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Sample records for focal plane pattern

  1. Beamlet focal plane diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Caird, J.A.; Nielsen, N.D.; Patton, H.G.; Seppala, L.G.; Thompson, C.E.; Wegner, P.J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes the major optical and mechanical design features of the Beamlet Focal Plane Diagnostic system as well as measurements of the system performance, and typical data obtained to date. We also discuss the NIF requirements on the focal spot that we are interested in measuring, and some of our plans for future work using this system.

  2. Focal-plane CMOS wavelet feature extraction for real-time pattern recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olyaei, Ashkan; Genov, Roman

    2005-09-01

    Kernel-based pattern recognition paradigms such as support vector machines (SVM) require computationally intensive feature extraction methods for high-performance real-time object detection in video. The CMOS sensory parallel processor architecture presented here computes delta-sigma (ΔΣ)-modulated Haar wavelet transform on the focal plane in real time. The active pixel array is integrated with a bank of column-parallel first-order incremental oversampling analog-to-digital converters (ADCs). Each ADC performs distributed spatial focal-plane sampling and concurrent weighted average quantization. The architecture is benchmarked in SVM face detection on the MIT CBCL data set. At 90% detection rate, first-level Haar wavelet feature extraction yields a 7.9% reduction in the number of false positives when compared to classification with no feature extraction. The architecture yields 1.4 GMACS simulated computational throughput at SVGA imager resolution at 8-bit output depth.

  3. SNAP focal plane

    SciTech Connect

    Lampton, Michael L.; Kim, A.; Akerlof, C.W.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Berkovitz, J.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers Jr., W.C.; Commins, E.D.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.E.; DiGennaro,R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.S.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.E.; Harvey, P.R.; Heetderks, H.D.; Holland, S.E.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.S.; Linder,E.V.; Loken, S.C.; Malina, R.; Massey, R.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.P.; Miquel, R.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto, E.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch,A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-29

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square-degree field sensitive in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. We describe the requirements for the instrument suite and the evolution of the focal plane design to the present concept in which all the instrumentation--visible and near-infrared imagers, spectrograph, and star guiders--share one common focal plane.

  4. Mosaic Focal Plane Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, David L.; Horner, Scott D.; Aamodt, Earl K.

    2002-12-01

    Advances in systems engineering, applied sciences, and manufacturing technologies have enabled the development of large ground based and spaced based astronomical instruments having a large Field of View (FOV) to capture a large portion of the universe in a single image. A larger FOV can be accomplished using light weighted optical elements, improved support structures, and the development of mosaic Focal Plane Assemblies (mFPA). A mFPA designed for astronomy can use multiple Charged Coupled Devices (CCD) mounted onto a single camera baseplate integrated at the instrument plane of focus. Examples of current, or proposed, missions utilizing mFPA technology include FAME, GEST, Kepler, GAIA, LSST, and SNAP. The development of a mFPA mandates tighter control on the design trades, component development, CCD characterization, component integration, and performance verification testing. This paper addresses the capability Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company's (LMSSC) Advanced Technology Center (ATC) has developed to perform CCD characterization, mFPA assembly and alignment, and mFPA system level testing.

  5. Mosaic Focal Plane Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, D.; Horner, S.; Aamodt, E.

    Advances in manufacturing and applied sciences have enabled the development of large ground and spaced based astronomical instruments having a Field of View (FOV) large enough to capture a large portion of the universe in a single image. A large FOV can be accomplished using light weighted optics, improved structures, and the development of mosaic Focal Plane Assemblies (mFPAs). A mFPA comprises multiple Charged Coupled Devices (CCD) mounted onto a single baseplate integrated at the focus plane of the instrument. Examples of current, or proposed, missions utilizing mFPA technology include FAME, GEST, Kepler, GAIA, LSST, and SNAP. The development of a mFPA mandates tight control on the design trades of component development, CCD definition and characterization, component integration, and performance verification testing. This paper addresses the results of the Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC), Advanced Technology Center (ATC) developed mFPA. The design trades and performance characterization are services provided by the LMSSC ATC but not detailed in this paper.

  6. SNAP Satellite Focal Plane Development

    SciTech Connect

    Bebek, C.; Akerlof, C.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bercovitz, J.; Bergstrom, L.; Berstein, G.P.; Bester, M.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.; Emmett, W.; Eriksson, M.; Fouchez,D.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Heetderks, H.; Holland, S.; Huterer, D.; Johnson, W.; Kadel, R.; Karcher,A.; Kim, A.; Kolbe, W.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureaux, J.; Lampton, M.; Lefevre, O.; Levi, M.; Levin, D.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Malina, R.; Mazure, A.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.; Miquel, R.; Morgan, N.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Roe, N.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Prieto, E.; Rabinowitz,D.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Schubnell, M.; Sholl, M.; Smadja, G.; Smith, R.; Smoot, G.; Snyder, J.; Spadafora, A.; Szymkowiak, A.; Tarle,G.; Taylor, K.; Tilquin, A.; Tomasch, A.; Vincent, D.; von der Lippe, H.; Walder, J-P.; Wang, G.

    2003-07-07

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square degree field in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. The requirements for the instrument suite and the present configuration of the focal plane concept are presented. A two year R&D phase, largely supported by the Department of Energy, is just beginning. We describe the development activities that are taking place to advance our preparedness for mission proposal in the areas of detectors and electronics.

  7. Rewritable photochromic focal plane masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Emilio; Bertarelli, Chiara; Bianco, Andrea; Bortoletto, Fabio; Conconi, Paolo; Crimi, Giuseppe; Gallazzi, Maria C.; Giro, Enrico; Lucotti, Andrea; Pernechele, Claudio; Zerbi, Filippo M.; Zerbi, Giuseppe

    2003-02-01

    The application of organic photochromic materials in astronomy is opening new possibilities which we are investigating in order to design innovative devices for future instrumentation. The photochromic property of transparent/opaque transition (although in a limited wavelength range) and the changes in intrinsic refractive index have led our studies to application in astronomic spectrographs, both as focal plane mask (for MOS application) and as dispersive elements (volume phase holographic gratings, VPHG), respectively. In both cases the possibility to write and erase devices with suitable irradiation has revealed a new perspective for non-disposable and fully customizable items for spectroscopy. Pursuing this goal we have synthesized a series of novel photochromic materials belonging to the diarylethenes. They fulfill the requirements of thermal stability and fatigue resistance necessary to build functional devices. Prototypes of high contrast focal plane mask working in the H-alpha spectral region have been manufactured and characterized both in laboratory and with the AFOSC camera at Asiago telescope (1.8 m). A custom writing robot (ARATRO) which, taking imaging frames and with the aid of interactive mask design software and ad hoc control electronics, is able to write MOS masks, has been constructed. The design of the MOS masks allow the fitting in the AFOSC slit wheel. The overall set-up is ready for the sky tests.

  8. Flagging and Correction of Pattern Noise in the Kepler Focal Plane Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; VanCleve, Jeffrey E.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Cote, Miles T.; Klaus, Todd C.; Argabright, Vic S.

    2010-01-01

    In order for Kepler to achieve its required less than 20 PPM photometric precision for magnitude 12 and brighter stars, instrument-induced variations in the CCD readout bias pattern (our "2D black image"), which are either fixed or slowly varying in time, must be identified and the corresponding pixels either corrected or removed from further data processing. The two principle sources of these readout bias variations are crosstalk between the 84 science CCDs and the 4 fine guidance sensor (FGS) CCDs and a high frequency amplifier oscillation on less than 40% of the CCD readout channels. The crosstalk produces a synchronous pattern in the 2D black image with time-variation observed in less than 10% of individual pixel bias histories. We will describe a method of removing the crosstalk signal using continuously-collected data from masked and over-clocked image regions (our "collateral data"), and occasionally-collected full-frame images and reverse-clocked readout signals. We use this same set to detect regions affected by the oscillating amplifiers. The oscillations manifest as time-varying moir pattern and rolling bands in the affected channels. Because this effect reduces the performance in only a small fraction of the array at any given time, we have developed an approach for flagging suspect data. The flags will provide the necessary means to resolve any potential ambiguity between instrument-induced variations and real photometric variations in a target time series. We will also evaluate the effectiveness of these techniques using flight data from background and selected target pixels.

  9. Optimal focal-plane restoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichenbach, Stephen E.; Park, Stephen K.

    1989-01-01

    Image restoration can be implemented efficiently by calculating the convolution of the digital image and a small kernel during image acquisition. Processing the image in the focal-plane in this way requires less computation than traditional Fourier-transform-based techniques such as the Wiener filter and constrained least-squares filter. Here, the values of the convolution kernel that yield the restoration with minimum expected mean-square error are determined using a frequency analysis of the end-to-end imaging system. This development accounts for constraints on the size and shape of the spatial kernel and all the components of the imaging system. Simulation results indicate the technique is effective and efficient.

  10. Digital scanner infrared focal plane technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, M. A.; Malone, N. R.; Harris, M.; Shin, J.; Byers, S.; Price, D.; Vampola, J.

    2011-09-01

    Advancements in finer geometry and technology advancements in circuit design now allow placement of digital architecture on cryogenic focal planes while using less power than heritage analog designs. These advances in technology reduce the size, weight, and power of modern focal planes. In addition, the interface to the focal plane is significantly simplified and is more immune to Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). The cost of the customer's instrument after integration with the digital scanning Focal Plane Array (FPA) has been significantly reduced by placing digital architecture such as Analog to digital convertors and Low Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS) Inputs and Outputs (I/O) on the Read Out Integrated Circuit (ROIC).

  11. Focal Plane Metrology for the LSST Camera

    SciTech Connect

    A Rasmussen, Andrew P.; Hale, Layton; Kim, Peter; Lee, Eric; Perl, Martin; Schindler, Rafe; Takacs, Peter; Thurston, Timothy; /SLAC

    2007-01-10

    Meeting the science goals for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) translates into a demanding set of imaging performance requirements for the optical system over a wide (3.5{sup o}) field of view. In turn, meeting those imaging requirements necessitates maintaining precise control of the focal plane surface (10 {micro}m P-V) over the entire field of view (640 mm diameter) at the operating temperature (T {approx} -100 C) and over the operational elevation angle range. We briefly describe the hierarchical design approach for the LSST Camera focal plane and the baseline design for assembling the flat focal plane at room temperature. Preliminary results of gravity load and thermal distortion calculations are provided, and early metrological verification of candidate materials under cold thermal conditions are presented. A detailed, generalized method for stitching together sparse metrology data originating from differential, non-contact metrological data acquisition spanning multiple (non-continuous) sensor surfaces making up the focal plane, is described and demonstrated. Finally, we describe some in situ alignment verification alternatives, some of which may be integrated into the camera's focal plane.

  12. Solid-state curved focal plane arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael (Inventor); Jones, Todd (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to curved focal plane arrays. More specifically, the present invention relates to a system and method for making solid-state curved focal plane arrays from standard and high-purity devices that may be matched to a given optical system. There are two ways to make a curved focal plane arrays starting with the fully fabricated device. One way, is to thin the device and conform it to a curvature. A second way, is to back-illuminate a thick device without making a thinned membrane. The thick device is a special class of devices; for example devices fabricated with high purity silicon. One surface of the device (the non VLSI fabricated surface, also referred to as the back surface) can be polished to form a curved surface.

  13. Hybrid Extrinsic Silicon Focal Plane Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommerrenig, D. H.; Meinhardt, T.; Lowe, J.

    1981-02-01

    Large-area focal planes require mechanical assembly techniques which must be compatible with optical alignment, minimum deadspace, and cryogenic requirements in order to achieve optimum performance. Hybrid extrinsic silicon has been found particularly suitable for such an application. It will be shown that by choosing a large-area extrinsic silicon detector array which is hybrid-mated to a multiplicity of multiplexers a very cost-effective and high-density focal plane module can be assembled. Other advantages of this approach are inherent optical alignment and excellent performance.

  14. MTI Focal Plane Assembly Design and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, M.; Rienstra, J.L.

    1999-06-17

    The focal plane assembly for the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) consists of sensor chip assemblies, optical filters, and a vacuum enclosure. Sensor chip assemblies, composed of linear detector arrays and readout integrated circuits, provide spatial resolution in the cross-track direction for the pushbroom imager. Optical filters define 15 spectral bands in a range from 0.45 {micro}m to 10.7 {micro}m. All the detector arrays are mounted on a single focal plane and are designed to operate at 75 K. Three pairs of sensor chip assemblies (SCAs) are required to provide cross-track coverage in all 15 spectral bands. Each pair of SCAs includes detector arrays made from silicon, iridium antimonide, and mercury cadmium telluride. Read out integrated circuits multiplex the signals from the detectors to 18 separate video channels. Optical filter assemblies defining the spectral bands are mounted over the linear detector arrays. Each filter assembly consists of several filter strips bonded together side-by-side. The MTI focal plane assembly has been integrated with the rest of the payload and has undergone detailed testing and calibration. This paper includes representative test data for the various spectral bands and the overall performance of the focal plane assembly.

  15. Optical interconnections to focal plane arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Rienstra, J.L.; Hinckley, M.K.

    2000-11-01

    The authors have successfully demonstrated an optical data interconnection from the output of a focal plane array to the downstream data acquisition electronics. The demonstrated approach included a continuous wave laser beam directed at a multiple quantum well reflectance modulator connected to the focal plane array analog output. The output waveform from the optical interconnect was observed on an oscilloscope to be a replica of the input signal. They fed the output of the optical data link to the same data acquisition system used to characterize focal plane array performance. Measurements of the signal to noise ratio at the input and output of the optical interconnection showed that the signal to noise ratio was reduced by a factor of 10 or more. Analysis of the noise and link gain showed that the primary contributors to the additional noise were laser intensity noise and photodetector receiver noise. Subsequent efforts should be able to reduce these noise sources considerably and should result in substantially improved signal to noise performance. They also observed significant photocurrent generation in the reflectance modulator that imposes a current load on the focal plane array output amplifier. This current loading is an issue with the demonstrated approach because it tends to negate the power saving feature of the reflectance modulator interconnection concept.

  16. Towards Dualband Megapixel QWIP Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Hill, C. J.; Rafol, S. B.; Salazar, D.; Woolaway, J.; LeVan, P. D.; Tidrow, M. Z.

    2006-01-01

    Mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) 1024 x 1024 pixel quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) focal planes have been demonstrated with excellent imaging performance. The MWIR QWIP detector array has demonstrated a noise equivalent differential temperature (NEDT) of 17 mK at a 95 K operating temperature with f/2.5 optics at 300 K background and the LWIR detector array has demonstrated a NEDT of 13 mK at a 70 K operating temperature with the same optical and background conditions as the MWIR detector array after the subtraction of system noise. Both MWIR and LWIR focal planes have shown background limited performance (BLIP) at 90 K and 70 K operating temperatures respectively, with similar optical and background conditions. In addition, we have demonstrated MWIR and LWIR pixel co-registered simultaneously readable dualband QWIP focal plane arrays. In this paper, we will discuss the performance in terms of quantum efficiency, NEDT, uniformity, operability, and modulation transfer functions of the 1024 x 1024 pixel arrays and the progress of dualband QWIP focal plane array development work.

  17. Large Format Multicolor QWIP Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soibel, A.; Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Ting, D. Z.; Hill, C. J.; Nguyen, J.

    2009-01-01

    Mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) multicolor focal plane array (FPA) cameras are essential for many DoD and NASA applications including Earth and planetary remote sensing. In this paper we summarize our recent development of large format multicolor QWIP FPA that cover MWIR and LWIR bands.

  18. Dual band QWIP focal plane array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Choi, Kwong Kit (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) that provides two-color image sensing. Two different quantum wells are configured to absorb two different wavelengths. The QWIPs are arrayed in a focal plane array (FPA). The two-color QWIPs are selected for readout by selective electrical contact with the two different QWIPs or by the use of two different wavelength sensitive gratings.

  19. Teal Amber Visible Focal Plane Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Charles R.; Burczewski, Ron

    1981-12-01

    Deep-space surveillance missions have imposed severe demands on existing technology and simulated the search for new, advanced technology developments to provide higher performance. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) sponsored Teal Amber as a visible charge-coupled device (CCD) and associated focal plane signal processing technology development and demonstration program. This paper describes this large-scale, staring-array-sensor concept. The current state of art in the resulting visibled CCD imagers is specified, along with the focal plane signal processor implementation in low power-weight-volume large-scale integrated (LSI) circuitry. Performance requirements and analytic predictions are compared to demonstration system results from an electro-optical test site in White Sands, New Mexico.

  20. Infrared fiber optic focal plane dispersers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Far infrared transmissive fiber optics as a component in the design of integrated far infrared focal plane array utilization is discussed. A tightly packed bundle of fibers is placed at the focal plane, where an array of infrared detectors would normally reside, and then fanned out in two or three dimensions to individual detectors. Subsequently, the detectors are multiplexed by cryogenic electronics for relay of the data. A second possible application is frequency up-conversion (v sub 1 + v sub 2 = v sub 3), which takes advantage of the nonlinear optical index of refraction of certain infrared transmissive materials in fiber form. Again, a fiber bundle is utilized as above, but now a laser of frequency v sub 1 is mixed with the incoming radiation of frequency v sub 1 within the nonlinear fiber material. The sum, v sub 2 is then detected by near infrared or visible detectors which are more sensitive than those available at v sub 2. Due to the geometrical size limitations of detectors such as photomultipliers, the focal plane dispersal technique is advantageous for imaging up-conversion.

  1. Focal plane scanner with reciprocating spatial window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Chengye (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A focal plane scanner having a front objective lens, a spatial window for selectively passing a portion of the image therethrough, and a CCD array for receiving the passed portion of the image. All embodiments have a common feature whereby the spatial window and CCD array are mounted for simultaneous relative reciprocating movement with respect to the front objective lens, and the spatial window is mounted within the focal plane of the front objective. In a first embodiment, the spatial window is a slit and the CCD array is one-dimensional, and successive rows of the image in the focal plane of the front objective lens are passed to the CCD array by an image relay lens interposed between the slit and the CCD array. In a second embodiment, the spatial window is a slit, the CCD array is two-dimensional, and a prism-grating-prism optical spectrometer is interposed between the slit and the CCD array so as to cause the scanned row to be split into a plurality of spectral separations onto the CCD array. In a third embodiment, the CCD array is two-dimensional and the spatial window is a rectangular linear variable filter (LVF) window, so as to cause the scanned rows impinging on the LVF to be bandpass filtered into spectral components onto the CCD array through an image relay lens interposed between the LVF and the CCD array.

  2. Optimization of starshades: focal plane versus pupil plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flamary, R.; Aime, C.

    2014-09-01

    We search for the best possible transmission for an external occulter coronagraph that is dedicated to the direct observation of terrestrial exoplanets. We show that better observation conditions are obtained when the flux in the focal plane is minimized in the zone in which the exoplanet is observed, instead of for the total flux received by the telescope. We describe the transmission of the occulter as a sum of basis functions. For each element of the basis, we numerically computed the Fresnel diffraction at the aperture of the telescope and the complex amplitude at its focus. The basis functions are circular disks that are linearly apodized over a few centimeters (truncated cones). We complemented the numerical calculation of the Fresnel diffraction for these functions by a comparison with pure circular disks (cylinder) for which an analytical expression, based on a decomposition in Lommel series, is available. The technique of deriving the optimal transmission for a given spectral bandwidth is a classical regularized quadratic minimization of intensities, but linear optimizations can be used as well. Minimizing the integrated intensity on the aperture of the telescope or for selected regions of the focal plane leads to slightly different transmissions for the occulter. For the focal plane optimization, the resulting residual intensity is concentrated behind the geometrical image of the occulter, in a blind region for the observation of an exoplanet, and the level of background residual starlight becomes very low outside this image. Finally, we provide a tolerance analysis for the alignment of the occulter to the telescope, which also favors the focal plane optimization. This means that telescope offsets of a few decimeters do not strongly reduce the efficiency of the occulter.

  3. Multispectral linear array (MLA) focal plane mechanical and thermal design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, A. S.; Kaminski, E. F.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanical and thermal design of an integrated focal plane subsystem of a Multispectral Linear Array (MLA) instrument is discussed in terms of focal-plane alignment, thermoelastic performance, and thermal requirements. The modular construction and thermal control of the focal plane array are discussed.

  4. Characterization of DECam focal plane detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, H.Thomas; Angstadt, Robert; Campa, Julia; Cease, Herman; Derylo, Greg; Emes, John H.; Estrada, Juan; Kibik, Donna; Flaugher, Brenna L.; Holland, Steve E.; Jonas, Michelle; /Fermilab /Madrid, CIEMAT /LBL, Berkeley /Argonne /Pennsylvania U.

    2008-06-01

    DECam is a 520 Mpix, 3 square-deg FOV imager being built for the Blanco 4m Telescope at CTIO. This facility instrument will be used for the 'Dark Energy Survey' of the southern galactic cap. DECam has chosen 250 ?m thick CCDs, developed at LBNL, with good QE in the near IR for the focal plane. In this work we present the characterization of these detectors done by the DES team, and compare it to the DECam technical requirements. The results demonstrate that the detectors satisfy the needs for instrument.

  5. Quantum-Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP) Focal Plane Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, Murzy; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Ewin, Audrey J.; Hess, Larry A.; Hartmann, Thomas M.; La, Anh T.

    2012-01-01

    A paper describes the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS), a QWIP-based instrument intended to supplement the Operational Land Imager (OLI) for the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM). The TIRS instrument is a far-infrared imager operating in the pushbroom mode with two IR channels: 10.8 and 12 microns. The focal plane will contain three 640x512 QWIP arrays mounted on a silicon substrate. The silicon substrate is a custom-fabricated carrier board with a single layer of aluminum interconnects. The general fabrication process starts with a 4-in. (approx.10-cm) diameter silicon wafer. The wafer is oxidized, a single substrate contact is etched, and aluminum is deposited, patterned, and alloyed. This technology development is aimed at incorporating three large-format infrared detecting arrays based on GaAs QWIP technology onto a common focal plane with precision alignment of all three arrays. This focal plane must survive the rigors of flight qualification and operate at a temperature of 43 K (-230 C) for five years while orbiting the Earth. The challenges presented include ensuring thermal compatibility among all the components, designing and building a compact, somewhat modular system and ensuring alignment to very tight levels. The multi-array focal plane integrated onto a single silicon substrate is a new application of both QWIP array development and silicon wafer scale integration. The Invar-based assembly has been tested to ensure thermal reliability.

  6. Short Wavelength Infrared Hybrid Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vural, K.; Blackwell, J. D...; Marin, E. C.; Edwall, D. D...; Rode, J. P.

    1983-11-01

    Short wavelength (λc = 2.5 μm) 32 x 32 HgCdTe focal plane arrays have been fabricated for use in an Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) developed by the Jet Propulsion Labora-tory for NASA. An Imaging Spectrometer provides simultaneous imaging of several spectral bands for applications in the sensing and monitoring of earth resources. The detector material is HgCdTe grown on CdTe substrates using liquid phase epitaxy. Planar processing is used to make photovoltaic detectors on 68 um centers. The detector array is mated to a silicon charge coupled device multiplexer to make hybrid focal plane arrays. Results show high performance detectors with a mean RoA = 9.6 x 107 Ω --cm2 and IleakAge (-100 mV) = 0.037 pA at 120K and near zero background. The yield and uniformity are high. The ratio of the standard deviation of the dc responsivity to the mean is 3% for 98.5% of the pixels. The D1.0 = 1.3 x 1012 cm - âœ"fiz/W at a background of 1013 ph/cm2-s and 120K which is close to the background limited (BLIP) D* of 1.9 x 1012 cm- âœ"Hz/W.

  7. Characterization of the KATRIN Focal Plane Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodine, Laura; Leber, Michelle; Myers, Allan; Tolich, Kazumi; Vandevender, Brent; Wall, Brandon

    2008-10-01

    The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) Experiment is a next generation tritium beta decay experiment designed to measure directly the electron neutrino mass with a sensitivity of 0.2 eV. In the experiment, electrons from tritium decay of a gaseous source are magnetically guided through analyzing solenoidal retarding electrostatic spectrometers and detected via a focal plane detector. The focal plane detector is a 90mm diameter, 500 micron thick monolithic silicon pin-diode array with 148 pixels. The diode contacts have a titanium nitride overlayer and are connected to preamplifiers via an array of spring-loaded pogo pins. This novel connection scheme minimizes backgrounds from radioactive materials near the detector, facilitates characterization and replacement of the detector wafer, but requires a unique mounting design. The force of the pins strains the silicon, possibly altering the detector properties and performance. Results on the mechanical, thermal and electrical performance of a prototype detector under stress from pogo pin readouts will be presented.

  8. Compact Focal Plane Assembly for Planetary Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Ari; Aslam, Shahid; Huang, Wei-Chung; Steptoe-Jackson, Rosalind

    2013-01-01

    A compact radiometric focal plane assembly (FPA) has been designed in which the filters are individually co-registered over compact thermopile pixels. This allows for construction of an ultralightweight and compact radiometric instrument. The FPA also incorporates micromachined baffles in order to mitigate crosstalk and low-pass filter windows in order to eliminate high-frequency radiation. Compact metal mesh bandpass filters were fabricated for the far infrared (FIR) spectral range (17 to 100 microns), a game-changing technology for future planetary FIR instruments. This fabrication approach allows the dimensions of individual metal mesh filters to be tailored with better than 10- micron precision. In contrast, conventional compact filters employed in recent missions and in near-term instruments consist of large filter sheets manually cut into much smaller pieces, which is a much less precise and much more labor-intensive, expensive, and difficult process. Filter performance was validated by integrating them with thermopile arrays. Demonstration of the FPA will require the integration of two technologies. The first technology is compact, lightweight, robust against cryogenic thermal cycling, and radiation-hard micromachined bandpass filters. They consist of a copper mesh supported on a deep reactive ion-etched silicon frame. This design architecture is advantageous when constructing a lightweight and compact instrument because (1) the frame acts like a jig and facilitates filter integration with the FPA, (2) the frame can be designed so as to maximize the FPA field of view, (3) the frame can be simultaneously used as a baffle for mitigating crosstalk, and (4) micron-scale alignment features can be patterned so as to permit high-precision filter stacking and, consequently, increase the filter bandwidth and sharpen the out-of-band rolloff. The second technology consists of leveraging, from another project, compact and lightweight Bi0.87Sb0.13/Sb arrayed thermopiles

  9. Design of large aperture focal plane shutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jia-wen; Ma, Wen-li; Huang, Jin-long

    2012-09-01

    To satisfy the requirement of large telescope, a large aperture focal plane shutter with aperture size of φ200mm was researched and designed to realize, which could be started and stopped in a relative short time with precise position, and also the blades could open and close at the same time at any orientation. Timing-belts and stepper motors were adopted as the drive mechanism. Velocity and position of the stepper motors were controlled by the PWM pulse generated by DSP. Exponential curve is applied to control the velocity of the stepper motors to make the shutter start and stop in a short time. The closing/open time of shutter is 0.2s, which meets the performance requirements of large telescope properly.

  10. Infrared focal plane array crosstalk measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Khoa V.; Kauffman, Christopher L.; Derzko, Zenon I.

    1992-07-01

    Crosstalk between two neighboring elements in a focal plane array (FPA) occurs when signal incident on one element in the array is seen on another. This undesired effect can occur due to both the electrical and optical properties of the FPA. An effort is underway at the U.S. Army's Night Vision and Electro-Optics Directorate to develop a capability to measure crosstalk on both mid-wave infrared and long-wave infrared FPAs. A single detector in an array is illuminated using a laser source coupled with a beam expander, collimating lens, and focusing lens. The relative response of that detector to that of its neighboring detectors is measured to calculate crosstalk. The various components of the test station, the methodology for implementing the crosstalk measurement, and a model of the laser spot size are discussed.

  11. Smart trigger logic for focal plane arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, James E; Campbell, David V; Holmes, Michael L; Lovejoy, Robert; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kay, Randolph R; Cavanaugh, William S; Gurrieri, Thomas M

    2014-03-25

    An electronic device includes a memory configured to receive data representing light intensity values from pixels in a focal plane array and a processor that analyzes the received data to determine which light values correspond to triggered pixels, where the triggered pixels are those pixels that meet a predefined set of criteria, and determines, for each triggered pixel, a set of neighbor pixels for which light intensity values are to be stored. The electronic device also includes a buffer that temporarily stores light intensity values for at least one previously processed row of pixels, so that when a triggered pixel is identified in a current row, light intensity values for the neighbor pixels in the previously processed row and for the triggered pixel are persistently stored, as well as a data transmitter that transmits the persistently stored light intensity values for the triggered and neighbor pixels to a data receiver.

  12. Short wavelength infrared hybrid focal plane arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vural, K.; Blackwell, J. D.; Marin, E. C.; Edwall, D. D.; Rode, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    The employment of area focal plane arrays (FPA) has made it possible to obtain second generation infrared imaging systems with high resolution and sensitivity. The Short Wavelength Infrared (SWIR) region (1-2.5 microns) is of importance for imaging objects at high temperature and under conditions of reflected sunlight. The present investigation is concerned with electrooptical characterization results for 32 x 32 SWIR detector arrays and FPAs which are suitable for use in a prototype imaging spectrometer. The employed detector material is Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te grown by liquid phase epitaxy on a CdTe transparent substrate. Attention is given to details of processing, the design of the detector array, the multiplexer, the fabrication of the hybrid FPA, and aspects of performance.

  13. ORFEUS focal plane instrumentation: The Berkeley spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Mark; Bowyer, Stuart

    1988-01-01

    A spectrograph for the ORFEUS mission that incorporates four varied line-space, spherically figured diffraction gratings was designed. The ORFEUS, a 1-m normal incidence telescope is equipped with 2 focal plane spectrographs. The Berkeley spectrograph was developed with an optimizing raytracing computer code. Each grating accepts the light from 20 percent of the aperture of the telescope primary mirror and has a unique set of characteristics to cover a sub-bandpass within the 390 to 1200 A spectral range. Two photon-counting detectors incorporating a time delay readout system are used to record the spectra from all four gratings simultaneously. The nominal design achieves a spectral resolution (FWHM) in excess of 5500 at all wavelengths within the bandpass. The resolution is limited primarily by the detector spatial resolution. The 1 sigma astigmatism of this design varies between 13 and 150 micrometer on the same focal surface. An independent, direct imaging system tracks the drift of the target within the spectrometer aperture and allows measurement of the misalignment between the telescope optical axis and that of the external star tracker. The resolution and astigmatism achievable with this design are superior to those of a standard Rowland spectrograph designed with the same constraints.

  14. Small pixel oversampled IR focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, John; Curzan, Jon; Lewis, Jay; Dhar, Nibir

    2015-06-01

    We report on a new high definition high charge capacity 2.1 Mpixel MWIR Infrared Focal Plane Array. This high definition (HD) FPA utilizes a small 5 um pitch pixel size which is below the Nyquist limit imposed by the optical systems Point Spread Function (PSF). These smaller sub diffraction limited pixels allow spatial oversampling of the image. We show that oversampling IRFPAs enables improved fidelity in imaging including resolution improvements, advanced pixel correlation processing to reduce false alarm rates, improved detection ranges, and an improved ability to track closely spaced objects. Small pixel HD arrays are viewed as the key component enabling lower size, power and weight of the IR Sensor System. Small pixels enables a reduction in the size of the systems components from the smaller detector and ROIC array, the reduced optics focal length and overall lens size, resulting in an overall compactness in the sensor package, cooling and associated electronics. The highly sensitive MWIR small pixel HD FPA has the capability to detect dimmer signals at longer ranges than previously demonstrated.

  15. Multiwavelength infrared focal plane array detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, Stephen R. (Inventor); Olsen, Gregory H. (Inventor); Kim, Dong-Su (Inventor); Lange, Michael J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A multiwavelength focal plane array infrared detector is included on a common substrate having formed on its top face a plurality of In.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x As (x.ltoreq.0.53) absorption layers, between each pair of which a plurality of InAs.sub.y P.sub.1-y (y<1) buffer layers are formed having substantially increasing lattice parameters, respectively, relative to said substrate, for preventing lattice mismatch dislocations from propagating through successive ones of the absorption layers of decreasing bandgap relative to said substrate, whereby a plurality of detectors for detecting different wavelengths of light for a given pixel are provided by removing material above given areas of successive ones of the absorption layers, which areas are doped to form a pn junction with the surrounding unexposed portions of associated absorption layers, respectively, with metal contacts being formed on a portion of each of the exposed areas, and on the bottom of the substrate for facilitating electrical connections thereto.

