-plane restoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichenbach, Stephen E.; Park, Stephen K.

    1989-01-01

    Image restoration can be implemented efficiently by calculating the convolution of the digital image and a small kernel during image acquisition. Processing the image in the focal-plane in this way requires less computation than traditional Fourier-transform-based techniques such as the Wiener filter and constrained least-squares filter. Here, the values of the convolution kernel that yield the restoration with minimum expected mean-square error are determined using a frequency analysis of the end-to-end imaging system. This development accounts for constraints on the size and shape of the spatial kernel and all the components of the imaging system. Simulation results indicate the technique is effective and efficient.

  2. Severe adenovirus community-acquired pneumonia in immunocompetent adults: chest radiographic and CT findings

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dingyu; Fu, Yangyang; Wang, Zhiwei; Cao, Jian; Walline, Joseph; Zhu, Huadong

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe adenovirus pneumonia and its associated imaging features are well-described in immunocompromised patients but are rare and poorly understood in immunocompetent adults. We sought to describe the radiographic and CT findings of severe adenovirus community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in eight immunocompetent adults. Methods We reviewed systematically chest imaging manifestations of laboratory-confirmed severe adenovirus pneumonia in eight immunocompetent adults from April 2012 to April 2014. Results All patients showed abnormal results on initial chest radiograph and CT, with the exception of one normal initial chest radiograph. The abnormalities of the initial chest radiographs were unilateral (n=4) or bilateral (n=3), including consolidation (n=4), dense patchy opacity (n=3), ground glass opacity (GGO) (n=1), and pleural effusion (n=1). The initial CT findings consisted of unilateral (n=5) and bilateral (n=3) abnormalities, including consolidation (n=8), GGO (n=2), pleural effusion (n=3) and small nodules (n=1). Focal consolidation was the predominant finding in six patients whose initial CT scans were examined within one week after illness onset. Follow-up radiologic findings showed rapid development of bilateral consolidation within ten days after illness onset, usually accompanied by adjacent ground-glass opacity and pleural effusion. The parenchymal abnormalities began to absorb around two weeks after illness onset, with no appearances of fibrosis. Conclusions Severe adenovirus CAP in immunocompetent adults mainly appears as focal consolidation followed by rapid progression to bilateral consolidation, usually accompanied by adjacent GGO and pleural effusion, which may resemble bacterial pneumonia. Adenovirus should be considered in severe pneumonia cases with negative cultures and failure to respond to antibiotics. PMID:27162658

  3. Lipoid pneumonia: an uncommon entity.

    PubMed

    Khilnani, G C; Hadda, V

    2009-10-01

    Lipoid pneumonia is a rare form of pneumonia caused by inhalation or aspiration of fat-containing substances like petroleum jelly, mineral oils, certain laxatives, etc. It usually presents as an insidious onset, chronic respiratory illness simulating interstitial lung diseases. Rarely, it may present as an acute respiratory illness, especially when the exposure to fatty substance(s) is massive. Radiological findings are diverse and can mimic many other diseases including carcinoma, acute or chronic pneumonia, ARDS, or a localized granuloma. Pathologically it is a chronic foreign body reaction characterized by lipid-laden macrophages. Diagnosis of this disease is often missed as it is usually not considered in the differential diagnoses of community-acquired pneumonia; it requires a high degree of suspicion. In suspected cases, diagnosis may be confirmed by demonstrating the presence of lipid-laden macrophages in sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, or fine needle aspiration cytology/biopsy from the lung lesion. Treatment of this illness is poorly defined and constitutes supportive therapy, repeated bronchoalveolar lavage, and corticosteroids. PMID:19901490

  4. Lipoid pneumonia: a challenging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kassem; Chalhoub, Michel; Maroun, Rabih; Abi-Fadel, Francois; Zhao, Fan

    2011-01-01

    Lipoid pneumonia is a rare medical condition, and is usually classified into two groups, ie, exogenous or endogenous, depending on the source of lipids found in the lungs. Exogenous lipoid pneumonia may result from the aspiration of food and lipids. Although most cases are asymptomatic, common symptoms include cough, dyspnea, chest pain, pleural effusions, fever, and hemoptysis. Radiologically, lipoid pneumonia can manifest as consolidations, pulmonary nodules, or soft-tissue densities. These presentations involve a wide differential diagnosis, including lung cancer. Other rare causes of fatty pulmonary lesions include hamartomas, lipomas, and liposarcomas. The avoidance of further exposures and the use of corticosteroids, antibiotics, and lavage comprise the mainstays of treatment. The exclusion of mycobacterial infections is important during diagnosis, in view of their known association. Generally, acute presentations run a benign course, if promptly treated. Chronic cases are more persistent and difficult to treat. Although the radiologic and pathologic diagnosis is fairly reliable, more research is needed to clarify the optimal treatment and expected outcomes. We report on a 54-year-old man presenting with progressively worsening cough, hemoptysis, and dyspnea over a few weeks. The patient underwent multiple computed tomographies of the chest and bronchoscopies. All failed to diagnose lipoid pneumonia. The diagnosis was finally established using video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. Most of the paraffinoma was resected during this surgery. He was treated with antibiotics and steroids, and discharged from the hospital in stable condition. PMID:21349583

  5. Bacterial Pneumonia in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Marrie, Thomas J; File, Thomas M

    2016-08-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is common in the elderly person; its presentation in this population is often confounded by multiple comorbid illnesses, including those that result in confusion. Although severity-of-illness scoring systems might aid decision-making, clinical judgment following a careful assessment is key in deciding on the site of care and appropriate therapy. PMID:27394017

  6. Polyradiculoneuritis and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Holt, S; Khan, M M; Charles, R G; Epstein, E J

    1977-07-01

    A patient with severe Mycoplasma pneumonia developed polyradiculoneuritis and respiratory failure. The acute phase of the illness was complicated by a myocarditis, and recovery of neurological function was slow. Residual left hemidiaphragmatic paralysis was present 1 year after onset of the illness. PMID:882485

  7. An Outbreak of Infections Caused by a Klebsiella pneumoniae ST11 Clone Coproducing Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase-2 and RmtB in a Chinese Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Zou, Ming-Xiang; Wang, Hai-Chen; Dou, Qing-Ya; Hu, Yong-Mei; Yan, Qun; Liu, Wen-En

    2016-01-01

    Background: Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae bacteria, which cause serious disease outbreaks worldwide, was rarely detected in Xiangya Hospital, prior to an outbreak that occurred from August 4, 2014, to March 17, 2015. The aim of this study was to analyze the epidemiology and molecular characteristics of the K. pneumoniae strains isolated during the outbreak. Methods: Nonduplicate carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae isolates were screened for blaKPC-2 and multiple other resistance determinants using polymerase chain reaction. Subsequent studies included pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing, analysis of plasmids, and genetic organization of blaKPC-2 locus. Results: Seventeen blaKPC-2-positive K. pneumoniae were identified. A wide range of resistant determinants was detected. Most isolates (88.2%) coharbored blaKPC-2 and rmtB in addition to other resistance genes, including blaSHV-1, blaTEM-1, and aac(3)-IIa. The blaKPC-2 and rmtB genes were located on the conjugative IncFIB-type plasmid. Genetic organization of blaKPC-2 locusin most strains was consistent with that of the plasmid pKP048. Four types (A1, A2, A3, and B) were detected by PFGE, and Type A1, an ST11, was the predominant PFGE type. A novel K. pneumoniae sequence type (ST1883) related to ST11 was discovered. Conclusions: These isolates in our study appeared to be clonal and ST11 K. pneumoniae was the predominant clone attributed to the outbreak. Coharbing of blaKPC-2 and rmtB, which were located on a transferable plasmid, in clinical K. pneumoniae isolates may lead to the emergence of a new pattern of drug resistance. PMID:27569227

  8. Exogenous lipoid pneumonia caused by herbicide inhalation.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Takamasa; Tsubata, Yukari; Okimoto, Tamio; Hoshino, Teppei; Hamaguchi, Shun-Ichi; Isobe, Takeshi

    2016-09-01

    Exogenous lipoid pneumonia is caused by aspiration or inhalation of oily substances. Generally, lipoid pneumonia has non-specific clinical and radiological presentations and may be misdiagnosed as bacterial pneumonia. Our patient, a 68-year-old man who had been diagnosed with pneumonia on three previous occasions, was admitted to our hospital with a fourth similar episode. Computed tomography of the chest revealed extensive consolidations with air bronchograms in lung fields on the right side. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) increased ghost-like macrophages that stained positive for lipid. Our patient reported that he had sprayed herbicide in large quantities without wearing a mask. We analysed the BALF and herbicide by gas chromatography and diagnosed exogenous lipoid pneumonia caused by inhalation of herbicide. Clinicians should be aware of lipoid pneumonia, which may present as infectious pneumonia. PMID:27516888

  9. Analysis of Rapid Multi-Focal Zone ARFI Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rosenzweig, Stephen; Palmeri, Mark; Nightingale, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging has shown promise for visualizing structure and pathology within multiple organs; however, because the contrast depends on the push beam excitation width, image quality suffers outside of the region of excitation. Multi-focal zone ARFI imaging has previously been used to extend the region of excitation (ROE), but the increased acquisition duration and acoustic exposure have limited its utility. Supersonic shear wave imaging has previously demonstrated that through technological improvements in ultrasound scanners and power supplies, it is possible to rapidly push at multiple locations prior to tracking displacements, facilitating extended depth of field shear wave sources. Similarly, ARFI imaging can utilize these same radiation force excitations to achieve tight pushing beams with a large depth of field. Finite element method simulations and experimental data are presented demonstrating that single- and rapid multi-focal zone ARFI have comparable image quality (less than 20% loss in contrast), but the multi-focal zone approach has an extended axial region of excitation. Additionally, as compared to single push sequences, the rapid multi-focal zone acquisitions improve the contrast to noise ratio by up to 40% in an example 4 mm diameter lesion. PMID:25643078

  10. Epidemiology of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infections in Japan and Therapeutic Strategies for Macrolide-Resistant M. pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Kenri, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae pneumonia) is a major cause of community-acquired pneumonia worldwide. The surveillance of M. pneumoniae pneumonia is important for etiological and epidemiological studies of acute respiratory infections. In Japan, nation-wide surveillance of M. pneumoniae pneumonia has been conducted as a part of the National Epidemiological Surveillance of Infectious Diseases (NESID) program. This surveillance started in 1981, and significant increases in the numbers of M. pneumoniae pneumonia patients were noted in 1984, 1988, 2006, 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2015. The epidemics in 2011 and 2012 were particularly widespread and motivated researchers to conduct detailed epidemiological studies, including genotyping and drug resistance analyses of M. pneumoniae isolates. The genotyping studies based on the p1 gene sequence suggested that the p1 gene type 1 lineage has been dominant in Japan since 2003, including the epidemic period during 2011–2012. However, more detailed p1 typing analysis is required to determine whether the type 2 lineages become more relevant after the dominance of the type 1 lineage. There has been extensive research interest in implications of the p1 gene types on the epidemiology of M. pneumoniae infections. Serological characterizations of sera from patients have provided a glimpse into these associations, showing the presence of type specific antibody in the patient sera. Another important epidemiological issue of M. pneumoniae pneumonia is the emergence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae (MRMP). MRMPs were noted among clinical isolates in Japan after 2000. At present, the isolation rate of MRMPs from pediatric patients is estimated at 50–90% in Japan, depending on the specific location. In view of the situation, Japanese societies have issued guiding principles for treating M. pneumoniae pneumonia. In these guiding principles, macrolides are still recommended as the first-line drug, however, if

  11. Hospitalizations for vaccine preventable pneumonias in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: a 6-year analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample

    PubMed Central

    Stobaugh, Derrick J; Deepak, Parakkal; Ehrenpreis, Eli D

    2013-01-01

    Background Pneumonias are among the most common causes of hospitalization among inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Guidelines published in 2004 advocate vaccination against Streptococcus pneumoniae and influenza virus. We sought to examine trends in hospitalizations for vaccine preventable pneumonias among IBD patients since the availability of published guidelines, and to identify whether Haemophilus influenzae is a causative organism for pneumonia hospitalizations among IBD patients. Methods This cross-sectional study on the Nationwide Inpatient Sample was used to identify admissions for pneumonias in patients with IBD between 2004 and 2009. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed comparing IBD patients to controls, accounting for potential confounders. Results There were more admissions for S. pneumoniae pneumonia than influenza virus or H. influenzae (787, 393, and 183 respectively). Crohn’s disease (CD) as well as ulcerative colitis (UC) patients did not demonstrate increased adjusted odds of hospitalization for S. pneumoniae pneumonia (1.08; confidence interval [CI] 0.99–1.17 compared to 0.93; CI 0.82–1.06 respectively). Increased adjusted odds for hospitalization for pneumonias due to influenza virus were seen among UC patients in the bottom quartile of income (1.86; CI 1.46–2.37). Adjusted odds for H. influenzae pneumonia admission in patients with UC and CD patients were increased compared to controls (1.42; CI 1.13–1.79 and 1.28; CI 1.06–1.54, respectively). Conclusion The study identified lowest income UC patients as having higher adjusted odds, and these patients should be targeted for influenza virus vaccination. Additionally, H. influenzae may be another vaccine preventable cause for pneumonia among IBD patients. PMID:23818801

  12. A case of vildagliptin-induced interstitial pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Kuse, Naoyuki; Abe, Shinji; Kuribayashi, Hidehiko; Inomata, Minoru; Saito, Hitoshi; Fukuda, Yuh; Gemma, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old Japanese male with type 2 diabetes mellitus was admitted to our hospital with a productive cough and worsening dyspnea. He had started receiving vildagliptin, which is one of the dipeptideylpeptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, several days before the appearance of his symptoms. Laboratory findings revealed markedly elevated levels of immunoglobulin E and Krebs von den Lungen-6. Chest computed tomography revealed ground-glass opacity with irregular reticulation throughout both lungs. Biopsy specimens by transbronchial lung biopsy showed subacute interstitial pneumonia and an organizing pneumonia pattern with acute alveolar injury. The drug lymphocyte stimulation test showed a positive result for vildagliptin. Withdrawal of vildagliptin and administration of glucocorticoid treatment improved his respiratory condition and radiological findings. Therefore, we diagnosed the patient with vildagliptin-induced interstitial pneumonia based on both his clinical course and pathological findings. Interstitial pneumonia as a side effect of vildagliptin is rare. It may be necessary to monitor the respiratory condition of patients upon administration of DPP-4 inhibitors until further evidence is obtained. PMID:27144110

  13. A case of vildagliptin-induced interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kuse, Naoyuki; Abe, Shinji; Kuribayashi, Hidehiko; Inomata, Minoru; Saito, Hitoshi; Fukuda, Yuh; Gemma, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old Japanese male with type 2 diabetes mellitus was admitted to our hospital with a productive cough and worsening dyspnea. He had started receiving vildagliptin, which is one of the dipeptideylpeptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, several days before the appearance of his symptoms. Laboratory findings revealed markedly elevated levels of immunoglobulin E and Krebs von den Lungen-6. Chest computed tomography revealed ground-glass opacity with irregular reticulation throughout both lungs. Biopsy specimens by transbronchial lung biopsy showed subacute interstitial pneumonia and an organizing pneumonia pattern with acute alveolar injury. The drug lymphocyte stimulation test showed a positive result for vildagliptin. Withdrawal of vildagliptin and administration of glucocorticoid treatment improved his respiratory condition and radiological findings. Therefore, we diagnosed the patient with vildagliptin-induced interstitial pneumonia based on both his clinical course and pathological findings. Interstitial pneumonia as a side effect of vildagliptin is rare. It may be necessary to monitor the respiratory condition of patients upon administration of DPP-4 inhibitors until further evidence is obtained. PMID:27144110

  14. Interaction of Mycoplasma pneumoniae with human lung fibroblasts: role of receptor sites.

    PubMed Central

    Gabridge, M G; Taylor-Robinson, D

    1979-01-01

    The biochemical nature of the neuraminidase-sensitive Mycoplasma pneumoniae receptor site on human lung fibroblast cells was studied. Purified, mixed sialoglycolipid (ganglioside) preparations from human and bovine tissues did not bind to M. pneumoniae organisms and block their subsequent attachment to fibroblasts. Fibroblasts incubated for 24 h in sialoglycolipid solutions to increase the ganglioside content of their membranes did not show increased pathogen attachment when later incubated with mycoplasmas. HeLa cells grown in the presence of sodium butyrate to increase GM3 ganglioside levels likewise did not have significantly increased uptake of M. pneumoniae organisms. Treatment of fibroblasts with enzymes indicated that the mycoplasma receptor site is trypsin and papain resistant but Pronase sensitive. Pronase digests of fibroblast membranes contained a product(s) which combined with M. pneumoniae cellls and cosedimented with them during centrifugation. Glycoproteins, purified from fibroblast membranes by a lithium diiodosalicylate solubilization technique, similarly bound to M. pneumoniae organisms. Collectively, these data suggest that the major component of the M. pneumoniae receptor site is a sialoglycoprotein with little or no lipid. PMID:113349

  15. The capsular network of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Cassone, A; Garaci, E

    1977-06-01

    Attempts at improving chemical fixation for electron-microscopic observation of the capsule of Klebsiella pneumoniae were made. The capsule was preserved by using alcian blue - lanthanum and tris-(1-aziridinyl) phosphine oxide (TAPO) - aldehyde - osmium procedures. Despite the different retention of the overall capsular material and minor variations in morphological details, in both cases the interpretation of ultrastructural patterns suggested that the capsule be composed of a meshed network of thin polysaccharide fibrils radiating from the cell wall. This organization is in keeping with all recognized chemical properties of bacterial polysaccharide capsules or, at least, does not contradict them. Moreover, an effective preservation of bacterial structures other than capsule has been obtained, mostly in specimens fixed by the TAPO-aldehyde-osmium method, a fact which gives further reliability to the technical approach used for capsule visualization. PMID:326360

  16. GABAergic networks jump-start focal seizures.

    PubMed

    de Curtis, Marco; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    Abnormally enhanced glutamatergic excitation is commonly believed to mark the onset of a focal seizure. This notion, however, is not supported by firm evidence, and it will be challenged here. A general reduction of unit firing has been indeed observed in association with low-voltage fast activity at the onset of seizures recorded during presurgical intracranial monitoring in patients with focal, drug-resistant epilepsies. Moreover, focal seizures in animal models start with increased γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneuronal activity that silences principal cells. In vitro studies have shown that synchronous activation of GABAA receptors occurs at seizure onset and causes sizeable elevations in extracellular potassium, thus facilitating neuronal recruitment and seizure progression. A paradoxical involvement of GABAergic networks is required for the initiation of focal seizures characterized by low-voltage fast activity, which represents the most common seizure-onset pattern in focal epilepsies. PMID:27061793

  17. Adsorption of Mycoplasma pneumoniae to Neuraminic Acid Receptors of Various Cells and Possible Role in Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sobeslavsky, O.; Prescott, B.; Chanock, R. M.

    1968-01-01

    Monkey, rat, and chicken tracheal epithelial cells, as well as monkey, rat, guinea pig, and chicken erythrocytes, adsorbed firmly to colonies of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and M. gallisepticum. Colonies of M. pulmonis also adsorbed erythrocytes but with less avidity than M. pneumoniae or M. gallisepticum; unlike the latter organisms, M. pulmonis did not adsorb tracheal epithelial cells. Colonies of M. orale type 1 and M. orale type 3 adsorbed only chicken red cells. Other mycoplasma species tested, including four of human origin and one of animal origin, did not adsorb red cells or epithelial cells. M. pneumoniae and M. gallisepticum appeared to attach to erythrocytes or tracheal epithelial cells by neuraminic acid receptors on these cells, whereas M. orale types 1 and 3 and M. pulmonis seemed to utilize another type or other types of receptors. Pretreatment of red cells or tracheal epithelial cells with receptor-destroying enzyme, neuraminidase, or influenza B virus removed the adsorption receptors for M. pneumoniae. Similarly, pretreatment of M. pneumoniae colonies with neuraminic acid-containing materials prevented adsorption of erythrocytes or respiratory tract cells. The adsorption sites on M. pneumoniae were specifically blocked by homologous but not heterologous antisera. This property made it possible to study the nature of the mycoplasma adsorption sites by testing the capacity of different fractions of the organism to block the action of adsorption-inhibiting antibodies. Such studies suggested that the mycoplasma binding sites were probably lipid or lipoprotein in nature. The glycerophospholipid hapten was implicated as one such site, since this serologically active hapten blocked the action of hemadsorption-inhibiting antibodies in M. pneumoniae rabbit antiserum. The affinity of M. pneumoniae for respiratory tract epithelium, unique among the mycoplasmas that infect man, may play a role in virulence, since this type of attachment provides an unusual

  18. Report on SEQUAL/FOCAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, E. J.; Philander, S. G. H.; Richardson, P. L.

    In Eos (April 6, 1982), United States plans for a program to study the dynamic response of the equatorial Atlantic to seasonally varying surface winds were described. Now, 6 years later, we report on progress toward our goal “to describe accurately, and to model correctly” the changes in the currents and density field of the upper equatorial Atlantic Ocean during a 2-year period. A major effort toward this goal was the field phase of SEQUAL (Seasonal Response of the Equatorial Atlantic) and the closely coordinated French program FOCAL (Français Océan et Climat dans l'Atlantique Equatorial).Between February 1983 and September 1984 changes in the surface winds and in oceanic conditions in the equatorial Atlantic were monitored continuously with a variety of instruments. Figure 1 shows key deployments and sections. The resulting data include six current meter moorings, 15 inverted echo sounders and island tide gauges, 57 near-surface drifters, and 18 French and five U.S. cruises that made 1200 hydrographic stations and 800 current profiles. All these data, as well as nearly 10,000 expendable bathythermographs (XBTs) (from the cruises, from air-dropped expendable bathythermograph (AXBT) programs, and from repeated ship of opportunity lines run between 1980 and 1985) were combined and documented by George Heimerdinger, of the National Oceanographic Data Center, and are available from NODC on request.

  19. Focal liver lesions found incidentally

    PubMed Central

    Algarni, Abdullah A; Alshuhri, Abdullah H; Alonazi, Majed M; Mourad, Moustafa Mabrouk; Bramhall, Simon R

    2016-01-01

    Incidentally found focal liver lesions are a common finding and a reason for referral to hepatobiliary service. They are often discovered in patients with history of liver cirrhosis, colorectal cancer, incidentally during work up for abdominal pain or in a trauma setting. Specific points should considered during history taking such as risk factors of liver cirrhosis; hepatitis, alcohol consumption, substance exposure or use of oral contraceptive pills and metabolic syndromes. Full blood count, liver function test and tumor markers can act as a guide to minimize the differential diagnosis and to categorize the degree of liver disease. Imaging should start with B-mode ultrasound. If available, contrast enhanced ultrasound is a feasible, safe, cost effective option and increases the ability to reach a diagnosis. Contrast enhanced computed tomography should be considered next. It is more accurate in diagnosis and better to study anatomy for possible operation. Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance is the gold standard with the highest sensitivity. If doubt still remains, the options are biopsy or surgical excision. PMID:27028805

  20. Early vision and focal attention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julesz, Bela

    1991-07-01

    At the thirty-year anniversary of the introduction of the technique of computer-generated random-dot stereograms and random-dot cinematograms into psychology, the impact of the technique on brain research and on the study of artificial intelligence is reviewed. The main finding-that stereoscopic depth perception (stereopsis), motion perception, and preattentive texture discrimination are basically bottom-up processes, which occur without the help of the top-down processes of cognition and semantic memory-greatly simplifies the study of these processes of early vision and permits the linking of human perception with monkey neurophysiology. Particularly interesting are the unexpected findings that stereopsis (assumed to be local) is a global process, while texture discrimination (assumed to be a global process, governed by statistics) is local, based on some conspicuous local features (textons). It is shown that the top-down process of "shape (depth) from shading" does not affect stereopsis, and some of the models of machine vision are evaluated. The asymmetry effect of human texture discrimination is discussed, together with recent nonlinear spatial filter models and a novel extension of the texton theory that can cope with the asymmetry problem. This didactic review attempts to introduce the physicist to the field of psychobiology and its problems-including metascientific problems of brain research, problems of scientific creativity, the state of artificial intelligence research (including connectionist neural networks) aimed at modeling brain activity, and the fundamental role of focal attention in mental events.

  1. Role of CD 11/CD 18 in neutrophil emigration during acute and recurrent Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced pneumonia in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Kumasaka, T.; Doyle, N. A.; Quinlan, W. M.; Graham, L.; Doerschuk, C. M.

    1996-01-01

    This study examined CD11/CD18-mediated adhesion in neutrophil emigration during acute and recurrent Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced pneumonia. Neutrophil emigration during acute pneumonia was studied in anti-CD18 antibody or murine-IgG-pretreated rabbits 4 hours after intrabronchial instillation of P. aeruginosa. To examine emigration in recurrent pneumonias, rabbits given P. aeruginosa on day 0 received anti-CD18 antibody or IgG on day 7. A second instillate was placed either at the initial site or in a separate lobe, and emigration into alveolar spaces was quantitated morphometrically after 4 hours. The results show that CD11/CD18 was required for neutrophil emigration in acute pneumonias and in recurrent pneumonias that occurred at a site distant from the initial infection. However, when the recurrent pneumonia occurred in the previously inflamed site, CD11/CD18 was not required. When the same number of organisms were instilled on days 0 and 7, emigration was reduced to 15 to 20 percent of the number that migrated initially and only CD18-independent adhesion pathways were used. Increasing the concentration of organisms threefold increased emigration through both CD18-dependent and CD18-independent pathways. These data indicate that P. aeruginosa induces CD11/CD18-dependent emigration during acute pneumonia and recurrent pneumonia at previously uninflamed sites. However, adhesion pathways are altered in regions of chronic inflammation, and a greater proportion of neutrophil emigration occurs through CD11/CD18-independent pathways. PMID:8644870

  2. Dosimetry Modeling for Focal Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Qaisieh, Bashar; Mason, Josh; Bownes, Peter; Henry, Ann; Dickinson, Louise; Ahmed, Hashim U.; Emberton, Mark; Langley, Stephen

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Focal brachytherapy targeted to an individual lesion(s) within the prostate may reduce side effects experienced with whole-gland brachytherapy. The outcomes of a consensus meeting on focal prostate brachytherapy were used to investigate optimal dosimetry of focal low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy targeted using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and transperineal template prostate mapping (TPM) biopsy, including the effects of random and systematic seed displacements and interseed attenuation (ISA). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were selected according to clinical characteristics and concordance of TPM and mp-MRI. Retrospectively, 3 treatment plans were analyzed for each case: whole-gland (WG), hemi-gland (hemi), and ultra-focal (UF) plans, with 145-Gy prescription dose and identical dose constraints for each plan. Plan robustness to seed displacement and ISA were assessed using Monte Carlo simulations. Results: WG plans used a mean 28 needles and 81 seeds, hemi plans used 17 needles and 56 seeds, and UF plans used 12 needles and 25 seeds. Mean D90 (minimum dose received by 90% of the target) and V100 (percentage of the target that receives 100% dose) values were 181.3 Gy and 99.8% for the prostate in WG plans, 195.7 Gy and 97.8% for the hemi-prostate in hemi plans, and 218.3 Gy and 99.8% for the focal target in UF plans. Mean urethra D10 was 205.9 Gy, 191.4 Gy, and 92.4 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Mean rectum D2 cm{sup 3} was 107.5 Gy, 77.0 Gy, and 42.7 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Focal plans were more sensitive to seed displacement errors: random shifts with a standard deviation of 4 mm reduced mean target D90 by 14.0%, 20.5%, and 32.0% for WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. ISA has a similar impact on dose-volume histogram parameters for all plan types. Conclusions: Treatment planning for focal LDR brachytherapy is feasible. Dose constraints are easily met with a notable

  3. SOI diode uncooled infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimata, Masafumi; Ueno, Masashi; Takeda, Munehisa; Seto, Toshiki

    2006-02-01

    An uncooled infrared focal plane array (IR FPA) is a MEMS device that integrates an array of tiny thermal infrared detector pixels. An SOI diode uncooled IR FPA is a type that uses freestanding single-crystal diodes as temperature sensors and has various advantages over the other MEMS-based uncooled IR FPAs. Since the first demonstration of an SOI diode uncooled IR FPA in 1999, the pixel structure has been improved by developing sophisticated MEMS processes. The most advanced pixel has a three-level structure that has an independent metal reflector for interference infrared absorption between the temperature sensor (bottom level) and the infrared-absorbing thin metal film (top level). This structure makes it possible to design pixels with lower thermal conductance by allocating more area for thermal isolation without reducing infrared absorption. The new MEMS process for the three-level structure includes a XeF II dry bulk silicon etching process and a double organic sacrificial layer surface micromachining process. Employing advanced MEMS technology, we have developed a 640 x 480-element SOI diode uncooled IR FPA with 25-μm square pixels. The noise equivalent temperature difference of the FPA is 40 mK with f/1.0 optics. This result clearly demonstrates the great potential of the SOI diode uncooled IR FPA for high-end applications. In this paper, we explain the advances and state-of-the-art technology of the SOI diode uncooled IR FPA.

  4. Early non-invasive ventilation treatment for severe influenza pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Masclans, J R; Pérez, M; Almirall, J; Lorente, L; Marqués, A; Socias, L; Vidaur, L; Rello, J

    2013-03-01

    The role of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in acute respiratory failure caused by viral pneumonia remains controversial. Our objective was to evaluate the use of NIV in a cohort of (H1N1)v pneumonia. Usefulness and success of NIV were assessed in a prospective, observational registry of patients with influenza A (H1N1) virus pneumonia in 148 Spanish intensive care units (ICUs) in 2009-10. Significant variables for NIV success were included in a multivariate analysis. In all, 685 patients with confirmed influenza A (H1N1)v viral pneumonia were admitted to participating ICUs; 489 were ventilated, 177 with NIV. The NIV was successful in 72 patients (40.7%), the rest required intubation. Low Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, low Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) and absence of renal failure were associated with NIV success. Success of NIV was independently associated with fewer than two chest X-ray quadrant opacities (OR 3.5) and no vasopressor requirement (OR 8.1). However, among patients with two or more quadrant opacities, a SOFA score ≤7 presented a higher success rate than those with SOFA score >7 (OR 10.7). Patients in whom NIV was successful required shorter ventilation time, shorter ICU stay and hospital stay than NIV failure. In patients in whom NIV failed, the delay in intubation did not increase mortality (26.5% versus 24.2%). Clinicians used NIV in 25.8% of influenza A (H1N1)v viral pneumonia admitted to ICU, and treatment was effective in 40.6% of them. NIV success was associated with shorter hospital stay and mortality similar to non-ventilated patients. NIV failure was associated with a mortality similar to those who were intubated from the start. PMID:22404211

  5. Oral and Airway Microbiota in HIV-Infected Pneumonia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, Shoko; Fei, Matthew; Huang, Delphine; Fong, Serena; Subramanian, Anuradha; Grieco, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Despite the increased frequency of recurrent pneumonia in HIV-infected patients and recent studies linking the airway bacterial community (microbiota) to acute and chronic respiratory infection, little is known of the oral and airway microbiota that exist in these individuals and their propensity to harbor pathogens despite antimicrobial treatment for acute pneumonia. This pilot study compared paired samples of the oral and airway microbiota from 15 hospitalized HIV-infected patients receiving antimicrobial treatment for acute pneumonia. Total DNA was extracted, bacterial burden was assessed by quantitative PCR, and amplified 16S rRNA was profiled for microbiome composition using a phylogenetic microarray (16S rRNA PhyloChip). Though the bacterial burden of the airway was significantly lower than that of the oral cavity, microbiota in both niches were comparably diverse. However, oral and airway microbiota exhibited niche specificity. Oral microbiota were characterized by significantly increased relative abundance of multiple species associated with the mouth, including members of the Bacteroides, Firmicutes, and TM7 phyla, while airway microbiota were primarily characterized by a relative expansion of the Proteobacteria. Twenty-two taxa were detected in both niches, including Streptococcus bovis and Chryseobacterium species, pathogens associated with HIV-infected populations. In addition, we compared the airway microbiota of five of these patients to those of five non-HIV-infected pneumonia patients from a previous study. Compared to the control population, HIV-infected patients exhibited relative increased abundance of a large number of phylogenetically distinct taxa, which included several known or suspected pathogenic organisms, suggesting that recurrent pneumonia in HIV-infected populations may be related to the presence of these species. PMID:22760045

  6. Epidemiological study of enzootic pneumonia in dairy calves in Saskatchewan.

    PubMed Central

    Van Donkersgoed, J; Ribble, C S; Boyer, L G; Townsend, H G

    1993-01-01

    A field study involving 325 calves from 17 dairy herds in Saskatchewan was conducted to determine the risk of enzootic pneumonia and to assess its association with a number of factors. Two different case definitions of pneumonia were used in the analyses: the first was based on producers' treatment risk (CASE1) and the second was based on semimonthly clinical examinations of calves by the research veterinarian (CASE2). The risk of pneumonia based on CASE1 was 39% and on CASE2 was 29%. The measure of agreement between CASE1 and CASE2 at the calf level of analysis was poor (kappa = 0.24, SE = 0.02) and at the herd level of analysis was moderate (kappa = 0.40, SE = 0.12). The mortality risk from pneumonia was 1.8% and a variety of infectious organisms were isolated from pneumonic lungs. Twenty-seven percent of the calves had inadequate (total IgG < or = 800 mg/dL) levels of passively acquired antibodies as measured by radial immunodiffusion. The proportion of seropositive titers in calves within the first two weeks of age was 94% to parainfluenza 3 virus (PI3V) and bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), 73% to Pasteurella haemolytica (Ph), 68% to bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), 67% to infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (IBRV), 46% to Mycoplasma dispar (Md), 44% to Haemophilus somnus (Hs), and 21% to Mycoplasma bovis (Mb). At the calf level of analysis and after adjusting for clustering, there was a negative association (p = 0.10) between the diagnosis of pneumonia based on CASE2 and total IgG levels and Ph titers (rPh).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8269363

  7. Biofilm formation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Domenech, Mirian; García, Ernesto; Moscoso, Miriam

    2012-07-01

    Biofilm-grown bacteria are refractory to antimicrobial agents and show an increased capacity to evade the host immune system. In recent years, studies have begun on biofilm formation by Streptococcus pneumoniae, an important human pathogen, using a variety of in vitro model systems. The bacterial cells in these biofilms are held together by an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, proteins and, possibly, polysaccharide(s). Although neither the precise nature of these proteins nor the composition of the putative polysaccharide(s) is clear, it is known that choline-binding proteins are required for successful biofilm formation. Further, many genes appear to be involved, although the role of each appears to vary when biofilms are produced in batch or continuous culture. Prophylactic and therapeutic measures need to be developed to fight S. pneumoniae biofilm formation. However, much care needs to be taken when choosing strains for such studies because different S. pneumoniae isolates can show remarkable genomic differences. Multispecies and in vivo biofilm models must also be developed to provide a more complete understanding of biofilm formation and maintenance. PMID:21906265

  8. Biofilm formation in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Domenech, Mirian; García, Ernesto; Moscoso, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    Summary Biofilm‐grown bacteria are refractory to antimicrobial agents and show an increased capacity to evade the host immune system. In recent years, studies have begun on biofilm formation by Streptococcus pneumoniae, an important human pathogen, using a variety of in vitro model systems. The bacterial cells in these biofilms are held together by an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, proteins and, possibly, polysaccharide(s). Although neither the precise nature of these proteins nor the composition of the putative polysaccharide(s) is clear, it is known that choline‐binding proteins are required for successful biofilm formation. Further, many genes appear to be involved, although the role of each appears to vary when biofilms are produced in batch or continuous culture. Prophylactic and therapeutic measures need to be developed to fight S. pneumoniae biofilm formation. However, much care needs to be taken when choosing strains for such studies because different S. pneumoniae isolates can show remarkable genomic differences. Multispecies and in vivo biofilm models must also be developed to provide a more complete understanding of biofilm formation and maintenance. PMID:21906265

  9. Focal adhesion kinases in adhesion structures and disease.

    PubMed

    Eleniste, Pierre P; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases. PMID:22888421

  10. Focal Adhesion Kinases in Adhesion Structures and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Eleniste, Pierre P.; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases. PMID:22888421

  11. Epidemiology of Invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae with Hypermucoviscosity Phenotype in a Research Colony of Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Robin L; Whitehouse, Chris A; Taylor, Justin K; Selby, Edward B

    2009-01-01

    Invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae with hypermucoviscosity phenotype (HMV K. pneumoniae) is an emerging human pathogen that, over the past 20 y, has resulted in a distinct clinical syndrome characterized by pyogenic liver abscesses sometimes complicated by bacteremia, meningitis, and endophthalmitis. Infections occur predominantly in Taiwan and other Asian countries, but HMV K. pneumoniae is considered an emerging infectious disease in the United States and other Western countries. In 2005, fatal multisystemic disease was attributed to HMV K. pneumoniae in African green monkeys (AGM) at our institution. After identification of a cluster of subclinically infected macaques in March and April 2008, screening of all colony nonhuman primates by oropharyngeal and rectal culture revealed 19 subclinically infected rhesus and cynomolgus macaques. PCR testing for 2 genes associated with HMV K. pneumoniae, rmpA and magA, suggested genetic variability in the samples. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis on a subset of clinical isolates confirmed a high degree of genetic diversity between the samples. Environmental testing did not reveal evidence of aerosol or droplet transmission of the organism in housing areas. Further research is needed to characterize HMV K. pneumoniae, particularly with regard to genetic differences among bacterial strains and their relationship to human disease and to the apparent susceptibility of AGM to this organism. PMID:20034435

  12. Unilateral Isolated Proximal Femoral Focal Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Doğer, Emek; Köpük, Şule Y.; Çakıroğlu, Yiğit; Çakır, Özgür; Yücesoy, Gülseren

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To discuss a patient with a prenatal diagnosis of unilateral isolated femoral focal deficiency. Case. Antenatal diagnosis of unilateral isolated femoral focal deficiency was made at 20 weeks of gestation. The length of left femur was shorter than the right, and fetal femur length was below the fifth percentile. Proximal femoral focal deficiency was diagnosed. After delivery, the diagnosis was confirmed with skeletal radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging. In prenatal ultrasonographic examination, the early recognition and exclusion of skeletal dysplasias is important; moreover, treatment plans should be initiated, and valuable information should be provided to the family. PMID:23984135

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase-Producing K. pneumoniae Siphophage Sushi

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Dat T.; Lessor, Lauren E.; Cahill, Jesse L.; Rasche, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium in the family Enterobacteriaceae. It is associated with numerous nosocomial infections, including respiratory and urinary tract infections in humans. The following reports the complete genome sequence of K. pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae T1-like siphophage Sushi and describes its major features. PMID:26337889

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase-Producing K. pneumoniae Siphophage Sushi.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dat T; Lessor, Lauren E; Cahill, Jesse L; Rasche, Eric S; Kuty Everett, Gabriel F

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium in the family Enterobacteriaceae. It is associated with numerous nosocomial infections, including respiratory and urinary tract infections in humans. The following reports the complete genome sequence of K. pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae T1-like siphophage Sushi and describes its major features. PMID:26337889

  15. Klebsiella pneumoniae inoculants for enhancing plant growth

    DOEpatents

    Triplett, Eric W.; Kaeppler, Shawn M.; Chelius, Marisa K.

