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Sample records for focal organizing pneumonia

  1. Organizing pneumonia: chest HRCT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Igor Murad; Zanetti, Gláucia; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Araujo-Neto, Cesar Augusto; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of HRCT findings and their distribution in the lung parenchyma of patients with organizing pneumonia. METHODS: This was a retrospective review of the HRCT scans of 36 adult patients (26 females and 10 males) with biopsy-proven organizing pneumonia. The patients were between 19 and 82 years of age (mean age, 56.2 years). The HRCT images were evaluated by two independent observers, discordant interpretations being resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The most common HRCT finding was that of ground-glass opacities, which were seen in 88.9% of the cases. The second most common finding was consolidation (in 83.3% of cases), followed by peribronchovascular opacities (in 52.8%), reticulation (in 38.9%), bronchiectasis (in 33.3%), interstitial nodules (in 27.8%), interlobular septal thickening (in 27.8%), perilobular pattern (in 22.2%), the reversed halo sign (in 16.7%), airspace nodules (in 11.1%), and the halo sign (in 8.3%). The lesions were predominantly bilateral, the middle and lower lung fields being the areas most commonly affected. CONCLUSIONS: Ground-glass opacities and consolidation were the most common findings, with a predominantly random distribution, although they were more common in the middle and lower thirds of the lungs. PMID:26176521

  2. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Pneumonia KidsHealth > For Teens > Pneumonia Print A A A ... having to go to the hospital. What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia (pronounced: noo-MOW-nyuh) is an infection ...

  3. Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia: A rare form of nonbacterial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Prashant; Kumar, Kuldeep; Mittal, Sarita; Goyal, Nidhi; Trikha, Sahil; Vashisth, Arti

    2016-04-01

    Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) is a rare disease characterized by bilateral basilar infiltrates and histological findings of organizing pneumonia and intra-alveolar fibrin in the form of "fibrin balls." Here, we report a 43-year-old female with complaints of fever, dry cough, and shortness of breath with hypoxemia. High-resolution computed tomography thorax revealed diffuse confluent consolidation in bilateral lung zones. Bronchoscopy and transbronchial biopsy revealed features of AFOP. With prednisolone treatment, there was an improvement in her condition. AFOP is a rare disease and should be taken into consideration and differential diagnosis of severe acute pneumonias with no significant comorbidities. PMID:27303141

  4. Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia: A rare form of nonbacterial pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Prashant; Kumar, Kuldeep; Mittal, Sarita; Goyal, Nidhi; Trikha, Sahil; Vashisth, Arti

    2016-01-01

    Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) is a rare disease characterized by bilateral basilar infiltrates and histological findings of organizing pneumonia and intra-alveolar fibrin in the form of “fibrin balls.” Here, we report a 43-year-old female with complaints of fever, dry cough, and shortness of breath with hypoxemia. High-resolution computed tomography thorax revealed diffuse confluent consolidation in bilateral lung zones. Bronchoscopy and transbronchial biopsy revealed features of AFOP. With prednisolone treatment, there was an improvement in her condition. AFOP is a rare disease and should be taken into consideration and differential diagnosis of severe acute pneumonias with no significant comorbidities. PMID:27303141

  5. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pommepuy, I; Farny, M; Billey, T; Olivier, P; Lassoued, S

    1998-01-01

    A 75-year old man with rheumatoid arthritis developed bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP), which responded to treatment with prednisolone (1 mg/kg/d) and cyclophosphamide (100 mg/d). PMID:9523389

  6. Influenza B/Streptococcal co-infection complicated by organizing pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Wang C; Lam, Sonia H Y; Wong, Maria P; Ip, Mary S M; Lam, David C L

    2016-09-01

    Organizing pneumonia is a rare complication of influenza infection that has substantial morbidity. We report the first case of organizing pneumonia associated with influenza B and Streptococcus pneumoniae coinfection that had significant improvement with corticosteroid treatment. The clinical and radiological features of organizing pneumonia associated with this coinfection are similar to those after influenza A infection. Timely use of systemic glucocorticosteroids would be of benefit in promoting resolution for influenza-associated organizing pneumonia. PMID:27516886

  7. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia and Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Matteson, E L; Ike, R W

    1990-05-01

    A 52-year-old man developed a systemic illness with fever, malaise, cough, dry eyes and mouth. Investigation revealed bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia associated with retinal vasculitis, hepatic and renal involvement, lymphocytic sialoadenitis and symptoms of the sicca complex. High dose steroid treatment resulted in resolution of his symptoms and prolonged remission. PMID:2359080

  8. Organized Pneumonia Secondary to Increasing Doses of Temozolomide

    PubMed Central

    Consuegra Vanegas, Angélica; Matachana Martínez, María; Cordero Lorenzana, Lourdes; Vidal García, Iria; Montero Martínez, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Surgery, radiotherapy (RT), and chemotherapy have a role in the control of tumor growth, progression, and recurrence in high-grade gliomas. Temozolomide has been incorporated as the main chemotherapy agent for managing these tumors. Here, we present a case of a patient who developed a severe organizing pneumonia after increasing doses of temozolomide for a high-grade glioma. PMID:26487994

  9. Cryptococcus neoformans as a cause of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Alexander T; Al Kharrat, Tamim; Kourtis, Athena P

    2010-06-01

    The most frequent manifestations of Cryptococcus neoformans (CN) disease are systemic infections in immunocompromised patients and localized pulmonary disease in immunocompetent individuals. Such pulmonary cryptococcosis can range from asymptomatic infection to frank pneumonia that can be severe. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) is a rare severe form of pneumonitis caused by a variety of infectious and toxic agents or connective tissue diseases. BOOP due to Cryptococcus neoformans has very rarely been reported; there have been only five such case reports, mostly in immunocompromised patients. We report herein on a case of CN-associated BOOP in an immunocompetent individual and discuss the diagnosis and treatment of this entity. PMID:20169387

  10. Organizing Pneumonia in a Patient with Quiescent Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ozeki, Keiji; Katano, Takahito; Shimura, Takaya; Mori, Yoshinori; Joh, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old man with Crohn's disease (CD) was admitted to our hospital due to moderate risk of pneumonia while receiving scheduled adalimumab maintenance therapy. Symptoms remained virtually unchanged following administration of antibiotics. A final diagnosis of organizing pneumonia (OP) was made based on findings of intra-alveolar buds of granulation tissue and fibrous thickening of the alveolar walls on pathological examination and patchy consolidations and ground glass opacities on computed tomography. Immediate administration of prednisolone provided rapid, sustained improvement. Although a rare complication, OP is a pulmonary manifestation that requires attention in CD patients. PMID:27413560

  11. Nonspecific interstitial pneumonia overlaps organizing pneumonia in lung-dominant connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Ren; Peng, Shou-Chun; Wei, Lu-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Here, we reported two cases of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia overlap organizing pneumonia (NSIP/OP) with lung-dominant connective tissue disease (LD-ILD). The first case is a patient with hands of chapped skin, right-sided pleuritic chest discomfort, weakness, positive ANA and antibodies to Ro/SS-A (+++) and Ro-52 (++). In the second case, there were Reynaud's disease, and nucleolus-ANA increased (1:800). Chest high resolution CT scan in both cases showed ground-glass opacifications, predominantly in basal and subpleural region and the pathologic manifestation were correlated with NSIP/OP, which were previously discovered in Sjogren syndrome, PM/DM and other rheumatic diseases. The two cases of NSIP/OP with LD-CTD we reported expand disease spectrum of NSIP/OP pathological types in ILD. However, it is necessary to process large-scale studies. PMID:26617847

  12. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... en español Neumonía You're out in the rain, jumping around in puddles, and somebody yells, "Get ... you really catch it from playing in the rain? What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia (say: noo-MOW-nyuh) ...

  13. [Bronchiolitis obliterans with organized pneumonia: apropos 2 new cases].

    PubMed

    Fernández Vázquez, E; Zamarrón Sanz, C; Palacios Bartolomé, A; Valle Vázquez, J M; Alvarez Dobaño, J M; Tumbeiro Novoa, M

    1992-12-01

    We present two cases of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) with different clinical and radiological characteristics. In one case, the chest X-ray demonstrated bilateral migrating infiltrates. The pathology showed bronchiolar and intra-alveolar occupation by granulation tissue in both cases. It should be noted that both patients responded well to treatment with prednisone although alterations in gas exchange persisted in one case. PMID:1486169

  14. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the flu Your doctor will use your medical history, a physical exam, and lab tests to diagnose pneumonia. Treatment depends on what kind you have. If bacteria are the cause, antibiotics should help. If you ...

  15. [CT pathologic correlative study of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Nishimura, K; Kitaichi, M; Izumi, T; Kanaoka, M; Itoh, H

    1989-01-01

    Though bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) was proposed as a new infiltrative lung disease in 1985, we think it has two radiologic problems. First, in spite of interstitial pneumonia, about half of chest radiographs of BOOP has been reported to show alveolar opacities. Second, because radiologic features of both some cases of BOOP and of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) show reticular shadows on chest radiographs, it is sometimes difficult to differentiate between two diseases. We correlated CT images with open lung biopsy specimens and evaluated CT's ability to differentiate BOOP from UIP. CT findings of all cases of BOOP were: (1) markedly increased dense infiltrates of various sizes which demarcated sharply from normal lung field. Air bronchogram was always present. (2) less dense images were seen which also stood out against the normal lung field. The former corresponded to air space consolidation formed by organized exudates and inflammatory cells within alveolar ducts and alveoli, while the latter indicated luminal and mural alveolitis. Both findings were sharply delineated from each other probably because of intervening interlobular septa. Conglomerated small cystic shadows and air bronchography within areas of intense lung density were seen in CT images of most of 28 patients with UIP. Those findings proved to correspond to macroscopic or microscopic honey combing which were not seen in our cases of BOOP. These radiologic and pathologic features of UIP were different. PMID:2724593

  16. [A case of Legionella pneumonia with multiple organ failure].

    PubMed

    Li, Jiali; Wen, Rui; Deng, Hong; Li, Qian

    2016-06-28

    Legionella pneumonia (LP) is a rare systemic infectious disease, which is often misdiagnosed by clinicians due to the atypical symptoms. A middle-aged man who suffered from fever and dyspnea was diagnosed as community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in Changsha Central Hospital in March 2015. The treatment was unsatisfied firstly. The patients showed further symptoms of rhabdomyolysis, acute liver and renal failure, and impaired neural functions, who was diagnosed as LP with multiple organ failure based on a positive test for Legionella antibody. The patient was recovered after treated with moxifloxacin combined with azithromycin and continuous renal replacement therapy. LP should be paid attention when patient was diagnosed as CAP and failed to be treated. The satisfied outcome is achieved after application of macrolide, quinolones and comprehensive treatments. PMID:27374453

  17. A Case of Organizing Pneumonia (OP) Associated with Pembrolizumab

    PubMed Central

    Fragkou, Paraskevi; Souli, Maria; Theochari, Maria; Kontopoulou, Christina; Loukides, Stelios; Koumarianou, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, chemotherapy for metastatic melanoma had disappointing results. The identification of immune checkpoints such as CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1 has led to the development of an array of monoclonal antibodies (Mabs). These immunologic approaches against tumoral cells come with a novel kind of side effects that the clinician needs to be familiarized with. Herein, we report for the first time a case of organizing pneumonia, based on imaging and cytological analyses of bronchoalveolar lavage, possibly associated with the use of pembrolizumab, an anti-PD-1 Mab recently approved for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. PMID:27257369

  18. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia due to gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Rong; Xu, Xue-Feng; Zhou, Chun-Ju; Yang, Hai-Ming; Zhao, Shun-Ying

    2015-06-01

    The most common causes of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) are connective tissue diseases, organ transplantation, drug reaction, and infections. Although rare, BOOP due to gastroesophageal reflux (GER) has been reported in adults but not to date in pediatric patients. This study describes 2 pediatric patients who developed GER and BOOP. One patient had superior mesenteric artery syndrome and Helicobacter pylori infection, and the other had a gastroduodenal ulcer with reflux esophagitis. Respiratory symptoms occurred concurrently or after gastrointestinal symptoms. Monitoring of esophageal pH for 24 hours revealed pathologic acid reflux. Lung biopsy findings confirmed BOOP. No other causes of BOOP were observed in these 2 patients. Both patients were cured with antireflux therapy and corticosteroids. To our knowledge, this is the first case report to implicate GER as a reversible cause of BOOP in children. PMID:25986021

  19. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia associated with achalasia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Malek, Farhad; Nobakhat, Hossein; Hemmati, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    There is little mention in the literature about achalasia as an etiologic factor of Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP). In this study, a case of BOOP, which appeared to be secondary to achalasia is reported. A 35 years old man present with nonproductive cough, chills and fever from two month ago. Due to permanent consolidation in mid zone of right lung and unresponsive to antibiotics, transthoracic needle biopsy was done that showed BOOP. Due to esophageal dilatation in chest computerized tomography (CT) scan, endoscopy and esophagogram was done that showed achalasia. After surgery and a course of corticosteroid the patient condition became well. This report demonstrates that achalasia may be associated with BOOP. PMID:27408784

  20. Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Urinary Tract Infection following Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Sandra S.; Cober, Eric D.; van Duin, David

    2014-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) is an emerging pathogen with a devastating impact on organ transplant recipients (OTRs). Data describing urinary tract infections (UTIs) due to CRKP, compared to extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing and susceptible K. pneumoniae, are lacking. We conducted a retrospective cohort study comparing OTRs with a first episode of UTI due to CRKP, ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae, or susceptible K. pneumoniae. We identified 108 individuals; 22 (20%) had UTIs due to CRKP, 22 (20%) due to ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae, and 64 (60%) due to susceptible K. pneumoniae. Compared to susceptible K. pneumoniae (27%), patients with UTIs due to CRKP or ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae were more likely to have a ≥24-hour stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) before or after development of the UTI (64% and 77%, respectively; P < 0.001). Among 105/108 hospitalized patients (97%), the median lengths of stay prior to UTI with CRKP or ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae (7 and 8 days, respectively) were significantly longer than that for susceptible K. pneumoniae (1 day; P < 0.001). Clinical failure was observed for 8 patients (36%) with CRKP, 4 (18%) with ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae, and 9 (14%) with susceptible K. pneumoniae (P = 0.073). Microbiological failure was seen for 10 patients (45%) with CRKP, compared with 2 (9%) with ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae and 2 (3%) with susceptible K. pneumoniae (P < 0.001). In multivariable logistic regression analyses, CRKP was associated with greater odds of microbiological failure (versus ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae: odds ratio [OR], 9.36, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.94 to 72.1; versus susceptible K. pneumoniae: OR, 31.4, 95% CI, 5.91 to 264). In conclusion, CRKP is associated with ICU admission, long length of stay, and microbiological failure among OTRs with UTIs. Greater numbers are needed to determine risk factors for infection and differences in meaningful endpoints associated with carbapenem

  1. Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae urinary tract infection following solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Brizendine, Kyle D; Richter, Sandra S; Cober, Eric D; van Duin, David

    2015-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) is an emerging pathogen with a devastating impact on organ transplant recipients (OTRs). Data describing urinary tract infections (UTIs) due to CRKP, compared to extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing and susceptible K. pneumoniae, are lacking. We conducted a retrospective cohort study comparing OTRs with a first episode of UTI due to CRKP, ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae, or susceptible K. pneumoniae. We identified 108 individuals; 22 (20%) had UTIs due to CRKP, 22 (20%) due to ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae, and 64 (60%) due to susceptible K. pneumoniae. Compared to susceptible K. pneumoniae (27%), patients with UTIs due to CRKP or ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae were more likely to have a ≥ 24-hour stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) before or after development of the UTI (64% and 77%, respectively; P < 0.001). Among 105/108 hospitalized patients (97%), the median lengths of stay prior to UTI with CRKP or ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae (7 and 8 days, respectively) were significantly longer than that for susceptible K. pneumoniae (1 day; P < 0.001). Clinical failure was observed for 8 patients (36%) with CRKP, 4 (18%) with ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae, and 9 (14%) with susceptible K. pneumoniae (P = 0.073). Microbiological failure was seen for 10 patients (45%) with CRKP, compared with 2 (9%) with ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae and 2 (3%) with susceptible K. pneumoniae (P < 0.001). In multivariable logistic regression analyses, CRKP was associated with greater odds of microbiological failure (versus ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae: odds ratio [OR], 9.36, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.94 to 72.1; versus susceptible K. pneumoniae: OR, 31.4, 95% CI, 5.91 to 264). In conclusion, CRKP is associated with ICU admission, long length of stay, and microbiological failure among OTRs with UTIs. Greater numbers are needed to determine risk factors for infection and differences in meaningful endpoints associated with carbapenem

  2. Pneumonia (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumonia is an inflammation of the lungs caused by an infection. Many different organisms can cause it, including bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Pneumonia is a common illness that affects millions of ...

  3. Acute respiratory failure caused by organizing pneumonia secondary to antineoplastic therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Adriell Ramalho; Amorim, Fábio Ferreira; Soares, Paulo Henrique Alves; de Moura, Edmilson Bastos; Maia, Marcelo de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases belong to a group of diseases that typically exhibit a subacute or chronic progression but that may cause acute respiratory failure. The male patient, who was 37 years of age and undergoing therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, was admitted with cough, fever, dyspnea and acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Mechanical ventilation and antibiotic therapy were initiated but were associated with unfavorable progression. Thoracic computed tomography showed bilateral pulmonary "ground glass" opacities. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy was initiated with satisfactory response because the patient had used three drugs related to organizing pneumonia (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and rituximab), and the clinical and radiological symptoms were suggestive. Organizing pneumonia may be idiopathic or linked to collagen diseases, drugs and cancer and usually responds to corticosteroid therapy. The diagnosis was anatomopathological, but the patient's clinical condition precluded performing a lung biopsy. Organizing pneumonia should be a differential diagnosis in patients with apparent pneumonia and a progression that is unfavorable to antimicrobial treatment. PMID:23917942

  4. Elective preterm delivery as a management option in cryptogenic organizing pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Holder, Kelly L; Scardo, James A; Laye, M Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia, now termed as cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), is a fibrotic lung disease of the small airways with the potential to progress to end-stage lung disease. COP in pregnancy carries a high risk of maternal and neonatal complications and only two prior cases have been reported. This is the first case of pre-existing COP in pregnancy. We report a 16-year-old primigravid with COP who elected inpatient management and preterm delivery as a successful management option.

  5. Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia associated with influenza A/H1N1 pneumonia after lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Immunocompromised patients, particularly after lung transplantation, are at high risk to develop atypical forms of pulmonary infections including influenza A/H1N1. Acute Fibrinous and Organizing Pneumonia (AFOP) is a special histological pattern in acute respiratory failure with high mortality. Case presentation We describe a 66-year-old woman with double lung transplantation in August 2009 due to end stage pulmonary fibrosis. After prolonged weaning and subsequent promising course, she developed atypical pneumonia with diffuse pulmonary infiltrates in both lungs in January 2010. Infection with influenza A/H1N1 virus was verified. The patient rapidly suffered from respiratory insufficiency and died eight days after this diagnosis. The post-mortem revealed especially in the lower parts of the lungs the classical histological pattern of pure AFOP. Molecular analyses of lung tissue were positive for influenza A/H1N1. Conclusion To our knowledge we present the first case of AFOP triggered by viral infection, here proven to be influenza virus A/H1N1. Thus, also in the setting of viral infection the highly deadly differential diagnosis of AFOP must be considered. PMID:23683442

  6. Nivolumab-induced organizing pneumonia in a melanoma patient.

    PubMed

    Sano, Tasuku; Uhara, Hisashi; Mikoshiba, Yasutomo; Kobayashi, Aya; Uchiyama, Ryuhei; Tateishi, Kazunari; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Okuyama, Ryuhei

    2016-03-01

    We report the case of a 70-year-old woman with vaginal melanoma and multiple metastases in the lung. After the third dose of nivolumab, decreased room-air resting arterial oxygen saturation with bilateral basal fine crackles on auscultation developed despite the absence of respiratory symptoms. Computed tomography showed ground-glass opacities with airspace consolidations scattered with a peculiar distribution, and most were observed around the existing metastatic tumors in the lung. From the 42nd day to the 56th day after the last administration of nivolumab, she received dexamethasone 1-2 mg/body for the prevention of adverse events after stereotactic radiation for brain metastasis. At 3 months after the last administration of nivolumab, a computed tomography scan revealed improvement of the pneumonia and a decreased size and number of metastatic lesions in the lung, although some lesions showed enlargement. Further examination is needed to clarify the relationship between the pattern of pneumonia after Nivo therapy and clinical effects. PMID:26759348

  7. Cryptogenic organizing pneumonia due to amiodarone: long-term follow-up after corticosteroid treatment.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Katja; Schima, Wolfgang; Kaliman, Josef F

    2010-08-01

    Cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (formerly known as bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia) is a clinicopathological entity with characteristical radiographic findings such as bilateral, asymmetrical, sometimes migrating, patchy infiltrates in chest radiograph and ground-glass opacities in computed tomography. The disease has been observed in the context of gastrointestinal disorders, certain lung infections, autoimmune-mediated diseases (such as Wegener granulomatosis), inhalation of toxic fumes, bone marrow transplantation and administration of drugs. The benzofuran amiodarone, a commonly used antiarrythmic drug for atrial fibrillation, can exhibit several pulmonary adverse effects, amongst them cryptogenic organizing pneumonia as a rarely diagnosed and published one. We report a case of cryptogenic organizing pneumonia secondary to amiodarone treatment, its clinical course with significant improvement of clinical symptoms within a few days after discontinuation of amiodarone treatment and administration of corticosteroids. Also the infiltrations found in chest X-ray and computed tomography responded well and showed remarkable resolution tendency quickly. During 5 months of corticoid therapy pulmonary abnormalities gradually resolved almost completely and remained equal during the 8 months follow-up after corticoid termination. PMID:20668958

  8. [Bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia associated with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura].

    PubMed

    Presas, J L; Piriz, J; Serra, S L; Paz, E D; Allievi, A; Kartin, D; Olmedo, G

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of a 35 year-old woman with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) who, under treatment with immunosuppressive drugs, developed bilateral interstitial pulmonary disease. Previously she had been splenectomized and treated with corticosteroids and cyclosporin. During the clinical course, the patient developed alterations of the hepatogram and presented a positive serology for Epstein-Barr virus. The lung biopsy showed the histologic pattern of obliterative bronchiolitis, interstitial inflammatory infiltration and intraalveolar pneumonia (BOOP). We could not find in the literature a previous report in which ITP was associated with BOOP. Of interest was the spontaneous remission of the pulmonary disease after suppression of cyclosporin and positive serology for Epstein-Barr virus. PMID:9674210

  9. Acute Fibrinous and Organizing Pneumonia Associated With Allogenic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Successfully Treated With Corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Lam-Phuong; Ahdoot, Stella; Sriratanaviriyakul, Narin; Zhang, Yanhong; Stollenwerk, Nicholas; Schivo, Michael; Harper, Richart

    2016-01-01

    Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) is an extremely rare, relatively new, and distinct histological pattern of acute lung injury characterized predominately by the presence of intra-alveolar fibrin and associated organizing pneumonia. AFOP may be idiopathic or associated with a wide spectrum of clinical conditions. It has a variable clinical presentation from mild respiratory symptoms to that similar to the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Currently there is no consensus on treatment, and corticosteroids previously were of unclear benefit. To date, there are less than 40 cases of AFOP reported in the literature and only one has been linked to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Here we report the first case series of 2 patients who developed AFOP following allogenic stem cell transplant that were successfully treated with high-dose corticosteroids. PMID:27152316

  10. Invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma mimicking organizing pneumonia associated with Mycobacterium fortuitum infection.

    PubMed

    Morichika, Daisuke; Miyahara, Nobuaki; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiko; Minami, Daisuke; Irie, Masahiro; Tanimoto, Yasushi; Kanehiro, Arihiko; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2014-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 68-year-old man diagnosed with invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma of the lungs. Chest computed tomography showed subpleural ground-glass opacity and small nodules with cavitation. A culture of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid resulted in the detection of Mycobacterium fortuitum. The patient's lung consolidation rapidly progressed; however, repeated bronchoscopy showed no atypical cells, thus suggesting a diagnosis of organizing pneumonia associated with M. fortuitum infection. However, the surgical biopsy specimen was diagnostic for adenocarcinoma, with no mycobacterial infection. Invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma should not be excluded in the differential diagnosis of patients with clinical features of organizing pneumonia and nontuberculous mycobacterium infection, even if a transbronchial biopsy confirms the absence of malignancy. PMID:25500441

  11. Atypical pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... that cause typical pneumonia. These include Legionella pneumophila , Mycoplasma pneumoniae , and Chlamydophila pneumoniae . Atypical pneumonia also tends to have milder symptoms than typical pneumonia. Causes Mycoplasma pneumonia is a type of atypical pneumonia. It ...

  12. Pneumonias – a dynamic relationship between the human organism and the etiologic agent

    PubMed Central

    Chiotan, R; Chiotan, M

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Pneumonias are usually acute infectious processes of the pulmonary parenchyma, being the result of the overcome of the natural defence mechanisms of the human organism, which lead to the penetration, persistence and multiplication of a biologic agent (which has become a pathogen agent) within the lungs. This is a phenomena which generates local manifestations (inflammation) and systemic manifestations, their variable dimension (which is conditioned by the state of the host and/or the virulence of the pathogen agent) explaining the clinical, paraclinical and biological dimensions of the phenomena. The current material deals on one hand with the phenomena which takes part in the formation of the heterogeneous spectrum of the pneumonias and, on the other hand, we will demonstrate the manner in which the expansion and the severity of the infectious phenomena depend on the virulence of the etiologic agent, on the manner in which the defence mechanisms have been overcome, and also on the biological state of the invaded organism. Abbreviations: PN – pneumonia, O2 – oxygen, CO2 – carbon dioxide PMID:25408724

  13. Acute Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Hammad; Fasanya, Adebayo; Cheema, Tariq; Singh, Anil C

    2016-01-01

    Acute pneumonia is an active infection of the lungs that results when an individual at risk gets exposed to a particular microbiological pathogen. Acute pneumonia is the leading cause of death in the United States that is attributable to an infection. The risk factors, pathogenesis, and microbiological organisms involved differ if the pneumonia develops in the community versus health care-associated environment. The development of concise and comprehensive guidelines has led to an improvement in the management of the problem. However, the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms and the increase in the percentage of elderly population keep mortality risk very substantial. PMID:26919676

  14. Brain Network Organization in Focal Epilepsy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Floor E.; Stam, Cornelis J.; Braun, Kees P. J.; Otte, Willem M.

    2014-01-01

    segregation, on whole brain interictal network organization, which may relate to the co-morbid cognitive and behavioral impairments often reported in patients with focal epilepsy. PMID:25493432

  15. Ultrastructural evidence of alveolar epithelial injury in idiopathic bronchiolitis obliterans-organizing pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, J. L.; Katzenstein, A. L.