  16. Tohoku University Focal Plane Array Controller (TUFPAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Takashi; Matsumoto, Daigo; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Katsuno, Yuka; Suzuki, Ryuji; Tokoku, Chihiro; Asai, Ken'ichiro; Nishimura, Tetsuo

    2003-03-01

    TUFPAC (Tohoku University Focal Plane Array Controller) is an array control system originally designed for flexible control and efficient data acquisition of 2048 x 2048 HgCdTe (HAWAII-2) array. A personal computer operated by Linux OS controls mosaic HAWAII-2s with commercially available DSP boards installed on the PCI bus. Triggered by PC, DSP sends clock data to front-end electronics, which is isolated from the DSP board by photo-couplers. Front-end electronics supply powers, biases and clock signals to HAWAII2. Pixel data are read from four outputs of each HAWAII2 simultaneously by way of four channel preamps and ADCs. Pixel data converted to 16 bit digital data are stored in the frame memory on the DSP board. Data are processed in the memory when necessary. PC receives the frame data and stores it in the hard disk of PC in FITS format. A set of the DSP board and front-end electronics is responsible for controlling each HAWAII-2. One PC can operate eight mosaic arrays at most. TUFPAC is applicable to the control of CCDs with minor changes of front-end electronics.

  17. Focal Plane Arrays and Electronics for WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterjohn, Stacy; Hogue, H.; Mattson, R.; Dawson, L.; Bojorquez, A.; Muzilla, M.

    2009-01-01

    DRS provided the four channel focal plane array system for the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) payload. The two shorter wavelength bands, centered near 3.2 and 4.5 µm, employed 1024x1024 HAWAII 1RG Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT) FPAs obtained from Teledyne Imaging Systems, Inc. The two longer wavelength bands, centered near 12 and 24 µm, utilized 1024x1024 arsenic doped silicon (Si:As) Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) FPAs, which were developed for the program by DRS. DRS packaged the 4 FPAs into similar custom cryogenic modules, each with its own flexible cryogenic ribbon cable to route FPA image output signals from within the WISE cryogenic telescope assembly through the cryostat walls. DRS also designed the cables and a common flight electronics box (FEB) to operate all 4 FPAs to provide their multiplexed digital image data streams to subsequent on-payload data processing and downlink systems. Fully functional, non-flight versions of the cabling and FEB were built to operate the FPAs during payload integration. The FPA system was delivered to the WISE payload integrator Space Dynamics Laboratory (SDL) in late 2007, and it is currently being integrated in to the WISE payload.

  18. SOI diode uncooled infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimata, Masafumi; Ueno, Masashi; Takeda, Munehisa; Seto, Toshiki

    2006-02-01

    An uncooled infrared focal plane array (IR FPA) is a MEMS device that integrates an array of tiny thermal infrared detector pixels. An SOI diode uncooled IR FPA is a type that uses freestanding single-crystal diodes as temperature sensors and has various advantages over the other MEMS-based uncooled IR FPAs. Since the first demonstration of an SOI diode uncooled IR FPA in 1999, the pixel structure has been improved by developing sophisticated MEMS processes. The most advanced pixel has a three-level structure that has an independent metal reflector for interference infrared absorption between the temperature sensor (bottom level) and the infrared-absorbing thin metal film (top level). This structure makes it possible to design pixels with lower thermal conductance by allocating more area for thermal isolation without reducing infrared absorption. The new MEMS process for the three-level structure includes a XeF II dry bulk silicon etching process and a double organic sacrificial layer surface micromachining process. Employing advanced MEMS technology, we have developed a 640 x 480-element SOI diode uncooled IR FPA with 25-μm square pixels. The noise equivalent temperature difference of the FPA is 40 mK with f/1.0 optics. This result clearly demonstrates the great potential of the SOI diode uncooled IR FPA for high-end applications. In this paper, we explain the advances and state-of-the-art technology of the SOI diode uncooled IR FPA.

  19. Terahertz detectors and focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogalski, A.; Sizov, F.

    2011-09-01

    Terahertz (THz) technology is one of emerging technologies that will change our life. A lot of attractive applications in security, medicine, biology, astronomy, and non-destructive materials testing have been demonstrated already. However, the realization of THz emitters and receivers is a challenge because the frequencies are too high for conventional electronics and the photon energies are too small for classical optics. As a result, THz radiation is resistant to the techniques commonly employed in these well established neighbouring bands. In the paper, issues associated with the development and exploitation of THz radiation detectors and focal plane arrays are discussed. Historical impressive progress in THz detector sensitivity in a period of more than half century is analyzed. More attention is put on the basic physical phenomena and the recent progress in both direct and heterodyne detectors. After short description of general classification of THz detectors, more details concern Schottky barrier diodes, pair braking detectors, hot electron mixers and field-effect transistor detectors, where links between THz devices and modern technologies such as micromachining are underlined. Also, the operational conditions of THz detectors and their upper performance limits are reviewed. Finally, recent advances in novel nanoelectronic materials and technologies are described. It is expected that applications of nanoscale materials and devices will open the door for further performance improvement in THz detectors.

  20. Digital-pixel focal plane array development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Matthew G.; Baker, Justin; Colonero, Curtis; Costa, Joe; Gardner, Tom; Kelly, Mike; Schultz, Ken; Tyrrell, Brian; Wey, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Since 2006, MIT Lincoln Laboratory has been developing Digital-pixel Focal Plane Array (DFPA) readout integrated circuits (ROICs). To date, four 256 × 256 30 μm pitch DFPA designs with in-pixel analog to digital conversion have been fabricated using IBM 90 nm CMOS processes. The DFPA ROICs are compatible with a wide range of detector materials and cutoff wavelengths; HgCdTe, QWIP, and InGaAs photo-detectors with cutoff wavelengths ranging from 1.6 to 14.5 μm have been hybridized to the same digital-pixel readout. The digital-pixel readout architecture offers high dynamic range, A/C or D/C coupled integration, and on-chip image processing with low power orthogonal transfer operations. The newest ROIC designs support two-color operation with a single Indium bump connection. Development and characterization of the two-color DFPA designs is presented along with applications for this new digital readout technology.

  1. Deep ultraviolet (254 nm) focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicek, Erdem; Vashaei, Zahra; McClintock, Ryan; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2011-10-01

    We report the synthesis, fabrication and testing of a 320 × 256 focal plane array (FPA) of back-illuminated, solarblind, p-i-n, AlxGa1-xN-based detectors, fully realized within our research laboratory. We implemented a novel pulsed atomic layer deposition technique for the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth of crackfree, thick, and high Al composition AlxGa1-xN layers. Following the growth, the wafer was processed into a 320 × 256 array of 25 μm × 25 μm pixels on a 30 μm pixel-pitch and surrounding mini-arrays. A diagnostic mini-array was hybridized to a silicon fan-out chip to allow the study of electrical and optical characteristics of discrete pixels of the FPA. At a reverse bias of 1 V, an average photodetector exhibited a low dark current density of 1.12×10-8 A/cm2. Solar-blind operation is observed throughout the array with peak detection occurring at wavelengths of 256 nm and lower and falling off three orders of magnitude by 285 nm. After indium bump deposition and dicing, the FPA is hybridized to a matching ISC 9809 readout integrated circuit (ROIC). By developing a novel masking technology, we significantly reduced the visible response of the ROIC and thus the need for external filtering to achieve solar- and visible-blind operation is eliminated. This allowed the FPA to achieve high external quantum efficiency (EQE): at 254 nm, average pixels showed unbiased peak responsivity of 75 mA/W, which corresponds to an EQE of ~37%. Finally, the uniformity of the FPA and imaging properties are investigated.

  2. KrF resists for implant layers patterning extreme high-aspect ratio structures with a double focal plane exposure technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafaelli, Giorgio; Ferri, Fabio; Volpi, Stefano; Hong, Chisun

    2012-03-01

    The design rules for advanced image sensor applications are requiring continuous CD shrinkage, and increasing aspect ratios which resulting in major challenges associated with using KrF technology. For the implant photo layers in particular, the need to block high-energy boron implants (well above 2 MeV) with extremely localized implant profiles requires an aspect ratio of deep well structures greater than 10:1. Other desirable attributes of a good photoresist for such demanding applications are high transparency, a steep wall profile consistent throughout the entire film, good adhesion with no structure collapse, and a wide process window. In this paper, we will discuss the role of a chemically amplified, ESCAP-type of resist in meeting these design criteria using a double focal plane exposure technique.

  3. Improved interframe registration based nonuniformity correction for focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Chao; Chen, Qian; Gu, Guohua; Sui, Xiubao; Ren, Jianle

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, an improved interframe registration based nonuniformity correction algorithm for focal plane arrays is proposed. The method simultaneously estimates detector parameters and carries out the nonuniformity correction by minimizing the mean square error between the two properly registered image frames. A new masked phase correlation algorithm is introduced to obtain reliable shift estimates in the presence of fixed pattern noise. The use of an outliers exclusion scheme, together with a variable step size strategy, could not only promote the correction precision considerably, but also eliminate ghosting artifacts effectively. The performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated with clean infrared image sequences with simulated nonuniformity and real pattern noise. We also apply the method to a real-time imaging system to show how effective it is in reducing noise and the ghosting artifacts.

  4. MWIR and LWIR Megapixel QWIP Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath D.; Bandara, S. V.; Liu, J. K.; Rafol, S. B.; Thang, J.; Mumolo, Jason; Tidrow, M.; LeVan, P. D.; Hill, C.

    2004-01-01

    A mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) 1024x1024 pixel quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) focal plane array has been demonstrated with excellent imagery. MWIR focal plane has given noise equivalent differential temperature (NETD) of 19 mK at 95K operating temperature with f/2.5 optics at 300K background and LWIR focal plane has given NEDT of 13 mK at 70K operating temperature with same optical and background conditions as MWIR array. Both of these focal plane arrays have shown background limited performance (BLIP) at 90K and 70K operating temperatures with the same optics and background conditions. In this paper, we will discuss their performance in quantum efficiency, NETD, uniformity, and operability.

  5. Performance characterization of a PIAA complex focal plane mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Kevin; Belikov, Ruslan; Guyon, Olivier; Pluzhnik, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    The Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization Complex Mask Coronagraph (PIAACMC) is an architecture for directly observing extrasolar planets, and can achieve performance near the theoretical limits for any direct-detection instrument. PIAACMC can be designed for centrally-obscured and segmented apertures, which is particularly useful for next-generation telescopes. The PIAACMC architecture includes aspheric PIAA optics, and a complex phase-shifting focal plane mask that provides a pi phase shift to a portion of the on-axis starlight. The phase-shifted starlight is forced to interfere destructively with the un-shifted starlight, causing the starlight to be eliminated, and allowing a region for high-contrast imaging near the star.The main challenge in designing the complex focal plane mask is to achieve deep contrast over a wide spectral band. Another challenge for the mask design is to avoid sharp features, which can be difficult to manufacture. We present a solution to the design challenge by dividing the mask into sections and optimizing the phase shift produced by each section. We also demonstrate a method to design the mask with a smooth profile. One remaining challenge is to measure the performance of the mask. We present a method to compute the phase profile of the mask based on measurements of the diffraction pattern. The computed phase profile is used to simulate the expected coronagraph performance.

  6. Self-calibration of Antenna Errors Using Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napier, P. J.; Cornwell, T. J.

    The thery of focal-plane correlation is reviewed and applied to the problem of the self-calibration and self-correction of a radio telescope with errors in its reflecting surface. Curves are presented which allow the estimation of focal-plane array size and integration time needed for telescopes with varying amounts of error. It is suggested that the technique may have application to the problem of the construction of large telescopes in space.

  7. Thermomechanical architecture of the VIS focal plane for Euclid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martignac, Jérôme; Carty, Michaël.; Tourette, Thierry; Bachet, Damien; Berthé, Michel; Augueres, Jean-Louis; Amiaux, Jérôme; Fontignie, Jean; Horeau, Benoît; Renaud, Diana; Pottinger, Sabrina; Denniston, James; Winter, Berend; Guttridge, Phillip; Cole, Richard; Cropper, Mark; Niemi, Sami; Coker, John; Hunt, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    One of the main challenges for current and near future space experiments is the increase of focal plane complexity in terms of amount of pixels. In the frame work of the ESA Euclid mission to be launched in 2020, the Euclid Consortium is developing an extremely large and stable focal plane for the VIS instrument. CEA has developed the thermomechanical architecture of that Focal Plane taking into account all the very stringent performance and mission related requirements. The VIS Focal Plane Assembly integrates 36 CCDs (operated at 150K) connected to their front end electronics (operated at 280K) as to obtain one of the largest focal plane (˜0.6 billion pixels) ever built for space application after the GAIA one. The CCDs are CCD273 type specially designed and provided by the e2v company under ESA contract, front end electronics is studied and provided by MSSL. In this paper we first recall the specific requirements that have driven the overall architecture of the VIS-FPA and especially the solutions proposed to cope with the scientific needs of an extremely stable focal plane, both mechanically and thermally. The mechanical structure based on SiC material used for the cold sub assembly supporting the CCDs is detailed. We describe also the modular architecture concept that we have selected taking into account AIT-AIV and programmatic constraints.

  8. Femtosecond spatial pulse shaping at the focal plane.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Matos, Ó; Vaveliuk, P; Izquierdo, J G; Loriot, V

    2013-10-21

    Spatial shaping of ultrashort laser beams at the focal plane is theoretically analyzed. The description of the pulse is performed by its expansion in terms of Laguerre-Gaussian orthonormal modes. This procedure gives both a comprehensive interpretation of the propagation dynamics and the required signal to encode onto a spatial light modulator for spatial shaping, without using iterative algorithms. As an example, pulses with top-hat and annular spatial profiles are designed and their dynamics analyzed. The interference of top-hat pulses is also investigated finding potential applications in high precision pump-probe experiments (without using delay lines) and for the creation of subwavelength ablation patterns. In addition, a novel class of ultrashort pulses possessing non-stationary orbital angular momentum is also proposed. These exotic pulses provide additional degrees of freedom that open up new perspectives in fields such as laser-matter interaction and micro-machining. PMID:24150344

  9. LiteBIRD: Mission Overview and Focal Plane Layout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, T.; Akiba, Y.; Arnold, K.; Borrill, J.; Chendra, R.; Chinone, Y.; Cukierman, A.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M.; Dominjon, A.; Elleflot, T.; Errard, J.; Fujino, T.; Fuke, H.; Goeckner-wald, N.; Halverson, N.; Harvey, P.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hattori, M.; Hazumi, M.; Hill, C.; Hilton, G.; Holzapfel, W.; Hori, Y.; Hubmayr, J.; Ichiki, K.; Inatani, J.; Inoue, M.; Inoue, Y.; Irie, F.; Irwin, K.; Ishino, H.; Ishitsuka, H.; Jeong, O.; Karatsu, K.; Kashima, S.; Katayama, N.; Kawano, I.; Keating, B.; Kibayashi, A.; Kibe, Y.; Kida, Y.; Kimura, K.; Kimura, N.; Kohri, K.; Komatsu, E.; Kuo, C. L.; Kuromiya, S.; Kusaka, A.; Lee, A.; Linder, E.; Matsuhara, H.; Matsuoka, S.; Matsuura, S.; Mima, S.; Mitsuda, K.; Mizukami, K.; Morii, H.; Morishima, T.; Nagai, M.; Nagasaki, T.; Nagata, R.; Nakajima, M.; Nakamura, S.; Namikawa, T.; Naruse, M.; Natsume, K.; Nishibori, T.; Nishijo, K.; Nishino, H.; Nitta, T.; Noda, A.; Noguchi, T.; Ogawa, H.; Oguri, S.; Ohta, I. S.; Otani, C.; Okada, N.; Okamoto, A.; Okamoto, A.; Okamura, T.; Rebeiz, G.; Richards, P.; Sakai, S.; Sato, N.; Sato, Y.; Segawa, Y.; Sekiguchi, S.; Sekimoto, Y.; Sekine, M.; Seljak, U.; Sherwin, B.; Shinozaki, K.; Shu, S.; Stompor, R.; Sugai, H.; Sugita, H.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, A.; Tajima, O.; Takada, S.; Takakura, S.; Takano, K.; Takei, Y.; Tomaru, T.; Tomita, N.; Turin, P.; Utsunomiya, S.; Uzawa, Y.; Wada, T.; Watanabe, H.; Westbrook, B.; Whitehorn, N.; Yamada, Y.; Yamasaki, N.; Yamashita, T.; Yoshida, M.; Yoshida, T.; Yotsumoto, Y.

    2016-04-01

    LiteBIRD is a proposed CMB polarization satellite project to probe the inflationary B-mode signal. The satellite is designed to measure the tensor-to-scalar ratio with a 68 % confidence level uncertainty of σ _r<10^{-3} , including statistical, instrumental systematic, and foreground uncertainties. LiteBIRD will observe the full sky from the second Lagrange point for 3 years. We have a focal plane layout for observing frequency coverage that spans 40-402 GHz to characterize the galactic foregrounds. We have two detector candidates, transition-edge sensor bolometers and microwave kinetic inductance detectors. In both cases, a telecentric focal plane consists of approximately 2× 10^3 superconducting detectors. We will present the mission overview of LiteBIRD, the project status, and the TES focal plane layout.

  10. CLAES focal plane array. [Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roche, A. E.; Sterritt, L. W.; Kumer, J. B.; Callary, P. C.; Nielsen, R. L.

    1989-01-01

    The Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer for the NASA Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite uses solid-state focal plane arrays to detect emission from the earth's atmosphere over the IR wavelength range 3.5 to 13 microns. This paper discusses the design of the focal plane detector assembly and compares calculated performance with measurements. Measurements were made of focal plane noise and responsivity as functions of frequency (2 to 500 Hz) and temperature (12 to 19 K), pixel-to-pixel and across-array crosstalk, and linearity over a dynamic range of 100,000. The measurements demonstrate that the arrays satisfy the science requirements, and that, in general, there is reasonable agreement between the measurements and the analytical model.

  11. WISE focal plane module lessons learned in light of success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterjohn, S.; Hogue, H.; Muzilla, M.; Rector, S.; Mattson, R.

    2010-08-01

    DRS Sensors & Targeting Systems, under contract to the Space Dynamics Laboratory of Utah State University, provided the focal plane detector system for NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The focal plane detector system consists of two mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) focal plane module assemblies (FPMAs), two arsenic doped silicon (Si:As) Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) FPMAs, electronics to drive the FPMAs and report digital data from them, and the cryogenic and ambient temperature cabling that connect the FPMAs and electronics. The WISE Satellite was launched in late 2009 and has been a very rewarding success. In light of the recent success on orbit, there were many challenges and hurdles the DRS team had to overcome in order to guarantee the ultimate success of the instrument. This report highlights a few of the challenges that the team overcame in hopes that the information can be made available to the astronomy community for future use.

  12. LiteBIRD: Mission Overview and Focal Plane Layout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, T.; Akiba, Y.; Arnold, K.; Borrill, J.; Chendra, R.; Chinone, Y.; Cukierman, A.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M.; Dominjon, A.; Elleflot, T.; Errard, J.; Fujino, T.; Fuke, H.; Goeckner-wald, N.; Halverson, N.; Harvey, P.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hattori, M.; Hazumi, M.; Hill, C.; Hilton, G.; Holzapfel, W.; Hori, Y.; Hubmayr, J.; Ichiki, K.; Inatani, J.; Inoue, M.; Inoue, Y.; Irie, F.; Irwin, K.; Ishino, H.; Ishitsuka, H.; Jeong, O.; Karatsu, K.; Kashima, S.; Katayama, N.; Kawano, I.; Keating, B.; Kibayashi, A.; Kibe, Y.; Kida, Y.; Kimura, K.; Kimura, N.; Kohri, K.; Komatsu, E.; Kuo, C. L.; Kuromiya, S.; Kusaka, A.; Lee, A.; Linder, E.; Matsuhara, H.; Matsuoka, S.; Matsuura, S.; Mima, S.; Mitsuda, K.; Mizukami, K.; Morii, H.; Morishima, T.; Nagai, M.; Nagasaki, T.; Nagata, R.; Nakajima, M.; Nakamura, S.; Namikawa, T.; Naruse, M.; Natsume, K.; Nishibori, T.; Nishijo, K.; Nishino, H.; Nitta, T.; Noda, A.; Noguchi, T.; Ogawa, H.; Oguri, S.; Ohta, I. S.; Otani, C.; Okada, N.; Okamoto, A.; Okamoto, A.; Okamura, T.; Rebeiz, G.; Richards, P.; Sakai, S.; Sato, N.; Sato, Y.; Segawa, Y.; Sekiguchi, S.; Sekimoto, Y.; Sekine, M.; Seljak, U.; Sherwin, B.; Shinozaki, K.; Shu, S.; Stompor, R.; Sugai, H.; Sugita, H.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, A.; Tajima, O.; Takada, S.; Takakura, S.; Takano, K.; Takei, Y.; Tomaru, T.; Tomita, N.; Turin, P.; Utsunomiya, S.; Uzawa, Y.; Wada, T.; Watanabe, H.; Westbrook, B.; Whitehorn, N.; Yamada, Y.; Yamasaki, N.; Yamashita, T.; Yoshida, M.; Yoshida, T.; Yotsumoto, Y.

    2016-08-01

    LiteBIRD is a proposed CMB polarization satellite project to probe the inflationary B-mode signal. The satellite is designed to measure the tensor-to-scalar ratio with a 68 % confidence level uncertainty of σ _r<10^{-3}, including statistical, instrumental systematic, and foreground uncertainties. LiteBIRD will observe the full sky from the second Lagrange point for 3 years. We have a focal plane layout for observing frequency coverage that spans 40-402 GHz to characterize the galactic foregrounds. We have two detector candidates, transition-edge sensor bolometers and microwave kinetic inductance detectors. In both cases, a telecentric focal plane consists of approximately 2× 10^3 superconducting detectors. We will present the mission overview of LiteBIRD, the project status, and the TES focal plane layout.

  13. Uncooled infrared sensors with digital focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Charles A.; Butler, Neal R.; Blackwell, Richard; Murphy, Robert; Breen, Thomas

    1996-06-01

    Loral Infrared & Imaging Systems is developing low cost, high performance, uncooled infrared imaging products for both military and commercial applications. These products are based on the microbolometer technology, a silicon micromachined sensor which combines the wafer level silicon processing with a device structure capable of yielding excellent infrared imaging performance. Here, we report on the development of an uncooled sensor, the LTC500, which incorporates an all digital focal plane array and has a measured NETD of less than 70 mK. The focal plane array and the electronics within the LTC500 have been designed as an integrated unit to meet a broad range of end user applications by providing features such as nonuniformity correction, autogain and level, NTSC video, and digital outputs. The 327 X 245 element focal plane array has a 46.25 micrometers pixel pitch and an on focal plane array 14 bit to analog to digital converter (ADC). The ADC has a measured instantaneous dynamic range of more than 76 dB at a 6.1 MHz output data rate and 60 Hz frame rate. The focal plane array consumes less than 500 mW of power, of which less than 250 mW is used in the ADC. An additional 36 dB of digital coarse offset correction in front of the ADC on the focal plane array results in a total electronic dynamic range of 112 dB. The MRT of the LTC500 camera has been measured at less 0.2 C at f(subscript o).

  14. Megapixel Multi-band QWIP Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Liu, J. K.; Rafo, S. B.; Hill, C.; Mumolo, J.; Thang, J.; Tidrow, M.; LeVan, P. D.

    2004-01-01

    A mid-wavelength 1024x1024 pixel quantum well infrared photodetector (QW) focal plane array has been demonstrated with excellent imagery. Noise equivalent differential temperature (NETD) of 19 mK was achieved at 95K operating temperature with f/2.5 optics at 300K background. This focal plane array has shown background limited performance (BLIP) at 90K operating temperature with the same optics and background conditions. In this paper, we will discuss its performance in quantum efficiency, NETD, uniformity, and operability.

  15. The Whipple Mission: Design and development of the focal plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenter, A.; Kraft, R.; Murray, S. S.; Gauron, T.; Alcock, C.; Vrtilek, J.

    2014-12-01

    Whipple is a proposed space borne mission intended to detect and characterize thesize and spatial distribution of Trans Neptunian Objects (TNOs) using the ``blind'' occultation technique. This technique measures the size of, and distance to, a TNO by discerning features of the Fresnel diffraction pattern that is produced when a TNO intercepts the light path between a distant star and the observatory. As the observatory transects the diffraction pattern, it resolves that pattern as a light curve using a differential photometer. The light curve decrement is relatively large (few percent) and the temporal duration is short. For a TNO in the Kuiper Belt the duration is a fraction of a second. For objects in the Oort cloud the duration is ~ a few seconds. Since a blind occultation event is rare, tens of thousands of stars need to be observed simultaneously over several years to accumulate sufficient statistics. Stars need to be observed at cadences up to 40 Hz with a read noise <20e rms (post CDS)Though this is beyond the capability of CCDs, such a high speed, low noise, multi-object differential photometer instrument can be implemented with CMOS imaging technology. The proposed focal plane for the Whipple photometer consists of nine Teledyne HyVISI Silicon hybrid CMOS detectors behind a 77cm F1.34 optic. The detectors consist of 1k by 1k 36 micron pitch pixels and each detector is connected to its own SIDECAR ASIC. Due to the high cadence required, the detectors are operatedin window readout mode. Approximately 700 stars per detector, each in a 2x2 pixel window, will be read out at 40Hz. Progressively more stars can be observed as the cadence decreases, until the limit of the SIDECAR memory is reached at about 4,000 windows The lack of atmospheric turbulence combined with the large field of view and high, speed low noise performance of the focal plane will provide the Whipple mission with unprecedented capability in exploring our Solar System.

  16. Design study of the accessible focal plane telescope for shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design and cost analysis of an accessible focal plane telescope for Spacelab is presented in blueprints, tables, and graphs. Topics covered include the telescope tube, the telescope mounting, the airlock plus Spacelab module aft plate, the instrument adapter, and the instrument package. The system allows access to the image plane with instrumentation that can be operated by a scientist in a shirt sleeve environment inside a Spacelab module.

  17. Optical Link For Readout From Focal-Plane Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Larsson, Anders G.; Maserjian, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Outputs of photodetectors modulate beam of light. Proposed optical link carries analog readout signals from photodetectors in focal-plane array to external signal-processing circuitry. Insensitive to electromagnetic interference at suboptical frequencies, and imposes smaller heat load on cryogenic apparatus because it does not include high-power electronic amplifier or laser transmitter within cold chamber.

  18. Testing of focal plane arrays at the AEDC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Randy A.; Mead, Kimberly D.; Smith, Robert W.

    1992-07-01

    A facility was developed at the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) to provide complete radiometric characterization of focal plane arrays (FPAs). The highly versatile facility provides the capability to test single detectors, detector arrays, and hybrid FPAs. The primary component of the AEDC test facility is the Focal Plane Characterization Chamber (FPCC). The FPCC provides a cryogenic, low-background environment for the test focal plane. Focal plane testing in the FPCC includes flood source testing, during which the array is uniformly irradiated with IR radiation, and spot source testing, during which the target radiation is focused onto a single pixel or group of pixels. During flood source testing, performance parameters such as power consumption, responsivity, noise equivalent input, dynamic range, radiometric stability, recovery time, and array uniformity can be assessed. Crosstalk is evaluated during spot source testing. Spectral response testing is performed in a spectral response test station using a three-grating monochromator. Because the chamber can accommodate several types of testing in a single test installation, a high throughput rate and good economy of operation are possible.

  19. Tie-In Orbits for the Focal Plane Stability Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz-Reed, Linda

    1991-07-01

    This proposal is part of the TTSC request entitled, "Distortion Calibration in FGS 1 and FGS 2, FGS-to-FGS Alignment Calibration". This portion is listed separately due to the time critical nature of one of the orbits. OFAD in FGS 3 which will be performed in December 1992 together with the Mini OFAD's in FGS's 1 and 2 which will be performed in January 1993 will provide a new set of FGS calibration parameters. One of the objectives of the STScI Focal Plane Stability test is to monitor changes to these parameters by repeatedly observing targets in the cluster M35. Since the cluster is near the ecliptic, only two vehicle orientations are needed, the "fall" and the "spring" pointings (see attached pickles plots). Since the Mini OFAD targets are not necessarily the same targets used in the Focal Plane Stability Test, tie in orbits using the Focal Plane Stability targets are needed shortly before and after the Mini OFAD activities. In addition, the Focal Plane Stability Test may not be

  20. Design of a focal plane array with analog neural preprocessing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koren, Ivo; Dohndorf, Juergen; Schluessler, Jens-Uwe; Werner, Joerg; Kroenig, Arndt; Ramacher, Ulrich

    1996-12-01

    The design of a CMOS focal plane array with 128 by 128 pixels and analog neural preprocessing is presented. Optical input to the array is provided by substrate-well photodiodes. A two-dimensional neural grid wIth next- neighbor connectivity, implemented as differential current- mode circuit, is capable of spatial low-pass filtering combined with contrast enhancement or binarization. The gain, spatial filter and nonlinearity parameters of the neural network are controlled externally using analog currents. This allows the multipliers and sigmoid transducers to be operated in weak inversion for a wide parameter sweep range as well as in moderate or strong inversion for a larger signal to pattern-noise ratio. The cell outputs are sequentially read out by an offset compensated differential switched-capacitor multiplexer with column preamplifiers. The analog output buffer is designed for pixel rates up to 1 pixel/microsecond and 2 by 100 pF load capacitance. All digital clocks controlling the analog data path are generated on-chip. The clock timing is programmable via a serial computer interface. Using 1 micrometer double-poly double-metal CMOS process, one pixel cell occupies 96 by 96 micrometer2 and the total chip size is about 2.3 cm2. Operating the neural network in weak inversion, the power dissipation of the analog circuitry is less than 100 mW.

  1. Focal properties of a plane grating in a convergent beam.

    PubMed

    Hall, J T

    1966-06-01

    Focusing from a plane grating can be accomplished by using convergent radiation incident on the grating in such a manner that any incident angle alpha(n), the resulting diffraction angle beta(n), will be on the same side of the grating normal. The theory for the focal properties is developed by applying Fermat's principle of least time to selected terms resulting from a finite series expansion of the system's distance function. Derivations are given for finding the focal curve equation, astigmatism, and coma, of the most usable configuration of the optical components. Discussions of the aberrations disclose methods for eliminating the astigmatism and reducing the coma. PMID:20049009

  2. Automatic location of microscopic focal planes for computerized stereology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elozory, Daniel T.; Bonam, Om Pavithra; Kramer, Kurt; Goldgof, Dmitry B.; Hall, Lawrence O.; Mangual, Osvaldo; Mouton, Peter R.

    2011-03-01

    When applying design-based stereology to biological tissue, there are two primary applications for an auto-focusing function in the software of computerized stereology system. The system must first locate the in-focus optical planes at the upper and lower surfaces of stained tissue sections, thus identifying the top and bottom as well as the thickness of the tissue. Second, the system must find the start and end along the Z-axis of stained objects within a Z-stack of images through tissue sections. In contrast to traditional autofocus algorithms that seek a global maximum or peak on the focus curve, the goal of this study was to find the two "knees" of the focus curve that represent the "just out-of-focus" focal planes. The upper surface of the tissue section is defined as the image just before focus is detected moving down the Z-stack. Continuing down, the lower surface is defined as the first image of the last set of adjacent images where focus is no longer detected. The performance of seven focus algorithms in locating the top and bottom focal planes of tissue sections was analyzed by comparing each algorithm on 34 Z-stacks including a total of 828 images. The Thresholded Absolute Gradient algorithm outperformed all others, correctly identifying the top or bottom focal plane within an average of 1 μm on the training data as well as the test data.

  3. Uncooled infrared focal plane array imaging in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Shuyu

    2015-06-01

    This article reviews the development of uncooled infrared focal plane array (UIFPA) imaging in China in the past decade. Sensors based on optical or electrical read-out mechanism were developed but the latter dominates the market. In resistive bolometers, VOx and amorphous silicon are still the two major thermal-sensing materials. The specifications of the IRFPA made by different manufactures were collected and compared. Currently more than five Chinese companies and institutions design and fabricate uncooled infrared focal plane array. Some devices have sensitivity as high as 30 mK; the largest array for commercial products is 640×512 and the smallest pixel size is 17 μm. Emphasis is given on the pixel MEMS design, ROIC design, fabrication, and packaging of the IRFPA manufactured by GWIC, especially on design for high sensitivities, low noise, better uniformity and linearity, better stabilization for whole working temperature range, full-digital design, etc.

  4. Focal Plane Phase Masks for PIAA: Design and Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, K.; Conway, J.; Belikov, R.; Guyon, O.

    2016-05-01

    The Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization Complex Mask Coronagraph (PIAACMC) is a coronagraph architecture for the direct detection of extrasolar planets, which can achieve close to the theoretical performance limit of any direct detection system. The primary components of a PIAACMC system are the Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) optics and the complex phase-shifting focal plane mask. PIAA optics have been produced and demonstrated with high coronagraph performance. In this paper, we describe the design process for the phase-shifting focal plane mask, and strategies for smoothing the mask profile. We describe the mask manufacturing process and show manufacturing results. Errors in the fabricated mask profile degrade the system performance, but we can recover performance by refining the manufacturing process and implementing wavefront control.