    2008-07-01

    A biological inoculant for enhancing the growth of plants is disclosed. The inoculant includes the bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101, Pantoea agglomerans P102, Klebsiella pneumoniae 342, Klebsiella pneumoniae zmvsy, Herbaspirillum seropedicae Z152, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PA15, with or without a carrier. The inoculant also includes strains of the bacterium Pantoea agglomerans and K. pneumoniae which are able to enhance the growth of cereal grasses. Also disclosed are the novel bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101 and P102, and Klebsiella pneumoniae 342 and zmvsy.

  16. Intravenous ciprofloxacin versus ceftazidime for treatment of nosocomial pneumonia and urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Rapp, R P; Billeter, M; Hatton, J; Young, A B; Tibbs, P A; Dempsey, R J

    1991-01-01

    Intravenous ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime were compared for efficacy in the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia and urinary tract infection (UTI). Patients with nosocomial pneumonia were randomized to receive ciprofloxacin (as the lactate salt) 300 mg i.v. every 12 hours or ceftazidime (with sodium carbonate) 2 g i.v. every eight hours. Patients with UTI were randomized to receive ciprofloxacin 200 mg i.v. every 12 hours or ceftazidime 1 g i.v. every eight hours. Sputum and urine specimens were collected before, during, and after therapy. For patients with pneumonia, the organisms most frequently isolated before treatment began were Escherichia coli, Haemophilus influenzae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis. Of the 17 pneumonia patients who completed ciprofloxacin treatment, 15 (88%) had resolution of signs and symptoms or improvement. Of the 15 ceftazidime-treated pneumonia patients, 13 (87%) had resolution or improvement. Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus species, Acinetobacter species, and K. pneumoniae infections persisted for the ciprofloxacin treatment failures. Infections by Enterobacter cloacae and Acinetobacter species persisted for the ceftazidime treatment failures. For UTI patients, E. coli was the organism most frequently isolated before treatment. All 14 UTI patients who completed treatment showed resolution or improvement. In the ciprofloxacin group two patients were superinfected by Enterococcus species, and in the ceftazidime group there were two superinfections by Enterococcus species and one by Enterobacter cloacae. Intravenous ciprofloxacin was as effective as ceftazidime in the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia and urinary tract infection. Caution should be exercised when treating serious infections by streptococci or staphylococci. PMID:1999086

  17. Mechanisms of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia-induced intestinal epithelial apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Erin E; Jung, Enjae; Breed, Elise; Dominguez, Jessica A; Liang, Zhe; Clark, Andrew T; Dunne, W Michael; Burd, Eileen M; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2012-07-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia-induced sepsis is a common cause of morbidity in the intensive care unit. Although pneumonia is initiated in the lungs, extrapulmonary manifestations occur commonly. In light of the key role the intestine plays in the pathophysiology of sepsis, we sought to determine whether MRSA pneumonia induces intestinal injury. FVB/N mice were subjected to MRSA or sham pneumonia and killed 24 h later. Septic animals had a marked increase in intestinal epithelial apoptosis by both hematoxylin-eosin and active caspase 3 staining. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus-induced intestinal apoptosis was associated with an increase in the expression of the proapoptotic proteins Bid and Bax and the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL in the mitochondrial pathway. In the receptor-mediated pathway, MRSA pneumonia induced an increase in Fas ligand but decreased protein levels of Fas, FADD, pFADD, TNF-R1, and TRADD. To assess the functional significance of these changes, MRSA pneumonia was induced in mice with genetic manipulations in proteins in either the mitochondrial or receptor-mediated pathways. Both Bid-/- mice and animals with intestine-specific overexpression of Bcl-2 had decreased intestinal apoptosis compared with wild-type animals. In contrast, Fas ligand-/- mice had no alterations in apoptosis. To determine if these findings were organism-specific, similar experiments were performed in mice subjected to Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Pseudomonas aeruginosa induced gut apoptosis, but unlike MRSA, this was associated with increased Bcl-2 and TNF-R1 and decreased Fas. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus pneumonia thus induces organism-specific changes in intestinal apoptosis via changes in both the mitochondrial and receptor-mediated pathways, although the former may be more functionally significant. PMID:22592747

  18. Mechanisms of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia-induced intestinal epithelial apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, Erin E.; Jung, Enjae; Breed, Elise; Dominguez, Jessica A.; Liang, Zhe; Clark, Andrew T.; Dunne, W. Michael; Burd, Eileen M.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2012-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia-induced sepsis is a common cause of morbidity in the intensive care unit. Although pneumonia is initiated in the lungs, extrapulmonary manifestations occur commonly. In light of the key role the intestine plays in the pathophysiology of sepsis, we sought to determine whether MRSA pneumonia induces intestinal injury. FVB/N mice were subjected to MRSA or sham pneumonia and sacrificed 24 hours later. Septic animals had a marked increase in intestinal epithelial apoptosis by both H&E and active caspase-3 staining. MRSA-induced intestinal apoptosis was associated with an increase in the expression of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bid and Bax and the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL in the mitochondrial pathway. In the receptor-mediated pathway, MRSA pneumonia induced an increase in Fas-ligand but decreased protein levels of Fas, FADD, pFADD, TNF-R1 and TRADD. To assess the functional significance of these changes, MRSA pneumonia was induced in mice with genetic manipulations in proteins in either the mitochondrial or receptor-mediated pathways. Both Bid−/− mice and animals with intestine specific overexpression of Bcl-2 had decreased intestinal apoptosis compared to wild type animals. In contrast, Fas-ligand−/− mice had no alterations in apoptosis. To determine if these findings were organism-specific, similar experiments were performed in mice subjected to Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. P. aeruginosa induced gut apoptosis, but unlike MRSA, this was associated with increased Bcl-2 and TNF-R1 and decreased Fas. MRSA pneumonia thus induces organism-specific changes in intestinal apoptosis via changes in both the mitochondrial and receptor-mediated pathways although the former may be more functionally significant. PMID:22592747

  19. Reversed Halo Sign on CT as a Presentation of Lymphocytic Interstitial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Marcus D; Grajo, Joseph R; Karamsadkar, Neel D; Steffensen, Thora S; Hazelton, Todd R

    2013-01-01

    A 52 year-old African American female with a past medical history of symptomatic uterine fibroids and increasing abdominal circumference underwent abdominal computed tomography (CT) as part of her workup. Because of an abnormality in the left lower lobe, CT of the chest was subsequently performed and showed a focal region of discontinuous crescentic consolidation with central ground glass opacification in the right lower lobe, suggestive of the reversed halo sign. The patient underwent percutaneous CT-guided core biopsy of the lesion, which demonstrated lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia, a benign lymphoproliferative disease characterized histologically by small lymphocytes and plasma cells. This case report describes the first histologically confirmed presentation of lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia with the reversed halo sign on CT. PMID:24421923

  20. The Multidisciplinary Swallowing Team Approach Decreases Pneumonia Onset in Acute Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Shiro; Hirayama, Junko; Nakamori, Masahiro; Yoshikawa, Mineka; Nezu, Tomohisa; Kubo, Satoshi; Nagano, Yuka; Nagao, Akiko; Yamane, Naoya; Nishikawa, Yuichi; Takamoto, Megumi; Ueno, Hiroki; Ochi, Kazuhide; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Hiromi; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia occurs in acute stroke patients at high rates, and many of them develop aspiration pneumonia. Team approaches with the cooperation of various professionals have the power to improve the quality of medical care, utilizing the specialized knowledge and skills of each professional. In our hospital, a multidisciplinary participatory swallowing team was organized. The aim of this study was to clarify the influence of a team approach on dysphagia by comparing the rates of pneumonia in acute stroke patients prior to and post team organization. All consecutive acute stroke patients who were admitted to our hospital between April 2009 and March 2014 were registered. We analyzed the difference in the rate of pneumonia onset between the periods before team organization (prior period) and after team organization (post period). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using a Cox proportional hazards model to determine the predictors of pneumonia. We recruited 132 acute stroke patients from the prior period and 173 patients from the post period. Pneumonia onset was less frequent in the post period compared with the prior period (6.9% vs. 15.9%, respectively; p = 0.01). Based on a multivariate analysis using a Cox proportional hazards model, it was determined that a swallowing team approach was related to pneumonia onset independent from the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score on admission (adjusted hazard ratio 0.41, 95% confidence interval 0.19–0.84, p = 0.02). The multidisciplinary participatory swallowing team effectively decreased the pneumonia onset in acute stroke patients. PMID:27138162

  1. Th1/Th2 Cytokine Profile and Its Diagnostic Value in Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Liu, Yu-jie; Zhao, Xiao-le; Shang, Shi-qiang; Wu, Lang; Ye, Qing; Xu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background: The levels of Th1/Th2 cytokine can alter in pathogenic infection in children with pneumonia. Objectives: To evaluate Th1/Th2 cytokine profile and its diagnostic value in M. pneumoniae pneumonia in children. Patients and Methods: Children with M. pneumoniae mono-infection and 30 healthy children were tested with cytokines assay. We used real time PCR to detect M. pneumoniae in children with pneumonia. Results: M. pneumoniae test was positive in 2188 (16.62%) out of 13161 pneumonia children. Children aged 5 - 9 years had the highest rate and summer was a season with high rate of M. pneumoniae incidence in Zhejiang province. During the course of study, in 526 pneumonia children with M. pneumoniae mono-infection and 30 healthy children cytokines assay was performed. IL-2 level of M. pneumoniae pneumonia children was lower than that of healthy children (median levels, pg/mL: IL-2: 3.2 vs. 5.7, P = 0.00), while IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ were higher than in healthy children (median levels, pg/mL: IL-4: 3.2 vs. 1.5, P = 0.00; IL-10: 5.6 vs. 2.5, P = 0.001; IFN-γ: 20.4 vs. 4.8, P = 0.001). Conclusions: IL-2 decreases and IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ increase in children with M. pneumoniae pneumonia, which has a promising prospect in diagnosis of this disease in clinical practice. PMID:26848377

  2. Clinical epidemiology of the global expansion of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases

    PubMed Central

    Munoz-Price, L Silvia; Poirel, Laurent; Bonomo, Robert A; Schwaber, Mitchell J; Daikos, George L; Cormican, Martin; Cornaglia, Giuseppe; Garau, Javier; Gniadkowski, Marek; Hayden, Mary K; Kumarasamy, Karthikeyan; Livermore, David M; Maya, Juan J; Nordmann, Patrice; Patel, Jean B; Paterson, David L; Pitout, Johann; Villegas, Maria Virginia; Wang, Hui; Woodford, Neil; Quinn, John P

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases (KPCs) were originally identified in the USA in 1996. Since then, these versatile β-lactamases have spread internationally among Gram-negative bacteria, especially K pneumoniae, although their precise epidemiology is diverse across countries and regions. The mortality described among patients infected with organisms positive for KPC is high, perhaps as a result of the limited antibiotic options remaining (often colistin, tigecycline, or aminoglycosides). Triple drug combinations using colistin, tigecycline, and imipenem have recently been associated with improved survival among patients with bacteraemia. In this Review, we summarise the epidemiology of KPCs across continents, and discuss issues around detection, present antibiotic options and those in development, treatment outcome and mortality, and infection control. In view of the limitations of present treatments and the paucity of new drugs in the pipeline, infection control must be our primary defence for now. PMID:23969216

  3. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia in patients treated with systemic immunosuppressive agents for dermatologic conditions: a systematic review with recommendations for prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Santiago, Tania M; Wetter, David A; Kalaaji, Amer N; Limper, Andrew H; Lehman, Julia S

    2016-08-01

    Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia is an opportunistic infection associated with substantial rates of mortality in immunosuppressed patients. Prophylaxis recommendations are mostly targeted toward patients with non-dermatologic diagnoses. This study was conducted to determine when dermatology patients treated with immunosuppressive medications should be offered P. jiroveci pneumonia prophylaxis. We searched the literature from January 1, 1993, to December 31, 2013, using terms relating to P. jiroveci pneumonia and dermatologic diagnoses to analyze the clinical characteristics of previously affected patients. Guidelines for P. jiroveci pneumonia prophylaxis from other medical fields were also analyzed. Of 17 dermatology patients reported to have contracted P. jiroveci pneumonia, eight (47.1%) died of the pneumonia. Risk factors included lack of prophylaxis, systemic corticosteroid therapy, lymphopenia, hypoalbuminemia, low serum CD4 counts, comorbid pulmonary or renal disease, malignancy, and prior organ transplantation. The present conclusions are limited by heterogeneity among the selected studies and limitations in their identification and selection. However, P. jiroveci pneumonia in dermatology patients is associated with a high mortality rate. Based on our analysis, we propose that prophylaxis be considered in dermatology patients in whom treatment with systemic corticosteroids at doses exceeding 20 mg/day or treatment with corticosteroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents is anticipated for at least 4 weeks, and in patients with additional risk factors for P. jiroveci pneumonia. PMID:27009930

  4. Strain Typing Methods and Molecular Epidemiology of Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Patricia; Nevez, Gilles; Hauser, Philippe M.; Kovacs, Joseph A.; Unnasch, Thomas R.; Lundgren, Bettina

    2004-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) caused by the opportunistic fungal agent Pneumocystis jirovecii (formerly P. carinii) continues to cause illness and death in HIV-infected patients. In the absence of a culture system to isolate and maintain live organisms, efforts to type and characterize the organism have relied on polymerase chain reaction–based approaches. Studies using these methods have improved understanding of PCP epidemiology, shedding light on sources of infection, transmission patterns, and potential emergence of antimicrobial resistance. One concern, however, is the lack of guidance regarding the appropriateness of different methods and standardization of these methods, which would facilitate comparing results reported by different laboratories. PMID:15504257

  5. Sighting optics including an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length

    DOEpatents

    Crandall, David Lynn

    2011-08-01

    One embodiment of sighting optics according to the teachings provided herein may include a front sight and a rear sight positioned in spaced-apart relation. The rear sight includes an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length. The first focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a distance separating the optical element and the front sight and the second focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a target distance. The optical element thus brings into simultaneous focus, for a user, images of the front sight and the target.

  6. PcpA Promotes Higher Levels of Infection and Modulates Recruitment of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells during Pneumococcal Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Walker, Melissa M; Novak, Lea; Widener, Rebecca; Grubbs, James Aaron; King, Janice; Hale, Joanetha Y; Ochs, Martina M; Myers, Lisa E; Briles, David E; Deshane, Jessy

    2016-03-01

    We used two different infection models to investigate the kinetics of the PcpA-dependent pneumococcal disease in mice. In a bacteremic pneumonia model, we observed a PcpA-dependent increase in bacterial burden in the lungs, blood, liver, bronchoalveolar lavage, and spleens of mice at 24 h postinfection. This PcpA-dependent effect on bacterial burden appeared earlier (within 12 h) in the focal pneumonia model, which lacks bacteremia or sepsis. Histological changes show that the ability of pneumococci to make PcpA was associated with unresolved inflammation in both models of infection. Using our bacteremic pneumonia model we further investigated the effects of PcpA on recruitment of innate immune regulatory cells. The presence of PcpA was associated with increased IL-6 levels, suppressed production of TRAIL, and reduced infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells. The ability of pneumococci to make PcpA negatively modulated both the infiltration and apoptosis of macrophages and the recruitment of myeloid-derived suppressor-like cells. The latter have been shown to facilitate the clearance and control of bacterial pneumonia. Taken together, the ability to make PcpA was strongly associated with increased bacterial burden, inflammation, and negative regulation of innate immune cell recruitment to the lung tissue during bacteremic pneumonia. PMID:26829988

  7. Macrolide-Resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae, United States.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaotian; Lee, Stella; Selvarangan, Rangaraj; Qin, Xuan; Tang, Yi-Wei; Stiles, Jeffrey; Hong, Tao; Todd, Kathleen; Ratliff, Amy E; Crabb, Donna M; Xiao, Li; Atkinson, T Prescott; Waites, Ken B

    2015-08-01

    Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MRMP) is highly prevalent in Asia and is now being reported from Europe. Few data on MRMP are available in the United States. Using genotypic and phenotypic methods, we detected high-level MRMP in 13.2% of 91 M. pneumoniae--positive specimens from 6 US locations. PMID:26196107

  8. Pericardiectomy for Pleuropericardial Effusion Complicating Bacterial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Quarti, Andrea; de Benedictis, Fernando Maria; Soura, Elli; Pozzi, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Severe pericardial effusion is a rare complication of bacterial pneumonia and it usually disappears under medical treatment. Herein we report a case of a girl with a congenital immunodeficient syndrome and bacterial pneumonia, who developed recurrent and life-threatening pericardial effusion refractory to medical treatment. She was finally treated with pericardiectomy. PMID:20585369

  9. Gallium-67 pulmonary uptake in eosinophilic pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Morais, J.; Carrier, L.; Gariepy, G.; Le Bel, L.; Chartrand, R.; Picard, D.

    1988-01-01

    Eosinophilic pneumonia is usually diagnosed based on the findings on chest x-ray, white blood count, and transbronchial biopsy. After reporting a case of Ga-67 lung uptake in eosinophilic pneumonia, its histopathology is discussed and the mechanisms of Ga-67 uptake by inflammatory lesions are reviewed.

  10. Supporting prostate cancer focal therapy: a multidisciplinary International Consensus of Experts ("ICE").

    PubMed

    Reis, Leonardo O; Billis, Athanase; Zequi, Stenio C; Tobias-Machado, Marcos; Viana, Publio; Cerqueira, Michael; Ward, John F

    2014-06-01

    Prostate cancer is a common malignancy among men, and the current screening, imaging and sampling approaches aim to detect early-stage, organ-confined disease. In such scenario, focal prostate cancer therapy currently relies on the index lesion concept as the dominant lesion that drives the disease natural history. Focal therapy demands the essential imaging and sampling techniques to strategically locate and qualify the disease, but, despite advances in technology, prostate imaging and biopsy have several limitations that need to be overcome if focal therapy is to be developed further. The I Prostate Cancer Focal Treatment International Symposium was convened to foster discussion on this topic that sits at the crossroads of multiple disciplines (Urology, Pathology, Radiology, Radiation Oncology and Medical Oncology) all of which were represented for this comprehensive multidisciplinary review of the current literature. PMID:24597940

  11. Actin cap associated focal adhesions and their distinct role in cellular mechanosensing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hwee; Khatau, Shyam B.; Feng, Yunfeng; Walcott, Sam; Sun, Sean X.; Longmore, Gregory D.; Wirtz, Denis

    2012-01-01

    The ability for cells to sense and adapt to different physical microenvironments plays a critical role in development, immune responses, and cancer metastasis. Here we identify a small subset of focal adhesions that terminate fibers in the actin cap, a highly ordered filamentous actin structure that is anchored to the top of the nucleus by the LINC complexes; these differ from conventional focal adhesions in morphology, subcellular organization, movements, turnover dynamics, and response to biochemical stimuli. Actin cap associated focal adhesions (ACAFAs) dominate cell mechanosensing over a wide range of matrix stiffness, an ACAFA-specific function regulated by actomyosin contractility in the actin cap, while conventional focal adhesions are restrictively involved in mechanosensing for extremely soft substrates. These results establish the perinuclear actin cap and associated ACAFAs as major mediators of cellular mechanosensing and a critical element of the physical pathway that transduce mechanical cues all the way to the nucleus. PMID:22870384

  12. First Report of a Verona Integron-Encoded Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Infection in a Child in the United States.

    PubMed

    Tamma, Pranita D; Suwantarat, Nuntra; Rudin, Susan D; Logan, Latania K; Simner, Patricia J; Rojas, Laura J; Mojica, Maria F; Carroll, Karen C; Bonomo, Robert A

    2016-09-01

    We report the first case of a child in the United States infected with an organism producing a Verona Integron-Encoded Metallo-β-Lactamase. This child succumbed to a ventilator-associated pneumonia caused by a Klebsiella pneumoniae producing this resistance mechanism. PMID:27147714

  13. [Ventilator-associated pneumonia and other infections].

    PubMed

    Bobik, Piotr; Siemiątkowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    One of the fundamental elements of therapy in patients hospitalised in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is mechanical ventilation (MV). MV enables sufficient gas exchange in patients with severe respiratory insufficiency, thus preserving the proper functioning of organs and systems. However, clinical and experimental studies show that mechanical ventilation may cause severe complications, e.g. lung injury (VALI, VILI), systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and, on rare occasions, multiple organ failure (MOF). Mechanical ventilation and especially endotracheal intubation are associated also with higher risk of infectious complications of the respiratory system: ventilator-associated respiratory infection (VARI) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). The complications of the MV listed above have a significant influence on the length of treatment and also on the increase of the costs of therapy and mortality of patients who stay in an ICU. These negative effects of supported breathing are the reasons for intensive research to find new biological markers of inflammation and lung injury, more sensitive and specific diagnostic instruments, more effective methods of therapy, and programs of prevention. The purpose of this article is the presentation of current knowledge concerning VAP-related infections, to allow pulmonologists and general practitioners to become more familiar with the problem. Basic and the most important data concerning the definition, epidemiology, pathophysiology, microbiology, diagnostics, treatment, and prevention of VAP have been included. Additionally, ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis (VAT) was discussed. PMID:25133817

  14. Activation of IFN-γ/STAT/IRF-1 in Hepatic Responses to Klebsiella pneumoniae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Chun; Lu, Min-Chi; Lin, Chingju; Chiang, Ming-Ko; Jan, Ming-Shiou; Tang, Hui-Ling; Liu, Hsu-Chung; Lin, Wea-Lung; Huang, Chih-Yang; Chen, Chuan-Mu; Lai, Yi-Chyi

    2013-01-01

    Background Klebsiella pneumoniae-caused liver abscess (KLA) has become a health problem in Taiwan and is continually reported in other countries. Diabetes mellitus, the most common metabolic disorder, underlies half of the KLA patients in Taiwan. The clinical impact of KLA has been well-documented. Nevertheless, the molecular basis regarding how K. pneumoniae causes liver infection, particularly in diabetic individuals, remains unclear. Methodology/Principle Findings Auto-bioluminescence-expressing K. pneumoniae was inoculated into diabetic mice and age-match naïve control. With the use of in vivo imaging system, translocation of the bioluminescence-expressing K. pneumoniae from intestine to extraintestinal organs, mainly the liver, was noted in 80% of the diabetic mice, whereas the same bacteria causes extraintestinal infections in only 31% of naïve mice. Besides increased morbidity, the severity of hepatic tissue injury was also enhanced in the K. pneumoniae-infected diabetic mice. Upon K. pneumoniae infection, IFN-γ production was significantly evoked in the liver. To mediate IFN-γ signal, STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) 1 and 3 were activated in hepatocytes, and so was the expression of IRF (interferon regulatory factor)-1. Moreover, accumulation of neutrophils which was triggered by prolonged production of IL-1β and MIP-2, and significant increases in the level of active caspase 3 and phospho-eIF2α, were exclusively revealed in the K. pneumoniae-infected diabetic mice. Conclusion The activation of IFN-γ/STAT/IRF-1 signaling demonstrated by this work emphasizes the role of IFN-γ for mediating the hepatic response to K. pneumoniae infection. PMID:24223208

  15. Epidemiology and outcome of severe pneumococcal pneumonia admitted to intensive care unit: a multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) account for a high proportion of ICU admissions, with Streptococcus pneumoniae being the main pathogen responsible for these infections. However, little is known on the clinical features and outcomes of ICU patients with pneumococcal pneumonia. The aims of this study were to provide epidemiological data and to determine risk factors of mortality in patients admitted to ICU for severe S. pneumoniae CAP. Methods We performed a retrospective review of two prospectively-acquired multicentre ICU databases (2001-2008). Patients admitted for management of severe pneumococcal CAP were enrolled if they met the 2001 American Thoracic Society criteria for severe pneumonia, had life-threatening organ failure and had a positive microbiological sample for S. pneumoniae. Patients with bronchitis, aspiration pneumonia or with non-pulmonary pneumococcal infections were excluded. Results Two hundred and twenty two patients were included, with a median SAPS II score reaching 47 [36-64]. Acute respiratory failure (n = 154) and septic shock (n = 54) were their most frequent causes of ICU admission. Septic shock occurred in 170 patients (77%) and mechanical ventilation was required in 186 patients (84%); renal replacement therapy was initiated in 70 patients (32%). Bacteraemia was diagnosed in 101 patients. The prevalence of S. pneumoniae strains with decreased susceptibility to penicillin was 39.7%. Although antibiotherapy was adequate in 92.3% of cases, hospital mortality reached 28.8%. In multivariate analysis, independent risk factors for mortality were age (OR 1.05 (95% CI: 1.02-1.08)), male sex (OR 2.83 (95% CI: 1.16-6.91)) and renal replacement therapy (OR 3.78 (95% CI: 1.71-8.36)). Co-morbidities, macrolide administration, concomitant bacteremia or penicillin susceptibility did not influence outcome. Conclusions In ICU, mortality of pneumococcal CAP remains high despite adequate antimicrobial treatment. Baseline demographic data

  16. Focal Mechanism determination of local M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vales, Dina; Custório, Susana; Carrilho, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    We determine the focal mechanisms of local small (ML<3.9) earthquakes that occurred between 2013 and 2014 in mainland Portugal. These low magnitude events were recorded by several stations that provide first-motion polarity solutions. However, only few stations are located near the epicenter and record a waveform with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) high enough to allow full waveform modelling. To overcome this limitation, we used a new approach called cyclic scanning of the polarity solutions (CSPS) (Fojtíková and Zahradnik, 2014), which performs a joint inversion of full waveform and first motion polarities to retrieve the focal mechanism. This methodology has the advantage of yielding reliable focal mechanism solutions, even when high SNR waveforms are available from only a few near field stations (or in the limiting case, only with one single station). To apply the CSPS method one needs to: i) run the the FOCal MEChanism (FOCMEC) code (Snoke, 2003) to obtain a suite of the DC solutions corresponding to the first motion polarities, and then ii) perform the waveform modelling in order to decrease the uncertainty. The ISOLated Asperities (ISOLA) software (Sokos and Zahradník, 2008, 2013) is used in this second step. We applied this method to weak events recorded by a network of 30 broadband seismic stations that transmit data in real-time to Instituto Português do Mar e da Atmosfera (IPMA), the institution responsible for seismic monitoring in Portugal. We interpret the obtained fault plane solutions in light of active faults and regional tectonics, and in comparison with focal mechanisms previously inferred for events in the region. The focal mechanisms obtained for small earthquakes allow us to significantly expand the database of available focal mechanisms in mainland Portugal, contributing to the understanding of active deformation in the region.

  17. NMDA receptor binding in focal epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    McGinnity, C J; Koepp, M J; Hammers, A; Riaño Barros, D A; Pressler, R M; Luthra, S; Jones, P A; Trigg, W; Micallef, C; Symms, M R; Brooks, D J; Duncan, J S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate altered N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor availability in patients with focal epilepsies using positron emission tomography (PET) and [18F]GE-179, a ligand that selectively binds to the open NMDA receptor ion channel, which is thought to be overactive in epilepsy. Methods Eleven patients (median age 33 years, 6 males) with known frequent interictal epileptiform discharges had an [18F]GE-179 PET scan, in a cross-sectional study. MRI showed a focal lesion but discordant EEG changes in two, was non-localising with multifocal EEG abnormalities in two, and was normal in the remaining seven patients who all had multifocal EEG changes. Individual patient [18F]GE-179 volume-of-distribution (VT) images were compared between individual patients and a group of 10 healthy controls (47 years, 7 males) using Statistical Parametric Mapping. Results Individual analyses revealed a single cluster of focal VT increase in four patients; one with a single and one with multifocal MRI lesions, and two with normal MRIs. Post hoc analysis revealed that, relative to controls, patients not taking antidepressants had globally increased [18F]GE-179 VT (+28%; p<0.002), and the three patients taking an antidepressant drug had globally reduced [18F]GE-179 VT (−29%; p<0.002). There were no focal abnormalities common to the epilepsy group. Conclusions In patients with focal epilepsies, we detected primarily global increases of [18F]GE-179 VT consistent with increased NMDA channel activation, but reduced availability in those taking antidepressant drugs, consistent with a possible mode of action of this class of drugs. [18F]GE-179 PET showed focal accentuations of NMDA binding in 4 out of 11 patients, with difficult to localise and treat focal epilepsy. PMID:25991402

  18. Focal Plane Metrology for the LSST Camera

    SciTech Connect

    A Rasmussen, Andrew P.; Hale, Layton; Kim, Peter; Lee, Eric; Perl, Martin; Schindler, Rafe; Takacs, Peter; Thurston, Timothy; /SLAC

    2007-01-10

    Meeting the science goals for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) translates into a demanding set of imaging performance requirements for the optical system over a wide (3.5{sup o}) field of view. In turn, meeting those imaging requirements necessitates maintaining precise control of the focal plane surface (10 {micro}m P-V) over the entire field of view (640 mm diameter) at the operating temperature (T {approx} -100 C) and over the operational elevation angle range. We briefly describe the hierarchical design approach for the LSST Camera focal plane and the baseline design for assembling the flat focal plane at room temperature. Preliminary results of gravity load and thermal distortion calculations are provided, and early metrological verification of candidate materials under cold thermal conditions are presented. A detailed, generalized method for stitching together sparse metrology data originating from differential, non-contact metrological data acquisition spanning multiple (non-continuous) sensor surfaces making up the focal plane, is described and demonstrated. Finally, we describe some in situ alignment verification alternatives, some of which may be integrated into the camera's focal plane.