    1988-01-01

    The ultrastructural features of idiopathic bronchiolitis obliterans-organizing pneumonia (BOOP) were studied in 9 patients. As expected, the characteristic air space fibrosis was composed of spindled fibroblasts and myofibroblasts arranged concentrically within an electron-lucent stroma. In 6 patients there was evidence of incorporation of air space fibrosis into the interstitium. A surprising finding in all patients was the presence of extensive epithelial damage involving peribronchiolar alveolar septa. Necrosis and sloughing of alveolar lining cells resulted in denuding of epithelial basal laminae. Complex infoldings and deep invaginations of the denuded basal laminae into alveolar septa were common. These ultrastructural changes involving the interstitium are similar to those occurring in the interstitial pneumonias, and suggest that BOOP also results from acute epithelial injury. The different clinical manifestations and prognosis of these entities may relate to the peribronchiolar localization of the epithelial damage in BOOP compared with more diffuse involvement of distal lung in the interstitial pneumonias. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:3394793

  16. MyMpn: a database for the systems biology model organism Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Wodke, Judith A H; Alibés, Andreu; Cozzuto, Luca; Hermoso, Antonio; Yus, Eva; Lluch-Senar, Maria; Serrano, Luis; Roma, Guglielmo

    2015-01-01

    MyMpn (http://mympn.crg.eu) is an online resource devoted to studying the human pathogen Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a minimal bacterium causing lower respiratory tract infections. Due to its small size, its ability to grow in vitro, and the amount of data produced over the past decades, M. pneumoniae is an interesting model organisms for the development of systems biology approaches for unicellular organisms. Our database hosts a wealth of omics-scale datasets generated by hundreds of experimental and computational analyses. These include data obtained from gene expression profiling experiments, gene essentiality studies, protein abundance profiling, protein complex analysis, metabolic reactions and network modeling, cell growth experiments, comparative genomics and 3D tomography. In addition, the intuitive web interface provides access to several visualization and analysis tools as well as to different data search options. The availability and--even more relevant--the accessibility of properly structured and organized data are of up-most importance when aiming to understand the biology of an organism on a global scale. Therefore, MyMpn constitutes a unique and valuable new resource for the large systems biology and microbiology community. PMID:25378328

  17. Molecular mechanism of vinculin activation and nano-scale spatial organization in focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Case, Lindsay B.; Baird, Michelle A.; Shtengel, Gleb; Campbell, Sharon L.; Hess, Harald F.; Davidson, Michael W.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) link the extracellular matrix (ECM) to the actin cytoskeleton to mediate cell adhesion, migration, mechanosensing and signaling. FAs have conserved nanoscale protein organization, suggesting that the position of proteins within FAs regulates their activity and function. Vinculin binds different FA proteins to mediate distinct cellular functions, but how vinculin’s interactions are spatiotemporally organized within FA is unknown. Using interferometric photo-activation localization (iPALM) super-resolution microscopy to assay vinculin nanoscale localization and a FRET biosensor to assay vinculin conformation, we found that upward repositioning within the FA during FA maturation facilitates vinculin activation and mechanical reinforcement of FA. Inactive vinculin localizes to the lower integrin signaling layer in FA by binding to phospho-paxillin. Talin binding activates vinculin and targets active vinculin higher in FA where vinculin can engage retrograde actin flow. Thus, specific protein interactions are spatially segregated within FA at the nano-scale to regulate vinculin activation and function. PMID:26053221

  18. Cytomegalovirus Colitis in a Critically Ill Patient Following Severe Legionella Pneumonia with Multiple Organ Failure.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Kei; Aoshima, Masahiro; Suzuki, Fumi; Watanabe, Junko; Otsuka, Yoshihito

    2016-01-01

    A 68-year-old man visited an emergency department complaining of dyspnea. He was diagnosed to have Legionella pneumonia with multiple organ failure. Although his multiple organ failure improved, he suffered from persistent abdominal pain and diarrhea with continuous minor bleeding. Colonoscopy revealed a longitudinal ulcer of the rectum, below the peritoneal reflection. He was diagnosed with cytomegalovirus (CMV) colitis. Antiviral therapy with ganciclovir was initiated. He finally underwent a colostomy after a bowel stricture caused an intestinal outlet obstruction, which made oral intake impossible. Based on the present case, we believe that CMV colitis must be considered as one of the differential diagnoses when critically ill patients develop continuous diarrhea and abdominal pain. PMID:26935377

  19. Trends in Pneumonia Mortality Rates and Hospitalizations by Organism, United States, 2002-2011(1).

    PubMed

    Wuerth, Brandon A; Bonnewell, John P; Wiemken, Timothy L; Arnold, Forest W

    2016-09-01

    Because the epidemiology of pneumonia is changing, we performed an updated, population-based analysis of hospitalization and case-fatality rates for pneumonia patients in the United States. From 2002 to 2011, hospitalization rates decreased significantly for pneumonia caused by pneumococcus and Haemophilus influenzae but increased significantly for Pseudomonas spp., Staphylococcus aureus, and influenza virus. PMID:27532154

  20. Trends in Pneumonia Mortality Rates and Hospitalizations by Organism, United States, 2002–20111

    PubMed Central

    Wuerth, Brandon A.; Bonnewell, John P.; Wiemken, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    Because the epidemiology of pneumonia is changing, we performed an updated, population-based analysis of hospitalization and case-fatality rates for pneumonia patients in the United States. From 2002 to 2011, hospitalization rates decreased significantly for pneumonia caused by pneumococcus and Haemophilus influenzae but increased significantly for Pseudomonas spp., Staphylococcus aureus, and influenza virus. PMID:27532154

  1. Supramolecular Organization of the Repetitive Backbone Unit of the Streptococcus pneumoniae Pilus

    PubMed Central

    Spraggon, Glen; Koesema, Eric; Scarselli, Maria; Malito, Enrico; Biagini, Massimiliano; Norais, Nathalie; Emolo, Carla; Barocchi, Michèle Anne; Giusti, Fabiola; Hilleringmann, Markus; Rappuoli, Rino; Lesley, Scott; Covacci, Antonello; Masignani, Vega; Ferlenghi, Ilaria

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, like many other Gram-positive bacteria, assembles long filamentous pili on their surface through which they adhere to host cells. Pneumococcal pili are formed by a backbone, consisting of the repetition of the major component RrgB, and two accessory proteins (RrgA and RrgC). Here we reconstruct by transmission electron microscopy and single particle image reconstruction method the three dimensional arrangement of two neighbouring RrgB molecules, which represent the minimal repetitive structural domain of the native pilus. The crystal structure of the D2-D4 domains of RrgB was solved at 1.6 Å resolution. Rigid-body fitting of the X-ray coordinates into the electron density map enabled us to define the arrangement of the backbone subunits into the S. pneumoniae native pilus. The quantitative fitting provide evidence that the pneumococcal pilus consists uniquely of RrgB monomers assembled in a head-to-tail organization. The presence of short intra-subunit linker regions connecting neighbouring domains provides the molecular basis for the intrinsic pilus flexibility. PMID:20559564

  2. Simultaneous diagnosis of cryptogenic organizing pneumonia and HIV in a 45 year old man

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Israr A.; Saadia, Naseem; Sheikh, Naveed; Culpepper-Morgan, Joan A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP) is a small airways disease characterized by intraluminal polyps of myxoid connective tissue which follows a subclinical course and is associated with infectious as well as non infectious processes The concomitant occurrence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and COP has rarely been reported. We describe a unique case in which COP was a presenting feature in a patient with newly diagnosed HIV Infection. Case Report: A 45 year-old man with chronic active smoking presented to the ER with 15 months history of cough productive of minimal whitish sputum without frank or streaks of blood, low grade fever, anorexia and 4–6 lbs weight loss in past 6 months. He had three life time sexual partners. PPD status were unknown. He was extensively worked up as the Chest X ray showed cystic lesions all of which came back normal. Patient also received HIV test which was positive with CD 4 count of 546. He received bronchoscopy which revealed cryptogenic organising pneumonia. He was placed on steroids tapering course which helped in relieving the symptoms. Conclusions: HIV infection with CD 4 count above 500 has seldom been reported having COP with this case being the second in literature but this entity should be kept in mind during management of these patients. PMID:23569519

  3. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia following a jalapeño grease fire.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, Brian T; West, Natalie E; Illei, Peter B; Terry, Peter B

    2015-02-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) is an inflammatory lung disease characterized by granulation tissue in the respiratory bronchioles, alveolar ducts and alveoli. BOOP can be caused by a number of etiologies including infection, toxic inhalation, medications, radiation, and collagen vascular disease, or it can be idiopathic. We report here a case of BOOP following inhalational exposure to a jalapeño grease fire. Capsaicin and other jalapeño-derived compounds are known causes of epithelial damage and airway inflammation but to our knowledge have never been implicated in the development of BOOP. This case adds to the growing list of exposures associated with BOOP and highlights the importance of taking a thorough exposure history in patients with lung injury of unknown etiology. PMID:25644912

  4. Spontaneous resolution of cryptogenic organizing pneumonia in pediatrics: A case report.

    PubMed

    Abi-Khalil, S; Fadel, N; Menassa-Moussa, L; Torbey, P H; Haddad-Zebouni, S

    2016-05-01

    Cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP) is a rare entity in childhood, particularly in previously healthy children. Moreover, the spontaneous remission of the disease is exceptional. We report on the case of a previously healthy 10-year-old girl who consulted her doctor for a 2-month history of mild pyrexia, fatigue, weight loss, and exertional dyspnea with no response to amoxicillin. A chest CT revealed bilateral, asymmetrical peribronchovascular consolidation areas predominating in the lower lobes and imaging features of COP. The bronchoalveolar lavage and the biological findings were negative. On follow-up, the girl showed clinical and radiological remission of the disease with no treatment. Our report describes an extremely rare case of spontaneously resolving COP in a child, the diagnosis being made based on the imaging pattern. PMID:27021808

  5. A case of acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia during early postoperative period after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Alici, I O; Yekeler, E; Yazicioglu, A; Turan, S; Tezer-Tekce, Y; Demirag, F; Karaoglanoglu, N

    2015-04-01

    Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) is a distinct histologic pattern usually classified under the term chronic lung allograft dysfunction. We present a 48-year-old female patient who experienced AFOP during the 2nd week of double lung transplantation for pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis and secondary pulmonary hypertension. During the 8th day after transplantation, fever and neutrophilia developed together with bilateral consolidation. Infection markers were elevated. Despite coverage of a full antimicrobial spectrum, the situation progressed. The patient was diagnosed with AFOP with transbronchial biopsy. The infiltration resolved and the patient improved dramatically with the initiation of pulse corticosteroid treatment. AFOP should be suspected when there is a pulmonary consolidation after lung transplantation, even in the very early post-transplantation period. Several causes, such as alveolar damage and drug reactions, should be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:25891742

  6. [Idiopathic bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia complicated by transitory cystic lesion in the healing stage].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, T; Hachisuka, H; Akusawa, H; Chin, T; Kayama, Y; Nomura, Y; Horie, T

    1999-11-01

    A 21-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because chest X-ray films disclosed infiltrative shadows indicative of Mycoplasma pneumonia. He experienced fever and dry cough for 2 weeks. Chest X-ray findings showed ground-glass shadows in the lower fields of both lungs. The patient was not responsive to antibiotic therapy (PAPM/BP 1 g/day and CLDM 1,200 mg/day); dyspnea advanced rapidly and spikes of fever persisted. On hospital day 5, chest computed tomographic (CT) films disclosed interstitial shadows in all lower lung fields with dense infiltration. A transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) was performed on day 7, and TBLB specimens demonstrated infiltration of mononuclear cells in alveolar septa and organizing exudate in alveolar ducts with polypoid granulation tissue. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid findings revealed an increase in the total cell count and the percentage of lymphocytes. The CD 4/CD 8 ratio was normal. The findings of other laboratory tests ruled out drug-induced lung disease, infectious disease, and collagen disease. Idiopathic bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia (BOOP) was diagnosed. Corticosteroid therapy (methyl prednisolone: 500 mg/day) was started. After 2 weeks of treatment (prednisolone: 30 mg/day), the dyspnea and fever disappeared. Chest CT films showed that the interstitial shadows had largely resolved, but that a large cystic lesion had formed rapidly in the right lower lung field (right S 6). To the best of our knowledge, no cases of BOOP complicated by cystic lesions in the healing stage have been reported to date. We speculated that polypoid granulation in a bronchiole had given rise to a check-valve mechanism. After 2 months of treatment (prednisolone: 15 mg/day), the cystic lesion disappeared. We concluded that the bronchiolar lesion of polypoid granulation had resolved in response to therapy, thus facilitating air-way communication and the release of air from the cyst. PMID:18217316

  7. Meningococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Vossen, Matthias; Mitteregger, Dieter; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-08-17

    Neisseria meningitidis remains the most important cause of bacterial meningitis worldwide, particularly in children and young adults. The second most common and a potentially severe end-organ manifestation of invasive meningococcal disease (excluding systemic sepsis) is meningococcal pneumonia. It occurs in between 5% and 15% of all patients with invasive meningococcal disease and is thus the second most common non-systemic end-organ manifestation. To establish the diagnosis requires a high level of clinical awareness - the incidence is therefore very likely underreported and underestimated. This review of 344 meningococcal pneumonia cases reported in the Americas, Europe, Australia, and Asia between 1906 and 2015 presents risk factors, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnostic approaches, treatment, and prognosis of meningococcal pneumonia. PMID:27443594

  8. Intermediate risk of multidrug-resistant organisms in patients who admitted intensive care unit with healthcare-associated pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hongyeul; Park, Ji Young; Lee, Taehoon; Lee, Yeon Joo; Lim, Hyo-Jeong; Park, Jong Sun; Yoon, Ho Il; Lee, Jae-Ho; Lee, Choon-Taek; Cho, Young-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) was proposed asa new pneumonia category in 2005, and treatment recommendations includebroad-spectrum antibiotics directed at multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens.However, this concept continues to be controversial, and microbiological data arelacking for HCAP patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). This study was conductedto determine the rate and type of antibiotic-resistant organisms and theclinical outcomes in patients with HCAP in the ICU, compared to patients withcommunity-acquired pneumonia (CAP) or hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP). Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of patients with pneumonia(n = 195) who admitted to medical ICU in tertiary teaching hospital fromMarch 2011 to February 2013. Clinical characteristics, microbiological distributions,treatment outcomes, and prognosis of HCAP (n = 74) were compared tothose of CAP (n = 75) and HAP (n = 46). Results: MDR pathogens were significantly higher in HCAP patients (39.1%) thanin CAP (13.5%) and lower than in HAP (79.3%, p < 0.001). The initial use of inappropriateantibiotic treatment occurred more frequently in the HCAP (32.6%) andHAP (51.7%) groups than in the CAP group (11.8%, p = 0.006). There were no differencesin clinical outcomes. The significant prognostic factors were pneumoniaseverity and treatment response. Conclusions: MDR pathogens were isolated in HCAP patients requiring ICU admissionat intermediate rates between those of CAP and HAP. PMID:26968189

  9. Proliferative re-modeling of the spatial organization of human superficial chondrocytes distant to focal early osteoarthritis (OA)

    PubMed Central

    Rolauffs, Bernd; Williams, James M.; Aurich, Matthias; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Kuettner, Klaus E.; Cole, Ada A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Human superficial chondrocytes show distinct spatial organizations whereas they commonly aggregate near osteoarthritic (OA) fissures. It is not known whether remodeling or destruction of the spatial chondrocyte organization may occur distant to focal (early) OA lesions. Methods The intact cartilages (condyles, patellofemoral groove, proximal tibia) distant to focal OA lesions of human grade 2 joints were compared to location-matched non-degenerative (grade 0–1) cartilages. Chondrocyte nuclei were stained with propidium iodide and recorded by fluorescence-microscopy in a top-down view. Chondrocyte arrangements were tested for randomness or significant grouping via point pattern analyses (Clark and Evans Aggregation Index), and were correlated with OA grade and surface cell densities. Results In grade 2 cartilages, superficial chondrocytes were situated in horizontal patterns such as strings, cluster, pairs and singles comparable to non-degenerative cartilage. In the intact cartilages of grade 2 joints, the spatial organization included a novel pattern, consisting of chondrocytes that were aligned in two parallel lines building double strings. These double strings correlated with an increased number of chondrocytes per group (p<0.05), increased corresponding superficial zone cell density (p<0.001), and were observed in all grade 2 condyles (p<0.001), some grade 2 tibiae (p<0.05) but never in grade 0–1 cartilage (p<0.001). Conclusion The present study is the first to identify a distinct spatial re-organization of human superficial chondrocytes in response to distant early OA lesions and suggests that proliferation had occurred distant to focal early OA. This spatial re-organization may serve to recruit metabolically active units as attempt to repair focal damage. PMID:20112377

  10. Aspiration pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic pneumonia; Aspiration of vomitus; Necrotizing pneumonia; Aspiration pneumonitis ... The type of bacteria that caused the pneumonia depends on: Your ... facility, for example) Whether you were recently hospitalized ...

  11. Organization and post-transcriptional processing of focal adhesion kinase gene

    PubMed Central

    Corsi, Jean-Marc; Rouer, Evelyne; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Enslen, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Background Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase critical for processes ranging from embryo development to cancer progression. Although isoforms with specific molecular and functional properties have been characterized in rodents and chicken, the organization of FAK gene throughout phylogeny and its potential to generate multiple isoforms are not well understood. Here, we study the phylogeny of FAK, the organization of its gene, and its post-transcriptional processing in rodents and human. Results A single orthologue of FAK and the related PYK2 was found in non-vertebrate species. Gene duplication probably occurred in deuterostomes after the echinoderma embranchment, leading to the evolution of PYK2 with distinct properties. The amino acid sequence of FAK and PYK2 is conserved in their functional domains but not in their linker regions, with the absence of autophosphorylation site in C. elegans. Comparison of mouse and human FAK genes revealed the existence of multiple combinations of conserved and non-conserved 5'-untranslated exons in FAK transcripts suggesting a complex regulation of their expression. Four alternatively spliced coding exons (13, 14, 16, and 31), previously described in rodents, are highly conserved in vertebrates. Cis-regulatory elements known to regulate alternative splicing were found in conserved alternative exons of FAK or in the flanking introns. In contrast, other reported human variant exons were restricted to Homo sapiens, and, in some cases, other primates. Several of these non-conserved exons may correspond to transposable elements. The inclusion of conserved alternative exons was examined by RT-PCR in mouse and human brain during development. Inclusion of exons 14 and 16 peaked at the end of embryonic life, whereas inclusion of exon 13 increased steadily until adulthood. Study of various tissues showed that inclusion of these exons also occurred, independently from each other, in a tissue-specific fashion

  12. CMV pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... help prevent CMV pneumonia in certain people: Using organ transplant donors who don't have CMV Using CMV-negative blood products for transfusion Using CMV-immune globulin in certain ... that can occur in people who have a weakened immune system.

  13. The Spectrum of Presentations of Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia in High Resolution Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mehrian, Payam; Shahnazi, Makhtoom; Dahaj, Ali Ahmadi; Bizhanzadeh, Sorour; Karimi, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Various radiologic patterns of cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP) in X-rays have been reported for more than 20 years, and later, in computed tomography scans. The aim of the present study was to describe the spectrum of radiologic findings on high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scans in patients with COP. Material/Methods HRCT scans of 31 sequential patients (mean age: 54.3±11 years; 55% male) with biopsy-proven COP in a tertiary lung center between 2009 and 2012 were reviewed by two experienced pulmonary radiologists with almost perfect interobserver agreement (kappa=0.83). Chest HRCTs from the lung apex to the base were performed using a 16-slice multi-detector CT scanner. Results The most common HRCT presentation of COP was ground-glass opacity (GGO) in 83.9% of cases, followed by consolidation in 71%. Both findings were mostly asymmetric bilateral and multifocal. Other common findings were the reverse halo (48.4%), parenchymal bands (54.8%) and subpleural bands (32.3%). Pulmonary nodules were found in about one-third of patients and were frequently smaller than 5 mm in diameter. Both GGOs and consolidations were revealed more often in the lower lobes. Conclusions The main presentations of COP on HRCT include bilateral GGOs and consolidations in the lower lobes together with the reverse halo sign. PMID:25493105

  14. Systematic Review of Postradiotherapy Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia in Women With Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Eileen M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Radiation therapy for breast cancer has been implicated in the development of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP). This inflammatory lung disorder was first noted in 1983, and there have been numerous reports of BOOP occurring in women who have had radiation therapy for breast cancer since 1995. This study was undertaken to perform a systematic review of postradiotherapy BOOP to determine the occurrence, presentation, treatment, and outcome. Materials and Methods. A systematic literature review was conducted according to the guidelines provided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses report. Results. The literature search yielded 10 Japanese epidemiological reports with 129 women, 4 case series reports with 36 women, and 24 case reports with 34 women. Common symptoms included fever, cough, and shortness of breath. Most patients received corticosteroid therapy, and duration of treatment ranged from 6 months to 1 year, although some patients received steroids for longer than 1 year because of relapse, which occurred in approximately one half of patients. No deaths have been reported. Conclusion. BOOP is a rare but significant complication from radiation therapy for breast cancer. Chest radiographic studies for women who report new respiratory symptoms during the postradiation period can be beneficial for early diagnosis and for guiding appropriate management. PMID:25361622

  15. Acetoin catabolic system of Klebsiella pneumoniae CG43: sequence, expression, and organization of the aco operon.

    PubMed Central

    Deng, W L; Chang, H Y; Peng, H L

    1994-01-01

    A cosmid clone which was capable of depleting acetoin in vivo was isolated from a library of Klebsiella pneumoniae CG43 cosmids. The smallest functional subclone contained a 3.9-kb DNA fragment of the cosmid clone. Sequencing of the DNA fragment revealed three open reading frames (ORFs A, B, and C) encoding polypeptides of 34, 36, and 52 kDa, respectively. The presence of these proteins was demonstrated by expression of the recombinant DNA clone in Escherichia coli. Considerable similarities between the deduced amino acid sequences of the ORFs and those of the following enzymes were found: acetoin dissimilation enzymes, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex, and branched-chain 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complex of various origins. Activities of these enzymes, including acetoin-dependent dichlorophenolin-dohenol oxidoreductase and dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase, were detected in the extracts of E. coli harboring the genes encoding products of the three ORFs. Although not required for acetoin depletion in vivo, a possible fourth ORF (ORF D), located 39 nucleotides downstream of ORF C, was also identified. The deduced N-terminal sequence of the ORF D product was highly homologous to the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases of several organisms. Primer extension analysis identified the transcriptional start of the operon as an A residue 72 nucleotides upstream of ORF A. Images PMID:8206829

  16. Analysis of volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath to diagnose ventilator-associated pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Schnabel, Ronny; Fijten, Rianne; Smolinska, Agnieszka; Dallinga, Jan; Boumans, Marie-Louise; Stobberingh, Ellen; Boots, Agnes; Roekaerts, Paul; Bergmans, Dennis; van Schooten, Frederik Jan

    2015-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a nosocomial infection occurring in the intensive care unit (ICU). The diagnostic standard is based on clinical criteria and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Exhaled breath analysis is a promising non-invasive method for rapid diagnosis of diseases and contains volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that can differentiate diseased from healthy individuals. The aim of this study was to determine whether analysis of VOCs in exhaled breath can be used as a non-invasive monitoring tool for VAP. One hundred critically ill patients with clinical suspicion of VAP underwent BAL. Before BAL, exhaled air samples were collected and analysed by gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-tof-MS). The clinical suspicion of VAP was confirmed by BAL diagnostic criteria in 32 patients [VAP(+)] and rejected in 68 patients [VAP(−)]. Multivariate statistical comparison of VOC profiles between VAP(+) and VAP(−) revealed a subset of 12 VOCs that correctly discriminated between those two patient groups with a sensitivity and specificity of 75.8% ± 13.5% and 73.0% ± 11.8%, respectively. These results suggest that detection of VAP in ICU patients is possible by examining exhaled breath, enabling a simple, safe and non-invasive approach that could diminish diagnostic burden of VAP. PMID:26608483

  17. Organizing Pneumonia in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: A Case-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Shunsuke; Koga, Yukinori; Sugimoto, Mineharu

    2015-01-01

    We treated 21 patients with organizing pneumonia (OP) associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or related to biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) at our institution between 2006 and 2014. Among these cases, 3 (14.3%) preceded articular symptoms of RA, 4 (19.0%) developed simultaneously with RA onset, and 14 (66.7%) occurred during follow-up periods for RA. In the case of OP preceding RA, increased levels of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies and rheumatoid factor were observed at the OP onset. RA disease activity was related to the development of OP in the simultaneous cases. In the cases of OP developing after RA diagnosis, 10 of 14 patients had maintained low disease activity with biological DMARD therapy at the OP onset, and among them, 6 patients developed OP within the first year of this therapy. In the remaining four patients, RA activity was not controlled at the OP onset. All patients responded well to systemic steroid therapy, but two patients suffered from relapses of articular and pulmonary symptoms upon steroid tapering. In most of the RA patients, DMARD therapy was introduced or restarted during the steroid tapering. We successfully restarted a biological DMARD that had not been previously used for patients whose RA would otherwise have been difficult to control. In this study, we also perform a review of the literature on RA-associated or biological DMARD-related OP and discuss the pathogenesis and management of OP occurring in RA patients. PMID:26543387

  18. Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia in Swine Associated with Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ching-Chang; Lee, Yen-Feng; Lin, Nai-Nu; Wu, Chieh-Liang; Tung, Kwong-Chung; Chiu, Yung-Tsung

    2011-01-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) is a chronic respiratory disease. Although the pathogenesis of BOOP is still incompletely understood, BOOP is responsive to steroids and has a good prognosis. In our five pigs with chronic postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), typical BOOP lesions were revealed. All five porcine lungs showed typical intraluminal plugs, and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) was identified. They also exhibited similar pathologic findings such as proliferation of type II pneumocytes and myofibroblasts (MFBs), extracellular collagen matrix (ECM) deposition, and fragmentation of elastic fibers. MFBs migration correlative molecules, for instance, gelatinase A, B and osteopontin, appeared strongly in the progressing marginal area of polypoid intraluminal plugs of fibrotic lesion. These molecules colocalized with the active MFBs. Both gelatinase activity and intercellular level of active MFBs were significantly increased (P < .05). Porcine chronic bronchopneumonia leads to BOOP and it is associated with PCV2 persistent infection. Swine BOOP demonstrates similar cellular constituents with human BOOP. Perhaps their molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis operate in a similar way. Thus we infer that the swine BOOP can be considered as a potential animal model for human BOOP associated with natural viral infection. Moreover, it is more convenient to obtain samples. PMID:20976305

  19. Selection of focal earthworm species as non-target soil organisms for environmental risk assessment of genetically modified plants.

    PubMed

    van Capelle, Christine; Schrader, Stefan; Arpaia, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    By means of a literature survey, earthworm species of significant relevance for soil functions in different biogeographical regions of Europe (Atlantic, Boreal, Mediterranean) were identified. These focal earthworm species, defined here according to the EFSA Guidance Document on the environmental risk assessment (ERA) of genetically modified plants, are typical for arable soils under crop rotations with maize and/or potatoes within the three regions represented by Ireland, Sweden and Spain, respectively. Focal earthworm species were selected following a matrix of four steps: Identification of functional groups, categorization of non-target species, ranking species on ecological criteria, and final selection of focal species. They are recommended as appropriate non-target organisms to assess environmental risks of genetically modified (GM) crops; in this case maize and potatoes. In total, 44 literature sources on earthworms in arable cropping systems including maize or potato from Ireland, Sweden and Spain were collected, which present information on species diversity, individual density and specific relevance for soil functions. By means of condensed literature data, those species were identified which (i) play an important functional role in respective soil systems, (ii) are well adapted to the biogeographical regions, (iii) are expected to occur in high abundances under cultivation of maize or potato and (iv) fulfill the requirements for an ERA test system based on life-history traits. First, primary and secondary decomposers were identified as functional groups being exposed to the GM crops. In a second step, anecic and endogeic species were categorized as potential species. In step three, eight anecic and endogeic earthworm species belonging to the family Lumbricidae were ranked as relevant species: Aporrectodea caliginosa, Aporrectodea rosea, Aporrectodea longa, Allolobophora chlorotica, Lumbricus terrestris, Lumbricus friendi, Octodrilus complanatus and

  20. Rattus model utilizing selective pulmonary ischemia induces bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Densmore, John C; Jeziorczak, Paul M; Clough, Anne V; Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Cummens, Breana; Medhora, Meetha; Rao, Arjun; Jacobs, Elizabeth R

    2013-03-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP), a morbid condition when associated with lung transplant and chronic lung disease, is believed to be a complication of ischemia. Our goal was to develop a simple and reliable model of lung ischemia in the Sprague-Dawley rat that would produce BOOP. Unilateral ischemia without airway occlusion was produced by an occlusive slipknot placed around the left main pulmonary artery. Studies were performed 7 days later. Relative pulmonary and systemic flow to each lung was measured by injection of technetium Tc 99m macroaggregated albumin. Histological sections were examined for structure and necrosis and scored for BOOP. Apoptosis was detected by immunohistochemistry with an antibody against cleaved caspase 3. Pulmonary artery blood flow to left lungs was less than 0.1% of the cardiac output, and bronchial artery circulation was ∼2% of aortic artery flow. Histological sections from ischemic left lungs consistently showed Masson bodies, inflammation, and young fibroblasts filling the distal airways and alveoli, consistent with BOOP. In quantitative evaluation of BOOP using epithelial changes, inflammation and fibrosis were higher in ischemic left lungs than right or sham-operated left lungs. Apoptosis was increased in areas exhibiting histological BOOP, but there was no histological evidence of necrosis. Toll-like receptor 4 expression was increased in ischemic left lungs over right. An occlusive slipknot around the main left pulmonary artery in rats produces BOOP, providing direct evidence that ischemia without immunomodulation or coinfection is sufficient to initiate this injury. It also affords an excellent model to study signaling and genetic mechanisms underlying BOOP. PMID:23364425

  1. Radiation-induced organizing pneumonia after stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung tumor

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Satoru; Nomoto, Yoshihito; Yamashita, Yasufumi; Murashima, Shuuichi; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Kurobe, Yusuke; Toyomasu, Yutaka; Kawamura, Tomoko; Takada, Akinori; II, Noriko

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate characteristics of organizing pneumonia (OP) after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumor. Between September 2010 and June 2014, patients who were diagnosed as Stage I lung cancer and treated with SBRT at our institution were included in this study. A total of 78 patients (47 males with a median age of 80 years) were analyzed. The median follow-up period was 23 months. Five patients (6.4%) developed OP at 6–18 months after SBRT. The cumulative incidence of OP was 4.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–11.0) and 8.2% (95% CI, 2.9–17.0) at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Tumor location (superior and middle lobe vs inferior lobe) was shown to be a borderline significant factor for the occurrence of OP (P = 0.069). In the subgroup analysis of patients with a radiographic follow-up period at least 6 months, or who died within 6 months after SBRT, 7 of 72 patients (9.7%) developed Grade 2 or 3 radiation pneumonitis (G2/3 RP) at 2–4 months after SBRT. A statistically significant association between G2/3 RP in the subacute phase and OP was shown (P = 0.040). In two of the five patients who developed OP, the symptoms and radiographic change were improved rapidly by corticosteroid administration. One patient had relapsed OP after suspending the treatment and re-administration was required. Three patients with minor symptoms were managed without corticosteroid administration and OP resolved without any relapse. The radiation-induced OP should be considered as one of the late lung injuries after SBRT for lung tumors. PMID:26338993

  2. Pneumonia - weakened immune system

    MedlinePlus

    ... immunocompromised host." Related conditions include: Hospital-acquired pneumonia Pneumocystis jirovecii (previously called Pneumocystis carinii) pneumonia Pneumonia - cytomegalovirus Pneumonia ...