  5. Two-color quantum well infrared photodetector focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundas, Jason; Patnaude, Kelly; Dennis, Richard; Burrows, Douglas; Cook, Robert; Reisinger, Axel; Sundaram, Mani; Benson, Robert; Woolaway, James; Schlesselmann, John; Petronio, Susan

    2006-05-01

    QmagiQ LLC, has recently completed building and testing high operability two-color Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP) focal plane arrays (FPAs). The 320 x 256 format dual-band FPAs feature 40-micron pixels of spatially registered QWIP detectors based on III-V materials. The vertically stacked detectors in this specific midwave/longwave (MW/LW) design are tuned to absorb in the respective 4-5 and 8-9 micron spectral ranges. The ISC0006 Readout Integrated Circuit (ROIC) developed by FLIR Systems Inc. and used in these FPAs features direct injection (DI) input circuitry for high charge storage with each unit cell containing dual integration capacitors, allowing simultaneous scene sampling and readout for the two distinct wavelength bands. Initial FPAs feature pixel operabilities better than 99%. Focal plane array test results and sample images will be presented.

  6. Modulation transfer function of QWIP and superlattice focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Rafol, S. B.; Ting, D. Z.; Soibel, A.; Liu, J. K.; Khoshakhlagh, A.; Keo, S. A.; Mumolo, J. M.; Nguyen, J.

    2013-07-01

    Modulation transfer function (MTF) is the ability of an imaging system to faithfully image a given object. The MTF of an imaging system quantifies the ability of the system to resolve or transfer spatial frequencies. In this paper we will discuss the detail MTF measurements of a 1024 × 1024 pixel multi-band quantum well infrared photodetector and 320 × 256 pixel long-wavelength InAs/GaSb superlattice infrared focal plane arrays.

  7. Back focal plane imaging spectroscopy of photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Rebecca; Heerklotz, Lars; Kortenbruck, Nikolai; Cichos, Frank

    2012-08-01

    Back focal plane imaging spectroscopy is introduced to record angle resolved emission spectra of 3-dimensional colloidal photonic crystals. The auto-fluorescence of the colloids is used to quickly map the photonic band structure up to 72 % of the solid angle of a semisphere with the help of a high numerical aperture objective. Local excitation provides spatially resolved information on the photonic crystal's optical properties. The obtained fractional density of states allows direct conclusions on the crystal's stacking faults or defects.

  8. Precise annealing of focal plane arrays for optical detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, Daniel A.

    2015-09-22

    Precise annealing of identified defective regions of a Focal Plane Array ("FPA") (e.g., exclusive of non-defective regions of the FPA) facilitates removal of defects from an FPA that has been hybridized and/or packaged with readout electronics. Radiation is optionally applied under operating conditions, such as under cryogenic temperatures, such that performance of an FPA can be evaluated before, during, and after annealing without requiring thermal cycling.

  9. Signal processing of microbolometer infrared focal-plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junju; Qian, Yunsheng; Chang, Benkang; Xing, Suxia; Sun, Lianjun

    2005-01-01

    A 320×240-uncooled-microbolometer-based signal processing circuit for infrared focal-plane arrays is presented, and the software designs of this circuit system are also discussed in details. This signal processing circuit comprises such devices as FPGA, D/A, A/D, SRAM, Flash, DSP, etc., among which, FPGA is the crucial part, which realizing the generation of drive signals for infrared focal-plane, nonuniformity correction, image enhancement and video composition. The device of DSP, mainly offering auxiliary functions, carries out communication with PC and loads data when power-up. The phase locked loops (PLL) is used to generate high-quality clocks with low phase dithering and multiple clocks are to used satisfy the demands of focal-plane arrays, A/D, D/A and FPGA. The alternate structure is used to read or write SRAM in order to avoid the contradiction between different modules. FIFO embedded in FPGA not only makes full use of the resources of FPGA but acts as the channel between different modules which have different-speed clocks. What's more, working conditions, working process, physical design and management of the circuit are discussed. In software designing, all the function modules realized by FPGA and DSP devices, which are mentioned in the previous part, are discussed explicitly. Particularly to the nonuniformity correction module, the pipeline structure is designed to improve the working frequency and the ability to realize more complex algorithm.

  10. SIRTF Focal Plane Survey: A Pre-flight Error Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.; Brugarolas, Paul B.; Boussalis, Dhemetrios; Kang, Bryan H.

    2003-01-01

    This report contains a pre-flight error analysis of the calibration accuracies expected from implementing the currently planned SIRTF focal plane survey strategy. The main purpose of this study is to verify that the planned strategy will meet focal plane survey calibration requirements (as put forth in the SIRTF IOC-SV Mission Plan [4]), and to quantify the actual accuracies expected. The error analysis was performed by running the Instrument Pointing Frame (IPF) Kalman filter on a complete set of simulated IOC-SV survey data, and studying the resulting propagated covariances. The main conclusion of this study is that the all focal plane calibration requirements can be met with the currently planned survey strategy. The associated margins range from 3 to 95 percent, and tend to be smallest for frames having a 0.14" requirement, and largest for frames having a more generous 0.28" (or larger) requirement. The smallest margin of 3 percent is associated with the IRAC 3.6 and 5.8 micron array centers (frames 068 and 069), and the largest margin of 95 percent is associated with the MIPS 160 micron array center (frame 087). For pointing purposes, the most critical calibrations are for the IRS Peakup sweet spots and short wavelength slit centers (frames 019, 023, 052, 028, 034). Results show that these frames are meeting their 0.14" requirements with an expected accuracy of approximately 0.1", which corresponds to a 28 percent margin.

  11. On-chip ADC for infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lei; Chen, Guo-qiang; Wang, Pan; Ding, Rui-jun

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a low power and small area analog-digital converter (ADC) for infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPA) readout integrated circuit (ROIC). Successive approximation register (SAR) ADC architecture is used in this IRFPA readout integrated circuit. Each column of the IRFPA shares one SAR ADC. The most important part is the three-level DAC. Compared to the previous design, this three-level DAC needs smaller area, has lower power, and more suitable for IRFPA ROIC. In this DAC, its most significant bit (MSB) sub-DAC uses charge scaling, while the least significant bit (LSB) sub-DAC uses voltage scaling. Where the MSB sub-DAC consists of a four-bit charge scaling DAC and a five-bit sub-charge scaling DAC. We need to put a scaling capacitor Cs between these two sub-DACs. Because of the small area, we have more design methods to make the ADC has a symmetrical structure and has higher accuracy. The ADC also needs a high resolution comparator. In this design the comparator uses three-stage operational amplifier structure to have a 77dB differential gain. As the IR focal plane readout circuit signal is stepped DC signal, the circuit design time without adding the sample and hold circuit, so we can use a DC signal instead of infrared focal plane readout circuit output analog signals to be simulated. The simulation result shows that the resolution of the ADC is 12 bit.

  12. Achromatic Focal Plane Mask for Exoplanet Imaging Coronagraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Kevin Edward; Belikov, Ruslan; Guyon, Olivier; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Wilson, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in coronagraph technologies for exoplanet imaging have achieved contrasts close to 1e10 at 4 lambda/D and 1e-9 at 2 lambda/D in monochromatic light. A remaining technological challenge is to achieve high contrast in broadband light; a challenge that is largely limited by chromaticity of the focal plane mask. The size of a star image scales linearly with wavelength. Focal plane masks are typically the same size at all wavelengths, and must be sized for the longest wavelength in the observational band to avoid starlight leakage. However, this oversized mask blocks useful discovery space from the shorter wavelengths. We present here the design, development, and testing of an achromatic focal plane mask based on the concept of optical filtering by a diffractive optical element (DOE). The mask consists of an array of DOE cells, the combination of which functions as a wavelength filter with any desired amplitude and phase transmission. The effective size of the mask scales nearly linearly with wavelength, and allows significant improvement in the inner working angle of the coronagraph at shorter wavelengths. The design is applicable to almost any coronagraph configuration, and enables operation in a wider band of wavelengths than would otherwise be possible. We include initial results from a laboratory demonstration of the mask with the Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization coronagraph.

  13. Energy Reconstruction with the Sweeper Magnet Focal Plane Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitt, George; Thoennessen, Michael; Frank, Nathan; Cooper, Matt; Vander Molen, A. M.; Nett, Brian

    2002-10-01

    The Sweeper Magnet Focal Plane Detector project is a collaboration of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) at Florida State University and the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University. The NHMFL will construct the Sweeper Magnet, a large C-type magnet necessary for the bending of rigid nuclear beams. The NSCL will build the Focal Plane Detectors consisting of two Cathode Readout Drift Detectors (CRDCs) for taking precise position measurements and an Ion Chamber with plastic scintillators for taking ΔE and E_tot measurements. During beam experiments, the Sweeper Magnet will bend the charged fragments for detection in the Focal Plane Detector. As fragments pass through, each CRDC will measure a position where fragments impinge. This will allow experimenters to calculate a fragment's trajectory and determine where it will strike the large stopping scintillator for the E_tot measurements. In order to obtain accurate energies of the fragments, the position sensitivity of the large scintillator must be mapped. By finding a functional relationship between the position of the impinging particles and the attenuation of the light emitted by the scintillator, one can use the known position information from the CRDCs to reconstruct the energy of fragments. The position sensitivity of the large plastic scintillator as measured with a collimated, pulsed blue diode will be presented.

  14. Measuring the Flatness of Focal Plane for Very Large Mosaic CCD Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Jiangang; Estrada, Juan; Cease, Herman; Diehl, H.Thomas; Flaugher, Brenna L.; Kubik, Donna; Kuk, Keivin; Kuropatkine, Nickolai; Lin, Huan; Montes, Jorge; Scarpine, Vic; /Fermilab

    2010-06-08

    Large mosaic multiCCD camera is the key instrument for modern digital sky survey. DECam is an extremely red sensitive 520 Megapixel camera designed for the incoming Dark Energy Survey (DES). It is consist of sixty two 4k x 2k and twelve 2k x 2k 250-micron thick fully-depleted CCDs, with a focal plane of 44 cm in diameter and a field of view of 2.2 square degree. It will be attached to the Blanco 4-meter telescope at CTIO. The DES will cover 5000 square-degrees of the southern galactic cap in 5 color bands (g, r, i, z, Y) in 5 years starting from 2011. To achieve the science goal of constraining the Dark Energy evolution, stringent requirements are laid down for the design of DECam. Among them, the flatness of the focal plane needs to be controlled within a 60-micron envelope in order to achieve the specified PSF variation limit. It is very challenging to measure the flatness of the focal plane to such precision when it is placed in a high vacuum dewar at 173 K. We developed two image based techniques to measure the flatness of the focal plane. By imaging a regular grid of dots on the focal plane, the CCD offset along the optical axis is converted to the variation the grid spacings at different positions on the focal plane. After extracting the patterns and comparing the change in spacings, we can measure the flatness to high precision. In method 1, the regular dots are kept in high sub micron precision and cover the whole focal plane. In method 2, no high precision for the grid is required. Instead, we use a precise XY stage moves the pattern across the whole focal plane and comparing the variations of the spacing when it is imaged by different CCDs. Simulation and real measurements show that the two methods work very well for our purpose, and are in good agreement with the direct optical measurements.

  15. HIGH PERFORMANCE PIAA CORONAGRAPHY WITH COMPLEX AMPLITUDE FOCAL PLANE MASKS

    SciTech Connect

    Guyon, Olivier; Martinache, Frantz; Belikov, Ruslan; Soummer, Remi

    2010-10-15

    We describe a coronagraph approach where the performance of a Phase-Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) coronagraph is improved by using a partially transmissive phase-shifting focal plane mask and a Lyot stop. This approach combines the low inner working angle offered by phase mask coronagraphy, the full throughput and uncompromized angular resolution of the PIAA approach, and the design flexibility of Apodized Pupil Lyot Coronagraph. A PIAA complex mask coronagraph (PIAACMC) is fully described by the focal plane mask size, or, equivalently, its complex transmission which ranges from 0 (opaque) to -1 (phase shifting). For all values of the transmission, the PIAACMC theoretically offers full on-axis extinction and 100% throughput at large angular separations. With a pure phase focal plane mask (complex transmission = -1), the PIAACMC offers 50% throughput at 0.64 {lambda}/D while providing total extinction of an on-axis point source. This performance is very close to the 'fundamental performance limit' of coronagraphy derived from first principles. For very high contrast level, imaging performance with PIAACMC is in practice limited by the angular size of the on-axis target (usually a star). We show that this fundamental limitation must be taken into account when choosing the optimal value of the focal plane mask size in the PIAACMC design. We show that the PIAACMC enables visible imaging of Jupiter-like planets at {approx}1.2 {lambda}/D from the host star, and can therefore offer almost three times more targets than a PIAA coronagraph optimized for this type of observation. We find that for visible imaging of Earth-like planets, the PIAACMC gain over a PIAA is probably much smaller, as coronagraphic performance is then strongly constrained by stellar angular size. For observations at 'low' contrast (below {approx} 10{sup 8}), the PIAACMC offers significant performance enhancement over PIAA. This is especially relevant for ground-based high contrast imaging

  16. Technological developments of the OGRE focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutt, James H.; McEntaffer, Randall L.; DeRoo, Casey; Schultz, Ted; Rogers, Thomas; Murray, Neil; Holland, Andrew; Weatherill, Daniel; Holland, Karen; Colebrook, David; Farn, David

    2015-09-01

    The Off-plane Grating Rocket Experiment (OGRE) is a high resolution soft X-ray spectrometer sub-orbital rocket payload designed as a technology development platform for three low Technology Readiness Level (TRL) components. The incident photons will be focused using a light-weight, high resolution, single-crystal silicon optic. They are then dispersed conically according to wavelength by an array of off-plane gratings before being detected in a focal plane camera comprised of four Electron Multiplying Charge-Coupled Devices (EM-CCDs). While CCDs have been extensively used in space applications; EM-CCDs are seldom used in this environment and even more rarely for X-ray photon counting applications, making them a potential technology risk for larger scale X-ray observatories. This paper will discuss the reasons behind choosing EM-CCDs for the focal plane detector and the developments that have been recently made in the prototype camera electronics and thermal control system.

  17. Detectors and Focal Plane Modules for Weather Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Souza, A. I.; Robinson, E.; Masterjohn, S.; Ely, P.; Khalap, V.; Babu, S.; Smith, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Weather satellite instruments require detectors with a variety of wavelengths ranging from the visible to VLWIR. One of the remote sensing applications is the geostationary GOES-ABI imager covering wavelengths from the 450 to 490 nm band through the 13.0 to 13.6 micron band. There are a total of 16 spectral bands covered. The Cross-track infrared Sounder (CrIS) is a Polar Orbiting interferometric sensor that measures earth radiances at high spectral resolution, using the data to provide pressure, temperature and moisture profiles of the atmosphere. The pressure, temperature and moisture sounding data are used in weather prediction models that track storms, predict levels of precipitation etc. The CrIS instrument contains SWIR (lamba(sub c) approximately 5 micron at 98K), MWIR (lambda(sub c) approximately 9 micron at 98K) and LWIRs (lamba(sub c) approximately 15.5 micron at 81K) bands in three Focal Plane Array Assemblies (FPAAs). GOES-ABI contains three focal plane modules (FPMs), (i) a visible-near infrared module consisting of three visible and three near infrared channels, (ii) a MWIR module comprised of five channels from 3.9 micron to 8.6 micron and (iii) a 9.6 micron to 13.3 micron, five-channel LWIR module. The VNIR FPM operates at 205 K, and the MWIR and LWIR FPMs operate at 60 K. Each spectral channel has a redundant array built into a single detector chip. Switching is thus permitted from the primary selected array in each channel to the redundant array, given any degradation in performance of the primary array during the course of the mission. Silicon p-i-n detectors are used for the 0.47 micron to 0.86 micron channels. The thirteen channels above 1 micron are fabricated in various compositions of Hg1-xCdxTe, and in this particular case using two different detector architectures. The 1.38 micron to 9.61 micron channels are all fabricated in Hg1-xCdxTe grown by Liquid Phase Epitaxy (LPE) using the HDVIP detector architecture. Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE

  18. Detectors and focal plane modules for weather satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, A. I.; Robinson, E.; Masterjohn, S.; Ely, P.; Khalap, V.; Babu, S.; Smith, D. S.

    2016-05-01

    Weather satellite instruments require detectors with a variety of wavelengths ranging from the visible to VLWIR. One of the remote sensing applications is the geostationary GOES-ABI imager covering wavelengths from the 450 to 490 nm band through the 13.0 to 13.6 μm band. There are a total of 16 spectral bands covered. The Cross-track infrared Sounder (CrIS) is a Polar Orbiting interferometric sensor that measures earth radiances at high spectral resolution, using the data to provide pressure, temperature and moisture profiles of the atmosphere. The pressure, temperature and moisture sounding data are used in weather prediction models that track storms, predict levels of precipitation etc. The CrIS instrument contains SWIR (λc ~ 5 μm at 98K), MWIR (λc ~ 9 μm at 98K) and LWIRs (λc ~ 15.5 μm at 81K) bands in three Focal Plane Array Assemblies (FPAAs). GOES-ABI contains three focal plane modules (FPMs), (i) a visible-near infrared module consisting of three visible and three near infrared channels, (ii) a MWIR module comprised of five channels from 3.9 μm to 8.6 μm and (iii) a 9.6 μm to 13.3 μm, five-channel LWIR module. The VNIR FPM operates at 205 K, and the MWIR and LWIR FPMs operate at 60 K. Each spectral channel has a redundant array built into a single detector chip. Switching is thus permitted from the primary selected array in each channel to the redundant array, given any degradation in performance of the primary array during the course of the mission. Silicon p-i-n detectors are used for the 0.47 μm to 0.86 μm channels. The thirteen channels above 1 μm are fabricated in various compositions of Hg1-xCdxTe, and in this particular case using two different detector architectures. The 1.38 μm to 9.61 μm channels are all fabricated in Hg1-xCdxTe grown by Liquid Phase Epitaxy (LPE) using the HDVIP detector architecture. Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE)-grown Hg1-xCdxTe material are used for the LWIR 10.35 μm to 13.3 μm channels fabricated in Double

  19. MOSAD IR focal plane per pixel A/D development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandl, William J.; Kennedy, James J.; Chu, Muren

    1996-06-01

    An on focal plane digital readout development suggested by the Army Night Vision & Electronics Sensors Directorate is proceeding under a combined program with the development of two color HCT detector arrays. The on focal plane A/D process is based on the Amain patented multiplexed oversample A/D, MOSAD, technology. In the first year of the program, prototype on focal plane analog to digital converters for both staring arrays and scanning arrays were built and demonstrated. The prototypes included a 2 loop double ended switched MOSAD and a 1 loop single ended MOSAD. Results from the original experimental prototypes showed conclusively that better than 14 bits could be achieved and that well capacity could be increased to support high background HCT needs approaching 10(superscript 9) electrons. In the second year, a 64 X 64 staring array for HCT LWIR detectors, 50 micron centers, was built based on these original prototype designs. The layout of the per pixel MOSAD A/D staring array used Orbit 1.2 micron CMOS process and achieved a pixel size of 40 microns with a well capacity of 1.9 X 10(superscript 8) electrons. Integration capacitors were built using Orbit's normal double poly capacitors with a standard buffered direct inject TIA detector interface configuration. Preliminary testing has been completed indicating complete functionality. Fermionics LWIR HCT detectors with cutoff at 9 microns have been built for attachment to the readout but indium bumping was not completed in time to report system level testing results. However, some noise tests have been performed using on array current mirrors. These tests indicate that better than 12 bits has been achieved, but lower noise current sources will be required for a more accurate measurement.

  20. Kalman Filter for Calibrating a Telescope Focal Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Bryan; Bayard, David

    2006-01-01

    The instrument-pointing frame (IPF) Kalman filter, and an algorithm that implements this filter, have been devised for calibrating the focal plane of a telescope. As used here, calibration signifies, more specifically, a combination of measurements and calculations directed toward ensuring accuracy in aiming the telescope and determining the locations of objects imaged in various arrays of photodetectors in instruments located on the focal plane. The IPF Kalman filter was originally intended for application to a spaceborne infrared astronomical telescope, but can also be applied to other spaceborne and ground-based telescopes. In the traditional approach to calibration of a telescope, (1) one team of experts concentrates on estimating parameters (e.g., pointing alignments and gyroscope drifts) that are classified as being of primarily an engineering nature, (2) another team of experts concentrates on estimating calibration parameters (e.g., plate scales and optical distortions) that are classified as being primarily of a scientific nature, and (3) the two teams repeatedly exchange data in an iterative process in which each team refines its estimates with the help of the data provided by the other team. This iterative process is inefficient and uneconomical because it is time-consuming and entails the maintenance of two survey teams and the development of computer programs specific to the requirements of each team. Moreover, theoretical analysis reveals that the engineering/ science iterative approach is not optimal in that it does not yield the best estimates of focal-plane parameters and, depending on the application, may not even enable convergence toward a set of estimates.

  1. Focal plane array with modular pixel array components for scalability

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, Randolph R; Campbell, David V; Shinde, Subhash L; Rienstra, Jeffrey L; Serkland, Darwin K; Holmes, Michael L

    2014-12-09

    A modular, scalable focal plane array is provided as an array of integrated circuit dice, wherein each die includes a given amount of modular pixel array circuitry. The array of dice effectively multiplies the amount of modular pixel array circuitry to produce a larger pixel array without increasing die size. Desired pixel pitch across the enlarged pixel array is preserved by forming die stacks with each pixel array circuitry die stacked on a separate die that contains the corresponding signal processing circuitry. Techniques for die stack interconnections and die stack placement are implemented to ensure that the desired pixel pitch is preserved across the enlarged pixel array.

  2. Focal plane detectors possible detector technologies for OWL/AIRWATCH

    SciTech Connect

    Flyckt, Esso

    1998-06-15

    New satellite-born projects OWL and AIRWATCH will need single-photon focal-plane detectors of a million pixels in a design which is optimized to the focusing optics and electronics at acceptable cost. We discuss different phototube possibilities and their pros and cons with crude cost estimates. We conclude that a multichannel-photomultiplier solution is safe. A better compromise may be to adapt a 6 or 9 inch X-ray image intensifier tube or develop a 12 inch image intensifier for detecting individual photons, and adapt the optics to have many mirror modules. The possibility of developing super-large-area phototubes is also discussed.

  3. Focal-plane detector system for the KATRIN experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amsbaugh, J. F.; Barrett, J.; Beglarian, A.; Bergmann, T.; Bichsel, H.; Bodine, L. I.; Bonn, J.; Boyd, N. M.; Burritt, T. H.; Chaoui, Z.; Chilingaryan, S.; Corona, T. J.; Doe, P. J.; Dunmore, J. A.; Enomoto, S.; Formaggio, J. A.; Fränkle, F. M.; Furse, D.; Gemmeke, H.; Glück, F.; Harms, F.; Harper, G. C.; Hartmann, J.; Howe, M. A.; Kaboth, A.; Kelsey, J.; Knauer, M.; Kopmann, A.; Leber, M. L.; Martin, E. L.; Middleman, K. J.; Myers, A. W.; Oblath, N. S.; Parno, D. S.; Peterson, D. A.; Petzold, L.; Phillips, D. G.; Renschler, P.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Schwarz, J.; Steidl, M.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Thümmler, T.; Van Wechel, T. D.; VanDevender, B. A.; Vöcking, S.; Wall, B. L.; Wierman, K. L.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wüstling, S.

    2015-04-01

    The focal-plane detector system for the KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment consists of a multi-pixel silicon p-i-n-diode array, custom readout electronics, two superconducting solenoid magnets, an ultra high-vacuum system, a high-vacuum system, calibration and monitoring devices, a scintillating veto, and a custom data-acquisition system. It is designed to detect the low-energy electrons selected by the KATRIN main spectrometer. We describe the system and summarize its performance after its final installation.

  4. Measurement of modulation transfer function of focal plane arrays and imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreman, Glenn D.

    1994-05-01

    A method for measuring the modulation transfer function (MTF) of focal-plane arrays (FPA's) has been developed which uses the statistical properties of laser speckle. The entire area of the focal plane is characterized, and no optics are required for target projection. The random nature of the test pattern avoids phasing effects between the target and the detector-array structure, which greatly relaxes alignment tolerances as compared to other methods. The technique is applicable to arrays that have intentional nonlinearity of response, as well as to those arrays that are inherently linear. The test can be performed on any focal-plane configuration, either one dimensional (1D) or two dimensional (2D). The data processing is usually performed by an off-line computer. However, the test is also useful for real-time diagnostics, to facilitate adjustment of focal-plane operating parameters. In the real-time case, the necessary signal processing can be performed on a digital oscilloscope.

  5. Simultaneous imaging of multiple focal planes using a two-photon scanning microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, W.; Carriles, R.; Hoover, E. E.; Planchon, T. A.; Durfee, C. G.; Squier, J. A.

    2007-06-01

    Despite all the advances in nonlinear microscopy, all existing instruments are constrained to obtain images of one focal plane at a time. In this Letter we demonstrate a two-photon absorption fluorescence scanning microscope capable of imaging two focal planes simultaneously. This is accomplished by temporally demultiplexing the signal coming from two focal volumes at different sample depths. The scheme can be extended to three or more focal planes.

  6. Antenna coupled detectors for 2D staring focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritz, Michael A.; Kolasa, Borys; Lail, Brian; Burkholder, Robert; Chen, Leonard

    2013-06-01

    Millimeter-wave (mmW)/sub-mmW/THz region of the electro-magnetic spectrum enables imaging thru clothing and other obscurants such as fog, clouds, smoke, sand, and dust. Therefore considerable interest exists in developing low cost millimeter-wave imaging (MMWI) systems. Previous MMWI systems have evolved from crude mechanically scanned, single element receiver systems into very complex multiple receiver camera systems. Initial systems required many expensive mmW integrated-circuit low-noise amplifiers. In order to reduce the cost and complexity of the existing systems, attempts have been made to develop new mmW imaging sensors employing direct detection arrays. In this paper, we report on Raytheon's recent development of a unique focal plane array technology, which operates broadly from the mmW through the sub-mmW/THz region. Raytheon's innovative nano-antenna based detector enables low cost production of 2D staring mmW focal plane arrays (mmW FPA), which not only have equivalent sensitivity and performance to existing MMWI systems, but require no mechanical scanning.

  7. Focal-Plane Array Receiver Systems for Space Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britcliffe, M.; Hoppe, D.; Vilnrotter, V.

    2007-08-01

    Typical ground antennas intended for use in space communications require large apertures operating at high frequencies. The challenge involved with these applications is achieving the required antenna performance in terms of antenna aperture efficiency and pointing accuracy. The utilization of a focal-plane array in place of a standard single-mode feed minimizes these problems. This article discusses the key elements required to implement a focal-plane array on a large high-frequency antenna. The example of the NASA Deep Space Network 70-m antennas operating at 32 GHz has been chosen to illustrate these advantages. The design of a suitable feed and low-noise cryogenically cooled amplifier and the required signal-processing techniques are described. It is shown that adaptive least mean-square algorithms can be applied to the output of the array elements, in order to obtain the optimum combining weights in real time, even in the presence of dynamic interference (nearby spacecraft in the array's field of view or planetary radiation). This adaptive optimization capability maximizes the combined output signal-to-noise ratio in real time, ensuring maximum data throughput in the communications link when operating in the presence of receiver noise and external interference generally present during planetary encounters.

  8. Radiometric infrared focal plane array imaging system for thermographic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, B. J.; Mccafferty, N.; Brown, R.; Tower, J. R.; Kosonocky, W. F.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes research performed under the Radiometric Infrared Focal Plane Array Imaging System for Thermographic Applications contract. This research investigated the feasibility of using platinum silicide (PtSi) Schottky-barrier infrared focal plane arrays (IR FPAs) for NASA Langley's specific radiometric thermal imaging requirements. The initial goal of this design was to develop a high spatial resolution radiometer with an NETD of 1 percent of the temperature reading over the range of 0 to 250 C. The proposed camera design developed during this study and described in this report provides: (1) high spatial resolution (full-TV resolution); (2) high thermal dynamic range (0 to 250 C); (3) the ability to image rapid, large thermal transients utilizing electronic exposure control (commandable dynamic range of 2,500,000:1 with exposure control latency of 33 ms); (4) high uniformity (0.5 percent nonuniformity after correction); and (5) high thermal resolution (0.1 C at 25 C background and 0.5 C at 250 C background).

  9. High operating temperature interband cascade focal plane arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Z.-B.; Godoy, S. E.; Kim, H. S.; Schuler-Sandy, T.; Montoya, J. A.; Krishna, S.

    2014-08-04

    In this paper, we report the initial demonstration of mid-infrared interband cascade (IC) photodetector focal plane arrays with multiple-stage/junction design. The merits of IC photodetectors include low noise and efficient photocarrier extraction, even for zero-bias operation. By adopting enhanced electron barrier design and a total absorber thickness of 0.7 μm, the 5-stage IC detectors show very low dark current (1.10 × 10{sup −7} A/cm{sup 2} at −5 mV and 150 K). Even with un-optimized fabrication and standard commercial (mis-matched) read-out circuit technology, infrared images are obtained by the 320 × 256 IC focal plane array up to 180 K with f/2.3 optics. The minimum noise equivalent temperature difference of 28 mK is obtained at 120 K. These initial results indicate great potential of IC photodetectors, particularly for high operating temperature applications.

  10. Detectors and Focal Plane Modules for Weather Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Souza, A.I.; Robinson, E.; Masterjohn, S.; Khalap, V.; Bhargava, S.; Rangel, E.; Babu, S.; Smith, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Weather satellite instruments require detectors with a variety of wavelengths ranging from the visible to VLWIR. The Cross-track infrared Sounder (CrIS) is a Polar Orbiting interferometric sensor that measures earth radiances at high spectral resolution, using the data to provide pressure, temperature and moisture profiles of the atmosphere. The pressure, temperature and moisture sounding data are used in weather prediction models that track storms, predict levels of precipitation etc. The CrIS instrument contains SWIR (lambda(sub c) (is) approximately 5 micrometers at 98 K), MWIR (lambda(sub c) (is) approximately 9 micrometers at 98 K) and LWIRs (lambda(sub c) (is) approximately 15.4 ?m at 81 K) bands in three Focal Plane Array Assemblies (FPAAs). CrIS detectors are 850 micrometers diameter detectors with each FPAA consisting of nine photovoltaic detectors arranged in a 3 x 3 pattern. Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE)-grown Hg1-xCdxTe material are used for the detectors fabricated in a modified Double Layer Planar Heterostructure (DLPH) architecture. Each detector has an accompanying cold preamplifier. SWIR and MWIR FPAAs operate at 98 K and the LWIR FPAA at 81 K, permitting the use of passive radiators to cool the detectors. D* requirements at peak 14.01 micrometers wavelength are greater than 5.0E+10 Jones for LWIR, greater than 7.5E+10 Jones at 8.26 micrometers for MWIR and greater than 3.0E+11 Jones at peak 4.64 micrometers wavelength for SWIR. All FPAAs exceeded the D* requirements. Measured mean values for the nine photodiodes in each of the LWIR, MWIR and SWIR FPAAs are D* = 5.3 x 10(exp 10) cm-Hz1/2/W at 14.0 micrometers, 9.6 x 10(exp 10) cm-Hz1/2/W at 8.0 micrometers and 3.4 x 10(exp 11) cm-Hz1/2/W at 4.64 micrometers.

  11. Detectors and focal plane modules for weather instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, A. I.; Robinson, E.; Masterjohn, S.; Khalap, V.; Bhargava, S.; Rangel, E.; Babu, S.; Smith, D. S.

    2016-05-01

    Weather satellite instruments require detectors with a variety of wavelengths ranging from the visible to VLWIR. The Cross-track infrared Sounder (CrIS) is a Polar Orbiting interferometric sensor that measures earth radiances at high spectral resolution, using the data to provide pressure, temperature and moisture profiles of the atmosphere. The pressure, temperature and moisture sounding data are used in weather prediction models that track storms, predict levels of precipitation etc. The CrIS instrument contains SWIR (λc ~ 5 μm at 98 K), MWIR (λc ~ 9 μm at 98 K) and LWIRs (λc ~ 15.4 μm at 81 K) bands in three Focal Plane Array Assemblies (FPAAs). CrIS detectors are 850 μm diameter detectors with each FPAA consisting of nine photovoltaic detectors arranged in a 3 x 3 pattern. Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE)-grown Hg1-xCdxTe material are used for the detectors fabricated in a modified Double Layer Planar Heterostructure (DLPH) architecture. Each detector has an accompanying cold preamplifier. SWIR and MWIR FPAAs operate at 98 K and the LWIR FPAA at 81 K, permitting the use of passive radiators to cool the detectors. D* requirements at peak 14.01 μm wavelength are >= 5.0E+10 Jones for LWIR, >= 7.5E+10 Jones at 8.26 μm for MWIR and >= 3.0E+11 Jones at peak 4.64 μm wavelength for SWIR. All FPAAs exceeded the D* requirements. Measured mean values for the nine photodiodes in each of the LWIR, MWIR and SWIR FPAAs are D* = 5.3 x 1010 cm-Hz1/2/W at 14.0 μm, 9.6 x 1010 cm-Hz1/2/W at 8.0 μm and 3.4 x 1011 cm-Hz1/2/W at 4.64 μm.

  12. Focal plane array based infrared thermography in fine physical experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainer, Boris G.