  19. Decreased Interleukin-10 Responses in Children with Severe Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Fang, Yuan; Liu, Boyu; Liu, Yan; Fei, Guanghe; Wang, Linding

    2016-01-01

    Several cytokines may play roles in the immunological pathogenesis of mycoplasmal pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae. In this study, we investigated serum cytokine profiles in children with mycoplasmal pneumonia. The serum levels of interleukin (IL)-8, IL-10, and IL-18 were examined using ELISA kits in 34 patients with M. pneumoniae infection (Group 1, 11 with severe mycoplasmal pneumonia; Group 2, 13 with mild mycoplasmal pneumonia; Group 3, 10 with asthma) and 32 age-matched, non-infected controls. The serum levels of IL-8, IL-10, and IL-18 increased significantly in patients with mycoplasmal pneumonia compared with those in controls (P<0.01). The serum levels of IL-10 decreased significantly in Group 1 compared with those in Group 2 (P<0.01). The serum levels of IL-18 increased significantly in Group 1 compared with those in Group 2 (P<0.01). The serum levels of IL-10 and IL-18 decreased significantly in 10 M. pneumoniae-infected patients with asthma compared with those in 24 M. pneumoniae-infected patients without asthma (P<0.01). We examined the level of interleukins (IL-8, IL-10 and IL-18) after the patients started therapy. The data showed that IL-18 were lower after therapy (P<0.01). Collectively, our data suggested that these cytokines may be involved in the pathogenesis of mycoplasmal pneumonia. PMID:26751073

  20. Chlamydia pneumoniae infection among healthy children and children hospitalised with pneumonia in Greece.

    PubMed

    Triga, M G; Anthracopoulos, M B; Saikku, P; Syrogiannopoulos, G A

    2002-04-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae has been recognized as a cause of respiratory tract infection in humans, and its prevalence has been shown to vary among different age groups and populations. The prevalence of Chlamydia pneumoniae antibody was determined by serological investigation in 343 healthy children and in 77 children consecutively hospitalised for pneumonia in southwestern Greece. Seventy-eight (22.7%) healthy children had IgG Chlamydia pneumoniae titers > or =1/8. The prevalence of Chlamydia pneumoniae antibody in the age groups 6 months-5 years, 6-9 years and 10-15 years was 7.9%, 11.4% and 36%, respectively. One child hospitalised for pneumonia had serological results consistent with acute Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. The results of the present study suggest a low prevalence of Chlamydia pneumoniae antibody among preschoolers in Greece, followed by a steep rise in children 10-15 years of age. Chlamydia pneumoniae is not a common etiologic agent of childhood pneumonia requiring hospitalisation. PMID:12072942

  1. Not your typical pneumonia: a case of exogenous lipoid pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Ashley; Rouf, Emran; Whittle, Jeff

    2007-11-01

    The constellation of chronic cough, dyspnea, and hemoptysis can include a broad range of differential diagnoses. Although uncommon, exogenous lipoid pneumonia (ELP) should be considered when patients present with this symptom complex. We report a case of a 72-year-old female who presented with hemoptysis, cough, and dyspnea. The admission computed tomography scan of the chest revealed progressive interstitial infiltrates. Bronchoscopy revealed diffuse erythema without bleeding. Culture and cytology of lavage fluid were negative. Open-lung biopsy revealed numerous lipid-laden macrophages and multinucleated foreign-body giant cells. On further questioning, the patient admitted to the daily use of mineral oil for constipation. The diagnosis of ELP was made. The literature review revealed that many cases typically present with chronic cough with or without dyspnea. Our case illustrates an unusual presenting symptom of hemoptysis and the need to identify patients who can be at risk of developing this rare condition. PMID:17846847

  2. Histopathology of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in immunocompetent laboratory rats

    PubMed Central

    KIM, HYUN-SOO; DO, SUNG-IM; KIM, YOUN WHA

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of idiopathic pulmonary lesions in laboratory rats, characterized by lymphohistiocytic interstitial pneumonia with dense perivascular lymphoid cuffs, has been reported over the past decade. Although the term rat respiratory virus (RRV) was adopted to confer a putative viral etiology to the idiopathic pulmonary lesions, the etiology of this disease remains to be elucidated. Recently, inflammatory lesions have been observed in the lungs of immunocompetent laboratory rats similar to those previously described. Based on the latest evidence indicating that Pneumocystis carinii (P. carinii), and not putative RRV, causes infectious interstitial pneumonia in laboratory rats, the present study investigated whether the pulmonary lesions observed were caused by P. carinii infection. Male Sprague-Dawley rats, free of known pathogens, were introduced into a rat colony positive for RRV-type lesions. Routine histopathological examinations were performed on the rat lung tissues following exposure. The presence of Pneumocystis organisms was confirmed using Grocott’s methenamine silver (GMS) staining. At week 3 following introduction, a few small lymphoid aggregates were located adjacent to the edematous vascular sheath. By week 5, foci of dense perivascular lymphoid cuffing were observed. Multifocal lymphohistiocytic interstitial pneumonia and prominent lymphoid perivascular cuffs were observed between week 7 and 10. GMS staining confirmed the presence of Pneumocystis cysts. Thus, the results of the present study demonstrated that P. carinii caused lymphohistiocytic interstitial pneumonia in a group of laboratory rats. The observations strongly support the conclusion that P. carinii infection in immunocompetent laboratory rats causes the lung lesions that were previously attributed to RRV. PMID:25009598

  3. Solid-state curved focal plane arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael (Inventor); Jones, Todd (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to curved focal plane arrays. More specifically, the present invention relates to a system and method for making solid-state curved focal plane arrays from standard and high-purity devices that may be matched to a given optical system. There are two ways to make a curved focal plane arrays starting with the fully fabricated device. One way, is to thin the device and conform it to a curvature. A second way, is to back-illuminate a thick device without making a thinned membrane. The thick device is a special class of devices; for example devices fabricated with high purity silicon. One surface of the device (the non VLSI fabricated surface, also referred to as the back surface) can be polished to form a curved surface.

  4. Measuring microfocus focal spots using digital radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, David A

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of microfocus spot size can be important for several reasons: (1) Quality assurance during manufacture of microfocus tubes; (2) Tracking performance and stability of microfocus tubes; (3) Determining magnification (especially important for digital radiography where the native spatial resolution of the digital system is not adequate for the application); (4) Knowledge of unsharpness from the focal spot alone. The European Standard EN 12543-5 is based on a simple geometrical method of calculating focal spot size from unsharpness of high magnification film radiographs. When determining microfocus focal spot dimensions using unsharpness measurements both signal-to-noise (SNR) and magnification can be important. There is a maximum accuracy that is a function of SNR and therefore an optimal magnification. Greater than optimal magnification can be used but it will not increase accuracy.

  5. Legionnaires' disease organism, legionella (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... an outbreak of fatal pneumonia at a Legionnaires convention. The newly described organism which caused the disease was named Legionella pneumophila, shown in this picture. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.)

  6. Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviation/Space, 1980

    1980-01-01

    This is a list of aerospace organizations and other groups that provides educators with assistance and information in specific areas. Both government and nongovernment organizations are included. (Author/SA)

  7. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... who are receiving chemotherapy are also at increased risk. You work in construction or agriculture. Working in environments where you breathe in dust, chemicals, air pollution or toxic fumes can damage ...

  8. Effect of Chlamydia pneumoniae on Cellular ATP Content in Mouse Macrophages: Role of Toll-Like Receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Yaraei, Kambiz; Campbell, Lee Ann; Zhu, Xiaodong; Liles, W. Conrad; Kuo, Cho-chou; Rosenfeld, Michael E.

    2005-01-01

    Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular gram-negative bacteria and are dependent on the host cell for ATP. Thus, chlamydial infection may alter the intracellular levels of ATP and affect all energy-dependent processes within the cell. We have shown that both live C. pneumoniae and inactivated C. pneumoniae induce markers of cell death prior to completion of the bacterial growth cycle. As depletion of ATP could account for the observed increase in cell death, the effects of C. pneumoniae on ATP concentrations within mouse macrophages were investigated. Live, heat-killed, and UV-inactivated C. pneumoniae cultures (at multiplicities of infection [MOIs] of 0.01, 0.1, and 1.0) were incubated with mouse bone marrow macrophages isolated from C57BL/6J mice and mice deficient in Toll-like receptors. Treatment of the macrophages with both live and inactivated C. pneumoniae increased the ATP content of the cells. In cells infected with live C. pneumoniae, the increase was inversely proportional to the MOI. In cells treated with inactivated C. pneumoniae, the increase in ATP content was smaller than that induced by infection with live organisms and was proportional to the MOI. The increase in ATP content early in the developmental cycle was independent of the growth of C. pneumoniae, while sustained induction required live organisms. The capacity of C. pneumoniae to increase the ATP content was ablated in macrophages deficient in expression of either Toll-like receptor 2 or the Toll-like receptor accessory protein MyD88. In contrast, no effect was observed in macrophages lacking expression of Toll-like receptor 4. PMID:15972526

  9. Actinic Granuloma with Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Phasukthaworn, Ruedee; Chanprapaph, Kumutnart; Vachiramon, Vasanop

    2016-01-01

    Actinic granuloma is an uncommon granulomatous disease, characterized by annular erythematous plaque with central clearing predominately located on sun-damaged skin. The pathogenesis is not well understood, ultraviolet radiation is recognized as precipitating factor. We report a case of a 52-year-old woman who presented with asymptomatic annular erythematous plaques on the forehead and both cheeks persisting for 2 years. The clinical presentation and histopathologic findings support the diagnosis of actinic granuloma. During that period of time, she also developed focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. The association between actinic granuloma and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis needs to be clarified by further studies. PMID:27293392

  10. Hybrid Extrinsic Silicon Focal Plane Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommerrenig, D. H.; Meinhardt, T.; Lowe, J.

    1981-02-01

    Large-area focal planes require mechanical assembly techniques which must be compatible with optical alignment, minimum deadspace, and cryogenic requirements in order to achieve optimum performance. Hybrid extrinsic silicon has been found particularly suitable for such an application. It will be shown that by choosing a large-area extrinsic silicon detector array which is hybrid-mated to a multiplicity of multiplexers a very cost-effective and high-density focal plane module can be assembled. Other advantages of this approach are inherent optical alignment and excellent performance.

  11. Ambroxol-induced focal epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Lapenta, Leonardo; Morano, Alessandra; Fattouch, Jinane; Casciato, Sara; Fanella, Martina; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that in epileptic patients some compounds and different drugs used for the treatment of comorbidities can facilitate or provoke seizures, this evidence regarding a wide spectrum of pharmacological categories. The potential facilitating factors usually include direct toxic effects or pharmacological interactions of either active ingredients or excipients. We report the case of a patient with drug-resistant epilepsy who experienced focal epileptic seizures, easily and constantly reproducible, after each administration of a cough syrup. This is, to our knowledge, the first electroencephalogram-documented case of focal epileptic seizures induced by cough syrup containing ambroxol as active ingredient. PMID:24824664

  12. [Liver ultrasound: focal lesions and diffuse diseases].

    PubMed

    Segura Grau, A; Valero López, I; Díaz Rodríguez, N; Segura Cabral, J M

    2016-01-01

    Liver ultrasound is frequently used as a first-line technique for the detection and characterization of the most common liver lesions, especially those incidentally found focal liver lesions, and for monitoring of chronic liver diseases. Ultrasound is not only used in the Bmode, but also with Doppler and, more recently, contrast-enhanced ultrasound. It is mainly used in the diagnosis of diffuse liver diseases, such as steatosis or cirrhosis. This article presents a practical approach for diagnosis workup, in which the different characteristics of the main focal liver lesions and diffuse liver diseases are reviewed. PMID:25523277

  13. Rare extrapulmonary complications of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Kiran; Enright, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Stevens-Johnsons syndrome (SJS) is a rare extra-pulmonary complication of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. We present the case of a 26-year-old man with fever, cough, extensive oral mucosal ulceration and a widespread truncal rash. He was diagnosed with M. pneumoniae-induced SJS. He responded well to antibiotics and steroids initially, but went on to develop pseudomembranous conjunctivitis requiring bilateral amniotic membrane grafting. SJS is most commonly drug-induced, however, M. pneumoniae is the commonest infectious cause and should be considered in the differential diagnosis. It is also important to get specialist care involved early to minimise the long-term effects of any complications. PMID:26837942

  14. [Patient's Risk Factors for Perioperative Aspiration Pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Teruhiko; Isono, Shiroh

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews patient's own risk factors for perioperative aspiration pneumonia. Maintaining the function of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), the airway protective reflex, and the oral hygiene are the most important to prevent the pneumonia. The LES is adversely affected by excessive stomach distention, some medication given in perioperative periods, and habitual smoking, as well as pathological status such as esophageal hiatus hernia and achalasia. Postapoplectic patients may have insufficient airway protective reflex including swallowing and laryngeal reflex. It is emphasized that the perioperative oral care is increasing in its importance for the prevention of aspiration pneumonia. PMID:27004381

  15. Statins in pneumonia--magic versus science?

    PubMed

    Kruger, Peter S; Thomas, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have investigated the use of statins as an adjunct in the treatment of pneumonia, some with conflicting conclusions. The most recent of these large observational studies again suggests statin use is associated with an improved outcome for patients with pneumonia. How best to incorporate these findings into current practice is of great interest. Hidden confounders plague database interrogation and so cast doubt on the real or causal nature of observed associations. Data from large, observational studies must be complemented by smaller biological studies and randomised controlled trials in an effort to complete missing pieces in the biological puzzle of the use of statins in patients with pneumonia. PMID:23025797

  16. Many radiologic facies of pneumococcal pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Kantor, H.G.

    1981-12-01

    In 1978, 89 patients were treated for (S. pneumoniae) pneumonia at New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. Only 40 cases met rather strict diagnostic criteria. Of these, 12 demonstrated the classical consolidative (air space) pattern usually ascribed to this disease. A bronchopneumonic (patch) pattern was demonstrated in an equal number of patients; interstitial (irregular linear) infiltrates were manifest in nine cases and a mixed interstitial and patchy presentation shown in seven cases. Absence of the consolidative pattern does not exclude pneumococcal pneumonia. Bacteriologic investigation is required to determine the proper diagnosis and course of therapy.

  17. Highly Multiplexed Imaging Uncovers Changes in Compositional Noise within Assembling Focal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Harizanova, Jana; Fermin, Yessica; Malik-Sheriff, Rahuman S.; Wieczorek, Jakob; Ickstadt, Katja; Grecco, Hernán E.; Zamir, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Integrin adhesome proteins bind each other in alternative manners, forming within the cell diverse cell-matrix adhesion sites with distinct properties. An intriguing question is how such modular assembly of adhesion sites is achieved correctly solely by self-organization of their components. Here we address this question using high-throughput multiplexed imaging of eight proteins and two phosphorylation sites in a large number of single focal adhesions. We found that during the assembly of focal adhesions the variances of protein densities decrease while the correlations between them increase, suggesting reduction in the noise levels within these structures. These changes correlate independently with the area and internal density of focal adhesions, but not with their age or shape. Artificial neural network analysis indicates that a joint consideration of multiple components improves the predictability of paxillin and zyxin levels in internally dense focal adhesions. This suggests that paxillin and zyxin densities in focal adhesions are fine-tuned by integrating the levels of multiple other components, thus averaging-out stochastic fluctuations. Based on these results we propose that increase in internal protein densities facilitates noise suppression in focal adhesions, while noise suppression enables their stable growth and further density increase—hence forming a feedback loop giving rise to a quality-controlled assembly. PMID:27519053

  18. Highly Multiplexed Imaging Uncovers Changes in Compositional Noise within Assembling Focal Adhesions.

    PubMed

    Harizanova, Jana; Fermin, Yessica; Malik-Sheriff, Rahuman S; Wieczorek, Jakob; Ickstadt, Katja; Grecco, Hernán E; Zamir, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Integrin adhesome proteins bind each other in alternative manners, forming within the cell diverse cell-matrix adhesion sites with distinct properties. An intriguing question is how such modular assembly of adhesion sites is achieved correctly solely by self-organization of their components. Here we address this question using high-throughput multiplexed imaging of eight proteins and two phosphorylation sites in a large number of single focal adhesions. We found that during the assembly of focal adhesions the variances of protein densities decrease while the correlations between them increase, suggesting reduction in the noise levels within these structures. These changes correlate independently with the area and internal density of focal adhesions, but not with their age or shape. Artificial neural network analysis indicates that a joint consideration of multiple components improves the predictability of paxillin and zyxin levels in internally dense focal adhesions. This suggests that paxillin and zyxin densities in focal adhesions are fine-tuned by integrating the levels of multiple other components, thus averaging-out stochastic fluctuations. Based on these results we propose that increase in internal protein densities facilitates noise suppression in focal adhesions, while noise suppression enables their stable growth and further density increase-hence forming a feedback loop giving rise to a quality-controlled assembly. PMID:27519053

  19. Coccidioidomycosis with diffuse miliary pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Sotello, David; Rivas, Marcella; Fuller, Audra; Mahmood, Tashfeen; Orellana-Barrios, Menfil; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is a well-known infection in the southwestern United States, and its occurrence is becoming more frequent in endemic areas. This disease can have a significant economic and medical impact; therefore, accurate diagnosis is crucial. In conjunction with patient symptoms, residence in or travel to an endemic area is essential for diagnosis. Diagnosis is usually made with serology, culture, or biopsy and confirmed with DNA probe technology. Pulmonary disease is the most common presentation and is seen in almost 95% of all cases. One-half to two-thirds of all Coccidioides infections are asymptomatic or subclinical. Most pulmonary infections are self-limited and do not require treatment except in special populations. When treatment is warranted, itraconazole and fluconazole are frequently used. Diffuse miliary pneumonia is uncommon and is especially rare in immunocompetent patients. Herein we describe a rare presentation of miliary coccidioidomycosis in a nonimmunocompromised patient. PMID:26722164

  20. Genetics and Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Chu, Sarah G; El-Chemaly, Souheil; Rosas, Ivan O

    2016-06-01

    Significant progress has been made in elucidating the genetics of parenchymal lung diseases, particularly idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs). IIPs are a heterogeneous group of diffuse interstitial lung diseases of uncertain etiology, diagnosed only after known causes of interstitial lung disease have been excluded. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is the most common IIP. Through candidate gene approaches and genome wide association studies, much light has been shed on the genetic origins of IIPs, enhancing our understanding of risk factors and pathogenesis. However, significant work remains to be accomplished in identifying novel genetic variants and characterizing the function of validated candidate genes in lung pathobiology, their interplay with environmental factors, and ultimately translating these discoveries to patient care. PMID:27231858

  1. Pneumonia in rural Malawians under five years old: Treatment outcomes and clinical predictors of death on admission

    PubMed Central

    Mzumara, Suzgo; Mlenga, Maurice; Talipu, Raphael; Kasagila, Eric

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background High mortality and disability due to pneumonia occur worldwide. The introduction of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness strategy in Malawi brought with it hope of an improvement in the outcome of pneumonia. However, the risk of death and treatment outcomes remain unknown in many districts. Method The medical records of 466 consecutive patients admitted to the Mchinji District Hospital from January 2004 to January 2006 whose disease met the World Health Organization criteria for pneumonia were reviewed. Data were collected from forms that had been filled out and different treatment outcomes and determinants of death were analysed using logistic regression. Results Of the 466 patients, 62.7% completed treatment, 15.9% had unknown outcomes, 12.9% died, 8.4% were lost to follow-up, 0.8% failed to improve with treatment, and 0.4% were transferred to other facilities. Independent predictors of death were: age less than 2 years, female sex, history of pneumonia, chest retractions, type of pneumonia, and central cyanosis. Conclusion A high proportion of deaths and unknown outcomes occurred among participants. Young age, female sex, history of pneumonia, chest retractions and central cyanosis were associated with death. Mortality from pneumonia may be reduced by close monitoring of these risk factors and by improving health education programmes and communicating these findings to parents and health workers. Further investigations of local reasons for high rates of unknown/unreported outcomes are welcomed.

  2. Value of bacterial antigen detection in the diagnostic yield of transthoracic needle aspiration in severe community acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Bella, F.; Tort, J.; Morera, M. A.; Espaulella, J.; Armengol, J.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Transthoracic needle aspiration (TNA) with an ultrathin needle is a safe and highly specific procedure for obtaining a diagnosis in bacterial pneumonias, but its sensitivity is at best 70%. A study was performed to assess whether Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b antigen detection by latex agglutination from the TNA sample enhanced the diagnostic yield. METHODS--Blood cultures, TNA with an ultrathin needle (culture, Gram stain, and latex agglutination), serological tests, and pneumococcal antigen detection in the urine by counterimmunoelectrophoresis were performed in samples from 18 of 23 consecutive patients with severe community acquired pneumonia. RESULTS--The causative organism was identified in 16 cases (88%): S pneumoniae (10 cases), S pneumoniae plus H influenzae (two cases), Legionella pneumophila (three cases), and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (one case). The investigation of antigens by latex agglutination in the pulmonary aspirate increased the diagnostic yield of TNA from 50% to 78% and provided a rapid diagnosis (in less than two hours) with therapeutic implications in seven cases. Its effectiveness was not modified by prior antibiotic therapy. CONCLUSIONS--A latex agglutination test on the pulmonary aspirate enhances the diagnostic yield of TNA in severe community acquired pneumonia. PMID:8303628

  3. The current status of community-acquired pneumonia management and prevention in children under 5 years of age in India: a review

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Krishna Kumar; Awasthi, Shally

    2016-01-01

    India has the highest number of global deaths of children under 5 years of age. In the year 2015, it was reported that there were 5.9 million deaths of children under 5 years of age globally, of which 1.2 million (20%) occurred in India alone. Currently, India has an under 5 mortality rate of 48 per 1000 live births. Community-acquired pneumonia contributes to about one sixth of this mortality. Fast breathing is the key symptom of community-acquired pneumonia. The World Health Organization recently categorized community-acquired pneumonia in children under 5 years of age into two, pneumonia, and severe pneumonia. Fast breathing with or without chest in-drawing is categorized as pneumonia and fast breathing with any of danger signs as severe pneumonia. Because effective vaccines against two of the common organisms causing community-acquired pneumonia, namely Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b, are available, there should be urgent and phased introduction into the Indian Universal Immunization Programme. Several preventable risk factors of community-acquired pneumonia such as lack of exclusive breast feeding for first 6 months of life, inappropriate complimentary feeding, iron deficiency anemia, malnutrition, and indoor air pollution should be adequately addressed. The community should be aware about the signs and symptoms of community-acquired pneumonia and its danger signs so that delay in qualified care seeking can be avoided. To achieve the sustainable development goal of ⩽25 under five deaths per 1000 live births by 2030, a multipronged approach is the need of the hour. PMID:27536353

  4. The current status of community-acquired pneumonia management and prevention in children under 5 years of age in India: a review.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Krishna Kumar; Awasthi, Shally

    2016-06-01

    India has the highest number of global deaths of children under 5 years of age. In the year 2015, it was reported that there were 5.9 million deaths of children under 5 years of age globally, of which 1.2 million (20%) occurred in India alone. Currently, India has an under 5 mortality rate of 48 per 1000 live births. Community-acquired pneumonia contributes to about one sixth of this mortality. Fast breathing is the key symptom of community-acquired pneumonia. The World Health Organization recently categorized community-acquired pneumonia in children under 5 years of age into two, pneumonia, and severe pneumonia. Fast breathing with or without chest in-drawing is categorized as pneumonia and fast breathing with any of danger signs as severe pneumonia. Because effective vaccines against two of the common organisms causing community-acquired pneumonia, namely Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b, are available, there should be urgent and phased introduction into the Indian Universal Immunization Programme. Several preventable risk factors of community-acquired pneumonia such as lack of exclusive breast feeding for first 6 months of life, inappropriate complimentary feeding, iron deficiency anemia, malnutrition, and indoor air pollution should be adequately addressed. The community should be aware about the signs and symptoms of community-acquired pneumonia and its danger signs so that delay in qualified care seeking can be avoided. To achieve the sustainable development goal of ⩽25 under five deaths per 1000 live births by 2030, a multipronged approach is the need of the hour. PMID:27536353

  5. Complex source description of focal regions.

    PubMed

    Monzon, Cesar; Forester, Donald W; Moore, Peter

    2006-04-01

    Closed-form solutions of the two-dimensional homogeneous wave equation are presented that provide focal-region descriptions corresponding to a converging bundle of rays. The solutions do have evanescent wave content and can be described as a source-sink pair or particle-antiparticle pair, collocated in complex space, with the complex location being critical in the determination of beam shape and focal region size. The wave solutions are not plagued by singularities, have a finite energy, and have a limitation on how small the focal size can get, with a penalty for limiting small spot sizes in the form of impractically high associated reactive energy. The electric-field-defined spot-size limiting value is 0.35lambda x 0.35lambda, which is about 38% of the Poynting-vector-defined minimum spot size (0.8lambda x 0.4lambda) and corresponds to a condition related to the maximum possible beam angle. A multiple set of solutions is introduced, and the elementary solutions are used to produce new solutions via superposition, resulting in fields with chiral character or with increased depth of focus. We do not claim generality, as the size of focal regions exhibited by the closed-form solutions has a lower bound and hence is not able to account for Pendry's "ideal lens" scenario. PMID:16604758

  6. Focal Dermal Hypoplasia: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Sahana M; Hiremagalore, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz syndrome) is a rare genetic multisystem disorder primarily involving the skin, skeletal system, eyes, and face. We report the case of an eight-month-old female child who presented with multiple hypopigmented atrophic macules along the lines of blaschko, skeletal anomalies, umbilical hernia, developmental delay, hypoplastic nails, syndactyly, and lobster claw deformity characteristic of Goltz syndrome. PMID:25657436

  7. MTI Focal Plane Assembly Design and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, M.; Rienstra, J.L.

    1999-06-17

    The focal plane assembly for the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) consists of sensor chip assemblies, optical filters, and a vacuum enclosure. Sensor chip assemblies, composed of linear detector arrays and readout integrated circuits, provide spatial resolution in the cross-track direction for the pushbroom imager. Optical filters define 15 spectral bands in a range from 0.45 {micro}m to 10.7 {micro}m. All the detector arrays are mounted on a single focal plane and are designed to operate at 75 K. Three pairs of sensor chip assemblies (SCAs) are required to provide cross-track coverage in all 15 spectral bands. Each pair of SCAs includes detector arrays made from silicon, iridium antimonide, and mercury cadmium telluride. Read out integrated circuits multiplex the signals from the detectors to 18 separate video channels. Optical filter assemblies defining the spectral bands are mounted over the linear detector arrays. Each filter assembly consists of several filter strips bonded together side-by-side. The MTI focal plane assembly has been integrated with the rest of the payload and has undergone detailed testing and calibration. This paper includes representative test data for the various spectral bands and the overall performance of the focal plane assembly.

  8. Optical interconnections to focal plane arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Rienstra, J.L.; Hinckley, M.K.

    2000-11-01

    The authors have successfully demonstrated an optical data interconnection from the output of a focal plane array to the downstream data acquisition electronics. The demonstrated approach included a continuous wave laser beam directed at a multiple quantum well reflectance modulator connected to the focal plane array analog output. The output waveform from the optical interconnect was observed on an oscilloscope to be a replica of the input signal. They fed the output of the optical data link to the same data acquisition system used to characterize focal plane array performance. Measurements of the signal to noise ratio at the input and output of the optical interconnection showed that the signal to noise ratio was reduced by a factor of 10 or more. Analysis of the noise and link gain showed that the primary contributors to the additional noise were laser intensity noise and photodetector receiver noise. Subsequent efforts should be able to reduce these noise sources considerably and should result in substantially improved signal to noise performance. They also observed significant photocurrent generation in the reflectance modulator that imposes a current load on the focal plane array output amplifier. This current loading is an issue with the demonstrated approach because it tends to negate the power saving feature of the reflectance modulator interconnection concept.

  9. Focal dermal hypoplasia: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Sahana M; Hiremagalore, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz syndrome) is a rare genetic multisystem disorder primarily involving the skin, skeletal system, eyes, and face. We report the case of an eight-month-old female child who presented with multiple hypopigmented atrophic macules along the lines of blaschko, skeletal anomalies, umbilical hernia, developmental delay, hypoplastic nails, syndactyly, and lobster claw deformity characteristic of Goltz syndrome. PMID:25657436

  10. Dual band QWIP focal plane array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Choi, Kwong Kit (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) that provides two-color image sensing. Two different quantum wells are configured to absorb two different wavelengths. The QWIPs are arrayed in a focal plane array (FPA). The two-color QWIPs are selected for readout by selective electrical contact with the two different QWIPs or by the use of two different wavelength sensitive gratings.

  11. Sensory-motor integration in focal dystonia.

    PubMed

    Avanzino, Laura; Tinazzi, Michele; Ionta, Silvio; Fiorio, Mirta

    2015-12-01

    Traditional definitions of focal dystonia point to its motor component, mainly affecting planning and execution of voluntary movements. However, focal dystonia is tightly linked also to sensory dysfunction. Accurate motor control requires an optimal processing of afferent inputs from different sensory systems, in particular visual and somatosensory (e.g., touch and proprioception). Several experimental studies indicate that sensory-motor integration - the process through which sensory information is used to plan, execute, and monitor movements - is impaired in focal dystonia. The neural degenerations associated with these alterations affect not only the basal ganglia-thalamic-frontal cortex loop, but also the parietal cortex and cerebellum. The present review outlines the experimental studies describing impaired sensory-motor integration in focal dystonia, establishes their relationship with changes in specific neural mechanisms, and provides new insight towards the implementation of novel intervention protocols. Based on the reviewed state-of-the-art evidence, the theoretical framework summarized in the present article will not only result in a better understanding of the pathophysiology of dystonia, but it will also lead to the development of new rehabilitation strategies. PMID:26164472

  12. Towards Dualband Megapixel QWIP Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Hill, C. J.; Rafol, S. B.; Salazar, D.; Woolaway, J.; LeVan, P. D.; Tidrow, M. Z.

    2006-01-01

    Mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) 1024 x 1024 pixel quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) focal planes have been demonstrated with excellent imaging performance. The MWIR QWIP detector array has demonstrated a noise equivalent differential temperature (NEDT) of 17 mK at a 95 K operating temperature with f/2.5 optics at 300 K background and the LWIR detector array has demonstrated a NEDT of 13 mK at a 70 K operating temperature with the same optical and background conditions as the MWIR detector array after the subtraction of system noise. Both MWIR and LWIR focal planes have shown background limited performance (BLIP) at 90 K and 70 K operating temperatures respectively, with similar optical and background conditions. In addition, we have demonstrated MWIR and LWIR pixel co-registered simultaneously readable dualband QWIP focal plane arrays. In this paper, we will discuss the performance in terms of quantum efficiency, NEDT, uniformity, operability, and modulation transfer functions of the 1024 x 1024 pixel arrays and the progress of dualband QWIP focal plane array development work.

  13. Large Format Multicolor QWIP Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soibel, A.; Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Ting, D. Z.; Hill, C. J.; Nguyen, J.

    2009-01-01

    Mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) multicolor focal plane array (FPA) cameras are essential for many DoD and NASA applications including Earth and planetary remote sensing. In this paper we summarize our recent development of large format multicolor QWIP FPA that cover MWIR and LWIR bands.

  14. Chlamydia trachomatis and pneumonia in infants: report of two cases.

    PubMed Central

    Embil, J. A.; Ozere, R. L.; MacDonald, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    In two cases of pneumonia associated with Chlamydia trachomatis in infants the symptoms began in the second week of life and the illness was severest at 4 weeks of age. Both infants were afebrile. One had a history of conjunctivitis. Both presented with a characteristic staccato cough and tachypnea but little evidence of peripheral airway obstruction. Chest roentgenograms showed interstitial and alveolar pulmonary infiltration in hyperexpanded lungs. The serum IgM concentrations were markedly elevated. C. trachomatis was cultured from specimens from both infants and one mother, and titres of antibody to the organism were substantially elevated in one infant and one mother. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:743659

  15. Classification of Extrapulmonary Manifestations Due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection on the Basis of Possible Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Narita, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    comprehensive therapeutic strategy, covering microbiology (antibiotics), immunology (immunomodulators), and hematology (anticoagulants). The possible influence of the emergence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae on extrapulmonary manifestations, which can be considered of limited clinical threat in Japan where the resistant rate has currently decreased, is discussed on the basis of unique biological characteristics of M. pneumoniae, the smallest self-replicating organism. PMID:26858701

  16. Bilateral iliac and popliteal arterial thrombosis in a child with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyoung Hee; Park, Ji Youn; Min, Seung-Kee; Ha, Il-Soo; Cheong, Hae Il

    2016-01-01

    Thromboembolic complications (TECs) are clinically important sequelae of nephrotic syndrome (NS). The incidence of TECs in children is approximately 2%–5%. The veins are the most commonly affected sites, particularly the deep veins in the legs, the inferior vena cava, the superior vena cava, and the renal veins. Arterial thrombosis, which is less common, typically occurs in the cerebral, pulmonary, and femoral arteries, and is associated with the use of steroids and diuretics. Popliteal artery thrombosis in children has been described in cases of traumatic dissection, osteochondroma, Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection, and fibromuscular dysplasia. We report of a 33-month-old girl with bilateral iliac and popliteal arterial thrombosis associated with steroid-resistant NS due to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Her treatment involved thrombectomy and intravenous heparinization, followed by oral warfarin for 8 months. Herein, we report a rare case of spontaneous iliac and popliteal arterial thrombosis in a young child with NS. PMID:27279890

  17. Bilateral iliac and popliteal arterial thrombosis in a child with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyoung Hee; Park, Ji Youn; Min, Seung-Kee; Ha, Il-Soo; Cheong, Hae Il; Kang, Hee Gyung

    2016-05-01

    Thromboembolic complications (TECs) are clinically important sequelae of nephrotic syndrome (NS). The incidence of TECs in children is approximately 2%-5%. The veins are the most commonly affected sites, particularly the deep veins in the legs, the inferior vena cava, the superior vena cava, and the renal veins. Arterial thrombosis, which is less common, typically occurs in the cerebral, pulmonary, and femoral arteries, and is associated with the use of steroids and diuretics. Popliteal artery thrombosis in children has been described in cases of traumatic dissection, osteochondroma, Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection, and fibromuscular dysplasia. We report of a 33-month-old girl with bilateral iliac and popliteal arterial thrombosis associated with steroid-resistant NS due to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Her treatment involved thrombectomy and intravenous heparinization, followed by oral warfarin for 8 months. Herein, we report a rare case of spontaneous iliac and popliteal arterial thrombosis in a young child with NS. PMID:27279890

  18. Lipoid pneumonia in a gas station attendant.

    PubMed

    Yampara Guarachi, Gladis Isabel; Barbosa Moreira, Valeria; Santos Ferreira, Angela; Sias, Selma M De A; Rodrigues, Cristovão C; Teixeira, Graça Helena M do C

    2014-01-01

    The exogenous lipoid pneumonia, uncommon in adults, is the result of the inhalation and/or aspiration of lipid material into the tracheobronchial tree. This is often confused with bacterial pneumonia and pulmonary tuberculosis due to a nonspecific clinical and radiologic picture. It presents acutely or chronically and may result in pulmonary fibrosis. We describe here a case of lipoid pneumonia in a gas station attendant who siphoned gasoline to fill motorcycles; he was hospitalized due to presenting with a respiratory infection that was hard to resolve. The patient underwent bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage, which, on cytochemical (oil red O) evaluation, was slightly positive for lipid material in the foamy cytoplasm of alveolar macrophages. Due to his occupational history and radiographic abnormalities suggestive of lipoid pneumonia, a lung biopsy was performed to confirm the diagnosis. The patient was serially treated with segmental lung lavage and showed clinical, functional, and radiological improvement. PMID:25374742

  19. Pneumonia Can Be Prevented -- Vaccines Can Help

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Emails CDC Features Pneumonia Can Be Prevented—Vaccines Can Help Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... not recommended. Learn more . Lower Your Risk with Vaccines In the United States, there are vaccines that ...

  20. Lipoid Pneumonia in a Gas Station Attendant

    PubMed Central

    Yampara Guarachi, Gladis Isabel; Barbosa Moreira, Valeria; Santos Ferreira, Angela; Sias, Selma M. De A.; Rodrigues, Cristovão C.; Teixeira, Graça Helena M. do C.