  3. [Chest radiograph of atypical pneumonia: comparison among Chlamydia pneumoniae. Pneumonia, ornithosis, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Itoh, I; Ishida, T; Hashimoto, T; Arita, M; Osawa, M; Tachibana, H; Nishiyama, H; Takakura, S; Bando, K; Nishizawa, Y; Amitani, R; Onishi, H; Taguchi, Y

    2000-11-01

    No report has been found comparing Chlamydia pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae) pneumonia radiographically with other atypical pneumonias, Chlamydia psittaci (C. psittaci) pneumonia and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) pneumonia. We described the chest radiographs of three kinds of pneumonia cases: 46 cases of C. pneumoniae pneumonia, 39 cases of C. psittaci pneumonia, and 131 cases of M. pneumoniae pneumonia. Radiographic shadows were categorized into main shadows and sub-shadows. The main shadows are classified from the viewpoint of the characteristics; air space consolidation(AS), ground-glass opacity(GG), reticular shadow(RS), bronchopneumonia(BP), and small nodular shadows (SN). The size, the site, and the number of the main shadows were also analyzed. In comparison among the three pneumonias, BP was the most frequent in M. pneumoniae pneumonia (0.40/case). AS predominated in C. pneumoniae pneumonia (0.67/case), and GG in C. psittaci pneumonia (0.62/case). The number of main shadows was equal, about 1.4/case in three pneumonias. Large shadows were less frequent in M. pneumoniae pneumonia than C. pneumoniae pneumonia (p = 0.02) and C. psittaci pneumonia (p = 0.01). Main shadows were more frequent in the outer zone in M. pneumoniae pneumonia than C. psittaci pneumonia (p = 0.01), and in the middle zone in C. psittaci pneumonia than in M. pneumoniae pneumonia (p = 0.02). Cases with bilateral main shadows were less common in M. pneumoniae pneumonia (9%) than C. pneumoniae pneumonia(33%, p = 0.001) and C. psittaci pneumonia(30%, p = 0.005). Thickening of bronchovascular bundles as a sub-shadow was most frequently noted in M. pneumoniae pneumonia. Some differences among the three atypical pneumonias were seen in the chest radiograph. However, no specific findings of C. pneumoniae pneumonia were shown radiographically in this study. PMID:11140079

  4. [Nosocomial pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Díaz, Emili; Martín-Loeches, Ignacio; Vallés, Jordi

    2013-12-01

    The hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP) is one of the most common infections acquired among hospitalised patients. Within the HAP, the ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common nosocomial infection complication among patients with acute respiratory failure. The VAP and HAP are associated with increased mortality and increased hospital costs. The rise in HAP due to antibiotic-resistant bacteria also causes an increase in the incidence of inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy, with an associated increased risk of hospital mortality. It is very important to know the most common organisms responsible for these infections in each hospital and each Intensive Care Unit, as well as their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, in order to reduce the incidence of inappropriate antibiotic therapy and improve the prognosis of patients. Additionally, clinical strategies aimed at the prevention of HAP and VAP should be employed in hospital settings caring for patients at risk for these infections. PMID:23827827

  5. Molecular Identification of Tritrichomonas foetus-Like Organisms as Coinfecting Agents of Human Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Duboucher, Christophe; Caby, Stéphanie; Dufernez, Fabienne; Chabé, Magali; Gantois, Nausicaa; Delgado-Viscogliosi, Pilar; Billy, Christophe; Barré, Eric; Torabi, Edith; Capron, Monique; Pierce, Raymond J.; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Viscogliosi, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Trichomonads closely related to the bovid parasite Tritrichomonas foetus were identified in the bronchoalveolar lavage sample from a patient with AIDS in association with Pneumocystis pneumonia. This human case of T. foetus-like infection emphasizes the zoonotic potential of trichomonads, although the existence of a human-host-adapted T. foetus strain cannot be excluded. PMID:16517921

  6. Vimentin contributes to epithelial-mesenchymal transition cancer cell mechanics by mediating cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion maturation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ching-Yi; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Tang, Ming-Jer; Wang, Yang-Kao

    2015-01-01

    Modulations of cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion turnover correlate to tumorigenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), the latter process accompanied by the loss of epithelial markers and the gain of mesenchymal markers (e.g., vimentin). Clinical microarray results demonstrated that increased levels of vimentin mRNA after chemotherapy correlated to a poor prognosis of breast cancer patients. We hypothesized that vimentin mediated the reorganization of cytoskeletons to maintain the mechanical integrity in EMT cancer cells. By using knockdown strategy, the results showed reduced cell proliferation, impaired wound healing, loss of directional migration, and increased large membrane extension in MDA-MB 231 cells. Vimentin depletion also induced reorganization of cytoskeletons and reduced focal adhesions, which resulted in impaired mechanical strength because of reduced cell stiffness and contractile force. In addition, overexpressing vimentin in MCF7 cells increased cell stiffness, elevated cell motility and directional migration, reoriented microtubule polarity, and increased EMT phenotypes due to the increased β1-integrin and the loss of junction protein E-cadherin. The EMT-related transcription factor slug was also mediated by vimentin. The current study demonstrated that vimentin serves as a regulator to maintain intracellular mechanical homeostasis by mediating cytoskeleton architecture and the balance of cell force generation in EMT cancer cells. PMID:25965826

  7. Pneumonia in the immunocompetent patient

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, J H; Mcdonald, G; Alton, H; Gordon, S B

    2010-01-01

    Pneumonia is an acute inflammation of the lower respiratory tract. Lower respiratory tract infection is a major cause of mortality worldwide. Pneumonia is most common at the extremes of life. Predisposing factors in children include an under-developed immune system together with other factors, such as malnutrition and over-crowding. In adults, tobacco smoking is the single most important preventable risk factor. The commonest infecting organisms in children are respiratory viruses and Streptoccocus pneumoniae. In adults, pneumonia can be broadly classified, on the basis of chest radiographic appearance, into lobar pneumonia, bronchopneumonia and pneumonia producing an interstitial pattern. Lobar pneumonia is most commonly associated with community acquired pneumonia, bronchopneumonia with hospital acquired infection and an interstitial pattern with the so called atypical pneumonias, which can be caused by viruses or organisms such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Most cases of pneumonia can be managed with chest radiographs as the only form of imaging, but CT can detect pneumonia not visible on the chest radiograph and may be of value, particularly in the hospital setting. Complications of pneumonia include pleural effusion, empyema and lung abscess. The chest radiograph may initially indicate an effusion but ultrasound is more sensitive, allows characterisation in some cases and can guide catheter placement for drainage. CT can also be used to characterise and estimate the extent of pleural disease. Most lung abscesses respond to medical therapy, with surgery and image guided catheter drainage serving as options for those cases who do not respond. PMID:21088086

  8. Pneumonia in the immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, J H; McDonald, G; Alton, H; Gordon, S B

    2010-12-01

    Pneumonia is an acute inflammation of the lower respiratory tract. Lower respiratory tract infection is a major cause of mortality worldwide. Pneumonia is most common at the extremes of life. Predisposing factors in children include an under-developed immune system together with other factors, such as malnutrition and over-crowding. In adults, tobacco smoking is the single most important preventable risk factor. The commonest infecting organisms in children are respiratory viruses and Streptoccocus pneumoniae. In adults, pneumonia can be broadly classified, on the basis of chest radiographic appearance, into lobar pneumonia, bronchopneumonia and pneumonia producing an interstitial pattern. Lobar pneumonia is most commonly associated with community acquired pneumonia, bronchopneumonia with hospital acquired infection and an interstitial pattern with the so called atypical pneumonias, which can be caused by viruses or organisms such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Most cases of pneumonia can be managed with chest radiographs as the only form of imaging, but CT can detect pneumonia not visible on the chest radiograph and may be of value, particularly in the hospital setting. Complications of pneumonia include pleural effusion, empyema and lung abscess. The chest radiograph may initially indicate an effusion but ultrasound is more sensitive, allows characterisation in some cases and can guide catheter placement for drainage. CT can also be used to characterise and estimate the extent of pleural disease. Most lung abscesses respond to medical therapy, with surgery and image guided catheter drainage serving as options for those cases who do not respond. PMID:21088086

  9. Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Infections of Adults and Children

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, James D.; Welliver, Robert C.

    1976-01-01

    Although the hallmark of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection is pneumonia, the organism is also responsible for a protean array of other symptoms. With an increased awareness of the board clinical spectrum of M. pneumoniae disease and the ready availability of the cold agglutinin and M. pneumoniae complement-fixation tests, interested clinicians will note additional clinical-mycoplasmal associations in their patients. PMID:782043

  10. Comparative organization of nitrogen fixation-specific genes from Azotobacter vinelandii and Klebsiella pneumoniae: DNA sequence of the nifUSV genes.

    PubMed Central

    Beynon, J; Ally, A; Cannon, M; Cannon, F; Jacobson, M; Cash, V; Dean, D

    1987-01-01

    In the facultative anaerobe Klebsiella pneumoniae 17 nitrogen fixation-specific genes (nif genes) have been identified. Homologs to 12 of these genes have now been isolated from the aerobic diazotroph Azotobacter vinelandii. Comparative studies have indicated that these diverse microorganisms share striking similarities in the genetic organization of their nif genes and in the primary structure of their individual nif gene products. In this study the complete nucleotide sequence of the nifUSV gene clusters from both K. pneumoniae and A. vinelandii were determined. These genes are identically organized on their respective genomes, and the individual genes and their products exhibit a high degree of interspecies sequence homology. PMID:3040672

  11. Rothia mucilaginosa Pneumonia Diagnosed by Quantitative Cultures and Intracellular Organisms of Bronchoalveolar Lavage in a Lymphoma Patient

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun-Jung; Sung, Heungsup; Park, Sook-Ja; Lee, Sang-Oh

    2013-01-01

    Rothia mucilaginosa is a gram-positive coccus of the family Micrococcaceae. R. mucilaginosa is considered a part of the normal flora of the human oropharynx and upper respiratory tract and lower respiratory tract infections attributable to R. mucilaginosa are not frequent. We present a case of pneumonia, in which the R. mucilaginosa infection was diagnosed by quantitative cultures of a bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimen. A 46-yr-old woman with B lymphoblastic lymphoma was admitted to the hospital for scheduled chemotherapy. Her chest computed tomography (CT) scan revealed bilateral multifocal nodular and patchy consolidation in both lungs. Investigation of the BAL specimen revealed that 7% of leukocytes had intracellular gram-positive cocci. The quantitative cultures of the BAL specimen grew mucoid, non-hemolytic, and grayish convex colonies on blood agar at a count of approximately 200,000 colony-forming units/mL. The colonies were identified as R. mucilaginosa. The patient was empirically treated with levofloxacin for 7 days, after which findings on the chest radiograph and CT scan improved. She was discharged with improvement on hospital day 46. To our knowledge, this is the first report of R. mucilaginosa pneumonia diagnosed in Korea. Quantitative culture of BAL specimen and examination of intracellular organisms are crucial for assessing the clinical significance of R. mucilaginosa recovered from the lower respiratory tract. PMID:23483615

  12. Mycoplasma pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000082.htm Mycoplasma pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Mycoplasma pneumonia is an infection of the lungs by the ...

  13. Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia as an Initial Presentation of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Rare Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hung-Ping; Chen, Chun-Ming; Chen, Yih-Yuan; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) remains controversial. While it has been reportedly associated with several connective tissue disorders, there are only rare reports of BOOP associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Herein, we report a 56-year-old female patient who presented with dyspnea on exertion, cough, fever, and joint pain of her left wrist and fingers as initial symptoms. Laboratory tests revealed positivity for anti-nuclear antibody, anti-Ro, and anti-double strand DNA antibody. In this case, the patient with SLE had respiratory illness as the initial symptom due to BOOP in the absence of clear etiology. The diagnosis of BOOP was confirmed by thoracic surgery biopsy. Her respiratory symptoms and radiologic findings significantly improved following prednisolone treatment. PMID:27200095

  14. Implementation of World Health Organization Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses (IMCI) Guidelines for the Assessment of Pneumonia in the Under 5s in Rural Malawi.

    PubMed

    Kalu, Ngozi; Lufesi, Norman; Havens, Deborah; Mortimer, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The Cooking and Pneumonia Study (CAPS) is a pragmatic cluster-level randomized controlled trial of the effect of an advanced cookstove intervention on pneumonia in children under the age of 5 years (under 5s) in Malawi (www.capstudy.org). The primary outcome of the trial is the incidence of pneumonia during a two-year follow-up period, as diagnosed by healthcare providers who are using the World Health Organization (WHO) integrated management of childhood illnesses (IMCI) pneumonia assessment protocol and who are blinded to the trial arms. We evaluated the quality of pneumonia assessment in under 5s in this setting via a cross-sectional study of provider-patient encounters at nine outpatient clinics located within the catchment area of 150 village-level clusters enrolled in the trial across the two study locations of Chikhwawa and Karonga, Malawi, between May and June 2015 using the IMCI guidelines as a benchmark. Data were collected using a key equipment checklist, an IMCI pneumonia knowledge test, and a clinical evaluation checklist. The median number of key equipment items available was 6 (range 4 to 7) out of a possible 7. The median score on the IMCI pneumonia knowledge test among 23 clinicians was 75% (range 60% to 89%). Among a total of 176 consultations performed by 15 clinicians, a median of 9 (range 3 to 13) out of 13 clinical evaluation tasks were performed. Overall, the clinicians were adequately equipped for the assessment of sick children, had good knowledge of the IMCI guidelines, and conducted largely thorough clinical evaluations. We recommend the simple pragmatic approach to quality assurance described herein for similar studies conducted in challenging research settings. PMID:27187773

  15. Implementation of World Health Organization Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses (IMCI) Guidelines for the Assessment of Pneumonia in the Under 5s in Rural Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Kalu, Ngozi; Lufesi, Norman; Havens, Deborah; Mortimer, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The Cooking and Pneumonia Study (CAPS) is a pragmatic cluster-level randomized controlled trial of the effect of an advanced cookstove intervention on pneumonia in children under the age of 5 years (under 5s) in Malawi (www.capstudy.org). The primary outcome of the trial is the incidence of pneumonia during a two-year follow-up period, as diagnosed by healthcare providers who are using the World Health Organization (WHO) integrated management of childhood illnesses (IMCI) pneumonia assessment protocol and who are blinded to the trial arms. We evaluated the quality of pneumonia assessment in under 5s in this setting via a cross-sectional study of provider-patient encounters at nine outpatient clinics located within the catchment area of 150 village-level clusters enrolled in the trial across the two study locations of Chikhwawa and Karonga, Malawi, between May and June 2015 using the IMCI guidelines as a benchmark. Data were collected using a key equipment checklist, an IMCI pneumonia knowledge test, and a clinical evaluation checklist. The median number of key equipment items available was 6 (range 4 to 7) out of a possible 7. The median score on the IMCI pneumonia knowledge test among 23 clinicians was 75% (range 60% to 89%). Among a total of 176 consultations performed by 15 clinicians, a median of 9 (range 3 to 13) out of 13 clinical evaluation tasks were performed. Overall, the clinicians were adequately equipped for the assessment of sick children, had good knowledge of the IMCI guidelines, and conducted largely thorough clinical evaluations. We recommend the simple pragmatic approach to quality assurance described herein for similar studies conducted in challenging research settings. PMID:27187773

  16. Expression and organization of basement membranes and focal adhesion proteins in pregnant myometrium is regulated by uterine stretch.

    PubMed

    Shynlova, Oksana; Chow, Michelle; Lye, Stephen J

    2009-10-01

    The mechanisms underlying the preparation of the uterus for labor are not fully understood. We have previously found a significant increase in the expression of messenger RNA (mRNAs) encoding extracellular basement membrane (BM) proteins of the smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in late pregnant rat myometrium. At term, the myometrium is stretched by growing fetuses and these mechanical signals are transmitted from extracellular matrix into SMCs through focal adhesions (FA). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of gravidity on the expression and spatiotemporal distribution of major BM proteins, laminin-gamma2 and collagen IV, as well as typical FA constituents, vinculin and paxillin, in the myometrium during gestation and parturition, using a unilaterally pregnant rat model. We found that the expression of laminin-gamma2 and collagen IV proteins increased significantly with gestational age (P < .05) and was dependent on gravidity whereas vinculin and paxillin proteins were not affected. Near term, BM proteins from gravid horn myometrium demonstrated increased extracellular immunostaining and major rearrangement from sporadic protein distribution to organized, continuous, and regular structures surrounding the plasma membrane of each myocyte. Examination of FA proteins revealed that paxillin was translocated from the cytoplasm to the cell periphery, while vinculin was sequestered specifically to FAs. At labor, BM and FA proteins, organized in similar bead-like structures, were localized on opposing sides of SMC plasma membrane into 2 different compartments. We suggest that these stretch-induced changes facilitate formation of stable cell-matrix adhesions and provide the molecular basis for optimal force transduction during labor contractions. PMID:19602722

  17. The D,D-carboxypeptidase PBP3 organizes the division process of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Morlot, Cécile; Noirclerc-Savoye, Marjolaine; Zapun, André; Dideberg, Otto; Vernet, Thierry

    2004-03-01

    Bacterial division requires the co-ordination of membrane invagination, driven by the constriction of the FtsZ-ring, and concomitant cell wall synthesis, performed by the high-molecular-weight penicillin-binding proteins (HMW PBPs). Using immunofluorescence techniques, we show in Streptococcus pneumoniae that this co-ordination requires PBP3, a D,D-carboxypeptidase that degrades the substrate of the HMW PBPs. In a mutant deprived of PBP3, the apparent rings of HMW PBPs and that of FtsZ are no longer co-localized. In wild-type cells, PBP3 is absent at the future division site and present over the rest of the cell surface, implying that the localization of the HMW PBPs at mid-cell depends on the availability of their substrate. FtsW, a putative translocase of the substrate of the PBPs, forms an apparent ring that is co-localized with the septal HMW PBPs throughout the cell cycle of wild-type cells. In particular, the constriction of the FtsW-ring occurs after that of the FtsZ-ring, with the same delay as the constriction of the septal PBP-rings. However, in the absence of PBP3, FtsW remains co-localized with FtsZ in contrast to the HMW PBPs. Our work reveals an unexpected complexity in the relationships between the division proteins. The consequences of the absence of PBP3 indicate that the peptidoglycan composition is central to the co-ordination of the division process. PMID:15009891

  18. Viral pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Pneumonia - viral; "Walking pneumonia" - viral Images Lungs Respiratory system References Lee FE, Treanor J. Viral infections. In: Mason RJ, VC Broaddus, Martin TR, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel’s Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2010: ...

  19. Risk factors of Pneumocystis pneumonia in solid organ recipients in the era of the common use of posttransplantation prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Iriart, X; Challan Belval, T; Fillaux, J; Esposito, L; Lavergne, R-A; Cardeau-Desangles, I; Roques, O; Del Bello, A; Cointault, O; Lavayssière, L; Chauvin, P; Menard, S; Magnaval, J-F; Cassaing, S; Rostaing, L; Kamar, N; Berry, A

    2015-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients becomes rare in the immediate posttransplantation period thanks to generalized prophylaxis. We aimed to identify the predictive factors for PCP in the era of universal prophylaxis and to propose a strategy for preventing PCP beyond the first year after transplantation. In a retrospective case-control study, 33 SOT cases with PCP diagnosed between 2004 and 2010 were matched with two controls each to identify risk factors for PCP by uni- and multivariate analysis. All the patients benefited from 6 months of posttransplantation trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis. Most PCP in SOT patients occurred during the second year posttransplantation (33%). By univariate analysis, age, nonuse of tacrolimus, total and CD4 lymphocyte counts, gamma-globulin concentration and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection appeared to be PCP risk factors. In the final multivariate analysis, age (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 3.7, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.3-10.4), CMV infection (OR: 5.2, 95% CI: 1.8-14.7) and total lymphocyte count (OR: 3.9, 95% CI: 1.4-10.7) were found to be independently associated with PCP. The second year posttransplantation appeared to be the new period of highest risk of PCP. Age, CMV viremia and lymphocytes were the most pertinent predictive criteria to evaluate the risk of PCP in clinical practice. PMID:25496195

  20. Chlamydia pneumoniae (TWAR).

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, C C; Jackson, L A; Campbell, L A; Grayston, J T

    1995-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (TWAR) is a recently recognized third species of the genus Chlamydia that causes acute respiratory disease. It is distinct from the other two chlamydial species that infect humans, C. trachomatis and C. psittaci, in elementary body morphology and shares less than 10% of the DNA homology with those species. The organism has a global distribution, with infection most common among children between the ages of 5 and 14 years. In children, TWAR infection is usually mild or asymptomatic, but it may be more severe in adults. Pneumonia and bronchitis are the most common clinical manifestations of infection, and TWAR is responsible for approximately 10% of cases of pneumonia and 5% of cases of bronchitis in the United States. The microimmunofluorescence serologic assay is specific for TWAR and can distinguish between recent and past infections. The organism can be isolated in cell culture; however, PCR techniques have recently facilitated its detection in tissues and clinical specimens. PMID:8665464

  1. Hydrocarbon pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumonia - hydrocarbon ... Coughing Fever Shortness of breath Smell of a hydrocarbon product on the breath Stupor (decreased level of ... Most children who drink or inhale hydrocarbon products and develop ... hydrocarbons may lead to rapid respiratory failure and death.

  2. Viral pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    More serious infections can result in respiratory failure, liver failure, and heart failure. Sometimes, bacterial infections occur during or just after viral pneumonia, which may lead to more serious forms ...

  3. Analysis of Factors Associated With Radiation-Induced Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia Syndrome After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Norihisa Sato, Shuhei; Katsui, Kuniaki; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Tsuda, Toshihide; Yoshida, Atsushi; Morito, Tsuneharu; Nakagawa, Tomio; Mizuta, Akifumi; Waki, Takahiro; Niiya, Harutaka; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate factors associated with radiation-induced bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) syndrome after breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 702 women with breast cancer who received radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery at seven institutions between July 1995 and December 2006 were analyzed. In all patients, the whole breast was irradiated with two tangential photon beams. The criteria used for the diagnosis of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome were as follows: (1) radiotherapy to the breast within 12 months, (2) general and/or respiratory symptoms lasting for {>=}2 weeks, (3) radiographs showing lung infiltration outside the radiation port, and (4) no evidence of a specific cause. Results: Radiation-induced BOOP syndrome was seen in 16 patients (2.3%). Eleven patients (68.8%) were administered steroids. The duration of steroid administration ranged from 1 week to 3.7 years (median, 1.1 years). Multivariate analysis revealed that age ({>=}50 years; odds ratio [OR] 8.88; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.16-67.76; p = 0.04) and concurrent endocrine therapy (OR 3.05; 95% CI 1.09-8.54; p = 0.03) were significantly associated with BOOP syndrome. Of the 161 patients whose age was {>=}50 years and who received concurrent endocrine therapy, 10 (6.2%) developed BOOP syndrome. Conclusions: Age ({>=}50 years) and concurrent endocrine therapy can promote the development of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome after breast-conserving therapy. Physicians should carefully follow patients who received breast-conserving therapy, especially those who are older than 50 years and received concurrent endocrine therapy during radiotherapy.

  4. A Survey of Radiation-Induced Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia Syndrome After Breast-Conserving Therapy in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Ogo, Etsuyo Komaki, Ritsuko; Fujimoto, Kiminori; Uchida, Masafumi; Abe, Toshi; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Mitsumori, Michihide; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: We observed a rare and unique occurrence of radiation-induced pulmonary injury outside the tangential field for early breast cancer treatment. The findings appeared to be idiopathic and were called radiation-induced bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) syndrome. We surveyed major hospitals in Japan to review their findings of radiation-induced BOOP, in particular the clinical and pictorial characteristics of the entity. Methods and Materials: We reviewed surveys completed and returned by 20 institutions. The survey responses were based on a total of 37 cases of BOOP syndrome. We also reviewed X-ray and computed tomography scans provided by these institutions. We discussed the information derived from the questionnaire and analyzed patients' characteristics, methods used in the treatment of BOOP syndrome, and prognosis. Results: The incidence of the radiation-induced BOOP syndrome was about 1.8% (37 of 2,056). We did not find a relationship between the characteristics of patients and the occurrence of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome. The pulmonary findings were classified into four patterns on chest computed tomography scans. Progression of the pulmonary lesions observed on chest X-ray was classified into three patterns. Pneumonitis appeared within 6 months after radiotherapy was completed and disappeared within 6-12 months after its onset. At 5-year follow-up, 2 patients had died, 1 of breast cancer and the other of interstitial pneumonitis, which seemed to be idiopathic and unrelated to the radiation-induced BOOP syndrome. Conclusions: Although the incidence of BOOP syndrome and its associated prognosis are not significant, the patients' clinical condition must be carefully followed.

  5. [A case of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia: diagnostic utility of bronchoalveolar lavage and CT scan].

    PubMed

    Hyakudo, T; Yoshii, C; Nikaido, Y; Yokosaki, Y; Nagata, N; Nakata, H; Kido, M

    1994-08-01

    A 54-year-old female was admitted to our hospital because of abnormal shadows on chest X-ray at annual checkup. She complained of dyspnea on exertion. Chest X-ray findings showed an increase in density at the bilateral lower lung fields and unclearness of the silhouette of the heart and the diaphragm. CT scan findings revealed irregular opacities of various density with many small cystic changes and air bronchograms and air bronchiolograms. The pulmonary function test showed restrictive ventilatory disturbance and reduced diffusing capacity. BALF findings revealed an increase in the total cell count, an increase in the percentage of lymphocytes and a decrease in the OKT4+/OKT8+ ratio. TBLB specimen showed infiltration of mononuclear cells in alveolar septa and organizing exudate in alveolar ducts. These findings suggested a diagnosis of BOOP rather than IPF, and an open lung biopsy was performed. Open lung biopsy specimen showed obstructive bronchiolitis with polypoid granulation tissue and thickening of alveolar septa with infiltration of mononuclear cells, and she was diagnosed as having BOOP. She responded well to corticosteroid and is free from any abnormalities on chest X-ray, CT scan and pulmonary function test at present. Analysis of BALF and CT scan findings are useful for the differential diagnosis of BOOP and IPF. PMID:7807756

  6. How Is Pneumonia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pneumonia Treated? Treatment for pneumonia depends on the type ... can go back to their normal routines. Bacterial Pneumonia Bacterial pneumonia is treated with medicines called antibiotics. ...

  7. Carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Deresinski, Stan

    2014-01-01

    The continuing emergence of infections due to multidrug resistant bacteria is a serious public health problem. Klebsiella pneumoniae, which commonly acquires resistance encoded on mobile genetic elements, including ones that encode carbapenemases, is a prime example. K. pneumoniae carrying such genetic material, including both blaKPC and genes encoding metallo-β-lactamases, have spread globally. Many carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae are resistant to multiple antibiotic classes beyond β-lactams, including tetracyclines, aminoglycosides, and fluoroquinolones. The optimal treatment, if any, for infections due to these organisms is unclear but, paradoxically, appears to often require the inclusion of an optimally administered carbapenem. PMID:25343037

  8. [Aspiration pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Almirall, Jordi; Cabré, Mateu; Clavé, Pere

    2007-09-29

    The incidence and the prevalence of aspiration pneumonia (AP) in the community is poorly defined. It increases in direct relation with age and underlying diseases. The pathogenesis of AP presumes the contribution of risk factors that alter swallowing funtion and predispose the orofaringe and gastric region to bacterial colonization. The microbial etiology of AP involves Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae for community-acquired aspiration pneumonia and Gram-negative aerobic bacilli in nosocomial pneumonia. It is worth bearing in mind the relative unimportance of anaerobic bacterias in AP. When we choose the empirical antibiotic treatmentant we have to consider some pathogens identified in orofaríngea flora. Empirical treatment with antianaerobics should only be used in certain patients. Videofluoroscopic swallowing studies should be used to determine the nature and extent of any swallow disorder and to rule out silent aspiration. Assessment of swallowing disorders is cost-effective and results in a significant reduction in overall morbidity and mortality. PMID:17927938

  9. Fungal diagnostics in pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lease, Erika D; Alexander, Barbara D

    2011-12-01

    Fungal pneumonia is increasingly common, particularly in highly immunosuppressed patients, such as solid organ or hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, and the diagnosis is evolving. Although standard techniques such as microscopy and culture remain the mainstays of diagnosis, relatively recent advances in serological and molecular testing are important additions to the field. This article reviews the laboratory tools used to diagnose fungal respiratory disease. PMID:22167394

  10. Fungal Diagnostics in Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Lease, Erika D.; Alexander, Barbara D.

    2014-01-01

    Fungal pneumonia is increasingly common, particularly in highly immunosuppressed patients, such as solid organ or hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, and the diagnosis is evolving. While standard techniques such as microscopy and culture remain the mainstay of diagnosis, relatively recent advances in serologic and molecular testing are important additions to the field. This chapter will review the laboratory tools used to diagnose fungal respiratory disease. PMID:22167394

  11. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Gram-negative organisms isolated from patients hospitalised with pneumonia in US and European hospitals: results from the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program, 2009-2012.

    PubMed

    Sader, Helio S; Farrell, David J; Flamm, Robert K; Jones, Ronald N

    2014-04-01

    Here we evaluated the frequency of occurrence and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Gram-negative bacteria isolated from patients hospitalised with pneumonia in medical centres in the USA (n=28) and Europe and the Mediterranean region (EMR) (n=25) in 2009-2012. Susceptibility testing was performed by reference broth microdilution methods. Overall, 12851 isolates were collected (6873/5978 in USA/EMR). The same top 11 organisms were observed in both geographic regions, but in different rank orders, and Gram-negative organisms represented 61.5/76.1% of strains in USA/EMR. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most frequently isolated Gram-negative organism in both regions (20.9/20.9% of cases in USA/EMR) and showed reduced susceptibility to most antimicrobials tested, including ceftazidime (79.6/68.7% susceptibility in USA/EMR), meropenem (76.3/65.8%) and piperacillin/tazobactam (72.9/63.9%). Klebsiella spp. was isolated from 9.7/11.6% of cases and showed extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) phenotype rates of 19.5/35.1% in USA/EMR. Meropenem and amikacin were active against 62.3/78.7% and 60.8/85.2% of ESBL phenotype Klebsiella spp. from USA/EMR, respectively. Enterobacter spp. ranked fourth in the USA (5.9%) and sixth in EMR (5.5%), whereas Escherichia coli ranked fifth in the USA (5.5%) and third in EMR (11.8%). Acinetobacter spp. and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia combined were isolated from 8.0/10.7% of cases in USA/EMR. A significant increase in P. aeruginosa susceptibility to meropenem and a significant decrease in gentamicin susceptibility among Klebsiella spp. were noted in EMR. These results confirm that very few agents remain broadly active against the most frequently isolated Gram-negative organisms from patients with pneumonia in US and EMR medical centres. PMID:24630306

  12. Photometabolic production of hydrogen from organic substrates by free and immobilized mixed cultures of rhodospirillum rubrum and klebsiella pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Weetall, H.H.; Sharma, B.P.; Detar, C.C.

    1981-03-01

    A culture of R. rubrum cells apparently contaminated with K. pneumoniae were immobilized by entrapment in agar. This system was used as a model for hydrogen production by photometabolic means. Observed results indicated that the contaminant exerted a major influence on the observed results. This preparation, when immobilized and used in a specifically designed reactor with glucose substrate, showed operational half-lives of approximately 1000 hr. The feasibility of using this ''mixed'' culture for producing hydrogen from acid hydrolyzed cellulose and wood sawdust was also examined. 5 refs.

  13. Pathology of Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias

    PubMed Central

    Hashisako, Mikiko; Fukuoka, Junya

    2015-01-01

    The updated classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) in 2013 by American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society included several important revisions to the categories described in the 2002 classification. In the updated classification, lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP) was moved from major to rare IIPs, pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (PPFE) was newly included in the rare IIPs, acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) and interstitial pneumonias with a bronchiolocentric distribution are recognized as rare histologic patterns, and unclassifiable IIP (UCIP) was classified as an IIP. However, recent reports indicate the areas of concern that may require further evaluation. Here, we describe the histopathologic features of the updated IIPs and their rare histologic patterns and also point out some of the issues to be considered in this context. PMID:26949346

  14. Pneumonia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... kids under 6 years old. Take your child's temperature at least once each morning and each evening, ... Respiratory System Croup Fever and Taking Your Child's Temperature Influenza (Flu) Walking Pneumonia Word! Pneumonia Pneumonia Hib ...

  15. How Is Pneumonia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pneumonia Diagnosed? Pneumonia can be hard to diagnose because it may ... than these other conditions. Your doctor will diagnose pneumonia based on your medical history, a physical exam, ...

  16. What Is Pneumonia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia (nu-MO-ne-ah) is an infection in ... such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi—can cause pneumonia. The infection inflames your lungs' air sacs, which ...

  17. Klebsiella pneumoniae Flocculation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, T. L.; Taylor, K. A.; Thompson, A. P.; Younger, J. G.