    2008-03-01

    By two examples of dissimilar physical phenomena causing thermophysical effects, the unique capabilities of one of the up-to-date methods of experimental physics—focal plane array (FPA) based infrared (IR) thermography (IRT), are demonstrated distinctly. Experimenters inexperienced in IRT can grasp how this method provides a means for combining real-time visualization with quantitative analysis. A narrow-band short-wavelength IR camera was used in the experiments. It is discussed and stated that IRT is best matched and suited to the next two test conditions—when a heated specimen is thin and when heat is generated in the immediate region of a surface of a solid. The first prerequisite is realized in the search for directional patterns of combined low-power radiation sources with the use of the IRT-aided method. The second one is realized in studies of water vapour adsorption on uneven (irregular) surfaces of solid materials. With multiple swatches taken from a set of different fabrics and used as experimental samples, a sharp distinction between adsorptivities of their surfaces is strikingly illustrated by IRT time-domain measurements exhibiting the associated thermal effect ranging within an order of magnitude. It is justified that the described IRT-aided test can find practical implementation at least in the light industry. Emissivities of different fabrics are evaluated experimentally with the described reflection method based on the narrow spectral range of IRT. On the basis of direct IR observations, attention is paid to the need for close control over the surface temperature increase while the adsorption isotherms are being measured. Sensitivity of the FPA-based IRT method, as applied to examine the kinetics of initial stages of adsorption of gaseous molecules on the solid surface, is evaluated analytically and quantitatively. The relationship between the amount of adsorbate and the measurable excess of adsorbent temperature is found. It is discovered

  13. Focal-Plane Arrays of Quantum-Dot Infrared Photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath; Wilson, Daniel; Hill, Cory; Liu, John; Bandara, Sumith; Ting, David

    2007-01-01

    Focal-plane arrays of semiconductor quantum-dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) are being developed as superior alternatives to prior infrared imagers, including imagers based on HgCdTe devices and, especially, those based on quantum-well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs). HgCdTe devices and arrays thereof are difficult to fabricate and operate, and they exhibit large nonunformities and high 1/f (where f signifies frequency) noise. QWIPs are easier to fabricate and operate, can be made nearly uniform, and exhibit lower 1/f noise, but they exhibit larger dark currents, and their quantization only along the growth direction prevents them from absorbing photons at normal incidence, thereby limiting their quantum efficiencies. Like QWIPs, QDIPs offer the advantages of greater ease of operation, greater uniformity, and lower 1/f noise, but without the disadvantages: QDIPs exhibit lower dark currents, and quantum efficiencies of QDIPs are greater because the three-dimensional quantization of QDIPs is favorable to the absorption of photons at normal or oblique incidence. Moreover, QDIPs can be operated at higher temperatures (around 200 K) than are required for operation of QWIPs. The main problem in the development of QDIP imagers is to fabricate quantum dots with the requisite uniformity of size and spacing. A promising approach to be tested soon involves the use of electron-beam lithography to define the locations and sizes of quantum dots. A photoresist-covered GaAs substrate would be exposed to the beam generated by an advanced, high-precision electron beam apparatus. The exposure pattern would consist of spots typically having a diameter of 4 nm and typically spaced 20 nm apart. The exposed photoresist would be developed by either a high-contrast or a low-contrast method. In the high-contrast method, the spots would be etched in such a way as to form steep-wall holes all the way down to the substrate. The holes would be wider than the electron beam spots perhaps as

  14. Curved-Focal-Plane Arrays Using Deformed-Membrane Photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Jones, Todd

    2004-01-01

    A versatile and simple approach to the design and fabrication of curved-focal-plane arrays of silicon-based photodetectors is being developed. This approach is an alternative to the one described in "Curved Focal-Plane Arrays Using Back- Illuminated High-Purity Photodetectors" (NPO-30566), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 27, No. 10 (October 2003), page 10a. As in the cited prior article, the basic idea is to improve the performance of an imaging instrument and simplify the optics needed to obtain a given level of performance by making an image sensor (in this case, an array of photodetectors) conform to a curved focal surface, instead of designing the optics to project an image onto a flat focal surface. There is biological precedent for curved-focal-surface designs: retinas - the image sensors in eyes - conform to the naturally curved focal surfaces of eye lenses. The present approach is applicable to both front-side- and back-side-illuminated, membrane photodetector arrays and is being demonstrated on charge-coupled devices (CCDs). The very-large scale integrated (VLSI) circuitry of such a CCD or other array is fabricated on the front side of a silicon substrate, then the CCD substrate is attached temporarily to a second substrate for mechanical support, then material is removed from the back to obtain the CCD membrane, which typically has a thickness between 10 and 20 m. In the case of a CCD designed to operate in back-surface illumination, delta doping can be performed after thinning to enhance the sensitivity. This approach is independent of the design and method of fabrication of the front-side VLSI circuitry and does not involve any processing of a curved silicon substrate. In this approach, a third substrate would be prepared by polishing one of its surfaces to a required focal-surface curvature. A CCD membrane fabricated as described above would be pressed against, deformed into conformity with, and bonded to, the curved surface. The technique used to press and

  15. Strained layer superlattice focal plane array having a planar structure

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Jin K; Carroll, Malcolm S; Gin, Aaron; Marsh, Phillip F; Young, Erik W; Cich, Michael J

    2012-10-23

    An infrared focal plane array (FPA) is disclosed which utilizes a strained-layer superlattice (SLS) formed of alternating layers of InAs and In.sub.xGa.sub.1-xSb with 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5 epitaxially grown on a GaSb substrate. The FPA avoids the use of a mesa structure to isolate each photodetector element and instead uses impurity-doped regions formed in or about each photodetector for electrical isolation. This results in a substantially-planar structure in which the SLS is unbroken across the entire width of a 2-D array of the photodetector elements which are capped with an epitaxially-grown passivation layer to reduce or eliminate surface recombination. The FPA has applications for use in the wavelength range of 3-25 .mu.m.

  16. Thermal and mechanical architecture for the SAFARI focal plane assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martignac, J.

    2010-07-01

    The very challenging SPICA/SAFARI scientific goals imply to cool most detector solutions below 100 mK. This implies to find reliable solutions providing not only very efficient thermal insulation between the different temperature stages, but also keeping the stray light level well below the foreseen astronomical background (20 aW/pixel !). The main constraint is the available power budget (1-2μW) this value includes optical, electrical and parasitic power loads. This poster describes how the Herschel/PACS Bolometer Focal Plane thermo-mechanical design can be adapted to the new thermal and optical needs, while keeping a sufficiently stiff structure to withstand launch vibrations. We give the first results on the thermal and mechanical behaviour obtained with a prototype.

  17. Optical-based spectral modeling of infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouzali, Salima; Lefebvre, Sidonie; Rommeluère, Sylvain; Ferrec, Yann; Primot, Jérôme

    2016-07-01

    We adopt an optical approach in order to model and predict the spectral signature of an infrared focal plane array. The modeling is based on a multilayer description of the structure and considers a one-dimensional propagation. It provides a better understanding of the physical phenomena occurring within the pixels, which is useful to perform radiometric measurements, as well as to reliably predict the spectral sensitivity of the detector. An exhaustive model is presented, covering the total spectral range of the pixel response. A heuristic model is also described, depicting a complementary approach that separates the different optical phenomena inside the pixel structure. Promising results are presented, validating the models through comparison with experimental results. Finally, advantages and limitations of this approach are discussed.

  18. Blocked impurity band hybrid infrared focal plane arrays for astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, D. B.; Seib, D. H.; Stetson, S. B.; Herter, T.; Rowlands, N.

    1989-01-01

    High-performance infrared hybrid focal plane arrays using 10- x 50-element Si:As blocked-impurity-band (BIB) detectors (cutoff wavelength = 28 microns) and matching switched MOSFET multiplexers have been developed and characterized for space astronomy. Use of impurity-band-conduction technology provides detectors which are nuclear-radiation-hard and free of the many anomalies associated with conventional silicon photoconductive detectors. Emphasis in the present work is on recent advances in detector material quality which have led to significantly improved detector and hybrid characteristics. Results demonstrating increased quantum efficiency (particularly at short-wavelength infrared), obtained by varying the BIB detector properties (infrared active layer thickness and arsenic doping profile), are summarized. Measured read noise and dark current for different temperatures are reported. The hybrid array performance achieved demonstrates that BIB detectors are well suited for use in astronomical instrumentation.

  19. Infrared focal plane detector modules for space applications at AIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, Dominique; Hanna, Stefan; Thöt, Richard; Gassmann, Kai-Uwe; Haiml, Markus; Weber, Andreas; Haas, Luis-Dieter; Ziegler, Johann; Nothaft, Hans-Peter; Fick, W.

    2012-09-01

    In the framework of this paper, AIM presents the actual status of some of its currently ongoing focal plane detector module developments for space applications covering the spectral range from the short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) to the long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) and very-long-wavelength infrared (VLWIR), where both imaging and spectroscopy applications will be addressed. In particular, the integrated detector cooler assemblies for a mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) push-broom imaging satellite mission, for the German hyperspectral satellite mission EnMAP will be elaborated. Additionally dedicated detector modules for LWIR/VLWIR sounding, providing the possibility to have two different PVs driven by one ROIC will be addressed.

  20. ACIS Focal Plane Temperature Control and Observational Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams-Wolk, Nancy; Plucinsky, P. P.; Aldcroft, T. L.; Germain, G.

    2012-01-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory continues to deliver excellent science to the astronomical community as it enters its 13th observation cycle. The thermal conditions of the spacecraft components have changed over time necessitating changes in observing strategies; particularly for the ACIS Instrument. In this poster, we focus on the thermal conditions that affect the ACIS focal plane temperature, and the ACIS observational parameters that need to be carefully considered for the observer. We discuss the electronics affected, the specific conditions that can effect the science return and how Guest Observers can choose observational parameters to mitigate these issues.The Guest Observers must be aware of changes and considerations needed when preparing their observations to continue the high quality of science return from Chandra.

  1. Integration of IR focal plane arrays with massively parallel processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfandiari, P.; Koskey, P.; Vaccaro, K.; Buchwald, W.; Clark, F.; Krejca, B.; Rekeczky, C.; Zarandy, A.

    2008-04-01

    The intent of this investigation is to replace the low fill factor visible sensor of a Cellular Neural Network (CNN) processor with an InGaAs Focal Plane Array (FPA) using both bump bonding and epitaxial layer transfer techniques for use in the Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS) interceptor seekers. The goal is to fabricate a massively parallel digital processor with a local as well as a global interconnect architecture. Currently, this unique CNN processor is capable of processing a target scene in excess of 10,000 frames per second with its visible sensor. What makes the CNN processor so unique is that each processing element includes memory, local data storage, local and global communication devices and a visible sensor supported by a programmable analog or digital computer program.

  2. Panoramic monocentric imaging using fiber-coupled focal planes.

    PubMed

    Stamenov, Igor; Arianpour, Ashkan; Olivas, Stephen J; Agurok, Ilya P; Johnson, Adam R; Stack, Ronald A; Morrison, Rick L; Ford, Joseph E

    2014-12-29

    Monocentric lenses provide high-resolution wide field of view imaging onto a hemispherical image surface, which can be coupled to conventional focal planes using fiber-bundle image transfer. We show the design and characterization of a 2-glass concentric F/1.0 lens, and describe integration of 5 Mpixel 1.75µm pitch back-side illuminated color CMOS sensors with 2.5µm pitch fiber bundles, then show the fiber-coupled lens compares favorably in both resolution and light collection to a 10x larger conventional F/4 wide angle photographic lens. We describe assembly of the monocentric lens and 6 adjacent sensors with focus optomechanics into an extremely compact 30Mpixel panoramic imager with a 126° "letterbox" format field of view. PMID:25607140

  3. Design of the Focal Plane for the Pleiades HR Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaisant, Gérard; Le Goff, Roland; Deswarte, David

    This paper presents the design of the focal plane of the future French observation satellite PLEIADES. The purpose of this focal plane is to analyse images in panchromatic (Pa) as far as multi- spectral (Xs) bands in push-broom mode. The size of the observed image is close to 400 mm and it shall be analysed in 30.000 samples in Pa and 7.500 in Xs, resulting in an on- ground resolution lower than 1 meter in Pa. Compared to the previous French SPOT instrument series, the optical architecture is largely simplified : the Xs images are separated in the field of view and detected by four parallel CCD lines integrated in the same package. The spectral selection is made by means of strip filters placed very close in front of the Xs detector. Pa and Xs images are shifted in the field of view. Folding mirrors are used to cope with both constraints : the CCD package size and the required limitation of the distance Pa-Xs. The detection in Pa is made thanks to a Time Delay Integration (TDI) CCD in order to improve the radiometric performances. Five TDI CCD providing each 6000 pixels are optically butted to form a continuous line. The thermo-mechanical concept makes use of the characteristics of the SiC structure. It allows to evacuate the CCDs and their close electronics power towards a radiator while maintaining stable the detection lines geometry. The development is presently in phase B ; the phase C/D will start in 2002.

  4. Myxoid adrenal adenoma with focal pseudoglandular pattern.

    PubMed

    De Padua, Michelle; Rajagopal, V

    2008-05-01

    Adrenal cortical tumors with myxoid change are rare tumors. To our knowledge, only 22 cases have been described so far in literature, which include 13 carcinomas and 9 adenomas. A pseudoglandular pattern has been described in 9 of these tumors. We report a case of a myxoid adenoma of the left adrenal gland in a 67-year-old woman, with a focal pseudoglandular pattern involving about 20% of the studied tumor. Rest of the tumor was composed of anastomosing cords of tumor cells. Abundant myxoid stroma was present, which stained positively with alcian blue and was weakly focally positive with periodic acid Schiff. Immunophenotype was consistent with an adrenal tumor, i.e., positive for vimentin, inhibin, and melan A. Cytokeratin AE1/AE3 and chromogranin were negative. MIB-1 index was < 0.1%. PMID:18579979

  5. Solar-Driven Background Intensity Variations in a Focal Plane Array

    SciTech Connect

    Eyer, H.H.; Guillen, J.L.L.; Vittitoe, C.N.

    1998-12-03

    Portions of a series of end-of-life tests are described for a Sandia National Li~boratories- designed space-based sensor that utilizes a mercury-cadmium-telluride focal plane array. Variations in background intensity are consistent with the hypothesis that seasonal variations in solar position cause changes in the pattern of shadows falling across the compartment containing the optical elements, filter-band components, and focal plane array. When the sensor compartment is most fully illuminated by the sun, background intensities are large and their standard deviations tend to be large. During the winter season, when the compartment is most fully shadowed by surrounding structure, backgrounci intensities are small and standard deviations tend to be small. Details in the surrounding structure are speculated to produce transient shadows that complicate background intensifies as a function of time or of sensor position in orbit.

  6. Spitzer Space Telescope: Focal Plane Survey Final Report. Appendix B:; IRAC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.; Kang, Bryan H.; Brugarolas, Paul B.; Boussalis, Dhemetrios

    2004-01-01

    This final report summarizes the results and accuracies of the Spitzer Space Telescope focal plane survey. Accuracies achieved are compared to the focal plane survey calibration requirements put forth in the SIRTF IOC-SV Mission Plan [14] and pre-flight predictions made in [2]. The results of this focal plane survey are presently being used to support in-flight precision pointing, precision incremental offsets, IRS peakup array calibration, and ground pointing reconstruction...

  7. Mid-Wave and Long-Wave Infrared Dualband Megapixel QWIP Focal Plane Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Hill, C. J.; Ting, D. Z.; Kurth, E.; Woolaway, J.; LeVan, P. D.; Tidrow, M. Z.

    2008-01-01

    Mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) 1024x1024 pixel InGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs based quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) focal planes and a 320x256 pixel dual-band pixel co-registered simultaneous QWIP focal plane array have been demonstrated as pathfinders. In this paper, we discuss the development of 1024x1024 MWIR/LWIR dual-band pixel co-registered simultaneous QWIP focal plane array.

  8. Future directions in focal-plane signal processing for space-borne scientific imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.

    1991-01-01

    The potential of focal-plane signal processing for space-borne scientific imagers is discussed. Significant improvement in image quality and consequent scientific return may be enabled through the utilization of focal-plane signal processing techniques. The possible application of focal-plane signal processing to readout noise reduction, cosmic ray circumvention, non-uniformity correction, and throughput enhancement is described. On-focal-plane analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion and micromotion stabilization are also discussed. It is the intention of this paper to stimulate further thought and efforts in this field.

  9. Behavior of asymmetric Bessel beam in focal plane of high numerical aperture objective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafeev, Sergey S.; Kotlyar, Victor V.; Porfirev, Alexey P.

    2016-04-01

    Tight focusing of a linearly-polarized asymmetric Bessel beam, which has a crescent profile, was investigated numerically and experimentally. FDTD calculations show that a binary zone plate of numerical aperture NA = 0.995 forms a crescent in the focal plane, which is rotated clockwise around the optical axis, moving away from the focal plane. Using the Debye formulae it was shown that a direction of polarization of incident light has a significant influence on intensity distribution in focal plane. The crescent in the focal plane was also observed experimentally by focusing of the asymmetric Bessel beam using an immersive objective (NA = 1.25).

  10. Fabrication of a Cryogenic Bias Filter for Ultrasensitive Focal Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chervenak, James; Wollack, Edward

    2012-01-01

    A fabrication process has been developed for cryogenic in-line filtering for the bias and readout of ultrasensitive cryogenic bolometers for millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. The design is a microstripline filter that cuts out, or strongly attenuates, frequencies (10 50 GHz) that can be carried by wiring staged at cryogenic temperatures. The filter must have 100-percent transmission at DC and low frequencies where the bias and readout lines will carry signal. The fabrication requires the encapsulation of superconducting wiring in a dielectric-metal envelope with precise electrical characteristics. Sufficiently thick insulation layers with high-conductivity metal layers fully surrounding a patterned superconducting wire in arrayable formats have been demonstrated. A degenerately doped silicon wafer has been chosen to provide a metallic ground plane. A metallic seed layer is patterned to enable attachment to the ground plane. Thick silicon dioxide films are deposited at low temperatures to provide tunable dielectric isolation without degrading the metallic seed layer. Superconducting wiring is deposited and patterned using microstripline filtering techniques to cut out the relevant frequencies. A low Tc superconductor is used so that it will attenuate power strongly above the gap frequency. Thick dielectric is deposited on top of the circuit, and then vias are patterned through both dielectric layers. A thick conductive film is deposited conformally over the entire circuit, except for the contact pads for the signal and bias attachments to complete the encapsulating ground plane. Filters are high-aspect- ratio rectangles, allowing close packing in one direction, while enabling the chip to feed through the wall of a copper enclosure. The chip is secured in the copper wall using a soft metal seal to make good thermal and electrical contact to the outer shield.

  11. Electronic Processing And Advantages Of CMT Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Kevin S.; Dennis, Peter N.; Bradley, Derek J.

    1990-04-01

    There have been many advances in thermal imaging systems and components in recent years such that an infrared capability is now readily available and accepted in a variety of military and civilian applications. Conventional thermal imagers such as the UK common module imager use a mechanical scanning system to sweep a small array of detectors across the thermal scene to generate a high definition TV compatible output. Although excellent imagery can be obtained from this type of system, there are some inherent disadvantages, amongst which are the need for a high speed line scan mechanism and the fundamental limit in thermal resolution due to the low stare efficiency of the system. With the advent of two dimensional focal plane array detectors, staring array imagers can now be designed and constructed in which the scanning mechanism is removed. Excellent thermal resolution can be obtained from such imagers due to the relatively long stare times. The recent progress in this technology will be discussed in this paper together with a description of the signal processing requirements of this type of imaging system.

  12. MTF comparisons between mesa and planar focal plane detector structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perley, Mitchell; Wehner, Justin; Buell, Dave; Micali, Jason; McCorkle, Joe; Rehfield, Mark; Williams, Dave; Dixon, Andrew; Malone, Neil

    2013-09-01

    Raytheon Vision Systems (RVS) has developed scanning, high-speed (<3klps), all digital, with on-chip Analog-to-Digital Conversion (ADC), mid-wave infrared (MWIR 3-5mm) focal plane arrays (FPA) with excellent modulation transfer function (MTF) performance. Using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) data and detailed models of the mesa geometry, RVS modeled the predicted detector MTF performance of detectors. These detectors have a mesa structure and geometry for improved MTF performance compared to planar HgCdTe and InSb detector structures and other similar detector structures such as nBn. The modeled data is compared to measured MTF data obtained from edge spread measurements and shows good agreement, Figure 1. The measured data was obtained using a custom advanced test set with 1µm precision alignment and automatic data acquisition for report generation in less than five minutes per FPA. The measured MTF values of 83 unique parts, Figure 2, had a standard deviation of 0.0094 and a mean absolute deviation of 0.0066 at half Nyquist frequency, showing excellent process repeatability and a design that supports high MTF with good repeatability.

  13. RDA Requirements For Optimum Hybrid Focal Plane Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, S. B.; Emmons, R. B.; Hawkins, S. R.

    1982-06-01

    In analyzing the performance of direct-injected hybrid focal plane arrays, many factors must be consiaered in determining the minimum detector resistance-area product RDA neces-sary to obtain background-limited performance (BLIP) and good array uniformity. In photo-aioue arrays, a necessary but not sufficient condition is that noise due to the diode generation-recombination and diffusion currents are less than the background photon shot noise. Tnis places a minimum requirement on the magnitude of RoA, the zero bias resistance area product. In addition, there are generally much more stringent requirements on RDA uue to input MOSFET l/f noise and threshold variations which exceed the single detector RoA requirement for BLIP operation at a given background. In general, the input thresnolu variations require that the photodiodes be somewhat back-biased. This produces a substantially higner average RDA at the expense of higher detector l/f noise due to surface leakage. In tnis study we have investigated the detector impedance requirements in terms of tne injection efficiency, threshold nonuniformities, the input MOSFET excess (l/f) noise, and tne detector excess noise. For state-of-the-art parameters, it was determined tnat tne input MOSFET l/f noise always dominates the other elements in determining the required detector impeaance:k

  14. Stress analysis of the space telescope focal plane structure joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, W. A., Jr.; Shoemaker, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    Two major efforts were begun concerning the Space Telescope focal plane structure joint. The 3-D solid finite element modeling of the bipod flexure plate was carried out. Conceptual models were developed for the load transfer through the three major bolts to the flexure plate. The flexure plate drawings were reconstructed using DADAM for the purpose of developing a file from which the coordinates of any point on the flexure plate could be determined and also to locate the attachment points of the various components which connect with the flexure plate. For modeling convenience the CADAM drawing of the flexure plate has been divided into several regions which will be subdivided into finite elements using MSGMESH, which is a finite element mesh generator available with MSC/NASTRAN. In addition to the CADAM work on the flexure plate, an effort was also begun to develop computer aided drawings of the peripheral beam which will be used to assist in modeling the connection between it and the flexure plate.

  15. Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) Focal Plane Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuss, D. T.; Ali, A.; Amiri, M.; Appel, J.; Bennett, C. L.; Colazo, F.; Denis, K. L.; Dünner, R.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Eimer, J.; Fluxa, P.; Gothe, D.; Halpern, M.; Harrington, K.; Hilton, G.; Hinshaw, G.; Hubmayr, J.; Iuliano, J.; Marriage, T. A.; Miller, N.; Moseley, S. H.; Mumby, G.; Petroff, M.; Reintsema, C.; Rostem, K.; U-Yen, K.; Watts, D.; Wagner, E.; Wollack, E. J.; Xu, Z.; Zeng, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) will measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background to search for and characterize the polarized signature of inflation. CLASS will operate from the Atacama Desert and observe ˜ 70 % of the sky. A variable-delay polarization modulator provides modulation of the polarization at ˜ 10 Hz to suppress the 1/f noise of the atmosphere and enable the measurement of the large angular scale polarization modes. The measurement of the inflationary signal across angular scales that spans both the recombination and reionization features allows a test of the predicted shape of the polarized angular power spectra in addition to a measurement of the energy scale of inflation. CLASS is an array of telescopes covering frequencies of 38, 93, 148, and 217 GHz. These frequencies straddle the foreground minimum and thus allow the extraction of foregrounds from the primordial signal. Each focal plane contains feedhorn-coupled transition-edge sensors that simultaneously detect two orthogonal linear polarizations. The use of single-crystal silicon as the dielectric for the on-chip transmission lines enables both high efficiency and uniformity in fabrication. Integrated band definition has been implemented that both controls the bandpass of the single-mode transmission on the chip and prevents stray light from coupling to the detectors.

  16. Focal plane analog-to-digital conversion development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandl, William J.

    1995-05-01

    An on focal plane analog to digital conversion approach has been implemented for infrared sensor application. This development uses a patented oversampling methodology named MOSAD (Multiplexed OverSample Analog to Digital) in the design of simple circuits that can be placed at individual pixel sites. The construction of an analog to digital converter pixel is allowed with this technology. Most of the crosstalk and broadband noise associated with analog multiplexing and readout is avoided. Two demonstration designs were developed and built with Orbit, 1.2 micron CMOS Foresight process. For cost reasons, both designs were placed on the small die, 4.8 X 4.8 mm, and packaged in a 84 pin grid array carrier. These designs consist of a scanning array, 1 X 64 on 60 micron centers and two column portion of a 64 X 64 staring array on 60 micron centers. The detector buffer design will support HgCdTe high background applications. Support for the demonstration was received from Army, Night Vision Laboratory under their two color detector SBIR development program.

  17. Advancement in 17-micron pixel pitch uncooled focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan; Skidmore, George; Howard, Christopher; Clarke, Elwood; Han, C. J.

    2009-05-01

    This paper provides an update of 17 micron pixel pitch uncooled microbolometer development at DRS. Since the introduction of 17 micron pitch 640x480 focal plane arrays (FPAs) in 2006, significant progress has been made in sensor performance and manufacturing processes. The FPAs are now in initial production with an FPA noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD), detector thermal time constant, and pixel operability equivalent or better than that of the current 25 micron pixel pitch production FPAs. NETD improvement was achieved without compromising detector thermal response or thermal time constant by simultaneous reduction in bolometer heat capacity and thermal conductance. In addition, the DRS unique "umbrella" microbolometer cavities were optically tuned to optimize detector radiation absorption for specific spectral band applications. The 17 micron pixel pitch FPAs are currently being considered for the next generation soldier systems such as thermal weapon sights (TWS), vehicle driver vision enhancers (DVE), digitally fused enhanced night vision goggles (DENVG) and unmanned air vehicle (UAV) surveillance sensors, because of overall thermal imaging system size, weight and power advantages.

  18. Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) Focal Plane Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuss, D. T.; Ali, A.; Amiri, M.; Appel, J.; Bennett, C. L.; Colazo, F.; Denis, K. L.; Dünner, R.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Eimer, J.; Fluxa, P.; Gothe, D.; Halpern, M.; Harrington, K.; Hilton, G.; Hinshaw, G.; Hubmayr, J.; Iuliano, J.; Marriage, T. A.; Miller, N.; Moseley, S. H.; Mumby, G.; Petroff, M.; Reintsema, C.; Rostem, K.; U-Yen, K.; Watts, D.; Wagner, E.; Wollack, E. J.; Xu, Z.; Zeng, L.

    2016-08-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) will measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background to search for and characterize the polarized signature of inflation. CLASS will operate from the Atacama Desert and observe ˜ 70 % of the sky. A variable-delay polarization modulator provides modulation of the polarization at ˜ 10 Hz to suppress the 1/ f noise of the atmosphere and enable the measurement of the large angular scale polarization modes. The measurement of the inflationary signal across angular scales that spans both the recombination and reionization features allows a test of the predicted shape of the polarized angular power spectra in addition to a measurement of the energy scale of inflation. CLASS is an array of telescopes covering frequencies of 38, 93, 148, and 217 GHz. These frequencies straddle the foreground minimum and thus allow the extraction of foregrounds from the primordial signal. Each focal plane contains feedhorn-coupled transition-edge sensors that simultaneously detect two orthogonal linear polarizations. The use of single-crystal silicon as the dielectric for the on-chip transmission lines enables both high efficiency and uniformity in fabrication. Integrated band definition has been implemented that both controls the bandpass of the single-mode transmission on the chip and prevents stray light from coupling to the detectors.

  19. Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) Focal Plane Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, D. T.; Ali, A.; Amiri, M.; Appel, J.; Bennett, C. L.; Colazo, F.; Denis, K. L.; Dunner, R.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Eimer, J.; Fluxa, P.; Gothe, D.; Halpern, M.; Harrington, K.; Hilton, G.; Hinshaw, G.; Hubmayr, J.; Iuliano, J.; Marriage, T. A.; Miller, N.; Moseley, S. H.; Mumby, G.; Petroff, M.; Reintsema, C.; Rostem, K.; U-yen, K.; Watts, D.; Wagner, E.; Wollack, E. J.; Xu, Z.; Zeng, L.

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) will measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background to search for and characterize the polarized signature of inflation. CLASS will operate from the Atacama Desert and observe approx.70% of the sky. A variable-delay polarization modulator provides modulation of the polarization at approx.10Hz to suppress the 1/f noise of the atmosphere and enable the measurement of the large angular scale polarization modes. The measurement of the inflationary signal across angular scales that spans both the recombination and reionization features allows a test of the predicted shape of the polarized angular power spectra in addition to a measurement of the energy scale of inflation. CLASS is an array of telescopes covering frequencies of 38, 93, 148, and 217 GHz. These frequencies straddle the foreground minimum and thus allow the extraction of foregrounds from the primordial signal. Each focal plane contains feedhorn-coupled transition-edge sensors that simultaneously detect two orthogonal linear polarizations. The use of single-crystal silicon as the dielectric for the on-chip transmission lines enables both high efficiency and uniformity in fabrication. Integrated band definition has been implemented that both controls the bandpass of the single-mode transmission on the chip and prevents stray light from coupling to the detectors.

  20. Hyperspectral modeling of an infrared focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouzali, Salima; Lefebvre, Sidonie; Rommeluère, Sylvain; Ferrec, Yann; Primot, Jérôme

    2014-10-01

    Infrared Focal Plane Arrays (FPA) are increasingly used to measure multi- or hyperspectral images. Therefore, it is crucial to control and modelize their spectral response. The purpose of this paper is to propose a modeling approach, adjustable by experimental data, and applicable to the main cooled detector technologies. A physical model is presented, taking into account various optogeometrical properties of the detector, such as disparities of the pixels cut-off wavelengths. It describes the optical absorption phenomenon inside the pixel, by considering it as a stack of optical bulk layers. Then, an analytical model is proposed, based on the interference phenomenon occurring into the structure. This model considers only the three major waves interfering. It represents a good approximation of the physical model and a complementary understanding of the optical process inside the structure. This approach is applied to classical cooled FPAs as well as to specific instruments such as Microspoc (MICRO SPectrometer On Chip), a concept of miniaturized infrared Fourier transform spectrometer, integrated on a classical Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride FPA, and cooled by a cryostat.

  1. Combatting infrared focal plane array nonuniformity noise in imaging polarimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratliff, Bradley M.; Kumar, Rakesh; Black, Wiley; Boger, James K.; Tyo, J. Scott

    2005-08-01

    One of the most significant challenges in performing infrared (IR) polarimetery is the focal plane array (FPA) nonuniformity (NU) noise that is inherent in virtually all IR photodetector technologies that operate in the midwave IR (MWIR) or long-wave IR (LWIR). NU noise results from pixel-to-pixel variations in the repsonsivity of the photodetectors. This problem is especially severy in the microengineered IR FPA materials like HgCdTe and InSb, as well as in uncooled IR microbolometer sensors. Such problems are largely absent from Si based visible spectrum FPAs. The pixel response is usually a variable nonlinear response function, and even when the response is linearized over some range of temperatures, the gain and offset of the resulting response is usually highly variable. NU noise is normally corrected by applying a linear calibration to the data, but the resulting imagery still retains residual nonuniformity due to the nonlinearity of the photodetector responses. This residual nonuniformity is particularly troublesome for polarimeters because of the addition and subtraction operations that must be performed on the images in order to construct the Stokes parameters or other polarization products. In this paper we explore the impact of NU noise on full stokes and linear-polarization-only IR polarimeters. We compare the performance of division of time, division of amplitude, and division of array polarimeters in the presence of both NU and temporal noise, and assess the ability of calibration-based NU correction schemes to clean up the data.

  2. Corrugated Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector Focal Plane Array Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, A.; Choi, K. K.; Das, N. C.; La, A.; Jhabvala, M.

    1999-01-01

    The corrugated quantum-well infrared photodetector (C-QWIP) uses total internal reflection to couple normal incident light into the optically active quantum wells. The coupling efficiency has been shown to be relatively independent of the pixel size and wavelength thus making the C-QWIP a candidate for detectors over the entire infrared spectrum. The broadband coupling efficiency of the C-QWIP makes it an ideal candidate for multiwavelength detectors. We fabricated and tested C-QWIP focal plane arrays (FPAs) with cutoff wavelengths of 11.2 and 16.2 micrometers. Each FPA has 256 x 256 pixels that are bump-bonded to a direct injection readout circuit. Both FPAs provided infrared imagery with good aesthetic attributes. For the 11.2-micrometers FPA, background-limited performance (BLIP) was observed at 60 K with f/3 optics. For the 16.2-micrometers FPA, BLIP was observed at 38 K. Besides the reduction of dark current in C-QWIP structures, the measured internal quantum efficiency (eta) remains to be high. The values for responsivity and quantum efficiency obtained from the FPA results agree well with those measured for single devices.