    2014-01-01

    The exogenous lipoid pneumonia, uncommon in adults, is the result of the inhalation and/or aspiration of lipid material into the tracheobronchial tree. This is often confused with bacterial pneumonia and pulmonary tuberculosis due to a nonspecific clinical and radiologic picture. It presents acutely or chronically and may result in pulmonary fibrosis. We describe here a case of lipoid pneumonia in a gas station attendant who siphoned gasoline to fill motorcycles; he was hospitalized due to presenting with a respiratory infection that was hard to resolve. The patient underwent bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage, which, on cytochemical (oil red O) evaluation, was slightly positive for lipid material in the foamy cytoplasm of alveolar macrophages. Due to his occupational history and radiographic abnormalities suggestive of lipoid pneumonia, a lung biopsy was performed to confirm the diagnosis. The patient was serially treated with segmental lung lavage and showed clinical, functional, and radiological improvement. PMID:25374742

  1. A College Epidemic of Mycoplasma Pneumoniae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralston, David; Cochran, Burt

    1979-01-01

    The article reports on an outbreak of mycoplasma pneumoniae at the California Polytechnic State University including a historical background of the disease, clinical features, laboratory findings for treated patients, treatment, and clinical clues for diagnosis. (JMF)

  2. Candida Pneumonia in Intensive Care Unit?

    PubMed Central

    Schnabel, Ronny M.; Linssen, Catharina F.; Guion, Nele; van Mook, Walther N.; Bergmans, Dennis C.

    2014-01-01

    It has been questioned if Candida pneumonia exists as a clinical entity. Only histopathology can establish the definite diagnosis. Less invasive diagnostic strategies lack specificity and have been insufficiently validated. Scarcity of this pathomechanism and nonspecific clinical presentation make validation and the development of a clinical algorithm difficult. In the present study, we analyze whether Candida pneumonia exists in our critical care population. We used a bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimen database that we have built in a structural diagnostic approach to ventilator-associated pneumonia for more than a decade consisting of 832 samples. Microbiological data were linked to clinical information and available autopsy data. We searched for critically ill patients with respiratory failure with no other microbiological or clinical explanation than exclusive presence of Candida species in BAL fluid. Five cases could be identified with Candida as the likely cause of pneumonia. PMID:25734099

  3. Klebsiella pneumoniae Liver Abscess and Metastatic Endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Jason T.; Lewis, Catherine R.; Danner, Omar K.; Wilson, Kenneth L.; Matthews, L. Ray

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Klebsiella pneumoniae is a well-known cause of liver abscess. Higher rates of liver abscess associated with Klebsiella pneumoniae are seen in Taiwan. Metastatic endophthalmitis is a common complication associated with a poor prognosis despite aggressive therapy. Case Report. We report a case of a 67-year-old Korean female with Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess. The patient developed metastatic endophthalmitis and ultimately succumbed to her disease despite aggressive medical and surgical treatment. Conclusion. Dissemination of Klebsiella pneumoniae is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Liver abscesses preferably should be treated with percutaneous drainage, but surgical treatment is needed in some cases. Metastatic spread to the eye is a common complication that must be treated aggressively with intravenous antibiotics and surgical intervention if necessary. PMID:26788530

  4. Relationships between periodontal disease and bacterial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Scannapieco, F A; Mylotte, J M

    1996-10-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a prevalent and costly infection that is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients of all ages. The continuing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (e.g., penicillin-resistant pneumococci) suggests that bacterial pneumonia will assume increasing importance in the coming years. Thus, knowledge of the pathogenesis of, and risk factors for, bacterial pneumonia is critical to the development of strategies for prevention and treatment of these infections. Bacterial pneumonia in adults is the result of aspiration of oropharyngeal flora into the lower respiratory tract and failure of host defense mechanisms to eliminate the contaminating bacteria, which multiply in the lung and cause infection. It is recognized that community-acquired pneumonia and lung abscesses can be the result of infection by anaerobic bacteria; dental plaque would seem to be a logical source of these bacteria, especially in patients with periodontal disease. It is also possible that patients with high risk for pneumonia, such as hospitalized patients and nursing home residents, are likely to pay less attention to personal hygiene than healthy patients. One important dimension of this personal neglect may be diminished attention to oral hygiene. Poor oral hygiene and periodontal disease may promote oropharyngeal colonization by potential respiratory pathogens (PRPs) including Enterobacteriaceae (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter species, etc.), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus. This paper provides the rationale for the development of this hypothesis especially as it pertains to mechanically ventilated intensive care unit patients and nursing home residents, two patient groups with a high risk for bacterial pneumonia. PMID:8910830

  5. Subselective magnification angiography of experimental pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Bookstein, J.J.; Alazraki, N.P.; Jassy, L.N.

    1983-04-01

    An experiment was designed to determine whether or not acute pneumococcal pneumonia in dogs is associated with intravascular thrombosis, or with angiographic features distinguishable from pulmonary embolism. In dogs with normal baseline chest radiographs and perfusion scans, pneumonia was produced by transbronchial instillation of type III pneumococcus. After 2 days, perfusion scans demonstrated discrete appropriate defects. In vivo magnification pulmonary arteriography, postmortem pulmonary arteriography, and histologic examination disclosed no evidence of thrombi.

  6. Klebsiella pneumoniae in orange juice concentrate.

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, F A; Hazen, T C; López-Torres, A J; Rechani, P

    1985-01-01

    Fecal coliform-positive, capsule-forming Klebsiella pneumoniae cells were observed in high densities (10(4) to 10(8) CFU/100 ml) in two commercial batches of frozen orange juice concentrate at a cannery in Puerto Rico. Contamination of both lots was gross and included off colors and odors. Isolates of K. pneumoniae from these concentrates revealed growth at 4, 25, and 34 degrees C with generation times from 0.39 to 1.84 h. PMID:3893321

  7. The gut microbiota plays a protective role in the host defence against pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Schuijt, Tim J; Lankelma, Jacqueline M; Scicluna, Brendon P; de Sousa e Melo, Felipe; Roelofs, Joris J T H; de Boer, J Daan; Hoogendijk, Arjan J; de Beer, Regina; de Vos, Alex; Belzer, Clara; de Vos, Willem M; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Objective Pneumonia accounts for more deaths than any other infectious disease worldwide. The intestinal microbiota supports local mucosal immunity and is increasingly recognised as an important modulator of the systemic immune system. The precise role of the gut microbiota in bacterial pneumonia, however, is unknown. Here, we investigate the function of the gut microbiota in the host defence against Streptococcus pneumoniae infections. Design We depleted the gut microbiota in C57BL/6 mice and subsequently infected them intranasally with S. pneumoniae. We then performed survival and faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) experiments and measured parameters of inflammation and alveolar macrophage whole-genome responses. Results We found that the gut microbiota protects the host during pneumococcal pneumonia, as reflected by increased bacterial dissemination, inflammation, organ damage and mortality in microbiota-depleted mice compared with controls. FMT in gut microbiota-depleted mice led to a normalisation of pulmonary bacterial counts and tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 levels 6 h after pneumococcal infection. Whole-genome mapping of alveolar macrophages showed upregulation of metabolic pathways in the absence of a healthy gut microbiota. This upregulation correlated with an altered cellular responsiveness, reflected by a reduced responsiveness to lipopolysaccharide and lipoteichoic acid. Compared with controls, alveolar macrophages derived from gut microbiota-depleted mice showed a diminished capacity to phagocytose S. pneumoniae. Conclusions This study identifies the intestinal microbiota as a protective mediator during pneumococcal pneumonia. The gut microbiota enhances primary alveolar macrophage function. Novel therapeutic strategies could exploit the gut–lung axis in bacterial infections. PMID:26511795

  8. Comparative phylogenomics of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from invasive disease and nasopharyngeal carriage from West Africans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We applied comparative phylogenomics (whole genome comparisons of microbes using DNA microarrays combined with Bayesian-based phylogenies) to investigate S. pneumoniae isolates from West Africa, with the aim of providing insights into the pathogenicity and other features related to the biology of the organism. The strains investigated comprised a well defined collection of 58 invasive and carriage isolates that were sequenced typed and included eight different S. pneumoniae serotypes (1, 3, 5, 6A, 11, 14, 19 F and 23 F) of varying invasive disease potential. Results The core genome of the isolates was estimated to be 38% and was mainly represented by gene functional categories associated with housekeeping functions. Comparison of the gene content of invasive and carriage isolates identified at least eleven potential genes that may be important in virulence including surface proteins, transport proteins, transcription factors and hypothetical proteins. Thirteen accessory regions (ARs) were also identified and did not show any loci association with the eleven virulence genes. Intraclonal diversity (isolates of the same serotype and MLST but expressing different patterns of ARs) was observed among some clones including ST 1233 (serotype 5), ST 3404 (serotype 5) and ST 3321 (serotype 14). A constructed phylogenetic tree of the isolates showed a high level of heterogeneity consistent with the frequent S. pneumoniae recombination. Despite this, a homogeneous clustering of all the serotype 1 strains was observed. Conclusions Comparative phylogenomics of invasive and carriage S. pneumoniae isolates identified a number of putative virulence determinants that may be important in the progression of S. pneumoniae from the carriage phase to invasive disease. Virulence determinants that contribute to S. pneumoniae pathogenicity are likely to be distributed randomly throughout its genome rather than being clustered in dedicated loci or islands. Compared to other S

  9. Coinfection with Streptococcus pneumoniae Modulates the B Cell Response to Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Amaya I.; Strauman, Maura C.; Mozdzanowska, Krystyna; Whittle, James R. R.; Williams, Katie L.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Weiser, Jeffrey N.; Caton, Andrew J.; Hensley, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pathogen-specific antibodies (Abs) protect against respiratory infection with influenza A virus (IAV) and Streptococcus pneumoniae and are the basis of effective vaccines. Sequential or overlapping coinfections with both pathogens are common, yet the impact of coinfection on the generation and maintenance of Ab responses is largely unknown. We report here that the B cell response to IAV is altered in mice coinfected with IAV and S. pneumoniae and that this response differs, depending on the order of pathogen exposure. In mice exposed to S. pneumoniae prior to IAV, the initial virus-specific germinal center (GC) B cell response is significantly enhanced in the lung-draining mediastinal lymph node and spleen, and there is an increase in CD4+ T follicular helper (TFH) cell numbers. In contrast, secondary S. pneumoniae infection exaggerates early antiviral antibody-secreting cell formation, and at later times, levels of GCs, TFH cells, and antiviral serum IgG are elevated. Mice exposed to S. pneumoniae prior to IAV do not maintain the initially robust GC response in secondary lymphoid organs and exhibit reduced antiviral serum IgG with diminished virus neutralization activity a month after infection. Our data suggest that the history of pathogen exposures can critically affect the generation of protective antiviral Abs and may partially explain the differential susceptibility to and disease outcomes from IAV infection in humans. IMPORTANCE Respiratory tract coinfections, specifically those involving influenza A viruses and Streptococcus pneumoniae, remain a top global health burden. We sought to determine how S. pneumoniae coinfection modulates the B cell immune response to influenza virus since antibodies are key mediators of protection. PMID:25100838

  10. Organics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chian, Edward S. K.; DeWalle, Foppe B.

    1978-01-01

    Presents water analysis literature for 1978. This review is concerned with organics, and it covers: (1) detergents and surfactants; (2) aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons; (3) pesticides and chlorinated hydrocarbons; and (4) naturally occurring organics. A list of 208 references is also presented. (HM)

  11. Organizers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on "organizers," tools or techniques that provide identification and classification along with possible relationships or connections among ideas, concepts, and issues. Discusses David Ausubel's research and ideas concerning advance organizers; the implications of Ausubel's theory to curriculum and teaching; "webbing," a specific…

  12. Call to action on world pneumonia day.

    PubMed

    Hajjeh, Rana; Whitney, Cynthia G

    2012-11-01

    This month, on November 12, the world will recognize the fourth annual World Pneumonia Day. First launched in 2009 by a coalition of global health leaders (1), World Pneumonia Day aims to raise awareness about pneumonia's toll on the world's children and to promote interventions to protect against, treat, and prevent the disease. Pneumonia continues to be the leading killer of young children around the world, causing ≈14% of all deaths in children 1 month to 5 years of age (2). It is a critical disease for countries to conquer in order to reach Millennium Development Goal 4: reducing the child mortality rate by two thirds from 1990 to 2015 (3). Most children who die from pneumonia live in developing countries, where such factors as malnutrition, crowding, and lack of access to quality health care increase the risk for death. Pneumonia kills few children in industrialized countries, although it remains among the top 10 causes of deaths in the United States, for example, because of deaths in older adults (4). PMID:23092708

  13. Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection and Tourette's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Müller, Norbert; Riedel, Michael; Blendinger, Christa; Oberle, Karin; Jacobs, Enno; Abele-Horn, Marianne

    2004-12-15

    An association between infection and Tourette's syndrome (TS) has been described repeatedly. A role for streptococcal infection (PANDAS) has been established for several years, but the involvement of other infectious agents such as Borrelia Burgdorferi or Mycoplasma pneumoniae has only been described in single case reports. We examined antibody titers against M. pneumoniae and various types of antibodies by immunoblot in patients and in a sex- and age-matched comparison group. Participants comprised 29 TS patients and 29 controls. Antibody titers against M. pneumoniae were determined by microparticle agglutination (MAG) assay and confirmed by immunoblot. Elevated titers were found in significantly more TS patients than controls (17 vs. 1). Additionally, the number of IgA positive patients was significantly higher in the TS group than in the control group (9 vs. 1). A higher proportion of increased serum titers and especially of IgA antibodies suggests a role for M. pneumoniae in a subgroup of patients with TS and supports the finding of case reports implicating an acute or chronic infection with M. pneumoniae as one etiological agent for tics. An autoimmune reaction, however, has to be taken into account. In predisposed persons, infection with various agents including M. pneumoniae should be considered as at least an aggravating factor in TS. PMID:15590039

  14. Radiological diagnosis of pneumonia in children.

    PubMed

    Kiekara, O; Korppi, M; Tanska, S; Soimakallio, S

    1996-02-01

    During 12 months in 1981-82, 201 children were hospitalized due to radiologically verified definite or probable pneumonia. In 1985, 194 chest radiographs (anteroposterior views) were re-evaluated jointly by two radiologists, and classified into three categories: alveolar, interstitial and probable pneumonia. In 127 cases definite pneumonia was diagnosed on both occasions, alveolar in 48 cases and interstitial in 79 cases. Variation between the two evaluations 3 years apart was observed in 46 (24%) of the 194 cases; the adjusted kappa (0.47) was in the modest region. Factors contributing to this variation were young age, less than 12 months, and the presence of interstitial infiltration, bronchial obstruction and low C-reactive protein. Factors associated with less marked variation were the presence of alveolar infiltration, auscultatory fine rates and elevated C-reactive protein. The microbial aetiology of infection, assessed by viral and bacterial antigen and antibody assays, showed no association with diagnostic variation. A lateral view of the chest radiograph was obtained from 158 patients; it was positive in 99 (91%) of the 109 cases with definite pneumonia. In only three cases the diagnosis was based on the lateral view alone. Our results show that the radiological diagnosis of pneumonia is difficult in children, especially in young children with interstitial pneumonia. PMID:8932509

  15. Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Infection with Neurologic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Yimenicioğlu, Sevgi; Yakut, Ayten; Ekici, Arzu; Bora Carman, Kursat; Cagrı Dinleyici, Ener

    2014-01-01

    Background: Extrapulmonary complications of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) infection include encephalitis, optic neuritis, acute psychosis, stroke, cranial nerve palsies, aseptic meningitis and also it may be implicated in immune mediated neurological diseases such as acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis, Guillain-Barre syndrome and transverse myelitis. Case Presentation: We present five cases with acute neurological diseases after M. pneumoniae infection. The clinical presentations were characterized by encephalitis in 2 patients, Gullain-Barre syndrome in 2 patients, transverse myelitis in 1 patient. M. pneumoniae infection was detected in serum by serological method. Only two patients had respiratory symptoms preceding M. pneumoniae infection. Brain MRI revealed hyperintensities on corpus striatum and mesencephalon in one patient with encephalitis, the other had front parietal coalescent periventricular white matter lesions on T2 images. The patient with transverse myelitis had cervical, dorsal and lumbar scattered hyperintense lesions on T2 images. Two patients were treated with high dose steroid, the other two patients received treatment with intravenous immune globuline. Conclusion: M. pneumoniae may reveal different neurologic complications with different radiologic findings. PMID:25793076

  16. Risk Factors and Clinical Impact of Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase–Producing K. pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Gasink, Leanne B.; Edelstein, Paul H.; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Synnestvedt, Marie; Fishman, Neil O.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)–producing K. pneumoniae is an emerging pathogen with serious clinical and infection control implications. To our knowledge, no study has specifically examined risk factors for KPC-producing K. pneumoniae or its impact on mortality. METHODS To identify risk factors for infection or colonization with KPC-producing K. pneumoniae, a case-control study was performed. Case patients with KPC-producing K. pneumoniae were compared with control subjects with carbapenem-susceptible K. pneumoniae. A cohort study evaluated the association between KPC-producing K. pneumoniae and in-hospital mortality. RESULTS Fifty-six case patients and 863 control subjects were identified. In multivariable analysis, independent risk factors for KPC-producing K. pneumoniae were (1) severe illness (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 4.31; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.25–8.25), (2) prior fluoroquinolone use (AOR, 3.39; 95% CI, 1.50, 7.66), and (3) prior extended-spectrum cephalosporin use (AOR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.18, 5.52). Compared with samples from other anatomic locations, K. pneumoniae isolates from blood samples were less likely to harbor KPC (AOR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.12, 0.86). KPC-producing K. pneumoniae was independently associated with in-hospital mortality (AOR, 3.60; 95% CI, 1.87–6.91). CONCLUSIONS KPC-producing K. pneumoniae is an emerging pathogen associated with significant mortality. Our findings highlight the urgent need to develop strategies for prevention and infection control. Limiting use of certain antimicrobials, specifically fluoroquinolones and cephalosporins, use may be effective strategies. PMID:19860564

  17. The Therapeutic Effect of Tigecycline, Unlike That of Ceftazidime, Is Not Influenced by whether the Klebsiella pneumoniae Strain Produces Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases in Experimental Pneumonia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mouton, Johan W.; ten Kate, Marian T.; Sörgel, Fritz; Kinzig, Martina; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    The efficacies of tigecycline and ceftazidime against fatal pneumonia in rats caused by an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-positive Klebsiella pneumoniae strain or its wild-type (WT) progenitor were compared. Ceftazidime at 12.5 or 50 mg/kg of body weight twice daily (b.i.d.) was effective (50% or 100% rat survival) in pneumonia caused by the WT isolate but unsuccessful (100% rat mortality) in pneumonia caused by the ESBL-positive variant. In contrast, tigecycline at 6.25, 12.5, or 25 mg/kg b.i.d. showed dosage-dependent efficacy up to 100% rat survival irrespective of the ESBL character of the infecting organism. PMID:23129049

  18. Streptoccocus pyogenes: a forgotten cause of severe community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Birch, C; Gowardman, J

    2000-02-01

    We report a case of severe community-acquired pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pyogenes (Lancefield Group A streptoccocus) that was complicated by a streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Although this micro-organism is an uncommon cause of community-acquired pneumonia, previously well individuals may be infected and the clinical course may be fulminant. A household contact was the likely point of infection. Invasive group A streptococcal disease continues to remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the community and therefore will continue to be encountered by intensive care physicians. Treatment of Group A streptococcal infection remains penicillin; however, clindamycin should be added in severe infection. PMID:10701045

  19. Disease risk and mortality prediction in intensive care patients with pneumonia. Australian and New Zealand practice in intensive care (ANZPIC II).

    PubMed

    Boots, R J; Lipman, J; Bellomo, R; Stephens, D; Heller, R F

    2005-02-01

    This study of ventilated patients investigated pneumonia risk factors and outcome predictors in 476 episodes of pneumonia (48% community-acquired pneumonia, 24% hospital-acquired pneumonia, 28% ventilator-associated pneumonia) using a prospective survey in 14 intensive care units within Australia and New Zealand. For community acquired pneumonia, mortality increased with immunosuppression (OR 5.32, CI 95% 1.58-1799, P<0.01), clinical signs of consolidation (OR 2.43, CI 95% 1.09-5.44, P=0.03) and Sepsis-Related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores (OR 1.19, CI 95% 1.08-1.30, P<0.001) but improved if appropriate antibiotic changes were made within three days of intensive care unit admission (OR 0.42, CI 95% 0.20-0.86, P=0.02). For hospital-acquired pneumonia, immunosuppression (OR 6.98, CI 95% 1.16-42.2, P=0.03) and non-metastatic cancer (OR 3.78, CI 95% 1.20-11.93, P=0.02) were the principal mortality predictors. Alcoholism (OR 7.80, CI 95% 1.20-17.50, P<0.001), high SOFA scores (OR 1.44, CI 95% 1.20-1.75, P=0.001) and the isolation of "high risk" organisms including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp, Stenotrophomonas spp and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (OR 4.79, CI 95% 1.43-16.03, P=0.01), were associated with increased mortality in ventilator-associated pneumonia. The use of non-invasive ventilation was independently protective against mortality for patients with community-acquired and hospital-acquired pneumonia (OR 0.35, CI 95% 0.18-0.68, P=0.002). Mortality was similar for patients requiring both invasive and non-invasive ventilation and non-invasive ventilation alone (21% compared with 20% respectively, P=0.56). Pneumonia risks and mortality predictors in Australian and New Zealand ICUs vary with pneumonia type. A history of alcoholism is a major risk factor for mortality in ventilator-associated pneumonia, greater in magnitude than the mortality effect of immunosuppression in hospital-acquired pneumonia or community

  20. Evaluation of antibacterial effects of Zataria multiflora Boiss extracts against ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae strains

    PubMed Central

    Dadashi, Masoud; Hashemi, Ali; Eslami, Gita; Fallah, Fatemeh; Goudarzi, Hossein; Erfanimanesh, Soroor; Taherpour, Arezou

    2016-01-01

    Objective: There are few therapeutic options for treatment of multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates as a hospital infectious agent (nosocomial infection). The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of Zataria multiflora Boiss extracts against ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae strains. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 100 K. pneumoniae isolates from two hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion and microdilution broth methods and detection of ESBL was carried out according to CLSI guidelines. The blaCTX-M-15 plasmid gene was detected by PCR and sequencing methods. Extracts susceptibility test was performed by broth microdilution method. Results: Among 100 K. pneumoniae strains, 48 (48%) were ESBL positive. In this study, fosfomycin, colistin and tigecycline were more active than other antibiotics. The existence of blaCTX-M-15 was detected in 30 (62.5%) of 48 ESBL-producing isolates. The chloroformic extract showed potent activity against ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae strains (MIC50 = 1.56 mg/ml and MIC90=3.12mg/ml). The MIC50 and MIC90 (The MIC50 represents the MIC value at which ≥50% of the isolates in a test population are inhibited and the MIC90 represents the MIC value at which ≥90% of the strains within a test population are inhibited) were 3.12 and 6.25 mg/ml and 6.25 and 12.5 mg/ml for methanolic and acetonic extracts, respectively. Conclusion: The incidence of ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae is very high. Therefore, detection of ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolates is of great importance in identifying drug resistance patterns in K. pneumoniae isolates and in control of infections. Zataria multiflora may have the potential to be used against multidrug resistant organisms such as clinical isolates of ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae. PMID:27462557

  1. Comparison of Passively Transferred Antibodies in Bighorn and Domestic Lambs Reveals One Factor in Differential Susceptibility of These Species to Mannheimia haemolytica-Induced Pneumonia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannheimia haemolytica consistently causes fatal bronchopneumonia in bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis) under natural and experimental conditions. Leukotoxin is the primary virulence factor of this organism. BHS are more susceptible to developing fatal pneumonia than the related species Ovis aries...

  2. The Frontal Lobes and Theory of Mind: Developmental Concepts from Adult Focal Lesion Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuss, Donald T.; Anderson, Vicki

    2004-01-01

    The primary objective in this paper is to present a framework to understand the structure of consciousness. We argue that consciousness has been difficult to define because there are different kinds of consciousness, hierarchically organized, which need to be differentiated. Our framework is based on evidence from adult focal lesion research. The…

  3. Elucidation of the RamA regulon in Klebsiella pneumoniae reveals a role in LPS regulation.

    PubMed

    De Majumdar, Shyamasree; Yu, Jing; Fookes, Maria; McAteer, Sean P; Llobet, Enrique; Finn, Sarah; Spence, Shaun; Monahan, Avril; Monaghan, Avril; Kissenpfennig, Adrien; Ingram, Rebecca J; Bengoechea, José; Gally, David L; Fanning, Séamus; Elborn, Joseph S; Schneiders, Thamarai

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a significant human pathogen, in part due to high rates of multidrug resistance. RamA is an intrinsic regulator in K. pneumoniae established to be important for the bacterial response to antimicrobial challenge; however, little is known about its possible wider regulatory role in this organism during infection. In this work, we demonstrate that RamA is a global transcriptional regulator that significantly perturbs the transcriptional landscape of K. pneumoniae, resulting in altered microbe-drug or microbe-host response. This is largely due to the direct regulation of 68 genes associated with a myriad of cellular functions. Importantly, RamA directly binds and activates the lpxC, lpxL-2 and lpxO genes associated with lipid A biosynthesis, thus resulting in modifications within the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide. RamA-mediated alterations decrease susceptibility to colistin E, polymyxin B and human cationic antimicrobial peptide LL-37. Increased RamA levels reduce K. pneumoniae adhesion and uptake into macrophages, which is supported by in vivo infection studies, that demonstrate increased systemic dissemination of ramA overexpressing K. pneumoniae. These data establish that RamA-mediated regulation directly perturbs microbial surface properties, including lipid A biosynthesis, which facilitate evasion from the innate host response. This highlights RamA as a global regulator that confers pathoadaptive phenotypes with implications for our understanding of the pathogenesis of Enterobacter, Salmonella and Citrobacter spp. that express orthologous RamA proteins. PMID:25633080

  4. Elucidation of the RamA Regulon in Klebsiella pneumoniae Reveals a Role in LPS Regulation

    PubMed Central

    De Majumdar, Shyamasree; Yu, Jing; Fookes, Maria; McAteer, Sean P.; Llobet, Enrique; Finn, Sarah; Spence, Shaun; Monaghan, Avril; Kissenpfennig, Adrien; Ingram, Rebecca J.; Bengoechea, José; Gally, David L.; Fanning, Séamus; Elborn, Joseph S.; Schneiders, Thamarai

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a significant human pathogen, in part due to high rates of multidrug resistance. RamA is an intrinsic regulator in K. pneumoniae established to be important for the bacterial response to antimicrobial challenge; however, little is known about its possible wider regulatory role in this organism during infection. In this work, we demonstrate that RamA is a global transcriptional regulator that significantly perturbs the transcriptional landscape of K. pneumoniae, resulting in altered microbe-drug or microbe-host response. This is largely due to the direct regulation of 68 genes associated with a myriad of cellular functions. Importantly, RamA directly binds and activates the lpxC, lpxL-2 and lpxO genes associated with lipid A biosynthesis, thus resulting in modifications within the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide. RamA-mediated alterations decrease susceptibility to colistin E, polymyxin B and human cationic antimicrobial peptide LL-37. Increased RamA levels reduce K. pneumoniae adhesion and uptake into macrophages, which is supported by in vivo infection studies, that demonstrate increased systemic dissemination of ramA overexpressing K. pneumoniae. These data establish that RamA-mediated regulation directly perturbs microbial surface properties, including lipid A biosynthesis, which facilitate evasion from the innate host response. This highlights RamA as a global regulator that confers pathoadaptive phenotypes with implications for our understanding of the pathogenesis of Enterobacter, Salmonella and Citrobacter spp. that express orthologous RamA proteins. PMID:25633080

  5. Detection and Characterization of Mycoplasma pneumoniae during an Outbreak of Respiratory Illness at a University

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Jessica L.; Diaz, Maureen H.; Petrone, Brianna L.; Benitez, Alvaro J.; Wolff, Bernard J.; Edison, Laura; Tobin-D'Angelo, Melissa; Moore, Ashley; Martyn, Audrey; Dishman, Hope; Drenzek, Cherie L.; Turner, Kim; Hicks, Lauri A.

    2014-01-01

    An outbreak at a university in Georgia was identified after 83 cases of probable pneumonia were reported among students. Respiratory specimens were obtained from 21 students for the outbreak investigation. The TaqMan array card (TAC), a quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based multipathogen detection technology, was used to initially identify Mycoplasma pneumoniae as the causative agent in this outbreak. TAC demonstrated 100% diagnostic specificity and sensitivity compared to those of the multiplex qPCR assay for this agent. All M. pneumoniae specimens (n = 12) and isolates (n = 10) were found through genetic analysis to be susceptible to macrolide antibiotics. The strain diversity of M. pneumoniae associated with this outbreak setting was identified using a variety of molecular typing procedures, resulting in two P1 genotypes (types 1 [60%] and 2 [40%]) and seven different multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) profiles. Continued molecular typing of this organism, particularly during outbreaks, may enhance the current understanding of the epidemiology of M. pneumoniae and may ultimately lead to a more effective public health response. PMID:24371236

  6. Endobronchial tumor in children: Unusual finding in recurrent pneumonia, report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Madafferi, Silvia; Catania, Vincenzo D; Accinni, Antonella; Boldrini, Renata; Inserra, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    We are reporting 3 cases of pediatric endobronchial tumors presented with recurrent pneumonia. The median age of patients, at time of presentation, was 10.6 years. All patients presented with recurrent pneumonia with a mean time to occurrence, after onset of symptoms, of 14 mo. Bronchoscopy was early performed as part of diagnostic work-up and it revealed an endobronchial mass in every case. Complete surgical resection was performed in all cases, with lung preservation in two of them. Neither post-operative chemotherapy nor radiotherapy was required. The mean duration of follow-up was 7 years and all patients are still alive and disease-free. Recurrent pneumonia, in pediatrics, should raise the suspicion of an obstructing lesion, congenital malformation or systemic disease. A systematic approach is useful for organize the clinicians initial workup. Prompt diagnosis allows parenchymal-sparing surgery, which offers the best chance of cure and reduces clinical and functional complications in these patients. PMID:26015878

  7. Detection of Chlamydia pneumoniae in a collection of captive snakes and response to treatment with marbofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Rüegg, S R; Regenscheit, N; Origgi, F C; Kaiser, C; Borel, N

    2015-09-01

    In a collection of 58 snakes comprising predominantly Eurasian vipers in Switzerland, five snakes died unexpectedly during hibernation from 2009 to 2012. In one snake, organisms resembling chlamydiae were detected by immunohistochemistry in multiple histiocytic granulomas. Real-time quantitative PCR and microarray analysis were used to determine the presence of Chlamydia pneumoniae in tissue samples and cloacal/choanal swabs from snakes in the collection; 8/53 (15.1%) of the remaining snakes were positive. Although one infected snake had suppurative periglossitis, infection with C. pneumoniae did not appear to be associated with specific clinical signs in snakes. Of seven snakes treated with 5 mg/kg marbofloxacin IM once daily, five became PCR negative for C. pneumoniae following treatment, whereas one animal remained positive and one snake was lost to follow-up. PMID:26049258

  8. Pathogenicity of Aeromonas hydrophila, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis to Brown Tree Frogs (Litoria ewingii)

    PubMed Central

    Schadich, Ermin; Cole, Anthony LJ

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial dermatosepticemia, a systemic infectious bacterial disease of frogs, can be caused by several opportunistic gram-negative bacterial species including Aeromonas hydrophila, Chryseobacterium indologenes, Chryseobacterium meningosepticum, Citrobacter freundii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Serratia liquifaciens. Here we determined the pathogenicity of 3 bacterial species (Aeromonas hydrophila, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis) associated with an outbreak of fatal dermatosepticemia in New Zealand Litoria ewingii frogs. A bath challenge method was used to expose test frogs to individual bacterial species (2 × 107 cfu/mL in pond water); control frogs were exposed to uninfected pond water. None of the control frogs or those exposed to A. hydrophila or P. mirabilis showed any morbidity or mortality. Morbidity and mortality was 40% among frogs exposed to K. pneumonia, and the organism was reisolated from the hearts, spleens, and livers of affected animals. PMID:20412685

  9. Inhibition of α-toxin production by subinhibitory concentrations of naringenin controls Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Jian-Feng; Dong, Jing; Wei, Jing-Yuan; Wang, Ya-Nan; Dai, Xiao-Han; Wang, Xin; Luo, Ming-Jing; Tan, Wei; Deng, Xu-Ming; Niu, Xiao-di

    2013-04-01

    Staphylococcal pneumonia provoked by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a life-threatening infection in which α-toxin is an essential virulence factor. In this study, we investigate the influence of naringenin on α-toxin production and further assess its therapeutic performance in the treatment of staphylococcal pneumonia. Remarkably, the expression of α-toxin was significantly inhibited when the organism was treated with 16 μg/ml of naringenin. When studied in a mouse model of S. aureus pneumonia, naringenin could attenuate the symptoms of lung injury and inflammation in infected mice. These results suggest that naringenin is a promising agent for treatment of S. aureus infection. PMID:23425602

  10. Critical appraisal of ceftaroline in the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and skin infections

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Julian J; Martin, Stanley I

    2012-01-01

    Ceftaroline is a novel broad-spectrum cephalosporin β-lactam antibiotic with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) as well as multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae among other routine Gram positive and Gram negative organisms. It has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs). Ceftaroline is approved for treatment of ABSSSI due to MRSA, however currently there are no data for pneumonia due to MRSA in humans. Herein we review the major clinical trials as well as ceftaroline microbiology, pharmacokinetics, and safety, followed by a look at further directions for investigation of this new agent. PMID:22547933

  11. Adenovirus Type 7 Pneumonia in Children Who Died from Measles-Associated Pneumonia, Hanoi, Vietnam, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Hai, Le Thanh; Thach, Hoang Ngoc; Tuan, Ta Anh; Nam, Dao Huu; Dien, Tran Minh; Sato, Yuko; Kumasaka, Toshio; Suzuki, Tadaki; Hanaoka, Nozomu; Fujimoto, Tsuguto; Katano, Harutaka; Hasegawa, Hideki; Kawachi, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    During a 2014 measles outbreak in Vietnam, postmortem pathologic examination of hospitalized children who died showed that adenovirus type 7 pneumonia was a contributory cause of death in children with measles-associated immune suppression. Adenovirus type 7 pneumonia should be recognized as a major cause of secondary infection after measles. PMID:26926035

  12. Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae in adolescents with community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the prevalence of macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae isolates in Japanese pediatric patients has increased rapidly, there have been no reports concerning macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae infection in adolescents aged 16 to 19 years old. The purpose of this study was to clarify the prevalence and clinical characteristics of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae in adolescent patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Methods A total of 99 cases with M. pneumoniae pneumonia confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and culture were analyzed. Forty-five cases were pediatric patients less than 16 years old, 26 cases were 16 to 19-year-old adolescent patients and 28 cases were adult patients. Primers for domain V of 23S rRNA were used and DNA sequences of the PCR products were compared with the sequence of an M. pneumoniae reference strain. Results Thirty of 45 pediatric patients (66%), 12 of 26 adolescent patients (46%) and seven of 28 adult patients (25%) with M. pneumoniae pneumonia were found to be infected with macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae (MR patients). Although the prevalence of resistant strains was similar in pediatric patients between 2008 and 2011, an increase in the prevalence of resistant strains was observed in adolescent patients. Among 30 pediatric MR patients, 26 had an A-to-G transition at position 2063 (A2063G) and four had an A-to-G transition at position 2064 (A2064G). In 12 adolescent MR patients, 10 showed an A2063G transition and two showed an A2064G transition, and in seven adult MR patients, six showed an A2063G transition and one showed an A2064G transition. Conclusions The prevalence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae is high among adolescent patients as well as pediatric patients less than 16-years old. To prevent outbreaks of M. pneumoniae infection, especially macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae, in closed populations including among families, in schools and in university students, physicians should pay

  13. The Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health Project: A 21st Century Childhood Pneumonia Etiology Study

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Katherine L.; Deloria-Knoll, Maria; Murdoch, David R.; Feikin, Daniel R.; DeLuca, Andrea N.; Driscoll, Amanda J.; Baggett, Henry C.; Brooks, W. Abdullah; Howie, Stephen R. C.; Kotloff, Karen L.; Madhi, Shabir A.; Maloney, Susan A.; Sow, Samba; Thea, Donald M.; Scott, J. Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) project is a 7-country, standardized, comprehensive evaluation of the etiologic agents causing severe pneumonia in children from developing countries. During previous etiology studies, between one-quarter and one-third of patients failed to yield an obvious etiology; PERCH will employ and evaluate previously unavailable innovative, more sensitive diagnostic techniques. Innovative and rigorous epidemiologic and analytic methods will be used to establish the causal association between presence of potential pathogens and pneumonia. By strategic selection of study sites that are broadly representative of regions with the greatest burden of childhood pneumonia, PERCH aims to provide data that reflect the epidemiologic situation in developing countries in 2015, using pneumococcal and Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccines. PERCH will also address differences in host, environmental, and/or geographic factors that might determine pneumonia etiology and, by preserving specimens, will generate a resource for future research and pathogen discovery. PMID:22403238

  14. Teal Amber Visible Focal Plane Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Charles R.; Burczewski, Ron

    1981-12-01

    Deep-space surveillance missions have imposed severe demands on existing technology and simulated the search for new, advanced technology developments to provide higher performance. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) sponsored Teal Amber as a visible charge-coupled device (CCD) and associated focal plane signal processing technology development and demonstration program. This paper describes this large-scale, staring-array-sensor concept. The current state of art in the resulting visibled CCD imagers is specified, along with the focal plane signal processor implementation in low power-weight-volume large-scale integrated (LSI) circuitry. Performance requirements and analytic predictions are compared to demonstration system results from an electro-optical test site in White Sands, New Mexico.