    2011-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae is a cause of community- and hospital-acquired lung, urinary tract, and blood stream infections. A common contaminant of indwelling catheters, it is theorized that a common infection pathway for this organism is via shedding of aggregates off of biofilm colonies. In an effort to better understand bacterial proliferation in the host bloodstream, we develop a PDE model for the flocculation dynamics of Klebsiella pneumoniae in suspension. Existence and uniqueness results are provided, as well as a brief description of the numerical approximation scheme. We generate artificial data and illustrate the requirements to accurately identify proliferation, aggregation, and fragmentation of flocs in the experimental domain of interest. PMID:18071828

  18. [THREE CASES OF DRUG-INDUCED PNEUMONIA CAUSED BY MESALAZINE].

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Norimichi; Yokomura, Koshi; Nozue, Tsuyoshi; Abe, Takefumi; Matsui, Takashi; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-12-01

    We report three cases of drug-induced pneumonia caused by mesalazine. They were all diagnosed as ulcerative colitis and treated with mesalazine orally. Our three cases and literature review revealed that mesalazine-induced pneumonia resemble like eosinophilic pneumonia or organizing pneumonia and that have good prognosis with drug cessation or administration of corticosteroid. The patient of ulcerative colitis is increasing every year and it is anticipated that the patient with mesalazine-induced pneumonia may also increase. In the treatment of ulcerative colitis with mesalazine, we should pay attention with patient's cough or fever for early detection of drug-induced pneumonia. PMID:26727138

  19. Healthcare-associated Pneumonia and Aspiration Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Komiya, Kosaku; Ishii, Hiroshi; Kadota, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) is a new concept of pneumonia proposed by the American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America in 2005. This category is located between community-acquired pneumonia and hospital-acquired pneumonia with respect to the characteristics of the causative pathogens and mortality, and primarily targets elderly patients in healthcare facilities. Aspiration among such patients is recognized to be a primary mechanism for the development of pneumonia, particularly since the HCAP guidelines were published. However, it is difficult to manage patients with aspiration pneumonia because the definition of the condition is unclear, and the treatment is associated with ethical aspects. This review focused on the definition, prevalence and role of aspiration pneumonia as a prognostic factor in published studies of HCAP and attempted to identify problems associated with the concept of aspiration pneumonia. PMID:25657850

  20. Standard method for detecting upper respiratory carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae: updated recommendations from the World Health Organization Pneumococcal Carriage Working Group.

    PubMed

    Satzke, Catherine; Turner, Paul; Virolainen-Julkunen, Anni; Adrian, Peter V; Antonio, Martin; Hare, Kim M; Henao-Restrepo, Ana Maria; Leach, Amanda J; Klugman, Keith P; Porter, Barbara D; Sá-Leão, Raquel; Scott, J Anthony; Nohynek, Hanna; O'Brien, Katherine L

    2013-12-17

    In 2003 the World Health Organization (WHO) convened a working group and published a set of standard methods for studies measuring nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus). The working group recently reconvened under the auspices of the WHO and updated the consensus standard methods. These methods describe the collection, transport and storage of nasopharyngeal samples, as well as provide recommendations for the identification and serotyping of pneumococci using culture and non-culture based approaches. We outline the consensus position of the working group, the evidence supporting this position, areas worthy of future research, and the epidemiological role of carriage studies. Adherence to these methods will reduce variability in the conduct of pneumococcal carriage studies undertaken in the context of pneumococcal vaccine trials, implementation studies, and epidemiology studies more generally so variability in methodology does not confound the interpretation of study findings. PMID:24331112

  1. sup 111 In-labeled nonspecific immunoglobulin scanning in the detection of focal infection

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, R.H.; Fischman, A.J.; Callahan, R.J.; Khaw, B.A.; Keech, F.; Ahmad, M.; Wilkinson, R.; Strauss, H.W. )

    1989-10-05

    We performed radionuclide scanning after the intravenous injection of human IgG labeled with indium-111 in 128 patients with suspected focal sites of inflammation. Localization of 111In-labeled IgG correlated with clinical findings in 51 infected patients (21 with abdominal or pelvic infections, 11 with intravascular infections, 7 with pulmonary infections, and 12 with skeletal infections). Infecting organisms included gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, Pneumocystis carinii, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Candida albicans. No focal localization of 111In-labeled IgG was observed in 63 patients without infection. There were five false negative results, and nine results were unusable. Serial scans were carried out in eight patients: continued localization correctly predicted relapse in six, and the absence of localization indicated resolution in two. To determine whether 111In-labeled IgG localization was specific for inflammation, we studied 16 patients with cancer. Focal localization occurred in 13 of these patients (5 with melanomas, 5 with gynecologic cancers, and 1 each with lymphoma, prostate cancer, and malignant fibrous histiocytoma). No localization was seen in patients with renal or colon cancer or metastatic medullary carcinoma of the thyroid. We conclude that 111In-labeled IgG imaging is effective for the detection of focal infection and that serial scans may be useful in assessing therapeutic efficacy. This technique may also be helpful in the evaluation of certain cancers.

  2. Risk factors for clinical mastitis, ketosis, and pneumonia in dairy cattle on organic and small conventional farms in the United States.

    PubMed

    Richert, R M; Cicconi, K M; Gamroth, M J; Schukken, Y H; Stiglbauer, K E; Ruegg, P L

    2013-07-01

    The US regulations for production of organic milk include a strict prohibition against the use of antimicrobials and other synthetic substances. The effect of these regulations on dairy animal health has not been previously reported. The objective of this study was to characterize disease detection and identify risk factors for selected diseases on organic (ORG) and similarly sized conventional (CON) farms. Dairy herds (n=292) were enrolled across 3 states (New York, Oregon, Wisconsin) with CON herds matched to ORG herds based on location and herd size. During a single herd visit, information was collected about herd management practices and animal disease occurring in the previous 60 d, and paperwork was left for recording disease occurrences during 60 d after the visit. For analysis, CON herds were further divided into grazing and nongrazing. Poisson regression models were used to assess risk factors for rate of farmer-identified and recorded cases of clinical mastitis, ketosis, and pneumonia. An increased rate of farmer-identified and recorded cases of clinical mastitis was associated with use of CON management, use of forestripping, presence of contagious pathogens in the bulk tank culture, proactive detection of mastitis in postpartum cows, and stall barn housing. An increased rate of farmer-identified and recorded cases of ketosis was associated with having a more sensitive definition of ketosis, using stall barn housing, and feeding a greater amount of concentrates. An increased rate of farmer-identified and recorded cases of pneumonia was associated with a lack of grazing, small or medium herd size, and Jersey as the predominant breed. Overall, disease definitions and perceptions were similar among grazing systems and were associated with the rate of farmer-identified and recorded cases of disease. PMID:23684015

  3. Coxiella burnetii pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Marrie, T J

    2003-04-01

    This report reviews the pulmonary and extrapulmonary manifestation of infections due to Coxiella burnetii. Q fever, a zoonosis, is due to infection with C. burnetii. This spore-forming microorganism is a small gram-negative coccobacillus that is an obligate intracellular parasite. The most common animal reservoirs are goats, cattle, sheep, cats, and occasionally dogs. The organism reaches high concentrations in the placenta of infected animals. Aerosolisation occurs at the time of parturition and infection follows inhalation of this aerosol. There are three distinct clinical syndromes of the acute form of the illness: nonspecific febrile illness, pneumonia, and hepatitis. The chronic form of Q fever is almost always endocarditis, but occasionally it is manifest as hepatitis, osteomyelitis or endovascular infection. The pneumonic form of the illness can range from very mild-to-severe pneumonia requiring assisted ventilation. Multiple round opacities are a common finding on chest radiography. Treatment with doxycycline or a fluoroquinolone is preferred. Susceptibility to macrolides is variable. In conclusion, Coxiella burnetii pneumonia should be considered when there is a suitable exposure history and when outbreaks of a pneumonic illness are being investigated. PMID:12762362

  4. Bronchoscopic diagnosis of pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Baselski, V S; Wunderink, R G

    1994-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections are characterized by significant morbidity and mortality but also by a relative inability to establish a specific etiologic agent on clinical grounds alone. With the recognized shortcomings of expectorated or aspirated secretions toward establishing an etiologic diagnosis, clinicians have increasingly used bronchoscopy to obtain diagnostic samples. A variety of specimen types may be obtained, including bronchial washes or brushes, protected specimen brushings, bronchoalveolar lavage, and transbronchial biopsies. Bronchoscopy has been applied in three primary clinical settings, including the immunocompromised host, especially human immunodeficiency virus-infected and organ transplant patients; ventilator-associated pneumonia; and severe, nonresolving community- or hospital-acquired pneumonia in nonventilated patients. In each clinical setting, and for each specimen type, specific laboratory protocols are required to provide maximal information. These protocols should provide for the use of a variety of rapid microscopic and quantitative culture techniques and the use of a variety of specific stains and selective culture to detect unusual organism groups. PMID:7834604

  5. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia induce distinct host responses

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Kevin W.; McDunn, Jonathan E.; Clark, Andrew T.; Dunne, W. Michael; Dixon, David J.; Turnbull, Isaiah R.; DiPasco, Peter J.; Osberghaus, William F.; Sherman, Benjamin; Martin, James R.; Walter, Michael J.; Cobb, J. Perren; Buchman, Timothy G.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Pathogens that cause pneumonia may be treated in a targeted fashion by antibiotics, but if this therapy fails, treatment involves only non-specific supportive measures, independent of the inciting infection. The purpose of this study was to determine whether host response is similar following disparate infections with similar mortalities. Design Prospective, randomized controlled study. Setting Animal laboratory in a university medical center. Interventions Pneumonia was induced in FVB/N mice by either Streptococcus pneumoniae or two different concentrations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from septic animals was assayed by a microarray immunoassay measuring 18 inflammatory mediators at multiple timepoints. Measurements and Main Results The host response was dependent upon the causative organism as well as kinetics of mortality, but the pro- and anti- inflammatory response was independent of inoculum concentration or degree of bacteremia. Pneumonia caused by different concentrations of the same bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, also yielded distinct inflammatory responses; however, inflammatory mediator expression did not directly track the severity of infection. For all infections, the host response was compartmentalized, with markedly different concentrations of inflammatory mediators in the systemic circulation and the lungs. Hierarchical clustering analysis resulted in the identification of 5 distinct clusters of the host response to bacterial infection. Principal components analysis correlated pulmonary MIP-2 and IL-10 with progression of infection while elevated plasma TNFsr2 and MCP-1 were indicative of fulminant disease with >90% mortality within 48 hours. Conclusions Septic mice have distinct local and systemic responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Targeting specific host inflammatory responses induced by distinct bacterial infections could represent a potential therapeutic

  6. Pneumonia - weakened immune system

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000093.htm Pneumonia - weakened immune system To use the sharing features on this page, ... fighting off infection because of problems with the immune system. This type of disease is called "pneumonia in ...

  7. Pneumonia - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    You have pneumonia, which is an infection in your lungs. In the hospital, your doctors and nurses helped you breathe better. ... body get rid of the germs that cause pneumonia. They also made sure you got enough liquids ...

  8. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumocystis pneumonia can be life threatening, causing respiratory failure that can lead to death. People with this condition need early and effective treatment. For moderate to severe pneumocystis pneumonia in people with ...

  9. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000146.htm Hospital-acquired pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hospital-acquired pneumonia is an infection of the lungs ...

  10. Pneumonia - children - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000011.htm Pneumonia in children - discharge To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Your child has pneumonia, which is an infection in the lungs. In ...

  11. Pneumonia - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000017.htm Pneumonia in adults - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You have pneumonia, which is an infection in your lungs. In ...

  12. Studies of an outbreak of Corynebacterium equi pneumonia in foals.

    PubMed

    Smith, B P; Robinson, R C

    1981-10-01

    Five out of 6 foals between 2 and 4 months old, on a ranch in northern California, developed pneumonia within a 3 week period in June and July 1978. Corynebacterium equi was recovered from each of the 5 foals by transtracheal aspiration. Clinical signs were variable but included increased respiratory rate, fever, cough, nasal discharge, harsh airway sounds over middle sized airways and wheezing over small airways. Cyanosis was present in the most severely affected foal. Radiographic findings included diffusely increased interstitial and peribronchial densities, areas of consolidation and, in 3 cases, dense focal areas indicating abscessation. Foals were treated with several different antimicrobial agents. Most were treated with penicillin and gentamicin. Four of the 5 affected foals recovered within 2 to 3 weeks but the first foal to be affected died 2 days after first receiving veterinary attention. At postmortem examination, pulmonary changes considered typical of C equi pneumonia were found, including wet, heavy dark red lungs which failed to collapse and numerous 1 to 7 cm thin-walled abscesses throughout the parenchyma, containing inspissated exudate. C equi was cultured from the exudate. Samples of soil and dust from 9 of 20 areas inhabited by infected foals yielded C equi of the same serological group as found in the foals. Eight paddocks in which foals had not been kept were negative for C equi. The organism was recovered from cobwebs in the stalls occupied by infected foals. Aerosol infection via dust was considered to be the route of infection. Pharyngeal, vaginal and faecal cultures from the dams of 3 affected foals were negative for C equi. Early diagnosis by transtracheal aspiration and appropriate therapy are considered to be extremely important in the successful treatment of C equi pneumonia. Preventive therapy should include control of environmental dust. PMID:7318800

  13. Beamlet focal plane diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Caird, J.A.; Nielsen, N.D.; Patton, H.G.; Seppala, L.G.; Thompson, C.E.; Wegner, P.J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes the major optical and mechanical design features of the Beamlet Focal Plane Diagnostic system as well as measurements of the system performance, and typical data obtained to date. We also discuss the NIF requirements on the focal spot that we are interested in measuring, and some of our plans for future work using this system.

  14. Ultrasound in Rheumatologic Interstitial Lung Disease: A Case Report of Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Laria, A; Lurati, A; Scarpellini, M

    2015-01-01

    According to the American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society consensus classification, idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) include several clinic-radiologic-pathologic entities: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, acute interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated ILD, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and lymphoid interstitial pneumonia. Ultrasound Lung Comets (ULCs) are an echographic chest-sonography hallmark of pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. We describe the ultrasound (US) findings in the follow-up of a NSIP's case in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). PMID:26240772

  15. Pneumocystis Pneumonia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Pneumocystis Pneumonia KidsHealth > For Parents > Pneumocystis Pneumonia Print A A A Text Size What's in ... article? About PCP Diagnosing PCP Treating PCP Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) is an infection caused by Pneumocystis jiroveci , ...

  16. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Serves a Protective Role during Klebsiella pneumoniae - Induced Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Achouiti, Ahmed; de Vos, Alex F; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Florquin, Sandrine; Tanck, Michael W; Nawroth, Peter P; Bierhaus, Angelika; van der Poll, Tom; van Zoelen, Marieke A D

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella species is the second most commonly isolated gram-negative organism in sepsis and a frequent causative pathogen in pneumonia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is expressed on different cell types and plays a key role in diverse inflammatory responses. We here aimed to investigate the role of RAGE in the host response to Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae pneumonia and intransally inoculated rage gene deficient (RAGE-/-) and normal wild-type (Wt) mice with K. pneumoniae. Klebsiella pneumonia resulted in an increased pulmonary expression of RAGE. Furthermore, the high-affinity RAGE ligand high mobility group box-1 was upregulated during K. pneumoniae pneumonia. RAGE deficiency impaired host defense as reflected by a worsened survival, increased bacterial outgrowth and dissemination in RAGE-/- mice. RAGE-/- neutrophils showed a diminished phagocytosing capacity of live K. pneumoniae in vitro. Relative to Wt mice, RAGE-/- mice demonstrated similar lung inflammation, and slightly elevated-if any-cytokine and chemokine levels and unchanged hepatocellular injury. In addition, RAGE-/- mice displayed an unaltered response to intranasally instilled Klebsiella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with respect to pulmonary cell recruitment and local release of cytokines and chemokines. These data suggest that (endogenous) RAGE protects against K. pneumoniae pneumonia. Also, they demonstrate that RAGE contributes to an effective antibacterial defense during K. pneumoniae pneumonia, at least partly via its participation in the phagocytic properties of professional granulocytes. Additionally, our results indicate that RAGE is not essential for the induction of a local and systemic inflammatory response to either intact Klebsiella or Klebsiella LPS. PMID:26824892

  17. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Serves a Protective Role during Klebsiella pneumoniae - Induced Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Achouiti, Ahmed; de Vos, Alex F.; van ‘t Veer, Cornelis; Florquin, Sandrine; Tanck, Michael W.; Nawroth, Peter P.; Bierhaus, Angelika; van der Poll, Tom; van Zoelen, Marieke A. D.

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella species is the second most commonly isolated gram-negative organism in sepsis and a frequent causative pathogen in pneumonia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is expressed on different cell types and plays a key role in diverse inflammatory responses. We here aimed to investigate the role of RAGE in the host response to Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae pneumonia and intransally inoculated rage gene deficient (RAGE-/-) and normal wild-type (Wt) mice with K. pneumoniae. Klebsiella pneumonia resulted in an increased pulmonary expression of RAGE. Furthermore, the high-affinity RAGE ligand high mobility group box-1 was upregulated during K. pneumoniae pneumonia. RAGE deficiency impaired host defense as reflected by a worsened survival, increased bacterial outgrowth and dissemination in RAGE-/- mice. RAGE-/- neutrophils showed a diminished phagocytosing capacity of live K. pneumoniae in vitro. Relative to Wt mice, RAGE-/- mice demonstrated similar lung inflammation, and slightly elevated—if any—cytokine and chemokine levels and unchanged hepatocellular injury. In addition, RAGE-/- mice displayed an unaltered response to intranasally instilled Klebsiella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with respect to pulmonary cell recruitment and local release of cytokines and chemokines. These data suggest that (endogenous) RAGE protects against K. pneumoniae pneumonia. Also, they demonstrate that RAGE contributes to an effective antibacterial defense during K. pneumoniae pneumonia, at least partly via its participation in the phagocytic properties of professional granulocytes. Additionally, our results indicate that RAGE is not essential for the induction of a local and systemic inflammatory response to either intact Klebsiella or Klebsiella LPS. PMID:26824892

  18. Chitinases in Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Leah R.; Kottom, Theodore J.

    2014-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia remains an important complication of immune suppression. The cell wall of Pneumocystis has been demonstrated to potently stimulate host inflammatory responses, with most studies focusing on β-glucan components of the Pneumocystis cell wall. In the current study, we have elaborated the potential role of chitins and chitinases in Pneumocystis pneumonia. We demonstrated differential host mammalian chitinase expression during Pneumocystis pneumonia. We further characterized a chitin synthase gene in Pneumocystis carinii termed Pcchs5, a gene with considerable homolog to the fungal chitin biosynthesis protein Chs5. We also observed the impact of chitinase digestion on Pneumocystis-induced host inflammatory responses by measuring TNFα release and mammalian chitinase expression by cultured lung epithelial and macrophage cells stimulated with Pneumocystis cell wall isolates in the presence and absence of exogenous chitinase digestion. These findings provide evidence supporting a chitin biosynthetic pathway in Pneumocystis organisms and that chitinases modulate inflammatory responses in lung cells. We further demonstrate lung expression of chitinase molecules during Pneumocystis pneumonia. PMID:22535444

  19. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  20. Focal vibration in neurorehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Murillo, N; Valls-Sole, J; Vidal, J; Opisso, E; Medina, J; Kumru, H

    2014-04-01

    During the last decade, many studies have been carried out to understand the effects of focal vibratory stimuli at various levels of the central nervous system and to study pathophysiological mechanisms of neurological disorders as well as the therapeutic effects of focal vibration in neurorehabilitation. This review aimed to describe the effects of focal vibratory stimuli in neurorehabilitation including the neurological diseases or disorders like stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's' disease and dystonia. In conclusion, focal vibration stimulation is well tolerated, effective and easy to use, and it could be used to reduce spasticity, to promote motor activity and motor learning within a functional activity, even in gait training, independent from etiology of neurological pathology. Further studies are needed in the future well-designed trials with bigger sample size to determine the most effective frequency, amplitude and duration of vibration application in the neurorehabilitation. PMID:24842220

  1. Focal neurological deficits

    MedlinePlus

    A focal neurologic deficit is a problem with nerve, spinal cord, or brain function. It affects a specific ... of the back, neck, or head Electromyogram (EMG)/ nerve conduction velocities (NCV) MRI of the back, neck, or head Spinal tap

  2. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff RB, ... 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 67. ...

  3. Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia: IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TGF- β1 Serum Concentrations and Response to Clarithromycin Treatment.

    PubMed

    Radzikowska, E; Roży, A; Jaguś, P; Wiatr, E; Gawryluk, D; Chorostowska-Wynimko, J; Roszkowski-Śliż, K

    2016-01-01

    Cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP) is a distinct clinicopathological entity with unknown etiology. Inflammatory cytokines play a role in the development of the disease. The present study was performed to assess the correlation between concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TGF-β1 in the serum with response to clarithromycin (CAM) treatment in patients with COP. A total of 39 patients with COP were enrolled in to this study. An oral dose of 500 mg CAM was administered to all of the patients twice daily for 3 months. A complete response was noticed in 31 (80 %) of patients, and 8 (20 %) patients failed to respond to treatment. The concentration of cytokines were assessed by ELISAs before and after treatment. CAM treatment was associated with decreases in serum IL-6 (3.8 pg/mL [IQR 0.9-11.8] vs. 1.1 pg/mL [IQR 0.2-3.1]; p = 0.004), IL-8 (13.6 pg/mL [IQR 9.8-17.5] vs. 8.1 pg/mL [IQR 6.2-13.2]; p = 0.004), and TGF-β1 (37.1 ng/mL [IQR 31.7-46.2] vs. 25.7 ng/mL [IQR 22-41.7];p = 0.0001), which was particularly notable in the responders. We conclude that IL-6, IL-8, and TGF-β1 may play a role in the pathogenesis of COP, as their decreased concentrations were associated with a positive response to CAM treatment. PMID:26987326

  4. Predictors of hospital surface contamination with Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae: patient and organism factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of the hospital environment in transmission of ESBL-Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL-KP) and ESBL-Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC) is poorly defined. Recent data however suggest that in the hospital setting, ESBL-KP is more transmissible than ESBL-EC. We sought therefore to measure the difference in hospital contamination rates between the two species and to identify key risk factors for contamination of the hospital environment with these organisms. Methods We systematically sampled 8 surfaces in the rooms and bathrooms of adult patients colonized or infected with ESBL-EC or ESBL-KP throughout their hospital stay. Data were collected on factors potentially affecting contamination rates. Environmental contamination was defined as recovery of an ESBL-producing organism matching the source patient’s isolate. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed at the level of the patient visit using generalized estimating equations to identify independent predictors of environmental contamination. Results 24 patients (11 with ESBL-KP, 11 ESBL-EC and 2 with both organisms) had 1104 swabs collected during 138 visits. The overall contamination rate was 3.4% (38/1104) and was significantly higher for ESBL-KP than ESBL-EC (5.4% versus 0.4%; p < 0.0001). After multivariate analysis, environmental contamination was found to be negatively associated with carbapenem exposure (OR 0.06 [95% CI 0.01-0.61]; p = 0.017) and positively associated with the presence of an indwelling urinary catheter (OR 6.12 [95% CI 1.23-30.37]; p = 0.027) and ESBL-KP in the source patient (OR 26.23 [95% CI 2.70-254.67]; p = 0.005). Conclusions Contamination of the hospital environment with ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) is inversely associated with carbapenem exposure. Predictors of hospital contamination with ESBL-E include: indwelling urinary catheters and ESBL-KP. Rooms of patients with ESBL-KP have substantially higher contamination rates than those with

  5. Pathogenesis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae: An update.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, R; Ghosh, A; Chandolia, A

    2016-01-01

    Genus Mycoplasma, belonging to the class Mollicutes, encompasses unique lifeforms comprising of a small genome of 8,00,000 base pairs and the inability to produce a cell wall under any circumstances. Mycoplasma pneumoniae is the most common pathogenic species infecting humans. It is an atypical respiratory bacteria causing community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children and adults of all ages. Although atypical pneumonia caused by M. pneumoniae can be managed in outpatient settings, complications affecting multiple organ systems can lead to hospitalization in vulnerable population. M. pneumoniae infection has also been associated with chronic lung disease and bronchial asthma. With the advent of molecular methods of diagnosis and genetic, immunological and ultrastructural assays that study infectious disease pathogenesis at subcellular level, newer virulence factors of M. pneumoniae have been recognized by researchers. Structure of the attachment organelle of the organism, that mediates the crucial initial step of cytadherence to respiratory tract epithelium through complex interaction between different adhesins and accessory adhesion proteins, has been decoded. Several subsequent virulence mechanisms like intracellular localization, direct cytotoxicity and activation of the inflammatory cascade through toll-like receptors (TLRs) leading to inflammatory cytokine mediated tissue injury, have also been demonstrated to play an essential role in pathogenesis. The most significant update in the knowledge of pathogenesis has been the discovery of Community-Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome toxin (CARDS toxin) of M. pneumoniae and its ability of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) ribosylation and inflammosome activation, thus initiating airway inflammation. Advances have also been made in terms of the different pathways behind the genesis of extrapulmonary complications. This article aims to comprehensively review the recent advances in the knowledge of pathogenesis of this

  6. Annexin A6 contributes to the invasiveness of breast carcinoma cells by influencing the organization and localization of functional focal adhesions

    SciTech Connect

    Sakwe, Amos M.; Koumangoye, Rainelli; Guillory, Bobby; Ochieng, Josiah

    2011-04-01

    The interaction of annexin A6 (AnxA6) with membrane phospholipids and either specific extracellular matrix (ECM) components or F-actin suggests that it may influence cellular processes associated with rapid plasma membrane reorganization such as cell adhesion and motility. Here, we examined the putative roles of AnxA6 in adhesion-related cellular processes that contribute to breast cancer progression. We show that breast cancer cells secrete annexins via the exosomal pathway and that the secreted annexins are predominantly cell surface-associated. Depletion of AnxA6 in the invasive BT-549 breast cancer cells is accompanied by enhanced anchorage-independent cell growth but cell-cell cohesion, cell adhesion/spreading onto collagen type IV or fetuin-A, cell motility and invasiveness were strongly inhibited. To explain the loss in adhesion/motility, we show that vinculin-based focal adhesions in the AnxA6-depleted BT-549 cells are elongated and randomly distributed. These focal contacts are also functionally defective because the activation of focal adhesion kinase and the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt pathway were strongly inhibited while the MAP kinase pathway remained constitutively active. Compared with normal human breast tissues, reduced AnxA6 expression in breast carcinoma tissues correlates with enhanced cell proliferation. Together this suggests that reduced AnxA6 expression contributes to breast cancer progression by promoting the loss of functional cell-cell and/or cell-ECM contacts and anchorage-independent cell proliferation.

  7. The History of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Saraya, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    In the United States in the 1930s, although the pathogen was not known, atypical pneumonia was clinically distinguished from pneumococcal pneumonia by its resistance to sulfonamides. Reimann (1938) reported seven patients with an unusual form of tracheo bronchopneumonia and severe constitutional symptoms. He believed the clinical picture of this disease differed from that of the disease caused by influenza viruses or known bacteria and instead suspected “primary atypical pneumonia.” For many years, the responsible infectious agent was tentatively classified as a filterable virus that could pass through a Seitz filter to remove bacteria and was reported to be a psittacosis-like or new virus. After that, Eaton et al. (1942, 1944, 1945) identified an agent that was the principal cause of primary atypical pneumonia using cotton rats, hamsters, and chick embryos. Eaton et al. (1942, 1944, 1945) did not perform an inoculation study in human volunteers. During the 1940s, there were three groups engaged in discovering the etiology of the primary atypical pneumonia. (1) Commission on Acute Respiratory Diseases Diseases directed by John Dingle, (2) Dr. Monroe Eaton’s group, the Virus Research Laboratory of the California State Public Health Department, (3) The Hospital of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research directed by Horsfall. During 1940s, the members of the Commission on Acute Respiratory Diseases concluded that the bacteria-free filtrates obtained from the patients, presumably containing a virus, could induce primary atypical pneumonia in human volunteers via Pinehurst trials. During 1950s, serological approaches for identification of the Eaton agent developed such as Fluorescent-Stainable Antibody, and at the beginning of the1960s, the Eaton agent successfully grew in media, and finally accepted as a cause of primary atypical pneumonia. Thus, technical difficulties with visualizing the agent and failure to recognize the full significance of the

  8. The History of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Saraya, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    In the United States in the 1930s, although the pathogen was not known, atypical pneumonia was clinically distinguished from pneumococcal pneumonia by its resistance to sulfonamides. Reimann (1938) reported seven patients with an unusual form of tracheo bronchopneumonia and severe constitutional symptoms. He believed the clinical picture of this disease differed from that of the disease caused by influenza viruses or known bacteria and instead suspected "primary atypical pneumonia." For many years, the responsible infectious agent was tentatively classified as a filterable virus that could pass through a Seitz filter to remove bacteria and was reported to be a psittacosis-like or new virus. After that, Eaton et al. (1942, 1944, 1945) identified an agent that was the principal cause of primary atypical pneumonia using cotton rats, hamsters, and chick embryos. Eaton et al. (1942, 1944, 1945) did not perform an inoculation study in human volunteers. During the 1940s, there were three groups engaged in discovering the etiology of the primary atypical pneumonia. (1) Commission on Acute Respiratory Diseases Diseases directed by John Dingle, (2) Dr. Monroe Eaton's group, the Virus Research Laboratory of the California State Public Health Department, (3) The Hospital of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research directed by Horsfall. During 1940s, the members of the Commission on Acute Respiratory Diseases concluded that the bacteria-free filtrates obtained from the patients, presumably containing a virus, could induce primary atypical pneumonia in human volunteers via Pinehurst trials. During 1950s, serological approaches for identification of the Eaton agent developed such as Fluorescent-Stainable Antibody, and at the beginning of the1960s, the Eaton agent successfully grew in media, and finally accepted as a cause of primary atypical pneumonia. Thus, technical difficulties with visualizing the agent and failure to recognize the full significance of the Pinehurst

  9. How Can Pneumonia Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Pneumonia Be Prevented? Pneumonia can be very serious and ... t last as long Fewer serious complications Pneumococcal Pneumonia Vaccine A vaccine is available to prevent pneumococcal ...