  3. Modulation transfer function of infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Rafol, S. B.; Ting, D. Z.; Soibel, A.; Hill, C. J.; Khoshakhlagh, A.; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Keo, S. A.; Höglund, L.; Luong, E. M.

    2015-09-01

    Modulation transfer function (MTF) is the ability of an imaging system to faithfully image a given object. The MTF of an imaging system quantifies the ability of the system to resolve or transfer spatial frequencies. In this presentation we will discuss the detail MTF measurements of 1024x1024 pixels mid-wavelength and long-wavelength quantum well infrared photodetector, and 320x256 pixels long-wavelength InAs/GaSb superlattice infrared focal plane arrays (FPAs). Long wavelength Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector (CBIRD) based on InAs/GaSb superlattice material is hybridized to recently designed and fabricated 320x256 pixel format ROIC. The n-type CBIRD was characterized in terms of performance and thermal stability. The experimentally measured NEΔT of the 8.8μm cutoff n-CBIRD FPA was 18.6 mK with 300 K background and f/2 cold stop at 78K FPA operating temperature. The horizontal and vertical MTFs of this pixel fully delineated CBIRD FPA at Nyquist frequency are 49% and 52%, respectively.

  4. FOCAL PLANE WAVEFRONT SENSING USING RESIDUAL ADAPTIVE OPTICS SPECKLES

    SciTech Connect

    Codona, Johanan L.; Kenworthy, Matthew

    2013-04-20

    Optical imperfections, misalignments, aberrations, and even dust can significantly limit sensitivity in high-contrast imaging systems such as coronagraphs. An upstream deformable mirror (DM) in the pupil can be used to correct or compensate for these flaws, either to enhance the Strehl ratio or suppress the residual coronagraphic halo. Measurement of the phase and amplitude of the starlight halo at the science camera is essential for determining the DM shape that compensates for any non-common-path (NCP) wavefront errors. Using DM displacement ripples to create a series of probe and anti-halo speckles in the focal plane has been proposed for space-based coronagraphs and successfully demonstrated in the lab. We present the theory and first on-sky demonstration of a technique to measure the complex halo using the rapidly changing residual atmospheric speckles at the 6.5 m MMT telescope using the Clio mid-IR camera. The AO system's wavefront sensor measurements are used to estimate the residual wavefront, allowing us to approximately compute the rapidly evolving phase and amplitude of speckle halo. When combined with relatively short, synchronized science camera images, the complex speckle estimates can be used to interferometrically analyze the images, leading to an estimate of the static diffraction halo with NCP effects included. In an operational system, this information could be collected continuously and used to iteratively correct quasi-static NCP errors or suppress imperfect coronagraphic halos.

  5. A CMOS Imager with Focal Plane Compression using Predictive Coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon-Salas, Walter D.; Balkir, Sina; Sayood, Khalid; Schemm, Nathan; Hoffman, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a CMOS image sensor with focal-plane compression. The design has a column-level architecture and it is based on predictive coding techniques for image decorrelation. The prediction operations are performed in the analog domain to avoid quantization noise and to decrease the area complexity of the circuit, The prediction residuals are quantized and encoded by a joint quantizer/coder circuit. To save area resources, the joint quantizerlcoder circuit exploits common circuitry between a single-slope analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and a Golomb-Rice entropy coder. This combination of ADC and encoder allows the integration of the entropy coder at the column level. A prototype chip was fabricated in a 0.35 pm CMOS process. The output of the chip is a compressed bit stream. The test chip occupies a silicon area of 2.60 mm x 5.96 mm which includes an 80 X 44 APS array. Tests of the fabricated chip demonstrate the validity of the design.

  6. Synthesis of fully continuous phase screens for tailoring the focal plane irradiance profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, S.; Feit, M.

    1996-04-26

    We present an iterative procedure for constructing fully continuous phase screens for tailoring the focal plane intensity distributions. This algorithm alleviates the stagnations experienced in the application of the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm with a random initial phase screen and leads to efficient distribution of the incident energy into the desired focal plane profile.

  7. Fast iterative adaptive nonuniformity correction with gradient minimization for infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jufeng; Gao, Xiumin; Chen, Yueting; Feng, Huajun; Xu, Zhihai; Li, Qi

    2014-07-01

    A fast scene-based nonuniformity correction algorithm is proposed for fixed-pattern noise removal in infrared focal plane array imagery. Based on minimization of L0 gradient of the estimated irradiance, the correction function is optimized through correction parameters estimation via iterative optimization strategy. When applied to different real IR data, the proposed method provides enhanced results with good visual effect, making a good balance between nonuniformity correction and details preservation. Comparing with other excellent approaches, this algorithm can accurately estimate the irradiance rapidly with fewer ghosting artifacts.

  8. System and method for generating a deselect mapping for a focal plane array

    SciTech Connect

    Bixler, Jay V; Brandt, Timothy G; Conger, James L; Lawson, Janice K

    2013-05-21

    A method for generating a deselect mapping for a focal plane array according to one embodiment includes gathering a data set for a focal plane array when exposed to light or radiation from a first known target; analyzing the data set for determining which pixels or subpixels of the focal plane array to add to a deselect mapping; adding the pixels or subpixels to the deselect mapping based on the analysis; and storing the deselect mapping. A method for gathering data using a focal plane array according to another embodiment includes deselecting pixels or subpixels based on a deselect mapping; gathering a data set using pixels or subpixels in a focal plane array that are not deselected upon exposure thereof to light or radiation from a target of interest; and outputting the data set.

  9. Validating Phasing and Geometry of Large Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Standley, Shaun P.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Rabbette, Maura

    2011-01-01

    The Kepler Mission is designed to survey our region of the Milky Way galaxy to discover hundreds of Earth-sized and smaller planets in or near the habitable zone. The Kepler photometer is an array of 42 CCDs (charge-coupled devices) in the focal plane of a 95-cm Schmidt camera onboard the Kepler spacecraft. Each 50x25-mm CCD has 2,200 x 1,024 pixels. The CCDs accumulate photons and are read out every six seconds to prevent saturation. The data is integrated for 30 minutes, and then the pixel data is transferred to onboard storage. The data is subsequently encoded and transmitted to the ground. During End-to-End Information System (EEIS) testing of the Kepler Mission System (KMS), there was a need to verify that the pixels requested by the science team operationally were correctly collected, encoded, compressed, stored, and transmitted by the FS, and subsequently received, decoded, uncompressed, and displayed by the Ground Segment (GS) without the outputs of any CCD modules being flipped, mirrored, or otherwise corrupted during the extensive FS and GS processing. This would normally be done by projecting an image on the focal plane array (FPA), collecting the data in a flight-like way, and making a comparison between the original data and the data reconstructed by the science data system. Projecting a focused image onto the FPA through the telescope would normally involve using a collimator suspended over the telescope opening. There were several problems with this approach: the collimation equipment is elaborate and expensive; as conceived, it could only illuminate a limited section of the FPA (.25 percent) during a given test; the telescope cover would have to be deployed during testing to allow the image to be projected into the telescope; the equipment was bulky and difficult to situate in temperature-controlled environments; and given all the above, test setup, execution, and repeatability were significant concerns. Instead of using this complicated approach of

  10. Infrared focal plane performance in the South Atlantic anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junga, Frank A.

    1989-01-01

    Proton-induced pulse height distributions (PHD's) in Si:XX detectors were studied analytically and experimentally. In addition, a preliminary design for a flight experiment to characterize the response of Si:XX detectors to the trapped proton environment and verify PHD models was developed. PHD's were computed for two orbit altitudes for a variety of shielding configurations. Most of the proton-induced pulses have amplitudes less that about 3.5 x 10(exp 5) e-h pairs. Shielding has a small effect on the shape of the PHD's. The primary effect of shielding is to reduce the total number of pulses produced. Proton-induced PHD's in a Si:Sb focal plane array bombarded by a unidirectional 67-MeV beam were measured. The maximum pulse height recorded was 6 x 10(exp 5) pairs. The distribution had two peaks: the larger peak corresponded to 3.8 x 10(exp 5) pairs and the smaller peak to 1.2 x 10(exp 5) pairs. The maximum pulse height and the larger peak are within a factor of two of predicted values. The low-energy peak was not expected, but is believed to be an artifact of inefficient charge collection in the detector. The planned flight experiment will be conducted on a Space Shuttle flight. Lockheed's helium extended life dewar (HELD) will be used to provide the required cryogenic environment for the detector. Two bulk Si:Sb arrays and two Si:As impurity band conduction arrays will be tested. The tests will be conducted while the Space Shuttle passes through the South Atlantic Anomaly. PHD's will be recorded and responsivity changes tracked. This experiment will provide a new database on proton-induced PHD's, compare two infrared detector technologies in a space environment, and provide the data necessary to validate PHD modeling.

  11. Next Generation Submillimeter Heterodyne Focal Plane Array Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Paul; Mehdi, I.; Kawamura, J. H.; Siles, J. V.; Lee, C.; Chattoopadhyay, G.; Bumble, B.; Stern, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The results from the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) on the Herschel Space Observatory have had a major impact on astronomy, including the first velocity-resolved survey of the critical 158 micron fine structure line of C+ to observations of water in comets. To follow up on Herschel’s discoveries we need to be able to image significant areas with high angular resolution. This requires high-sensitivity focal plane heterodyne arrays, which is the driver for the present effort. The current state of the art for mixers at frequencies above ~1200 GHz utilizes Hot Electron Bolometer (HEB) mixers that have remarkably good sensitivity (noise temperature < 1000 K) and require low local oscillator power. One significant limitation is the IF bandwidth of < few GHz for NbN devices. At 2 THz, 1 GHz corresponds to a Doppler width of 150 km/s, less than seen in the 1900 GHz [CII] line. For higher frequency transitions, such as the [OI] fine structure line at 4.7 THz (63 micron wavelength), this bandwidth is insufficient. Development of new HEB materials such as magnesium based alloys may overcome this challenge, and promising results have been reported in the literature. A characteristic of all HEB mixers is their high sensitivity to local oscillator power variations. We have developed an architecture for array local oscillator power production and distribution that is based on a chain of multipliers starting from a Ka band source. Improved multiplier diodes as well as circuit designs have made it possible to obtain adequate LO power to 2.7 THz, with extension to 4.7 THz promising. We have developed a system design for a 1.9 THz [CII] array with a separate chain of multipliers for each pixel allowing individual control of LO power, together with efficient LO-signal combination in a single beamsplitter. We will present results from multiplier tests and results of measurements on a 4 pixel prototype of a full 16 or more pixel system. This robust and efficient

  12. Advances in Focal Plane Wavefront Estimation for Directly Imaging Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldorado Riggs, A. J.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Groff, Tyler Dean

    2015-01-01

    To image cold exoplanets directly in visible light, an instrument on a telescope needs to suppress starlight by about 9 orders of magnitude at small separations from the star. A coronagraph changes the point spread function to create regions of high contrast where exoplanets or disks can be seen. Aberrations on the optics degrade the contrast by several orders of magnitude, so all high-contrast imaging systems incorporate one or more deformable mirrors (DMs) to recover regions of high contrast. With a coronagraphic instrument planned for the WFIRST-AFTA space telescope, there is a pressing need for faster, more robust estimation and control schemes for the DMs. Non-common path aberrations limit conventional phase conjugation schemes to medium star-to-planet contrast ratios of about 1e-6. High-contrast imaging requires estimation and control of both phase and amplitude in the same beam path as the science camera. Field estimation is a challenge since only intensity is measured; the most common approach, including that planned for WFIRST-AFTA, is to use DMs to create diversity, via pairs of small probe shapes, thereby allowing disambiguation of the electric field. Most implementations of DM Diversity require at least five images per electric field estimate and require narrowband measurements. This paper describes our new estimation algorithms that improve the speed (by using fewer images) and bandwidth of focal plane wavefront estimation. For narrowband estimation, we are testing nonlinear, recursive algorithms such as an iterative extended Kalman filter (IEKF) to use three images each iteration and build better, more robust estimates. We are also exploring the use of broadband estimation without the need for narrowband sub-filters and measurements. Here we present simulations of these algorithms with realistic noise and small signals to show how they might perform for WFIRST-AFTA. Once validated in simulations, we will test these algorithms experimentally in

  13. Experimental characterization, evaluation, and diagnosis of advanced hybrid infrared focal plane array electro-optical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomheim, Terrence S.; Schumann, Lee W.; Kohn, Stanley E.

    1998-07-01

    High performance scanning time-delay-and-integration and staring hybrid focal plane devices with very large formats, small pixel sizes, formidable frame and line rates, on-chip digital programmability, and high dynamic ranges, are being developed for a myriad of defense, civil, and commercial applications that span the spectral range from shortwave infrared (SWIR) to longwave infrared (LWIR). An essential part in the development of such new advanced hybrid infrared focal planes is empirical validation of their electro-optical (EO) performance. Many high-reliability, high-performance applications demand stringent and near flawless EO performance over a wide variety of operating conditions and environments. Verification of focal plane performance compliance over this wide range of parametric conditions requires the development and use of accurate, flexible, and statistically complete test methods and associated equipment. In this paper we review typical focal plane requirements, the ensuing measurement requirements (quantity, accuracy, repeatability, etc.), test methodologies, test equipment requirements, electronics and computer-based data acquisition requirements, statistical data analysis and display requirements, and associated issues. We also discuss special test requirements for verifying the performance of panchromatic thermal and multispectral imaging focal planes where characterization of dynamic modulation transfer function (MTF), and point-image response and optical overload is generally required. We briefly overview focal plane radiation testing. We conclude with a discussion of the technical challenges of characterizing future advanced hybrid focal plane testing where it is anticipated that analog-to- digital conversion will be included directly on focal plane devices, thus creating the scenario of 'photons-in-to-bits- out' within the focal plane itself.

  14. 1024x1024 Pixel MWIR and LWIR QWIP Focal Plane Arrays and 320x256 MWIR:LWIR Pixel Colocated Simultaneous Dualband QWIP Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath D.; Bandara, Sumith V.; Liu, John K.; Hill, Cory J.; Rafol, S. B.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Trinh, Joseph T.; Tidrow, M. Z.; Le Van, P. D.

    2005-01-01

    Mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) 1024x1024 pixel quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) focal planes have been demonstrated with excellent imaging performance. The MWIR QWIP detector array has demonstrated a noise equivalent differential temperature (NE(Delta)T) of 17 mK at a 95K operating temperature with f/2.5 optics at 300K background and the LWIR detector array has demonstrated a NE(Delta)T of 13 mK at a 70K operating temperature with the same optical and background conditions as the MWIR detector array after the subtraction of system noise. Both MWIR and LWIR focal planes have shown background limited performance (BLIP) at 90K and 70K operating-temperatures respectively, with similar optical and background conditions. In addition, we are in the process of developing MWIR and LWIR pixel collocated simultaneously readable dualband QWIP focal plane arrays.

  15. Approaches and analysis for on-focal-plane analog-to-digital conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Fossum, Eric R.

    1994-06-01

    This paper presents approaches for on-focal-plane analog-to-digital conversion (ADC). Common approaches and architectures for ADC and their utility for on-focal-plane integration are discussed. Candidate approaches are analyzed with respect to required amplifier gain, bandwidth, capacitance matching, noise and offsets as a function of ADC resolution. A column-parallel ADC architecture appears to be an effective compromise of chip area, power, circuit speed and ADC resolution. The discussion is valid for both infrared focal-plane arrays and visible image sensors.

  16. Multi-Color Megapixel QWIP focal plane arrays for remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath D.; Bandara, S. V.; Liu, J. K.; Hill, C. J.; Rafol, S. B.; Mumolo, J. M.; Trinh, J. T.; Tidrow, M. Z.; LeVan, P. D.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we will discuss the performance in terms of quantum efficiency, NEAT, uniformity, operability, and modulation transfer functions of the 1024x1024 pixel arrays and the progress of dualband QWIP focal plane array development work.

  17. Visible charge-coupled device (CCD) focal plane design considerations for multispectral applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowski, H.

    1982-01-01

    The typical Multispectral Linear Array (MLA) Instrument mission would be to gather high-resolution, radiometrically accurate earth resources data in several spectral bands over a prolonged period of time. These bands would include the visible (VIS), near infrared (NIR) and short wavelength infrared. Silicon charge-coupled imaging devices (CCDs) can be assembled into contiguous pixel focal planes which will cover the VIS/NIR region and operate reliably for several years in a space environment. A typical MLA focal plane would have approximately 12,000 pixels, with a pixel-to-pixel registration requirement on the order of + or - 0.1 pixel. The technology to assemble such focal planes has been developed and is described. The problem of polarization sensitivity associated with certain types of focal plane assemblies is addressed. Radiation effects on CCDs are also discussed, and a practical solution to the problem through the use of shielding is described.

  18. Focal plane detectors for the WISE 12- and 23-μm bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogue, H. H.; Mattson, R. B.; Stapelbroek, M. G.; Masterjohn, S. A.; Larsen, M. F.; Elwell, J. D.

    2007-09-01

    DRS Sensors & Targeting Systems, under contract to the Space Dynamics Laboratory of Utah State University, is providing the focal plane detector system for NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The focal plane detector system consists of two mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) focal plane module assemblies (FPMAs), two arsenic doped silicon (Si:As) Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) FPMAs, electronics to drive the FPMAs and report digital data from them, and the cryogenic and ambient temperature cabling that connect the FPMAs and electronics. The MCT and Si:As BIB focal plane arrays (FPAs) utilized in the WISE FPMAs are both megapixel class indium-bump hybridized devices fabricated by Teledyne Imaging Systems and DRS Sensors & Targeting Systems, respectively. This paper reports performance of the WISE Si:As BIB FPAs that are used for the WISE 12- and 23-μm wavelength bands.

  19. Large format focal plane array integration with precision alignment, metrology and accuracy capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Jay; Parlato, Russell; Tracy, Gregory; Randolph, Max

    2015-09-01

    Focal plane alignment for large format arrays and faster optical systems require enhanced precision methodology and stability over temperature. The increase in focal plane array size continues to drive the alignment capability. Depending on the optical system, the focal plane flatness of less than 25μm (.001") is required over transition temperatures from ambient to cooled operating temperatures. The focal plane flatness requirement must also be maintained in airborne or launch vibration environments. This paper addresses the challenge of the detector integration into the focal plane module and housing assemblies, the methodology to reduce error terms during integration and the evaluation of thermal effects. The driving factors influencing the alignment accuracy include: datum transfers, material effects over temperature, alignment stability over test, adjustment precision and traceability to NIST standard. The FPA module design and alignment methodology reduces the error terms by minimizing the measurement transfers to the housing. In the design, the proper material selection requires matched coefficient of expansion materials minimizes both the physical shift over temperature as well as lowering the stress induced into the detector. When required, the co-registration of focal planes and filters can achieve submicron relative positioning by applying precision equipment, interferometry and piezoelectric positioning stages. All measurements and characterizations maintain traceability to NIST standards. The metrology characterizes the equipment's accuracy, repeatability and precision of the measurements.

  20. Performance of an Achromatic Focal Plane Mask for Exoplanet Imaging Coronagraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Kevin; Belikov, Ruslan; Pluzhnik, Eugene; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Wilson, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Coronagraph technology combined with wavefront control is close to achieving the contrast and inner working angle requirements in the lab necessary to observe the faint signal of an Earth-like exoplanet in monochromatic light. An important remaining technological challenge is to achieve high contrast in broadband light. Coronagraph bandwidth is largely limited by chromaticity of the focal plane mask, which is responsible for blocking the stellar PSF. The size of a stellar PSF scales linearly with wavelength; ideally, the size of the focal plane mask would also scale with wavelength. A conventional hard-edge focal plane mask has a fixed size, normally sized for the longest wavelength in the observational band to avoid starlight leakage. The conventional mask is oversized for shorter wavelengths and blocks useful discovery space. Recently we presented a solution to the size chromaticity challenge with a focal plane mask designed to scale its effective size with wavelength. In this paper, we analyze performance of the achromatic size-scaling focal plane mask within a Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) coronagraph. We present results from wavefront control around the achromatic focal plane mask, and demonstrate the size-scaling effect of the mask with wavelength. The edge of the dark zone, and therefore the inner working angle of the coronagraph, scale with wavelength. The achromatic mask enables operation in a wider band of wavelengths compared with a conventional hard-edge occulter.

  1. Continuous contour phase plates for tailoring the focal plane irradiance profile

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, S.N.; Rushford, M.C.; Thomas, I.M.; Perry, M.D.

    1995-08-09

    We present fully continuous phase screens for producing super-Gaussian focal-plane irradiance profiles. Such phase screens are constructed with the assumption of either circular symmetric near-field and far-field profiles or a separable phase screen in Cartesian co-ordinates. In each case, the phase screen is only a few waves deep. Under illumination by coherent light, such phase screens produce high order super-Gaussian profiles in the focal plane with high energy content effects of beam aberrations on the focal profiles and their energy content are also discussed.

  2. Visualization of Subsurface Defects in Composites using a Focal Plane Array Infrared Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotnikov, Yuri A.; Winfree, William P.

    1999-01-01

    A technique for enhanced defect visualization in composites via transient thermography is presented in this paper. The effort targets automated defect map construction for multiple defects located in the observed area. Experimental data were collected on composite panels of different thickness with square inclusions and flat bottom holes of different depth and orientation. The time evolution of the thermal response and spatial thermal profiles are analyzed. The pattern generated by carbon fibers and the vignetting effect of the focal plane array camera make defect visualization difficult. An improvement of the defect visibility is made by the pulse phase technique and the spatial background treatment. The relationship between a size of a defect and its reconstructed image is analyzed as well. The image processing technique for noise reduction is discussed.

  3. Characterization of an advanced focal plane for multispectral linear array (MLA) application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, P.; Botts, S.; Orias, G.; Yang, H. B.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that the MLA instrument represents the next generation in the Landsat series of earth resources satellites. The MLA sensor concept utilizes a pushbroom scan mode to eliminate electromechanical scan mirrors, and the lower reliabililty and higher power dissipation which accompany their employment. The pushbroom scanner makes use of a linear array which consists generally of thousands of detectors oriented perpendicular to the along-track direction of the satellite. Test techniques have been developed for the measurement of the module parameters which are critical to MLA focal plane performance. These measurements include the determination of infrared responsivity, linearity over the dynamic range, temporal noise, and fixed pattern effects on each detector element of each module tested. Tests related to spectral response, crosstalk, and spot scan profiles are also conducted. A description is provided of the test equipment involved.

  4. Estimation of Thickness and Cadmium Composition Distributions in HgCdTe Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouzali, S.; Lefebvre, S.; Rommeluère, S.; Ferrec, Y.; Primot, J.

    2016-09-01

    Mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) is one of the most commonly used material systems for infrared detection. The performance of infrared focal-plane arrays (IRFPAs) based on this material is limited by several noise sources. In this paper, we focus on the fixed pattern noise, which is related to disparities between the spectral responses of pixels. In our previous work, we showed that spectral nonuniformities in a HgCdTe IRFPA were caused by inhomogeneities of thickness and cadmium composition in the HgCdTe layer, using an optical description of the pixel structure. We propose to use this bidimensional dependence combined with experimental spectral responses to estimate disparities of thickness and cadmium composition in a specific HgCdTe-based IRFPA. The estimation methods and the resulting maps are presented, highlighting the accuracy of this nondestructive method.

  5. Fabrication of resonator-quantum well infrared photodetector focal plane array by inductively coupled plasma etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jason; Choi, Kwong-Kit

    2016-02-01

    Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching has distinct advantages over reactive ion etching in that the etching rates are considerably higher, the uniformity is much better, and the sidewalls of the etched material are highly anisotropic due to the higher plasma density and lower operating pressure. Therefore, ICP etching is a promising process for pattern transfer required during microelectronic and optoelectronic fabrication. Resonator-quantum well infrared photodetectors (R-QWIPs) are the next generation of QWIP detectors that use resonances to increase the quantum efficiency (QE). To fabricate R-QWIP focal plane arrays (FPAs), two optimized ICP etching processes are developed. Using these etching techniques, we have fabricated R-QWIP FPAs of several different formats and pixel sizes with the required dimensions and completely removed the substrates of the FPAs. Their QE spectra were tested to be 30 to 40%. The operability and spectral nonuniformity of the FPA is ˜99.5 and 3%, respectively.

  6. Estimation of Thickness and Cadmium Composition Distributions in HgCdTe Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouzali, S.; Lefebvre, S.; Rommeluère, S.; Ferrec, Y.; Primot, J.

    2016-05-01

    Mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) is one of the most commonly used material systems for infrared detection. The performance of infrared focal-plane arrays (IRFPAs) based on this material is limited by several noise sources. In this paper, we focus on the fixed pattern noise, which is related to disparities between the spectral responses of pixels. In our previous work, we showed that spectral nonuniformities in a HgCdTe IRFPA were caused by inhomogeneities of thickness and cadmium composition in the HgCdTe layer, using an optical description of the pixel structure. We propose to use this bidimensional dependence combined with experimental spectral responses to estimate disparities of thickness and cadmium composition in a specific HgCdTe-based IRFPA. The estimation methods and the resulting maps are presented, highlighting the accuracy of this nondestructive method.

  7. Real-world stereoscopic performance in multiple-focal-plane displays: How far apart should the image planes be?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, Simon J.; MacKenzie, Kevin J.; Ryan, Louise

    2012-03-01

    Conventional stereoscopic displays present conflicting stimuli to vergence and accommodation, causing fatigue, discomfort, and poor stereo depth perception. One promising solution is 'depth filtering', in which continuous variations in focal distance are simulated by distributing image intensity across multiple focal planes. The required image-plane spacing is a critical parameter, because there are constraints on the total number that can be used. Depth-filtered images have been shown to support continuous and reasonably accurate accommodation responses with 1.1 dioptre (D) image-plane spacings. However, retinal contrast is increasingly attenuated with increasing image-plane separation. Thus, while such stimuli may eliminate the vergence-accommodation conflict, they may also unacceptably degrade stereoscopic depth perception. Here we measured stereoacuity, and the time needed for stereoscopic fusion, for real targets and depth-filtered approximations to the same stimuli (image-plane spacings of 0.6, 0.9 and 1.2 D). Stereo fusion time was reasonably consistent across conditions. Stereoacuity for depth-filtered stimuli was only slightly poorer than for real targets with 0.6 D image-plane separation, but deteriorated rapidly thereafter. Our results suggest that stereoscopic depth perception, not accommodation and vergence responses, is the limiting factor in determining acceptable image-plane spacing for depth-filtered images. We suggest that image-plane spacing should ideally not exceed ~0.6 D.

  8. NeuroSeek dual-color image processing infrared focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarley, Paul L.; Massie, Mark A.; Baxter, Christopher R.; Huynh, Buu L.

    1998-09-01

    Several technologies have been developed in recent years to advance the state of the art of IR sensor systems including dual color affordable focal planes, on-focal plane array biologically inspired image and signal processing techniques and spectral sensing techniques. Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) and the Air Force Research Lab Munitions Directorate have developed a system which incorporates the best of these capabilities into a single device. The 'NeuroSeek' device integrates these technologies into an IR focal plane array (FPA) which combines multicolor Midwave IR/Longwave IR radiometric response with on-focal plane 'smart' neuromorphic analog image processing. The readout and processing integrated circuit very large scale integration chip which was developed under this effort will be hybridized to a dual color detector array to produce the NeuroSeek FPA, which will have the capability to fuse multiple pixel-based sensor inputs directly on the focal plane. Great advantages are afforded by application of massively parallel processing algorithms to image data in the analog domain; the high speed and low power consumption of this device mimic operations performed in the human retina.

  9. The finite element modeling and thermal analysis of the special focal plane of LAMOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Heng; Yang, Dehua; Li, Guoping

    2010-07-01

    The Large Area Multi-Object Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) is a meridian reflecting Schmidt telescope with a 40m optical axis between the reflecting Schmidt plate and the spherical primary mirror. In the middle is located the spherical focal plane, through which there are corresponding 4000+ unit mounting holes for the fibers, and on its back, there attached a support truss adapted from Serrurier concept. The mechanical stabilization of the focal plane system naturally has magnificent impact on the observation efficiency of the LAMOST. A comprehensive Finite Element Model of the focal plane system has been built to evaluate thermally induced degradation of its mechanical accuracy using the nodal modification technique within ANSYS, and diverse temperature load cases have been considered on the Finite Element model and related thermal analyses have been carried out to investigate thermal deformation of the focal plane. Subsequently the calculated deflection of the working surface has been extracted and reconstructed with least square fitting in MATLAB. The results show that temperature change around the telescope has little effect on the performance of the focal plane within temperature variation requirements of the LAMOST. The methods of modeling and analyzing used in this research are informative for future large telescope projects.

  10. Materials, devices, techniques, and applications for Z-plane focal plane array technology II; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, July 12, 13, 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, John C.

    1990-11-01

    Various papers on materials, devices, techniques, and applications for X-plane focal plane array technology are presented. Individual topics addressed include: application of Z-plane technology to the remote sensing of the earth from GEO, applications of smart neuromorphic focal planes, image-processing of Z-plane technology, neural network Z-plane implementation with very high interconnection rates, using a small IR surveillance satellite for tactical applications, establishing requirements for homing applications, Z-plane technology. Also discussed are: on-array spike suppression signal processing, algorithms for on-focal-plane gamma circumvention and time-delay integration, current HYMOSS Z-technology, packaging of electrons for on- and off-FPA signal processing, space/performance qualification of tape automated bonded devices, automation in tape automated bonding, high-speed/high-volume radiometric testing of Z-technology focal planes, 128-layer HYMOSS-module fabrication issues, automation of IRFPA production processes.

  11. Non-local means-based nonuniformity correction for infrared focal-plane array detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hui; Zhang, Zhi-jie; Chen, Fu-sheng; Wang, Chen-sheng

    2014-11-01

    The infrared imaging systems are normally based on the infrared focal-plane array (IRFPA) which can be considered as an array of independent detectors aligned at the focal plane of the imaging system. Unfortunately, every detector on the IRFPA may have a different response to the same input infrared signal which is known as the nonuniformity problem. Then we can observe the fixed pattern noise (FPN) from the resulting images. Standard nonuniformity correction (NUC) methods need to be recalibrated after a short period of time due the temporal drift of the FPN. Scene-based nonuniformity correction (NUC) techniques eliminate the need for calibration by correction coefficients based on the scene being viewed. However, in the scene-based NUC method the problem of ghosting artifacts widely seriously decreases the image quality, which can degrade the performance of many applications such as target detection and track. This paper proposed an improved scene-based method based on the retina-like neural network approach. The method incorporates the use of non-local means (NLM) method into the estimation of the gain and the offset of each detector. This method can not only estimates the accurate correction coefficient but also restrict the ghosting artifacts efficiently. The proposed method relies on the use of NLM method which is a very successful image denoising method. And then the NLM used here can preserve the image edges efficiently and obtain a reliable spatial estimation. We tested the proposed NUC method by applying it to an IR sequence of frames. The performance of the proposed method was compared the other well-established adaptive NUC techniques.

  12. Low power, highly linear output buffer. [for infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foley, D.; Butler, N.; Stobie, J.

    1992-01-01

    A class AB CMOS output buffer has been designed for use on an IR focal plane array. Given the requirements for power dissipation and load capacitance a class A output, such as a source follower, would be unsuitable. The approach taken uses a class AB amplifier configured as a charge integrator. Thus it converts a charge packet in the focal plane multiplexer to a voltage which is then the output of the focal plane. With a quiescent current of 18 micro-a and a load capacitance of 100 pf, the amplifier has an open loop unity gain bandwidth of 900 khz. Integral nonlinearity is better than .03 percent over 5.5 volts when run with VDD-VSS = 6v.

  13. Orion: A 1-5 Micron Focal Plane for the 21st Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, A. M.; Merrill, K. M.; Ball, W.; Henden, A.; Vrba, F.; McCreight, C.

    The Orion program is a project to develop a 2Kx2K infrared focal plane using InSb p-on-n diodes for detectors. It is the natural follow-up to the successful Aladdin 1Kx1K program started in the early 90's. The work is being done at the Raytheon Infrared Operations Division (RIO, previously known as the Santa Barbara Research Center) by many of the same people who created the Aladdin focal plane. The design is very similar to the successful Aladdin design with the addition of reference pixels, whole array readout (no quadrants), two-adjacent-side buttability, and a packaging design that includes going directly to the ultimate focal plane size of 4Kx4K. So far we have successfully made a limited number of hybrid modules with InSb detectors. In this paper we will describe the design features and test data taken from some of these devices.