  15. Dynamic reactive astrocytes after focal ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shinghua

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are specialized and most numerous glial cell type in the central nervous system and play important roles in physiology. Astrocytes are also critically involved in many neural disorders including focal ischemic stroke, a leading cause of brain injury and human death. One of the prominent pathological features of focal ischemic stroke is reactive astrogliosis and glial scar formation associated with morphological changes and proliferation. This review paper discusses the recent advances in spatial and temporal dynamics of morphology and proliferation of reactive astrocytes after ischemic stroke based on results from experimental animal studies. As reactive astrocytes exhibit stem cell-like properties, knowledge of dynamics of reactive astrocytes and glial scar formation will provide important insights for astrocyte-based cell therapy in stroke. PMID:25657720

  16. Myxoid adrenal adenoma with focal pseudoglandular pattern.

    PubMed

    De Padua, Michelle; Rajagopal, V

    2008-05-01

    Adrenal cortical tumors with myxoid change are rare tumors. To our knowledge, only 22 cases have been described so far in literature, which include 13 carcinomas and 9 adenomas. A pseudoglandular pattern has been described in 9 of these tumors. We report a case of a myxoid adenoma of the left adrenal gland in a 67-year-old woman, with a focal pseudoglandular pattern involving about 20% of the studied tumor. Rest of the tumor was composed of anastomosing cords of tumor cells. Abundant myxoid stroma was present, which stained positively with alcian blue and was weakly focally positive with periodic acid Schiff. Immunophenotype was consistent with an adrenal tumor, i.e., positive for vimentin, inhibin, and melan A. Cytokeratin AE1/AE3 and chromogranin were negative. MIB-1 index was < 0.1%. PMID:18579979

  17. Chest pain in focal musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Christensen, Henrik Wulff

    2010-03-01

    The musculoskeletal system is a recognized source of chest pain. However, despite the apparently benign origin, patients with musculoskeletal chest pain remain under-diagnosed, untreated, and potentially continuously disabled in terms of anxiety, depression, and activities of daily living. Several overlapping conditions and syndromes of focal disorders, including Tietze syndrome, costochondritis, chest wall syndrome, muscle tenderness, slipping rib, cervical angina, and segmental dysfunction of the cervical and thoracic spine, have been reported to cause pain. For most of these syndromes, evidence arises mainly from case stories and empiric knowledge. For segmental dysfunction, clinical features of musculoskeletal chest pain have been characterized in a few clinical trials. This article summarizes the most commonly encountered syndromes of focal musculoskeletal disorders in clinical practice. PMID:20380955

  18. Focal tracer uptake in the jaw.

    PubMed

    El-Zahry, Mai R; Sinzinger, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Focal tracer uptake in the jaw during conventional bone scintigraphy is a quite frequent finding usually due to dental disease and seldom to other diseases including malignant disease. Methylene diphosphonate-technetium-99m ((99m)Tc-MDP) 3-phase bone scan is considered the most sensitive imaging method for the detection of jaw osteonecrosis at an early stage. This finding can also but seldom be seen in patients undergoing palliative radionuclide treatment for bone metastases. In conclusion, focal jaw lesions are usually benign and of dental origin. In a small percentage of cancer patients of about 4.3%, jaw lesions as diagnosed among 347 cases of various carcinomas may be due to malignancy. Unfortunately, the number of studies is small, most of them are retrospective and few show biopsy results. PMID:25397621

  19. Focal region fields of distorted reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buris, N. E.; Kauffman, J. F.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of the focal region fields scattered by an arbitrary surface reflector under uniform plane wave illumination is solved. The physical optics (PO) approximation is used to calculate the current induced on the reflector. The surface of the reflector is described by a number of triangular domain-wise 5th degree bivariate polynomials. A 2-dimensional Gaussian quadrature is employed to numerically evaluate the integral expressions of the scattered fields. No Freshnel or Fraunhofer zone approximations are made. The relation of the focal fields problem to surface compensation techniques and other applications are mentioned. Several examples of distorted parabolic reflectors are presented. The computer code developed is included, together with instructions on its usage.

  20. Extensive Focal Epithelial Hyperplasia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Zahra; Bakhtiari, Sedigheh; Noormohamadi, Robab

    2015-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) or Heck’s disease is a rare viral infection of the oral mucosa caused by human papilloma virus especially subtypes 13 or 32. The frequency of this disease varies widely from one geographic region and ethnic groups to another. This paper reports an Iranian case of extensive focal epithelial hyperplasia. A 35-year-old man with FEH is described, in whom the lesions had persisted for more than 25 years. The lesion was diagnosed according to both clinical and histopathological features. Dental practitioner should be aware of these types of lesions and histopathological examination together and a careful clinical observation should be carried out for a definitive diagnosis. PMID:26351501

  1. Focal adhesions, stress fibers and mechanical tension

    PubMed Central

    Burridge, Keith; Guilluy, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Stress fibers and focal adhesions are complex protein arrays that produce, transmit and sense mechanical tension. Evidence accumulated over many years led to the conclusion that mechanical tension generated within stress fibers contributes to the assembly of both stress fibers themselves and their associated focal adhesions. However, several lines of evidence have recently been presented against this model. Here we discuss the evidence for and against the role of mechanical tension in driving the assembly of these structures. We also consider how their assembly is influenced by the rigidity of the substratum to which cells are adhering. Finally, we discuss the recently identified connections between stress fibers and the nucleus, and the roles that these may play, both in cell migration and regulating nuclear function. PMID:26519907

  2. Status of uncooled focal plane detector arrays for smart IR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddiard, Kevin C.; Ringh, Ulf; Jansson, Christer

    1996-06-01

    A cooperative research project between the Defense Science and Technology Organization, Australia, and the National Defense Research Establishment, Sweden, seeks to investigate concepts for smart IR focal plane detector arrays, whereby a monolithic Semiconductor Film Bolometer detector array is integrated with a CMOS signal conditioning circuit, analog- to-digital conversion and signal processing functions on the same silicon chip. Novel signal conditioning and on-chip digital readout techniques have been successfully demonstrated, and the supporting signal processing electronic design is being developed. This paper discusses the status of detector materials research and staring focal plane array development. The first experimental array has been delivered and is undergoing evaluation.

  3. FOCAL: an experimental design tool for systematizing metabolic discoveries and model development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Current computational tools can generate and improve genome-scale models based on existing data; however, for many organisms, the data needed to test and refine such models are not available. To facilitate model development, we created the forced coupling algorithm, FOCAL, to identify genetic and environmental conditions such that a reaction becomes essential for an experimentally measurable phenotype. This reaction's conditional essentiality can then be tested experimentally to evaluate whether network connections occur or to create strains with desirable phenotypes. FOCAL allows network connections to be queried, which improves our understanding of metabolism and accuracy of developed models. PMID:23236964

  4. Infrared fiber optic focal plane dispersers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Far infrared transmissive fiber optics as a component in the design of integrated far infrared focal plane array utilization is discussed. A tightly packed bundle of fibers is placed at the focal plane, where an array of infrared detectors would normally reside, and then fanned out in two or three dimensions to individual detectors. Subsequently, the detectors are multiplexed by cryogenic electronics for relay of the data. A second possible application is frequency up-conversion (v sub 1 + v sub 2 = v sub 3), which takes advantage of the nonlinear optical index of refraction of certain infrared transmissive materials in fiber form. Again, a fiber bundle is utilized as above, but now a laser of frequency v sub 1 is mixed with the incoming radiation of frequency v sub 1 within the nonlinear fiber material. The sum, v sub 2 is then detected by near infrared or visible detectors which are more sensitive than those available at v sub 2. Due to the geometrical size limitations of detectors such as photomultipliers, the focal plane dispersal technique is advantageous for imaging up-conversion.

  5. Focal plane scanner with reciprocating spatial window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Chengye (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A focal plane scanner having a front objective lens, a spatial window for selectively passing a portion of the image therethrough, and a CCD array for receiving the passed portion of the image. All embodiments have a common feature whereby the spatial window and CCD array are mounted for simultaneous relative reciprocating movement with respect to the front objective lens, and the spatial window is mounted within the focal plane of the front objective. In a first embodiment, the spatial window is a slit and the CCD array is one-dimensional, and successive rows of the image in the focal plane of the front objective lens are passed to the CCD array by an image relay lens interposed between the slit and the CCD array. In a second embodiment, the spatial window is a slit, the CCD array is two-dimensional, and a prism-grating-prism optical spectrometer is interposed between the slit and the CCD array so as to cause the scanned row to be split into a plurality of spectral separations onto the CCD array. In a third embodiment, the CCD array is two-dimensional and the spatial window is a rectangular linear variable filter (LVF) window, so as to cause the scanned rows impinging on the LVF to be bandpass filtered into spectral components onto the CCD array through an image relay lens interposed between the LVF and the CCD array.

  6. [Focal therapy for prostate cancer: German version].

    PubMed

    Kasivisvanathan, V; Shah, T T; Donaldson, I; Kanthabalan, A; Moore, C M; Emberton, M; Ahmed, H U

    2015-02-01

    Focal therapy is a treatment strategy for men with localized prostate cancer that may serve as an alternative option to radical therapy. A number of minimally invasive ablative technologies are available to deliver treatment, and the energies most commonly used include high-intensity focused ultrasound and cryotherapy. The benefit of a tissue-preserving approach is the limitation of damage to key structures such as the neurovascular bundles, external urinary sphincter, rectal mucosa and bladder neck. This in turn minimizes side effects typically associated with radical therapies whilst also aiming to maintain oncological control. Over 30 single-centre studies of focal therapy have been published to date reporting excellent continence rates, good potency rates and acceptable short-term oncological outcomes. However, there are a number of controversial aspects associated with focal therapy including the index lesion hypothesis, patient selection criteria, assessment of treatment effect and the lack of medium- and long-term oncological outcomes. In the process of the adoption of new technology, there is a limited window of opportunity to provide this evidence in well-designed prospective trials. Men should be allowed to benefit from the potential advantages of this novel treatment whilst under close surveillance. An English version of this article is available under dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00120-014-3734-7. PMID:25690574

  7. Mechanism of Focal Adhesion Kinase Mechanosensing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Aponte-Santamaría, Camilo; Sturm, Sebastian; Bullerjahn, Jakob Tómas; Bronowska, Agnieszka; Gräter, Frauke

    2015-11-01

    Mechanosensing at focal adhesions regulates vital cellular processes. Here, we present results from molecular dynamics (MD) and mechano-biochemical network simulations that suggest a direct role of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) as a mechano-sensor. Tensile forces, propagating from the membrane through the PIP2 binding site of the FERM domain and from the cytoskeleton-anchored FAT domain, activate FAK by unlocking its central phosphorylation site (Tyr576/577) from the autoinhibitory FERM domain. Varying loading rates, pulling directions, and membrane PIP2 concentrations corroborate the specific opening of the FERM-kinase domain interface, due to its remarkably lower mechanical stability compared to the individual alpha-helical domains and the PIP2-FERM link. Analyzing downstream signaling networks provides further evidence for an intrinsic mechano-signaling role of FAK in broadcasting force signals through Ras to the nucleus. This distinguishes FAK from hitherto identified focal adhesion mechano-responsive molecules, allowing a new interpretation of cell stretching experiments. PMID:26544178

  8. The Focal Surface of EUSO Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, H. M.; Kawasaki, Y.; Takizawa, Y.; Sakaki, N.; Teshima, M.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Adams, J.; Catalano, O.; Scarisi, L.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Extreme Universe Space Observatory (EUSO) is a science mission under conceptual design for the detection of extremely high energy cosmic rays and neutrinos by the observation of time-resolved images of atmospheric fluorescence photons generated along the extensive air shower, in the near ultraviolet wavelength region. A refractive telescope with double-sided double Fresnel lens will be employed to achieve a large field of view of 60 degrees. The energy and arrival direction of the primary particles will be determined by observing the time evolution of the airshower. The focal surface of the EUSO telescope will be segmented to a few hundred thousand pixels to resolve the entire field of view with the angular resolution of the order of 0.1 degree. The time evolution will be observed with the time resolution of 0.8 microsecond. A large scale array of multianode photomultiplier (MAPMT) is being studied as the EUSO focal surface. The MAPMT array is capable of detecting near ultraviolet photons at single photoelectron level. In this contribution, we will report the present status of the focal surface design including the optimization of anode segmentation and the minimization of the dead area and discuss overall experimental performance in detecting extensive airshowers.

  9. Mechanism of Focal Adhesion Kinase Mechanosensing

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Sebastian; Bullerjahn, Jakob Tómas; Bronowska, Agnieszka; Gräter, Frauke

    2015-01-01

    Mechanosensing at focal adhesions regulates vital cellular processes. Here, we present results from molecular dynamics (MD) and mechano-biochemical network simulations that suggest a direct role of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) as a mechano-sensor. Tensile forces, propagating from the membrane through the PIP2 binding site of the FERM domain and from the cytoskeleton-anchored FAT domain, activate FAK by unlocking its central phosphorylation site (Tyr576/577) from the autoinhibitory FERM domain. Varying loading rates, pulling directions, and membrane PIP2 concentrations corroborate the specific opening of the FERM-kinase domain interface, due to its remarkably lower mechanical stability compared to the individual alpha-helical domains and the PIP2-FERM link. Analyzing downstream signaling networks provides further evidence for an intrinsic mechano-signaling role of FAK in broadcasting force signals through Ras to the nucleus. This distinguishes FAK from hitherto identified focal adhesion mechano-responsive molecules, allowing a new interpretation of cell stretching experiments. PMID:26544178

  10. Multispectral linear array (MLA) focal plane mechanical and thermal design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, A. S.; Kaminski, E. F.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanical and thermal design of an integrated focal plane subsystem of a Multispectral Linear Array (MLA) instrument is discussed in terms of focal-plane alignment, thermoelastic performance, and thermal requirements. The modular construction and thermal control of the focal plane array are discussed.

  11. Focus in Grade 1: Teaching with Curriculum Focal Points

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuson, Karen; Clements, Douglas; Beckmann, Sybilla

    2010-01-01

    "Focus in Grade 1: Teaching with Curriculum Focal Points" describes and illustrates learning paths for the mathematical concepts and skills of each grade 1 Focal Point as presented in Curriculum Focal Points for Prekindergarten through Grade 8 Mathematics. It includes representational supports for teaching and learning that can facilitate…

  12. Focus in Grade 2: Teaching with Curriculum Focal Points

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    "Focus in Grade 2: Teaching with Curriculum Focal Points" describes and illustrates learning paths for the mathematical concepts and skills of each grade 2 Focal Point as presented in 'Curriculum Focal Points for Prekindergarten through Grade 8 Mathematics". It includes representational supports for teaching and learning that can facilitate…

  13. Pneumonia Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Does Vancomycin Heteroresistance Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Claeys, Kimberly C.; Lagnf, Abdalhamid M.; Hallesy, Jessica A.; Compton, Matthew T.; Gravelin, Alison L.; Davis, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Vancomycin remains the mainstay treatment for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, including pneumonia. There is concern regarding the emergence of vancomycin tolerance, caused by heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (hVISA), and subsequent vancomycin treatment failure. Pneumonia is associated with high morbidity and mortality, especially with delays in appropriate therapy. This study evaluated the clinical outcomes of patients with hVISA pneumonia compared to those with vancomycin-susceptible S. aureus (VSSA) pneumonia. A retrospective cohort of patients with MRSA pneumonia from 2005 to 2014 was matched at a ratio of 2:1 VSSA to hVISA infections to compare patient characteristics, treatments, and outcomes. hVISA was determined by the 48-h population analysis profile area under the curve. Characteristics between VSSA and hVISA infections were compared by univariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression analysis to determine independent risk factors of inpatient mortality. Eighty-seven patients were included, representing 29 hVISA and 58 VSSA cases of pneumonia. There were no significant differences in demographics or baseline characteristics. Sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores were a median of 7 (interquartile ratio [IQR], 5 to 8) in hVISA patients and 5 (IQR, 3 to 8) in VSSA (P = 0.092) patients. Inpatient mortality was significantly higher in hVISA patients (44.8% versus 24.1%; P = 0.049). Predictors of inpatient mortality upon multivariable regression were SOFA score (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08 to 1.70), Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) positivity (aOR, 6.63; 95% CI, 1.79 to 24.64), and hVISA phenotype (aOR, 3.95; 95% CI, 1.18 to 13.21). Patients with hVISA pneumonia experienced significantly higher inpatient mortality than those with VSSA pneumonia. There is a need to consider the presence of vancomycin heteroresistance in pneumonia caused by MRSA in order to

  14. Classification of Extrapulmonary Manifestations Due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection on the Basis of Possible Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Narita, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    comprehensive therapeutic strategy, covering microbiology (antibiotics), immunology (immunomodulators), and hematology (anticoagulants). The possible influence of the emergence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae on extrapulmonary manifestations, which can be considered of limited clinical threat in Japan where the resistant rate has currently decreased, is discussed on the basis of unique biological characteristics of M. pneumoniae, the smallest self-replicating organism. PMID:26858701

  15. The use of waveform shapes to automatically determine earthquake focal depth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sipkin, S.A.

    2000-01-01

    Earthquake focal depth is an important parameter for rapidly determining probable damage caused by a large earthquake. In addition, it is significant both for discriminating between natural events and explosions and for discriminating between tsunamigenic and nontsunamigenic earthquakes. For the purpose of notifying emergency management and disaster relief organizations as well as issuing tsunami warnings, potential time delays in determining source parameters are particularly detrimental. We present a method for determining earthquake focal depth that is well suited for implementation in an automated system that utilizes the wealth of broadband teleseismic data that is now available in real time from the global seismograph networks. This method uses waveform shapes to determine focal depth and is demonstrated to be valid for events with magnitudes as low as approximately 5.5.

  16. Bacteriological and clinical profile of Community acquired pneumonia in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bashir Ahmed; Singh, Gurmeet; Naik, Muzafar Ahmed; Dhobi, Ghulam Nabi

    2010-04-01

    The aim of our study was to obtain comprehensive insight into the bacteriological and clinical profile of community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization. The patient population consisted of 100 patients admitted with the diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), as defined by British Thoracic society, from December 1998 to Dec 2000, at the Sher- i-Kashmir institute of Medical Sciences Soura, Srinagar, India. Gram negative organisms were the commonest cause (19/29), followed by gram positive (10/29). In 71 cases no etiological cause was obtained. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the commonest pathogen (10/29), followed by Staphylococcus aureus (7/29), Escherichia coli (6/29), Klebsiella spp. (3/29), Streptococcus pyogenes (1/29), Streptococcus pneumoniae (1/29) and Acinetobacter spp. (1/29). Sputum was the most common etiological source of organism isolation (26) followed by blood (6), pleural fluid (3), and pus culture (1). Maximum number of patients presented with cough (99%), fever (95%), tachycardia (92%), pleuritic chest pain (75%), sputum production (65%) and leucocytosis (43%). The commonest predisposing factors were smoking (65%), COPD (57%), structural lung disease (21%), diabetes mellitus (13%), and decreased level of consciousness following seizure (eight per cent) and chronic alcoholism (one per cent). Fourteen patients, of whom, nine were males and five females, died. Staphylococcus aureus was the causative organism in four, Pseudomonas in two, Klebsiella in one, and no organism was isolated in seven cases. The factors predicting mortality at admission were - age over 62 years, history of COPD or smoking, hypotension, altered sensorium, respiratory failure, leucocytosis, and staphylococcus pneumonia and undetermined etiology. The overall rate of identification of microbial etiology of community-acquired pneumonia was 29%, which is very low, and if serological tests for legionella, mycoplasma and viruses are performed the diagnostic yield would

  17. The management of pneumonia in internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Bouza, E; Giannella, M; Pinilla, B; Pujol, R; Capdevila, J A; Muñoz, P

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonia generates a high workload for internal medicine departments. Management of this disease is challenging, because patients are usually elderly and have multiple comorbid conditions. Furthermore, the interpretation and adherence to guidelines are far from clear in this setting. We report the opinion of 43 internists especially interested in infectious diseases that were questioned at the 2011 XXXII National Conference of Spanish Society of Internal Medicine about the main issues involved in the management of pneumonia in the internal medicine departments, namely, classification, admission criteria, microbiological workup, therapeutic management, discharge policy, and prevention of future episodes. Participants were asked to choose between 2 options for each statement by 4 investigators. Consensus could not be reached in many cases. The most controversial issues concerned recognition and management of healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP). Most participants were aware of the differences in terms of underlying diseases, etiological distribution, and outcome of HCAP compared with community-acquired pneumonia, but only a minority agreed to manage HCAP as hospital-acquired pneumonia, as suggested by some guidelines. A clinical patient-to-patient approach proved to be the option preferred by internists in the management of HCAP. PMID:23664752

  18. The management of pneumonia in internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Bouza, E; Giannella, M; Pinilla, B; Pujol, R; Capdevila, J A; Muñoz, P

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonia generates a high workload for internal medicine departments. Management of this disease is challenging, because patients are usually elderly and have multiple comorbid conditions. Furthermore, the interpretation and adherence to guidelines are far from clear in this setting. We report the opinion of 43 internists especially interested in infectious diseases that were questioned at the 2011 XXXII National Conference of Spanish Society of Internal Medicine about the main issues involved in the management of pneumonia in the internal medicine departments, namely, classification, admission criteria, microbiological workup, therapeutic management, discharge policy, and prevention of future episodes. Participants were asked to choose between 2 options for each statement by 4 investigators. Consensus could not be reached in many cases. The most controversial issues concerned recognition and management of healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP). Most participants were aware of the differences in terms of underlying diseases, etiological distribution, and outcome of HCAP compared with community-acquired pneumonia, but only a minority agreed to manage HCAP as hospital-acquired pneumonia, as suggested by some guidelines. A clinical patient-to-patient approach proved to be the option preferred by internists in the management of HCAP. PMID:26530942

  19. A family outbreak of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, K; Frew, C E; Carrington, D

    1992-07-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae, a newly described Chlamydia species, has been shown to be a cause of acute respiratory tract infection in both adults and children, but its role in human infection is still under investigation. Here we present a family outbreak of C. pneumoniae infection where three members of a family presented with a 'flu-like illness' and acute upper respiratory tract infection which did not improve despite penicillin or septrin therapy. No history of exposure to birds, pets or animals was obtained. As C. pneumoniae isolation from respiratory secretions is not without difficulty, diagnosis usually relies currently on serum-based tests. In this study C. pneumoniae specific IgM determined by the micro-immunofluorescence test was detected in the three clinical cases. All three cases had an elevated complement-fixing antibody titre to Psittacosis-LGV antigen, which may have suggested psittacosis, if type-specific tests had not been performed. In addition, three other members of the family had C. pneumoniae-specific IgG antibody although specific IgM was absent. These three younger members of the family had been symptomatic in the month preceding symptoms in their older sibling and their parents. All the symptomatic members of the family made a complete recovery on tetracycline therapy. PMID:1522345

  20. Immune ageing and susceptibility to Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Mariana Torrente; Mitchell, Timothy J; Lord, Janet M

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a complex Gram-positive bacterium comprising over 90 different serotypes and is a major cause of pneumonia. Susceptibility to S. pneumoniae is remarkably age-related being greatest in children under 5 years old and adults over 65. Whilst the immaturity of the immune system is largely responsible for poor immunity in the former, the underlying causes of susceptibility in older adults is complex. Immunity to S. pneumoniae is mediated predominantly through the inflammatory response in the nasopharyngeal mucosa recruiting phagocytes (neutrophils and monocyte/macrophages) which recognise the pathogen via TLR2 and ingest and kill the bacteria, with the induction of Th17 cells being required to maintain neutrophil recruitment and ensure clearance of the infection. In this review we discuss the impact of ageing upon these aspects of immunity to S. pneumoniae, as well as age-related changes to the serotypes present in the adult nasopharyngeal tract which could further influence susceptibility to infection. PMID:26472172

  1. A focal adhesion protein-based mechanochemical checkpoint regulates cleft progression during branching morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Daley, William P.; Kohn, Joshua M.; Larsen, Melinda

    2011-01-01

    Cleft formation is the initial step of branching morphogenesis in many organs. We previously demonstrated that ROCK 1 regulates a non-muscle myosin II-dependent mechanochemical checkpoint to transition initiated clefts to progressing clefts in developing submandibular salivary glands. Here, we report that ROCK-mediated integrin activation and subsequent formation of focal adhesion complexes comprise this mechanochemical checkpoint. Inhibition of ROCK1 and non-muscle myosin II activity decreased integrin β1 activation in the cleft region and interfered with localization and activation of focal adhesion complex proteins, such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Inhibition of FAK activity also prevented cleft progression, by disrupting recruitment of the focal adhesion proteins talin and vinculin and subsequent fibronectin assembly in the cleft region while decreasing ERK1/2 activation. These results demonstrate that inside-out integrin signaling leading to a localized recruitment of active FAK-containing focal adhesion protein complexes generates a mechanochemical checkpoint that facilitates progression of branching morphogenesis. PMID:22016182

  2. Effect of a Metalloantibiotic Produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa on Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Kerbauy, Gilselena; Vivan, Ana C P; Simões, Glenda C; Simionato, Ane S; Pelisson, Marsileni; Vespero, Eliana C; Costa, Silvia F; Andrade, Celia G T de J; Barbieri, Daiane M; Mello, João C P; Morey, Alexandre T; Yamauchi, Lucy M; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli F; de Oliveira, Admilton G; Andrade, Galdino

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO) are a great problem in hospitals, where thousands of people are infected daily, with the occurrence of high mortality rates, especially in infections caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae (KPC-producing Kpn). The challenge is to find new compounds that can control KPC producing-Kpn infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic activity of the F3d fraction produced by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa LV strain against clinical isolates of KPC-producing Kpn. The results showed that the minimum inhibitory concentration of F3d (62.5 µg mL(-1)), containing an organic metallic compound, killed planktonic cells of KPC-producing Kpn strains after 30 min of incubation. At the same concentration, this fraction also showed an inhibitory effect against biofilm of these bacteria after 24 h of incubation. Treatment with the F3d fraction caused pronounced morphological alterations in both planktonic and biofilm cells of the bacteria. The inhibitory effect of the F3d fraction seems to be more selective for the bacteria than the host cells, indicating its potential in the development of new drugs for the treatment of infections caused by KPC-producing Kpn and other MDRO. PMID:26891742

  3. Streptococcus pneumoniae NanC

    PubMed Central

    Owen, C. David; Lukacik, Petra; Potter, Jane A.; Sleator, Olivia; Taylor, Garry L.; Walsh, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important human pathogen that causes a range of disease states. Sialidases are important bacterial virulence factors. There are three pneumococcal sialidases: NanA, NanB, and NanC. NanC is an unusual sialidase in that its primary reaction product is 2-deoxy-2,3-didehydro-N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac2en, also known as DANA), a nonspecific hydrolytic sialidase inhibitor. The production of Neu5Ac2en from α2–3-linked sialosides by the catalytic domain is confirmed within a crystal structure. A covalent complex with 3-fluoro-β-N-acetylneuraminic acid is also presented, suggesting a common mechanism with other sialidases up to the final step of product formation. A conformation change in an active site hydrophobic loop on ligand binding constricts the entrance to the active site. In addition, the distance between the catalytic acid/base (Asp-315) and the ligand anomeric carbon is unusually short. These features facilitate a novel sialidase reaction in which the final step of product formation is direct abstraction of the C3 proton by the active site aspartic acid, forming Neu5Ac2en. NanC also possesses a carbohydrate-binding module, which is shown to bind α2–3- and α2–6-linked sialosides, as well as N-acetylneuraminic acid, which is captured in the crystal structure following hydration of Neu5Ac2en by NanC. Overall, the pneumococcal sialidases show remarkable mechanistic diversity while maintaining a common structural scaffold. PMID:26370075

  4. Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a trigger for Weston Hurst syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Verschoor, Chris P.; Bowdish, Dawn M.E.; Provias, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We report a case of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection as one possible trigger for Weston Hurst syndrome (acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis), a rare disorder of microvascular injury often described as a postinfectious complication of an upper respiratory illness. Methods: This is a case of a 27-year-old man presenting with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 3 and an acute head CT revealing extensive vasogenic edema in the right hemisphere associated with mass effect in the context of a recent upper respiratory illness. Right frontal biopsy was performed on day 2, which showed acute cerebritis, and the patient was aggressively treated with antibiotics. However, over the next 5 days from presentation, the vasogenic edema increased, leading ultimately to brain herniation and death. Results: A full autopsy was performed at 5 days from presentation, which showed areas of vessel wall fibrinoid necrosis throughout the right hemisphere as well as, but less so, in the left frontal lobe and pons. Chest x-ray on presentation revealed atypical pneumonia, blood tests were positive for cold agglutinins, and at full autopsy, there was myocarditis, all in keeping with recent M pneumoniae infection. DNA obtained from lung and diseased brain (postmortem) was positive for Mycoplasma providing more direct evidence for brain invasion by this organism as the ultimate trigger for Weston Hurst syndrome. Conclusions: This is a rare case report of Weston Hurst syndrome having both initial brain biopsy on day 2 and full autopsy results on day 5 of presentation revealing important clinical clues about the pathogenesis of this often fatal disorder. PMID:26819961

  5. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Streptococcus pneumoniae caused different microbial structure and correlation network in lung microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Heping; Dai, Wenkui; Qiu, Chuangzhao; Li, Shuaicheng; Wang, Wenjian; Xu, Jianqiang; Li, Zhichuan; Wang, Hongmei; Li, Yuzheng; Yang, Zhenyu; Feng, Xin; Zhou, Qian; Han, Lijuan; Li, Yinhu

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia is one of the most serious diseases for children, with which lung microbiota are proved to be associated. We performed 16S rDNA analysis on broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) for 32 children with tracheomalacia (C group), pneumonia infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) (D1 group) or Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) (D2 group). Children with tracheomalacia held lower microbial diversity and accumulated Lactococcus (mean ± SD, 45.21%±5.07%, P value <0.05), Porphyromonas (0.12%±0.31%, P value <0.05). D1 and D2 group were enriched by Streptococcus (7.57%±11.61%, P value <0.01 when compared with D2 group) and Mycoplasma (0.67%±1.25%, P value <0.01) respectively. Bacterial correlation in C group was mainly intermediated by Pseudomonas and Arthrobacter. Whilst, D1 group harbored simplest microbial correlation in three groups, and D2 group held the most complicated network, involving enriched Staphylococcus (0.26%±0.71%), Massilia (0.81%±2.42%). This will be of significance for understanding pneumonia incidence and progression more comprehensively, and discerning between bacterial infection and carriage. PMID:27293852

  6. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Streptococcus pneumoniae caused different microbial structure and correlation network in lung microbiota.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heping; Dai, Wenkui; Qiu, Chuangzhao; Li, Shuaicheng; Wang, Wenjian; Xu, Jianqiang; Li, Zhichuan; Wang, Hongmei; Li, Yuzheng; Yang, Zhenyu; Feng, Xin; Zhou, Qian; Han, Lijuan; Li, Yinhu; Zheng, Yuejie

    2016-06-01

    Pneumonia is one of the most serious diseases for children, with which lung microbiota are proved to be associated. We performed 16S rDNA analysis on broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) for 32 children with tracheomalacia (C group), pneumonia infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) (D1 group) or Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) (D2 group). Children with tracheomalacia held lower microbial diversity and accumulated Lactococcus (mean ± SD, 45.21%±5.07%, P value <0.05), Porphyromonas (0.12%±0.31%, P value <0.05). D1 and D2 group were enriched by Streptococcus (7.57%±11.61%, P value <0.01 when compared with D2 group) and Mycoplasma (0.67%±1.25%, P value <0.01) respectively. Bacterial correlation in C group was mainly intermediated by Pseudomonas and Arthrobacter. Whilst, D1 group harbored simplest microbial correlation in three groups, and D2 group held the most complicated network, involving enriched Staphylococcus (0.26%±0.71%), Massilia (0.81%±2.42%). This will be of significance for understanding pneumonia incidence and progression more comprehensively, and discerning between bacterial infection and carriage. PMID:27293852