  10. HIV Associated Opportunistic Pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Ismail, T; Lee, C

    2011-03-01

    Opportunistic pneumonias are major causes of morbidity and mortality in HIV infected individuals. The majority of new HIV infections in Malaysia are adults aged 20 to 39 years old and many are unaware of their HIV status until they present with an opportunistic infection. HIV associated opportunistic pneumonias can progress rapidly without appropriate therapy. Therefore a proper diagnostic evaluation is vital and prompt empiric treatment of the suspected diagnosis should be commenced while waiting for the results of the diagnostic studies. Tuberculosis, Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) and recurrent bacterial pneumonias are common causes of AIDS-defining diseases and are discussed in this article. PMID:23765154

  11. Persistent Pneumonia in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Kristen; Logan, Latania; Codispoti, Christopher; Jones, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    A 4-month-old boy with past medical history of eczema presented with fever and cough; a chest radiograph showed lung consolidation, and he was initially treated with amoxicillin for presumed community-acquired pneumonia. After several days, his fever persisted. He was also profoundly anemic. Antibiotic coverage was broadened because of the concern for resistant organisms; he began to improve and was discharged from the hospital. However, at 5 months of age, his fever returned, and he continued to demonstrate lung consolidation on chest radiograph. Additionally, he had lost weight and continued to be anemic. Splenic cysts were noted on abdominal ultrasound. He was diagnosed with an unusual etiology for his pneumonia and improved with the appropriate therapy. An underlying immunodeficiency was suspected, but initial testing was nondiagnostic. At 12 months of age, he presented with another infection, and the final diagnosis was made. PMID:26122810

  12. SNAP focal plane

    SciTech Connect

    Lampton, Michael L.; Kim, A.; Akerlof, C.W.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Berkovitz, J.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers Jr., W.C.; Commins, E.D.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.E.; DiGennaro,R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.S.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.E.; Harvey, P.R.; Heetderks, H.D.; Holland, S.E.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.S.; Linder,E.V.; Loken, S.C.; Malina, R.; Massey, R.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.P.; Miquel, R.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto, E.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch,A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-29

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square-degree field sensitive in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. We describe the requirements for the instrument suite and the evolution of the focal plane design to the present concept in which all the instrumentation--visible and near-infrared imagers, spectrograph, and star guiders--share one common focal plane.

  13. Pneumonia in the neutropenic cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Scott E.; Ost, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Pneumonia is the leading cause of death among neutropenic cancer patients, particularly those with acute leukemia. Even with empiric therapy, case fatality rates of neutropenic pneumonias remain unacceptably high. However, recent advances in the management of neutropenic pneumonia offer hope for improved outcomes in the cancer setting. This review summarizes recent literature regarding the clinical presentation, microbiologic trends, diagnostic advances and therapeutic recommendations for cancer-related neutropenic pneumonia. Recent findings While neutropenic patients acquire pathogens both in community or nosocomial settings, patients’ obligate healthcare exposures result in the frequent identification of multidrug resistant bacterial organisms on conventional culture-based assessment of respiratory secretions. Modern molecular techniques, including expanded use of galactomannan testing, have further facilitated identification of fungal pathogens, allowing for aggressive interventions that appear to improve patient outcomes. Multiple interested societies have issued updated guidelines for antibiotic therapy of suspected neutropenic pneumonia. The benefit of antibiotic medications may be further enhanced by agents that promote host responses to infection. Summary Neutropenic cancer patients have numerous potential causes for pulmonary infiltrates and clinical deterioration, with lower respiratory tract infections among the most deadly. Early clinical suspicion, diagnosis and intervention for neutropenic pneumonia provide cancer patients’ best hope for survival. PMID:25784246

  14. Acute and subacute idiopathic interstitial pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Kondoh, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) may have an acute or subacute presentation, or acute exacerbation may occur in a previously subclinical or unrecognized chronic IIP. Acute or subacute IIPs include acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (AE-IPF) and AE-NSIP. Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) including connective tissue disease (CTD) associated ILD, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, drug-induced lung disease and diffuse alveolar haemorrhage need to be differentiated from acute and subacute IIPs. Despite the severe lack of randomized controlled trials for the treatment of acute and subacute IIPs, the mainstream treatment remains corticosteroid therapy. Other potential therapies reported in the literature include corticosteroids and immunosuppression, antibiotics, anticoagulants, neutrophil elastase inhibitor, autoantibody-targeted treatment, antifibrotics and hemoperfusion therapy. With regard to mechanical ventilation, patients in recent studies with acute and subacute IIPs have shown better survival than those in previous studies. Therefore, a careful value-laden decision about the indications for endotracheal intubation should be made for each patient. Noninvasive ventilation may be beneficial to reduce ventilator associated pneumonia. PMID:27123874

  15. [Features of morbidity community-acquired pneumonia among young recruits].

    PubMed

    Serdukov, D U; Gordienko, A V; Kozlov, M S; Mikhailov, A A; Davydov, P A

    2015-10-01

    Were examined 3338 military personnel of the combined training center. 183 of them diagnosed community-acquired pneumonia, in 3155 focal and infiltrative changes in lung tissue were not identified. The analisys of prevalence been made among young recruits of the acute respiratory illness before arriving in part and at the assembly point, foci of chronic infection, smoking, low body weight. 511 military personnel arrived at the training center in the disease state with symptoms of acute respiratory illness. Examined the relationship these risk factor to the development of community-acquired pneumonia in this category of servicemen. PMID:26827502

  16. Diagnosis of nosocomial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Bamberger, D M

    1988-06-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia occurs in 0.6% of hospitalized patients. The usual causative agents are gram-negative bacilli, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and anaerobic bacteria. In immunocompromised hosts, the differential diagnosis also includes fungi, mycobacteria, viruses, Nocardia, and Pneumocystis carinii. Important risk factors for the development of nosocomial pneumonia include prolonged mechanical ventilation, thoracic or upper abdominal surgery, altered mental status, underlying immunosuppression, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and the use of antacids or histamine type 2 blockers. Colonization of the oropharynx and tracheal secretions with gram-negative aerobic bacteria is common in hospitalized patients with or without pneumonia. The diagnosis of nosocomial pneumonia is usually based on the clinical features of dyspnea, cough, fever, purulent sputum production, new pulmonary infiltrates, hypoxemia, and leukocytosis. However, the clinician must recognize that the presence of these features is neither sensitive nor specific in the diagnosis of nosocomial pneumonia. Microbiologic diagnosis is also difficult because blood cultures are usually negative, and cultures of tracheal secretions, although usually sensitive, are not specific. Invasive procedures may prove useful, but most have yet to be studied in large groups of patients with nosocomial pneumonia. PMID:3041515

  17. Ventilator associated pneumonia in major paediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Alan David; Deal, Cailin; Argent, Andrew Charles; Hudson, Donald Anthony; Rode, Heinz

    2014-09-01

    More than three-quarters of deaths related to major burns are a consequence of infection, which is frequently ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP). A retrospective study was performed, over a five-year period, of ventilated children with major burns. 92 patients were included in the study; their mean age was 3.5 years and their mean total body surface area burn was 30%. 62% of the patients sustained flame burns, and 31% scalds. The mean ICU stay was 10.6 days (range 2-61 days) and the mean ventilation time was 8.4 days (range 2-45 days). There were 59 documented episodes of pneumonia in 52 patients with a rate of 30 infections per 1000 ventilator days. Length of ventilation and the presence of inhalational injury correlate with the incidence of VAP. 17.4% of the patients died (n=16); half of these deaths may be attributed directly to pneumonia. Streptococcus pneumonia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumanii and Staphylococcus aureus were the most prominent aetiological organisms. Broncho-alveolar lavage was found to be more specific and sensitive at identifying the organism than other methods. This study highlights the importance of implementing strictly enforced strategies for the prevention, detection and management of pneumonia in the presence of major burns. PMID:24468505

  18. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach. PMID:26186969

  19. Rewritable photochromic focal plane masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Emilio; Bertarelli, Chiara; Bianco, Andrea; Bortoletto, Fabio; Conconi, Paolo; Crimi, Giuseppe; Gallazzi, Maria C.; Giro, Enrico; Lucotti, Andrea; Pernechele, Claudio; Zerbi, Filippo M.; Zerbi, Giuseppe

    2003-02-01

    The application of organic photochromic materials in astronomy is opening new possibilities which we are investigating in order to design innovative devices for future instrumentation. The photochromic property of transparent/opaque transition (although in a limited wavelength range) and the changes in intrinsic refractive index have led our studies to application in astronomic spectrographs, both as focal plane mask (for MOS application) and as dispersive elements (volume phase holographic gratings, VPHG), respectively. In both cases the possibility to write and erase devices with suitable irradiation has revealed a new perspective for non-disposable and fully customizable items for spectroscopy. Pursuing this goal we have synthesized a series of novel photochromic materials belonging to the diarylethenes. They fulfill the requirements of thermal stability and fatigue resistance necessary to build functional devices. Prototypes of high contrast focal plane mask working in the H-alpha spectral region have been manufactured and characterized both in laboratory and with the AFOSC camera at Asiago telescope (1.8 m). A custom writing robot (ARATRO) which, taking imaging frames and with the aid of interactive mask design software and ad hoc control electronics, is able to write MOS masks, has been constructed. The design of the MOS masks allow the fitting in the AFOSC slit wheel. The overall set-up is ready for the sky tests.

  20. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... tends to be more serious than other lung infections because: People in the hospital are often very sick and cannot fight off ... prevent pneumonia. Most hospitals have programs to prevent hospital-acquired infections.

  1. Pneumonia - adults (community acquired)

    MedlinePlus

    Ellison RT, Donowitz GR. Acute pneumonia. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015: ...

  2. Pneumonia - adults (community acquired)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fever , which may be mild or high Shaking chills Shortness of breath (may only occur when you ... or unexplained weight loss Shortness of breath, shaking chills, or persistent fevers Signs of pneumonia and a ...

  3. Escherichia fergusonii Associated with Pneumonia in a Beef Cow.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Guillermo M; Moeller, Robert B

    2013-01-01

    An adult Angus cow developed hyperthermia, prostration, and respiratory distress, dying 36 hours after the onset of clinical signs. The main finding during postmortem examination was a severe focally extensive pneumonia. Icterus and a chronic mastitis were also noticed. Histologic examination of the lungs detected fibrinonecrotic pneumonia, with large number of oat cells and intralesional Gram-negative bacterial colonies. Samples from lung lesions were collected, and a pure growth of Escherichia fergusonii was obtained. E. fergusonii is a member of Enterobacteriaceae, related to Escherichia coli and Salmonella sp. In veterinary medicine, E. fergusonii has been reported in calves and sheep with clinical cases suggestive of salmonellosis; in a horse and a goat with enteritis and septicemia; and in ostriches with fibrinonecrotic typhlitis. To our knowledge, this report represents the first description of E. fergusonii associated with an acute pneumonia in cattle. PMID:26464912

  4. Escherichia fergusonii Associated with Pneumonia in a Beef Cow

    PubMed Central

    Rimoldi, Guillermo M.; Moeller, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    An adult Angus cow developed hyperthermia, prostration, and respiratory distress, dying 36 hours after the onset of clinical signs. The main finding during postmortem examination was a severe focally extensive pneumonia. Icterus and a chronic mastitis were also noticed. Histologic examination of the lungs detected fibrinonecrotic pneumonia, with large number of oat cells and intralesional Gram-negative bacterial colonies. Samples from lung lesions were collected, and a pure growth of Escherichia fergusonii was obtained. E. fergusonii is a member of Enterobacteriaceae, related to Escherichia coli and Salmonella sp. In veterinary medicine, E. fergusonii has been reported in calves and sheep with clinical cases suggestive of salmonellosis; in a horse and a goat with enteritis and septicemia; and in ostriches with fibrinonecrotic typhlitis. To our knowledge, this report represents the first description of E. fergusonii associated with an acute pneumonia in cattle. PMID:26464912

  5. Chronic Klebsiella pneumonia: a rare manifestation of Klebsiella pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Thungtitigul, Poungrat; Suwatanapongched, Thitiporn

    2015-01-01

    K. pneumoniae can present as two forms of community-acquired pneumonia, acute and chronic. Although acute pneumonia may turn into necrotizing pneumonia, which results in a prolonged clinical course, it often has a rapidly progressive clinical course. In contrast, chronic Klebsiella pneumonia runs a protracted indolent course that mimics other chronic pulmonary infections and malignancies. Herein, we present two cases of chronic Klebsiella pneumonia. The diagnosis was made by microorganism identification, as well as absence of other potential causes. Clinical and radiographic findings improved after a prolonged course of antibiotic therapy. PMID:26543615

  6. Fatal pneumonia due to Serratia proteamaculans subsp. quinovora.

    PubMed Central

    Bollet, C; Grimont, P; Gainnier, M; Geissler, A; Sainty, J M; De Micco, P

    1993-01-01

    Serratia proteamaculans subsp. quinovora was isolated from several samples (blood cultures, tracheal aspirates, pleural effusion) from a patient with pneumonia. This is the first clinical isolate and the first documented human infection caused by this organism. PMID:8432835

  7. Focal adhesions in osteoneogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, M.J.P; Dalby, M.J

    2010-01-01

    As materials technology and the field of tissue engineering advances, the role of cellular adhesive mechanisms, in particular the interactions with implantable devices, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. A key tenet of medical device technology is to use the exquisite ability of biological systems to respond to the material surface or chemical stimuli in order to help develop next-generation biomaterials. The focus of this review is on recent studies and developments concerning focal adhesion formation in osteoneogenesis, with an emphasis on the influence of synthetic constructs on integrin mediated cellular adhesion and function. PMID:21287830

  8. Chest CT findings of influenza virus‐associated pneumonia in 12 adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Jiro; Bandoh, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Higa, Futoshi; Tateyama, Masao

    2008-01-01

    Objective  In this study, we describe the chest computed tomography findings of influenza virus‐associated pneumonia in adult patients. Methods  Our retrospective study included 12 adult patients who had proven influenza virus ‐ associated pneumonia. Results  Out of 12 patients, six were diagnosed as having pure influenza virus pneumonia, five as having bronchopneumonia caused by bacteria associated with influenza A infection, and one as having a cryptogenic organizing pneumonia associated with influenza A infection. Conclusion  Radiographic findings of influenza virus pneumonia in adult patients consist of ground‐glass attenuation. Localized patchy consolidations were observed in cases of bronchopneumonia. PMID:19453425

  9. [Healthcare associated pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Ceccato, Adrián; González, Alejandra; Heres, Marcela; Peluffo, Graciela; Monteverde, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare associated pneumonia (HCAP) is a different entity from community-acquired pneumonia and nosocomial pneumonia. There exist several risk factors that lead to it. Different features, severity and pathogens are described and there is controversy about the initial empirical treatment. The aim of this work was to analyze the etiology, clinical characteristics and evolution of the HCAP. It is a prospective and observational study that includes 60 patients; 32 had previous hospitalization during the last 90 days, 9 were under hemodialysis, 12 residents in nursing homes and 7 received outpatient intravenous therapy. The mean age was 63 years and the severity index was high. The most frequent comorbidities were cardiac. The radiological compromise was more than one lobe in 42% of cases and 18% had pleural effusion. Germ isolation was obtained in 30% of patients where the most isolated germ was Streptococcus pneumoniae (9 cases). There was only one case of multidrug-resistance. The mean length hospital stay was 11 days, six patients had complications and mortality was 5%. Complications but not mortality were significantly higher in the group of patients on hemodialysis (p value = 0.011 and 0.056 respectively). The antibiotic-resistance found do not justify a change in the antibiotic treatment commonly used for community acquired pneumonia. PMID:24561835

  10. A Compendium for Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Gretchen L; Kinjo, Takeshi; Fujita, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Historically, atypical pneumonia was a term used to describe an unusual presentation of pneumonia. Currently, it is used to describe the multitude of symptoms juxtaposing the classic symptoms found in cases of pneumococcal pneumonia. Specifically, atypical pneumonia is a syndrome resulting from a relatively common group of pathogens including Chlamydophila sp., and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The incidence of M. pneumoniae pneumonia in adults is less than the burden experienced by children. Transmission rates among families indicate children may act as a reservoir and maintain contagiousness over a long period of time ranging from months to years. In adults, M. pneumoniae typically produces a mild, "walking" pneumonia and is considered to be one of the causes of persistent cough in patients. M. pneumoniae has also been shown to trigger the exacerbation of other lung diseases. It has been repeatedly detected in patients with bronchitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and cystic fibrosis. Recent advances in technology allow for the rapid diagnosis of M. pneumoniae through the use of polymerase chain reaction or rapid antigen tests. With this, more effort has been afforded to identify the causative etiologic agent in all cases of pneumonia. However, previous practices, including the overprescribing of macrolide treatment in China and Japan, have created increased incidence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae. Reports from these countries indicate that >85% of M. pneumoniae pneumonia pediatric cases are macrolide-resistant. Despite its extensively studied past, the smallest bacterial species still inspires some of the largest questions. The developments in microbiology, diagnostic features and techniques, epidemiology, treatment and vaccines, and upper respiratory conditions associated with M. pneumoniae in adult populations are included within this review. PMID:27148202

  11. A Compendium for Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Parrott, Gretchen L.; Kinjo, Takeshi; Fujita, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Historically, atypical pneumonia was a term used to describe an unusual presentation of pneumonia. Currently, it is used to describe the multitude of symptoms juxtaposing the classic symptoms found in cases of pneumococcal pneumonia. Specifically, atypical pneumonia is a syndrome resulting from a relatively common group of pathogens including Chlamydophila sp., and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The incidence of M. pneumoniae pneumonia in adults is less than the burden experienced by children. Transmission rates among families indicate children may act as a reservoir and maintain contagiousness over a long period of time ranging from months to years. In adults, M. pneumoniae typically produces a mild, “walking” pneumonia and is considered to be one of the causes of persistent cough in patients. M. pneumoniae has also been shown to trigger the exacerbation of other lung diseases. It has been repeatedly detected in patients with bronchitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and cystic fibrosis. Recent advances in technology allow for the rapid diagnosis of M. pneumoniae through the use of polymerase chain reaction or rapid antigen tests. With this, more effort has been afforded to identify the causative etiologic agent in all cases of pneumonia. However, previous practices, including the overprescribing of macrolide treatment in China and Japan, have created increased incidence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae. Reports from these countries indicate that >85% of M. pneumoniae pneumonia pediatric cases are macrolide-resistant. Despite its extensively studied past, the smallest bacterial species still inspires some of the largest questions. The developments in microbiology, diagnostic features and techniques, epidemiology, treatment and vaccines, and upper respiratory conditions associated with M. pneumoniae in adult populations are included within this review. PMID:27148202

  12. Lung dendritic cells facilitate extrapulmonary bacterial dissemination during pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Rosendahl, Alva; Bergmann, Simone; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Goldmann, Oliver; Medina, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of bacterial pneumonia worldwide. Given the critical role of dendritic cells (DCs) in regulating and modulating the immune response to pathogens, we investigated here the role of DCs in S. pneumoniae lung infections. Using a well-established transgenic mouse line which allows the conditional transient depletion of DCs, we showed that ablation of DCs resulted in enhanced resistance to intranasal challenge with S. pneumoniae. DCs-depleted mice exhibited delayed bacterial systemic dissemination, significantly reduced bacterial loads in the infected organs and lower levels of serum inflammatory mediators than non-depleted animals. The increased resistance of DCs-depleted mice to S. pneumoniae was associated with a better capacity to restrict pneumococci extrapulmonary dissemination. Furthermore, we demonstrated that S. pneumoniae disseminated from the lungs into the regional lymph nodes in a cell-independent manner and that this direct way of dissemination was much more efficient in the presence of DCs. We also provide evidence that S. pneumoniae induces expression and activation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in cultured bone marrow-derived DCs. MMP-9 is a protease involved in the breakdown of extracellular matrix proteins and is critical for DC trafficking across extracellular matrix and basement membranes during the migration from the periphery to the lymph nodes. MMP-9 was also significantly up-regulated in the lungs of mice after intranasal infection with S. pneumoniae. Notably, the expression levels of MMP-9 in the infected lungs were significantly decreased after depletion of DCs suggesting the involvement of DCs in MMP-9 production during pneumococcal pneumonia. Thus, we propose that S. pneumoniae can exploit the DC-derived proteolysis to open tissue barriers thereby facilitating its own dissemination from the local site of infection. PMID:23802100

  13. Pathophysiology of pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Alcón, Amalia; Fàbregas, Neus; Torres, Antoni

    2005-03-01

    The development of pneumonia requires that a pathogen reach the alveoli and that the host defenses are overwhelmed by microorganism virulence or by the inoculum size. The endogenous sources of microorganisms are nasal carriers, sinusitis, oropharynx, gastric, or tracheal colonization, and hematogenous spread. Other external sources of contamination, such as intensive care unit workers, aerosols, or fibrobronchoscopy, must be considered as accidental. PMID:15802164

  14. Vaccinating welders against pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Keith T; Cosgrove, Martin P

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2011 the Department of Health in England recommended that welders should each receive a single dose of the 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PPV23). This review assesses the evidence behind the advice and its practical implications. Method The review was informed by a systematic search in Medline, which related pneumonia to welding and/or exposure to metal fume, and was supplemented using the personal libraries of the authors. Findings There is consistent evidence that welders die more often of pneumonia, especially lobar pneumonia, are hospitalised more often with lobar and pneumococcal pneumonia, and more often develop invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). It is estimated that one case of IPD may be prevented over a 10-year period by vaccinating 588 welders against pneumococcal infection. Conclusions A good case exists that employers should offer PPV23 vaccination to welders and other employees exposed to metal fume. Additionally, reasonable measures must be taken to minimise exposure to welding fume and welders should be encouraged not to smoke. PMID:22764269

  15. Lipoid pneumonia: an overview.

    PubMed

    Hadda, Vijay; Khilnani, Gopi C

    2010-12-01

    Lipoid pneumonia is an uncommon disease caused by the presence of lipid in the alveoli. It is classified into two major groups, depending on whether the lipid/oil in the respiratory tract is from an exogenous (exogenous lipoid pneumonia) or endogenous/idiopathic (endogenous lipoid pneumonia) source. The usual presentation occurs with insidious onset and nonspecific respiratory symptoms such as dyspnea and/or cough. The main radiological findings include airspace consolidations, ground-glass attenuation, airspace nodules and 'crazy-paving' pattern. However, the radiological appearance of the disorder can mimic many other lung diseases, including carcinoma. Owing to the nonspecific clinical presentation and radiological features, the diagnosis is often missed or delayed. Pathologically, lipoid pneumonia is a chronic foreign body reaction to fat, characterized by lipid-laden macrophages. Diagnosis of this disease requires a high index of suspicion and can be confirmed by demonstration of lipid-laden macrophages in respiratory samples such as sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or fine-needle aspiration cytology/biopsy from lung lesions. Treatment protocols for this illness are poorly defined. PMID:21128754

  16. Pneumonia - children - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... have some symptoms of pneumonia after leaving the hospital. Coughing will slowly get better over 7 to 14 days. Sleeping and eating may take up to a week to return to normal. You may need to take time off work to care for your child.

  17. Mosaic Focal Plane Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, David L.; Horner, Scott D.; Aamodt, Earl K.

    2002-12-01

    Advances in systems engineering, applied sciences, and manufacturing technologies have enabled the development of large ground based and spaced based astronomical instruments having a large Field of View (FOV) to capture a large portion of the universe in a single image. A larger FOV can be accomplished using light weighted optical elements, improved support structures, and the development of mosaic Focal Plane Assemblies (mFPA). A mFPA designed for astronomy can use multiple Charged Coupled Devices (CCD) mounted onto a single camera baseplate integrated at the instrument plane of focus. Examples of current, or proposed, missions utilizing mFPA technology include FAME, GEST, Kepler, GAIA, LSST, and SNAP. The development of a mFPA mandates tighter control on the design trades, component development, CCD characterization, component integration, and performance verification testing. This paper addresses the capability Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company's (LMSSC) Advanced Technology Center (ATC) has developed to perform CCD characterization, mFPA assembly and alignment, and mFPA system level testing.

  18. Mosaic Focal Plane Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, D.; Horner, S.; Aamodt, E.

    Advances in manufacturing and applied sciences have enabled the development of large ground and spaced based astronomical instruments having a Field of View (FOV) large enough to capture a large portion of the universe in a single image. A large FOV can be accomplished using light weighted optics, improved structures, and the development of mosaic Focal Plane Assemblies (mFPAs). A mFPA comprises multiple Charged Coupled Devices (CCD) mounted onto a single baseplate integrated at the focus plane of the instrument. Examples of current, or proposed, missions utilizing mFPA technology include FAME, GEST, Kepler, GAIA, LSST, and SNAP. The development of a mFPA mandates tight control on the design trades of component development, CCD definition and characterization, component integration, and performance verification testing. This paper addresses the results of the Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC), Advanced Technology Center (ATC) developed mFPA. The design trades and performance characterization are services provided by the LMSSC ATC but not detailed in this paper.

  19. Klebsiella pneumoniae Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Girometti, Nicolò; Lewis, Russell E.; Giannella, Maddalena; Ambretti, Simone; Bartoletti, Michele; Tedeschi, Sara; Tumietto, Fabio; Cristini, Francesco; Trapani, Filippo; Gaibani, Paolo; Viale, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Multidrug resistance associated with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) among K. pneumoniae is endemic in southern Europe. We retrospectively analyzed the impact of resistance on the appropriateness of empirical therapy and treatment outcomes of K. pneumoniae bloodstream infections (BSIs) during a 2-year period at a 1420-bed tertiary-care teaching hospital in northern Italy. We identified 217 unique patient BSIs, including 92 (42%) KPC-positive, 49 (23%) ESBL-positive, and 1 (0.5%) metallo-beta-lactamase-positive isolates. Adequate empirical therapy was administered in 74% of infections caused by non-ESBL non-KPC strains, versus 33% of ESBL and 23% of KPC cases (p < 0.0001). To clarify the impact of resistance on BSI treatment outcomes, we compared several different models comprised of non-antibiotic treatment-related factors predictive of patients’ 30-day survival status. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score determined at the time of positive blood culture was superior to other investigated models, correctly predicting survival status in 83% of the study cohort. In multivariate analysis accounting for APACHE II, receipt of inadequate empirical therapy was associated with nearly a twofold higher rate of death (adjusted hazard ratio 1.9, 95% confidence interval 1.1–3.4; p = 0.02). Multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae accounted for two-thirds of all K. pneumoniae BSIs, high rates of inappropriate empirical therapy, and twofold higher rates of patient death irrespective of underlying illness. PMID:25398065

  20. The burden of pneumonia in children: an Asian perspective.

    PubMed

    Singh, Varinder

    2005-06-01

    Pneumonia results in two million deaths each year among children worldwide (20% of all child deaths), 70% of them in Africa and South-east Asia. Most countries in Africa and Asia record 2-10 times more children with pneumonia (7-40/100 annually) than in the USA. Apart from resource constraints and an overburdened health system, there is lack of uniformity in defining pneumonia. Most nations employ a WHO standard case management protocol using age-specific cut-offs for increased respiratory rates and chest in-drawing for a clinical definition of pneumonia. The limited data available on the causative organisms have identified Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and viruses such as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza, para influenza and adenoviruses as the major pathogens. Measles infection increases pneumonia morbidity and mortality. Low birth weight, under-nutrition, hypovitaminosis A, zinc deficiency, lack of breastfeeding, air pollution (including environmental tobacco smoke) and over-crowding increase the risk for pneumonias in children. Standard case management protocols used for acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in these countries have brought down the disease burden but an improvement in the diagnostic algorithm is needed to appropriately recognise those with associated wheeze. Research is needed to find effective and affordable preventive strategies. PMID:15911453

  1. Pneumonia in the nursing home.

    PubMed

    Drinka, Paul J; Crnich, Christopher J

    2005-01-01

    Pneumonia syndromes may be caused by infection or the aspiration of food, acid, or particulate material. Antibiotic-resistant organisms or recurrent aspiration should be considered if the response to treatment is poor. Clinicians should consider discontinuing antibiotics if the resident's status rapidly returns to baseline after a noninfectious macro-aspiration event. The natural history of this process, however, is not well characterized. Diagnostic procedures including sputum gram stain, culture, and urinary antigen testing should be pursued to diagnose pathogens not covered by empiric therapy or to focus therapy with narrow spectrum agents. Sources of aspiration, including pharyngeal dysphagia, periodontal disease, and gastric regurgitation, should be identified and treated in hopes of preventing recurrence. PMID:16165077

  2. Focal colors are universal after all

    PubMed Central

    Regier, Terry; Kay, Paul; Cook, Richard S.

    2005-01-01

    It is widely held that named color categories in the world's languages are organized around universal focal colors and that these focal colors tend to be chosen as the best examples of color terms across languages. However, this notion has been supported primarily by data from languages of industrialized societies. In contrast, recent research on a language from a nonindustrialized society has called this idea into question. We examine color-naming data from languages of 110 nonindustrialized societies and show that (i) best-example choices for color terms in these languages cluster near the prototypes for English white, black, red, green, yellow, and blue, and (ii) best-example choices cluster more tightly across languages than do the centers of category extensions, suggesting that universal best examples (foci) may be the source of universal tendencies in color naming. PMID:15923257

  3. mPneumonia: Development of an Innovative mHealth Application for Diagnosing and Treating Childhood Pneumonia and Other Childhood Illnesses in Low-Resource Settings

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, Amy Sarah; Delarosa, Jaclyn; Brunette, Waylon; Levari, Shahar; Sundt, Mitch; Larson, Clarice; Tawiah Agyemang, Charlotte; Newton, Sam; Borriello, Gaetano; Anderson, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is the leading infectious cause of death in children worldwide. Each year, pneumonia kills an estimated 935,000 children under five years of age, with most of these deaths occurring in developing countries. The current approach for pneumonia diagnosis in low-resource settings—using the World Health Organization Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) paper-based protocols and relying on a health care provider’s ability to manually count respiratory rate—has proven inadequate. Furthermore, hypoxemia—a diagnostic indicator of the presence and severity of pneumonia often associated with an increased risk of death—is not assessed because pulse oximetry is frequently not available in low-resource settings. In an effort to address childhood pneumonia mortality and improve frontline health care providers’ ability to diagnose, classify, and manage pneumonia and other childhood illnesses, PATH collaborated with the University of Washington to develop “mPneumonia,” an innovative mobile health application using an Android tablet. mPneumonia integrates a digital version of the IMCI algorithm with a software-based breath counter and a pediatric pulse oximeter. We conducted a design-stage usability field test of mPneumonia in Ghana, with the goal of creating a user-friendly diagnostic and management tool for childhood pneumonia and other childhood illnesses that would improve diagnostic accuracy and facilitate adherence by health care providers to established guidelines in low-resource settings. The results of the field test provided valuable information for understanding the usability and acceptability of mPneumonia among health care providers, and identifying approaches to iterate and improve. This critical feedback helped ascertain the common failure modes related to the user interface design, navigation, and accessibility of mPneumonia and the modifications required to improve user experience and create a tool aimed at decreasing mortality

  4. mPneumonia: Development of an Innovative mHealth Application for Diagnosing and Treating Childhood Pneumonia and Other Childhood Illnesses in Low-Resource Settings.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Amy Sarah; Delarosa, Jaclyn; Brunette, Waylon; Levari, Shahar; Sundt, Mitch; Larson, Clarice; Tawiah Agyemang, Charlotte; Newton, Sam; Borriello, Gaetano; Anderson, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is the leading infectious cause of death in children worldwide. Each year, pneumonia kills an estimated 935,000 children under five years of age, with most of these deaths occurring in developing countries. The current approach for pneumonia diagnosis in low-resource settings--using the World Health Organization Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) paper-based protocols and relying on a health care provider's ability to manually count respiratory rate--has proven inadequate. Furthermore, hypoxemia--a diagnostic indicator of the presence and severity of pneumonia often associated with an increased risk of death--is not assessed because pulse oximetry is frequently not available in low-resource settings. In an effort to address childhood pneumonia mortality and improve frontline health care providers' ability to diagnose, classify, and manage pneumonia and other childhood illnesses, PATH collaborated with the University of Washington to develop "mPneumonia," an innovative mobile health application using an Android tablet. mPneumonia integrates a digital version of the IMCI algorithm with a software-based breath counter and a pediatric pulse oximeter. We conducted a design-stage usability field test of mPneumonia in Ghana, with the goal of creating a user-friendly diagnostic and management tool for childhood pneumonia and other childhood illnesses that would improve diagnostic accuracy and facilitate adherence by health care providers to established guidelines in low-resource settings. The results of the field test provided valuable information for understanding the usability and acceptability of mPneumonia among health care providers, and identifying approaches to iterate and improve. This critical feedback helped ascertain the common failure modes related to the user interface design, navigation, and accessibility of mPneumonia and the modifications required to improve user experience and create a tool aimed at decreasing mortality from

  5. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Polverino, E; Torres Marti, A

    2011-02-01

    Despite the remarkable advances in antibiotic therapies, diagnostic tools, prevention campaigns and intensive care, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is still among the primary causes of death worldwide, and there have been no significant changes in mortality in the last decades. The clinical and economic burden of CAP makes it a major public health problem, particularly for children and the elderly. This issue provides a clinical overview of CAP, focusing on epidemiology, economic burden, diagnosis, risk stratification, treatment, clinical management, and prevention. Particular attention is given to some aspects related to the clinical management of CAP, such as the microbial etiology and the available tools to achieve it, the usefulness of new and old biomarkers, and antimicrobial and other non-antibiotic adjunctive therapies. Possible scenarios in which pneumonia does not respond to treatment are also analyzed to improve clinical outcomes of CAP. PMID:21242952

  6. Acinetobacter Pneumonia: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hartzell, Joshua D.; Kim, Andrew S.; Kortepeter, Mark G.; Moran, Kimberly A.