  14. Fabrication of Transition Edge Sensor Microcalorimeters for X-Ray Focal Planes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chervenak, James A.; Adams, Joseph S.; Audley, Heather; Bandler, Simon R.; Betancourt-Martinez, Gabriele; Eckart, Megan E.; Finkbeiner, Fred M.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline; Lee, Sang Jun; Mateo, Jennette; Sadleir, John E.; Smith, Stephen J.; Wassell, Edward; Yoon, Wonsik

    2015-01-01

    Requirements for focal planes for x-ray astrophysics vary widely depending on the needs of the science application such as photon count rate, energy band, resolving power, and angular resolution. Transition edge sensor x-ray calorimeters can encounter limitations when optimized for these specific applications. Balancing specifications leads to choices in, for example, pixel size, thermal sinking arrangement, and absorber thickness and material. For the broadest specifications, instruments can benefit from multiple pixel types in the same array or focal plane. Here we describe a variety of focal plane architectures that anticipate science requirements of x-ray instruments for heliophysics and astrophysics. We describe the fabrication procedures that enable each array and explore limitations for the specifications of such arrays, including arrays with multiple pixel types on the same array.

  15. Design, fabrication and characterization of a polarization-sensitive focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobiev, Dmitry; Ninkov, Zoran

    2015-03-01

    Measurement of polarization is a powerful yet underutilized technique, with potential applications in remote sensing, astronomy, biomedical imaging and optical metrology. We present the design, fabrication and characterization of a CCD-based polarization-sensitive focal plane array (FPA). These devices are compact permanently aligned detectors capable of determining the degree and angle of linear polarization in a scene, with a single exposure, over a broad spectral range. To derive the polarization properties, we employ a variation of the division-of-focal plane modulation strategy. The devices are fabricated by hybridizing a micropolarizer array (MPA) with a CCD. The result is a "general-purpose" polarization-sensitive imaging sensor, which can be placed at the focal plane of a wide number of imaging systems (and even spectrographs). We present our efforts to date in developing this technology and examine the factors that fundamentally limit the performance of these devices.

  16. Signal processing and compensation electronics for junction field-effect transistor /JFET/ focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittig, K. R.

    1982-06-01

    A signal processing system has been designed and constructed for a pyroelectric infrared area detector which uses a matrix-addressable JFET array for readout and for on-focal plane preamplification. The system compensates for all offset and gain nonuniformities in and after the array. Both compensations are performed in real time at standard television rates, so that changes in the response characteristics of the array are automatically corrected for. Two-point compensation is achieved without the need for two separate temperature references. The focal plane circuitry used to read out the array, the offset and gain compensation algorithms, the architecture of the signal processor, and the system hardware are described.

  17. PHYSICS WITH A FOCAL PLANE PROTON POLARIMETER FOR HALL A AT CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Ron Gilman; F.T. Baker; Louis Bimbot; Ed Brash; Charles Glashausser; Mark Jones; Gerfried Kumbartzki; Sirish Nanda; Charles F. Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi; Ronald Ransome; Paul Rutt

    1994-09-01

    A focal plane polarimeter intended for the CEBAF Hall A high resolution hadron spectrometer is under construction at Rutgers University and the College of William and Mary. Experiments with focal plane polarimeters are only now beginning at electron accelerators; they play a prominent role in the list of approved experiments for Hall A. Construction of the polarimeter is in progress, it is expected to be brought to CEBAF in spring 1995. Several coincidence (e,e'p) and singles (gamma, p) measurements by the Hall A Collaboration are expected to start in 1996. In this paper we describe the polarimeter and the physics program planned for it.

  18. Status of uncooled focal plane detector arrays for smart IR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddiard, Kevin C.; Ringh, Ulf; Jansson, Christer

    1996-06-01

    A cooperative research project between the Defense Science and Technology Organization, Australia, and the National Defense Research Establishment, Sweden, seeks to investigate concepts for smart IR focal plane detector arrays, whereby a monolithic Semiconductor Film Bolometer detector array is integrated with a CMOS signal conditioning circuit, analog- to-digital conversion and signal processing functions on the same silicon chip. Novel signal conditioning and on-chip digital readout techniques have been successfully demonstrated, and the supporting signal processing electronic design is being developed. This paper discusses the status of detector materials research and staring focal plane array development. The first experimental array has been delivered and is undergoing evaluation.

  19. Characterization of a visible spectrum division-of-focal-plane polarimeter.

    PubMed

    York, Timothy; Gruev, Viktor

    2012-08-01

    The development of high resolution division-of-focal-plane polarimeters in the visible spectrum allows real-time capture of two chief properties of interest, the degree of linear polarization and the angle of polarization. The accuracy of these two parameters can be influenced by a number of factors in the imaged scene, from the incident intensity and wavelength to the lens used for image capture. The alignment, transmission, and contrast ratios of the pixel matched filters also impact the measured parameters. A system of measurements is presented here that shows how these factors can determine the quality of a division-of-focal-plane polarimeter. PMID:22859027

  20. Method of fabricating multiwavelength infrared focal plane array detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, Stephen R. (Inventor); Olsen, Gregory H. (Inventor); Kim, Dong-Su (Inventor); Lange, Michael J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A multiwavelength local plane array infrared detector is included on a common substrate having formed on its top face a plurality of In.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x As (x.ltoreq.0.53) absorption layers, between each pair of which a plurality of InAs.sub.y P.sub.1-y (y.ltoreq.1) buffer layers are formed having substantially increasing lattice parameters, respectively, relative to said substrate, for preventing lattice mismatch dislocations from propagating through successive ones of the absorption layers of decreasing bandgap relative to said substrate, whereby a plurality of detectors for detecting different wavelengths of light for a given pixel are provided by removing material above given areas of successive ones of the absorption layers, which areas are doped to form a pn junction with the surrounding unexposed portions of associated absorption layers, respectively, with metal contacts being formed on a portion of each of the exposed areas, and on the bottom of the substrate for facilitating electrical connections thereto.

  1. Composite axilens-axicon diffractive optical elements for generation of ring patterns with high focal depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmavarapu, Raghu; Vijayakumar, A.; Brunner, R.; Bhattacharya, Shanti

    2016-03-01

    A binary Fresnel Zone Axilens (FZA) is designed for the infinite conjugate mode and the phase profile of a refractive axicon is combined with it to generate a composite Diffractive Optical Element (DOE). The FZA designed for two focal lengths generates a line focus along the propagation direction extending between the two focal planes. The ring pattern generated by the axicon is focused through this distance and the radius of the ring depends on the propagation distance. Hence, the radius of the focused ring pattern can be tuned, during the design process, within the two focal planes. The integration of the two functions was carried out by shifting the location of zones of FZA with respect to the phase profile of the refractive axicon resulting in a binary composite DOE. The FZAs and axicons were designed for different focal depth values and base angles respectively, in order to achieve different ring radii within the focal depth of each element. The elements were simulated using scalar diffraction formula and their focusing characteristics were analyzed. The DOEs were fabricated using electron beam direct writing and evaluated using a fiber coupled diode laser. The tunable ring patterns generated by the DOEs have prospective applications in microdrilling as well as microfabrication of circular diffractive and refractive optical elements.

  2. Advanced high-performance 320x240 VOx microbolometer uncooled IR focal plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Philip E.; Clarke, John E.; Parrish, William J.; Woolaway, James T., II

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes Boeing's next-generation 320 X 320 uncooled IR focal plane product. The basic objectives have ben to at least double focal plane performance, improve focal pane operating stability, and significantly enhance the control interface between the focal pane and the camera. All of these basic objectives have been achieved. Focal plane temporal NETD equals 0.028 degrees C has been demonstrated at a frame rate of 60 Hz on the first lot of UFPAs produced, as well as a worst-case spatial NETD < 0.016 degrees C measured over 10 degrees C temperature calibration range. Operating stability improvement has been successfully demonstrated. The design has validated a 'smart sensor' UFPA/camera control interface that provides externally programmability of on-chip signal gain, on-chip pixel offset compensation, on-chip detector bias regulation, precision on-chip temperature measurement, and a 16 test- point Built In Test function. Based on Lot-1 test results, the next lot, which is now in wafer processing, is expected to achieve NETD < 0.02 degrees C at a 60 Hz frame rate. With an improved microbolometer Thermal Isolation Structure, currently in development at Boeing, NETD < 0.010 degrees C can be demonstrated before the end of this year.

  3. Characterization of post-correction uniformity on infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, John J.; Costanzo, Christopher R.; Kaplan, David R.

    1995-05-01

    With increased requirements for better performance being placed on thermal imaging systems, new characterization figures of merit are being developed to assess infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) attributes. Post correction uniformity (PCU) is a parameter that determines how successfully a thermal imaging system can eliminate spatial noise from scanning and staring focal plane arrays. Requirements on PCU, particularly for the more sensitive IRFPAs and applications, are quite rigorous. Test issues of l/f noise, drift, and repeatability become critical and require a rethinking of accepted methods. As infrared sensors have become more sensitive, the need to characterize these focal plane arrays under more controlled and realistic test conditions has emerged. The U.S. Army Night Vision and Electronic SEnsors Directorate (NVESD) has attempted to address these issues by developing a unique capability to measure the PCU of IR focal plane arrays using software algorithms and a specialized mechanical modulator. The modulator is a two foot diameter, two toothed (one reflective and one emissive) blade, which is used to facilitate the real-time collection of test, gain, and offset flux levels. This paper addresses (1) the significance of PCU from a system perspective, (2) discuss the limitations of various PCU measurement techniques, (3) present the NVESD approach for measuring PCU, and (4) report PCU data collected using these techniques.

  4. Chemical imaging of cotton fibers using an infrared microscope and a focal-plane array detector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this presentation, the chemical imaging of cotton fibers with an infrared microscope and a Focal-Plane Array (FPA) detector will be discussed. Infrared spectroscopy can provide us with information on the structure and quality of cotton fibers. In addition, FPA detectors allow for simultaneous spe...

  5. Radiation-Induced Transient Effects in Near Infrared Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Robert A.; Pickel, J.; Marshall, P.; Waczynski, A.; McMurray, R.; Gee, G.; Polidan, E.; Johnson, S.; McKeivey, M.; Ennico, K.; Johnson, R.

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes a test simulate the transient effects of cosmic ray impacts on near infrared focal plane arrays. The objectives of the test are to: 1) Characterize proton single events as function of energy and angle of incidence; 2) Measure charge spread (crosstalk) to adjacent pixels; 3) Assess transient recovery time.

  6. Development and Testing of an Innovative Two-Arm Focal-Plane Thermal Strap (TAFTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urquiza, E.; Vasquez, C.; Rodriguez, J.; Van Gorp, B.

    2011-01-01

    Maintaining temperature stability in optical focal planes comes with the intrinsic challenge of creating a pathway that is both extremely flexible mechanically and highly conductive thermally. The task is further complicated because science-caliber optical focal planes are extremely delicate, yet their mechanical resiliency is rarely tested and documented. The mechanical engineer tasked with the thermo-mechanical design must then create a highly conductive thermal link that minimizes the tensile and shear stresses transmitted to the focal plane without design parameters on an acceptable stiffness. This paper will describe the development and testing of the thermal link developed for the Portable Remote Imaging Spectrometer (PRISM) instrument. It will provide experimentally determined mechanical stiffness plots in the three axes of interest. Analytical and experimental thermal conductance results for the two-arm focal-plane thermal strap (TAFTS), from cryogenic to room temperatures, are also presented. The paper also briefly describes some elements of the fabrication process followed in developing a novel design solution, which provides high conductance and symmetrical mechanical loading, while providing enhanced flexibility in all three degrees of freedom.

  7. Performance of the QWIP focal plane arrays for NASA's Landsat Data Continuity Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhabvala, M.; Choi, K.; Waczynski, A.; La, A.; Sundaram, M.; Costard, E.; Jhabvala, C.; Kan, E.; Kahle, D.; Foltz, R.; Boehm, N.; Hickey, M.; Sun, J.; Adachi, T.; Costen, N.; Hess, L.; Facoetti, H.; Montanaro, M.

    2011-06-01

    The focal plane assembly for the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) instrument on NASA's Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) consists of three 512 x 640 GaAs Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP) arrays. The three arrays are precisely mounted and aligned on a silicon carrier substrate to provide a continuous viewing swath of 1850 pixels in two spectral bands defined by filters placed in close proximity to the detector surfaces. The QWIP arrays are hybridized to Indigo ISC9803 readout integrated circuits (ROICs). QWIP arrays were evaluated from four laboratories; QmagiQ, (Nashua, NH), Army Research Laboratory, (Adelphi, MD), NASA/ Goddard Space Flight Center, (Greenbelt, MD) and Thales, (Palaiseau, France). All were found to be suitable. The final discriminating parameter was the spectral uniformity of individual pixels relative to each other. The performance of the QWIP arrays and the fully assembled, NASA flight-qualified, focal plane assembly will be reviewed. An overview of the focal plane assembly including the construction and test requirements of the focal plane will also be described.

  8. Tie-In Orbits for the Focal Plane Stability Test - Part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz-Reed, Linda

    1991-07-01

    This proposal is part of the TTSC request entitled, "Distortion Calibration in FGS 1 and FGS 2, FGS-to-FGS Alignment Calibration". This portion is listed separately due to the time critical nature of one of the orbits. OFAD in FGS 3 which will be performed in December 1992 together with the Mini OFAD's in FGS's 1 and 2 which will be performed in January 1993 will provide a new set of FGS calibration parameters. One of the objectives of the STScI Focal Plane Stability test is to monitor changes to these parameters by repeatedly observing targets in the cluster M35. Since the cluster is near the ecliptic, only two vehicle orientations are needed, the "fall" and the "spring" pointings (see attached pickles plots). Since the Mini OFAD targets are not necessarily the same targets used in the Focal Plane Stability Test, tie in orbits using the Focal Plane Stability targets are needed shortly before and after the Mini OFAD activities. In addition, the Focal Plane Stability Test may not be

  9. A description of the focal plane/detector test and evaluation lab at MDAC-HB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beebe, D. D.; Lowe, J. J.; Sheldon, C.; D'Ippolito, E. S.; Osler, A. G.

    1986-01-01

    A description of a test facility for testing and evaluating visible and infrared (IR) focal plane arrays (FPA's) and associated components and subsystems is given. The facility is comprised of three computer controlled test systems for characterization of hybrid FPA's, detector arrays, and readout electronics under cryogenic conditions. Facility capabilities include FPA assembly and dewar test and assembly.

  10. Status of very long infrared-wave focal plane array development at DEFIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravrand, O.; Chorier, Ph.

    2009-05-01

    The very long infrared wavelength (>14μm) is a very challenging range for the design of large HgCdTe focal plane arrays. As the wavelength gets longer (ie the semiconductor gap gets smaller), the physic of photodiodes asks for numerous technological improvements to keep a high level of detection performance. DEFIR (LETI-Sofradir common research team) has been highly active in this field during the last few years. The need (mainly expressed by the space industry ESA and CNES) of very long wave focal plane arrays appears very demanding in terms of dark current, defect density and of course quantum efficiency. This paper aims at presenting a status of long and very long wave focal plane array development at DEFIR for three different ion implanted technologies: n on p mercury vacancies doped technology, n on p extrinsic doped technology, and p on n arsenic on indium technology. Special focus is done to 15μm cut off n/p focal plane array fabricated in our laboratory demonstrating high uniformity, diffusion and shot noise limited photodiodes at 50K.

  11. A new method of focal plane mosaic for space remote sensing camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guangwei; Li, Lin

    2011-08-01

    With the development of space remote sensors, the urgent needs of large area array optical detectors increase strongly. To address the conflict between the resolution and the detector size, the most straightforward approach is to use a larger CCD chip, but a single small area array CCD chip cannot meet the needs of the focal plane, therefore, the method of CCD mosaic must be used. This paper presents a new method of splicing, it's a twice-imaging scheme. The first image is formed on an imaging plate of intercepting optical component, and then four separate CCD cameras are used to produce the segmented images on the final image plane. So a CCD focal plane mosaic can be achieved.

  12. Photolithographic lens characterization of critical dimension variation using empirical focal-plane modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusa, Mircea V.; Su, Bo; Dellarochetta, Stephen; Zavecz, Terrence E.

    1997-07-01

    Exposure tool optimization in process development today extends beyond the classic concepts of exposure and focus setting. The lithographer must understand and tune the system for critical feature performance using variables such as Numerical Aperture (NA), Partial Coherence (PC), and critical level tool matching. In a previous study, the authors demonstrated that the phase-shift focal plane monitor (PSFM) accurately measures focal plane variations when appropriate calibrations are employed. That paper also described the development of a model for classic aberrations such as Astigmatism, Field Curvature and Coma. The model considered geometrical aberrations (Seidel) with radial symmetry across image plane as being the primary contributor to CD variation across stepper image plane. The publication correlated image plane focal results to an approximation of the stepper's Critical Dimension (CD) behavior for a matrix of NA and PC settings. In this study, we continue the analysis of the focus budget and CD uniformity using two generations of optical steppers in a 0.35 micrometers process. The analysis first addresses questions involving the use of the PSFM including the variation of calibration across the exposure field and the advantages of using field center or full field calibrations. We describe a method of easily measuring the uniformity of NA and PC across the exposure field. These new tools are then applied as an aid in lens image field characterization and tool-to-tool matching. The information gathered is then applied to measure image aberrations and predict CD variation across the image under various conditions of focus. The predictions are validated by a comparison against CD uniformity as measured by a commercial Scanning Electron Microscope. Present work confirmed previous work and recent assumptions that Zernike diffraction theory of aberration is most appropriate for current stepper lenses with local image plane focal variations across entire field being

  13. 320 x 256 Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector Focal Plane Array for Long-Wave Infrared Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Jean; Rafol, Sir B.; Soibel, Alexander; Khoskhlagh, Arezou; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Liu, John K.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2012-01-01

    A 320 x 256 Complementary Barrier Infrared (CBIRD) focal plane array for long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) imaging is reported. The arrays were grown by molecular beam expitaxy (MBE) with a 300 period 1.9 um thick absorber. The mean dark current density of 2.2 x 10-4 A/cm2 was measured at an operating bias of 128 mV with a long wavelength cutoff of 8.8 ?m observed at 50% of the peak. The maximum quantum efficiency was 54% measured at 5.6 ?m. Operating at T = 80K, the array yielded an 81% fill factor with 97% operability. Good imagery with a mean noise equivalent different temperature (NE?T) of 18.6 mK and a mean detectivity of D* = 1.3 x 1011 cm-Hz1/2/W was achieved. The substrate was thinned using mechanical lapping and neither an AR coating nor a passivation layer was applied. This article provides the details of the fabrication process for achieving low-dark current LWIR CBIRD arrays. Discussion for an effective hard mask for excellent pattern transfer is given and appropriate mounting techniques for good thermal contact during the dry etching process is described. The challenges and differences between etching large 200 ?m test diodes and small 28 ?m FPA pixels are given.

  14. 320 x 256 complementary barrier infrared detector focal plane array for long-wave infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Jean; Rafol, B., , Sir; Soibel, Alexander; Khoskhlagh, Arezou; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Liu, John K.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2012-06-01

    A 320 x 256 Complementary Barrier Infrared (CBIRD) focal plane array for long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) imaging is reported. The arrays were grown by molecular beam expitaxy (MBE) with a 300 period 1.9 um thick absorber. The mean dark current density of 2.2 x 10-4 A/cm2 was measured at an operating bias of 128 mV with a long wavelength cutoff of 8.8 μm observed at 50% of the peak. The maximum quantum efficiency was 54% measured at 5.6 μm. Operating at T = 80K, the array yielded an 81% fill factor with 97% operability. Good imagery with a mean noise equivalent different temperature (NE▵T) of 18.6 mK and a mean detectivity of D* = 1.3 x 1011 cm-Hz1/2/W was achieved. The substrate was thinned using mechanical lapping and neither an AR coating nor a passivation layer was applied. This article provides the details of the fabrication process for achieving low-dark current LWIR CBIRD arrays. Discussion for an effective hard mask for excellent pattern transfer is given and appropriate mounting techniques for good thermal contact during the dry etching process is described. The challenges and differences between etching large 200 μm test diodes and small 28 μm FPA pixels are given.

  15. A comparison of deghosting techniques in adaptive nonuniformity correction for IR focal-plane array systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Alessandro; Diani, Marco; Corsini, Giovanni

    2010-10-01

    Focal-plane array (FPA) IR systems are affected by fixed-pattern noise (FPN) which is caused by the nonuniformity of the responses of the detectors that compose the array. Due to the slow temporal drift of FPN, several scene-based nonuniformity correction (NUC) techniques have been developed that operate calibration during the acquisition only by means of the collected data. Unfortunately, such algorithms are affected by a collateral damaging problem: ghosting-like artifacts are generated by the edges in the scene and appear as a reverse image in the original position. In this paper, we compare the performance of representative methods for reducing ghosting. Such methods relate to the least mean square (LMS)-based NUC algorithm proposed by D.A. Scribner. In particular, attention is focused on a recently proposed technique which is based on the computation of the temporal statistics of the error signal in the aforementioned LMS-NUC algorithm. In this work, the performances of the deghosting techniques have been investigated by means of IR data corrupted with simulated nonuniformity noise over the detectors of the FPA. Finally, we have made some considerations on the computational aspect which is a challenging task for the employment of such techniques in real-time systems.

  16. Modeling of HgCdTe focal plane array spectral inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouzali, Salima; Lefebvre, Sidonie; Rommeluère, Sylvain; Ferrec, Yann; Primot, Jérôme

    2015-06-01

    Infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPA) are widely used to perform high quality measurements such as spectrum acquisition at high rate, ballistic missile defense, gas detection, and hyperspectral imaging. For these applications, the fixed pattern noise represents one of the major limiting factors of the array performance. This sensor imperfection refers to the nonuniformity between pixels, and is partially caused by disparities of the cut-off wavenumbers. In this work, we focus particularly on mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe), which is the most important material of IR cooled detector applications. Among the many advantages of this ternary alloy is the tunability of the bandgap energy with Cadmium composition, as well as the high quantum efficiency. In order to predict and understand spectral inhomogeneities of HgCdTe-based IRFPA, we propose a modeling approach based on the description of optical phenomena inside the pixels. The model considers the p-n junctions as a unique absorbent bulk layer, and derives the sensitivity of the global structure to both Cadmium composition and HgCdTe layer thickness. For this purpose, HgCdTe optical and material properties were necessary to be known at low temperature (80K), in our operating conditions. We therefore achieved the calculation of the real part of the refractive index using subtracti

  17. Polymer films as planarization and sacrificial layers for uncooled infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huan; Liu, Weiguo; Cai, Changlong; Zhou, Shun

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a planarization procedure using polymer films to achieve a flat CMOS surface of Readout Integrated Circuit (ROIC) for the integration between uncooled infrared focal plane arrays and ROIC. At the same time, the polymer film is also used as the sacrificial layers. After amorphous Silicon (a-Si) film was deposited using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and patterned using inductively coupled plasma (ICP), the polymer sacrificial layer should be removed to form a-Si self-supporting micro-bridge structure. So the thickness of polymer film determine the height of the micro-bridge; the soft curing temperature determines if the contact hole can be etched by developer during the first photolithography; and the rate of dry etching determines whether the sacrificial layers of the structure can be released successfully. In this paper, the curing temperature, surface roughness, etching process of polymer films are systematically researched. On this basis, polymer film as planarization successfully reduces the 2μm height of the bumps on ROIC to less than 83 nm, over the planarized polymer mesas, bolometer arrays are fabricated. Then the polymer film as sacrificial are removed by ICP and 160x120 self-supporting micro-bridge structure arrays are successfully fabricated.

  18. Polymer films as planarization and sacrificial layers for uncooled infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huan; Liu, Weiguo; Cai, Changlong; Zhou, Shun

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents a planarization procedure using polymer films to achieve a flat CMOS surface of Readout Integrated Circuit (ROIC) for the integration between uncooled infrared focal plane arrays and ROIC. At the same time, the polymer film is also used as the sacrificial layers. After amorphous Silicon (a-Si) film was deposited using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and patterned using inductively coupled plasma (ICP), the polymer sacrificial layer should be removed to form a-Si self-supporting micro-bridge structure. So the thickness of polymer film determine the height of the micro-bridge; the soft curing temperature determines if the contact hole can be etched by developer during the first photolithography; and the rate of dry etching determines whether the sacrificial layers of the structure can be released successfully. In this paper, the curing temperature, surface roughness, etching process of polymer films are systematically researched. On this basis, polymer film as planarization successfully reduces the 2μm height of the bumps on ROIC to less than 83 nm, over the planarized polymer mesas, bolometer arrays are fabricated. Then the polymer film as sacrificial are removed by ICP and 160x120 self-supporting micro-bridge structure arrays are successfully fabricated.

  19. Modeling and deformation analyzing of InSb focal plane arrays detector under thermal shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Meng, Qingduan; Zhang, Liwen; Lv, Yanqiu

    2014-03-01

    A higher fracture probability appearing in indium antimonide (InSb) infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPAs) subjected to the thermal shock test, restricts its final yield. In light of the proposed equivalent method, where a 32 × 32 array is employed to replace the real 128 × 128 array, a three-dimensional modeling of InSb IRFPAs is developed to explore its deformation rules. To research the damage degree to the mechanical properties of InSb chip from the back surface thinning process, the elastic modulus of InSb chip along the normal direction is lessened. Simulation results show when the out-of-plane elastic modulus of InSb chip is set with 30% of its Young's modulus, the simulated Z-components of strain distribution agrees well with the top surface deformation features in 128 × 128 InSb IRFPAs fracture photographs, especially with the crack origination sites, the crack distribution and the global square checkerboard buckling pattern. Thus the Z-components of strain are selected to explore the deformation rules in the layered structure of InSb IRFPAs. Analyzing results show the top surface deformation of InSb IRFPAs originates from the thermal mismatch between the silicon readout integrated circuits (ROIC) and the intermediate layer above, made up of the alternating indium bump array and the reticular underfill. After passing through both the intermediate layer and the InSb chip, the deformation amplitude is reduced firstly from 2.23 μm to 0.24 μm, finally to 0.09 μm. Finally, von Mises stress criterion is employed to explain the causes that cracks always appear in the InSb chip.

  20. The Mid-Infrared Instrument for the James Webb Space Telescope, VIII: The MIRI Focal Plane System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ressler, M. E.; Sukhatme, K. G.; Franklin, B. R.; Mahoney, J. C.; Thelen, M. P.; Bouchet, P.; Colbert, J. W.; Cracraft, Misty; Dicken, D.; Gastaud, R.; Goodson, G. B.; Eccleston, Paul; Moreau, V.; Rieke, G. H.; Schneider, Analyn

    2015-07-01

    We describe the layout and unique features of the focal plane system for MIRI. We begin with the detector array and its readout integrated circuit (combining the amplifier unit cells and the multiplexer), the electronics, and the steps by which the data collection is controlled and the output signals are digitized and delivered to the JWST spacecraft electronics system. We then discuss the operation of this MIRI data system, including detector readout patterns, operation of subarrays, and data formats. Finally, we summarize the performance of the system, including remaining anomalies that need to be corrected in the data pipeline.

  1. Advancements in large-format SiPIN hybrid focal plane technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilcoyne, S.; Malone, N.; Kean, B.; Cantrell, J.; Fierro, J.; Meier, L.; DeWalt, S.; Hewitt, C.; Wyles, J.; Drab, J.; Grama, G.; Paloczi, G.; Vampola, J.; Brown, K.

    2014-09-01

    Raytheon has built hybrid focal planes based on Silicon P-I-N photo-sensors for the past three decades. The device has undergone a continuous improvement process during this period. The detector material has been improved and the thickness has been greatly reduced. Most recently, the readout integrated circuit (ROIC) and the hybridization process, have undergone significant advancements1,2,3. This paper presents recent advancements in the latest generation 8μm pixelpitch 1k2 format and 5k2 format visible Si PIN focal-planes. The current family of devices has very low read-noise ROICs, low detector dark current, operate with a 25 volt bias and deliver 50% mean response operability greater than 99.995%.

  2. Submillisecond measurements of system optical modulation functions in mosaic focal plane arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurlow, P. E.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of system optical modulation functions (MTF, SWR) may be distorted by time-dependent environmental effects (thermal, vibration, flexure) and by electronics drift. Fast data collection may therefore be advantageous by minimizing drift time. The problem of fast data collection is accentuated when modulation data must be taken on a large number of detectors in a focal plane array. A method has been developed for the generation and storage of knife edge data from focal plane arrays, where data collection time per detector is in the submillisecond range. Once knife edge collects are completed, MTF response is found using conventional convolution techniques. SWR is obtained directly from knife edge response using a computerized simulation algorithm which bypasses use of MTF harmonics. Requirements for detector electronics speed, damping, and dynamic range are considered.

  3. Quantitative Characterization of Super-Resolution Infrared Imaging Based on Time-Varying Focal Plane Coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, J.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, Y.

    2014-10-01

    High resolution infrared image has been the goal of an infrared imaging system. In this paper, a super-resolution infrared imaging method using time-varying coded mask is proposed based on focal plane coding and compressed sensing theory. The basic idea of this method is to set a coded mask on the focal plane of the optical system, and the same scene could be sampled many times repeatedly by using time-varying control coding strategy, the super-resolution image is further reconstructed by sparse optimization algorithm. The results of simulation are quantitatively evaluated by introducing the Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR) and Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), which illustrate that the effect of compressed measurement coefficient r and coded mask resolution m on the reconstructed image quality. Research results show that the proposed method will promote infrared imaging quality effectively, which will be helpful for the practical design of new type of high resolution ! infrared imaging systems.

  4. DRS U6000 640x480 VOx uncooled IR focal plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Philip E.; Clarke, John E.; Ionescu, Adrian C.; Li, Chuan C.; Stevens, John C.

    2002-08-01

    DRS (formerly Boeing) has completed the development and demonstration of a 25-micron pixel size 640x480 VOx microbolometer uncooled IR focal plane product, the U6000. The U6000 incorporates several advanced features to enhance its performance and functional capabilities. A parallel six- bit Smart-Sensor data bus provides external command and data interface capability between the sensor and the focal plane. This includes on chip 6-bit pixel offset correction, detector bias selection and regulation, programmable signal gain, interlaced and non-interlaced output video format selection, signal integration time selection and input referred global offset selection capabilities. The U6000 also includes a high resolution on-chip temperature measurement that is incorporated into the single channel output video during horizontal blanking. This paper describes the U6000's functional capabilities, and provides U6000 functional validation and performance data.

  5. Introduction of four different drive systems used in LAMOST focal plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guomin; Jiang, Xiang; Wang, Yuefei; Li, Guoping; Gu, Bozhong

    2006-06-01

    This paper describes four different drive systems adopted in LAMOST focal plane mechanism to achieve four movements: field derotation, focal plane attitude adjustment, focusing and move aside out of light path for optical checking. Different type drive systems, such as worm gear drive, spur gear drive, friction drive and direct drive, which were devised and used in telescopes in the past years, have their own inherent characteristics and their working conditions. According to feasibility, reliability, suitability and cost effective, friction drive, worm gear drive, ball screw drive and chain drive are selected to as the drive systems for the above four movements. The on-shop test results show that all the drive systems have met the design goals with the accuracy of image field derotation 0.45 arcsec, attitude adjustment 0.24 arcsec, focusing 2 microns and move aside 0.02mm.

  6. Type II superlattice infrared focal plane arrays: Optical, electrical, and mid-wave infrared imaging characterization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, John; Svensson, Stefan; Goldberg, Arnie; Kennerly, Steve; Olver, Kim; Hongsmatip, Trirat; Winn, Michael; Uppal, Parvez

    2006-03-01

    We have studied the infrared optical and temperature dependent electrical properties of 320 x 256 arrays of GaSb/InAs type II superlattice infrared photodiodes. Good agreement between single-pixel and focal plane array measurements of the photon-to- electron/hole conversion efficiency was obtained, and the infrared absorption coefficient extracted from these measurements was found to be comparable to that of HgCdTe with the same bandgap as the type II superlattice. Temperature and voltage dependent dark current measurements and the voltage dependent photocurrent generated by a 300 K background scene were described well using a semi-empirical model of the photodiode. We will show high-quality images obtained from the mid-infrared focal plane array operating at 78 K.

  7. Image interpolation for division of focal plane polarimeters with intensity correlation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junchao; Luo, Haibo; Hui, Bin; Chang, Zheng

    2016-09-01

    Division of focal plane (DoFP) polarimeters operate by integrating micro-polarizer elements with a focal plane. These polarization imaging sensors reduce spatial resolution output and each pixel has a varying instantaneous field of view (IFoV). These drawbacks can be mitigated by applying proper interpolation methods. In this paper, we present a new interpolation method for DoFP polarimeters by using intensity correlation. We employ the correlation of intensity measurements in different orientations to detect edges and then implement interpolation along edges. The performance of the proposed method is compared with several previous methods by using root mean square error (RMSE) comparison and visual comparison. Experimental results showed that our proposed method can achieve better visual effects and a lower RMSE than other methods. PMID:27607683

  8. InAs/GaSb superlattices for advanced infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehm, Robert; Walther, Martin; Schmitz, Johannes; Rutz, Frank; Fleißner, Joachim; Scheibner, Ralf; Ziegler, Johann

    2009-11-01

    We report on the development of high performance focal plane arrays for the mid-wavelength infrared spectral range from 3-5 μm (MWIR) on the basis of InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes. An investigation on the minority electron diffusion length with a set of six sample ranging from 190 to 1000 superlattice periods confirms that InAs/GaSb superlattice focal plane arrays achieve very high external quantum efficiency. This enabled the fabrication of a range of monospectral MWIR imagers with high spatial and excellent thermal resolution at short integration times. Furthermore, novel dual-color imagers have been developed, which offer advanced functionality due to a simultaneous, pixel-registered detection of two separate spectral channels in the MWIR.