  7. Retrospective survey for sialidase activity in Mycoplasma pneumoniae isolates from cases of community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sialidase is a well-known virulence factor of other respiratory pathogens, but was only recently documented to occur in some species of Mycoplasma. The sialidase activity expressed can vary quantitatively among strains within a species of mycoplasma, from undetectable to amounts that correlate positively with strain virulence. Very few isolates of Mycoplasma pneumoniae had ever been examined for sialidase activity, so it was unknown whether sialidase may contribute to diseases involving this species. Findings No sialidase activity was detected by spectrofluorometric assay of 15 laboratory strains and 91 clinical isolates of M. pneumoniae banked over many years from patients having radiologically-confirmed, uncomplicated community-acquired pneumonia. Conclusions The annotated genome of strain M129 (GenBank NC_000912, ATCC 29342), also isolated from a patient with pneumonia, accurately represents the absence of sialidase genes from strains of M. pneumoniae typically associated with uncomplicated community-acquired pneumonia. A possible involvement of sialidase in neurologic or other extra-respiratory manifestations of M. pneumoniae mycoplasmosis remains to be investigated. PMID:21676241

  8. Mechanotransduction at focal adhesions: integrating cytoskeletal mechanics in migrating cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Jean-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are complex plasma membrane-associated macromolecular assemblies that serve to physically connect the actin cytoskeleton to integrins that engage with the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). FAs undergo maturation wherein they grow and change composition differentially to provide traction and to transduce the signals that drive cell migration, which is crucial to various biological processes, including development, wound healing and cancer metastasis. FA-related signalling networks dynamically modulate the strength of the linkage between integrin and actin and control the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. In this review, we have summarized a number of recent investigations exploring how FA composition is affected by the mechanical forces that transduce signalling networks to modulate cellular function and drive cell migration. Understanding the fundamental mechanisms of how force governs adhesion signalling provides insights that will allow the manipulation of cell migration and help to control migration-related human diseases. PMID:23551528

  9. Endogenous lipoid pneumonia associated with Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1.

    PubMed

    Hui, Chee-Kin

    2013-03-01

    Endogenous lipoid pneumonia is an uncommon condition. This is a report of a 29-year-old woman diagnosed with endogenous lipoid pneumonia associated with Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 infection. The patient's endogenous lipoid pneumonia resolved completely after treatment for Legionella pneumophila infection. This suggests that early diagnosis and aggressive treatment of the underlying infection may prevent any long-term sequelae of lipoid pneumonia. PMID:23546039

  10. Pneumonia treated in the internal medicine department: focus on healthcare-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Giannella, M; Pinilla, B; Capdevila, J A; Martínez Alarcón, J; Muñoz, P; López Álvarez, J; Bouza, E

    2012-08-01

    Patients with pneumonia treated in the internal medicine department (IMD) are often at risk of healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP). The importance of HCAP is controversial. We invited physicians from 72 IMDs to report on all patients with pneumonia hospitalized in their department during 2 weeks (one each in January and June 2010) to compare HCAP with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP). We analysed 1002 episodes of pneumonia: 58.9% were CAP, 30.6% were HCAP and 10.4% were HAP. A comparison between CAP, HCAP and HAP showed that HCAP patients were older (77, 83 and 80.5 years; p < 0.001), had poorer functional status (Barthel 100, 30 and 65; p < 0.001) and had more risk factors for aspiration pneumonia (18, 50 and 34%; p < 0.001). The frequency of testing to establish an aetiological diagnosis was lower among HCAP patients (87, 72 and 79; p < 0.001), as was adherence to the therapeutic recommendations of guidelines (70, 23 and 56%; p < 0.001). In-hospital mortality increased progressively between CAP, HCAP and HAP (8, 19 and 27%; p < 0.001). Streptococcus pneumoniae was the main pathogen in CAP and HCAP. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) caused 17 and 12.3% of HCAP. In patients with a confirmed aetiological diagnosis, the independent risk factors for pneumonia due do difficult-to-treat microorganisms (Enterobacteriaceae, P. aeruginosa or MRSA) were HCAP, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases and higher Port Severity Index. Our data confirm the importance of maintaining high awareness of HCAP among patients treated in IMDs, because of the different aetiologies, therapy requirements and prognosis of this population. PMID:22284436

  11. [Lipoid pneumonia: presentation of a case].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Cordovés, M M; Mirpuri-Mirpuri, P G; Rocha-Cabrera, P; Pérez-Monje, A

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of lipoid pneumonia treated in our Health Centre. It is a disease that occurs rarely, but is important in Primary Care. This condition has been known since 1925, when it was first described by Laughlen, who described a case of lipoid pneumonia secondary to an injection of oil in the nasopharyngeal area. Today it is a rarity, and it is most frequently associated with the use of oil-based nasal drops (which are now decreasing in use). Its aetiology may be endogenous or exogenous. Although the pathological diagnosis is generally the most important, sometimes a lesion in the chest X-ray can lead us to suspect it due to the patient's history. This was a case of acute lipoid pneumonia in a young patient, who periodically performed as a "fire eater". PMID:23452539

  12. Lobar pneumonia treated by Musgrave Park physicians

    PubMed Central

    Hedley-Whyte, John; Milamed, Debra R

    2009-01-01

    In the decade 1935-45 the treatment of lobar pneumonia in the developed and warring world underwent a series of evolutions—anti-sera, specific anti-sera, refinement of sulpha drugs, sulpha and anti-sera, the introduction of penicillin for bacteriology, then ophthalmology, and then for penicillin-sensitive bacterial infections such as lobar pneumonia with its many Cooper types of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Penicillin for civilian use was essentially banned in World War II, a ban that early in 1941 two Musgrave Park physicians tried to circumvent. Strict secrecy on the details of penicillin production was enforced. The treatment option chosen by the Musgrave Park physicians in 1941, and the non-availability of penicillin led to sequelae affecting the post-Belfast careers of both patient and physicians. PMID:19568449

  13. Imipenem/cilastatin-induced acute eosinophilic pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Foong, Kap Sum; Lee, Ashley; Pekez, Marijeta; Bin, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Drugs, toxins, and infections are known to cause acute eosinophilic pneumonia. Daptomycin and minocycline are the commonly reported antibiotics associated with acute eosinophilic pneumonia. In this study, we present a case of imipenem/cilastatin-induced acute eosinophilic pneumonia. The patient presented with fever, acute hypoxic respiratory distress, and diffuse ground-glass opacities on the chest CT a day after the initiation of imipenem/cilastatin. Patient also developed peripheral eosinophilia. A reinstitution of imipenem/cilastatin resulted in recurrence of the signs and symptoms. A bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage showed 780 nucleated cells/mm(3) with 15% eosinophil. The patient's clinical condition improved significantly after the discontinuation of imipenem/cilastatin therapy and the treatment with corticosteroid. PMID:26944380

  14. Air pollution and infant mortality from pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Penna, M.L.; Duchiade, M.P. )

    1991-03-01

    This study examines the relationship between air pollution, measured as concentration of suspended particulates in the atmosphere, and infant mortality due to pneumonia in the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro. Multiple linear regression (progressive or stepwise method) was used to analyze infant mortality due to pneumonia, diarrhea, and all causes in 1980, by geographic area, income level, and degree of contamination. While the variable proportion of families with income equivalent to more than two minimum wages was included in the regressions corresponding to the three types of infant mortality, the average contamination index had a statistically significant coefficient (b = 0.2208; t = 2.670; P = 0.0137) only in the case of mortality due to pneumonia. This would suggest a biological association, but, as in any ecological study, such conclusions should be viewed with caution. The authors believe that air quality indicators are essential to consider in studies of acute respiratory infections in developing countries.

  15. Repetitive DNA sequences in Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, R; Herrmann, R

    1988-01-01

    Two types of different repetitive DNA sequences called RepMP1 and RepMP2 were identified in the genome of Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The number of these repeated elements, their nucleotide sequence and their localization on a physical map of the M. pneumoniae genome were determined. The results show that RepMP1 appears at least 10 times and RepMP2 at least 8 times in the genome. The repeated elements are dispersed on the chromosome and, in three cases, linked to each other by a homologous DNA sequence of 400 bp. The elements themselves are 300 bp (for RepMP1) and 150 bp (for RepMP2) long showing a high degree of homology. One copy of RepMP2 is a translated part of the gene for the major cytadhesin protein P1 which is responsible for the adsorption of M. pneumoniae to its host cell. Images PMID:3138660

  16. Complement resistance mechanisms of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Doorduijn, Dennis J; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; van Schaik, Willem; Bardoel, Bart W

    2016-10-01

    The current emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria causes major problems in hospitals worldwide. To survive within the host, bacterial pathogens exploit several escape mechanisms to prevent detection and killing by the immune system. As a major player in immune defense, the complement system recognizes and destroys bacteria via different effector mechanisms. The complement system can label bacteria for phagocytosis or directly kill Gram-negative bacteria via insertion of a pore-forming complex in the bacterial membrane. The multi-drug resistant pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae exploits several mechanisms to resist complement. In this review, we present an overview of strategies used by K. pneumoniae to prevent recognition and killing by the complement system. Understanding these complement evasion strategies is crucial for the development of innovative strategies to combat K. pneumoniae. PMID:27364766

  17. Dynamic focal spots registration algorithm for freeform surface measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenjiang; Zhao, Liping; Chen, I.-Ming

    2013-06-01

    In a wavefront sensing system, the raw data for surface reconstruction, either the slope matrix or curvature matrix, is obtained through centroiding on the focal spot images. Centroiding is to calculate the first moment within a certain area of interest, which encloses the focal spot. As the distribution of focal spots is correlated to the surface sampling condition, while a uniform rectangular grid is good enough to register all the focal spots of a uniformly sampled near flat surface, the focal spots of aspherical or freeform surfaces have varying shapes and sizes depending on the surface geometry. In this case, the normal registration method is not applicable. This paper proposed a dynamic focal spots registration algorithm to automatically analyze the image, identify and register every focal spot for centroiding at one go. Through experiment on a freeform surface with polynomial coefficients up to 10th order, the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm is proved.

  18. Systems Biology Approaches for the Prediction of Possible Role of Chlamydia pneumoniae Proteins in the Etiology of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahanavaj; Imran, Ahamad; Khan, Abdul Arif; Abul Kalam, Mohd; Alshamsan, Aws

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has recently supported the association of bacterial infection with the growth and development of cancers, particularly in organs that are constantly exposed to bacteria such as the lungs, colon, cervical cancer etc. Our in silico study on the proteome of Chlamydia pneumoniae suggests an unprecedented idea of the etiology of lung cancer and have revealed that the infection of C. pneumoniae is associated with lung cancer development and growth. It is reasonable to assume that C. pneumoniae transports its proteins within host-intracellular organelles during infection, where they may work with host-cell proteome. The current study was performed for the prediction of nuclear targeting protein of C. pneumoniae in the host cell using bioinformatics predictors including ExPASy pI/Mw tool, nuclear localization signal (NLS) mapper, balanced sub cellular localization predictor (BaCeILo), and Hum-mPLoc 2.0. We predicted 47/1112 nuclear-targeting proteins of C. pneumoniae connected with several possible alterations in host replication and transcription during intracellular infection. These nuclear-targeting proteins may direct to competitive interactions of host and C. pneumoniae proteins with the availability of same substrate and may be involved as etiological agents in the growth and development of lung cancer. These novel findings are expected to access in better understanding of lung cancer etiology and identifying molecular targets for therapy. PMID:26871581

  19. Pneumonia identification using statistical feature selection

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Fei; Vanderwende, Lucy; Wurfel, Mark M; Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha

    2012-01-01

    Objective This paper describes a natural language processing system for the task of pneumonia identification. Based on the information extracted from the narrative reports associated with a patient, the task is to identify whether or not the patient is positive for pneumonia. Design A binary classifier was employed to identify pneumonia from a dataset of multiple types of clinical notes created for 426 patients during their stay in the intensive care unit. For this purpose, three types of features were considered: (1) word n-grams, (2) Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) concepts, and (3) assertion values associated with pneumonia expressions. System performance was greatly increased by a feature selection approach which uses statistical significance testing to rank features based on their association with the two categories of pneumonia identification. Results Besides testing our system on the entire cohort of 426 patients (unrestricted dataset), we also used a smaller subset of 236 patients (restricted dataset). The performance of the system was compared with the results of a baseline previously proposed for these two datasets. The best results achieved by the system (85.71 and 81.67 F1-measure) are significantly better than the baseline results (50.70 and 49.10 F1-measure) on the restricted and unrestricted datasets, respectively. Conclusion Using a statistical feature selection approach that allows the feature extractor to consider only the most informative features from the feature space significantly improves the performance over a baseline that uses all the features from the same feature space. Extracting the assertion value for pneumonia expressions further improves the system performance. PMID:22539080

  20. Quinolone therapy of Klebsiella pneumoniae sepsis following irradiation: Comparison of pefloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and ofloxacin

    SciTech Connect

    Brook, I.; Elliott, T.B.; Ledney, G.D. )

    1990-05-01

    Exposure to whole-body irradiation is associated with fatal gram-negative sepsis. The effect of oral therapy with three quinolones, pefloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and ofloxacin, for orally acquired Klebsiella pneumoniae infection was tested in B6D2F1 mice exposed to 8.0 Gy whole-body irradiation from bilaterally positioned 60Co sources. A dose of 10(8) organisms was given orally 2 days after irradiation, and therapy was started 1 day later. Quinolones reduced colonization of the ileum with K. pneumoniae: 16 of 28 (57%) untreated mice harbored the organisms, compared to only 12 of 90 (13%) mice treated with quinolones (P less than 0.005). K. pneumoniae was isolated from the livers of 6 of 28 untreated mice, compared to only 1 of 90 treated mice (P less than 0.001). Only 5 of 20 (25%) untreated mice survived for at least 30 days compared with 17 of 20 (85%) mice treated with ofloxacin, 15 of 20 (75%) mice treated with pefloxacin, and 14 of 20 (70%) treated with ciprofloxacin (P less than 0.05). These data illustrate the efficacy of quinolones for oral therapy of orally acquired K. pneumoniae infection in irradiated hosts.

  1. Epidemiology, Co-Infections, and Outcomes of Viral Pneumonia in Adults: An Observational Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Crotty, Matthew P; Meyers, Shelby; Hampton, Nicholas; Bledsoe, Stephanie; Ritchie, David J; Buller, Richard S; Storch, Gregory A; Micek, Scott T; Kollef, Marin H

    2015-12-01

    Advanced technologies using polymerase-chain reaction have allowed for increased recognition of viral respiratory infections including pneumonia. Co-infections have been described for several respiratory viruses, especially with influenza. Outcomes of viral pneumonia, including cases with co-infections, have not been well described. This was observational cohort study conducted to describe hospitalized patients with viral pneumonia including co-infections, clinical outcomes, and predictors of mortality. Patients admitted from March 2013 to November 2014 with a positive respiratory virus panel (RVP) and radiographic findings of pneumonia within 48  h of the index RVP were included. Co-respiratory infection (CRI) was defined as any organism identification from a respiratory specimen within 3 days of the index RVP. Predictors of in-hospital mortality on univariate analysis were evaluated in a multivariate model. Of 284 patients with viral pneumonia, a majority (51.8%) were immunocompromised. A total of 84 patients (29.6%) were found to have a CRI with 48 (57.6%) having a bacterial CRI. Viral CRI with HSV, CMV, or both occurred in 28 patients (33.3%). Fungal (16.7%) and other CRIs (7.1%) were less common. Many patients required mechanical ventilation (54%) and vasopressor support (36%). Overall in-hospital mortality was high (23.2%) and readmissions were common with several patients re-hospitalized within 30 (21.1%) and 90 days (36.7%) of discharge. Predictors of in-hospital mortality on multivariate regression included severity of illness factors, stem-cell transplant, and identification of multiple respiratory viruses. In conclusion, hospital mortality is high among adult patients with viral pneumonia and patients with multiple respiratory viruses identified may be at a higher risk. PMID:26683973

  2. Characterisation of Chlamydia pneumoniae and other novel chlamydial infections in captive snakes.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Brown, Alyce; Rüegg, Simon; Polkinghorne, Adam; Borel, Nicole

    2015-07-01

    Chlamydiosis has been described in both free-ranging and captive reptiles. The infection usually manifests as granulomatous inflammation in inner organs such as spleen, heart, lung and liver but might also occur in asymptomatic reptiles. The aim of this study was to investigate and characterise Chlamydia pneumoniae and potential other novel chlamydial infections in the choana and cloaca samples of 137 clinically healthy captive snakes from six private collections. Forty eight samples from 29 animals were found to be positive by a Chlamydiaceae family-specific qPCR. By Chlamydia species-specific ArrayTube Microarray, 43 samples were positive, with 36 of these being identified as C. pneumoniae. The prevalence of Chlamydia ranged from 5 to 33%. PCR and sequencing of the Chlamydiales 16S rRNA signature sequence of 21 Chlamydia positive samples revealed the presence of seven novel 16S rRNA genotypes. BLAST-n and phylogenetic analysis of the near-full length 16S rRNA gene sequence of each of these novel 16S rRNA sequences revealed that five genotypes share closest sequence identity to 16S rRNA sequences from C. pneumoniae (98.6-99.2%), suggesting that these sequences are novel C. pneumoniae strains. One genotype is 96.9% similar to C. pneumoniae strains suggesting it may originate from a yet undescribed chlamydial species within the genus Chlamydia. This study further highlights the broad host range for C. pneumoniae and suggests that reptiles may still contain a significant and largely uncharacterised level of chlamydial genetic diversity that requires further investigation. PMID:25944652

  3. Critical Role of IL-22/IL22-RA1 Signaling in Pneumococcal Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Trevejo-Nunez, Giraldina; Elsegeiny, Waleed; Conboy, Parker; Chen, Kong; Kolls, Jay K

    2016-09-01

    IL-22-IL-22R signaling plays a crucial role in regulating host defenses against extracellular pathogens, particularly in the intestine, through the induction of antimicrobial peptides and chemotactic genes. However, the role of IL-22-IL-22R is understudied in Streptococcus pneumoniae lung infection, a prevalent pathogen of pneumonia. This paper presents the findings of IL-22 signaling during a murine model of pneumococcal pneumonia and improvement of bacterial burden upon IL-22 administration. IL-22 was rapidly induced in the lung during pneumococcal infection in wild-type mice, and Il22(-/-) mice had higher pneumococcal burdens compared with controls. Additionally, mice with hepatic-specific deletion of Il22ra1 also had higher bacterial burdens in lungs compared with littermate controls after intrapulmonary pneumococcal infection, suggesting that IL-22 signaling in the liver is important to control pneumococcal pneumonia. Thus, we hypothesized that enhancement of IL-22 signaling would control pneumococcal burden in lung tissues in an experimental pneumonia model. Administration of rIL-22 systemically to infected wild-type mice decreased bacterial burden in lung and liver at 24 h postinfection. Our in vitro studies also showed that mice treated with IL-22 had increased C3 expression in the liver compared with the isotype control group. Furthermore, serum from mice treated with IL-22 had improved opsonic capacity by increasing C3 binding on S. pneumoniae Taken together, endogenous IL-22 and hepatic IL-22R signaling play critical roles in controlling pneumococcal lung burden, and systemic IL-22 decreases bacterial burden in the lungs and peripheral organs by potentiating C3 opsonization on bacterial surfaces, through the increase of hepatic C3 expression. PMID:27456484

  4. A kinetic model for RNA-interference of focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Focal adhesions are integrin-based cell-matrix contacts that transduce and integrate mechanical and biochemical cues from the environment. They develop from smaller and more numerous focal complexes under the influence of mechanical force and are key elements for many physiological and disease-related processes, including wound healing and metastasis. More than 150 different proteins localize to focal adhesions and have been systematically classified in the adhesome project (http://www.adhesome.org). First RNAi-screens have been performed for focal adhesions and the effect of knockdown of many of these components on the number, size, shape and location of focal adhesions has been reported. Results We have developed a kinetic model for RNA interference of focal adhesions which represents some of its main elements: a spatially layered structure, signaling through the small GTPases Rac and Rho, and maturation from focal complexes to focal adhesions under force. The response to force is described by two complementary scenarios corresponding to slip and catch bond behavior, respectively. Using estimated and literature values for the model parameters, three time scales of the dynamics of RNAi-influenced focal adhesions are identified: a sub-minute time scale for the assembly of focal complexes, a sub-hour time scale for the maturation to focal adhesions, and a time scale of days that controls the siRNA-mediated knockdown. Our model shows bistability between states dominated by focal complexes and focal adhesions, respectively. Catch bonding strongly extends the range of stability of the state dominated by focal adhesions. A sensitivity analysis predicts that knockdown of focal adhesion components is more efficient for focal adhesions with slip bonds or if the system is in a state dominated by focal complexes. Knockdown of Rho leads to an increase of focal complexes. Conclusions The suggested model provides a kinetic description of the effect of RNA

  5. Approach to a child with recurrent pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Yousif, Taha Ibrahim; Elnazir, Basil

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia, or inflammation of the lungs parenchyma associated with consolidation of alveolar spaces, is a substantial cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood particularly among children below 5 years of age. It is one of the common causes of admission to the paediatric ward. The aim of this article is to provide a guide to a systemic approach for diagnosis and treatment of children with recurrent pneumonia while not over investigating those with common but usually unrecognised conditions such as asthma or recurrent simple viral infections. PMID:27493439

  6. latrogenic lipoid pneumonia in an adult horse.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, Lucy; Cummins, Carolyn; Maischberger, Eva; Katz, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    A 20-year-old gelding presented with a history of acute respiratory distress which began immediately after administration of a mineral oil and water mix, via nasogastric intubation, for treatment of suspected gastrointestinal dysfunction. An initial presumptive diagnosis of acute lipoid pneumonia was made; this was further supported by evidence of arterial hypoxaemia and oxygen desaturation on arterial blood gas analysis, ultrasonographic signs of bilateral ventral lung consolidation and a mixed bronchoalveolar-interstitial lung pattern seen on thoracic radiographs. Despite intensive supportive therapy the horse's condition continued to deteriorate and the decision was made for humane euthanasia. Gross necropsy findings supported the clinical diagnosis of lipoid pneumonia. PMID:21851746

  7. Idiopathic lipoid pneumonia successfully treated with prednisolone.

    PubMed

    Lococo, Filippo; Cesario, Alfredo; Porziella, Venanzio; Mulè, Antonino; Petrone, Gianluigi; Margaritora, Stefano; Granone, Pierluigi

    2012-01-01

    Lipoid pneumonia (LP) is a rare type of pneumonia that is radiologically characterized by lung infiltrates, although imaging alone may not be diagnostic. We describe an unusual 61-year-old patient with idiopathic LP presenting as a solitary pulmonary nodule mimicking lung cancer because of its rapid growth. After treatment with oral prednisone, a control chest radiogram indicated complete normalization of the radiologic features. This case shows that LP should be considered in the diagnostic assessment of any undefined pulmonary mass, after malignancy has been pathologically excluded. PMID:21419490

  8. [Treatment of pneumonia in childhood (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Weippl, G

    1976-01-01

    It is necessary to start with antibiotic treatment in infections of the lower respiratory system, especially pneumonias. The finding of the infectious agent is difficult and without security. With simple investigations, as sedimentation rate, white blood cell count and cell differentiation there is a possibility of 80% to get a diagnosis of bacterial infection. In 25 patients aged 1 1/2 to 9 years with x-ray diagnosis of pneumonia the results of treatment with cephacetril (100 mg/kg/d) are given. Clinical symptoms disappeared after 5 days, the average time of illness was 12 days. One patient got a severe pleural effusion. PMID:934680

  9. [Severe stomatitis caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection].

    PubMed

    Barfod, T S; Pedersen, C

    1999-11-15

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection is sometimes followed by systemic reactions such as erythema multiforme major/Stevens-Johnsons syndrome. In the described case, a 30 year-old man developed severe inflammation of the oral mucous membranes following respiratory infection with Mycoplasma pneumoniae. There was also conjunctivitis and diarrhoea, and a target-like eruption was seen on the penis, but apart from slight perioral erythema and periorbital swelling, no further skin involvement was seen. The patient was treated with macrolide antibiotics for 14 days and gradually recovered. PMID:10611837

  10. Carcinoma of the lung complicating lipoid pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Felson, B.; Ralaisomay, G.

    1983-11-01

    The authors have encountered four cases of oil aspiration pneumonia complicated by carcinoma. Each had a clear-cut history of chronic intake of an oily substance, radiographic changes, and histologically documented oil aspiration pneumonia. Lung cancer later appeared in the involved area. A small number of similar cases also have been reported. The implication is that oil aspiration pneumonitis may induce bronchogenic carcinoma, particularly either the alveolar cell or the squamous cell variety. The radiographic diagnosis of the malignant transformation is difficult, and consequently the prognosis is poor.

  11. Effects of Microgravity on Streptoccoccus Pneumonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    These gels were obtained by two-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis, in which proteins move different substances through a polyacrylamide gel matrix based on their molecular weight and total charge in an electric field. The gels illustrate principal investigator David Niesel's findings that exposure to modeled microgravity results in some Streptoccoccus Pneumonia's proteins being upregulated and others being downregulated. In 2D protein profiles of whole cell lysates of Streptoccoccus Pneumonia, 6,304 cultured under normal gravity (left), appear to be expressed at higher levels indicated with black circles. Red circles (right) indicate proteins that were grown under modeled microgravity in a high aspect ratio vessel HARV).

  12. Lemierre's Syndrome Caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Diabetic Patient: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Chuncharunee, Alan; Khawcharoenporn, Thana

    2015-08-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is characterized by an oropharyngeal infection with internal jugular vein thrombosis followed by metastatic infections in other organs. This infection is usually caused by Fusobacterium spp. In this report, we present a rare case of Klebsiella pneumoniae-associated Lemierre's syndrome in a patient with poorly-controlled diabetes mellitus. The infection was complicated by septic emboli in many organs, which led to the patient's death, despite combined antibiotics, anticoagulant therapy, and surgical intervention. Therein, a literature review was performed for reported cases of Lemierre's syndrome caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae and the results are summarized here. PMID:26279962

  13. Lemierre's Syndrome Caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Diabetic Patient: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Chuncharunee, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is characterized by an oropharyngeal infection with internal jugular vein thrombosis followed by metastatic infections in other organs. This infection is usually caused by Fusobacterium spp. In this report, we present a rare case of Klebsiella pneumoniae-associated Lemierre's syndrome in a patient with poorly-controlled diabetes mellitus. The infection was complicated by septic emboli in many organs, which led to the patient's death, despite combined antibiotics, anticoagulant therapy, and surgical intervention. Therein, a literature review was performed for reported cases of Lemierre's syndrome caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae and the results are summarized here. PMID:26279962

  14. Efficacy of lacosamide by focal seizure subtype.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Michael R; Rosenow, Felix; Faught, Edward; Hebert, David; Doty, Pamela; Isojärvi, Jouko

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this post hoc exploratory analysis was to determine the effects of the antiepileptic drug, lacosamide, on focal (partial-onset) seizure subtypes. Patient data from the three lacosamide pivotal trials were grouped and pooled by focal seizure subtype at Baseline: simple partial seizures (SPS), complex partial seizures (CPS), and secondarily generalized partial seizures (SGPS). Both efficacy outcomes (median percent change from Baseline to Maintenance Phase in seizure frequency per 28 days and the proportion of patients experiencing at least a 50% reduction in seizures) were evaluated by lacosamide dose (200, 400, or 600 mg/day) compared to placebo for each seizure subtype. An additional analysis was performed to determine whether a shift from more severe focal seizure subtypes to less severe occurred upon treatment with lacosamide. In patients with CPS or SGPS at Baseline, lacosamide 400 mg/day (maximum recommended daily dose) and 600 mg/day reduced the frequency of CPS and SGPS compared to placebo. Likewise, a proportion of patients with CPS and SGPS at Baseline experienced at least a 50% reduction in the frequency of CPS and SGPS (≥50% responder rate) in the lacosamide 400 and 600 mg/day groups compared with placebo. For both outcomes, numerically greatest responses were observed in the lacosamide 600 mg/day group among patients with SGPS at Baseline. In patients with SPS at Baseline, no difference between placebo and lacosamide was observed for either efficacy outcome. An additional exploratory analysis suggests that in patients with SPS at Baseline, CPS and SGPS may have been shifted to less severe SPS upon treatment with lacosamide. The results of these exploratory analyses revealed reductions in CPS and SGPS frequency with adjunctive lacosamide. Reduction in CPS and SGPS may confound assessment of SPS since the CPS or SGPS may possibly change to SPS by effective treatment. PMID:25082395

  15. Wave statistics in a coastal focal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, T. T.; Herbers, T. H. C.; Pearman, D. W.; Van Ettinger, E.; Smit, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    Wave-current dynamics in wave focal zones in exposed coastal inlets and river mouths are still poorly understood. This is in part due to lack of observations, which are complicated due to the presence of energetic waves, strong (tidal) currents, dynamic seabed morphology, and often busy ship traffic. Conventional (fixed) instruments, such as buoys and bottom-mounted current or pressure sensors, are difficult to maintain in such areas, and the spatial variability of the wave field is difficult to capture with single point measurements, or even arrays of fixed measurements. In addition to the observational difficulties, the effects of e.g. current shear, wave blocking, statistical inhomogeneity [see Smit & Janssen, 2013, J. Phys. Ocean., 43, pp 1741-1758], and nonlinearity [see Janssen & Herbers, 2009, J. Phys Ocean., 39, pp 1948-1964] on wave statistics are not fully understood, not accounted for in operational stochastic wave models, and - as a consequence - often ignored. In this paper, we consider new observational data of waves approaching the Mouth of the Columbia River undergoing bottom refraction and strong wave-current interaction. The data were collected during the 2013 ONR RIVET experiment using an array of free drifting wave-current buoys. The Lagrangian instruments capture the spatial variability of the wave field in the inlet and, by deploying them in large ensembles, resolve the (inhomogeneous and nonlinear) wave statistics in the focal zone. We discuss the use of free-drifting instruments to measure wave statistics in a coastal wave focal zone, consider the observed effects of wave inhomogeneity, and show that non-Gaussian effects are important and affect extreme wave occurrences in the Mouth of the Columbia River.

  16. Focal hepatic infarction with bile lake formation

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, I.M.; Neumann, C.H.

    1984-06-01

    Venous thrombosis associated with oral contraceptives is a well recognized phenomenon. Arterial thrombosis, while less common, is also a known risk, as evidenced by the increased incidence of cerebral vascular accidents and myocardial ischemia or infarction. The liver is relatively protected from the usual consequences of arterial thrombosis because of its dual blood supply. The authors present an unusual case of a young woman with a history of oral contraceptive and cigarette use who developed hepatic artery thrombosis and had focal liver lesions on computed tomography (CT) due to hepatic infarction and bile lake formation despite an intact portal venous system.

  17. Characterization of DECam focal plane detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, H.Thomas; Angstadt, Robert; Campa, Julia; Cease, Herman; Derylo, Greg; Emes, John H.; Estrada, Juan; Kibik, Donna; Flaugher, Brenna L.; Holland, Steve E.; Jonas, Michelle; /Fermilab /Madrid, CIEMAT /LBL, Berkeley /Argonne /Pennsylvania U.

    2008-06-01

    DECam is a 520 Mpix, 3 square-deg FOV imager being built for the Blanco 4m Telescope at CTIO. This facility instrument will be used for the 'Dark Energy Survey' of the southern galactic cap. DECam has chosen 250 ?m thick CCDs, developed at LBNL, with good QE in the near IR for the focal plane. In this work we present the characterization of these detectors done by the DES team, and compare it to the DECam technical requirements. The results demonstrate that the detectors satisfy the needs for instrument.

  18. Nosocomial pneumonia : rationalizing the approach to empirical therapy.

    PubMed

    Andriesse, Gunnar I; Verhoef, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia or hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) causes considerable morbidity and mortality. It is the second most common nosocomial infection and the leading cause of death from hospital-acquired infections. In 1996 the American Thoracic Society (ATS) published guidelines for empirical therapy of HAP. This review focuses on the literature that has appeared since the ATS statement. Early diagnosis of HAP and its etiology is crucial in guiding empirical therapy. Since 1996, it has become clear that differentiating mere colonization from etiologic pathogens infecting the lower respiratory tract is best achieved by employing bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) or protected specimen brush (PSB) in combination with quantitative culture and detection of intracellular microorganisms. Endotracheal aspirate and non-bronchoscopic BAL/PSB in combination with quantitative culture provide a good alternative in patients suspected of ventilator-associated pneumonia. Since culture results take 2-3 days, initial therapy of HAP is by definition empirical. Epidemiologic studies have identified the most frequently involved pathogens: Enterobacteriaceae, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus ('core pathogens'). Empirical therapy covering only the 'core pathogens' will suffice in patients without risk factors for resistant microorganisms. Studies that have appeared since the ATS statement issued in 1996, demonstrate several new risk factors for HAP with multiresistant pathogens. In patients with risk factors, empirical therapy should consist of antibacterials with a broader spectrum. The most important risk factors for resistant microorganisms are late onset of HAP (>/=5 days after admission), recent use of antibacterial therapy, and mechanical ventilation. Multiresistant bacteria of specific interest are methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and extended

  19. Role of focal adhesions and mechanical stresses in the formation and progression of the lamellipodium-lamellum interface [corrected].