    2007-01-01

    Acinetobacter species are becoming a major cause of nosocomial infections, including hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated pneumonia. Acinetobacter species have become increasingly resistant to antibiotics over the past several years and currently present a significant challenge in treating these infections. Physicians now rely on older agents, such as polymyxins (colistin), for treatment. This paper reviews the epidemiology, treatment, and prevention of this emerging pathogen. PMID:18092011

  7. Septic shock, necrotizing pneumonitis, and meningoencephalitis caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae in a child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Barreira, Eliane R; Souza, Daniela C; Góes, Patricia F; Bousso, Albert

    2009-04-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an important causative agent of respiratory infection in childhood. Although the infection caused by M. pneumoniae is classically described as benign, severe and life-threatening pulmonary and extrapulmonary complications can occur. This study describes the first case of septic shock related to M. pneumoniae in a child with necrotizing pneumonitis, severe encephalitis, and multiple organs involvement, with a favorable outcome after lobectomy and systemic corticosteroids. PMID:19023109

  8. Statistical Earthquake Focal Mechanism Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Y. Y.; Jackson, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    The new whole Earth focal mechanism forecast, based on the GCMT catalog, has been created. In the present forecast, the sum of normalized seismic moment tensors within 1000 km radius is calculated and the P- and T-axes for the focal mechanism are evaluated on the basis of the sum. Simultaneously we calculate an average rotation angle between the forecasted mechanism and all the surrounding mechanisms. This average angle shows tectonic complexity of a region and indicates the accuracy of the prediction. The method was originally proposed by Kagan and Jackson (1994, JGR). Recent interest by CSEP and GEM has motivated some improvements, particularly to extend the previous forecast to polar and near-polar regions. The major problem in extending the forecast is the focal mechanism calculation on a spherical surface. In the previous forecast as our average focal mechanism was computed, it was assumed that longitude lines are approximately parallel within 1000 km radius. This is largely accurate in the equatorial and near-equatorial areas. However, when one approaches the 75 degree latitude, the longitude lines are no longer parallel: the bearing (azimuthal) difference at points separated by 1000 km reach about 35 degrees. In most situations a forecast point where we calculate an average focal mechanism is surrounded by earthquakes, so a bias should not be strong due to the difference effect cancellation. But if we move into polar regions, the bearing difference could approach 180 degrees. In a modified program focal mechanisms have been projected on a plane tangent to a sphere at a forecast point. New longitude axes which are parallel in the tangent plane are corrected for the bearing difference. A comparison with the old 75S-75N forecast shows that in equatorial regions the forecasted focal mechanisms are almost the same, and the difference in the forecasted focal mechanisms rotation angle is close to zero. However, though the forecasted focal mechanisms are similar

  9. [Travel-associated pneumonias].

    PubMed

    Geerdes-Fenge, H F

    2014-10-01

    Respiratory infections are responsible for up to 11% of febrile infections in travellers or immigrants from tropical and subtropical regions. The main pathogens are the same as in temperate climate zones: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, influenza viruses, Legionella pneumophila. However, some pulmonary diseases can be attributed to bacterial, parasitic, viral or fungal pathogens that are endemic in tropical and subtropical regions. The most commonly imported infections are malaria, dengue, and tuberculosis. Pulmonary symptoms and eosinophilia in returning travellers and migrants may be caused by several parasitic infections such as Katayama syndrome, Loeffler syndrome, tropical pulmonary eosinophilia, amebiasis, paragonimiasis, echinococcosis, and toxocariasis. In Asia, Tsutsugamushi fever is transmitted by chiggers, spotted fever rickettsiae are transmitted by ticks. Transmission of zoonotic diseases occurs mainly via contact with infected animals or their excretions, human-to-human transmission is generally rare: MERS-CoA (dromedary camels), pulmonary hantavirus infection (rodents), tularemia (rabbits and hares), leptospirosis (rats), Q-fever (sheep and goats), very rarely anthrax (hides of ruminants) and pest (infected rats and wildlife). Inhalation of contaminated dust can cause infections with dimorphic fungi: histoplasmosis (bat guano) and coccidioidomycosis in America and parts of Africa, blastomycosis in America. Some infections can cause symptoms years after a stay in tropical or subtropical regions (melioidosis, tuberculosis, histoplasmosis, schistosomiasis-associated pulmonary hypertension). Noninfectious respiratory diseases caused by inhalation of high amounts of air pollution or toxic dusts may also be considered. PMID:25290923

  10. Motility of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Radestock, U; Bredt, W

    1977-01-01

    Cell of Mycoplasma pneumoniae FH gliding on a glass surface in liquid medium were examined by microscopic observation and quantitatively by microcinematography (30 frames per min). Comparisons were made only within the individual experiments. The cells moved in an irregular pattern with numerous narrow bends and circles. They never changed their leading end. The average speed (without pauses) was relatively constant between o.2 and 0.5 mum/s. The maximum speed was about 1.5 to 2.0 mum/s. The movements were interrupted by resting periods of different lengths and frequency. Temperature, viscosity, pH, and the presence of yeast extract in the medium influenced the motility significantly; changes in glucose, calcium ions, and serum content were less effective. The movements were affected by iodoacetate, p-mercuribenzoate, and mitomycin C at inhibitory or subinhibitory concentrations. Sodium fluoride, sodium cyanide, dinitrophenol, chloramphenicol, puromycin, cholchicin, and cytochalasin B at minimal inhibitory concentrations did not affect motility. The movements were effectively inhibited by anti-M. pneumoniae antiserum. Studies with absorbed antiserum suggested that the surface components involved in motility are heat labile. The gliding of M. pneumoniae cells required an intact energy metabolism and the proteins involved seemed to have a low turnover. Images PMID:14925

  11. Hypervirulent (hypermucoviscous) Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Shon, Alyssa S.; Bajwa, Rajinder P.S.; Russo, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    A new hypervirulent (hypermucoviscous) variant of Klebsiella pneumoniae has emerged. First described in the Asian Pacific Rim, it now increasingly recognized in Western countries. Defining clinical features are the ability to cause serious, life-threatening community-acquired infection in younger healthy hosts, including liver abscess, pneumonia, meningitis and endophthalmitis and the ability to metastatically spread, an unusual feature for enteric Gram-negative bacilli in the non-immunocompromised. Despite infecting a healthier population, significant morbidity and mortality occurs. Although epidemiologic features are still being defined, colonization, particularly intestinal colonization, appears to be a critical step leading to infection. However the route of entry remains unclear. The majority of cases described to date are in Asians, raising the issue of a genetic predisposition vs. geospecific strain acquisition. The traits that enhance its virulence when compared with “classical” K. pneumoniae are the ability to more efficiently acquire iron and perhaps an increase in capsule production, which confers the hypermucoviscous phenotype. An objective diagnostic test suitable for routine use in the clinical microbiology laboratory is needed. If/when these strains become increasingly resistant to antimicrobials, we will be faced with a frightening clinical scenario. PMID:23302790

  12. Burden of Severe Pneumonia, Pneumococcal Pneumonia and Pneumonia Deaths in Indian States: Modelling Based Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Farooqui, Habib; Jit, Mark; Heymann, David L.; Zodpey, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The burden of severe pneumonia in terms of morbidity and mortality is unknown in India especially at sub-national level. In this context, we aimed to estimate the number of severe pneumonia episodes, pneumococcal pneumonia episodes and pneumonia deaths in children younger than 5 years in 2010. We adapted and parameterized a mathematical model based on the epidemiological concept of potential impact fraction developed CHERG for this analysis. The key parameters that determine the distribution of severe pneumonia episode across Indian states were state-specific under-5 population, state-specific prevalence of selected definite pneumonia risk factors and meta-estimates of relative risks for each of these risk factors. We applied the incidence estimates and attributable fraction of risk factors to population estimates for 2010 of each Indian state. We then estimated the number of pneumococcal pneumonia cases by applying the vaccine probe methodology to an existing trial. We estimated mortality due to severe pneumonia and pneumococcal pneumonia by combining incidence estimates with case fatality ratios from multi-centric hospital-based studies. Our results suggest that in 2010, 3.6 million (3.3–3.9 million) episodes of severe pneumonia and 0.35 million (0.31–0.40 million) all cause pneumonia deaths occurred in children younger than 5 years in India. The states that merit special mention include Uttar Pradesh where 18.1% children reside but contribute 24% of pneumonia cases and 26% pneumonia deaths, Bihar (11.3% children, 16% cases, 22% deaths) Madhya Pradesh (6.6% children, 9% cases, 12% deaths), and Rajasthan (6.6% children, 8% cases, 11% deaths). Further, we estimated that 0.56 million (0.49–0.64 million) severe episodes of pneumococcal pneumonia and 105 thousand (92–119 thousand) pneumococcal deaths occurred in India. The top contributors to India’s pneumococcal pneumonia burden were Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh and Rajasthan in that order. Our

  13. Rothia mucilaginosa pneumonia in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Baeza Martínez, Carlos; Zamora Molina, Lucia; García Sevila, Raquel; Gil Carbonell, Joan; Ramos Rincon, José Manuel; Martín Serrano, Concepción

    2014-11-01

    Rothia mucilaginosa is a gram-postive coccus that occurs as part of the normal flora of the oropharynx and upper respiratory tract. Lower respiratory tract infections caused by this organism are rare and usually occur in immunocompromised patients. This is the case of an immunocompetent 47-year-old woman with right upper lobe pneumonia in which R.mucilaginosa was isolated in sputum and bronchial aspirate. Infections caused by this agent in the last four years in our hospital were reviewed. The most common predisposing factor was COPD with bronchiectasis. R.mucilaginosa was identified as the causative agent for pneumonia in only two cases, of which one was our case and the other was a patient with lung cancer. PMID:24568756

  14. Pneumonia and empyema: causal, casual or unknown

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Parapneumonic effusions complicating pneumonia are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Along with increased mortality, complicated parapneumonic effusion and empyema often necessitate prolonged treatment, longer hospital stay and interventions. Parapneumonic effusions arise from inflammation in the lungs and pleural space from direct invasion of bacteria, cascade of inflammatory events and bacteriologic virulence features. Patient factors and comorbidities also contribute to the pathophysiology of parapneumonic effusion development. The evolution of parapneumonic effusion can be divided into three progressive stages: (I) exudative stage; (II) fibrinopurulent stage; and (III) organizing stage with pleural peel formation. These stages can help categorize effusions into groups in order to evaluate the risk of a complicated course requiring intervention. We recommend that clinical data be evaluated and a stepwise approach be taken in management of these patients. This review article discusses current understanding of the development and relationship of parapneumonic effusions with pneumonia. PMID:26150912

  15. Mycobacterium fortuitum lipoid pneumonia in a dog.

    PubMed

    Leissinger, M K; Garber, J B; Fowlkes, N; Grooters, A M; Royal, A B; Gaunt, S D

    2015-03-01

    A 1-year old female spayed German Shepherd dog was evaluated for acute onset of dyspnea. Pyogranulomatous inflammation and green globoid structures were present on aspirates of the affected lung. Impression smears and histopathology confirmed pyogranulomatous pneumonia, with large amounts of lipid corresponding to the green structures noted cytologically, and identified poorly staining bacterial rods within lipid vacuoles. Special stains confirmed the presence of acid-fast bacterial rods, and polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing identified the organism as Mycobacterium fortuitum. M. fortuitum pneumonia is well described in humans and has previously been reported in 4 dogs and 1 cat. Lipid was a prominent cytologic and histologic feature, as is often described in humans and in the single feline case report. Additionally, this case highlights the variable cytologic appearance of lipid, as well as Mycobacterium spp, which are classically nonstaining with Wright-Giemsa. PMID:24788402

  16. Understanding, preventing and eradicating Klebsiella pneumoniae biofilms.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Suzana Meira; Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; Cândido, Elizabete de Souza; Franco, Octávio Luiz

    2016-04-01

    The ability of pathogenic bacteria to aggregate and form biofilm represents a great problem for public health, since they present extracellular components that encase these micro-organisms, making them more resistant to antibiotics and host immune attack. This may become worse when antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains form biofilms. However, antibiofilm screens with different compounds may reveal potential therapies to prevent/treat biofilm infections. Here, we focused on Klebsiella pneumoniae, an opportunistic bacterium that causes different types of infections, including in the bloodstream, meninges, lungs, urinary system and at surgical sites. We also highlight aspects involved in the formation and maintenance of K. pneumoniae biofilms, as well as resistance and the emergence of new trends to combat this health challenge. PMID:27064296

  17. Pneumonia caused by Pittsburgh pneumonia agent: radiologic manifestations

    SciTech Connect

    Muder, R.R.; Reddy, S.C.; Yu, V.L.; Kroboth, F.J.

    1984-03-01

    Using an objective scoring system, chest radiographs were reviewed in 23 cases of pneumonia due to the Pittsburgh pneumonia agent (PPA, Tatlockia micdadei, Legionella micdadei), including six cases of pneumonia with simultaneous isolation of PPA and L pneumophila (Legionnaires' disease). Infiltrates were typically segmental to lobar; nodular infiltrates were noted in three cases. Spread to additional lobes after presentation occurred in four of 17 PPA infections. Pneumonia caused by both PPA and L pneumophila was unusually severe, with involvement of all lobes occurring in four of six cases, compared with one of 17 cases of PPA infection (p>0.02). Radiographic severity did not correlate with underlying disease, immune status, or outcome. The majority of patients receiving erythromycin demonstrated objective radiologic improvement. In a patients, population that included nonimmunosuppressed patient, nodule formation and rapid radiologic progression were not found to be characteristic of PPA pneumonia.

  18. Precise Measurement of Effective Focal Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, T. D.; Young, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    Computerized instrument measures effective focal lengths to 0.01 percent accuracy. Laser interferometers measure mirror angle and stage coordinate y in instrument for accurate measurment of focal properties of optical systems. Operates under computer control to measure effective focal length, focal surface shape, modulation transfer function, and astigmatism.

  19. [A case of bettolepsy in acute pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Valenkevich, L N; Markelova, N N

    1992-03-01

    Literature lists more than 300 case reports of bettolepsy developing mainly in chronic diseases of the respiratory organs (chronic bronchitis, bronchial asthma, pulmonary emphysema, cor pulmonale) as well as in patients with epilepsy and organic brain diseases. The authors describe a case of bettolepsy in a patient with acute (croupous) pneumonia without respiratory diseases in the anamnesis and without a burdened neurological status. The role of nicotin and alcohol in the development of bettolepsy is shown. The problems of pathogenesis, clinical picture, differential diagnosis and treatment of bettolepsy are discussed. PMID:1413706

  20. Role of Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-Containing (NOD) 2 in Host Defense during Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Hommes, Tijmen J.; van Lieshout, Miriam H.; van ‘t Veer, Cornelis; Florquin, Sandrine; Bootsma, Hester J.; Hermans, Peter W.; de Vos, Alex F.; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing (NOD) 2 is a pattern recognition receptor located in the cytosol of myeloid cells that is able to detect peptidoglycan fragments of S. pneumoniae. We here aimed to investigate the role of NOD2 in the host response during pneumococcal pneumonia. Phagocytosis of S. pneumoniae was studied in NOD2 deficient (Nod2-/-) and wild-type (Wt) alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in vitro. In subsequent in vivo experiments Nod2-/- and Wt mice were inoculated with serotype 2 S. pneumoniae (D39), an isogenic capsule locus deletion mutant (D39Δcps) or serotype 3 S. pneumoniae (6303) via the airways, and bacterial growth and dissemination and the lung inflammatory response were evaluated. Nod2-/- alveolar macrophages and blood neutrophils displayed a reduced capacity to internalize pneumococci in vitro. During pneumonia caused by S. pneumoniae D39 Nod2-/- mice were indistinguishable from Wt mice with regard to bacterial loads in lungs and distant organs, lung pathology and neutrophil recruitment. While Nod2-/- and Wt mice also had similar bacterial loads after infection with the more virulent S. pneumoniae 6303 strain, Nod2-/- mice displayed a reduced bacterial clearance of the normally avirulent unencapsulated D39Δcps strain. These results suggest that NOD2 does not contribute to host defense during pneumococcal pneumonia and that the pneumococcal capsule impairs recognition of S. pneumoniae by NOD2. PMID:26673231

  1. Enteral Tube Feeding and Pneumonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, David Sheridan; Kimmel, David

    2006-01-01

    To determine the effects of enteral tube feeding on the incidence of pneumonia, we performed a retrospective review of all clients at our institution who had gastrostomy or jejunostomy tubes placed over a 10-year period. Ninety-three subjects had a history of pneumonia before feeding tube insertion. Eighty had gastrostomy and 13, jejunostomy…

  2. Lymphocytic Interstitial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Panchabhai, Tanmay S; Farver, Carol; Highland, Kristin B

    2016-09-01

    Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP) is a rare lung disease on the spectrum of benign pulmonary lymphoproliferative disorders. LIP is frequently associated with connective tissue diseases or infections. Idiopathic LIP is rare; every attempt must be made to diagnose underlying conditions when LIP is diagnosed. Computed tomography of the chest in patients with LIP may reveal ground-glass opacities, centrilobular and subpleural nodules, and randomly distributed thin-walled cysts. Demonstrating polyclonality with immunohistochemistry is the key to differentiating LIP from lymphoma. The 5-year mortality remains between 33% and 50% and is likely to vary based on the underlying disease process. PMID:27514593

  3. Feedlot Acute Interstitial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Woolums, Amelia R

    2015-11-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) of feedlot cattle is a sporadically occurring respiratory condition that is often fatal. Affected cattle have a sudden onset of labored breathing. There is no confirmed effective treatment of feedlot AIP; however, administration of antibiotics effective against common bacterial respiratory pathogens and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, especially aspirin, has been recommended. Protective strategies are not well defined, but efforts to limit dust exposure and heat stress; to ensure consistent formulation, mixing, and delivery of feed; and to identify and treat infectious respiratory disease in a timely manner may decrease rates of feedlot AIP. PMID:26253266

  4. [National consensus for management of community acquired pneumonia in adults].

    PubMed

    Saldías P, Fernando; Pérez C, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an acute respiratory infection that affects pulmonary parenchyma, and is caused by community acquired microorganisms. In Chile, pneumonia represents the main cause of death due to infectious diseases and is the third specific cause of mortality in adults. In 1999, an experts committee in representation of "Sociedad Chilena de Enfermedades Respiratorias", presented the first National Guidelines for the Treatment of Adult Community Acquired Pneumonia, mainly based in foreign experience and documents, and adapted it to our National Health System Organization. During the last decade, impressive epidemiological and technological changes have occurred, making the update of guidelines for treatment of NAC by several international scientific societies, necessary. These changes include: new respiratory pathogens that are being identified in CAP and affect adult patients (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila); the increasing senescent adult population that carries multiple co-morbidities; the emergence of antimicrobial resistance among respiratory pathogens associated to massive antibiotic prescription; the development by the pharmaceutical industry of new drugs that are effective for pneumonia treatment (macrolides, ketolides and respiratory fluorquinolones); and the development of new diagnostic techniques for detection of antigens, antibodies, and bacterial DNA by molecular biology, useful in respiratory infections. Based on these antecedents, an Advisory Committee of "Sociedad Chilena de Enfermedades Respiratorias" and "Sociedad Chilena de Infectología" has reviewed the national and international evidence about CAP management in adults in order to update clinical recommendations for our country. PMID:16163422

  5. Diagnosis of Pneumonia in Children with Dehydrating Diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Ronan, Anne; Khan, Wasif Ali; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for diagnosis of pneumonia are based on the history of cough or difficult breathing and age-adjusted respiration rates. Metabolic acidosis associated with dehydrating diarrhoea also influences the respiration rate. Two hundred and four children, aged 2 to 59 months, with dehydrating diarrhoea and a history of cough and/or fast breathing, were enrolled in a prospective study. Pneumonia diagnoses were made on enrollment and again 6 hours post-enrollment (after initial rehydration), using the WHO guidelines. These were compared with investigators’ clinical diagnosis based on history and findings of physical examination and a chest x-ray at the same time points. Using the WHO guidelines, 149/152 (98%) infants in the 2-11 months age-group and 38/40 (95%) children in the 12-59 months age-group were diagnosed to have pneumonia on enrollment, which dropped to 107 (70%) and 30 (75%) respectively at 6 hours post-enrollment. The specificity of the WHO guidelines for diagnosis of pneumonia was very low (6.9%) at enrollment but increased to 65.5% at 6 hours post-enrollment, after initial rehydration. The specificity of the WHO guidelines for diagnosis of pneumonia in young children is significantly reduced in dehydrating diarrhoea. For young children with dehydrating diarrhoea, rehydration, clinical and radiological assessments are useful in identifying those with true pneumonia. PMID:24847588

  6. Fatal pneumonia and empyema thoracis caused by imipenem-resistant Nocardia abscessus in a cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chih-Cheng; Tsai, Hsih-Yeh; Ruan, Sheng-Yuan; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2015-12-01

    We describe a case of pneumonia and empyema thoracis caused by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-susceptible, but imipenem-resistant Nocardia abscessus in a cancer patient. The isolate was confirmed to the species level by 16S rRNA sequencing analysis. The patient did not respond to antibiotic therapy, including ceftriaxone and imipenem, and died of progressing pneumonia and multiple organ failure. PMID:23523047

  7. Continuously variable focal length lens

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Bernhard W; Chollet, Matthieu C

    2013-12-17

    A material preferably in crystal form having a low atomic number such as beryllium (Z=4) provides for the focusing of x-rays in a continuously variable manner. The material is provided with plural spaced curvilinear, optically matched slots and/or recesses through which an x-ray beam is directed. The focal length of the material may be decreased or increased by increasing or decreasing, respectively, the number of slots (or recesses) through which the x-ray beam is directed, while fine tuning of the focal length is accomplished by rotation of the material so as to change the path length of the x-ray beam through the aligned cylindrical slows. X-ray analysis of a fixed point in a solid material may be performed by scanning the energy of the x-ray beam while rotating the material to maintain the beam's focal point at a fixed point in the specimen undergoing analysis.

  8. Sex prevalence of focal dystonias.

    PubMed Central

    Soland, V L; Bhatia, K P; Marsden, C D

    1996-01-01

    The sex prevalence of idiopathic focal dystonia is reported from a data base review of all patients seen at the National Hospital of Neurology, Queen Square and King's College, London up to 1993. There was a higher prevalence of females to males in all categories of focal dystonia involving the craniocervical region. The female to male ratio for cranial dystonia was 1.92:1 (P < 0.01) and 1.6:1 (P < 0.001) for spasmodic torticollis. On the other hand, twice as many men than women had writer's cramp (M:F = 2.0:1, P < 0.01). At present, there is no clear explanation to account for this differences in the sex prevalence of different types of focal dystonia. PMID:8708656

  9. Animal models of polymicrobial pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Hraiech, Sami; Papazian, Laurent; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Bregeon, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is one of the leading causes of severe and occasionally life-threatening infections. The physiopathology of pneumonia has been extensively studied, providing information for the development of new treatments for this condition. In addition to in vitro research, animal models have been largely used in the field of pneumonia. Several models have been described and have provided a better understanding of pneumonia under different settings and with various pathogens. However, the concept of one pathogen leading to one infection has been challenged, and recent flu epidemics suggest that some pathogens exhibit highly virulent potential. Although “two hits” animal models have been used to study infectious diseases, few of these models have been described in pneumonia. Therefore the aims of this review were to provide an overview of the available literature in this field, to describe well-studied and uncommon pathogen associations, and to summarize the major insights obtained from this information. PMID:26170617

  10. Granzyme A impairs host defense during Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    van den Boogaard, Florry E; van Gisbergen, Klaas P J M; Vernooy, Juanita H; Medema, Jan P; Roelofs, Joris J T H; van Zoelen, Marieke A D; Endeman, Henrik; Biesma, Douwe H; Boon, Louis; Van't Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Granzyme A (GzmA) is a serine protease produced by a variety of cell types involved in the immune response. We sought to determine the role of GzmA on the host response during pneumococcal pneumonia. GzmA was measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) harvested from CAP patients from the infected and contralateral uninfected side and in lung tissue slides from CAP patients and controls. In CAP patients, GzmA levels were increased in BALF obtained from the infected lung. Human lungs showed constitutive GzmA expression by both parenchymal and nonparenchymal cells. In an experimental setting, pneumonia was induced in wild-type (WT) and GzmA-deficient (GzmA(-/-)) mice by intranasal inoculation of S. pneumoniae In separate experiments, WT and GzmA(-/-) mice were treated with natural killer (NK) cell depleting antibodies. Upon infection with S. pneumoniae, GzmA(-/-) mice showed a better survival and lower bacterial counts in BALF and distant body sites compared with WT mice. Although NK cells showed strong GzmA expression, NK cell depletion did not influence bacterial loads in either WT or GzmA(-/-) mice. These results implicate that GzmA plays an unfavorable role in host defense during pneumococcal pneumonia by a mechanism that does not depend on NK cells. PMID:27343190

  11. [Exogenous lipoid pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Ramos, S A; Ramos-Solano, F

    1989-09-01

    We report 30 patients with exogenous lipoid pneumonia due to vegetal oil. This was employed in most of the cases during the first month of life for digestive tube symptomatology; clinical manifestations began three months following administrations, as a pneumonia or bronchopneumonia with a respiratory distress syndrome of variable severity. 60% of the thorax x-ray studies were abnormal, the main finding was opacity. One patient has alterations of the mechanics of deglutition; seven had gastroesophageal reflux. Arterial gasometry showed hypoxaemia and increase of alveolo-arterial gradient of oxygen in all. Ten patients died and all the survivors were reevaluated in september, 1988; 18 had normal physical findings. Thorax x-ray studies in 13 patients had right reticulate infiltration and 6 right apical opacity; ECG showed right ventricular hypertrophy in 3. Perfusion pulmonary gamagram with technetium 99 was abnormal in 5. Gastroesophageal reflux was evident in 2. Five were under treatment for several causes. Diagnosis and treatment is discussed. PMID:2604874

  12. Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, B; Seed, W A

    1980-01-01

    We described three cases of eosinophilic pneumonia of unknown aetiology investigated clinically and by lung biopsy. The illnesses lasted between six and 20 weeks and consisted of cough, dyspnoea, malaise, and in two cases prolonged pyrexia. All had blood eosinophilia and chest radiographs showing widespread bilateral shadowing; in two cases this had a characteristic peripheral distribution. One patient recovered spontaneously and the other two responded to steroids, with disappearance of pyrexia within 12 hours and radiological clearing within 14 days. Lung function tests during the acute illness showed volume restriction or gas transfer defects or both in two cases. After remission all three showed abnormalities if small airways function. Lung biopsies performed during the acute illness were examined histologically and by transmission electron microscopy, and in two cases by immunofluorescence. There was both intra-alveolar and interstitial eosinophilic pneumonia with bronchiolitis obliterans, microgranulomata, and a vasculitis. Electron microscopy showed numerous eosinophils, many degranulated, and macrophages with phagocytosed eosinophilic granules and intracytoplasmic inclusions. In one case IgM, IgG, and IgA were demonstrated in the bronchial walls and interstitium. No IgE or complement was present. We believe that eosinophil granules are responsible for the tissue damage and fever and suggest mechanisms for this and for the response to steroid therapy. Images PMID:7003796

  13. Ultrastructural Analysis of Chlamydia Pneumoniae in the Alzheimer's Brain

    PubMed Central

    Arking, E. James; Appelt, Denah M.; Abrams, J. Todd; Kolbe, Sonya; Hudson, Alan P.; Balin, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    We recently reported identification of the bacterium Chlamydia pneumoniae in affected brain regions of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) (Balin et al., 1998). In this report, we extend those initial observations to demonstrate that, in addition to the frequently described, standard morphological forms of the organism, pleiomorphic forms are also present in the AD brain. All AD and control brain tissues examined were verified to be PCR-positive and negative, respectively, for the organism. DNA sequence determination of PCR products so derived from total DNA of infected AD brains, as well as from total DNA of cell lines infected with the organism following isolation from these same patient samples, confirmed the presence of organism in relevant samples. Various morphologic forms of C. pneumoniae were identified in PCR-positive tissues and these were characterized based on membrane structure, core density, size, and immunolabeling profiles. Structures identified include the typical pear-shaped elementary body, as well as larger, spherical and oblong reticulate bodies. Intact C. pneumoniae were found both intracellularly and extracellularly in the sampled autopsy brains. Intracellular organisms were located principally within microglia, astroglia, and presumptive pericytes. These results suggest that C. pneumoniae found in cells indigenous to the AD brain do not conform universally to the classical morphology observed in other infected cell types. This pleiomorphism may reflect an adaptive response and/or persistent state of infection for these organisms in Alzheimer's Disease. PMID:20671799