  9. InAs/GaSb superlattice focal plane arrays for high-resolution thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehm, R.; Walther, M.; Schmitz, J.; Fleißner, J.; Fuchs, F.; Ziegler, J.; Cabanski, W.

    2006-03-01

    The first fully operational mid-IR (3-5 μm) 256×256 IR-FPA camera system based on a type-II InAs/GaSb short-period superlattice showing an excellent noise equivalent temperature difference below 10 mK and a very uniform performance has been realized. We report on the development and fabrication of the detecor chip, i.e., epitaxy, processing technology and electro-optical characterization of fully integrated InAs/GaSb superlattice focal plane arrays. While the superlattice design employed for the first demonstrator camera yielded a quantum efficiency around 30%, a superlattice structure grown with a thicker active layer and an optimized V/III BEP ratio during growth of the InAs layers exhibits a significant increase in quantum efficiency. Quantitative responsivity measurements reveal a quantum efficiency of about 60% for InAs/GaSb superlattice focal plane arrays after implementing this design improvement.

  10. Implementation of a 4x8 NIR and CCD Mosaic Focal Plane Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinsky, Patrick; Bebek, C. J.; Besuner, R. W.; Haller, G. M.; Harris, S. E.; Hart, P. A.; Heetderks, H. D.; Levi, M. E.; Maldonado, S. E.; Roe, N. A.; Roodman, A. J.; Sapozhnikov, L.

    2011-01-01

    Mission concepts for NASA's Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST), ESA's EUCLID mission, as well as for ground based observations, have requirements for large mosaic focal planes to image visible and near infrared (NIR) wavelengths. We have developed detectors, readout electronics and focal plane design techniques that can be used to create very large scalable focal plane mosaic cameras. In our technology, CCDs and HgCdTe detectors can be intermingled on a single, silicon carbide (SiC) cold plate. This enables optimized, wideband observing strategies. The CCDs, developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, are fully-depleted, p-channel devices that are backside illuminated capable of operating at temperatures as low as 110K and have been optimized for the weak lensing dark energy technique. The NIR detectors are 1.7µm and 2.0µm wavelength cutoff H2RG® HgCdTe, manufactured by Teledyne Imaging Sensors under contract to LBL. Both the CCDs and NIR detectors are packaged on 4-side abuttable SiC pedestals with a common mounting footprint supporting a 44.16mm mosaic pitch and are coplanar. Both types of detectors have direct-attached, readout electronics that convert the detector signal directly to serial, digital data streams and allow a flexible, low cost data acquisition strategy, despite the large data volume. A mosaic of these detectors can be operated at a common temperature that achieves the required dark current and read noise performance in both types of detectors necessary for dark energy observations. We report here the design and integration for a focal plane designed to accommodate a 4x8 heterogeneous array of CCDs and HgCdTe detectors. Our current implementation contains over 1/4-billion pixels.

  11. Fabrication of large aperture kinoform phase plates in fused silica for smoothing focal plane intensity profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Rushford, M.; Dixit, S.; Thomas, I.; Perry, M.

    1996-04-26

    We have fabricated large aperture (40-cm) kinoform phase plates for producing super-Gaussian focal plane intensity profiles. The continuous phase screen, designed using a new iterative procedure, was fabricated in fused silica as a 16-level, one-wave deep rewrapped phase profile using a lithographic process and wet etching in buffered hydrofluoric acid. The observed far-field contains 94% of the incident energy inside the desired spot.

  12. Modulation transfer function measurements of QWIP and superlattice focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Ting, D. Z.; Rafol, S. B.; Soibel, A.; Khoshakhlagh, A.; Hill, C.; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Keo, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    Modulation transfer function (MTF) is the ability of an imaging system to faithfully image a given object. The MTF of an imaging system quantifies the ability of the system to resolve or transfer spatial frequencies. In this presentation we will discuss the detail MTF measurements of 1024x1024 pixels multi-band quantum well infrared photodetector and 320x256 pixels long-wavelength InAs/GaSb superlattice infrared focal plane arrays.

  13. Modulation Transfer Function Measurement of Infrared Focal-Plane Arrays with Small Fill Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Barrière, Florence; Druart, Guillaume; Guérineau, Nicolas; Rommeluère, Sylvain; Mugnier, Laurent; Gravrand, Olivier; Baier, Nicolas; Lhermet, Nicolas; Destefanis, Gérard; Derelle, Sophie

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes an original method to measure the modulation transfer function (MTF) of an infrared focal-plane array (IRFPA), based on a diffraction grating called a continuously self-imaging grating (CSIG). We give a general methodology to design the test bench, and we describe the data processing approach which has been developed to extract relevant information about the size of the photodiodes and filtering effects. The MTF measurement capability of this method is illustrated with a cooled IRFPA.

  14. Focal-Plane Imaging of Crossed Beams in Nonlinear Optics Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bivolaru, Daniel; Herring, G. C.

    2007-01-01

    An application of focal-plane imaging that can be used as a real time diagnostic of beam crossing in various optical techniques is reported. We discuss two specific versions and demonstrate the capability of maximizing system performance with an example in a combined dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering interferometric Rayleigh scattering experiment (CARS-IRS). We find that this imaging diagnostic significantly reduces beam alignment time and loss of CARS-IRS signals due to inadvertent misalignments.

  15. Focal Plane Array Shutter Mechanism of the JWST NIRSpec Detector System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Kathleen; Sharma, Rajeev

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the requirements, chamber location, shutter system design, stepper motor specifications, dry lubrication, control system, the environmental cryogenic function testing and the test results of the Focal Plane Array Shutter mechanism for the James Webb Space Telescope Near Infrared Spectrum Detector system. Included are design views of the location for the Shutter Mechanism, lubricant (lubricated with Molybdenum Di Sulfide) thickness, and information gained from the cryogenic testing.

  16. Focal plane resolution and overlapped array time delay and integrate imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grycewicz, Thomas J.; Cota, Stephen A.; Lomheim, Terrence S.; Kalman, Linda S.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper we model sub-pixel image registration for a generic earth-observing satellite system with a focal plane using two offset time delay and integrate (TDI) arrays in the focal plane to improve the achievable ground resolution over the resolution achievable with a single array. The modeling process starts with a high-resolution image as ground truth. The Parameterized Image Chain Analysis & Simulation Software (PICASSO) modeling tool is used to degrade the images to match the optical transfer function, sampling, and noise characteristics of the target system. The model outputs a pair of images with a separation close to the nominal half-pixel separation between the overlapped arrays. A registration estimation algorithm is used to measure the offset for image reconstruction. The two images are aligned and summed on a grid with twice the capture resolution. We compare the resolution in images between the inputs before overlap, the reconstructed image, and a simulation for the image which would have been captured on a focal plane with twice the resolution. We find the performance to always be better than the lower resolution baseline, and to approach the performance of the high-resolution array in the ideal case. We show that the overlapped array imager significantly outperforms both the conventional high- and low-resolution imagers in conditions with high image smear.

  17. Short wavelength HgCdTe staring focal plane for low background astronomy applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D.; Stobie, J.; Hartle, N.; Lacroix, D.; Maschhoff, K.

    1989-01-01

    The design of a 128x128 staring short wave infrared (SWIR) HgCdTe focal plane incorporating charge integrating transimpedance input preamplifiers is presented. The preamplifiers improve device linearity and uniformity, and provide signal gain ahead of the miltiplexer and readout circuitry. Detector's with cutoff wavelength of 2.5 microns and operated at 80 K have demonstrated impedances in excess of 10(exp 16) ohms with 60 percent quantum efficiency. Focal plane performance using a smaller format device is presented which demonstrates the potential of this approach. Although the design is capable of achieving less than 30 rms electrons with todays technology, initial small format devices demonstrated a read noise of 100 rms electrons and were limited by the atypical high noise performance of the silicon process run. Luminescence from the active silicon circuitry in the multiplexer limits the minimum detector current to a few hundred electrons per second. Approaches to eliminate this excessive source of current is presented which should allow the focal plane to achieve detector background limited performance.

  18. The QWIP focal plane assembly for NASA's Landsat Data Continuity Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhabvala, M.; Reuter, D.; Choi, K.; Sundaram, M.; Jhabvala, C.; La, A.; Waczynski, A.; Bundas, J.

    2010-04-01

    The Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) is a QWIP based instrument intended to supplement the Operational Land Imager (OLI) for the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) [1]. The TIRS instrument is a dual channel far infrared imager with the two bands centered at 10.8μm and 12.0μm. The focal plane assembly (FPA) consists of three 640x512 GaAs Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP) arrays precisely mounted to a silicon carrier substrate that is mounted on an invar baseplate. The two spectral bands are defined by bandpass filters mounted in close proximity to the detector surfaces. The focal plane operating temperature is 43K. The QWIP arrays are hybridized to Indigo ISC9803 readout integrated circuits (ROICs). Two varieties of QWIP detector arrays are being developed for this project, a corrugated surface structure QWIP and a grating surface structure QWIP. This paper will describe the TIRS system noise equivalent temperature difference sensitivity as it affects the QWIP focal plane performance requirements: spectral response, dark current, conversion efficiency, read noise, temperature stability, pixel uniformity, optical crosstalk and pixel yield. Additional mechanical constraints as well as qualification through Technology Readiness Level 6 (TRL 6) will also be discussed.

  19. Orion: A 1 5 Micron Focal Plane for the 21st Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Albert M.; Merrill, K. Michael; Ball, William; Henden, Arne; Vrba, Fred; McCreight, Craig

    2002-08-01

    The Orion program is a project to develop a 2K × 2K infrared focal plane using InSb p-on-n diodes for detectors. It is the natural follow-up to the successful Aladdin 1K × 1Kprogram started in the early 90’s. The work is being done at the Raytheon Infrared Operations Division (RIO, previously known as the Santa Barbara Research Center) by many of the same people who created the Aladdin focal plane. The design is very similarto the successful Aladdin design with the addition of reference pixels, whole array readout (no quadrants), two-adjacent-side buttability, and a packaging design that includes going directly to the ultimate focal plane size of 4K × 4K. So far we have successfully made a limited number of hybrid modules with InSb detectors. In this paper we will describe the design features and test data taken from some of these devices.

  20. The QWIP Focal Plane Assembly for NASA's Landsat Data Continuity Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, M; Choi, K.; Reuter, D.; Sundaram, M.; Jhabvala, C; La, Anh; Waczynski, Augustyn; Bundas, Jason

    2010-01-01

    The Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) is a QWIP based instrument intended to supplement the Operational Land Imager (OLI) for the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM). The TIRS instrument is a dual channel far infrared imager with the two bands centered at 10.8[mu]m and 12.0[mu]m. The focal plane assembly (FPA) consists of three 640x512 GaAs Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP) arrays precisely mounted to a silicon carrier substrate that is mounted on an invar baseplate. The two spectral bands are defined by bandpass filters mounted in close proximity to the detector surfaces. The focal plane operating temperature is 43K. The QWIP arrays are hybridized to Indigo ISC9803 readout integrated circuits (ROICs). Two varieties of QWIP detector arrays are being developed for this project, a corrugated surface structure QWIP and a grating surface structure QWIP. This paper will describe the TIRS system noise equivalent temperature difference sensitivity as it affects the QWIP focal plane performance requirements: spectral response, dark current, conversion efficiency, read noise, temperature stability, pixel uniformity, optical crosstalk and pixel yield. Additional mechanical constraints as well as qualification through Technology Readiness Level 6 (TRL 6) will also be discussed.

  1. Rapid acquisition of high-volume microscopic images using predicted focal plane.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingjie; Wang, Rongwu; Zhou, Jinfeng; Xu, Bugao

    2016-09-01

    For an automated microscopic imaging system, the image acquisition speed is one of the most critical performance features because many applications require to analyse high-volume images. This paper illustrates a novel approach for rapid acquisition of high-volume microscopic images used to count blood cells automatically. This approach firstly forms a panoramic image of the sample slide by stitching sequential images captured at a low magnification, selects a few basic points (x, y) indicating the target areas from the panoramic image, and then refocuses the slide at each of the basic points at the regular magnification to record the depth position (z). The focusing coordinates (x, y, z) at these basic points are used to calculate a predicted focal plane that defines the relationship between the focus position (z) and the stage position (x, y). Via the predicted focal plane, the system can directly focus the objective lens at any local view, and can tremendously save image-acquisition time by avoiding the autofocusing function. The experiments showed how to determine the optimal number of the basic points at a given imaging condition, and proved that there is no significant difference between the images captured using the autofocusing function or the predicted focal plane. PMID:27229441

  2. Focal plane actuation for the development of a high resolution suborbital telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke Miller, Alex; Scowen, Paul A.; Veach, Todd

    2016-01-01

    We present a hexapod stabilized focal plane as the key instrument for a proposed suborbital balloon mission. Balloon gondolas currently achieve 1-2 arcsecond pointing error, but cannot correct for unavoidable jitter movements (~50μm at 20hz) caused by wind rushing over balloon surfaces, thermal variations, cryocoolers, and reaction wheels. The jitter causes image blur during exposures and is the limiting resolution of the system. To solve this, the hexapod system actuates the focal plane to counteract the jitter through real-time closed loop feedback from star-trackers. Removal of this final jitter term decreases pointing error by an order of magnitude and allows for true diffraction-limited observation. This boost in resolution will allow for Hubble-quality imaging for a fraction of the cost. Tip-tilt pointing systems have been used for these purposes in the past, but require additional optics and introduce multiple reflections. The hexapod system, rather, is compact and can be plugged into the focal point of nearly any configuration. The design also thermally isolates the hexapod from the cryogenic focal plane enabling the use of well-established non-cryogenic hexapod technology. High-resolution time domain multispectral imaging of the gas giant outer planets, especially in the UV range, is of particular interest to the planetary community, and a suborbital telescope with the hexapod stabilization in place would provide a wealth of new data. On an Antarctic ~100-day Long-Duration-Balloon mission the continued high-resolution imaging of gas giant storm systems would provide cloud formation and evolution data second to only a Flagship orbiter.

  3. Automated optical testing of LWIR objective lenses using focal plane array sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winters, Daniel; Erichsen, Patrik; Domagalski, Christian; Peter, Frank; Heinisch, Josef; Dumitrescu, Eugen

    2012-10-01

    The image quality of today's state-of-the-art IR objective lenses is constantly improving while at the same time the market for thermography and vision grows strongly. Because of increasing demands on the quality of IR optics and increasing production volumes, the standards for image quality testing increase and tests need to be performed in shorter time. Most high-precision MTF testing equipment for the IR spectral bands in use today relies on the scanning slit method that scans a 1D detector over a pattern in the image generated by the lens under test, followed by image analysis to extract performance parameters. The disadvantages of this approach are that it is relatively slow, it requires highly trained operators for aligning the sample and the number of parameters that can be extracted is limited. In this paper we present lessons learned from the R and D process on using focal plane array (FPA) sensors for testing of long-wave IR (LWIR, 8-12 m) optics. Factors that need to be taken into account when switching from scanning slit to FPAs are e.g.: the thermal background from the environment, the low scene contrast in the LWIR, the need for advanced image processing algorithms to pre-process camera images for analysis and camera artifacts. Finally, we discuss 2 measurement systems for LWIR lens characterization that we recently developed with different target applications: 1) A fully automated system suitable for production testing and metrology that uses uncooled microbolometer cameras to automatically measure MTF (on-axis and at several o-axis positions) and parameters like EFL, FFL, autofocus curves, image plane tilt, etc. for LWIR objectives with an EFL between 1 and 12mm. The measurement cycle time for one sample is typically between 6 and 8s. 2) A high-precision research-grade system using again an uncooled LWIR camera as detector, that is very simple to align and operate. A wide range of lens parameters (MTF, EFL, astigmatism, distortion, etc.) can be

  4. Hemispherical infrared focal plane arrays: a new design parameter for the instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendler, M.; Dumas, D.; Chemla, F.; Cohen, M.; Laporte, P.; Tekaya, K.; Le Coarer, E.; Primot, J.; Ribot, H.

    2012-07-01

    In ground based astronomy, mainly all designs of sky survey telescopes are limited by the requirement that the detecting surface is flat whereas the focal surface is curved. Two kinds of solution have been investigated up to now. The first one consists in adding optical systems to flatten the image surface; however this solution complicates the design and increases the system size. Somehow, this solution increases, in the same time, the weight and price of the instrument. The second solution consists in curving artificially the focal surface by using a mosaic of several detectors, which are positioned in a spherical shape. However, this attempt is dedicated to low curvature and is limited by the technical difficulty to control the detectors alignment and tilt between each others. Today we would like to propose an ideal solution which is to curve the focal plane array in a spherical shape, thanks to our monolithic process developed at CEA-LETI based on thinned silicon substrates which allows a 100% optical fill factor. Two infrared uncooled cameras have been performed, using 320 x 256 pixels and 25 μm pitch micro-bolometer arrays curved at a bending radius of 80 mm. These two micro-cameras illustrate the optical system simplification and miniaturization involved by curved focal plane arrays. Moreover, the advantages of curved detectors on the optical performances (Point Spreading Function), as well as on volume and cost savings have been highlighted by the simulation of the opto-mechanical architecture of the spectrometer OptiMOS-EVE for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT).

  5. Two-dimensional tracking of ncd motility by back focal plane interferometry.

    PubMed Central

    Allersma, M W; Gittes, F; deCastro, M J; Stewart, R J; Schmidt, C F

    1998-01-01

    A technique for detecting the displacement of micron-sized optically trapped probes using far-field interference is introduced, theoretically explained, and used to study the motility of the ncd motor protein. Bead motions in the focal plane relative to the optical trap were detected by measuring laser intensity shifts in the back-focal plane of the microscope condenser by projection on a quadrant diode. This detection method is two-dimensional, largely independent of the position of the trap in the field of view and has approximately 10-micros time resolution. The high resolution makes it possible to apply spectral analysis to measure dynamic parameters such as local viscosity and attachment compliance. A simple quantitative theory for back-focal-plane detection was derived that shows that the laser intensity shifts are caused primarily by a far-field interference effect. The theory predicts the detector response to bead displacement, without adjustable parameters, with good accuracy. To demonstrate the potential of the method, the ATP-dependent motility of ncd, a kinesin-related motor protein, was observed with an in vitro bead assay. A fusion protein consisting of truncated ncd (amino acids 195-685) fused with glutathione-S-transferase was adsorbed to silica beads, and the axial and lateral motions of the beads along the microtubule surface were observed with high spatial and temporal resolution. The average axial velocity of the ncd-coated beads was 230 +/- 30 nm/s (average +/- SD). Spectral analysis of bead motion showed the increase in viscous drag near the surface; we also found that any elastic constraints of the moving motors are much smaller than the constraints due to binding in the presence of the nonhydrolyzable nucleotide adenylylimidodiphosphate. PMID:9533719

  6. A 260 megapixel visible/NIR mixed technology focal plane for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besuner, Robert W.; Bebek, Christopher J.; Haller, Gunther M.; Harris, Stewart E.; Hart, Philip A.; Heetderks, Henry D.; Jelinsky, Patrick N.; Lampton, Michael L.; Levi, Michael E.; Maldonado, Sergio E.; Roe, Natalie A.; Roodman, Aaron J.; Sapozhnikov, Leonid

    2011-10-01

    Mission concepts for NASA's Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST)1,2, ESA's Euclid3,4 mission, as well as next-generation ground-based surveys require large mosaic focal planes sensitive in both visible and near infrared (NIR) wavelengths. We have developed space-qualified detectors, readout electronics and focal plane design techniques that can be used to intermingle CCDs and NIR detectors on a single, silicon carbide (SiC) cold plate. This enables optimized, wideband observing strategies. The CCDs, developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, are fully-depleted, pchannel devices that are backside illuminated and capable of operating at temperatures down to 120K. The NIR detectors are 1.7 μm and 2.0 μm wavelength cutoff H2RG® HgCdTe, manufactured by Teledyne Imaging Sensors under contract to LBNL. Both the CCDs and NIR detectors are packaged on 4-side abuttable SiC pedestals with a common mounting footprint supporting a 44 mm mosaic pitch. Both types of detectors have direct-attached readout electronics that convert the detector signal directly to serial, digital data streams and allow a flexible, low cost data acquisition strategy to enable large data rates. A mosaic of these detectors can be operated at a common temperature that achieves the required dark current and read noise performance necessary for dark energy observations. We report here the qualification testing and performance verification for a focal plane that accommodates a 4x8 array of CCDs and HgCdTe detectors.

  7. Advanced simulation methods to detect resonant frequency stack up in focal plane design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Craig; Malone, Neil R.; Torres, Raymond; Fajardo, Armando; Vampola, John; Drechsler, William; Parlato, Russell; Cobb, Christopher; Randolph, Max; Chiourn, Surath; Swinehart, Robert

    2014-09-01

    Wire used to connect focal plane electrical connections to external electrical circuitry can be modeled using the length, diameter and loop height to determine the resonant frequency. The design of the adjacent electric board and mounting platform can also be analyzed. The combined resonant frequency analysis can then be used to decouple the different component resonant frequencies to eliminate the potential for metal fatigue in the wires. It is important to note that the nominal maximum stress values that cause metal fatigue can be much less than the ultimate tensile stress limit or the yield stress limit and are degraded further at resonant frequencies. It is critical that tests be done to qualify designs that are not easily simulated due to material property variation and complex structures. Sine wave vibration testing is a critical component of qualification vibration and provides the highest accuracy in determining the resonant frequencies which can be reduced or uncorrelated improving the structural performance of the focal plane assembly by small changes in design damping or modern space material selection. Vibration flow down from higher levels of assembly needs consideration for intermediary hardware, which may amplify or attenuate the full up system vibration profile. A simple pass through of vibration requirements may result in over test or missing amplified resonant frequencies that can cause system failure. Examples are shown of metal wire fatigue such as discoloration and microscopic cracks which are visible at the submicron level by the use of a scanning electron microscope. While it is important to model and test resonant frequencies the Focal plane must also be constrained such that Coefficient of Thermal expansion mismatches are allowed to move and not overstress the FPA.

  8. Review of Concepts and Applications for Multispectral/Hyperspectral Focal Plane Array (FPA) Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdoo, James A.

    2001-01-01

    Multispectral, and ultimately hyperspectral, focal plane arrays (FPAs) represent the logical extension of two-color FPA technology, which has already shown its utility in military applications. Incorporating the spectral discrimination function directly in the FPA would offer the potential for orders-of-magnitude increase in remote sensor system performance. It would allow reduction or even elimination of optical components currently required to provide spectral discrimination in atmospheric remote sensors. The result would be smaller, simpler instruments with higher performance than exist today.

  9. Ballistic imaging of biological media with collimated illumination and focal plane detection.

    PubMed

    Brezner, Barak; Cahen, Sarah; Glasser, Ziv; Sternklar, Shmuel; Granot, Er'el

    2015-07-01

    A simple, affordable method for imaging through biological tissue is investigated. The method consists of (1) imaging with a wavelength that has a relatively small scattering coefficient (1310 nm in this case) and (2) collimated illumination together with (3) focal plane detection to enhance the detection of the ballistic photons relative to the diffusive light. We demonstrate ballistic detection of an object immersed in a 1-cm-thick cuvette filled with 4% Intralipid, which is equivalent to ∼1 to 2 cm of skin tissue. With the same technology, a ballistic image of a 1-mm-wide object in 10-mm-thick chicken breast is also presented. PMID:26172614

  10. Focal-plane optimization for detector noise limited performance in cryogenic Fourier transform spectrometer /FTS/ sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguirk, M.; Logan, L.

    1980-01-01

    A study was performed to determine the optimum focal plane configuration including optics, filters and detector-preamplifier selection. The configuration was optimized particularly with respect to minimizing the noise level, but fabrication considerations for a cryogenic environment were also taken into account. The noise terms from source, background, detector electronics and charged particle radiation were quantitatively evaluated. It appears that noise equivalent spectral radiance less than 10 to the -11th W/sq cm per sr per kayser can be achieved between 2.5 and 20 microns.

  11. Accounting for uncertainty in location when detecting point sources using infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, J. M.; Waterman, J. R.

    2016-07-01

    This work derives the modeling and detection theory required to predict the performance of an infrared focal plane array in detecting point source targets. Specifically, we focus on modeling the uncertainty associated with the location of the point source on the array. In the process we derive several new expressions related to pixel-averaged detection performance under a variety of problem assumptions. The resulting predictions are compared to standard approaches where the location is assumed fixed and known. It is further shown how to incorporate these predictions into multi-frame detection strategies.

  12. Upgrade of the TAMU MDM-focal plane detector with MicroMegas technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiridon, A.; Pollacco, E.; Roeder, B. T.; Saastamoinen, A.; Chyzh, R.; Dag, M.; Tribble, R. E.; Trache, L.; Pascovici, G.; De Oliveira, R.

    2016-06-01

    A gridded ionization chamber used as a focal plane detector at the back of the TAMU-MDM spectrometer was modified to use MicroMegas technology for the purpose of improving energy resolution and particle identification. The upgraded system was tested in experimental conditions with several heavy-ion beams at 12 MeV/u and found to achieve resolutions between 3.2% and 4.8%. This is a significant improvement over the previous performance of 10-15% obtained using the existing, conventional ionization chambers.

  13. Self-correction of telescope surface errors using a correlating focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwell, T. J.; Napier, P. J.

    The effects on the performance of a large radio telescope of aberrations such as reflector surface errors, defocussing, coma and pointing errors can be removed if the telesocpe is equipped with an array feed in its focal plane. If the cross correlations between all possible pairs of array elements are measured, then aberration-free images of radio sources can be obtained. Because of the great cost of building very precise large structures in space, in the future this concept may offer the possibility of a more economical design for a large, high frequency, space-born radio telescope.

  14. The Focal Plane Crystal Spectrometer for the HEAO-B satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaghy, J. F.; Canizares, C. R.

    1978-01-01

    The very low flux from even the brightest (non-solar) X-ray source has discouraged the use of instruments with high spectral resolution because of their inevitably low sensitivity. Mission B of the High Energy Astronomy Observatory will provide the first opportunity for moderate and high resolution spectral studies of celestial X-ray sources with high sensitivity. The Focal Plane Crystal Spectrometer (FPCS) described here is the instrument with the highest spectral resolution. It is designed to allow detailed spectral studies of both point and extended celestial sources in the energy range 0.2-3.3 keV with resolutions of 50 to 1000.

  15. Ballistic imaging of biological media with collimated illumination and focal plane detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brezner, Barak; Cahen, Sarah; Glasser, Ziv; Sternklar, Shmuel; Granot, Er'el

    2015-07-01

    A simple, affordable method for imaging through biological tissue is investigated. The method consists of (1) imaging with a wavelength that has a relatively small scattering coefficient (1310 nm in this case) and (2) collimated illumination together with (3) focal plane detection to enhance the detection of the ballistic photons relative to the diffusive light. We demonstrate ballistic detection of an object immersed in a 1-cm-thick cuvette filled with 4% Intralipid, which is equivalent to ˜1 to 2 cm of skin tissue. With the same technology, a ballistic image of a 1-mm-wide object in 10-mm-thick chicken breast is also presented.

  16. Three-Dimensional Integration Technology for Advanced Focal Planes and Integrated Circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Keast, Craig

    2007-02-28

    Over the last five years MIT Lincoln Laboratory (MIT-LL) has developed a three-dimensional (3D) circuit integration technology that exploits the advantages of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology to enable wafer-level stacking and micrometer-scale electrical interconnection of fully fabricated circuit wafers. Advanced focal plane arrays have been the first applications to exploit the benefits of this 3D integration technology because the massively parallel information flow present in 2D imaging arrays maps very nicely into a 3D computational structure as information flows from circuit-tier to circuit-tier in the z-direction. To date, the MIT-LL 3D integration technology has been used to fabricate four different focal planes including: a 2-tier 64 x 64 imager with fully parallel per-pixel A/D conversion; a 3-tier 640 x 480 imager consisting of an imaging tier, an A/D conversion tier, and a digital signal processing tier; a 2-tier 1024 x 1024 pixel, 4-side-abutable imaging modules for tiling large mosaic focal planes, and a 3-tier Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (APD) 3-D LIDAR array, using a 30 volt APD tier, a 3.3 volt CMOS tier, and a 1.5 volt CMOS tier. Recently, the 3D integration technology has been made available to the circuit design research community through DARPA-sponsored Multiproject fabrication runs. The first Multiproject Run (3DL1) completed fabrication in early 2006 and included over 30 different circuit designs from 21 different research groups. 3D circuit concepts explored in this run included stacked memories, field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), and mixed-signal circuits. The second Multiproject Run (3DM2) is currently in fabrication and includes particle detector readouts designed by Fermilab. This talk will provide a brief overview of MIT-LL's 3D-integration process, discuss some of the focal plane applications where the technology is being applied, and provide a summary of some of the Multiproject Run circuit results.

  17. Mercury cadmium telluride short- and medium-wavelength infrared staring focal plane arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vural, Kadri

    1987-01-01

    Short and medium IR wavelength 64 x 64 hybrid focal plane arrays (FPAs) have been developed using sapphire-grown HgCdTe. The short wavelength arrays were developed for a prototype airborne imaging spectrometer, while those of medium wavelength are suitable for tactical missile seekers and strategic surveillance systems. Attention is presently given to results obtained for these FPAs' current-voltage characteristics, as well as for their characterization at different temperatures. The detector arrays were also mated to a multiplexer and characterized under different operating conditions. The unit cell size used is 52 x 52 microns.

  18. Quantum Well and Quantum Dot Modeling for Advanced Infrared Detectors and Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David; Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Hill, C. J.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the modeling of Quantum Well Infrared Detectors (QWIP) and Quantum Dot Infrared Detectors (QDIP) in the development of Focal Plane Arrays (FPA). The QWIP Detector being developed is a dual band detector. It is capable of running on two bands Long-Wave Infrared (LWIR) and Medium Wavelength Infrared (MWIR). The same large-format dual-band FPA technology can be applied to Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetector (QDIP) with no modification, once QDIP exceeds QWIP in single device performance. Details of the devices are reviewed.

  19. NbN A/D Conversion of IR Focal Plane Sensor Signal at 10 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, L.; Durand, D.; Sandell, R.; Spargo, J.; Krabach, T.

    1994-01-01

    We are implementing a 12 bit SFQ counting ADC with parallel-to-serial readout using our established 10 K NbN capability. This circuit provides a key element of the analog signal processor (ASP) used in large infrared focal plane arrays. The circuit processes the signal data stream from a Si:As BIB detector array. A 10 mega samples per second (MSPS) pixel data stream flows from the chip at a 120 megabit bit rate in a format that is compatible with other superconductive time dependent processor (TDP) circuits being developed. We will discuss our planned ASP demonstration, the circuit design, and test results.

  20. Advanced III/V quantum-structure devices for high performance infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehm, Robert; Walther, Martin; Schmitz, Johannes; Rutz, Frank; Fleissner, Joachim; Scheibner, Ralf; Ziegler, Johann

    2009-09-01

    A mature production technology for Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP) focal plane arrays (FPAs) and InAs/GaSb superlattice (SL) FPAs has been developed. Dual-band and dual-color QWIP- and SL-imagers are demonstrated for the 3-5 μm and 8-12 μm atmospheric windows in the infrared. The simultaneous, co-located detection of both spectral channels resolves the temporal and spatial registration problems common to existing bispectral IRimagers. The ability for a reliable remote detection of hot CO2 signatures makes tailored dual-color superlattice imagers ideally suited for missile warning systems for airborne platforms.

  1. Optimization of indium bump preparation in infrared focal plane array fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zhijin; Si, Junjie; Wang, Wei; Wang, Haizhen; Wang, Liwen

    2014-11-01

    Optimization of indium bump preparation in infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) fabrication is presented. Reasons of bringing defective pixels during conventional lift-off and cleanout process in fabrication of indium bump are discussed. IRFPAs are characterized by IRFPA test-bench. Results show that defective pixels of InSb IRFPA are owing to indium bumps connecting through indium residue on the surface of wafer. The characteristic and configuration of defective pixels of InSb IRFPA are given and analyzed. A method of reducing defective pixels through optimizing liftoff and cleanout process in InSb IRFPA is proposed. Results prove that this method is effective.