    PubMed

    Shemesh, Tom; Verkhovsky, Alexander B; Svitkina, Tatyana M; Bershadsky, Alexander D; Kozlov, Michael M

    2009-09-01

    Actin network in the front part of a moving cell is organized into a lamellipodium and a lamellum. A distinct lamellipodium-lamellum interface is associated with focal adhesions and consists of a series of arclike segments linking neighboring focal adhesions in the front row. The interface advances by leaping onto new rows of focal adhesions maturating underneath the lamellipodium. We propose a mechanism of the lamellipodium-lamellum boundary generation, shape formation, and progression based on the elastic stresses generated in the lamellipodial actin gel by its friction against the focal adhesions. The crucial assumption of the model is that stretching stresses trigger actin gel disintegration. We compute the stress distribution throughout the actin gel and show that the gel-disintegrating stresses drive formation of a gel boundary passing through the row of focal adhesions. Our computations recover the lamellipodium-lamellum boundary shapes detected in cells and predict the mode of the boundary transition to the row of the newly maturing focal adhesions in agreement with the experimental observations. The model fully accounts for the current phenomenology of the lamellipodium-lamellum interface formation and advancing, and makes experimentally testable predictions on the dependence of these phenomena on the sizes of the focal adhesions, the character of the focal adhesion distribution on the substrate, and the velocity of the actin retrograde flow with respect to the focal adhesions. The phase diagram resulting from the model provides a background for quantitative classification of different cell types with respect to their ability to form a lamellipodium-lamellum interface. In addition, the model suggests a mechanism of nucleation of the dorsal and arclike actin bundles found in the lamellum. PMID:19720013

  20. Revisitingmolecular serotyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Ninety-two Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes have been described so far, but the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduced in the Brazilian basic vaccination schedule in 2010 covers only the ten most prevalent in the country. Pneumococcal serotype-shifting after massive immunization is a major concern and monitoring this phenomenon requires efficient and accessible serotyping methods. Pneumococcal serotyping based on antisera produced in animals is laborious and restricted to a few reference laboratories. Alternatively, molecular serotyping methods assess polymorphisms in the cps gene cluster, which encodes key enzymes for capsular polysaccharides synthesis in pneumococci. In one such approach, cps-RFLP, the PCR amplified cps loci are digested with an endonuclease, generating serotype-specific fingerprints on agarose gel electrophoresis. Methods In this work, in silico and in vitro approaches were combined to demonstrate that XhoII is the most discriminating endonuclease for cps-RFLP, and to build a database of serotype-specific fingerprints that accommodates the genetic diversity within the cps locus of 92 known pneumococci serotypes. Results The expected specificity of cps-RFLP using XhoII was 76% for serotyping and 100% for serogrouping. The database of cps-RFLP fingerprints was integrated to Molecular Serotyping Tool (MST), a previously published web-based software for molecular serotyping. In addition, 43 isolates representing 29 serotypes prevalent in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, from 2007 to 2013, were examined in vitro; 11 serotypes (nine serogroups) matched the respective in silico patterns calculated for reference strains. The remaining experimental patterns, despite their resemblance to their expected in silico patterns, did not reach the threshold of similarity score to be considered a match and were then added to the database. Conclusion The cps-RFLP method with XhoII outperformed the antisera-based and other molecular serotyping

  1. An unexpected cause for cavitary pneumonia and empyema.

    PubMed

    Bloch-Infanger, Constantine; Furrer, Katarzyna; Wiese, Mark; Hiebinger, Andreas; Bucher, Christoph M; Kopp, Sébastien; Hinić, Vladimira; Goldenberger, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Tularemia is an emerging zoonotic disease mainly of the Northern Hemisphere caused by the Gram-negative coccobacillus Francisella tularensis. It is affecting a wide range of animals and causes human disease after insect and tick bites, skin contact, ingestion and inhalation. A 66-year-old man presented to our clinic with cavitary pneumonia and distinct pleural effusion. After failure of empiric antibiotic therapy, thoracoscopic assisted decortication and partial excision of the middle lobe were conducted. Conventional culture methods and broad-range bacterial PCR including RipSeqMixed analysis were performed from the excised biopsies. Culture results remained negative but broad-range PCR targeting the first half of the 16S rRNA gene revealed F. tularensis DNA. This result was confirmed by F. tularensis-specific PCR and by serology. The source of infection could not be explored. To conclude, we report the rare clinical picture of a community-acquired pneumonia followed by pleural effusion and empyema due to F. tularensis. Broad range bacterial PCR proved to be a powerful diagnostic tool to detect the etiologic organism. PMID:26621335

  2. Outbreaks of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in colonies of immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Walzer, P D; Kim, C K; Linke, M J; Pogue, C L; Huerkamp, M J; Chrisp, C E; Lerro, A V; Wixson, S K; Hall, E; Shultz, L D

    1989-01-01

    Outbreaks of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia occurred in colonies of nu/nu and scid/scid mice at four different institutions. The disease, which was characterized by chronic wasting and respiratory insufficiency, was more severe in older mice and in animals housed in cages with special protective tops. Histopathologic features included alveolar filling with the typical foamy honeycomb material and a mild, nonspecific host inflammatory response. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting studies suggested the P. carinii isolate was of mouse rather than of rat or human origin, and the outbreaks could be related to each other by common vendor or source of breeding animals. Once P. carinii became established in a mouse colony, the organism tended to persist for long periods of time. The principal control measure was depopulation of the colony, although limited experience with the administration of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was encouraging. Thus, outbreaks of pneumocystosis are a serious problem among colonies of immunodeficient mice, with important implications for the use of these animals in biomedical research. Data obtained by studying these outbreaks should enhance understanding of the pathogenesis of P. carinii pneumonia and be helpful in formulating improved methods of detection and control. PMID:2642471

  3. [Pnemocystis jiroveci pneumonia: Comparison between conventional PCR and staining techniques].

    PubMed

    Kaouech, E; Kallel, K; Anane, S; Belhadj, S; Abdellatif, S; Mnif, K; Ben Othmane, T; Ben Lakhal, S; Kilani, B; Ben Châabane, T; Chaker, E

    2009-07-01

    Diagnosis of pneumocystis pneumonia is usually based on clinical features and X-rays photography and confirmed in the laboratory by visualisation of Pneumocystis organisms in stained preparations of respiratory specimens using several techniques (Gomori-Grocott, May-Grünwald Giemsa, bleu de toluidine O). Actually, PCR has considerably increased sensitivity of detection of Pneumocystis. The aim of this study is to compare conventional PCR results to those of staining techniques (Gomori-Grocott, May-Grünwald Giemsa) in addition to the X-ray and clinical findings in order to evaluate the contribution of each method. Sixty-four respiratory specimens were collected from 54 immuno-compromised patients with clinical symptoms of pulmonary infection. We diagnosed pneumocystis pneumonia in 16 patients according to staining techniques and/or typical clinical and radiological findings and/or response to treatment. Of the 15 patients, 14 were positive by PCR and only five were positive by direct examination, yielding a sensitivity and specificity of 93.3 and 87.1% for PCR and 33.3 and 100% for staining techniques. Conventional PCR provides a sensitive and objective method for the detection Pneumocystis jiroveci from less invasive sample. PMID:19038508

  4. Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia: What Is the Optimal Approach to Management?

    PubMed

    Tomassetti, Sara; Ryu, Jay H; Piciucchi, Sara; Chilosi, Marco; Poletti, Venerino

    2016-06-01

    We reviewed current aspects of the clinical and pathogenic profile of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), to better elucidate the complex issue of management and treatment options for NSIP patients. Recent findings suggest that idiopathic NSIP is a complex clinical entity with a disease spectrum that includes at least three different phenotypes: NSIP associated with autoimmune features, emphysema, and familial interstitial lung disease. This distinction, based mainly on clinical findings, may be of critical importance when it comes to making a decision on patients' management. This hypothesis warrants further studies. Currently, two major radiologic-pathologic different profiles have been well established. First, the "inflammatory type" characterized by prominent lymphocytic inflammation both on biopsy and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) with mixed NSIP/organizing pneumonia pattern that tends to have a better response to corticosteroid and immunosuppressive treatment. Second, the "highly fibrotic" subgroup that shows prominent reticular changes and traction bronchiectasis by HRCT, high fibrotic background on biopsy, and no lymphocytosis on BAL. The latter fibrotic NSIP is the subgroup with less potential to respond to immunosuppressive treatment and a marginal risk to evolve into "full-blown idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis." The management of patients with fibrotic, progressive, and immunosuppressive treatment, refractory NSIP remains uncertain, and further studies are needed to address the role of antifibrotic drug in this settings. Oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, and lung transplantation are of importance in the current management of severe, progressive, and refractory NSIP patients. PMID:27231862

  5. Complete occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ben; Kim, Dong Hyun; Hong, Young Jin; Son, Byong Kwan; Lim, Myung Kwan; Choe, Yon Ho

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 5-year-old girl who developed left hemiparesis and left facial palsy, 6 days after the initiation of fever and respiratory symptoms due to pneumonia. Chest radiography, conducted upon admission, showed pneumonic infiltration and pleural effusion in the left lung field. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed acute ischemic infarction in the right middle cerebral artery territory. Brain magnetic resonance angiography and transfemoral cerebral angiography revealed complete occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery. Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection was identified by a 4-fold increase in IgG antibodies to M. pneumoniae between acute and convalescent sera by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Fibrinogen and D-dimer levels were elevated, while laboratory exams in order to identify other predisposing factors of pediatric stroke were all negative. This is the first reported pediatric case in English literature of a M. pneumoniae-associated cerebral infarction involving complete occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery. PMID:27186223

  6. [Community acquired pneumonia in children: an update for outpatients management].

    PubMed

    Wagner, Noémie; Gehri, Mario; Gervaix, Alain; Guinan, Stéphane; Barazzone-Argiroffo, Constance

    2016-02-17

    Pneumonia should be considered in febrile children with tachypnea and/or chest recession. Virus are the most common cause of pneumonia in children under 5 years old. Streptococcus pneumonia can be found at any age. Mycoplasma pneumonia is more frequent in older children. Systematic chest radiograph is not necessary but must be obtained in patients with hypoventilation and in those with failed initial antibiotic therapy. Mycoplasma pneumonia should be tested according to patient age and response to initial antibiotic. First line antibiotherapy is amoxicilline. Antibiotic treatment is frequently not necessary in children under 5 but should be considered depending on clinical presentation and C reactive protein value. PMID:27039458

  7. Risk and outcome of aspiration pneumonia in a city hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, J.

    1993-01-01

    Because aspiration pneumonia contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients, this study was undertaken to identify risk factors for morbidity and mortality associated with aspiration pneumonia. Patients with a discharge diagnosis of aspiration pneumonia in 1985 and 1990 were studied. Factors associated with death from aspiration pneumonia were: altered mental status, cerebrovascular accident, endotracheal intubation, tachycardia, and hypoxemia. Fever, cough, and unilateral infiltrates on chest radiograph were associated with survival. Attention to proper positioning of comatose patients, aggressive treatment of gastroesophageal reflux, and strict attention to endotracheal tubes and tracheostomies should decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with aspiration pneumonia. PMID:8350375

  8. H1N1 influenza pneumonia and bacterial coinfection.

    PubMed

    Calbo, Esther; Robles, Alejandro; Sangil, Anna; Benet, Susana; Viladot, Maria Eugenia; Pascual, Vanesa; Barreiro, Bienvenido

    2011-12-01

    The model described by Bewick et al seems to be able to distinguish between H1N1 influenza-related pneumonia and non-H1N1 community acquired pneumonia (CAP) based on five criteria. However, bacterial infection in the influenza group has not been accurately excluded. Therefore, this model could misidentify these patients and lead to an inappropriate treatment. We conducted a prospective observational study to compare mixed pneumonia vs viral pneumonia. In the mixed pneumonia group patients were older, had higher levels of procalcitonine and higher scores of severity. In our cohort the model proposed by Bewick et al would not identify patients with coinfection. PMID:21994246

  9. Genetic Analysis of Sporadic and Familial Interstitial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Although much progress has been made in understanding the biology and clinical course of interstitial pneumonia, the etiology of this disease remains elusive. Epidemiologic studies have consistently identified cigarette smoke as an important exposure; however, most smokers do not develop interstitial pneumonia and many individuals with interstitial pneumonia do not smoke cigarettes. Moreover, interstitial pneumonias have been reported to cluster in families. Thus, a more thorough understanding of the genetic etiology of interstitial pneumonia may prove critically important in defining the biology and clinical course of this complex human disease. PMID:18403331

  10. Characterization of the KATRIN Focal Plane Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodine, Laura; Leber, Michelle; Myers, Allan; Tolich, Kazumi; Vandevender, Brent; Wall, Brandon

    2008-10-01

    The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) Experiment is a next generation tritium beta decay experiment designed to measure directly the electron neutrino mass with a sensitivity of 0.2 eV. In the experiment, electrons from tritium decay of a gaseous source are magnetically guided through analyzing solenoidal retarding electrostatic spectrometers and detected via a focal plane detector. The focal plane detector is a 90mm diameter, 500 micron thick monolithic silicon pin-diode array with 148 pixels. The diode contacts have a titanium nitride overlayer and are connected to preamplifiers via an array of spring-loaded pogo pins. This novel connection scheme minimizes backgrounds from radioactive materials near the detector, facilitates characterization and replacement of the detector wafer, but requires a unique mounting design. The force of the pins strains the silicon, possibly altering the detector properties and performance. Results on the mechanical, thermal and electrical performance of a prototype detector under stress from pogo pin readouts will be presented.

  11. Visual function and perinatal focal cerebral infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Mercuri, E; Atkinson, J; Braddick, O; Anker, S; Nokes, L; Cowan, F; Rutherford, M; Pennock, J; Dubowitz, L

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the visual function of infants with perinatal cerebral infarction in whom the site and size of the lesion has been determined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS: Twelve infants with cerebral infarction on MRI were studied with a battery of tests specifically designed to evaluate visual function in infancy. This included tests: for visual attention (fixation shifts); of cerebral asymmetry (optokinetic nystagmus, visual fields); for assessment of acuity (forced choice preferential looking); and neurophysiological measures of vision (phase reversal and orientation reversal visual evoked potential). RESULTS: A considerable incidence of abnormalities on at least one of the tests for visual function used was observed. The presence or severity of visual abnormalities could not always be predicted by the site and extent of the lesion seen on imaging. CONCLUSIONS: Early focal lesions affecting the visual pathway can, to some extent, be compensated for by the immature developing brain. These data suggest that all the infants presenting with focal lesions need to be investigated with a detailed assessment of various aspects of vision. Images PMID:8949687

  12. Idiopathic focal epilepsies: the "lost tribe".

    PubMed

    Pal, Deb K; Ferrie, Colin; Addis, Laura; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Caraballo, Roberto; de Saint-Martin, Anne; Fejerman, Natalio; Guerrini, Renzo; Hamandi, Khalid; Helbig, Ingo; Ioannides, Andreas A; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Lal, Dennis; Lesca, Gaetan; Muhle, Hiltrud; Neubauer, Bernd A; Pisano, Tiziana; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Seegmuller, Caroline; Shibata, Takashi; Smith, Anna; Striano, Pasquale; Strug, Lisa J; Szepetowski, Pierre; Valeta, Thalia; Yoshinaga, Harumi; Koutroumanidis, Michalis

    2016-09-01

    The term idiopathic focal epilepsies of childhood (IFE) is not formally recognised by the ILAE in its 2010 revision (Berg et al., 2010), nor are its members and boundaries precisely delineated. The IFEs are amongst the most commonly encountered epilepsy syndromes affecting children. They are fascinating disorders that hold many "treats" for both clinicians and researchers. For example, the IFEs pose many of the most interesting questions central to epileptology: how are functional brain networks involved in the manifestation of epilepsy? What are the shared mechanisms of comorbidity between epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disorders? How do focal EEG discharges impact cognitive functioning? What explains the age-related expression of these syndromes? Why are EEG discharges and seizures so tightly locked to slow-wave sleep? In the last few decades, the clinical symptomatology and the respective courses of many IFEs have been described, although they are still not widely appreciated beyond the specialist community. Most neurologists would recognise the core syndromes of IFE to comprise: benign epilepsy of childhood with centro-temporal spikes or Rolandic epilepsy (BECTS/RE); Panayiotopoulos syndrome; and the idiopathic occipital epilepsies (Gastaut and photosensitive types). The Landau-Kleffner syndrome and the related (idiopathic) epilepsy with continuous spikes and waves in sleep (CSWS or ESES) are also often included, both as a consequence of the shared morphology of the interictal discharges and their potential evolution from core syndromes, for example, CSWS from BECTS. Atypical benign focal epilepsy of childhood also has shared electro-clinical features warranting inclusion. In addition, a number of less well-defined syndromes of IFE have been proposed, including benign childhood seizures with affective symptoms, benign childhood epilepsy with parietal spikes, benign childhood seizures with frontal or midline spikes, and benign focal seizures of adolescence. The

  13. Focal embolic cerebral ischemia in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Rui Lan; Jiang, Quan; Ding, Guangliang; Chopp, Michael; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of focal cerebral ischemia are well accepted for investigating the pathogenesis and potential treatment strategies for human stroke. Occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) with an endovascular filament is a widely used model to induce focal cerebral ischemia. However, this model is not amenable to thrombolytic therapies. As thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) is a standard of care within 4.5 hours of human stroke onset, suitable animal models that mimic cellular and molecular mechanisms of thrombosis and thrombolysis of stroke are required. By occluding the MCA with a fibrin-rich allogeneic clot, we have developed an embolic model of MCA occlusion in the rat, which recapitulates the key components of thrombotic development and of thrombolytic therapy of rtPA observed from human ischemic stroke. The surgical procedures of our model can be typically completed within approximately 30 min and are highly adaptable to other strains of rats as well as mice for both genders. Thus, this model provides a powerful tool for translational stroke research. PMID:25741989

  14. Posttraumatic focal dystonia of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Vasileiadis, Georgios I; Sakellariou, Vasileios I; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Zoubos, Aristeides B

    2012-06-01

    Focal posttraumatic shoulder dystonia is a rare and not easily identifiable entity. Its true pathophysiologic nature, predisposing factors, and disease course remain debatable.This article describes a rare case of a 40-year-old man with late symptoms of focal shoulder dystonia after peripheral trauma of his left shoulder girdle. The shoulder was indirectly injured from the impact of a fall off his motorbike 3 years earlier. He was referred to the authors' institution because remarkable reduction of arm abduction, muscle spasms, and circumscribed hypertrophy of the trapezius muscle were noted while his head and neck were in neutral position and had a full range of motion. The left shoulder had a fixed elevated posture compared with the contralateral shoulder. A continuous burning pain was localized over the area of the hypertrophied trapezius muscle, radiating to the ipsilateral side of the head and neck. Dystonic movements of the trapezius, rhomboid, and supraspinatus muscles were observed. The abduction of the shoulder was significantly decreased, and any repetitive effort for arm abduction induced an exaggeration of his movement disorder, leading to a more pronounced shoulder elevation.Plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging of the left shoulder revealed a suprascapular tendinitis with no other abnormalities. Repeated needle electromyography of the left trapezius muscle and neurography of the accessory nerve on both sides were normal. Injections of botulinum toxin A were effective in the resolution of muscle hypertrophy and abnormal posture. PMID:22691679

  15. Drug discovery in focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pullen, Nick; Fornoni, Alessia

    2016-06-01

    Despite the high medical burden experienced by patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, the etiology of the condition remains largely unknown. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis is highly heterogeneous in clinical and morphologic manifestations. While this presents challenges for the development of new treatments, research investments over the last 2 decades have yielded a surfeit of potential avenues for therapeutic intervention. The development of many of those ideas and concepts into new therapies, however, has been very disappointing. Here, we describe some of the factors that have potentially contributed to the poor translational performance from this research investment, including the confidence we ascribe to a target, the conduct of experimental studies, and the availability of selective reagents to test hypotheses. We will discuss the significance of genetic and systems traits as well as other methods for reducing bias. We will analyze the limitations of a successful drug development. We will use specific examples hoping that these will guide a consensus for investment and drive greater translational quality. We hope that this substrate will serve to exemplify the tremendous opportunity for intervention as well as facilitate greater collaborative effort between industry, academia, and private foundations in promoting appropriate validation of these targets. Only then will we have achieved our goal for curative therapies for this devastating disease. PMID:27165834

  16. Short Wavelength Infrared Hybrid Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vural, K.; Blackwell, J. D...; Marin, E. C.; Edwall, D. D...; Rode, J. P.

    1983-11-01

    Short wavelength (λc = 2.5 μm) 32 x 32 HgCdTe focal plane arrays have been fabricated for use in an Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) developed by the Jet Propulsion Labora-tory for NASA. An Imaging Spectrometer provides simultaneous imaging of several spectral bands for applications in the sensing and monitoring of earth resources. The detector material is HgCdTe grown on CdTe substrates using liquid phase epitaxy. Planar processing is used to make photovoltaic detectors on 68 um centers. The detector array is mated to a silicon charge coupled device multiplexer to make hybrid focal plane arrays. Results show high performance detectors with a mean RoA = 9.6 x 107 Ω --cm2 and IleakAge (-100 mV) = 0.037 pA at 120K and near zero background. The yield and uniformity are high. The ratio of the standard deviation of the dc responsivity to the mean is 3% for 98.5% of the pixels. The D1.0 = 1.3 x 1012 cm - âœ"fiz/W at a background of 1013 ph/cm2-s and 120K which is close to the background limited (BLIP) D* of 1.9 x 1012 cm- âœ"Hz/W.

  17. ORFEUS focal plane instrumentation: The Berkeley spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Mark; Bowyer, Stuart

    1988-01-01

    A spectrograph for the ORFEUS mission that incorporates four varied line-space, spherically figured diffraction gratings was designed. The ORFEUS, a 1-m normal incidence telescope is equipped with 2 focal plane spectrographs. The Berkeley spectrograph was developed with an optimizing raytracing computer code. Each grating accepts the light from 20 percent of the aperture of the telescope primary mirror and has a unique set of characteristics to cover a sub-bandpass within the 390 to 1200 A spectral range. Two photon-counting detectors incorporating a time delay readout system are used to record the spectra from all four gratings simultaneously. The nominal design achieves a spectral resolution (FWHM) in excess of 5500 at all wavelengths within the bandpass. The resolution is limited primarily by the detector spatial resolution. The 1 sigma astigmatism of this design varies between 13 and 150 micrometer on the same focal surface. An independent, direct imaging system tracks the drift of the target within the spectrometer aperture and allows measurement of the misalignment between the telescope optical axis and that of the external star tracker. The resolution and astigmatism achievable with this design are superior to those of a standard Rowland spectrograph designed with the same constraints.

  18. The Piriform Cortex and Human Focal Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, David N.; Jackson, Graeme D.

    2014-01-01

    It is surprising that the piriform cortex, when compared to the hippocampus, has been given relatively little significance in human epilepsy. Like the hippocampus, it has a phylogenetically preserved three-layered cortex that is vulnerable to excitotoxic injury, has broad connections to both limbic and cortical areas, and is highly epileptogenic – being critical to the kindling process. The well-known phenomenon of early olfactory auras in temporal lobe epilepsy highlights its clinical relevance in human beings. Perhaps because it is anatomically indistinct and difficult to approach surgically, as it clasps the middle cerebral artery, it has, until now, been understandably neglected. In this review, we emphasize how its unique anatomical and functional properties, as primary olfactory cortex, predispose it to involvement in focal epilepsy. From recent convergent findings in human neuroimaging, clinical epileptology, and experimental animal models, we make the case that the piriform cortex is likely to play a facilitating and amplifying role in human focal epileptogenesis, and may influence progression to epileptic intractability. PMID:25538678

  19. Small pixel oversampled IR focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, John; Curzan, Jon; Lewis, Jay; Dhar, Nibir

    2015-06-01

    We report on a new high definition high charge capacity 2.1 Mpixel MWIR Infrared Focal Plane Array. This high definition (HD) FPA utilizes a small 5 um pitch pixel size which is below the Nyquist limit imposed by the optical systems Point Spread Function (PSF). These smaller sub diffraction limited pixels allow spatial oversampling of the image. We show that oversampling IRFPAs enables improved fidelity in imaging including resolution improvements, advanced pixel correlation processing to reduce false alarm rates, improved detection ranges, and an improved ability to track closely spaced objects. Small pixel HD arrays are viewed as the key component enabling lower size, power and weight of the IR Sensor System. Small pixels enables a reduction in the size of the systems components from the smaller detector and ROIC array, the reduced optics focal length and overall lens size, resulting in an overall compactness in the sensor package, cooling and associated electronics. The highly sensitive MWIR small pixel HD FPA has the capability to detect dimmer signals at longer ranges than previously demonstrated.

  20. Multiple molecular penumbras after focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Sharp, F R; Lu, A; Tang, Y; Millhorn, D E

    2000-07-01

    Though the ischemic penumbra has been classically described on the basis of blood flow and physiologic parameters, a variety of ischemic penumbras can be described in molecular terms. Apoptosis-related genes induced after focal ischemia may contribute to cell death in the core and the selective cell death adjacent to an infarct. The HSP70 heat shock protein is induced in glia at the edges of an infarct and in neurons often at some distance from the infarct. HSP70 proteins are induced in cells in response to denatured proteins that occur as a result of temporary energy failure. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is also induced after focal ischemia in regions that can extend beyond the HSP70 induction. The region of HIF induction is proposed to represent the areas of decreased cerebral blood flow and decreased oxygen delivery. Immediate early genes are induced in cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, and other brain regions. These distant changes in gene expression occur because of ischemia-induced spreading depression or depolarization and could contribute to plastic changes in brain after stroke. PMID:10908035

  1. Talin determines the nanoscale architecture of focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jaron; Wang, Yilin; Goh, Wah Ing; Goh, Honzhen; Baird, Michelle A.; Ruehland, Svenja; Teo, Shijia; Bate, Neil; Critchley, David R.; Davidson, Michael W.; Kanchanawong, Pakorn

    2015-01-01

    Insight into how molecular machines perform their biological functions depends on knowledge of the spatial organization of the components, their connectivity, geometry, and organizational hierarchy. However, these parameters are difficult to determine in multicomponent assemblies such as integrin-based focal adhesions (FAs). We have previously applied 3D superresolution fluorescence microscopy to probe the spatial organization of major FA components, observing a nanoscale stratification of proteins between integrins and the actin cytoskeleton. Here we combine superresolution imaging techniques with a protein engineering approach to investigate how such nanoscale architecture arises. We demonstrate that talin plays a key structural role in regulating the nanoscale architecture of FAs, akin to a molecular ruler. Talin diagonally spans the FA core, with its N terminus at the membrane and C terminus demarcating the FA/stress fiber interface. In contrast, vinculin is found to be dispensable for specification of FA nanoscale architecture. Recombinant analogs of talin with modified lengths recapitulated its polarized orientation but altered the FA/stress fiber interface in a linear manner, consistent with its modular structure, and implicating the integrin–talin–actin complex as the primary mechanical linkage in FAs. Talin was found to be ∼97 nm in length and oriented at ∼15° relative to the plasma membrane. Our results identify talin as the primary determinant of FA nanoscale organization and suggest how multiple cellular forces may be integrated at adhesion sites. PMID:26283369

  2. Talin determines the nanoscale architecture of focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jaron; Wang, Yilin; Goh, Wah Ing; Goh, Honzhen; Baird, Michelle A; Ruehland, Svenja; Teo, Shijia; Bate, Neil; Critchley, David R; Davidson, Michael W; Kanchanawong, Pakorn

    2015-09-01

    Insight into how molecular machines perform their biological functions depends on knowledge of the spatial organization of the components, their connectivity, geometry, and organizational hierarchy. However, these parameters are difficult to determine in multicomponent assemblies such as integrin-based focal adhesions (FAs). We have previously applied 3D superresolution fluorescence microscopy to probe the spatial organization of major FA components, observing a nanoscale stratification of proteins between integrins and the actin cytoskeleton. Here we combine superresolution imaging techniques with a protein engineering approach to investigate how such nanoscale architecture arises. We demonstrate that talin plays a key structural role in regulating the nanoscale architecture of FAs, akin to a molecular ruler. Talin diagonally spans the FA core, with its N terminus at the membrane and C terminus demarcating the FA/stress fiber interface. In contrast, vinculin is found to be dispensable for specification of FA nanoscale architecture. Recombinant analogs of talin with modified lengths recapitulated its polarized orientation but altered the FA/stress fiber interface in a linear manner, consistent with its modular structure, and implicating the integrin-talin-actin complex as the primary mechanical linkage in FAs. Talin was found to be ∼97 nm in length and oriented at ∼15° relative to the plasma membrane. Our results identify talin as the primary determinant of FA nanoscale organization and suggest how multiple cellular forces may be integrated at adhesion sites. PMID:26283369

  3. Molecular Epidemiological Characteristics of Klebsiella pneumoniae Associated with Bacteremia among Patients with Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Ryota; Shindo, Yuichiro; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Ando, Masahiko; Jin, Wanchun; Wachino, Jun-ichi; Yamada, Keiko; Kimura, Kouji; Yagi, Tetsuya; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Some important virulence factors have been elucidated in Klebsiella pneumoniae infections. We investigated the relationship between virulence factors and multilocus sequence types (STs) and assessed the risk factors for bacteremia in patients with pneumonia due to K. pneumoniae. From April 2004 through April 2012, a total of 120 K. pneumoniae isolates from patients with pneumonia (23 with bacteremia and 97 without bacteremia) were collected from 10 medical institutions in Japan. Additionally, 10 strains of K. pneumoniae serotype K2 that were isolated >30 years ago were included in this study. These isolates were characterized using multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and the characteristics of their virulence factors, such as hypermucoviscosity phenotype and RmpA and aerobactin production between patients with and without bacteremia, were examined. MLST analysis was performed on the 120 isolates from patients with pneumonia, and some sequence type groups were defined as genetic lineages (GLs). GL65 was more prevalent among patients with bacteremia (21.7%) than in those without bacteremia (7.2%). The majority of the strains with serotype K2 were classified into GL14 or GL65, and rmpA and the gene for aerobactin were present in all GL65-K2 strains but absent in all GL14-K2 strains. In a multivariate analysis, the independent risk factors for bacteremia included GL65 (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 9.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.81 to 49.31), as well as neoplastic disease (AOR, 9.94; 95% CI, 2.61 to 37.92), immunosuppression (AOR, 17.85; 95% CI, 1.49 to 214.17), and hypoalbuminemia (AOR, 4.76; 95% CI, 1.29 to 17.61). GL65 was more prevalent among patients with bacteremia and was associated with the virulence factors of K. pneumoniae. PMID:25568434

  4. Role of the Mycoplasma pneumoniae/Interleukin-8/Neutrophil Axis in the Pathogenesis of Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinxing; Wang, Yuqing; Zhu, Canhong; Hao, Chuangli; Fan, Mingyue; Ji, Wei; Yan, Yongdong

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil infiltration is the characteristic pathological feature of M. pneumoniae pneumonia (MPP). This study aimed to explore the associations among neutrophil activity, clinical presentation, and role of the M. pneumoniae/interleukin-8 (IL-8)/neutrophil axis in the pathogenesis of MPP. A total of 42 patients with MPP were prospectively enrolled in the study. Neutrophil activity, including matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and neutrophil elastase (NE), were measured. Clinical information was collected for all patients and control group. In vitro, IL-8 production was measured at different time points after M. pneumoniae infection of bronchial epithelial cells, and neutrophil activity was analyzed after IL-8 stimulation. The percentage of neutrophil in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was higher in the group of patients with high levels of M. pneumoniae DNA than in those with low levels of M. pneumoniae DNA (P < 0.05). IL-8, MMP-9, and NE in patients with MPP significantly increased compared with controls and decreased after treatment (P < 0.05). MPO and MMP-9 were associated with duration of fever (r = 0.332, P < 0.05) and length of stay (r = 0.342, P < 0.05), respectively. In vitro, M. pneumoniae induced IL-8 production by bronchial epithelial cells in a time dependent manner. MPO, MMP-9 and NE production by neutrophils significantly increased compared with medium controls after IL-8 stimulation. In summary, the M. pneumoniae/IL-8/neutrophil axis likely plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of MPP. PMID:26752656

  5. Focal Adhesion Kinase-Dependent Regulation of Adhesive Force Involves Vinculin Recruitment to Focal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Hanks, Steven K.; García, Andrés J.

    2016-01-01

    Background information Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), an essential non-receptor tyrosine kinase, plays pivotal roles in migratory responses, adhesive signaling, and mechanotransduction. FAK-dependent regulation of cell migration involves focal adhesion turnover dynamics as well as actin cytoskeleton polymerization and lamellipodia protrusion. Whereas roles for FAK in migratory and mechanosensing responses have been established, the contributions of FAK to the generation of adhesive forces are not well understood. Results Using FAK-null cells expressing wild-type and mutant FAK under an inducible tetracycline promoter, we analyzed the role of FAK in the generation of steady-state adhesive forces using micropatterned substrates and a hydrodynamic adhesion assay. FAK expression reduced steady-state strength by 30% compared to FAK-null cells. FAK expression reduced vinculin localization to focal adhesions by 35% independently from changes in integrin binding and localization of talin and paxillin. RNAi knockdown of vinculin abrogated the FAK-dependent differences in adhesive force. FAK-dependent changes in vinculin localization and adhesive force were confirmed in human primary fibroblasts with FAK knocked down by RNAi. The autophosphorylation Y397 and kinase domain Y576/Y577 sites were differentially required for FAK-mediated adhesive responses. Conclusions We demonstrate that FAK reduces steady-state adhesion strength by modulating vinculin recruitment to focal adhesions. These findings provide insights into the role of FAK in mechanical interactions between a cell and the extracellular matrix. PMID:19883375

  6. [Thousand faces of Streptococcus pneumonia (pneumococcus) infections].