  14. Parallel Evolution in Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Churton, Nicholas W. V.; Misra, Raju V.; Howlin, Robert P.; Allan, Raymond N.; Jefferies, Johanna; Faust, Saul N.; Gharbia, Saheer E.; Edwards, Richard J.; Clarke, Stuart C.; Webb, Jeremy S.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a commensal human pathogen and the causative agent of various invasive and noninvasive diseases. Carriage of the pneumococcus in the nasopharynx is thought to be mediated by biofilm formation, an environment where isogenic populations frequently give rise to morphological colony variants, including small colony variant (SCV) phenotypes. We employed metabolic characterization and whole-genome sequencing of biofilm-derived S. pneumoniae serotype 22F pneumococcal SCVs to investigate diversification during biofilm formation. Phenotypic profiling revealed that SCVs exhibit reduced growth rates, reduced capsule expression, altered metabolic profiles, and increased biofilm formation compared to the ancestral strain. Whole-genome sequencing of 12 SCVs from independent biofilm experiments revealed that all SCVs studied had mutations within the DNA-directed RNA polymerase delta subunit (RpoE). Mutations included four large-scale deletions ranging from 51 to 264 bp, one insertion resulting in a coding frameshift, and seven nonsense single-nucleotide substitutions that result in a truncated gene product. This work links mutations in the rpoE gene to SCV formation and enhanced biofilm development in S. pneumoniae and therefore may have important implications for colonization, carriage, and persistence of the organism. Furthermore, recurrent mutation of the pneumococcal rpoE gene presents an unprecedented level of parallel evolution in pneumococcal biofilm development. PMID:27190203

  15. Parallel Evolution in Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Churton, Nicholas W V; Misra, Raju V; Howlin, Robert P; Allan, Raymond N; Jefferies, Johanna; Faust, Saul N; Gharbia, Saheer E; Edwards, Richard J; Clarke, Stuart C; Webb, Jeremy S

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a commensal human pathogen and the causative agent of various invasive and noninvasive diseases. Carriage of the pneumococcus in the nasopharynx is thought to be mediated by biofilm formation, an environment where isogenic populations frequently give rise to morphological colony variants, including small colony variant (SCV) phenotypes. We employed metabolic characterization and whole-genome sequencing of biofilm-derived S. pneumoniae serotype 22F pneumococcal SCVs to investigate diversification during biofilm formation. Phenotypic profiling revealed that SCVs exhibit reduced growth rates, reduced capsule expression, altered metabolic profiles, and increased biofilm formation compared to the ancestral strain. Whole-genome sequencing of 12 SCVs from independent biofilm experiments revealed that all SCVs studied had mutations within the DNA-directed RNA polymerase delta subunit (RpoE). Mutations included four large-scale deletions ranging from 51 to 264 bp, one insertion resulting in a coding frameshift, and seven nonsense single-nucleotide substitutions that result in a truncated gene product. This work links mutations in the rpoE gene to SCV formation and enhanced biofilm development in S. pneumoniae and therefore may have important implications for colonization, carriage, and persistence of the organism. Furthermore, recurrent mutation of the pneumococcal rpoE gene presents an unprecedented level of parallel evolution in pneumococcal biofilm development. PMID:27190203

  16. Fatal Outcomes in Family Transmission of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, T. R.; Hardy, R. D.; Coalson, J. J.; Cavuoti, D. C.; Siegel, J. D.; Cagle, M.; Musatovova, O.; Herrera, C.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Mycoplasma pneumoniae continues to be a significant cause of community-acquired pneumonia and, on rare occasions, manifests as fulminant disease that leads to mortality, even in healthy individuals. Methods. We conducted a retrospective study on members of a family who were quarantined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2002 for respiratory failure and death of a 15-year-old brother (sibling 1) and a 13-year-old sister (sibling 2). Collected airway, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and serum samples from both deceased siblings and serum samples from both parents and the remaining 3 ill siblings (sibling 3–5) were tested using a range of diagnostic assays. Autopsy lung tissue samples from sibling 2 were also assessed using immunohistochemical and immunoelectron microscopic methods. Results. Autopsy evaluation of sibling 1 revealed cerebral edema consistent with hypoxic ischemic encepatholopathy and pulmonary findings of bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia (BOOP). Postmortem lung examination of sibling 2 revealed lymphoplasmacytic bronchiolitis with intraluminal purulent exudate, BOOP, and pulmonary edema. Results of diagnostic assays implicated the household transmission of M. pneumoniae among all 5 siblings and both parents. Further analysis of lung tissue from sibling 2 demonstrated the presence of M. pneumoniae organisms and community-acquired respiratory distress syndrome toxin. M. pneumoniae was cultured directly from sibling 2 autopsy lung tissue. Conclusion. Evidence is provided that M. pneumoniae was readily transmitted to all members of the household and that the resulting infections led to a spectrum of individual responses with variation in disease progression, including lymphoplasmacytic bronchiolitis, BOOP, and death. PMID:22052890

  17. Focal weakness following herpes zoster.

    PubMed Central

    Cockerell, O C; Ormerod, I E

    1993-01-01

    Three patients presented with focal weakness of an arm which followed segmental herpes zoster affecting the same limb. Neurophysiological investigations suggest that the site of the lesion lay at the root, plexus, or peripheral nerve level. This reflects the various ways in which the virus may affect the peripheral nervous system. PMID:8410022

  18. [Lipoid pneumonia - an underestimated syndrome].

    PubMed

    Schwaiblmair, M; Berghaus, T; Haeckel, T; Wagner, T; Scheidt, W von

    2010-01-01

    Lipoid pneumonia, first described by Laughlen 1925 may be classified as endogenous or exogenous. The endogenous form is seen when fat is deposited into the lung tissue. It is usually associated with proximal obstructive lesions, necrotic tissue after radio- or chemotherapy, with lipid storage disease or hyperlipidemia . Exogenous lipoid pneumonia results from inhaling or aspirating animal, vegetable or mineral oil. There are usually some underlying neurological defects or esophageal abnormalities. Patients may present with cough, sputum, hemoptysis and chest pain or may be asymptomatic. There is no classic chest film appearance: it may appear as diffuse airspace infiltration or localized consolidation simulating tumour. Computed tomography is diagnostically helpful and shows hypodense areas measuring from -100 to - 30 Hounsfield units. Bronchoscopic biopsies are mandatory for histological confirmation of the diagnosis. Treatment of exogenous lipoid pneumonia has always been conservative by discontinuing the use of oil, correction of underlying defects that may favor aspiration and treatment of intercurrent pneumonia. Other measures, for example corticosteroid therapy, are of uncertain benefit. Complications of lipoid pneumonia that worsen prognosis are recurrent bacterial pneumonias including nontuberculous mycobacteria or aspergillus, or lung cancer that has developed in areas of pre-existing exogenous lipoid pneumonia. PMID:20024881

  19. Statistical earthquake focal mechanism forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Yan Y.; Jackson, David D.

    2014-04-01

    Forecasts of the focal mechanisms of future shallow (depth 0-70 km) earthquakes are important for seismic hazard estimates and Coulomb stress, and other models of earthquake occurrence. Here we report on a high-resolution global forecast of earthquake rate density as a function of location, magnitude and focal mechanism. In previous publications we reported forecasts of 0.5° spatial resolution, covering the latitude range from -75° to +75°, based on the Global Central Moment Tensor earthquake catalogue. In the new forecasts we have improved the spatial resolution to 0.1° and the latitude range from pole to pole. Our focal mechanism estimates require distance-weighted combinations of observed focal mechanisms within 1000 km of each gridpoint. Simultaneously, we calculate an average rotation angle between the forecasted mechanism and all the surrounding mechanisms, using the method of Kagan & Jackson proposed in 1994. This average angle reveals the level of tectonic complexity of a region and indicates the accuracy of the prediction. The procedure becomes problematical where longitude lines are not approximately parallel, and where shallow earthquakes are so sparse that an adequate sample spans very large distances. North or south of 75°, the azimuths of points 1000 km away may vary by about 35°. We solved this problem by calculating focal mechanisms on a plane tangent to the Earth's surface at each forecast point, correcting for the rotation of the longitude lines at the locations of earthquakes included in the averaging. The corrections are negligible between -30° and +30° latitude, but outside that band uncorrected rotations can be significantly off. Improved forecasts at 0.5° and 0.1° resolution are posted at http://eq.ess.ucla.edu/kagan/glob_gcmt_index.html.

  20. Susceptibility of ponies to infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae (capsular type 3)

    PubMed

    Blunden, A S; Hannant, D; Livesay, G; Mumford, J A

    1994-01-01

    Welsh Mountain ponies were inoculated with an isolate of Streptococcus pneumoniae, SPE 1618 (capsular type 3) recovered from the equine respiratory tract: 10 ml of a suspension of 10(8) or 10(9) cfu/ml were instilled intratracheally. Fever was observed after either dose but the greater concentration also produced coughing, ocular and nasal discharge, depression and enlargement of submandibular lymph nodes. Cytological evidence of infection was also observed in tracheal washings during the first week after inoculation and corresponded with isolation of S. pneumoniae from the washes. Morbid anatomical and histopathological examinations of selected animals revealed focal pneumonia affecting the ventral lung, especially the cardiac area and accessory lobe, with a propensity to affect the right lung. S. pneumoniae was isolated directly in pure culture from these lesions or was demonstrable by immunostaining of macrophages bearing specific capsular type 3 antigen. By 10 days after inoculation, the ponies were healthy and had developed antibodies to S. pneumoniae. S. pneumoniae was therefore a primary pathogen in the horse under the conditions of the challenge. PMID:8143658

  1. Epidemiology, aetiology and management of childhood acute community-acquired pneumonia in developing countries--a review.

    PubMed

    Falade, A G; Ayede, A I

    2011-12-01

    Childhood acute community-acquired pneumonia is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. In children who have not received prior antibiotic therapy, the main bacterial causes of clinical pneumonia in developing countries are Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), and the main viral cause is respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), but estimates of their relative importance vary in different settings. The only vaccines for the prevention of bacterial pneumonia (excluding vaccines for pertussis and measles) are Hib and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV). In children with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, bacterial infection remains a major cause of pneumonia mortality; however, Pneumocystis jirovecii and Mycobacterium tuberculosis are important causes of pneumonia in them. Studies of bacterial aetiology of acute pneumonia in severely malnourished children have implicated Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, S. pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and H. influenzae, with very few data on the role of respiratory viruses and tuberculosis. Studies of neonatal sepsis suggest that Gram-negative enteric organisms, particularly Klebsiella spp., and Gram-positive organisms, mainly pneumococcus, group b Streptococcus and S. aureus are causes of neonatal pneumonia. Many of the developing countries that ranked high in pneumonia mortality are preparing to introduce new pneumonia vaccines with support from Global Alliance for Vaccine and Immunization (GAVI Alliance), plan for the expansion of community-based case management and have ambitious plans for strengthening health systems. Assurance that these plans are implemented will require funding and continued public attention to pneumonia, which will help contribute to a substantial decline in childhood pneumonia deaths. PMID:22783679

  2. Rare idiopathic interstitial pneumonias: LIP and PPFE and rare histologic patterns of interstitial pneumonias: AFOP and BPIP.

    PubMed

    Kokosi, Maria A; Nicholson, Andrew G; Hansell, David M; Wells, Athol U

    2016-05-01

    In the 2013 reclassification of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs), two rare IIPs (idiopathic lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP), idiopathic pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (IPPFE)) and two rare histologic patterns (acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP), bronchiolocentric pattern of interstitial pneumonia (BPIP)) are described. All these entities are rare with small series published to date, mostly containing primary and secondary forms of disease. LIP is histologically characterized by diffuse polyclonal lymphoid cell infiltrate surrounding the airways and expanding the interstitium. Thin-walled cysts and diffuse ground glass are considered the typical radiologic features. The clinical course is highly variable with corticosteroid responsiveness evident in approximately half of cases. IPPFE is defined histologically by coexisting upper lobe pleural and intra-alveolar fibrosis with elastosis. Dense subpleural irregular fibrosis and consolidation are the cardinal radiologic features. A history of recurrent lower respiratory tract infection is frequent. Responses to immunomodulation have not been reported and the rate of progression appears to be highly variable. AFOP is a rare histologic pattern lying within the spectrum of acute/subacute lung injury, characterized by organizing pneumonia and intra-alveolar fibrin deposition without hyaline membranes. BPIP is characterized histologically by fibrosis and/or inflammation confined to the alveolar interstitium around bronchovascular bundles, overlapping with peribronchial metaplasia and fibrosis in some series. Currently, AFOP and BPIP are both best viewed as histological entities rather than true clinical disorders, in the absence of characteristic associated imaging patterns and clinical features. PMID:26627191

  3. Clinical Features of Severe or Fatal Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Izumikawa, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is one of the most common causes of community-acquired pneumonia in children and young adults. The incidence of fulminant M. pneumoniae pneumonia (MPP) is relatively rare despite the high prevalence of M. pneumoniae infection. This literature review highlights the clinical features of fulminant MPP by examining the most recent data in epidemiology, clinical presentation, pathogenesis, and treatment. Fulminant MPP accounts for 0.5–2% of all MPP cases and primarily affects young adults with no underlying disease. Key clinical findings include a cough, fever, and dyspnea along with diffuse abnormal findings in radiological examinations. Levels of inflammatory markers such as white blood cells and C-reactive protein are elevated, as well as levels of lactate dehydrogenase, IL-18, aspartate transaminase, and alanine transaminase. The exact pathogenesis of fulminant MPP remains unclear, but theories include a delayed hypersensitivity reaction to M. pneumoniae and the contribution of delayed antibiotic administration to disease progression. Treatment options involve pairing the appropriate anti-mycoplasma agent with a corticosteroid that will downregulate the hypersensitivity response, and mortality rates are quite low in this treatment group. Further research is necessary to determine the exact pathogenesis of severe and fulminant types of MPP. PMID:27313568

  4. Spectrum of PORCN mutations in Focal Dermal Hypoplasia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Focal Dermal Hypoplasia (FDH), also known as Goltz syndrome (OMIM 305600), is a genetic disorder that affects multiple organ systems early in development. Features of FDH include skin abnormalities, (hypoplasia, atrophy, linear pigmentation, and herniation of fat through dermal defects); papillomas...

  5. Pasteurella multocida pneumonia complicated by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Martyn, V; Swift, D

    1984-02-01

    A 71-year-old woman presented with acute non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema. She proved to have a Pasteurella multocida pneumonia, with blood stream invasion by the organism, and required positive pressure ventilation for 53 days. Penicillin G., the drug of choice for this infection, failed to reverse the steady decline in her arterial oxygen-tension, and it was only after treatment with chloramphenicol and prednisolone that she began to improve. Serological tests strongly indicated the presence of a Staphylococcus aureus infection and the delay in giving antibiotics appropriate to this second pathogen may have been the reason for the patient's initial downhill course. PMID:6709548

  6. Role of α1 and α2 chains of type IV collagen in early fibrotic lesions of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias and migration of lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Urushiyama, Hirokazu; Terasaki, Yasuhiro; Nagasaka, Shinya; Terasaki, Mika; Kunugi, Shinobu; Nagase, Takahide; Fukuda, Yuh; Shimizu, Akira

    2015-08-01

    Early fibrotic lesions are thought to be the initial findings of fibrogenesis in idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, but little is known about their properties. Type IV collagen comprises six gene products, α1-α6, and although it is known as a major basement membrane component, its abnormal deposition is seen in fibrotic lesions of certain organs. We studied the expression of type I and III collagen and all α chains of type IV collagen in lung specimens from patients with usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) or organizing pneumonia (OP) via immunohistochemistry. With cultured lung fibroblasts, we analyzed the expression and function of all α chains of type IV collagen via immunohistochemistry, western blotting, real-time quantitative PCR, and a Boyden chamber migration assay after the knockdown of α1 and α2 chains. Although we observed type I and III collagens in early fibrotic lesions of both UIP and OP, we found type IV collagen, especially α1 and α2 chains, in early fibrotic lesions of UIP but not OP. Fibroblasts enhanced the expression of α1 and α2 chains of type IV collagen after transforming growth factor-β1 stimulation. Small interfering RNA against α1 and α2 chains increased fibroblast migration, with upregulated phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and adding medium containing fibroblast-produced α1 and α2 chains reduced the increased levels of fibroblast migration and phosphorylation of FAK. Fibroblasts in OP were positive for phosphorylated FAK but fibroblasts in UIP were not. These results suggest that fibroblasts in UIP with type IV collagen deposition, especially α1 and α2 chains, have less ability to migrate from early fibrotic lesions than fibroblasts in OP without type IV collagen deposition. Thus, type IV collagen deposition in early fibrotic lesions of UIP may be implicated in refractory pathophysiology including migration of lesion fibroblasts via a FAK pathway. PMID:26006016

  7. Imaging of community-acquired pneumonia: Roles of imaging examinations, imaging diagnosis of specific pathogens and discrimination from noninfectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nambu, Atsushi; Ozawa, Katsura; Kobayashi, Noriko; Tago, Masao

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews roles of imaging examinations in the management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), imaging diagnosis of specific CAP and discrimination between CAP and noninfectious diseases. Chest radiography is usually enough to confirm the diagnosis of CAP, whereas computed tomography is required to suggest specific pathogens and to discriminate from noninfectious diseases. Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia, tuberculosis, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia and some cases of viral pneumonia sometimes show specific imaging findings. Peribronchial nodules, especially tree-in-bud appearance, are fairly specific for infection. Evidences of organization, such as concavity of the opacities, traction bronchiectasis, visualization of air bronchograms over the entire length of the bronchi, or mild parenchymal distortion are suggestive of organizing pneumonia. We will introduce tips to effectively make use of imaging examinations in the management of CAP. PMID:25349662

  8. Electron microscopy of Mycoplasma pneumoniae microcolonies grown on solid surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, C K; Pfister, R M; Somerson, N L

    1977-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae sprain CL-8 was studied by using various surfaces for adherence and growth. Cells grown on Epon 812, Formvar, carbon, and glass were of similar morphology. Thin Epon pieces were good material for culturing the organisms and examining thin-sectioned microcolonies by transmission electron microscopy. Images PMID:931378

  9. MRI of Focal Liver Lesions.

    PubMed

    Albiin, Nils

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging, MRI has more advantages than ultrasound, computed tomography, CT, positron emission tomography, PET, or any other imaging modality in diagnosing focal hepatic masses. With a combination of basic T1 and T2 weighted sequences, diffusion weighted imaging, DWI, and hepatobiliary gadolinium contrast agents, that is gadobenate dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA) and gadoxetic acid (Gd-EOB), most liver lesions can be adequately diagnosed. Benign lesions, as cyst, hemangioma, focal nodular hyperplasia, FNH or adenoma, can be distinguished from malignant lesions. In a non-cirrhotic liver, the most common malignant lesions are metastases which may be hypovascular or hypervascular. In the cirrhotic liver hepatocellular carcinoma, HCC, is of considerable importance. Besides, intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and other less common malignancies has to be assessed. In this review, the techniques and typical MRI features are presented as well as the new algorithm issued by American Association for the Study of the Liver Diseases (AASLD). PMID:23049491

  10. Variable focal length deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Headley, Daniel; Ramsey, Marc; Schwarz, Jens

    2007-06-12

    A variable focal length deformable mirror has an inner ring and an outer ring that simply support and push axially on opposite sides of a mirror plate. The resulting variable clamping force deforms the mirror plate to provide a parabolic mirror shape. The rings are parallel planar sections of a single paraboloid and can provide an on-axis focus, if the rings are circular, or an off-axis focus, if the rings are elliptical. The focal length of the deformable mirror can be varied by changing the variable clamping force. The deformable mirror can generally be used in any application requiring the focusing or defocusing of light, including with both coherent and incoherent light sources.

  11. Ultrasound elastographic techniques in focal liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Clara Benedetta; Cavalcoli, Federica; Fraquelli, Mirella; Conte, Dario; Massironi, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Elastographic techniques are new ultrasound-based imaging techniques developed to estimate tissue deformability/stiffness. Several ultrasound elastographic approaches have been developed, such as static elastography, transient elastography and acoustic radiation force imaging methods, which include point shear wave and shear wave imaging elastography. The application of these methods in clinical practice aims at estimating the mechanical tissues properties. One of the main settings for the application of these tools has been liver stiffness assessment in chronic liver disease, which has been studied mainly using transient elastography. Another field of application for these techniques is the assessment of focal lesions, detected by ultrasound in organs such as pancreas, prostate, breast, thyroid, lymph nodes. Considering the frequency and importance of the detection of focal liver lesions through routine ultrasound, some studies have also aimed to assess the role that elestography can play in studying the stiffness of different types of liver lesions, in order to predict their nature and thus offer valuable non-invasive methods for the diagnosis of liver masses. PMID:26973405

  12. [Focal liver lesion, incidental finding].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, C F; Jenssen, C

    2012-10-01

    The differential diagnosis of incidentally found Focal Liver Lesions (FLL) is complex. Screening procedures so far are only defined for patients with liver cirrhosis. Characterization of a FLL begins as soon as it is detected. Taking patients history and thorough clinical examination are essential. An imaging procedure that is used to detect liver masses should also allow the examiner to determine whether the lesion is benign or malignant. Conventional B-mode US and colour Doppler imaging are effective at detecting and characterizing typical liver cysts and calcifications. Laboratory data, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and imaging guided liver biopsy are complementary methods.Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) is a well established diagnostic imaging technique for a variety of indications and applications. One of the most important applications is in the liver where it is frequently a first-line technique for the detection and diagnosis (characterization) of focal liver lesions (FLL). In this setting the accurate differentiation of benign from malignant lesions is critical to ensure the patient undergoes the appropriate therapeutic option. This has been documented in recently published guidelines, in particular in terms of the enhancement patterns of the most common FLL hemangioma, focal nodular hyperplasia hepatocellular adenoma and their differentiation from malignant lesions. In this article the role of CEUS in the characterization of incidentally found FLL is described. PMID:23033169

  13. Persistent Focal Behavior and Physical Activity Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erfle, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the proclivity and performance attributes of focal students across time and activities using data from 9,345 students. Three systematic focal behavior partitions are examined: Across activities, across time, and across activities and time. A student's performance is focal if it ends in 0 or 5 for push-ups and 0 for…

  14. SUSCEPTIBILITY OF CHEMOSTAT-GROWN 'YERSINIA ENTEROCOLITICA' AND 'KLEBSIELLA PNEUMONIAE' TO CHLORINE DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The resistance of bacteria to antimicrobial agents could be influenced by growth environment. The susceptibility of two enteric bacteria, Yersinia enterocolitica and Klebsiella pneumoniae, to chlorine dioxide was investigated. These organisms were grown in a defined medium in a c...

  15. Isolation, Characterization, and Immunogenicity of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, J. Dennis; Somerson, Norman L.; Senterfit, Laurence B.

    1970-01-01

    Membrane and soluble fractions of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, M. pulmonis, and M. laidlawii B were prepared by hypotonic lysis of whole cells. The membranes of M. pneumoniae and M. laidlawii B contained, as percentage of dry weight: 34 to 37% protein, 59 to 61% lipid, 3 to 4% carbohydrate as hexose, and 0.2% ribonucleic acid as ribose. NADH2 and NADPH2 oxidase activities were localized in the soluble fractions of M. pneumoniae and in the membrane fraction of M. laidlawii B. NADH2 oxidase activity was localized in the soluble fraction of M. pulmonis. The lipids of M. pneumoniae were labeled when the organism was grown in the presence of either radioactive palmitic acid, oleic acid, cholesterol, or glycerol. The lipids were not labeled when grown in the presence of radioactive acetate. Palmitic acid radio-activity was found in neutral lipid, glycolipid, and phosphatide fractions. Immunodiffusion analyses of whole cells and membrane fractions demonstrated three reactive antigens. Two immunodiffusion antigens were localized in the membrane fraction. One of these apparently contains lipid. A third antigen, also considered lipoidal, was found in whole cells. Membrane and soluble fractions of M. pneumoniae were immunogenic. The immunogens eliciting metabolic-inhibiting antibodies were localized in the membrane. The membrane preparation also induced the formation of antibodies which fixed complement with an antigen extracted with lipid solvent. The soluble fraction contained a distinct immunogen which induces antibodies reactive in complement fixation with an antigen prepared by phenol extraction. Images PMID:16557840

  16. Atherosclerosis Induced by Chlamydophila pneumoniae: A Controversial Theory.

    PubMed

    Honarmand, Hamidreza

    2013-01-01

    More than a century ago, inflammation and infection were considered to have atherogenic effects. The old idea that coronary heart disease (CHD) possibly has an infectious etiology has only reemerged in recent years. Atherosclerosis is the main pathological process involved in CHD and is, logically, the first place to look for infectious etiology. The process of atherosclerosis itself provides the first hints of potential infectious cause. Smooth muscle proliferation, with subsequent intimal thickening, luminal narrowing, and endothelial degeneration, constitutes the natural history of atherosclerosis, being with the severity and speed of these changes. Both viral and bacterial pathogens have been proposed to be associated with the inflammatory changes found in atherosclerosis. Recently, Chlamydophila pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae) has been implicated as a possible etiologic agent of coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis. New evidence which supports a role for C. pneumoniae in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis has emerged. C. pneumoniae has been detected in atherosclerotic arteries by several techniques, and the organism has been isolated from both coronary and carotid atheromas. Recent animal models have suggested that C. pneumoniae is capable of inducing atherosclerosis in both rabbit and mouse models of atherosclerosis. Furthermore, human clinical treatment studies which examined the use of antichlamydial macrolide antibiotics in patients with coronary atherosclerosis have been carried out. The causal relationship has not yet been proven, but ongoing large intervention trials and research on pathogenetic mechanisms may lead to the use of antimicrobial agents in the treatment of CHD in the future. PMID:23956742

  17. Dynamics of lung defense in pneumonia: resistance, resilience, and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Quinton, Lee J; Mizgerd, Joseph P

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is initiated by microbes in the lung, but physiological processes integrating responses across diverse cell types and organ systems dictate the outcome of respiratory infection. Resistance, or actions of the host to eradicate living microbes, in the lungs involves a combination of innate and adaptive immune responses triggered by air-space infection. Resilience, or the ability of the host tissues to withstand the physiologically damaging effects of microbial and immune activities, is equally complex, precisely regulated, and determinative. Both immune resistance and tissue resilience are dynamic and change throughout the lifetime, but we are only beginning to understand such remodeling and how it contributes to the incidence of severe pneumonias, which diminishes as childhood progresses and then increases again among the elderly. Here, we review the concepts of resistance, resilience, and remodeling as they apply to pneumonia, highlighting recent advances and current significant knowledge gaps. PMID:25148693

  18. Dynamics of Lung Defense in Pneumonia: Resistance, Resilience, and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Quinton, Lee J.; Mizgerd, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is initiated by microbes in the lung, but physiological processes integrating responses across diverse cell types and organ systems dictate the outcome of respiratory infection. Resistance, or actions of the host to eradicate living microbes, in the lungs involves a combination of innate and adaptive immune responses triggered by air-space infection. Resilience, or the ability of the host tissues to withstand the physiologically damaging effects of microbial and immune activities, is equally complex, precisely regulated, and determinative. Both immune resistance and tissue resilience are dynamic and change throughout the lifetime, but we are only beginning to understand such remodeling and how it contributes to the incidence of severe pneumonias, which diminishes as childhood progresses and then increases again among the elderly. Here, we review the concepts of resistance, resilience, and remodeling as they apply to pneumonia, highlighting recent advances and current significant knowledge gaps. PMID:25148693

  19. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Pneumonia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Pneumonia? The signs and symptoms of pneumonia vary from ... have sudden changes in mental awareness. Complications of Pneumonia Often, people who have pneumonia can be successfully ...