  2. Mid-wave infrared metasurface microlensed focal plane array for optical crosstalk suppression.

    PubMed

    Akın, Onur; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2015-10-19

    Spatial crosstalk is one of the fundamental drawbacks of diminishing pixel size in mid-wave infrared focal plane arrays (IR-FPAs). We proposed an IR-FPA using the concept of optical phase discontinuities for substantial optical crosstalk suppression. This IR-FPA consists of asymmetrically tailored V-shaped optical antennas. Full-wave simulations confirmed major improvements in narrowing the intensity distribution of incident light beam by over 30-folds and concentrating these distributions in the central pixel of IR-FPA by achieving optical crosstalks of <1%. PMID:26480363

  3. 3D numerical model for a focal plane view in case of mosaic grating compressor for high energy CPA chain.

    PubMed

    Montant, S; Marre, G; Blanchot, N; Rouyer, C; Videau, L; Sauteret, C

    2006-12-11

    An important issue, mosaic grating compressor, is studied to recompress pulses for multiPetawatt, high energy laser systems. Alignment of the mosaic elements is crucial to control the focal spot and thus the intensity on target. No theoretical approach analyses the influence of compressor misalignment on spatial and temporal profiles in the focal plane. We describe a simple 3D numerical model giving access to the focal plane view after a compressor. This model is computationally inexpensive since it needs only 1D Fourier transforms to access to the temporal profile. We present simulations of monolithic and mosaic grating compressors. PMID:19529688

  4. Ion Transmission to the Focal Plane of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolodziejczak, J. J.; Elsner, R. F.; Austin, R. A.; ODell, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    The severe degradation in spectrometric performance observed by the AXAF CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) instrument on-board the Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) was associated with a sharp increase in charge transfer inefficiency combined with relatively constant dark current. It was also observed that damage occurred only during passage through the earth's radiation belts, and only when ACIS remained in the focal plane during the passage. Subsequent measurements and analyses support the conjecture that the damaging radiation entered through the Observatory's High-Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) aperture. A mechanism whereby low energy magnetospheric protons and/or heavier ions are scattered through the HRMA and reach the focal plane with just enough energy to stop in the CCD's charge transfer region currently provides a reasonably consistent explanation of all observed phenomena. In this paper, we will describe analyses which support this conclusion. Simulations using standard ion transmission codes were used to generate a bi-directional response function (BDRF) for the mirror surfaces and transmission through the various path elements. The BDRF was convolved with the geometry via ray-trace. Damage estimates using measured proton fluence and ground measurements of ACIS- type CCD damage vs. proton energy will be presented and compared with observed on- orbit damage.

  5. Removing defocused objects from single focal plane scans of cytological slides

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, David; Böcking, Alfred; Meyer-Ebrecht, Dietrich; Merhof, Dorit

    2016-01-01

    Background: Virtual microscopy and automated processing of cytological slides are more challenging compared to histological slides. Since cytological slides exhibit a three-dimensional surface and the required microscope objectives with high resolution have a low depth of field, these cannot capture all objects of a single field of view in focus. One solution would be to scan multiple focal planes; however, the increase in processing time and storage requirements are often prohibitive for clinical routine. Materials and Methods: In this paper, we show that it is a reasonable trade-off to scan a single focal plane and automatically reject defocused objects from the analysis. To this end, we have developed machine learning solutions for the automated identification of defocused objects. Our approach includes creating novel features, systematically optimizing their parameters, selecting adequate classifier algorithms, and identifying the correct decision boundary between focused and defocused objects. We validated our approach for computer-assisted DNA image cytometry. Results and Conclusions: We reach an overall sensitivity of 96.08% and a specificity of 99.63% for identifying defocused objects. Applied on ninety cytological slides, the developed classifiers automatically removed 2.50% of the objects acquired during scanning, which otherwise would have interfered the examination. Even if not all objects are acquired in focus, computer-assisted DNA image cytometry still identified more diagnostically or prognostically relevant objects compared to manual DNA image cytometry. At the same time, the workload for the expert is reduced dramatically. PMID:27217971

  6. Calibration method for division of focal plane polarimeters in the optical and near-infrared regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    York, Timothy; Gruev, Viktor

    2011-06-01

    Advances in nanofabrication allow for the creation of metallic nanowires acting as linear polarizers in the visible and near infrared regime. The monolithic integration of silicon detectors and pixelated nanowire metallic polarization filters allows for an efficient realization of high resolution polarization imaging sensors. These silicon sensors, known as division of focal plane polarimeters, capture polarization information of the imaged environment from ~400nm to 1050nm wavelength. The performance of the polarization sensor can be degraded by both irregularities in the fabrication of the nanowires and possible misalignment errors during the final deposition of the optical nanowire filters on the surface of the imaging sensor. In addition, electronic offsets due to the readout circuitry, electronic crosstalk, and optical crosstalk will also negatively affect the quality of the polarization information. Partial compensation for many of these post-fabrication errors can be accomplished through the use of a camera calibration routine. This paper will describe one such routine, and show how its application can increase the quality of measurements in both the degree of linear polarization and angle of polarization in the visible spectrum. The imaging array of the division of focal plane polarimeter is segmented into two by two blocks of superpixels. The calibration method chooses one of the four pixels as a reference, and then a gain and offset for each of the remaining three is computed based on this reference. The output is a calibration matrix for each pixel in the image array.

  7. Development of uncooled focal plane detector arrays for smart IR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddiard, Kevin C.; Reinhold, Olaf; Ringh, Ulf; Jansson, Christer

    1997-11-01

    This paper reports on the development of silicon microbolometer uncooled IR focal plane detector arrays at the Defence Science and Technology Organization (DSTO), in collaboration with the National Defence Research Establishment (FOA). The detector arrays were designed by Electro-optic Sensor Design, which also provided specialist scientific advice on array fabrication. Detector arrays are prepared by monolithic processing at DSTO, using surface micromachining to achieve thermal isolation, and are integrated on-chip with a CMOS signal conditioning and readout microcircuit designed by FOA. The CMOS circuit incorporates 16-bit analog-to-digital conversion, and is described in more detail in an accompanying paper presented. The ultimate objective is to develop 'smart' focal plane arrays which have on-chip signal processing functions, giving a capability for decision making such as automatic target detection. The silicon microbolometer technology described in the paper was invented at DSTO, and is representative of core technology employed in many initiatives world-wide. A brief overview will be given of theoretical considerations which influence detector array design, followed by an outline of recent developments in array processing.

  8. Beam control for LINC-NIRVANA: from the binocular entrance pupil to the combined focal plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, T.; Trowitzsch, J.; Herbst, T. M.; Ragazzoni, R.

    2012-07-01

    LINC-NIRVANA is the near-infrared interferometric imaging camera for the Large Binocular Telescope. Once operational, it will provide an unprecedented combination of angular resolution, sensitivity and field of view. To meet the tight requirements that result from long exposure interferometric imaging over a large field of view, active control beyond fringe tracking and adaptive optics has to be in place in the telescope and in the instrument domain. The incoming beams of the binocular telescope have to be controlled along the entire optical path, from the entrance pupil to the combined focal plane. The beams have to coincide in the focal plane of the science detector, their pointing origins, offsets, orientations, plate scales, and distortions have to match each other and must not change during the observation. Non-common path effects between AO and science channel, flexure and thermal effects have to be compensated and offioading requests from the adaptive optics and fringe tracking systems have to be arbitrated without introducing unwanted optical path length differences or changes in the geometry of the binocular entrance pupil. Beam Control aspects include pointing, co-pointing and field derotation, active optics and collimation control. In this presentation, the constraints for coherent imaging over a 1.5 arcminute field of view are discussed together with a concept for a distributed control scheme.

  9. Closed-loop focal plane wavefront control with the SCExAO instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinache, Frantz; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Guyon, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Aims: This article describes the implementation of a focal plane based wavefront control loop on the high-contrast imaging instrument SCExAO (Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics). The sensor relies on the Fourier analysis of conventional focal-plane images acquired after an asymmetric mask is introduced in the pupil of the instrument. Methods: This absolute sensor is used here in a closed-loop to compensate for the non-common path errors that normally affects any imaging system relying on an upstream adaptive optics system.This specific implementation was used to control low-order modes corresponding to eight zernike modes (from focus to spherical). Results: This loop was successfully run on-sky at the Subaru Telescope and is used to offset the SCExAO deformable mirror shape used as a zero-point by the high-order wavefront sensor. The paper details the range of errors this wavefront-sensing approach can operate within and explores the impact of saturation of the data and how it can be bypassed, at a cost in performance. Conclusions: Beyond this application, because of its low hardware impact, the asymmetric pupil Fourier wavefront sensor (APF-WFS) can easily be ported in a wide variety of wavefront sensing contexts, for ground- as well space-borne telescopes, and for telescope pupils that can be continuous, segmented or even sparse. The technique is powerful because it measures the wavefront where it really matters, at the level of the science detector.

  10. Terahertz 3D printed diffractive lens matrices for field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays.

    PubMed

    Szkudlarek, Krzesimir; Sypek, Maciej; Cywiński, Grzegorz; Suszek, Jarosław; Zagrajek, Przemysław; Feduniewicz-Żmuda, Anna; Yahniuk, Ivan; Yatsunenko, Sergey; Nowakowska-Siwińska, Anna; Coquillat, Dominique; But, Dmytro B; Rachoń, Martyna; Węgrzyńska, Karolina; Skierbiszewski, Czesław; Knap, Wojciech

    2016-09-01

    We present the concept, the fabrication processes and the experimental results for materials and optics that can be used for terahertz field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays. More specifically, we propose 3D printed arrays of a new type - diffractive multi-zone lenses of which the performance is superior to that of previously used mono-zone diffractive or refractive elements and evaluate them with GaN/AlGaN field-effect transistor terahertz detectors. Experiments performed in the 300-GHz atmospheric window show that the lens arrays offer both a good efficiency and good uniformity, and may improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the terahertz field-effect transistor detectors by more than one order of magnitude. In practice, we tested 3 × 12 lens linear arrays with printed circuit board THz detector arrays used in postal security scanners and observed significant signal-to-noise improvements. Our results clearly show that the proposed technology provides a way to produce cost-effective, reproducible, flat optics for large-size field-effect transistor THz-detector focal plane arrays. PMID:27607620

  11. Solid-state image sensor with focal-plane digital photon-counting pixel array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A photosensitive layer such as a-Si for a UV/visible wavelength band is provided for low light level imaging with at least a separate CMOS amplifier directly connected to each PIN photodetector diode to provide a focal-plane array of NxN pixels, and preferably a separate photon-counting CMOS circuit directly connected to each CMOS amplifier, although one row of counters may be time shared for reading out the photon flux rate of each diode in the array, together with a buffer memory for storing all rows of the NxN image frame before transfer to suitable storage. All CMOS circuitry is preferably fabricated in the same silicon layer as the PIN photodetector diode for a monolithic structure, but when the wavelength band of interest requires photosensitive material different from silicon, the focal-plane array may be fabricated separately on a different semiconductor layer bump-bonded or otherwise bonded for a virtually monolithic structure with one free terminal of each diode directly connected to the input terminal of its CMOS amplifier and digital counter for integration of the photon flux rate at each photodetector of the array.

  12. Thin active region, type II superlattice photodiode arrays: Single-pixel and focal plane array characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, J. W.; Svensson, S. P.; Beck, W. A.; Goldberg, A. C.; Kennerly, S. W.; Hongsmatip, T.; Winn, M.; Uppal, P.

    2007-02-01

    We have measured the radiometric properties of two midwave infrared photodiode arrays (320×256pixel2 format) fabricated from the same wafer comprising a thin (0.24μm), not intentionally doped InAs /GaSb superlattice between a p-doped GaSb layer and a n-doped InAs layer. One of the arrays was indium bump bonded to a silicon fanout chip to allow for the measurement of properties of individual pixels, and one was bonded to a readout integrated circuit to enable array-scale measurements and infrared imaging. The superlattice layer is thin enough that it is fully depleted at zero bias, and the collection efficiency of photogenerated carriers in the intrinsic region is close to unity. This simplifies the interpretation of photocurrent data as compared with previous measurements made on thick superlattices with complex doping profiles. Superlattice absorption coefficient curves, obtained from measurements of the external quantum efficiency using two different assumptions for optical coupling into the chip, bracket values calculated using an eight-band k •p model. Measurements of the quantum efficiency map of the focal plane array were in good agreement with the single-pixel measurements. Imagery obtained with this focal plane array demonstrates the high uniformity and crystal quality of the type II superlattice material.

  13. Infrared focal plane arrays based on dots in a well and strained layer superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we will review some of the recent progress that we have made on developing single pixel detectors and focal plane arrays based on dots-in-a-well (DWELL) heterostructure and Type II strained layer superlattice (SLS). The DWELL detector consists of an active region composed of InAs quantum dots embedded in InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells. By varying the thickness of the InGaAs well, the DWELL heterostructure allows for the manipulation of the operating wavelength and the nature of the transitions (bound-to-bound, bound-to-quasibound and bound-to-continuum) of the detector. Based on these principles, DWELL samples were grown using molecular beam epitaxy and fabricated into 320 x 256 focal plane arrays (FPAs) with Indium bumps using standard lithography at the University of New Mexico. The FPA evaluated was hybridized to an Indigo 9705 readout integrated circuit (ROIC). From this evaluation, we have reported the first two-color, co-located quantum dot based imaging system that can be used to take multicolor images using a single FPA. We have also been investigating the use of miniband transitions in Type II SLS to develop infrared detectors using PIN and nBn based designs.

  14. 256 x 256 hybrid HgCdTe infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Robert B.; Kozlowski, Lester J.; Chen, Jenkon; Bui, Duc Q.; Vural, Kadri

    1991-05-01

    Hybrid HgCdTe 256 x 256 focal plane arrays have been developed to meet the sensitivity, resolution, and field-of-view requirements of high-performance medium-wavelength infrared (MWIR) imaging systems. The detector arrays for these hybrids are fabricated on substrates that reduce or eliminate the thermal expansion mismatch to the silicon readout circuit. The readouts are foundry-processed CMOS switched-FET circuits that have charge capacities greater than 107 electrons and a single video output capable of 10-MHz data rates. The high quantum efficiency, tunable absorption wavelength, and broad operating temperature range of these large HgCdTe staring focal plane arrays give them significant advantages over competing sensors. The mature Producible Alternative to CdTe for Epitaxy-1 (PACE-1) technology, using sapphire detector substrates, has demonstrated 256 x 256 MWIR arrays with mean laboratory noise equivalent temperature difference (NETO) of 9 mK for a 4.9-micron cutoff wavelength, 40-micron pixel size, and 80-K operating temperature. RMS detector response nonuniformities are less than 4 percent, and pixel yields are greater than 99 percent. The newly developed PACE-3 process uses silicon for the detector substrate to eliminate completely the thermal mismatch with the silicon readout circuit. It has the potential for similar performance in even larger array sizes. A 640 x 480 hybrid array is under development.

  15. Producibility of Vertically Integrated Photodiode (VIP)tm scanning focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Arthur M.; Teherani, Towfik; Ehmke, John C.; Pettitt, Cindy; Conlon, Peggy; Beck, Jeffrey D.; McCormack, Kent; Colombo, Luigi; Lahutsky, Tom; Murphy, Terry; Williams, Robert L.

    1994-07-01

    Vertically integrated photodiode, VIPTM, technology is now being used to produce second generation infrared focal plane arrays with high yields and performance. The VIPTM process employs planar, ion implanted, n on p diodes in HgCdTe which is epoxy hybridized directly to the read out integrated circuits on 100 mm Si wafers. The process parameters that are critical for high performance and yield include: HgCdTe dislocation density and thickness, backside passivation, frontside passivation, and junction formation. Producibility of infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPAs) is also significantly enhanced by read out integrated circuits (ROICs) which have the ability to deselect defective pixels. Cold probe screening before lab dewar assembly reduces costs and improves cycle times. The 240 X 1 and 240 X 2 scanning array formats are used to demonstrate the effect of process optimization, deselect, and cold probe screening on yield and cycle time. The versatility of the VIPTM technology and its extension to large area arrays is demonstrated using 240/288 X 4 and 480 X 5 TDI formats. Finally, the high performance of VIPTM IRFPAs is demonstrated by comparing data from a 480 X 5 to the SADA-II specification.

  16. A balanced, phase sensitive back-focal plane interferometry technique to determine dynamics of a trapped bead in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Basudev; Pal, Sambit Bikas; Haldar, Arijit; Gupta, Ratnesh Kumar; Ghosh, Nirmalya; Banerjee, Ayan

    2012-04-01

    Back-focal plane interferometry is typically used to determine displacements of a trapped bead which lead to trapping force measurements in optical tweezers. In most cases, intensity shifts of the back-scattered interference pattern due to displacements of the bead are measured by a position sensitive detector placed in the microscope back-focal plane. However, in intensity-based measurements, the axial displacement resolution is typically worse than the lateral resolution since for axial displacements, the inherent resolution of the position detector cannot be used. In this paper, we demonstrate that measurement of the phase of the back-scattered light yields high axial displacement resolution, and can also be used for lateral displacement measurement. In our experiments, we separate out the back-scattered light from the trapped bead and reflected light from the top surface of the sample chamber by a confocal arrangement consisting of a spatial filter used in combination with two apertures. We proceed to beat the two separated components in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer where we employ balanced detection to improve our fringe contrast, and thus the sensitivity of the phase measurement. For lateral displacement sensing, we match experimental results to within 10% with a theoretical simulation determining the shift of the overall phase contour of the back-scattered light due to a given lateral displacement by using plane wave decomposition in conjunction with Mie scattering theory. Our technique is also able to track the Brownian motion of trapped beads from the phase jitter so that, similar to intensity-based measurements, we can use it to determine the spring constant of the trap, and thus the trapping force. The sensitivity of our technique is limited by path drifts of the external interferometer which we have currently stabilized by locking it to a frequency stabilized diode laser to obtain displacement measurement resolution ~200 pm.

  17. Dual-band technology on indium gallium arsenide focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Peter; Hess, Cory D.; Li, Chuan; Ettenberg, Martin; Trezza, John

    2011-06-01

    While InGaAs-based SWIR imaging technology has been improved dramatically over the past 10 years, the motivation remains to reduce Size Weight and Power (SWaP) for applications in Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR). Goodrich ISR Systems, Princeton (Sensors Unlimited, Inc.) has continued to improve detector sensitivity. Additionally, SUI is working jointly with DRS-RSTA to develop innovative techniques for manufacturing dual-band focal planes to provide next generation technology for not only reducing SWaP for SWIR imagers, but also to combine imaging solutions for providing a single imager for Visible Near-SWIR (VNS) + LW imaging solutions. Such developments are targeted at reducing system SWaP, cost and complexity for imaging payloads on board UASs as well as soldier deployed systems like weapon sights. Our motivation is to demonstrate capability in providing superior image quality in fused LWIR and SWIR imaging systems, while reducing the total system SWaP and cost by enabling Short Wave and Thermal imaging in a single uncooled imager. Under DARPA MTO awarded programs, a LW bolometer (DRS-RSTA) is fabricated on a Short Wave (SW) InGaAs Vis-SWIR (SUI-Goodrich) Imager. The combined imager is a dual-band Sensor-Chip Assembly which is capable of imaging in VIS-SWIR + LW. Both DRS and Goodrich have developed materials and process enhancements to support these dual-band platform investigations. The two imagers are confocal and coaxial with respect to the incident image plane. Initial work has completed a single Read Out Integrated Circuit (ROIC) capable of running both imagers. The team has hybridized InGaAs Focal planes to 6" full ROIC wafers to support bolometer fabrication onto the SW array.

  18. Focal plane wavefront sensor achromatization: The multireference self-coherent camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delorme, J. R.; Galicher, R.; Baudoz, P.; Rousset, G.; Mazoyer, J.; Dupuis, O.

    2016-04-01

    Context. High contrast imaging and spectroscopy provide unique constraints for exoplanet formation models as well as for planetary atmosphere models. But this can be challenging because of the planet-to-star small angular separation (<1 arcsec) and high flux ratio (>105). Recently, optimized instruments like VLT/SPHERE and Gemini/GPI were installed on 8m-class telescopes. These will probe young gazeous exoplanets at large separations (≳1 au) but, because of uncalibrated phase and amplitude aberrations that induce speckles in the coronagraphic images, they are not able to detect older and fainter planets. Aims: There are always aberrations that are slowly evolving in time. They create quasi-static speckles that cannot be calibrated a posteriori with sufficient accuracy. An active correction of these speckles is thus needed to reach very high contrast levels (>106-107). This requires a focal plane wavefront sensor. Our team proposed a self coherent camera, the performance of which was demonstrated in the laboratory. As for all focal plane wavefront sensors, these are sensitive to chromatism and we propose an upgrade that mitigates the chromatism effects. Methods: First, we recall the principle of the self-coherent camera and we explain its limitations in polychromatic light. Then, we present and numerically study two upgrades to mitigate chromatism effects: the optical path difference method and the multireference self-coherent camera. Finally, we present laboratory tests of the latter solution. Results: We demonstrate in the laboratory that the multireference self-coherent camera can be used as a focal plane wavefront sensor in polychromatic light using an 80 nm bandwidth at 640 nm (bandwidth of 12.5%). We reach a performance that is close to the chromatic limitations of our bench: 1σ contrast of 4.5 × 10-8 between 5 and 17 λ0/D. Conclusions: The performance of the MRSCC is promising for future high-contrast imaging instruments that aim to actively minimize the

  19. Demonstration of a bias tunable quantum dots-in-a-well focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Jonathan; Jang, Woo-Yong; Pezoa, Jorge E.; Sharma, Yagya D.; Lee, Sang Jun; Noh, Sam Kyu; Hayat, Majeed M.; Restaino, Sergio; Teare, Scott W.; Krishna, Sanjay

    2009-11-01

    Infrared detectors based on quantum wells and quantum dots have attracted a lot of attention in the past few years. Our previous research has reported on the development of the first generation of quantum dots-in-a-well (DWELL) focal plane arrays, which are based on InAs quantum dots embedded in an InGaAs well having GaAs barriers. This focal plane array has successfully generated a two-color imagery in the mid-wave infrared (i.e. 3-5 μm) and the long-wave infrared (i.e. 8-12 μm) at a fixed bias voltage. Recently, the DWELL device has been further modified by embedding InAs quantum dots in InGaAs and GaAs double wells with AlGaAs barriers, leading to a less strained InAs/InGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. This is expected to improve the operating temperature while maintaining a low dark current level. This paper examines 320 × 256 double DWELL based focal plane arrays that have been fabricated and hybridized with an Indigo 9705 read-out integrated circuit using Indium-bump (flip-chip) technology. The spectral tunability is quantified by examining images and determining the transmittance ratio (equivalent to the photocurrent ratio) between mid-wave and long-way infrared filter targets. Calculations were performed for a bias range from 0.3 to 1.0 V. The results demonstrate that the mid-wave transmittance dominates at these low bias voltages, and the transmittance ratio continuously varies over different applied biases. Additionally, radiometric characterization, including array uniformity and measured noise equivalent temperature difference for the double DWELL devices is computed and compared to the same results from the original first generation DWELL. Finally, higher temperature operation is explored. Overall, the double DWELL devices had lower noise equivalent temperature difference and higher uniformity, and worked at higher temperature (70 K and 80 K) than the first generation DWELL device.

  20. Crack-free AlGaN for solar-blind focal plane arrays through reduced area epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicek, E.; McClintock, R.; Vashaei, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Gautier, S.; Cho, C. Y.; Razeghi, M.

    2013-02-01

    We report on crack reduction for solar-blind ultraviolet detectors via the use of a reduced area epitaxy (RAE) method to regrow on patterned AlN templates. With the RAE method, a pre-deposited AlN template is patterned into isolated mesas in order to reduce the formation of cracks in the subsequently grown high Al-content AlxGa1-xN structure. By restricting the lateral dimensions of the epitaxial growth area, the biaxial strain is relaxed by the edges of the patterned squares, which resulted in ˜97% of the pixels being crack-free. After successful implementation of RAE method, we studied the optical characteristics, the external quantum efficiency, and responsivity of average pixel-sized detectors of the patterned sample increased from 38% and 86.2 mA/W to 57% and 129.4 mA/W, respectively, as the reverse bias is increased from 0 V to 5 V. Finally, we discussed the possibility of extending this approach for focal plane array, where crack-free large area material is necessary for high quality imaging.

  1. 256 x 256 PACE-1 PV HgCdTe focal plane arrays for medium and short wavelength infrared applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, L. J.; Vural, K.; Johnson, V. H.; Chen, J. K.; Bailey, R. B.

    1990-01-01

    The development of two 256 by 256 hybrid HgCdTe focal plane array (FPA) families is described, and their performance is discussed. The hybrid FPAs employ a PV HgCdTe detector array and custom Si CMOS readouts. The PACE-1 process was used to fabricate the detectors, whereby the liquid phase epitaxial growth of HgCdTe occurs on sapphire substrates buffered by a layer of CdTe. The performance characteristics of the detector arrays are given. A tactical 256 by 256 CMOS readout is tested, in which a high functional yield was achieved. Updated test results are given for a 256 by 256 readout circuit developed for use in an orbital replacement instrument for the Hubble Space Telescope. The characterizations of several MWIR and SWIR FPAs were thorough and shown to be reliable. The pixel yield, maximum FPA responsivity nonuniformity, and SWIR FPA read noise for the tests are given. The high contrast and insignificant fixed pattern noise of the imagery from the MWIR 256 by 256 FPA are emphasized. These qualities were obtained when the device was operating at 80 k and utilizing f/2 optics with an 8-in. focal length and a 4.4 micron high pass filter.

  2. 256 X 256 PACE-1 PV HgCdTe focal plane arrays for medium and short wavelength infrared applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlowski, L. J.; Vural, K.; Johnson, V. H.; Chen, J. K.; Bailey, R. B.

    1990-09-01

    The development of two 256 by 256 hybrid HgCdTe focal plane array (FPA) families is described, and their performance is discussed. The hybrid FPAs employ a PV HgCdTe detector array and custom Si CMOS readouts. The PACE-1 process was used to fabricate the detectors, whereby the liquid phase epitaxial growth of HgCdTe occurs on sapphire substrates buffered by a layer of CdTe. The performance characteristics of the detector arrays are given. A tactical 256 by 256 CMOS readout is tested, in which a high functional yield was achieved. Updated test results are given for a 256 by 256 readout circuit developed for use in an orbital replacement instrument for the Hubble Space Telescope. The characterizations of several MWIR and SWIR FPAs were thorough and shown to be reliable. The pixel yield, maximum FPA responsivity nonuniformity, and SWIR FPA read noise for the tests are given. The high contrast and insignificant fixed pattern noise of the imagery from the MWIR 256 by 256 FPA are emphasized. These qualities were obtained when the device was operating at 80 k and utilizing f/2 optics with an 8-in. focal length and a 4.4 micron high pass filter.

  3. Methodology for testing infrared focal plane arrays in simulated nuclear radiation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divita, E. L.; Mills, R. E.; Koch, T. L.; Gordon, M. J.; Wilcox, R. A.; Williams, R. E.

    1992-07-01

    This paper summarizes test methodology for focal plane array (FPA) testing that can be used for benign (clear) and radiation environments, and describes the use of custom dewars and integrated test equipment in an example environment. The test methodology, consistent with American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) standards, is presented for the total accumulated gamma dose, transient dose rate, gamma flux, and neutron fluence environments. The merits and limitations of using Cobalt 60 for gamma environment simulations and of using various fast-neutron reactors and neutron sources for neutron simulations are presented. Test result examples are presented to demonstrate test data acquisition and FPA parameter performance under different measurement conditions and environmental simulations.

  4. Identification and classification of chemicals using terahertz reflective spectroscopic focal-plane imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hua; Redo-Sanchez, Albert; Zhang, X.-C.

    2006-10-01

    We present terahertz (THz) reflective spectroscopic focal-plane imaging of four explosive and bio-chemical materials (2, 4-DNT, Theophylline, RDX and Glutamic Acid) at a standoff imaging distance of 0.4 m. The 2 dimension (2-D) nature of this technique enables a fast acquisition time and is very close to a camera-like operation, compared to the most commonly used point emission-detection and raster scanning configuration. The samples are identified by their absorption peaks extracted from the negative derivative of the reflection coefficient respect to the frequency (-dr/dv) of each pixel. Classification of the samples is achieved by using minimum distance classifier and neural network methods with a rate of accuracy above 80% and a false alarm rate below 8%. This result supports the future application of THz time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) in standoff distance sensing, imaging, and identification.

  5. 58 X 62 InSb focal plane array for infrared astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orias, G.; Hoffman, A. W.; Casselman, M. F.

    1986-01-01

    Santa Barbara Research Center has developed a 58 x 62 staring mosaic focal plane array (FPA) consisting of an indium antimonide detector array hybridized to a silicon direct readout (DRO) multiplexer for use in IR astronomy. The detectors are sensitive to radiation from 1 to 5 microns. Each detector in the array is connected to the DRO via an indium bump contact and has its own high-impedance, low-capacitance buffer amplifier. The requirements of infrared astronomy include low dark-current and readout noise for near-BLIP performance and full-frame readout times from 32 ms to more than 20s. Both modeling and measurements of the FPA performance are presented. Results include responsivity, noise, NEP, linearity, and dark current.

  6. Advanced planar LWIR and VLWIR HgCdTe focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Muren; Gurgenian, Ray H.; Mesropian, Shoghig; Terterian, Sevag; Becker, Latika; Walsh, D.; Kokoroski, S. A.; Goodnough, Mark A.; Rosner, Brett D.

    2004-01-01

    The advanced planar ion-implantation-isolated heterojunction process, which utilizes the benefits of both the boron implantation and the heterojunction epitaxy techniques, has been developed and used to produce longwave and very longwave HgCdTe focal plane arrays in the 320v256 format. The wavelength of these arrays ranges from 10.0-17.0μm. The operability of the longwave HgCdTe arrays is typically over 97%. Without anti-reflection coating and with a 60° FOV cold shield, the D* of the 10.0μm array is 9.4x1010cm x (Hz)1/2 x W-1 at 77K. The 14.7μm and 17.0μm very longwave HgCdTe array diodes have excellent reverse characteristics. The detailed characteristics of these arrays are presented.

  7. A substrate-free optical readout focal plane array with a heat sink structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rmwen, Liu; Yanmei, Kong; Binbin, Jiao; Zhigang, Li; Haiping, Shang; Dike, Lu; Chaoqun, Gao; Dapeng, Chen; Qingchuan, Zhang

    2013-02-01

    A substrate-free optical readout focal plane array (FPA) operating in 8-12 μm with a heat sink structure (HSS) was fabricated and its performance was tested. The temperature distribution of the FPA with an HSS investigated by using a commercial FLIR IR camera shows excellent uniformity. The thermal cross-talk effect existing in traditional substrate-free FPAs was eliminated effectively. The heat sink is fabricated successfully by electroplating copper, which provides high thermal capacity and high thermal conductivity, on the frame of substrate-free FPA. The FPA was tested in the optical-readout system, the results show that the response and NETD are 13.6 grey/K (F / # = 0.8) and 588 mK, respectively.

  8. Measurement of optical modulation functions in sparsely sampled mosaic focal plane arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. B.; Thurlow, P. E.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that the measurement of optical modulation functions for detectors in focal plane arrays may be somewhat more difficult under 'full-up' systems conditions as compared to ideal laboratory conditions. An idealized optical modulation test arrangement is considered along with a full-up scanned system involving an earth mapper in polar orbit. In testing the system in full-up condition, a problem arises with respect to the acquisition of knife edge response data. In order to overcome this problem, a preferred method is developed for obtaining KER data on a single scan. A special 'phased edge' reticle is developed for use in the test set-up. Attention is given to aspects of knife edge reconstruction.

  9. Fiber optically coupled infrared focal plane array system for use in missile warning receiver applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Arnold; Liepmann, Till W.

    1999-07-01

    The location and installation of mid-infrared missile warning receiver sensors is limited by the mechanical constraints of the detector/dewar assembly and the associated cryogenic cooler assembly. The size, shape, and weight of these assemblies limit the installation alternatives, and prevent placing the missile warning receiver system in the optimum locations. Hence, their coverage and detection performance is limited. A micro-lens array coupled to a coherent fiber optic bundle and an infrared focal plane array were designed and experimentally implemented, to allow the mid-wave sensor and cryogenic devices to be located remotely from the receiver aperture. This eliminates the receiver aperture placement restrictions while easing the integration and maintenance of the sensor/dewar and cooler. Modulation transfer function and noise equivalent temperature difference measurements were performed to determine the performance of the imaging system.

  10. Research in the modulation transfer function (MTF) measurement of InGaAs focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhonghua; Fang, Jiaxiong

    2012-10-01

    The Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) of an opto-electrical device is defined as the ratio of the system output modulation to the input modulation, which describes the performance of the imaging system in the Fourier domain. Accurate measurement of the MTF is often obtained by analyzing the high-quality image of a special target reproduced by the optical system with known MTF. To evaluate the MTF of short-wave infrared InGaAs focal plane arrays (FPAs), we develop a laboratory system with high precision and automation based on the slit scan method. An 8*1 linear InGaAs FPAs is then measured by this test set-up for the first time to evaluate the MTF of each pixel at room temperature. The results show a good MTF repeatability and uniformity of the 8*1 InGaAs FPAs. The relationship between the MTF and illumination is also discussed.