    PubMed

    Szabó, Bálint Gergely; Lénárt, Katalin Szidónia; Kádár, Béla; Gombos, Andrea; Dezsényi, Balázs; Szanka, Judit; Bobek, Ilona; Prinz, Gyula

    2015-11-01

    Incidence and mortality rates of infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) are high worldwide and in Hungary among paediatric as well as adult populations. Pneumococci account for 35-40% of community acquired adult pneumonias requiring hospitalization, while 25-30% of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonias are accompanied by bacteraemia. 5-7% of all infections are fatal but this rate is exponentially higher in high risk patients and elderly people. Mortality could reach 20% among patients with severe invasive pneumococcal infections. Complications may develop despite administration of adequate antibiotics. The authors summarize the epidemiology of pneumococcal infections, pathogenesis of non-invasive and invasive disease and present basic clinical aspects through demonstration of four cases. Early risk stratification, sampling of hemocultures, administration of antibiotics and wider application of active immunization could reduce the mortality of invasive disease. Anti-pneumococcal vaccination is advisable for adults of ≥50 years and high risk patients of ≥18 years who are susceptible to pneumococcal disease. PMID:26498896

  7. Q fever pneumonia in children in Japan.

    PubMed Central

    To, H; Kako, N; Zhang, G Q; Otsuka, H; Ogawa, M; Ochiai, O; Nguyen, S V; Yamaguchi, T; Fukushi, H; Nagaoka, N; Akiyama, M; Amano, K; Hirai, K

    1996-01-01

    The prevalence of Q fever pneumonia among children with atypical pneumonia from whom only an acute-phase serum sample was available was traced by using an indirect immunofluorescence (IF) test, nested PCR, and isolation. Twenty (34.5%) of 58 sera were found to have both polyvalent and immunoglobulin M antibodies to the phase II antigen of Coxiella burnetii by the IF test. Q fever pneumonia was present in 23 (39.7%) of 58 patients as determined by both the nested PCR and isolation and in 20 patients as determined by the IF test. The sensitivities for nested PCR and isolation were 100%, and that for the IF test was 87%. Our results indicate that nested PCR was faster and more sensitive than isolation and the IF test in the diagnosis of acute Q fever when a single acute-phase serum was available. These findings suggest that C. burnetii is an important cause of atypical pneumonia in children in Japan. PMID:8904431

  8. Pneumonia outbreaks in calves and finishers.

    PubMed

    2016-03-19

    Pneumonia in calves and finishers. Ovarian tumour in a calf . Abortion associated with bovine herpesvirus 1 in a suckler herd. Parasitic gastroenteritis causing illthrift and death in sheep. Outbreaks of acute fasciolosis in sheep. These are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for December 2015 from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS). PMID:26993450

  9. Pneumatoceles and pneumothorax after Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Sauleda, J; Aran, X; Gea, J; Aguar, M C; Sanz, M; Broquetas, J M

    1993-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) is common in patients with AIDS. The usual chest X-ray pattern is a diffuse interstitial pulmonary infiltrate. Nevertheless, unusual roentgenographic forms can appear. A patient with PCP that resulted in pneumatoceles and a further pneumothorax is described. PMID:8284529

  10. Exogenous lipoid pneumonia. Clinical and radiological manifestations.

    PubMed

    Marchiori, Edson; Zanetti, Gláucia; Mano, Claudia Mauro; Hochhegger, Bruno

    2011-05-01

    Lipoid pneumonia results from the pulmonary accumulation of endogenous or exogenous lipids. Host tissue reactions to the inhaled substances differ according to their chemical characteristics. Symptoms can vary significantly among individuals, ranging from asymptomatic to severe, life-threatening disease. Acute, sometimes fatal, cases can occur, but the disease is usually indolent. Possible complications include superinfection by nontuberculous mycobacteria, pulmonary fibrosis, respiratory insufficiency, cor pulmonale, and hypercalcemia. The radiological findings are nonspecific, and the disease presents with variable patterns and distribution. For this reason, lipoid pneumonia may mimic many other diseases. The diagnosis of exogenous lipoid pneumonia is based on a history of exposure to oil, characteristic radiological findings, and the presence of lipid-laden macrophages on sputum or BAL analysis. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is the best imaging modality for the diagnosis of lipoid pneumonia. The most characteristic CT finding in LP is the presence of negative attenuation values within areas of consolidation. There are currently no studies in the literature that define the best therapeutic option. However, there is a consensus that the key measure is identifying and discontinuing exposure to the offending agent. Treatment in patients without clinical symptoms remains controversial, but in patients with diffuse pulmonary damage, aggressive therapies have been reported. They include whole lung lavage, systemic corticosteroids, and thoracoscopy with surgical debridement. PMID:21185165

  11. Aspiration pneumonia in children: an iconographic essay*

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Gabriel Antonio; Pessanha, Laís Bastos; Guerra, Luiz Felipe Alves; Martins, Diego Lima Nava; Rondina, Ronaldo Garcia; Silva, Jamine Ronacher Passos

    2015-01-01

    In most cases of aspiration pneumonia in children, the disease is specific to this age group. Clinical and radiological correlation is essential for the diagnosis. The present pictorial essay is aimed at showing typical images of the most common etiologies. PMID:26811557

  12. Community-acquired pneumonia among smokers.

    PubMed

    Almirall, Jordi; Blanquer, José; Bello, Salvador

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have left absolutely no doubt that tobacco increases susceptibility to bacterial lung infection, even in passive smokers. This relationship also shows a dose-response effect, since the risk reduces spectacularly 10 years after giving up smoking, returning to the level of non-smokers. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the causative microorganism responsible for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) most frequently associated with smoking, particularly in invasive pneumococcal disease and septic shock. It is not clear how it acts on the progress of pneumonia, but there is evidence to suggest that the prognosis for pneumococcal pneumonia is worse. In CAP caused by Legionella pneumophila, it has also been observed that smoking is the most important risk factor, with the risk rising 121% for each pack of cigarettes smoked a day. Tobacco use may also favor diseases that are also known risk factors for CAP, such as periodontal disease and upper respiratory viral infections. By way of prevention, while giving up smoking should always be proposed, the use of the pneumococcal vaccine is also recommended, regardless of the presence of other comorbidities. PMID:24387877

  13. Nontypeable Streptococcus pneumoniae as an Otopathogen

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingfu; Kaur, Ravinder; Casey, Janet R.; Sabharwal, Vishakha; Pelton, Stephen; Pichichero, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Among 34 Spn sequential isolates from middle ear fluid we found a case of a nontypeable Streptococcus pneumoniae (NT-Spn) in a child with AOM. The strain was pneumolysin PCR positive and capsule gene PCR negative. Virulence of the NT-Spn was confirmed in a chinchilla model of AOM. PMID:21251566

  14. [Community-acquired pneumonia in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Füri, Julia; Oestmann, Andreas; Repond, Fernand

    2016-04-13

    We report the case of a 88 years old patient with cough and new onset confusion. Delirium was caused by a necrotizing Methicillin-sensible staphylococcus aureus pneumonia with bacteremia. Despite antibiotic therapy for several weeks and fall of inflammatory markers the patient died from consequences of delirium. PMID:27078731

  15. Cases of parasitic pneumonia in Scottish cattle.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    Parasitic pneumonia in cattleNutritional osteodystrophy in cattleWhite liver disease in lambsErysipelas in pigsLead poisoning and atherosclerosis in an eagle These are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for October 2015 from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS). PMID:26851101

  16. Streptococcus pneumoniae infections in western Nepal.

    PubMed

    Easow, Joshy Maducolil; Joseph, Noyal Mariya; Shankar, Pathiyil Ravi; Rajamony, Asish Purushothaman; Dhungel, Banodita Acharya; Shivananda, P G

    2011-07-01

    We conducted a study to determine the prevalence of antibiotic resistance among clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae. This study was conducted from January 2000 to August 2007 at a tertiary care teaching hospital in Nepal. The isolates were identified based on standard bacteriological techniques. Antibiotic susceptibility testing used the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method; penicillin resistance was confirmed by agar dilution method. During the study period, there were 312 S. pneumoniae isolates. Penicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, erythromycin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol resistance were observed in 5, 34.3, 7.4, 11.1 and 0.4% of isolates, respectively. Resistance to all tested antibiotics declined with time except for penicillin, in which resistance increased. Penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae were significantly co-resistant to erythromycin. Co-resistance to tetracycline and erythromycin were observed in trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistant isolates. Penicillin resistance is increasing; therefore, measures to ensure judicious use of beta-lactams and macrolides (inducers of penicillin resistance) should be advocated to control the development of penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae. PMID:22299473

  17. [Multidrug resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae: multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Boutiba-Ben Boubaker, Ilhem; Ben Salah, Dorra; Besbes, Makram; Mahjoubi, Faouzia; Ghozzi, Rafiaa; Ben Redjeb, Saida; Ben Hassen, Assia; Hammami, Adnène

    2002-01-01

    The extensive use of broad spectrum antibiotics, especially the third generation cephalosporins (C3G), was followed by the emergence of newer plasmid mediated betalactamases called extended spectrum betalactamases (ESBLs). To assess the impact of K. pneumoniae resistant to 3GC in Tunisia, this study was conducted in 3 teaching hospitals. A total of 1110 strains of K pneumoniae was collected. The antibiotics susceptibilities were tested by diffusion method using Mueller-Hinton agar. The quality control was regularly performed. I ESBLs producing solates were detected using the double-disc synergy test. Data analysis was done using the Whonet 4 software. 23.6% K. pneumoniae isolates showed phenotype pattern of ESBLs producers. The double-disc synergy test was positive in 75% of the cases. These isolates were recovered from hospitalized patients in different wards but mainly from pediatrics (23.6%), medicine (23.2%), surgery (22.9%), intensive care units (11%) and neonatology (11%). 54% were isolated from urines, 22% from blood cultures. These isolates remained susceptible to imipenem (100%) and most of them to cefoxitin (96.4%) but all had associated resistance to aminoglycosides, quinolones and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The prevalence of multidrug resistant K. pneumoniae is high. This resistance can be minimized by the implementation of infection control measures including handwashing and isolation procedures. PMID:12071040

  18. Correlation between Radiological and Pathological Findings in Patients with Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Studies focused on the pathological–radiological correlation of human Mycoplasma (M) pneumoniae pneumonia have rarely been reported. Therefore, we extensively reviewed the literature regarding pathological and radiological studies of Mycoplasma pneumonia, and compared findings between open lung biopsy specimen and computed tomography (CT). Major three correlations were summarized. (1) Peribronchial and perivascular cuffing characterized by mononuclear cells infiltration was correlated with bronchovascular bundles thickening on CT, which was the most common finding of this pneumonia. (2) Cellular bronchitis in the small airways accompanied with exudates or granulation tissue in the lumen revealed as centrilobular nodules on CT. (3) Neutrophils and exudates in the alveolar lumen radiologically demonstrated as air-space consolidation or ground-glass opacities. In M. pulmonis-infected mice model, pathologic patterns are strikingly different according to host cell-mediated immunity (CMI) levels; treatment with interleukin-2 lead to marked cellular bronchitis in the small airways and treatment with prednisolone or cyclosporin-A lead to neutrophils and exudates in the alveolar lumen. Patients with centrilobular nodules predominant radiologic pattern have a high level of CMI, measuring by tuberculin skin test. From these findings, up-regulation of host CMI could change radiological pattern to centrilobular nodules predominant, on the other hand down-regulation of host CMI would change radiological pattern to ground-glass opacity and consolidation. It was suggested the pathological features of M. pneumoniae pneumonia may be altered by the level of host CMI. PMID:27242720

  19. SP-D, KL-6, and HTI-56 levels in children with mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Lin-Hua; Lu, Quan; Han, Li-Ying; Dong, Guang-Hui

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed to evaluate the potential biomarkers from pulmonary surfactant protein D (SP-D), Krebs von den Lungen-6 (KL-6), and 56-kD a human type I protein (HTI-56) in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples of children with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia. This retrospective study, self-controlled study enrolled 34 Chinese children with M. pneumoniae pneumonia. The levels of SP-D, KL-6, and HTI-56 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples were assessed and compared between patients with unilateral lung infection and contralateral lungs without any abnormal findings. Significant differences in the levels of SP-D, KL-6, and HTI-56 were observed in infected bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples compared with uninfected samples (all P<0.05); however, there was no correlation between the serum level of SP-D, KL-6, and HTI-56 and their levels in infected and uninfected bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples (P>0.05). Conclusion: The high levels of SP-D, KL-6, and HTI-56 in infected bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples may reflect the injury of alveolar epithelium caused by M. pneumoniae. Instead of SP-D in uninfected bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples obtained by invasive bronchoscopy, serum SP-D may serve as a convenient medium to distinguish lung infection caused by M. pneumoniae. PMID:26617840

  20. A cohort study of bacteremic pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Guillamet, Cristina Vazquez; Vazquez, Rodrigo; Noe, Jonas; Micek, Scott T.; Kollef, Marin H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bacteremic pneumonia is usually associated with greater mortality. However, risk factors associated with hospital mortality in bacteremic pneumonia are inadequately described. The study was a retrospective cohort study, conducted in Barnes-Jewish Hospital (2008–2015). For purposes of this investigation, antibiotic susceptibility was determined according to ceftriaxone susceptibility, as ceftriaxone represents the antimicrobial agent most frequently recommended for hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia as opposed to nosocomial pneumonia. Two multivariable analyses were planned: the first model included resistance to ceftriaxone as a variable, whereas the second model included the various antibiotic-resistant species (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacteriaceae). In all, 1031 consecutive patients with bacteremic pneumonia (mortality 37.1%) were included. The most common pathogens associated with infection were S aureus (34.1%; methicillin resistance 54.0%), Enterobacteriaceae (28.0%), P aeruginosa (10.6%), anaerobic bacteria (7.3%), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (5.6%). Compared with ceftriaxone-susceptible pathogens (46.8%), ceftriaxone-resistant pathogens (53.2%) were significantly more likely to receive inappropriate initial antibiotic treatment (IIAT) (27.9% vs 7.1%; P < 0.001) and to die during hospitalization (41.5% vs 32.0%; P = 0.001). The first logistic regression analysis identified IIAT with the greatest odds ratio (OR) for mortality (OR 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5–3.2, P < 0.001). Other independent predictors of mortality included age, mechanical ventilation, immune suppression, prior hospitalization, prior antibiotic administration, septic shock, comorbid conditions, and severity of illness. In the second multivariable analysis that included the antibiotic-resistant species, IIAT was still associated with excess mortality, and P aeruginosa infection was

  1. [Risk Factor Analysis of Pneumonia after Cardiovascular Surgery].

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Yoshiyuki; Abe, Shuichi; Nakamura, Ken; Uchida, Tetsuro; Sadahiro, Mitsuaki; Morikane, Keita

    2016-08-01

    Pneumonia is a major and life-threatening complication after cardiovascular surgery. The objective of our study was to describe epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and risk factors of pneumonia after cardiovascular surgery. From January 2007 to December 2011, 511 consecutive patients (age 67.3±11.9;336 men, 175 women) were enrolled in this study. Pneumonia was diagnosed according to Centers of Disease Control and Prevention surveillance criteria for healthcare associated infection. Data collection included preoperative, intraoperative, and post-operative variables. The overall incidence of pneumonia was 72 cases(14.0%). The mortality in pneumonia group was significantly higher than that in non-pneumonia group (16.6% vs 4.3%, Odds ratio 4.4 p<0.001). Multi-logistic analysis revealed that elderly patient, preoperative congestive heart failure, preoperative hemodialysis, and operation of the thoracic aorta were independent risk factors for pneumonia after cardiovascular surgery. PMID:27476560

  2. Incidence, risk stratification, antibiogram of pathogens isolated and clinical outcome of ventilator associated pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Alok; Agrawal, Avinash; Mehrotra, Sanjay; Singh, Abhishek; Malik, Shruti; Khanna, Arjun

    2011-01-01

    Background: The initial empirical therapy of Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP) modified based on the knowledge of local microbiological data is associated with decreased morbidity and mortality. The objective was to find the incidence and risk factors associated with VAP, the implicated pathogens and their susceptibility pattern as well as to assess the final clinical outcome in VAP. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective cohort study of 107 patients taken on ventilatory support for two or more days and those not suffering from pneumonia prior were to be taken on ventilator. The study was done over a period of one year. VAP was diagnosed using clinical pulmonary infection score of >6. The mortality, incidence of VAP, frequency of different pathogens isolated, their antibiotic sensitivity pattern, duration of mechanical ventilation and duration of hospital stay were assessed. Statistical Analysis: Univariate analysis, χ2 test and paired t-test. Results: The incidence of VAP was 28.04%. Mortality in VAP group was 46.67%, while in the non-VAP group was 27.28%. High APACHE II score was associated with a high mortality rate as well as increased incidence of VAP. The most common organisms isolated from endotracheal aspirate of patients who developed VAP were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii. Most strains of Pseudomonas (55.56%) were resistant to commonly used beta-lactam antibiotics known to be effective against Pseudomonas. All strains of Staphylococcus aureus were MRSA and most isolates of K. pneumoniae (85.71%) were extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing. About 50% isolates of Acinetobacter were resistant to carbapenems. Mortality was highest for infections caused by A. baumannii (83.33%) and K. pneumoniae (71.42%). Conclusions: APACHE II score can be used to stratify the risk of development of VAP and overall risk of mortality. Drug-resistant strains of

  3. [A rare cause of pneumonia: Shewanella putrefaciens].

    PubMed

    Durdu, Bülent; Durdu, Yasemin; Güleç, Nuray; Islim, Filiz; Biçer, Mualla

    2012-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens is a gram-negative, non-fermentative, oxidase positive, motile bacillus that produces hydrogen sulphide. It is found widely in the nature especially in marine environments. Although it is accepted as saprophytic, different clinical syndromes, most commonly skin or soft tissue infections, have been associated with S.putrefaciens, mainly in immunocompromised cases and patients with underlying diseases. However, pneumonia cases due to S.putrefaciens are quite limited in the literature. In this report, a case of pneumonia caused by S.putrefaciens was presented. A 43-year-old female patient was admitted to our hospital with the complaints of fever, cough, sputum and weakness. The patient has had brochiectasis since childhood and has used periodical antibiotic therapies due to pneumoniae episodes. She was diagnosed to have pneumonia based on the clinical, radiological and laboratory findings, and empirical antibiotic treatment with ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime combination was initiated. Gram-stained smear of sputum yielded abundant leucocytes and gram-negative bacteria, and the isolate grown in the sputum culture was identified as S.putrefaciens by conventional methods and API 20 NE (BioMerieux, France) system. The isolate was found susceptible to ceftriaxone, ceftazidime, cefepime, ciprofloxacin, piperacillin-tazobactam, cephoperazon-sulbactam, imipenem, amikacin, gentamicin and trimethoprime-sulphametoxazole; whereas resistant to ampicillin, amoxycillin-clavulanate, cefazolin and cefuroxime, by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. According to the antibiogram results, the therapy was changed to ceftriaxone (1 x 2 g, intravenous). The patient was discharged with complete cure after 14 days of therapy. In conclusion, S.putrefaciens should be considered in patients with predisposing factors as an unusual cause of pneumonia and the characteristics such as H2S production and sensitivity to third generation cephalosporins and penicillins should be used

  4. Design Aspects of Focal Beams From High-Intensity Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Douglas N.; Kruse, Dustin E.; Qin, Shengping; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2011-01-01

    As the applications of ultrasonic thermal therapies expand, the design of the high-intensity array must address both the energy delivery of the main beam and the character and relevance of off-target beam energy. We simulate the acoustic field performance of a selected set of circular arrays organized by array format, including flat versus curved arrays, periodic versus random arrays, and center void diameter variations. Performance metrics are based on the −3-dB focal main lobe (FML) positioning range, axial grating lobe (AGL) temperatures, and side lobe levels. Using finite-element analysis, we evaluate the relative heating of the FML and the AGLs. All arrays have a maximum diameter of 100λ, with element count ranging from 64 to 1024 and continuous wave frequency of 1.5 MHz. First, we show that a 50% spherical annulus produces focus beam side lobes which decay as a function of lateral distance at nearly 87% of the exponential rate of a full aperture. Second, for the arrays studied, the efficiency of power delivery over the −3-dB focus positioning range for spherical arrays is at least 2-fold greater than for flat arrays; the 256-element case shows a 5-fold advantage for the spherical array. Third, AGL heating can be significant as the focal target is moved to its distal half-intensity depth from the natural focus. Increasing the element count of a randomized array to 256 elements decreases the AGL-to-FML heating ratio to 0.12 at the distal half-intensity depth. Further increases in element count yield modest improvements. A 49% improvement in the AGL-to-peak heating ratio is predicted by using the Sumanaweera spiral element pattern with randomization. PMID:21859578

  5. Deep Moonquake Focal Mechanisms: Recovery and Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapmeyer, Martin; Weber, Renee C.

    2011-01-01

    A defining characteristic of deep moonquakes is their tendency to occur with tidal periodicity, prompting previous studies to infer that they are related to the buildup and release of tidal stress within the Moon. In studies of tidal forcing, a key constraint is the focal mechanism: the fault parameters describing the type of failure moonquakes represent. The quality of the lunar seismic data and the limited source/receiver geometries of the Apollo seismic network prohibit the determination of deep moonquake fault parameters using first-motion polarities, as is typically done in terrestrial seismology. Without being able to resolve tidal stress onto a known failure plane, we can examine only gross qualities of the tidal stress tensor with respect to moonquake occurrence, so we cannot fully address the role of tidal stress in moonquake generation. We will examine the extent to which shear (S) and compression (P) wave amplitude ratios can constrain moonquake fault geometry by determining whether, for a given cluster, there exists a focal mechanism that can produce a radiation pattern consistent with the amplitudes measured by the Apollo instruments. Amplitudes are read in the ray coordinate frame, directly from seismograms for which the P and S arrivals are clearly identifiable on all long-period channels of the four Apollo stations. We apply an empirical station correction to account for site effects and the differences between P- and S-wave attenuation. Instead of focusing on the best fitting solution only, we formulate the inverse problem using a falsification criterion: all source orientations that do not reproduce the observed SV/P ratios within an error margin derived from the uncertainty of amplitude readings are rejected. All others are accepted as possible solutions. The inversion is carried out using an exhaustive grid search on a regular grid with predefined step size, encompassing all possible combinations of strike, dip and slip. To assess the

  6. Physical Activity Performance of Focal Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erfle, Stephen E.; Gelbaugh, Corey M.

    2013-01-01

    Histograms of push-ups and curl-ups from a sample of more than 9,000 students show periodic spikes at five and 10 unit intervals. This article argues that these spikes are related to focal points, a game theoretic concept popularized by Nobel Laureate Thomas Schelling. Being focal on one test makes one more likely to be focal on the other. Focal…

  7. Impact of Hfq on Global Gene Expression and Virulence in Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Ming-Ko; Lu, Min-Chi; Liu, Li-Cheng; Lin, Ching-Ting; Lai, Yi-Chyi

    2011-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is responsible for a wide range of clinical symptoms. How this bacterium adapts itself to ever-changing host milieu is still a mystery. Recently, small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) have received considerable attention for their functions in fine-tuning gene expression at a post-transcriptional level to promote bacterial adaptation. Here we demonstrate that Hfq, an RNA-binding protein, which facilitates interactions between sRNAs and their mRNA targets, is critical for K. pneumoniae virulence. A K. pneumoniae mutant lacking hfq (Δhfq) failed to disseminate into extra-intestinal organs and was attenuated on induction of a systemic infection in a mouse model. The absence of Hfq was associated with alteration in composition of envelope proteins, increased production of capsular polysaccharides, and decreased resistance to H2O2, heat shock, and UV irradiation. Microarray-based transcriptome analyses revealed that 897 genes involved in numerous cellular processes were deregulated in the Δhfq strain. Interestingly, Hfq appeared to govern expression of many genes indirectly by affecting sigma factor RpoS and RpoE, since 19.5% (175/897) and 17.3% (155/897) of Hfq-dependent genes belong to the RpoE- and RpoS-regulon, respectively. These results indicate that Hfq regulates global gene expression at multiple levels to modulate the physiological fitness and virulence potential of K. pneumoniae. PMID:21779404

  8. Identification and Differentiation of Carbapenemases in Klebsiella Pneumoniae: A Phenotypic Test Evaluation Study from Jaipur, India

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background: Carbapenem resistance is one of the major threats faced in antimicrobial treatment of infections caused by gram negative organisms. In recent years, carbapenem resistance has emerged in Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates due to acquisition of carbapenemases which belong to Ambler class A KPC type enzymes or to Ambler class B metallo-β-lactamases (MBL). Routine lab detection of carbapenemase producing K. pneumoniae isolates is crucial, both for a therapeutic management and an efficient infection control. Materials and Methods: A study was conducted on 60 carbapenem resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strains which were isolated from various clinical samples over a period of one year (September 2010-August 2011), at a tertiary care hospital in Jaipur. Phenotypic confirmatory test was done by using discs of Meropenem alone and those with phenyl boronic acid (PBA) or Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or both, for detection of carbapenemase production and differentiation of KPC and MBL enzymes. Results: Of the 60 carbapenem resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates, 53 (88.33%) were found to be MBL producers, 4(6.66%) were found to be MBL and KPC co-producers and the rest of the 3(5%) isolates were negative for both MBL and KPC production, as was seen by combined disc testing. Conclusion: The combined disc test is a simple test which can be used for differentiation of carbapenemases and it can be easily incorporated in routine microbiology lab testing. PMID:25177562

  9. Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid Cellular and Haematological Changes in Different Types of Caprine Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Jarikre, A T; Emikpe, O B; Ohore, G O; Akinremi, A T; Akpavie, O S

    2016-01-01

    Goats in the tropics are often reared under the traditional extensive and semi-intensive management systems. These and other factors influence the pattern of pneumonia complex in goats. We investigated the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf) cellular changes and haematological response in different types of caprine pneumonia in Nigeria. Haematological indices and BALf cells were analysed from 300 goats randomly selected from 700 goats comprising different breed, age and body scores. The pneumonia status was well characterised using standard pathological tools. Data is summarized as Mean ± SEM and compared using non-parametric statistics at 5% significance. There was leukocytosis in the pneumonic animals. The overall lavage recovery rate was 55.5%. The differences in Haemoglobin concentration, and Lymphocyte-Neutrophil ratio were significant (p<0.05). BALf changes in the neutrophil, macrophage and eosinophil counts were significantly different (p<0.05). The diagnostic features including increased percentage neutrophils, Macrophage-Neutrophil ratio and eosinophils observed in BAL were reliable and also correlated positively to the pathological findings. BAL should be considered a component of the diagnostic approach to caprine pneumonia complex, as it may accurately aid diagnosis and identification of the causal organisms. PMID:27574761

  10. Oral focal mucinosis of palatal mucosa: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Vipin; Singh, Jagmohan

    2012-01-01

    Oral focal mucinosis (OFM), an oral counterpart of cutaneous focal mucinosis, is a rare disease of unknown etiology. Its pathogenesis may be due to the overproduction of hyaluronic acid by a fibroblast, at the expense of collagen production, resulting in focal myxoid degeneration of the connective tissue, primarily affecting the mucosa overlying the bone. It has no distinctive clinical features, as the diagnosis is solely based on the histopathological features. This article reports of a 32-year-old female having the rare disease of oral focal mucinosis, involving the posterior palatal mucosa, and discusses its clinicopathological features and differential diagnosis of myxomatous lesions of the oral cavity. PMID:23230367

  11. Smart trigger logic for focal plane arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, James E; Campbell, David V; Holmes, Michael L; Lovejoy, Robert; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kay, Randolph R; Cavanaugh, William S; Gurrieri, Thomas M

    2014-03-25

    An electronic device includes a memory configured to receive data representing light intensity values from pixels in a focal plane array and a processor that analyzes the received data to determine which light values correspond to triggered pixels, where the triggered pixels are those pixels that meet a predefined set of criteria, and determines, for each triggered pixel, a set of neighbor pixels for which light intensity values are to be stored. The electronic device also includes a buffer that temporarily stores light intensity values for at least one previously processed row of pixels, so that when a triggered pixel is identified in a current row, light intensity values for the neighbor pixels in the previously processed row and for the triggered pixel are persistently stored, as well as a data transmitter that transmits the persistently stored light intensity values for the triggered and neighbor pixels to a data receiver.

  12. Deep Moonquake Focal Mechanisms: Recovery and Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Renee C.; Knapmeyer, Martin

    2012-01-01

    A defining characteristic of deep moonquakes is their tendency to occur with tidal periodicity, prompting previous studies to infer that they are related to the buildup and release of tidal stress within the Moon [refs]. In studies of tidal forcing, a key constraint is the focal mechanism: the fault parameters describing the type of failure moonquakes represent. The quality of the lunar seismic data and the limited source/receiver geometries of the Apollo seismic network prohibit the determination of deep moonquake fault parameters using first-motion polarities, as is typically done in terrestrial seismology [ref]. Without being able to resolve tidal stress onto a known failure plane, we can examine only gross qualities of the tidal stress tensor with respect to moonquake occurrence, so we cannot fully address the role of tidal stress in moonquake generation.

  13. Decreased subcortical cholinergic arousal in focal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Motelow, Joshua E.; Li, Wei; Zhan, Qiong; Mishra, Asht M.; Sachdev, Robert N. S.; Liu, Geoffrey; Gummadavelli, Abhijeet; Zayyad, Zaina; Lee, Hyun Seung; Chu, Victoria; Andrews, John P.; Englot, Dario J.; Herman, Peter; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Impaired consciousness in temporal lobe seizures has a major negative impact on quality of life. The prevailing view holds that this disorder impairs consciousness by seizure spread to the bilateral temporal lobes. We propose instead that seizures invade subcortical regions and depress arousal, causing impairment through decreases rather than through increases in activity. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in a rodent model, we found increased activity in regions known to depress cortical function including lateral septum and anterior hypothalamus. Importantly, we found suppression of intralaminar thalamic and brainstem arousal systems and suppression of the cortex. At a cellular level, we found reduced firing of identified cholinergic neurons in the brainstem pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus and basal forebrain. Finally, we used enzyme-based amperometry to demonstrate reduced cholinergic neurotransmission in both cortex and thalamus. Decreased subcortical arousal is a novel mechanism for loss of consciousness in focal temporal lobe seizures. PMID:25654258

  14. Design of large aperture focal plane shutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jia-wen; Ma, Wen-li; Huang, Jin-long

    2012-09-01

    To satisfy the requirement of large telescope, a large aperture focal plane shutter with aperture size of φ200mm was researched and designed to realize, which could be started and stopped in a relative short time with precise position, and also the blades could open and close at the same time at any orientation. Timing-belts and stepper motors were adopted as the drive mechanism. Velocity and position of the stepper motors were controlled by the PWM pulse generated by DSP. Exponential curve is applied to control the velocity of the stepper motors to make the shutter start and stop in a short time. The closing/open time of shutter is 0.2s, which meets the performance requirements of large telescope properly.

  15. Short wavelength infrared hybrid focal plane arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vural, K.; Blackwell, J. D.; Marin, E. C.; Edwall, D. D.; Rode, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    The employment of area focal plane arrays (FPA) has made it possible to obtain second generation infrared imaging systems with high resolution and sensitivity. The Short Wavelength Infrared (SWIR) region (1-2.5 microns) is of importance for imaging objects at high temperature and under conditions of reflected sunlight. The present investigation is concerned with electrooptical characterization results for 32 x 32 SWIR detector arrays and FPAs which are suitable for use in a prototype imaging spectrometer. The employed detector material is Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te grown by liquid phase epitaxy on a CdTe transparent substrate. Attention is given to details of processing, the design of the detector array, the multiplexer, the fabrication of the hybrid FPA, and aspects of performance.

  16. Infrared focal plane array crosstalk measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Khoa V.; Kauffman, Christopher L.; Derzko, Zenon I.

    1992-07-01

    Crosstalk between two neighboring elements in a focal plane array (FPA) occurs when signal incident on one element in the array is seen on another. This undesired effect can occur due to both the electrical and optical properties of the FPA. An effort is underway at the U.S. Army's Night Vision and Electro-Optics Directorate to develop a capability to measure crosstalk on both mid-wave infrared and long-wave infrared FPAs. A single detector in an array is illuminated using a laser source coupled with a beam expander, collimating lens, and focusing lens. The relative response of that detector to that of its neighboring detectors is measured to calculate crosstalk. The various components of the test station, the methodology for implementing the crosstalk measurement, and a model of the laser spot size are discussed.

  17. Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay and serology in pediatric community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Kensei; Nishimura, Naoko; Ohshima, Yasunori; Arakawa, Yasuko; Hosono, Haruki; Yamamoto, Yasuto; Iwata, Yasushi; Nakane, Kazumasa; Funahashi, Keiji; Ozaki, Takao

    2012-10-01

    Rapid diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia is required for treatment with effective antimicrobial agents without delay; however, this capacity has not yet been established in clinical practice. Recently, a novel nucleic acid amplification method termed loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) has been used to rapidly diagnose various infectious diseases. In this study, we prospectively evaluated the efficacy of the LAMP assay to rapidly diagnose M. pneumoniae pneumonia in clinical practice. Three hundred sixty-eight children (median age, 3.8 years; range, 0.1-14.3 years) admitted to our hospital between April 2009 and March 2010 for community-acquired pneumonia were enrolled in this study. We obtained throat swabs on admission to detect M. pneumoniae DNA and paired serum samples on admission and at discharge to assay M. pneumoniae antibody titers. M. pneumoniae pneumonia was diagnosed by either a positive LAMP assay or a fourfold or greater increase in antibody titer. Overall, 46 children (12.5% of the patients with pneumonia) were diagnosed with M. pneumoniae pneumonia; of these, 27 (58.7%) were aged less than 6 years. Of the aforementioned 46 children, 38 (82.6%) and 37 (80.4%) were identified by LAMP and serology, respectively. When the results of serology were taken as the standard, the sensitivity and specificity and positive and negative predictive values of the LAMP assay were 78.4%, 97.3%, 76.3%, and 97.6%, respectively. We concluded the LAMP assay may be useful for rapid diagnosis of M. pneumoniae pneumonia. PMID:22370920

  18. Focal cortical dysplasias in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous reports indicate the presence of histological abnormalities in the brains of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) suggestive of a dysplastic process. In this study we identified areas of abnormal cortical thinning within the cerebral cortex of ASD individuals and examined the same for neuronal morphometric abnormalities by using computerized image analysis. Results The study analyzed celloidin-embedded and Nissl-stained serial full coronal brain sections of 7 autistic (ADI-R diagnosed) and 7 age/sex-matched neurotypicals. Sections were scanned and manually segmented before implementing an algorithm using Laplace’s equation to measure cortical width. Identified areas were then subjected to analysis for neuronal morphometry. Results of our study indicate the presence within our ASD population of circumscribed foci of diminished cortical width that varied among affected individuals both in terms of location and overall size with the frontal lobes being particularly involved. Spatial statistic indicated a reduction in size of neurons within affected areas. Granulometry confirmed the presence of smaller pyramidal cells and suggested a concomitant reduction in the total number of interneurons. Conclusions The neuropathology is consistent with a diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). Results from the medical literature (e.g., heterotopias) and our own study suggest that the genesis of this cortical malformation seemingly resides in the heterochronic divisions of periventricular germinal cells. The end result is that during corticogenesis radially migrating neuroblasts (future pyramidal cells) are desynchronized in their development from those that follow a tangential route (interneurons). The possible presence of a pathological mechanism in common among different conditions expressing an autism-like phenotype argue in favor of considering ASD a “sequence” rather than a syndrome. Focal cortical dysplasias in ASD may serve to

  19. Focal symmetrical encephalomalacia in a goat.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Diego M; Pimentel, Luciano A; Pessoa, André F; Dantas, Antônio F M; Uzal, Francisco; Riet-Correa, Franklin

    2010-09-01

    Focal symmetrical encephalomalacia (FSE) is the most prominent lesion seen in the chronic form of enterotoxemia caused by Clostridium perfringens type D in sheep. However, this lesion has not been reported in goats. The current paper reports a case of FSE in a goat from the state of Paraíba in the Brazilian semiarid region. As reported by the farmer, 30, 4-48-month-old animals from a flock of 150 goats died after showing nervous signs, including blindness and recumbence, for periods varying between 1 and 14 days. The flock was grazing native pasture supplemented with wheat and corn bran. Additionally, lactating goats were supplemented with soybeans. A 4-month-old goat with nervous signs was examined clinically and then necropsied 3 days after the onset of clinical signs. Bilateral, focal, and symmetrical areas of brown discoloration were observed in the internal capsule and thalamus. Histologic lesions in these areas consisted of multifocal, bilateral malacia with a few neutrophils; endothelial cell swelling; perivascular edema; and hemorrhages. The etiology of these lesions was not determined. However, FSE is considered pathognomonic for C. perfringens type D enterotoxemia in sheep, and it is speculated that this microorganism was the etiologic agent in the present case. The flock had been vaccinated against type D enterotoxemia only once, approximately 3 months before the beginning of the outbreak. Insufficient immunity due to the incorrect vaccination protocol, low efficacy of the vaccine used, and a diet including large amounts of highly fermentable carbohydrates were suspected to be predisposing factors for this outbreak. PMID:20807946

  20. A cluster of Acinetobacter Pneumonia in foundry workers

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, L.G.; Brink, E.W.; Checko, P.J.; Lentnek, A.; Lyons, R.W.; Hayes, P.S.; Wu, T.C.; Tharr, D.G.; Fraser, D.W.

    1981-12-01

    In a 3-month period, three men who had worked for 5 to 19 years as welders or grinders of steel castings in a foundry acquired pneumonia caused by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus variety anitratus serotype 7J. Two of the men died, and postmortem examination showed mixed-dust pneumoconiosis with iron particles in the lungs. A calcoaceticus variety anitratus serotype 7J was isolated from the air in the foundry but the source was not found. The prevalence of antibody titers of 64 or greater to the 7J strain was significantly higher among foundry workers (15%) than among community controls (2%) (p less than 0.01). Sampling showed that the concentrations of total and metallic particles (especially iron) and of free silica in air inhaled by welders and grinders at the foundry frequently exceeded acceptable levels. These findings suggest that chronic exposure to such particles may increase susceptibility to infection by this organism, which rarely affects healthy people.