  20. Atypical pathogens and challenges in community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Kristopher P; Viera, Anthony J

    2004-04-01

    Atypical organisms such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and Legionella pneumophila are implicated in up to 40 percent of cases of community-acquired pneumonia. Antibiotic treatment is empiric and includes coverage for both typical and atypical organisms. Doxycycline, a fluoroquinolone with enhanced activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae, or a macrolide is appropriate for outpatient treatment of immunocompetent adult patients. Hospitalized adults should be treated with cefotaxime or ceftriaxone plus a macrolide, or with a fluoroquinolone alone. The same agents can be used in adult patients in intensive care units, although fluoroquinolone monotherapy is not recommended; ampicillin-sulbactam or piperacillin-tazobactam can be used instead of cefotaxime or ceftriaxone. Outpatient treatment of children two months to five years of age consists of high-dose amoxicillin given for seven to 10 days. A single dose of ceftriaxone can be used in infants when the first dose of antibiotic is likely to be delayed or not absorbed. Older children can be treated with a macrolide. Hospitalized children should be treated with a macrolide plus a beta-lactam inhibitor. In a bioterrorist attack, pulmonary illness may result from the organisms that cause anthrax, plague, or tularemia. Sudden acute respiratory syndrome begins with a flu-like illness, followed two to seven days later by cough, dyspnea and, in some instances, acute respiratory distress. PMID:15086042

  1. Inflammation-inducing Factors of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae, which causes mycoplasmal pneumonia in human, mainly causes pneumonia in children, although it occasionally causes disease in infants and geriatrics. Some pathogenic factors produced by M. pneumoniae, such as hydrogen peroxide and Community-Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome (CARDS) toxin have been well studied. However, these factors alone cannot explain this predilection. The low incidence rate of mycoplasmal pneumonia in infants and geriatrics implies that the strong inflammatory responses induced by M. pneumoniae coordinate with the pathogenic factors to induce pneumonia. However, M. pneumoniae lacks a cell wall and does not possess an inflammation-inducing endotoxin, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In M. pneumoniae, lipoproteins were identified as an inflammation-inducing factor. Lipoproteins induce inflammatory responses through Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2. Because Mycoplasma species lack a cell wall and lipoproteins anchored in the membrane are exposed, lipoproteins and TLR2 have been thought to be important for the pathogenesis of M. pneumoniae. However, recent reports suggest that M. pneumoniae also induces inflammatory responses also in a TLR2-independent manner. TLR4 and autophagy are involved in this TLR2-independent inflammation. In addition, the CARDS toxin or M. pneumoniae cytadherence induces inflammatory responses through an intracellular receptor protein complex called the inflammasome. In this review, the inflammation-inducing factors of M. pneumoniae are summarized. PMID:27065977

  2. [Guidelines for treatment of pneumonia in intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Emmi, V

    2005-01-01

    Patients affected by pneumonia can be admitted in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) independently by the setting where the infection has been acquired (community, hospital, long-term care facilities); even more frequently pneumonia can develop in patients already hospitalized in ICU especially in those requiring mechanical ventilation for different reasons. Within the severe community acquired pneumonia requiring admission in ICU, the most frequently responsible micro-organisms are mainly represented by Streptococcus pneumoniae, but also by Legionella and Haemophilus. Pseudomonas aeruginona, anyway, cannot be excluded. The most recent Canadian and American guidelines for treatment of the above mentioned infections suggest the use of a combination therapy with beta-lactams (ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, ampicillin/sulbactam, piperacillin/tazobactam) and a new generation macrolide or respiratory fluoroquinolone. In case of allergy to beta-lactams, the association fluoroquinolone-clindamycin should be preferred. Whenever a Pseudomonas etiology is suspected because of the presence of risk factors such as COPD, cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, previous and/or frequent therapies with antibiotics and/or steroids, the same guidelines suggest the use of an anti-pseudomonas beta-lactam (such as piperacillin/tazobactam, carbapenems, cefepime) associated with an anti-pseudomonas fluoroquinolone (high doses ciprofloxacin). An anti-pseudomonas beta-lactam plus an aminoglycoside or aminoglicosyde plus fluoroquinolone can be an alternative. Early onset Hospital Acquired Pneumonia (HAP) and early onset Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP) in patients without risk factors for multi-resistant etiological agents are generally sustained by S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, methicillin-susceptible Staphylocccus aureus e Gram negative enteric rods. These infections can be treated with one of the following antibiotics: ceftriaxone or fluoroquinolones (moxifloxacin or ciprofloxacin or levofloxacin) or

  3. A retrospective study of health care-associated pneumonia patients at Aichi Medical University hospital.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Yuka; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2011-12-01

    Health care-associated pneumonia (HCAP) was defined in the American Thoracic Society/Infectious Disease Society of America guidelines on hospital-acquired pneumonia in 2005. However, little is known about the occurrence of HCAP in Japan. A retrospective review of background characteristics, pathological conditions, causative organisms, initial treatments, and risk factors for HCAP was conducted to determine the relationship of HCAP to community-acquired pneumonia and hospital-acquired pneumonia. Thirty-five patients who were admitted to our hospital for pneumonia acquired outside our hospital were included and were stratified by disease severity according to the Japanese Respiratory Society risk stratification guidelines (A-DROP [age, dehydration, respiratory failure, orientation disturbance, and shock blood pressure] criteria). All patients had an underlying disease. A total of 70 microbial strains (25 gram-positive, 37 gram-negative, 6 anaerobic, and 2 causative of atypical pneumonia) were isolated from sputum cultures, showing high isolation frequencies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus and extremely low isolation frequencies of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. "History of hospitalization within 90 days before the onset of pneumonia" was the most common risk factor, and most of the patients had two or three risk factors. Initially, monotherapy [mainly tazobactam/piperacillin (TAZ/PIPC), sulbactam/ampicillin (SBT/ABPC), ceftriaxone (CTRX), cefepime (CPFM), carbapenems, or fluoroquinolones] or combination therapy (beta-lactam and fluoroquinolone) were administered and gave clinical effects in 63% (22/35) of cases. Bacteriological effects were seen in most strains (57%; 40/70). Since the causative organisms of HCAP were closely related to those of hospital-acquired pneumonia and not to community-acquired pneumonia, we believe that aggressive chemotherapy using broad-spectrum antimicrobials is needed in the initial treatment

  4. Butterfly Wings Are Three-Dimensional: Pupal Cuticle Focal Spots and Their Associated Structures in Junonia Butterflies

    PubMed Central

    Taira, Wataru; Otaki, Joji M.

    2016-01-01

    Butterfly wing color patterns often contain eyespots, which are developmentally determined at the late larval and early pupal stages by organizing activities of focal cells that can later form eyespot foci. In the pupal stage, the focal position of a future eyespot is often marked by a focal spot, one of the pupal cuticle spots, on the pupal surface. Here, we examined the possible relationships of the pupal focal spots with the underneath pupal wing tissues and with the adult wing eyespots using Junonia butterflies. Large pupal focal spots were found in two species with large adult eyespots, J. orithya and J. almana, whereas only small pupal focal spots were found in a species with small adult eyespots, J. hedonia. The size of five pupal focal spots on a single wing was correlated with the size of the corresponding adult eyespots in J. orithya. A pupal focal spot was a three-dimensional bulge of cuticle surface, and the underside of the major pupal focal spot exhibited a hollowed cuticle in a pupal case. Cross sections of a pupal wing revealed that the cuticle layer shows a curvature at a focal spot, and a positional correlation was observed between the cuticle layer thickness and its corresponding cell layer thickness. Adult major eyespots of J. orithya and J. almana exhibited surface elevations and depressions that approximately correspond to the coloration within an eyespot. Our results suggest that a pupal focal spot is produced by the organizing activity of focal cells underneath the focal spot. Probably because the focal cell layer immediately underneath a focal spot is thicker than that of its surrounding areas, eyespots of adult butterfly wings are three-dimensionally constructed. The color-height relationship in adult eyespots might have an implication in the developmental signaling for determining the eyespot color patterns. PMID:26731532

  5. Butterfly Wings Are Three-Dimensional: Pupal Cuticle Focal Spots and Their Associated Structures in Junonia Butterflies.

    PubMed

    Taira, Wataru; Otaki, Joji M

    2016-01-01

    Butterfly wing color patterns often contain eyespots, which are developmentally determined at the late larval and early pupal stages by organizing activities of focal cells that can later form eyespot foci. In the pupal stage, the focal position of a future eyespot is often marked by a focal spot, one of the pupal cuticle spots, on the pupal surface. Here, we examined the possible relationships of the pupal focal spots with the underneath pupal wing tissues and with the adult wing eyespots using Junonia butterflies. Large pupal focal spots were found in two species with large adult eyespots, J. orithya and J. almana, whereas only small pupal focal spots were found in a species with small adult eyespots, J. hedonia. The size of five pupal focal spots on a single wing was correlated with the size of the corresponding adult eyespots in J. orithya. A pupal focal spot was a three-dimensional bulge of cuticle surface, and the underside of the major pupal focal spot exhibited a hollowed cuticle in a pupal case. Cross sections of a pupal wing revealed that the cuticle layer shows a curvature at a focal spot, and a positional correlation was observed between the cuticle layer thickness and its corresponding cell layer thickness. Adult major eyespots of J. orithya and J. almana exhibited surface elevations and depressions that approximately correspond to the coloration within an eyespot. Our results suggest that a pupal focal spot is produced by the organizing activity of focal cells underneath the focal spot. Probably because the focal cell layer immediately underneath a focal spot is thicker than that of its surrounding areas, eyespots of adult butterfly wings are three-dimensionally constructed. The color-height relationship in adult eyespots might have an implication in the developmental signaling for determining the eyespot color patterns. PMID:26731532

  6. Analysis of clinical value of CT in the diagnosis of pediatric pneumonia and mycoplasma pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    GONG, LIANG; ZHANG, CHONG-LIN; ZHEN, QING

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia is an infectious disease of the lung causing mortality. Mycoplasma pneumonia (MP) is an atypical bacterial pneumonia that damages several organs. Lung computed tomography (CT) has been utilized in its identification. The aim of the present study was to examine the value of computed tomography diagnosis for pediatric MP. The present study prospectively analyzed the clinical and imaging data of 1,280 cases of pediatric MP in the out- and inpatient departments from March, 2010 to March, 2014; analyzed the morphology and distribution of the pneumonic lesion in the lungs; and summarized the value of CT diagnosis for pediatric MP. In the included children, there were 688 cases of lesions in the unilateral lobe, 592 cases of lesions in the bilateral lobes, 1,101 cases of extensive patchy opacity, 496 cases of mottled opacity, 432 cases of increased lung marking, 256 cases of streak opacity, 192 cases of ground-glass opacity, 992 cases of thickened bronchial wall in the lesions, 128 cases of lymphadenopathy in the hilar lymph nodes and mediastinal lymph nodes, and the lung CT showed 32 cases of pulmonary cavity and 144 cases of pleural effusion. In conclusion, the CT signals of pediatric MP had several types with some children exhibiting complicated changes. The child's clinical manifestation and symptoms should thus be considered in the diagnosis to improve the diagnostic rate. PMID:27073435

  7. Microbial etiologies of hospital-acquired bacterial pneumonia and ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N

    2010-08-01

    Hospital-acquired bacterial pneumonia (HABP) and ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia (VABP) can be caused by a wide variety of bacteria that originate from the patient flora or the health care environment. We review the medical and microbiology literature and the results of the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program (1997-2008) to establish the pathogens most likely to cause HABP or VABP. In all studies, a consistent 6 organisms (Staphylococcus aureus [28.0%], Pseudomonas aeruginosa [21.8%], Klebsiella species [9.8%], Escherichia coli [6.9%], Acinetobacter species [6.8%], and Enterobacter species [6.3%]) caused approximately 80% of episodes, with lower prevalences of Serratia species, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and community-acquired pathogens, such as pneumococci and Haemophilus influenzae. Slight changes in the pathogen order were noted among geographic regions; Latin America had an increased incidence of nonfermentative gram-negative bacilli. In addition, VABP isolates of the same species had a mean of 5%-10% less susceptibility to frequently used extended-spectrum antimicrobials, and the rate of drug resistance among HABP and VABP pathogens has been increasing by 1% per year (2004-2008). In conclusion, the empirical treatment of HABP and VABP due to prevailing bacterial causes and emerging drug resistance has become more challenging and requires use of multidrug empirical treatment regimens for routine clinical practice. These facts have profound impact on the choices of comparison therapies to be applied in contemporary new drug clinical trials for pneumonia. PMID:20597676

  8. SNAP Satellite Focal Plane Development

    SciTech Connect

    Bebek, C.; Akerlof, C.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bercovitz, J.; Bergstrom, L.; Berstein, G.P.; Bester, M.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.; Emmett, W.; Eriksson, M.; Fouchez,D.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Heetderks, H.; Holland, S.; Huterer, D.; Johnson, W.; Kadel, R.; Karcher,A.; Kim, A.; Kolbe, W.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureaux, J.; Lampton, M.; Lefevre, O.; Levi, M.; Levin, D.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Malina, R.; Mazure, A.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.; Miquel, R.; Morgan, N.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Roe, N.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Prieto, E.; Rabinowitz,D.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Schubnell, M.; Sholl, M.; Smadja, G.; Smith, R.; Smoot, G.; Snyder, J.; Spadafora, A.; Szymkowiak, A.; Tarle,G.; Taylor, K.; Tilquin, A.; Tomasch, A.; Vincent, D.; von der Lippe, H.; Walder, J-P.; Wang, G.

    2003-07-07

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square degree field in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. The requirements for the instrument suite and the present configuration of the focal plane concept are presented. A two year R&D phase, largely supported by the Department of Energy, is just beginning. We describe the development activities that are taking place to advance our preparedness for mission proposal in the areas of detectors and electronics.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase-Producing K. pneumoniae Myophage Miro

    PubMed Central

    Mijalis, Eleni M.; Lessor, Lauren E.; Cahill, Jesse L.; Rasche, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative pathogen frequently associated with antibiotic-resistant nosocomial infections. Bacteriophage therapy against K. pneumoniae may be possible to combat these infections. The following describes the complete genome sequence and key features of the pseudo-T-even K. pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae myophage Miro. PMID:26430050

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase-Producing K. pneumoniae Myophage Miro.

    PubMed

    Mijalis, Eleni M; Lessor, Lauren E; Cahill, Jesse L; Rasche, Eric S; Kuty Everett, Gabriel F

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative pathogen frequently associated with antibiotic-resistant nosocomial infections. Bacteriophage therapy against K. pneumoniae may be possible to combat these infections. The following describes the complete genome sequence and key features of the pseudo-T-even K. pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae myophage Miro. PMID:26430050

  11. Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia Associated With Methemoglobinemia and Anemia: An Overlooked Association?

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Tawfik; Abu Rmeileh, Ayman; Kornspan, Jonathan David; Abel, Roy; Mizrahi, Meir; Nir-Paz, Ran

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of acute methemoglobinemia and anemia in a patient with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia. We suggest that M. pneumoniae secretes a putative protein that can induce methemoglobin in red blood cells. Thus, Mycoplasma pneumoniae may induce methemoglobinemia in patients who have low oxygen saturation and anemia. PMID:26034771

  12. Pneumonia - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Japanese) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Pneumonia in Children 小児肺炎 - 日本語 (Japanese) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Korean (한국어) Pneumonia 폐렴 - ...

  13. Hemodynamics of focal choroidal excavations.

    PubMed

    Soma, Ryoko; Moriyama, Muka; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hemodynamics of focal choroidal excavations (FCEs). Four eyes of four patients with a FCE were studied. Indocyanine green angiography (ICGA), laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG), optical coherence tomography (OCT), and multi-focal electroretinography (mfERG) were performed to investigate the choroidal hemodynamics and the morphological and functional changes. The mean depth of the FCE determined by OCT was 222.5 ± 49.5 μm with a range of 164-272 μm. In one case, subretinal fluid was observed in the excavation, and in three cases, subretinal fluid was not observed. ICGA showed hypofluorescence, and laser flowgraphy (LSFG) showed decreased choroidal blood flow at the excavation in all cases. Three cases were symptomatic, and the amplitudes of the mfERGs were reduced. FCEs cause a decrease of choroidal blood flow. In three of four cases, the mfERGs were depressed over the FCEs leading to symptoms. PMID:25626897

  14. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a weakened immune system due to AIDS, cancer, transplantation, or corticosteroid use, call your provider if ... transplant recipients Organ transplant recipients People who take long-term, high- ...

  15. Focal axis resolver for offset reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Method and apparatus for determining the focal axis of an asymmetrical antenna such as an offset paraboloid reflector whose physical rim is not coincident with the boundary of the electrical aperture but whose focal point is known is provided. A transmitting feed horn array consisting of at least two feed horn elements is positioned asymmetrically on either side of an estimated focal axis which is generally inclined with respect to the boresight axis of the antenna. The feed horn array is aligned with the estimated focal axis so that the phase centers (CP sub 1, CP sub 2) of the two feed horn elements are located on a common line running through the focal point (F) orthogonally with respect to the estimated focal axis.

  16. Cytomegalovirus pneumonia in transplant patients: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Eun-Young Kang; Patz, E.F. Jr.; Mueller, N.L.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the CT findings of cytomegalovirus (CMV) pneumonia in transplant patients. The study included 10 transplant patients who had chest CT scan and pathologically proven isolated pulmonary CMV infection. Five patients had bone marrow transplant and five had solid organ transplant. The CT scans were retrospectively reviewed for pattern and distribution of disease and the CT findings compared with the findings on open lung biopsy (n = 9) and autopsy (n = 1). Nine of 10 patients had parenchymal abnormalities apparent at CT and I had normal CT scans. The findings in the nine patients included small nodules (n = 6), consolidation (n = 4), ground-glass attenuation (n = 4), and irregular lines (n = 1). The nodules had a bilateral and symmetric distribution and involved all lung zones. The consolidation was most marked in the lower lung zones. The CT findings of CMV pneumonia in transplant patients are heterogeneous. The most common patterns include small nodules and areas of consolidation. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Etiology of community acquired pneumonia among children in India: prospective, cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Joseph L.; Singhi, Sunit; Ray, Pallab; Hagel, Eva; Saghafian–Hedengren, Shanie; Bansal, Arun; Ygberg, Sofia; Sodhi, Kushaljit Singh; Kumar, B V Ravi; Nilsson, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background Childhood community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a significant problem in developing countries, and confirmation of microbial etiology is important for individual, as well as public health. However, there is paucity of data from a large cohort, examining multiple biological specimens for diverse pathogens (bacteria and viruses). The Community Acquired Pneumonia Etiology Study (CAPES) was designed to address this knowledge gap. Methods We enrolled children with CAP (based on WHO IMCI criteria of tachypnea with cough or breathing difficulty) over 24 consecutive months, and recorded presenting symptoms, risk factors, clinical signs, and chest radiography. We performed blood and nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) bacterial cultures, and serology (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae). We also performed multiplex PCR for 25 bacterial/viral species in a subgroup representing 20% of the cohort. Children requiring endotracheal intubation underwent culture and PCR of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens. Findings We enrolled 2345 children. NPA and blood cultures yielded bacteria in only 322 (13.7%) and 49 (2.1%) children respectively. In NPA, Streptococcus pneumoniae (79.1%) predominated, followed by Haemophilus influenzae (9.6%) and Staphylococcus aureus (6.8%). In blood, S. aureus (30.6%) dominated, followed by S. pneumoniae (20.4%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (12.2%). M. pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae serology were positive in 4.3% and 1.1% respectively. Multiplex PCR in 428 NPA specimens identified organisms in 422 (98.6%); of these 352 (82.2%) had multiple organisms and only 70 (16.4%) had a single organism viz. S. pneumoniae: 35 (50%), Cytomegalovirus (CMV): 13 (18.6%), Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV): 9 (12.9%), other viruses: 6 (8.7%), S. aureus: 5 (7.1%), and H. influenzae: 2 (2.9%). BAL PCR (n = 30) identified single pathogens in 10 (S. pneumoniae–3, CMV–3, S. aureus–2, H. influenzae–2) and multiple pathogens in 18 children. There were

  18. Digital scanner infrared focal plane technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, M. A.; Malone, N. R.; Harris, M.; Shin, J.; Byers, S.; Price, D.; Vampola, J.

    2011-09-01

    Advancements in finer geometry and technology advancements in circuit design now allow placement of digital architecture on cryogenic focal planes while using less power than heritage analog designs. These advances in technology reduce the size, weight, and power of modern focal planes. In addition, the interface to the focal plane is significantly simplified and is more immune to Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). The cost of the customer's instrument after integration with the digital scanning Focal Plane Array (FPA) has been significantly reduced by placing digital architecture such as Analog to digital convertors and Low Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS) Inputs and Outputs (I/O) on the Read Out Integrated Circuit (ROIC).

  19. Focal axis resolver for offset reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    Described are electrical means for determining the focal axis of an offset reflector antenna whose physical rim is not coincident with the boundary of the electrical aperture. Even and odd sensing functions are employed in the focal region, leading to both amplitude and phase criteria for resolving a focal axis generally inclined with respect to the system axis. The analytical aspects of the problem are discussed, and an example related to a 4-meter Large-Antenna Multiple-Frequency Microwave Radiometer (LAMMR) is included. The technique is useful for focal axis determination in mathematical simulations and in the physical world.

  20. Optimal focal-plane restoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichenbach, Stephen E.; Park, Stephen K.

    1989-01-01

    Image restoration can be implemented efficiently by calculating the convolution of the digital image and a small kernel during image acquisition. Processing the image in the focal-plane in this way requires less computation than traditional Fourier-transform-based techniques such as the Wiener filter and constrained least-squares filter. Here, the values of the convolution kernel that yield the restoration with minimum expected mean-square error are determined using a frequency analysis of the end-to-end imaging system. This development accounts for constraints on the size and shape of the spatial kernel and all the components of the imaging system. Simulation results indicate the technique is effective and efficient.

  1. Neurocysticercosis presenting as focal hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Azharuddin Mohammed; Shamim, Md Dilawez; Ahmad, Mehtab; Abdali, Nasar

    2014-01-01

    A 40-year-old man presented with a 2-month history of headache, nausea and vomiting, with generalised seizures for the past 15 days. On examination he had bilateral papilloedema, visual acuity was 6/6 in both eyes but perimetry showed right homonymous inferior quadrantanopia. His MRI showed numerous small cystic lesions with eccentric nodules, diffusely distributed in bilateral cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres. There was also focal hydrocephalus involving occipital and temporal horns of the left lateral ventricle leading to its selective dilation. Stool examination showed ova of Taenia solium. He was treated with albendazole, prednisone and sustained release sodium valproate for 1 month. His headache resolved and he is free of seizures. Repeat perimetry at 1 month also showed resolution of visual field defect. PMID:24962486

  2. Severe adenovirus community-acquired pneumonia in immunocompetent adults: chest radiographic and CT findings

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dingyu; Fu, Yangyang; Wang, Zhiwei; Cao, Jian; Walline, Joseph; Zhu, Huadong

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe adenovirus pneumonia and its associated imaging features are well-described in immunocompromised patients but are rare and poorly understood in immunocompetent adults. We sought to describe the radiographic and CT findings of severe adenovirus community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in eight immunocompetent adults. Methods We reviewed systematically chest imaging manifestations of laboratory-confirmed severe adenovirus pneumonia in eight immunocompetent adults from April 2012 to April 2014. Results All patients showed abnormal results on initial chest radiograph and CT, with the exception of one normal initial chest radiograph. The abnormalities of the initial chest radiographs were unilateral (n=4) or bilateral (n=3), including consolidation (n=4), dense patchy opacity (n=3), ground glass opacity (GGO) (n=1), and pleural effusion (n=1). The initial CT findings consisted of unilateral (n=5) and bilateral (n=3) abnormalities, including consolidation (n=8), GGO (n=2), pleural effusion (n=3) and small nodules (n=1). Focal consolidation was the predominant finding in six patients whose initial CT scans were examined within one week after illness onset. Follow-up radiologic findings showed rapid development of bilateral consolidation within ten days after illness onset, usually accompanied by adjacent ground-glass opacity and pleural effusion. The parenchymal abnormalities began to absorb around two weeks after illness onset, with no appearances of fibrosis. Conclusions Severe adenovirus CAP in immunocompetent adults mainly appears as focal consolidation followed by rapid progression to bilateral consolidation, usually accompanied by adjacent GGO and pleural effusion, which may resemble bacterial pneumonia. Adenovirus should be considered in severe pneumonia cases with negative cultures and failure to respond to antibiotics. PMID:27162658

  3. Polyradiculoneuritis and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Holt, S; Khan, M M; Charles, R G; Epstein, E J

    1977-07-01

    A patient with severe Mycoplasma pneumonia developed polyradiculoneuritis and respiratory failure. The acute phase of the illness was complicated by a myocarditis, and recovery of neurological function was slow. Residual left hemidiaphragmatic paralysis was present 1 year after onset of the illness. PMID:882485

  4. Bacterial Pneumonia in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Marrie, Thomas J; File, Thomas M

    2016-08-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is common in the elderly person; its presentation in this population is often confounded by multiple comorbid illnesses, including those that result in confusion. Although severity-of-illness scoring systems might aid decision-making, clinical judgment following a careful assessment is key in deciding on the site of care and appropriate therapy. PMID:27394017

  5. Lipoid pneumonia: an uncommon entity.

    PubMed

    Khilnani, G C; Hadda, V

    2009-10-01

    Lipoid pneumonia is a rare form of pneumonia caused by inhalation or aspiration of fat-containing substances like petroleum jelly, mineral oils, certain laxatives, etc. It usually presents as an insidious onset, chronic respiratory illness simulating interstitial lung diseases. Rarely, it may present as an acute respiratory illness, especially when the exposure to fatty substance(s) is massive. Radiological findings are diverse and can mimic many other diseases including carcinoma, acute or chronic pneumonia, ARDS, or a localized granuloma. Pathologically it is a chronic foreign body reaction characterized by lipid-laden macrophages. Diagnosis of this disease is often missed as it is usually not considered in the differential diagnoses of community-acquired pneumonia; it requires a high degree of suspicion. In suspected cases, diagnosis may be confirmed by demonstrating the presence of lipid-laden macrophages in sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, or fine needle aspiration cytology/biopsy from the lung lesion. Treatment of this illness is poorly defined and constitutes supportive therapy, repeated bronchoalveolar lavage, and corticosteroids. PMID:19901490

  6. Lipoid pneumonia: a challenging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kassem; Chalhoub, Michel; Maroun, Rabih; Abi-Fadel, Francois; Zhao, Fan

    2011-01-01

    Lipoid pneumonia is a rare medical condition, and is usually classified into two groups, ie, exogenous or endogenous, depending on the source of lipids found in the lungs. Exogenous lipoid pneumonia may result from the aspiration of food and lipids. Although most cases are asymptomatic, common symptoms include cough, dyspnea, chest pain, pleural effusions, fever, and hemoptysis. Radiologically, lipoid pneumonia can manifest as consolidations, pulmonary nodules, or soft-tissue densities. These presentations involve a wide differential diagnosis, including lung cancer. Other rare causes of fatty pulmonary lesions include hamartomas, lipomas, and liposarcomas. The avoidance of further exposures and the use of corticosteroids, antibiotics, and lavage comprise the mainstays of treatment. The exclusion of mycobacterial infections is important during diagnosis, in view of their known association. Generally, acute presentations run a benign course, if promptly treated. Chronic cases are more persistent and difficult to treat. Although the radiologic and pathologic diagnosis is fairly reliable, more research is needed to clarify the optimal treatment and expected outcomes. We report on a 54-year-old man presenting with progressively worsening cough, hemoptysis, and dyspnea over a few weeks. The patient underwent multiple computed tomographies of the chest and bronchoscopies. All failed to diagnose lipoid pneumonia. The diagnosis was finally established using video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. Most of the paraffinoma was resected during this surgery. He was treated with antibiotics and steroids, and discharged from the hospital in stable condition. PMID:21349583

  7. An Outbreak of Infections Caused by a Klebsiella pneumoniae ST11 Clone Coproducing Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase-2 and RmtB in a Chinese Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Zou, Ming-Xiang; Wang, Hai-Chen; Dou, Qing-Ya; Hu, Yong-Mei; Yan, Qun; Liu, Wen-En

    2016-01-01

    Background: Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae bacteria, which cause serious disease outbreaks worldwide, was rarely detected in Xiangya Hospital, prior to an outbreak that occurred from August 4, 2014, to March 17, 2015. The aim of this study was to analyze the epidemiology and molecular characteristics of the K. pneumoniae strains isolated during the outbreak. Methods: Nonduplicate carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae isolates were screened for blaKPC-2 and multiple other resistance determinants using polymerase chain reaction. Subsequent studies included pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing, analysis of plasmids, and genetic organization of blaKPC-2 locus. Results: Seventeen blaKPC-2-positive K. pneumoniae were identified. A wide range of resistant determinants was detected. Most isolates (88.2%) coharbored blaKPC-2 and rmtB in addition to other resistance genes, including blaSHV-1, blaTEM-1, and aac(3)-IIa. The blaKPC-2 and rmtB genes were located on the conjugative IncFIB-type plasmid. Genetic organization of blaKPC-2 locusin most strains was consistent with that of the plasmid pKP048. Four types (A1, A2, A3, and B) were detected by PFGE, and Type A1, an ST11, was the predominant PFGE type. A novel K. pneumoniae sequence type (ST1883) related to ST11 was discovered. Conclusions: These isolates in our study appeared to be clonal and ST11 K. pneumoniae was the predominant clone attributed to the outbreak. Coharbing of blaKPC-2 and rmtB, which were located on a transferable plasmid, in clinical K. pneumoniae isolates may lead to the emergence of a new pattern of drug resistance. PMID:27569227

  8. Exogenous lipoid pneumonia caused by herbicide inhalation.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Takamasa; Tsubata, Yukari; Okimoto, Tamio; Hoshino, Teppei; Hamaguchi, Shun-Ichi; Isobe, Takeshi

    2016-09-01

    Exogenous lipoid pneumonia is caused by aspiration or inhalation of oily substances. Generally, lipoid pneumonia has non-specific clinical and radiological presentations and may be misdiagnosed as bacterial pneumonia. Our patient, a 68-year-old man who had been diagnosed with pneumonia on three previous occasions, was admitted to our hospital with a fourth similar episode. Computed tomography of the chest revealed extensive consolidations with air bronchograms in lung fields on the right side. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) increased ghost-like macrophages that stained positive for lipid. Our patient reported that he had sprayed herbicide in large quantities without wearing a mask. We analysed the BALF and herbicide by gas chromatography and diagnosed exogenous lipoid pneumonia caused by inhalation of herbicide. Clinicians should be aware of lipoid pneumonia, which may present as infectious pneumonia. PMID:27516888

  9. Analysis of Rapid Multi-Focal Zone ARFI Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rosenzweig, Stephen; Palmeri, Mark; Nightingale, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging has shown promise for visualizing structure and pathology within multiple organs; however, because the contrast depends on the push beam excitation width, image quality suffers outside of the region of excitation. Multi-focal zone ARFI imaging has previously been used to extend the region of excitation (ROE), but the increased acquisition duration and acoustic exposure have limited its utility. Supersonic shear wave imaging has previously demonstrated that through technological improvements in ultrasound scanners and power supplies, it is possible to rapidly push at multiple locations prior to tracking displacements, facilitating extended depth of field shear wave sources. Similarly, ARFI imaging can utilize these same radiation force excitations to achieve tight pushing beams with a large depth of field. Finite element method simulations and experimental data are presented demonstrating that single- and rapid multi-focal zone ARFI have comparable image quality (less than 20% loss in contrast), but the multi-focal zone approach has an extended axial region of excitation. Additionally, as compared to single push sequences, the rapid multi-focal zone acquisitions improve the contrast to noise ratio by up to 40% in an example 4 mm diameter lesion. PMID:25643078

  10. Epidemiology of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infections in Japan and Therapeutic Strategies for Macrolide-Resistant M. pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Kenri, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae pneumonia) is a major cause of community-acquired pneumonia worldwide. The surveillance of M. pneumoniae pneumonia is important for etiological and epidemiological studies of acute respiratory infections. In Japan, nation-wide surveillance of M. pneumoniae pneumonia has been conducted as a part of the National Epidemiological Surveillance of Infectious Diseases (NESID) program. This surveillance started in 1981, and significant increases in the numbers of M. pneumoniae pneumonia patients were noted in 1984, 1988, 2006, 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2015. The epidemics in 2011 and 2012 were particularly widespread and motivated researchers to conduct detailed epidemiological studies, including genotyping and drug resistance analyses of M. pneumoniae isolates. The genotyping studies based on the p1 gene sequence suggested that the p1 gene type 1 lineage has been dominant in Japan since 2003, including the epidemic period during 2011–2012. However, more detailed p1 typing analysis is required to determine whether the type 2 lineages become more relevant after the dominance of the type 1 lineage. There has been extensive research interest in implications of the p1 gene types on the epidemiology of M. pneumoniae infections. Serological characterizations of sera from patients have provided a glimpse into these associations, showing the presence of type specific antibody in the patient sera. Another important epidemiological issue of M. pneumoniae pneumonia is the emergence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae (MRMP). MRMPs were noted among clinical isolates in Japan after 2000. At present, the isolation rate of MRMPs from pediatric patients is estimated at 50–90% in Japan, depending on the specific location. In view of the situation, Japanese societies have issued guiding principles for treating M. pneumoniae pneumonia. In these guiding principles, macrolides are still recommended as the first-line drug, however, if